(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Hardwood record"

a} n 






* ^'^^t^ 






^' .^^ 












■'.«:■> 






•^"V 



■-V -^v 



V ^--^ - 












'^'1^ 



^^ 






•nJ*^/ 






> V4iV- 



^kf^^- 



-^ • 



^' ■ ^Mf'l^-K 



^hf „/?^J 




f<n 






V OAKDEN 



Twelfth Year. I . 'jl, 
Semi-monthlr. ) \l '' 



CHICAGO, APRIL 25, 1907. 



I Subscription (2. 
iSinile Copies, 10 Cent*. 



ROSS LUMBER COMPANY 



The Cherry People 



ANYTHING IN CHERRY? 



Write Us. 



JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 




TWELVE YEARS' EXPERIENCE 

Policy Holders have saved OVER $250,000 IN DIVIDENDS received 

Have You Participated ? 
PRESENT RATE OF DIVIDEND, 35 PER CENT. 

THE LUMBER MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF BOSTON, MASS. 



) 



The Davidson-Benedict Company 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Everything in 

Southern Hardwoods 



POPLAR, CHESTNUT, ASH, OAK 

(Plain and Quartered.) Straight or Mixed Cars. 



DRESSED POPLAR ANY YOU GET what you buy from 

™ »^7 ,nL, , ™r» .,./^V^ us. ASK FOR OUR DELIVERED 

WAY YOU WANT IT. prices, any railroad point. 



THE ATLANTIC LUMBER CO. 

2 Kilby St., BOSTON 

Would like to talk to you about their large stock of 
Plain and Quartered 

\A/HITE OAK 

TENNESSEE RED CEDAR. THIN POPLAR AND POPLAR SIDING 



ASK US WHAT WE CAN DO FOR YOU. 



LUMBER 

INSURANCE 

COMPANY 

OF NEW YORK 

Cmpilal and Sui-- 
plum, $300,000 



IX our new offices at 84 William Street, we are better than e\-er equipped 
to handle insurance on lumber and woodworking risks. 
Write an inquiry to the underwriting managers, who will prompth- tell 

you our rates and what lines can be taken. 

Lumber Insurers' General Agency, nV w"y o l\ 



ADIRONDACK 

FIRE 

INSURANCE 

COMPANY 

Capital and Sur- 
plus, $300,000 



ADVERTISERS' CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY FOLLOWS WANT AND FOR SALE ADVERTISING SECTION. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 





I /^ 1 T T C^ X/ T 1 I r~? 


LOUI^V ILrL^li 


MANUFACTURING AND DISTKIBHTING CENTER OF KENTUCKY 



Wood-Mosaic Flooring and Lumber Co. 



ALL KINDS OF 



Hardwood Lumber 
and Sawn Veneers 

NEW ALBANY, INDIANA 



Rochester, N. Y. J 
Louisville, Ky. -Factories. 
New Albany, Iiirl. I 



Good Grades 
Prompt Shipments 
Ini]uiries Solicited 



McLean -Davis Lumber Co. 



Successors to 



Hugh McLean Lumber Co., Highland Park, Ky. 
ICdward L. Davis Lumber Co., Louisville, Ky. 
Berry - Davis Saw Mill Co., Louisville, Ky. 



Manufacturers and Dealers in 



Hardwood Lumber 



Daily Capacity: 
80,000 feet. 



Sales Offices: 
Louisville, Ky. 



Dry Stock w. P. BrowH & SoHS Lumber Co. 



Louisville, Ky. 



PLAIN BED OAK, 
65,000' 1" 1st & 2nd. 
25,000' 1V4" I8t & 2a. 
49,000' m' let * 2d. 
67,000' 2" 1st & 2a. 
18,000' 2%- let & 2a. 
16,000' 3" Ist & 2d. 
131,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
84,000' H4" No. 1 Com. 
44,000' 1%" No. 1 Com. 
47,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
8,000' 2%" No. 1 Com. 
16,000' 3' No. 1 Com. 

QUARTKSED RED OAS. 
10,000' 1" 1st & 2d. 



14,000' Hi" 1st & 2a. 

5.000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
15,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 

7,000' 1%" No. 1 Com. 
13,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 

PLAIN WHITE OAK. 

80,000' 1" 1st & 2d. 
28,000' 114" Ist & 2d. 
12,000' IMi" 1st & 2d. 
42,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
23,800' 2%- 1st & 2d. 
16,000" 3" 1st & 2d. 
227,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
60,000' 1%" No. 1 Com. 
80.000' 1%" No. 1 Com. 



50.000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
17.000' 2%" No. 1 Com. 
22,000' 3" No. 1 Com. 

QUARTERED WHITE OAK. 

50,000' 1" 1st & 2d. 
28,000' m" Ist & 2a. 
45,000' 1%" 1st & 2a. 
49,000' 2" 1st & 2a. 
19,000' 2W 1st & 2a. 
18,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
30,000' IVi" No. 1 Com. 
40.000' 1%" No. 1 Com. 
22.000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
10,000' 3" No. 1 Com. 



ASH. 

9.000' 1" Ist & 2d. 
65,000' IV," 1st & 2a. 
16.000' I%" 1st & 2a. 
10.000' 2" 1st & 2d. 

8,000' 2%" 1st & 2d. 
14.000' 3" 1st & 2d. 

6,000' 4" Ist & 2a. 

4.0O0' ly," No. 1 Com. 
16,000' !%'• No. 1 Com. 

8.000' 2" No. 1 Com. 

POPLAR. 
12,000' 1" 1st & 2d. 



All thicknesses in cult poplar, asli, cliestnut. 



Your inquiries will be appreciated. 



12,000' 114" Ist & 2d. 
11,000' 1%" 1st & 2d. 
12,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
10.000' 2H" 1st & 2a. 
10.000' 3" 1st & 26. 
50.000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
28,000' IH" No. 1 Com. 
10,000' IMi" No. 1 Com. 
10.000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
15,000' 1" 18" & up 1st & 2(1. 

8,000' 2" 18" & up 1st A 2d. 

6,000' 2" 24" & up 1st & 2d. 

4.000' !%" 18- & up 1st & 2d. 

3.000' 1%" 24" & up 1st & 2d. 

Prompt delivery guaranteed 



50 CARS. ONE INCH 

■ 




M 




LOG 


A 
P 
L 


ON 


RUN 


GRADE 




E 




e. W. Jon 


les Lti 


[mber Co. 


APPLETON, WIS. 















Albert R. Kamp! 

Mamifactiirer 

Hardwood Lumber and Timber 

Dimension .Stock 

Board 0! Trade BIdg., Louisville, Ky. 




E. W. Rhubesky 

Wholesale 

Poplar. Rough and Dressed. 

Oak, Chestnut and Other 

Hardwoods 














North Vernon 
Lumber Co. 

Band Sawed Plain nn.I Oiiartered 

Oak and Poplar. 

North Vernon, Ind . and 

Louisville, Ky 




Southern Lumber Co. 

Oak. Poplar and 

Chestnut. 
Louisville, Ky. 


_ 











AH Lumbermen, Attention! 

We do what you can't do. 
We measure j-our stumpage correctly. 
We make your maps correctly. 
Bank references: Asheville, N. C. 

L. A. OCnenCk ^ LO. No'AirCar°o'l!na. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



CADILLAC 

CELEBRATED FOR HIGH STANDARD OF QUALITY AND MILL WORK 



■Mitchell's Make- 



CHOICE 



WHITE BASSWOOD 



ALL CLEAR 
ALL WHITE 
BONE DRY 



End stuck in shed and just 
what you want if you use 
such stock. It is 1 inch thick 
and we have one large car. 



PLEASE SEND US YOUR INQUIRIES 

Mitchell Brothers Company 

CADILLAC, MICH. 



The Cadillac Handle Co. 

Band Sawn 
Michigan Hardwoods 

SPECIAL OFFEMNGS: 

5 Cars 4,'4 Hard Maple, 1st and 2nds. 
3 Cars 5 4 Hard Maple 1st and 2nds. 

6 Cars 5 4 Hard Maple, No. 1 and 2 Common 

1 Car 6 '4 Hard Maple, 10 in. and wider. No, 1 Common and 

Better. 

2 Cars 4 4 Birch, No. 2 Common and Better. 



MURPHY & DIQQINS 

Offer all grades of the followiog special dry stock 

MAPLE— 5/4, 6/4, 8/4, 10/4, 12/4, 14/4, 16/4 
GRAY ELM-4/4, 12/4 
BASSWOOD— 4/4 . 
BIRCH-»/4, 6/4 

Our own manufacture. Perfect Mill Work. Uniform Grades. 
LET US FIGURE ON YOUR HARDWOOD WANTS. 



Cummer, Diggins & Co. 



:IVIANUFACTURERS= 



"CUMMER" MAPLE 
AND BEECH FLOORING 



MICHIGAN HARDWOODS 



Good assortment of dry stock on hand ready 
for immediate shipment in Hard Maple, Beech, 
Birch, Soft Elm and Cherry. 



SEND US A LIST Of YOUR REQUIREMENTS. 




DRY ST 



OCKJ 



Northern Michigan 

Soft Gray Elm 

what our old cork pine was to the regular 
white pine — such is our Soft Cray Elm to 

ordinary soft elm. Buyers who gladly discrim- 
inate in favor of something Ijetter than the or- 
dinar_v, will be interested. We have 

2 cars 10-4 firsts and seconds. 
4 cars 12-4 firsts and seconds. 

Wide, choice stock, our own product, seasoned right, 
bone dry. 

WKITE US ABOUT IT. 




COBBS&HncnELL 

( INCORPORATED) 

CADILLAC. MICHIGAN 




HARDWOOD RECORD 



PAEPCKE-LEICHT LUMBER COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



COTTON>VOOD 

GUM AIND OTHER HARDWOODS 

Large stocks of well seasoned Lumber always carried at our yards and mills. 
General Offices: HOW. Chicago Ave., CHICAGO. Mills: Cairo, 111., Marked Tree, Ark., Greenville, Miss., Arkansas City, Ark., Blylheville , Ark. 



(gondb«!!»fL^ 



Cable Address: "Sonderco" Memphis. 



Codes Used: Lumberman's Telecode and ABC 5th Edition 



MANUFACTURERS 



HARDWOOD, GUM, COTTONWOOD AND CYPRESS 

Main Office: Tennessee Trust Building, Memphis, Tenn. 

Offers the following specials: 

50 Cars 1 inch No. 1 Common Cottonwood 10 Cars I 1,4 inch Is and 2s Cypress 

50 Cars I 1/4 inch No. I Common Cottonwood 10 Cars 2 inch Is and 2s Cypress 

SO Cars I inch No. 2 Common Cottonwood 10 Cars I 1/4 inch No. I Common Ash 

50 Cars 1 14 inch No. 2 Common Cottonwood 10 Cars I 1/2 inch No. 1 Common Ash 

Plain and Quarter Sawed White and Red Oak, Elm, Cottonwood, Poplar, Gum, White Ash and 

Cypress. Direct shipments from our own Mills of Lumber from our own Timber our 

Specialty. We manufacture and put in pile 300,000 ft. Hardwood every 24 hours. 



FENN BROS. COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Oak Flooring 

C?uiai-te>re«cl \A/hit@ HoIIo^a/ BetcU^&d 

Quartered Rod End JWettcti&d 

l=»laJn \A/hite Polished 

Plain Red Bored 

Offices a.rkd PlBLnt : 

Kansas and Mallory Ave., New South Memphis. 

(Take South Memphis car (o Mallory Ave.) 



Anderson-TuIIy Company 

OFFERS STOCK FOR SALE 

Three cars 6/4x8 in. and up 1st & 2nd Cottonwood 

One " 7/8x8 " 

Two ■• 5/4x12 " 

Two "4/4 " " Plain Red Oak 

MEMPMIS, TEININESSEE 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



FULLERTON'POWELL 

Hardwood Lumber Co. 



n 



OFFERS THE FOLLOWING STOCK 
FOR IMMEDLA.TE SHIPMENT 



H 



15 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Quartered White Oak 
20 cars 1 in. No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak 
10 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Plain Red Oak 

2 cars 1^ in. Plain Red Oak Step Plank 

1 car Ij in. Plain Oak Step Plank 

4 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Plain Red Oak, 12 in. and 
wider 



BRANCH OFFICES: 

CHICAGO, 1104 Chamber of Commerce 
MEMPHIS, TEItM.,30S Tennessee Trust BIdg. 
MIMMEAPOLIS, MIMM., SOS Lumber Exchange 




10 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 10 to 16 ft. 

7 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 12 ft. 

8 cars 2 in. 1st and 2nds Sap Gum 

8 cars 2 in. No. 1 Common Sap Gum 
5 cars 2 in. No. 2 Common Sap Gum 
20 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Cottonwood,'6 in. and wider 
4 cars 1 in. No. 1 Common Cottonwood 



MAIN OFFICES 

South "Bend, Ind. 



WEST VIRGINIA YELLOW POPLAR 
NORTH CAROLINA CORK WHITE PINE 

AND HARDWOOD 



DRY KILNS AND PLANING MILLS. ALL OUR MILLS RUN THE YEAR ROUND. 
SEND US YOUR INQUIRIES AND ORDERS. 

W. M. Hitter Lumber Co. 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 



Saw and Ship 100,000,000 Feet Yearly 



HARDIWOOD RECORD 



Phila. 


Veneer 4 Lum 


b 


er 


Co. 


817 N 

PILED 


JRTH FIFTH 


STREET. FHILADELI 


>HW 

EE 


. PA. 

YARD 


ON OUR KNOXVILLE. TENNESb 


20,000 ft. 4/4 Is and 2.s Plain 


White Oali 








5,000 


" 4/4 Clear Strips 










54,000 


" 4/4 No. 1 Common 


Plain White Oak 








128,000 


" 4/4 


" 2 " 


" 








42,000 


" 8/4 


" 2 










16,000 


"6/4 


" 1 Common 


and Better 








11,000 


" 5/4 


' 1 


" " 








20,000 


•8/4 


" 1 


. a 








21,000 


" 4/4 


" 1 Common 


Quartered White Oak 








67,000 


'4/4 


„ 2 










5,000 


• 6/4 


„ 1 


and Better Quartered 


White Oak 




9.000 


"4/4 


„ 1 




R 


■d " 





Mdlvain's Lumber Notes 



We have 4,000,000 feet Chestnut — some of it 12 to 15 

months' old — all grades and thicknesses. 
2.250.000 feet Poplar— 5/8 to 16/4. all grades. 
500.000 feet choice Gulf Cypress. We can make prompt 
shipments. Send in your inquiries. 

Did you say White Pine? We're fixed to give you satis- 
factory grades and prices. Ask for anything you want, 
special or regular, and see how well we can satisfy your 
demands. More than a million feet in various grades from 
Uppers and Selects to Culls. 



J. Gibson Mcllvain & Co. 



56th to 58th Sts. and Woodland Ave 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WILLIAM WHITMER. ®» SONS, Inc. 

ALWAYS IN THE MARKET FOR STOCKS OF 
WELL MANUFACTURED 

HARDWOODS 



BRANCHES: 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, PITTSBURG 



MAIN OFFICES: 
GIRARD TRUST BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 



THOMAS FORMAN CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

MANLF-VCTUREUS OF HIGH GRADE 

Maple and Oak Flooring 

We desire to move promptly a large quantity of 

13-16xU" Clear Quarter Sawed White Oak Flooring. 
13-16xU" Clear Plain Sawed White Oak Flooring. 
13-16xU" Clear Plain Sawed Red Oak Flooring. 
13-16xli" Clear Maple Flooring. 

Please write us for special delivered prices on the above lots. 



APRIL STOCK LIST 



HARD MAPLE 



1 in. 
U In. 
liin. 

3 in. 

4 in. 



,000,000 ft. 
100,000 ft. 
100,000 ft. 

50.000 ft. 

50,000 ft 



BEECH 

100,000 ft. 

BIRCH 

1 in. 500,000 ft. 

100,000 ft. 

100,000 ft. 

50,000 ft. 



li in. 
2 in. 
2} in. 



BASSWOOD 
1 in. 300,000 ft. 

GRAY ELM 
1 in. 300,000 ft. 
li in. 200.000 ft. 
3 In. 200.000 ft. 



Kelley Lumber & Shingle Co. 

TroLverse City, Mich. 



R.E. Wood Lumber Company 



^ Manufacturers of Yellow Poplar, Oak, Chestnut, Hemlock 
and White Pine. 

^\ We own our own stumpage and operate our own mills. 
^ Correspondence solicited and inquiries promptly answered. 



GENERAL OFFICES: 
CONTINENTAL BUILDING. 



Baltimore, Maryland 



HARDWOOD RECORD 


7 




nr* i-i r~7 rr? A ^ TP 


lilt fcAdl 




BOSTON NEWYORK PHILADt-LFHlA 11 



The West Florida Hardwood Co. 



Ash 
Hickory 



Mm. ON Apalachicola River 
MARYSVILLE, FLA. 

Red and WUte Oak Red Gum 

Yellow Cottonwood Tupelo Gum 

LET US HAVE YOUR INQUIRIES = 



B A LTIMO 
M AR YL A 



NO E. E. PRICE 



BUYER AND 
EXPORTER OP 



Hardwoods, Poplar and Logs 

I am always ic the market for nice lots of dry and well manufactured 
lumber. I inspect at point of shipment. Correspondence Bolicited. 



Pennsylvania Door & Sash Co. 

HARDWOOD DOORS 
AND INTERIOR FINISH 



NEW YORK 



PITTSBURG 



PHILADELPHIA 



WantCd-DimenSiOn nak Plam and Quartered. 

White and Red. Send for specifications. 

IndiaLiiaL QvidLrtered Oatk Co. 

7 EaLSt 42nd Street. New York City 



James & Abbot Company 

Lumber and Timber 

No. J 65 MILK ST., BOSTON, MASS., and GULFPORT, MISS. 



JONES HARDWOOD CO. 



INCOB.PO HATED 



WANTS: Poplar, Plain Oak, 
Quartered Oalt and Cypress. 



147 MILK STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Manufacturers please send stock lists and prices. 



Holloway Lumber Company 

WHOLESALE HARDWOODS 



In the market for all thicknesses of 
OAK, ASH and CHESTNUT. 



312 Arcade Building, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WM. E. LITCHFIELD 

MASON BUILDING, BOSTON, MASS. 

Specialist in Hardwoods 

Manufacturers are requested to supply lists of stock for sale 



WE are long on 8/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut. Send us your in- 
quiries. Let us quote you on Plain or Quartered WKlte and 
Red Oak. Look us up. 

SCHOFIELD BROTHERS 



PENNA. BUILDING 



LUMBER 



PHILADELPHIA 



Sales Agents: Long Pole Lumber Co., Case-Fowler Lumber Co. 

Honaker.'Va. aUBLIi BROTHERS QuaftCT'ed White 
Birmington, Ala. — Oak, Poplar. 

WHOLESALE LUMBER 

Land Title Building " . Philadelphia, Pa. 



WISTAR, UNDERHILL & CO. 

PHILADELPHIA 

WHOLESALE HARDWOOD LUMBER 



MICHIGAN WHITE PINE 
TENNESSEE WHITE PINE 



HEMLOCK HARDWOODS 
ALABAMA PINE 



H. H. MAUS & CO., INC. 

MANUFACTURERS 

HARDWOOD and YELLOW PINE. 

Write us it you wish to buy or sell. 
420 Walnut St.. . PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



W. M. GILLESPIE LUMBER 

HARDWOODS COMPANY Farmers Bank Bldg. 
Oak a Specialty PITTSBURGH, PA. 



ALBERT HAAS LUMBER CO. 

BAND SAWED 

OAK AND ASH 

YELLOW POPLAR 

ATLANTA - - - - GEORGIA 



JOHN L. ALCOCK & CO. 

BUYERS OF BLACK WALNUT LOGS 
BOARDS AND PLANKS 

sSfpClft" sp^cash: Baltimore, Md. 



li 



THE BUFFALO MAPLE FLOORING GO. 

MANUFACTURCRS OF 

MICHIGAN ROCK MAPLE AND OAK FLOORING 

BUFFALO, NEW YORK 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



R. M. SMITH J H. P. SMITH 

R. M. SMITH (^ COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WEST VIRGINIA HARDWOODS 

PARKERSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA 

WE CARRY IN STOCK FROM TEN TO FIFTEEN MILLION FEET OF ASH, BEECH, BASSWOOD, CHESTNUT, CHERRY, 

MAPLE, PLAIN & QTD. OAK, POPLAR, WALNUT, &C. OUR PLANING 

MILL FACILITIES ARE UNSURPASSED. 

Band Mill : Omdoff, Webster County, W. Va. 



EASTERN OFFICE: 
1425-6 LAND TITLE BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 



Planing Mill; Heaters, W. Va. 



Quartered Oak Flooring 

Manufactured for 

HIGHEST GLASS of trade only. 

Also Plain Oak, Maple and other Hardwood flooring. 

The name D WIGHT on flooring is a guarantee of its 

excellence. 
D WIGHT SPECIAL pattern of thin flooring is the 
only suitable thin flooring to lay. Write for Sample. 



DWIGHT LUMBER. COMPANY 

DETR.OIT, MICHIGAN 



R W. Mosby & Co. 



MANUFACTUEERS OP 



COTTONWOOD 

GUM 

ASH, ELM 



Large Stock on Hand 



HELENA, ARKANSAS 



W. H. Dawkins Lumber Co. 



Manufacturers of Band Sawed 

Yellow Poplar 



ASHLAND, KY, 



SWANN-DAY LUMBER COMPANY 

CLAY CITY, KENTUCKY 
OFFER 



POPLAR 



Bevel Siding. Drop Siding, as well as Wide Poplar 

Always a Large Stock on Hand Prices are Yours for the Asking 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



D. G. COURTNEY 




MANUFACTURER OF; 




Yellow Poplar 
Oak ^ Chestnut 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



Our Timber Holdings are located exclusively in the finest sections of West Virginia 
growth. Modern mills and perfect manufacture. Standard and uniform grades. 

We seek the trade of wood-working factories who want a dependable lumber supply 
and fair treatment. 

Just now we want to move 4/4 No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 Common Oak. 



Cherry River Boom and 



Lumber Co. 



SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA 



SPECIALS: 

4 '4 While Oak. No. 1 Common 
4/4 Cherry, U and 2s 

4/4 Cherry, No. I Common 
4 4 Maple, l9 and 29 

4/4 Maple, No. 1 Common 




BAND MILLS: 

RICHWOOD, WEST VIB61NIA 

CAMDEN-ON-GAULEY, WEST VIRGINIA 

HOLCOMB. WEST VIRGINIA 

DAILY CAPACITY, • • 500.000 FEET 







"THE BEST LUMBER" 



lO 




HARDWOOD RECORD 












C H I c A a o 


















THE GREATEST HARDWOOD MARKET IN THE WORLD 







Chicago Car Lumber Co. 



PULLMAN BUILDING 

CHICAGO 



WE ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 

Poplar, Oak, Ash and Car and R. R. 
Material 



Hayden & Westcott Lumber Co. 

IN MARKET FOR 

POPLAR 

25 M ft. li" No. 1 Common, standard widths and lengths. 
40 M ft. 2" No. 1 Common, standard widths and lengths. 
25 M ft. 2i" No. 1 Common, standard widths and lengths. 
60 M ft. 3" No. 1 Common, standard widths and lengths. 

ROCK ELM 
200 M ft. 6/4 No. 1 Common and better 
500 M ft. 8/4 No. 1 Common and better 

BLACK ASH 
60 M ft. each 4/4, 5/4 and 6/4 No. 1 common and better 

OAK AND ASH 
100 cars car oak framing 
25 cars white ash from 1" to 4" green or dry Is and 2s 



511 Railway Exchange, 



Chicago 



In the Market 

To Buy 

Ash, Hickory, Poplar and Oak Lumber. 
Also Wagon Stock. 

W anted == Hardwood Logs for Our Memphis Mill 



RYAN & McPARLAND 

CHICAGO....MEMPHIS 



John O'Brien Land & Lumber Co. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 

Hardwood Lumber 

Of All Kinds 



OFFICE AND YARDS : 

873 to 881 So. Laflin Street 

MILL : PHILIPP, MISS. 



Chicago 



F. Slimmer ^ Company 

Hardwood 
Lumber 



OflSce and Yard : 

65 W. Twenty-second St, 



CHICAGO 



PARK RICHMOND ®, 


CO. 


Wholesale 




Hardwood Lumbei 


p 


410 Monadnock Block 




PHONE r^Ui/^orr/^ 

HARRISON 5165 V_^illCagO 





[Ir. a. wells lumber CO, I 

Manufacturers of AU Kinds of 

HARDWOOD LUMBER 



Fine Quartered Oak a Specialty 

234 LA SALLE STREET 
Yards at Canal and 2Jst Sts. CHICAGO, 



I, ILL. 



White Lumber Company 

Dealers in Hardivood Lumber 



ALL KINDS 



Cherry Lumber a 
SpeciaLlty 




ALL GRADBS 



Laflin (& 22d Sts. 
Chicago 







HARDWOOD RECORD 


» 




11 








C H I C A Q 


O 


















THE GREATEST HARDWOOD MARKET IN THE WORLD 







McCauley- Saunders Lumber Co. 



Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 



BAND SAWED 
LOUISIANA GULF COAST 



RED CYPRESS 



Products Exclusively 



S::,Tsr493o ^703 Fisher BIdg., CHICAGO, ILL. 



CHAS. DARLING & CO. 

Southern 
Hardwoods 

22nd Street and Center Avenue - CHICAGO 






ERNEST B. LOMBARD I 



ManufoLCturer and Wholesale 

Northern ak.nd Southern 
Hard^voods 

Railwa.y Exchange - CHICAGO 





I 


WANT 


TO BUY 


4/ 


4 K E D OAK 
ALL 


AND 4/4 SAP GUM. 
G R. A DES 


A. 


w. 


WYLIE, 




1101 FISHER BVILDING 
CHICAGO, ILLS. 



Lesh- & Matthews Lumber Co. 

1649-50 MARQUETTE BUII.D1NG 

Are now offering bone dry BIRCH. ROCK ELM. BLACK ASH. etc., Wis- 
consin stock. Also PLAIN AND QUARTERED OAK, POPLAR, etc., 
from our Memphis yard. We are constant buyers. 



R. A. HC 

FIRST r 

POPLAR 


>OTON LUMBER CO. 

NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

AND CHESTNUT 

THAT'S ALL 







W. A. DAVIS 

SOUTHERN HARDWOODS 

i6i2 Marquette Bldg., CHICAGO 
Branch Offices : PADUCAH, KY., and MEMPHIS, TENN. 



CO=OPERATIVE MILL ^ LUMBER CO., (inc.) 

ROCKFORD, ILLS. 
Want Poplar, Oak, Gum, Hickory, Btrcb and Maple 

SEND STOCK LIST AND PRICES. 



CHAS. MIIXEB 



AilLLER BROS. 



UILTON UILLBB 



H/\RD\A/OOD LUTVIBER 

Main'Office: 208 WILLOUGHBY BLDG. 6 E. MADISON ST. 
'Plione Central 1363 CHICAGO, ILL. 

Yards: Loomis St. S.of 22nd St., Chicago, III., Houston Miss., Macon. Miss, 



Estabrook - Skeele 

Lumber Company 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Oak, Ash, Gum, Cottonwood, Wagon 
Stock and Other Hardwoods 

In the market for round lots of Hardwood and 
Wagon Stock. Write us before selling. 

Fisher Building, CHICAGO 



The Columbia Hardwood Lumber Co. 



Wholesale and Retail 



Telephone 
NORTH 223 



HARDWOOD LUMBER 



47 Domlnicfc St. 
CHICAGO 



HARDWOOD RECORD 

Not only the ONLY HARDWOOD PAPER, 
but the BEST LUMBER PAPER published 



IS 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



"Michigan Maple Flooring 

Our model factory is equipped with the hig-hest 
class tools and appliances made for Flooring 
production. 

We produce our lumber from the best rock Ma- 
ple area in Michigan and have 20 years' supply. 

Our brand "Michigan" is a guaranty of qual- 
ity. Perfect mill work and excellent grades 
distinguish our Flooring and our prices are 
reasonable. 

WARD BROS., Big Rapids, Mich. 



OAK FLOORING 



Kiln Dried 

Bored 

Polisiied 



/ HARDWOOD LUMBER x\ 



& MFC. CO. 
5A RDIS 
- MISS- 



Hollow 



and 

Bundled 



(( 



Idear'a Rock Maple Flooring 



is the flooring that is manufactured expressly to supply 
the demand for the best. It is made by modern ma- 
chinery from carefully-selected stock and every pre- 
caution is taken throughout our entire system to 
make it fulfill in every particular its name— "IDEAL.'* 

Rough or Finished Lumber — All Kinds 

Send us Your Inquiries 

The I. Stephenson Company 

■WEI.LS, MICHIGAN 



qThe HARDWOOD RECORD publishes a 
series of bulletins, showing the annual hardwood re- 
quirements of many thousands of wholesale consiraiers, 
by kind, grade and thickness. 

fl Indispensable to every lumber sales manager. 

fl Specimen bulletin for the asking. 



FIRE INSURANCE 

Specialists on Lumber and 

Lumber Working 

Plants 



Lumber Underwriters 

HOME OFFICE: 

66 Broadway, Neiv York 



Just to Remind You 

That we are manufacturers of the celebrated 

Wolverine Brand 
Maple Flooring 

"There is none better." 

Bored, polished, end and edge matched, lays with every 
joint even. Largest sales in the history of maple 
flooring. May we have your order ? 

BLISS & VAN AUKEN 

SAGINAW W. S., MICH. 



WE ARE OFFERING 

TIMBER LAND 6% BONDS 

Secured by first mortgage on Southern timber 
lands at less than SO per cent of their present 
market value. Issued by large, well established, 
responsible lumber companies. Full particu- 
lars will be mailed on request. 

Cl-ARIC L^. F»OOLE & CO. 

SUCCESSORS TO 

H. C. BARROLL Si. CO., Bankers 

First National Bank Building CHICAGO 



THE "FINEST" MAPLE FLOORING 



W. D. YOUNG & CO. 

BAY CITY, MICHIGAN. 

Producers from TREE to TRADE of the high- 
est type of Michigan Forest Products. Large 
stock of Maple Flooring and 15,000,000 feet 
of Hardwoods — 1 to 4 inches thick — on band. 



Maple, Birch and Beech Lumber 



Published in the Interest of Hardwood Lumber, American Hardwood Forests, Wood Veneer Industry, Hardwood Flooring, 
Hardwood Interior Finish, Wood Chemicals, Saw Mill and Woodworhing Machinery. 



Vol. XXIV. 



CHICAGO. APRIL 25. 1907. 



No. 1. 



Published on the 10th and 25th of each month by 

THE HARDWOOD COMPANY 

Henry H. Gibson. President 

OFFICES 

Sixth Floor, Ellsworth BIdg., 355 Dearborn St., Chicago, III.. U.S.A. 

Telephone Harrison 4960 

TERMS OF ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION 
In the United States, Canada, Philippine Islands and Mexico . , $2.00 

In all other countries in Universal Postal Union ..... 3.00 

Subscriptions are payable in advance, and in default of written orders to the 
contrary are continued at our option. 

Entered at Chicago Postoffice as Second Class Matter. 

Advertising copy must be received five da^ys lr\ aLdv&rxce of 
publication dd>.te. Advertising rates on application. 



ASSOCIATION MEETINGS. 



National Hardwood Lumber Association. 

The tenth annual convention of this association will be 
held on Thursday and Friday, May 23 and 24, 1907, at 
Atlantic City, N. J. 



National Lumber Manufacturers' Association. 

This organization will hold its annual meeting on Tuesday 
and Wednesday, May 28 and 29, at the Auditorium on the 
Jamestown Exposition gromids, Norfolk, Va. 




Editorial Announcement. 

On May 1 the offices of the Hardwood Record will be moved a step 
skyward, to the seventh floor of the Ellsworth Building, 355 Dear- 
born St., the modern, fire-proof structure in which they have been 
located for the past twenty-eight months. The greater portion of 
this floor has been leased for a term of years, where hereafter The 
Barrel and Box and Bock Products, now located at Louisville, Ky., 
will be published jointly with the Hardwood Eecord. This combina- 
,. tion, which will be known as The Trade Press Alliance, has been 
Qsnder negotiation for some time, and plans have now been consum- 
?iinated whereby the three publications, putting out five issues monthly, 
^yill all be under one general management. This arrangement is by 
C^io means a consolidation of the financial affairs of the three papers, 
qBS the business of each one will be conducted separately; but, owing 
Qlo joint interests of the publishers, it has been decided that considera- 



LIBRy 

NEW ^ 

botan 

iile economy m cost can be effected and that the scope of all the 
papers can be much widened and their character improved by this 
plan. 

The Barrel and Box is in its twelfth year, and is the foremost 
publication of its kind in the country; it is devoted to boxes, shocks, 
cooperage, staves, heading, hoops, head liners, woodenware, baskets and 
wood specialties. Hereafter it will be printed on the 15th of the 
month. 

EocK Products is a semi-monthly publication with two distinct 
editions. The issue of the 5th of the month is known as its "stone 
edition" and is devoted to stone and products manufactured there- 
from. The issue of the 20th is devoted to manufactured rock 
products. This paper is four years old and has become the leading 
exponents of the interests it represents in the United States. 

The Hardwood Record will continue to be published on the 10th 
and 25th of each month. 

In addition to . the publication headquarters at Chicago, branch 
offices will be maintained at New York, Philadelphia, Minneapolis, St. 
Louis, Memphis, Louisville and Barre, Vt. Readers of any of the 
papers will always be welcome callers at the Chicago office or at any 
of the others. 

It is intended that this new arrangement shall in no wise affect the 
policy or personnel of the several publications, but such a community 
of interests should prove of mutual advantage. 



General Market Conditions. 

There are no new features in the hardwood trade. The demand 
continues very strong, and stocks are bought well up to green 
lumber. Ash and hickory are well nigh out of the market, and 
there are insistent calls from all sources for more of these woods. 
Oak is in good call, but there is a large quantity being manufactured 
and the general trade is being fairly well supplied. Quartered 
white oak is doing about the same as during the past year, while 
the demand for red is increasing, with a corresponding accretion in 
value. Poplar, cottonwood and gum in all grades are in excellent 
demand. The good end of these three woods is being marketed as 
fast as it is fit for shipment, and box people are making insistent 
calls for the coarse end of every variety of hardwoods. 

In the north country stocks are well sold up. The average 
manufacturer has sold a goodly portion of his proposed season's cut. 
Rock elm and black ash are practically out of the market, and 
values are strengthening in birch and basswood. Thick maple, which 
was in oversupply a year ago, is now short, and the demand exceeds 
the supply. 

The hardwood flooring trade remains strong, and the factories are 
all busy. The capacity of veneer and panel plants is tested to the 
utmost, and some are running extra hours to keep up with demand. 

The call for mahogany seems to increase in quantity every month, 
and there is a gradual accretion in price. The call for cherry and 
black walnut is normal, but the limited quantity of these woods 
seems to be consumed about as fast as they are manufactured into 
lumber. 

Possibilities of Universal Hardwood Inspection. 

The working out of plans lookiug toward unification of all sys- 
tems of hardwood inspection and of a method of application in all 
parts of th'% United States, is a good deal more of a problem than 



u 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



it appears on the surface. This subject has been approached in many 
different ways for more than a decade, and thus far all etTorts have 
proven futile. In the specific text of rules governing hardwood in- 
spection there is a wide difference not only in various parts of the 
country but in the same sections. 

Every one who has the interests of the hardwood lumber business 
truly at heart has now come to recognize the permanent and valuable 
results that would accrue if there were one basis for hardwood 
inspection. This sentiment has been one of gradual growth, and it 
has now crystallized into an almost universal determination that it 
shall be accomplished. Active in this agitation is the president 
of the National Hardwood Lumber Association, who less than eight 
months ago, while doubtless believing in the value of the work, 
deprecated any attempt to abrogate the well-known and historical 
' ' Butf alo agreement ' ' of his association, which provided that no 
change in National rules should be made until December, 1908. Join- 
ing with him in this movement is the chairman of the Inspection 
Bules Committee of the same association, who up to within a short 
time ago has been strenuous in using his influence against the sus- 
pension of the alleged agreement governing a set of rules that are 
now confessedly archaic. 

The first genuine and wholesale expression of public opinion on 
this subject manifested itself at the annual meeting of the Hard- 
wood Manufacturers' Association of the United States, held at Mem- 
phis last January, when this desideratum was advocated by the presi- 
dents of both the national hardwood associations. Since that time 
conferences between inspection committees and meetings of several 
state and national organizations have been held, and while nothing 
has as yet been definitely accomplished, the spirit of conciliation and 
compromise from all sources is abroad in the land, and there is a 
possibility that this just work may soon become an accomplished 

fact. 

With regard to the difiBeulty of accomplishing universal hardwood 
inspection, it must be recalled that ten years ago the jobbing 
trade of Chicago, recognizing the chaotic condition of inspection 
affairs covering lumber reaching this market, decided that they 
needed a general overhauling, and that there was necessity for na- 
tional rather than numerous trade-center systems of inspection ; and 
through their influence the National Hardwood Lumber Association 
was organized. It was hoped that the power gained by cementing 
together even a few markets in a mutual agreement on inspection, 
would induce all other sections of the country to follow, and thst 
the rules might thus be made universal. This association put forth a 
set of rules to cover wholesale purchases of lumber — transactions 
between manufacturers ar.d jobbers. The movement was then strong- 
ly dominated by the jobbing element. This association has suc- 
ceeded in standardizing and generalizing its system of inspection 
to a considerable degree, but it has thus far signally failed to make 
it even approximately universal. 

Some five years ago a large element of the National Hardwood 
Lumber Association resigned from it and formed a second and 
purely manufacturers ' organization, known as the Hardwood Manu- 
facturers ' Association of the United States. Since that time both 
bodies have flourished, but their systems of inspection have always 
varied to a considerable extent. The method thus far employed by 
the national element has called for grading from the back or poorer 
face of the board, and in measurement has given the odd three- 
fourths inch and more to the seller, and less than three-fourths inch to 
the buyer. On the other hand the manufacturers have insisted that 
inasmuch as the greater portion of hardwood lumber in its finished 
state shows only ore face, both sides of a piece of lumber should 
be taken into, consideration in determining the grade, which prac- 
tically calls for inspection on the face or good side of the board. 
This association has also pursued the give-and-take half inch meas- 
urement irt determining the quantity. 

While these two sets of rules will show a difference in value on 
a thousand feet of lumber of from $1.50 to $3.00 under strict inter- 
pretation their general application as regulated by supply and de- 
mand and by custom will not show any vast difference in net results. 

It should be recalled that normally all men are selfish. It there- 
fore happens that every manufacturer of lumber naturally seeks to 



dispose of the lowest possible quality of a given grade at the highest 
possible price. On the contrary the jobber and wholesale consumer 
strenuously seek to secure the highest possible quality of a given 
grade at the lowest possible price. Here, thus far, has been the 
parting of the ways. The Hardwood Manufacturers' Association 
is entirely made up of manufacturers of lumber. The Michigan 
Hardwood Manufacturers' Association is also exclusively a manu- 
facturers ' organization. In Wisconsin there are two hardwood asso- 
ciations, one composed of manufacturers only and the other of manu- 
facturers and jobbers. The Indiana association is also made up of 
both elements. The New York Lumber Trade Association, which 
makes some pretense of having a hardwood inspection system, is 
largely dominated by the jobbing element, as are the various other 
lumber exchanges in the great trade centers of the country. 

It is a singular fact that the lumber business is the only manu- 
facturing enterprise in which the manufacturer does not regulate 
to the last degree the grading of his own product. This comes 
about from the necessity that he make qualities suitable to the re- 
quirements of the consuming trade. Up to this time hardwood in- 
spection usages have been quite largely dictated by jobbers, because 
they took the initial steps in the formation of the parent organiza- 
tion and the local exchanges. Today, however, it is asserted that 
the majority of members of the National Hardwood Lumber Asso- 
ciation are either jobbers and manufacturers, or manufacturers ex- 
clusively. This being the case, it should not be a difficult matter 
for the hardwood lumber manufacturing element of the country, as 
represented by all the various lumber exchanges and associations, tc 
get together on a uniform system of hardwood inspection, and 
promulgate it by very preponderance of numbers. 

It has become an axiom that value cannot be legislated into a 
grade; if the grade is high a high price will follow; if the grade is 
low, a low price will obtain. Up to this time, through local asso- 
ciation pride, and through each association having had its own way 
about inspection matters, there has been altogether too much stress 
laid upon what should constitute a specific grade of lumber. It really 
does not make much difference what the grade is so long as it suits 
the trade for which it is intended. 

There is no doubt of the integrity of purpose of the president of 
the National Hardwood Lumber Association in attempting to perfeci. 
and make universal a logical system of hardwood inspection. In this 
movement he .should have the endorsement and assistance of every 
hardwood manufacturer, merchant and consumer in the land. The 
Hardwood Record bids him Godspeed in his mission, and if he suc- 
ceeds, as it is hoped he will, the hardwood trade of this country will 
owe him more than it does any other man who has ever attempted to 
better its conditions. 



The Michigan Meeting. 

The meeting of the Michigan Hardwood Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion, held at Grand Eapids April 17, was marked by the first logical 
action that has thus far transpired looking toward actual results in 
the establishment of universal hardwood inspection. This associn- 
tion appointed a committee to treat with other associations on the 
subject of a uniform set of grading rules, and beyond that, gave 
this committee full power to act in the premises. 

From time immemorial associations have appointed committees 
to treat with other associations, but never before has an association 
"got down to brass tacks" and delegated a coterie of members to 
act in its behalf. 

Much may be expected from the impetus the hardwood manufac- 
turers of Michigan are giving to the overhauling of inspection sys- 
tems. They are being ably seconded in their efforts by Wisconsin 
producers, who are equally anxious for up-to-date methods. 

If the other associations of the country will follow this 
example, universal hardwood inspection will soon be in sight. 
There are not years enough left in this century for a general body 
of association members, meeting at odd times in various parts of 
the United States, to get together on this proposition, but competent 
committees representing these bodies can do it, and do it to the 
satisfaction of all, within a week. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



'5 



Pert, Pertinent and Impertinent, 



sweetest of Words. 



If, of all words of tongue or pen 

The saddest are, "It might have been," 

Thank heaven language still affords 

The choice of many other words : 

And sweetest far of all I reck 

Are simply these : "Inclosed find check." 



Ah, with what joy your bosom tills 

When 'mongst the letters and the bills 

You spy a quick acknowledgment 

Of car of lumber that you"ve sent 

But hardly dared so soon expect 

To find these words : "Inclosed find check !" 



Let poets prate of passioned verse, 

Let theologians still asperse 

The love of gold — but as for me, 

I'm armed — accoutred instantly 

Kor rosy cheeks and Clicquot sec. 

When people write ; "Inclosed find check." 



HARDWOOD INSPECTION RULES CONGRESS. 




The spirt of concession that now obtains is the onJy way to Unify hardwood inspection. 



The Reason. 

Most of the good things in life come to 
those who wait on themselves. 



Preferable. 
Even the dignified man wo.uld rather 
bend than go broke. 



Far Easier. 

It is easier to say that j'ou do just as 
you please than it is to do it. 

Just So. 

A man seldom tries to belittle another 
man unless he feels that he is superior to 
himself. 



Quite Often. 

A full hand is very often accompanied 
by an empty heart. 

Even He. 

Strange as it may seem, even a lazy man 
kicks if compelled to do nothing. 



The Real Difficulty. 

It is not so difficult to know oneself as 
it is to confess to the knowledge. 



Expensive. 

Castles in the air cost a great deal to 
keep lip. 

Great but Rare. 
Truly great is the man who has become 
so without making any of the noise him- 
self. 

True. 
It is a good thing not to be a "good 
thing." 

What Follows. 
A man often says "How do you do?" 
and then proceeds to do you. 

Just a Little. 
A word to the wise may be sufficient — 
but a little depends on the word. 



Troublesome. 

After wealth has bought its way into so- 
ciety it has to be constantly showing its 
admission ticket. 



Honor and Honesty. 

"Honor is finer than honesty. A man 
may be honest, and yet grasping and small; 
but the man who has a delicate sense of 
honor adds to integrity the grace of unsel- 
fishness." 



Dispicable. 

The fellow whom pride or cowardice or 
lai;iness drives into a corner and who does 
nothing but sit there and growl is dispic- 
able; even the chronic kicker is preferable 
to him. 

Good Advice. 

Never sign a document until you have 
read it, nor drink wine — till you have 
seen it. 



it 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



AMERICAN FOREST TREES. 



Pignut. 
Hicorla glabra. — Britton. 
The pignut has an exceedingly extensive 
range of growth, being found from the 
southern sections of Maine and Ontario 
southward to the Indian river district of 
Florida, westward through lower Michigan 
to parts of Nebraska, Indian Territory, 
Eastern Kansas and Eastern Texas. 

The tree is known as pignut in 
New Hampshire, Vermont, Massa- 
chusetts, Connecticut, Bhode Is- 
land, New York, New Jersey, Penn- 
sylvania, Delaware, West Virginia, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, 
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Lou- 
isiana, Texas, Arkansas, Kentucky, 
Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Wiscon- 
sin, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Min- 
nesota, Ohio and Ontario; it is 
called bitternut in Arkansas, Ill- 
inois, Iowa and Wisconsin; black 
hickory in Mississippi, Louisiana, 
Arkansas, Missouri, Indiana and 
Iowa; broom hickory in Missouri; 
brown hickory in Delaware, Mis- 
sissippi, Texas, Tennessee and 
Minnesota; hard-shell in West Vir- 
ginia; red hickory in Delaware; 
switch-bud hickory in Alabama; 
white hickory in New Hampshire 
and Iowa. 

The bark of the pignut is light 
grey; it is coarse and rough, but 
very 'close, and is not given to scal- 
ing off or becoming shaggy, as do 
other species of this family. 

The leaves are alternate and 
compound; they grow from eight 
to twelve inches in length, and 
consist of from five to nine sessile 
leaflets, wedge-shaped and pointed 
at the apex, the lower pair smaller 
than the others; they are dark, 
greenish -yellow, smooth on top, 
and glabrous at maturity. 

The staminate flowers grow in 
axillary, catkins four to seven 
inches long, and are usually in 
groups of three; the pistillate form 
in terminal spikes containing from 
two to five flowers; their color is 
greenish-yellow. The time of bloom 

is April. 

The fruit is an oblong nut, witli 
smooth thin shell; the kernel is 
small and usually bitter. This nut 
is contained in a globose husk, red- 
dish brown, hairy, thick or thin, which is 
divided in four sections, opening partially 
to disclose the nut, which matures in Octo- 
ber and November. 

The wood is of slow growth, brown, tough, 
elastic, hard and heavy; the heartwood is 
variable in color, while the thick sapwood 
is nearlv white. It is very close-grained, 
and is difficult to distinguish from that of 



FlFXy-FIRST PAPEK 

siiell-bark hickory. In the making of tool 
handles, agricultural implements, etc., it is 
liighly valued and almost indispensable. A 
cubic foot of seasoned wood weighs fifty- 
six pounds. 

In general appearance the pignut is a 
stately tree, tall and slender, growing to a 
height of from fifty to more than a hun- 
dred feet, witn narrow, round head, and 




TYPICAL PIGNUT GROWTH, INDIANA. 

liendulous, irregular branches. The trunk is 
usually from two to four feet in diameter, 
and is often forked. The tree thrives best 
upon hillsides and along dry ridges, and 
reaches its maximum development in the 
basin of the lower Ohio river. It ranges 
southward farther than do the other hick- 
ories, extending down into Florida; and 
grows farther to the southwest than does 



any other variety except the pecan. It is 
most common in Missouri and Arkansas; 
the latter State is the home of all the 
twelve known species of the hickory fam- 
ily. These trees are distinctly North Amer- 
ican, and none are now native to any other 
section of the world. There is one Mex- 
ican species, and the remaining eleven are 
confined to that portion of the United 
States which lies east of the Rock- 
ies. Scientists have shown that 
many members of this family once 
inhabited parts of Europe and 
Greenland, as well as the western 
part of this continent, but that 
they were all destroyed during a 
certain geological era, and the only 
traces of them remaining today are 
in rocks belonging to the Tertiary 
period. 

So valuable and ornamental a 
tree as the pignut is unfortunate 
in being known commonly by so 
insignificant a name; one botanist 
has named this species porcina, 
hence pignut, because the nuts were 
a favorite food for pigs, which 
were often turned into the woods 
to graze in the old days, and be- 
cause they are distasteful to most 
persons, while those of the shag- 
bark are eagerly sought. 

The hickories possess as high 
physical qualities as any group of 
American trees; their wood is ex- 
ceedingly valuable, so much so that 
it is almost impossible to find sat- 
isfactory substitutes for it in cer- 
tain lines, while for fuel it is unex- 
celled in heat-giving and bright- 
ness of flame. Even the nut is 
commercially valuable. When the 
trees are cut and manufactured 
into lumber, the buyer rarely at- 
tempts to distinguish the particular 
variety, merely asking whether he 
is purchasing virgin or second 
growth. Second growth is pecu- 
liarly well adapted to the manu- 
facture of light vehicles. The 
spokes of carriage wheels, the bent 
rims, axles and bolsters, running 
gear, poles, shafts, foundation 
frame-work, etc., are made of the 
wood whenever possible. Ash and 
maple have often been substituted 
for inferior-grade work, but a very 
little rough handling or usage will 
show the deception. 

Rogers says: "With wood equal to the 
best in its genus, exceptional merits as a 
shade and ornamental tree, and promise of 
developing orchard varieties that will rival 
the shagbarks as nut trees (experiments are 
now in progress looking toward the im- 
provement of the fruit, by grafting), the 
pignut seems to be one of the 'coming 




WALTER D. YOUNC3 

BAY CIXV, MICH. 



SUPPL£M£NT TO 

HAKDWOOD KEOORD 

APRIL 25, 1907 



rLLUSTRATING 
BUILDERS OF LUMBER HISTORY 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



17 




LEAF AND FRUIT OF PIGNUT. 



trees' in the Eastern States. It is to be 
hoped that the popular name will be aban- 
doned and the more suitable one 'smooth 
hickory' substituted. This is the literal 
translation of its scientific name." 



The photograph of pignut, from whi<;h the 
halftone accompanying this article was made, 
is from the collection of AVilliam H. Free- 
man, secretary of the Indiana State Board 
of Forestry. 



'Builders of Lumber History. 



NUMBER XLIII. 



Walter Dickson Young. 
(See Portrait Supplement.) 

Walter Dickson Young was born in Al- 
bany, N. Y., Sept. 25, 1855. His father 
was George Young, of Stewarton, Scotland; 
his mother was a resident of Albany. The 
boy attended the academy there until the 
family's removal to Bay City, more than 
thirty years ago, and he received his entire 
business training in the latter city. 

His first employment was as clerk in the 
Bay City Bank. He next entered the coal 
and ice business as a member of the firm of 
Young Brothers; and in 18S7 organized and 
managed the Michigan Log Towing Com- 
pany, which was engaged in towing logs 
from Georgian Bay to the Saginaw river. 
Mr. Young acted in this capacity for five 
years. 

In 1892 he entered the hardwood lumber 
and maple flooring business, establishing 
the house of W. D. Young & Co., of which 
he is the sole owner at the present time, 
and it is to the affairs of this concern that 
he devotes most of his energy and atten- 
tion, although largely interested in several 
other important enterprises. Among these 
is the Young Brothers ' Building Company, 
of which he is secretary; the Colonial 
Building Company, of Bay City, w-hieh he 
serves in like capacity; he is a director of 
the Bay City Bank and of the Colonial 
Trust & Savings Bank of Chicago; and is 
vice president of the German-American 
Sugar Company of Bay City, one of the 
largest producers of beet sugar in the state 
of Michigan. 

Mr. Young has a double band saw mill 
and an immense flooring plant at West Bay 
City. He does a general hardwood manu- 
facturing and wholesale business, but makes 
a decided specialty of maple flooring, and 
is recognized as one of the most important 



factors in the maple flooring trade of the 
United States, as well as in the foreign 
markets; his company exports a large 
quantity each year. Only recently the plant 
was improved and made up-to-date in every 
particular; it is equipped with the latest 
and best machinery to be had. The Young 
factory has long been noted for the excel- 
lence of its product, and it is one of Mr. 
Young's characteristics that he never does 
anything by halves. 

Mr. Young has been twice married — the 
first time to Miss Florence Blanchett, of 
Detroit, who died in 1887; the second to 
Miss Elizabeth Ambrose, daughter of 
George H. Ambrose, one of Chicago 's 
pioneer lumbermen. He has four children, 
Fanny May, Walter Dickson, Jr., Florence 
Ambrose and Francis Little. 

Although exceedingly domestic in his 
tastes, and caring little for politics, Mr. 
Young is very popular in a social way — as 
he is also with business associates. He is 
a member of the Bay City Club and of the 
Union League Club qf Chicago. 

It is a pleasure for the Hakdwood Eecoed 
to add the portrait of Mr. Young to its gal- 
lery of Builders of Lumber History, to 
which his enterprise, sagacity and success 
in lumber operations in Michigan fairly 
entith,' him. 

Record Mail Bag. 

fin this department it is proposed to reply 
to such inquiries as reach this oflQce from the 
IIaudwood Kecobo clientage as will be of enough 
general interest to warrant publication. Every 
patron of the paper is invited to use this de- 
partment to the fullest extent, and an attempt 
will be made tu answer queries pertaining to all 
matters of interest to the hardwood trade, in 
a succinct and intelligent manner] 



interested me. Was pleased to note the refer- 
ence you made to the coffee tree in one of our 
Boston parks, known as the Fens, Enclosed you 
will find a leaf of this tree, and also one from 
a red maple and balm of Gilead. My life has 
been spent in association with the trees. For 
years I have been trying to form a collection 
of the leaves of forest trees, but have difficulty 
in preserving them any length of time. Would 
be pleased to have you advise me of some for- 
mula to preserve them. 

Am sending you under separate cover a rem- 
nant of a tree that is very hard, and would like 
to have you classify it. This tree was located 
in north latitude 45 degrees, west longitude 53 
degrees, on an ocean mountain known as the 
Grand Bank. It is not known how many trees 
there are to the acre in this ocean forest, as no 
cruiser has ever returned to make his report, 
but it has stood a mute witness to the dying 
wail of many a whole ship's crew. In walking 
through this forest one would find the whitened 
bones of thousands of men who went down to 
the sea in ships. When I first came into pos- 
session of this tree, some dozen years ago, it 
was about two feet high, but continual knocking 
around has broken off its trunk and branches so 
that today it would not break any records in 
using a Doyle scale. C. B. Rogers. 

I am unable to identify the little piece of 
wood or coral that the writer sends. Ee- 
f erring to the subject of the preservation of 
leaves in their natural form, I have never 
been able to accomplish this result satisfac- 
torily. My method of preserving an accurate 
record of leaf forms is to put freshly plucked 
leaves in an ordinary photographic printing 
frame between a piece of plain glass, to 
hold them flat and firm, and a sheet of 
sensitized paper — thus employing the leaf as 
a negative. This process will make an ab- 
solutely accurate leaf print, which can then 
be toned in the usual way, making a more 
permanent and satisfactory record than any 
other I know of. — Editor. 



Thanks The Record. 
ASBUBY I'ABK, N. J., April 0, — Editor Haed- 
wooD Record : We want to thank you very 
much for the help you have given us concerning 
the short pieces of hickory. In view of the in- 
formation we have gained we think we can cut 
our wood to much better advantage in the 
future, — Yours very truly, Caxx & Taylor, 



■Wants Market for Hickory. 
Bcr-al Hall, N. C, April 13. — Editor Haed- 
wooD Record : We notice an article on page 20 
of the March issue of the Record, containing a 
question you have been asked before, but the 
same interests us. We expect to be in the 
hickory business and want to get a market for 
dimension stock, short lengths, second growth 
hickory. You will please give this place in the 
next issue of your paper and oblige. We enclose 
$2 check for the Record. Company. 

The above letter is self-explanatory and 
persons interested in securing this stock may 
have the address of the writer on application 
to this ofiice. — Editor. 



Asks for Information. 
Chelsea, Mass., April 13. — Editor Hardwood 
Record ; The subject of "American Forest 
Trees" as published in the Record has greatly 



Wants Second-Haiid. Kails. 

Derm.a, Miss.^ April 17. — Editor Hardwood 
Kecoed : Will you please give me the name of 
parties who handle second-hand rails for tram 
roads? I want to buy or lease one and a half 
miles for immediate use. & Co. 

Anyone interested in this inquiry can have 
the writer's address by applying to this of- 
fice. — Editor. 



i8 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Ameiican Forest Trees. 

West Chester, Pa., April 20.— Editor Hard- 
wood Recoiid: Eeferi'ing to the articles under 
the title American Forest Trees, published in 
your paper, will you kindly advise us when these 
articles will be printed in book form? We should 
like to get a copy.— Yours truly, Hoopes Bugs. 
& Darlington, Inc. 

There are upwards of 300 varieties of com- 



mercial forest trees growing in the United 
States. Of this number the Hardwood 
Record has published articles covering only 
about sixty. It is our intention to eventu- 
ally edit this series of articles and put them 
into book form. The first volume will prob- 
ably be issued some time during 1908.— 
Editor. 



The Care of the Glue Tot. 



The glue pot has more to do with the suc- 
cess of the factory than the average wood- 
worker supposes. Some of the important 
points of this branch of the industry are too 
often neglected. The methods of heating 
glue for veneering and other work in many 
shops and mills would surprise the average 
artisan in the woodworking line. In some 
cases the glue pot is any old kind of ket- 
tle or pot that happens to be available. One 
sometimes sees glue pots in operation on 
masses of coal, coke and charcoal, the glue 
coming in direct contact with the interior of 
the kettle, resulting in its piling up, baking 
and gritting into a mass as illustrated at 
a, Fig. 1, which is a sectional sketch of 
the glue pot with partly burned and clogged 
glue adhering to the sides of the metal uten- 
sil. This is a most imperfect way to dis- 
solve it and it is invariably burned. 

Some of the utensils employed for work- 
ing the melted glue are not kept, in proper 
order. In many instances the melting pots 
have the appearance of not having been 
cleaned for ages. In one mill, where much 
veneering work was in process, the writer 
noticed that glue melting apparatus was 
quite submerged, together with burned and 
clogged matter, refuse and slime. The lids 
of the pots failed to close, due to hardened 
masses of glutinous matter on the hinges. 

No effort seems to be made in some estab- 
lishments to care for the gluemaking outfit, 
although tlie power plant may boast a pol- 
ished engine, a clean floor, machinery in per- 
fect running order, with shafting and belts 
in good condition. In these same factories 
may be found a careless boy or two making 
glue in crude utensils, rendered unsuitable 
because of neglect, and even the floor be- 
smeared with the gummy stuff. Just why 
this department shouhl be so often over- 
looked, it is difficult to understand. How- 
ever, some of the woodworking plants have in- 
stalled very desirable systems of glue-pre- 
paring apparatus and invested considerable 
money in them. Often old apparatus which 
is defective in some particular point is 
changed at slight expense into a suitable 
device. For example in Fig. 2 is shown one 
of the single pots altered so that there is a 
boiler inside, thus preventing the glue from 
coming into direct contact with the metal 
that is next to the fire. There is no chance 
for the glue to get burned in the inner kettle, 
providing that the proper amount of water is 
kept in the exterior kettle at all times. A 
melting pot of this description can be used 
to good advantage in dissolving common glue. 



The brushes and the mode of applying 
them are worthy of special note. 

There are instances of using crude brushes 
made of a rag tied on a stick, and instances 
in which worn and broken brushes are utilized, 
but the majority of users of glue depend 
upon common bristle brushes. The camel's 
hair brush cannot be used long before the 
fine strands become clogged and torn. The 
stubby bristle brush will not do, and the user 
of glue finally hits upon the common hog- 
bristle brush of the character exhibited in 
Fig. 3. Of course he often seeks to alter the 
original condition of the brush and sometimes 
ruins it this way. In one shop a glue worker 
had his brushes bridled with wire as at b. 
This shut off just that much action of the 
bristles. In other places, while the glueman 
did not put his brushes "on the bum" by 
Ijinding up the bristles with wire, he went at 
the work in such a way that he ruined his 
brushes early in the game, besides doing de- 
fective work in the meantime. Some glue- 



the work, without jamming the bristles as in 
the previous case. 

Many brushes are put out of working order 
prematurely because of their use in grooves 
of work to be joined, as at e. Fig. 6. Wide 
and full brushes are often squeezed into nar- 
row grooves. The best way is to have an 
assortment of glue brushes, and in this as- 
sortment there sliould be some small ones, the 
bristle combination of which should just fit 
the width of the grooves of the work in hand. 
Tliis will prevent tearing and wearing the 
bristles on the grooves. Then the brush is 
often worn down unevenly by constantly drag- 
ging it over the work at an angle, as shown in 
Fig. 7. While the inner side of the brush 
slides over the surface, the outer drags irregu- 
larly as at f, and the result is that the un- 
equal pressure makes the brush crooked in a 
short time. Much depends upon the manner 
of holding the brush. 

Of course all manner of schemes for heat- 
ing the pots are invented by ingenious glue- 
makers in the shops. In one the resourceful 
glueman introduced a complete Bunsen burner 
device. He got gas from the main by run- 
ning a rubber tube from a jet to the gas 
pipe, as shown in the diagram. Then he 
rigged up a little fan blower motor, attached 
a tube and secured an air blast therefrom, 
'inen the air and the gas were combined in 
the Bunsen burner at g and intense heat was 
obtained from the flame. 

Fig. 9 shows another kind of glue pot. 
The object of this contrivance is to enclose 




^gi 



men apply the glue to the work by grasping 
the brush as in Fig. 4, exerting more than 
necessary pressure in the direction of the 
arrow e, thereby reducing the bristles to a 
flattened condition. Many glue brushes are 
prematurely ruined by this method. A better 
way to operate is exhibited in Fig. -5. The 
brush handle is grasped with the forefinger, 
the thumb on the stem as shown. The fore- 
finger d is not brought down hard upon the 
brush head. This gives opportunity for a 
clean sweeping of the brush to and fro on 



the heating chamber. Coke, charcoal or other 
fuel is employed and ignited just beneath the 
pot, which is constructed with an inner boiler 
for the glue. 

There are many different kinds of glue 
melting and working devices in use in wood- 
working mills. The large veneer and fur- 
niture factories have special glue rooms, care- 
fully fitted up, where all ghiing is done, for 
this department of any shop of importance 
is worthy the best appliances and the atten- 
tion of an expert. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



19 



Meeting Michigan HardWood Manufacturers' Ass'n. 



There was a rousing iiieetiug of the Michi- 
gan Hardwood Manufacturers' Association, 
lield at Grand Rapids, Mich., Ajiril 17. 
Although the association was only organized 
in July last, this is the fourth meeting that it 
has held. The attendance at every meeting 
seems to be growing larger and is indicative 
of the interest that is being manifested in 
the association. Already the organization has 
systematised plans for gaining an accurate 
knowledge of stocks of lumber and logs on 
hand, both sold and unsold, and many details 
that put every hardwood manufacturer in 
Michigan in possession of facts essential to a 
thorough knowledge of the conditions of the 
business in the state. This information is 
collated by the association 's secretary at fre- 
quent intervals and distributed to every mem- 
ber. It is safe to say that there is no body 
of lumbermen in the country who are bet- 




WILLIAJI H. WHITE. PRESIDENT. 

ter posted on facts of such essential interest 
in assisting just values for their product as 
the members of this organization. 

Beyond the information collated and dis- 
seminated as above noted, the association has 
formulated a set of inspection rules and 
endorsed them, which it hopes to make the 
standard of the entire country on northern 
hardwoods. The membership has grown to 
about seventy in number, and represents 
about eighty-five per cent of the total hard- 
wood output of Michigan. The initial meet- 
ing of the organization was held at Ottawa 
Beach on July 13 and 14 last. The second 
meeting was called at Mackinaw Aug. 8. The 
third took place at Traverse City on Oct. 31. 

The Grand Rapids meeting was called in 
the auditorium of the Hotel Pantlind at 10 
A. M., with President William H. White in 
the chair, and Secretary Bruce Odell at his 
desk. President White after calling the meet- 
ing to order, delivered the following address: 

President White's Address. 

Gentlemen : This is the fourth meeting of 
the Michigan Hardwood Manufacturers' Associa- 



tion and while our association has not made 

ver.v miicli stir or excitement, we feel that its 

woi-ii has been very effective. 

The last statistics which our secretary sent 

out were gotten up in splendid shape. They 

reached nearly every manufacturer and I think 

had their effect. 

The work of this meeting today, as I look at 

it, is to consider fullj' the rules that have been 
drafted by the different committees and if found 
to be satisfactory, adopt the same and put them 
into effect in say thirty or sixty days. T'his 
would give our committee a chance to confer 
witli the committee of the National Hardwood 
Lumber Association, as I understand it is the 
wish tif the National Association that our Grad- 
ing Committee meet their Grading Committee 
and go over the rules question. If their com- 
mittee approves of the rules which our com- 
mittees agree on, and agrees to recommend 
their adoption at their annual meeting to be 
held at Atlantic City in May, on maple, beech, 
birch, ash, elm and basswood, so that these prod- 
ucts could be shipped on one set of rules known 
to the trade, I feel that we would have accom- 
plished a great deal. We want a set of rules 
that cannot be manipulated and in order to 
have such a set of rules we will have to con- 
sider the board from both sides. 

I am very desirous of seeing the defects in 
boards placed according to the amount of feet 
in each board, instead of according to the width 
and length. I am also very desirous of seeing 
a tmifurm inspection — I mean one set of inspec- 
tion rules. Every member here should give 
this rules question serious thought because when 
it is decided upon now it should be left so for 
some time. 

The marketing committee has a very impor- 
tant task to perform, and I hope they have 
given their work sufllcient thought to enable 
them to slate to this meeting the market con- 
ditions as they are today, and the chance for 
maintaining the present prices for our stock or 
of advancing prices in the near future. We 
also want to discuss fully the amount of stock 
on hand, compared witti last year, and the 
amount of stock sold and unsold at the present 
time- We want to look Into it carefully and 
outline a policy for this association to pursue, 
taking into account the amount of money it 
will re(iuire to run it successfully, and make 
provision for raising the amount today or when 
it will be needed. I-'or the best interests of this 
association it is going to require lots of atten- 
tion and work in the future. Your secretary 
deserves a great deal of credit for what he has 
accomplished in the short time he has had to 
do it. Taking into consideration his own busi- 
ness interests I cannot see how he can continue 
this work and do either himself or the associa- 
tion justice after the close of our year, which 
will be in July, unless he or some one else gives 
the work their full time and attention. 

Every member of this association should have 
a list "of stock on hand every month : namely, 
each kind of hardwood lumber, as well as the 
thickness, also the market conditions and the 
price at which lumber is selling at the central 
points, so that every manufacturer will be 
posted on the true condition of the market and 
know whether the supply of material is increas- 
ing or decreasing the demand. Products in 
which members are interested should be consid- 
ered even if not controlled by the association, 
such as bark, seats and other forest products, 
and whatever information the secretary may 
have in his possession should go out to the 
members and he should keep in touch with 
them. If a member is not sure on any point on 
which he thinks the association might give in- 
formation, it is his duty to write the secretary 
and try to find out the true facts as they stand. 
We are all busy men, perhaps too busy to give 
this association work the time it needs. Every- 
body is willing to do what they can, but this 
is an important work and a work that is going 
to have its results if properly looked after. 

The matter is now in your hands and I hope 
we will have a good meeting. 

At the request of the chair Secretary Odell 
read a synopsis of the minutes of the last 
meeting, which was approved. 

Chas. A. Bigelow, chairman of the grading 
committee, stated that a conference had been 
held between his committee and the grading 
rules committee of the National Hardwood 
Lumber Association in Chicago some time 
ago, and that they had received courteous 
treatment at the hands of the National repre- 



sentatives and that a report of this conference 
would be furnished later. 

President White invited W. H. Russe, 
president of the National Hardwood Lumber 
Association, to address the meeting on the 
subject of the National Association's joining 
the Michigan Association, or the Michigan 's 
joining the National. Mr. Russe responded 
as follows : 

W. H. Russe 's Speech. 

Ml. President and Michigan Millionaires : I 
think the request of your president is very em- 
barrassing when he asks if Michigan shall adopt 
the National rules or the National adopt the 
Michigan rides. At Puft'alo we made an agree- 
ment not to change the rules for three years, 
but I, for one, feel there are some changes 
which should be made. You will all bear in 
mind in making rules, when we hear from all 
sections of the countr.y, that Michigan will not 
get just what it wants, that Wisconsin will not 
get just what it wants, and Indiana will not 
get what it wants, because we do not all think 
alike, and that is true on any legislation on any 
subject. .\ny legislation you might carry out 




W, W. MITCHELL. VICE PRESIDENT. 

here in your organization will not meet the ap- 
proval of all your members. You must get to- 
gether for the general good. I was present at 
(Jttawa Beach when you were organizing this 
association. I am glad you have made such 
progress. Association work is a good thing. It 
is a good thing if you don't go any farther than 
to know each other, for then you have accom- 
plished good work. 

The market has been on our side of the fence 
for two years and I would like to see it con- 
tinue for five years longer. Whether it will or 
not I can not say. Hi Memphis just at present 
we are getting good prices. A man comes into 
an office and we add a cotiple of dollars and 
another man comes in and we add a couple 
more. Conditions have been such that stocks 
have been kept at a minimum. The demand has 
been greater than the supply and while these 
conditions exist you are going to get good prices 
for your lumber. 

Getting back to the rules, the National has 
always stood for and worked for uniform inspec- 
tion,' and by that we mean we hope some day 
to have one set of inspection rules governing the 
country. I believe the time is ripe now to get 
together on the proposition. The markets are 
with us for any changes. We are all manufac- 
turing lower classes of material. I have alwa.vs 
held our prices naturally will follow the quality 
of the goods we ship and if w'e make them too 
low we can not get as much money, but we 
should have universal inspection. They ought 
not to be Michigan rules, Wisconsin rules, or 
National rules, but we ought to have only one 
set of rules. In fact, the very existence of dif- 
ferent rules has brought into effect the National 
association. Originally we had a great many 
exchanges and systems of inspection. C'jicago, 



20 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



St. Louis, Buffalo, New York and other cities 
had rules. Wlien we made quotations on lum- 
ber tliey aslied us, "Wliat rules are you going 
to measure it liyV" Then we got together and 
n.ade a set of rules. 

We have made wonderful progress. The suc- 
cess of the National association proves that de- 
spite the fact that this year there has been 
more agitation in manufacturing centers in re- 
gard to changes in the rules the association 
has made a large increase in membership and 
the inspection force has measured more lumber 
than ever before. The National association 
never has been in better condition than it is to- 
day. Still we have not attained the idea we 
started out for — universal inspection. I be- 
lieve that with conservative action, and every 
man giving the other man credit for being hon- 
est in what he says, while we may not agree 
with you. bv giving and taking we can get to- 
gether and make a set of rules that will suit all 
of us. With the different interests at stake this 
will be the best thing that can be done. 

I am not familiar with your northern woods. 
I do not know just what changes you feel 
should be made, but I know there are a few 
changes we of the south want and fee! we 
should have. On the other hand, I do not be- 
lieve iu rescinding the Buffalo agreement — tak- 
ing it out and throwing it overboard. I believe 
we can suspend the Buffalo agreement and make 
the changes uecessary for the changed condi- 
tions and let the Buffalo agreement go right 
along until it has expired. 

I am glad your association has invited the 
inspection committee not only of our associa- 
tion but also of the Indiana and Wisconsin as- 
sociations, because I believe these committees 




BRUCE ODEI^L, SECRETARY. 

have given inspection rules so much thought 
that they can go over the entire list far better 
than a general convention. Naturally when you 
go in a general convention the different sections 
handle different woods and it is hard to reach 
an agreement. For instance, I would not give 
any consideration as to what changes Michigan 
needs, because I would not be in a position to 
give them any advice. I do give thought to 
the woods we handle personally. Your chair- 
man would not consider the woods you do not 
handle. There will come in differences of opin- 
ion again, but if we simply will wipe out senti- 
ment and merely bear in mind that we are 
there not only for our own good but for the 
general good, and whenever you help the gen- 
eral good you will find you are helping your- 
selves, you will remove the obstacles and you 
are bound to put money in your pocket when 
you help the general good of the lumber busi- 
ness. 

1 feel that the movement here has been a 
wise one and I hope that when the committees 
get together one won't insist on having a cer- 
tain speck removed, but by giving and taking 
they will be able to get together and when they 
get there we will be satisfied and then let the 
matter rest under the Buffalo agreement until 
it has expired. The National Association has 
always had that one idea in view ; that is, 
universal inspection. You must bear in mind 
that with a membership of more than six hun- 
dred we have differences of opinion. We have 
differences of opinion in our club at Memphis, 
in which we have 116 members, but we try to 
get the best of the ideas advanced adopted. I 
find 1 am not infallible in my views and other 
people find out the same thing. 



Let us meet with a determination to get to- 
gether. If you conflict you will never get to- 
gether. Some of our members have felt that 
they do not get what they are entitled to.- If 
you will bear this in mind there is no reason 
under the sun why we should not get together, 
and I believe we will. 

General Discussion on Inspection. 

The chair next invited Frank F. Fish, sec- 
retary of the National Association, to speak. 
Mr. Fish stated that his time was given 
very largely to carrying out detail work and 
that he was not a practical lumberman and 
was not competent to pass an opinion on in- 
spection rules. He urged attendance at the 
forthcoming annual meeting at Atlantic City 
and hoped that every Michigan manufacturer 
would be present to further the interests of 
that section of the country. 

President White then gave Theodore Fath- 
auer, chairman of the Inspection Eules Com- 
mittee of the National Association, an op- 
portunity to speak. Mr. Fathauer said: 

The question of inspection always seems to 
be a prominent one in a meeting of lumbermen. 
When first the subject was broached, ten or 
eleven years ago, the National Hardwood Lum- 
ber Association took great pains to enlist the 
support and cooperation of hardwood lumber- 
men. At that time they extended a general in- 
vitation to attend a meeting held in Chicago. 
Michigan was approached by personal efforts 
and Mr. White was among the first to attend 
the meeting. He is as conversant with the im- 
portance of the achievement as any of us. The 
dealers and manufacturers of hardwood lumber 
should and must get together. In a measure 
the dealer reflects the necessities of the con- 
sumer. Manufacturers, on the other hand, know 
what a log will produce and it would be the 
height of folly were they to adopt inspection 
rules which would not be practicable in the 
manufacture of hardwood lumber. You who 
have followed the work of the National Hard- 
wood Lumber Association know that Michigan 
through its representative sawmill men has 
been represented on this committee. The in- 
spection rules necessarily must represent the 
custom of the trade, and the inspection rule 
through its grades must take care of the entire 
product of the log. You gentlemen can answer 
the question far better than anyone else whether 
or not the National rules would take care of 
the entire product of the log with the exception 
of slabs, sawdust and edgings. 

Personally I have always felt that to change 
the rules every time you have a meeting is a 
grave mistake. Not only are universal inspec- 
tion rules desirable but uniform application of 
the rules. You cannot change the rules and ex- 
pect the inspectors to apply them as well as if 
your inspectors had opportunity to apply them 
lor a year or two. 

We will fight for the rescinding of the Buffalo 
agreement if for no other reason than to show 
we acted in all sincerity. This is the position 
taken by the Chicago Hardwood Lumber Ex- 
change. We will send a strong representation to 
.\tlantic City for this purpose. 

I might say, however, that we will have op- 
position and if you gentlemen are interested, 
which you are — at least I think you are — it 
devolves upon you to attend the meeting in 
person. Proxies are not accepted. Whichever 
way you vote, for or against, goes and you must 
be there to voice your sentiments. The National 
Hardwood Lumber Association for at least ten 
years has endeavored to have its rules adopted 
in the eastern markets and about a month ago 
it was successful. I simply mention this tact 
to show you with what diligence the work is 
carried on. Also I wish to state to you that it 
any radical movement is on foot to change the 
rules for grading lumber you will lose the sup- 
port whicli we now have and frustrate the 
efforts of ten years. 

Carroll F. Sweet, a director of the Na- 
tional Association, spoke in substance as fol- 
lows : 

The subject of inspection rules your commit- 
tee is very much more capable of handling with 
the committee of the National and other asso- 
ciations than it is possible to do here, and far 
better results can be secured through committee 
action. One point that is essential is to have 
a large attendance at the .Atlantic City meet- 
ing. Last year Grand Rapids sent a big delega- 
tion to Memphis, which I got up, and I have 
been requested to repeat the program this year. 



Y'our secretary has had bouquets thrown at him, 
so I think he can stand a little criticism. I 
called Mr. Odell up on the 'phone and he said 
be did not see auy use in going. Now I want 
to tell vou one thing — anything we don't get 
doesn't do us any good. Anyone who is dead 
doesn't get any good out. of life. 

Mr. Sweet further said that he was the 
excursion manager of the Grand Eapids mem- 
bers of the National Association and pro- 
posed to charter a special car to take the 
local lumbermen to the Atlantic City meeting 
of the National Association, and invited all 
members of the Michigan Association who 
could make it convenient to join the party 
to go with them. 

Mr. Russe then cordially seconded the in- 
vitation given by Mr. Sweet. 

The chair invited Geo. H. Chapman, a dele- 
gate from the 'Wisconsin Hardwood Manu- 
facturers' Association, to address the con- 
vention. Mr. Chapman spoke as follows: 

I would like to touch upon one question 
which has been brought up, largely because of 
the remarks I made at the Traverse City meet- 
ing and because there has been some misunder- 
standing in regal d to the position which has 




CHAS. A. BIGELOW, CHAIRMAN GRADING 
COMMITTEE. 

been talten by the manufacturers of Wisconsin, 
especially those who have taken an active part 
in the "formation of our new association. A 
good many of the wholesalers and others have 
given it to me pretty hard because they think 
we want to make it as hard as possible for 
wholesalers to do business. There is no such 
intention. We do not want to do anything that 
would be detrimental to the business of our 
Iriends and we want them to understand that 
the formation of this new association is for the 
purpose of taking up questions that our friends 
are not interested in. We intend to maintain 
both associations over there. There are ques- 
tions which both can handle. There are ques- 
tions that either one or the other could not 
handle. We recognize that their branch of the 
business is necessary to us. We will not under 
any circumstances take any action that will be 
detrimental to their affairs and those in other 
lines of the hardwood lumber business. 

We have given this question of grading a 
great deal of thought. Mr. Fathauer said that 
the rules should be so written that they would 
cover the entire product of the log. This in- 
cludes the low grade stock which is being sold 
for scoots, crating and other purposes. If the 
logging is closely done and the sawing properly 
done some provision should be made for this low 
grade product. For this reason we are advocat- 
ing a grade which will take care of it. We 
think it should have a better name, however. 

We are heartily in favor of uniform rules. 
We do not care who gets the credit for them. 
We are willing to keep up the flght until we 
get what we want. So far as continually chang- 
ing the rules is concerned I do not favor too 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



21 



much o£ that, but it seems to us that the great 
trouble with the hardwood lumber business has 
been and is today because we are working on 
antiquated plans. The first hardwood rules 
ever written were written in Wisconsin. They 
were used as the foundation of the National 
rules. They were written fifteen or eighteen 
years ago in a great deal of haste. We all of 
us know that conditions in the lumber business 
have changed within the last ten or twenty years. 
I do not know of a single set of rules that have 
not been changed materially within the last ten 
years. Shop common and pine rules are as 
radically different from w'hat we had years ago 
as is possible. Changes were made in order to 
give sash and door factories what they wanted 
and then put on an adequate price. The rules 
were changed probably fifteen years ago. X'o 
make these changes there were conferences be- 
tween the bureau of grades and the sash and 
door concerns tributary to the Mississippi river 
territory. 

I don't see what objection there can be to 
making changes in the rules provided they are 
needed. I don't see that anything can be 
gained by changing gradually. Hardwood lum- 
ber as graded out is not as a rule satisfactory 
to the users of lumber. In a great many case.s 
it is necessary to make special grades. I 
think all of you can recognize where that comes 
in. I think the basis — that is, the ground work 
of the present National rules — is not right. We 
do not think they cover the wants of the users 
of hardwood lumber. We don't care what it 
does to the manufacturer, because you can make 
a grade and put the price on it. but there may 
be a hardship on the user because he may not 
be able to use our grade. You are not going to 
change the real value of your lumber by chang- 
ing the grade. We feel conditions are such that 
a radical change can be made. There are only 
slight differences which would enable us to give 
a man who is cutting up good lumber something 
that can be used to advantage. 

On invitation Chas. H. Barnaby, president 
of the Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen 's As- 
sociation, spoke as follows: 

I came here to represent Indiana in the joint 
conference on rules and am greatly pleased to 
find the Michigan association in session. We 
had a conference several years ago and we went 
to Chicago and tried to get changes but did not 
get anything. The next year we went to St. 
Louis, fought good and hard and got what we 
wanted. If we are going to get anything now 
we must fight for it. We have met four times, 
our Indiana committee, and suggested such 
changes as we think are right. We are going 
to Atlantic City in a body and are going to 
fight hard to have the Buffalo agreement sus- 
pended and have adopted such rules as we can 
have recognized by the National inspection com- 
mittee. 

Now. gentlemen, the chairman of the inspec- 
tion committee cannot change these rules. It 
is the majority of the entire convention that 
will change them. If you want them changed 
you must go down there and fight for it. Now' 
you speak about the manipulator. He will 
manipulate some way if he is a smooth citizen 
regardless of rules. Why, there is a fellow in 
our town who makes good money by manipulat- 
ing and he will keep on just as long as he can 
do that. I hope Michigan will send a strong 
delegation and fight for the suspension of the 
BuflTalo resolution. 

W. C. Hull of Traverse ('ity responded to 
Mr. Chapman's address as follows: 

I do not know that I have anything to say 
until the discussion of the rules comes up. I 
was quite interested in the remarks of the gen- 
tleman in regard to grades. The gentleman who 
spoke at length says one cut of the log is not 
provided for. He advocates another grade and 
doesn't seem to like the name scoots. A No. 3 
now is a very poor board. They only require 
25 per cent sound cuttings and" a board that 
will cut less than 25 per cent sound certainly 
Is not entitled to a much better name. Should 
we change the name to No. 4 the result would 
be that one-half of the boards which the inspec- 
tors now put into No. 3 will go into No. 4. 

On motion of D. H. Day a vote of thanks 
■U'as given to visiting members of other hard- 
■wood associations for their attendance. 

The Hart Cedar & Lumber Company of 
Hart was admitted to membership, where- 
upon the grading committee and the dele- 
gates from the National, the Wisconsin and 
Indiana associations went into session, as 



well as the Market Conditions Committee; 
recess was then taken until 2:30 p. m. 
AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Secretary Odell submitted the following 
statement as a report of the Market Condi- 
tions Committee: 
Report of Market Conditions Committee. 

From the stock reports of January 1, 1907, 
and such other information as your committee 
is able to obtain, stocks of all kinds of northern 
hardwoods are very light, probably lighter than 
at any time in several years. In the opin- 
ion of your committee the following prices can 
lie obtained for northern hardwoods over rail 
or by vessels : 

BIBCH. 

4, 4 red ?40 

First and No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 

second, common, common. Com. 

4/4 $29 $21 $15 $13 

5/4 and 6/4. 31 23 15 13 

8/4 33 25 17 

30/4 37 27 17 

12/4 40 30 20 

ie/4 45 35 25 

MAPLE. 

4/4 $25 $20 $15 $13 

5/4 26 21 15 13 

6/4 27 22 15 13 

8/4 28 23 16 

10/4 30 24 17 

12/4 32 26 18 

16/4 35 28 19 

No. 3 
common. Log run. 

Ash $15 $30 

Basswood 16 26 

Keech 13 16 

Soft elm lo 26 

Rock elm 15 25 

Bruce Odell^ 
A. W. Newark, 
W. L. Martin, 
W. N. Kellev, 
S. G. McClellan, 
W. C. Hull. 

R. Hanson said that the prices recom- 
mended by the committee were already being 
secured in most cases and gave a very op- 
timistic ■view of trade conditions. The senti- 
ments expressed were confirmed by both 
W. W. Mitchell and F. A. Diggins. On mo- 
tion the report was accepted and adopted, 
and the meeting adjourned until 8 p. m. 

EVENING SESSION. 

Chas. A. Bigelow, chairman of the grading 
committee, submitted the following report: 

Report of Grading Conunittee. 

Your committee submits the following modi- 
fications and changes in the rules of inspection 
of the National Hardwood Lumber Association, 
as its report, which, if incorporated in their 
rules, will, we earnestly believe, result to the 
advantage of all concerned. We ask that a 
committee be appointed by you to meet the 
inspection rules committee of the National Hard- 
wood Lumber .\ssociation in Chicago, prior to 
the meeting of that association in Atlantic City 
the latter part of May. as we believe the pres- 
ent time most opportune in which to further 
our efforts for a uniform inspection of hard- 
wood lumber. 

No. 1. Reference paragraph 2, general in- 
structions : Both sides of the board shall be 
taken into consideration by the inspector, ex- 
cept as otherwise stated. 

No. 2. Reference paragraph 3, general in- 
structions : Instead of the words "and square 
ends" use the words "all ragged and bad ends" 
shall be trimmed off. Tapering lumber in stand- 
ard grades to be measured one-third the length 
of the piece from the narrow end. 

No. 3. Reference paragraph 4, general in- 
structions : In the measurement of lumber in 
miscellaneous widths, all fractions one-half foot 
or over, as shown by the board rule, shall be 
added to the next higher figure, and all frac- 
tions under one-half foot shall be dropped. 

No. 4. New paragraph, general instructions : 
All lumber grading firsts on the best side of the 
piece and No. 1 common on the reverse side 
shall be classed as seconds, and admitted into 
the grades of firsts and seconds. 

No. 5. Standard lengths : Fifteen per cent 
of odd lengths to be admitted and measured and 
classed as such : 25 per cent of 8 and 10 foot 
to be admitted in the grade of firsts and sec- 
onds, not exceeding 10 per cent under 10 feet. 



No. 6. Standard thicknesses of lumber are 
% inch, 1/2 inch, % inch, % inch, 1 inch, I14 
inch, 114 inch, 2 inch, 2% inch, 3 inch, 3Vj 
inch, 4 inch, 4 li, inch, 5 inch, 5 14 inch and 6 
inch. 

No. 7. Stain that will surface off in dressing 
to any standard thickness shall not be consid- 
ered a defect. 

No. 8. All lumber less than 1 inch in thick- 
ness shall be measured and counted the same 
as lumber 1 inch thick when sold as such. 

No. 9. Wane : Wane on edge of inch board 
not exceeding one-half Inch in width on face 
side of the piece, running not to exceed one- 
third in length, shall not be considered a de- 
fect. Inch and a quarter and thicker lumber 
will admit a proportionate amount of wane. 

No. 10. No. 1 common : Width, 3 inches and 
wider ; lengths, 6 feet and longer. This grade 
is a cutting up grade, and must work two-thirds 
clear face cutting in not exceeding three pieces. 

No. 11. No. 2 common : Width, 3 inches 
and wider ; lengths, 4 feet and longe'r. This 
grade is a cutting up grade and must work 50 
per cent clear face, cutting in not exceeding four 
pieces. 

No. 12. No. 2 common in soft elm shall con- 
form to the general rules of all No. 2 common, 
except that the rules shall read "sound cutting" 
instead of "clear face cutting." 

Your committee recommends further that 
copies of this report be furnished the secre- 
taries of the Wisconsin Hardwood Manufac- 
tures' Association, the Indiana Hardwood Lum- 
bermen's Association ; and again we ask that a 
special committee be appointed to confer with 
members of the associations previously named. 
Respectfully, 

Charles A. Bigelow, 

F. A. DiGGINSj 

Henry Ballou, 
D. H. Day, 
R. J. Clark. 

On motion of F. A. Diggins the report 
as read was approved. 

R. Hanson then addressed the association 
as follows: 

I make a motion that the committee 
which had in charge the making of the 
specifications submitted be continued ; that it be 
instructed to attend the National convention 
which meets at Atlantic City in the near future 
for the purpose of having these inspection rules 
adopted. It is a well recognized fact that in 
order to make these inspection rules of any ben- 
efit to us it will be necessary for us to have 
them recognized by the National association. X 
do not mean by that to say we should join the 
National association, but in dealing with people 
in diflferent cities we become international, in a 
sense, and for that reason want rules recognized 
by the general trade as the standard inspection 
rules. We would have hard bumping to inaugu- 
rate our system in our part of the country. 
I do not mean to say that we cannot enforce 
our inspection rules in a measure, but it will be 
a great deal better to have them adopted by the 
National association. I cannot see that we 
would gain anything by joining the National 
association, but I know we will profit materially 
by having them recognized as the standard of 
inspection, or In other words that our inspec- 
tion rules agree with theirs. We are an associ- 
ation that does not come in contact with the 
other manufacturers' associations. We deal in 
lumber in which they do not deal. They should 
recognize our inspection as the standard inspec- 
tion. I would recommend instructing this com- 
mittee to attend the National association con- 
ference and. if possible, having it secure the 
incorpotation of our inspection in their rules. 

By having an organized association and taking 
a positive stand and adopting certain rules and 
regulations by which we want our lumber in- 
spected they will listen to us and modify their 
inspection of that grade of lumber to harmonize 
with ours. Indications are they want us to he 
part of their body, but this I do not favor, be- 
cause our interests are not common to that 
extent. If we were taken in as a body in that 
association they would have to supply us the 
same inspectors as are used in that body, and 
that I believe we can accomplish with a great 
deal more readiness than to attempt to fill the 
same positions they have to fill. 

Let us stand outside of the association and 
hold the same relative position to their organi- 
zation as the states hold to one another in the 
federal government. I am right, I believe. We 
should proceed along the line I have stated and 
appoint a committee with full power to act. I 
think we should send a committee down there 
with power to make reasonable concessions. If 
we do not give them that power then I do not 
think there is any use to send a committee. 

Secretary Fish was asked to name a con- 
venient time for the proposed conference with 
the Grading Rules Committee of his associa- 
tion, and suggested May 9. 



22 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



F. A. Diggins interposed an objection, stat- 
ing that he understood that the National 
committee was to meet with the Indiana Hard- 
wood Lumbermen's Association's committee 
on May 8, and stated that he would like to 
have the committees of all the associations 
meet together at one time. 

This suggestion was accepted by Mr. Fish, 

whereupon Mr. Hanson offered the following 

resolution, which was adopted: 

Be it moved tbat the president and the mem- 
bers of the Grading Committee of the Michigan 
Hardwood Manufacturers' Association meet with 
the grading committees of the other hardwood 
associations in Chicago on May 8, or at any 
other time that would be agreeable to all, and 
attend the annual meeting of the National Hard- 
wood Lumber Association at Atlantic City on 
May 23 and 24, and that they have full author- 
ity to act in the matter of devising satisfactory 
and uniform inspection rules to govern the grad- 
ing of northern hardwoods. 

This committee consists of C. A. Bigelow, 
D. H. Day, F. A. Diggins, Henry Ballou, 
R. J. Clark and President White. 

Secretary Odell read a financial statement 
of the condition of the association's affairs, 
showing that the total receipts up to this time 
had been $1,18.5 and disbursements $1,106.77, 
leaving a balance of only $78.23 on hand. He 
stated that the organization would require 
some additional funds to pay existing in- 
debtedness and carry on the work, and re- 
ferred to the provisions of the constitution 
relating to dues, which provides that an as- 
sessment on shipments not in excess of 2 cents 
per thousand feet might be made. The secre- 
tary introduced the following resolution, 
which prevailed : 

Resolved, That the secretary be instructed to 
levy an assessment of 2 cents a thousand feet 
on all shipments of hardwood lumber shipped 
from January 1, 1907, the same to be paid quar- 
terly, each member to render a .statement 
promptly on blanks to be sent out by the secre- 
tary, which are to show the amounts of the 
different kinds of hardwood lumber shipped be- 
tween the dates of January 1, 1907, and March 
31, 1907, that being the first quarter of the 
year. 

C. R. Duggan asked the secretary if it 
would be possible to compile a statement 
showing stocks on hand at more frequent in- 
tervals. In reply the secretary stated that he 
had encountered extreme difficulty in getting 
these reports as often as he had and did not 
think it would be possible to secure stock re- 
port statements from members oftener than 
quarterly, !;nd doubted if it would be possible 
to secure (hem oftener than semi-annually. 

The secretary was instructed to issue a cir- 
cular letter to all members noting the invi- 
tation to be present at the annual meeting of 
the National Hardwood Lumber Association 
at Atlantic City, and urging that all attend. 

On motion it was decided to •hold the first 



annual meeting of the Michigan association 
at Cadillac some time in July, the date to be 
fixed by the president and secretary. 

The meeting then adjourned. 

The attendance was as follows: 

Henry Ballou, Cobbs & Mitchell, Inc., Cadillac. 
Charles A. Bigelow, The Kneeland-Bigelow Co., 
Bay City. 

C. H. Barnaby, Greencastle, Ind. 
Frank Chickering, Grand Kapids. 

E. C. Groesbeck, Stearns Salt & Lumber Co., 
Ludington. 

George H. Chapman, Northwestern Lumber 
Co., Stanley, Wis. 

W. T. Christine, American Lumberman, Chi- 
cago. 

If. J. Clark, Peninsula Bark & Lumber Co., 
Sault Ste. Marie. 

C. E. Duggan, Tindle & Jackson, Pellston. 

F. A. Diggins, Murphy & Diggins, Cadillac. 
H. E. Davies, Ilackley-Phelps-Bonnell Co., 

Grand Kapids. 

H. I'. Dutton, Worcester Lumber Co., Ltd., 
Cliassell, 

C. E. Davis, Perkins Lumber Co., Grand Rap- 
ids. 

D. II. Day, Glen Haven. 

G. B. Dunton, Thos. MacBrlde Lumber Co., 
Buckle.v. 

Theodore Fathauer, Theodore Fathauer Co., 
Chicago. 

Frank F. Fish, National Hardwood Lumber 
Association, Chicago. 

M. J. Fox, G. von Platen, Boyne City. 

L. E. Fuller, Lumber World, Chicago. 

Henry H. Gibson, Hardwood Record, Chicago. 

William F. Gustine, A. F. Anderson, Cadillac. 

Bruce Green, Williams Bros. Co., Cadillac. 

W. C. Hull, The Oval Wood Dish Co., Tra- 
verse City. 

H. S. Hull, The Oval Wood Dish Co., Tra- 
verse City. 

E. S. Harris. Dalton Lumber Co., New Dalton. 
I!. Hanson, Sailing, Hanson & Co., Grayling. 
W. W. Johnson, Johnson & Crowl, Petoskey. 
Paul Johnson, North Shore Lumber Co., 

Thompson. 

E. L. Klise. A. B. Klise Lumber Co., Sturgeon 
Bay. 

A. B. Klise. A. B. Klise Lumber Co., Sturgeon 
Bay. 

W. N. Kelley, Kelley Lumber & Shingle Co., 
Traverse City. 

J. M. Longnecker, Oval Wood Dish Co., Tra- 
verse City. 

S. 0. McClellan, Earle Lumber Co.. Simmons. 

R. E. Morris, Lumber Mutual Insurance Co., 
Ypsilanti. 

W. W. Alitchell, Mitchell Bros. Co.. Cadillac. 

W. Ij. Martin, Embury-Martin Lumber Co., 
Cheboygan. 

A. W. Newark. Cadillac Handle Co., Cadillac. 

.lohn F. Ott, John F. Ott Lumber Co., Tra- 
verse City. 

Bruce Odell, Cummer, Diggins & Co., Cadillac. 

A. R. Owen, John S. Owen Lumber Co., Owen 
Wis. 

R. G. Peters, R. G. Peters Salt & Lumber Co., 
Manistee. 

W. P. Porter, East Jordan Lumber Co.. East 
Jordan. 

M. .T. Quinlan. Menominee Bay Shore Lumber 
Co.. Soperton. Wis. 

W. H. Russe, Russe & Burgess. Memphis, Tenn. 

C. F. Sweet, Merchants' Lumber Co., Strongs. 

J. Sullivan, Cedar. 

L. L. Skillman, Skillman Lumber Co., Grand 
Rapids. 

R. W. Smith, Louis Sands Salt & Lumber Co., 
Manistee. 

W. Tillotson. inspector National Hardwood 
Lumber Association, Grand Rapids. 

George S. Wilkinson. Van Keulen & Wilkinson 
Lumber Co.. Grand Ranids. 

W. IT. White, W. II. White Co., Bovue City, 
.Mich. 

George F. Williams. Williams Bros. Co.. Cadil- 
lac. 

II. Widdicomb. Jr.. Halladay Lumber Co., 
Grand Rapids. 

John S. Weidman, J. S. Weidman, Weidman. 



NeWs Miscellanp. 



Inspection Conference at Minneapolis. 

.Si.x ofhcers of the National Hardwood Lumber 
Association headed by President W. H. Russe on 
April 19 visited Minneapolis for the purpose of 
getting in touch with the hardwood wholesalers 
of the Twin Cities and ealisting enough of them 
as members of the National Association to justify 
locating a National inspector there. A meeting 
of the Northwesteru Hardwood Lumbermen's 
Association was called by President D. F. Clark 
for the purx^ose of talkiug things over with the 



visitors. It was held at the Commercial Club 
and was followed by a dinner, at which Mayor 
J. C. Hayues welcomed the guests to Minne- 
apolis. 

It was the sense of the meeting that the local 
hardwood men should Join forces with the Na- 
tional Association, whose inspection rules they 
have long been using, and that they should en- 
deavor to use all honorable means to have a 
imiversal inspection system adopted for the 
whole country. Seven new members were re- 



cefved into the National Association and three 
others promised to join if their colleagues were 
willing. 

President Clark called the meeting to order 
and stated its object, going on record himself 
in favor of hearty support of the National As- 
sociation and of securing a local National in- 
spector. W. C. Bailey said that as northern 
hardwoods were being cut out it was more neces- 
sary to have an inspector for the Twin Cities to 
give good service on southern stock. 

W. H. Russe explained the National inspec- 
tion service and said the association desired to 
locate inspectors wherever needed. The service 
is maintained as near uniform as possible, and is 
giving very general satisfaction. The buyer will 
like it better even if not always suited, because 
he will know what he is going to get. Mr. Clark 
explained that, while at Buffalo two years ago 
a resolution was adopted not to change the 
grading rules for three years, there is some talk 
now of change and it will come up at the an- 
nual meeting May 23 and 24. 

F. F. Fish, secretary of the association, said 
tlmt beginning five years ago with three in- 
spectors, they now had twenty-one. They are 
paid lfl,200 to $2,100 a year, and are under 




U. F. CLARK. PRESIDENT NORTHWEST- 
ERN HARDWOOD LUMBERMEN'S 
ASSOCIATION. 

bond. If on a reinspection there is a difference 
of more than four per cent the association mails 
a check to the buyer or seller, as the case may 
be, and takes it out of the inspector's bond. 
There are now 580 members : there are only six 
in the Twin Cities and there .should be twenty. 
O. O. Agler said that National inspection had 
gained the confidence of buyers now so that 
they were satisfied to take it in nearly all cases 
without question. 

A. E. Peterson of St. Paul thought the owner 
or buyer should be allowed to have a man on the 
pile with the inspector. Mr. Fish said that nine 
times out of ten this man would try to influence 
the inspector. Theodore Fathauer of Chicago, 
chairman of the grading rules committee, said 
that in Micltigan no man thought of going on 
the pile, and the inspectors would be *'very im- 
polite" to a man who tried it. Michigan shipped 
400,000,000 feet under National inspection, he 
stated, and as a buyer he had such con- 
fidence in it that he never reinspected. 
W. C. Stanton of St. Paul wanted to 
know whether parties not members of the 
association could call for a reinspection. The 
reply was that they could if the lumber had been 
sold subject to National inspection. J. V. Stim- 
son of Huntingburg. Ind., said he had formerly 
paid little attention to anything but the social 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



23 



side of the association, but now he was fully 
reliant on National inspection, and in the few 
cases that were reinspected for him the results 
were perfectly satisfactory. C. H. Barnaby of 
Indianapolis, president of the Indiana Associa- 
tion, spoke briefly and said he had learned some 
things from the discussion. F. H. Lewis of 
Minneapolis aslced whether a National inspector 
for the Twin Cities would instruct the local in- 
spectors. Mr. Fish said he would be directed 
to do so. 

Dinner was then served in one of the small 
club dining rooms. D. F. Clark presided. After 
dinner Mayor Haynes was introduced and ex- 
tended the visitors welcome to the city, speaking 
at some length. Messrs. Russe, Stimson, Fath- 
auer, Agler and Barnaby all responded briefly 
anil spoke in complimentary terms of the Twin 
Cities and of their meeting with the local hard- 
wood men. 

Those present included the following : 

W. H. Russe, Memphis, president N. H. L. A. 

F. F. Fish, Chicago, secretary N. H. L. A. 

0. O. Agler, Chicago, first vice president N. 
H. L. A. 

Theo. Fathauer, Chicago, chairman rules com- 
mittee, N. H. L. A. 

Charles H. Barnaby, Indianapolis. 
.1. V. Stimson, Huntingburg, Ind. 

D. F. Clark, C. F. Osborne, Grant Osborne and 
H. E. Walker, Osborne & Clark, Minneapolis. 

A. H. Barnard, Minneapolis. 

W. H. Sill, P. R. Hamilton, Minneapolis Lum^ 
ber Company, Minneapolis. 

A. E. Peterson, Peterson-Moore Lumber Com- 
pany, St. Paul. 

S. H. Davis, Henry Levine, S. II. Davis Lum- 
ber Company, Minneapolis. 

R. H. Grinsted, Pacific Timber Company, Min- 
neapolis. 

F. H. Lewis, Minneapolis. 

1. P. Lennan, I. P. Lennan & Co., Minneapolis. 

E. Payson Smith, A. S. Bliss, Payson Smith 
Lumber Company, Minneapolis. 

W. C. Stanton, George De Long, Stanton-De 
Long Lumber Company, St. Paul. 

G. W. Everts, C. A. Mayo, G. W. Everts Lum- 
ber Company, Minneapolis. 

H. M. Haisted, Ilalsted & Booraem, Minneapo 
lis. 

T. D. Jones, G. W. Jones Lumber Company, 
Appleton. Wis. 

W. C. Bailey, Minneapolis. 

E. H. Ilobe, Ilobe Lumber Company, Minne- 
apolis. 

A. A. Rotzien, W. C. Meader, Hawkins Lumbeir 
& Manufacturing Company, Minneapolis. 

F. W. Buswell, Buswell Lumber & Manufac- 
turing Company, Minneapolis. 

N. C. Bennett, N. C. Bennett Lumber Com- 
pany, Minneapolis. 

T. T. Bartelme, Minneapolis. 

J. F. Hayden, secretary Northwestern Hard- 
■wood Lumbermen's Association, Minneapolis. 

Piatt B. Walker, Minneapolis. 

Mayor J. C. Haynes, Minneapolis. 



Indianapolis Machinery House. 

The patrons of the II.\rdw(iod Record are 
introduced in the advertising pages of this issue 
to the veteran sawmill and special machinery 
manufacturing house — the Sinker-Davis Com- 
pany of Indianapolis. This concern was founded 
in LSril by Edward T. Sinker and operated under 
various firm names until 1871, when the firm 
of Sinker, Davis & Co. was incorporated, and 
in 1S8S reincorporated under the style of the 
Sinker-Davis Company. Perhaps the company 
is best known through its line of "Hoosier" 
sawmill machinery, and its specialty in this line 
is its "Gold Dust" band sawmills, in 7 and 8 
foot sizes, and its new "Hoosier" 6-foot band 
sawmill. It also makes a full line of circular 
sawmills, gang edgers, lumber trimmers, engines 
and boilers. 

One of the company's famous machines, which 
is illustrated in its ad. is the "Hoosier" self- 



feed rip saw. This machine is of special In- 
terest to manufacturers of furniture, flooring 
and cut-up material, and is one of the best types 
of feed-in and feed-out rip saws that has ever 
been made. Its value is attested by the numbers 
of these machines that already have been sold, 
and its popularity seems to be general with the 
trade. 

The officers of the Sinker-Davis Company are 
J. H. Hooker, president ; H. R. Bliss, secretary 
and treasurer, and John N. Steely, superintend- 
ent. These gentlemen are all very popular with 
the hardwood lumber manufacturing and remanu- 
facturing trade, with whom they particularly 
come in contact. 

The plant of the Sinker-Davis Company is 
very close to the downtown district of Indian- 
apolis. It consists of a machine shop and foun- 
dry, a millwright shop and pattern storage house, 
and is located at the intersection of Kentucky 
avenue and Missouri street and the Union Rail- 
way tracks, and the structures run through to 
West street. The shops are fitted with the most 
modern types of iron and steel working tools 
and the employees of the house have been 
brought up with it and are skilled machinists. 

The machinery of the Sinker-Davis Company 
is pretty well scattered over the entire United 
States, but particularly through the South and 
Southwest, and has achieved a splendid reputa- 
tion wherever it has been sold. 



Indian Territory Hardwoods. 

O. M. Eruner, president o£ the Owen M. 
Bruner Company, wholesale lumber dealer of 
Philadelphia, has recently returned from a trip 
to Indian Territory. Mr. Bruner supplies the 
Record with the accompanying picture of an 




A FINE COTTONWOOD LOG CUT IN 
INDIAN TERRITORY. 

Indian Territory Cottonwood log scaling 1,500 
feet, cut by Burgoyne Brothers of Hugo. Mr. 
Bruner makes a very alluring report of the hard- 
woods he finds in that district, and thinks that 
that region will become an eventful source of 
supply for a considerable quantity. 



Annual National Hardwood Lumber 
A.ssociation. 

The eastern members of the National Hard- 
wood Lumber Association, represented by a com- 
mittee of arrangements consisting of C. E. Lloyd, 
K. A. Beckley and B. C. Currie, are out with a 
handsome little booklet containing valuable sug- 
gestions and requisite information for members 
and others who contemplate attending the annual 
meeting, which will be held at Atlantic City, May 
T.', and 24. 

Members and guests attending the convention 
will be entertained by the eastern contingent, 
which hospitably invites all hardwood lumber 
manufacturers and wholesale hardwood dealers 
to be present, and announces that special ar- 
rangements have been made for ladies, so that 
it is hoped a large number will attend. The com- 
mittee recommends that visitors arrive as early 
as Wednesday evening, if possible, that everyone 
may be on hand promptly the opening day of 
the convention. 



The headquarters and meetings will be on the 
Steel Pier, admission to which will be insured 
by showing the badge or button to the business 
meetings ; at other times by ticket. A repre- 
sentative of the committee will be at the entrance 
to the Pier during the entire convention, to give 
information, tickets, etc., and to register all mem- 
bers and guests. It is urged that ail register 
promptly, as soon as located at any hotel ; all 
tickets for meetings, smoker, ladies' entertain- 
ment, etc., will be presented at the time of regis- 
tration. 

Special railroad rates have been secured for 
this convention, on the certificate plan ; the 
method of procedure is to purchase a straight 
ticket to Atlantic City, over the route by which 
one intends to return home, and get with it a 
certificate from the agent which will entitle one 
to one-third fare returning ; the tickets will be 
on sale from the 19th to the 27th of May. For 
members wishing to stop at Philadelphia, New 
York, New England points, or the Jamestown 
Exposition on their return, stop-over privileges at 
Philadelphia have been arranged for, the side- 
trips to be taken from there. Whatever route Is 
decided upon, it should be borne in mind that 
tickets must be routed the same both going and 
coming, in order to insure securing the low rate. 

Atlantic City is noted tor its fine hotels, and 
the committee has selected eight of the very 
best for recommendation to prospective visitors ; 
they are the Chalfoute, the Dennis, Haddon Hall, 
the Marlborough-Blenheim, the Rudolph, the St. 
Charles, the Strand and the Traymore. In writ- 
ing for accommodations, which should be engaged 
in advance, mention the National Hardwood 
Lumber Association. 

The following programme of events has been 
decided upon : 

Wednesday, 22d : Committees will meet In the 
evening, time and place to be determined upon 
by their chairmen. 

Thursday, 23d : Morning and afternoon ses- 
sions of convention on the Steel Pier. Regular 
business and speeches on important and Interest- 
ing subjects will be heard. 

Thursday evening : Smoker and entertainment 
will be tendered the members and guests at the 
Rudolph Grotto, at 8 P. M. Lunch and "other 
good things" will be served. Entertainment for 
the ladies will be furnished on the Pier at 8 
P. M. Music, special attractions, and a "cake 
walk." 

Friday, 24th : Morning and afternoon sessions 
on Pier. Morning excursion for the ladles along 
the bay and sound to Somers Point. In the even- 
ing there will be entertainment for all on the 
Pier, with music and a basketball contest. 

Building Operations for March. 

Building operations for March, as given in the 
report of the American Contractor of Chicago, 
while showing a gratifying and widely distributed 
building activity and a gain in thirty-one of the 
principal states of the United States as compared 
with the corresponding month of 1906, indicate 
a loss in twenty-one cities. This aggregate loss 
amounts to only three per cent, however. The 
greatest decrease reported is in the Manhattan 
and Bronx districts of New York, while Brooklyn 
shows an increase. Chicago shows a gain of 
thirty-three per cent. The total for March, 
1906, was $56,072,037. as compared with $54,- 
222,077 for March, 1907. 



New Chicago Hardwood House. 

The R. A. Hooton Lumber Company is the 
name of a new and desirable addition to the 
wholesale hardwood fraternity of Chicago. The 
company is under the management of R. A. 
Hooton. and has opened headquarters at 1052 
First National Bank building. It will specialize 
in poplar and chestnut. Mr. Hooton has had 
long experience in the lumber trade, both in the 
retail and jobbing business, and made his head- 
quarters for many years at Danville, 111. He 
will be heartily welcomed by the wholesale con- 
tingent of Chicago. 



24 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Lost, Strayed or Stolen? 

A further instance of slow delivei'y by rail- 
roads, which has of late become a serious 
menace to trade, has just come to hand, and 
as It is even more remarkable than any of the 
tales of woe yet told by lumbermen, It is worthy 
of repetition. 

A carload of lumber — the Southern Pacific 
railway's No. 17228 — arrived at Maiden, Mass., 
April 9, which has evidently been a wanderer 
over the face of the earth for nine years. It 
has been offered to one firm after another, but 
has been unable to find a home up to date, al- 
though it is now being temporarily sheltered by 
hospitable yard hands in Maiden. In identically 
the same box car in which it was first loaded, 
in 1898 at Bangor, X. Y., the lumber rests unmo- 
lested, with the original seal unbroken. It now 
bears the name of the Sw'eezey Lumber Company 
of Maiden, but that concern disclaims all knowl- 
edge of the shipment, and of course refuses to 
accept it, basing their contention that the car 
Is not for them on the ground that they were 
not in business nine years ago, and the bill of 
lading shows that it was consigned September 
12, 1898. The following day it put in an appear- 
ance at Rouse Point, N. Y., bearing a tag ad- 
dressed to the J. A. Shepard Lumber Company — 
which no one there knew, or had ever heard of. 
So once more it started on its weary way. On 
October 5 of that year it appeared in Burling- 
ton, Vt., but nobody wanted it, so it "went right 
In and turned around and went right out again." 
From that day to this it has traveled hither and 
thither — nobody knows where — until its sudden 
appearance in Maiden. 

The value of a load of lumber of the size and 
quality contained in the mysterious car would 
have about doubled its value in nine years, in 
addition to the fact that it would have become 
thoroughly seasoned. At the same time the use 
of it for so long a time would doubtless run up 
a pretty bill with the railroad companies, so it 
is a question whether the original consignee, 
should he ever step in and claim his own, would 
have a diamond mine or a gold brick on his 
hands. 



Important Decision, 

The supreme court of Virginia, sitting at 
Richmond, handed down on April 6 an impor- 
tant decision in the case of J. A. Wilkinson of 
Bristol vs. Norfolk & Western Railway Com- 
pany and Old Dominion Steamship Company, 
deciding a hitherto unadjudicated point and 
establishing a Judicial precedent of incalculable 
benefit to shippers not only in Virginia but all 
over the country. 

Mr. Wilkinson shipped a considerable amount 
of high class hardwood lumber to New York 
over the Norfolk & Western and Old Dominion 
lines. The lumber was delayed and when it 
reached New York the prices had dropped so 
that Mr. Wilkinson sustained a heavy loss. He 
brought suit in the law and chancery court at 
Norfolk against the Norfolk & Western and Old 
Dominion Steamship Company for damages. The 
companies would neither disclose upon which line 
the delay occurred and on a well established 
principle of law which they have hitherto plead 
successfully called upon the plaintiff to prove 
his case and show which one of them had 
caused the delay. This he could not do, as he 
was without proof, and the power of discovering 
this did not He with him. He won the case in 
the lower court, being the first time that a 
state court had repudiated the doctrine that a 
defendant cannot generally be made to disclose 
facts to his own detriment. The case then 
attracted the attention of shippers everywhere. 
The defendants appealed to the supreme court 
and the decision afiirming the judgment of the 
.-•ourt below was rendered by Judge Cardwell 
April 6. and in commenting on the case he used 
these words : "It would be a denial of justice, 
as it seems to us, if the law wirhheld from ship- 



pers, in such a case as this, the right of recov- 
ery, where from the nature of the case he Is 
powerless to trace the negligence to the particu- 
lar carrier concerned, and where, perhaps, by 
agreement between them, or collusion, each de- 
clines to introduce evidence to establish Its own 
freedom from negligence, because the establish- 
ment of this freedom from negligence of the 
one would place the fault on the other." 

The court further held that where a plaintiff 
establishes by evidence that there was a delay, 
this Is a prima facie case against the initial 
carrier and it must show itself free from negli- 
gence. 

The holding of the appellate tribunal is a 
very important one to shippers everywhere and 
will be cited in other states in analogous cases 
as a precedent upon this point which has here- 
tofore been without the light of judicial con- 
struction. 



A Big White Ash. 
W. T. Schnaufer of the Crescent Lumber Com- 
pany, Marietta, O., supplied the photograph 
from which the halftone reproduced herewith 
was made. This white ash tree, which was 5 
feet in diameter two and one-half feet from the 
ground, is a specimen of the timber growth on 
the Crescent Lumber Company's new timber 
holdings in West Virginia. The company pur- 



1 




^ ■ \> ''^^ft^H ^-*- ' 


ft 


1 




'9^SH^ 


H 


R 




i^HB 


ft 


1 




3 


1 



A BIG WEST VIRGINIA 'WHITE ASH. 

chased a few months ago 8.000 acres of timber 
land In Clay county. West Virginia, the prepon- 
derance of growth on the property being poplar, 
oak and chestnut. The company is already 
planning to commence active milling operations. 
Incidentally, the Crescent Lumber Company is 
engaged in moving its otEces from Harmer street 
in Marietta to the First National Bank build- 
ing, in which it has secured a handsome suite 
on the fifth floor, consisting of five rooms. 



The Fischer Lumber Company. 

The I-'lscher Lumber Company has been Incor- 
porated at Kewanee, 111., to manufacture lumber 
and wholesale it from Its sawmill, to be located 
about twelve miles from Sikeston, Mo. The 
company will be thoroughly organized in the 
immediate future, and will first establish a large 
mill on property which it owns on the main line 
of the Frisco railroad, about a hundred miles 
south of St. Louis. Upon the land owned by 
this company cypress, oak, gum, ash, sycamore 
and other hardwoods grow in abundance. The 
demand Is such that the company already has 
offers for all the lumber it can make. A switch 
from the Frisco line will be Installed to facili- 
tate shipping. The Incorporators of the new 
company are John Fischer, W. E. Gould and 
F. H. Davis of Kewanee. 



Maple Sugar Production. 

When the early spring days come on, followed 
by the usual cold nights, the sap begins to flow 
In trees, and the maple sugar season Is "on." 
In olden times the farmers made thousands of 



"spiles'* of willow, mountain ash, alder or other 
wood with a pithy center. TTiese spiles were 
sticks about six inches In length, cut and shaped 
so one end could be driven Into a hole made in 
the tree, while the other end was cut so as to 
form an open spout. The farmers and their 
help worked at odd times all winter forming 
these tools and burning out the pith with hot 
irons. Then when the weather Indicated a run 
of sap men would go through the woods and 
tap the selected trees a few feet from the 
ground. A hole an inch or more In diameter 
was bored to receive the spile, and a bucket 
placed to receive the drippings. Ancient as is 
this method of tapping, some farmers still em- 
ploy It, although now there are galvanized iron 
spouts on the market which fit into the tree at 
one end and into a covered pail at the other. 

Every night and morning sleds drawn by 
heavy draft horses and containing large tubs 
or tanks pass around among the trees : the driv- 
ers take the pails and pour their accumulated 
contents into the tubs, which are returned to 
the boiling cabin. After gathering up the sap 
in the morning, the teams are usually kept busy 
hauling wood for the fires, which must be ke^t 
at a steady heat day and night during the whole 
process of making the sugar. 

For many years farmers boiled the maple 
sap in the open air, in kettles supported on 
rocks : later they adopted a cabin made of rough 
logs, or merely a sort of shed with bark thatch. 
At the present time throughout the maple for- 
ests in New England may be found well equipped 
sugar houses, containing huge kettles set in 
brick, over open furnaces or fireplaces, and con- 
nected by a conveyor pipe running across them. 
The sap is poured into a huge vat, also in the 
circuit, and the conveyor Is provided with 
valves which permit Its distribution into all or 
part of the kettles, as desired. Benches and 
tables are provided for the comfort of occu- 
pants, and the fires under the kettles keep the 
abode warm and pleasant. An expert sugar 
maker Is usually in charge of each boiling 
house, and never leaves it until the end of the 
season. Each vessel has to be carefully and 
continually watched: If the maker does not stir 
the boiling sap enough, or correctly, or if he 
stirs it too much, the result will be disastrous 
in that the sugar will be burned or otherwise 
ruined. It takes a trained and practiced eye to 
recognize the precise moment when the boiling 
mass should be run off into moulds and hardened 
for the sugar market, for if syrup be too thin 
It will not command a good price, and if too 
thick the unnecessary loss will be considerable. 
When the expert decides that the liquid is 
"right" — which he does by testing large spoon- 
fuls of it In pans of snow till the right consis- 
tency appears — he draws It off Into moulds, each 
of which holds just the amount to make the 
proper sized cake of sugar, or into tin cans 
with corks and screw tops to hold the liquid 
form. 

It is a well known fact that many manufac- 
turers make their actual maple product go 
twice as far as do others, by purchasing large 
quantities of brown sugar and boiling it up 
with the sap — thus often using only one-third 
or even less of the genuine product. Of course, 
their output Is very materially increased in this 
way, but the experienced buyer can detect the 
fraud, and they cannot command nearly so high 
a price for their goods as do manufacturers 
who put out "the real thing." The new pure 
food law should tend to curtail this practice to 
a great extent, as it will now be necessary for 
makers to label their product so that the exact 
percentage of adulterating material contained 
therein may be seen by a glance at the wrapper 
or can : it should also prevent retail buyers hav- 
ing to pay a fancy price for adulterated map'e. 
which the expert wholesale buyer has obtained 
at Its real value from the manufacturer. 

The maple sugar and syrup industry is much 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



25 



more extensive than is commonly l^nowc. Ver- 
mont produces the largest quantity — nearly 
5,000.000 pounds a year. New Yorlc comes next, 
with an output of about 4,000,000 pounds. Penn- 
sylvania makes about 1,500,000 pounds; Michi- 
gan, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and West 
Virginia come next, in the order given, each 
producing several hundred thousand pounds. 
For the year 1903 the maple sugar and syrup 
product of this country aggregated a market 
value of ?2,636,774. 



Removal Lumber Insurance Companies. 

sis years ago the organization of an insur- 
ance association to be devoted exclusively to the 
purpose of insuring lumber and woodworking 
risks, was commenced in a very modest way at 
66 Broadway, New York. The idea took very 
rapidly with the lumber trade, with the result 




THE NEW ROYAL INSURANCE BUILDING, 

NEW YORK. HOME OF LUMBER 

INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

that an unprecedented support was accorded the 
new organization and very rapid growth ensued. 

From this small beginning there were subse- 
quently organized three stock insurance com- 
panies, two of them under the New York state 
laws and one under the laws of the state of 
Ohio. These are the Lumber Insurance Com- 
pany, capital and surplus $300,000 ; the Adiron- 
dack Fire Insurance Company, capital and sur- 
plus $300,000 ; and the Toledo Fire & Marine 
Insurance Company, capital $100,000. 

These companies are under the management 
of the Lumber Insurers' General Agency. 
Through the support of the lumber trade 
throughout the United States and Canada the 
companies have developed to such an extent that 
they now have aggregate assets in excess of 
$1,000,000, and stand responsible to the lumber 



trade for over $20,000,000 insurance liability on 
lumber and woodworking risks. 

During this period of development the com- 
panies have extended their ofSce space until a 
large part of the twelfth floor of the Manhattan 
Life building at 66 Broadway has been taken 
for their offices. Over a year ago, however, it 
appeared that the companies would unquestion- 
ably outgrow the available space in the Man- 
hattan Life building, and it being considered 
desirable to locate in the insurance district, a 
floor in the Royal Insurance building, then in 
process of construction, was leased. The new 
Royal Insurance building has now been com- 
pleted and it is worthy of mention that having 
been constructed by one of the greatest Are in- 
surance companies in the world, it is quite 
natural that every feature of construction look- 
ing toward Are prevention has been Installed in 
the building. It is a flne modern fireproof build- 
ing, sixteen stories high. The twelfth floor has 
been finished with special reference to the re- 
quirements of the Lumber Insurance Company of 
New York and the Adirondack Fire Insurance 
Company, and these companies will take posses- 
sion of their new quarters April 20. It is quite 
fitting that these two specializing companies, 
organized on a financial basis on a par with 
many of the general insurance companies, should 
have for their permanent home the finest lum- 
ber insurance office in the world. 

With 5,000 feet of floor space, private offices 
for all oflicers and heads of departments, large, 
light rooms for clerical work and stenography, 
the new quarters of the lumber insurance com- 
panies have been laid out with a view to per- 
manency and to accommodating a business which 
will ultimately attain very large proportions. 

America has been foremost in the movement 
for specializing insurance, and it is a credit to 
the lumber trade that no single trade or indus- 
try supports insurance companies of its own 
equal in size and strength to those maintained by 
the lumber trade. 



Utilization of Electric Power. 

Everyone has heard about the utilization of 
the vast electric power now being developed 
thiMuyh the aid of Niagara Falls, and that the 
street car system and nearly all other immediate 
users of power at Buffalo employ this wonderful 
force. Among others who have recently installed 
electric power for driving their plant is the E. & 
I!. Holmes Machinery Company, the demand for 
its line of tools having outgrown the steam 
power formerly employed. The company has in- 
stalled a full equipment of electric motors and 
April 8 turned on the new power to run its plant. 
The company figures that this new equipment 
will enable it to increase its facilities to such 
an extent that in future it will be able to make 
even more prompt delivery than formerly. In 
this issue of the Record the E. & B. Holmes 
Machinery Company advertises one of its best 
known appliances, its gang ripping and straight- 
ening machine, which is of especial interest to 
hardwood users. 



Removal of Page Lumber Company. 

The R. G. Page Lumber Company of South 
Bend, Ind., manufacturer and wholesaler of all 
varieties of hardwoods and of dimension stock, 
has moved its main offices and extensive yards 
to Ashland, Ky. RoUo G. Page, head of the 
house, will move to the new location, as will 
also C. E. Wilson, traffic manager. This move 
was considered necessary on account of the 
company's big timber interests in Kentucky and 
West Virginia and in view of the fact that for 
more than a year it has been operating yards 
and office at Ashland. It is thought that the 
entire business can be handled with greater dis- 
patch and advantage from a point in close 
proximity to these interests. 

Mr. Page located in South Bend about eight 
years ago, and was a member of the firm of 



Martin & Page. A little over two years ago 
the firm dissolved and Mr. Page operated under 
the name of the R. G. Page Lumber Company. 
Yards were maintained on South Main street 
and offices in the American Trust building. The 
former will be closed out, but a sales office In 
charge of John Martin will be continued in the 
same location. 



An Endorsement. 

A concern which is constantly receiving the 
most flattering testimonials from well known 
lumbermen regarding the excellence and utility 
of its product is the Gordon Hollow Blast Grate 
Company of Greenville, Mich. Recently the J. 
B. Galloway Company of Clarendon, Ark., In- 
stalled a set of their grates, which they have 
thoroughly tested, and unhesitatingly say la 
especially well adapted to burning all sorta of 
refuse, thus saving their wood, and effecting a 
saving of from $1,000 to $1,500 a year ; they 
also find that it is an easy matter to keep ample 
steam with "any old thing in the shape of fuel" 
and explain that their two boilers run five 
engines, the capacity of the boilers being just 
equal to that of the engines, without any sur- 
plus whatever. To say that they are highly 
pleased with their investment in the Gordon 
grate is to put it mildly, and they unhesitatingly 
recommend it. 



Removal of Headquarters. 

The American Woodworking Machinery Com- 
pany, whose general offices have been at 136 Lib- 
erty street, New York, for several years, has 
removed to a permanent location at 596 Lyell 
avenue, Rochester, N. Y. The company's new 
and principal manufacturing plant recently com- 
pleted at Rochester is the largest woodworking 
machinery plant in the world, and covers ten 
acres. The company operates six other Important 
factories. 

Atkins Sa'ws for Alaska. 

E. C. Atkins & Co., the Silver Steel saw peo- 
ple, have just secured a very interesting order 
through their Seattle branch. This consists of 
the complete saw equipment for five sawmills 
which will be constructed and placed at diCfer- 
ent points along the line of the Alaska Pacific 
Railway & Terminal Company, in southeastern 
Alaska. The saws were shipped from Seattle 
on the steamer Yucatan and will be taken into 
the country over snow and ice. Many large 
trestles will be necessary in the building of the 
road and piles and pile drivers will be used 
extensively. Piers are now in the course of 
construction at Cataila and other points. The 
road opens valuable territory from the Marten 
islands through the Copper river country to the 
Yukon river, a distance of 500 miles. 

Miscellaneous Notes. 

The Ford Lumber & Manufacturing Company 
of Ford, Ky., filed suit recently against the L. iS: 
N. railroad for nearly $12,000 as damages. When 
the first tide in the Kentucky river came last 
fall the run of logs was one of the largest In the 
history of the river. At that time the railroad 
company was building a new bridge across the 
river at Ford. The false work supporting the 
bridge caught the floating logs and caused an 
immense jam of nearly 100,000 logs. The lumber 
company alleges that its booms were crowded 
out of the river by this jam and that it lost 
thousands of logs in consequence. 

The Swarthmore Lumber Company of Parsons, 
W. Va., has purchased the interests of J. Scott 
Bell, including three tracts and a lumber plant 
on the Dry Fork railroad, in Tucker county, for 
$162,831. The purchasing company, which was 
formed last February, will operate the plant on 
an extensive scale. Summerfield Baldwin, a 
prominent capitalist of Baltimore, is at the head 
of the company. 

The exceedingly high prices of standing timber 
at the present time have induced farmers and 
land owners to sell their holdings, and little 
mills have been busy this season cutting on 



26 



HARDWOOD lECORD 



small lots ot trees throughout the north country. 
This has been quite a feature of the lumber in- 
dustry in the vicinity of Saginaw, Mich., where 
a great number of small mills were in operation 
on farms and wood lots. 

The Standard Parlor Frame Company of Chi- 
cago has filed an amendment to its charter in- 
creasing its capital stock from $9,000 to $26,000. 

Leonard L.. Shertzer has recently engaged 
in business at Mobile, Ala., where he will 
market a fine line of hardwoods which are 
manufactured at his mill at Merrill. Miss. 

The Timpson Handle Company ot Timpson. 
Texas., has been incorporated with $10,000 
capital stock to manufacture handles and 
wagon timbers. The company started opera- 
tions March 1 in a new and thoroughly 
equipped factory. H. H. Fory is manager. 

The Boice-Grogan Lumber Company, whose 
plant at Lexington, Ky., was destroyed by 
flre recently, plans the erection of a new saw- 
mill and veneer factory on which will be ex- 
pended $30,000. The plant will have a daily 
capacity of 20,000 feet. 

Fire destroyed the plant of the W. E. Will- 
lams Company, large manufacturers of maple 
flooring at Traverse City, Mich., recently. 
The loss is estimated at $60,000. with $29,000 



insurance. The property destroyed included 
the manufacturing plant proper, a consider- 
able amount of valuable ^machinery, four dry 
kilns, and large quantities of maple lumber. 
It is announced that the plant wmU be rebuilt 
and will be ready for operation in about three 
months. 

The Peabody Lumber Company of Colum- 
bia City. Ind.. has bought of Henry Smith a 
232-acre farm in De Kalb county, paying for 
it $18,200. The land is heavily wooded with 
black walnut. 

The United Walnut Company of Ft. Smith 
is shipping two car loads of walnut logs a 
day tor export to Germany, where they are 
made up into furniture. Black w.ilnut is 
more highly prized abroad for this purpose 
than in the United States, especially the wood 
which shows a curly grain; only about one 
stump in two hundred supplies this variety, 
however. 

The Southwestern Lumber Company ot Lake 
Charles. La., lately purchased 32,000 acres of 
fine hardwood timber land in Calcasieu and 
Avoyelles parishes, the consideration being 
something over $300,000. The property is said 
to contain some of the finest hardwood timber 
in that section of the country. 



Hardwood NeWs. 

(By HARDWOOD BECOBD Special Corrsspondents.) 



Chicago. 
W. E. Douglass of the Crosby & Beckley 
Company, Columbus, 0., was an agreeable 
caller at the Record office on the 24th inst. 

O. B, Law. who has been engaged in the 
sale of timber lands for several years at 
Detroit, Mich., and is one of the well known 
and successful operators in this line, has con- 
cluded to widen his opportunities by a re- 
moval to Chicago, and has opened an otBce at 
85 Dearborn Street. Mr. LaWa specialty is 
handling going yellow' pine and hardwood 
operations. 

L. P. Arthur ot the .\rthur Hardwood Floor- 
ing Company of Memphis, well known pro- 
ducers of oak flooring, has been spending the 
last ten days in Chicago, organizing plans for 
the distribution of his product in this market. 

Paul Johnson of the North Shore Lumber 
Company, of Thompson, and S. G. MeClellan 
of the Earle Lumber Company of Simmons. 
Mich., two Northern Peninsula operators, were 
welcome callers at the RECoitD office this week. 
Both these gentlemen are specialists in birch 
production and are much pleased over the 
advancing prices this variety of lumber is 
commanding. 

Charles H. Barnaby, the hardwood lumber- 
man of Greencastle and president of the Indi- 
ana Hardwood Lumbermen's Association, was 
a Chicago visitor last week. 

W. H. Russe. president of the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association, spent some 
time at the association's headquarters in this 
city last week. 

R. J. Clark of the Peninsula Bark & Lumber 
Company, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., was in 
town last week. He reports that the largest 
part of his hardwood and hemlock stock on 
hand has been sold. 

Among recent Chicago visitors from Wis- 
consin were A. R. Owen of Owen, George H. 
Chapman of Stanley, and M. J. Quinlan of 
Soperton. 

Theo. Schneider, northern purchasing agent 
for the Brunswick-Balke^Coliender Company, 
."pent several days in Chicago last week. 

Joel B. Ettinger, manager of the Chicago 
branch of the S. A. Woods Machine Company, 
spent several days in Michigan last week, and 
met with his usual success in making sales 
of the high-class machines manufactured by 
his house. 



Charles F. Braftcit. vice-president of the 
Simonds Manufacturing Company and man- 
ager of its Chicago saw factory, is absent on 
a southern trip for business and pleasure. 

George Greer, purchasing agent for the 
Joyce-Watliins Company of Chicago, is south 
on a buying trip. 

Lewis Doster, secretary of the Hardwood 
Manufacturers' Association of the United 
States, has just issued a revised edition of the 
inspection rules of his association, wliicli for 
the first time includes the new rules of the 
Michigan Hardwood Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion covei'ing northern hardwoods. These 
books are supplied free on application to the 
association headquarters— First National Bank 
Building. Chicago. 

Jerome G. Leavitt. vice-president of the 
Leavitt Lumber Company, returned last week 
from an extended southern trip. 

The Record is in receipt of a letter from 
John H. Lank, secretary of the Lumbermen's 
Excliange of Philadelphia, announcing that a 
vote of thanks was extended to the Hardwood 
Record for copies of the paper furnished the 
Exchange during the past year. 

Ryan & McParland have removed their yards 
from the corner of Blue Island Avenue and 
Robey Street, where they have been located 
ever since they started in business, to Twenty- 
second and Laflin Streets, the site of the John 
O'Brien Land & Lumber Company's old yard. 

The John O'Brien Land & Lumber Company 
is now nicely situated in commodious ofllces 
at 185 Dearborn Street. 

Owing to the illness of his brother. Ben W. 
Davis, who superintends operation of the 
John R. Davis Lumber Company at Phillips, 
Wis.. John R. Davis of this city has been 
spending most of his time at Phillips per- 
sonally overseeing work at the big plant. 

Irvine McCauley of the MeCauley-Saunders 
Lumber Company. Fisher Building, this city, 
has left for a fortnight's visit to the cypress 
mills of Louisiana. 

Clarence Boyle, an expert hardwood lumber- 
man who has long been connected with tlie 
trade of this city, has recently resigned his 
position with the Chicago Car Lumber Com- 
pany and has obtained an interest in the 
Heath-Witbeck Company of the Willoughby 
Building. As vice-president and manager of 
the company Mr. Boyle will have sufficient 



opportunity to display his energy and ability. 
His connection with the concern is thought 
especially advantageous at this time owing 
to the prolonged illness of Mr. Wolfe, secre- 
tary of the company, and to the inability of 
Mr. Heath, president, to give his attention 
to the details of business because of his long 
absences from the eity. Mr. Wolfe is steadily 
improving in health, and although he is able 
to be out. he is not yet strong enough to 
supei-intend the sales department, which is his 
special duty. 

The steamer Louis Pahlow and consort 
Delta, belonging to the Edward Hines Lumber 
Company of Chicago, were driven ashore at 
Clay Banks, near Sturgeon Bay, Wi.s., April 
15, during a snowstorm. An alarm was sent 
to the life-saving station at the latter place, 
and the crew went out overland tor the wreck. 
They succeeded in saving the entire crew 
without loss of life, although the steamer is 
totally wrecked. The Delta escaped serious 
injury. 

A new concern in Chicago is the Chicago 
Wood Turning Company, recently incorporated 
with $10,000 capital stock. 

Secretary Fish of the National Hardwood 
Lumber Association is figuring on arranging for 
a special train to run from Chicago to Atlantic 
City over the Pennsylvania lines, to carry 
those who wish to attend the annual meeting 
May 23 and 24. The plan is to have visitors 
from northern Indiana, 'W'isconsin and Michi- 
gan join with the local contingent and go to 
the eastern meeting in a body. On the basis 
of the plans now contemplated the special 
train will leave Chicago at noon. May 23. 

John N. Penrod, the black walnut king of 
Kansas City, was a Chicago visitor on 
April 23. 

Oscar H. Babcock of E. V. Babcock & Co.. 
Pittsburg, was in Chicago last Tuesday. 

John N. Bonnell, treasurer of the Hackley- 
Phelps-Bonnell Company of Grand Rapids. 
Mich., spent last Tuesday in the city on his 
way home from a Pacific coast trip that has oc- 
cupied several months. Dm-ing his absence Mi". 
Bonnell has cruised a good many thousand 
acres of timber in Oregon, and is figuring 
on timber deals of considerable magnitude in 
that state. 

Lewis Doster, secretary of the Hardwooil 
Manufacturers' Association of the United 
States, is in the South on association work. 

Upham & Agler, the well known Chicago 
jobbing house, of the American Trust Build- 
ing, has practically concluded purchases of 
its season's stock. Between its northern and 
southern lumber holdings the company has 
secured an aggregate of nearly 40,000,000 feet, 
which puts it in a very enviable position in 
the market. 

F. E. Creelmun, who was recently defend- 
ant in a suit in which he was charged with 
assisting in the wrecking of the Bank of 
America, has been declared by the jury not 
guilty. The president. vice-president and 
cashier of the bank were declared guilty, and 
the first two will receive a penitentiary sen- 
tence, while the cashier will escape with a 
fine. 

Boston. 

Boston wholesalers state that several large 
consumers of hardwoods are carrying such 
small stocks that their • purchasing agents 
have visited Boston personally which, in sev- 
eral instances, is unusual. Among the buyers 
were those from the Heywood Bros, and John 
A. Dunn Sons. Gardiner. The purchasing 
agent for the latter concern stopped in Boston 
en route for New York. 

The hardwood division of the Metropolitan 
Exchange of Boston held its meeting in the 
rooms of the exchange, Tuesday, April 23. 

Frederick B. Cole, treasurer of the National 
Wholesale Lumber Dealers' Association, vis- 
ited Boston last week. 



HARDVvOOD RECORD 



27 



Charles W. Leatherbee of the C. W. Leather- 
bee Lumber Company, Boston, has returned 
from a southern trip. 

The firm of H. A. Grimwood & Co. ot 
Providence, met with a fire recently, wliich 
destroyed their stocli of sash, doors and 
blinds. Messrs. Grimwood, senior and junior, 
liave been in the West buying to replace this 
stock. 

The plant of the Greenwich Sash & Blind 
Company, Greenwich, Conn., which was re- 
cently destroyed by fire, will be rebuilt. 

F. W. Henry has been appointed manager 
of the Pittsfield branch of the Blakeslee 
Lumber Company of Albany. This company 
has recently decided to open a brancli in 
Pittsfield. 



New York. 

The Wayne Lumber Company, wholesaler in 
hardwoods at Manhattan, has removed to more 
commodious quarters in the Importers and 
Traders' Building, 24-2G Stone street, city, where 
it has much better facilities for taking care of 
its increasing business. 

J. W. Hussey, well known hardwood lumber 
and log exporter, who for years has been located 
at 1 Broadway, Manhattan, has removed to 59 
Pearl street. 

The forthcoming second annual golf tourna- 
ment to be held by the Lumbermen's Golf Asso- 
ciation at the Baltimore Country Club, June 12 
and 13, is going to be a fine affair, and Secretary 
Henry Cape of 1 Madison avenue. New York, 
urgently requests all lumbermen throughout the 
country who are enthusiasts of this sport to 
enter the contest this year by sending in their 
applications to him. W. D. Gill, the prominent 
Baltimore lumberman, is president of the asso- 
ciation and has been made a committee of one 
for the entire arrangements for the approaching 
contest. A large number of handsome prizes will 
he played for and handicaps arranged on such a 
basis as will give every one an excellent oppor- 
uuuty of winning. 

Prancis E. Southard, well known lumljerman 
of this city, on April committed suicide at bis 
residence in the Ehinelander Apartment. Ho 
has been in ill health for several years. 

Brooklyn is the banner borough of Greater 
New York in the matter of building activities for 
this year. For the first three months ot 1007 
.the gain over 1906 was about $4,500,000. 

Hamilton V. Meeks, head of the Gardner & 
Meeks Company, Weehawkeu, N. .L, accompanied 
by his wife and daughter, arrived on April 10 
after an extended European trip. 

Hugh McLean of the Hugh McLean Lumber 
Company, Buffalo, X. Y.. has been spending sev- 
eral days in town during the fortnight in the 
interest of business and visiting with his local 
representative, C. B. Cox. 

F. J. Cronin, eastern representative ot the 
Y'ellow Poplar Lumber Company of Coal Grove, 
O., has been in town on one of his regular sell- 
ing trips. He reports the jjoplar market as very 
active, with prices stiff. 

Gilbert H. Shepard, cypress wholesaler of 29 
Broadway, announces his removal to the Bruns- 
wick Building, Twenty-sixth street and Fifth 
avenue, 

John Bossert, Louis Bossert & Son, big Brook- 
lyn house, has just returned from a pleasure trip 
to the popular Florida winter resorts, 

J, C. Turner of the J. C. Turner Cypress Lum- 
ber Company, 1123 Broadway, has just returned 
from an extended tour of the south in the inter- 
est of business. 

Thomas A. Murphey of the Murphey-Hardy 
Lumber Company, Newark. N. J., arrived in port 
last week after a two months' Mediterranean 
tour, accompanied by Mrs. Murphey. 

S. F. Alinter. hardwoods, 1 Broadway, is main- 
taining a branch wholesale hardwood distributing 
yard at Asheville, N. C, which is a convenience 
greatly appreciated by his customers. 

The New Jersey State Senate passed a new 



railroad demurrage bill on April 11, providing 
that when owners or consignees of freight re- 
fuse to accept the same and pay charges the 
railroads may after three days impose a charge 
of not more than §1 per day for detention of 
each car or for the use of the track occupied. 
Sunday is not included in the demurrage limita- 
lions and the companies are allowed one hour a 
day for the moving ot cars for train operation 
purposes. The railroads are also to have the 
right of lien of property where demurrage 
charges are not paid, although in disputes the 
property may be removed by the filing of a bond. 

The regular annual meeting of the New York 
Lumber Trade Association was held at the asso- 
ciation rooms. IS Broadway, on April 10 and was 
largely attended. The Hoban & Curtis Lumber 
Company, 1 Madison avenue, was elected to mem- 
bership, and the membership of the Hull Lum- 
ber Company was transferred to G. H. Perley & 
Co. New committees were appointed by the 
president and were confirmed by the board of 
trustees. A fitting resolution of condolence was 
I>assed concerning the death of the late Russell 
Johnson of Johnson Bros.. Brooklyn, who was for 
many years a respected member of the organiza- 
tion and of the board of trustees. A committee 
was also appointed to nominate officers for elec- 
tion at the annual meeting in October next. 

John Woyka of John Woyka & Co., Limited, 
extensive mahogany timber and veneer mer- 
chants, Glasgow, Scotland, arrived in New York 
last week to visit the principal manufacturing 
points in the United States and Canada, buying 
poplar, walnut and oak. 



Philadelphia. 

The auutuil meeting of the Lumbermen's Ex- 
change was held on April 11. The attendance 
was large and the usual zest was manifested 
in all the i)roceedings. Edwin B. Malone of 
Watson Malone & Sons was elected chairman of 
the meeting and John H. Lank secretary. Busi- 
ness reports were read by the different commit- 
tees, after which the secretary, John H. Lank, 
read an exhaustive history of the association 
during the two decades of its existence. A 
most interesting report of the year's doings then 
followed by George F. Craig, the retiring presi- 
dent. The officers elected for the coming year 
are William L. Rice of T. B. Rice & Sons Com- 
pany, president ; Frederick S. Underbill ot Wis- 
tar. Underbill & Co., vice president ; Charles P. 
Maule, treasurer, and John H. Lank, secretary. 

The annual banquet of the Lumbermen's Ex- 
change, an exceptionally brilliant affair, was 
held at the Union League on April 11, with 139 
guests present. The banquet was followed by 
an address by the ex-president, George F. Craig, 
who then introduced William L, Rice, the new 
president, who responded with an interesting 
talk, interspersed with humorous anecdotes. Mar- 
tin G. Brumbaugh, superintendent of public 
schools, was orator of the evening. His address 
was particularly Interesting, as he had spent 
his youth in a lumber camp and was thus able 
to discourse eloquently on the secrets of the lum- 
ber trade. Justin Peters, manager of the Penn- 
sylvania Lumbermen's Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, followed with an interesting and in- 
structive speech. E. F. Perry, secretary of the 
Xatioual Wholesale Lumber Dealers' Associa- 
tion, spoke next, after whom Frederick S. Under- 
hill, the newiy elected vice president, wound up 
with a humorous address. 

A synopsis of the history of the I^umbermen's 
Exchange taken from the interesting report of 
the secretary, John H. Lank, shows the first 
meeting to have been held on Feb. 13, 1886, 
and a charter was granted under the present 
style on April IT, 1886. Laws were adopted 
May 20, 1880. These were revised in 1888, 
1898 and 1906. 

The first election of oflicers was on May 27, 
1886, and resulted as follows: For president, 
William M. Lloyd ; first vice president, Charles 



W. Henry ; second vice president, Charles M. 
Betts ; treasurer, Edwin H. Coane. The total 
number of members at this time was 49 ; since 
then 193 have been added, but 106 have with- 
drawn, leaving the present membership 136, the 
largest in its history. Of the original members, 
27 are still associated with the exchange, 25 
as active and 2 as honorary members. 

John W. Coles has recently been on a stock 
bunt in the South, where he made some con- / 
nections for North Carolina pine, also contracted 
for some good hardwoods in Bristol, Tenn. He 
is receiving considerable of his goods by water 
and is expecting some barges of lumber from 
North Carolina in a few days. 

Wistar, Underbill & Co., always in the front 
row of hustlers, have no fault to find with 
trade conditions. R. W. Nixon of this firm is on 
a selling trip in New York City and H. E. Bates 
has just returned from New York state, bringing 
in a good bunch of orders. This firm recently 
made a deal to handle the entire output of the 
Pigeon River Lumber Company near Newport, 
Cocke county, Tenn., which will run about 25,- 
000,000 feet of poplar, oak, chestnut, spruce 
and hemlock per annum. 

Among the recent visitors to the city are 
George A. Mitchell of White, Gratwick & Mitch- 
ell, Incorporated, of North Tonawanda, N. Y., 
and George B. Breon and John Coleman ot 
Williamsport, Pa. 

The many friends of George Nass of George 
Nass & Son will be sorry to learn that he is 
confined to his home with typhoid fever. A 
speedy recovery is hoped for. 

E. B. Hayman of W. H. Fritz & Co. has been 
confined to his home for some time, it is re- 
ported, threatened with typhoid fever. As he is 
possessed of a strong constitution it is hoped 
that he will throw off the trouble. 

li. M. Smith & Co. do not seem inclined to 
push for orders. They are confining themselves 
mainly to clearing up back orders as fast as 
railroad facilities will allow. Their mills are 
actively preparing stock. B. C. Currie, Jr., 
Philadelphia manager ot this concern, reports 
things moving along a little quietly at this 
time ; he is watching developments as the spring 
opens. 

A large quantity of timber was recently de- 
stroyed by forest fires near Pottsville, Pa., and 
through the lower section of Schuylkill county. 
The loss will be heavy. 

Fire in the plant of the Keystone Cabinet 
Works' at Chester, Pa., on April 13, caused a 
loss estimated at $15,000. 

A report comes from Reading, Pa., that the 
480 acres of timber land owned by A. Thal- 
heimer. which is being cut at the rate of 30,000 
feet daily, will be converted into cigar boxes. 

Two hundred acres of timber land were re- 
cently destroyed by fire on the Nescopec Moun- 
tain near Bloomsburg, Pa. 

The Sbamokin Wagon Works, an adjoining 
planing mill and some dwellings at Sbamokin, 
Pa., were recently destroyed by fire, causing a 
loss estimated at $75,000. 

Fire destroyed the woodwork manufactory of 
William Russell of this city on April 17, com- 
pletely gutting the plant ; the loss is placed at 
$20,000, 

The Bruce-Bock Lumber Company was incor- 
porated under Pennsylvania laws on April 11 
with authorized capital $10,000. Principal office 
Conway, Pa. Incorporators are C. R. Bruce, 
II. J. Bock of Conway, Pa., J. A. Davis, W. A. 
Reader of Baden, Pa., and J. A. McNutt of 
Freedom, Pa. 

Owen M. Bruner of Owen M. Bruner Com- 
pany, a very busy concern, has no complaint to 
make in the way of business complications. The 
company has engaged J. A. Finley as salesman to 
look after the Metropolitan and Baltimore terri- 
tory. Mr. Finley was formerly with Henson & 
Pearson. He will handle specially maple floor- 
ing and yellow pine timber. Mr. Bruner and' 



28 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Mr. Flnley have recently returned from an ex- 
tended tour in the South and Northwest, visit- 
ing their various connections and familiarizing 
themselves with stocks and conditions. Mr. 
Bruner reports the mills all active and that he 
is looking forward to good summer trading. 

The Paul W. Fleck Lumber Company has re- 
moved its office from 704 Real Estate Trust 
building to 322 North American building. 

The Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Com- 
pany recently issued a notice that on account of 
the proposed elevating of its road through the 
upper section of the city the freight yards at 
Huntingdon and Broad streets, and Tenth and 
Berks, will be abandoned on June 1. They have 
since announced that it is probable a yard will 
be opened at Seventeenth street and Indiana 
avenue. At the railroad company's office they 
assert that it has not been decided as yet as to 
whether the same privileges at the old yards will 
be allowed at the new one ; but nothing definite 
can be ascertained for a week or two. 

The National Hardwood Lumber Association 
is looking forward to a big time at its tenth 
annual convention to be held at Atlantic City, 
N. J., on May 23 and 24. The committees have 
■been hard at it under the able leadership of 
C. E. Lloyd, Jr.. and B. C. Currie. Jr., of the 
committee of arrangements which has issued a 
neat booklet containing programme, excellent 
views of Atlantic City scenery, board walk, 
hotels, etc., together with full information as to 
railroad tickets, hours of departure from New 
York and Philadelphia, rates per day at all the 
leading hotels, etc., supplemented with a con- 
cise history of the National Hardwood Lumber 
Association. 

Baltimore. 

In compliance with action taken at the last 
annual meeting of the National Lumber Export- 
ers' Association in Norfolk, Secretary E. M. 
Terry has sent to members the draft of a letter 
which they are asked to use as a model in com- 
municating with their correspondents abroad 
relative to the shipping of lumber on consign- 
ment. The letter asks that members request 
their European representatives to desist, and 
use their best efforts to influence others to de- 
sist from soliciting consignments from mills and 
wholesale merchants in this country ; also that 
they stop the promiscuous circulation in the 
United States of brokers' circulars. It was the 
opinion of those present that sending out this 
letter as a copy for exporters to follow in com- 
municating with foreign brokers would be more 
effective as a means of combatting the practice 
of shipping on consignment than any other that 
might be attempted. A meeting of the special 
committee on Liverpool measurement is to be 
held on April 26 in the rooms of Secretary 
Terry. The committee includes George D. Bur- 
gess of Russe & Burgess, Memphis, Tenn. ; Har- 
vey M. Dixon of the Dixon Lumber Company, 
Norfolk, Va., and George M. Spiegle of George 
M. Spiegle & Co. of Philadelphia. 

Michael S. Baer of the hardwood firm of Rich- 
ard P. Baer ,& Co., in the Keyset building, this 
city, is away on a trip to the mill operated by 
the firm at Mobile, Ala. He will return by way 
of Cincinnati and other cities, paying close at- 
tention to the business situation in each place 
visited. The mill at Mobile is now running full 
time, and lumber is being turned out to the 
limit of its capacity, there being orders in hand 
for all the stocks that can be obtained. 

William M. Burgan is at Eddy Lake, S. C, 
looking after the operations of the Eddy Lake 
Cypress Company, in which he is largely inter- 
ested. He may also stop in North Carolina, 
where he has extensive interests in connection 
with the Pigeon River Lumber Company. In 
consideration of his services rendered to the 
Retail Lumber Dealers' Association Mr. Burgan 
has been presented with a handsome mahogany 
desk and office chair. Mr. Burgan, though a 



wholesaler, took a deep interest in the work of 
bringing the retailers together and largely 
through his efforts the organization was ef- 
fected. 

William B. Tllghman, one of the most exten- 
sive lumber and sawmill operators in Maryland 
and head of the William B. Tllghman Company 
of Salisbury, Md., died there on April 13, after 
an illness of several years. He had been 
active in business until his last sickness, but 
continued to take a great interest in the affairs 
of the company, which conducts a sawmill at 
Salisbury and operates other enterprises. Mr. 
Tilghman was twice married and leaves seven 
children, William B., Jr., being the only son. 
The deceased organized the Salisbury National 
bank and otherwise worked hard to build up the 
town. 

On April 14 fire in the chair factory of James 
McDonough & Co., 744-746 East Lombard street, 
this city, caused a loss of $15,000, and for a 
time placed the National Casket Company's big 
plant, just across the street. In danger. The 
loss is fully covered by insurance. 



PittsTsurg. 

The Pittsburg Hardwood Door Company, which 
was organized three months ago from the busi- 
ness of the Paine Lumber Company, Ltd., and 
A. G. Breitwiser & Co., is carrying a stock of 
10,000 hardwood veneer doors in its quarters in 
the big Terminal warehouse on the South Side. 
The company occupies seven floors, 20x155 feet 
each, and in addition to its stock of doors has a 
large stock of rails, balusters, molding, etc. 

The Clay-Schoppe Lumber Company is in its 
new offices at 1015 House building, where it has 
much better quarters than in its former loca- 
tion. The W. E. Terhune Lumber Company has 
moved to the ninth floor of the same building 
and J. E. Mcllvain & Co. occupy a handsome 
suite of offices alongside of the Terhune quarters. 
J. W. Selvey of Grafton, W. Va., and J. T. 
Caveney of the same place are at the head of 
a company which has purchased 2,000 acres of 
timber land in Randolph, Barbour, Preston and 
Tucker counties. West Virginia. A big sawmill 
will be established at once. 

George W. Nicola, president of the Nicola 
Lumber Company, has bought one of the finest 
sites in the Schenley Farms allotment in the 
Oakland district and will erect on it a $20,000 
residence. 

The Crescent Lumber Company has moved 
from the Whitfield building in the East End to 
the fifth floor of the Machesney building in 
Fourth avenue below Wood street. Its president 
is R. A. Wolf, and W. A. Kessler is secretary 
and treasurer. 

The Flint, Erving & Stoner Lumber Company 
reports business active. The company now has 
over 10,000,000 feet of lumber on sticks and 
can't get enough cars ot permit of loading as 
fast as it is cut. 

The A. M. Turner Lumber Company will move 
into its big suite of offices in the 20-story Union 
Bank building May 1. Mr. Turner has just re- 
turned from an extended trip through the 
South. 

The Kendall Lumber Company has sold nearly 
all its hemlock bark and at much better figure 
than was realized last year. The Ohiopyle Com- 
pany, in which the Kendalls are largely inter- 
ested, is cutting a fine lot of oak, and the Out- 
crop, Pa., mill near by Is making 35,000 feet of 
hardwood lumber every day. J. L. Kendall Is 
still in Roseburg, Ore., where he is picking up 
some more choice timber land in preparation for 
the big operation which the Kendalls will start 
there in the fall. 

At last the Carter timber lands on West Hick- 
ory creek near Tionesta, Pa., will be brought 
close to market by reason of a new railroad for 
which surveys are now being made. This will 
run up West Hickory creek, near the mouth of 
which a big sawmill will be built. There are 



about 15,000,000 feet of lumber on the tract, 
which will require fully two years to cut off. 
Oak, birch, chestnut and hemlock predominate. 

The Stewarton Lumber Company has been or- 
ganized by Otto and August Stickel of Mills Run, 
Pa., and J. A. Guiler of Connellsville, Pa. It 
will develop a large tract of hardwood and hem- 
lock near Stewarton, Pa. 

The Linehan Lumber Company is pushing out 
"strong" in the hardwood floor business in which 
it took a hand only recently. J. J. Linehan 
has been south again and finds stocks of hard- 
woods only fair in most places. 

The Herman H. Hettler Lumber Company is 
having a rushing trade in hardwoods at its Pitts- 
burg office. Manager C. W. Cantrell got hold of 
some mighty nice business while on a recent trip 
to Cleveland and only wishes that everything in 
lumber was as good as hardwoods at present. 

The Interior Lumber Company, whose plant 
at Oneida, Tenn., was burned recently, will open 
a sorting and distributing yard there and an- 
other in Georgia and will make a specialty of 
rough lumber for a time. J. G. Criste will be 
Pittsburg manager as formerly and President 
J. R. Edgett will look after the buying in the 
south. 

The Nicola Building Company has received a 
contract from the Pennsylvania Lumber Com- 
pany for the erection of a reinforced concrete 
sawmill near Kane, Pa., in Warren county. It 
will cost $50,000 when complete and will have 
spans on the sides of 60 feet. This will be the 
first mill of its kind in Pennsylvania and is caus- 
ing no little interest locally. 

The Pittsburg-Kanawha Lumber Company of 
Buckhannon, Pa., has been incorporated with a 
capital of $10,000. Its incorporators are : 
Charles Campbell, H. B. Cooper, C. W. Heavner, 
H. W. Jackson and J. M. N. Downes, prominent 
capitalists of Buckhannon. 

I. F. Balsley of the Willson Bros. Lumber 
Company, who is looking after the Pittsburg end 
of the finances for the National Hardwood Lum- 
ber Association's convention to be held in At- 
lantic City May 23 and 24, is enthusiastic over 
the outlook. He believes there will be a large 
attendance from this end of the state and says 
that many subjects of great interest to hardwood 
men are going to be fully and fairly discussed. 

Wholesalers in northern Ohio are devoting 
much time this month to getting out piling for 
use at the Lake Erie docks at Collinwood, O., 
where are located the big shops and yards of the 
Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad Com- 
pany. Most of the stock is used by this com- 
pany in improvements, although the government 
has been a liberal buyer also. 

The Cheat River Lumber Company has bought 
700,000 feet of gum, and is selling it off rap- 
idly for boxing. 

The American Lumber & Manufacturing Com- 
pany is pushing its hardwood department for 
all that it will stand. President W. D. Johnston 
is anxious that this shall be the best hardwood 
year in the American's history and General Man- 
ager J. N. Woollett is enthusiastically aiding him 
in iM-inging about this desired result. Charles 
Cruikshank of the hardwood force is touring 
New England ; Samuel Dunseith is looking after 
business in Canada ; A. T. Ash Is buying stock in 
West Virginia ; T. C. Clark is selling hardwood 
out west ; W. T. Robertson has been perma- 
nently stationed to look after southwestern hard- 
wood purchases in Arkansas. 



Buffalo. 

Buffalo lumbermen are anxious to get their 
new clubrooms in the Chamber of Commerce 
ready for occupation, as the move will solve 
the problem of a permanent home for them. 
The new building was formally opened April 18, 
but it will be some weeks before the lumbermen's 
clubrooms will be finished. 

There is some improvement in the car situa- 
tion locally, but the complaints of shortage in 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



33 



this time of the year, but manufacturers are 
encouraged over the more favorable conditions 
recently experienced. 

There is some improvement noted in the car 
situation. There are more cars available for 
lumber interests and this means larger ship- 
ments out of this city as well as increased 
receipts of both timber and lumber from 
interior points. Lumber firms engaged in 
manufacturing are better supplied with timber 
now, taken as a whole, than they have been 
for some months. 



New Orleans. 

The sensation caused here last week by the 
announcement that a receiver had been ap- 
pointed for the big lumber exporting firm 
known as the "W. A. Powell Lumber Com- 
pany, Ltd., had hardly subsided when William 
A. Powell, head of the company, was arrested 
and charged with embezzling a large amount 
of staves and lumber belonging to two New 
Orleans banks. The first charge of embezzle- 
ment was preferred by the German-American 
National Bank, which charged that Powell 
had embezzled 22,000 pieces of French claret 
staves intended for export and on wiiich the 
bank had advanced something over $1,000. 
The value of the staves was set at $1.S25. 
The Hibernia Bank & Trust Company then 
preferred charges against Powell, alleging that 
he had embezzled 400.000 feet of lumber, valued 
at $12,000, on which this bank had also 
advanced money. It was alleged in both 
instances that the bank had paid the money 
advanced on the staves and lumber to Powell 
expecting to secure the receipts and bills of 
lading when the lumber was delivered on ship- 
board. These bills of lading were never 
received and the charges were consequently 
preferred. Powell was arraigned in one of the 
Inferior criminal courts and his bond was 
fixed at $10,000 on the two charges. The 
Whitney-Central National Bank. Canal-Louis- 
iana Bank & Trust Company and the Cosmo- 
politan Bank & Trust Company are also said 
to have been victimized by Powell. His oper- 
ations in this particular line, it is stated, 
represent between $200,000 and $300,000. 

The receiver for the Powell Lumber Com- 
pany was appointed on the application of 
Stahl & Son. lumbermen of Rotterdam, who 
alleged that the company's affairs were being 
mismanaged. It was set forth in their peti- 
tion that the company's liabilities would 
exceed $450,000, while its assets were less 
than $350,000. In accoi-dance with the repre- 
senta,tions of the petitioners Judge E. D. 
Saunders in the United States Circuit Coirrt 
named the Coramercial-Germania Savings 
Bank & Trust Company as the receiver. This 
institution is now in charge of the affairs of 
the company. Several interventions have since 
been filed in the suits. 

A good deal of interest is being manifested 
in the vigorous campaign which lumber ex- 
porters of this territory are making to secure 
better car service from the railroad com- 
panies. Several conferences of exporters have 
taken place recently and briefs have been 
prepared setting forth cases where the rail- 
roads are charged with having made discrimi- 
nations against certain shippers. The lum- 
bermen will ask the railroad officials to 
remedy certain conditions and if nothing is 
done the matter will be taken to the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. The statement 
that some of the lumber exporters are forced 
to pay a bribe of from $2 to $5 per car to 
secure a supply has created something of a 
sensation. It is said by a number of lum- 
bermen that bribing the officials is the only 
way to secure cars from some of the raijroad 
companies. 

The largest timber deal that has been con- 
summated this year in the Calcasieu district 
was closed the other day at Lake Charles 



when 32.000 acres of hardwood timber belong- 
ing to the Orange Land Company and J. B. 
Watkins wore transferred to the Southwestern 
Lumber Company of New Jersey, which was 
represented by Pi-esident Sam Parks of the 
Industrial Lumber Company. The price paid 
was $271,580. The tract lies adjacent to the 
proposed route of the Louisiana extension of 
the Santa Fe railroad, several stockholders of 
which are identified with the Southwestern 
Lumber Company. This concern has made 
several other big purchases in this vicinity 
and will erect a big hardwood mill there. 

The Sabine River Lumber Company, a new 
hardwood company, has been formally organ- 
ized at Lake Charles with an authorized 
capital of $200,000. All of the stockholders 
in the company are Illinois people, and all 
but one reside in Illinois. The exception is 
W. Scott Matthews, president of the Matthews 
Hardwood Lumber Company of Ouachit<a 
parish, who moved to Louisiana from Illinois 
several years ago. Mr. Matthews is the head 
of the new concern. The others on the Board 
of Directors with Mr. Matthews are: W. K. 
Murphy, Pinckneyville, 111.; C. B. Cole, 
Chester. 111.; Judge George W. Wall, DuQuoin. 
111.; John B. Jackson. Anna, 111. 

The Caddo-Rapides Lumber Company, one 
of the leading enterprises in the hardwood 
section of Louisiana, has increased its capital 
stock from $12,000 to $100,000. The following 
are the stockholders: Hugh Corry, J. E. Thir- 
sell, W. D. Luny, A. L. Ducate, G. W. Bolton. 
J. W. Bolton, A. W. Looney, J. W. Alex- 
ander, Hugh Corry, Jr., James Corry, John R. 
Hunter, all of Alexandria, La.; C. H. Teal. 
Earl Roberts and J. W. Duncan of Colfax. 
La.; T. C. Bush of Fairmount. La.; F. W. 
Offenhauser of Texarkana, and T. H. Garrett 
of St. Louis. 

The Bay Springs Spoke & Manufacturing 
Company has filed a charter in Mississippi. 
It is domiciled at Bay Springs, Jasper county, 
and has an authorized capital of $25,000. The 
incorporators are; L. L. Denson, W. J. Shoe- 
maker and others. 



land, Ky., was In Louisville a few days ago 
looking after the shipping out of some lumber 
his firm has here. 



Louisville. 

The car situation here is better, and it is 
now not only possible to get cars, but lumber is 
moving quite freely. How it happened, what 
caused it, or how long it will last, are questions 
unknown, as all are too busy to ask questions 
and are only hoping it will last long enough to 
let them get their order books cleared up a 
little. 

The W. P. Brown & Sous Lumber Company 
has a different story to tell now from that of a 
month ago. At that time stock was moving out 
of its yard here so much more rapidly than it 
was coming in as to give cause for worr.v. Now, 
however, they have it coming in pretty lively 
and it is keeping all hands busy to take care 
of it. 

Edward L. Davis reports busy times and says 
there is nothing to find fault with now but the 
price of oak timber. All hardwoods are in good 
demand and his company has its hands full tak- 
ing care of trade and getting fresh timber sup- 
plies. 

E. M. Overstreet of the Southern Lumber 
Compan.v says that just a few more days of 
nice weather will put them on the sunny side 
of the street with their hardwood business. 
They have about 3,000,000 feet down at their 
mills which they are now moving out. Cars 
are more plentiful and Mr. Overstreet has been 
booking some more nice business lately, and says 
that both demand and prices are good. 

The Louisville Point Lumber Company's mill 
and all the other mills on the point are busy 
these days and have more business than they 
can take care of. It is simply a question of get- 
ting the logs and sawing them into lumber, as 
the market practically takes care of Itself. 

Chas. Kitchen of Vansant, iKtchen & Co., Ash- 



Charlotte, N. C. 

Lumbermen of this section are gratified over 
the action of the legislature which recently 
closed on matters relating especially to their 
business. The Corporation Commission was 
given wider jurisdiction over complaints coming 
from lumber shippers in all parts of the state, 
asking for influence in their behalf against dis- 
crimination in freight rates. The lack of trans- 
portation facilities was given due consideration 
and the commission was given power to demand 
the railroads to build spur tracks and double 
tracks to accommodate their patrons. 

The plant of Ashbury & Finger of this city 
was totally destroyed by fire a few days ago, 
the loss aggregating .1;22,000. About 300,000 
feet of well-seasoned lumber, including several 
lots of mahogany, bird's-eye maple, cherry and 
other hardwoods, was a complete loss. The shop 
will be rebuilt at an early date. 

The Trenton Buggy & Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Trenton, N. C, has been organized with 
$150,000 authorized capital. The company will 
begin operations with a small capital, but expect 
to do a lively business. R. L. May, T. D. War- 
ren and others are the incorporators. 

H. C. Clark and others are the incorporators 
(pf a new Safe & Table Company, recently or- 
ganized to operate at Statesville, N. C, with a 
capital of $50,000. Kitchen safes and furniture 
will be turned out. 

High Point manufacturers have decided to 
have an exhibit at the Jamestown Exposition. 
There are about sixty hardwood manufactories 
at High Point and no city in the state has a 
more progressive set of business men behind 
the industry. A large sum has already been 
donated to make the exhibition attractive. 

The Bell Lumber Company of Mt. Olive, N. C, 
suffered the loss of their establishment a few 
days ago. It was a small plant, the loss 
amounting to about $3,000. 

The ofllcials of the Waynesville Wood Manu- 
facturing Company of Waynesville, N. C, are 
considering the advisability of turning out hard- 
wood mantels only. The company has been 
manufacturing table tops, legs and other prod- 
ucts for some time, but the demand for mantels 
of the class it is making is so great that other 
work will probably be excluded. 

The Camp Lumber Company in Dlnwlddie 
county has sold to the Butterworth Lumber 
Company a large tract of hardwood, the price 
paid being $50,000. The tract contains about 
15.000 acres. 

The Ingleside Lumber Company has been 
granted a charter, with principal office at Ra- 
leigh. It is capitalized at $35,000 and will 
manufacture hardwood products. J. D. Bou- 
sball, W. H. Pace and others are the incorpo- 
rators. 

The largest cargo of lumber ever sent from 
this state went out this week from Wilmington, 
the cargo being consigned to New York. It was 
shipped from the wharves of the Cape Fear 
Lumber Company and the total amount was 
more than 1,000,000 feet. 

A tract containing some of the finest hard- 
wood in the state, lying in Graham, Clay and 
Cherokee counties and comprising 55.000 acres, 
has been optioned by M. E. Cozad and others to 
Bailey & Chapman, who operate particularly in 
the western section of the state. The property 
is known as the Belding timber tract and is 
one of the largest and most valuable pieces of 
timber land in the entire state. The considera- 
tion is said to have been $625,000. 

Minneapolis. 

Trouble in the building trades, which was 
threatened here for a couple of weeks, has 
been averted. The carpenters struck fcr an 
increase in wages, and were about to call the 



34 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



other trades out on a sympathetic strike, but 
the Retail Merchants' Association brought 
about conferences which finally led to builders 
and carpenters appointing committees with 
power to act. They settled on a compromise 
basis of 421^ cents an hour. Sash and door 
factories and flooring: men were not buyers 
during the trouble, as there was danger of 
their being left with a lot of repudiated con- 
tracts on hand. 

The Hobe Lumber Company has engaged 
Charles C. Covel. formerly of Pittsburg, as 
sales manager. Mr. Covel is experienced par- 
ticularly in the hardwood line, and will em- 
phasize that branch of the business of the 
company more in the future. The company 
also handles a line of pine and hemlock. 

P. H. Hammer of the Red Birch Lumber 
Company, Catawba. Wis., was a business vis- 
itor in Minneapolis the other day, inquiring 
into the spring situation as to supply and 
demand. 

F. W. Buswell of the F. W. Buswell Lum- 
ber Company is back from a visit to the 
company's mill and logging camp in northern 
Wisconsin. He says that because of the deep 
snow and abundance of thawing weather the 
log product was lower than was figured on. 
High cost of labor and provisions also con- 
tributed to the greater expense of logging. 
He also reports a great deal of trouble in 
getting cars to fill orders. 

W. H. Sill of the Minneapolis Lumber 
Company is braving the Jibes of his friends 
who take a lively interest in the Sill chicken 
farm. Mr. Sill has been devoting considerable 
thought and attention to an incubator, which 
he loaded with 350 eggs, and when the said 
incubator came oft the nest the other day with 
only two chickens the childish glee of Mr. 
Sill's friends knew no bounds. They put him 
on the entertainment committee for the doings 
of April 19, with especial injunctions to fur- 
nish the chicken for the table. Mr. Sill is not 
at all discouraged, as la.st year he only drew 
one chicken out of the incubator and thinks 
a 100 per cent increase is certainly encourag- 
ing. 

John Hein, Jr., of the John Hein Company, 
Tony. Wis., brought his young son down a few 
days ago for an operation in a Minneapolis 
hospital. At last reports the lad was doing 
very well. 

A. A. Rotzien, with the Hawkins Lumber & 
Land Company, hardwood and hemlock manu- 
facturers, is back from a short business trip 
into northern Minnesota. 



Toledo. 

The railroad situation remains about the 
same, but the chances are that relief will be 
felt in a short time, since the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission is conducting an investi- 
gation of the car shortage situation in Toledo 
on complaint of the Toledo Produce Exchange. 
It seems that the members of the Produce 
Exchange are of the opinion that the local 
gi-ain market has been badly discriminated 
against in favor of the other markets. Act- 
ing on this basis. President Fred Mayer of 
the Produce Exchange filed formal complaint 
with the Interstate Commerce Commission at 
Washington. As a result of his communica- 
tion. Special Agent Ralph M. McKenzie was 
sent to Toledo to make a thorough investiga- 
tion. The natural and probably the correct 
inference is that the car shortage in other 
lines is being probed, and it now looks as 
though everybody interested in shipping may 
expect some relief in the very near future. 
In fact, it may be stated that the past few 
days have shown a decided improvement in 
the car situation. 

Kenneth McLeod, president of the Cache 
Lumber Company, returned from St. Louis 
recently, where he went to arrange the de- 
tails for the purchase of 25,000 acres of terri- 
tory, including a large mill, in northeastern 



Arkansas. The Cache Lumber Company 
already controls a large lumber tract in that 
section. The company has also received a 
proposition to purchase 12,000 additional acres 
lying to the north of its present holdings, 
and the matter will be brought before the 
board of directors at its next meeting. 

The Brooke Lumber Company, capital of 
$25,000. was recently organized at Pataskala. 
The company takes in the ' Henry Brooke 
Lumber Company, the planing mill of E. 
Frankenberg & Bro., and the business of 
W. S. Hanna. The new company will engage 
in the wholesale and retail lumber business. 
Henry Brooke was elected president; A. 
Frankenberg. vice-president; H. H. Baird, 
secretary; Emil Frankenberg, treasurer. 

Twenty-three local lumbermen were indicted 
by the Lucas County grand Jury, charged with 
conspiracy in restraint of trade and violation 
of the Valentine antitrust law. Some sixty 
plumbers and nine brick manufacturers are 
also included in the list. The lumbermen are 
Justly indignant over the action and are re- 
solved to fight the case hard. 



Indianapolis. 

The Showers Bros.' Company, operating a 
large furniture factory at Bloomington, Ind., 
i.s preparing to build a large veneer plant to 
be run in connection with its present factory. 
It will cost approximately $50,000 and will be 
ready for occupancy within a few months. 

Within the last few days the Brown, Mar- 
tin & Phillips Lumber Company has Ijeen 
organized at Salem to deal in a full line of 
lumber, including hardwoods. The capital 
stock is $15,000 and the directors are S. D. 
Brown. F. A. Martin and H. H. Phillips, men 
well known in the Indiana lumber trade. 

There is a ray of hope for the solution of 
the car shortage proposition by the announce- 
ment that railroads centering in Indiana will 
probably appoint car distributers, to assure 
the just distribution of cars in compliance 
with the Indiana shippers' law. These dis- 
tributers, it is understood, will liave control 
of the distribution of all cars on the various 
lines and will have a large corps of clerks 
under them. The Pennsylvania railroad is the 
first company to make such an appointment. 
The Walnut Lumber Company of this city 
has a number of good sized orders on hand 
and is expecting a phenomenal business this 
season. While some difficulty is being ex- 
perienced in getting new stock, the officers 
of the company were far-seeing enough to 
order early in the season, and as a conse- 
quence orders are being cared for witli little 
delay. Some improvements have recently been 
made at the company's plant. 

Win Runyan and Wallace Caswell have 
formed a partnership and will establish a 
furniture and cabinet works at Huntington, in 
the northern part of the state. The men were 
formerly in charge of the Syracuse Grille 
Company's plant at North Manchester and 
have had several years' experience in the 
business. 

The Mcllvaine Lumber Company has been 
incorporated at Vincennes with ,a capital stock 
of $40,000. John A. Cox, Joseph L. Ebner, 
William B. Robinson, William H. Davenport. 
Heathcote R. Mcllvaine, Frank E. Sheldon 
and Mason J. Niblack have been elected 
directors. 

The Paoli Spoke Company will manufacture 
spokes, wooden handles, and sell a line of 
hardwood lumber at Paoli, according to arti- 
cles of incorporation filed last week. With a 
capitalization of $15,000 the company expects 
to carry on an extensive business. Among 
those interested in the new venture are 
Ernest Stout, Oscar Ellis and Ellen M. Stout. 
Due to prospective building contracts 
amounting to nearly $4,000,000 during the sea- 
son, all local dealers are paying special 



attention to the hardwood branch of the trade. 
From lack of a local organization of dealers 
there is sharp competition for business, al- 
though there cannot be any great price cutting 
due to market conditions. 

An effort will be made to ascertain what 
lands are best suited for the growth of tim- 
bers used for manufacturing purposes, and the 
relative strength of each kind of timber, by 
Will H. Freeman, secretary of the Indiana 
Board of Forestry. The tests, which will be 
started this summer and will likely be con- 
tinued for several years, will be started in 
several counties of Indiana. Mr. Freeman 
believes that sooner or later forestry will be 
driven to the cheap lowlands of the state and 
that the tests will show timber grown on 
waste lands to be as good for manufacturing 
purposes as that grown on the best ground. 
Samples of wood will be obtained from various 
regions selected for tests, and will be shipped 
to the government experiment station at Pur- 
due University. Timber will be tested when 
both green and cured, undei" similar conditions, 
eitlier in sun or kiln. Both physical and 
chemical analysis of soil will be made, as well 
as a study of insect pests that infest woods. 
The three kinds of timbers to be used in 
tests will be oak, hickory and ash, and the 
timber for experiments will be procured in the 
hilly lands and bottom lands of different sec- 
tions of Indiana. In addition to tests of tim- 
bers used for manufacturing, similar tests 
will be made with the twenty best Indiana 
timbers. 

Ashland. 

There has been a big output of logs, mostly 
oak and poplar, from both the Big Sandy and 
Guyandotte rivers the past few days. The 
timber is reported as being of the best qual- 
ity, and is bringing fancy prices. 

A tragedy that resulted in the death of 
Virgil Fannin, a nineteen-year-old boy, oc- 
curred at Normal, Ky., and Marion McPeak. 
timber guard for the Nigh Lumber Company 
of fronton, is held under $500 bond charged 
with the boy's death. Young Fannin and a 
companion were detected by McPeak stealing 
chain dogs from the company's property boat. 
When they saw McPeak they started to run 
and he. armed with a shotgun, started in pur- 
suit. Fannin carried some chain dogs in his 
hand, but! dropped them, McPeak says, and 
pulled a revolver. McPeak immediately fired, 
the heavy charge entering the boy's back and 
neck. The coroner's Jury rendered a verdict 
of killing in self-defense, but McPeak was 
bound over by the grand Jury under a $500 
bond. 

T. N. Fannin of the Keyes-Fannin Lumber 
Company has returned from a month's stay in 
Arizona, where lie has large copper interests. 

Chas. Kitchen. Jr., of Leon, son of Chas. 
Kitchen of Vansant, Kitchen & Co., is very 
low with typhoid fever in a hospital in Louis- 
ville. His father and two sisters are at his 
bedside. The young man was taken sick at 
the winter home of the family at Eaugallie, 
Fla. 

Barboursville, W. Va.. at the mouth of 
Guyandotte rlAcr, is soon to have a new 
furniture factory. It will be quite an exten- 
sive affair, employing a large number of men. 

The Ironton Tool Handle Manufacturing 
Company has been formed in Ironton, Ohio, 
for the manufacture of all kinds of tool 
handles. The incorporators are; F. J. Ginn, 
D. C. Davies, T. J. Gilbert, F. E. Deidrick 
and F. J. McConnell. The capital stock is 
$15,000. They will operate the Deidrick plant 
in South Ironton. 

W. L. Watson is here from Mahan, W. Va., 
for a brief visit to his family. 

B. B. Fannin of Paintsville, Ky., a success- 
ful lumber and tie dealer, is in Louisville 
looking after a big lumber deal. 

The main offices of the Page Lumber Com- 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



pany have been removed to this city from 
South Bend, Ind. R. G. Page, head of the big 
fnterprise, and C. E. Wilson of the traffic 
department, witli their families, are already 
here. The company has a large lumber yard 



here and extensive interests throughout north- 
eastern Kentucky and West Virginia, and in 
order to handle the business to better advan- 
tage it wa.s thought best to have the main 
office in proximity to its large timber lands. 



Hardwood Market. 

(By HABDWOOD BECOBD Exclusive market Beporters.) 



Chicago. 

There seem.s to be a slight slackening in 
local sales to the consuming trade. It is con- 
sidered on all sides that this is only tempo- 
rary, and is occasioned very likely by what 
seems a pretty high scale of lumber values 
which buyers now have to pay for their stock. 
Many figure that already top-notch prices 
have been reached, and that by delaying pur- 
chases they will not have to pay any more 
money and may possibly buy at slightly lower 
prices. 

There are some varieties of hardwoods that 
are in such short supply at sources of pro- 
duction as to make them remarkably good 
sellers when a buyer succeeds in locating any 
of the stock. For example, dry basswood, of 
which Chicago is 'the largest consuming mar- 
ket in the countrj-, is practically exhausted. 
Very few manufacturers or jobbers have any 
to offer. The result is that the price on this 
wood has advanced from $6 to $8 in the last 
eight months. Some sales of firsts and sec- 
onds are reported in this market as high as 
$40. Birch is undeniably doing better, but 
there is still a considerable quantity of this 
wood unsold. Thick maple is in good call 
locally, and what little there is will surely 
command more money. Rock elm and black 
ash are practically out of the market. Nearly 
all the southern woods are in fair demand. 
There are many more inquiries for high grade 
poplar than there is stock. Cottonwood and 
gum are also doing exceedingly well, while 
the demand for oak still keeps in excess of 
.supply, and the call for the coarse end of all 
hardwoods for crating and box material re- 
mains active and prices have materially ad- 
vanced. Last fall $9 to $10 was a high price 
for miscellaneous No. 3 hardwoods, and today 
manufacturers located along the upper lakes 
sell culls as high as $12. and in many eases 
are asking more. The local situation is en- 
tirely healthy, with every prospect for a 
strong season's demand. 



Boston. 

The market for hardwoods in Boston has 
developed quite a degree of activity of late. 
Prices are firmer in nearly all instances, but 
this does not appear to have checked the 
inquiry. While the demand was fairly active 
during March, it is much better this month. 
Wholesalers find it difficult to get dry stock. 
Advices from some of the largest mills in the 
country indicate that their stocks are small. 
The reports of the better conditions have 
evidently reached mill points, as asking prices 
are higher on nearly every lot offered. The 
furniture manufacturers are very busy. Their 
stocks are moderate only and many buyers 
are "hungry for lumber," as one dealer puts 
it. Several out of town buyers who have 
seldom, if ever, called upon the trade in 
Boston for supplies have been here lately. 

A fair demand for plain oak is reported in 
this market. Values are high, but all dealers 
are not getting outside prices. Quartered oak 
shows considerable activity and prices are 
tending upward. Offerings are small and 
dealers find it difficult to place new business 
at satisfactory prices. A moderate demand 
for plain oak for export is reported. Walnut 
is in very small offering, with the demand of 
larger proportion than for five years. Offer- 



ings of wliite ash are of very small volume. 
Brown ash is scarce and firm. The call for 
cypress is not of large volume, but there is 
enough business to keep prices steady. White- 
wood is very firmly held. Dealers have small 
stocks to offer and yards are not heavily sup- 
plied. All advices from mill points indicate 
that values will continue firm for some time. 
Maple is well held with the demand for floor- 
ing moderate. 



New York. 

The situation in the hardwood trade in the 
Metropolitan District continues active with prices 
bullish throughout the entire list. The market is 
in the hands of the seller in view of the marl<ed 
shortage at producing and wholesale sources, 
especially in the better grades of hardwoods. 
There seems to be less hardwood available at 
mill points than there was three months ago, not- 
withstanding the spring log tides. The poplar 
Situation is particularly acute and all grades are 
readily salable. Ash and birch are similarly 
situated. In chestnut, sound wormy has first 
call, ones and twos common having eased off 
slightly in demand. Inch maple seems fairly 
plentiful, but thick stock is scarce and in good 
call. Beech and gum are more than holding 
their own, and the oak situation is almost en- 
tirely in the hands of the seller. The situation 
is exceptionally good all along the line with the 
exception of the dirth of supplies. 

The wholesale mahogany trade in the local 
market is firm and active. The arrivals of logs 
from foreign ports during the month of March 
were far less than in either January or Feb 
ruary. and a large part of such arrivals, together 
with a large portion of the logs on hand a month 
previous, has been .sold, leaving the market 
almost bare of wood iu first hands. This, together 
with the fact that consumption continues 
normally active, makes early shipments of good 
wood necessary. Prices are still ruling from G 
to 12 cents per foot with the average close to 
9 cents, the higher prices being selling values 
for laguDa. Santiago and the choice stock. 

In foreign cedar there were more ports repre- 
sented in the arrivals in March and more logs 
were received than in any month for many 
years. Notwithstanding these heavy arrivals 
stocks have only been added to in comparatively 
small amounts, and prices have eased off about 
one cent a foot owing to the heavy receipts. The 
large increase in shipments is explained by the 
railroad development in Cuba, which has neces- 
sitated the extensive cutting of timber and con- 
sequently heavy shipments. It is authoritatively 
announced that such cutting is about completed, 
with a result that the market will undoubtedly 
resume a normal basis in the next thirty to sixty 
days. Prices on cedar rule firm at from 8 to 12 
cents a foot, according to quality, with the aver- 
age about lOyu cents. * 



Philadelphia. 



Conditions in the lumber market for the last 
fortnight have been rather perplexing. A quietus 
is felt generally along the line. Opinions in 
trade circles as to the probable cause vary. 
Some are inclined ot think the backward spring 
has much to do with it. It is conceded by all. 
however, that there has been entirely too much 
contention as regards the doings of the large 
public corporations both in the newspapers and 
legislative bodies, creating a want of confidence. 



and in consequence a holding off ot investors. 
One thing is sure, money is tight at this time, 
and the bulk of operation work depends on 
loans, as do also all large public enterprises. 
It is possible that the opinion expressed by the 
more conservative trade element that the slump 
is only temporary, and that conditions will 
right themselves as soon as the weather settles, 
is the correct one. The eastern furniture fac- 
tories, interior finish works, sash and door mills, 
and veneer and cigar box makers, are all af- 
fected more or less by this wavering feeling as 
to future business, for although things are 
humming right along, aud they have a fair stock 
on hand, they prefer to wait for developments 
before buying ahead. Yardmen feel the de- 
pression also. Some of the hustling firms, how- 
ever, in the face of all this disquietude, seem 
to have all the business they can handle and 
make no complaint whatever. Permits for large 
structures are being applied for right along, as 
also for operation work for rows of dwellings. 
Among the hardwoods, ash, chestnut and 
basswood hold front rank in values but are still 
very scarce. Poplar has retreated somewhat as 
to volume of sales and in some quarters is super- 
seded by cypress, the latter being so much 
cheaper. Oak is somewhat uncertain. It was 
thought this wood would advance in price ; in- 
stead there is a downward tendency in values, 
which may be only temporary, however. Cherry 
and maple hold old status : maple flooring keeps 
steady and in good demand ; gum remains firm. 



Baltimore. 

There is no change of consequence to be re- 
ported in the hardwood Inisiness of this section. 
Stocks are in strong demand and prices are 
firm. All the dealers report that they have 
numerous inquiries and that they are unable to 
till orders for want of supplies. The mills 
are being operated to the limit of their capacity 
and their output is taken up as fast as it can 
he made ready for the market at figures that 
tend to stimulate operations. Kspecially is this 
true with respect to oak, which wood is being 
called for in large quantities not only to meet 
the needs of the domestic market, but also to 
fill orders for foreign consumption. European 
buyers are at present disposed to meet the terms 
of shippers and they also manifest a tendency 
to aid the American exporters in their efforts 
the stop the practice of shipping on consignment. 
The situation abroad is very much improved and 
an excellent feeling now prevails. Poplar is also 
called for in large quantities, though some ex- 
porters allege that manufacturers are forward- 
ing stocks at lower figures than they can be 
bought for in the domestic market, and that 
this expedient is employed for the purpose of 
preventing a break in the market here. How- 
ever that may be, the fact remains that poplar 
is in strong request and that stocks are sold in 
large quantities. The trade is evidently pre- 
pared to take all the lumber which the mills 
can turn out and the supplies in the hands of 
local dealers at the present time are lower than 
they have been for many months. Other hard- 
woods are in equally good shape and there is 
every prospect that the prevailing state of af- 
fairs will continue. 



Pittsburg. 



The call for hardwood lumber continues very 
active. There is an increased call for ash and 
hickory which are used largely by the imple- 
ment and carriage and wagon manufacturers. 
Straight grained white ash, dry enough for use, 
is a much prized article in the market just now 
and is bringing the wholesaler's price. There is 
little of it in stock for the country mills of 
western Pennsylvania and Ohio have not been 
able to deliver their usual quota of dry lumber 
owing to the extremely unfavorable weather and 
resultant bad roads preventing them from get- 
ting logs into mill. Most of the West Virginia 



36 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



ash is sold under contract and it Is very hard 
to pick up any in that state. Practically the 
same may be said o£ hiclsory. Every car o£ 
hickory that is heard o£ is snapped up almost 
before it is o£E the saw. Basswood is in better 
demand and some good orders have been placed 
latel.v. Several dealers have had good inquiries 
for elm lately, most of them coming from the 
hub men of eastern Ohio. There is a better in- 
quiry for maple — both flooring and two-inch 
planking. Oak finish and timbers are still among 
the best sellers on the local list, the bulk of 
the orders coming from out of the city. Dealers 
are finding it hard to get ties, especially white 
oak and switch ties. Although there is less 
river work being done this year than last and 
a few of the railroads are cutting down their 
outlay for improvements, heavy timbers and 
piling are making a good showing on the order 
books and are bringing satisfactory prices. Con- 
siderable beech has been sold through this mar- 
ket lately for piling. Sound wormy chestnut 
holds a front place in the inquiries and is being 
sold at slightly higher figures than two months 
ago. 

The local trade is somewhat dull. Building is 
"coming up" a little in Pittsburg, but does not 
show the activity that was expected. Architects 
and owners are very slow in awarding contracts 
and the yard men are accordingly tardy in get- 
ting their stocks out to contractors, which makes 
them timid about giving large orders. House 
building bids fair to be good after the weather 
opens up, but so far operations are greatly de- 
layed. The market shows no weakness in prices 
and in general the outlook for higher prices is 
better than March 1. Reports from the mill 
owners everywhere indicate that they are work- 
ing hard to keep up with orders and the present 
cut of logs is already spoken for in most cases. 



Buffalo. 

There is special report just now from some 
of the hardwood dealers of activity in maple, 
which is bringing satisfactory prices. It is go- 
ing so fast that a new supply will be needed 
soon. 

Another wood that is much wanted is chest- 
nut, though dealers find It harder every season 
to get supplies of it. If they find a lot of it 
they take it these days without much reference 
to anything but the price, for it will always 
sell. 

The oak supply is unsteady, though there 
seems to be enough at present for all needs. A 
few dealers found for some time that they could 
not get rid of their plain red oak, but they can 
sell it all now and more if they had it. Quar- 
tered is now scarcer than plain. Prices are 
considerably higher than last year. 

Every possible effort is being made to keep 
up the stock of birch, for it is always needed 
and If there is plenty of it there will always 
be at least one good wood that will answer for 
almost anything. It is in fair supply now and 
there will be a good lot brought down by lake, 
when lumber tralBc starts, which will probably 
be early in May. 

It now looks as though there would be a bet- 
ter sale of elm and basswood than there was, 
as these woods have been laid aside for some 
years on account of the high mill prices. 



Basswood culls are firm at $18 and elm culls 
at $13 and $14. Maple firsts and seconds are 
strong at $24 and Nos. 1 and 2 range from 
$12 to $18. 

Ashevllle. 

The hardwood market in western North Caro- 
lina remains firm. There is a slight slump no- 
ticeable in prices for the best grades of oak, 
which is attributed to the vast quantities of 
this wood which are now coming out of Arkan- 
sas and Mississippi. Prices for best grades of 
poplar remain at the top notch. Chestnut is 
stiff, with the demand greater during the past 
few weeks and prices better than for many 
months past. Great quantities of inferior chest- 
nut are going to the tannic acid plants in this 
section, while the commercial chestnut Is in good 
demand. Recently a representative of the Na- 
tional Casket Company was in this section. This 
concern, which uses 20,000,000 feet of chestnut 
annually, has purchased its year's supply from 
the West Virginia forests, but owing to the 
inability of loggers to get the wood to railway 
stations and also the car shortage, it has been 
forced to buy stock elsewhere. The car shortage 
in western North Carolina is no longer a menace 
to the trade and the hardwood men are in high 
spirits. Lumbermen are being quite liberally 
supplied with empties and only at times is there 
anything like a shortage. This condition, how- 
ever, has only prevailed during the past several 
weeks, and dealers are taking advantage of the 
situation. 

Bristol, Va.-Tenn. 

Tlie past fortnight has seen little or no 
change in hardwood conditions. The mills 
ai'e nearly all in operation and the conditions 
in the rural districts are more propitious to 
the manufacturer than they have been at any 
time this year. 

The car supply Is not as good as it should 
be — indeed, many shippers report that they 
are still handicapped by inability to get cars. 
In many instances gondolas are being boxed 
up and used for box cars. 

The weather has been fair for the past few 
days, though the month as a whole lias seen 
much rain, to the detriment of business. 



Saginaw Valley. 

Local conditions are more satisfactory than 
they have been in some years. The market 
has developed much strength during the year 
and prices have increased all along the line. 
There has been a good trade and dry stocks 
of most kinds of wood are scarce. Basswood, 
oak and ash are particularly strong. Maple 
is doing materially better and elm and birch 
are stronger. Beech has also advanced. Some 
large lots of the latter No. 2 common have 
sold •within ten days at $16 and $17. Beech 
and maple culls are bringing $12 and $14. 



Cincinnati. 

The volume of business transacted during 
the last fortnight showed an increase com- 
pared with the two weeks previous, and this 
is largely attributable to the railroads fur- 
nishing better shipment facilities. The car 
shortage that has hampered business for sev- 
eral months has to a certain extent been 
relieved and many of the orders that had been 
on file for weeks have been filled. The lumber 
yards at present fully bear out the strain 
they stood in the last few months, being 
almost stripped of the most desired lumber 
such as poplar and oak. A good demand 
continues for tliese woods. Oak is holding its 
own and the same might be said of cypress, 
gum. hickory and mahogany. The furniture 
dealers have been doing a better business 
this season than for some time, and this 
has caused the market on mahogany and 
other woods used for its manufacture to take 
on a decidedly firm tone. The spring trade 
has been fairly well supplied, but still large 
orders for immediate delivery are coming in. 
The market as it looks at present will be 
held at the same tone for some time to come. 



Chattanooga. 

The demand for lumber in this section is 
much greater than the supply. Dry stocks 
are snapped up promptly at good prices. 
Poplar is perhaps as scarce as it has ever 
been in this vicinity. Chestnut is in great 
demand and oak is still strong. ■ 

The export trade is active. Expressed in 



the words of one of the local lumbermen, this 
is a sellers' market. 

The car situation Is a little easier than it 
has been for some time and lumber is being 
shipped out of the city and logs into the city 
at a fair satisfactory rate. 



St. Iiouis. 

The market in hardwoods in St. Louis con- 
tinues active, and a record business would be 
transacted were It possible to obtain ample 
supplies to meet the inquiries which are ur- 
gent for all classes of hardwood. Some of 
the dealers here report that the demand for 
certain items of stock, especially those in 
which tliere have been advances recently, is 
not quite as active as it was in March. A 
like statement is made regarding some of the 
higher class woods, which prior to the be- 
ginning of March sold without effort. How- 
ever, the general volume of buying seems to 
keep lumbermen busy and to absorb practi- 
cally everything in desirable stock quickly. 

Price advances on several items are confi- 
dently expected before the month is out. The in- 
creased cost and difficulty of getting out pop- 
lar, ash and cottonwood make them very 
strong items and they will never be as cheap 
as they have been in the past under any 
reverse. Oak continues firm, with prices 
strong on all classes of stock. Gum is show- 
ing steady improvement and is selling readily 
at satisfactory prices. 



Nashville. 

The local market continues stiff and firm, 
with an upward tendency. The feature during 
the past few days has been the advance in 
quartered oak. There has been a tendency 
recently to use more of this wood than per- 
liaps any other, unless it be poplar. Poplar 
will bring today in this market almost any- 
thing a dealer chooses to ask for it. The de- 
mand for plain oak has not been so noticeable 
during the past week or so, but it is not 
dragging. No one seems to have large stocks 
of It on hand, and for that reason it is not 
inoving so briskly. The recent and incessant 
spring rains liave served to retard logging and 
sawmill operations in the country. The roads 
are still impassable in many places, and this 
has produced a shortage in the amount of 
timber that should be coming to this market 
in the spring. 

Memphis. 

There is very little change to report in 
hardwood conditions. There Is no decrease in 
the demand while there is very little If any 
Increase in the amount of dry lumber avail- 
able for immediate use. Buyers are having 
difficulty in covering their requirements and 
they are quite willing to pay full prices for 
whatever is offered. On the other hand, hold- 
ers, while realizing that there is some increase 
in the quantity of lumber going on sticks, 
understand that there is nothing that points 
toward even a moderate stock of dry lumber 
for some time and they are therefore indis- 
posed to make concessions on what they have 
on hand. Thus firmness characterizes every 
item on the list. 

Ash is perhaps the strongest feature, the 
demand for this being so large that it cannot 
be properly taken care of. Even the firms 
which make a specialty of handling this wood 
are having a very hard time getting all they 
need for their customers. Plain oak is firm 
in all grades and the same is true of quarter- 
sawed stock. The scarcity of low grade gum 
and cottonwood Is a feature which continues, 
while the demand for both is exceptionally 
large, owing to the activity in box making 
circles. Tlie higher grades of these woods, 
however, are finding ready sale around top 
prices of the year. There are only moderate 
offerings of cypress and poplar and everything 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



37 



placed on sale is taken at full value and with 
little loss of time. It is ttie consensus of 
opinion that general market conditions, aside 
from the scarcity of dry stock, were never 
more favorable at this season of the year. 



New Orleans. 

The market here is not altogether satis- 
factory and the general condition of the trade 
shows the effects of the small European 
demand for lumber. Exports have dwindled 



MrJohnW.Woyka 

Managing Director of 

John Woyka & Co. 

Limited 

Mahogany, Timber 
and Veneer Merchants 



Glasgow, 



Scotland 



is presently on a tour through the bard- 
wood centers of the States and Canada, 
purchasing Hardwood Lumber. 

Mr. Woyka is also selling African 
Mahog&ny in the log and will be pleased 
to meet or correspond with interested 
parties, especially those whose manufac- 
tured goods are of interest to Cabinet- 
makers and Ship Builders. 



Address and probable dates as follows : 

Auditorium Annex, Chicago 
May J St to 3rd 

Frontenac Hotel, Quebec 
May Uthto 12th 

Murray Hill Hotel, New York 
May I4th to I8th 



THE GENERAL LUMBER 
COMPANY 

Hardwoods 



HEMLOCK 
YELLOW PINE 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 



POPLAR 

Rough and Dressed 

SOUTHERN HARDWOODS 



M. A. HAYWARD 

1021 Saving and Trust Bldg., Columbus, O. 



away to little or nothing, while the interior 
demand is said to be less active than a fort- 
night ago. The mills are still cutting a good 
deal of lumber, but have been hampered in 
their logging opei-ations during the last two 
or three days by the heavy rain and hail 
storms which were general over the state. 
Prices are fair. 



Louisville. 

The Louisville h.irdwood market is in excellent 
sliaijo. There is not only more stock being cut, 
but better time is being made getting it to the 
railroads and, best of all, there seems to be a 
deckled improvement in the car situation. It 
puts the millmen in good humor and makes addi- 
tions to their order books, and of course it 
makes the buyers feel better, for while they 
still have to do a little shopping around, they 
can now generally get what they want any time 
they are ready to pay the price. There is, and 
always will be, more or less dickering about 
prices. On poplar it is not much trouble to get 
full list, especially for dry stock, but oak prices 
are always something of a bone of contention. 

In addition to the good factory trade (or 
hardwoods, and a splendid call for car stock, 
the mills report quite a local call for struc- 
tural material, bill stuff, framing and siding, 
and at many of the country mills quite a nice 
retail trade is being done in building material, 
especially where planers and resaws have been 
put in so as to enable the mill to turn out bevel 
siding. Gum is getting to be quite a factor in this 
trade, and there is also quite a call for resawed 
coramun gum for box and crating purposes. For 
that matter there is a good call for everything 
on the hardwood list, which, together with the 
fact that receipts are now more plentiful, gives 
the trade a lively air. 



Charlotte, N. C. 



Local hardwood dealers declare that the price 
of goods at present is all that could be expected. 
There has been no material change in quota- 
tions for some months, but lower prices are be- 
lieved to be not far off. The fact that the con- 
gested freight traffic has kept much lumber from 
being brought in is one reason assigned for the 
good prices that prevail. The car shortage is 
being rapidly relieved and lumbermen are getting 
better service than they have been able to secure 
in many months. With improvement in weather 
conditions and in the supply of cars, the hard- 
wood men of this city do not conceal the fact 
that they believe lower prices will prevail. Pop- 
lar is bringing the best price of any wood just 
at present. Tills is due primarily to the fact 
that it is becoming so scarce. 



Minneapolis. 

The chief interest in the market is now 
centered on contracts for the new cut. which 
are being taken at a pretty lively rate. There 
is very little dry stock left except birch, which 
is also running low. and the low grade stuff is 
well cleaned out. Mills which can get cars to 
do any business at all are shipping green 
stock, especially in basswood, which is active 
in demand and with no dry lumber to be had. 
The factory trade is not heavy, but with con- 
ditions as they are it is hard enough to satisfy 
dealers. Conditions are bright for the summer 
in the twin cities, as the carpenters' strike 
started two weeks ago has been settled and 
the men are all back at work. 

The yard trade is good, most of it coming 
in mixed car orders. The supply of southern 
stock is a little better than it has been this 
spring, but delivery is still slow and uncer- 
tain, and the volume of business is not wliat 
it would be if there was a free supply. In 
this as well as in northern stock it is not so 
much a question of orders as getting the stock 
and shipping. 



Toledo. 

Firm prices and a fair demand for the better 
grades of hardwood are the features of the 
local market. Ash, chestnut and oak are sell- 
ing well and there is not much ot an over- 
supply of any of these items. Poplar is also 
a prominent feature in the market and higher 
prices are expected. 



Indianapolis, 

In all parts of Indiana the hardwood market 
is especially active at the present time. Stocks 
are arriving slowly, although there seems to 
be sufficient supplies on hand to fill orders 
with some degree of promptness. The heavy 
building and manufacturing demands are 
causing a steady demand, but as yet prices 
have not been raised. The shortage is prob- 
ably more acute in southern than in central 
and northern Indiana, but conditions in the 
southern portion of the state are improving. 



Liverpool. 

The mahogany sales last week were without 
incident and prices ruled much on the last 
sales low level. The turn ot the quarter gives 
an admirable opportunity of viewing the future 
position of this market. 

A prominent shipper is authority for the 
statement that there is no more wood of any 
consequence coming from the west coast and 
that much higher prices will be seen at the 
next sale. Of course, a statement like this 
must be taken with reserve, as it is to this 
shipper's interest to make a bullish report. On 
the other hand, however, several things point 
to higher prices. First, the high price of pop- 
lar, which can be so easily faked by cabinet- 
makers. Second, the cabinetmaking business 
which has been so depressed here for so long, 
shows signs ot improvement. And lastly, there 
seems to be a growing tendency toward a better 
class of wood being used by consumers. Not so 
much imitating is being indulged in, as buyers 
now prefer the genuine article. Having thus 
weighed up the situation. It would seem wise 
for buyers to cover their requirements for some 
months to come, as the next sale will probably 
show higher prices. 

Other hardwoods are much in demand. Hick- 
ory and first growth ash logs (of large size) 
are wanted, and can safely be shipped in large 
quantities. Second growth ash. on the other 
hand, should not be shipped except on order, as 
there is a large stock here. 

Oak planks and boards are good stock and are 
finding a ready sale. Oak logs are firm and pop- 
lar logs are increasing in strength, both follow- 
ing the recent rise in the price of the lumber. 
Large maple logs are badly wanted, but shippers 
should be careful only to ship logs suitable for 
this market — anything under 22 inches in diam- 
eter at small end is absolutely useless here. 
Ash planks are still as before, but birch, both 
logs and planks, are firmer and will probably be 
higher. 

London. 

As is usual just before the Easter holidays, 
there is no great amount of business passing, 
although the arrivals have been larger during 
the past fortnight, but being goods ordered on 
firm contract these are going into direct con- 
sumption. 

In whitewood there is a good demand for all 
grades at top prices, but the cull grade is arriv- 
ing freely. 

Plain oak boards are still in good request and 
are sold immediately on arrival at fair prices ; 
planks are also wanted. There seems to be 
more activity in quartered boards, which have 
been difficult to sell for some time past. Planks 
are in good demand. 

Satin walnut arrivals are small, but what 
does arrive is sold at good prices. There Is an 
increasing demand for good, medium and prime 
grades of walnut at full prices. 



38 HARDWOODRECORD 



AT COST 

IS AN UNCOMMON TERM AS APPLIED TO INSURANCE 

But this is the actual price of Indemnity against Fire Loss furnished by the 

Manufacturing 

Lumbermen's 

Underwriters 



THE STRONGEST INSURANCE ORGANIZATION 
TO-DAY IN AMERICA 



The saving is not on a — Only well built plants 

small portion oi J with adequate protectioo 

your insurance but on the V/ and at least 

entire line. j five years timber 

There are other advantages f supply are considered 

equally interesting. ^ eligible. 



FOR LIST OF MEMBERS AND FURTHER INFORMATION, ADDRESS 



HARRY RANKIN 4 CO. Kansas City, No. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



39 



WaRtedairopSflle 

'SECTION' 



Advertisements will be inserted in tliis 
section at the following rates : 

Far one Insertion 20 cents a line 

For two insertions 36 cents a line 

Far three Insertions 60 cents a line 

For four Insertions 60 cents a line 

Eight words of ordinary length make one line. 

Heading counts as two lines. 

He display except the headings can be ad- 
mitted. 

Remittances to accompany the order. No 
extra charges for copies of paper containing 
the advertisement. 



EMPLOYES WANTED. 



WANTED. 

Young man abuiii 'JO ynars old. high school 
education, with good hahits. who has had about 
a year's experience at measuring and grading 
hardwood lumber. A good opportunity for a 
man who is willing to work and will be loyal. 
(■- J. KKAXK. Logansport, Ind. 

"" WANTED. 

A head sawyer and tiler t<i saw quartered 
oak for our veneer mil!. (lood position for 
the right party. None other than thoroughly 
experienced men in this line of work need ap 
ply. MARTIN CUTSIXCEK & SONS CO.. 

Koachdale, Ind. 

WANTED. 

A live, hustling buyer and shipper of hard- 
wood lumber in the south. Must ho familiar 
with grading and be in touch with good mill-s. 
Will give salary and commission to right man. 
Address 

"LrMBER." care Jacob Ilnltzman. 
:U0 Laud Title P.ldg., riiiiadeiphia. I'a. 



EMPLOYMENT WANTED 



OFFICE POSITION WANTED. 

Experienced man '.\o years of ay,e. Experi- 
enced in lumber business. Expert bookkeeper 
and shorthand writer. Now in Arkansas. 
AVant position by .Tune 1 at $1^0 per week with 
good firm. Address 

"A 205." care Hardwood Record. 



LUMBER WANTED 



HICKORY AXLES WANTED. 

L'o.o(H) feet 4x.".xr, and otlier sizes, dry or 
pai'tlv di'v. Xo. 1 llii-liorv Axles. 

BROOKVILLE ME"G. CO., Biooliville. Pa. 



WANTED. 

4-4" and 6-4" Sound Woj-m.v C'liestnnt. 



4-4 Basswood and Buclie.ve. 
4-4 Soutli'^rn Wliite I'ine. 
Address Lumber Department. 
NATIONAL I'ASICI'yr CO., Iloh 



il;eu. N. ,T. 



HABD MAPLE LUMBER WANTED. 

2 or 3 cars ot Ists and 2nds drv 2V>". 
The A. B. CHASE CO., Norwalli, Ohio. 

WANTED. 

Walnut logs 11" and U|) in diameter, Oali 
logs 24" and up and Hiclcory logs 14" and up — 
all good quality. Address 

IL V. HARTZELI., Greenville, Obio. 



1 
1x3 
111. 



WANTED. 

QU.\RTEnED RED OK WHITE 0.\K. 

x4xll, 10J~.. 1!) & 20. lx3V-.xll. 16ii & 19, 
xl4, lx2Uil4 — tor delivery at Mound City, 

Qf.iETEREn Oak chair racks. 
;io to G" wide, 15 and 17" long, for delivery 
Port Wasliington, Wis. 

THE WISCONSIN CHAIR CO.. 

I'ort Washington. Wis. 



WANTED— DRY CYPRESS. 

2x5" and wider, 8 or 16', Ists and 2nds, 
selects or sound common. 

AMER. LBK. & Mi'G. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 

YELLOW PINE CAR MATERIAL. 

Long Leaf Car Sills, Switch Timbers and 
Decking wanted, rough or dressed. Also Long 
or Short Leaf Car Siding, 1x4 6"-9 or 18', also 
16' Isiin dried and worked to pattern. Quote 
cash price f. o. b. mill. 

AMEIt. LBK. & MEG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 

WANTED. 

1" dry log run Blacli Walnut; 2", 2i4", 2%" 
and 3" green White and Red Oak; 11/2x2-26" 
clear Oak or Hickory and IV'" to 4" White Ash. 
McCLURE LUMBER CO., Detroit, Mich. 

BASSWOOD WANTED. 

A few carloads 4/4 and S/4 Northern White 
Fasswood dressed two sides. Quote price de- 
livered on New York rate of freight. 

H. J. ROSEVELT, 
66 Broad St., New York, N. Y. 

YELLOW PINE POLE STOCK 

Wanted — From reliable mills who under- 
stand how to manufacture No. 1 I'oie stock, 
clear and straight grain quality, free from ail 
defects excepting sap. 

AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 

WANTED— HARDWOOD LOGS. 

200,000 ft, 28" and up White Oak logs, 
200,000 ft. 12" and up Walnut logs. 
50,000 ft. 12" and up Cherry logs. 
C. L. WILLEY, 1235 S. Robey St., Chicago. 



DRY SOFT YELLOW POPLAR. 

Ail grades and thicknesses, rough or dressed, 
wanted. Prompt cash. Willing to contract. 
AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO.. Pittsburg, Pa. 



ASH DIMENSION STOCK. 

One inch stock wanted, in carloads, from 
2% to 10" in width and from 10 to 48" In 
length. Can use large quantities If properly 
gotten out. Stock must be clear and free from 
defects. Write us for list. 

BELDINGIIALL MFG. CO., Belding, Mich. 



OAK. 

We are In the market for plain sawed oak, 
all grades and thicknesses. 
P. G. DODGE & CO., 2116 Lumber St., Chicago. 

OAK WANTED. 
3 and 4 inch White Oak : also Mixed Oak ; 
also 12x12 Timbers and Piling of all kinds. 
CONTINENTAL LUMBER CO., 
1213 Monadnock Bldg., Chicago, III. 



LUMBER FOR SALE. 



FOR SALE. 

One car 8. 4 common and iietter Hickory, 
good widths and lengths in shipping condition. 
W. A. NOBLE UMBER CO., Altoona, Pa. 



HICKORY AXLES FOE SALE. 

Five cars 4x."i -'i' No. 1 Hickory Axles ready 
for shipment. 

W. A. NOBLE LBR. CO., .Mtoona, Pa. 

FOR SALE. 

7."iii M feet Hemlock boards 4"-12" (can be 
worked if desired I. 

125 M feet 4,4 White Pine log run. 
50 M feet 5/4 White Pine log run. 
125 M feet 4 4 Chestnut sound wormy. 
100 M feet 6 8 and 8/4 Chestnut log run. 

75 M feet 4 4 Poplar log run. 
This stock is near Bristol. Tennessee. Pre- 
fer selling entire lot to one purchaser. 
EMIL GUENTHEI!. 302 Pennsylvania Rld.a.. 
Whol. I.br. Dealer, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SOFT^OEK WHITE PINE^ 

High grade Michigan stock for sale, all 
thicknesses up to 4". bone dry, suitable for 
making patterns and fine cabinet work. 

AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 



OAK FOR SALE. 

We offer to the trade the following items of 
band-sawed, equalized Oak, eight months and 
longer on sticks ; 

White Oak. 
123,000 feet 5/4 common plain. 
5,000 feet 6, 4 common plain. 
24.0011 feet 8/4 firsts and seconds plain. 
22.00t» feet .s/4 common plain. 

3,600 feet 12/4 firsts and seconds plain. 
14,000 feet 16/4 firsts and seconds plain. 
24,000 feet 4/4 firsts and seconds quar- 



tered. 

35,000 feet 

20,000 feet 
tered. 

18,000 feet 
tered strips. 

24,000 feet 

8,000 feet 
tered. 

27,000 feet 
tered, 

6.000 feet 

190.000 feet 

103,000 feet 

23.1100 feet 

33.1100 feet 

240.000 feet 

47,000 feet 

14,000 feet 

tered strips. 

40.000 feet 
Ified. 

15,000 feet 

12.000 feet 



4/4 common quartered. 
4/4 common and better 



quar- 



5/4 firsts and seconds quar- 

5/4 common quartered oak. 
6/4 firsts and seconds quar- 

8/4 firsts and seconds quar- 

8/4 common quartered. 
Red Oak. 

5/4 firsts and seconds plain. 

5/4 common plain. 

6/4 firsts and seconds plain. 

6 '4 common plain. 

S 4 firsts and seconds plain. 

4/4 common quartered. 

4/4 common and better quar- 

6/4 firsts and seconds quar- 

6/4 common quartered. 

6-1 — 12" and wider firsts and 
cconds niain Red and \\'hite Oak. 
CIIAS. F. LUEHRMANN HDWD. I.. CO.. 

St. Louis. Mo. 



TIMBER LANDS FOR SALE 



FOR SALE. 

Timber laud and mill pnipertv in Vermont. 
About r.0.oOo.ooo feet standing "timber, about 
40 per cent of which is hardwood, hulk being 
Kirch, balance Spruce and Hemlock. 2.500.000 
feet manufactured lumber. aOO.OOO feet logs. 
This is a running business and can be bought 
at an attractive figure. 

V. J. SNOW CO., Greenfield, Mass. 



FOR SALE. 

SOO acres of bardwiiud timber, five miles 
from the Chesapeake & Ohio Kailroad in Green- 
brier county. West Virginia. Timber only 
$12.50 per acre. Estimated to cut 7.500 feet 
per acre, fine qualitv. 

EMOKV H. SMITH, Newburg, W. Va. 



r 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



IVtAPLE FLOORING MILL 

For sale. Located in Michigan and now in ac- 
tive operation. This plant is modern in every 
respect and making money. Will sell or take 
stock in new company. Owners have large in- 
terests elsewhere demanding personal attention. 
Address . -MAPLK FLOORING." 

rarp IlAiitiwooD Record. 



MACHINERY FOR SALE 



FOR SALE. 

One complete 7-foot Band mill, together with 
filing machinery, shotgun feed, boilers and en- 
gine : all in good repair. Will sell on good 
terms, or exchange for lumber. Price, $2,500. 
.\lso one locomotive and logging cars. Address 
D. G. COTTiTXKV. Charleston, W. Va. 
FOR SALE. 

Second-hand circular saws, all sizes, 10" to 
68" diameter, rip and cut oft saws. Repaired 
in first class condition. Cheap prices. How 
manv and what sizes do tou need? 

P..\R<'Tii^ SA W WORKS. Muskegon. Mich. 

SAW MliiL AND STAVE MILL. 

Machinerv clieap. Write for list and prices. 
E. E. HE.MINGWAY, Mattoon, Wis. 



40 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



jidVertisers* Directory [ 



NORTHERN HARDWOODS. 

Alcock, John L.. & Co 7 

American Lumber & Mfg. Company.. 50 
Arpin Hardwood Lumber Company.... 52 

Bnbcock Lumber Company 50 

Beyer. Knux & Co 59 

Bliss & Van Auken 12 

Boyuc City Lumber Company 54 

Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Company.. 59 

Cadillac Handle Company 3 

Carter, Frank, Company 53 

Cheat River Lumber Company 50 

Cherry River Boom & Lumber Co 9 

Chicago Car Lumber Company 10 

Chirvls. \\. II 49 

Cincinnati Hardwood Lbr. Company.. 56 

Cobbs & Mitcbell. Inc 3 

Columbia Hardwood Lumber Company 11 

Connor, R. , Company 53 

Co-Op Mill and Lbr. Co 11 

Crescent Lumber Company 50 

Crosby & Beckley Company, The 

Crosby, C. P 52 

Cunimer, Digging & Co 3 

Darling, Chas., & Co 11 

Davis, John R., Lumber Company 52 

Davis, W. A U 

Dennis Bros 5?-, 

Dennis & Smith Lumber Company... 55 
D'Heur & Swain Lumber Company... 58 

Dixon & Dewey 

DuLlmcier Eros 57 

Dwight Lumber Company 8 

Earle Lumber Company 54 

Elias, G., & Bro 59 

Empire Lumber Company 59 

Estabrook-Skeele Lumber Company... 11 
Evans & Retting Lumber Company... 55 

Fall. E. H 

Forn^an Company, Thomas 6 

Freiberg Lumber Company, The 57 

Fullertoii-rowell Hardwood Lumber 

','ompariy 5 

General Lumber Company, The 37 

Gillespie. W. M.. Lumber Company.. 7 

Goldie, J. S 54 

Haak Lumber Company 41 

Hackley-rhelps-Bonnell Company 55 

Hayden & Westcott Lumber Company 10 

Holloway Lumber Company 7 

Hoyt. C. I.. & Co .].'..'. 58 

Indiana Quartered Oak Company 7 

Ingram Lumber Company 52 

James & Abbot Company 7 

Jenks, Robert H., Lumber Company.. 51 

Jones, G. W.. Lumber Company 2 

Jones Hardwoud Company 7 

Kampf , Albert R 2 

Kelley Lumber & Shingle Company. . 6 

Kneeland-Bigelow Company 4s 

Lesb & Matthews Lumber Company.. 11 

Linehan Lumber Company 50 

Litchfield, William E \\\\ 7 

Lombard. E. B H 

Long-Knight Lumber Company 58 

Maley, Thompson & Mofifett Company 57 

Martin-Barriss Company 51 

Mason-Donaldson Lumber Company... 52 

Maus, H. H., & Co., Inc 7 

Mcllvain. J. Gibson. & Co 6 

McLean. Hugh. Lumber Company 59 

Miller, Anthony 59 

Miller Bros H 

Mitchell Bros. Company 3 

Mowbray & Robinson 57 

Murphy & Digging 3 

Nichols & Cox Lumber Company 55 

Nicola Lumber Company, The 50 

Northern Lumber Company 54 

North Shore Lumber Company 54 

North Vernon Lumber Company 2 

North Western Lumber Company 53 

O'Brien, John, Land & Lumber Co. . . 10 

Osburn. Norval 41 

Perriue-Aimstrong Company 58 

Price, E. E 7 

Radina, L. W., & Co 57 

Richmond Park & Co 10 

Ross Lumber Company 1 

Rumbarger Lumber Company 

Ryan & McParland 10 

Sailing Hanson Company 55 

Sawyer-Goodman Company 52 

Scatcherd & Son 59 

Schofield Bros 7 

Slimmer, F., & Co 10 

Soble Bros 7 



Standard Hardwood Lumber Company 59 

-Stearns Company, The 56 

Stephenson, The I., Company 32 

Stewart. I. N., & Bro 59 

Stewart-Roy Lumber Company 50 

Stimson, J. V 58 

Stone, T. B., Lumber Company 50 

Sullivan, T., & Co 59 

Tegge Lumber Company 

Turner. A. M., Lumber Company 50 

Vollmar & Below Company 52 

Walnut Lumber Company, The 58 

Wells, R. A.. Lumber Company 10 

While Luml)er Company 10 

White. W. H.. Company 54 

Whitmer. Wm., & Sons, Inc 6 

Wiborg & Ilanna Company 57 

Wilison Bros. Lumber Company 50 

Wisconsin Land & Lumber Company. 55 

Wistar. Underbill & Co 7 

Wylie, A. W 11 

Yeager, Orson E 59 

Young, W. D., & Co 12 

Young & Cutsinger 58 

SOUTHERN HARDWOODS. 

Advance Lumber Company 51 

Alcock. John L.. & Co 7 

American Ildwd. Lumber Company... 49 
American Lumber & Mfg. Company.. 50 

Anderson-Tully Company 4 

Atlantic Lumber Company 1 

Beyer, Knox & Co 59 

Brown, Geo. C, & Co 4S 

Brown. W. P.. & Sons, Lumber Co... 2 
Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Company.. 59 

Carrier Lumber & Mfg. Company 12 

Cherry River Boom t& Lumber Co 9 

Chicago Car Lumber Company 10 

Chivvis. W. R 49 

Cincinnati Hardwood Lumber Co 50 

Columbia Hardwood Lumber Company 11 

Co-op. Mill & Lumber Company 11 

Courtney, D. G 9 

Crane. C, & Co 56 

Crescent Lumber Company 56 

Crosby & Beckley Co., The 

Cude, W. J.. Land & Lbr. Company.. 

Cypress Lumber Company 56 

Darling. Chas., & Co H 

Davidson-Benedict Company 1 

Davis, W. A H 

Dennis & Smith Lumber Company... 55 
D'Heur & Swain Lumber Company... 58 

Dixon & Dewey 

Duhlmeler Bros 57 

Ellas. G.. & Bro 59 

Empire Lumber Company, Buffalo.... 59 
Estabrook-Skeele Lumber Company... 11 
Evans & Retting Lumber Company... 55 

Fan. E. H 

Farrin-Korn Lumber Company 57 

Freiberg Lumber Company, The 57 

Fuller ton-Powell Hardwood Lumber 

Company 5 

Garetson-Greason Lumber Company. . 49 

Gayoso Lumber Company 

General Lumber Company, The 37 

Gillespie, W. M.. Lumber Company.. 7 

Haas, Albert. Lumber Company 7 

Hacklcy-Plielps-Bonnell Company .... 55 

Hay ward, M. A 37 

HImmelberger-Harrison Lumber Co... 1 
Hooton, R. A., Lulnber Company.... 11 

Hoyt. C. I., & Co 58 

Indiana Lumber Company 48 

Indiana Quartered Oak Company 7 

International Felloe Mfg. Company.. 49 

James & Abbot Company 7 

Jenks, Robert H., Lumber Company.. 51 

Jones, G. W.. Lumber Company 2 

Jones Hardwood Company 7 

Kampf. Albert R 2 

Kentucky Lumber Company 67 

Lamb-Fish Lumber Company 60 

Lesh & Matthews Lumber Company.. 11 

Linehan Lumber Company 50 

Litchfield. William E 7 

Ix>mbard, E. B 11 

Long-Knight Lumber Company 58 

Love, Boyd & Co 48 

LuehrmanTi, Chas. F., Hardwood Lum- 
ber Company 49 

Maley, Thompson & MofTett Company 57 

Martin-Barriss Company 51 

Massengale Lumber Company 49 

Maus, H. H., & Co., Inc 7 



McCauley-Saunders Lumber Company. 11 

Mcllvain, J. Gibson. & Co 6 

McLean-Davis Lumber Company 2 

McLean, Hugh, Lumber Company. ... 69 

Miller, Anthony 59 

Miller Eros 11 

Mosby. H. W.. & Co 8 

Nicola Lumber Company, The 50 

O'Brien, John. Land & Lumber Co... 10 

Paepcke-Lelcht Lumber Company 4 

Phila. Veneer & Lumber Company.... 6 

Plummer Lumber Company 49 

Price, E. E 7 

Radina, L. W., & Co 57 

Ransom. J. B.. & Co 

Rhubesky, E. W 2 

Richmond Park & Co 10 

Ritter, W. M., Lumber Company 5 

Rumbarger Lumber Company 

Ryan & McParland 10 

Scatcherd & Son 59 

Schofield Bros 7 

Slimmer, F., & Co 10 

Smith, R. M., & Co 8 

Sondheimer, E., Company 4 

Southern Lumber Company 2 

Standard Hardwood Lumber Company 59 

Stearns Company, The 56 

Steele & Hibbard 49 

Stewart, I. N., & Bro 59 

Stimson, J. V 58 

Stone, T. B.. Lumber Company 56 

Sullivan. T.. & Co 59 

Swann-Day Lumber Company 8 

Three States Lumber Company 60 

Turner, A. M.. Lumber Company 50 

Vestal Lumber & Mfg. Company 49 

Walnut Lumber Company, The 58 

Wells, R. A.. Lumber Company 10 

West Florida Hardwood Company 7 

White Lumber Company 10 

Whitmer. Wm., & Sons, Inc 6 

Wiborg iS: Hanna Company 57 

Wilison Bros. Lumber Company 50 

Wood, R. E.. Lumber Company 6 

Wylie, A. W H 

Yeager, Orson E 59 

Young tSi Cutsinger 58 



Advance Lumber Company 51 

Atlantic Lumber Company 1 

Brown, W. P.. & Sons, Lumber Co... 2 

Cheat River Lumber Company 50 

Courtney, D. G 9 

Crane. C, & Co 56 

Cude. W. J., Land & Lbr. Company.. 

Davidson-Benedict Company 1 

Dawkins, W. H., Lumber Company.. 8 

Haas, Albert, Lumber Company 7 

Hayden & Westcott Lumber Company 10 

Hay ward. M. A 37 

Hooton. R. A., Lumber Company 11 

Kentucky Lumber Company 57 

•KeyesFanniu Lumber Company 41 

Massengale Lumber Company 49 

McLean-Davis Lumber Company 2 

Rhubesky. E. W 2 

Ritter, W. M., Lumber Company 5 

Smith. R. M., & Co S 

Southern Lumber Company 2 

Stewart-Roy Lumber Company... 56 

Swann-Day i^umber Company 8 

Vansant. Kitchen & Co 60 

Wood, k. E., Lumber Company 6 

Yellow Poplar Lumber Company 60 

COTTONWOOD AND GUM. 

Anderson-Tully Company 4 

T^arrin-Korn Lrmber Company 57 

Himmelberger-Harrison Lumber Co. . . 1 

Lamb-Fish Lumber Company 60 

Luehrmann, C. P., Hardwood Lumber 

Company 49 

Mosby. H. W., & Co 8 

Paepcke-Lelcht Lumber Company 4 

Sondheimer, E., Company 4 

Three States Lumber Company 60 



CYPRESS. 

Cypress Lumber Company 56 

Plummer Lumber Company 49 



VENEERS. 

Grand Rapids Veneer Works 48 

Phila. Veneer & Lumber Company.... 6 
Wisconsin Veneer Company 53 

HARDWOOD FLOORING. 

Advance Lumber Company 51 

Arpin Hardwood Lumber Company... 52 

Bliss & Van Auken 12 

Buffalo Maple Flooring Company, The 7 

Carrier Lumber & Mfg. Company 12 

Cobbs & Mitchell. Inc 3 

Cummer, Diggins & Co 3 

Dwight Lumber Company 8 

Eastman, S. L., Flooring Company... 54 

Fenn Bros. Company 4 

Forman, Thos., Company 6 

Haak Lumber Company 41 

International Hardwood Company.... 56 
Kerry & Hanson Flooring Company... 55 

Mitchell Bros. Company 3 

Nashville Hardwonil Flooring Company 

Nichols & Cos Lumber Company 65 

Stephenson, The I., Company 12 

Ward Bros 12 

Wilce, The T., Company 58 

Wisconsin Land & Lumber Company.. 55 

Wood Mosaic Flouring Company 2 

Young, W. D., & Co 12 

SAW MILL MACHINERY. 

Garland, M. , Company 

Gordon Hollow Blast Grate Company. 42 

Mershon. W. B.. & Co 45 

Phoenix Manufacturing Company 53 

WOODWORKING MACHINERY. 

American Wo^xl Working Machinery 

Company 47 

Berlin Machine Works, The 

Covel Manufacturing Company 

Crown Iron Works 

Defiance Machine Works, The 42 

Holmes, E. & B., Machinery Company 45 

Matteson Manufacturing Company 41 

Ober Manufacturing Company, The... 51 

Sinker-Davis Company 46 

Smith, H. B., Machine Company 

Woods, S. A., Machine Company 46 

LOGGING MACHINERY. 

Clyde Iron Works 44 

Lidgerwood Manufacturing Company. 45 

Overpack, S. C -^^ 

Russel Wheel & Foundry Company... 48 

DRY KILNS AND BLOWERS. 

Gordon Hullnw Blast Grate Company. 42 

Grand Rapids Veneer Works 48 

Morton Dry Kiln Oimpany 53 

New York Blower Company 42 

SAWS, KNIVES AND SUPPLIES. 

Atkins, E. C, & Co 44 

Covel Manufacturing Company 

Crown Iron Works 

Gillette Roller Bearing Company 42 

Hanchett Swage Works 43 

Marshall, Francis 41 

Matteson Manufacturing Company 41 

LUMBER INSURANCE. 

Adirondack Fire Insurance Company.. 
Lumber Insurance Company of New 

York I 

Lumber Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 

Iiany, Boston 1 

Lumber Underwriters 12 

Pennsylvania Lumbermen's Mutual 

Fire Insurance Company 

Rankin, Harry, & Co 3S 

MISCEXLANEOU&. 

Chllds, S. D., & Co 41 

Gillette Roller Bearing Company 42 

International Felloe Mfg. Company.., 49 

Lacey. James D.. & Co 43 

Lumbermen's Credit Association 41 

Martin & Co 51 

Pennsylvania Door & Sash Company.. 7 

Poole. Clark L., & Co 12 

Schenck, C. A., & Co 2 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



41 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 

When you have anything to Hell, or wish to 
purt;huse anything in the way of 

HARDWOOD LUMBER 

CROSS TIES OK PILING 

Norval Osburn, Seaman, Ohio 



Keys=Fannin 
Lumber Company 

Manufacturers of Band 
and Circular sawn 

SOFT 

YELLOW 

POPLAR 



Plain and quartered red and white 
Oak, Hemlock, Bass and Chest- 
nut. Give us a trial. 



Herndon, Wyoming Co., W. Va. 



COUNTERFEIT CHECKS 



are frequent 
except where 
our 

Two Piece 
Geometrical 
Barter Coin 

Is in w^e, then 
Imitation isn't 
possihie. 
Sample IC you 
ask lor It. 

S. D. CHILDS 
4 CO. 

Chicago 

We also make 
Time Checks, 
Stencils and 
Log ilammers. 




Send Us Your Orders 

We Have on Hand Ready for 
Shipment a Nice Stock of 

2'/4 Clear Maple 
Flooring 

ALSO OTHER SIZES AND GRADES 

Our fine timber, modern plant and 
skilled workmanship combine to 
make a flooring that cannot be ex- 
celled. You will be pleased with it. 

HAAK LUMBER CO. 

HAAKWOOD, MICH. 



Save Your Money 



By Using the 



RED BOOK 



Published Semi-Annually 
in January and July 



It contains a carefully prepared list of the 
buyers of lumber in car lots, both among 
ihe dealers and manufacturers. 

The book indicates their financial stand- 
ing and manner of meeting obligations. 
Covers the UNITED STATES and MANI- 
TOBA. 

The trade recognizes this book as the au- 
thority on the lines it covers. 

A well organized Coileciion Department 
is also operated and the same is open to you. 



WRITE FOR TERMS. 



Lumbermen's Credit Association 

Established 1878 

1405 Greal Northern Building, CHICAGO 

18 Broadway. : NEW YORK CITY 



MENTION THIS PAPER 



A machine that declares saw mill dividends 




ftjr-cife- :-^it. .fc.-.i,^ .|jx 





AUTOMATIC SWING SAW flAUGE. 



^ An inexpensive little device 

that sai'es a dollar a day and 

upwards. 

^ Stops one of the biggest 

profit leaks at the mill. Pays 

for itself several times over 

during a year. 

^ Isn't it worth investigating? 



FRANCIS MARSHALL, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Improved 
Automatic 
Band Saw 
Sharpener 




All Machines Fully Guaranteed 



CThis machine excels all others for single cutting Band Saws from 8 to 14 
inches. Its construction is mechanically correct, simple and durable, and 
does not possess any of the intricate complicated parts that confuse the oper- 
ator. The head is adjustable so that straight wheels can be used with the same 
results as concave. 



C 



This represents just one type of machine. Wo make in addition a com- 
plete line of modern tools for the care of saws. 

For particulars address 

Matteson Mfg. Co. 



120-128 S. CLINTON STREET, 



CHICAGO, ILLS. 



42 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



"DEFIANCE" WOOD-WORKING MACHINERY 

COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS OF 

HIGH GRADE TOOLS 

^ FOR MAKING ^ 

Hubs, Spokes, Wheels, Singl.: Trees, Hoops, 

Wagons, Carriages, Handles, Bobbins, Spools, 
Rims, Shalts, Poles, Insulator Pins and 

Neck-Yokes, Oval Wood Dishes. 

INVENTED AND BUILT BY 

The DEFIANCE MACHINE WORKS 

DEFIANCE, OHIO. 
NO. 1 AUTOMATIC HUB LATHE. Send for 500 Page Catalogue 





32 " AUTOMATIC SPOKE LATHE. 




Works 

BUCYRUS, OHIO 



ESPECIALLY 

Adapted for Handling Shavings, Saw° 
dust and Stringy Material of All Kinds 

i-piECE FAN WHEEL. "** Catalogue ^q obstructions. 

58=G 

We Also Make Lumber Dryers. 

New York Blower Company 




Main Office : 

25tb Place and Stewart Avenue 
CHICAGO 



Do you lack steam ? 



We can help you. 



The Gordon Hollow Blast Grate Co. 

GREENVILLE, MICHIGAN 

MANUFACTUHERS OF 

THE CELEBRATED GORDON HOLLOW BLAST GRATE 

("Arv Ervormovis Bla^cksmUh's Forge") 

AND THE ECiU.\LI.Y 

Famous "Tower" Line of Edgers and Trimmers 

CO-MrUISlXG 

Forty Different Sizes and Styles 

Forming by far the largest and most complete line of edgers and 
trimmers on tlie market. 




We make a specialty of the "TOWER" 32" EDGEH, NEW 
MODEL (.see cut), which is especially designed for mills cutting 
not to exceed 20,000 feet in ten hours, and wliich makes a small 
mill A LARGE MILL IN MINIATURE. 

We Lead; Others Follow. 







This Truck— The Gillette Truck— with its Roller Bearing Axle — 
Unbreakable Malleable Iron Caster-Fork, Improved Stake Pockets 
and general Superioritv of Construction is the Easiest Running 
Truck niaile. Strongest where other trucks are weakest. Best 
Truck to buy. Cheapest Truck to use. Invest money in these 
trucks. Do nut waste it on others. 

GILLETTE ROLLER BEARING COMPANY 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 




HARDWOOD RECORD 



43 



ESTABLISHED SINCE 1880 



TIMBER 

WE OFFER TRACTS OF VIRGIN TIMBER IN LOUISI- 
ANA, MISSISSIPPI, FLORIDA, ALABAMA AND ALSO ON 

PACIFIC COAST 

We employ a larger force of expert timber cruisers than any other firm in the wor.d. We have furnished 
banks and trust companies with reports on timber tracts upon which millions of dollars of timber certifi- 
cates or bonds have been issued. We furnish detailed estimates which enables the buyer to verify our reports 
at very little expense and without loss of valuable time. Correspondence with bona fide investors solicited. 



JAHES D. LACEY & CO. 

JAMES D. LACEY, WOOD BEAL, VICTOR THRANE. 



608 Hennen BIdg., NEW ORLEANS 
1200 Old Colony Bldg., CHICAGO 



LARGEST TIMBER DEALERS 
IN THE WORLD 



507 Lumber Exchange, SEATTLE 
829 Chamber of Com., PORTLAND 



Veneered Columns and SKafts 

We have unequaleci facilities for perfect Veneering in 
all kinds of hani woods. Our Veneering on Columns 
and Shafts for Bar Fixtures, Dining Room Tables 
and all kinds of Furniture will not warp, split, come 
off or lose its color. 

Our stock of Veneers represents the choicest cuttings 
from the finest logs. Each piece is handled with the 
greatest care. The strips are clipped, worked to size and 
finished by the most skilled and painstaking workmen. 

You cannot get more durable or more beautiful Ve- 
neering than is done in our factory. 



r 

% 



THEY 

CAN NOT 

COME 

APART 






KoH's Patent Lock Joint Colvimns 

Are made in all hard woods. Veneered or Solid Stave. 
Tfiey are perfect architecturally and can not come apart. 

We make a hobby of executing all orders with unfail- 
ing promptness. 

Write today for our beautiful illustrated catalog. It's 

free. 

HENRY SANDERS COMPANY 

900 Elston Avenue, Chica.go 



^ Manchett - Hanchett ■ Hanchett ^ 



Hanchett 
Saw Sw^age 

Every one made Perfect 

The Sivage with a Name 



^ A poor Swage Kuins a Good Saw, and 
for that reason the manufacturers of the 

HANCHETT ADJUSTABLE SWAGE 

employ only the Best Mechanics and use 
only the Best Material in their construction. 



It Pays Us 
to make 
The Best 



Send for 

Catalog 

No. 10 

It tells you all 

about them 



It Pays You 

to use 

The Best 



MANU'^ACTURED BY 



Hanchett Swage Works 

Big Rapids, Michigan 



^ Hanchett - Hanchett - Hanchett ^ 



44 



HARD^VOOD RECORD 




cost more than other Saws, because they are BETTER. 
The First cost of a Saw does not count for much. 
What you want is your Money's Worth. Isn't it better 
to pay a fair price and get the best rather than a low 
price and get poor goods? Try an ATKINS SAW. 
They're better. 



E. C. ATKINS & CO., Inc. 

The Silver Steel Saw People. 
Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis. 



Branches: Atlanta, Chicago, 

New York City, Portland, 



Memphis, 

San Francisco, 



Minneapolis, 
Seattle, 



New Orleans, 
Toronto. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



45 



A Gang Ripping Macliine That Rips Straight 




IMPROVED VARIABLE FEED GANG RIPPING AND STRAIGHTENING MACHINE 



The IdeaLl Ma.chine for Flooring Ma.n\ifa.cturers, 
Furniture Fa-ctories, Dimension Stock Producers, etc. 

LET us TELL YOU ALL ABOUT IT 



E. 4 B. Holmes 

Machinery Co.,%' 



BUFFALO. 
Y. 



Catalogs of our full lines of Wood Working, 
Cooperatie ami Ilanie Machinery for the asking 




LIDGERWOOD MACHINES 

WILL STOCK YOUR MILL 



SKIDDERS 
SNAKERS 
YARDERS 



LOADERS 
PULL BOATS 
CABLEWAYS 



LIDGERWOOD MFG. CO, .M 

96 Liberty St., New York. 
NEW ORLEANS ATLANTA SEATTLE 




'«, — - I- — ^^> 



Standard 
54 Inch 
Band 
Re-Saw 




MERSHON 

BAND-RESAW SPECIALISTS 



25 MODELS 

ADAPTED TO 
EVERY REQUIREMENT 



Wm. B. Mcrshon & Co., Saginaw, Mich.. D.S.A. 



46 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



No. 24 C FLOORING MACHINE 




A heavy, powerful, eight roll matcher particularly suited to producing, in quantity, Hard= 
wood Flooring of High Finish. SPECIAL PATENTED Appliances and Attachments. Write us 
and we'll tell you how we can double your output and improve the quality. :::::: 

S. A. Woods Machine Co., Boston 



CHICAGO 



SPECIALISTS IN 
FLOORERS, PLANERS AND MOULDERS 



SEATTLE 




THE "HOOSIER" 
SELF-FEED 
RIP SAW 



The cut shows a front view of our Hoosier Self 
Feed Rip Sawing Machine; it has a square raising 
table, easily operated by a crank in front of the 
machine and is always firmly locked, at any point, 
thus preventing any jarring or falling down and 
doing away with all clamp bolts and screws. The 
machine has our patent feeding device, with two 
feed shafts, one in front of the saw with a thin star 
feed wheel and one in the rear with a corrugated 
roll, the advantage of which can be readily seen. 

This machine will rip stock 6 inches thick and 
by using the saw on the outer end of the mandril 
will take in stock 17i inches between guide and 
saw. It can be used with a gang of saws by the 
use of spacing collars on the mandril. It has no 
equal in the rapid production of slats, cleats and 
dimension material of all kinds. Price S175.00. 

We also build the machine with a movable 
saw, at a slightly higher price. 

Write for Full Description. 



Sinker-Davis Co. 

Manufacturers of 

SAW MILL MACHINERY 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



47 



0) 



:3 

o 



a; 

o 

So 






u 

B 




48 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



The KNEELAND BIGELOW CO. 

MANUrACTURER.S OF LUMBER 



Annual Output: 

20,000,000 ft. Hardwoods. 
20,000,000 ft. Hemlock. 

4,000,000 pes. Hardwood Lath. 

9,000,000 pes. Hemlock Lath. 



Mills R-vin the Yea.r 
Arovind. 



Bay City. Mich. 



INDIANA LUMBER CO. 

Manufacturers Lumber 

DIMENSION STOCK A SPECIALTY. 

Office and Mills: Corner Oldham TVT A CXJX/TT T t? T'CXTKT 

Street and Cumberland River IN Aatl V ILLt, 1 ClNiN. 



GEO. C. BROWN & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Hardwood Lumber 



Tennessee Red Cedar l,umber a Specialty. 



Nash\-ille. Tennessee 



DRY HARDWOODS 

1.50,000 ft. Tennessee Red Cedar Boards (Aromatic) 
150,000 ft. 4-4 Is and 2s Plain Red Oak. 

.50,000 ft. 5-4 Is and 2s Plain Red Oak. 
200,000 ft. 8-4 No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak, 

44,000 ft. 10-4 No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak. 

80,000 ft. 8-4 No. 1 Common Quartered Red Oak. 
.300,000 ft. 4-4 Shipping Cull Plain Oak. 
Also fair stock of Poplar and Hickory. 

LOVE, BOYD & CO. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



RUSSEL WHEEL AND FOUNDRY CO. 



WE BUILD 

Lo^^ing Cars 

AND 

Logging Machinery 

Your Correspondence Solicited 



DETROIT. MICHIGAN 




.\LLOW US TO POINT OUT 

THE ADVANTAGES OF 

OUR EQUIPMENT 



Wf- 



TELL US YOUR WANTS 
AND GET OUR PRICES 



Hardwoods Dried in a Week ! 



Dept. D. 



^Our method can be attached to .your old Kiln. 
^If it does not do all we claim after being installed, 
we will take it out without expense to you. 

Grand Rapids Veneer Works 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



49 





c* nn 


• 
OF 


1 /'^ f T T ^ 


^ 1 


Lr O LJ 1 ^ 


LARGEST 


ALL HARDWOOD MARKETS 



CHAS. I LDEHRMAi HARDWOOD LUMBER COMPANY 



Carry a complete stock of Hardwood and are 

constantly in the market to purchase 

large blocks of stock for cash. Are 

also the largest manufacturers of 

the famous St. Francis 

Basin Red Gum. 

General Offices: 148 Carroll Street 



Garetson=Greason Lumber Co. 

J2J2-J3-I4 Times Building 
ST. LOUIS 

MANUFACTURERS 



Shipments of Plain and Quartered Oak, Ash, Cypress and Gum 
Lumber direct from our own mills in straight or mixed carloads. 



STEELE & HIBBARD LUMBER CO. 

North BrosLtlway and Dock Streets 
Wholesale Manufacturers, Dealers and Shippers 

ASH, CYPRESS. MAHOGANY. OAK, POPLAR, &c 

Mills: Yazoo City. Miss.; McGregor, Arlj.; England, Arlt.; 
Dermott, Ark. O'Hara, La.; De.xter. Mo. 



MASSENGALE LUMBER CO., ST. LOUIS 

Manufacturers and dealers in 

HARDWOODS 

In the market to buy and sell OAK, POPLAR, ASH, CYPRESS 
Large stock dry lumber alwayson hand 



Wantcd-to Boy or Contract (or future Delivery 

500,000 to 1,000,000 ft. Poplar, all grades 
600,000 to 1,000,000 ft. Cypress, all grades 
500,000 to 1,000,000 ft. Ash, all grades 

SsteTt^^'J PLUMMER LUMBER CO. ITs^g^M 



W. R. CHI WIS. 



Lesperance Street and Iron 
Mountain Railroad. 

WHOLESALE HARDWOODS 

BLACK WALNUT LUMBER MY SPECIALTY. Always in the market to buy 
Walnut and Cherry Lumber. Pay spot cash and take up at shipping 
point when amounts justify. 



Vestal Lumber & Mfg. Co. 

Manufacturers and Wliolesalers 
of all kinds of 

HARDWOODS 



BEVELED SIDING A SPECIALTY. 
UNSURPASSED FACILITIES 
FOR DELIVERING. 



Knoxvillc 
Tennessee 



American Hardwood Lumber Co* 

14,000,000 ft. Hardwood Lumber 

YARDS AT BENTON, ARK., NEW ORLEANS, LA.. ST. LOUIS, MO., 
DICKSON. TENN. 



TVSu?" "Want and For Sale" Columns 

others are Securing Results 
Why Not You? 

Hardwood Record 




;ORPORATED 

MANUFACTURERS OF STANDARD SIZE 

WAGON FELLOES AND WAGON STOCK 

Send your requirements and receive price. COLUJVloUb, JVII0&. 



so 


HARDWOOD RECORD 






D I nn T* c: T~> f T i~y i'^m 


1^11 l^UUrcvJ 


HARDWOOD DISTRIBUTING CENTER OF PENNSYLVANIA , 

■■ '' 



A. M. Turner 
Lumber Company 



Everything in lumber. We buy hardwoods 
as well as sell them. If you have anything 
to offer, please tubmit same to ui. t t 



Willson Bros* Lumber Co* 



MANUFACTURERS 



WEST VIRGINIA 
HARDWOODS 

FARMERS BANK BLDG. k PITTSBURG, PA. 



sxock: list 

The following list covers the hardwoods we now have on hand. Special 
price f. 0. b. cars mill for all one ^ade. We would be pleased to have 
you favor us with your inquiries and orders. 

4 4 Maple, No. I Common 2 Cars 

S/4 '' " " 2 Cars 

5/4 " " " and Better 59,000 Feet 

6/4 " " •' I Car 

6/4 " Firsts and Seconds 2 Cars 

8/4 " No. 2 Common 2,500 Feet 

10/4 " Firsts and Seconds 1 Car 

10 4 " No. 2 Common and Better 7 1, 000 Feet 

12 4 " No. 1 " 1,500 Feet 

12/4 " "2 " 1,000 Feet 

4/4 Bassweod, Log Runm.c. o 1 car 

8/4 " 1 car 

DRY STOCK 

Favorable Freight Rates to the East. 

BABCOCK LUMBER CO.. Ashtola, Pa. 



FOR SALE 



POPLAB 

128,000' 4/4 lsand2s 
40,000' 4/4 No. 1 Com. 
325,000' 4/4 No. 2 Com. 
228,000' 4/4 No, 3 Com. 
150,000'4/4Mill Cull 



CHESTNUT 

200,000' 4 4 Sound Wormy 
80,000' 5/4 Sound Wormy 

100,000' 6/4 Sound Wormy 
48,000' 8, 4 Sound Wormy 



PLAIN OAI 

60,000' 4/4 No, i Com. 
18,000' 4/4 No. 2 Com. 

QUABTEHED OAI 
2 cars 4/4 No. 1 Com. 
1 car 4 4 No. 2 Com. 



OAK TIMBERS SAWBD TO ORDER. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 

CHEAT RIVER LUMBER COMPANY, Pittsburg, Pcnna. 



American Lumber ^ Mfg. Co. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 



Hardwoods a Specialty 



COTTONWOOD WANTED 



We want to buy one to five million feet of 
log run Cottonwood. We will send our in- 
spector to take the stock up at the mill and 
pay cash for it as shipped. 

ASH WANTED 

300M feet 6-4, 8-4, 14-4 and 16-4 No. 1 
Common and 1st and 2nds for immediate 
shipment, or to be cut and shipped when dry. 



The Nicola Lumber 
Company 



One million feet 4-4 Bay Poplar. 
Can be shipped log run, or sold 
on grade. Bone dry) band 
sawed. Send your inquiries. 



Oak Flooring 



Maple Flooring 



Best that Care and Skill can Produce 



Can Ship Oak Flooring in Mixed Cars with other 

HARDWOODS 

Right Grades Right Prices Prompt Shipments 

LINEHAN LUMBER CO. 

2423 Farmers Bank Bldg., PITTSBURG, PA. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



51 



CLEVELAND 

HARDWOOD DISTRIBUTING CENTE.R OF NORTHERN OHIO 



The 

Robert H. Jenks Lumber 

Company 

44 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, O. 

OFFER.S: 

5 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd Poplar— 7" to 17" 
4 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd Poplar— 18" to 23" 
3 Cars 4/4 Poplar Box Boards— 7" to 12" 

10 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Poplar (Selects in ) 

10 Cars 4/4 No. 2 Common Poplar 
3 Cars 4/4 No. 3 Common Poplar 

2 Cars 5/4 No. 1 Common Poplar (Selects in) 
8 Cars 8/4 No. 1 (Common Poplar (Selects in) 

10 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd White Oak 
15 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd Red Oak 
15 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Red Oak 
10 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common White Oak 
10 Cars 4/4 No. 2 Common White Oak 
20 Cars 4/4 Mill Cull Oak 

3 Cars 4/4 Common and Better Chestnut 
1 Car 6/4 Ojmmon and Better Chestnut 

4 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Chestnut 

5 Cars 5/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 
5 Cars 6/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 

10 Cars 4/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 
10 Cars 8/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 



The Martin-Barriss Company 

Importers SLnd iMsLnufacturers 

MAHOGANY 



&nd Fine H&rdw^ood 



SYMBOLS FOR GRADE MARKS 

Adopted by the Hardwood Manufacturers Association of United States 

A 


Q Panel and Wide No. 1 


ZA Selects 


/\ Wide No. 2 


Ql^ No. 1 Common 


B Box Boards 


Q2^ No. 2 Common 


/f FAS or Firsts and 
^" Seconds 
^ Saps 


(3^ No. 3 Common 
(^ No. 4 Common 


Every Manufacturer should stamp the grade on his Lumber. 
Set of 10 Rubber Stamps, V4"xll{" in size, Pad, Pint of Ink. and 
Spreader, packed for shipment $3.50. 

AT/\RTIN <fe CO. LEWIS DOSTER. Sec'y 


191 S. Clark St., CHICAGO, or 


1535 First Nal. Bank lldg. CHICAGO 



HARDWOODS 

Dry Stock is Scarce 

Mill Shipments are Slow in Coming Forward 



We therefore call attention to stock of upwcircis 
of SIX MILLION FEET seasoned HARD- 
WOODS we offer for quick shipment from 
Cleveland. WANT TO CLEAN IT OUT. 
Are you interested ? 



The Advance Lumber 
Company 

13th Floor. Rockefeller Bldg.. CLEVELAND, O. 

Manufacturers and Dealers 
In White Pine, Yellow Pine, Hemlock and Hardwoods 



This cut shows the 44 inch No. 2 

OBER LATHE 



fortuming Pick, Sledge, Hammer, 
Hatchet and Double Bitted Axe 
Handles, WhiiHetrees, Yokes, 
Spokes, Porch Spindles, Stair 
Balusters, Table and Chair Legs, 
BaO Bats, etc. We also manufac- 
ture the No. 2 Lathes in 3 other 
sizes, viz.: 36 in., 33 in., 22 in. 




Simple, Strong, 
Durable, Economical 



We also manufacture other 
Lathes for making Spokes, 
Handles and Variety Work. 
Sanders, Shapers, Boring and 
Chucking Machines, etc., etc 
Complete catalogue and price 
list free. 



THE OBER MFG. CO., 28 Bell St., CHAGRIN FALLS, 0., U. S. A. 



52 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



WISCONSIN 



WHERE THE FINEST NORTHERN HARDWOODS GROW 



WRITE US FOR QUOTATIONS ON THE FOLLOWING: 



RED BIRCH 



f 300,000 ft. 1 in. No. 1 Common and Better 

! 150,000 ft. 11 in. No. 1 Common and Better 

^1 125,000 ft. U in. No. 1 Common and Better 

(^ 100,000 ft. 2 in. No. 1 Common and Better 



PLAIN BIRCH. 100,000 ft. 1 in. 1st and 2nd Clear. 

HEMLOCK. 200,000 ft. 2 in. No. 3 Hemlock. 100,000 ft. 2x6 and wider No. 3 Hemlock. 

Mason-Donaldson Lumber Company 



Inquiries answered promptly and 
orders tilled without delay. 



RHINELANDER., WIS. 



John R. Davis Lumber Company 

PHILLIPS, WISCONSIN 
The Leading Manufacturers 

Wisconsin Hardwoods 

"SHAKELESS" HEMLOCK and WHITE CEDAR PRODUCTS 

WE HAVE THE FINEST BLOCK OF 

4-4 UNSELECTED BIRCH 



ON THE MARKET 



Write for our Price Lists 
and Stock Sheets 



Mixed Cars, Even Grades 
"^ Prompt Shipments 




We have 
to offer 
the 

following 
stock in 

file at 
ngram, 
Wis. 



WAUSAU, WIS. 



20,000 ft. 2 in. No. 2 Common Plain Birch. 
1 24,000 ft. 1 in. First and Second Red Bircli. 
\ 11,460 ft. H in. Fir.st and Second Ited Birch. 
4,700 ft. 2 in. First and Second Red Birch. 
2,144 ft. 1 in. Curlv Birch. 
2,350 ft. IJ, U and 2 inch Curlv Birch. 
22,000 ft. 1 in. End Dried White Birch. 
144,000 ft. 1 in. Select Pine, 
f 57,000 ft. U in. No. 3 Shop and Better Pine. 

19.000 ft. li in. Select Pine. 
v,26,000 ft. U in. No. 1, No. 2 and No 3 Shop. 

Write us for prices on hemlock. 



Your 

orders 

and 

Inquiries 

solicited 



We are prepared to furnish mixed carloads 

And solicit your inquiries and orders. At present we are 
offering Red Birch in thicknesses, I" to 2i" common 
and better, also Maple, Birch and one quarter sawed 

RED o/\k: rlooriing 

Basswood Ceiling and Siding and Finish, also Molding 

Our hardwood flooring "A. H. L." Brand, is the 
highest grade as to workmanship and quality. 

ARPIN HARDWOOD LUMBER CO. 

GRAND RAPIDS, WISCONSIN 
Saw Mill, Planing Mill and Yard at Atlanta, near Bruce, Wis. on "Soo" Line. 



SAWYER GOODMAN CO. 



We Manufacture at Marinette. Wisconsin 



BASSWOOD, ELM, BIRCH, MA- 
PLE AND BLACK ASH LUMBER 



White Pine Pattern Lumber 
and Cedar Boat Lumber 



C. P. CROSBY 

RHINELANDER s 8 WISCONSIN 

Wholesale Hardwood Lumber 



I want to sell birch, in No. 1 common & better. I have 
4-4, 5-4, 8-4, and 12-4, good dry stock. Mixed cars easily 
filled. 

DIFFICULT AND MIXED ORDERS A SPECIALTY 



Vollmar & Below Company 



MARSHFIELD, WISCONSIN 



Basswood, Birch 

and Other Wisconsin Hardwoods 



LET US KNOW WHAT YOU ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 



HARDIWOOD RECORD 



53 



NVI S C O N S I N 

WHERE THE FINEST NORTHERN HARDWOODS GROW 



Frank Carter Co. 

MANUFACTURER 

Wisconsin Hardwood 



SPECIALTY-HARD MAPLE 



MiUs: DURAND 

SPRING VALLEY 
GLEN FLORA 
ELMWOOD 
HILLSDALE 



General Offices : 



MENOMONIE, WIS. 



Wisconsin Veneer Co* 

RHINELANDER, WIS. 

Largest and best equipped Veneer 
cutting plant in the country. High- 
grade product from Birch, Maple, 
Elm, Basswood, Ash and other na- 
tive woods. 

Veneers for Door Work a Specialty. 



North Western Lumber Company 

MANUFACTURERS OP BAND-SAWED 

Wisconsin Hardwoods 



CAREFUL GRADINGS — PROMPT SHIPMENTS 

General Offices. EAU CLAIRE. WIS. Mills at STANLEY, WIS. 




R. CONNOR CO. 

^V HOLES ALE MANUFACTURERS 

Wisconsin 
Hardwood 

PINE AND HEM- 
LOCK LUMBER 



Mills at 

Aiiburii<iale.Wis.,on W. C. R.R. 

Slratford. Wis.,on C. & N.W.R.R. 



Marshfjeld, Wis. 




you want a 
foot band mill? 



This is a first-class 
machine and will 
give the best of re- 
sults. It is strong, 
well made, and as 
good as it looks. 
Write us and wc will 
give you full particu- 
lars. 



Phoenix Mfg. Co. 

Eau Claire, Wis. 



Michigan Logging Wheels 



standard 
for a 
Quarter 
Century 




Cheap and easy logg"inK. 
Write for circular & prices. 



S. C. OVERPACK 



MANISTEE, 
MICH. 



The Morton Dry Kiln 



MOIST AIR SYSTEM 



Recording 
Ther- 
mometers. 
Transfer 
Cars. 




Trucks. 

Canvas 

Doors. 



HOW TO DRY LUMBER. 

As exemplified in our Catalog D. Free on application. 

MORTON DRY KILN CO., Chicago, Ills. 



54 






HARDWOOD 


RECORD 












M 


I C H I 

IS FOR HARD MAPL 


Q A N 


















FAMOt 


C AND GRCY E.LM 







The North Shore Lumber Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Hardwood and Hemlock Lumber 



Rail and water shipments 



THOMPSON 



MICHIGAN 





BIRCH 


WE WANT YOUR ORDERS FOR 

4/4 AND 5/4 COMMON AND BETTER 




A No. I STOCK 


The 


Earle Lumber Company 

SIMMONS, MICHIGAN 



W. H. WHITB, Pres. 

JAS. A. WHITE, Vice-Pres. 



W. L. MARTIN, Secy. 

THOS. WHITE, Treas. 



W. H. WHITE COMPANY 

BOYNE CITY. MICHIGAN 

Manufacturers of Hardwood and Hemlock Lumber, Cedar Shingles, 

White Rock Maple Flooring. 



You can't go astray 
when in the market 



IF YOU WRITE THE 



Northern Lumber 
Company 



RUSH CULVER, Pres. 



BIRCH, MICHIGAN 



C We manufacture from our 
own forests, the finest line of 
Northern Hardwoods on the 
market. C We have the woods, 
the machinery, the experience, 
enabhng us to fill your orders 
right. 



BOYNE CITY LUMBER COMPANY 

BOYNE CITY 

MICHIGAN ROCK MAPLE and other HARDWOODS 

LARGE CAPACITY PROMPT SHIPMENTS RAIL OR CARGO 




J. S. GOLDIE, 

Cadillac. ;: Michigan. 

Low Price on five cars 2J" Clear 
Maple Squares, 17" to 27" long. 

Correspondence Solicited on Michigan 
Lumber, especially White Maple. 



S. L. EASTMAN FLOORING CO. 

■AQINAW BHAND 

MAPLE FLOORING 

SAGINAW, MICH. 



You read this= 


-others 


will, 


too. 


They would 


read 


your 


ad. 


Try it. 









HARDWOOD RECORD 






55 








M 


I C H I 

JS FOR RED BIRCH 


Q 

AND 


A 

BASS 


N 


















FAMOl 


WOOD 







"Chief Brand" 
Maple Flooring 

Will commend itself to you and your trade on 
its merits alone. 1 Comprises all the features 
desirable in pood flooring. ■[ Made by the latest, 
most approved machinery methods and best 
skilled labor, t We believe we can make it to 
your interest to handle our "Chief Brand" and 
will appreciate your inquiries. 

Kerry 4 Hanson Flooring Co. 

GRAYLING, MICHIGAN 



DENISIS BROS 



GRAND RAPIDS, 



MICHIGAN 



HARDWOOD LUMBER (by water or rail) 
"NATIONAL" MAPLE & BIRCH FLOORING 



SPECIAL BARGAINS IN THE FOLLOWINQ: 

120M feet 4 4 Log Run Birch 
12SM feet 6 4 Log Run Birch 
2 Cars 8 4 Common and Better Birch 

1 Car 1x4 Clear Birch 

2 Cars 1x7 and Wider No. 1 Common Birch 
140M feet 5 4 Log Run Beech 

160M feet 4 4 Log Run Soft Elm 

Hard Maple— All grades and thicknesses 



Main Office : 

205-209 Miciiigaa 

Trust 

Company 

Building 



Evans & Retting Lumber Co. 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 

Hardwood 
Lumber 

RAILROAD TIMBERS, TIES AND SWITCH TIES 

Michigan Trust Building Grand Rapids, Mich. 



DENNIS & SMITH LUMBER CO. 

Wholesale Hardwood Lumber 

Office and Yards, FOURTH AND HOLDEN AVENUES. 
DETROIT, MICH. 

MILLS AT: OrDdorfl. W. Va., Healers W. Va.. and Parkersburg, W. Va. 



HackleyPhelpsBonnell Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Northern and Southern 

Hardwood Lumber 



Main Office, Michigan Truit Company Building 

GRAND RAPIDS : . . . MICBIGAN 




OUR SLOW METHOD 2;i^'£.?-g?^Sg 

I X L POLISHED 

ROCK MAPLE FLOORING 

Enables us to offer you an excellent and superior product — 
One which has; stood the test 20 years. 

WRITE TODAY FOR PRICES AND BOOKLET 

Wisconsin Land ^ Lumber Co. 

Hermansville, Michigan 



SALLiNQ, HANSON CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Michigan Hardwoods 



GRAYLING, MICHIGAN 



56 



HARDWOOD RECORD 





/'^ I 1X_T i'^ ¥ IN^T 1N.T A ^TT* 1 


oirNOirsrNA i i 


THE, GATEWAY OF THE SOUTH 



The Stewart=Roy Lumber Co. 



CINCINNATI 



Selling Agents 
for 
Product of 

ROY 

LUMBER 

CO. 




Will Buy 

OAK, ASH, 

POPLAR, 

CHESTNUT, 

BASSWOOD 

All Grades and 
Thicknesses 



The Stearns Company 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Northern and Southern 

HARDWOODS 



Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Cincinnati, 0. 



C. CRANE & COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS 



Poplar, Oak, Ash, Chestnut, Sycamore, 
W. Va. Spruce, Pine and Elm 



YEARLY CAPACITY 100,000,000 FEET 



LONG BILL STUFF A SPECIALTY 



Mills and Yards: CINCINNATI. OHIO 



THE HOUSB OF STOINE 

The One ot Good Grades 
Poplar, Oak, Chestnut Cottonwood, Ash, Basswood and Qum 

T. B. STOINE LUMBER CO. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



Cash buyers for stock in our line. 

Cincinnati Hardwood Lumber Co. 

GEST AND SUMMER STREETS 

Wholesalers Mahogany, Thin Lumber, Veneers 

Finely figured quarter sawed oak veneers a specialty. 



THE . . 



CRESCENT LUMBER CO. 




Manufactdeers op 



% Hardwood Lumber 



MARIETTA. O. 



CYPRESS LUMBER CO. 

Manufacturer of Hardwoods and Cypress 

*'lain and Quartered White and Red Oak, Yellow Poplar, 
Yellow Pine, Walnut, etc. Mills in Temi., Ala. and Va. 

OFFICE AND YARDS. GEST AND DALTON AVE., CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



§ 



For items of Hardwood Stock or Hardwood 
Machinery, you will find it advantageous to 
write our advertisers. Get in touch 1 



OAK FLOORING 

Thoroughly Kiln Dried. 
Perfectly Manufactured. 
We are located in the best Oak Timber section in the 

United States; have new and modem machinery and 

experienced operators. 
Why should we not be able to furnish the best Oak 

Flooring? 
Write us and we will convince you that we can. 

The INTERNATIONAL HARDWOOD COMPANY 

Catlettsburg, Kentuclty 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



57 



i"^ I 1VT /"^ ¥ IX T IX T A T^ ¥ 


oirNc^irsrNAT i | 


THE, GATtWAY OF THE SOUTH 



IN THE MARKET FOR 



OAK-ASH-POPLAR 



ALL GRADES AND THICKNESSES 



MOWBRAY & ROBINSON 



Office! 
f219 ^est Sixth Street 



Yards: 
Sixth Street, below Harriet 



L. W. RADINA & COMPANY 

Correspondence Solicited with Buyers and Sellers of All Kinds of 



Wanted for cash — desirable blocks of 1 inch to 4 inch Poplar, all grades, 

Especially l>i-inch stock, for immediate shipment. 



=CLARK STREET AND DALTON AVENUE^ 



PLAIN OAK—BASSWOOD 

Are what we want. All thicknesses and grades. Spot 
cash. Send us list of your offerings with prices. 



DUHLMEIER BROS., 



CINCINNATI, 0. 



THE WIBORG & HANNA COMPANY 



CINCINNATI. OHIO 



PLAIN 
AND 

QUARTER 
SAWED 



White and Red Oak 



I CHESTNUT 

POPLAR 

GUM AND 

CYPRESS 



Flooring, Siding, Ceiling, Base, Case and Molding. Rough, Dressed and Re-sawed. Mixed Carloads. 



THE 

MALEY, THOMPSON & MOFFETT CO. 



Always in the Market for 

BLACK WALNUT LOGS. 
SELECTED WHITE OAK LOGS, 
LUMBER OF ALL KINDS. 



CINCINNATI, 



OHIO 




THE FREIBERG LUMBER CO. 

Manufacturers ot 

Tabasco Mahogany 
Walnut, OaK 

Poplar, McLean and Findlay Ats. 

CINCINNATI. O. 



"BUY GUM" 

We ore in the market to buy 
Dry Gum Lumber in any 
quantity, from a single car 
load to a million feet. Will 
take all grades and thlcl£- 
nesses. We receive lumber 
at shipping point, pay cash 
and are Jiberal in inspection. 




THE FARRIN-KORN 

LUMBER COMPANY 

General Office, Tarda, 

Planing MiUb, Dry Kilns, 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Furchasing Office. 

Randolph Building, 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Cypr«s9 Red Gum Oak 



WANTED 



POPLAR and GUM 

SEND LIST OF DRY STOCK. WILL CONTR.-^CT FOR 
MILL CTTS. 

KENTUCKY LUMBER COMPANY 

CINCINN.'^TI, OHIO 



Hardwood Board Rules 

FOP HARDWOOD LUMBERMEN 




Best Goods, Prompt Shipment 

Send your orders to the HARDWOOD RECORD, 355 Dearborn Street 



58 



HARDWOOD RECORD 







INDIANA 


















WHERE THE BEST HARDWOODS GROW 







J, V. Stimson 



ALL KLNDS OF 



HARDWOOD LUMBER 

MANUFACTURED 

HUNTINGBURG, IND. 



D'Heur 4 Swain Lumber 
Company 

MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Quartered Oak and Sycamore 

SEYMOUR, IND. 



April Stock: List 

25,000 ft. 1 in. No. 2 Common Walnut 

50,000 " 2 " Common and Better Plain White Oak 

50,000 " 6-4 Red 

50,000 " 5-4 
100,000 " 4=4 " " " 

15,000 '■ 6=4 and 8=4 Cherry Culls 
100,000 " 4-4 No. 2 Common and Better Red Ouni 

10,000 " 4»4 1st and 2nd Plain Red Oak 

10,000 " 4-4 1st and 2nd Ash 

Long:=Knight Lumber Co. 

INUL\NAPOLI8. INU. 



Three Mills in Indiana 



FORT WAYNE 



INDIANAPOLIS 



LAFAYETTE 



Biggest Band Mill in the State 
Long Timbers up to Sixty Feet 

HARDWOOD SPECIALTIES 

Everything from Toothpicks to Timbtrs 

Perrine=Armstrong Co. 



-Uirr WAYNE 



INDIANA 



Young 4 Cutsinger 



MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS 



OUH SPECIALTY 



Fine Figured Quartered Oak 

E VA N S Y I L L E, INDIANA 



ALWAYS IN THE MARKET 

For choice lots of hardwoods. 
Wahuit our specialty. 
Inspection at Mill Points. 

The Walnut Lumber Company 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



C. I. Hoyt 4 Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Quartered and Plain Oak, Poplar, 
Ash and Chestnut 

Offer a few cars 4 4 and 6 4 Plain Oak to move quick 
PEKIN, INDIANA 



A floor to adore 

For thirty-three years Wilce's Hardwood Floor- 
ing has heen among the foremost on the market 
and because it stands today "unequaled" is the 
I 'est evidence that its manufacturer has kept 
ahreast of modern methods and the advanced de- 
mands of the trade. To convince yourself of the 
above .statements, try our poHshed surface floor- 
ing, totigued and grooved, hollow backed, with 
matche<l ends and holes for blind nailing — you'll 
hnd it reduces the expense of laying and poli.shing. 
Our Booklet teih ail about H a rdzvood Flooring ayfd 
hinv tu care Joy it— a/so prices — and is/ree. 

The T. Wilce Company 

22nd and Throop Sts. CHICAGO. ILL. 




HARDWOOD RECORD 



59 



BUFFALO 

THE GREAT WHOLESALE L U M B E, R CENTER OF THE EAST 




Manufacturers and 
Dealers in 

Ash 

white and Brown 

Basswood 
Birch 

Red and White 

Butternut 

Cherry 

Chestnut 

Cottonwood 

Cypress 

Elm 

Soft and Rock 

Gum 

Red and Tupelo 

Hickory 
Maple 

Bard and Soft 

Red Oak 

Plain and Quartered 

White Oak 

Plain and Quartered 

Black Walnut 
White Wood 

Poplar 




EMPIRE LUMBER COMPANY 



Our specialties are PLAIN »nd QUARTERED OAK and ASH. 

1142 SENECA STREET. 



G. ELIAS & BROTHER 



BXJY AND CARRY LARGE QUANTITIES OF ALI> KINDS OF HARDWOODS 

95,'j TO 1015 ELK STREET 



HUGH McLEAN LUMBER COMPANY 

Specialty: INDIANA WHITE OAK 



940 ELK STREiJT 



ANTHONY MILLER 

HARDWOODS OP ALL KINDS 



893 EAGLE STREET 



SCATCHERD & SON 

HARDWOODS ONLY 

Yard, 1555 SENECA STREET Office, 886 ELLICOTT SQUARE 

STANDARD HARDWOOD LUMBER CO, 

OAK, ASH AND CHESTNUT 

1075 CLINTON STREET 

L N. STEWART & BROTHER 



specialties: CHERRY AND OAK 



892 ELK .STREET 



T. SULLIVAN & COMPANY 

Specialties: BROWN ASH, BIRCH, PACIFIC COAST FIR AND SPRUCE 

50 ARTHUR STREET 

ORSON E, YEAGER 

Specialtiei: OAK, ASH AND POPLAR 

932 ELK STREET 



BEYER, KNOX & COMPANY 

ALL KINDS OF HARDWOODS 

Office and Yards, 69 LEROY AVENUE 

BUFFALO HARDWOOD LUMBER CO, 

We want to buy for cash : 

Oak, Ash and other Hardwoods, all grades and thicknesses. 
Will receive and inspect stock at shipping point. 
P. O. Box 312. MEMPHIS. TENN. 940 SENECA STREET 



Vansant, 



5-8 AND 4-4 

IN WIDE STOCK. 

SPECIALTY 



Kitchen £1 



MANUFACTURERS OLD-FASHIONED 

SOFT YELLOW 
POPLAR 



Ashland* Kentucky 



Company 



Three States Lumber Co. 

OFFERS 

1 00,000 feet 5-4 Fir^s and Seconds Cottonwood 
1 00,000 feet 1 3" to 1 7" Box Boards Cottonwood 

Prompt Shipment Memphis, Tennessee 

Lamb -Fish Lumber Co. 

SUCCESSORS TO LAMB HARDWOOD LUMBER COMPANY, BACON-NOLAN-HARDWOOD COMPANY GUIRL-STOVER LUMBER COMPANY 



MaLnufa.c- 
furers 



OAK, ASH, COTTONWOOD, GUM 
AND CYPRESS 

MAIN OFFICE: 720 MEMPHIS TRUST BVILDING, MEMPHIS. TENN. 



<-., Tk « ««•«« i Memphis, Tenrv. i\ €> * 1^* ( Well MsLnufa 

Three Band Mills j 1.'^--:^!^^!'' 0"^ Specialties { ^-^ «i^tpr 



Memphis, Tenrv. g\ £» i_lA* [ Well Ma.nufactured Stock 

es 
ipments 



YELLOW POPLilR 



MANUFACTURERS 

BAND SAWED 
POPLAR 
LUMBER 



DRY 



ALL GRADES 



5-8, 4-4, 5-4,6-4, 8 4, 10-4, 12-4,16 4 

Bevel Siding, Lath & Squares 

SPECIALTY, WIDE STOCK 



Coal Crove, Ohio, U, S. A. 




HoMwoM RocoM 



Twelfth Year. * 
Semi-monthly, f 



^ CHICAGO. MAY 10, 1907. 



(Subscription $2 
(Single" 



Copies, 10 Cents. 



1 



ROSS LUMBER COMPANY 



The Cherry People 



ANYTHING IN CHERRY? 



Write Us. 



JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 




ferfy tnatjutactared and treated tot 
pri accordance with methods iev 
Venty-five years' experience. || 



HIMfMEL 




Throw Away Your Money 

BY STICKING TO OLD LINE COMPANIES 



PENNA. LUMBERMEN'S MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

943 Drexel Building. PhilatdelpKiaL. Pa. 

Rumbarger Lumber Company 

Main Office: 808 Harrison Bldg., IStli and Market Sts., Pliiladelphia, Pa. 
New York Office: 8018 Metropolitan Bldg., 1 Madison Avenue. Pittsburg Office: 701 Keystone Building 

40 Cars 4-4 Birch Log Run. 
10 Cars 4-4 Quartered Red Oak, No. 1 Common. 
10 Cars 4-4 Chestnut, No. 2 Common. 
10 Cars 4-4 Oak, No. 2 Common. 
A stock of Southern White Pine, I", IJ", 1|" and 2", mostly No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 barn. 

We are operating a tract of timber land containing considerable HoUy and Persimmon. We can ship W. Virginia spruce sizes and boards, either rough or 
dressed, via any railroad. 



Lumber I n s u r a n c e C o m p a n y of New York 
Adirondack Fire Insurance Company 
Toledo Fire 4 Marine Insurance Company 



Combined Assets Over $1.000.000 

Specialists in Lumber Insurance 



FOR LINES AND RATES ADDRESS 



Lumber Insurers' General Agency, 



84-88 Williams St., 
New York City 



ADVERTISERS' CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY FOLLOWS WANT AND FOR SALE ADVERTISING SECTION. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



I /^ iTic^/^ii I r~? 


JUCJUI^VlLrLIV 




HANUFACTDRING AND DISTRIBUTING CENTER OF KENTUCKY 





Dry Stock w. P. BrowR & SoHS Lumber Co. 



Louisville, Ky. 



PLAIN BED OAK. 
65,000' 1" 1st & 2nd. 
25.000' IVt" 1st & 2a. 
49,000' Hi" Ut & 24. 
57.000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
18,000' 2%" 1st & 2d. 
18,000' 3" l8t & 2d. 
131,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
84,000' 114" No. 1 Com. 
44,000' Hi" No. 1 Com. 
47.000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
8.000' 2W No. 1 Com. 
15,000' 3- No. 1 Com. 

QITARIEBED RED OAK. 
lO.OOO' 1' 1st & 2d. 



14,000' 1%" 1st & 2d. 

5,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
15,000' 1- No. 1 Com. 

7,000' H4" No. 1 Com. 
13,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 

PLAIN WHITE OAK, 

80,000' 1" let & 2d. 
28,000' 114" 1st & 2d. 
12,000' IH" Ist & 2d. 
42,000' 2" let & 2d. 
23,800' 214- 1st & 2d. 
16,000' 3" 1st & 2d. 
227,000' 1- No. 1 Com. 
60,000' 114" No. 1 Com. 
80.000' ly,' No. 1 Com. 



50,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
17,000' 2^4" No. 1 Com. 
22,000' 3" No. 1 Com. 

QUAKTEEED WHITE OAK. 

50.000' 1" 1st & 2d. 
28,000' 1>4" 1st & 2d. 
45,000' IMi" 1st & 2d. 
49,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
19,000' 2%" 1st & 2d. 
18.000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
30.000' IVi" No. 1 Com. 
40,000' 1%" No. 1 Com. 
22,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
10,000' 3" No. 1 Com. 



ASH. 

0,000' 1" iBt & 2d. 
65.000' m" l8t & 2d. 
16,000' 1%" 1st & 2d. 
10,000' 2- 1st & 2d. 

8,000' 2H" iBt & 2d. 
14,000' 3" 1st & 2d. 

6.000' 4" l3t & 2d. 

4.000' IVt' No. 1 Com. 
16.000' IMi" No. 1 Com. 

8.000' 2" No. 1 Com. 

POPLAB. 
12,000' 1" lat & 2d. 



All thicknesses In cull poplar, ash, chestnut. 



Your inquiries will be appreciated. 



12,000' 114" 1st & 2d. 
11.000' 1%" 1st & 2d. 
12,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
10,000' 2%" 1st & 2d. 
10,000' 3" Ist & 2d. 
50,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
28,000' 1%" No. 1 Com. 
10,000' IVi" No. 1 Com. 
10.000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
15.000' 1" 18" & up 1st & 2d. 

8,000' 2" 18' & up 1st & 2d. 

6,000' 2" 24" & up 1st & 2d. 

4,000' 1%" 18" & up 1st & 2d. 

3.000' 1%" 24" & up Ist & 2d. 

Prompt delivery guaranteed 



Wood-Mosaic Flooring and Lumber Co. 



ALL KINDS OF 



Hardwood Lumber 
and Sawn Veneers 

NEW ALBANY, INDIANA 



Rochester, N. Y. ) 
Louisville, Ky. r Factories. 
New Albany, Ind. ) 



Good Grades 
Prompt Shipments 
Inquiries Solicited 



McLean -Davis Lumber Co. 

Successors to 

Hugh McLean Lumber Co., Highland Park, Ky. 
Edward L. Davis Lumber Co., Louisville, Ky. 
Berry - Davis Saw Mill Co., Louisville, Ky. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Hardwood Lumber 



Daily Capacity: 
80,000 feet. 



Sales Offices: 
Louisville, Ky. 



50 CARS. ONE INCH 




M 




LOG 


A 

p 

L 


ON 


RUN 


grade: 




E 




G. W. Jon 


les Lii 


imber Co. 


APPLETON, WIS. 















Albert R. Kampf 

Manufacturer 

Hardwood L,uml)er and Timber 

Dimension Stock 

Board ol Trade BIdg.. Louisville. Ky. 




E. W. Rhubesky 

Wholesale 

Poplar. Rough and Dressed. 

Oak, Chestnut and Other 

Hardwoods 














North Vernon 
Lumber Co. 

Band Sawed Plain and Quartered 

Oak and Poplar. 

North Vernon, Ind.. and 

Louisville, Ky. 




Southern Lumber Co. 

Oak, Poplar and 

Chestnut. 
I^ouisville, Ky. 










1 



All Lumbermen, Attention! 

We do what you can't do. 
We measure your stumpag:e correctly. 
We make your maps correctly. 
Bank references: Asheville, N. C. 

C. A. Schenck ^ Co. XlX'l^^^. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 









c 


A 

ATED FOR 


D 

UIGB . 


1 L 

STANDARD OF 


L 

QUALITY 


A 

AND MILL 


c 


















CELEBS 


WORK 




_ 



■Mitchell's Make— ^ 



CHOICE 



WHITE BASSWOOD 



ALL CLEAR 
ALL WHITE 
BONE DR.Y 



End stuck in shed and just 
what you want if you use 
sucli stocli. It is 1 inch thick 
and we have one large car. 



PLEASE SEND US YOUR INQUIRIES 

Mitchell Brothers Company 

CADILLAC, MICH. 



The Cadillac Handle Co. 

Band Sawn 
Michigan Hardwoods 

SPECIAL OFFER^INGS: 

5 Cars 4 4 Hard Maple, 1st and 2nds. 
3 Cars 5 4 Hard Maple 1st and 2nds. 

6 Cars 5 4 Hani Mai)le, No. 1 and 2 Common 

1 Car 6/4 Hard Maple, 10 in. and wider. No. 1 Common and 

Better. 

2 Cars 4/4 Birch, No. 2 Common and Better. 



MURPHY & DIQQINS 

Offtr all grades of the following special dry stock 

MAPLE— 5/4. 6/4, 8, 4, 10/4, 12/4, 14/4, 16/4 
CRAY ELM-4/4, 12/4 
BASSWOOD— 4/4. 
BIRCH-4/4, 6/4 

Our own manufacture. Perfect Mill Work. Uniform Grades. 
LET US nOURE ON YOUR HARDWOOD WANTS. 



Cummer, Diggins & Go. 



=MANUFACTURERS= 



"CUMMER" MAPLE 
AND BEECH FLOORING 



MICHIGAN HARDWOODS 



Good assortment of dry stock on hand ready 
for immediate shipment in Hard Maple, Beech, 
Birch, Soft Elm and Cherry. 



SEND US A LIST OF YOUR REQUIREMENTS. 




DRY ST 



OCK J 



Northern Michigan 

Soft Gray Elm 

what our old cork pine was to the regular 
white pine — such is our Soft Gray Elm to 

ordinary soft elm. Buyers who gladly discrim- 
inate in favor of something better than the or- 
dinary, will be interested. We have 

2 cars 10-4 firsts and seconds. 
4 cars 12-4 firsts and seconds. 

Wide, choice stock, our own product, seasoned right, 
bone dry. 

VTBITE US ABOUT IT. 




COBBS&HirGHELL 

(INCORPORATED) 

CAPILUG. MICHIGAN 




HARDWOOD RECORD 



PAEPCKE-LEICHT LUMBER COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



COTTONNVOOD 

GUM AIND OTHBR HARDWOODS 

Large stocks of well seasoned Lumber always carried at our yards and mills. 
General Offices: HOW, Chicago Ave., CHICAGO. Mills: Cairo, III., Marked Tree, Ark., Greenville, Miss., Arkansas City, Ark., Blylheville, Ark. 




(im^ ^ 



Cable Address: "Sonderco" Memphis. 



Codes Used: Lumberman's Telecode and ABC 5th Edition 
MANUFACTURERS 



HARDWOOD, GUM, COTTONWOOD AND CYPRESS 

Main Office: Tennessee Trust Building, Memphis, Tenn. 

Offers the following specials: 

50 Cars I inch No. 1 Common Cottonwood 10 Cars I 1/4 inch Is and 2s Cypress 

50 Cars I 1/4 inch No. 1 Common Cottonwood 10 Cars 2 inch Is and 2s Cypress 

50 Cars 1 inch No. 2 Common Cottonwood 10 Cars 1 1 /4 inch No. I Common Ash 

50 Cars 1 1/4 inch No. 2 Common Cottonwood 10 Cars 1 1/2 inch No. 1 Common Ash 

Plain and Quarter Sawed White and Red Oak, Elm, Cottonwood, Poplar, Gum, White Ash and 

Cypress. Direct shipments from our own Mills of Lumber from our own Timber our 

Specialty. We manufacture and put in pile 300,000 ft. Hardwood every 24 hours. 



Anderson-Tully Company 



OFFERS STOCK FOR SALE 

Three cars 6/4x8 in. and up 1st & 2nd Cottonwood 

One " 7/8x8 " 

Two " 5/4x12 " 

Two "4/4 " " Plain Red Oak 

MEMPHIS, TEININESSEE 



FENN BROS. COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Oak Flooring 

Quarterod \A/hi!t^ HoIIoia/ BacRe^d 

Quartei-ed Rod End /Watched 

F»lain lA/hit» Polished 

F»laJn Re>d Bored 

Offices si-rvd PlSLrvt : 

Kansas and Mallory Ave., New South Memphis. 

(Take Soulb Memphis car (o Mallory Ave.) 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



WEST VIRGINIA YELLOW POPLAR 
NORTH CAROLINA CORK WHITE PINE 

AND HARDWOOD 



DRY KILNS AND PLANING MILLS. ALL OUR MILLS RUN THE YEAR ROUND. 
SEND US YOUR INQUIRIES AND ORDERS. 

W.M.Ritter Lumber Co. 



COLUMBUS. OHIO 

Saw and Ship 100,000,000 Feet Yearly 



FULLERTON-POWELL 

Hardwood Lumber Co. 



OFFERS THE FOLLOWING STOCK 
FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 



15 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Quartered White Oak 10 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 10 to IG ft. 

20 cars 1 in. No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak 7 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 12 ft. 

10 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Plain Red Oak S cars 2 in. 1st and 2nds Sap Gum 

2 cars IJ in. Plain Red Oak Step Plank 8 cars 2 in. No. 1 Common Sap Gum 

1 car 1\ in. Plain Oak Step Plank 5 cars 2 in. No. 2 Common Sap Gum 

4 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Plain Red Oak, 12 in. and 20 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Cottonwood, 6 in. and wider 
wider -1 cars 1 in. No. 1 Common Cottonwood 



BRANCH OFFICES: 

/ (Quotations \ MAIN OFFICES 

OHIOAGO, 1104 Chamber of Commerce | cheerfully I 

MEMPHIS, TEMH.,305 Tennessee Trust BIdg. \ t ij / . C/^fl/A *f\^TIi1 T tl H 

mmMEAP0US.MmH.,30B Lumber E^oHanuo \ f"™^'^^'^ / k3 OlZf/? 1^6710, ITIU, 




HARDWOOD RECORD 



WILLIAM WHITMER. (Si> SONS, Inc. 

ALWAYS IN THE MARKET FOR STOCKS OF 
WELL MANUFACTURED 

HARDWOODS 



BRANCHES: 
NEW YORK, BOSTON, PITTSBURG 



MAIN OFFICES: 
GIRARD TRUST BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 



THOMAS FORMAN CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH GRADE 

Maple and Oak Flooring 

We desire to move promptly a large quantity of 

13-16x1 i" Clear Quarter Sawed White Oak Flooring. 
13-16xli" Clear Plain Sawed White Oak Flooring. 
13-16xli" Clear Plain Sawed Red Oak Flooring. 
13-16xl|" Clear Maple Flooring. 

Please w-rite us for special delivered prices on the above lots. 



The Crosby & Beckley Company 



HARDWOODS 



We are 
In the Market for Choice Stock 

WRITE US 



No. 1 Madison Ave., 
New York, N. Y. 



New Haven. 
Connecticut. 



JOHN T. DIXON 



HARRY S. DEWEY 




We are not Wizards in making new grades to fit a price. 

No tricks in our methods of making shipments. The 
straight grades are good enough for us. 

If you will give us a trial order for POPLAR., OAK, 
ASH, CHESTNUT or OAK, MAPLE and YELLOW 
PINE FLOORJNG, we believe we can demonstrate our 
ability to please j'ou. 



DIXON & DEWEY 



716 and 716 A, Flatiron Building, 



NEW YORK 



Phila. Veneer 4 Lumber Co. 

817 NORTH FIFTH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



PILED ON OUR KNOXVILI.E. TENNESSEE YARD 

1 car 4.4 Is and ?.s Plain Wliite Oak 

6 cars 4'4 No. 1 Common Plain Wliite Oak 
18 cars 4/4 No. 2 Common Plain White Oak 

2 cars 8/4 No. 1 Common and Bt-tl. r Wlutn ():ik 
1 car 6, 4 Common and Hi-tttr Wliiti- Oak 

1 car 5, '4 Common and Bt-ttpr White Oak 
i car 8 4 Common and Better White Oak 

2 cars 4/4 No. 1 Common (Quartered White Oak 
J car 4/4 Is and 2s Quaitereil White Oak 

i car 4 4 No. 1 Common and Better Qnartered Red Oak 

We also manufacture Sawed and Sliced Quartered Oak Veneers. 
Can make prompt shipments. 



McUvain's Lumber Notes 



We have 4,000,000 feet Chestnut— some of it 12 to 15 

months' old — all grades and thicknesses. 
2.250.000 feet Poplar— 5/8 to 16/4, all grades. 
500.000 feet choice Gulf Cypress. We can make prompt 
shipments. Send in your inquiries. 

Did you say White Pine? We're fixed to give you satis- 
factory grades and prices. Ask for anything you waut, 
special or regular, and see how well we can satisfy your 
demands. More than a million feet in various grades from 
Uppers and Selects to Culls. 



J. Gibson McIIvain & Co. 



56th (o 58th Sts. and Woodland Ave 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 


7 




nr* i.-i r~T r~? A c nr* 


lllfc tiA^l 




BOSTON NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA 1 



JOHN L, ALCOCK & CO. 

BUYERS OF BLACK WALNUT LOGS 
BOARDS AND PLANKS 

Baltimore, Md. 



Inspection at point of 
shipment. Spot cash. 



THE BUFFALO MAPLE FLOORING CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

MICHIGAN ROCK MAPLE AND OAK FLOORING 

BUFFALO, NEW YORK 



The West Florida Hardwood Co. 

MnJ- ON Apai.achicola River 
MARYSVILLE, FLA. 

Ash Red and White Oak Red Gum 

Hickory Yellow Cottonwood Tupelo Gum 

= LET US HAVE YOUR INQUIRIES = 



BALTIMORE 
M A R Y L A 



N^o E. E. PRICE L^ 



U YE R AND 
XPORTER OF 



Hardwoods, Poplar and Logs 

I am always in the market for nice lots of dry and %veil manufactured 
lumber. I inspect at point of shipment. Correspondence solicited. 



Pennsylvania Door & Sash Co. 

HARDWOOD DOORS 
AND INTERIOR FINISH 



NEW YORK 



PITTSBURG 



PHILADELPHIA 



Wantcd-Dimension Oak,Sj£SS 

White and Red. Send for specifications. 

IndieLiiaL Q\ia.rtered OaLk Co. 

7 Eevst 42nd Street, New York City 



James & Abbot Company 

Lumber and Timber 

No. J 65 MILK ST„ BOSTON, MASS., and GULFPORT, MISS. 



JONES HARDWOOD CO. 



INCORPORATED 



WANTS: Poplar, Plain Oak, 
Quartered Oak and Cypress. 



147 MILK STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Manufacturers please send slock lists and prices. 



Holloway Lumber Company 

WHOLESALE HARDWOODS 



In the marSet for all thicknesses of 
OAK, ASH and CHESTNUT. 



312 Arcade Building, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WM. E. LITCHFIELD 

MASON BUILDING, BOSTON, MASS. 

Specialist in Hardwoods 

Manufacturers are requested to supply lists of stock for sale 



VV/E are long on S, 4 Sound Wormy Chestnut. Send us your in- 
*• quiries. Let us quote you on Plain or Quartered Whvlte and 
Red Oak. Look us up. 

SCHOFIELD BROTHERS 



PENNA. BUILDING 



LUMBER 



PHILADELPHIA 



Sales Agents: Long Pole Lumber Co., Case-Fowler Lumber Co. 



Mills: 

Honaker. Va. 

Birmington, Ala. 



SOBLE BROTHERS Q^t^i^^Lne 

3=i::zzrnr^^^:z:irrz^:z^^ Oak, Poplar. 
WHOLESALE LUMBER 
Land Title Building = ■ Philadelphia. Pa. 



WISTAR. UNDERBILL & CO. 

PHILADELPHIA 

WHOLESALE HARDWOOD LUMBER 



MICHIGAN WHITE PINE 
TENNESSEE WHITE PINE 



HEMLOCK HARDWOODS 
ALABAMA PINE 



H. 


H 


. MAUS & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS 

HARDWOOD and YELLOW PINE. 

Write us if you wish to buy or sell. 


INC. 


420 Walnut 


St., . - PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



W. M, GILLESPIE LUMBER 

HARDWOODS COMPANY Farmers Bank BIdg. 
Oak a Specialty PITTSBURQH, PA. 



ALBERT HAAS LUMBER CO. 

BAND SAWED 

OAK AND ASH 

YELLOW POPLAR 

ATLANTA ... - GEORGIA 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



SWANN-DAY LUMBER COMPANY 

CLAY CITY. KENTUCKY 
OFFER 



POPLAR 



Bevel Siding. Drop Siding, as vv^ell as Wide Poplar 

Always a Large Stock on Hand Prices are Yours for the Asking 



MAY STOCK LIST 



HARD MAPLE 
1 in. 1.000,000 ft. 
U in. 100,000 ft. 
- ■ ■ 100.000 ft. 

50.000 ft. 

50,000 ft 



li in 

3 in 

4 in 



1 in. 



1 in. 
H in. 

2 in. 
2i in. 



BEECH 

100,000 ft. 
BIRCH 

500,000 ft. 

100,000 ft. 

100,000 ft. 

50,000 ft. 



BASSWOOD 
1 in. 300,000 ft. 

GRAY ELM 
1 in. 300.000 ft. 
li in. 200.000 ft. 
3 in. 200,000 ft. 



Kelley Lumber & Shingle Co. 



TraLverse City, Mich. 



The Tegge Lumber Co. 




MILWAUKEE 
WI SCONSIN 






BUYERS OF 
ALL KINDS OF 




HARDWOOD LUMBER 



Quartered Oak Flooring 

Manufactured for 

HIGHEST GLASS of trade only. 

Also Plain Oak, Maple and other Hardwood flooring. 

The name D WIGHT on flooring- is a guarantee of its 

excellence. 
DWIGHT SPECIAL pattern of thin flooring is the 
only suitable thin flooring to lay. Write for Sample. 



DWIGHT LUMBER. COMPANY 

DETR-CIT. MICHIGAN 



R W. Mosby & Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



COTTONWOOD 

GUM 

ASH, ELM 



Large Stock on Hand 



HELENA, ARKANSAS 



R. M. SMITH 



J H. P. SMITH 



R. M. SMITH (^ COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

WEST VIRGINIA HARDWOODS 

PARKERSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA 

WE CARRY IN STOCK FROM TEN TO FIFTEEN MILLION FEET OF ASH, BEECH, BASSWOOD, CHESTNUT, CHERRY, 

MAPLE, PLAIN & QTD. OAK, POPLAR, WALNUT, &C. OUR PLANING 

MILL FACILITIES ARE UNSURPASSED. 

Band Mill: Orndoff, Webster County, W. Va. 



EASTERN OFFICE: 
1425-6 LAND TITLE BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 



PlaninK Mill; Heaters, W. Va. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Cherry River Boom and 



Lumber Co. 



SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA 



SPECIALS: 

4 4 While Oak, No. 1 CommoD 
4/4 Cherry, Is and 2s 

4 4 Cherry. No. 1 CommoD 
4,4 Maple, Is and 2s 

4/4 Maple, No. 1 Common 




BAND MILLS: 

RICHWOOD, WEST VIRGINIA 

CAMDEN-ON-GAULEY, WEST VIRGINIA 

HOLCOMB. WEST VIRGINIA 

DAILY CAPACITY, ■ ■ 500,000 FEET 







"THE BEST LUMBER" 



D. G. COURTNEY 




MANUFACTURER OF 




Yellow Poplar 
Oak ^ Chestnut 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



Our Timber Holdings are located exclusively in the finest sections of West Virginia 
growth. Modern mills and perfect manufacture. Standard and uniform grades. 

We seek the trade of wood-working factories who want a dependable lumber supply 
and fair treatment. 

Just now we want to move 4/4 No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 Common Oak. 



10 




HARDWOOD RECORD 












CHICAGO 


















THE GREATEST HARDWOOD MARKET IN THE WORLD 







In the Market 

To Buy 

Ash, Hickory, Poplar and Oak Lumber. 
Also Wagon Stock. 

W anted =^ Hardwood Logs for Our Memphis Mill 



RYAN & McPARLAND 

CHICAGO....MEMPHIS 



Chicagfo Car Lumber Co. 



PULLMAN BUILDING 

CHICAGO 



WE ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 

Poplar, Oak, Ash and Car and R. R. 
Material 



Hayden & Westcott Lumber Co. 

IN MARKET FOR 

POPLAR 

25 M ft. 3/4" Is and 2s, standard widths and lengths 
30 M ft. 1-1 4" Is and 2s. stamlard widths and lengths 
30 M ft. 1-1 2" Is and 2s. siaiiihud widths and lengths 
30 M ft. each 2-1/2 and 4" standard widths and lengths 

ROCK ELM 
200 M ft. 5 4 No. 1 Common and better 
SCO M ft. 8/4 Mo. 1 Common and better 

BLACK ASH 
50 M ft. each 4 4, 5 4 and 6,4 No. 1 common and better 

OAK AND ASH 
100 cars car oak framing 
25 cars white ash from 1" to 4" green or dry Is and 23 



511 Railway Exchange, 



Chicago 



White Lumber Company 

Dealers in Hardwood Lumber 



ALL KINDS 



Cherry Lumber a 
Speciatlty 




ALL GRADES 



Laflin <a 22d Sts. 
Chicago 



John O'Brien 


Land & Lumber 


Co. 


MANUFACTfRERS AND DEALERS IN 




Hardwood Lumber 






Of AU Kinds 




OFFICE AND YARDS : ^^^ ^ 

873 to 881 So. Laflin Street 1 K 1 r a ft r» 

MIL,. : PHiLiPP, MISS. ^^ n 1 c a g O 



F. Slimmer S* Company 

Hardwood 
Lumber 



Office and Yard : 

65 W. Twenty-second St. 



CHICAGO 



PARK RICHMOND (& CO. 


Wholesale 


Hardwood Lumber 


410 Monadnock Block 


HARRISON 5165 V-UlCagO 



R. A. WELLS LUMBER CO. 



Manufacturers of All Kinds of 



HARDWOOD LUMBER 

Fine Quartered Oak a Specialty 

234 LA SALLE STREET 
Yards at Canal and 2 1st Sts. CHICAGO, 



), ILL. I 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



II 




Estabrook - Skeele 

Lumber Company 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Oak, Ash, Gum, Cottonwood, Wagon 
Stock and Other Hardwoods 

In the market for round lots of Hardwood and 
Wagon Stock. Write us before selling. 

Fisher Building. CHICAGO 



McCauIey- Saunders Lumber Co. 



Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 



BAND SAWED 
LOUISIANA GULF COAST 



RED CYPRESS 



Products Exclusively 



5::rrr493o J 703 Fisher Bldg., CHICAGO, ILL. 



CHAS. DARLING & CO. 

Southern 
Hardwoods 

22nd Street and Center Avenue - CHICAGO 



Heath Witbeck Co. 

CHICAGO 



HALLEY, ARK. 



THEBES, ILL. 



McEWEN. TENN. 



WE OFEER FOR. QUICK SHIPMENT: 

4 cars IJ-in. 1 and 2 Quartered Red Oak, Dry. 
3 cars U-in. No. 1 Common Red Gum, Dry. 
100,000 ft. 1-in. No. 2 Common Plain Oak, 1 Year Old. 
\\'rite us for delivered quotations. 

NUMBER- 6 MADISON STREET 



The Columbia Hardwood Lumber Co. 



Wholesale and Retail 



Telephone 
NORTH 223 



HARDWOOD LUMBER 



47 Dominick St. 

CHICAGO 



Lesh & Matthews Lumber Co. 

1649-50 MARQUETTE BUILDING 

Are now offering bone drv BIRCH. ROCK ELM. BLACK ASH. etc., Wis- 
consin stock. Also PLAIN AND QUARTERED OAK. POPLAR, etc . 
from our Memphis yard. We are constant buyers. 





I 


WANT 


TO 


BUY 


4/' 


* R. 


ED OAK 
ALL 


AND 4/4 SAP GUM. 
G K A DES 


A. 


w. 


WYLIE. 




HOI 


FISHER BVILDING 
CHICAGO. ILLS. 



R. A. HOOTON LUMBER CO. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

POPLAR, OAK, CHESTNUT 

PRICES AR.E YOURS FOR. THE ASKING. 



J ERNEST B. LOMBARD ■ 



Manufacturer arvd WHolesale 

Northern a.rvd Southern. 
Hardwoods 

RailwaLy Exchange ^ CHICAGO 



W. A. DAVIS 

SOUTHERN HARDWOODS 

i6i2 Marquette Bldg., CHICAGO 
Branch Offices : PADUCAH. KY., and MEMPHIS. TENN. 



CHAS. MILLEH 



yniLLER BROS. 



UILTON UIIXEB 



HARD\A/OOD LUAIBER 

MalnOffice: 208 WILLOUGHBY BLDG. 6 E. MADISON ST. 
'Phone Central 1363 CHICAGO. ILL. 

Yards: Loomis St. S.of 22nd St., Chicago, 111., Houston Miss., Macon, Miss. 



12 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



"Ideal" sSRocK Maple Flooring 



is the flooring that is manufactured expressly to supply 
the demand for the beft. It is made by modern ma- 
chinery from carefully-selected stock and every pre- 
caution is taken throughout our entire system to 
make it fulfill in every particular its name— "IDEAL." 

Rough or Finished Lumber — All Kinds 

Send us Your Inquiries 

The I. Stephenson Company 

WELLS, MICHIGAN 



"m/i* « • " 



Michigan Maple Flooring 

Ourmodel factory is equipped with the highest 
class tools and appliances made for Flooring 
production. 

We produce our lumber from the best rock Ma- 
ple area in Michigan and have 20 years' supply. 

Our brand "Michigan" is a guaranty of qual- 
ity. Perfect mill vpork and excellent grades 
distinguish our Flooring and our prices are 
reasonable. 

WARD BROS., Big Rapids, Mich. 



OAK FLOORING 



KilD Dried 



/;^ HABDWOOD LUMBER ^y 



Polished 




^The HARDWOOD RECORD publishes a 
series of bulletins, showing the annual hardwood re- 
quirements of many thousands of wholesale consumers, 
by kind, grade and thickness. 

fl Indispensable to every lumber sales manager. 

^ Specimen bulletin for the asking. 



THE "FINEST" MAPLE FLOORING 



W. D. YOUNG & CO. 

BAY CITY, MICHIGAN. 

Producers from TREE to TRADE of the high- 
est type of Michigan Forest Products. Large 
stock of Maple Flooring and 15,000,000 feet 
of Hardwoods — 1 to 4 inches thick — on hand. 



Maple, Birch and Beech Lumber 



FIRE INSURANCE 

Specialists on Lumber and 

Lumber Working 

Plants 



Lumber Underwriters 



HOME OFFICE: 



66 Broadway, New York 



Just to Remind You 

That we arc manufacturers of the celebrated 

Wolverine Brand 
Maple Flooring 

** There is none better." 

Bored, polished, end and edge matched, lays with every 
joint even. Largest sales in the history of maple 
flooring. May we have your order ? 

BLISS & VAN AUKEN 

SAGINAW W. S., MICH. 



WE ARE OFFERING 

TIMBER LAND 6% BONDS 

Secured by first mortgage on Southern timber 
lands at less than SO per cent of their present 
market vaUie. Issued by large, well established, 
responsible lumber companies. Full particu- 
lars will be mailed on request. 

clark: l^. f»ool^e & co. 

SUCCESSORS TO 

H. C. BARROLL (St CO.. Bankers 

First National Bank Building CHICAGO 



Published In the Interest of Hardwood I^umber, American Hardwood Forests, Wood Veneer Industry, Hardwood Flooring. 

Hardwood Interior Finish. Wood Chemicals, Saw Mill and Woodworking Machinery. '-'^RARv 



CHICAGO. May 10. 1907. 



No. 2!'^'^*^icm 



Published on the 10th and 25th of each month by ' ^ 

THE HARDWOOD COMPANY 

Henry H. Gibson. President 

OFFICES 

7th Floor, Ellsworth Bldg., 355 Dearborn St., Chicago, III., U.S.A. 

Telephone Harrison 4960 

TERMS OF ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION 
in the United States, Canada, Philippine Islands and Mexico . . $2.00 

In all other countries in Universal Postal Union ..... 3.00 

Subscriptions arc payable in advance, and in default of written orders to the 
contrary are continued at our option. 

Entered at Chicago Postoffice as Second Class Matter. 

Advertising copy must be received five da>.ys in ab.dvaLnce of 
publication da^te. Advertising rates on application. 



ASSOCIATION MEETINGS. 



National Hardwood Lumber Association. 

The tenth annual convention of this association will be 
held on Thursday and Friday, May 23 and 24, 1907, at 
Atlantic City, N. J. 



National Lumber Manufacturers' Association. 

This organization will hold it.s amiual meeting on Tuesday 
and Wednesday, May 28 and 29, at the Auditorium on the 
Jamestown Exposition grounds, Norfolk, Va. 



General Market Conditions. 

Eeportu from the chief lumber cousiimiiig centers of the United 
States, as reflected in the market reports in this issue of the Hard- 
wood Eecord, indicate that there is a slight diminution in demand 
for hardwoods in nearly all parts of the country. It is not of euougli 
importance to warrant shading prices in the least and they are still 
very firm on all varieties of woods. This condition is no exception 
in the great consuming district of Chicago. Weather conditions 
prevailing in the South are again very bad. There has been a 
continuous fall of rain for more than a week, and a large portion 
of the southern hardwood producing section is afloat. This militates 
against active log supply, and it is estimated that the average saw- 
mill is at least thirty days behind the output of a year ago, which 
was small enough. 

There seems to be no disposition on the part of either manufac- 
turers or jobbers to worry in the least over trade slackening a bit, 
and they feel as though they would like to have an opportunity to 
catch up with business a little and get the order books fairly well 
cleaned up, w'hich they have been unable to do for a long time. 

In the Chicago district the furniture trade constitutes a large per- 
centage of hardwood buyers and manufacturers have not had as 
large a trade as they expected, hence are holding off on placing 
lumber orders. This is one feature that contributes to the lessening 
of the local trade. The situation is the same in Grand Eapids and 
Roekford, other large furniture manufacturing centers. In the 
wagon trade several associations are advising their members to sus- 



pend buying, in hopes that the market will be broken and that they 
will soon succeed in placing orders for less money. 

As a general proposition the hardwood situation is very strong and 
will remain so, even if buying falls off to a considerable extent, as 
stocks in every producing section are remarkably short and there 
seems no likelihood of an accumulation of a normal amount for 
months to come. Buyers can bank on the prophecy of the Hardwood , 
Record that general hardwood values will not be less than they are 
at the present time for a good while. . '. 

Northern hardwoods are in just about as short supply as, are 
southern, and there is very little dry stock of anji variety offered. 
Basswood, thick maple, black ash and rock elm are exceptionally 
short. There seems to be an increased call for mahogany, and (he 
trade in cherry and black walnut is even better than usual. The 
veneer people are as busy as ever and many orders have to be re- 
turned because of inability to execute them. This is true of sawn, 
sliced and rotary-cut stock, as well as of panels and other built-up 
stock. 

Flooring manufacturers are all remarkably busy, and these insti- 
tutions are up against considerably increasing values of rough lum- 
ber without a compensating increase in the price of their flooring 
product. Those engaged in this line of production who are not 
stumpage owners are having their margins whittled down to an un- 
satisfactory basis. A marked example of this condition is oak floor- 
ing, which does not command a price commensurate with the high 
price of oak limiber. 

Timber Supply of the United States. 

The United States as a whole consumes each year between three 
and four times as much wood as all its forests can produce in the 
same inten'al. The average acre of forest in this country grows 
about ten cubic feet annually instead of the thirty or more which 
it should in order to keep pace with the drain upon it. Since the 
year 1880 more than 700,000,000,000 feet of timber have been cut 
for hunber alone, including SO. 000,000, 000 feet of coniferous timber 
more than was estimated to be standing in the entire eoiuitry by 
the census of 1880. 

The Forest Service, which has just issued a circular dealing 
W'ith the timber supply and with stumpage estimates as furnished by 
important authorities, is sponsor for the startling statements made 
in the above paragraph. A study of the document will lead to the 
usual conclusion that forest products of the United States are being 
consumed far too lavishly, and that the inevitable result will be a 
timber famine unless the government lays a heavy hand upon such 
depredations. 

With regard to hardwoods, the amount of stumpage is very in- 
definitely known, and is determinable only with difficulty, owing to 
the scattered and uneven stands. It was estimated at some 435,- 
000,000,000 feet in 1880 and at about 300,000,000,000 in 1900; 
although as late as 190.5 other than government authorities placed it 
at 400,000,000,000. Whatever it may be, that which is fit for the 
saw is rapidly decreasing. In 1900 the hardwood cut was 8,634,000,- 
000 feet; in 1904, 6,781,000,000 feet. The present annual cut of 
hardwoods is estimated at about 5,000,000,000 and consists of ap- 
proximately forty-three per cent oak, twelve per cent poplar, nine 
per cent nmple and lesser amounts of numerous other timbers in 
this class. 



14 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Lest it be assumed that the rapid depletion of forest resources is 
siif5ScieTitly accounted for by the increase in population, it should 
be, noted that statistics show the increase in population since 1880 
to be half the increase in lumber cut during the same period. At 
present but one-fifth the total forest area of the United States is 
embraced in National Bcserves, the rest remaining in private hands. 
The average age of trees felled for lumber this season is not less 
than one hundred and fifty years, so that it is obvious the stumpage 
owner must wait at least a hundred years for his land to produce 
another such crop, but Americans are too strongly addicted to the 
get-rich-quick habit to have patience with such investments, so that 
the nation and the states individually must look toward the pro- 
tection of coming generations and future industries. 

Railroads and the Freight Problem. 

One of the most pleasing signs of the times is the fact that the 
leaders in thought and management of railroad affairs are at last 
falling into line, and now seem to be willing to cooperate with the 
public in correcting transportation abuses. 

A notable exhibition of this spirit was manifested by Melville E. 
Ingalls, chairman of the Big Four System 's board of directors, in 
a speech made before the Pittsburg Traffic Club, in which he de- 
clared that President Roosevelt is about the only and probably the 
best friend the railroads have. He emphasized the fact that they 
might as well quit fighting and submit to regulation, and said, ' ' Any 
man who is not prepared to manage his railroad as a public institu- 
tion in accordance with the law should resign and seek some other 
business." More than three hundred prominent railroad men and 
a large gathering of manufacturers and shippers listened to Mr. 
Ingall's speech. This sort of spirit on the part of even a few as 
prominent in railroad affairs as is Mr. Ingalls will very soon bring 
about more satisfactory and certainly much more amicable relations 
between the railroads and the shipping public. 

Another striking evidence of this spirit of conciliation, and one 
that promises to be a foremost movement in the history of trans- 
portation, is the recent organization by Secretary W. G. Hollis of 
a car service department for the Northwestern Lumliermen 's Associa- 
tion. At a conference between members of this organization and the 
railroads the former agreed to submit to the association all its 
claims and complaints against the roads, which the new department 
will investigate, passing over to the railroads at interest only such 
claims as it deems worthy. The railroads on their part agree that 
such cases, with attached evidence, shall be accepted in good faith 
as the basis of adjudication. This agreement has been entered into 
by all the roads centering at Minneapolis and St. Paul. 



The Hardwood Buying Situation. 

The struggle between jobbers and manutacturers nt hardwood 
lumber goes on. The jobbers are making strenuous attempts to 
buy round lots of desirable stock at a price that will leave them a 
margin of profit, but manufacturers, even down to the owner of the 
small ground mill, are very independent. 

A feature of lumber trading that is jiarticularly in evidence at 
this time is the unwillingness of manufacturers in the South and 
Southwest to sell lumber on the basis of the rules of the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association. Prominent St. Louis hardwood men 
state to the Eecokd that the best grades of half-dry and green stock 
they can secure today from manufacturers are fully 10 per cent 
below National standards and that when the depreciation of re- 
handling and seasoning is taken into account the grades stand fully 
'20 per cent lower. 

As a matter of fact, in the purchase of round lots and mill stocks 
it has come about that trades are consummated on the basis of a 
mutual agreement on joint inspection. If the buyer's inspector can 
' ' keep house ' ' with the seller 's inspector, the shipments are made. 
On the contrary, if there is a disagreement between them the trade 
is off. After making one of these trades a buyer is entirely at sea 
as to whether he will get the stock or not. This same condition 
concerning the jiurchase of southern and southwestern stocks is 



reported by jobbers at Chicago, Memphis and Cincinnati, and 
doubtless prevails to a considerable extent over the entire south 
country. 

In Michigan and Wisconsin these conditions obtain to a very lim- 
ited extent, as the greater portion of lumber sold in those sections is 
shipped strictly on National As.sociation grades, or their exact equiv- 
alent — those of the Wisconsin Hardwood Lumbermen 's Association. 
This divergence in conditions in the North and South is perhaps ex- 
plainable from the fact that the grading rules of the Hardwood Man- 
ufacturers ' Association are a good deal in evidence in the latter sec- 
tion, and manufacturers have learned that these grades are satis- 
factory to a considerable portion of the consuming trade. There 
never has been any quantity of northern lumber sold under the rules 
of the Manufacturers' Association. These varying conditions are 
a further argument for the unification of all hardwood inspection 
rules, so that they may be made universal throughout the country. 

The Time for Cutting Hickory. 

As is known to the trade at large, hickory stumpage, throughout 
its entire range of growth in the United States, is becoming ex- 
tremely scarce. Hickory is a wood tor which thus far there has 
not been found a satisfactory substitute. Its rapid diminution is 
an absolute menace to the very important industry of vehicle pro- 
duction, and the situation is looked upon with concern by everyone 
interested in this great branch of American commerce. 

The Hardwood Eecoed is in receipt of a communication from a 
prominent wheel manufacturing concern of central Ohio, which sug- 
gests that it would be a good idea to ask all manufacturers of hard- 
wood lumber to make it a rule to saw hickory only betweeii Sep- 
tember 1 and January 15. This is the best and only logical time 
for the felling and sawing of this valuable timber. The writer 
contends that well toward twenty per cent of the hickory now pro- 
duced in the country is going to waste on account of its being sawed 
too late in the spring, when the atmosphere causes checking and dis- 
coloration of the wood. 

The above is certainly a pertinent piece of advice, for too great 
care cannot be taken in order to make the modicum of hickory 
stumpage remaining last as long as possible. 

States' Increasing Interest in Forestry. 

It is encouraging to see that legislators of several states are wak- 
ing up to the woeful forest conditions prevailing within their 
boundaries, and are passing laws that will contribute materially to 
the advancement of the interests of forestry. At least nine states 
are now endeavoring to make the most of their timber resources and 
are availing themselves of the information furnished by the Forest 
Service, which has been gained by the national government through 
years of experiment and investigation. 

These states are New York, New Hampshire, Maryland, Wisconsin, 
Missouri, California, Kentucky, Ehode Island, Delaware and to a 
ccmsiderable extent Pennsylvania, Indiana and Michigan. Maine has 
discovered that its chief forestry problem is the protection of cut- 
over lands from fire, and a law has been enacted with the result that 
the fire damage in 1906 was only about $21,000, which is less than 
one-third of what it has been in former years. This state is under- 
taking the utilization of the national Forest Service plans. The 
states of Delaware, Kentucky and Rhode Island are of late interest- 
ing themselves in forestry, and the Kentucky legislature has recently 
provided for a forestry commissioner and made a small appropria- 
tion for the study of the work. 

Outside of its timber reserves the government can accomplish little 
for individual states in forestry work save giving them the benefit 
of its exhaustive experiments covering the protection of existing 
forests and the regrowing of abandoned lands and depleted forest 
areas to timber. The individual states must do other work very 
largely for themselves, but such legislation can be passed as will make 
it possible and even profitable for both states and individuals to 
engage in forestry pursuits on varying scales. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



15 



Pert, Pertinent and Impertinent. 



The man who wins in the fight for fame, 

Who wins in the war tor gold. 
The welliin rings with his lauded name 

Wherever his deeds are told. 
Not mine to jeer when I hear him hailed ; 

I'm proud of his heart so stout — 
i;\it what of the fellow who tried and failed. 

The fellow that's "down and out" '.' 



Down and Out. 

Shall naught be said for the man who tried 

The goal of his hopes to gain ; 
Who faced the battle with patient pride 

And fought though the fight was vain : 
Whose spirit in one weak moment quailed, 

Who fell at the last redoubt? 
Ah. man.v a hero heart has failed — 

So here's to the "down and out" ! 



'i'he man who wins, oh, honor him well. 

And give him the praise that's due, 
I!ut don't forget the other who (ell 

Ere ever his dreams came true ; 
Ves, honor the man whose will prevailed. 

Who baffled despair and doubt — 
lUit give one thought to the man who failed, 

Tht' fellow that's "down and out" ! 

— Denis A. McCarthy. 



WELCOME TO THE BOARD WALK ! 




Scene at Atlantic City: Tenth Annual Meeting National Hardwood Lumber Association, May 23 and 24, 1907. 



•What's the Use? 
Doubtless early to bed 

And early to rise 
Will do very well 

For sicli folks and guys : 
But it makes a man miss 

All the fun till he dies 
And joins other stiffs 

Who have gone to the skies, 
tio to bed when you like, 

And lie at your ease — 
You'll die, just the same, 

1)1 some Latin disease ! 



Bare. 

Hail to the graduating girl I 
She's sweeter far than some : 

For she's allowed to use no slang 
And chew no chewing gum. 



Canceled. 

If you lend money here and there 
To friends both far and wide. 

When you pay nature's last great debt 
They'll all be glad you've died. 

— Houston Post. 



No Pass. 

The editor 

Sat in a train 
And murmured in 

A tone of pain : 
"Of all sad words 

In times like these, 
The very worst 

Are 'tickets, please !' " 

■Virtue. 

"Virtue is not known by its exemption 
from trial, but by its victory in trial." 



A Bad Bep. 

Many a man has been ruined by acci- 
dentally getting a reputation for being a 
good fellove and trying to live up to it. 



Life. 

The life of every man is a diary in 
which he means to write one story, but in- 
variably writes a far different one. 



To Be Old. 

Drink from when 

You start to walk. 
Chew from when 

You start to talk. 

Eat whatever 

Strikes you right. 
Frolic and 

Stay out all night. 

Be one of 

The careless throng. 
Wine and woman. 

Rout and song. 

These hundred- 

Y'ear-old duffers say 
That they all 

Spent life that-a-way. 

— HonsTOx Post. 



The Little Hindoo. 

Here's to the little Hindoo, 
Who does all that he kin do ; 

Away off there with naught to wear. 
He makes his little skin do. 



i6 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



AMERICAN FOREST TREES. 



Pin Oak. 
Quercus palustris. — Mueuch. 

Pin oak ranges from certain sections of 
Masaschusetts, notably the Connecticut river 
valley, and near Amherst, westward as far 
as tlie southeastern part of Missouri; on the 
south it is found along the lower Potomac 
liver in Virginia, through Kentucky, north- 
ern Arkansas and southeastern Indian Ter- 
ritory. 

Ir is known by the above name in 
the states of Massachusetts, Connec- 
ticut, Ehode Island, New York, 
Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia, 
Mai-yland, Arkansas, Missouri, Il- 
linois, Wisconsin, Iowa and Kansas; 
in Arkansas and Kansas it is called 
swamp Spanish oak; in Ehode Is- 
land and Illinois it is often known as 
water oak; in Pennsylvania, Ohio 
and Kansas as swamp oak; in Ar- 
kansas as water Spanish oak. 

The term pin oak is one of the 
names which are used interchange- 
ably for so many species of the 
genus Quercus, but the subject of 
this sketch, (Quercus palustris, is the 
only variety to which it rightly be- 
longs. The name palustyis, which is 
the Latin for swampy, has been 
given to the tree because of the fact 
that its preferred habitat is the bor- 
ders of swamps and river bottoms 
where the soil is deep, rich, and 
moist; while the term' "pin" is ap- 
plied to it because of the appear- 
ance of the tiny twigs set in its 
trunk and limbs, which are so crowd- 
ed together that they never develop 
into anything larger. Pin oak 
reaches its maximum development 
and is most abundant along the rich 
bottom lands of the lower Ohio and 
tributary streams, while in New 
England it is much less plentiful, 
and is of small size. 

The bark of a mature tree is dark 
gray or brownish-green; it is rough, 
being full of small furrows, ami 
frequently cracks open and shows 
the reddish inner layer of bark; on 
small branches and young trunks, it 
is smoother, lighter, and more lus- 
trous. 

The staminate flowers grow in 
hairy aments two to three inches 
long; the pistillate on short pedun- 
cles, and have bright red stigmas. 

The fruit of pin oak is a small acorn which 
grows either sessile or on a very short stem; 
sometimes in clusters, and sometimes singly. 
In shape the acorns are nearly hemispherical, 
and measure about a half inch in diameter; 
they are enclosed only at the base, in a thin, 
saucer-shaped cup, dark brown, and scaly. 

The leaves are three to five inches long; 
tlicy are simple, and alternate. They are 



FIFTT-SECOXD PAPER 

liroad, and have from five to nine lobes which 
.■ire toothed, and bristle-tipped on the ends. 
The sinuses are broad and rounded, and ex- 
tend well toward the midrib, which is stout, 
and from which the veins branch off con- 
spicuously. In color the leaves are bright 
green above and lighter below when young, 
becoming thin, tirm and darker green at ma- 
turity; late in autumn they turn a rich, deep 




attained an average height of thirty feet, 
although they were planted only about twen- 
ty-five years ago. They now measure about 
twelve inches in diameter, but when planted 
were only an inch and a half. Frequently the 
]iin oak, though tapering and symmetrical in 
form when young, becomes irregular and un- 
couth when old. The branches are pendulous 
and are a ijrominent distinguishing mark of 
the species. 

Pin oak is often cultivated as an 
ornamental tree in the eastern part 
of the United States and in some 
countries of Europe. In the city of 
Washington one may see a fine ave- 
nue of pin oaks on the way from the 
capitol to the navy yard, which, 
though very young, are already ex- 
cellent shade trees. In Flushing, 
Long Island, the pin oak is a favor- 
ite ornamental and shade tree, and 
many are the handsome specimens to 
be seen there. 

The wood of this tree is heavy, 
hard, strong, coarse-grained, and 
tuugh. The heartwood is light 
brown and the sapwood nearly 
white ; the medullary rays are nu- 
merous and plainly marked. The 
wootl is apt to cheek and warp badly 
in seasoning, but is used extensively 
for shingles, clapboards, cooperage, 
interior finish and construction. A 
cubic foot of seasoned wood weighs 
about forty-three pounds. 

Oak-apples are the round excres- 
cences formed on the limbs by gall- 
flies and their eggs. They seem par- 
ticularly fond of this species and 
specimens are often seen which are 
literally covered "with them; the 
worms which live inside seem to 
flourish particularly well on the food 
they imbibe from pin oak. 

The photograph from which the 
accomj)anying illustration was made 
is among the collection of William 
H. l''reeman, secretary of the Indi- 
ana State Board of Forestry. 



TYI'ICAL FOltEST GROWTH TIN OAK, IXDI AXA. 

scarlet. They are coated below with pubes- 
cense, and have large tufts of pale hairs in 
the axils of the veins. 

Pin oak reaches a height of from seventy 
or eighty feet ordinarily, although in thick 
forests it sometimes becomes 120 feet high. 
In Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, there is an 
avenue of handsome pin oaks which are re- 
markable for their symmetry, and which have 



Yate Wood. 

Hecent tests of the hardwoods of 
western Australia have revealed 
the extraordinary properties of yate. 
Its average tensile strength is 24,000 
pounds to the square inch, equaling 
that of cast iron. Many specimens 
are much stronger, and one was 
tested which showed a resistance of seventeen 
and one-half tons to the square inch, which is 
equal to the tensile strength of wrought iron. 
The sawn timber of yate is probably the 
strongest in the world. The tree grows to a 
maximum height of one hundred feet, and 
occasional specimens have been found which 
had a diameter of two and a half or even 
three feet. 




JOHN WHEATLEY l_OVl 

N ASM VI 1_1_E, TEN M. 



SUPPLEMENT TO 

HARDWOOD RECORD 

MAY 10, 1907 



ILLUSTRATING 
BUILDERS OF LUMBER HISTO) 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



17 



'Builders of Lumber History. 



John Wheatley Love. 

(See Portrait ISiipitlcincnt.) 
The city of Nashville, Tenii., numbers 
;iniong its industries some of the most im- 
portant in the country today. The greatest 
lit these is its hardwood lumber trade, which 
is of such magnitude as to make the city 
one of the foremost hardwood markets in the 
United States. Its location in the heart of 
the timber district of Tennessee, upon the 
Cumberland river, which taps the magnificent 
forests of that state and contiguous terri- 
tory, makes it naturally a great operating 
;nid distributing point for lumber products, 
hut in addition to this the prowess, public 
spirit and energy of its lumbermen-citizens 
liave largely contributed to making Nashville 
tlie important factor it now is in the lumber 
business. 

Notable among these ' ' captains of iudus- 
try" is John Wheatley Love, whose portrait 
his many associates and admirers in the 
trade will be glad to receive at the hands of 
the Hardwood Eecord. 

Mr. Love was born in Nashville, April 30, 
1866, of Virginia and Kentucky ancestry, 
being a lineal descendant of Col. James Love, 
of Revolutionary fame. He was reared in 
that city and received his education iu the 
public schools there. His first acquaintance 
with the lumber business came when he en- 
tered the employ of his kinsman, Theodore 
Plummer, who then operated at Nashville un- 
der the style of Sutherland & Co. This first 
position was a very humble one — that of 
otKce boy. 

In 1886 Mr. Plummer organized the Nash- 
ville Lumber Company, and gave young Love 
a position with the new house under another 
prominent Nashville man, M. F. Greene, of 
the Davidson-Benedict Company, who was 
then associated with this concern, as general 
bookkeeper. Shortly after making this 
change Mr. Love entered the office of the 
Edgefield & Nashville Manufacturing Com- 
pajiy, manufacturers of lumber and furni- 
ture, as bookkeeper, but was obliged to give 
up his work in 1888 on account of failing 
health, which necessitated a change of cli- 
n;ate. A year's sojourn in San Diego, Cal., 
proved of great benefit to him, and in 1889 
he returned to act as manager for the Edge- 
field & Nashville concern. 

In 1890 Mr. Love decided to enter the 
lumber trade on his own account, and ac- 
cordingly organized the firm of J. W. Love 
& Co., to do a general lumber jobbing busi- 
ness. His next step was to buy out the Sootts- 
ville Lumber Company, located at Scotts- 
\illc, Ky., a concern which manufactured 
large quantities of oak and poplar, and op- 
erated several small mills. These interests 
demanded that he move to Scottsville, where 
he lived for five years, or until 1895, return- 
ing at that time to Nashville, which he made 
headquarters for the management of the 



operations and the job- 



NUMBEB XLIV. 

Scottsville district 
bing business. 

In 1899 the house of Love, Boyd & Co. was 
organized, with J. W. Love, his brother, Ham- 
ilton Love, and John W. Boyd as principals; 
some years later James D. Read was ad- 
mitted to membership in the firm; all four 
gentlemen are still connected with it, acting 
as general manager, sales manager, timber 
expert, and sawmill superintendent, respect- 
ively. The company maintains a general of- 
fice at Nashville, but operates largely in 
Kentuck.y, having yards at Scottsville, Ky., 
Westmoreland, Hartsville, Bon Aqua and 




LEAF AXD FKUIT OF TIN OAK. 

Nashville, and producing about 100,000 feet 
of hardwood lumber every day. This output 
consists of poplar, oak, chestnut, hickory, 
ash, sycamore and red cedar, with quartered 
oak the specialty. The main yards are lo- 
cated at Scottsville, where the company car- 
ries from .5,000,000 to 10,000,000 feet of 
lumber in stock at all times, and a like quan- 
tity distributed among the various mill yards. 
Mr. Love is president of the Nashville Tie 
& Cedar Company, large handlers of red ce- 
dar poles, posts, piling and railroad ties. As- 
sociated with him in this enterprise are the 
other members of the firm of Love, Boyd 
& Co., John B. Ransom & Co., and Walter 
Keith ; the two first-named concerns handle 
out about 3,000 cars annually. Mr. Love is 
also president and principal owner of the 
Green River Coal & Coke Company of Island, 
Ky., which concern produces seven to eight 
hundred tons of coal daily; he is interested 
in other lumber enterprises, but the indus- 



tries above named require most of his atten- 
tion and energy. 

A concern entirely outside the lumber field, 
of which Mr. Love is president, is the Mark- 
land Company, Limited, of Markland, Cape 
Forchu, Nova Scotia, which owns some very 
valuable property in that section, which it in- 
tends to develop into a seaside resort that 
will be second to none. A handsome hotel 
or ' ' Summer Home ' ' will be maintained, and 
the company operates a safe line of steam- 
ers between Yarmouth and Markland; many 
other advantages are offered for building cot- 
tages on the property. The promoters in- 
tend to beautify the laud until, with its nat- 
ural scenery, it shall be the garden spot of 
Nova Scotia. 

Mr. Love was married in 1891 to Miss 
W^ade of Kentucky; they have three chil- 
dren — Jack, Eleanor and Mary Hamilton. He 
is exceedingly domestic in his tastes, and to 
quote his own words, "can be found at home 
most of the time," when business does not 
absolutely demand his attention. 

On meeting Mr. Love one is impressed with 
his bright and pleasing personality, and on 
better acquaintance invariably finds him to 
be the embodiment of energy and integrity. 
These characteristics have justly brought him 
to the high position he now occupies in the 
affairs of his native city, and in the confi- 
dence of his fellow lumbermen the country 



The Hoo-Hoo Annual. 

Cliaiimau .Terome 11. Sheip of Philadelphia, 
exofflcio head o£ the various committees of east- 
ern Hoo-Hoo, having in charge the reception and 
entertainment ot the order at Atlantic City in 
September next, has notllied all committees to 
start active work in the matter o£ arrangements 
for the annual, which will occur Sept. 9, 10 
and 11. The time intervening between the Phil- 
adelphia meeting in February, at which these 
committees were appointed, has been spent by 
Mr. Sheip and the various committee members 
in formulating general plans so that all arrange- 
ments can start off right foot. Mr. Sheip has 
just concluded a week's visit at Atlantic City 
and reports with much pleasure that he has 
secured the use of the Steel Pier at that famous 
watering resort for $150. This is a big 
concession. The Bureau of Publicity & In- 
formation will also furnish Mr. Sheip with 
5,000 booklets descriptive of Atlantic City 
— its various hotels and places of inter- 
est — which he will immediately distrib- 
ute among the members of each Hoo-Hoo 
jurisdiction. Of course, Atlantic City requires 
no formal introduction in any section of the 
country, as its fame is world-wide and the an- 
nual will afford them an opportunity to spend a 
week or two at this popular resort. 

In the next thirty days the Committee on Ac- 
commodations and Entertainment will meet and 
pass on the Steel Pier proposition, but it prac- 
tically goes without saying that the convention 
will be held there. The finance and the other 
general committees will proceed with their work 
at once in order that plans may be pretty well 
matured before the summer vacation time. 

Chairman Sheip will hold another big concate- 
nation in Philadelphia about the middle of May. 
The enthusiasm of the eastern members of the 
order for the success of the forthcoming annual 
is active and it is hoped that in view of the 
opportunities afforded for a good time through 
both the meeting and the resort at which it will 
be held there will be a large attendance of mem- 
bers of the order from all sections of the coun- 
try. 



i8 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



How Things HaVe Changed. 



By VAN B. PERRINE 



Out here in Indiana, sa> some thirty years ago, 
When you had cut your logs all up, to Chicago p'raps you'd go, 
And there you'd sell your lumber to a jobber on the spot, 
Who'd clean you up — buy everything^ — ^no matter what you'd got! 
He didn't care about the wood, or how the boards were made; 
He had the money every time — the cash, spot down, he paid. 
Of course, they had inspection rules to measure lumber by, 
You read them up, you read them down; you'd try and try and try 
To figure out how you were "done"^ — the more that you reflected 
The plainer the solution seemed — 'twas "how it was inspected." 

Next time you'd send your lumber East, most any place that way, 
But soon you'd get a kick, in which commission men would say 
That yard men found it graded low, but that, without a doubt, 
They'd sent a bigger payment if you'd left the common out. 
Next car you'd send the same old place, encouraged by such talk. 
And mark the feet on every board, real plain, with nice, white chalk. 
*Twas cherry lumber, clear and wide, that is, 'twas clear of knots. 
But in New York they'd cull it down just for a few gum spots. 
You'd ponder long on what was sent, and why it was rejected, 
The sole idea your thinking brought^'twas "how it was inspected." 

Next, to old Philadelphia, to Quakers good and square, 
You'd send your lumber — but alas, they had inspectors there! 
The man -who put his rule across your boards, so clear and wide. 
Could always find a knot or two, when turned the other side; 
And then a little split, you know, would sometimes longer get; 
However perfect stuff you sent, they'd find a flaw, you bet. 
No matter where you shipped your boards — to this town or to that — 
Though measured by a Quaker man, who wore a broad=brimmed hat, 
Or by a Yankee, long and lean! Of course, there's no reflection 
Meant on any town or rules — 'twas "diff'rence in inspection." 





INSPICCTION A'l I)K8TINATION. 



INSPECTION AS SHIPPED. 

Next time, you shipped to Boston town, where Yankees are so smart. 

But didn't find it paid you more than any other mart, 

iTho' let me say right here and now, for fear I might forget, 

That Boston is a d good place to send your lumber yet.) 

You shipped your product here and there, and shifted all around,^ 
In hopes that finally, perhaps, some market could be found 
Where rules were not in use that made your meagre profit flit 
By grading down a board each time for tiny knot or split; 
Where worm hole merel> visible was worse than "standard knot," 
And boards that showed a little stain would "soon begin to rot." 

Of course, all this I'm talking of was many years ago— 

The mill man was an "easy mark," and also somewhat "slow." 

Of the last attribute, 1 grant, sometimes he's still accused. 

But for his "easy" traits, I'm sure he's rarely now abused. 

He used to book some special bills, so mighty hard to get, 

That if compelled to fill them out, he'd been a-sawing yet. 

They called for lumber wide and long, the sawing quite correct. 

And ended with the usual phrase — "Stock free from all defect." 

For this, of course, was years ago, before the man reflected. 

But now he turns them down, >ou know — he's seen a few inspected. 

Of late, things have been changed a lot-— associations made — 
The mill man and the dealer, too, can sell on National grade, 
And ship his lumber anywhere, to North or South or West, 
The question's not locality, but where the price is best. 
'Tis so in case he sends it East, as every place, you know- 
In old New York or down in Maine -the National grades will go. 
They only want (heir money's worth — they know what grades will be> 
Inspection hasn't changed so much, as any one can see, 
Now, read the next line very slow, and say it with inflection. 
The National grade that goes to-day's old Indiana inspection! 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



19 



Hardwood Record Mail 'Bag. 



[ In this department it is proposed to reply 
to such inquiries as reacli tliis otfice from the 
HAKDWfMH) liEcoKD clientage as will bo of enough 
general interest to warrant publication. Kvery 
patron of the paper is invited to use this de- 
pai'tment to the fullest extent, and an attempt 
will be made to answer queries pertaining to all 
matters of interest to the hardwood trade, in 
a succinct and intelligent manner.] 



Infonnation Atout Hotels. 

GnAND Rapids, Mich., April 19. — Editor Haed- 
wu(iD Record : Will you suggest to me the name 
of a desirable hotel at Atlantic City to patronize 
during the annual meeting of the National 
Hai'dwood Lumber Association? I shall be ac- 
companied by my wife. . 

Jly wife and myself have spent a part of 
each summer at Atlantic City for many years, 
and have lived at many of the leading hotels. 
In my opinion the Hotel Strand, located at 
the end of Pennsylvania avenue, and within 
one block of the Steel Pier, where the con- 
vention will be held, is the best hotel for the 
money in Atlantic City. It is a modern struc- 
ture, the table is bountifully supplied with 
well-cooked food, and the service is faultless. 
The rooms, though not large, are well-fur- 
nislied and immaculately clean. The rates in 
tlii.s hotel for one person are from $3 to $4 
per day; double rooms, $6 to $8 per day; 
rooms with bath, $2 a day extra. These rates 
include both rooms and meals. There is no 
bar connected with this hostelry and hence 
ladies are not subjected to any possible of- 
fense by reason of this usual hotel append- 
age. — Editor. 

P. ti. There is a very good ' ' coaling sta- 
tion" within a square of the Strand. I know 
tlie distance because when before dinner my 
wife goes to her room to primp, with the ob- 
servation that she will be back in ten min- 
utes, I am always able to meet her in the 
ladies' parlor on time. I know I can walk a 
liloek and return in six minutes, and I don 't 
spend all the time walking. I '11 show you the 
place, but if you can 't find me, ask Clem 
Lloyd. 

P. P. S. Another good feature about the 
Hotel Strand is H. L. Fairbairn, its manager. 
He is the easiest boniface in Atlantic City to 
coax money away from, and any man who 
goes to Atlantic City and don't have to get a 
check cashed before he gets away is a freak. 
— Editor. 



Piling Wagon Stock. 

Shenandoah, 1a., Hay 3. — Editor IIaiidwuuu 
ItKCOHD : There has been some question in the 
minds of some of our yard men as to the better 
way of piling green wagon stock, wagon axles 
in particular — some insisting that it is best to 
pile the axles all one way, with thin crossbars 
between ; others insisting that they can be piled 
crosswise on each other with equally good re- 
sults. Our method of piling Is to pile them 
crosswise, but to elevate the outside axles about 
a quarter of an inch at each end, so that the 
weight of the pile is carried on the extreme 
corners at all times and there is a complete 
circulation of air around the axles except at 
the ends where they cross the elevated ones. 
I'lease give us some information through the 
medium of your publication relative to your 



opinion of the matter. We would also like to 
know where we can dispose of short hlcliory 
squares, as In our work we are able to furnish 
(luilp a lot of 2-Inch stuff in squares up to 6 
feci in length. ■ Company. 

It is essential that wagon stock be made 
ready for use with a minimum of checking, 
and hence it must be seasoned slowly. There 
i,s no particular choice in the way axles are 
piled, between being cross-piled and put up 
cm stickers. However, it is almost essential 
to paint the ends of axles with heavy red 
ochre or some equally good material, and that 
the piles are carefully roofed and the sides 
( nclosed to protect them from the sun, at the 
same time leaving suflScient air space for ven- 
tilation. Again, it is best to have the stock 
piled well off the ground, with plenty of 
air underneath the piles. If a manufacturer 
has an operation for which he has a timber 
supply sufficient to last a number of years, 
the cheapest way to provide for seasoning the 
stock is to build sheds for the purpose. 

A¥e have supplied above correspondent with 
names of a few hickory buyers, and any oth- 
ers who can use the above described mate- 
rial should 'send in their names. — Editou. 



center of the chief stand of this wood is in 
northern West Virginia. Of course, locust 
never grows in a pure stand, but is always 
intermingled with the oaks, chestnut, poplar, 
etc. Anyone interested in the above inquiry, 
or able to furnish the required stock, may 
have the address of the writer on application 
to til is office. — Editor. 



Wants Glued-Up Stock and Dowels. 

Wa.shini'.ton. X. .1.. May '\. — Editor H.\rd- 
wouD Record : Please give us information of 
lirms who make a specialty of making glued-up 
stock, as we wish to get into correspondence 
with them. & Co. 

London, England, April 20. — Editor Hard- 
wood Record : We have Inquiries for consider- 
able quantities of built-up panel (3-ply) stock 
in various woods, also for white birch, maple 
and beech dowels, both for London and Liver- 
pool, and we should feel much obliged it you 
could put us into communication with likel.v 
suppliers of such. If you print our inquiry In 
your "mail bag" do not mention our name, but 
kindly refer any inquirers to us. Yours truly, 

COJIPANY. 

We have supplied the above correspondents 
with the names of several reliable houses 
manufacturing both panel stock and dowels. 
Any others wishing to communicate with 
them may have the addresses on application 
to this office. — Editor. 



Wants to Buy Locust. 

Helena, Mont., Ajpril 29. — Editor Hardwood 
Record : Can you advise me of a location 
where locust wood abounds in such quantity as 
to admit of the purchase of 1,500 to 5,000 cords 
at reasonable figures? Company. 

The original center of growth of black 
locust was in southern Ohio, but today, the 



Wants Ash Oars. 

AXTWERT, UEi.GirM. April 18. — Editor Hard- 
wood Record : We should be thankful to you 
If you could give us the address of some firms 
making boat oars out of a.sh. & Co. 

The writer has been supplied with a list of 
ash oar manufacturers, but any further ad- 
dresses sent in will be forwarded. — Editor. 



The Financial Aspect of Forest 
Management. 



Dr. C. A. Sehenck of Biltmore, N. C, has 
recently issued an interesting booklet on 
Forest Management. Used in a limited sense 
this terra deals with forest working plans 
only, or the determination and regulation of 
the sustained yield of timberlands. The 
author believes that American forest man- 
agement should be considered along broader 
lines. It should determine upon the ways 
and means by which the desire of the owner 
relative to the use of his forest (for revenue, 
timber supply, shelter, pasture, ornament, 
water protection, game preserves) can best 
be accomplished. In the majority of cases 
the owner desires to draw from the forest 
the largest possible revenue. As a conse- 
quence American forest management will 
have to deal usually with the various means 
by which given forestal investments can be 
developed in a manner producing the highest 
dividends in the long run. 

The rapidity of development depends upon 
the owner's finauciaJ ability to make desir- 
able moves at proper times. 

In many instances development is possi- 
ble only with the help of money borrowed 



by the owner. Borrowed money frequently 
proves a curse to the owner of forests after 
the lapse of a few years. His policy of de- 
velopment is handcuffed by the necessity of 
meeting the indebtedness, year in and year 
out, irrespective of market and labor con- 
ditions. Forestry, in such oases, must be 
destructive. It must pay the bonds as they 
mature out of the substance of the forest. 

Dr. Sehenck has covered the many phases 
of the subject of forest management in his 
usual masterly and comprehensive manner; 
and, because of his thoroughly practical 
demonstrations of the theories which he pro- 
nuilgates, has come to be regarded as the 
Solon of forestry affairs in this country. 
Parts of two chapters— those on Financial 
Considerations and Forestal Investments- 
are herewith presented: 

FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS. 

Three kinds of increment compose the latent 
siross revenue obtained from any wood which Is 
left to itself or which is placed under forestal 
care : , , 

1. The quantity increment, depending solely 
on the amount of wood fibre formed. 

2. Tlie quality Increment, depending solely on 
the difference of price shown in the same year 



20 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



by logs of ditEerent diameters, per unit o£ con- 
tents. 

3. The price increment, depending solely on 
the difference o£ value which the same log will 
exhibit in different years. This latter increment 
is influenced by increase of population and 
wealth, cheapened facilities of transportation, 
exhaustion of the virgin woods and declining 
purchasing power of gold. 

As an illustration of price increment, the fol- 
lowing figures may be of interest : 

Wholesale I'rices of Yellow Poplar, 4/4 Lumber, 

at Biltmorc, N. C. 

Qualitv. In 180U. In 1907. 

I?as • .$21.00 ?:43.00 to $52.00 

Saps 16.00 33.00 

(^1 12.00 28.00 

c' 2 6.50 10.00 

The expense of production, with modern mills 
and improved transportation, is as high in 1907 
as it was in 1S96, viz. : $0 per 1.000 feet b. 
m. Assuming that certain trees have turned 
out 2."i per cent of fas, 25 per cent saps, 25 per 
cent L'. 1 and 25 per cent C. 2. the stumpage 
values in such trees was per J, 000 feet b. m., 

in 1896 ? 300 

in 1007 ^2.00 

and has increased, consequently, at the rate of 
.'iO per cent (simple interest, equalling 14 per 
cent of compound interest) per annum. 

The increase in the value of many other for- 
est products has been similarly phenomenal ; 
and the question arises ; Why is the owner of 
forests unwise enough to reduce this stumpage 
as long as the rise continues to be pheno.menal — 
in excess of any dividend deri\ able from other 
investments? The answer frequently lies in 
three svords : poverty, impatience, ignorance. 

The enormous increase of gold production 
during the last twenty years promises to con- 
tinue and to become more phenomenal. The 
director of the United States Mint reports (in 
1904, p. 41) that the rise of wages does not act 
as an automatic check to gold production, and 
that the tendency of the expense of gold pro- 
duction continues to be downward. The effect 
of increasing gold supplies on commodity prices, 
wages, land values, mortgages, bonds, etc., is 
easily perceived. The owner of bonds and mort- 
gage's sinks to a lower level of revenue, whilst 
the owner of forests and farms remains (at 
least) equally wealthy. 

The question will be asked, naturally : Does it 
pav to strive towards the establishment of an 
■■ideal forest" . . ■ towards the establish- 
ment of an impossibility ■; European foresters 
are iipt to answer the question by an emphatic 
■■Yes." The American forester might consider, 
before answering, four points : 

(1) The great variety of conditions existing in 
the various sections of the various states from 
which the financial prospects of conservative 
forestry depend. 

(2) The fact that conservatism in the forest 
cannot lie expected, in the long run, to be as 
remunerative in this country as it is abroad 
unless the forest is rendered as safe as the 
German forests from fire, taxes and whimsical 
legislation. 

(3) The fact that an ideal forest represents 
a large investment yielding a small fate of sur- 
plus revenue. 

(4) The possibility that a forest now consid- 
ered ■■ideal" as to rotation, composition, species, 
roads and so on, is apt to be considered deficient 
when the lapse of years has caused a change of 
the economical conditions surrounding the for- 

As long as our country develops by leaps and 
bounds, as long as the immediate future of our 
forests is dark, as long as other investments seem 
safer, simpler, better than forestal investments, 
the time has not arrived to strive toward ■'ideal 
forests." 

The American forester can consider the forest 
only as '■so much money invested." That forest 
is ideal which can be expected to yield, for a 
long time and perhaps forever, a safe, steady 
and" high dividend on every dollar invested. In 
such a forest the various items of value (as 
trees, soil, roads, sawmills) appear as proper 
shares of the aggregate value. 

The following may serve as an illustration : 

Per acre. 

Value of stumpage $ 7.75, or 77 M; per cent 

Value of soil 1.00, or 10 percent 

Value of roads 50, or 5 per cent 

Value of sawmills 75, or 71/0 per cent 

Total investment .... $10.00, or 100 per cent 

The form of the ideal revenue depends on the 
owner's wish. The owner may or may not prefer 
an annual revenue of 40 cents per acre, obtained 
without decreasing the value of the stumpage, 
to a revenue of $2, exhausting the forest in a 
dozen years. The owner alone can decide 
whether a dividend is safe enough, steady 
enough and high enough ; his decision is based, 
naturally, on a comparison between forest reve- 



nue and revenues obtainable from other invest- 
ments. J.-, ^ 1. 

The investor stakes his money on that enter- 
prise in which he has the greatest confidence ; 
and it is usual that the farmer puts his money 
in farms- the miner in mines: the railroad man 
in railroad stock ; and the lumberman in for- 

The American lumberman is apt to consider 
investments in forestry (be it destructive or con- 
servative) as ideal investments ; outsiders are 
not prone to share this view. 

As long as this country abounds in merchant- 
able woods, the lumberman has an easy chance, 
after exhausting the stumpage on a given tract 
completely, to shift his capital to another tract, 
purchasing the stumpage thereon out of the 
moneys obtained by his operations conducted on 
the preceding tract. Usually he prefers, for 
obvious reasons, the purchase of timbfr to the 
purchase of the forest in fee simple. Under 
such conditions, the lumberman cannot be inter- 
ested in the production of a second growth, nor 
in operations merely withdrawing trees working 
at a small rate of revenue. 

The owners of the fee simple— farmers, towns- 
folk aliens — do not command any knowledge of 
forest investments; having paid the taxes on 
the land for a number of years without any re- 
turns they embrace readily the first chance at 
obtaining ''big returns." These big returns usu- 
ally exceed the price by far at which the land 
was bought. Nevertheless, and .iust as usually, 
such ■■big returns" are a mere pittance. 

The I'-orest Service of the United States has 
before it an enormous task ; the task of proving 
to the owners of woodlands, who are ignorant 
of present and of prospective value of timber, 
the advisability of conservative lumbering. 

Unfortunately, there do not exist anywhere 
associations of forest owners through which the 
members might be enlightened. 

FOKESTAL INVKSTMENTS. 

In the United States, no private actlvtty hav- 
inf the forest for its object (id est. any forestry 
in a broad sense), is conceivable which does not 
mean to result in good financial returns. Fores- 
try is business, and in business there is no room 
for sentiment. That forestry must be considered 
best which pays best. . 

Compared with other investments in realties 
(e g, farms, mines, houses), forest invest- 
ments show several undesirable features. They 
are difficult to control ; they fail continuously to 
vield annual cash dividends : they are endan- 
gered bv fires and cannot be insured against de- 
struction ; their products are not as absolutely 
Indispensable to mankind as farm products, 
mine products or the shelter of a house : subdi- 
vision, joint ownership, sale in fee are difficult 
to arrange ; mortgages or bonds on forests are 
hard to secure, and theft of timber is hard to 
prevent. , „ . 

There are. on the other hand, many factors 
speaking in favor of forest investments : Nota- 
bly the phenomenal increase in the value of 
timber brought about by an increase in popula- 
tion and continuous prosperity ; the certamty 
of wood production, year in and year out, with 
which tires only can Interfere ; the strong possi- 
bility of more extended use of wood products in 
the manufacture of paper, packages, yarns, alco- 
hol, sugar and food stuffs ; the tact that the for- 
est stores its own products away, free of charge, 
until it mav please the owner to place them 
on the market ; the rapid advance in the value 
of soil, etc. „ ^ , . 

According to the location of the forest and in 
a higher degree, according to species of trees 
and age of trees, the disadvantages connected 
with forest investments vary from case to case 
Thev seem to weigh heavily on a second growth 
which yields no dividend whatever, is seriously 
endangered hv fire, contains assets of prospec- 
tive value only and offers no chance at extraordi- 
nary results. There exist in the United States 
enormous areas covered with second growth for- 
ests • What sense can there be, consequently, in 
investments tending to produce still more second 

^' It is obvious that (he chances of first growth 
to be remunerative are, generally speaking, very 
good. This first growth does not increase in 
volume, the death rate of timber offsetting the 
birth rate ; its increase in value, however, is 
certain : heavy logs are getting scarce, and they 
alone furnish lumber commanding the highest 
price : the degree to which the trees are utilized 
without waste increases from year to year ; the 
difficulties of transportation are declining con- 
tinuously. Is it to be wondered at. then, that 
many investors— and notably all lumbermen- 
are 'eager to invest in first growth whilst ut- 
terly unwilling to stake their money on second 

^"^Tlie^ question might be asked: Why are the 
owners reluctant to practice "conservative lum- 
bering," a modus of logging which tends to se- 
cure the maximum smu total formed of net 
present returns and pn.specUve values lef t '; To 
take an illustration from the South: Why does 
the owner insist on cutting every pine making 
a log of over inches at the small end .' Why 



does he refuse to leave all trees having a diam- 
eter under 20 inches and yielding over seven per 
cent of latent annual interest? , . 

The explanation lies in the following points : 
1 No seer can actually foretell the latei* 
annual interest which trees of various diameters 
will yield in the immediate and in the more dis- 
tant "future. The forest dividend consists largely 
of price increment ; the price increment of big 
trees is (veneer business!) particularly good. 
There is little financial advantage in the utili- 
zation of big trees (if they are sound), as long 
as an annual price increment of ten per cent 
and more can be counted upon. A big tree hav- 
ing a stumpage value of 5il2 per 1,000 feet b. m 
is not mature per sc. The fine poplars, oaks and 
chestnuts of the Southland must be considered 
immature, since their value is absolutely sure 
to increase at an annual rate of over ten per 
cent. .... 

The assumption of the principle is wrong, it 
seems that conservative lumbering should leave 
the smaller trees and remove the big trees ; or 
that maturity can be determined by diameter 

The owner of woodlands (and the forester) 
can only venture a forecast, guessing at the 
future condition of the lumber market ; big trees 

have to say the least — the same chance with 

small trees to be money makers. And it is nat- 
ural that the owner is inclined to either remove 
or to leave ull of his trees. 

'' Let us suppose that the owner leaves in 
the course of lumbering all trees having under 
18 inches diameter representing a stumpage of 
1 500 feet per acre. The reduction of the cut by 
1500 feet per acre has increased the logging 
expense per 1,000 feet of stumpage removed— 
•m increase which can he considered only as a 
new investment added to the value of 1,500 feet 
per acre left. 

For a number of years to come the small 
trees are non-removable, since it cannot pay in 
the near future to remove a handful of inferior 
lumber from an acre of ground. In the mean- 
time, the property must be watched and taxes 
must be paid. 

The owner leaving small trees embarks in a 
new venture which cannot be countermanded nor 
altered, for years to come, without serious loss ; 
and which is subject to more serious dangers 
than the old venture. . 

Small trees form, prior to the removal of tne 
big trees mixed with them, a tangible, mer- 
chantable asset. After the removal of the big 
trees, however, thev can be considered only as 
an intangible asset, an asset of merely prospec- 
tive value, an asset impossible to realize on. 

3 After lumbering, small trees left are much 
more endangered by fire, windfall, insects, fungi 
than liefore lumbering. Where fires cannot be 
controlled at a reasonable expense, conservative 
lumbering is. under almost any circumstances, 
absolutely absurd. , ,^ ■ 

4 The soil on which small trees are left — in 
order to grow into better dimensions and in 
order to act as seed trees for a third growth — 
cannot be used for pasture without interference 
with the object at stake. 

5. Conditions may arise, before a second 
growth of small trees becomes merchantable, ren- 
dering the soil occupied by them valuable for 
farming purposes. In that case the small trees 
must he removed without any benefits accruing 
to the owner from such removal. 

I! The taxes on land completely stripped are 
lower than the taxes on land conservatively lum- 
bered. When a long number of years is required 
to convert a second growth left into a mer- 
chantable stand, the taxes annually paid -'ad 
lalui-cm" and increasing at a compound ratio, 
form a countercharge against the slowly in- 
creasing value of the second growth ditticult to 
countenance. . . ., ^ 

Considering these various points, the financier 
cannot be called unwise when he prefers invest- 
ments in first growth forest to those possible in 
second growth. .^ ■, cj. ^ j • 

Many a man in the United States and in 
Canada has made a fortune by clever invest- 
ments in first growth, whilst no one, prac- 
tically has had a chance to show dividends ob- 
tained from second growth forest ( exceptions : 
farm wood lots : second growth pine in ^ ir- 
gin la ) . , , J 

' Under what conditions, it may be asked, can 
or does conservative lumbering pay in primeval 
w'oods? ^ , . . ^„^ 

The conditions are those under which any 
business proves to be remunerative . . . be 
it a liverv business, a hotel, a railroad or a 
music store : that business alone can be remu- 
nerative in which the parts composing the busi- 
ness investments are at hand in proper propor- ■ 
tions ■ that business alone can he remunerative 
which is established in an economically proper 
site ■ that business alone can be remunerative 
whicli is safe from overtaxation and — by insur- 
ance or otlierwise — safe from accidental destruc- 
tion of its assets. 

Properly arranged within, properly arranged 
without ■ 'properly insured against accidents a 
business must be remunerative. Applying this 
logic to conservative lumbering as a business it 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



21 



is safe to state that it must be remunerative 
wliere its components are properly Ijalanced and 
wliere an economic site is obtainable for its 
conduct. 

The components of a business investment in 
conservative forestry are partly derived from 
nature (natural gifts, natural powers) and 
partly made by man. The natural components 
are usually at hand in primeval forests — which 
does not mean to say that they are at hand in 
proper amounts. The components made by man 
are added to those made by nature and consist, 
above all, in investments permanently employed 
for forest utilization. 

In the case of well-stocked virgin woods, the 
aggregate final investment is likely to be lower 
than the original purchase price of the forest, 
when the virgin forest contains a surplus of 
mature timber exceeding in value the expense 
required for the establishment of the essential 
artificial components. 

In the American forests, after the usual lum- 
bering operations, very little is left of the nat- 
ural components ; as a conser|uence, relatively 
heavy additional investments are required (as a 
rule without a chance of deriving immediate 
revenue) in order to make the aggregate, in time 
to come, a permanent source of revenue. 

The conclusion is simple : Unless the owner, 
before he begins to operate primeval woods, de- 
cides to embark in conservative forestry, the 
chances are slim that he will ever embark in it. 

In German working plans the necessity of 
ascertaining the most opportune amount of capi- 
tal to be invested in forestr.v is invariably over- 
looked. The explahation lies in the following: 

1. The value of the growing timber and of the 
soil comprises, say, ninety-five per cent of the 
investment. 

2. The means of transportation are already at 
hand, developed at a time at which financial con- 
siderations were not made in forestry. 



The "period of installation" should cover as 
many years as are required to obtain the proper 
total and the proper composition of the forestal 
investment. 

It is unfortunate that the period of installa- 
tion in conservative forestry must comprise a 
number of years ; whilst other investments can 
be fully installed in the course of a few weeks 
or a few months. Whosoever has traveled in 
recent years through Germany with an eye to 
the forest cannot be in doubt that every state 
and every county offers innumerable sites at 
which conservative forestry can be conducted as 
a remunerative business. Indeed, economic sites 
are at hand in Germany wheresoever the trees 
do not happen to occupy farming soil. Such was 
not the case in Germany two hundred years ago : 
and such is not the case in Russia, Canada and 
the United States today. Economic sites are those 
where stumpage values range high ; where natural 
reproduction is easy ; where the danger of fires is 
small : where the land is unfit for agriculture ; 
where forest taxes are low. These conditions 
prevail, particularly, in the pineries of the 
coastal plains and in the hardwood forests of 
the higher Appalachian region. 

It must be clearly understood that these con- 
ditions did not — or did not all — prevail some 
twenty years ago; further, that the absence of 
such conditions in the West annn 1907 does not 
render conservative forestry in the West for all 
times impossible. It is unfortunate, indeed, that 
the majority of these conditions ari.s(es only at a 
very late hour, to-wit, invariably after the gen- 
eral disappearance of the primeval woods. No 
man in the United States has had, so far. suffi- 
cient confidence in conservative lumbering to 
postpone the tapping of his primeval woods until 
the "economic site" for conservative lumbering 
bad locally arisen. 

The man who does will never live to regret 
his confidence. 



NetOs Miscellany. 



Pending Mercantile Tax Bill in Pennsylvania 

.\bout two mouths ago twenty-tour of the 
representative mercantile bodies of Philadelphia 
met in the Lumbermen's Exchange rooms and 
inaugurated a movement looking to the abolish- 
ment of the mercantile license tax, which they 
consider an objectionable one for several reasons. 
An allied association was accordingly formed b.v 
the various committees, with W. C. MacBride of 
Ilaney-White Company as chairman and Robert 
G. Kay. secretary, since which meetings have 
been held at various periods, which have been 
well attended by representatives of every trade 
organization in the city, and the result of which 
has been submitted to the committee of ways 
and means in Harrisburg, impressing upon this 
committee the universal opinion of the mercan- 
tile bodies in Philadelphia and throughout the 
state that the bill is a most obnoxious one, and 
for these reasons : It requires every business 
man to make public his private affairs ; it 
returns to the state a too small proportion of 
the amount collected : and it was instituted at 
a time when the state needed the money, which 
condition does not now exist. The bill has 
passed a second reading before the House, and it 
is believed will pass the third ; it will then go 
before the Senate, where it is surmised it will 
meet with some opposition. 

A well attended meeting of the Allied associa- 
tion was held in the rooms of the Lumbermen's 
Exchange on April ."iO. at 1 :30 p. m., William C. 
MacBride in the chair and Robert G. Kay, acting 
secretary. It was unanimously agreed to send 
representatives to appear before the senate com- 
mittee having charge of this bill, and that the 
chairman and secretary be authorized, in event 
of the bill passing the House, to make arrange- 
ments for a day to be set aside when the repre- 
sentatives of this allied association could appear 
and be heard on this matter. 



that the cost of furniture production is greatly 
increased. Not only Is this true of the lumber, 
however, but of other supplies entering into fur- 
niture manufacture — iron, copper, varnish, tur- 
pentine, glass and glue. Oak, walnut and ma- 
hogany have increased from thirty to forty per 
cent, according to kind and quality, and manu- 
facturers, with a few exceptions, are without 
stocks on hand. Thus it is that with the in- 
creased prices necessarily demanded for the fur- 
niture itself, retail dealers are going very slow- 
on purchases, with the result that many smaller 
manufacturers will be obliged to close down 
their factories for lack of orders, and this in 
turn will mean that nearly 3,00U workmen will 
be thrown out of employment. 



New Oklahoma Hardwood House. 

Announcement is made of the formation of the 
.Turden-Akin Lumber Company of Muskogee, 
Okla., with general offices in suite .j, Colo- 
rado building.- The company is composed of 
R. L. Jurden, recently with the I'enrod Walnut 
& Veneer Company of Kansas City, and Benja- 
min Akin, late with the K & P Lumber Com- 
pany of Cincinnati. The company will manu- 
facture and deal exclusively in hardwoods, mak- 
ing a specialty of oak, ash and Cottonwood. It 
controls considerable stumpage and a number of 
mills, and announces that it will be able to give 
customers prompt shipments and honest grades. 



Belgian Furniture Business, 

The most important industry in Belgium is 
the manufacture of furniture as carried on at 
Malines, writes Consul Atwell from Ghent, but 
its future seems to be dubious owing to the 
fact that large quantities of American lumber 
are imported annually for use in this business 
and prices are now reaching such a high altitude 



The Grading Bules Conference, 

According to plans announced in the last issue 
of the RecokDj a protracted conference between 
the inspection committees of the National Hard- 
wood Lumber Association, the Indiana Hardwood 
Lumbermen's Association, the Michigan Hard- 
wood Manufacturers' Association and the Wis- 
consin Hardwood Manufacturers' Association 
took place in the rooms of the National Hard- 
wood Lumber Association this week. The ses- 
sions are still in progress as the Hardwood 
Record goes to press. However, it is under- 
stood that before adjournment on Wednesday 
evening an agreement was reached which con- 
templated recommending for adoption at the 
annual meeting of the National association. May 
23 and 24, rules lUnt w-ill take into consideration 



both sides of a piece of lumber in its inspection ; 
the injection of a new grade between firsts and 
seconds and No. 1 common, to be known as 
selects ; a give-and-take system of measurement 
on the half-inch basis, and the admission of 15 
per cent of odd lengths in all grades. The only 
matter remaining unsettled for Thursday morn- 
ing's session was speciflcations covering the 
poorer side of Nos. 1 and 2 common. It is re- 
garded as certain that the representatives of the 
various associations will come to an amicable 
agreement and will go to Atlantic City fully 
pledged to attempt to secure the adoption of 
these recommendations. 

Representing the National Hardwood Lumber 
Association at the conference are Theodore 
Fathauer of Chicago, H. C. Humphrey of Apple- 
ton. Wis., and D. F, Clark of Minneapolis. Rep- 
resenting Michigan are C. A. Bigelow of Bay 
City, F. A. Diggins of Cadillac, D. H, Day of 
Glen Haven and R. J. Clark of Sault Ste. Marie. 
Representing the Wisconsin manufacturers arc 
M. J. Quinlan of Soperton, A. R. Owen of Owen, 
G. E. Foster of Mellen, B. W. Davis of Phillips, 
F. H. Pardee of Wausau, B. F. McMillan of Mc- 
Millan, E. J. Young of Madison, J. T. Barber of 
Eau Claire and Daniel Arpin of Grand Rapids. 
Representing the Indiana association are C. H. 
Barnaby of Greencastle and J. M. Pritchard of 
Indianapolis, respectively president and secre- 
tary of the organization. 



Program N. H. L. A. Meeting at Atlantic 
City. 

Secretary Fish of the National Hardwood 
Lumber .Association has made public a most 
interesting program which will be carried out at 
the forthcoming annual meeting of his organiza 
tion at Atlantic City, May 23 and 24. It is as 
follows : 

THUIISD.IY, MAY 23. 

11 a. m. — Reception of members and guests in 
convention hall at Steel Pier. 

12 noon — Opening session. Address of w-elcome 
by ^layor Stoy of Atlantic City. Reports of 
officers. 

1 p. m. — Intermission for luncheon. 

'J :3(} p. m. — Reports of standing committees by 
respective chairmen. Address on ".Associate 
Obligations." by Earl Palmer: on "A School 
of Inspection." b.v B. C. Currie, .Tr. ; on 
"Cherry Inspection," by W. L. Sikes. 

.S p. m. — Smoker and entertainment for members 
at Rudolph Grotto. 

.S p. m. — Entertainment for ladies at Steel Pier. 

FRIDAY, iJtAY 24. 

it a. m. — Members will reassemble. 

10 a. m. — Call to order : report of committee on 
officers' reports : address on "The Wholesaler ; 
Why He Is Necessary," by Robert W. Higbie : 
on "Forestry." William L. Hall : on "Rivers 
and Harbors," Jolin A. Fox ; introduction of 
new business. 

1 p. m. — Intermission for luncheon. 

2 :30 p. m. — Unfinished business. 

4 ;30 p. m. — Election of officers and directors. 

5 :30 p. m. — Adjcuirnment. 

*> p. m. — Meeting board of directors. 

.S p. m. — Entertainment on Steel Pier for all. 



Meeting National Lumber Manufacturers' 
Association. 
It should not be forgotten that the annual 
meeting of the National Lumber Manufacturers' 
Association will be held in the .Auditorium of 
the .Jamestow-n Exposition grounds near Norfolk. 
Va., on Tuesday and Wednesday, May 2S and 
20. The hotel headquarters of the delegates 
will be the Hotel Chamberlin, at Fortress Mon- 
roe, from which point they will be transported 
to the exposition grounds by steamer. Delegates 
to this convention from the Hardwood Manu- 
facturers' Association of the United States are 
H. II. Vansant, Ashland, Ky. : John W. Love. 
Xashville. Tenn. : W. M. McCormick, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. : .1. W. Oakford, Scranton, Pa. ; 



22 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Wm. Wilms, Chicago, 111. ; W. A. Giltbi-ist, Mem- 
phis, Tenn. ; John B. Ransom, Nashville. Tenn., 
and Lewis Doster, secretary, Chicago, 111. 

Those from the Wisconsin Hardwood Lum- 
bermen's Association are F. H. Pardoe, Wausau, 
Wis. ; Edw. J. Young, Madison, Wis. ; M. J. 
Quinlan, Soperton, Wis. ; Geo. E. Foster, Mellen, 
Wis., and A. E. Beebee, secretary, McMillan, 
Wis. 

All the other manufacturing lumber associa- 
tions of the country affiliated with this organiza- 
tion will be represented by delegates. 



Building Operations for April. 

isuikiing statistics from fifty-four leading cit- 
ies throughout the country, officially reported to 
fhe American Contractor, Chicago, and tabu- 
lated show a gradual increase as the season 
progresses over similar reports for the same 
month in 1906, showing a widely distributed 
building activity for April. In the aggregate 
the gain, as compared with April, 190G, is 
a trifle over 5 per cent. Twenty-six cities show 
gains ranging from 6 to 199 per cent, and 
twenty-eight show a loss varying from 2 to 77 
per cent. 

.\pril. .Vpril. I'er I'or 

1SK)7. lUOU. <'ent cent 

Cit.v — cost. cost. i.'alii. loss. 

.\tlanta $ 395.306 .$ nOU.OT" ... :!0 

BaltitQOrc 846,544 795.000 II 

Bu-mingh:im 126.29G 173,200 ... 27 

Bridgeport 302,910 152,300 00 

Buffalo 1,086,700 l,42fl,30.-i ... 23 

Chicago 5,336.950 12,139,875 ... .16 

Chattauooga 05,835 103,37.". ... 7 

Davenport 60,430 30.2on 12<l 

Dallas 379,410 456, »so ... 16 

Denver 520,995 486,07.'j 7 

Detroit 1,271.400 1.438,10 1 ... 11 

Dullitb 376.493 313,507 20 

EvansTille 82,515 128,49ii ... :i5 

rail River 61,000 286,09.". ... 77 

Grand Rapids 160,664 210,077 ... 22 

Harrishurg 376,515 261,7oii 44 

Hartford 343,700 386.88.". ... U 

ludianapolis 677,710 852,664 ... 20 

Kansas Cily 1,129,995 1,424,7411 ... 20 

Louisville 445.220 328.790 ys 

Los Angeles 1,451.632 2,002,351 ... 27 

Milwaukee 1,463.195 l,003,6(rr 46 

Minneapolis 1,147.960 893.0911 2S 

Memphis 482,030 451.,S39 

Mobile 173,270 121,3511 42 

Nashville 1.82,979 255,070 28 

New HaviMi 354,935 478,219 ... 25 

Newark 1,280,933 783,402 63 

New Orleans 327.361 442.896 ... 26 

Manhattan 12.647.223 13,275.445 ... 4 

Brooklyn 9,594.513 4,828,079 9S 

Bronx 2,797,420 3.157.195 ... 11 

New York £5,039,158 21,260,719 17 

Omaha 413,375 373,3.".5 10 

Philadelphia 6,893.500 4,071.885 69 

Patcrson 223.493 128.008 74 

Pittsburg 1,386,142 4,226.I.S.-1 ... 67 

Pueblo 17,560 20.942 ... 34 

Portland 1.645.450 .550.8112 199 

Rochester 786,045 657.046 19 

St. Jjseph 109,280 112, OO.'. ... 2 

St. Louis 2,560.447 4.450.713 ... 42 

St. Paul 623.110 726,603 ... 14 

San Antonio 130:693 73.845 7S 

.San Francisco .... 8,615,042 

Scrauton 222,110 172.575 28 

.Seattle 741,999 1,074,322 ... 31 

Spokane 554,380 476.043 16 

South Bend 87.395 59,240 47 

Syraonse 606,633 437,685 52 

Toledo 339,224 388.433 ... 12 

Tacoma 462,385 312,533 48 

Washington 1,0IX),9SS 1,881,198 ... 4 

Worcestei- 476,613 316.804 50 

Wilkesbarve 270,395 411,943 ... 34 

Winnipeg 1,125,250 2.072,41X1 ... 45 

Total $75,947,209 $72,401,224 5 



Tennessee has just been torn away to permit 
the erection of a part of a modern mill plant, 
which will house the business of the T. M. 
Michaels Lumber & Manufacturing Company. 
This firm has been using the old mill as one of 
three until it was decided that its great age 
made it no longer safe. 

It was built by George Harris, a mill man, 
also known as the author of the humorous book 
"Sutt Lovingood." .lohn Craig used it for some 
time, and it was long known as "Craig's saw- 
mill." Later it was taken over by S. T. Atkin, 
a pioneer lumber dealer and manufacturer, who 
occupied it for several years. During the flood 
of 1867 — a well remembered epoch to those who 
lived along the Tennessee river — the old mill was 
partially carried away by the tide, as was also 
one of the planing machines which it contained. 
It was later removed further from the river 
bank and became the nucleus of the present 
Michael plant, several buildings having been 
placed around it, so that the original structure 
could not be seen by the passer-by. 

During the long and honorable history of this 
old mill, great masses of woodwork have been 
turned out for all sorts of building purposes — 
from rough boarding and shingles to mantels 
and doors. The old structure is being torn down 
to make room for another more modern depart- 
ment. 

Filer Hardwood Lumber Company. 

The Filer Hardwood Lumber Company, a 
concern capitalized at $1,000,000, was organized 
April IS at Detroit, Mich. The company has 
acquired title to 80,000 acres of timber land in 
Arkansas, consisting of ash, cypress, pine, hick- 
ory and other varieties, the oak greatly predomi- 
nating. This tract is said to be one of the Quest 
hardwood propositions remaining in that section, 
and the cruiser's estimate shows nearly 800,- 
000,000 feet of standing timber. The incorpor. 
ators are : Frank Filer, James E. Danaher, B. 
A. Scott and F. F. Tillotson of Detroit ; Edward 
L. Ueel and F. W. Clements of Springfield, Mo., 
and Sidney Tremble of the banking house of 
Devitt, Tremble & Co., Chicago. 



Cincinnati and to Cleveland, from 10 to 12 
cents ; to Pittsburg and to Buffalo, from 12'/2 
to 15 cents ; to Philadelphia, from 18 to 23 
cents ; to Baltimore, from 17 to 22 cents : to 
New York, from 20 to 25 cents ; to Boston, from 
22 to 27 cents. 



Important Timber Deal. 

K. M. Smith & Co., the prominent hardwood 
lumber manufacturers of Parkersburg, W. Va., 
ou April 23 completed negotiations with the 
Indiana Realty Company of Indianapolis where- 
by they come into possession of 20,000 acres of 
timber land in Louisiana. The purchase price 
was $330,000, and it is estimated that there are 
about 100,000,000 feet of hardwood upon the 
tract. E. M. Smith & Co. intend to clear about 
1,000 acres every year, and will commence opera- 
tions at once. 



Old Knoxville Landmark Gone. 

One of the first structures built in the city 
of Knoxville and the first sawmill built in 



Advance in Bates on Eastbound Freight. 

It has been authoritatively stated by promi- 
nent railroad men that on and after June 1. 
1907, a new schedule of rates on freight going 
from or through Chicago to eastern points will 
be put into eft'ect, which will mean an advance 
of. from ten to thirty per cent on lumber ship- 
ments. Commodity rates on lumber and other 
forest products have been eliminated and the 
rates of Class 6 have been substituted. An ad- 
vance of 1 cent in the freight rate on hardwood 
lumber means that the transportation charge 
will be augmented by from 40 to 60 cents, while 
an increase of 5 cents a hundred is equivalent 
to a difference of from $2 to $3. These ad- 
vances are based on minimum weights of 4,000 
pounds and maximum 6,000 pounds to the thou- 
sand feet, and under this prospective classifica- 
tion all forest products will be listed and 
charges assessed on the basis of Class 6 rates, 
with the exception of valuble cabinet woods, no 
distinction being made on various kinds of 
lumber. 

The rate from Chicago to Toledo and to De- 
troit will be advanced from 9 to 10 cents ; to 



New North Caiolina Enterprise. 

One of the largest real estate deals made 
recently in the state was consummated at 
Wilkesboro, N. C, this week, the Giant Lumber 
Company, a nev/ly organized concern, purchasing 
from T. E. Findley over 10,000 acres of fine 
timber lands. This property contains white 
pine, oak, poplar and chestnut of flue physics, 
and lies at the foot and in the coves of the 
Blue Ridge mountains on the Reddles river. 

The lumber company is preparing to construct 
a flume from the railroad at North Wilkesboro 
up the river through the land. It will cost over 
.fSO.noo. When the lumber is sawed at the mill 
it will be floated to the railroad in this flume, 
a distance of eighteen miles. At least $30,000 
additional, and probably a much larger sum, 
will be put in sawmills, planing mills, box 
factories, etc., whicli the company will estab- 
lish. Within a few weeks the company expects 
to expend on the work more than $150,000. It 
will bring a large number of northerners to the 
section to engage in logging, cutting, fluming, 
manufacturing and selling the timber on this 
property. 

The Giant Lumber Company Is composed of J. 
M. 'Barnhardt and W. J. Palmer of Lenoir, N. 
C. ; F. G. Harper of Peterson and E. P. Wharton 
of Greensboro, all men of prominence and wealth. 
The company will conduct a lumber, timber and 
sawmill business. Mr. Barnhardt is one of the 
pioneer lumbermen of the state and has been 
very successful in the business. The personnel 
of the company is altogether capable of making 
the enterprise one of the leading concerns in 
North Carolina. The capital stock is placed at 
$125,000. 

N, W. L. D. A. Committees. 

Among other committees which President 
Hastings of the National Wholesale Lumber 
Dealers' Association has appointed is a hard- 
wood inspection committee, of which J. V. Stim- 
son of Huutingburg, Ind., is chairman, and the 
other members are : J. L. Lytle, Pittsburg ; J. B. 
Stark, Memphis : R. F. Kreinhedcr, Buffalo ; W. 
M. Weston, Boston, and H. P. Wiborg, Cin- 
cinnati. F. R. Babcock, who has served the 
railroad and transportation committee as chair- 
man so admirably during the past year, has 
been reappointed to that office. M. P. Wheeler 
of Endeavor, Pa., becomes chairman of the 
forestry committee, with R. C. Lippincott as 
chairman of the advisory committee to the 
-Vmerican Forestry Association. 



Embarrassment of Cincinnati Company. 

W. A. Bennett has been appointed receiver of 
the Pease Company of Cincinnati and announces 
that the financial embarrassment of the Standard 
Millwork Company has produced this similar 
condition with the Pease Company. The cred- 
itors of the Standard Millwork Company have 
agreed upon a plan by which that business Is 
to be continued under the supervision of a 
creditor's committee. In order to protect the 
interests of all creditors alike, the common pleas 
court of Hamilton county has appointed Mr. 
Bennett receiver of the assets of the Pease 
Company, with authority to carry on the busi- 
ness as a going concern pending a sale of the 
property. The appointment was made on appli- 
cation of C. H. I'ease, president and large stock- 
holder of the company. An inventory is now in 
preparation and the receiver states that he will 
soon be able to make a correct statement of the 
assets and liabilities. 

In the light of present information Mr. Ben- 
nett feels .iustlfled in making the statement that 
the claims against the Pease Company will be 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



23 



paid in full and that a balance will be left to 
go to the stockholders. Creditors are requested 
to file their claims, duly verified, with the 
receiver on or before June 28. 



Change in Prominent Hardwood House. 

That veteran and sterling hardwood lumber 
concern, the Heath, Witbeck Company, has been 
changed in its personnel by the addition of 




EDWARD HEATH, CHICAGO. 

Clarence Boyle, who has acquired an interest in 
the company, and brought about some official 
changes. C. H. Wolfe has resigned as secretary 
and the officers of the company are now as 
follows : Edward Heath, president and treas- 
urer ; Clarence Boyle, vice president and pur- 
chasing agent: C. H. Wolfe, assistant treasurer 
and sales manager ; C. F. HoUe, secretary. The 
general offices will be continued at Room 408-9, 




C. H. WOLFE, CHICAGO. 

WlUoughby building, corner of Michigan and 
East Madison street, and the general assembling 
yards of the company have all been consolidated 
at Thebes, HI., where it carries a stock of about 
15,000,000 feet. The company's specialties are 
oak, gum, ash and cypress. It maintains a dry 
kiln at its Thebes plant and is in a position to 
ship either air or kiln dried stock, but from the 
fact that it operates no planing mill guarantees 



to make the shipments with the "picks all in." 
Its specialty is mixed carloads for direct and 
prompt shipment to the trade. 

In the change of affairs of the Heath, Witbeck 
Company noted, this concern takes over the stock 
and business of the Evansville Lumber Company 
formerly located at Evansville, Ky., and discon- 
tinues entirely the Chicago yard. The indi- 
viduals associated with the Heath, Witbeck 
Company are almost too well known to need 




CLARENCE BOYLE, CHICAGO. 

recurring mention. Edward Heath has been in 
the hardwood trade in Chicago for well toward 
twenty years, and associated with him during 
nearly all this period has been C. H. Wolfe. 
Clarence Bgyle has for years been a well-known 
figure in Chicago hardwood circles and Mr. Holle, 
the most recent ally of this concern, was 
brought up in the lumber business in Colorado, 
but has served tour years' apprenticeship with 




C. F. HOLLE, CHICAGO. 

the Heath-Witbeck Company at its various dis- 
tributing yards. 

The company in addition to its large domestic 
trade has an excellent foreign business and Mr. 
Heath spends a part of each year in Europe. 
It is his intention to sail for Liverpool about 
January 1 and he will spend the greater portion 
of the summer in adding to the foreign clients of 
his house. 



Largest Order for Boilers. 

The largest order for water tube boilers ever 
let by the United States government was 
awarded during the closing hours of Congress to 
the Atlas Engine Works of Indianapolis. It 
was for the boiler equipment of the new central 
power plant located in Garfield Park at Wash- 
ington, which when completed is to furnish heat, 
light and power for the Capitol and surrounding 
buildings— the new Senate and House office build- 
ings, and the Congressional Library. The pur- 
chase includes sixteen high-pressure Atlas water 
tube boilers of approximately 600 H. P. each 
They will be erected in groups of two and will 
be equipped with Roney stokers and Foster 
super-heaters, necessary because of the excep- 
tionally high degree superheat called for in the 
special turbines to be used. Deliveries will com- 
mence on August 1 and it is expected the plant 
will be ready for operation by the first of the 
next year. J, G. White & Co. of New York 
were the government's consulting engineers on 
this work. 

Miscellaneous Notes. 

The Bay City Colonial Porch Column Company 
of Bay City, Mich., will erect a large plant there. 

The Chippewa Falls Chair Company of Chip- 
pewa Falls, Wis., has been formed by George 
Ganser and others and will erect a new factory. 

A. L. Davison of Beaver, Mo., proposes to 
establish a large spoke factory at Rolla, Mo. 

The Oklahoma City Desk Manufacturing Com- 
pany has been incorporated at Oklahoma City, 
Okla., with a capital stock of $250,000 by Alvln 

0. Bowers and others. 

A new furniture factory with a capital of 
$25,000 has been incorporated at Allegan, Mich., 
by Fred I. Chichester and others. It is to be 
known as the Allegan Furniture Company. 

The Twentieth Century Casket Company of 
Findlay, O., is planning to enlarge its plant. 
John D. Renshler is manager. 

The Cream City Casket Company of Milwau- 
kee, Wis., has been incorporated by Joseph J. 
Rademacher and others with a capital stock of 
.?35.000. 

Fire destroyed the planing mill of the Swann- 
Day Lumber Company at Jackson. Ky., recently. 

The Buchanan-Brewster Furniture Manufac- 
turing Company of Kansas City, Mo., has been 
incorporated with a capital stock of $100,000. 

1. J. Buchanan is one of the incorporators. 

The Smith & Nixon Piano factory at Louis- 
ville, Ky., was destroyed by fire a few days ago. 

The Sioux City Casket Company is erecting a 
large plant at Sioux City, Iowa. 

George A. Myers and others have incorporated 
the Aurora Mantel Manufacturing Company at 
Aurora, III., with a capital of $25,000. 

G. M. Easier of Bloomfleld, 111., will erect a 
factory at Jonesboro, Ark., for the purpose of 
manufacturing hubs. The plant will cost about 
$25,000. 

The Paoli Spoke Company of Paoli, Ind., has 
been incorporated with a capital of $25,000. 
Ernest Stout is one of the incorporators. 

The Boyertown Burial Casket Company of 
Boyertown, Pa., will erect a new factory to cost 
$180,000. 

The Commercial Vehicle Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Springfield, 111., has been incorporated 
with a capital stock of $60,000 by Harry Good- 
man and others. 

One of the finest exhibits shown at the James- 
town Exposition is that of the Virginia Mineral 
& Timber Association, which was organized at 
Roanoke on November 24, 1906, for the purpose 
of exploiting the resources of Virginia and to 
show the progression of her mineral and timber 
operations. The railroad companies, the mine 
owners and the timber producers joined their 
efforts with those of Governor Swanson, and the 
cooperation and liberal responses which have 
been forthcoming have been productive of the 
splendid exhibit which is now being shown. 

Four carloads of maple logs were recently 
shipped to Glasgow, Scotland, from Nashville, 



24 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Micli. They will be used for rolls in large wall 
paper manufacturing institutions. The design 
for the paper is engraved on the maple cylinder 
and the process of reproduction is similar to that 
of ordinary printing. 

A new and handsome imported wood, which 
bids fair to be very popular tor fine cabinet 
work, is the Tasmanian myrtle. It is of a rich 
pinkish color, hard and close grained. 

The Ked River section of Texas is shipping 
considerable walnut timber to the Liverpool mar- 
ket. A large quantity of the wood, purchased 
from farmers iu the neighborhood, w;is shipped 
from Annona last month. The Zeiglcr Saw Mill 
Company of Richmond, Tex., recently shipped a 
fine lot of ash timber to the Houston market. 

The Lansing Veneer Company has purchased 
over two carloads of black walnut from farmers 
in the vicinity of Chelsea. Mich., which are be- 
ing delivered to the Michigan Central for ship- 
ment. 

The Grand Rapids-Oregon Timber Company has 
been formed at Grand Rapids, Mich., for the 
purpose of dealing in timber lands. It is capi- 
talized at ?S0,000. The stockholders, all of 
Grand Rapids, are as follows : A. G. Dickinson, 
F. I. Nichols, W. E. Cox, C. H. Walker, J. H. 
Walker, J. R. Taylor, J. II. Haak, C. A. Coye, 
Adrian Otte, Edward Ansorge. F. II. Nichols, 
P. H. Travis, C. L. Grinnell, L. T. Wilmarth, 
W. E. Gill and B. B. Luten. 

Consul-General Richard Guenther of Frank- 
fort, Germany, reports that near Algiers, Mo- 
rocco, there is a large plantation of soap trees, 
from which several thousand tons of berries are 
gathered annually. This fruit is used for making 
an extract which may be destined to be of great 
service for domestic purposes, since it will clean 
linen, silk and colored embroideries much better 
than ordinary soap. 

The Southwestern Lumber Company, a New 
Jersey concern, has purchased 32,000 acres of 
hardwood timber land in Calcasieu parish, Louis- 
iana, for the sum of $271,580. The land was 
the property of the Orange Land Company and 
J. B. Watson. 

The Virginia Timber Company has commenced 
operation near Kilbourne. 111. A sawmill plant 
and other necessary machinery for the manufac- 
ture of hardwood lumber will be installed and 
a mile of railroad track built. The company 
owns 1,000 acres of timber land .along the San- 
gamoif river. 

The Henry Quellmalz Lumber and Manufactur- 
ing Company has been formed at St. Louis, Mo., 
to manufacture and deal in wagons, woodwork, 
etc., and to establish sawmills ; the capital stock 
is $100,000. 

The St. Louis Woodwork Manufacturing Com- 
pany has been organized at St. Louis with a 
capital of $10,000. The incorporators are E. P., 
E. R. and C. A. Maule. 

The Pennsylvania railroad will expend in the 
neighborhood of $4,000,000 for wooden cross- 
ties this year. 

The Straus sawmill, near Coleman, Wis., was 
destroyed by fire recently, entailing a total loss 
of $5,000. 

The Chicago Tie and Timljer Preserviug Com- 
pany has been incorporated in that city by E. E. 
Gray, C. P. Tallmadge and E. Murray. It will 
deal in and treat railroad ties and timber and 
is capitalized at $00,000. 

Nineteen girls employed in the clothes pin 
department of the Oval Wood Dish Company's 
plant at Traverse City, Mich., went on a strike 
week before last, which necessitated shutting 
down that branch of the big concern. They de- 
manded a "raise" of 10 cents a day, but were 
refused, although they were offered their old 
positions back again at the same wages. The 
girls refused to take them, however, and were 
replaced by new employees. 

Another buried forest has just been brought to 
light near Peterborough, England. Oak trees, 
which have been buried for perhaps two thousand 



years, have been discovered at a depth of seven 
feet. The wood is extremely hard, as is usually 
the case with these buried timbers, and can 
only be worked by machinery, as it turns the 
edge of an ax. 

The H. M. Hoskins Lumber Company of Bris- 
tol, Va., which was incorporated April 4 with a 
capital stock of $25,000, elected H. M. Hoskins 
president, C. A. Reyburn vice-president and gen- 
oral manager and F. W. Kelly secretary. The 
company will erect a band sawmill of a capacity 
of 25.000 feet per day and three circular saw- 
mills, each of a capacity of 10,000 to 12.000 feet. 
C. C. Hagemeyer of Butler, Ky., H. L. Mlckle 
of Highlands, Hall Hagemeyer of Covington and 
Lurancy Mickle of Highlands have incorporated 
the H. L. Jlickle Lumber Company at Covington, 
Ky., capitalized at $50,000. 

TTie Alabama Black Locust Pin Company has 
been organized at I'ort Payne, Ala., with E. 
Cochran as president and J. G. Bohling as secre- 
tary and treasurer. A factory has been built 
and the concern is now manufacturing locust and 
oak insulator pins and oak brackets. 

The Nelson Lumber Company has been incor- 
porated at Johnson City, Tenn., with a capital 
of $50,000 by J. A. Summers, Guy L. Smith, 
L. W. Missimer and others. 

The Sunflower Lumber Company will establish 
a sawmill at Sunflower, Ala., with a daily ca- 
pacity of 20,000 feet to develop 4,000 acres of 
pine and hardwood timber lands. They propose 
to add a kiln and planer. C. L. Flora, formerly 
of Tiffiu. O., is general manager. 

The Genessee, New York, valley is a natural 
black walnut belt, but the great demand for 
trees for the German export trade is causing 
them to be rapidly cut down. They are used 
abroad for veneers, and are given a very high 
polish in the construction of fine furniture. For 
large black walnut trees as much as $100 has 
been paid, although the price of average trees is 
about $35. 

The Sabino Lumber Company of Lake 
Charles. La., has been formed with a capital 
stock of $200,000 to saw hardwood from 16,000 
acres of land recently acquired from the re- 
ceiver of the Chicago-Texas Land & Lumber 
Company. This land lies in the Sabine bot- 
toms in the western part of the parish. With 
the purchase was included a hardwood mill at 
Merryville. on an extension of the Santa Fe. 
The company will improve this mill and make 
a specialty of quarter-sawed oak. 

The Cadillac Veneer Company of Cadillac, 
Mich., is now running twelve hours a day 
three days in the week, and still cannot keep 
up to its orders for panels. At present eighty 
men are on the pay roll. 

The veneer factory of Mulholland & Co. at 
Sundridge. Ontario, was totally destroyed by 
nre recently. The plant was valued at $16,000 
and only a small portion of the loss was 
covered by insurance. 

The Chandlei-ville Hardwood Lumber Com- 
pany of Chandlerville, 111., has decided to 
move its offlces to Springfield, where it will 
have quarters in the Booth Building. A large 
tract of timber near Havana will be pur- 
chased and the mill moved to that point as 
soon as the supply of timber near its present 
site is exhausted. E. A. Williams is president 
of the company. 

The Seamans-Kent Company of Meaford, 
Ontario, is establishing <a woodworking plant 
which will make sash and doors, blinds, hard- 
wood flooring, etc. It will cost in the neigh- 
borhood of $100,000 and will employ 100 men. 
The Underwood Veneer Company, of Wau- 
.sau. Wis., cut 1.250.000 feet of hardwood logs 
during the last winter, in addition to the 
large supplies which it purchased from others. 
This will insure keeping the plant busy during 
the coming summer. 

The principals of the Paddock Lumber Com- 
pany of Pana, 111., have returned from a trip 



to Arkansas, where they purchased about 
9,000 acres of fine timber land which contains 
about 10,000,000 feet of hardwood and 60,000,000 
of yellow pine. They will develop the prop- 
erty at once, it is understood. 

F. W. Teal and Felix Teal, formerly of 
Owosso, Mich., but late of Baltimore, have 
returned to the former place and will enter 
into the manufacture of veneer. They are 
experienced in this line, having been with the 
Estey Manufacturing Company before its de- 
struction by fire a year ago. 

Of the total area of Ireland, about 1.5 per 
cent is wooded. The latest return shows 
301,132 acres of forests, of which 44,227 are 
larch, 31,281 fir, 16.201 spruce, 3,230 pine, 22.- 
536 oak, 7,521 ash, 9.533 beech, 2,756 elm, 
2,613 sycamore, and 161,244 "mixed." 

The name of the Kenova-Portsmouth Rim 
& Spoke Company of Kenova, W. Va., manu- 
facturer of ciuarter-sawed oak veneer, thin 
lumber and hickory spokes, has been changed 
to the Three States Manufacturing Company. 
There is no change in the institution other 
than in name. John T. Breece continues as 
president, G. E. Breece as vice-president. 
J. W. Breece as secretary, and W. W. Breece 
as treasurer and manager. 

Judge A. M. Post, the referee appointed by 
the Nebraska Supreme Court to take testi- 
mony on the alleged lumber trust in that 
state, made a report recently, finding that 
the Nebraska Lumber Dealers' Association, as 
now maintained, is not contrary to any of 
the state laws relating to trusts. The judge 
made a thorough investigation, covering sev- 
eral months' time, and if the Supreme Court 
supports the referee the suits will of neces- 
sity be dismissed. 

City Forester Boddy, recently appointed to 
that position by the city of Cleveland. O.. 
has commenced the planting of trees along 
the streets. A large shipment was received 
last week and planting started on both the 
East and West sides. The public square 
will be beautified by the addition of several 
handsome specimens. 

A correspondent in Bellingham, Wash., 
writes that the foreign trade shows an in- 
crease of 105.000.000 feet of lumber over the 
exports of 1905. The heaviest buyers were 
Australia and China. The former imported 
110,000.000 feet and the latter but little less. 
Australia increased its importations by 47,- 
000,000 feet, Siberia by 5,000,000 feet. Japan's 
receipts, however, show a loss of 2.900.000 
feet, and it appears that trade with that 
country has passed from the hands of Pacific 
coast lumbermen. Japan has invaded Man- 
ohurian forests, from which it evidently in- 
tends to supply its needs and those of China. 
The loss of Chinese trade would be deplorable, 
for it has been constantly increasing. Hawaii, 
Alaska and the Philippines substantially in- 
creased their imports, and the outlook for 
their business continues excellent. 

One of the new and progressive lumber 
concerns of Wisconsin is the Blodgett-Booth 
Lumber Company of Marshfield. manufacturers 
and wholesalers of hardwood and hemlock. 
The company was incorporated in November 
last and is made up of C. E. Blodgett. presi- 
dent, N. E. Blodgett and George D. Booth, 
secretary and treasurer. 

J. W. Romine has recently engaged in the 
wholesale hardwood lumber business at 
Parkersburg, W. Va., with oflices in the Citi- 
zens' National Bank Building. 

The Bayspring Spoke & Manufacturing 
Company has been incorporated with $20,000 
capital stock to engage in the manufacture 
of spokes and other articles of hardwood at 
Bayspring. Miss. 

Tlie Forestry Commission of the province of 
Quebec has planted nine million forest trees 
along the Ottawa river. i 



i 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



25 



Hardwood NeWs. 

(.By HABSWOOD BECOBD Special Correspondents.) 



Chicago. 

D. S. Hutchinson, sales manager of the Nash- 
ville Ilai'dwood Flooring Company, has just 
returned to Nashville from an extended sales 
trip as far as the chief cities of the Pacific 
coast, where he had an exceptionally good busi- 
ness for the Acorn Brand of flooring. 

R It. Babcock of Pittsburg, chairman of the 
railroad and transportation committee of the 
National Wholesale Lumber Dealers" Association, 
suggests that there will likely be some advances 
made by railroads on lumber rates in the near 
future, and that it is advisable for every lum- 
berman to protect his interests as far as possible. 
He therefore thinks it would be wise in making 
sales or naming prices to endorse with a rubber 
stamp all such documents with the notation, 
"All quotations made and orders accepted are 
based on present freight rates." This notation, 
he contends, will properly safeguard lumbermen's 
interests and provide for proper distribution of 
an increased cost of transportation. Tlie sug- 
gestion of Mr, Babcock seems an eminently 
wise one. 

W. M. Piatt, formerly associated with W. E. 
Barrett & Co., has gone into the wholesale and 
commission lumber business on his own account. 
His office is Room 02S, Stock Exchange, Chicago. 
Mr. I'iatt is a gentleman whose business methods 
have always been clean-cut : he has had con- 
siderable experience in the lumber business and 
his man.y friends wish him the greatest possible 
success in Ills new undertaking. 

The H-\RDW00D Record had a call a few days 
ago from E. A. Armstrong, the well-known hard- 
wood salesman of Kokomo, Ind. 

A. F. Anderson, the hardwood operator of 
Cadillac, Mich., dropped into the Hardwood 
Record office last week on his way home from an 
extended Pacific coast trip. Mr. .\nderson has 
been engaged for some time in rounding out a 
large timber purchase in Oregon, and has now 
secured about 10,000 acres. He has three or 
four years' more cut of hardwoods in the 
Cadillac district, after which he expects to 
remove to the coast and enter lumber operations 
there. On his recent trip Mr. Anderson was 
accompanied by his family. 

W. A. Gilchrist of the Three States Lumber 
Company of Memphis was registered at the 
Annex May 8. 

Among the Chicago visitors within the last 
few days were C. A. Gilbert and Arthur Boutell 
of tlie Saginaw Manufacturing Company' of 
Saginaw, Mich., the foremost makers of wood 
split pulleys. 

A^'. A. McLean of the Wood Mosaic Flooring 
& Lumber Company, New Albany, Ind., was in 
town Wednesday. 

Pliss & Van -\uken of Saginaw, the well-known 
producers of the Wolverine Brand of maple floor- 
ing, have sent monthly calendars out as an 
.advertising medium for several years. This 
season they portray the Teddy bears in various 
exploits, and make unique and attractive adver- 
tising mediums. 

A few days ago the ILvrdwood Record had 
the pleasure of a call from John W. Woyka of 
John W. Woyka & Co. of Glasgow, Scotland, who 
is making an extended trip throughout the 
I'nited States and Canada, not only making 
direct purchases of lumber for his Scottish trade, 
which includes many varieties of hard and soft 
woods, but has also purchased high-class veneers 
extensively. Mr. Woyka also is marketing in 
this country maliogany logs and lumber and 
incidentally is introducing to the jobbing trade a 
three-ply veneer made of alder wood which his 
house produces in Russia. The wood has the 
.general appearance of basswood, but is almost as 
dense and strong as birch. This three-ply stock 
is cemented together with waterproof material 
and is an excellent piece of laminated work. It 
is particularly well suited to drawer backs and 
bottoms, mirror backs, etc. The surprising fea- 
ture about the material is that it can he laid 
<iown in this country, in spite of an import 



duty of 25 per cent, at slightly above .$20 a 
thousand feet, in 3-16 thicknesses. ' This is the 
fifth trip to this country that has been made 
by a member of Mr. Woyka's concern. Mr. 
Woyka reached New York on April 15, and since 
that time has visited Baltimore, Cincinnati, 
Columbus, Louisville, Indianapolis and Chicago. 
He will continue his tour to Ottawa, Montreal 
and Quebec, and will sail for home within the 
month from New York. 

A pleasant caller from "the other side" on 
April 27 was Ralph Shirley, a director of the 
Timber Trades Journal of London. 

Two new inspectors have been appointed for 
the Chicago market by the officials of the Na- 
tional Hardwood Lumber Association, making 
three resident inspectors for this city. They are 
F. R. Burk of Lexington, Ky., who formerly cov- 
ered eastern Tennessee inspection for the associa- 
tion, and George Kelley, a well-known inspector 
and lumberman of Chicago. 

The Henry Sanders Company of this city, a 
large manufacturer of built-up columns, recently 
increased its capital stock from ,$25,000 to $75,- 
000. This concern enjoys a wide trade in its 
line which is the direct result of its expert 
manner of manufacture. 

Victor Thrane of the well-known house of 
J. D. Lacey & Co., timber brokers at Chicago, New 
Orleans and Portland, Ore., has recently been east 
on business connected with the purchase of large 
Oregon properties by W. W. Mitchell, Cadillac, 
Mich. Mr. Thrane discussed in an interesting 
manner the coming timber shortage of the coun- 
try and said that at the present rate of cutting 
based upon the standing timber now left in the 
country only about a quarter of a century w'ould 
elapse before something would have to be found 
to take the place of wood, unless the government 
enforces a vigorous reforestation policy. 

Frederic Wilbert, president of the Southern 
Cypress Manufacturers' Association, has called 
a meeting for all members for May 15 and 16. 
at the St. Charles Hotel, New Orleans, the first 
session to be called at 10 :30 a. m. A large 
number of important matters will be under con- 
sideration, and all members are strongly urged 
to attend the meeting, although in case of neces- 
sary absence proxies may represent them, but 
no member may vote more than two proxies. 
Changes in grading rules will come up. and it 
is essential that there be a full attendance. 

A meeting of the executive board of the Hard- 
wood Manufacturers' Association of the United 
States will be held at the Grand Hotel, Cincin- 
nati, on Saturday, May 11. It is expected that 
the meeting will be attended by every member of 
the board. 

The Hardwood Record acknowledges receipt 
of an invitation to be present at the forthcoming 
Atlantic City meeting of the National Hardwood 
Lumber Association, May 23 and 24, at the 
hands of W. H. Russe, president. 

The Recced Is in receipt of a very handsomely 
printed and illustrated booklet from T. G. Wiu- 
nett, general freight and passenger agent of the 
Detroit & Mackinac railway, whose headquarters 
are at Bay Cit.v, Mich. The book describes and 
pictures the scenery along the line of the Turtle 
Route, and gives a large amount of information 
that would appeal to everyone interested in gun 
or rod. Copies of this handsome book may be 
obtained on application to Mr. Winnett. 

.\pparently owing to the fact that some of the 
lumber mutual insurance companies have removed 
their headquarters from GQ Broadway there has 
been a rumor that the location of the Lumber 
Underwriters' offices has been changed. Such is 
not the case ; they have not moved from GO 
Broadway, where they have been located for 
more than eight years, but on the contrary have 
recently renewed their lease and enlarged their 



oflSces because of increased business. The man- 
agement of this company remains with E. F, 
Perry, attorney in fact : Lewis Dill, Robt, C, 
Lippincott and Robt. W. Iligbie continuing as 
executive committee. 

Milton Miller of Miller Brothers is spending 
some time at their mills in Macon, Miss, 

John AI. Dawson has joined the force of 
Schultz Bros. & Cowen. He left the city this 
week for a trip through the South on the com- 
pany's business. 

Park, Richmond & Co. have moved their offices 
from 410 Monadnock building to 926 in the same 
building. 

A, W. Wylie, wholesale dealer whose offices 
are iu the Fisher building, reports that business 
is very good with him. Mr. Wylie makes a 
specialty of oak, gum and yellow pine. He 
says that dry stock is hard to get just now. 

F. S. Hendrickson of the Hendrickson Lumber 
Company, whose offices are in the Masonic 
Temple, states that business is in splendid 
shape, though the rains in the South make log- 
ging difficult. 

James C. Cowen leaves the early part of next 
week for a trip through Virginia, where the 
Schultz Bros. & Cowen mills are located. He 
will take in the Atlantic City convention on hie 
way home. 

John Schoen of the Columbia Hardwood Lum- 
ber Company states that business has eased off 
some this month. Speaking of the railroad 
situation, Mr. Schoen said that switching charges 
have been advanced. A short time ago they 
paid twent.v cents per ton and are now com- 
pelled to pay sixty cents for the same work. 
Situated as their yards are on the north side 
of the city and on a railroad it sometimes takes 
longer to switch a ear after it has reached 
Chicago than it does to get It from the mills. 

R. A. Hooton, one of the latest wholesalers 
to enter this market, states that he now has 
his business in shape to handle hardwoods. 
All the buying will be at the home office. The 
yellow pine end of the business will be handled 
by the Interior Lumber Company of St. Louis, 
Mo. The office of this allied company is located 
at 1208 Wright building. The officers of the 
company are : R. A. Hooton, Chicago, president : 
J. F. Oldham, St. Louis, vice president and 
general manager, and L. D. Walker, St. Louis, 
secretary and treasurer. 

Fred Jeffries of the Chicago Car Lumber Com- 
pany in tlie Pt^llman building said that business 
was good. The car situation is considerably 
better than it has been, he says; especially this 
is true of the shipments from the Coast. This 
company has just secured a tract of 51,000 
acres of high quality timber in Louisiana and 
will erect a mill at Forest. At present the lines 
of the tract are being surveyed and the details 
of the mill have not as yet been decided. The 
timber on the property consists of oak, ash and 
gum. W. B. Peckman will be manager of the 
plant. They will commence building the railroad 
very soon. 

A. H. Ruth. Chicago manager of the G. W. 
Tones Lumber Company of Appleton. Wis., has 
just returned from a trip through the North. 
He visited the company's mills and stated that 
they were very busy at all the plants. Those 
in the South have difficulty in getting logs, 
though they have not been obliged to shut down 
for want of material. 

J. N. Woodbury, manager of E. B. Lombard in 
the Railway Exchange building, states that 
business is keeping up in excellent shape. He 
has several large contracts on hand. 



Boston. 

Several of the hardwood lumbermen of Bos- 
ton are planning to attend the annual conven- 
tion of the National Hardwood Lumber Asso- 
ciation, which will be held at Atlantic City, 
N. J., May 1'3 and 24. John M. 'ft'oods will 
be accompanied on this trip by Mrs. "Woods. 

The New Hampshire Lumbermen's Associa- 
tion held a meeting in Manchester late in 



26 



HARDWOOD liECORD 



April. The prominent guest o£ the association 
was Lucius Tuttle of tlie Boston & Maine Rail- 
road. President Tuttle gave a very interesting 
talk. Among the new members elected were: 
M. W. Hart. hardwood dealer. Boston; 
Nathaniel P. Beman, Chelsea, Mass.; C. M. 
Howlett, Cambridge. Mass.; C. J. Sargent, 
Wilmington, Mass.; C. J. Kennedy, "Worcester, 
Mass., find Charles C. Batchelder, Boston, 
treasurer of the Boston Dumber Company. In 
addition to the above several New Hampshire 
lumber dealers were admitted to membership. 

Mr. Mead of Mead & Speer, Pittsburg, Pa., 
spent several days in Boston recently. 

The Connecticut River Lumber Company, 
whose large sawmill at Mt. Tom, Mass., was 
destroyed by fire recently, will rebuild the 
structure shortly. Until this is completed the 
company will get out all its orders at the 
Holyoke mill. 

The Atlantic Lumber Company, dealers in 
hardwoods and North Carolina pine, have re- 
moved from 2 Kilby street to the Mason 
Building. 

The woodworking plant of John B. Moran, 
Valley Falls, R. I., has been destroyed by 
fire, entailing a loss of about $30,000. 

A large lumber deal in which Massachusetts 
interests are prominent has just been consum- 
mated in Quebec. The sale of timber lands 
comprised in all about ninety square miles 
and the buyers have an option on about fifty- 
five additional square miles. The purchasers 
are said to be A. C. Button & Co. and John 
Fenderson & Co., both of Springfield, Mass. 

The Steep Falls Lumber Company has been 
incorporated in Portland with a capital stock 
of $10,000. The promoters are William M. 
Tucker. Roscow S. Emery and Thomas J. 
Brackett. 



New York. 

Insignificant labor troubles have broken out 
in various sections of the metropolitan district 
during the past fortnight among lumber handlers 
and teamsters and the employees of several firms 
have been called out, but in every instance of 
such proceedings the firm immediately replaced 
their men and have the situation well in hand, 
and to date there has been no serious inter- 
ruption of business. It is not believed that the 
trouble will grow or exceed the present limits 
and therefore little is feared in the way of any 
disturbance to business generally in that par- 
ticular. 

C. E. Lloyd, Jr., of Philadelphia, chairman of 
the entertainment committee for the reception 
of the National Hardwood Lumber Association, 
was a visitor in town last week rounding up 
some final details. While here he called atten- 
tion to the fact that the Monticellor hotel of 
Atlantic City has been issuing an announcement 
to the effect that it is headquarters for the 
National convention, which he absolutely denies, 
and which denial he wishes to make public with 
the further announcement that the hotel In 
question has no authority nor has any hotel the 
authority to make such a claim. Mr. Lloyd was 
also disappointed over the railroads failing to 
comply with their original promise for reduced 
rates on the certificate plan. He hopes, how- 
ever, that the railroad ofl5cials may be shown 
the error of their ways and that privileges as 
promised will be accorded. 

The proposed advance in freight rates of five 
cents from Central Freight Association territory 
to eastern states, effective June 1, has not 
created a great deal of stir In local lumber 
circles, as the proposed advance will be of direct 
benefit to shippers from the eastern wholesale 
markets, giving them a distinct advantage over 
western shippers and to that extent is a benefit 
to the Buffalo, Tonawanda and other eastern 
wholesale markets as against western competi- 
tion. 

The new tariffs just issued by the Canadian 
rail lines in conjunction with the Williams Line, 



water route, from Albany to the Metropolitan 
District place lumber tonnage on the weight 
basis of so much per hundred pounds as against 
the measurement basis of so much per thousand 
feet as heretofore. This same action was taken 
by the New York Central from Adirondack points 
last year, and now that the Canadian lines have 
followed suit the entire northern traffic is now 
on the weight basis. The schedule of rates 
issued accompanying the new weight basis has 
again been slightly advanced, but as a general 
proposition the new weight rates will about 
equal the old measurement rates. It will be 
more difficult to adjust differences under the 
new arrangement and the possibility of error in 
weights, etc., will be increased rather than 
diminished by reason of the new arrangement, 
but shippers are hoping that the general opera- 
tion of the new schedule will not work to any 
material disadvantage. 

The Parker-Bothner Milling Company has been 
incorporated in this city with a capital of $30.- 
000 to manufacture mouldings and woodwork. 
The incorporators are E. C. and K. W. Parker 
of Brooklyn and W. Bothner of New York. 

Sales Manager F. A. Kirby of the Cherry River 
Boom and Lumber Company, Scranton, Pa., was 
a recent visitor in town In the interest of 
business, which he reported of very satisfactory 
volume. The West Virginia mills of the com- 
pany are putting out close to 10,000,000 feet of 
spruce and hardwoods per month, all of which 
is being freely absorbed by the large trade 
enjoyed by the company. Business in the Middle 
West Mr. Kirby reports exceptionally active. 
After spending a few days in this vicinity he 
left for the Middle West to consult with the 
selling representatives of the company in that 
territory. The hew local sales office at 18 Broad- 
way is doing an excellent business. 

LaBau & Baker, well known cypress whole- 
salers of Jersey City, N. J., who handle the 
output 6f the LoBisiana Cypress Lumber Com- 
pany and several other Louisiana mills, totaling 
75,000,000 feet annually, have removed to fine 
new quarters at 909 Lincoln Trust building, 
Jersey City, where they have much better facili- 
ties for handling their increasing business. 

Chester F. Korn of the Farrin-Korn Lumber 
Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, was a recent visitor 
in town In the interest of business. Mr. Korn 
spoke optimistically In regard to the western 
hardwood market and the general business situa- 
tion. 

Owing to constantly increasing work in the 
activities of the National Wholesale Lumber 
Dealers' Association, the headquarters at CG 
Broadway have just been extended by the addi- 
tion of another room which will be devoted 
to general usefulness. 

John P. McEwan, well known wholesaler, 140 
East 42d street, has incorporated his business 
under the style of the John P. McEwan Lumber 
Company with a capital of $200,000. The 
Incorporators are : John P. McEwan and L. H. 
Strouse of New York City and C. B. Folsom 
of Upper Montclair. 

At a meeting of the creditors of McBride & 
Co., manufacturers of parquet flooring at 1932 
Park avenue, who failed recently, held oa May 1, 
sixteen claims were filed and Thomas B. Lan- 
caster was elected trustee. 

One thousand carpenters went on strike at 
Paterson, N. J., on May 1, and building opera- 
tions there are at a standstill. Tliey have been 
getting $3.50 a day and now want fifty cents 
an hour for a working day of eight hours. 

The planing mill of Gerham F. Smith, 001-605 
West 29th street, was destroyed by fire on April 
22, entailing a loss of $30,000. 

There was a meeting of the Board of Direc- 
tors of the Eastern States Retail Lumber Deal- 
ers' Association in the rooms of the New York 
Lumber Trade Association on May 3, with Presi- 
dent Richard S. White of Brooklyn in the chair. 
Numerous matters of importance were discussed 
and it was voted to hold a special meeting of 



the association at Atlantic City May 23, at 12 
o'clock, in the Marlborough-Blenheim Hotel, 
which will be during the sessions of the Na- 
tional Hardwood Lumber Association. 

The foreign mahogany and cedar trade in (In- 
New York market continues strong and pri'->s 
very firm. Receipts of mahogany during ilie 
month of April were far below the average, sum ' 
countries not being represented at all in tli-' 
month's receipts. This fact, together wilh a 
very fair demand, has kept all available s orks 
absorbed and there are but small holdings in 
hand. In cedar the receipts of Cuban stock wi r. 
heavy during April, which together with the it 
ceipts from other ports considerably Incrfasnl 
stoclcs in first hands, but the demand of the mar 
ket is such that arrivals keep sufficiently alj- 
sorbed to maintain prices on a good level. The 
range of prices at this writing run from 7 to 12 
cents per foot on mahogany, according to qualit.v. 
with an average of about 10 cents. Cedar valu-'-- 
range from 8 to 12 cents, with an average clos' 
to 11. 

Philadelphia. 

The Lumbermen's Exchange held its first meet- 
ing under the newly elected officers on May 2. 
with President W. L. Rice in the chair. It was 
preceded by a luncheon In Griffith Hall. The 
attendance was unusually large, which was of 
course very gratifying to the new president. 
It was moved and adopted at this meeting that 
the Lumbermen's Exchange of Philadelphia en- 
dorse the wharf owners' bill now before the 
legislature. The Hindle Lumber Company and 
Paul W. Fleck Lumber Company were elected 
members to the exchange. Committees were 
appointed for the year and a great deal of busi- 
ness of a private nature was disposed of at this 
meeting. 

Sheip & Vandegrift have increased their 
capacity from 10,000 to 15,000 cigar boxes a 
day. They have also installed several new 
Whitney planers and one of Falls Machine Com- 
pany's automatic jointers. Their mills are 
working full force and the outlook for future 
trading Is very good. They report prices on 
cigar boxes as stiff, with trend upward, on 
account of the scarcity and high price of cigar- 
box lumber. 

The Cooling Carriage Company of Wilmington, 
Del., obtained a charter under Delaware laws on 
April 30, capitalized at $100,000. The incor- 
porators are : Severson B. Cooling, Charles E. 
Dubell and George T. Brown, Wilmington. 

The Philadelphia Hardwood Lumber Company 
reports business, except for handicap of inade- 
quate railroad service, moving smoothly, that 
good orders are coming in right along and that 
they are in the market for good hardwoods. 

Jos. P. Dunwoody & Co. are complacent over 
satisfactory conditions. They have engaged P. 
M. Nevin, who was formerly with the Cypress 
Selling Corporation as salesman, to look after 
the eastern Pennsylvania district. Jos. P. Dun- 
woody, senior member of this firm, is traveling 
through southwestern Virginia and eastern Ten- 
nessee, looking for stocks. He reports that the 
mill of the Norva Land and Lumber Company 
near Walleston, Va., in which they are inter- 
ested, has started, and by May 15 will be run- 
ning full force, with lots of orders on hand. 
S. Y. Warner of the Dunwoody firm states that 
they are making a specialty of tupelo and 
poplar. 

The Philadelphia Veneer and Lumber Com- , 
pany. Inc.. reports busy in all departments, their 
mills working day and night. Francis Goodhue, 
Jr., of this concern states that they are cutting 
60,000 feet of cedar and 25,000 feet of oak 
daily, besides the sawed veneer, and over 64,000" 
feet per day of cigar-box lumber. By the last 
tides they received a large quantity of poplar 
and oak logs. The company is operating on two 
tracts of timber, one in Tennessee and one In 
Kentucky, where it has ten circular mills run- 
ning, besides the band mill at Kuoxville. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



27 



The J. W. Ditenderfer Lunibei' Company is as 
ever among the busiest. A. E. Magargal of this 
concern reports many inquiries being made and 
orders coming in rapidly. They have a fair 
stock on hand, but, as usual, no ears in sight. 

.7. H. and K. W. Schofleid of Schoflekl Bros., 
with their salesman, Jos. Lance, Jr., are looking 
after their interests in South Carolina. 

The Rumbarger Lumber Company is benefitting 
by the reaction in trading and is looking for- 
ward to a good summer business. Frank T. 
Rumbarger was in Baltimore, Md., recently, 
where he closed a contract for the output of a 
South Carolina hardwood mill. 

O. II. Rectanus, secretary of the A. M. Turner 
Lumber Company of I'ittsburg, Pa., called on 
John J. Rumbarger recently, in connection with 
the Hoo-I-Ioo annual. 

Wm. Bond of DuBois & Bond Bros, DuBois, 
Pa. ; Bond, Md., and Thomas, W. Va., was 
an interesting visitor to the local trade recently. 
He called on John J. Rumbarger of the Rum- 
barger Lumber Company, and also looked up his 
old schoolmate Robert Whitmer, with whom he 
attended Lafayette College. 

The Kirby & Hawkins Company are much 
pleased with the future business outlook. They 
are large handlers of ties and report the rail- 
roads preparing (or steady work throughout the 
coming season. 

W. M. McCormlck reports business moving in 
easy grooves. Tlie mills are all working steadily, 
but orders are taken only for what stock they 
may have ready for delivery. 

Horace G. Hazard & Co. have no serious 
complaints to make, have good share of orders. 
They are now receiving most of their goods by 
.water, which arrangement suits them better than 
the delinquent car service. 

The Philadelphia Textile Machinery Company 
la a busy concern. It has just issued a book 
copiously illustrated, called Veneer Dryers, which 
will be mailed to any veneer concern or other 
parties interested in the subject on request. T. 
W. Howlett, manager for twenty-two years of 
the St. Louis Basket and Box Company and 
now representative of the Philadelphia Textile 
Machinery Company, is traveling through all the 
veneer making districts in the United States and 
will call upon any veneer house so desiring to 
exploit the merits of the dryer, which machine 
he considers has no superior. 

The Union City Chair Company of Union City, 
Pa., was visited by a disastrous fire on April 28. 
The loss, including several houses, is estimated 
at $300,000. 

Ephraim E. Bertolet, a carriage builder in 
Pottstown, Pa., died recently of cerebral apop- 
lexy. He was sixty-four years of age. 

The firm of W. S. Haller & Co., cigar-box 
manufacturer, was declared a voluntary bank- 
rupt on April 24. Liabilities are given at 
$2,823. .13 and assets. $1,500. 

The ground and buildings of the old Lybrand 
and McDowell Stove Works at liast Girard 
avenue and Aramingo street were purchased at 
auction on April 30 by Wilson H. Lear, the 
extensive lumber dealer. The price paid was 
$74,500, which is regarded very low, as the 
property is assessed at $100,000. The plant 
covers an area of D5S feet on Girard avenue, 2G4 
feet on Fletcher street and 300 feet on Aramingo 
street. 

The Twentieth Century Lumber Company was 
incorporated under Pennsylvania laws April 20. 
capitalized at $10,000. The incorporators are 
W. S. Snyder and G. il. Whitney of Harrisburg, 
Pa., and David Wiener, Carlisle, Pa. 

The planing mill and lumber yard of J. A. 
Hoilinger of Chambersburg, Pa., were destroyed 
by fire on May 1. The loss is estimated at 
$100,000. Insurance, $40,000. 

William T. Hoffman, deputy county treasurer, 
and L. O. Lambert, both of Somerset, Pa., 
recently purchased the Gastelger timber tract 
near Ligonier on the Pittsburg, Westmoreland 



& Somerset Railroad. The tract is said to con- 
tain 1,000 acres and will cut some 8,000,000 
feet of lumber. There is a mill on the tract, 
which the purchasers will operate to its full 
capacity. 

It is announced that the state of Pennsyl- 
vania will this year take over 26,000 acres of 
land at the headwaters of Eishing Creek, which 
will be converted into a forest reserve. The 
land lies in Columbia, Sullivan and Lycoming 
counties and will be purchased from the Pente- 
cost Lumber Company. 

A fire along the Standard Oil Company's 
pipeline at Plowville, Berks County, Pennsyl- 
vania, spread over fifty acres of land, destroying 
considerable valuable timber belonging to Gideon 
Delcomp and others. 

The Hoo-Hoo Annual is becoming the all- 
consuming topic of conversation among 
lumbermen throughout the country. The 
various committees appointed some months 
ago have worked faithfully, plans have 
been formulated and other necessary work 
brought so near consummation that it will be 
easy sailing during the summer to carry out all 
arrangements comfortably and satisfactorily. 
Chairman Jerome H. Sheip of Philadelphia, aided 
by the various committees, is neglecting no 
opportunity to render this annual a star of the 
first magnitude in the galaxy of Hoo-Hoo. He 
recently spent a week at Atlantic City arranging 
for rates at the best hotels. It is a settled 
matter that the fine steel pier at this famous 
summer resort will be secured for the Hoo-Hoo 
headquarters. Five thousand booklets will be 
issued by the middle of May and distributed in 
all Hoo-Hoo centers, containing any information 
desired concerning matters pertaining to the 
annual, including a program of the daily doings 
and entertainments arranged for guests. 



Baltimore. 

The National Lumber Exporters' Association 
and the various committees of that body are 
working energetically to bring about the elimina- 
tion of some of the abuses that have troubled 
the export trade for a long time. One of the 
questions agitated is the so-called Liverpool 
measurement. The special committee named to 
bring about a change met at the office of E. M. 
Terry, secretary, on April 23, and adopted a 
plan of campaign. It was decided to draft a 
circular letter to members and newspapers' and 
talk to representative exporters and buyers, 
pointing out the injustice of the Liverpool 
measurement and explaining that under the 
system every cargo of lumber is subject to a 
dockage of from two to ten per cent for alleged 
faults. It is also urged in the letter that 
members write to buyers and brokers, informing 
them that it is impossible to do business in 
Liverpool under the present system aud that the 
exporters are prepared to sell hiniber only on 
the basis of a measurement of the actual con- 
tents, no allowance for defects of any kind 
to be made. Secretary Terry was directed to 
draft another letter to the National Hardwood 
Lumber Association, the Plardwood Manufac- 
turers' Association, the National Wholesale Lum- 
ber Dealers' Association and the New Orleans 
Lumber Exporters' Association urging that, they 
co-operate with the National Lumber Exporters' 
.\ssociation in this matter. It was further 
decided to send letters to the Timber I'rades 
Federation of Liverpool and the hardwood sec- 
tion of the Timber Trades Federation of London 
on the subject. 

The claims committee of the National Lumber 
E.'iporters' Association also had a session ten 
days ago and disposed of various matters that 
had accumulated since the previous meeting. 
The difficulty which this committee encounters 
is to be found in the numerous loopholes left 
by careless consignees, and which enable the 
transportation companies to get out of paying 
claims for damage or shortage. Often the 
receiver of a shipment will neglect to file a 



claim or give proper notice of a shortage, and 
this is taken advantage of to reject claims. 
With the idea of overcoming the difficulty the 
committee has had sent to members of the 
association a letter covering this difficulty. In 
order to correct these drawbacks and secure a 
basis for future claims, the committee had 
formulated recommendations and it suggested 
that shippers notify their consignees of these 
recommendations and endeavor to have them 
adopted wherever necessary. 

Secretary Terry of the National association 
has lately received advices from England which 
justify the expectation that an agreement upon 
.'I new form of contract satisfactory to both the 
exporters and the brokers and buyers on the 
other side of the Atlantic will shortly be 
reached. When the question first came up the 
exporters drafted a form of contract which was 
rejected by the brokers and buyers as not 
acceptable to them. The latter then drew up 
one that met their views but which the ex- 
porters did not find it possible to accept. 
Another draft was submitted, and this has been 
.somewhat amended. With a few additional 
changes it may meet the wishes of both sides, 
and will then be adopted. 

An accident which cost a dozen lives a few 
days ago will be a matter of much concern to 
the lumber export business of this city, inas- 
much as it means an indefinite delay in the 
completion of facilities for the unloading of 
lumber and logs that would greatly facilitate 
the trade. This accident was the collapse of the 
new pier, known as No. 8, being erected at 
Locust Point by the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. 
The work had progressed so far that the finish- 
ing touches were being put on, when the great 
weight of sand, concrete and the superstructure 
of steel — the latter being some 2,000 tons — 
caused the piles to bulge and let down the whole 
pier. A large number of men were caught in 
the wreckage and twelve have since been miss- 
ing. The pier was designed to relieve the 
freight congestion at Locust Point and the 
lumber exporters had the promise of the railroad 
that they would get room for the prompt un- 
loading on it of the lumber and logs reaching 
here for shipment abroad. This meant that 
such consignments would have been put aboard 
steamers without delay, as the intention was to 
divert the Liverpool and Glasgow vessels to the 
pier. The latter was one of the largest in the 
United States, two stories in height and rested 
on about 10,000 piles, sixty feet long. What 
caused the piles to shift has not yet been 
ascertained. 

Work on the Swayne county (N. C.) mill of 
the R. E. Wood Lumber Company of this city 
has been resumed, and the plant may be put in 
operation this summer. 

Pittsburg. 

Tlie Nicola Lumber Company has been hav- 
ing its full share of hardwood trade all the 
spring. It is covering the Pennsylvania and 
Ohio field very thoroughly this year and is 
making some fine contracts with large manu- 
facturers and for building lumber. 

A new company, promoted by J. T. Caveney 
and J. W. Selvey of Grafton, W. Va., has 
bought 2,000 acres of timber land in Randolph. 
Barbour, Preston and Tucker counties. West 
Virginia. A large sawmill will be erected at 
once. 

H. E. Clark and Kreger & Bradley of Abing- 
don, W. Va., have bought 7,300 acres of tim- 
ber land in Johnston county. Tennessee, for 
about $60,000. They will erect a large band 
sawmill and market most of tire product in 
Pennsylvania and Ohio. 

The Linehan Lumber Company made a very 
fortunate hit when it arranged to take over 
the entire output of the International Hard- 
wood Company of Catlettsburg, Ky. This con- 
cern makes a specialty of fine oak flooring, 
and Linehan Bros, are getting orders for the 



28 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



stock which keeps them hustling. Hardwood 
stocks in general are reported by the Line- 
hans to be scarce, and the demand outside of 
the city is fully up to expectations. 

Two hardwood men of prominence who re- 
cently paid Pittsburg- wholesalers friendly 
calls were J. P. Shirk of the Garrett Lumber 
Company of Maryland and L. J. Pischel of the 
Farmers' Lumber Company of Kentucky. Both 
men have been taking some good Pittsburg 
business this spring and say that hardwood 
stocks in their respective states are down 
pretty close to the saw. 

The Willson Bros. Lumber Company an- 
nounces a fine call for sound wormy chestnut. 
Most of this is coming from West Virginia, 
where the company placed some big orders 
under contract last year. I. F. Balsley of tills 
company is working hard to raise a good per- 
centage of the cash required at the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association's annual at 
Atlantic City, May 23 and 2-1, and predicts a 
large attendance from Pittsburg. 

R. C. Patterson, hardwood man for the Wil- 
liam H. Schuette Company, says that oak, 
hickory and ash are all in splendid demand. 
The latter two woods are going to the imple- 
ment people in Ohio, Indiana and Michigan 
in large quantities. The Schuette company is 
getting most of its hardwood from West Vir- 
ginia and Kentucky and reports a tendency 
among mill owners there to submit lists of 
broken stocks of late at a little better prices 
than formerly. Straight stocks, however, are 
as firm as ever. . 

The Kendall Lumber Company has resumed 
operations in full at its plant at Crellin, Md., 
where its mill was shut down for four weeks 
for repairs. 

Manager G. W. Cantrell of the Herman H. 
Hettler Lumber Company has been stirring up 
the Cleveland trade this week. His work at 
the Pittsburg office shows up mighty well 
on the company's books, for it makes an aver- 
age of 1,500,000 feet a month. 

W. P. Craig of the firm of William Whit- 
mer & Sons, Inc., has been taking a long 
trip through the South. 

The Edgewood Improvement Company of 
Charleston, W. Va., has been chartered with 
a capital of $25,000 for the purpose of dealing 
in lumber and building material. Its in- 
corporators are: John A. Thayer. H. L. 
Wehrle, A. S. Guthrie, Steele A. Hawkins and 
• Henry Fry, all of Charleston. 

General Manager J. N. Woollett of the 
American Lumber and Manufacturing Com- 
pany is off again on a two weeks' selling tour, 
which is likely from his reports to result in 
some mighty fine hardwood orders being 
placed. 

J. E. Mellvain & Co. are making some very 
nice advances in the tie business as well as 
in securing orders for bridge and river tim- 
bers. They note a scarcity of stocks in West 
Virginia, where they get most of their lum 
ber. "and see no reason for a belief that prices 
will be any lower for a year at least. 

The C. P. Caughey Lumber Company has 
recently taken an order for 190,000 feet of oak 
timber to be used in a liig coal shaft at 
Uniontown. Pa. This is one of several -similar 
orders which this company has secured this 
spring, and it is busy cutting the oak at its 
five mills in western Pennsylvania. It also 
reports a fine demand for railroad ties, SxSxS, 
and for bridge timbers. 

The big plant of J. Hollinger of Chambers- 
burg, Pa., was burned May 1. The plant em- 
ployed seventy-five men, and every building 
was destroyed. The total loss is estimated 
at about $100,000 and insurance at $40,000. 

Some splendid oak timber has been cut the 
past month in the vicinity of Washington, 
Pa., for ship building concerns. One of the 
best logs that has come to the notice of Pitts- 
burg lumbermen was shipped last week and 



measured 43 feet long. It squared 20 inches 
at one end and 19 at the other. 

The planing mill and lumber yards of E. R. 
Dowler at Braddock, Pa., burned last week. 
It is estimated that his loss will be $80,000. 
The plant was an old one and employed a 
large force of men. 

The Crescent Lumber Company is now in 
its new quarters in the Machesney skyscraper 
and has much larger offices than in its old 
place in the Whitfield building. East End, 
Telephone companies have contributed largely 
to the business of this concern lately in the 
way of good orders for poles and they have 
also received some good business from tiie 
new traction lines that are being built in 
western Pennsylvania. The officers note a 
slight falling off in the call for piling. 

H. F. Domhoff of the Cheat River Lumber 
Company came back from a trip through 
West Virginia and Kentucky last week. He 
bought 500.000 feet of chestnut and other 
hardwood lumber while there and is market- 
ing it rapidly in the Pittsburg field. 

The Reitz & Martin Lumber Company of 
Parkersburg, "\V. Va., has been organized with 
a capital of $24,000. It will have a large plant 
at Kermit, Mingo county, W. Va. The in- 
corporators are: T. G. Reitz, T, G. Martin, 
Ralph B. Martin, G. L. Dudley and W. D. 
Camden of Parkersburg. 

The McDowell & Torrence Lumber Company 
of Xenia. C, has been incorporated with a 
capital of $18,000. Those interested are: T. 
D. Torrence. A. M. Patterson, D. McD. Pat- 
terson, W. C. Conan and T. B. Clark. 

An interesting example of how well the tim- 
ber bridges have stood the strain of years is 
seen in the razing of the old Union bridge 
at the intersection of the Ohio and Allegheny 
rivers in Pittsburg, which has been ordered 
down by the government engineers to make 
navigation better on the three Pittsburg 
rivers. The bridge is thirty-five years old, 
but the timbers are coming out of it with 
hardly a wormhole visible and very little rot 
except where the nails and bolts were in- 
serted. Engineers who have examined the 
structure say that it was good for at least 
ten years more and maintain that a timber 
bridge of this sort is much more durable than 
the new style steel structures, which are 
liable to rust out rapidly. 

The Parkersburg Tie and Timber Company 
has been formed to take over 3,700 acres of 
timber land in Clay county. Kentucky. The 
timber is twelve miles back from the Ken- 
tucky river and to bring it down to a point 
where it can he rafted down to the Ohio river 
a narrow-gauge railroad has been built and 
equipped with a twelve-ton engine. Over 
20,000 logs are already cut. The members of 
the company are: John W. Dudley, Jr., 
Lysander Dudley, G. W. Carney and G. W. 
Brown of Ritchie county. W. G. Stout, who 
was for years in the employ of the Standard 
Oil Company in that territory, has been en- 
gaged as general superintendent of the 
operation. 

Buffalo. 

Vicegerent Snark Blumenstein will hold a 
Hoo-Hoo concatenation May 11. The attend- 
ance at the last meeting, April IS, gives 
promise of a very large turnout next time. 

There is still much complaint of car shortage 
• in the West and South, although the situa- 
tion is easier here. Shortage has not been the 
real difficulty here — it was easier to get the 
car than it was to get it to destination after 
it was loaded. 

H. S. Janes, manager of the Empire Lumber 
Company, toured through the South very ex- 
tensively on his late visit there. He looked up 
the Arkansas mills and then went to the Gulf 
states, returning through Georgia and North 
r'arolina. 



J. N. Scatcherd has returned from his late 
visit to his Memphis mills, where he found 
conditions much improved, though it would 
be very pleasant if oak logs were more 
plentiful than they are. 

T. Sullivan & Co. are now getting some cars 
of Washington fir and hope that the long em- 
bargo is raised for good, though it is not 
likely that the movement will be very active 
right away. The lumber sells well. 

Beyer, Knox & Co, again hear that there is 
going to be grade crossing work on their 
street this year, but will not worry till they 
are notified to move. Business is too good to 
be dropped for side issues. 

F. W. Vetter is filling up his yard with 
good hardwood lumber and will go to North 
Carolina as soon as he can be spared. His 
son, George Vetter. is still in North Carolina 
buying oak and other hardwoods for him. 

A. Miller is off on a trip to Pennsylvania 
and will no doubt return with a further addi- 
tion to his hardwood stock, which is moving 
out fast enougli to keep the office force busy. 
A. J. Ellas is still the watchdog of the Buf- 
falo river improvement project and does not 
mean to give it up till the work is done. He 
lately helped block a scheme to build station- 
ary bridges on the river. 

Angus McLean has so far recovered from 
his late severe illness that he has gone to the 
sanitarium at St. Catherines, beyond Niagara 
Falls, to complete his convalescence. 

O. E. Yeager keeps his Buffalo yard very 
full of lumber and is constantly receiving more 
from southern points, especially oak. poplar 
and chestnut from his headquarters in 
Kentucky. 

M. M. Wall, as president of the Manufac- 
turers' Club, took charge of a meeting of that 
body on May 2, assembled to listen to an 
address of W. T. Stead, the London journalist 
and diplomat. 

The cherry stock of 1. N. Miller & Bro. goes 
out in bunches at times and is always the 
very best stock to handle, for it is never 
thrust aside when a fine material is wanted. 
A. W. Kreinheder came back from the mills 
of the Standard Hardwood Lumber Company 
in Kentucky and Tennessee very well pleased 
with the lot of oak, poplar and chestnut that 
he got started this way. 



Detroit. 



An important move which was interesting 
to the car manufacturers and hardwood men 
of Detroit was told in a dispatch from St. 
Louis last week to the effect that W. J. Mc- 
Bride, fir-st vice-president of the American 
Car & Foundry Company, had resigned and 
accepted the position of general manager and 
president of the Haskell -Barker Car Company 
of Michigan City, Ind., at the princely salary 
of $50,000 per year. Mr. McBride was 
originally a Detroit man. He began at the 
bottom with the old Peninsular Car Company 
of Detroit and is now at the height of his 
career, though only 46 years old. 

After winning a lawsuit against W. E. D. 
Stokes in three New York courts, one being 
in the highest court in the state, and getting 
judgments that now amount to $89,000, the 
Vinton Company of Detroit was called on early 
this week to fight before Supreme Court Jus- 
tice Thomas in New York Stokes' efforts to 
get a new trial of the case. The Vinton Com- 
pany did the hardwood interior finish a few 
years ago in Stokes' large Ansonia apartment 
house in New York, over which the trouble arose. 

The Detroit Board of Review, composed of a 
committee of aldermen and the three city 
assessors, have made several startling boosts 
in the valuation of the local lumber com- 
panies. The Detroit Lumber Company's as- 
sessment was raised from ,$123,000 to $150,000, 
It was planned at first to fix the assessment of 



f 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



29 



the McClui-e Lumber Company at $160,000, but a 
representative of that concern appeared before 
the board and declared that nearly all the prop- 
L'l'ty enumerated in the valuation was located 
in the South, and so the matter was referred 
to the corporation counsel for investigation. 
The assessment of the C. W. Restrick Lumber 
Company was apportioned at $100,000, although 
the company kicks on this figure, saying that 
is about $.30,000 too high. 

Arthur N. Perry, a well-known wholesale 
and retail lumber dealer of Detroit, has filed 
a petitio!! of bankruptcy in the United States 
district court. He gave his assets as $1,814.85 
and his liabilities as $12,259.18. 

The Austin Automobile Company of Grand 
Rapids will remove to Detroit at an early 
date. They employ about 200 men. Detroit 
hardwood dealers like to see these companies 
coming, as that means larger demand for 
hardwood in the manufacture of auto bodies. 

Tliomas Merrill of Saginaw, w'ho has just 
completed his ninety-second year, has been 
connected with the lumber industry over fifty 
years. He was fonnerly associated with ex- 
Senator Thomas Palmer of Detroit for many 
years. 



Saginaw Valley. 

Il.trdwood lumbermen in the valley are taking; 
every possible opportunity to strengthen their 
position in the matter of obtaining stock for the 
future. The KneelandBigelow-Buell interests 
have a stock of hardwood sufflclent to stock their 
two mills at 23,000,000 feet a year for flfteeu 
years if they do not buy another stick, and they 
are picking up every tree they can get an option 
on. They are stocking the Bliss & Van Auken 
mill with 10,000,000 feet annually for ten years, 
and the latter firm also has some timber of its 
own. The Wylie & Buell Company is furnishing 
a large quantity of hardwood logs for J. T. 
Wylie & Co. and one or two other firms. 

A deal is now being negotiated which will 
bring the timber from 30,000 acres of land to 
Bay City to be manufactured. W. D. Young & 
Co. and people with whom they are associated 
control 200,000,000 feet of hardwood timber 
which comes to Bay City ; S. G. M. Gates is cut- 
ting 7,000,000 feet annually at his mill anil 
owns the timber which it cuts. The .Johan- 
nesburg Manufacturing Company, Sailing, Han- 
son & Co. and the Michaelson & Hanson Com- 
pany have very large holdings of hardwood, and 
the Stephens Lumber Company is cutting mixed 
timber which embraces considerable hardwood. 
At Au Sable the H. M. Loud's Sons Company not 
only owns a large quantity of hardwood timber 
tributary to the plant, but also a number of 
thousands of acres in Presque Isle county as 
yet unprofaned by the axe and saw. 

The White Brothers plants at Boyno City have 
thousands of acres of hardwood timber liehind 
them, as have the Gilchrist and Churchill com- 
panies at Alpena. The Richardson Lumber Com- 
pany, which is erecting a hardwood plant at Bay 
City, has a twenty-year stock for the new mill, 
located in Montmorency county, and the Lewis- 
ton branch of the Mackinaw division of the 
Michigan Central is to be extended twelve miles 
to reach the Richardson timber ; it will be cut 
and hauled by rail to Bay City. There are also 
numberless smaller tracts of timber available 
and which will be gradually picked up, though 
the larger tracts are now in comparatively few 
hands. Stumpage is appreciating and some hold- 
ers have put prices out of sight. Lumbermen 
regard $4.50 and $3.50 as about the stumpage 
prices that will enable cutting, hauling to the 
mill by rail and manufacturing at a profit at 
existing prices for the manufactured product, 
but some stumpage owners are asking as high 
as $8. 

The Ottawa Hardwood Company which has 
operated a sawmill plant, cutting about 5,000,000 
feet annually the last few years, has been suc- 
ceeded by Gardner & Richards, who have ac- 



quired the property and will operate the mill. 
It has a stock 'of over 4,000,000 feet for the 
season. 

Wages paid men in the woods continue high, 
as all of the large manufacturers who operate 
jilauts the year through run about the same 
number of camps in summer as in winter, and 
ihc small mills and the portable mills in opera- 
tion give employment to a large number of men 
in the aggregate. 

The H. M. Loud's Sons Company shipped a 
large cargo of hardwood limber last week to 
Port Arthur, Ont., on contract to furnish timber 
for harbor purposes for the Canadian govern- 
ment. The company shipped a cargo of maple 
to Lake Erie ports. This company has some 
heavy contracts for timber to fill during the 
year. 

The maple flooring business is in excellent 
condition, both as regards prices and volume of 
business. The S. L. Eastman Flooring Company 
has made extensive improvements to its plant 
and reports a good trade. The Strable plant at 
Saginaw is already full of orders, and the Bliss 
& Van Anken and the W. D. Young & Co. plants 
ai-e running day and night. The new Richardson 
plant at Bay City will give the valley five large 
plants, and still another is being projected at 
Bay City. 

.1. E. Wright has taken a contract to cut 
l.(JOO,(IO0 feet of hardwood lumber at Ocqueoc 
Lake lor the Embury-Martin Lumber Company 
(if Cheboygan. 

The Cook, Curtis & Miller hardwood plant at 
(Jrand Marais will ship its cut by lake this sea- 
son. 

I). B. I'inkerton has his hardwood plant at 
Onaway ready to begin operations and has 
enough logs to stock the plant for the season. 

The Metz Manufacturing Company's sawmill 
at Metz after being thoroughly overhauled and 
receiving a new boiler and steam feed has re- 
sumed operations. 

At West Branch the P.atchclor Timber' Com- 
pany is installing a finely equipped heading 
plant to be operated in connection with its saw- 
mill plant. Brick kilns will be erected in con- 
nection and the entire plant is equipped wllh 
electric lighting. 

Scarcity of cars is the only serious obstacle 
that confronts the hardwood operators, but it is 
a serious problem. It is almost impossible to 
got box cars at all. Where ten are wanted the 
shipper is thankful to get one. It is a source of 
no little vexation that lumber cannot be shipped 
after being sold, and when loaded the delay in 
gc'tling it forward is exceedingly exasperating. 



Grand Baplds. 

M. F. Butters of Ludington was in the city 
May 5. 

C. A. Phelps. "W. A. Phelps and J. H. Bon- 
ncll of the Hackley-Phelps-Bonnell Company; 
Clay H. HoUister. Edward Lowe, Dudley E. 
Waters. H. S. Jordan and T. F. Garratt of the 
Michigan Chair Company, and W. A. Gunn of 
the Gunn Furniture Company are included in 
the list of stockholders in the National Bank 
of Commerce, recently organized in Detroit. 

A belt line steam road, connecting all the 
roads entering Grand Rapids, will be con- 
structed this year, which it is expected will be 
of great advantage to shippers and at the same 
time will open up excellent factory sites just 
outside the city. The Grand Rapids-Muskegon 
Power Company will stretch one of its big 
feeder wires around this loop, supported on 
steel towers 100 feet high, to supply the new 
industries with power. 

L. L. Skillman, B. D. Hazard and C. S. 
Travis, a committee of creditors appointed to 
straighten out the affairs of A. L. Utter of 
Grandville. have secured a bill of sale of the 
lumber yard and other property, which will be 
disposed of to the advantage of creditors. 

John E. Barnes, until recently president of 
the Spencer-Barnes Furniture Company, Ben- 



ton Harbor, has organized a new company 
there, known as the John E. Barnes Furni- 
ture Company, and will manufacture dining- 
room furniture and specialties. Mr. Barnes 
has an interest in a large tract of southern 
timber and has options also on some scatter- 
ing pieces in the southwestern part of 
Michigan. 

The Northern Michigan Press Association 
met recently at Traverse City and forestry 
matters, including the state's policy in deal- 
ing with its lands, were discussed. Perry F. 
Powers of Cadillac, former auditor gener£Ll, 
favored a continuance of the present policy 
rather than turning over the lands to the 
Forestry Commission. He said that the turn- 
ing over of lands to the commission would in- 
jure the value of adjoining property for years, 
or until the crop of trees had been grown. The 
association evinced its interest in forestry, 
however, by asking E. L. Sprague, a news- 
paper man of Traverse City, to prepare an 
article on growing locust trees for ties and 
posts, with cuts showing the growth of such 
trees in one, five, ten and sixteen years. 

In discussing the above objection to re- 
forestation Charles W. Garfield, president of 
the State Forestry Commission, said: "It is 
unworthy of consideration as an argument. In 
any plan of timber growing on a large scale 
somebody will be injured for a time. This is 
true in the development of a street or a drain 
or .T. thousand other public utilities. The state 
must look out for all its people in adopting 
its land and forest policy. The question of 
growing timber enough for its woodworking 
industries is alone of tremendous importance." 



Cleveland. 

F. M. Kinderman of Columbus, O., repre- 
senting the Collins Lumber Company, of Elk- 
hurst, W. Va., called on the hardwood trade 
here last week. 

John D. Mershon of Mershon, Schuette, 
I'arker & Co., Saginaw, Mich., was a caller 
among the dealers here this week. 

James Miller of Pittsburg, representing Wm. 
Whitmer & Sons, Inc., called on the trade this 
week. 

W. D. Steinmetz of Bergholz, O., an exten- 
si\-e hardwood manufacturer, was a visitor in 
this market recently. He reports business 
good and the outlook very promising. 

W. P. Hilton of the Advance Lumber Com- 
pany has just returned from a two months' 
absence at their mill at Baskin, La. He re- 
ports they are cutting a very fine lot of oak. 
This stock will find a ready market in New 
Orleans territory. 

W. A. Cool of W. A. Cool & Son is at their 
mills in West Virginia looking after securing 
car.s for shipments of stock. 

White oak has been moving freely of late. 
I'oplar continues firm and dry stock is exceed- 
ingly scarce. Jobbers fight shy of taking orders 
for this stock unless they know where they 
can put their hands on it. Large quantities 
of beech and maple are being shipped into this 
market, and iu some cases this stock is being 
substituted for other hardwoods which consum- 
ers have not been able to buy owing to the 
scarcity of dry stock. A cargo of hardwood 
recently arrived from Michigan, being the first 
stock to come in by boat this season. 



Indianapolis. 

The Turner, Day & Woolworth Haudle Com- 
pany is preparing to build a large plant at 
Bluffton. Bids have been asked and work will 
be started within a short time with a probability 
that tlie new factory will be occupied early in 
the Fall. 

G. II. Palmer of Sheridan suffered a loss of 
considerable lumber stored in a barn. Boys and 
cigarettes were responsible for the burning of 
the building. 

The Advance Veneer & Lumber Company at 



30 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



.MassiU-linsetts avenue and Arlams sti-eet, is en- 
.ioyinK 111!' largest business in its liistoi'.v. in 
I he veneer plant unusual business is reiiniring 
111,' r.iree to put in mueli iivertinie, while in the 
yarils (here is a steady demiuul for hardwoods 
lor building and manutacturing piiipnses. Th • 
eoMipany lias a praetieally new plani in lirighl- 
wood, one of the city's largest suburbs. 

.T. D. Tennant and J. E. Orant o( Sidney, O., 
have iiiirchased the manufacturing plant at La- 
p,,rle ..wned by William E. Crichton. Fanning 
mills, lawn furniture, chairs, step ladders and 
Ihe like have been manufactured in the factory 
for several years and it is one of the leading 
industries in I.aporte. 

It has been announced that the recenlly or- 
ganized Jlcllvalue Lumber Company of Vin- 
cennes will take over the lumber yard and plan- 
ing mills of D. It. Mcllvaine in that city. The 
company has a capital stock of $-tO,OnO and ex- 
pects to make considerable improvement in (he 
old plant and extend the business. 

The Indiana Realty Company of this cily bas 
sold to K. M. Smith & Co.. hardwood lumber 
manufacturers of I'arkersburg. W. A"ii., extensive 
lioliliugs of hardwood timber lands in Franklin 
parish, Louisiana. There are about 2(1.000 acres 
ill the tract and it is understood the price paid 
was If:i.j0,000, the local company clearing about 
$.-,(1,(1(1(1 on the deal. J. H. P. Smith, senior 
member of the West Virginia firm who came to 
Indianapolis to consummate the deal, said lie 
li,.Ueved the tract would net 100,000,000 feet of 
hardwood Uimber and that it would be deareil 
at the rate of about 1,000 acres a year. As soon 
as clearcMl Ihe ground will be used for growing 
collon, which will produce, according lo an esti- 
mate, about .$.jO worth of cotton to the acre per 
yi-ar. W. B. Cooley is president of the Indiana 
itealty Company, which was organized about 
three' months ago for the purpose of investing 
In southern timber lands. 

I'urdne University at Lafayette will inaugu- 
rale a course in forestry, beginning with the 
fall semester. Students will have the advanlage 
of hardwood experiments to be conducted at the 
institution under the auspices of the State Hoard 
of Forestry and the course will be designed lo 
meet the needs of farmers, lumbermi'n and manu 
facturers who handle lumber in large quantities. 
A timely word of warning relative to the rap- 
idly disappearing supply of hardwood lumber in 
Indiana has been issued by the State Board 
of Forestry to the farmers of the state. The 
board advocates the planting of forestry lots 
on each farm to be given the same attention as 
other crops. While the supply of timber fo^ 
manufacturing purposes would ultimately be in- 
lueased from this plant, farmers are urged lo 
plant trees especially for use on their farms to 
meet their own demands for fence posts, tele- 
phone poles and building purposes as well as to 
furnish lumber yards in their respective locali- 
ties with timber. From one-tenth to one-eighth 
of the whole farm should be given over to the 
exclusive growing of timber, according to the 
board. From an investigation made in different 
parts of the state it is found that farmers, with 
few exceptions, take little interest in forestry on 
the theory that when the present supply of tim- 
ber is exhau.sted something will be found to take 
its place. This, the board says, will never be 
possible. 



Milwaukee. 



chair and furniture center of Wisconsin. In 
nearly all instances the leading chair factories 
own tlielr own sawmills, in wliich tlii'y get out 
Iheir rough stock. 

.Tulius G. Ingram, tlie well known iiiiUioimirc 
liiiiilicriniin of Eau Claire, Wis,, has offered 
,f4ii,iiii(l to Ihe trustees of the Congregational 
Cliiirili of the I'ilgrims, Washington, II. C. 
with which to erect an institutional church, (o 
lie a memorial to Jlr. Ingram's son, who diiMl 
about a year ago. 

The Long-Bell Lumber Company of I.iidingto'i. 
La., has bought the entire southern interests of 
Isaac Stephenson, .Jr.. for .i;3„")00,000. 

As the result of a 'conference between repre- 
scntalives of the Milwaukee, the Xorth-Western 
and the Wisconsin Central roads and members 
of the legislative committee of Ihe ilerchants' 
& Manufacturers' Association, the rate on lum- 
bci- shipped from the South lo Milwaukee has 
been reduced so as to he in conformity with 
that shipped from the north to Chicago. The 
new tariff became effective May 7. This rate 
puts Milwaukee manufacturers using southern 
lumber in a position to compete with Chicago 
manufacturers in the same line. 

The Milwaukee road is turning oul twenty- 
eight complete freight cars a day iu i(s shops at 
West Milwaukee. It expects to add at least 
,S,000 freight cars to its rolling slock this year. 
Heavy wooden beams for the body work of these 
cars is being discarded, steel being sulntil iited. 
owing to the scarcity of lumber of a high cpiality 
demanded in car construclion. The company is 
also building a large number of mail and ex- 
press cars. It is not putting out any passenger 
coaches at this time, though it has beiu build 
iug many sleepers. 

The Milwaukee market continues steady, 
though business on the whole is light. Prices 
remain firm. The outlook is considered highly 
favorable by local dealers. 



lain City is preparing to install mills and begin 
cutting on a big tract of limber which it 
recently purchased iu .lohnsou county. Tennessee. 
M. X. iiffiitt of the Tyg Kiver Lumber Coin 
jiaiiy lias gone on a business trip iu \'irginia. 



Milwaukee has been a furniture manufactur- 
ing city since as early as ISoo, when the Arm 
of A. Meinecke & Son was established, which 
still continues in business, though in another 
line. The first chair manufactory was started 
in 18oT, among the first concerns in this line 
being the Milwaukee Chair Company and the 
Mayliew Manufacturing Company, which sti'.I 
exist. The city's output last year was more 
than it;?.,riOO,OllO. In recent years it has been 
distanced by Sheboygan, which has become the 



Bristol, 'Va.-Tenn. 

The first I-Ioo-IIoo concatenation of Ihe year 
was held here May 3. The attendance of lum- 
bermen from all over this section was large and 
twenty-four kittens were initiated inli, the 
mysteries of Iloo-IIoo. Vicegerents Irving 
Whaley of Tennessee and T. W. Fugati' of 
Virginia conducted the ceremonial session. The 
guests repaired to Hotel Tip Top. where a 
sumptuous banquet was served. C. D. Clark of 
.\bingdon acted as toastmaster and toasts were 
responded to by W. A. Ilassinger. .1. .\. Wilkin- 
son. A. D. Reynolds. .Tr.. and others. 

C. II. Smith, .Tr., of Nashville, Teun., was in 
the city last week buying hardwood. 

.Tohn T. Xagle and O. C. Ilathway. managers 
of the W. M. Ritter Lumber Company's eastern 
Tennessee and western North Carolina opera- 
tions, were iu the city last week. ilr. Nagle 
heads the Linville River Lumber Company, the 
new concern that is preparing to begin cutting 
near I'ineola, X. C, on a large scale. The com- 
pany is building a railroad to its timber lands 
near Saginaw and will use the big band mill of 
the W. M. Ritter Lumber Company near that 
place. 

Natlian Bradley and D. D. Anderson of the 
Itradley Lumber Company of Elizabethton, Teun., 
were in the city last week. 

1'. V. Widener, manager of .T. A. Wilkinson's 
Hluefield. W. Va., ofBce, came to the ity last 
week and will spend several days at Mr. Wil- 
kinson's offices in this city. 

Chas. A. Baker, manager of the T. \\'. Tliay<'r 
Lumber Company, at Damascus. A'a.. was in the 
city on business last week. 

The II. M. Hoskins Lumber Company of this 
city has received articles of incorporatiim under 
the laws of Virginia, with a capital stock of 
.t;2.3,000. 

A. M. Scutt of the .T. Walter Wright Lumber 
t^ompany of Mountain City. Tenn.. was in l!rist,,l 
last week. 

'i'he T. K. Cailand Lumber Company of Mouu- 



Cincitmati. 

AVilliam A. Bennett, president of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce of Cincinnati, has been ap- 
jiointed receiver "with honds of $25, Otto for the 
Pease Company. This action wa.s taken upon 
the petition of C. H. Pease, president of the 
Pease Company, dealers in sash, doors, build- 
ing: material and general millwork, with plant 
located at Avondale. a suburb of Cincinnati. 
The company is capitalized at $50,000 and bas 
assets of over $30,000, with liabilities of .f200.- 
OOO. President Pease avers iu his petition 
that he is, in addition to being a heavy stock- 
holder and the president of the company, a 
creditor in the sum of $90,000 as security on 
the company's paper for money liorrowed with 
which to meet current obligations in conduct- 
ing the business. He is not. he says, secured, 
and while the concern is perfectly solvent, he 
asks the court to take the business in charge 
and conduct it through, not sacrificing to 
jiressui-e of creditors, as there are others than 
hi» and some are pressing for collection. 
Lengtb.v and expensive litigation with forced 
sales, he says, would sacrifice the business, 
while if free will is preserved and time given 
in which to wind up or straighten out the 
affairs of the company, all creditors will be 
Itaid in full and there will be a substantial 
balance for distribution among stockholders. 
The Receivers and Shippers' Association re- 
cently made public a reply to the statement 
of Vice-President Murphy of the Cincinnati 
Southern Railroad, in which he called atten- 
tion to the necessity for an increase in freight 
charges in order to keep pace with increased 
cost of materials and labor used by trans- 
portation companies. The statement is a very 
warm one and took up more than 2.000 words. 
A conference of shippers will be held in the 
association I'ooms to arrange to bring the 
case of the Southern's rates before the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. 

Cliester F. Korn of the Farrin-Korn Lumber 
Company has gone to New York to meet M. 
R. Farrin and wife, who are returning from 
a pleasure trip to the Orient. He will also 
look after business affairs while in the East. 
'J'he Dornstreet Lumber Company of Toledo, 
()., has been incorporated with a capital sto"'.\ 
of $20,000 by C. P. Brigham, William M. Ha.n- 
ilton, F. M. Dotson, G. McKay and J. M. 
■Weaver. 

E. M. Schantz of North Fairmount is adding 
another one of his patented dimension ma- 
chines to his mills. The new dry kilns are 
now in full operation. 

Frank F. Fish, secretar.v of the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association, was in town 
recentl.v to look after the affairs of the 
oi-ganization. 

The Wiborg-Hanna Company has added ad- 
ditional land to its yards at North Fairmount 
liy filling' up the bottoms in the rear of the 
plant. The yards have been increased sev- 
eral hundred feet. The company has been 
doing a better business this season than ever 
before and was pressed for .a bigger yard 
accommodation. 

The Cincinnati lumbermen are figuring on 
sending a large delegation to the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association's con\'ention, to 
be held at Atlantic City the middle of May. 
A special car will probably be chartered and 
several of the married men are contemplating 
taking their wives with them and spending 
se\'eral days on the seashore after the 
convention. 

William E. Delaney, general manager of 
the local offices of the Kentucky Lumber 
Company, lias gone South on a business trip. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



30A 



visiting tlie comijany's three mills. During 
his trip he will complete a deal that involves 
several thousand feet of lumber. During liis 
absence R. MeCracken assumes charge of 
affairs in this cit>'. 

The large stock of veneers stored by the 
iVlaley, Thompson & Moffett Company, which 
were i)artl>- destroyed b>- the recent fire, were 
put on the "bargain" counter and sold at 
low prices. The veneers were burnt on the 
ends, but not sufficiently to keep furniture 
manufacturers from using them. 

L. H. Gage of the Gage-Possell Lumber 
Company has returned from a successful busi- 
ness trip through the South. Mr. Gage stated 
that the car shortage still hampers trading in 
the South, but aside from that business is 
brisk. 

W. Quick and L. D. Halstead, of Richey. 
Halstead & Quick, have returned from 
business trips. 

At the annual election of the Cincinnati Lum- 
bermen's Club, held May G, Thomas J. Moffett 
of the Maley. Thomp.son & Moffett Company was 
again elected president ; George Littlcford, first 
vice president; J. W. Darling, second vice presi- 
dent ; B. Bramlage, treasurer, and E. J. Thomas, 
secretary. President Moffett stated that the 
ilnli has had one of the most successful years of 
its career, also each individual himlier dealer re- 
ports that business has been very brisk. He also 
said that he looks for a record breaker this year. 
The C. & O. road was selected as the route to 
the annual convention in Atlantic City, May 23 
and 24. The plans of the I'ark Commission were 
unanimously and enthusiasticall.v indorsed, and 
the club will use its best efforts to further the 
scheme. 

The Parlor Table Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion of the United States, makers of parlor 
furniture, met at the Sinton hotel and dis- 
cussed a new tariff sheet. Indications are 
that an advance will be made in flnislied goods 
because of the higher prices of wood and 
other materials. 

Work of cutting down the walnut timber on 
the old Todhunter farm, recently purchased 
by D. F. Frazee of Lexington, Ky., will be 
superintended by L. L. Vandegrift of this 
city. The lumber is the finest in Fayette 
county, it is said, and will be sent to Cin- 
cinnati to be sawed and sold for furniture use. 
The receipts of lumber during the month of 
April exceeded those of the past few months, 
amounting to 7,561 cars as compared with 
6.S75 the same month last year, The ship- 
ments for the month also show an increase, 
amounting to 5, -157, against 5,39S last year. 
Besides showing an increase in business these 
figures show that railroad accommodations 
have been materially better than for some 
time. 

The two large sawmills of the Cincinnati 
Hardwood Lumber Company at Huntsville. 
Tenn., will be in operation within the next 
ten days. A complete new line of machiner.v 
has been purchased and the company expects 
to do business on an increased scale. The 
first cut will be shipped directly to Cincinnati. 
William A. Bennett, president of the Cin- 
cinnati Chamber of Commerce, hopes to have 
General Kuroki. the Japanese warrior, speak 
before the members of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. Business men are anxious to induce 
him to visit the Queen City. 



St. Iiouis. 



The O'Reilly Lumber Company has recently 
been incorporated with a capilal stock of .$r)0,- 
000. It is the successor of tlie Mosberger- 
O'Reilly Lumber Company, and will maintain 
heartrjuarters and yards at llie same location, 
Jlain and Chambers streel«. It assumes all 
liabilities of the latter concern and will collect 
all iiutshindinij indebtedness. A general whole- 
sale liMi-dwood business will be carried on. and 
a gijod stock of lumber will be maintained at 



southern points as well as in St. Louis. The 
personnel of the force will be practically the 
same, with Richard ,1. O'Reilly at its head, 

George B. Osgood, representing the I'aepcke- 
I.eicbt Lumber Company of Chicas;o, was a 
recent visitor to this market. 

l-'rank F. Fish and F. P. Southgate. secretary 
and chief inspector of the National Hardwood 
Lumber Association, made a business trip to 
St. Louis a fortniKbt ago. 

G. II. Barnes has been succeeded by the G. H. 
Barnes Hardwood Lumber Company, with a 
capital stock of $45,000, G. II. Barnes, M. D. 
Barnes and M. H. Stiles are the incorporat<irs. 
This new arrangement contemplates no change 
in business procedure as formerly conducted, but 
is calculated to facilitate handling the steady 
and increasing growth of the wliolesale hard- 
wood business which Mr. Barnes lias been carry- 
ing on. The company's yard at Main and War- 
ren streets was formerly occupied by the Knenij; 
Lumber Company, and is well situated for the 
quick handling of stock, Well-as.sorted stocks 
of lumber will be kept on hand. 

Two n-ell-known machinery men, N. A. Glad- 
ding of Indianapolis and S. V. Kgan of Cincin- 
nati, were visitors to their companies' St. Louis 
branch houses recently. 

Jacob Mosberger of the dissolved Mosberger- 
O'Reiily Lumber Company has entered the hard- 
wood business on his own account, with yards 
at 653 Morin avenue, under the name of the 
Jlosherger Limiber (Company. This extensive 
property is owned by Mr. Mosberger and is well 
supplied with transportation facilities. TTpon it 
are situated a stable for sixteen horses, a bouse 
for the teamster in charge, ample sheds, and a 
handsome office building. A large and varied 
stock of hardwoods will be kept on hand, and a 
competent force of salesmen and buyers main- 
tained. Mr. Mosberjier has been identified with 
the lumber business for twent.v-six years, and is 
thoroughly familiar with all Its details. He is 
a strong factor in the hardwood trade of this 
market. 

G. H. Barnes has luu-cbased a liandsome large 
brick residence at n\imber D43'J Berlin avenue, 
which he will occupy in the near future. 

A, R. Stevens of Stevens & Lyons, Uecatur, 
III., was a recent St. Louis visitor. Ills house 
is well known in the local wholesale hardwood 
trade as a handler uf white and red oak, birch 
and cypress. 

The Massengale Limiber Company has been 
getting in a great deal of stock by river of late 
and reports its mill in Mississippi r\nuiiug 
steadily. 

The Ilafner Manufacturing Company has 
greatly increased its cypress holdings, and 
reports car service from the South much better 
of late. 

The J. P. Harnett Lumber Company has 
moved its headi|uarters to Pine Bluff, Ark., 
where it will wholesale a fine line of hardwoods 
manufactured at a large up-to-date sawmill re- 
cently established at Langford. The company is 
composed of progressive business men ami lias 
built up a large trade in its line. 



Nashville, 



The lumber firm of John B. Ransom & Co. 
purchased at auction this week at Baxter, Tenn., 
the lumber left by the late Chalmers Vestal, of 
the Caney Fork Lumber Company. There were 
imly two bidders, the other being the American 
Lumber Company. The property disposed of at 
llie sale consisted of some 600,000 feet of oak 
and beech and if went "dirt cheap." Chalmers 
"Vestal, it will be remembered, was recently found 
dead at his home at Baxter and his bookkeeper 
was later arrested charged wilh the murder. 

C. B. Benedict will shortly sever bis connec- 
liun with the Davidson-Benedict Company in 
order to go to east Tennessee to take charge of 
a big tract of timber in Pike county owned by 
llie newl.v organized S.vico Lumber Company. 
The company has recently bought a large tract. 



embracing several thousand acres, in this sec- 
tion and will shortly erect two band saw mills 
and a planing mill, A logging road ten miles 
in length will be built to connect with the 
Knoxville division of the Louisville & Nashville 
railroad. Both C. P.. Benedict and C. H. Bene- 
dict have disposed of their stock in the David- 
son-Benedict Company. Several other stockhold- 
ers have become interested in the Sylco com- 
pany and .John W. Love and John B. Ransom 
have also taken some of the stock. 

II. S. Hutchinson, tlie popular manager of tlie 
Xasliville Hardwood Flooring Company, has re- 
'iirned from a three months' trip through the 
iVcst and Northwest. He first visited points 
In Colorado, then dropped down to Texas and 
from there on out to the coast, taking in Los 
.\ngeles and 'Frisco. He returned through the 
northern route by Minneapolis and Chicago. 
Mr. Hutchinson's trip was plienomenally siic- 
ci'ssful. lie got orders most everywhere he went 
and listed many new customers. He states that 
Tennessee hardwoods arc thoroughly established 
in the West and quile popular there. He de- 
scribes the lumber situation at 'Frisco as most 
excellent, saying that the lumber and planing 
mill people there survived the recent gr.-at dis- 
aster in great shape. 

A special from Humboldt, Tenn., announces 
the destruction of the large heading mill there 
of the Humboldt Hoop & Heading Company. C. 
H. Feri-eil was the principal stockholder. There 
was no insurance. 

A special from Decatur, Ala., announces that 
Arantz Bros, have Just completed a large band 
band saw mill at Red Iliil, in Lawrence county. 
Several thousand feet of hardwood lumber :n\: 
bein.g sawed daily. 

Among the visitors to the city this wei'k were: 
K. E. Taenzer, first vice president of the Darnell- 
Taenzer Lumber Company, and R. J. Wiggs, 
secretar.v and treasurer of R. J. Darnell, Inc., 
both of Memphis. 

Several big deals are recorded recently as 
having been transacted at Waynesboro, Tenn.. 
and in that vicinity. T. S. Hassell of Clifton, 
Tenn.. who recently purchased from the Decatur 
Land Company of New Decatur, Ala., some 17, 0011 
acres of timber lands in Wa.vne county, has sold 
to R. A. Haggard of Waynesboro a one half 
interest in these lands. Messrs. Hassell and 
Haggard have sold 200,000 cross ties to the 
Holcomb-IIayes Company of Cincinnati for $00,- 
000 delivered on tlie Tennessee river. The tract 
from whicli these cross ties are being cut is 
said 111 lie rich in poplar, hickory, chestnut and 
pine. 

Thomas Wells, a well known agent at Tulla- 
homa, Tenn., has closed a deal whereby the 
Greenfield-Talbot-Finney-Battle Company of Nash- 
ville and Tullahoma purcliases a tract of 2,0(H1 
acres of timber lands in Grundy county near 
Altamont. The price is said to be a most sub- 
stantial one. Mr. Wells is said to have some 
11.000 additional acres he will shortly place on 
the market. 

.1. H. Baskette, former general manager of the 
I'rewitt-Spurr Manufacturing Company of Nasli- 
ville and Murfreesboro, which concern is the 
only red cedar factory in the world, has tendered 
his resignation as a member of the city council 
of Nashville. He removes from here to Helena, 
Ark., soon, where he will establish a big wooden- 
ware factory. 

What is said to be the largest cross tie camp 
in the world is being established at Guntersville 
on the Tennessee river in Alabama, just across 
the Tennessee line. The ties are being collected 
at this point for the Big Four railroad, which 
has a contract with Chattanooga parties for 
,'1,000,000 lies. The ties will be floated down 
the Tennessee river lo llie Ohio lo the point of 
deliver.v. 

I'he Chattanooga Slave & Cooperage Company 
lias been granted a charter by Secretary of State 
Jolin \V. Morton. The capital stock is ,$10,000 
and tbc incorporators are V. J. Blow, H. F, 



3oB 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Smith, D. G. Hart, S. G. Holland and Leroy 
McGregor. 

A project is on foot in Nashville to secure a 
new railroad running from Nashville to Ilunls- 
ville, Ala. The promoters want the citizens of 
Nashville to siibscril)e for .$7o.noO worth of 
stocli in the road and Nashville lumbermen have 
subscribed as follows : Love, Boyd & Co., ,'[;2,00 ; 
John B. Ransom & Co., ¥250 ; Nashville Hard- 
wood Flooring Company, .f 100 ; Standard Lum- 
ber & Bos Company, .$100 ; W. .7. Wallace, $100 ; 
J. H. Baird, $100 ; A. E. Baird, $100 ; E. & N. 
Manufacturing Company, $250 ; A. L. Hayes & 
Co., $200. 

The American Pencil Company has about com- 
pleted arrangements to erect a large pencil fac- 
tory at Murfreesboro, Tenn. Murfreesboro is 
probably the largest red cedar market in the 
world. There is considerable growth of this 
very valuable timber remaining in this section, 
and in addition practically all the fences in the 
county are built of red cedar rails. The pencil 
companies are now buying these rail fences and 
putting up other kinds of fences for the farmers 
in order to get the cedar. 

J. H. McCall and Gray Sanders of Hunting- 
don, Tenn., are erecting a saw mill at West 
Port, near Hiintingdon. 

Work has begun on the new saw and stave 
factory that is being built by the C. C. Mengel 
& Bro. Company of Louisville, at Hickman, Ky. 

The W. J. Cude Land & Lumber Company has 
moved its ofhccs into the new Stahlman sky- 
scraper. 

A. E. Baird has .lust returned from a business 
trip to Texas and Mexico. 

V. J. Blow, president of the Hiram Blow Stave 
Company, is back from a business trip through 
Mississippi and Louisiana. 

Nashville has nearly a score of woodworking 
plants and they are all running overtime in 
order to try and keep pace with the heavy de- 
mand for building material. In spite of the 
large number of suburban lots into which tracts 
around the city are being subdivided, numerous 
houses are springing up on them and it is these 
that are keeping the plants busy. Some of the 
larger plants are turning out contracts for hand- 
some structures in many parts of the country. 
The box factories here are also doing a record 
business and many of them have been forced 
to go into distant territory to get all the gum 
and other varieties they use in their business. 



Memphis. 

Lumbermen in this city and throughout this 
section are much interested in the outcome of 
the case of the E. Sondheimer Company against 
the Illinois Central and Yazoo & Mississippi Val- 
ley Railroad companies, hearing on which was 
begun In the federal court recently before lion. 
Judson C. Clements, a member of the Interstate 
Commerce Commission. The plaintiff alleges dis- 
crimination in favor of Memphis and against 
Cairo, III., in the matter of rates on lumber, the 
allegation being made that Cairo does not enjoy 
the reconsignment privileges which have lieen 
given to Memphis. Mr. Clements had to leave 
Memphis for other hearings before the conclu- 
sion of this case and will resume the hearing in 
a short time. J. ,T. Bruner, traffic manager for 
the E. Sondheimer Company, and members of 
that firm have appeared and given testimony, 
while a number of railroad men have been exam- 
ined for the defense. Lumber interests of Mem- 
phis will take a hand when the hearing is re- 
sumed, the Lumbermen's Club being represented 
by its regular counsel. In addition to Ibis, 
however, there is a movement among local 
wholesale handlers of hardwood lumber, who 
would be aftected more than other interests by 
an adverse decision, to employ associate counsel, 
though no definite statement is obtainable at 
this time. Reconsignment privileges have played 
an important part in the development of the 
Memphis market, especially in the building up 
of this center as a distrilniting and yarding 



point, and the Lumbermen's Club will do every- 
thing it can to prevent an un£avoral)le decision 
in this case. There is no opposition on the part 
of Memphis lumbermen to the granting of re- 
consignment privileges to Cairo liy the defendant 
roads, but there is a very strong protest against 
taking away from Memphis the privileges now 
enjoyed. Moreover, the plaintiff company does 
not care how the equalization of rates is ef- 
fected, whether through the abrogation of the 
privileges given Memphis or through the grant- 
ing of similar ones at Cairo. There is a sug- 
gestion that the reconsignment privilege is not 
exactly legal and that the commission may so 
hold, but local lumlier interests are encouraged 
over the fact that the commission has ruled that 
while it is anxious to remove this practice wher- 
ever po.ssible it will not do so unless the letter 
of the law demands it in cases where large busi- 
ness interests would be affected by such a rul- 
ing. Cotton and grain interests would be as se- 
riously affected as the lumbermen if the com- 
mission should declare the reconsignment prac- 
tice illegal. 

The Rust Land & Lumber Company, a corpo- 
ration affiliated with the Three States Lumber 
Company and the W. E. Smith Lumber Com- 
pany, is building a mill at Merrouge, La., to 
cut cypress timber at that point. The plant 
is a circular one and will have only a moderate 
capacity. It will be ready for operation within 
the next thirty days. 

The Three States Lumber Company is making 
good progress on its planing mill at Burdett. 
Ark., and with favorable weather conditions will 
have this in readiness for operation within the 
next fifty to sixty days. The big band mill of 
tlie same company at Burdett, Ark., is being op- 
crated both day and night in order that con- 
siderable accumulated timber may be cut up 
before it has sustained any damage. 

The Bellgrade Lumber Company, the corpora- 
tion recently launched by Thompson & McClure 
and Crenshaw & Catliey, reports through A. N. 
Thompson, vice president, that ninety-flve per 
cent of the machinery has been shipped to Bel- 
zoni, Miss., where it recently acquired a large 
site, and that actual construction of the plant 
is under way. Mr. Thompson estimates that the 
mill will be ready for operation within about 
sixty days. 

The conference held here April 22 between 
the river and rail committee of the Lumbermen's 
Club and higli officials of the railroads operating 
in Memphis territory did not accompli.sh any- 
thing deflnlle, but the feeling among Ijoth lum- 
bermen and the railroad interests after adjourn- 
ment was that much good would result from the 
interchange of views. Various subjects were 
discussed from the standpoint of both the rail- 
road men and the committee representing the 
lumber interests of this city. 

John W. McClure, secretary of the Lumber- 
men's Club, who, with President George X). Bur- 
gess, participated in the conference, gave out a 
statement afterward in which he declared it lo 
he his conviction that the railroad men did not 
know any more about the causes of congestion 
than the lumbermen themselves. He further 
said the object of tlic conference was lo prevent 
a recurrence of conditions recently experienced 
and that one of the remedies suggested l>y I lie 
railroad men was "less hostility on the part "f 
the people and their representatives in llu! va 
rious legislatures." 

The car situation now shows marlced iiu- 
provemcnt. For a time after the congestion first 
began to disappear it was almost impossible t > 
secure box cars for lumber shipments. In fact 
lumbermen had to use flat cars and everything 
elese they could get placed on their sidings. 
Now they are obtaining a better supi>I.v of box 
cars than for some time, thus relieving to some 
extent the rather serious complaints from buyers 
regarding the use of flat cars and the damage 
to lumber thereon while in transit. The cotton 
movement is running much lighter and this of 



itself is in some measure responsible for the bet- 
ter ear situation. 

Heavy rains are reported for the entire Mem- 
phis hardwood lumber producing area, and this 
has interfered with both logging and milliiTg 
operations, thus restricting the output of hard- 
wood lumber below the recent average. Condi- 
tions surrounding production had begun to get 
rather favorable, but it is intimated that it may 
take some days, even with fair weather, to get 
production back up to the average reached prior 
to the previous fortnight. 

There will be- a very large delegation of lum- 
bermen from the Memphis club at the annual of 
the National Hardwood Lumber Association at 
Atlantic City, May 23-24. At the last meeting 
a committee was appointed to look after trans- 
portation arrangements, of which James E. Stark 
is chairman. The Memphis delegation will wear 
the same button which was worn during tlie 
Memphis convention last year, bearing the em- 
blem of the association and the word Memph's 
in addition thereto. 

The publicity committee of the club, of which 
George C. Ehemann is chairman, is now making 
arrangements to secure a permanent gold lapr'l 
button to he worn exclusively by members of the 
Lumbermen's Club at home and abroad. The 
idea is to advertise the city and give every mem- 
ber of the organization some insignia of mem- 
bership. The button is described by Mr. Ehe- 
mann as an axe sunk into a stump. The initials 
'"L. C." will be written across the axe and tlie 
word "Memphis" will appear below. The mem- 
bership of the club is now at the highest point 
in the history of the organization, four new 
members having been received at the last meet- 
ing : W. C. Barneth. Ileth, Ark. ; Philip A. Ryan, 
C. B. Willey and Frank B. O'Leary, all of Mem- 
phis. 

The announcement of the Southern railway 
that it will aliandon the proposed extension of 
the Delta Southern, wliieh was intended to con- 
nect Mempliis and Jackson. Miss., is regretted 
by lumber interests of this section because it 
was felt that this road would be an important 
factor in the development of timber resources in 
tlie section between Memphis and Jackson. The 
Moljile & Ohio has declared its intention of 
abandoning the construction of the branch linr^s 
for tlic inirpose of developing the virgin forests 
Iribntary to the road. Officials of llie Pine Bluff 
North & South railroad, which plans to build a 
line from Memphis to Shreveport, La., announc 
that the contract has already been awarded for 
the building of a 4i;-miie secthm from Pine Bluff 
to Lonoke. Ark., where connection will be made 
into Jlemphis over the Rock Island. On the 
completion of this, which will reijuire about six 
months, work will begin on tlie line from Pine 
Bluff south to Shreveport. The Memphis divi- 
sion will be the last constructed. The road is 
backed altogether by Pine Bluff capitalists and 
it is lieing built for the purpose of competing 
with the St. Louis Soutliwestern (Cotton Belt I 
and the St. Louis, Iron Mo\nitain & Southern, 
which now handle all the traffic from Pine HlulT 
and the surrounding territory. 

Hugh McLean of the Hugh .McLean Lumlpcr 
Coiupnny, which operates a large liand mill in 
tills city, has Ijciui here during llie past few 
days looking after interests of the firm. His 
lii'adciuarters arc at Buffalo. 

H(n-ace F. Taylor, another Buffalo lumberman, 
member of the firm of Taylor & Crate, has been 
circulating among local lumber interests during 
the past few days. 

The Robert.son-Fo<ishe l.iunber Company will 
make application within the next few- days for 
a charier with a capital stock of $:5.000. The 
company will engage in the manufacture jind 
wholesale handling of hardwood lumber and 
will have offices and yards at North Second 
street and the Illinois Central railroad. The 
officers of the company will he : F. B. Robert- 
son, president; S. B. .\nderson, vice president; 



I 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



30C 



W. B. Morgan, trensuvev, and Geuige W. Fooslie, 
secretary. Jlr. Kobci-tson is well known to the 
hardwoiid Uimber trade, having lieen for some 
years a member of the Goodlander liobertson 
LnmlicTr Company. Mr. Anderson Is president of 
I lie .\nders()n-Tully Company and W. B. Morgan 
is seeretarytreasurcr of the same corporation. 
Mr. Kooslie has been for some years represen- 
lalive of the leading lumber papers of the 
I'liited States. The eompany will begin busi- 
ness .Tunt^ 1 . 

New Orleans. 
Two liundred boxmaliers employed in the 
plants of the Central Manufaeturing & I.umber 
Company and S. T. Alcus & Co. went out May 1 
because their demands for a nine-hour day and 
recognition of the union had been refused. Sixty- 
live of these men were employed in the plant 
of the first named company, while the remain- 
ing I?..-, worked fur Aleus & Co. Trouble had 
been brewing in these plants for some time, and 
the walk-out was not altogether unexpected. 
Tliere are fourteen of these box factories in the 
city, but so far as is known no others have 
as yet been affected by the strike. The New 
Orleans Box Factory, on which demands had 
been served, conceded what the men asked, with 
the result that there was no strike in its fac- 
tory. About .jiio boxmakers are employed in the 
fourteen factories here. Two hundred of these 
nre now on a strike, and it is expected that 
iitliers will go out. The proprietors of the fac- 
tories declare that they will stand pat and hold 
out against the demand for recognition of the 
union to the very last. 

A full statement of the liabililies and assets 
of the W. A. Powell Lumber Company. Ltd., has 
been tiled in the United States Circuit Court 
here in accordance with an order issued by 
.Tudge rarlange. The liabilities are given as 
if494,(i4."i.02 and the assets are $;i8.3.tl4!).42. 
showing a deficiency of .flii.s.niiri.liO. The .state- 
ment of deficiency is supplemented by the fol- 
lowing table: Apparent detlciency, .flOS.no.i.ilO : 
\V. A. Powell. .$61,420.24: doubtful accimnts. 
,1!.H4.flo4.7S : stock not turned over to receivers. 
,$1,0110: estimated total deficiency. .|206..'i70.02. 
Heavy rains throughout Louisiana recently 
liave interfered seriously with the operations of 
hmibermen and comparatively little has been 
done by luirdwood men in the interior. Tlie 
rains have been general and the precipitation 
in the last two weeks has been exceedingly 
heavy. Logging operations in a great many 
instances have been suspended. The weather is 
fair again, however, and it is anticipated that 
the lumbermen in the interior will sboitly lie 
able to get back to cutting stock. 

The Evart Lumber Company, which operates 
a big mill in Calcasieu Parish, has just been 
incorporated. Its capital stock has been fixed 
at $T."i.iioO and the following are its officers : 
.lames II. Simpson of Detroit. Mich., president : 
W. E. Hooper, Chicago, vice-president: Ira T. 
Sayre, Flushing, Mich., secretary and treasurer. 
Advices here state that I. R. and .T. W. Adams 
have purchased the interests of .1. M. Nugent 
in llie Smith & Adams Lnmbei' Company of 
'I'nril. in Catahoula Parish. The same persons 
liave piu-cbased Mr. Xugent's interests in a liig 
planing n'ill at Georgetown, in Grant Parisli. 

K. Chaniplain. a well known Mississippi 
"lierator. has bouglil a big site on Fort Bayou, 
in (he rear of ocean Springs, and will erect 
(hereon a big box factory. He expects to estab- 
lish a big plant and very soon put it in opera- 
tion. 

Chailotte, N. C. 

The .1. Kaudall Williams Company of Phila- 
delphia has about completed its splendid plant 
at Salisbury, and within a few days it will be 
running at full force. It will turn out lumber 
Utv shipment to foreign as well as domestic 
ports, and when contemplated additions are 
made will be one of the most complete plants 
in the entire South. A large force has been 



employed and when operations are well under 
way both equipment and help will be largely 
increased. Mr. Williams is expected from Phila- 
delphia to take charge of the work temporarily. 
An effort will be made to obtain an injunction 
against .T. Middleby, Jr.. to restrain the sale 
of 23.000 acres of fine hardwood timljer lands 
near Itutherfordton. which is valued at several 
milliou dollars. .Mr. Middleby sold the property 
about six montlis ago to Governor Swanson of 
Virginia and his brother, W. G. Swanson, who, 
with I>. A. Ritchie, D. E. Cogbill, C. J. Argyle 
and W. L. Clements, have organized the Broad 
River Lumber Company. He now alleges failure 
to pay interest and other breaches of contract 
in consequence of which he has advertised the 
lands for sale on May 18. The Broad River 
Company, acting through Governor Swanson, has 
for this reason agreed to ask for an injunction. 
Tile lands In question extend through four coun- 
ties and are the most valuable lumber and 
mineral lands in North Carolina. They were 
purchased for $l.jn.()00. .$10,000 being paid in 
casii and a mortgage being given for the re- 
mainder. When the first note for $15,000 fell 
due in February it was paid, but no interest was 
Included. The company answered Mr. Middleby 
when he made complaint at first that they wovild 
pay no interest until a re-estimate of the 
lumber on the lands was made, alleging a short- 
age in the first estimate of 100,000,000 feet, 
asking that this allowance be made in favor 
of them. This led to the foreclosure proceedings. 
Manimolh operations are in progress between 
Waynesville and Clyde. X. C. where the Waynes- 
vllle Transportation Company is constructing a 
twelve-mile flume which will serve seven saw- 
mills. S. Montgomery Smith, who Is at the 
head of the enterprise, means to make North 
Waynesville an important manufacturing center 
of the state. His company is building a large 
planing mill, through which some (50,000 feet of 
lumber will pass daily. The flume will serve a 
section producing lo0.O(f:i,UO0 feet of lumber 
and 200.0110 cords of cord and acid wood. Mr. 
Smith owns a tr.act at the head of the flume 
which contains 2r).000.000 feet of hemlock, 
spruce and balsam and 12,000.000 feet of hard- 
wood. The big sawmill which will be operated 
is the first "gang" sawmill ever built in this 
section of the state. Great things are held In 
view by the company, and with the capital 
behind It anil the erticient men who are pushing 
it, tile Waynesville sectlim will doubtless become 
one of the most important hardwood centers in 
the lumbering district of North Carolina. 

The plant of the J. W. Watts Lumber Com- 
pany at Stony Point, N. C. was damaged by 
fire a few days ago. A large amount of fine 
lundier was destroyed in addition to machinery 
and equipment. The loss is estimated at ,$2,000. 
.T. W. Crowell of Lexington, N. C, has estab- 
lished a new hardwood business in Salisbury. 
The> capital stock of his company at the begin- 
ning of business is named at $30,000 with privi- 
lege of increase. 

The plant of the Kings Mountain Lumber 
Company, manufacturers of sash, doors and 
blinds and woodwork of every description. Is 
nearing completion. The officers of the company 
are : W. A. Ridenhour, president : T. C. Mauney. 
secretary, and H. F. Petter.son, general manager. 
A carload of new machinery will be installeil in 
the new factory. 

The plant of Asbury & Finger of this city 
recently destroyed by fire will he completed at 
an early date. Already work has commenced, 
and within a few weeks the plant will be in 
operation. The loss the firm sustained amounted 
to aljont $22,000, large quantities of fine hard- 
wood being burned as well as the entire ma- 
chinery equipment. 

C. W. Jones, formerly of this city, has decided 
to operate a hardwood plant In New Mexico. 
He recently made purchases of timber in that 
state and expects to begin operating a plant 
within a few weeks. He reports fine qualities 



of hardwood, and exceedingly liigh prices in 
tlie West. 

The High Point Planing Mills Company has 
been charteied with a capital of $2.'i,000. M. B. 
Smith and others are the incorporators. 

President Hotchkiss of the Dare Lumber Com- 
pany of Binghamton, N. Y.. has announced 
that he will soon begin the erection of mills at 
Elizabeth City, N. C. The company owns 1(>7,000 
acres of fine timber lands lying between Croatan 
sound and the Alligator river in Dare county. 
This property has been in litigation for a num- 
ber of years, which has held back the building 
of the mills which have long been contemplated. 
These encumbrances have been cleared away 
and plans are about matured for the erection of 
mills for the development of the property. The 
daily output of the mills will be 150.000 feet. 
.\hout 300 hands will be employed. U. Gilpin 
Smith is now in the North buying machinery 
for the new mills. Active work is expected to 
begin within a few days. 

Kramer Bros. & Co.'s establishment at Eliza- 
beth City, the oldest plant in that section of 
tlie state, is being extensively improved. These 
additions are being made with the hope of being 
able to handle the large orders which are being 
hooked daily from all over the country. This 
large concern shipped the first load of dressed 
lumber from the eastern part of the state to 
rhiladelphia. This was the beginning of a repu- 
tation which lias constantly broadened since the 
establishment of the business and wliich was 
never more evident than just at present. 

A certificate has been issued by the secretary 
of state for the dissolution of the Waccamaw 
Land and Lumber (Company of Wilmington. 
This is one of the largest lumber companies in 
(he state, being capitalized at $1,000,000 and 
backed by prominent .Micliigan hardwood men. 
The company owns about 200, 000 acres of timber 
land in Columbus and Brunswick counties. The 
gi-antiug of tlu^ privilege of dissolution does not 
mean that the company is going out of busi- 
ness, however. The Waccamaw Lumber Com- 
pany, backed by practically the same capital, 
will own and operate the establishment here- 
after. Extensive improvements are looked for. 
The Tyrrell Manufacturing Company will soon 
begin operating Its new circular sawmill on the 
Scuppernong i-iver near Columbia. X. C. Tiie 
lilant will manufacture all kinds of lumber, the 
daily output lieiug about 30,000 feet, which will 
he increased as logging and shipping facilities 
are improved. B, F. Duncan is the principal 
spirit in the movement. 

The McEwen Lumber Company of .\zalea, N. 
('., Is installing an up-to-date planing mill, a 
much-needed addition to its large plant. The 
company expects to begin operating within sixty 
days, manufacturing hardwoods. W. B. JlcEwen 
is president : I'. R. Moale, vice-president ; Her- 
man Meader. treasurer, and A. H. Cobb, secre- 
tary. 

The Whiteville Lnmher Company has filed an 
amendment to its charier increasing its capital 
stock to $250,000. The plant is situated at 
(joldsboro. X. C. 

The Hope River Lumber Company lias been 
chartered at Durham, N. C, with a capital of 
$50,000. 

The Cochrane Show Case Company of Cliar- 
lotte recently filled an order for Secretary Pruner 
of the State Agricultural Department for cases 
to be used at the Jamestown Exposition to 
<iintaiu North Carolina exhibits. This is one of 
tlie leading hardwood factories of this part of 
tlie state. 

The Dixon Luiulier and Veneer Company of 
Rose Hill. X'. C, has been chartered with a 
capital of ,$100,000 : William J. Hall and others, 
stockholders. 

The Linville Lumlier Company of Pineola. X. 
('., which has been operated for a number of 
years by John T. Xagle and others has recently 
consolidated with a number of hardwood con- 
cerns operating in the vicinity of Bristol, Tenn., 



3oD 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



nnd a movement has been started to do a general 
wliolesale and maunfacturing business. 

Altapass. X. ('.. will be tbe scene of operations 
of tbe Tipp City Lumber Company of Bristol, 
wbicb lias recently establisbed itself on the 
South & Western railroad near Spruce Fine, 
X. ('. 

The Xoell-Anderson Company of Danville, Va., 
manufacturer of office furniture, tables and 
desks, has begun the construction of a new 
factory which will be completed in a couple of 
months. The addition was necessary on account 
of increased business, and represents an expendi- 
ture of aliout .$2.", 11(10. The concern is preparing 
to manufacture betweeu two and three million 
feet of hogshead staves per year fur consumers 
in and around Danville. 



Louisville. 

r. ]>. l.anbitm. fnrmi'riy of Lelianun. Ky.. and 
others have organized the Lanham Lumber Com- 
pany, to manufacture parquetry flooring. The 
company is equipping a plant at 12th and 
Magnolia streets. ' Down-town offices have been 
established in the Columbia building. Mr. Lan- 
ham has already had some experience in this 
work at Lebanon, where be developed quite a 
business in pariiuetry tlo<»riug, shii^ping to the 
eastern trade. The new venture simply means 
going into the same business on a larger scale. 

A. E. Xorman reports that his company is 
putting in two or three new mills down in its 
Kentucky timber territory which will increase 
manufacturing facilities considerably. Speaking 
of the liardwood situation generall.v, he says 
that it has improved materially in point of 
supply. The company now gets stock more 
freel.v over country roads and is also getting a 
better supply of railway cars, so that tlie out- 
look for a busy summer is rosy. 

The A. P. Turner Lumber Company is making 
better progress in tbe woods now than for some 
weeks, but not enough to be entirely satisfac- 
tory. It hopes to continue improving the work 
in the woods and expects pretty busy times all 
summer. 

Albert R. Kampf says there is larger demand 
for hardwoods than can be cared for, and while 
he keeps booking orders from time to time to 
cover his accumulations, he has to turn away 
considerably more orders than he is able to 
accept because he hasn't the stock with W'hich 
to fill them. He thinks the situation in oak is 
pretty strong and it is only a matter of time 
until oak prices go up. In fact, he is a firm 
believer in all hardwood prices being firmly fixed 
and inclining upwards. 



Minneapolis. 

The local consumption of liardwoud promises 
to he fully up to last year. Building opera- 
tions are under way with assurance that they 
will not be interrupted. The carpenters com- 
promised their demand on the contractors for 
an increase in wages, the strike was called 
oft and all the building trades are ciuiet and 
satisfied. The building permits for April 
reached a total estimated cost of $1,147,960. 
compared with $893,090 for April last year. 
St. Paul's were valued at $623,119. The sash 
and door factories have a big line of special 
work calling for oak, birch, maple and bass- 
wood, and while not buying heavily now they 
will be in the market right along. The fur- 
niture factories have been having rather a 
liglit business. 

Notices have been sent to the trade of the 
new table of estimated weights adopted hy tiie 
Northwestern Hardwood Lumbermen's Asso- 
ciation, which makes a nimiber of increases 
on account of the tendency to ship so much 
nardwood dry or half dry. The new table of 
standard weights per thousand feet, which 
means some increase in price, reads thus: 

Pounds. 

Birch 4.000 

Hard maple 4,000 



Soft maiile 3,500 

Rock elm ; 4.00(1 

Soft elm '. 3.000 

Brown ash 3,250 

White oak 4,000 

Red oak 3,800 

Butternut 2,500 

Bas.swood 2.400 

Basswood ceiling. % in 1,500 

Ba-sswood siding and ceiling. -Ki in 800 

-Oak flooring. 13-16 2,100 

Maple ftooring, 13-16 2.100 

Birch flooring, 13-16 2.inii 

In this connection it is of interest to Minne- 
sotLL producers of luirdwood that lumber rates 
within tlie state have been reduced by the 
legislature about 10 per cent and that a law 
has been passed giving the state railroad com- 
mission jurisdiction over the question of rail- 
road track scales. An inspector will be de- 
tailed to test the scales and also to check up 
on the present careless methods of weighing. 

John E. Glover, the New Richmond, Wis., 
lumberman, was in the twin cities last week 
looking up the hemlock and hardwood situa- 
tion. He has sawed about 7.000,000 feet of 
hardwood for the summer and fall trade, now 
in pile, most of it birch. He expects to cut 
about 20.000.000 feet of hemlock during the 
season. 

E. Pa.vson Smith of the Payson Smith Lum- 
ber Company has been away on a sliort trip 
to Milwaukee and Chicago. He reports their 
business good and enough now on the books 
to give them a good volume of shipments for 
three montlis. George S. Agnew, who has 
been in the South looking after shipments of 
oak for them, will be home this week. 

Tlie Transfer Warehouse Lumber Company, 
a new concern which expects to asseml>le lum- 
ber and look after mixed ear business, w'ith 
shipping facilities at Minnesota Transfer, has 
been organized witli $50,000 capital stock by 
C. W. Dewey. A. J. Si^e and C. T. Dewey, all 
of Minneapolis. 

W. O. Barndt of tlie W. O. Barndt Lumber 
Company is back from a business trip in Wis- 
consin territory looking after the condition of 
stoclc. 

Ashland, Ky. 

F. G. Kberhart of Misbawaka, Ind., a member 
of the Page Lumber Compan.v, has returned 
from a business trip through West Virginia in 
his company's interests. 

E. C. .Means and C. M. Crawford of tbe 
Yellow Poplar Lumber Company are among the 
incorporators of the Kiissell Fork Railroad Com- 
pany. The road will lie a standard gauge and 
will run through Dickinson and Buchanan coun- 
ties, Virginia, to the Kentucky border, and will 
promote tlie development of the rich timber 
and mineral lands in that section. This 
begins tbe railroad development in the brakes 
of Big Sandy, in which the people of this sec- 
tion are interested, and foreshadows the devel- 
opment of great riches in that portion of the 
rich Big Sandy country. 

O. F. L. Beckette and wife are in Caliluruia. 
where they will s]iend several weeks in travel 
after taking in the Shriners' meeting at Los 
Angeles. 

W. 11. Dawkius has returned from a trip 
east, where he looked after business interests 
and visited his daugliter, Miss Hazel, who is 
attending Fairmont College, Washington. D. C. 

.lohn Hartman. head sawyer for tbe Dimen- 
sion Lumber Company at Xorth Catlettsburg. 
was friglitfnU'y mangled by one of the rapidly 
revolving saws, a few days ago. and was thought 
to be fatally wounded, but tbe attending physi- 
cians say there is a slight chance for his life. 
He fell on fop of the saw, which severed every 
rib in the left side from the backbone and 
cut the end off of one lung. So great was the 
wound that the liver protruded, while ills lungs 
could be seen moving. Hartman recently came 



from Cincinnati, where he worked for C. Crane 
& Co. lie has a wife and four cliildreu. 

Ironton, (Jhio. lias Inst one of its best-informed 
and nidst prominent luinlii'rmen in tlie death oi 
.Tames W. Pierce, president and manager of the 
Pierce Lumber Company, who died at his home 
of pneumonia after a week's illness. He is 
survived by his wife and a young son. Mrs. 
pierce was made executrix of her husband's 
estate and will carry on his business without 
any change. 

Giles Wright has purchased of C. C. C'hirk a 
fine tract of poplar on Rockcastle, in Martin 
County, Kentucky. There are 3,(100 trees ttf tlie 
finest quality and extra large. Mr. Wright lias 
just made a business trip through Michigan. 
He reports business brisk, witli all the orders 
be can comfortably handle. Iievelopment of the 
vast and unexcelled timber along the lines of 
the Deepwater Railroad in Raleigli and Wyo- 
ming counties. West ^'irgiuia, is being pnslieil 
with unusual vigor at a number of points along 
the route. Capitalists seeing the possibilities of 
this region are attracted to it almost daily. 



■Wausau, Wis. 

The Cisco Lake Lumber Company of Wausau 
has been organized with a caiiital stock of 
$200,000. The incorporators are Walter Alex- 
ander, Cyrus C. Yawkey and Benjamin Ileine- 
mann. The firm has lately purchased lands in 
(jogebic County, Michigan, on wbicb tliere is 
100,000,000 feet of hardwood and beiiilock, 
whicli will be shipped by rail to Wausau iind 
manufactured. 

The I'pbam Manufacturing Coniiiany of Marsli- 
field recently paid ^'inrcnt Milkowski. an em- 
ployee, .f3.200 for the loss of both feet while 
in the company's employ. It was a volnutiuy 
act. 

The lumber barge Arcadia, whicli recently 
left Manistee, Mich., for Two Rivers. Wis.. Inadeil 
with a cargo of hardwood, was lost willi lier 
crew. 

The Wheeler-Timlin Lumber Compauy of Wau- 
sau, a liardwood concern, has increased its capi- 
tal stock from .^lo.ooo to .$23,000. 

W. D. Connor, head of the R. Connor Com 
pany of Marshtield, and lieutenant governor. li:i>^ 
been acting governor during Governor Davidson's 
recent absence from the state. 

The Roddis Lumber & Veneer Company of 
Marsbfieid, which is rebuilding its plant de- 
stroyed by fire last winter, w'iil have a roller 
drier with a cafjacity for drying 120,000 feet of 
thin veneer every ten hours. 

Tbe lOngllsb Manufacturing Company of Mer- 
rill is adding machinery to its plant which will 
greatly increase its capacity. It is engaged 
largely in the manufacture of paint pails and 
has one order which will take five years to fill. 

C'. P. (^rosby, a lihinelander hardwood man, 
and family are visiting in the Sonrli and in 
Cuba. 

A carload of birch lumber containing 20,22'. 
feet was recently shipped out of Hundy to tbe 
Lesh-Matthews Lumber Company of Chicago. 
This is one of the largest amounts of that grade 
of lumber ever put on a car in northern Wis- 
consin. 

The hub factory recently built by businesn 
men of Athens has been put in operation. The 
concern has 100,000 feet of timber on hand, 
sufficient to turn out 14,500 sets of hubs. 

The I'ayne Lumber Company of Oshkosli is 
enlarging its sawmill plant at a cost of ,$100, Odd. 
which will make it one of the largest in the 
world. 

What is claimed to be the largest tree in Wis- 
consin is (m the farm of Matthew JIallon near 
Reedshurg. It is an elm and it requires a string 
thirty feet long to reach around the trunk. It 
is about eighty feet high and tbe body holds 
its si/.i' remarkably well for about forty feel, 
when several large branches are thrown out. 
making a symmetrical an<I beautiful specimen. 

Tbe (-1. W. Jones Lumber Company of Apple 



HARDWOOD RECORt) 



ii 



lull ri'i-piiily inade a sale of rtUd.mm JVet of roi-k 
('III' iihink .11 its plant in rraiulmi which will 
Im- ciil iiil" in;itiTial I'nr Ihi- I!<'ll T.-lMphone 
Conipatiy. 

riuirh's Fish of Kli-ho and (.'hai'Ics U. .lohuson 
(if (Jrand Ilapids. :\Iifh.. will Imild a mill iind 
f-niipera^'i' plant in Elclio. 

As a sii initio of the diltit-nll y himlHM- liruis 
li:iv(' in kci'pinjj laborers may l»i* ciletl the fol 
lowing; : The W. H. Ivi>j;;i'rs LnmUer Company 
nf XashviUe, Wis., recently found \ii»on Iool<ing 
over its books that during: one month there was 
ail enrollment of over (iOO names, and yet never 
nt one time did they employ over lUO men. The 
company owns 7.000 acres of hardwood lands 
in Langlade County. 

Here is an instanee showin^i how hanUvcod 
lands are advancing in Wisconsin : A. W. IJreit- 
enstein of Stockton three years ago purchased a 
tract for which he paid .1:1,700. A few days ago 
lie sold it to Charles Gehoreck of the same town 
for .$:^.oo(i. 

Isaac Stepheuson, Jr.. will return to Mari- 
nette to live. He recently disposed of hi.s tim- 
lier holdings in the South to the Long-Beil Com- 
pany for $:i.ooo.ooo. 

The Kaukauna Lumber & Manufacturing 
(Nmipany of Kaukauna has purchased and sawed 
into Uintlter some black walnut trees which grew 
from seed planted over fifty years ago. They 
had attained a growth of from eight to ten 
inches in diameter and were cut down to make 
room for building purposes. 

'I'he I'aine Lumber ("ompany of Oshkosh. hav- 



ing placed the highest hid t'lr 
of logs on the Keshemi Indian 
Shawano, will be awarded the < 

was .^.'I'JIllKKI. 



17. Hint, (Hid fee! 
■eservation near 
niracl. Its bid 



Toledo. 

Kolbnving the annonncmcnt of an investiga- 
tion of local railroad conditions by Special Agent 
Mackenzie of the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion they seemed for a time to be somewhat im 
proved. This, however, did not last long accord- 
ing to most dealers, and while western shipments 
are some better there is room for much improve- 
ment. It is understood semi-officially that when 
the grand jury convenes in June the government 
will enter into the investigation from the grand 
jury standpoint. 

There has not been very much change in tho 
situation caused by the indictment of the lumber 
dealers last month for violation of the Valentine 
anti-trust law. All of them have givt-n bond for 
appearance and it is expected that their case 
will come up the latter part of the month. ThJ 
defendants have indicated no line of defense, but 
it is hinted strongly that they will open up a 
few surprises before the end is reached. 

The hardwood lumber plant of C. A. Hunt & 
Co. at Bancroft, near I't. Huron, was destroyc'd 
by fire last week. The loss was total, as there 
was no insurance. The owners announce they 
will rebui'.d the plant. 

Thomas A. Buckley of Fostoria. a well known 
lumber bnyei-, died suddenly at Upper Sandusky 
last week. 



Hardwood Market. 



(By HABDWOOD BECOBD 

Chicago. 

While many local wholesalers claim that they 
are as busy as ever, others admit that trade 
is slackening a little. It is certain that there 
is no particular buoyancy in the market, and. 
wliile prices remain firm, sales are being urged 
in a good many instances. The furniture man- 
ufar-turing trade, which furni.shes a consider- 
able element of the local demand, is not par- 
ticularly active : in fact it is not up to expecta- 
tions, while stocks in the yards of factories are 
ciunparatively light ; buyers are hesitating aliout 
placing many orders for advance shipments. 
The entire woodworking industry still remains 
active, and there is a good demand from this 
class of trade for oak, birch and some of the 
other woods. Local flooring people are busy 
and are still strong buyers of maple and oak 
when they are offered at reasonable terms. On 
the whole, the situation may be regarded as 
healthy, and m.any of the dealers are glad to 
see an evidence of slackening demand so that 
they can catch up with their business. 



Exclusive market Reporters.) 

ing, with prices tending toward a higher 
rather than a lower level. Whitewood has 
developed a great deal of strength during 
the past two months. No shipper is willing to 
make concessions, and where prompt delivery 
is wanted values are very firm. Cypress is 
well held, but demand is not of large volume 
,iust now. Black walnut is in good demand; 
prices are strong. 



Boston. 

The market for hardwoods is very firm, but 
trading is less active than it was. Nearly all 
dealers did a good business during March and 
April, but this month so far has produced 
small orders. A leading dealer gives as a 
reason for this that sellers notified the re- 
tailers that prices were advancing and ad- 
vised them to place orders previous to the 
mark-up with the result that the majority of 
buyers have unusually large stocks or are pro- 
tected by orders placed. Some buyers believe 
present high prices cannot continue and that 
holding out of the market will result in the 
market becoming easier. 

Consumers of hardwoods are busy. Fur- 
niture manufacturers are doing a good 
business. 

Export inquiry is not large, and until there 
is a material decline small orders only will 
be received from abroad. Plain oak is firmly 
h< Id and ciuartered oak is strong. White and 
brown ash are in comparatively small offer- 



New York. 

The hardwood trade in New York city proper 
has eased off slightly of late in certain lines. 
but the volume of buying in the outlying sec- 
tions seems strong. Trade as a whole is not 
abnormally large, but supplies are small, and 
taking all branches of the trade into considera- 
tion there is a fair consumption, particularly 
among manufacturers of furniture, pianos, trim, 
mouldings, etc., with oak, ash and poplar in the 
most active call. There is an exceedingly brisk 
trade in low-grade rough stuff and rough car 
and ship lumber and specialties of that natm-e, 
hut as a matter of fact there has not been as 
good a demand for this class of material for 
many years as there is at the present time, and 
the mills and wholesale houses in a position to 
furnish this class of material are reaping a 
profitable trade. Hardwoods in the better grades 
are by no means plentiful, although in certain 
directions there seems to be a slight increase in 
supplies. In some sections the supply of cars 
is a little more plentiful, hut as a whole the 
situation seems to -row pretty generally worse, 
and large handlers of stock are urging buyers to 
place orders for their summer W'ants at once in 
order to get shipments when wanted, as it is 
generally believed that delayed purchases will 
prevent buyers from securing their supplies as 
the season progresses. 

The price situation continues strong, biit while 
hardwood values as a whole are today on a 
higher level than was ever known before the 
margin of profit is by no means commensurate 
with what it appears to the average manufac- 
turer. It is true that the manufacturer who 
holds timber purchased years ago is reaping good 



profits, bill the iiperatots who linve gotten into 
the game in recent years ;ind luive purchased 
tlieir tiiiibi-r holdings at recent prices and have 
jn-^taHed up-to-date plants must of necessity 
realize tlu'se high prices in order to receive 
;iny profitable returns. Of course, this increased 
operation will eventually increase supplies, but 
any material rasing off in values will result in 
a suspension of newer operations in many sec- 
tions. 

As a whole, the general outlook for the bal- 
ance of the spring and summer trade is very 
fair and there is every indication that values 
will be maintained for some months to come, 
and especially so if the supplies do noi nuite- 
riallv increase. 



Philadelphia. 

The good efl'ert of the spring-like weather, 
which has put in a tardy appearance, is very 
perceptible in the lumber business and a reaction 
is felt all along the line. It is unfortunate, 
however, that a strike is on in building circles, 
which naturally will call a halt to free buying 
among those who handle building material. The 
trouble is a complicated one and concerns 
neither the question of wages nor hours, but has 
grown out of a dispute as to whose work it is 
to set the cut stone in the body of a building. 
For years the granite cutter has been doing this, 
but now the stone-mason, who does the lighter 
work, insists that the heavier stone should be 
set by him. and as the stone-masons' association 
is allied with that of the bricklayers, the latter 
naturally back the first named in the stand it 
has taken. It is understood that the brick- 
layers, however, are not unanimously in favor 
of this move, and the master bricklayers tried to 
force a settling of the dispute upon the brick- 
layers by notifying them that all building would 
stop short on the evening of ^lay '2 unless the 
three organizations came to satisfactory terms. 
This warning has been ignored and the strike is 
now on. It is believed, however, that pressure 
will he brought to bear upon the stone masons 
and that they will yield. 

The various woodworking industries are luisy. 
wMth no perceptible sign of abatement. Hard- 
wood dealers are anticipating a good season and 
many houses claim they have any number of 
good orders coming in. but are unable to get the 
goods on account of the railroad service and 
the unfavorable weather conditions at the mill 
districts. Among the hardwoods, chestnut, ash 
and basswood keep the top notchers, but con- 
tinue scarce. Oak is apparently regaining old 
status, but opinions do not all coincide, it 
seems, on poplar. Some say it is not so stiff 
as heretofore, while others contend it is showing 
up strong. Quartered white oak is looking up. 
and gum holds steady. Maple flooring keeps in 
good call. The cedar and veneer market is 
active, but the high grades are scarce, with 
prices up. On account of this scarcity and high 
price of cedar and veneer, some dealers have 
made a trial of African and Brazilian mahogany 
as a substitute, hut it did not work, so some 
of the cigar-box makers are using veneered 
instead. Yard stocks of hardwood are normal, 
but seasoned material is scarce, both here and 
at the mills. 



Baltimore. 

The hardwood trade of this section is holding 
up remarkably well. Stocks continue to be in 
good demand and the mills are unable to supply 
lumber fast enough. Values are firmly main- 
tained, and dealers admit that they are getting 
the highest prices ever paid for stocks : an 
excellent feeling prevails in the trade and no 
uneasiness is felt over the outlook. Manufac- 
turers as well as dealers reason that as the 
railroads cannot now handle all the freight that 
is offered, because of the scarcity of rolling 
stock, they must continue to make large addi- 
tions to the equipment, whether they w^aut to or 
not. it is the general belief that the demand 



32 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



for stocks must continue brisk because o£ tlie 
extraordinary requirements of the large con- 
sumers which cannot be deferred but must be 
met without delay. And this oiiinion appears 
to be .iustiflerl by the existing state ot affairs, 
which has all the manifestalions of a big boom. 
Oak commands m.)s-t attiaitive values and 
the inquiries are alwa.v.s ahead of the output of 
the mills, which latter have contracts enough to 
keep them going for months to come. Sliipments 
are m.ade at record-breaking figures and the ten- 
dency of stumpage values is steadily upward. 
The demand for foreign points is said to be not 
(piite so urgent as it was some time ago, but 
the situation there is eminently satisfactory. 
What is eciually important, the terms are such 
as to leave the exporters a good profit, liecause 
the consignees have ceased to insist upon vexa- 
tious requirements which tend to cut down the 
gains. Ash is not far behind oak, being eagerly 
sought, bringing very acceptable prices and hold- 
ing its own in every particular. Chestnut, wal- 
nut, beech and all the other hardwoods dealt in 
are finding ready takers and there is so far no 
indication of a decline in the movement. The 
favorable weather serves to increase the output 
of the mills, hut an inspection ot the yards here 
shows that stocks have been materially reduced 
during the past months, and that large quanti- 
ties of lumber will be needed to bring the selec- 
tion up to what it was before the heavy with- 
drawals. Business is being done abroad on a 
more satisfactory basis and exporters are hene- 
lited accordingly. 

Pittsburg. 

Pittsburg hardwood men for months have 
held the center of the .stage. It is not so with 
dealers in other woods by a long way. Busi- 
ness is moving along at a very fair pace in 
all lines, but it goes by leaps and jumps in 
the hardwood trade, and there is not a dealer 
in the city who is not ahead of the game so 
far as orders are concerned. His greatest 
trouble is to get lumber enough to fill his 
orders and cars to ship out the stock. Of late 
the latter complaint has been a very serious 
one. especially on the short line branches in 
West Virginia, where the scarcity of cars is 
perhaps more pronounced than one month 
ago. 

Everything in hardwood is selling well. 
Stocl<s at the country mills are piclced over 
till they are down to the minimum. Dry 
lumber is at a premium almost anywhere in 
the Pittsburg district. 

Under this strain of demand prices are re- 
marlcably firm in all lines. Oak is leading the 
race. Pittsburg has never had a better mar- 
ket for oak lumber of almost every variety 
than this spring. From the finest grades of 
finishing stock to the heavy timbers and pil- 
ing wanted for river and railroad improve- 
ments there is a steady inquiry for every- 
thing in oak and the quotations named by 
local wholesalers are not objected to, as a 
rule. Chestnut is strongest in market this 
month. There is an excellent inquiry for 
sound wormy, and mill culls are being worked 
oft at good prices. Piano and casket manu- 
facturers are taking more chestnut this spring 
than ever before and this makes a very good 
demand for the better grades. Several firms 
report a splendid call for ash and hickory, 
which are wanted chiefly by the factories of 
Ohio and Michigan. The trade throughout the 
Kast is good and some big orders have been 
placed there lately. 



There seems to be oak enough to meet most 
demands and the balance between quartered 
and plain is better than it used to be. Prices 
are strong, and .some dealers say that they 
ought to be higher. 

One thing that is not very reassuring to the 
eastern dealer is the fact that so much hard- 
wood lumber sells right from the mills into 
other markets. It is now out of the question 
to bring such woods as gum and cottonwood 
here, as there is a better trade in them 
further south and west. 

There is a big demand for poplar, with only 
a light supply and that pretty badly dis- 
tributed. While some of the dealers are man- 
aging to get a, fair supply of it, others are 
reporting so little ot it that they have to turn 
most ot their orders down. 

The opening ot tlie late trade will soon add 
materially to the birch, black ash, elm, maple 
and basswood supply, all ot which will find a 
ready sale. The demand for elm is improving, 
as it is wanted so badly in place of ash, and 
maple is going into the same trade. Bass- 
wood grows in demand as poplar becomes 
harder to find. 



shortage that held back trade for some time is 
now practically cleared up and cars can be 
secured with short notice. The only thing that 
now bothers lumber dealers is the shortage 
ot stock on poplar grades. That item ot wood 
has never been in greater activity than now 
and dealers are contemplating augmenting the 
price. Poplar firsts and seconds are eagerly 
sought and dealers are securing fancy prices: 
however, a general rise in the price has not 
been posted. Oak, white and plain, are two 
more that are receiving their portion of re- 
quests, and next to poplar are the best seller 
in this market. Hemlock and cypress are 
still selling well, but not like oak and poplar. 
Hickory, spruce, birch and mahogany are 
keeping up with the pace set iiy them some 
weeks ago and prices obtained are generally 
on a steady basis. Dealers now look for heavy 
orders ,all through the year 19117. 



Buffalo. 

Business in hardwood is unanimously re- 
ported active, with prospects for a busy 
season. There is in general enough stock of 
the various hardwoods to meet the demand, 
though it is no longer possible for the con- 
sumer to choose just the sort that he used to 
prefer. 



Saginaw Valley. 

Hardwood plants are in operation throughout 
this territory and u number of them have been 
running all winter, yet there is no accumulation 
ot dry stock. The market is in much better form 
than it was a year ago, both as to volume and 
price. A quantity ot No. 1 common basswood 
at ,?43 a thousand was shijiped out to I'ennsyl- 
vania last week, and there is an inquiry for dry 
stock on every hand. Beech and birch are do- 
ing very well. A lot of beech, birch and bass- 
wood culls are being worked up into boxes. 
Prices for all kinds of hardwood are now firm 
and everything that appeals to the eye of the 
dealer is being taken. Maple flooring has ad- 
vanced on the factory grades and the market all 
through is strong, 

Indianapolis. 

Within the last ten days the car situation has 
shown considerable improvement throughout 
Indiana. Cars ot the fast freight lines have ap- 
peared in larger numbers during that time than 
at any other period within the last five or six 
months. This does not mean that there is an 
ample supply of cars for every line of traffic, but 
the roliet is noticeable. An advance in grain 
rates has checked the demand tor cars from that 
source and it is believed that the shortage will 
be greatly relieved until grain begins to move in 
the fall. Lumber has been coming into Indian- 
apolis in large quantities the last ten days, and 
hardwood men are getting a fairly satisfactory 
.supply to meet the unusually heavy demand. 
There has been no increase in hardwood prices, 
nor is any contemplated, it is understood, in 
the immediate future. The demand for all lines 
of hardwood is brisk, with a fairly good supply. 



Bristol, Va,-Temi. 

The past fortnight has seen no appreciable 
change in market conditions in this section. 
Despite the fact that stock is moving rapidUv 
and there is a steady demand for all grades and 
kinds, it is beginning to accumulate on the yards 
which have been pretty generally depleted for the 
past few weeks. 

The car supply is not what it sliould be and 
many lumbermen in remote sections report that 
they' are handicapped by their inability to get 
their wants in this line supplied. 

Local exporters report the foreign markets 
very satisfactory. There has been a large amount 
of stock from this section exported this year 
and shippers are unanimously satisfied with 
conditions abroad at the present time. 



St. Louis. 

The demand for hardwoods is still excellent, 
but the majority of dealers report the market 
less active than it was a month ago. Buyer.<i 
evidently think that the improved car service 
and the past few weeks of good weather in 
soutliern milling and logging territory will bring 
up a large amount of stock, which operators 
have not been able to move during the winter 
months. However, the cut for the season was 
light, owing to the heavy rains and tlie scarcity 
ot cars. 

Poplar, cottonwood and ash are still in great 
demand with the jobbing and consuming trade 
at the prevailing high prices for all sorts of 
grades in these woods. Oak is not so active ot 
late as it was a short time ago. although the 
demand for quartered white is still excellent. 
Gum is coming into the market rapidly, and 
with the increased supply there seems to be no 
diminution in the call, business in this line 
being better than ever before. 



Nashville. 



Nashville lumbermen have at last reached the 
stage where they are making promises about the 
time they will deliver shipments, so marked has 
been the recent improvement in the car shortage 
situation. Until right recently the question 
of getting a car for a shipment figured very ma- 
terially in the price paid. Many northern and 
eastern dealers who came South here offered 
big increases in quotations it they could only 
get the promise ot a car at once in which to 
forward their stuff. Poplar continues to lead all 
the other hardwoods in this market. Dealers 
who have any are still able to get most any- 
thing they have the nerve to ask for all kinds 
of stock. Quartered oak showed a slight ad- 
vance this past week, although the market has 
been pretty steady in this variety owing to the 
liberal supply on hand. There is plenty of 
plain oak but it is selling well. A good deal of 
ash has been reaching this market recently, 
although a slight advance is noticed. Gum 
shows an advance, owing to the heavy inroads 
the box men have been making. First class oak 
staves are now bringing the highest price ever 
known here. The demand for staves this season 
exceeds that of any previous year. In some 
quarters staves are worth more than lumber 
and many ot the saw mills are putting in stave 
cutting facilities. 



Cincinnati. 

The demand for all grades of hardwood 
lumber in this market is excellent. The car 



Memphis. 

The demand for hardwood lumber is perhaps 
not quite so active as previously. 'There is no 
evidence of weakness in the market and there is 
still a very satisfactory volume of business do- 
ing, but it is evident that buyers are not quite 
so strenuous as they were. They have secured 
large quantities ot lumber during the past several 
months and, with improved car service, this is 
now being delivered to them. Thus they are in 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



33 



a waiting attitude pending further d(.'velopments 
liefore they become active buyers again. 

There is scarcely as much strength in the 
higher grades of gum as there has been recently. 
The offerings of this have shown considerable 
increase and some holders are offering to sell 
at lower prices than recently current, which has 
created the impression among buyers that prices 
DTiay go lower on this class of lumber. The 
lower grades are firmly held because there is 
such an excellent demand for these for use in 
box and crating factories, riain oak, quartered 
oak, ash, poplar and cypress are just as firm as 
heretofore. There is no surplus of any of these 
woods and holders are rather independent. The 
recent increase in the amount of hardwood lum- 
ber placed on sticks may have had some influ- 
ence in making buyers hold back somewhat, but 
the decrease now in evidence, resulting from 
the unfavorable weather conditions told of in 
the general letter from Memphis, may have the 
effect of renewing the demand somewhat in in- 
stances where it is beginning to lag. General 
conditions continue quite wholesome and the 
trade is confident of the immediate future of the 
market. 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Hardwood market conditions locally are satis- 
factory. The good prices that have prevailed 
for six months continue with little evidence of 
early reduction. All grades of lumber are de- 
manding stiff prices. The past few weeks have 
brought much Improvement in the car situatiou 
and the prospects are that before many more 
weeks lumbermen will not be troubled at all iu 
this direction. High-grade hardwood is some- 
what scarce on the local market, and prices have 
advanced. Poplar and chestnut are in demand 
over the state. Weather conditions were favor- 
able to work during the month of April, many 
important timber deals have been made, new 
companies are chartered almost daily and alto 
gether the outlook here is exceedingly gratifying 
to the hardwood manufacturer. 



Louisville. 

There are hustling times in the Louisville 
hardwood market. The improvement in the car 
situation continues, and as a result the receipts 
in the yards here and the shipments from 
<-ountry points have been much more liberal. 
Operations in the woods are also more active. 
There does not seem to be any trouble about 
the demand, except that here and there a pros- 
pective buyer will wrangle over prices, but these 
things are always with us and do not alter the 
fact that prosperit.v continues to smile on the 
hardwood trade in this community and every 
<!lass of hardwood ju-oducts finds a ready 
market. 

There is in addition to the regular factory 
trade an increasing call for structural material 
as the spring building season advances, and this 
call in the aggregate absorbs a large quantity 
of hardwood and incidentally assists the mill 
men materially in cleaning up their cut. Poplar 
bevel siding continues scarce and in demand, as 
is the case with all poplar lumber. Aside from 
poplar, which is distinctly in the lead, the woods 
seem to be pretty well bunched as far as demand 
is concerned, and naturally with the continued 
improved conditions of transportation there is a 
decided increase in the amount of business being 
done. 



POPLAR 

Rough and Dressed 

SOUTHERN HARDWOODS 



M. A. HAYWARD 

1021 Saving and Trust Bldg., Columbus, O. 



Minneapolis. 

The country trade is the main feature now 
with Twin City wholesalers. They could do 
a bigger volume of business it they had the 
stock, but the offerings of dry lumber are 
decidedly restricted. Some oak is being 
shipped green and, with the exception of one 
or two small lots of red oak, there is no dry 
northern oak stock to be had. Low grade 
lumber is all very scarce and high in price, 
.and basswood is especially sought after. Box 
manufacturers are buying the new cut and 
will soon have it cleaned up at prices $5 or $6 
a thousand higher than last year. The mixed 
car trade is good and calls for wagon stock, 
which is very scarce, with liberal amounts 
of flooring. 

Factories seem pretty well stocked up for 
the present and are not buying much, but 
are looking ahead and contracting to quite an 
extent for the new cut, at prices which show- 
confidence in the market. The talk of re- 
trenchment in business has not affected the 
factories as much as it has .some wholesalers, 
who are disposed to clean up and not take 
on much more stock until summer comes and 
they know more about the outlook. Prices 
are stiff now on everything, and birch, about 
the only northern hardwood in fair supply, is 
running low and getting stronger on the mar- 
ket, though the new cut can be had on con- 
tract very reasonably. Southern stock is not 
very freely offered and is held high. Dry ash 
is out of the market, and new offerings are 
pretty well contracted by large consumers. 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Backward spring weather has delayed the 
placing of a good many orders, and complaints 
are being made that trade is rather dull. Trav- 
eling men report finding factories pretty well 
filled up. There are certain items, however, that 
customers are short of, as was the case last 
year. Cars are quite plentiful, but for eastern 
shipments nothing but gondolas or flats are pro- 
vided, a*d in the case of hardwood flooring, or 
firsts and seconds of any kind, dealers dislike to 
load open cars. One advantage in loading open 
cars is that one can get on a good big load. 
C. P. Crosby of this city last week shipped a 
car from Whitcomb. Wis., to Sheboygan loaded 
with 30,D32 feet of 2-inch birch plank. This 
is the biggest carload of lumber on record yet, 
considering the fact that dry birch weighs 4,00U 
pounds, so that the car must have weighed over 
120,000 pounds. Buyers of basswood are re- 
signed to the prevailing prices and are placing 
orders for the new cut without a kick. Those 
who cannot afford to use basswood will have to 
substitute some other wood, for there is no 
likelihood that it will ever become plentiful or 
cheap again. 

Birch is selling well and covering a wide 
range of country. Probably the birch trade 
never before approached in volume what it is 
today. Many manufacturers of furniture and 
wood goods are using it in place of some wood 
that has grown too scarce or too high for them, 
but the bulk of it goes into house finishing, 
w-here it is largely supplanting oak. A good 
deal of birch leaves here for New York state 
points, and Ohio and Indiana are buying it to 
a large extent also. 

Soft elm is in better demand than at any time 
for several years and is commanding good prices, 
but still they are not as much as the wood is 
worth, 

Toledo. 

Good demand, firm prices and no surplus stock 
seem to fairly toll the condition of the hardwood 
market in Toledo, The strongest feature of the 
market is poplar. This wood is very scarce and 
very high. Every foot is snapped up eagerly as 
fast as it is received and box men and manu- 
facturers are complaining constantly of being 



imable to get stock. The maple market, particu- 
larly in the flooring line, has been fairly quiet 
up to a week ago, but since that time it has 
taken a brace and now is moving along In prett.v 
good shape. There is a strong demand for plain 
oak with prices inclining upward. Quartered 
oak is also fairly active and may take a jump 
at any time. Ash is holding well with demand 
fair ; straight-grained is not to be found in any 
tjuantity. Hickory is being readily sold. 



Ashland, Ky. 



The car shortage is easier in this section and 
not so much ditficulty is met in making prompt 
shipments. There was never a better demand 
for high grade poplar, and in fact all kinds and 
grades of lumber find ready sale as soon as they 
leave the saws ; in consequence of which there 
is very little accumulation in the yards. All 
mills are busy and lumbermen have no complaint 
from an.v qinirter. 



Liverpool. 

Two mahogany sales were held recently and 
higher prices were the rule. The advance, 
though small, was ciuite distinct and there is 
no hesitation in saying that much higher prices 
can be looked forward to. Mahogany on this 
side is, without the smallest shadow of doubt, 
coming into fashion again. All the cabinet 
makers state that it will be used more than 
ever during the next year or so. This must 
mean that the increased deinand will bring 
increased prices. It certainly seems a sound 
deduction to buy freely at the comparatively 
low price prevailing today. 

Poplar and ash are still firm and stocks are 
very low. Oak remains in similar position. 
Hickory is better and is really wanted. Some- 
thing like a famine in this wood would take 
place if one or two of the big buyers started 
buying, as they no doubt shortly will have 
to do. Satin walnut and walnut boards are 
not so good as they should be, considering the 
high price of poplar. Ash logs are not so 
strong, the import having been very heavy. 
These should be kept back a bit. The price 
asked, too, does not meet with buyers' ideas, 
which are only low. 



London. 



Business certainly seems to be improving and 
Intyers are making more inquiries for stocks, 
which in many instances seem to be coming 
forward quite freely. 

Thick oak planks for car construction and 
house building purposes are still scarce. Most 
of the arrivals are being sold on the open mar- 
ket and are realizing top prices. It is not 
always safe to send thick planks here for the 
open market, but at the present moment buyers 
are afraid that by the time they receive goods 
ordered prices may not be quite so high. 

Plain boards, 1", IM," and 1%", seem to be 
arriving quite freely, but the market is in 
position to deal with these stocks for some time 
to come. 

Quartered boards and planks are coming into 
better demand and there is no great stock here. 

Walnut is very difficult of sale, the demands 
being for other woods for furniture making. 
There is a fair stock of all except prime grade 
thin boards, which are in request. Logs fit for 
veneers would sell well. The demand for satin 
walnut is mostly for No. 1 common, which is in 
good supply ; Is and 2s have got too high in 
price for the class of small makers who manu- 
facture this wood into furniture, and therefore 
the demand is restricted to one or two large 
buyers who take constant supplies which do not 
come on the market. Whitewood shows a con- 
tinued scarcity and stocks are practically ex- 
hausted and arrivals realize good prices. 

Ash planks have a good sale, but logs are 
neglected. 



34 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



AT COST 

IS AN UNCOMMON TERM AS APPLIED TO INSURANCE 

But this is the actual price of Indemnity against Fire Loss furnished by the 

Manufacturing 

Lumbermen's 

Underwriters 

THE STRONGEST INSURANCE ORGANIZATION 
TO-DAY IN AMERICA 



The saving is not on a _ Only well built plants 

small portion of J with adequate protection 

your insurance but on the V^ and at least 

entire line. i five years timber 

There are other advantages / supply are considered 

equally interesting. ^ eligible. 



FOR LIST OF MEMBERS AND FURTHER INFORMATION, ADDRESS 



HARRY RANKIN 4 CO. Kansas City. Mo. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



35 



WanMandropSate 



Advertisements will be inserted in this 
section at the following rates : 

For one Insertion 20 cents a line 

For two insertions 35 cents a line 

For three insenlons 60 cents a line 

For four insertions 60 cents a line 

Elgiit words of ordinary lengtii malie one line. 

Heading counts as two lines. 

No display except the headings can be ad- 
mitted. 

Remittances to accompany the order. No 
extra charges for copies of paper containing 
the advertisement. 



EMPLOYES WANTED. 



WANTED. 

Young man al^oiit 2U years old, high school 
education, with good habits, who has had about 
a year's experience at measuring and grading 
hardwood lumber. A good opportunity for a 
man who is willing to work and will be loyal. 
C. .7. FRANK, Logansport, Ind. 



WANTED. 

A head sawyer and filer to saw quartered 
oaii for our veneer mill. Good position for 
the right party. None other than thoroughly 
experienced men in this line of worli need ap- 
ply. MARTIN CUTSINGER & SONS CO.. 

Roachdale, Ind. 



EMPLOYMENT WANTED 



OFFICE POSITION WANTED. 
Experienced man 35 years of age. Experi- 
enced in lumber business. Expert bookkeeper 
and shorthand writer. Now in Arkansas. 
Want position by June 1 at $20 per week with 
good firm. Address 

"A 205." care Hardwood Record. 



LUMBER WANTED 



WANTED— WHITE OAK STRIPS. 

One car of clear, bone dry Quartered White 
Oak Strips, 4 to SV^" wide. 

S. D. SMITH, Fort Wayni\ Ind. 

WANTED— SHORT HICKORY SQUARES 

In carload lots: .Ml White Grade: IV.x 
11/2x26" iUKi 14" to 42". In Red and White: 
iy2Xl%x26" and 30" to 42"; also l%xl?4x 
6C". Address 

VAN DEVENTER MFG. CO.. LTD., 
302 Cora Bldg., New Orleans, La. 

WANTED— CAR STOCK. 

Inspectfd and cash at mill. 

.1. GUTIIRIDGE. 
934 Monaduoek Bldg.. Chicago, 111. 

WANTED. 

5 cars each 4/4. 5/4. C, 4 and S '4" Sound 
Wormy Chestnut. Quote f. o. b. Cincinnati. 
DUHLMEIER BROTHERS. Cincinnati. O. 

WANTED. 

Walnut logs 11" and up in diameter. Oak 
logs 24" and up and Hickory logs 14" and up — 
all good quality. Address 

H. V. HARTZELL, Greenville, Ohio. 

YELLOW PINE POLE STOCK 

Wanted — From reliable mills who under- 
stand how to manufacture No. 1 Pole stock, 
clear and straight grain quality, free from all 
defects excepting sap. 

AMBR. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 



WANTED. 

QUARTERED RED OR WHITE OAK. 

1x4x11, 16%, 19 & 20. IxSMixll, ley^ & 19, 
1x3x14, 1x2^x14 — for delivery at Mound City, 
111. 

QUARTERED OAK CHAIR BACKS. 

-'■• to 6" wide, 15 and 17" long, for delivery 
at I'ort Washington, Wis. 

THE WISCONSIN CHAIR CO., 

Port Washington. Wis. 



WANTED. 
4-4" and 6-4" Sound Wormy Chestnut. 
4-4 Basswood and Buckeye. 
4-4 Southern White I'ine. 
Address Lumber Department, 
NATIONAL CASKET CO., Hoboken, -N. J. 



BASSWOOD WANTED. 

A few carloads 4/4 and 8/4 Northern White 
Passwood dressed two sides. Quote price de- 
livered on New York rate of freight. 
H. .1. ROSEVELT, 
66 Broad St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED— DRY CYPRESS. 

2x5" and wider, 8 or 16', Ists and 2nds, 
selects or sound common. 

AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 

WANTED— HARDWOOD LOGS. 

200,000 ft. 28" and up White Oak logs. 
200,000 ft. 12" and up Walnut logs. 
50,000 ft. 12" and up Cherry logs. 
C. L. WILLEY, 1235 S. Robey St., Chicago. 



DRY SOFT YELLOW POPLAR. 

.411 grades and thicknesses, rough or dressed, 
wanted. Prompt cash. Willing to contract. 
AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Fa. 

OAK. 

We are In the market tor plain sawed oak, 
all grades and thicknesses. 
P. G. DODGE & CO., 2116 Lumber St., Chicago. 

OAK WANTED. 
3 and 4 Inch White Oak ; also Mixed Oak ; 
also 12x12 Timbers and Piling of all kinds. 
CONTINENTAL LUMBER CO., 
1213 Monadnock Bldg.. Chlraeo. Til. 

YELLOW PINE CAR MATERIAL. 

Long Leaf Car Sills, Switch Timbers and 
Decking wanted, rough or dressed. Also Long 
or Short Leaf Car Siding, 1x4 6"-9 or 18', also 
16' kiln dried and worked to pattern. Quote 
cash price f. o. b. mill. 

AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 



LUMBER FOR SALE. 



YOU ARE OFFERED 

the following bone dry stock for immediate 
shipment : 

1 car 3", 4" and 5" Birch Strips. 

3 cars 3" No. 2 and No. 3 Oak. 

1 car 1" No. 2 and No. 3 Oak. 
5 cars 1" Log Run Maple. 

2 cars 3" firsts and seconds Maple. 
1 car 5" and 6" Bass Siding. 

G. W. JONES LBR. CO., Appleton, Wis. 

SOFT CORK WHITE PINE. 

High grade Michigan stock for sale, all 
thicknesses up to 4", bone dry, suitable tor 
making patterns and fine cabinet work. 

AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 

FOR sale" 

10 cars 1" 1st and 2nds Plain Red Oak. 
2 cars 1V>" Plain Red Oak, Step Plank. 

4 cars 1" 1st and 2nds Plain Red Oak, 12" 
and wider. 

2 cars 1" 1st and 2nds Qtd. Red Oak, 10" 
and wider. 

5 cars lli" No. 1 Common Plain White Oak. 

1 car 1" No. 1 Common Qtd. White Oak. 

2 cars 2" 1st and 2nds Qtd. White Oak. 

2 cars 2" No. 1 Common Qtd. White Oak. 

3 cars 1V>" 1st and 2nds Qtd. White Oak. 

2 ears Hi" No. 1 Common Qtd. White Oak. 
10 cars 1" 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 10' to 16'. 

7 cars 1" 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 12'. 

8 cars 2" 1st and 2nds Sap Gum. 
8 cars 2" No. 1 Common Sap Gum. 
1 car 2" No. 2 Common Sap Gum. 

IS cars 1" 1st and 2nds Cottonwood, 6" and 
wider. 

3 cars 1" No. 1 Common Cottonwood. 
FULLBRTON-POWBLL HARDWOOD LBR. 

CO.. South Bend. Ind. 



TIMBER LANDS FOR SALE 



FOR SALE. 

800 acres of hardwood timber, five' miles 
from the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad in Green- 
brier county, West Virginia. Timber only 
*12.50 per acre. Estimated to cut 7.500 feet 
per acre, fine quality. 

EMORY H. SMITH, Newburg, W. Va. 



MACHINERY FOR SALE 



FOE SALE. 

Power 12-inch Hand Jointer. Practically 
new. Will sell cheap. 

SHEIP & VANDEGRIFT. INC.. 
814 N. Lawrence St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MACHINERY WANTED 



AT ONCE. 

If you are In need of machinery — new or 
second hand — a few lines in this column will 
place your wants before those who have such 
goods for sale. For particulars address 

Hardwood Record, Chicago, 111. 



RAILWAY EQUIPMENT 



RAILS AND LOCOMOTIVES. 

All inquiries for industrial railway equip- 
ment listed before Record readers will find 
ready response. 

Hardwood Record, Chicago, 111. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



WANTED— MANAGER. 

The advertiser, a large corporation, contem- 
plates starting a first-class Box and Veneer 
plant in the South, and desires to as-sociate 
with a first-class, practical man to take full 
local charge. Man must have had successful 
experience in similar work, be of unquestioned 
character, and be able to invest from ten to 
twenty-five thousand dollars in the business. 
The business will require a capital of one 
hundred to one hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars. The advertiser has ample capital to 
finance it, but desires investment indicated on 
part of manager for business reasons, which 
will be apparent to the right man. Give in 
confidence full information in replying. Ad- 
dress "E. W. C," care Hardwood Record. 



A SAWMILL OPERATOR 

With at least 25 to 50 M capital can obtain 
timber from an Eastern Tennessee hardwood 
tract 6.000 acres and stumpage b.ised per thou- 
sand feet, pay when dry and shipped. Write 
for further particulars. A good chance for 
good timber and will warrant investigation. 
Address "D.," care Hardwood Record. 

MAPLE FLOORING MILL 

For sale. Located in Michigan and now in ac- 
tive operation. This plant is modern in every 
respect and making money. Will sell or take 
stock in new company. Owners have large in- 
terests elsewhere demanding personal attention. 
Address "MAPLE FLOORING," 

care Hardwood Record. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FACTS FROM PRACTICAL MEN. 

The Hardwood Record is always In the mar- 
ket for articles on any and every feature of 
the hardwood Industry. It wants practical 
statements of tact from practical men who 
know how certain things can be done In the 
best way. Literary quality not essential. Lib- 
eral pay tor acceptable articles. Address 

Editor Hardwood Recced. 



36 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



jidVertisers' T>trectori; 



NORTHERN HARDWOODS. 



7 Phila. Veneer & Lumber Company. 



50 
10 



Standard Hardwood Lumber Company 59 Mans. H. H.. & Co.. Inc . ^ wlseonsin Vereer Comoanv 53 

Stearns Company, The 56 .McCauley-Saunders Lumber Company. 11 Wisconsin \ eneer company »J 

Alcook John L., & Co 7 Stephenson, The L. Company 12 McIIvain. J. Gibson, & Co 6 wARnwnnn TTOORTNR 

ISan Lumber & Mfg. Company.. 50 s.ewart. L N.. & Bro 59 McI^an-DavIs Lumber Company. 2 HARDWOOD FLOORING. 

Arpin Hardwood Lumber Company.... 52 stewart-Eoy Lumber Company 5b McLean, Hugh, Lumber Company.... 69 ^^^^^^^ j^^^^^^ Company 51 

Babcock Lumber Company 50 stlmson, J. V 58 Mjller, Anthony Arpin Hardwood Lumber Company... 52 

Beyer, Knoi; & Co 59 .stone, T. B., Lumber Company 50 Miller Bros. 11 g,,^^ ^ Van Auken 12 

Bliss & Van Auken 12 Sullivan. T., & Co 69 Mosby, H. W.. & Co 

Boyne City Lumber Company 54 Tegge Lumber Company S Nicola Lumber Company The. . ... 

Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Company.. 59 Turner. A. M., Lumber Company 50 O'Brien, .Tohn, Land & Lumber Co ^ ^ ^^ ^ _ 

Cadillac Handle Company 3 Vollmar & Below Company 52 Paepcke-Lelcht Lumber Company 4 c„„^„ nigglns 

Carter Frank. Company 53 Walnut Lumber Company, The -oS Phila. Veneer & Lumber Company.... 6 ^^ j_^_^,^^^ , 

Cheat River Lumber Company 50 Wells, R. A.. Lumber Company 10 Plummer Lumber Company 49 . _ 

Cherry River Boom & Lumber Co.... 9 White Lumber Company 10 Price, E E .. 7 

Chicago Car Lumber Company 10 White, W. H.. Company 64 Radina, L W., & Oo u, 

Chivvis W R •*" Whitmer, Wm., & Sons, Inc 6 Ransom, J. B., & Co 4S 

Cincinnati Hardwood Lbr, Company.. 56 Wiborg & Hanna Company 57 Rhubesky E. W. 2 

Cobbs & Mitchell Inc 3 Willson Bros. Lumber Company. 50 Richmond Park & Co 10 

Columbia Hardwood Lumber Company 11 Wisconsin Land & Lumber Company. 53 Ritter. W. M.. Lumber Company 5 Mitchell Bros. Company 3 

Connor R Company 53 Wistar, Underbill & Co 7 Rumbarger Lumber Company 1 Nashville Hardwood Flooring Company 4S 

Co-op 'Mili'& Lumber Company 46 Wylle. A. W 11 Ryan & McParland 



Crescent Lumber Company 56 Yeager. Orson E. 59 Scatcherd & Son 

Crosby & Beckley Co.. The 6 Young, W. D.. & Co 12 Schofleld Bros 

Crosby, C. P 52 Young & Cutsinger 58 Slimmer^ F.^ & Co 

Cummer, Diggins & Co 

SOUTHERN HARDWOODS 



Smith. R. M.. & Co. 



Buffalo Maple Flooring Company, The 7 

Carrier Lumber & Mfg. Company 12 

Cobbs & Mitchell. Inc 3 

& Co 3 

Company 8 

Eastman, S, L., Flooring Company... 54 

Fenn Bros. Company 4 

Forman. Tbos., Company 6 

Haak Lumber Company 37 

International Hardwood Company.... 54 

Kerry & Hanson Flooring Company... 55 



Nichols & Cox Lumber Company 65 

5^ Stephenson. The I.. Company 12 

■^ Ward Bros 12 

1? Wilce, The T., Company 58 

Wisconsin Lar^d & Lumber Company.. 66 



Darling, Chas., & Co 11 

Davis, John R., Lumber Company 52 

Davis, W. A 31 

Dennis Bros 

Dennis & Smith Lumber Company. 
D'Heur & Swain Lumber Company. 

Dixon & Dewey 

Duhlmeier Bros, 



.Southern Lumber Company 2 

Standard Hardwood Lumber Company 59 
Advance Lumber Company 51 Stearns Comnany, The 66 



Sondheimer. E., Company 4 wood Mosaic Flooring Company 2 

Young, W, D., & Co 12 



SAW MILL MACHINERY, 

Company. 



55 Alcock, John L.. & Co 7 Steele & Hibbard 49 

58 American Hdwd. Lumber Company... 49 Stewart, I. N., & Bro 69 Garland, M., 

6 American Lumber & Mfg. Company.. 50 Stimson. J. V 68 Gordon Hollow Blast Grate Company. 3.S 

_ 67 Anderson-Tully Company 4 Stone, T. B., Lumber Company 56 Mershon, W. B., & Co 

Dwicht lumber Company 8 Atlantic Lumber Company Sullivan. T., & Co 59 Phoenix Manufacturing Company 53 

Farle Lumber Company 54 Beyer, Knox & Co 69 Swann-Day Lumber Company 8 

Ellas G & Bro 59 Brown, Geo. C. & Co 46 Three States Lumber Company 60 WOODWORKING MACHINERY. 

Empire Lumber Company!. 59 Brown, W. P., & Sons. Lumber Co, . . 2 Turner, A, M.. Lumber Company 50 



Estabrook-Skeele Lumber Company 
Evans & Retting Lumber Compan) 
Fall. E. H 



11 Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Company.. 59 Vesta! Lumber & Mfg. Company 49 American Wood Working Machinery 

55 Carrier Lumber & Mfg. Company 12 Walnut Lumber Company. The 68 Company 

51 Cherry River Boom & Lumber Co 9 Wells. R. A., Lumber Company 10 Berlin Machine Works, The. 



Forir'an Company, Thomas 6 Chicago Car Lumber Company 10 West Florida Hardwood Company 



Covel Manufacturing Company. 



Freiberg Lumber Company, The 57 Chivvis, W. R 

FuUerton-rowell Hardwood Lumber Cincinnati Hardwood Lumber Co. 



49 White Lumber Company 10 Crown Iron Works. 



56 Whitmer, Wm., & Sons, Inc.. 



6 Defiance Machine Works, The. 



3S 
;i,s 
39 



Company 



5 Columbia Hardwood Lumber Company 11 Wiborg & Hanna Company 57 Holmes, E. & B., Machinery Company 39 

GeneS^Lumber Company,' The. 56 Co-Op. Mill and Lumber Comiiany 46 Willson Bros. Lumber Company 50 Matteson Manufacturing Company 47 

nllesnie W M Lumber Company.. 7 Courtney, D. G 9 Wood, R. E.. Lumber Company 47 Nash, J. M -'3 

"'iJ./ J o' ' ■ 54 Crane, C, & Co 66 Wylie, A. W 11 Olier Manufacturing Company, The... 



Goldie J. S 54 Crane, 

Haak Lumber' Company 37 Crescent Lumber Company 56 Yeager. Orson E 59 Suiker-Davia Company 

Hackley-rbelps-Bonnell Company 55 Crosby & Beckley Company, The 6 

Hayden & Westcctt Lumber Company 10 Cude, W. J., Land & Lbr. Company.. 48 

HoUoway Lumber Company 7 Cypress Lumber Company 56 

Hoyt C. I., & Co 58 Darling. Chas., & Co 11 

Indiana Quartered Oak Company 7 Davidsoc-Beuedlct Company 



44 

Young & Cutsinger 58 Smith, H. B., Machine Company 41 

Woods. S. A., Machine Company 44 



POPLAR. 

Advance Lumber Company 51 



LOGGING MACHINERY. 



Lumber Company 52. Davis. W. A 11 .^tlantic Lumber Comp.any 



Ingram 

James & Abbot Company 

Jenks, Robert H., Lumber Company 



Dennis & Smith Lumber Company... 53 Brown. W. P.. & Sons. Lumber Co.. 



51 D'Heur & Swain Lumber Company... 58 Cheat River Lumber Company 50 overpack. 



Clyde Iron Works 42 

Lidgerwood Mauufacturing Company. 4:', 



D. G. 



Jones Hardwood Company 

Kampf, Albert R 

Kelley Lumber & Shiugle Company 



Russel Wheel & Foundry Company . . 
DRY KILNS AND BLOWERS. 



.Tones. G. W.. Lumber Company 2 Dixon & Dewey '-;«"t'.e5% 

7 Duhlmeier Bros 5j Crane, C, & Co 

2 Ellas G. & Bro 59 C'ude, W. J.. Land & Lbr. Company. 

8 Empire Lumber Company, Buffalo 59 Davidson-Benedict Company 

Kneeland Bi"eiow^ Company ..."...... 47 Estabrook-Skeele Lumber Company... 11 Dawkins. W. H.. Lumber Company.. 57 Gordon Hollow Blast C^ate Compan, . ^,s 

^esh & Mat'thews Lumber Company . . 11 Evans & Retting Lumber Company... 65 Haas. Albert. Lumber Company 7 Grand Rapids Veneer Works 48 

Lesh & Matthcns i^umoer i.ompa , i, Hayden & Westcott Lumber Company 10 Morton Dry Kiln Company 3, 

Ut:m:mwml°T .::'.:'.:: ? F^rmkorn- Lumber •company....... 57 Hayward, M. A 37 New York Blower Company 3. 

llmbard F B "....:.:.:.... H Freiberg Lumber Company, The 57 Hooton, R. A., Lumber Company.... 11 

Knight' Lumber' Company 58 PuUerton-Powell Hardwood Lumber Kentucky Lumber Company ,'i7 



Long-] 



SAWS, KNIVES AND SUPPLIES. 



Keyes-Fannin Lumber Company. 



Mafey, Thompson & Moffett Company 58 C°"//°^ --'-^j,-'-^-^^^ ^l Massengale Lumber Company. 49 Atkins, E. C, & Co. 

Martln-Barriss Company ■--•■•;"■" ^f/*'°°L^Xr Company '^"P^"'^- ^S McLean Davis Lumber Company 2 Covel Manufacturing Company. 

Mason-Donaldson Lumber Company... 52 Ga.voso Lumber company..... -ta ,, w o rvown Iriin Works 

Mans H. H., & Co., Inc 7 General Lumber Company, The 56 Rhubesky, E W 2 tro^^n Hon works.. 

Mcllvain, J. Gibson, & Co 6 Gillespie, W. M., Lumber Company.. 7 ' " 



Ritter, ^iv, M., Lumber Company 5 Gillette Roller Bearing Company. 



McLean, Hugh, Lumber Company. . 



59 



Haas. Albert. Lumber Company.....'.' 7 Smith. R. M., & Co S Hanchett Swage Works. 



42 
3.S 
3S 
37 
3S 



Southern Lumber Company 2 Marshall. Francis 

Stewart-Roy Lumber Company 56 Matteson Manufacturing Company. 



COTTONWOOD AND GUM. 



60 



Miller, Anthony 59 Uackley-Phelps-Bonnell Company 55 

ATillpr' Bros 11 Hayward, M. A 33 

Mitchell Br'os: Company 3 Heath. Wbitbeck & Co ^.... U Swann-Day i^umber Company 

Mowbray & Robinson 57 Himmelberger-Harrison Lumber Co. . . 1 Vansant Kitchen & Co 

Mu7phy & Dlgglns 3 Hooton. R. A., Lumber Company.... 11 Wood. R E., Lumber Company 4, 

mchols & Cox Lumber Company 55 Hoyt, C. L, & Co 68 bellow Poplar Lumber Company 60 

Nicola Lumber Company, The 50 Indiana Lumber Company 48 

Northern Lumber Company 54 Indiana Quartered Oak Company .__ < 

North Shore Lumber Company International Felloe Mfg. Company.. 49 

North Vernon Lumber Company 2 James & Abbot Company 7 

North Western Lumber Company 53 Jenks, Robert H.. Lumber Company.. 51 

O'Brien. John. Land & Lumber Co... 10 Jones, G. W., Lumber Company 2 

Osburii,' Norval 37 Jones Hardwood Company 7 

Perrinc-.\i'mstrong Company 68 Kampf. Albert R 2 

Price E E "! Kentucky Lumber Company 07 

Lamb-Fish Lumber Company 60 

Lesh & Matthews Lumber Company.. 11 

Linehan Lumber Company 50 

7 
E. B 11 

Long-Knight Lumber Company 58 

Love. Boyd & Co 46 

Luehrmann, Chas. F., Hardwood Lum- 
ber Company 49 

Maley, Thompson & Jloffett Company 56 



LUMBER INSURANCE, 

.\dirondack Fire Insurance C.>mpany.. 

Lumber Insurance Company of New 
York 

Lumber Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, Boston 



Kadina, L. W.. & Co 57 

Richmond Park & Co W 

Ross Lumber Company 1 ^.^^ ,„,„„^„ E. 

Rumbarger Lumber Company i j^^j;,,^^ v n 

Ryan & McParland 10 r„„„V.„;, 

Sailing-Hanson Company 55 

Sawyer-Goodman Company 62 

Scatcherd & .Son 59 

Schofleld Bros. 



.\nderson-Tully Company 4 

Fan-in-Korn Lrmber Company 57 Lumber Underwriters 

Himmelberger-Harrison Lumber Co... 1 Pennsylvania Lumbermen's 

Lamb-Fish Lumber Company CO 

Luehrmann, C. F., Hardwood Lumber 

Company 49 

Mosby, H. W., & Co 8 

Paepcke-Lelcht Lumber Company 4 

Sondheimer. E., Company 



12 

Mutual 

Fire Insurance Company 1 

Rai.kiii. Harry. & Co 34 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



* Oiilds. S. D., & Co. 



Slimmer, F., & Co 10 Martln-Barriss Company 51 

Soble Bros 7 Massengale Lumber Company 49 



Three States Lumber Company 60 (jjnette Roller Bearing Company .37 

International Felloe Mfg. Company.. 49 

CYPRESS. Lacey. James D.. & Co 46 

Lumbermen's Credit Association .'17 

Cypress Lumber Company 56 jjartin & Co 51 

Plummer Lumber Company 49 penr.syiyania Door & Sash Company.. 7 

Poole, Clark L.. & Co 12 

Sanders. Henry, Company 4i: 

Grand Itapids Veneer Works 47 Schenck. C. A.. & Co 2 



VENEERS. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



37 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 

When you have anything to sell, or wish to 
purchase anything in the way of 

HARDWOOD LUMBER 

CROSS TIES OR PILING 

Norval Osburn, Seaman, Ohio 



Keys=Fannin 
Lumber Company 

Manufacturers of Band 
and Circular sawn 

SOFT 

YELLOW 

POPLAR 



Plain and quartered red and white 
Oak, Hemlock, Bass and Chest- 
nut. Give us a trial. 



Herndon, Wyoming Co., W. Va. 








Send Us Your Orders 

We Have on Hand Ready foh 
Shipment a Nice Stock of 

2'4 Clear Maple 
Flooring 

.\LSO OTHER SIZES AND GRADES 

Our fine timber, modern plant and 
skilled workmanship combine to 
make a flooring that cannot be ex- 
celled. You will be pleased with it. 

HAAK LUMBER CO. 

HAAKWOOD, MICH. 



COUNTERFEIT CHECKS | 


are frequent 
except where 
our 


.^^^^^ 


Two Piece 
Geometrical 
Barter Coio 


^^^^^^ 


is in uie, then i 
Imitation isn't / 
possible. / 
Sample if yon t 
ask tor It. f 


^Co^B 


S. D. CBILDS V 
< CO. W 
Chicago V 


^^^-?r;^^H 


We also make * 
Time Checks, 
Stencils and 
Log Hammers. 


^^^r 



Save Your Money 



By Using the 



RED BOOK 



Published Semi-Annually 
in January and July 



It contains a carefully prepared list of the 
buyers of lumber in car lots, both among 
the dealers and manufacturers. 

The book indicates their financial stand- 
ing and manner of meeting obligations. 
Covers the UNITED STATES and MANI- 
TOBA. 

The trade recognizes this book as the au- 
thority on the lines it covers. 

A well organized Collection Department 
is also operated and the same is open to you. 



WRITE FOR TERMS. 



Lumbermen's Credit AssociatioD 

Established 1878 

1405 Great Norlhern Building, CBICA09 

18 BrMdw.y. NEW YOHK CITY 



MENTION THIS PAPER 




This Truck — The Gillette Truck — with its Roller Bearing Axle 
Unbreakable Malleable Iron Caster-Fork, Improved Stake Pockets 
and t^eneral Superiority of Construction is the Easiest Running 
Truck made. Strongest where other trucks are weakest. Best 
Truck to buy. Cheapest Truck to use. Invest money in these 
trucks. Do not waste it on others. 

GILLETTE ROLLER BEARING COMPANY 

Grand Rapids, Michigan ■ UJ 



The Morton Dry Kiln 



MOIST AIR SYSTEM 



Recording 
Ther- 
mometers. 
Transfer 
Cars. 




Trucks. 

Canvas 

Doors. 



HOW TO DRY LUMBER. 



As exemplified in our Catalog D. Free on application. 

MORTON DRY KILN CO., Chicago, Ills. 



FRAMES 



FOR 



HARDWOOD RECORD 
SUPPLEMENTS 



Complete with backing, but without the glass, made 
from Flemish Oak, are lo be had delivered by ex- 
press, charges prepaid to any point east of the 
Missouri river, at 50 cents each ; or at the Hard- 
wood Record office, at 30 cents each. Prepay orders 
with two-cent stamps or postal notes, addressed 



Hardwood Record, 355 Dearborn St.eet, Chicago 



38 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



THE NEW 1907 
CATALOG 



is ready, ask for 
one. Itdescribes 
the most com- 
plete line of fil- 
ing room ma- 
chinery manu- 
factured, includ- 
ing our New No. 
99 Automatic 
Sharpener, a s 
shown by cut, 

also our New No. 109 Stretcher with 

automatic Re-toother. 



Covel Manufacturing Co. 
Chicago, U. S. A. 




THE MARKET IS DEMANDING, more and more LUM- 
BER OF STANDARD LENGTHS, WITH SQUARE ENDS 

As well as straight and parallel edges. The straight and par- 
allel edges you can obtain with a "Tower" Edger, while 

THE "TOWER" 

ONE-MAN 2-SAW TRIMIVIER 

will give you the standard lengths and square ends 
with a minimum of time, labor and waste. In all 
other trimmers the manner of shifting the saws is 
such that every time the position of the saws is 
changed the operator has to go clear to the end of 
the machine. In the "Tower" One-man 2-saw Trim- 
mer he never has to go beyond the end of the board. 
Especially with short boards, this means a great sav- 
ing in time and labor. It also greatly reduces the 
amount of waste, as it is much easier to see how to 
trim lumber to the best advantage from the end of 
the board than from the end of the machine. 




In all of these trimmers there are two feeds, which may be instant- 
ly started, stopped or changed, without stopping the saws. 
liSoth are controlled by the same lever, which is lo- 
cated in the most convenient possible position. 

The Gordon Hollow Blast Grate Co. 

GREENVILLE, MICHIGAN 

The LareesI Hanufaclurers of Grales, Edgers and Trimmers in the World. 



^ Manchett - Hanchett ■ Hanchett ^ 



Hanchett 
Saw Swage 

Every one made Perfect 

The Swage with a Name 



^ A poor Swage Ktiins a Good Saw, and 
for that reason the manufacturers of the 

HANCHETT ADJUSTABLE SWAGE 

employ only the Best Mechanics and use 
only the Best Material in their construction. 



It Pays Us 
to make 
The Best 



Send tor 

Catalog 

No. 10 

It tells you all 

about them 



It Pays You 

to use 

The Best 



MANU^^ACTURED BY 



Hanchett Swage Works 

Big Rapids, Michigan 



^ Hanchett -Hanchett- Hanchett <^ 




HARDWOOD RECORD 



39 



"DEFIANCE" WOOD-WORKING MACHINERY 




COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS OF 

HIGH GRADE TOOLS 

^ FOR MAKING ^ 
Hubs, Spokes, Wheels, Single Trees, Hoops, 



Wagons, Carriages, 

Rims, Shalts, Poles, 

Neck-Yokes, 



Handles, Bobbins, Spools, 

Insulator Pms and 

Oval Wood Dishes. 



TBIPLE HOOP AND TBUNK SLAT PLANEB. 



INVENTED AND BUILT BY 

The DEFIANCE MACHINE WORKS 

DEFIANCE, OHIO. 
Send for 500 Page Catalogue : 




HAMMER AND HATCHET HANDLE LATH 



Holmes No. 46 Variable Feed Planer 



Feed can instantly be 
changed from 20 to 100 
feet per minute. Will do 
the finest and smoothest 
work on hardwoods. Planes 
from 1-16 to 8 inches in 
thickness and 24 inches in 
width. Let us tell you all 
about it. 



£. ^ B. 
Holmes 
Machinery 
Company 

Buffalo, N. Y. 





Works 

BUCYRVS, OHIO 



ESPECIALLY 



Adapted for Handling Shavings, Saw= 
dust and Stringy Material of All Kinds 



l-PIECE FAN WHEEL. 



Get Catalogue 
58=G 



NO OBSTRUCTIONS. 



We Also Make Lumber Dryers. 

New York Blower Company 




Mair\ Office : 

25th Place and Stewart Avenue 

CHICAGO 



40 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



GARLAND 

Special Hardwood 74U Band Mill 



There are 
many good 
features about 
this mill that 
we will be 
glad to tell 
about. 
Write for 
catalogue and 
descriptive 
circulars. 




Simplicity, 

Capacity, 

Economy on 

Saws. 

We 

manufacture 

a full line 

of Sawmill 

and 

Conveying 

Machinery. 



A fe^v hardwood saLwmill maLchirvery installaLtiorvs ; 



Kneeland-Bigelow Co Bay City, Mich. 

Kneeland-Buell Co Bay City, Midi. 

W. D. Young & Co Bay City, Mich. 

E. C. Hargrave Bay City, Mich. 

Bliss & Van Auken Saginaw, Mich. 

Sailing, Hanson & Co Grayling, Mich. 

Johannesburg Mfg. Co Johannesburg, Mich. 

Michelson & Hanson Co Lewiston, Mich. 



Harbor Spi ings Lumber Co Harbor Springs, Mich. 

W. H. White Co Boyne City, Mich. 

Mud Lake Lumber Co Raber, Mich. 

Engel Lumber Co Englewood, La. 

Hardgrove Limiber Co Hardgrove, Mich. 

Churchill Lumber Co Alpena, Mich. 

Waccamaw Land & Lumber Co Wilmington, N. C. 

Embury-Martin Lumber Co Cheboygan, Mich. 



The M. Garland Co, 

BAY CITY. MICHIGAN 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



41 



SMITH of 

SMITHVILLE 



I The Profit Builder 





NO.105-A, EXTRft HEAVY t2-INCH MOULDER 




T HAS been our purpose during the last half century to develop 
»| a line of wood working machines containing the best work- 
manship and material that American skill and wisdom can 
afford. This fact we are proud to say is well established in 
the minds of our many patrons. We have, however, now 
exceeded ourselves by the development of a remarkable Moulder , the 
excellence of which is due to our obtaining written suggestions from more 
than a thousand operators throughout America. This machine stands alone 
as being the composite idea of the thinking operators of this country. One 
year's test of its work has convinced us that it is impossible for you to 
compete successfully against the Smith Moulder with any other machine. 
Can't we send you prices and literature i 



Branches : 

New York, Chicago. 

Boston, Atlanta 




H. B. SMITH MACHINE CO. 

SMITHVILLE, N. J., U. S. A. 




42 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



"GIFFERT 

LOG LOADER 

will be in full operation al the 

JAMESTOWN EXPOSITION 




This is your chance to combine business with 

pleasure. Go and enjoy yourself and at the 

same time see what a really wonderful 

machine the McGIFFERT is. Watch it 

switch and spot its own cars, skid its 

own logs, and especially load those logs 

faster, easier and cheaper than you've 

ever seen it done before. We'll have 

a good man in charge to proi'f what 

you've only read before. 

Seeing is believing, you know. 

so go if you possibly can. 

CLYDE IRON WORKS 

Duluth. Minnesota 



U'K%- 



-CJ.3. 





Silver 



ATKINS S SAWS 



cost more than other Saws, because they are BETTER. 
Tlie First cost of a Saw does not count for much. 
What you want is your Money's Worth. Isn't it better 
to pay a fair price and get the best rather than a low 
price and get poor goods? Try an ATKINS SAW. 
They're better. 



E. C. ATKINS & CO., Inc. 

The Silver Steel Saw People. 
Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis. 



Branches: Atlanta, Chicago, Memphis, Minneapolis, 

New York City, Portland, San Francisco, Seattle, 



New Orleans, 
Toronto. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 




Lidgerwood 
Combination Hardwood Logger 

(Patented) 

EspeciaUy Designed to Log the Hardwood Flats Bordering on the Mississippi River. A Machine that Can 
*^ ' be Used Twelve Months in the year. 



RIGGED AS A CABI-EWAY SKIDDER- 

To be used in sloughs, sivampyplaces and during the^uet season, especially where 
,he timber runs ligh-to the acre per thousand feet, or where the timber is thick and 
small with lots of underbrush. 




Lidgerwood Manufacturing Co 



96 Liberty Street, 
New York 



New Orleans Representatives: 
Woodward, Wight & Co. 



Empire Building, 
Atlanta, Ga. 



44 



HARD.^VOOD RECORD 




THE "HOOSIER" 



SELF-FEED 
RIP SAW 



The cut shows a front view of our Hoosier Self 
Feed Rip Sawing Machine; it has a square raising 
table, easily operated by a crank in front of the 
machine and is always firnily locked, at any point, 
thus preventing any jarring or falling down and 
doing away with all clamp bolts and screws. The 
machine has our patent feeding device, with two 
teed shafts, one in front of the saw with a thin star 
feed wheel and one in the rear with a corrugated 
roll, the advantage of which can be readily seen. 

This machine will rip stock 6 inches thick and 
by using the saw on the outer end of the mandril 
will take in stock 17i inches between guide and 
saw. It can be used with a gang of saws by the 
use of spacing collars on the mandril. It has no 
equal in the rapid production of slats, cleats and 
dimen.sion material of all kinds. Price S175.00. 

We also build the machine with a movable 
saw, at a slightly higher price. 

Write for Full Description, 



The Sinker-Davis Co. 



Manufacturers of 



SAW MILL MACHINERY 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



No. 24 C FLOORING MACHINE 




A heavy, powerful, eight roll matcher particularly suited to producing, in quantity', Hard= 
wood Flooring of High Finish. SPECIAL PATENTED Appliances and Attachments. Write us 
and we'll tell you how we can double your output and improve the quality. :::::: 

S. A. Woods Machine Co., Boston 



CHICAGO 



SPECIALISTS IN 
FLOORERS, PLANERS AND MOULDERS 



SEATTLE 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



45 






o 




0) 



C/5 

u 

o 



a 

CO 



CO 






>^ 













•0 




cd 






a 




id 




:S 




■8 

(J 




o 




OS 

n 




u 




>> 




>. 




e 




u 








a; 


• 

>< 






e 


• 

z 






•pn 


es 






pCi 


bd 
H 






u 






z 
o 


CS 








S 


© 




o 




W y 2 
> ^ 05 


K 


^OJD 


f 


u 

s 

H 


a 


9 I 


l^ 




• w^ 


:^^ 


■^ S 


as 












o 






OB 


^ 


b 
O 

mi 






ns 


< 






o 


U 
Z 






o 








^ 








e 








CO 




OS 

2 




u 








• pl^ 








;^ 




iji 




0) 








:3 




a! 
o 




<5 










46 



HARDWOOD RECORD 




ROLL'S PATENT LOCK JOINT COLUMNS 

I_IERK are four of them in the new Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern Railroad depot in Chicago. They are mahogany, 
36 inches in diameter. Note their proportions. They are ab- 
solutely perfect. We make veneered or solid stave columns in 
all hard woods and for every conceivable 
use. They are beautiful, durable, true in 
classic proportions and cannot come apart. 



CAN NOT ^1 
COME US 

k. APAPT .Jfii0 




Write today for our illustrated 
catalog. It will interest you. 

Henry Sanders Company 



900 ELSTON AVENUE, 



CHICAGO 



GEO. C. BROWN & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Hardwood Lumber 

Tennessee Red Cedar Lumber a Specialty. Nashville, Tennessee 



CO=OPERATIVE MILL 4 LUMBER CO.. (inc.) 

ROCKFORD, ILLS. 
Want Poplar, Oak, Gum, Hickory, Blrcb and Maple 

SEND STOCK LIST AND PRICES. 



DRY HARDWOODS 

150,000 ft. Tennessee Red Cedar Boards (Aromatic) 
150,000 ft. 4-4 Is and 2s Plain Red Oak. 

50,000 ft. 5-4 Is and 2s Plain Red Oak. 
200,000 ft. 8-4 No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak. 

44,000 ft. 10-4 No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak. 

80,000 ft. 8-4 No. 1 Common Quartered Red Oak. 
300,000 ft. 4-4 Shipping Cull Plain Oak. 
Also fair stock of Poplar and Hickory. 

LOVE, BOYD & CO. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



ESTABLISHED SINCE 1880 



TIMBER 

WE OFFER TRACTS OF VIRGIN TIMBER IN LOUISI- 
ANA, MISSISSIPPI, FLORIDA, ALABAMA AND ALSO ON 

PACIFIC COAST 

We employ a larger force of expert timber cruisers than any otlier firm in tlie wor^d. We have furnished 
banks and trust companies with reports on timber tracts upon wliieh millions of dollars of timber certifi- 
cates or bonds have been issued. We furnish detailed estimates which enables the buyer to verify our reports 
at very little expense and without loss of valuable time. Correspondence with bona fide investors solicited. 



JAHES D. LACEY & CO. 



J.\MES D. LACEY. 



WOOD BEAL. 



VICTOR THRANE. 



608 Hennen BIdg., NEW ORLEANS 
1200 Old Colony BIdg., CHICAGO 



LARGEST TIMBER DEALERS 
IN THE WORLD 



507 Lumber Exchange, SEATTLE 
829 Chamber of Com., PORTLAND 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



47 



Hardwoods Dried in a Week ! 

^Our method can be attached to your old Kiln. 
^If it does not do all we claim after being installed, 
we will take it out without expense to you. 



Dept. D. 



Grand Rapids Veneer Works 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 



The KNEELAND BIGELO W CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF LUMBER 



Annual Output: 

20,000,000 ft. Hardwoods. 
20,000,000 ft. Hemlock. 

4,000,000 pes. Hardwood Lath. 

9,000,000 pes. Hemloek Lath. 



Mills R.\jn the Yea.r 
Around. 



Bay City. Mich, 



R.E. Wood Lumber Company 



^ Manufacturers of Yellow Poplar, Oak, Chestnut, Hemlock 
and White Pine. 

^ We own our own stumpage and operate our own mills. 
^\ Correspondence solicited and inquiries promptly answered. 



GENERAL OFFICES: 
CONTINENTAL BUILDING. 



Baltimore, Maryland 



Improved 
Automatic 
Band Saw 
Sharpener 




^ This machine excels all others for sinple cuttiDg Band Saws from 8 to 14 
^^inches. Its construction is mechanically correct, simple and durable, and 
does not possess any of the intricate complicated parts that confuse the oper- 
ator. The head is adjustable so that straight wheels can be used with the same 
results as concave. 



C 



This represents just one type of machine. We make in addition a com- 
plete line of modern tools for the care of saws. 

[For particulars address 

Matteson Mfg. Co. 



All Machines Fully Guaranteed 



120-128 S. CLINTON STREET, = 



CHICAGO, ILLS. 



48 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



W. J. CUDE. Pres. 



J. B. RANSOM, Vice-Pres. 



A. B. RANSOM, Sec'y. 



W. J. Cude Land 4 Lumber Company 



1013-1014 Stahlman Building 
NASHVILLE 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



Poplar, Oak, Chestnut and Gum Lumber 

Mills and Yards at Kimmins, Tenn., Colesburg, Tenn., and Cude, Miss. 



J. B. RANSOM, President. 



A. B. RANSOM, Secy, and Treas. 



JOHN B. RANSOM & COMPANY 



Oak, Ash, Poplar, 
Hickory, Gum, Syca- 
more, Walnut, Cherry, 
Elm, Cedar Posts. 



NASHVILLE, TENN, 



Hardwoods 



Poplar, Gum^ and Lynn 
Siding. Turned Pop- 
lar Columns. Dressed 
Stock, etc. 



Lninbcr of all kinds is being cut every flay at our city and country For material difficult to secure, write us, Wi^ can supply you, if any- 

inills and with stock constantly coming in from many other points, wi- one can. Write for specimen copy of our monthly Stock and Price 

are iiUfly to have supplies nieetintr yoiu" want^. List, Can we place your name on our niailint; INt ? 



J. B. Ransom, Pres. 



A. B. Ransom, Secy. 



R. J. Wilson, Treas. 



NASHVILLE HARDWOOD FLOORING CO. 



-M A N U FA C TURK R S O F 



MARKET PRICE ON 
CAR LOTS. Less than 
car lot orders shipped 

promptly. 



"ACORN BRAND 



99 



OAK AND BEECH FLOORING 



We especially invite in- 
quiries for Flooring, Oak 
and Poplar lumber and 
other Hardwoods in 



nuxeo cars. 



'The Product de Luxe* 



DELIVERED ANYWHERE 



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



J. B. RANSOM, Pres. 



A. B. RANSOM. V. Pies. W. A. RANSOM, Seo. arvd Mgr. C. R., RANSOM, Treas. 



GAYOSO LUMBER COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 



Hardwood Lumber and Wagon Stock 

MEMPHIS. TENNESSEE 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



49 



ST. LOUIS 

LARGEST OF ALU HARDWOOD MARKETS 



Vestal Lumber & Mfg^Co. 

Manufacturers and Wholesalers 
of all kinds ot 

HARDWOODS 



BEVELED SIDING A SPECIALTY. 
UNSURPASSED FACILITIES 
FOR DELIVERING. 



Knoxville 
Tennessee 



Garetson=Greason Lumber Co. 

J2t2-J3-I4 Times Building 
ST. LOUIS 

MANUFACTURERS 



-Shipments of Pliio and Quartered Oak, Ash, Cypress and Gum 
Lumber direct from our own mills in straight or mixed carloads. 



STEELE & HIBBARD LUMBER CO. 

NortK BrodLdway and Dock Streets 
Wholesale Manufacturers, Dealers and Shippers 

ASH, CYPRESS, MAHOGANY, OAK, POPLAR, 6,c 

Mills: Yazoo City. Miss.; McGreKor. Ark.; England, Ark. ; 
Dermott. Arl;. O'Hara, La.; Dexter, Mo. 



Wanted-to Buy or Contract for future Delivery 

SOO.OOO to 1.000,000 ft. Poplar, all grades 
SOO.OOO to 1,000,000 ft. Cypress, all grades 
500,000 to 1,000,000 ft. Ash, all grades 

Fn^teTt'^'n' PLUMMER LUMBER CO. ITs^Sfel! 



American Hardwood Lumber Co. 

14,000,000 ft. Hardwood Lumber 

YARDS AT BENTON, ARK,, NEW ORLEANS, LA., ST, LOUIS, MO,, 
DICKSON, TENN. 



MASSENGALE LUMBER CO., ST. LOUIS 

Manufacturers and dealers in 

HARDWOODS 

in the market to buy and sell OAK, POPLAR, ASH, CYPRESS 
Large stock dry lumber always on hand 



CHAS. I 



Carry a complete stock of Hardwood and are 

constantly in the market to purchase 

large blocks of stock for cash. Are 

also the largest manufacturers of 

the famous St. Francis 

Basin Red Gum. 

General Offices: 148 Carroll Street 



W. R. CHIVVIS. 



Lesperance Street and Iron 
Mountain Railroad. 

WHOLESALE HARDWOODS 

BLACK WALNUT LUMBER MY SPECIALTY. Always in the market to buy 
Walnut and Cherry Lumber. Pay spot cash and take up at shipping 
point when amounts justify. 



rry an Ad it 
in Our 



Want and For Sale" Columns 

others are Securing Results 
Why Not You? 

Hardwood Record 





W^^^/, 



MANUFACTURERS OF STANDARD SIZE 

WAGON FELLOES AND WAGON STOCK 

Send your requirements and receive price. COLUJVlljUb, JVllob. 



so 


HARDWOOD RECORD 






F^ I 'T^ T* c r^ f T r> 4'^ 


t-'ll l^|-^UKO 


HARDWOOD DISTRIBUTING CENTER OF PENNSYLVANIA 



The Nicola Lumber 
Company 



One million feet 4-4 Bay Poplar. 
Can be shipped log run, or sold 
on grade. Bone dry ; band 
sawed. Send your inquiries. 



OAK FLOORING 

PLAIN AND QUARTERED 
RED AND WHITE 

Ample stock, insuring quick service. 

Mixed cars with hardwoods or worked poplar. 

Can't we have your inquiries? 

Linehan Lumber Co. 



•2423 Farmer's Bank Bldg. 



PITTSBURG, PENN. 



A* M* Turner 
Lumber Company 



Everything in lumber. We buy hardwoods 
as well as sell them. If you have anything 
to offer, please submit same to us. s • 



Hardwoods a Specialty 



FOR SALE 



POPLAR 

12S.000'4,4 Is and 2s 
40,000' 4/4 No. 1 Com. 
325,000' 4, 4 No. 2 Com. 
228,000' 4/4 No. 3Com. 
150,000'4/4 Mill Cull 



CHESTNUT 

300,000' 4 4 Sound Wormy 
80.000' 5/4 Sound Wormy 

100,000' 6/4 Sound Wormy 
48,000' 8, 4 Sound Wormy 



PLAIN OAK 

60,000' 4 4 No. \ Com. 
18,000' 4/'4 No. P. Com. 

QUARTERED OAK 
2 cars 4/4 No. 1 Com. 
1 car 4 4 No. 2 Com. 



OAK TIMBERS SAWED TO ORDER. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 

CHEAT RIVER LUMBER COMPANY, Pittsburg, Pcnna. 



Willson Bros. Lumber Co* 



MANUFACTURERS 



WEST VIRGINIA 
HARDWOODS 

FARMERS BANK BLDG. :: PITTSBURG, PA. 



stock: list 

The following list covers the hardwoods we now have on hand. Special 
price f. o. b. cars mill for all one grade. We would be pleased to have 
you favor us with your inquiries and orders. 

4 4 JHaple, No. 1 Common 2 Cars 

54 " " " 2 Cars 

S4 " " '• and Better 59,000 Feet 

6 4 " •' " I Car 

6/4 " Firsts and Seconds 2 Cars 

8 4 " No. 2 Common 2,500 Feet 

10/4 " Firsts and Seconds I Car 

104 " No. 2 Common and Better 71,000 Feet 

12 4 " No. I " 1 ,500 Feet 

12 4 " "2 " l.OOOFeet 

4/4 Bassweod. Log Run m. c. o I car 

8,4 " " " " I car 

DRY STOCK 
Favorable Freight Rates to the East. 

BABCOCK LUMBER CO., Ashtola, Pa. 



COTTONWOOD WANTED 



We want to buy one to five million feet of 
log run Cottonwood. We will send our in- 
spector to take the stock up at the mill and 
pay cash for it as shipped. 

ASH WANTED 

300M feet 6-4, 8-4, 14-4 and 16-4 No. 1 
Common and 1st and 2nds for immediate 
shipment, or to be cut and shipped when dry. 



American Lumber 4 Mfg. Co. 



PITTSBURG. PA. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 


51 




t^ ¥ xr:! ^ 7 r^ i A ivt f^ 




OLLJ^V L^Lr/VrNU 


HARDWOOD DISTRIBUTING CENTE.R OF NORTHERN OHIO 



The 


Robert H. Jenks Lumber 


Company 


44 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, O. 


OFFER.S: 


5 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd Poplar— 7" to 17" 


4 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd Poplar— 18" to 23" 


3 Cars 4/4 Poplar Box Boards— 7" to 12" 


10 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Poplar (Selects in ) 


10 Cars 4/4 No. 2 Common Poplar 


3 Cars 4/4 No. 3 Common Poplar 


2 Cars 5/4 No. 1 Common Poplar (Selects in) 


8 Cars 8/4 No. 1 Common Poplar (Selects in) 


10 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd White Oak 


15 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd Red Oak 


15 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Red Oak 


10 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common White Oak 


10 Cars 4/4 No. 2 Common White Oak 


20 Cars 4/4 Mill Cull Oak 


3 Cars 4/4 Common and Better Chestnut 


1 Car 6/4 Common and Better Chestnut 


4 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Chestnut 


5 Cars 5/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 


5 Cars 6/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 


10 Cars 4/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 


10 Cars 8/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 



SYMBOLS FOR GRADE MARKS 

Adopted by the Hardwood Manufacturers Association of United States 

o 



A 
B 



Panel and Wide No. I 

Wide No. 2 

Box Boards 

FAS or Firsts and 

Seconds 
Saps 



L.\ Selects 
(^ No. 1 Common 
\2^ No. 2 Common 
rS No. 3 Common 
\A No. 4 Common 



Every Manufacturer should stamp the grade on his Lumber. 
Set of 10 Rubber Stamps, \V\"yAM" in size. Pad, Pint of Ink, and 
Spreader, packed for shipment $3.50. 

7VV/\RXIIN & CO. LEWIS DOSTER, Sec'y 

191 S. Clark Si., CHICAGO, or 1535 First Nal. Bank lld£. CHICAGO 



H . FALL 

EXPORTER 
. . . OF . . . 

WALNUT , POPLAR 

=^^^=^^^ AND =:=== 

BIRDSEYE MAPLE LOGS 

Cash paid for Black Walnut Log3 at point oE shipment. If you have 
any walnut lo^s to offer, write me. 

I have some Sycamore, Red OaU. Ash and other hardwood logs which 
I am prepared lo saw to order. Correspondence solicited. 

Can also supply Black Walnut lumber, sawed to any specification 
required. 



PORT CLINTON 



OHIO 



The Martin-Barriss Company 

Importers a.nd iMaLiwifacturers 

MAHOGANY 



a^nd F i n e ' H a.r d wo o ds 



HARDWOODS 

Dry Stock is Scarce 

Mill Shipments are Slow in Coming Forward 



We therefore call attention to stock of upwards 
of SIX MILLION FEET seasoned HARD- 
WOODS we offer for quick shipment from 
Cleveland. WANT TO CLEAN IT OUT 
Are you interested ? 



The Advance Lumber 
Company 

13th Floor, Rockefeller Bldg., CLEVELAND, O. 

Manufacturers and Dealers 
In White Pine, Yellow Pine, Hemlock and Hardwoods 



Hardwood Board Rules 

FOR HARDWOOD LUMBERMEN 




Best Goods, Prompt Shipment 

Send your orders to the HARDWOOD RECORD, 355 Dearborn Street 



52 



HARDWOOD RECORD 





"* 1L ^ t C> ^'"^ ^^^^ 1X.T O ¥ IV. T 


w i^oorsi^irN 


WHERE THE FINEST NORTHERN HARDWOODS GROW 



C. p. CROSBY 

RHINELANDER : : WISCONSIN 

Wholesale Hardwood Lumber 



I wart to sell biich, in No. J common & belter. I have 
4-4, 5-4, 8-4, and 12-4, good ary stock. Mixed Cirs easily 
filled. 

DIFFICULT AND MIXED ORDERS A SPECIALTY 



Vollmar & Below Company 



MARSHFIELD, WISCONSIN 



Basswood, Birch 

and Other Wisconsin Hardwoods 



LET US KNOW WHAT YOU ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 



WR.ITE US FOR QUOTATIONS ON THE FOLLOWING: 



RED BIRCH 



f 300,000 ft. 1 in. No. 1 Common and Better 

' 150,000 ft. H in. No. 1 Common and Better 

'1 125,000 ft. U in. No. 1 Common and Better 

I 100,000 ft. 2 in. No. 1 Common and Better 



PLAIN BIF^CH. 100,000 ft. 1 in. 1st and 2nd Clear. 

HEMLOCK. 200,000 ft. 2 in. No. 3 Hemlock. 100,000 ft. 2x6 and wider No. 3 Hemlock. 

Mason-Donaldson Lumber Company 



Inquiries answered promptl> and 
orders filled without delay. 



RHINELANDER, WIS. 



John R. Davis Lumber Company 

PHILLIPS, WISCONSIN 
The Leading Manufacturers 

Wisconsin Hardwoods 

"SHAKELESS" HEMLOCK and WHITE CEDAR PRODUCTS 

■WK H.WIC THK FINEST IILOCC OF 

4-4 UNSELECTED BIRCH 



ON THE M.^RKET 



Write for our Price Lists 
and Stock Shcett 



Mixed Cars, Even Grades 
Prompt Shipments 




^ 



We have 
to offer 
the 

following 
stock in 
pile at 
Ingram, 
Wis. 




r^m mmoM 




WAUSAV. WIS. 



20,000 ft. 2 in. No. 2 Common Plain Bircli. 

L 24,000 ft. 1 in. First and Second Red Bircli. 

\ll,460 ft. IJ in. First and Second Red Birch. 

4,700 ft. 2 in. First and Second Red Birch. I Vour 

2,144 ft. 1 in. Curly Birch. \ orders 

2,350 ft. IJ. U and 2 inch Curlv Birch. > and 

122.000 ft. 1 in. End Dried White Birch. i Inquiries 

1 44.000 ft. 1 in. Select Pine. I solicited 

7.000 ft. U in. No. 3 Shop and Better Pine. I 

lii.uoo ft. 1* in. Select Pine. 1 

^20,000 ft. li in. No. 1. No. 2 and No 3 Shop. / 

Write us for prices on hemlock. 



We are prepared to furnish mixed carloads 

And solicit your inquiries and orders. At present we are 
offering Red Birch in thicknesses, I" to 2*" common 
and better, also Maple, Birch and one quarter sawed 

RED o/\k: f^looring 

Basswood Ceiling and Siding and Finish, also Molding 

Our hardwood flooring "A. H. L." Brand, is the 
highest grade as to workmanship and quality. 

ARPIN HARDWOOD LUMBER CO. 

GRAND RAPIDS, WISCONSIN 
Saw Mill, Planing Mill and V ard at Atlanta, near Bruce, Wis. on "Soo" Line, 



SAWYER GOODMAN CO. 



MARINETTE, WIS. 



Mixed Cars of Hardwood, Bass- 
wood, White Pine and Hemlock, 
Cedar Shingles and Posts. 



We make a specialty of White Pine Beveled Siding and 
White Pine Finish and Shop and Pattern Lumber 





HARDWOOD RECORD 53 




"V1L ^ W O ^'"^ ^'■^ l^T O 1 T^ T 


w i&c^orN^irsi 




WHERE THE FINEST NORTHERN HARDWOODS GROW 




R. CONNOR CO. 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS 

Wisconsin 
Hardwood 

PINE AND HEM- 
LOCK LUMBER 

Auburndale.Wis..onW.C. K.R. M^irChFipid WlC 

itratfoi<i.Wis.,onC.&N.W.R.R. I'lQI 3111 ICIU, HIS. 



Wisconsin Veneer Co< 

RHINELANDER, WIS. 



Largest and best equipped Veneer 
cutting plant in the country. High- 
grade product from Birch, Maple, 
Htm, Basswood, Ash and other na- 
tive woods. 



Veneers for Door Work a Specialty. 



North Western Lumber Company 

MANUFACTURERS OF BAND-SAWED 

Wisconsin Hardwoods 



CAREFUL GRADINGS — PROMPT SHIPMENTS 



General Offices, EAU CLAIRE. WIS. 



Mills at STANLEY, WIS. 



Frank Carter Co. 



MANUFACTURER 



Wisconsin Hardwood 



SPECIALTY-HARD MAPLE 



MiUs: DURAND 

SPRING VALLEY 
GLEN FLORA 
ELMWOOD 
HILLSDALE 



General Offices : 

MENOMONIE, WIS. 




Do you want a 
7=!oot band mill? 



This is a first-cUss 
machine and will 
give the best of re- 
sults. It is strong, 
well madCf and as 
good as it looks. 
Write us and wc will 
give you full particu- 
lars. 



Phoenix Mfg. Co. 

Eau Claire. Wis. 




The Nash Automatic 
Sander 

FOR ALL ROUND STOCK WORK 

A wonderful labor-saving machine. 

Pays for itself in a short 

time. For particulars 

address 

I M M„oU 842=848 Thirtieth St. 
J. iYl. l>aSn MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Broom, 

Hoe, Rake, 

Fork and 

Shovel 

Handles, 

Chair Stock, 

Dowel Rods, 

Curtain 

Poles, 

Shade 

Rollers, 

WhipStocks, 

Canes, 

Veneered 

Columns, 

Ten Pins, &c. 



54 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



M I C H I Q A N 

FAMOUS FOR HARD MAPLE AND GRE,Y E, L M 



You can't go astray 
when in the market 



IF YOU WRITE THE 



Northern Lumber 
Company 



RUSH CULVER, Pres. 



BIRCH, MICHIGAN 



C We manufacture from our 
own forests, the finest line of 
Northern Hardwoods on the 
market. C. We have the woods, 
the machinery, the experience, 
enabhng us to fill your orders 
right. 




J. S. GOLDIE. 

Cadillac, :: Michigan. 

Low Price on five cars 2f" Clear 

Maple Squares, 17" to 27" long. 

Correspondence Solicited on Michigan 

Lumber, especially White Maple. 



BOYNE CITY LUMBER COMPANY 

BOYNE CITY 

MICHIGAN ROCK MAPLE and other HARDWOODS 



LARGE CAPACITY 



PROMPT SHIPMENTS 



RAIL OR CARGO 



S. L. EASTMAN FLOORING CO. 

SAQINAW BRAND 

MAPLE FLOORING 

SAGINAW, MICH. 



You read this==others 
will, too. They would 
read your ad. Try it. 



W. H. WHITE. Pres. 

JAS. A. WHITE, Vice-Pres. 



W. L. MARTIN, Secy. 

THOS. WHITE, Treas. 



W. H. WHITE COMPANY 

BOYNE CITY. MICHIGAN 

Manufacturers of Hardwood and HemlocK Lumber, Cedar Shingles, 

White RocK Maple Flooring. 



OAK FLOORING 

Thoroughly Kiln Dried. 
Perfectly Manufactured. 
We are located in the best Oak Timber section in the 

United States; have new and modern machinery and 

experienced operators. 
Why should we not be able to furnish the best Oak 

Flooring? 
Write us and we will convince you that we can. 

The INTERNATIONAL HARDWOOD COMPANY 

Catlettsburg, Kentucky 





BIRCH 




WE WANT YOUR ORDERS FOR 


4/4 AND 5 4 COMMON AND BETTER 




A No. I STOCK 


The 


Earle Lumber Company 




SIMMONS, MICHIGAN 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



55 









M 


I 

JS 


C H I 

FOR RED BIRCH 


G 

AND 


A 

BASS 


N 


















F AMOl 


WOOD 







DENNIS & SMITH LUMBER CO. 

Wholesale Hardwood Lumber 

Office and Yards, FOURTH AND HOLDEN AVENUES. 
DETROIT, MICH. 

MILLS AT: Orndorlf, W. Va., Healers W. Va., and Parkersburg, W. Va. 



SAILING, HANSON CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Michigan Hardwoods 



GRAYLING, MICHIGAN 



"Chief Brand" 
Maple Flooring 

Will commend ilselt to you and your trade on 
its merits Lilone. ■[ Comprises ail the features 
desirable in Kood flooring. ^ Madeby the latest, 
most approved machinery methods and best 
skilled labor. •] We believe we can make it to 
your interest to handle our "Chief Brand" and 
will appreciate your inquiries. 

Kerry ^ Hanson Flooring Co. 

GRAYLING. MICHIGAN 



DENNIS BROS. 

GliAXU KAPIUS, MICHIGAX 
Manufacturers of 

National Maple 

AND 

Birch Flooring 

and all kinds of Micliieau liaidwood lumber 



WRITE FOR SPECIAL PRICES 

ON 80m feet S 4 TAMARACK AND 

20.M FEET 4 4 TAMARACK. 



MAIN OFFICE : 

205-209 MICHIGAN TRUST 

BUILDING. 



Evans & Retting Lumber Co. 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 

Hardwood 
Lumber 

RAILROAD TIMBERS, TIES AND SWITCH TIES 

Michigan Trust Building Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Hackley-Phelps-Bonnell Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Northern and Southern 

Hardwood Lumber 



Main Olfice, Michigaa Truil Campanr Building 

GRAND RAPIDS : . . . MICHIGAN 




OUR SLOW METHOD «',*>£,?-s??lJIg 

I X L POLISHED 

ROCK MAPLE FLOORING 

Enables us to offer you an e.xcellent and superior piuducl — 
One which has stood the test 20 years. 

WRITE TODAY FOR PRICES AND BOOKLET 

Wisconsin Land ^ Lumber Co. 

Hermansville, Michigan 



56 HARDWOOD RECORD 




i"^* ¥ IV T /'"* ¥ 1X.T 1X.T A 'TT* ¥ 


wIINCIININA 1 1 


THE. GATEWAY OF THE SOUTH 



The Stearns Company 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Northern and Southern 

HARDWOODS 



Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Cincinnati, 0. 



Cash buyers for stock in our line. 

Cincinnati Hardwood Lumber Co. 

GKST AND SUMMER STREETS 

Wholesalers Mahogany, Thin Lumber, Veneers 

Finely tigiired quarter sawed oak veneers- a specialty. 



THE HOUSE OF STOINE 

The One of Good Grades 
Poplar, Oak, Chestnut Cottonwood, Ash, Basswood and Gum 

T. B. STOINE UUiVlBER CO. 

CINCINNATI. OHIO 



The Stewart=Roy Lumber Co. 



Selling Agents 
for 
Product of 

ROY 

LUMBER 

CO. 



CINCINNATI 



V,ocs 




Will Buy 

OAK, ASH, 

POPLAR, 

CHESTNUT, 

BASSWOOD 

All Grades and 
Thicknesses 



CYPRESS LUMBER CO, 

Manufacturer of Hardwoods and Cypress 

S'lain and Quartered White and Red Oak, Yellow Poplar, 
Yellow Pine, Walnut, etc. Mills in Teun., Ala. and Va. 

OFriCE AND YARDS. GEST AND DALTON AVE.. CINCINNATI, OHIO» 



THE GENERAL LUMBER COMPANY 

HARDWOODS 



HEMLOCK YELLOW PINE 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 



C. CRANE & COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS 



Poplar, Oak, Ash, Chestnut, Sycamore, 
W. Va. Spruce, Pine and Elm 



YEARLY CAPACITY 100,000,000 FEET 



LONG BILL STUFF A SPECIALTY 



Mills and Yards: CINCINNATI, OHIO 



CRESCENT LUMBER CO. 




Manufacturers of 



Hardwood Lumber 

MARIETTA. O. 



THE 

MALEY, THOMPSON & MOFFETT CO. 



Always in the Market for 

BLACK WALNUT LOGS, 
SELECTED WHITE OAK LOGS, 
LUMBER OF ALL KINDS. 



CINCINNATI, 



OHIO 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



57 



•-^ ¥ IK. T d"^ ¥ T^ T IX. T A ^1"^ ¥ 


c^irNOirNiNA 1 I 


THE. GATEWAY OF THE SOUTH 



WANTED 



POPLAR and GUM 

SEND LIST OF DRY STOCK. WILL CONTRACT FOR 
MILL CUTS. 

KENTUCKY LUMBER. COMPANY 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



«< 



BUY GUM" 

We are in the market to buy- 
Dry Qiim Lumber in any 
quantity, from a single car 
load to a million feet. Will 
take all grades and thick- 
nesses. VVe receive lumber 
at shipping point, pay cash 
and are liberal in im^pection. 




THE FARRIN.KORN 

LUMBER COMPANY 

General Office, Yards. 

Planing MiUa, Dry Kilns, 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Purchasing Office, 

Randolph Building. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Cypress Red Gum Oak 




THE FREIBERG LUMBER CO. 

Manufacturers ol 

Tabasco Mahogany- 
Walnut, Oak 

Poplar, McLean and Findlay Ats. 

CINCINNATI, O. 



IN THE MARKET FOR 



OAK-ASH-POPLAR 

ALL GRADES AND THICKNESSES 

MOWBRAY & ROBINSON 



Offices 
1219 West Sixth Street 



Yards: 
Sixth Street, below Harriet 



L. W. RADINA & COMPANY 

Correspondence Solicited with Buyers and Sellers of All Kinds of 



Wanted for cash — desirable blocks of 1 inch to 4 inch Poplar, all grades, 
Especially IJ^-inch stock, for immediate shipment. 



=CLARK STREET AND OALTON AVENUE= 



PLAIN OAK—BASSWOOD 

Are what we want. All thicknesses and grades. Spot 
cash. Send us list of your offerings with prices. 

DUHLMEIER BROS., CINCINNATI, 0. 



THE WIBORG & HANNA COMPANY 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 



PLAIN 
AND 

QUARTER 
SAWED 




CHESTNUT ! 

POPLAR ! 

GUM AND J 

CYPRESS ! 



Fiooring, Siding, Ceiling, Base, Case and Molding. Rough, Dressed and Re-sawed. Mixed Carloads. 



W. H. Dawkins Lumber Co. 

Manufacturers of Band Sawed 

Yellow Poplar 

ASHLAND, KY. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 





J ¥ 


N O I 

ERE THE, BEST 1 


A ^ T A 


I 


ANA 


WH 


iARDWOODS GROW 



Three Mills in Indiana 

FORT WAYNE INDIANAPOLIS LAFAYETTE 

Biggest Band Mill in the State 
Long Timbers up to Sixty Feet 

HARDWOOD SPECIALTIES 
Everything from Toothpicks to Timbers 

Perrine=Armstrong Co. 



FOIIT WAYNE 



INDIANA 



J. V. Stimson 



ALL KINDS OF 



HARDWOOD LUMBER 

MANUFACTORED 

HUNTINGBURG, IND. 



C. I. Hoyt 4 Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OP 



Quartered and Plain Oak^ Poplar^ 
Ash and Chestnut 

Offer a few cars 4 4 and 6 4 Plain Oak to move quick 
PEKIN, INDIANA 



Young 4 Cutsinger 



MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS 



OUR SPECIALTY 



Fine Figured Quartered Oak 

E VA N S V I L L E, INDIANA 



D'Heur 4 Swain Lumber 
Company 

MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Quartered Oak and Sycamore 

SEYMOUR, IND. 



ALWAYS IN THE MARKET 

For choice lots of hardwoods. 
Walnut our specialty. 
Inspection at Mill Points. 

The Walnut Lumber Company 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



Alay Stock: List 

12,000 f(. 1 in. No. 2 Common Walnut 

50,000 " 2 " Common and Better Plain White Oak 

50,000 " 6=4 " " " " Red 

50,000 " 5=4 
100,000 " 4=4 

15,000 " 6=4 and 8=4 Cherry Culls 
100,000 •• 4=4 No. 2 Common and Better Red Gum 

10,000 " 4=4 1st and 2nd Plalh Red Oak 

10,000 " 4=4 1st and 2nd Ash 
100,000 " 5=4 to 2 in. Shop and Better Cypress 

Long=Knight Lumber Co. 

INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 






A floor to adore 

For thirty-three years Wilce's Hardwood Floor- 
int,' has hecn among the foremost on the market 
ant] Ik.'( aiise it stands today "unequaled" is the 
ttfsl evidence that its manufacturer has kept 
abreast of modern methods and the advanced de- 
iniuids ot the trade. To convince yourself of the 
aliove statements, try our polished surface floor- 
inj,'. tonuued and Erooved, hollow backed, with 
niaiched ends and holes for blind nailing — you'll 
htul it reduces the expense of laying and polishing. 
Our Bookld (eUs alt about Hardwood Fiooritiff and 
//(■?(/ to ill) I' for it — aho prices—and isfrrc. 

The T. Wilce Company 

22nd and Throop Sts. CHICAGO, ILL, 






HARDWOOD RECORD 



5^ 



BUFFALO 

THE GREAT WHOLESALE LUNrBE,R CENTER OF THE EAST 




Manufacturers and 
Dealers m 

Ash 

White and Brown 

Basswood 
Birch 

Red and White 

Butternut 

Cherry 

Chestnut 

Cottonwood 

Cypress 

Elm 

Soft and Rock 

Gum 

Red and Tupelo 

Hickory 
Maple 

Hard and Soft 

Red Oak 

Plain and Quartered 

White Oak 

Plain and Quartered 

Black Walnut 
White Wood 

Poplar 




BUFFALO HARDWOOD LUMBER CO, 

We want to buy for cash : 

Oak. Ash and other Hardwoods, all grades and thicknesses. 
Will receive and inspect stock at shipping point. 
P. O. Box 312. MEMPHIS. TENN. 940 SENECA STREET. 



EMPIRE LUMBER COMPANY 



Our specialties are PLAIN »nd QUARTERED OAK and ASH. 

1142 SENECA STREET. 



G, ELIAS & BROTHER 

BUY AND CARRY LARGE QUANTITIES OF ALL KINDS OF HARDWOODS 

^^^^_^^_^^^^^ 955 TO 1015 ELK STREET 



HUGH McLEAN LUMBER COMPANY 

Specialty: INDIANA WHITE OAK 



940 ELK STREET 



ANTHONY MILLER 

HARDWOODS OF ALL KINDS 



893 EAGLE STREET 



SCATCHERD & SON 



HARDWOODS ONLY 

Yard, 1555 SENECA STREET Office. 886 ELLICOTT SQUARE 



STANDARD HARDWOOD LUMBER CO, 

OAK, ASH AND CHESTNUT 



1075 CLINTON STREET 



L N. STEWART & BROTHER 

Specialties: CHERRY AND OAK 



892 ELK STREET 



T, SULLIVAN & COMPANY 

Specialties: BROWN ASH, BIRCH, PACIFIC COAST FIR AND SPRUCE 

50 ARTHUR STREET 



ORSON E. YEAGER 

Specialtie*: OAK, ASH AND POPLAR 



932 ELK STREET 



BEYER, KNOX & COMPANY 



ALL KINDS OF HARDWOODS 

office and Yards, 69 LEROY AVENUE 



W T A MANUFACTURERS OLD-FASHIONED 

Vsinssinty soft yellow 

POPLAR 

Kitchen cw 



5-8 AND 4-4 

IN WIDE STOCK. 

SPECIALTY 



Ashland* Kentucky 



Company 



Three States Lumber Co. 

• OFFERS 

1 00,000 feet 5-4 Fir^s and Seconds Cottonwood 
1 00,000 feet 1 3" to 1 7" Box Boards Cottonwood 

Prompt Shipment Memphis, Tennessee 

Lamb -Fish Lumber Co. 

SUCCESSORS TO LAMB HARDWOOD LUMBER COMPANY, BACON-NOLAN-HARDWOOD COMPANY GUIRL-STOVER LUMBER COMPANY 



MaLnufa.c- 
turers 



OAK, ASH, COTTONWOOD, GUM 
AND CYPRESS 

MAIN OFFICE: 720 MEMPHIS TRUST BUILDING. MEMPHIS. TENN. 
_.- _. « ««.«« i Memphis, Tervn. /\ rs • 1j* ( Well MsLnufactureJ Stock 

Three Band Mills ch^-cy m^ Our Specialties Good Grades 

* *■* ^^ «*••»•*• » »asw I siover. M'ss. "^ ( Prompt Shipments 



YELLOW POPLAR 



iWANUFACTURERS 

BAND SAWED 
POPLAR 
LUMBER 



DRY 



ALL GRADES 

5.8, 4-4, 5 4,6 4, 8 4, 10-4, 12-4,16 4 

Bevel Siding, Lath & Squares 

SPECIALTY, WIDE STOCK 



Coal Crove, Ohio, U, S. A. 




floMwoi RooJM 



Twelfth Year. I 
SemlTDonthly. f 



•^ CHICAGO. MAY 25, 1907. 



f Subscription C2 
ISIngle " " 



Copies, 10 Cents. 



1 



ROSS LUMBER COMPANY 



The Cherry People 



ANYTHING IN CHERRY? 



Write Us. 



JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 




ufactnred and treated forev 
tccjSrdaoce with methods devel<i 
|iwentj'-gve years' experience, >| 



HIMMEII 




"A GOOD THING" 

The Policy Holders say so and they ought to know. ' Perhaps the CASH DIVIDEND of 35% they 

now receive has something to do with it. 
Don't guess. Get in touch with — 

The Lumber Mutual Fire Insurance Company 



141 MILK STREET. 



OF BOSTON. MASS. 



The Davidson-Benedict Company 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 
Everything in 

Southern Hardwoods 



POPLAR, CHESTNUT, ASH, OAK 

(PUinand Quartered.) Straight or Mixed Cars. 



DRESSED POPLAR ANY YOU GET WHAT YOU BUY FROM 
ZTf-,, .Z.,, ^r^J^,-^ US. ASK FOR OUR DELIVERED 

WAY YOU WANT IT. prices, any railroad point. 



THE ATLANTIC LUMBER CO. 

2 Kilby St., BOSTONS 

Would like to talk to you about their large stock of 
Plain and Quartered 

\A/HITE OAK 

TENNESSEE RED CEDAR. THIN POPLAR AND POPLAR SIDING 



ASK US WHAT WE CAN DO FOR YOU. 



Lu m b e r I n s u ra n c e C m p a n y of New York 
Adirondack Fire Insurance Company 
Toledo Fire ^ Marine Insurance Company 



Combined Assets Over $1.000,000 

Specialists in Lumber Insurance 



FOR LINES AND R.\TES ADDRESS 



Lumber Insurers' General Agency, 



84-88 Williams St., 
New Yorl< City 



ADVERTISERS' CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY FOLLOWS WANT AND FOR SALE ADVERTISING SECTION. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



I #^^ iTic^x/ii I rr 


LUUI&VIL^L^Lj!* 


" ■ MANUFACTURING AND DISTKIBUTINO CENTER OF KENTUCKY 



Dry Stock w. P. BrowR & SoRS Lumber Co. 



PLAIN RED OAK. 
85,000' 1" l8t & 2na. 
25.000' Hi" 1st & 2d. 
•49,000' I%- l«t 4 2d. 
67.000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
18,000' 2%' 1st & 2d. 
16.000' 3" 1st & 2d. 
131,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
84,000' 114" No. 1 Com. 
44,000' IV," No. 1 Com. 
47,000' 2" No. 1 Coni. 
8.000' 2W' No. 1 Com. 
18,000' 3' No. 1 Com. 

QUAETXHED RED OAK. 
ID.OOO' 1" Ist & 2d. 



14,000' 1%" Ist & 2d. 

5.000' 2" l8t & 2d. 
15,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 

7,000' 1%- No. 1 Com. 
13,000' 2- No. 1 Com. 

PLAIN WHITE OAK. 

80,000' 1" 1st & 2a. 
28,000' IVi" Ist & 2d. 
12,000' 1%" Ist & 2d. 
42,000' 2" Ist & 2d. 
23,800' 2W" 1st & 2d. 
18,000' 3" Ist & 2d, 
227,000' 1" No, 1 Com. 
00,000' IVi" No, 1 Com. 
80.000' 1V4" No. 1 Com. 



50.000' 2- No. I Com. 
17.000' 2%" No. 1 Com. 
22,000' 3" No. 1 Com. 

QUARTERED WHITE OAK. 

60.000' 1" 1st & 2d. 
28,000' 1 14" 1st & 2d. 
45,000' IVi" l8t & 2d. 
49,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
19,000' 2%" Ist & 2d. 
18,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
30,000' IVi" No. 1 Com. 
40,000' 1%" No. 1 Com. 
22.000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
10.000' 3" No. 1 Com. 



ASH. 

9,000' 1" 1st & 2d. 
65.000' 1%- Ist & 2d. 
16.000' 1%- 1st & 2d. 
10.000' 2" Ist & 2d. 

8.000' 2%" 1st & 2d. 
14,000' 3" Ist & 2d. 

6,000' 4" 1st & 2d. 

4.000' H4" No. 1 Com. 
16,000' 114- No. 1 Com. 

8,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 

POPLAR. 
12,000' 1- 1st & 2d. 



• 1 


^©••^•nJsviUcKy. 


12.000' 


IVt" Ist A 2d. 


11.000' 


IV," 1st & 2d. 


12,000' 


2" 1st A 2d. 


10,000' 


2V," 1st A 2d. 


10,000' 


3" 1st A 2d. 


80,000' 


1" No. 1 Com. 


28,000" 


IVi" No. 1 Com. 


10,000' 


IV," No. 1 Com. 


10,000' 


2- No. 1 Com. 


15,000' 


1- 18" & up 1st A 2d. 


8,000' 


2" 18- & up 1st A 2d. 


6,000' 


2" 24" & up Ist & 2d. 


4,000' 


IH" 18' A up 1st A 2d. 


3.000' 


IV," 24" A up Ist 4 2d. 



All thlckaesses in cull poplar, ash, chestnut. 



Your Inquiries will be appreciated. 



Prompt delivery guaranteed 



McLean -Davis Lumber Co. 



Successors to 



Hugh McLean Lumber Co., Highland Park, Ky. 
Edward L. Davis Lumber Co., Louisville, Ky. 
Berry -Davis Saw Mill Co., Louisville, Ky. 



Manufacturers and Dealers in 



Hardwood Lumber 



Daily Capadty: 
80,000 feet. 



Sales Offices: 
Louisville, Ky. 



Wood-Mosaic Flooring and Lumber Co. 



ALL KINDS OF 



Hardwood Lumber 
and Sawn Veneers 

NEW ALBANY, INDIANA 



Rochester, N. Y. i 
Louisville. Ky. J- Factories. 
New Albany, Ind. ) 



Good Grades 
Prompt Shipments 
Inquiries Solicited 



OAK AND GUM SALE 



150M 
oOOiM 

2oo:\i 

20M 
50M 
lOOM 
•iOM 
.50M 



feet 4-4 in, 
feet 4-4 in. 
feet 4-4 in. 
feet 5-4 in 
feet 6-4 in 
feet 4-4 in, 
feet 5-4 in 
feet 4-4 in 
feet 4-4 in 



Gum Box Boards, 13 ft. to 17 ft. 

1 st and 2nd Sap Gum. . 

No. 1 com. vSap Gum. 

No. 1 com. and better Sap Gum. 

No. 1 com. and better Sap Gum. 

No. 1 com. and better Red Gum. 

No. 1 com. Rod Gum. 

1st and 2nd White Oak. 

No. 1 com. White Oak. 



Are you READY to place your con- 
tract tor H.\RDWOODS, Northern 
and Southern, summer and fall delivery? 

G. W. JONES LUMBER CO. 



APPLETON, WIS. 



MI LLS — Wisconsin 
Arkansas 



All Lumbermen, Attention! 

We do what you can't do. 
We measure your stumpage correctly. 
We make your maps correctly. 
Bank references: Asheville, N. C. 

L* A. oCnCnCk ^ LO. Nonh CardltnsL 



OAK FLOORING 

Thoroughly Kiln Dried. 
Perfectly Manufactured. 
We are located in the best Oak Timber section in the 

United States; have new and modern machinery and 

experienced operators. 
Why should we not be able to furnish the best Oak 

Flooring? 
Write us and we will convince you that we can. 

The INTERNATIONAL HARDWOOD COMPANY 

Catlettsburg, Kentucky 



J I 



HARDWOOD RECORD 







CADILLAC 


















CELEBRATED FOR BlOa STANDARD OF QUALITY AND HILL WORK 







■Mitchell's Make— ^ 



DRY vSTOCK LIvST OF 



Michigan Hardwoods 



Cadillac, Mich., May, igoy 



4/4 Birch, No. 2 Common and Better 
4/4 Cherry, No. 2 Common and Better 
4/4 Cherry, No. .3 Common 
4/4 Hard Maple, Lst and 2nds 
10/4 Hard Maple, 1st and 2nds 
4/4 Red Oak, No. 2 Common and Better 
4/4 No. 3 Common Maple and Beech 



13M feet 

4M 

oM 
20M 

3M 
40M 
60M 



MAPLE SPECIALTIES 

We can furnish limited quantities of inch l.sts and 
2nds or Clear Maple lumber selected to widths or 
lengths or both. The lumber is our own manufac- 
ture and air seasoned. 



PLEASE SEND US YOUR INQUIRIES 

Mitchell Brothers Co. 

CADILLAC, MICH. 



The Cadillac Handle Co. 

CADILLAC. MICHIGAN 

Band Sawn 
Michigan Hardwoods 

We solicit Inquiries for : 

4/4 Hard Maple, 1st and 2nds, 10% or less No. 1 Common in it. 

Cut 12 months 
5/4 Maple 1st and 2nds 
5/4 Maple No. 1 and 2 Common 
6/4 Maple 10 in. and over wide, 1st and 2nd with small per cent 

No. 1 Common 



MURPHY & DIQQINS 

Offer all grades of the following special dry stock 

MAPLE— 6/4, 6/4, 8/4, 10/4, 12/4, 14/4, 18/4 
ORAY ELM— 4/4, 12/4 
BASSWOOD— 4/4: 
BIRCH-4/4, e/4 

Our own manufacture. Perfect Mill Work. Uniform Grades. 
LET US nCURE ON YOUR HARDWOOD WANTS, 



Cummer, Digglns & Co. 



=MANUFACTURERS= 



"CUMMER" MAPLE 
AND BEECH FLOORING 



MICHIGAN HARDWOODS 



Good assortment of dry stock on hand ready 
for immediate shipment in Hard Maple, Beech, 
Birch, Soft Elm and Cherry. 



SEND US A LIST OF YOUR REQUIREMENTS. 



DRY STOCK 



Northern Michigan 

Soft Gray Elm 

What our old cork pine was to the regular 
white pine — such is our <Soft Gray Elm to 
ordinary soft elm. Buyers who gladly discrim- 
inate in favor of something better than the or- 
dinary, will be interested. We have 

2 cars 12-4 firsts and seconds. 

Wide, choice stock, our own product, seasoned right, bone dry. 

This stock runs 10 in. and wider, and 50% or 

more 19 inches and wider. 

WRITE US ABOUT IT. 



COBBS&MITCnElL 

(INCORPOfZATED) 

CADILLAC. MICHIGAN 





ttARbWOOi) feECOfefi 




(i\mv ^ 



Cable Address: "Sonderco" Memphis. 



Codes Used: Lumberman's Telecode and ABC 5th Edition 



MANUFACTURERS 



HARDWOOD, QUM, COTTONWOOD AND CYPRESS 

Main Office: Tennessee Trust Building, Memphis, Tenn. 

Offers the following specials : 



10 cars 11 in. No. 1 Com. Quailered White Oal<. 
10 cars 1 in. No. 2 Com. Quartered White Oak. 
10 cars I } in. Is and 2s Quartered Red Oak. 
10 cars 1 h in. Is and 2s Quartered Red Oak. 



10 cars i in. No. I Common Plain Red Oak. 
10 cars 1 J in. Is and 2s Plain Red Oak. 
10 cars 1 in. No. I Common Plain White Oak. 
10 cars li in. No. I Common Plain White Oak. 



Plain and Quarter Sawed White and Red Oak, Elm, Cottonwood, Poplar, Gum, White Ash and 

Cypress. Direct shipments from our own Mills of Lumber from our own Timber our 

Specialty. We manufacture and put in pile 300,000 ft. Hardwood every 24 hours. 



FENN BROS. COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Oak Flooring 

Quai-t^r^d \A/I-iite> Hollov(\/ BacR^d 

Quiai-tei-eci Red End TWatched 

F»Ieiin \A/hite F»oUsh»cl 

Plain Red Bored 

Offices a.r\d Plai.rvt : 

Kansas and Mallory Ave., New South Memphis. 

(Take South Memphis car to Mallory Ave.) 



Goodlander Robertson 
Lumber Co. 

Hardwood Lumber 

Memphis, jTennessee 

IF IT'S HARD TO GET, WRITE US 



PAEPCKE-LEICHT LUMBER COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



COTTONWOOD 

GUm AIND OTHER HARDWOODS 

Large stocks of well scatoned Lumber always carried at our yards and mills. 



General Offices: MOV. Chicago Ave., CHICAGO. Mills: Cairo, 111., Marked Tree, Ark., Greenville, Miss., Arkansas City, Ark., Blytheville, Ark. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



FULLERTON-POWELL 

Hardwood Lumber Co. 



a 



OFFERS THE FOLLOWING STOCK 
FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 



i 



10 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Plain Red Oak 
2 cars U in. Plain Red Oak Step Plank 

4 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Plain Red Oak, 12 in. and 

wider 
2 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Quartered Red Oak, 10 in. 

5 cars 1 \ in. No. 1 Common Plain White Oak 

1 car 1 in. No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak 

2 cars 2 in. 1st and 2nds Quartered White Oak 

2 cars 2 in. No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak 



BRANCH OFFICES: 

CHICAGO, 1104 Chamber of Commerce 
MEMPHIS. TeMM.,30S Tennessee Trust BIdg. 
MIMHEAPOLIS. MIHH., 30S Lumber Exchange 




3 cars U in. 1st and 2nds Quartered White Oak 

2 cars \h in. No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak 
10 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 10 to 16 ft. 

7 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 12 ft. 
S cars 2 in. 1st and 2nds Sap Gum 
S cars 2 in. No. 1 Common Sap Gum 
1 car 2 in. No. 2 Common Sap Gum 
IS cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Cottonwood, 6 in. and wider 

3 cars 1 in. No. 1 Conmion Cottonwood 



MAIN OFFICES 

South 'Bend, Ind. 



WEST VIRGINIA YELLOW POPLAR 
NORTH CAROLINA CORK WHITE PINE 

AND HARDWOOD 



DRY KILNS AND PLANING MILLS. ALL OUR MILLS RUN THE YEAR ROUND. 
SEND US YOUR INQUIRIES AND ORDERS. 

W.M.Ritter Lumber Co. 



COLUMBUS. OHIO 



Saw and Ship 100,000,000 Feet Yearly 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



R.E. Wood Lumber Company 



41^ Manufacturers of Yellow Poplar, Oak, Chestnut, Hemlock 
and White Pine. 

^ We own our own stumpage and operate our own mills. 
^\ Correspondence solicited and inquiries promptly answered. 



GENERAL OFFICES: 
CONTINENTAL BUILDING. 



Baltimore, Maryland 



Phila. Veneer ^ Lumber Co. 

817 NORTH FIFFH STREET. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



PILED ON OUR KNOXVILLE. TENNESSEE Y.A.RD 

1 car 4/4 l.s and ?s Plain White Oak 

6 cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Plain White Oak 
18 oars 4/4 No. 2 Common Plain White Oak 

2 cars 8/4 No. 1 Common and Better White Oak 
1 car 6/4 Common ai.d Better White Oak 

1 car 5/4 Common -ind Better White Oalv 
i car 8 4 Common and Better White Oak 

2 cars 4 4 No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak 
^ car 4/4 Is and 2s Quartered White Oak 

1 car 4/4 No. 1 Common and Better Quartered Red Oak 

We also manufacture Sawed and Sliced Quartered Oak Veneers. 
Can make prompt shipments. 



Mcllvain's Lumber Notes 

We have 200.000 feel 4-4 (■hoiee dry Guif Cypress, p-aiJy 
to ship. Mostly select and shop jrrades. What do yoii 
want to-day ? 

(.)ak— Red and Whit*— Phun and Qiiartcicd— 3.000.000 
leet in stock. Iwo millions ot this oak of all kinds is dry 
stock. Balance is part dry. Thicknesses. 3 to Ginclies. All 
grades. Bill sizes cut to order. .Send in your retiuisilions. 

White Pine — Dry — a miliion feet — from Uppers and Se- 
lects to Barn Boards and Fencing. We can give you 
anything you want in this lumber. Grades and prices 
satisfactory. Prompt and careful attention given to all 
inquiries and orders. 

J. Gibson Mcllvain & Co. 



56th (o SSth Sts. and W oodland Ave. 



PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



WILLIAM WHITMER (Si> SONS, Inc. 

ALWAYS IN THE MARKET FOR STOCKS OF 
WELL MANUFACTURED 

HARDWOODS 



BRANCHES: 

NEW YORK, BOSTON, PITTSBURG 



MAIN OFFICES: 
GIRARD TRUST BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 



THOMAS FORMAN CO. 

DETROIT, MICH. 

M.\NUFACTURERS OF HIGH GR.\DE 

Maple and Oak Flooring 

We desire to move promptly a large quantity of 

13-16.\1A" Clear Quarter Sawed White Oak Flooring. 
13-16x1 i" Clear Plain Sawed White Oak Flooring. 
13-]6.\U" Clear Plain Sawed Red Oak Flooring. 
13-16xli" Clear Maple Flooring. 

Please write us for special delivered prices on the above lots. 



MAY STOCK LIST 



HARD MAPLE 
1 in. 1,000.000 ft. 
l}in. 100,000 ft. 
li in. 100,000 ft. 

3 in. 50,000 ft. 

4 in. 50,000 ft 



BEECH 
1 in. 100,000 ft. 
BIRCH 
500,000 ft. 



1 in. 
li in. 

2 in. 
2J in. 



100.000 ft. 

100.000 ft. 

50,000 ft. 



BASS WOOD 
1 in. 300,000 ft. 

GRAY ELM 
1 in. 300,000 ft. 
li in. 200,000 ft. 
3 in. 200,000 ft. 



KeUey Lumber & Shingle Co. 



Tra. verse City, Mich. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 





T^ 1.-1 ■"^ r^ A c> nr* 


lilt tA&l 




BOSTON NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA 



W, M. GILLESPIE LUMBER 

HARDWOODS COMPAN I Farmers Bank Bldg. 
Oak a Speciilty PITTSBURGH, PA. 



ALBERT HAAS LUMBER CO. 

BAND SAWED 

OAK AND ASH 

YELLOW POPLAR 

ATLANTA - - - - GEORGIA 



JOHN L. ALCOCK & CO. 

BUYERS OF BLACK WALNUT LOGS 
BOARDS AND PLANKS 



Inspection at point of 
shipment. Spot cash. 



Baltimore, Md. 



(I 



THE BUFFALO MAPLE FLOORING CO. . 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

MICHIGAN ROCK MAPLE AND OAK FLOORING 

BUFFALO, NEW YORK 



The West Florida Hardwood Co. 

MlLi. ON Apalachicola River 
MARYSVILLE, FLA. 

Ash Red and White Oak Red Gum 

Hickory Yellow Cottonwood Tupelo Gum 

LET US HAVE YOUR INQUIRIES = 



BALTIMORE 
M AR Y L A 



KE T? 17 DDTr'ir BUYER AND 
ND H,. [_,. ri\lV>lli EXPORTER OF 

Hardwoods, Poplar and Logs 

I am always in the market for nice lots of dry and well maaufaclured 
lumber. X Inspect at point of shipment. Correspondence solicited. 



Pennsylvania Door & Sash Co. 

HARDWOOD DOORS 
AND INTERIOR FINISH 



NEW YORK 



PITTSBURG 



PHILADELPHIA 



WantCd-DimenSiOn n^k Pla-n and Quartered. 

White and Red. Send for specifications. 

IndiaLiiaL Qxia-rtered Oa^k Co. 

7 Ea.st 42nd Street. New York City 



James & Abbot Company 

Lumber and Timber 

No. 165 MILK ST., BOSTON, MASS., and GULFPORT, MISS. 



JONES HARDWOOD CO. 



INCORPORATED 



WANTS: Poplar, Plain Oak. 147 MILK STREET 

Quartered Oak and Cypress. BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Manufacturers please send slock lists and prices. 



HoUoway Lumber Company 

WHOLESALE HARDWOODS 



In the marlcet for all thicknesses of 
OAK, ASH and CHESTNUT. 



312 Arcade Building, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WM. E. LITCHFIELD 

MASON BUILDING, BOSTON, MASS. 

Specialist in Hardwoods 

Manufacturers are requested to supply lists of stock for sale 



VY/E are long on 8/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut. Send us your in- 
*» quiries. Let us quote you on plain or Quarteied White and 
Red Oak. Look us up. 

SCHOFIELD BROTHERS 



PENNA. BUILDING 



LUMBER 



PHILADELPHIA 



Sales Agents: Long Pole Lumber Co., Case-Fowler Lunaber Co. 



SOBLE BROTHERS Qimne'redHviite 
=:^:z3::^i^i:;:;:zi:iz:^^z^^^ Oak, Poplar. 



MiUs: 

Honaker, Va. 

Birmington, Ala. 

WHOLESALE LUMBER 

Land Title Building = = Philadelphia, Pa. 



WISTAR, UNDERHILL & CO 

PHILADELPHIA 

WHOLESALE HARDWOOD LUMBER 



MICHIGAN WHITE PINE 
TENNESSEE WHITE PINE 



HEMLOCK HARDWOODS 
ALABAMA PINE 



H. 


H 


. MAUS & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS 

HARDWOOD and YELLOW PINE. 

Write us it you wish to buy or sell. 


INC. 


420 Walnut St.. - PHILADELPHIA. PA. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 




■a/li^e\ 





aen^el ^^Mt^mel 




^. 



.^A 



(Tis ^7, c€^3C<ce. t>'Cc£- -t e^-ii J- f^ >«. e; 



( M OAHNELL. PREST. 

e. E. TAENZER, 1ST VICE- Pn EST 



(Cyit:-/t-€^t'C *5c;^<Z^ *;&r 



as^ 



(^ ?y^^.:i~€-£-c 






F C DUPKr. 2nd Vice-P*>EST- 
W S DARNELL. 1reaS' & GeN MCR. 



/. 



^ 



t'^e^.i 



G-^j^ ^^-C -t^x^cJ-C -^ri^t^ CL^.t^^.'l. 



R. M. SMITH 



J H. P. SMITH 



R. M. SMITH m COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WEST VIRGINIA HARDWOODS 

PARKERSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA 

WE CARRY IN STOCK FROM TEN TO FIFTEEN MILLION FEET OF ASH, BEECH, BASSWOOD, CHESTNUT, CHERRY, 

MAPLE, PLAIN & QTD. OAK, POPLAR, WALNUT, &C. OUR PLANING 

MILL FACILITIES ARE UNSURPASSED. 

EASTERN OFFICE; Band Mill: Orndoff, Webster County, W. Va. 

1425-6 LAND TITLE BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA Planing Mill; Heaters, W. Va. 



Quartered Oak Flooring 

Manufactured for 

HIGHEST GLASS of trade only. 

Also Plain Oak, Maple and other Hardwood flooring:. 

The name D WIGHT on flooring is a guarantee of its 

excellence. 
O WIGHT SPECIAL pattern of thin flooring is the 
only suitable thin flooring to lay. Write for Sample. 



DWIGHT LUMBER. COMPANY 

DETR.OIT, MICHIGAN 



H. W. Mosby & Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OP 



COTTONWOOD 

GUM 
ASH, ELM 



Large Stock on Hand 



HELENA, ARKANSAS 



SWANN-DAY LUMBER COMPANY 



CLAY CITY, KENTUCKY 



OFFER 



POPLAR 



Bevel Siding. Drop Siding, as well as Wide Poplar 

Always a Large Stock on Hand Prices are Yours for the Asking 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



D. G. COURTNEY 



MANUFACTURER OF 





Yellow Poplar 
Oak ^ Chestnut 

CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 



Our Timber Holdings are located exclusively in the finest sections of West Virginia 
growth. Modern mills and perfect manufacture. Standard and uniform grades. 

We seek the trade of wood-working factories who want a dependable lumber supply 
and fair treatment. 

Just now we want to move 4/4 No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 Common Oak. 



Cherry River Boom and 



Lumber Co. 



SCRANTON, PENNSY LVA N I A 



SPECIALS: 
4/4 While Oak. No. 1 Common 
4/4 Cherry, Is and 2s 

4/4 Cherry. No. 1 Common 
4 4 Maple, Is and 2s 

4/4 Maple, No. 1 Common 




BAND MILLS: 

RICHWOOD. WEST VIR6IMA 

CAMDEN-ON-OAULEY, WEST VIRGINIA 

HOLCOMB. WEST VIRGINIA 

DAILY CAPACITY. - - 500,000 FEET 







"THE BEST LUMBER" 



lO 




HARDWOOD RECORD 












C H I c A a o 


















THE GREATEST HARDWOOD MARKET IN THE WORLD 







PARK RICHMOND (& 


CO. 


Wholesale 




Hardwood Lumbei 


■ 


926 Monadnock Block 




HARRISON 5165 V^illCagO 





In the Market 

To Buy 

Ash, Hickory, Poplar and Oak Lumber. 
Also Wagon Stock. 

Wanted^ Hardwood Logs for Our Memphis Mill 



RYAN & McPARLAND 

CHICAGO....MEMPHIS 



Chicago Car Lumber Co. 



PULLMAN BUILDING 

CHICAGO 



WE ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 

Poplar, Oak, Ash and Car and R. R. 
Material 



Hayden & Westcott Lumber Co. 

IN MARKET FOR 

POPLAR 

25 M ft. 3 4" Is and 2s, staiidanl wiiltlis aTirl lengths 
30 M It. 1-1,4" Is and 2s, standard widths and length.s 
30 M tt. 1-1/2" Is and 2s. standard widths and lengths 
30 M ft. each 2-1/2 and 4" standard widths and letigths 

ROCK ELM 
200 M ft. 5/4 No. 1 Common and better 
500 M ft. 8/4 No. 1 Common and better 

BLACK ASH 
50 M ft. each 4/4. 5/4 and 6/4 No. 1 common and better 

OAK AND ASH 
100 cars car oak framing 
25 cars white ash from 1" to 4" green or dry Is and 2s 



511 Railway Exchange, 



Chicago 



R. A. WELLS LUMBER CO. I 

Manufacturers of All Kinds of 

HARDWOOD LUMBER 



Fine Quartered Oak a Specialty 

234 LA SALLE STREET 
Yards at Canal and 2 1st Sts. CHICAGO, 



, ILL. 



White Lumber Company 

Dealers in Hardwood Lumber 



ALL p:inds 



Cherry Lumber a 
SpeciaLtty 




ALL GRADES 



Laftin ®. 22d Sts. 
Chicago 



John 


O'Brien Land & Lumber 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IX 

Hardwood Lumber 

Of All Kinds 


Co. 


OFFICE AND YARDS : ^.^ ^ 

873 to 88 1 So. Laflin Street 1 K i /- a rr r» 

MILL PHiLipp MISS ^^ n 1 c a g o 



F. Slimmer ^ Company 

Hardwood 
Lumber 



Office and Yard : 

65 W. Twenty-second St. 



CHICAGO 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



II 







CHICAGO 


















THE GREATEST HARDWOOD MARKET IN THE WORLD 







CHAS. DARLING & CO. 

Southern 
Hardwoods 

22nd Street and Center Avenue - CHICAGO 



CHAS. MILLER 



yVVlLLER BROS. 



MILTON MILLEB 



H/\RD\A/OOD LUAIBER 

Main'Offlce: 20S WILLOUGHBY BLDG. 6 E. MADISON ST. 
'Phone Central 1363 CHICAGO, ILL. 

Yards: Loomis St. S.of 22nd St.. Chicago, 111., Houston Miss., Macon. Misa 



W. A. DAVIS 

SOUTHERN HARDWOODS 

i6i2 Marquette Bldg., CHICAGO 
• Branch Offices : PADUCAH. KY., and MEMPHIS, TENN. 



I ERNEST B. LOMBARD " 



Manvifa-cturer ar\d Wholesale 

Northern a.nd Southern. 
Hardwoods 

Railwa.y Exchange - CHICAGO 



Heath Wit beck Co. 

CHICAGO 

HALLEY, ARK. THEBES. ILL. McEWEN, TENN. 

WE OFFER FOR. QUICK SHIPMENT: 

1 car 1 inch No. 1 Common and Better Soft Elm. 
1 car I inch No. 1 Common Plain Red Oak. 
1 car I inch No. 1 Common Plain White Oak. 
4 cars 6-4 inch 1st and 2nds Quarter Sawed Red Oak. 
Write ns for delivered quotations. 

NUMBER. 6 MADISON STREET 



Estabrook-Skeele 

Lumber Company 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Oak, Ash, Gum, Cottonwood, Wagon 
Stock and Otlier Hardwoods 

In the market for round lots of Hardwood and 
Wagon Stock. Write us before selling. 

Fisher Building, CHICAGO 



R. A. HOOTON 


LUMBER CO. 


FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING | 


POPLAR. OAK 


. CHESTNUT 


PRICES ARE YOURS 


FOR THE ASKING. 





I 


WANT 


TO BUY 1 


4/ 


4 R. E D OAK 
ALL 


AND 4/4 SAP GUM. 
G R. A DE S 


A. 


w. 


WYLIE. 




1101 FISHER BUILDING 
CHICAGO. ILLS. 



McCauley- Saunders Lumber Co* 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 

BAND SAWED DpTi (^VPRTh^^ 

LOUISIANA GULF COAST •IvJ-'-L-' V-i X r JXJJiOkJ 



Products Exclusively 



5i:rir'493o 1703 Fisher Bldg., CHICAGO, ILL. 



The Columbia Hardwood Lumber Co. 



Wholesale and Retail 



Telephone 
NORTH 223 



HARDWOOD LUMBER 



47 Dominick St. 
CHICAGO 



Lesh & Matthews Lumber Co. 

1649-50 MARQUETTE BUII,D1NG 

Are now offering bone dry BIRCH, ROCK ELM. BLACK ASH, etc., Wis- 
consin stock. Also PLAIN AND QU.A^RTERED OAK, POPLAR, etc., 
from our Memphis yard. We are constant buyers. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Just to Remind You 

That we are manufacturers of the celebrated 

Wolverine Brand 
Maple Flooring 

"There Is none better." 

Bored, polished, end and edge matched, lays with every 
joint even. Largest sales in the history of maple 
flooring. May we have your order ? 

BLISS & VAN AUKEN 

SAGINAW W. S., MICH. 



"Ideal" SSRocK Maple Flooring 



is the flooring that is manufactured expressly to supply 
the demand for the best. It is made by modern ma- 
chinery from carefully-selected stock and every pre- 
caution is taken throughout our entire system to 
make it fulfill in every particular its name— "IDEAL" 

Rough or Finished Lumber — All Kinds 

Send us Your Inquiries 

The I. Stephenson Company 

WELLS, MICHIGAN 



"Michigan Maple Flooring 

Our model factory is equipped with the highest 
class tools and appliances made for Flooring 
production. 

We produce oar lumber from the best rock Ma- 
ple area in Michigan and have 20 years' supply. 

Our brand "Michigan" is a guaranty of qual- 
ity. Perfect mill work and excellent grades 
distinguish our Flooring and our prices are 
reasonable. 

WARD BROS., Big Rapids, Mich. 



OAK FLOORING 



Kiln Dried 



Polisiied 



& MFC. CO. 
SA RDIS 
MISS- 



Hollow 
.-^\ Backed 

and 

Bundled 



WE ARE OFFERING 

TIMBER LAND 6% BONDS 

Secured by first mortgage on Southern timber 
lands at less than 50 per cent of their present 
market value. Issued by large, well established, 
responsible lumber companies. Full particu- 
lars will be mailed on request. 

CLARK L. F»OOLE & CO. 

SDCCESSOR3 TO 

H. C. BARROLL ISL CO., Bankers 

First National Bank Building CHICAGO 



THE "FINEST" MAPLE FLOORING 



W. D. YOUNG & CO. 

BAY CITY, MICHIGAN. 

Producers from TREE to TRADE of the high- 
est type of Michigan Forest Products. Large 
stock of Maple Flooring and 15,000,000 feet 
of Hardwoods — 1 to 4 inches thick — on hand. 



Maple, Birch and Beech Lumber 



FIRE INSURANCE 

Specialists on Lumber and 

Lumber Working 

Plants 



Lumber Undcrivritcrs 

HOME OFFICE: 

66 Broadway, New York 



x\ H Neal. I',«t Ireas J. L. Stricklan.l. vi 


e-Prest. W. A. Dolpli, Secv 


V Gen. N(i;r, 


NEAL = 


DOLPH 


LUMBER 


CO. 




Manufacturers Hardwood Lumber 




RANDOLPH BLILDINQ 


MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE || 


WE 


WILL TAKE 


CARE OF YOU 





^ 



For items of Hardwood Stock or Hardwood 
Machinery, you will find it advantageous to 
write our advertisers. Get in touch ! 



Publtahed In the Interest of Hardw^ood Lumber. American Hardwood Forests, Wood Veneer Industry, Hardwood Flooring, 
Hardwood Interior Finish, Wood Chemicals* Saw Mill and Woodw^orKing Machinery. 



Vol. XXIV. 



CHICAGO. May 25. 1907. 



No. 3. 



Published on the 10th and 25th of each month by 

THE HARDWOOD COMPANY 

Henry H. Gibson. President 



OFFICES 
7th Floor, Ellsworth Bldg., 355 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111., U.S.A- 

Telephone Harrison 4960 

TERMS OF ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION 

In the United States, Canada, Philippine Islands and Mexico . . $2.00 

In all other countries in Universal Postal Union ..... 3.00 

Subscriptions are payable in advance, and in default of written orders to the 
contrary are continued at our option. 

Entered at Chicago PostoRice as Second Class Matter. 

Advertisir\g copy must be received five da.vs ir\ a,.dvaLnce of 
publication d&te. Advertlsirvg rates on application. 



General Market Conditions. 

There were no particularly new features in the hardwood situation 
during the last fortnight. While prices are being well maintained, 
there is a slackening of demand in nearly all the trade centers. It is 
thought that speculative building is over for some time, and the 
business of the furniture manufacturers is not as active as it has 
been. These two causes are primarily responsible for a slight let-up 
in the insistent demand for many varieties of woods. 

Oak and poplar, especially wide stock, are still in active call, with 
the good end of Cottonwood a close second. The demand for nearly 
,^ll kinds of hardwoods used in boxes and crates is still heavy, as 
is the call for ash, hickory and all varieties of wagon material. 
Maple, beech and birch are in fair demand. 

Current market conditions are entirely satisfactory owing to the 
fact that there is a manifest shortage in practically every hard- 
wood producing section of the country. The southern and south- 
western districts, owing to bad weather conditions, are fully sixty 
days behind a year ago, and the average stocks north show very 
light assortments at milling points. The season's cut among north- 
ern producers is already entirely sold. 

This apparent settling up and levelling of prices is going to be a 
good thing for the trade. It will not only give it time to catch up 
with business but for thorough adjustment of prices on a basis of 
relative values. On the whole, the situation is decidedly favorable 
and the season will undeniably be a very satisfactory one. 

Flooring factories report a good volume of trade with their plants 
all busy. There seems to be an increasing demand for veneers and 
panels, and the many plants producing this line have their facilities 
fully occupied. There is a heavy call for mahogany and there seems 
to be an increasing home demand for walnut and cherry, owing to 
the immense development in the use of these woods in electrical ap- 
pliances. 

The call for dimension stock of nearly every variety is far in 
excess of tlie capacity of manufacturers to supply. At least ten 
times as much of this material as is now produced could be sold. 



The Lesson and Its Warning. 



^LIBRARY 
N8W YOR 



Luckily, perhaps, the business man, in common with all humanity, 
is prone to forget his past troubles, but surely the wise lumbermaii '*^'^^''' 
will profit by the car shortage experiences he has encountered at 
regular intervals during the last few years, especially during the 
fail and winter of 1906. There is every evidence that there will 
be a manifest shortage in hardwood lumber of all varieties during 
the remainder of 1907, and there is equally good evidence that the 
extremely severe ear famine of last season will be eclipsed during 
the coming fall. Railroad companies cannot begin to keep up their 
freight equipment. Old cars which are about worn out, and those 
already being abandoned, are in excess of the number they are able 
to buy and build at the present time. 

There will surely be less cars to carry lumber and kindred products 
next fall than there were last. The sensible buyer of lumber should 
not fail to anticipate his wants and attempt to .secure his lumber 
supplies for the coming season at a very early date. It requires no 
element of prophecy to see that the men who expect to fill lumber 
requirements from a distance after September 1 are going to get 
their cars at rare intervals for some months following that date. 
Right now, and perhaps for a month or two to come, cars can be 
secured in limited numbers. If lumber can be found today, now is 
the time to buy it and get it shipped. 

Annual National Hardwood Lumber Association. 

As the Hakdwood Record goes to press the annual meeting of the 
National Hardwood Lumber Association at Atlantic City is about 
to close. A telegraphic abstract of the proceedings will De found in 
the news columns of this issue, but rather than delay the publication 
it has been deemed wise to defer the detailed report of this meeting 
until the issue of June 10, at which time a complete account will be 
published, including the portraits of many distinguished members 
of the organization. 



Business Honor and Commercial Failures. 

A review- of the commercial failures that occurred in the L^nited 
States and Canada last year shows that ten per cent of them were 
directly traceable to fraudulent intent on the part of the persons, 
tirms or corporations involved. Directly due to fraud there were 
938 failures, involving losses of more than $21,000,000. Such are 
Bradsfr^i't's figures for 1906, drawn from the great total of 10,624 
failures and an aggregate loss of $137,000,000. The ten other general 
causes for failure, any one of which may have had the elements 
of dishonesty involved, bring home to the reader a realization of 
how widespread is the crime of crookedness in present time busi- 
ness methods. 

In spite of these facts it should be remembered that the last 
fifteen years have witnessed great improvement in the systems of 
the business Vforld and in the conduct of commercial pursuits of 
all kinds. Bookkeeping long ago became an exact science; the 
economies of admiuistration are no longer left to guesswork or re- 
garded as a matter of chance; fixed charges, ratio of depreciation, 
etc., may now be anticipated with almost absolute certainty. The 
modern business man, who is entitled to that name, has ceased to 
guess at cost. He knows it. The one chance element above all 



14 HARDWOODRECORD 

others — the one the business man is perforce still obliged to esti- prime cause of disastrous failures. It is these conditions which point 

mate — is crookedness. These records of failures for one year are significantly to the fact that merely lack of capital furnished nearly 

something to set students of men and affairs to thinking. The pos- one-third of the failures of the year. The disposition of so many 

sible assets represented in last year's failures, which involved $137,- men in business to resort to crooked schemes naturally makes hard- 

000,000, were $68,000,000. In the light of these figures it is not ships for any concern which, liowever honestly struggling, often 

to be wondered at that "honesty is the best policy" has come to finds itself pushed for capital. It is plain that inexperience and 

be regarded as a platitude rather than a worthy axiom. even sharp competition as threatening factors in business are in the 

Noting the eleven ascribed causes for failures in America and con- minority, both as to numbers and aggregate possibility of loss. Only 

sidering only those which have brought loss to innocent investors a little more than five per cent of the year 's failures are due to 

and creditors, students of business methods may make their own de- these causes. Against the average loss from these two causes of 

ductions as to the possible degree of criminality involved. The $2,762 we have the average from all failures standing at $6,510. 

compilation is as follows: A. further analysis will show that of all firms failing ninety-one and 

a half per cent had an alleged capital of $5,000 and under; six 

I-MTED STATES. p^^. ^^^^ ^^^^ ^ capital of between $5,000 and $20,000, and only 

Causes op Failures. failures. Assets. Liabilities. one and seven-tenths per cent employed capital of between $20,000 

Incompetence 2,091 $9,743,680 .$19,057,908 and $50,000. 

Inexperience 457 1,520,516 2,760,234 n jg perhaps something of which to be proud that of the 1,401,085 

Lack of capital 3,370 19,577,813 39,342,384 . ,. ■ i i I j ^- • • i • i u • 

Unwise credits 244 1,381.690 2.652,590 individuals, firms and corporations m recognized commercial busi- 

Failures of others 190 7,068,226 11,196,193 ness in the United States only 9,385 "proved their inability or in- 

Ne^ecT^*""^" "06 955947 l,'855;4sl disposition to pay their debts ' ' in 1906, in the language of Brad- 
Competition 101 253.662 537,470 street's. At the same time it cannot be disputed that among the 

Speciflc conditions 1,623 11,674.844 22,923.002 hundreds of thousands of surviving business enterprises there are 

Speculation 70 1,166,633 4,5(6,(34 ° 

pj,au(j 938 9,389,192 20,574,560 possibly uncounted thousands which are "making good through 

keener manipulations of crooked methods. 
CANADA. 

In view of the foregoing analysis of commercial failures can one 

iTe^erieTcV ............... ■ '*1 2oo!233 '527^620 be at all positive that " honesty is the best (and accepted) policy " 

Lack of capital 626 2,266,775 5.080.214 in the modern business world? 

FriTu^esTf" itle'rs •:::;::::;:: II lllitt lllill Happily it may be stated that this record does not apply specif- 

Extravagance 9 52,175 29,285 ically to the lumber industry. The small record of business failures 

Neglect 41 Jo'U?^ """ii'?!!,'. during 1906 makes an enviable showing for this great commercial 

Competition 9 12,213 27,420 ? ,^ . , . „ , ,.,,,. „, . 

Specific conditions 168 392,766 934,261 pursuit. However, this analysis of general results m all lines of busi- 

Speculation 7 26.600 77,254 ^ess is well worth study by every lumberman that it may prove a 

Fraud 108 182.760 620,334 .^ ^ , • ■ 1 ^i. 4.u 4. i i j 

guide-stone and a warning against the causes that have produced so 

Granting that in almost any of these specific causes for failures many failures in other lines. 

this element of crookedness may have entered, it will be seen that 

the fraud and speculation have been- especially costly, while failures ^^^ QuestiOD of Continued Prosperity. 
attributable to competition and inexperience are particularly light; 

, . , . . . , , „ 1 ■ .»! i li • 1 ! 1 i.1 1 rinancial experts are discussing the question, ' ' Is prosperity 

and the inference is thereiore plain that "irregular ' methods are ^ " ^ _, . ,. 

, , .■,...■.■ ■ . waning?" and they are unable to agree. Jacob H. Schift predicts 
much more dangerous to creditors than is even mcompentence. ^ ■' ° t, , ■■ , , 
. 1 . J! ii ii -1, i J I,- t, 1. , . „ an era of great suffering among the poor. August Belmont told the 
An analysis of. the attributed causes which are most suggestive ot " ..... 
,. , , ,,,.,. „ ., , , ., . ... capitalists and workmgmen at Mr. Carnegie s industrial peace con- 
dishonest methods m business failures makes a striking showing in ^ , , , , . . , , . , ^ 

TT .1 1 c^ 1 • i- 1 T i.1 ■ 1 1,1 ference that we are about to have a halt in industry, which, he 

averages for the United States m particular. In this double „ , , , ,, ,, , . ,, ^ t Vr.,, 

, . ,, ^ Li .L T ^ ii 1- 1 -i-i- ii • • alleged, may not be altogether undesirable. James J. Hill, often 

analysis the assets are subtracted from the liabilities, thus arriving , „ , . . r , , . , , , , -,. , , „ 

accused of being a pessimist, denies that he has predicted a collapse 

at the net average loss: „ . -, , , ^ ,, . , x, •„ ^ , , . m. 1 

Net losses Aveiage n(?t "^ industry, but thinks there will be a slackening. The general 

Xo. of ivom all loss from yjg^ jjjat trade has been going ahead too fast prevails, and that it 

Causes of Failures. tailures. tailures. each cause. . . , ^, . 

„ „„, .„ .^, . „„„ „. ^., w'lU have to slow down to give capital a chance to catch up: Chair- 
Incompetence 2,091 $9,914,228 $4,741 j. .., tt •. j cf ^ 0! , r, t- 1 f • 

Inexperience 457 1,240,718 2,715 man Gary of the United States Steel Corporation and many foreign 

Lacit of capital 3,370 19,764,571 5.865 observers have the same view. 

Unwise credits 244 1,270,900 5,209 t, :, ^^. ^, ^ • t 1 .c • i ■ .ir i- i t 

Failures of others 190 4,127,967 21,668 Based on the theory of periodical financial crises the time has not 

Extravagance 95 387,605 4,080 yet arrived for a great industrial depression. Such disasters over- 
Competition ■ ■. ■. ■. ■. '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 101 283;S08 2;810 ^°°^ ^^^ country in 1819, in 1837, in 1857, in 1873 and in 1893. 

Speciflc conditions 1,623 11,250,158 6,932 The average interval between them was twenty years. Hitherto the 

Speculation 70 3,410,101 47,716 shortest has been sixteen years— that between 1857 and 1873, and the 

1' land 938 ll,18o,192 11,925 

effects of the Civil War furnished ample explanation of the ex- 

lu proportionate net loss it will be seen that speculation, failures ception. On the basis of financial history a long, severe crisis cannot 
of others, and fraud are the three greatest agencies. In "failures naturally be expected until some time between 1909 and 1913. A 
of others" professional men, farmers, stock brokers, real estate mild reaction from prevailing prosperity midway between two great 
dealers, bucket shops, old bankruptcies in process of court settle- panics has usually prevailed. One occurred in 1884, and a correspond- 
ment, etc., have not been considered by Bradstreet's in any way. ing break in the present period of prosperity came in 1903. There- 
in like manner mere failures to succeed, which have not involved fore, according to precedent, "good times" ought to last for some 
loss to others, have no place in these statistics. Here, then, is the years longer. 

clue to the enormous average of $47,716 for the seventy concerns Prosperity in the United States is largely dependent upon the 

which went down through speculation, and of $21,668 for each of the yield of the crops. The Baring panic of 1890 would have brought 

190 failures through failures of others. In each of these cases the the calamitous times of 1893 two years earlier if the disaster had not 

stock broker, the race track, the real estate dealer and the bucket been stayed by the magnificent harvests of 1891. Of vast impor- 

shop pointed the way to that form of crookedness which leaves dis- tance, therefore, in estimating the commercial prospects of the near 

tinctly ' ' fraudulent ' ' failures in inconsiderable quantity. future are the crop prospects. At the present time this outlook is 

Beyond question these figures point to one form of crookedness or decidedly encouraging. The winter wheat acreage is greater than 

another, on the part of those directly or indirectly concerned, as the ever and fine crops are anticipated. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



15 



Pert, Pertinent and Impertinent. 



I dreamed that I dwelt in the Isle of Cracked 
Ice 
In the midst of a lake of champagne; 
Where bloomed the mint julep in meadows 
green 
Amid showers of lithia rain. 
I reclined on a divan of lager beer foam 

With a pillow of froth at my head. 
While the spray from a fountain of spark ■ 
ling gin fizz 
Descended like dew on my bed. 
From faraway mountains of crystalline ice. 
A zephyr, refreshing and cool, 



Reminiscences of Atlantic City. 

Came wafting the incense of sweet muscatel 

That sparkled in many a pool; 
My senses were soothed by the soft, purling 
song 

Of a brooklet of pousse cafe. 
That rippled along over pebbles of snow. 

To a river of absinthe frappe. 
Then, lulled by the music of tinkling glass. 

From the schooners that danced on the 
deep, 
I dreamily sipped a high ball or two 

And languidly floated to sleep. 



And then I awoke in a bed full of rocks, 

With a bolster as hard as a brick; 
A wrench in my neck, a rack in my head 

And a stomach detestably sick. 
With sand in my eyes and grit in my throat 

Where the taste of last evening still clung. 
And felt a bath towel stuffed into my mouth 

Which I afterwards found was my tongue; 
And I groped for the thread of the evening 
before 

In a mystified maze of a brain 
Until a great light burst upon me at last 

"I'm off of the wagon again!" 



Why? 

Few liquors im- 
prove with age — they 
don't get a chance. 

Conversely. 
Don't judge a 
woman 's brain by 

the size of her hat 
or her pompadour! 



JUST A SUGGESTION. 



Sad, but True. 

Most men appreci- 
ate the nonsense of a 
pretty woman far 
more than they do 
the good sense of a . 
homely one. 

Stay Up. 
"Early to bed and 
early to rise — and 
you'll meet no prom- 
inent people," says 
Frank Daniels 



Impossible. 

It is safe to say 
that the French artist 
who claims to have 
painted President 
Eoosevelt "in a rest- 
ful pose" has never 
been at the White 
House. 



The Loafer. 

If a man is a loaf- 
er he has little to 
live for. 



Every Time. 

Find fault with 
your employes and it 
will make them 
faultier. 



To Women. 

Though we scorn and 

flout 'em, 
We can live with but 

not without 'era! 




In view of the ever-recurring inundation of the timber area of the lower Mississippi 
Valley and the consequent interruption of logging enterprises, the Hardwood Record sub- 
mits this drawing as illustrative of a possible way to carry on woods worli the yeeu- through. 



Capacity. 

Some pint bottles 
can hold more than a 
peck o' trouble! 



Making the Best of 
It. 

Many women who 
appear to be content- 
ed are merely re- 
signed. 



Waiting. 
Now that the won- 
derful Spanish heir 
has really arrived, we 
may soon expect a 
cablegram that he 
has said "Goo! " 



Ciuming. 
A man often wins 
out by asking man}- 
questions and an- 
swering nime. 



Suspicious. 
Lots of men are 
suspicious of others 
because they know 
themselves so well. 



The Pace. 

The faster a man 
travels the harder it 
is for him to pay as 
he goes. 

Surely the Worst. 

The worst failure 
of all is not to try. 



Logical. 

Some of us expect 
to find rest in heav- 
en because we feel 
sleepy in church. 

Elusive. 

The slipperiest 
thing in the world is 
the nian who never 
says no. 



Later Advices. 

But Winter wouldn't stay put out— 
The stubborn, tough old chap. 

He ousted Summer, and resumed 
His seat in Spring's soft lap. 



Springless Poetry. 

If you should send a poem 
To the editors on Spring, 

Send evidence to show 'em 
The existence of the thing. 



Helps Some. 
Little spots of powder, 

Little dabs of paint. 
Make a thing look pretty 

When it really ain't. 



i6 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



AMERICAN FOREST TREES. 



Chinquapin Oak. 

Qucicus uciimiiKila — Sai-g. 
This tree has a range of growth from north- 
ern New York, along Lake Champlai° =>"'^ 
the Hudson river westward through southern 
Ontario, and southward into parts of Ne- 
braska and Kansas; on its eastern boundary 
it extends as far south as the JJistriot of Co- 
hnnbia and along the upper Potomac; the 
growth west of the Allegheny moun- 
tains reaches into central Alabama 
and Mississippi, through Arkansas 
and the northern portion of Louisi- 
ana to the eastern part of Indian 
Territory and parts of Texas even 
to the canyons of the Guadaloupe 
mountains, in the extreme western 
part of that state. 

It is known as the chinquapin oiik 
in Massachusetts, Ehode Islaml. 
Pennsylvania, Delaware, North Caro- 
lina, South Carolina, Alabama, Ar- 
kansas, Mississippi, Texas, Missouri. 
Indiana, Nebraska and Kansas; it 
is called chestnut oak in Connecticut. 
Delaware, Alabama, North Carolina, 
Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Ohio, 
Illinois, Michigan, Kansas and Ne- 
braska; pin oak in Kansas and Ar- 
kansas; yellow oak in Illinois, Kan- 
sas, Nebraska and Michigan; scrub 
jak in New York; dwarf chestnut 
aak in Massachusetts, North Cani- 
Jina and Tenessee; shrub oak in Ne- 
braska; white oak in Tennessee; 
rock oak in Arkansas; and yellow 
chestnut oak in several of tliese lo- 
calities. 

This variety should not be con- 
fused with Qiwrcus primis, or the 
true chestnut oak, although it is 
commonly known in so many sections 
of the country by the latter name; 
the names yellow oak, pin oak and 
scrub oak are likewise applied to 
many varieties, so that the only way 
to accurately designate members of 
this great family is to employ their 
botanical name. However, this spe 
cies should always be known as tlie 
chinquapin oak, which is a distinct- 
ive term, and not applied to any 
other variety; it is so designated m 
Indiana, where the tree reaches its 
maximum development. 

The bark of this tree is light gray 
and is broken into thin flakes, sil- 
very-white, sometimes slightly tinted 
with brown; rarely becomes half an incli 
thick. The branclilets are marked with pale 
lentieels. 

The leaves of the chinquapin oak are from 
five to seven inches long, simple and alter- 
nate; they have a taper-pointed apex and 
blunt, wedge-shaped or pointed base; are 
sharply serrate. When unfolding they show 
a bright bronze-green above, tinged with pur- 



FIFTT-TUIKD PAPER. 

pie and are covered underneath with light 
silvery ilow n ; at maturity they become thick 
and firm, showing greenish-yellow on the 
upper surface and silvery-white below, the 
pubescence remaining. The midrib is conspic- 
uous and the veins extending outward to the 
]ioints of the teeth are well-defined. In 
autumn the leaves turn orange and scarlet 
and are very sluiwy. The leaves are narrow. 




TYI'ICAL KOUKST GltdWTlI ClIINQUAl'IX n.\K. INIlIAXA 



liarilly two inches wide, and more nesirly re- 
semble those of the chestnut than do any 
other oak leaves. In their broadest forms 
they are also similar to those of the true 
chestnut oak, although the difference in the 
quality and color of the bark, and of the 
leaves en masse, would prevent either tree 
from being mistaken for the other. They are 
crowded at the ends of the branches and hang 



in such a manner as to show their under sur- 
faces with every touch of breeze. This char- 
acteristic gives the chinquapin oak a peculiar 
effect of constantly shifting color whicli is 
one of its most attractive features and which 
puts the observer in mind of the trembling 
aspen, although the shading and coloring of 
the oak is nuich more striking. 
The staminate-flowers grow in catkins from 
three to four inches long, having a 
light yellow calyx; the pistillate are 
sessile, or grow in short spikes, cov- 
ered with thick white tomentum, and 
have bright red stigmas. In speak- 
ing of these flowers, Lounsljerry 
says: "Those that have paid little 
or no attention to the trees, except- 
ing perhaps to regard them as af- 
fording a gracious and wholesome 
shade, are invariably surprised when 
tlieir interest in them is quickened, 
to see how exquisite are many of 
tlie blossoms with which they are 
hung in the spring. Then it is a 
revelation that the long yellow clus- 
ters, looking like bits of string, 
wliich dangle from this great oak 
are in reality its staminate flowers. 
In this way many of them grow 
.snugly together. The pistillate blos- 
soms are congregated in more com- 
pact clusters and, as in many mo- 
noecious trees, they are located near 
the tips of the lower boughs. From 
the topmost branches the staminate 
ones sway. That their respective po- 
sitions are such is another illustra- 
tion of Nature's theory that noth- 
ing is insignificant. When the 
lu-eezes bend the tree-tops the pollen 
is shaken out, and its natural fall is 
then downward upon the pistillate 
ones wdiich eagerly arrest its flight. " 
The fruit of this tree is a small, 
sessile acorn ; its cup is broad, 
round and thin, with close scales; 
the nut is light brown, and is alxmt 
one-third hidden bj^ the cup ; it is 
sweet and sometimes edible. 

The wood of chinquapin oak is 
lieavy, exceedingly hard, strong and 
close-grained; it is very durable, and 
is largely used in cooperage, for 
wheels, railway ties, fencing, etc. 
The sapwood is thin and light-col- 
ored ; the heartwood much darker. 

In general appearance this tree is 
tall and straight, with narrow head, 
reaching a height of from forty to 160 
feet. It is rare and comparatively local 
through the Atlantic states, being usually 
found on limestone soil. In the Mississippi 
basin, along stony ridges and dry hills, and 
the rocky banks of rivers, it is very abundant, 
as it is also in the rich bottom-lauds. It 
reaches its finest development along the lower 
Wabash river and its tributaries, in the south- 




MAURICE M. WAI 

BURRAI_0, N. Y. 



SUPPLEMENT TO 

HARDWOOD KKOORD 

MAY 25, 1907 



ILLUSTRATING 

BUILDERS OF LUMBER HISTORY^ 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



17 




LEAF AND FKUIT OF CIII.NyUAl'lN <.)AK. 



ern parts of Illinois and Indiana. The ehin- 
<|iuipin oak is a magnificent tree, its hardy 
uprightness and beautiful, ever-shifting foli- 
age making it an ornament to any landscape. 



The large halftone accompanying this 
sketch was made from a picture loaned by 
William H. Freeman, secretary of the Indiana 
State Board of Forestry. 



'Builders of Lumber History. 



NUMBEB XLV. 



Maurice Martin Wall. 
I .Sec portrait sttpplcment.) 

The Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Company of 
Buifalo, N. Y., occupies a position among the 
wholesale hardwood contingent of the United 
States which is second to none — not in point 
of enormity of its plant, size of output, etc., 
but as to its exalted' reputation for correct 
business methods and general high character--, 
in commercial transactions. In the building 
up of this enviable record, Maurice M. Wall, 
secretary and treasurer of the company, has 
been most instrumental. 

Mr. Wall was born at Avon, N. Y., in 1864, 
and is of Irish descent. He received his 
early education in the common schools, and 
with only this equipment, supplemented by 
his own intelligence and what knowledge he 
acquired through reading and observation, he 
entered the business world at the early age of 
eighteen, becoming a bookkeeper for a lumber 
concern in his native town. In addition to 
his work in the office, the young man was re- 
quired to spend about half his time in the 
lumber yard, giving attention to receipts and 
outgoing shipments of lumber. This gave 
him excellent training in the line "which he 
elected to follow as his life work. Mr. Wall 
remained with the firm for about three years, 
or until the business was sold out, when the 
owner removed to Painted Post, taking his 
employee with him. Two years later, in 1887, 
he was taken into the new firm as a partner, 
and it was then called Stanton, Crandall & Co. 

When native timber began to grow scarce 
in that locality, which had previously been of 
considerable importance as a lumber manufac- 
turing center, attention was directed toward 
Buffalo, which was fast becoming a great 
market. The Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Com- 
pany was a small concern which had suffered 
financial reverses, and which was at that time 



ill charge of two eastern banks who were anx- 
ious to unload, its affairs upon a competent 
manager. Mr. Wall was offered the position 
and took hold of the business with a vim and 
ability which soon brought it to the front 
rank of the city's industries. In a year he 
and his brother, James B., purchased the busi- 
ness and operated it as a firm until March, 
1S98, when it was incorporated and organized 
with James B. Wall as president, Thomas H. 
Wall vice president, and M. M. Wall secre- 
tary and treasurer, w-hich are the offices still 
occupied by the three brothers. 

The old institution made a specialty of 
cherry before Mr. Wall took hold of it, and 
he continued along the same line, although 
adding some other varieties of hardwoods to 
the stocks carried. However, his policy has 
always been to confine efforts to a few lines, 
believing that such concentration is better 
business and brings better results. Today the 
company's specialty is oak in all its varieties, 
and it has a sawmill located in Woodruff 
county, Arkansas, which is in the center of a 
fine oak district; it also has a yard in Mem- 
phis, where it carries a large stock of all 
kinds of southern hardwoods. The principal 
yard is at Buffalo, through which many mill- 
ion feet of lumber coming from the South are 
handled; also stock from Michigan, Wiscon- 



sin, Pennsylvania, Canada and other points 
from which hardwoods are obtained. 

The company has just established a new and 
separate department in the shape of a large 
plant. in that city for manufacturing glued-up 
veneer stock. The factory is equipped with 
the most modern machinery and appliances 
known for getting out this class of work, and 
jjlaces the company in position to furnish 
goods of superior quality with promptness. 
The principal output is veneered tops, fronts 
and panels of all woods. The company is par- 
ticularly well equipped for furnishing quar- 
tered oak, mahogany, figured birch and other 
fancy woods, cut to length, jointed and taped 
to required widths, ready for the glue room. 
The quality of glued-up veneered stock that 
this house is now making puts it in the mar- 
ket as one of the large buyers of rotary cut, 
sawn and sliced veneers, wormy chestnut and 
other hardwood lumber. 

In addition to his chief interest — the Buf- 
falo Hardwood Lumber Company — Mr. Wall 
is prominently identified with several other 
business enterprises, among them the Buffalo 
Desk & Table Company, of which he is secre- 
tary and treasurer; the Cutting Furniture 
Company, which he serves in like capacity; 
the Eureka Hardwood Lumber Company, of 
which he is president; he is also a director of 
the Buffalo Maple Flooring Company and sec- 
retary and treasurer of the Plus & Minus 
Desk Company. 

Mr. Wall is prominent in the social as W"ell 
as the business life of the city and is presi- 
dent of the Manufacturers' Club of Buffalo, 
which has a membership of over five hundred 
men — all leading spirits in pushing their city 
forward to its rightful place in the industrial 
^\orld. He has been very prominent in the 
affairs of the National Hardwood Lumber As- 
sociation and was the first inspector general 
of that organization. For two years he spent 
a large portion of his time in organizing the 
Inspection Bureau and it was largely through 
his influence that salaried inspectors were 
placed in charge of inspection and reinspec- 
tion affairs of the association. 

Personally Mr. Wall is the embodiment of 
good nature; he makes friends easily and 
holds them for all time; his sincerity and up- 
rightness and other sterling qualities give him 
universal popularity. He is married and has 
three daughters. It is with no ordinary de- 
gree of pleasure that the Hardwood Record 
takes this opportunity to pay its respects tii 
a man so distinguished both at home and 
abroad. 



Hickory Wheels for J\Iotor Trucks, 



Since the introduction of heavy motor ve- 
hicles for the transportation of freight, 
there has been considerable activity in the 
manufacture of wheels for these carriers. 
The hickory wheel for motor wagons is not 
built like the ordinary wheel. It has to be 
designed for the special service to which it 
is put. The wheel must be small in diameter, 
and quite powerfully constructed, as is 



known. Different woods are used for dif- 
ferent parts of the modern motor wheel by 
some manufacturers, while others employ a 
single wood for all parts. In the English- 
made wheel ash is used for the felloes, elm 
for the hub and oak for the rim. The 
French wheels, on the other hand, are made 
entirely of locust, and a good wheel results. 
Manufacturers in this country use quite a 



i8 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



■wide variety of timbers, but find that hick- 
ory serves as well or better than any other. 
Hence, while we find model motor vehicle 
wheels exhibited as samples in all of the 
shops which are composed of various woods, 
when it comes down to utility strictly hick- 
ory predominates. This article refers briefly 
to the manufacture of the hickory wheel for 
heavy transportation vehicles which are now 
propelled by steam, gasoline, gas or elec- 
trical power. 

The selection of the wood is made from 
that part of the tree below the branches, so 
as to avoid knots and make sure of even 
grain. This valuable portion of the tree is 
then barked and the hickory butts are made. 
These butts are usually about thirty inches 
long, this size being convenient for working. 
They are out down to a size about the shape 
shown in Fig. 1; then comes the riving 
process, which calls for the insertion and 
driving of wood or iron splitting wedges. 
This work is done before the stock passes 
to the manufacturers of the wheels in some 
cases, while in others the stock is obtained 
in the butts, which are halved, quartered 
and split to the sizes required for wheel 
spokes. Or if hubs are to be made, the 
pieces are reduced only to the size required 
for that part of the work. For felloes, still 
another size is needed. 

After the splitting operation is finished, 
the sticks have to be thoroughly aired be- 
fore anything is done with them. They are 
piled in the open air for seasoning. After 
a complete exposure in this way, the pieces 
are piled in a heating chamber, where hot, 
dry air is admitted. A summer-heat ex- 
posure of thirty or more days in a chamber 
like that shown in Fig. 2 thoroughly dries 
the stock. The dryer illustrated is built 
with brick sides and back. The top, bottom 
and door are of sheet metal, coated with 
concrete. One of the splits is shown in 
Fig. 3. 

The turning process, to get the spokes to 
the form shown in Fig. 4, follows. The 
lathe is called into service for this work. 

Machine model turning is employed in 
some shops, while in others the modeling is 
accomplished by hand. The rough sawed 
and split hickory stick is quickly rounded 
off into proper shape in the hands of the 
experienced turner. Then comes the opera- 
tion of buffing, which is done by various 
methods. The sheet metal pattern of boxed 
belt buffer is now used to considerable ex- 
tent. This consists of a belt running in a 
casing, as in Fig. 6. The operator simply 
holds the stick to be treated on the mov- 
ing surface of the speeding belt. The re- 
volving belt, with the usual distribution of 
adamas powder, will fill the pores of the 
wood quite thoroughly. This powdered, 
flint-like stuff gives the wood a smooth 
finish. 

Further seasoning is required, however, 
and once more the sticks go to the drying 
chamber, after which the fine work is put 
in on the spokes. The mortiser shapes the 



keystone base and throats out the neck. 
He trues up the ends and puts on the shoul- 
der, as in Fig. 5. He must shape the bulky 
spoke so that it will look trim in the wheel, 
and at the same time possess the necessary 
strength. It will not do to shave down too 
closely to make the spokes look well at the 
expense of strength, since they are not for 
the light wheels of speedy automobiles, but 
for the slower, heavier, freight-loaded ma- 
chines. Revolving discs are used to make 
the ends true, and insure a uniform fit. 

The manufacture of hubs and felloes forms 
almost another story, so important are the 
details of their construction. The work of 
setting up the wheel begins at the hub, be- 
cause it is necessary that the adjustments 




/- 


/ 






Zg5 


1 


/ 


^ 







^>g^6 



be absolutely exact in every part, although 
the dies may have stamped out everything 
in an apparently uniform manner. There 
are machine-made wheels for heavy automo- 
biles in which the setting-up work is done 
on the'plan of putting it through with speed 



and cheapness. But the best firms do the 
adjusting through trained men who fit each 
identical part in place with care and judg- 
ment. Slight turning off is done here and 
there, while in other places a little building 
up is done in order to get a perfect com- 
bination of fit and balance. Nothing is left 
to chance. Each part of each wheel is han- 
dled and carefully adjusted by an expert. 
The spokes are perfectly fitted into the hub 
of the motor wheel. Numbered spokes are 
used and pressure is applied to force each 
into the place created for it. A hub thus 
fitted is shown in Fig. 7. A band of iron is 
then applied to hold the spokes in place 
while the setting bolts are put through and 
fastened. 

Another delicate piece of work is the fit- 
ting of the felloes to the tongues of the 
spokes. It must be done with great care 
and accuracy and in a manner to avoid 
any future looseness. The parts are forced 
together to avoid play. After the felloes 
are on, the whole wheel has to be trued. 
A skilled workman is given charge of this, 
and when he gets the rim right, the metal 
tire is placed, as in Fig. 8, being first ex- 
panded by heat, and in this condition 
slipped over the rim. When cooling, the rim 
of course contracts, and a proper fit results. 
In Fig. 9 is shown an end view of the fin- 
ished wheel, and in Fig. 10 a side view. 

The usual varnishing and striping puts the 
wheel in order for the market. The interiors 
of the hubs are usually fitted in other shops, 
where the metal sleeves are adjusted, the 
ball-bearing devices introduced, or the hub 
keyed or set-screwed direct to the shaft, 
which is arranged to revolve in journals of 
its own below the bodv of the vehicle. 



Modern HardWood and Cement 
Combinations. 



All workers in hardwoods have noticed the 
increased demand for unique styles of deco- 
ration for the interior of houses. The so- 
called art iwuveau decoration is becoming 
very popular, and the illustrations will give 
an idea of the character of some of this class 
of work. The list of hardwoods selected in- 
cludes nearly all in the category. The deco- 
ration devices include panels, grilles, arches, 
cornices, and all kinds of household furnish- 
ings; and the scope of the work is exceed- 
ingly wide. 

On a recent visit to a well-known manufac- 
turer the writer saw samples of hardwood 
decorative material which had been purposely 
charred for the sake of giving the desired 
burned effect; also some pieces coated with 
emery and others decorated with serial rows 
of tacks. Oddity and originality are con- 
stantlj' sought. Some of the panels are out- 
lined with floral decorations; there are roses 
and lilies and painted figures of Indians and 
of animals; there are imitations of checker 
boards and patterns that seem suitable for 
the dime museum only. Yet these oddities 



are constantly called for and sell at good 
prices, so that manufacturers will continue to 
make them while the demand lasts. 

Many varieties of interior and exterior dec- 
orations and fixtures are made along the lines 
stated to be used in connection with concrete, 
for there is a cement age at hand, as is well 
known. Cement block buildings are going up 
all over the world in considerable numbers. 
Ingenious men combine woodwork for inside 
and outside ornamentation with cement 
blocks. The design shown in Fig. 1 is a 
demonstration of this idea. The wood bracket 
lines the interior surface of the concrete wall 
and ceiling at intervals; on top of the cement 
layer is wood again. 

Furthermore, there are combinations in- 
cluding metal, as in Fig. 2. Cement is placed 
in the tier shown, while the hardwood is next 
to it, below. Then the iron brace is placed 
in position. The object is to show the crude 
concrete and the finished wood and iron 
within the room. Just as the advent of fin- 
ished hardwood beams became an important 
factor in interior building some years ago. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



19 



the combination of rough cement and smooth 
finished surfaces of hardwood form a feature 
at present. Some of the patterns are exceed- 
ingly rich, the fine finish of the wood serving 
to make the design very pleasing to the eye. 
At the same time the presence of metal, con- 
crete or brick work increases the strength. 

One is surprised at the numerous patterns 
in hardwood, cement, stone aud metal which 
may be found in modern building designs. 
In Fig. 3 is shown another type in which 
hardwood is employed. The black represents 



roon coloring matter. The cement in the 
crevices between the stones, combined with 
panels of finished hardwood, made an unusu- 
ally handsome window for the interior of a 
library or music room. 

Manufacturers and designers of this line of 
work say they are receiving liberal orders to 
create novelties in the finishing of artwork 
for studios, arbors, dens, etc. In the latter 
much hardwood grille work is used ; and the 
prevailing style calls for a half door, so that 
the swinging blind is now very popular. 




I . I , I , I . I . I . I . I. ' . 1.1 .1 , '^ I'M : ,!a 



' ' [ ' I ' I ' I ' I ' I ' I I I ' I ' 1 I 




a zig-zag form of hardwood which is set into 
the masonry at the time of building, just as 
plain cement bricks are used. The hardwood 
bricks, so to speak, are stained to the tint 
required. In the selection of the material 
for making this line of work, thoroughly dried 
stock is used, so as to avoid its warping, 
shrinking or expanding. A design in the 
form shown in Fig. 4 is what the workman 
called a ' ' blind window. ' ' Instead of glass 
in the frame there are panels of hardwood. 
The effect is unique. The frame supporting 
the wood panels is of ash and around this 
were cemented cobblestones. They were im- 
pregnated with green and other colors, just 
enough to make an attractive contrast with 
the cement which had been treated with ma- 



Considerable work like that shown in Fig. 5 
is also used. The spaces between the short 
posts are filled with concrete. In Fig. 6, 
rubble stones are used in the panels. They 
can be found on the beaches in various colors 
and are carefully assorted before being placed. 
When the cement dries and hardens the stones 
become fast. 

Cement work is usually done by concrete 
w-orkers, although some of the hardwood arti- 
sans do it themselves. The wooden portion 
of the combination shown in Fig. 7 is repre- 
sented by the jiieces forming the squares. At 
the upper left-hand corner of each square a 
wood block is fitted in. The other portions 
of the squares are packed with small stones 
imbedded in cement. The entire frame is 
fitted into a brick wall. 



Firewood Consumption in France. 



France, particularly the citj' of Paris, 
consumes immense quantities of timber 
every year for fuel. Eegardless of modern 
heating methods, the Parisians still cling 
to the use of wood for cooking and heating. 
Coal is very scarce and high in price, and 
not of the best quality; moreover the 
French people have an eye to the beauti- 
ful, and are loth to give up the glo-sying 
log in the fireplace, which appeals to them 
as much more cheerful and attractive than 
the radiator or register. 

However, consumption has decreased ma- 



terially during the last twenty-five years, as 
statistics show; the average annual burn- 
ing for the first four years of the present 
century for heating purposes alone was 
nearly 9,000,000 cubic feet, which required 
the stumpage on nearly 125,000 acres of 
woodland. The trees cut range in age from 
24 to 25 years, and extensive forests in sev- 
eral parts of France are reserved to meet 
this drain. Some of the provinces are fa- 
mous for their picturesque beauty, of which 
the great forests of beech, oak, chestnut 
and elm form the most attractive feature. 



The trees are never allowed to reach a very 
great age, however, for they are felled as 
soon as large enough for good fuel. In the 
autumn the superintendents go through the 
sections selected for the winter's operations 
and mark the available trees. Cutting be- 
gins in December. The woodsmen build 
rough huts, which they occupy during the 
season. As the trees are cut down they 
are sawed into logs perhaps five feet long 
and piled on carts, wrhich take them to the 
nearest stream, where they are built up into 
great cross-wise piles to await the arrival 
of bu3'ers, who usually come in October, 
after the wood has lain in the heat and sun- 
shine all summer. 

A firewood fair is held at Chateau Chinon 
the first Monday in each November, each 
buyer sending his axmen to brand his spe- 
cial mark on every log which he has pur- 
chased, that he may identify them when 
they arrive at destination after their long 
journe3' down stream. The water courses are 
usually swollen by the fall rains, although 
if not, water is turned into them from ponds 
and reservoirs which are maintained for 
this purpose. One of these ponds, at Set- 
tons, can, if necessary, release about 700,- 
000,000 cubic feet of water into the river 
Cure. When such an operation takes place, 
the banks are lined with men who see that 
the logs start oif with a clean sweep. The 
logs on the Cure are stopped at Clamency 
by a dam, and then it is that men, women 
and children commence work on them, hand- 
ing them from the water, identifying them 
by the owners' marks previously placed 
upon them, and sorting them out for the 
rivermen to form into huge rafts, which 
are then sent forward again, to Paris. Many 
of these rafts contain 7,000 to 8,000 cubic 
feet of lumber. Under good conditions, 
they reach Paris, more than 150 miles away, 
in about twelve days. 

Pine from the shores of the Bay of Bis- 
cay also reaches that city by water, since 
railroad transportation is much too expen- 
sive for the purpose. This lumber, however, 
is loaded upon small vessels, which slowly 
make their way along the coast to the 
mouth of the Seine, and thence up that 
stream to Paris. 

The bakers and restaurant keepers con- 
sume enormous amounts of wood since they 
will not, as a rule, employ coal. It is esti- 
mated that they use 10,500,000 cubic feet of 
pine alone. The public officers of the gov- 
ernment consume immense quantities also; 
the Department of .Justice uses approxi- 
mately 2,000 cubic feet every winter; the 
Department of Instruction 6,000, of the In- 
terior 5,200, of War 10,000, of Finance 10,- 
000. The government's supply is piled in 
great yards along the shores of the river 
Seine. Sawing is done there for both pub- 
lic and private consumers of the wood, the 
government doing its own in the courtyards 
of the public offices each summer, to insure 
a ready winter supply. 



20 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Annual National HardWood Lumber 

Association, 



The tenth annual convention of the Na- 
tional Hardwood Lumber Association opened 
under the most favorable auspices on Thurs- 
day, May 23. at Atlantic City, N. J. The 
weather was bright and clear, though crisp 
for the season; nearly 300 delegates were 
present, representing nearly all the hai'dwood 
manufacturing and consuming sections of the 
United States; and the steel pier proved an 
ideal place for holding such a gathering. 

On Thui'sday at 11 a. m. a reception for 
members and guests was held in the con- 
vention hall at the Pier, and at noon the first 
session was opened with an address of wel- 
come by Mayor Stoy of Atlantic City. Fol- 
lowing it the officers presented reports for 
the past year, which were comprehensive and 
showed the association to be flourishing in 
every department. The secretary reported 
that the membership is now nearly 600, and 
that the finances are in good shape. 




W. II. KUSSB, RE-ELECTED PRESIDENT. 

During the day reports of standing commit- 
tees were heard, and several exceedingly in- 
teresting addresses were given. Earl Palmer 
spoke on "Association Obligations" ; B. C. 
Currie, Jr., on "A School of Inspection"; 
Eobt. W. Higbie on "The Wholesaler; Why 
He is Necessary," and John A. Fox on 
"Rivers and Harbors." 

The Inspection Rules Committee in their 
report recommended the suspensio!i of the 
now famous "Buffalo agreement" and a modi- 
fied set of inspection rules. Action on this 
report was deferred until Friday's session. 
Considerable friendly "electioneering" went 
on among members, the most favored can- 
didates for the oflSce of president being 
Maurice M. Wall of BufEalo and W. H. Russe 
of Memphis, now holding that office. 

In the evening a smoker and entertainment 
for members was held at the Rudolph Grotto, 
while the many ladies who accompanied dele- 
gates were agreeably entertained on the Steel 
Pier. The work of the Committee on Arrange- 
ments was admirably systematized and the 
minutest details for the welfare and amuse- 
ment of guests carried out. 

SECOND DAY'S SESSION. 

The convention reconvened on Friday morning, 
and nearly the entire session was occupied by 
Interesting and earnest discussion of inspection 
matters. By resolution the "Buffalo agreement" 



providing that no cliange in inspection rules be 
made until December, 1908, was suspended. The 
Inspection Rules Committee presented numerous 
amendments to the rules as they now stand, and 
recommended their adoption, to take effect Dec. 
1 next. At the afternoon meeting the report of 
the committee was adopted after three hours' 
discussion, and the presentation of many argu- 
ments for and against it. Its adoption was se- 
cured by a ratio of ninety-three to forty-five 
votes. 

By resolution provision was made for taking 
up the subject of the establishment of an inspec- 
tion school, as suggested in a valuable paper 
presented by B. C. Currie, Jr., the preceding day. 

John M. Woods presented a resolution con- 
demning the daily press for its false allegations 
that the National Hardwood Lumber and other 
associations were fostering a lumber trust ; he 
stated concisely the prime objects of his associa- 
tion, and that its aim was the establishment of 




O. O. 



AGLER, RE-ELECTED FIRST VICE 
PRESIDENT. 



uniform hardwood inspection ; that it formu- 
lated no price agreements and did not attempt to 
curtail the lumber supply. 

A resolution was adopted endorsing the survey 
of the proposed Appalachian forest reserves and 
urging congressional appropriations for their 
establishment ; also for support in the timber 
census work. 

A vote of thanks was tendered the Inspection 
Rules Committee for the strenuous work accom- 
plished, and for the painstaking services it has 
rendered the association. Another expression of 
appreciation was extended to the Entortiiinment 
Committee, which so generously and capably pro- 
vided for the entertainment of delegates and vis- 
itors. 

M. M. Wall spoke in behalf of the Yale school 
for practical lumbering, setting forth its line of 
work and accomplishments, and asked for con- 
tributions. John J. Rumbarger urged members 
to attend the coming big Hoo-Hoo convention, 
and promised them a royal good time. 

Some minor business was transacted, after 
which the election of officers was held, resulting 
in the following choice : 

President, W. H. Russe, Memphis, Tenn. 
First 'N'ice President, O. O. Agler, Chicago. 
Second Vice President, C. E. Lloyd, Jr., Phila- 
delphia. 



Third Vice President, Sam E. Barr, New York. 

Treasurer, Claude Maley, Evansville, Ind. 

New Directors, Theo. Fathauer, Chicago ; Geo. 
W. Stoneman, De Vails Bluff, Ark. ; F. A. Dig- 
gins, Cadillac, Mich. ; G. J. Landeck, Milwaukee, 
Wis. ; J. II. I". Smith, Parkersburg, W. Va. 

The next annual meeting will be held at Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

Tree Planting in Illinois. 

During :t recent field season an extensive 
study of Illinois forest plantations was carried 
on by the forest service. This work covered 
nearly two-thirds of the state, or in all ap- 
proximately 50,000 square miles. The region 
considered was principally north of a line 
drawn through the central part of the state. 
South of this the prairie gives way to natural 
forest land, and though much of it is cleared, 
there has been little tree planting. The re- 
sults of the study are equally applicable to the 
soutliern part of the state, however, as well 
as to pai'ts of Indiana, Missouri and Iowa. 

All variations of soil occur in Illinois from 
deep black prairie loam to pure sand and 
these clianges are frequent and often abrupt. 
On the whole botii climate and soil conditions 
are favorable to tree growth, as is well illus- 
trated by the fact that there are over a hun- 
dred native tree species in the state and a 
number of foreign species which have been 
introduced are thriving. European larch is 
adapted to the well-drained prairie soils and 
in such situations grows well. It will produce 
posts and poles in a short time if closely 
spaced; it is intolerant of many other species, 
liowever, and will not endure mixing with trees 
which grow as fast or faster than it does. A 
plantation set with larch, catalpa and white 
ash showed at the end of twenty-two years, 
but fourteen per cent of survi"^ng larch, al- 
though seventy-one per cent of the aslr trees 
survived and fifty-two of catalpa. Silver ma- 
ple has been more extensively planted in 
Illinois tiian any other species, although its 
rapid growth is about the only point in its 
favor. It is a quick-growing shelter-belt tree 
and good for fuel. Ash usually does well on up- 
land prairie soil, thougli moister situations are 
preferable. It is also principally used as a 
shelter-belt tree, close planted, the necessary 
thinnings furnishnig good poles for farm use. 
The Osage orange grows well everywhere ex- 
cept in the extreme northern part, and will 
succeed where neither catalpa nor larch thrive. 
Burr oak will readily adapt itself to the prairie 
soils throughout the state, but its rate of 
growtli is slow, and there is no particular in- 
ducement to plant it on agricultural land un- 
less for wind-breaks or ornament. 

Black locust was planted extensively in the 
early days, and for a time it thrived; the bor- 
ers appeared, however, and most of the plan- 
tations were cut. The durability of posts 
made of this wood is well understood in Illi- 
nois, where they sell for a high price. It is 
not uncommon to find posts sound after twenty 
years' use, while they have been known to last 
for fortj". Black locust should be planted on 
sandy soil, such as occurs along the Mississippi 
and Illinois rivers. Its growth is rapid, and 
if the situation be right and proper treatment 
given, post size will be reached before the 
damage from borers is serious. The tree is as 
hardy as Osage orange, and will not winter- 
kill; when forest planting on poor land is con- 
templated this species should be considered. 
Cottonwood thrives throughout the state, and 
makes a good shelter-belt. It is planted large- 
ly in towns because of its rapid growth, but 
its habits are not such as should recommend 
it for a street tree. Sugar maple is one of 
the finest shade and ornamental species; it 
grows slowly but reaches great size, presents 
a fine appearance, and lives to an old age. 
It is probably the most popular tree in Illinois 
where these points have to be considered. The 
white elm is also desirable as protection and 
for ornament; it flourishes, as do also hem- 
lock, arbor vitae and bald cypress, slippery 
elm, sycamore and white birch. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



21 



NeWs Miscellany. 



Meeting Executive Board Hardwood Man- 
ufacturers' Association. 

A meetinfr of tlip cxi'ciuivf board of the Hard- 
wood Maniifacturei-s' Association of the I'nited 
States was lield at tlie Grand Hotel, Cincinnati. 
Saturdaj'. May 11. Present at the meeting 
were : J. B. Ransom, president : W. M. Ritter. 
K. M. Carrier, C. M. Crawford. Clinton Crane. 
R. IT. Vansant. Frank F. Fee and Secretary 
Lewis Dostcr. 

Page proofs of the new bool; covering grad- 
ing rules, with the changes authorized at the 
last annual meeting, were submitted. The sec- 
retary supplied information covering the changes 
in the matter of lengths and uniformity of 
wording. On motion it was decided that the 
revised proofs should be submitted to the com- 
mittee before tinal approval. 

The secretary made a report covering the loca- 
tion and work of the inspectors since the last 
meeting, which report was carefully gone over 
and approved. It was decided that a permanent 
inspector should be located in Philadelphia to 
take care of the work in the eastern section of 
the country. This decision was reached after 
the secretary had explained that all sections of 
the country were covered by traveling inspec- 
tors, but those who did the work in the East 
had their headquarters in the central West. 
The location of an inspector at Philadelphia 
was decided upon to enable the association to 
give prompt service to members located in Atlan- 
tic coast cities. 

Tlie secretary suggested the publication of a 
new report on market conditions and changes in 
values on wide poplar, poplar saps, wide cotton- 
wood and ash. A reduction was recommended 
on No. 3 common white oak and on Xo. 2 com- 
mon red oak. The secretary was instructed to 
issue a new list within the next few weeks, if 
conditions warranted 

The report ot the secretary showed that the 
hardwood buyers' guide authorized at the last 
annual meeting would be received from the 
printers in from two to three weeks. He sub- 
mitted specimen pages showing final corrections, 
which were approved. 

A telegram was received from A. F. Specht. 
secretary of the Lumber Manufacturers' Joint 
Committee of Seattle. Wash., asking the associa- 
tion to join the lumber associations of the 
Pacific Northwest in filing a complaint before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission to deter- 
mine the reasonableness of the proposed advance 
in the lumber tarift from Chicago to points in 
the trunk line territory, effective .Tune 1 next, 
and in a Federal Court injunction to stay the 
proposed changes until the reasonableness of 
the tariff was legally determined : and to bear 
the proportionate expense with the other asso- 
ciations. 

Owing to the fact that the territory involved 
was not covered by the association, the execu- 
tive Ixiard did not deem it wise to join in the 
movement, although expressing entire sympathy 
with it. 

A letter from T. Jas. Fernly, secTretary of the 
Affiliated Presidents & Secretaries' Association, 
was read, asking that the president and secre- 
tary of the Hardwood Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion join that organization to assist in further- 
ing the advancement of a one-cent postage 
propaganda throughout the United States. This 
letter was referred to the president and secre- 
tary for action. 

A further portion of the secretary's report 
showed that the membership of the association 
during the first lour months ot its fiscal year 
showed an increase of twenty-nine manufactur- 
ing members, and that he had received many 
applications for membership under the consum- 
ers' list, as authorized at the last annual meet- 
ing, and that he was making arrangements to 



take care of that division of the organization. 

On invitation ot President Ransom, the mem- 
bers of the board adjourned for lunch as his 
guests, at which time representatives of the city 
of Nashville were introduced and urged that the 
secretary's office be moved to that city. 

The secretary reported that reservations had 
been made for some of the delegates and others 
had arranged for their own accommodations at 
the Norfolk meeting of the National Lumber 
Manufacturers' Association. He advised that 
S. B. Anderson had been substituted for W. A. 
Gilchrist as Memphis delegate. 

Resolutions were adopted authorizing the as- 
sistance in the work of unifying methods of 
measurement both in this country and in for- 
eign markets in harmony with the work of the 
New Orleans Lumber Exporters' Association and 
the National Lumber Exporters' Association. 

The secretary was authorized to notify the 
National Association of Box Manufacturers that 
the association was entirely in sympathy with 
it in the movement to work with the Census 
Bureau of the government for the purpose of 
obtaining statistics as to the annual timber 
supply. 

After careful consideration it was decided to 
move the association's headquarters to Nashville 
at such time as the secretary could arrange to 
do so. 

The Exploiter of Memphis. 

Tliere are newspaper correspondents and news- 
paper correspondents. There are some men who 
write for the press that have "a nose for news. " 
and there are others who fail to recognize news 
value in very important happenings. There are 
some correspondents who depend on rewriting 
the usually somewhat unreliable information of 
the daily press for technical trade journals, and 
others who go and dig out the facts accurately 




GEORGE W. FOOSHE, MEMPHIS, TENN. 

and state them succinctly for the papers they 
represent. There are some correspondents who 
impress the public with the get-up-and-get quali- 
ties of the city they represent, while other 
writers leave the impression that their town is 
more dead than alive. 

Probably as thoroughly alive a correspondent 
as there is in the country is George W. Fooshe 
of Memphis, whose portrait adorns this page. 
Mr. Fooshe represents not only the Record, but 
many other trade newspapers throughout the 
country. If one is in Boston he finds Memphis 
exploited : if in New York, there arc columns 



about Memphis in the leading commercial news- 
paper ; the trade press is pregnant with infor- 
mation supplied by George W. Fooshe. Perhaps 
his chief value as a newspaper correspondent 
lies not only in his accuracy of statement hut 
in his ability to know what to keep out of a 
newspaper. He never forwards scandal or hard- 
luck stories ; his news is always clean, forceful 
and convincing. 

Mr. Fooshe represents the leading lumber 
papers, as well as the cotton trade press of the 
country at Memphis. lie has recently become 
allied with the new Robertson-Fooshe Lumber 
Company of that city, and while he will take 
no active part in this enterprise at present, he 
will come in closer touch with the hardwood 
trade and be able to cover the news of the lum- 
ber interests of Memphis with still greater ac- 
curacy. 

The city ot Memphis owes Mr. Fooshe more 
than a debt of gratitude lor the splendid work 
he has accomplished for years in exploiting the 
business interests of that energetic and great 
commercial center, and if the business public ot 
.Memphis did its entire duty by him it would 
acknowledge his services in a substantial way. 



A Novel Sawmill. 

A novelty in the sawmill line ma.v be seen 
at Oshkosh, Wis., on the property ot Buck- 
staft-Edwards Company; it is an electric saw- 
mill, the second of the kind to be put in op- 
ei-ation in that city. The other is used by the 
Oshkosh Logging Tool Company, and both 
mills have been proven successful. The former 
company is a manufacturer of caskets, chairs, 
etc., and during the two weeks or more that 
the mill has been operated, it has "eaten up" 
a good-sized pile of hardwood logs, and has 
fulfilled expectations in its rapid disposal of 
timber, and in its ease of operation. Many 
outside millmen have visited the plant, as it is 
unique to see a mill running in which not a 
particle of steam power is employed, and 
where the familiar sounds of the ordinary saw- 
mill are missing. 

The birch, maple and elm used by the Buok- 
staff-Edwards Company are brought from the 
northern part of the state by rail, unloaded 
from the switch track in the mill yard and 
piled up to a height ot perhaps twenty feet 
by t'ne aid of electric power applied through a 
windlass. A car holding three or four logs is 
pulled up the slip, which is graded at about 
forty-five degrees, to a platform. The power 
for the car comes from an electric winch. 
From the platform the logs are rolled oft to an- 
other platform next the carriage, on which. 
one at a time they are carried back and forth 
past the big band saw. which takes oft a 
plank or long slab at every trip. The rolls and 
the conveyor, as well as the slasher and other 
mechanical appliances about the mill are run 
l>y a 75-horsepower electric motor. Eight men 
are required to operate the plant. Its capa- 
city is 15.000 feet of lumber daily. The power 
is generated in the boiler engine room of tile 
factory, whei'e a steam engine runs the neces- 
sary dynamo. At the mill no attention is re- 
(;uired by the motor except to start and stop 
it. Two men handle the logs on the slip, two 
I'ide the carriage, one acts as head sawyer, 
one takes the boards away from the saw. one 
runs the slasher and one takes the boards 
from the conveyor. The outfit cost about 
$7,000. and is expected to effect considerable 
economy to the users. 



New Memphis Hardwood House. 

There has just been organized at Memphis, 
Tenu.. the Neal-Dolph Lumber Company, with 
a paid-up capital of $75,000. The principals of 
this new house are : W. H. Neal. formerly of 
Greenville, Miss., now residing at Memphis, 
president and treasurer ; J. T. Strickland. 
Greenville, Miss., vice-president and manager 
Greenville plant : Wm. A. Dolpb of Memphis, 



22 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



general manager and secretary. The company's 
offices are located in the Randolph building. 
The corporation takes over the sawmill plant 
formerly owned by the Planters Lumber Com- 
pany at Greenville. Miss., and at an early date 




WILLIAM A. DOLPH, NEAL-DOLPH LUMBER 
COMPANY, MEMPHIS, TENN. 

will commence the manufacture of hardwood 
lumber at that point. This mil! is a modern 
single band hardwood mill, and an ample sup- 
ply of logs for it is assured. The company will 
also be large buyers of hardwood lumber in 
the open market. Mr. Neal of this company 
was formerly president of the Planters Lumber 
Company. J. T. Strickland has been local man- 
ager and sawmill operator for the Chicago- 
Mississippi Land & Lumber Company the past 
year, and formerly was associated with the 
Planters Lumber Company. \V. A. Dolph for 




Collins Company Purchase. 

The Collins Company, wholesaler of lumber 
at Pennsboro, W. Va., has just purchased from 
the Decker Lumber Company a large tract of 
Virginia Umber near Sturgisson, between Mor- 
gantown and Kingwood. The tract comprises 
from 2,500 to 3.000 acres o£ virgin timber 
and is one of the finest in the state. The trans- 
action includes several miles of railroad, two 
sawmills, a hotel, store, and other property. 
Although the exact amount of money involved 
has not been announced, report places it at at 
least $100,000. The company has taken posses- 
sion of operations, with E. M. Bonner as general 
manager and Frank Smith as superintendent. 
The sales department will be conducted through 
the general offices of the Collins Company at 
Pennsboro, W. Va. Creed Collins, C. W. Sprinkle 
and E. M. Bonner are the principals of this 
well-known hardwood house. 



J. L. STRICKLAND. XEAL-DOLPII LUMBER 
COMl'ANY, GREENVILLE, MISS. 

the past seventeen years has been associated 
with I. M. Darnell & Son Company in a confi- 
dential capacity, and has had a very wide expe- 
rience in hardwood affairs. All the members of 
the house are particularly popular in both the 
producing and consuming ends of the market, 
and the success of the new enterprise is assured 
in advance. 



Peruvian Hardwoods. 

A recent report of the development of various 
industries in Peru states that that country 
contains a large amount of valuable hardwoods. 
Many years ago the government, looking toward 
the development of its rich lands along the 
Amazon river, maintained several steamers which 
plied between Para and Iquitos, and which 
brought down lumber to a planing mill which 
was established in the latter city. The plan 
was not successful, however, until 1894, when 
business generally became better, and it was 
placed on a paying basis. It is at present man- 
aged remarkably well, considering its size and 
the kind of machinery in use. The operator has 
a ten-year contract with the government at £13 
per month rental, and in return is given charge 
of the mill ; he assumes all liabilities and 
receives all profits. This contract will expire in 
inOS. The machinery is very ancient, and con- 
sists of two vertical saws, one band saw, tw^o 
circular saws and an eighty horsepower engine. 
The mill when pushed to the utmost can turn 
out 1,800 feet of lumber a day, but the usual 
output is about 900 feet. It is run less than 
half the time, because of poor labor and the 
difficulty in obtaining it, as well as the primitive 
methods used in logging. The desirable timber 
within easy access of Iquitos has been cut and 
the remaining timbers must be floated down the 
river. Laborers will work at lumbering only 
during the dry season, and then cut a very 
meager supply of trees growing near the water's 
edge : when the river rises the logs are allowed 
to float down the stream. 

The best grades of Peruvian lumber are very 
heavy and will not float, so immense rafts are 
made from the poorer kinds, and used for car- 
rying the better stock down to the mill. No 
fine work is turned out, owing to the fact that 
there are only limited facilities and that the 
demand for rough and dimension stock is in 
excess of supply, so that the entire output is 
sold at prices which would average about $180 
per thousand feet. United States money. The 
greater part of the timber is a kind of cedar, 
which is not at all durable, and which splits 
badly ; it is not even desirable for the shooks 
and rough boxes into which it is made as casing 
for the rubber output of that section. 

It is a peculiar fact that the United States, 
with its rapidly decreasing supply of timber, 
furnishes to the countries of the Amazon valley 
many thousand feet of lumber annually, although 
the latter is remarkably rich in virgin forests. 
It is the opinion of Consul Eberhardt of Iquitos 
that there is now no industry in Peru where 
better profits could be made than on a modern 
hardwood saw mill in charge of a practical 
lumberman, providefl the problem of securing 
labor could be solved satisfactorily. The river 
for 400 miles above Iquitos is navigable the year 
round for vessels drawing fourteen feet of water, 
so that it would seem possible lo bring some 
of the handsome Peruvian hardwoods into the 
inited States from the Amazon countries. 



Annual National Lumber Manufacturers' 
Association. 
On Tuesday, May 28, at 11 a. m., the fifth an- 
nual convention of the National Lumber Manu- 
facturers' Association will be called to order in 
the Auditorium on the .lamestown Exposition 
Grounds at Norfolk, Va. Following is the pro- 
gramme wbicli will be presented : 

First Day's Session. 
Roll call of delegates from affiliated associa- 
tions. 

Enrollment of visiting manufacturers. 
Address of welcome by Harry St. George 
Tucker, president of Exposition. 
President's address, William Irvine. 
Secretary's report, George K. Smith. 
Treasurer's report, J. A. Freeman. 
Appointment of committee on credentials. 
Paper, "The Growing Need of Accurate Knowl- 
edge as to the Standing Timber in the United 
States Available for the Slanufacture of Lum* 
her," J. B. White, Kansas City, Mo. 

Paper, "The Lumber Cut of the United States 
in 1900," R, S. Kellogg, Forest Service, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Paper, "Yale Forest School," Henry S, Graves, 
director, New Haven, Conn. 

Paper, "Adjustment of Lumber Fire Losses," 
James M. Hamill. Columbus, O. 
■~ Appointment of committees. 
Cargo conference at 8 p. m. 

Second Day's Skssiox. 
Report of Committee on Credentials. 
Reports of standing committees — Transporta- 
tion, C. I. Millard, chairman. 

Report of Committee on Credit Indemnity, 
Drew Musser, chairman. 

Report of Committee on Endowment of Chair 
of Applied Forestry and Practical Lumbering 
in Tale Forest School, F. £. Weyerhaeuser, 
chairman. 

Report of new committees appointed. 

New business. 

Election of officers. 

Appointment of standing committees. 

Adjournment of convention. 

Meeting of the Board of Governors. 

New East-Bound Freight Rates. 
The proportion of the new schedule of lumber 
freight rates from Chicago east, on tonnage 
originating in the Pacific Northwest and West, 
has been definitely determined upon by freight 
officials. The Hardwood Record is indebted to 
R. L. Clark, general western freight agent of the 
L. S. & M. S. railway, tor the following table 
showing the present and the new rates : 

Chicago to — Present rate. New rate. 

Toledo 9 cents 9 cents 

Detroit 9 cents 9 cents 

Cleveland 10 cents 10 cents 

Pittsburg 12V> cents 15 cents 

Buffalo 12% cents 15 cents 

Cincinnati 10 cents 10 cents 

I'biladelphia 18 cents 23 cents 

Baltimore 17 cents 22 cents 

New Y'ork 20 cents 25 cents 

Boston 22 cents 27 cents 

A Doubtful Remedy. 

In an oak log which was sawed up at Webb's 
Sawmill at Greenfield, Ind., a walnut peg, a foot 
long and one inch in diameter, was found, 
where it had been driven into the heart of the 
log about seventy-five years ago. At the end of 
the peg was wound a long coil of dark brown, 
silky hair, and after investigation a peculiar 
legend was unfolded which, in these days of 
easy divorces, is quite interesting. 

It seems that one of the customs of pioneer 
times, when a man and his wife could not get 
along happily together, was to cut a lock of hair 
from the head of each and wind around a 
walnut pin, which was then driven Into a hole 
bored in some thrifty oak tree. Tradition does 
not state whether the remedy was always effec- 
tive or not. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



23 



New Self-Feed Eip Saw. 

The well-known machinery manufacturing 
house of Cliagrin Falls. Ohio — the Ober Manu- 
facturing Company — has put out a new type of 
self-feed rip saw for ripping boards and plank 
and preparing squares for lathes and other work 
that is usually 
done on saws of 
this class. The 
machine is very 
rigid and is en- 
tirely of iron 
and steel, except 
the table, which 
is made of strips 
of quartersawn 
hardwood which 
are glued and 
dowelled togeth- 
er. The table is 
hinged at one 
end. The saw is 
covered in such 
a manner as to 
fully protect the 
operator against 
injury from sliv- 
ers or pieces 
which may fly 
from the saw. 
This saw guard 
is raised and 
lowered when 
ripping plank of 
different thick- 
nesses by means 
of a hand wheel 
and crank. The 
guide is hinged 
to a hand lever 
within easy 
reach of the 
operator. A scale 
provides for va- 
rying widths of 
stock which it is 
desired to cut. 
The machine rips 

up to 12 inches iu width. The entire machine 
is an admirable specimen of the product of the 
Ober Manufacturing Company and while it is 
illustrated herewith, a complete description and 
price can be obtained from the manufacturers. 



Iron Company, and a director in the United 
States Leather Company. In 1902 Mr. Good- 
year and his associates commenced accumu- 
lating longleaf yellow pine in Louisiana and 
MissLssippi, and their holdings in those states 
now aggregate fiOO.OOO acres. An extensive 




Frank Henry Goodyear. 

On May 13, at the family home in Buffalo, 
N. T., occurred the death of Frank H. Good- 
year, caused by an attack of Bright's disease. 
Kot only was Mr. Goodyear a man of fine 
character and one of the first citizens of 
Buffalo, but he was one of the most promin- 
ent factors in lumber and railroad circles in 
the country. 

Mr. Goodyear was born at Groton, N. T.. 
March 17, 1849. He took up his residence 
at Buffalo in 1871. and although he began 
operations on a small scale, they have multi- 
plied and grown to mammoth proportions. 
He early commenced to purchase hemlock 
and hardwood timber land in northwestern 
Pennsylvania, and organized one corporation 
after another, until he controlled directly or 
indirectly nearly all the available timber in 
that section. In 1887, with his brother, 
Charles W., Mi\ Goodyear organized the firm 
of F. H. & C. W. Goodyear, which in 1902 
was made the Goodyear Lumber Company. 
Their holdings In Pennsylvania produce an 
annual output of more than 200,000,000 feet of 
hemlock and a large quantity of hardwoods. 

Aside from directing lumber interests Mr. 
Goodyear was the promoter of the Buffalo & 
Susquehanna railroad and was interested in 
several minor ones; was president of the Buf- 
falo & Susquehanna Coal & Coke Company, 
vice president of the Buffalo & Susquehanna 
and modern plant is being constructed at 



NEW SELF-FEED RIP SAW MANUFACTURED 
BY OBER MFG. CO., CHAGRIN FALLS, O. 

Bogalusa, La., which will cost $2,500,000. The 
enterprise is called the Great Southern Lum- 
ber Company; Mr. Goodyear was its president. 
The funeral was held on Wednesday, May 
15, at the family home in Buffalo. The ofiices 
of the many Goodyear interests were closed 
during the day; the trains on his railroads 
ceased running, and work was suspended at 
the lumber camps, saw mills and iron plant 
during the hour of the funeral. Interment 
w-as at Forest Lawn. 



Stephenson Captures Toga. 

Lumbermen are mucli pleased over the se- 
lection of Isaac Stephenson, Marinette, Wis., 
to succeed John C. Spooner in the L'nited 
St.ates senate, thus ending the deadlock which 
began nearly five weeks ago. Mr. Stephen- 
son's victory is due to some extent to another 
prominent Wisconsin lumberman. Lieutenant 
Governor R. Connor, of Marshfteld, who 
turned to Mr. Stephenson the votes of two 
assemblymen who had been counted upon to 
support an opposing candidate. Wlien this 
change of front took place the opposition 
moved to make his nomination unanimous. 

Mr. Stephenson is an intimate friend of 
Senator La Follette, who has Deen his warm 
supporter during the campaign, which has 
been made on a platform which is exceeding- 
ly progressive, not to say radical. It has 
declared for thorough revision of tariff sched- 
ules, reducing duties where possible without 
reducing the wages of labor; giving Inter- 
state Commerce Commission power to regu- 
late rates and service and to ascertain the 
true value of railway property, the cost of 
operation and the amount paid therefor: 



legislation compelling the adoption of the best 
known safety appliances and strict regulation 
as to operation of trains; strengthening the 
Sherman anti-trust law and imposing neces- 
sary penalties for control of corporations; 
constitutional amendment for election of 
United States senators by popular vote; fed- 
eral tax on incomes and inheritances; an 
effective child-labor law; legislation prohibit- 
ing sale of public lands containing coal, oil, 
or gas. would lease them; opposition to ship 
subsidy and all forms of government bounty. 
Mr. Stephenson is reputed to be the wealth- 
iest man in Wisconsin, and has made his for- 
tune through prudent investments in timber 
lands. He is interested in several large lum- 
ber operations in Wisconsin and in the I. 
Stephenson Company of Wells, Mich., an im- 
mense proposition. He is seventy-eight years 
old; from 1S66 to- 1SG8 he was a member of 
the Wisconsin legislature and from 1883 to 
1889 a member of Congress. 



Increase in Memphis Lumber Companies. 

It has become almost an axiom in Memphis 
that it is a cold week that does not see the 
organization of one or more new hardwood lum- 
ber concerns. There are well toward one hun- 
dred hardwood houses of various caliber in 
that city at the present time. 

The IIAKDWOOD Record does not want to be- 
tray any unwise advance information, but from 
a memorandum card picked up by a representa- 
live in the foyer of the Gayoso Hotel a few 
days ago. it is probable that official announce- 
ment will soon be made of still another new 
corporation. The card reads : 

THREE OWL LUMBER COMPANY, 

Dealers in 

Quartered Cocoanut in the Round 

and 

Airy Persiflage. 

Specialties : Cocoanut Fur and Milk. 

C. M. Kellogg, Pres. ; Geo. C. Ehemann, V.-Pres. ; 

H. L. Stern, Secy. & Treas. 

The present ostensible occupation of the offi- 
cers of the Three Owl Lumber Company must 
needs be explained for the enlightenment of those 
unfortunate enough not to be acquainted with 
them. Mr. Kellogg is the active man in the 
hardwood house of Barksdale & Kellogg ; Mr. 
Ehemann is the junior partner of Bennett & 
Witte, while Mr. Stern makes a bluff as south- 
ern buyer for the Brunswick-Balke-Collender 
Company of Chicago. The out-of-work head- 
quarters of the bunch is the Gayoso. 



New Hardwood Eules for London. 

It is proposed by the hardwood section of the 
Timber Trades Federation of the United King- 
dom to substitute a set of new rules governing 
hardwoods for those made effective in July, 1902. 
The proposal contemplates the measurement of 
lumber by the American board rule in accord- 
ance with the present rules of the National Hard- 
wood Lumber Association : all lumber should be 
tallied face measure, and all fractions of ?i of 
a foot or more counted to the next higher figure ; 
all fractions less than % of a foot to be counted 
back to the next lower figure. Standard lengths 
are specified as 6, S, 10, 12, 14 and 16 feet, 
except as otherwise specified, and all lengths 
such as 9, 11 and 13 feet are to be measured 
back to the next even length, except in walnut, 
which shall be measured odd and even feet ; 
no allowance to be made for defects : the width 
of tapering boards to be made at the narrow 
end. 

In view of the prevailing tendency toward the 
modification of hardwood rules and measure- 
ment, the H.VRDwooD Record has its suspicions 
lliat the Timber Trades Federation of the United 
Kingdom will have difficulty in buying American 
hardwoods on the basis of the proposed meas- 
ure. 



•24 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Changes in Grading Hules. 

At a meeting of the SouUiern Cypress Manu- 
facturers' Association, held in New Orleans 
May 16 changes were made in the grading 
rules as given below. The revised rules are 
now being printed and copies will be sent to 
all members as soon as possible. 

In the fifth paragraph, under the head of 
"General Instructions." the word "shall" is 
changed to "should" in the clause "liut the re- 
verse side should, in no case, etc." 

Under the head of "Standard Defects" sea- 
son checks are now described as follows: "Or- 
dinary season checics. meaning such as occur 
in lumber properly covered, shall not be con- 
sidered a defect in any grade." 

Add to standard lengths of mouldings "not 
exceeding five per cent of eight feet." 

Under the head of "Standard Thicknesses" 
"all lumber shipped in the rough shall be of 
sufBcient thickness to S2S to standard thick- 
ness as follows:" 

After the worked thicknesses of ceiling add 
the thicknesses of panel stock, as follows; 

Inch. Inch. 

3-8 panel stock S2S shall be 7-33 
1-2 panel stock S2S shall be 5-16 
5-8 panel stock S2S shall be 7-16 
3-4 panel stock S2S shall be 9-16 

The thickness of flat pickets is changed to 
3-4 inch. 

In the grade of first and second clear briglit 
sap is not a defect in pieces 13 inches and 
wider. 

In the grade of selects 4-inch stock is made 
a standard thickness. 

In the grade of shop both No. 1 and No. 2 
4-inch stock is made a standard thickness and 
the words "cuts and rips" are changed in all 
instances to "cuttings and rippings." 

In the grade of selected common tank the 
words "wane edge" are eliminated. 

In the grade of No. 2 common the wording 
is changed to read "This grade may be either 
random or specified widths 3 -inch and wider, 
1-inch and thicker, etc." 

The grade of "C" finisli now reads as fol- 
lows: "All widths in this grade shall admit 
small sound knots, stained sap, pin worms and 
other defects, except shake; but none that will 
prevent the use of same in its full width and 
length as a paint grade." 

"D" (or selected common) finish is changed 
so that 12-inch stock will be furnished and the 
closing words "for common finishing purposes" 
are changed to read "as a common paint 
grade." 

In "C" siding the waste of 12-inch length is 
changed to ten per cent of the length. 

The grade of "A" flooring and ceiling is 
changed to read as follows: "May have bright 
sap on one edge one-fourth of its width, oth- 
erwise must be clear." 

In the grade of "C" flooring and ceiling the 
words "ten per cent of the length" are inserted 
in lieu of "twelve inches in length" both as 
regards waste and end split. 



Miscellaneous Notes. 

It has recently been reported through vari- 
ous channels that the Seaman. Kent Company, 
Ltd.. a large manufacturer of kiln-dried hard- 
wood flooring and sheeting, with factory at 
Meaford. Ontario, and offices at 160 Bay street. 
Toronto, would build a sash, door and blind 
factory. The company announces that it has 
no such intention, but that it will erect a large 
flooring plant at the head of the Lakes in the 
near future. 

The first large raft of logs to be brought 
down the Arkansas river by the United Wal- 
nut Company passed Fort Smith recently and 
were watched by crowds as they passed the 
wharf. Three of them were several hundred 
feet long and were the largest hardwood rafts 
that have floated down the Arkansas river for 



many years. Each contained many hundred 
logs which were being brought downstream 
from the large timber possessions of the com- 
pany in the Canadian valley and other up- 
river points. 

Charles R. Little, for sixteen years superin- 
tendent of the Merrill & Ring sawmill at West 
Duluth, Minn., committed suicide May 14, at 
the home of his parents, with wliom he re- 
sided, by firing a bullet through his brain. 
Failing health is said to be the cause of his 
act. Mr. Little was 48 years old and had been 
in the lumber business at Saginaw and Duluth 
since a boy. 

An authority writing from Santo Domingo in 
regard to cedar suitable for the manufacture 
of pencils says that there are considerable 
quantities of the timber tliere, but no success- 
ful exploration has been made except by a Vir- 
ginia lumber company which owns several 
tracts of land yielding cedar, and has done a 
good deal in getting out the cedar and other 
-woods. 

The Fort Lumber Company ot Little Rock, 
Ark., has filed a certificate with the secretary 
of state showing a change in name; it is now 
known as the Brinkley Hardwood Manufactur- 
ing Company. 

An interesting dispatch from Tresbein. O., 
states that an old tramp wandered through 
that village recently planting nut trees, so 
that the youth of the land in years to come 
will not be deprived of shellbarks and walnuts. 
Not many years ago there was hardly a farm 
in the East that did not have at least one 
walnut tree, and all the streams had hundreds 
of shellbark hickories along their banks. The 
demand for black walnut and hickory for man- 
ufacturing have made these varieties so scarce 
that it will not be long before the joy of gath- 
ering tlie nuts will be lost to the children, so 
that during the last three years the old tramp 
has been engaged in his work of planting. He 
seeks out-of-the-way spots, so that the trees 
will have a chance to grow unmolested and 
untrampled. The rocky sides of hills and the 
edges of creeks ai'e preferred, and he hopes 
that when he h^s become but a memory, chil- 
dren of other generations will thank him for 
his foresight and kindness. 

Efforts are being made to form a combine 
of German top manufacturers, including those 
in other woodworking lines also, to regtilate 
selling conditions, prices and other matters 
pertaining to that line of trade. 

The Kaukauna (Wis.) Lumber Company has 
purchased some black walnut logs of William 
Tuttle which were grown on his father's farm 
near that town from seed planted by his 
mother over fifty years ago. They had reached 
a diameter of from eight to ten inches and 
were converted into valuable lumber; such 
wood is now high in price and easily stands 
stcond to rosewood and mahogany. 

The Bird & Wells Lumber Company ot Wau- 
saukee. Wis., has purchased another tract of 
standing timber in Forest county, having 
closed a deal with C. A. Hutchins of Beloit for 
a section of land heavily timbered with hem- 
lock and hardwoods. 

A dispatch from Stockholm. Sweden, says 
that Hernosand was the scene of a riot on the 
13th inst. as a result of the strike of several 
hundred laborers in. the Sando sawmills. 
Twenty nonunionists and a sheriff were seri- 
ously hurt. The owner of the mills. Dr. 
Kemphe, who is one of the most prominent 
men in this line of business in Sweden, had 
imported laborers, and this was the cause ot 
the clash. Order was finally restored by the 
Westernorrland regiment. 

The Diamond Match Company has purchased 
a. large tract of limber land in California from 
the Sierra Lumber Company, for $1,000,000, 
which will be paid in four quarterly install- 
ments during 190S. 



Two sawmills are being installed in Ran- 
dolph county. West Virginia, by the Roaring 
Creek Lumber Company, a new concern wliose 
principals are all of Clearfield, Fa. 

The Tyrell Manufacturing Company of Co- 
lumbus, S. C, will soon complete and put into 
operation its new circular sawmill on the Scup- 
pernong ri\'er. All varieties of lumber will be 
manufactured and the daily capacity will be 
from 20,000 to 30,000 feet. 

About 20,000 acres of timber land in Thomas 
county. Georgia, have been purchased by the 
J. L. Phillips Company of Thomasville, tlie 
consideration being about $127,000. A mill and 
tram road will be built, and the capacity of 
the mill when in active operation will be 50,0'00 
feet. The company recently increased its 
capital stock from $500,000 to $1,000,000. 

According to official returns the capital stock 
of lumber companies organized in Mississippi 
from Oct. 1. 1905, to April 15, 1907, aggregated 
$3,800,000. The total increase in capital stock 
of railroads, banks, land companies, etc.. is 
given as $39,638,500. 

Reports from Scranton, Miss., say that the 
loading of steamships direct from the sawmills 
of Moss Point is causing a rapid increase in 
the maritime commerce of that port. Cargoes 
of 3,400,000 feet of square timber, 2,000,000 feet 
of hewn lumber and 1,500.000 superficial feet 
of timber have been loaded within the last 
few days by the L. N. Dantzler Lumber Com- 
pany, consigned to European markets. 

Barges are being loaded at Morgan City, La., 
sawmills to carry cross-ties to Galveston. The 
scarcity of railroad cars has forced mills to 
secure water transportation. 

Fire at I.,incoln. N. H., last week very nearly 
wiped that town out of existence. It is prac- 
tically owned by J. E. Henry & Sons, known 
as New Hampshire's lumber kings, who have 
suffered great losses; 120 men, women and chil- 
dren were left homeless. 

J. Beecher has started a sawmill at Lake- 
wood. Wash. The output will be about 100.000 
feet of cedar per day. There is said to be suf- 
ficient timber in that vicinity to keep a mill 
running for years, the settlers selling the 
cedar as they clear the land. 

There is a great shortage of stovewood and 
hardwood for building in Oakland and San 
Francisco. The hard winter has made the 
mountain roads practically impassable and the 
railroads have been so loaded with freight that 
they have neglected or refused to haul cord- 
wood when the cars could be loaded with any 
other material. San Francisco and vicinity 
have drained the state of hundreds of able- 
bodied woodchoppers who find they can get 
more money doing lighter work in the metropo- 
lis than they can in the woods. 

Charles M. White, a veteran lumberman of 
Old Town, Me., died May 14. He operated 
along the Penobscot for many years. 

John E. Wilcombe. a lumber merchant of 
Hammond. La., filed a petition in bankruptcy 
in the United States District Court May 14. 
He gives his liabilities as $1,298.57 with no 
assets. 

Charles V. Higgins ot Paris. Ky., has sold 
his interest in the lumber yards and manufac- 
turing plants of the Paris Manufacturing Com- 
pany to William P. Ardery and Ossian Ed- 
wards and will locate in Florida. 

The large sawmill of Rose & Fisher at 
Bethel. O., was destroyed by fire on the 15th 
inst. The loss was only partially covered by 
insurance. 

The Case-Fowler Lumber Company, which 
operates a hardwood mill at North Birming- 
ham. Ala., and has valuable timber lands on 
the Tombigbee river, has disposed of its hold- 
ings to the Hugh McLean Lumber Company of 
Buffalo, a large hardwood manufacturer. 

The Cleveland Cliffs Iron Company is carry- 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



25 



ing on considerable experiments in northern 
Michigan, with a view to bringing about tlie 
leforestation of the pine barrens of that sec- 
tion Ijy raising tlie trees from seed. An at- 
tempt is also being made to grow soutliern 
Cottonwood on northern Mieliigan lands. It is 
believed this timber would be ideal for pulp- 
wood, of which commodity the Cleveland Cliffs 
Iron Company is a heavy consumer. A consid- 
erable quantity of Cottonwood cuttings will be 
planted on lowlands in the vicinity of Coal- 
wood. All these experiments are in charge of 
expert foresters. The company's holdings com- 
prise nearly 1,500.000 acres, and much of the 
land is covered with hardwood, which the 
company uses in the manufacture of charcoal 
to supply its various furnace plants. 

The Elmira Interior Hardwood Company, a 
new concern at Elmira. N. Y. , has been in- 
corporated with a capital stock of $100,000. 

A new company witli a capital of $10,000 has 
been incorporated at Ripley, Tippah county, 
Virginia, by J. W. Paulk. William Ruff and 
I. M. Paulk. It is to be known as the Missis- 
sippi Sawmill Company. 

The Crosby- Bonds Lumber Company of 
Bookhaven, Lincoln county. Virginia, has been 
incorporated with a capital stock of $30,000. 
W. P. Bond? Jr.. L. O. Crosby and others are 
the incorporators. 

R. C. Oliver, A. C. Jones and others have in- 
corporated the Hurricane Creek Lumber Com- 
pany at Columbia, Marion county, Virginia, 
with a capital of $50,000. 

The Cisco Lumber Company, recently organ- 
ized in Wausau, Wis., by Wausau capitalists, 
has closed a deal for the purchase of a large 
tract of timber land in Gogebic county, Mich., 



in the vicinity of Cisco Lake, whereon is over 
100,000,000 feet of standing timber. While it is 
not definitely stated, the probabilities are that 
this timber will be hauled to Wausau and 
sawed there. 

The Richwood Lumber Company of Hatties- 
burg. Perry county, Virginia, has been incor- 
porated with a capital stock of $25,000 by A. 
E. Causey, O. B. Perry and others. 

A new stock concern, under the name of the 
Harris Lumber Company, has recently been or- 
ganized at Junction City, Ark., with a capital 
stock of $6,000. divided into sixty shares of 
$100 each. The general business of the com- 
pany is the manufacturing, buying and selling 
of lumber and the buying and selling of land 
and timber. 

The Ohio Handle and Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Jonesboro, Ark., has been organized 
with a capital stock of $25,000 for the purpose 
of manufacturing handles, etc. The company 
will erect a frame building 60x100 feet. All 
necessary machinery has been purchased and 
the plant will be installed and ready for op- 
eration by June 1. N. Hetherington has been 
elected president and E. S. Hetherington sec- 
retary. 

The Beaumont Iron Works Company of 
Beaumont, Tex., has begun building a large 
logging car factory, which will be developed 
into a general car factory. It is planned to 
install a carwheel foundry later. 

The Hilton Lumber Company of New Ha- 
ven, Conn., has filed a certificate of incorpora- 
tion in the office of the secretary of state. The 
capital stock is $20,000 and the incorporators 
are C. H. Hilton, J. W. Palmatier, William 
Aufort and E. C. Sloan. 



Hardwood NeWs. 

(B7 HABOWOOD BECOBD Special Corraspondents.) 



Chicago. 

In\'itations have been received in this city 
for the marriage of Stephanie Suzanne Bens- 
dorf and Rudolph Sondheimer, which will 
occur at the Hotel Gayoso in Memphis on the 
evening of Tuesday, June 11. 

Registered at Chicago hotels May 16 were 
John Catheart of New York, A. F. Anderson 
of Cadillac and C. B. Dudley of Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 

Harry P. Coe of the Coe Manufacturing 
Company, well-known manufacturers of veneer 
machinery at Painesville, O., was in town 
May 16. 

James Cowen of Schultz Brothers & Cowen. 
left town on May 15 for a trip through the 
hardwood producing sections of the South- 
east. Before returning home he will attend 
the annual meeting of the National Hardwood 
Lumber Association at Atlantic City. 

L. L. Harris of Harris & Cole Brothers, Inc.. 
Cedar Falls. la., was a Chicago visitor May 15. 

Secretary Doster has had another lemon 
handed him; the Hardwood Manufacturers' 
Association has decided to remove its head- 
quarters to Nashville. These constant changes 
of the official headquai-ters of this organiza- 
tion are getting to be a very serious matter 
for the young bachelor secretary. Just about 
the time he gets properly introduced into so- 
ciety and has a girl lined up to the courting 
stage, he is steered off to some far distant 
spot on the niap. The fair and marriageable 
femininity at Nashville is liereby notified that 
Doster is not only an eligible but a very sus- 
ceptible bachelor, and if they want him it's 
wise to get busy early. 

The forces of J. D. Lacey & Co.. leading 
timber dealers, are reassembling at the Chi- 
cago office, 1200 Old Colony building. Mr. 
Lacey and a corps of clerks have already ar- 
rived, but Victor Thrane is now in the East 



and Wood Beale is at the New Orleans office. 
Botli will be in town soon. 

The Morton Dry Kiln Company of this city 
has just issued a handsome little catalogue 
profusely illustrated, setting forth the many 
advantages of its product and an explanation 
of its method of seasoning lumber, which is 
universally conceded to be among the very 
best. 

Gilbert Y. Tickle of Tickle, Bell & Co., 5 
St. Albans Rd., Liverpool, has been making 
an extended trip through the chief lumber 
markets of the United States, and dropped 
into the REcoiiti office May 14. Mr. Tickle is 
a prominent factor in the mahogany trade of 
the United Kingdom, and also a large buyer 
of American hardwoods. He will .sail for liome 
the middle of June. 

G. von Platen, the well known lumber manu- 
facturer of Boyne City, was a recent caller 
at the Recokd office. Mr. von Platen was en 
route home after an eight months' trip to 
the Pacific Coast. 

Wagstaff-Lumber-Oshkosh is back from an 
extended southern trip which included the in- 
spection of timijer properties with a view to 
purchasing, and a little vacation sojourn at 
French Lick. 

The Record acknowledges receiirt of a very 
elaborate and attractive "ad" from the In- 
terior Hardwood Company of Indianapolis, 
which consists of a wall hanger displaying to 
excellent advantage types of the floors which 
they make a specialty. 

W. F. Biederman. superintendent of the Na- 
tional Lumber Manufacturers' Credit Corpora- 
tion, with executive office in the Victoria 
building, St. Louis, is out with his seventh 
credit rating book, dated April, 1907. It con- 
tains the usual classified list with capital and 
pay ratings, of all manufacturers, wholesale 
and retail dealers in lumber, and factories 



which buy lumber in carload lots. It is an- 
nounced that the utmost care has been taken 
to make the new list as complete and accurate 
as possible. The information on which the 
capital and rating are based has been obtained 
from sources deemed reliable, and conserva- 
tism consistent with the facts in each case, 
has been exercised. Corrections, business 
changes, new firms, failures, etc., are taken 
care of by weekly correction sheets, and a 
trade report is issued each week which is a 
source of further important information to 
members. The book is published semi-annu- 
ally and is of great value to lumbermen in 
their commercial transactions. 

John N. Penrod of the Penrod Walnut Cor- 
poration, Kansas Citj', Mo., was a recent Chi- 
cago visitor. 

The American Wood Working Machinery 
Company lias removed its general offices to 
Rochester, N. Y., where all remittances and 
correspondence regal-ding collections and ac- 
counts should be directed in future. For prices 
or information regarding machinery, the near- 
est salesrooms should be addressed; they are 
at Cedar and West streets, New York; Hen- 
nen building. New Orleans; Fisher building, 
Chicago, and 591 Lyell avenue. Rochester. 

The IlAKDWooD Record acknowledges re- 
ceipt from the Lidgerw,ood Manufacturing 
Company, New York, of a set of six fine 
photographs illustrating Lidgerwood logging 
systems, contained in a handsome frame 21x 
2S inches in size. 

J. J. Linehan of the Linehan Lumber Com- 
pany, Pittsburg, was in town on May 11. 

The Michigan Maple Company of Grand 
Rapids has removed its offices from the Mich- 
igan Trust building to 414 Houseman block, 
that city. 

R. J. Clark, president of the Peninsula 
Bark and Lumber Company of Sault Ste. 
Marie, Mich., was a welcome caller at this 
office on May 11. 

The Fullerton-Powell Hardwood Lumber 
Company of South Bend, Ind., announces that 
Wm. P. Schmuhl, for the last twelve years 
buyer and inspector for the Ford & Johnson 
Company of Michigan City, Ind., has resigned 
his position witli the latter concern and ac- 
cepted one with the former, to take effect 
July 1. 

The American Central Lumber Company, 
formerly of Anderson, Ind.. has moved its 
office from that city to Central City. W. Va. 
The company manufactures and wholesales 
oak and hickory wagon stock in the rough 
and lias about twenty mills in various parts 
of the country in opei'ation. It is under the 
management of G. A. Lambert. 

The Rotary File and Machine Company, 
Inc., 5S9 Kent avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.. is 
out with a neat little booklet about its band 
saw machines, sharpeners, setters, blades, 
guides and brazers, which gives in concise 
form considerable information about its tools, 
and a number of useful pointers for hard- 
wood manufacturers. 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Inc., of Indianapolis, 
whose Chicago branch at 38 S. Canal street 
was recently destroyed by fire, are noted for 
their ability to get to the front and surmount 
all sorts of obstacles with the utmost dis- 
patch. Another instance of this is shown 
in the following communication, dated May 
11: "We write to announce the fact that 
we have opened new headquarters in Chicago 
at 75-77 Market street, and while we are not 
doing business at the same old stand, still 
we are doing business right along, and lots 
of it." 

J. W. Embree, vice president of the Ritten- 
house & Embree Company, has returned home 
from a week's trip to the company's mill at 
Warren, Ark. 

William Wilms of the Paepcke-Leicht Lum- 



26 



HARDWOOD EECORD 



ber Company is making an extended southern 
trip; he will visit Cairo, Memphis and other 
mill points at which his concern has interests. 
Fred W. Blaclt of the Fred W. Blaclt Lum- 
ber Company has gone to Memphis on busi- 
ness for his house; from there he will visit 
other Tennessee and Mississippi points. 



Boston. 

The Heywood Bros. & Wakefield Company 
of Gardiner, Mass.. is contemplating the erec- 
tion of an addition to its plant at Gardiner. 
The addition will be 440x75 feet and will be 
four stories and basement. Another build- 
ing will be erected for the office. 

Collier & Keyworth, manufacturers of go- 
carts, Gardiner, Mass., will build another 
story on their plant. 

C. F. Schurster, who for over twenty years 
has been connected with the Connecticut Val- 
ley Lumber Company, has resigned and will 
give his entire time to the affairs of the Green 
Mountain Lumber Company, 

The Hilton Lumber Company has been in- 
corporated in New Haven, Conn., with a cap- 
ital of $20,000. The incorporators are C. H. 
Hilton, J. W. Palmatier, William Aufort, E. 
C. Sloan. Mr. Hilton has recently returned 
from Bellevue, Fla., where the mills of the 
company will be located. He secured an 
option on a large tract of land there con- 
taining oak, baywood and other hardwoods. 

The cofiln manufacturing plant of -Miller 
& Burnham, Hartford, Conn., was recently 
destroyed by fire, causing a loss of about 
$10,000. 

Lawrence & Wiggin are making ciuite a 
specialty of mahogany veneers. Fred W. 
Kirch, formerly of New York, who has been 
in the veneer business for several years, has 
been engaged as salesman in this department. 
He is showing some fine samples of mahogany 
veneers. 

William E. Litchfield, who has been visit- 
ing his mill in Indiana, has returned. 

Among the southern visitors to this market 
recently have been: M. F. Amorous of At- 
lanta, Ga.. and J. J. McDonald, Savannah, Ga. 

A leading dealer in hardwoods states that a 
few years ago it was customary for him when 
opening his morning mail to first look for 
orders, then checks and finally shipments. 
Conditions have changed. Now he looks for 
shipments, checks and orders. 

Mr. Bacon of the Davenport-Peters Com- 
pany, says whitewood is still held at high 
prices. Manufacturers are able to mdrket 
their product as fast as they have it in ship- 
ping condition. Dealers here are buying only 
what they need and are not anticipating 
wants. 

The New England lumbermen will hold their 
seventh annual outing at Narragansett Bay, 
June S. The train leaves South Station. Bos- 
ton, at 10:45 a. m. for Providence, where con- 
nections will be made with the steamer War- 
wick. Dinner will be served at Fields Point, 
after which the party will proceed to Pru- 
dence Park. Howard C. Morse of Blacker & 
Shepard, is one of the leaders in this outing. 
It is hoped tliat the lumbermen will turn out 
in large numbers. 

Fred S. Morse of the F, S. Morse Lumber 
Company, Springfield, has recently returned 
from a trip South. 

Elmer L. Gibbs, president of the- O. M. 
Bearse & Son Company. Chelsea, Mass., has 
returned from a western trip, with a very 
satisfactory volume of orders. It is reported 
that he took one order for 1,000,000 feet of 
mahogany, 

K. W. Hobart of Hobart & Co.. Boston, re- 
turned from a southern trip recently. 

J. M. W. Hall, president of the Machias 
Lumber Company, returned last week from 
a trip to Maine. 



New York. 

Labor troubles are infesting certain sec- 
tions of the metropolitan lumber district, 
which, while they have not as yet assumed 
momentous proportions, are, nevertheless, 
causing considerable speculation as to what 
the future will bring forth. In every case 
where trouble has arisen the places of the 
strikers have been immediately filled by strike 
breakers and nonunion help, and there has 
been absolutely no interference with the con- 
duct of business on the part of the dealers 
affected. The New York Lumber Trade Asso- 
ciation has the situation well in hand and 
is preparing to cope witli trouble of any pro- 
portions should occasion require, and tlie fact 
of its absolute preparation in tills respect bids 
fair to prevent general spreading of the 
trouble. As a matter of fact, the trouble 
is not due to any dissatisfaction on the part 
of the men, but is caused by the activity of 
walking delegates. 

As the time approaches for the lumbermen's 
golf tournament, which will be held at the 
Baltimore Country Club, Baltimore, Md., June 
12 and 13, everything is reported to be pro- 
gressing finely and a large number of entries 
have already been received. The tournament 
will be held under the auspices of tlie Lum- 
bermen's Golf Association, of which Wm. D. 
Gill of Baltimore is president, and Henry 
Cape, 1 Madison avenue, New York, secre- 
tary. Arrangements for the comfort and en- 
tertainment of the contestants at Baltimore 
are in charge of Mr. Gill. Any lumberman or 
anyone engaged in any of the allied lines of 
the lumber business is not only eligible but 
cordially invited to enter tlie contest. 

The official report of the National Whole- 
sale Lumber Dealers' Association's last an- 
nual convention has just been issued in its 
usual attractive style, containing handsome 
illustrations of the officials for the current 
year, a full list of committees, etc., together 
with the annual proceedings. 

The Lumber Underwriters of 66 Broadway 
recently enlarged and renovated their quar- 
ters at that address and now have a very 
handsome suite of offices. They have just 
Issued a very handsome calendar, containing 
a beautiful reproduction of a famous forest 
fire scene. Accompanying the calendar is a 
booldet giving some interesting and valuable 
pointers as to their system of insurance, the 
character of their policy, financial resources, 
etc.. which they will be very glad to mail 
to any one interested on application. 

The executive committee of the National 
Wholesale Lumber Dealers' Association will 
hold its first regular meeting of the year at 
the headquarters, 66 Broadway, on May 22. 
at which time reports will be received cover- 
ing the work thus far this year and plans 
will be discussed for future operations. 

Mrs. Lewis Dill, wife of I^W'is Dill, the 
distinguished Baltimore lumberman, sailed 
from this port on May 7 for a summer stay 
in Europe, and will be joined by Mr. Dill 
a little later. 

The regular annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of the Cross. Austin & Ireland Lum- 
ber Company, big Brooklyn house, was held 
at the company's offices on May S, at which 
time officers and directors were elected. The 
oflicers are: President, Jas. Sherlock Davis; 
vice president, J. S. Carvalho; secretary, 
Bruce W. Belmore; treasurer, Charles L. 
Adams, Jr., and assistant secretary and treas- 
urer, Wm. Dubocq. The Board of Directors 
of last year was re-elected. The retirement 
of N, Irving Lyon because of ill health was 
announced. Bruce W. Belmore, the new secre- 
tary, has been associated with the company 
for a number of years. The gigantic improve- 
ments which have been under way at the 



company's premises during the past year or 
more are Hearing completion, at which time 
the premises will represent one of the biggest 
and most up-to-date operations of its kind in 
the country. 

The wholesale lumber business of John Mc- 
Clave of 1 Madison avenue has been incor- 
porated under the name of the McClave Lum- 
ber Company, with a capital of $150,000. The 
incorporators are S. W. McClave and John 
McClave of New York. 

The local branch office of the Lumbermen's 
Credit Association of Chicago, publishers of 
the Red Book, has been removed from 18 
Broadway to 116 Nassau street, where Man- 
ager Charles D. Chase is enjoying larger quar- 
ters for the conduct of their business. 

John R. Glover of W. R. Adams & Co., 
Van Brunt and Bowne streets, Brooklyn, is 
on a business trip to Buffalo and Tonawanda 
markets. 

G. Wetherhorn, local representative of 
Wetherhorn & Fischer, manufacturers of 
cypress sash, doors, blinds, mouldings, etc., 
of Charleston, S. C, has removed from 150 
Nassau street to 146 Broadway, where he has 
increased facilities. The plant of the com- 
pany at Charleston has undergone some im- 
provements and additions which will increase 
the daily output forty per cent. 



Philadelphia. 

Chas. F. Felin & Co. report their mills and 
factory working to full capacity, orders coming 
in right along, 

Eli B. Hallowell & Co. have been busy for 
the last few months, and have no fault to 
find with conditions. Their hardwood depart- 
ment is doing nicely. They have a man in 
West Virginia looking up these woods. Their 
business is extending so rapidly that a good 
man for Pittsburg and one for New York 
territory is to be considered. Eli B. Hallo- 
well of this firm and wife, are sojourning in 
Wernersvillo, Pa. 

Soble Bros, report trade in excellent con- 
dition. Frank D. Folsom of this concern has 
been called home on account of the serious ill- 
ness of his son. John J. Soble is at the mills 
in Honaker, Va., looking after their interests 
there. H. P. Minard, superintendent of the 
Okeeta Planing Mills Company, in which the 
Soble Bros, are largely interested, spent a few 
days at the home office in Philadelphia re- 
cently. 

J. R. Williams, 909 Land Title Building, re- 
cently returned from a Canadian trip. He is 
very busy and reports his liardwood depart- 
ment in good shape. He has just made con- 
nection with the largest mill work concern in 
the northwest. 

The Righter-Parry Lumber Company is 
reaping good results from its hardwood de- 
partment. Frederick C. Righter recently re- 
turned from a selling trip through the Pitts- 
burg territory with a good bunch of orders. 
Charles K. Parry is making a tour of North 
and South Carolina and Georgia, visiting the 
mills and making some desirable connections. 

The Codling Lumber Company, wholesaler 
of lumber at Twenty-second and Bellevue 
streets. Tioga, is moving its offices into the 
Land Title building. 

M. F. Amorous, president of tlie LTnion- 
Pinopolis Lumber Company. Atlanta, Ga., re- 
cently visited the local trade. 

The Pennsylvania Lumbermen's Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company reports business at the 
present time the best in the history of the 
company. In the past their banner year 
showed a total of about $1,000,000 insurance; 
for 1907, so far, the company has written up 
insurance amounting to over $800,000; this 
prosperity is imdoubtedly due to the conscien- 
tious and careful policy of its manager. 

James Ruth of Sinking Spring, Pa., a well 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



27 



known lumber dealer, and first station agent 
of this place, died on May 3, in his seventy- 
sixth year. 

C. E. Lloyd, Jr.. of the Boice Lumber Com- 
pany, Inc., reports business active and is more 
than pleased with results to date. Mr. Lloyd 
has been malting- an extensive tour among 
mills, their own and others, and reports con- 
ditions eminently satisfactory — no weakening 
at any point in values. This company has 
purchased considerable hardwood of late, and 
with the output from their mills, will be pre- 
pared to meet most any demand for months 
to come. 

A forest fire that has been burning in Presi- 
dent and Pine Grove townships since May 12. 
was recently checked, after the timber loss 
had reached the sum ot $75,000. 

The Holloway Lumber Company reports 
business moving along nicely and the car 
service a little improved, so that it is able 
to get out some of the back orders. 

Miller & Miller, a prosperous firm, have ex- 
tended their business considerably during the 
past year. They have mills at Branchville 
and Bowman, S. C, and are arranging for 
the building of a railroad to connect with 
their mills. They also expect shortly to open 
a branch office in this vicinity. They report 
their hardwood department doing well. Frank 
B. Miller has recently returned from an ex- 
tended tour in South Carolina and Georgia, 
where he has been looking up longleaf pine, 
in which wood they also deal extensively. 

J. N. Holloway & Co. are receiving a good- 
ly share ot orders. They feel that a new im- 
petus has been given to trading, in conse- 
quence of the more seasonable weather. 

H. H. Maus & Co., Inc., report the best 
year's business they have ever had. Their 
mill is working without interruption, orders 
coming in right along, notwithstanding they 
have not been able as yet to close out all the 
back orders. The company has engaged F. 
W. Strahorn to look after the pole end of the 
business. Mr. Strahorn. who is well known, 
having been in this business on his own ac- 
count for some years, is thoroughly familiar 
with the line. 

The J. W. Ditenderfer Lumber Company 
will shortly remove to 1314 North American 
Building. 

J. Randall Williams & Co. are preparing tor 
prospective good summer trading. J. Randall 
Williams. Jr., of this firm, is on a buying 
trip in South Carolina. When last heard from, 
he was fast developing into an expert in the 
piscatorial line. It comes from good author- 
ity that his record for one afternoon's catch 
was twenty-three trout. 



Baltimore. 

A meeting of Baltimore members of the 
National Hardwood Lumber Association was 
called prior to the annual meeting of that 
organization to discuss the advisability of 
urging the amendment of the National grad- 
ing rules and whether the Buffalo resolution 
of 1905 should not be rescinded with a view- 
to securing as close an approach to unanim- 
ity throughout the United States as pos- 
sible. All the Baltimore members were pres- 
ent with two exceptions, and the action taken 
was unanimous. After an extended discus- 
sion of the subject under consideration, the 
following resolution was adopted: 

"Resolved, 1st. That it is the sense of the 
Baltimore members of the National Hard- 
wood Lumber Association that the association 
in convention at Atlantic City, N. J.. May 23 
and 24, 1907, should take such action as is 
necessary to rescind the Buffalo resolution of 
1905, whereby it was agreed to make no 
change in the grade rules of the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association for a period 
of three years; and that this association 
should make such alteration and changes in 



its grade rules as will as nearly as possible 
promote and bring about a common and uni- 
versal system of inspection of hardwood lum- 
ber throughout the entire country. 

"2nd. That the chairman shall appoint a 
committee ot three members whose duty it 
shall be to present to the convention of the 
National Hardwood Lumber Association 
through the proper channel this resolution 
and the further action of the Baltimore mem- 
bers here assembled." 

The following resolution was adopted on 
motion of M. S. Baer: 

"Resolved. That the committee of Balti- 
more members are empowered and instructed 
to meet with the committee on inspection of 
the National Hardwood Lumber Association, 
and discuss with them fully the proposed 
changes to be offered in the association in- 
spection rules, with a view to determining 
their action in behalf of the Baltimore mem- 
bers and to lay before the committee the de- 
sirability of the following changes: 

"1st. That there should be a proper divi- 
sion in the grade of shipping Culls Hard- 
wood, conforming nearly to the present sys- 
tem of division into No. 2 Commons and No. 
3 Commons of the Hardwood Manufacturers' 
Association of the United States. 

"2nd. That for the inspection ot poplar 
lumber there should be established an addi- 
tional grade of "stained" saps, making a 
place for this class of stock under a head to 
itself. 

"3rd. That the rules governing the mea- 
surement of hardwood lumber should be so 
changed as to cause measurement to be made 
as follows: 

"In widths, fractions on the one-half foot 
are t3 be given alternately to the buyer and 
seller; the fractions below the one-half foot 
to be dropped, and all fractions above the one- 
half foot to be counted to the next higher 
figures on the board rule. 

"In lengths, standard to be four to sixteen 
feet, counting the 'odd' as well as the 'even' 
feet." 

This matter, for which the meeting had 
been especially called, having been disposed 
of, the cost of inspecting hardwood lumber 
at Baltimore was taken up. The Baltimore 
Lumber Exchange having adopted the na- 
tional rules. M. S. Baer offered the follow- 
ing resolution, which was adopted: 

"Resolved, That the committee of three 
members appointed by the chairman of this 
meeting shall be further empowered and re- 
quested to take up with the Inspection 
Bureau of the National Hardwood Lumber 
Association at some suitable time in the near 
future the subject of co-operation between 
the National Hardwood Lumber Association 
and the Lumber Exchange of Baltimore, with 
a view to having the association grant proper 
license to the chief inspector of the Lumber 
Exchange of Baltimore, permitting him to 
issue the National Hardwood Lumber Asso- 
ciation inspection certificate on lumber in- 
spected under his supervision, and allowing 
the Lumber Exchange charges to apply." 

This, it was contended, would relieve the 
association of the fixed expense of the 
salaried inspectors in this city. 

Richard W. Price presided over the delib- 
erations. The committee named to bring the 
matter before the Atlantic City convention 
was: R. B. Wood, Richard P. Baer and 
Richard W. Price. 

Articles of incorporation were filed re- 
cently by the John C. Scherer. Jr.. Manufac- 
turing Company, which is organized to manu- 
facture and deal in office furniture, bar fix- 
tures and other similar products, and has an 
authorized capital stock of $60,000. The in- 
corporators named are John C. Scherer, Jr.. 
Harry R. Ruse. Thomas T. Tongue, Frank H. 



Longfellow and Daniel MacLea. Mr. Scherer 
is widely known in the sash, door and blind 
trade. Mr. MacLea is a member of the 
Eisenhauer & MacLea Company, dealers in 
hardwoods on West Falls avenue, and enjoys 
an excellent reputation. The company will 
doubtless conduct operations on a large scale. 
Hardwood men here are considerably exer- 
cised over the action of the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad in serving notice of an increase 
in the freight rates of one cent per 100 
pounds. The increase became effective on 
May 1. At the same time the minimum 
weight of cars was increased from 30,000 to 
34,000 pounds. In other words, where a lum- 
ber shipper had formerly to pay for 30,000 
pounds when he loaded a car, he will now 
havp to pay on 4.000 pounds more, so that 
the increase in rates is really much more 
than the one cent advance indicates. Ar- 
rangements are under way to make some sort 
of representation on the subject to the rail- 
road company, the advance being considered 
out of proportion to that on other commod- 
ities. 

Among the visiting lumbermen here last 
week was C. E. Lloyd, vice-president of the 
Boyce Lumber Company of Philadelphia. Mr. 
Lloyd had been on a southern trip, and was 
enroute for home. He said that the hard- 
wood business continued in excellent shape, 
with prices strong and the demand active 
with the possible exception of common oak. 
which, he thought, had eased off somewhat, 
though the general situation was not affected 
thereby. He looked for a prosperous busi- 
ness during the balance of the year. 

A concatenation of local Hoo-Hoo has been 
called by Vicegerent Snark Maurice W. Wiley 
for the first week in June, when it is ex- 
pected that a number of applicants for ad- 
mission will be on hand. 

B. C. Currie of the R. M. Smith Lumber 
Company of Parkersburg, W. Va., was in 
town last week and expressed himself as 
highly gratified over the way trade keeps up. 
The Norva Land and Lumber Company of 
which Robert MacLean, a well-known ex- 
porter of hardwoods with offices in the Stew- 
art building, this city, is general manager 
and president, is erecting a planing mill in 
Norfolk County, Va.. along the Dismal Swamp 
Canal, with Walliston, Va., as the postofBce 
station. The company has some 23,000 acres 
of land there, containing large quantities of 
hardwoods, cypress and much gum. The lat- 
ter is being worked up into staves, a stave 
mill and sawmill having been on the place 
when it was purchased. A resaw is also 
being put up, and the facilities of the com- 
pany will be greatly enlarged when the im- 
provements are complete. The planing mill 
will be in running order about the middle of 
June. 

The Danzer Lumber Company of Hagers- 
town, Md., is making extensive improvements 
at its yards on South Potomac street, which 
cover an area of five acres and are being 
connected with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
by means of a switch 550 feet long. This will 
permit cars to be shunted direct to the yards 
without extra handling. A smoke stack 80 
feet high is being built, and dry kilns are 
under construction, together with exhausts to 
convey shavings and sawdust to the boilers. 
Every facility for handling lumber, heavy 
timber and logs is to be provided. The im- 
provements will be completed some time in 
July. 

Mary L. Evans, president; Eugene Murray, 
vice-president, and William B. Murra.v. sec- 
retary-treasurer, all of W'ashington, D. C. 
have incorporated the Convertible Furniture 
Manufacturing Company of Alexandria. Va.. 
with a capital stock of $50,000. and will erect 
a factory there. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



R. P. Baer of R. P. Baer & Co. recently 
returned from a trip South, in the course of 
which he visited a large number of mills. 

The Herbertson Lumber Company has been 
incorporated at Richmond. Va., with William 
Herbertson. Sr., as president; M. L. Herbert- 
son as vice-president. R. H. Herbertson as 
secretary, and R. K. Herbertson as treasurer. 
The three first-mentioned are of Pittsburg, 
and R. K. Herbertson is of Burkeville, Va. 
The capital stock of the company is fixed at 
$100,000. 

Pittsburg. 

The Willson Brothers Lumber Company re- 
ports an excellent demand for hardwoods of 
all kinds and says that the call for oak and 
sound wormy chestnut is one of the most 
promising features of the Pittsburg market 
for two years. This firm has fortified itself 
with large stocks and is supplying the trade 
throughout the East in a way that few 
other concerns are able to do. 

The A. M. Turner Lumber Company is now 
quartered in one of the finest suites of offices 
in the city, in the Union Bank building. They 
have nearly double the space which they had 
in their old quarters in the Ferguson build- 
ing, but the room has been badly needed for 
a long time. In poplar. Cottonwood and bass- 
wood the Turner Company is doing a big 
business. 

A number of investors from Clearfield. Pa., 
have bought 1.000 acres of hardwood timber 
land on the Coal & Coke railroad in Randolph 
county. West Virginia, for about $20,000. It 
is estimated that the tract will cut 5.000,000 
feet, most of which will be marketed through 
the agency of W. W. Dempsey of Johnstown, 
Pa.; several portable mills will be installed 
at once. 

The L. L. Satler Lumber Company is get- 
ting out a fine lot of hardwood at its big 
plant at Blackstone, Va. A large part of this 
is oak and the firm finds a good market for 
this lumber. both on the eastern coast and in 
the Pittsburg district. Mr. Satler was one 
of the Chamber of Commerce excursionists 
who toured West Virginia on a business trip 
last week. 

The big plant of J. A. HoUinger at Cham- 
bersburg. Pa., was burned a few days ago. 
with a total loss of $100,000. About $40,000 
of this was covered by insurance. The fire 
started in the engine room of the sawmill 
and burned practically the entire plant of 
the company. 

The Cotton Belt Timber and Manufactur- 
ing Company has been incorporated in Ohio 
by a number of capitalists of Norwalk. Its 
capital is $100,000, and the members of the 
company are Fred H. Fox. F. C. l&iUer, B. N. 
Chikls. John Laylin and H. A. Gallup. 

J. E. Mcllvain & Co. are having a very good 
call for railroad ties. They report most of 
the West Virginia mills fairly busy and they 
are putting on new men at the mills where 
they have lumber under contract. 

The big planing mill of Dimond & Borland 
at Oil City, Pa., was damaged by fire to the 
extent of $50,000 on May 8. The firm carried 
about $7,000 insurance. 

West Virginia Hoo-Hoo held a very suc- 
cessful meeting at Weston. May 2. Nearly 
thirty were initiated and over two hundred 
members of the order were present at the 
services. Among the prominent speakers were 
H. K. Stover of Elkins, I. N. Butler of Pick- 
ens, James H. Chapman of Sutton. John L. 
Altizer of Baltimore and E. S. Boggess of 
Clarksburg. 

The Babcock Lumber and Boom Company 
has been incorporated at Davis. Tucker 
county, West Virginia, with a capital of $500,- 
OOO. The stock is all held by the Babcock 
lumber interests, which have their headquar- 
ters in Pittsburg. 



The Valley Bend Lumber Company, of Shaf- 
fer's Run. Randolph county, W. Va., lost its 
big mill last week by fire. Wilson Brothers 
of Toronto were the chief owners and will 
likely rebuild the plant. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad Company has 
set out more than 500,000 trees as a prelimi- 
nary to its immense project of starting enough 
oak forests to supply it with tie timber in 
the future. At its new nursery at Hollidays- 
burg, Pa.. 135 pounds of seed will be planted 
this year. The work is being conducted by 
E. A. Sterling, formerly of the United States 
Bureau of Forestry. 

The Lycoming Lumber Company is a new 
concern chartered by Wm. CoUum, S. V. 
Brown and F. C. Zercher. It will operate 
near Greensburg. Pa. 

Pittsburg wholesalers are greatly concerned 
at the increase of 20 to .10 per cent in freight 
rates whicli will go into effect June 1 on all 
the roads of the Central Freight and Trunk 
Association. Hitherto the rate on lumber 
from Chicago to New York has been 20 cents 
per hundred pounds. The increase will cause 
a sharp advance in the price of some hard- 
woods that are being shipped in large quanti- 
ties to the Middle West and it is expected 
that oak will suffer worse in this respect. 

Three new lumber companies were char- 
tered last week in western Pennsylvania. The 
Newell Brothers Lumber Company of Pitts- 
burg is backed by J. A., W. A. and H. T. 
Newell. H. A. Miller, A. C. Leslie of Pitts- 
burg and W. E. McMillan of Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
The capital is $100,000, of which over $40,000 
has been paid in, The Fort Pitt Lumber 
Company of Pittsburg has a capital of $12,- 
500 and is promoted by H. L.. Austin, George 
McGinnis. R. J. Hadley and T. S. Dickey of 
Pittsburg and C. M. Konkle of New Ken- 
sington, Pa. The other company mentioned 
is the Stewarten Lumber Company of Con- 
nellsvillc. Pa., capital $6,000. The incorpor- 
ators are August Stickle. Jr.. and Otto Stickle 
of Mill Run. Pa., and John A. Guyler of Con- 
nellsville. 

Lloyd. Chalfant & Peyton have bought the 
planing mill of Rowand & Company at Shinn- 
ston. near Morgantown, W. Va.. for about 
$15,000. The price includes several acres of 
real estate. 

The Crescent Lumber Company is now lo- 
cated in its new quarters in the Machesney 
Building, and is doing an excellent business 
in white oak. cypress and hardwoods. Much 
of its trade is in lots of from 20 to 50 cars, 
and a good portion of its lumber goes nortli 
to the lake towns. 

W. E. Terhune of the W. E. Terhune Lum- 
ber Company has been looking up the West 
Virginia situation the past week. He finds 
the hardwood business in general mucli bet- 
ter than the yellow pine trade. 

The J. W. Pierce Lumber Company of Iron- 
ton, O., has been shut down by the order of 
the Pierce estate. It is expefcted that ar- 
rangements will soon be made witli the Ad- 
vance Lumber Company of Cleveland by 
which the plant can be operated again. 

The Sommer & Henry Lumber and Manu- 
facturing Company has taken over the plant 
of Charles Ike at Canton. Ohio, and will 
manufacture hardwood lumber on a large 
scale. It has also secured several tracts of 
timber which will be good feeders for the big 
planing mill. The new officers of the com- 
pany are: President, David S. Sommer; vice 
president and treasurer, U. R. Henry; secre- 
tary. Edward L. Smith; directors. J. M. Cozan 
and Anna Sommer. 

The Pittsburg Pit Post Company is doing a 
fine business in the Pittsburg field in all 
kinds of mine timber. Its posts are selling 
for half a cent higher than a year ago and it 
also has a good demand for mine car stock. 

Tlie Maley, Thompson & Moffatt Lumber 



Company of Cincinnati has bought from D. F. 

Frazee tibout 500 acres of walnut timber near 
Lexington. Ky., for $15,000. The firm will cut 
ttff the timber at once and market most of it 
in Cincinnati. 

The Warren Handle Company is one of the 
busiest concerns in eastern Ohio. Last week 
it shipped another order of 200 dozen pick 
handles tc* the Panama Canal, this being one 
of several consignments which it has lately 
sold to the United States government. The 
company also has the entire handle business 
of the Carnegie Steel Company and the Re- 
public Iron and Steel Company. 

The Twentieth Century Lumber Company, 
capital $10,000, has been incorporated by 
David Weiner, W. S. Snyder and G. M. Whit- 
ney of Harri.sburg and Carlisle, Pa. 

Timber lands in the neighborhood of Oil 
City, Pa., got a bad scorching last week by 
forest fire. Nearly the entire townships of 
President and Pine Grove were swept over, 
badly damaging an area of about ten square 
miles. 

The Western Lumber Company of Weston. 
W. Va.. has increased its capital to $75,000, 
its president, John T. Dixon of Memphis, 
Tenn., having taken a large part of this last 
issue. 

Tlie Baltimore & Oliio Railroad Company is 
negotiating with the Kendall Lumber Com- 
pany for the purchase of the latter's line 
from Confluence. Pa., to Mountain Park, a 
distance of about twenty miles. This is a 
narrow gauge road, but if the B. & O. gets 
it. it will be made into a broad gauge for ex- 
cursion purposes. The Kendalls built it sev- 
eral years ago to furnish an outlet for their 
timber operations in that district. 

The Wellman Lumber Company has been 
incorporated at Glen Jean. Fayette County. 
Pa,, with a capital of $5,000. The members 
of the company are O. F. McCoy, L. D. Mar- 
shall. H. E. Wilson, J. R. Gunning and C. W. 
Osenten. 

Robert Felty of Connellsville. Pa., has 
bought from the Collins Lumber Company of 
Pennsboro. W. Va., a tract of hardwood lum- 
ber which it is estimated will cut 20,000,000 
feet, besides some 4,000,000 pit posts. The 
deal includes all the machinery, tram road, 
logging engines, cars and other equipment 
of the Deckers Valley Lumber Company of 
Morgantown. W. Va.. in which Mr. Felty is 
a large stockholder. 

The Webster-Keasey Lumber Company is a 
new wliolesale concern at 803 Bessemer build- 
ing. It will have its own mills, and will 
handle poles, ties and piling on a large scale. 
Webster Keasey, president of the company, 
has been in the lumber business in the Pitts- 
burg district for seventeen years. George 
A. Cypher. Jr., of Butler, Pa., is secretary 
and treasurer of the concern, and J. O. Har- 
rison, who has been associated with Mr, 
Keasey for a long time, will be general man- 
ager. 

The Red Lick Lumber Company of Marlin- 
ton, W. Va.. has been formed with a capital 
of $10,000. The incorporators are M. C. Wat- 
kins of Gassaway, W. Va., A. D. Williams 
and N. C. McNeil of Marlinton and John 
Peters of Ronceverte. 

The Furnace Run Saw Mill & Lumber 
Company of Pittsburg has started a branch 
office at Cincinnati, with William Hunter, 
manager. The company is practically cut out 
at Johnston City. Tenn.. and will handle 
hardwood direct from its Cincinnati office. 

The Pittsburg Hardwood Floor Company re- 
ports much the best business in its history. 
Its city trade is picking up rapidly and of 
late it has been doing a fine business in the 
big industrial towns of western Pennsyh'ania 
and eastern Ohio. 

The Kendall Lumber Company sold 200 
cars of lumber and ties in two days last 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



29 



week. Throughout the hardwood list it notes 
a very flrm feehng as to prices and Secretary 
J. H. Hendei-son says that both oak and 
chestnut are going up slowly. The com- 
pany's mill at Crellin, Md., is now cutting 
100.000 feet a day. 

General Manager J. N. Woollett of the 
American Lumber and Manufacturing Com- 
pany recently took an order for 1.000.000 feet 
of oak to be exported from Mississippi and 
Arkansas for car lumber. He also bought 
5.000,000 feet of Cottonwood to be cut in 
Texas and Indian Territory, a large part of 
which will be brought up the Mississippi for 
distribution in the central West. 



BuiTalo. 

The Hoo-Hoo Concatenation held by Vice- 
gerent F. J. Blumenstein May 11 was the 
principal event of the month. The attend- 
ance was large and a class of ten kittens was 
admitted to membership as follows: Edwin 
S. Lott of Chestnut * Slaght: William F. 
Stuhlmiller of the Stuhlmiller Mantel Works; 
Oris M. Moyer of the American Seating Com- 
pany; Jacob F. Hirschmiller of Palen & 
Burns; Arthur T. Wilcox, with G. Elias & 
Bro. : Frank M. Betts of the Eastern Lumber 
Company. Tonawanda; Sylvester B. Bond of 
the Hugh McLean Lumber Company; James 
H. Walsh, with F. W. Vetter; Frank W. Mc- 
Gregor of the Standard Hardwood Lumber 
Company and James L. Stewart, inspector 
for the National Hardwood Lumber Associa- 
tion. 

A. Miller keeps two or three good hustling 
buyers in the oak and other hardwood dis- 
tricts .south, looking after stock and so is 
easily able to carry a full stock in yard, in 
spite of active sales. 

The Buffalo yard of Scatcherd cS: Son still 
depends on hardwoods, mainly from Penn- 
sylvania, as the cut of the Memphis mills is 
all needed to meet tlie general eastern and 
foreign demand. 

Beyer, Knox & Co. find that their new mill 
headquarters at Pascola, Mo., is to be a 
fortunate venture, as they are selling too 
much oak and other southwestern hardwoods 
not to have a special supply somewhere. 

T. Sullivan & Co, are now for the first 
time lately able to put some Washington fir 
into stock here. A lot of 2^ -inch, a size 
always hard to get, is going , into pile Just 
now. 

G. Elias & Bro. are getting in lumber liber- 
ally by lake and as they handle all sorts of 
lumber it is quite in their line to get a cargo 
from Lake Ontario, as they did a few days 
ago. 

Members of the Standard Hardwood Lum- 
ber Company have organized the Bison City 
Table Company, with $50,000 paid up capital. 
, R. F. Kreinheder is president, A. W. Krein- 
heder, vice president; O. W. Kreinheder, 
treasurer and manager, and Charles Benfold. 
secretary. The factory is already in full 
operation. 

F. W. Vetter is still adding to his yard 
stock since going into business on his own 
account. He now carries a full assortment 
of general hardwood sorts and is enjoying all 
his former trade. 

The Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Company has 
two barges coming down from the upper 
lakes with hardwood stock, all of which will 
be needed to keep up the yard stock, as 
everything is moving fast. 

Manager Janes of the Empire Lumber Com- 
pany is back from a long trip through the 
South and Southwest, stirring up his mill and 
shipping forces. He is able to report plenty 
of cars, which is exceptionally favorable. 

Oak, ash and poplar are being added to the 
yard stock of O. E. Teager from his Ken- 
tucky headquarters. Cars in that direction 



are not as plenty as they ought to be, but 
are made to answer. 

I. N. Stewart & Bro. are moving an in- 
creased amount of cherry and are always 
able to show an increased stock of oak in 
yard, which comes from cherry territory and 
sells along with it nicely. 

The Hugh McLean Lumber Company still 
finds the Memphis district a rain center, but 
is able to get stock enough from its various 
mills to meet all demands. 



Detroit. 

Joseph H. Berry, the genius behind the 
greatest varnish manufactory in the world, 
died in Detroit, May 22. He had been ill 
only seven weeks. He was 68 years of age. 

Mr. Berry was chairman of Berry Brothers. 
Ltd., of Detroit, large varnish manufacturers. 
He was also president of the Dwight Lumber 
Compan.v. large handlers of hardwood; presi- 
dent of the Detroit Heating and Lighting 
Company and the Berry Car Wheel Foundry 
Company at Buffalo, N. Y. He was interested 
in the press steel, barrel, lumber and picture 
frame trades, in iron furnaces in the northern 
peninsula, in the sugar business, in real 
estate, was a promoter of the new $2,500,000 
belt line in Detroit, which is now in progress 
of construction. 

William C. Brownlee of the Brownlee cSt 
Kelly Lumber Company, hardwood whole- 
salers of Detroit, is spending a week at the 
company's mill in northern Georgia. The 
company has just received a large cargo of 
basswood. 

There is now a very serious strike at the 
Detroit plant of the American Car and Foun- 
dry Company among the forces in the steel 
di partmcnt. Police are necessary to keep 
Older. 

A new warehouse is being erected for the 
Detroit Lumber Company. 

The $2,500,000 new Cleveland "D. & C." 
boat which was to have gone into commis- 
sion this month was burned at her dock at 
the foot of Orleans street last week. A large 
amount of beautiful interior hardwood finish 
was destroyed at a big loss to the Detroit 
Shipbuilding Company. 

There is a big strike among the shipbuild- 
ers of the American Shipbuilding Company 
at the Great Lakes branch at Ecorse. Out- 
side workmen are being imported. 

The spring shipments by boat to Detroit 
are very liglit owing to the fact that the 
spring stock is not entirely dry, and fall stock 
has been pretty well cleaned up. Basswood 
is reported very scarce. Every wholesaler is 
busy, there being no let up in building here. 



Sagina'w Valley. 

The Superior Iron and Chemical Company 
has been organized at Detroit with a capital- 
ization of $7,500,000. Joseph H. Berry of 
Berry Bros.. Detroit, is said to hold $6,000.- 
000 of the stock. This company has charcoal 
and iron plants at Ashland. Manistique, New- 
berry. Chocolay. Elk Rapids, and Boyne City. 
All of these plants manufacture charcoal 
from hardwood and charcoal iron from the 
charcoal. They also manufacture chemicals 
from the wood by-products. Efforts are being 
made to secure a large plant of that character 
at Bay City. There is one chemical plant in 
operation which manufactures wood alcohol 
and other by-products, the plant being oper- 
ated by the Dupont Powder Company of Phil- 
adelphia. The alcohol from the wood is con- 
verted into use in the manufacture of gun- 
powder. There is no location in the world so 
advantageous for the location of a plant of 
this character as Bay City. Eight E,awmills. 
nearly all of which are operated the year 
through, are engaged in the manufacture of 
hardwood lumber ar^l there is thus a vast 



accumulation of hardwood refuse available. 
Moreover, tributary to Bay City are immense 
forests of the best hardwood timber in the 
world, and it has rail and water transporta- 
tion for the raw material and the manufac- 
tured product. 

S. L. Eastman has purchased the interest 
of Ross & Wentworth of Bay City in 10,000,- 
000 feet of standing timber in Ogemaw 
County. A spur track will be extended into 
it by the Detroit & Mackinac railroad and the 
timber will be taken off. A portable band 
mill will be put up on the ground to manu- 
facture the timber. A large portion of the 
timber is beech, maple and birch. The lum- 
ber will be handled by Mr. Eastman in his 
business, the maple going into flooring. 
Beech lumber of good quality is being put 
into flooring here and it gives satisfaction as 
it finishes nicety. This timber has advanced 
to $18 for No. 1 common, and there is a 
good call for it. 

The Saginaw Manufacturing Company, 
which puts out washboards, wood split pulleys 
and other hardwood novelties, is enlarging its 
plant materially to permit of the expansion 
of its business. The concern is doing a pros- 
perous business. The Palmerton Wooden- 
ware Company and the Bousfleld Wooden 
"Works Company are two of the largest estab- 
lishments of their kind in the United States. 
They use a number of million feet of bass- 
wood and also large quantities of other hard- 
woods every month. Over at Ithaca. Mich., 
is a plant operated by Armour & Co.. which 
produces butter tubs and other novelties. All 
of these institutions are doing a fine business 
and are operated with full crews. 

A. McKay is erecting a portable mill on the 
French Siding, near West Branch, with which 
he will cut up 1,000,000 feet of logs. 

The Batchelor Timber Company at West 
Branch has erected a heading mill and other 
improvements. The mill is cutting about 
60.000 feet of hardwood lumber daily. 

The new Strable Flooring plant at Saginaw 
is having a fine run of business considering 
the short time it has been in operation. The 
company is booking orders ahead and the 
oflacials feel well satisfied with conditions. 

At Whitestone Point, near AuGres on Sag- 
inaw Bay, Samuel Umphrey is operating a 
small sawmill which is cutting 12,000 feet 
a day. Up in that section a number of small 
mills are in operation. 

Good progress is being made on the new- 
mill of Keyes & Warboys at Tower, and it 
will soon be rftady for business. 

The Pinkerton sawmill, near Onaway, is 
ready for business and has an ample stock of 
logs. 

The Krieeland-Bigelow Company's mill is 
running day and night and cutting some fine 
stock. The maple goes to S. L. Eastman. 
Mr. Bigelow says that practically their entire 
cut for the season has been sold. 

Bay City parties are negotiating for a large 
body of hardwood timber north of the city 
to come here to be manufactured. 



Grand Bapids. 

Among the new Michigan corporations are 
the following: Cisco Lake Lumber Company, 
Wausau. Wis.. and Ontonagon, $200,000; 
Southland Lumber Company, Grand Rapids, 
$20,000. 

The Baines-Mosier Cabinet Company of 
Allegan has increased its capital stock from 
$4,000 to $13,000. 

Louis D. Rich has resigned his position as 
cashier of the R. G. Peters Salt and Lumber 
Company, Manistee, taking effect June 1, 
and will give his entire attention to his lum- 
ber interests in the South. 

Officers of the newly formed Portage Lake 
Lumber Company of Hancock are: President, 



30 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



James J. Byers; vice-president. James W. 
Cleaves; secretary and treasurer. William J. 
McKenna. A mill has been built at West 
Hancock and will be operated this summer. 

The Grand Trunk railroad has expended 
three-quarters o£ a million dollars on the 
erection of a new depot and freight house 
and is extending its tracks into the downtown 
district of Grand Rapids. Business men are 
arranging for a celebration in connection 
with the opening of the new station June 15. 
The Wilson Manufacturing Company of 
Port Huron, manufacturer of saws, is the 
only concern of that city to make an exhibit 
at the Jamestown Ter-centennial. The Wil- 
son company started operations at South 
Park five years ago with five men. The force 
has been increased to 125 men and the out- 
put added to tenfold. 

All Michigan railroads have made a change 
in classification of railroad ties which ma- 
terially increases the shipping rates to points 
within the state. Every road needs the ties 
originating along its own line and is averse 
to moving the same. Some roads refuse to 
move ties to outside points, which is indica- 
tive of the scarcity of timber. 

The Grand River boat line is carrying large 
cargoes of freight, including furniture and 
manufactured products, and the directors of 
the new transportation line, who include 
some of the leading business men and manu- 
facturers of the city, state that proper sup- 
port of the venture will assure the ultimate 
operation of an independent boat line to Chi- 
cago, whereby traffic arrangements with lake 
lines to and from the East may be made and 
the eastern freight rates reduced. The rates 
to western jsoints are from 5 to 10 per cent 
below the tariffs over the electric or steam 
lines. 

More than 2.000 trees and shrubs were set 
out this spring on the school grounds at Iron- 
wood, by direction of the board of education. 
The Superior Manufacturing Company of 
Muskegon has closed a contract with the 
board of education of New York city for 
$14,700 worth of opera chairs and school 
seats. 

The Muskegon factory of the Brunswick- 
Balke-Collender Company has recently begun 
the manufacture of cues, and 100 men are 
employed in this department. When the bil- 
liard table department is in operation, which 
will be in about four months, 250 men will 
be added to the force. 



Cleveland. 
J^-H. Benedict of Detroit, representing the 
Duncan Bay Manufacturing Company, stopped 
off here a few days on his way to Cincin- 
nati, where he will buy machinery for their 
sawmill at Cheboygan. 

The Sawmill Company of Chase City, Va., 
was incorporated recently with $20,000 capital 
stock. W. P. Porter of East Jordan. Mich., 
president; Harry Sherman of CoUingwood, 
O.. vice president; C. H. Foote of this city, 
treasurer, and A. M. Foote of this city, secre- 
tary. The four officers, together with Burt 
Pero. comprise the Board of Directors. The 
company will manufacture hardwoods and 
North Carolina pine. The main office will be 
at Cleveland. 

The car situation in Kentucky and West 
Virginia is easing up somewhat. Manufac- 
turers and dealers report shipments going 
forward more satisfactorily than for some 
time. 

R. H. Vansant of Ashland, Ky., was a caller 
among the hardwood trade here last week. 

W. L. McManus. who is a large manufac- 
turer of hardwoods at Petoskey, Mich., called 
on the trade here May 18. 

W. A. Cool of W. A. Cool & Son returned 
recently from the Chamber of Commerce trip 



into Indiana. He reports a fine trip and trade 
conditions good. Mr. Cool left May 19 for 
the firm's West Virginia mill. 

Trade conditions continue good. The bet- 
ter grades of poplar and oak are moving 
rapidly. Dealers having dry stock to offer 
report ready sale. Most manufacturers in 
this territory state they are well filled up 
with orders. 

Indianapolis. 

The will of Charles Zabel. formerly con- 
nected with the Cabinet Makers' Union, one 
of the large manufacturing concerns of the 
city, has been offered for probate in a local 
court. His widow is left a life interest in 
all personal and real estate, amounting to 
about $20,000. 

An increase in capital stock from $36,000 
to $60,000 has been announced by the South 
Bend Healy Box Company of South Bend. 
A. M. Russell is president and Frank B. 
Clayton, secretary. 

Changes necessary to make the plant a 
standard fire ri.sk are being made by the 
Greer-Wilkinson Lumber Company of this 
city at its hardwood mill in Maugham. La. 
Among the improvements is a 20,000-gallon 
water tank which supplies 6-inch water mains 
laid completely around the plant. New ma- 
chinery is being installed and the company 
believes it will have one of the finest hard- 
wood mills in the country when improvements 
are completed. The company is also installing 
a retail yard in connection with its wholesale 
plant in Cairo, 111. 

A company has been organized at New 
Albany to manufacture veneer. It will have 
a capital stock of $100,000. The plant will 
be located on a part of the De Pauw glass 
factory tract, and will be complete in every 
respect. Those interested in the company 
are N. T. De Pauw. W'. A. McLean. C. W. 
Inman, E. V. Knight. Conrad Fleischer. 
Thomas McCuUoch and Basil Doerhoefer. 
This will make the third veneer plant in Ne-w 
Albany. 

An increase in capital stock has been made 
by the Hoftie Planing Mill of Muncie. accord- 
ing to its secretary. Irvin L. Morrison. The 
increase is from $15,000 to $20,000. the addi- 
tional stock to be used in extending the com- 
pany's business. 

One of the newest lumber concerns in 
southern Indiana is the George D. Seitz Lum- 
ber Company at Haubstadt. which is just 
entering the field where hardwoods are most 
plentiful. Articles of incorporation were filed 
last month, showing a capitalization of $15.- 
000 and stating that directors had been elect- 
ed as follows: George D. Seitz, Grover M. 
Cleveland. John F. Ringer. Amy G. Tenbarge 
and Sophia F. Riftert. 

Balke & Krauss of this city have pur- 
chased some old buildings and ground on 
West Market street. The buildings are be- 
ing razed to make way tor additional switch- 
ing facilities, the city council having granted 
permission for the laying of the tracks. 

An important change in Indiana manufac- 
turing circles was noted last week when 
the Barcus Manufacturing Company of Wa- 
bash purchased the abandoned plant of the 
American School Furniture Company in that 
city for less than $25,000. The Barcus Com- 
pany ■will move from its present quarters and 
with a large addition built to the school 
furniture plant, will manufacture wagon 
stock, automobile bodies and operate a foun- 
dry. 

Miss Marie Jungclaus, daughter of W. P. 
Jungclaus. a well-known local lumberman, 
was married one night last week to Samuel 
L. Pattison of Memphis. Tenn. The couple, 
after a wedding trip, will make their home 
in Memphis. 



Frank E. Patrick. Henry Kasperlain and 
Cora Patrick have organized the Seymour 
Chair Company at Seymour, and will manu- 
facture all grades and designs of chairs. 
They have $15,000 capital stock and have in- 
corporated. 

Auburn is fast becoming one of the Vjest 
■nardwood markets in the state, due to the 
constantly increasing business of manufac- 
turing carriages, buggies, wagons and auto- 
mobiles. The city now ranks third in Indi- 
ana in the vehicle industry and is only 
rivaled by South Bend and Indianapolis. In 
South Bend one-third of the vehicles made 
in Indiana are turned out. 

The Capitol Lumber Company is enjoying 
such an extensive business that it has been 
obliged to open a fourth yard in this city. 
The new yard is located on English avenue 
in a fast-growing part of the city, where 
there is a great demand for all grades of 
lumber. 

The M. R. Gardner Company of Wabash has 
been incorporated aod will .soon begin manu- 
facturing furniture and other cabinet work 
in that city. Its capital stock is $25,000. in- 
vested by Delia B.. Rolland and Morland Gard- 
ner, who are also named as the directors of 
the new concern. Wabash is becoming one of 
the greatest furniture manufacturing centers 
in Indiana. 

Steps for the permanent organization of an 
association representing the various shippers' 
organizations in Indiana will be taken at a 
meeting to be held in the Board of Trade 
building in this city on the evening of May 27. 
With all shipping interests of Indiana com- 
bined, it is believed that considerable influ- 
ence can be exercised in bettering shipping 
conditions and pushing desirable legislation. 
At the same time every effort will be made to 
keep existing laws on the subject intact. A 
meeting was held some time ago. when the 
organization was put on a temporary basis 
with John W. McCardle as temporary presi- 
dent and J. V. Zartman as temporary secre- 
tary. A committee is drafting by-laws and 
constitution which will be offered at the com- 
ing meeting. 

Extensive planting is being conducted at the 
reservation of the State Forestry Board near 
Henryville. and includes the following: white 
oak and hickory on eight acres of clay upland: 
red oak, burr pak and large shellbark hickory 
on seven acres of bottom land. 600 feet ele- 
vation; American chestnut, on five acres of 
upland clay at 700 feet elevation; black walnut 
and American chestnut on three acres of up- 
land porous clay at 700 feet elevation; Amer- 
ican chestnut on three acres of upland clay 
at 570 feet elevation and mixed oaks and hick- 
ory on five acres of upland clay at 620 feet 
elevation. 



Ashe-rtUe, N. C. 

There has been little change in the hard- 
wood situation in western North CaroUna 
during the past thirty days. Prices still re- 
main firm with a demand equal to if not 
greater than the supply. The hardwood men 
are able to fill orders with some promptness, 
as the railroads are giving better service than 
for months past. With a dry season in the 
mountains a good supply of hardwood will be 
cut and made ready for shipment. 

A number of important deals in timber 
lands are pending in this section, but as yet 
none of importance have been consummated. 
Should some of the deals now pending go 
through several large tracts of splendid tim- 
ber will be opened up. 

The ten-mile Hume from the mountains In 
Jackson county to Dillsboro is rapidly near- 
ing completion. Less than three miles of it 
remain to be constructed. The flume will be 
put in operation by midsummer, when large 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



31 



boundaries of timber land will be opened and 
transportation of lumber and logs to railroad 
points made possible. 



Bristol, Va.-Tenn. 
The Smoky Mountain Land and Lumber 
Company of Monroe cou!ity. Tennessee, last 
week sold to the Babcook Limiber Company 
of the same county a tract of approximately 
43.000 acres of timber land, lying in the east- 
ern part of Monroe county. The considera- 
tion is said to liave exceeded $300,000. The 
land is said to be well wooded and easily 
accessible. It is understood that the pur- 
-chasers will develop the property as soon as 
]iossible. 

Irving Whaley. vicegerent of the Concate- 
nated Order of Hoo-Hop for east Tennessee 
snd well known in local lumber circles, has 
resigned his position with the Tug River 
Lumber Company in this city, and gone to 
CJiles county. Virginia, where he has pur- 
chased an interest in the East River Lumber 
Company and will have charge of the com- 
pany's mills at Tamiosh. 

F. G. GrifBn. European representative of 
J. A. Wilkinson of this city, was a visitor in 
Bristol last week as the guest of Mr. Wil- 
liinson. Mr. Griffin has been with Mr. Wil- 
kinson, with headquarters at London, for the 
past three j'ears. He has gone to Mobile, 
-\la., and other southern points to look after 
lumber interests. 

H. M. Hoskins of the H. M. Hoskins Lum- 
"Ijer Company, has become interested with C. 
M. Ryburn. also of this city, in the Little 
Creek Lumber Company, in Pulaski county, 
Virginia. This compan.v, of which Mr. Hos- 
]\ins i.-i vice president, has leased eight miles 
■of railroad in Pulaski county, leading to a 
;0.000-acre tract of timber land which it owns 
and is preparing for extensive development. 
The company will install a big band mill at 
i^nce. 

The H. M. Hoskins Lumber Company is en- 
gaged in initting in circular mills on its tim- 
ber property eight miles north of Bristol. 

Among the visitors on the local market last 
week were James Faulkner. Faulkner Lumber 
Company, Damascus, Va.; R. G. Rogers. Ten- 
nessee Lumber and Manufacturing Company, 
Sutherland, Tenn.; T. H. Carrier, Adventure 
lyumber Company. Butler, Tenn.; Paul W. 
Fleck. Paul W. Fleck Lumber Company. 
Philadelphia: J. H. Smith. J. J. and A. H. 
Jones. Philadelphia, and C, T. Aust. New 
Vork. 

The Tug River Lumber Company of this 
<ity is erecting a big hand mill at Horton's 
Summitt. Scott county. Virginia, and has 
purchased an additiOTial 3.00U-acre tract of 
larul in that county. 

O. C. Armitage and others of Greeneville, 
Tenn.. are preparing to erect a big furniture 
manufacturing plant at that place. 

J. W. Stiles of the Kingsport Lumber Com- 
pany was here from Johnson City last week. 
Mr. Stiles' company is operating a band mill 
and a circular mill at Caretta. McDowell 
county. West Virginia, and is receiving about 
a million and a half feet of lumber per motnh 
from this operation. 

J. H. Bryan of the Bryan Lumber Com- 
pany has returned from a business trip to 
North and South Carolina. He visited his 
company's mills in these states while away. 
L. C. Capps. formerly with the J. Walter 
Wright Lumber Company of Mountain City, 
Tenn,, has come to Bristol to enter the busi- 
ness with a local concern. 

George E. Davis & Co. of this city has 
purchased a tract of timber land in Virginia 
and is getting ready for extensive operation. 
The plant of the Empire Chair Company 
at Elizabethton. Tenn.. was destro.ved by fire 
May I'll, entailing a loss of $75,000 and throw- 
ing lL'5 men out of employment. The plant 



was insured for $i'5,000. It is understood that 
it will be reouilt, though General Manager 
E. M. Carrier is absent from Elizabethton. 
It was erected two years ago. 



Cincinnati. 

The Wiborg & Hanna Company of North 
Fairmouth has donated to the Improvement 
Association of that suburb a considerable 
amount of lumber to be used in protecting 
the ti-ees just planted. There were 550 of 
them and a large quantity of lumber will be 
needed to make the necessary protection. 
The Improvement Association is working un- 
tiringly to push the viaduct at Hopple street. 
When this is completed it will be a great 
convenience for the suburb and will also serve 
well the big lumber industry located there. 

"It seems that prosperity was never so 
universal as at the present time," said 
Thomas J. Moftett, the re-elected president 
Of the Cincinnati Lumbermen's Club, "The 
demand for lumber throughout the United 
States is unusually heavy, and England, 
France, Germany, Australia, South America 
and other countries are also enjoying an ex- 
traordinary business, which may be taken to 
indicate that general trade conditions are 
splendid. And the prospect is for a con- 
tinuance of the prosperous situation. The 
demand has been so heavy that stocks are 
very low and, although a vast amount of lum- 
ber is being produced, it is taken up so rap- 
idly that there is no opportunity to accumu- 
late stocks. Prices have an upward tendency. 
Conditions in the East are fine, and the South 
and West likewise are busy, absorbing rapid- 
ly the lumber that is produced. Cincinnati is 
the biggest hardwood lumber center in the 
world and naturally gets her share of the 
large business that is now being transacted." 
James Albert Green recently spoke before 
the Carriage Makers' Club on Panama, and 
was complimented by the various local pa- 
pers for his efforts, both in a literary way 
and in his illustrations. The annual outing 
of the club will be held June 15, and will 
consist of a steamboat ride to New Richmond, 
luncheon to be served on board. 

The Bell Belting and Supply Company of 
Cincinnati, was incorporated lately with a 
capital stock of $25,000 by Oliver G. Bailey, 
James G, Fenwick. Michael Roehrer, Thomas 
J. Bell and Abner Thorp, Jr. 

John McGrath of the Eberhard CaiTiage 
and Buggy Supply Company, who has been 
located in this territory for many years, has 
been transferred to Cleveland, where he and 
his family will make their future home. 

At the meeting of the Furniture Exchange, 
held last week. Colonel Henry LTcthman pre- 
sided, owing to the indisposition of President 
William J. Sextro, who is mourning the loss 
of his father, the late Joseph G. Sextro. 
pioneer fui-niture manufacturer and promoter 
of the first furniture exposition ever held in 
America. Eulogies on the life of the late 
member. Joseph G. Sextro, were pronounced 
by many of his associates. The committee 
on outing reported that Highland Grove had 
been secured for Saturday. June S. The regu- 
lar baseball game between manufacturers and 
supply men will be held in the morning, and 
in the afternoon the dealers and manufac- 
turers will meet. Bowling prizes will also be 
off€ red. 

The Jacoby Lumber Company of Dayton, 
O.. is the name of a new company incorpo- 
rated with a capital stock of $50,000. The 
incorporators are Peter Kuntz. Peter Kuntz, 
Jr., John A. Payne, Dennis Dwyer, Hugh E. 
Wall and John Kuntz. 

B. F. Dulweber of John Dulweber & Co. is 
much improved after having undergone a sur- 
gical opei-ation. Mr. Dulweber has suffered 
from stomach trouble for some time and it is 



hoped he will now be entirely tree from this 

annoyance. 

George Littleford of the Littleford Lumber 
Company is rapidly recuperating from an at- 
tack of typhoid fever. He is still confined to 
his home, but expects to be out again within 
a few days. 

William E. Delaney, general manager of 
the Kentucky Lumber Company, has re- 
turned from a successful business trip in the 
South. He stayed in Cincinnati only a few 
days and then left for Burnside, Ky., where 
the company runs a large sawmill. He ex- 
pects to return to the Queen City in a week. 

George Ehemann of Bennett & Witte will 
be married next month to Miss Lillie E. Mor- 
ris of Memphis, Tenn. Mr. Ehemann has 
charge of the Memphis office of the company, 
and is very popular in the trade. 

St. Louis. 

The Moore Company has moved its offices 
to suite 1717 in the new Lumbermen's Build- 
ing. 

The regular monthly meeting of the Board 
of Directors of the St. Louis Lumber Ex- 
change was held on May 10. Only routine 
business was transacted. 

Among recent visitors to this market were 
the Hon. Gifford Pinchot, United States For- 
ester, and R. S. Kellogg, also of the Forest 
Ser\-ice. 

Clarence Boyle of the Heath-Witbeck Com- 
pany, Chicago, is making a trip to the com- 
pany's mills in Arkansas, and stopped off in 
this city for a short time. 

J. C. Magness, of J. L. Phillips & Co., 
Thomasville, Ga., was a recent St, Louis vis- 
itor. Mr. Magness' concern is a great factor 
in the car and railroad equipment business, 
and handles the cut of a number of saw mills 
in all parts of the country, representing an 
output of about 10.000,000 feet per month. 

A number of prominent lumber and ma- 
chinery men have been in St. Louis within 
the past two weeks; among them R. M. Mer- 
rill and H. G. Buckner, in charge of Missis- 
sippi and Alabama interests of the Interna- 
tional Hardwood Lumber Company of this 
city; Samuel Disston of Henry Disston's Sons, 
Philadelphia; J. W. Thompson of the J. W. 
Thompson Lumber Company, Memphis; A. R. 
Vinnedge of the A. R. Vinnedge Lumber Com- 
pany, Chicago. 

Building operations for April compare un- 
favorably with those of the same month last 
year, possibly owing to the fact that the lat- 
ter was the banner month in number of per- 
mits issued in the history of this city. The 
totals for the two were $4,459,715 and $2,- 
560,447. 

The Thomas & Proetz Lumber Company 
has secured the services of G. M. Bailey, who 
resigned his position as inspector with the 
St. Louis Lumber Exchange. 

The Chas. F. Luehrmann Hardwood Lum- 
ber Company is making more or less of a spe- 
cialty of red gum, which they are pushing to 
the front as much as possible; their yards are 
well stocked, and they report that they are in 
a position to take care of a good trade. 



Nashville. 

The Board of Trade and the lumber inter- 
ests of Nashville are much pleased with the 
success of the special committee which went 
to Cincinnati and secured for this city the 
headquarters of the Hardwood Manufacturers* 
Association of the United States. It was 
jiointed out that Nashville is the natural and 
actual center of hardwood activity. While 
other hardwood sections has been cut out, the 
territory tributary to Nashville is Just being 
developed, especially North Alabama, North 
Georgia, etc. 

Lewis Doster. the genial secretary of the 
association, will come to Nash\ille the early 



32 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



part of June ana will take offices in the new 
Stahlman skyscraper, Nashville's largest and 
handsomest building. 

Several of the most prominent lumber firms 
in this city have manifested a keen interest 
in the trial of two men in the criminal 
court of Davidson county on the charge of 
committing acts of vandalism on Cumberland 
river, consisting of the theft of rope with 
which rafts were tied and the cutting loose of 
rafts, causing lumbermen much damage and 
loss. For years Nashville lumbermen have 
been held up by a gang of river pirates who 
charged them with catching lumber that had 
"broken loose." for bankage. etc.. and they 
have found it cheaper to pay than to refuse. 
Catching the offenders, however, has been the 
difficult part. Recently they got the "dead 
wood" on one defendant, J. D. Miller, and 
several of the local companies combined in a 
prosecution, chief among them being John B. 
Ransom & Co.. Lieberman. Loveman & 
O'Brien. Davidson-Benedict Company. Prewitt, 
Spurr Manufacturing Company and the South- 
ern Lumber and Box Company. Miller re- 
ceived a sentence of three years in the peni- 
tentiary and three sentences of three months 
each on the county road. Miller and his ac- 
complice were charged with having cut loose 
five rafts containing some 1.800 valuable logs. 

Walter E. Knox, general manager of the 
Nashville Terminal Company, announces that 
he has secured for Nashville another big lum- 
ber concern, one that will handle 1.000 cars 
of lumber annually. The plant is now nego- 
tiating for a site on the lines of the terminal 
company and the matter will be closed up in 
a few days. A specialty will be made of han- 
dling hardwood. The company will have 
plenty of capital back of it. 

The properties of the Powell Lumber and 
Mining Company at Crossville, Tenn.. have 
been sold to H. M. Alexander of the Coleman 
Lumber and Mining Company with headquar- 
ters at Williamsport. Pa. The purchase price 
was $77,000. The purchasing company now 
owns about 12.000 acres of timber land in 
Cumberland county and estimates the timber 
on it at about 60.000.000 feet. Quite a boom 
is reported in the lumber business at Cross- 
ville. 

The Journey & McCombs Slat Factory, de- 
stroyed by fire recently, is again in operation. 
The new factory is much larger than its pred- 
ecessor. 

The Davidson-Benedict Company has decided 
to move its plant at Cedar Hill. Tenn.. on the 
Washington estate, to a point near Monterey, 
where the company also has large undevel- 
oped holdings. 

J. H. Baskette. former general manager of 
the Prewitt-Spurr Manufacturing Company, is 
winding up his Nashville interests preparatory 
to his depai-ture to take charge of a big wood- 
enware factory at Helena. Ark. 

Lieberman. Loveman & O'Brien have re- 
cently added a cross-tie department to their 
business and are cutting a good supply of 
them at their Nashville mill. Love. Boyd cS: 
Co. continue to do a big business in this line. 
This firm is probably the pioneer in that busi- 
ness in Nashville. They have recently sold to 
the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Company 
several hundred thousand ties at this point. 

Much activity is reported in the counties 
bordering on the Tennessee river in this state. 
In Wayne, Hardin. Perry and Decatur a num- 
ber of important land and timber sales are 
reported and St. Louis and Chicago tie con- 
cerns have made heavy purchases in that sec- 
tion. 

The Jones & Woodfolk Lumber Company 
is a new concern organized at Lexington, 
Tenn., by Chicago. Louisville and Lexington 
capital. Will J. Jones of Chicago was made 
president; J. A. Woodfolk of Louisville, vice 



president, and Thomas E. Graper of Lexington 
general manager. 

A big timber deal is reported from Sparta, 
Tenn., on the McMinnville branch of the N. C. 
& St. 1j. The consideration for the timber 
properties in the Second and Tenth districts 
of White county is said to be $45,000. The 
property was bought from J. W. McClure, 
agent for the Eastland heirs, by J. T. Ander- 
son. O. H. Anderson. John M. Welch. J. A. 
Wilson and J. R. Tubb. 

W. B. Bynum and Guy Alexander of Glea- 
son, Tenn.. have purchased a large tract of 
oak timber in northern Alabama and will erect 
two or three stave mills there in the near 
future. 

Memphis. 

Recent heavy rains throughout this terri- 
tory have further interfered with logging and 
milling operations. There is a pronounced 
scarcity of timber and this is proving a se- 
rious handicap. The past five days have been 
clear, but the ground is so wet that very lit- 
tle progress is being made in the woods and 
it may be some days before much can be 
accomplished in getting out timber. Most of 
tlie smaller mills are out of business altogether, 
while some of the larger have been forced to 
suspend operations for the time being. 

The Darnell-Love Lumber Company has filed 
application for an amendment to its charter 
to increase the capital stock from $25,000 to 
$250,000. R. J. Darnell. A. M. Love. R. J. 
Wiggs and other officials signed the applica- 
tion. The company was established five years 
ago at Leland. Miss. It has been operating a 
big band mill at that place and is now in- 
stalling another one there. This, together 
with large purchases of timber lands and the 
building of a standard guage railroad, is the 
reason for the increase in capitalization. The 
Darnell-Love Lumber Company is affiliated 
with R. J. Darnell. Inc., Mr. Darnell being 
president of both corporations. 

R. J. Darnell. Inc.. is now completing its 
new double band sawmill and veneer plant in 
South Memphis. The new machinery will soon 
be ready for operation. The management ex- 
pects to have everything running by July 1. 

The Crittenden Railway Company, which be- 
gan some months ago the building of a stand- 
ard gauge railroad from Earl to Heth. Ark., 
has completed the main line as well as the 
branch to Parkin. Ark., where the Lansing 
Wheelbarrow Company has extensive milling 
interests, and everything is now in readiness 
for the operation of trains. The road fur- 
nislies a connecting link between the Chicago, 
Rock Island & Pacific at Heth and the St. 
Louis. Iron Mountain & Southern at Earl, thus 
giving lumber interests at the terminals and 
at intermediate points the use of both roads 
without having to depend altogether on a sin- 
gle line. F. E. Stonebraker. general manager 
for the Lansing Wheelbarrow Company in the 
South, is president and general manager of 
this road. 

A number of gentlemen prominently inter- 
ested in the Lamb-Fish Lumber Company 
were in Memphis a few days ago, including 
Col. LaFayette Lamb, president of that cor- 
poration, who makes his headquarters at Clin- 
ton. Iowa, and J. M. Studebaker of the 
Studebaker Wagon Company, South Bend, 
Ind. Col. Lamb came down on his houseboat 
and with him were a number of friends. It 
is understood that while Mr. Studebaker was 
here he looked over the field very carefully 
and picked up a good lot of wagon stock. 

There was a called meeting of the Lumber- 
men's Club at the Hotel Gayoso. May 11, at 
which the report of the River and Rail Com- 
mittee, covering the conference recently held 
here between that committee and high ofB- 
cials of the railroads entering this city, was 



formally presented. The report was read by 
A. L. Foster, one of the members of the com- 
mittee and himself an old railroad man. It 
stated that the committee had considered 
means of preventing a recurrence of the un- 
favorable conditions which have recently pre- 
vailed rather than present relief, the feel- 
ing of the members being that relief would 
come through a reduction in the volume of 
traffic. It further stated that, in the opinion 
of the committee, the railroads were doing- 
all they could, not only for immediate relief, 
but for the prevention of a recurrence of the 
trouble. The report contained a lengthy quo- 
tation from a prominent railroad official, to- 
the effect that the railroads were in the trans- 
portation business; that their revenue was de- 
rived from handling this business and that, 
since this was the case, they were doing a.U 
they could to solve the problems confronting- 
shippers; that the railroads had submitted the 
various features of the traffic problem to the- 
most experienced committee of railroad men 
obtainable; that the recommendations of this 
committee would be submitted to the Ameri- 
can Railway Association, which would not 
adopt them unless they were practical, and 
that the main question right now is "What 
can shippers do to help the railroads?" 

The report states that statistics were cited, 
showing that a large percentage of equipment 
is being held at important junction points be- 
cause the delivering lines are unable to effect 
immediate delivery, receivers being unable to 
find storage room or being slow in unloading 
cars after delivery has been effected; that 
thousands of cars are being held at the va- 
rious seaports, awaiting the convenience of 
ocean carriers; that many of the railroads of 
the smaller class have found it cheaper to 
borrow cars than to build them, with the re- 
sult that the stronger lines connecting with 
the weaker systems have, against their most 
earnest protest, been deprived of a large por- 
tion of their equipment. In this connection 
the committee expresses the belief that the 
raising of the per diem rate from 25 to 50 
cents per car will have the effect of making 
it cheaper for the weaker lines to build their 
cars than to borrow them and points out that 
Ihey have already placed orders for enough 
equipment to materially relieve the situation. 
At this meeting two important papers on 
phases of the transportation problem were 
heard. One was prepared by C. D. Hendrick- 
son and read by Secretary John W. McCIure. 
In this the writer made a plea for justice on 
the part of the public, the legislatures and 
shippers toward those railroads which are 
striving honestly to improve the disastrous 
conditions of the past and to prevent their re- 
currence in the future. The other was from El- 
liott Lang, formerly secretary of the National 
Lumber Exporters' Association and now con- 
nected with R. J. Darnell, Inc. The main 
feature of his paper was the necessity for 
relying on the national laws for the correc- 
tion of transportation evils, his contention 
being that the states, which are trying to 
correct evils by legislation, have no power to 
enforce their enactments where interstate 
commerce is concerned. 

Much interest has been lent to the 14-foot 
channel from the lakes to the gulf by the 
presence in this city a few days ago of the 
Inland Waterw.ays Commission, of which 
Congressman Burton is cliairman. This offi- 
cial delivered an address in which he ex- 
pressed the belief that the plan was feasible, 
but in which he further declared that, be- 
fore it was realized, it would be necessary to 
create additional public interest therein. 

It is announced in the press dispatches 
from Washington that President Roosevelt 
has accepted an invitation to come down 
with the commission on its trip to Memphis 



next fall. He is in sympathy with the move- 
ment, and it is believed he will incorporate 
important recommendations in regard there- 
to in a future message to Congress. 

Lumbermen here generally concede that, if 
there is to be complete relief from the traffic 
conditions which recur ever>' year during the 
period of heaviest freiglit movement, it will 
oome through the impro\-ement of the water- 
ways and tlie liundling of tlie heavier and 
more bulky traffic thereon. For this reason 
they are taking deep interest in the move- 
ment. 

C. C. Lataner of Montpelier. O.. has be- 
come interested in the General I.umljcr Com- 
pany, which has offices in llie Randolph 
building, this city. It is understood that he 
has become equally interested with Messrs. 
Bailey and Bookmiller. the other two stock- 
holders therein. 

The Ostermann Miinufacturing Company is 
about ready to begin the operation of the 
branch plant in this city which is to manu- 
facture car stock to be used in the plant of 
the company at West Pullman, 111. E. H. 
Ward is to be manager of the local interests 
of the company. 

H. Katz, of the American Land. Stave and 
Timber Company, with offices in the Tennes- 
see Trust building, lias sailed for Europe, 
where he will spend some time looking after 
the interests of his firm. Fred B. Zupke. 
one of the vice presidents of the Darnell- 
Taenzer Lumber Company, Is also another 
of tile local lumber contingent who recently 
left for Europe. 

The consolidation of the offices and office 
forces of the two concerns which recently 
combined in the Darnell-Taenzer I-umben" 
Company has not yet been completed and it 
will require some time before it will be ef- 
fected. Enlargement of the offices of the 
old I. M. Darnell & Son Company was neces- 
sary and this work is not yet finished. Tlie 
company, however, liopes to have everything 
in readiness soon for operation from a single 
office. 

J. W. Thompson, president of the J. W. 
Thompson Lumber Company, left here some 
days ago for St. Louis, Chicago and New 
York. From the latter point he will go to 
Atlantic City to attend the annual meeting 
of the National Hardwood Lumber Associa- 
tion. The company is in receipt of advices 
from the manager of its Berclair (Miss.) 
mill to the effect that the recent rains will 
enable the floating out of 500,000 feet of 
cypress. As a consequence the company is 
now making preparations for resuming op- 
erations there. 

The Kimball- Lacy Lumber Company of Ar- 
kansas City is authority for the statement 
that it is getting out a large quantity of 
Cottonwood timber on this rise in the Ar- 
kansas river, its float being estimated at 
about 1,000.000 feet. 

George H. Foote, local manager for the 
Fullerton-Powell Hardwood Lumber Com- 
pany, with headquarters in the Tennessee 
Trust building, has recently returned from 
St. Louis and other points north. 

W. H. Greble of the Three States Lumber 
Company is another local lumberman who 
has recently made an extended trip to north- 
ern and western markets. 

The Robertson-Fooshe Lumber Company 
has filed appUcation for a charter with a 
capital stock of $50,000. It will be ready for 
business June 1. Yards and offices will be 
at North Second street and the Illinois Cen- 
tral road. F. B. Robertson is president; S. 
B. Anderson, vice president; George W. 
Fooshe. secretary, and C. J. Tully. treasurer. 
Privilege of manufacturing and of handling 
hardwood lumber at wholesale is conferred 
by the charter. 

The Marked Tree Lumber Company, with 



HARDWOOD RECORD 

a capital stock of $750,000, the Chicago Mill 
and Lumber Company, witli capital stock of 
$25,000, and the Paepcke-Leicht Lumber 
Company, with capital stock of $25,000, have 
complied with the new corporation laws of 
Arkansas by Hling their articles of incorpora- 
tion. A. C. Liinge is named as state agent 
for all three companies and the principal 
places of business as jiesignated are Marked 
Tree and Blytheville. Two of these com- 
panies have local offices in Memphis, 



33 



New Orleans. 



The New Orleans Lumber Exporters' Asso- 
ciation has joined hands with the Public Belt 
Railroad Commission in an effort to have the 
Board of Port Commissioners of New Or- 
leans construct at some place along the river 
front of this city, a big wharf which will be 
used exclusively for handling of export lum- 
ber. This matter was broached by J. H. Hin- 
ton, president of the Exporters' Association 
at a recent meeting of the Belt Commission 
and has attracted considerable attention 
here. At present the lumber exporting indus- 
tory gets comparatively little consideration 
along the New Orleans wharves with the re- 
sult that this port does not export anywhere 
near the. amount of lumber it should handle. 
The agitation over this question, however, 
will in all probability result in a change that 
will divert to and through New Orleans sixty 
per cent of the southern lumber manufactured 
for foreign shipment. The matter will at 
once be taken up witli the dock board and 
an effort will be made to have that board 
build a $200,000 wharf to be devoted entirely 
to lumber shipments. It is understood that 
the members of the board are in favor of 
building such a structure and will do so just 
as soon as they can get the necessary funds. 

W. A. Powell, former head of the W. A. 
Powell Lumber Company, a. big exporting 
firm which is now in the hands of a receiver, 
was in one of the inferior criminal courts 
here last week on the charge of embezzling 
cargoes of lumber and staves valued at some- 
thing over $12,000. The flrst charge was 
preferred by the German^American National 
Bank and the second by the Hibernia Bank 
and Trust Company, both of which institu- 
tions alleged that they had advanced money 
on shipments and had never received the bills 
of lading. In the case of the German-Ameri- 
can National it was alleged that a shipment 
of French claret staves had been embezzled, 
while the Hibernia Bank charged that Pow- 
ell had embezzled a cargo of lumber valued 
at something over $10,000. The accused was 
committed to the Criminal District Court 
under bond of $10,000. He will be tried there 
on the two charges of embezzlement. In its 
recent report to the United States Circuit 
Court. the Commercial-Germania Savings 
Bank and Trust Company, receiver for Pow- 
ell's Company, estimated that the firm's lia- 
bilities would exceed the assets by $200,000 
or more. 

The Wright -Blodgett Company, Ltd., of 
Saginaw. Mich., has just transferred to the 
Gulf Lumber Company of Louisiana an 80,000 
acre tract of land in 'Vernon, Rapides and 
Calcasieu parishes, this state, the considera- 
tion being $4,197,454, of which amount some- 
thing over $1,000,000 was paid in cash. 

The Lecompte Lumber Company has been 
succeeded by the Oberlin Lumber Company, 
whicli has an authorized capitalization of 
$50,000. The officers are: G. W. Gainnie. 
president; N. C. Waggoner, vice-president 
and general manager; K. M. Gainnie. secre- 
tary and treasurer. 

Advices from Mississippi state that the 
lumber exporters of Gulfport have been having 
all kinds of trouble with their shipments of 
late as a result of the heavy rains which have 



caused washouts all along the lines of the 
railroads leading into the Mississippi lumber 
exporting center. The Gulf & Ship Island 
one of the principal lumber hauling roads 
was tied up practically all of last week by 
the several washouts. From last Tuesday 
to last Sunday it was unable to move a train 
and It was not known when the service 
would be straightened out. The Mobile 
Jackson & Kansas City also suffered from 
washouts, but the freshets along its lin,. were 
not quite as serious as those which tiod-up 
the G. & S. I. ^ 

Though the interior demand on hardwoods 
continues good, the foreign market is not as 
steady as it has been and exports from this 
section have fallen off. The end of the crop 
season is enabling lumbermen to handle their 
interior business in better shape, however 
and they are keeping that trade in good con- 
dition. Not a great deal of difficulty is being 
experienced in getting cars at present and a 
large amount of the output of the Louisiana 
hardwood mills is going into the interior and 
is being handled very well. 



Minneapolis. 



The Minnesota metropolis will contend 
for the honor of entertaining the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association in 1908. The 
proposition was put forward May 20 at the 
monthly meeting of the Northwestern Hard- 
wood Lumbermen's Association, and was re- 
ceived with unanimous favor. A. E. Peter- 
son of St. Paul was the propounder of the 
idea, and that is enough to show that the 
Twin Cities are better friends than they used 
to be. D. F. Clark and A. H. Barnard, who 
are the only Twin City men to attend the 
Atlantic City gathering, will present the in- 
vitation. 

The meeting of May 20 was of special in- 
terest in the discussion of grades. D. F. 
Clark, who is a member of the Grading Rules 
Committee of the National Association, ex- 
plained the changes in rules which the com- 
mittee decided to submit to the Atlantic City 
gathering, and they were freely discussed. 
Frank H. Long, one of the official inspectors 
of the National Hardwood Lumber Associa- 
tion, was present and took part in the dis- 
cussion. Mr. Long is looking over the ground 
here, and if there is work enough to keep 
him busy, expects to locate permanently in 
Minneapolis. 

Complaints against the overcharges of the 
Minnesota Transfer officials were taken up by 
the state railroad and warehouse commission 
at a public hearing May 21. It frequently 
happens that lumbermen send word as to the 
disposition of a car, that the transfer com- 
pany employees disregard the order and set 
the car out on the team track, and then hold 
the shipper for switching charges for their 
own mistake. Complaints of this kind have 
been so numerous that the state commission 
set a time to take them up and notified the 
complainants. Several hardwood men ap- 
peared in the hearing. 

C. F. Osborne of Osborne & Clark, the 
Minneapolis wholesalers, has been on a trip 
in lUinois looking over their retail yards at 
Erie and other points. 

Loren H. Pope of St. Louis, representing 
the Charles F. Luehrmann Hardwood Lum- 
ber Company, was here a few days ago call- 
ing on line yard buyers and factory managers 
with an attractive line of hardwoods to offer. 

W. H. Sill of the Minneapolis Lumber Com- 
pany says they are having no trouble to dis- 
pose of the new cut on long contracts to be 
filled during the fall and winter. They have 
a good supply of logs and will have a fine line 
at the mill of the Ruby Lumber Company, 
Ruby. Wis. 

F. M. Bartelme of the F. M. Bartelme Lum- 



34 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



ber Company says he has all the business on 
hand that he can take care of during the 
next month, and has foun,d a ready market 
for everything on his stock sheets. 



Toledo. 



In order to prevent a long drawn out fight 
and to protect members of National Associa- 
tions from being harassed by any evidence 
that might be given, the Toledo lumber deal- 
ers, recently indicted for violation of the Val- 
entine ,inti-trust law. entered their pleas of 
guilty and are now awaiting sentence. 

No intimation is given of what the sentence 
may be and it lies with the judge to fine 
them any amount between $50 and $1,000 or 
sentetice them fronn six months to one year 
in the workhouse, or both. This action on 
the part of the lumbermen caused no little 
surprise as it was commonly supposed that a 
long and bitter fight would ensue. Attorney 
Barton Smith represented the lumbermen. In 
addressing the court he said that he feared 
that the indicted men as members of the 
Credit Bureau might be found technically 
guilty of violating the Valentine law. He said 
that neither he nor they felt that they were 
morally guilty or guilty in the spirit of the 
law itself, but that there was likelihood that 
they could be found guilty on a technicality. 
For this reason he said he did not care to 
plunge his clients into a long and hard fight 
and that he would therefore enter pleas of 
guilty and ask the mercy of the court in pass- 
ing sentence. 

As a result of all this disturbance business 
has ''gone to the bad." There is nothing 
doing compared with what should be doing at 
this time of the year, and with the weather 
against builders prospects are for a very poor 
season. Record cold weather has been the rule 
during May, and this has had its effect on 
prospective builders. But the big drawback is 
the idea of narrow-sighted persons that since 
these lumbermen have been indicted the price 
of lumber is to be cut in two and that because 
of the indictment of the brick men and the 
plumbers other supplies will soon be given 
away for the asking. Many who are planning 
to build simply as an investment have de- 
ferred in hope of lower prices 

Another fact that is bothering lumbermen 
at this time is the announcement of the rail- 
roads that there is to be an increase in freight 
rates. This is particularly Important in this 
section because the oflicial announcement has 
already been made from Michigan points. The 
new ruling is the change in classification. This 
means a raise from five per cent to ten per 
cent in the rates. The railroads announce 
through their agents here that the raise is to 
enable them to increase their re\'enue, which 
they will have to do in order to meet their in- 
crease in wages and "the increased cost of ma- 
terials with which to keep up their roads 
Lumbermen are going to fight the action of 
the roads. They will probably enter a pro- 
test with the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion alleging that the new rate is unfair and 
unreasonable and not warranted. Just what 
the exact move will be cannot be stated as 
nothing can be done until the rate becomes 
effective and the roads try to operate under it. 
The sawmill and planing mill owned by 
Jacob A. Petty at Sycamore, O.. was wrecked 
by the explosion of the boiler a few days ago, 
and Charles Ludwig, an employee, was fatally 
hurt. 

Sampson Bice, vice president of the West 
Side Lumber Company of Dayton, Ohio, died 
last week, aged 70 years, as the result of an 
operation. 

The Baney Washing Machine factory is 
moving into the Burger Foundry building at 
Delphos, Ohio. 
The Dorr Street Lumber Company of To- 



ledo. Ohio, has been incorporated for $20,00r 
by C. G. Brigham. W. M. Hamilton and others 
Mr. Brigham is president and general man 
ager. Mr. Hamilton is secretary-treasurer. 

The Bowers & Conke Lumber Company of 
Massillon, Ohio, have dissolved partnership. 

At the annua! meeting of the West Wood 
Turning Company at Fremont. O., last week, 
a six per cent dividend was declared. E. B. 
Smith, president; A. E. Culbert. vice presi- 
dent; C. C. Bowlus. secretary-treasurer and 
general manager, were all re-elected. It was 
practically decided to erect an addition to the 
plant, costing in the neighborhood of $4,000. 

The majority of the creditors having at last 
consented to accept 30 cents on the dollar, the 
bankruptcy case of Bruner & Sons, owners of 
the stave factory at Tiffin, is in a fair way to 
be settled. W. K. Noble of Fort Wayne has 
deposited in a Tiffin bank the sum of $21,200 to 
secure the proportional payments, and as soon 
as the settlement is confirmed by the district 
court at Cleveland the old firm will begin op- 
erations on a new basis. 

Wauseon is to have a new handle factory 
and sawmill. The plant will be built and oper- 
ated by J. M. Cleveland and others of Indi- 
anapolis. It will be located near the junction 
of. the Wabash railroad and the Detroit, To- 
ledo and Iron road. 



Ohaxlotte, N. C. 

Fire, which originated in one of the dry 
kilns of the Goldsboro Lumber Company at 
Dover a few days ago destroyed three of the 
company's kilns and 110.000 feet of lumber, 
entailing a heavy loss. 

The Clarkton Planing Mill Company of 
Clarkton has been incorporated with a cap- 
ital stock of $25,000. O. L. Clark is the prin- 
cipal stockholder. 

The New Hope Lumber Company, recently 
incorporated, will erect a two-story building, 
costing $12,000. It will have an average daily- 
capacity of 25,000 feet of pine, oak, gum and 
hickory. 

The Moss Planing Mill at Washington, N. 
C, has been chartered with a capitalization 
of $125,000. B. G. Moss, H. N. Blount and 
W. T. Condon are the incorporators. 

The Avant Woodworking Company of 
Charlotte is beginning business, with W. A. 
Avant, manager, and C. A. Eastman, de- 
signer. Chairs and tables will be manufac- 
tured. 

A mass meeting of the North Carolina 
Case Workers' Association, composed of fur- 
niture manufacturers, was held a few days 
ago at Greensboro, N. C. The matters dis- 
cussed and acted upon are said to have been 
relative to the demoralized condition of the 
furniture market, although the sessions were 
executive, for which reason no more details 
of the convention are available. It is known, 
however, that for some months the manufac- 
turers of the state were concerned about the 
condition of the market. 

The Hardwood Novelty Company of Dur- 
ham, to manufacture hardwood novelties, 
bank furniture and fixtures of all kinds, has 
been organized with an authorized capital 
stock of $100,000. Eight prominent citizens 
of Durham are behind the movement. 

The Swansboro Lumber Company of 
Swansboro has been chartered and will be- 
gin business within a few days with a capi- 
tal stock of $250,000. T. H. Pritchard is the 
principal holder of stock. 

The Newton-Purdle Lumber Company of 
Elizabethton has been organized with a cap- 
ital of $40,000 by F. A. Addington and others. 

The Red Lyon Lumber Company of Bur- 
gaw is chartered with a capital of $100,000, 
most of which is held by W. F. Baughman 
of Pennsylvania. 

The Carolina Flumes Company is a new 
industry just starting business at Franklin. 



It has a capital of $40,000 and will operate 
flumes for timber. 

The Sprucement Lumber Company of 
Waynesville has been authorized by the sec- 
retary of state to operate with a stock of 
$30,000. 

The Globe Mantel . and Cabinet Company 
has established at High Point, N. C, and 
is beginning a thriving business. The com- 
pany occupies the plant of the High Point 
Hardwood Company, which has moved to 
the Standard Furniture Company's old fac- 
tory. This last named company has erected 
a new plant which it now occupies. 



■Wausau, Wis. 

The Bird & Wells Lumber Company of 
Wausaukee has purchased of C. A. Hutchins 
a large tract of timber land contiguous to 
other timber the company is cutting in For- 
est county. The timber, which is largely 
birch and maple, will be hauled by rail to 
the company's mill in Wausaukee. 

The north section of the Escanaba Manu- 
facturing Company's plant at Escanaba was 
destroyed by fire recently, entailing a loss 
of $75,000, covered by insurance. The fire 
was caused by an overheated dry kiln. The 
company will rebuild on a larger scale. 

The Stange-EUis Lumber Company, incor- 
porated last fall, has commenced the work of 
erecting its plant in Grand Rapids. The main 
factory building will be 96x100 feet in dimen- 
sions, and the power house 56x66 feet, the 
latter to enclose a 400 horse power engine. 
A sawmill will also be erected. The com- 
pany will manufacture sash, doors, interior 
hardwood finish, fixtures, etc. 

In Milwaukee recently the Newbold Land 
and Lumber Company was organized and in- 
corporated with a capital stock of $9,000. The 
oflicers are L. Peshong, president; J. D. Da 
Boule, vice president; Henry Wubker, secre- 
tary; Carl Krueger, treasurer. The general 
office of the company will be located in 
Rhinelander, and a sawmill will be operated 
on Wm. Doyle lake in Oneida county. The 
present holdings of the company are about 
1.000 acres of good hardwood lands, with 
options on about as much more. 

An addition to the veneer mill and installa- 
tion of more power are improvements being 
made by the Morgan Company of Oshkosh. The 
cost will be about $15,000. The addition to 
the veneer mill will add 20.000 square feet of 
floor space. It will be of brick and steel 
construction, three stories high. 

Two sawmills, operated entirely by elec- 
tricity, have been built in Oshkosh, one by 
the Oshkosh Logging Tool Company and the 
other by the Buckstaff-Edwards Company. 
The latter mill was built recently and has been 
an object of much curiosity among lumber- 
men. It has a capacity of cutting 15.000 feet 
daily. The company manufactures chairs, 
furniture, caskets, etc. Only eight men are 
required to operate the mill. 

Two measures have been brought into the 
assembly chamber of the Wisconsin legisla- 
ture which will engage the attention of lum- 
bermen generally. One was a set of resolu- 
tions, unanimously passed, memorializing con- 
gress to remove the tariff on lumber. The 
other is a resolution adopted providing for an 
investigation of the operations of alleged lum- 
ber and cement trusts in Wisconsin. The 
foi'mer resolution comes from a lumber state, 
and one which is overwhelmingly republican. 
It therefore, in a measure, places W^isconsin 
republicans in the position of demanding the 
removal of the tariff on one of their chief 
products. Both of these measures have re- 
ceived prominence because of the high prices 
charged in the state for building materials. 
There is a very strong feeling among farmers 
that building materials are costing too much 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



35 



and that the lime has come when there should 
be a cheapening of those articles. It was this 
feeling which led to the adoption in the as- 
sembly of the resolutions mentioned. It is 
believed that this feeling also will secure the 
adoption in the senate of the lumber and 
< i-niHnt investigation resolution. 



Ashland, Ky. 

Most of the timber that recently came out 
of Guyandotte and Big Sandy rivers is rafted 
and the river bank on both sides from Iron- 
ton, O.. to Huntington is crowded with logs, 
most of which are of superior quality. Nearly 
all the mills in this section have enough logs 
to keep them sawing until the first of next 
year; usually these mills have to shut down 
at least tliree months in the year, but, owing 
to the unprecedented runs of timber, will 
saw steadily. 

Jeff Tacket and James Sowards of Pike- 
ville are associated in the construction of the 
railway and other big undertakings for the 
Yellow Poplar Lumber Company, at Jane, 
near the breaks of the Big Sandy. 

The Acton Piano Company has had a repre- 
sentative looking over ground with a view to 
locating the company's works in this sec- 
tion. Catlettsburg will probably be selected 
as the site for the factory. 

W. T. Hubbard of Toledo. O., was a recent 
visitor in the Ashland markets. He bought a 
big bill of lumber from the Giles-Wright Com- 
pany. 

W. A. Cool of Cleveland and W. W. Reilly 
of Buffalo, N. T., were here recently. 

There is prospect of two large sawmills be- 
ing erected at Kenova, W. Va. 

The R. G. Page Lumber Company has re- 
cently bought a tract of timber land contain- 
ing several thousand acres, in the Big Sandy 
valley, near Paintsville. The tract will yield 
20.000,000 feet of extra fine poplar, oak and 
walnut lumber. A narrow gauge road and a 
big band mill will be built at once. 

John W. Kitchen has gone to Asheville, N. 
C, on business for Vansant. Kitcher & Co. 
R. H. Vansant and son Harold have been 
spending a few days in Elliott county, visit- 
ing relatives. 

W. H. Dawkins of the W. H. Dawkins Lum- 
ber Company is in Parkersburg and W. E. 
Berger of the same firm is in Logan, W. Va. 

The spoke works of the Breece Manufac- 
turing Company at Garrison, Ky., were to- 
tally destroyed by fire at a loss of $5,000. 
Ground is being cleared to rebuild at once. 

Mr. Evan Walker, a prominent lumberman 
of Pikeville. and Miss Josephine Francis of 
the same city were recently married in Pike- 
ville, and left for a visit to the groom's home 
in Philadelphia. 

Fire of unknown origin destroyed the plant 
of the Pike Lumber Company near Pikeville, 
Ky., on May 20. The loss will be several thou- 
sand dollars. 

On account of the rapid increase in busi- 
ness, the Fearon Lumber Company of Iron- 
ton has been obliged to put on a night crew 
at its mill. 

The main ofHces of the W. R. Vansant 
Lumber Company will "be removed from this 
city to Rush, Carter county, Kentucky, near 
to where the company is opening up a large 
tract of virgin forest. Mr. Vansant will re- 
move his family to the scene of his new 
operations, as will also James Hayes. 



Morehead, Ky. 

The Clearfield Lumber Company has re- 
ceived a new Climax engine to be used in 
hauling logs. It now has two engines and 
one log loader on its new railroad. 

S. M. Bradley has commenced work on 



another large boundary of timber, princi- 
pally oak, and is experiencing great difficulty 
in getting men and teams. 

There is really no improvement in the car 
situation here. It is still diflicult to get cars, 

W. J. Rice of Jackson, Miss., is here to at- 
tend the hearing of the case of the Winton 
Lumber and Manufacturing Company, bank- 
rupts, at Mt. Sterling, Ky., on May 23. Sev- 



eral attorneys here and at Ashland are in- 
terested in this case. 

We notice a very singular thing in freight 
rates at Ashland. The C. & O. charge 2 cents 
more per hundred on all freight out of Ash- 
land than other roads charge to same point.' 
This goes to show the C. & O. does not want 
business, and it is needless to say they are 
not getting the business from Ashland. 



Hardwood Market. 

(By HABD-WOOD SECOBD Exclusive Market Beporters.) 
Chicago. 



In the Chicago district trade in hardwoods 
is only fair. There is no particular snap in 
the market and in some instances lumber is 
being urged upon buyers. Of course, a good 
call remains for oak, ash and all varieties of 
wagon stock, wide poplar and Cottonwood. 
There is a fair demand for maple and bass- 
wood. Undeniably, the furniture people are 
disappointed in the volume of current sales, 
and this constitutes a large element of the 
local buying trade. A lessening demand is 
being felt by the jobbers. Owing to the short- 
age of stock at sources of supply, prices are 
being well maintained and the volume of trade 
as it is, is above normal. 



Boston. 



The market for hardwoods is firm. Whole- 
salers continue to complain of a great delay 
in shipments from mill points, although the 
trouble from this .source is not as bad as it 
was. The demand is moderately active. One 
of the leading wholesalers says he prefers to 
get notice of shipments having been made 
at present rather than new orders, although 
the latter are welcome. Some of the interior 
finish mills have been handicapped by a labor 
strike and as a result have not been large 
buyers. Furniture manufacturers are busy 
and are in the market for fair sized lots from 
week to week. A good demand for vi?neer of 
all kinds is reported. It is stated that since 
the marked advance in lumber took place 
more veneer has been used than previously. 
The yards in this vicinity are carrying fair 
sized stocks of hardwoods, and owing to the 
extremely high prices they are buying in 
moderate way only. 

Plain oak is in moderate call. It is reported 
that some sales have been made at lower 
figures than this, but where this has been 
so, it is found that the lumber does not come 
from the best sections of the country. Quar- 
tered oak is very firm with a fair call. One 
inch stock is held at $S5 to $S7. Considerably 
more interest is reported in black walnut 
than for several months. Offerings of this 
are not large and prices are very firmly held. 
Many believe that walnut is coming back 
into favor as wood for furniture. The call 
for maple flooring is moderate only. White- 
wood continues very firm with offerings of de- 
sirable dry stock small. Many of the southern 
mills have very little dry lumber on hand. It 
is reported that they have two customers for 
every lot ready for shipment. Cypress is in 
quiet call with prices well maintained. 



Ne-w York. 



The current volume of trade in hardwoods 
in the metropolitan district continues good in 
pretty much all branches. Notwithstanding 
the high prices which have prevailed for some 
months, the yard dealers, with a full apprecia- 
tion of the situation at mill points in the 
matter of supplies, have laid in good stocks, 
and a majority of the yards are today in pos- 
session of some very choice assortments of 



stock and are all looking to a good volume 
of summer and fall business. For this reason 
the demand in the wholesale market from 
the yard dealers has eased oft considerably 
of late except perhaps in choice or fancy car 
loads, for which there seems to be a specially 
good call. Also for glue-up table and furni- 
ture stock. This latter character of business 
is constantly increasing and is a very profit- 
able line of business for those wholesale houses 
handling it where they have proper facilities 
for supplying the wants in this line. Not- 
withstanding this easing off in the demand 
among the yards, the furniture, cabinet mak- 
ers and in fact the general manufacturing 
trade, both in the city and surrounding terri- 
tory, are very active and are supplying a 
good volume of buying orders to the whole- 
sale trade. 

Stocks of good lumber continue to be scarce, 
although there are some slight increases in 
offerings in certain lines due undoubtedly to 
the fact that the season is approaching when 
the new cut begins to be available for market. 
There is, however, no easing off in the mat- 
ter of prices, which continue very stiff and 
high all along the line. It has really been 
remarkable the prices which have obtained 
this year for good hardwood lumber and which 
have seemed to have no effect on the volume 
of demand, and it has indeed been a rich 
harvest for those houses who had foresight 
enough to lay in a good stock before the rise. 

Plain oak, ash, birch, chestnut and poplar 
seem to be mostly in call in the lumber line, 
with oak ship timber and heavy coarse hard- 
woods for construction work likewise moving 
freely in those channels. Beech is also in 
large call for boarding and planking and tem- 
porary construction work, and the trade 
therein is developing greatly as each season 
arrives. The whole hardwood situation in this 
section of the country is certainly on a very 
sound basis and the general opinion of the 
trade is that there will be a good and firm 
market for the balance of the year. 



Philadelphia. 

Although general activity is noticeable in 
hardwood circles, some members of the trade 
still report a slight dullness. This is at- 
tributed mainly to the belief that there is 
likely to be a drop in values, consequently 
some diffidence is felt in buying certain 
woods. The better posted dealers and con- 
sumers, however, realize that the bad weather 
recently experienced in southern producing 
sections will prevent accumulation of stock, 
which condition must keep values up, hence 
they do not hesitate to transact business on 
the prevailing schedule of prices. Fair sup- 
plies of logs have come in at mill districts, 
and a good deal of lumber is being turned 
out, but it is sold way ahead. 

Although reports show that the western 
furniture manufacturers are slacking up, there 
has been no indication so far of a let-up in 
the activity of the factories in eastern Penn- 
sylvania. The sash and door men continue 
prosperous, and are rushing things. Indoor 



36 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



finishing works keep up a hum, and rail and 
trolley building promise steady consumption 
of material during the summer months. Build- 
ing will be extensive, now that the strike 
among the bricklayers, stonemasons and gran- 
ite cutters has been called off. The veneer 
and cigar box men work day and night, and 
the box factories keep fairly busy. The rail- 
road service is reported but slightly better; 
whatever improvement there is has been spas- 
modic, and not to be relied upon for any 
length of time. 

Among the hardwoods, ash, poplar, chestnut 
and basswood lead, but are scarce. Oak is 
more plentiful and values hold steady. Gum 
keeps firm. Quartered white oak holds its 
own, cherry is moving fairly well and maple, 
both lumber and flooring, receives a good call. 
Dry stocks of all hardwoods are scarce, and 
there is no prospect of impro\'ement in this 
direction for some time to come. Veneer and 
cigar box lumber values are high and very 
scarce. 

Baltimore. 

Such changes as have taken place in the 
hardwood situation here are of no moment. 
With the exception of the common grades of 
oak, which, according to the statements of 
some dealers and manufacturers, have eased 
off slightly, the whole range of prices is firm, 
and the demand promises to remain sufficient- 
ly active all the summer to keep the price 
list strong. Stocks are in brisk demand. Ap- 
parently the requirements of the trade are 
as large as ever. If some of the big corpo- 
rations ha\'e deferred, for a time, improve- 
ments that would have called for the use of 
great quantities of lumber such improvements 
cannot be long postponed for the reason that 
the facilities to be supplied are urgently 
needed. This holds good especially of the 
railroads, which show a disposition to hold 
tack improvements, but their equipment is 
undeniably far behind the demands of traflic 
and some provision must be made before 
long. 

The export business is sufficiently brisk to 
call for liberal shipments, and the movement 
is large enough to hold out the prospect of 
a complete acceptance of the conditions 
which American shippers insist upon espe- 
cially with regard to inspection and measure- 
ment. Stocks abroad are low enough to en- 
courage purchases and no inifavorable factors 
have developed. Oak, ash and walnut are in 
good request on the other side and the for- 
wardings are large accordingly, while poplar 
also retains its activity, though the returns 
are said by some shippers to be lower on 
this wood relatively than are realized in the 
domestic market. The destruction of the new 
B. & O. pier here will be felt as a serious 
inconvenience by the exporters, especially 
as months must elapse before the work of 
rebuilding is well under way. The availa- 
bility of the improvement which was badly 
needed, has been deferred by the collapse for 
perhaps a year. Stocks in the hands of local 
dealers are relatively low at the present time 
and all the hardwoods are in good shape. 



Pittsburg. 

There has been little change in the hard- 
wood situation in Pittsburg since May 1. 
Hardwood wholesalers say that It is hard to 
get dry stock fast enough to meet demands. 

The building situation in greater Pittsburg 
is the most unhappy feature of the market at 
present. In spite of the fact that there are 
no strikes of consequence on hand, building 
lags and the local yards are accordingly buy- 
ing very little lumber. This affects the hard- 
wood men less than wholesalers of hemlock 
and the pines, but they are beginning to feel 
it a little. Their trade is held up very well 
thus far by the inquiries from manufacturers 



in the eastern and central states and also by 
the increased demand of late from the rail- 
roads and big industrial concerns. These 
latter are beginning to place orders that were 
held up indefinitely early in the spring when 
the railroad investigations were at their 
height. It is quite possible now that this 
business will come forward right along and 
help very materially to relieve the usual 
summer dullness. 

Oak is by far the best seller. The rapidity 
with which good oak lumber is being 
snatched up is shown by the fact that most 
of the hardwood wholesalers are sending out 
their buyers to pick up choice tracts of oak 
timber whenever they can find them. Many 
such purchases have been made lately and at 
a uniform advance over prices that were 
paid six or eight months ago. A few firms 
are buying very extensively in the Southwest 
and have worked up a splendid market in 
Cottonwood and southern oak for export 
trade. A large amount of this lumber is also 
being shipped up the Mississippi for delivery 
in the big manufacturing centers of the 
middle west. 

Chestnut is another wood that has a very 
strong hold on local buyers at present. Pi'ices 
range little higher than a month ago and the 
stocks are being picked over so carefully that 
even mill culls are in good demand. The 
minor hardwoods are selling well all through 
Ohio. Indiana and Michigan, as well as in 
the seaboard cities of the Atlantic Coast 
where Pittsburg firms have a very strong 
footing in the wholesale market. 



Buffalo. 



If there is any cliange in the hardwood 
lumber situation here it is in the line of bet- 
ter business, but as that was good enough 
all along there is not much need of close cal- 
culation along that line. There is not quite 
as much complaint of stock shortage as there 
was. though poplar is not coming in any 
faster than it is going out and there seems to 
be no hope of a full assortment again of 
either chestnut or ash. Dealers are getting 
fugitive lots of all these woods, but nobody 
is able to furnish a wood that will meet all 
demands. 

It looks now as though the three scarce 
woods would before long take the position 
in the trade that sycamore has already taken. 
It is so hard to get that the consumer does 
not ask for it to any extent and when a 
dealer gets a lot of it he finds that it sells 
very slowly. Poplar, chestnut and ash are 
quite easily grown, however, and when this 
country wakes up to the necessity of culti- 
vating timber they will return to general use. 
There is plenty of plain-sawed oak at pres- 
ent, some of the yards receiving liberal 
amounts of it and all finding that an assort- 
ment is quite possible. Some dealers report 
that birch is a trifle dull of late, .though it is 
pretty generally doing well. It has been a 
great help to the oak situation. 

Maple is coming forward as a much-needed 
wood, especially as it can be so easily used 
in place of ash. With maple, Washington 
fir and yellow pine to substitute for ash the 
gap is pretty well filled as a rule. 

Dealers find that there is more call for 
basswood and elm and are looking for it with 
some success, but they are not pushing gum 
or Cottonwood in this market. If they have 
any at their southwestern mills they find 
a better market for them there than to ship 
them here. 



Sagiuaw Valley. 



greatly facilitate the movement of lumber 
products. The market is' in good form. 
There isn't much dry lumber available in the 
market and prices are firm. Lumber that can 
be converted into box material is in active 
demands. Dry stock moves off rapidly and 
some firms are disposing of green lumber as 
it comes from the saw. Trade, in fact, all 
round is healthy, with indications that it 
will hold out strong during the year. 



Indianapolis. 

There has been considerable betterment in 
the car situation during the last fortnight. 
With lighter grain movement and the long- 
shoremen's strike in New York, which is de- 
laying export trade, more cars are available 
for lumber trafflc. Railroads operating in the 
state are also receiving an unusual amount of 
new equipment and the effect is noticeable. 
Without doubt the car situation is better than 
it has been in a long time and shippers have 
little complaint to make. 

Building is increasing. In April building 
fell off more than $120,000 as compared with 
April, 1906. 

The demand for all grades of hardwood is 
brisk with a specially heavy demand for all 
kinds of oak. Building activity is exception- 
ally heavy and the supply of hardwoods will 
probably be less plentiful from now on. All 
factories that use hardwoods are crowded with 
orders, the output only depending upon ship- 
ping and warehouse facilities. 



Bristol, Va.-Tenn. 

"The lumber business in this section is in 
fine shape." said M. N. Offutt, of the Tug 
River Lumber Company and Boice, Burns & 
Offutt, to the Hardwood Record representa- 
tive. "The mills are nearly all running regu- 
larly. The car supply is ample and the de- 
mand for stock in excess of the supply. Prices 
are good, and while some do not appear to 
be appreciative of present conditions, I am 
eminently satisfied." 

The yards are pretty well filled, despite the 
fact that lumber has been moving rapidly 
during the past fortnight. The car supply 
is much better and the lumbermen all report 
that they are having no trouble in this re- 
spect at present. 



Cincinnati. 

The demand for all grades of hardwood 
lumber in this market has, if anythin:?, 
showed improvement over that of the previ- 
ous two weeks. This fact is emphasized by 
the increase in the price of both poplar and 
gum. The advance in poplar has been con- 
templated for some time, but gum was not 
expected to take a jump. Both woods have 
advanced from $1 to $2 per thousand feet, 
but despite this fact the demand has not let 
up any. Both items find ready sale at the 
increased prices, and consumers are willing 
to pay the price asked if they can secure 
immediate shipment. The car situation has 
eased up, and dealers are doing a larger busi- 
ness. Tlie demand for oak, both white and 
quartered, is at its best and while the values 
have not advanced, dealers are securing top 
prices quoted for it. Building material of all 
kinds is in active request. Large improve- 
ments are being made in the suburbs, and 
the construction of cottages along the river 
banks for summer residences. Cypress and 
mahogany are being rapidly absorbed and 
prices are generally firm. The market has 
had a firm tone for some time and from 
present indications Will continue on that 
basis throughout the year. 



The car shortage is believed to be prac- 
tically a thing of the past. Shippers do not 
complain and freight agents say they are 
getting cars right along now. This will 



St. Louis. 



Buyers of hardwoods continue to put off 
purchases except for stock that they need for 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



37 



immediate use, evidently still hugging the de- 
lusion that the price schedule will shortly be 
lowered. This will not take place, and fur- 
thermore, it is not only possible but probable 
that consumers who wait very much longer 
before getting in their supplies will be serious- 
ly hampered by the usual fall car shortage 
when it comes time for delivery. All concerns 
are making strong efforts to replenish their 
:i-ard stocks during this temporary lull in de- 
mand, but although the car supply has im- 
proved, the few weeks of pleasant weather ex- 
perienced a month or more ago were not the 
forenmners of a good logging season, as they 
appeared to be, and were followed by ex- 
tremely heavy rains, which still continue, 
making the woods and all low land almost 
impassable. In fact, many mills in Missouri 
and Arkansas, as well as in parts of Louis- 
iana and Mississippi, have suspended opera- 
• ions. Even those large plants which are well 
equipped with logging roads have suffered 
from continued interruptions to work caused 
by floods and washouts. The general situation 
does not show any radical change over that 
uf a fortnight ago. 



Nashville. 

A general advance in prices was noted in 
the local lumber market last week. Poplar 
and ash were advanced, following a slight low- 
ering in prices on dry stocks the week previ- 
ous. Poplar continues to be a top-notcher in 
price and this wood along with ash is getting 
deai-er all the time. Many of the local lum- 
bermen, however, are making good money on 
poplar, as a large amount of it cut in this 
vicinity is owned or controlled by Nashville 
concerns. A slightly increased demand is 
noted for plain and quartered oak. An upward 
tendency is noted in walnut, beech and chest- 
nut. These woods have experienced advances 
from time to time during the past winter and 
early spring. The river has had a good tide 
on for some time and many logs have reached 
the market. The mills are all working full 
blast and on every hand there are indications 
of prosperity. The supply of railroad ties and 
poles is reported short owing to the fact that 
the farmers are busy getting their crops 
itlanted and have not had time to cut pbles 
and ties. Top prices are being paid here for 
these items. 

Memphis. 

The hardwood situation here continues 
quite healthy. The demand readily absorbs 
all the dry stock available for immediate 
shipment and there is therefore no pressure 
to sell. In some instances it is reported that 
prices are being shaded on the high grade 
gum, but there is nothing to indicate any 
special weakness in that item. Low grade 
gum is in excellent request and full prices 
are being paid therefor. Ash. cottonwood, 
poplar, cypress and all grades and descrip- 
tions of oak are in excellent request and 
prices are about as high as they have been 
at any time this season. Buyers are perhaps 
not quite as persistent as they were a short 
time ago, owing to the arrival of delayed 
shipments, but there is no difficulty in dis- 
posing of well-sawed, well-handled lumber at 
satisfactory values. The export situation is 



PORLAR 

Rough and Dressed 

SOUTHERN HARDWOODS 



M. A. HAYWARD 

1021 Saving and Trust Bldg., Columbus, O. 



hardly as healthy. Several exporters state 
that they are in receipt of advices indicat- 
ing the presence of considerable consigned 
stock on the other side, which is interfering 
somewhat with firm offers. The recent in- 
terference with production, growing out of 
the unfavorable logging and milling condi- 
tions, will, it is believed, result in a well 
maintained market for some time because 
assuring the continuance of the recent 
strained relations between supply and de- 
mand. The car situation is quite satisfac- 
tory. 



Minneapolis. 

Conditions are rather quiet all along the 
line at present. The dealers are devoting 
most of their energies to taking care of old 
orders, and cleaning up their business before 
starting in with the new year's cut. This 
line of activity will probably prevail until per- 
haps the end of June. Manufacturers in some 
lines claim they are doing a lighter business 
than last year, and conditions just at this 
time in the Northwest seem to warrant their 
statements. They are picking up dry hard- 
wood when it is offered, however, and not 
haggling about the price, though they are slow 
to eonti-act ahead for new stock at present 
prices. The sash and door factories are keep- 
ing well stocked on birch, oak and maple, as 
the building movement is heavy and calls for 
large quantities of hardwood finish. 

The railroad demand has fallen oft, and pur- 
chasing agents are sending out stories about 
retrenchment. They look a good deal like 
attempts to bear the market, however. The 
retail yards are not active in the market for 
any kind of lumber just now, and the outside 
demand for hardwoods is rather slow\ There 
is plenty, however, considering the low state 
of dry hardwood lumber, and the orders that 
dribble in are enough to pick the yards clean 
by .luly 1. Birch is running low and other 
northern woods are practically out of the 
market unless shipped green. Southern stock 
is coming more freely now, and about all the 
oak being received in the northwest is coming 
from southern mills. They are reporting a 
better car situation, but their stocks as a rule 
are very limited and likely to be closed out 
earlier than usual. 



Toledo. 



The demand is generally fair and as a 
consequence there is no marked difference in 
prices in the local hardwood market. There 
seems to be more effort to force buying than 
for some time, due largely to the failure of the 
building boom that was anticipated earlier in 
the season. 

The car situation is only fair. For the last 
two or three weeks things have been going 
along smoothly but this does not seem to be 
lasting. If a change comes and the demand 
grows unexpectedly as it should there is liable 
to be a big cry for material and prices may 
respond. 

Poplar is about the only wood that ha,s 
shown any material change during the week. 
The better grades are stiffer than ever but 
the lower grades are being offered to local 
consumers at off prices. The prices are still 
high enough, but they are some weaker than 
they have been for several weeks. Delivery, 
however, is not guaranteed. 



Liverpool. 

Chaloner's wood circular for May announces 
that arrivals from North American ports dur- 
ing April have been considerably less than 
the corresponding month last year. There 
have been no arrivals of oak logs the past 
month, but deliveries have been fair; prices 
remain unchanged; stocks are very light. The 
consumption of elm has been nominal and 



the stock is still sufflcient. Ash has been 
coming in in quantities which have kept the 
stock large enough. Walnut logs of prime 
quality and good size are in request, and for 
desirable shipments full prices would be ob- 
tained; boards and planks of this wood are 
in steady call at fair prices, according to 
quality and specification. There is a moder- 
ate demand for seasoned satin walnut boards 
of good quality, but logs are not wanted. 
Whitewood logs of good dimensions are bring- 
ing good prices, as are also boards and planks. 
Of birch logs there has been a fair import, 
and consumption has been good the past 
month: the stock is heavy and prices are 
still steady and unchanged; planks have been 
moderately imported and deliveries fair. Prime 
quality hickory logs sell at good prices. The 
market in African mahogany is in a very 
strong position, the demand being exceeding- 
ly active, and full values rule for medium to 
large logs in sound or fairly sound condition. 
Stocks are light and shipments will be well 
received. This is practically true of Cuban, 
Mexican and Central American mahogany 
also. Stocks in all varieties of this wood are 
much depleted. 

London. 

There is a fair amount of business doing, 
but it may be fairly said that it is of a 
forced nature. During the past fortnight 
close upon 400 carloads of lumber have ar- 
rived per the steamers from New Orleans 
and Newport News. These vessels have 
mostly oak lumber of various grades. Another 
steamer is shortly due from New Orleans 
and carries about 350 cars of lumber. 

Now, whilst it must be admitted that quite 
one- third of these cars have arrived under 
firm contracts the balance of say 500 cai-s 
have to be sold, and on a market that is 
exceedingly dull owing to the slack state of 
the cabinet and building trades here. Buyers 
are taking this opportunity whilst these 
stocks are being forced upon the markets to 
point out that there is an end at last to the 
high prices that have been ruling for some 
time. Be that as it may, why this quantity 
of lumber has been slumped upon the market 
so suddenly is a puzzle. Either prices are 
falling in the states and shippers are only too 
glad to ship goods against drafts, chancing 
the prices that these goods will realize 
when sold, after the heavy dock charges have 
accrued upon them; or this is the direct re- 
sult of the recent visit to the states of a rep- 
resentative of one of the firms of brokers 
here who sell on commission and urge ship- 
pers to send them lumber on consignment, 
a practice which has been so often strongly 
written against in this paper, and can only 
mean a great loss to parties concerned, as 
the London market cannot absorb this quan- 
tity foi" some months. 

Plain oak, there is a good demand for 
"dry" parcels of which the market is in need, 
but most of the parcels recently arrived do 
not fulfill this requirement. Quartered oak 
is in slightly better demand for boards and 
planks, and the demand for moulding strips 
of this wood is much greater than the supply. 

In satin walnut there is still a good de- 
mand for No. 1 common, but prime grades 
are neglected. In walnut, the arrivals have 
been light, but sufficient for the demand, 
and supplies certainly seem to be regulated 
according to the market requirements. 

All grades of whitewood are in good re- 
quest at fair prices, and unless heavy con- 
signments are made, prices bid fair to be 
maintained all the summer. 

Several large parcels of poor ash logs have 
arrived recently which are difficult to sell. 

Some very fine parcels of hickory logs have 
recently been seen on the quay, which have 
changed hands at good prices. 



38 HARDWOODRECORD 



AT COST 

IS AN UNCOMMON TERM AS APPLIED TO INSURANCE 

But this is the actual price of Indemnity against Fire Loss furnished by the 

Manufacturing 

Lumbermen's 

Underwriters 

THE STRONGEST INSURANCE ORGANIZATION 
TO-DAY IN AMERICA 



The saving is not on a — Only well built plants 

small portion of J with adequate protection 

your insurance but on the V^ and at least 

entire line. V five years timber 

There are other advantages / supply are considered 

equally interesting. ^ eligible. 



FOR LIST OF MEMBERS AND FURTHER INFORMATION, ADDRESS 



HARRY RANKIN 4 CO. Kansas City, Mo. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



WanMaMMe 

-SECTION- 



r 



Advertisements will be inserted in this 
section at the following rates : 

F*r one Insertion 20 cents a line 

For two Insertions 36 cents a line 

For three Inseriions 50 cents a line 

For four Insertions 60 cents a line 

Eight words of ordinary length make one line. 

Heading counts as two lines. 

No display except the headings can be ad- 
mitted. 

Remittances to accompany the order. No 
extra charges for copies of paper containing 
the advertisement. 



EMPLOYES WANTED. 



FOREMAN WANTED 

In machine room on piano cases and havo 
charge of about oO men. Good proposition to 
married men willing to locate in small town 
near Chicago. Address 

"X. T. Z.," care Hardwood Recokd. 



MANAGER WANTED 

In chair factory at Gardner, Mass. Man to 

run 12 dry bilus, who has had experience in 

the handling of hardwood dimension lumber for 

drying. State wages and e.Yporience. Address 

"E 25," care Hakdwood Record. 



WANTED— HARDWOOD INSPECTOR. 

Wanted — A young man not over 25 years, ex- 
perienced at measuring and grading Hardwood 
lumber, especially Poplar and Oak. A good 
position to a good, reliable man. 

C. J. FRANK, Logansport, Ind. 



LUMBER WANTED 



WANTED. 

300.000 ft. 4/4" to 8/4" guartered Oak, all 
grades. 

100,000 ft. 4/4" to 8/4" Walnut, all grades. 
Also Oak and Walnut logs. 
THE FREIBERG LBR. CO., Cincinnati. O. 

SMALL DIMENSION HICKORY 

In sizes of from li-V'xlJi" — 36" to 2"x2i4" 
— 39", tough, good wood, white or red. Send 
for specifications. 

L. T. LA BAR. Hackettstown, N. J. 



WANTED— SHORT HICKORY SQUARES 

In carload lots: AH White Grade: li/'X 
l%x26" and 14" to 42". In Red and White: 
l%xiyox26" and 30" to 42"; also l%xl%x 
66". Address 

VAN DEVENTER MFG. CO.. LTD., 
302 Cora Bldg., New Orleans, La. 



WANTED— CAH STOCK. 

Inspected and cash at mill. 

J. GUTHRIDGE. 
934 Monadnock Bldg., Chicago, 111. 



WANTED. 

5 cars each 4/4, 5/4. 6/4 and 8/4" Sound 
Wormy Chestnut. Quote f. o. b. Cincinnati. 
DUHLMEIER BROTHERS. Cincinnati, O. 



WANTED. 

Walnut logs 11" and up in diameter. Oak 
logs 24" and up and Hickory logs 14" and up — 
all good quality. Address 

H. V. HARTZELL, Greenville, Ohio. 



YELLOW PINE POLE STOCK 

Wanted — From reliable mills who under- 
stand how to manufacture No. 1 Pole stock, 
clear and straight grain quality, free from all 
detects excepting sap. 

AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg. Pa. 

WANTED. 

QUARTERED RED OR WHITE OAK. 

1x4x11, ley,, 19 & 20, lx3i/>xll, 161/, & 19, 
1x3x14, 1x214x14 — for delivery at Mound City, 

QDARTERED OAK CHAIR BACKS. 

IV1 to 6" wide, 15 and 17" long, for delivery 
at Port Washington, Wis. 

THE WISCONSIN CHAIR CO.. 

Port Washington. Wis. 



WANTED. 

4/4" Chestnut, all grades. 
4/4" Log Run Buckeye. 
4/4" Stained Sap Poplar. 
Address Lumber Department, 

NATIONAL CASKET Co., 
Hoboken, N. J. 



BASSWOOD WANTED. 

A few carloads 4/4 and S/4 Northern White 
Passwood dressed two sides. Quote price de- 
livered on New York rate of freight. 
H. J. ROSEVELT, 
66 Broad St., New York, N. Y. 

WANTED— DRY CYPRESS. 

2x5" and wider, 8 or 16', Ists and 2nds, 
selects or sound common. 

AMER. LBR. k MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 

WANTED— HARDWOOD LOGS. 

200,000 ft. 28" and up White Oak logs. 
200,000 ft. 12" and up Walnut logs. 
50,000 ft. 12" and up Cherry logs. 
C. L. WILLEY, 1235 S. Robey St., Chicago. 



DRY son YELLOW POPLAR. 

All grades and thicknesses, rough or dressed, 
wanted. Prompt cash. Willing to contract. 
AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO.. Pittsburg, Pa. 

OAK. 

We are In the market for plain sawed oak, 
all grades and thicknesses. 
P. G, DODGE & CO., 2116 Lumber St.. Chicago. 

OAK WANTED. 
3 and 4 inch White Oak ; also Mixed Oak ; 
also 12x12 Timbers and Piling of all kinds. 
CONTINENTAL LUMBER CO., 
1213 Monadnock Bldg., Chicago. HI. 

YELLOW PINE CAR MATERIAL. 

Long Leaf Car Sills, Switch Timbers and 
Decking wanted, rough or dressed. Also Long 
or Short Leaf Car Siding, 1x4 6"-9 or 18', also 
16' kiln dried and worked to pattern. Quote 
cash price f. o. b. mill. 

AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 



LUMBER FOR SALE. 



SOFT CORK WHITE PINE. 

High grade Michigan stock for sale, all 
thicknesses up to 4", bone dry, suitable for 
making patterns and fine cabinet work. 

AMER. LBR. & MFG. CO., Pittsburg, Pa. 



TIMBER LANDS FOR SALE 



FOR SALE. 

Timber lands in fee simple, 2..j00 acres. S. E. 
Missouri on St. Francis river. Good railroad 
transportation. Finest grade Oak. Gum, Tu- 
pelo, Cypress and Hickory. Money maker to 
work or hold : l.ooo acres more may be secured. 
R. F01iE.M4.N, St. Francis, Ark. 



FOR SALE. 

A new saw mill in operation cu'ting 30 to 
35 M ft. of hardwood lumber per day — with an 
abundance of choice Oak and Poplar logs and 
timber on hand, and with a supply of hardwooil 
timber to draw from that will last for years 
and can be bousht at right prices. Address 
"Box K 'i." care Hardwood Record. 



MACHINERY WANTED 



39 

- 1 



AT ONCE. 

If you are In need of machinery — new or 
second hand — a few lines in this column will 
place your wants before those who have Buch 
goods for sale. For particui.irs address 

Hardwood Record, Chicago, III. 



RAILWAY EQUIPMENT 



RAILS AND LOCOMOTIVES. 

All Inquiries for industrial railway equip- 
ment listed before Record readers will find 
ready response. 

Hardwood Record, Chicago, III. 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



WANTED. 

To contract with some experienced sawmill 
man, with complete band-mill outfit, to saw 
from ten to fifteen million feet Poplar and 
Oak timber. 

R. G. PAGE LUMBER COMPANY. 

Ashland, Ky. 

A SAWMILL OPERATOR 

With at least 25 to 00 M capital can obtain 
timber from an Eastern Tennessee hardwood 
tract 6,000 acres and stumpage based per thou- 
sand feet, pay when dry and shipped. Write 
for further particulars. A good chance for 
good timber and will warrant investigation. 
Address "D.," care Hardwood Record. 

MAPLE FLOORING MILL 

For sale. Located in Michigan and now in ac- 
tive operation. This plant is modern in every 
respect and making money. Will sell or take 
stock in new company. Owners have large in- 
terests elsewhere demanding personal attention. 
Address "MAPLE FLOORING," 

care Hardwood Record. 



WANTED— MANAGER. 

The advertiser, a large corporation, contem- 
plates starting a first-class Box and Veneer 
plant in the South, and desires to associate 
with a first-class, practical man to take full 
local charge. Man must have nad successful 
experience in similar work, be of unquestioned 
character, and be able to Invest from ten to 
twenty-five thou-saud dollars in the lousiness. 
The business will require a capital of one 
hundred to one hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars. The advertiser has ample capital to 
finance it. but desires investment Indicated on 
part of manager for business reasons, which 
will be apparent to the right man. Give In 
confidence full information in replying. Ad- 
dress "E. W. C," care Hardwood Record. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FACTS FROM PRACTICAL MEN. 

The Hardwood Record Is always In the mar- 
ket for articles on any and every feature of 
the hardwood industry. It wants practical 
statements of fact from practical men who 
know how certain things can be done In the 
best way. Literary quality not essential. Lib- 
eral pay for acceptable articles. Addresi 

Editor Hardwood Record. 



TRY A 




CLASSIFIED 


LINER 


IN THIS SECTION 


RESULTS WILL 


FOLLOW 



40 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Advertisers' Directori; [ 



NOHTHERN HARDWOODS. 



Alcock. John L., & Co 7 

American Lnmber & Mfg. Company.. 50 

Arpin Hardwood Lumber Company 52 

Babcock Lumber Company 50 

Beyer. Knox & Co 59 

Bliss & Van Auken ,,,, 12 



HARDWOOD FLOORING. 



Stearns Company. The 56 McCauley-Saunders Lumber Company. 11 

Stephenson, The L, Company 12 Mcllyain. J. Gibson, & Co 6 

59 McLean-Davls Lumber Company ] 2 Advance Lumber Company 51 

Arpin Hardwood Lumber Company... 52 
Bliss & Van Auken 12 

Sullivan. T.. & Co "" """ ' 

Boyne City Lumber Company . ' ' ' ' 54 I.^^^" ^"™''" Company 8 Nc-al-DoIph Lumber Co 12 

Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Company.'! ™ ?.".™'''"' - --. ^'"^^" Company 50 Nicola Lumber Company, The 



Stewart, I. N., & Bro. 

Stewart-Roy Lumber Company 56 McLean, Hugh, Lumber Company 69 

Stlmson, J. V 58 Miller, Anthony "59 

Stone, T. B., Lumber Company 50 Miller Bros 11 

59 Mosby, H. W., & Co. 



BO 



Cadillac Handle Company.... 3 Volhnar & Below Company 52 O Brien, John, Land & Lumber Co. .. „ „,..6.. ...-uaue. v^mpany . 

Carter, Frank, Company [.53 w^',""' ^T , T"""/' ''''' ^^ PaepckeLeicht Lnmber Company 4 Eastman, S. L., Flooring Company::: 

Cheat River Lumber Company 50 w! 1 ' ?' C '^'""''" Conpany 10 Pbila. Veneer & Lnmber Company.... 6 Penn Bros. Company.. ... 4 



Buffalo Maple Flooring Company, The 7 

Carrier Lumber & Mfg. Company 12 

Cobbs & Mitchell, Inc 3 

Cummer, Diggins & Co : 3 

Dwight Lumber Company. 

54 

flummer Lumber Company 49 Forman, Thos., Company 6 

P'''<^f' E. E 7 Haak Lumber Company ::::::: 37 

Radina, L. W., & Co 57 liilernational Hardwood Company •> 

Ransom. J. B., & Co 48 Kei-ry & Hanson Flooring Company... 5B 



jau iiarawood Lbr. Company 56 win„„ o V .T — J, r.. v o „ *° i^tf.ij a nauson riooring company... 55 

& Mitchell Inc Pany.. Ob Willson Bros. Lumber Company 50 Richmond Park & Co 10 Mitchell Bros. Company. . . 3 



Cherry River Boom & Luiiberco: : : ! "9 whiJe w^h" ^""P""'' 2° 

Chicago Car Lumber Company 10 wh Lr w '^T^'"' ' ; '•» 

Chivvis, W R Z W"'*™"' Wm., & Sons, Inc 6 

Cincinnati Hardwood" LbrV Company' ' '- ~-'^'^ - ^''°"'' Company 57 

Cobbs & Mitchell Inc i wr ■ • "^ - '" ■■ —f.'-j o 

Columbia Hardwood Lum'b'er'comnanv 11 ^ Ks^nsin Land & Lumber Company. 55 R"ter, W. M., Lumber Company 5 Nashville Hardwood Flooring Company 48 

Connor, R., Company . m ^i^,'"' .^°*"''"" ^^° ^ Rumbarger Lumber Company 1 Nichols & Cox Lumber Company. .... 65 

Stephenson, The I., Company 12 

Ward Bros 12 

Wilce, The T., Company 58 

Wisconsin Land & Lumber Company.. 55 



Company 53 

' o-i.ji mm anil Lbr. Co 411 

Crescent Lumber Company 56 



Crosby & Beckley Co.i The 

Crosby, C. P 

Cummer, Diggins & Co. . : 

Darling, Chas., & Co. . . 

Davis, John R., Lumber (iJm'pa'ny:" 

Davis, w. A ' 

Dennis Bros 

Dennis & Smith 'L'u'm'b'er'company" 
1) Heur & Swain Lumber Company 

Dixon & Dewey 

Dublmeier Bros 

Dwight Lumber Company 

Earle Lumber Company 

Ellas, G., & Bro " . 

Empire Lumber Company 

Ev'atTRetH" ^•="''" Company::. 11 
fIh E H ^^ """^ Company... 55 

Forman Company, 'ihoinas 

Freiberg Lumber Company, The 

clrCny^™^!' . .'^.-.'^"-a Lumb;; 

'ieiieral Lumber Compaiiv "-riie 

gS'j.I.'':.^':"':^^':-^-^-- 

Haak Lumber Company 

Hackley-Phelps-Bonnell Company' 

Hayden & Westcctt Lumber Company 

Heath. Witbeck Co ■ 

Holloway Lumber 
Hoyt, C. I., & Co. 



Wylie, A. W 11 Ryan & McParland 10 

Yeager, Orson B 59 Scatcherd & Son 59 

Young, W. D., & Co 12 Scbofleld Bros 7 



Young & Cutslnger. 



58 



10 



SOUTHERN HARDWOODS. 

Advance Lumber Company 51 

Alcock. John L. , & Co 7 

American Hdwd. Lumber Company... 49 
American Lumber & Mfg. Company.. 50 

.\nder.son-Tiilly Company 4,s 

.\tlantic Lumber Company 

Beyer, Knox & Co 59 

Brown, W. P., & Sons. Lumber Co. 
Buffalo Hardwood Lumber Company 
Carrier Lumber & Mfg. Company... 
Cherry River Boom & Lumber Co 



Slimmer, P.. & Co 

Smith, R. M.. & Co _ 

Sondheimer, E., Company [ 4 

Standard Hardwood Lumber Company 59 

Stearns Company, The S6 

Steele & Hibbard 49 

Stewart, I. N., & Bro ::::.."59 



68 



Stlmson, J, 

Stone, T. B., Lumber Company 56 

Sullivan, T., & Co 59 

Swann-Day Lumber Company 8 

59 Three States Lumber Company eo 

2 Turner, A. M.. Lumber Company 50 

59 Vestal Lumber & Mfg. Company 49 

12 Walnut Lumber Company, The 58 

„_.... 9 Wells, R. .4.. Lumber Company 10 

Chicago Car Lumber Company 10 West Florida Hardwood Company 7 

Chivvis. W. R ' 49 White Lumber Company 10 

Cincinnati Hardwood Lumber Co r,e ^l'""^'": ^"^ * Sons, Inc 6 

Columbia Hardwood Lumber Company 11 " 



Wood Mosaic Flooring Company 2 

Young, W. D., & Co 12 

SAW MILL MACHINERY. 

Garland, M., Compan.v 40 

Gordon Hollow Blast Grate Company. 38 

Mersbon. W. B.. & Co 

Phoenix Manufacturing Company 53 

WOODWORKING MACHINEHY. 

American Wood Working Machinery 

Company 45 

Berlin Machine Works, The 

Covel Manufacturing Company .38 

Crown Iron Works 3S 



-ompany 7 

58 



Cn-on, Mill & Lumber t^ouipany 49 

Courtney. D. G 9 

Crane. C. & Co 55 

Crescent Lumber Company 56 

Crosby & Beckley Company. The 6 

Code, W. J., Land & Lbr. Company , . 4S 

Cypress Lumber Company 56 

Darling, Chas., & Co 11 

Damell-Taenzer Lumber Co S Advance Lumber Company 51 



Wlborg & Hanna Company 57 Defiance Machine Works, The .39 

Wlllson Bros. Lumber Company 50 Holmes, E. & B., Machinery Company 39 

M'ood, R. E.. Lumber Company 47 Matteson Manufacturing Company.... 47 



Wylie, A. W n 

Yeager, Orson E 59 

Young & Cutsinger 53 

POPLAR. 



Indiana Quartered Oak'company 7 S'"''^- '^- ^ 

Ingram Lumber Company ,, Dennis 

James & Abbot Company 7 

Jenks, Robert H., Lumber Com'pany" 51 
Jones, G. W., Lumber Company 2 

Jones Hardwood Company - 

Kelley Lumber & shingle Com'pauy:: S 
Ivneelaud-Bigelow Company ' 47 

Lesh & Matthews Lumber Company" n 
Linehan Lumber Company.. i.n 

Litchfield, William E " 

Lombard, E. B . 



Davidson-Benedict Company 

n 

& Smith Lumber Company... 55 
D'Heur & Swain Lumber Company... 58 

Dixon & Dewey 6 

Dublmeier Bros 57 

Ellas, G., & Bro ..,, 59 

Empire Lumber Company, Buffalo.... 59 
Estabrook-Skeele Lumber Company... 11 
Evans & Retting Lumber Company... 55 

Fall, E. H ,r,i 

Farrin-Korn Lumber Company 57 

Freiberg Lumber Company, The 57 



Atlantic Lumber Company 

Brown, W. P.. & Sons, Lumber Co,.. 2 

Cheat River Lumber Company SO 

Courtney, D. G ". 9 

Crane, C. & Co _[ 56 

Cude, W. J., Land & Lbr. Company.. 48 

Davidson-Benedict Company '. . . 

Dawkins. W. II.. Lumber Company.. Zu 

Haas, Albert, Lumber Company 7 ^.. ^^^, ^^ ^.„.^ ^^^ 

Hayden & Westcott Lumber Company 10 Grand Rapids Veneer Works .. r."!".'! . 48 



Nash, J. M 53 

tlber Manufacturing Company, The... 

Sinker-Davis Company 44 

Smith, H. B., Machine Company 41 

Woods, S. A., Machine Company 44 

LOGGING MACHINEEY, 

Clyde Iron Works 42 

Lldgerwood Manufacturing Company. 43 

Overpack, S. C 

Russel Wheel & Foundry Company . . . 

DRY KILNS AND BLOWERS. 

Gordon Hollow Blast Grate Company. 



Long-Knight Lumber"com'n'anv H Eull^'ton-Powell Hardwood Lumber 

M-ilm. 'in,. .. ,. .. ^ ' ^!* Comnanv 



Company 5 



Maley, 'i-hoiniison 

Martin-Barriss Companv """'' «? liaretson-Greason Lumber Company.. 49 

Mason-Donaldson Lumber 'com'pan;" ' 62 ''°'° '*"°"'" '^""P""^ "8 



nn„n Company .->6 Garetson-Greason Lumber Comp, 



Mans, H. H., & Co., Inc 

McIIvain, J. Gibson, & Co « 

McLean, Hugh, Lumber Company:!:: 59 

Miller, Anthony .... ta 

Miller Bros °° 

Mitchell Bros. Company I 

Mowbray & Robinson... K7 

Murphy & Digging t, 

Nichols & Cox Lumber 'com'pany::::: 55 
Nicola Lumber Company, The 



Gi-neral Lumber C impaiiy. The 56 

Gillespie, W. M., Lumber Company.. 7 

(Joodlander-Robertson Co 4 

Haas, Albert, Lumber Company 7 



Hackley-Phelps-Bonnell Company 55 

Hay ward, M. A 33 

Ileatli-Witlieck Co 11 

HImmelberger-Harrison Lumber Co. . . 1 
Hooton, R. A., Lumber Company.... 11 

Hoyt, C. I., & Co ' 58 

Indiana Quartered Oak Company 7 

M„,.*i, TO . V -—ijau, 54 International Felloe Mfg. Company.. 49 

Woith- Western Lumber Company 53 James & Abbot Company 7 

n.hni-!,'"' ^"'"'■,^'""5 & Lumber Co... 10 Jenks, Robert H., Lumber Company., 51 

Osburn. Norval 3^ jones, G. W., Lumber Company ..... 2 

±"errine-Armstrong Company 58 Jones Hardwood Company 7 

Price, E. E ^ Kentucky Lumber Company 67 

Radina, L. W., & Co 57 Lamb-Fish Lumber Company 60 

Richmond Park & Co !!!: 10 ^^^ * Matthews Lumber Company.. 11 

Ross Lumber Company ::::: j Linehan Lumber Company 50 



Hayward, M. A 

Hooton, R. A., Lumber Company.... 11 

Kentucky Lumber Company 57 

Keyes-Fanuin Lumber Company 37 

Massengale Lumber Company 49 

McLean-Davis Lumber Company 2 

Ritter, W. M., Lumber Company 5 

Smith, R. M., & Co s 

Stewart-Roy Lumber Company 56 

Swann-Day i^nmber Company 8 

Vansant, Kitchen & Co 60 

Wood, R. E., Lumber Company 47 

Yellow Poplar Lumber Company 60 

COTTONWOOD AND GUM. 



Morton Dry Kiln Company.. 
New York Blower Company. 



37 
30 



Northern Lumber Company.. ^ 

North Shore Lumber Company 



Rumbarger Lumber Company 1 

Ryan & McParland lo 

Sailing-Hanson Company 55 

Sawyer-Goodman Company 52 

Sea tcherd & Son fig 

Schofield Eros 7 

Slimmer, F., & Co 10 

Soble Bros 7 



Litchfield. William E 7 

Lombard. E. B n 

Long-Knight Lumber Company 58 

Love. Boyd & Co 46 

Luehrmann, Chas. F., Hardwood Lum- 
ber Company 49 

M:iley. Thompson iV :\!u.lTett Company 56 

Martin-Barriss Company 51 

Massengale Lumber Company. ....... 49 



Amlcrsnu-Tiilly r<inip;iii.v 4s 

l^arriu-Korn Lr.raber Company 57 

Himmclberger-Harrison Lumber Co... 1 

Lamb-Fisli Lumber Company 60 

Luehrmann, C. F., Hardwood Lumber 

Company 49 

Mosby. H. W.. & Co .' 8 

Paepcke-Lelcht Lumber Company 4 

Sondheimer, E.. Company 4 

Tliree States Lumber Company 60 

CYPRESS. 

Cypress Lumber Company 56 



■Pl^mmer Lumber C-^t^piny: :::!!:::: 49 ll^T J^s "lei ^". .'"T"^! 



Standard Hardwood Lumber Company 59 Mans. H. H.. & Co.. Inc 



VENEERS. 

Grand Rapids Veneer Worlcs 47 

Phila. Veneer & Lumber Company.... 6 
Wisconsin Veneer Company 53 



SAWS, KNIVES AND SUPPLIES. 

Atkins, E. P.. & Co 42 

Covel Manufacturing Company. 3S 

Crown Iron Works ^ 38 

Gillette Roller Bearing Company 37 

Hanchett Swage Works 3S 

^Marshall, Francis 

Matteson Manufacturing Company.... 47 

LUMBER INSURANCE. 

AiliruiiiUick Fire Insurance Company.. 1 
Lumber Insurance Company of New 

York 1 

Lumber Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany. Boston ■ 

Lumber Underwriters 12 

Pennsylvania Lumbermen's Mutual 

Fire Insurance Company 1 

Rankin. Harry, & Co 34 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Cbilds. S. D., & Co 37 

Gillette Roller Bearing Company 37 

49 
46 

Lumbermen's Credit Association 37 

Martin & Co 51 

Pennsylvania Door & Sash Company.. 7 

Poole, Clark L.. & Co 12 

Siuuiers' Co.. Ilenrv 4:! 

Schenck. C. A.. & Co :.' 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



41 



Keys=Fannin 
Lumber Company 

Manufacturers of Band 
and Circular sawn 

SOFT 

YELLOW 

POPLAR 



Plain and quartered red and white 
Oak, Hemlock, Bass and Chest- 
nut. Give us a trial. 



Herndon, Wyoming Co., W. Va. 



Send Us Your Orders 

We Have on Hand Ready for 

Shipment a Nice Stock of 

254 Clear Maple 
Flooring 

ALSO OTHER SIZES AND GRADES 

Our fine timber, modern plant and 
skilled workmansliip combine to 
make a flooring that cannot be ex- 
celled. You will be pleased with it. 

HAAK LUMBER CO. 

HAAKWOOD, MICH. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED 

When you have anything to sell, or wish to 
purchase anything in the way of 

HARDWOOD LUMBER 

CROSS TIES OR PILING 

Norval Osburn, Seaman, Ohio 



COUNTERFEIT CHECKS 



are frequent 
ex'.-ept where 
our 

Two Piece 
Geometrical 
Barter Coin 

1b in u«e. then 
imitation isn't 
possible. 
Sample if you 
ask tor it. I 

S. D. CHILDS 
« CO. 

Chicago 

We also make 
Time Checks, 
StencHs and 
Log Hammers. 




Save Your Money 



By Using the 



RED BOOK 



Published Semi-Aimually 
in January and July 



It contains a carefully prepared list of the 
buyers of lumber in car lots, both among 
tlie dealers and manufacturers. 

The book indicates their financial stand- 
ing and manner of meeting obligations. 
Covers the UNITED STATES and MANI- 
TOBA. 

The trade recognizes this booU as the au- 
thority on the lines it covers. 

A well organized Colleciion Department 
is also operated and the same is open to you. 



WRITE FOR TERMS. 



LumbermeD's Credit Association 

Established 1878 

I40S Great Northern Building, CBICAGO 

116 Nassau Street. NEW YOHK CITY 



MENTION THIS PAPER 




IMPROVED AUTOMATIC BAND SAW SHARPENER 

THE EXPERIENCED, SAW FILER QUICKLY REALIZES WHY THE 

Matteson Sharpeners 

ARE THE BEST. 

Every machine guaranteed. We make a complete line of modern tools for the care of saws. 
It will pay you to get in touch with us. 

MATTESON MFG. CO. 



120-128 SO. CLINTON ST., 
CHICAGO, ILLS. 



A machine that declares saw mill dividends 




uto-Matic swing saw gaugi 



^ An inexpensive little device 

that saves a dollar a day and 

upwards. 

^ Stops one of the biggrest 

profit leaks at the mill. Pays 

for itself several times over 

during: a year. 

fl Isn't it worth investigating? 



FRANCIS MARSHALL, - - Grand Rapids, Mich. 



42 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



"DEFIANCE" WOOD-WORKING MACHINERY 

COMPLETE EQUIPMENTS OF 

HIGH GRADE TOOLS 




^ FOR MAKING ^ 
Hubs, Spokes, Wheels, Single Trees, Hoops, 



Wagons, Carriages, 

Rims, Shafts, Poles, 

Neck-Yokes, 



Handles, Bobbins, Spools, 

Insulator Pins and 

Oval Wood Dishes. 



AUTOMATIC LAST TURNING LATHE. 



INVENTED AND BUILT BY 

The DEFIANCE MACHINE WORKS 

DEFIANCE, OHIO. 
Send Jor 500 Page Catalogue 




NO. 4 POWER-FEED BAND RIP SAW.' 



THE MARKET IS DEMANDING, more and more LUM- 
BER OF STANDARD LENGTHS, WITH SQUARE ENDS 

As well as straight and parallel edges. The straight and par- 
allel edges you can obtain with a "Tower" Edger, while 

THE "TOWER" 

ONE-MAN 2-SAW TRIMMER 

will give you the standard lengths and scjuare ends 
with a minimum of time, labor and waste. In all 
other trimmers the manner of shifting the saws is 
such that every time the position of the saws is 
changed the operator has to go clear to the end of 
the machine. In the "Tower" One-man 2-saw Trim- 
mer he never has to go beyond the end of the board. 
Especially with short boards, this means a great sav- 
■ ing in time and labor. It also greatly reduces the 
amount of waste, as it is much easier to see how to 
trim lumber to the best advantage from the end of 
the board than from the end of the machine. 




In all of these trimmers there are two feeds, which may be instant- 
ly started, stopped or changed, without stopping tlie saws. 
Both are controlled by the same lever, which is lo- 
cated in the most convenient possible position. 

The Gordon Hollow Blast Grate Co. 

GREENVILLE, MICHIGAN 

The Largest Manufacturers of Grates. Edgers and Trimmers in the World. 




This Truck — The Gillette Truck— with its Roller Bearing Axle — 
Unbreakable Malleable Iron Caster-Fork, Improved Stake Pockets 
and general Superiority of Construction is the Easiest Running 
Truck made. Strongest where other trucks are weakest. Best 
Truck to bu.v. Cheapest Truck to use. Invest money in these 
trucks. Do not waste it on others. 

GILLETTE ROLLER BEARING COMPANY 

Grand Rapids, Michigan ■ UJ 




Works 

BUCYRUS. OHIO 



ESPECIALLY 



Adapted for Handling Shavings, Saw° 
dust and Stringy Material of All Kinds 



l-PIECE FAN WHEEL. 



Get Catalogue 
58=G 



NO OBSTRUCTIONS. 



We Also Make Lumber Dryers. 

New York Blower Company 




Main Office : 

25tb Place and Stewart Avenue 

CHICAGO 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



43 




ROLL'S PATENT LOCK JOINT COLUMNS 

These four 36-inch mahogany, perfectly-built columns are in 
the new L. S. & M. S. Railroad Depot in Chicago. We can 
make for you just as perfect and beautiful columns of any size 
and for any conceivable purpose, either veneered or solid stave in 
any kind of wood. Write to-day for our free illustrated catalog. 



4^ 



TMEV 

CAN NOT 

COME 

APART 



'"1 



We make a specialty of dry-kilning lum- 
ber. Switch tracks make our new mod- 
ern dry kilns convenient to all Chicago 
and vicinity. Let us quote you prices. 



Henry Sanders 

900 ELSTON AVENUE, 



Company 

- CHICAGO 



Hanchett 
Saw Swage 

Every one made Perfect 

The Swage with a Name 



^ A poor Swag-e Ruins a Good Saw, and 
for that reason the manufacturers of the 

HANCHETT ADJUSTABLE SWAGE 

employ only the Best Mechanics and use 
only the Best Material in their construction. 



It Pays Us 
to make 
The Best 



Send for 

Catalog 

No. 10 

It tells you all 

about them 



It Pays You 

to use 

The Best 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Hanchett Swage Works 

Big Rapids. Michigan 



^ Hanchett - Hanchett - Hanchett ^ 



ESTABLISHED SINCE 1880 



TIMBER 

WE OFFER TRACTS OF VIRGIN TIMBER IN LOUISI- 
ANA, MISSISSIPPI, FLORIDA, ALABAMA AND ALSO ON 

PACIFIC COAST 

We employ a larger force of expert timber cruisers than any other firm in the wor^d. We have furnished 
banks and" trust companies with reports on timber tracts upon which millions of dollars of timber certifi- 
cates or bonds have been issued. We furnish detailed estimates which enables the buyer to verify our reports 
at very little expense and without loss of valuable time. Correspondence with bona fide investors solicited. 



JAHES D. LACEY & CO. 



JAMES D. L.VCEY. 



WOOD BEAL, 



VICTOR THRANE. 



608 Hennen BIdg., NEW ORLEANS 
1200 Old Colony BIdg., CHICAGO 



LARGEST TIMBER DEALERS 
IN THE WORLD 



507 Lumber Exchange, SEATTLE 
829 Chamber of Com., PORTLAND 



44 



HARDWOOD RECORD 




This is your chance to combine business with 
pleasure. Go and enjoy yourself and at the 
same time see what a really wonderful 
machine the McGIFFERT is. Watch it 
switch and spot its own cars, skid its 
own logs, and especially load those logs 
faster, easier and cheaper than you've 
ever seen it done before. We'll have 
a good man in charge Xopiovc what 
you've only read before. 
Seeing is believing, you know, 
so go if you possibly can. 

CLYDE IRON WORKS 

Duluth. Minnesota 



^ 



P' 




ATKINS m SAWS 



cost more than other Saws, because they are BETTER. 
The First cost of a Saw does not count for much. 
What you want is \'our Money's Worth. Isn't it better 
to pay a fair price and get the best rather than a low 
price and get poor goods? Try an ATKINS SAW. 
They're better. 



E. C. ATKINS & CO., Inc. 



The Silver Steel Saw People. 
Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis. 



Branches : Atlanta, 

New York City, 



Chicago, 

Portland, 



Memphis, 

San Francisco, 



Minneapolis, 
Seattle, 



New Orleans, 
Toronto. 






HARDWOOD RECORD 



45 



Holmes' No. 46 Variable Feed Planer 



Feed can instantly be 
changed from 20 to 100 
feet per minute. Will do 
the finest and smoothest 
work on hardwoods. Planes 
from 1-16 to 8 inches in 
thickness and 24 inches in 
width. Let us tell you ail 
about it. 



£. ^ B. 
Holmes 
Machinery 
Company 

Buffalo. N. Y. 




New 
Standard 
54 Inch 
Band 
Rc-Saw 




MERSHON 

BAND-RESAW SPECIALISTS 



25 MODELS 

ADAPTED TO 
EVERY REQUIREMENT 



Wm. B. Mershon & Co., Saginaw, Mich.. U.S.A. 




LIDGERWOOD MACHINES 

WILL STOCK YOUR MILL 



SKIDDER.S 
SNAKERS 
YARDERS 



LOADERS 
PULL BOATS 
CABLEWAYS 






LIDGERWOOD MFG. CO. 

96 Liberty St., New York. 

Logging Machinery Branc.i Houses: ATLANTA, GA.. SEATTLE, WASH, 
Agency: Woodward, Wight & Co., New Orleans, La. 




46 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



No. 107 INSIDE MOULDER 




A Machine of Great Range and Capacity. Has every Necessary and Convenient Adjustment 

for producing Mouldings, Finish and Flooring. Quick Changes. 

Further Details from the Makers. 

S. A. WOODS MACHINE CO., BOSTON 



PACIFIC COAST OFFICE, 617 LUMBER EXCHANGE, SEATTLE 
WESTERN OFFICE, 811 RAILWAY EXCHANGE, CHICAGO 



SPECIALISTS IN 
PLANERS, MOULDERS AND FLOORERS 




THE "HOOSIER" 



SELF-FEED 
RIP SAW 



The cut shows a front view of our Hoosier Self 
Feed Rip Sawing Machine; it has a square raising 
table, easily operated by a crank in front of the 
machine and is always firmly locked, at any point, 
thus preventing any jarring or falling down and 
doing away with all clamp bolts and screws. The 
machine has our patent feeding device, with two 
feed shafts, one in front of the saw with a thin star 
feed wheel and one in the rear with a corrugated 
roll, the advantage of which can be readily seen. 

This machine will rip stock 6 inches thick and 
by using the saw on the outer end of the mandril 
will take in stock 17i inches between guide and 
saw. It can be used with a gang of saws by the 
use of spacing collars on the mandril. It has no 
equal in the rapid production of slats, cleats and 
dimension material of all kinds. Price S175.00. 

We also build the machine with a movable 
saw, at a slightly higher price. 

Write for Full Description. 



The Sinker-Davis Co. 

Manufacturers of 

SAW MILL MACHINERY 

Indianapolis, Ind. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



47 



1^ 

0) 



o 




a; 

o 










a 

cs 

S 

O 

u 

>^ 

a; 

S 

CO 



z 

u 

u 
B 
u 
e 









U 

s 



O 



o 
o 

U 

a 



u 

b 
b 
O 

mi 
< 

u 
z 

u 



•0 

c 
id 

u 
« 

« 

K 
O 

a 

2 



10 

o 
o 

K 

VI 

U 

OS < 
It) <n 






mi 



S 

"3 

a 

ui 
z 
«< 

U 

•J 

o 

u 



48 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Hardwoods Dried in a Week ! 



Dept. D. 



^Our method can be attached to your old Kiln. 
^If it does not do all we claim after being installed, 
we will take it out without expense to you. 

Grand Rapids Veneer Works 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 



The KNEELAND BIGELOW CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF LUMBER 



Annual Output: 

20,000,000 ft. Hardwoods. 
20,000,000 ft. Hemlock. 

4,000,000 pes. Hardwood Lath. 

9,000,000 pes. Hemloek Lath. 



Mills Rvjn tKe Yea.r 
Around. 



Bay City, Mich. 



Anderson-Tully Company 



OFFERS STOCK FOR SALE 

Three cars 6/4x8 in. and up 1st & 2nd Cottonwood 

One " 7/8x8 " 

Two " 5/4x12 " 

Two "4/4 " " Plain Red Oak 

iVIEiVIPHIS, TEININESSEE 



DRY HARDWOODS 

150,000 ft. Tennessee Red Cedar Boards (Aromatic) 
150,000 ft. 4-4 Is and 2s Plain Red Oak. 

50,000 ft. 5-4 Is and 2s Plain Red Oak. 
200,000 ft. S-4 No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak. 

44,000 ft. 10-4 No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak. 

80,000 ft. 8-4 No. 1 Common Quartered Red Oak. 
300,000 ft. 4-4 Slipping Cull Plain Oak. 
Also fair stock of Poplar and Hickory. 

LOVE, BOYD & CO. 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



RUSSEL WHEEL AND FOUNDRY CO. 



WE BUILD 



Lo^^ing Cars 



AND 



Logging Machinery 



Your Correspondence Solicited 



DETROIT, MICHIGAN 




ALLOW US TO POINT OUT 

THE ADVANTAGES OF 

OUR EQUIPMENT 



Wf- 



TELL US YOUR WANTS 
AND GET OUR PRICES 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



49 



ST. LOUIS 

LARGEST OF ALL HAKDWOOD MAKK£,TS 



Wanted-to Byy or Contract for future Delivery 

600,000 to 1.000,000 ft. Poplar, all grades 
500,000 to 1,000,000 ft. Cypress, all grades 
500,000 to 1,000,000 ft. Ash. all grades 



fns^Ttfon PLUMMER LUMBER CO. ^^- ^°^'^ 



MISSOURI 



STEELE & HIBBARD LUMBER CO. 

North BroaLdway and Dock Streets 
Wholesale Manufacturers, Dealers and Shippers 

ASH, CYPRESS. MAHOGANY, OAK. POPLAR. «,c 

Mills: YaEOO City. Miss.; McGregor, Ark.; England, ArW.; 
Dermott, Ark. O'Hara, La.; De.xter, Mo. 



Vestal Lumber & Mfg^Co. 



Manufacturers and Wholesalers 
of all kinds of 



HARDWOODS 



BEVELED SIDING A SPECIALTY. 
UNSURPASSED FACILITIES 
FOR DELIVERING. 



Knoxville 
Tennessee 



Garetson=Greason Lumber Co. 

1212-13- 14 Times Building 
ST. LOUIS 

MANUFACTURERS 



Shipments of Pliia and Quartered Oak, Ash, Cypress and Gum 
Lumber direct from our own milli in straight or mixed cjrloads. 



CHAS. F. 



Carry a complete stock of Hardwood and are 

constantly in the market to purchase 

large blocks of stock for cash. Are 

also the largest manufacturers of 

the famous St. Francis • 

Basin Red Gum. 

General Offices : 148 Carroll Street 



W. R. CHIVVIS, 



Lesperance Street and Iron 
Mountain Railroad. 

WHOLESALE HARDWOODS 

BLACK WALNUT LUMBER MY SPECIALTY. Always in the market to buy 
Walnut and Ctierry Lumber, Pay spot cash and take up at shipping 
po Dt when amounts justify. 



American Hardwood Lumber Co. 

14,000,000 ft. Hardwood Lumber 

YARDS AT BENTON, ARK., NEW ORLEANS, LA., ST. LOUIS, MO,, 
DICKSON, TENX. 



MASSENGALE LUMBER CO., ST. LOUIS 

Manufacturers and dealers in 

HARDWOODS 

in the market to buy and sell OAK, POPLAR. ASH, CYPRESS 
Large stock dry lumber always on hand 



COOPERATIVE MILL 4 LUMBER CO., mc.) 

ROCKFOBD, ILLS. 
Want Poplar, Oak, Gum, Hickory, Birch and Maple 

SEND STOCK LIST AND PRICES. 




^AW^' 



INCORPORATED 

MANUFACTURERS OF STANDARD SIZE 

WAGON FELLOES AND WAGON STOCK 

Send your requirements and receive price. COLUMtJUo, iVlioO. 



50 


HARDWOOD RECORD 






r^ I T^ HP ^ T~> ¥ T r^ /'^ 


l-'ll l^LiUhcO 


HARDWOOD DISTRIBUTING CENTER OF PENNSYLVANIA 



stock: lisx 

The following list covers the hardwoods we now have on hand. Special 
price f. o. b. cars mill for all one grade. We would be pleased to have 
you favor us with your inquiries and orders. 

4 4 Maple, No, 1 Common 2 Cars 

5 4 '' " " 2 Cars 

54 " " " and Better 59,000 Feet 

6 4 " " " 1 Car 

6 4 ** Firsts and Seconds 2 Cars 

8 4 " No. 2 Common 2,500 Feet 

10/4 " Firsts and Seconds I Car 

10 4 " No. 2 Common and Better 71,000 Feet 

12 4 " No. I " 1,500 Feet 

12/4 " "2 " l,OOOFeet 

4/4 Bassweod, Log Run m. c. o 1 car 

8/4 " I car 

DRV STOCK 
Favorable Freight Rates to the East. 

BABCOCK LUMBER CO., Ashtola, Pa. 



The Nicola Lumber 
Company 



One million feet 4-4 Bay Poplar. 
Can be shipped log run, or sold 
on grade. Bone dry ; band 
sawed. Send your inquiries. 



COTTONWOOD WANTED 



We want to buy one to five million feet of 
log run Cottonwood. We will send our in- 
spector to take the stock up at the mill and 
pay cash for it as shipped. 

ASH WANTED 

300M feet 6-4, 8-4, 14-4 and 16-4 No. 1 
Common and 1st and 2nds for immediate 
shipment, or to be cut and shipped when dry. 



American Lumber 4 Mfg. Co. 



PITTSBURG. PA. 



A* M* Turner 
Lumber Company 



Everything in lumber. We buy hardwoods 
as well as sell them. If you have anything 
to offer, please submit same to us. t t 



OAK FLOORING 

PLAIN AND QUARTERED 
RED AND WHITE 

Ample stock, hisurinK quick service. 

Mixed car.s with liardwoods or worked poplar. 

Can't we have your inquirie.s? 

Linehan Lumber Co. 



242.3 Farmer's Bank Bids 



PITTSBURG. PENN. 



Willson Bros. Lumber Co* 



MANDFACTURERS 



WEST VIRGINIA 
HARDWOODS 

FARMERS BANK BLDG. :: PITTSBURG, PA. 



Hardwoods a Specialty 





FOR SALE 




POPLAR 

125,000' 4 '4 Isand 2s 
40,000' 4/4 No. 1 Com. 
3'25,000' 4/4 No. 2 Cora. 
228,000' 4/4 No. 3 Com. 
160,000'4/4 Mill Cull 


CHESTNUT 

200,000' 4 4 Sound Wormy 
80,000' ,=1, 4 Sound Worm v 

100,000' fi/4 Sound Wormy 
48,000' 8 '4 Sound Wormy 


PL.MN OAK 

60,000' 4 4 No. J. Com. 
18,000' 4, 4 No. B Com. 

QUARTERED OAK 
2 cars 4-4 No. 1 Com. 
1 car 4 4 No. 2 Com. 



OAK TIMBERS SAWED TO ORDER. 
WRITE FOR PRICES. 

CHEAT RIVER LUMBER COMPANY, Pittsburg, Pcnna. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



51 



•-^ w 1-^ ^ r w-^ ¥ A 1*. T w-^w 




^^i-^LJr V I=:*L-^/-ViML^ 


HARDWOOD DISTRIBUTING CENTtR OF NORTHERN OHIO 



The 

Robert H. Jenks Lumber 

Company 

44 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, O. 

OFFER^S: 

5 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd Poplar — 7" to 17" 
4 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd Poplar— 18" to 23" 
3 Cars 4/4 Poplar Box Boards— 7" to 12" 

10 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Poplar (Selects in ) 

10 Cars 4/4 No. 2 Common Poplar 
3 Cars 4/4 No. 3 Common Poplar 

2 Cars 5/4 No. 1 Common Poplar (Selects in) 
8 Cars 8/4 No. 1 Common Poplar (Selects in) 

10 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd White Oak 
15 Cars 4/4 1st and 2nd Red Oak 
15 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Red Oak 
10 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common White Oak 
10 Cars 4/4 No. 2 Common White Oak 
20 Cars 4/4 Mill Cull Oak 

3 Cars 4/4 Common and Better Chestnut 
1 Car 6/4 Common and Better Chestnut 

4 Cars 4/4 No. 1 Common Chestnut 

5 Cars 5/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 
5 Cars 6/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 

10 Cars 4/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 
10 Cars 8/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut 



The Martin-Barriss Company 

Importers a.nd iMa.rvufacturers 

MAHOGANY 



a^nd Fine Ha,rdwood 



SYMBOLS FOR GRADE MARKS 

Adopted by the Hardwood Manufacturers .Association of United States 
Q Panel and Wide No. 1 l\ Selects 



A Wide No. 2 
HS Box Boards 



(^ No. 1 Common 

(^ No. 2 Common 

(3 No. 3 Common 

M- No. 4 Common 



yf FAS or Firsts and 
^" Seconds 
^ Saps 

Every Manufacturer should stamp the grade on his Lumber. 
Set of 10 Rubber Stamps, VA"y.\Vi' in size, Pad, Pint of Ink, and 
Spreader, packed for shipment S3. 50. 

;V\/\RTIIN & CO. LEWIS DOSTER, Sec'y 

191 S. Clark Si.. CHICAGO, or 1535 First Nal. Bank lldg. CUICAGO 



HARDWOODS 

Dry Stock is Scarce 

Mill Shipments are Slow in Coming Forward 



We therefore call attention to stock of upwards 
of SIX MILLION FEET seasoned HARD- 
WOODS we offer for quick shipment from 
Cleveland. WANT TO CLEAN IT OUT. 
Are you interested ? 



The Advance Lumber 
Company 

13th Floor. Rockefeller Bldg., CLEVELAND, O. 

Manufacturers and Dealers 
In White Pine, Yellow Pine, Hemlock and Hardwoods 




THIS (AT SHOWS 



The No. 11 Ober Lathe 

For turning -A-xe, Adze, Pick, Sledge, Hammer and Hatchet Handles, Spokes,Whiffletrees, 
Gun Stocks Shoe Lasts, etc., etc. It is very simple, strong and durable, requires but very 
little power and is very easily and quickly changed from one kind of work to another. 

We ahso manufacture other Lathes for making Spokes. Handles and X'ariety Work, 
Sanders, Shapers, Boring and Chucking Machines, etc., etc. 

f'ompk'te catalogue and price list free. 

The O ber Manufacturing Co. 

28 BELL STREET, CHAGRIN FALLS, OHIO, U. S. k. 



52 HARDWOOD RECORD 




^H r ¥ O r~^ ^^~X IV. T C> ¥ IV T 


W l^t^OfN^lIN 


WHERE THE FINEST NORTHERN HARDWOODS GROW 



We are prepared to furnish mixed carloads 

And solicit your inquiries and orders. At present we are 
offering Red Birch in thicknesses, 1" to 2\" common 
and better, also Maple, Birch and one quarter sawed 

RED OAK FLOORING 

Basswood Ceiling and Siding and Finish, also Molding 

Our hardwood flooring "A. H. L." Brand, is the 
highest grade as to workmanship and quahty. 

ARPIN HARDWOOD LUMBER CO. 

GRAND RAPIDS. WISCONSIN 
SawMill, Planing Mill and Yard at Atlanta, near Bruce, Wis. on "Soo" Line. 



SAWYER GOODMAN CO. 

MARINETTE, WIS. ' 

Mixed Cars of Hardwood, Bass- 
wood, White Pine and Hemlock, 
Gedar Shingles and Posts. 

We make a specialty of White Pine Beveled Siding and 
White Pine Finish and Shop and Pattern Lumber 



C, p. CROSBY 

RHINELANDER s : WISCONSIN 

Wholesale Hardwood Lumber 



I want to sell birch, in No. J common & better. I have 
4-4, 5-4, 8-4, and J2-4, good cry stock. Mixed cars easily 
filled. 

DIFFICULT AND MIXED ORDERS A SPECIALTY 



Vollmar & Below Company 

MARSHFIELD, WISCONSIN 

Basswood, Birch 

and Other Wisconsin Hardwoods 
LET US KNOW WHAT YOU ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 



WRITE US FOR. QUOTATIONS ON THE FOLLOWING: 



RED BIRCH 



( 300,000 ft. 1 in. No. 1 Common and Better 

; 150,000 ft. \\ in. No. 1 Common and Better 

"\ 125,000 ft. \\ in. No. 1 Common and Better 

1 100,000 ft. 2 in. No. 1 Common and Better 



PLAIN BH^CH. 100,000 ft. 1 in. 1st and 2nd Clear. 

HEMLOCK. 200,000 ft. 2 in. No. 3 Hemlock. 100,000 ft. 2x6 and wider No. 3 Hemlock. 

Mason-Donaldson Lumber Company 

Inquiries answered promptly and \> U I VI IT f AMI^IPO \Jl/ f € 

orders tilled without delay.' r\.VWVS K^ij t\.\r% U 1^1^,, TT U. 



DEAL WITH AN OLD, RELIABLE FIRM 

WHEN IX NEED OF 

WISCONSIN HARDWOODS 

"Shakeless" Hemlock and AVhite Cedar Products. 

Orders for Grain Doors, Box Shocks and other 
Special Bills promptl.y executed. 

Standard Grades, Good :\lill Work^audQuick De- 
li\-eries Guaranteed. 

JOHN R. DAVIS LUMBER COMPANY 

PHILLIPS, WISCONSIN 




WAVSAU, WIS. 



We have 
to offer 
the 

following 
stock in 
pile at 
Ingram, 
Wis. 



20,000 ft. 2"in. No. 2 Common I'hiiii Birch. 
[ 24.000 ft. 1 in. First and Second Red Bircli. 
\ 11,460 ft. li in. First and Second Ki-d Bircli. 

4,700 ft. 2 in. First and Second Red Birch. 

2,144 ft. 1 in. Curlv Birch. 

2,350 ft. U. li and 2 inch Curly Birch. 
122,000 ft. 1 in. End Dried White Birch. 
144,000 ft. 1 in. Select Pine, 
r 67.000 ft. 1* in. No. 3 Shop and Better Pine. 

19.000 ft. li in. Select Pine. 
^26,000 ft. li in. No. 1. No. 2 and No 3 Shop. 

Write us for prices on hemlock. 



Your 

orders 

and 

Inquiries 

solicited 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



53 







^A ,^ I c r^ i"^ IX T c^ I ]VT 


w i<30orN^irN 


WHE,RE THE FINEST NORTHERN HARDWOODS GROW 



Michigan Logging Wheels 




Have madethem 2'* yeai-s. and know o p H \7 IT D P A P IT -'^lAMSTKK 
how. Easy aiid (■heap way of lo^gmp. O. V/. U V E/Iir/i^Ii MICHIGAN 



FRANK CARTER CO. 

MANUFACTURER 

Hardwood Lumber 

Specialty Wisconsin Oak 

HAVE KO LI.O WINO SEASONED STOCK TO OFFER 

250M feet 1 inch Millrun Red Oak 

75M feet. 1 inch Logrun Butternut 

riOM feet 2 inch Logrun Rock Elm 

3011 feet 1 inch Millrnn Ash 
lOOM feel 1 inch No. 3 Common Birch. 

40M feet 2 in. antl 3 in. Com. White Oak. 



Write for Prices on 
Stock for Future Delivery 



MENOMo'nVe, WISCONSIN 



North Western Lumber Company 

MANUFACTURERS OF BAND-SAWED 

Wisconsin Hardwoods 

CAREFUL, GRADINGS — PROMPT SHIPMENTS 

General Offices, EAU CLAIRE, WIS. Mills at STANLEY, WIS. 




R. CONNOR CO. 

WHOLES A T. E MANUFACTURERS 

Wisconsin 
Hardwood 

PINE AND HEM- 
I,OCK LUMBER 



MiUs at 

Auburndale.Wis-.on W. C. R.R. 

Stratford. Wis., on C.&. "J. W.K.li. 



Marshfieid, Wis. 



Wisconsin Veneer Co* 

RHINELANDER, WIS. 

Largest and best equipped Veneer 
cutting- plant in the country. High- 
grade product from Birch, Maple, 
Elm, Basswood, Ash and other na- 
tive woods. 

Veneers for Door Work a Specialty. 




Do you want a 
7=foot band mill? 



This is a first-class 
machine and will 
give the best of re- 
sults. It is strong, 
well made, and as 
good as it looks. 
Write us and wc will 
give you full particu- 
lars. 



Phoenix Mfg. Co. 

Eau Claire, Wis. 



The Morton Dry Kiln 



IVIOIST AIR SYSTEM 



Recording 
Ther- 
mometers. 
Transfer 
Cars. 




Trucks. 

Canvas 

Doors. 



HOW TO DRY LUMBER. 



.\s exemphlK.l ni uiir Catalog D. Free on application. 

MORTON DRY KILN CO., Chicago, Ills. 



54 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



\j\ I i^^ III /^ A IN-T 




iVi IC/lliCjAfN 






FAMOUS FOR HARD MAPLE AND GRE.Y ELM 





You can't go astray 
when in the market 



IF YOU WRITE THE 



Northern Lumber 
Company 



RUSH CULVER, Pres. 



BIRCH, MICHIGAN 



C We manufacture from our 
own forests, the finest line of 
Northern Hardwoods on the 
market. C We have the woods, 
the machinery, the experience, 
enabhng us to fill your orders 
right. 



BIRCH 

WE WANT YOUR ORDERS FOR 

4/4 AND 5/4 COMMON AND BETTER 



A No. 1 STOCK 



The Earle Lumber Company 

SIMMONS, MICHIGAN 







J. S. GOLDIE. 

Cadillac, ;: Michigan. 

Low Price on five cars 2f" Clear 

Maple Squares, 17" to 27" long. 

Corresporvdence Solicited orv Michigarv 

Lumber, especially White Maple. 



BOYNE CITY LUMBER COMPANY 

BOYNE CITY 

MICHIGAN ROCK MAPLE and other HARDWOODS 

L.^RGE CAPACITY PROMPT SHIPMENTS RAII, OR CARGO 



W. H. WHITE, Pres. 

JAS. A WHITE, Vice-Pres. 



W. I,. MARTIN, Secy. 

THOS. WHITE, Treas. 



W. H, WHITE COMPANY 



BOYNE CITY. MICHIGAN 



Manufacturers of Hardwood and HemlocK Lumber, Cedar Shingles, 

White F^ocK Maple Flooring. 



The North Shore Lumber Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Hardwood and Hemlock Lumber 



Rail and water shipments 



THOMPSON 



MICHIGAN 



S. L. EASTMAN FLOORING CO. 



■AQINAW ailANO 



MAPLE FLOORING 

SAGINAW, MICH. 



You read this= 


=others 


will, 


too. 


They 


would 


read 


your 


ad. 


Try it. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



55 



MICHIGAN 

FAMOUS FOR RED BIRCH AND BASSWOOD 



Evans & Retting Lumber Co« 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers 

Hardwood 
Lumber 

RAILROAD TIMPERS, TIES AND SWITCH TIES 

Michigan Trust Building Grand Rapids, Mich. 



DENNIS & SMITH LUMBER CO. 

Wholesale Hardwood Lumlier 

Office and Yards, FOURTH AND HOLDEN AVENUES. 
DETROIT, MICH. 

MILLS AT: Orndorfl. W. Va., Healers W. Va., and Parkersburg. W Va. 



"Chief Brand" 
Maple Flooring 

Will commend itself to you and your trade on 
its merits alone. 5 Comprises all the features 
desirable in good flooring. U Made by the latest, 
most approved machinery methods and best 
skilled labor. 1 We believe we can make it ro 
your interest to handle our "Chief Brand" and 
will appreciate your inquiries. 

Kerry 4 Hanson Flooring Co. 

GRAYLING. MICHIGAN 



DENNIS BROS. 

GKAXD KAPIDS, MICHIGAN 



Manufacturers of 



National Maple 

AND 

Birch Flooring 

and all kinds of Michigan hardwood lumber 



WRITE FOR SPECIAL PRICES 

"S SOm feet 8 4 TAMARACK AND 

20m feet 4 4 TAMARACK. 



MAIN OFFICE : 

205-209 MICHIGAN TRUST 

BUILDING. 



OUR SLOW METHOD --'£«-— ,sg 

I X L POLISHED 

ROCK MAPLE FLOORING 

Enables us to offer you an excellent and superior product — 
One which has stood the test 20 years. 

WRITE TODAY FOR PRICES AND BOOKLET 

Wisconsin Land ^ Lumber Co. 

Hermansville, Michigan 



SALLINQ, HANSON CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Michigan Hardwoods 



GRAYLING, MICHIGAN 



Hackley-PhelpsBonnell Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Northern and Southern 

Hardwood Lumber 

Main Office, Micfiigaa Trust Company Building 

GRAND RAPIDS : . . . MICHIGAN 




56 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



i"^ I TVT f^ I 7VT IN^T A HP I 


C/irsoirNiNA 1 1 


THE, GATtWAY OF THE SOUTH 



C. CRANE & COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS 



Poplar, Oak, Ash, Chestnut, Sycamore, 
W. Va. Spruce, Pine and Elm 



YEARLY CAPACITY 100,000,000 FEET 



LONG BILL STUFF A SPECIALTY 



Mills and Yards: CINCINNATI, OHIO 



THE 

MALEY, THOMPSON & MOFFETT CO. 



Always in the Market for 

BLACK WALNUT LOGS. 
SELECTED WHITE OAK LOGS. 
LUMBER OF ALL KINDS. 



CINCINNATI, 



OHIO 



THE GENERAL LUIWBER COMPANY 

HARDWOODS 

HEMLOCK YELLOW PINE COLUMBUS, OHIO 



Cash buyers for stock in our line. 

Cincinnati Hardwood Lumber Co. 

GEST AND SVMMFR STREETS - 

Wholesalers Mahogany, Thin Lumber, Veneers 

Fintfly flgur<d iiuarter sawed oak veneer;; a specialtv. 



THE HOUSB OF STOINE 

The One of Good Grades 
Poplar, Oak, Chestnut Cottonwoodt Ash, Basswood and Gum 

T. B. STOINE LUMBER CO. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



CYPRESS LUMBER CO. 

Manufacturer of Hardwoods and Cypress 

•■Iain and Quartered White and Red Oak, Yellow Poplar, 
Yellow Pine, Walnut, etc. Mills in Tenn., Ala, and Va. 

OFFICE AND YARDS. OEST AND DALTON AVE., CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



The Stearns Company 



iLVNUFACTURERS OP 



Northern and Southern 

HARDWOODS 



Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Cincinnati, 0. 



CRESCENT LUMBER CO. 




MANnFACTUEER3 OF 



Hardwood Lumber 

MARIETTA. O. 



The Stewart=Roy Lumber Co. 



Selling Agents 

for 

Product of 

ROY 

LUMBER 

CO. 



CINCINNATI 



^°S>^ 



Will Buy 

OAK, ASH, 

POPLAR, 

CHESTNUT, 

BASSWOOD 

All Grades and 
Thicknesses 



HARDWOOD RECORD 57 




i"^ ¥ IVT i'^ I IN-T IN-T A T* I 


wifNC/irNrNA 1 1 


THE, GATEWAY OF THE SOUTH 



IN THE MARKET FOR 



OAK-ASH-POPLAR 

ALL GRADES AND THICKNESSES 

MOWBRAY & ROBINSON 



Office: 
I2J9 West Sixth Street 



Yards: 
Sixth Street, below Harriet 



PLAIN OAK—BASSWOOD 

Are what we want. All thicknesses and grades. Spot 
cash. Send us list of your oflFerings with prices. 

DUHLMEIER BROS., CINCINNATI, 0. 



"BUY GUM" 

We are in the market to buy 
Dry Gum Lumber in any 
quantity, from a single car 
load to a niUiioh feet. Will 
take all grades and thick- 
nesses. We receive lumber 
at shipping point, pay cash 
and are liberal in in.-pection. 




THE FAI^RIN.KORN 

LUMBER COMPANY 

General Office. Tarde, 
Planing Mills. Dry Kilns, 

Cincinnati, Ohio 
Purchasing Office, 

Randolph Building, 

Uemphis.TeDD. 

Cypress Red Gum Oak 



WANTED 



POPLAR and GUM 

SEND LIST OF DRY STOCK. WILL CONTRACT FOR 
MILL CUTS. 

KENTUCKY LUMBER COMPANY 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 




THE FREIBERG LUMBER CO. 

Manufacturers ol 

Tabasco Mahogany 
Walnut, OaR 

Poplar, McLean and Findlay Ats. 

CINCINNATI. O. 



L. W. RADINA 6l COMPANY 

Correspondence Solicited with Buyers and Sellers of All Kinds of 



Wanted for cash — desirable blocks of 1 inch to 4 inch Poplar, all grades, 
Especially IJ^-inch stock, for immediate shipment. 

CLARK STREET AND DALTON AVENUE - 



W. H. Dawkins Lumber Co. 

Manufacturers of Band Sawed 

Yellow Poplar 



ASHLAND, KY. 



THE WIBORG & HANNA COMPANY 



CINCINNATI. OHIO 



PLAIN 
AND 

QUARTER 
SAWED 



White and Red Oak 



CHESTNUT S 

POPLAR ! 

GUM AND J 

CYPRESS { 



Flooring, Siding, Ceiling, Base, Case and Molding. Rough, Dressed and Re-sawed. Mixed Carloads. 



58 



HARDiWOOD RECORD 



INDIANA 

WHERE THE, BEST HAKDWOOOS GROW 



A^ay Stock: List 



12,000 ft 
50,000 " 
50,000 " 
50,000 " 

100,000 " 
15,000 " 

100,000 " 
10,000 " 
10,000 " 

100,000 " 

Long= 



1 in. No. 2 Common Walnut 
2 " Common and Better Plain White Oak 
6=4 " " " " Red 

5=4 " << i. » .. .. 

4=4 ** " t« «( a a 

6=4 and 8=4 Cherry Culls 

4=4 No. 2 Common and Better Red Qum 

4=4 1st and 2nd Plain Red Oak 

4=4 Isf and 2nd Ash 

5=4 to 2 in. Shop and Better Cypress 

Knight Lumber Co. 

INDIANAPOLIS. INI). 



Three Mills in Indiana 



FORT WAYNE 



INDIANAPOLIS 



LAFAYETTE 



Biggest Band Mill in the State 
Long Timbers up to Sixty Feet 

HARDWOOD SPECIALTIES 
Everything from Toothpicks to Timbers 

Perrine=Armstrong Co. 



FORT WAYNE 



INDMNA 



J. V. Stimson 



ALL KINDS OF 



HARDWOOD LUMBER 

MANUFACTURED 

HUNTINGBURG, IND. 



D'Heur 4 Swain Lumber 
Company 

MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS 

OUR SPECIALTY 

Quartered Oak and Sycamore 

SEYMOUR, IND. 



ALWAYS IN THE MARKET 

For choice lots of hardwoods. 
Walnut our specialty. 
Inspection at Mill Points. 

The Walnut Lumber Company 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



C. I. Hoyt 4 Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Quartered and Plain Oak^ Poplar, 
Ash and Chestnut 

Offer a few cars 4 4 and 6 4 Plain Oak to move quick 
, PEKIN, INDIANA 



Young 4 Cutsinger 



MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS 



OUR SPECIALTY 



Fine Figured Quartered Oak 

EVANSVILLE, INDIANA 



A floor to adore 

For thirty-three years Wilce's Hardwood Floor- 
iiiK has been among the foremost on the market 
and because it stands today "unequaled" is the 
best evidence that its manufacturer has kept 
abreast of modern methods and the advanced de- 
uKinils of the trade. To convince yourself of the 
:i ttovf statements, try our poUshed surface floor- 
ing', tuiit:ut'd and grooved, hollow backed, with 
malclierl ends and holes for blind nailing — you'll 
find it reduces the expense of laying and polishing. 
Our Booklet tells all about Hardivood Flooring and 
how to caif for it — also prices— and is/rei; 

The T. Wilce Company 

22i\d and Throop Sts. CHICAGO. ILL. 




HARDWOOD RECORD 



59 



BUFFALO 

THE GREAT WHOLESALE L U M B E, R CENTER OF THE EAST 




Manufacturers and 
Dealers in 

Ash 

White and Brown 

Basswood 
Birch 

Ked and White 

Butternut 

Cherry 

Chestnut 

Cottonwood 

Cypress 

Elm 

Soft and Rock 

Gum 

Red and Tupelo 

Hickory 
Maple 

Hard and Soft 

Red Oak 

Plain and Quartered 

White Oak 

Plain and Quartered 

Black Walnut 
White Wood 

Poplar 




BEYER, KNOX & COMPANY 



ALL KINDS OF HARDWOODS 

Office and Yards. 69 I,EROY AVENCB 



BUFFALO HARDWOOD' LUMBER CO, 

We want to buy for cash : 

Oak, Ash and other Hardwoods, all grades and thicknesses. 
Will receive and inspect stock at shipping point 
P. O. Box 312. MEMPHIS. TENN. 940 SENECA STREET. 



EMPIRE LUMBER COMPANY 



Our specialties are PLAIN %nd QUARTERED OAK and ASH. 

1142 SENECA STREET. 



G, ELIAS & BROTHER 



BUY AND CARRY LARGE QUANTITIES OF ALL KINDS OF HARDWOODS 

^_^,^^^^^^^__ 955 TO 1015 ELK STREET 



HUGH McLEAN LUMBER COMPANY 

Specialty: INDIANA WHITE OAK 



940 ELK STREET 



ANTHONY MILLER 

HARDWOODS OF ALL KINDS 



S93 EAGLE STREET 



SCATCHERD & SON 



HARDWOODS ONLY 

Yard, 1555 SENECA STREET Office. 886 ELLICOTT SQCARK 



STANDARD HARDWOOD LUMBER CO. 

OAK, ASH AND CHESTNUT 

1075 CLINTON STREET 

L N. STEWART & BROTHEr"" 



Specialties: CHERRY AND OAK 



892 ELK STREET 



T. SULLIVAN & COMPANY 

specialties: BROWN ASH, BIRCH. PACIFIC COAST FIR AND SPRUCE 

50 ARTHUR STREET 



ORSON E, YEAGER 



Specialtiei: OAK, ASH AND POPLAR 



932 ELK STREET 



W T ^ A MANUFACTURERS OLD-FASHIONED 

VSinSSinty soft yellow 



5-8 AND 4-4 

IN WIDE STOCK. 

SPECIALTY 



Kitchen & 



POPLAR 



Ashland, Kentucky 



Company 



Three States Lumber Co. 

OFFERS 

1 00,000 feet 5-4 Fir^s and Seconds Cottonwood 
1 00,000 feet 1 3" to 1 7" Box Boards Cottonwood 

Prompt Shipment Memphis. Tennessee 

Lamb -Fish Lumber Co. 

SUCCESSORS TO LAMB HARDWOOD LUMBER COMPANY, BACON-NOLAN-HARDWOOD COMPANY GUIRL-STOVER LUMBER COMPANY 



Ma.nufa.c- 
turers 



OAK, ASH, COTTONWOOD, GUM 
AND CYPRESS 

MAIN OFFICE: 720 MEMPHIS TR.UST BUILDING. MEMPHIS. TENN. 
ag.. •« « ««•«« ( Memphis. Tenn. t\ t> * Ia* 1 Well Manufactured Stock 

Three Band Mills chancy miss. uur Specialties Good crudes 

* *•* *'*' »**•••*• * »"*« ( Stover, M'ss. '^ ( Prompt Shipments 



YELLOW POPlilR 



MANUFACTURERS 

BAND SAWED 
POPLAR 
LUMBER 



DRY 



ALL GRADES 

5-8, 4-4, 5-4,6 4, 8 4, 10-4, 12-4,16 4 

Bevel Siding, Latli & Squares 

SPECIALTY, WIOE STOCK 



Coal Crove, Ohio, U, S. A. 




floMwol RocoM 



Twelfth Year. I 
Soml-xnonthly. \ 



CHICAGO, JUNE 10, 1907. 



/Subscription C2. 
(Single Copies, 10 Cents. 



ROSS LUMBER COMPANY 



The Cherry People 



ANYTHING IN CHERRY? 



Write Us. 



JAMESTOWN, N. Y. 



;o«T business is the prodactt 







^.^^^.^ 



properly tnanufacttrred and tfeated for every 
use, in accordance with methods developed 
^^^enty-five years' experience. 1^^^^ 







Throw Away Your Money 

BY STICKING TO OLD LINE COMPANIES 



PENNA. LUMBERMEN'S MUTUAL FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

943 Drexel Bxjilding, PhilaLdelpKiaL. Pa. 

Rumbarger Lumber Company 

Main Office: 808 Harrison Bldg., 15th and Market Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York Office: 8018 Metropolitan Bldg., I Madison Avenue. Pittsburg Office: 701 Keystone Building 

40 Cars 4-4 Birch Log Run. 
10 Cars 4-4 Quartered Red Oak, No. 1 Common. 
10 Cars 4-4 Chestnut, No. 2 Common. 
10 Cars 4-4 Oak, No. 2 Common. 
A stock of Southern White Pine, 1", H", H" and 2", mostly No. 1, No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 barn. 

We are operatins a tract of timber land containing considerable Holly and Persimmon. We can ship W. Virginia spruce sizes and boards, either rough or 
dressed, via any railroad. 



PRESIDENT 

G. A. MITCHELL 



\ irF.-I'KKSlDEXT 

\V. H. tJRATWICK 



TRKASIHKK 

cry WHiTK 



SECRETAKV 

R. H. McKELVEY 



LUMBER INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $!»00.000 

ADIRONDACK FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $300,000 

84-88 WilliaLin St. 



NEW YORK 



ADVERTISERS' CLASSIFIED DIRECTORY FOLLOWS WANT AND FOR SALE ADVERTISING SECTION. 



2 HARDWOOD RECORD 




f /^ ITIC^X/II I f~M 


LCJUl^V IL^L^LJf 


MANUFACTURING AND DISTKIBUTING CENTER OF KENTUCKY 



Dry Stock W. P. BFOWII & SOHS LUmbCr CO.L«nisvillc,Ky. 



PLAIN BED OAS. 
66,000' 1" 1st & 2nd. 
25,000' 1^4" Ist & 2d. 
49,000' 1%' Ut & 2d. 
67,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
18,000' 2V4" Ist & 2d. 
18,000' 3" 1st & 2d. 
131,000' 1- No. 1 Com. 
84,000' 114- No. 1 Com. 
44,000' 1%- No. 1 Com. 
47,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
8.000' 2W' No. 1 Com. 
15.000' 3" No. 1 Com. 

QVABTESED RED OAK. 
> 19,000' 1' 1st & 2d. 



14,000' IW' 1st A 24. 

5,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
15.000' 1" No. 1 Com. 

7,000' m' No. 1 Com. 
13,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 

PLAIN WHITE OAS. 

80,000' 1" 1st & 2d. 
28,000' IVi" 1st & 2d. 
12,000' IVi" 1st & 2d. 
42,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
23,800' 2%- 1st & 2d. 
18,000' 3" 1st & 2d. 
227.000' 1- No. 1 Com. 
60,000' IVi" No. 1 Com. 
80,000' IW No. 1 Com. 



50,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
17.000' 2^4" No. 1 Com. 
22,000' 3" No. 1 Com. 

QUARTERED WHITE OAK, 

60,000' 1" 1st & 2d. 
28,000' 114" 1st & 2d. 
45,000' 1%" Ist & 2d. 
49,000' 2' 1st & 2d. 
19,000' 2%" 1st & 2d. 
18,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
30,000' 1V4" No. 1 Com. 
40,000' 1%" No. 1 Com. 
22,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
10,000' 3" No. 1 Com. 



ASH. 

9,0(30' 1" 1st & 2d. 

65,0UO' IVt" Ist & 2d. 

16.000' 1%" Ist & 2d. 

10.000' 2" 1st & 2d. 

8,000' 2%" 1st & 2d. 

14,000' 3" 1st & 2d. 

6,000' 4" lat & 2d. 

4.000' Hi* No. 1 Com. 

16.000' Hi' No. 1 Com. 

8,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 

POPLAR. 
12,000' 1" 1st A 2d. 



All thicknesses in cull poplar, ash, chestnut. 



Your inquiries will be appreciated. 



12,000' IVt" 1st & 2d. 
II.OOO' 1%" 1st & 2d. 
12,000' 2" 1st & 2d. 
10,000" 2%" Ist & 2d. 
10,000' 3" 1st & 2d. 
60,000' 1" No. 1 Com. 
28,000' H4" No. 1 Com. 
10,000' IVi" No. 1 Com. 
10,000' 2" No. 1 Com. 
15,000' 1" 18" & up 1st & 2d, 

8,000' 2" 18' & up 1st & 2d. 

8.000' 2" 24" & up Ist & 2d. 

4,000' 1%" 18" & up 1st & 2d. 

3.000' 1%" 24" & up l3t & 2d. 

Prompt delivery guaranteed 



SWANN-DAY LUMBER COMPANY 

CLAY CITY, KENTUCKY 
OFFER 

POPLAR 

Bevel Siding, Drop Siding, as well as Wide Poplar 

Always a Large Stock on Hand Prices are Yours for the Asking 



500,000 F^EEX 



GUM 



1st enrtdi Uriels 



G. \M. JONBS 
COA\RANY 



MIIJ.S 



^ .\rkansas 



"Wiscon.sia 



APPLIiTOX, WIS. 



McLean -Davis Lumber Co. 



Successors to 



Hugh McLean Lumber Co., Highland Park, Ky. 
Edward L. Davis Lumber Co., Louisville, Ky. 
Berry - Davis Saw Mill Co., Louisville, Ky. 



Manufacturers and Dealers in 



Hardwood Lumber 



Daily Capacity: 
80,000 feet. 



Sales Offices: 
Louisville, Ky. 



W, H Neal. Prest, Treas. I, L- SinckUnd. vi 


.-Prest. W. A. Dolph, Secy 


V Gen. Mur. 


NEAL = 


DOLPH 


LUMBER 


CO. 




Manufacturers Hardwood Lumber 




RANDOLPH BUILDING 


MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE | 


WE 


WILL TAKE 


CARE OF YOU 





HARDWOOD RECORD 

Not only the ONLY HARDWOOD PAPER, 
but the BEST LUMBER PAPER published 



HARDWOOD RECORD 







CADILLAC 


















CELEBRATED FOR HIGH STANDARD OF QUALITY AND MILL WORK 







■Mitchell's Make— n 



DRY STOCK LIST OF 



Michigan Hardwoods 



Cadillac, 3/ich., 3fay, igoy 



-1/4 Birch, No. 2 Common and Better 
4/4 Clierry, No. 2 Common and Better 
4/4 Cherry, No. 3 Common 
4/4 Hard Maple, 1st and 2nds 
10/4 Hard Maple, 1st and 2nds 
4/4 Red Oak, No. 2 Common and Better 
4/4 No. 3 Common Maple and Beech 



13M feet 

4M 

5M 
20M 

3M 
40M 
60M 



MAPLE SPECIALTIES 

We can furnish limited quantities of inch Ists and 
2nds or Clear Maple lumber selected to widtlis or 
lengths or both. The lumber is our own manvifac- 
ture and air seasoned. 



PLEASE SEND US YOUR INQUIRIES 

Mitchell Brothers Co. 

CADILLAC, MICH. 



The Cadillac Handle Co. 

CADILLAC. MICHIGAN 

Band Sawn 



Michigan Hardwoods 

We solicit Inquiries for : 

4/4 Hard Maple, 1st and 2nds, W% or less No. 1 Common in it. 

Cut 12 months 
5/4 Maple 1st and 2nds 
5/4 Maple No. 1 and 2 Common 
6/4 Maple 10 in. and over wide, 1st and 2nd with small per cent 

No. 1 Common 



MURPHY & DIQQINS 

Offer all grades of the foUowiog special dry stock 

MAPLE--5/4, 6/4, 8/4, 10/4, 12/4, 14/4, 16/4 
GRAY ELM— 4/4, 12/4 
BASSWOOD— 4/4 . 
BIKCB-l/4, 6/4 

Our own manufacture. Perfect Mill Work. Uniform Grades. 
LET US nOURE ON YOUR HARDWOOD WANTS. 



Cummer, Diggins & Go. 



==IHANUFACTURERS:== 

'<CUMMER" MAPLE 
AND BEECH FLOORING 



MICHIGAN HARDWOODS 



Good assortment oi dry stock on hand ready 
for immediate shipment in Hard Maple, Beech, 
Birch, Soft Elm and Cherry. 



SEND US A LIST OF YOUR REQUIREMENTS. 



DRY STOCK 




Northern Michigan 

Soft Gray Elm 

What our old cork pine was to the regular 
white pine — such is our Soft Gray Elm to 
ordinary soft elm. Buyers who gladly discrim- 
inate in favor of something better than the or- 
dinary, will be interested. We have 

2 cars 12-4 firsts and seconds. 

Wide, choice stock, our own product, seasoned right, bone dry. 

This stock runs 10 in. and wider, and 50% or 

more 19 inches and wider. 

WRITE US ABOUT IT. 




COBBS&HITGnELL 



(INCORPORATED) 




CADILLAC. MICHICAN^'W 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



FENN BROS. COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Oak Flooring 

Qiaarte»r&c* \a/hlte> HoIIo'va/ Backed 

Quartered Red End WVatched 

Plain \A/hite F»oHshed 

Plain Red Bored 

Offices a.rvd Pla.nt : 

Kansas and Mallory Ave., New South Memphis. 

(Take Soulh Memphis car lo Mallory Ave.) 



Goodlander Robertson 
Lumber Co. 

Hardwood Lumber 

Memphis, Tennessee 

IF IT'S HARD TO GET. WRITE US 



I. M. DARNELL, PREST. 

E. E. TAENZER, VICE-PRCST. 



F. C. OUPKE, 2ND VICE-PREST. 

W. S. DARNELL, TREAS -GEN. MGR. 



DARNELL-TAENZER LUMRER CO. 



/RED GUM\ 

/white oak > 

' SAP GUM 
1 RED OAK, ASH 
\ CYPRESS I 
\ POPLAR / 



MEMPHIS, TENN. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DTALERS IN HIGH-GRADE 

HARDWOOD LUMRER 

BAND SAWN THIN STOCK A SPECIALTY 



, CONSOLIDATED 




i\m^ % 



Cable Address: "Sonderco" IVleinphis. 



Codes Used: Lumberman's Telecode and A B C Sth Edition 



MANUFACTURERS 



HARDWOOD, GUM, COTTONWOOD AND CYPRESS 

Main Office: Tennessee Trust Building, Memphis, Tenn. 

Offers the following specials: 



10 Cars I in. No. 1 Common Ash. 
10 Cars I \ in. No. 1 Common Ash. 
10 Cars lA in. No. 1 Common Ash. 
10 Cars 2 in. No. 1 Common Ash. 
10 Cars I in. Shop Cypress. 



10 Cars I in. Pecky Cypress. 

10 Cars 2 in. Pecky Cypress. 

10 Cars 2 in. Dimension Cypress. 

20 Cars 1 in. No. I Common Cottonwood. 

20 Cars 1 in. No. 2 Common Cottonwood. 



Plain and Quarter Sawed White and Red Oak, Elm, Cottonwood, Poplar, Gum, White Ash and 

Cypress. Direct shipments from our own Mills of Lumber from our own Timber our 

Specialty. We manufacture and put in pile 300,000 ft. Hardwood every 24 hours. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



WEST VIRGINIA YELLOW POPLAR 
NORTH CAROLINA CORK WHITE PINE 

AND HARDWOOD 



DRY KILNS AND PLANING MILLS. ALL OUR MILLS RUN THE YEAR ROUND. 
SEND US YOUR INQUIRIES AND ORDERS. 

W.M.Ritter Lumber Co. 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 

Saw and Ship 100,000,000 Feet Yearly 



FULLERTON-POWELL 

Hardwood Lumber Co. 



D OFFERS THE FOLLOWING STOCK fp 

FOR IMMEDL^TE SHIPMENT L= 



10 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Plain Red OakJ 3 cars li in. 1st and 2nds Uuartered White Oak 

2 cars li in. Plain Red Oak Step Plank 2 cars IJ in. No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak 

4 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Plain Red Oak, 12 in. and 10 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 10 to 16 ft. 

wider 7 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Red Gum, 12 ft. 

2 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Quartered Red Oak, 10 in. S cars 2 in. 1st and 2nds Sap Gum 

.5 cars \\ in. No. 1 Common Plain White Oak 8 cars 2 in. No. 1 Common Sap Gum 

1 car 1 in. No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak 1 car 2 in. No. 2 Common Sap Gum 

2 cars 2 in. 1st and 2nds Quartered White Oak 18 cars 1 in. 1st and 2nds Cottonwood, 6 in. and wider 
2 cars 2 in. No. 1 Common Quartered White Oak 3 cars 1 in. No. 1 Common Cottonwood 



BRANCH OFFICES: 



miMMEAPOUS. MINM., 30S Lumber Exchangm 




MAIN OFFICES 



CHICAGO, 1104 Chamber of Commerce tiiccriuuv 

MEMPHIS,TEMM.,30S Tennessee Trust BIdg. \ r i J / i^Ollff^ ^H^ftl/I T TiH 

«— «=«,.. -—,«=..._.... r_„..-— \ furnished / KJOUm JJCnU, 2/fU. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



PAEPCKE-LEICHT LUMBER COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



COTTONWOOD 

GUM AIND OTHER HARDWOODS 

Large stocks of well seasoned Lumber always carried at 0'<r yards and mills. 
General Offices: 14G W. Chicago Ave., CHICAGO. Mills: Cairo, 111., Marked Tree, Ark., Greenville, Miss., Arkansas City, Ark., Blytheville, Ark. 



THOMAS FORMAN CO, 

DETROIT, MICH. 

MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH GRADE 

Maple and Oak Flooring 

We desire to move promptly a large quantity of 

13-16xH" Clear Quarter Sawed White Oak Flooring. 
13-16xli" Clear Plain Sawed White Oak Flooring. 
13-16xU" Clear Plain Sawed Red Oak Flooring. 
13-16xU" Clear Maple Flooring. 

Please write us for special delivered prices on the above lots. 



MAY STOCK LIST 



HARD MAPLE 
1 in. 1,000.000 ft. 
1} in. 100,000 ft. 
li in. 100,000 ft. 

3 in. 50,000 ft. 

4 in. 50,000 ft 



BEECH 
1 in. 100,000 ft. 
BIRCH 

1 in. 500,000 ft. 
li in. 100,000 ft. 

2 in. 100,000 ft. 
2J in. 50.000 ft. 



BASSWOOD 
1 in. 300,000 ft. 

GRAY ELM 
1 in. 300,000 ft. 
li in. 200,000 ft. 
3 in. 200,000 ft. 



Kelley Lumber,& Shingle Co. 



Tra. verse City, Mich. 



WILLIAM WHITMER. (Si, SONS, Inc. 

ALWAYS IN THE MARKET FOR STOCKS OF 
WELL MANUFACTURED 



HARDWOODS 



BRANCHES: 
NEW YORK, BOSTON, PITTSBURG 



MAIN OFFICES: 
GIRARD TRUST BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 



R.E. Wood Lumber Company 



^ Manufacturers of Yellow Poplar, Oak, Chestnut, Hemlock 
and White Pine. 

^\ We own our own stumpage and operate our own mills. 
^ Correspondence solicited and inquiries promptly answered. 



GENERAL OFFICES: 
CONTINENTAL BUILDING. 



Baltimore, Maryland 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



THE EAST 



BOSTON 



NEW YORK 



PHILADELPHIA 



WISTAR, UNDERBILL & CO. 

PHILADELPHIA 

WHOLESALE HARDWOOD LUMBER 



MtCHIGAN WHITE PINE 
TENNESSEE WHITE PINE 



HEMLOCK HARDWOODS 
ALABAMA PINE 



H. H. MAUS & CO., INC. 

MANUFACTURERS 

HARDWOOD and YELLOW PINE. 



Write us it you wish to buy or sell. 



420 Walnut St.. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



W. M. GILLESPIE LUMBER 

HARDWOODS COMPANY Farmers Bank Bldg. 
Oak a Speculty PITTSBURGH, PA, 



ALBERT HAAS LUMBER CO. 

BAND SAWED 

OAK AND ASH 

YELLOW POPLAR 

ATLANTA - - - . GEORGIA 



JOHN L, ALCOCK & CO. 

BUYERS OF BLACK WALNUT LOGS 
BOARDS AND PLANKS 

Baltimore, Md. 



Inspection at point of 

shipment. Spot cash. 



THE BUFFALO MAPLE FLOORING CO. 

MANUFACTURCRS OF 

MICHIGAN ROCK MAPLE AND OAK FLOORING 

BUFFALO, NEW YORK 



The West Florida Hardwood Co. 



MnJL ON Apalachicola River 
MARYSVILLE, FLA. 



Ash 
Hickory 



Red Gum 
Tupelo Gum 

LET US HAVE YOUR INQUIRIES == 



Red and White Oak 
Yellow Cottonwood 



BALTIMORE 
MARYLAND 



E. E. PRICE 



BUYER AND 
EXPORTER OF 



Hardwoods, Poplar and Logs 

I am always in the market for nice lots of dry and well manufactured 
lumber. L inspect at point of shipment. Correspondence Bolicited. 



Pennsylvania Door & Sash Co, 

HARDWOOD DOORS 
AND INTERIOR FINISH 



NEW YORK 



PITTSBURG 



PHILADELPHIA 



WantCd-DimCnSlOn n^k Plam and Quartered. 

White and Red. Send for specifications. 

IndiaLiiaL Q\iak.rtered Oa-k Co. 

7 Ea.sf 42nd Street. New York City 



James & Abbot Company 

Lumber and Timber 

No. J65 MILK ST., BOSTON, MASS., and GULFPORT, MISS. 



JONES HARDWOOD CO. 



INCORPORATED 



WANTS: Poplar, Plain Oak, 
Quartered Oak and Cypress. 



147 MILK STREET 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Manufacturers please send slock lists and prices. 



Holloway Lumber Company 

WHOLESALE HARDWOODS 



In the marKet for all thicknesses of 
OAK, ASH and CHESTNUT. 



312 Arcade Building, 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WM. E. LITCHFIELD 

MASON BUILDING, BOSTON, MASS. 

Specialist in Hardwoods 

Manufacturers are requested to supply lists of stock for sale 



VT/E are long on 8/4 Sound Wormy Chestnut. Send us vour in- 
** quiries. Let us quote jou on Plairv or Quartered White and 
Red Oak. Look us up. 

SCHOFIELD BROTHERS 

PENNA. BUILDING L V M B E R PHILADELPHIA 



Sales Agents: Long Pole Lumber Co., Case-Fowler Lumber Co, 

HonS va SOBLE BROTHERS 

Birmington. Ala. ^^z=:zrz::::::^:i:^:^^^:^zr= 



Specialties: 

Quartered White 

Oak, Poplar. 



WHOLESALE LUMBER 
Land Title Building = ■ Philadelphia, Pa. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



MILLS: 

NEW ALBANY, IND. 

^HIGHLAND PARK) LOUISVILLE 



DR. C. E. RIDER, President 

W. A. McLean, v. p. & Cen'l. Mgr. 

ANGUS McLEAN, Sec'y-Treas. 



WOOD MOSAIC FLOORING 
AND LUMBER COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Choice Indiana Wliite Dale 



A GOOD STOCK. PROMPT SHIPMENTS, 

Personal supervision from timber purchase to delivery of your kind of Stock 

NEW ALBANY, IND. 



mmmk^ 


C. C. Wen^el & Bro. Co. 




m^^am 


Louisville, Ky. 




MAHOGANY 




WE IMPORT THE LOGS FROM OUR OWN CAMPS, 
AND MANUFACTURE THEM INTO 


%~ '■^::-^ 


Lumber and Veneers 


... ' - V . 


Diiuenslon Stock a Specialty 


BRANCHES: 
BELIZE, BrHish Honduras. SAN PEDRO SULA, Spanish Honduras. AXIM, Gold Coast, Africa. 


Photograph of Mahogany Tree. 

at Mengel's Suwinsu Camp, on j 

the We.st Coast of Africa, i^ 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Cherry River Boom and 

Lumber Co. 

SCRANTON, PENNSY LVA N I A 



WEST VIRGINIA HARDWOODS 

AND SPRUCE 

THE BEST LUMBER 

3 Band Mills s'&S^M'" 

D. G. COURTNEY 



MANUFACTURER OFj 





Yellow^ Poplar 
Oak 61 Chestnut 

CHARLESTON. WEST VIRGINIA 

Our Timber Holdings are located exclusively in the finest sections of West Virginia 
growth. Modern mills and perfect manufacture. Standard and uniform grades. 

We seek the trade of wood-working factories who want a dependable lumber supply 
and fair treatment. 

Just now we want to move 4/4 No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 Common Oak. 



lO 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



JOHN T. DIXON 



HARRY S. DEWEY 




We are not Wizards in making new grades to fit a price. 

No tricks in our methods of making shipments. The 
straight grades are good enough for us. 

If you will give us a trial order for POPLAR, OAK, 
ASH, CHESTNUT or OAK, MAPLE and YELLOW 
PINE FLOORJNG, we believe we can demonstrate our 
ability to please you. 



DIXON & DEWEY 



716 and 716 A, Flatiron Building, 



NEW YORK 



Quartered Oak Flooring 

Manufactured for 

HIGHEST CLASS of trade only. 

Also Plain Oak, Maple and other Hardwood flooring. 

The name DWtGHT on flooring is a guarantee of its 

excellence. 
D WIGHT SPECIAL pattern of thin flooring is the 
only suitable thin flooring to lay. Write for Sample. 



DWIGHT LUMBER COMPANY 

DETR.OIT, MICHIGAN 



R. M. SMITH 



The Tegge Lumber Co. 




MILWAUKEE 
WI SCONSIN 






BUYERS OF 
ALL KINDS OF 


1 


HARDWOOD LUMBER 






The Crosby & Beckley Company 



HARDWOODS 



We are 
In the Market for Choice Stock 

WRITE US 



No. 1 Madison Ave., 
New York, N. Y. 



New Haven, 
Conneclicut. 



Mcllvain's Lumber Notes 

CEDAR, CYPRESS AND REDWOOD SHINGLES 

430.000 No. 1 Cedar and Cypress Shingle.? — Hand made — 
Heart Split — 5 x 20 — 6 x 20 — 7 x 24. Finest you ever saw. 

470,000 No. 1 — 16 inch — Sawed — Redwood Shingles. 
Send for samples and prices. Want to move them quickly. 

Oak — Red and White — Plain and Quartered — 3,000,000 
feet in stock. Two million feet of tliis oak of all kinds is dry 
stock. Balance is part dry. Thicknesses, f to 6 incites. All 
grades. Bill sizes cut to order. Send in your requisitions. 

J. Gibson Mcllvain & Co. 

56th to 58th Sts. and Woodland Ave. 
City Offices, 1420 Chestnut St. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



J H. P, SMITH 



R. M. SMITH (BL COMPANY 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

WEST VIRGINIA HARDWOODS 

PARKERSBURG, WEST VIRGINIA 

WE CARRY IN STOCK FROM TEN TO FIFTEEN MILLION FEET OF ASH, BEECH, BASSWOOD, CHESTNUT, CHERRY, 

MAPLE, PLAIN & QTD. OAK, POPLAR, WALNUT, &C. OUR PLANING 

MILL FACILITIES ARE UNSURPASSED. 

Band Mill: Orndoff, Webster County, W. Va. 



EASTERN OFFICE: 



1425-6 LAND TITLE BUILDING, PHILADELPHIA 



Planing Mill; Heaters, W. Va. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



II 



HOLMES' 
"CLIPPER 
CUT-OFF SAW 



>99 



This machine is de- 
signed to tnm the ends 
of maple flooring and 
for cutting off stock in 
box and furniture fac- 
tories. It is the most 
rapid and accurate ma- 
chine for the purpose 
now on the market 
and is extremely sim- 
ple and durable. The 
saw carriage is brought 
forward by a foot 
lever and returned by 
an equalized extension 
spring on the foot 
ever. The saw is com- 
pletely covered, thus 
making it perfectly safe 
to operate. The slot- 
ted frame carrying the 
braced slide rods can 
be bolted either to 
posts or to the wall, 
and it is vertically ad- 
justable. 

The automatic belt 
binder is placed direct- 
ly above the saw ar- 
bor on adjustable post 
hangers and the belt 
passmg over both pul- 
leys is kept uniformly 
tight at ail times. If 
desired, a regular coun- 
tershaft with T. & L. 
pulleys can be furn- 
ished instead of the 
automatic binder. 

The machine for 
trimming maple floor- 
ing will cut up to 
5 in. wide, and the 
machine for box 
and furniture fac- 
tories will cut up 
to 1 2 in. wide. 



LET US TELL YOU MORE ABOUT IT. 

E. 6i B. Holmes 
Machinery Company 

BUFFALO, NEW YORK 




General Electric Company 



Flexible 
Power 




INDUCTION MOTOR 

111 all sawmill work the power re- 
quired varies with the kind of timber 
handled and according to' its condition 
wlien passing through the mill. In a 
day's work heavy logs follow on the 
heels of smaller ones, partially seasoned 
timber is mixed with green and the 
work is constantly changing. 

These conditions can be met only 
with a motor of ample over-load capa- 
city and the simplest possible construc- 
tion — qualities which are featured in the 
General Electric Inductioi} Motors for 
sawmill work. Upon demand these 
motors will supply 200 per cent to 300 
per cent of their normal output. 

One Man Said:— 

"The 100 h. p. {GE) Induction Motor 
dri\'ing our 9-foot sawmill shows abso- 
lutely no drop in speed no matter what 
load the sawyer puts on it, and can 
hum thro' a 30 in. birch at as good a 
clip as it can thro' a poplar log." 

He h\a.s more to solv in booklet 4470-H. 
Send for it. 



1347 



Principal Office: Schenectady, N. Y. 



SaLles Offices in all La^rge Cities. 



J 



12 



HARDWOOD RECORD 






OAK FLOORING 



Kiln Dried 

Bored 

Polished 



MAPPWOOD LUMBER (yN 



& MFC. CO. 
5ARDIS 

MISS. 



Hollow 



Bundled 



"Michigan Maple Flooring 

Our model factory is equipped with the highest 
class tools and appliances made for Flooring 
production. 

We produce our lumber from the best rock Ma- 
ple area in Michigan and have 20 years' supply. 

Our brand "Michigan" is a guaranty of qual- 
ity. Perfect mill work and excellent grades 
distinguish our Flooring and our prices are 
reasonable. 

WARD BROS, Big Rapids, Mich. 



Just to Remind You 

That we are manufacturers of the celebrated 

Wolverine Brand 
Maple Flooring 

" There is uone better." 

Bored, polished, end and edge matched, lays with every 
joint even. Largest sales in the history of maple 
flooring. May we have your order ? 

BLISS & VAN AUKEN 

SAGINAW W. S., MICH. 



WE ARE OFFERING 

TIMBER LAND 6% BONDS 

Secured by first mortgage on Southern timber 
lands at less than SO per cent of their present 
market value. Issued by large, well established, 
responsible lumber companies. Full particu- 
lars will be mailed on request. 

CLARK L. F»OOLE & CO. 

SUCCESSORS TO 

H. C. BARROLL (Si CO., Bankers 

First National Bank Building CHICAGO 



"Ideal" a Rock Maple Flooring 



is the flooring that is manufactured expressly to supply 
the demand for the best. It is made bj' modern ma- 
chinery from carefully-selected stock and every pre- 
caution is taken throughout our entire system to 
make it fulfill in every particular its name— "IDEAL." 

Rough or Finished Lumber — All Kinds 

Send us Your Inquiries 

The I. Stephenson Company 

WELLS, MICHIGAN 



^The HARDWOOD RECORD publishes a 
series of bulletins, showing the annual hardwood re- 
quirements of many thousands of wholesale consumers, 
by kind, grade and thickness. 

^ Indispensable to every lumber sales manager. 

^ Specimen bulletin for the asking. 



THE "FINEST" MAPLE FLOORING 



W. D. YOUNG & CO. 

BAY CITY, MICHIGAN. 

Producers from TREE to TRADE of the high- 
est type of Michigan Forest Products. Large 
stock of Maple Flooring and 15,000,000 feet 
of Hardwoods — 1 to 4 inches thick — on hand. 



Maple, Birch and Beech Lumber 




FIRE INSURANCE 



Specialists on Lumber and 

Lumber Working 

Plants 



Lumber Underwriters 

HOME OFFICE: 

66 Broadway, New York 



flaMwooil RocoM 

Published in the Interest of Hardwood Lumber, American Hardwood Forests, Wood Veneer Industry, Hardwood Flooring, 

Hardwood Interior Finish, Wood Chemicals, Saw Mill and WoodworHlng Machinery. J 






Vol. XXIV. 



CHICAGO. JUNE 10. 1907. 



No. 4. 



Published on the 10th and 25th of each month by 

THE HARDWOOD COMPANY 

HENRY H. GIBSON. EJ.cor. EDGAR H. DEFEBAUGH, Manager. 

7th Floor, Ellsworth Bidg., 355 Dearborn St., Chicago, III., U.S.A. 
Telephone Harrison 4960 

Easlern Office: 31U Land Tille BuilJ.ng. Philadelphia. Jacob Holliman. Represenlalive. 

TERMS OF ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION 

In the United States, Canada, Philippine Islands and Mexico . $2.00 

in all other countries in Universal Postal Union ..... 3.00 

Subscriptions are payable in advance, and in default of written orders to the 
contrary are continued at our option. 

Entered at Chicago Postoffice as Second Class Matter. 

Advertising copy invist be received five da..vs ir\ a.dvak.rvce of 
publication da-te. Advertising rates on application. 



VENEER MEETING. 

Senii-annual meeting of the National Veneer and Panel 
Manufacturers' Association, Auditorium Annex, Chicago, 
Thursday and Friday, June 20 and 21. first session 10 
o'clock a. m. 



General Market Conditions. 

The liiirihvood tratlc the cuiintry over is not particularly active, 
as will be noted by market reports from all the chief consuming 
couters, in this issu'^ of the Hardwood Becord. Happily stocks 
of dry lumber are sold up closely in every producing section, and 
therefore it happens that with the diminishing insistence for 
hardwood lumber, there is no shading of values save in rare 
exceptions. Tliese seem to be in firsts and seconds and sap gum, 
which within the last few days have been offered at considerably 
less than past quotations, and West Virginia oak is being quoted 
at from $1 to -$2 off in the eastern markets. 

In the great area of hardwood production in the Southwest, 

prevailing weather conditions are still very bad. There has been 

an endless flood of rain and the mills have not yet been able to 

run more than half the time on account of inability to secure logs. 

There is a little accumulation of stock in some rare cases, but 

generally speaking every foot of reasonably dry lumber is being 

shipped out as fast as cars can be secured. In the North basswood 

and black ash are practically out of the market and the stocks of 

maple and birch are pretty low. Poplar today stands at the very 

head of the list in demand, and with short stocks and heavy call, 

prices are fending upwards rather than otherwise. Cottonwood 

and oak are reasonably close seconds in demand. 

^ In the news columns will be found an analysis of building opera- 

— tions for May which is a surprise, as they show a slight gain in 

y^he aggregate over that month a year ago. Some cities seem to 

—ibe booming in this respect, while others show a tremendous falling 

jl^off. It is thought that local conditions govern these marked 

Dehanges. 



The furniture trade the country over is not up to expectations; 
neither is the interior trim business, hardwood door making, agri- 
cultural implement and wagon trade. All these usually large 
buyers are holding off on purchases, having the very prevalent 
idea that they will be able to buy hardwoods at lower prices later 
in the season. 

Veneer and panel makers still seem to have all the business they 
can carry, but prices remain unsatisfactory and comparatively few 
plants are making any considerable amount of money. The hard- 
wood flooring people with their accumulation of orders and a fair 
current demand are having all they can do. Apparently a vast 
quantity of hardwood flooring is going into old buildings to replace 
worn-out yellow pine and other softwood floors. The demand for 
the rest of the season looks very promising. The call for 
mahogany, cherry and walnut seems to be growing, as the furniture 
and electric trades are increasing their use of these woods. 

On the whole, the hardwood situation shows marked strength by 
reason of the paucity of present and prospective stocks, and it can 
scarcely be predicted that there will be any diminution of conse- 
quence in prices during 1907. 



A School of Inspection. 

Perhaps the most notable paper presented at tlie Atlantic City 
meeting of the National Hardwood Lumber Association was the one 
suggesting a school of inspection for training young men, especially 
amateurs, into a correct knowledge of the way in which hardwood 
lumber should be graded 'to accord with standard rules. 

In the past, associations and individuals have selected inspectors 
who have been educated in a hit-or-miss sort of way and their inter- 
]iretation of rules has varied in accordance with the environment 
under which they worked. It has been a rare thing for two in- 
spectors to get anywhere near each other when it came to matters 
of reinspection, and the result has been equally unsatisfactory to 
lioth seller and buyer. Old-time inspectors who have been edu- 
cated to do the work in a certain way are very loath to amend 
their ideas of grades, even when a printed page of specific rules is 
before them. It is the boast of more than one that he has not 
I'hanged his grading methods for a quarter of a century, but does 
the same under National or Manufacturers' rules that he did before 
either were promulgated. This has been the serious difficulty en- 
countered by association managers of grading systems. 

The plan of taking young men, preferably common school gradu- 
ates, who are desirous of fitting themselves for employment that 
will pay a very handsome salary is admirable. It is proposed to 
establish several of these schools throughout the United States, so as 
to cover experience with all varieties of timber, and by transferring 
classes from one point to another, let each individual gain a com- 
]irehensive knowledge of all hardwoods and thus enable him to 
inspect lumber of every kind, no matter where he finds it. It has 
been suggested that the Biltmore estate in North Carolina would be 
one admirable location for one school, on account of the great 
variety of woods encountered there. It is suggested that a second 
school might be established at Cadillac, Mich., as this point offers 
fine residence facilities and hardwoods are manufactured there under 
the best possible conditions; moreover, it is a point at which all 



14 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



varieties of northern woods are encountered. A third school should 
be maintained in Memphis, for like reasons. 

It may be said that the essential, professed value of inspection is 
to estaljlish the \Yorth of lumber. Up to this time an inspection cer- 
tificate simply recites the sizes and grades. While this is absolutely 
essential, it fails iu a marked degree to set forth all the facts in 
the case that go to make up the value of lumber. These students 
should be taught Ijeyond actual measurement and the nomination of 
a grade, to be able to analyze the physics of the wood which they 
inspect. On the certificate of inspection should be stated the quality 
of the wood itself; in the case of oak, whether it is soft and work- 
able, or tough and stringy. Students should be taught to take into 
consideration the sawing of the lumber as well as the seasoning. 
These two features tend to determine value, iu a marked degree. In 
fact, if young men are to be scientifically trained in the inspection 
of lumber, they should be started at the tree and have a course 
through the woods, sawmill and lumber yard, previous to undertak- 
ing actual grading per sc. It is to be hoped that the committee 
having this matter in charge will carry out this scheme of education 
in inspection to its logical conclusion, and that there may be per- 
manent schools maintained under competent tutelage, until the neces- 
sary thousands of lumber inspectors become fully competent to carry 
on this work scientifically and intelligently. 



Atlantic City Meeting. 

The recent meeting of the iSIational Hardwood Lumber Association 
held at Atlantic City, the full proceedings of which appear in this 
issue of the H-uidwood Record, was marked by very important legis- 
lation. The so-called Buffalo agreement, a resolution providing that 
no change be made iu inspection rules until December, 1908, was 
suspended, and many modifications were made in the grading rules, 
to take effect December next. These rules were the result of the 
most exhaustive and careful deliberation on the part of the Inspection 
Rules Committee in conference with delegates from the hardwood 
associations of Michigan, Wisconsin and Indiana, and while the stand- 
ard of quality is lowered in many instances, it was deemed wise to 
thus amend the rules to conform with current trade practices cover- 
ing the inspection of hardwood lumber. The grade of firsts and 
seconds remains practically unchanged, save that the minimum widths 
admitted are narrower. New grades of selects and finish lumber are 
incorporated between firsts and seconds and No. 1 common. These 
changes were not made without long and patient consideration by the 
delegates and serious debate on the subject. The majority in favor 
of the amendments was more than two to one. The new rules corre- 
spond closely to those of the Hardwood Manufacturers' Association 
in that resultant grade products from the application of either set 
will be practically the same. 

In spite of jiast fiascos in reaching a joint agreement with the 
Manufacturers' Association on the subject of grades, it is now cer- 
tainly up to this association to again make overtures toward having 
the wording of the various rules for hardwood grades of both asso- 
ciations synonymous and for the eventual establishment of a joint 
bureau of insjiection which shall be competent, impartial, intelligent 
and unhampered by any political influence from either body. 

This is the insistent and crying demand of the hardwood trade 
at large in all its divisions — manufacturers, jobbers and consumers 
alike. Tlie slight breaches today can easily be bridged over. Let 
conciliation and compromise go on until the desideratum is obtained. 



Annual Statistics of Forest Products. 

The great value of accurate statistics as a factor in assisting to 
regulate production to the best advantage and to estimate prospective 
values should be more carefully considered by progressive lumber 
manufacturers. Information of this character, when accurate and 
complete, reflects tlie true situation unerringly. It is therefore 
highly essential that these statistics be made public at the earliest 
possible moment, otherwise much of their value is lost. The United 
States government has for years made itself responsible for crop 
statistics, and last year with the cooperation of the National Lum- 



ber Manufacturers ' Association undertook the work of collating 
statistics covering forest products. The average lumber manufac- 
turer supported the movement heartily, but still the work did not 
possess the value it should have done, owing to the indifference of 
the few who failed to supply individual reports, thus rendering the 
figures incomplete. The Forest Service has now entered into 
cooperation with the Bureau of the Census, which has a large force 
of trained statisticians, and if it can secure the cooperation to 
which it is entitled, the lumber-manufacturing public will be doing 
itself a great service in assisting to this end. The bureau announces 
that state totals will be published as soon as any individual state 
report is complete. It is to be hoped that every hardwood manu- 
facturer will take the little time necessary to supply the information 
asked for. 

The Veneer Meeting. 

Agreeable to the announcement at the liead of the editorial 
columns of this issue of the Record, the National Veneer & Panel 
Manufacturers' Association will hold its semi-annual meeting at the 
Auditorium Annex in Chicago on June 120 and 21. Tlie first session 
will be called at 10 a. m. The meeting promises to be very interest- 
ing, as a carefully prepared report by the grading committee on the 
proposed amendment of rules on all kinds of woods will be pre- 
sented. A series of papers will be read by experienced operators on 
topics of particular interest to the trade. 

It is designed to make this a good old-fashioned ' ' experience 
meeting," in which every problem pertaining to the trade will be 
thoroughly threshed out. In view of the present rather unsatis- 
factory condition of the veneer industry it is anticipated that the 
meeting will call out a larger number of veneer manufacturers than 
has ever before been present. 



Government's Forest Reserve Policy. 

A meeting to be known as the Public Lands Convention has been 
called at Denver June 18, 19 and 20. This meeting is the result of 
crystallized effort that is being made to discourage the forest re- 
serve policy of President Roosevelt and the United States govern- 
ment. This policy is keeping many lumber, mining an-d coal com- 
])anies from appropriating as much of the timber and mineral lands 
of the public domain as they would like. There has been a steady 
attempt for months past to array cattlemen and lumbermen against 
the forest reserve plan, on the plea that it cuts them out of timber 
and grazing rights and locks up the public land from "legitimate" 
use. 

The fallacy of this reasoning is specious and apparent. This 
country has wasted billions of dollars iu its senseless depredation 
of the forest, and the time has arrived for scientific conservation. 
There is nothing in the law governing forest reserves that prevents 
any land suitable for agricultural purposes from being taken over 
by legitimate settlers, and it is hoped that hereafter lumbermen, 
mining men and cattlemen alike will be obliged to pay for the lands, 
timber and minerals which they utilize for their own profit. 

Tlie government 's theory of forest reserves is a simple one. It 
proposes to do merely what the Gernmn and other European nations 
have done for generations. The forestry plan provides for cutting 
a reasonable quantity of mature or hyper-mature timber, under such 
systems as will preserve the young and immature trees. The system 
will promote and assist in the redevelopment of forest area and 
provide against the future needs of the nation. Lumbering methods, 
especially in the mountainous districts, have been extravagant to 
the verge of criminality; but a small portion of the timber has 
been converted into lumber and the remainder has been wantonly 
burned. Lumbermen, by their careless methods, have not only 
burned the unfelled timber, but also the humus or top stratum of 
decomposed vegetation, which is not only indispensable to the re- 
growth of a forest, but also has resulted in the washing away of 
every mountain side thus depredated, so that no vegetation of any 
sort can be reproduced. By a wise system of lumbering on con- 
servative lines, it is possible to have both lumber and forests, and in 
a nutshell this is what the forestry policy is meant to accomplish. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



IS 



Pert, Pertinent and Impertinent. 



I'ou may iliiiib to tlie top of the tree, 

But youi- perch will not help you a bit. 
If you fall you will very soon see 

There is no way of dodging a hit. 
For the world lies in wait with a briek 

Or a stone twisted up in a sock. 
If it isn't a knock it's a kick; 

If it isn't a kick it's a knock. 



Take Your Choice. 

If you're down you'll be feeling a boot 

To your person with vigor applied ; 
If you're up you'll hear the loud hoot 

And the jab will get into your hide. 
You may think you are skillful and quick. 

But you'd far better brace for the shock. 
If it isn't a knock it's a kick: 

II it isn't a kick it's a knock. 



It's a kick for the fellows who lose ; 

It's a knock for the others who win. 
You may do just whatever you choose, 

Hut you'll need a good thickness of skin. 
I can tell you which one I will pick ; 

I'll succeed and then let the w-orld mock. 
If it isn't a knock it's a kick : 

If it isn't a kick it's a knock. 



Sure Enough. 
T h (' teacher h a il 
grown eloquent pic- 
turing the glories of 
Heaven, and finally 
asked, ' ' What kind 
of boys g o t <i 
Heaven?" A lively 
little four-year-old 
flourished his fist. 
"You may answer,'' 
said the teacher. 
''Dead ones!" shout- 
ed the little fellow at 
the top of Ills lungs. 



REQUIESCAT IN PACEM. 



A Child's Definition. 

"A lie is an aboni- 
ination in the sight 
of the Lord, but an 
ever-present help in 
time of trouble! " 



A Difference. 

A man will stand 

for a wife 's going 

through his fortuue 

• — liut not his pockets. 



Usually. 

A howling swell — 
t li e side-show 
' ' barker. ' ' 



Wait in 'Vain. 

Men wlio spend all 
their lives in looking- 
for a real opening 
are pretty sure not to 
find it till they strike 
a hole in the ground. 



Falls Down. 

A fellow never ful- 
ly realizes the limita- 
tions of his vocabu- 
lary until he tries to 
describe a woman's 
<lress. 




7r^.A//<r/h'o^/. 



Easy. 
Many a failure in 
business is making 
money writing advice 
to young men. 



As Many Do. 

To get back one's 
youth one has only to 
repeat one's follies. 



Too Many Yet. 

After all there are 
but few people in the 
world that we can 
help with safety 



Big ■Winnings, Too. 
A erackerjack at 
skin games — the 
beauty doctor! 



Mostly Otherwise. 
Early to bed and 
early to rise makes a 
man healthy, wealthy 
— or otherwise. 



■Variable. 
In some men am- 
bition is a veritable 
■'brain storm"; in 
others it is an inter- 
mittent fever. 



One 'Way. 
A man who can in- 
duce the world to 
take him at his own 
valuation is sure to 
lie successful. 



The solitary grave beside tlie sad sea waves. 



Two of a Kind. 

IJou 't be too hard 
on the nagging wom- 
an; she's not a bit 
more disagreeable 
than the bragging 
man ! 



/ Wonder. 



1 wonder if the robin that has found himself 1 wonder if the lioness is never satisfied 

a mate With any den her tawny lord is able to pro- 
Sits down as soon as she is his to gravely vide? 

meditate? I wonder if she secretly, as soon as she is 
I wonder if the lady bird upon some other limb mated. 

Has charms that .set him yearning, since she I!egins to think she might have done much jjy .^-^^ whose name she has to bear, is ne'er a 

cannot be for him? better had she waited? little bored? 



I wonder if 'tis only man that, being loved, is 

prone 
To think some other lovelier than she who is 

bis own? 
I wonder if the woman lives who, knowing she's 

adored 



i6 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



AMERICAN FOREST TREES. 



White Cedar. 
Chamaecyparis sphaeroklea — Spach. 
Clutmaecypuris thyoides — Britt. 

The white eedar frequents cold swamps 
often inundated during several months of 
the year, its range of growth commencing 
with southern Maine on the north and ex- 
tending southward along the coast to north- 
ern Florida; westward to the Pearl Ki%-er 
valley in Mississippi; it is comparatively 
rare east of Boston and west of 
Mobile Bay. 

The botanical term applied to 
this species — thyoides — is from two 
Greek words, meaning "resem- 
blance ' ' and ' ' arbor vitae, ' ' to 
which the tree is sometimes 
likened. It is called white cedar 
in Massachusetts, Ehode Island, 
New York, New Jersey, Pennsyl- 
vania, Delaware, North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Florida, Alabama 
and Mississippi; in Delaware it 
is known as swamp cedar and 
post cedar, while in Alabama, 
North Carolina and Virginia it is 
popularly called juniper. 

The leaves of white cedar are 
closely appressed or spreading at 
the apex; on the back they are 
glandular or punctate; in color 
dull greenish-blue, becoming brown 
during the winter in northern 
climes; they die down during the 
second season, and are afterward 
persistent for many years. While 
the leaves of this tree resemble 
those of arbor vitae, their gen- 
eral effect is more brownish, the 
latter being much greener, and 
the leaf spray is less broad and 
flat than that of arbor vitae, as 
well as less heavy and coarse. 

The staminate flowers are com- 
posed of five or six pairs of 
stamens, which are dark brown 
below the middle and nearly black 
toward the apex; they are very 
abundant. TTie pistillate flowers 
are subglobose, and have ovate 
spreading light-colored scales and 
black ovules; they are greenish 
and much fewer in number than 
the staminate flowers. The tree 
blooms in April. 

The fruit is a tiny, woody, 
spherical cone, often not more 
than a quarter of an inch in 
diameter ; its few scales open at a 
wide angle with the axis of the cone. The 
fruit grows sessile on a short, leafy branch, 
and is light green, covered with a glaucous 
bloom when matured, then becoming bluish- 
purple and exceedingly glaucous, eventually 
turning dai'k brown. One or two seeds grow 
under each fertile scale of the cone, about 
an eighth of an inch in length, and winged. 

The wood of white eedar is soft, light, 



FIFTT-FOUKTH PAPEB. 

weak, brittle, close-grained, and slightly 
fragrant. It is very durable in contact with 
the soil, and is easily worked. The heart- 
wood is a pinkish or darker brown ; the sap- 
wood thin and much lighter colored; the 
annual layers are very distinct. The wood 
of white cedar is used in boat and canoe 
building, for shingles, fencing, cooperage, 
woodenware and railroad ties; it is also f re- 




in open fan-shaped sprays; their reddish, thin 
bark separates into small feathery scales. 
White cedar is an important ornamental 
evergreen tree, and is cultivated widely; 
however, it will not grow far from coast land. 
The illustration accompanying this article 
was made in one of the clumps of jvmiper, 
popularly known as ' ' greens ' ' in the North 
Carolina timber holdings of the John L. 
Eoper Lumber Company of Nor- 
folk, Va. This company is the 
J largest holder in the world of this 

•\ valuable stumpage. 

V Tlie swamp water in which 

juniper grows is locally regarded 
as very healthful, and many bar- 
rels of it are shipped to outlying 
sections, where it is drunk for its 
alleged medicinal qualities. 



TY 



riCAL FOREST GUOWTH WHITE CED.\R, NORTH 
CAROLINA. 



quently employed for interior trim in dwell- 
ings. The weight of a cubic foot of sea- 
soned wood is about twenty-three pounds. 

The wliite cedar grows from seventy to 
eighty feet high, with a tall trunk usually 
about two to three feet in diameter. Its 
slender, horizontal branches form a narrow, 
spire-like head and give it a generally grace- 
ful appearance, with its branchlets disposed 



Varieties of Cedar. 

The original true cedar, the 
species to which the name properly 
belongs, is the eedar of Lebanon, 
which seems to have been im- 
ported into England more than 
two hundred and fifty years ago. 
Its introduction into that country 
has been attributed to John Eve- 
lyn, from the fact that he wrote 
of raising it ' ' from the seeds and 
berries. ' ' Tiiis very fact, how- 
ever, would tend to show that such 
an idea is erroneous, and that the 
growth was doubtless one of the 
junipers, and not the true Leb- 
anon wood. The many foreign 
"cedars" include the Cape, the 
Japan, and Queensland, and nu- 
merous varieties of cypress and 
juniper. 

England still contains many fine 
specimens of this famous tree, one 
of which is in the garden of the 
old palace at Enfield. It was 
planted at the time of tlie Great 
Plague, in 1665, and measures 
eighteen feet in girth. The most 
noted cedars were the four planted 
in 1683, in the famous physic-gar- 
den at Chelsea, belonging to the 
Society of Apothecaries. They 
were eventually cut or broken 
down, the last disappearing in 
1904. The society had a beautiful 
chair made from one of the large 
branches. The wood of Lebanon 
cedar is wonderful in its time-re- 
sisting qualities. Egyptian boats made of it, 
which were recently found buried near the 
banks of the Nile and which, according to 
excellent authorities, must be between four 
and five thousand years old, were in a good 
state of preservation. The desert sand had 
covered them completely, which of course 
served as a protection to them and consider- 
ably prolonged tiieir existence. 




EUIHU A. BECKLEY 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



SUPPLEMENT TO 

HA.KDWOOD REOORD 

JUNE 10, 1907 



ILLUSTRATINO 
BUILDERS OF LUMBER HIST 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



17 



'Builders of Lumber History. 



Elihu A. Beckley. 

iScc portrait siippleviciit.) 
Elihu A. Beckley, whose portrait the 
Hardwood Eecoed is proud to present as 
supplement to this issue, was born at Orange, 
Conn., May 20, 1845, of parents descended 
from some of the earliest English settlers 
of that state. He attended various public 
and private schools in New Haven, and 
finished his education with a complete busi- 
ness college course. 

Mr. Beckley made his entry into the lumber 
business at the early age of twenty, when he 
was taken into the employ of his older 
brother, the late William A. Beckley, who 
had started a retail lumber yard in New 
Haven about 1860. After a year or two the 
younger man was admitted to partnership, 
and this arrangement continued until 1889 ; 




NUMBEB XLTI. 

also his excellent judgment in selecting the 
younger men associated with him in the 
management of his vast business enterprises. 
The Crosby & Beckley Company still main- 
tains its head office at New Haven, and has 
a western office and distributing yard at 
Columbus, O., with a New York branch at 
No. 1 Madison avenue. Its officers are E. A. 
Beckley, presideiit; W. E. Douglass, vice 
president; R. L. Walkley, treasurer, and O. 
E. Beckley, secretary. The company also 
operates several sawmills in West Virginia, 
cutting poplar, oak, chestnut and other hard- 
woods; it is a large owner of timber proper- 
ties in that state, and conducts a hardwood 
yard at Evansville, Ind., doing a general 
wholesale business. Affiliated with the same 
interests the Douglass & Walkley Company 
owns stumpage and operates a band mill at 
Drew, Miss., with W. E. Douglass as presi- 
dent; also the Holly Lumber Company, of 
which E. L. Walkley is president, owns 



FOLIAGE AND FRUIT OP WHITE CEDAR. 

by constant and conscientious attention to 
his duties, and by dint of energy and am- 
bition, he helped develop the business from 
a very small beginning to one of the largest 
in its line in Connecticut. 

Feeling eventually that there was a 
broader field in the wholesale line and hav- 
ing in the meantime formed an intimate 
friendship with the late F. E. Crosby of 
Eome, O., a pioneer in the hardwood lumber 
business, Mr. Beckley decided to accept an 
offer from Mr. Crosby to become his partner 
and handle the selling end of his trade in 
the East. Such an arrangement was effected 
and The Crosb}' & Beckley Company was 
incorporated, with its principal office at New 
Haven under the management of Mr. Beck- 
ley. Since the death of Mr. Crosby, which 
occurred in 1893, Mr. Beckley has been the 
head of tliis great company, and the business 
has grown and flourished to such an extent 
that it stands today among the most prom- 
inent hardwood concerns of the United States. 
This prosperity indicates not only the ability 
of its prime mover as an executive and his 
remarkable grasp on commercial affairs, but 



large timber boundaries and a band saw 
mill at Pickens, W. Va., both companies 
operating their own logging railroads with 
complete up to date equipment. 

Mr. Beckley is interested and active in 
association affairs, and is at present a mem- 
ber of the Board of Arbitration of the 
National Wholesale Lumber Dealers' Asso- 
ciation and a loyal supporter of the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association. He has 
never been particularly active in politics, 
but has always been a staunch Eepubliean. 
He is a member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce of New Haven, of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Congregational 
Church, and is also identified with several 
clubs of the quieter sort. 

In 1866 Mr. Beckley was married to Eliza- 
beth J. Bartlett of Dorset, Vt. ; they have 
three sons and one daughter. Mr. Beckley is 
a man of quiet tastes and domestic habits, 
finding his greatest enjoyment and recreation 
in his home, which is a beautiful structure on 
one of New Haven's fine avenues, and in 
the society of his little family and a circle 
of close friends. 



Hardwood Carpets. 



Hardwood carpets differ from hardwood 
floors in that the floor has rafters, flooring 
boards, joints and finishes to be considered. 
The hardwood floor is permanent, while the 
carpet is not a fixture; it is not a part of 
the building, but is separate from it and 
can be moved from place to place, unless the 
joints are of such nature that the sections 
are too large for practicable transportation. 
The hardwood floor is used in all countries, 
whereas the hardwood carpet is not very 
conspicuous except in certain lands. This 
sort of carpet may be seen in daily service 
very often in tropical countries, where con- 
ditions are such that fabrics are not sani- 
tary. Hardwood mats and carpets prevail 
to considerable extent in Cuba, the Philip- 
pines and China. Probably the most crude 
type of covering is obtained by the use of 
blocks or cubes cut out for purposes of lay- 
ing, like bricks. Often these blocks are 
stained. Then they are inlaid and dove- 
tailed and frequently set with ornaments or 
engraved, until one wonders what one is 
walking upon. 

The accompanying cuts show some of the 
processes of manufacturing hardwood floor 
coverings. The first work involved consists 
in preparing the stock. Some of the car- 
pets are made by intersecting small pieces 
of wood, shaped to fit neatly and uniformly. 
Others are constructed by forming parallel 
sections of different kinds of pieces. Cubes 
and oblongs are worked in, and angles de- 
scribed; ovals and circles are not over- 
looked, nor is engraving and work in which 
pieces of colored glass and sea shell are 
employed for purposes of ornamentation, or 
to set off some showy figure. Birds, horses, 
fish and even the human figure are often 



outlined by the- use of differently finished 
or colored pieces of wood. 

Figure 1 shows one of the bolts in readi- 
ness for trimming down to the prescribed 
size of block or pad for carpets. The block 
is turned if for round work, and sawed if 
for flat work. This gives the block the 
form shown in Fig. 2; the cross as in Pig. 3; 
the hollowed block as in Fig. 4; the open 
disk as in Fig. 5, or the long block as in 
Fig. 6. Any manner of style may be chosen 
and the original blocks reduced accordingly. 
Often there is a great amount of handwork 
necessary to get them into shape for adjust- 
ing in a certain design. Usually very small 
pieces are made and fitted, one at a time, 
into the design, where they are cemented or 
glued. 

There are carpets which are constructed 
with split hardwood stock on the order 
shown in Fig. 9. The operation involves the 
stripping of a number of pieces of wood. 
These pieces are made about one-quarter of 
an inch in thickness and about one inch in 
width. The weaving process is simple. The 
pieces are properly arranged and the ' ' fill- 
ing" strips are alternately laid into the 
' ' warp ' ' strips, so that the combination re- 
sults as pictured in the diagram. Some- 
times very much smaller pieces are employed 
and the design works out as in Fig. 8. In 
Fig. 9 are shown various shapes of the small 
pieces of carpet stock, used in making up 
combination designs. Fig. 10 shows an- 
other cluster. One may find all kinds of 
figures and shapes. 

The work of inlaying, matching and fit- 
ting falls to nimble fingered persons, who 
often create the design as they work. Oth- 
ers work according to a given pattern. The 



i8 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



IHfWillHgl»linMl>r^lil^Mti|V==«wraJlllllil 




finished woods are of various species, there- 
fore make an agreeable contrast when the 
pieces of one kind are matched in with 
pieces of another. Whitewood is often com- 
bined with the darkest of stock; black wal- 
nut and whitewood go together in some pat- 
terns; in others the object is to have very 
little contrast. Often the shading is so 
slight that it barely defines the intersec- 
tions. In Fig. 11 is exhibited one of the 
popular floor covers manufactured with these 
varying pieces of hardwood, interlaid as 
described. 

The base for one of these built-up carpets 
must of course be substantial, as the pieces 
depend xipon it for support. 

A flexible base is often wanted, in which 
case heavy canvas or oil cloth is used. Again 
sheet metal is employed to advantage. Often 
the flooring is constructed direct on the 



original base, in which case the covering 
can not be removed without tearing it into 
pieces. Cement and glue are used for hold- 
ing the parts together. The matching and 
putting up of a design like that in Fig. 11 
is very laborious and tedious. There are 
many small pieces of wood and each piece 
must be picked up separately and adjusted 
before the adjoining one can be placed in 
position. All this requires . time and pa- 
tience. Weeks are often devoted to the 
ijianufaeture of one carpet of sufficient size 
to cover the floor of an ordinary apartment. 
Some of the hardwood carpets are made 
with the body of the surface of a certain 
color, as in Fig. 12, in which case the pieces 
may be of good size, and the operation of 
setting is thus much simplified. A number of 
other designs are shown in illustrations 
13 to 16. 



Hardwood Record J\Iail Bag. 



[In this department it is proposed to reply 
to such inquiries as reach this nlfice from the 
HARDWftoD Heooud clientage as will be of enough 
general interest to warrant publication. Every 
patron of the paper is invited to use this de- 
partment t(i the fullest extent, and an attempt 
will be made tu answer queries pertaining to all 
matters of interest to the hardwood trade, in 
a succinct and intelligent manner.] 



Criticizes Hardwood Inspection. 
Gkand ItAriii.s. Micji.. .lune :■.. — Kditur Hard- 
wood Record : A point occurs to us that we 
would like to lay before you, and which we be- 
lieve should find space in the pages of the 
Recobd, presented in the manner of which we 
know you are so very capable. It is this : From 
past experience, and especially during the last 



cnuiili- vf years, if we were asked to cite the one 
■bone of contention" in the lumber trade it is 
that attention enough is not paid to the rules 
Koverning the scaling of lumber. We refer now 
In the National Hardwood Lumber Association's 
rules of inspection. We firmly believe that a 
great deal (if time and trouble and useless corre- 
spondence might be saved if this rule were more 
closely adhered to in the sale of lumber. For 
instance, the writer a short time ago placed an 
order for a certain grade of lumber. Upon re- 
ceipt of the car he found five distinct grades in 
the one car and all purporting to be in accord- 
ance with the order placed. This, you see, natur- 
ally necessitates delay and additional corre- 
spondence that is not always of the pleasantest 



nature. We tliiuk a word from the Hardwood. 
UKCtiiut along these lines would have a very 
sahilary eflfect in promoting a closer observance 
of the National rules in each instance of inspec- 
tion. Trusting these remarks may appeal to 
you, and with best wishes for the Hahdwood 
Record, we beg to remain. Yours very truly, 
BissELL, Carpet Sweeper Company, 

J. II. Shanahan. Supt. 

Tlie criticisms noted by the superintendent 
of the Bissell Carpet Sweeper Company have 
been repeatedly discussed in the Hardwood 
Record and it is this very desideratum that 
the hardwood associations are now so ener- 
getically trying to work out. It is sincerely 
to be hoped that before the year is over 
corps of inspectors who are competent, ac- 
curate and impartial will have the hamlling 
of lumber, and that complaints of careless 
inspection will finally be at an end. — Editor. 



Who Wants Oak Spokes? 
The Blackstone Handshaved Handle Com- 
pany of Blackstone, Va., manufacturer of 
handmade and turned hickory handles of all 
kinds, has added a spoke department to its 
business and would like the name and ad- 
dress of some concern that is in the market 
for oak sjiukcs. 



Good Advice. 

I'u.sEMiTE, Kv., May :'.(i. — Editor IIardwuod 
Record : For good sound information in a nut- 
shell you have the only lumber journal in Amer- 
ica today. While I have only been a subscriber 
for two or three years, I have been a constant 
reader for more than ten years. Would like to 
see both associations get together and formulate 
one set of inspection rules. A. E. M. 



More Good Advice. 

New YiiKK, .May :',!. — Editor Hardwood Rec- 
ord : The man, men or newspaper that will 
succeed in securing uniform inspection of hard- 
wood lumber throughout the United States will 
have conferred the greatest good to the indus- 
try. This most desirable end can be accom- 
plished by compromise between the two hardwood 
lumber associations, and I verily believe that 
Clinton Crane and W. A. Bennett, both of Cin- 
cinnati, hold the key to the situation. They 
are both as stubborn as mules and are not dis- 
posed to concede a point to each other, but they 
should have the good of the trade at heart and 
get together. They are good friends and 
should belong to the same association. It makes 
very little diflFerence how the grade of lumber is 
defined in the rules for grading, because prices 
will be made according to those grades anyhow, 
hut it would prevent an enormous amount of 
friction and consequent loss if only one court for 
arbitration of inspection differences existed. Let 
the Hardwood Record advocate conciliatlou and 
compromise between the two associations so 
that uniform inspection may come in the life- 
time of the present lot of lumber dealers, manu- 
facturers and users. & Co. 



A Friendly Ciiticistn. 

Rhinei.andkr. Wis.. May 29. — Editor Hard- 
wood Record : I have no criticisms to make of 
your paper, but as to suggestions of matters of 
interest, like to see correspondents iaject news 
of real value into what they write — not news of 
how Tom, Hick or Harry, or Fred's wife has 
been in Chicago or (.'aire, but real news, sales 
of lumber, prices for which it is selling, etc. 
While like every other man, I occasionally like 
to see m.v name in the paper, yet, as with other 
men, I don't care ver.v much for personal items 
about some other fellow, hut prefer to get the 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



19 



market inices at wliicli that other fellow is sell- 
ing, conditions of markets as to trade, etc. I 
think that is a good point to emphasize, and 
not a lot of personal items cut out of some local 
paper. I also think wood chemical plants are 
going to cut quite a figure in our business, and 
that the matter is worth elaborating. 

& Co. 

I wisli to tliank you for your frank letter 
of criticism. Jly view.s are entirely in liar- 
mony with your own on this subject, but I 
think you will concede that the Hardwood 
Record contains less of the matter which 
you deprecate than any lumber trade paper 
you ever saw. Again, I believe our news 
covers a wider rauge and is more complete 
in its character than that furnished by any 
other periodical of similar nature. In other 
words, I believe we are running a paper that 
jjretty nearly suits your ideas of what a 
lumber newspaper should be. My reason for 
not publishing more matter on the subject of 
wood chemicals is the fact that I have seen 
wood alcohol go to 19 cents a gallon, which 
meant ruin for everyone engaged in the 
business. Today these people are making 
just a fair profit owing to the iniquitous 
legislation passed by Congress last winter, 
in the denatured alcohol bill. I therefore did 
not think it wise to encourage new plants on 
account of the present and prospective pau- 
city of demand for these products. I think 
attempting to educate people up to the finer 
manipulation of their product and the manu- 
facture of dimension stock promises surer 
returns than the manufacture of pyroligne- 
(Uis acid and its products. — Editor. 



the specimen you sent the stain has pene- 
trated clear beyond that point. — Editor. 



Discoloration From Stickers. 

I'lTTSmRc;. May l(i. — IDditnr II.\hi>W(iod Kec- 
oiiii : We are expressing to you a piece of hard 
maple for your examination and wish to call 
your attention to the conversation we had re- 
cently relative to the discoloration you will find 
in the sample we are sending. Our customer has 
rejected a (luantity out of a car, claiming that 
tliis discoloration in the wood is the first stage 
nf decay, (lur Judgment is quite to the con- 
trary; we claim that it is merely the calico 
color which is a peculiarity of maple, and wliich 
iu no way affects the strength or durability of 
the wood. We would like very much to have 
your opinion on this subject foi- guidance in fu- 
ture, and also for adjustment of this complaint. 

LU-MBEU CO^[I■.lXY. 

Referring to the specimen of hard maple 
which you send — this piece of wood is un- 
deniably discolored by the stickers, and if 
such discoloration was general in the ship- 
ment, in justice tlie stock should have been 
graded down. In all probability this lumber 
^^as stuck on old stickers which had com- 
menced to materially decay. There is just 
as much danger of discoloring lumber by 
the use of stickers in this condition as in 
the use of green ones. In fact any stickers 
cutside of red gum and sycamore, after they 
ha^•e been used two or three times, are more 
likely to stain lumber than green ones. Man- 
ufacturers generally seem to think that if a 
sticker is old it can be used with safety in 
green lumber, but such is not the case. As 
a general principle of inspection, stain which 
will not dress off is a defect. In the case of 



Keeping Busy. 

>I.\RQi-ETTK, Micii., May 31. — Editor IIakd- 
woOD REconii : In our territory here, along the 
south shore of Lake Superior, the hardwood in- 
dustry up to the present time has been almost 
exclusively in the hands of Providence and re- 
lated solely to the year by year laying on of 
those thin rings of wood under the bark oif our 
hardwood trees : but the business of converting 
these trees into material tor news in the Record 
has begun, and the men so far engaged in the 
business have found upon opening up these 
frees that the work of I'rovldencc as above men- 
tioned has been exceedingly well done, and are 
greatly pleased thereat. Both i|uality and quan- 
tity are found satisfactory and more new saw- 
mill enterprises are being initiated each year ; 
this district will ere long fill an important place 
in the hardwood markets for all varieties of tim- 
licr native here. .T. il. Lo.xgyeak. 



Hickory Dimension Stock Market, 
Cincinnati, tl.. May 2',). — Kditor Hardwood 
Record: Can you consistently put us on the 
track of someone wanting small pieces of fine- 
grade thoroughly seasoned hickory, say from t! 
inches long up to 1 foot long, and from 1 inch to 
about IV2 inches in diameter? A good deal of the 
timber is all white. There are a thousand things 
in this world that could be made from it and 
are made, if we knew where to get into com- 
munication with the parties. & Co. 

There are doubtless many consumers who 
would like to get hold of this stock, and the 
address of the correspondent may be had 
on application to this office. — Editor. 



Wants Market for Gum. 

Beloit, Wis., May is.— Kditor IIaruwood 
Record : Our company has begun work on its 
new mill in Missouri, and will manufacture lath 
and shingles and saw southern hardwoods. We 
will have a good deal of short ends, say 24 inches 
long, from gum, and would be obliged if you will 
tell us of a market for them. We could saw 
them to any required length or thickness. I'lease 
enter our subscription to the Hardwood Record. 
Lumber Company. 

Anyone in the market for gum dimension, 
as above offere<l, would do well to write for 
this correspondent 's address. — Editor. 



Wants Oak for Sleigh Runners. 

riTTSRURO, I'A., May 17. — Editor Hardwood 
Record : We are in the market for some straight- 
grained white oak to be used for sleigh runners. 
This stock is to be 2%x3% inches, 7 feet. Will 
you be good enough to advise us the names of 
any parties you may know who are likely to 
furnish this stock'; & Co. 

The writer has been furnished a few ad- 
dresses, but others who would like to com- 
municate with him may do so through this 
otfice. — Editor. 



Persimmon Waste. 

New Orleans, I, a.. May 'Ml — i;ditor Uard- 
wnoD Record: We should be obliged if you 
could, through the medium of your valued jour- 
nal, assist us to find a market for our persimmon 
waste. We manufacture shuttle blocks out of 
this timber and have a considerable quantity of 
waste that is not large enough to make our 
smallest size shuttle block, but out of which we 
could cut pieces suitable for small tool and knife 
handles, etc. Persimmon wood is very desirable 
for the above purposes as it wears smooth and 
acquires in use a natural polish, and we tliink it 
could be employed to advantage for these han- 



dles, or for any trade requiring similar qualities 
in wood, such as toy making, small turnery, etc. 
Company. 

The above will doubtless prove a valuable 
suggestion to someone, and the name of the 
correspondent will be furnished on applica- 
tion to this oflSce. — Editor. 



Unfair Claims, 

Grand Rapids, Mich.. May 29. — Editor Hard- 
wood Record : I consider the Hardwood Record 
a good paper, but without calling any names I 
wish all lumbermen would reject the business of 
men and firms who kick on grades and shortage, 
so as to get a deduction, and then make a profit 
without being found out, and could buy only 
from firms shipping them their inspection. One 
firm bought on Manufacturers" inspection, called 
for a reinspection, sent a good man from Chi- 
cago. Then he said he was going to turn them 
down. This on two cars of poplar. I wasn't in 
the deal but know who was. Such men ought to 
be shown up and in my opinion an article on 
such work, well gotten up, would open their 
eyes. 

The H.^RDWOOD Record, in common wij;h 
otlier reputable newspapers, is always willing 
to show up irregular jaractices wherever found 
in the lumber business, but you must recall 
that there is sucli a thing as very uncom- 
fortable libel suits which are expensive in 
the defense whether judgment is given 
against you or not, and this part of the 
newspaper game we have to fight shj' of at 
all times. The Hardwood Record stands 
ready at an)- and all times to show up ir- 
regular practices when lumbermen like the 
writer present evidence of such transactions 
that constitutes proof. We cannot under- 
take to print mere hearsay evidence. Give 
us facts substantiated, and we are not only 
willing but anxious to ju'int them. — Editor. 



Drying Hickory Dimension. 

Nkw iiRLEANS. La.. June 3. — Editor Hard- 
wood ItKcoRD : I'erhaps some of your read- 
ers who are experienced in the liandling of 
hickory can inform us in what way we can 
avoid the excessive warping of this wood 
when sawing up into small dimension. "We 
are working on some orders for 1x1x44 inches 
to be used for golf shafts. "We have the tim- 
ber and the means for manufacturing same 
properly but have very great ditnculty with 
the seasoning. "We find that a very large pro- 
portion of the pieces warp and therefore be- 
come useless for turning into the shafts. Our 
present method is to cut the suitable part of 
the log into 1 inch boards of slightly over the 
required length and then rip same on a sin- 
gle rip saw bench into 1 inch wide pieces. "We 
do this when the boards are green. Then the 
1 inch squares are piled up crosswise to sea- 
son. They usually begin to warp in a day or 
two and get worse as time goes on, making 
the percentage of wasted pieces so large as 
to make the Ijusiness unprofitable. We find 
that the best timljer warps most; that is, 
the young, heavy, small trees, white practi- 
cally all through. The makers of shafts want 
just this sort of timber to make a good 
"steely" shaft, and if we could keep them 
straight, they would be just the thing. Trust- 
ing that some of your readers may be able to 
give us the benefit of their experience. Very 
truly yours & Co. 

Will not some of our readers who have 
mauufactured these hickory squares send us 
the benefit of their experience, and give some 
advice on the subject of seasoning, that we 
may communicate it to the above corre- 
spondent ? — Editor. 



20 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



Accidents to Boilers. 



Both serious and minor accidents to boilers 
are happening every day. Many of them 
could be avoided. A certain steam plant 
was installed as illustrated in the first draw- 
ing, with three boilers, one of which even- 
tually exploded. The boilers had been fired 
up and the water gauges indicated that the 
proper amount of water was in each. Un- 
fortunately some one who tested the boilers 
the day before had carelessly left the stop- 



neers and firemen. Manufacturers of up-to- 
date fire grates for boilers would be sur- 
prised if they were to count up the make- 
shift grates which are in use in really im- 
portant positions. Old car rails are some- 
times utilized for grate bars. The plan is 
shown in Fig. 3. The rails are cut to proper 
length and placed side by side on the fire- 
brick walls, the engineer priding himself on 
liaviug .a pretty good thing. 




cocks closed. This of course was a most 
dangerous thing to do. The workmen should 
have looked over the apparatus before they 
left the plant, and certainly the fireman 
should have examined the cocks before he 
fired up. But he had fired many times before 
without testing the gauges, and took it for 
granted that all was well, as usual. The 
water was retained in the gauges, and no 
water was in the middle boiler, which heated 
up good and hot. The steam valves of the 
main line, over the boilers, although closed, 
leaked badly. The result was that steam en- 
tered the middle boiler, and the pressure 
therefore registered correctly and once more 
the fireman was deceived. 

This illustrates how easily conditions may 
fool a man who is not nnusually alert. Some 
of the best firemen and engineers get caught 
this way occasionally. They are often rushed 
in the early morning to get up steam so 
that the works can start full blast by seven 
o'clock. In the darkness and hurry it takes 
a very conscientious man to examine into all 
the little details. In the above ease the re- 
sults were very disastrous. Suddenly the 
steam shot out of the door and ash-pit of the 
middle furnace. An examination afterwards 
revealed tlie burst plate just over the firebox 
of the middle boiler, marked A, Fig. 1. Some 
one had blown out the boiler, closing the 
valves on the water gauges, also the blow 
off, and had not refilled the boiler, in his 
haste or carelessness. The fireman was also 
to blame for not trying the gauges. The 
accident caused several days' delay in opera- 
tions and the broken plate was substituted 
with a new one as shown in Fig. 2. 

One does not have to tramp about the 
country much to find evidence of many reck- 
less proceedings on the part of steam engi- 



Iron rails stolen from a road are cheaper 
than modern grate bars any time. But the 
engineer forgets the losses. He overlooks 
the fact that the draft is hindered, that the 
rails iu their warped condition are letting 
good fuel sift through only partly burned. 
Such rigs are money-losers to a firm and a 
detriment to the work. 

In one case a mill lost considerable money 
for a long period, due to the condition of the 



lever, and a chain extended from this down 
to a point near the level of the ground, 
where it could be operated. But the fire- 
man was not able to get the proper draft. 
Weeks and weeks went by; the stack smoked 
and the fuel in the furnaces failed to burn 
thoroughly; great difficulty was experienced 
in getting up and maintaining steam. 
Finally it was decided to go to the trouble 
of examining the damper. Long ladders were 
obtained and adjusted against the chimney. 
An opening was made through the bricks, and 
the damper, which was originally adjusted 
evenly, as in Fig. 4, was found to be dropped 
down, as in Fig. 5, due to the breaking of 
the bearing at B. This bearing had grad- 
ually worn down, and, lacking lubrication of 
any kind, soon filed itself through and off. 
Hence the damper was supported solely by 
the remaining end C. This damper was re- 
moved and a new one put in, after which 
the draft was perfect. 

At another place an explosion was caused 
by corroded plates, some of which were as 
badly corroded as represented at D, Fig. 6. 
In another instance the corrosion worked 
itself deeply into the hole near the head of a 
plate bolt, also cutting into the bolt, as at 
E, resulting in weakening the plate and allow- 
ing it to break. 

Instances of this kind are numerous. Many 
such troubles occur in country plants, how- 
ever. City plants are better kept and more 
up-to-date. More experienced engineers are 
employed in them as a rule; a new man 
usually strikes out for the country. Nev- 
ertheless, one may find some first-claas 
establishments in the rural districts. Many a 
little hillside mill is operated by as neatly 




':r. 



damper in the chimney. For months it bad 
been giving trouble. It was operated on a 
steel shaft bearing which was fitted in iron 
journals set into the wall-work of the stack. 
The shaft was fitted with the proper crank 



equipped engine and boiler rooms as one 
would care to see; while, on the other hand, 
this department of some great metropolitan 
works will occasionally be thoroughly littered 
up and extremely unhandy. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



21 



Complete Official Report of the Tenth Annual Convention 



Rational Hardt/uood Lumber A^'sociatton 



Held at Atlantic City, May 23 and 24, 1907. 



OFFICERS I907-a 




I'KESIDENT, W. H. RUSSK." 


. . . Mcniphi.s. Tenn. 


FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT. O. O. AGI.ER 


Chicago. 


SECOND VICE-PRESIDENT. C. E. LLOVD. Jr. . . 


Pliiladelpliia. 


THIRD VICE-PRESIDENT. SAM E. BARR 


New York. 


TRE.\SURER. CLAUDE MALEY 


. . . Evansville. Ind. 


SECRETARY. FRANK F. FISH 


Cliiiiiml 





MEW TH-RECTOTiS 

THEODORE FATHAUER Cliicago. 

GEO. W. STONEMAN De ValLs Bluff, Ark. 

F. A. DIGGINS Carlillac, Mich. 

G. J. LANDECK Milwaukee. Wis. 

.1. H. P. SMITH . l';Mkersl>urg, W. Va. 



Tlio tfiitli annual i-onventidu of tlie Xa- 
tioinil Hartlwood Lumber Association, held at 
Atlantic City, N. J., May 23 and L'4, ivas 
marked not only by a large but by a repre- 
sentative attendance of members of the 
organization from every part of the United 
States. The weather was clear and while the 
air was tinged with chill, con- 
ditions were such as to con- 
tribute to the comfort ami 
pleasure of the assembled hosts. 
The occasion was further mark- 
ed 1-iy the presence of many 
ladies, the wives and relatives 
of delegates. The meeting it- 
self was held in the great ball 
room of the magnificent Steel 
Pier, which proved an ideal 
place for a convention. 

Every detail of the arrange- 
ments for the entertainment of 
guests was systematically ai 
delightfully handled by the 
eastern hosts, of which com- 
mittee C, E. Lloyd, Jr., of 
Philadelphia, was chairman ; 
E. A. Beclsley of Xew Haven, 
trea.surer; and B. C. Currie, 
.Jr., of Philadelphia, secretary. 
Other than these, this eomtnit- 
tee consisted of John J. Eum- 
barger and J. P. Punwoody of 
Philadelphia; John L. Alcork 
;'.ml R. E. Wood of Baltimore ; 
I. F. Balsley of Pittsburg; IT. 
M. Dickson of Norfolk; Sam 
E. Barr, H. S. Dewey and E. 
S. Foster of New York; N. 11. 
Walcott of Providence; and 
Gardner I. .Tones and John il. 
Woods of Boston. In the di'- 
tails of the work they were 
most ably assisted by Ed. M. 
Bechtel of Philadelphia. The 
entertainment features in- 
eluded a smoker and vaudeville 
performance of unusual excellence at the 
Grotto of the big Rudolph ITotel on Thurs- 
day, during which a delightful hinch was 
served. This feature of the program was 
under the personal charge of Messrs. Lloyd 
and Currie. and the vaudeville entertainment 
itself was handled by Wm. D. Hall of the 
Theatrical Exchange and Booking Agency of 



I'hilailclphia. The lady visitors were delight- 
fully taken care of both in a cake-walk affair 
at the Steel Pier on Thursday evening and 
with a trolley ride in special cars to all 
points of interest in Atlantic City and vicin- 
ity on Friday. 

The ]ii-o linys of the convoTition liave 




W. H. R-USSE, MEMPHIS. RE-ELECTED PRESIDENT 

gone down to history as somewhat radical in 
character, but the prevalence of common sense 
in the deliberations has rarely if ever been 
equaled at any gathering of the sort. 

Primarily, a resolution adopted at the 
eighth annual meeting of the association held 
at Buffalo in 1S0.5, providing that the grading 
rules then authorized shonlil not lie changed 



before Dei-endicr, I9ll,S, was rescimlei.l ; a new 
set of rules made after the most diligent 
stndy and conference between the Inspection 
Rules Committee of the association and dele- 
gates representing the hardwood associations 
of Michigan, Wisconsin and Indiana, was 
approveil, whitdi rules go into effect on Dec. 
1 next. In a general way 
these new rules conform to 
current custom in the sale and 
grading of Iiardwood lumber, 
and provide for an inspection 
that somewhat lowers old 
standarils of grades. The rules 
still adhere to inspection from 
the poorer side of the piece in 
the higher grades; they pro- 
vide that tapering lumber shall 
lie measured one-third of the 
length of the piece from the 
narrow end ; anil minimum 
widths mentioned in any grade 
must be of the full width 
named: in random width lum- 
ber, fractions over one-half 
foot are counted up to the next 
higher figure; fractions less 
than one-half foot to the next 
lower figure; and fractions ex- 
actly on the half foot are 
divided equally between buyer 
and seller. In the grade of 
Xo. T ( ommon the rules pro- 
viile that heart must not show- 
more than half the length of 
the piece in the aggregate: 
and in Xo. 2 Common not niore 
than three-fourths the length of 
the jiiec(\ In standard lengths 
now run in even and odd foot 
lengths from i to 16 feet but 
not over fifteen per cent of 
odd lengths are admitted. 
Eight-foot lengths are the 
shortest admitted to firsts and 
seconds, and not more than 
twentj' per cent under 12 feet are admitted, 
and not to exceed ten per cent of 8 and 9 
feet. Stain that wdll surface off in dressing 
is not considered a defect. A moderate 
amount of wane is admitted without being 
considered a defect. A new grading of clear 
face cutting is authorized, which provides for 
one clear face and a sound back. The old 



22 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



grade of merchantable is entirely eliminated. 
A grade of finish is authorized, which with 
the other grades named is described in detail 
in the report of the Inspection Rules Com- 
mittee wliich is incorporated in the proceed- 
ings. Tlie rules further provide for the 
splitting <if Xii. .'5 Common when desired into 
two grades. 




o. o. .\r;i-E.;, ciiicvf:!). keki.kcted first 
virp; I'ltESiDEXT. 

J''urthcrniorp, the report of the secretary 
showed that the association has passed be- 
yond the si.x hundred mark in membership, 
and that the financial condition of the or- 
ganization is excellent. Reports from other 
officers were indicative of growing harmony 
between the association and all others in the 
hardwood line, imduding various local asso- 
ciations and exchanges in different parts of 
the country. The organization exhibited its 
confidence in the conduct of its afiairs dur- 
ing the last year by rei^lecting its i)resideut 
and first and second vice presidents, and by 
reappointing its secretary for another year. 
The latter was the recipient of many encomi- 
ums on the good work he has performed. 

Features of the meeting were the forestry 
report by if. >l. Wall; a paper on Associate 
Obligations by ex-President Palmer; an ad- 
dress covering suggestions for a school of 
inspection by B. ('. Currie, Jr.; forceful re- 
marks on the necessity of the wholesaler by 
Robt. W. Higbie, and a strong speech urging 
the association's influence looking toward 
proposed improvements of the great water- 
way's of the county by John A. Fox. 

Without question this tenth annual meet- 
ing of the National Hardwood Lumber As- 
sociation was the most important and valu- 
able to the lumlior trade at large that has 
ever been held by it. The complete official 
report of the jiroeeediugs follows herewith. 

Tlie convent inn was called to order by I'l-osi- 
dent W. II. Uusse at 12 o'clock JI. 

Mr. I.loyd — Ladies and Gentlemen : It is very 
seldom that we have an opportunity to include 
the ladies in our opening address ; the commit- 
tee will state that they are especially pleased 
to he able to do so. On behalf of Ihc eastern 
members of the association, we have invited you 
to come to Atlantic City, and we are very much 
pleased indeed to note the number who have 
accepted. We are looklnp for iniite a mimher 
more this afternoon. 



1 won't attempt to make any opening ad- 
dress, but will simply introduce the next speaker, 
a man who is so well known he hardly needs 
an introduction, as this is the attractive point 
practically of the whole United States where 
the people of the country come when they want 
lo have a good tune. I am sure he will tell 
you that you can not only take care of business, 
but have a little pleasure as well. I have the 
pleasure of introducing the Hon. Franklin P. 
Sloy, mayor of Atlantic City. [Applause.] 
Address of Welcome. 

.Mr. I'resldent. ladies and members of the asso- 
lialuin: It is a pleasure, I assure you, to come 
here this morning ' to greet people coming as 
vim do from nil parts of the United States. 
The introduction by your member here is very 
nattering. 1 assure you. not only for myself, but 
Uiv the entire city. We hope that during your 
stay with us yi>u" will Hnd it to be true — that 
it is a place of entertainment, and that abso- 
lutely. We have no manufacturing interests in 
.Vtlaiilic City. Therefore, we apply our whole 
lime to the guests of our city — in making them 
ccimfortable. I am glad this moruing that I 
have the opportunity of bidding you welcome 
to our city, and with it, I want to say we al- 
ways extend the freedom of the city. Therefore, 
yoii must be assured during your stay with us 
that yon have tlie freedom of the city and all 
enurti'sies that can be extended to yon as a 
bodv. This is not only meant for your institu- 




c. E. Li.oYii. .IK. i'iiii..viii;i,riiiA. i;e 

EI.EI.'TED SECOND \1CE I'HESIUENT. 

tion lint each of you individually. I'crhaps yon 
will not return, all of you. immediately, but 
may lind it necessary to stay a day or two. 
not by reason of any oversight of yours hut', 
then, there are times when yon might ri'inain a 
little longer by reason of having the i»/,one of 
the sea so close to you. And we certainly will 
recognize that badge and have the Department 
of rublic Safety notiticd that you are here and 
the badge goes. [ AjJiilause. ] 

Now. Mr. I'resident. I must reiterate what 
I have said, referring to tnir humble way of 
bidding you welcome to .Vtlantic City. \A'e know- 
that your meeting liere is for tlie benefit of 
your institution and fiu' the benefit of the United 
Slates, and without the great industry you ari- 
interested in some of our homes, perhaps, would 
not be decorated as finel.v as they are ; some 
of our i^assenger coaches, some of our furniture, 
etc.. would not be, perhaps, of such quality if 
it were not for those who are looking after the 
interests of this institution. Therefore, we feel 
honored in having such an institution visit At- 
lantic City. We trust that when you are look- 
ing over the ground in years to come you will 
not: forget the little stay ,vou will have had in 
Atlantic City and the courtesies that have been 
extended. 

I thank you for the kind invitation. Mr. 
President, to come before this assemblage, and 
I trust that youi- stay with us will be one of 
pleasure. [Applause. 1 

I'resident liusse — ,7olin M. Woods of Boston 
will e.\press the pleasure of the members here 
in receiving so Jiiudly a welcome. Mr. Woods 
does not need any introduction to the members. 
I .\i)plause. ] 



Mr. President, honored mayor and friends : 
I thank you, Mr. Mayor, (or the kindly and 
cordial greeting you have given this association. 
It is the first time we have ever visited a place 
where the people do not work. [Laughter.] 
This is a place of pleasure, and it is the most 
natural and logical thing that we should come 
here because of that fact, Mr. Mayor. If you 
were as well acquainted with lumbermen as I 
am you would know they would eventually bring 
up at a place where there is no work — the Celes- 
tial City. As a representative of the effete East, 
I am glad to say that we are descendants of 
men who were engaged in this business two 
hundred and fifty years ago. 

We have come here lor business, to transact 
the business of this association. The lumber 
business is the fourth largest in the United 
States. It touches every part and the whole 
of our life. We are glad to come here this 
spring, and I assure you that you will be proud 
that this convention has been in your city. It 
is made up of gentlemen, of the highest type 
of business men. an honor to the country and 
to their industry. 

It is not my business to make a long speech, 
but I want to thank you, Mr. Mayor, for your 
kind words, and I assure you that if it is 
possible to make a little reduction in the price 
of board we may stay a day or two longer. 
[Laughter.] But I think we will give you little 
trouble and you will never be sorry this conven- 
tion visited your good city. I thank yon. [Ap- 
plause.] 

President Russe — Gentlemen : we will call 
.the meeting to order for general business. We 
had a gavel but it is not here. It is on the 
way. I understand. 

Mr. Barr — Are there any stenographic reports 
being talcen of this meeting besides that by our 
otficial stenographer'.' I would move tliat no 
reports be taken by the trade journals, and that 
the only report be that made by our utiicial 
stenographer. 

This motion was duly seconded and carried. 

President Russe — The papers will please be 
governed accordingly. 

President's Address. 

tlentlemen and members of the Natiuujil Hard- 
wood Lumber Association : I consider it a great 
honor to preside over this, the tenth annual 
meeting of our association and wish to con- 
gratulate you on tite satisfactory business you 
have all "had since our meeting in Memphis. 
This imiu'o\ement has not been confined to any 
one section or any one wood hut our entire 
membership has enjoyed the prosperity. I am 
not surprised at the large attendance, for the 




SAM E, liARU. NEW YORK. THIRD VICE 
PRESIDENT. 

interest sliown at the meetings heretofore has 
proven that our work is not only one of great 
important e. but that it is on the right lines 
and we are benefiting not only our membership 
but the trade at large. 

Ex-president Palmer, in his annual report at 
Memphis, recommended the change of our Itead- 
ouarters from Indianapolis to some large bard- 
wood center. Immediately after the adjourn- 
ment of the annual meeting, the Board of Man- 
agers considered this recommendation and re- 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



23 



moved the association's offices to Chicago. The 
change was beneficial, enabling oui* secretary 
to come in close contact with om- membei'shlp, 
and was also of great benefit to our members 
who do business in Chicago. 

After being elected and assuming charge of 
the duties imposed by you, the executive com- 
mittee dccideil that their main object during 
the year wmild be the improvement of the in- 
spectiim department : that we would not give 
our attention to securing new members but would 
try and give tlie members we had better and 
greater facilities — providing more inspectors, 
and doing all we could to see that the applica- 
tion of the rules was more uniform. Following 
out this i)lan we relieved the surveyor general 
of part of his duties, and put the entire office 
and correspondence in charge of our secretary, 
leaving the surveyor general with nothing to do 
but to see and instruct his deputies as to the 
proper application of the rules and to make re- 
inspection when necessary. 

(tur reasons for desiring this change were : 
First. We found that our inspectors in the dif- 
ferent markets were not making a uniform ap- 
pliratiiin of the rules and felt that when we 
could get the inspection of a shipment within 
the 4 " per cent clause, whether made by the 
deputy in Memphis. Xew York, (^'hicago, or any 
other market. <uir work, as far as the applica- 
tion was concerned, would be practically solved, 
lor the buyer would then know just what he 
would receive when the goods were measured 
by a National A.ssociation deputy and certificate 
issued. 

Second. That we were not giving prompt serv- 
ice to re-inspections. 

The records will show that the change was 
not only a good but a necessary one. 

As already stated, we have made no special 
effort to increase our membership. The change 
in luindling our inspection department, and in 
giving prompt service naturally brought in new 
members, and I am pleased to inform you that 
we have enrolled 169 new members during the 
year. 

As you all know, the organization of our 
association was brought about by the fact that 
every market had its own inspection rules, and 
the "object was to get the different markets to- 
gether and adopt one rule and make it possible 
for the different markets to know what they 
were buying and selling. As I understand it. 
this association still has this, for its main ob- 
ject and if it stands for anything it stands for. 
and is committed to bring about, one inspection 
rule and luiifnrm application of same. 

At the liuffalo meeting a resolution was 
adopted not to change our rules for three years, 
the rules taking effect Dec. 1. 1 1)0.5, .so that 
the time the i-utes would remain in effect would 
be until Iiee. 1. IttO.S. At that time we all felt 
that this was a wise move. We did not antici- 
pate the changes that would develop, whicli 




FUAXK F. FISH. CIIICAIjO. REAPPOINTED 
SECRETARY. 

have been ni^)re marked than has ever been 
known in the history of the lumber interests. 
Timber lands and stumpage have increased in 
such a marked degree that manufacturers have 
been obliged to saw and manufacture logs that 
formerly were left to decay in the woods. The 
scarcity and high price of some one wood would 
cause manufacturers to try a cheaper article 
which they would substitute and find that it 
would give satisfaction, thus bringing into gen- 
ei*al demand lumber to which very little atl;eu- 



tion was given when the rules were made, on 
account of its limited use and cheapness. Our 
rules of today do not conform altogether with 
custom and the entire output of tlie log is not 
provided for. There has been for the past year 
a persistent and vigorous agitation for what 
are considered necessary changes in the rules 
from the producing centers of Indiana, Michigan. 
Wisconsin and the South. Your E-vecutive Com- 
mittee, feeling that an earnest effort would 
and should be made to suspend the Ruffalo 
agreement at this meeting, instructed tlie 
secretary to send out a letter to the 
membersliip to this effect, and asked them 
to send their views to Chairman Fath- 
auer of the rules committee of any changes 
they thought necessary. This was done for the 
reason that lieretofore the inspection committee 
has attempted to do this work, just prior to. 
and at. the annual meeting, and was unable to 
five attention 10 and to hear all who wished to 
be heard on the subject. The inspection com- 
mittie has nut only taken into consideration 
all views from members who have given the 
matter enough tluutght to express themselves 
but liave also heard committees from other asso 
ciatiiins and has its report ready to hand in 
at tills meeting. I can assure you that the 
changes offered have had more consideration 
and tliought tliau any ever presented. I recom- 
mend that the liuffalo agreement be suspended 
and that the changes in the rules be adopted, 
lefore leaving the subject I would also recom- 
mend that the measurement be made on the hair 
inch, viz., fi. eVj, 7, TVo-inch, etc.. and do away 
with the give and take proposition tliat is the 




W. A. BENNETT, CINCINNATI, DIRECTOR. 

lause of so many cars falling one or two hun- 
ilred feet .-.hort. and that we also allow a per- 
lentage of odd feet in length. In shipping 
lumber there is often six inches or one foot at 
the end of the board that is valueless, and I 
ran see no reason why two feet should be cut 
ott simply because the custom was established 
when we' had mtire timber land in the country 
tluin wc knew what to do with. Lumber is too 
valuable to continue this w'aste. 

The inability of the railroads, for the past 
eight months, to handle with promptness busi- 
ness offered them has Interfered with the ship- 
ments to such an extent that all of you have 
sustained more or less serious loss. Railroad 
officials frankly admit that the traffic of the 
country has increased beyond their facilities to 
such an extent that they are unable to promise 
auv definite relief. This has brought into prom- 
inence the subject of improving our existing 
waterways. I consider it one of the vital ques- 
tions of this day — we not only need trans- 
])ortation. but we want transportation at a 
minimum and not a maximum cost. Our water- 
ways should be made navigable and kept so, and 
when they are tu"re will be no such thing as 
car shortage for, by relieving the railroads of 
the vast amount of bulk product, they will be 
able to keep up with the general development 
of our country. We have invited John A. Fox, 
special director of the National River and Har- 
bor Congress, to speak on this subject tomor- 
row, and I can assure you his address will be 
entertaining and instructive. 

I take this opportunity to thank the Board 
of Managers and their committees for their 
hearty and loyal support. TTie year has been 
a very successful one for the association, and 
before' closing I wish to place the credit where 



it largely belongs, to our efficient secretary, 
Frank F. Fish. 

W. H. RussE, President. 
The address was received with applause. 
Secretary Fish then read his report, as fol- 
lows : 

Secretary's Report. 

Mr. President and gentlemen : In submitting 
this, my second annual report. I am gratitied 




.lOlIN N. SC.VrCHERD, BUFFALO, DIRECTOR. 

at being able to do so in a spirit of confidence 
not possessed bv me upon the former occasion. 
The as...oriaie vear closing with this meeting has 
been profitable to the association and prolihc 
in experience to the secretary. Each day has 
developed new situations demanding the exer- 
<ise of judgment and discretion in order that the 
interests of the association might be fully pro- 
tected In this school of experience I have 
"•ithered a fund of information relative to asso- 
ciate mctliods of operation and development not 
possessed by me on taking charge of the office. 
I trust tliat this training has not been secured 
at an unduly high cost to this association, and 
beg to assure this membership that it will he 
used to the extent of my ability for the fur- 
ther lietterment and development of the asso- 
ciation. , , , 

In the preparation of my report I have been 
pla<-ed at some disadvantage by the knowledge 
hat it would follow the address of our able 
president, which will leave little or nothing of 
''cnerai interest for the secretary to communi- 
cate to this membership aside from details 
connected with his official duties. I trust, how- 
ever that even those details may contain some- 
thing worthy of consideration on the part 01 
the members' present. .. , ij ;„ 

Shortly after the annual meeting lield m 
Memphis last May, and in pursuance of the de- 
cision reached by the Board of Managers at 
that meeting the executive offices of the asso- 
ciation were removed from Indianapolis, Ind. 
It is mv belief that the change in location has 
been distinctly advantageous to the interests of 
he association, as it has enabled a much lai;ger 
percentage of the membership to come in duect 
contac with the actual workings of the asso- 
ciation than would have been possible had the 
ofhce been maintained in its former location. 
The best assurance that the change has not in 
a'; d?gre"e' worked adversely to the interests 
of the association, rests m the tact that it has 
occasioned no unfavorable comment "« bile on 
?he other hand, in its present location the office 
has been of much convenience to members who 
ale had occasion to visit Chicago. It has been 
mVbel ef ?hat the office belongs to the members 
ot thi^^ association and I have therefore en- 
deavored to extend to members a hospitable le- 

""■""new departure in the work of the pa^t jear 
was the holding of a semiannual mating of 
the membership, which occurred m Cincinnati 
on ofto^ei 2.5 aid 26. and brought out a credit- 
able attendance. AS a full report of this ineet- 
11'' was published in the various trade .lour- 
n ,1s t is not desirable to enter into any de- 
tails pertaining thereto. It may, however be 
m-ope. to place some emphasis upon the adverse 
,ction taken at that meeting with regard to 
; he admission to membership in this association 
of Hi ms or individuals not actually engaged 
in the lumber trade. This action demonstra.ed 
beyond any question that it is practically the 



24 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



uniiuiratms desire nf the membership that the 
;issociati<m ever shall he an association (if lum- 
hermen. for lumhermen and hy lumbermen. 

As the year prngrcssed and an enormously in- 
creased demand was noted from all sections of 
the country for the inspection of this association 
to he applied hy its inspectors, it became ap- 
parent to tliose who had the work in cliarge 
that a chanfie was necessary in the methods 
in voijiie for haniJIinK the inspectors in the held 
in oi"der tu inci-ease the efficiency of tlie de- 




i;i<\VAl;i 



'KLKV. MAMSTKK. MU'll. 
IUKKCTOR. 



parlmenl in which lliey were employed and 
that tlic members of the association might re- 
ceive reasonably pmmpt service. 

nwing to the fact that the chief inspector was 
necessarily absent from the office of the asso- 
ciation much of the time in the prosecution 
of his duties pertaining: to re-inspe<-tirm and 
supervising the work nf inspectors, delays of a 
serious nature were likely to occur iu the trans- 
mission of directions from that office to the in 
spectors at work in Ihe various sections of thi' 
country. To obviate these delays and to place 
the work on a tiioting of greatest efficiency. 
Ihe IJiiard of .M:niagers. at a meeting held on 
June 14 and 1o. unanimously decided to place 
Ihe secretary in cliarge of the work of inspec- 
tion so far as the assignment of employment 
to the different inspectors was concerned. 'With- 
out a desire to appropriate any personal credit. 
it is (uily proper for uie to state that this new 
arrangement lias produted results of the most 
sa I isfactory nal ure. A check is now kept on 
all salaried inspectors employed by the asso- 
ciation whereby it is possible to determine from 
the records in the secretary's office just where 
and for whom each inspector is at work at all 
limes, and what work he has assigned to him 
several days in advance. As a result of this 
system inspectors are no longer idle while mem- 
bers are waiting for service. Chaotic cimdi- 
tions have been replaced by system and effi- 
cien'*y in service is ii-ade to keep step with the 
'levcIoi)ment of the association. 

Much *tf my lime during the past year has 
I bus It-'cn <levi>t(fi to bettering the conditions 
under wbicli the actual work of inspection is 
conducted. I believe, however, that efforts put 
fnrtli in this direction have been of a ijrotitablc 
nature to the association, as the increase in 
the demands for national inspection shown by 
the i-eport vf the chairman of tlie Inspection 
Bureau Committee will amply demonstrate. 

II has a ISO been part of the work of the 
secretary to invcstiL'ale and settle a number 
of claims arising from re-inspedinn. 1 have 
made it a point to handle these claims promptly 
and if thev were of a nature to justify pay- 
ment by this association such payment has been 
made willioiit any unnecessary delay. i >n the 
other band, if ii" liability rested against the 
association, the claimanls liave been promptly 
notified tliat their claims were denied. 

The establishment of a system of thorough- 
ness ciuipled with pruiupt action in the affairs 
of the inspection department cannot fail to 
commend itself to all members who are brought 
into contact with I bat feature of the work of 
the association. U is not my purpuse to claim 
that perfection in detail has' been attained, for 
such is not the fact. Put a reasonable degree 
of progress has b^en made in the proper direc- 
tions which justifies the belief that still belter 
conditions will nrovail in the near future. In 
the selection of new insnectors extreme care 
has been taken to admit <n]Iy those of umpies- 



tiiined integrity and greatest ability, and every 
practical lumberman will appreciate the diffi- 
culty of establishing and maintaining a corps 
of i'nspei-tors of such a quality in the markets. 

There have been instances during the past 
year wherein association members have not 
hesitated to prevail upon inspectors of this 
association to leave its service and enter into 
their employment. Such action, while possibly 
not irregular even from an associate stand- 
point, is at times very embarrassing to the 
service. The only suggestion I can offer to 
insure the retention of inspectors in our serv- 
ice when it is to the interest of the association 
to so retain them, is to increase the compensa- 
tion to a degree that will prohibit their em- 
ployment hy individuals. I offer this sugges- 
tion under "the belief that the strength of this 
association is sufficient fn enable it to command 
tile services of an inspector against the com- 
petition of any individual. 

While much of my time has thus been occu- 
Itied in the discharge of duties newly assigned to 
the (iffice of the secretary. I have not been un- 
mindful of the necessity existing for a con- 
liniied increase in membership, and although the 
important increase of the previous year has 
not been equalled during the year just ended. 
1 trust the following figures will he approved 
by the membership. 

Since May. lf*(i(». HJM new firms have been 
added to the membership roll. During the same 
period a number of firms who have been identi- 
lied with the work have retired from business 
or sold out and we have dropped several names 
as delinquent. Details are as follows : 




<;ai:i>m:u i. .inNi:s. nosTOX. dikectou. 

.Membership May, liUir. oO:^ 

Applications received since 177 

Applications rejected sine-' S 

Total accepted 169 

67li 
Hesignation and withdrawals by reason 

of going out of business. . . '. .").s 

Dropped as delinquent L'U 

78 
Association membership May 23. 1007.. oU4 

The manner in which a majority of our mem-, 
bers have remitted dues and inspection fees 
has supplied the treasury with sutficient funds 
to discharge all indcbledness promptly. Details 
()f receipts and disbursements from my office are 
as follows : 

ItKCEIPTS. 

P^rom membership dues .fll 5.175.00 

From inspection fees 2S. 148.95 

From inspection rules G91.17 

From cash deposits 450.00 

$44,465.12 

DISRUUSEMICXTS. 

Tieiuitted treasurer !};44. 279.81 

Cash anri checks on liand 185.31 

.H4.4G5.12 

Uesults obtained from the publication in 
pamphlet form of the proceedings of the meet- 
ing prompted the executive committee to sim- 
ilar action on the Memphis convention. Sev- 
eral thousand copies were distributed among 
the membership and others interested in the 
association work. 

A revised edition of the official hand-hook 
was issued in November. lOOr,. and lias been 



of assistance iu acipiainting the trade at large 
with the methods of the Inspection tJureau, 
and as a considerable percentage of the delay 
in inspection work can be traced to the fact 
that all of our members are not familiar with 
the system, it is perhaps proper that I urge a 
careful study on the part of members of this 
hand-book. 

At our ninth annual meeting, held last year 
at Memphis, the committee, appointed hy the 
president, on officers' reports recommended that 
the emblem in use on the association letter- 
heads and all printed matter coming from the 
executive office he adopted hy our members for 
use on their business stationery. 

.\bout twenty-five per cent of our members 
have adopted this suggestion and employ the 
cut on their checks as well as stationery. I 
have a supply of the electrotypes of this design 
on hand and should he pleased if the balance 
of the members would adopt it. 

luiring this year the exe<-utive committee have 
held eight meetings, and <m four occasions the 
full Hoard of Directors have been called in con- 
ference as follows ; 

Mav 4. iriOG. 

.Tune 14 and 15. 190G. 

Julv 10 and 17. 19n0. 

October 25 and 20. 1900. 

November 22. 1906. 

January 11. 1907. 

February 27, 1907. 

March 28. 1907. 

.\ll of these meetings except two were held 
in the executive offices in Chicago, the excep- 
tions being Board of Managers' meeting of May 
4. 19n0, which was held at Memphis, and Board 
of Managers' meeting of .lanuary 11, 1007. held 
in Indianapolis, on which occasion we were the 
guests of the Indiana Hardwood Dumbermeu's 
Association at their annual meeting. 

Before entering the service of this asso<'iation 
my occupation was such as to bring me into 
close touch with many lines of business and 
also with the men in charge and I became more 
or less acquainted with the methods by which 
such lines of business were conducted. I may 
therefore be qualified to a certain extent to ex- 
press expert opinion regarding business methods 
and business men. It is a source of much satis- 
faction to me to have this opportunity to tes- 
tify to Ihe high quality of ability and the unself- 
ish devotion shown by those gentlemen who 
have bad in charge the destiny of this associa- 
tion during my brief connection therewith. If 
I possessed any doubts as to the ultimate at- 
tainment of the objects toward which the efforts 
of this membership have been directed, such 
doubts have long since been dissipated by the 
sincerity and enthusiasm which I have seen 
brought into the work by these members. 

If this enthusiasm were contagious and if 
all itiembers of this association shfuild become 
inoculatf'd therewith, enormous gains would 
be immediately shown in the affairs of the 
association. 1 would not be understood, how- 




W. A. BONSACK, ST. LOUIS, DIUKCTOR. 

ever, as implying that this membership is lack- 
ing in interest in associate aft'airs. because the 
attendanie at this meeting is a sufficient con- 
tradiction of any such implication. It is my 
belief that the National Hardwood Lumber Asso- 
ciation is not only growing stronger numeri- 
cally hut that the" sentiment of unity is also 
increasing in the membership, which cannot 
fail to add materially to the strength of the 
association. 



HARDWOOD RECORD 



25 



That natiniial iuspectiun is firmly established 
throuKh<'<iT the country cannot he successfully 
denied. TInM-e is no hardwtMjd market in this 
country thai does not recognize it as the basis 
for yradinji hardrt'ood hnnher. Therefore, so 
far as it is proper fur an employee to congratu- 
late his emphiyer. I desire to express that senti- 
ment tv tliis membership for the quality of the 
organizatinn which has been developed by their 
efforts, for the position which it occupies in the 
trade today and tor the smcess which has at- 
tended upon its endeavors to improve conditions 
imder which that trade is conducted. Tlie future 
progress of the association will depend, in large 
measure, upon the efficiency of its officers and the 
enthusiastic Uiyalty of its members. If the 
experience of the past year is a criterion there 
is every reason to look forward to large accom- 
plishments in the near future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Fi{.\NK F. Fish. Secretary. 

The report was received with applause. 

J. \V. Thompson moved that the address of 
the president and the report of the -secretary be 
referred tn a (-(mimitlee to consider the recom- 
mendations contained therein, which was duly 
seconded and carried. 

The chair appointed as such committee : 
Samuel K. Parr of New York, D. F. Clark of 
Minneapolis and George ^A^ Stoneman of Devalls 
Bluff. Ark. 

President liusse^I hope the committee will 
get to work as soon as they get the reports so 
they will be al)Ie to make their reports not later 
than tomiirrow morning at the opening session. 

Treasurer (iraham read his report, as follows* 

Treasurer's Report. 

Kec'd San Francisco fund $ 1,045.00 

-lune 27,. llMMl. .T. B. I'helan, Chn. Re- 
lief c*c Bed rross Com 1.045.00 

RECEIPTS. 

Cash deposit fund, O. E. Yeager. treas.$ 1,800.41 

Nineteen inspectors 475.00 

Interest to January S 34.14 

Total $2,309.55 

Surplus transf. to gen. fund. ..$559.55 

Kefiiud to IT inspf. it.is. . . ..425.00 984.55 

Balance $1,325.00 

General fund. O. E. Yeager, treas. . . .$ 520.47 

Dues. 607 members 15.175.nii 

Inspec. and reinspec. fees 27.903.04 

Inspection rules 091.17 

Surplus and int. from deposit fund.. 559.55 

Total $44,000.83 




EARL PALMER, FADUCAH, KV., DIRECTOR. 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

President's office $35.60 

Secretary's salary $3,000.00 

Rent 1.008.00 

Office and trav. exp 4.762.19— 9,370.19 

Treas. bond, printing and stationery. 29.75 

Inspectors' salaries 23.526-95 

Expense 5,354.84 — 28.881.79 

Reinspection 3,927.72 

Directors attending meetings 339.55 

I'rinting 1.525.71 



Error remittance II. C. Corn Lbr. Co.. 15.86 

Refund deposit at-count 25.00 

Refund deposit acci. (Talbertt. 4. 85 29.85 

Total $42,156.12 

Balance $ 2,753.71 

Respectfully submitted, 
J. W.\TT Graham, Treasurer. 

I'resident Russe — I think that shows we are 
still alive — and we don't owe anything. We 
have paid our debts and still we have money. 

The program shows at this time an intermis- 
sion for lunch. I believe, however, if there are 
no objections, that we ought to get in one or 
I wo more reports so that we will be sure to get 
through tomorrow. Of course, if it is the sense 
of the meeting, we can adjourn now for lunch. 
If not. we will hear the report of the Inspec- 
tion Bureau committee, \V. \\'. Knight, chair- 
man. 

Mr. Lloyd — Tlie big hotels have dinner at 1 
o'clock, but if you have a short report you mighi 
take it up. 

President Russe — This is not a long report 
and we had better get rid of it. We will ad- 
journ after this report. We want to get through 
as soon as we can. In this town there is noth- 
ing to do but have fun. 

Mr. Knight — ^This report is practically a repe- 
tition of what has been said by Mr. Russe and 
Jlr. Fish. 



inspectors employed by the association where 
bunded fi-rtihcates have been issued and by no 
means cuvcr, even approximately, the "total 
amount iuspt'cted under the rules of the National 
Hardwood Lumber Association. 

At the present time there is a demand for 
several salaried inspectors in the sawmill dis- 
trict, and it is believed that such places as New 
York city. Philadelphia. Boston. Baltimore, etc. 
the cities now having only nne inspectiu-. will 




IIIBBARD, ST. LOUIS, DlRECTOIi. 

Report of the Inspection Bureau Committee. 

Mr. President and Gentlemen : The chairman 
nf this committee begs to submit the following 
report of the workings of this branch of the 
association which has been, almost exclusively, 
in the hands of the Executive Committee, and 
of Mr. Fish, the secretary. 

In compiling figures showing the result of the 
work of the Inspection Bureau for the past year 
the secretary submits, on separate sheets marked 
"Exhibit A" and "B." the figures necessary for 
a comparison with the work of the preceding 
year, and the chairman submits that the monthly 
cost to the association of the Inspection Bu- 
reau has been slightly less, under the present 
management, than for the year which closed 
May 1, 1906. 

In the report made at the last annual meeting 
we showed that ten salaried inspectors were in 
the employ of the association, located in the 
principal cities of the country, where the de- 
mands of the hardwood trade warranted their 
steady employment. At the present time there 
are in the employ of the association seventeen 
salaried inspectors, located as follows : Chicago, 
three: Memphis, two: Cincinnati, two: Milwau- 
kee, one ; Minneapolis and St. Paul, one ; Grand 
Rapids, one : St. Louis, one : New Orleans, one ; 
Buffalo, one : New York City, one ; Philadelphia, 
one. and Baltimore one. 

JJuring the past year the salaried and fee in- 
spectors have issued bonded certificates for 123.- 
1 86.828 feet of lumber, an increase over last 
year of practically 25.552.000 feet. These fig- 
ures cover only the amount inspected by the 




C. F. S\VEi:r. GRAND liAPins. MICIL. DIREC- 
TOR. 

leipiire the appointment of an assistant in the 
near futui e. 

In the report of last year attention was called 
particularly t<> the scarcity of competent in- 
spectors, and the difficulty of getting them to 
enter the i-mploy of the national association. 
The situation, under the present conditions gipv- 
erning the lumber industry, is even more compli- 
(ated than ever, but by systematic effort we 
ha VI' been successful In getting on tile applica- 
tions from nearly nue hum] red inspectors now 
employed by uther parties. 

During the year no less Ihan five of our 
salaried inspectors, who have been successfully 
riained by the chief inspector and located at 
■ niisiderable expense, have been taken from the 
.issociat ion's employ by assdciation members in 
\ariuus sections of the coimti'y. 

Such action on the part of members renders 
it even more difficult to maintain an efficient 
and sufficient fr>rce to produce prompt service, 
and the chairman wishes to urge on the mem- 
bers that they kindly keep "hands off" from the 
association inspectors until such time as the 
bureau is in better position to spare these men. 
There should be a hearty response to this re- 
ipiest and the loyal support of the members to 
the management in their efforts to put this 
lirauch of the association on a thorough working 
basis. The taking away of competent men by 
some of the members is not what the chairman 
considers "loyal support." as the practical re- 
sult of this sort of work is to weaken the force 
and discredit the efforts of the management. 

In last year's report it was urged on the 
members to familiarize themselves with the rules 
governing the inspection. Reference is again 
called to this subject, and a study of the hand- 
book issued from the executive office is strongly 
recommended as there seems to be a general Jack 
of information on the part of many members as 
to just what is necessary for them' to do in or- 
der to get a reinspection in the regular way. 
Your attention is particularly called to the fact 
that when they wish to obtain an official rein- 
spection where bonded certificates have already 
been issued, the application must be made to 
the office of the secretary, as applications made 
direct to the deputy inspector for official rein- 
spection will not be recognized under any cir- 
cumstances. 

Your committee submits that the gain in the 
work of the inspection department is absolute 
proof that we are working along right lines, and 
numerous letters from shippers to the secretary 
expressing satisfaction with the work of salaried 
inspectors in large wholesale markets are among 
the most encouraging features of the present 
year's work. 

The general satisfaction among the member- 
ship over the service rendered by the inspection 
department is really due, in great part, to the 
fact that care has been exercised in ttie selec- 
lion of new men appointed as inspectors to ad- 
mit only those of unquestioned integrity and 



26 



HARDWOOD JECORD 



experience and we believe that credit is due to 
the present force for this condition of satisfac- 
tion as weil as for the substantial gain indi- 
cated by the figures pi-esented. 

Your' attention is further called to the fact 
that the amount remitte