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Full text of "Harmonic fourth reader"

HMDHHaaanMa 



NATURAL MUSIC COURSE 




FREDERIC H|l) f 



&? THOMAS 
iTAPPE; 




AMERICAN B0DK1" COMPANY 
NEW TO^JC CINCINNATI CHICAGO 




Southern Branch 
of the 

University of California 

Los Angeles 



Form L-l 






This book is DUE on the last date stamped below 



JUL * 191< 



Natural Music Course 



HARMONIC 
FOURTH READER 



BY 

FREDERIC H. RIPLEY 

PRINCIPAL OF THE PRINCE SCHOOL, BOSTON 
AND 

THOMAS TAPPER 

LECTURER ON MUSIC AT THE INSTITUTE OF MUSICAL ART 
OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK 



47206 

NEW YORK .-. CINCINNATI .-. CHICAGO 

AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY 



Copyright, 1903, by 
FREDERIC H. HIPLEY and THOMAS TAPPER. 



Entered at Stationers' Hall, London. 



Harmonic Fourth Reader. 

E-P 5 



fy 



PI 3 5 
v. 4 

PREFACE. 



The books of the Natural Course in Music present the study of music as an 
art. If followed faithfully, they establish a love for music and at the same time 
cultivate the creative a'nd appreciative faculties. For while they stimulate 
the aesthetic sense by presenting the finest examples of music for the young, 
they arouse and cultivate the inventive power by a systematic course of ear 
and eye training. 

Music study thus conducted becomes active, stimulating, intellectual. The 
feelings which are aroused by the singing are not allowed to pass away un- 
fruitful, but affect the will, which in turn stimulates to action of a highly 
developing character. 

The pupil is regarded as an active responsible agent, capable not only of 
being influenced but also of influencing others ; not as an appreciative listener 
alone, but as a possible creator of art ; not merely as an instrument to be 
played upon and swayed by the leader's emotions, but as an independent 
thinker capable of expressing feelings peculiar to himself. 

The fact is sometimes forgotten that tonal combinations are as clearly ob- 
jects of thought as any of the material used in elementary perception develop- 
ment. It is readily conceded that the smallest children are capable of making 
designs of the colors and forms commonly used in the primary school, but it is 
not so generally believed that the same children are capable of making tonal 
designs or musical compositions. The fact is, however, that music is so nat- 
ural and universal that if tone combinations are distinctly presented as objects, 
the use of them for design becomes possible at a very early stage ; but a diffi- 
culty with music arises frequently from the fact that the period which should 
be spent in making the members of the tone family distinctly familiar is devoted 
to an effort to establish certain ethical and oesthetical principles which are 
thought to be established when the child has lapsed into a passive condition 
entirely subservient to the teacher's will. Thus not only is the educational 
value of elementary music as a means of cultivating sense perception by hear- 

Har. Fourth Reader. (3) 



4 PREFACE. 

ing lost, but the foundation on which development is based is neglected and 
the artistic study of music in the upper grades is retarded. 

Training the ear in tone perception is never completed. It corresponds 
to drill on the number tables, which is never so perfect that it can not be 
improved. So in this fourth reader of the Harmonic Series the study of tone 
relation is continued and material for review is freely furnished, together with 
new and varied combinations for advanced study. 

The compositions presented for study are of larger form and display a more 
artistic development than was possible in an earlier book. 

Emphasis is placed on the necessity of establishing the symbols of music 
as the representatives of actual thought which the mind receives without the 
medium of instrument of voice, so that the pupil shall be able to study the 
composition in silence, and in silence to work out his own tone design. 

The Fourth Harmonic Header presents the following interesting subjects 
for study and practice : 

1. Development of larger artistic wholes, by means of which the aesthetic 
nature may be cultivated. 

2. Review material for the further development of tonal perception and 
the increase of the cause to study music silently. 

3. Presentation of exercises in different modes (major and minor) for the 
study of harmonic relation. 

4. The study of movement as expressed in more varied rhythmic form. 

5. The study of advanced chromatic modification, with a consideration of 
resulting intervals. 

6. The theory of music as expressed in the footnotes and applied in the 
dictation work. 

7. Study for voice culture, with special reference to the change in boys' 
voices and the use of the bass clef. 

8. An enlarged and carefully selected collection of songs in various forms. 

9. A collection of patriotic and devotional songs for assemblies and special 
occasions. 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



DIRECTIONS. 

The Conditions. With each advancing grade the conditions change 
somewhat. The difficulties which beset the beginners have passed away, 
but new and quite as serious obstacles now await us. The character of the 
school has changed, new, untrained pupils have come in, much of the 
elementary knowledge and power seen in lower grades is wanting here. 
There is a great unevenness in ability. Self-consciousness has asserted itself, 
and a feeling of restraint limits the pupil's efforts. The voices are grow- 
ing thicker. The more vigorous boys' sports and habitual shouting on the 
playground and in the streets have roughened the tones There is a very 
general stiffness of the vocal organs. These conditions must influence us 

in our practice. 

The Voices. 

The voices must be made flexible and light by the constant use of 
vocal drills, and the control of the breath must be secured by intelligent 
phrasing and artistic performance. The range of tones is now probably 
greater than before, except with boys whose voices are beginning to change. 

Vocal Drills. The practice of beginning high and singing down the 
scale must now be combined with exercises moving in the opposite direc- 
tion, and exercises for flexibility must begin rather low and work up by 

degrees. 

Exercise for Flexibility. 

etc. 




The exercise should continue advancing upward, a step at a time, till 
the voices are pure and flexible. 

Holding the Tone and Changing the Syllable. Holding the tone and 
establishing a new hey tone or Do is a matter that should be fully reviewed 
and perfected. Each pupil's power should be ascertained by individual 
test. 



Her. Fourth Reader. 



<5> 



DIRECTIONS. 



Additional Vocal Drill for Flexibility and Correctness of Pitch. 




-&-\-r-0-x- 



->-&- 



i^ssii 



Give the correct pitch at the beginning and test the pitch at the end. 
When this exercise is correctly sung, it may be extended upward one 
degree at a time. 

Many pupils in this grade will be found wanting in the power to rec- 
ognize either the tonality or the syllables at sight. For their benefit 
a little instruction and some practice should be given with the opening 
lessons. To ascertain the status of the class use the following exercises. 

Beginning at the left, sing instantly, calling the first tone Do. Then 
call the same tone Mi, then Sol, then Fa, then La. Do the same with 
each group of notes in turn. Let the recitation be individual. Assign 
similar exercises to slow pupils for home study. Continue the work until 
every pupil has the order of the scale tones, the syllables and the tonality, 
perfectly at command. When the first stage of development is fully accom- 
plished, require the pupils to give the tonality without giving the syllables, 
then require them to give the tonality with little word groups. 



g&>g 



I 



Exercise. 

c d 



J2 S g 



I 



-B-^-Z7 



O 



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I 



^ 



&> c ' & - 



II 



Cultivation of the Ear. 

Pupils will be found who are still unable to tell Do, Re, from Do, Ti, 
and whose perception of rhythms is equally bad. Do not relax the effort 
till every pupil in the class is able to perceive simple tone relations from 
hearing. Add to this the very simplest individual reading exercises, and 
make sure that every pupil can at least read scale successions correctly. 

Perception of rhythms and familiarity with simple rhythmic figures 
must be cultivated persistently. In this work make quick tests of each 
pupil's power by writing on the board a collection or succession of musical 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



DIRECTIONS. 



figures or phrases and call upon the pupil to tell what each says. Thus, 
The following being before the pupils, the teacher may say, "What does one 
say?" then jive, two, and so on, referring to the phrases on the board. The pupil 
should instantly respond with the movement, giving the measures as wholes. 

Exercise. 
2 




Note. The figures should be varied and increased in variety until every combination used 
in the book is entirely familiar. 

Dictation. The elementary steps should be reviewed and enforced by 
means of dictation. Rapid oral dictation first for tonality and then for 
rhythm should be given at the opening of each lesson. In this exercise 
Mie teacher should sing or play such simple combinations as Do, Ti, Do ; 
Do, Re, Do ; Do, Sol, Mi, Do, and the like, using the syllable loo, and the 
pupils respond with the tones and the syllables. 

For rhythms the teacher sings simple measures as 
1 2 3 4 




and calls upon the pupils to tell the kind of notes used in two-four meter, 
and how the same figure would be represented in two-two meter. 

Written Dictation. The work in dictation which is called written dic- 
tation is precisely like oral dictation except in the matter of recitation. In 
written dictation the pupil writes what before he gave orally. Written dicta- 
tion is necessarily slower and hence can hardly form a part of every exercise. 
The writing, too, may be done by a single pupil at the board, or it may be a 
class exercise written on ruled paper. In this case it becomes a general test 
and is very useful in estimating the individual ability of the pupils. 

Hmr. Fourth Readr. 



8 



DIRECTIONS. 



Summary. 

The various lines of work suggested here are carried forward in the 
book to the end. Additional exercises for vocalization and dictation will 
be found in the proper places. The theory of music, which now becomes a 
matter of some importance to the children, is provided for under the head 
of Dictation, while the terms used in music are explained in the footnotes. 
We do not require the definition of symbols when the definition is a statement 
of their use, as the correct use is sufficient evidence that it is understood. 

Teaching Chromatic Tones and Advanced Rhythms. Nearly every pos- 
sible combination of chromatic tones may be given as the natural scale tones 
in another key. This fact is illustrated again and again in the lessons in 
the book, and in chart drills. Similarly every rhythm, however com- 
plicated, will be found on analysis to be but a new combination of elements 
already made familiar by the analysis given in the chart. 

The intimate relation between rhythms and tonal groups makes the 
advanced study of either dependent in a measure on the other. Thus in- 
tervals which by themselves seem very difficult often appear to be but a 
necessary correlative of certain movements. Hence, the movement of the 
music should be fully in mind when the interval is attempted. For exam- 
ple, the following exercise contains two little phrases which are precisely 
alike, and when so considered it becomes entirely easy. If the exercise is taken 
note by note, an awkward interval occurs (#1 to 5) ; but this interval dis- 
appears altogether when we sing the first phrase by itself, stopping on $1, 
and then sing it again, going on to the end. 



W 



3 



^H 



'< 



;=* 



5 







f* 



w% 



The effect produced by such sudden key changes as this illustration 
affords are made familiar to our pupils by the continued practice of the 
chromatic studies given in the charts. This study when systematically 
taken as prescribed gives a taste for music which else could be acquired 
by instrumental study only. 

Hsr. Fourth Readtr, 



PAET I. 

Vocal Drill.* 

To be sung from different pitches. 



^^ ^5 i= SJ S |E p 



Ch. Ser. G, pages 1 and 2. 
Ex. 1. 



g=K-^-^b 



II 



Lffi 



W 



-+^ 



Ch. Ser. G, page 2. 
Ex.2. 



I 



I 



3 



^ 



Ex. 3. 



m 



s 



^ * 



* i * 



* *~ 



Ex. 4. 



feii E fr = r = rng 



I 



^ 



Ex. 5. 



<< 



3^^ 



II 



-* - 



r Staff, fe Clef. I Bar. H Double Bar. 2 j 3, 4 ? Meter Signatures 
. Sn I II 4-4-4 

rjj: Repkat. 

* Vocal Drill, see Directions, page 5. 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



(9) 



10 



Ch. Ser. G, pages 4 and 3. 
Ex. 6. 



Study of Chromatics. 



Ex. 6. Ex. 7. Ex 8. 



Do.ti, do. 



Sol, fi, sol. 



Ex.9. 



fr jj jU|j jiyji^^ W j iffr^a 



* Ch. Ser. G, page 12, Ex. 1 and 2. 
Ex. 10. 



S 



ifcafc- 



3 



IN 



=t 



3=5 



II 



Ex. 11. 



See 



Ft 



"SIS 



i=2ii 



I 



BEGONE! DULL CARE. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 16, Ex. 2. 
^ Allegretto. 



i 



mp 



^ 



^=^ 



English Air, 17th Centurt. 

TJ ^ 



fegiS 



=fc 



1. Be -gone! dull care, . . I prith- ee, be- gone from me, ... Be - 

2. O, too much care . . Will make a young man turn gray, . . And 



5EBE 




mm 



/ 



:fcgx=g: 



m 



8 



3SE? 



^sa 







I Sharp. b Flat. & Natural. 



B-S 



Key Signature. 



A sharp, flat, or natural used as in Ex. 7, is called an accidental, and the tone which it 
indicates is called a chromatic tone. 

Allegretto, light and cheerful, but slower than Allegro; f, forte, strong; mp, mezzo piano, 
moderately soft; mf, mezzo forte, moderately strong. 

* See directions for Chromatic and Rhythmic teaching, page 8. 

Mar. Fourth Reader. 



11 



# 



mp 






:=fc=|t 



^ 






gone ! dull care, You and I shall nev - er a - gree. . 
too much care AVill turu an old man to clay. . 



3 



Long 
My 






* 



/ 






5 



WJB 



*r * 



m^ 



^j^=g^ 



^35 



-*-* i- 



=3- 



W~0~V 



^E5Et. 






j=^= 






time hast thou been tar-rying here, And fain thou wouldstme kill, . 
wife shall dance and I will sing, So mer-ri-ly pass the day,. 



But v 
For I 



;-- 



f-fj ^j ft j-tfj jjj 



^^jE^i^g^^ 




-4* E-* 

d d d 



f * n 



^~^ 



=t= 



faith, dull care, . . . Thou nev-er shall have thy will. . . 

hold it one of the wis - est things To drive dull care a - way. . 



3 



r* 







fcsfe! 



=f=i 



3S3 



PH 



*"* 



*ee 



&3S 



=fc= 



II 



3ip 



~1 



^F 



H=t=l 



Har. Fourth Raadar. 



12 



Ch. Ser. G, page 4. Ex. 2. 
Ex. 12. 



Ex. 18. 



^- g? r zj - 






Do, 



Fa, te, . te, Li, 



Ex.14. 
,1 



f^^Bpll^^ii^^E^i^^lJ 



Ex. 15. 



u 




-4 



4 



ji J1 



B^S^ 



3S 



II 



Ex. 16. 



3=^ 



j-j- U _j^=j 



r p 



fSfEEfSfEEi 



J-JL 



fe^fe^ 



I 



3T 



jg^^H 



g> 



-s> 



JSZZ3 



MS 



Ex. 17. Ch. Ser. G, page 4. Ex. 6 



fcfel 



fe^Ei 



3fc=^ 






333: 



* -^ 1 # r* 



d=^7e=s=q 



SEE 



3 _^_^jrES_^|^.^_^__j. 



, i jm i^u 



j J j * 1^3J^jj!;J^'^^ 



I 



t+Tntfm 



p=^^^i( 



'^S 



Har. Fourth Rear)' 



SING NOT TO ME OF SUNNY SHORES. 
Ch. Ser. G, page 4. 
James Little. 
mf Con brio. 



13 



J. Sneddon. 



-r- 



=t 



* 



^L ^ 



1. Sing not to me of sun -ny shores, Or climes where ol - ives bloom, Where 

2. Sing not of yon-der sun -ny isle, Where sum- mer ev - er reigns, Where 

3. Sing not to me of sun -ny lands, If ty - rants there hold sway, These 




on -ward still the riv - er pours, 'Mid groves of sweet per-fume. Give 

or - ange groves se-rene - ly smile, And flow -'rets deck the plains; Give 

climb to pow'r with blood- y hands, And trem- bling slaves o -bey; Give' 




me the land where tor- rents flash, Where loud the an - gry 
me the lands of mountains steep, Where wild and free the 
me the laud un - con-quered still, Tho' oft - en tried in 



cat-"racts pour, As 
ea -gles soar. The 
days of yore, Where 




wild - ly on their course they dash ; We love our 
diz - zy crags where torn -q>ests sweep ; We love our 
free - dom reigns from plain to hill; We love our 



own dear shore, 
own dear shore. 
own dear shore. 



/TN 



/C\ 




Con brio, with life, spirit; = or rres., crescendo, gradually increase the power of tone- 
:r= or dim., diminuendo, gradually decrease the power of tone; rail., rallefUando, gradually 
slower and softer. /T\ Hold; this increases the value of a note at least one beat. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



14 



MY BARK IS BOUNDING TO THE GALE. 

Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847). 



^ 



tH? 



ft=* 







-* P 



-* 1 ~P~~ Hg 



r 



5E=3 



My bark is bound-ing to the gale, . The sea is foam - ing 

:t?-E.- *i . d kt-| *. i I s l-I fr Nx I & I & 



#=* 



&-*w- 



w * ' m ~w 



^= 



tl 



tes 



^=t=g= j 



P33C 



fcafc 



- J^-^x- 



t=a 



round her, A - dieu to thee, . my na - tive vale, 



A - dieu to 



XIX 



^P 




p dolce. 



-X-^X 



S=53 



i=f: 



thee, my na - tive vale, And thee for whom I wan - der, and 



&E 



sisyi^ii 



335^ 



sr 



S 



\*f* 






5pS 



tfl 



thee for whom I wan - der, and thee for whom . I wan - der. 

k-t- _, _,__ _ , . ^-h ji. 






3 



^tt^: 



-T< 



II 



^ ^ Tie ; two notes representing the same pitch, joined by a tie, are sung as one note 
having their united value. 

p, piano, softly ; dolce, sweetly, softly, delicately ; %f, sforzando, one chord or tone to be 
sung with force; > Accent. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



15 



Vocal Drill. 






Si, 
Ch. Ser. G, page 11, Ex. 3. 

Ex. 18. Ex. 19. Ex. 20. 



lE^=#figiJ^^gl 



I^Hee?^ 



*=t 



Ex. 22. 




Ex. 23. 




iij j 'nirij l 



Ex.24. 




Ex. 25. 

(a) Major. 



(b) Minor. 



# 



33EB 



^aSe^^ 



*=* 



t ri~ 



' trtrrr 



(=*- 



m 



xzn 



II 



^P^ 



=r 



II 



gg 



3 



^ * 



- (faP r~p f* <s * E _{ & I ~ I | T~f i* "* g> The key signature shows the 



Fa, mi, re, do. " TI, do, do. 

position of Do. The flat farthest to the right is always on Fa, and the sharp farthest to the 
right is always on Ti. 

=> Whole Note. J Half Note. J Quarter Note. ^Eighth Note. ^Sixteenth 
Note. s Thirty-Second Note. Whole Rest. Half Rest. Quarter Rest. 
1 Eighth Rest, q Sixteenth Rest. 

A dot placed after a note increases its value one half, thus: <=* equals & # or * 
J . equals J / or ///} J\ equals J* J* or J 

Hr. Fourth Readet. 



16 







4=1 



Ifis^=S 



lip^^E^ 





^=3^= 



.S^5 JJ 



g^pE^ 



SI 



-*~ * * 



-r^ 






1 



THE THREE RAVENS. 

Ch. Ser. G, page 13. English Air, 16th Century. 

Smoothly and with expression. 




1. There were three rav - ens sat on a tree, 

2. Be- hold, a -las! in yon green field, 

3. His faith - ful hawks so near him fly, 

4. She lift - ed up his ghast - ly head, 

-4- 



Down 
Down 
Down 
Down 



a down, hey - 
a down, hey - 
a down, hey - 
a down, hey - 




The common meter signatures are 2, ?, ^, , ^ , ^, ^, ^, '^, S and (. The figures 
show the note value in each full measure. The upper figure shows also the number of beats or 
pulses to a measure, and the lower figure indicates the note value of each beat. C indicates a 
four part measure and (j> a two part measure. 

poco, a little; rit., ritardando, retarding the speed gradually. 

Mar. Fourth Reader 



m 



17 



jmp_ 



JL-JL_ ^ 



*=i 



do\vn,hey-down ; They were 
down,hey-down ; There lies 
down,hey-down ; No bird 
down, hey -down ;And kissed 



black as they might be, With a 

knight, slain 'neath his shield, With a 

prey dare ven - ture nigh, With a 

were so red, With a 



of 

his wounds that 





And one of them said to his mate, "Where shall we our 
His hounds lie down be-side his feet, So well do they their 
But see ! there comes a fal-low doe, And to the knight she 

She bu -ried him be-fore the prime, And died her-self ere 






~J2 



r r 



= p poco rit. 



break - fast take ?"With a down, 

mas - ter keep, With a down, 

straight doth go, With a down, 

even -song time, Willi a down, 



^S 



=*E 



der - ry, der - ry, der - ry down, down ! 

der - ry, der - ry, der - ry down, down ! 

der - ry, der - ry, der - ry down, down ! 

der - ry, der - ry, der - ry down, down ! 




Har. Fourth Reader. 



18 



Ch. Ser. G, page 11. 

Ex. 27. 

Andante. 



Studies in Major and Minor. 



Ssh 



Ex. 28. 

Andante. 



mf 1 




m 



I! 



t ^_ . -W- 9 +- -^. 



=*3 



"2^- 



3^3 



tt 



Ex. 29. 

Moderalo 



Ex. 30. 



Moderato. ^. rl ! i I a f**1 ""s 

p ^ p ' ' 



^gg^^plB^p(i^p(i 



Ex. 31. 

Andantino. 



Ex. 32. 



=* 



fc*: 



P 



Q^ 






pp 



^gp^^api^ 



s^3 



d=3s 



* 1 



w 



Accent. The first beat of every measure should be accented, and in T and g meters, a 
secondary accent, weaker than the first, falls on the third and fourth beats respectively. The 
effect of the secondary accent in 3j meter is illustrated by the word com' pro-mis' ing. 

Andante, moderate, but flowing; Moderato, moderately, as to speed; Andantino, a little 
faster than Andante; pp, pianissimo, very softlv. 

Har. Fourth Reader 



19 



WIND AND SEA. 



Bayard Taylor 
With spirit. 



J. Spencer Curwen. 




gbsl 



}L-:te3L-=: 



The sea 



_ 1 R5 ^ * ^ +. 

V +* 1 i *^rf=?r 



1/ 

a jo - vial com - ratle, He laughs wher-ev - er he 
Yet \vel - come are both their voi - ces, I know not which is 



4t 



SS 



^ 



B, i> I s r> ? 




e 



E3E3S 



,' 



goes, 
best, 



His mer - ri - ment shines in the dimp - ling lines That 
The laugh - ter that slips from the o - cean's lips Or the 



^ 



W=0^ 



ha, ba, 



&M^?-+- 




=fe^- 


dS-dSi 


-f hr- ^r^~ 


wrin - kle his hale 
com - fort - less wind's 

h 


*- 

re - 
un - 


pose, 
rest. 


~1 

He 
There's a 


k k w r 5^s 

lays him - self down at the 
pang in all re - 


y i " 






/Lb*. u ^ 


i k *i *i 




Ifts" h is * 


i' 


r 




VMJ J r m 






Z) 9 ^. * 




L #i W 







>-J- 



m mm 



feet of the sun, 
joi - cing, 



r 



- 



0w * 



6S 



Shakes all o - ver with 

Joy in the heart of 



; 



3E 



3 



=*= 



vl 



Har. Fourth Readr, 



And shakes all o - ver with glee, 

A Joy in the heart . . of pain, 



with 
of 



20 



Shakes all . . . o - ver with glee, 
Joy in the heart . . of pain; 



=r 



glee, 
pain, 






& 



I P # '"l" k 

with glee, And the broad-back'd bil - lows fall 
of pain; And the wind that sad -dens, the 



=t 







55 



P 







f 



J 



J 



l^i 



^^=ft:=^= s fsc 

J I ^. fa p >J 



-*-=!- 



-X- 2 *- 



r 



faint on the shore, In the mirth of the might - y sea, In the 

sea that glad-dens, Are. . sing - ing the self -same strain, Are . . . 



I 



^ 



s=3* 







s 



-*-* 




2i 



Fine. Mournfully and legato 

-3k 






p^p 



IX p L 

mirth of the mighty sea, the might - y sea. 

sing-ing the self-same strain, the self - same strain. 



ft r i 



But the wind is sad and 
But the wind is sad and 






M=al 



i 



fc=^ 



* 



r 



* 






rest- less, And cursed with an in - ward pain; You may hark as you will by 



~ 



*-^-hj--=^P=] 

W ^ * ^ - ^ 4 



s 



==* 



=*= 



? 



Fine. The end. Legato, smoothly. 



Har, Fourth Reader. 



21 



-f- < ^ n- X'y r i i | ^ = T H i r 1 ' 



val-ley or hill, But you hear him still complain, You hear him still com 



^JJ M 



= 



^P^ 



rallenlando. 



m 



== 



-, j 






i= 



-& 



F = rr F F^=f=Ft i 



plain, You hear him still com - plain. He wails on the bar - ren 







& 



P=t 



_J*- 



-i I | J 



fc=i 



# 



moun - tains, and shrieks on the win -try sea. He sobs in the ce - dar and 



h 



^^3SEE5 



EE 



**z?r 



cres 



pm 



- do. 



dn. 



/>.<7- 



* 




M=^ 



fW^ 



moans in the pine, And shud-ders all o - ver the as - pen tree. 



II 



Sf. * *- 



:*=*=E3 



*=*C 



'* * *" 



> 



D. C. , Da capo. From the beginning. 

Hr Tourth Reader 



22 



ENVY. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 12. 
Chakles ami Maky Lamb. 




1. This rose - tree is not made to bear The vio - let blue, nor 

2. And should it fret, you would sup - pose It ne'er had seen its 
8. Like such a blind and sense- less tree As I've im - ag - ined 




P 



i= : H- 



^ 



i 



p 



m 



' lil - y fair, Nor the sweet mi-gnon - ette : And if this tree were 

own red rose, Nor aft - er gen - tie shower Had ev - er smelled its 

this to be, All en - vious per - sons are: With care and cul - ture 




W^- 




dis - con - tent, Or wished to change its nat - ural bent, It 
ros - e's scent, Or it could ne'er be dis - con - tent With 
all may find Some pret - ty flow'r in their own mind, Some 



^3E 






FFH* 



V 

all in vain would fret, It all in vain would fret, 

its own pret - ty flower, With its own pret - ty flower, 
tal - ent that is rare, Some tal - ent that is rare. 




II 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



i 



23 
Dictation. 

The oral dictation is suggested for review. See directions, page 7. 

The teacher sings with loo; the pupils respond naming the tones as they sing. Illustration: 

Teacher. Pupils. Teacher. Pupils. 



*> 



D^^fl 



r 



-& _ 1 Qit & 

Loo,loo,loo,loo,loo,loo,loo,loo. Do, ti, la, sol, fa, mi, re, do. Loo.Ioo. Do, do. 

Keview Exercise. 
3 4 5 



-&-&-&. 



]l2lfZ2Z 



-^2-.- 



-S 5-&G T 



II 



&&&- 



I 




The teacher should give the exercises quite rapidly and demand prompt responses. In 
addition to those suggested in the book the teacher should add every reasonable combination 
of tones she can think of. 

Written Dictation. 

The teacher should require the pupils to draw the staff and place the clef. After singing 
the scale to fix the tones in the pupils' minds, she calls attention to the position of Do upon 
the staff. She should then sing the exercise slowly, with the syllable loo ; and the children 
should write the notes upon the staff. Afterwards the correct representation should be placed 
before them, errors corrected, and new trials made. 

Rhythmic Dictation. 
2 






o 



^m 



& 







TI 



LLUJ 



^p^l^m 



Theory. 

Review the signs used In music, including staff, clef, key signature, meter signature, 
sharps, flats, notes, rests, and any other common characters. See that the use of these 
characters is fully understood, that they are correctly formed and placed on the staff. Teach 
the staff degrees, showing the use of the clef, and explain what is meant by pitch. (See 
footnotes. ) 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



24 



Vocal Drill 

To be sung from different pitches. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 4. 



Ex. 33. 



S^ 



* k v -U 



E 



Do, sol - o - do. 



it 



P <=Z- 



d E 



r? 



Ex.34. 




I 







3ESI 



^ 



1^1 



&k 



Ex. 35. 



f^l^gfe 






Wt^JZZjtt 



m 



J*Z* 



i 



Do, la -a"- o -do. 




^^^^^ j gfe Nl 



Note. "When it is desired that the tones of a measure like (a) shall be short and detached, 
it may be indicated by placing dots under the notes, as at (6), or by using notes of a less value 
with rests after them, as at (c). The rests at c indicate the way in which the measure should 
be sung ; they do not cause a pause in the music. This is important, as children frequently 
suppose there must be a count or a beat for each rest ; but if they are once assured that in such 
cases the rests are not to be considered, except as affecting the notes, the difficulty is removed. 



(a) 



(6) 



(c) 



^ 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



25 



RETURN OF SPRING. 




Ch. Ser. G, page 13. 
> Moderato. 

sites 



Robert Schumann (1810-1856). 



a 



-. 



3 



1. A joy - ful wel - come now we bring, Gen - tie, gen - tie 

2. In glow - ing beau - ty all is seen, Gen - tie, gen - tie 

3. We give thee wel - come with a song, Gen - tie, gen - tie 



*k= 



ii^ 



spring - time, 
spring - time, 
spring - time, 



Till 

Now 

In 



. 



-P 



'-^= 



hill and dale and val - ley ring, 
gay - ly clad in robes of green, 
our green val - ley tar - ry long, 




Gen - tie, gen - tie springtime ; For - est dell and fields a - mong, 
(ien - tie, gen - tie springtime; Sweet with -in our low - ly vale, 
Gen - tie, gen - tie springtime ; Joy - ful ev - 'ry heart and gay, 




Ev - 'rv-where we'll greet thee with a song, a mer - ry song. 
Greet the songs of lark and night - in - gale, and night - in - gale. 
Joins with us in our sweet round -e - lay, sweet round- e - lay! 



JT3- 



* * 



Triplets. 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



26 



Study of Rhythm 



To be sung first as four-part measure, an eighth note to a beat. 
Ex. 37. Ch. Ser. G, page 13. 



?=^5 



g^r [jE^ ^j^y 



ta 



--frf- 



^L-^^3^ 



c== 



- *--* 



dy> 


* 


>* 


SB^E 


v 


_- <r=* 


r nr i* 


.. 




-Wr 


^F^ 


1 F5j" 




L-^r 'L 






V 


^ * J- 





J 


_l_ ^i 


z= ^r&-j- 


=^=i 






fc 



; 



^^^f 



=q=f= 



:fe - 



Pi 



' 



-=1 =1- 



3 



-q i * 



S 



II 



The word chromatic is derived from the Greek word chroma, meaning color. Chromatic 
tones are so called because they were at one time indicated by notes of a different color from 
the others. They are now indicated by Sharps (til), Flats ({?), Naturals (3), Double 
Sharps ( x ), or Double Flats (W?). 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



27 



Ch. Ser. G, page 15 
Ex. 38. 




s*r 






3=*t* 



feg 



M 



"; :f 



S^g.-d.-^ffi^ J i J? g Q^ ffl - J H 



W^ 




tf 



^s ^U_J^3^ZEDLJ = -.l^i 



Ex. 39. 



^^ ^^^^ ^^ 



S 



^ 



SN^-^-^MJjT^^?^^ 






piUHP 



fe^ 



!=? 



Har. Fourth Readar. 



J -iU^ l gl ' 



28 



RIVER SONG. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 16, Ex. 2. 
u Softly. 



F. C. Maker. 






a 



dH^ ^fc3= 5g 



/ ; 



1. Gen - tly on the tran - quil tide . . . With the stream we 

2. See . . . the Hes - pe - rian gleam . . Mir - rored in the 



*$fctt 



m 



^^^: 
-*-=-*-*- 



B^^ 



*= 



gay - ly glide, While the mel - low eve - ning breeze 
plac - id stream ; Hark ! the hap - py feath - ered throng 



** 



m 



Rus 
Trill 



*& 



^3 






**=F e 



ties in . 

their joy 



the 
ful 



leaf 
e 



y 

ven 



trees. . 
son jr. . 



=Jt 



fe 



The lines and the spaces of the staff are called staff degrees. With the G clef, the staff 

_f , 

degrees are lettered thus : 






Har. Fourth Reader 



29 



And the rocks and wood - lands ring 
With a song as blithe and gay 




= j i r i 



, ^- 



=* 



With the glad - some 
Let us speed the 



*^- * 



^^^p 



rit. 



m 



-+T-TT* 



^-TC# - 



songs we sing, 

part - ing day. 



Mer n - ly on, 
Mer - ri - ly on, 



Mer - ri - ly on. 
Mer - ri - ly on. 



* 



"i 



^ 



+- * 



^^^ 



IT^ 



# ^_f&= 



^ 



=3^ 



3*: 



Youth has no care or sor - row, Mer - ri - ly on; the 



m^^^m 



&Z3 



^ 



-* *- 



r#. 



P=tt 



: 



sun - set glow Fore - tells a bright to - mor - row. 



f-' 4 . 



3=mm 



II 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



30 



Ch. Ser. G, page 4. 
Ex. 40. . 



-.: 



t 



A 



m 







-* - 



=f= 



' 



? 



f 3 ? 



& 



;:4: 



^^ 



3Hg=| 



J I I J> J-1|J 



o=emM^ 



^B 



-<S>- 



f" 



Z2_ 



m 



=3= 



* ^pK p 



Ex. 41. 







* 



r 



I 



be, x - 



H 



S* 



^ 



W 



3f 



m m 



Mm 



^^ 



II 



dgi 



3 



r-r-r wr^T ^^^i 



i 



=t 



^ 



P^i 



The clef is used to show how the staff degrees are lettered. The G clef (2), which is a 

modified Gothic G, shows the position of the letter G. From this the letters of the other staff 
degrees are easily derived. 

The first tone of the scale (Do of the major scale) is called the key tone. The name of 
the staff degree on which the key note occurs is also the name of the key. 

Har Fourth Reader. 



31 



MEN OF WAR AT ANCHOR. 





James Smith. 
Gently. 
? ^ i 


H 


r-i 


rt^J- 


-4-1 


1-4- 


^ 


P. SlLCHEB. 

H +-i 


iL 


fS . 1 




_^ l =L_ 




_ SJ. J 

.U m 


*.jh < r 


f^ - 




a * 


m ffl* 


r \ 

1. Lis - ten 

2. State - ly 

3. Sen - tries 

4. Fit - ful j 

5. Slum - ber 

n 


r 

to 

ships 
pace 
^leam 
reigns 


r 

the 
are 
the 
the 
o'er 


foam - 
rid - 
si 

bea - 
gal - 


i 

ing 
ing 
lent 
con 
lant 


r 

waves 
there, 
deck, 
lights, 
hearts, 




O'er the 

Mon - archs 
Mid - night 
Dark - ness 
Famed in 


y <\ 










/ ' 






s 


i i 


f(\ >\ 


I i 




* 


i 


^ ) 4- 1 1 






1 






. 




-S- 


J- 




-4 


S- 




1 S 9 



i 



J=^3=^ 



P 



~^= 



P 



*=* 



* 



f^f 



bul 
of 

breez 
wide 
mar 



wark dash 
the o 

es sigh 

sur - round 
tial sto 



ing! 
cean; 

ing! 

ry; 



See, 

Mann'd 

Proud 

Hark! 

While 



mid 
hard 



a 

by 

ly in 

the might 
the Eye 



the 

y 

the 

y. 

that 



1^ 



^33^ 



% 



m 



*u=a 



j 



^ 



5fc 



II 



-* ^- 



r=^rT" r ' r^ r 



r r 

shades of night, 
sail - ors brave, 
murk - y gloom, 
roar - ing deep, 
nev - er sleeps 



r 



i 



Sig - nals faint - ly 

Fired with true de - 

Free - dom's col - ors 

Ev - er loud re - 

Guards our coun - try's 



flash - 
vo 

fly 

sound 
glo 



mg. 
tion. 
ing. 

ing! 

ry. 



II 




-*- 



^m 



W 3 



Mar. Fourth Reader. 



32 



Vocal Drill 



Study of Minor. 



^^_=g3JjJES 



Ch. Ser. G, page 13. 
Ex. 42. 



*'4 



4 



#* 



S 



^^^^ 



S? 



Ex. 43. 



& 



^1 



&5 



= 



3 



S 



II 



Ex.44. 



=# 



^ 



g^ ?= g 



^H 



-* - 



Ex. 45. 



S 



^ 



I 



Ex. 46. Triplets. 




tt 



fc 







^^S 



mffl^^l ^fl 



Ex. 47. 2%e same groups in g. 



i^^^^^p^^s 




Ex. 48. 
It 



m^A 



tt 



T^= 



m- t * 



m 



=s 



P^E 



When we speak of the key of an exercise we simply mean that the tones of the exercise 
are to be found in the scale beginning on a certain pitch. Scales are either major or minor 
according to the effect which they produce on the ear. 

M. Fourth Raads' 



33 



THE FATHERLAND. 







Ch. Ser. G, page 11. 
Andante. 



Edvard Grieg. 



9 



m 



-t- 



^L 



N 



^ 



t= 



1. O God 

2. O King 
8. Let all 



of Hosts, with Thy 

of kings, with Thy 

who toil just due 



strong hand pro - 

pure might de - 

re - ceive, let 




tect our homes and Fa - ther - land ! Be Thou our shield in 

fend us from all wrong and spite. When man with man shall 

him who hires true worth per - ceive ; Let strife and bit - ter 



S 



*=f 



5E 



^A 



W+ 



:=* 



*: ^ * 

1 



:S^=t^ 



ff 
rr. t 



W^ 



Ped. 



jsk^E^EJ: 



dim. 



II 



i 



=, 



war or peace, and guide our steps till life 
strive in vain, let all Thy peace, Thy mer 
mal - ice die with faith in Thee and hope 



shall cease, 
cy claim, 
on high. 



II 



i 



Q 



IT* 



s 



te=ds&==j= 



^ 



i 



7 I=^ 



"* *= 



^ 



Hr, Fourth Reader. 



r ' > r 






r 



34 



Ex. 49. 




i 



PSfeB( 



Ex. 50. 




:& 






I 



~C" 



Pf 



Ex. 51. 





f^ 



ife 



-^-tt-J- 



:=!= 



p^ fl 



i 



The key signature shows us where Do is. In the example below, the signature' being 
formed of sharps, we know that the one farthest to the right is on Ti, or seven of the scale. 



Going down from this we come to Do : 



Ti, 



doT 



The key tone being in this 



case represented by the staff degree indicating the pitch of E, we say this is in the key of E. 
By the key of E, we mean that the notes of the exercise are to be found in the scale begin- 
ning on the pitch called E, or as we say, beginning on E. 

Mar. Fourth Reader 



ONE BY ONE. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 11. 
Adelaide A. Proctor. 
Andante. 



. 






35 



i==i 






-r ^ 



1. One by 

2. Ev - 'ry 



one the sands are 

hour that fleets so 



flow - ing, 
slow - ly 



--EJ 

One by 
Has its 



*% 



W 



-*-- 



$ 






WP 



zf 



I 



one the mo - ments fall ; Some are com - ing, some are 
task to do or bear; Lu - mi - nous the crown and 



-.1 



3EE^E 



-s*- 



33 







go - lllg 

ho - ly, 



Do 

When 



not strive to 
each gem is 



grasp them all. 
set with care. 



.[ 



I 



--- d 



^"^ 






If there is no key signature we know that Do is on the third space, or C, and the exercise 
(if major) is in the key of C. 

If tones are used that are not in the scale indicated by the key signature, they are distin- 
guished by accidentals, and are called chromatic tones. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



36 



NIGHT HYMN AT SEA. 



Felicia Hemans. 
Andante sostenuto. 
Introduction (to be hummed.) 



K. G. Thompson. 




^ss^e 



wmmm. 



& 



*=*_ 



I I i i i ' 



Urn 



$+& =F=t 



^t 



. 



T=t 



z 







-& &- 



-&*-? 



Hoi - low gusts 
Few and sad 



and 



d2: 



a 






,c? 0- 



cres. , | s 



1. Night sinks o 1 er the wave, Hol-low gusts are 

2. Stars look o'er the sea Few and sad and 



m 



-<s>- 



~^r- + 



-*-** 



. 



cave .... Thro' the gloom are 
be When all else is 



J 4- 



w/ 



CT^3^ 



U. 



* m 



te^ 



* 



Sb.L^y-y^ 



g ; , gg^'-a r - - ^ ^= 



i 



sigh- ing, Sea-birds to their cave Thro' the gloom are fly - ing; 
shroud -ed; Faith our light must be When all else is cloud - ed. 



* ": 



fe str 



FJ==2 



q 



:JZ*3%5 



Sostenuto, simple, flowing, ores , crescendo, or .:_. gradually increase the tone 

power; dim., diminuendo, or , gradually decrease the tone power; moltorit., molto 

ritardando, much retarded ; a tempo, in same speed as at first. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



3? 



L? 



3m$m$ 



cres. 

i 



<^PP 






1 T 



PP 



O! should stormscome sweep - ing, Thou in heaven un - sleep - ing, 
Thou whose voice came thrill - ing, Wind and bil - low still - ing, 






tt 



3S 



3 



11111111=! 



4=^ 



i 



e 



3 



^Ft 



r i 



t=t 



r r 



O'er Thy chil - dren vig - il keep - ing, Hear, hear, and save ; 
Speak once more, our prayer f ul - fill - ing, Power dwells with Thee ; 



/ 



Efc 



SiPi 



=f* *- 



m 



^ -^ 



O'er Thy 
Speak once 




jrrr 



O'er Thy chil-dren vig - il keep-ing, Hear, hear, and save. Hm 
Speak once more, our prayer f ul-fill-ing,Power dwells with Thee. 



^^U=JJ=^ F^ 







I 1 ji ' tS> *-&> ^ 

chil - dren vig - 11 keep- Ing, Hear and save. Hm 

more, our prayerful - till - lug, Power dwells with Thee. 



. 



-J- 



II 



fS 



r^^Ti^P^^^^PF 



-s^- 



E^i^^ 



II 



?'\>: 



s>- 



Htr. Fourth Reader. 



47206 



38 



Lord Tennyson. 
Moderato. 
mf 



BLOW, BUGLE, BLOW. 



F. W. Jones. 




k k k u k lj 



1. The splendor falls on cas -tie walls And snow-y sum-mits old in sto - 

2. O hark, O hear! how thin and clear, And thinner, clear -er, far-ther go - 

3. O love, they die in yon rich sky, They faint on hill or field or riv - 



ftf 



a=n 



2=SJz==^i3^ 



*==&: 



3^ 



cres. 



ip# 



Afefe^M 



^=M^ki 



Ff=&=$ 



k k | k k k f U k 

ry ; The long light shakes across the lakes, And the wild cat'ract leaps in glo - 
ing; O sweetand far from cliff and scar, The horns of Elf-land faint-ly blow 
er; Our ech-oes roll from soul to soul, And grow for- ev - er and for- ev - 



i 



te=* 



W 



3= 



-MHa 



ry. Blow, bugle,blow, Blow, bugle, blow, Set the wild ech-oes fly - ing. Blow .bugle, 



ry. Blow, bugle.blow, Blow, bugle, blow, Set the wild ech-oes fly - ing. Blow .bugle, 

ing! Blow, let us hear, Blow, let us hear The purple glens re-ply -ing. Blow, bugle, 

er. Blow, bugle, blow, Blow, bugle, blow, Set the wild ech-oes fly - ing. Blow, bugle, 



3 



m 



*-* 



5> 



r 



mf 






3=b 



: *=^i=F 



W=W- 



S 



i\* 



p 



hJ-J-x- 



r-r 







pp rail 



IsdEteEsk 



rrrr*w 






cres. ^ 
blow, Mow, bugle, blow, Answer, Answer, echoes, 



^r^=5j=*==JH:3 r^zg-bzj^z^-Fjz=4z^H=q- | x-|l-r I 



echoes, dy - ing. 



II 



Har. Fourth Reader 



39 



l 



Dictation. 
Oral Review (Suggestive Exercises). 

2 3 4 



& 



I 



-<$<- -&- 



o; 



j2.\\ a 



7 



I 



bfe= s: 



ill 



z? ft^ ^? g> : g z ? 



"g" 



fy-g-f g 



II 



Written Dictation. 



The key is D. The signature is : 7u * = . Where is Do in this key? The meter is ?. 



What must each measure contain in ? meter? Where does the accent fall in ? meter? The 

teacher will call attention to the dotted note J. ^ J To familiarize the ear with this effect 
the teacher may have the children sing such examples of it as occur in "America." Flat 
seven, which is also introduced here, is represented by placing a natural (fl) on Ti, or seven of 



the scale : thus 

1 



> Te, 



^ 






P^ppl 



P 



* 



^ 



m 



&- 1 - 



ii 



? 



Intervals. 

The difference in pitch between two tones is called an interval. Intervals are called 
seconds, thirds, fourths, fifths, and so on according to the number of staff degrees which are 
required to represent them. (See footnote, page 87.) 

Give practice in naming intervals from the staff. Illustration : Name these intervals : 



&"\ 



JZZ 



I 



V 



-s>- 



:^_ ^ 



S4- 

Note. In this exercise the pupils simply gain the power to distinguish intervals without 
reference to their character. The prime represented by two notes on the same staff degreo 
may be spoken of, and the fact that an actual interval may be represented by two notes on the 

same staff degree by means of an accidental, thus : 

Har. Fourth Readet 



i^Si 



40 



Vocal Drill 

Major. 



Minor. 




gPgj ^ ^l^ 



Ex. 52. 



* =, lti 



*-e=*t 



^ 



II 



Ex. 53. Ch. Ser. G, page 9. 



Sifcrf 



*U* 



*3tt^ 



d=4: 



fc* 



?* +~ 



^a 



-v 



22=2: 



x* 



tXWL 



Ex. 54. 



^^ 



& 



-++ 



Ex. 55. 



'^ 



^21 



33 



&l 



PSE3 



'sa 



3*: 



^^^^^^1 



Ex. 56. 



3= 



^EJ=feS 



"i 1 r* ^ v 



'~x 



f=r 



** * =r 

- r- f ^r i i r - 



SlJlfcs 



?#%# 



t3 



^ 



- * 



^ 



When it is desired to indicate a higher pitch on a staff degree already hearing a sharp In 
the key signature, the double sharp is used (x). 

When it is desired to indicate a lower pitch on a staff degree already hearing a flat, the 
double flat is used (b(?). 

Hr. Fourth Reader. 



41 



NEW YEAR'S EVE. 



is 




Welsh Air, "Nos Galan." 


V i z i - m - 1 1 j^ I 1 


s p P is k^-s 


I | 


&H: r J J 4J ^J* J- 


-* *b^ J=*^z 


^jZ 1 1 _ 

1. Hark! the sum-mons,come, my fel - lows, 

2. Shep-herds,quit your cares for pleas - ure, 

3. Toil and trou - ble lie be - hind us, 

4. Quick.join hands, and foot it feat - ly, 

-0. f , 


Fa la la la la la 
Fa la la la la la 
Fa la la la la la 
Fa la la la la la 


la la la, 
la la la, 
la la la ; 
la la la, 


7f-rn 


MB ' 


S N j N k 1 ' 


"1 1~ 


VT\ V * ' 




1 d r j is 


J 1 J * 


\<.\) 




m m m m ' P 


* 1 * 


O 









fife = 






fs * J is 1 is 


1 i h~cjr 


w "" 




~0 * '-0 W 


^y=^_ 


Crown your hats with hoi - 

Fish - ers, leave your nets 

Think no more of chan 

In the dance we ne'er 

f) IS 


ly ber - ry, 

and wher-ry, 

ces drea-ry, 

can wea - ry, 


Fa la la la la la la la la. 
Fa la la la la la la la la; 
Fa la la la la la la la la, 
Fa la la la la la la la la, 


y, ^ i 


i r"^ i 








r 1 1 1 


is s p \ \ 


~ 


W*f. * * J_| 


~d 


m +-* J 


^-r * J J. h 


-j f-j 


^ 1 1 






-0 * 9 J 1 


L *-z w \r* J 



4 



V 



tef 



p 



t 



'0=^- 



Hark ! the peal - ing bells that tell us, Fa la la la la 

This must be a night of lei - sure, Fa la la la la 

While the well-known strains remind us, Fa la la la la 

To the harp that sounds so sweet-ly , Fa la la la la 



la 
la 
la 
la 



la 
la 
la 
la 



la la 

la la 

la la 

la la 



la la, 

la la, 

la la, 

la la. 



s=ft 



m 



3"^ 



w 



^ 



te^fe*! 



v- 



'Tis the eve of new year mer-ry f Fa 

'Tis the eve of new year mer-ry, Fa 

'Tis the eve of new year mer-ry, Fa 

On the eve of new year mer-ry, Fa 



la la la la 

la la la la 

la la la la 

la la la la 

IS h 



la la la 

la la la 

la la la 

la la la 



la. 
la. 
la. 
la. 



^ 



s ^ 



Mar. Fourth Rtader. 



4 



-0- -0- 



42 



ROAMING. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 13. 
Rev. Dr. Trodtbeck. 
Marziale, moderate. 



Franz Abt. 




-4--*- . 

\ 

1. A- way 

2. A- way 

3. A- way 






let us roam, un - re-strain'd let us roam, a -way, a -way let us 
to the wood, to the storm-beat-en wood, a -way, a -way to the 
to the height.to the far loft - y height, a - way, a - way to the 



-0- -0- -0-. -* 



-J 



-5 



*=:* 



3=^ 



mf 



fe 



t 

roam ; 
wood ; 
height ; 

/ 



i^^B 



h * 



Mi 



f g'l'f C g'r Pt::f l 



Where in vale and on height All is wondrous bright, Where with 

Where the tem-pest is high In the lu - rid sky, Where the 

Which by close-cling-ing mist We be- hold oft kissed, Where the 
mf 



i 



g 



W^^ 



^=1 



* =r 



let 


us roam ; 


Where In 


vale 


and 


where on 


height, 


All 


is 


to 


the wood; 


Where the 


tem 


- pest 


ris - es 


high 


In 


the 


to 


the height; 


Which by 


close 


- iy 


cling - ing 


mist 


We 


be- 




31 S 



fX 



f 



i -* 0- 



dors sweet From the flow'rs we meet, Where the airs of Heaven o'er the meadows 
ech-oes sound Thro' the rocks a - round,Where the sun gleams down, showing red as 
lightnings flash, And the thunders crash.Where the sun shines out with a ros - y 



I 



W- 



: 



won-drous bright, is 
lu - rid sky, the 
hold oft kissed, be 



31 



p3 3g3=g ggg 



& 



". 



^* 



won - drous bright, 
lu - rid sky, 
- hold oft kissed. 



Two dots placed after a note increase its duration three fourths of Its original value. 
Marziale, martial, in the style of a march. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



43 






come,A-way, a - way let us roam, let us roam, a-way, a- way let us roam, 
blood, A-way, a - way to the wood,to the wood, a-way, a-way to the wood, 
light, A-way, a - way to the height, to the height, a-way, a-way to the height. 



l^^j^pp^-EEi^iESS^i^^Ppil 



Harmonic Study. 



Ex. 57. 



BE^ 



^P 



J 



1 I ' 



J 



Hrt*t^ 



V 



t=p= 






P^ 



ES 



rt 



3 



< c?-. - 



SB 



rf*l 



Ex. 58. 



rt 



u 



s 



5PjC 



tto-^- r 



: 



S^ 



- 



^U" ^ 






E2 



-C5f 



3: 



d=d 




g^i 



te 



Har. Fourth Raadar. 



g L 



3F 



E9 



tz^^E^ 



=t 



-=JT 



I! 



44 



Vocal Drill. 

To be sung from higher pitclies. 



f^ 32 



x- 



(fV^?"- 



Study of Flat Three (Contrasted with Three). 



Oh. Ser. G, page 18, Ex. 1, 2. 
Ex. 59. 



Ex. 60. 






igtl^ 



^B 



Ex. 61. 



Ex. 62. 



^^ 



W 



-^ 



^rr^-Tj-i 



ii 
ii 



Ex. 63. 



^ipil^3|^l^ a i^=^S^lH 



me, 



Ex. 64. 

4fc 



g p%3 J J.J I I I I J jj l i 



*iHi 



W ' gg 



1 



F ffi^J.lj J JU d w U 1 J J j -^ 4^MI 



Ex. 65. 



' 



(= 



i=f 



s 



ii 



Ex. 66. 



^=-1 



ftA 



a 



-< ^ 



bE3 



II 



**: 



'^ 






Har. Fourth Reade- 



Ex. 67- 



Study of Minor. 



45 




!=jl=^=tii 





The scale beginning and ending on La is frequently used. This scale gives a minor effect 
and is called the minor scale. The key signature remains unchanged, however, so that every 
key signature may stand for two keys, one major and one minor, and it is by the tone effect 
alone that we can discover that La instead of Do is the key tone. 

If the La of a minor scale has the pitch called A, we say that the exercise is in A minor, 
but if B indicates the pitch we say the exercise is in B minor, if C, in C minor, etc. 



Hr. Fourth Reader. 



46 



THE LIFT IS HIGH AND BLUE. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 10. 
Dinah Makia Mulock. 
mp Affetuoso. 



J. Sneddon. 



gB3^JB^Eg=g=^^^=;fc^ 



1. The lift is high and blue, And the new moon's shin -in' thro' The 

2. Oh! the shearers that I see There's ne'er a ane kens me, Tho' I 






*W 



fi 






t- 



-q ft fc 



bon - nie corn 
aince kent them 



stooks 
a' 



o' 
at 



Strath _ air 
Strath - air 



iy; 



My 
An' this 



=&5 



W- * 



fefe 



^ 



gE^Ep j^ g=fe^^^E^EE^ 



ship's in Lar - go Bay, An' I ken it weel, the way Up the 
fish - er wife I pass, Can she be the bon - nie lass That I 



tdt 



: 



*= 



^ 



*=fc 



-0- 



* 



*3f==& 



steep, steep brae 

met at the back 



==3 



i^^^^ 



Strath - air 
Strath - air 



=* 



* 



iy- 

ly? 



r-far-d 



When 
Oh, the 



-=1 # 



&=*=: 



Affetuoso, with tender feeling or emotion. 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



47 



I 



$F 



Q 



i^=i=i=^i 



S 



:=& 



I sail'd o'er the sea, 
land, the land is fine, 



A lad - die bold and free, The 

I could buy it a' for mine, My gowd 1 s 



I 



^ 



i^P 



-w- 



i^ 



-*s>- 



p 



I 



p 



corn, the corn grew green 
yel - low as the stooks 



at Strath - air 
o' Strath - air 



i 



:&====&=: 



=t 



ly; When 
ly; But I 







-j. 



& 



_2 



raW. 



r#d> ^ s: k r 


h ^- 


s ^ i 


/_ N _ * vj 


J J 


* s r >. - -in 


fc " * -f-^ ^-2 




* - + - w 


d J 


I come back a - gain, 
fain yon lad wad be, 


'Tis an auld man walks his lane, 
That sail'd a - cross the sea, 


Slow and 
When the 


/ 1 i 




/ b _ _ IS * 


s is ' s IS 


y~ P 1 -in 5 p J 


w * 


^ r - ^ r I k * 


tr * J W * * 


" s 


* -0 


V ^ ' 



f) h IS 






- 








^ ^"^^^ 


- 9 - 


-r-' h* 


-pa ^ 


p 


m 


-Ul 


sad thro' 
corn, the corn 


the 

grew 


fields 
green 


o' Strath 
on Strath 


- air 

- air 


I- 

ly. 


B 



# 



* 



See Chart G. page 11, Ex. 3. 
Hr. Fourth Reader. 



48 



Harmonic Study; 



Ch. Ser. G, page 17, Ex. 1 and 2 
Ex. 69. 



^^ 



T&~- 



J^M 



II 



-0- -ar rat- 



Ex. 70. 
) I- IT? 

rr 



y 4tf f f Tffl T f^ ^ /tfi I Wl i J ^ J I J ^ 

=*-F i t ) 4i -0 J -9-9-0-0 F- 8 h 1 i i L +* m -0 J -0-00~^- 1 -^ Jj 




rr^r 






H 



Ex. 71. 



a 



x 



:BET 



2^: 



:sg 



:#*t==^ 



r r i- 



-*-* 



^- r r 



-* ' 



i 



E 



* ^~ ^r|^. Hah *- 



g 



J , fi) 



3S: 



fe 



^ 



:*=>: 



m- 



e=p=r 



-a>-4-(* 







h: 







^ 







* r*- 



=r=^= 



II 



--s *- 



II 



Many exercises begin in one key and pass into another. The change is brought about by 
introducing the tones of another key, shown usually by accidentals. 

We think of each succeeding tone of the ascending scale as higher than the one before it. 
The tones at the top of the scale we call high tones ; those at the bottom we call low tones. 
This property of tones which enables us to distinguish them by the words high and low, we 
have already spoken of as pitch. % 

Har, Fourth Reader. 



49 



IN THE ALPS. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 4. 



Cornelius Gurlitt. 




1. Spar - kling gem of liq 

2. Ver - dant slopes a - round 

3. O'er the hill - side pas 

4. Feel - ino-s born of beau 



? 



uid bright -ness, 

de - light us, 

ture sound - ing, 

ty cheer us, 



Deep in 

While they 

Hear the 

Lift - ins: 



S 



:j^r 



-*- -r 



~* * 



m^m^^m^: 







Al - pine 

of - fer 

dis - tant 

ev - 'ry 



0^m 



m 



w 



moun - tains set, 

sweet re - pose; 

goat - herd's bell ; 

thought on high ; 



I- 

Lo! . their 

Wa - ters 

Hark ! Irom 

Heaven it 



& 



:- 



m 



^ 



? 



m 



t- 

sum - mits 1 
fresh and 
rock to 
self seems 



w 



= 



a. 



*=i 



dim. 



m 



pure 
rock 



y 

in 



f^ 



r= tr=r 



white-ness Makes 
vite us, With 
bounding, Far 
near us, So 



thy 
the 
the 



waves more 

charm which 

dy - ing 

spir - its 



-iy 

ture 



love 
na - 
ech - oes 
up - ward 



7" 

yet! 

knows. 

fell. 

fly! 



S^ 



w 



^P^PPi 



=t 



=t 



ii 



The pitch of tones is indicated by the staff degrees as named by the clef. A note sep- 
arated from the staff represents no pitch. In studying the representation of pitch, therefore, 
we must study the staff, rather than the notes. 

Mr. Fourth Reader. 



50 



"W. HODGBTT. 

mf 



WHEN WILL SPRING RETURN? 

J. Frank Proudman. 






iiii^E 






C ' C ' r r f* ^ * ' rrfi 

* k U k U I 



LU T -f_i. 



When will Spring re-turn a -gain, The cold winds cease to blow? 






L -0 -0 * * 



ft:=S 






;lte* 



S*S 



jh^/7 J 






te 



-&>- 



'W=0- 



When will fer - tile show'rs de - scend, The flow 'rs be -gin to grow? 



u. 



m^m ^3^3 ^^=^F^^^^^^\ 



'! 









-*=$. 



fe^=i 



t 



M 1 0- i m J & m - - * ** 



f i 



k k k ' r . " U 

When will Win - ter's frost be gone, The snow all melt a - way ? 



*&= 



? 



r 



d 



? 



H 



:*z5zat 



i^EEE 



F^ 



P 



Hi 



=*Efe 



N S 



E E-T r ~ *~r ^-u t2=t ^ == := f ==z F 



fe 



I 



When will gen - tie, gen - tie Spring a - gain Her glo-rious seep - ter sway ? 



A 



?' J J'J J-J*"?^ / J "^"" IP 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



51 



mf 



-a 



: * * 



Will the sun for- ev-er hide Be -hind the lead- en cloud, Will the 



*& 



ej r * 






^^ 







sun for ev-er hide Behind the lead - en cloud ? Will the earth for-ev -er 



U 



pt 



^3pi^l^SpS 



t=^r. 



I 



/ 



r^M 



diminuendo. 



-V * fc* 



' 



r" 



H 1 1- 



IPi 



:= 



r^Er-p-t 



k u* k l | 

wear Her dark and dis - mal shrou.1, Her dark and dis - mal shroud, Her dark and 



!=i 



EEBE5E 






Zg Z^_ 



!feA 



Oh, how I long! 



Oh, how I long! 



dis 



I * *-' r~ p i * ' I 'w | 



mal shroud P 



Oh, how I long! How I long! 






=t 



& 



^e$ee 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



52 



a4a 



-t* *- 






* N ^ 



t- 






How I long, I long to see . . That bright and hap - py day, 



-M 



ABE 



=t 



&* 



+=*! 



i*zM. 



T 



m 



^^ 



=33 



=**=i 






k k ^ ^ i* k 

How I long, I long to see . That bright and hap - py day 



u. 



P^EEf 



3t=3t 



^ 



f~** 



^=^= 



* * 



31 



i*^=* 



*-- 






*-S 



?P=? 



- ? * X- - 



5-f 



=fc 



few. 



r 



J pj*>> 



When we can cull the flow'rs, the pret - ty, pret - ty flow'rs, 




== 



d^H 



^ 



M: 



m f. 



fid 



z-rr- 



J- 



d^ F^dM^M 



?c C 



fipP^pH 



When we can cull the flow'rs, the flow'rs that bloom in ear- ly May! 



SJi 



Bfe^^^ S 



:-/ 



*tirt~^ w g g * 



ten., lenuto, sustained ; give the note its full value. 



Har. fourth Reader. 



Dictation (Oral Review). 
2 3 



53 



ffiy |u t^ M^^m^ K:^ I I >*-d ^p^B 



Written Dictation. 

The key is E. The signature is r^j frSr. Where is Do in this key ? The meter is % 

What must each measure contain in % meter ? Where does the accent fall in \ meter ? The 
features of this lesson are the divided beat and the introduction of the tone Si, or sharp five 
To familiarize the ear with the effect of the divided beat some exercises should be sung. Sharp 
five, or Si, is represented in this key by placing a sharp on five, or Sol, thus 



ih 



=* 1- 



rt:^ 1 




Intervals ( Major and Minor Seconds). 



Ch. Ser. G, page 18. 

Compare Mi, Fa, Mi with Do, Re, Do 



sung from the same pitch, thus : 



I 



v 



m 



k 




m 



P=s=tf* 



I! 



Mi, fa, mi - l - o - do, re, do. 



Do, re, do. 



Mi, fi, mi. 



Compare similarly each second of the scale with Mi, Fa, Mi. Teach the children to sing 
a major second up and down from each tone of the scale. Sing major and minor seconds up 
and down in varying order from each tone of the scale and call upon the children to tell what, 
they hear. 

1 2 3 4 5 



i 



ii 



*5> sr 



I 



#*- 



II 



II 



^fe=; 



1 



Minor seconds, up and down. 



Major second. Minor second. 



Each line and each space of a staff, with clef, is called a degree. Each degree represents 
a certain pitch. Many attempts have been made to settle upon a standard of pitch, which 
should be accepted by musicians in all countries, but the results are not entirely satisfactory 
as yet, though the variation from the standard proposed is but slight. 

Har. Fourth Read*'. 



54 



Ch. Ser. G, page 9. 
Ex. 72. 

-8 3 



Study of Rhythm. 



WL Lf t^m 



& 



B^^ 



.. 



* 



II 



Ex. 73 
I 



3^==3 



=* 



*+E 



M*j*zkL 



311 

3-- cs ' ' 



Ex. 74. 



J ^^ a a ^ ^ 



Ex. 75. 







fcdzz* 



*=* 






q=3=f 



J^e^e^: 



n-j-t 



5=f 



S3:- 



* -^ 



3^3EE5 



-=l-*- = 1- 



I 



Ex. 76. 




9 : 



fc 



=*=r 



Sfe 






^ 



-3-*-^- 



*H-ah 



Ex. 77. 



^ 



:l r 



rrr 



s 



*3=^ 



4 



.J! r-i 



3^3 



Let us suppose that the teacher, by blowing the pipe or striking the tuning fork, or piano 
key, gives the class the correct pitch for the staff degree called C 



_, and from this 



pitch as Do the class sing the descending scale; then each tone of the scale will be the normal 
or natural pitch of the staff degree on which its note stands. 

When no sharps or flats are placed on the staff degrees, the pitches which they represent 
are said to be natural, We speak of the key of C as the natural key for this reason. 



Har. Fourth Reader 



55 



yttt j n r r 



m 



-wt +- 



p 



*=d! 



S3 



=^^r 



=1 



i 



#3: 



J 



II 



Ch. Ser. G, page 15. 
Ex. 78. 



Study of Harmony. 



f 



Vi! 



r* 



tt=f 



E! 



J=^ 



mm 



at?: 



2 F-^ 



^ 



^ 



ri=* 



^ 



* fe* -++ 



sfc*: 



I 



* : ? 



BS 



^=at 



fi 



C -*z 



^^^&^=^0 



Ex. 79. 




3^3^; 






r* r IF 



ii 



4 



2 



P 



3td:3 



s 



:3 



^i^^i 



ii@ 



ipzzzpc 



-! h 



' 



= -*E*=^ 



pggllES&r=M^^ pgN*E=|: : l 



When sharps or flats occur on the staff degrees, they no longer represent the natural oi 
normal pitch, but a higher or a lower pitch, according to the characters used. 

Hr. Fourth Reader. 



56 



THE WHALE. 

(Ballad.) 



Allegretto. 



Db. Callcott. 



S 



B 



dte 



m 



^ 



s^ 



*=* 



rr 





r r * 


f 




1. 


'Twas in the 


year 


of 


2. 


Blow-hard it 


was 


our 


3. 


And when we 


came 


to 


1. 


Our mate up - 


on 


the 


5. 


Our cap - tain 


on 


the 


6. 


We struck that 


fish, 


and 


7. 


'Twas when the 


news 


to our 


8. 


The los - ing 


of 


his- 



7 r . ?-r 



eigh - ty - five, Of March the twen - tieth 
cap -tain's name, Our ship the Li - on 
that cold land, Where white snow al - ways 
top- mast stood, With a spy- in g glass in 
deck he ran, And a right smart man was 
off she went With a flour- ish of her 
cap - tain came, He call'd up all his 
'pren - tice boy Did grieve our cap - tain 




5 



day, Our gal-lant ship her . an -chor weighed, And to sea we bore a - 

bold, And we were bound to the north-ern coast, To . face the frost and 

lies, Where the storms, and cold.andthe big whales blow, And the daylight nev - er 

hand "A whale! a whale! a. whale!" he cries, "And she spouts at ev - 'ry 

he "Ov'-er-haul, overhaul, let your main tackle fall, And launch your boats to 

tail; But ah and a -las! we lost one boy, And we did not catch that 

crew, And for los - ing of his 'pren - tice boy He . down his col - ors 

sore, But the los - ing of that great big whale Did grieve our cap - tain 



:' 



=t 



J=J^ 



mm 



i 



*=!*: 



f 



way, brave boys, With a 

cold, brave boys, With a 

dies, brave boys, With a 

span, brave boys, "With a 

sea, brave boys, "With a 

whale, brave boys, With a 

drew, brave boys, With a 

more, brave boys, With a 



rr^ 



5 



fa 
fa 
fa 
fa 
fa 
fa 
fa 
fa 



la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 



la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 



la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 



la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 



la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 
la 



la, With a 

la, With a 

la, With a 

la, With a 

la, W T ith a 

la, With a 

la, With a 

la, With a 



Ballad, a story told to music. 



Har. Fourth Reader 



itm 



=x 



p i- 

m 



eM 



57 



r 

fa 



T 

I 

la 



la la 



la 



la la, With a fa 



ib=i 



J*. 



i 



la la, with 



* 

la 



I 







r 

la 



fa 



la 



la, With a 



fa 



la la 



la 



la. 



Study of Harmony. 



Ch. Ser. G. page 17, Ex. 1 to 5. 
Ex. 80. 

4- 



i 



J 



i- 



(: 



I=t 



*=$ 



-&- 



1K- 



B^H 



f=T^ 



m 



=t 



5' 



<5 



^ 



J -4- 



P 



^s: 



J- 



IS: 



& 



IZS2" 



II 



. 



=l 



II 



* 



-sp- 



-<S>- 



Ex. 81. 






' 



r 



f^EF^' 




II 



^=1 



|EEE^ES3=3= EEfeg 



The difference in pitch represented by two staff degrees is called an interval. The inter- 
val from one staff degree to the next np or down is called a step. The interval from one staff 
degree to any other not the next is called a skip. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



58 



Psalm 146. 
/ 



i?^^ 



J 4 



I WILL EXTOL THEE. 

(Anthem.) 



RlNCK. 



.stzzpfc 



d 






*= 



i 

I will ex - tol Thee, O God my King, I will ex - tol . Thee, 



5 



m 



3EE3E3 



m- 



S> -0- 



wlll ex^ 



== 



w? 



U^J- 



j j-J i ^ * ^ 



-<s>- 



&- 






I will ex - tol Thee.O God my King,and praise Thy name, and praise Thy 



i^EE^^^^z 



=t== j-L4- -h- 1 r-~1 3^=H=7 



tol Thee, ex - tol Thee, 

for ev - er and ev - er, 

4 



P 



* *~w =a * * * -*=J -5* 1m-^- F * * - 



name for ev 



J 



-* *- 



=t 



er and ev - er, for ev - er and ev - er. 

5 



-m s>- 



3 



._^_ 



for ev - er and ev - er, for ev 



s,. 



er and ev - er. 



/ 



(9 0-&. 0. 0. ms 1 1 2_ 



f=P T tri r 



l i , 



I will ex - tol Thee, God my King, and praise Thy glorious name, and 



I 



s^ 



st 



ij 



-JZL 



iS=5 



4=j 



Anthem, a vocal composition in the sacred style, set to words generally taken from the 
Bible. 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



J. 



y 



tp^=t 



59 



&= J=Je&3 =^ 



praise Thy glorious name for ev - er - more. All men shall speak of Thy might-y 



*=E 



1 



=1t 



< l * ^ * 



E^^ 



^3 



==J=S 



e*- 



They 



J== i 



acts, They shall de-clare the great-ness of Thy mer - cy. The Lord is 



1 



^ 






S 



^=5 



#-^r 



^=S 



m The Lord is 



JE 



p jLr 



K 



|0 



rs 



F 



33 



r-r. 



-2- 



r 



I? 



:p= g=i p2z; 



X=* 



nBtiat 



f= 



good un-to all that call . . up - on Him. I will ex - tol Thee, O 



I 



p 



-*-* 



++*- 



*==^I 



^3 



t* 



good, 



im 



is good to all who call up - on Him. 



/ 



55fr 



F 



P 



iifeiibkii 



*-^-^ 



ra#. 



* 



32: 



<s>- 



^ 



God my King! I will ex-tol Thee.O God my King! O God my King 



|^|Epi^^ ^Z^^ ||EJgg|p=l 



Har. Fourth Radr. 



60 



Oh. Ser. G, page 11. 
Ex. 82. 



Study of Minor. 

Ex. 83. Ex. 84. 



^^S^Bii^^fe^SpB 



Ch. Ser. G, page 11, Ex. 2, and page 23. 
Ex. 85. 







Ex. 87. 



^HEg ^fe^^ ^^E^ 



3=*= 



-r 



Ex. 88. 






!rp:^Ei|3:te 



l^l^l 






*=^ 



-e^ 



Ex. 89. 



U 



*=: 



*=: 



=E=F 



sr 



BE 



i 



j-fej J r jlJ fJ_JJ-4^ ^ 



Pi 



s &jl^cz =* 






35L 



1221 



SI 



II 
II 



*EE5^ 



-^ - 



d===T 



iN 



-j * *- 



Scale Ascending. 



t 



f < > 



* # 






Scale Descending. 



Hr. Fourth Readar 



61 



Ex. 90. 



Study of Minor. 



%^^M 



#* 






\2 



m 



4-- 



#* 



m 



&- 



3^^i^ 



?=m 



^i^^E^EplE^ 



22: 



II 



i 



3E^E^^SI 



Ex. 91. 



/?\ 









* 




^35 



4zat 



==t 



3^pS323 



x 



Eg^^g^ 



-t? 



3: 



g^j^g^^gj^^^^tegfl 



&: 



s^^^^as 



The octave is a very important interval. The name is derived from the Latin ocio, mean- 
ing eight. Each sharp or flat in the key signature affects all the octaves of the degree on 

h. 



which it is placed, thus : 



Har Fourth Reader. 



- is understood to mean E 



62 



Study of Harmony in Minor. 

Ch. Ser. G, pages 11 and 23. 
Ex. 92. 



i 



K J^ J 



wf = F = Ff =s= ?r^*^ 



t> 



-q=^: 



?* 



=j rnH : 

-0 ' 9- 



ES- 



S- 




EX. 93. 



v J 



m^ 



a 



EEEE 



E: 



ESS 



I I i 



m 



'-. * 






^=P^~ 



^Pf 



-<s>- 



EE=JEEEEJ=EE ^ tJi SgSSB^ 



II 



& 



-9- 



*EEE 



3= 



g^=Pl 



Are the exercises on this page founded on the major or the minor scale ? What chromatic 
tone occurs most frequently ? 

p, piano, softly; mp, mezzo piano, moderately softly; pp, pianissimo, very softly; /, forte, 
strong ; mf, mezzo forte, moderately strong ; ff, fortissimo, very strong. 

Hw. Fourth Reader 



63 



BLOW, BLOW, THOU WINTER WIND. 

William Shakespeare. E. J. S. Stevens. 



Andante. __ 

Blow, blow, thou win - ter wind, thou art 






thou art not so un 



33EE5 



-* ^ 



*N3^ 



^2: 



=t=t 



-V* 1 hS -^- <S>-s H 



I I I I I I 

kind . . As man's in - grat - i - tude, as man's in - grat 



i - tude. 



m -m- 



m 



pe^ees 



=t 



-SI- 



-K 



thou art not so un - kind as man's in - grat - i 



i&fe&i 



tude. 



s 



fe=F 



pp 



1 T 



PF 






T 



F=pF 



I 



Thy tooth is not so keen be - cause thou art not 



=t 



ff*=5F 



g? . 



J 



~9 *" 



Thy tooth is not 



/, 






^ 



seen, Although thy breath be rude, al 



though thy breath be rude. 



t= 



^S 



P^ttl 



gfe |p=3= = j ; 



keen be - cause tJiou art not seen, al - though Uiy breath be rude. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



64 



SINCE FIRST I SAW. 



i 



Ch. Ser. G, page 4. 
P 



Thomas Ford. 



i 



mmti?mm 



m 



t - 



P 



: r" 



r 



S^ 



1. Since first I saw your face, I re-solved To hon - or and re 

2. The sun, whose beams most glo - ri - ous are, Re - ject - eth no be 



I 



f? 



BE 



. 



# # ' ^ * ^~0- 



jfar 



S 



=t 



^ 



^ 



(8JB 



a 



E* 



d=t 



g 



F 



f^rr 



*T-=rr 







nown you:If now I be disdained, I wish My heart had nev- er known you. 
hold - er.And your sweet beauty.past compare, Made my poor eyes the bold - er. 



i 



m 



jm^_ 



-3*=JL 



r 



What, I that loved.and you that liked, Shall ay 



-j0- 
]cres. S 



atSTJfc 



j-^e 



^m 



-4 



?=t= 



i you that liked,. "Mian we be -gin to 
Where beau - ty moves, and wit de-lights, And signs of kind - ness 



wran 
bind 



gle? 
me, 



I 



&=*= 



P 






* 



Jr 



>->-j-^ 
*# 



What, I thatloved,aml you that liked .Shall we be -gin to wran 
Where beau - ty moves, and wit de-lights,And signs of kind-ness bind 



gle? 
me, 



P 



f=F 



^ 



t~t 



/J I 



rrrf 



* 



te* 



D.S. 



=F 



No, no, no, no, no, my heart is fast, And can not dis - en - tan- 
There, there, there, oh there, where'er I go, I leave my heart be - hind 



SB 



FT 



s:le. 



m 



i 



> 



* 



^sfe=^ 



^i=3 



stir 



D.iS., DaZ segno, return to the point marked by the sign :g:, and repeat from there on. 
r/, rinforzando, increase the tone power. 

* A syncopation is an interruption of the regular flow of the music produced by causing 
the acceut to fall out of the regular order indicated by the meter signature. 

Har. Fourth Readr 



65 



Dictation (Oral Review). 
2 



II 



-& zg-hs?- 



"^ 2?-^' 



II 



-* 25T 



# 



-S< <2- 



-g g= 



II 



^ <0 



II 



II 
II 



* "*r 

Written Dictation. 

The key is F. The signature is E2y& Where is Do in this key ? The meter is ^ 

What must each measure contain in 3 meter ? Where does the accent fall in ^ meter ? The 
feature of this lesson is the following rhythm J/3, which is taught by the contrast with J"H 
The teacher should familiarize the ear with this rhythm by singing some exercises which rep- 
resent it. 




Intervals ( Major and Minor Thirds). 

Ch. Ser. G, page 19. 

Compare La, Do, with Do, Mi, from the same pitch, thus : 

12 3 



^^m^^m^^^mm 



La, do, la, Do, mi, do, Do, me, do, La, do, la. 

Compare similarly each third in the scale with La, Do, and Do, Me, and tell which are 
major and which minor. 

Sing thirds, major and minor, in varying order and call upon the children to tell what 
they hear. Thus : 

.1 2 3 4 



<?, 



V- 



-a> 



fv 



II 



% 



II 



-<5>- -& -&- -&- -<9- ~&- 

If major and minor thirds are sung from the same pitch, the difference is marked ; thus, 
sing: 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



r> 



*= 



!>* 



I! 



66 



Study of Rhythm. 



Vocal Drill. 

To be sung from, various pitches. 

Hfc*u I I | I | | I I i i i 



/ #Va ! I I i i i i I 



, I 



S^gS 



_3 



- f^i! 



=^z^ 



=ttrJ=*. 



-*r+ 




Ch. Ser. G, page 13. 
Ex.94. 



E|^l^^i^^-^|^^^^^^^|1 



Ex. 95. 



<-h 



^_ g^ _g ~g 1^1^^ 



l^j 



Ex. 96. 



3E^3E 



^p^ ^E ~N 1 



Ex. 97. 



f3* 



1 



b. 



3=3==i 



:4=^: 



-e^ 



ntz^z 



-gJ- 



3tZzJ 



V 



Ex. 98 * 



fc^^l 



3_ 



*=ft* 



i_ig 



- 1 X 1 



j_. ru T 



. (~"3l3 5_i 



^SEdE- 



-* =i- 



II 



The rhythmic and chromatic teachiig of this section is fully presented and explained in 
Chart Series G. T'.ie teacher should open each lesson with a study of the chart exercises 
which illustrate the difficulty about to be taken up. 

* Three beats to a measure. 



Har. Fourth Reader, 



67 



Et. 99. 



Study in Rhythm. 



H. 



r r * * 

-\- i* i 



^P= 



$ 



n 



a- 



^^^=^^S 



I 



- F- 



S^ 



^=^1=^10 



=t==t=f= 



i^s^ 



:jf*= 



^ J J ^ i 1 X 



I! 



Ex. 100. 



5 ==^ 



S 



^^f ^^g 



zffi 



-s>- 



=t 



g^^^ 



I 



fi^^^^^^^^m 



*=p 



:= 



- g? rJ 



IB 



tzfezz: 



:zis2: 



j^ jrjj-jgj^g^a 



HH 



When several notes are to be sung to one word or syllable, the notes are united by a 



slur, thus : 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



see . The 



68 



ROSE! WHAT DOST THOU HEAR? 



Ch. Ser. G, page 11. 
Felicia Hemans. 



ii^ 



*c 



. 



1 . Rose ! what dost thou hear? Brid - al, roy - al 

2. As an ea - gle soar-ing Through a sun - ny 



ffi 



1 



rose ? 
sky, 






> d 



^ 



yt 



d: 



=1 



.. 



How, midst grief and fear, Canst thou thus dis 
As a clar - ion pour-ing Notes of vie - to 



close 




t * -h. 



:zj: 



?d2=3t 



:f=F 



t=- 



~e^ 



F=t= : 



That fer-vid look of love Which to thy heart leaf glows, That 
So dost thou kin - die thoughts For earth - ly life too high, So 






y?: 



^^^Hf 



*=4 



^ 



^ 



EE 



t= 



^ 



g^j 



fer - vid look of love Which to thy heart leaf 
dost thou kin - die thoughts For earth - ly life too 



glows ! 
high; 



1^3S 



Fr^T^^gB 



s 



=E3 



E 



3 * ~ * =* 



-*-- 



Har. Fourth Reader 



69 



m 



* 



* 



i*=^r- 



Rose ! too much ar - ray'tl For tri - urn ph. - al hours, 

Thoughts of rap - ture flush - ing Youth - ful po - ef s cheek, 






=1 



i 



=*- 



mm 



<tb- * * i 



=t 



4- 



Look'st tliou through the shade Of these mor - tal 
Thoughts of glo - ry rush - ing Forth in song to 

dz , -s 



bowers, 
hreak, 



3 



:=?s=): 






a 



= 




1* h h 



^__JL_^z 



6 T 1 



:K=d 



Not to dis - turb my soul, Thou crown'd one of all flow'rs! Not 

But find - ing the spring - tide Of rap - id song too weak, But 



KJ -*- " - -* ^ ^ 



;^^ 



^^ 



fr-Fj 88 ^ 



r 







* 



to dis - turb my soul, Thou crown'd one of all . . flow'rs I 

find - ing the spring-tide Of rap - id song too . . weak. 



^^3T ^ ^^3&S*=&=s=se& 



Xa> Fourth Rcaoat 



70 



THE SILVER SWAN. 



Orlando Gibbons. 



I 



(Si 



=t 



S3^ 



' 



g 



I 



The sil - ver swan, 



who liv 



in had no 



I 



ffiE 



:< 



S^ 



^ -33=^ ^=1 



The 



sil - ver swan, who liv - ing, liv - ing had no 



a 



ffi^ 



=t 



zzfc: 



The sil - ver swan, 



who 



liv 



ing> had no 



i 



&=? 



V=t 



r 



-++ 



note, 



When death ap-proach'd un - lockMher si - lent 



I 



$=F 



v 



P^^^=^ 



3 



s?_ 



note.When death approach'd un 



lock'd 



her 



lent 



I 



m 










-=- 



F^P^E^F^ 



fa 



note, When death approach'd.When death approach'd unlock'd her si - lent 



3 



r P T& > . 



g 



p!EE? 



I* F 



throat, Leaning her breast, lean - ing her breast 

* ' a - 



l 



: *=*-=F=^=E 



r 



E 



a - gainst the reed - y 

f T r 



Lean - ing her breast a - gainst . . the reed - y shore, 



W=& 



throat, 



I 



r- 



*z=jL 



sn 



3 



h r 



*=*: 



throat, Leaning her breast 



a-srainstthe reed 



shore, 



Har. Fourth Reader 



71 



/.. 



2=E 



-F 



3=^^s^3=3 



i 



shore, Thus sung her first and last, and sung no more: Farewell, all 



: =*=*=Ce3 



Sung her first and last, her first and last, and sung no more : 



Fare- 



S 



: 



= ==|: 



3=t 



-*- 



* w-r~ai - 



-+-9+- 



Thussung her first and last, and sung 
P. 



no more : Farewell, all 
/ 



&=*=t : 



S? 



^e^s 



joys, Fare -well, all joys, 



O death, come close my 



}} 



^^ 



fe 



F 



^m 



d= 



*=^ 



-<s>- 



It=E 



well, all joys, O death come close my eyes, 



--'- 



1 



t=tzj* M 



joys 



O death , come close 



my eyes, 



1*. 



2= 



-# r*^ m- 



--t=& 



II 



eyes, 



More geese than 8 wans now live, more fools than wise. 

/ 



q^J 



S3 



More geese than swans live, more fools than wise, more fools than wise. 



& 



i 



* 



:s2_ 



uZM 



^^-T 

More geese than swans now live, more fools 

Har. Fourth Reid*f. 



II 



than wise. 



72 



Study in Harmony. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 17. 
Ex. 101. 






3^^5 



3^S3E5 



II 



s=p 



tru- 



=t 



o. 



The G clef indicates the position of the letter G, P% g The clef itself is a modified 
Gothic G. The letter above G is A, and the one below is F. The letters follow in alphabetical 

order, but only the first seven letters of the alphabet are used : jji 

It has been found that all objects which emit sound are in a state of motion. This motion 
is called vibration. As the rapidity of the vibration increases, the pitch of the tone rises. 

The scientist Helmholtz found by the use of fine instruments that fewer than sixteen vibra- 
tions a second produce no sound that the human ear can detect, and that from sixteen vibra- 
tions a second the tone steadily rises in pitch, until at thirty -eight thousand vibrations the tone 
is again inaudible to the average human ear, though certain animals have been found to hear 
sounds produced by a still higher number of vibrations per second. 

For the purposes of music the tones produced by not fewer than forty nor more than four 
thousand vibrations per second are employed. 

Har. Fourth Reader 



LADYBIRD. 



73 



Andante. 



cr ^0. ^. ^. ^0. 



5? 






Come, 
Go, 
Fly, 



K. 

La 
La 



dy 



bird, 
bird, 
bird, 



and 

fly 

a 



i==*r=^ 




* 



sit 
home, 
cross 



you 
fly 

the 



down 
home, 
hedge, 



Up 

Tis 

To 



on my 

all on 

neigh - bors 



as: 



1 






3 



J \+. + 



35 




i~l 5- > P f^T 

hand, up - on my hand, 

fire, your children cry 

there, to neighbors there, 



Be sure I will 
So sore-ly, oh, 
Be sure they will 



r5*T< 



r r ?? * 

not harm you ; I could not 
so sore-ly! The spi-der 
not harm you ! They could not 



I 



I^^^IF^-^ 



s 



E^iiJ 



ta: 



3 ; 



=^ 



iEEfefe 



T 



f* 



* f. u r l u 



d*= 



u# ^ " - k U* ^u 

hurt such pret - ty things, I on - ly want to see your shin-ing 

spins them round a - bout, Go, La - dy- bird, and take them 

hurt such pret - ty things, They on - ly want to see your shin-ing 



# 



=*E 



=t 



pczzt 



3 1* 



m 






<5 



?=3 



=f 



33=3 






;- 



Sl 



P^fT^ 



r 

wings, Your shin - ing, 
out, Your chil - dren, 

wings, And greet them, 



your 
your 
and 



shin - ing 

chil - dren 

greet them 



Wf 



r 



wings 
cry 
all 



so 
so 
so 



pret - ty ! 
sore - ly ! 
pret - t y ! 



Har. Fourth Reader 



si^fs^r^f 



3= 



II 



74 



Minor Study. 



Vocal Drill. 
Minor. 



_ , i i I i. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 11 
Ex. 102. 



'*! 






&S 



d= 



J 



m 



3= 



Ex. 103. 



iEg^p^^^^sy^^ 



Ex. 104. 



Ex. 105. 



EfHiPii 



*a 



t^ 



P^3=33^ 



Ex. 106. 



<l 



EI3 



^ 



*-**- 



+->-+ 



J.J** 



^2 ^^"-n-i 



Ex. 107. 



3 



m||=S 



59 



fe 



Ex. 108. 



Chromatic Study. 

Ex. 109. Ex. 110. 



'-2 



:j2 



l= 



* 



gfe^^fe^a 



Ex. 111. 



Ex. 112. 



Ex. 113. 



|g^ g=Bj|^ ^ g=Hg| ^^3^i pp 



Har. Fourth Reader 



75 



Study in Harmony. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 16. 
Ex. 114. 






a 



^S 



zz: 



* 



=?5 



"'* 






II 



^r-r+^P^^r^ r ^P^f 



i 



ii 



^ 



si 



^9=? 



S 



i s- 



Ex. 115. 



aggfe iie 




It has been ascertained by careful experiment just how many vibrations per second will 
produce each tone of the scale, and a rule has been found by which the vibrations for the 
other tones of the scale can be found from a given pitch. 

Thus if we say that 



cf 



is produced by a body vibrating at the rate of two hundred 



and fifty-six times a second, high C 

five hundred and twelve vibrations. 
Har. Fourth Reader. 



will be produced by just twice that number, or 



76 



ROCKABY, LULLABY. 

( A Cradle Song.) 



J. G. Holland. 

pp ( Closed lips.) 



H. ERNE8T NlCHOL. 




1. Rock - a - by, 

2. Rock - a - by, 

3. Rock - a - by, 

( Closed lips.) 

I 



lull 
lull 
lull 



4 i I J- i J 1 i 




a - by, bees in 
a - by, rain on 
a - by, clew on 

X 



the clo - ver! 
the clo - ver! 
the clo - ver ! 



r 



*== 



=* 



= 



2E 



3=3 

- 9 m- m- 



Croon - ing so drow - si - ly, cry 
Tears on the eye - lids that wa 
Dew on the eyes that will spar 



ing so 
ver and 
kle at 



f 



T 



low ! 
weep ' 
dawn 






m 



j 2~ t 



& 



Kt 



-i=t 






Rock - a - by, 
Rock - a - by, 
Rock - a - by, 



V 

lull 
lull 
lull 



^* 



dear 



by, 

by, bend 
by, dear 



-* E- 

lit - tie 
ing it 
lit - tie 



rov 
o 
rov 



v- 

er ! 
ver, 
er! 



=t 



r- 1 - 



Har Fourth Reader 



77 



:=&=^: 






if ^ If > f 

Down in - to won - der - land go ! . 

Down on the moth - er world sleep ! 

In - to the still - y world gone ! 
Ik 



jj," * if if ^ i* 

Down in - to won - der-land, 

Down on the moth - er world, 

In - to the still - y world, 




Down to the un 

Down on the oth 

In - to the lil 



* * y u 

der - land, Down in - to 
er world, Down* on the 
y world, In - to the 



If 
won 
moth 
still 



der - land, 

er world, 

- y world, 



i 



? 



3= 



^ 



i 




* 



^ 



:=* 



f 

Down to 
Down on 



f 



^ ' If if if k 

the un . der - land, Down in - to 

the oth - er world, Down on the 

- to the 



If 
won 
moth 
still 



q 1 

der - land, 
er world, 
y world, 






v r 

won - der - land, go, O 

oth - er world, sleep, O 

lil - y world, gone, O 



go! . 
sleep ! 
gone ! 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



78 



FAITH. 



F. StLCHER (1789-1860). 



kk 



d=* 



I I 



f f t 



=t=t 



r r 






What joy on earth is sweet - er, What hap - pi - ness so great, 
As un - to God our Fa - ther, Our lives to con - se - crate ? 



&3^ 






3==t 



3^^ 



^ 



d _ -j .J! 



h=t 



'mm^m^kB 



i 



We know that we are near Him Wher - ev - er we may rove, For 



fci5 



-- 



3=i=t=s^ 



^ 







p 



s 



55 



Spa 



*^^ 



though no eye can see . . Him The heart can feel His love. 



s/ 



I3EET: 



i=3^^^3=j^=| 



mm 



If we remember what we learned about the octave, we are able to understand why the 
natural is used in this case when we wish to make the staff degree represent a higher pitch 



n ^ . The flat which is canceled by the natural appears on the octave of the 



Sol, fl, sol. 
staff degree affected. 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



79 




Dictation (Oral Review). 
2 8 



221 



=feE^^|iE?J= 



? 1K1}* 



II 



-** <s>-^ 



I 



Written Dictation. 



r$% 3 

The key is G. The signature is F gj- . Where is Do in this key ? The meter is q. 
What must each measure contain in ^ meter ? Where does the accent fall in ^ meter ? 



i 



A 



z&. 










sS ~ 



=MB 







^^T^ g^^ ^^-^ : : feH 



i 



Intervals (Perfect and Augmented Fourths). 
Ch. Ser. G, page 20. 
Compare Do, Fa, with Fa, Ti, from the same pitch, thus : 



II 




II 



#* 



-&- -&- 



-&- -&- 



*= 



Compare similarly each fourth in the scale with Do, Fa, and find if possible the aug- 
mented fourth, and then sing the augmented fourth from each tone of the scale, and a perfect 
fourth, where the augumented fourth would naturally appear. See Chart G, page 20. 

Note the tendency of the voice to progress to Do from Ti (Fa, Ti Do ). Note also the 
tendency to progress to Mi from Fa ( Ti, Fa Mi ). This tendency to certain progressions or 
succession of tones in melodies is called voice leading. In good melodies the voice leading con- 
forms to the natural tendency of harmonic movement. 

Sing to the" pupils repeatedly until the interval is instantly recognized, such combinations 
as the following : 



8 (Two voices.) 




ga3-jr 



Note that the effect produced by combining these tones as in 3 is one of finish or ending, 
hence we may look for this interval at the close of a phrase. 

The pitch of D will be found by multiplying the number of vibrations required for C by |. 
E will be found by multiplying the same number by f, F by f, G by g, A by , B by y, and 
C by 2, as previously given. 

Hr. Fourth Reidr. 



80 



Chromatic Study. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 17 
Vocal Drill. 




Ex. 116. 



Ex. 117. 



g . J , I 



Lfefe^ 



* *- 



? h li^^Ui 



II 



Ex. 118. 



=& 



t=f 



Ex. 119. 



?2I 



P^=E 



b 



^ 



-+P~ 



II 



Ex. 120. 



Ex. 121. 



;^sii 



Ex. 122. 



^Ip^p^^S 



=J=ta 



Mi, fa, mi. 



Sol, la, sol. 



Ex. 123. 



spig^i^ri 




The first note of any scale is called the key note. The staff degree on which it occurs 
gives it its name. Thus a scale having its first note on the second line would be the key 



of G. 



o ^ 



1 



If the staff degree on which the first, or key note, of the scale occurs bears a sharp or flat 
in the key signature, the fact is indicated by adding the word sharp or flat in giving the name of 

the key. Thus a scale beginning on B (third line ) in this case p yftjk-gg => ^--^ 

'-^Y <??s 

would be the key of B flat. 

War. Fourth Reader 



81 



Ex. 124. 



Study in Harmony. 



=hP=*$ 



f-~*-\ fr 



&:eE 



:[=tt 



: P=S : 



^^g^^^^^gg^^^^ 



H- 



I 



=t 



^& 



^ * ^ 



aa 



SE 



? 



-* * 



= *' 



I 



i=^ii=0 



f^3ES^E3ia^EKiE3SEgEEfc 



S? -* 



Ex. 125. 



ffl^: 



* * * * * ' d J d . * . iF~ L S * 



=CT 



i 






^r^tt-** 







a 



5 



J J ^ I J-T 3 



a 



3E 



P= * F= 



II 



I 



P 



3E=PpJ^Eg 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



82 



ON THE SEA. 



G. Donizetti. 




1. Oh, what joy to be Out on the shin - ing sea, Row-ing in time to our 

2. Sea' birds hov-er-ing Round us on snow -y wing, Show their de-light at . . 



! ^!?ll^^|^^^^Sp|p:i| 



~%)k *. T x "1 


1 - 


1| fr-, 




s h I s 1 


fir* ^ J^ frf-fc *- J 


J rV- 


r*^ # J- 




^_ J *_ 


song, sung so mer - ri - ly ! .Hearts so full of glee, 
hear - ing the song we sing, Sun - beams shim-mer - ing 


From care and 
Gold on the 


<tti+ 






r* s _ 


_ K 1 


<?r* IS "t 1 b 


~fe "ft 


1 T 


-J- ^-+- 


-* P 8 JM 


W J J J' 


tJ^z^zzMzzd 


* * 





* 


L J 



w^^^^^^^^^m 



trou - ble free, Light as the zeph - yr that rip - pies the sea. 
wa - ters fling, Bright - er by far than the crown of a king. 



*=*= 



=*C 



t=aE 



* 



^_ L __ t __ jL ___ 1 _ 



"*-! ZjfT 



m 



B 



* *0- 



Row, 



row, we can not grow wea - ry, Row, row, we're 



V 



^ 



~ 



* d IF 



= 



- L -*i * D 

Kar. Fourth Reader. 



83 






It J * fr 



S^3 



=P 



i=^^i 



fc- 



=S*= 



I 



strong and we're cheer - v, Sing and row, 



sins and row. 



^^Ei 



~m W 



EEESe 



=32: 



3^ 



*-* 



^11 






Oh, what joy to be out on the shin - ing sea, Row-ing in time to our 




=*: 



* w 



F5 



* * 



^=^=^ 

-*- 






; 



^=^: 



-+*- 



^^ 



song sung so mer - ri - ly ! Hearts, so full of glee, From care and 



# 



^z===^=tJzr-E^ 



^m 



d^3 



^=3=P?-^-3 



BB^^^^ 



- fc- 



-> - f> - 

J^ J w- 



EEEE 



II 



trou - ble free, Oh, what joy to be out on the sea! 



t^S 



~ 



== 



H 



:i: 



I s 



II 



Htr. Fourth Reader. 



84 




Con molo. mf 

-em 



FORM OF PUREST SPLENDOR. 

Felix Mendelssohn. 



t: 



3 



*= 



* 



1. O form of pur -est splen-dor To mor-tal sight re-vealed; "Whose 

2. To thee shall ev - 'ry na - tion One day their serv - ice bring, While 



^^^EEJJEE^ 



3^ 




ac-eents soft and ten- der Tlie sweetest charm can yield, The sweetest charm can 
dark dis- sim - u - la - tion And er - ror far they fling, And er - ror far they 




yield ; Thy love-ly face we see, 
fling. Then peace, and rest, and joy 



O Truth, and bow to thee. 
Shall hap-py hours em-ploy, 



S 



\^8-. 



:*=: 



m 



= 



m 



-4>- N^ ! 



^ 



R 



:* 1- 



- * * 



> 



-*** 



O Truth, O Truth, and bow to thee, and bow to 
Shall hap- py hours em-ploy .Shall hap-py hours em 



/ 



:*: 



5t 



2rf 



:*=: 



To thee we ev - er ren-der Our hom-age full and free, Our hom-age 

And storm-y ag - i - ta-tion No more the world an -noy, No more the 




Our horn - age full 
No more the world 



and free, Our 

an - noy, No 



Con moto, with motion, not dragging. 



Har. Fourth Reader 



85 



? 



SS 



~\ i F- 



dim. pp 



N ^ g^^Pa 



full and free, Our homage full and free, Our hom-age full and free, 

world an-noy, No more the world an - noy, No more the world annoy. 






i^^ 







l=E 



d 



^ ^=s ^% 



m 



hom 
world 



age free, 
an - noy, 



Study of Rhythm. 



Ex. 126. Ch. Ser. G, pages 15 and 16. 



m 



& 



-_ \-rn- 



33 



i 



i 



PfS&- 



S:3: 







K 



-n 



Wj jLQ J ifl 






f=X; 



zzins: 



r*-h 



:jfc*: 



tr sjH" 



Sill 



r rr 



r- 






F 



Ex. 127. 



Iii^i^^^^^^pn 



=t 



^ 



3h* I ?|*^iEg~ 



Hr. Fourth Reader. 



86 



BY THE BROOK. 



1. On ward 


gen - 


tlv 


still 


be 


flow 


'i. In the 


shades 


with 


flow'rs 


A - 


houl, 


3. May thy 


niur - 


mar 


low 


be 


bring 


Andanlino. 













ing, 

us, 

ing 



Franz Abt. 
Brook, that 
Brook, we 

Friend - ly 







f>& 



1. On - ward gen - tly still be 



2. In 



the shade with flow'rs a 



3. May thy mux - mur low be 




=fc 



=te 



x 



dost be - side . 
lay us down 

sleep our eyes . 



P 



me 
by 
to 



wind, 
thee ; 
close ; 



-fri -1 
is * 


N 

* - 


*= 




- 1 




t- 


F ^"~ 






=jy- 


in 


flow - 

bout 

bring 


f- 
-V 

ing. 

us, 

-ing 


Brook, 
Brook, 
Friend - 


0~r 

that 
we 


dost 

lay 

sleep 


i 

be - 

us 

our 


side 

down 

eyes 


me 

by 

to 

h - 


-f 

wind, 
thee ; 
close ; 

1 


^5= 

Through the 
Have not 
And the 


= 1 


- 


-0 


J 

0~ 


-m- 


==* 


-J 


HZ^ 








1 fS- 

* 





mead 



'ry 

thy Joy 
be - side 



Through the flow . 

Have not thou 

.May the birds 

ores. ^^ 



ows go 
with - out 
thee sing 



ing. Bend thy 

us, Glad as 

ing Give the 




m 



flow . 
thou . 
birds 



=s=* 



r 



flow - xy mead - - ows go 

thou thy joy with - out 

birds be - side thee sing 



d 



ing, Bend thy 
us, Glad as 
ins: Give the 



3? 



ifc^E 



'ry 

thy 

be 



mead 
side 



ows go 
with - out 
tbee sing 



ing, Bend thy 
us, Glad as 

ing Give the 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



87 




it 



course 
thou . 
wea 



the wood to find, 
art let us be, . 
ry heart re - pose, 



3* 



=t 



course the 
thou art 

wea - ry 



wood . 
let . , 
heart , 



=Jt 



to find, the wood to find, 

us be, yea, let us be, . 

re - pose, the heart re - pose, 




Thro' the flow - 'ry mead - ows go 

Have not thou thy joy with - out 

May the birds be - side thee sing 



=T 



ing, Bend thy 
us, Glad as 

ing Give the 



i 



~ r TT<> * JL g^ ^ 



I 



H 



r 



$ 



t i i 







<9- 



-1 



mm 



course 
thou . 
wea 




the 
art 



wood to find, 
let . us be. . 
heart re - pose. 



3 



I 



3=* 



3^5 



course the wood 
thou art let . 

wea - ry heart 



3=3F 



to find, the wood to find, 
us " be, yea, let us be. 

re - pose, the heart re - pose. 



Hr Fourth Reader. 



88 



Vocal Drill. 

To be sung from higher pitches. 



|j^ ^ |gE~^* ^-HN l 



Ch. Ser. G, pages 11 and 13. 
Ex. 128. 



Ex. 129. 







=* 



^^ ^m 



Ex. 130. 



Azitzt 



pgg^^g 









^^eJ==3 



*- 



3 



a*--*-* 



a 



II 



Ex. }31. 



3ES^3 



3^ 



^g^E 



-8 



S 



z^jt 



>- 



f 



mi 



The interval from any tone of the scale to the next above or below is called a second; but 
if we examine this exercise we shall find that seconds are not all alike, 



I 



:jt=^ 



?o 



=*== 



for no chromatic tone can be placed between three and four or seven and eight of the scale, or 
in other words, the staff degrees lettered E and F, and B and C, represent pitches nearer to- 
gether than the others do. 

If 256, the vibrations required for C, be multiplied by f we have 288, the vibrations re- 
quired for D. 288 256 = 32. If we m lltiply 256 by f- we have 320, the vibrations required 
for E, or 32 vibrations more than D. But multiplying 256 by f we have 341^, or the vibrations 
required to produce F, a difference of 21 1 vibrations, showing a lesser difference between E 
and F than is found between the other tones. 

Fowth Reader- 



Study in Rhythm. 



89 



Ex. 132. Ch. Ser. G, page 15 






^E^-t**- 



Ee3=PeJ 







Se 



3=q 



^ S>- 



:^z 



1 1 ^ -j-i-*- 



3=S 



ii==ZZ 



ll 



S 



"* #" 



Ex. 133. Ch. Ser. G, page 18. 



8 









fi 
II 



2 



^=* 



-*-* 



3E 



r- 



M= 



^= 



s* 



*^=W- 



^ 



5 



^ 



^EJEEEE^i^^g 



q: 



fT * 3 



P 





fep=T5- 



E^I^p^3=2=I 



^ -j # 



Hr. Fourth Reader. 



90 



Vocal Drill. 



Ch. Ser. G,.page 7. 
Ex. 134. 



S^ 






m 



d 



J^-r-i 



ll 

II 



^=E=F 



f T 



I 



P 



2 



WW* 



i?-*- 



Ex. 135. 



-a 



=Z&1 



=k 



3^ 



H"j- 



*fe 



m 



s 



^ 



iHU 



Ex. 136. 



I 



P* 



SES^^EE* 






r^ 



3fc 

fcfi: 






=l==l 



-i 






*=3=^: 



d^5 



H3 



r 



~4 






asT 



1 fl 



r 



I 



II 



p 



:5= 



as 



ir* *-*- 



^k i ni ~ -A- -^- ir + *> ' 



%- 



The seconds between C and D, and D and E, are called major or large seconds, while the 
seconds between E and F, and B and C, are called minor seconds. 

Har. Fourth Reader 



91 



EARLY SPRING. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 11. 
Andante. 



Robert Schumann. 



-j* a, = ^t -i* ^ i* *i-i 



' * 

1. O ten - der green of ear - ly spring, On trees and hedge - rows 

2. O sweet - est hue of Na - ture's dress ! O prom - ise bright of 

3. And when a robe of liv - ing green On long - hid fields a 

4. When life is sad and drear to me, And friend - ship fails in 




=|t 



rfic 



==ft 



r* 



=* 



=* 






mf 



^ I* 



^ 



:?=* -* + 



p*-- 



5 



w 2 2 s s 

bios -som-ing:Wel-come to me thy beau-ty rare, Wea-ry of win - tei-, 
fruit- fulness ! How ma- ny hearts will gain from thee Hope of a fu - ture, 
gain is seen, Then from the ice - im - pris-on'd soul Oft will its chill - y 
sym - pa - thy, Na - ture a se - cret balm can give, Help - ing her wounded 




^f^^P^-^*%te?=S 



:|S=fc: 




P 

bleak and bare, 

fair and free, 

bur - den roll, 

child to live, 



^ k 

ry of win 

Hope of a fu . 

Oft will its chill 



ter, bleak 
ture, fair 
y bur 



Help - ing her wound - ed child 



and 

and 

den 

to 



bare, 
free! 
roll, 
live. 




When we begin onr scale on Do we place the minor seconds between three and four ( Mi, 
Fa) and seven and eight (Ti, Do) without any thought about it whatever, and the scale which 
we thus give is called the major scale on account of the arrangement of the seconds in it. 

Hsr. Fourth Reader. 



92 



Allegretto, 



SOLDIER, REST ! 



James Thomson. 



>ol - dier, rest ! thy war - fare o'er, 

[unts-man, rest ! thy chase is done : 



llW j-i 



r 



thy 
thy 



Sleep 
While 



tlie 



5P* 



j, jJJ^j a'J.'J' J-U j, 



m 



-* aF 



= 



-h- 



ate 



:^c 



71 






*=* 



r~T* 



sleep that knows not break - ing. Dream of bat - tied 

slum - brous spells as - sail ye. Dream not with the 



f-4 



sr 



FIf^ 



w 



' -L. 



* 



1*1 



Jfc=fe 



f5? 



, 



r-r 



^W 



=t 



fields . no more, 
ris - ing sun 



Days of dan - ger, 

Bu - gles here shall 



3= 



* *. 



d. W 



=1 



=i=d=fEgB 



Days 
Bu 



of dan 
glesliere 



ger, 
shall 



nighte, . . 
sound, . . 



yyfee^ 



#? 



1 r 

nights 
sound 



1 r 



=3= 1 J.gn 



->-=-> 



of wak-ing, of wak - ing. 
re-veil - 16, re -veil - le. 






d 1 J 



In our isle's en - chant-ed hall, 
Sleep ! the deer is in his den ; 



a 



~ J -^ * - * W Y d 






nights of 
3ound re 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



93 






1 p p H~W~ 

Hands un - seen thy 
Sleep ! thy hounds are 



-T3-J* i -f^-4 

-j~ f f 4 4 ! ^E 



t 



^ 



i 



i 



couch are strew - ing, Fair - y strains of 
by thee ly - ing ; Sleep ! nor dream in 




rau - sic fall, 
von - der crlen 

=f 



Ev' 
How- 



ry sense in slum 
thy gal - lant steed 



ber dew - ing, 
lay dy - ing, 






^=5=^: 



fv 3- 



m 



i=& 



l^=JF 



dfe 






&>. ' <5>-r 



jj 



Ev' - ry sense in slum 
How thy gal - lant steed 



ber 
lay 



dew 



ing. 
ing. 



3==3=^m 



**= 



Ev' - ry sense in slum 
How thy gal - lant steed 



PP 



ber 
lay 

thy 
thy 



Gh-r 

dew 
dy 

war 
chase 



-S^- 
ing, 
ing, 



fare 

is 



S 



* 



3? 



fe^S^ 



Sol - dier, rest! 
Hunts - man, rest! 



thy 
thy 



war - fare 
chase is 



1X1 



3-3 g- 



-3-3- 



=i* 



3-3- 



-33- 



= 



-3-3- 



dew - 
dy - 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



ing. 
ing. 



**- 



94 



*$EJEi 



J^i 




?m?m 



o'er, Dream of fight - ing fields 

done, Think not of the ris 



no more ; 
ing sun, 



*t 



*: * 



as 



^S 



3 



la 



If*- 



SEE* 



see 



> J- 



-^ 



H*E 



* 



*: 



r 

Sleep the sleep that knows not break - ing, 

For at dawn - ing to as - sail ye 



3^^ 



w 



-=r 



=t 



S 



^3== 



Solo ad lib. 



*fcfe 



toe 



A 



XT 



Morn 
Here 



-i a 



hp 



* 
* 



of 



r 



I 



d^F*- 3^- 



toil 
bu 



*fc 



nor night 
gles sound 



f tr- 

of wak - ing, 
re - veil - le, 



-=( =- 



==r= 



g^3Eg 



. 



355^f 



1 1 






pp 



3?3 



^H 



Morn of toil, nor night of wak 
Here no bu - gles sound re - veil 



ing. 
16. . 



^Sfe^^3^^ 



d^g^g 



-x * 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



95 



Dictation (Oral Review). 

Pupils name the intervals which the teacher sings, after the tones are named. 
12 3 4 5 6 7 



i=lpi=[]i^i|sll^| 



m 



II 



s 



10 







-& a- 



\?$EEk- 



p^Ks-^r iks. 



II 



11 



12 



jza ^g^ l 



13 



14 



15 



16 




II 



II 



II 



II 



: T- 



1*- 



srll-s=- 



iH^ 



2Z? =22- 



Written Dictation. 

The character called the natural or cancel ( jj ) is used to remove the effect of a sharp or 
flat that precedes it. If, for instance, we wish to remove the effect of a sharp, which causes 
the staff degree to represent a higher pitch, we apply a natural ; thus restoring the degree to its 
natural condition. If we wish to represent a still higher pitch than a sharped staff degree 
indicates, a character known as a double sharp ( x ) is used. 

The following dictation exercises are intended to illustrate the principle. The key is E. 



The signature is 



The meter is ?. Te, or flat seven, is produced by placing a ton 



the staff degree which stands for Ti, or seven of the scale, thus : p y ( |JLQ g i The natural 



Te. 



thus removes the effect of the % in the signature. Ri or sharp two is indicated by the double 
sharp x as this staff degree already bears a sharp in the key signature. 



F^Mta 



<* 



4 



x# 



U 



Pipilii^isliH 



B 



B| ^g^=3^ 



.(,*- 



ffe gife^i 



J&1 



-' 



& 



tt: 



II 



Kar Fourth Raider. 



96 



Intervals (Perfect and Diminished Fifths ) , 

Compare Do, Sol, with Ti, Fa, ( see chart G, page 21 ). 
1 




Compare similarly each fifth of the scale with Do, Sol. But one diminished fifth will be 
found. Its effect is so marked as to be unmistakable. Note the tendency of the voice to fall 
back on to Mi ( Ti, Fa, Mi ). Sing the interval in the opposite order and note the tendency of 
the voice to move from Ti to Do, ( Fa, Ti, Do ). This tendency of the melody to progress in 
certain directions must be regarded in original writing. When melodies conform well to these 
leadings, as they are called, the effect is very satisfactory to the trained ear. Sing to the pupils 
repeatedly until the effect is entirely familiar and can be quickly named. 

1 2 3 ( Two voices.) 

*> 




S|ti#pi 



The effect of close or ending produced by such combinations of tones as the above is called 
cadaence. 

Variations in the minor scale are made by means of accidentals, and major scales may be 
modified by accidentals so that while Do continues to be the key tone, the effect of the minor 
scale is perfectly evident. 



Rhythmic Study. 



Ch. Ser G, page 15. 



Ex. 137. 



1- 



EifM; 



~(S=ZM 



*st 



1:22=5=: 



Ex. 138. 



ign^s 






I 



8= 



-4 *^* 



zt 



m 



m 



d _ J ft =4 



igppiigiigSS 



Taking the scale beginning on C, and considering C to be Do, descend to La, and taking 
that for the first note of the scale, sing to La, and note the effect. 



m 



m 



^s> a g=gE 



Z2S>Z 



-**-*= 



a-cr 



&1=L 



:=>-*- 



~i"P c~ 



g-p - 



The difference in these scales is due to the arrangement of the minor seconds in them. 
The second or La scale is called minor. Whenever the position of the minor seconds of a scale 
is changed, the effect is felt at once; and we usually recognize the change as being from major 
to minor, or minor to major, as the case may be. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



97 



WANDERING. 

(Rhythmic Study.) 



Joyfully. 



Franz Schubert (1797-1828). 



i==^^^^i^^^i^ 



To wan - der is the mill - er's joy, To 

a little louder. 



softly. 



:fc 



-*-*- J * - 



* f 



:f=*=J: 



der, to wan - der. He must a wretch-ed 



fe=g=P^f^ q^Mh * 



:fe *--*=^=^==^Hk 



- * *- 



^ ^^^ jEE 




mill - er be, Who nev - er cares the world to see, To 

sq/%. 



-0- m -+- 



:^^ =B 



^t 



wan - der, to wan - der, to wan - der, to wan - der. 



Ex. 139. 



=a=t 



^33^ 



= 4- 1 i 



-* % * =1- 



r^trr^f- ett 5 



* si * =1- 










^F^F 



3^* 



vfe- 



R 



^ ^ -^ ulj r fr r- 



i 



II 



=t 



M 



ssi*" =?: 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



98 



Vocal Drill. 



UgJzJlJ^JJijJI 



Ch. Ser. G, pages 11 and 17. 
Ex. 140. 



Dl, rl, me, ra. 



Antonio Caldaba. 




^ 



f= 



t= 



E33^i 



2SZZZI 



tJN 



t=*3 



3= M=r- 



=&=t 



gffi 



* m 



Ambhozio Minoja. 



^fe^S^l 



^ 



=t 



=F -*-^ E 



j pjY r-^^^ 



-* -- 



1 



^-o- 



e>" 



II 
II 



c - 



# 



i=4 



it* 



^ g=^ f-- ^ | 



-*- 



Hpi 



-js^- 



E2 



-e>- 



** 



m 



We found that in the normal minor scale a minor second occurs between two and three 
and between five and six (counting La as one of this scale). This arrangement of minor' 
seconds is varied frequently, and another minor second produced. Thus the seventh tone of 
this scale is frequently indicated by an accidental so that a third minor second occurs between 
seven and eight. 

Employing this tone increases still more the interval between Fa and the next tone above. 
This interval was already a major second. Now it is more than that. It is called an aug- 
mented second. This form of the scale is called the Harmonic Minor. It contains three 
minor seconds. 



n 



f 



3^ 



Har. Fourth Readti 



99 



Study in Harmony. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 13. 
Ex. 144. 

,-tt 



&=*: 



"^ r >" 



3Ea3=g=i 



L - 



u 










&^=|= 



^-^^^ 



-4 -=**- * 



vTl 



Ex. 145. 



i 



feSaai 



m 



- *+- 



J=r^J ' J_i_J 



II 

I! 



-* <g- 



r 



7*= ? |q 



i 



^ . ,l * ' <g c*- 



Ex. 146. 




3=j=i= 



=t=t 



^ ^- 



i=*^^ 



-J: 






m H^ & ' t \t&fW ts f^ 




a=B^==gg^ZS3^^d=faJ 



Another variation in the minor scale is made hy removing the minor second between Ave 
and six, and at the same time destroying the augmented second. The new tone is Fi. 

Mar. Fourth Reader. 



100 



HEAVENLY FATHER, HEAR OUR CRY. 



Andante. , p 



vnaame. , jj 

a>iiJ i + 



^-i- 



S2 



4 






r, r r p i . -r^ 



1. Heav'n-ly Fa - ther, hear our cry As we bow be -fore Thee; 

2. Keep us through the com - ing day With its work and pleas - ure, 






ate 



! 



.w. .m -j- 



J- 1- 



W 



# 



3=5: 



mf 



=t 



d2==-*=i=d 



I J K 



-=5- 



sfe* 



.U^ J' J. 



F 



Thou didst bid Thy chil - dren come, And we would a 
May we learn to love Thee more, And Thy word to 



- dore Thee, 
treas - ure. 



< 



fe* 



5 






s> 



=t 



5 



3=3 



^=^=* 



**- 



/j. J* J i J- Z>j i j. > J J 

r -| i c r E r-r f g f 



z==^= 



r 

Through the watches of the night Thou didst guard and keep us, 



=Jfc=t 



^^P^. 



w- 



-* d :gf 



< * 



i ces. , i I 

- i ' T i ^rT-r 



cfo'm. 






Xow we sing our morning hymn, So loud and clear, O Fa-ther,lend Thine ear. 
rg-b" did d I J 



= 



t^t-^- 



d- 



3=*! 



H 5 ==:: F ' t 



f : 



I! 



Har. Fourth Rtadtr 



101 



Vocal Drill. 

To be sung from different -pitches. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 14. 
Ex. 147. 



^m^Tfffr^ r rrir j r_gg 






Ex. 148. 







^^S!Hp^lpiS^rf3 



i-j^r I I 



:^zzjfc 



gl^^^I 



Ex. 149. 



ffiBE 



=R 



^ 



fa rjr jju J=g ^ g 



3E^ 



a 



63ESfc* 



^g 



Ex. 150 



^pg^^^^pg^l 






The effect of the melodic minor scale, page 102, can be easily produced by a slight 

change in the major. Thus, if we consider the note which is La of the key of C to 

r -pi 4- n 

be Do, we have the key of A. . -|p p _ ^zegn By using a lower third tone 



we have precisely what was represented before without any key signature. Thus : 



k* 



Both representations should be familiar to the pupil. 

Har. Fourth Rader. 



J gives the same effect as :ffi _ ^^ ^ 



102 



Ch. Ser. G, page 13. 
Ex. 151. 



Study in Harmony. 



item& = 



T&- 



:=T 



lie 



m 



& 



--i=* 



m 






1^^E= 



-pa. 



*2 



^Pl 






;* J- 



^? i ~ !zzaL 



-mj- 



w 



m 



Ex. 152. 

fen 



^fe^^^^El 



gggEjg 



-* - 



^HH^^t^^ 



Ex. 153. 



lN 



: * X- 



3fc31! 



:;;*- 






|i^^^|-=^^S^^^P 



I 



^szjfe 



This scale is called the melodic minor. 

It will be noticed that the sharps are not used in the descending scale ; so that the melodic 
minor scale is really a combination of two scales. 

The method for teaching this scale is fully illustrated elsewhere. 

Har. Fourth Reader 



103 



THE DEWDROPS GLEAM. 



John Guard. 

Vivace e legyiero. 



Felix Mendelssohn. 



fe^ 



a=*- 



= 






^ 



1. The dew-drops gleam In aum-nier's gay beam ; A pearl - y show'r, On 

2. O come with me Where la - bors the bee, And banks of bloom The 




-ir-n 



}t===fa=d 



*=* 



* 



==% 



> 



^5= 



greensward and flow'r. Soft zeph - yrs rove Thro' thick - et and grove, Thro' 
breez - es per-fume. There, by the spring, A - while will we sing; A - 



= 



-*-+ 



^ 



S 



rit. 



=*C 



a tempo. 



~ 



:*- 



*= 



thick - et and grove, Thro' thick - et and grove. In sun - - shine 

while will we sing, A - while will Ave sing. The slum - ber - ing 



3&fc=t 



=f 



=* 



-*-F 



bright, a joy - ous throng Fill all . 
grove and rock - y height Shall hear 



J0 !!'. 



i 



3 



^ 



~* 



A 



the air wifli joe - "und 
our cho - rus of de - 



Vivace e leggiero. quickly and delicately ; rit., ritardando, retarding the tempo gradually ; 
a tempo, in the original speed, as in the beginning. 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



104 



Chords. 



/ 




^m 



t 



* 



p 



t= 



=t= 



> 



r 



In sun 



lisrht. 



shine bright a joy - ous throng Fill all the 



=1* 



=1 



*= 



Fill 



./' 



=E^ 



yqc 



E 



-*-F 



1 t*- 



t= 






air . . with joe - - und song, In sun - shine bright a joy - ous 



4 



=\ 



5=*^: 






=P 



^P 



all . . . the air with joe - uud song, 




fr=F 



3= F 



rtJ- 



throng Fill all the air 



Avith joe 



und 



=^^^p^^ 



-* *- 



Fill all the air . . with 



joe 



und 



/> 



m 



t=: 



t=fc 



r 1 



SI 



song, Fill all 

i P > 



the air 



with joe 



und song. 



*=i 



*- +- 



' 



II 



=p: 






song, Fill 



all the 



air with 



joe - und song. 

Har. Fourth Reader 



105 



Ch. Ser. G, page 9. 
Ex. 154 



Study in Harmony. 






fe 



-1-1 gfei 



9- -9- -9-~ 



II 



Ex. 155. 






SEE 






5E 



4=* 



f- 1 ^r-^^ f^^r=^ t ! ^F=rf 



^^ 



&ffl 



e 



- I i h 



3 



^=T= 



-*- 



^S* 



-^--a-^l-l-S, #> 



zt^t^- L ^ L c 



Ex. 156. 






&s^ 



-* -9- n+ -*r 9 -=. 



H 



Ex. 157. 

^ ' F-^r J: (=-t^s=|== t- 3 - t ^ T^ i " 



55^ 



gm^ip 



ICfc 



Ur. Fourth Reader. 



106 



PRAISE THE LORD. 



W. Verb Mingabd. 

mf Andante. 




F. W. Farrington. 



?BEJ 






r 



r= 



"d: 



r 



=i 



Him! 



|| I I I V ' ' I 1 

1. Praise the Lord for all His lov-ing-kind-ness, Praise Him, O praise 

2. Praise the Lord! the ev - er - ten-der Shepherd, Praise Him, O chil-dren, 

3. Praise the Lord! O praise Him.all ye na-tions, Praise Him, ye peo - pie! 



E: 



s 



5 






X 



o 



3F 



=1=1 




dim. 



mf 



i 



cres. 



Jx^ 



=3: 



T^fT 



r?- 



-*=Z3SL 



-&- 



-f*- 



m 

>*^ 



i 



rte: 



r~ r~r~z 

Praise the heav'n-born King ! Fields, in your glo - ry, Tell out the sto - ry, 

for His watch-ful care. He gen-tly leads you, He ev - er feeds you, 

. Praise the Prince of Peace ! Bow down be - fore Him, Come and a - dore Him, 

ft: 



e 



3 






i i^i Jt V - U^Tfel* 




cres. 



SU: 



J. 



mf 



-&r -& 



Kt 



3 



d=f 



E^i 



= 



f=rf 



o- 



r 



l^ 3 ?^^^ 



i 



Earth is the Lord's, He giv - eth all. 
He shields His loved ones in His arms. 
His strength a - lone can keep you all. 



r 

Then sing of His might-y love, 

Then sing of His might-y love, 

Then sing of His might-y love, 



spP 3 



=+= 



-<s>- 



T* 



f 



TZ? 



dim 




^? 



'*=&& 



B 



-fc- g? 3 



Sing of His might-y love, Sing of His might-y love, Praise the Lord. 



^^m^mm^= 3=^^ m 



f 






f-0^ 



rrrrr 



Har. Fourth Reader 



Dictation ( Oral Review ). 



107 



The pupils should not only give the names of the tones, but state whether the effect is 
major or minor, and name any interval which the teacher calls for; thus, in the first exam- 
ple the pupils should say not only " Do, Ti, Do," but also, " Minor second down and up." 

1 2 3 4 5 



II 



II 



II 



II 



fe 



II 



II 



II 



^ 



Written Dictation. 

If we wish to represent a higher pitch by a staff degree that bears a flat, the natural 
would be used, because it removes the effect of the flat and causes the degree to represent its 
natural or usual pitch ; but if we wish to represent a lower pitch by a staff degree that already 
bears a flat, we use another flat. This sign is called the double flat ( bb ). 

The following exercises are intended to illustrate this principle. The key is F. The 



signature is 



The meter is ?. 



What must each measure contain in 9 meter? The 9 



on Fa removes the effect of the flat (b) in the signature, and produces Fi. 




Intervals (the Remaining Intervals). 

The interval of the sixth with chromatic modification is shown on Chart Ser. G, page 22. 
The third and sixth occur so frequently in two part exercises and songs that the children 
become very familiar with the effect produced on the ear, and it is only necessary to direct their 
attention to the matter to secure the result we desire. 

Let two pupils sing very slowly and distinctly such an exercise as the following. 

( 1 ) Call upon the pupils to name each interval as it occurs. 

( 2 ) Sing the melody alone, and require the pupils to write it. When it is correctly 
written, 

( 3 ) Sing as a duet again, and add the lower part naming the interval. 

( 4 ) Select similar exercises from the book and continue the practice. 

i o 

J- 



$ 



J 



f =c r = r 




I L r2 & L|__ 

II I I 



r M 



II 



Unison, third, sixth, fifth, third. Unison, third, third, sixth, third. third, unison. 

After the interval is named, state whether it is major or minor, and compare it with the 
models previously given. 

Hr. Fourth Reidtr. 



108 



Vocal Drill. 



j^^fc 



Ch. Ser. G, page 17. 
Ex. 158. 



2 







t=T 



3.= 






3^^gQ^=g^ ij^'ijBagrapi 



Ex. 159. 




^^ll*feS 




* 







Ex. 160. 




lS^p.gisp 






Note. The arrangement of minor seconds on the plain staff is shown as in (a) below ; 
and if Do be on C these minor seconds are in the right place. But if Do be placed on G, for 
instance, we find that one of the minor seconds is out of place, as in ( b ) below. That is, it oc- 
curs between six and seven instead of between seven and eight. A sharp is therefore placed in 
the key signature, upon seven of this scale, or upon the staff degree lettered F. This sharp shows 
that that staff degree no longer represents its natural pitch but that it represents a pitch higher 
than before. This removes the minor second between six and seven, and at the same time 
makes one between seven and eight, thus giving a correct major scale beginning on G. 
.<> _ 



II 



Do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti, do. 

All major scales beginning on G will have the F sharped, and if the music is written on 
this scale the sharp will be placed as a key signature. 

When, therefore, one sharp appears in the key signature we expect to find the scale begin- 
ning on G. 

A careful study of scales beginning on different staff degrees will show how many and 
what characters must be used in any key signature. 

Har, Fourth Reader 



Study in Rhythm. 



109 



Ex. 162. 





^ jM \ nrn^rn-^M 



i i i r i 




3pIii|pBlS 



Ex. 163. 



jM?u j j J i ^p^ c r J P J *rP^ P^ 







Wm^ 



=t 



s 



x 



^ 



<^ 



; 



+*-&- 



^ F 



d== 



P 



= 



II 



d: 



-1-J- 



i=t 



3=3=^ 



U* *'-^ 






It sometimes occurs that in order to bring the minor seconds in the right places the staff 
degrees must be made to represent a lower than their natural pitch. This gives rise to the use 
of flats in the key signatures. 

If we begin the scale on F, first space, we find that the minor seconds come thus: 



The first one is between four and five, instead of being 



between three and four. By making the third line of the staff represent a lower pitch we bring 
the minor second between three and four, and at the same time produce a major second 
between four and five. This restores the proper succession of tones for the major scale. The 

obange is shown by placing a flat on the third line, thus : 

Har. Fourth Rader. 



* 



=^? 



110 



THE LITTLE SCREECH OWL. 



Quickly 



$^^$m^m 



Robebt Schumann (1810-1866). 



I 







-G>- 



Ah nie ! poor tim - id owl - et, O whith-er shall I fly ? By 

2 woodlands are so fragrant, Then off on down-y wing I'll 

3. cry forbodes them e - vil, The lit -tie children say; And 

4. branch is sawn a - sun-der On which I sat a - lone, Its 












!f=jZ. 



=P 



=fc 



* 



: 



m 



i. 



night I feel so lone - ly, I cannot choose but cry. 
soar in - to the for - est, To hear the sweet birds sing, 
so from out the woodlands They'd drive me fain a-way. 
leaves are sere and yel-low, The night-in-gale is gone. 



My cry, it 
The nightin - 
I would not 
Now tell me, 



+- 1- 1r +" ** * 



r 



/p 



H 1 1- 



hi" r*j|J j ji j*r i ffi 



:*:t>i=i 



S 



yp, forte piano, strong, softly ; this indicates that the tone is to be taken strong at 
first, then diminished in power to piano. 

Hr. Fourth Rescfer. 



Ill 



n^ 



^B 



-* -- 



f 



fP 



:gt= 



:*** 



J 



Z ^ 



d 



sounds so wild and clear 
gale to me is dear; 
scare them with my cry ; 
is it not too bad? 

-i r" 



The children hide their heads for fear. Ah, 

I love her note so sweet and clear. Ah, 

They need not think it gives me joy, Ah, 

I've noth-ing now to make me glad. Ah, 



g 



J 






:*=* 



:= 



S3 



fczsfc 






q 



L 3r# 



/*> 



/A> 



-?=^^ m 



i ; 



H 



*==^ 



#- 



inm 



me ! poor lit 
me ! poor lit 
me ! poor lit 
me ! poor lit 



3=* 



3EB5 




tie owl! 2. The 

tie owl! 3. My 

tie owl! 4. The 
tie owl ! 




| The F clef, so called because it shows the place of F. The sign is a modihed Gothic F. 
The letters on the F clef are shown here : 



Q 



B G 



Hr Fourth Reader. 



112 



A SONG OF SUMMER. 



^ 



=t 



m 



' 



22: 



t 



Sum-mernow un- folds to view, un - folds 



M^^S 



P==3=- 



:zz2i 



A song of sum 



mer, 



Sum - mer now un - 



r=*= 



* ^- 



F=F=^ 



H* 



. 



-:[=: 



to view, un - folds to view Buds, blooms, 



and 



. 



i= 



-f I 1 



3t=* 



r- 



U 



:=: 



*z 



m 



folds to view, Sum-mernow un- folds to view Buds, blooms, and flow'rs in 



'. 



& 



FEgrJ-^F EF * y= 



=fc 



& 



flow'rs 



in va - ried col - ors bright, A song of sum 



6 



B 






S3 



W=^ 



Zjf, 0- 

col - ors bright, . 






in col - ors bright, 



Woods and fields in 



sS 



I J 



^^H* 1 



mer, 



Woods and fields in ver - nal hue, 



Zj= 



^ 



ver - nai 



-r- 
hue, 



. 



= 



nal hue. In 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



113 



^=*=^ 



'=F 



f 



3ee&&fj=& 



s 



Woods and fields in ver - nal hue, Sights and sounds . . 



of 



<5 



* 



nal 



hue, 



Sights 



and 




P3=b 



* * 



3 ^-i*-f=p 



^: 



dear de - light, 



Sights of dear de - light. . 






=t 



^t 



sounds, Sights and sounds of dear de light, 



de - light. 



m 


F^=^ 


' * 





^ 


A 


<s> 




1* 





P 


* 1 

1 


IF 




-t j 







|_ 




j 
o 


Sum - mer 


now un - 


folds 


to 


view 


Woods 


and 


fields 


in 


y 


1 






/: b - 


I 


1 ! J 




1 ' 


1? V 









# 




cJ 









P 







^ * 


















Sum - mer now un folds to view 



Woods and 



^=^= 



:feS3 



= 



^21 



-2- 



(=2 



r 



ver - nal hue, Sights 



and sounds of 



dear de - light. 



^^s 



$- 



^fe^ 



^ i ^ tfc 



i * * 



fields iit ver - nal hue. Sights and sounds of dear de - light, of dear de - light. 

Har. Fourth Reader 



114 



Study in Rhythm. 
Vocal Drill. 

Sing also in F major, contrasting the minor and major effects. 
fa 



gt^ m^k f!^^^ 



Ch. Ser. G, page 15. 
Ex. 164. 



M 



E4: 



^M^p^ f^p^g sgpp^ 



^^ppl^^P^&l^^B 



Ex. 165. 



mm 



"- 



T. I r i j 



I 






J rri 



*==*=* 



^^ 



* 






e 



* 



ts *- 



:ie=rr-n: 



=i= g=^^ ^^ 



* ^ 



=1=^3 

-d ltd 



V 



F=* : 



f=a 



^ i 



It must be remembered that all major scales contain two minor seconds, and that these 
occur between three and four (Mi, Fa) and seven and eight (Ti, Do). We should also remem- 
ber that the staff degrees represent pitches which can be varied only by accidentals or by the 
key signature. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



Ex. 166. 



0=^ 



*E^E^. 



Study in Harmony* 

- * * F *- 



115 



- h =r 



jftts 



V&? 



^sfefea 



4 = 









I 



*&==: 






3=W-1 



=ra 



^ ^ 



zSt 



Ex. 167. 



gzEj 



1 



:4 



* + 



-+ * X <=> $=? 



-v-* 



'H 



-=j. 



:j r 



-& *- 



V: 



w X 



3 



3=*: 



-c*- 



d 



^ :izzEfr= 



=t 



L e> 



II 



;v= 



i I I =t 



J J I j J 3E^EJg=^H 



Hr. Fourth Rader. 



116 



Study in Rhythm. 



Ch. Ser. G, page 13. 
Ex. 168. 



m$^0^M^m4 



=r 



^ 



w^&^=^ 



- 



.j J3 I J~3~.i-^g3- 



f 1 ! gg ^ g #fl j fg l ^ -J 






^p g. * J7nfr~3~i 



Ex. 169. 






SSEf 



3=5 



3=*=l 



te3E3 




^ 



-* * !>* * 1 ~^r 



J2_fei: 



s 



.Mf^T E F 3 ^ E t!Ff 



II 



_i> 






3- 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



117 



AUGUST. 



Celia Thaxter 
Allegretto. 




Clo - ver 
Each crick 



ft 



dai - sy went off 
chirps like a rare 



to - geth 
good fel 



& 



- er, 
low, 



1 1 
But the 

And the 



=: 



s 



_^ m ^ 



=Jt 



I*- 



=*: 



i$=^^E= 



= 



f 



"' 



fra 

as 



grant 
ters 



wa 
twin 



ter 

kle 



lil 
clus 



ies 
tered 



lie 
bright, 



Yet 
While 




3E 



1K 



* 



H 



=^===fc 



=fc 



*fe 



the 
corn fast grows 



moored 




in 



gold 
ripe 



en 

and 



Au 
ap 



gust weath 
pies mel 



er. 
low. 



F^j ^^^fe e ^ eeB 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



118 



BATTLE PRAYER. 



F. H. HiMMEL (1765-1814). 




1. Fa - ther, I call on Thee ! Round me the smoke of 

2. Fa - ther, O lead Thou me ! Be Thou my guide, wheth 

3. God, I ac - kn owl - edge Thee! In the low voice of 



the 
er 
the 



Hi 



^ 






W- 



=te 



f^Sll 



u 







p 



* L> 1* 



Sfc 



r=F=9-r- 



a^M^ 









^ 



bat - tie is glooming, O'er me the roll of the can - non is boom-ing, 
vie - tor or dy - ing, O - ver me still let Thy ban - ner be fly - ing, 
night wind I hear Thee, In the wildtem-pest of bat -tie Thou'rtnear me, 



=fc 



W^ 



3=*=* 



3=^=^ 



-*-^L-^L- 



-#7-** 



i 



2 



P 






=*=t 



W- 



t\ t I 



* M 



^ 



=PE 



iiH 



Cap - tain of Bat - ties, 
Lord, where Thou will-est, 
Foun-tain of grace, I 



7^ r ^ r c 

I call on Thee, Fa - ther, O lead Thou me ! 
O lead Thou me, God, I ac-knowl-edgeThee ! 
ac-knowl-edge Thee, Fa - ther, O bless Thou me ! 



-w- 



* -0. -v.- -0- -0.. -+ f.^..--. 



5=f 



^ 



I 



*-. -* * *^. -= 



Lento, slow. 

In the representation of intervals upon the staff the name of the interval corresponds to 
the number of staff degrees embraced by the notes, counting the degrees upon which the notes 
are placed. Thus from Do to Mi is a third, and Mi is represented on the third staff degree 
from Do. Or if we consider the notes in reverse order, Do is on the third staff degree from Mi. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



Dictation (Oral. Review). 

Pupils name the tones and also all intervals called for. 



119 






--$^=* 



II 



Written Dictation ; Review of Seconds. 
(Analysis of the Scale.) 



'i 



W & -g,- * e ^sr-&-^-p. 



^=^=^=^ |g: 



II 



If we examine this exercise carefully, and sing it many times, we learn that no chromatic 
tone can be placed between Mi and Fa or between Ti and Do, but that such tones may occur 
between all of the other tones. 

This teaches us that while the seconds of the scale all look alike upon the staff, in reality 
two of them differ from the rest, in sound. 




_ 



o 



II 



These smaller seconds are called Minor Seconds. (Minor means smaller.) The other 
seconds are called Major Seconds. (Major means larger.) 

We see that each major second may be divided ; that is, it admits a tone not so high as one 

and higher than the other of the two tones that constitute it 

tween Sol and Fa comes Fi. 

and Do, Ti 



F4=?- 



Th us be- 



But Sol, Fi 



sound alike, and as Do, Ti is a 



minor second, so Sol, Fi must be. 

The following dictation exercises are intended to illustrate major and minor seconds. The 



key is C. The signature is 




The meter is ?. 
4- 



i^ipr^feip^y 



Give similar exercises from different scaje degrees. Note the difference in representation 
when ascending by minor seconds and when descending by the same intervals. 

Triads. 

Sing each triad in the following exercise. Note what a triad is, and discover to the pupils 
by actual ear test that there are three varieties of triads possible in the scale. 
Unison. 
1 2 3 4 




Htr. Fourth Reader 



! 



i^iliSip^i 



SI 



120 



Study of Rhythm. 

Vocal Drill. 

a i l i j . 



Ch. Ser. G, page 9 
Ex 170. 



B^J5^*iT ^rJJi5*3 E5J= | i=|l 

^ Be.dl, rl, me, ra. 




te 




er 



^=^-r^ r 







^^fe^sl 



Ex 171. 




nnm^^g 



g 



Ex. 172. 







X-^21 



^^^ 



a 



^> 



rShzjfd 



1*=0 



*Zj&Z 



g 



^ 



*= ^ J 



!B 



2 



Ex. 173. 



m^=$ 



1 1 *- 



c* * ^r 



-c* *- 



i 



s=s 



II 



w 



* P 



Two notes occupying the same staff degree are said to represent a prime, though in reality 
there is no interval. 

We have already studied seconds, and we found that they are of two kinds, major and 
minor, and that the diatonic major scale contains five major and two minor seconds. By a 
careful study of Chart Series G, page 18, the difference in effect between major and minor 
seconds can be clearly established. 

Hv Fourth Reader 



Study in Chromatic Alterations. 



121 



Ch. Ser. G, page 11, Ex. 3. 
Ex. 174. 



Ex. 175. 



*g|^g 



B3 



Z2: 



Sfe2 



bfct 



-* g 



2^ *: 



Mi, 
Ex. 176. 



Do, se, le, 
Ex. 177. 



le. 




i 



3==: 



QZtzTEP^^ 



-e* ^L 







^=d= 



?#= 



Mi, 



Do, ra, 



"iJO- 
ra, 



i 



i 



Ex. 178. 



E -j 4=3 



e 



T=t 



zfeatzq 



ite^zz*: 



II 



H 



i?o- 



W 3 ^ 



Ex. 179. 



2 



llf^^gz^^S^J^^f^-^ 



=tq 



s 



s =r 



3^ 



P" 



*A 



^ 



^- ^-3=LU= j^fl 



fejj^i 



^z? 



3^ 



SI 



Har. Fourth Readar. 



122 



Ex. 180. 



&- 



S 



Study in Harmony. 



^=S 



? 



i 



= 



r = fa 



3 



e 



HE 



:=L 



!:d2:S=E2: 







* 



=t= 



s-i? 



-<S>-v 



32: 



^Si 



.-A 



F 



^M 



-c? 



&E 



b^=; 



tfe=: 



r r 



== 



^>^^.-^= L ^ 



^3" 



p 



s 



Ex. 181. 



*5 



=t 



3 



3=g 



e* 



Si 



S 



_1_ u^_C 



r 



* f" %r~ f 



kdz=* 



r 



r 



=t 



IS 



52: 



3 



3t=Z* 



Ex. 182. 



?^=Iei^^^3 



^ 



Isy 



t i 



P^E^: 



-T-*: 



3^E 



T^ P" 



= 



I 



&"#: 



I 



iEEES 



=t=t 



ft- 



^ 



Seconds continued. We find, however, that a major second may become augmented by 
raising or lowering the pitches of one or both of the staff degrees which represent it. Thus 
Sol, Fa represents a major second ; but if Sol be raised, as shown below, we have an augmented 
second. This is the characteristic interval of the harmonic minor scale and is considered on 
pages 11 and 18 of Chart Series G. 



3^ 



:*P_ 



H*r. Fourth 



123 



i 



Caroline B. Southey. 
Allegretto. 



LADYBIRD. 



ta 



f 



1 



*= 



1. La 

2. La 



I 



dy - bird, 
dy - bird, 



La 
La 



dy - bird ! 
dy - bird ! 



fly 



9 

0- 



f 



a - way 
a - way 



Ki 



2 






i 



s 



c 



iome ! 
home! 



ier 



V 



i 



-> 



To your house 
The . . fair 



in the 

y bells 



old 
tin 



wil 
kle 



low 




: 5 = nr = ^r tI s^ 



r 



t^r 



tree, the wil -low tree, Where your chil - dren so dear have in - 
far! tin - kle a - far! Make haste or they'll catch you and 



6 



r fe 



> 



' 



E?=*= 



^ 



.^_^_ 




^^ 



r^Tr rT" 5 r-5 f 



vit - ed the ant And a few co - sy neigh-bors to tea. 
har- ness you fast With a cob-web to Ob - er - orfs car. 



t 



II 



^riw^ 



-frj 






Hr. Fourth Reader. 



124 



Study of Chromatics. 

Vocal Drill. 



q &-t*=2^&t3^=Bi 



Ch. Ser. G, pages 4 and 17. 
Ex. 183. 






m 



-~ *t 



r f , r ^bfej 



K=^ 



F=t 



d=tezi==q 



< g d 



^E=^- 



^F 



I! 
!! 



Ex. 184. 



--#; 



H 



4 



Ex. 185. 



h-H I ! q 

; J-ii I 1 



g^ 



4u-ta-f=4 



sggg^ Jig^ 



*=5^ 



=*=$ 



^=t 



*=i 



S 



J, ]* I zzt 



:i 



+-+ 



m 



m 



Ex. 186. 



= 



W J J / t^ E^J-jW-^ 



:5f 



4=*: 



l*=Jt 



^ 



= 



& 



SEEEEE5! 



^ 





E 



:"S 



3==1: 



:s2: 



1 



The diatonic scale, as we have already learned, presents two kinds of thirds, the major and 
the minor. If, however, one of these tones composing a minor third should be brought still 
nearer the other by an accidental, we have a still smaller third, known as a diminished third. 

The diminished third will evidently occur in those places only in the scale where the minor 
thirds regularly exist. Re, Fa; Mi, Sol; La, Do; and Ti, Re, represent the minor thirds. 



P 



Diminished thirds, therefore, are most likely to be represented thus: 



-fw 



^ 



-Jj=!2=2 



Har. Fouith Readti 



125 



THE KINDLY STARS ARE PEEPING. 



Thoughtfully 
PP 




tfJ 


r* 


r 00 *\ ^ 












% 




= |t . 


m 9 F 


: 


=s^ 4 


"J 


-*1- 


-- 


== 


=3 


J 


| i- 


t 


W r 

smil - 
plaint 
on 
fore 

o 


-y 

ing 
ive 
our 
the 


eyes of 
night - in - 
way we 
con - qu'ring 


- 1 
1 

gold: 
gale 

roam ; 
day; 




^ 


0- 

And 
Her 
But 
The 


night 

wealth 

love 

orb 


o'er 

of 

will 

of 


earth 
song 
soon 
light 


b- 1 

is 
now 

dis - 
shall 


y . 






(fe b i 


- 


~d sr 


1 


Si 


-*- 


Is 


t , r- 1 


v/ 9 







-m- 






-P 

-m- 


\ 

m- 


_T 


J 


4-: J 




of home, 
a - way. 



ppS 



^^ 



I 



Har. Fourth Reader.. 



126 



Ex. 187. 



t#=3 



Study in Harmony. 



i 



i 



i 






I 



=*=* 



p4 



-e^- 5 - 



rr-r^ 



^ 



tI7^2 



!==!= 



^ 



^T 



-&>- 



Ex. 188. 



*^=? 



^ =J=jz=^ 



r=4=*r=^ 



S# 



"r 



r 



-S*-*- 



r" 



II 



=4: 



Ex 189 



^J - |- 



S 



S 



d 



.^=F 



B 



js ^r 



SS 



'MID THIS EVENING'S SPLENDOR. 

_! *_> * 



*= 



M= 






1. 'Mid this eve-ning's qui - et splen - dor, Lord, to Thee my thanks I 

2. Fa -ther, gen-'rous was Thy giv - ing, Peace of spir - it, joy in 

3. Have I, from my du - ty stray -ing.Erred, Thy pre-ceptsdis - o 



ssaa 



5E^ES 



=t 



*=3* 



* 



S=3: 



^ 



I 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



$=* 



m= 



T 






& 



127 

d* i 



r r 



ren - der, 
liv - ing, 
bey - ing, 



x x ' 

With a love sin- cere and strong, With a 

Firm re - solve my task to do, Firm re 
Lord, for - give the fault to - day, Lord, for 




S 



^S 



te 



JI 



With a love 
Firm re - solve 
Lord, for - give 



sin - cere 
my task 

the fault 



and strong, 
to do, 

to - day, 



*> 



n 



feS 



-3Z21 



I/ 



^^ 







dfc2: 



r 



t* 



love sin 

solve my 

give the 



cere and strong ; For the day's 

task to do, All that glads 
fault to - day ; May each eve 




=g-g-g 

P P * 
past hours of 
me in pos 
ning's dy - ing 




=3F 



^r^^t^z^ 



^^^ 



For the day's past hours of 

All that glads me in pos 

May each eve-ning r s dy - Ing 



S=gE^ 



fe 

P 



glad - ness, 
sess - ing, 
beau - ty 



For all sor - row, Lord, 
Were not mine, save for 
Find ac - com-plish'd ev 



and sad - ness, Let me 
thy bless - ing, Watch - ful 
'ry du - ty, Find me 



=*: 



^ 



EE^ 



*-r ^L 



n> 



IS 



f 



i2^*: 



praise Thee 
Fa - ther, 
far - ther 



f 



p pi r p 

in my song, Let me 

tire - less, true, Watch - ful 

on my way, Find me 



.-H J J 



r 



32: 



1 



praise Thee in my song. 
Fa - ther, tire - less, true, 
far - ther on my way. 



^^ 



w=^m- 



Hr. Fourth Readtr. 



.128 



Vocal Drill. 






Di, ri, fl. 



Ch. Ser. G, pages 9 and 17 
Ex. 190. 

-3 _ i a- 



-H F rra I J ^ i-*--^ * ^-3 N 1 t i^"^ 






II 



Ex. 191. 



f^ 



^i ta =3 



II 



=s^=p= 



:=^ 



i=3* 



s 



* - 



3*1 



Ex. 192 




Eg S E B 




:*= 



fbt 



i F^fl 



Ex. 193. 



PlppipilgiP^^^i^^i 



Ex. 194. 



m 



^MMe^ 



=a=d= 



?=*** 



3tEl-Jt 



-3-*-- 



Fourths embrace four staff degrees, but they vary somewhat in the number of minor 
seconds which they contain. 

The fourth from Do to Fa contains one minor second and two major seconds. (Do, Re, 
major, Re, Mi, major, Mi, Fa, minor.) This is called a perfect fourth. 

But the fourth from Fa to Ti contains three major seconds, and is larger than the perfect 
fourth. It is therefore called the augmented fourth. 

The effect of the augmented fourth on the ear is so striking that very little practice en- 
ables us to distinguish it whenever given, and it is so important in modulation, that it should 
be very carefully learned. See Ch. Ser. G, page 21. 

Har. Fourth Reader 



Vocal Study. 



129 



Ex. 195. 



Luigi Rossi. 




1 



-2 *-*- 



r i r 



w=^ 



m^ 



^EfcE 



z{f=EEEEE==t: 



* X 



, *-S 1 



r" J J7jTT77^ 



E 



iH 



3E 



*a J!zwzj. 



p-f- H>-T-^ J ^T T i^-. P=u - H j- (- F F f- 



i 



^=#-^ 



5=ffi? 



s e^tce ^ 




^ 



-*-- 



Pr^i , - tti 



SS^^S 






- f I Li - 



& 



f Cf fff K -f 



^t=F 



<s 



-< g = 



i n- 






^5- 



: & 



?CSff 



EEf* 



II 



The fourth from Re to So] is equal to two major and one minor second, and the fourth 
from Mi lo La is equal to the same. These are, therefore, also perfect fourths. 

When Fa, Ti is sung, the voice inclines to pass at once to Do, while if the reverse is 
sung, Ti, Fa, the voice tends to pass to Mi. See Chart Ser. G, page 20. 



^EEZ E^^ Z^-~ -=t^==& 



Hr. Fourth Retdr. 



130 

Clefs. 

Clefs are signs used to indicate the pitch assigned to the staff degrees. 
The clef may also indicate the voice for which the part is intended. 

Three clefs are in common use. They are the G clef, indicating the 

part to be sung by soprano or unchanged voices ; the F clef, indicating the 

part for changed voices ; and the C clef, which, indicates that the part is to 

be sung an octave below where it is written and by tenor voices. 

Note. The tenor part is frequently written on a staff bearing the G clef. In such 
cases the part is designated by the word tenor, and is to be sung an octave below where it is 
written. 

As all musical notation is relative, a change in the clef adds no diffi- 
culty for the singer. By this we mean that, since the position of Do (the 
key tone in the major) is always indicated by the key signature, the last 
sharp being on seven, and the last flat on four of the scale, it is equally easy 
for all singers to sing all parts, and sopranos should be as well able to sing 
the bass as to sing the melody, and contrariwise it is just as easy for bass 
singers to sing the melody as it is to sing the bass. 

A difficulty arises in part music, however, if the melody is sung by 
persons having bass voices, as it gives two melodies an octave apart and 
destroys the harmony. Similarly in the same kind of music, if persons 
with soprano voices sing the bass, tones occasionally rise above the melody 
and completely destroy it. Illustration, (a) shows the relation of tones 
when the lower part is sung by basses alone ; (5) shows the relation of tones 
when the lower part is sung by basses and sopranos together. 
(a) (o) 




In introducing the Bass clef, we have selected exercises which are so 
written that the part for changed voices may be sung by sopranos without 
destroying the melody, as no tone in the bass, even if raised an octave* 
will rise above the soprano part. Har _ Fourth Reader 



131 



Ex. 196. 



J. S. CUBWIN. 



*--?s- 



3^E 



*=?tr=F- 



pfeH 



--z== &YT^* 



SS? 



2= 



i p r p - 



1221 



-f 2 ^<s>- 



^F^z 



I 



Ex. 197. 



glp^^g^ 



is?: 



#-#-#- 



==: 



--f ^ i 



HI 



*5SEB: 



&-T&- 



te^Ete 



fepsS 



S 



sz 



22: 



II 



Ex. 198. 



feig^igii^^g^ ^^^ gi^ip 



* * 






<& P- 



<< 



=P=*~-^-^-P 



= *: 



: <S> <=2I 



^L^L. 



2 



^* 






:*=: 



II 
II 



Har Fourth Rad*r. 



132 




With spirit. 



COME, BROTHERS, TUNE THE LAY. 

IGNAZ Musi IIKI.KS 



I 



E 



i 



:^=l 



1. Come, broth - ers, tune 

2. Now we with Pri 

3. So far there's noth 

. 



* 



the lay, Come, brothers, tune the lay, For 
mo start, Well take the Al - to part, The 
ing wrong, So far there's nothing wrong, For 



g 



3t=J 



^3 






^ 



^5 



=q 



all who can 
rest will* try 
ev - er live 



sons 



must sing to - day; Ye jo - vial sons of 

their cho - ral art ; Now you, sir, mind what you're a- 
the soul of song; Let all the bur - den 



=t 



* -at -+ 



P=i=l 



3 



E 



( l F m F i 



song ! Ye jo - vial sons of song ! Here at pleas - ure's sum - mons 
bout ! Mind, mind what you're a - bout ! Now keep time or else you'll all be 
share, Let all the bur - den share, And Mu - sic's glo - rious praise de- 




p cres .... 



cen 



A 



throng. Now, pray, let all be har-mo - ny, Be-ware, 
out. Now, pray, let all be har-mo - ny, Be-ware, 
clare ! Bra- vis - si - mo ! What har-mo - ny ! A - ha ! 



IeH 



be - ware ! Now, 

be - ware ! Now, 

a - ha ! Sweet 




5 



; e-^f c-c-c-sH 



Now, pray, let all be har-mo - ny, Be - 

Now, pray, let all be har-mo -ny, Be- 

Bra - vis - si - mo! What har-mo -ny! A - 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



133 



do. 



: 



pray, let all be har-mo-ny, Take care, 

pray, let all be har-mo-ny, Take care, 

har-mo-ny, brave harmony ! A - ha ! 



take care, 

take care, 

a - ha! 



That all who hear may 
That all who hear may 
Vic - to - ri - a, a 



=* 



=3* 



m 



-**- 



m m 



JtZL 



* * 



I*-V- 






ware, 


be- ware! 


ware, 


be- ware! 


ha! 


a - ha! 



Now, pray, let all be har-mo-ny, 
Now, pray, let all be har-mo-ny, 
Sweet har - mo-ny.brave har - mo - ny ! 



- 



3SEE^ 



#: PP 



E-* * -F > - 



1F- 



1^ 



praise the strain, A-gain, and yet a - gain. 

praise the strain, A-gain, and yet a-gain. 

no - ble strainlWe'll have it yet a - gain. 

i: 



Tra la la, tra la la, 
Tra la la, tra la la, 
Tra la la, tra la la, 






=*=ffc 



. 



if _ r r-r 



A - gain and yet a - gain. 

A - gain and yet a - gain. 

We'll nave It yet a - gain. 



PP 



f 



D.S. ad 



^^^^ m^^^^m ^m^ 



w=&- 



tra la la la la la la, Tra la la, tra la la, tra la la la la. 



ffi=3-/ j^j^fcEifflB 




Ad lib., ad libitum, at one's pleasure, as one wishes. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



134 



YE WHO SHUN THE HAUNTS OF CARE. 



David Thomson. 



u Andante. 



W. A Mozart. 



SE^J 



m^mm. 



f E Tf? 



3EE^gEEEj 

f " pa 3 



i i r 



1. Ye who shun the haunts of care, To our f or - est wilds re - pair, 

2. Naught is heard the gale to swell, Save the wood-man in the dell, 



He 



' 



* 



i= 



- 



U itf fm 



C3=&=i 



Where thro' clear,ee - ru - lean air Phoe-bus ris - es bright - ly ; 
And the sol-emn Sab - bath bell, Far a -long the nioun - tain. 



Z 



m 



= 



' 






i= 



j=j=j 



$ f j ' 



*=* 



rr-r 



r-t-r-r-rrr 

Here thro' nev - er - end -in g shades, You may rove till eve - ning fades, 
Here no noise at dawn of day Drives your dream of bliss a - way, 







E 



= 



r 



you 
drives 



i 



Here thro' nev - er - end - ing shades You may rove till 

Here no noise at dawn of day Drives your dream of 

may rove, 
your dream, 



t^FF* 



fefea^3 



Tr ~r 



eve -ning fades, may rove, may rove till eve - ning 
bliss a - way, your dream, your dream of bliss a 




a 



=E=t 



eve - ning fades, 


You 


mav rove 


till 


eve - 


ning 


fades. 


bliss a - way, 


Drives 


your dream 


of 


bliss 


a 


way. 

Har. Fourth Reader 



135 



F~i r 



&& 



*EgE 



m 



r~r 



rvrrr~ 



Nev - er ' has the po - et's rhyme Feigned a sweet - er, soft - er clime, 
Yet the wood-lark hov - 'ring nigh Sings as morn -ing opes her eye, 



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Where the rest - less foot of time Moves a - long more light - ly. 
And at eve a lull - a - by Near yon mur-nVring foun - tain. 



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I DREAM OF ALL THINGS FREE. 



Felicia Hemans. 
mp Allegro. 




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1. I dream of all things free, . 

2. I dream of some proud bird, . 

3. I dream of for - est child, 



. Of a gal -lant, gal -lant 

Of a bright-eyed moun-tain 

With the fawns and flow'rs at 



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1. I dream of all things free, . 

2. I dream of some proud bird, 

3. I dream of for - est child, 



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Of a gal - lant, gal - lant bark, . . . That 

Of a bright-eyed moun - tain king, ... In 

With the fawns and flow'rs at play; ... Of 



Allegro, lightly and quickly. 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



13b" 



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bark, . . That sweeps thro 1 storm Like ar - row to its mark ! Of a 
king ! . . In rap - ture hear The rush - ing of his wing, Then I 
play ; . . Of In - dian wild With stars to guide his way, Of a 



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sweeps thro' storm.thro' storm and sea, Like ar - row to its mark ! 
rap - ture I still hear, still hear The rush ing of his wing, 
In - dian, In - dian, 'midst the wild.With stars to guide his way, 




cres. 






stag that o'er the moun - tain Goes bound-ing in his glee, Of a 
fol - low some wild riv - er Where no trim sail may be, Dark 

chief his war - riors lead - ing, Of arch - er's greenwood tree, While 







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thou - sand flash- ing foun - tains ; 
woods a - round us shiv - er; 
lone - ly heart lies bleed - ing ; 



I dream of all things free. 
I dream of all things free. 
I dream of all things free. 



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Har. Fourth Reader 



HOLY, HOLY, HOLY! 



137 



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1. Ho - ly, Ho 

2. Ho - ,y, Ho 

3. Ho - ly, Ho 



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- ly, Ho 

- lv, Ho 

- ly, Ho 



iy! 
ly! 



Lorn 



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Lorn God Al - might - y ! 
all the saints a - (lore Thee, 
though the dark-ness hide Thee, 



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Ear - ly in 
Cast - ing down 
Though the eye 



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the morn - ing our song shall rise to Thee; 
their gold - en crowns a - round the glass - y sea, 
of sin - ful man Thy glo - ry may not see, 



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Ho - ly, Ho - ly, Ho - ly ! mer - ci - ful and might - y ! 

Cher -u - bim and ser - a - phim fall -ing down be - fore Thee, 

On - ly Thou art Ho - ly, there is none be - side Thee, 



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All Thy works 
Which wert 
Per - feet 



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f^f i n^t r r r * 

shall praise Thy name in earth and sky and sea ! 

and art, and ev - er more shalt be. 

in pow'r, in love and pu - ri - ty. 



Hr. c ourth Reader 



jPTTg 



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138 



OXFORDSHIRE MAY SONG. 



Allegretto. 

Spring 




is com 
ores. . . 



ing, spring 



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1. Spring is com - ing, is com - ing, Bird - ies, 

2. Spring is com - ing, is com - ing, Flow'rs are 

3. Spring is com - ing, is com - ing, All a - 



*1^ 



Spring 





nest; . . . 
too; . . . 
fair; . . . 




build your nest, build your nest ; Weave to - geth - er, weave 

com - ing too, com - ing too ; Pan - sies, lil - ies, and 

round is fair, all is fair ; Shim - mer, quiv - er on 



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Weave to-geth - er.weave 
Pan - sies, lil - ies, and 
Shim-mer, quiv - er on 



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straw and feath - er, Do - ing each your best, 
daf - fo - dil - lies, Now are com - ing through, 

qui - et riv - er, Joy is ev - 'ry - where. 




33: 



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Har. Fourth Reader. 



139 



THE WORLD'S MUSIC. 



Gabriel Setown. 



George Henry Howard. 




T f 

1. The world's a ver 

2. The twigs that shake, 

3. The coals be - neath 

4. The Avorld is such 



y 

the 
the 
a 



r * 

hap - py place, Where ev - 'ry 

boughs that sway, And tall old 

ket - tie croon, And clap their 

hap - py place, That chil - dren, 




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child should 
trees you 
hands and 
wheth - er 



dance and 
could not 
dance in 



sing, 

climb, 

glee; 



And al - ways have a 
And winds that come but 
And ev'n the ket - tie 




big 



or small, Should al - ways have 



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smil - ing face, And nev - er sulk for an - y - thing, 

can not stay, Are gay - ly sing - ing all the time, 

hums a tune, To tell you when it's time for tea. 

smil - ing face, And nev - er, nev - er sulk at all. 



i 



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<ar, Fourth Reader. 



=r 



140 



John Henby Newman. 



LEAD, KINDLY LIGHT. 



J. B. Dykes. 






1. Lead,kind - ly Light ! a - mid th'en-cir- cling gloom, Lead Thou me 

2. I was not ev - er thus, nor pray 'd that Thou Should'st lead me 

3. So long Thy power has blest me, sure it still . . Will lead me 

4 4 4 ,4. / j j J j \jJ-4A A ^J 



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life 



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on : The night is dark, and I am far from home, Lead Thou me 
on : I loved to choose and see my path ; but now Lead Thou me 
on Thro' drear - y doubt, thro' pain and sorrow, till The night is 




%i^R 



on. Keep Thou my 

on. I loved the 

gone, And, with the 



feet: 

gar 

morn, 



I do 

ish day ; 
those an - 



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not ask to 

and, spite of 

gel fa - ces 

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see . . 

fears, , 
smile . 



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?he dis 
Pride ruled 
Which I 



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tant 
my 
have 



scene, one step e - nough 
will : re - mem-ber not . 
loved long since, and lost . 



for me. . . 

past years. 

a while. 



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Har. Fourth Reader. 



PART II. 
PATEIOTIO AND DEVOTIONAL SONGS. 

AMERICA. 



S. F. Smith. 



Henry Caret ( ?). 



I 



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1. My coun-try! 'tis of thee, Sweet land of lib - er - ty, 

2. My na - tive coun - try, thee Land of the no - ble free 

3. Let niu - sic swell the breeze, And ring from all the trees, 

4. Our fa- thers' God! to Thee, Au - thor of lib - er - ty, 



i 



gfr-n-= ns 



Of tliee I sing; 

Thy name I love; 

Sweet free - dom's song ; 

To Thee we sing; 



~0- 



Land where my fa - thers died ! Land of the 
1 love thy rocks and rills, Thy woods and 
Let mor - tal tongues a - wake ; Let all that 
Long may our land be bright With free-dom's 




Pil-grim's pride ! From ev - 'ry moun-tain side Let free - dom ring. 

tem - pled hills ; My heart with rap - ture thrills Like that a - bove. 

breathe par- take ; Let rocks their si- lence break, The sound pro - long. 

ho - ly light; Pro - tect us by Thy might, Great God, our King. 



H.ir. fourth Reader. 



(141) 



142 



BLESSED ARE THE MERCIFUL. 



Matthew, v: 7. 



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Bless - ed are the mer - ci - ful for they shall ob - tain 



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Bless - ed are the ruer - ci - ful for they shall ob - tain 



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mer - cy.Bless-ed are the mer-ci-ful for they shall obtain mer-cy. 



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mer - ey.Bless-ed are the mer-ci-ful for they shall obtain mer-cy. 






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Har. Fourth Reader. 



143 



ONWARD, CHRISTIAN SOLDIERS. 



Eev. 8. Baring-Gould. 



Sir Arthttb S. Sullivan. 




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1. Onward, Christian sol - diers, Marching as to war, With the cross of Je - sus 

2. At the sign of tri - umph Satan's host doth flee; On, then, Christian soldiers, 

3. Like a might-y ar - my Moves the Church of God ; Brothers, we are treading 

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Go - ing on he - fore ! Christthe roy-al Mas - ter Leads a-gainst the foe ; 
On to vie - to - ry! Hell's founda-tions qniv - er At the shout of praise; 
Where the saints have trod ; We are not di - vid - ed, All one Bod - y we, 

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Chorus. 



_J^_i_j^t _4 1 1 ^ -^ 



Forward in - to bat - tie, See, His banners go. Onward.Christian sol - diers, 
Brothers, lift your voi - ces, Loud your anthems raise I 
One in hope and doc - trine, One in char- i - try. 



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arching as to war, With the cross of Je - sus Go - ing on be - fore ( 

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Hr. Fourth RetJai. 



144 



Joseph Hopkinson. 




3e2 



HAIL, COLUMBIA! 



Prof. Phyla. 



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I 



Hail, Co-lum - bia ! hap - py land ! Hail, ye he - roes, 

raor - tal pa - triots, rise once more ! De - fend your rights, de 
Sound, sound the trump of fame, Let Wash - ing 

hold the chief, who now com-mands,Once more to serve his 



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heav'n-born band ! Who fought and bled in Freedom's cause, Who fought and bled in 
feud your shore ; Let no rude foe with im - pious hand, Let no rude foe with 
ton's great name Ring thro' the world with loud applause! Ring thro 1 the world with 
coun-try stands ; The rock on which the storm will beat ! The rock on which the 



S 



: 



Free 
im 
loud 
storm 




3 



m 



cause, And, when the 

hand, In - vade the 

plause!Let ev - 'ry 

beat! But armed in 



storm of war was gone, En 

shrine where sa - cred lies Of 

clime, to Free - dom dear, 

vir - tue, firm and true, His 




joyed the peace your val -or won. Let in - de-pend-ence be our boast, 
toil and blood the well-earn'd prize. While of-fring peace, sincere and just, In 
Lis - ten with a joy-ful ear; With e - qual skill, with steady power, He 
hopes are fixed on heav'n and you.When hope wassink-ing in dis-may,When 




Ev - er 
Heav'n we 



mind - ful 
place a 
gov - ems in the 
gloom ob - scured Co 



what it 
man - ly 
fear - ful 
lum - bia's 



cost ; Ev - er grate - ful 

trust, That truth and jus - tice 

hour Of hor - rid war, or 
day, His stead - y mind, from 




for the prize, Let its al 

shall pre - vail, And ev - 'ry scheme 

guides with ease The hap - pier time 

chan - ges free, Re - solved on death 



tar 


reach 


the 


skies. 


of 


bond - 


age 


fail. 


of 


hon - 


est 


peace. 


or 


lib - 


er 


- ty. 




Ha 


r. Feu 


rth Reader 



145 



I 



Chorus. 

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Firm, u - nit - ed let 



be, Bal-hing round our lib - er - ty ! 

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As a band of broth-ers joined, Peace and safe - ty we shall find. 



FLAG OF THE FREE. 




Richard "Wagxeh. 



* 



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V 



55 







the tree, fair - est to see ! Borne thro' the 
the brave, long may it wave, Cho - sen of 



EE3 



3 



strife and the thun - der of war ; Ban - ner made bright 

God while His might we a - dore ; Tn Lib - er - ty's van, 

D.s. While thro' the sky 

Finb. 



V 



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I* 



with star - ry light, Float ev - er proud - ly from moun - tain to shore, 
man -hood of man, Sym - bol of right thro' the years pass-ing o'er. 
loud rings the cry, Un - ion and Lib - er - ty ! one ev - er - more J 




3 



dfcd: 



S- 



of 



Em - blem 
Pride of 



Free - dom, hope 
coun - try, hon 



fe 



6c_ 



to the slave, 
ored a - far, 

J).S. 



! 



Spread thy fair folds but to shield 
Scat - ter the cloud that would dark 



and to save, 
en a star, 



har. Fourth Reader 



146 



AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL. 



Katharine Lee Bates. 
Maestoso. 



Will 0. Macfarlane. 



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1. O beau- ti - ful for spa - eious skies, For am - ber waves of grain, 

2. O beau- ti - f ul for pil-grim feet, Whose stern, im-pas- sion'd stress 

3. O beau - ti - ful for he -roes proved, In lib - er - at - ing strife, 

4. O beau - ti - ful for pa - triot dream That sees be -yond the years 



3 



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Bass with octaves throughout. 



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For pur - pie moun-tain ma - jes - ties A - bove the fruit - ed plain ! 
A thor-ough-fare for free-dom beat A - cross the wil - der - ness ! 
Who more than self their eoun- try loved, And mer - cy more than life ! 
Thine al - a - has ter cit - ies gleam Un-dininVd by hu - man tears ! 



J 



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mer 



m 



oa 



mer - l - ca 
mer - i - ca 
raer - i - ca 



A - mer - i - ca ! God shed His grace on thee, And 

A - mer - i - ca ! God mend thine ev - 'ry flaw, Con - 

A - mer - i - ca ! May God thy gold re - fine, Till 

A -mer -i - ca! God shed His grace on thee, And 



+ 



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* 



By permission of the author. 

Copyright, 1913, by Will C. Macfabiane. 



Har. Fourth Reader 























147 


fl# 




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1 








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+ * 




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crown thy good 


with 


brotli 


-er - 


hood, 


From 


sea 


to shin - 


ing 


sea! 


firm thy soul 


in 


self - 


con 


trol, 


Thy 


lib - 


er - ty 


in 


law! 


all sue -cess 


be 


no - 


ble - 


ness, 


And 


ev - 


'ry gain 


di - 


vine ! 


crown thy good 


witli 


broth 


-er - 


hood, 


From 


sea 


to shin - 

[* f- 


ing 


sea ! 

1 1 


698 ! * 




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--J- 



Refrain. Molto maestoso. 



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ritard. 



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A - mer - i - ca ! A - mer - i - ca ! God shed His grace on thee ! 



. 



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HEAVENLY FATHER, SOVEREIGN LORD. 

SONOS FOR THE SaNCTOARY. Ff.LIX MENDELSSOHN. 



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1. Heav'n-ly Fa - ther, sov'reign Lord, Be Thy glo-rious name a - dored ! 

2. Though un-wor - thy, Lord, Thine ear Deign our hum- ble songs to hear; 

3. While on earth or-dained to stay, Guide our foot-steps in Thy way, 

4. Then with an - gel harps a - gain We will wake a no- bier strain; 



ft-. 



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Lord, Thy mer-cies nev - er fail; Hail, ce 
Pur-er praise we hope to bring When a 
Till we come to dwell with Thee, Till we 
There, in joy- ful songs of praise, Our tri 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



^g iggj ^^fl 



les - tial good-ness.hail. 
round Thy throne we sing, 
all Thy glo - ry see. 
urn - phant voi - ces raise. 



148 



GOD EVER GLORIOUS. 



8. F. Smith. 



Alexis T. Lwoff. 



m 



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1. God ev - er glo - ri - oust Sov 

2. Still may Thy bless - ing rest, Fa 



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'reign of na - tions, 
ther most Ho - ly, 



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Wav - ing the ban - ner of Peace 
O - ver each moun - tain, rock, riv 



o'er the land ; 
er, and shore ; 



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Thine is the 
Sing Hal - le 



vie - to - ry, Thine the sal - va - tion, 

lu - jah! Shout in ho - san - nasi 



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Strong to tie - liv - er 
God keep our coun - try 



T?-. 



Own we Thy hand. 

Free ev - er - more. 



THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER. 



m 



Francis Scott Kev. 
fc 



Dr. Samuel Arnold. 






i 



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1. Oh ! say, can 

2. On the shore, dim 
3 And where is 
4. Oh! thus be it 



you 


see, 


by the 


dawn's ear 


iy 


light, What so 


iy 


seen 


thro' the 


mist of 


the 


deep.Where the 


that 


band 


who so 


vaunt-ing 


iy 


swore, 'Mid the 



er when free - men shall stand Be - 



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proud - ly we hailed at the twilight's last gleam-ing? Whose stripes and bright 
foe's haughty host in dread si -lence re - pos - es, What's that which the 
hav - oc of war and the bat- tie's con - fu - sion, A home and a 

tween their lov'd home and the war's des -o - la - tion, Blest with vie - fry and 

Hit. Fourth Reader. 



149 




t 






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stars thro' the per - il - ous fight, O'er the ram-parts we watched, were so 
breeze, o'er the tow- er - ing steep, As it fit - f ul - ly blows, half con - 

coun - try they'd leave us no more ? Their blood has washed out their foul 
peace, may the Heav'n-rescued land Praise the Pow'r that hath made and pre- 



fefc 



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gal - lant - ly stream -ing. And the rock - ets' red glare, the bombs 

ceals, half dis - clos - es ? Now it catch - es the gleam of the 

foot - steps' poi - lu - tion. No ref - u^e could save . . the 

served us a na - tion. Then con-quer we must, when our 



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burst-ing in air, Gave proof thro' the night that our flag was still there. 

morning's first beam, In full glo - ry re - fleet - ed, now shines in the stream. 

hire-ling and slave From the ter - ror of flight or the gloom of the grave. 

cause it is just, And this be our mot - to, "In God is our trust." 

Chorcs. 



F=t 



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O . . say, does that star - span - gled ban - ner yet 

Tis the star - span - gled ban - ner, oh long may it 

And the star - span - gled ban - ner in tri - umph shall 

And the star - span - gled ban - ner in tri - umph shall 




wave 


O'er the 


land 


of 


wave 


O'er the 


land 


of 


wave 


O'er the 


land 


of 


wave 


O'er the 


land 


of 


Hr. Fourth Rdr. 









the free and the home of the brave? 

the free and the home of the brave ! 

the free and the home of the brave ! 

the free and the home of the brave! 



150 



COME, THOU ALMIGHTY KING. 



Charles Wesley. 



Felice Giakdinl 



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1. Come, Thou 


al - 


might 


y 


King, 


Help 


us 


Thy 


2. Come, Thou 


in 


car 


nate 


Word, 


Gird 


on 


Thy 




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sing, Help us to praise. Fa - ther all glo - ri - ous, 
sword, Our prayer at - tend. Come and thy peo - pie bless, 



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O'er all vie- to - ri-ous, Come and reign o 
And give Thy word suc-cess ; Spir - it of ho 



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ver us, An - cient of days. 
li - ness, On us de - scend. 



BATTLE HYMN OF THE REPUBLIC. 

Julia Ward Howe. 



1. Mine . 


eyes have 




seen 


the 


= 

glo 


-*- 

- r y 


* 
of 




- 

the 


2. I have seen Him 




in 


the 


watch 


- fires 


of 


a 


3. I have read a 




fier 


y 


gos 


pel 


writ 


in 


4. He has sound - ed 




forth 


the 


trump 


- et 


that 


shall 


5. In the beau - ty 




of 


the 


lil 


ies 


Christ 


was 


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-- 


m- 


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s 


ft -\* 


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com - ing of the Lord ; 


He 


is 1 


0-i -m m^- 

,ramp-ling out 


the vint 


- age 


where the 


hun - dred cir-cling camps ;They have 


build - 


ed Him 


an al - 


tar 


in the 


burnished rows of steel : ' 


'As 


ye 


deal with My 


con- tem 


-ners, 


so with 


nev - er call re- treat ; 


He 


is 


sift - 


ing out 


the hearts of 


men be - 


born a -cross the sea, 


With a 


glo - 


ry in 


His bos 


- om 


that trans- 




















Ha 


r. 


-ourth Reader. 



151 



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grapes of wrath are stored ; He hath loosed the fate - ful light - ning of His 

even - ing dews and damps ; I can read His right - eous sen - tence by the 

you My grace shall deal : Let the He - ro born of worn - an crush the 

fore His judg-ment seat : Oh, be swift, my soul, to an- swerHim!,be 

fig - ures yon and me ; As He died to make men ho - ly, let us 



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ter - ri - ble swift sword ; His truth 

dim and flar - ing lamps : His day 

ser - pent with his heel, Since God 

ju - bi - lant, my feet ! Our God 

die to make men free, While God 

Chorus. 



is march 
is march 
is march 
is march 
is march - ins: 



ing 
ing 
ing 
ins 



on. 
on. 
on. 
on. 
on. 







Glo - ry, glo-ry,IIal-le - lu - jah ! Glo - ry,glo- ry.Hal- le - lu - jah ! 



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Glo - ry, glo - ry.Hal - le - lu - jah! His truth is march -ing on. 




Hr. Fourth Reader 



152 



PARADISE. 



Frederick W. Faber. 



Joseph Barnby. 




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1.0 Par - a-dise! Par - a - dise ! Who doth not crave for 

2. Par - a - disc ! O Par - a - dise ! The world is grow - ing 

3.0 Par - a-dise! O Par - a - dise ! Where - fore doth death de 

4. O Par - a - dise ! O Par - a - dise ! I want to sin no 






rest ? Who would not seek the hap - py land, Where they that loved are 
old ; Who would not be at rest and free, Where love is nev - er 

lay ? Bright death, that is the wel - come dawn Of our e - ter - nal 

more ; I want to be as pure on earth As on thy spot - less 



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blest? Where loy - al hearts, and true, 

cold? Where loy - al hearts, and true, 

day. Where loy - al hearts, and true, 

shore. Where loy - al hearts, and true, 



Stand 


ev - 


er 


in 


the 


Stand 


ev - 


er 


in 


the 


Stand 


ev - 


er 


in 


the 


Stand 


ev - 


er 


in 


the 



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light, All rap - ture thro' and thro', In God's most ho - ly sight. A-mex. 



JERUSALEM THE GOLDEN. 

Bernard of Cluny. . Alexander Ewing. 



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1. Je - ru - sa - 1cm the gold - en, With milk and hon - ey blest: 

2. They stand, those halls of Zi - on, All ju - bi - lant Avith song, 

3. There is the throne of Da - vid, And there, from care re - leased, 



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Be - neath thy con - tem - pla - tion, Sink heart and voice op -pressed. 
And bright with many an an - gel And all the mar - t}r throng. 
The song of them that tri - umph, The shout of them that feast. 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



153 



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I know not, 
The Prince is 



oh, I know not, What joys a - wait me there ; 
ev - er in them, The day - light is se - renc ; 



And they who with their Lead - er Have con - quered in the fight, 



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What ra - dian - cy of glo - ry, What light be - yond com-pare. 
The pas - tures of the bless - ed Are decked in glo - rious sheen. 
For - ev - er and for - ev - er Are clad in robes of white. 



PORTUGUESE HYMN. 



James Montgomery. 



J. Beading. 






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1. The Lord is my shep - herd, no want shall I know; I 

2. Let good - ness and mer - cy, my boun - ti - ful God, Still 




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feed in green pas - tures ; safe fold - ed I rest-, lie lead - eth my 
fol - low my steps till I meet Thee a - bove ; I seek by the 



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soul where the still 
path which my fore 



wa-ters flow, 
fa-thers trod, 



. Re - stores me when wand'ring.re - 
. Thro 1 the land of their so-journ, Thy 




deems when op- press'd, Re - stores me when wand'ring.redeems when oppressed, 
kingdom of love, Thro' the land of their so - journ, Thy kingdom of love. 



Htr. Fourth Reads'. 



154 



COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN. 



D. T. Shaw. 
Spirited 



D. T. Shaw. 




1. Oh ! Co-lum - bia, the gem of the o-cean, The home of the brave and the 

2. When war wing'd its wide des-o - la - tion, And threaten'd the land to de - 

3. The star-span-gled ban-ner bring hith-er, O'er Co-lum-bia 1 s true sons let it 




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The shrine of each pa - triot's de - vo - tion, A . . 

The ark then of free-dom's foun-da - tion, Co - 

May the wreaths they have won nev - er with - er, Nor its 



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world of - fers horn - age to thee, 
lum - bia,rode safe* thro' the storm ; 
stars cease to shine on the brave. 



Thy man- dates make he - roes as - 

With gar-lands of vie - t'ry a - 

May the serv - ice u - nit - ed ne'er 



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sem-ble, 

round her, 

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When Lib - er - ty's 

When so proud-ly she 

But hold to their 



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form stands in view ; Thy 

bore her brave crew ; With her 

col - ors so true; The 



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ban-ners make tyr - an-ny tremble, When borne by the red, white, and blue, When 
flag proud-ly float-ing be-fore her, The boast of the red, white, and blue, The 
ar - my and na - vy for- ev-er, Three cheers for the red, white, and blue, Three 



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borne by the red, white, and blue, When borne by the red,white,and blue ; Thy 
boast of the red,white,and blue, The boast of the red, white, and blue ;With her 
cheers for the red, white, and blue, Three cheers for the red, white, and blue ; The 



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ban-ners make tyr - an-ny tremble, 
flag proud-ly float-ing be-fore her, 
ar - my and na - vy for - ev - er, 



When borne by the red, white, and blue. 
The boast of the red, white, and blue. 
Three cheers for the red,white,and blue. 



Har. Fourth Reader. 



MARCH OF THE MEN OF HARLECH. 



155 



William Duthie. 



Welsh National Song. 




1. Men of Har- lech ! In the hoi - low, Do ye hear, like rush-in g bil -low, 

2. Rock - y steeps and pass-es nar - row Flash with spear and flight of ar-row; 




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Wave on wave that sur - ging fol - low Bat- tie's dis 
Who would think of death or sor - rowPDeath is glo 



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tant sound ? 
ry now ! 




'Tis the tramp of Sax- on foe -men, Sax- on spear -men, Sax - on bow -men, 
Hurl the reel- ing horse -man o - ver, Let the earth dead foe- men cov- er ! 




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they knights, or hinds, or yeo - men, They shall bite the ground ! 
of friend, of wife, of lov - er, Trem - bles on a blow ! 



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Loose the folds a - sun -der, Flag we con - quer un-der ! The plac-id sky now 
Strands of life are riv - en ; Blow for blow is giv-en, In dead-ly lock, or 



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bright on high Shall launch its bolts in thun - dcr ! On - ward ! 'tis our 
bat- tie shock, And mer - cy shrieks to heav - en ! Men of liar -lech! 




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needs us, He is brav 
hoar - y, Would you win 



est, . he who leads us ! 
a name in sto - ry ? 



Hon - or 1 s self now proud-ly heads us ! Free-dom ! God, and Right ! 
Strike for home, for life, for glo - ry ! Free-dom ! God, and Right ! 

Har. Fourth Reader. 



156 



PRAISE THE LORD. 



Bishop Richard Makt. 



Joseph Hatdw. 



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1. Praise the Lord! ye heav 1 ns, a - dore Him, Praise Him, an-gels in the 

2. Praise the Lord, for He is glo - rious ; Nev-er shall His prom-ise 







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height; Sun and moon, re - joice be - fore Him ; Praise Ilim, all ye stars of 
fail ; God hath made His saints vie - to - rious, Sin and death shall not pre- 



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light ! Praisethe Lord, for He hath spo-ken ; Worlds his mighty voice o-beyed. 
vail. Praisethe God of our sal - va-tion, Hosts on high, His pow'r pro-claim : 



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Laws which nev - cr shall he hro - ken, For their guid - ance He hath made. 
Ileav'n and earth, and all ere - a - tion, Laud and mag - ni - fy His name. 




Hr. Fourth Reader. 



157 



HOLY NIGHT. 



Michael Haydn. 









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1. Si - lent 


night, 


Ho - ly 


night, 


All 


is calm, all 


is bright 


2. Si - lent 


night, 


Ho - ly 


night, 


Shep 


- herds quake at 


the sight. 


3. Si - lent 


night, 


Ho - ly 


night, 


Son 


of God, love's 


pure light 


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Round yon Vir- gin Moth-er and Child. Ho - ly In - fant so ten-der and mild, 
Glo-riesstreamfromlleav-en a - far, Heav'n-ly hosts sing Al - le- lu-ia; 
Radiant beams from Thy ho- ly face, With the dawn of re - deem - ing grace, 

J I i * s * s . J J J J J -~ * > >~- * 



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Sleep in heav- en - ly peace, 

Christ, the Sav-ior, is born! 

Je - sus, Lord, at Thy birth ! 



Sleep in heav - en - ly peace. 

Christ, the Sav - ior, is born ! 

Je - sus, Lord, at Thy birth ! 



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158 



GUIDE ME, 
Rev. W. Williams. 


O THOU GREAT 

i i n 


JEHOVAH! 


F. IIerold. 


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1. Guide me, 

2. - pen now 
8. When I tread 

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the 
the 

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of 


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vali ! 

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dan, 

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Pil - grim 

Whence the 

Bid my 

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through this bar - ren land ; I am weak, but Thou art might-y, 
heal - ing stream doth flow ; Let the fier - y, cloud - y pil - lar 
anx - ious fears sub - side ; Death of deaths, and all de - struction ! 



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Hold me with Thy 

Lead me all my 

Land me safe on 



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pow'r - ful hand. Bread of Heav - en, 
jour-ney through. Strong De - liv - 'rer, 
Ca - naan's side. Songs of prais - es, 



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Bread of Heav - en, Feed me till I 
Strong De - liv - 'rer, Be Thou still my 
Songs of prais - es, I will ev - er 



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want no more. 

strength and shield. 

give to Thee. 



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Har. Fourth Reader. 



INDEX. 



Page Poet or Source Composer or Source 

141 America S. F. Smith Henry Carey (?) 

146 America the Beautiful .... Katharine Lee Bates .... Will C. Macfarlane 

117 August Celia Thaxter 

150 Battle Hymn of the Republic . Julia Ward Howe 

118 Battle Prayer ' p. H. ilimmel 

10 Begone! Dull Care English Air, 17th Century 

142 Blessed are the Merciful . . Matthew, v : 7 

63 Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind William Shakespeare R. J. S.Stevens 

38 Blow, Bugle, Blow .... Lord Tenuyson F. W^ Jones 

86 By the Brook Franz Abt 

154 Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean D. T. Shaw D. T. Shaw 

132 Come, Brothers, Tune the Lay Ignaz Moscheles 

150 Come, Thou Almighty King . Charles Wesley Felice Giardini 

103 Dewdrops Gleam, The . . . John Guard Felix Mendelssohn 

91 Early Spring Robert Schumann 

22 Envy Charles and Mary Lamb 

78 Faith p. Silcher 

33 Fatherland, The Edvard Griey 

145 Flag of the Free Richard Wagner 

148 God Ever Glorious . . . . S. F. Smith Alexis T. Lwoff 

158 Guide Me, O Thou Great { ,, , T .. _.. ., 

Jehovah! ( liev - W * Wllliams F - Uerold 

144 Hail, Columbia! Joseph Hopkinson Prof. Phyla 

100 Heavenly Father, Hear Our ) 

Cry [ 

147 Heavenly Father, Sovereign ) Songs for the Sancfcuary .... Yelix, Mendelssohn 

137 Holy, Holy, Holy! . . . . . Bishop R. Heber T. B. Dykes 

157 Holy Night ... Michael Haydn 

135 1 Dream of All Things Free . F'elicia Hemans 

58 I will Fxtol Thee Psalm 145 liinck 

49 In the Alps Cornelius Gurlitt 

152 Jerusalem the Golden . . . . Bernard of Cluny Alecander Ewing 

125 Kindly Stars are Peeping, | Franz Liszt 

73 Ladybird 

123 Ladybird Caroline B. Southey 

140 Lead. Kindly Light .... John Henry Newman J. I>. Dykes 

46 Lift is High and Blue, The . . Dinah Maria Mulock ,/. Sneddon 

110 Little Screech Owl, The Robert Schumann 

155 .March of the Men of Harlech William Duthie Welsh National Song 

31 Men of War at Anchor . . . James Smith F. Silcher 

126 Mid This Evening's Splendor 

Har. Fourth Reader. 159 



1G0 INDEX. 

Page Pokt or Source Composer or Source 

14 My Bark is Bounding to the Gale Felix Mendelssohn 

41 New Year's Eve Welsh A ir, " Nos Galam " 

36 Night Hymn at Sea .... Felicia Hemans H. G. Tkompton 

84 O Form of Purest Splendor Felix Mendel **</,, 

152 O Paradise Frederick W. Faber Joseph Bat 

82 On the Sea Q, Dombietti 

35 One by One ....... Adelaide A. Proctor 

143 Onward, Christian Soldiers . . Rev. S. Baring-Gould . . Sir Arthur S. Sullivan 

138 Oxfordshire May Song 

153 Portuguese Hymn James Montgomery J. Heading 

156 Praise the Lord Bishop Richard Mant Joseph Haydn 

106 Praise the Lord W. Vere Mingard . . F. W. Farringlon 

25 Return of Spring tidbert Schumann 

28 River Song F. C. Maker 

42 Roaming Rev. Dr. Troutbeck Franz Abt 

76 Rockaby, Lullaby J. G. Holland //. Ernest Xichol 

68 Rose! What dost Thou Hear ? . Felicia Hemans 

70 Silver Swan, The . . Orlando Gibbons 

64 Since First I Saw Thomas Ford 

13 Sing Not to Me of Sunny Shores James Little J. Sneddon 

92 Soldier, Rest ! James Thomson 

112 Song of Summer, A 

148 Star-Spangled Banner, The . . Francis Scott Key . . . .Jr. Samuel Arnold 

16 Three Ravens, The English Air. J 6th Century 

97 Wandering Franz Schubert 

56 Whale, The Dr. Callcott 

50 When will Spring Return ? . . W. Hodgett J. Frank Proudman 

19 Wind and Sea ...... Bayard Taylor / Spencer Curuen 

139 World's Music, The .... Gabriel Setown .... (.e>rge Henry Howard 

134 Ye Who Shun the Haunts of | r. i rn. tit- a w t 

> David Thomson W.A.Mozart 



Hsr. Fourth Reader. 



UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACILITY 



A A 000 041 773 3 



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UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA 
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