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Full text of "Hartland in the Revolutionary War : her soldiers; their homes, lives, and burial places. The muster rolls of Captain Elias Weld's and Lieutenant Daniel Spooner's Hartland companies. Also Hartland in the War of 1812 and in the Mexican War"

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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01079 0852 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/hartlandinrevoluOOflow 



Jgartland Tn ^he 

Y^ evolutionary ^|WTar 



JjER SOLDIERS; THEIR HOMES, LIVES, 
AND BURIAL PLACES THE MUS- 

TER ROLLS OF CAPTAIN ELIAS WELD'S 
AND LIEUTENANT DANIEL SPOONER'S 
HARTLAND COMPANIES ALSO HART 

LAND IN THE WAR OF 1812 AND IN THE 
MEXICAN WAR 



COMPILED BY 

DENNIS FLOWER 



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SECOND EDITION 
PRICE, FIFTY CENTS 




0OUTARIAN ]QrESS 
HARTXAND, VERMONT 



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PREFACE 

"In response to a letter received from W. P. Baxter, Esq, of 
Chicago, who is engaged in historical research connected 
■with Revolutionary War soldiers, Dennis Flower, accompa- 
nied by John F. Colston, last week visited ten of the fourteen 
or more cemeteries in Hartland for the purpose of getting the 
names and dates of death of those buried in this town. " — Ex- 
tract from Hartland Four Corners correspondence to the Ver- 
mont Standard, May 10, 1906, by Helen L. Flower. 

Starting out with the supposition that there were some fif- 
teen or twenty of these men buried in Hartland — a number 
soon increased to more than three times as large — it was de- 
cided to make a clean sweep and list the names, dates of death, 
and ages of all men the inscriptions on whose tombstones 
show them to have been born prior to 1766. This list, of fif- 
ty-one names, was sent to Mr. Baxter, who found the milita- 
ry records of all but nine; he having access to the Chicago 
libraries, which contain the Revolutionary War Rolls of many 
of the colonies, besides over five thousand family genealogies, 
where a large number of the records are to be found. Thanl s 
are due to J. F. Colston, A. J. Weed, John Webster, Mrs. R.P. 
Miller, Mrs. Sarah Spafford, Mrs. Mary A. Thayer, F. C. 
Burk, Elias Billings, Clarine P. Gallup, Mrs. H. H. Miller, 
Mrs. R. T. Dean, of Barnard, T. C. Lull, of Rutland, Walter 
H. Crockett, of St. Albans, Secretary of the Vermont Society 
of S. A. R.,and others for documents furnished and other as- 
sistance given in compiling these lists. 

Through the influence of L. J. M. Marcy and other Civil 
War veterans one hundred markers have been purchased for 
the graves so far located. 

Great care has been tnken that no name should be included 
herein for which authority is not given by the Revolutionary 
Rolls of Vermont or the colonies; and that in every case the 
identity should be well established. 

Hartland, Vermont Dennis Flower 

December 2, 1914 



T> 



able of Content 




SUBJECT PAGE 

PREFACE 3 

REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS BURIED IN TOWN 5 
HARTLAND SOLDIERS BURIED IN OTHER TOWNS 8 

THOSE WHOSE BURIAL PLACES ARE UNKNOWN 9 

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT THEIR LIVES . 10 
TWO HARTLAND TORIES: — 

I. ZADOCK WRIGHT ...... 37 

H. TITUS SIMONDS • • • • • • 38 

HARTLAND SOLDIERS IN FAMOUS BATTLES 

I. THE BATTLE OF BENNINGTON 38 

H. THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL 39 

HI. MEN WITH SETH WARNER BEFORE QUEBEC • 39 

CAPTAIN ELIAS WELD'S COMPANY • • 39 

LIEUTENANT DANIEL SPOONER'S COMPANY 40 

REVOLUTIONARY WAR PENSIONERS . . 40 

GRANDSONS AND GRANDDAUGHTERS • . 41 

HEADS OF FAMILIES — 1790 .... 41 
OTHER WARS: — 

I. HARTLAND IN THE WAR OF 1812 . 44 

II. LIST OF HARTLAND SOLDIERS OF 1812 46 

III. THE ANNEXATION OF TEXAS AND 

THE RES UL TANT WAR WITH MEXICO 47 

ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS .... 49 



Hartland in the Revolution 



REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS BURIED IN 

THE "PLAIN f " 



Name 

Elisha Flower* 

Peter Gilson 

Noah Aldrich 

Eliphalet Rogers 

Thomas Shaw 

Phinehas Killam .... 

Colonel George Denison 
Captain Aaron Willard 
William Symmes Ashley 

Lot Hodgeman 

Jonathan Hodgeman 
Captain Timothy Lull 
Leonard Spaulding 

John Lull 

Nathan Call 

John Flower* 

Doctor David Hall 
Timothy Spalding 

Adin Williams 

James Mason 

Eleazar Spaulding 
Colonel William Syms 

Simeon Short 

Adonijah Luce 

William Livermore 

Thomas H. Cady 

Simeon Simmons 

Adam Crandall 

Isaac Stevens 

Noah Shepard 



CEMETERY 

Date of Death 

July 5, 1812 

May 3 

October 18 

March 12 

September 4 

October 31 

January 19 

January 4 

June 10 

March 30 

February 17 

September 11 



January 16 

July 21 

August 6 

January 19 

March 11 

February 24 

December 1 

May 14 

December 4 

February 28 

May 31 

April 19 

April 23 

April 22 

September 2 

April 14 



1849 
1846 
1841 
1848 
1825 
1821 
1817 
1846 
1831 
1801 
1811 
1849 
1832 
1789 
1803 
1796 
1826 
1820 
1783 
1805 
1789 
1818 
1796 
1806 
1824 
1825 
1796 



HARTLAND 

Aze 
56 
85 
81 
85 
86 
68 
77 
74 
89 
75 
74 
81 
87 
72 
53v 
85 
63 
85 
59 
71 
84 
79 
75 
79 
54 
64 
83 
40 
no headstone 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 



no headstone 
grave not located 



Joseph Patterson* 

William Flower 

Joseph Remington 

BURIAL, GROUND AT THE CENTER OF THE TOWN 

Thomas Cotton September 29, 1808 

Isaac Main June 23, 1837 



Nehemiah Liscomb 
Ichabod Cushman 
Holmes Cushman 
Darius Liscomb 
Eleazar Bishop 

Samuel Capon 

Reverend Daniel Breck 

Marston Cabot 

Solomon Brown 

Melvin Cotton 

Corporal Joseph Grow 
Robert Cushman 
Stephen Main 
Benjamin Bryaut 

John Hendrick 

Colonel Edward Swan 
Alexander Campbell 
Ephraim Miner 
Samuel Abbott 
Amasa Bryant 



August 29, 1835 

October 14, 1804 

August 31, 1833 

September 7, 1838 

April 15, 1811 

January 13, 1809 

August 12, 1845 

April 12, 1814 

December 3, 1850 

December 16, 1846 

March 9, 1813 

January' 19, 1819 

March 19, 1838 

December 17, 1801 

November 8, 1810 

July 3, 1805 

April 13, 1813 

December 20, 1828 

September 25, 1825 

June 27, 1832 



"*■ OLD BURIAL GROUND AT THE CENTER 

Nathaniel Rogers April 4, 1800 

THE GALLUP YARD AT NORTH HARTLAND 



William Gallup 

Aaron Currier 
Thomas Bagley 
Nathaniel Weed 
Moses Currier 



THE 



August 13, 1803 

WEED BURIAL GROUND 

May 28, 1812 

June 19, 1838 

November 29, 1818 
March 20. 1791 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 



THE JUDGE CUTTS BURIAL, GROUND 

Colonel Oliver Willard . September 15, 1810 
Sergeant Jeremiah Richardson • Sept. 12, 1834 

Captain Paul Davison May 12, 1795 

Lieut. -Gov. Paul Spooner September 4, 1789 

Thomas Lawton June 9, 1829 

Asa Taylor September 23, 1816 

Nathan Billings August 27, 1818 

Corporal Joseph Evans • • October 12, 1827 

Moses Webster October 11, 1844 

Timothy Carey January 26, 1826 

Oliver Taylor May 19, 1797 

John Sumner October 15, 1779 

Deacon William Sumner •• July 21, 1850 

Thomas Liscomb March 2, 1833 

Deacon Dana Davison •• January 31, 1827 

Phinehas Strong May 5, 1822 

Zebulon Lee January 31, 1833 

Asa Wright* age and date of death 

Daniel Spooner no 

THE DENSMORE HILL BURIAL GROUND 

Lieutenant Ephraim Carey • • June 23, 1826 

Lemuel Scott September 24, 1823 

Captain David JRitter • • October 7, 1823 

HARTLAND HILL CEMETERY 

Asahel Doubleday April 24, 1843 

Seth Darling March 27, 1825 

THE GALLUP CEMETERY 

John Dunbar June 12, 1827 

John Orcutt November 4, 1833 

Isaac Morgan October 31, 1817 

James Denison April 26, 1813 

Elisha Gallup August 24, 1800 

Robert Dunbar July 2, 1831 

Aaron Rice November 3, 1799 



81 
77 
30 
43 
84 
70 
68 
70 
90 
85 
48- 
70 
89 
83 
84 
71 
90 

unknown 
headstone 



87 
74 
78 

91 

61 

75 
80 
68 
68 
73 
81 

4a 



e 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 



HARTLAND VILLAGE CEMETERY 

Zelotes Gates March 19, 1823 

Captain Nathaniel Cole • • January 12, 1846 
Major Edmond Freeman • September — , 1854 

THE WALKER YARD 

Gardner Marcy October 8, 1837 

Isaac Sargent November 26, 1818 

THE CEMETERY AT JENNEVILLE 



Nathan Kitteredge 
Robert Morrison 

Eliakim Rice 

Ensign Thomas Weeden 
William Danforth 
Thomas Hoadley 

David Morrison 

Benjamin Jaquith 

Jacob Tuxbury 

Francis Cabot 

Peleg Thomas 

Samuel Jenney 



Joseph Marcy 



October 24, 1840 .... 74 

June 10, 1802 • • • • 56 

August 4, 1834 .... 78 

June 11, 1824 .... 95 

October 17, 1813 76 

January 20, 1829 • • - . 92 

January 5, 1826 .... 69 

February 11, 1810 .... 72 

May 12, 1819 • • • • 70 

February 20, 1831 ... 78 

December 10, 1836 ... 73 

January 1, 1802 • ■ • • 72 

MARCY TOMB 

age and date of death unknown 



68 
87 
90 

75 

81 



HARTLAND SOLDIERS BURIED IN OTHER TOWNS 



quechee: Thomas Richardson • • — , 1828 
Quartus Alexander • • — , 1847 
Woodstock: Daniel Marsh • December 29, 1827 
north royalton: Jeremiah Rust • Feb. 5, 1838 
russtown: Phinehas Rust • • May 10, 1832 
Niel Rust ... March 24, 1813 
so. Woodstock: Thos. Park Rood • Oct. 10, 1795 

" Colonel Ebenezer Bridge 

warner, N. H. : Joseph Burke 
weare, N. H. Samuel Smith 
ashtabula, ohio Shadrach Dodge 



85 
86 

78 
78 
56 
63 



HARTLAND IN THE RE VOL UTIONARY WAR l 

THOSE WHOSE BURIAL PLACES ARE UNKNOWN 



Captain Elias Weld died in Hartland 

Chester Marcy " " 

Elnathan Walker probably in the Walker Yard 

Shubel Lamphear • • died in the West, March 28, 1829,aged78 
Corporal Moses Barron • • • wife buried in Cutts Yard 

Corporal John Grow wife buried in Center Yard 

John Goldsbury moved to Barre 

William Goldsbury William Patterson James Richardson 

Wilder Willard "* Robert Anderson Timothy Fisher 

Joseph Olmstead Parsons Antizil Jonathan Wright 

Nehemiah Closson Abijah Lamphire William Hopkins 

Luke Lamphire Thomas Duncan Benjamin Munsell 

Joseph Mathews Absalom Holmes Samuel Williams 

Jonathan Tylor Daniel Bugbee Thomas Emmons 

Ichabod Hatch Ebenezer Call William Johnson 

Nathaniel Bugbee William Jones Timothy Banister 

Lezedel Munsell James Harwood Ezra Elsworth 

Willard Cotton Luther Cotton Samuel Weeden 

Ambrose Grow . Samuel Grow Joseph Grow, Jr. 

John Gardiner Timothy Clark William Wheeler 

Ensign John Laiton Nego Darak John Williams 

Isaiah Burke Jonathan Burke, 3d Daniel Ainsworth 

James Kelsey Charles Jones Jonathan Burke 

John Williams, Jr. Thomas Clark Elihu Smead 

Ivory Luce Zimri Luce Andrew Luce 

William Cobb Edward Wood Jonathan Wood 

Joseph Gallup David Pierce Elisha Howard 

Thomas Smith Walter Smith Jedediah Leavens 

Esta Russell Daniel Badger Silas Dutton 

Joel Bishop John Nichols George Back 

Eli Willard James Willard John Brown 

Oliver Russ Anthony Rust Noah Jenne 

John Moses Joseph Marsh John S. Harvey 



10 HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONAR Y WAR 

John Scott Asa White Moses Evans 

Christopher Billings Zenos Lull • • moved out west 

John Billings Captain Samuel Paine 

Ensign Jonah Loomis Sergeant Nathaniel Killam 

Lieut. Joel Mathews f Brigadier-General Roger Enos 

Edward Willard: probably in Willard Yard, at foot of Mace Hill 
* Government markers erected in 1911 \Commissary 

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT THEIR HOMES AND LIVES 

ffTTl MOTH Y LULL, Hartland's first settler, was born 

in Concord, Mass., in 1730. He served in the 

King's armies throughout the last French and Indian 




War, 1755 and 1756, being present at the Massacre of 
Fort William Henry and in most of the operations that 
resulted in the conquest of Canada. It is supposed 
that he was attached to that portion of the army which made 
and used the old military road from Charlestown (Number 
Four) to Crown Point, thus becoming familiar with this sec- 
tion and eager to acquire land here." 

"I have a certified copy of his record from the Secretary of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He is said to have 
been a direct descendant of Lord Mansfield, of the old Eng- 
lish nobility." —From a letter from T.C.Lull. 

"Plartland, a post town in the eastern part of Windsor 
County, in latitude 43 degrees, 34 minutes, and longitude 4 de- 
grees, 34 minutes; and is bounded: north, by Hartford; east, 
by Plainfield, N. H„, from which it is separated by the Con- 
necticut River; south, by Windsor; and west, by Woodstock. 
This township lies fifty miles southeasterly from Montpelier, 
sixty-two northeast from Bennington, one hundred from Bos- 
ton, It was chartered July 10, 1761 by the name of Hertford, 
containing 25,350 acres. The charter was confirmed by New 
York in 1766. The name was altered to Hartland. June 15, 
1782." — Ref., Thompson's Vermont, Part IU, page S8. 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 11 

At an afternoon session of the Vermont Legislature: Sat- 
urday, "June 15, 1782, Hertford changed to Waterford"; re- 
mained Waterford over Sunday and to the afternoon of Mon- 
day, June 17, 1782: "on motion of Paul Spooner the name was 
changed to Hartland." — Ref., "Governor and Council." 

"The settlement of the township was commenced in May, 
1763 by Timothy Lull, from Dummerston, in this state. At 
this time there were no inhabitants on the Connecticut River 
between Charlestown (then Number Four) and Hartland. A 
few families had, however, settled in Newbury, about forty 
miles north of this place. Mr. Lull moved into town in the 
following manner. Having purchased a log canoe, he pro- 
ceeded in that up Connecticut River with his furniture and 
family, consisting of a wife and four children. He arrived at 
the mouth of a considerable brook in Hartland, where he 
landed his family, tied his canoe, and, breaking a junk bottle 
in the presence of his little family, named the stream Lull's 
Brook, by which name it has ever since been known. He 
proceeded up the brook about a mile to a log hut, which had 
been previously erected near the place now called Sumner's 
Village. Here he spent his days and died at the advanced 
age of eighty-one years. His son, Timothy, lately deceased, 
was the first child born in town. He was born in December, 
1764, on which occasion the midwife was drawn by the father 
from Charlestown upon the ice, a distance of twenty-three 
miles, upon a handsled. Mr. Lull had to suffer many pri- 
vations and hardships for several years; but, possessing a 
strong constitution and a vigorous mind, he overcame all ob- 
stacles, accumulated a handsome property, lived respected, 
and died generally lamented. 

"Statistics of 1840: Horses, 454; Cattle, 2,786; Sheep, 16,323; 
Swine, 1,583; Wheat, bushels, 4,403; Oats, 38,663; Rye, 4,637; 
Buckwheat, 3,664; Indian Corn, 9,127; Potatoes, 79,395; Hay, 
tons, 7,211; Sugar, pounds, 25,280; Wool, 48,575. Population, 
2,3H." —Thompson's Vermont, Part 1H, pages 88 and 89." 



12 HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 

Timothy Lull, the first settler, was the captain of a compa- 
ny in Colonel Joseph Marsh's Cumberland County Regiment. 
Aaron Willard was a lieutenant in this company; Asa Taylor 
was ensign. The name of Timothy Lull appears in Captain 
Elias Weld's company, Lieutenant Daniel Spooner's compa- 
ny, and Captain John Benjamin's company; but whether it 
is that of his son, Timothy, Jr., then a youth sixteen or seven- 
teen years old, or that of Timothy, Sr., is not known. 

Zenos Lull. A history of Windsor County, edited by Aid- 
rich and Holmes about 1895 states that in the summer of 1775 
Captain John Grant (or Grout) came to this vicinity in search 
of recruits for Seth Warner's Regiment. Zenos Lull was 
one of the five who enlisted; he joined the regiment at Crown 
Point, from which place it proceeded down the lake to Cana- 
da and took part in the operations that resulted in the cap- 
ture of St. John's and Montreal and the flight of Carleton to 
Quebec. The Census of 1790 shows him to have been a res- 
ident of Hartland. 

John Lull was a cousin of Timothy and the father of Na- 
than, and came to Hartland shortly after the former. At 
one time the Lulls were the most numerous family in town. 
The late L. A. £hedd said he once knew of eleven different 
families of that name living in town at one time. At pres- 
ent there is none, and very few persons in Hartland have the 
Lull blood in their veins. 

John Flower, the father of Elisha. The Flowers came 
from Hartford, Conn, at the early settlement of the town, in 
exactly what year is not known. They made their first 
pitch on what was afterward the Parson Breck farm, subse- 
quently exchanging with someone who desired "improved" 
land, for the land now occupied by W. E. Davis. 

Elisha Flower was in Captain Benjamin Wait's Windsor 
company of rangers. He was the first settler en the farm 
and built the large two-story house now the home of W. K. 
Davis. 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 13 

William Flower, a cousin of Elisha, served in the Revolu 
iion as a captain's waiter. He never was regularly enlisted, 
but it is said that Judge Elihu Luce was on the point of se- 
curing a pension for him, when he died. 

David Pierce, father of James Pierce and grandfather of 
Mrs. Rosaline (Pierce) Clifford, former wife of Don C. Flower, 
served in Vermont. He married Keziah Packard, lived on 
or near Densmore Hill, and may be buried there. 

Thomas Shaw settled on the farm now owned by Tobias 
Burk, where he lived and died. "It was my business when 
a boy to get up in the morning at four o'clock and build a 
fire in the fire-place in Grandfather's room, hang the tea-ket- 
tle on the crane to heat the water for his flip, and then to fill 
his pipe. He would get up, drink his flip, and have a smoke, 
after which we would go back to bed and sleep until seven. 
He was a very robust healthy man, and might have lived 
years longer, though he was eighty-six at the time of his 
death, but for a cancer of the breast." — William I. Allen, a 
grandson, now living. 

Joseph Remington served in the Colonies before coming to 
Vermont. "Marched on the alarm in Lieutenant Daniel 
Spooner's company." He lived in a house that stood just 
across the road from the present site of John D. Rogers' low- 
er barn. fie had gone to the village to get his first pension 
money; and, after getting in sight of his house, dropped dead 
in the road. Mrs. Eliza (Lamphear) Shattuck is his grand- 
daughter. She is also the granddaughter of Shubel Lam- 
phear, Hartland's blind showman, who once lived in the Ar- 
temas Beers house, the first house below W. E. Davis' — 
burned a few years ago. Shubel Lamphear was owner of 
a puppet-show, and died while exhibiting in the West. 

Isaac Main lived on the James Bates farm. 

Marston Cabot made the first survey of the town, receiving 
therefor the choice of a lot in the same. He settled on 
what is now the town farm. 



14 HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

Stephen Main lived on the farm at present occupied by 
Will Brown. 

Francis Cabot came from Woodstock, Conn., and made the 
first settlement on the Foster T. Alexander farm, now owned 
by Albert S. Jenne. 

William Symmes Ashley originally bought a tract one 
mile square; but sold off several farms, reserving for a home 
the farm now owned by G. E. Graham. 

Colonel William Symmes, foster father of William Symmes 
Ashley, was town clerk. The following epitaph appears on 

his grave-stone: 

"His company was much admired, 
And by the people was desired; 
But now, alas, his glass is run, 
And left us here his loss to mourn." 
Moses Webster was at the Battle of Bunker Hill. He was 
placed as guard over a powder-house as a blind to the British, 
the powder having been previously removed. He lived on 
the farm now owned by his great-grandson, D. C. Webster. 
He marched in Elias Weld's company to Royalton, upon the 
burning of that town by the Indians. After arriving there, 
he and his neighbor, Thomas Lawton, began the search for 
something to eat. They found nothing but a pail of swill. 
Being nearly famished after their long march, they "laid-to" 
and partook of the contents. 

Thomas Lawton lived on the farm now occupied by John 
Webster. He came from Petersham, Conn., and has many 
descendants still living in this vicinity. 

Major Jo '1 Mathews was here at the organization of the 
town, and was elected an assessor, an overseer of highways, 
and one of the three constables. He was a very prominent 
Vermonter in the v, ar, being major in Colonel Joseph Marsh's 
(upper) Cumberland County Regiment, and afterward com- 
missary of issues. See pages 811, 812, 824, and 825 in the 
Vermont Revolutionary Rolls. 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 15 

Joseph and Moses Evans -were brothers who were at the 
Battle of Bunker Hill. 

Colonel Ebenezer Bridge came to Hartland from Fitch- 
burg, Mass. He was captain of a company at Bunker Hill; 
this company he marched to Boston from Fitchburg. There 
is a tablet at the latter place commemorating the event. 
He was commissioned Colonel after the battle. He re- 
signed, remarking, "Think I will make a better farmer than 
soldier." He is buried in the Henry W. Walker Yard at 
South Woodstock. — Ref., Guy Bridge, a great-grandson. 

John Hendrick settled on the farm now owned by George 
D. Wood. 

Lieutenant Robert Morrison was a blacksmith. His 6hcp 
stood beside the road near the house now owned and occu- 
pied by Frank C. Burk. He was one of Hartland' s promi- 
nent men. David Morrison was a brother. 

There were eighty soldiers of the name of Luce in the Rev- 
olutionary War. Adonijah Luce served from Massachu- 
setts. His wife, Abigail Arthorn, who died in 1790, was the 
first corpse carried to its grave by a team in town. The 
farm where Mr. Luce lived is now owned by Arthur Ly- 
man. Adonijah Luce's epitaph: 

"What have we in this barren land? 

Our Jesus is not here. 
Our eyes will not be satisfied 
Until he doth appear." 

Alexander Campbell lived on the E. F. Spear farm at the 
Center, now owned by Mr. Kibler; and kept hotel there in 
the old days. 

Sergeant Nathan Billings was in Captain Jesse Safford's 
company of provincial troops, sergeant in Captain John 
Burt's company in the service of the United States; also in 
Elias Weld's company and Captain Joseph Safford's com- 
pany. He was grandfather of the late Elias Billings. 

Nehemiah Liscomb resided in the Sixth School District. 



16 HASTLANB IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

Darius Liscomb's home was the farm long occupied by O. 
F. Heminway. One of the Liscombs owned the farm and 
built the house now occupied by Mrs. Lillian Hatch. 

Zebulon Lee was born in "Wellington, Conn., September 23, 
1742. — Ref.,the Lee Genealogy, which contains a picture 
of his house in Hartland as it appeared in 1899; this house is 
Bupposed to have been built between 1770 and 1775. The 
farm is situated between the Samuel Taylor place — owned 
by J. O. Wright — and the Grout schoolhouse. 

Jeremiah Richardson lived on the farm where Charles 
Hoisington lives now. It adjoins the old Zebulon Lee farm 
on the south. 

Oliver Taylor lived on the farm owned by the late Nathan 
Harlow. 

Asa Taylor lived on the first farm north of the old Govern- 
or Spooner farm now called "Fairview." He was ensign 
in Timothy Lull's company. 

Lieutenant-Governor Paul Spooner made the first settle- 
ment on the farm at present owned by Charles Gates — "Fair- 
view." He was Lieutenant-Governor four years, a Judge of 
the Superior Court eight years, and a Judge and Register of 
Probate for Windsor Counly two years. He was born in 
Dartmouth, Mass., March 20, (some say, 30)1746, and died at 
Hartland, Vermont, September 4, 1789. His funeral on Sep- 
tember six was attended by a concourse of people estimated 
from five hundred to one thousand. Rev. Aaron Hutchin- 
son, of Pomf ret, delivered the address. At its close the ' 'Fu- 
neral Thought" was sung. He has no gravestone; in fact, 
the exact location of his grave is not known. 

Asahel Doubleday was at the Battle of Saratoga and was 
present at the surrender of liurgoyne. It is said to have 
been a favorite remark of his: "He" (Burgoyne) " was a 
mighty fine-looking man, and I vum! I pitied him." 

Holmes and Robert Cushman were brothers; and came 
from Middleboro, Massachusetts. They served in that state. 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 17 

Holmes Cushman lived on the A. J. Hoisington farm. 

Ichabod Cushman settled on the farm now owned by H. 
A. Gilson — the Marshall Harlow place. 

Lieutenant Daniel Spooner commanded a company, com- 
posed mainly of Hartland men, that "marched to Orford on 
the alarm"; and was a brother of Lieutenant-Governor Paul 
Spooner. A great-grandson, Frank Whittaker, resides on 
the Daniel Spooner farm. 

Moses Evans was taken prisoner, carried to Canada, and 
kept almost a year; he made his escape and returned home. 
Petitioned the legislature, sitting at Windsor, for pay for loss 
of gun, blanket, time, etc. , which was paid: £ 29, s 1 , d\. (The 
Vermont Revolutionary Rolls, pages b9i and 695.) 

Quartus Alexander located on the farm owned by his grand- 
Bon, Frederick Alexander, until his death recently. He was 
the first blacksmith in this part of the town. 

Samuel Jenne came from Bedford, Mass., in 1770, and set- 
tled on the farm owned by the late Sebastian Jenne, who 
was his great-grandson. 

Benjamin Jaquith came from Massachusetts about 1776, 
and settled on the farm owned by his great-grandson, the late 
Wesley A. Jaquith; now owned by Ord Watson. 

Isaac Morgan came from Groton, Conn., in 1784, and was the 
first settler on the farm owned till his death by his grandson, 
Daniel F. Morgan; now in the possession of Lewis Marcott. 
He was a privateersman, and at the burning of New London 
by Arnold. 

Thomas Bagley at one time lived in a house (long since de- 
molished) southwest of ClarineHadley's, on the opposite side 
of the road, near a large willow tree. The old cellar still re- 
mains. Arnold G., William W. , and Cyrus R. — the last two 
named being Civil War veterans — are grandsons. 

John Dunbar came from Connecticut about 1780. He 
served in a New Hampshire regiment at the Battle of Ben 
nington. He made the first settlement on the farm occu- 



tS HARTJLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

pied by Arthur Kneen. Robert Dunbar, brother of John, 
came from Connecticut about 1780 and settled on the farm 
now owned by George Bagley. 

Zelotes Gates lived on the farm now owned and occupied by 
Frank G. Spear. Mrs. Frances Spear is his granddaughter. 

Revolutionary War service of Zelotes Gates: — 

Appears with the rank of private on Lexington Alarm Roll 
of Captain Daniel Bent's company of Colonel Nathaniel Spar- 
hawk's regiment, which marched April 20 in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 177.", frcm Rutland, Mass. to Cambridge. 
Length of service, six days. Appears as private on muster 
and pay rolls of Captain David Bent's company, Colonel Na- 
thaniel Sparhawk's regiment; time of service at twenty miles 
per day, eleven days; travel and home, two hundred twenty- 
six miles. Company detached August 20, 1777, and marched 
to Bennington, Vermont on an alarm. Appears as private 
on muster and pay roll of Captain Jotham Houghton's com- 
pany; service frcm November 3, 1778 to November 19, 1778, 
seventeen days. Company detached from Colonel Spar- 
hawk's 7th Regiment, Ceneial Warner's brigade, to reinforce 
guards at the barracks in Rutland under Colonel Jacob Ger- 
rish, and to escort trccps of Convention at Saratoga to En- 
field, Conn., according to an order of Council. Appears 
with rank of private on muster and pay roll of Captain Jo- 
tham Houghton's company, Colonel Samuel Denny's Second 
Regiment, General Fellows' brigade; service from October 
24, 1779 to December 1, 1779, inclusive, and eight days at 
Claverack. 

Peter Gilson's home was on the farm at present owned by 
E. B. Maxham. He was in Washington's army, and entered 
New York at the evacuation of the city by the British. ' 'There 
were forty-four of us old fellows present today," remarked 
"Uncle Peter" on his return from some gathering at "The 
Three Corners," as related by his grandson, Henry Gil6on ,of 
Qaechee, who was a small boy at the time of the gathering. 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 19 

Nathaniel Weed came to Hartland from Weare, N. H. in 
1789; he bought of several persons tracts of land, all of -which 
went in to make up three good-sized farms, which remained 
in the Weed family one hundred and fourteen years, until sold 
by his 'great-grandsons, Asa J. and Nathaniel Weed, in 1903. 
Nathaniel Weed, the subject of this paragraph, marched from 
Weare to Lexington, arriving after the battle. He was aft- 
erward engaged in transporting supplies, etc. 

Thomas Park Rood made the first settlement on the farm 
lately owned by his great-great-grandson, M. J. Holt, now of 
Kedron Tavern, South Woodstock. He built the second 
barn put up in town. He is buried in the Henry W. Walk- 
er Yard at South Woodstock; the stone bears this inscription: 

"In memory of Mr. Thomas P. Rood, who died Oct'r 10th, 
A. D. 1795, ae 63. He moved to Hartland in the year 1762, one 
of the first settlers, bore the bruut of a uew, uncultivated wil- 
derness, lived to see 5 of his tender offspring taken by death, 
one only left to set this stone. 

"Behold and see as you pass by. 
As you are now so once was 1. 
As I am now so you must be; 
Prepare yourselves to follow me." 

Daniel Breck was born in Boston; he was a chaplain in the 
Continental Army, and was with Montgomery near Quebec. 
He was for several years town clerk. The old Parson Breck 
homestead was for a long time owned by John Spear, a son- 
in-law of Parson Breck. 

Solomon Brown came from Connecticut in 1780; he served 
in that state, having been enlisted at the age of fourteen. 
(Ref. — "Connecticut Men in the Revolutionary War"; also 
the Brown Genealogy.) 

Nathan Call first settled on the farm now owned by U. H. 
Dutton, afterward selling to the Walkers, who located on 
the opposite side of the road, and going from there to what 
is called the Conant place on "The Plain." 



20 HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 

Colonel Elnathan Walker, born in Dighton, Mass., Februa- 
ry 9, 1727, lived in Woodstock, Conn., then in Sturbridge, 
Mass., coming to Hartland in 1778 with his family, consist- 
ing of his second wife (Hannah Bugbee)and their two sons, 
Elnathan, Jr. , aged thirteen, and James, aged ten. They set- 
tled on that part of the farm owned now by U. H. Dutton, 
which lies on the lower side of the road, the house standing 
just north of where the barns are today. Subsequently t hey 
bought out the Calls, their neighbors just across the road. 
This farm, noted as one of the best in Hartland, has been the 
home of the Walkers and in the Walker name ever since, up 
to the death of James and Simon, great-grandsons of Elna- 
than, Sr. It was then bought by O. W. Waldo, husband of 
Frances M. (a sister of James and Simon) who with another 
sister, Mrs. Mary A. Thayer, until recently lived on the old 
farm. Colonel Walker was a clothier, but possessed great 
mechanical ingenuity; he made epinning-wheels for both 
wool and flax; he was an excellent rake-maker; and supplied 
the inhabitants of the new settlements with various useful 
articles, such as rakes, chests of drawers, etc. He was of a 
bold fearless spirit, of fine physical proportions, df noble ap- 
pearance, and at eighty-seven years of age stood as erect as 
most men at thirty. "I remember," says a grandson, "see- 
ing him run to overtake a team, and with considerable rapid- 
ity, in his eighty-eighth year." Elnathan, Jr. married: first, 
Olive, daughter of Major Joseph Call; second, Olive, daugh- 
ter of Lieutenant Jonathan Burke. James married Jane, 
daughter of Lieutenant Robert Morrison. The Colonel's 
military service was performed before coming to Hartland. 
"There were nearly one hundred of the name in Massachu- 
setts, who took part, more or less, in the Revolution." He 
died in Hartland, November, 1815, and is undoubtedly buried 
in the old Walker Burial Ground, where his two sons — and 
in fact most of this branch of the family — are buried; but the 
grave is unmarked and cannot be identified. — Ref., "The 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 21 

Walkers of the Old Colony and Their Descendants." For 
his Revolutionary record I am indebted to W. P. Baxter, Esq., 
of Chicago. 

Isaac Sargent came from Weare. His farm and the same 
house he lived in were recently sold by his great-grandson, 
Frank Sargent, to Frank Burk. Isaac Sargent was a pri- 
vate in Capt. Samuel McConnel's company in General Stark's 
brigade, raised out of the regiment of New Hampshire mili- 
tia, Thomas Stickney colonel, which company marched from 
Pembroke in that state in July, 1777, and joined the Northern 
Continental Army at Bennington and Stillwater. Extract 
from payroll, Captain McConnel's company: — "Exeter, No- 
vember 27, 1777. Isaac Sargent: Time of engagement, July 
19; time of discharge, September 18; time in service, two 
months." — Official statement furnished to Hon. Charles 
H. Darling, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Jul} 7 29, 1905, by 
F. C. Ainsworth, Major-General, IX. S. A., the military secre- 
tary. 

Isaac Sargent married Ruth Blaisdell; their daughter, Ruth 
Sargent married Levi Marcy, whose daughter, Nancy Marcy 
married Jason Darling; the last-named two were the parents 
of Charles Edgar Darling. 

Melvin Cotton lived either on the Ward Cotton place or on 
the Porter Cotton farm. 

William Danforth's epitaph: 

''Refuse me not this little spot 

My weary limbs to rest, 
Till I shall rise with sweet surprise, 
And be forever blest." 

Shadrach Dodge was born, probably in Brookfield, Mass., 
August 15, 1762; and died in Ashtabula, Ohio in 1849. These 
children by a second marriage were born to him in Hartland: 
William C, Mary, Roderick L., and Major R. According to 
the New Hampshire Revolutionary' Rolls, Volume XV: page 
seven, Shadrach Dodge was a private in the second company 



22 HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

of Colonel Ashley's regiment of militia, which marched from 
Westmoreland, Chesterfield, and Hinsdale to Ticonderoga on 
an alarm May 8, 1777. He enlisted June 6, 1777, for eight 
months; and was discharged, January 10, 1778. He re-en- 
listed July 7, 1779, for one year in Captain Waitstill Scott's 
company; he served five years. He was wounded in the 
hand; and was a pensioner. He served under Lafayette, 
was in his service at the surrender of Yorktown, and met La- 
fayette later when the French general passed through Hart- 
land during his visit to this country. Most of Mr. Dodge's 
children were born in Hartland. (Ref., Frederick A. Dodge, 
Bridgewater, Vermont.) 

Isaac Stevens was a private in Captain Charles Nelson's 
company in Major Brown's detachment in service of the U- 
nited Colonies near Quebec; he enlisted November 26, 1775; 
was in Simeon Stevens' Newbury company, 1779; in Captain 
Elias Weld's company, 1780. He was a large land-owner, 
and built the hotel and kept public house there. Through 
indorsing for neighbors and iriends financially embarrassed 
he lost a large part of his property. 

"General Enos first appeared in Vermont history in March, 
1780, when the town of Enosburg was granted to him and his 
associates. He appears next as commander of all Vermont 
troops in service, when he was among the few cognizant of the 
'Haldimand Correspondence' and governed his military move- 
ments accordingly. His residence was in Hartland until aft- 
er 1791, as the record shows that he represented that town on 
several occasions frcm October, 1782 to October, 1792. The 
closing years of his life were spent with his daughter, Mrs. Ira 
Allen in Colchester, where he died, October 6, 180S, in the sev- 
enty-third year of his age. He was a major-general in the 
Vermont militia. "-"Governor and Council," Vol.11: page 108. 

"Colonel Ira Allen, brother of Ethan Allen, born at Corn- 
wall, Conn., April 21, 1751, married Jerusha, daughter of 
General Roger Enos, of Hartland." — Ibid, Vol. I: page 111. 




HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 23 

In October, 1780 Captain Abisha Sampson, 
in command of a company of militia, marched 
to Barnard on the occasion of the Indian at- 
tack at that place; his company was composed of fifty-one 
men, several of whom -were from Hartland, while others were 
from Windsor and West Windsor. Five at least were from 
Woodstock, namely, Phineas Williams, James Harwood, Tim- 
othy Knox, James Sanderson, and Elias Thomas. Of the 
last-named man we copy the following statement from Child' s 
Windsor County Gazetteer: "During the Revolutionary 
War Elias Thomas and about twenty others from Woodstock 
marched through the forest to Saratoga, N. Y., and tendered 
their services to General Gates, and assisted in taking Bur- 
goyne's army, October 17, 1777. For this service they neith- 
er asked nor received any compensation." 

Joel Mathews, Luke Lamphire, James Harwood, Ebenezer 
Call, and Sergeant Nathaniel Killam were in Woodstock in 
1790, as shown by the United States Census of that year. 

Elisha Gallup, William Gallup, and Samuel Willard came 
from Stonington, Conn. The former lived on the farm now 
owned by Clarine Gallup. The latter lived where Tobias 
Burk lives today; he built the large commodious farmhouse 
destroyed by fire a few years ago. 

Phinehas Killam lived on the George Merrill farm. 

The Woods lived on Densmore Hill, and probably are 
buried there. They served in New Hampshire troops. 

Lieutenant Jedediah Leavens was the first town clerk of 
Reading, having been elected in 1780. 

Noah Aldrich owned the farm now occupied by Nathaniel 
Spafford. 

Samuel Smith came to Hartland from Weare and settled on 
what has since been known as Smith Hill; here he lived many 
years and reared a family. His descendants moved 'out 
west" some fifty years ago. Samuel Smith's wife is buried 
in the Weed cemetery; but he returned to Weare, and died 



24 HARTLAND IN THE RE VOL UTIONARY WAR 

there. " 'Capt.' Samuel Smith belonged to the 'Troops of 
the Line' and served as one of Washington's Life Guard on 
the Hudson after the attempts were made to capture the 
great patriot." — From Miss Darling's "History and Anni- 
versary of Hartland" in the Vermonter for November, 1913. 

Joseph Marcy, sergeant in the company of minute-men of 
■which Nathaniel Healey was captain; Ebenezer Learned be- 
ing colonel of the regiment to which this company belonged. 
4 'Order for bounty and coat, or its equivalent in money, dated 
Roxbury Camp, Nov. 2, 1775. ' ' (Ref. , ' 'Massachusetts Soldiers 
and Sailors in the Revolutionary War": Volume XX.) "Jo- 
seph Marcy, born Nov. 22, 1758, married Mary Cole, of Middle- 
boro, Mass.; died at Hartland, Oct. 13, 1838. She died Aug. 
9, 1854." (From "Record of Marcy Family.") Sergeant 
Marcy, on coming to this town, settled on the farm recently 
sold by his grandson, L. J. M. Marcy, to Kimball R. Perry. 

Gardner Marcy, brother to Chester, was very prominent in 
town affairs. He built the house where W. W. Bagley now 
lives. "Gardner Marcy was stationed at West Point, was 
drilled by Baron Steuben, saw Arnold go on board the 'Vul- 
ture', and was present when Washington arrived." 

"Sergeant Joseph Marsh, no place of residence given, 
served as a sergeant in Capt. Tyler's company, Col. Reed's 
regiment, his name appearing upon a return dated Dec. 10, 
1775, although the date of enlistment and discharge is not re- 
corded. The company was made up of men who were resi- 
dents of Mendon, Uxbridge, and Upton." (From the Massa- 
chusetts Secretary of State.) Joseph Marsh, born in Walpole 
(then Mendon), Mass., Dec. 26, 1731, served also in the French 
and Indian war. 

"Daniel Marsh, residence Mendon, Mass., enlisted to serve 
to the credit of that town for the term of nine months, and 
served as a private in Capt. Bradford's company, Col. Bailey's 
Massachusetts Line regiment, from Aug. 6, 1779 to May 6, 
1780, he being reported as being sixteen years of age at the 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 25 

time of enlistment. He next enlisted for the term of three 
years from Feb. 8, 1781, and served as a private in Capt. John 
Mill's company, Col. Vose's Massachusetts Line regiment; 
as shown by muster rolls for April, 1781 — February, 1782, he 
being reported as having been promoted to a drummer, June 
25, 1782." (Ref., "Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the 
Revolutionary War" : Volume X.) 

Sergeant Joseph Marsh, fourth in descent from John Marsh 
and wife, Sarah, of Boston, 1669, married Deborah Staples; 
lived in Douglas and in Mendon, Mass. and in Hartland, Vt. 
His son, Daniel, born in Douglas, Mass., Feb. 1, 1763, married 
Rhoda Taft, born Sept. 3, 1765. Henry Taft, son of Daniel 
and Rhoda Marsh, bad a daughter, Louise R. (Marsh) Sturte- 
vant, -whose daughter, Pearl E. married J. G. Underwood. 

Chloe, daughter of Joseph and Deborah Marsh, born in Men- 
don, April 30, 1768, married there, Oct. 6, 1786, Seth Darling; 
he born in Mendon, March 21, 1764. Jason, son of Seth and 
Chloe Darling, married Nancy Marcy. 

Lieutenant Jonathan Burke, Jr., his two sons (Jonathan 3d 
and Joseph) and Isaiah Burke. "Tradition says that a fam- 
ily or families by the name of Burke came up the Connecti- 
cut River in a boat or boats to Westminster, Vt., where some 
of them made a permanent settlement; and others soon moved 
farther up the Connecticut Valley. Jesse, Simon, and Silas 
remained at Westminster, but their father, Jonathan, Sr. with 
the other three sons, Jonathan, Jr., Isaiah, and Solomon, and 
also Jonathan, 3d and Joseph, sons of Jonathan, Jr. , moved far- 
ther up the Connecticut. Jonathan, Sr. and Solomon stopped 
at Windsor, where they lived and died; they are buried in the 
'Old South' Burial Ground at Windsor. Isaiah, and Jona- 
than, Jr. and his sons came to Hartland, where the first two 
lived and died. Isaiah died in 1802. Abel Farwell, a son- 
in-law (afterward a lieutenant in the War of 1812) who owned 
a grist and saw mill near the site of A. W. Varney's black- 
B nith shop, was administrator of his estate. He owned land 



28 HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 

in Hartland and in Windsor; his Windsor land is described as 
being bounded on the east by the 'Great River', on the north 
by the dividing line lately made between his and Solomon 
Burke's land, on the south by 'Burke's Brook.' Solomon's 
farm was bounded on the north by the Hartland line, south 
by land of Isaiah, etc."; Solomon's farm being the one now 
owned by Harry Weeden — the Penniman farm. (Ref., 
Burke and Alvord Memorial.) These six brothers as well 
as Jonathan 3d and Joseph, sons of Jonathan, Jr.; and Jona- 
than and Joseph, sons of Jesse; Samuel, son of Simeon; and 
Benjamin and John, -whose exact relationship to the others is 
not established, were soldiers of the Revolution and their 
names are on the Vermont Revolutionary Rolls. "The first 
militia company raised in that vicinity of which there is any 
record was raised in Westminster, and Jesse Burke was cap- 
tain. Jonathan Burke, Jr. was a member of the Vermont 
committee of safety, with the rank of lieutenant. His son 
Jonathan was with Warner's men in Canada and died 'before 
Quebec' of small-pox." His son Joseph served in a New- 
Hampshire regiment at the Battle of Bennington. He also 
served in the War of 1812; after the war he left his wife and 
went to Warner, N. H. , and is buried there. Joseph Burke 
had one son, Jonathan (the father of the late Albert B. Burke) 
who owned the farm and built the brick house now owned by 
R. D. Britton. Mr. Burke kept a hotel here in the old days 
of teaming to Boston; the place is known today as the "Burk 
Stand." 

A Victim of a British Press-gang: "Jonathan Burke, 
son of Capt. Jesse, was a soldier of the American Revolution, 
and for his patriotic services a recipient of a pension from the 
first enactment of the pension law in the United States to the 
day of his death. After the close of the Revolution he en- 
gaged as a seaman in the mercantile service. Having made 
a voyage to England, he was there impressed into the naval 
service of that country, where he remained eight years, and 



HARTLAND IN THE RE VOL UTIONARY WAR 2 7 

was not allowed to go ashore when it was suspected that there 
was an opportunity for him to escape. But he did desert in 
England. He was from home some sixteen years. During 
the time he was in the British naval service he was in the 
fleet commanded by Lord Nelson; he fought at the Battle of 
Copenhagen. At his decease the newspapers of the day an- 
nounced the event, with the expressive addition, "A Revolu- 
tionary soldier and an honest man." (Burke and Alvord 
Memorial.) 

John Sumner came from Pomfret, Conn, in June, 1777, and 
settled on the farm always owned in the family until the re- 
cent death of his grandson, Frank A. Sumner. 

Eliphalet Rogers, born in Martha's Vineyard in 1756, was 
captured by the enemy and confined in an English prison sev- 
en years. He made his escape. After the war he came to 
this place, married, and settled on the Harris Miller farm. 
Jerome Rogers, a grandson, who died in 1906, was bis last de- 
scendant. 

Amasa Bryant lived the last years of his life with a son-in- 
law, Thomas Rogers, on the farm now owned by A. E. Gilson. 

Colonel George Denison, born in Stonington, Conn., came 
from there to Hartland about 1780. He was a sergeant in 
Captain Elias Weld's Hartland company of militia and went 
with his company to Royalton on the alarm; also "to Orford 
on the alarm" under Lieutenant Daniel Spooner. He was 
the first settler on the farm owned now by Edwin Slayton. 
It was sold to Truman L. Slayton in 1864 by Henry C. Deni- 
son, Esq., a grandson, now of New Bedford, Mass. 'Squire 
Denison was a prosperous farmer well supplied with this 
world's goods, and it seemed a pleasure to him to assist free- 
ly out of his abundance those neighbors less fortunate. To 
the sick and distressed he proved himself to be a kind, sym- 
pathising, and helpful neighbor and friend. The Census of 
1790 shows Colonel Denison the head of a family of eleven. 

William Livermore came from Paxton, Mass. in 1791, and 



28 HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 

located in North Hartland. He moved in 1793 to a farm on 
"The Plain", which was occupied by his son, a soldier of 1812, 
till his death. "William Livermore, son of Jason and Abi- 
gail (Hagar) Livermore, married Mary Bigelow. Enlisted 
at the commencement of the Revolutionary War, was slight- 
ly wounded at the Battle of Bunker Hill, and received wounds 
at the Battle of Bennington from which he never fully recov- 
ered, but lived many years after." (Livermore Genealogy.) 

Mathias Rust (now Russ) came to Hartland from New Lon- 
don, Conn, in 1763 or 1764, and took charge of a grist mill at 
North Hartland, the first one built in the County. He was 
not a Revolutionary soldier, but seven of his sons were, viz: 
Anthony, Jehiel, Jeremiah, Nathan, Niel, Oliver, and Phineas. 
Jeremiah was born January 14, 1760 at Norwich, Conn, and 
died in Royalton, Vt. Phineas and Niel and probably more 
of them are buried at Russtown. Phineas marched "on the 
alarm" under Lieutenant Daniel Spooner, was with his broth- 
ers and other soldiers actively engaged in the capture and 
guarding of Zadok Wright, Esq. and Major Amasa Wright, 
a Hartford tory. He was a private in Captain John Strong's 
company, one of four companies raised under the jurisdiction 
of New York, commanded by Major Joab Hoisington. "He 
had a hand-to-hand encounter with an Indian on the banks 
of the 'Waterquechee'; he secured the Indian's gun, but the 
savage himself escaped. The gun is in the possession of a 
descendant." — Ref., Frank Russ, Hartford, Vt. 

Ichabod Hatch was great-grandfather of Lee F. Hatch. 

The wives and families of Corporal Moses Barron, Lieuten- 
ant Moses Evans, Quartus Alexander, and Stephen Main are 
buried in the Cutts Yard. The men themselves, except 
Main, may be buried there, but there are no indications of any 
graves where we should naturally look for them. 

Recorded in Volume II, Hartland Town Records: "Mary, 
wife of Capt. Timothy Lull, deceased March 19, 1790"; and by 
Charlestown records he married Peggy Allen, September 6, 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 29 

1790. July 8, 1794 he deeded the place now the home of W. R. 
Sturtevant, Esq. to his son, Zenos, and took a mortgage back 
for £ 400 ' 'for the support of said Timothy and his wife Peggy. ' ' 

The Wellards of Hartland. A reference to the extract 
from the United States Census printed on another page will 
show that in 1790 there were eight Willard families in Hart- 
land. The heads of three of these families were named Oli- 
ver; viz: Colonel Oliver, born 1729-30, lived at North Hartland; 
Deacon Oliver, born 1741, a second cousin to the first-named; 
and Captain Oliver, son of the deacon, born 1765. All of the 
Hartland Willards were descendants of Major Simon Willard, 
the English emigrant and noted Indian fighter of Lancaster 
and Cambridge, Mass. There were sixteen soldiers named 
Willard who served in Vermont during the Revolution, six of 
whom were from Hartland; viz: Colonel Oliver and Wilder 
and Eli, his sons; Captain Aaron; and James and Edward, sons 
of James Nutting (Quaker) Willard and nephews of Captain 
Aaron. 

Lineage of Colonel Oliver Willard, of North Hartland: — 1. 
Major Simon Willard, first mentioned as of Newton, (now 
Cambridge) Mass. in 1634; he died, Charlestown, Mass., April 
24, 1676, "aged nearly 68." 2. Henry Willard, fourth son of 
Major Simon, was born at Concord, Mass., June 4, 1655; mar- 
ried, first, Mary Lakin; second, Dorcas Cutler. A son of 
Henry and, 2, Dorcas (Cutler) Willard: 3. Josiah Willard, born 
Lancaster, Mass. about 1693, married about 1715 Hannah, 
daughter of John Wilder. He was early a colonel and com- 
mander at Fort Dummer, (Brattleboro) where he died, De- 
cember 8, 1750, aged 58; he had several sons, the first three of 
whom are noted in Vermont history. 4. Josiah, born, Lunen- 
burgh, Mass., January 21, 1715-16, married Hannah Hubbard; 
was a colonel in command of Fort Dummer after his father's 
death. 4. Nathan, born, Lunenburgh, May 28, 1726, married 
Lucy Allen; he rose from the ranks in his father's company, 
to become commander of Fort Dummer after his brother, Jo- 



30 HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 

siah. 4. Oliver, born, Lunenburgh, March 6, 1729-30. From 
the Doolittle Genealogy: "Thankful Doolittle, born January 
20, 1733-34, married July 10, 1750, Oliver Willard, a soldier of 
Fort Dummer." He became a captain in the army, and was 
one of the grantees of Winchester, N. H. In 1762 he was one 
of the grantees of Westmoreland. Vt., and later of Hartland 
and Woodstock. We see therefore that Oliver Willard, of lo- 
cal fame, was a great-grandson of Major Simon Willard, the In- 
dian fighter, and had seen considerable service before com- 
ing to Hartland. Of his descendants we know nothing be- 
yond the fact that, 5, Wilder Willard and Eli Willard, Hartland 
Revolutionary soldiers, were his sons. A part of the fore- 
going is copied from an article in "The Spirit of the Age/' 
by E. H. W., Jr. Dorcas Cutler survived her husband and 
married General Benjamin Bellows, of Lancaster, the ances- 
tor of the Bellows family of Walpole, N. H. (Ref.. History 
of Charlestown, N. H.) 

Colonel Oliver Willard came to Hartland in 1763 and made 
the first settlement on the farm owned by the late P. K. Will- 
ard; he was owner of two saw mills at the mouth of the Ot- 
tauquechee, which were known as the upper and lower mills. 
One of them stands across the road, opposite the house, and 
the other across the river near the present woolen mill. The 
first female child born in town was a daughter to Colonel 
Willard; she died soon after, hers being the first death in town. 

Captain Aaron Willard was the seventh child of Lieuten- 
ant Moses and Susanna (Hastings) Willard; he married Mary 
Smead, lived in Charlestown, N. H. until 1775, and then 
moved to Hartland. He lived on the farm now owned by 
Will Britten; his property extended southerly, including the 
mill property, which his son, Aaron rented in 1819 to Lewis 
Merritt. He probably owned to the foot of the mill gorge 
hill. He entered the military service very soon after his 
arrival here, as we find him a lieutenant in Captain Timothy 
Lull's Hartland company, Colonel Joseph Marsh's Cumber- 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 31 

land County regiment in 1775. (Ref., Vermont Revolution- 
ary Rolls, page 825.) "Marched on the alarm to Royalton 
and Haverhill in Captain Elias Weld's Hartland company, 
October, 1780. ' ' (Ibid, page 276. ) Clarisa, first child of Cap- 
tain Aaron Willard, married William Symmes Ashley; Char- 
lotte, third child, married, first, Adam Crandall; second, Rob- 
ert Rogers; third, Noah S. Shepard; all of these are buried on 
"The Plain." 

James Nutting Willard, the fourth child of Lieutenant Mo- 
ses, came from Charlestown to Hartland, and settled on the 
farm now owned by H. A. Gilson. He married Abigail Weth- 
erbee. He died April 21, 1818, aged eighty-three years, elev- 
en months. She died, March 4, 1814, aged seventy-eight. 
They with numerous descendants are buried in the Willard 
burial ground at the foot of Mace Hill. John Small Willard, 
Sr., a second lieutenant of cavalry in the War of 1812, was a 
son of James N. and Abigail Willard; his home was on the 
Cobb place, now owned by Fred Spafford. 

"Many anecdotes of him" (James Nutting Willard) "have 
been handed down in the Willard families, of which the fol- 
lowing must suffice. It happened at one time that the num- 
ber of dogs in his household was considerably larger than 
either his comfort or necessities appeared to require. He 
therefore told the children one day that some of the dogs would 
have to be killed, and he would give them the privilege of se- 
lecting their favorites, when the others would be despatched. 
The children on hearing this unwelcome announcement im- 
mediately took their stand beside their favorites, saying, 'thee 
must not kill this one', and 'thee must not kill this one', till 
there was only one left, when Mr. Willard, calling the remain- 
ing dog to him, said, 'hast thou no friend among the children? 
Thou shouldst have a friend; I will therefore be thy friend.' 
So all the dogs continued to live. ' ' 

June 18, 1756: "While Lieutenant Moses Willard was en- 
deavoring to extinguish the fire which had been kindled in 



32 HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

his fence, he was attacked by the Indians and killed. At the 
same time his son, Moses was wounded in the hip by a spear, 
•which is said to have remained in the wound until after his 
retreat into the fort. While engaged in mending the fence 
after the fire was extinguished, the son, who was at a little 
distance from his father, was startled by the report of a mus- 
ket, and, instantly turning in the direction of the sound, saw 
his father fall and at the same time several Indians who had 
leaped the fence dashing furiously toward him to take him 
prisoner. He did not stop to see more, but started on a race 
for both liberty and life, for the fort, which he succeeded in 
reaching, though, as has been narrated, dragging the spear, 
which had been lodged in his hip, after him." 

The above two narratives are from History of Charlestown. 

Lieutenant Moses Willard was the second son of Simon and 
Mary (Whitcomb) Willard, and was born at Lancaster, Mass. 
about 1702 or 1703; he married at Groton, Mass., September 
28, 1727, Susanna Hastings. The son, Moses referred to above 
was a fifth child, born, Groton, Mass., August 15, 1738; he 
married Lydia Farwell. "On August 30, 1754, Mrs. Susan- 
na, wife of Capt. James Johnson and second child of Lieut. 
Moses Willard, and her sister, Miriam, a young girl of four- 
teen and afterward the wife of Rev. Phineas Whitney, of Shir- 
ley, "were, with the captain, three children, Peter Labaree, and 
Ebenezer Farnsworth (eight prisoners) taken captive by the 
Indians, and carried through the wilderness to Canada." 

— Copied from "Willard Memorial" by Mrs. Janet B. Hard- 
ing Blackford, a lineal descendant of Major Simon Willard. 

4. Susanna (Willard) Johnson, (born February 20, 1729-30) 
on the night after b.-ing raptured by the Indians gave birth 
in Weathersfield, Vt. to a daughter, whom she named Cap- 
tive. Beside the road leading from Greenbush to Felchville 
at the intersection of the road that leads up through the de- 
file (where the Indians encamped) to Cavendish, stands a 
slatestone slab on which, besides the figure of a nude Indian 



HARTLAND IN THE RE VOL UTIONARY WAR 33 

with bow and arrows, is the following inscription: 

"This is near the spot that the Indians encamped the night 
after they took Mr. Johnson and family, Mr. Labaree and 
Farnsworth, August 30th, 1754 And Mrs. Johnson was deliv- 
ered of her child half a mile up this brook. 

"When troubles near the. 
Lord is kind. 
He hears the captives crys. 

He can subdue the savage mind. 
And teach it sympathy." 
A smaller stone with the following inscription was meant 
to be placed on the spot where Captive was born, but in con- 
sequence of a doubt as to the exact spot was placed by the 
side of the other. Inscription: "On the 31 of Aug. the 
year of our Lord 1754 Capt. James Johnson had a daughter 
born on this spot of ground, being captivated by the Indians. 

"If mothers ere should wander here. 

They'll drop a sympathetic tear. 

For her who in the howling wild. 

Was safe delivered of a child." 
August 14, 1723 Rev. Joseph Willard was killed by Indians 
at Rutland, Mass.; the same day two sons of Deacon Joseph 
Stevens were killed and two, Phineas and Isaac, made pris- 
oners. Phineas was the afterward famous Indian fighter, 
Captain Phineas Stevens, long time commandant at "Num- 
ber Four" (Charlestown, N. H.) He was nearly related to 
Colonel Josiah Willard, of Fort Dummer. Joseph Willard. 
Jr. was born about three months after the death of his father. 
He settled in Charlestown, and married Huldah, third daugh- 
ter of Lieutenant Moses and Susanna (Hastings) Will- 
ard. On June 7, 1760 they, with their five children, 
were taken by the Indians and carried to Canada. Con- 
sidering Samuel, the youngest, who was an infant, some 
what burdensome to them, the Indians took him aside 
the next day and beat out his brains against a tree. 




84 HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 

The prisoners were taken to Montreal and kept there until 
after the surrender of Montreal, then returned to Charlestown. 
This was the last attack on Charlestown by the Indians. The 
Rev. Joseph Willard killed at Rutland, Mass. was the ancestor 
of the celebrated hotel men of that name, of Washington, D. C. 
A daughter of that line recently married a son of Ex-Presi- 
dent Roosevelt. Captain Phineas Stevens' grandmother was 
Mary Willard, daughter of Major Simon Willard and his third 
wife, Mary Dunster Willard. 

Willard Genealogy. I. Major Simon Willard, English 
immigrant, died 1676, Cambridge, Mass., married, first, Mary 
Sharpe; second, Elizabeth Dunster; third, Mary Dunster. 

II. Henry, son of Major Simon and Mary Sharpe Willard, 
born 1655, married, first, Mary Lakin; second, Dorcas Cutler. 

HI. Simon, son of Henry and Mary Lakin Willard, born in 
1678, married Mary Whitcomb. 

IV. Lieutenant Moses, son of Simon and Mary Whitcomb 
Willard, married 1727, Si*sanna Hastings; he -was killed by In- 
dians at Charlestown, N. H., 1756. 

V. Children of Moses and Susanna Hastings Willard: 1, Je- 
mima. 2, Susanna, born 1729*30, married Captain James John- 
son, captured by Indians, 1754. 3, Huldah, born 1732, ffiarried 
Joseph Willard, Jr.; they, with five children, were taken pris- 
oners in last Indian raid on Charlestown, 1760. Rev. Joseph, 
father of the foregoing, killed by Indians at Rutland, Mass., 
1723. 4, James Nutting, born 1734, married Abigail Weth- 
erbee. 5, Mosey, Jr. 6, Miriam, taken captive with her sister, 
Mrs. Johnson. 7, Aaron, born 1743, married ftary Smead. 8, 
Captain John. 9, Abigail. 10, Elizabeth. 11, Mary. 12,— 

V. James Nutiiug ((Juakcr) and Abigail Wetherbee Will- 
ard. 

VI. Children: Lieutenant John Small, born 1772; (and oth- 
ers.) He married Nancy West. 

VII. Their son, James Nutting, 2d, born 1796, married Ma- 
ria White. 



1770952 

HARTLANT) IN THE JREVOL UTIONARY WAR 35 

VIII. The children of James Nutting and Maria White 
Willard: 1, James Nutting3d, born 1821, married Mary G. Thay- 
er. 2, E. Maria, born 1823. 3, Phineas K. f born 1825, married 
Ellen R. Pierce. 4, Louisa M. born 1828. 5, Allen Hatch, born 
1830; a Civil War veteran; he married Susan H. Collins. 6, 
Daniel Spaulding, born August 16, 1832, married, first, Mary 
A. Daniels; second, Mary E. Brothers. 7, George Elisha, born 
1837, married Ada Stoughton. 

IX. Children of James N. and Mar}' G. Thayer Willard: 1, 
James Nutting 4th, born 1845, married KateC. iiicks. 2, Sam- 
uel R., born 18*16, married Hanett L. Hall. 3, Frances M., born 
1849. 4, George M. , born 185 1 , married Eottie C. Dorci. 5, Sum- 
ner W., born 1853; unmarried. 6, Allen Hatch, born 1855. 7, 
Carey T., born 1857. 8, Walter C, born 1859. 9, Marry P., born 
1862. P. K. and Ellen R. Willard: daughter, Kate married 
L. W. Gee. Allen H. and Susan H. Willard: children: 1, Kate 
Sumner, born November 14, 1857, married Clarence E. Reid, 
April 20, 1886. 2, Lillian White. George Elisha and Ada S. 
Willard: a child, Mabel. Children of D.S. and Mary Daniels 
Willard: 1, Daniel, born January 28, 1861; President of Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad; married, March 2, 1885, Bertha L. 
Elkins. 2, Maria, born January 8, 1863; unmarried. 3, Jessie, 
born March 1, 1864; unmarried. Children of D. S. and Mary 
Brothers Willard: 1, Henry Britton, born July 6, 1874, died 
August 17, 1875. 2, Harry Burton, born January 5, 1876, mar- 
ried, December 22, 1897, Sarah York. 3, Edward G. born June 
28, 1879, married Florence Kenyon. 4, Marguerite, born Au- 
gust 26, 1882. 5, Giles C, born September 14, 1884, died March 
23, 1893. 6, Alice M., born December 5, 18S6, died November 
19,1910. 7, James Nutting 5th, born February 13, 18SS; mar- 
ried Bessie Burke. 

X. Child of James Nutting and Bessie Burke Willard: 
James Nutting 6th, born August 17, 1914. 

X. Children of Daniel and Bertha Elkins Willard: 1, Har- 
old Nelson, born June 28, 1890. 2, Daniel, Jr., born February 



36 HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

15, 1894. 

X. Children of Harry B. and Sarah York Willard: 1, Hazel 
E., born March 28, 1899. 2, Sheldon S., born September 21, 
1901. 3, Verlie Y., born January 11, 1907. 

X. Children of Edward G. and Florence Kenyon Willard: 
1, Helen E., born November 3, 1903. 2, Doris M., born Feb- 
ruary 2, 1906. 3. Florence L., born August 2, 1908. 4, Winston 
R., born July 4, 1910. 5, Edward George, Jr., born March 23, 
1913. 6, Alice Marion, born December 25, 1914. Florence 
Kenyon, wife of Edward G. Willard, died January 2, 1915. 

X. Child of James Nutting 4th and Kate C. Willard: Hel- 
en Hicks, born July 12, 1873. 

X. Children of Clarence L. and Kate Willard Reid: 1, Allen 
Wiilard, born Feb. 24, 1886. 2, Marjorie, born March 26, 1892. 

Deaths: James N. Willard, at North Hartland, April 7, 1868. 
Maria White Willard, March 17, 1869. Their children: E. Ma- 
ria, May 13, 1823. Louisa M., September 9, 1829. Allen H., 
September 30, 1S65. Mary A., wife of Daniel S. Willard, No- 
vember 22, 186S. Children of James N. 3d and Mary Willard: 
Carey T., September 13, 1859. Walter C, April 24, 1864. Fran- 
ces M., July 8, 1868. Allen H., October 24, 1881. Samuel R., 
July 14, 1884. Mary G. Willard, daughter of Samuel White 
Thayer and Ruth Packard Thayer, (born at Braintree, VI.) 
December 28, 18:8. Samuel W. Thayer, at Burlington, Vt., 
December 12, 1863. Ruth P. Thayer, at North Hartland, May 
5, 1872. Samuel W. Thayer, Jr., at Burlington, November 14, 
1882. Rush B. Thayer, September 14, 1843. 

Willard descent of the Harding family: 1, Major Simcn 
Willard and Mary Sharpe. 2, Henry Willard and Mary- Lakin. 
3, Henry Willard, Jr., and Abigail Temple. 4, Henry iWillard 
3d and Abigail Fairbanks. 5, Deacon Oliver Willard and Lucy 
Haskell. 6, Captain Oliver Willard and Abigail Keith. 7, Lu- 
cy Willard and John Harding, M. D. 8, Watson Harding and 
Hester Bruns. 9, Janet B. Harding (married Rev. A. N. Black- 
ford.) Helen I. Harding. 



HARTLAND IN THE RE VOL UTIONARY WAR 37 

Willard lineage of Mrs. Bessie Burke Willard: 1, Captain 
Aaron Willard, a Revolutionary soldier, and Mary Smead. 2, 
Charlotte Willard and Noah S. Shepard, a Revolutionary sol- 
dier. 3, Sylvanus Shepard and Sarah Chase. 4, Edna Shepard 
and Charles Gardner, a Civil War veteran. 5, Rose Gardner 
and George Burke. 6, Bessie Burke and James N. Willard. 
7, James Nutting Willard. 

TWO HARTLAND TORIES:- ZADOCK WRIGHT AHD TITUS SIMONDS 

I. ZADOCK WRIGHT 



NE of the grantees of Kartland under both the 
New Hampshire and New York charters was Za- 
^|Ct-~%j/jZ dock Wright; he was an early settler here, a large 
'ii^ — ^ju landowner, and took an active part in the affairs 
of the town. At the organization of the town, March 11, 
1767, he was elected assessor, also constable. He was after- 
ward elected to the following offices, holding most of them 
at one time: overseer of the poor, overseer of highways, com- 
missioner to lay out highways, treasurer, moderator, super- 
visor, and clerk. At the ninth meeting, on the second Tues- 
day in March, 1774, he was reelected to most of these offices. 
On May 29, 1778 by a "return of a guard" (See Vermont Rev- 
olutionary Rolls, page 693) it appears that "Zadock Wright, 
Esq." had been "captured" by the following Revolutionary 
soldiers: Phineas,Niel, and Jeremiah Rust; \V. M. Gallup; Na- 
than Carel (Call); Thomas P. Rood; James Denison; Ivory 
Luce. By the return of another guard it is shown that Mr. 
Wright was kept under guard at Lebanon, X. H. until Decem- 
ber, 1778. His property was confiscated by the state, the 
farm being rented to Moses Evans. He was taken to Al- 
bany, placed in prison, and afterward "on the limits." He 
ran away and returned to Hartland, and was promptly re-ar- 
rested, but claimed immunity on the ground that he had be- 



38 HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

come a Shaker, and therefore non-militant. His brother and 
neighbors became his bondsmen, vouching for his appear- 
ance if it should ever be required. He was early an active 
Shaker and became the head of the family at Enfield, New 
Hampshire. The state did not strip him entirely of his pos- 
sessions, as in 1786 he deeded to different parties three tracts of 
land on or near the Ottauquechee at North Hartland. Jan- 
uary 29, 1761 he married Mary Ashley of Hinsdale, Massachu- 
setts. "It was arranged that his wife Sarah should have the 
use of three cows, ten sheep, one horse, and thirteen acres of 
land, pasturing for three cows." So it appears that he had 
a second wife. "He had a commission from the king to re- 
cruit a royal regiment." "Mr. Wright must have been an 
interesting man, able, strong, and aggressive. ' ' Credit is due 
to the Rev. Anson Titus for much of the foregoing. 

n. TITUS SIMONDS 

In the superior court for Cumberland County held at Ben- 
nington in December, 1778, a complaint was entered against 
Titus Simonds, of Hertford, (Hartland) charging that he went 
over to the enemy on the fourth of September, 1777. His 
property was confiscated. "Windsor, 4 June, 1779, Slate of 
Vermont in Council date above, 'Sir, — you are hereby direct- 
ed to Take the wife and family of Titus Simonds and transport 
them to the officer commanding at Rutland, consulting him 
in some Method to Transport said family within the Enemies 
Lines in Canada.' By order of Governor and Council, Jonas 
Fay, Secretary P. T. — To Capt. Simonds, of Andover.' " 
4 — "Governor and Council," Volume I; page 304. 

HARTLAND SOLDIERS IN FAMOUS BATTLES 

BATTLE OF BENNINGTON — SERVED IN NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENTS 

Sergt. Joseph Burke William S. Ashley Nathaniel Bugbee 
Jonathan Wright William Livermore Wilder Willard 

Isaac Sargent Nego Darak Thomas Duncan John Dunbar 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 



39 



MEN AT THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL 

Colonel Ebenezer Bridge William Livermore 

Joseph Evans Moses Evans Moses Webster 

Joseph Patterson, Leonard Spaulding, Jedediah Leavens, 
and Isaiah Burke were probably at Bunker Hill; their names 
Appear in three payrolls of Captain John Marcy's Windsor 
company, which was in that battle. The company was 
formed of men living in the border towns extending on each 
side of the Connecticut River at least as far south as Charles- 
town, N. H. A history of Charlestown gives a list of men 
from that town who belonged to Marcy's company and were 
in the battle. "At North Hartland it is said, that the moth- 
er of two sons who were at the battle of Bunker Hill heard 
the roar of conflict there, and it is thought that she was Mrs. 
Evans, the mother of Joseph and Moses." — Miss Darling, 
in the Vermonter. 

MEN BEFORE QUEBEC IN SETH WARNER* S REGIMENT, 
MAJOR BROWN'S DETACHMENT 

Isaac Stevens Thomas Clark Jonathan Hodgeman 

Phineas Killam Corporal Moses Barron 

Nehemiah Closson Jonathan Burke (died before Quebec, 
January 16, 1776.) 



CAPTAIN ELIAS WELD'S COMPANY 

(MARCHED TO ROY ALTON AND HAVERHILL ON THE ALARM OCT. 1780) 



Captain Elias Weld 
Ensign Jonah Loomis 
Sergt. Nathaniel Killam 
Sergt. John S. Harvey 
Sergt. George Denison 
Corporal John Grow 
Thomas Richardson 
Jeremiah Richardson 
William S. Ashley 



Jeremiah Rust 
Asa Wright 
Zimri Luce 
John Laiton 
Asa Taylor 
Ivory Luce 
Andrew Luce 
Samuel Capon 
Elihu Smead 



Benjamin Munsell 
Robert Morrison 
John Goldsbury 
William Sumner 
Aaron Willard 
Wilder Willard 
Oliver Willard 
Eli Willard 
Willard Col ton 



40 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 



Nathan Billings 
Jonathan Burke 
Kleazar Bishop 
Thoma9 Lawton 
Marston Cabot 
Ephraim Miner 
Phinehas Killam 
Lezedel Munsell 
Joseph Olmstead 
Elisha Gallup 
Ambrose Grow 
Thomas Smith 
Jesse Bannister, 



Joel Bishop 
John Dunbar 
Joseph Marcy 
Isaac Stevens 
Timothy Lull 
Daniel Bugbee 
Zebulon Lee 
Noah Jenne 
Esta Russell 
Joseph Gallup 
Samuel Grow 



Thomas Liscomb 
Lot Hodgeman 
Ichabod Hatch 
Parsons Antizil 
Samuel Weeden 
Moses Webster 
Daniel Sumner 
Elisha Howard 
Dan Davison 
Luther Colton 
Joseph Grow, Jr. 



Timothy Bannister, Drummer 
George Back, Darius Liscomb, Fifers 



LIEUTENANT DANIEL SPOONER'S COMPANY 
(marched to orford on the alarm, 1781) 



Lieut. Daniel Spooner 
Ensign Jonah Loomis 
Sergt. George Denison 
Sergt. John Harvey 
Corporal Joseph Evans 
Corporal Oliver Rust 
Corporal John Grow 
Corp'l Joseph Grow, Jr. 
Surgeon Paul Spooner 
William Goldsbury 
Thomas Richardson 
Nehemiah Liscomb 
Zebulon Lee Walter 



Robert Green 
Timothy Lull 
Isaac Main 
Eleazar Bishop 
Joab Tiller 
John Goldsbury 
Timothy Fisher 
Moses Webster 
Asa Wright 
Dan Davison 
John Dunbar 
Joseph Gallup 
Smith Nathan 



Joseph Remington 
William S. Ashley 
Wilder Willard 
Eli Willard 
Benjamin Munsell 
William Patterson 
James Richardson 
Jeremiah Rust 
Phineha9 Rust 
Phinehas Killam 
William Sumner 
Parsons Antizil 
Call Asa Taylor 



Persons Who Are Known to Have Drawn 
Revolutionary War Pensions in Hartland 



Joseph Remington 
Jeremiah Remington 



Asa Wright 
Oliver Rust 



Joseph Evans 
Moses Webster 



HARTLAND IN THE RE VOL UTIONARY WAR 41 

Jeremiah Rust Chester Marcy Gardner Marcy 

Luke Lamphire Jonathan Burke Solomon Brown 

John Orcutt Amasa Bryant Thomas Shaw 

Timothy Richardson Shadrach Dodge Isaac Stevens 

Lieutenant Moses Evans Two Eliza Lamphires 

Grandsons and Granddaughters of The Revolution 
Now or Recently Living in Hartland 
{All descended from Hartland men) 

Grandsons: - William I. Allen, William W. Bagley, Sidney 
W. Brown, J. F. Colston, Charles E. Darling, Elbridge Gates, 
Albert E. Gilson, H. A. Gilson, L. J. M. Marcy, Andrew J. Ste- 
' vens, Samuel Eugene Stevens, M. D. 

Granddaughters: - Louise Bugbee, Rosaline Clifford, Ade- 
laide Crosby, Eliza Shattuck, Frances M. Spear, Adaline Stur- 
tevant, Louise M. Sturtevant, Mary A. (Walker) Hodgeman 
Thayer, Clarine Gallup. 

HEADS OF HARTLAND FAMILIES IN 1790 
From U. S. Census of 1790. Figures Show Size of Families 

Samuel Abbott, 4. Daniel Ainsworth, 6. Isaiah Aldrich, 8. 
Noah Aldrich, 2. Eldad Alexander, 9. Quartus Alexander, 6. 
Ebenezer Allyn, 5. Ebenezer Amris, 8. Robert Anderson, 8. 
W. S. Ashley, 7. Peter Ayers, 7. George Back, 10. Daniel 
Badger, 12. Daniel Badger, 4. Elisha Badger, 5. Gideon Bad- 
ger, 9. David Bailey, 8. Henry Bagley, 4. Orlando Bagley, 6. 
Thomas Bagley, 7. Joseph Billings, 6. Christopher Billings, 3. 
Joseph Billings, 4. Runnels Cady, 4. Thomas H. Cady, 4. 
Francis Cabot, 7. Marston Cabot, 5. Sebastian Cabot, 3. Eli- 
as_Call,6. Caleb Call, 4. Samuel Capon, 4. Kphraim Carey, 7. 
Nathaniel Carver, 2. Henry Chase, 7. HerbaChild,5. Lyman 
Child, 7. Thomas Clark, 3. Timothy Clark, 5. Wesson Clark, 
3. William Cobb, 8. Luther Cotton, 5. Melvin Cotton, 7. 



42 HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 

Thomas Cotton, 4. Willard Cotton, 11. Aaron Currier, 6. Ad- 
am Crandall, 6. Lewis Croseroot, 4. William J. Dailey, 3. 
James Danford, 6. Francis Danford, 3. William Danford, 6. 
William Danford, 7. Nicholas Danforth, 7. Samuel Darby, 6. 
Seth Darling, 4. Dan Davison, 7. Paul Davison, 2. George 
Denison, 11. John Dinsmore, 7. John Dunbar, 10. Ezra Els- 
worth, 3. Sylvester Edson, 6. Thomas Emmons, 3. Roger 
Enos,6. Elsi Evans, 6. Moses Evans, 5. Zerah Evans, 4. Tim- 
othy Fisher, 8. Elisha Flower, 4. John Flower, 5. Ned Free- 
man, 4. Elisha Gallup, 7. Joseph Gallup, 5. Perez Gallup, 6. 
William Gallup, 13. Benjamin Garey, 6. Thomas Garey, 3. 
Elias Gates, 6. James Garven, 8. James Gay, 5. Abel Goss, 4. 
John Grow, 11. Joseph Grow, 12. Samuel Grow, 6. Timothy 
Grow, 7. Ishmael Harris, 4. HemanHatch,8. Ichabod Hatch, 

5. John Harding, 5. Nathaniel Harvey, 5. Wilbur Hathwey, 

6. Lot Hodgeman, 7. Jonathan Hodgeman, 8. Samuel Heal- 
ey, 5. John Hendrick, 7. Thomas Hoadley, 5. Ebenezer Hol- 
brook, 5. Ebenezer Holbrook, Jr. ,9. Harba Holbrook,4. Eph- 
raim Holdridge, 5. Thomas Holdridge, 8. Stilson Holmes, 13. 
Absalom Holmes, 3. William Jaquith, 5. Benjamin Jaquith, 
8. Lot Jenne, 6. Samuel Jenne, 4. William Johnson, 4. 
Charles Jones, 3. William Jones, 5. AzelKeith,6. Ames Ken- 
dal, 8. Samuel Kendal, 3. Ebenezer Kelley, 11. Phinehas 
Killam, 3. Phinehas Kimball, 10. Asahel King, 4. David 
Kinston,6. John Laiton, 8. John Lamphier,9. Thomas Law- 
ton, 9. Robert Law, 7. Zebulon Lee, 13. Thomas Liscomb, 6. 
Darius Liscomb, 7. George Little, 7. William Livermore, 8. 
Jonah Loomis, 12. Andrew Luce, 10. Ivory Luce, 11. Moses 
Luce, 4. Oliver Luce, 5. Asa Lull, 4. Timothy Lull, 9. Timo- 
thy Lull, 4. Nathan Lull, 5. Zenos Lull, 8. Isaac Main, 6. 
Benjamin Marbel, 3. William Marey, 5. Duty Martin, 3. Abel 
Marsh, 7. Daniel Marsh, 5. Roger Marsh, 5. Royal Marsh, 4. 
Joseph Marsh, 5. Isaac Morgan, 11. Joseph Morey, 1. John 
Moaes, 1. Robert Morrison, 10. Clemont Miner, 4. Ephraim 
Miner, 11. Daniel Munsell, 6. Lezedel Munsell,4. Seth Mux- 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 43 

ley, 4. John Nichols, 5. Simeon Olvord, 3. John Osmore, 4. 
Eleazar Paine, 8. Joseph Patterson, 6. William Patterson, 4. 
David Pierce, 6. Ebenezer Pike, 3. Joseph Remington, 6. Aar- 
on Rice, 2. Eliakim Rice, 8. Obadiah Rice, 9. James Richard- 
son, 5. Jeremiah Richardson, 8. Daniel Rider, 3. Clark Rob- 
erts, 3. Artha Rogers, 6. Benjamin Rogers, 3. Eliphalet Rog- 
ers^. Nathaniel Rogers, 4. Paul Rogers, 4. Humphrey Roode, 
5. Thomas P. Rood, 2. Mathias Rust, 2. Oliver Rust, 8. Thom- 
as Richardson, 11. Abel Sawyer, 5. John Scott, 8. Lemuel 
Scott, 8. Moses Sergents, 6. Richard Shaw, 6. Silas Shattuck, 
5. Silas Shattuck, 2. Daniel Short, 9. Joseph Simmons, 15. 
Simeon Simmons, 5. Samuel Smith, 6. Elkanah Sprague, 4. 
Anna Spooner, 7. Daniel Spooner, 11. Daniel Stanton, 2. 
James Stanton, 8. Phinehas Stanton, 9. Isaac Stevens, 9. Ol- 
iver Stevens, 8. Perula Stevens, 8. Thomas Stickney, 7. Abel 
Stone, 4. Job Sturvant, 5. John Sumner, 5. William Sumner, 
4. William Sweetser, 4. Isaiah Strater, 5. Artemus Taft, 6. 
Asa Taylor, 14. Elias Taylor, 11. Oliver Taylor, 12. Ephraim 
Teuxbury, 2. Israel Teuxbury, 9. Jacob Teuxbury, 2. Elisha 
Twiner, 4. Job Tylor, 4. Jonathan Tylor, 4. Thomas V. Voce, 
4. Elnathan Walker, 6. John Walden.5. Nathaniel Walden, 7. 
Zenos Warren, 8. Timothy Waters, 7. Moses Webster, 6. Ben- 
oni Webster, 3. Nathaniel Weed, 11. Samuel Weeden, 5. Thom- 
as Weeden,2. Elias Weld, 9. Jason Winch, 7. Asa White, 4. 
Francis White, 4. Thomas White, 10. Adam Williams, 7. James 
Williams, 7. Samuel Williams, 7. Simeon Williams, 6. Edward 
Wood, 7. Jonathan Wood, 2. Josiah Wood, 9. John Billings, 9. 
Nathan Billings, 10. Moses Belding, 5. Moses Belding, 2. El- 
eazer Bishop, 9. Daniel Breck, 8. John Barrell,3. Ebenezer 
Bridge, 10. Solomon Brown, 7. Abner Brigham, 9. Jonathan 
Burke, 4. Daniel Bugbee, 6. Stanton Burdick, 3. Bates: Jo- 
seph, 6; Jacob, 5. Bryant: Amasa, 7; Benjamin, 8. Levi Hos- 
mer, 3. William Holmes, 2. Elisha Howard, 7. Willard: Aaron 
7. Edward, 3: Ely, 5. James, 10; Oliver, 9; Oliver, 11; Oliver, 
8; Wilder, 6. William Hopkins, 5. 




44 HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONAR Y WAR 

HARTLAND IN THE WAR OF 1812 

HE Government of the United States having in 
vain endeavored to induce the British to abrogate 
their restrictions so injurious to American com- 
merce and also to cease their impressment of ou r 
seamen, war was declared against that power on the 19th of 
June, 1812." — Anderson's United States History. 

"On hearing the news most of the American seamen who 
had been impressed as British subjects at the risk of flogging 
and possibly of death refused to serve against their country. 
2500 such were imprisoned in England throughoutthe war." 
— Quackenbos' American History. "Upwards of six thou- 
sand cases of alleged impressment were recorded at Wash- 
ington." — Hildreth's History of the United States. "More 
than nine hundred American vessels had been seized since 
1803. Several thousand American seamen had been im- 
pressed into the British service." — Scudder. 

"The independence of the United States was securely fixed 
by the war of 1812: England withdrew her last claim to sov- 
ereignty; the country was not only established in its own do- 
main, but it had equal rights with Europe on the broad seas. 
It was henceforth to be one of the great powers of the world." 
— Scudder' s United States History. 

That a majority of the citizens of Hartland were in favor of a 
vigorous prosecution of "our second war for independence," 
as it has been so aptly termed, is shown by the following res- 
olution, which is copied from "History and Anniversary of 
Hartland," by Xancy Darling in the Vermonter of November, 
1913. "A 'Resolution' entered in one of the town books by 
Daniel Breck, town clerk, declares, ' • • - • we will do our utmost 
to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections, and 
repel invasions, and to this end 'praying the God of armies to 
make bare his arm' .we pledge our lives and Fortunes & our 
sacred honor.' " Under the old June training laws of Ver- 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 45 

mont all men subject to military duty were enrolled; and 
Hartland, as appears from the records, had three companies: 
infantry, cavalry, and a company of artillery commanded by 
Captain Andrew Dodge, who was at one time a Lieutenant of 
cavalry; he went with the Hartland company to Plattsburg, 
and was its captain. His grandson, Andrew Stevens now has 
the military coat of his grandfather. Captain David H. 
Sumner recruited and drilled a company for this service, 
which may have been the one that went under Captain 
Dodge, part of which was enlisted by him. Second Lieu- 
tenant Abel Farwell was a recruiting officer, and his grand- 
son, Frederick A. Dodge, Esq., of Bridgewater, mentions Jo- 
seph Patterson as one of his recruits. Captain Dodge' s com- 
pany marched the entire distance to Burlington, where they 
were stationed for a time, afterward taking part in the battle 
of Plattsburg. Many men left Hartland at different times, 
going in small squads, one of which is mentioned as arriving 
the night before the battle. Being deficient in military 
training, but experts with the rifle, they were placed at strat- 
egic points, where, it is said, "they performed very effective 
service in picking off the officers of the enemy." 

Three Hartland Revolutionary soldiers served in the war of 
1812, and possibly or probably more. The three were Joseph 
Burke, Joseph Patterson, and Isaac Morgan, Sr. Two sea- 
captains of the war of 1812 lived in Hartland after the war; 
viz: Captain James 0'Hara,who lived on the farm now owned 
by H.T.Dunbar; and Captain John Hammond. 

John English was at Plattsburg, but not in the battle. His 
daughter was the second wife of James Lawrence Latimer, 
the father of Mrs. L. J. M.Marcy. At the time of his death 
he was living on the Latimer farm, part of which he owned. 

Ezekiel Sleeper lived in Washington, Vt. He was visiting 
relatives who lived on the farm now owned by Fred E. Gil- 
son, when, as stated on his gravestone, he was drowned at Ot- 
tauquechee Falls, generally known as Sumner's Falls. He 



46 HARTLAND IN THE RE VOL UTIONAR Y WAR 

■was grandfather of JohnS. Sleeper, a former Hartland resident. 

Rufus Marcy, son of Chester, was killed at the battle of 
Plattsburg. Phineas and Alfred Barrell were brothers of Eli- 
za, wife of Ahira Flower, Jr. 

Joseph Patterson was enlisted by Second Lieutenant Abel 
Farwell. Paul, Gallup, and Fish were enlisted from Captain 
Webster's company by Lieutenant Andrew J. Dodge. 

"Captain Joseph Livermore, son of William and Mary (Bige- 
low)Livermore, enlisted at the commencement of the war of 
1812. Served under Gen. McCabe at Plattsburg. The last 
six or eight months he was stationed near Stanstead Plain on 
the Canada line with a squad of men detailed to guard this line 
and take deserters from the British army and parole them and 
send them to Burlington, where they were each paid sixteen 
dollars for their guns, and they became American citizens. 
Joseph Livermore was discharged at the end of the war, after 
holding several commissions. On his way home he met an 
order making him captain. He was born July 29, 1789; died 
November 9, 1S87; married Jerusha Merritt Lull." 
— From the Livermore Genealogy. 

LIST OF HARTLAND SOLDIERS OF 1812 

buried at jenneville: Willard Marcy, Jr. , died August 9, 1872, 
aged 84. Samuel Weeden, Jr., died July 28, 1870, aged 78. 
Joshua Spear, died December 31, 1809, aged 84; great-grand- 
father of F. G. Spear. 

"the plain" cemetery: Dr. Friend Sturtevant, surgeon at 
Plattsburg. Captain Joseph Livermore. William Liver- 
more 2d. Jonathan Hodgeman. Daniel Childs. Joseph 
Patterson. Ezekiel Sleeper, drowned May 12, 1817, aged 47. 
gallup yard: Perkins Bagley. Isaac Morgan, Sr. Isaac 
Morgan, Jr. 

buried in various places: Otis Fish, Russtown; died 1S-1G, 
aged 61. Perez W.Gallup, Gallup Yard at North Hartland. 




HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 47 

Sergeant Hial Paul, Center Yard. Second Lieutenant John 
S. Willard, Willard Yard at foot of Mace Hill. Eldad French, 
Village Cemetery. Daniel Bagley, West Windsor. Thom- 
as Bagley, Jr., Lincoln, Vt. Joseph Burke, son of Lieuten- 
ant Jonathan, Warner, N. H. Caleb Barrell, Canada. 
burial place unknown: Captain Andrew Dodge. Second 
Lieutenant Abel Farwell. Alfred Barrell. Rufus Marcy. 
John English. Phineas Barrell, probably Troy, N. Y. 

THE ANNEXATION OF TEXAS: AND 
THE EESULTANT WAR WITH MEXICO 

N the presidential campaign of 1844 the paramount 
issue was the question of the annexation of Texas. 
The party favoring annexation named as its candi- 
date James K. Polk; the one opposing that measure 
nominated Henry Clay; while Van Buren was supported by 
the "Free-soil" element of the Democratic party. During 
the campaign Mr. Clay wrote to a friend what has passed in- 
to history as the "Alabama letter," the purport of which was 
that under certain conditions he personally favored annexa- 
tion. Van Buren also wrote a letter of like import. Hor- 
ace Greeley in summing up on this question in "The Ameri- 
can Conflict" says, "undoubtedly Texas would have been an- 
nexed to the United States had either Mr. Clay or Mr. Van Bu- 
ren been elected, as their letters clearly indicate." Annexa- 
tion was consummated on July 4, 1845 by a convention of Tex - 
ans, who voted to accept the conditions offered by the United 
States. Mexico declared war. 

We will qnote from "Twenty Years of Congress," by James 
G. Blaine; Volume I: page 40. ' 'The lapse of forty years and 
the important events of intervening history give the oppor- 
tunity for impartial judgment concerning the policy of ac- 
quiring Texas. We were not guiltless toward Mexico in o- 
riginally permitting if not encouraging our citizens to join in 



48 HARTLAND IN THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

the revolt of one of the states of that republic. But Texas 
had passed definitely and finally beyond the control of Mexi- 
co, and the practical issue was whether we should incorpor- 
ate her in the union or leave her to drift in uncertain cur- 
rents — possibly to form European alliances which we should 
afterwards be compelled in self-defence to destroy. An as- 
tute statesman of that period summed up the whole case when 
he declared that it was wiser policy to annex Texas and ac- 
cept the issue of immediate war with Mexico, than to leave 
Texas in nominal independence, to involve us probably in ul- 
timate war with England. The entire history of subsequent 
events has vindicated the wisdom, the courage, and the states- 
manship with which the Democratic party dealt with this 
question in 1844." 

Total area of the United States in 1800: 827,756 square miles. 
Total area of territory acquired between 1803 and I860 (Louis- 
iana territory, Florida, Oregon, Texas, and the Mexican cess- 
ion, including the Gadsden purchase): 2,135,540 square miles. 
Of this territory acquired b}' the Democratic party either by 
purchase or by conquest 1,607,808 square miles were free, and 
528,730 square miles were slave territory. — Kef., "The War 
Between the States," by Alexander H. Stevens. 

hartlaxd ix the mexicax wak: A good many Hartland 
men are said to have gone to the Mexican war. Some of 
them never enlisted. But four men seem to be known by 
name today. From ' 'History and Anniversary of Hartland, ' ' 
by Nancy Darling, in the Vermonter of December, 1913 we 
take the following: "J. F. Colston says that William Doug- 
las went from Hartland, also a man named Spear; while Ed- 
ward Baker, the Assistant Adjutant-General of Vermont re- 
ports that Stephen M. Hatch, of Hartland, 'died in hospital 
at Vera Cruz, July 16th, 1847,' and James Roden was 'taken 
prisoner at battle of Huamantla and exchanged about March 
1, 1848. These two men served in Captain E. A. Kimball's 
Company, Xinth Kegiment, United States Infantry." 



HARTLAND IN THE REVOL UTIONARY WAR 49 

ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 

Additions to and Corrections of the Revolutionary Lists 

the cemetery at jenneville 
Samuel Weeden {name on page 9) died May 12, 1821, aged 62 

THE WILLARD YARD AT THE FOOT OF MACE HILL 

James Willard (name also on page 9) 

THE JUDGE CUTTS BURIAL GROUND 

Deacon Dan Davison {not Dana as on page 7) 

MARCY TOMB 

Joseph Marcy (seepage 8) died October 13, 1838, aged 79 

Levi Marcy, who married Ruth Sargent and was father of 
Nancy Marcy, as stated on page 21, was the son of William 
Marcy and brother of Gardner Marcy. 

Elisha and William Gallup. The third paragraph on page 
23 refers to Elisha Gallup as having lived where Clarine Gal- 
lup does now; and should refer to William Gallup and not 
Samuel Willard as having lived on the farm occupied at pres- 
ent by Tobias Burk. 







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THIS BROCHURE 
PRINTED BY THE 

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HARTLAND, VERMONT 

/. HOWARD FLOWER 
DONALD M. FLOWER 



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