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Full text of "Harvey/Moog roots : and an entanglement of Schneider, Bell, Blesbois, Joly, Savery and Barnard branches"

0238451 



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Donated to the Family History Library by 



Steve Harvei/ 



P.O. Box 4308 



Los Angeles. CA. 90051 



PFGS2953 8/88 Printed in USA 



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Take me back to old Montana, 
Where there's plenty room and air; 
Where there's Cottonwood an' pine trees, 
Bitter root and prickly pear; 
Where the sun-tanned prospector, 
Dreams of wealth an' pans his dirt; 
Where the sleepy night-herd puncher, 
Sings to steers and plies his guirt. 

J.C. Cory 



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■HMfl 1MB Jfttmr w^HHBh (HI 



W /tn enUnqlemnt of- 
Stkndhr, 3d]] dUshis, 

Jcly, Savery mi darnnri Brunches 



Stw Harvey 



FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 
36 NORTH WEST TEMPLE 
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84150 






y\*> 






LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 



DATE MICROFILMED 
ITEM #__2__ 

PROJECT ana G. S. 

ROLL # CALL fc 

ytl07-/a^L /6973as\ 



1988 



For my mother, whose stories inspired 
this project; for my sister, whose early 
research served as the foundation; for my 
wife, who supplied the graphic talents (and 
patience, while I spent nights poring over 
hundred-year-old census records) ; for my 
daughter, who is continuing the story. 

And, in memory of my father, and those 
who came before him. 



Copyright 1988 by 
STEVE HARVEY 



All rights reserved including the rights to 

translate or reproduce this work or parts 

thereof in any form or by any media. 



Design: Stan Kelton 
Layout: Robert Clark, Eagle Rock, California 
Printing & Binding: Intercollegiate Press, 
Shawnee Mission, Kansas 



Photo on title page: The Clyde Harvey family, Christmas, 1952 




The Rose Avenue Mob, 1962, dressed up for grad- 
uation ceremonies at Clover Avenue grade school in 
West L.A.: Barbara Tappan (left), Marilyn Harvey, 
Susan Tappan and Sue Oppliger. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I THE HARVEYS: A Mormon from Scotland 3 

II THE ELLISES: A Welsh Miner's Daughter 3 3 

III THE BELLS: A Midnight Ride for Help 3 5 

IV THE ADAMSES: Pennsylvania in Penn's Time 4 4 

V THE WETSELS: Schaghticoke' s Farmer /Soldier 48 

VI THE RICHARDSONS: Almira's Diary 54 

VII THE MOOGS: A German Chemist in the West 59 

VIII THE SCHNEIDERS: Soldiers, Mount ainwomen, TV Hosts 99 

IX LES BLESBOIS: Wine-Makers in the Chateau Country 130 

X LES JOLY: The Boatman in the Top Hat 145 



INTRODUCTION 

The year 1860 found: 

A 37-year-old, German-born chemist named Frederick Moog 
mixing liquids in the wild frontier town of Denver. He was a 
bartender, worth $75, according to the 1860 census. 

Louis Desire Blesbois, about 23, in the French chateau 
country town of Blois; he, too, would soon enter the world of 
spirits in the wine business. 

Robert Bell, 21, in Cochranton, Pa., possibly working for 
an oil company. 

Scottish-born James Harvey, a 31-year-old painter and 
carpenter, helping spread the gospel of the Mormon Church in 

Salt Lake City through labor as well as celebration (in one 

pageant depicting a dialogue between founder Joseph Smith and 
the Devil, James portrayed the Devil). 

The year 1860 also found: 

Mary Schneider, a 22-year-old German emigre, somewhere 



2 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 

in the United States, perhaps Albert Lea, Minn., or Denver. 

Marie Antoinette Joly, about 25, in Blois. 

Evaline Wetsel, 14, attending school in Richmond (near 
Meadville) , Pa. 

Martha Ellis, 8, in Trevethin, England. 

In succeeding years, their family lines would intertwine 
through marriage: Fred Moog and Mary Schneider (1863) , Louis 
Blesbois and Marie Joly (1867), Robert Bell and Evaline 
Wetsel (1872) and James Harvey and Martha Ellis (1879) . 

Others contributing to the mergers across more than three 
centuries included such surnames as Adams, Baucus, Blackstone, 
Brown, Campbell, Chambers, Dunlope, Hall, Harper, Henderson, 
Lai, Liggett, McConahy, Matthews, Pistorius, Richardson, 
Rohle, Ross, Savery, Selkridge, Semple, Stabo (Stobo) , Stein 
and Woodrow. 

James Harvey's marriage to Martha Ellis gave him two 
concurrent wives (he was a Mormon, remember) . However, Martha 
and Agnes Burns Harvey (No. 1) lived at separate residences. 
"Agnes gave her consent (for the second marriage)," 
writes a great granddaughter Shauna Peterson, "as this was 
necessary before a man could take a second wife in the Mormon 
Church. " 

Anita Gross, a descendant of James and Agnes, says that 
her forebears referred to Martha as "Auntie." 

Such are the roots of the Harvey/Moog family line. 



CHAPTER ONE 



THE HARVEYS: A Mormon from Scotland 



James Harvey, the first of this Harvey line to come to 
America, had Scottish 
roots dating back at least 
as far as Dec. 26, 1686, 
when church records show 
that a Glasgow merchant 
named Thomas Harvie 
married one Agnes Selkrig 
(Selkridge) . 

Thomas Harvie' s son, 
Alexander (born 1693) , 
who was also a merchant, 
was followed in succeed- 
ing generations by another Harvey crest: Squirrels and nuts 




HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



Alexander, a shoemaker born about 1726, then by Moore (1782- 
1852) . Moore married Marian Hall in Ayrshire, the birthplace 
of the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Their son, Alexander (1807- 
1841), was the father of James, born in Kilmarnock, Dec. 6, 
1829. 



PEACE BODY 
ATHERING 
HERE TODAY 




A. K. HAKVF.V 

J nion official, who will upenk ot pence 

meet today 



. E. Harvey One of Prin- 
cipal Speakers; Hopes of 
Slopping Wars 



Delegates are gathering from three 
states to attend the regional congress 
to enforce peace, meeting Friday and 
Saturday, February 21 and 22, called by 
the League, to Enforce- Peace. Among 
other prominent speakers is A. K. 
Harvey, secretary of the Utah State 
Federation of Labor. Mr. Harvey is 
one of labor's best orators. Also Mr. 
Harvey is classed as among the very 
best posted men in the labor movement. 

The Hon. William Howard Taft. for- 
mer President of the United States, 
and national president of the League 
to Enforce Peace, will preside and 
among the famous visiting speakers at 
the sessions will be Dr. A. Lawrence 
Lowell, president of Harvard univer- 
sity; Henry Morgenthau, former am- 
bassador to Turkey; Dr. Henry Van 
Dyke, foraier ambassador to the Neth- 
erlands; Mrs. Philip North Moore, 
president of the National Council of 
Women; Prof. George Grafton Wilson, 
professor of international law at Har- 
vard and recognized as one of the 
greatest authorities in the world on 
the Monroe doctrine. 

1921: James' son, A.E., 
was keynote speaker at 
a Utah peace meeting. 



THE HARVEYS 



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HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 




THE HARVEYS 



HARVEY LINE 
Source: Church Latter-Day Saints. 



Refer to: 



1.0 Thomas Harvie (7-1712) 

m. Agnes Selkrig (Selkridge) (?-?) 

c. Alexander Harvie (1693-?) 2.1 

1.1 Alexander Harvie (1693-?) 
m. Anne Sempel (1697-1756) 

c. Alexander Harvie (1726-?) 1.2 

1.2 Alexander Harvie (17 2 6-?) 
m. Mary Ross (17 4 6-?) 

c. Muir Harvie (1782-1852) 1.3 

1.3 Muir Harvie (1782-1852) 
m. Marion Hall (1782-1841) 

c. Alexander Harvey (1807-1841) 1.4 

1.4 Alexander Harvey (1807-1841) 
m. Margaret Harper (1808-1848) 

c. James Harvey (1829-1897) 1.5 

1.5 James Harvey (1829-1897) 

m. Martha Ellis (1852-1926) 2.3 

c. A. E. Harvey (1884-1972) 1.6 

c. Bruce Harvey (1887-1888) 1.7 

1.6 A. E. Harvey (1884-1972) 

m. Bessie Bell (1884-1932) 5.3 

c. Chrystal Harvey (1906-1963) 1.9 

c. A. C. Harvey (1910-1969) 1.10 

m. Elva 0. McConahy (1884-1974) 1.8 

1.7 Bruce Harvey (1887-1888) 

1.8 Elva O. McConahy (1884-1974) 

1.9 Chrystal Harvey (1906-1963) 
m. Lamont Blackstone 

c. Martin Blackstone (1935-1981) 1.11 



Previous page: Clyde Harvey, a member of Los Angeles City 
College's 1930 tennis team, during sport's long-pants era. 



8 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



1.10 A. C. Harvey (1910-1969) 

m. Marie Moog (b. 1912) 7.3 

c. Steve Harvey (b. 1946) 1.12 

c. Marilyn Harvey (b. 1950) 1.13 

1.11 Martin Blackstone (1935-1981) 

m. Bonnie Devenny (b. 1938) j^~= — - — 

c. Martin Blackstone (b. 1964) r --■--'--. ^-.^ 

c. Kristen Blackstone (b. 1965) 

■ .(■' 

1.12 Steve Harvey (b. 1946) ^- - ^^£— :r " ; ~ — L - 
jn. Tia Lai (b. 1957) t^ft^^^fr^iSifim^ 
c. Sarah Marie Harvey (b. 1988) - ^Lii'N' 



1.13 Marilyn Harvey (b. 1950) 
m. John Stein (b. 1950) 

c. Nick Stein (b. 1981) 

c. Elizabeth Stein (b. 1984) 

1.14 Morris (Boris) (1970-86) 








mMmm: 



rmS$* 



[{order's Blacksmith Shop, 
Location of Los Angeles Times 




y^^^^^A^ 




*&y , 



G// <J S- rVc+xt. / 

ft- ?-&*> 



Discovery of this long-forgotten document was a breakthrough 



THE HARVEYS 



JAMES HARVEY (1829-1897) (1.5) 

Shoemaker, carpenter, painter, Mormon High Priest, born 

in Kilmarnock, Scotland, on 

Dec. 6, 1829, to Alexander 

Harvey and Margaret Harper, 

m. (1) Agnes Burns, 1851, 

Pollockshaw, Scotland, c. 

Jeanette (Prestwich) , 

Alexander, Margaret, Agnes 

(Earl) , Jamima, James 

Douglas, Eliza (Bradley) , 

William Burns. 

M. (2) Martha Ellis 

on March 6, 1879, in Salt Lake City, c. Alma Ellis, Gilbert 

Alexander, Bruce Harper, Josephine. 

D. Dec. 19, 1897, in Salt Lake City. 

One of seven children (four died in infancy) , James 

Harvey joined the Mormon Church in 1852, and sailed from 

Glasgow for America in 1854. 

He compiled his family's genealogy and also left us 

a personal history, which said, in part: 

After seven weeks sailing arrived at 
New Orleans, half starved, that is we 
could not eat the food we got on board the 
ship. We then started up the Mississippi 
River for St. Louis and arrived after 10 
days sailing. 




10 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



The Harveys and another family bought a yoke of cattle 

and set out across the plains in a covered wagon. After 

three months travel we arrived in 

Salt Lake City ... I was sick for a month 

with a gathering in my leg. 

In succeeding years, James Harvey helped build Mormon 
temples in Salt Lake City, St. George, Moroni and Manti. In 
1884, he made a mission to Scotland where he preached the 
gospel. And in 1890, he was made a High Priest in the church. 

Of James* and Agnes' eight children, one James Douglas 

Harvey was killed in 1912 during the Mexican Revolution, 

according to descendant Thora McConkie. 

Of James' and Martha's four children, only Alma Ellis 
survived childhood. Church records show that on June 20, 

1888, James married Susan Cottel, Catherine McDonald, 
Elizabeth Logan, and Janet Craig, all deceased. 

Great-granddaughter Anita Harvey Gross: "It was a means 
whereby worthy female members of the church received the 
ordinance of eternal marriage to a worthy male member of the 
church. " 



Death of jamq Harvey. 
Jamea Harvey, an old and renpected 
citlx^n of this city. pai>*ed away ye* 
terday in the sixty-eighth year of his 
**c He was & native of Ayrshire. 
3- otland. and came, to rtah In l$3t 
crossing the plains In John Banks's 
company and arriving here on October 
2nd. He went to Hantl. 8anpet* coun- 
ty, 'where he rr-nkJM for fir* or six 
years. He then moved to Moroni and 
aMlMed In the settlement of the place 
FYom there he" came to Salt Lake. 



THE HARVEYS 11 

ALMA ELLIS HARVEY (1884-1972) (1.6) 
Union activist, political candidate, lumberjack, barber 

and realtor, b. Feb. 19, 1884, 
Moroni, Utah, m. (1) Bessie 
Bell on Dec. 5, 1905, Salt Lake 
City, Ut., c. Chrystal 
(Blackstone) and Alma Clyde, m. 
(2) Elva O. McConahy, d. Nov. 
20, 1972, Monterey Park, Calif. 

A. E. (as he called 
himself) ran away from home as a 
teenager, riding the rails to 
Washington (positioning his body 
in the framework underneath the 
railroad car at intervals) . 
The young barber, 1909 He worked for a while as a 
lumberjack there, later returning to Salt Lake City to learn 
the barber's trade. An early union activist at a time (and in 
a state) where unions had very few rights, he went before the 
the legislature in 1919 to push a workmen's compensation bill. 

COMPENSATION LAW 




A. E. Harvey of Utah Federation of Labor Warns Com- 
mijttee'Abput Campaign Promises and How Work' 
men Feel Regarding Pledges 



•J: 



12 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 
The Salt Lake Tribune's sneering lead read: 

JL" * flag otpoFtl leal. ^Bho^iton/AT^UJ 

of I 




Using the Democratic party platform as 
a red flag of political Bolshevism, A. E. 
Harvey, a barber and representative of the 
Federation of Labor, appeared before the 
joint Senate and House committees consid- 
ering the Olson workmen's compensation 
bill yesterday and demanded in the name of 
labor. . . that they pass the Olson measure. 

Harvey aviated into the meeting with 
a copy of the party platform waving from 
his hand and (told) the legislators where 
they were "going to get off" ... if they 
didn't live up to (their) pledges... 

Harvey's little bomb only caused a 
ripple of merriment... 

His "little bomb" failed that day. But he lived to see 
compulsory workmen's compensation become a routine part of 
American life. (And he proudly carried the "Bolshevism" 
clipping in his wallet the remaining 53 years of his life.) 

In 1923, he made a Quixotic attempt — considering the pop- 
ularity of the union cause — for city commissioner (the equiva- 
lent of city councilman) of Salt Lake City. His war chest? 



La ,::| h 







Mf: UenxtxenM $22.41); Mr. Hurvey. 
$17.50; Mr/- Young", r J2S0.25; ,Mr. - Wll- 
Han»*. % 12 ; Mr.V £LAwj t m e, ••'.-$ 14 ; "•* Mr. 



$17.50. 



Oliiciai Primaiy Ballot 

Candidate* for nomination for the office* of i 
Mavor «»d Coaunmionrn for four-»e*ri 



THE HARVEYS 



13 





! BENCTZEN. CHAS. J. 

i 


! BURTON. T. T. 


CRABBE. A. K. 

i r 


i GREEN. HERMAN H. 

i p 


1 

i 


HARVEY. A. E. 


' LAU R£NCE. CEORCE N. 

i 


OLESON. SAM. W. 


i 


OLSON. BERKLEY. 


1 WILLIAMS. PARLEY L. 


i YOUNG. R. N. v 




IVMI ••- TMI 



BURTON, GREEN, LAWRENCE 
[ AND WILLIAMS QUALIFY TO 
RUN FOR COMMISSIONSHIPS 



roa COMMISSIONEE. 



Fim Secocd Third rVi.--S rtftii 



Btag-Utn 112 

Bunon 3325 

Cntbe 1343 

aroen 2100 

Hirrey I <7i 

Liwrnnc4 ; 1807 

OIwod I 194 

Olson 620 

Willtunj | 1674 

Yottny . , j 1380 



157 
1527 
371 
103 
287 
942 
80 
383 
730 
3G0 



53 I 23 

1307 • 1580 

425 548 

834 : :on 

153 | S3 



54 

1438 
783 

1033 
303 



384 I 1300 , 2044 



44 I 141 



M 



260 j 224 , 353 
335 ; 1130 ; 1849 
420 I 751 ; 764 



£<x*l 

, 399 

9237 

1 3468 

I 5237 

: ii«5 

'- 8477 
5M 

j 1828 
I I73» 
i 3875 



Harvey (second from left) came 
in eighth in a 10-man race though 
he had a few heavy backers. 




14 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 

Never shying away from a good fight, even one with the 
city fire chief, Harvey wrote this sarcastic poem for the 
union paper. 



It Happened in Salt Lake City 



OH, MR. MUST PERRY, 

* * * 
MAYOR of our city. 

* * * 
YOU ARE the boas. 

* * « 

OF PUBLIC safely, and everything" 

* * * 
INCLUDING 

* * * 
TUB FIRE Department, 

* * * 
ARE VOl NOT! 

* * * 

vol remember the city water mala 

* * * 
THAT BROKE f 

* * * 
WELL IT didn't wash me away 

* * * 
HIT IT did wash 

* ♦ ♦ 
A FRIEND of mine 

* * * 
AWAY, or almost. 

* * * 
HE LIVED In a flat 

* * * 
ON SIXTH South 

* * * 
AND THIRD East 

* * * 
AND HE woke up 

* » * 
TO PINO 

* * * 
FIVE FEET of water 

* * . * 
AND WHAT came with It 

* * * 
IN HIS flat 

* * # 

IN THE middle of the night 

* * * 

HE thought the Fire Department • 

* * * 
WAS a part 

* ♦ * 

OF THE Public Safety Department 

* * * 
OF OUR fair city 

* * * 
AND FOR the public safety 

* * * 

AND EVERYTHING. 

* * * 

HE PHONED to the chief 

* * * 
AND ASKED him , 

•flt ifc ik 
IF he wouldn't 

* * * 
SEND DOWN an engine 

* S 4 f 

TO PUMP the water out. 

* * * f 
AND THE chief. 

* *. * ■ ...■.'■'.-. 
SO I am told. 

* * * +■ ■ 
CUSSED AND swore so rouclC-'V ■ 

I . ■-.. — . — 7i r*r1T i :' i 



THAT RED streaks 

* ♦ ♦ 
POPPED OUT 

. * * * 
OF THE receiver. 

* * * 
AND THE chief told him 

* * s) 
TO GO straight to, 

* * * 
WHERE I Jost don't know. 

* ♦ # 
BUT SOMEWHERE within 

* * * 
OR WITHOUT 

* * * 
OR BELOW 

* * * 
THIS earthly realm. 

* * * 
THEN CAME one of the 

* * * 
PROTECTORS 

* * * 

OF public safety, 

• * * * 

A POLICEMAN. 

* * * V 
AND HE phoned 

* * * 
TO THE same chief 

* * ♦ • 

AND, BI NOD. ' > 

* * * 
GOT THE same answer. 

SO 8AJTH my friend 

* * * 

AND IN the meantime ■' 

* * * , . , 
THIS FRIEND of mine 

" * * * 
WATCHED his bed -,,.,.. 

* * * .,.' . . ,. 
AND EVERYTHING • " " . * 

* * * 
FLOATING, and waited. 

* * * 
BUT IN vain. ■ 

£ * * 
SEVEN OR eight hours later "- r 

* * * 
THE ENGINE ramp 

* * * 
BUT THE chief got order* 

* * * 
FROM YOU 

* * * ■;■ ;. 

OR THE Commission. ..:•-. - - 

THE QUESTION Is, • X 

* * * 

DO YOU . . < ' 

* * * \ ., 
THINK HIM a protector 

* * * 
OF PUBLIC safety? 

* * *£ 
I THANK YOU. *c 

• a. HAjtyrr, 

With apologies to no one^ _^_ v . ,- t 



1 



1 

ri 

■ i 



i 

:s 

-t 

X 
J 



THE HARVEYS 



15 



Moving to Los Angeles in the 1920s, he served on the 
state Cosmetology Board, edited a trade newspaper (see below) , 
worked for the Democratic Party, and headed a senior citizens 
organization in Monterey Park. 

A voracious reader even in his 80s, he enjoyed discours- 
ing with his grandchildren on such varied topics as post-Ice 
Age migrations, the Spanish occupation of Mexico, and Emperor 
Henry IV s 3-day vigil in the snow outside the gates of Pope 
Gregory VII 's residence at Canossa. 



Ike 




HHIII 



I 



Official Bulletin: Southern California Hairdresser* and Cosmetologists Association 
4903 So. Western Ave., Los Angeles 37 Phone AX. 8276 



Volume '3 



AUGUST - SEPTEMBER, 1947 




THE 

E 

D 
I 

T 
O 
R 



SUPPLYMEN — BEAUTY PRICES 
AND JOE UPSWEEP 

By A. E. HARVEY 

I happened to meet my old friend, Joe 
Upsweep last Saturday. You remember 
me telling you of Joe. He is the old 
time beauty operator, now retired. 

He, like some other Europeans, sorta 
murders the "King's English, but he is 
inherently more or less smart. Smart 
enough that in his older years de doesn't 



WARREN POCKET VETOES 
COSMETOLOGY LEGISLATION 

Word reaches us that Governor War- 
ren failed to sign Assembly Bill 2454 
passed by the recent session of the 
Legislature. 

We discussed this bill in detail in 
the July issue of "The Cosmetologist." 
Word of its pocket veto by the Gov- 
ernor did not reach us until the issue 
was on the press. 

It would seem this is a case of too 
many eggs in one basket. Too many 
legislative items in one bill. If the 
opposition is strong enough against one 
item we loose the whole bill including 
the items against which there is no 
opposition. 

We suspect the opposition in this 
case was against the Full Time Board 
provisions. We know the Department 
Heads were opposed to this in another 
case. 



OREGON PROHIBI 

ING OF BEAUT 

WHY NOT Ci 

LEGISLATION— A I 

advertising of prices 
statutes affecting beau' 
last meeting of the i 
The law became effe 
reads as follows: "If a 
ingly made any false, 
ceptive material staten 
or statement such as 
town,' or 'reduced price 
substance, effect or Im 
tised any definite or fi: 
for personal services re 
may refuse to Issue, mi 
or restore, may suspen 
a certificate to such pe 
15, which deals with t 
existing laws, was ah 
legislature. 

Modern Beat 

Most of our trouble 

and unscrupulous firm 

who put out dishonest 

deceptive statements in 



16 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 




Darling Bruce has gone and left you, 
He has left this world of care, 
He has gone to join the angels, 
In a world that's bright and fair. 

He was always pure and lovely, 
Tender as a sweet spring flower, 
Often when you might feel lonely, 
He has cheered you many an hour. 

With a sweet and gentle nature, 
Winning love from all around, 
And a smile so sweet and tender, 
Hidden now beneath the ground. 

Many hours you watched beside him, 
As he lay so pale and weak, 
How you longed to see him smiling, 
When the bloom had left his cheek. 

But I know you would not call him, 
Back to earth to sin and pain; 
For he's gone where pain and sickness, 
Ne'r will trouble him again. 

He is free from every sorrow, 
From temptation' s chains and snares; 
Where no evil can befall him, 
And his life be free from cares. 

Though your heart was full of sadness, 
At the loss of one so sweet, 
Yet it fills your heart with gladness, 
To know that you again will meet. 

To know you will again behold him, 
Sweet and tender as before, 
In your arms again to fold him, 
There where parting is no more. 



Nancy Harvey, a 
daughter of James, 
wrote this poem after 
the death of Martha's 
baby boy, Bruce, from 
diptheria in 1888. 
All four of Martha's 
children contracted 
the disease. Only 
Alma survived. 



NANCY HARVEY 



THE HARVEYS 17 




Bruce Harvey (left) 
and Alma, in 1888. 



ELVA O. MC CONAHY (1884-1974) (1.8) 
Beauty shop assistant, b. Marion (?) , Ohio, July 24, 
1884, m. A. E. Harvey app. 1936, d. Aug. 21, 1974, Monterey 
Park, Calif. Until suffering a stroke in the final months 
of her life, Elva had never spent a day in a hospital. She 
is lovingly remembered by her grandchildren for her smile and 
the chocolate cake and fruit jello she always had ready for 
them. 



18 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 




Elva, second from right, and siblings Jess, Sherm and Edna 



CHRYSTAL BELL HARVEY (1906-1963) (1.9) 
Vaudeville performer, b. Sept. 10, 1906, Salt Lake City, 
to A. E., Bessie (Bell) Harvey, m. Lamont Blackstone, Sioux 
City, Iowa, c. Martin, d. Sep. 6, 1963, Los Angeles. 

Possessor of a vivacious personality, she performed 
across the country in an all-girls band, the Gibson 
Navigators, during Vaudeville days, specializing in the 
banjo, mandolin and piano. 

After her husband's death in the late 1950s, she moved to 
Los Angeles and worked for the American Red Cross. 



THE HARVEYS 19 




The Gibson Navigators, circa 1927; Chris, second from right 

fch 



'<L^*Z- (At the 



The "Glbso'n Navigators, an or-!' 
:hestra of eight women deriving ; 
their appellation from the attire of 
their act, certainly pleased the; 
rather "hard to be pleased" Ann 
Arbor audience. The girls arc not ; 
masquerading under the name of 
syneopators — they really are. Jazz 
played in a manner which Is not 
repulsive to one's ears and comedy 
which does not overflow its bound- j 
ary into boredom characterize their 
^numbers. — — w^^ -• "j 

instrument. House Peters, and Patsy i^-^obby Brooks and Edna Rush. J 
Ruin Miller furnish the feature pic- jn a - scrub WO men act, received aj 
ture program in "Headwinds," also b ig'ov'atlon Sunday evening. Shorr 
c/omedy and Fox news. .. ^, Sisters. Eight Rogers dancers and; 

[ J® ft^t?-?T.. ■(■ -t: • ' ■ ■' . | y«p Pnct a male impersonator,' 

"Jazz that isn't repulsive": Rave reviews from Pocatello, Ida. 
(left) , and Ann Arbor, Mich. The scrub women were a hit, too. 



GIBSON GIHL8 
'Capitol} y 

The Gibsort -Imlhinjj^laJ^fl orchestra 
opened tlmy engagement last night to 
a crowded house, and they were en- 
thusiastically applauded throughout 
the entire performance. They are not 
charm jjirla but they are artists every 
one of Uiom- There are eight girls in 
the company each playing a different 



2 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 





Clyde and his dog, Goofy, 
1920; A cycle built for 
two, 1917; A.E., Chris 
(circled) in Great Salt 
Lake; note the woman in 
front, left, who seems to 
fear that she's too daring 




THE HARVEYS 



21 



ALMA CLYDE (A. C. ) HARVEY (1910-1969) (1.10) 
Insurance salesman, b. March 31, 1910, Salt Lake City, to 
E., Bessie (Bell) Harvey; m. Marie Moog, March 16, 1941, 

Las Vegas, c. 
Steve, Marilyn 
(Stein) , d. June 
24, 1969. 

Clyde Harvey 
played doubles on 
Los Angeles City 
College's confer- 
ence tennis 
champions. 

He worked as 
an usher at the 
old Belasco 
Theater at 10th 
and Hill Sts. , 
where he heard John Barrymore yell at a noisy spectator, 
"Hark, yon braying ass!" 

Later, he dug ditches in the desert-town of Trona during 
the Depression and was a mechanic in the U.S. Army Air 
corps in Texas World War II (he always joked he fought in "The 
Battle of Juarez") . After the war he worked as an agent for 
the Prudential Insurance Company in the era of door-to-door 




Chris and Clyde, 1913 



22 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 

canvassing. He often said he could have written a book about 
the characters he encountered on his job, such as the policy- 
holder who surprised him by yelling, "Shut up, Harvey!" (it 
turned out she had a parrot by that name) . 

Or the regulars in the back room of a barbershop on Adams 

Blvd. the proprietor, 

known as Jimmy the Barber, 
a Ring Lardner character 
who would close up shop if 
there was a quorum for a 
poker game, insulting 
potential customers, if 
necessary, to make them go 
away. 

He liked to joke about 

his brief career on 

television one holiday 

period in the late 1950s 

on Bob Yeakel * s "Rocket to 

Biggs Field, Tex., circa 1943 
Stardom." The midnight talent show was sponsored by Yeakel 1 s 

Oldsmobile business and during commercial breaks the camera 

occasionally showed Harvey and the other telephone salesmen 

talking to potential automobile buyers. Once when a crazed 

caller wouldn't hang up, Harvey told him, "I'm sorry I have to 

go but the building's on fire." 




THE HARVEYS 



23 











^-** 



$> -*•! 



LA- *> *^, 




|. : |.' OXi c iijtlc. i' (JikwI, It. Itorknoss, If. Carlson, L. Stu.-f. n. [,. 1'almer, i'. Smith, II. Steiner, C. Harvey, 
li. Mil.h.li. Mr. «' A. Klhs. i.:. TlKjMipsi.il. 



TENNIS SQUAD 

Although the annual went to press before 
the season closed the tennis squad gave, at 
the time, every indication of winning the first 
conference championship ever to come to Los 
Angeles. Six matches had been played and, in each 
case, the Cubs had come out victorious. Only 
once — in the Fullerton match — were the locals 
in danger. In preseason matches the Cubs tied 
U.C.L.A.'s crack varsity, but lost to them at 
a later date. Occidental was beaten by a 17-0 
score. 

The first conference tilt, with Santa Ana, 
was won by a 17-0 score. Every match was 
won in two sets. 

Fullerton took the Cubs by surprise in the 
next match by coming to Los Angeles on a 
Thursday afternoon, and putting up a better 
fight than was expected. Carlson saved the day 
when he managed to nose out Fullerton's first 
singles to give a 9-8 victory to Los Angeles. 

Riverside, the next opponent, was subdued 
16-1. Mitchell, the Cub's eighth man, lost to 
Riverside's fifth man for the only defeat of the 
day. 

Rain and an error in management kept all 
but two of Santa Monicas men away from the 
courts the day of their match with the Cubs. 



Stoefen and Steiner defeated these men and 
the rest of the matches were won by default. 

L.A.J.C.'s first three singles men are Stoefen, 
Steiner, and Carlson. None of these men has 
yet been defeated and their points alone are 
sufficient to win a match. Carter Good and Phil 
Smith form a strong doubles team, while Chester 
Hale and Clyde Harvey compose the another 
doubles combination almost as good. Lee Pal- 
meris a steady singles player and completes an 
exceptionally well-rounded squad. Earl Fox and 
Bob Mitchell also earned letters. The team was 
managed by Bill Harcos and coached by Charles 
Ellis. 

Ll:g.£<IJBSWIN 
TENNIS MATCH, 22-2 

Invading the Los Angeles Junior 
College tennis courts the Chaff ey Pan- 
ther .racquet squad entered its "third 
conference defeat, the Cubs "team 
swamping them 21 to 2. 

•The second doubles team composed 
of Goldnmr. and Michel (Ch.), were 
•defeated by Palmer and Harvey (L- 
A.) fr-«,6-3. 



L. A. Junior College's 1930 yearbook salutes its netters. 



24 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



MARTIN BLACKSTONE (1935-1981) (1.11) 
Football coach, realtor, b. 1935 in Sioux City, Iowa, to 
J. Lamont, Chrystal (Harvey) Black- 
stone; m. Bonnie Devenny on Sept. 2, 

1961, children: 
Marty, Kristen; 



Head Football 
Coach Named 
at Rio Hondo 

Martin (Marty) Black- 
stone has been named 
head football coach at Rio 
Hondo College, succeeding 
Jim Williams, who re- 
signed. 

Blackstone, 35, served 
under Williams as assis- 
tant coach since 1966. 

A veteran of eight years 
of coaching, Blackstone 
played football in the Mid- 
west in Sioux City, la. and 
attended the University of 
South Dakota where he 
starred as a guard and 
tackle. 

After serving four years 
in the Marine Corps, 
Blackstone attended Cal 
■State LA. where he 
earned a masters degree in 
physical education. 

Blackstone began his 
football coaching career at 
Cal State as assistant frosh 
coach in 1962. In 1963, he 
moved to El Rancho High 
School where he was 
coaching aide for three 
consecutive champion 
league teams. 



d. June 13, 1981, 
Long Beach, Calif. 
One of the 
winningest junior 
college football 




Lamont and Marty 



coaches in the state in the 1970s, Marty 
retired from Rio Hondo College after lead- 
ing the team to four conference titles. 

Scholarship Fund 
WUlHonor Coach 

TRU J UN 1 8 1981 

A scholarship fund has been established at Rio Hondo 
College in memory of Mar tin/Blackstone) the school's 
most successful football" coach, who died last weekend 
at his home in Long Beach. He was 46. 

He joined the Rio Hondo coaching staff in 1966 and 
waited through two head coaches before taking the 
football program. (y f\ T — ( S *" / 

When he became head coach in 1970, he took a team 
that finished 3-6 in 1969 to the conference champion- 
ship, with a 6-0 record, 9-2 overall— still the best record 
in Roadrunner history. 

He won three more championships in 1971, 1972 and 
1973, placing second in 1974 and 19761 

"It's not his win-loss record that's important," said 
Clint South, a close friend and former assistant coach. 
"It's how he touched people as a friend and teacher. 
That's where his victory was— not on the field but in 
the hearts of all who knew him." 



THE HARVEYS 2 5 





Marty Jr., left, carrying 
on family tradition in 
the world of music. Above, 
Marty Sr. and wife Bonnie 



SARAH MARIE HARVEY (b. 1988) 




..Before feeding 



2 6 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



STEVE HARVEY (b.1946) (1.12) 

Newspaperman, radio commentator, b. 

March 31, 1946, Santa Monica, Calif., to A. 

C. and Marie Harvey, m. Oct. 10, 1987, to Tia 

Lai, graphic artist at the Orange County 




Bottom Ten's Stav* Horv«y 



Register, c. Sarah Marie Harvey (b. April 22, 1988). A feature 

writer for the 
L. A. Times 
since 1968, he 
also writes a 
syndicated 
column, "The 
Bottom Ten," 
parody of Top 
Ten football 
polls, and is 
a commentator 
for National 
Public Radio. 




Sleuthing out a 
burial ground for 
fast-food signs. 



(Photo by Rick 
Meyer of the Los 
Angeles Times.) 



THE HARVEYS 



27 







Steve Harvey, 20, a sportswritcr for 
Tlie Herald-Examiner and co-sports 
editor or the Daily Trojan, was hanged 
Jn effigy on the USC campus yester- 
day by members of the marching 
band. 

The action apparently came as the 
result of an article charging that cer- 
tain band members were not playing 

their instruments during the football 
games, instead faking it 
V- The figure; was -wearing a -white 
tshirt with Harvey's name boldly writ- 
ten across the'-cbest and a lettuce 
used as the figure's head. 
•' ' "It doesn't look a thing like me." 
said Harvey,, denying he uses Roque- 
fort hair dressing. 




Tia in Paris at the Renault Museum, 1986 



28 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 




MARILYN ANNE HARVEY (b. 1950) (1.13) 
Nurse, social worker, former member UC Santa Barbara 

basketball team; b. Nov. 18, 1950, Santa Monica, Calif., to A. 

C. and Marie Harvey, m. John Stein on Dec. 14 (her mother's 

birthday), 1979, c. Nick and Elizabeth. 

Marilyn received a bachelor's degree in sociology from U. 

C. Santa Barbara and a nursing degree from City College of New 

York. She has competed in several 10-kilometer runs as well as 

the 50-mile, Tijuana-Ensenada bicycle race. 

Husband John is an advertising copy writer (winner of 

several Clios, the top award in the industry) as well as a 

motorcycle collector and racing-bike owner (his machines run 

under the banner of Team Stein) . 



THE HARVEYS 



29 




John Stein 
in bachelor 
days; Mari- 
lyn displays 
a 2nd place 
medal after 
10-kilometer 
race while 
friend Greg 
Horbachevsky 
displays an 
avocado that 
he evidently 
found on the 
course. 







3 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 




Marilyn, age 7, arm in sling, and classmates, 1957 



Wedding day in New 
York, 1979, John, 
left, his father 
Elliot and mother 
Mary Ann, his 
brother Skip and 
the bride. 





THE HARVEYS 31 

THE SAYINGS OF NICK 
Age 3, asked where Grandpa lives: "At the airport." 

Asked what he wants for 
Christmas, age 3: "A sledge- 
hammer. " 

Told he's going to St. 
Louis: "Do they have tools 
there?" 

Asked why his eyes are 
brown: "Because Dr. Gurfield 
painted them that way." 

Told to behave, age 3: 
"What's 'behave,' Marilyn?" 

To guests: "I'm 4. Now I 
can wipe!" 

THE SAYINGS OF ELIZABETH 

Responding, at age 2 , to a woman who told her to put back 
a candy bar she had picked up in a market: "No way, Jose!" 

Refusing to sit on Santa's 
lap in a store: "He has no 
mouth . " 



Spotting parsley on her 
mother's plate: "Can I have the 
tree?" 

Asked why she didn't like 
Disney World: "Shamu splashed 
me. " 

Touching older friend 
Greg's wrinkles: "Do they 
hurt?" 

"Mama, I hurt my bellbow." 

At the market: "Mama, you 
need to get some beer! You drink 
beer every day!" 




"Nana, it's froggy outside!" 



32 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



Nine Lives 
of Morris 



BrSTEVgHARVTSTf. 



tStorf Wr«fer 



The last I hadaeard of Moms, his jaws were wrapped 
around tie neck at oae at his neighbors in ^"han an 

So I wasn't surprised when my sister Maniyn phoned 
to say that she and Moms were moving out here. It re- 
minded me of young Michael Coneone oeing sent off to 
visit Sicily after running out a r. val m "The Godfather. 
Blowing town, if s called. ]/(/]/ f — J - / 
Moms is my sister's dog, a Slack- and -white Labrador, 
mix. lean and muscular. And fast I once amed mm mts 
a stopwatch at 7.1 seconds in the 100- yard ^a«» 

Moms spent part of his early life imprisoned in a 
pound and perhaps that is where he deveiooed his un- 
healthy dislike for his fellow male dog. 

The idea of Mams flying out here filled me with terri- 
ble thoughts. 

My aster said she had asked an elderly vet how to se- 
date Moms and his prescnpuon wa& "Give him 15 drops 
of cognac and 15 drops of water." Possibly the vet 
thought Moms was Marilyn's husband. Anyway, she 
decided to give him one Valium p<n inwtraii . 

In retrospect. I should have recommended a pair of 
doecuffs. After all I knew of the several tragicomic A „ v- .u «• u. PCTEBE ? rrov o jA ' *-• "**» **" 

cross-country automooiie excursions they had made. ° D £li 8 nt — M mv mother and I learned tne 

On those trips. Marilyn tned to master the art o 




night of the plane's arrival at Los Angeles International. 
"He ate through the crate," a security officer said, 
surveying the wooden wreckage. "He's running loose." 
"Inside the airport?" I asked. 
The officer paused. "On the runway," he said. 
Alas. Moms had a way of making his presence felt- MartiypAeit "^ Ae S^d to search for Moms in a 
like mugging the motel manager's malamute puppy in ^f* 5 " retv 
small Kan s a s town on Interstate 70. Maniyn got ou^o 
that one by pretending she had never seen Moms be- 



sneaking the dog into a motel room— never check 
during the day, never park near the office, never put m ' 
name down on the registration form, never send hun ou 
to fetch ice. etc. etc. 



fore— but like a good sport, volunteering to take him ot 

the oremises. 

" Paw-to-Piw Combat 

He was forever plunging through screens or ou 
bathroom windows to commit assaults in towns Lik' 
Webster Grove. Mo.. Little Rock. Ark., and a string c 
West Coast communiues (including paw-to-paw com 
bat with a Dobennan pinscber at UC Santa BarDara— lr 
a crowded classroom ). 

.He and Maniyn settled in Manhattan where, it wa 
hoped, he could make a fresh start with a new idenut 
,(Bans). Then, a German shepherd charged into my sis 
ter's apartment— and the waiting jaws of Moms (the 
family still used his old name in private). 

The shepherd would have expired if Marilyn's hus- 
band John, after trying for several minutes to loosen 
Moms' favorite death-grip, hadn't lit a match and gent- 
ly touched the flame to a sensitive area. 

Mnms let ro immediately, though he didn't make a 
noise. The shepherd survived, but it was definitely time 
for Moms to skip town. 
Unfortunately, one Valium Dill wasn't enough to se- 



returned in an hour— without the dog. 
Hard to Believe 

"It was unbelievable." she reported. "We heard a re- 
port on the radio that he was out in the TWA area. Then 
he was seen at Golden West and at United. I think: It's 
so big out there— the flashing lights, planes coming and 
leaving, the noise. . ." She sighed and left to resume the 
hunt with the patient officer. 

It was hard to believe that Morris might die out there 
—or anywhere, for that matter. In his nine years, his life 
had assumed a sort of mythlike stature. 

He had never been sick a day. He had been hit by cars 
twice and walked away uninjured. He had survived an 
attack by Venice's celebrated Roving Band of Dogs, as 
well as scores of more even-sided matches. 

Would he now become the Phantom of LAX. occa- 
sionally glimpsed by passengers on moonlit nights? 

Ninety minutes passed. Finally. Marilyn reappeared 
— with Moms. The officer suggested she acquire aplas- 
tic crate— an advance over the wooden model— for 
Morris' next flight (if a next flight was absolutely ne- 
cessary). 

Moms, meanwhile, looked a little winded But he 
didn't have a scratch on him. Of course, we'll never 
know whether any planes hit hun. 



Recollection of a rowdy member of the Harvey household 



CHAPTER TWO 



THE ELLISES: A Welsh Miner's Daughter 

The Ellis family is our Welsh connection. Church records 
show that Edward Ellis, son of William, was born in Machen, 
Wales, in 1787. His son Richard, a miner, was born in 
Llantherwell, Wales, in 1811, and married Mary Matthews of 
Drumcondr a , Ireland. 

Converted to Mormonism, Richard and Mary Ellis emigrated 
to the United States (Salt Lake City) in 1881 to live near 
their daughter, Martha, wife of James Harvey. 

ELLIS LINE 
Source: Records of the Church of Latter Day Saints. 

Refer to: 

2.0 William Ellis (?-?) 
m. Catherine (?-?) 

c. Edward (1787-?) 2.1 

2.1 Edward Ellis (1787-?) 
m. Ann Jenkins (1790-?) 

c. Richard Ellis (1811-1891) 2.2 



34 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



2.2 Richard Ellis (1811-1891) 
m. Mary Matthews (1813-1892) 

c. Martha Ellis (1852-1926) 2.3 

2.3 Martha Ellis (1852-1926) 

m. James Harvey (1829-1897) 1.5 

c. A. E. Harvey (1884-1972) 1.6 



MARTHA ELLIS (1852-1926) (2.3) 

Milliner, b. July 30, 1852, Trevethin, Eng. , to Richard 

Ellis and Mary Matthews, m. James Harvey, 

March 6, 1879, Salt Lake City, c. Gilbert 

Alexander, Bruce Harper, Josephine, Alma Ellis, 

d. Feb. 25, 1926, in Salt Lake City. 

Britta Bradford (b. Dec. 20, 1899) , a 

granddaughter of James Harvey and Agnes Burns, 

wrote in 1986: 

I was married Sept. 4, 1918, in the 
Salt Lake Temple. Your great grandmother 
Martha was working in the temple and when 
she saw my name, she came to me and told 
me who she was and went through the 
temple with me. 

I was surely glad to have one of my 
own family with me. She told me my 
grandfather had done the painting in some 
of the rooms we went through. She was 
Aunt Martha to me; anyway that is what I 
called her. 

Bless her heart! 




CHAPTER THREE 



THE BELLS: A Midnight Ride for Help 




Seven of John and Lydia Bell's children gathered in 
Cochranton, Perm., for the solemn ritual of a family 
photograph, circa 1870. Front row (from left): James, George, 
Mary and Robert. Back row (from left), Cooper and the twins, 
Joseph and William. (William and Joseph?) 



36 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

BELL LINE 
Source: Roy Smith 



Refer to: 



3.1 John Bell (1807-1880) 

m. Lydia Adams (1813-1889) 4.6 

c. Robert Bell (1839-1917) 3.2 

3.2 Robert Bell (1839-1917) 

m. (1) Julia Emaline Danforth 

c. Bertie (1870-1897) 

c. May (Imes) (1867-?) 

m. (2) Eva Wetsel (1846-1916) 5.3 

c. Bessie Bell (1884-1932) 3.3 

c. Harry H. Bell (1886-1918?) 3.4 

c. Ralph Bell (1887-1936) 3.5 

3.3 Bessie Bell (1884-1932) 

m. A. E. Harvey (1884-1972) 1.6 

3.4 Harry H. Bell (1886-1918?) 

3.5 Ralph Bell (1887-1936) 
m. Jesse Bell (?-?) 

3.6 Roy Smith (1901-) 
m. Genevieve Vickers 






• r >3() HISTORY OF CKAHTORI) COUNTY. 

John Hell, a cabinet -maker, moved in about lNL'S from Allegheny County. 
Georgu Henry, u few years later, opened n store. Tim population -in IN-H' 
comprised about a dozen families The |m*lolliee was at liist kept on Him 
pike east of Hie village, and about 1SVJ Hugh Smith became tho first Post- 
master at Cochranton. The growth of the villago lias been gradual but con - 
ntant. Tho Franklin I5rane.li of the X. Y., I*. A: 0. Railroad passes through 



THE BELLS 



37 



JOHN BELL (18077-1880) (3.1) 
Cabinet-maker , b. Feb. 9, 18 07, Lawrence, Beaver County, 

Pa., m. Lydia Adams, 
Dec. 8, 1831, 
Cochranton, Pa., c. : 
John (1832-59), Robert 
(1839-1917), George 
(1842-1908), twins 
Joseph (1846-1919), 
William (1846-?), Mary 
(Reed) (1845-1919), 
Cooper Adams (1851- 
1911) James S., (1853- 
1929) and Lydia 
(unknown), d. Jan. 27, 
1880, Cochranton, Pa. 

Bell descendant 
Roy Smith (4.3) 
found the following 

biographical sketch, written about 1879, in Crawford 

County's historical file. 

It recounts how, at age 13, John Bell 

went to Pittsburgh and learned the 
trade of cabinet making, working there 4 
1/2 years. On Aug. 30, 1826, he landed in 
Cochranton and worked several years at 
his trade. . .During 1832, he built a 




Photo believed to be 
that of John Bell 



38 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 

section of the Erie Canal. 

In 1844, he bought his present 

farm... His place originally was of the 

Adams tract, which was settled by his 
father-in-law . 

Mr. Bell has been a member of the 
School Board of Cochranton . . . and was also 
a member of the Grand Jury which condemned 
the old jail. 

John Bell was also remembered for an act of heroism by 

a local historian: 

It was considered a great feat that 
John Bell, one winter night in 1830, went 
on horseback for Dr. Kennedy, and brought 
him at risk of life and limb, over the icy 
trail to the home of our good clergyman, 
Rev. Samuel Smith and our late citizen of 
prominence, Esq. Hugh Smight, became an 
important acquisition to the minister's 
household. 

Of John and Lydia Bell's children, George was a well known 

railroad builder in Pueblo, Colo. , Cooper Adams was owner and 

editor of the Cochranton Times and James S. was a Franklin, 

Neb. , hardware store-owner and local Democratic Party worker 

who was said to have been a friend of William Jennings Bryan. 



C&yrT. . 0% QIAO., tfeyzdJj, U*<u£ 4rttrzu.<prfL, /ty ;»?*y 



In his will, Robert left old Jenny to Lydia 



THE BELLS 



39 



ROBERT BELL (1839-1917) (3.2) 
Justice of the peace, realtor, rancher, b. April 2, 1839, 

Cochranton, Penn. to 
John, Lydia (Adams) 
Bell, m. (1) Julia 
Emeline Danforth Aug. 
21, 1865; c: May 
(Imes) (1867-?), 
Robert (1870-1897), 
(2) m. Eva Wetsel Oct. 
5, 1872, Cochranton; 
c. : Bessie (Harvey) , 
Harry and Ralph; d. 
Dec. 18, 1917, Salt 
Lake City. 

Robert Bell's 

life was touched by 

tragedy early when 

his wife Emma died in the early 1870s. He reacguainted 

himself with Eva Wetsel, who had been Emma's next-door 

neighbor when she was growing up. They married in 1872. 

In 1897, Bertie his and Emma's son drowned in the 

Rio Grande while transporting gold from Mexico for his uncle 
George Bell, a railroad builder. 

A wandering sort, Robert worked in Cochranton, Pa., 




40 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



Jamestown, N.Y., Franklin, Neb., Pueblo and Salida, Colo., 
Brawley, Long Beach and Tropico, Calif., and Salt Lake City. 






'OR''hWiCE^'{t3t^K/WE^wr^^e>redaet^^ 



Winning election each time he ran, Robert Bell served as 
Justice of the Peace in Salida from 1896-1903. 




IRCULATION OF ANY NE^5PAPERlN~50UT 



FRAMBXiy,.N EBRASKA,THC^Ar/JAMARY10, 1918 

ther'i Death. j-with on * of his brothers, and af-j 

l__"» « — --i^— ^ wrwards purchased a-raneh at Sa-< 
James." Bell or uua city, re-: Hfi /s:, .jrsri. -.- itw .t— z 



Gets New* of 




^eirecf^wocd-ofctae- d« 
; brother, > Robert, last week,! 
[through receiving a eopy of his! 
fold home paper back in Peonsyl- j 

vania. tins b€iug the first he had' 
.heard of his brother's death. The; 
JoMniaryrtoUo^sx^i.r - :: :.~ ;r~~: ~d 
F._ Robert Bell, sen of John and ; 
|fcydia~Beil," waf horn in~Uoehraj> j 

ton, Pa, hi 1837, and died at Salt i 

Lake City, Utah, Dec. 18, 1917. 1 

He-was educated in the Cochran-] 

ton Academy arfd become a mem- ' 

ber of the United Presbyterian 

church aVah early age. When a! 
[young man he engaged in the oil 
[business, and after his marriage 
[resided for some years at James- 1 

lSr ,K "fc T- ? ^^ X °^ hl0 > j i^hnatw^->-TtaS^ 
ICoio.. wheie he was in business 1 «.»»./ 



;lida, Colo., which is still the prop- 
erty nf hi« f»hildr« >n - fTi«t w yf*V 
jfaying-heHlfhT caused them to lo- 
:cate in California, where her 
death occurred. Since that thne 
[he liad been tenderly _cared 
[for. by his daughter, Mrs. Harvey,. 
Uul fehfl.se home. he^died^. JThe_ only] 
i members of his family surviving) 
tare - his. sister ,~Mrs. Mary Reed, re- 
Itldjng in. the old homestead at 
Cochranton, and two brothers, 
James 8. Ball of Franklin, Neb., 
and Joseph J. Bell of Bellingham, 
Wash., the, laler_heing jg ery S L at 
"the presenTunie. Uobert Bell was 
a faithful attendant at church ser- 
vices, a Sabbath school teacher 
and~o consistent Christian. — The 



Franklin, Neb., newspaper report of Robert Bell's death 



THE BELLS 



41 



BESSIE V. BELL (1884-1932) (3.3) 
Beautician, theater organist, b. June 27, 1884, Franklin, 
Neb., to Robert and Eva (Wetsel) Bell, m. A.E. Harvey, Dec. 5, 
1905, Salt Lake City, c. Chrystal Bell (Blackstone) , Alma 
Clyde, d. Sep. 16, 1932, Los Angeles. 

She helped her husband run the Palace Beauty Salon in Los 
Angeles. She occasionally played the theater organ in silent- 
movie theaters and was a member of the musical group of the 
Women's Benefit Assn, one of many musically talented people in 
the Bell/Blackstone branch. 





Born 80 years apart, Bessie Bell and great-granddaughter 
Kristen Blackstone bear a striking resemblance. 



42 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



HARRY BELL (1886-1918?) (3.4) 

Miner, rancher, b. 1886 (exact date unknown) , Franklin, 
Neb., to Robert and Eva (Wetsel) Bell, killed during World War 
I. He worked for a time in the mines in Miami, Ariz., and on 
the family ranch in Brawley, Calif. The Pentagon's record of 
his death was apparently destroyed (along with thousands of 
others) in a fire in the 1970s. 

RALPH BELL (1887-1936) (3.5) 

Carpenter, b. Jan. 
20, 1887, Franklin, Neb., 
to Robert and Eva (Wetsel) 
Bell, badly wounded at 
Chateau Thierry, France, 
in World War I, m. Jesse 
Bell, d. April 9, 1936, 
Los Angeles. "A great 
guy," his nephew A.C. 
Harvey always said. 




RALPH BELL 



THE BELLS 



43 



ROY W. SMITH (b. 1901) (3.6) 

Author, teacher, accountant, historian, b. Feb. 28, 1901, 
Carlton, Penn. , to 
James and Elizabeth 
(Reed) Smith, m. 
Feb. 7, 1924, to 
Genevieve Vickers. 

A great-grand- 
son of John Bell and 
grandson of Mary 
(Bell) Reed, Roy was 
crippled by polio at 
2 and forced to use 
crutches for the 
rest of his life. 

Still, he did 
earn a college 
degree, worked as an 
accountant for 40 
years for the railroad, and devoted 1,000 hours to the Army 
Aircraft Warning Service as an observer during World War II. 

Roy, whose wife Genevieve also was forced to use 
crutches after a childhood disease, chronicled their story in 
the book, "Sticks." 







CHAPTER FOUR 



THE ADAMSES: Pennsylvania in Penn's Time 



A>'D MILITIA OF THE REVOLUTION. 



38: 



CUMBERLAND COUNTY ASSOCIATORS. 

OFFICERS I>* SERVICE, 1771 

(Troro data in our possession wo find the following officers in 
•ftaal service daring the campaign of 177C. The darns affixed 
t, w time when in the service, anil uot date of commission.] 

i»i 1 J 

Captains. 
Thomas Clark (Wilson's Battalion), December, 177l>. 
ThomusTurhett (Wilson's Buttalion), December, 177G. 
Robert Culbertsou (Fifth), September, 177li. 
Samuel Irwin (Maine's Battalion). January, 1777. 
John Carothers, December, 177U. 
William Blaine, December, 177(5. 
John Andrew (Fifth), January, 1777. 
James Gibson (Fourth), January, 1777. 
George Kobin>on (Fourth), January, 1777. 
Joseph Martin, January, 1777. 
George Matthews (Armstrong's Battalion). January, 1777. 

MoCoiinull (Watts' Battalion), January, 1777. 

Alexander Trindlu, January, 1777. 
Samuel Goudy (Watts' Battalion), July, 177H 
James Punly (Watts' Battalion), July, 177G. 
Thomas Bf-ale (Watts' Battalion), July, 177IL 
James Adams, July. 177C. 

Capt. James Adams' Revolutionary War record 



Source: Roy Smith 



ADAMS FAMILY 



THE ADAMSES 4 5 



Refer to: 



4.0 Richard Adams (1618-?) 
c. Nicholas (?-?) 
c. John (1647-?) 4.1 

4.1 John Adams (1647-?) 
c. James (1674-?) 

c. Richard (1676-?) 4.2 

4.2 Richard Adams (167 6-?) 
c. Ann (Woodrow) 

c. Joseph (1705-1791?) 4.3 

4.3 Joseph Adams (1705-1791?) 
m. Ann ? (?-?) 

c. James Adams (1734-1824) 4.4 

c. Hannah (Gilliland) 

4.4 James Adams (1734-1824) 

m. Isabel Waldon (1736-1825) 

c. John Adams (1772-1855) 4.5 

4.5 John Adams (1772-1855) 

m. Ann Chambers (1777-1854) 

c. Lydia Adams (1813-1889) 4.6 

4.6 Lydia Adams (1813-1889) 

m. John Bell (18077-1880) 3.1 



RICHARD ADAMS (1618-?) (4.0) 

B. 1618; c. John, Nicolas. From William Perm's 

Commissioner of Property (Penn. Archives) : 

The proprietor of deeds of lease and 
releases, dated ye 26 and 27 of Feb. 1681, 
granted to Richard Adams of Upper Mayorford 
in Northhampeonshire, 500 acres of land in 
this province. 

John Adams, son and heir of the said 
Richard Adams, by power of attorney, proved 
here, authorizes and appoints Hugh Sharp of 
the county of Burlington in West Jersey, to 
take up said land; whereupon he reguests 
warrant for laying out of it (26 Feb 1717) 



46 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

JOSEPH ADAMS (1705-1791?) (4.3) 
B. West Fallowfield Township, Chester County, Penn. , 1705; 
His will, dated Sept. 12, 1791, lists his wife's name as Ann 
and children as James and Hannah (Gilliland) . 

JAMES ADAMS (1734-1824) (4.4) 
Captain of the 4th Company, 5th Battalion, Cumberland 
County, Penn., 1776-1778, b. Oct. 30, 1734, Delaware County, 
Penn., m. Isabel Welden on April 26, 1756; c. Joseph, Jacob, 
William, Jonathan, Jesse, David, Lydia, James, John, Isaac, 
Weldon, Eli, Levi, d. Oct. 17, 1824, Mifflin County, Penn. 



1012 HISTORY OF VENANGO COUNTY. 

John Adams, rclirod fiiriiii'r, I'olk, is tbo ohlosi mombor ol tbo Adams 
family now liviin* in YtMiaui'o counlv, and is a sun of Woldon Adams, who 
B t'tth'tl in Froncli Umok township in IT'.Hi. Tim Intlor was a son ofQIamos,' 
' A-daupy a native of iMistorn Pennsylvania, horn October 'M), 1731. JnniP9 
Ailainn wus married April 20, 1750, to Isabel WnMnn, born September 22. 
17:'fJ. They ilied in Or.tobor, IH2I, and in September, liVITt, respectively, 
nml worn the parents of tbo following children: Jusoph; Jncob; William: 
Jonatlian; Jesse; David; Lydia; JamoH; John; Isaac; Wolilen; Jdi, and Ijovi. 



JOHN ADAMS (1772-1855) (4.5) 
Carpenter, b. Dec. 23, 1772, Milroy, Miflin County, 
Penn., to James and Isabel (Welden) Adams; m. Ann Chambers 
(1777-1854), c. James, Joseph, Jacob, William R. , Lydia 
(Bell) , Isabel (Dean) , Sally Ann (Record) , Mary (Shaw) , Nancy 
(Couch) , d. Aug. 30, 1855, Conneaut, Penn. 



THE ADAMSES 



47 



John Adams helped found the village of Cochranton, 
building a sawmill and grist mill there in the early 1800s, 
according to local histories. 

LYDIA ADAMS (1813-1889) (4.6) 
B. 1813, Cochranton, to John and Ann (Chambers) Adams, m. 
John Bell, Dec. 8, 1831, c. John, Robert, George, Joseph J., 
William T. , Mary A. (Reed), Cooper Adams, James S., Lydia, d. 
Jan. 25, 1889, in Cochranton. 

It's a shame that historians ignored the women of Lydia 
Bell's period. All we know of her are the vital statistics: 
raised nine children, lived about 76 years, all within a few 
miles of her birthplace on the western Pennsyvlania frontier. 

Come to think of it, those statistics, in themselves, 
tell a quietly heroic story. 



Davis — Tn this city. January 29th, 
A. rUewartDuvib.aged OS years 

Belli — At" Coobrsnton, Jan. 25th, 
Mrs 1 . Lydia Bell, aged about 76 
years. 

Mrs. Bell, whose maiden name was 
Adams, whh boru uear ibe spot where 
aheOied. Rhe «ae the ruoiber of st-ven 
hildreu, live of the s»me being resi- 
dents of the west at tbe i-rer>eut time 
Her husbaud, the late Johu Bell, died 
iu 1SS0. Tbe funeral Her vices of Mrs. 
Bell were held Monday. 

i _ " ■ ■'■ 



P* 



it 

ii 
b 
v 

a 

U 



1889 newspaper story announcing Lydia Adams' death 



CHAPTER FIVE 



THE WETSELS: Schaghticoke' s Farmer/Soldier 



The first member of the family to come to America was 
George Wetsel (also spelled Wetzel, or Whetzel) . He settled in 
the upper New York state town of Schaghticoke (an Indian word 
meaning "the meeting of two rivers") in Rensselaer County. 

A Wetsel Road in Schaghticoke speaks of the family 
pioneer status. A Wetsel descendant, Mrs. Margaret Hetrick, 
says: "My grandfather (Charles Wetsel) had a farm on that road 
which burned many years ago and today another farm originally 
owned by Peter Wetsel (Charles 1 brother) is still in operation 
by Myron Wetsel (grandson of Peter)." 



^^'^y^^si 











i 



Revolutionary War pay voucher for George Wetzel (Wetsel) . 



THE WETSELS 



49 



WETSEL LINE 
Source: Genealogist Doris Sheridan 



George Wetsel (1727/8-1824) 
m. Maria Barbara ? (1735-1832) 

(1776-1848) 



c. Daniel Wetsel 



Refer to: 



5.1 



5.1 Daniel Wetsel (1776-1848) 

m. (1) Elisabeth Girford/Clifford (1788-1853) 

m. (2) Anna Baucus 

c. William Wetsel (1804-1872) 5.2 

c. John B. Wetsel (1807-1858) 

5.2 William Wetsel (1804-1872) 
m. (1) Minerva Ann ? 

m. (2) Almira Richardson (18157-1878?) 6.1 

c. Eva Wetsel (1846-1916) 5.3 



DEATH OF MR. WETSEL 

(From the Troy (N.Y.) Budget, Oct. 26, 1858) 

Mr. John B. Wetsel, who has been a conductor on the Troy 
& Greenbush Railroad since the departure of Mr. Philip Miller, 
died on Sunday evening. 

We have heard it stated, that Mr. Wetsel, a few weeks 
since, got an insurance policy on his life of $3,000 when to 
appearances he was one of the healthiest men in the City. 

Suspicious-sounding newspaper item on William's brother 




JOHN BROWN 

Newsletter 

Publlshtd by the John Brown Heritag* Ano ct ition 
MtadvilU, PttvnsyWanii 



JOHMiSROWN^^ANHERy^BUILT^N^ME^] 



VOI. I 



MARCH 1988 



NO. 13 



Meadville hasn't forgotten one-time resident John Brown 



50 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

GEORGE WETSEL (1727/28-1824) (5.0) 

Farmer, soldier, B. 1727/1728, Germany(?), m. Maria 

Barbara (1735-1832), c. George Jr., Daniel, Christopher, John, 

Joseph, Mary (Baucus) , Elizabeth (Sipperly) , Christina 

(Stover) , d. Schaghticoke, Rensselaer County, New York, April 

6, 1824. 

Records show George Wetsel came to America around 1745. 

A Schaghticoke village history described him as a 

pios old Lutheran who was a private in the 
14th regiment of the Albany County Militia 
under Col. John Knickerbocker during the 
American Revolution. 

He was also founder of the first 
Lutheran Church of the village of Melrose 
which was organized in 1777 by descendants 
of the German immigrants who came from 
Palatinate. 

He was buried, a local newspaper said, "near the church 
where he had so long labored to support." 

DANIEL WETSEL (1776-1848) (5.1) 
Farmer, b. 1776 Schaghticoke, N.Y., to George and Maria 
Wetsel; m. Anna Wetsel, Elisabeth Girford/Clif ford, c. Daniel 
N., Elizabeth (Welling), William B. , Jane E. , George H. , 
Evaline, Peter, Caroline, Christina (Day) , Maria Ann 
(Brownell) , John B. , Elizabeth, Margaret; d. Apr. 16, 1848, 
Schaghticoke. 






THE WETS ELS 51 



Dan Wetsel's will included such items as "1 Breeding mare, 
Hay in Barn, Oxen, yoke, 20 Hens, 14 Sheep, 1 Side hill plow" 



WILLIAM B. WETSEL (1804-1872) (5.2) 
Farmer, b. Nov. 20, 1804, Schaghticoke, N.Y., to Daniel 
and Anna (or Hannah) Wetsel, m. (1) Minerva Ann (?) , m. (2) 
Almira C. Richardson, circa 1843, c. Eva (Bell); d. Aug. 24, 
1872, Richmond, Penn. (buried in New Richmond Cemetery). 

Eking out a living was not easy for William Wetsel. By 
1834, he had moved to Girard (now Platea) , Penn., and married 
Minerva Ann. At one point, a parcel of his land was seized by 
the local sheriff on behalf of creditors. 

Minerva Ann's fate is not known to us. However, by 1843, he 
was married to Almira Richardson. They moved to New Richmond 
(near Meadville) , a Crawford County town where revolutionary 
abolitionist John Brown operated a tannery for a time. 

Their daughter, Evaline, may have been named after 
William's sister who died while still in her 20s. 



FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 
0238451 35 NORTH WEST TEMPLE 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84150 



52 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

When William died, tax rolls for the next year listed his 



heirs owning: 



"12 acres worth $165, 7 cows. 



j*'. *»• 



E L-^fVeS Inhabitant* in j^>/<tr*^p^t*^/%t . in the 0< 
A.^; _ enumerated by ine, on the -Z/e/Zzs, day off ~j&U~ J?®9 




l.iV--JUU, ' iHi ■ U-lV *- |»-I-IL4-I 

Tk« ujm of i*«i7 p*n«r«lF>M bi 

pltoi of »bod« m 0* In* Ur of Jiin«, 
J I860, *u ia Oil fcnfl*. 

. . . . . ■ • " • -i 



: 



PrtbMiofc QutpoUoo, ar TnU« »f 
c«-i p»i*on. m*ll »nd f»mtl4, of «r 
II pu^ of «o 

i i ' 
M 






r 



2h&i'*>Jfi 



£■**%; 



/ 



{^LLJu4,\>.i-i -t-t; I 




M« 



The Wetsels (misspelled) in 1860 Richmond, Penn. census 

EVALINE WETSEL (1846-1916) (5.3) 
Schoolteacher, b. June 5, 1846, in New Richmond, Penn., 

to William, Almira Wetsel; m. to 
Robert Bell, Oct. 5, 1872; d. Feb. 
25, 1916, Tropico, Calif. 




BALT LAKE CITY D1RECTOBY. 



BELL Bessi IV. tel o;,r. bds 247 S Main. | 
li.-i Lv» A. propr Lawrence Room- I 



_S iiC'U-t:. !■• 



S Main. 



H -~ -''■ cicar mfcr Sam Levy Clenr 
\.U Co. t3s HT S Main. 

ft •- e hrlptr OSLE It. bdi 247 
Robert • Ws J«' S Main. 



1905: Eva ran a rooming house 



; T i^rwrf ^IFETTP 



THE WETSELS 



53 



Ml 







A f'/rr// r 

Ml ''./'■■" '•'• ft 






*• : >v// a 

fn/rmf* r/ fit ft i i* 7 o ^ ^ 



l.ni'if 




Hni/rr i ,/oft II SHi 

•" 1435 .. 
•:• •<''/ / 1 c 

Inhiisnn • .'.,/jfm „ ', ~ 
.,•/ .li/fi liter, » ■"' 



l» -\ 



Wetsel Farm 
c (arrow) near 



'7,'..^ ^ , / / A - , ' Left, fo 

y*ic eoucL fia^tj c y n *.<*«*> for i yin 

/ . ' ' .j 9 ra Y na i 

'*/■•/ ' ' ci 

-^- V « • / 

<7v» < /rati n > t ^c in a. fj~fi <-,/ — 



Richmond, 1875. 
Left, formula 

ng those 
rs black, 
from Eva's diary, 
rca 1885 



CHAPTER SIX 



THE RICHARDSONS: Almira's Diary 



INDEX OF A~WAKDS 



OX CLAIM? OF TUE 



DIKES OF THE WAR OF 1812 



NAMB UP APPLICANT. 



RE8IDBNCE OP APPLICANT. 



11 



■ocar 

ilXOTO. 



iciiardson, Isaac, by Administratrix, 

■ dson, Isaac, by Administrator 



Auburn, New York, 
Vernon, New York, 



mison, \varren,. 
irdson, William, 
.rdson, William, 
rdson, William, 



Schuyler, Herkimer County, N. Y.,.. 

Riley, McHenry County, Illinois 

Oneonta, New York, 



-$58 00 
•' 80 "OO 

28 50 

23 00 

45 00 

47 00 



Richmond Township, Pennsylvania, . 

William Richardson (bottom line), Almira's father, collected a 
$47 claim for service during the War of 1812 46 years later. 



THE RICHARDSONS 55 



THE RICHARDSON LINE 

Source: Genealogist Eugene Throop 



6.0 William Richardson (1786-1870) 

m. Rhoda ? (1788-1866) 

c. Almira (1815-1878?) 6.1 

c. Hannah (1812-1860) 6.2 

c. William Jerome (1835-1882) fc »J** 4,u *. 

c. Rhoda (died under age of 20) 

c. Susan (1830-?) 



Refer to: 






6.1 Almira Richardson (1815-1878?) 
m. William Wetsel (1804-1872) 5.2 
c. Eva Wetsel (1846-1916) 5.3 

6.2 Hannah (Jewell?) (Joel?) (1812-1860) 
m. ? 

c. Josephine ? 



WILLIAM RICHARDSON (1786-1870) (6.0) 
Hatter (estate valued at $200, ace. to 1850 census); b. 
Seneca Co. (?) , N. Y., Mar. 9, 1786, (parents unknown); m. 
Rhoda ? (1788-1866) , c. Almira, Susan, Jerome William, Hannah, 
Rhoda; d. Richmond, Penn. , Apr. 12, 1870. 

William Richardson fought in the New York militia under 
Col. Henry Bloom for eight months in the War of 1812. He was 
paid 160 acres in exchange, possibly his farm in Richmond. 

But, like many soldiers before and after, Cpl. Richardson 
felt short-changed. So he filed a claim for back pay ($3.25) 
and expenses ($56) for such personal items as 1 neckerchief 
($1), 1 knapsack ($1.50) and 1 "Ordinary Coat" ($10) (see next 
page). Why he waited until 1858 to make his claim isn't 
known. The Army gave the old soldier $47. 



56 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 




— -TrfV ^k-O" £ TV". E. — « a> t •= c 

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Ex-Cpl. William Richardson, age 72, sent this claim to Uncle 
Sam in 1858 for $3.25 back pay plus expenses from War of 1812. 



THE RICHARDSONS 57 

ALMIRA RICHARDSON (1815-1878?) (6.1) 

Farmer, b. Seneca County (?) , N. Y., in 1815, to William 

and Rhoda Richardson, m. early 1840s William Wetsel in Girard, 

Penn., c. Eva Wetsel (Bell), d. 1878 (?) , Richmond, Penn. (?) 

After moving from Girard (now Platea) Penn. to Richmond 

with her husband in the early 1840s, Almira began a diary that 

frequently alludes to the loneliness of the frontier: 

Oh, love that died! Oh, broken faith! 

Bright dreams forever gone, 

Ye shall be mine while once again 

I listen to that song. 

Then while the stars of twilight shine, 

And winds are whispering low, 

Sing me the song I love to hear, 

The song of long ago. 

She also dwells on her own strict Baptist beliefs, 

denouncing such sins as chewing and smoking tobacco, whose 

victims, I believe are mostly 

irreclaimable. . .gradually they sink until 
lost to every sense of decency. . . they cling 
to that poisonous weed more devotedly than 
to their God. 

Their minds become weakened and they 
sink victims to intemperance in its most 
hideous form. 

Her diary also speaks of the cold winters ("J live in 

hope to see fair weather when the clouds return again and the 

mud dries away") , the ever-present specter of sudden death 

("Evaline will be seven years old if she lives") and the 

simpler pleasures of the period ("Eva went berryin' with 

the Jeromes" ) . 



58 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 

She saw humor, too, though ("How many men think they are 
getting a help mate for life but find to their sorrow tis, 
after all, only a help eat") . 

She last appears in tax records in 1879. In 1884, Eva and 
Robert Bell, listed as her inheritors, sold the property. 
While William Wetsel is buried in a cemetery not far from 
their farm, the site of Almira's grave is not known. 



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A page from Almira's diary, recounting the death of her sister 



CHAPTER SEVEN 

THE MOOGS: A German Chemist in the West 

In our search into the past of Fred Moog (1823-1867) , we 
sent out hundreds of letters within the United States (where 
about 650 Moogs live, according to family authority Robert 
Moog) and overseas (mostly to Germany) . A rewarding byproduct 

was the replies that we received charming, informative, 

touching, funny and downright bizarre. Some excerpts: 
"I am not a Moog. I just married one." 

"When we got the letter we were wondering, for we don't 
know anyone in the United States." 

"Maybe you have seen our younger son on T.V. He now 
plays with the Washington Redskins." 

"Apparently Grandpa Moog's mother was something of a 
'tart,* and went through about six husbands." 

"Grandfather Moog was a character. He played the horses, 



60 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 
shot pool and drank beer. " 

"Are any of your family musical? This seems to be a pre- 
vailing talent among the Moogs." 

"My Moog cousins are all truck-driving , cigar-smoking, 
women-chasing guys. (Also card-playing and beer-drinking) . " 

"I put Grandpa 
Moog out of my mind 
long ago after Mamma 
told me he was cruel 
and unfaithful." 

"Our Moogs have 
big noses. " 

"It turned out my 
grandfather was an 
illegitimate child and 
went by his mother's 
name. " 

"We heard that one 
Moog woman was hanged 
as a spy during World 
War I. " 




Photo on next page: Albert Moog (middle) , decked out like 
a city slicker, poses in studio with Schneider cousins in 
Minnesota, circa 1875. Albert was curious about his kinfolk 
and went to see them but his mother decided to stay home. 



THE MOOGS 



61 




.-•* >. 



62 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



Sources: Genealogists Helen Finnegan, Eileen Kockler, Jim Petty 



7.0 Frederick Moog (1823-1867) 

m. Marie Schneider (1838-1923) 
c. Albert Moog (1866-1959) 
c. Montana Moog (1864-1958) 

7.1 Albert Moog (1866-1959) 

77i. Therese Blesbois (1872-1928) 

c. Marie Moog (b. 1912) 

c. Albert Moog Jr. (b. 1915) 



Refer to: 

8.6 
7.1 
7.2 



9.1 
7.3 
7.4 



7.2 Montana Moog (1864-1958) 

771. (1) James S. Cox (18527-1887) 
c. James Cox/Savery (1887-1931) 
m. (2) James Savery (1826-1905) 



7.8 
7.9 
7.10 



7.3 Marie Moog (b. 1912) 

m. A.C. Harvey (1910-1969) 
c. Steve (b. 1946) 
c. Marilyn (b. 1950) 



7.4 Albert Moog Jr. (b. 
77i. Mildred Lomax (b. 
c. Lisa (b. 1950) 
c. Leslie (b. 1953) 



1915) 
1922) 



7.5 Mildred Lomax (b. 1922) 

7.6 Lisa Moog (b. 1950) 

m. Steve Sewell (b. 1953) 
c. Leah Marie (b. 1986) 
c. Lauren (b. 1988) 

7.7 Leslie Moog (b. 1953) 
77i. Lennie Fischer 

c. Chad Fischer (b. 1983) 

7.8 James S. Cox (1852-1887) 



7.9 James Cox/ Savery (1887-1931) 
m. Sarah Savery (1897-1979) 
c. James (b. 1929) 
c. Virginia (Olkowski) (b. 1925) 
c. Sarah (Venn) (b. 1925) 



1.10 
1.12 
1.13 




7.10 James Savery (1826-1905) 
771. (1) Anna Noland (7-1891) 
m. (2) Montana Moog (1864-1958) 



7.2 



THE MOOGS 



63 



FREDERICK C. (?) MOOG (1823-1867) (7.0) 

Saloon-keeper, gold miner, rancher and stagecoach station 
operator, b. 1823, m. Mary Schneider 1863, Black Hawk Point, 
Colo., c. Albert, Montana (Savery) , d. March 1, 1867, n. 
Anaconda, Mont. 

All but seven years of Fred Moog's life the last seven 

years are a mystery to us. We don't know what he looked 

like, whether he is one of the dozen or so groomed-for-the- 
occasion types staring at us solemnly in studio photos that we 
possess. 

He first materializes in the 1860 Denver census, and 
later turns up in the liquor-tax records of the gold-rush 
towns of Black Hawk, Colo., (1862) and Virginia City, Mont., 



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I860 census, stating Fred Moog was born in "Russia." His 
children said Germany. Did census-taker mishear "Prussia"? 



64 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 

(1864). "From Virginia City came Fred Moog with five burros 

and much optimism," wrote Ralph Powell in his "Complete 

History of the Livestock Industry in Silver Bow County." 

"He tried his hand at 

placer mining near Silver Bow, finally lost 
interest, and traded his five burros for a 
ranch. It was located three miles north of 
Stuart station, and covered 160 acres. Moog 
immediately stocked his ranch with a small 
herd of scrub beef cattle, and before 1865 
ended, he was on the way to a successful, 
though brief, career as a stockman. 

Fred Moog arrived in Montana at a time when local Indian 
tribes were warning white men to stay out. (It was just 13 
years before Custer's Last Stand, some 400 miles to the east.) 

And white men could be dangerous in those parts, too. 
More than 100 people are believed to have been murdered in one 
three-month period in 1863 by a gang (surreptitiously) led by 
Sheriff Henry Plummer, later hanged. 




Fred Moog decided early, it appears, that working the 
mines provided less steady income than supplying those who 
worked the mines. Soon, he was running a successful 
stagecoach station/restaurant about three miles west of Butte. 
His wife Mary was especially known for her pies. 



THE MOOGS 65 



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Record of Fred Moog's purchase of Frank's Shoe Shop in Silver 
Bow for $110 in June, 1865. Silver Bow is now a ghost town. 



Fred Moog died suddenly on March 1, 1867. "For the first 
time," Powell wrote, "tragedy struck among the members of the 
new and tiny livestock fraternity." 



66 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



Moog's death, like his birth, is a mystery. A possible 
clue: One of the severest cold spells in the history of the 
state hit in March 
of 1867, with tem- 
peratures falling to 
60 below zero in 
Butte . Was Moog 
caught in a storm? 
We don't know. 

He was buried 
on his farm, atop a 
hill overlooking the 
town of Opportunity 
— his favorite view, 
it was said. One of Steve Harvey at "Father" Moog site 
his executors was Conrad Kohrs, a well-known cattle rancher. 

The notation "Father" inscribed on the tombstone, still 
standing on what is now Anaconda Copper Co. property, has 
intrigued subseguent generations. 

When Steve Harvey and his mother Marie asked a gas 
station attendant in Opportunity for directions to the 
gravesite in 1985, he said: "Oh, you mean the priest?" 

Historian Alice Finnegan said: "As a child I heard the 
'priest' story, as did my father, who grew up near there. So 
I'm happy to know there are descendants still around." 




THE MOOGS 67 







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Inventory of Fred Moog's estate in 1867 ran five pages and 
included everything from oysters and "Sour Krout" to elk-skin 
dresses. Note first item: "147 gals whiskey at $4 per Gal." 



68 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



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A local landmark, Fred Moog's final resting spot on an isola- 
ted Montana hilltop is marked "Grave 11 (circle) on survey maps. 



THE MOOGS 



69 



ALBERT MOOG (1866-1959) (7.1) 

Mining engineer, chemist, rancher, alderman, b. May 11, 
1866, Silver Bow, Mont., to Fred, Mary (Schneider) Moog, educ. 
Grinnell College (Iowa.) Conservatory of Music (1884-1886), 
College of 



Montana at 
Deer Lodge 
(1891) . 

M. to 
Miss Therese 
Blesbois, on 
Oct. 9, 1911, 
in Wallace, 
Idaho, c. 
Albert Jr. , 
Marie 

(Harvey) ; d. 
Ju. 4, 1959. 




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ORGANIZED SEPTEMBER It. ie84 



70 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

Around 1910, Albert, his mother Mary (Schneider) Moog and 
sister Montana (Moog) Savery moved from Deer Lodge, Mont. , to 
Long Beach, Calif. (Pgs. 71-76 tell of his Montana years.) 

Albert Jr. remembers hearing they were greeted at the 
train stop in Long 
Beach by a vendor. 
The man warned them 
that they should buy 
sunglasses or they 
would be blinded by 
the glare produced 
by the sun hitting 
the ocean. 

Around 1915, 
Albert purchased a 
ranch down the road Therese, Albert in Seattle, 1911 
from the moonshining Love family near where Seventeenth Ave. 

and Springdale Blvd. intersect the present-day site of 

the Westminster Shopping Mall. On his ranchhouse, he displayed 
a sign that he brought from the north, which said, "Deer 
Lodge." Often passersby would take the sign to mean that the 
ranch was a hotel, especially since he insisted on keeping a 
phone on the outside wall. 

His acguaintances in Orange County included the operator 
of a small chicken stand, Walter Knott, as well as a farmer 



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THE MOOGS 71 

named Raymond Boysen, inventor of a hybrid berry that 
attracted Mr. Knott's attention. 

A vigorous man with a full thatch of white hair, Al 
Moog traveled to Montana every summer even in his 90s. 



./THE COLLEGE OF MONTANA. 

The Commencement of «. New Oolleprlrvto 
Year— The Pri»e ConUtt, Etc 

A spirit of generous emulation char- 
acterized the competition for prlzcB 1 rvet 
Wednesday evening In Cottonwood Hall. 
The essayists wore Miss Virginia Doug- 
Ins and Mr. Snndors; the orators, Messrs. 
Burkctt and McArtbur. MIbs Dougla.8 
was awarded the first prize for osBfiys, 
Mr. 'Sanders receiving the second. In 
oratory Mr. Burkett, with benevolont 
smiles and a heart brimful of kindest 
wishes for his competitor, was the happy 
recipient of the first prize. 

TheBo earnests of future usefulness 
were so well prepared that It mado the 
task of just decision unenviable. 

The class day exercises were crowded 
with gems of dawning wit and youthful 
jollity. Miss Roberta Robinson, the 
President of the class, groeted the •aud- 
ience with words of warm welcome. 
Her elegant address was gracefully de- 
livered., The College history of the claBs 
was briefly reviewed liy Mr. Burkott, 
each milestone- rovenllug much thnt was 
praiseworthy. 

Mr. Moog played In the roll of a humor- 
ous avenger; TIIb pungent criticisms 
upon an oxactlng faculty wore seasoned 
with reverential respect. 



.,.. College Commencement. 

The Eighth Annual Commencement of 

the Collogo of Montana will begin next 

8nnday June 7, the programme being 

arranged as follows: 

Sunday, Juuo 7 2:80 p. m.— Baccalaure- 
ate discourse by President Reld. 

Monday, 8 p. m.— Leqture before the 
terary " 
3f Butte. 



.Monday, a p. m.— Lecture 
Literary Soclotlos, Rev. E. J. Q 



roeneveld, 



Tuesday, 8 p. m.— Annual Concert, ln- 
:luding the cantata, "The Flower Queen." 

Wedoesday, 2 p. m.— Class day exer- 
:laes;8 p. m., prize contest 

Thursday, II a. m.— Graduating exer- 
:Ue8; conferring of degrees; 8 p. m., 
^resident's reception. 

A number of friends .and former 
tudenta of the College, from abroad, are 
xpected to be presont.. 

Thoue who will graduate are the Mls- 
ea Roberta Robinson and Virginia 
)ouglaa, and Mr. Wm. B. BurkeL, In the 
•Iternry Department; and RobL A. Mc- 
.rthur and Albert Mdog In the School of 
Hues. ', "..'.■ 

The public Is cordially Invited to attend 
il of these excrciseB. 



J(\X SoDjf— The Owl.. 
1*. VtoMn Jniwli,., 
Cborai Trio — 



...... jJm 



***»•»• 



t -» mm »** 



Graduation day, 1891; Al entertained as an orator, violinist 



72 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



College Base Ball Game. 



Ad excitiDg aud intereHting game of hall 
was played on the College Base Ball grounds, 
Tuendav afternoon, between the School of 
Mines and the Classical nines. The game 
waa witnessed by a large number of town- 
folk besides the u.sual number of college 
people. The afternoon was all that could be 
asked for and the bojs played tbisir best. 
The School of Mines had things pretty 
much their own way until the seventh inn* 
ing, when Capt. Maples told his hoys to 
"keep cool and play ball" which they did, 
and the OlaMsical boys came out winner by a 
score of 10 to 10. 
Classical. Position. School ov Mures. 



. '.-OHillCl . 



« M * v,. «i 



r» iimJH , 

Hupies Pitcher Warner 

Adams 1st Base Sanders 

Chase 2nd Base, Kroger 

Beckwitb, N Sd Base, Moog 

Smyth Short Stop Coblelgh 

Deckwlth, B.. Left Field Slemons 

Stapleton Ontre Field Held 

Wtckcs Rl^ht Field Odell 

Base hits— Classical*, 15- School of Mines. 12. 
Two base hit? — Odea. Mnules, Moog. Simmons. 
Three base hits— N. Beckwttb and Smyth. Home 
runs, llaplds. Time of game— 2 hours, 45 mlnutm 
Urn plro— Clagoe, 

The next game will be played Saturday, 

May 2. 



Al toiled at first, second and third base for the School of 
Mines in 1891. Catcher William Burket missed this game because 

of a "painful accident" "a ball pitched by Mr. Adams 

passed between two of his fingers, putting one out of joint." 



THE MOOGS 



73 



THE CITY ELECTION. 



A Canvass of the Result. 



The election of Saturday was a very <]ui&t 
on*. During tbe morning the friends of 
both ticket* did lively work for theirfrionds. 
and when the polls opened at two o'clock 
the votes were cast rapidly, antf by five 
o'clock almost tbe entire list bad been 
checked ott", Tbe vote by wards was as fol- 
lows : 

FIRST WARD. 

For Mayor— 



H. R. Davjj 
H. A. Bmur 



£ 



irr 33 

A Merman —8am Scott. 45 

M. Bien 35 

Majorities —Davis v — 

Scott ... 

SECOND WARD. 

For Mayor— H. B. Davis 48 

H. A. Smurr 4l 

Alderman -IS. Eldred 4X 

W. N. Ayleswortli 41 

Majorities —Davie — 

Eldred......,...,.,,...... 

THIRD WARD. 



■17 
10 



7 



For Mayor— H. B. Davis 42 

H. A. 8murr 22 

Alderman —Albert Moag IW 

J. W. Smurr 25 

Majorities —Davis 20 

M005 14 

Total majority in all wards for H. Davia 

(for Mayor) of 44 votes. A total of 234 waa 

voted. 

Al was elected alderman of Deer Lodge in 1896 though the 
Silver Post did not mention him or any of the other Democrats 
in its pre-election story. Note the usual misspelling. 



On next 3 pages: March 30, 1940, Montana Standard story on Al 



74 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



Albert MoogVisiiing 



' Albert Moor, earliest native-born 
llvlngdSllver Bow county white man 
—no -data on Indians — the first 
;radotte of the College of Mon- 
uniit Deer Lodge — and the first 
ii.ilivf-born Montana mining eif- 
ftirictf, Is a visitor to Itutte from 
Ms home in Los Angeles, whero 
ie removed In 1023. For the past 
rveral days he has been drum- 
ming up members of the fast- 
• llniinlshlng band of early-day 
Mutt* friends — the corporal's 
suard who knew one another when. 
Up to last evening his list covered 
Judge A. B. Cohen, Will Orton, 
[Jill Robbins— Butte's first school 
hoy— Sam Sabolsky and Isadore" 
Rosensteln. 

Mr. Moog was born In Sliver 
Bow In 1866. There wasn't much 
of a "town" Jn those days, any- 
where In Montana, — Just groups of 
.shacks. Silver Bow had the ; disj- 
unction of being the county seat 
of Deer Lodge county. Later on 
Heer Lodge not only deprived Sll- ' 
ver\Bow of Its "tltlo — but It also 
toolothe courthouse that served as 
t county seat; Deer Lodge has 
built i another and better _ court- 
houses since those .days*. but the 
old one may be still' In the "Utile 

tillages on the road to Bear. 7, ~Mr7 
Mposr plans to take a look while 
her iff, in the state this time.. 
tvAVa -mother— he prefers to be 
called: "Al" by Montanans — was 
the first to run a restaurant in 
Itutt**, This Is no' repudiation of 
Sammy Alexander's claim because 
Sammy really ran a chop house, 
while- Mrs. Moo j ran a real, res- 



taurant— regular courses, etc She 
Included' among her patrons such 
men"* as . W. A. and J. Roas Clark, 
W.^W. Dixon, Lcc Foster, M. J. 
Conneli and, now and then r Mar- 
cus Daly. . She was, for aitirae, 
"tho^.only \woman In Butte who 
could make yeast .-> rising bread." 
Eastern housewives, of today are 
said to have learned, after many 
trials, that the formulas that serve 
along/ the sea coast or, : in _; the 
Mississippi jyalley. do not serve In 
the higher "altitudes; the science 
of bakjng- must be learned all over 
again in the Rock lea. 

.Mrs.' Moog. and her- daughters 
came^to ^utte j**on' the^lam"— -ran 
away' from a possible attack-, by 
the Nez Perce Indians," Chief Jo- 
>eph.'a tribe. W.. A. Clark was re- 
sponsible for the fear, when; the 
Nei Perce Invaded Montana. Ho 
rame '^tearing up -*lo " the "Moog 
stage station near Stuart,' on a 
badly winded horse and asked for 
i new^mount. He was In' a. rush 
to get\to Butte to organize the 
citizen* -under authority of Gov- 
ernor fotts, to dciend the district 

frbm>*' redskin attack, he Bald. 

tie!. was given a fresh horse, and 

for years afterward was' famed for 

the fast ride .he 'had made from 

iDe^r lodge to Butte ; r uhtH re'eeht 

^year^'Ji'was not. know ihafCap- 

; tajn'j. Clark's speed ~ hf-.-'^ad 'the 

;Whk i 6ra-Hptairi-r^aa'".due > .to the 

! Moor'^statlpn / ehang©-/df •; horses 

.wHh-hlin; 

':. Mrs. Moog's husband decided 
that he didn't wish, to have his 
family exposed to a possible mas- 
sacre. So he rushed them up to 
Butte. Little Albert, who came up 



Mother, the only woman in Butte who made yeast-rising bread 



THE MOOGS 



75 



(Cont. from previous page) 

to Jlutte with lils mother, went, 
back to the ranch with his father,' 
for company. lie known something 
of- the prickly .sriuutlun caused 
by tho Impression thai every" 
sound -may be due to a redskin 
hiding around tho corner with a 
tomahawk. 

Airs. Moo; bought all of the 
lots fronting on Broadway, from. 
Hamilton street cast to the alley 
back of the First National bank.' 
Her restaurant was located at 
What Is now No. 77 — in the Hen- 
derson auu Bellenberg block. She 
charged 75 cents for a meal. Later 
on O'Kecfe, of, the Saddle Rock, 
who went to Anaconda when the 
•meltcr was built, was to succeed 
her and cut the price to 25 cents. 
Mrs. Moog was not only a 
restaurant keeper but also a dairy 
keeper. Al remembers when the 
Butte district was covered with 
trees, grass and '. underbrush; 
when alder and cottonwood grew 
along both banks of 8 liver Bow- 
creek,' to shade the strawberries 
that' ripened In the grass ' that 
also bordered the stream. :/, .< ; 
•""'.*!• does not . remember . ■ynVn 
Butte moved to Silver; Bow — he 
was only two yean old then and 
knows about It only .from others. 
But. be remembers when' Sliver 
Bow moved to Butte. This -/was 
about 1875 after Farlln \y%d' an- 
nounced that the 'black rock of. 
the Butte hill 'carried silver val* 
ues.. .Before Farlln's ; disclosure, 
Butleyhad dwindled to a point 
that v caused the people" to • "do 
their marketing: In the Highlands" 
which proves that Silver Bow had 



.dwindled quite a bit also,-: at one 
time, that camp had 1,000 placer 
miners gathered about the, banks 
of the stream. ..:'•• . ■„ ./ 




The- Moogs were not only 
pioneers of Silver Bow but of, 
Montana also. Fred Moog came ta 
Virginia City In 1861. When he 
decided to remain he sent for his 
wife. She camo all tho way from 
Denver with a babe in her arms, 
by stage coach, at a cost uf H&0 
which Is said to have been a low 
rale for thoso. days. In 18G5 Ihey 
decided to try the new places .dig- 
gings at Silver Bow. 'When mining 
began to slow up Fred Moog,' who 
was a chemist by professloqr de- 
cided -to "get. a farm. 'He- 'bought 
one 'for five burros.? ■•• Jt*,;wa8 
located 'three milts north, of 
Stuart station, and numbered. 160 
acres. It was identified, before 
the. railroads came, as being lo- 
cated !"20 miles this side of French 
crossing, on the Deer Lodge river." 
"French crossing" meant neither 
bridge nor. boat Simply that 
travelers waded or drove across. 
The Moog.ranch became a stage 



"She came all the way from Denver with a baby in her arms..." 



76 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



itation for the Ralston-Dadow 
stare line.' The. Gilnian-Sallsbury 
stare line, In competition with the 
Ratstou-Dadow line, also stopped 
for-meals. The station kept from 
eight to' 18 stage horses on hand. 
The: stages required from four to 
six horse teams, \yhen the stage 
drove up, six fresh horses, har- 
nessed, were waiting- to take the 
place of. the tired team. .' 

Ralson was the*, owner, of the 
ground which was bought as a 
site . for St. r* trick's school. He 
and- his wife were drowned in the 
Big Hole river. •• • • ...v ;v *-.' ' 
' r Fred Moo; got his farm-foe five 
burros.- .,L, : A, Barnard got- the 
adjoining- ICO acres for about 
J500 000. It was a blind - deaU L. 
A. Barnard owned . the - JWasouIa 




Gulch 1 placer location*", and his 
brother, A. W. Barnard. ..owned 
the farm adjoining ; the ,'Mooga, 
L,'"A."°. offered to trade- 'the'' gulch 
for /the. farm. Placer miners wore 
already , at work on; the ^little 
stream. A. W. decided he coujdn't 
lose .Anything ;. he had only squat- 
ters'' rights on .the farm. So/, he 
made,*, the ...trade. \. Missoula*! gulch 
nilnea'yald well eitouglwt*- > JjV9>-K¥ 
thai new-, owner In expenditures- to 
hrhi's iu ivater Trolu' the;W»g Hole 
to wash gold, -On Alabama street, 
between Mercury ■■: and >. SIlYCT* ' on 
the. west side of the street, there 
Is a strip of, ground about -scyen 
feet , ? wide between, the ;-:»idc\?i|lc 
and the -nearest residence^ yard*, 
that strip,: which' is Ieit bt: jriany 
lots, too small to bujlcj on, belongs 



to the Barnard estate. It 1» stated. 
The estate also owns many .other 
acres near the gulch below !Platt- 
uum- street. . 

Fred Moot died In 1867. and 
Mrs. Moog eventually married her 
neighbor, Mr.- Barnard He -It 'was 
who.-;, brought 1 , her to, Buttcy to 
escape the Indians- anil who- en- 
couraged : her to enter "the' res- 
taurant and duiry venture*, .Moog 
o«ica owned the site of the Red 
Hoot .Shoe company. He- sold' the 
property .to .Chris Wcibold^ .who 
£old It to A. B. Cohen's father. 
.Young Albert Moog attended, 

the Butte, schools and . graduated', 
In raining engineering , from'.- the 
College of 'Montana In 180J.gll> 
was the first . graduate of -'..the 
school which later fused with'- the 
Inter-Mountain college, at Helena 
and which, on account of the 
Helena earthquake, has moved (o 
Great Falls. The first president of 
the College of Montana was Prof.' 
Clinton H. Moore. The Rev. J. R. 
Ru^sel and Dr. E. J. Groeneveld 
abo headed the .faculty; In 1881 
Dr. McMillan was president. A.M. 
Ryon, professor of engineering -In 
Columbia university, was also a 
member of the staff as was F. W. 
Traphagen, chemist, ; who had 
charco of the Montana exhibit 'at 
the World's fair in 1803/ ■- ..'.* :.\ 
Albert' Moo?, who claims the 
distinction 'of being the "young- 
est -old' man* In the Society pf 
Montana* iMoriecrs; avers that he 
could "tell a lot about this part of 
Montana If I could only remember 
it." He does remember that he 
used to herd cows' through the 
streets of Butte and that some of 
the city's Important business men 
started from scratch with no capi- 
tal except an optimistic outlook on 
life and a reputation for being "on 
the square." 



Recalling the days when he herded cows through Butte's streets 






THE MOOGS 77 

MARY MONTANA MOOG (1864-1958) (7.2) 

A real frontier schoolmarm, b. March 17, 1864, Golden, 
Colo., to Fred and Mary 
(Schneider) Moog, educ. Grinnell 
College (Iowa) Music 
Conservatory (1884-1888) , m. (1) 
James Cox (1886?) , c. James , m. 
(2) James Savery (1896?) , d. 
Aug. 7, 1958, Long Beach, Calif. 

Mary, who arrived in 
Montana (Virginia City) in July, 
1864, just a few months after 

her birth, called herself ■ -r^^v-^ c>_ 
"Montana" the rest of her life. \ *■ ^"c 1 1 I (\\( • C) ~ w o 
(See article pp. 78-83 for account of her years in Montana.) 

Around 1910, she moved to Long Beach and purchased the 
Tichenor house at 852 E. Ocean Ave. (designed by the Greene 
brothers) . Later, she moved to a house at 5th Place and Ocean 
Ave. A world traveler, she was sailing from home in 1933, 
just as the Long Beach earthguake struck. According to family 
lore, the captain refused to turn back. 

In later years, she contributed heavily to charity and 
toward the education of her grandchildren. Succeeding Moog and 
Harvey generations have also inherited something else from 
Montana: her red hair. 




78 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



First School Entertainment in 1878 



Article in 
1914 Miner 
recalling 
the first 
grade 
school 
play in 
Butte. Two 
of the 
actors in 
the log 
cabin 

production 
were Miss 
Montana 
Moog, age 
14, and 
Albert 
Moog, age 
12 (last 
paragraph) . 

The cast 
amounts to 
a Who's 
Who of 
Butte 
pioneers. 



The first school entertainment 
ever given In Butte was held Just 
38 years ago last Friday in the 
city's first brick school building 
which occupied a site on West Park 
street Just, west of what Is now 
the Goldberg block. The return to 
Butte of J. A. Saville, who was 
then teacher of the school, from 
southern California, recalls to the 
minds of many of the old-time 
residents this memorable event. A 
score or more of men and women 
who have since played an important 
part in the upbuilding of Butte par- 
ticipated In the entertainment as 
children arid to them rentier, cf 
the program of the affair, which 
Mr. Saville cherishes, will recall 
many pleasant memories and remin- 
iscences. Mr. Saville taught in 
Butte the winter of 1875-76. 

"We held school then in a log 
cabin which was later replaced by 
a brick building," said Mr. Saville 
yesterday while in a reminiscent 
mood. "There was but one room and 
I taught all grades the winter of 
75 and 76 from the first to the 
eighth. It was not the first -school 
established in Butte, but I think 
that I might safely say it 'was the 
first after the' city assumed Im- 
portance as a quartz camp. The 
old Travonia mine -was then being 
operated. It was not until two or 
three years later that the properties 
in Walkerville .were developed and 
operated by the "Walker brothers. 
The late Addison Smith was county 
superinte lent of -Deer Lodge coun- 
ty, of wh::h Butte was then a part. 
The trustees of my district my first 
term were Robert Glrton, Peter 
Hume and Wayne Barnard. The 
trustees during "77 and 78 at the 
time the school entertainment 
was held were Rolla Butcher, Hen- 
ry Jacobs and W. H. Young. The 
late John F. Fbrbis was the school 
clerk. ) ; - c ' i . 

"The" first "time that I taught, 
that is the four months in the 
winter of 1875 and 1876, I taught 
alone. We had no regular system 
of text books, although later a uni- 
form 6ystem was adopted. The fol- 
lowing winter, that of 73 and 77, 
I taught school In Deer Lodge val- 
ley and then In th« -sinter of 1877 



and 1878 I took the Butte schoc 
again with Miss Lizzie Self of Dee 
Lodge «as my assistant. The schoc 
building became so crowded that thi 
advanced departments were move< 
to the Good Templars hall, then i 
log building on West Broadway. 
' "At the time the entertainmen 
was given on the evening of Ma; 
22, 1878, Miss Self had charge o 
the primary grades.- I taught th< 
Intermediate grades and Prof. W 
Egbert Smith had charge of th< 
higher grades. The proceeds wen 
in charge of the school trustee 
and the entertainment was given fai 
the benefit of the school fund.' 
O' tJ-.nce trho participated in tha: 
entertainment, Mr. Saville has fol- 
lowed the lives of many in late 
years. Recalling those whose name? 
appeared on the program, Mr. Sa- 
ville named Lizzie Jacobs, who wa.« 
-he late Mrs. Sands; Lillie Parlin 
now Mrs. Clint Clark of this city; 
Lizzie Thornton, now the wife oi 
Dr. Hough, living in Missouri; Addi« 
Mayer, now of this city; Abe Cohen 
the former Butte alderman; Roben 
Stevens of Butte; John Hauswirth 
now living in the Bitter Root valley; 
"George Porter of Missoula; -Lulie 
Fausett, a resident of the Bitter 
Root valley; Albert Moog, now living 
in southern California; Rolla Batch- 
er, also a 'resident of- Cali- 
fornia; Emannuel Jacobs, who 
lives at present at Long Beach; 
George Fif er, who as , a fire- 
man was killed in the Sooth Butte 
explosion of 1895; Frances Morrier, 
now Mrs. Charles Stevens of this 
city; Hattie Evans, now Mrs. Joe 
Lewis of Los Angeles; Jeff Thor* 
oughman, who lives in the High- 
lands; Ella and Dorinda Powell of 
Butte; Mary Stride of this rity; 
Mary Thornton, the wife of the late 
James F. Forbis; Cora Young, now 
Mrs. J. K_ Heslet; Barnett Fausett, 
now^a resident of the Bitter Root; 
Herman Hauswirth, now living at 
Bonita ; Miles Cavanaugh, the Butte 
attorney; Collie Fifer, a resident of 
this city; Montana Moog, now Mrs. 
J. C. Savery of Long Beach; Mary 
Rea, now Mrs. H. G. Valiton of 
Deer Lodge; Louise Ehrie, now Mrs. 
Fatherly of Dillcr^ and Ida Copinus, 
now living in Axaccrsda. CMsy 34. 
IBID 



THE MOOGS 



79 



First White Child of This 
■District Returns to Tell 
of Interesting Incidents 




Montana Moog's return visit to 
Butte prompted this page one 
story in the Montana Stan- 
dard on July 7 , 1935. 



■i .The first white child In what are 
now Silver : Bow and Deer Lodge 
counties, one of the very, first babies 
to, all Montana and one of the two 
first graduates of the Butte high 
sahool, Is a house guest of Miss Theo 
Russell, 849 West'Quartz'street. Her 
name, is Mrs. James Savery, widow 
of the owner knd operator of the 
famed Gable gold mine of pioneer 
days. She is known to hundreds of 
Montanans as "the baby of the So- 
ciety of Montana Pioneers," a dis- 
tinction that she now divides with 
Miles Cavanaugh, president of the 
organization. 

Mrs, Savery's arrival in the Silver 
Bow county. district in 1864 was an 
event. To Judge by its affect on the 
nostalgic prospector element it was 
equal to a gold strike. Miners, when 
they heard of the arrival of a young 
mother and her babe in this part of 
the territory, dropped their picks 
and pans and tramped as many as 
35 miles over mountain and gulch 
to gaze once more upon a sight that 
reminded them of "God's Country," 
the name by which they designated 
the homes they had left in the East. 
'• They brought their pokes of gold 
dust along to make their offering at 



(Continued on Page 9, Col. 6.) 



80 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 




i . 



■ (Continued From Page U 
the shrme of white motherhood. 
Thoy' opened .their" pokrs .and -in- 
vited '.the little ;j3aby to help herself. 
Whatever gold' she might clutch In 
her- tiny hand wu hers. Many of 
theso prospectors had not aeon a 
white mother much less a White baby 
In years. It was one of the treat* of 
their • Uvea.,. A'dlstanoe" of 35 mile? 
mean?, nothln^'today^but' in" 1864 \i 
was a serious undertaking.* Sixteen 
years ' later' when the legislature 
passed a law to "take effect imme- 
diately'* the government allowed one 
day for eaech 15 miles distance from 
the capltol so that a law that went 
Into effect on the day of passage In 
Helena did not become effective ,ln 
Butte until four or five days later, 
And In the ^O's travel was much 
more difficult than in the late "70's 
although In those later years the In- 
dians were still troublesome. 
Clark Changed Horses. 
■Mrs. Savery vividly recalls the In- 
cidents connected with the Gibbons 
Pass battle between Chief Joseph's 
band and General Gibbons. Students 
of Montana history will remember 
that when the Invasion of the Nez 
Perce was reported from Missoula 
Senator W. A. Clark, then a resident 
of Deer Lodgs, mounted his horse 
and set off pell mell for Butte to 
organize . a company — he recruited 
thee of them here — to repel the red 
skins and that he made the trip 
from Deer Lodge to Butte in three 
hours. 



The- Impression is created that he 
made the trip on one horse. He 
didn't. He stopped at the Moog 
ranch near Stuart, asked them If 
they had any arms to tend him, took 
the only thing they could offer, a 
huge butcher knife, to give his Butte 
troops, and borrowed a horse. It was 
the Moog horse, it seems, that Sen- 
ator Clark rode Into Butte. : 

The Moogs had many horses but 
there was a great drain on their 
stock at that time. When they left 
the ranch to seek safety In Butte 
there was left only two of the herd 
they owned. The others had been 
borrowed by the volunteer soldiers. 
Mining: a Lottery. 

Mrs. James Savery was born to be: 
named Mary Montana Moog. She 
first saw the light of day In Golden,-, 
Colo. Her father. Frederick Moog, J 

» formw Via/4 smlnrnf^ from f»^r_ I 

xoAoy iQse&K (us j or tune in loc. nav i 
world .of . Americar The Moogij fe- [ 
<*t&i-)M Golden -but the ; work: ; ^f 
mining' did not appeal to hirni'V.:-'. 

He quickly learned that while a 
great ballyhoo was mewle over those 
vbo "struck it rich," the chances for 
a prospector, becoming wealthy was 
about one in. ^,000. Small, • strikes 
were frequent enough but the cost of 
living was high and the average' 
prospector had at the end of his 
month, small compensation for his 
strenuous labor— except, of course, 
that highly prized gift of freedom 
and equality which permitted him 
to "look any man in the eye and tell 
him to go h — " which, in the opinion 
of those llbtrty-lovlng, hard-boiled 
old pioneer minors, was almost com- 
pensation enough. 

Shortly after Mary Montana's 
birth the Moogs, yielding to the 
widely spread reports of the Eden 
that Montana offered — it wasn't 



Sen. Clark rode a Moog horse on his historic ride to Butte 



Montana but Idaho territory In those | 
days — set out for Alder Gulch. The ! 
experiences of the family In the new i 
"dlggln's" merely confirmed the con- 
victions formed In Colorado regard- 
ing the returns the average man 
might expect from prospecting. But 
there was a lure about it like race 
horse betting or lottery tickets. . If 
he had been footloose Moog might/ 
have remained a prospector. Bu; 
there was a family to provide for 
and Fred Moog, practical man that 
he was, turned to the soil that ha<^ 
supported his family In Germany fo 
ages. 

He arrived In the Sliver Bow-Deer. 
Lodge district a few months aft 



'> 




the prospectors had broken a trail, 
Into the Butte district from Virglnl 
City. 

He scouted the country and w 
about to take up a ranch at Wan 
Springs when some of the drift!!; 
prospectors and squaw men of tht 
district warned him that "hot v/>* 
ttv will be bad for your crops."! sc, 
reconsidered and located on a pie 
of ground west of what is now Stu 
and where he afterwards malnt^ , 
a stage station, for the Butte- • 
Lodge coach line. \ 

There was no Butte, no Sllv'ct 
Bow, no anything worthy of thj 
name of a settlement. But he bulll 
him a little home out In the wildi 
and manfully set to work to growl 



THE MOOGS 

food for' his family. It was amid 
these surroundings that little Mary 
Montana lived until she was 10 years 
of age. In 1874 she was sent by her 
family to "the little village on the 
road to Bear," which was afterwards 
known as Cottonwood and later as 
Deer Lodge, to attend school. The 
trip by stage from Stuart— it wasn't 
Stuart yet — took three hours. 

She became a member of the fam- 
ily of the late Judge O'Bannon. who 
promoted the establishment of the 
Butte townslte several years later. 
Across the street was the home of 
the Rev. J. R. Russell, the first 
Presbyterian minister in Deer Lodge 
county, and the founder of the Pres- 
byterian church in Butte. Miss 
Moog attended a private school at 
Deer Lodge until her family re- 
moved to Butte following the death 
of her father and the marriage of 
her mother to' L, A. Barnard, brother 
pf one of Butte's most active early- 
! day business men. 
, Mr. and Mrs. Barnard bought the 
lot where the Henderson and Blelen- 
burg block now stands and 'built a 
home on it. Mary attended the 
Butte high school. Her. teachers were 
Judge E. B. Howell and Prof. R, B. 
HasselL Judge Howell. is now a resi- 
dent of Los Angeles and lately pub- 
lished an interesting treatise on 
gold. He was successively a teacher, 
a minister, a lawyer and an' author. 
Mary Montana and Josle Bucher were 
the first gTaduat;s of the Butte high 
school. 

Following her graduation she went 
to Cable, where she met her future 
husband, to- teach school. .Her con- 
tact with the Russel family' In Desr 
liodge had established a life-long 
friendship. She was so impressed 
(Continued on next page) 



81 



Sent to school in "the little village on the road to Bear" 



82 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

(Cont. from previous page) 

tpr the teachings of Rev. Russel that 
she Joined his church, 
i At Cable there was no church. The 
'little echcolma'am did not feelqual- 
• Ifled' to preach, but she. felt she 
obuld run a Sunday, school, so she 
wrote Mr. RusseV about "it: He sent 
her' a bundle. of hyjnh^'lbboksv; tracts 
and periodicals an<fshe'set to work. 
There were few < -children butln a 
'little,- while she .had a class" of 35 
Ipupllst • among\.which f ;wera. many 
lusty miner s— and ■ the pretty uh-. 
sophisticated little lY-year-old school 
teacher was confident that ' they 
came because of their Interest In re- 
ligion. The school had a slight set- 
back one day when the town's 
good Sunday school super- 
[tendent, with Uie^shexUf;: of s Deer 
lge at^>wi^^to.j^' l th^ 
ssroom to escape xhi.serylce Of ft 
arrant charging hmV/^illi ?hlghr 
|radlng" the gold ©ragout of the 
'able mine. ..» ■ <• 

Mary Montana felt that her edu- 
cation was Incomplete. She, needed 
further trainln.g Howell and Has- 
sel, her Butte teachers, were both 
graduates of Qrlnell college ,in Iowa 
•--so she decided to go to .GrineU 
also. Following her graduation she 
removed to Chicago, where she met 
and married James Cox.- The big 
cyclone of 1852 had something to dc 
. with her removal to Chicago: It lit- 
' erally frightened her out of Iowa. 
Mr. Cox passed away and she re- 
moved to New York returning latei 
to Cable, where she renewed her ac- 
qualtanceshlp with and later mar- 
ried Mr. Savery. This took place Jr 
1897. He died in 1905. Mrs. Saverj 
has been a resident of Long Beact 



since 1910, but has been a frequ<mi 
visitor to Montana. Three cblldrer 
were born to her mother, a son and 
two daughters. Mrs. Savery's brother 
Albert, Is a farmer in California 
Her half-sister. May Barnard, is th 









PIONEER DINNER 

CiviH e» 
MR J C 5AVERV 



r -i .?. 






wife of Charles S. Handerson o 
Long Beach, former sheriff of Sllve: 
Bow county. 

One child was born to Mrs. Savery 
a son, who graduated from Harvan 
In 1911, served in the World war an< 
returned home uninjured to- estab 

^nsh the Wayside Colony, a retrea 
for authors and play writers in Call 
fornla. He died In 1931. During th 

| war he edited an army paper knowi 
as the Martian, which was located a 
Mars, France. 

Mrs. Savery Is a well preserved, at 
tardive matron, who looks mucl 
younger than her 71 years. She ha 
a clear recollection of her early Uf« 
In Montana, — before there was Mon 
tana. Her reminiscences would fil 
a volume. 



The day the Sunday school superintendent had to flee the law 



THE MOOGS 



83 








sm 






ffiS^OUMAN ,RETyRNg : *JKpM GERMANY, WHERE 

i^W^g^yE^I^G-lWHEN. CONFLICT 
OPENED. ' HARDiTO SECURE: PASSAGE 

Montana Savery and son James, visiting Germany in August, 
1914, had to flee by train when World War I broke out. 




NA. WEDNESDAY MORNING. AUGUST .13/ 



Mary M. Savery 
Dies Thursday 
[n California 

Mrs. Mary Montana Savery, 94, 
died Thursday in Long Beach, 
Calif., friends learned Tuesday. 
She formerly made her home at 
Cable' and visited frequently in 
Anaconda: ; She was 'the fifth old- 
est member of the Montana Soci- 
ety of Pfpneersi -She was born- 
in Denver ^MarCh 17, 1864. She 
was brought ,to Bu#e by her fa- 
ther in 1865. '.< .vf* 1 

She lived in Montana until Xn . , 
early 19'40's. Her brother, Albert] 
Moog, 92, Yerba Jijoda, CalH.,' 
survives.- 



84 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



MARIE THERESE MOOG (b. 1912) 7.3) 
Schoolteacher, b. Dec. 14, 1912, Los Angeles, to Al and 
Therese (Blesbois) Moog, educ. 
UCLA (B.A.), USC (M.D.) m. March 
16, 1941, A.C. Harvey, c. Steve, 
Marilyn (Stein). Her master's 
thesis, "An Analytical 
Bibliography of the Post-War 
Novels of Paul Bourget" is in 
USC's Doheny Library. 

Her experiences include 
visiting Europe at the age of 2 
(and having to hurry out as 
World War I approached) , sit- 
ting in the lap of silent screen 
star Ruth Roland during shooting 
of a movie at Montana Savery's home on 5th and Ocean Aves., 
wearing a surgical mask during the 1919 flu siege (ritzy 
stores displayed masks with lace) , teaching French at Manual 
Arts High School, working at bases in El Paso, Tex., and 
Alamagordo, N.M., during World War II (seeing fair-haired, 
bewildered German POWS) , and tramping up a hill to find her 
grandfather's lost grave near Anaconda, Mont. 




Long Beach Pike, 1915; 
Mother was upset that 
Marie's bloomers showed 



THE MOOGS 



85 







Wrfttaa Wr 

Students of the KngJi^h Department of the 

Qendale Union High Sci»oi 

THE SCRIBBLERS' CLUB 



TO A--MARIGOLD 



Little common flc 

With jofjx s unn y face. 
How 70a juia to brighten things 

That jnrw uwmd tin place! 
■ .#^ 
Litita cururnvi Hjtrer — 

With toot bright ii e en stalk. 
What a eorerinf for tha earth! 
What a border for a walk! 

Little bright joee* flower— 

You bring joy and cheer; 
That's the reason, I am sore. 

That God pas 70a here. — 2tarie Moog 



A bit of poetry from 1929 Scribblers' Club member, Marie Moog 




Sons and Daughters of 
Montana Pioneers 



Oblivious to roadster, Marie (far 
left) sunning herself in Balboa in 
1930 with pals, including Priscilla 
Watson (Cantrell) , second from right. 




"Chartered by the Stale Their Parents Founded" 



86 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



6 — The Montana Standard, Butte, Saturday, August 24, 1985 

Grave occupant not 
Father, but a dad 



By Rich Simpson 

Standard Staff Writer 

For many years, Anacondans 
have believed a solitary grave on a 
hill above Opportunity contained 
the remains of an area priest. 

Some people claim it has never 
been vandalized, because of super- 
stitions about defacing a priest's 
grave. 

The words FATHER, Frederick 
M. Hoog, 1823-1867, on the rose 
quartz marker probably led people 
to think it was a priest's resting 
place, said Alice Finnegan, Tri- 
County Historical Society director. 

Not so, says Steve Harvey, a Los 
Angeles Times feature reporter. 
The grave holds his great-grand- 
father's remains. 

"Everybody thought it was a 
priest's grave, because it had father 
on it," Finnegan said. "They didn't 
realize it meant dad." 

Harvey, 39, viewed the grave for 
the first time Wednesday. He flew 
up from California with his mother, 
Marie Harvey, just to inspect it. 

The Harveys visited the Anacon- 
da area in June, but never looked 
for the marker because they felt it 
had probably had crumbled. Mrs. 
Harvey saw it only once before, in 
1941. 

But after corresponding with Fin- 



negan, they learned it was still in 
excellent shape. So, they returned. 

Harvey, who also pens the Bot- 
tom 10 football columns for United 
Press syndicate, is an avid genealo- 
gist and is researching his family's 
past. 

"When you reach a certain age, 
you start wondering where you 
came from," Harvey said. 

"It's a way of getting a feel of 
what life was like back then," be 
said. 

Harvey started wondering about 
his past two years ago. His search 
for his family's roots has brought 
him to Montana three times and in- 
stigated about 200 letters to persons 
with the last name of Moog. 

While searching Southwest Mon- 
tana records offices, libraries and 
archives, Harvey verified that his 
ancestor wasn't a holy man. A pro- 
bate file at the Anaconda-Deer 
Lodge County Courthouse showed 
Moog possessed 147 gallons of whis- 
key; 32 gallons of brandy; and 130 
pounds of tobacco when he died. 

From other items listed on the 
probate, it appears Moog's Opportu- 
nity ranch also served as a trav- 
eler's way station or store. He also 
possessed 52 cans of tomatoes at the 
time of his death. 
His great-grandfather Moog was 







Virginia City, 
Montana 




society a 

OF *" N| 

MONTANA^ 
PIONEERS'*- 



SEPT. iO-M-IZ 

1953 

VIRGINIA CITY 

MONT. 

"CBMU0FM8NTMU" 



one of the first settlers in the Op- 
portunity area. Frederick Moog ar- 
rived in the Deer Lodge Valley in 
about 1863. A former Denver saloon- 
keeper, he left the Colorado capital 
in the early 1860s. He ended up in 
Silver Bow in 1863 in the search of 
gold. 

Moog arrived in Silver Bow with 
five mules and mining equipment. 
He remained a miner for only three 
years. On St. Patrick's Day, 1866, 

Newspaper article on the 



be traded his mules for land in Op- 
portunity. 

He said his mother used to tell 
him his maternal grandfather, Al- 
bert Moog, was a baseball player 
and a violinist. Mrs. Harvey, how- 
ever, never heard or saw her father 
play music or sports. 

"There was a violin at our house, 
but I thought it was a neighbor's," 
she said. 



Harvey search for Fred Moog's grave. 



THE MOOGS 



87 



ALBERT MOOG JR. (b. 1915) (7.4) 
Aircraft mechanic and quality control inspector, b. Aug. 
1, 1915, in Long Beach to Albert and Therese (Blesbois) Moog, 
m. Mildred Lomax, May, 10, 1941, in Centerville, Tenn. , c. 
Lisa (Sewell) , Leslie (Fischer) . 

During World War II, Albert was a civilian mechanic for 

the Navy and the Air 
Force. He and Millie 
were part-owners of a 
restaurant later. 






Al, Therese, Marie, 1922 Mother cropped out a frowning shot 

of Al, substituting a happy face; Al in Seal Beach, 192 9 



88 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



Day the Earth Shook: 127 Died 



6.3 Quake Spread Panic in Southland 

BY STEVE HARVEY 

TImi ln« WrltOT 

Forty -four years ago today. Joe Fox. a 
shortstop on Compton Junior College's baseball 
team, was nding through Long Beach on the 
team bus when he noticed that the telephone 
poles outside were swaying like palm trees. 

At nearly the same Instant in Santa Ana— it 
was 5:54 p.m.— Albert Moog's house shook so 
violently that the family raced out the back 
door and was narrowly missed by a falling 
ehimney. 

Meanwhile, at Callech in Pasadena. Albert 
Einsiem was so engrossed in a conversation 
with a fellow scientist that he reportedly an- 
swered. "What earthquake?" to a student va- 
cating the trembling building. 

In Los Angeles. Luella Aknim also fled from 
her home, but with tragic results. She was 
struck and killed by an auto on 54th Si 

Mrs. Alcrum was one of 127 persons who 
died in the earthquake that struck Southern 
California March 10. 1933. 

It injured more than 5.000 and forever de- 
stroyed the prevailing myth that major earth- 
Juakes occurred in Northern, not Southern, 
aJifornia. 

The epicenter of the temblor, which mea- 
sured 6.3 on the Richter scale ( compared to 6J 
for the 1971 San Fernando quake), was 3V* 
miles offshore from Newport Beach. 

The initial major shock lasted 11 seconds. By 
midnight. 34 aftershocks had followed. 

Panic was widespread. In the cool evening 

air of her backyard in Santa Ana. Marie Har- 
vey recalls. "It was as if everyone in the city 
was talking at once." 

Rumors with no basis in fact were rife: The 
SS Catalina had sunk. The Catalina Channel 
had sunk— had sunk 369 feel, no less. A tidal 
wave was coming. 

Alben Moog Jr.. then a curious youth of 17. 
gathered with hundreds of others at the sea- 
shore to wait for the big wave. The surf didn I 
get any bigger than usual." he remembers now 
—with relief. 




Young Albert went down to 
the beach to watch for a 
tidal wave after the Long 
Beach earthquake of 1933. 
Alas, it never came. 



THE MOOGS 



89 



MILDRED LOMAX (b. 192 3) (7.5) 
Realtor, b. Oct. 29, 1922, in Linden, Tenn. , to Arnold 
Lomax and Ethel Richardson, m. Albert Moog Jr. on May 10, 
1941, c. Lisa (Sewell) and Leslie (Fischer), g.c. Leah Marie 
Sewell, Lauren Sewell and Chad Fischer. 




A forward, upper row, far right, for Perry County High of 
Linden, Tenn., in the late 1930s. The team made the district 
playoffs twice in four years, winning once. Hence the smiles. 



90 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 

LISA MOOG (b. 1950) (7.6) 
Schoolteacher, b. June 24, 1950, Orange, Calif., to Albert 
Jr. and Mildred Moog, m. Steve Sewell Oct. 5, 1985 in Diamond 
Bar, Calif.; c. Leah Marie, b. July 3, 1986; Lauren, b. March 
21, 1988. Lisa teaches fourth grade at Blandford School in 
Rowland Heights. Husband Steve, b. April 14, 1953, teaches 
social science and coaches soccer at Irvine High. 

LESLIE MOOG (b. 1953) (7.7) 
Billing clerk, b. Dec. 13, 1953, to Albert Jr. and 
Mildred Moog, m. Lennie Fischer, Oct. 5, 1983, in Carbon 
Canyon, Calif.; c. Chad, b. Apr. 27, 1983. 





The Moog/Sewell Clan gathers at a cousin's wedding: Al, Lisa, 
Leah, Millie, Chad and Leslie; right, Lisa, Leah and Steve. 



THE MOOGS 



91 



JAMES S. COX (18527-1887) (7.8) 

Railroad switchman, b. 1852 (?) , m. Montana Moog, 1886 

(?), c. James Cox/Savery, d. Aug 1, 1887, Chicago. James Cox 

didn't live to see his son born, dying of typhoid fever two 

months earlier. We know almost nothing of his life except that 

he lived at 760 39th St. with his wife. Montana Cox and her 
son moved back to Montana, where she married James Savery. 



JAMES COX/SAVERY (1887-1931) (7.9) 
Playwright, poet, civic leader, and arts patron, (he 

composed a Rotary 

club 1 s theme) , b. 

Oct. 18, 1887, 

Chicago, to 

James, Montana 

Cox (adopted by 

James Savery) 

grad. Harvard U; 

m. Sarah Savery, 

Contemplating nature d. Mar. 16, 1931. 

A member of the Hasty Pudding Club at Harvard, where he 

befriended the poet Alan Seegar (killed in World War I) , James 

was active in stage productions in New York and was an 

acquaintance of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ethel Barrymore. 

His twins, Mary (Olkowski) and Sarah (Venn) , reside in 




92 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



Eugene, Ore., where Mary is a realtor and Sarah owns a busin- 
ess. His son James, an inventor and scientist, lives in 
Hudson, N.H. 

The Olkowski children are Sharon (Keiser) and Richard, 
the Venn children are Steven and Eugene C. Jr. , and the Savery 
children are Pamela (Stegner) and Lisa. 




mm& fcH 1 



*W J& I 




ALIFORNIA, TUESDAY MORNING, MARCH 17, 1931 




Price Thro 



DEATH TAKES 
J. C. SAVERY, 
ART PATRON 

Wayside Colony Creator 

And Veteran of World 

War Dies Suddenly 

sufferITrelapse 

Complications Res u 1 1 i n g 

From Appendicitis Are 

Cause of Demise 

James C. Savery, creator 
and owner of the Wayside 
Colony, 53 Atlantic avenue, 
overseas veteran of the World 
war and prominent citizen of 
Lontf Beach, widely known 
for his patronage of the fine 
*ru died ycslerd»7 alttmoon at 
4;23 o'clock after a eudden rrlapee 
following an appendectomy followed 
by another operation and a hlrwt 



City's Grievous, Loss 

CULTURAL progress m Long Beach own 
touch to James Savory, whoae untimely 
death occurred bate ye* i c r d » y . after * brief 
illness. - / 

For more than fifteen yeari Mr. Savery 
had been a leader in the task of buildinji 
a better and more complete city m thi» 
naturally favored location. 

Mr. Savery spoke with authority on edu- 
cation. literiiUne, the arta. mime and th* 
drama, in all of which subject* he v.a_: well 
grounded, at his friends and admirers know 
to well. His interest therein Wf»s expressed 
in many practical way*; for he was no mere 
dreamer. His Wayside Colony was one of 
tha products of his enterprise and (,'truut. - 
' In earlier years, Mr. Savery ,was one of 
ihe first members of the Planning Commis- 
sion, end mote recently he served on the 
Park Board. His constructive thoughts lelt 
their impress in both instances, as on every 
project, public or private, in which he en- 
uited for the betterment of the city he 
loved so devotedly. The patriotism that in- 
spired him to volunteer for aervic* in the 
World War marked his civic career. 



THE MOOGS 9 3 



6i»*2 v * L// hiilinctiuc fhnppinn /renter 
Ml&ZJL^^ 70 ATLANTIC AVENUE 

fe^A^l* 3 'JL«* _ *_ A s TEP^CKATT ^MTN^^ 

|| jEDICATED to the Unknown Pioneer. The Wayside Colony 
stands, not .is one shouting from the housetop, but in gentle tones 
of helpful comradeship of those who still love yesterday and the 
Iragrant wood-smoke of kindly hearth fires. 

When the late James C Savery. beloved citizen of Long 
Beach came home from Europe in 1920 he resolved that he 
would spend the rest of his life in helping people create useful 
and beautiful things. Believing as he did. in those ideals which 
make for the greatest progress to the individual and to the com- 
munity, from an old apartment house, and five garages Mr. Savery 
began the development of The Wayside Colony — a. center which 
has brought a joyous expression of Art to Long Beach for many 
years This artistic unity of buildings has become a monument 
to this great man. Unfortunately he did not live to see the com- 
pletion of his dream. 

In 192S during the Pacific Southwest Exposition local and 
internationally known artists gathered in YE OLDE COURT 
YARD THEATRE for the sessions "Mornings In Art." Here 
the Long Beach Theatre Guild was born and produced their first 
plays. 

A number of actors and actresses now famous, made their 
debut on this stage, bare of artificial scenery and stage parapher- 
nalia. The Long Beach Art Association has held many exhibitions 
here and given delightful entertainments. 

Once a bandstand, now class room in The Colonial School 
for boys and girls, the "BIG TOP was moved in. sans side walls 
and floor. The old log cabin, brought in for the World War 
Veterans Workshop, became the home of Needlecrafters who 
are responsible for many revivals of old time stitchery and hooked 
rug making. 



Jim Savery founded the Wayside Colony in Long Beach to 
encourage the arts. It has since given vay to urban renewal. 
Next page (top): Jim's wife Sarah and the twins, about 1928. 



94 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 




JAMES SAVERY (1826-1905) (7.10) 
Hotel, mine owner, b. Wareham, Mass. , Nov . 13, 

Anna Noland (1853) , 

m. (2) Montana Moog, app. 

1896, c. James C. Savery; 

d. Aug. 21, 1905, in 

Cable, Mont. 

After some gold- 
seeking in California, 

he formed the American 

Emigrant Co., and pub- 



1826, m. 




THE MOOGS 95 

lished a Des Moines newspaper, before striking it rich with 
the Cable mine in the 1880s. His first wife, Anna Nowland, 
who died in 1891, was one of the first female lawyers in Iowa. 




ANACONDA. MONTANA. TUESWAY .-MORNING. AUGUST 22. 190> 



AT PICTURESQUE HOME ON CABLE MOUNTAIN 

JAMES C. SAVERY ANSWERS DEATH'S SUMMONS 




8fHS'l.ll lM*|Kll<rtl '0 Mir <fAli.U:J. 

Cubit*, auk. :i — Jam*-* i i*:iv* 

tll»t] -It l\t* |H«l,kl,L. ■ i r . i»i»- ,ll 

uVIot-k *h»*« »-\ entity ■( limit fjuiutv i 
H»*,h.i«i u-«-«t in t.«ih».* hf.iltlt sin^r hw ) 
return fron: ih.- k,i-i i month .i«-» ><ut ' 

t*ltt—l mftwwiliil tftt-r rrni ■htuif Hum*, i 

While II *\u« tn«>U8h! !«'■ iniUI 'i"i 'iv* J 

! I"»i«r. !ii» -I'-.tin «.i> I • !>!■-• U)i*»«p*i-1«*'l. i 

} ftf r-x(vinii« iuiltlnih nml<- -h nt« w i*h 
] *U* f.ninlv r»l \X*h k-f-N.-i ■■' Ah.i- 
r mmi i « ,i« |»r»*^iu ' '(» :.» t h- ri>.. 

mm i ->r hi« itt-itih »ir w.\* in I i>1 
| tM-*nh>n ..r .,tl m- r.-n uin*** nul .-it* !h*« 

| .luv tw-fnr*- hj-l nini ■ •■ led*-!"* .n.-i il- 
I t~rvle,t ;.. ..in. i *.,i*i-.- -■* in ft- i" 

Mf Siiv-ry wad .-.n K.i»( 

| W'.irvh..ni. M^«« til 1 --M I h*i <• !m 



james Savery's death was big news in nearby Anaconda, Mont. 



96 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

r — - 

THE S AVERY 

DES MOINES 




LARliKST AND I.EAlllNti HOTKL OK IOWA 



lnler-l'rliaii Cars Entering Des Moines 
Pass THE SAVERY Corner 



S, A. HOGAN, Manager 



Death of Pioneer Is 
Start of Recollecting 

On Early Day Home 

The death of Mary Savery, pio- 
neer of thtfi district, in Lone 
Beach, brought recollections' to 
Matt J. Kelly, who is receiving 
treatment at the state sanitarium 
at Galen. Her father . is buried 
on the. first, knoll; of the foothills 
directly, east of' the^'end of ^ew- 
art street / in Opportunity Y above 
French crossing. A headstone 
shows he died, in the 1860's. The 
stone was erected by his daughter, 
Mary Montana Moog Savery. ".. 

The old home at Cable was a 
showplace for many years until 
it burned do«^n after 1910. Each 
room had bafid* carved hardwood 
furniture tyrbiight Jnrby , ox team. 

Each ro^'hi^Vtflfferent hard 
woOd. The, mantle over the fire- 
place would be df ch'erry, the bed- 
room of oak!, the| dining room of 
maple. There also ,was 'some out- 
standing china and glassware. 



Hotel Savery, Des Moines, Iowa 



(ATLANTIC) CABLE MINE 
.Produced World's Richest Gold Pockets 

The Cable Mine, located about 13 miles west of Anaconda, \va: 
mined as early as the 1860's but history verifies organized mining ir 
the area only .from the 1870's. 

Many prospectors worked the hills and creeks of the area before 
it was officially located by J. C. Savory about 1880. "High-grading'' 
became so rampant that miners were searched when leaving the mine, 
but in spite of such precautions much gold was stolen. 

Cable, the town, remained small but due to its wealth, was a 
social beehive and boasted of stores, post office, saloon, etc. The mag- 
nificent Savory home was the scene of social functions. It was de- 
stroyed by fire but the fire place and the "Lover's Lane" stairway 
through the garden still remain. 

One Cable miner supposedly made off with so much gold that he 
built a mansion in England on what he named "Cable Terrace." 



THE MOOGS 



97 



Writer Sy Stoddard told an intriguing tale about Cable: 

Mr. Savery drove up to the rail 
station one day in a light spring wagon. He 
was accompanied by three armed men. Walking 
into the office he glanced about and then 
informed agent Leonard he had a shipment 
for New York. 

"Where is it?" Leonard inguired. 
"It will be here in a few minutes." 

About 10 minutes later a team of 
horses plodded to the depot, pulling 
nothing but the running gear of an old 
dead-axe wagon. The driver was seated on a 
small bundle of hay tied to the front. 

He hitched his horses and untied the 
bundle of hay from which he extracted a 
small wooden box. It reguired two men to 
carry the box into the depot... It contained 
$55,000 in gold bullion. 




The Savery house at Cable, circa 1900 



98 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 




/" * wf" 




CHAPTER EIGHT 

THE SCHNEIDERS: Soldiers, Mount ainwomen, TV Hosts 

"Buffalo gals, won'cha come out tonight, come out 
tonight, come out tonight/ Buffalo gals, won'cha come 
out tonight and dance by the light of the moon." 

Favorite song of Mary Schneider (Barnard) , 

German- farm-girl- turned-Montana-pioneer 

A breakthrough in our research was meeting Claire 
Schneider, great-granddaughter of William (1933-1906) . 

Claire, to our mutual amazement, possessed some of the 
family memorabilia we had, notably the photo of Albert Moog 
(at start of Moogs section). "I never knew who he (Moog) was," 
Claire said, "or why we had this obituary (of Mary Moog)." 

We both had the photo of the Schneider clan on the next 

page as well. Claire identified the man in back as William. 

Adella Lenz, age 93, granddaughter of Fred Schneider 

(William's brother), recognized the man in the middle as 

Photo on previous page: Montana pioneer Mary Schneider/ 
Moog/Barnard, with Albert (left), age 2, and Mary, 4, in 1868. 



100 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 






"Gramps" and the man on Gramps 1 left as "Cris," William's 
half-brother Christian. Adella said her father (Charles A. 
Schneider) called the woman in the middle "Aunt Bickbach," 
which is why we believe she is Jeanette Schneider Bickenbach. 

Other Schneiders 
said the fourth man in 
the photo was Charles. 

Mary (p. 104) was 
a sister of these five. 

The Schneiders 
came from Vasbeck, 
Hesse, Germany, in the 
1850s, eventually set- 
ling in Pickerel Lake 
(now Albert Lea) , Minn. 

They were leaders 
of the community, 
Charles serving as 
election judge, Fred as 
a district school 

official and William 

The Schneiders, circa 1880: Fred 
as a justice of the (left), Jeanette (perhaps), Charles, 

William and Christian. 

peace. 

Many of their descendants especially Elmer Schneider, a 
great-grandson of Charles, contributed to this genealogy. 




THE SCHNEIDERS 101 
SCHNEIDER LINE 
Source: Vasbeck town history, family records, 
8.0 Kurt Schneider (16207-1693) 



Refer to 



8.1 Johann Arnd Schneider (16547-1729) 
m. Anna Elisabeth Dulle (1659-1740) 

c. Johann Georg Schneider (1693 chr.-1759) 8.2 

8.2 Johann Georg Schneider (1693 chr.-1759) 
m. Maria Katharina Colherg (1694 chr.-1740 

c. Johann Philipp Schneider (1725 chr.-1798) 8.3 

8.3 Johann Phillip Schneider (1725-1798) 
m. Anna Margarete Nehm (7-7) 

c. Johann Henrich Schneider (1754-1840) 8.4 

8.4 Johann Henrich Schneider (1754-1840) 
m. Maria Elizabeth Pistorius (1767-1815) 

c. Johann Friedrich Schneider (1792-7) 8.5 

8.5 Johann Friedrich Schneider (1792-7) 
m. (1) Maria Emde (1787-1819) 

c. Henry Schneider (1811-1861) 
c. Christian Schneider (1817-7) 

m. (2) Elisabeth Rohle (1797-7) 

c. Frederick Schneider (1820-87) 

c. Charles Schneider (1823-1879) 

c. Mary Schneider (Keuthe) (1826-1872) 

c. William Schneider (1833-1906) 8.15 

c. Mary Schneider (1838-1923) 8.6 

c. Jeanette (?) Schneider (1839-1910) 8.14 

8.6 Mary Schneider (18387-1923) 

m. (1) Fred Moog (1823-1867) 7.0 

c. Albert Moog (1866-1959) 7.1 

c. Montana Moog (1864-1958) 7.2 

m. (2) Luther Barnard (1835-1883) 8.7 

c. Lee Barnard (1872-1897) 8.8 

c. Allen Barnard (1878-1939) 8.9 

c. May Barnard (1875-1839) 8.10 

8.7 Luther Barnard (1835-1883) 

8.8 Lee Barnard (1872-1897) 

8.9 Allen Barnard (1878-1939) 

8.10 May Barnard (1875-1939) 

m. Charles Henderson (1874-1936) 8.11 

c. Rita Henderson (1896-1973) 8.12 



102 



HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



8.12 Rita Henderson (1896-1973) 
m. Harold Werre (1895-1984) 
c. Irene Werre (b. 1924) 
c. Charles Werre (b. 1928) 

8.13 Irene Werre (b. 1924) 
m. Harlan Lee (b. 1919) 
c. Carol (Tamang) (b. 1949) 
c. Linda (Balyeat) (b. 1950) 
c. Dale (b. 1951) 
c. Allen (b. 1959) 

Charles Werre (b. 1928) 
m. Barbara Nicholson (b. 192 7) 

8.14 Jeanette Schneider (1839-1910) 
m. Charles Bickenbach (1837-1908) 
c. William (1866-1924) 
c. Frank (1867-1931) 
c. Roy (1879-?) 
c. Marie H. (1864-?) 

8.15 William Schneider (1833-1906) 
m. Julia Bramer (1842-1923) 
c. Emma (Gage) 1862-1889) 
c. George A. (1864-1912) 

c. Matilda (Copelin) (1870-1957) % 

c. Walter S. (1876-1942) 

C. Louis H. (1883-1924) 

c. Edward (1878-1904) 

c. Sarah Carolina (1872-1961) 

c. William C. (1874-1954) 

8.16 William C. Schneider (1874-1954) 
m. Isabella McAdam (1878-1929) 

c. William Edward Schneider (b. 1918) 

8.17 William E. Schneider (b. 1918) 

m. (1) Audrey Claire French (1923-1975) 
c. Claire Marie (b. 1948) 

m. Acie Davis 
c. Beverly Anne (b. 1949) 

m. (1) Michael Andress 

m. (2) Wayne Brooks 

c. Laurie Brooks (b. 1969) 
c. William Edward Jr. (b. 1952) 

m. Suzanne Schneider 
c. Laurie (b. 1954) 

m. Ron Purdue 
m. (2) Norma Jean Durham 



Re 


fe 


r to 




8 


.13 




8 


.13 







Isabel Schneider and 
* young Bill, 1928 

Refer to: 
8.16 
8.17 



THE SCHNEIDERS 10 3 



JOHANN FRIEDRICH SCHNEIDER (1792-?) (8.5) 

B. 1792, Vasbeck (Hessen) , Germany, to Johann Heinrich 
and Mary (Pistorius) Schneider. 

M. (1) Maria C. Emde, March 7, 1810, c. Johann Henrick 
Jakob (1811-1861), 
Christian Wilhelm (1812- 
1861), Henrick (1815-?), 
Christian (1817-?) . 

M. (2) Elisabeth 
Rohle, May 18, 1819, c. 
Frederick (1820-87), 
Mary Elisabeth Keuthe 
(1826-?) , Charles Sr. 
(1823-79) , Christian 
(1828-?) , Wilhelmine 
Resting) (1831-?), Will- 
iam (1833-1906), Mary 
(Barnard) (1838-1923), 
Mary (Jeanette) (Bicken- 
bach?) (1839?-1910) . 

A town history lists 
Johann, his wife and five 
children emigrating here. 




Map of Vasbeck, Hessen 
state, home of Schneiders 



But we have found no trace of 
the parents. Are records of their life in America lost? Did 
they stay in Germany? Or did they die en route? 



104 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



MARY SCHNEIDER (1838-1923) (8.6) 
Stage-coach station operator, pioneer restaurateur, 
rancher, b. April 15, 1838, 






Vasbeck, Germany, to Johann 
Friedrich and Elizabeth 
(Rohle) Schneider, m. (1) 
Fred Moog, Black Hawk Point, 
Colo., in 1863; c. Albert, 
Mary (Savery) . 

M. (2) L. A. Barnard, 
Deer Lodge, Mont. , on Sept. 
8, 1869, Deer Lodge; c. 
Lee, May (Henderson) , Allen; 
d. Oct. 3, 192 3, Long Beach. 

Mary Schneider was not 
a 19th century, behind-the- 
scenes wife. In the 1880 
Montana census, while then A widow in Montana, 1868 
married to L.A. Barnard, she listed her own personal worth, 
one of the few wives to do so. 

Her nephew James Savery wrote that she came to Albert 
Lea, Minn., from Vasbeck, in the early 1850s with five 
siblings. We believe they were Frederick, Charles, William, a 
half-brother Chris and perhaps Jeanette (Bickenbach) . 

Family lore says she knew Buffalo Bill, who was said to 




THE SCHNEIDERS 105 



have embarrassed her son once when he visited Al at work. 
Much spittoon use, salty language, etc. 



She baked pies and other 
goods at the stage station she 
ran with her successive 
husbands, then moved into 
Butte after Chief Joseph and 
the Nez Perce panicked 
Montanans in the countryside. 

There, she ran a hotel 



Some one, who is meau enough to do 
anything that is low-lived, hroke into the 
house at Mrs. L. A. Barnard's rnucb, near 
Stuart, last Wednesday week, during the 
temporary absence of the man iu charge. 
The whole house was ransacked, includ- 
ing Mrs. Barnard's room, from which a 
number of valuables were taken. It is 
pretty well understood who the vandals 
are, and if we are not mistaken they will 
have to answer for their devilmeut one of 
these days. 

Silver State Post (1891) 



eatery, where mining magnate Marcus Daly was a customer. As a 
businesswoman, she swapped property with such historic figures 
as former Montana Sens. William Clark and Lee Mantle. 

Still robust in her late 70s, she began to fail after she 
fell and broke a hip while chasing a cat out of her summer 
cabin in Montana. 






*_~a_*/j »»-w /£*!+-*» <~J" ■ f<-<-.^. 



7?7, 





r- ■- > /* * * -» 



*<.^*/ /<-*>-< -xi <y 



Deed record of Mary Barnard purchase of a lot in Butte for $80 
in May 1878. The family had moved from a ranch into town out 
of fear of Indian attacks. 



106 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



MRS. L. A. BARNARIh 
PIONEER, PASSE 

LIVED FOR MANY YEAJth jl 
DEER LODGE VALLEY. RE- 
MEMBERED BY MANY J 

■ — •' << 

Mrs. L. A. Barnard, a Morftan 
pioneer, died early last evening i 
Long Beach, Calif. Death v -* nd 
unexpected for she had been/jii 
failing health for a long time 1 oJ 
account of her age. The decease! 
is remembered by all of the old. 
timers of this pretty and thrivin( 
city as -well as those residing ii 
the Deer Lodge valley. . ; 

Mrs. Barnard was born jn Fur 
steuthumn-Waldeck, Germany, """or 
April 15th, 1838. She, togethpi 
wi:lf four brothers and one sitftei 
came to Albert Lea, Minnesota, ir 
th<« earley fifties. From there sh< 
went to Colorado . where she Was 

married to Frederick Moog in 1863! 
at Black Hawk Point, Colorado] 
Two children were born of this 
union, Mary Montana, now Mrsi 
James C, Savery, and Albert Moog, 
wh t < *» »*• bot h -*ie w l iving at Long 
Beach, California. Mrs. Moog made 
the journey from Denver, Colorado, 
V>. Virginia City, Montana, in 1864, 
t* entire journey in a stage coach 
and carrying a baby in her arms. 
From Virginia City they went to 
Silver Bow where Mr. Moog opened 
a rrocery store. 



In 1866 they took up the fTrit 
homestead in Deer Lodge Valley 
where Mr. Moog was associated 
with Conrad Kohrs in the 1 stock 
racing businers. The Deer Lodfre 
Valley Ranche was a store, , hotel, 
and ata»;e station for the Cjilnier, 
Salsbury, Rnlston . and , Dpddow 
stage lines for many years.? Mr. 
Moojr died there March 3, 18G7. 

On Sept. 8, 1869, Mrs. 'Moog 
married L. A. Barnard, a brother 
of 'Wayne Barnard. Three children 
were bom to Mr. and Mrs. .Ber- 
nard: Lee, who died in Gibbons- 
ville, Idaho, May 17, 1897; iMay, 
now Mrs. Charles S. Henderson, 
who, with he r husband and daugh- 
ter,; now reside in Long" B,each, 
Calif. f and Allen Barnardi how a 
retident of Anaconda, Montana; 

Tpe family left the Deer Lodge 
valley in 1877 and located in ^utte 
where Mr. Barnard 'died in/ 1883. 
After his death Mrs. Barnarq op- 
erated a hotel located on (West 
Broadway, oh the site where, the 
Henderson - Bielenberg, block j now 
stands. y j 

hi 1887, Mrs. Barnard moved to 
Deer Lodge with her jfamily, where 
she lived until 1911, when she went 
to Long Beach and where she I has 



L\ 



since resided with her two daugh- 
ters. Even though living in (Cal- 
ifornia she always ' called >\ Deer 
Lodge her home. As long as /her 
health permitted she went to Mon- 
tana every summer. It was on I one 
of these trips in 1917, while at her 
home in Deer Lodge, that she fell 
and fractured her hip and had been 
an .invalid until .the time of her 
death. 



Montana Standard records the death of a pioneer, 1923. 




THE SCHNEIDERS 107 
LUTHER A. BARNARD (1835-1883) (8.7) 
Miner, rancher, first postmaster in Warm Springs, Mont., 
b. 1835, in Chautau- 
qua County, N.Y., to 
Martin M. , Elizabeth 
(Benedict) Barnard; 
m. on Sep. 8, 1869, 
to Mary Schneider in 
Deer Lodge ; c . Lee , 
May (Henderson) , 
Allen, d. April 4, 
188 3, Butte, Mont. 

Luther ' s father , 
attracted by liberal 
offers of land from the government, moved his family of eight 
children to Wisconsin in 1847. Luther and Wayne left the 
family farm in 1866, setting out for Montana in a train of 75 
wagons. They encountered no Indian trouble but lost several 
men and animals crossing swollen rivers. 

When they reached Butte, one Montana history recounts, 

her inhabitants did not number 150 and 
luxuriant grass fully two feet high stood 
where now her principal streets are filled 
with the busy tides of life and trade. 

Ironically, Wayne (1846-1919) became a wealthy and 

influential citizen because Luther traded him a mining claim 

for a ranch. The claim paid off more than $500,000. 






L.A. BARNARD, possibly (shot in same 
setting as photos of his family) 



108 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

In the Butte cemetery, where both reside, Luther has a 
modest plaque, Wayne, a 2-foot-tall headstone. But Luther 
found good fortune in one respect. The ranch that he acquired 
bordered one owned by widow Mary Moog, whom he married. 



4^JS£EilS^r 



enumerated by me? on. the 



. . , in the County of ,yJft&HrJ$tfyy...,}\ tf tai 
■j/aJUi day of June, il^uf 



%~^2, <2/6* 



10U2. 

'X? V' -"\ f 






.is 

I ; 



-i.jf/ffUa 






^JJ. 



I > 






Y8*.y~ \u-% 






l?+lo4l 



(2L 



A i... 



7 T 



•|...J...l. 



i i. 



z 



44 



1880 Butte census-taker either forgot name of the Barnards' 2- 
year-old "Baby" or didn't bother to ask. (It was Allen.) 



WARMSPRINGS, Warm Springs (Deer Lodge) was named for the 
nearby hot water springs. The post office opened in 1871 with Luther 
Barnard as postmaster. Prior to 1873 the name was spelled as two words. In 
1895 the State Hospital for the Insane was established here. 

A reference to Luther's role in the history of Warm Springs 
in "Names on the Face of Montana," by Roberta Carkeek Cheney. 



f yr /y «m »i« »'iiii i jiiij « ni"yi" 'jt T i fir *~— <" V* " ' I ^ 







A deed detailing how Barnards, now living in Butte, rented out 
their ranch near Anaconda in the country to one Allen Pierse 
in 1878 to keep a "House of public entertainment and a bar..." 



THE SCHNEIDERS 109 



Recollection* of early-day Butte 
crowd f ist on the memory of George 
P. Porter, former state auditor, as 
he reads the Standard's "Echoes" 
page. Among his contributions are 
the following: 

"When I waj a boy In Butte Jim 
Orton had a jacic knife that was 
the envy of all his playmates. The 
knife was one of Jim's favorite 
wagers — the icr.ife against C — the 
pr:ce he had paid for It. One Sun- 
day he offered to make a bet with 
Abe Cohen that he could not run 
to old Silver Bow and back In two 
hours. 

Abe put up the 12 against the 
knife. I wa.ir.ed to see Abe win. So 
I went along as coach. Abe wen: 
good en the way out, but when we 
reacned Silver Bow his feet were 
badly blistered. Determined to win 
the kmfe ac all hazards he decided 
to run barefooted. Dashing along 
at top speed over the rough road he 
suffered several bad stone-bruises. 
Grit to the backbone he slipped on 
his shoes, clenched his teeth and 
pushed onward. I did what I could 
to help him. Just north of the 
school of Mines site I decided to 
make a try against time on my own 
hook. I got in Just one minute 
ahead of the time limit. Abe. crip- 
pled as he*was. made it only one 
minute late. Abe lost his $2 and I 
didn't win anything, but we cured 
Jim Orton of betting his prized 
knife. If Abe's feet had been in 
better condition we both could have 
easily beaten that two-hour limit " 



Referring to Tom Coberly's re- 
mark that he was one of Butte's 
early-day arrivals and qualified to 
rank In* the same class as Porter 
and Cohen he says: "The Porters 
were In Butte In 1864. My sister, 
Grace, was bom In the Deer Lodge 
valley, at the place now cailed 
StU2rt, In 1865. My parents re- 
moved to Helena before I was bom. 
When we returned there were many 
children already there — Ace Cohen. 
I Tom. Coberly. Henry Morier. the 
! Hauswiths, the Moags, the " 3er- 
1 r.aris. the Crrs. the Noyes family. 
J She Young family. Mary Rea— later 
Mrs. Hank Valiton— the FUsrs. 
Humphries. Selchsrs. Nelderthofens 
and Aliens. 



Early Days 
Recalled by 
G. P. Porter 



SEMI-WEEKLY MINER 



.SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1SS3. 



X.j<y c a I TV e >v s . 



From the Dally of Friday 
The funeral of L. A. Bernard yes- 
terday was very largely attended. 



L. A. Laniard, whose untimely 
death occurred on Wednesday in this 
Mtv, wan a brother of our esteemed 
tellow townsman A. W. Barnard. He 
was an intelligent citizen and an old 



rospprtor, though in late years he 

£nl7.V u r '" lNTKU Mountain ex- 
tends its Hiiircru condolence to his sur- 
viving relatives in this city. 



A Butte pioneer remembers the 

"Moags" and "Bernards" 

which the Miner reporter 

misspelled in a 1940 

article (left). Above, 

obituaries on Luther. 



110 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



JV ° J?///./ Land Office at Milwankcc, Wisconsin Tcrrilor7,^^^f.<<.-f../^..-^f....l8i7. 

It is hereby Certified, SFLtt in |iiasiuuv«e> of Ppu>,.^^^^f ,^L.J&( r S-?l*/--<L 

.of <$&¥&. bounty, yjj&raiAlii. 

■gUht of tftU (Dffice, tfU 3Botot. <?*/./ ^.#".._. 



oil, LfiU unit-, liMlcTu^ea x>f. live xJWnistet. of tftU (Dffii 



./. A{-...'f £//.;£ 



<i <f 



No...////r/C tit JToiciufuli Nc.^^'/if; Nottft., of ^anq-i 



__ aitalteV of- uJect 
No. <^-/£ ^rvi 



ioit 

.J 

cue 



©<i»t, cciitauuiici. ,.\{'.(i7i^i.O/. :'-../' O^efce*, at tli« late of 

Dolfat auo tiuenLii -Piue cervt* Itcv acte, amounting* to .^...J.^.'i.-.^Li.ff'.f. Af^JlCiff™ 

Ooflats and '_ _ cents, Pol luhlcfl llie ^^a/mj:ujx. /((.-. ^.(K: 7 ..^..^. .'.({. 

'.■ Has ntaoe liniiiiicitt tit fufjC a* lacMtltcu Gii- laii>. 

NOW THEREFORE BE IT KNOWN, 9Twit oh, |tie»fll^tttU»l, of tlirt cevUficatc to tfic 
Wimnmioiicl of tPicHjtiielnC ibaut) t)ffic«, tPio ialb /'f/f /'-v/i S/f.rv4rJiAi ri 
_ iPwiM 6e enlUfcd to tcccioc a ffiatc itt fot t Pte fot aGooo 

ucicilGcu. /? r ■£*..< a*. 




1847 receipt (above) entitling 
Luther's father, Martin Barnard 
to 160 acres in Wisconsin; below, 
grand, modest tombs of Martin's 
sons, Anthony Wayne and Luther. 
(Alan was Luther's son.) 




THE SCHNEIDERS 111 



LEE BARNARD (1872-1897) (8.8) 



Pharmacist, b. Dec. 4, 1872, 
Mary Barnard, d. May 17, 
1897, Gibbonsville, Ida. 



Mrs. L. A. Bernard has' moved back 
to Deer Lodge from Stuart aixl will speud 
tho winter here.' Her son Lee will enter 
the College of Montanaafter the holidays. 

(1891) 



THE SILVER STATE. 



Pafciii-hed by tb* ftn.vn Stiti 
Pabliehiftg Co., 

XtKBT WlDlTMlUI ArTMMMOOM. 



Deer Lodge, Mont., to L.A. 

DEATH OF LEE B ERNARD. 

A YouniWan Well Known In Deer 
Lodge Dies In Idaho. 
Dr. Chas. G. Glass, who was taken to 
Gibbonsville, Idaho, Monday of last week 
by Ed. Spensley, of the Deer Lodge 
Stablee, having been called to attend L. 
B. Bernard, whose aeriom illness and 
death was mentioned In this paper last 
week, icturned home Thursday. Dr. 
Glass arrived In Gibbonsville on Tuesday 
afternoon, but was too late to be of any 
assistance to the sufferer, who died before 
the physician's arrival. Th"e~remaIns~of 
the young "man^were "Interred In the 
cemetery at Gibbonsville, where they will 
rest until autumn, when the body will be 
removed to the family plot in the Deer 
Lodge" burying ground. The deceased 
was born on the Bernard farm, near 
Stuart, In this valley, and removed with 
his mother and family -to Deer Lodge 
when about 6 -years of<a;jc, -.attending 
both the" public" school and College of 
Montana, taking a special -course In 
chemistry in the latter Institution to bet- 
ter fit himself for bis chosen profession. 
He entered an Eastern school of pbar- 
macy some f ou r years a gc^ gradoatln g 
with high class honors at the end-of-his 
term, and had been connected with a drug 
house in Gibbonsville for the past 18 
months. Lee was a young man (recently 
turned his '22d year), of exemplary naoits, 
!who was possessed of many traits which 
'go to make up a good citizen, and his 
■:fe-work, 'though scarcely begun, showed 
his every act to be prompted by a noble 
impulse. He leaves a mother, Mrs. L. A. 
3eraard, of this city; a sister, Mrs. J. C. 
Savery, and two brothers, A. Bernard and 
Albert Most, the latter being ;*;th_hlm 1 
Mr tint hw lirrallii'd ItU last. 

Clippings tell the sad short story of Lee Barnard, dead at 24. 



Dated: January 1, 18%. 

Li'e Bernard left tlii* morninc fnr CJili- 
hoiipvillc, Idaho, to take- a position as 
dniejjist in a store tln»r«». 
(1896) 



Dr. Cum. O. (Maa* left rarly Monday 
mornlnf for (Hbbontrlll*, Idaho, on • 
professional tUIL 1*. U. lUrnard, form- 
erly of this city. It n>rj III there and bis 
bn.ihwr, AJ|wtt,Mno£aenl ^»*^l>r.'Ol«j«. 
Kd. HpmiiTrT-Jr«i»«l¥« 't*am T Wdrtkrj 
,ar^«trvroUNl Iwira. rWturday If th« cOo 
dltlon of thf> patient permit*. 
(1897) 



112 



HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



ALLEN BARNARD (1878-1939) (8.9) 
Realtor, b. June 7, 1878, in Butte, to Luther and Mary 
Barnard, d. March 12, 
1939, in Plains, Mt. 
Known as "Uncle A," to 
distinguish him from 
half-brother Albert 
Moog, he was the head 
of the Plains Land 
Improvement Co. 

Grand - daughter 
Irene Henderson Lee 

recalls: "He was Uncle "A," about 1900 
handsome, well-dressed, and always had little gifts for us." 




1894: Being a 
cowboy was 
risky work. 



•Allen Bernard, son of Mrs. L. A. Ber- 
nard, of this city, hud hi» leg badly 
fractured wliilo trying to corral a cow, on 

tlicir ranch near Stuart, last Friday. His 
horse niado a quick turn on tlie slippery 
ground and full, causing tlie nccirieut, 
He wns brought here Saturday and placed 
In St. .Joseph's hospital. 



MAY BARNARD (1875-1937) (8.10) 
Charity fund-raiser, b. Feb. 8, 1875, Deer Lodge, to L.A. 
and Mary (Schneider) Barnard; m. April 17, 1896, to Charles 
Henderson, Deer Lodge; c. Rita (Werre) ; d. Aug. 11, 1937. 



THE SCHNEIDERS 113 




IWIDELY-KNOWN 

■ '.■FORMER BUTTE 
! MATRON PASSES 



Mrs. May Henderson, 61, 
Wife of Past Silver Bow- 
County Sheriff, Is 
Taken at Long Beach. 



MAY BARNARD, in Montana days 

i 

City -Will; Mi ss -Mrs ; ? . Henders on ! 

] N THE PA SSINCf of . Mx^fcharles'^S'cHender.- 

son yesterday ' ; thousand^of-:.underpriyileged 
children of thisicity lost al real benefactress. 

And the Santa \Claus Vhp,.direct3 distribution 
of gifts from the people of.-this city through the' 
Press-Telegram/ and Sun.- Christmas Cheer Fund 
lost one of his most' faithful and capable aids; 

With Mrs. Henderson, it was a.-labpr 
ofilove, prompted, solely byjbe^ sympathetic.-rih 
terest in humanity.' particularly the. children/ . 



Mrs.lfctay Henderson. 81, former 
wicfefr -known Butte 'matron and the 
wife of Charles 3. Henderson, for- 
mer sheriff of Silver Bow 'county, 
died suddenly Tuesday at her home 
In Long Beach, Calif., from a heart 
attack. 

News of her passing was received 
here today by Mrs. Malcolm Glllla, 
823 West Quartz street. In a letter 
from Mr. GIUls. who Is at the W. D. 
Thornton lodge on the Madison 
river near West Yellowstone. The 
letter stated that Mr. Henderson, 
who Is one of the "Four Horsemen 
of the Madison." and who had been 
at the lodge fishing with his com- 
panions since July 26, left by plane 
Tuesday evening for Long Beach. 
Here Long Time. 

Mrs. Henderson spent most of her 
life in Butte until leaving for South- 
ern California with Mr. Henderson 
late in 1019. She was born In Deer 
L"™ ar.d Tjs the daughter of 
pie-.ocr .Vcntcr.a residents. Mr. md 
Vrs. Lu'her B-rnard. She came 
h*Tf with her parents when a younc 
girl rr.d ;rrery to womanhood in the 
Mir.i.n; city . She was nr.rr:ed here 
to Mr. Hcnicrson. A woman of 
m?.ny fine q^iities and lovable 
tra; - ^. sho ieives many close frir.ds 
arr>?n? the o.-irz residents of the 
city who »•:'.; be c'eep'.y grieved to 
'.earn of Iier pa«:ng. 

H<*r fs.tr.er wa« one of the prom!- 
n°r.; real estate dealers and opera- I 
t"rs of — .m'.ng ler-r?r. hore before j 
the turn cf the cenrjry. Her uncle., 
A. W. Bamard. built the Barnard 
b'oc* en ".Vest Granite street tr. . 
1SS5. She was a mrrr.ter of the 
Eastern S;?r and xas prominent in 
serial and church affa.rs while in 
Futte. 



114 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



CHARLES HENDERSON (1874-1946) (8.11) 
Long Beach (Calif.) city manager, sheriff of Silver Bow 
County (Mont.), bicycle racer; b. 
Oct. 19, 1874, in Hastings, Neb., to 
George and Helena (Adamstone) 
Henderson, m. (1) May Barnard on April 
17, 1896, Deer Lodge, Mt. , c. Rita 
(Werre) ; m. (2) Alice Marie Dunn, 
Jan. 8, 1945, Phoenix, Ariz., d. Feb. 
1, 1946. 



OF LOCAL INTEREST. 



Married: Mr. Charles H. Henderson to 
Mist May Barnard by Her. Adam John- 
ston, at the resilience of the bride's 
mother iu ibis city, April IT, l!«0fl. 




Herdin' in bad guys 



BuXUpTLXto" 




;emen 



ai-3* 



"FIVE HORSEMEN* RETURN. 

It was with much pleasure that Mon- 
tanans learned yesterday that the famous 
"Four Horsemen of the Madison," aug- 
mented by their noted companion, Herbert 
Hoover, former President of the United 
States, will return next week to the Treasure 
state. For the past three years now the re- 
nowned quartet of Montana old-timers has 
had the pleasure of entertaining Mr. Hoo- 
ver. He has become one of them and the 
party has actually become the "Five Horse- 
men." 

There is a long standing friendship be- 
tween these gentlemen who take so much 
pleasure each year from whipping Mon- 



tana's famous stream and talking over old 
times. For 35 years W. D. Thornton, Charles 
3. Henderson, Ben E. Calkins and Malcolm 
QUlls have gathered at Mr. Thornton's 
lodge, principally to fish. Their life work 
has taken them Into widely separated chan- 
nels of endeavor and yet when they gather 
at the Thornton lodge they meet on a com- 
mon ground, the love of angling for the "big 
ones." Into this congenial group for the 
past three seasons has come Mr. Hoover, 
who Is probably the most famous of all the 
fishing Presidents the nation has known. 
All politics aside, Montanans take great 
Joy on the occasion of again playing host 
to Mr. Hoover besides the famous four whom 
we claim as our own. Their summer visits 
have become a saga of the Treasure state. 



THE SCHNEIDERS 115 




"-' *0 Ay f «x^. ly ^>l 



*~<-' i-^i4rhiXjP L w-»_ s<^\x*S[ *s' 



-MWi 



Charles (center) , on a racing bicycle built for two, about 1894 

HENDERSON, LONG BEACH 
CIVIC LEADER. SUCCUMBS 



LONG BEACH, Feb. 1 — 
Charles S. Henderson, 71, for- 
mer City Manager here and long 
prominent in the city's civic and 
social life, died today in Com- 
munity Hospital where he was 
[taken, several days ago for a 
severe heart ailment. ^ 

Ecru in Nebraska, he V^gS 
reared In Montana, and whiie 
serving as United States mar- 
shal in Montana he became a 
close friend of former President 
Herbert Hoover, his companion 
;on many hunting and fishing 
'trios. 



In 1925 he beczme C'ty Man- 
ager of Long Beach, and later 
j served two terms as presiiie-u 
p: the Long Beach Chamber of 
iGorr.merce. He was an honorary 
member of the board of dir.-- 
-.ors of the Los Angeles Cnr - 
N»r of Commerce. 

Af'.er the I0C3 earthquake *« 
wa_-; ar,rjo;n:en '.n- the Govc-rr.ur 
to take charge of all forces op- 
erating in the emergency, for 
which action he was awarded 
the Meritorious Citizenship 
Award in 1038 by the Long 
Beach Council of Service Clubs. 




116 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

RITA HENDERSON (1896-1973) (8.12) 
Schoolteacher, b. Oct. 9, 1896, Butte, Mont., m. Harold 
Werre, in Long 
Beach, June 26, 
1923, c. Irene 
(Lee), Charles; d. 
December, 1973. 

'Si 





— - * " A -'gf lm v -cr-'/J fc ONT. 





Cu 




uraA 



Her memories of pioneer Xin — and the mine claim that got away. 



THE SCHNEIDERS 117 



IRENE WERRE (b. 1924) (8.13) 

B. Oct. 12, 1924 to 
Harold, Rita (Henderson) 
Werre; m. optometrist 
Harlan Lee, May 26, 1946, 
in Fairfield, Mont.; c. 
Carol (Tamang) , (Linda 
Balyeat) , Dale and Allen. 
The Lees live in Great 
Falls, Mont. 

Newlyweds in 194 6 




Norlk'Side of Broadway, West From Main ocT. it- us 

.... 




Irene's great-grandmother, Mary Barnard, ran a cafe in 1880s 
Butte at site of second building from right. Meals: 75 cents. 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



CHARLES WERRE (b. 1928) (8.12) 
Oil refinery unit operator, b. June 3, 1928, Alhambra, 

Calif., to Harold and 
Rita (Henderson) Werre; 
m. Barbara Nicholson on 
Dec. 31, 1959. Barbara 
works as a political 
coordinator for Republi- 
can state Assemblyman 
Gerald Felando. 

The Werres live in 
Harbor City, Calif. 




Chuck and Barbara, 1985 



1870s map of 
ranch of L.A. 
(circled) , 
Chuck 



Montana 
Barnard 
who Vas 
Werre * s 



great-grandfather 



1876: Will 
of Luther 
Barnard' s 
father, 
Martin M. , 
listing 
wife Sarah, 
children, 
Luther, 
A. Wayne, 
Elliot, 
Guy, Elvira, 
Annette, and 
Amarette 



THE SCHNEIDERS 

if. . (ffJjfT 





'^^_tA 



1894: The 
miner's lament 



1895: Montana 
Moog Cox was 
a widow 



1920: Deer 
Lodge town 
directory 
lists widows 
of Barnard 
brothers 



We regret to leara the placer properties 
of Albert Moog, near Three Forks, are 
not turning out us he expected from the 
way they prospected. 

ME SILVER STATE. 



— rnUULwl bf'Jif Bii.»b» Atati 

P nt.'t.Mng CO-, 

Etkrt ,. "VFkdkxadaV"" kmaxoort. 

Dated: October 0,^895. 

— 1 

Mr«. Muutfttia Cm unU lililo ui 1 1 (Mine 
over from CuMe Sundnv. lu vU:i »:t!i 
her m.itbrr, Mr*. L. A. I-nrnartl. in ibit 
city. 



MANTLE&WARREN.^l 



1 3NT S XT Ft A. 1>X O D . 

Bepresent4ti7« AxerlcAn 
English Insuranes Coinpaaiei. 



6S0 



R. L. POLK & CO'fl 



Barnard Antiie M (will Anthony W), res e s Main, n of Sixth. 
Barnard Mary (wid L A), res n w cor E and Ninth. 



118 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 

JEANETTE SCHNEIDER (18397-1910) (8.14) 
B. 1839? Vasbeck, Germany; m. Charles Bickenbach (1837- 
1908) on Nov. 20, 1862 in Burlington Iowa; c. Henrietta (b. 
1864?), Frederick William (1866-1924), Frank (1867-1931), Otto 
(b. 1870?), Leroy (b. 1879?); d. June 11, 1910, Albert Lea, 
Minn. 

This, we believe, was the sister who emigrated from 
Vasbeck to America with Mary Schneider (Barnard) . 

Jeanette lived in Iowa in the early 1860s (as did William 
Schneider) , and after marrying harness-maker Charles 
Bickenbach in Burlington, Iowa, in 1862, she and her husband 
moved to the Albert Lea area (where more Schneiders lived) . 



C/i ic^fcf Jkt ?jL « , c'C e i.PVi 






i '■' 



flu* . £c *i /?<£?. 



f §fra **. S?U 






ai»** % £/ *&/*£%. 



Record of 1862 Bickenbach-Schneider marriage in Iowa 
Still later, she resided in Butte, Mont., near Mary 
Barnard. After Jeanette 's death, two of her children, Frank 
and Frederick, moved to Long Beach, Calif., where Mary Barnard 
had also moved. And the Barnards and Bickenbachs often 
visited in Long Beach. 



THE SCHNEIDERS 119 

WILLIAM SCHNEIDER (1833-1906) (8.15) 
Cabinet-maker, Justice of the Peace, Civil War veteran, 
brother of Mary Barnard, b. Oct, 27, 183 3 to Johann, Elisabeth 
Schneider, m. Julia Bramer, March 28, 1860, Farmington, la., 
c. Emma (Gates), George A., Emilie, Janette, Matilda 
(Copelin) , Walter S., Louis H. , William C. , William. F. , 
Edward, Sarah Carolina, d. April 18, 1906, Pasadena, Calif. 

Julia was born March 28, 1842 in New Orleans to Carl and 
Henriette (Hunke) Bramer (sometimes spelled Bremmer) . Her 
father was a Methodist minister. She and William moved to 
Albert Lea, Minn., after the Civil War, and then to Pasadena, 
Calif., in 1888. She devoted herself there to church and 
charitable causes. She died Jan. 12, 1923 in Pasadena. 

NATOIB AM^TPHOH (DIE WHMa&TPlE, 

Skit of lotos, fa $ra fltkntg— ss. 

I X^7l>?Z 4^ sV' /^2^7-rz^ Clerk of the District Court, 
in nnd for the County and State aforesaid, do hereby certify that /fcS*/* &*'-*> 

(Vsrtsf c£c*s ^^_ a native of Jv??4'4-^C4?0 

personally appeared in open Court, and took upon himself the oalh of Natur- 
alization, nnd that he would support the Constitution of the United States, 
nud the State of Iowa, and that he renounced and ahjurcd forever nil alle- 
giance and fidelity to every Foreign Prince, Potentate, Slnle or Sovereignty 
whatever, nnd particularly the A/vetf sfr/t*^'**. , <2torct^*c/l//'<&''<>** t ol 

whom he wns a lawful subject. 

In testimony wherof I have hereunto set my hand and^ 
nflixcd the seal of said Court, at Kcosauqiio, this /f- 

day of ?~?ict^ — •■« — « A. I)., I8»^ 

Renouncing fidelity to foreigners, esp. that King of Prussia 



THE SCHNEIDERS 121 




Left: Julia and Emma, 
1865. Photo sessions, 
because they were so 
infrequent, were seen 
as serious occasions 
the results as doc- 
uments to be handed 
down from generation 
to generation. 

Below: William 
Schneider farm (arrow) 
in Minnesota, 1878. 
Other Schneiders 
(Henry, Charles and 
Frederick) were near- 
by. 

Previous page: Pvt. 
William Schneider, 
all 5-feet-l-inches 
of him, poses in 
studio shot as one 
of the most heavily 
armed men in the Union 
Army. 






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! i .l. ^ . •y /^-Hr- - '-y 



122 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



• William Bcbihu dm was bom In Germany in 
lft^V received "a common school education and 



S 



g 

is 

I- 

c> i 

** " 

£ 

J5 



to 



learned the cabinet maker's, trade in hU natiTe 
oonntrj. In 1858 be came to America and 
worked at bU trade for two jeara at Batavia, 
New-Jfork, then came to Farrolngton, Iowa, and 
resided aix ytsam. He wna married in 1860 to 
Jnlia Bruman, wbo wan born in Now Orleana, 
where ber father wae the first German Methodist 
preaober. 8be oaroe to Iowa ^ when young, and 
there received her education. Her father died 
when ahe was three years old, and her mother 
now lire* in thw 8tate. In 1881, Mr. Bohneider 
enlisted in Company B, of the Third Iowa Cav- 
alry, and aerred sixteen morjtha; was then dis- 
charged in Memphis, Tenneaoecr for disability, 
and rwtnrned to his home in Iowa. After a abort 
lime he removed to Pickerel Lake, and located in 
6o?Qoa sevens where be now resides. He owna 



thTeTlrundrw and sixty-five acrea of land, with 
two hundred Improved, and has a new Urge 
brick bouse and a good bam. He baa held every 
local office except constable, and i* now clerk of 
bia aobool district. Ha organised the flrai Sab- 
bath school in this part of tbc town, bimaelf and 
wife being members of the German Methodist 
church. Mr. and Mrs. Schneider have had nine 
children, seven of wbCm are living; Emma H„ 
aged twenty years; George A*, eighteen ; Matilda, 
twelve"; Sarah IJL, ten; Willie IL, eight; Walter 

8^ six; and Edward H., fonr. Annie J. died at 
the ag<t_at ooe year, and William F. at the ags of 

ooe year and four months, and both art buried in 
the cemetery near their home. Emma, tba oldest 
child beoams deaf from the effects of soar let 
fever, and when tan years old entered the Fari- 
bault institute, and in scTeo years graduated. 
Biography of Minnesota pioneer William Schneider 



THE SCHNEIDERS 12 3 



TRAILS M A G A Z I S £ 



TEE HALF WAY HOUSE 
and George A. Schneider, Moustaineer 

George Schneider, ill and in search of a 
milder climate than that of hi? birthplace. 
Albert Lea. Minnesota, cam- to Pasadena in 
1S?6 and a year later was joined bv a sister, 
Matilda (Mr;. Frank B. Copeiin}.' Then i.-i 
March or 18b8,the entire Schneider farr.:!\ 
followed, buiiding a home in North Fa-ade 



Jena 
b -,:h 



The following year or perhaps IS-' 

Cjr. "_'p ind Mr'i'Ha. s-:ki ■•-.' l*>i" '-.:. v*« .'•• 
rcotmtain a.r. spent tr.e summer w;t~. tr.at old 
rr.'-ur.taineer. Cap Hennice: at Ker.nije: 
Fiats. George, who had he:orne quite a noted 
hunter before leaving Minnesota, scon re- 
gained his prowess, as game wa^ plentiful ani 
deer and wild cats were often added to the 
small game which fell to his rif.e. Ke aiso 
trapped foxes and ki'.ied many rattlesnake-. 

He later acquired a few burros, became 
expert at parking and stayed nn at Henn : ger's 
for three years, much improved ir health and 
by this time a confirmed mountaineer. 

A timber tract of loO acres, adjoining Her- 
the east, had been filed en bv a man 



n:ge* s on 
named Curtis 
killed. Schnei 
from the \\l A 



wr.o was 



later 



a;;iden:all\ 



der bought the reiir ju:sriment 
ow, renltd on the lard for him- 



self, and leaving Henniger's built a ;m .11 
board cabin near what is now known a> ld:e 
Hour Junction or Turnout 14, the first Half- 
wax House. I am not sure of the date h„t 
recall that he was living there the. year oi Cap 
Henniger's death in 1 S°4. 

A bullet hole through the door often aroused 
the interest of visitors. It w-as made bj train 
robbers known as the Juhn-on G.inj who. 
after holding up a Southern Pacific train at 
Roscoe, in the San Fernando Valley. pa>sed 
the cabin on their way to a hide-out in the 
mountain--. Luckily, George had cone to town 
tor supplies and didn't meet the desperado.- 

but found their calling card on his return. 

While the Toll Road was being built and 
improved, George packed water and supplies 
for the workmen and on one trip his burros 
were stampeded by a female mountain lion 
with two cubs. 

About 1897, he started the larger house 
farther ud the road which soon became known 



as Schneider's Camp or the Half-way House. 
This was quite an undertaking as his health 

Trails magazine piece on mountain man George Schneider 
1912), William's son and operator of Mount Wilson camp 



was not the be-t and he had little monev to 
work with. It took a whole summer to pack 
in the material on burro back and considerable 
ingenuity to negotiate that crooked trail with 
glass doors, six foot windows, brick for the 
ch;mne\ and finally the successful transporting 
of the 24 foot timbers which today support the 
front porch. Swivel pack saddles were de- 
vised, with rollers on winch to slide the long 
timbers back and forth, sometimes far out 
over the canyon at sharp turns of the trail. 

The house, two storie> high, with a two 
story porch on three sides was completed 
about lo'9S, and here, with the assistance of 
h.s sister. Mrs G'pelin, he served lunches and 
soft drinks and rented rooms to tho»e who 
traveled the trail. As work on the toll road 
progressed, large crews of workmen we-e 
camped there and, at times, groups of fire 
fghters who had been hastily recruited in the 
valley to fight several mountain fires. 

At the opening of the deei season it was the 
headquarters for hunters who knew Sci.neidt: 
as a great hunter h:mse!t. I can remember 
them well, shooting at the mark and talking 
guns, their favorite target, a black frying pan. 
hung in the center of the white rock slice 
near Buzzard's Roo^r. and 400 yards away. 
It took a good shot to hit the pan and spirts 
of dust told when the\ missed. 

As the road was widened, mule and burro 
trains gave way to horse drawn vehicles and 
astronomers and scientists came from afar to 
the observatory on Mount Wilson, stopping 
for refreshment at the Half-way Hou-e. Per- 
haps the must noted of these visitors was the 
great Iron Ma-ter himself, Andrew Carnecie. 
whose millions have since made permanent 
provision for the Mount \Vii>on Observatory 
and its staff. 

On moonlight nights, especially Saturd.i>s. 
there were parties oi hikers arriving at all 
hours. It was quite the thing to go up by 
moonlight and I noticed that many of these 
folk were from a distance or from abroad, 
while on the other hand, many who have lived 
long in this vicinity have never been up the 
mountain. 

George Schneider's Half-way House was 
popular with mountain folk and many are 
these who recall it with pleasant memories. 
After 2bout a dozen years his health failed 
and he came to his mother's home in Pasadena 
where he died in 1912 at the age of 48. Thus 

(1864- 



124 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 




Mountaineer George Schneider (middle) at Mt. Wilson 



TRAILS M A G A Z I S £ 

passed the last and perhaps the youngest of 
the mountain pioneers who built trails and 
cabins, developed water and helped to make 
our mountains accessible to the public. 

The house which he built at such a sacrifice 
of strength and under such difficulties is the 
only one standing of seven buildinzs which, at 
one time, stood along the Mount Wilson road. 

On the east bank of Eaton's Canyon, at the 
foot of the old toll road, stood the first Toll 
House. Dew Drop Inn, and just above, where 
the road turned east, was a corrugated iron 
storehouse. Next came Henniger's house, long 
ago replaced, then the Schneider cabin at Idle 
Hour Junction and just above it, the Half- 
wav House. 



About a mile below the summit, in the 
saddle between Mount Wilson and Mwunt 
Harvard, many old-timers will remember 
St.'el's Camp, later known as Martin's Camn. 
which was built before the hotel building': on 
the peak. Then a little storehouse, farther 
up. for the West Fork Resorts and lastly the 
old log Casino, southwest of the present hotel. 
All are now gone e.vcept the Hill-'™ a; House 
and the toll road itself is a thing of the past, 
replaced by the new high-gear highway from 
Angeles Cre<t. It is said that the Count) 
will widen and improve the old road to Hen- 
niger's Flats which, if true, is welccme news 
to us all, but the old Mount Wilson Trail 
and the Toll Road which replaced it will 
soon be only memories, passing out with tho=e 
who built and loved them. 



THE SCHNEIDERS 125 




66 



PASADENA 



COMMUNITY BOOK 



MRS. MATILDA SCHNEIDER COPELIN Remembers: 

. . . "Half-Way House" Her Brother Operated 

Mrs. Matilda Copelin, who lives at 83 years of age in the Pasadena Home 
for the Aged remembers clearly the events of two adventurous years — 1897 
and 1898 — which she spent with her brother, George Schneider, while he 
built the Half-Way House on what became the Mt. Wilson Toll Road. The 
two-story frame house stood on stilts against an embankment on a 160 acre: 
timber claim that her brother had acquired on the southern slope of Mount 
Wilson. Mrs. Copelin recalls, — "I put on all the laths where I could reach and 
painted all of the floors." 

After the toll road was completed in 1891, Half-Way House or Schneider's 
Camp, became a stop-over for hikers and horseback riders who were makingi 
the nine-mile trek from Altadena to the top of Mt. Wilson. In summer its cool 
porches and rooms welcomed hikers who had tramped the four hot and dusty 
miles from the toll house, which was located on Foothill Boulevard east oft 
Allen Avenue. 

All of the materials for the Half -Way house were packed in on two burros. 
George Schneider rigged up pack saddles with rollers which enabled the saddles 
to move as the burros made the sharp turns in the ascent, and allowed the long 
planks to jut fai out over the steep canyons. Mrs. Copelin traveled the narrow 
trail by horseback, muleback or on a burro, and sometimes she hiked, too. 
"I never used a saddle," she says, "only a blanket strapped onto the animal." 

After Mrs Copelin married and settled in Pasadena, her brother continued 
to play host to weary wayfarers at the Half -Way House. His most distinguished 
visitor probably was Andrew Carnegie on a trip to see the telescope his money 
had financed. When her brother left the Half-Way House to Mrs. Copelin at 
his death in 1912, she kept it open at times by renting it. 

In time the toll road was smoothed out for motorists who did not object to 
its steep ascent. But eventually — just as it had supplanted the old Wilson 
Trail — the road was forgotten by motorists who spun along the Angeles Crest 
Highway to the top of Mount Wilson. 

William Schneider's daughter Matilda recalls Mt. Wilson 



days 



12 6 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



T^1<^1<>^<>^C^ '_«>Q ~<>-e ~<^^ 



WALTER SCHNEIDER, 
•William's son, was a 
painter, a clarinetist 
who played in 3 3 Rose 
Parades, a botanist, and 
a poet ("We live in 
heart-throbs, joys and 



Scrap book Tells 
Citv*» Hislorv '?' 

m • 

By C Fred Shoop 



'I 



tt 



s. 



Who Remember? 
Salter if. Schneider. Painlcr? 



This coicrr..-. evolved like a main reaction yam. 
It ail heron last -.vc-ok wfcea I received a telephone r-2 
from Soul-. S.r. Gabr:?!. a*kin; me if I had ever hearc cf 

tears,/ And tho' our Walter S. Su-.r.^cer and if I. 

knew of anv relatives still livin;; j j ? t once 'ir-ked hi.Ti - 3 •-" 

bodies note the !*?• » tafc »" 1 * atere ^i V*! 1 * 1 LTBfcmalta Church a: -ja. 

^^ UJ .<=^ " u, - c UJ -"= : ceivin? an oid scrap-book wftica'cc.-r.cr of Fair Oaks and C-es:- • 

her husbar.d had recently found. :--j t . j ohnr.ed Helen K?ir-. 

years,/ Our souls must Pasadena Star News, circa I9 60 



ever onward go,/ Must ever, always greater grow. 

The scrapbook mentioned above has never been found. 




\MX TiU 5e4U^c&?~ /ted* iTcu/k^ 1^- . 



m -»— - t* 



George's 1901 photo of his modest Minnesota schoolhouse 



THE SCHNEIDERS 127 



WILLIAM E. SCHNEIDER (b. 1918) (8.17) 
Musician, school teacher, farmer, actor, b. Dec. 11, 1918, 



in Pasadena to William Charles and 




Bill, Norma Jean (top) with (middle row) 
Billy, Ron and Laurie Purdue, and (bot- 
tom) Laurie and Beverly (Brooks) , Claire. 



Isabella (McAdam) 
Schneider, m. 
Audrey Claire 
French (1923-) ; 
children: Claire, 
Beverly, William 
E. , Laurie; m. 
(2) Norma Jean 
Durham. 

Incredibly, of 
the 10 children 
of Wm. Schneider 
(1833-1906), only 

one William C- 

— bore a son. 
That was William 
E. Schneider. 

Bill hosts a 
cable TV show, 
"Past, Present 
and Future" in 
Ventura, Calif. 



128 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

CLAIRE MARIE SCHNEIDER (b. 1948) 8.18 
Schoolteacher, b. July 27, 1948, Ventura, Calif., lives 
in Ramona, Calif. Claire, whose genealogical research helped 
achieve a breakthrough in the Schneider line, has three 
siblings: Beverly, a certified public accountant who lives in 
Jacksonville, Fla., Laurie Purdue, who runs a copy machine 
shop, and William, a diesel mechanic. 




Descendants of Johann Friedrich Schneider in Minnesota, July, 
1985: Franklin Lindeman (left), Elmer Schneider, Muriel 
Schneider Lindeman, Freida Schneider and William Schneider 





-.->> 



Therese Blesbois on an outing in the 1890s 



CHAPTER NINE 



LES BLESBOIS: Wine-Makers in Chateau Country 




Henry III 



We trace the Blesbois to Blois, a 
chateau town south of Paris. It is famed as 
the spot from which Joan d'Arc set out in 
1429 to lift the British siege of Orleans. 
It was also the site of the murder of the 
Duke de Guise by Henry Ill's men in 1588. 





•♦* ♦ • *#** • mu ft 
ML 

If-J «A 




LES BLESBOIS 131 



BLESBOIS LINE 
Source: Family records 



Refer to: 



9.0 Louis Desire Blesbois (1837-1900) 
m. Marie Antoinette Joly (1835-1895) 10.8 
c. Therese Cecile Blesbois (1872-1928) 9.1 
c. Georges Blesbois (1871-1960) 9.2 
c. Marie Antoinette Blesbois (1876-1967) 9.3 
c. Octave Blesbois (1867-1917?) 9.5 
c. Blanche Antoinette Toupet (1867-1960) 10.9 

9.1 Therese Cecile Blesbois (1872-1928) 

m. Albert Moog (1866-1959) 7.1 

c. Marie Moog (b. 1912) 7.3 

c. Albert Moog Jr. (b. 1915) 7.4 

9.2 Georges Blesbois (1871-1960) 
m. Mathilde Blesbois (1885-1940) 

c. Robert Blesbois (1907-1986) 9.6 

c. Jean Blesbois (19127-1938?) 

9.3 Marie Antoinette Blesbois (1876-1967) 
m. Daniel Jordan (1870-1945) 

c. Francois Jordan (b. 1906) 9.4 

9.4 Francois Jordan (b. 1906) 

m. Eleanor Thomas son (b. 1918) 

9.5 Octave Blesbois (1867-1917?) 

9.6 Robert Blesbois (1907-1986) 
m. Odette Berquin 

c. Francois Blesbois (b. 1947) 9.7 

c. Jean Pierre Blesbois (b. 1948) 9.8 

9.7 Francois Blesbois (b. 1947) 
m. Brigitte Fouquier (b. 1952) 
c. Marc Blesbois (b. 1976) 

c. Marie Blesbois (b.1984) 

9.8 Jean Pierre Blesbois (b. 1948) 
m. Martine Gr asset 

c. Edouard Blesbois (b. 1979) 
c. Victoire Blesbois (b. 1981) 
c. Veleda Blesbois (b. 1987) 



13 2 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



LOUIS DESIRE BLESBOIS (1837-1900) (9.0) 
Wine merchant, b. 1837, Blois; mil. duty (Antibes, 1859), 
m. Marie Antoinette Joly; c. Marie Antoinette (Jordan) , 
Georges, Octave, Therese Cecile Maria (Moog) , d. 1900, Blois. 

His business was wiped out during the Franco-Prussian War 
(1871-72) , according to family accounts, when the French army 
commandeered his warehouses and transformed them into 
hospitals. His casks of wine were destroyed. A fun-loving 

individual, "he did 
not always spit out 
the wine he tasted," 
a grandson, Maurice 
Daviau, recalled 
hearing. 





Papa with Marie Antoinette, Georges 



LES BLESBOIS 13 3 



THERESE CECILE BLESBOIS (1872-1928) (9.1) 
Artist, teacher, lecturer; b. Dec. 16, 1872 in Blois to 
Louis and Marie (Joly) Blesbois; m. Albert Moog, Oct. 9, 1911, 
in Wallace, Ida., c. Albert Jr. and Marie (Harvey); d. May 3, 
1928, Glendale, Calif. 

Therese Blesbois taught French in Germany before coming 
to Louisville, Ky. , in 1900. Later, the usually-elegantly- 
dressed Therese roughed it for a while in a tent in the 
frontier town of Seattle. There she apparently met Albert Moog, 




Always fashionable Therese (with lorgnette, second from left) , 
and sister Marie Antoinette (center) sailing to America, 1900 



13 4 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

Family lore 

says that Al ' s 

older sister Mary 

was so concerned 

about the virtue 

of a "French 

woman" that she 

took the train 

to New York to 

check her out with 

her sister, Marie 

Antoinette. 

Therese later 

lectured at the 

Ebell Theater and 

was honored by the 

French for her 

service in World 

War I (see 

page 144) . 

Atlantic City, 
1902, (right) in 
colorful outfit 
she made herself. 

On next page: 
A painting that 
Therese dedicated 

. . . M to my 
little girl" 





LES BLESBOIS 13 5 




-L./ 



13 6 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



GEORGES BLESBOIS (1871-1960) (9.2) 

Wine merchant, publisher, bicycle racer, b. April 3, 

1871, Blois, to Louis Desire and Mary Antoinette (Joly) 

Blesbois, m. Mathilde Blesbois, c. Robert, Jean, d. Nov. 26, 

1960 in Meudon, France. Georges, who competed in several 

long-distance races as 
a youth, was said to 
have pedaled at least 
six kilometers a day 
until he was 85. His 
grandchildren still 
have one of his racing 
bicycles, which sports 
wooden tires. 












J 



Georges, he of the 
flamboyant mustache 



His son, Jean 



LES BLESBOIS 137 

MARIE ANTOINETTE BLESBOIS ( 1876 (?) -1967 ) (9.3) 
Teacher, b. June 28, 1876 (?) , Blois, to Louis Desire and 

Marie (Joly) Blesbois, m. July 18, 1902, to Daniel Jordan in 

New York City, c. Francois; d. Oct. 9, 1967, Baltimore, Md. 

Barely 5 feet tall, this sister of Therese came to 

America in 1900, meeting her future husband aboard the ship, 

according to family lore. 




Marie Antoinette (left), accompanying her sister Therese on 
the mandolin. Therese captioned this photo for her children: 
"Why mother had indigestion see her stylish small waist." 



13 8 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

The Jordans spent their summers in the Adirondacks (near 
Lake Placid, the site of the 1980 Winter Olympics) , where 
Daniel practiced his hobby of amateur photography. 

One family mystery: Marie Antoinette and her sister Therese 
occasionally added the title, de 1'Archerie, to their last 
names. Francois Jordan believes that "this was a little joke 
the sisters had together." The title translates roughly as 
"place where you keep your bows and arrows." 

PROF. DANIEL JORDAN | 

Retired Educator H»d Served at; 
Columbia and Annapolis 

OLD FORGE. N. Y, March 25J 
t.-F> — A funeral service was held to-j 
day for Daniel Jordan, "retired pro-' 
feasor, who had served on the far-, 
ulties of Columbia University and! 
the United States Naval Academy] 
at Annapolis. He wai a co-found- 
er of L'Alllanre Frajiraise He 
died Friday at the ag« of 7.V 

Born In Montbcllnrd. Frniii p. a 

son of the Rev Coeaiir Jordan. 

Lutheran minister. Pro! <*iini ir .lor* 

■ Ian rime to this country in IMi.'i 

He wni a graduate Qf Cohiinhtn. 

'whore he was later Assistant Pro- 

I fessor of Romance Languages be- 

i fore becoming Profeaaor of th'* 

isame subject at the Naval Arad- 

Jemy. He retired in 1M2. During 

!the first World War. he served in 

| France for two years. 

Sinca.1900 Professor Jordan and 
[his wife, the former Mile. Bles- 
i borts de l'Archerie of Blots. Franca, 
have made their nummtr home on 
I Fourth Lake of the Fulton chain. 
and were well-known in the central 
I Adirondack*. 

Dan and sister Blanche in Canada; Besides his widow, be leaves a 

His death merited an article in son. Comdr. F. C. B. Jordan. USN. 
New York Times on March 26, 1945. 'now in the Pacific are»» 




LES BLESBOIS 13 9 



CPT. FRANCOIS JORDAN (U . S . N . -ret . ) (b. 1906) (9.4) 

Navy commander, businessman, b. Nov. 9, 1906, New York 
City, to Daniel and Marie 
Antoinette (Blesbois) Jordan, 
m. Eleanor Evans Thomasson, 
Oct. 10, 1940. They live in 
Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. 

Francois, a graduate 
of the U.S. Naval Academy 
in Annapolis, commanded the 
Cortland, an attack 
transport, and the Chukawan, a 
fleet oiler, during World War 
II. 

He was awarded the French p- 
Legion of Honor. Later, he ^^ 
served as a naveil attache in 
Paris and also held diplomatic * 
posts in London and Tokyo. 

Francois is an avid 
amateur radio operator. 




With his mother, circa 1920 



Tf 




Francois and Eleanor, 
and his mother, 1957. 



14 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 







Cousin Marie Moog 
snapped young 
Jordan on leave, 
circa 1930. 






OCTAVE BLESBOIS (1867-1917?) (9.5) 



Wine merchant, b. 1860s, m. Jermaine ?, c. Renee, d. 
1917? The son of Louis Desire Blesbois, little is known of 
him though nephew Francois Jordan remembers him as "big, 
handsome and a helluva nice guy." 



LES BLESBOIS 141 



ROBERT BLESBOIS (1907-1986) (9.6) 
Publisher; b. 1907, Blois, to Georges, Mathilde Blesbois; 

m. to Odette Berquin, Nov. 26, 

1938; c. Francois, Jean Pierre; 

d. Dec. 1986, Meudon, France. 

Robert was captured by the 

German Army during World War II 

and released in 1945. 

His American cousins 

remember him fondly for his hu- 
mor and generosity during their 

visits. 




The young violinist, circa 
1930; with sons Francois 
(right) and Jean Pierre; 
mother Mathilde (above) . 




142 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 



FRANCOIS BLESBOIS (b. 1947) (9.7) 
Computer executive, b. Aug. 4, 1947, in Paris, to Robert 
and Odette (Berquin) Blesbois, m. Brigitte Fouquier on July 
13, 1973 in Meudon; c. Marc and Marie. They live near Paris in 
one wing of a restored castle in Verrieres-le-Buisson. 




Wielding his great-grandfather's 130-year-old sword 
v 





Marie 



Marc 



LES BLESBOIS 14 3 



JEAN PIERRE BLESBOIS (b. 1948) (9.8) 
Lawyer, b. Dec. 24, 1948, in Paris to Robert and Odette 
(Berquin) Blesbois, c. Edouard, Victoire and Veleda. Jean 
Pierre and Margaret and their family live in Paris. 
E-VtC L or 



Jean Pierre's 

personalized 

announcement 

of his and 

Margaret's 

child, 

Veleda 













With the other thinkers atop Notre Dame 



14 4 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 




Harvey-Blesbois reunion in Paris, 1986: Standing: Jean Pierre 
(left) , Margaret, Tia, Francois, Marie; Seated: Odette (left) , 
Victorie, Edouard, Robert. 







lq!4- 




PRESIDENT WILSON 



gjff*.cvu*iMct.Au souvenir de la Guerre wmcm. «x» 

\ip coHAbCi'-'ce de I CEuvrc du Prrsorm-ef de Guerre " 




Certificate of appreciation for Therese Blesbois Moog from 
French and U.S. governments for her work during World War I. 



CHAPTER TEN 
LES JOLY: The Boatman in the Top Hat 

Therese Blesbois (Moog) , a daughter of Marie Antoinette 
Joly (Blesbois) , traced the Joly line back to a Pierre Joly, 
born in 1555 (see page 91) . The first Joly that we have much 
knowledge about, however, is Jean Baptiste Joly, Marie 
Antoinette's father. He was a boatman. 

JOLY LINE 

Source: Therese Blesbois Moog. 

Refer to: 

10.0 Pierre Joly (1555-?) 

10.1 Olivier Joly (7-1642) 

10.2 Pierre Joly (1638-1664) 

10.3 Jacques Joly (1652-1715) 

10.4 Phillipe Joly (7-1751) 

10.5 Jean Joly (7-7) 

10.6 Jean Baptiste Joly (1790-7) 

10.7 Jean Baptiste Joly (1807-1878) 
m. 7 

c. Marie Antoinette Joly (1835-1895) 10.8 

10.8 Marie Antoinette Joly (1835-1895) 
m. (1) Jules Toupet (1834-67) 

c. Blanche Toupet (1867-1960) 10.9 

m. (2) Louis Desire Blesbois (1837-1900) 9.0 

c. Therese Cecile Blesbois (1872-1928) 9.1 

c. Marie Antoinette Blesbois (1876-1967) 9.3 



146 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



JOLY LINE (cont.) 



c. Georges Blesbois (1871-1960) 
c. Octave Blesbois (1860s?-1917?) 



9.2 
9.5 



10.9 Blanche Toupet (1867-1960) 
m. Joseph Daviau (1860-1938) 
c. Jeannette Daviau (1894-1972) 
c. Andre Jules Daviau (1899-1921) 
c. Henri Daviau (b. 1903) 
c. Maurice Daviau (b. 1905) 







Marie Harvey with cousins Henri (left) and Maurice in Blois 




*, >- »- 



LES JOLY 147 

Ihronoltfgicieu^amillt EHoli 



«. 




GtUv 



Jj « ttj^~ 



«Wrt ~- 1H.I 



Eloljr ou. :s_i 



•rl I 0m.u 







<3fclrr <&^ 



tAf«d: 



Sol 



t H-~ " 



ID ?H-i. j i r 



«,art & fj BM !(•< 



r» (if t^ltfl 

tut,*. 



^cltr «rc~o ^vJ cur ^ 






Eloign •'rrr-~Zt l *t A ' 



( 



-*<\ 






¥ 






« i. -.,-..;. 









£**. Boljj-. 



^j 



B^fct 



\ 



- * 



U\.a\1 



•--, 



clplm^JSolw&i** £$vlptr~^ Hole <&~jl {3 o'er 1^ 






148 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 

JEAN BAPTISTE JOLY (1807-1878) (10.7) 
Great-grandson Francois Jordan recalled that Jean 
Baptiste "ran 20 to 30 barges on the canals of Loire. My 
mother (Marie Antoinette Jordan) remembered how he always 

wore a high hat and how he would keep sandwiches and 

presents for his grandchildren inside." 



MARIE ANTOINETTE JOLY (183 5-1895) (10.8) 
B. 1835, Blois, to Jean Baptiste Joly; m. (1) Jules 
Toupet (1834-1867) , c. Blanche (Daviau) ; m. (2) Louis Desire 
Blesbois, c. Marie Antoinette (Jordan) , Georges, Octave, 
Therese Cecile Maria (Blesbois); d. Jan. 25, 1895, Blois. 




*c 




Daughter Blanche at 12 



Mother Joly 



LES JOLY 14 9 



BLANCHE TOUPET (1867-1960) (10.9) 
B. May 28, 1867, Blois, to Jules and Marie Antoinette 

(Joly) Toupet; m. Joseph Daviau 

(Sep. 2, 1860-May 10, 1938), d. 
Nov. 3, 1860. 

A vigorous woman even in 
her later years, she bicycled to 
Spain to escape the Nazis during 
World War II. 

Her children were Jeannette 

(1894-1972) , a schoolteacher 
for many years in Cairo, Egypt; 
Andre Jules (1899-1921), a 
photographer who died in an 
airplane crash; Henri (b. 
1903) , a retired accountant who 
lives in Bordeaux; and Maurice 

(b. 1905) , a retired soldier 
who lives in Blois. Several 
paintings of Therese 
Blesbois (Moog) hang in 
Maurice's house. 




Blanche/ Henri 
Jeannette in 1947 




Andre, circa 1918 



150 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 




4 



M^^-t Six 





H& 







< 



.** 




j 



vf 



^ 









S5 IN? 



^ 



■X 




^ 



1l 






^S4^*^4<H4*N' 






The 1820 will of Jesse Bell of Beaver Co., Penn., left James 
Bell, who was possibly the father of John Bell, $1 richer. 



APPENDIX 



151 



THE ADAMSES OF CONNEAUT AND COCHRANTON 
Roy Smith, public records, family Bibles.) 

BORN 



PEKN. 



(sources: 



DIED 



JAMES ADAMS 

■. Isabel Welden 




1734 
173* 




1824 

1*25 


c. Joseph 






1757 




1784 


Jacob 






1758 




1803 


William 






1760 




1805 


Jonathon 






1762 






Jesse 






1764 






David 






1766 




1787 


Lydia 






1768 




1847 


James 






1770 




1851 


JOHN 






1772 




1455 




'm. 


Ann Chambers 


1777 




1854 




c. 


James 

Joseph 

Jacob 


1803 










William R. (m. 


Eliz. Blair) 1809 


1864 






LYDIA 


1*13 




1889 






a. JOHN BELL 


(see page 


36) 








Isabel 


1806 




1856 






Sarah 


1812 










Mary 


1798 




1852 






Nancy (Couch) 








Isaac 






1774 




1783 


Welden 






1776 




1849 


Eli 






1780 






Levi 






1782 




1784 



THE BARNARVS OF CHATTAUQUA CO., N.Y., PORTER, WISC. , 
MONT, (source: public, family records): 



AND BUTTE, 



BORN 

MARTIN M. BARNARD 

m. Elizabeth (Benedict) 
m. (2) Sarah ? 

e. Luther A. (see page 102) 1835 
Anthony W. 1846 

m. (1) Jessie G. Addis 
m. (2) Annie Mary Hansen 1854 
c. Lillian 1871 
m. Ammon Hansen 
c. Ruby D. Hansen 1889 
Ida 1872 

m. Gus Bird 
Josephine 1874 
A.W. 
Guy (Porter, Wise.) 
Elliot (Missouri) 

Elvira (Anaitage) , (Dodge County, Wise.) 
Annette (Sale), (Colona, 111.) 
Amarette Wood (Calif.) 



DIED 



1176 



1883 

1919 

1930 
1956 
1956 
1914 
1960 

1959 



THE BELLS OF COCHRANTON, PENN 



JOHN BELL 

m. Lydia Adams 

c. 1. John 

2. Robert 

3 . George 

4. Joseph J. 

5. William T. 
6- Mary (Reed) 

7. Cooper Adams 

8. James S. 



N. (source: 


Roy 


Smith) 


BORN 




DIED 


1*07 




11*0 


1813 




1889 


1832 




1859 


1839 




1917 


1842 




1908 


1846 




1919 


1846 






1845 




1919 


1851 




1911 


1853 




1929 



Rob 


•rt Ball (tea 


alao 


page it) 


B. 


(1) 


Julia En 


si ine 


Danforth 


C. 


May 










D. 


Williaa 


lues 






C. 


Louis Paul laes 






Lona lies 








Robert 


Imes 




c. 


Bertie 






Gaorga Ball 






b. 


Eva 








c. 


Effa 










B. 


(1) — 


Sweetwood 




B. 


(2) Dr. 


A. L 


Fugard 




C. 


Harry Fi 


jgard 





152 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

BORW DIED 

1. John Ball 



1867 

1870 1897 

1859 1903 



Effa Fugard 
Marie Fugard 

4. Joseph J. Ball 

B. Margaret Thompson 
c. Ada 

b. Arthur W. Clothier 

c. Lyle Bell Clothier 

B. (1) Aay Corey 

B. (2) Althea Thompson 

c. Lyle B. Clothier Jr. 
Daisy 

b. Jerry Foster 
William 

b. Edith Holbrook 

c. Virginia 
Forest 
Margaret 
williaB Jr. 
Loren 
Vernon 

Raymond 1863 

b. Chloe Fizer 

c. Gaylord 
Beatrice 

a. Wallace Nicholson 

5. Williaa T. Bell 

b. Julia E. Shannon 

6. Mary A. Bell 

B. Williaa Reed 1838 

c. John A. Reed 1866 1933 
George W. Reed 1876 1915 
Elizabeth (Saith) 1870 , 1960 

B. James Andrew Saith 1871 1952 

e. Roy w. Smith 1901 (see page 43) 

c. Carl Reed Saith 1899 1958 

b. Mildred Sunderland 1909 

c. Elizabeth J. 1931 
Catherine L. 1934 
Jeanne Marie 1946 

7. Cooper Adaaa Ball 

b. Nannie Lowery 

c. John 

8. Jaaes S. Ball 

a. (1) Laura J. Hayes 1852 1883 

B. (2) Bertha Sickefouae 1945 

c. Anna L. 1877 1957 

a. Harry A. McCliaana 
c. Grace McCliBans 1901? 
James Hayes Bell 1879? 1962? 

a. Jane Douglas 

c. Jean 1967 

b. Henry Arnold 



APPENDIX 15 3 



HARVEYS 1 /HAP.PEP/STABOW CONNECTION (SCOTLAND 4 IRELAND) 
(source: records of Church of Latter-Day Saints) 

BORN DIED 

John Stobow 172 6 Irvine, Scotland 

m. Mary Semple 1733 (parnts: James S., Jean Paton) 

c. John Stabo 1755 Irvine, Scotland 

B. Barbara Campbell 16Junl763 (parents: John 

Campbell, Jean Brown) 
c. Annie Stabo 1789 Scotland 

B. James Harper 1784 (father: Stephen H.) 
c. Margaret Harper 1808 Dublin 1848 

■- Alexander Harvey 1S07 1141 (•■• p. 7) 

HARVEYS' LIGGAT/POSS CONNECTION (SCOTLAND I IRELAND) 
(source: records of Church of Latter-Day Saints) 

BORN 

David Liggat 1681 Blackbyre, Scotland 

a. Griz(s)el Dunlope) 1685 Abbey, Renfrew, Scotland 

12 Dec 1706 

c. Margaret Liggat 29Janl713 Govan, Lanark, Scotland 

a. Alexander Ross 1713 (son of Francis Ross, 

and Elizabeth Hattrig) 
c. Mary Ross 1746 

■. Alexander Barvie (see page 7) 
(Glasgow, Scot.) 

THE FICUARDSONS OF SENECA COUNTY, N.Y., AND RICHWOND/MEADVILLE, 
PENN. (source: genealogist Eugene Throop) . 

BORN DIED 

William Richardson 1786 12Aprl870 

a. Rhoda ? 1788 23Aprl866 

C. Almira (Wetael) lie* page 55) 

Hannah 1812 1860 

b. ? Joel/Jewell 

c. Josephine 
Rhoda 



Susan 


1830 






William Jerome 


1835 




1882 


B. Sarah Rainey 24Janl838 




28Aprl921 


c. Charles L. 


1860 




1861 


Fred L. 








Madge E. 








Lee Burt 


1863 




1936 


m. Lulu Pike 


1866 




1942 


Tryphena? 


1819 




1864 


m. Henry Baldwin 


1820 




1896 


c. Frank H. 


1845 




1859 


Lily 








m. Joseph 0. 


Childs 


1848 


1910 


Annette 








B. George Hotchkiss 


4Marl847 


28Sepl873 



THE SCHNEIDERS OF VASBECK, GERMANY, AND PICKEREL LAKE/ ALBERT 
LEA, MINN, (sources: Claire Schneider, Elmer Schneider*, Steve Harvey, 
family and public records) 

B ORN DIED 

JOHANN FRIEDRICH SCHNEIDER 23Aprl792cbr 777? 

ELISABETH ROHLE 29Marl797cbr 7777 

1. Frederick 5Marl820 260ctl887 

2. Baby girl 9Augl822 9Augl822 

3. Mary E. HJanl826 20Mayl872 

4. Charles Sr 240ctl823 17Febl879 

5. Christian W. 190ctl828 19Junl830 

6. Wilhelmine C. 1831 

7. William 270ctl833 18Aprl906, Pasadena 
a. Maria Henrietta 5AprlS3t JOctl»23, Lng Batch 
9. Maria? Jeanette? 5Novl839? 22Junl910 



154 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

SCHNEIDERS ( cont . ) 



BORN DIED 



Frederick Schneider 

m. Louisa 16Aprl822 Prussia 16Aprl911 

c. Fred 1856 Missouri 1924 

m. Lena Resting Janl859? 1941 

c. Bell AprlB86 

b. Ed(?) Brandt 

c. Muriel Brandt 
Ivy Brandt 

Ed Marl888 1947 

Victor Marl891 

Anne Augl889 1913 

William Octl893 1921 

Walter Sepl896 1954 

Paul Aprl897? 1981 

B. Edna ? 1934 

c. Donald 1934 

b. Bonnie Nesje 

c. Angela 1967 
John 1970 

Caroline i860 Mo. 

m. Andrew Stephen 
c. Milton Stephen 

B. Jessie Walker 
c. Marian Stephen 

b. Frederick Bangert 

c. Dianne, Mary Beth, Lowell, Paul 
Lois Stephen 

n. Roy Lundgren 
c. Steven, Rick 
Colene Stephen 

b. Donald Maiden 

c. John, Jim, Theresa 
Louise Stephen 

B. Elmer Hansen 
c. Mildred Hanson 
Evelyn Hanson 
Mae Stephen 

b. Percy Johnson 

c. Robert Johnson 
Clare Johnson 
Eugene Johnson 

Clarence Stephen 

b. Ella Sylbruid 

c. Harland Stephen 
c. Raymond Stephen 

Elmer Stephen 

Charles A. 15Aprl861 Mo. 18Novl933 

B. Selma Siebel 27Junl863 29Junl938 

c. Arthur Decl886 Mn. 1957 

B. Daisy Ler.z 1892 1947 

c. Alton 1911 Mn. 

b. Sereta Kelley 
Chester 1912 Mn. 

B. Evangeline Harvood 
Rollin 1915 Mn. 

a. Janet Kendrick 
Clinton 1917 Mn. 

B. Harriette Anderson 

c. Kathryn (Digalbo) 1948 
Mark 1950 

Mary (Emery) 1952 
Virginia 1920 

b. James Yeager 
Florence Augl888?Mn. 

a. Rev. George Scheider 
c. Maurice 
Adella 4Jull893, Mn 
B. Frank Lenz 1966 



APPENDIX 



155 



SCHNEIDERS (cont.) 



BORN 

c. Stanley Lenz 1918 

m. Idoris Bjerke Hanson 

c. Larry 1942 

c Lonny 1958 
Irvin Jull895 
m. Nora Jeffrey 
c. Janet 



Albert 
Louisa 



Richard 



m. Wash Bailey, 

c. Delia Bailey 

Art Bailey 

2. Baby girl Schneider 

3. Mary Elisabeth Schneider 

m. Christian Keuthe 2Mayl848 
c. Henry Keuthe 
*. Charles Schneider 8r. 
m. Johanna Kestling 
c. Charles Jr. 

m. Johannette 



28NOV1863 
1858? 



Mo. 
Mo 



3Marl820 

1852 

Janl854 



DIED 



1983 



30Mayl874 



Possum Hollow, Mo. 



1849 



Prussia 



Bertha (Pistorius) 1877 
Emma (Breamer) 1879 



Mayl886 Albert Lea 
26Decl889 Albert Lea 
8Decl898 
1968 
1962 



Mary 



Fred L. 



Caroline 

B. 

c. 



Janelle 



Albert 1881? 

m. Anna Schmidt 1886 
Frieda 1911 

Elmer 1919 (see footnote) 
Muriel 1916 

m. Franklin Lindeman 
c. Steven Lindeman 
David Lindeman 
Clarice Lindeman 
m. Vic Richardson 
c. Melanie, Craig 
Dean Lindeman 
Barbara Lindeman 
m. (1) Joe Borgan (dec.) 
c. Christine, Kevin, Amy 
m. (2) Michael McGoughan 
c. Paul, Patrick 
Elizabeth (Taris) 1883 
1888 
1890 

1854 N.Y. 
1849 
1876? 
1878 
1879? 



1953 
1950 



Ida (Breamer) 
Charles 



Henry Kuethe Sr. 
Charley Kuethe 
Lydia (Krueger) 
Henry Kuethe Jr. 
Otto Kuethe 
Fred Kuethe 1894 

Janl856 N.Y. 
Netta Behrends Marl864 
Clara Aprl891 

m. George Tavis 

c. Donald Tavis 
m. Matilda Smith 
c. Brenda, Carol, Carla 
Fred Novl893 

Mary (Wilke) Janl895 
Amelia (Hruska) Febl898 
Lydia (Drescher) (McMillan) Marl900 

c. Marion (Lunning) 



1976 

1967 

1936? 

1910 

1927 

1917 



Henry Steele Sr. 
Esther Steele 
Henry Steele Jr. 
Edward Steele 
Louise (Schmidt) 



1857? N.Y. 



1880 
1883 



1972 
1934 

1971 



1969 
1965 

1937 



156 



HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



SCHNEIDERS (cont) - 



BORN 



DIED 



Caroline (Pi»toriu») 
Ann* (Baer) 



1929 
1934 



1978 



1962 



l*drieb Xasting) 

HJanl923 Pasadena 

1889 
HJanl912 Pasadena 

1867 
2 7Sepl9 57Pasadena 

1941 
2 lAug 19 A 2 Pasadena 
21Augl92 4Pasadena 
s (St. Louis) 



SMayl954Pasade"» 
(4) Anna Heckler, (5) Anns Snoddy 
18Novl929, Sta. Barb, 
e. wa. B. llDecl»l»Pasad*na (■*• page 101) 
William F. 21Janl868 1869 

Edward 15Janl878,Mn. 190ctl904Pas 

Sarah Caroline lHarl872, Hn. 22Junel961, Saticoy 
•- Maria Harriett* 6cbn*id*r (Koog/ Barnard) (*ae page 102) 
*. Maria Jeanatt* (Biek*nbach7) (••• page 102) 

•Elmer Schneider has completed family tree of Charles 
Schneider Jr. ( 1852-1889 j ; for space reasons, early portions 
only are included here. 





Jana 1861 


N.Y. 




B. Fred Luettk* 1852 






c. Elvira (Ihnenn) 






Dora (Fink) 1899 






Fred Luettk* 1897 






Emma (Bangert) 






Louise (Sclimidt) 






Bertha (Heine) 1893 






Ella (Wacholz) 1894 






Sadie (Schmidt) 1895 




s. 


Christian wilbala Schnaldar 




t. 


vilhalaic* Christiana Schneider (a. 


Johann Pr 


7. 


Williaa Schneider 






B. Julia (Bramer) (Bremm-) 28Marl842 


N.O. 




c. Emma (Gage) 9Sepl862 


Farm. ,1 . 




George A. 22Febl864 


PkL.Mn. 




Emilie Janetta 20Mayl866, 


Mn. 




Matilda 24Aprl870, 


Hn. 




a. Frank B. Copelin 






Walter S. 14Febl876, 


Hn. 




Louis H. 5Janl883, 


Hn. 




b. Mary C. Broderick, Rose M. Eckle 




Williaa C. 19Aprl874, 


Hn. 




B. (1) ?; (2) Louise GrenJ 


.er, (4) A 




(3) Isabella McAdaml5Decl878 



THE HETSELS OF SCHAGHTICOKE, N.Y./ RICHMOND, 
PENN. (source: genealogist Doris Sheridan; Steve Harvey). 



BORN 



DIED 



GEORGE WTT8BL 1727/8 

a. Maria Barbara 1735 

1. Daniel Wetsel 1776 

B. Anna (Hannah) ? 1772 

a. Elizabeth Giff (Cliff )ord 1788 

c. Daniel 

Elizabeth 1817? 

a. Isaac Welling 1798 

Williaa (see page 50) 1804 

Jane E. 1812 

George H. 1817 

B. Henrietta Brown 1832 

c. Peter (Grandson: Myron Wetsel) 

Charles 

B. Eaaa Stllwcll 
c. George I. 
c. John H. 

B. Emily McLeod 
c. Margaret (Hetrick) 
c. John M. 
Clarantine 

1819 



Evaline 
Peter 



1824 
1832 
1848 
1821 
1853 

1887 
1881 
1872 

1»98 
1865 
1921 



1985 



1843 



WETSELS (Cont.) 



BORN 



APPENDIX 



DIED 



157 



c Sarah Lavinia? 1833? 



Caroline 
Christine 

a. Joseph Day 
Maria Ann Wetsel 

a. David Brownell 
John B. 
Margaret 



1802? 

1807 
1829? 



1773 
1773 



George Wetsel Jr. 

a. Hannah Fake 

c. John F. 

a. Harriet van Denburqh 
"*" ' 1811 

" aria 1802 

Margaret 1805 

Chrietopher Wetsel 1758 

a. Margarette Groberger 
c. George 1795? 

a. Elizabeth Lawyer 1791 
c. Mary M. 1319 

a. John L. Kroner 1820 
c. Helen Kromer 1849 

a. Charles E. Lee 1845 



Henry 
Maria 



a. Elsie Wolford 
a. Jacob Wethervax 
John Brayaan 
Maria Wolford 



Elizabeth 
a. 
Daniel 

a. 
Christopher 
Catherine 

a. William Richtayer 
Margaretta 179 3 

John Rttitl 
Josepb w«ts*l 

m. Elizabeth Fake 10Octl79l 
c. Mary Elizabeth 



1790 



1800 



1864? 



1873? 



1858 
1875? 



1853 
1852 



1866 
1873 
1890 
1825 
1842 
1825 
1885 
1907 
1876 
1908 
1904 



Margaret 

Hannah 

Joseph 

Jacob 

John 

George 

Christina 

Rebecca 

Daniel 

Philip 

Christina 

a. Seth Wheelock. 
(. Mary Wetsel 
a. John Baucus 
c. Henriette Baucus 
7. Elizabeth Wetsel 
a. Peter Sipperly 
c. George Sipperly 
c. Daniel Sipperly 
». Christina Wetsel 
a. Jacob Stover 
c. Gideon? 

Maria 



1777 
1772? 

1808 
1780 



1801 
1808 



1782 
1784 



1869 
1832 



1798 



1858 
1849 



1808 



158 HARVEY/MOOG ROOTS 



proitct,}* otitis it uieds - 

S4t4iftff«f£*KtUi ^^KAr^Z^ /?&• Cc^Jy $->'<* fy~ 

itflLt^jL *- I cut 









He of the "big, strong nose" and "ordinary lips" with "no 
missings": A translation of the 1853 emigration passport for 
William Schneider (1833-1906), brother of Mary Moog Barnard. 



liRJ 






L-i 



^C^ 






a. 






rr-» — 
Lrz. 




1876 map of East Fairfield Township, Pennsylvania, shows 
Cochranton farm of John Bell (circled at top) . Great- 
grandson Roy Smith now lives in his house. 



160 HARVEY /MOOG ROOTS 

MONTANA STANDARD, BUTTE, 



Buiie Pioneers 



AlDen Moog. Dorn in silver Bow 
in 1866, earliest, native-born liv- 
ing Silver Bow County white man 
—no data on Indians. Mr. Moog 
now resides in Los Angeles, but 
has sent congratulation to the city 
on its jubilee through L. R. Ed- 
wards, 922 E. First, was born 
wards, 922 East First, was born 
in Butte in 1877, two years before 
the city received its charter. He 
was employed for 50 years on the 
street cars and buses of Butte. 

Mrs. Annie C. Gavin, 1044 Mary- 
land Ave , came to Butte in 1881 
and has lived here since. She came 
lo the Mining City by stage from 
Dillon 

J. R. Reed, president of the 
Sherman and Reed Mortuary, ca..ie 
to Butte in 1883 and has lived here 
since. 

Louis Rosenstein, born in Vir- 
ginia City in 1876, came to Butte 
with his parents in 1880. His par- 
ents were Mr. and Mrs. Harris 
Rosenstein. 

Stanley H. Fraser, 1105 1 ,? Neva- 
da, came lo Butte in August, 1879, 
a year after . birth in Hastings, 
Minn. His father and mother later 
moved to the Big Hole Basin coun- 
try, residing there until 1882, when 
the family returned to Butte. Mr. 
Fraser has lived here ever since. 
Mrs. Anna Thomas, 222 Penn- 
sylvania Block, came to Butte in 
1887, and has lived here ever since. 
She is 82 years old 

Mrs Katie Mae Harris Maunder, 
211 Williams St., Walkerville, came 
to Walkerville 65 years ago from 
Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Nellie Slerbens, 32312 Ken- 
nedy, arrived here in 1886 and has 
lived here since. 

Andy Roden. 83, of 1046 W. Ga- 
lrna, has been a resident of the 
ciu since he was 16. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Berryman, 
Seattle, are here for "Homecom- 
ing Days." Mr. Berryman came to 
Butte in 1889 from England. His 
wife came here at a child in 1884. 
A visitor from Sheridan is Wn- 
mer Hall who came to Butte in 
1878, but who has been residing in 
Sheridan since 1928. He recalls 
many interesting yarns about Butte 
which were published in the Dia- 
mond Jubilee Edition of the Mon- 
tana Standard. 

Mrs. William P. Toy has been in 
the Mining City since 1885. She 
resides at 1916 Arizona. 
A 70-year resident of Butte is 



Mrs. Grace Toohey, 373 Curtis. 

Henry Pissot, 864 South Main, 82, 
came to the Mining City in '96. 

Sidney Hughes, 1839 Elm, a 
miner, is a native-born of the Min- 
ing City. He is 62 years old. 

Mrs. Margaret I. Vogel, 229 Pa- 
cific, who came to Butte in 1886 
from England, and who has resided 
here ever since, wrote the com- 
mitter: 

"The Diamond Jubilee Celebra- 
tion is a wonderful undertaking. I 
am a shutin, but wish I could take 
part in the festivities. I think it is 
grand that Butte is honoring the 
'oldtimers' with a picnic and 
dance." 

Another 70-year resident of Butte 
is Mrs. Maria Kerns who came 
to the Mining City when she was 
10 years old. "We came to Butte 
in a covered wagon from Weston, 
Idaho," she wrote, "We drove on 
Park Street to a point just this 
side of Meaderville. The Silver 
Bow Mill was operating at that 
time." 

John Nance, 943 Caledonia, ar- 
rived in Butte on Good Friday in 
April 1887. He has lived here ever 
since. Mr. Nance is 89, and an en- 
thusiastic Diamond Jubilee boost- 
er. 

Mrs. Edmondine Bertrand, 2119 
S. Arizona, came to Butte in '89. 
Mrs. Bertrand is now 72. 

Mrs. J. C. Mitchell, 2307 Harri- 
son, has resided here more than 
70 years. 

Mrs. Mable Sampson, 2216 Har- 
vard, 69, came here in '85 for a 
visit and has been here ever since. 
She is the widow of W. J. Samp- 
son, a blacksmith for years at the 
Leonard Mine. 

Mrs. Mary Stride, Salt Lake City, 
who may be here for the final days 
of the celebration came to Butte 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
James Stride in 1876 when she was 
10 years old. She left here in 1936. 

Richard Gartrell Sr., 826 N. Ex- 
lelsior, came to Butte in 1882, and 
has made bis home here since. 

Mrs. Bertha Louise SpecKbacher, 
854 S. Washington, has been a con- 
tinuous resident of Butte since 
1881 with exception of three years 
spent with her daughter in Cali- 
fornia. 

Mrs. J. Honeychurch. 1320 Jef- 
ferson, 86, came to Butte in 1895, 
has lived here since, and wrote, 
"I expect to live here always." 

Mrs. Dilla M. Zwicky, Whitehall, 
who came to Butte in 1878, and 
lived here for 60 years, wrote, "I 



JULY, 1954 

know when we all get together dur- 
ing this Jubilee it will bring many 
memories back to me." 

Mrs. Elizabeth Huotte, Phoenix 
Block, cane to Montana before the 
state was in the Union. She is 75 
and came to Butte in the late '70s. 

Harry Curran. here from Port- 
land. Mr. Curran was born here 
in 1883. He was a twin, and it is 
believed he and his brother, the 
late Frank Curran, were the first 
boy twins born in Silver Bow 
County. 

J. A Harrington, Boise, Id*ho, 
is another oldtimer who sends re- 
gards for Jubilee Days. He is a 
grandson of Rolla Butcher, who is 
credited with discovering the Alice 
mine in Walkerville. Mr. Har- 
rington was born in Deer Lodge, 
came to Butte in 1876 and spent 
his childhood, young manhood 
and much of his adult life here. 

Mrs. Richard T. Paull, 13 Rose 
Street, Walkerville, came to Butte 
in 1880. She was born in 1879, the 
year Butte received its city char- 
ter. 

A life-long resident of Butte is 
Dave Levy, 906 Sliver Bow Homes 

George V. Straszer, Zone Editor, 
L° s ^Tigele. Times, wrote, "My 
* a Juitr, W. C. Straszer, and I plan 
on being 'hom?' for the celeb'rati 
My father is air-»«ly-d^.re£i' 
of Butte, and I am a native so. 
of the Mining City." 

BUTTE'S STAR PUPILS, 
MINER, JAN. , 1878 



1. 9. unui, T«*eb'r 

48 l-C ITU KXBDUXD. 

JoeH l*ulcbw. . .«• t 

Li Hie ftriiu 9*J 

Umce Purler UK* 

Albert Moog....W. 

■rim*, ot tn» 

J«j- Orr M1.B 

AtMit Woner.. .VJ-6 
>lu)l>e I'ifcr...-, -TI4 

Lulu Ktusett WCJ 

Ro*4- SwifM.. .YM 
John Thornton . 4PC-J 
Llu>« TlarutM.tt. 
JuLt* Xri«fc....V&4 
Fnnda ■««■*.. JB.1 
X. A. Heaiaf*r..tn.» 
lita. Mj*nu»a. . Jf\\ 
M. C*T*a*itifa...tn-ft 
O. D.r v B*o..,.«.4 
Uuik *>»».... VJJ 
lint Uun«r «ML7 

C. Xt*bki te.4 

111* (Jopiuua *&-*■■ 



INDEX 


BARNARD 




Allen 101, 104-107, 112 


A 


A. Wayne 78, 106-110 




Elliot ff. 117 


ADAMS 


Lee 101, 104-107, 111 


Ann (Woodrow) 45 


Luther 74-82, 101-111 


Hannah (Gill Hand) 45, 46 


Martin M. 107-110, ff. 117 


James (1674-?) 45 


May 101, 104, 107, 112-116 


James (1734-1824) 44, 45, 




46 


Sarah ff. 116 


chi Idren: 


Barrymore, Ethel 91 


David 46 


Barrymore, John 21 


Eli 46 


Baucus, Ann (Wetsel) 49 


Jacob 46 


Beckwith brothers 72 


James 46 


Beilenberg Block 74, 106 


John 46 


Belcher family 109 


Jonathan 46 


BELL 


Joseph 46 


Bessie (Harvey) 7, 11, 18, 


Jesse 46 


21, 26, 42, 111, 152 


Isaac 46 


John (1807-1880) 35-39, 


Levi 46 


43-47 


Lydia 46 


chi Idren: 


We l don 46 


Cooper A. 35, 37, 38, 47 


William 46 


George 35, 37, 39, 47 


John (1647-?) 45 


James 35-38, 42, 47 


John (1772-1855) 45, 46, 


John (1832-1859) 37, 47 


47 


Lydia 37, 47 


chi Idren: 


Joseph 35-37, 42, 47 


Isabel (Dean) 46 


Mary (Reed) 35, 37, 42, 


Jacob 46 


43, 47 


James 46 


Robert 1, 2, 35-42, 47, 


Joseph 46 


52, 58 


Lydia (Bell) 35-40, 45-47 


William T. 35, 37, 47 


Mary (Shaw) 46 


Harry 36, 39, 42, 52 


Nancy (Couch) 46 


Jessie 36, 42 


Sally Ann (Record) 46 


May (Imes) 36, 39 


William R. 46 


Ralph 36, 39, 42, 52 


Joseph 46 


Robert (Bertie) 36, 39 


Nicholas 45 


Benedict, Elizabeth 


Richard (1618-?) 45 


(Barnard) 42, 107 


Richard (1676-?) 45 


Bengtzen, Charles 12-13 


Adams ? 72 


Berquin, Odette (Blesbois) 


Adamstone, Helena 114 


131, 141-144 


Alexander, Sammy 74 




Anaconda Copper Co. 66 


BICKENBACH 


Arc, Jean d' 130 


Charles 102, 118 


Aylesworth, W. N. 73 


Frederick 102, 118 



BLAOCSTONE 
Kristen 8, 24, 41 
Lamont 7, 18, 24 
Martin 7-8, 18, 24-25 
Martin Jr. 8, 24, 25 

BLESBOIS 
Brigitte 142 
Edouard 131, 143 
Francois 131, 141-144 
Georges 131-136, 141, 145, 

148 
Jean 131, 136 
Jean Pierre 131, 141-144 
Louis Desire 1-2, 131-137, 

140, 142, 145, 148 
Marc 131, 142 
Marie 131, 142 
Marie Antoinette 131-139, 

145, 148 
Margaret 131, 143, 144 
Mathilde 131, 136, 141 
Octave 131-132, 140, 145, 

148 
Robert 131, 136, 141-144 
Therese 62, 69, 84, 87, 

129-137, 145-149 
Veleda 131, 143 
Victorie 131, 143, 144 

Bloom, Col. Henry 55 
Bourget, Paul 84 
Botman, C. A. 53 
Boysen, Raymond 71 
Bradford, Britta 34 
Bramer, Carl 102, 119 
Bramer, Julia (Schneider) 

(Bremmer)102, 119-122 
Brown, Old John 49-51, 53 
Bryan, Wm. Jennings 88 
Bu(t)cher, Josie 81 
Burket, William 71-73 
Burns, Agnes 2, 9, 10, 34 
Burns, Robert 4 
Butcher, Rolla 78 
Buzzards' Roost 123 
C 



B 
Bailey, C. K. 53 
Barber, Jimmy the 22 



Otto 102, 118 
Le Roy 102, 118 
Henriette 102, 118 
Bien, M. 73 



Cable Mine 74-82, 94-97 
Carnegie, Andrew 123-125 
Cavanaugh, Miles 78-79 
Chambers, Ann (Adams) 45, 46 



Clark, Clint 78 

Clark, Sen. Wm. A. 80, 105 

Claus, Santa 31 

Clif f (Giff )ord, E. 49-50 

Coberly, Tom 109 

Cobleigh 72 

Cody, Wm. (Buffalo Bill) 

104 
Cohen, Abe 74-76, 78, 109 
Colberg, Maria 101 
Colonel, Ky. 26 
Connel, M.J. 74 
Copinus, Ida 78 
Corleone, Michael 32 
Cox, James 62, 77, 91 
Crabbe, A. H. 13 
Custer, Col. G. A. 64 

D 
Daly, Marcus 74, 105 
Danford T., B., 53 
Danforth, J. Emaline 36, 39 
DAVIAU 

Andres J. 145, 149 

Henri 145, 149, 150 

Jeanette 145, 149 

Joseph 145, 149 

Maurice 132, 145, 149, 150 
Davis, H. B. 73 
Day, Christina 50 
De Guise, The Duke 130 
Devenny, Bonnie 
(Blackstone) 8, 24, 25 
Devil, The 1 
Douglas, Virginia 71 
Dulle, Anna (Schneider) 101 
Dunn, Alice M. (Henderson) 

114 
Durham, Norma Jean (Schn.) 

102, 127 

E 

Ehrie, Louise (Fatherly) 78 

Eldred, I.S. 73 

ELLIS 

Catherine 33 

Edward 33 
Martha 2, 3, 7, 9, 11, 34 

Richard 33, 34 

William 33 



Emde, Maria (Schneider) 101, 

103, 118 
Evans, Hattie 78 

F 
Farlin, Lillie (Clark) 78 
Fausett, Barnett, Lulie 78 
Fifer, Geo., Mollie 78, 109 
Fischer, Chad 62, 89-90 
Fitzgerald, F. Scott 91 
Forbis, John F. 78 
Foster, Lee 74 
Furst, John ff. 117 map 

6 
Gibson, Lee ff. 117 map 
Gibson Navigators 18-19 
Gi I lis, Malcolm 113-114 
Gi Iman-Sal isbury stage 106 
Green, Herman 13 
Gregory, Pope VII 15 
Griffin, H. ff. 117 map 
Gurfield, Dr. 31 

H 

Hall, Marion 4, 7 
Hamilton, James ff. 117 map 
Hamner, John ff. 117 map 
Harper, Margaret 7, 9 
HARVEY (HARVIE) 

Agnes (Earl) 9 

Alexander (1693-?) 3, 7 

Alexander (1726-?) 47 

Alexander (1807-1841) 4, 7, 
9 

Alexander 9 

Alma Clyde 11, 20-23, 26, 
28, 41, 42, 62, 78, 84 

Alma Ellis 7-18, 20, 21, 
34, 41 

Bruce 7, 9. 16, 17, 34 

Chrystal 7, 18-20, 24, 41 

Eliza (Bradley) 9 

Gilbert Alexander 9, 34 

James 1-4, 7-11, 34 

James Douglas 9, 10 

Jamima 9 

Jeanette (Prestwich) 9 

Josephine 9, 34 

Margaret 9 
Marilyn (Stein) 8, 28-32, 
62, 84, 144 

Muir 3, 4, 7 

Nancy 4, 16 



Sarah Marie 8, 25, 26 

Steve 8, 21, 26-27, 32, 62, 
66, 84-88, 144 

Thomas 3, 7 

William Burns 9 
Hausuirths 78, 109 
HENDERSON: 

Charles 101-102, 112-116 

Rita 101-102, 112-116 

George 114 

Henninger, Cap 123-24 
Henry, King III 130 
Henry, King IV 15 
Hetrick, Margaret 48 
Hoover, Herbert 114 
Horbachevsky, F. 29, 31 
Hume, Peter 78 
Humphries fami ly 109 

J 
Jacobs, Emmanuel 78 
Jenny 38 

Jenkins, Ann 33 
Jessen, Peter ff. 117 map 
Jewell, Josephine 55 
Johnson, Amos et al 53 
Johnson Gang 123 
JOLY 

Jacques 145, 147 

Jean 145, 147 

Jean Baptiste (1790-?) 145, 
147 

Jean Baptiste (1807-1878) 
145, 147, 148 

Marie Antoinette (1835- 

1895) 2, 131-137, 145-148 

Philippe 145, 147 

Pierre (1555-?) 145, 147 

Pierre (1638-1664) 145, 147 
Jordan, Cesare 138 
Jordan, Daniel 131, 137-139 
Jordan. Francois 131, 137- 

140, 148 

Jose 31 

Joseph, Chief 74, 105 

Juarez, Battle of, 21 

K 

Kelley, Matt J. 96 
Kelton, Stan 1-157 
Knickerbocker, Col. John 50 



Knott, Walter 70, 71 
Kohrs, Conrad 66, 106 
Kroger 72 

L 

Lai, Venetia 8, 26, 27, 144 

Lardner, Ring 22 

LEE 
Harlan 102, 116-117 
chi Idren: 

Carol (Tamang) 102, 117 
Linda (Balyeat) 102, 117 
Dale 102, 117 
Allen 102, 117 

Leonard, Lee 97 
Lomax, Arnold 90 
Lomax, Mildred (Moog) 62 
87-90 

Lord, B.F. 53 
Love farm 70 

M 

McAdam, Isabel 102, 127 
McArthur, Robert 71 
Maples, Capt. 72 
Mathews, Mary 33-34 
Mayer, Addie 78 
MC CONAHY 

Elva 7, 11, 17, 18 

Edna 18 

Jess 18 

Sherm 18 

McConkie, Thora 10 
McGuire, Lizzie ff. 117 map 
Meyer, Rick 26 
Mitchell, R.H. ff. 117 map 
MOOG 
Albert 7, 60-63, 69-76, 
84, 87, 99, 101, 104, 
112, 131-135 
Albert Jr 62, 69 70, 
79-90, 106, 131-133 
Frederick 1, 2, 59-69, 74- 
84-86, 96, 101, 104-106 
Leslie (Fischer) 62, 87-90 
Lisa 62, 87-90 
Marie (Harvey) 21, 26, 28, 
31, 62-66, 69, 84-87, 131- 
134, 140, 150 



Montana 63, 70, 74-76 
77-85, 91, 94, 96, 99, 
101, 104, 106, 135 
Robert 59 
Morse, William 53 
Morrier, Frances (Stevens) 78 
Morris 8. 32 
N 

Neidenhofen family 109 
Nicholson, Barbara 102, ff.117 
Notand, Anna (Savery) 62, 64 
Norton, Mary ff. 117 map 
Noyes family 109 

o 

Odell 72 
O'Keefe 74, 75 
Orton family 74, 109 

P 
Palace Beauty Salon 41 
Parrott, George ff. 117 map 
Penn, Wi lliam 45 
Phantom of LAX 32 
Phelps, Capt. 56 
Pierse, Allen 108 
Pistorius, Maria (Schneider) 

101, 103 
Plummer, Henry 64 
Porter, George 78, 109 
Powell, Ella, Dorinda 78 
Powell, Ralph 64-65 
Purdue, Ron 102, 128 



Ralston stage line 76 

Rea, Mary 109 

Reed, Elizabeth (Smith) 43 

Reid 72 

RICHARDSON 

Almira (Wetsel) 49, 51-58 

Ethel 90 

Hannah (Jewell?) 55, 58 

Jerome William 53-55 

Rhoda (1788-1866) 55, 57 

Rhoda (7-1850?) 55 

Susan 55 

William 54-57 
Robbins, Bill 74 
Robinson, Roberta 71 
Rohle, Elisabeth 101-104 
Rosenstein, Isadore 74 
Ross, Marion 7 
Russell, Rev. J. R. 76-81 



Russell, 
Ryon, A. 



Theo 79 
M. 76 
8 



Sabolsky, Sam 74 
Sanders 71-72 
Sands, Lizzie(Jacobs) 78 
SAVERY 
James (b. 1826) 62, 77, 
91, 94-96 

James (b. 1887) 62, 77, 81, 
91-94, 104, 106 
James (b. 1929) 62, 92 
Sarah (Savery) 91, 94 
Sarah (Venn) 62, 91, 94 
Virginia (Olkowski) 62, 

91, 94 
Savery Hotel 96 

Saville, J. A. 78, ff. 117 

SCHNEIDER 

Adella (Lenz) 99, 100, 102 
Charles A. 99 
Elmer 100, 128, 153 
Henry 101, 103 
Johann Arnd (1654?-1729) 101 
Johann George (1693 chr. 

-1759 ) 101 
Johann Friedrich (1792-?) 
101-104. 118, 119 
chi Idren: 
Charles 100-104 
Christian 99-104 
Frederick 99-104 
Jeanette (Bickenbach) 99- 

104 
Maria (1826-?) 101, 103 
Mary (Barnard) (1838 
-1923) 1, 2, 62-64, 69, 
74-85, 99-112, 118, 119 
Wilhelmina 103 
William 99-104, 119-127 
chi Idren: 
Edward 102, 119, 
Emma (Gage) 102, 119 
Emilie 102, 119 
George 102, 119-125 
Louis 102, 119-125 
Matilda (Copelin) 102, 

119-125 
Sarah 102, 119 



Walter 102, 119, 126 
William C. 102, 119, 127 
William F.102, 119 
Johann Henrich (1754-1840) 

101, 103 
Johann Phillip (1725-1798) 

101 
Wm E (b. 1918) 102, 119, 
127, 128 
chi Idren: 
Claire 99-102, 127-128 
Beverly 102, 127, 128 
Laurie 102, 127, 128 
Um E (b. 1952) 102, 127, 
128 



Thornton, Lizzie 78 
Thoroughman, Jeff 78 
Toupet, Blanche 145-149 
Toupet, Jules 145-149 
Traphagen, F.W. 76 



Upsweep, Joe 15 



Valiton, H. G. 78, 109 
Venice's Roving Dogs 32 
Vickers, Genevieve (Smith) 
36, 43 



Wilhelm, Kaiser 119 
Williams, Parley 12-13 
Wilson, President Woodrou 

135 
Wilson ? 72 



Y 

Yeakel, Bob 22 

Young, Cora (Heslet) 78 



Scott, Sam 73 

Scribblers Club 85 

Self, Lizzie 78 

Selkrig, Alice (Harvey) 3, 7 

Sempel I, Anne 7 

SEWELL 

Leah Marie 62, 89 

Laurin 62, 89 

Steve 62, 89 
Shamu 31 
Sharp, Hugh 45 
Sheridan, Doris 49 
Snoop, Fred 126 
Simpson, Rich 85-86 
S lemons 72 
Smight, Hugh 38 
Smith, James A 43 
Smith, Roy 36, 37, 43 
Smith, Rev. Samuel 38 
Smurr, H. A. 73 
Smyth 72 
Stapleton 72 
STEIN 

Elizabeth 8, 28, 31 

Elliot 30 

John 8, 28-30, 32 

Mary Ann 30 

Nick 8, 28, 31 

Skip 30 

Team 28 
Stevens, Robert 78 
Stoddard, Sy 97 
Stride, Mary 78 

T 
Thomasson, Eleanor 
(Jordan) 131, 139 



Watson, Priscilla (Cantrell) 84 
Weibold, Chris 76 
Welden, Isabel 45, 46 
Werre, Charles 102, 116, ff. 117 
Werre, Harold 102, 116-117 
Werre, Irene (Lee) 102, 116-117 
WETSEL 
Charles 48 

Daniel (1776-1848) 49-51 
chi Idren: 
Carolina 50 
Christina (Day) 50 
Daniel N. 50 
Elizabeth (Welling) 50 
Eliza? 50 
Evaline 50-51 
George H. 50 
Jane E. 50 
John B. 50 

Maria Ann (Brownell) 50 
Margaret 50 
William B. 49-58 
Eva 2, 36, 39-42, 52-58 
George (1727/8-1824) 48-50 
chi Idren: 

Christina (Stover) 50 
Christopher 50 
Daniel 50 

Elizabeth (Sipperly) 50 
George Jr. 50 
John 50 
Joseph 50 
Mary (Baucus) 50 
Minerva 49, 51 
Myron 48 
Peter 48 



ADDENDUM 



165 



As this book was going to press, 
along his latest findings, including: 



Roy Smith (p. 43) sent 



1. The family tree of patriarch John Bell's grandfather Jesse, 

BORN DIED BORN DIED 



JESSE BELL 




circa 


1740 1820 




C. 


Amzi 






m. ? 

children: 
1. John Sr. 

m. Susanna Allen 


ca 1770 
ca 1775 


1816 






n. Eliza 
Eliza 
Elizabeth 
Nancy 

m. John ] 

h 


Stewart 


16Junl853 


c. Ezekial 
Reuben 
Merriba 
John Jr. 




ca 1803 

ca 1805 

1799 

13Febl797 


25Janl819 
1848 


4. 

5. 
6. 


Daniel 

Ezekial 

Elizabet.. 


Emery 7 


Febl857 


m. Marg. 

2 . Stephen 

3 . Reuben 


Cooper 8Mayl796 1887 
Febl763 2Marl829 


7. 


m. John McKinney 
Susanna 
in. Thomas Adams 






m. Mary 
c. Cetran 

Jesse 

John 
m. Susanna 


1764 

cal794 

Mayl797 

cal792 

1796 


24Junl841 

210ctl877 

3JU11874 


8. 


James 
m. Martha 
c. James Jr. 
Samuel 
Martha 


C31765 
1772 

cal793 
1795 
1796 


cal835 
5Febl850 

8Janl884 
1851 



Roy Smith's notes on his work: 

JESSE BELL'S 1820 will in Beaver 
(now in Lawrence) County is on p. 150 of 
this book. JESSE BELL sold 120 acres 
to Ezekial and Reuben Bell, sons of (No. 
1) John Sr. (Durant's history of 
Lawrence County) . 

(No. 1) John Bells Sr. and Jr. both 
served in War of 1812, Capt. Robert 
Imbrie's 2nd Co., 1st Battalion, 26th 
Reg. , Penn. Militia. 

Descendants of (No. 1) John Bell's 
son, John Jr., Margaret Cooper are on 
file with Crawford Co. Historical Soc. 

(No. 3) Reuben Bell is buried at 
Slippery Rock Presbyterian Church, 
El wood City, Pa. Dates for Reuben and 
Mary from stones in church cemetery. 

2. John's son, William Bell, a 

Mexico on Dec. 31, 1911 (letter 



JOHN (sea pagas 35-38) 

Dates for Reuben's son Jesse from 
Simonton File of the Lawrence Guardian. 

(No. 8) James Bell's wife, Martha, 
of New Castle, Lawrence Co., Penn., 
bequeathed land to daughter Martha and, 
in items 3 AND 4 gave $5 to her son 
Samuel. Son JOHN is not mentioned and I 
think he was to get one of the $5 sums. 
Will book 1, page 9, writ. 4-9-1849, 
Prob. 2-5-1850. 

(No. 8) James Bell's daughter, 
Martha, unmarried, of New Castle, left 
$200 to her brother JOHN "if he shall be 
living and returns to New Castle within 
one year after my decease." Otherwise, 
the money was to go to "the children of 
my brother Samuel .. .Mary Ann, John, 
Samuel and James." Will book 1, page 49, 
Writ. 4-5-1851. Filed 6-24-1851. 

railroad contractor, died in 
from nephew James H. Bell) . 



3. John's son, George Bell (1842-1908), fought for the Union 
Army in the 150th ("Buckeye") Regiment, Penn., Volunteers. A 
regiment history recounts one scene from Gettysburg: 

"When Adjutant Ashhurst gave the order to fall back, Bell, 
just promoted as lieutenant in Company H, protested to me 
against the retreat, saying: 

•••Adjutant, it is all damned cowardice; we have beaten 
them and will keep on beating them back.'" 

At Gettysburg, his company went into action with 56 men 
and finished with 12; at Wilderness, his company was reduced 
from 60 to 14. Date of muster: Aug. 28, 1862. Discharged as a 
captain, Dec. 15, 1864. 



FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY 
35 NORTH WEST TEMPLE 
SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH 84150