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Full text of "The Hatfield cook book. Plain and fancy recipes"

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TXllS. 



Class. 

Book -^Z i o 

Copyright 1^°_ 







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The Hatfield 




K In 



ri 




K 



o 



PLAIN AND FANCY RECIPES. 



li 



"7^ 



ARRANGED BY 



The "Real Folks' 



OF 



THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, 



HATFIELD, MASS. 



HOLVOKE, MASS., 

HUBBARD & TABER PRINTING CO. 

1899. 






A^\ 



P 



47034 






REMARKS. 



npHE HATFIELD COOK BOOK is sent forth to 
the public with best wishes to all patrons for its 
success. The Recipes given are "tested" ones. This 
means more to good housekeepers than words alone. 
May each housewife or maiden who attempts a recipe 
reap success to her personal efforts, and remember 
that tact and common sense are as necessary in cook- 
ing, as in many other practical duties of life. 






SOUPS. 



'Who builds the fire for his wife, much happiness will find in life." 



TOMATO SOUP. 



Two quarts of cold water, eight large tomatoes, 
four rolled crackers, pepper and salt. When nearly 
done, put in a piece of butter the size of an egg, one 
teaspoon of soda dissolved in one cup of milk, put in 
just as you take it off the fire. 

MRS. M. N. HUBBARD. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

One can tomatoes, one pint water; boil hard until 
tomato is cooked. Add one-fourth teaspoon soda, 
strain, set on stove and season uith butter, salt and 
pepper. Add slowly one pint of milk, and let come 
to a boil 

MRS. J. E. PORTER, 

TOMATO BISQUE. 

Three pints milk boiled in double boiler, one 
can tomato soup (condensed.) The tomato is to be 
added to soup just before serving. One tablespoon of 
flour improves the soup. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Two quarts clear stock, skimmed clean of every 
particle of fat, one carrot, one onion, one potato, one- 
half cup rice. Cook carrot, onion and potato in a 
part of stock until tender. Add rice and cooked 
vegetables to remainder of stock and cook half an 
hour before serving. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Three potatoes, one teaspoon chopped onions, one 
teaspoon salt, one-half tablespoon butter, one-half 
tablespoon flour, one pint of milk. Cook potatoes 
until soft and mash. Cook onions in the milk and 
add to the potato, strain. Cook flour and butter 
together, add to the other and cook five minutes. 

MRS. HENRY A. WARNER. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

Three or four pounds of fowl. Three quarts cold 
water, one tablespoon salt, one tablespoon chopped 
onions, two tablespoons chopped celery, one pint of 
creaui, one tablespoon butter, one tablespoon corn 
starch, one teaspoon salt, one salt spoon white pepper, 
two eggs. 

MRS. GEORGE A. BILLINGS. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Boil one pound of calf's liver and two pounds of 
veal two hours, skimming well, then strain, chop the 
meat fine and add to it a small onion chopped. Salt, 
pepper and ground cloves to taste, thickening all 
with a tablespoonful of browned flour, and boiling all 
up together. Have four hard boiled eggs, cut up in 
tureen, also one lemon sliced. 

MRS. C. E. HUBBARD. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



CHICKEN SOUP. 

Set the liquor in which two or three fowls have 
been boiled, away to cool. Skim off the fat, and then 
put it into the soup kettle, witli one whole onion and 
a half cup of rice; boil two hours. Just before dishing, 
take out onion and put in some pieces of cold chicken. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 

CABBAGE SOUP. 

Boil a small soup bone, to the stock add a small 
head of cabbage chopped fine, one teacup of rice, a 
little chopped celery, (or celery salt) and boil until soft. 

MRS. NELSON ALLAIR. 

CABBAGE SOUP. 

One quart of chopped cabbage, one quart of water, 
cook one-half hour. Be sure you have the same 
quantity before adding milk. Add one quart of milk, 
season with butter, pepper and salt. This quantity 
will serve three or four persons. 

MRS. M. F. SAMPSON. 

PEA SOUP. 

One quart of split peas soaked over night, next 
morning let them boil until soft, and then pass them 
through a fine sieve, after which mix with it stock if 
you have it, if not add water to make it as thin as 
you wish and a small piece of butter, pepper and salt. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 

CLAM SOUP. 

Two dozen clams chopped fine, pour over them 
one quart of cold water and let them just simmer, 
nothing more, on the back of the stove three-quarters 
ofan hour, then add one pint of milk, season with 
butter, pepper, salt; soup is improved by adding from 
one-half to a tablespoon of Worcestershire Sauce. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



POTATO SOUP. 

One quart of milk, six large potatoes, one stalk of 
celery, one tablespoon butter, one large onion. Boil 
in" double boiler with celery and onion. Pare and 
boil potatoes thirty minutes, turn off the water and 
mash fine; season with salt, pepper and butter; add to 
the boiling milk; strain and serve immediately. A 
cup of whipped cream added after the soup is in the 
tureen improves it. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 
TURKEY SOUP. 

Take a carcass of roast chicken or turkey, leaving 
on some of the dressing. Cover with cold water and 
boil several hours. Cut into this one stalk of celery, 
and boil one hour longer. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 
CLAM CHOWDER. 

One-half peck clams, wash shells with brush and 
boil. Fry four slices of salt pork crisp, in frying pan, 
(cut fine before frying.) Take out pork, and fry 
brown four onions sliced thin. Take clams from 
shells and chop fine, strain broth that clams were 
boiled in, and put back into kettle, add chopped clams, 
pork, onions, three or four sliced potatoes, salt and 
pepper to taste; boil slowly one hour Just before 
serving add spoonful of flour to thicken slightly. 
Add milk if desired. 

MRS. J. E. PORTER. 
BEAN SOUP. 

One pint of steamed beans; rub through a colander 
or remove skins, place on stove, and add one pint of 
milk with salt and a little red pepper. Also one onion 
sliced and fried in butter. Butter two slices of bread, 
cut them in dice, brown them in the oven Add to the 
soup just before serving. Potatoes, peas, asparagus 
or tomatoes can be used in the same way. 

MISS MILLER, 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



CELERY SOUP. 

One quart of milk, one pint of water, one large 
head of celery, two tablespoons flour, one tablespoon 
butter, one onion, grating of nutmeg. Boil celery in 
the water forty minutes. Boil milk, onion and nut- 
meg together. Mash celery in the water in which it 
has been boiled; add the flour and butter to the milk; 
add the mashed celery, strain and serve. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 

BLACK BEAN SOUP.— (fink.) 

One pint black beans, two quarts cold water, one 
small onion, one lemon, two hard boiled eggs, two 
teaspoons salt, one tablespoon flour, two tablespoons 
butter, one saltspoon pepper, one saltspoon mustard, 
one-quarter saltspoon cayenne. Soak the beans over 
night, in morning drain and put to boil in the cold 
water. Slice the onions and fry in butter, and put it 
with the beans and simmer four or five hoars un'. il 
they are soft, adding water as needed, so there will be 
about two quarts when done. Then rub the beans 
throngh strainer, ]>ut soup on to boil again, add salt, 
pepper and mustard. While boiling add the butter 
and flour which have been cooked together. Cut 
the lemon and eggs in thin slices, and put in tureen 
and pour soup over them. 

MISS M. A. MORTON. 

HAM AND EGG SOUP. 

Re-heat three pints of the liquor in which ham 
has been boiled, (if not too salt) and when boiling, 
skim, stir in gradually two tablespoonfuls of flour 
wet in a cup of the cold liquor. Bring to a boil and 
pour into tureen in which two well beaten eggs and a 
tablespoonful of chopped parsley with six round 
crackers split have been placed. 

]MRS. C. E. HUBBARD. 



10 11 AT FIELD COOK ROOK. 



ASPARAGUS SOUP. 

Boil one quirt of finely cut asparagus, tender in 
one qnart of water, rub all through a colander. Heat 
one pint of milk, warm and rub together one table- 
spoonful of butter with two of flour, adding the hot 
milk gradually. Season and pour into asparagus. 
Bring to a boiling point, pour into tureen with a 
cup of toasted bits of bread. 

MRS. C. E. HUBBARD. 
MILK SOUP. 

One quart of milk, one tablespoon butter, one 
teaspoonful chopped onion, one-half tablespoon flour, 
one stalk celery, one teaspoon salt, one half saltspoon 
white pepper, speck of cayenne, one-half teaspoonful 
of celery salt, cook milk, onion, celery twenty minutes 
in double boiler; cook the flour and butter together 
five minutes being careful not to burn it, then pour 
it into the soup, add the seasoning and it is ready to 
finish in any way, if for Potato Soup add three boiled 
potatoes mashed very fine to the foundation, rub 
through a sieve into hot tureen, if for Celery add one 
pint stewed and sifted celery to the foundation and 
strain over one ^^^ beaten to a cream. 

MRS. GEO. BILLINGS. 
TURNIP AND POTATO SOUP. 

One cup mashed potato, one cup of mashed 

turnip, one sliced onion, one pint water. Simmer 

together, add one pint of hot milk. Butter, salt and 
pepper to taste. Strain and serve. 

MRS. CHARLES GRAVES. 
PARSNIP STEW. 

One cup meat stock (lamb preferred,) four cold 
parsnips cut up into dice, four cold potatoes cut in the 
same manner, two onions, one quart water, cook about 
one-half hour, or until onion is cooked. Season to 
taste and serve. 

MISS E. SHATTUCK. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. U 

LAMB SOUP. 

In bu3'iiig lamb chops, buy the whole piece from 
which they are cut; have it cut into chops, using the 
rest for soup. Wash thoroughly rubbing the outside 
with a coarse towel. Put on the fire in cold water, 
and boil until meat drops from the bones. Strain 
and set away till cold. Remove ever}^ bit of fat when 
you wish to use the soup. Put in j^our tureen one- 
half cup of rice, which you have steamed till very 
tender. When the soup is boiling hot, beat an egg 
and stir it into a cup of milk in which a tablespoon 
of flour has been rubbed; put with this, a little at a 
time some of the scalding liquor, until there is no 
danger of the Q:gg curdling. Serve instantly as it 
will thicken by standing; season with pepper and salt. 

MRS. J. vS. WELLS. 

SOUP STOCK. 

If 3^ou bu}^ fresh meat for a soup stock, the shank 
is most economical. Wash and put on in cold water 
and one spoonful of salt. When it comes to a boil, 
take off the scum, and set the kettle where it will 
boil slowly ten hours. Then strain into a bright 
tin, or stone pot. In the morning skim off" all the 
fat, turn the jelly out, and take off" all the sediment. 
Use the meat for hash. Do not boil vegetables with 
this stock as it causes it to sour quickly. 

Use celery in all kinds of soup when you can 
obtain it. 



12 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 13 



14 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



PISH, 



"There's as good a fish in the sea as ever was caught." 



BAKED FISH.— A la creme. 

Boil four pounds halibut, when done skin and 

remove bones, and flake it. Boil one quart of milk, 

with oue half onion chopped fine, a few sprigs of 

parsley, cayenne pepper and salt. Thicken the milk 

with three tablespoons flour or butter size of an egg. 

Butter a dish, put in a layer offish and then cream, 

then fish, until it is all used, having cream on top. 

Sprinkle with sifted bread or cracker crumbs, and 

bake one-half hour. Garnish with parsley and slices 

of hard boiled egg. 

MRS. G. w. c, N. Y. 

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE FOR FISH. 

Half tea cup of butter, juice of one-half a lemon, 
yolks of two eggs, a speck of cayenne, one-half cup 
boiling water, one-half teaspoon of salt. Beat butter 
to a cream, add yolks of eggs one by one, then lemon 
juice, pepper and salt. Place the bowl containing the 
mixture in a saucepan of boiling water; beat with an 
egg beater until it begins to thicken, which will 
be in about a minute, then add boiling water, beating 
all the time. As soon as it is like soft custard, it is 
done. For fish and meats, to be poured around the 
article on the dish. 

MISS PARLOA. 



IG HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

BROILED OYSTERS. 

Salt and pepper large oysters, dip in melted butter, 
then in cracker crumbs. Broil over hot coals until 
brown. 

MRS. CUTLER. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 

One cup milk, three eggs, one dozen rolled crack- 
ers, one tablespoon flour. Place a large oyster in a 
tablespoon of batter and fry in hot lard. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 

TO FRY OYSTERS. 

Dry a few moments in a cloth, dip each one in 
beaten ^gg., and then into sifted cracker crumbs. Fry 
in just enough fat to brown them, put pepper and 
salt on before turning them over. 

RHODE ISLAND FISH CAKES. 

One cup of salt cod fish and two cups potatoes cut 
in small pieces, boil together until tender, then mash 
together, beat one Q.gg^ a little butter, three table- 
spoons of cream, and add to the fish and potato, beat 
well, drop with a spDon into hot fat. Bacon fat is the 
best if you have it. 

MRS. EDWARD ELDRIDGE. 

ESCALLOPED FISH. 

One pound of fresh boiled cod fish, then make a 
sauce of one tablespoon of butter, two of flour stirred 
into one pint of boiling milk until it thickens, cut 
hard boiled ^gg into sauce then pour all into a deep 
dish, first a layer offish then a layer of sauce until 
dish is filled, cover top with cracker crumbs and bake 
one-half hour. 

MRS. H. L. WILLIAMS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 17 

FRIED SALT COD FISH. 

Soak salt cod fish twerit3^-foiir hours, changing the 
water three times, drain thoroughly, roll in ^gg batter 
and fr^'. 

M. A. MORTON. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Three pints of 03'sters, fifteen rolled crackers, one 
pint of milk, three eggs, butter, salt and pepper. 

MRS. CHAvS. JONES. 
BAKED FISH. 

Make a dressing- of bread crumbs. Stuff the fish 
and sew or tie securely. Place in a pan with some 
hot water, lay pieces of pork on top with a little 
pepper and salt and bake, basting very often. 

MRS. ¥. H. BARDWELL. 

ESCALLOPED SALMON. 

Prepare with rolled cracker; butter, pepper and 
salt in layer, same as for 03'sters. Pour milk over 
them, and last of all beat one o^gg., and spread over 
the top and bake. 

MRS. DOUGHERTY. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Take bread crumbs, rolled fine; put layer in bottom 
of dish; season with butter, salt and pepper, then layer 
of oysters and so on until dish is nearly full. Cover 
tightly and bake twenty minutes or half an hour, 
then remove cover and bake until done. Use no 
wetting. 

MRS. J. E. PORTER. 

FISH CROQUETTES. 

One pint each of finely minced cold boiled fish 
and mashed potato, wet with one-half cup hot milk, 
one e.gg and salt and pepper, mix well, shape, dip in 
Qgg then in crumbs and fry brown. 



13 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK 



19 



20 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



MBATS. 



The body craveth meats, the spirit athirst for peacefulness, 
He that hath these, hath enough. (Tupper ) 



ROAST TURKEY, CHICKEN OR DUCK. 

Wash the fowl and wipe dry, and stuff the breast 
and body with the following dressing For a fowl 
weighing between seven and eiglit pounds, take one 
quart of stale bread and crumb very fine; add a table- 
spoon of salt, a scant teaspoon of pepper, a teaspoon 
of chopped parsley, one teaspoon powdered sage, one 
of summer savory, a half cup of butter and a little 
milk. Mix well together. Sew up the fowl, tie legs 
and wings close to the body, rub well with butter, 
pepper, salt and flour. Sew up in a cloth and baste 
often, turn the fowl over when about half done. 

ROAST VEAL. 

Cut gashes all over ihe meat, and fill them with 
dressing, and sprinkle salt, pepper and flour over the 
surface; baste frequently. 

SPICED VEAL. 

Boil three or four pounds of veal until tender, then 
chop it fine and season with salt and pepper, and very 
little sage and very little clover; return to the liquor 
you boiled the veal in, leaving only enough to moisten 
your chopped meat, then pour this into a square 
tin, set in a cool place to harden. 



2? HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

VEAL CUTLETS. 

One pound veal steak, remove all fat and bones, 
shape nicely into round flat pieces about the size of 
doughnuts, pound out, skewer into good shape, 
sprinkle with salt and pepper, roll in sifted bread 
crumbs, then tgg^ then crumbs last, fry in pork fat 
fifteen minutes, a handsome brown, all over the same, 
lay them in a stew pan, carefully make the following 
sauce: One tablespoonful butter, one tablespoonful 
flour, mix smoothly, add a cupfull hot water or stock 
made from the trimmings of the veal; pinch of pepper, 
one tablespoon lemon juice, or vinegar or mixed 
horse-radish; cook the cutlets, just simmer them 
three-fourths of an hour. 



TO WARM-OVER iMEAT. 

Butter a dish; put in a layer of mashed seasoned 
potatoes, then any kind of meat you wish to utilize, 
chopped fine; season with salt, pepper and butter to 
taste; then more mashe I potatoes, and so on until the 
dish is full; the top layer should be potatoes, bake 
one-half hour; serve hot. 

SCALLOPED CHICKEN. 

One pound chicken meat, cut in small bits as for 
salad; one cup fine dry bread crumbs, one coffee cup 
of chicken broth or jelly, three cups rich milk, two 
tablespoons butter, two eggs, two tablespoons corn 
starch, salt and pepper. Put the milk in a sauce pan 
and when boiling hot add the corn starch wet with a 
little milk, add butter, crumbs and broth; season all 
to taste. Butter a baking dish, line with a thick 
layer of bread crumbs, pour in the mixture, put a 
layer of crumbs on top and a few bits of butter. Bake 
three quarters of an hour. 

MRvS. A. F. CURTIS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 23 



ROAST I'ORK. 

Wipe and dredge with flour, salt, pepper and sage. 
Place in hot oven for two hours then ba^te frequently, 
and bake one hour. 



ROAST LAMB. 

Take a leg of lamb weighing six pounds, wipe 
with a damp cloth, steam two hours, then sprinkle 
with salt, flour and pepper. Bake one hour, while 
baking baste often. 

LAMB STEWED WITH PEAS. 

Cut breast of lamb in pieces, place in a pan, cover 
and let it simmer for twenty minutes Skim, and 
add a tablespoon of salt and one quart of shelled peas, 
cover, and stew for half an hour. Mix a tablespoon 
of flour and two of butter and stir into the stew. 
Simmer fifteen minutes longer and serve. 



FRIZZLED BEEF. 

Shave dried beef, put in a frying pan. Add milk 
and a piece of butter, thicken with flour, add one o^gg 
just before removing from the fire. 

MRS. R. BIIvLINGS. 



BROILED BEEFSTEAK. 

A steak cut about three-quarters of an inch thick, 
well pounded. Place immediately over hot coals, on 
a hot gridiron. Thoroughly brown on one side before 
turning. When done sprinkle with salt and pepper; 
place on a hot platter and spread with softened butter. 
Send at once to the table. 

MRS. A. F. CURTIS. 



24 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



GRILLED CHICKEN. 

Take a young and tender chicken and halve it. 
Rub well with butter and flour; sprinkle with salt 
and pepper. Lay in a well buttered dripping-pan, 
place in a hot oven and bake about an hour. Serve 
with giblet sauce. 

MRvS. A. H. GRAVES. 

MUTTON PIE PLAIN. 

Take cold mutton cut in thin slices; put in pud- 
ding dish and season with salt and pepper; mix two 
tablespoons of flour wath cold water, then pour on 
to this one pint of boiling water; season and pour over 
the meat. Make a paste as for plain pie crust, and 
cover it. Bake one hour. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Boil three chickens until tender; place a layer of 
chicken in pan, add butter, pepper and salt; then 
another layer of chicken and so on until the pan is 
filled, pour in broth of chicken. Cover with a baking 
powder crust made as follows: Three pints of flour, 
four teaspoons baking powder, three tablespoons 
shortening, three cups of milk, salt. Place a little 
butter on top of pie before baking. 

POT ROAST. 

Take a good sized piece of meat for boiling. Sear 
over all sides by placing in a hot kettle and turning 
until all the sides are brown. Place water enough in 
the kettle to keep from burning, and cover closely to 
keep in steam. Cook slowly four or five hours 
(adding water as it boils away.) At the last allow 
nearly all the water to boil away and make a brown 
gravy if desired by adding a little flour and butter 
and boiling water. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 25 

MOCK DUCK. 

spread a round steak with butter or pork fat, salt, 
pepper, and dredge with flour, prepare a dressing of 
one cup bread crumbs (soaked,) one Qgg, one-half 
chopped onion, a little chopped pork, salt and pepper, 
spread the dressing on the steak and roll as you 
would roll jell}^ cake, tie in place, basting frequently, 
serve with a gravy, cut into rounds. 

MRS. CHARLES GRAVES. 

ESCALLOPED MEAT. 

Take cold roast beef or chicken, chop fine, butter 
a deep dish and fill with alternate layers of bread 
crumbs and meat, season with salt, pepper and butter, 
moisten with milk or beef gravy. Bake one-half 
hour. 

MRS. F. H. BARDWELL. 

ESCALLOPED MEAT. 

Boil pieces of roast beef until tender, when cold 
strain out all fat and take meat out of the stock, chop 
meat fine, salt and pepper. Cook one quart of canned 
tomatoes with an onion sliced in it for half an hour, 
strain this, add the tomato juice to the seasoned meat, 
a pint of bread or cracker crumbs, butter a baking 
dish put in a layer of crumbs well moistened with 
stock, on this put a layer of seasoned meat, another 
layer of crumbs and stock and meat, dot the top with 
bits of butter, bake in a moderate oven three-quarters 
of an hour. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 

STUFFED BEEF. 

Take a beefsteak, (round) pound well. Make a 
good dressing, (same as for turkey) and roll inside, 
pin together with skewers, dust with flour. Season 
well and bake quickl}^, about three quarters of an 
hour. Have the pan hot. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 



26 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

BEEF A LA MODE. 

The day before using, take about six pounds of 
round of beef, gash it at intervals to receive strips of 
salt pork, half an inch wide. Have several table- 
spoons full of chopped carrots and onion, also whole 
spices, pepper corns, allspice, cloves, salt and press 
some into the meat, and lay the remainder over it for 
the night. In the morning put all into a large pot, 
and nearly cover with hot water, close pot and boil 
until tender, boiling water away, and browning in pot. 
Take out meat, and add water enough to make gravy 
in the same pot, and pour over meat on platter. Must 
cook many hours. Bxcellent to re-heat another day. 

MISS NETTIE MORTON. 

POTTED HAM. 

Cut all the meat, fat and lean, from a boiled ham, 
chop very fine and pound to a paste, to each pint of 
paste add one teaspoonful mustard, a speck of cayenne 
pepper, a little garlic, and if not fat enough a table- 
spoon of butter, pack in a small earthen jar, paste 
paper over the top and put on the cover, place the jar 
in a baking pan of hot water in the oven, bake slowly 
two hours, when cold take of co\ er and pour over 
melted butter. Cover again and set away in cool 
place. 

MRS. M. E. MILLER. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Boil a chicken until tender, take the meat from 
the bones, season with salt, pepper and butter, pour 
in enough of the liquor it was boiled in to moisten 
well and pour in any shape 3'ou choose, placing 
alternate layers of light and dark meat, when cold 
turu out and slice. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 27 



VEAL PATTIE. 

Three pounds of veal chopped fine, one pound of 
salt pork, one coffeecup of rolled crackers, two tea- 
spoons salt, two small teaspoons of pepper, four eggs, 
mix thoroughly, and bake two hours in a slow oven. 

MRvS. KNIGHT. 
ROUND STEAK. 

Chop round steak thoroughly on both sides, but 
leave it in one piece, season with salt, pepper, and 
place in a hot spider in which 3'ou have before placed 
a piece of butter, fr}- brown. 

FRIED TRIPE. 

Take good fat honeycomb tripe, let stand in hot 
water a few moments, drain, and wipe dry, dip in ^gg, 
and then roll in fine cracker crumbs, fry in butter or 
fat until a delicate brown on both sides, lay on platter, 
and add a little butter and salt. Serve hot. 

MUTTON PIE WITH TOMATOES. 

Chop mutton fine as for hash, put in dish and 
season with salt, pepper, and butter, then a layer of 
sliced tomatoes, then soft boiled rice spread on top, a 
little more butter, bake three-quarters of an hour. 

MEAT PIE. 

Pieces of cold roast beef may be placed in a baking 
dish and seasoned with salt, pepper, butter and a little 
wetting. A baking powder crust may be placed over 
this, or some prefer mashed potato. 

RAGOUT OF MEAT. 

Two cups chopped cold meat, one cup rolled 
cracker, season with salt and pepper, nioisten with 
milk or beef grav}^ shape into balls, roll in cracker 
crumbs, then in ^gg^ again in crumbs, bake in a hot 
oven fifteen minutes or until brown. 

MRS. CUTLER. 



28 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

BEEFSTEAK SMOTHERED IN ONIONS. 

Fr)' brown four slices of salt pork, when brown 
take out the pork and put in six onions sliced thin, 
fry ten minutes stirring all the time, then take out 
all except a thin layer, and upon this la^^ a slice of 
steak, then a layer of onions, then steak and cover 
with onions, dredge each layer with salt, pepper and 
flour, pour over this one cupful of boiling water, and 
cover tight, simmer half an hour. When you dish 
place the steak in center of dish and heap the onions 
around it. 



BEEFSTEAK OMELET. 

One and one-half pounds steak, chop fine, add one 
^gg^ small piece of butter, little salt, half cup milk, 
bake half an hour. 

MRS. CHARLES BARTLETT. 



VEAL LOAF. — EXCELLENT. 

Four pounds lean veal, well done, and one pound 
raw salt pork, chop together fine, add one tablespoon 
pepper, salt, two tablespoons of sage, four tablespoons 
of bread crumbs, four eggs and half pint sweet cream, 
mix eggs, cream, bread crumbs and seasoning together, 
then add the meat and mix thoroughly, press into a 
deep dish and bake four hours, lay bits of butter on 
top before baking, to be eaten cold, slice thin. 



BEEF LOAF. 

Three pounds fresh beef chopped fine, two cups 
cracker crumbs, one and one-half cups sweet milk, two 
eggs, butter the size of an o^gg., salt, pepper and sage if 
you choose, bake slowly two hours. 

MRS. C. L. WARNER. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



29 



30 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



HATFIELD OOOK BOOK. 31 



32 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



GRAVIES AND SAUCES FOR MEATS. 



GIBLET SAUCE. 



Take heart, livers and gizzard; (chicken) boil, chop 
fine; make a drawn butter gravy; add the giblets; 
season with salt and pepper. 

BROWN GRAVY SAUCE. 

Set the pan in which the meat was roasted on the 
range; add boiling water, scrape toward the center the 
browned flour from the sides and bottom, thicken with 
small quantity of flour, season with butter, pepper 
and salt, to be used with roast beef. 

OYSTER SAUCE. 

Make drawn butter gravy, season to taste, add 
raw oysters, chopped a little. Nice to eat with roast 
turkey, 

MINT SAUCE. 

To two tablespoons of chopped mint, add one table- 
spoon of white sugar, and nearly two-thirds of a cup 
of vinegar. Let them stand ten minutes in a cool place 
before sending to table, 

MARION HARLAND. 

CAPER SAUCE FOR LEG OF LAMB. 

Make drawn butter gravy from drippings left from 
steaming, add capers more or less, season with pepper 
and salt. 



84 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

GRAVY FOR BOILED OR BAKED FISH. 

One-quarter pound butter, large spoon flour, 
thoroughly mixed. One cup boiling water. Salt if 
needed. Take the yolks of two hard boiled ei^gs, 
pulverize and add to the above. Cook three minutes 
before egg is added. 

BREAD SAUCE. 
Two cups of milk, one cup of bread crumbs, one- 
quarter of a good sized onion; one tablespoon of butter, 
salt and pepper to taste, let onion and milk come to a 
boil together, have bread very dry, roll fine and sift 
through a flour sieve put in milk and cook ten 
minutes, then take out the onion and add butler and 
seasoning. Put tablespoon of butter in a small fry 
pan, when very hot add coarse crumbs and stir con- 
stantly until crisp and bro^n, sprinkle over birds or 
game of any kind and pour sauce around and serve. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 
One quart can tomatoes, two tablespoons of butter, 
two of flour, two cloves and a small slice of onion. 
Cook tomatoes onions and cloves ten minutes, heat 
the butter in frying pan and add the flour, stir into 
the tomato and cook ten minutes, season to taste with 
salt and pepper and put through a strainer. Nice for 
fish and meat 

TART ARE SAUCE. 
Yolks of two uncooked eggs, one-half cup olive 
oil, three tablespoons vinegar, one tablespoon mustard, 
one teaspoon sugar, one-quarter teaspoon pepper, 
one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon onion juice, one 
tablespoon of chopped capers, one tablespoon 
chopped cucumber pickks. Beat yolks well and 
add seasoning and mustard mixed together add 
drop by drop the oil alternately with the vinegar beat- 
ing all the while, then add capers and cucumber pick- 
les. Serve with fish or cauliflower. 

M. K. BARNES. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 35 



36 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



VBQBTABUBS. 



Cheerful looks make every dish a feast. 

(Massinger.) 



VEGETABLES — prepauing and cooking. 

All green vegetables must be washed in cold water 
and dropped into water which has been salted and just 
beginning to boil. There should be a tablespoon of 
salt to every two quarts of water. The 3'onnger and 
more freshl}^ gathered the more quickly they are 
cooked. 



Potatoes, boiled, Thirty to forty minutes. 

Potatoes, baked, Forty five minutes. 

Sweet Potatoes, boiled, Forty-five minutes. 

Squash, boiled, Twenty-five minutes. 

Squash, baked, Forty-five minutes. 

Green Peas, boiled, • . . . . Twenty to forty minutes. 

Shell Beans, One hour. 

String Beans, One to two hours. 

Green Corn, Twenty-five minutes. 

Asparagus, Fifteen to thirty minutes. 

Spinach, One to two hours. 

Cabbage, Forty-five minutes to two hours. 

Dandelion Greens, Two to three hours. 

Beet Greens, One hour. 

( )nions, One to two hours. 

Beets, One to five hours. 

White Turnips, Forty-five minutes. 

Parsnips, Thirty to forty minutes. 

Carrots, One to two hours. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



POTATO SOUFFLE. 

Boil four good sized potatoes, pass them through a 
sieve, scald one-half cup milk aud one tablespoon 
butter add to the potato with a little salt and pepper, 
and beat to a cream, add (one at a time) the yolks 
of four eggs, beating thoroughly, drop into the whites 
a small pinch of salt, and beat to a stiff froth add to 
mixture, beating as little as possible. Bake twenty 
minutes in well buttered baking dish. Serve at once, 
to be eaten with meats that have gravies. 



STUFFED AND BAKED TOxMATOES. 

Take as many tomatoes as j^our dish will hold, 
smooth, and solid Cut a small piece from top, and 
carefully remove the pulp and seeds. Make a dressing 
of bread crumbs, seasoned with pepper, salt and sage, 
mix with pulp carefully, stuff tomatoes and add a piece 
of butter on the top of each. Bake about half an 
hour. 



TO BOIL CAULIFLOWER. 

Put into boiling water, and boil briskly from twenty 
minutes to one-half hour keeping the sauce pan un- 
covered, skimming the water several times. When 
tender, drain and place in the dish. Serve with butter, 
a white sauce or drawn butter. 



STUFFED POTATOES. 

Take large, fair potatoes, bake until soft, cut small 
piece from one end, and carefully remove the inside 
without breaking the skin. Prepare as for mashed 
potato using milk, butter, salt and pepper to taste. 
Stuff the potatoes and put in oven to keep hot until 
wanted for table. 

MRS. G. w. c. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 3'J 



BOILED DINNER. 

Wash a piece of corned beef weighing about five 
ponnds, put into one gallon of cold water, when it 
comes to a boil ,skim carefully aud boil slowly three 
hours. At the beginning of the last two hours add a 
large head of cabbage, cut in two. An hour later add 
carrots and turnips nicely cleaned. Lastly add pota- 
toes, allowing one-half hour for them to boil. Cook 
beets in a separate kettle. 

MRS. C. E. HUBBARD. 

BOILING VEGETABLES. 

In boiling beef and vegetables, put a tea cup of 
vinegar into the pot when the v/ater is cold, and the 
beef will be much tenderer, and cabbage and beets 
better flavored and will not fill the house with unplea- 
sant smell. The vinegar will not affect the taste of 
food. Rule: — All vegetables to go into fast boiling 
water, to be quickly brought to the boiling point again, 
not left to steep in the hot w^ater before boiling, which 
toughens them and destroys color and flavor. 

MRS. CHARLES E. HUBBARD. 

POTATO BALLS. 

Take four large mealy cold potatoes and mash in 
a pan with two tablespoons of melted butter, a pinch 
of salt and a little pepper, one tablespoon of cream 
and the beaten yolk of one ^gg. Rub all together for 
about five minutes or until very soft, shape into round 
balls dip them into fine sifted bread crumbs and fry in 
boiling lard. 

S. G. LANGDON. 

FRIED PARSNIPS. 

Boil until tender remove the skin and cool, cut in 
lengthwise nice slices, and fry in hot lard or pork fat, 
until nicely browned, season with pepper, salt, and 
butter, serve hot. 



40 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

A NICE WAV TO COOK CABBAGE. 

With a sharp knife cut a small cabbage into small 
pieces, boil one hour in salted water, drain through a 
colander, take one cup sweet milk, piece of butter size 
of an egg, a little salt, heat hot, but do not boil, put 
the cabbage into this mixture and let stand on stove 
until well warmed through. Dish, sprinkle with pepper, 
send to the table hot and although cabbage it is really 
delicate. Onions, cooked the same way are equally 
nice, 

MRS. A. F. CURTIS. 

STEWED CABBAGE. 

Cut a head of cabbage fine as for slaw, and boil 
half an hour in clear water, pour off this water and 
cover with salted water, and cook until tender, drain, 
pour over this a dressing made of one-half cup of 
cream, one-half cup sweet milk, and one tablespoon 
of flour, stirred together until smooth; this is good 
either hot or cold and will not hurt the most delicate 
stomach. 

MRS. F. CARIv. 

TREMONT POTATOES. 

Take cold boiled potatoes of uniform medium size, 
and split lengthwise into quarters or sixth?^, fry like 
doughnuts in boiling lard until the outside is browned 
or crisped. Skim out and drain, sprinkle a little salt 
on them before serving. 

BAKED RICE AND TOMATOES. 

One pint of rice, boil from twelve to fifteen 
minutes; pour off water through a colander, put the 
rice into a steamer for one hour or until dry, and each 
grain is like pop corn. Have your tomatoes boiled 
and pour over rice. Butter and salt and pepper to 
taste. Bake until brown, and serve hot. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 41 



BEET HASH. 

Add usual quantity of meat and potato, one-third 
quantity of boiled beets moisten with cream if possible, 
if not use milk, can be made with or without meat, 
season to taste. 

MRS. A. L. BARDWELL. 

PARSNIP FRITTERS. 

Mash parsnips fine, then add one tablespoonful 
flour, one ^gg, season, butter, salt, pepper, make 
patties, and fr}^ in butter. 

MISS E. SHATTUCK. 

MACARONI BOILED. 

Break up and wash a pint bowl full of macaroni, 
put in a shallow basin and cover with coid water, set 
this basin into another, and place on the fire, after 
fifteen minutes add a pint of milk and a teaspoon of 
salt. Let it cook ten minutes longer, then add a 
spoonful of butter and cook five minutes longer The 
macaroni left from one dinner can be used by placing 
in a buttered shallow dish, then grate cheese over it 
and brown. 

MISS PARLOA. 
iMACARONI IN CREAM. 

Wash a pint of macaroni, and put in a basin with 
cold milk, set this in another basin with some water 
and let it stand twenty minutes on the fire, then take 
off and when it gets cold stir in one teaspoon of salt, 
and three well beaten eggs, turn into shallow dish and 
bake twenty minutes. 

AN OLD-FASHIONED DISH. 

Fry several slices of salt pork brown, and take 
from the spider, place in the fat, sliced sour apples 
cover and fry, take these out and put in potatoes 
sliced thin, serve apples and potatoes with pork. 



42 HATFIELD COOK BOOK 

BAKED BEANS. 

Soak one quart of beans over night pour off the 
water, and cook in fresh water until they crack open, 
then put them in an earthen dish, cover with water. 
(Add a little molasses if you like them sweet ) Put 
in center of the dish one half pound of salt pork, 
parboiled, and scored across the rind. Bake slowly 
four hours, until brown 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 43 



44 ■ HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 45 



46 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



BREAKFAST AND TEA DISHES. 



"Dinner may be pleasant- 
So may social tea; 
But yet methinks the breakfast 
Is best of all the three." 



DUCHESS POTATOES. 

Boil potatoes as usual to mash, when done, drain, 
and add two ounces of butter, two eggs, a bit of white 
pepper and salt. Press through a sieve, form into 
little oval loaves, flat on top, mark with a knife, put 
melted butter on top, and brown in oven. 

MISS. LUCY WEBBER. 

ESCOLLOPED POTATOES. 

Butter a deep dish and fill with cold sliced potatoes, 
sprinkle salt over the potatoes, scald one quart of 
milk, boil two tablespoons butter on stove, when 
boiling add one-half cup of flour, then stir in gradually 
the milk, until it thickens, seasoning with salt and 
pepper. Then pour in the potatoes, place cracker 
crumbs on top mixed with melted butter. Bake one- 
half hour. 

MRS. F. H. BARDWELL. 
POTATO CAKES. 

Two cups mashed potatoes, one beaten egg, one 
tablespoon melted butter, salt and pepper. Form into 
balls, roll in flour and fry in hot lard. 

MRS. C. A. JONES. 



48 HATFIELD COOK BOOK 



RISOTTO NAPOLITAINE. 

One onion, one ounce butter, one pound rice, one 
quart beef stock, tliree ounces grated cheese. Cut 
a medium sized onion into small pieces, and put into 
sauce pan on stove with one ounce of butter. Cook 
about fifteen minutes or until lightly colored. Wash 
the rice, blanch ten minutes in boiling water, then 
put in cold water for a minute, drain and put in 
sauce pan with onion and beef stock. Simmer gently 
for fifty minutes and add the grated cheese, dash of 
pepper, salt and cayenne. Stir well together boil a 
few minutes, and serve hot. 

MISS M. K. BARNES. 



GRAHAM GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Two quarts of sweet milk or skim milk, two 
tablespoons of molasses, five teaspoons of salt, one-half 
of a yeast cake, one quart and half of graham 
flour, one quart and a fourth of wheat flour. Stir all 
together the night before. L-et rise until morning, 
then fry on a hot iron, and serve immediately. Cakes 
for a family of nine. 

MRS. F. H. BARDWELL. 



POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Six large cooked potatoes, one tablespoon of butter; 
one wineglass of cream, yolks of two eggs, salt to 
taste. Peel, boil and mash potatoes until perfectly 
smooth, then add the butter, cream and lastly eggs. 
Shape as croquettes, dip in Q:gg and bread and 
cracker crumbs, and fry in boiling lard a nice brown. 
It would be well after mixing to let stand in a cold 
place for an hour. 

MISS HARRIET BYRNE. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 4!> 

SWEET BREADS ON TOAST. 

Boil sweet breads twenty minutes, remove the 
skin, and tough fibre. Make cream sauce of one pint 
milk thickened with tablespoon of flour when boiling, 
and a little butter and salt. Cut the sweet breads 
into dice and add to the boiling sauce, boil a minute 
and serve on pieces of toast. 

MIvSS M. K. BARNES. 

CROQUETTES. 

One cup chopped lobster or chicken, one saltspoon 
of dry mustard, one saltspoon of salt, a little pepper. 
Make white sauce as follows: One cup scalded milk, 
tw^o tablespoons butter, two tablespoons flour. Stir 
butter and flour 'till smooth. Add hot milk and 
chopped meat. When cool roll a large spoon of the 
mixture in cracker or bread crumbs, then in beaten 
^gg^ then in crumbs again. Fry in hot fat until 
brown. 

MRS. I. B. LOWELL. 

RICE OMELET. 

One cup cold boiled rice, four teaspoons milk, 
two eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, one- 
half saltspoon salt, one tablespoon butter. Heat 
butter very hot in frying pan, then pour in other 
ingredients mixed well together. Cover and bake 
about ten minutes in moderate oven, until stiff. 
Double and turn it out carefully onto hot platter. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 

VEAL PATTEE. 

Three pounds finely chopped veal, one pound salt 
pork, one coffee cup rolled crackers, tw^o tea spoons 
salt, two small tea spoons pepper, four eggs, mix 
thoroughly, bake two hours in slow oven. 

MRS. KNIGHT. 



50 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

One large cup cooked rice, one-half cup milk, 
one Qgg^ one tablespoon of sugar, one tablespoon 
butter, one-half teaspoon salt, little grating of 
nutmeg. Put milk in a dish and add rice and 
seasoning. When it boils up, add the well beaten 
Qigg. Stir a minute, then take off and cool. When 
cold, shape and roll well in egg and crumbs, drop in 
boiling lard and fry until brown. 

MISS M. K. BARNES. 
CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Two finely chopped cups chicken, butter size of 
an egg., one large spoon flour, one large cup of water, 
one-half teacup of milk. Melt butter and flour 
together, then add milk and water. Cook this to 
consistency of drawn butter. Then add cup bread 
crumbs. Season with salt and pepper, then add 
chicken and cook slowly a few moments. When done 
spread in a dish to cool, then make into balls, dip 
in beaten egg., roll in cracker crumbs and fry in 
boiling lard. This rule makes twelve. Veal can be 
used instead of chicken. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

One solid pint of finely chopped chicken or lamb, 
(cooked,) one tablespoon salt, one-half teaspoon 
pepper one cup cream or chicken stock, one table- 
spoon flour, four eggs, one teaspoon onion juice, one 
tablespoon lemon juice, one pint bread crumbs, little 
parsley, three tablespoons butter. Put stock or cream 
on to boil. Mix flour and butter together and stir 
into it. Then add chicken and seasoning. Boil for 
two minutes and add two of the eggs, well beaten. 
Then take from fire and set away to cool. When 
cold, shape and fry, using the other two eggs to dip 
the balls into. 

MRS. G. B. BARNES. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 61 

CHICKEN SOUFFLE. 

One pint finely chopped cooked chicken, one pint 
cream sauce, four eggs, one tablespoon onion juice, 
salt and pepper. Stir the chicken into the boiling 
sauce, cook two minutes. Add the yolks of the eggs 
well beaten, and set away to cool. Then add the 
whites well beaten. Turn into a buttered dish and 
bake half an hour. 

MRS. G. B. BARNES. 

ESCOLLOPED POTATOES. 

Butter the bottom and sides of a tin basin, slice 
cold boiled potatoes, place in the basin a laj^er of po- 
tatoes, butter, pepper and salt, dust flour over it. 
Another layer of potatoes, with seasoning and so on, 
until the dish is filled. Place on top a layer of 
cracker crumbs, and over the whole a large cup of 
cream. Bake in steady oven half an hour. 

CREAM POTATOES. 

One pint cold chopped potatoes, one cup milk, one 
tablespoon flour, one teaspoon salt. Heat milk in a 
sauce pan, stir flour in cold milk until smooth, add 
to the boiling milk, put potatoes into the cream and 
stir until well heated, add tablespoon of butter and 
put into oven to brown. 

MRS. B. M. WARNER. 
SMOTHERED SAUSAGE. 

Prick link sausages with large needle in fifteen or 
twenty places. Put in frying pan in which is half 
cup hot water, roll sausages over in this several 
times and cover closely. Put the pan where the water 
will boil slowly for ten minutes, roll sausages over 
again two or three times and cook the other side ten 
minutes. Turn twice more, at intervals of five minutes. 
Cover and let steam five minutes before serving. 

MRS. D. BILLINGS. 



52 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Boil a chicken until tender, take the meat from 
the bones, season with salt, pepper and butter. Pour 
in enough of the liquor it was boiled in to moisten 
well, and put in an\' shape yon choose, placing 
alternate layers of light and dark meat. When cold 
turn out and slice. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 

BEEF LOAF. 

Three pounds fresh beef chopped fine, two cups 
cracker crumbs, one and one-half cups sweet milk, 
two eggs, butter size of an Qgg^, salt, pepper and sage 
if you choose. Bake slowly two hours. 

MRS. C. L. WARNER. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Two pounds uncooked veal, chopped very fine, one- 
half pound salt pork, chopped very fine, two eggs, 
one pound pounded crackers, three tablespoons of 
salt, two talDlespoons of pepper, one tablespoon of 
sugar, little sage. Press hard and bake two hours. 

MRS. PEASE. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Two eggs, one cup of milk, one cup flour, one 
teaspoon of baking powder, three apples sliced thin, 
little salt. Drop in hot fat, a tablespoon at a time. 
Brown like doughnuts, sprinkle on sugar while hot. 

MRS. I. B. LOWELL. 

SNOWY OMELET. 

Four eggs, four tablespoons of milk, little salt and 
pepper, beat yolks separately, mix together, leaving 
out one-third of the whites, when ready to turn spread 
one-half the remaining whites. In making omelet, 
when it has set round the edge, set in the oven four 
minutes, then take out and turn. 

MRS. S. G. HUBBARD. 



HATFIELD COOK £00K. 53 



BEEF STEAK OMELET. 

One and one-half pound steak, chop fine, one ^gg, 
small piece butter, little salt, one-half cup milk. Bake 
one-half an hour 

MRS. CHARLES BARTLETTE. 

MEAT OMELET. 

Piece of cold roast beef or steak, chopped fine, to 
one cup meat add one Q^gg, beaten, salt and { epper. 
Mix thoroui^hly, drop a tablespoon on a hot buttered 
g'ridd'e brown b' th sides. Chopped oysters ma\ hi 
used. 

MRS. CUTLER. 

RAGOUT OF MEAT. 

Two cups chopped cold meat, one cup rolled 
cracker, season with salt and pepper, moisten with 
milk or beef grav}^, shape into balls, roll in cracker 
crumbs, then in eggs, again in crumbs. Bake in hot 
oven fifteen minutes, or until brown. 

MRS. CUTLER. 

OMELET. 

Four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separatel}-, 
three tablespoons milk to each ^gg, one tablespoon of 
flour, salt, add beaten whites last. Put in spider 
butter half size of an ^gg^ cover and cook slowly. 

MRS. J. E. PORTER. 

PRESSED EGGS. 

Eight eggs boiled hard, while hot, chop with salt 
and butter size of a walnut. Press in deep dish and 
serve cold. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 

EGG OMELET. 

One cup milk, one cup cracker crumbs, three eggs 
beaten, and a little salt. 

MRS. C. W. MARSH. 



54 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

WELSH RARE BIT. 

One-half pound grated cheese, two eggs, one-half 
cup of cream or milk, one teaspoon mustard, one tea- 
spoon salt, one teaspoon melted butter, speck of 
cayenne, speck of soda. Melt cheese, when nearly 
melted add other ingredients and cook until thickened. 
Serve on split crackers. 

MISS EUNICE MORTON. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

One pint of corn pulp, two beaten eggs, one-half 
teaspoon of salt, a little pepper, two tablespoons of 
flour or just enough to keep corn and eggs together. 

MRS. C. W. MARSH. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

One pint of grated sweet corn, one Qgg well beaten, 
one small cup of flour, one-half gill of cream, one 
teaspoon of salt. Fry in hot fat by teaspoon fuls. 

MRS. HENRY S. HUBBARD. 

HAM AND EGG ON TOAST. 

Chop fine pieces of cold boiled ham, toast and 
butter slices of bread, spread the ham on bread and 
place in oven about three minutes. Beat six eggs, 
(less will do) with half cup milk, little pepper and salt. 
Put in sauce pan with two tablespoons of butter and 
stir over fire until it begins to thicken, take off and 
beat for a minute, then spread on toast and ham. 

MRS. C. K. MORTON. 

BAKED OMELET. 

Four eggs, whites, yolks beaten separately, add 
to yolks one tablespoon flour, two tablespoons melted 
butter, one cup milk, salt and pepper to taste, stir in 
whites of eggs. Butter the dish and bake fifteen 
minutes. 

MISS CORNELIA BILLINGS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 55 



BAKED EGGS. 

Beat the whites of six eggs to a stiff froth add 
little salt, place on buttered dish make six holes 
dropping into each one whole yolk. Bake quickly 
until whites are slightly brown. 

MRvS. CUTLER. 

WAFFLES. 

One pint sweet milk, two heaping teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, flour to make as thick as griddle cakes. 
Then add three eggs well beaten, butter size of an 
e^^ melted. Fry brown in waffle iron. 

WAFFLES. 

Three eggs, 3^olks oijly, one quart milk, one-half 
cup melted butter, one heaping teaspoon baking 
powder. Afterwards add whites of eggs, and flour 
enough to make stiff batter. 



5G HATFIELD COOK JiOOK. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 67 



68 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



SAUADS. 



"Now good digestion wait on appetite and health on both." 

(Shakespeare.) 



CHICKEN OR VEAL SALAD. 

Half as much celery as meat, yolks of two eggs, 
cup of vinegar, one teaspoon strong mustard, piece of 
butter, salt, teaspoon sugar. Boil all together on 
stove. Pour over. 

CARRIE h. WARNER. 



SALAD DRESSING. 

Yolks of three eggs, one teaspoon mustard, two 
teaspoons salt, one-quarter teaspoon cayenne pepper, 
two tablespoons sugar, one cup cream or milk, one-half 
cup hot vinegar, whites of three eggs beaten stiff. 

MRvS. GEO. BILLINGS. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Two and a half teaspoons mustard, one cup 
vinegar, three eggs, little pepper and salt. Boiled 
together with a cup of butter or cream. When cold 
add one-third cnp of sugar. Ju.'^t before serving whip 
a half cup cream and stir into dressing. 

MRvS. A. H. GRAVES. 



60 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

ANOTHER. 

One Q^g^ thoroughly beaten, one teaspoon mustard, 
one tablespoon sugar, butter size of a walnut, one-half 
cup vinegar. Mix thoroughly and cook a little. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

Shred cabbage fine, sprinkle with salt and pepper, 
one-half cup vinegar, two tablespoons water, one table- 
spoon butter, two tablespoons sugar. Let it come to 
a boil; when cool beat in one-half cup of cream, one 
^gg^ one-half tablespo(m flour. Let all boil up once, 
add the cabbage, mix while hot. 

S. G. LANGDON. 

CREAM SALAD. 

Chop fine one-half head of cabbage. Stir into it 
one-half cup cream and a little salt. Heat one-half 
cup vinegar stirring into it the beaten yolks of two 
eggs, one teaspoon sugar, one-half teaspoon mustard. 
Pour over the cabbage as it goes to the table. 

MISvS CARRIE WARNER. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

One small head of cabbage sliced or chopped fine, 
one cup sweet milk boiling hot, a little less than a 
cup of vinegar, one tablespoon butter, two eggs, well 
beaten, one tablespoon sugar, one teaspoon extract 
of celery, pepper and salt to taste. Heat milk and 
vinegar separately, when vinegar boils add the butter, 
sugar, pepper and salt. Boil up once and stir in the 
cabbage. Heat to scalding heat (do not boil.) To 
the hot milk add the eggs and cook one minute after 
it begins to thicken. Put cabbage into a deep dish, 
pour on the custard, stirring quickly, tossing up 
mixture with a silver fork. Cover close and put on 
ice. 

MRS. E. GRAVES. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 61 

BOILED DRESSING. 

Yolks of three eggs, one teaspoon mnstard, one 
teaspoon salt, a little cayenne, one tablespoon of 
sugar, two tablespoons melted butter, one-half cup 
vinegar, one cup cream or milk, mix together and 
cook like boiled custard. Tlie whites of eggs may be 
beaten and added just before serving to make more 
in quantity, but better without. 

MRS. M. K. MORTON, MRvS. M. II. BURKE. 



SALAD DRESSING. 

Two eggs beaten light, one-half cup vinegar, one 
teaspoon each of mustard, sugar and salt, mixed 
together with a little hot w^ater until smooth. Pour 
the egg into the mixture, add one cup of cream or 
butter, and cook in a double boiler until it thickens. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Two boiled lobsters chopped with lettuce, not very 
fine, also the whites of four hard boiled eggs, rub the 
yolks in a bowl with one teaspoon mustard, one-half 
teaspoon salt, small teaspoon sugar, little cayenne 
pepper, butter size of an &gg (melted ) Add vinegar 
to taste, a half cup or so. Serve on lettuce leaves 
after mixing with the dressing. 

MRS. E. C. BYRNE. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Two well beaten eggs, one tablespoon made mus- 
tard, two tablespoons sugar, three tablespoons melted 
butter, two- thirds cup of vinegar, one-half teaspoon 
salt Cook as boiled custard in kettle of water. Stir 
briskh' after taking from the fire that it may be 
smooth. 

MRS. C. W. MARSH. 



62 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



POTATO SALAD. 

One dozen cold potatoes sliced thin, one-half tea- 
spoon mustard, one-half teaspoon pepper, one teaspoon 
salt, buttei' size of an egg, one-half cup vinegar, one- 
half cup water, chop celery or a little onion with 
potatoes. Let the dressing simmer and pour over the 
potato while hot, 

MRS. FRED CARL. 

ANOTHER. 

Six cold boiled potatoes cut in small cubes. One 
or two stalks of celery cut in thin slices, put in salad 
dish, season with salt and pepper, (if you like a little 
parsley may be used,) then pour over it the dressing. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Have a tablespoon of mustard, or half as much, 
with a little cayenne pepper and mix with it gradually 
two tablespoons olive oil or melted butter, stir into 
this a teaspoon of salt, and a tablespoon of sugar, add 
three beaten eggs and mix thoroughly, then add a 
cup of milk or cream, and a cup of vinegar. Cook 
like soft custard. 

MRS. E. A. HUBBARD. 

VEAL SALAD. 

One small teaspoon salt. One large teaspoon 
mixed mustard, one tablespoon sugar, two raw eggs, 
butter, size of an egg; beat thoroughly, then add one 
teacup vinegar. Set in dish of boiling water and stir 
until it thickens. One and one-half pounds veal and 
half as much celerv. 

MISS EUNICE J. MORTON. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 63 



WBIQHTS AIND MEASURBS. 



The foUowiug is a table of weights and measures. 

4 tablespoons, .... 1-2 gill or i wine glass or 1-4 cup. 
I tablespoon 1-2 ounce. 

1 pint, 1 pound. 

2 gills, I cup or 1-2 pint. 

I quart of flour, i pound. 

4 cups, I quart or 1 pound. 

I rounded tablespoon flour, 1-2 ounce. 

3 cups of corn meal, i pound. 

I cup of butter, 1-2 pound. 

I pint of butter, i pound. 

1 tablespoon of butter, i ounce. 

1 solid pint of chopped meat, i pound. 

10 eggs, I pound. 

2 cups granulated sugar, i pound. 

2 1-2 cups of powdered sugar, i pound. 

I pint of brown sugar, 13 ounces. 



BREADS, 



"The very staff of life. The comfort of the husband— and the pride 
of the wife." 



POTATO YEAST. 

At noon take 2 common sized potatoes, mash 
them well. Add i tablespoon of salt, i tablespoon 
of sugar. Pour over this i pint of boiling water, 
then I quart of cold water. Dissolve ^ yeast cake, 
and let it rise until night. Then make your bread 
with only the water. Keep the settlings to raise your 
yeast next time. This will make 4 loaves of bread. 

MRS. ERNEST GODIN. 

POTATO YEAST. 

4 large boiled potatoes, 3 tablespoons flour, 2 
tablespoons sugar, i tablespoon salt. mix. Pour 
boiling water over this and strain. When cool add 
I cent's worth brewers' yeast. Bottle. 

MRS. ED. GRAVES. 

WHEAT BREAD. 

I pint milk, i pint water. Warm milk and water. 
Add I tablespoon sugar, i teaspoon salt, ^4 cent's 
worth of yeast. Stir in flour sufficient for thin batter. 
Let it stand until light. Mould in flour until it will 
not stick, let rise again. Mould into loaves. Makes 2 
loaves. 

MRS. ED. GRAVES. 



e,(i HATFIELD CODE BOOK. 



BREAD TWICE RAISED. 

3 pints milk scalded and cooled, 3 quarts of floury 
(or enough for stiff sponge,) i tablespoon sugar, i 
teaspoon salt, ^ cake compressed yeast dissolved in a 
little water. Mix thoroughly and let rise over night. 
In the morning knead one-half hour, and let rise 
again. Then mould into loaves, and when light 
enough bake from fifty minutes to one hour. Three 
loaves. 

MRS. N. t). BILLINGS. 

WHEAT BREAD. 

1^4 quarts warm flour, i^ pints milk scalded and 
cooled and well beaten, y^ cake yeast dissolved in 
little tepid water. Stir together and let rise over 
nijrht. In the morning add one teaspoon salt, one 
tablespoon sugar, }4 tablespoon shortening, flour 
enough to knead. Let rise; when well risen put in two 
pans and let them rise to twice their size and put in 
oven to bake. 

MISS L. D. PORTER. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

2 cups white flour, 2 cups graham flour, i cup milk, 
'^ tablespoons sugar, i tablespoon salt, i cup water, 
3^east. One loaf. 

MRS. C. W. MARSH. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

2 cups of milk, 3 cups graham flour, i cup wheat 
flour, }4 cup molasses, i teaspoon of soda, salt. Steam 
2 hours and bake one-half hour. 

MRS. I. B. LOWELL. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

2^ cups graham flour, i cup white flour, i coffee 
cup sour milk with teaspoon of soda in it, teaspoon 
salt, ^2 cup molasses, i egg, cover with tin and bake 
in slow oven an hour and a half. 

MISS M. E. PHELPS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 67 



GRAHAM CRACKERS. 

^ cup of butter, i cup of sugar, white of one Qgg 
•well beaten. Add i teaspoon cream tartar, ^ teaspoon 
soda, J/2 cup cold water, graham flour enough to 
knead. Roll thin, cut in squares, prick with a fork and 
bake in hot oven, 

MARIA L. PORTER. 



GRAHAM BREAD. 

I pint milk and water, V2 gill molasses, l table- 
spoon brewers' yeast, little salt, flour to stir stiff". Let 
rise, mould and put in pan. One loaf. 

MRS, ED. GRAVES, 



GRAHAM BREAD. 

2 y2 cups sour milk, i cup molasses, 2 teaspoons 
soda, 1 teaspoon salt, 3 cups graham, i cup wheat 
flour. Stir in the order named, set to rise for two hours 
in the loaf pans and bake three fourths of an hour in 
a medium oven, 

MRS. R. M, W^OODS. 

OAT MEAL BREAD. 

2 cups oat meal, pour over 4 cups boiling water at 
noon, at night ."-tir into this 3^ cup of molasses, J/^ 
yeast cake, salt and flour to make it very stiff", abotit 
2 quarts, in the morning place in bread pans and let 
rise until light, 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 

GRAHAM ROLLS. 

I pint sour milk, i teaspoon of soda, 1 tablespoon 
molasses, small half teaspoon salt, graham sufficient 
for thin batter. Bake in hot gempans. 

MRS. C. D. BARDWELL 



68 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



BAKED BROWN BREAD. 

3 cups graham flour, i cup white flour, i cup 
New Orleans molasses, i teaspoon of soda dissolved in 
hot water, 2 cups sour milk, bake one hour and a 
half in oven not too hot. 

ULA GRAVES. 



STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

2 cups of milk, 2 cups indian meal, i^ cups of 
flour, I cup of molasses, i teaspoon of soda, steam 
three hours. 

MRS. I. B. LOWELL. 



BROWN BREAD. 

2 cups of corn meal, 2 cups of white flour, 1 cup 
of graham flour, ^ cup molasses, 3 cups sour milk or 
butter milk, i heaping teaspoon of soda, scant teaspoon 
of salt mix and put in covered pail, set in kettle of 
boiling water, steam for two and a half hours, bake 
one half hour. 

MRS. N. S. HEAFY. 



BROWN BREAD. 

2% cups of sour milk, yi cup molasses i teaspoon 
of salt, I teaspoon of soda, 2H cups Indian meal, r 
cup graham flour, steam three hours. 

MARGARET McGRATH. 



STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

I coffee cup molasses, i teaspoon soda dissolved 
in hot water and beaten into molasses, i ^gg, i quart 
sweet milk, 3 cups sifted corn meal, 2 cups graham 
flour, y2 cup white flour, little salt, steam three and a 
half hours. 

MRS. J. E. PORTER. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. G9 

BROWN BREAD. 

I cup meal, 2 cups graham, 2 cups milk, -/y cup 
molasses, i teaspoon soda, little salt, steam three 
hours. 

MRvS. M. H. BURKE. 



INDIAN xMEAL ROLLS. 

2 egg-s, Vi cup sugar, i large cooking spoon of 
shortening, Y^ cup bolted indian meal, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 2 cups pastry flour, 2 teaspoons Ro3^al Baking 
Powder, pinch of salt. Beat eggs, sugar and shortening 
well together, then add remaining ingredients, beat 
again and bake in gem pans. 

RAISED BISCUIT. 

I quart new milk, 3^ cup lard set on stove and 
when melted add Vz cup sugar, tablespoon of salt. Set 
aside to cool, when luke warm add i cake of compress- 
ed yeast dissolved in a little water with small pinch of 
baking soda, stir as stiff as possible, with well sifted 
bread flour, then knead well with hands, set in a warm 
place to rise. In the morning knead down and let it 
rise again. When light mould into biscuit, let it rise 
again and bake in rather hot oven. 

GEMS. 

1 cup of milk, I ^gg^ i^ cups flour, ^2 cup corn 
meal, 2 teaspoons baking powder, salt. 

MRS. I. B. LOWELL. 

RAISED BISCUIT. 

2 quarts flour, i pint milk, i yeast cake, M cup 
lard, I tablespoon sugar. 

MRS. GEORGE A. BILLINGS. 



70 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

RYE MUFFINS. 

I cup rye flour, y^ cup sugar, ^4 teaspoon salt, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, i cup white flour, i ^gg, i 
cup milk. 

MRS. CUTLER. 



JOHNNY CAKE. 

i^ cups butter-milk, ^ cup sugar, i cup flour, i 
cup Indian meal, i Qgg,, i large teaspoon soda, little 
salt, nutmeg. 

MRS. J. T. FITCH. 



JOHNNY CAKE. 

2 cups butter-milk, i cup molasses, i teaspoon 
soda, 5^ teaspoon salt, 2 cups Indian meal, 2 cups 
wheat flour. 

MRS. D. \V. WELLS. 



RAISED GRIDDLE CAKE. 

I quart milk scalded, 14 yeast cake, i tablespoon 
sugar, I teaspoon salt, flour to make a thin batter. 
In the morning add ^i teaspoon soda. 

MRS. A. L. BARDWELL. 



WHEAT ROLLS. 

2 cups flour, 2 tablespoons sugar, butter size of 
^gg^ Yi teaspoon soda, i ^/2 teaspoons cream tartar. 
The above worked together with the hands. Then 
add T ^gg^ and milk enough for thick batter. Bake 
quickly in hot pans. 

MRS. C. D. BARDWELL. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 71 



NEWPORT ROLLS. 

2 eggs, I cup milk, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, butter size of an &gg, 2 cups 
flour. 

MRS. FRED PEASE. 

GERMAN SPONGE. 

Scald i^ cups sweet milk, when cool add ^2 cup 
sugar, ^ yeast cake, i beaten ^gg, flour for batter. 
When risen, work in with hand ^ cup butter and 
flour to make soft dough, which can be patted in 
baking pan. This will make two loaves in jelly tins. 
When risen, bake quickly, and while hot spread 
butter on the top, and sprinkle over the whole a little 
cinnamon and sugar. 

MRS. C. M. BARTON. 

FRENCH ROLLS. 

Stir I pint of scalded milk into 3 pints of flour, 
add yi cup of lard and ]2 cup of sugar. When cold 
add ^ cup of yeast. 

MRS. J. D. PORTER. 

WHEAT MUFFINS. 

% cup butter, ^ cup sugar, i cup milk, pinch of 
salt, 1 5^ cups flour or about as thick as cake, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder. 

MRS. J. D. BROWN. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

At night take 2 quarts of flour, rub in 3 table- 
spoons of lard. Make a hole in middle and put in i 
pint of cold milk, ^2 cup yeast, 3 tablespoons sugar, 
I ^gg and I teaspoon of salt. Let stand until morn- 
ing without mixing. Then mix and when risen cut 
into rolls. When ver}^ light bake quickl}^ 

MRS. C. M. BARTON. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



BREAKFAST MUFFINS. 

% cup sugar, 2 teaspoons butter, i cup milk, i 
teaspoon soda, little salt, 2^^ cups flour, at last stir 
in I ^gg. 

MRS. J. CARL. 

BUNS. 

3 cups milk, I cup sugar, 4 tablespoons yeast, 
flour enough for batter. Rise over night. Add i 
cup sugar, i cup butter, nutmeg, raisins and flour. 
Raise again. When baked rub over with molasses and 
cream. 

MARY E. BRIGGS. 

MUFFINS. 

I cup of sugar, 2 eggs, i cup milk, 2)4 cups flour, 
I teaspoon cream tartar, ^,^ teaspoon soda, butter size 
of an Qgg. 

MARY E. BRIGGS. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

I pint of milk, ^/^ cup of butter, V2 cup of sugar, 
I yeast cake, i teaspoon of salt, 2 quarts of flour. 
Scald the milk, add butter to milk,while warm, when 
cool add sugar, yeast, salt and flour. Let rise until 
morning, then mould a few moments, again at noon 
the same, roll out, cut with a round cookie cutter, 
spreak ^^ with melted butter, and turn the other over 
it Let rise until time to bake for tea. Quick oven. 

MRS. F. H. BARDWELL. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

I quart of flour, i pint milk, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder, little salt. Drop with a spoon into mufiin 
rings. 

MRS. D. W. WELLS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 73 

ROLLS. 

1 quart sifted flour, i tablespoon butter rubbed in 
flour, I tablespoon sugar, i teaspoon salt, ^ yeast 
cake, nearly a pint of milk scalded and cooled. Mix 
as soft as you can work. Set to rise at nine o'clock 
in the morning, and at noon stir down, (not mould.) 
At four or five o'clock roll out ^ of an inch thick 
and put melted butter on each and lap together. Rise 
till light and bake quickly. 

MRS. W. H. BELDEN. 

TOP OVERS. 

2 cups flour, 2 cups milk, 2 eggs, salt, 2 table- 
spoons melted butter. This makes two dozen. Beat 
eggs thoroughly, add salt, butter, milk and flour. 
Bake in hot gem pan in hot stove. 

MRS. J. E. PORTER. 

WHEAT GEMS. 

2 cups water, J/^ cup milk, 3 cups entire wheat 
flour, little salt. Heat gem pans very hot on top of stove, 
fill even full with batter, and place on grate of hot 
oven, let it remain ten minutes then bake quickly 
thirty minutes on bottom of the oven. 

MRS. DAVID BILLINGS. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

2 quarts of flour, i large spoonful of lard rubbed 
with the flour, put in deep pan and make a hole in 
the middle. Take a pint of cold boiled milk, ^^ a cup 
of yeast, Yz a cup of sugar mixed, put into the hole 
and not stir, let it stand over night, stir all together 
with a spoon and let it remain until after noon, then 
knead into biscuits, let them stand until quite light 
or take these ingredients and use them iu the ordinary 
way. 

MISS A. LYMAN. 



74 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



POP OVERS OR I]REAKFA>>T CAKES. 

I ^gg., I cup of flour, I cnp of milk, little salt, 
mukes one dozen, bake in hot gem pans, in quick oven. 
Bake twenty minutes. 

MRS. H. HUBBARD. 



BREAKFAST POCKET BOOKS. 

I quart of warm w ater or milk, 2 eggs, 3 teaspoons 
sugar, I cup of 3^east, 4 tablespoons melted butter. 
Add flour to make a sponge and set to rise, when 
risen work over and set to rise again. When light 
dissolve and add a piece of soda size of a bean, roll 
out, spread the surface with butter, cut in square and 
double over to form a pocket book shape, and put 
them in a pan. Let stand until light, and bake. 

MRS. SAMUEL BILUINGS. 

PAN CAKES. 

1 pint new milk, 2 eggs, yi teaspoon soda, little 
salt and flour to stiffen, mix well and fry in hot lard. 

POP OVERS. 

2 cups flour, 2 large cups milk, 2 eggs, small tea- 
poon salt, makes one dozen. Add a little milk to flour 
and the rest gradually, and eggs thoroughly beaten, 
the last thing. Bake in hot oven. 

MRS. B. M. WOODS. 
MRS. FRED PEASE. 
MISS LIZZIE PORTER. 

SALLY LUNN. 

I quart flour, i tablespoon butter, 3 tablespoons 
sugar, 2 eggs, 2 teacups milk, 2 teaspoons cream 
tartar, i teaspoon soda, small teaspoon salt. 

MRS. N. D. BILLINGS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK 



GREEN CORN GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Grate i dozen ears of corn, add to this i cup of 
sifted pastry flour, i cup niilk, ^2 teaspoon salt, i 
teaspoon sugar. Pinch of black pepper and the beaten 
yolks of 2 eggs. Beat well, stir in the beaten whites, 
and 2 teaspoons baking powder. If canned corn is 
used, I egg will do for the above receipt. 

MRvS. A. L. BARDWKLL. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

I dozen ears of corn grated, 4 eggs, ^4 cup of flour, 
little salt. Fry in hot fat. 

MRS. M. N. BURKE. 

GOOD CORN BREAD. 

Two cups Indian corn, and a cup wheat, 

One cup sour milk, one cup sweet. 

One good o^gg that well you beat; 

A half cup molasses too, 

One half cup sugar add there to 

With one spoon of butter (new,) 

Salt and soda each one spoon 

Mix up quickly and bake it soon, 

Then yon will have corn bread complete, 

Best of all corn bread \ou meet 

It will make your boys ej^es shine 

If he is like that bo}^ of mine. 

If 3'ou have a dozen bo3'S 

To increase your house hold joys 

Double then this rule I should 

And you will have two corn cakes good. 

When you have nothing nice for tea 

This the very thing will be. 

All the men that I have seen 

Say that its of all the cakes the queen; 

Good enough for any king 

That a husband home may bring. 



76 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



PUDDIINGS AIND SAUCES, 



'The proof of the pudding lies in the eating" 



TIREBOT CREAM PUDDING. 

PINK POUTION. 

I pint cream whipped, 3 eggs, whites beaten, speck 
of gelatine to hold it, sweeten to taste and flavor with 



strawberry. 



WHITE PORTION 



I pint cream whipped, 3 eggs whites beaten, speck 
of gelatine, sweeten and flavor with lemon. 

YELLOW PORTION. 

I pint rich milk. 6 eggs yolks, gelatine enough to 
stiffen, sweeten and flavor with vanilla, this can be 
served wdth a border of jelly cut in fancy shapes 

SARAH McHUGH. 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLING. 

I quart of flour, i heaping tablespoon of lard, i 
teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, i large coffee 
cup of milk. Roll and bake one-half hour. Bake 
apples in dish fifteen minutes before laying on crust. 
Sauce for above, i cup of sugar, 2 tablespoons of 
butter, I teaspoon of flour beaten together, V2 cup of 
boiling water. Flavor and boil until clear. 

MRS. N. D. BILLING. 



78 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



BAKED SUET PUDDING. 

I cup of SLiet chopped fine, 2^4 cups of flour, i cup 
raisins, i cup currants, i small cup molasses, ^/^ tea- 
spoon of nutmeg", I teaspoon cinnamon, 2 teaspoons 
cream tartar, i teaspoon soda. Bake one hour in a 
moderate oven. 



I cup of sugar, ^2 cup of butter, i Qgg all well 
beaten, i tablespoon water, then heat to a scald; when 
cool flavor to taste» 

MRS. J. H. HOWARD. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

^ box gelatine, i pint boiling water, 3 lemons 
(juice only) 2 cups of sugar, 4 eggs (whites). Soak 
gelatine in a cup of cold water one-half hour then add 
the boiling water, the juice of the lemons, the sugar 
strain and set awa}^ to cool. When it begins to cool 
beat with an Q.gg beater until quite stiff, then add the 
beaten whites of the eggs. Put in a uiould to cool. 
When cool turn into dish. Serve with boiled custard, 
made with yolks of the eggs. 

MRS. E. B. DICKINvSON. 

CREAM TAPIOCA. 

3 tablespoons tapioca soaked over night, i quart 
of milk, 4 eggs, yolks, i cup sugar, 3 tablespoons of 
prepared cocoanut. Boil milk and tapioca in double 
boiler half an hour. Add yolks, sugar and cocoanut 
beaten together and boil ten minutes longer. Beat 
white to a stiff froth with 3 tablespoons powdered 
sugar, spread over the top sprinkle with cocoanut and 
brown in the oven. 

MRS. E. B. DICKINSON. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. V^ 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDINGS. 

Scald I quart milk, i cup Indian meal, i teacup 
sugar, I teaspoon cinnamon, j4 teaspoon salt. Wet 
the meal in cold milk, stir into the boiling milk, add 
the sugar, cinnamon and salt, pour "the batter into a 
2 quart dish and fill with cold milk, mix, and bake 
four or five hours, 

MRS. FRED CARL. 
DELICATE INDIAN PUDDING. 

I quart milk, 2 large tablespoons Indian meal, i cup 
sugar, 3 eggs, scald the milk, add the meal, cook ten 
minutes and remove from the fire, add the eggs and 
sugar and stir all together and bake slowly three- 
quarter of an hour. To be eaten with cream. 

MISS NELLIE WHALEN. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

I pint stale bread crumbs, i quart milk, 2 squares 
chocolate, 3 tablespoons sugar, i tablespoon hot water, 
4 eggs. Soak crumbs in milk one hour, then mash 
fine, cut chocolate fine into a sauce pan, add 3 table- 
spoons of sugar and i tablespoon hot water, when 
melted add the milk and bread. Beat the yolks of 4 
eggs and the white of one, add 2 more tablespoons of 
sugar and turn into the mixture. Pour into a buttered 
dish and bake forty minutes. Cover with a meringue 
made from the remaining whites of the eggs. Serve 
with whipped cream. 

MRS. C. L. GRAVES. 
GRAHAM PUDDING. 

I cup molasses, i cup milk, icup raisins, 2 cups 
graham flour, j4 teaspoon soda, i egg. (Steam two 
hours.) 

SAUCE. 

Mix with I cup cream whipped and sweetened, the 
beaten white of i egg, 

MRS. C. A. JONES. 



?0 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

I pint cream, i cup milk, J/2 cup sugar, J 2 box 
gelatine soaked in the milk, i square of chocolate. 
Whip the cream to a stiff froth, melt chocolate and 
sugar together with a teaspoon of hot water stir gela- 
tine into this mixture and let it cool, then add whipped 
cream beat all together and put in mould. Serve with 
cream and sugar. 

MARGARET McGRATH. 

CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

I quart milk, take out enough to wet 3 tablespoons 
corn starch, 2 eggs well beaten, 14 cup sugar. Boil 
milk then add beaten eggs, sugar, corn starch and a 
little salt, fla\or with vanilla. Serve with hard sauce. 

SAUCE. 

^ cup butter beaten to a cream, i cup sugar. 
Season with nutmeg. 

MRS. R. M. WOODvS. 

JUDGE PETER'S PUDDING. 

^ box of gelatine, 2 oranges, (juice only,) 9 dates, 
6 figs, two bananas, 2 Bnglish walnuts. Dissoh e the 
gelatine in % pint cold water, let it stand one hour 
then add y2 pint boiling water, 2 lemons, (juice) 2 
cups of sugar. Strain and let cool. The jelly must be 
almost cold before adding the fruit; which has been 
cut fine. Pour into a fancy dish and serve with 
whipped cream. 

MRS. C. A. JONES. 
BREAD PUDDING. 

I pint bread crumbs, i quart milk, i cup of sugar, 
3 eggs (yolks,) piece of butter size of an Q:gg raisins, 
stirred in dish together and baked. Put layer of jelly 
over the top after baking, beat the whites of 3 eggs 
and ^ cup of sugar into a meringue. Brown in the 
oven. 

MISS EMMA A. WAITE. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 81 

RICE PUDDING. 

3 tablespoons (even) rice, i quart of milk, ^2 cup 
^ , of sugar, raisins. Bake until the rice is soft, about 
three hours in a slow oven. Serve cold. 

MISS E. SHATTUCK. 



PRUNE PUDDING. 

White of 3 eggs, i teacup stewed prunes, cut in small 
pieces, 3 tablespoons sugar, 2 teaspoons vanilla. Take 
the whites of the eggs beaten very stiff with the sugar 
then whip in the prunes, then add vanilla, put in a 
buttered dish and bake until brown. Serve with whipp- 
ed cream and sugar. 

MISS EUNICE MORTON. 



PRUNE PUDDING. 

3 well beaten eggs, -/t, cup sugar, i cup stewed 
prunes, i pint milk, i heaping tablespoon corn starch. 
Heat tbe milk to boiling point, stir in the corn starch 
rubbed smooth in a little cold milk, let this come to a 
boil, add the prunes and pour into a pudding dish and 
bake fifteen minutes. Serve with cream. 

MRS. D. ^V. WELLS. 



HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. 

3 ^ggs, I cup milk, i tablespoon melted butter, i 
pint flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, i pint huckle- 
berries, a little salt. Boil one an one-half hours. 
Sauce, butter and sugar. 

E. A. WAITE. 



8'I HATFIELD COOK BOOK'. 



QUAKING PUDDING. 

I qnait milk, 6 eg^s, 2 tablespoons butter (warm 
for buttering the mold,) 1 quart of stale bread cut in 
thin slices (sli\ered,) j4 cup dr}- currants, i cup seeded 
raisins, 5^ leaspoon salt, 3 tablespoons sugar, % 
nutmeg. Measure the bread after it is cut, packed 
solid into a quart measure, butter a 3 quart bowl 
thoroughly, sprinkle the bottom and sides with cur- 
rants, lay bread in laj^ers, raisins betw^een layers, and. 
bread on top. Beat eggs, sugar, salt, and nutmeg, add. 
milk and pour over bread. Put in cool place for three- 
hours, steam in a steamer one and one quarter hours. 
Serve with a creamy sauce made as follows: — 

SAUCE ^ 

% cup of butter, 1 cup powdered sugar, J^ cup 
cream or milk, i teaspoon vanilla or lemon. Beat 
butter to a cream adding sugar gradually, beating all 
the time, when light and creamy, add the flavoring 
and a little at a time the cream. When all is beaten 
smooth place the bowl in a basin of hot water until 
smooth and creamy, 

MISS BERTHA THAYER. 



STEAM PUDDING. 

1 cup sweet milk, j4 cup sugar, }4 cup molasses^ 
3 cups flour, I teaspoon each cinnamon, cloves, soda. 
Add either raisins or berries. Grease a pail or mold 
into which put the above. Cover tightly. Steam 
two hours^ 

SAUCE. 

4 tablespoons boiling milk, t egg, i cup sugar. 
Beat Qgg and sugar together, add to the milk, 

MRS. ARTHUR JENNY. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. ^'A 



COTTAGE PUDDING. 

I egg, I scant cup of milk, i cup of sugar, 2 cups 
of flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, i tablespoon 
melted butter. Serve with 

SAUCK. 

\ % cup of butter, ^ cup of sugar beaten to a 
cream, i teaspoon flour, i cup hot water, cook over 
tea-kettle, juice and rind of i lemon. 

MRS. ARTHUR CURTKS. 

KINGSLEV PUDDING. 

I quart milk, ^^ box gelatine, 4 eggs, yolks. 
Cook these together, then add beaten whites, sweeten 
and flavor to taste Just before it begins to stiffen add 
I dozen macaroons and i dozen cocoanut balls. Serve 
with whipped cream. 

SARAH McHUGH. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

ij4 cups of graham flour, i cup of sweet milk, i 
cup chopped raisins, i cup molasses, ^ teaspoon soda, 
I teaspoon cloves and cinnamon. Steam two hours. 
Serve with whipped cream. 

MRS. F. H. BARDWELL. 

SWEET CORN PUDDING. 

I pint of sweet corn pulp, 2 eggs, i j4 pints of 
milk, I tablespoon of butter, }4 cup of sugar, raisins 
if you like. 

M. A. MORTON. 

BERRY PUDDING. 

I egg, Yz cup sugar, i cup buttermilk, i teaspoon 
soda, little salt, 2 cups berries, flour to make a stiff 
cake, then pour into a 2 quart pan, cover, and boil 
two hours. Serve with sweetened sauce. 

MRS. R. HUBBARD. 



84 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



CUSTARD SOUFFLE i'UDDlNG. 

I pint milk, ^^2 cup flour, J-^ cup sugar. Stir all 
together, cook in double boiler until it tliickens, then 
add a small piece of butter. When cool add 4 eggs, 
whites and j^olks beaten separately. Then bake three- 
quarters of an hour in a pan of water. Serve im- 
mediately from the oven with following. 

EGG SAUCE. 

1 cup of sugar, ^ cup of butter beaten to a cream, 
2 eggs beaten together and added to the sugar and 
butler. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

MRS. F. H. BARDWELL. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Peel, core and slice apples sufficient to fill a baking 
dish. Butter the dish thickly, and put in the apples 
in layers alternately wiih stale cake crumbs and a 
little melted butter. 2 tablespoons of melted butter 
to a pint of apples. Let the last layer be a thick one 
of cake crumbs, then put in a moderately hot oven, 
until apples are tender, then beat together 2 eggs, 
2 tablespoons sugar, more if r.pples are very tart. 
Add I cup of cream, pour it over the puddiug. 
Return to the oven until the pudding is a rich golden 
color. Serve with cream. 

MRS. B. M. WARNER. 

CARAMEL PUDDING. 

2 cups sugar, melted, care must be taken not 
to burn, ^ cup hot water added to sugar, i quart 
milk boiled, 8 eggs, ^^olks only, i tablespoon corn- 
starch, salt to taste. When cooked add the caramel. 
Make a me 1 in gue of the whites of the eggs and brown 
in the oven. Serve with whipped cream flavored 
lightly with vanilla. 

SARAH McHUGH. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 80 



ORANGE PUDDING. 

I package of minute gelatine, i pint boiling water, 
I cup sugar, 3 oranges. Dissolve the gelatine in the 
pint of boiling water, add the sugar and stir well, add 
grated rind and juice of the oranges, and stir all 
together, when cold pour over i cup whipped cream, 
flavor with extract of orange. 

MISS NELLIE ORMONDE. 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

6 oranges, i cup sugar, i pint milk, 3 eggs. Scald 
the milk, add the 3^olks of three eggs well beaten, 
stir constantly. As soon as it thickens add to the 
oranges which have been cut into small piece-^. Beat 
the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, adding i table- 
spoon sugar to each Qgg- Spread on top and set in 
the oven to brown. 

MRS. C. L. WARNER. 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 

Yo cup of minute tapioca, i cup sugar, i pint 
water, 2 lemons, 2 eggs, (whites,) i pint pineapple. 
Boil the tapioca in the water until clear. Add the 
juice of the lemons, add sugar and stir in the beaten 
whites of the eggs, add the pineapple cut in inch 
pieces. Serve cold with sweet cream. 

MRS. CHARLES GRAVES. 



INDIAN PUDDING. 

2 quarts of milk, i cup Indian meal, i cup 
molasses, 2 eggs, ^ teaspoon salt. Scald meal in i 
quart of milk. Add the rest of the milk, molasses, 
eggs and salt. Put in pudding dish. Cover the top 
with small bits of butter and bake three hours. 

MRS. I. B. LOWELL. 



8G HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

1% pounds seeded raisins, i ounce candied lemon 
peel chopped, i ounce candied orange peel chopped, 
yi ounce bitter almonds, i pound suet chopped fine. 
Mix the suet with i quart of sifted bread crumbs. 
Add the raisins, peels and almonds, and the grated 
rind of a fresh lemon, i teaspoon nutmeg, i teaspoon 
cinnamon, i pound light brown sugar, 8 eggs beaten 
very light. Add the sugar, and stir into fruit mix- 
ture. Then add ^ cup of strong coffee. Put in a 
well greased mold and steam three hours. Serve 
with a hard sauce. 

M. A. MORTON. 



SUET PUDDING. 

1 cup chopped raisins, i cup suet chopped fine, i 
cup molasses, i cup milk, i teaspoon soda, i teaspoon 
spices, all kinds, 3 cups of flour. Stir in the order 
named and steam three hours. Serve with 

SAUCE. 

2 eggs, whites only, 4 tablespoons sugar. Flavor 
with vanilla. 

MRS. CHLOE MORTON. 



IMPERIAL RICE PUDDING. 

I teacup rice boiled soft, 3 tablespoons butter, 
nutmeg, sugar, salt to taste, i quart creamy milk, 
% pound raisins, % pound currants, % pound citron 
and candied cherries. Serve with English cream 
sauce made as follows: — i pint rich milk, 6 eggs, 
j^olks beaten, and add to the boiling milk. Sweeten 
to taste. Flavor with vanilla. Beat until cold. 

SARAH McHUGH. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



CREME — DU'I.OMATE. 

I quart rich cream, well whipped, 6 eggs, whites 
only, beaten stiff, ^4 box gelatine, soaked and strained. 
Sweeten and flavor with vanilla. 2 dozen lady fingers, 
^ dozen macaroons arranged in a mold. Just before 
pouring in the crenn, add yi pound candied fruits 
which have been soaked. 

SARAH McHUGH. 

CRACKER PUDDING. 

I quart of milk, 4 crackers rolled fine, 2 eggs, 
yolks only, salt. Bake thirty minutes. When nearh' 
cool make a meringue of whites of eggs and ^ cup 
of sugar. Return to oven and brown quickly. 

MRS. I. B. LOWELL. 
PUDDING SAUCES. 

WHIPPED CREAM. 

I coffee cup cream, 2 eggs, (whites,) 2 tablespoons 
sugar, ^4 teaspoon flavoring extract. Beat all 
together with an &gg beater until stiff. A good sauce 
for many kinds of cake or pudding. 

MRS. B. M. WARNER. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

I ^gg (3'olk,) I cup sugar. 2 tablespoons flour, I 
cup boiling water, butter size of an &gg. Beat the 
sugar and yolk of the egg with a little water together, 
then add the flour, then the cup of boiling water also 
butter. Let this boil a few moments and pour it on 
the well beaten white of an ^gg and stir very lightl3^ 
Add 2 teaspoons vanilla. 

MRS. p. J. BOYLE. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

I &gg well beaten with Vi cup of sugar. Pour on 
this 2 tablespoons of boiling milk. Beat until it is 
light. Flavor. 

MRS. E. A. HUBBARD. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



PUDDING SAUCE. 

I cup sugar, ^ cup butter, i eg-g-, i lemon, juice, 
3 tablespoons boiling water. Cream the butter and 
sugar, and beat in the Qgg whipped light, then the 
lemon. Add a little at a time the boiling water. Set 
in the top of the tea-kettle till it is very hot, stirring 
constantly. It should be the consistency of rich 
cream. 

MRS. J. S. WELIvS. 

RICE PUDDING, 

I tea-cup rice, boiled in 2 cups water, add i quart 
milk, boil until soft. Butter % size of egg, 6 eggs, 
salt. Beat yolks and whites separate, the sugar with 
the yolks stir into rice, also salt and butter Return 
to fire 2 or 3 minutes, being careful not to burn. 
Pour into buttered dish. Beat the 6 whites and 6 
tablespoons sugar to a stiff froth, flavor with lemon, 
lay it over the pudding in folds like a turban, set in 
the oven to brown. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



89 



90 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



PIBS, 



No soil upon earth is so dear to our eyes, 

As the soil we first stirred into terrestrial pies. 

(O. W. Holmes.) 



PIE CRUST. 



4 teacups flour, i heaping cup lard, i teaspoon 
salt, mix lightly with ice water. Add one teaspoon 
baking powder to flour. 

MRS. A. F. CURTIS. 
PUFF PASTE. — (VEHY NICE.) 

I quart sifted flour, i teaspoon baking powder, l 
teaspoon salt, i teacup lard, ver}^ cold, rubbed in fine, 
just enough ice water and the beaten white of an egg 
to make a stiff dough. Roll in sheets, make three parts 
to a cup of butter, roll out three times and set on ice. 
The Qgg may be omitted. 

SARAH McHUGH 



NICE MINCE PIE. 

I bowl of chopped meat, i bowl chopped suet, 3 
bowls chopped apples, i bowl molasses, i bowl sugar 
I bowl cider or sweet pickle juice, 7 teaspoons cinnamon, 
5 teaspoons cloves, 2 mutmegs, raisins. An\' fruit 
you like, salt and pepper to taste. 

MRS. S. G. IirBBARD. 



92 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



MINCE MEAT FOR PIES. 

I cup chopped meat, ly^ cups raisins, lyi cups 
currants, I ^ cups brown sugar, i cup granulated 
sugar, 3 cups chopped apples, i cup meat liquor, 2 
teaspoons salt, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, )4 teaspoon 
powdered cloves, i lemon, grated rind and juice, i 
cup boiled cider or sweet pickle juice, mix in the 
order given. Cook in a porcelain kettle until the apples 
and raisins are soft. Meat from the vein or lower part 
of the round that has a little fat and no bone is the 
best for pie meat. Meat should be boiled until tender 
before chopped. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 

STAWBERRY CREAM PIE. 

I pint milk, 4 eggs (yolks), i teaspoon cornstarch, 
sweeten, i large cup berries or one can. Put on a 
layer of jam before covering with a meringue. 

SARAH McHUGH. 

CREAM PIE. 

I pint milk, ^ cup sugar, 2 eggs (yolks), i table- 
spoon flour. Scald the milk in a double boiler, then 
add eggs and sugar, butter the size of an ^gg^ then 
the flour. Have ready a nicel}^ baked crust in a deep 
pie plate. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth 
add 2 tablespoons sugar, put on top, place in the 
oven unil a delicate brown. Very nice for a change 
witli 2 tablespoons of cocoa in the cream, 

• ULA GRAVES. 

CREAM PIE. 

3 eggs, 8 tablespoons sugar, i tablespoon flour, 
1% cups sweet cream, 4 teacups milk, a little salt, 
and nutmeg. Beat the eggs fast for five minutes, 
then add sugar and flour and beat five minutes, then 
add the other ingredients. 

MRS. FRED CARL. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 93 

CREAM PIE. 

V2 cup cream, i cup milk, i tablespoon flour, i ^gg^ 

1 cup sugar, vanilla. Mix flour and milk, cook in a 
double boiler, remove from stove, add the other ingre- 
dients. Bake with two crusts, 

MRS. WM. BILLINGS. 

SQIJASH PIE. 

1 quart scalded milk, (its better part cream) i pint 
sifted squash, 2 cups sugar, 2 tablespoons flour, (stirred 
into the squash) 3 eggs, flavor with nutmeg. This 
makes two large or four small pies. 

MRS. EDWARD ELDRIDGE. 

CRANBERRY PIE. 

3 large cups cranberries, 3 cups sugar, ^/^ cup 
raisins, 2 cups boiling water, i large tablespoon corn- 
starch. Chop berries and raisins, add sugar and 
water, then add dissolved cornstarch. Boil until it 
thickens a little. Enough for three pies. 

CARRIE W. HOLT. 

LEMON MERINGUE PIE. 

2 lemons, i^ cups sugar, i tablespoon cornstarch, 

2 cups boiling water, 3 eggs, (yolks), butter size of a 
walnut Stir well together the lemons, sugar and 
cornstarch, add the water Cook and add the yolks 
of the eggs, also butter Pour into a baked crust 
spread with three spoons currant jelly. And cover 
with a meringue of three eggs. 

SARAH McHUGH. 

RHUBARD PIE. 

I cup chopped rhubard, i cup sugar, i Q:gg well 
beaten, r tablespoon flour. Bake with two crusts. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 



94 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

LEMON FIE. 

I lemon, (grated rind and juice) 2 eggs, (yolks) 
I cup sugar. Cook in a double boiler, when cool add 
the well beaten whites of the eggs. Put in a crust 
already baked, and put in the oven to brown. 

MRS. D. F. SHATTUCK. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

I cup chopped raisins, i^ cups sugar, i^^ cups 
molasses, 2 cups water, ^ cup vinegar, 8 crackers roll- 
ed fine, I teaspoon cinnamon, ^^ cup butler, a little salt 
and nutmeg. Makes four pies. 

MRS. WM. BILLINGS. 

SQUASH PIE. 

i^ cups sifted squash, i pint cream, 2 cups sugar, 
4 eggs, I pint milk, cinnamon. This quantity makes 
four pies. 

MRS. T. GRAVES. 

CREAM PIE. 

1 34 cups milk, 4 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons 
flour, 2 eggs. Flavor with vanilla. 

MRS. ERNEST GODIN. 

CUSTARD PIE. 

4 ^ggs, (well beaten) 2 tablespoons flour, 2 small 
cups sugar, (beat for five minutes) i quart milk beaten 
in slowly. Have the oven hot enough to brown quickly 
then close the dampers and bake slowly. Makes two 
pies. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

8 tablespoons grated chocolate, i quart boiling 
water, 4 tablespoons flour or cornstarch, 12 tablespoons 
sugar. Boil like custard, fill pies, bake, put meringue 
on top. Makes two pies. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 95 



COCOANUT PIE. 

3 eggs V2 cup shredded cocoanut (soaked in i 
pint milk) I cup sugar, small piece butter, bake with 
one crust. Be sure and watch while baking If de- 
sired 3' on can use less eggs and use i tablespoon flour. 

MRS. C. D. BARDWELL 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Parboil two chickens, make a paste using three 
teaspoons of baking powder to one quart of sifted flour, 
wetting the paste with sweet cream, a little salt. Re- 
move skin and bones, placing the chicken in dish, salt 
and pepper, small pieces of butter. Add liquor in 
which the chickens were parboiled, after removing the 
grease, cover with the paste, having well punctured. 

MRS. HENRY HUBBARD. 

APPLE PUDDING PIES. 

5 cups stewed and strained sour apples, i small 
teacup butter, added while hot, 2 cups sugar, 5 eggs 
bealen light, 2^4 cups cream or rich milk. Make 
three pies baked with one crust. Less eggs, cream 
and butter may be used and still be very nice. 

MRS. A. F. CURTIS. 

RICE PIE. 

% cup boiled rice, 2 eggs, 7^ pint milk, 3^ cup 
cream, 7/3 cup sugar, ^ teaspoon salt, butter size of 
a walnut, 14 cup seeded raisins, nutmeg to taste. 
Bake with one crust, 

MRS. A. S. BROWN. 

LEMON PIE. 

3 ^ggs (yolks,) I teaspoon flour, i cup sugar, 1 
lemon, juice and grated rind, i)^ cups milk, pinch of 
salt. Bake with one crust, when nearly cold cover 
with a meringue, made of the whites of three eggs, 
and brown in the oven. 

MRS. M. A. MORTON. 



1 

96 HAtPlELD COOK BOOK. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 97 



98 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



PUAIIN AIND RAIVCV DESSBRTS 



"The Smile of the Hostess is the Cream of the Feast." 



PINE APPLE CREAM. 

Stir I pound grated pine apple with i cup sugar 
(ten minutes), Yz box gelatine soaked in ^ cup cold 
water until soft, then dissolve in ^^ cup of boiling 
water and strain into the pine apple. When cool and 
lightl}^ stiffened add a pint of whipped cream, put in 
lightly. The whites of 4 or 5 eggs may be used 
instead of cream. 

MISS CARRIE WARNER. 

WHIPPED APPLE CREAM. 

I ^<g^ (white) I cup strained apple, ^ cup sugar. 
Whip until it will not drop from a spoon, pour over 
it the following; i pint milk fin double boiler) let 
come to a boil, stir into this 2 eggs and the yolk of i 
beaten with l^ <^^^P sugar and i tablespoon corn 
starch. 

MRS. T. GRAVES. 

COFFEE BLANC MANGE. 

I pint of coffee, i pint of water, i cup of sugar, 
i^ box of gelatine dissolved in little water, let all come 
to a boil, strain into a mould and cool. Serve with 
whipped cream, or sugar and cream. 

MRS. C. K. MORTON. 



100 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



TAPIOCA CREAM. 

4 large spoonfuls of tapioca, i quart of milk, 
yolks of 4 eggs, i cup sugar. Cover tapioca with cold 
water and soak over night. Set milk on stove to 
warm. Beat yolks of eggs and sugar together, stir 
into the warm milk with pinch of salt, then stir in 
tapioca. Beat whites to a stiff froth and stir into the 
custard. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

MRS. G. A. BILLINGS. 

PRUNE WHIP. 

Vo pound prunes, 4 eggs (whites) ^^ cup sugar. 
Soak the prunes over night, in the morning stew until 
tender with the sugar. Rub through a sieve. Beat 
the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, add the sifted 
prunes, beating well together. Heap upon a platter, 
and bake in a slow oven fifteen or twenty minutes, 
allowing the whip to brown delicately. Serve with 
custard sauce. 



Scald I pint of milk, beat the 3''olks of 4 eggs 
slightly, add 4 tablespoons sugar and ^ saltspoon of 
salt, pour on the hot milk and cook in a double 
boiler until it thickens. When cold flavor with % 
teaspoon vanilla extract, 

MISS HELEN SMITH. 



CHEESE STRAWS. 

Take i tablespoon of fine bread crumbs, 3 table- 
spoons of flour, little salt, 4 tablespoons of grated 
rich cheese. Add to these the yolk of i ^gg, i table- 
spoon of water, then mix until hard, roll out to about 
% of an inch thickness, cut into strips and bake in a 
quick oven until a pale brown. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 101 



CHEESE STRAWS. 

Chop together i cup flour, ^^ cup butter, i salt 
spoon salt. Mix to a stiff dough roll out very thin, 
sprinkle with 2 tablespoons cheese, roll out agam 
and sprinkle. Add i saltspoon salt, cut in narrow 
strips and bake in a moderate oven ten or fifteen 
minutes. 

MISS HELKN SMITH. 

SHORT CAKE. 

I quart of flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, salt, 
and sift several times. Rub in the flour i tablespoon 
butter and i of lard. Mix with milk. Take ^ the mix 
ture and roll as large as the pan to be baked in, spread 
with butter, roll out the other portion, put on top and 
bake in a quick oven. 

MRS. CHARLES JONES. 
STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

y2 cup butter, i quart flour, 2 eggs, little salt, 
3 heaping teaspoons baking powder, milk to make 
thick batter. Rub butter well into flour, add salt 
and baking powder, then add eggs well beaten. Wet 
with enough milk to make thick batter. Bake quickly. 
Split with warm knife. Butter top pieces, spread 
with layer of strawberries. Serve with crushed 
berries, sweetened, to which plenty of cream has been 
added. Pour over the whole whipped cream if wanted 
very rich. 

MRS. ALFRED H. GRAVES. 

RASPBERRY TAPIOCA. 

4 tablespoons tapioca soaked over night in i cup 
water. Add 5^ cup water in the morning and heat 
in double boiler. When clear, add cup of strained red 
raspberry juice, (bottled,) i cup sugar and juice of 
small lemon. Pour in small "moulds and when set, 
serve with thin sweet cream. 

MISS LrCY WEBBER. 



102 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. 

I quart of milk, i ounce of gelatine, 4 tablespoons 
grated chocolate, 3 eggs, i cup sugar. Reserve i 
cup from the quart and soak i ounce of gelatine in it. 
Grate chocolate and dissoUe in a little milk, add 
eggs, whites and yolks separately. Add sugar, flavor 
with \anilla. 

MRS. WM. BILLINGvS. 



ORANGE CUSTARD. 

Separate the whites of 8 eggs from the yolks, 
setting latter away in a cool place. Add the grated 
rind and juice of 2 large oranges to the whites, and 
after beating well add ^/^ pint of water and set away 
for an hour. Then beat yolks of eggs add them with 
one cupful of sugar to the mixture of whites, orange 
and water, strain into a pitcher and set into a basin 
of boiling water. Let it boil rapidly stiring the mix- 
ture meanwhile until it becomes as thick as heavy 
cream. Allow the custard to cool, pour into glass cups 
and set awa}^ to get cold. 

LUCY WEBBER. 



BAKED CUSTARD. 

I quart milk, 4 eggs, 3 large tablespoons sugar. 
Scald the milk. Beat the eggs thoroughly. Add the 
sugar. Stir into the milk when hot. Strain into 
cups or a dish and bake slowly. Pour into cups 
when cold and flavor. 



BOILED CUSTARD. 

I quart rich milk, '4 eggs, i cup sugar. Scald 
the milk, then add eggs and sugar, cook well but do 
not let it curdle. When cold add i teaspoon vanilla. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 103 



COFFEE PUFF. 

I pint cream, ^ cup powdered sugar, V2 cup cold 
coffee. Whip cream, when nearh^ done add sugar, 
then the coffee slowly. Put it in a pail or mould. 
Pack in ice and salt; use ^ as much salt as ice and 
let it stand three hours. Before serving dip pail in 
warm water for a second, then slip from the mould. 

MRS. C. K. MORTON. 

ANOTHER. 

I pint sweet cream, ^i cup sugar, ^ cup strong 
coffee. Beat the cream and sugar, add coffee, then 
pack as for ice cream. Let it remain three hours 
without stirring. 

MRS. FRED CARL. 

COFFEE JELLY. 

I box of gelatine, i^ quarts of coffee. Strain 
coffee, sweeten slightly, pour into mould, serve with 
whipped cream. 

MISS E. A. WAITE. 

PINEAPPLE ICE. 

4 cups water, 3 cups sugar, 2 eggs (whites.) Boil 
together the sugar and water. Add Vz a can grated 
pineapple. When nearly frozen add whites of the eggs. 

LOUISE BARDWELL. 
MILK SHERBET. 

Juice of 2 lemons, i pint of sugar, i quart of milk. 
Do not mix lemon and milk until ready to freeze. 

MISS. EUNICE MORTON. 

BEATEN CREAM. 

Place a bowl in a pan of pounded ice, pour in it i 
pint rich cream beat until stiff. Sift in gently 8 table- 
spoons powdered sugar and ^4 teaspoon vanilla. This 
may be used for filling to cake, charlotte russe, 
cream cakes or eclairs. 



104 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

MILK SHERBET. 

1 pint of sugar, juice of 2 lemons, i teaspoon of 
extract of lemon, i quart of milk. Mix the extract, 
sugar, and juice together in freezer, then pour in the 
milk and freeze at once. 

MRS. W. H. BELDEN. 

ICE CREAM. 

2 quarts milk, 2 cans condensed milk, i cup 
sugar, flavor to taste. This makes i gallon. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 

RASPBERRY PUFF. 

2 eggs (whites) beaten stiff, ^ cup sugar, ^^ cup 
raspberry jam, all beaten till very stiff. Serve with 
whipped cream. 

MRS. C. W. MARSH. 

COFFEE ICE CREAM. 

I cup strong coffee, i large cup sugar boiled 
together until it is a syrup. While hot add a cup of 
milk and the yolks of 3 eggs well beaten. Take 
syrup from the fire and pour over the eggs and milk, 
beating rapidly. Then return to the fire and cook 
until it begins to thicken. Great care must be taken 
that it does not curdle. Add i pint cream and freeze. 

MRS. E. A. WAITE. 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM. 

4 heaping tablespoons sugar put on the range in 
a sauce pan, and kept there until it melts, smokes 
and boils, 2 cups milk boiling. Beat the 3'olks of 4 
eggs and stir into the boiling milk, then add burnt 
sugar and mix well together Finally add 2 small 
cups of granulated sugar. Put on ice to cool. Before 
freezing add i pint of cream. 

MRS. E. A. WAITE. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 105 

VANILLA ICE CREAM. 

3 ^gg-'^i I pii^t milk, i cup sugar, i teaspoon 
vanilla. Make the custard several hours before freez- 
ing and add i pint sweet cream. 

For raspberry ice cream omit the vanilla and add 
I quart berries. Put i cup sugar on berries and let 
stand an hour or two before mashing and setting 
through the strainer, 

MRS. E. A. WAITE. 

STRAWBERRY SHERBET. 

2 quarts of berries, i pint sugar, i^i pints water, 

1 tablespoon gelatine. Mash berries and sugar 
together, and let stand two hours. Soak gelatine in 
cold water just enough to cover. Add i pint of the 
water to the berries and strain. Dissolve gelatine in 
i^ pint of boiling water. Add this to the strained 
mixture and freeze. Raspberry sherbet the same. 

MISS EMMA A. WAITE. 

ICE CREAM. 

I quart of milk, i cup of sugar, i tablespoon of 
corn starch, 4 eggs. Save out whites of 2 eggs 
Make custard. Beat the whites of 2 ^gg^, and add 

2 tablespoons sugar. Stir in the custard just before 
freezing. 

MRS. ANNA ELDRIDGE. 
LEMON ICE. 

6 lemons, juice of all, and grated rind or3. i large 
sweet orange, juice and grated rind, i >2 pints of 
water, i pint sugar. Squeeze out every drop of juice 
and add the rind of the orange, and let stand one-half 
hour. Strain, squeezing the bag dry; mix in the 
sugar and then the water. Stir until sugar is entirely 
dissolved, and then freeze. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 



106 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

LEMON ICE. 

3 cups sugar, 4 lemons, V+ box gelatine, i quart 
water. Boil sugar and water together, let it cool. 
Dissolve gelatine in a little cold water, then pour a 
cup of boiling water over it. Grate the rind of 2 
lemons. Freeze same as ice cream. When half 
frozen add beaten whites of 3 eggs. 

MRS. C. D. BARDWELL. 

ICE CREAM. 

2 quarts sweet milk, 6 eggs, i^^ cups sugar, i 
heaping tablespoon corn starch. When cool add i 
quart sweet cream, sweeten to taste, flavor and freeze. 
This will make i gallon. 

MRS. C. M. BARTON. 

NUT ICE CREAM. 

I quart cream, i coffee cup milk, i coffee cup 
sugar, thoroughly heated. Wlien cold, add i table- 
spoon vanilla and i cup English walnuts chopped 
fine. Freeze. 

MISS EUNICE MORTON. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK- 1^7 



108 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



CAKE. 



With weights and measures just and true, 
Oven of even heat, 
Well buttered tins and quiet nerves, 
Success will be complete. 



MACAROONS. 



I teacup pounded blanched almonds, i teacup 
brown sugar, 2 tablespoons flour, i egg^ (white,) salt, 

The white of the egg must be sufficient to mois- 
ten so that they can be molded into balls, as large 
as a walnut. Place them well apart upon buttered 
white paper, the thinner the paper the better. 

MRS. A. M. PECK. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

j4 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, }i cup cocoanut, ^ 
cup milk, 2}4 cups flour, 4 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder. This make 2 loaves. 

MISS M. MILLER. 

POP DOODLE. 

I egg^ I cup sugar, i cup milk, 2 scant cups flour, 
2 scant teaspoons baking powder. Butter size of a 
walnut. Bake in a dripping pan, but before putting 
in the oven, sprinkle sugar and cinnamon on top of 
batter. 

MRS. FRED CARL. 



no HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

HERMIT CAKES. 

1 cup butter, i ^/^ cups white sugar, 3 eggs, ^ tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in milk, i nutmeg, i teaspoon 
each of all kinds of spice, % pound currants, ^^4 pound 
citron chopped fine. Mix hard, roll thin, cut like 
cookies. Will keep nicely. 

MRS. W. H. BELDEN. 

POUND CAKE. 

10 ounces sugar, 10 ounces flour, 8 ounces butter, 
5 eggs. Mix the flour and butter, grating the 
nutmeg in the flour. Frotli the whites of the eggs, 
beat the yolks hard with sugar, add alternately the 
whites and the butter and flour. Beat hard. 

MRvS. G. A. BILLINGvS. 

FILLING FOR CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, i cup sweet cream. Boil together 
twenty minutes. 

MRS. J. E. PORTER. 

BLACK FRUIT CAKE. 

3 eggs, I cup butter, i cup molasses, i cup brown 
sugar, ^ nutmeg, i teaspoon each cinnamon and 
cloves, 5'2 teaspoon each all-spice and saleratus, i^ 
cups currants, ij^ cups raisins. Stir in flour until 
very stiff, 

MRS. J. H. HOWARD. 

BLACK OR WEDDING CAKE. 

3 pounds raisins, 3 pounds currants, i '^i pounds 
sugar, i^ pounds citron, i^ pounds butter, i^ 
pounds flour, 14 eggs, 2 lemons, grated rind, nutmegs, 
cloves, and all-spice to taste, i cup molasses, 3 gills 
brandy, i gill wine, i teaspoon soda. 

MRS. L. L. PEASE. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. Ill 



WALNUT CAKE. 

ij/^ cups sugar, ^i cup butter, 2 cups flour ^^ cup 
milk, 4 eggs, (whites ouly,) 1)4 teaspoous baking 
powder, i cup walnut meats, 

MISS EMMA WAITK. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

I cup sugar, i small tablespoon shortening, i 
whole Qigg or two whites, 7^ cup milk, 1^/2 cups flour, 
I teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar. Flavor 
with vanilla, bake in shallow tins. Frost with boiled 
frosting flavored with vanilla. Dissolve 2 squares 
Baker's chocolate, and spread over the top. or make a 
frosting by taking 2 tablespoons milk and stir it stiff 
with powdered sugar. Flavor and spread the choco- 
late over it. 

MRS. FRANK JONES. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

4 ^ggs, 2 cups flour, 2 cups sugar, i lemon, i 
heaping teaspoon baking powder, i scant cup cold 
water, pinch of salt. Beat the yolks and sugar 
together twenty minutes, adding 3 or 4 tablespoons 
water and beat five minutes. Add flour and lemon, 
last of all add whites after they have been well beaten. 
Stir as little as possible after adding the whites. 

MISS E. SHATTUCK. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

II eggs, (whites,) i>^ cups sugar, i cup pastry 
flour, I teaspoon cream tartar, i teaspoon vanilla. 
Pleasure the flour after being sifted six times. Sift 
flour and cream tartar together, beat the whites to i 
stiff froth, beat the sugar into the eggs, add seasoning 
and flour, stirring lightly and swiftly. Bake forty 
minutes in a moderate oven in an ungreased pan. 

MRS. E. B. D. 



112 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

ORANGE CAKE. 

}4 Clip butter, 2 cups sugar, 2 eggs, i cup sweet 
milk, 3 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. The 
juice of one orange added last. Bake in layers. Put 
together with icing and sliced oranges, 2 loaves. 

MRS. GREENE. 

QUICK LOAF CAKE. 

I cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups milk, 2 eggs, 
2 teaspoons cream tartar, i teaspoon soda, 5 cups 
flour, raisins and spice to taste. 

MRS. M. H. BURKE. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

5 ^§"§"^5 I cup of sugar, i cup flour, pinch of salt. 
Boil sugar with just a little water until clear and 
pour on the whites of the eggs, beaten very stiff, then 
beat ten or fifteen minutes, add yolks which have 
been beaten light, then flour sifted 3 times and the 
juice of a 5^ lemon. Bake in ungreased pan forty 
minutes. 

MRS. GEO. BILLINGS. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

54 cup butter, i cup boiling water. Set over 
stove to boil, i cup pastry flour, stir into butter and 
water while boiling, when cold add 3 well beaten 
eggs, soda size of a pea, mixed with the flour. Bake 
on buttered pans, making twelve, 

CREAM. 

^ pint milk on stove, i egg, ^^ cup sugar, 4 
tablespoons flour, 2 teaspoons lemon. Pour on boil- 
ing milk and stir until it thickens. Add extract 
when cold. Fill the cakes as you want them. 

MRS. A. S. BROWN. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 113 



PORK CAKE. 

^/^ of a pound of salt pork without lean or rind, 
chopped as fine as lard. Pour on % pint boiling 
water, i ^gg^ 2 cups sugar, i cup molasses, i tea- 
spoon soda, 2 cups raisins, i cup of currants, citron 
chopped, nutmeg, all-spice, cloves, cinnamon. Thicken 
as thick as loaf cake. 

MRS. C. E. HUBBARD. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE (devu.s' food.) 

% cup butter, i]4 cups sugar, ^^ cup milk, 2 
eggs, ^ cake of chocolate, dissolved in ^ cup of boil- 
ing water, i^ cups of flour, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder, i teaspoon of vanilla. Bake in 2 la3'ers and 
cover with icing, putting icing between the layers. 

MRS. S. G. HUBBARD. 

HALLIGAR CAKE. 

I cup sugar, 2 cups flour, % cup milk, % cup 
butter, whites of 4 eggs, i teaspoon cream tartar, ^ 
teaspoon soda. 

MRS. D. L. FITZGERALD. 

CAKE WrrHOUT EGGS. 

I cup sugar, 2 cups sifted flour, 5 tablespoons 
butter, I teaspoon of vanilla or lemon, 2 teaspoons 
baking powder. Beat thoroughly, good with choco- 
late frosting. 

ULA GRAVES. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

I cup sugar, i cup cocoanut, 2 cups flour, ^2 cup 
milk, ^'2 cup butter, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons of baking 
powder, cream, sugar and butter. Add beaten eggs, 
then milk and lastly flour and baking powder sifted 
together. 

MISS NELLIE WHALEN. 



114 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

I cup butter, T cup strong coffee, i cup sugar, 4 
cups flour, I cup molasses, i pound raisins, % pound 
citron, ^ pound currants, i teaspoon soda. 2 teaspoons 
cream tartar, i teaspoon of each of the spices. 

MRS. D. L. FITZGERALD. 

FIG CAKE. 

1 5^ cups sugar, ^2 cup butter, whites of 3 eggs, i 
cup milk, I teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 
23^ cups of flour. Bake in 3 or 4 tins. Filling: — y^ 
pound figs, chopped fine, y^ cup of water, 1 cup of 
sugar. Boil on stove until like jelly, then spread 
between cake. 

MRS. F. H. BARDWELL- 

COMPOSITION CAKE. 

35^ cups of flour, 2 cups of sugar, % cup of butter, 
3 eggs, I cup of sw^eet milk, i teaspoon cream tartar, 
^ teaspoon soda. Spice and fruit. 

MISS A. p. LYMAN. 



CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

I square Baker's chocolate, ^4 cup milk, yolk of 
I Q^ggi 2 tablespoons sugar, i teaspoon vanilla. Cook 
like boiled custard and stir into cake part. Cake: — 
I cup sugar, % cup milk, i ^2 cups flour, ^ cup butter, 
I ^g^g) I /"a teaspoons baking powder. 

MISS M. L. WAITE. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE. 

Break 2 eggs in a cup, fill with cream, i cup of 
sugar, 13^ cups of flour, i teaspoon of cream tartar, 
^ teaspoon of soda. Flavor with vanilla. 

MRS. E. M. GRAVES. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



FRUIT CAKE. 

I pound of flour, ^ pound of sugar, 3_,^ pound of 
butter, 2 pounds of fruit, % cup of molasses, y^ cup- 
of strona: coffee, 6 eggs, i teaspoon cloves, ^< teaspoon 
cinnamon, ^/^ teaspoon nutmeg, \^ teaspoon soda. 

RAISED CAKE. 

3 cups of milk, 2 cups of sugar, i cup of \'east. 
Put together in the order given. Add flour to make 
a batter as stiff as can be with a spoon. In the 
morning add 2 cups sugar, 2 cups butter, )4 cup lard, 
2 eggs, 2 nutmegs, raisins. Work well with hands 
until very light. Put in pans and let rise again. 
Makes 3 large or 4 small loaves. 

RAISED CAKE. 

T cup sugar, i cup milk, -3 cup yeast If com- 
pressed yeast is used add water enough to make -A, 
cup. Make stiff and stir with a spoon. Let stand 
until morning, then add i cup sugar, i cup butter, 2 
eggs. Give all a good beating, then add i cup floured 
raisins and other fruit if desired. This makes 2 large 
loaves. 

ANNA C. DEA. 

RAISED DOUGH CAKE. 

1 cup of raised dough, i cup of sugar, % cup of 
butter, 14 cup of milk, i cup of flour, i cup of raisins, 
I Q^gg., I teaspoon of cream tartar, ^ teaspoon of soda 
sifted in flour. Spice to taste. 

MRvS. E. ELDRIDGE. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

2 eggs well beaten, i ^4 cups sugar, i teaspoon bak- 
ing powder, 2 cups flour. Beat together thoroughly. 
xAdd ^2 cup of cold water. 

ANNA E. HARRIS. 



llfi HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



RAISED LOAF CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, i cup shortening, (half butter and 
half lard,) 3 cups of milk, i cup of yeast or 1 com- 
pressed yeast cake. Stir in flour sufficient for 
a stiff batter, and let rise over night. In the morning 
add 2 cups sugar, i cup of shortening, 2 eggs, i small 
teaspoon soda, nutmeg, cinnamon, 3 cups raisins, i 
cup currants, i cup citron. Makes 4 loaves. 

MRS. T. GRAVES. 
LEMON CAKE. 

4 eggs, I cup sugar, 3 tablespoons sweet milk, 3 
tablespoons melted butter, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 
I cup flour. Sauce: — i lemon, (juice and grated 
rind,) i cup cold water, i cup sugar, i ^gg^ i table- 
spoon corn starch. Beat lemon rind and egg together, 
add sugar and lemon juice, dissolve cornstarch in cold 
water. Cook in a double boiler until it jellies, 

MRS. JOSEPH STODDARD. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

iy2 cups sugar, li cup butter, % cup milk, 2. cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, whites of six eggs, 
beaten very stiff, i teaspoon extract of peach. Sift 
flour several times and measure after sifting. Bake 
in shallow tins. 

MRS. P. ELIZA PORTER. 

CARAMEL SPONGE CAKE. 

2 eggs beaten very light, i cup sugar, a little salt, 
^ cup flour. Add these three ingredients a little at 
a time. ^2 cup flour additional, i teaspoon baking 
powder, i teaspoon lemon extract, a small half cup of 
boiling water. Frosting: — i cup sugar, 3 tablespoons 
water, boil until it hairs. Beat white of i egg stiff, 
stir into the frosting and spread on cake. Melt i 
square chocolate and spread on frosting. 

ANNA M. GRAVES. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 117 



PLAIN CAKE, 

1 egp^, 1 cup sugar, i large teas}>oon sour cream, i 
cup milk. Piuch of soda dissolved iu milk, 2 cups 
-flour, 2 teaspoous bakiug p-^wder. Flavor with uut- 
iiieg and vanilla. Bake in shallow tin as layer cake, 

MRS. D. W. WKLLS. 

SPONGE LAYER CAKE. 

4 eggs, 1^2 cups sugar, ^4 cup cold water, 3 
teaspoon^ baking powder, 3 -mall cups flour. Flavor 
with vanilla, makes 3 lay^Ts, Use an}^ kind of cake 
filling. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVKSs 

COLD WATER Sl'OXGE CAKE, 

3 eggs beaten two minutes, 1% cups ^ugar beaten 
into the eggs for five minutes, i cup of flour in which 
2 teaspoons of baking powder have been mixed. Bent 
all together three minutes. }4 teacnp of cold 
water beaten five minutes. A little salt, i more cup 
of flour. Beat all together three minutes. 

MRvS. CELIA R. WELLS. 

LAYER CAKE. 

I cup of sugar, i^ cups flour, ^2 cup of milk, 2 
eggs, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, ^4 teaspoon soda or 2 
teaspoons baking powder. Bake in three layers and 
fill with I cup of whipped cream, or i lemon, grated 
rind and juice, i egg, i small cup of sugar, butter 
size of walnut. Beat all together and boil until thick. 
Spread between la3'(-rs when cold. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 

ONE EGG CAKE. 

I egg. I cup sugar, 3,^ cup milk, i^/^ cups flour, 3 
teaspoons baking powder, i tablespoon butter. Flavor. 

MRS. WIGHT. 



118 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



SWISS CAKE. 

2 eggs, I heaping cup of sugar, ^4 cup of butter, 
I cup of sweet milk, 2^ cups of flour, i^ teaspoons 
baking powder. Stir the butter and sugar to a cream. 
Beat the eggs thoroughl3^ This quantity makes two 
loaves. 

MRS. L. S. BLI.SS. 

ALBION CAKE. 

I cup sugar, ]A, cup butter, ^ cup water, 2 eggs, 
(3^olks,) i^ cups flour, 3 even teaspoons baking 
powder. Cream the butter and sugar, then add the 
beaten yolks of the eggs, next the water, then flour, 
lastly whites of the eggs beaten very stiff. 

MRS. A. AVERY. 

CAKE FILLING. 

I cup cream, i cup sugar boiled twenty minutes, 
flavor to taste. 

MRS. D. F. SHATTUCK. 

WALNUT FILLING FOR CAKE. 

Whites of 3 eggs beaten stiff, 3 large tablespoons 
white sugar, i cup chopped walnut meats, flavor to 
taste, or use boiled frosting into which stir the meats. 

MRS. D. BILLINGS. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

I square of chocolate, 4 tablespoons of thick 
cream, )4^ of a cup of sugar, cook over steam. 

MRS. ERNEST GODIN. 

CREAM CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

I cup sweet cream, i cup sugar, 2 squares grated 
chocolate, i tablespoon flour. Cook as custard, letting 
the water boil twenty minutes. Beat until light. 

MARION WARNER. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 119 



FILLING FOR LAYER CAKE. 

Grate i large apple, add i cup sugar, stir for 
twent}' minutes, add white of i ^gg beaten to a stiff 
froth, stir ten minutes, then add i teaspoon white 
rose and stir five minutes more. 

MRS. B. IM. WARNER. 



CARAMEL CAKE. 

3 eggs whites, i cup sugar, % cup butter, ^2 cup 
milk, lyi cups flour, i heaping teaspoon baking pow- 
der. Flavor with vanilla. 



CARAMEL FILLING. 

Piece of butter size of an o^gg^ i pint brown sugar, 
% cup of milk. Boil twenty minutes or until quite 
thick. Pour over the cake while warm. 

MARY K. BARNES. 



LAYER CAKE. 

^cup sugar, y2 cup milk, i heapingcup flour, i ^gg, 
little salt, I tablespoon melted butter, 2 teaspoonsbaking 
powder. Filling: — i cup cream, i cup sugar, i square 
chocolate, grated, i dessert spoon flour. Boil twenty 
minutes. Scald cream, mix dry chocolate, sugar, 
flour and add to the cream, when cold beat with Qgg 
beater until thick enough to spread. 

MRS. ALICE. L. BARDWELL. 

SNOW CAKE. 

I cup pulverized sugar, ^ cup butter, whites of 3 
eggs beaten very light, i^^ cups flour, ^ cup sweet 
milk, scant 2 teaspoons baking powder, almond 
to flavor. To frost, beat 3 yolks to froth, i cup 
pulverized sugar. Flavor with vanilla. 

MRS. J. E. PORTER. 



120 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



COLD WATER CAKE. 

2 cups sttgar, i cup butter, i cup cold water, 4. 
cup-- flour, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, i tea- 
spoon soda. Nutmeg and fruit if you like. Makes- 
2 loaves, 

PEAr<L CAKE, 

% cup butter, r cup sugar, whites of 2 eggs, i cup 
milk, 2 full cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
little salt, I teaspoon vanilla. Work butter and sugar 
thoroughly, then add milk, then flour with baking 
powder well mixed; lastly whites of eggs. 

MRvS. JAMES PORTER. 

LAYER CAKE. 

2 Qg^^^ I Clip sugar, 2 cups flour, ^2 cup sweet 
milk, I teaspoon cream of tartar, J/^ teaspoon of soda,. 
I teaspoon of lemon extract Filling for cake: — 2 cups 
sugar, I cup sweet cream. Boil together twenty minutes. 

MRS. ERNEST GODIN. 



WHITE FRUIT CAKE, 

1 cup but'er, 2 cups sugar, i cup miik, 3^ cups 
flour, I grated cocoanut, i pound citron, i pound 
almonds, blanched and cut fine, 2 heaping teaspoons 
baking powder, whites of 5 eggs. If dessicated cocoa- 
nut use I cup, 

MRS. C. A. JONES. 

LEMON CAKE. 

1 pound flour, i pound sugar, ^ pound butter, 
7 eggs, juice of i lemon, rind of 2. The sugar, butter 
and yolks must be beaten a long time, adding by 
degrees the flour, whites last, i goblet currants, i 
teaspoon baking powder, 

MRS. ELIHU MARSH. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK Vl\ 



ROLLED JELL^ CAKE. 

3 eggs, I cup sugar, i cup flour, 2 tablespoons 
cold water, pinch of salt, i heaping teaspoon baking 
powder. Beat yolks until light, then add sugar, water 
and salt, lastly stir in the flour and baking powder. 
Bake in a long tin well greased. Turn on a damp 
towel. Cover the top with jelly and roll. 

MISS CLARA FOLEY. 



ANOTHER. 

2 eggs, I cup sugar, i cup flour, i]^ teaspoons 
baking powder, 3 tablespoons water. Bake in a 
dripping pan, spread with jelly, before cake is cold. 
Roll quickly. 

MRS. D. W. WELLS. 



QUEEN CAKE 

^ pound shortening, {l4 pound butter, y^ pound 
lard,) I pound sugar, i pound eggs, (9,) i cup milk, 
5 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, % pound 
citron sliced thin and floured Will make two very 
large loaves, or three fair sized. If fruit is desired, 
take one pound of mixed raisins, currants and citron, 
leaving out the % pound citron in the above rule. 

MRS. W. H. BELDEN. 



SOUR MILK CAKE. 

1 cup raisins, % cup butter, i cup sour milk, i^ 
cups sugar, 3 cups flour, i teaspoon soda, i egg. 
Spice to suit the taste. Nutmeg, cloves, cinnamon. 

MRS. C. E. HUBBARD. 



ia2 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



SPICE CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, i egg, % cup of butter, 2^ cups 
flour, I cup buttermilk, i cup raisius, % cup molasses, 
I teaspoon soda i teaspoon cinnamon, i teaspoon 
cloves. 

MRS. ERNEST GODIN. 
CHOCOLATE MARBLE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, ^ cup butter, i cup milk, 3 cups 
flour, 2 ej^^gs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 squares 
chocolate Dissolve chocolate in a little hot water. 
Add y2 cup sugar, i teaspoon vanilla. To this add 
three tablespoons of the mixture. 2 loaves. 

MRS. G. MORTON. 
LAYER CAKE. 

3 eggs well beaten, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups flour, 2 
large teaspoons baking powder. ^ cup cold water. 

MRS. C. E. HUBBARD. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

5 eggs, whites only, 7^' tumbler of sugar, ^ 
tumbler flour. ^ teaspoon vanilla, % cream tartar 
Beat the whites stiff. Add the sugar in which the 
vanilla and cream tartar has been mixed. 

MRS. D. W. WELLS. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

I ^g^, (or not,) I cup sugar, ^ cup each butter 
and sweet milk, 2 cups flour, i teaspoon baking 
powder, salt. For the dark part take a cup of the 
light batter. Add grated chocolate to make a dark 
brown. Put in alternate layers, the light on the top. 

MRS. A. MATHEWS. 
WHITE CAKE. 

I cup sugar, Yz cup butter, ^ cup milk, 2 cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 4 eggs, whites only. 

MRS. R. S. ROSS. 



HATFIELD COOK HOOK. 123 



FRUIT CAKE. 

I cup butter, 4 eggs, i cup sour milk, 35^ cups 
flour, 2 cups raisins. }4 cup citron, 2 cups currants, 
spices 

MRS. R. S. ROSS. 

WALNUT CAKE. 

I cup sugar, % cup butter, }4 cup milk, 1^4 cups 
flour, 2 eggs beaten separately, 3 tablespocm^ baking 
power, I cup chopped walnuts. 

MISS E. MORTON. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

4 eggs, whites only, well beaten, ^ tumbler gran- 
ulated sugar, }4 teaspoon cream tartar, ^ tumbler of 
flour, }4 teaspoon vanilla, salt. Bake in small round 
tins,' with hole in center, about twenty minutes in 
moderate oven. 

MRS. G. S. BELDEN. 

DRIED APPLE FRUIT CAKE. 

I cup dried apples soaked over night, i cup 
molasses i cnp salt pork chopped fine, i cup boiling 
water Pour the water o^ er the pork, add the apples 
cliopped fine, and the molasses. When cold add 2 
eggs, 1% teas]H)ons of soda, i teaspoon cream 
tartar, 1 cups flour, all kinds spice. Chopped dates 
and fruit if you wish. Bake one hour in a stove 
oven. 

MRS. R. B. ABBOTT. 

NO EGG FRUIT CAKE. 

1 cup of sugar, i cup molasses, i cup sour milk, 
^ cup butter, i rounded teaspoon soda, i teaspoon, 
nutmeg, i teaspoon cinnamon, i teaspoon cloves, i 
cup seeded raisins, i cup currants, 4 cups flour 
Excellent and keeps well. 

MRS. CELIA E. WELLS. 



124 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

BLACK HILL CAKE 

2 eggs, I cup sugar, ^/^ cup butter, -^ cup milk, 
^ teaspoon soda, i teaspoon cream tartar. 2 cups 
flour Reserve ^ cup of the dough and put in it 
a tablespoon of molasses, yolk of an ^gg, Yz teaspoon 
each of cloves, cinnamon and nutmeg, put dark dough 
on top. Flavor the light part with lemon. 

MRS. L. H. KINGSLEY. 

BOILED FROSTING. 

% cup sugar boiled, white of i ^gg-, % teaspoon 
cream tartar, ^ teaspoon corn starch, ver}^ li^ht and 
fluify. 

MRS. C. W. MARSH. 



ADDITION. 



AUNT EMILY'S CAKE. 



I cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 eggs, i cup milk, 4 
small cups flour, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoous cream 
tartar, (or 3 teaspoons baking powder.) Flavor. 



CORRECTIONS. 

Page 113. — Cake without eggs. Add i cup milk. 

Page 1 17. — Plain Cake. Should read i large table- 
spoon of sour cream instead of teaspoon sour cream. 

Page 123 — Fruit Cake. Add i teaspoon soda. 

Page 123. — Dried Apple Fruit Cake. Should be 
slow oven, not stove oven. 

Page 129. — Marshmallow Cookies. Add i tea- 
spoon cream tartar, V2 teaspoon soda. 



HATFIELD COOK HOOK. 126 



126 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



DOUGHNUTS, GINGER BREADS, COOKIES. 



DOUGHNUTS, (very fine.) 

^ cup bitter, i cup sugar, 1^2 pints flour, i]/^ 
teaspoons Royal Baking powder, i egg, ij^ cups 
ruilk. Put butter, sugar and ^gg together smooth. 
Sift flour and powder together, add it to the butter 
and milk etc Mix with a soft dough, flour well the 
board. Roll out dough to ^^ inch in thickness, cut 
out with large doughnut cutter, and fry in hot lard. 
Serve with sifted sugar over them. Makes 24 dough- 
nuts. 

DOUGHNUTS. 
I ^ggy Yz cup of sugar, piece of butter size of a 
butternut, i cup of milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 
Flour sufficient to roll out. 

MRS. D. H. SHATTUCK. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

I quart of flour, i cup sugar, i Qgg> 2 tablespoon.^ 
shortening, i cup milk, 2 teaspoous baking powder. 
I small teaspoon salt. Nutmeg if you like. 

MRS. D. p. MORTON. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

. y^ cup sugar, i cup milk, i ^gg. i teaspoon of 
cream tartar, ^ teaspoon soda, i large spoon short- 
ening, little salt, flour sufficient to roll out. Roll in 
pulverized sugar, when taken from kettle. 

MRS. R. B. ABBOTT. 



128 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



GINGER WAFERS. 

1 cup of molasses, i cup brown sugar, i cup of 
lard, % cup cold coffee, 2 even teaspoons soda, 
I of ginger, mix stiff. Roll thin and bake in quick 
oven. 

MRS. C. D. BARDWELL. 

CREAM GINGER BREAD. 

2 cups flour, I cup molasses, ^ cup sour cream, 

1 teaspoon soda, i Qg^^ i teaspoon ginger, i teaspoon 
cinnamon, ]/2 teaspoon salt. 

MRS. J. S. WELLS. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

2 cups molasses, i cup sugar i cup shortning, i 
^gg^ 2 tablespoons soda, dissolve in little hot water, 

2 teaspoons ginger, salt. Mix hard and roll very 
thin. Makes about 100. 

MRS. G. S. BELDIN. 

GINGER CAKE. 

% cup sugar, % cup molasses, ^ cup lard, salt, 
V2 cup sour milk, ^ teaspoon soda, i teaspoon 
ginger. Spice if you like. Flour to drop from spoon, 

MRS. O. S. GRAVES. 

GINGER DROP CAKES. 

Yz cup tiutter, I cup sugar, i cup molasses, i cup 
water, 2 teaspoons soda, i teaspoon ginger, i tea- 
spoon cinnamon, ^ teaspoon cloves, currants, salt, 
3^ cups flour. 

MRS. A. L. BARDWELL. 

OLIVE GINGER BREAD. 

5^ cups flour, 2 cups molasses, i cup sour milk, 
or sweet, teaspoon of cream tartar, ^ cup butter, 2 
teaspoons soda, 2 teaspoons ginger. 

MISS EUNICE MORTON. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 12;) 



GINGER SNAPS. 

I cup molasses, ^2 cup melted shortening, ^4 
teaspoon salt, % teaspoon ginger, small teaspoon 
soda. Flour enough to mix hard. Boil molasses five 
minutes. Take from stove and add lard, add other 
ingredients. Roll out thin and bake. 

ANNA K. HARRIS. 



COOKIES. 

I cup sugar, i ^gg., i cup sour cream, 2 cups 
flour, little nutmeg or caraway seed. Drop from 
spoon. 

MRS. C. D. BARDWELL. 

MARSHMALLOW COOKIES. 

1 cup sugar, ^'2 cup butter, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons 
milk, 2^/2 cups flour. Cut in diamond shaped pieces, 
in the center place a marshmallow, fold the two opposite 
points, over the marshmallow and press together, after 
baked they will look like little baskets. 

MRS. EDWARD ELDRIDGE. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar, ^^ cup lard or butter, i Qgg, i cup 
sweet milk, i teaspoon lemon, i teaspoon soda, 2 
teaspoons cream of tartar. Flour to roll. 

MRS. ERNEST GODIN. 

COOKIES. 

I cup molasses, ^2 cup sugar, i Qgg, i teaspoon 
soda, I teaspoon salt. Let molasses come to a boil, 
beat in soda, cool a little, add the egg (beaten slightly,) 
sugar and salt and make very stiff with flour and roll 
thin. 

MRS. C. E. WELLS. 



130 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



SOUR CREAM COOKIES. 

I cup sugar, 2]4 cups flour, )^ cups sour cream, i 
teaspoon soda, a little salt, i tgg Handle lightly 
and quickly, roll, then bake in quick oven. 

MISS M. E. PHELPS. 

TART CRUST. 

3 cups flour, I cup lard, i teaspoon sugar, 3 tea- 
poons water, i egg (white.) Rub flour and lard 
together, add sugar and ^gg well beaten, add water, 
roll about as thin as pie crust. 

MRS E. B. DICKINSON. 
LOVE KNOTS. 

I Q-gg., 4 tablespoons sweet cream, 2 tablespoons 
sugar, pinch of salt. Flour to knead very hard, roll 
out, cut in narrow strips, tie each one in 2 or 3 knots 
and fr}^ in hot lard, sprinkle with white sugar while 
hot. 

ULA GRAVES. 
COOKIES 

3 cups sugar, i cup butter, 4 eggs, 4J/2 teaspoons 
baking powder, 3,4 cup milk, flour enough to roll out. 
Makes large quantity. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 
CRULLERS. 

I tablespoon butter, 5 tablespoons sugar, 4 eggs, 
little nutmeg. Mix very stiff and fry. 

MRS. ELIHU MARSH. 

CRULLERS. 

3 eggs, I cup sugar, butter size of a butternut, 
little salt and nutrheg, flour to roll hard. Cut in 
squares, slash in narrow strips from one side nearl}' 
to the other, to look like fringe, fr}^ in hot lard. 

MRS. J. H. HOWARD. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. ISl 

CRULLERS. 

I ^gg, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons melted 
butter, Flonr enough to make a stiff batter. Roll 
out the dough a quarter of an inch thick, cut in strips 
2% inches long and 1^2 inches wide. Cut these 
into 6 small strips, leaving ^4 of an inch uncut at 
either end. Take up ever}- other strip on fingers 
and pull apart, so that the uncut ends will nearly 
meet, I'Vy in hot fat. 

MRS- I. B. LOWELL- 
NUT CRACKERS. 

I pound English Walnuts, 3 eggs (whites,) 27 
teaspoons pulverized sugar. Beat whites and sugar 
as for frosting. Chop the nuts fine and stir in. 
Spread this over saltines and bake twenty minutes in 
a slow oven. 

LOUIvSA BARDWELL. 

BRAMBLES. 

Crust: — 2 cups flour, i cup lard, whites of 2 eggs 
beaten stiff, 4 tablespoons water, % teaspoon soda, 
I teaspoon cream tartar, little salt. Filling: — i cup 
chopped raisins, i cup sugar, i ^gg. i lemon (juice 
and rind.) Roll out crust and cut in small squares 
and put a teaspoon of filling in each. Draw the 
corners together and bake. 

MRS. C. W. MARSH. 

CRULLERS. 

I cup sugar, % cup shortening (butter,) i cup 
milk, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, nutmeg. 
Stir in flour to roll, cut in rings, set in the oven two 
or three minutes before frying. 

MRS. Ct. a. billings. 



132 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



PICKUES, 



"Turnpike road to people's hearts 
I find, lies through their mouths, or 
I mistake mankind" 



IlIGDON PICKLES. 



Take green tomatoes and chop fine. Salt them 
and let them stand twenty-four hours, i cup of salt 
to the gallon for the brine. Then pour off the water, 
and to ever}^ gallon of tomatoes add two quarts of 
chopped cabbage, 3 onions, 3 green peppers, (also 
chopped,) 3 pounds sugar, 2 quarts of vinegar, a 
desert spoon each of cinnamon, cloves, celery seed, 
and mustard seed. Heat the vinegar scalding hot, 
pour over, does not require cooking. 

MRS. W. H. BELDKN. 

PICCALILLI. 

Yz bushel green tomatoes, chopped fine, 1^2 pints 
vinegar, 4 green peppers, 3 tablespoons of salt, 2^^ 
cups brown sugar, i tablespoon each of cloves and 
all-spice. Boil until tender. 

MRvS. CHARLE.S KARTLETT. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

3 pounds stemmed currants, 2 pounds brown 
sugar, Yz tablespoon each of ground cloves, all-spice 
and cinnamon, % pint vinegar. Boil to a jam. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 



134 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

FRENCH CHOW CHOW. 

For this chow chow, select i quart large green 
cucumbers, cut in small pieces, i quart tin3^ cucum- 
bers, 2 iuches long or less, i quart green tomatoes 
sliced or cut in bits, i large cauliflower divided into tin}' 
flowerets, 4 large green peppers, cut in coarse bits. 
When ready put in a weak brine, a cup of salt to 
gallon of water. Soak pickle twent37-four hours. 
Scald in same brine and drain. Make paste of 6 
tablespoons of ground mustard, i of tumeric, i cup 
flour, I cup sugar, 2 quarts vinegar. Mix the drj^ 
ingredients with a little of the vinegar, then add 
remainder of vinegar. Let this mixture scald, and 
stir until a smooth thick pnste, then add pickles 
and it is done. If one like the flavor of onions, 
6 small onious improve it. This chow chow is excel- 
lent the day after it is made, but better in a month 
of time. Put in jar. 

MRS. W. H. BELDEN. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 

I quart grapes, i quart brown sugar. Squeeze 
out the pulps and cover with viuegar. Boil pulps 
and vinegar and strain to remove the seeds, being 
careful not to let it burn, then add sugar and skins 
with I tablespoon each of cinnamon and all-spice and 
}4 table.'^poon cloves. Boil until the skins are tender, 

MRS. \Vm. H. DICKINSON. 

COLD CATSUP. 

I peck of ripe tomatoes peeled and chopped fine. 
Squeeze juice out, then add i tea cup onions chopped 
fine, I cup green peppers, i cup sugar, i pint vinegar, 2 
stems grated horse radish, i ounce black mu.stard, . 
I ounce white mustard, i ounce celery seed, salt to 
taste. 

MISS CORNELIA BILLINGS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 135 

SWEET PICKLED PEACHES. 

lO pounds peaches, 7 pounds sugar, i quart 
vinegar, li ounce whole cloves, ^-2 ounce whole 
cinnamon. 

MISS EMMA A. WAITE. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

iS ripe tomatoes, 2 peppers, 2 onions, : cup 
sugar, 2 1'i cups vinegar, 2 teaspoons of salt, cloves 
and cinnamon. Boil one hour. 

MRS. M. H. BURKE. 

SWEET PICKLE (citron.) 

7 pounds citron, 3 pounds sugar, i quart vinegar. 
All-spice, cinnamon and cloves. Cut citron in slices 
and let stand in salt and water over night. Drain, 
boil in water with a teaspoon of alum until soft. 
Boil sugar, spices and vinegar. Drain the citron and 
pour the syrup over it. 

MISS LUCY COWXES. 

. MUSTARD PICKLE. 

I pint small onions, i quart cucumbers, i quart 
small green tomatoes, i head cauliflower, 3 green 
peppers. Boil tomatoes in'water two or three minutes, 
not too much. Then pour over the whole, boiling 
salt and water. Let this stand over night, then pour 
over hot vinegar, and let stand tv/o or three days, 
until pickled. Now take i pint of vinegar, i^i cups 
sugar, Yi cup flour, 2 tablespoons dry mustard. 
Mix the flour and mustard w^ell, then wet with a little 
cold vinegar, heat vinegar and sugar together. When 
boiling put in flour and mustard, and stir until 
thickened then pour over the other. Four times this 
rule will make 2 gallons. 

MRS. S. G. HUBBARD. 



136 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

PICKLE LILLY. 

1 peck green tomates, 3 onions, 3 large green 
peppers chopped fine. Place in ajar with alternate 
layers of salt. Let stand over night, in the morning 
drain, then cook in water until tender, drain again, 
add I quart vinegar, i cup sugar, i tablespoon each 
of cinnamon, all-spice and cloves. 

MRS. Wm. JONES. 

PICCALILLI (without cooking.) 

2 quart chopped tomatoes, i pint onions, ]i^ pound 
peppers. Mix together with i teacup of salt, and 
let stand two days. Then drain and add j^ pound 
white mustard seed and cover with cold vinegar. 
Put in stone jar. 

MRS. A. H. GRAVES. 

MUSK MELON PICKLE. 

Take ripe melons, remove seeds and peel, cut in 
small pieces and put them into a small jar, cover 
with hot vinegar. Let them stand until next day, 
then pour off vinegar, heat and pour on again, repeat 
this process until the fourth da}^, then weigh the 
melons and to every 5 pounds, add 3 pounds of white 
sugar. I quart of vinegar and spice to taste. They 
'should be whole spices and 'tied in a linen cloth, sim- 
mer until tender. Take out fruit and boil the syrup 
until there is just enough to cover pickles. 

MRS. H. L. WILLIAMS. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

I quart of rock salt, i gallon vinegar 2 gallons 
w^ater scalded to dissolve the salt. Cool, and throw 
in cucumbers as they are picked. When wanted for 
use put into spiced vinegar. They will keep a long 
time in this preparation. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 137 

ONION PICKLE. 

The white onions called silver skin are the best 
for pickling. They should be of uniform size, as 
large as a hickory nut. Pour boiling water on them, 
and the peeling can be quickly done. Drop the 
peeled onions in cold salt water. Let them stand over 
night. The next day, take out of the water and 
drain. Then put them in jars with mustard seed, 
whole mace and whole peppers. Pour on strong cold 
vinegar until the onions are covered. The jar should 
be closely covered and set away. They are ready for 
use in two days. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 



138 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



PRBSERVBS AIND JBI^UIES, 



"in everything you do aim to excel 

For what is worth doing, is worth doing well" 



PREPARING FRUIT FOR PRESERVING. 

Blackberries, Boil moderately about Six minutes. 

Plums, 

Raspberries, 

Cherries, 

Strawberries, 

Whortleberries. 

Bartlett Pears (halves,) " 

Small sour Pears (whole) 

Peaches halves. 

Peaches whole, 

Sour Apples (quartered)" 

Ripe Currants, 

Wild Grapes, 

Tomatoes, 



Boil 


modera 


tely 


about Six minu 


i k 


a 




i I 


Ten " 


(( 


(( 




i i 


Six 


a 


(( 




a 


Five 


u 


( ( 




a 


Eight " 


i I 


it 




a 


Five 


)" 


'' 




a 


Twent\ " 


e)" 


1 1. 




it 


Thirty - 
Eight " 


( I 


a 




a 


Fifteen " 


1)- 


a 




a 


Ten " 


ti 


( ( 




n 


Six " 


(( 


(( 




a 


Ten " 


li 


C( 




( ( 


Sixty '■'■ 



140 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

AMOUNT OF SUGAR TO A QUART JAR. 

Cherries, Six ounces. 

Strawberries, Eight 

Raspberries, Four 

Bhtckberries, Six 

Qiiince, Ten 

Sour Pears, Eight 

VN'ild Grapes, Eight 

Peaches Four 

Bartlett Pears, • . . . . Six 

Pine Apple, Six 

Plums, Eight 

Pie Plant, Ten 

Ripe Currants, Eight 

Cranberries, Twelve 

Sour Apples (quartered,) Six 



ORANGE MARMALADE. 

12 medium sized oranges, slice them leaving out 
end piece and seeds. With water added make 7 pints. 
Let stand twenty-four hours. Boil until tender, then 
add I pound sugar to i pint fruit and the juice of 2 
lemons. Boil ten or fifteen minutes and put in cans 
or jelly tumblers. 



GOOSEBERRY JAM. 

Top and stem the berries and wash them clean. 
Drain and weigh them. Take equal quantities of 
berries and white sugar. Stir them well together. 
Put them in a preserving kettle and boil for an hour, 
stirring them constantly to keep them from burning. 
When soft, mash. Put in jelly tumblers and when 
cold cover as for any jelly. Serve with cold meats. 

MRS. DAVID BILLINGS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. Ul 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Wash the currants clean, drain, put in a bag and 
mash them. Squeeze out all the juice. To every pint 
of juice allow i pound sugar, put the juice in a kettle 
over the lire and heat; add the sugar and let come to a 
boil, stirring and skimming as required. Boil from 
ten to twelve minutes. Pour into tumblers. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 

BLACKBERRY PRESERVE. 

7 pounds fruit, 3^2 pounds sugar, i pint good 
vinegar; scald together and let stand twenty-four 
hours. Then pour off juice and scald it, and let it 
stand another twenty-four hours. Then scald all 
together, and put in cans. This will keep a year or 
more. 

MISS A. p. LYMAN. 

LEMON JELLY. 

I box gelatine, i pint cold water, let it stand one- 
half hour to one hour. Add i quart boiling water, 
i^^ pints sugar, the juice of 5 and grated rind of 2 
lemons. Strain into jell}' mould and set in cool place. 

MRS. S. G. HUBBARD. 

LEMON JELLY. 

Soak I box of gelatine in i cup of cold water. 
Add I quart boiling water, 2 cups sugar and i cup 
lemon juice, strain into a mould and let it harden. 

MISS MARIA L. PORTER. 

QUINCE HONEY. 

I quart sugar, i pint water, 2 teacups grated 
quince. Boil fifteen minutes and pour into jelly 
tumblers. 

M. L. PORTER. 



142 HATFIELD GO OK BOOK. 

GREEN GRAl'E MARMALADE. 

Pick tiie grapes from stems, wash and put in a 
porcelain kettle with a small bowl of water, boil 
slowly until soft enough for the seeds to slip out, 
then strain, to i bowl of grape juice add i bowl of 
granulated sugar, cook slowly half an hour or until 
thick enouo:h to cut with a knife when cool. 

CORNELIA A. BILLINGS. 

TO PRESERVE BLACKBERRIES. 

7 pounds of berries and t^'^^ pounds of sugar, i 
pint of good vinegar, scald all together and let it 
stand twenty-four hours, then turn off the juice and 
scald it and let it stand twenty-four hours and then 
scald all together. 

A. LYMAN. 

BUTTERCUP JELLY. 

i^ package gelatine soaked in ^i cup cold water 
two hours, 3 eggs, i pint of milk, i heaping cup 
sugar, I teaspoon vanilla, bit of soda size of a pea 
stirred into milk. Scald milk, stir in soaked gelatine 
uutil that is dissolved and strain through coarse 
cloth. Add sugar and j^olks of eggs, return to kettle 
and stir until it begins to thicken. Let cool and add 
flavoriug, whip white of i Oigg stiff. When yellow 
jelly coagulates around edges, beat it with the white 
of ^gg. 

MRS. DAVID BILLINGS. 

CIDER JELLY. 

I box gelatine, i pint water to dissolve. Let 
stand twenty minutes, add i pint boiling water, i ^ 
pints cider, i^ pounds sugar, juice and rind of i 
lemon. Let it boil with the mixture. Let it stand 
in pan of cold water until quite cool. Strain through 
flannel. 

MISS MARY BRIGGS. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 143 

CIDER APPLE SAUCE 

3 pails sweet apples, 3 quarts boiled cider, i pint 
molasses, i peck quinces. Boil 4 liours slowly. 

MRS. J. II. vSANDKRvSON. 

ORANGE JELLY. 

I box gelatine soaked in 2 cups cold water, 2^ 
cups sugar, juice of 4 oranges and grated rind of 2, 
3 cups of boiling water. Soak gelatine two hours, add 
juice, and grated rind and sugar and leave for i 
hour. Pour in boiling water. Stir until dissolved; 
strain through double flannel 

MRS. DAVID BILLINGS. 



PRESERVED PEARS. 

8 pounds of pears, 4 pounds of sugar, y^ pound 
of ginger root ,3 lemons, i^^-^ pints of water. Slice the 
pears ver}'- thin, also the lemon very thin. Prepare 
the syrup with water, sugar and ginger root. When 
heated to boiling put in pears and lemons, boil until 
pears are very tender, almost clear, then skim out 
pears, ginger root and lemons, boil down the syrup 
quite thick and pour over the whole. 

MRS. SAMUEL BILLINGS. 

CURRANT CONSERVE. 

5 pounds currants, 5 pounds sugar, 2 pounds 
raisins, 4 oranges, squeeze juice of oranges on sugar 
put the peel of 3 in cold water and let come to a boil 
slowly to remove bitter taste. Chop rather fine, stone 
the raisins and chop, add to currants, sugar and 
oranges and boil slowly twenty minutes, put into 
jelly tumblers. 

MRS. E. L. DICKINSON. 



m HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



BBVERAGBS, 



"Drink, pretty creature, drink."— Wordsworth. 



BEEF TEA. 

1 pound lean beef cut into small pieces. Put 
into ajar without a drop of water, cover tightly and 
set in a dish of cold water. Heat gradually to a boil 
and continue this for three or four hours, until the 
meat is white. vSeason with salt; when cold skim. 

MRS. G. A. BILLINGS. 

BEEF EXTRACT. 

Take lean beef, chop in fine pieces, place in glass 
fruit jar, sprinkle on just a little salt and seal tightl}''. 
Place in a kettle of water and boil four hours. Re- 
move bits of meat before using. 

MRS. p:. a. HUBBARD. 
RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

2 cpiarts raspberries, i pint vinegar. Let stand 
three or four days, mash and strain through a bag. 
Add I pound sugar to each pint juice. Boil twenty 
minutes, skim; bottle when cold. 

RED RASPBERRY SHRUB. 

3 pints raspberries, i pint vinegar. Let stand 
three or four days, strain. To every pint of juice add 
I pound of sugar. Boil twenty minutes. Bottle 
when cold. 



146 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



CURRANT SHRUB. 

To I pint currant juice add i pound loaf sugar. 
Boil five minutes, stir it constantly while cooking, 
and when cold bottle it. i or 2 spoonfuls in a tumbler 
of water affords a refreshing beverage. 

LEMON SYRUP. 

I pound loaf sugar to i pint lemon juice. Let it 
stand t\vent3^-four hours or until sugar is dissolved, 
stirring it often. When dissolved wring a flannel bag 
very dry in hot water and strain the syrup. Bottle. 
This will keep a long time. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

I quart juice, ^^ pound loaf sugar, % ounce 
nutmeg, '^,{1 ounce ground cinnamon, yi ounce ground 
all-spice. Boil five or six minutes. When cool add 
I pint best brandy. For sickness. 

MRvS. M. L. PEASE. 

MEAD. 

3 pounds white sugar. Pour over it 3 pints of 
boiling water, i pint of molasses, ^4 pound tartaric 
acid, I ounce sassafras. Bottle and use as a syrup 
with soda. 

INDL\N MEAL GRUEL. 

I tablespoon Indian or oat meal, a pinch of salt. 
Mix the meal smooth with cold water. Pour upon 
this a pint of boiling water, and turn into a sauce 
pan to boil gently one-half an hour. Stir frequently. 
Strain and add a tablespoon of cream. Some persons 
like it sweetened and a little nutmeg added, but to 
many it is more palatable without either. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 147 

MILK PORRIDGE. 

2 cups oat meal, 2 cups water, 2 cups milk. 
Soak the oat meal over uight in the water. Strain 
in the morning, and boil the water half an hour. 
Put in the milk. Salt to taste. Boil up once and 
serve. 

SODA CREAM. 

Mix together in a sauce pan, i pound sugar, i 
egg, I tablespoon of flour, i pint cold water, juice of 
I lemon. Put over the fire and let scald, remove and 
add I ounce of tartaric acid and i tablespoon of flavor- 
ing. This will make i quart of syrup. Bottle and 
keep on ice, when ready for use put 2 tablespoons of 
cream in glass, fill half full of cold water and add ^ 
teaspoon baking soda. 

MRvS. O. S. GRAVES. 
TO MAKE COFFEE. 

I tablespoon coffee for each person. Mix it with 
an Qgg and cold water to make a paste: then add boil- 
ing water and boil five or ten minutes. Settle the 
coffee with a little cold water. Serve with cream or 
hot milk. 

TO MAKE COFFEE BY FILTERING. 

Put coffee in the strainer and pour over it boiling 
water. If not strong enough, let it drip again. 

TO MAKE TEA. 

Scald tea-pot. i teaspoon of tea for i cup. Pour 
T boil 
minutes. 



over boiling water and let stand on back of stove five 



CHOCOLATE. 

I quart water, i^^ pints milk, 2 squares Baker's 
chocolate. Sweeten to taste. Steam in a double 
boiler two hours. 

MRS. C. A. JONES. 



148 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



COINRBCTIOINERV, 



"Sweet to the sweet"— Shakespeare. 



FRENCH VANILLA CREAM. 

Break into a bowl the white of i or more eggs, and 
add to it an eqnal quantity of cold water. Then stir 
in confectioner's sugar until you have it stiff enough 
to mould into shape with the fingers. Flavor to taste. 
This can be used for plain creams or English walnuts. 
Dates or any kind of nuts or fruit can be added. 
Grated maple sugar or chocolate added to the cream 
makes a nice confection. 

ORANGE DROPS. 

Grate the rind of i orange and squeeze the juice 
over it. Strain, then stir in confectioner's sugar 
until it is stiff enough to form into small balls. 
Cocoanut grated can be added to above. 

FUDGE. 

2 cups granulated sugar, i cup cream, % cake 
of Baker's chocolate, a piece of butter (^ the size of 
an ^gg,) I teaspoon of vanilla. Cut the chocolate up, 
put it with sugar, cream and butter in a sauce pan. 
Boil until it forms a soft ball in cold water. Remove 
from the fire, add the vanilla and stir until it will just 
spread on buttered tins. 

MABEL BILLINGS. 



150 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

FUDGE. 

2 cups sugar, ^ cup milk, i square of chocolate. 
Heat the milk, grate chocolate and mix dry with 
sugar, then pour the heated milk over it with the 
butter. Cook and when it grains by stirring a little 
in a saucer pour in a cup of either cocoanut or chopped 
nuts and 2 teaspoons of vanilla. Remove from the 
stove and beat w^ell. Pour into a buttered tin and 
when nearly cold cut into squares, 

HEIvEN SMITH. 

PEANUT TAFFY. 

1 pint molasses, li cup sugar, i tablespoon vinegar, 
a piece of butter the size of an egg. Boil until it is 
brittle in water, add a pinch of soda. Put in the meats 
of a quart of peanuts and pour on buttered pans. 

MABEL BILLINGS. 

WALNUT CREAM. 

2 cups of coffee A sugar, i cup cream, i quart 
hickory nuts or i pound of Knglish walnuts. Boil 
the sugar and cream until it becomes brittle in cold 
water. Put in the meats, stirring well, and set away 
on buttered plates to harden. Be sure that it is 
boiled enough else it will not harden. 

SALTED PEANUTS. 

Buy the raw peanuts and shell. Pour boiling 
water on them and let stand a few minutes until the 
skins slip off easily. Melt a little butter in a drip- 
ping pan, put in the prepared peanuts, sprinkle them 
with a little salt, then place on the grate in a mode- 
rate oven. Turn occasionall}^ until browned as much 
as desired. 

MRS. CHARLES L. GRAVES. 



HATF'IELD COOK BOOK. 151 



GLACI NUTS. 



2 cups sugar, just enough water to dissolve the 
sugar. Boil to the "crackle" and drop in English 
walnuts, Brazil nuts; bits of orange, pineapple or 
any fruit you prefer. Remove at once and place on 
buttered plates and cool ilnmediatel3^ 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

1 cup sugar, ^^ cup cold water, ^ cup vinegar, 
butter size of butternut, pour in buttered pan. 

MRS. SETH KINGSLKY. 

FUDGE. 

2 cups sugar, i cup milk, 2 squares chocolate. 
Butter size of a small Q.%%. Boil all together until it 
hairs. Remove from stove and stir until it grains. 
Pour into buttered tins until it hardens. 

MRS. R. BILLINGS. 
CREAM TAFFY. 

I cup granulated sugar, i tablespoon vinegar, % 

cup water. Let ingredients boil until the candy will 

crack when dropped in water. Pour into buttered 

pans to cool, then flour the hands and pull the taffy 

until white. 

ULA gravp:s. 

FRENCH CREAM CANDY COOKED. 

4 cups white sugar, i cup hot water, flavor with 
vanilla. Put the sugar and water in a pan and let it 
boil without stirring, about eight minutes. If creamy, 
and will roll in a ball between the fingers, pour the 
whole into a bowl and beat rapidly. If not boiled 
enough to cream, cook a little longer, but not too much. 
Add the flavoring. This is the foundation for all 
French creams. It can be used in any shape. 

MARGERY DAW. 



152 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



MOLASSES CANDY. 

2 cups molasses, i cup sugar, i tablespoon butter, 
I tablespoon vinegar, i teaspoon soda. 

MRvS. EUROTAvS MORTON. 
CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

I cup rich sweet cream, i cup brown sugar, i cup 
white sugar, 7 tablespoons grated chocolate, i table- 
spoon corn starch stirred into the cream also soda the 
size of a pea. i tablespoon butter. Boil all these 
ingredients together except the chocolate and yi of 
the cream, stirring often to keep from burning. Boil 
half hour. Mix chocolate with cream adding little 
water if necessary. Draw the sauce pan to the back 
of the stove and stir well wliile adding the chocolate 
and cream, then let all cook together for fifteen min- 
utes or until it makes a hard glossy coat on the spoon. 
Pour into buttered tins and cut into squares. 

MRS. GEO. BARNES. 
MOLASSES TAFFY. 

% cup molasses, i cup white sugar, i tablespoon 
vinegar, 2 cups water. Butter size of an ^gg. 

MRS. GEO. BELDEN. 

PEANUT CANDY. 

I cup sugar melted, yj^ cup chopped nuts. When 
sugar is melted stir in the nuts and pour on a sheet 
of tin. 

EUNICE MORTON. 
PANOCHEE CANDY. 

4 cups brown sugar, i cup of milk, butter size of 
a walnut. Cook about twenty minutes then put in a 
tablespoon of vanilla and the meats of i pound of En- 
glish walnuts. Spread on a buttered dish. 

MISS HELEN SMITH. 



HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 153 

SALTED ALMONDS. 

Shell I pound almonds. Pour on boiling water 
and let stand until the red skins will slip off easily. 
Place the nuts on a tin and rub them with a piece of 
butter the size of a w^alnuts. Shake salt over all, do 
not get them too salt. Set them in a moderate oven 
and let brown as much as desired, 

MRvS. GEO. BARNEvS. 

COCOANUT CAKES. 

2 cups sugar, U cup w^ater. Boil until it crisps 
in water, take off the fire and stir until it creames, 
after the cand}' is beaten to a cream, stir in i grated 
cocoanut, make in good sized cakes but thin. Different 
kinds of nuts can be used or fruit if desired. 

NUT CANDY. 

1 cup milk or cream, 4 cups brown sugar, i cup of 
nuts. Butter size of an ^gg^ a desert spoon of vanilla. 
When done, make into squares. 

MARION WARNER. 

PEPPERMINTS. 

2 cups sugar, ^2 cup water. Boil five minutes, 
flavor with peppermint, stir till thick and creamy, 
drop on buttered paper. 

MRS. I. B. LOWELL. 



154 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



MISCEUUAINBOLJS. 



'Variety is the spice of life which gives all its flavor." 



TO EXTERMINATE RED ANTS. 

Tie sulphur in a cotton cloth and place where 
they are troublesome. Small piece of camphor gum 
or elder leaves will sometimes drive them away. 

SODA. 

Common baking soda is excellent for scalds and 
burns. Moisten the burned place and sprinkle on 
the soda. It seems to withdraw the heat and with it 
the pain. 

REMEDY FOR COUGH. 

Take the juice of i lemon, i dessert spoon vaseline, 
Yi cup sugar and the white of one ^%%. Beat all 
together. Take spoonful every hour. 

MRS. A. WARNER. 

LAXATIVE FIG CONSERVE. 

Yi. pound of figs, chopped fine, i ounce of powdered 
senna leaves, i dram cardamom seeds, (pulverized,) 
Yz pint molasses. Let molasses come to a boil add 
chopped figs and other ingredients, keep in jelly 
tumblers. Dose, ^ teaspoon just before retiring. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 



156 HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 

HAM BRINE. 

To I pail of water 2 quarts salt, i tablespoon 
saltpetre, i tablespoon of ammonia, i tablespoon 
baking soda, i teacup of molasses, i teacup of sugar. 
Stir all together till dissolved, add this cold. 

MRvS. D WIGHT MORTON. 

SAUSAGE. 

30 pounds meat, 12 ounces fine salt, 2^^ ounces 
pepper 2 cups sage, 1% cups savory if desired. 

MRS. A. PECK. 

PICKLE FOR HAM. 

For I hundred pounds of pork, allow 6 pounds salt, 
2 pound light brown sugar, 2 ounces saltpetre. Water 
sufficient to cover hams. Boil and skim until clear. 
Just before taking from fire add i ounce soda. When 
cold pour this pickle over the ham. 

MRS E. B. DICKINvSON. 

SAND BAG FOR THE SICK ROOM. 

Get some clear, fine sand, dry it thoroughly in a 
kettle on the stove, make a bag about eight inches 
square of flannel, fill it with the sand, sew the opening 
carefully together and cover the bag with cotton or 
linen. 

JAPANESE CLEANSING FLUID. 

2 ounces spirits of ammonia, i ounce ether, i 
ounce alcohol, i ounce glycerine. All put in i bottle 
at druggists, 2 ounces white powdered castile soap, put 
up in white paper. Dissolve soap in i pint of water 
over the fire, add 2 quarts of boiling water, when nearly 
cold add the bottle of ingredients. Will keep for 
years in bottles when securely corked. 

MRS. R. M. WOODS. 



IIATJ-IELD COOK BOOK. 157 

WASHING FLUID. 

1 pouud Babbit's Potash, i ounce dry ainiiioiiia, 
I ounce salts tartar, i ounce borax, 4 quarts hot water. 
Dissolve potash in the hot water and when a little 
cool add the other ingredients. Soak the clothes in 
warm water over night. In the morning put into 
boiler of cold water to which has been added, 7^ cup 
of fluid and ^ bar of soap. Boil fifteen minutes. 
Put through 2 tubs water and hang up to dr}^ 

MRS. J. E. PORTER. 
POULTICE FOR SORE THROAT. 

2 tablespoons Indian Meal, 2 tablespoons wood 
ashes, i tablespoon mustard, i tablespoon salt. Mix 
with hot water to a thick dough, put in a woolen 
stocking and bind on the neck at night. 

MRvS. W. H. BELDEN. 

GLOSS STARCH. 

To give high gloss to shirts, collars and cuffs, 
add a little dissolved gum arable to the starch. A 
bottle of this should be kept in the laundr3\ Prepare 
by pouring an ounce of boiling water over 2 ounces 
of white gum arable, add a teaspoon powdered borax 
and bottle before it gets quite cold. i tablespoon of 
this added to a quart of starch gives a nice gloss. 

MRS. GEO. BARNES. 

"Hot sunshine will remove scorch." 

"Clothes dry much quicker when borax is added 
to the hot starch just before using." 

"To remove soot from carpet, cover thickly with 
salt and then brush up." 

"When a felon first begins to make its appearance, 
take a lemon, cut off one end, insert the finger, and 
change ever}' three hours." 

"To remove paint or grease spots, take four 
tablespoons alcohol and one of salt, shake well together 
and apply with a sponge or brush." 



IINDEX, 



SOUPS. 
Tomato Soup, No. i, 
" " No. 2, 

Tomato Bisque, 
Vegetable Soup, 
Potato Soup, No. I, 
Chicken Soup, No. i, 
Mock Turtle Soup, 
Chicken Soup, No. 2, 
Cabbage Soup, No. i, 
" " No. 2, 

Pea Soup, 
Clam Soup, 
Potato Soup, No. 2, 
Turkey Soup, 
Clam Chowder, 
Bean Soup, 
Celery Soup, 
Black Bean Soup, (fine,) 
Ham and Egg Soup, 
Asparagus Soup, 
Milk Soup, 

Turnip and potato vSoup, 
Parsnip Stew, 
Lamb Soup, 
Soup Stock, 

FISH. 
Baked Fish, (a la creme,) 
Hollandaise Sauce for Fish, 
Broiled Oysters, 
Oyster Fritters, 



GE 


" 


PAGE 




To Fry Oj'sters, 


i6 


5 


Rhode Island Fish Cakes, 


i6 


5 


E seal loped Fish, 


i6 


5 


Fried vSalt Cod Fish, 


I? 


6 


Escalloped Oysters, No. i. 


17 


6 


Baked Fish, 


17 


6 


Escalloped vSalmon, 


17 


6 


Escalloped Oysters, No. 2, 


17 


7 


Fish Croquettes, 


17 


7 
7 


MEATS. 




7 


Roast Turkey, Chicken or D 


uck, 21 


7 


Roast Veal, 


21 


8 


Spiced Veal, 


21 


S 


Veal Cutlets, 


22 


8 


To Warm-Over Meat, 


22 


8 


Scalloped Chicken, 


22 


9 


Roast Pork, 


23 


9 


Roast Lamb, 


23 


9 


Lamb Stewed with Peas, 


23 


lO 


Frizzled Beef, 


23 


lO 


Broiled Beefsteak, 


23 


ID 


Grilled Chicken, 


24 


ID 


Mutton Pie Plain, 


24 


II 


Chicken Pie, 


24 


II 


Pot Roast, 


24 




Mock Duck, 


25 




Escalloped Meat, No. i, 


25 


15 


" " No. 2, 


25 


15 


Stuffed Beef, 


25 


i6 


Beef a la Mode, 


26 


i6 


Potted Ham, 


26 



INDEX- HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



PAGR 1 




PAGE 


Pressed Chicken, 


26 


BREAKFAvST AND TEA 




Veal Pat tie, 


27 


DISHES. 




Round vSteak, 


27 


Duchess Potatoes, 


47 


Fried Tripe, 


27 


Escal loped Potatoes, No. i, 


47 


Mutton Pie witli Tomatoes, 


27 


Potato cakes. 


'17 


Meat Pie, 


27 


Risotto Napolitaine, 


48 


Ragout of Meat, 


27 


Graham Griddle Cakes, 


48 


Beefsteak Smothered in Onions 


28 


Potato Croquettes, 


48 


Beefsteak Omelet, 


28 


Sweet Breads on Toast, 


49 


Veal Loaf, (excellent,) 


28 


Croquettes, 


49 


Beef Loaf, 


28 


Rice Omelet, 


49 






Veal Pattee, 


49 






Rice Croquettes, 


50 


GRAVIEvS AND SAUCEvS 




Chicken Croquettes, No. i. 


50 


FOR MEATS. 




" " No. 2, 


50 


Giblet Sauce, 


33 


Chicken vSouffle, 


51 


Brown Gravy Sauce, 


33 


Escallopcd Potatoes, No. 2, 


51 


Oyster Sauce, 


33 


Cream Potatoes, 


51 


Mint Sauce, 


33 


Smothered Sausage, 


51 


Caper Sauce for Leg of Lamb, 


33 


Pressed Chicken, 


52 


Gravy for Boiled or Baked F'ish 


,34 


Beaf Loaf, 


52 


Bread Sauce, 


34 


Veal Loaf, 


52 


Tomato Sauce, 


34 


Apple Fritters, 


52 


Tartare Sauce, 


34 


Snowy Omelet, 


52 






Beef Steak Omelet, 


53 


VEGETABLES. 




Meat Omelet, 


53 






Ragout of Meat, 


53 


Vegetables, preparing-cookiug 


, 37 


Omelet, 


53 


Potato Souffle, 


38 


Pressed Eggs, 


53 


Stuffed and Baked Tomatoes, 


38 


]':gg Omelet, 


53 


To Boil Cauliflower, 


38 


Welsh Rare Bit, 


54 


Stuffed Potatoes, 


38 


Corn Fritters, 


54 


Boiled Dinner, 


39 


Corn Oysters, 


54 


Boiling Vegetables, 


39 


Ham and Egg on Toast, 


54 


Potato Balls, 


39 


Baked Omelet, 


54 


Fried Parsnips, 


39 


Baked Eggs, 


55 


A nice way to cook Cabbage, 


40 


Waffles, No. i, 


55 


Stewed Cabbage, 


40 


" No. 2, 


55 


Tremont Potatoes, 


40 






Baked Rice and Tomatoes, 


40 


SALADS. 




Beat Hash, 


.41 


Chicken or Veal Salad, 


59 


Parsnips Fritters, 


41 


Salad Dressing, No. i, 


59 


Macaroni Boiled, 


41 


No. 2, 


59 


Macaroni in Cream, 


41 


No. 3, 


60 


An old-fashioned Dish, 


41 


Cabbage Salad, No. i, 


60 


Baked Beans, 


42 


" No. 2, 


60 



INDEX—HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 







PAGE 


Cream Salad, 




6o 


Boiled Dressing, 




6i 


Salad Dressing, No. 


4. 


6i 


No. 


5 


6i 


Lobster Salad, 




6i 


Potato vSalad, No. i, 




62 


" " No. 2, 




62 


Salad Dressing, No. 


5. 


62 


Veal Salad, 




62 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Remarks 64 

BREADS. 

Potato Yeast, No. i, 65 

" " No. 2, 65 

Wheat Bread, No. i, 65 

Bread Twice Raised, 66 

Wheat Bread, No. 2, 66 

Graham Bread, No. i, 66 

" " No. 2, 66 

" No. 3, 66 

Graham Crackers, 67 

Graham Bread, No. 4, 67 

" No. 5, 67 

Oat Meal Bread, 67 

Graham Rolls, 67 

Baktd Brown Bread, 68 
Steamed Brown Bread, No. i, 68 

Brown Bread, No. i, 68 

No. 2, 68 
Steamed Brown Bread, No. 2, 68 

Brown Bread, No. 3, 69 

Indian Meal Rolls, 69 

Raised Biscnit, No. i, 69 

Gems, 69 

Raised Biscuit, No. 2, 69 

Rye Muffins, 70 
Johnny Cake, No. i, 70 

No. 2, 70 

Raised Cxriddle Cakes, 70 

Wheat Rolls, 70 

Newport Rolls, 71 

German Sponge, 71 

French Rolls, 71 

Wheat Muffins, 71 



PAGE 

Parker House Rolls, No. i, 71 

Breakfast Muffins, 72 

Buns, 72 

Muffins, 72 

Parker House Rolls, No. 2, 72 

Baking Powder Biscuit, 72 

Rolls, 73 

Top Overs, 73 

Wheat Gems, 73 

Parker House Rolls, No. 3, 73 
Pop Overs or Breakfast Cakes, 74 

Breakfast Pocket Books, 74 

Pan Cakes, 74 

Pop Overs, 74 

Sally Lunn. 74 

Green Corn Griddle Cakes, 75 

Corn Fritters, 75 

Good Corn Bread, 75 

PUDDINGS AND SAUCES. 

Tirebot Cream Pudding, 77 

Baked Apple Dumpling, 77 

Baked Suet Pudding, 78 

Snow Pudding, 78 

Cream Tapioca, 78 

Baked Indian Pudding, 79 

Delicate Indian Pudding, 79 

Chocolate Pudding, No. i, 79 

Graham Pudding, 79 

Chocolate Pudding, No. 2, 80 

Corn Starch Pudding, 80 

Judge Peter',s Pudding, 80 

Bread Pudding, 80 

Rice Pxidding, 81 

Prune Pudding, No. i, 81 

No. 2, 81 

Huckleberry Pudding, 81 

Quaking Pudding, 82 

Steam Pudding, 82 

Cottage Pudding, 83 

K'ingsley Pudding, 83 

Graham Pudding, 83 

Sweet Corn Pudding, 83 

Berry Pudding, 83 

Custard Souffle Pudding, 84 



INDEX-HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



Ap])lt' PiKldiiiir, 

Caraintl Puddinj^, 

Orange Pudding, No. i, 
No. 2, 

Pineapple Pudding, 

Indian Piulding, 

I^nglish Plum Pudiling, 

Suet Piulding, 

Imperial Rice Pudding, 

Crenie, diplomate. 

Cracker Piulding, 

Pudding vSauces, No. i, 

" " No. 2, 

No. 3, 

No. 4, 

Rice I'udding, 

pip:vS. 

Pie Crust, 

Puff Paste, (very nice,) 
Nice Mince Pie, 
Mince Meat for Pies, 
Strawljerry Cream Pie, 
Cream Pie, No. r, 
" " No. 2, 

" No. 3, 
Squash Pie, No. i, 
Cranberry Pie, 
Lemon Meringue Pie, 
Rhubarb Pie, 
Lemon Pie, No. i. 
Mock Mince Pie, 
Squash Pie, No. 2, 
Cream Pie, No. 4, 
Custard Pie, 
Chocolate Pie, 
Cocoauut Pie, 
Chicken Pie, 
Apple Pudding Pies, 
Rice Pie, 
Lemon Pie, No. 2, 

PLAIN and FANCY DI^SST 
Pine Apple Cream, 
Whipped Apple Cream, 
Coffee Blanc Mange, 



84 
84 

85 
85 
85 
85 
86 
86 
86 
87 
87 
87 
87 
87 
88 
88 



91 
91 
91 
92 
92 
92 
92 
93 
93 
93 
93 
93 
94 
94 
94 
94 
94 
94 
95 
95 
95 
95 
95 

:rts. 

99 
99 
99 



Tapioca Cream, 
Prune Whip, 
Cheese Straws, No. r, 

" " No. 2, 

Short Cake, 

Strawberry Short Cake, 
Rasp1)erry Tapioca, 
Chocolate Blanc Mange, 
Orange Custard, 
Baked Custard, 
Boiled Custard, 
Coffee Puff, No. i, 

" " No. 2, 
Coffee Jelly, 
Pineapple Ice, 
Milk Sherbet, No. i, 
Beaten Cream, 
Milk Sherbet, No. 2, 
Ice Cream, No. i, 
Raspberry Puff, 
Coffee Ice Cream, 
Caramel Ice Cream, 
Vanilla Ice Cream, 
Strawberry Sherbet, 
Ice Cream, No. 2, 
Lemon Ice, No. i, 
Lemon Ice, No. 2, 
Ice Cream, No. 3, 
Nut Ice Cream. 

CAKES. 
Macaroons, 
Cocoanut Cake, No. i. 
Pop Doodle, 
Hermit Cake, 
Pound Cake, 
Fillin.g for Cake, 
Black Fruit Cake, 
Black or Wedding Cake, 
Walnut Cake, No. i. 
Chocolate Cake, No. i. 
Sponge Cake, No. i, 
Angel Cake, No. i. 
Orange Cake, 
Quick Loaf Cake, 



PAGE 

icx> 
loo 
100 
ror 
lor 

lOI 

lol 
102 
102 
102 
102 

103 
103 
103 
103 
103 
103 

104 
104 
104 

104 

104 

105 
105 
105 
105 

106 
106 
106 



109 
109 
109 
1 10 
110 
no 
no 

1 10 

11 1 

11 1 
III 
III 

1 12 
1 12 



INDEX— HATFIELD COOK BOOK. 



PAGE 




PAGE 


Sunshine Cake, 


12 


Sour Milk Cake, 


121 


Cream Puffs, 


12 


Spice Cake, 


122 


Pork Cake, 


13 


Chocolate Marble Cake, 


122 


Chocolate Cake, (deviPs food, ) 


13 


Layer Cake, No. 3, 


122 


Halligar Cake, 


13 


Angel Cake, No. i. 


122 


Cake without Egtjs, 


13 


Marble Cake, 


122 


Cocoanut Cake, No. 2, 


13 


White Cake, 


122 


Coffee, Cake, 


14 


Fruit Cake, No. 2, 


123 


Fig Cake, 


14 


Walnvit Cake, No. 2, 


123 


Composition Cake, 


14 


Angel Cake, No. 2, 


123 


Chocolate Cake, No. 2, 


14 


Dried Apple Fruit Cake, 


123 


Cream Sponge Cake, 


14 


No Egg Fruit Cake, 


123 


Fruit Cake, 


15 


Black Hill Cake, 


124 


Raised Cake, No. i. 


15 


Boiled Frosting, 


124 


" " No. 2, 


15 


DOUGHNUTS, GINGER 




Raised Dough Cake, 


15 


BREADS, COOKIES. 




Sponge Cake, ] 


15 


Doughnvits, (very fine,) 


127 


Raised Loaf Cake, ] 


16 


Doughnuts, No. i. 


127 


Lemon Cake, No. i, : 


16 


Doughnuts, No. 2, 


127 


Delicate Cake, 


16 


Doughnuts, No. 3, 


127 


Caramel Sponge Cake, 


16 


Ginger Wafers, 


128 


Plain Cake, 


17 


Cream Ginger Bread, 


128 


Sponge La^-er Cake, 


17 


Ginger Snaps, No. i. 


128 


Cold Water Sponge Cake, 


17 


Ginger Cake, 


128 


Laj'er Cake, No. i. 


[17 


Ginger Drop Cakes, 


128 


One Egg Cake, 


[17 


Olive Ginger Bread, 


128 


Swiss Cake, 


ti8 


Ginger Snaps, No. 2, 


T29 


Albion Cake, 


[18 


Cookies, No. i. 


129 


Cake Filling, 


[18 


Marshmallow Cookies, 


129 


Walnut Filling for Cake, 


18 


vSugar Cookies, 


129 


Chocolate Filling, 


18 


Cookies, No. 2, 


129 


Cream Chocolate P'illing, 


[18 


Sour Cream Cookies, 


130 


Filling for Layer Cake, 


rig 


Tart Crust, 


130 


Caramel Cake, 


19 


Love Knots, 


130 


Caramel Filling, 


19 


Cookies, No. 3, 


130 


Layer Cake, No. 2, 


[19 


Crullers, No. i. 


130 


Snow Cake, 


[19 


Crullers, No. 2, 


130 


Cold Water Cake, 


[20 


Crullers, No. 3, 


131 


Pearl Cake, 


[20 


Crullers, No. 4, 


131 


Layer Cake, No. 3, 


[20 


Nut Crackers, 


131 


White Fruit Cake, 


20 


Brambles, 


131 


Lemon Cake, No 2, 


[20 


PICKLES. 




Rolled Jelly Cake, No. i, 


r2i 


Higdon, Pickles, 


133 


" " " No. 2, 


[21 


Piccalilli, 


133 


Queen Cake, 


121 


Spiced currants. 


133 



INDEX— HATFIELD COOK }iOOK. 





PACK 




PACE 


French Chow Cht)\v, 


',i4 


To Make Coffee 1)y I'iltering, 


'47 


Grape Catsup, 


i.U 


To Make Tea, 


U7 


Cold Catsup, 


134 


Chocolate, 


147 


vSweet Pickled IVaclies, 


135 






Chili Sauce, 


135 


CONFECTIONERV. 




Sweet Pickle, (citron, ) 


r35 


h'rench Vanilla Cream, 


149 


Mustard Pickle, 


135 


Orange Drops, 


149 


Pickle Lilly, 


136 


Fudge, No. I, 


149 


Piccalilli, (without cookinj^, ) 


136 


No. 2, 


150 


Musk Melon Tickle, 


136 


Peanut Taffy, 


150 


Cucumber Pickles, 


136 


Walnut Cream, 


150 


Onion I'ickle, 


137 


Salted Peanuts, 


150 






Glaci Nuts, 


151 


PRESERVES AND JELLIES. 


Butter Scotch, 


151 


Preparing Fruit for Preserving 


139 


Fudge, No. 3, 


151 


Amount of Sugar to a Quart Jar 


140 


Cream Taffy, 


151 


Orange Marmalade, 


140 


French Cream Candy Cooked 


151 


Gooseberry Jam, 


140 


Molasses Cand}-, 


152 


Currant Jelly, 


141 


Chocolate Caramels, 


152 


Blackberry Preserves, 


141 


Molasses, Taffy, 


152 


Lemon Jelly, No. i, 


141 


Peanut Candy, 


152 


Lemon Jelly, No. 2, 


141 


Panochee Candy, 


152 


Quince Honey, 


141 


Salted Almonds, 


153 


Green Grape Marmalade, 


142 


Cocoanut, Cakes, 


153 


To Preserve Blackberries, 


142 


Nut Candy 


153 


Buttercup Jelly, 


142 


Peppermints, 


153 


Cider Jelly, 


142 


MISCELLANEOUS. 




Cider Apple Sauce, 
Orange Jelly, 


143 






143 


To Exterminate Red Ants, 
vSoda, 


155 


Preserved Pears, 


143 


155 


Currant Conserve, 


143 


Remedy for Cough, 


155 






Laxative Fig Conserve, 


155 


BEVERAGES. 




Ham Brine, 


156 






Sausage, 


156 


Beef Tea, 


145 


Pickle for Ham, 


156 


Beef Extract, 


145 


Sand Bag for the vSick Room, 


■56 


Raspberry Vinegar, 


145 


Japanese Cleansing Fluid, 


156 


Red Raspberry Shrub, 


145 


Washing P'luid, 


157 


Currant Shrub 


146 


Poultice for vSore Throat, 


157 


Lemon Syrup, 


146 


Gloss Starch, 


157 


Blackberry Cordial, 


146 






Mead, 


146 






Indian Meal Gruel, 


146 






Milk Porridge, 


147 






Soda Cream, 


147 






To Make Coffee, 


147 







GEO. IN. UUCIA, 

We make a specialty of 

* HMctures anb jframcs * 

And carry in stock a large assortment. 

Artists^ Supplies, Stationery, Fancy Goods, Toys, Etc. 



GBO. IN. UUCIA, 

229 WAIN STREET, NORTHAMPTON. 

B. E. Cook & Son, 

^ ^ ^ 

Watches and Clocks, . . 
Jewelry and Silverware, 
Optical Goods 

^ ^ ^ 

1 1 z jMain Street, JVortbampton, JMass. 

F^OR Jewelry, Optical Goods, 
Stationery, Cameras and 

Camera Supplies, 

CALL ON 

F. W. ROBERTS, 

27 jMain Street, JSorthamptoti, JMass. 



ff HATFIELD, MASS. «r 



J. H. HOWARD, 



DFALER IN 



Choice Groceries^ Crockery^ Dry Goods^ 
Boots, Shoes, Hardware, Etc* 



Chase & Sanborn Teas and Coffees. 
ARTHUR M. WARB, 

Dealer in 

Beef, pork, Ram, Veal, Lamb, provisions 
and 6ggs, 

52 MAPI^n STRHUT, FhORimCE, MASS. 



Vegeta1)les and Fruit of all kindB in their season. 
A nice line of High Grade Canned Goods. 

specialties: — 

Ware's Cooked and Pressed Meats, Boiled Ham, Sliced Dried Beef. 

These goods are as good as I can make or buy. 
I sell them as reasouaVjlc, as I can, and do a 
satisfactory business. 

TELEPHONE 1 19-5. 



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JVE HA]'E THE EXPERIENCE OF SEVENTEEN YEARS, 
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OR CA8 



r\ 



\j 



m 



]S[o orders solicited. 
]So goods delivered. 



WE CAN SELL GROCERIES TO THOSE HA VING THEIR 

OWN TEAM, JUST ONE PROFIT LOWER 

THAN OTHERS. 

AND WE DO IT T 

It pays to trade ivhere you do not pay for delivering to some one else 



TXC^T^^ STORE, 

COt?JMEF{ IWflF^i^eT AJMD WALi|SiUT STl^EETS. 



Good Cooking vs. Stylish Dress. 



Good cooking will surely be promoted 
by use of the many excellent receipts printed 
in this book. 

Stylish dress is just as surely promoted 
by frequeiit visits to the dry goods house of 



J. E. LAMBIE & CO., 

NORTHAMPTON, - MASS. 

THE LATEST NOVELTIES, 

BOTH ORNAMENTAL AND 
PRACTICAL, AS WELL AS 
EMBROIDER Y MA TE RIALS 
OE EVERY DESCRIPTION, 

FANS, LACES, RIBBONS, GLOVES, 

Can always be found at 



E. P. COREL-7^ND*S, 

104 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



J. G. S7VYIXH, 



. . . DEALER IN 



Beef, Veal, Pork, Lamb, Poultry, Etc. 



HATFIELD, MASS. 



• • • garpenTer • • • 



FOR A . . . 
FIRST CLASS 



CALL ON OCR TOWNSMAN, 



EDGAR LiYjVIAlSl, 

Weather Strips a Specialty.. 



G. H, HMRT^aZELL, 



DEALER IN 



Breab, pies, Cahes, Crackers, Etc 



351 Bridie Street, Northampton, Mass. 



Deuefs Stabk 



NORTHAMPTON. 



Teams ot" every description, with or without (hiver. 
The best place in town to feed or hitcli vour horse. 



FRANK D. DEUEL, Prop. 

TELEPHONE 128-2. 



. . MANDELL'S . . 

IS A 

GOOD PLACE - 

TO BUY 

- GOOD SHOES. 

Mansion House Block, Northampton, Mass. 

CKe sell plants, Cut flowers, "Jardiniers and 
Ornamental Shrubbery, 

Our prices are as low as it is possible to inakc them. 
Visitors are always welcome at our Green House. 



FIELD, THE FLORIST, 

Store, 279 Main St., Green^house, Cor. Prospect and Massasoit Sts., 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



M. Howes & Son, 

Dry (S@@dSp Or@c€ri' 

Boots and Shoes, 
HaPdxxtaPe, Ete. 






MAIN STREET, WHATELY, MASS. 



North Hatfield Store. 



This is our first ''^acT'' in a Coo/c Book, 
It is hard to write the right words^ but 
zve wish you to remember that ive liave all 
goods usually found iu a country store. 

W. B. MeGLEL2LAN. 



G. H- B0VDE]S1, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

lee Gream, ^nt and Gonfeetionery. 

197 CQain Street, 
fiopthampton, « (Tiass. 



1l3aibvvare, jfainiino XTools, ^ 

SEEDS, BICYCLES, 
SPORTING GOODS, 

GRAIN, FEED, LIHE AND CEHENT. 



J. R. SULlilVfllSl, 

3 WAIN STREET, NORTHAMPTON, WASS. 

Telephone 6-2. 

^ ESSENTIALS. ^ 
FOOD! HEATT 

WitJi this Book and a ^' Richmond^'' Range 
you can ynake the best food on earth. 

THE KELSEY HOT AIR GENERATOR 

Is the Greatest Heater on Earth. 



J. H. & W. H. RILEY, 

RELIABLE PLUMBERS, 
193 main St., fiorthampton, mass. 



REFRIGERATORS, ICE CREAN FREEZERS. 



1kino8le)2'3 Sarsapadlla, 

50 CENTS. 



We wish everj'one knew tlie actual worth of this preparation. 

Other Sarsaparillas would have a small sale. That sounds 
large, but it's a fact. Try a bottle of it and j'ou will sa}-, as one man 
did in our store, ^ — "I have tried three or four different makes of 
Sarsaparilla, but yours takes right hold. It seems to be all medicine." 

We make this Sarsaparilla and refund your money if you do 
not find it at the least, the equal of any dollar »Sarsaparilla. 

People who have tried it say it is the best one made. 



CH7XS. B. KIINGSL-EV, 

Prescription Druggist, 

140 Main Street, Northampton. 



A GOOD COOK USES 
THE BEST EL OUR. . 

Pillsbury's Best 
and White Lily 

Are Still al the Head. 

Commercial Fertilizers 

Eor All Crops. 
WOOD AND LIME ASHES. 



All kinds of . . . 

. . FEED . . 

aheays on Iiand. 

/'< ) I L TR ) ' EOOn TLIA T Jl ELL 

iMAKE HENS LAV 

WHEN EGGS ARE HIGH. 



MOWING MACHINES, 
TEDDERS, HORSE RAKES 
WEEDERS, 
CULTH'ATORS, 

and all oilier 

Agricultural Implements. 



S. i& H. A. WIUDBR, 

North Hatfield, Mass. 



CHAS. R. FITTS, 



Furniture, Coroets Draoeiies 



1 



FURNISHING UNDERTAKER. 



Northampton, Mass. 



:LT 



IN 



Ladies^ Neckwear and Infants^ Goods 



AT 



E. C POMEROY'S, 

122 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



A. G. FEARING, 

Northampton, Hass. 



Dry Goods, flotions and Carpets. 

All at the Lowest Cash Prices. 

No fictitious quotations allowed in this store. 

We show goods with pleasure. 



YOU WILL FIND 



EVERYTHING 

IN THE 

. . . DRUG LINE . . . 

AT 

COB URN 6c GRAVES. 

OPP. COURT HOUSE, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

WHEN IN WANT OF THE BESl 

TEAS AND COEEEES 

OR CHOICE GROCERIES, 

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IN THEIR SEASON, 

CO TO 

K. H. STOINB'S GROCERV, 

28 Main Street, Northampton. 

for batches, Clocks^ "Jewelry. Silverware, 
Spectacles or 6ye Glasses. 



. . TRY . . 

C H. GOULD, 

133 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

Rxpcrt Watch Re])aircr. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



GHAUNGEY H. PIERGE, 



^'p%"o^s',Tr:^::o°mAL HAL. NORTHAMPTON- MASS. 



INSURANCE, 

REAL ESTATE, 

INVESTMENTS. 



NOTARY PUBLIC. 

All business pertaining to Estates and Trusts carefully managed. 

. . OUH SHOES . . 

.lA'/-: nilAT IV E REPRESENT 
THEM TO BE, .... 

Che Best for the price, that JVIoney Can Buy, 



R. H. DRURY cSt CO., 

Northampton, Mass. 



6681 ^ AON 



FORBES & WALLACE, 

Springfield, 1899. 



Dad:— 

You know Forbes & Wallace's store in Springfield! 
You know you can get almost everything there! You 
know that prices are generally lower there than 
elsewhere for the same articles! Do you also know 
that they take anything back which you bu}^ of them 
and do not find satisfactory? Do you know that they 
advertise: — 

"Your money back, if when 3'on get home 3^ou'd 
rather have it than what you got for it"? 



FORBES & WALLACE, 

Main, Vernon and Pynchon Streets, 

Springfield, Mass. 




I 



Copies of this valuable Cook 
Book containing tested Receipts 
may be had from 7nembers of 
''REAL folks;' 

LL at field, 
Hampshire Co. Mass.