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Full text of "Hawk"



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TABLE 0F E0NTENTS 






PflGE 


DEDIE<nTIQN 


4 


STUDENT LIFE 


6 


SENIGR EL-flSS 1985 


31 


5ENIGR EL^flSS 1886 


38 


QRE-nNIZ-flTIQNS 


56 


FflEULTY Si STAFF 


66 


EENTENNIflL REVIEW 


81 


'HEIMEEEIMING 


87 


SPGRTS 


113 


SPEEIflL EVENTS 


128 


•fIRGUND TtiE YARD 


148 


ERflDUflTIQN 


177 


EflMPUS IN BLQQM 


186 


fl MATTER EJF SUPPQRT 

2 


184 



"1QQ YEARS EIF 
PROGRESS <HND PRIDE" 



With the strong support of the University of Maryland Board of Regents and Central Administration, 
UMES has developed an academic program above and perhaps more impressive than any other higher 
educational institution of its size in the East. 




^<?seA9ft^ 



Today, the University offers not only a well-constructed and varied academic program, but a beautiful 
setting that is conducive to learning. It provides each student a wholesome experience in a non- 
threatening environment, an opportunity to develop into a well-rounded individual who is able to 
assume leadership in today's society. 

As the University enters its second century, there is no limit to the progress that can be made or the 
educational apex that can be reached. 



DEDICATIO]\ 




Dr. William P. Hytche, 
Chancellor 

In appreciation of ten years of outstanding service and achievements, the staff readily 
selected Dr. William P. Hytche, as the honoree for the Centennial Yearbook. 

As a campus, we are appreciative of his tireless service, his loyalty, his dynamic leadership, 
his genuine concern for students and his personal commitment to the academic enhancement of 
UMES through research and programs. His duties and responsibilities have carried him to many 
countries abroad, and this has added to the international flavor that is prevalent on our campus. 
This dedication page is our small way of saying, "Thanks for bringing this campus successfully 
in another century." 





Mrs. Deloris Hytche 



Grandchildren 




Dr. and Mrs. Hytche and Family 



Student Life 




The Process Continues 




HARD AT IT . . . 



while some consider it a 
serious case of perpetration, 
others know that they are hard 
at their work. During class 
everything is taken seriously 
as students prepare 
themselves for making the 
grade here and eventually 
making it in the real world. 





AND TAKING IT EASY 



And when it comes to a time for just 
"cooling out," students tend to put the 
books aside and make the best of their 
free time. And when this happens, 
sometimes studies are far from their 
minds in an attempt to escape. 
From the sometimes hot and dry yard, 
to the cool comfort of the Student 



Development Center, students find a 
nice place to take a break. While some 
engage in meaningful conversation or 
playful moments, others enjoy the 
solace of solitude. But everyone knows 
that this free time does not last 
forever, and it's back to being "hard at 
it." 




THE MANY 

FACES 

OF OUR CAMPUS 

U.M.E.S. has an array of per- 
sonalities all rolled up into one 
beauiful campus. The scenic 
quiet setting of the yard and its 
surrounding structures, as well 
as, the jovial attitudes that the 
students display give visitors a 
sense of our beautiful "home 
away from home." 






■L 



Looking in Different Directions 





As the year settles in and students enjoy 
the campus, there appears to be an air of 
diversity about. Even still, students from 
different modes of campus life are able to 
enjoy themselves, from the fraternal in- 
volvement of "finding that diamond in 
the sky" — to the Sigmas cooling out on 
their plot — to the Alphas who simply 
have a "chill effect." Who will ever real- 
ly know "which way to go?" 




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It's Fall Festival Time. The Student 
Development Center vi^as soaring with 
action as various organizations and 
^^^^^ groups joined together to make the 

Fall Indoor Festival a success. There 
was music to dance to, games to play, good food 
to indulge in, and plenty of people to converse 
with. A lot of energy was exerted by those who 
had an active hand in making the Fall Festival 
come alive, and the student body was able to 
enjoy the experience to the fullest. 










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People 




The Process 
Continues . . . 



Throughout the day as 
students juggle their classes, 
work and extracurricular 
activities, they encountered 
many different people. 
Some were faculty 
members who motivated 
and challenged them. 
Others were fellow students 
out to fulfill dreams. But, 
whether they were 
students, faculty or staff 
members they each brought 
a special magic to the UMES 
experience. 



Senior Class 
of 1985 




Catherine Abbey 
Kingsley Annan 



Pamela Ashford 
Charlettta Ayers 



Mulyate Boniface 
Lloyd Bowser 



Linda Carter 
Vincent Chigbu 



Cynthia Colbert 
Lenox Coles 





Janice Collins 
Donna Dixon 



Jeff Dixon 
Elisha Edwards 



Lucille Evans 
Margaret Foster 



Awoyinka Gabriel 
Joan Gibbs 



Ihianacho Godson 
Karen Johnson 



Mona Jones 
Richard Lindsey 






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Tammy Lomax 
Michael Morrison 




Stephanie Nix 
Robert Omodi 



Jeanetta Robinson 
Catherine Robinson 



Sherrie Ross 
Adrienne Showell 



Rick Stewart 
Kenneth Tilghman 



Angela Tyer 
Phyllis White 





Roslyn Williams 
Tina Wilson 




Stephen Amobi 
Business Administration 



M. Esquire Anthony 
Biology 

Bonnie Barnes 

Home Economics 

Education 




Denise Beckett 
Business Administration 

Kendall Blackston 
Business Administration 



Veronica Brisco 
Business Administration 

Meredith Britton 
Sociology 



Ronald Brooks 
Computer Science 

Lance Brown 
Biology 



Tonya Brown 

Electrical Engineering 

Tech 

Mareesa Burnette 
Computer Science 



Gordon Canty 
Business Administration 

Suresh Chandra 

Hotel/Restaurant 

Management 



Mathias Chijioke 
Accounting 

Terri Crawford 
Business Administration 





Duane Davis 

Business Administration 

Gary Davis 
Computer Science 



Carlissa Dennis 
Computer Scinece 

Florence Ennals 
General Home Economics 



Kenneth Evans 
Sociology 

Jacqueline Facey 
Sociology 



Wavie Gibson, II 
Biology 

Betty Grogan 
Physical Therapy 



Dennis Hackett 

Hotel/Restaurant 

Management 

Annette Harrigan 
Business Administration 



Towanda Hawkins 
Computer Science 

Glenn Hayes 
Business Administration 





Scarlette Howard 
Computer Science 

Darin Hungerford 
Business Administration 



Paul Jefferson 

Business Administration 



II Charlene Kelly 
I Computer Science 



Paul Lewis 
Sociology 

Cynthia Lilly 
Physical Education 



Carlton McCullough 
Computer Science 

Stephanie Mcintosh 
General Home Economics 




Leroy Maddox, Jr. 
Sociology 

Radhia Magoma 
Physical Therapy 









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Alison Martin 
History 

Susan Mitchell 

Elementary /Special 

Education 






Sylvester Mitchell 
Social Science 

"^ Lisa Moore 

Business Education 



Sharon Murray 
Business Administration 

Herald Pearsall 
Computer Science 



Emma Perry 
General Studies 

Kimberly Pierce 
Business Administration 



Pius Efobi 
Business Administration 

Ozetta Posey 
Physical Education 



Karen Raison 
Business Administration 

Anthony Ruffin 
Sociology 



Lohsel Shagaya 
General Agriculture 

Doraetbia Shorter 
Sociology 





Barbara Thomas 
Accounting 

Sharon Walker 
Physical Therapy 



Lovell Walls 

Business Administration 

Tyrone Watkins 
Physical Education 



Linda Wiles 
Computer Science 

Al Doran Willis 

Hotel/Restaurant 

Management 



Craig Willis 
English 

Tamika Wise 
Business Administration 




Jeffrey Wutoh 

Christopher Young 
Sociology 



Underclassmen 




Wyndetta Valentine, William Garrett, and Valerie Norwood take a 
break to catch up on reading and beauty. 



Danette Anderson 



Danon Ashton 



Anthony Audrey 

Van Barnes 

Amenda Burrough 

Robert Bell 

Karen Berry 



Titus Better 

Michael Blandford 

Eric Brown 

Theresa Brown 

Nadine Campbell 



Kenneth Chapman 

Trevol Chapman 

Ben Chelsedine 

Rodney Coleman 

Catana Cooper 



Maurice Cotton 
Connie Cropper 
Linda Dempsey 
Kevin Dixon 
Elgerthia Dodds 




Robert Bell chats with a friend. 



Stephanie Faison 
Jackie Folkes 
Aaron Frazier 



Betty Fuller 
Karen Glover 
Kimberly Gloster 




Barrel Green 

Steve Green 

Milroy Harried 

Andrea Hawkins 

Lance Hawkins 



Robert Henry 

Derrick Hill 

Shannon Hines 

Anthony Holmes 

Stacy Hux 



Jenae Hyman 

Phyllis Hyman 

Rhonda Jackson 

Tracey James 
Wanda Jefferson 



Lenard Jenkins 

Carlos Johnson 

Darryl Johnson 

Larry Johnson 

Sonja Johnson 




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Lisa Jones 
Monica Jones 
Lenae Leach 
Edmond Lee 
Howard Linsey 



Rosalyn McGinnis 
Ingrid Mattliews 
DanieJ MerrifieJd 
Darren MiJbourne 
Nichole Minor 



Namon MitcJieJl 
John Morman 
Anthony Murrill 
Michael Paylor 
Clarence Polk 



Sharron President 
Cynthia Randolph 
Michelle Robinson 
Victor Rouse 
Bertina Selman 



Robin Shelton 

Bryon Showell 

John Sica 

Michele Simple 

Cheryl Smiler 



Andre Stover 

Twanda Swann 

Linda Tankerson 

Sandra Taylor 

Glenda Tilghman 



Eric Torrain 

Kevin Turner 

Pedro Valdez 

Trinna Walker 

Dawn Wallen 



Trina Ward 

Kimberly Weaver 

Daniel Welch 

Gary West 

William White 




Angle Williams 

Enor Williams 

Stacey Wills 

Nadine Wilson 

Melicia Woodland 



Odetta Wynter 

Al Young 

Jesslyn Haskin 

? ? 

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Organizations 




^ 




The Process Continues . . . 






Fraternity 

Brothers 

Perform at 

Step Show 




Gary Davis 


Kendall Blackston 


Artie Williams 


Lawrence Bailey 


Rick Stewart 


Antonio Bateman 


Gordan Canty 


Hamilton Parrar III 


Harold Pearsal Jr. 


James Corley 


Mike Morrison 


Richard Lindsay 


Glenn Hayes 


Timothy Smith 




sa^ 



Denise Goode, Linda Carter Kim Flannigan, Linda Davis 
Brenda Davis, Juanetta Robinson 

Sharon Edwards, Michom Washington Mildred Strange, Cyn- 
thia Colbert 

Radia Magoma, Annette Harrigan, Tina Wilson, Sharon Drig- 
gins, Alice Allen, Donna Dixon 

AKA's perform at step show 




Cynthia, Karen, AUegra 



Ozetta, Michele, Emma 



Bonnie, Etta, Lena, Tammy 



DELTA 



Zetas move to the music 



Kelli King, Phyllis White, Angela Tyer, Jeanne Delta Pledgees in a somber stance 
Willis, Ramona Haggarty, Stella Carver, Cheryl 
Smiler, Barbara Thomas, Stephanie Bryant, 
Eunice Bedminster 




Cheerleaders 



U.M.E.S. Hawk Cheerleaders on the move 





Pom Pom Squad help Cheer Hawks to 
victory. 



Student Activity Board 




Seated, Left to Right: Allen Taylor, 
Kevin Briscoe, Robert Dowery, Ad- 
visor, Eric Bell, Edmund Lee. 



Standing: Patrice West, Lisa Davis, The Board that plans major campus 
Angela Butler, Tracee Holman, Shelby activities 
Hill, Susan Mitchell, Lisha Scriber, 
Michelle Mack. 




Jazz Band Takes Time to Jam, 
Tune-up, and Kool Out 



FACULTY 

AND 

STAFF 




Mr. James Lockwood 
Mr. William Miles 



Dr. Metaferia 



Dr. Britt 





Kirland Hall 
Donzella Gaines 




Always 

In 
Action 



Dr. Shaw 





Cheryl Holden 



Lillian Ballard 



Craig Cotton 



Faculty & Staff 




Dr. Elvin Webber 
Ms. Lauren Taylor 








Ms. Susan Beckett 
Mr. Norman Bromley 




1. Dr. Arya 

2. Sgt. Custis 



Ms. Lynette Messick 

Dr. Henry Brooks 

Ms. Elaine Lankford 
Ms. Brenda Wiltbank 



Faculty & Staff 



Ms. Alverta Polk 




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Mr. David Wells 




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Dr. William Pender 




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Mr. Norman Tilghman 


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Ms. Susan Tull 



Dr. Raymond Blakely 



Ms. S. Sabaratnam 
Ms. T. Ann Lucas 






Ms. Allena Bagwell 



Dr. Mortimer Neutville 



Dr. Howard Rebach 



Mr. David Alls 
Dr. John Groutt 
Ms. Judy M. Daniels 
Dr. Anthony Pescatore 
Mr. Steve Williams 



Faculty and Staff 




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Dr. Diann Showell 
Ms. Rebecca Palmer 
Dr. Gerald Johnson 
Dr. Youssef Hafez 
Mr. Al Constantine 



hear . ..and I forqef. 
see ...and I remember 




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Faculty and Staff 

Ms. Beatrice Wright 
Dr. Jeanine H. Dennis 
Ms. Jackie Handy 
Ms. Sharon Brooks 





Ms. Shirley Hyman-Hendricks 

Ms. Florence Jones 

Ms. Linda Corbin 
Ms. Veronica Miles 

Ms. Juanesta Cannon 



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Coach Howie Evans 

Ms. Sharon Brooks, Library 



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Otis Conway, Andrew 
Turner, Security 



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Rochelle Peoples, 
Admissions 

Filmore Corbin, Security 



Security Policeman Diane Johnson 



Public Relations Director 
Alan Fritch 




Track Coach Ian Daley 





Dr. Joel Roache 
Ms. Delia D. Johnson 




Lois Smith, P.Ed. 



Dr. David Johnson 




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John Lamkin, Music Dept. 



Germaine McCauJey, P.Ed. 




Thomas Wiles, Photography Instructor 



Dining Hall Managers, D. Anderson and M. 
Hairston 




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Coach Corbett 



Ms. Edwina Morse, Admissions Office 



Corporal Armwood, Securi- 
ty Police 




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UNIVERSITY OF MARYLa! 
EASTERN SHORE 

ffttNCESS ANNE, MARYLANO 

AUDITORIUM 

COMPLETED 1973 

MARVIN MANOEL. GOVERN 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 
MAIVIH WANOEL GOv 

[lOai* L«OIOSTEIN CO.'M 

JOHN A. UfTIf MEYER im 



UmVERSITY OF MARYLAf 

BOARD OF REGfNT^ 

lOaiS LKAPLAN. CHAl f !. ■. 
ttCHAIOKCASE 
aMCIMIT MOWN .' SAUJc: H H 

HAItV MKIITTLE EOWADC V K> P 

UMLAUCf H.MO*GAN HuCH t Mc M 

f. OtOVf Mlilf ■. JH. I •" ^ £ 

Mn.WieNAtlJlOEEGAN.JR EMF^ 
PRESIDENT 

WIUON H EtHNf 

CHANCELLOR 
AICHIE l.BUfFK;NS 



OEWUmHENT OF GENERA 

OiOiei riEwis sFcar 

sietai.MiLis c ei.HK, A(' 

J.«<51A«(0 BAIHIIU t «ONViNC. CtNi - 



100 Years 

of 

Pride and Progress 

MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE ALMA 
MATER 
To thee dear Alma Mater 
We raise our grateful song 
Thou, through thy noble teachings 
Hast made thou children strong; 
And thousands still shall praise thee. 
All earth shall hear their swell. 
And bind our hearts yet closer. 
To thee we love so well. 

We love thy spacious campus. 
We love thy tow'ring halls. 
And hallow'd are the lessons 
We've learned within thy walls. 
Stand thou forever glorious. 
Full rob'd in living green; 
Shine thou in endless splendor 
Beneath thy trees serene. 

Maryland, Maryland, home of Maroon and 

Grey 
Maryland, Maryland, thee we will love always. 
All hail to thee fair Maryland 
All glory be to thee! 
Grow thou in strength and honor 
Through all eternity! 










,,1., Wifilfff^li', 




University of Maryland Eastern Shore 

Taking Pride in Our Long History 



Residenls or Somersel County who like progress can ^J*^ 
point with pride to Maryland Stale College, the local 
Eastern Shore Institution, which has grown from humble 
origins to a great enterprise for the education of youth of 
Maryland. The College is now a recognized landmark 
rendering many worthwhile services to the citizens of the 
State. 



The Old Milk House 




Campus as it used to be . 







Olney, Built In 1798 




First Classes Held in Olney, Built 1798 



Founded in 1886, the College held its 
first classes in an old colonial dwelling called 
Olney. This building was situated near the 
outskirts of town on the unpaved road to 
Salisbury. Ezekiel Haynie, a physician of 
Snow Hill, built Olney in 1 798 when George 
Washington was still alive. 

With many claimants, Olney remained in 
possession of the heirs of Haynie until a 
court decision in 1867 ordered the property 
to be sold under the trusteeship of Isaac D. 
Jones, then a lawyer of Princess Anne and 
Attorney General of the State. Jones sold the 
entire Haynie estate to his friend James U. 
Dennis, one of the wealthiest men of the 
County. Eventually, Olney passed through 
the hands of Louis W. Morris, Beulah Hirst, 
Aaron D. Woodruff, and John A. B. Wilson. 
Morris and Woodruff were local residents 
and Wilson was presiding elder in the 



Methodist Church. 

Persuaded by Joseph Waters, a native of 
Fairmount, Wilson sold the property to the 
school despite some local objections. John 
F. Goucher, after whom Goucher College 
was name, made the down payment. 

By the time Olney was deeded to the 
school, it was badly in need of repairs, hav- 
ing deteriorated to the extent of being used 
as a granary. Trees, weeds, and tall grass 
were all around Olney when the school first 
opened. Inside the building the walls were 
beginning to crumble. The elegance of 
Olney in Haynie's day had passed, never be- 
ing entirely recaptured or recreated. College 
officials now say that Olney will be torn 
down, but the building is still in use despite 
some destruction by a fire in 1919 and the 
telling effects of lime and age. 



Pezavia OConnell 1861-1930 
Third Principal 1899-1902 



First Students and Teachers 



Methodist Control 



The firsl sluderils enrolled in September of 1886 were put lo work cleaning ihe 
grounds and making repairs on OIney. There were only nine students to enroll, there 
were thirty-seven in attendance. Most of the firsl students came from the County, bear- 
ing such well known family names as Dennis, Gale. Maddox. Tilghman. and Waters. 

The firsl teachers were Benjamin 0. Bird, the principal, his wife Portia, and an assis- 
tant named Jacob C. Dunn. Bird and his wife were natives of Virginia, but Dunn came 
from Queen Anne's County. Bird was a faithful worker for school and community and 
for many years the school preserved his memory through the Bird Lyceum, a student 
organization that passed out of existence by 1930 ... In 1940. Crystal Bird Fauset. a 
former member of the Legislature dedicated a new mechanic arts building in his 
memory. Bird died in 1897 and was buried on the campus. 



Most of the names were given when the school was under the control of the 
Methodist Church. Methodists really look the lead in founding the school. They ad- 
ministered it until the State took over completely in 1936. Early Methodists set up 
the school as a Branch of the Centenary Biblical Institute of Baltimore with the idea 
in mind that the school would be a preparatory one. 

Receiving support from various Methodist Conferences during the early years, 
the school look the name of the Delaware Conference in which it was located. 
Although graduation certificates were given yearly beginning in 1887, there was no 
four year graduating class unli' 1904. Methodist discipline and leadership were 
planted early in the history of the school and continued until 1936. 



ELIZA SMITH, father gave first girls dormitory in her memory. 



College Given Many Names 



The college has had many names in its history and the various names seem lo have 
indicated the type of program and control in existence at the school. There have been 
such names as the Delaware Conference Academy, Industrial Branch of Morgan Col- 
lege, Princess Anne Academy, Eastern Branch of the Maryland Agricultural College, 
Princess Anne College, and since 1947, Maryland State College. Oldlimers slip up 
referring lo early names. 





Graduating Class of 1894 




^ Frank Trigg 1850-1934 
>sH Fourth Principal, 1902-1910 







^4. 



Federal and State Support 

From High School to College 



Most of the financial support after 1900 came from 
I-ederal land-grant funds under the Morrill Acts and 
the Nelson Amendment. In order for the State of 
Maryland to continue to receive Federal funds under 
an act of 1812, it was necessary for the State to give its 
legislative assent to the Morrill Act of 1890. This act 
set up the principle that no land-grant funds for 
education were to be used in any state where a 
"distinction of race or color is made." Land Grant 
Funds went to the Maryland Agricultural College in 
College Park, a predecessor of the present University 
of Maryland. 

Receiving only six thousand dollars in appropria- 
tions from the State, officials in College Park dicl not 
wish to lose the badly needed funds which made up a 
large part of the budget. Accordingly the President of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, Henry E. Alvord. 
was very interested in having Federal funds continue 
at his college until the Assembly could meet and take 
action on the Morrill Act of 1890. The Assembly was 
then meeting biannually on even numbered year's and 
would not hold its next session until 1892, two years 
after the Morrill Act of 1890 became effective. This 
would delay the receipt of funds at College Park. So 
Alvord go in touch with Goucher and the two men 
drew up a contract on December 31, 1890 designating 
the Academy to receive Federal funds in compliance 
with Morrill Act of 1890. The Academy was given the 
name of the Eastern Branch of the Maryland 
Agricultural College by this contract, and the institu- 
tion in College Park was set up as the administrative 
agency. But in reality control continued to be exer- 
cised by the Trustees of Morgan College. 

One month after the contract was signed, Alvord 
reported to Governor Elihu Jackson of Salisbury that 
the land-grant issue was of "utmost importance," and 
that the Board of Trustees at College Park desired "to 
fully meet the spirit of the new law" by designating 
the Academy. Alvord's report contained the following 
statement: To save time and economize expenditures, 
advantage was taken of the existence of a school for 
colored persons in Princess Anne, in Somerset Coun- 
ty, known as the Normal and Industrial Branch of 
Morgan College of Baltimore. A legal contract has 
been made witn the representatives of that institution, 
by which the school in Princess Anne, becomes the 
Eastern Branch of the Maryland Agricultural College 
and will so continue until the next meeting of the 
General Assembly of the State, At the next Assembly, 
legislators gave legal assent to the Morrell Act of 1890 
and indicated approval of the contract. 

Under the Nelson Amendment to the Morrell Acts, 
the school's share of Federal funds was increased to a 
sum of $10,000 by 1913. This sum with student fees, 
made up practically all of the income of the Academy. 
Yet, some persons in the State attempted to have this 
income distributed among other scnools, including 
the teacher's college at Bowie. But the United States 
Bureau of Education insisted that the Academy and 
the institution in College Park were to remain the sole 
recipients of Morrill funds. 

In 1936, the State agreed to pay the Trustees of 
Morgan for their interests in the school. 



In 1936, the old Academy had 
been transformed from a high 
school to a college. This transforma- 
tion had been brought about during 
the principalships of Frank J. Trigg 
and Thomas W. Kiah. 

A native of Virginia, Trigg served 
as the principal of the Academy 
from 1902 until 1910. Trigg brought 
with him the influence of Hampton 
Institute and Booker T. Washington, 
his classmate. Trigg and his staff did 
much to make the Academy a first 
rate high school. 

Thomas W. Kiah, a native of 
Virginia served as principal from 
1910 until his death in 1936. With 
an increase in free public educa- 
tion, there was a decline in the 
Academy's enrollment after World 
War I. A junior college program was 
instituted under Kiah to meet the 
competition from public schools. 
This idea failed to bring desired 
results so it was later abandoned to 
make the Academy a full fledged 
four year college. The State was 
reluctant to make appropriations for 
expansion and furthermore World 
War II intervened with its inroads 
into student enrollment. 



A major program was instituted shortly after the end of World War II. 
The program was designed to revolutionize life at the College. The 
development added a new outlook at the school. By almost any yard- 
stick, the changes made since the War have led to the establishment of 
a first rate four year college program. 

The changes have been for reaching, touching every aspect of college 
life. For example the construction of many buildings has changed the 
shape and size of the campus. Old timers who come back have been 
amazed and well pleased with the progress. Buildings constructed dur- 
ing the past two years include two dormitories for men, a classroom 
building, a dining hall, a faculty apartment building, faculty cottages, a 
dairy and poultry plant, and a splendid agriculture building. An 
athletic field has been built; pavements have been laid; and several old 
structures have been razed or moved. The face of the campus has been 
lifted by landscaping, drainage, and changing the course of the old road 
to Salisbury which passes by the campus. 



There have been many other changes since the War: A competent and 
well qualified staff was obtained to carry out the offerings in several 
specialized fields. The staff was greatly enlarged under the new program. 
The entire organization of the College was streamlined, being divided into 
four major divisions of Agriculture, Arts and Sciences, Home Economics, 
and Mechanical. Industries. A new curriculum was carefully devised for 
each Division and published in new catalogues. 

The student enrollment was increased considerably, to three times the 
size for any given year since the school first opened. 

Appropriations for maintenance nearly quadrupled those for pre-War 
years and an Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps was added. 

The College Library increased fifteen times its number of volumes and 
athletic programs became nationally recognized. An impressive list of na- 
tionally known speakers has continually added much to the community. 
The College received its present name as a symbol of its new program. 




INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND AGRICULTURE 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS AND HOME ECONOMICS 




Activities and social events were encouraged. Football, homecoming, 
cheerleading, and ROTC are some of the many programs thai are now 
or have flourished over the years. 





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The Board of Regents of ihe Universily of Maryland 
employed the flrsl presidenu Dr. John T. Williams. Dr. 
Williams was a native of Oklahoma and a former dean 
of Kentucky State College. Able as an administrator, he 
provided leadership with distinction in making a newer 
and better College in Princess Anne. 

The College is intimately a part of the history of 
Somerset and the Shore. Its roots are deep. Its work has 
been a lasting contribution to the people of the County 
and the State. Its future is more promising than ever 
before. Us doors are always open to visitors and friends. 
Maryland Stale College has truly become "The Peo- 
ple's College.'" 

In 1948, the Eastern Branch of the University of 
Maryland popularly known as Princess Anne College 
became officially Maryland Stale College, A Division of 
The University of Maryland. 

The first head of the institution to bear the title of 
president had been employed in September 1947. 
When the new administration of the college was begun, 
the President was instructed by both the executive of- 
ficer of the Board of Regents and the chairman at that 
lime that he musl build a good college; the land-grant 
function musl be carried out; and as well as possible the 
graduates of the school must be of such caliber that 
their educational status would be unquestioned. 




Dr. John T. Williams and the Board of Regents 




According to the catalog of 1947-48, the purpose of the 
College is to offer training in theory and practice by 
which a student can make advancement in his field of 
study and develop his powers to understand the world in 
which he lives; to choose wisely his life work, and to 
function agreeably and effectively in the society which 
he must help to maintain. 

The realization of this purpose is sought through: 

1. Carefully planned four-year curricula in 
Agricultural Education, Home Economics Educa- 
tion, Mechanic Arts and Industrial Education, and 
two years of Arts and Sciences. 

2. Wholesome extra-curricular activities for training 
in good sportsmanship, health development, and the 
proper use of leisure time. 

The Legislature for the first time (Maryland 
Legislature) almost quadrupled the annual appropria- 
tions for maintenance of the College by raising it from 
$33,183.00 to $113,633.00. This increase meant a better 
paid faculty, a larger faculty, and more efficient teaching 
for students and the beginning of research. 



In September 1947, the President of the University and 
the Chairman of the Board of Regents met in the office of 
the President of the Princess Anne College (now 
Maryland State College) and carefully emphasized the 
importance of students and employees respecting the 
mores and folkways of the people of the local geographic 
area, and the immediate need of strengthening the offer- 
ings of the college. 



In 1947, Higher Education in Maryland made a recom- 
mendation that Princess Anne College should be 
abolished. The principal reasons being: 

1. The college is unfortunately located, access is 
difficult. 

2. The institution has no recognition by national or 
regional accrediting agencies. 

3. It can never hope to attract a student body for effi- 
cient operation. 

4. As a branch of the University of Maryland it has 
been shamefully neglected. 



5. The control of a negro college by a Board of Regents 
w^hose main interest is in a State University for 
white students is not likely to result in satisfactory 
facilities for negro students. 

On December 17, 1947, the Legislative Council met on 
the campus of Maryland State College to consider for- 
mally the necessity for continuing the existence of this 
particular state-suppcrted institution. 




The growth of the campus was accelerated during this time. 




A general feeling of opposition was directed toward 
the decision of the group that recommended that the col- 
lege should continue its operation. Views expressed by 
the news media and certain groups in the State were so 
adverse that a newly elected Governor of Maryland in 
his inaugural address included a statement to the effect 
that there would be no increase in funds for the college 
until certain answers were forthcoming and a number of 
decisions had been made. 

In 1947, the assertion rang so loudly throughout the 
State, negro citizens organized the Eastern Shore 
Citizens' Association in an attempt to defend the college. 
The association sent 750 people to Annapolis to witness 
the attempts of their elected officers to explain to the 
Governor of the State their desire to have the programs 
of the college continued and improved. The Maryland 
State College National Alumni Association was 
motivated to send several different small groups and 
committees to seek the ear of the Governor and the 
members of the Board of Regents. The Governor did not 
see fit to grant or recommend funds for capital outlay for 
the construction of buildings. Not one single appropria- 
tion was granted the college over an eight-year period. 



The years mentioned were crucial years for the Col- 
lege. A new administration had just begun, and there 
was almost universal questioning of the accreditation of 
the college, in comparison with the status of the College 
Park area of the University. 

The State Legislature of 1957 made the first clear-cut 
appropriation of funds for the construction of buildings 
since 1949. By this time, there could be no question con- 
cerning the accreditation of the institution, because in 
1953 the Middle States Association, in a separate evalua- 
tion, had given its approval for full accreditation of 
Maryland State College. 

By way of comment, the Middle States Accrediting 
Association in its report of that year stated, in part: 

"Finally to be noted is the extraordinary spirit of 
cohesiveness and optimism which pervades the Princess 
Anne campus. From the President to the last freshman, 
these people are convinced that there is a job to do, con- 
fident that they can do it, grateful for the resources 
which have already been put at their disposal, hopeful 
that their very considerable needs will continue to be 
met by the University and State." 



Ella Fitzgerald at the dedication of the Ella Fitz- 
gerald Center for the Performing Arts 







Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, Commencement Speaker 




Famous Faces Over 
the Years 



Dr. John Taylor Williams (deceased) and Dr. Martin Luther King. Coi 
mem Speaker and Board of Regents Members 

Mrs. Corella Scoll King, accepts key to the City of Salisbury during her 
pearance as guest of the AKA Sorority. 

Mrs. King addresses AKA Founders Day Celebration 




1QQ YEfIRS EIF PRIDE -HND PRQEREiS 



Within the "One Hundred Years" of 
University history, there have been 
many changes, both physically and 
academically. For instance, Kiah Hall, 
once a landmark on the campus 
outgrew its usefulness and safety, as a 
result, it was recently dismantled. For 
"Maryland Staters" Kiah Hall holds 
many memories of commencements, 
cultural programs, homecoming 
dances, and basketball games. 

Waters Dining Hall is still standing, 
noted not only for its scrumptuous 
meals, but also for the opportunity it 
offered to "meet and eat." 

Wilson Hall and "Enghsh" are 
synonymous so if one graduated from 
UMES or Maryland State, they passed 
through Wilson Hall. 

If the walls of Murphy Hall could 
talk, they would weave a best seller. 




Homecoming 1986 




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SGA President, Carlton McCullough presents flowers to Mrs. 
Deloris Hytche. 





Coronation 



Mistresses of Ceremony Carolyn Mercer Lisa Parson and Robin Harmon 
and Maria Hull entertain. 




Cynthia Randolph 
Milroy Harried entertains 




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Grand Court 
Florence Ennals 
Pamela Highsmith 
Delphine Johnson 
LaVerne Sylvester 
Jeanine Green 
Towanda Hawkins 
Ardelia Jackson 
Martiza Carnegie 
Sharri Faulcon 
Julia Ford 
Stephanie Hunter 
Karmalita Contee 
Phyllis Hendricks 
Stella Carver 
Wyndetta Valentine 
Robyn Thompson 
Rachel Fisher 
Katanya Cooper 
Tyrea Mitchell 
Antionette Lopez 
Patrice West 
Cynthia Lilly 



Campus Organization Queens 



Ann Lopez, Ms. Residence Life 




Patrice West, Ms. Student Activity Board 






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The Thrill 
of the 

Night is 
Seen on Faces! 



Profile of Her 

Majesty 
Veronica Brisco 

Her majesty, Veronica Yvonne Brisco, is the second of four children born to Mr. and Mrs. John William 
Brisco. She was born on June 3, 1964, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Business Administration is Ms. Brisco's major with a concentration in management. Upon completing 
her education here at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Veronica plans to further her education 
by going on to graduate school. 

Ms. Brisco believes that God is always on her side in times of hardship and in glory. "Nothing comes to 
you on a silver platter." One must strive for success and advancement in life; for he who toils tenaciously 
for what he wants will learn to appreciate it more, because he has worked hard to get it. She also believes 
that self-respect will flow from such individual effort and striving. Happiness comes from within, one 
must believe in himself in order for others to believe in him. 

Her motto in life is, "the bonds that chain the body cannot imprison the spirit, so fly as high as thy wings 
will allow", and always remember the sky is the limit. 



Accept Me 



I am I 

Do not change me 

Condemn me nor put me down 

Accept me for what I am 

No . . . you need not agree with me 

But accept me, for I am total in being 

I have my faults, I have my guilts 

But that is who I am 

Perfect I will never be 

Do not put me down . . . nor make me feel 

unhappy about me 

I am I 

and I like being what I am 

Me. 



Each year the prestigious 
title of Miss U.M.E.S. is af- 
forded a young lady by stu- 
dent votes representative of 
the UMES Campus. Com- 
peting for the title addresses 
such criteria as academic 
excellence, campus in- 
volvement and senior class 
status. 

The young lady chosen is 
recognized with a gala cor- 
onation fit for a queen 
(move over Princess Di). Ms. 
Freshman, Sophomore, 
Junior, and Senior serve as 
the Imperial Court. The 
Grand Court is represented 
by queens from the various 
campus organizations; all of 
whom entertain the queen 
and present her with a gift 
of their choice. 

Miss U.M.E.S. gets her 
last thrill by getting her 
photo in the Ebony 
magazine. 





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Miss UMES '85-'86 




Ms. Veronica Brisco escorted 
by Mr. Michael Robinson 



Ms. Portia Dennis — Miss 
U.M.E.S. 1984-85 

Dr. William Hytche, 

Chancellor 

Miss U.M.E.S. 1985-86 




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Roy Ayres and His Band set the mood for 
Homecoming '86 



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sports 




Captured by the Spirit! 




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Howard U. looks on as UMES at 
tempts a shot. 



I'm trying 




Hand up, we need this ball! 





On our way to victory! 



Pass it to me, I'm your man! 



I tiave got to try this shot. 





What is this, one on one? 



You can't block that shot! 



You'd better get out of the way, I'm coming through 



















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LADY HAWKS IN 
ACTION! 




Don't just stand there, HELP! 






You call this a "lump Shot" 





It's rolling off my fingers. 



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Hawks at Attention 



Cheer up, don't look so sad 



We are happy! 





Race! 



Look at him fire that ball! 




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Strike one! 



I got him! 



Here it comes! 



There it goes! 




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This is how you pick it up. 



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Put it here! 




What a stance! 



READY, SET, GO! 





Oh, My Arm 



Sliding In 






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A campus/community project that 
recognizes the many cultures on UMES'S 
campus. Patrons and participants enjoy a 
cultural program and a wide variety of 
exotic foods and native dress. Proceeds 
are used for student scholarships, book 
loans, and financial aid. 




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The gala dinner theatre was held 
on the stage of the Ella Fitzgerald 
Center for the Performing Arts. The 
Department of Hotel/Restaurant 
Management prepared and served 
the scrumptuous meal which was 
followed by a musical recalling 
favorites of the last one hundred 
years at UMES. 






Costen Taylor 



Linda Wiles 





Tina Leatherbury 



Craig Willis 





Tracy Rogers 



David Hearn 





Amos King 



Augusta Kilpatrick 



The Annual Somerset County 
Health Fair is utilized by County 
residents as well as students. Most of 
the services are free except for the 
various blood tests. 






HEALTH FAIR 1986 




RECITALS '86 




Dr. Smith, Faculty Member on flute 



Dr. Smith and Ms. |ulie Barton, guest oboist 





Linda Wiles, Senior Voice Recital 



Zinnie lones. Guest Flutist 



Kenny Jones^ Senior Art Exhibit 




HONORS CONVOCATION 




Dr. Boyd makes presentation in Computer Science. 



C^ Chancellor Hytche accepts check from Mrs. Omega Frazier for the Kiah 
Scholarship. 




Dr Showell recognizes outstanding student. 



Dr. Gerald Johnson congratulates recipient in music. 




Technology 
Fair '86 



New Building '^^"'*'^% 
New Equipment ^L& fim.* 





Black History Celebration 





Faculty and guest artists par- 
ticipated in the Black History Week 
celebration: Jacqueline Sue, Marci 
Bryant, Lois Smith, Rosalyn Boyd, 
Patricia Tilghman, Annette Noble and 
Velma Nutter Johnson. 



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Eric Bell 



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Eunice Bedminster 



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Stephanie Macintosh 



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Valerie Gooden 



Play 




Angela Williams 




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Lisa Parsons 



AWARDS AND 







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RECOGNITION DAY 







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Leadership Convocation 







ALUMNI CONCERNS 





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Around the "Yard" 





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Take a Chance 



Who^s Who 

in 

American Colleges 

and 

Universities 




Felicia Norman 





Florence Ennals 



Anthony Esquire 





Sherrie Worth 



Towanda Hawkins 





Arthur WilHams 



Lance Brown 
"Who's Who" 



STUDE]\T LEADERIS 




Paul Lewis 
Drama Society 



Linda Wiles 
Choral Society 



Kathy Scarborough, Editor 
Hawk Yearbook '85-'86 




Edmund Lee, President 
Caribbean International 



Janice Collins, President 
Senior Class '85 



Darrin Hungerford, President 
Groove Phi Groove 




Veronica Briscoe 
Miss UMES '85-86 



Carlton McCullough 
President, Student Government 




Carrol Hebron, President 
Freshman Class 



Stella Carver, President 
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority 




Florence Ennals, President 
Human Ecology Club 




Meredith Britton 
UMES Judicial Board 




Ronald Brooks, President 
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity 




Alice Allen, Basileus 
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority 



Esquire Anthony, President 
Senior Class 



Barbara Thomas, President 
National Student Business League 



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Reception 



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Commencement 

Speaker 

1986 

Dr. John Slaughter 
Chancellor of 
the College 
Park Campus 




Dr. John S. Toll 
President of the 
University of fTlaryland 




Dr. Joel Corrington 
member of Board of 
Regents 



Dr. William P. 
Hytche 
Chancellor of 
UfTlES 
Confers Rn 
Honorary Degree 
upon 

John Wilson, 
Civic Leader 



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''Maryland, 

Maryland, 

Home 

of 
Maroon 



and Gray'' 




Maryland, 
Maryland, 





Maryland 



All Glory 



All hail 

to thee 

fair 





in 



strength 



Grow 
thou 





and 
honor 




II (I 



Through 



all 





eternity! 



campus administrators '85-^86 





Dr. Edward V. Ellis, Vice-Chancellor 
Academic Affairs 



Dr. Herman Franklin, Vice-Chancellor 
Student Affairs 




Dr. Mortimer H. Neufville, Dean 
School of Agricultural Sciences 





Dr. Chester Hedgepeth, Jr. Dean 
School of Arts and Sciences 



Dr. Leon Coursey, Dean 
School of Professional Studies 




Mr. Ronnie E. Holden, MBA 
Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 



a matter of support 




national 
alumni 

president 
Valerie watts 







State 
legislators 







the president 
of the U.S. 

ronald reagan 




the governor 

of maryland 

harry hughes 

and 

senator paul 

sarbanes 



umes and international relations 




In the picture above, Dr. William P. Hytche, Chancellor of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore is shown signing 
for the United States of America, an $8 million plus grant wfith the government of Cameroon for education and 
research. Signing for the Cameroon government is the Minister of Higher Education Abouem a Tchoye. Looking on is 
the U.S. Ambassador to the Cameroon, Frechette. The signing of thie $8 million protocol took place October 2, 1986. 



■/ / 



Q 
u 

E 
E 

N 

for 

a 

Y 
E 
A 
R 




Freda Harris 
Miss UMES 1986 




Miss Veronica Brisco 
Miss UMES 1985 




Portia Dennis 
Miss UMES 1984 



Sandra Smith 
Miss UMES 1983 




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Greta Elliott 
Miss UMES 1982 



Vicki Hairston 
Miss UMES 1981 




Catherine Christmas 
Miss UMES 1980 



Sharon EUiott 
Miss UMES 1979 





Donna Walton 
Miss UMES 1978 



Carol Ann Perkins 
Miss UMES 1977 




Miss Gloria Maye 
Miss UMES 1976