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Full text of "Hazzard's history of Henry county, Indiana, 1822-1906"

97 .201 '*"-' 

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1139220 

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GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02299 9657 






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HAZZARDS HISTORY 

OF 

HENRY COUNTY 
INDIANA 

1822-1906 



MILITARY EDITION 



^-/T Sol 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



GEORGE HAZZARD 

AUTHOR AND PUBLISHER 

NEW CASTLE, INDIANA 

1906 





This 


volume 


is affectionately dedicated to my wife, 








MARIA 


EUDORA 


HAZZARD 


! 


uho 


yet 


abides \ 


■ith 


me, born M 


ly 30, A. D. 1849. 


We : 


were mai 


ried Jun 


e 30 


A. D. 1870. 


She is the daugliter of 


the 


late 


Reuben 


and 


Adaline Tob 


:'y. Her father was 


the 


min 


ster of the M 


. E. 


Church, New 


Castle, 1869-70. 





1139220 



hazzard's history of henry county. 629 

GEORGE W. r,ENNARD POST. NO. 148. G. A, R., NEW CASTLE. 
INDIANA. 

(ieorge W. Lennard Post, No. 148, Department of Indiana. Grand Army nf 
the Republic, was ort^anized and instituted at New Castle. Henr\- County. Indiana. 
April I. 1883. in the Knii^dits nf Pythias Hall, Murphey Building, and was mus- 
tered in by Joseph !'. llitT of Sol Meredith Post, No. 55. Richmond. Indiana. 
assisted by members of George \\'. Rader Post. No. i ig. Middletown. Indiana. 
'!1ie Post was named for and in honor of the late George W. Lennard. Colonel 
nf the 57th Indiana Infantry, a sketch of whose life and military service is fully 
set forth at the conclusion of this article. 

'idle following named comrades were present at the organization and became 
charter members of the Post, viz; John P. Albertson. William H. Albright, Miles 
P. Anderson. Thomas J. P.urchett, ]\lilton P>urk, George H. Cain. David W. 
Chamljers. Thaddeus Coffin. David Daniels. William H. Elliott. Owen Evans. 
I ieiirge W. Goodwin, Henry C. Gordon. Isaac Grove, Miles Haguewood, Pleasant 
W. Harvey, Andrew F, Kraner, Louis N. Moore. James I. Newby. Patrick 
Sullivan, William Thomas. 

The regular meetings of the Post are held on Saturday evening of each week. 

The following were the Post officers from the organization in 1883 down 
to and including the year 1904. The names of the commanders are arranged in 
the order in which they served. The names of all otlier officers are arranged 
alphabetically. 



George H. Cain, Exum Saint, William F. Shelley, William M. Pence. John C. 
Livezey, Leander P. Mitchell, William S. Bedford, Elihu T. Mendenhall, George W. 
Burke, Louis N. Moore, Leander S. Denius, Miles E. Anderson. Thomas W. Gronendyke, 
Thaddeus Coffin, Joseph M. Brown, David W. Chambers, Asa M, Weston. Henry C. 
Elliott, William B. Bock, Isaac W. Ellis, Richard J. Edleman. 



William B. Bock, Joseph M. Brown. Thaddeus Coffin, John Curry. Richard J. Edle- 
man, Henry C. Elliott, Isaac W. Ellis. Thomas W. Gronendyke. Mahlon D. Harvey, 
Louis N. Moore, Henry L. Powell, Obed C. Rife. Albert W. Saint. John Thornburgh, Asa 
M. Weston. 

.irXIOR VK'IO lOMM.\KDERS. 

Miles E. Anderson. William B. Bock, Joseph M. Brown. David W. Chambers. Rich- 
ard J. Edleman, Henry C. Elliott, Isaac W. Ellis. Daniel Hartman. Mahlon D. Harvey, 
John C. Murray, Albert W. Saint, George W. Shelley, Lorenzo D. Shepherd, John Thorn- 
liurgb. 



William F. Boor. George W. Burke. Thomas W. Gronendyke. Elihu T. Mendenhall. 



William S. Bedford. George W. Bunch. Thomas W. Gronendyke, David T. King. 



William B. Bock. Thaddeus Coffin. Leander S. Denius. William H. Elliott. Elihu 
T. Mendenhall, Louis N. Moore, Albert W. Saint, Asa M. Weston. Richmond Wisehart. 



630 IIAZZARO'S HISTORY OF IlKXRV COUNTY. 

in'AKTKRMASTEKS. 

Andrew F. Kraner, William M. Pence. 

OFFKEKS OK Tin: L).\T. 

Miles E. Anderson. James W. Brodrick, Thaddeiis Cotfin. Vv'illiam T. Corya, Leander 
S. Denius. David Modlin. Cornelius M. Moore. Louis N. Moore. John C. Murray, .\Il)ert 
W. Saint. William F. Shelley. Lewis H. Worster. 



George H. Cain. Isaac W. Ellis. Richard Hartman. Andrew F. Kraner. Loui 
Moore. John C. :\Iurray. Obed C. Rife. Harvey W. Swaim. 



William S. Bedford. Henry C. Elliott, Isaac V\'. Ellis. Asa W. Hatch. John C. 
Livezey, William E. Livezey. Louis N. Moore. George B. Robson, Albert W. Saint. 
Lorenzo D. Shepherd. Richmond Wisehart. 

IJIAUTKKM.VSTK!! SEKCK.^NTh. 

Mathew T. Abbott. Miles E. Anderson. William B. Bock, William T. Corya. Richard 
J. Edleman, Henry C, Gordon. Leander M. James, Andrew F. Kraner. Peter Michels. 
Samuel G. Vance. 

(Note: — The records of the Post from 1S83 to 18S8, which contained the minutes 
of organization, nomination and election of officers, etc., are lost and a strict inquiry 
and search for the same has been without favorable result.) 

IIHRKKS I'OI! IHE YEAR 1905! 

Commander, John Thornburgh; Senior Vice-Commander. George W. Shelley; Junior 
Vice-Commander, Albert W. Saint; Surgeon, Thomas W. Gronendyke; Chaplain, David 
T. King; Adjutant. Leander S. Denius; Quartermaster, William M. Pence: Officer of the 
Day, Richard J, Edleman; Officer of the Guard. Isaac W. Ellis: Sergeant Major, Thaddeus 
Coffin; Quartermaster Sergeant. Vv'illiam T. Corya. 

The following is believed to be a complete list or roster of all who have hetii 
or are now, members of the Post. In the several alphabetical lists of 
soldiers and sailors, set out elsewhere in this History, will be foiuid a 
more detailed statement of the service in the Army and Xavy of each comrade 
who is entitled to further mention in the History of Henry County : 

HOST ME.MBERS. 

Mathew T. Abbott, Company A. 35th Iowa Infantry. 

Thomas Addington. Company C, 87th Indiana Infantry. 

John B. Albertson. Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Albright, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry, 

William Alcorn. Company B. 8th Indiana Cavalry. 

Miles E. Anderson. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Morrow P. Armstrong. Company K and Chaplain. 3tllh Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel Arnold. Company G, 5th Ohio Cavalry. 

Samuel Barnard. Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Henry C. Bateman. Company G. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

George P. Beach, Company A, 3fith Indiana Infantry. 

Thurman H. Beardsley. Company D, 168th New York Infantry. 

William S. Bedford. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Benjamin Bitner, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

William B. Book. Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY < IF HENRY COUNTS'. ( 13 1 

William F. Boor, Major and Surgeon. 4tli Indiana Cavalry; Brigade Surgeon. 1st. 
Brigade. 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Cumberland. 

Moses Bowers, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

John W. Brattain, Company E. 34th Indiana Infantry. 

Charles Brenneman, Company B. Benton Cadets, Missouri Volunteers (Fremont's 
Body Guard). 

George Brenneman. Company H, ti9th Indiana Infantry. 

James W. Brodrick. Company C. 11th Ohio Infantry; Company C. 2nd Indiana 
Cavalry. 

Eli Brookshire, Company G. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

William Brookshire. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Charles Brown, Company E, 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Francis M. Brown, Company F, 1st U. S. Sharpshooters. 

Joseph M. Brown, Company B, llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company I. 
(i9th Indiana Infantry. 

Theodore F. Brown, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Francis M. Brunner, Company B, 58th Ohio Infantry. 

James W. Bunce, Company A, 15th Indiana Infantry. 

George W. Bunch, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry; Company C, 20th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Martin L. Bandy, Major and Paymaster and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel. U. S. 
Volunteers. 

William Bunnell. Company D. Benton Cadets. Missouri Volunteers (Fremont's 
Body Guard); Company D. 39th Ohio Infantry. 

Thomas J. Burcheti. Company G, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); Company 
H. 74th Ohio Infantry. 

Milto.n Burk, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

George W. Burke. Company H, 9th Pennsylvania Infantry; Surgeon, 46th Pennsyl- 
vania Infantry, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel. 

George H. Cain, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Company G. 
84th Indiana Infantry. 

Edward H. Campbell. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Solomon F. Carter, Company A. 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Daniel C. Catt. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry; , 22nd Indiana Bat- 
tery. 

William F. Catt. Company B. 99th Indiana Infantry. 

Andrew J. Chambers, Company D. 113th Ohio Infantry 

David W. Chambers, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Company 
n. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Harvey B. Chew, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company E, 9th Regiment. 
1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Arthur W. Coffin. Company F, 120th Ohio Infantry; Company I. 23rd Ohio Infantry. 

Thaddeus Coffin, Company G and Regimental Band, 23rd Ohio Infantry. 

Ellas Con well, Company A. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Daniel M. Cooper, Company I, 11th Ohio Infantry; Company K. S7th Ohio Infantry: 
Company E, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery. 

William T. Corya, Company D, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Cornelius W. Cosand, , 24th Indiana Battery. 

James A. Cotton, Company H, 47th Indiana Infantry. 

Jacob Courtney, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Leonard H. Craig, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company 
H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

William J. C. Crandall, Company G. 1st Tennessee Infantry. 

Gilliam L. Craven. Company B. 89th Indiana Infantry. 

John C. Curry, Unassigned, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 



632 hazzard's history of henry county. 

John L. Custer, Company A, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

William H. Daklns, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry; . 19th Indiana 

Battery. 

David Daniels. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Milton Davis, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry; Company P. 7th Indiana Cavalry. 
re-or,!>anized. 

Leander S. Denius. Regimental Band. 3.5th Ohio Infantry; Company G, 1.5Gth Ohio 
Infantry. 

David Dowell. Company C, 12th Missouri Cavalry. 

Richard J. Edleman, . 12th Indiana Battery. 

Henry C. Elliott. Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (tlirep montlisi; Company F and 
Adjutant, 57th Indiana Infantry; Lieutenant Colonel. llSth Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Elliott, Lieutenant, U. S. Navy. 

Isaac W. Ellis. Company C, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Owen Evans, Company A, 2nd U. S. Sharpshooters. 

.lames P. Ewing. Company B. 18th Ohio Infantry. 

.lames H. E. Feezer, Company I, 1st Maryland Potomac Home Brigade Infantry. 

William Fletcher, Company F, 8th U. S. C. T. 

James H. S. Ford, Company B. 153rd Indiana Infantry. 

Iredell R. Frazler, Company G, 3rd Maryland Cavalry. 

James Frazier, Company G, 29th Iowa Infantry. 

William Frazier. Company G, 29th Iowa Infantry. 

Joseph Funk. Company A, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Company I. 3r>fh 
Indiana Infantry. 

George Gaddis, Company B, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Charles N. Gihbs, Company B, 69th Ohio Infantry. 

John M. Gear. . Record incomplete in this History. 

William O. Gold, Company H, 52nd Indiana Infantry. 

George W. Goodwin. Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Company 
C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Henry C. Gordon, Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry; Principal Musician. 20th 
Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

James W. Gormon. Company C. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

William C. Goudy, Company I, 32nd Ohio Infantry. 

Jacob M. Gough. Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Thomas W. Gough. Company K, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

David A. Graham, Battery F, 1st West Virginia Light Artillery. 

Thomas Gray, , 4th Indiana Battery. 

John Griffith, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas W. Gronendyke. Company K, 10.5th Indiana Infantry ( ^Morgan Raid); 
Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

William Grose. Colonel. 3ijth Indiana Infantry; Brigadier General and Brevet 
Jlajor General. U. S. Volunteers. 

Isaac Grove, Company K. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Company H, 69th 
Indiana Infantry; Company P, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Miles Haguewood. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Henry B. Harter, , 23rd Indiana Battery. 

Thomas L. Hartley. Company D. 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Daniel Hartman, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Richard Hartman. Company D, 109th U. S. C. T. 

Charles W. Harvey. Company D, 79th Ohio Infantry. 

John R. Harvey, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company A. 110th Indana In- 
fantry (Morgan Raid); Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Levi Harvey, Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Mahlon D. Harvey, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Pleasant W. Harvey, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 033 

Asa W. Hatch, Company F, 2nd Ohio Infantry; Company E, 152ud Ohio Infantry. 

James T. J. Hazelrigg. Company D, 4th Kentucky Infantry. 

Henry H. Henderson, Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): Company 
C, .36th Indiana Infantry. 

Isom P. Henderson. Company B, .5tli Indiana Cavalry. 

Martin L. Heuneigh, Company B, 74th Pennsylvania Infantry. 

Henry Herliman, Regimental Band, 36th Indiana Infantry: Company A, lliith In- 
diana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

.lohn W. Hill, Company I, 8th U. S. C. T. 

David Hoover, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Company B. 
139th Indiana Infantry. 

Harrison Hoover. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry: Company G. 84th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Daniel Hoppis, Company A, 19th Indiana Infaniry; Company I, 20th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Thomas J. Houck, Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): Company D. 
36th Indiana Infantry. 

William House, Company B, lluth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Company A, 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Charles A, C. Howren, Company A, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

John H. Ike, Company E, 71st Ohio Infantry. 

James W. Irving, Company H, 3rd Maine Infantry: Company C, 2nd Maine 
Cavalry. 

Presley E. Jackson, Company K, 47th Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Jacobs, Company A, 91st Ohio Infantry. 

Leander M. James, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hiram. Julian, Company B, 40th Indiana Infantry. 

Milton P. Julian, Company D, 11.5th Illinois Infantry. 

George Kamphere. Company I, 13th Heavy Artillery U. S. C. T. 

Adam Kendall, Company K, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

David T. Kin.g, Company I. 7th Illinois Cavalry. 

Alfred M. Kissell. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel Kissell. Unassigned, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Andrew F. Kraner. Company G, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): Company 
K. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Joseph M. Lacy. Company I, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

William T. Latchaw, Company D, 87th Indiana Infantry: Company D. 42nd Indiana 
Infantry. 

John C. Livezey, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry: Captain and Commissary of 
Subsistence and Brevet Major, U. S. Volunteers. 

William E. Livezey, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

John Lockridge, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Pearson Loer, Company A. 54th Indiana Infantry (one yean. 

Michael Longnecker, Company B, 11th Ohio Infantry: Company B. 94th Ohio 
Infantry. 

David Lowe. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Company E, 9th 
Indiana Cavalry. 

Philip Lowery, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

David M. Luellen, Company E. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

.Joshua Luthultz, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

John McDivitt, , 3rd Indiana Battery. 

William H. Macy, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Elihu T. Mendenhall. Company A, 101st Indiana Infantry. 

James M. Mercer, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Peter Michels, Company K, 72nd Ohio Infantry. 

Wilson C. Middaugh, Company C, 1st Michigan Infantry: Company M, 8tb Michigan 
Cavalry. 



634 HAZZARO'S HISTOkV OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Leander P. Mitchell, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

David Modlin, Company B, 28th U. S. C. T. 

William H. Modlin. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cornelius M. Moore. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Company 
C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Com- 
pany B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Gideon Moore, Company H, 59th Indiana Infantry. 

Louis N. Moore, Company K, Kith Indiana Infantry. 

Hugh L. Mullen. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph R. Mullen, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

John C. Murray. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Isaac Needham, Company F. 154th Indiana Infantry. 

Winford Needham, Company F and Principal Musician, 57(h Indiana Infantry. 

James I. Newby, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

John W. Newby, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Peter Niccum, Company D, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Nathan Nicholson, Company C, 3fith Indiana Infantry. 

Robert M. Nixon, Regimental Band, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Rhoderick D. Norviel, Company K, 132nd Ohio Infantry. 

William O'Neal, Company D, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

William M. Pence, Seaman. U. S. Navy. 

Henry Perry, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

James B. Philabaum. Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Henry L. Powell. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Comiiany A. 
110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Henry Pry, Company E, 33rd Ohio Infantry. 

George W. Ralston, Company B, .Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Company 
G. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Martin L. Real, Company D, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

John M. Redding, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas B. Reeder. Company I. 19th Indiana Infantry: Company B and Major, 149th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Henry Reichart, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

John Rhine, Company K. 75th Indiana Infantry. 

William Rhinewalt, , ISth Indiana Battery. 

Cornelius J. Richardson, Company B. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Obed C. Rife, Company D, 152nd Ohio Infantry; Company H, 154th Indiana 
Infantry. 

George B. Robson. Company A, 86th Ohio Infantry; Company B, 69th Ohio Infantry. 

Leonidas Rodgers, Company C, 16th Ohio Infantry; Regimental Band. 13th Mis- 
souri Infantry; Company E, 152nd Ohio Infantry. 

William H. H. Rohrback. Company E. 1st .Maryland Potomac Home Brigade 
Infantry. 

William J. Runyan, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Dennis Ryan, Company B. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Albert W. Saint, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Exum Saint. Company E, 4th Iowa Cavalry. 

John W. Sanders, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

James M. Semans. Company D, 26th Indiana Infantry. 

George W. Shane. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Company K. 
54th Indiana Infantry (three months); Company C, 109lh Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid); Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Timothy Shane, Company G, 13th Indiana Cavalry. 

Charles C. Shedron. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

George W. Shelley, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

William F. Shelley, Company B. Benton Cadets, Missouri Volunteers (Fremont's 



HAZZAKD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 033 

Body Guard); Company B, 19tli Indiana Infantry; Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry; 
Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Lorenzo D. Shepherd, Company C, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

David Shields, Company F, 124th Indiana Inlantry. 

William H. Showalter, Company I, 67th Indiana Infantry. 

Henry L. Shopp, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company C. 
3(lth Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Parvis Sims. Company G, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Frederick Slade, Company F, 64th Ohio Infantry. 

.loseph Smith, 5th Independent Battery, Ohio Light Artillery. 

Pleasant A. Spain, Company C, 58th Indiana Infantry. 

John Speakman, , 12th Indiana Battery. 

Patrick Sullivan, Company F, 19th Indiana Infantry; Company E. 20th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Laban W. Swafford, Company G. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Harvey W. Swaini, Company F, Hth Indiana Infantry (three months); Company I, 
iilMh Indiana Infantry, 

John M. Swaim, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Company A, 
:;iith Indiana Infantry; Company H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

James W. Swain, Company B, Slst Ohio Infantry. 

Jacob Sweigart, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Daniel A. Tawney, Chaplain. 179th Ohio Infantry. 

James Taylor, Company B, 33rd Ohio Infantry. 

James W. Thomas, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

James Thornburgh, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry; Company H. 147th Indiana 
Infantry. 

John" Thornburgh, Lieutenant and Quartermaster, 4th Indiana Cavalry. 

Isom Thurman, Company F, 14th U. S. C. T, 

Moab Turner, Company I, 4th Tennessee. Infantry, re-organized as 1st Tennessee 
Cavalry. 

Nathan Upham, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel G. Vance, Company F, 14Gth Indiana Infantry. 
Theodore R. Vaughan, Company G, 89th Ohio Infantry. 

James L. Waggoner. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Holman W. Waldron, Company C, 23rd Maine Infantry; Company E. 32nd .Maine 
Infantry. 

John C. Wayman, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Charles H. Weaver, Company K, 17th Indiana Infantry. 

Cornelius C. Weaver, Company B, 18th Illinois Infantry. 

John S. Weaver, Company K. 17th Indiana Infantry. 

James M. Welker, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months) ; , 

15th Indiana Battery. 

Jordan Welker, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Asa M. Weston, Company K and Company E, 50th Ohio infantry. 

Augustus Williams, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel Winings, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Richmond Wisehart, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel Wolf, Company M, 11th Indiana Cavalry. 

Pyrrhus Woodward. Company H, 5th Indiana Infantry (Mexican War); Company 
C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Lewis H. Worster, Company H. 153rd Indiana Infantry. 

David Wrightsman, Company A. 79th Ohio Infantry; Company D. 73rd Ohio 
Infantry. 



636 hazzard's history of henry county. 

RKJGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF GEORGE WASHIXGTOX LEXNARD. 

COLONEL 57Tn INFANTRY RECU.MEXT. INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Colonel George Washington Lennard. the subject of this sketch, was born 
near Newark, Licking Coimty, Ohio, March 5, 1825. Deprived by circumstances 
of early educational advantages, he reached the age of sixteen years without 
having learned to read or write. By determined energ)', which so highly char- 
acterized him in later life, he made such use of his meager opportunities that in 
1847 li^ ^^'^^ prepared to commence the study of medicine, a profession to which 
he then expected to devote his life. In March. 1850, he received the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine from the Eclectic Medical Institute of ^ledicine of Cincinnati. 
He located at Xew Castle in 185 1, to engage in the practice of his profession. 
Though young in years he became from the first a successful physician. He 
soon discovered that the practice of medicine did not open to him the field in 
which to gratify his ambition so he retired from it at the expiration of two years, 
and purchased the New Castle Courier office, and was connected with this paper 
as editor and publisher for some eighteen months. He next studied law and 
graduated with honor at the law school of Cincinnati, in 1855. In this profession 
he became a successful practitioner. He was married June 10, 1852, at the 
residence, in Xew Castle, of Samuel and Vienna (Woodward) Hazzard. 
parents of the author of this History, to Miss Clarinda Woodward, a noble 
lady, youngest child of Asahel and Catharine Woodward, the first white 
settlers of Henry County. She was a sister of Mrs. Samuel Hazzard. Ini8C)i. 
when the tocsin of war sounded through the land, he was one of the first to 
respond, and his energy and influence were thrown at once into the cause and 
his labors from that time forth were earnest and untiring in behalf of his country. 
He was among the first to volunteer as a private soldier. On the organization nf 
Company C, Thirty Sixth Regiment, he was elected its First Lieutenant, from 
which position before the company was mustered into service, he was called Ui 
the Adjutancy of the regiment. His gentlemanly bearing, proni])! attentinn to 
duties and fine soldierly qualities soon attracted the attention t)f his superior 
officers, and he was tendered by General Thomas J. Wood, a position on his stalT 
with the rank of Captain which was accepted, and for some time filled with such 
a degree of credit as won for him the unanimous and hearty encomiums of his 
brother officers. Because of his prompt and manly discharge of every duty. 
Governor Morton. December 2, 1862. gave him a commission as Colonel and 
assigned him to the Fifty Seventh Regiment. In all the varied and responsible 
positions to which he was assigned, his career illustrated the highest type of our 
citizen soldiery. His duties were performed with skill, bravery and success. In 
all the engagements in which his regiment participated he was conspicuous for 
his gallant bearing and was highly complimented. At the battle of Stone's 
River. December 31, 1862, he was severely wounded in the right leg by a 
musket shot which resulted in a tedious confinement, but from which he afterward 
sufficiently recovered to rejoin his regiment. He afterward led his gallant regi- 
ment in the hard-fought battles of Missionary Ridge. Rocky Face Ridge 
and Resaca. At the battle of Resaca, Way 14, 1864, he was struck 




~K/. <S^7^ 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. U7,~ 

l)v a shell which shattered his ris;ht knee anil int^icted a shock from which 
his system never rallied. Ashury L. Kerwood, one of his soldiers, in a well- 
written history of the regiment, gives the following account of his death : 

"death of colonel llnnaud." 

"There were probably few officers connected with the army who were more 
solicitous or took a deeper interest in every movement in which their command 
should participate than did Colonel Lennard. Immediatel\- after the last change 
of position, the Colonel advanced to the open ground in front, dismounted, and 
was engaged for several minutes in conversation with General Newton and other 
officers, concerning the disposition of the regiment. The consultation over, he 
turned to go back to the regiment; and just as he was in the act of mounting his 
horse a shell from the enemy passed through his right knee, shattering it to 
pieces and mangling it horribly. The horse, much frightened, dashed on toward 
the regiment, and in a few moments a pair of stretchers were provided on which 
to bear away the body of the Colonel. Gloom and sadness took possession of 
every man as he was borne back to take his farewell of the men who had almost 
learned to love him. 'Now, take good care of the boys. Major," were the last 
words he ever said in hearing of the command. General Wagner, when he heard 
of the fall of the Colonel, was deeply moved, and was afterwards heard to sav 
he had lost his best man. Soon afterward the Colonel was carried to a house 
three-quarters of a mile in the rear, and a member of- the regiment, Sergeant \\'. 
W. Sims, remained with him until after his death. 

"At his own request a pallet was laid on the floor, and on that he was placed. 
The wound produced a wonderful shock on his system, and as yet there was no 
reaction. From the first he seemed to realize his true situation, and when in 
conversation with the surgeons spoke coolly and calmly of his wound. He was 
anxious that amputation should take place just as soon as the system revived. 
Several hours elapsed from the time he was wounded until the attending surgeon 
discovered that instead of reviving he was growing weaker. In the meantime 
he was engaged in conversation on various subjects. He spoke of his experience 
in the army, and especially since he becatne connected with the regiment ; of a con- 
versation he had with ( a-iKral W'liipple about the campaign, and his reply that the 
enemy would be very oljstinalc. '.rhen his thoughts would turn toward his family. 
He requested that his wife might be sent for to come and take care of him : 
wondering if his little children would always be good children. He spoke of the 
tender aft'ection which always existed between him and his companion, and 
talked only as a brave man could, who was so near the hour of dissolution. 

"Night was now fast approaching, and a fire of pine knots was kindled on 
the hearth; About 7 o'clock the surgeons informed the Sergeant that the Colonel 
would probably never revive; that he was even then sinking; and that he had 
better speak to him of his danger. "Wlien told that he could hardly survive, and 
that he might die at any moment, his pale features lighted up with a smile as he 
calmly said, 'What, so soon ?' Continuing, he said : 'It is necessary for me to make 
the sacrifice, and I make it cheerfully, though here I am in Georgia, away from my 
pleasant home, away from my wife and dear little children. Tonight thev don't 
know that I am dying by the fire of these pine knots.' 



638 hazzard's history of henry county. 

■'He had given up his regiment. Now he gave up his family, and began to 
talk of the solemn realities of death. He remarked that he was never a believer 
in death-bed repentance, and that it was the duty of every one to prepare for 
death in time of health. One of the surgeons, a pious man, prayed with him, and 
told liim that Jesus died to save him and would hear his prayer. Up to the last 
moment, the colonel contiiuied to speak of his soul's salvation, and entreated those 
around him to not postpone the greatest duty of their lives. Before he died, he 
gave evidence to those around him that he was willing to go, and that he should 
pass from labor to reward. To the last he was calm and collected. Even the 
terrors of death did not move him. and he met the grim monster without a shudder. 
Noble man ! Green in our memory will be the remembrance of his name. 
Encomiums we need not add. We have dropped the tear of sorrow at his untimely 
death, and we wait in hope of meeting him in a better land. Peace to the ashes 
of George W. Lennard." 

Kind, courteous, and affable with all — one of Nature's own gentlemen. Never 
was man more popular among his neighbors and acquaintances than was Colonel 
Lennard. His friends were warmly attached to him and no man ever lived in 
Henry County who made a deeper impression upon her people, or whose death 
wa.s more sincerely mourned. He was about five feet and ten inches in height, well 
proportioned, always appropriately appareled, dark hair, dark gray eyes — a hand- 
some man. Just prior to his death he had been nominated to the State Senate and 
it was confidently predicted by those who knew him that he would have been 
transferred from the Senate to a seat in Congress. Hallowed indeed must be the 
cause which demands the sacrifice of such noble men. It is to be hoped that God 
in his infinite mercies will never again permit the day to come when our common 
country shall be divided, section against section, in terrible war. His widow 
remained single and died of brain fever at her home in New Castle, June i. 1879. 
highly respected and loved by all who knew her. 

HENRY RUDISEL LENNARD. 

(Son.) 

Henry Rudisel Lennard, the eldest son of Colonel George W. and Mrs. 
Clarinda (Woodward) Lennard, was born in New Castle, Henry County, Indiana. 
August 14, 1853. He was a bright, intelligent youth, possessed of excellent .social 
qualities, who enjoyed the society of his friends and was always full, even to 
running over, with good humor. He was educated in the public schools of New- 
Castle, and afterwards attended Kentucky University at Lexington, in that State, 
and Michigan University at Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

After completing his education, he took up the study of the law in 1876. at 
New Castle, having for his preceptor, Judge Joshua H. Mellett, who was never 
more pleased than when he had under his charge some young man preparing to 
enter the legal profession. Young Lennard continued to study law during the 
following two years (1877-78) and was afterwards admitted to the Henry County 
Bar before Judge Robert L. Polk, presiding judge of the Henry County Circuit 
Court. He practiced his chosen profession in New Castle for a short time and 
then turned his attention to mercantile and manufacturing pursuits, which he 
has since followed, except for a period of several months when he was in the 



HAZZARI3S HISTOKV OX-' HENRY COUNTY. 631) 

eni])lci\- (if the government as a raihvay mail clerk, servino- from Xovember 13, 
1880, to May 5. 1881. 

Henry Rudisel Leonard and Letta Gordon, daughter of Milton J!, and Sophia 
(iordon, were married at Metamora, Franklin County. Indiana. January 7, 1880. 
The parents of Mrs. Leonard are old jiioneer residents of Metamora, and the 
family is probably the most prominent in Franklin County. Mrs. Letta (Gordon) 
Lennard was born at Metamora and was educated in the public schools of that 
])lacc and at Asbury. now De Pauw, L'niversity. (kcencastle. Indiana. After 
their marriage, [Mr. and Mrs. Lennard resided in X'ew Castle, where they had a 
large circle of relatives and friends, until 1884, when they moved to Mrs. Leonard's 
old home, Metamora, where they have since resided. They are the parents of two 
children namely: Edith Gordon, born at New Castle, November 22, 1880; and 
George Milton, born December 20, 1890. Edith Gordon Lennard, who grew to 
young womanhood under the watchful care of her devoted parents and who 
was and is now very prominent in the society of her many friends, at home and 
abroad, was united in marriage, January 7, 1903, with Frederick H. Wiley, a 
very active and prominent young business man of Indianapolis, which beautiful, 
thriving and progressive city is now their home. 

Among the chief industries of the timber country of the West, an industry 
that has assumed great proportions, is the making of handles for shovels, spades, 
fiirks. axes, hoes, hammers and numerous other tools and instruments. It is in 
tiiis business that Mr. Lennard is now engaged, he being the leading member of 
the Lennard Handle Company, Metamora, Indiana. The product of this factory, 
which is hardly second to any similar concern in the State, goes mainly under 
contract to foreign consumers. To the conduct and management of the facton.-, 
Mr. Lennard has given and now gives the most assiduous attention but its demands 
are not allowed to hold him entirely aloof from those affairs which socially and 
politically engage the eflforts of those interested in good government, local. State 
and National. Hence it is that Mr. Lennard, as a leading Republican of his town, 
county and district, never fails to participate in the meetings and conventions 
having for their object the interests and the success of the party. 

ASA H EL WOODW ARD I-EXNWRO. 

(Son.) 

One of the most popular of the young men. who figured in the life of New 
Castle and its immediate, neighborhood, was Asahel Woodward Lennard, the 
second son of Colonel George W. Lennard and Clarinda (Woodward) Lennard, 
his wife. He was born October 15, 1859, at New Castle and was but a young 
boy when his lamented father lost his life in the Civil War, at Resaca, Georgia. 
This boy. "Sale," as he was best known, obtained a part of his education, along 
with his early associates, in the public schools of New Castle and completed the 
same at Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio, where he remained as a student 
for four years. 

After finishing his education, he returned to New Castle where he commenced 
the study of the law with Mellett and Bundy, then one of the leading law firms of 
Eastern Indiana. He was admitted to the Henry County Bar, December 4, 1880, 
and in the year 1883 was elected Treasurer of the Corporation of New Castle and 
was re-elected to the same office in the years 1884 and 1885 without opposition. 



040 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

He practiced his profession for several years at New Castle and then determined 
to seek a wider field. After visiting Duluth, Minnesota, and other Northwestern 
points, he established himself at Pueblo, Colorado, to which growing and pros- 
perous Colorado city he removed in March, 1887. That place has ever since been 
his home. 

On May 21, 1885, he married Anna Agnes Scott, daughter of James Robison 
and Elizabeth Ann (King) Scott. This lady was born at Champaign, Illinois. 
June 13, 1862, and was educated at the home schools and in the Chicago Female 
College, Chicago, Illinois. She is a bright, intelligent woman and the devoted 
wife of an equally devoted husband. 

Mr. Lennard is a prominent and popular citizen of his nuw home, who holds 
a warm place in the hearts of a host of friends, and is justly regarded as one of the 
leading men of the City. County and State. As a lawyer he ranks among the 
leaders of the bar. He was a member of the Colorado Legislature during the 
ninth session, 1893, and represented his district, which is one of the most im- 
portant in Colorado, with credit to himself and honor to his constituents. While 
a member of the Legislature, he was chairman of the committee on the judiciary 
and also a member of a number of other leading committees. He has 
been City Attorney of Bessemer, a manufacturing town adjacent to Pueblo, and 
was the attorney for the Pueblo Water Trustees. He has also filled several other 
positions of trust and responsibility. Mr. Lennard was admitted to the Colorado 
Bar, March 13, 1887. In politics he declares himself to be a high tarift, gold bug. 
McKinley Republican. 

Mr. Asahel W. Lennard is now but little past the meridian of life and is 
destined probably to become an important factor in the rapid, western civilization 
with which he has become identified. He seems assured of distinguished civic 
and political preferment. 

LKANDER PICRKY MITC'HF.I.I-. 

( Son-in-law. ) 

Leander Perry Mitchell was born upon his father's farm in Fall Creek 
Township, Henry County, Indiana, about half way between Mechanicsburg and 
Middletown, February 5, 1849. His parents were Charles Mitchell and Mary 
(Black) Mitchell. He worked on his father's farm and attended the public 
schools in the neighborhood. On May i, 1864, at the age of fifteen years, he 
enlisted as a private soldier in Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry, and was 
mustered into the Army. June 3. 1864. He was mustered out with the regiment 
September 29, 1864, on account of expiration of term of enlistment. He again 
enlisted as a private in the 147th Indiana Infantry and went to Richniontl. 
Indiana, for muster in but was rejected on account of his age. This was the 
last regiment and company which was recruited in Henry County. 

In the Winter of 1864-65 he determined to secure, if possible, an education 
and started to attend the public schools. He taught two Winters at Mechanics- 
burg; first, as assistant to Walter A. Boor (afterwards a learned and successful 
physician) of New Castle, who was principal; second, as principal, with William 
H. Keesling (afterwards the successful merchant, farmer and banker) of 
^lechanicsburg, as assistant. 

Among his students were Erastus L. Elliott, now cashier of the Farmers" 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUN': 



04 1 



ISank of Aliddletown, who afterwards served two terms in the General Assenililv 
with honor to himself and to the county : his sister, Ida Elliott, now the wife of 
Dr. Joseph M. Thurston of Richmond. Indiana: Alattie Jones, now Mrs. Mattie 
E. S. Charles of .Spicelantl ; Dr. Lihhie Weeks, late of Mechanicsburg, deceased; 
Cassius M. (jreenlee, now Judoe of the Superior Court of Andtrson, Indiana; 
George L. Swain, attorney-al-law of Al iddletMW n ; Lulher ( >. Miller oi .\ I iddU-town, 
a contractor, who built the new Methodist l'"piscoi)al Church oi Xew (.'astle; 
Lurtin R. (unn, now an oificial in the Treasury Department at Washington. 
D. C. and the present Grand Master of Masons of the District of Columbia ; and 
a number of others who afterwards became useful men and women. 

After attending Spiceland Academy for some two years, he entered the 
Northwestern Christian L'niversity (now Butler College) of Indianapolis where 
he graduated in the Latin-Scientific course. He also graduated in the Law 
Depattment of Indiana University at lUoomington. Between terms at coU'ege, 
he rode on horseback once every week from his home in Fall Creek Township 
to Xew Castle to recite law to the late Judge Jehu T. Elliott, who had then just 
retired from the Supreme Bench. In the Fall of 1872 he opened an office at New 
Castle and began the practice of law, and followed that |ioifrssion closely until 
January, 1898. The bar of the Henry Circuit i/nur[ w.is then and has been ever 
since composed of able lawyers. 

On June 4, 1874, he married Bettie E. Woodward, daughter of Dr. Thomas 
B. and Catharine Woodward, who at that time was a teacher in the public 
schools of New Castle. On July 31, 1875, but little more than a year ^fter 
her marriage, Mrs. Mitchell departed this life. The fruit of this marriage was one 
child who died in infancy. Both mother and child are buried in South Mound 
Cemetery. Mrs. Mitchell was a bright, sweet. Christian, noble young woman, 
admired and loved by all who knew her. 

On January 6, 1879, he was married to Gertrude Lennard. only daughter of 
Colonel George W. and Clarinda (Woodward) Lennard. To this union were 
born two sons, Lennard H.. born l-'ebruary 24, 1881, and ijryant S., born 
December 14, 1887. 

In the campaign of 1888, he was the Presidential elector on the Harrison and 
Morton ticket, for the Sixth C( in,L;re-.si, ,n.il I )istrict. which he full\- can\assed. In 
1890. he was appointed by the Secreiai\ (it the Interior, superintendent of the 
census for the State of Indiana, and had entire charge of the taking of the census 
of recorded indebtedness of the State, covering the preceding ten years. In 1892 
he was an alternate delegate tn the national convention which nominated Har- 
rison and Reid. In the cani]iai-n '>i 1896, he was unanimously chosen as member 
of the Republican State Central (/■ miniittee from the Sixth Congressional District. 
In this campaign, after Ex-President Harrison had published his letter stating 
that he would not be a candidate for President, it is a matter of history that, with 
the exception of John K. Gciwd\ . now C.nsul General at Paris, France, and then 
State Chairman, Mr. Mitchell did 111. ne ilian ;in\ dlher man in the State to secure 
in district conventions and in the Stale c nu ention instructions of delegates to the 
national convention, for Governor William McKinley. His efforts in that cam- 
paign were characterized by energy, zeal and success. 

Strange things ha|i|ien in politics. .After Mr. McKinIc\ was elected. Mr. 



642 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Mitchell became an applicant for appointment to the office of Comptroller of the 
Treasury. Robert J. Tracewell, then a member of Congress from the Third 
District, was an applicant for appointment as Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court of New Mexico and wrote to Mr. Mitchell for his endorsement for that 
position, which was given. The President declined to appoint Mr. Tracewell to 
the position for which he was an applicant on the ground that he would not appoint 
anyone to that position who was not a resident of the Territory. He declined to 
appoint Mr. Mitchell, Comptroller of the Treasury, on the ground that he would 
not appoint anyone to that position who had not been a member of Congress. 
Both appointments were delayed until the Summer of 1897, when he appointed 
^Ir. Tracewell, without his being an applicant, Comptroller of the Treasury, the 
position for which Mr. Mitchell was an applicant, and sometime thereafter Mr. 
Mitchell was tendered the position of Associate Justice of the Suprem'e Court of 
New ^Nle.xico, the position for which ]\Ir. Tracewell had been an applicant, which 
was declined. The place was then given to Judge Crumpacker of Indiana and in 
January, 1898, Mr. Mitchell was appointed Assistant Comptroller of the Treasury, 
a position corresponding to what was formerly the Second Comptroller of the 
Treasury. This office he still holds. It is a position of great honor and responsi- 
bility and one of the most important offices attached to the Treasury Department. 
It is practically independent of the Comptroller's Office, has jurisdiction of all 
fiscal matters pertaining to the War, Navy, and Interior Departments ; its decisions 
are final and no appeal lies from them by the Government; the incumbent 
should possess legal acumen commensurate with that pertaining to the highest 
courts in the land. It is a purely judicial position, where legal arguments are 
made orally or by written briefs, the cases often involving large sums of money. 
In the discharge of his official duties, Mr. Mitchell has been industrious, pains- 
taking and conscientious and has given good satisfaction. 

In November, i()oi, the physician attending his wife, who was thought to 
be slightly indisposed, informed him that she was fatally ill. At first this could 
scarcely be realized. How often is it true that "In the midst of life we are in 
death !" She was possessed of a gentle, genial, sunny nature, and her cheerful, 
hopeful disposition was never more in evidence than during her prolonged strug- 
gle with the grim destroyer which continued until the night of April 22, 1902, 
which brought the end and a release to her warm, sweet spirit. At the time of 
her decease at her home in Washington, D. C, her husband, her two sons, and 
her brother Asahel W. Lennard, who had come from Pueblo, Colorado, were 
with her. 

She was born July 22. T855. at New Castle, which was her home, except 
when away at college and during her residence in Washington. She was a member 
of the first class (1875) which graduated from the New Castle Academy. In 
the Fall of 1875 she entered Antioch College at Yellow Springs, Ohio, at that 
time ranking in thoroughness and high grade of studies with the best schools 
in the land, taking the regular classical course. She passed through the Fresh- 
man, Sophomore, Junior and the greater part of the Senior year, always standing 
at the head of her classes, when her health broke down and compelled her, much 
to her sorrow and that of her friends, to give up her work in college and return 
to her home. She was a noble woman, possessed of a beautiful Christian char- 



hazzard's history of henry county. 643 

acter, of strong ability both natural and acquired. No company where she was 
present could be dull. She was a woman of high ideals, a loyal, generous, sweet- 
hearted friend, a faithful and devoted wife, an affectionate and indulgent mother. 
She was admired and loved by all who knew her. Her remains were brought to 
her home in New Castle, and on Sunday, .\pril 27, 1902, followed by a large as- 
sembly of friends who had known her in life, they were laid at rest in South 
Alound Cemetery. To all who knew her. her life is a sweet and enduring memory. 

To Bryant S., the loss of his mother seemed more than he could bear. He 
could hardly be reconciled to the thought that he would never again see her in 
this world. On account of his health, after the death of his mother, he went with 
his uncle to his home in Pueblo, Colorado. On August i, 1902, he and his father 
and Lennard H. met in Chicago and together visited the Yellowstone National 
Park, Salt Lake City, Idaho and other points of interest in the West, and then 
returned to Pueblo where it was arranged for him to remain and attend a private 
school during the ensuing year. On September 8th, just three weeks from the day 
his father and brother left him, word was received that he was dangerously ill. 
His father started to him immediately but he passed away before he could reach 
him. By all who knew him he is remembered as of handsome appearance, bright, 
generous, affectionate, a splendid specimen of a manly boy. His remains were 
brought to his home in New Castle, where on Monday, September i6th, 1902, 
they were quietly laid to rest beside his mother. 

In a few brief months a pleasant home was shattered, deprived of nearly 
exery ray of sunshine, with no comfort except that which must come from Above. 

On page 276 of this History, in the biographical sketch of Samuel Alexander 
Mitchell, will be found further and fuller reference to Qiarles and Man.' (Black) 
Mitchell, parents of Leander Perry Mitchell. 

LENNAKD HARRIS MITCHET.I.. 

(Grandson.) 

» Lennard Harris Mitchell completed his education at the Dean Academy, Frank- 
lin. Massachusetts, twenty seven miles from Boston, where he graduated in June, 
1901. In the Fall of the same year he returned to the Academy and took the post 
graduate course of that institution. On June 23, 1904, he married Bessie Joye, 
daughter of Judge John M. and Cora (Heritage) Morris, of New Castle. Since 
his graduation from Dean Academy, he has been connected with the Postoffice 
Department and he and his wife make their home with his father in Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

In January. 1902, at the request of the Auditor for Cuban affairs at Wash- 
ington (then in Havana), he was sent to Cuba to assist in straightening out the 
accounts of the Island. This work had particular reference to the affairs of 
the Postoffice Department which were being investigated, owing to the pecula- 
tions of Rathbone and Neely. He remained in Cuba until the following April, 
when he was called back to Washington on account of the fatal illness of his 
mother. In the Winter of 1902-3 and again in the Fall of 1903, besides attending 
to his duties in the Postofifice Department, he found time to attend the law school 
of the Columbian University (now the George Washington LTniversity). He has 
recently been engaged in the direction and installation of the rural route service 
in Pennsylvania and Virginia. 



GRA.N'U ARMY POSTS CON riNUEU. 
( tK(;AMZ.\TIOX AND RoSTKK (IF JoUX R. McCdRMACK PoST. Xo. 4O3, CaDIX 

P>ioi;rai'iiicai, Skktch hi- Prixate John Rowdy McCormack and Family 
— Organization and Roster of Jerry B. Mason Post. Xo. i68, Kniohts- 

TOWN BlOCRAPIIlC.XL SkETCII OF LlEUTEN.VNT JeROMK P.0N.\I>.\RTE MaSON 

\ND I'.vMiLY — < ')r(;aniz.\ti()n .\nd Roster of George W. Rader Post. Xh. 
1 10. .M 'iiiH.i row N — Bio(;rapitical Sketch of Sergeant George Washing- 
ton k\iii:u ANif Family — Organization and Roster of H.\rmoN Rayi. 

PliSr. X(l. ,^60. Si'KKI.AND I'.IOGR.M'HICAI. SKETCH OF PrUATE H.\RM(.IN 

Raxi. \nii I'^AMiLY — Organiz.m'ion .\Nn Roster oi- the Henry Covntx 

AsSdCIATKIN OF \'eTER.\\S (IF THE ClVII. W.\R. 

JOHX R. MtCORAlACK POST. XO. 403. (r. A. R.. CADIZ. TXDL\XA. 

John R. AlcCorniack Post. Xo. 403. Department nl Indiana, (irand Arni\- 
oi the Reptiblic, was org-anized and instituted at Cadiz. Henry County. Indiana. 
June 14, 1885, i" Cook's Hall, and was mustered in ]y\- Comrade Morrow I'. Ann- 
strong of George W. Lennard Post, Xo. 148. G. A. R.. Xew Castle, Indiana, 
mustering officer, assisted by Post Commander, William F. Shelley, who installed 
the officers, and George H. Cain, Senior \'ice Commander ; Asa W. Hatch, Junior 
\ice Commander; William S. Bedford, Chaplain; William H. Elliott. Adjutjint : 
George B. Robson, CJfficer of the Day; John C. Murray, Officer of the Guard, 
and other comrades of George W. Lennard Post, as follows: Thomas J. Burchett. 
Henry C. Gordon, Thomas W. Gough, Joseph R. Mullen, Peter Xiccum, Lorenzo 
D. Shepherd and Harvey W. Swaim. The Post was named for and in honor of 
the late John Rowdy ]McCormack of Company L 69th Indiana Infantry, a sketch 
(if whose life and military service is fully set forth at the end of this article. 

The following named comrades were present at the organization and became 
charter members of the Post, viz: Hiram T. Alshouse, Henry Alspaugh. Samuel 
Bowers, Samuel Craig, Allen S. Deeter, William I\l. Gardner, Job P. i linn. 
Patrick H. Hansard, Thomas X. Lewis, Andrew J. McCormack. XoSli McCnr- 
mack, Joseph McKee. Abraham Moore, Joseph (3'Xeal, John Perrw Henr\- 
Reichart, Ethan S. Taylor and George W. Thompson. 

The regular meetings of the Post were held on Wednesdax' evening of each 
week. 

The following were the I'ost officers from the organization in 1885 do^^" to 
and including the year 1904. The names of all of the officers are arranged 
aliihabetically : 



AZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY, 



Samuel Bowers, .Josiah Bradway. George H. Brown. John R. Clevenger, Allen W. 
Coon, Daniel W. Craig, Samuel Craig. Patrick H. Hansard, Francis M. Lowery. Philander 
Lowery. John W. McCormack. Noah McCormack. John Perry, Henry Reichart. George 
W, Thompson. 



John Baughan. George H. Brown, Abner Cantrell. John R. Clevenger. Allen W. 
Coon. Samuel Craig. Job B. Ginn, Patrick H. Hansard. Philander Lowery, Abraham 
Moore, Henry Reichart, Ethan S. Taylor, Henry Thompson. 

.lUXIOR VICE COMMAXDEK.S. 

George H. Brown. Abner Cantrell, John R. Clevenger. Daniel W. Craig. Samuel 
Craig. Allen S. Deeter. Job B. Ginn, Thomas N. Lewis. Philander Lowery. Samuel Mc- 
Cormack. Henry Reichart, Henry Thompson. 

SURGEOXS. 

John Baughan. Josiah Bradway, John R. Clevenger. Allen \V. Coon. Daniel \V 
Craig. Job B. Ginn, Patrick H. Hansard. John Hill. Alfred Lafferty. Joseph P. McCon- 
neil. Abraham Moore. Henry Reichart. 

tllAPL.^INS. 

Josiah Bradway. George H. Brown, Patrick H. Hansard. John Perry. 

AD.U-T.VNTS. 

Hiram T. Alshouse. Samuel Craig. William M. Gardner. Greenberry W. Hedges, 
Francis M. Lowery, Henry Reichart. 

Ql AirrERMASTEKS. 

George H. Brown, Josiah Bradway. George W. Thompson. 

OFFICERS or THE DAY. 

George H. Brown, Abner Cantrell, Allen W. Coon. Samuel Craig, Allen S. Deeter. 
Patrick H. Hansard. Philander Lowery. Noah McCormack. Henry Reichart. 



Charles Brown, Daniel W. Craig, William M. Gardner. Joli B. Ginn, Francis M. 
Lowery, Andrew J. McCormack, John W. McCormack. Abraham Moore, John Perr.y, 
Henry Reichart, William Shockey, Henry Thompson. 



Allen W. Coon. Samuel Craig. Patrick H. Hansard. Greenberry W. Hedges, Joseph 
P. McConnell, Joseph McKee, Henry Reichart. Henry Thompson. 

(H'AUTEHMASTER SERGEANTS. . 

Josiah Bradway. Allen W. Coon. Greenberry W. Hedges. Francis M. Lowery. Joseph 
P. McConnell. Andrew J. McCormack. Henry Reichart. Ethan S. Taylor. 

■ The records of the Department Assistant Adjutant ("leneral at Indianapohs 
show that this Post surrendered its charter. December i6, 1904. 

The following is believed to be a complete list or roster of all who have been 
members of the Post. In the several alphabetical lists of soldiers and 
sailors, set out elsewhere in this History, will be found a more detailed 



646 hazzard's history of henry county. 

statement of the service in the Army and Navy of each comrade who is entitled 
to further mention in the History of Henr)' County. An ai>terisk thus * in front 
of a name denotes a comrade residing in an adjoiningr county, therefore there is 
no further reference to him in the •■Alphabetical List" above mentioned. 

POST JlE.\n!EKS. 

Hiram T. Alshouse, Company F. 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Henry Alspaugh. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hngh Anderson, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

.John Baughan, Company K, 10.5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Christopher C. M. Bocli. Company H. (iOth Indiana Infantry: Company H, 147th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel Bowers. Company K, 10.5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company B. 
130th Indiana Infantry. 

Josiah Bradway. Company A, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Charles Brown, Company S, 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

George H. Brown. Company B, 89th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas C. Burton, Company E, 50th Indiana Infantry. 

Abner Cantrell. Company A, 2nd ^Vest Virginia Infantry. 

.lohn R. Clevenger, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Robert K. Collins, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Company I. 
69th Indiana Infantry. 

.^llen W. Coon, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Daniel W. Craig, , 15th Indiana Battery. 

Samuel Craig, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Allen S. Deeter, . Record incomplete in this History. 

.Tames H. Bowling Company C, 71st New York Infantry. 

William M. Gardner, Company G. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Job B. Ginn, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Jonathan J. Ginn, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

John W. Hammer. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Patrick H. Hansard, Company F, 14th U. S. C. T. 

Lewis Hart, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry ( Morgan Raid ) . 

Greenberry W. Hedges, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry; Company D, 147th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Joel Hendricks, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

John Hill, Company G, 55th Massachusetts Infantry. 

Amos J. Kern, Company B, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Alfred Lafferty, . Membership honorary on account of having liff-n 

body servant in the Civil War to Colonel George W. Jackson, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

William Larrowe, Company K, 99th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas N. Lewis, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company H, 30th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Francis M. Lowery, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Philander Lowery, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph P. McConnell, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Com- 
pany E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

-Andrew J. McCormack. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

John W. McCormack. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Josiah McCormack, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Lafe McCormack, Company I, 111th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Noah McCormack, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel McCormack, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry, 

Joseph McKee, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry: Company K. 105th Indiana 
Infantry (Morgan Raid). 



» hazzard's history of henry county. 647- 

Abraham Moore. Company B. 2nd Indiana Cavali-y. 

Solomon Myers, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

James L. Newhouse, Company C, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph O'Neal, Company F. 4(ith Ohio Infantry; Company I. .".Ist Ohio Infantry. 

Henry Perry, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

John Perry, Company B. 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Ezra Pickering, Company B, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Elijah M. Pressnall, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Mori;an Raid t ; Company 
A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Henry Reichart, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

William Shockey, . Record incomplete in this History. 

Ethan S. Taylor, Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

George W. Thompson, Company H, 5th Indiana Infantry (Mexican War): Com- 
pany C, 36th Illinois Infantry. 

Henry Thompson. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raidi. 

Daniel Ulmer, Company I. 79th Pennsylvania Infantry. 

Milton Williams. Company B. IS'tth Indiana Infantry: Company I, lS7th Ohio 
Infantry. 



648 hazzard's history of henry county. 

I'.IOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF JOHX ROWDY McCORMACK. 

I'RiVATE. C(i.\rr.\NV 1. 6qth ixfaxirv Ki-:i;iMi-:xr. ixdiax \ \()I,uxtki-:us. 

John Rowdy McO-irniack was the eldest son of ■Melon and Mary AlcCorniack, 
and was born in Henry County. Indiana, on his father's farm, about two miles 
west of Cadiz. The parents came from X'irginia and settled in Henry Count}- at 
a very early date. 

That the famil\- was full^of patriotic blood is shown in the fact that the suliject 
of this sketch was one of four brothers, all of whom served in the Federal Armv 
during the Civil War. The second son. Thomas AlcCormack, of Company K. 
8th Indiana Infantry (three years), was killed at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on the 
2 1, St day of May. 1863. The third son. Noah McCormack. of Company C. 36th 
Indiana Infantry, went through all the campaigns of that well known regiment 
and upon the muster out of the regiment. September 21, 1864, returned home 
where he still lives, an honored citizen of the county. The fourth son, Andrew J. 
McCormack, of Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry, is a survivor of the ill-fated 
steamboat. Sultana, which was blown up. set on fire and destroved on the Mis- 
sissippi River, April 2-j. 1865. His recollections of that tragic event are publislied 
elsewhere in this work. 

John R. McCormack. the subject of this sketch, enlisted in the service of his 
country in Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry, and was mustered into the service 
of the Cnited States. .August 19, 1862. At the battle of Richmond, Kentuck\ , 
August 30, 1862, he was severely wounded and w-as taken prisoner with the 
greater part of his regiment. After the regiment had been exchanged and re- 
organized, it was sent down the Mississippi River to serve under General Grant. 
After the siege and surrender of A'icksburg. he was taken sick and died at that 
]5lace. .A.ugust ii. 1863. His body was buried at Milliken's I'er.fl. Louisiana, but 
has since been re-interred among the unknown dead in the National Cemetery at 
Mcksburg. 

In 1850 John R. McCormack was married to Nancy Baughan and to them 
was born one child, now Mrs. Richard Callahan, who lives two and one-half 
miles southwest of Cadiz. His wife died in 1855. He was a carpenter 1)\- trade, 
honorable and upright, a good citizen, a brave soldier, highly esteemed b\- all of 
his friends and neighbors, and his memory preserved and honored l)v his com- 
rades in arms. 

JF.RRV I'.. MAS( )\ POST. XO. 168, G. A. R.. KXTGHTSTOWX, IXOIAXA. 

Jerry i'.. Mason Post. No. l6g. Department of Indiana. Grand Armv of the 
Rei)ulilic. was organized and instituted at Knightstow n. Henry Countv. Indiana. 
-May 4. 1883. in P.ell's Hall, and was mustered in by James R. Carnahan. Depart- 
ment Commander, assisted by Benjamin D. House. Assistant Adjutant (ieneral. 
and Will C. David. Acting Assistant Adjutant General, together with ten or 
twelve comrades from .Samuel H. Dunbar Post. Xo. (;2. Greenfield. Indiana. 
The Post was named for and in honor of the late Lieutenant Jerome B. 
-Mason (commonly called Jerry B. Mason) of Comjiany F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 




5t. 



JT-/*?^, 



i 



hazzard's history of henry county. 649 

a sketch of whose Ufe and military service is fully set forth at the conclusion of 
this article. 

The following- named comrades were present at the organization and became 
charter members of the Post, viz: Charles M. Butler. Tliomas Clair, Henry M. 
Crouse, James Daugherty, Francis Dovey, J. Lee Furgason, George P. Graf, 
Tliomas M. Hackleman, John E. Keys, John H, May, George \V. Aleuser, Harry 
Watts, Thomas R. Wilkinson and John Wysong. 

The regular meetings of the Post are held on the first and third .Saturday 
evenings of each month. 

The following were the Post ot¥icers from the organization in 1883 down 
to and including the year 1904. The names of the commanders are arranged in 
the order in which they served. The names of all other olificers are arranged 
aljihabetically. 

COMMANDER.S. 

Thomas B. Wilkinson. John E. Keys, Milton Peden, Harry Watts. Henry M. Crouse, 
George P. Graf, William H. Edwards. William P. Foulke. Joshua T. C. Welboru, Clinton 
D. Hawhee, Asa E. Sample, William B. McGavran, Charles M. Butler, Francis Dovey. 
George P. Graf. 

SKMOK VICE COir.M.VXDKK.S. 

De Witt C. Alspaugh, William M. Cameron, Squire Dillee, Francis Dovey, Clinton D. 
Hawhee, White Heaton. James Hutson. Isaac C. Lemraon. La Fayette Ogborn, Newton 
Robinson, Albert W. Saint, Asa. E. Sample, Joshua T. C. Welborn, Henry C. Woods. 



DeWitt C. Alspaugh. Shepperd Bowman. Squire Dillee. William P. Foulke. Thomas 
M. Hackleman, Clinton D. Hawhee. White Heaton, Joseph P. McConnell, John McNurney. 
.lames Steele. Benjamin F. Sf ration. Madison Tyer. Henry C. Woods. 

SUK(iEONS. 

Henry M. Crouse. William B. McGavran. 

CII.M'I.AINS. 

De Witt C. Alspaugh, Robert F. Brewington. William A. Cutler. Francis Dovey. 
White Heaton, William B. McGavran, John W. Newby. 



John B. Antrim. Charles M. Butler, John A. Craft, William H. Edward; 
rgason, Waitsel M. Heaton. Mark M. Morris. Asa E. Sample. 



Shepperd Bowman. Francis Dovey. White Heaton. Harry 
Robert E. Woods. 



Shepperd Bowman. William M. Cameron. George P. Graf, John E. Keys. Levi Kiser, 
Joseph P. McConnell. Joshua T. C. Welborn. 

OFKICKliS OF THE CCUil). 

James Adams. Squire Dillee. Austin M. Edwards. Leander M. James. Levi Kiser, 
William F. Lakin. John W. Newby. Benjamin F. Stratton, Madison Tyer. Joshua T. C. 
Welborn. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HEN£ 



SERGEANTS MAJOR. 



Charles M. Butler, Amos Crawford. Francis Dovey, George P. Graf, Clinton D 
Hawhee. Waitsel M. Heaton, Isaac C. Lemmon, Asa E. Sample, Benjamin F. Stratton. 
Henry C. Woods, Robert E. Woods, John Wysong. 

QUARTEKM.\STER SERGEANTS. 

John B. Antrim, Shepperd Bowman, Charles M. Butler, Waitsel M. Heaton, Isaac 

C. Lemmon, John McNurney,' John W. Newby, Robert E. Woods. 

(Note: — The records of the Post for the ySars 1892 and 1893 having been lost, it is 
impossible to give the names of the officers for those two years.) 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1905. 

Commander, tjeorge P. Graf; Senior Vice-Commander, Francis Dovey; Junior Vice- 
Commander, John McNurney; Surgeon, Henry M. Crouse; Chaplain, William B. Mc- 
Gavran; Adjutant, Asa E. Sample; Quartermaster, Shepperd Bowman; Officer of the 
Day, Joshua T. C. Welborn; Officer of the Guard, John W. Newby; Sergeant Major. 
Benjamin F. Stratton; Quartermaster Sergeant, John E. Keys. 

The following- is believed to be a complete list or roster of all who have been 
or are now members of the Post. In the several alphabetical lists of soldiers 
and sailors, set out elsewhere in this History, will be found a more 
detailed statement of the service in the Army and Nav\' of each comrade who is 
entitled to further mention in the History of Henry County. An asterisk, thus '\ 
in front of a name denotes a comrade, residing in an adjoining county, therefore 
there is no further reference to him in the "Alphabetical List," above mentioned. 

POST MEMBERS. 

James Adams, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Oliver Allee. Company D, 19th Indiana Infantry; , 19th Indiana 

Battery. 

De Witt C. Alspaugh, Company G, KUh Indiana Infantry. 

John B. Antrim, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

James Archibald, , 23rd Indiana Battery. 

Cyrus Armstrong, Company K, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Josiah D. Ayres, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company G. 
9th Indiana Infantry. 

Warren F. Ballard, Company G, Quartermaster Sergeant, Lieutenant and Quarter 
master, 47th Indiana Infantry. 

Augustus E. Barrett, Company D, Sth Illinois Infantry (three months); Company 

D, Sth Illinois Infantry (three years). 

*Joseph F. Bartlow, Company C, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel H. Bennett, Company H, 54th Ohio Infantry. 

John W. Bishop. Company K. 70th Indiana Infantry; Company B, 33rd Indiana 
Infantry. 

Lycurgus L. Boblett, Company F and Adjutant, Slth Indiana Infantry. 

Jacob Bodmer, Company B, 46th New York Infantry; Company C. 32nd Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

James H. Bowles, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Shepperd Bowman, Company A. lHoth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company 
D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Bowman. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Com- 
pany A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Robert F. Brewington, Company K. 68th Indiana Infantry. 

Daniel Burk, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 651 

Daniel H. Burris, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company 
A. 139th Indiana Infantry; Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Blwood Burris, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company A, 
3Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Charles M. Butler, , 19th Indiana Battery. 

William R. Callahan, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

John D. Cameron, Company A, 38th Indiana Infantry. 

William M. Cameron, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months I; Company 
F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Adam P. Campbell, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

James M. Camplin, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

John T. Casely. Company A, 133rd Indiana Infantry. 

Daniel C. Catt, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry; , 22nd Indiana 

Battery. 

(Jeorge Catt, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Thomas Clair. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Timothy Clair, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Isaac Clevidence, Company E, 13th Maryland Infantry. 

Exum Copeland, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company A, 105th Indiana 
Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

John A. Craft, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Amos Crawford, Company C, 91st Illinois Infantry. 

William H. Cross, Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Henry M. Crouse, Assistant Surgeon, Major and Surgeon. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

William A. Cutler, Company C, 145th Illinois Infantry. 

Prear Daniel, Company P, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Company B. 110th 
Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*James Daugherty, Company A, 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Will C. David, Company A, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Amos Davidson, Company D. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

John E. Deck, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

James I. Dent, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Luther S. Dillee, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Squire Dillee, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry; Company A. 38th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Francis Dovey, , 19th Indiana Battery. 

Daniel Davidson Duncan, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (:\Iorgau Raid); 
Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

George Eagle, Company K, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Austin M. Edwards, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
William H. Edwards, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

William M. Edwards, Company A and Principal Musician, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

George D. Englerth, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

•James Fifer, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company B. 
130th Indiana Infantry. 

John A. Fike, Company F. 20th Indiana Infantry. 

Tilghman Fish. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Brice D. Fort, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company A. 
139th Indiana Infantry. 

William P. Fouike, Company D. 115th Indiana Infantry; Company C. 31st Indiana 
Infantry. 

Henry Frederick. Company C. 9th Indiana Infantry. 

J. Lee Furgason, Company A and Quartermaster Sergeant, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Ezra Gillinghani, Company I, 21st Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps. 

George P. Graf, Company A, 32nd Indiana Infantry. 

Jacob Green, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 



652 HAZZARU'S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Marquis D. Griffith. Company D. 34th Indiana Infantry. 

James Grunden. Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry; Company C. 20th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Thomas M. Hackleman. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

.lames W. Harris, Company H, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Martin B. Harris. Company A. 10.5th Indiana Infantry ( Morgan Raid ) : Company 
A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Nathan H. Haskett. Company G. 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Peter Hasting, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Clinton D. Hawhee, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Waitsel M. Heaton. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Company 
A and Sergeant Ma,jor. 139th Indiana Infantry: Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry 
(Morgan Raid). 

White Heaton, . 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Charles Hewitt, Company B. 132nd Indiana Infantry. 

Orville W. Hobbs. Company G. 133rd Indiana Infantry. 

Wilson Hobbs. Major and Surgeon. S5th Indiana Infantry. 

.John E. Hodson. Company F. 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Alonzo Howard. Company L. liith New York Heavy Artillery; Company L and Com- 
pany D. 1st New York Mounted Infantry: Company D, 4th New York Cavalry. 

Thomas I. Howren Company D. 3()th Indiana Infantry. 

Alonzo Hubliard. Company F. lUh Indiana Infantry (three months): Company A, 
105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hldwin Hubbard. Company H, U9th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph L. Hubbard, , 19th Indiana Battery, 

John W. Hudelson, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Company A. 
57th Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Hudelson. Company K, 37th Indiana Infantry. 

James Hutson, Company G. 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

John James, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry, 

beander M. James, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Michael Kaltenbaoh, Company A. 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

John E. Keys, Companj B. 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

William L. Kerr, Company F, 23rd Indiana Infantry; Company B, 13th Indiana 
Cavalry. 

George Kinder, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Levi Kiser. Company C. 3.5th Ohio Infantry. 
William F. Lakln, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Isaac C. Lemmon. Company I, 71st Ohio Infantry. 

.lohn C. Leonard. Company L, 21st Indiana Infantry re-organized as Isl Heavy Ar- 
tillery. 

William H. Leonard. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Abraham Level. Company B. 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

*John F. McCarty, Company G. 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph P. McConnell. Company K. lOStli Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Com- 
pany E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Milton McCray. Company K, 132nd Indiana Infantry. 

George McDougal, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-ortanized. 

William B. McGavran, Major and Surgeon, 26th Ohio Infantry, 

Samuel H, McGuffin, Company H, 1 t7th Indiana Infantry. 

John McNurney. Company A, Major Berry's Battalion, i\Iissouri Cavalry; Company 
L, 1st Missouri Cavalry, 

John H. May, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry: Company F, 84th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

.lohn W. .Mayes. Company E. 47th Ohio Infantry. 

(Jeorge W. Meuser. , 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Wallace Midkiff, Company B, 156th Indiana Infantry. 



IIAZZAUDS inSTdKV OF HICNRV COUNTV. ri:;:> 

William D. Mills, Company A. lOSth Inrliana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company A, 
139th Indiana Infantry. 

David Monticue, Company D. Stith Indiana Intantry, 

Solomon R. Monticue, -. . 4th Indiana Battery. 

Abraham Moore, Company B, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Mark M. Morris. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

William J. Morris, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

John W. Musselman. Company H, Itith Indiana Infantry. 

John W. Newby, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas E. Niles. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

La Fayette Ogborn, Company G, 12th Illinois Cavalry. 

John Oldaker, Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

David Osborn, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

George K. Otis, Company I, 54(h Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Samuel W. Overman, Company B, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas J. Owens, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Robert Parker, Company F, Sth Wisconsin Infantry. 

Milton' Peden, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; Colonel. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

*Henry Perigo, Company F, 115th Indiana Intantry. 

John Perry. Company B, Sth Indiana Cavalry. 

*Marion Philpot. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Elihu Powell, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months): . 

lyth Indiana Battery. 

Henry C. Powell, , 22nd Indiana Battery. 

James C. Pratt, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Isaac Jtoberts, Company K. 3Hth Indiana Infantry. 

William Roberts, Company C, 120th Indiana Infantry. 

Newton Robinson, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Fernandez Rose. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry; Company H. 30th Indiana In- 
fantry, re-organized. 

Albert W. Saint. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Asa E. Sample. Company B. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 
Henry Schaffer, Company B, 156th Indiana Infantry. 
Jesse R. Schofield, Company F, 69th Ohio Infantry. 
Joseph F. Shultz, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
Henry W. Simmons, Company A. 38fh Indiana Infantry. 

John A. Simmons, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry: Comijany K. 132nd Indiana 
Infantry. 

William Simmons. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry: Company C. 9th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Peter 1). Sloat, Company K, 123rd Indiana Infantry. 
Thomas M. Smith, Company G. 12th Kentucky Infantry. 

James Steele, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months): Company G. 16th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Valentine Steiner, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
*Corwin Stites, Company K, 31st Indiana Infantry. 
'William Stockdale, Company D, 4Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Ben.iamin F. Stratton, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Com- 
pany A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas M. Swain. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry: Company A. 139th Indiana 
Infantry. 

*Martin Trevillian. Company D. 6Sih Indiana Infantry. 

Madison Tyer. Company I. 132nd Indiana Infantry. 

Leroy Vallandigham, Company D. 79th Indiana Infantry. 

Harry Watts, Company F. 24th Indiana Infantry. 

Walter S. Weaver, Company H and Principal Musician, 147th Indiana Infantry. 



(.)54 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Joshua T. C. Welborn. Company F. 11th Indiana Infantry; Company F, 84th Indiana 

Noah B. White, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

James L. Whitesel. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months) : , 

2nd Indiana Battery. 

Joseph M. Whitesel, Assistant Surgeon, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Thomas B. Wilkinson. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Henry C. Woods, ^ . 19th Indiana Battery. 

Jeremiah Woods. Company B. 99th Indiana Infantry. 
Robert E. Woods, Company M, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
John Wysong, Company 1, 71st Ohio Infantry. 



^1 ^m mm 



^^r-r-^ ^. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 655 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF JEROME BONAPARTE MASON, 

■^K^ iiM) LIEUTENANT COMPANY F, 84TH INFANTRY REGIMENT, INDIANA VOLUNTEERS. 

Lieutenant Jerome Bonaparte Mason, son of Daniel and Nellie Mason, was 
born in the year 1837 ^^ Knightstown. Indiana, but the exact date of his birth 
is not now obtainable. 

He was a brave, intrepid soldier and the first commissioned officer from 
Knightstown and Wayne Township killed in the Civil War. Because of this 
fact and to do honor to his name, the G. A. R. Post at Knightstown was named 
the "Jerry B. Mason Post," "Jerry" being the name by which he was familiarly 
known, but his correct name was as it appears at the beginning of this sketch. 
He was instantlx- \<U\c(\ at the famous battle of Chickamauga, Georgia, on Sun- 
da}- aftern(i(in, Stpteniber 20, 1863, at which time, being attached to the staff of 
General Walter C Whitaker, who commanded the brigade, he was in the act of 
carrying a message from the latter's headquarters to the headquarters of the 
division commander, when he was struck in the forehead by a shell and the top 
of his head torn ofif. When at home on furlough a shnrt time before this tragic 
ending of his life, he told his wife and two or three nf his friends a (h't:nii Ik- had 
and at its conclusion stated in bidding them goodbye, "I will never see you again." 
The vision showed him with particularity the scene of the battle, what he was 
doing at. the time and how he would be killed, and curiously enough was in 
, accordance with the facts as they afterwards transpired. 

From boyhood. Mason was interested in military affairs and in 1861 organized 
a company of zouaves, than which there was no better drilled military organiza- 
tion in the State. 

His sword was saved from the battlefield and given into the possession of his 
widow who died some years ago at Kansas City, Missouri. His wife was a 
daughter of Dr. Hill who, at the beginning of the Civil War, was a resident 
of Knightstown. They had but one child, a son, who is still living and engaged 
in the railroad service in the West. Two of his brothers are also living, Robert 
W. Mason, who is an inmate of the National i\Iilitary Home at Danville, Illinois, 
and George W. Mason, who lives at Edina, Knox County, Missouri. The Post 
at Knightstown is the owner of an excellent portrait of Lieutenant Mason, whose 
remains are laid in the National Cemeterv at Chattanooga, Tennessee, having 
been removed there from the battlefield when the National Cemetery was estab- 
lished. Unfortunately, he is among the unknown dead, which results undoubtedly 
from the fact that he was first buried by the Confederates who occupied the 
field immediately after the battle. 

MASON FAMILY. 1139220 

The Masons were a martial family. Daniel Mason, Senior, scrvetl in the 
War of 1812-15 with the Virginia Troops and afterwards moved to Indiana, 
settling at Knightstown. His eight sons were all soldiers of the Civil War. They 
went into the Federal Army from Knightstown, Ogden and vicinity, except Alex- 
ander L. Mason, who at the beginning of the war was in Iowa and entered the 
armv from that State. The record of each is as follows : 



656 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Alexander L. Mason. Knightstown. Enlisted at .Muscatine. Muscatine 
County. Iowa. Captain, Company C, First Iowa Infantrx'. .Mustered in May 14. 
1861. Killed at Wilson's Creek, Missouri, .\ugust 10, 1861. 

David A. Mason, Knig-htstown. Musician. Company F. 84th Indiana In- 
fantry. Mustered in August 26, 1862. Mustered out Jime 14. 1865. 

Daniel Mason, Ogden. Saddler, Company M, ijth Indiana Cavalry. .Mus- 
tered in March i. 1864. Mustered out June 9. 1865. 

George W. Mason, Knightstown. Vrivate, Company !•", Oth Indiana Infantry 
(three months). Mustered in .\pril 22. 1861. Mustered out .\ugust 2. 1861. 
.\gain enlisted, Private, Comjiany (1. 32nd Indiana Infantry, re-organized. Mus- 
tered in February I. 1862. \'eteran. Mustered out September to, 1865. . 

Jerome B. Mason, Knightstown. Second Lieutenant, Company F. 84th 
Indiana Infantry. Mustered in September 3, 1862. Kijled at Chickamauga. 
Georgia, September 20, 1863. 

John Mason. Ogden. Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. Mus- 
tered in June 5, 1864. Appointed Musician. Mustered out September 29. 1864. 

Robert W. ]\Iason, Ogden. Private. Company F. iTrth Indiana Infantry (one 
year). Mustered in .\])ril 13, 18C11. Mustered out May 23. 1862. .\gain enlisted. 
Corporal. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. .Mustered in August 21, 1862. 
Mustered out June 14, 1865. 

Thomas Mason. Knightstown. Private, Cumpany H. 52nd Indiana Infantry, 
re-organized. Mustered in February i. 1862. Discharged, disability, Septeml)er 
29, 1862. 

(;f( )K(;f w. rader P( )ST. xo. uq. t;. a. r.. middletowx. ixdiaxa. 

( ieorgc W. Rader Post, No. 119, Department of Indiana. Grand Arm\ of 
the Republic, was organized and instituted at Middletown, Henry County, Indiana. 
December 12. 1882, in Odd Fellows Hall, and was mustered in by Joseph P. IlitT, 
of Sol Meredith Post. Xo. 55. Richmond, Indiana. The Post was named in honor 
of the late Sergeant. George W. Rader, of Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry 
(three years' service), a sketch of whose life and militarv service is fully set forth 
at the conclusion of this article. 

The following named comrades were present at the organization and became 
charter members of the Post, viz ; John Baker, Samuel Barrett, Jonathan Brat- 
tain, liurton W. Castetter. Isaac X. Gienoweth, Enoch Craig. John Dutton. 
Joseph Dutton, Benjamin H. Davis, Theophilus Everett. James Graham, Joseph 
Graves, Thomas J, Ginn, Joseph G. Gustin, Abram B. Hopper, David Jones. 
Josiah McCormack. Peter ]\IcKenzie. William M. Moore, Thomas Morton, John 
.\. Mundell, Flemmon T. W. Painter, Collier M. Reed, David Stewart, (7ieorge ^^■. 
Tarkleson, Frederick Tykle, Richmond Wisehart, Joseph A. Young. 

When the Post was first organized, it held weekly meetings but its rank;- 
havi> been so thinned by death that only monthly meetings are now held. 

The following were the Post officers from the organization in 1882 down to 
and including the year 1904. The names of the commanders are arranged in the 
order in which they served. The names of all other officers are arranged alpha- 
betically. 



HAZZAKU S IIISTURV ilF HENRY COUNTY. 



Joseph A. Young, David Jones, Abram B. Hopper, Joseph A. Young, Benjamin H. 
Davis, Alexander Abernathy, Peter McKenzie, Hiram B. Brattain, Joseph A. Young, 
John R. Weaver, John Gibson, Isaac H. Miller, Thomas J. Ginn, Jonathan Brattain, Bur- 
ton W. Castetter, Joseph A, Young, Benjamin H. Davis, Elisha M. Hanby, Andrew J. 
Fleming, Collier M. Reed. 

SKXIOR VICK CO.MMAXDEKS. 

Late Bel). Hiram B. Brattain, Jonathan Brattain, Benjamin H. Davis, Andrew J. 
Fleming, Thomas J. Ginn, Joseph G. Gustin, Elisha M. Hanby, David Jones, Peter Mc- 
Renzie, Isaac H. Miller, David M. Painter, Collier M. Reed. Sanford Whitworth, Richmond 
Wisehart. 

.irxlOR \ ICK CIIM.MANDERS. 

John Balier, Hiram B. Brattain, Benjamin H. Davis. John Gibson. Thomas J. Ginn. 
Joseph G. Gustin. Elisha M. Hanby. William H. Morgan. John Mundell, Collier M. Reed, 
Jacob Warnock. 

.SUEtiEO.XS. 

Joseph G. Gustin. Peter McKenzie. Isaac H. Miller, William H. .Morgan, Collier M. 
Reed, James H. Welsh. 

C]1.\PL.\I>S. 

Alexander Abernathy, Perry J. Albright. Benamin H. Davis, John J. Noftsinger, 
William H. Pierce. George W. Tarkleson. 



Late Bell. Burton W. Castetter. Benjamin H. Davis, Abram B. Hopper, David Jones, 
John R. Weaver. Joseph A'. Young. Robert A. Young. 

QU.'VRTEKM.VSTERS. 

Isaac N. Chenowetb. Benjamin H. Davis, Joseph Dutton. John Gibson. Elisha M. 
Hanby. Frederick Tykle. John R. Weaver. James H. Welsh. Robert A. Young. 

OFFICERS OF THE D.iY. 

Hiram B. Brattain, Burton W. Castetter, Benjamin H. Davis, John Gibson. Thomas 
J. Ginn. Elisha M. Hanby. Abram B. Hopper, Thomas Morton, John J. Noftsinger. Charles 
C. Bhedron, John R. Weaver, Richmond Wisehart, Joseph A. Young. 



Jonathan Brattain, George H. Brown, James R. Diltz. Joseph Dulton. John Gibson, 
Joseph G. Gustin. Amos McGuire. Russell B. Sharp. 

SF.B(ir..\XTS MA.J0R. 

Isaac H. ililler. William M. iloore, Collier M. Reed, Levi P. Shoemaker. Jacob War- 
nock. 

i;rAR'l'EEM.\STER SERGEANTS. 

John Baker. Thomas Morton. Collier M. Reed. Cyrus Van Matre. 

OFFICERS FOR TUE YEAR 1905. 

Commander, Lafe Bell; Senior Vice Commander, Joseph Graves; Junior Vice Com- 
mander, Hiram B. Brattain; Surgeon, Peter McKenzie; Chaplain, Cyrus Van Matre; Adju- 
tant, Joseph A. Young; Quartermaster, John R. Weaver; Officer of the Day. Benjamin H. 
Davis; Officer of the Guard, John J. Noftsin.ger; Sergeant Major, Jacob Warnock: Quar- 
termaster Sergeant, Collier M. Reed. 



658 hazzard's history of henry county. 

The following is believed to be a complete list or roster of all, who have been 
or are now, members 'of the Post. In the several alphabetical lists of 
soldiers and sailors, set ont elsewhere in this History, will be found a 
more detailed statement of the service in the Army and Navy of each comrade 
who is entitled to further mention in the History of Henry County. 

POST MESIBER.S. 

Alexander Abernathy, Company G, 21st Indiana Infantry; Company .M, 9th Indiana 
Calvary. 

James T. Abshlre, Company F, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Perry J. Albright, Company B, 110th Ohio Infantry. 

Henry Alspaugh, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

George P. Atkinson, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

John Baker, Company E, 1st Heavy Artillery. U. S. C. T. 

Philip Barkdnll, Company I, 142nd Indiana Infantry. 

Philip N. Barrett, Company I, 193rd Ohio Infantry. 

Samuel Barrett, Company B, 118th Indiana Infantry. 

John G. Bartow, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry: Company H. 147th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Benjamin F. Benbow, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Lafe Bell, Company F, 53rd Kentucky Infantry. 

David Bowers, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel Bowers Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Company B. 
130th Indiana Infantry. 

George W. Brandon. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Company 
G, 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hiram B. Brattain. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Company H. 
fi9th Indiana Infantry. 

Jonathan Brattain. Company E, 34th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas C. Burton. Company E, 50th Indiana Infantry. 

Silas Byram, Company K. 34th Ohio Infantry; Company G, 17th Regiment, V. R. 
Corps. 

John B. Campbell, , 4th Indiana Battery. 

Burton W. Castetter, Company B, 48th Indiana Infantry. 

Isaac N. Chenoweth. Company P, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

John R. Clevenger. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Jonathan J. Clevenger, Company G, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Robert K. Collins. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Company 1. 
'i9?h Indiana Infantry. 

Adam Eli Conn, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry: , 25th Indiana 

Battery. 

Imla W. Cooper, Company D. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Enoch Craig. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry ( .Morgan Raid ) : Company E. 
Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Samuel Craig, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Peter Crasher, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Company E. 
Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Benjamin H. Davis, Company C. 155th Indiana Infantry. 

James R. Diltz, Company I, 44th Indiana Infantry. 

William Downs, Company D. 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

John Dutton, , 3rd Ohio Independent Battery. 

Joseph Dutton, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Peter Eaton, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Richard J. Edleman, , 12th Indiana Battery. 

Cyrus Ellingwood, Company I. 8th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 



HAZZARlj's JIISTOKV OF JIENRV COUX'l'V. 659 

riieophilus Everett. , Magrucler's Battery (Mexican War.i ; Company 

D, L'nd Indiana Cavalry; Company K, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Andrew J. Fleming, Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

William R. Fleming, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

William M. Gardner, Company G, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

John Gibson. Company K, 12th Indiana Cavalry. 

Job B. Ginn, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Jonathan J. Ginn, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas J. Ginn, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Richard S. Gossett, Company G, 17th Indiana Infantry. 

William Gossett, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Company E, 
8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

James Graham, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

.Joseph Grave?, Company H, (;9th Indiana Infantry. 

William Griffith, Company E. 40th Indiana Infantry. 

Isaac Grove, Company K, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Company H, G9th 
Indiana Infantry; Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph G. Gustin, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Rlisha M. Hanby, Company F. 53rd Indiana Infantry. 

Henry W. Higley, Company G, 3rd Missouri Cavalry, 

,Iohn Hodson, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

.Jacob Holsinger, Company G, 110th Ohio Infantry. 

Abram B. Hopper, Compa;ny G, 39th Ohio Infantry. 

Herbert Hunt, Company C, 57th Indiana Infantry, 

Joseph Hurst, Company G, 17th Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Jacobs. Company A, 91st Ohio Infantry. 

George W. Jennln.gs. Company K, lOth Indiana Infantry. 

Gary Jester, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Stevan John, Company L, Sth Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

David Jones, Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Richard J. Laboyteaux, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

KJza Lanham, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Mor.gan Raid). 

^\'illiam Latchaw. Company D. 87th Indiana Infantry; Company D, 42nd Indiana 
Infantry. 

Alfred D. W. Leavens, Company K, Sth Illinois Cavalry. 

Thomas N. Lewis, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry: Company H. 30th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Gambral Little, Company B, 130th Indiana Infantry, 

Joseph P. McConnell, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Com- 
pany E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Andrew J. McCormack, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Josiah McCormack, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Amos McGuire. Company B, 12th Indiana Infantry. 

Peter McKenzie, Company E, 91st Ohio Infantry. 

Jonathan May, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

David T. Miller, Company I, 9th New Jersey Infantry- 
Isaac H. Miller, . Record incomplete in this History. 

Samuel H. Mills, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Andrew J. Minnick, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel A. Mitchell, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Abraham Moore. Company B, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

William M. Moore, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) ; Company 
F. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Mor.gan, Company E, 38th Illinois Infantry; , U. S. Signal 

Corps. 

T,Jiomas Morton, Company F, U. S. Mounted Rifles (Mexican War) ; Company C and 
Colonel. 20th Ohio Infantry; Colonel. Slst Ohio Infantry. 



OOO HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

John A. Mimdell, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Lewis E. Myers. Company H, l.i3rd Indiana Infantry. 

Solomon Myers, Company D. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Isaac Needham. Company G. 7th Indiana Cavalry: Company F, 7th Indiana Cavalry, 
re-organized. 

Joshua Needham. Company E. U)th Indiana Infantry: Company E, 20th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

William H. Nelson. Company E. Uyth Ohio Infantry: Company M. 13th Ohio Cav- 
alry. 

Peter Netz, Company A. .')4th Indiana Infantry (one year); Company D. 2nd Ohio 
Heavy Artillery. 

Eubebius A. L. Nixon, , 13th Indiana Battery. 

John J. Noftsinger. Company K. ISSth Ohio Infantry. 

David M. Painter. Company E. flth Indiana Cavalry. 

F'lemmon T. W. Painter. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years): Company 
F, 10th Indiana Cavalry. 

William M. Paty, Company C. 117th Indiana Infantry: Company D. 35th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Jesse Pearson, Company A. 19th Indiana Infantry: Company I. 2uth Indiana In- 
fantry, re-organized. 

Alfred M. Pence, Company H. lliith Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Pierce, Company H, Slth Indiana Infantry. 

Collier M. Reed, Company C. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Daniel Rent, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

George D. Rent. Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

John H. Rent. Company F. .57th Indiana Infantry. 

Levi Ricks, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Company H. Ifntli 
Indiana Infantry. 

Afred Riggs. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

William H. H. Rohrback. Company E, 1st Maryland Potomac Home Brigade In- 
fantry. 

George W. Sanders. . 25th Indiana Battery. 

Henry Saunders, Company H, 110th Indiana Infantry. 

Loveless Seward, Company B. 2nd Indiana Cavalry: Company B, 2nd Indiana Cav- 
alry, re-organized. 

Russell B. Sharp. Company F. (i(ith Ohio Infantry. 

Charles C. Shedron. Company H. 09th Indiana Infantry. 

John W. Sherry. Company H. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months) : Company D, 2nd 
Indiana Cavalry: Company I, Sth Regiment. 1st Ai-niy Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

William P. Sherry, Company K, 3i;th Indiana Infantry: Company H. 30th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

John M. Shoemaker. Company H. 09th Indiana Infantry. 

John P. Shoemaker. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Company 
B. 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Levi P. Shoemaker. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry j three years). 

John W. Shroyer. Company D. S^th Indiana Infantry. 

David Stewart, Company 'G, 17th Indiana Infantry. 

William K. Sweet. Company G. 40th Ohio Infantry: Company K. 51st Ohio Infantry. 

George W. Tarkleson. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Ethan S. Taylor, Company D. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Frederick Tykle. Company G and I, 4th Infantry V. S. A. (Mexican War) : Company 
B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three 
years); Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Cyrus Van Matre, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Company E. 
Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Joseph Walling. Company B. 134th Indiana Infantry. 



Noah W. Warner, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three monlhs): Comiiany H. 
(jyth Indiana Infantry. 

Jacob Warnock. Company C. luyth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company G, 
7th Indiana Cavalry. 

John R. Weaver, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

James H. Welsh, Assistant Surgeon U. S. A.; Assistant Surgeon lS.5th Ohio Infantry. 

William H. West. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); Company C. 
I(i9th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company F. 124tli Indiana Infantry. 

John W. Whitworth, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years i . 

Sanford Whitworth, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry: Company F, 7th Indiana 
Cavalry, re-organized. 

Robert H. Wilson. Company C. 15(ith Ohio Infantry. 

David E. Windsor. Company I, 99th Indiana Infantry, 

Richmond Wisehart. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

William Wisehart, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Albert N. Yost, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months) ; Company G, S4th 
Indiana Infantry; Company K. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph A. Young, Company C, l(J9th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company 
G, 7th Indiana Cavalry, 

Robert A. Young. Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry; Company H. 147th Indiana 
Infantry. 



662 hazzard's history of henry county. 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF GEORGE WASHINGTON RADER. 

SERGEANT. fOMPAN'i- K. 8tH INFANTRY REGIMENT. INDIANA X'OI.UNTEERS (THREE 

years). 

Jesse Rader, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Rockingham 
County, Virginia, March 4, 1806. In 1832 he was united in marriage with Diana 
Hoover, daughter of a wealthy farmer of Rockingham County. In 1835 they 
migrated to Indiana and entered one hundred acres of land in Henry County, 
immediately south of Middletown. Very little of the land was at that time 
cleared, most of it being heavily timbered. Middletown was then composed of a 
few log houses, a postoffice, blacksmith shop and a general store. The Raders 
commenced housekeeping in a log cabin but soon built a two-story house of 
hewed logs, and this in those early days was considered a rather pretentious 
dwelling. They both worked at clearing the farm and raising such produce as 
thev could dispose of, the nearest markets being Columbus and Cincinnati. Ohio. 

.\fter their land had been all cleared, forty acres of woodland were added to 
it and hcri' they cuitiiiued to reside, leading quiet and uneventful but honorable 
and useful livrs. I'liuy administered to the sick and assisted in the last rites to 
the dead, ciimfortcd those in trouble and exercised a broad charity that knew no 
distinction of person or creed. Churches and schools were few and scattered but 
their children received the best education the locality afforded and the home 
was thrown open to worshippers of God and was made the circuit rider's stopping 
place at which regular religious services were held. 

To the union of Jesse and Diana (Hoover) Rader were born four daughters 
and one son. Amanda, the oldest daughter, was married in 1852 to Robert R. 
Van Winkle, who lived in the Middletown neighborhood. He became a soldier 
of the Civil War, enlisting in Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. He was 
mustered into the service of the United States, as a private, August 19, 1862. and 
participated in all the marches, skirmishes and battles of his regiment until 
mustered out May 23, 1865. Sarah, the second daughter, was married in 1855 
to Dr. David Toops. Mary, the youngest daughter, was married in 1867 to 
IMadison Grose. The last named was a soldier of the Civil War, whose services 
are recounted more at length in connection with the life of his father. General 
William Grose, in the chapter of this History relating to General Officers. 

Mr. and j\Irs. Jesse Rader were members of the United Brethren Church 
and devout Christians. After the marriage of their daughters and the death of 
their only son in the Civil War, feeling themselves growing too old for the 
labors of the farm, they sold it and bought property in Middletown, where they 
retired for the remainder of their lives. Jesse Rader died in March, 1885. and 
his widow. Diana CHoover) Rader, died four years later, in ;\Iay, 1889. 

GEORGE ^^•.\SHINGrON RADER. 

George Washington Rader. the subject of this sketch, was the only son of 
Jesse and Diana (Hoover) Rader and was born on his parents' farm near Mid- 
dletown. Henry County, Indiana, August 17, 1841, where he grew to manhood, 
assisting in the work of the farm and receiving such education as the schools of 




7^, 5^d^T 



hazzard's history of kenry county. 663 

Middletown afiforded. On the threshold of maturity, he was met by the country's 
call to arms and with the ardor of youth, he plunged into that mighty struggle. 
He was active in recruiting and organizing what became Company E, 8th Indiana 
Infantry, three years' service, and was himself mustered into the service of the 
United States, as a Sergeant of that company, September 5, 1861. He was in ill 
health during much of his service in the army but never faltered in the perform- 
ance of duty. He participated in all the marches, skirmishes and battles of his 
regiment until the 22nd day of May, 1863, when, in the general assault on Vicks- 
burg, one of his legs was broken near the knee by a minie ball. He was taken 
to the hospital at the Furgasbn House where the leg was amputated. The injury 
was mortal and five days later, on May 27, 1863, he passed away and his remains 
were buried on the battlefield by his comrades. Thus ended the brave and youthful 
life of one who had been the hope and joy of his parents. 

After the war, when a grateful people established the National Cemetery at 
Mcksburg as a burial place for the honored dead who had fallen in the struggle 
for possession of that place, the remains of George Washington Rader were 
removed from their original burial place and reinterred in the National Cemetery, 
in Section G, Grave No. 4965. 

When the armed hosts of the nation had conquered peace, his returned com- 
rades remembered the gallant young soldier and perpetuated his memory in the 
name of the George W. Rader Post. No. 119, Grand .\rmy of the Republic. 

W II.I.IAM J. IIIIJ.IGOSS. 

Connected with the Rader family by marriage was that meritorious soldier 
of the Civil War. William J- Hilligoss. He was of German-Scotch ancestry but 
was himself born in Rush County, Indiana, October 3, 1837. He removed to 
Madison County, Indiana, with his father, where he worked on the farm and 
was educated in the district schools and at the jMarion Academy. 

During the Civil War, he enlisted in Company G, 75th Indiana, Infantry, and 
was mustered into the service of the United States, as a Sergeant of the company, 
July 28, 1862. His regiment was brigaded with the 87th and loist Indiana 
Infantry, constitutijig the famous "Indiana Brigade." which was the 2nd Brigade, 
3rd Division, 14th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland. He participated with 
his regiment in the TuUahoma Campaign and the march towards Chattanooga and 
was wounded at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863. During the Atlanta 
Campaign, he especially distinguished himself. He participated in Sherman's 
"March to the sea," and the campaign through the Carolinas and the final events 
of the war. April 26, 1364, he was promoted First Lieutenant of his company 
and was mustered out of the service June 8, 1865. 

In August, 1862, a few days after his enlistment in the army, he was united 
in marriage with Elizabeth Rader, the third daughter of Jesse and Diana 
(Hoover) Rader. _ After his return from the war, they resided at Middletown, 
where for six years Mr. Hilligoss was engaged in business. They then moved 
to Bluffton, Wells County, where he practiced law. In 1877 he took charge of 
the Huntington Democrat, as business manager and editor but sold out the 
business in 1885. In 1882 he was elected to the Indiana State Senate from the 
district composed of Huntington and Wells counties. In politics he had been a 



664 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Republican until 1872 when, in common with many others, during the Hberal 
movement of that time, he joined tlie Democrats. In 1886 JMr. HilHgoss bought 
an interest in the Anderson Herald and moved with his family to that city. He 
was in charge of the paper for a short time only, for in December. 1886, he 
was appointed Chief of the Eastern Division, in the Pension Department, Wash- 
ington City, where they went to live. In 1889 Mr. and Mrs. Hilligoss. returned 
to Indiana, .where he bought an interest in the Muncie Herald and afterwards 
engaged in the law and real estate business in that city until his death which 
occurred January 19, 1901. 

During their residence at Middietown, Henry County, two daughters were 
l)orn to Mr. and ^Irs. Hilli.goss. Luetta, the younger daughter, was married in 
January, 1887, to W. G. !\IcEdward. an official of the Erie Railroad. In June 
of the same year, the elder daughter, De Lenna, died in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Hilligoss was, during his later years, greatly interested in the cause of 
temperance and religion. He was an earnest and devout member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Oiurch. Upon his death, the funeral ceremonies were helcl in that 
church under the auspices of the Masonic Fraternity and the Grand Army of 
the Republic, of both of which organizations he was a member. His remains were 
interred at Anderson. 

HARMON R.\YL POST. XO. 360, G, A. R.. SPICELAXD. IXDTAX.V. 

Harmon Rayl Post, Xo. 360, Department of Indiana. Grand .\rmv of the 
Republic, was organized and instituted at Spiceland, Henr\- County, Indiana. 
June 17, 1884, and was mustered in by Colonel Edward H. Wolfe, of Joel Wolfe 
Post, X'o. 81. Rushville. Rush County, Indiana, assisted by Thomas J. Lindley. 
of Lookout Post. X'o. 133, Noblesville, Hamilton County. Indiana. The 
Post was named for and in honor of Harmon Rayl, late of Com- 
pany A, 36th Indiana Infantr\-, a sketch of whose life and military service is full\- 
set -forth at the conclusion of this article. 

The following named comrades were present at the organization and became 
charter members of the Post, viz: Samuel Berry, Jesse Bunker., John F. Camplin. 
George W. Conrad, Francis M. Crull, James Davy, Martin Deem, John Eastridge. 
Hugh L. English, Alpheus Fawcett, Andrew Fifer, Nathan Foster, Qarkson 
Gordon, John N. Leamon, William H. Lewis, Charles H. C. Moore, Louis P. 
;\loore, William A. Pate. William 'Reynolds. William Rhinewalt, Xelson G. Smith. 
John .\. Spencer, Thomas M. Swain and Thomas P.. A'an Dyke. 

The regular meetings of the I'ost are held on the first and third Saturday 
nights of each month. 

In February. 1892. the records, paraphernalia and other property of the 
Post were destroyed by fire. There has been no sergeant major nor quartermaster 
sergeant of this Post since the fire, which is no doubt owing to the small member- 
ship of the Post and for this reason neither of these officers is enumerated in the 
history of the Post. The fire, unfortunate and disastrous as it was, did not dispel 
the ardor of its members. The ruins which they sadl\- contemplated only served 
to give them fresh strength and from that fatal hour down to the present time, 
the Post has kept its loyalty and integrity of purpose and today, though small in 



iIA7,ZAR[?S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 6(>5 

minibers. it ranks in comparative strens^th with any other Post in the De])artment 
^)t Indiana. 

Tlic followini;- were the Post officers from the organization in 1884 down tn 
anil inchidini;- the vear 1904. The names nf aU of the officers are arranged 
alphabetically. 

CCI.MM ANDERS. 

George P. Beaeh, James \V. Black, William L. Cooper, Alphens Fawcett. Nathan 
Foster. Clarkson Gordon, Micajah C. Gordon. Erie Lamb, Eli F. Millikan, Frank Millis, 
William Rhinewalt, Albert W. Saint. .John A. Spencer. Thomas E. Taylor. .Johnson A. 
White. Richmond Wisehart. 

SKNIOI! \ ICK IdXr M.VNDK.RS. 

George P. Beach, Wesley Copeland. John N. Leamon, Frank Millis, Peter Rifner, 
John A. Spencer, Thomas E. Taylor. 

.irXIOli VU'K COMM.WDKRS. 

William D. Ball. James Davy, Alpheus Fawcett, Nathan Foster. Erie Lamb, Peter 
Rifner, John A, Spencer, Thomas E. Taylor. 



William D, Ball, George P. Beach, John Eastridge, Andrew J. Spron,g. Rol)ert A. 
ith. Thomas E. Taylor, Johnson A. White. 



James W. Black, William A. Darling, Clarkson Gordon, Erie 
Smith, 



Clarkson Gordon. Eli F. Millikan, Peter Rifner. 

<(i'.\r.TKini.\sTi:i!s. 

George P. Beach. James W, Black, Clarkson Gordon, 

OFKICKKS (IF TIIK r>.\V. 

Alpheus Fawcett. Nathan Foster. 



Wesley Copeland. John Eastridge. William Jenkins, Erie Lamb, John Millis, John 
A. Spencer. Thomas E. Taylor. 

(The fore.going record of officers is from and imlnding the meeting held in John 
Eastridge's harness shop, March 26. 1S92. and ilic nicciini; held in the street. May 14. 1892. 
Officers for 1892 not given, the records havini; lieen de^^noyed by tire. The commanders, 
however, are given from the organization of tlie Post, the same having been compiled 
from the records of the Department Assistant Adjutant General at Indianapolis). 

OFFICKHS FOK THE YEAR 1905. 

Commander. Erie Lamb; Senior Vice Commander, Thomas E. Taylor; Junior Vice 
Commander. Frank Millis; Surgeon, Orville W. Hobbs; Chaplain, James W. Black; Adju- 
tant, Eli F, Millikan; Quartermaster. Clarkson Gordon; Officer of the Day. Nathan Fos- 
ter; Officer of the Guard, John A. Spencer. 

The following is believed to be a complete list or roster of all who have been 
xjr are now, members of the Post. In the several alphabetical lists of 
soldiers and sailors, set out elsewdiere in this History, will be t'ound a 



666 hazzard's history of henry county. 

more detailed statement of the service in the Army and Xavv of each comrade who 
is entitled to further mention in the History of Henry County. 

POST MEMBERS. 

Alexander Abernathy, Company (}. 21st Indiana Infantry; Company M, 9th Indiana 
Calvary. 

William T. Addison, Company U, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

William D. Ball, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

George P. Beach. Company A, Stith Indiana Infantry. 

David W. Berry, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel Berry, Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

James W. Black, Company B. 18Hth Indiana Infantry: Company H. 147th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Seely A. Black, Company C. .57lh Indiana Infantry. 

Wsley R. Brandon, Company B, 71st Ohio Infantry. 

Francis M. Brown, Company F, 1st U. S. Sharpshooters. 

George R. Bundy. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Jesse Bunker, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry: Company C. 147th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Zachariah Burden, Company F, Sth U. S. C. T. 

Cary Campbell, . Record Incomplete in this Historq. 

John F. Camplin, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

William H. Chance. . Record incomplete in this History. 

Joel Collins, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

George W. Conrad, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry; Company H, 30th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Eli Coon, Company H, 72nd Indiana Infantry; Company A, 44th Indiana Infantry. 

John Coon, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

William L. Cooper, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raidl; Company 
A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Wesley Copeland. Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas J. Cox. Company I. 37th Indiana Infantry. 

Francis M. Crull, Company H, Sth Iowa Infantry; Company E. 106th Indiana In- 
fantry (Morgan Raid). 

William A. Darling. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry; Company H, 147th Indi- 
ana Infantry. 

James Davy. Company C. 47th Indiana Infantry. 

Martin Deem. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Marshall Dill, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

John Eastridge, Company G, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Hugh L. English, Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Alpheus Fawcett. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry; Company H, 140th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Andrew Fifer, Company B. 89th Indiana Infantry. 

Nathan Foster, Company I. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Frederick E. Glidden. Company I. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Truman Goldsbary. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Clarkson Gordon, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry; Company A, 4th Regiment. 
1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Micajah C. Gordon, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas Gray, , 4th Indiana Battery. 

William C. Hall, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas S. Haugh, Company K, 52nd Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

John R. Henry, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Branson Hiatt, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); . 

4th Indiana Battery. 

Orville W. Hobbs, Company (J. 133rd Indiana Infantry. 

William Jenkins, Company K, 14th U. S. C. T. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 667 

John D. Julian, Company C, Stith Indiana Infantry. 

John Kirby, Company E and H, 92nd Ohio Infantry. 

Allen M. Kirk. Company B, 98th Ohio Infantry. 

Brie Lamb, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas Lawrence, Company C, 28th U. S. C. T. 

John N. Leanion, Company B, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

James J. Lewis, . Record incomplete in this History. 

William H. Lewis, Company A, 3«th Indiana Infantry. 

Wlllard H. Loring, . Record incomplete in this History. 

Dwight G. Loucks, Company H, 112th New York Infantry. 

Lambert JMacy, , ISlh Indiana Battery. 

William H. Macy, Company D, Sfith Indiana Infantry. 

Kli P. Millikan, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Frank Millis, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Henry Modlin. Company C, 28th U. S. C. T. 

Sonney Modlin, Company B, 2Sth U. S. C. T. 

Charles H. C. Moore. Company A. 3(ith Indiana Infantry: Company K. 11th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Josiah B. Moore, Company A, 3iith Indiana Infantry: Company H. SOth Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Louis P. Moore, Company K. tiTth Illinois Infantry: Company A, 139th Indiana 
Infantry. 

William B. Newby, Company D. 3t;th Indiana Infantry. 

King Outland, Company A, 2Sth U. S. C. T. 

William A. Pate, Company H, (JBth Indiana Infantry, 

Amos E. Pennington, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Com- 
pany A, ISath Indiana Infantry. 

Albert W. Poarch, Company D, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Henry C. Powell, , 22nd Indiana Battery, 

Amos Ray, . Record incomplete in this History. 

Henry C. Reece. Company B, 3rd North Carolina Infantry. 

William Reynolds, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

William Rhinewalt, , 18th Indiana Battery. 

Peter Rifner, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry; Troop G, Gth Cavalry. U. S. A. 

Albert W. Saint, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Nelson G. Smith, Company F, 99th Indiana Infantry; Company F. 48th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Robert A. Smith, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
David Spencer, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

John A. Spencer, Company D, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Andrew J. Sprong, Company G. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

James M. Starbuck. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Benjamin A. Stewart, Company C, 82nd Indiana Infantry. 

John Stigleman. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas M. Swain, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry: Company A, 139th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Thomas E. Taylor. Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year) : Company B, 21st 
Indiana Infantry re-organized as 1st Heavy Artillery. 

William Trail, Company I, 28th U. S. C. T. 

Nathan Upham, Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas B. Van Dyke, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Johnson A. White, Company E, 87th Ohio Infantry. 

Henry B. Wiggins, Company K, 37th Indiana Infantry. 

Richmond Wisehart. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

John R. Winkler, Company C, Sth Kentucky Infantry. 

Isaac N. Wright, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

James S. Young. Company I. 84th Indiana Infantry: Company K, 57th Indiana 
Infantry. 



668 HAZZ.VRU'S lllSTOKV OF HEXRV COUNTY. 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF HARMOX RAVL. . 

PRIVATE, COMPANY A. 36TH INFANTRY RF.C.IMENT. TNIllAN A \()H-NTEERS. 

Harmon Ravi was born in Guilford County, North Carolina. October 4. 
1839. and in earlv childhood came with his parents, Zadoc and Delilah Ravi, to 
Henry County, where he grew to manhood, working on his father's farm, two 
miles southwest of Spiceland. He attended the country and town schools during 
the Winter months and obtained a fair education for the time in which he lived. 
Having become of age a short time prior to the memorable Presidential contest 
of i860, he had the privilege of casting his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. 

In the Summer of the following year, when President Lincoln called for 
three hundred thousand volunteers, Harmon Rayl became aroused to the gigantic 
nature of the struggle to preserve the L'nion and resolved to give all the aid 
within his power to the President, whom he had helped to elect. He enlisted in 
Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry, on September 16. 1861, and participated in 
all the campaigns of that noted regiment up to and including the battle of Lookout 
Mountain, Tennessee. Here he was greatly exposed to the inclemency of the 
weather and subjected to such terrible hardships during the campaign, that he- 
was at last taken ill with brain fever, which terminated his life at \Miitcsidcs. 
Tennessee. December 18, 1863. 

His remains were brought iKmie and interred in the old cemetery at Spice- 
land. .^ suitable monument marks the last resting place of this genial, whole- 
souled and patriotic young man. He was a favorite in his social circle, a brave 
soldier and the light and life of the camp. He yielded up his life, at the age of 
twenty four years, for the preservation of the L'nion. 

When the Spiceland Post. Grand Army of the Republic, was instituted, it 
was unanimously agreed to name it Harmon Rayl Post, in honor of the comrade 
who had shed such lustre upon the annals of his township. 

.\n excellent picture of the deceased was presented to the Post b\' his father. 
Zaddc Ravi, hut it was destroyed in the fire which consunie<l the property of the 
Post in 1802. 

Surviving Harmon Rayl, there remain of his family, .\lpheus Rayl. a bnither, 
and Mrs. Thomas K. ?ilillikan, a sister, living at Spiceland, and Clarkson Rayl, 
another brother, who resides at Carmel. Hamilton County. Imliana. 

HEXRY COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF A'ETERANS 
OF THE CRTL WAR. 

Late in the year igo2. the George W. Lennard Post, ("irand .\rniy of the_ 
Republic, gf New Castle, conceived the idea of a county association of veterans 
of the Civil War, with the double purpose of recruiting and strengthening the 
Grand Army and of getting better acquainted with each other, and keeping in 
closer touch than they had heretofore been able to do. 

It was argued in the Post that many soldiers in the county belonged to 
organizations so widelv scattered as to make it impracticable for them to ever 
meet in regiment.al or battery re-union with their own comrades and that they 




0/^i>7^7^t<yyi' 5^^?^/^ 



iiazzard's history of henry countv. 669 

were for that reason liable to drop out and be lost sight of altogether. It was 
expected that this association would take care of all such soldiers, know who they 
were, where the}- were and, if they should die or remove from the county, the 
\-ice-president of the township in which they lived would report such fact to the ' 
secretary of the association. In this way a complete record would be kept of evcrv 
soldier in the county. 

The argument was so convincing that a committee consisting of William 1!. 
Cock, Thomas W. Gronendyke and Henry C. Elliott was appointed to call a 
meeting. Invitations were issued and the call published in all of the county papers 
and on Saturday, November 22, 1902, the first meeting was held. The day was 
an unfavorable one, a rainstorm keeping many away. However, eighty four 
comrades registered, which, under the circumstances, was considered very en- 
couraging. 

William B. Bock called the meeting to order and stated the object of assemb- 
ling. Thomas W. Gronendyke was elected temporary President and Henry C. 
l'311iott. Secretary. A committee on organization and nomination of officers, con- 
sisting of Albert W. Saint, Joseph M. Lacy, Samuel W. Overman, Harvey B. 
Chew and John H. Templin, was appointed to report after dinner. A number of 
short speeches, favorable to the new movement, made by different comrades, 
provoked such enthusiasm that success was assured. Adjournment was then 
had to the Knights of Pythias Hall where the ladies of the Women's Relief Corps 
had prepared a grand banquet. The comrades all repaired there and soon con- 
vinced the ladies that their efforts were appreciated. 

The afternoon session was called to order at i 130 o'clock and the committee 
on organization reported as follows : 

"We recommend that this organization be known as the 'Henry County 
.\ssociation of Veterans of the Civil War,' and that the officers consist of a Presi- 
dent, a Secretary, and a Vice-President from each township in the county, and 
that we hold meetings annually : that we also recommend Thomas W. Gronendyke 
for President, to serve one year, and Henry C. Elliott for Secretary, to serve for 
a like period, and that we recommend the follnwing \ice-Presidents for the 
several townships : 

Blue River Township Henry H. Moore. 

Dudley Township Joseph M. Lacy. 

Fall Creek Township ; Jacob Warnock. 

Franklin Township John F. Camplln. 

Greensboro Township Harvey B. Chew. 

Harrison Township , John W. McCormack. 

Henry Township 'William M. Pence. 

Jefferson Township John W. Whitworth. 

Liberty Township John Perry. 

Prairie Township John A. Powers. 

Spiceland Township Erie Lamb. 

Stony Creek Township John H. Templin. 

Wayne Township Samuel W. Overman." 

(7)n motion of Leander S. Dcnius, the report of the committee was adopted 
and a collection, sufficient to defra\- expenses, was taken u|i. The exercises of the 
day followed, consisting of recitations b\- the Misses Helen Gronendvke, Edvthe 



670 HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

King and Harriet Xardin. a song by Edith Gronendyke, and short but lively 
speeches, after the manner of camp fire talks, by David T. King, Caleb Lamb, 
fSenjamin A. Stewart, George Hazzard (author of this History) and others. On 
motion of Mahlon D. Harvey, a vote of thanks was tendered the young ladies for 
their songs and recitations, after which the meeting adjourned to meet on the call 
of the President. 

The "bean supper," prepared by the Women's Relief Corps, was well 
patronized by the comrades and citizens generally and all left with the feeling that 
the initial meeting had been a grand success. 

The second meeting of the association was held in the G. A. R. Hall, New 
Castle, on Tuesday. October 6, 1903. At this meeting one hundred ex-soldiers 
registered. President Thomas W. Gronendyke called the meeting to orde*- at 
10 :30 o'clock and the session was opened with an invocation by Chaplain David 
T. King, after which the President appointed the following committee on resolu- 
tions : Albert W. Saint, of Henry Township ; James M. Mercer, of Liberty Town- 
ship ; John W. ?iIcCormack, of Harrison Township ; Clarkson Gordon, of Spice- 
land Township, and Jacob Warnock, of Fall Creek Township. He also appointed 
the following committee on nominations : Eli F. Millikan, of Spiceland Township ; 
Leonard H. Craig, of Prairie Township, and Isaac N. Wright, of Dudlev Town- 
ship. 

Elihu T. Mendenhall made a motion that a committee be appointed to present 
the matter of a county soldiers' monument to the Board of County Commissioners 
and the County Council, which was adopted and Elihu T. Mendenhall, Erie Lamb, 
Jacob Warnock, Pearson Loer and John W. Whitworth were appointed as such 
committee, after si^eeches favorable to the project had been made by Richmond 
Wisehart. Pearson Loer, 'Leander M. James and Joseph M. Brown. The meet- 
ing was then entertained with musical selections by George M. Barnard and 
Miss Mary Smith. The ladies of the Methodist Church served an excellent 
dinner in the Knights of Pythias Hall, which was heartily complimented by all. 
A goodly number of citizens honored the association with their presence and 
took a lively interest in the proceedings. 

At the afternoon session, the committee on resolutions made the following- 
report : 

"Resolved, by the Henry County Association of A'eterans of the Civil War. 
that we favor a continuance of this organization of old soldiers to the end that 
we- may keep in touch with each other, renew acquaintances formed in other 
years and insist that' justice be done our comrades in the way of more liberal 
pensions. 

"Resolved, that we favor a pension of not less than twelve dollars per month 
for all honorably discharged L'nion soldiers and sailors who have reached the age 
of sixty years and who served not less than ninety days, and that a like pension 
be allowed to the widows of such soldiers and sailors, provided they did not 
marry said soldier later than June 27, 1890. 

"Resolved, that we urge our senators and representatives in Congress to do 
all in their power to secure this much needed legislation for worthy comrades 
who can never get justice under the existing laws. 

"Resolved, that the thanks of this association be tendered the members of the 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 6/1 

Kniohts of Pythias Lodge for the use of their magnificent hall in which to hold 
its meetings'; to George j\I. Barnard and Miss Mary Smith for the musical enter- 
tainment, and to any and all others who aided in carrying out a most successful 
]irogram." 

The committee on nomination,s reported in favor of Henry C. Elliott for 
President and Albert ^^■. Saint for Secretary, each to serve for one year, which 
was concurred in by the meeting. 

The session was brought to a close with short speeches, songs and hand- 
shaking among the comrades. 

The third and last meeting recorded in this History was held in the Court 
House, New Castle, Tuesday, October ii, 1904. The announcement that Daniel 
R. Lucas, Department Commander of the G. A. R., would be present served to 
call out a large crowd of citizens as well as ex-soldiers anxious to honor him 
by their presence. The attendance of veterans reached high water mark at this 
meeting, one hundred and ten affixing their names to the register, but the shaky 
signatures told only too plainly of advancing age and feeble bodies. It may be 
remarked that a goodly number of comrades, living within sight of the Court 
House, were by reason of wounds or other disabilities imable to meet their old 
comrades at this annual gathering. 

The meeting was called to order at one o'clock by President Henry C. Elliott 
and the session opened with an invocation by Department Commander, Daniel R. 
Lucas. The Secretary, Albert ^^'. Saint, read tlie minutes of the last meeting 
which were approved, and a committee on resolutions was appointed consisting of 
Thomas P. Wilkinson, John W. Whitworth anrl John Thornburgh. A Vice- 
President for each township was named as follows : 

Blue River Township Henry C. Bridget. 

Dudley Township Joseph M. Lacy. 

Fall Creek Township Benjamin H. Davis. 

Franklin Township John F. Camplin. 

Greensboro Township Exum Copeland. 

Harrison Township Philander Lowery. 

Henry Township John Thornburgh. 

Jefferson Township John W. AVhitworth. 

Liberty Township ,. . . .James M. Mercer. 

Prairie Township William Frazier. 

Spiceland Township George P. Beach. 

Stony Creek Township Franklin W. Murray. 

Wayne Township Clinton D. Hawhee. 

These vice-presidents were instructed to report to the secretary any deaths 
or removals in their respective townships. 

The financial report of the secretarv showed a balance on hand of $1.15 from 
the meeting of the previous year. \ committee on nominations consisting of. 
Robert A. Smith, Elihu T. Mendenhall and John Lockridge was appointed. The 
committee appointed at the preceding session to confer with the Board of County 
Commissioners and the County Council with regard to aid in erecting a monument 
to our soldier dead, reported that nothing had as yet been accomplished, owing 
chiefly to the expense incurred in building the new addition to the Court House, 
but that the officials were friendly to the proposition and hoped soon to be in 
shape to aid this much desired object, whereupon the committee was continued. 



672 hazzakd's history of henry county. 

The chief attraction of this meeting of veterans was the address of Daniel R. 
Lucas, who proved himself a forceful speaker, a good singer of patriotic songs 
and a capital stor}- teller. His strong appeal to the veterans to he loyal to each 
other and to the Grand Army will, no doubt, aid materiall\- in increasing the 
membership of the organization. 

The committee on nominations recommended Robert A. Smith, of Knights- 
town,, for President and Albert W. Saint, of New Castle, for Secretary, which 
action of the committee was concurred in. 

The committee on resolutions made the following report : 

"After a fair trial of the merits of this organization of the veteran soldiers 
of Henry County, it is with pleasure that your committee recommends its con- 
tinuance until the day and the hour when all of the Cnion ex-soldiers of the 
county shall have passed away. The organization has fulfilled the fondest hopes 
of "its friends and its several meetings have resulted in strengthening and cement- 
ing the ties of comradeship. In the fullness of our hearts, realizing the good 
of such an organization in this county, we unite in recommending other counties 
to go and do likewise. 

■"And it is further resolved, that we reiterate our belief that a pension of 
not less than twelve dollars per month should be granted to all honorably dis- 
charged soldiers and sailors who have reached the age of sixty years and that a 
like pension should be granted to their widows, and that we heartily appmve 
President Roosevelt's pension order. Number 78. 

"Resolved also, that we continue to urge our National Legislature to do all 
and everything to aid and assist ex-soldiers of the Union, by strengthening our 
present pension laws and making them more liberal in their intent and purpose." 

The third session of annual meetings then came to a close with the singing 
of patriotic songs. 

The following is a list of the members with their addresses, who have at- 
tended the several meetings of the association. It is believed that it comprises at 
least two-thirds of all the ex-soldiers now living in the county. Where the 
address is in Henry County, the State is omitted. An asterisk '■' denotes those 
who are known to have died since joining the association. 

Mathew V. Abbott. New Castle. Company A. 35th Iowa Infantry. 

William T. Addison, New Castle. Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Miles E. Anderson, New Castle. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Samuel Arnold, New Castle. Company G, 5th Ohio Cavalry. 

Henry C. Bateman, Lewisville. Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

George P. Beach, Spiceland. Company A, 30!th Indiana Infantry. 

*WilIiam S. Bedford, New Castle. Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

bate Bell, Mlddletown. Company F, 53rd Kentucky Infantry. 

Benjamin F. Benbow. Sulphur Springs. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Benjamin Bitner. New Castle. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

.lames Wesley Black, New Castle, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry; Company 
H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

William B. Bock. New Castle. Company G. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

William F. Boor. New Castle. Major and Surgeon, 4th Indiana Cavalry. Brigade 
Surgeon, 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the puniberland. 

David Bowers, Sulphur Springs. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

John W. Brattain, New Castle. Company E, 34th Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 673 

George Brenneman, New Castle. Company H, li'Jth Indiana Infantry. 

Henry C. Bridget, Mooreland. Company G, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

George H. Brown, New Castle. Company B, 89th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph M. Brown, New Castle. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) ; 
Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

William Brunner, New Castle. Company H, 100th Indiana Infantry. 

Martin L. Bundy, New Castle, Major and Paymaster and Brevet Liemenant Colonel 
U. S. Volunteers. 

.William Bunnell, New Castle. Fremont's Body Guard. Company D. Benton Cadets, 
Missouri Volunteers; Company D, 39th Ohio Infantry. 

Thomas J. Butchett, New Castle. Company G, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years): 
Company H, 74th Ohio Infantry. 

Milton Burk, New Castle. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

George Burton, New Castle. Company H, 3rd Indiana Infantry (Jle.xican War); 
Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized; Company B. llMih Indiana Infantry 
(Morgan Raid), New Castle Guards, Indiana Legion. 

George H. Cain, New Castle. Company B. Sth Indiana Infanlry (three months); 
Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

John F. Camplin, Lewisville. Company D, 30th Indiana Infantry. 

Solomon F. Carter, New Castle, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

David W. Chambers, New Castle. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months I ; 
Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Harvey B. Chew, Kennard. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company E, 9th 
Regiment. 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

John R. Clevenger, Cadiz. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Thaddeus Coffin, New Castle. Company G and Regimental Band, 2:ird Ohio Infantry.. 

Joel Collins, Greensboro. Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Allen W. Coon, Cadiz. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Kxum Copeland, Greensboro. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company A. 
105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

William T. Corya, New Castle. Company D, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Leonard H. Craig, New Castle. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid ) ; Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel Craig, Cadiz. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry 1 three years). 

William J. C. Crandall, New Castle. Company G. 1st Tennessee Infantry. 

Gilliam L. Craven, New Castle. Company B. 89th Indiana Infantry. 

Amos Crawford, Knightstown. Company C, 91st Illinois infantry. 

Benjamin Crawford, Losantville, Indiana. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

William C. Crawford, New Lisbon. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry; Company 
H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

James Cummins, Daleville, Indiana. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Benjamin H. Davis, Middletown. Company C, 1 55th Indiana Infantry. 

David F. Davis, Marion, Indiana. Fremont's Body Guard. Company B, Benton 
Cadets, Missouri Volunteers; Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

John Davis, Middletown. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Sedley A. Deem, Knightstown. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Leander S. Denius, New Castle. Regimental Band, 35th Ohio Infantry; Company 
G. 156th Ohio Infantry. 

Francis Dovey, Knightstown. 19th Indiana Battery. 

David Dowell, New Castle. Company C, 12th Missouri Cavalry. 

William Downs, Mount Summit. Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Daniel Davidson Duncan. Knightstown. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry 
(Morgan Raid); Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Richard J. Edleman. New Castle. 12th Indiana Battery. 

Austin M. Edwards. Knightstown. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Henry C. Elliott, New Castle. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 



6/4 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Company F and Adjutant. 57th Indiana Infantry; Lieutenant Colonel. llSth Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Isaac W. Ellis, New Castle, Company C, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Joseph H. Fadely, Honey Creek. Company G, Hilst Indiana Infantry (Spanish- 
American War). 

Alpheus P'awcett, Spiceland. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry: Company H, 
140th Indiana Infantry. 

James L. Filson, New Lisbon. Company (i, Kilst Indiana Infantry (Spanish- 
American War), 

William Ford, Ashland. U. S. Navy. 

Nathan Foster. Spiceland. Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

William Frazier. New Castle, Company G, 29th Iowa Infantry. 

William J. Frazier. New Castle. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph Gilbert. New Lisbon. Company G, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

*William Gillgeese, Sulphur Springs. Company K, 2.5th Illinois Infantry: Sth 
Battery Wisconsin Light Artillery, 

Jonathan J, Ginn, Middletown, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Clarkson Gordon, Spiceland. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company A, 
4th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancocks Veteran CorpsL 

Thaddeus H. Gonion, Company F, 3(ith Indiana Infantry. 

Jacob M. Gough, New Castle. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

William C. Goudy, New Castle. Company I. 32nd Ohio Infantry. 

Thomas W. Gronendyke, New Castle. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry; Com- 
pany K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid), 

Joseph G, Gustin, Middletown. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry, 

Miles Hagiiewood, New Castle, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry, 

Patrick H, Hansard, Cadiz, Company F, 14th U, S, C. T. 

i-'rank W, Harris, Kennard. Company L. 38th Infantry, U. S. V. (Spanish-Ameri- 
can War). 

*Thomas L. Hartley. Oakville, Indiana, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry, 

John R, Harvey, New Castle, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company A. 
110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry, 

Mahlon D. Harvey, New Castle. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry, 

Nathan H. Haskett. Knightstown. Company G, Sth Indiana Cavalry. 

Clinton D. Hawhee, Knightstown. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

George Hazzard, (Author of this History), Tacoma, Washington. Company C. 36th 
Indiana Infantry. 

AVaitsel M. Heaton, Knightstown. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three 
months); Company A and Sergeant Major, 139th Indiana Infantry: Company A, 105th 
Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid), 

White Heaton, Kni.ghtstown. 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Henry H. Henderson, New Castle. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three 
months); Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Joel Hendricks, Kennard. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Samuel M. Hockersmith, New Castle. Company D, 47th Ohio Infantry. 

David Hoover, New Castle. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Daniel Hoppis, New Castle, Company A, 19th Indiana Infantry: Company I, 20th 
Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

William House, New Lisbon, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Company A. 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized, 

Thomas I, Howren. New Castle, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Presley E. Jackson, Kennard. Company K, 47th Indiana Infantry. 

John James, Knightstown. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry, 

Leander M, James, New Castle. Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Adam Kendall. New Castle. Company K, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Amos J. Kern, Greensboro. Company B, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 675 

John E. Keys, Knightstown. Company B, 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

David T. King, New Castle. Company I, 7th Illinois Cavalry. 

Andrew F. Kraner. New Castle. Company G, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months) : 
Company K, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Joseph M. Lacy, New Lisbon. Company I, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Alfred Lafferty, Cadiz. Honorary member of the Cadiz G. A. R. Post on account 
of his having been body servant in the Civil War to Colonel George W. Jackson, Sth 
Indiana Cavalry. 

Caleb Lamb, Greensboro. Company A, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Krie Lamb, Spieeland. Company D, 'itith Indiana Infantry. 

John C. Livezey. New Castle. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Captain and 
Commissary of Subsistence, U. S. Volunteers; Brevet Major, U. S. Volunteers. 

John Lockridge, Shirley. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Pearson Loer, New Castle. Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Michael Longnecker, Springport. Company B, 11th Ohio Infantry; Company B, 
94th Ohio Infantry. 

Philander Lowery, Cadiz. Company P, .57th Indiana Infantry. 

Philip Lowery, New Castle. Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Daniel R. Lucas, Indianapolis, Indiana. Chaplain. 99tli Indiana Infantry. 

Jackson McCormack, Crawfordsville, Indiana. Comp.any H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

John W. McCormack, Cadiz. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Josiah McCormack, Kennard. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Noah McCormack, Knightstown. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph McKee. Sulphur Springs. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry; Company K, 
105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

William H. Macy. New Castle. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Elihu T. Mendenhall, New Castle. Company A, 101st Indiana Infantry. 

James M. Mercer, New Lisbon. Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Peter Michels, New Castle. Company K, 72nd Ohio Infantry. 

Wilson C. Middaugh, New Castle. Company C, 1st Michigan Infantry; Company 
.M, Sth Michigan Cavalry. 

Eli F. Millikan, Spieeland. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

David Modlin, New Castle. " Company B, 2Sth U. S. C. T. 

Henry H. Moore, Mooreland. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Josiah B. Moore, Spieeland. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Company H, 30th 
Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Louis N. Moore, New Castle. Company K, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Hugh L. Mullen, New Castle, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Franklin W. Murray. Blountsville. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*John C. Murray, New Castle. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Alkanah C. Neff. Honey Creek. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Peter Netz, Sulphur Springs. Company A. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year); Com 
pany D, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery. 

James I. Newby, New Castle. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Nathan Nicholson. New Castle. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel W. Overman, Shirley. Company B. 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

John Palmer. Winchester, Indiana. U. S. Navy; Company B, 34th New Jersey 
Infantry. 

Franklin N. Pence, Pendleton. Indiana. Company (.;, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

William M. Pence. New Castle. U. S. Navy. 

John Perry, New Castle. Company A. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Robert F. Poer, Knightstown. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Henr.v L. Powell. New Castle. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

John A. Powers, Springport. Company H. 154th Indiana Infantry. 

Elijah M. Pressnall. New Castle. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid): Company A, 30tli Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 



O/O HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

*John M. Redding, New Castle. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Collier M. Reed, Middletown. Company C, 8th Indana Infantry (three months i. 

William Reynolds, Lewisville. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Feter Rifner, Spiceland. Coinpi;ny 1. S4th Indiana Infantry: Troop G. (jth Cavalry. 
U. S. A. 

Levi Ricks, New Castle. Company K. ItJoth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Com- 
pany H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Isaac Roberts, Knightstown. Company K, SUth Indiana Infantry. 

Leonidas Rodgers, New Castle. Company C. 16th Ohio Infantry; Regimental Band. 
13th Missouri Infantry; Company E, 152nd Ohio Infantry. 

William H. H. Rohrback, Sulphur Springs. Company E. 1st Maryland Poiomac 
Home Brigade Infantry. 

S. A. RoUin, Indianapolis, Indiana. 71st Ohio Infantry. 

William J. Runyan, New Castle. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Albert W. Saint, New Castle. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Horace M. Saint, Greensboro. Company H, 3rd Battalion, 16th Infantry U. S. A 
re-organized as Company H, 34th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Charles C. Shedron, Middletown. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

George W. Shelley, New Castle. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Henry W. Simmons, Springport. Company A. 3Sth Indiana Infantry. 

James H. Smith, New Castle. Company A, 87th Indiana Infantry; Company .-V. 
42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Joseph Smith, New Castle. Record incomplete in this History. 

Robert A. Smith, Knightstown. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

John A. Spencer, Spiceland. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Benjamin A. Stewart, Dunreith. Company C, 82nd Indiana Infantry. 

John Stigleman, Spiceland. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

William Sullivan, Dublin, Indiana. Company G. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Samuel V. Swearingen. Mooreland. Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

John H. Templin. Losantville, Indiana. Company I, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

John Thornburg, New Castle, Lieutenant and Quartermaster. 4th Indiana Cavalr;. 

William Trail, Kennard, Company I, 2Sth U. S. C. T. 

Moab Turner, New Castle. Company I. 4th Tennessee Infantry, re-organized as l^i 
Tennessee Cavalry. 

Richard H. H. Tyner, Knightstown. Company D, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

*Daniel Ulmer, Kennard. Company I. 79th Pennsylvania Infantry. 

Samuel G. Vance. New Castle. Company F, 146th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas B. Van Dyke, Lewisville. Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Cyrus Van Matre, Middletown. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months i : 
Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Thomas Waller, New Lisbon. 3rd Indiana Battery; 14th Indiana Battery. 

Noah W. Warner, Sulphur Springs. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three 
months) ; Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Jacob Warnock, Honey Creek. Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid i ; 
Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

"Cornelius C. Weaver, New Castle. Company B, ISth Illinois Infantry. 

James M. Welker, Millville. Company K, 54th -Indiana Infantry (three month<=l; 
15th Indiana Battery. 

John W. Whitworth. Sulphur Springs. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three 
years). 

Sanford Whitworth. Honey Creek. Company G. 7th Indiana Cavalry: Company V. 
7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Thomas B. Wilkinson, Knightstown. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Richmond Wisehart, New Castle. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Jeremiah Woods. Knightstown. Company B, 99th Indiana Infantry. 

Isaac N. Wright, New Lisbon. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

David Wrightsman. New Castlo. Company A, 7flth Ohio Infantry: Company 1). 
73rd Ohio Infantry. 




e H B N^^^ . 
SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR. 



CHAPTER XXXI. 



SPANISH-A.Ml- 



r.RiEF History of the Spanish-A.meuicax Wak — Rosier of Henry County 
Soldiers in the 27TH Indiana Battery — Rosters of Henry County 
Soldiers in the 158TH Indiana Infantry — 159TH Indiana Infantry — 
it)OTH Indiana Infantry — Roster of the i6ist Indiana Infantry — His- 

lORY OF THE ReGIMENT BIOGRAPHICAL SkETCH OF CaPTAIN AlBERT 

DuretOgkokn and Family — Recapitulation. 

For a period of ten years, from 1868. to 1878, the inhabitants <lf Cuba were 
vuL^aged in a struggle to free themselves from the yoke of Spanish tyranny, but 
were defeated. The Spanish Government made most liberal promises, but failed 
Id keep them. Hostilities were renewed which lasted for three years, from 1895 to 
1898. The inhabitants were in a most deplorable condition ; the reconcentradoes — 
men, women, and children, non-combatants — were by edict of the Spanish Captain 
General. Weyler, driven from their homes, crowded together without proper food 
iir shelter, and died by thousands of disease and starvation. The attention and 
sympathy of the American people had for several years been attracted to this 
miserable condition of the Cubans, and many attempts had been made to relieve 
their distress. 

.\t the beginning of 1898 about 40 per cent, of the inhabitants had perished. 
At this juncture two events happened which increased the tension in the United 
States. One was the exposure of a letter written by Senor de Lome, the Spanish 
Minister to the United States, to a friend, grossly reflecting upon the President ; 
the other was a demand by the Spanish Government for the recall from Cuba of 
Consul General Lee, which was refused. On the 25th of January, 
i8<;8. the L^nited States Battleship- Maine was ordered to Havana 
Harbor, on a peaceful mission, by the authority of the United States, 
and on the 15th of February, 1898, between 9 and 10 o'clock p. m., the vessel was . 
blown up by a submarine mine, 266 sailors losing their lives. A searching in- 
vestigation followed without fixing the responsibility. Congress immediately ap- 
propriated $50,000,000 "for the national defense and for each and every purpose 
connected therewith, to be expended at the discretion of the President." 

.\fter fruitless effort to bring about an amicable settlement, on April 11, 
1808. the President asked Congress to intervene to stop the Cuban War, and by 
force establish a stable government on the island. On April 19, i8g8. Congress 
passed resolutions, which were signed by the President at 11 124 a. m.the following 
day, declaring "that the people of the island of Cuba are, and by right ought to be, 
free and independent," and demanding that Spain at once relinquish its authority- 



6/8 iiazzard's history of henry county. 

in the island. It also authorized the President to use the entire military force 
of the United States to carry the resolution into effect. 

The diplomatic relations between the two countries ceased April 21, 1898, 
and it was held that a state of war existed from that date. Blockade of the 
principal Cuban ports was declared April 22. and on the 23d the President called 
for 125,000 volunteers to serve two years, and on May 24 the Spanish Govern- 
ment announced that a state of war between that country and the United .States 
existed. 

The protocol of agreement Ijetwcen the United States and Spain was signed 
at Washington, District of Columbia. August 12, 1898, by ^^'illiam R. Day- and 
Tules Cambon. 

The treaty of peace was signed at Paris December 10. 1898, by William R. 
Day, Cushman K. Davis, William P. Frye. George Gray, and Whitelaw Reid. 
for the United States, and by Eugenio Montero Rios, B. de Abarzuza, J. de Gar- 
nica, W. R. de N'illa Urrutia. and Rafael Cerero, for the Kingdom of Spain. 

."^Jgned at Paris, December 10, 1898: ratification advised by the .Senate Febru- 
ary 0, 1899; ratified by the President P^ebruary 6, 1899; ratified by Her jNIajesty 
the Queen Regent of Spain March 19, 1899; ratifications exchanged at \'\'ashing- 
ton April 11, 1899; proclaimed, Washington, April 11, 1899. 

TWENTY SEVENTH B.\TTERY. 

This Battery of light Artillery was formed of I lattery A, I-'irst Artillery. 
Indiana National Guard, and was mustered into the service of the United States 
on May 10, 1898. It served at Camp Thomas, Chickamauga Park, Georgia, and 
in Porto Rico. It was mustered out November 25, 1898. Henry County had 
only three representatives in the Batterv. 

In the following condensed roster, the name of each soldier is followed by his 
postofifice address at the time of enlistment. The date of enrollment is the date of 
enlistment, not the date of muster. 

William Burton, New Castle. Saddlei. Enrolled April 26. 1898. Mustered out 
November 25, 1898. 

Harry B. Millikan, New Castle. Private. Enrolled April 26. 1898. Discharged, 
disability, September 22, 1898. 

William P. Rutledge. Mount Summit. Private. Enrolled June 14, 1S9S. Rerruit. 
Mustered out November 25, 1898. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY EIGHTH INFANTRY. 

This regiment was formed of the Second Infantry, Indiana National Guard, 
and was mustered into the service of the United States on May 10, 1898. Its 
service was confined to Camp Thomas, Chickamauga Park, Georgia, and Camp 
Poland, Knoxville, Tainessee. It was mustered out, November 4. 1898. Henry 
County had only four representatives in the regiment. 

In the following condensed roster, the name of each soldier is followed by 
his postoffice address at the time of enlistment. The date of enrollment is the date 
of enlistinent, not the date of mu.ster. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUN'l 



j/y 



Frederick Caldwell. Lewisville. Private. Company H. Enrolled April 26, 1S98. 
Mustered out November 4, 1888. 

William Netz. Ashland. Private. Company E. Enrolled April 2(;. 1898. Mustered 
out November 4, 1898. 

Daniel E. Shalfer, New Castle. Private, Company B. Enrolled April 26, 1898, 
Mustered out November 4, 1898, 

Homer H, W rightsman, New Castle. Private. Company H. Enrolled April 26, 1898, 
Mustered out November 4, 1898. 

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY NINTH INFANTRY, 

This regiment was formed of the First Infantry. Indiana National Guard, 
and was mustered into the service of the United States on ]vlay 12. i8gS, Its 
service was confined to Camp R. A. Alger, Dunn Loring. Virginia : Thoroughfare 
Gap. \'irginia, and Camp Meade, near Middletown. Pennsylvania, It was mus- 
tered out November 23. 1898, Henry County had only one representative in the 
regiment. 

In the following condensed roster, the name of the soldier is followed by his 
postoffice address at the time of enlistment. The date of enrollment is the date of 
enlistment, not the date of muster. 

William Reed, Mount Summit. Private. Company I. Enrolled April 26. 1898. 
Appointed Corporal. Mustered out November 23, 1898, 

ONE HUNDRED AND SINTIETH INFANTRY, 

This regiment was formed of the Fourth Infantr}', Indiana National Guard, 
and was mustered into the service of the United States on ]\Iay 12. 1898. It 
served at Camp Thomas, Chickamauga Park, Georgia; Camp Hamilton. Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, and Matanzas, Cuba, It was mustered out April 25. 1899, Henry 
County had only two representatives in the regiment. 

In the following condensed roster, the name of each soldier is followed by 
his address at the time of enlistment. The date of enrollment is the date of enlist- 
ment, not fhe date of muster. 

William Neff, Honey Creek. Artificer. Company L. Enrolled April 26, 1898, 
Mustered out April 25, 1899. 

Howard O. Powell. New Castle. Corporal. Company K. Enrolled April 26. 1898. 
.Mustered out February 24, 1899. 

ONE HUNDRED AND SINTY FIRST INFANTRY. 

This was a volunteer regiment organized for the Spanish-American \\ ar 
to fill the quota of Indiana under the President's second call for troops. It was 
mustered in by battalions and on July 15, 1898, the regiment as a whole was mus- 
tered into the service of the United States, It remained at Camp Mount under 
instruction until August 11. 1898. when it was ordered to Jacksonville. Florida, 
where it arrived on August 14 and was assigned to the First Brigade. Third 
Division, Seventh Army Corps, General Fitzhugh Lee commanding. The brigade 
was made up of the 2nd Mississippi, the 3rd Nebraska (Colonel William Jen- 
nings Bryan ) and the T6ist Indiana, 



68o hazzard's history of henry county. 

During its stay at Jacksonville, the regiment was engaged in numerous regi- 
mental drills and brigade and division reviews, and on August 31 took part in 
a review of the whole corps, in which twenty three regiments and more than 
twenty eight thousand men were in line, .\mong this host the 161 st Indiana was 
conspicuous for soldierly appearance, fine marching, full companies and straight 
lines. On October 21, the Seventh Army Corps was re-organizcd and the Knst 
Indiana was assigned to the First Brigade. Second Division. 

( )n October 23, 1898, the regiment was moved from Jacksonville to Savan- 
nah. Georgia, where it went into i^amp and once more took up the routine of 
drills, inspections and reviews, until under orders to proceed to Cuba, the regi- 
ment, on December 12, embarked on the transport Mobile, now the Sherman, for 
Havana, Cuba. Its arrival there was the signal for a notable reception by the 
Cubans, grateful for long delayed freedom. The Spanish power had not yet 
turned over its authority in the Island but was to do so under the terms of the 
treaty of peace negotiated at. Paris. The enthusiasm .of the people broke all 
bounds when the Seventh Corps, disembarl<:ing at Havana, took up its route for 
camp through that city. 

The regiment went into camp at Camp CoUimbia. Alarianao. Cuba, December 
17, 1898, where it remained until ordered home. On January i, 1899, ^^ V^^' 
ticipated in the ceremonies marking the relinquishment of Spanish authority in 
the Antilles and witnessed the raising 6f the American flag over Morro Castle, 
an epoch making event, and certainly the most important one in the history of the 
regiment. While in Cuba, the i6ist Indiana gained the reputation of being the 
finest regiment in the Seventh Army Corps, and the praise awarded it by the 
commanding officers was a deserved tribute to the intelligent and hard working 
officers and men of the organization. After the pacification of Cuba, the regi- 
ment was ordered home and arrived at Savannah. Georgia, ?\Iarch 31. 1899. where 
it was mustered out April 30, 1899. 

In the following roster, the name of each officer and man is followed by his 
postoffice address at the time of enlistment. The date of enrollment is the date 
of enlistment, not the date of muster. 

Company G was considered a distinctively Henry County organization, and 
for that reason the names of all its members are published to complete the roster, 
whether they lived in Henry County or not. This company was organized by 
the indefatigable efforts of Captain Albert D. Ogborn and Lieutenant James I. 
Meyers, who were afterwards joined by Lieutenant Charles M. Pitman. There 
was great rivalry from all parts of the State to get into this volunteer regiment, 
and officers and men of this provisional company were alike rejoiced when it was 
ordered to appear for examination. Defections from the ranks were made good 
by the acceptance of a number of Delaware County men and the Captain was 
able to report one hundred and nine men accepted by the local surgeon. Their 
departure for Indianapolis on July i, 1898. was celebrated by the closing of the 
business houses of New Castle, and a great procession, headed by the Grand Army 
Post, escorted the company to the station. This was the fourth company to arrive 
in Indianap'olis and was the first one ready for muster and was mustered in July 
12, 1898. The record of this fine regiment owes much to the soldierly qualities 
of the officers and men of Companv G. In the roster of the company recur the 



HAZZARU'S HISTORY OF llENRV COUNTV. b8 1 

names of many whose father.-, fought in the great Civil War, and. remembering 
the slighter opportunities of the Spanish-American War. they maintained the 
honor of Henry County in the armies of the Nation with the same loyalty and 
devotion as their fathers nearly half a century ago. 

FIELD OFFICERS AND REGIMENTAL STAFF. 



WinfieUl T. Durliin. Anderson. Commissioned .Inly 15. ISflS. Mustered out April 30, 

LIELTEX.iNT COLO.NEL. 

X'ictor M. Backus, Indianai)olis. Commissioned July 1.5. 1S9S. Mustered out April 
30, 1899. 

JM.V.JORS. 

Harold C. Megrew. Indianapolis. Commissioned July 11, 1S9S. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Matt R. Peterson, United States Army. Commissioned July 1.5, 1S98. Resigned No- 
vember 29, 1898. 

SURGEO\. 

Wickliffe Smith. Delphi. Commissioned June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

.\SSISTANT SURGEON -S. 

MiUard F. Gerrish, Seymour. Commissioned June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 
1899. 

,)ames Wilson. Wabash. Commissioned June 28. 189S. Mustered out April 30. 1899. 

.\D.Jl-T.\KT. 

Oliver M. Tiohenor. Princeton. Commissioned July 11, 1S9S. Mustered out April 30 

1S9H. 

Qt A1!TERM.\STER. 

John R. Brunt, Anderson. Commissioned June 30, 1898. Mustered- out April 30, 
1S99. 

eii.vi'L.\ix. 

William E. Biederwolf, Logansport. Commissioned July 15, 1S9S. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

NON-COMMISSIONKD STAFF. 
SERGEANT MAJOR, 

William T. Starr. Richmond. Enrolled July 5. 1898. Mustered out April 30. 1899. 

IIOSriTAI. STEWARDS. 

William H. Rathert, Fort Wayne. Enrolled June 30. 189S. Mustered' out April 30. 
1899. 

James G. Espey, Jeffersonville. Enrolled July 12, 1S9S. Discharged, disability, 
November 23, 1898. 

John I. Lewis. Bedford. Enrolled July 3. 1898. Died September 8. 1898. 
()^TAR^ER^^ASTl;K sergea>-1'. 

Baird G. Saltz.gaber, Lebanon. Enrolled June 29, 1898, Mustered out April 30, 
1899. 

CHIEF JtUSICIAX. 

Edwin White, Waltham, Massachusetts. Enrolled June 24, 1898. Transferred to 
Company E, December 22, 1898. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY". 



PHIXCIPAL ill 



Charles L. Applegate, Kortville. KnroUed July 12, 1898. Transfen-ed to Company 
E, July 22, 1898. 

Frank F. Webb, Indianapolis. Knrolled July 12, 1898. Transferred to Company 
E, July 22, 1898. 

Anthony A. Montani, Indianapolis. Enrolled August 1. 1898. Recruit. Discharged, 
disability, November 3, 1898. 

Ernest S. Williams. Winchester. Enrolled December 3, 1898. Recruit. Mustered 
out April 30, 1899. 

COMPANY F. 

SERGEANT. 

John C. Weissgarber, New Castle. Enrolled June 27, 189S. Discharged, disability. 
January 17. 1899. 

riilVATE. 

Frank H. Weissgarber, New Castle. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Appointed Corporal. 
Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

COMPANY G. 

CAPTAI-X. 

Albert D. Ogborn, New Castle. Enrolled June 25, 1898. Mustered out .\pril 3ii. 
1899. 

FIIt.ST I.TErXENANT. 

James I. Meyers, New Castle. Enrolled June 2.5. 1898. Mustered out April 30. 
1899. 

Si:CO>,-D T.IEl-TE>-.\NT. 

Charles M. Pitman. New Castle. Enrolled June 25, 1898. Mustered out April 3ii. 
1899. 

FIRST SERGE.^NT. 

Paul Rogers, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Reduced to pri- 
vate at his own request, July 31, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

QU.\RTEUM ASTER SERGE.VNT. 

Charles B. Owens, Franklin, Johnson County, Enrolled July 5. 1898. Transferred 
to Duty Sergeant, December' 22, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

SER(iEANTS. 

T. William Engle, Indianapolis, Marion County. Enrolled July 5, 1898. Trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps. 

John Welsbacher, Middletown. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 3". 
1899. 

Edward McCrea, Muncie,- Delaware County. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Claud Bock, New Castle. Enrolled June 27. 1898. .Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

CORPORALS. 

Albert O. Martin, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Appointed 
Sergeant. Mustered out April 30. 1899. 

Ray Keesling, Mechanicsburg. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30. 
1899. 

Linley W. McKimmey, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Mus- 
tered out April 30, 1899. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 683 

James .M. Redding, New Castle. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Miistered out April 30, 
899. 

Alonzo Allen, New Castle. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Transferred to Hospital Corps. 

George H. Elliott, Meehanicsburg. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 
899. 

Joseph H. Fadely, Honey Creek. Enrolled June 27. 1898. Mustered out April 30. 
899. 

Charles R. Gontner. Muncie. Delaware County. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Mustered 
out April 30, 1899. 

Ellwood L. Baldwin. Spiceland. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30. 

Charles M. Nash, Mount Summit. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 

E. Murray Luther. Blountsville. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Appointed Sergeant and 
Quartermaster Sergeant. Mustered out April 30. 1899. 

Harry S. Nugent, Kennard. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 30. 1899. 



Henry W. Van Dyke, Lewisville. Enrolled June 27, 1S9S. Discharged, disability, 
.March 17, 1899. 

Ira O. Yates, Middletown. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Discharged, disability. March 
17, 1899. 

.\RTIFICER. 

Huston Hutchins. New Castle. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30. 
1899. 

WAGOKEK. 

Oscar Livezey, New Castle. Enrolled June 27. 1S98. Mustered out April 30. 1899. 

PRIVATES. 

Joseph Akers, .Middletown. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Discharged, disability. Feb- 
ruary 6, 1899. 

Henry Barnes, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Guy Barnett, New Castle. Enrolled June 27. 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Edward Beeson, Dalton, Wayne County. Enrolled June 28. 1898. Appointed Musi- 
cian. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Roy W. Brown, New Castle. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Transferred to Regimental 
Band. Transferred from Band to Company L. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Guy Buckley. New Castle. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

James Canaday, New Castle. Enrolled July 5. 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Ered P. Cecil, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled July 6, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Alva Darling, Spiceland. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Harry C. Darnell, Indianapolis, Marion County. Enrolled July 7, 1898. Mustered 
out April 30, 1899. 

Frank N. Davenport, New Castle. Enrolled June 29. 1898. Mustered out April 30, 
1899. 

George C. Detrich. Muncie. Delaware County. Enrolled June 28. 1898. Discharged, 
disability, September 28, 1898. 

John Dolan, Cambridge City, Wayne County. Enrolled July fi, 1898. Transferred 
to Hospital Corps. 

Ben.iamin W. Eilar, New Castle. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Appointed Corporal and 
Sergeant. Mustered out April 30. 1899. 

Henry Faulkner, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled July 5. 1898. Discharged, 
disability. January 13, 1899. 



()84 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

James L. Pilson, New Lisbou. Enrolled June 28. 1S9S. Mustered out April 30. 
189y. 

Frank W. Fisher, New Castle. Enrolled June 29, 1S9S. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Frank Foster. Spieeland. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30. 1899. 

Walker Frazee, Byers, Ohio. Enrolled July 6, 1S9S. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Ferry Freeman, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled July .5, 1898. Appointed Cook. 
Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Thomas Freeland, New Lisbon. Enrolled June 27, 1S9S. Mustered out .\pril 30. 
1899. 

Max P. Gaddis. New Castle. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Appointed Corporal. Mus- 
tered out, April 30, 1899. 

Joseph Goddard, Middletown. Enrolled June 29. 1S9S. Appointed Corporal. Mus- 
tered out April 30, 1899. 

Bud Goodman, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 27. 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

^'rank Hale, Springport. Enrolled June 28. 1898. Mustered out April 30. 1899. 

Thomas T. Hale. Dublin. Wayne County. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Edgar B. Halfaker. Franklin. Johnson County. Enrolled July 5, 1898. Discharged, 
disability, August 22, 1898. 

Benton F. Hamilton. Greensboro. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30. 
1899. 

Frank M. Hamilton. New Castle. Enrolled .hily 6. 1S9S. Mustered out April 30. 
1899. 

John W. Hanna, Fort Worth, Texas. Enrolled July 5, 1898. Mustered out April 30. 
1899. 

Charles Harper, Indianapolis, Marion County. Enrolled July 8, 1898 Mustered 
out April 30. 1899. 

Herbert H. Hickman, Springport. Enrolled June 29. 1898. Discharged, disability. 
March 13, 1899. 

Hoyt A. Holton. Indianapolis, Marion County. Enrolled July 7. 1S9S. Dischar.ged, 
disability, January 12. 1899. 

Arthur A. Huddleston, Dublin, Wayne County. Enrolled June 29. 1S98. .Mustered 
out April 30, 1899. 

George Irwin, New York City. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 
1899. 

William G. Israel. Franklin. Johnson County. Enrolled July 5. 1898. Mustered out 
April 30. 1S99. 

Solomon Jackson, Franklin, Johnson County. Enrolled July 5, 1898. Mustered 
out April 30, 1899. 

Oltie F. Lamb. Dalton, Wayne County. Enrolled June 28. 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Fred Lane, Mooreland. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1S99. 

J. Morris F. Leech, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 28. 1898. Trans- 
ferred to Hospital Corps. 

Arthur Leonard, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 28, 1898, Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

John M. Leonard. Muncie, Delaware County, Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered 
out April 30, 1899. 

Sebastian Lykens. Spieeland. Enrolled June 27, 189S. Mustered out April 30, 1S99. 

Charles McCoy. Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 29. 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Clarence McCoy, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Discharged, 
disability, Septemher 27, 1898. 

Henry C. Martin, Junior, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 28. 1898. Dis- 
charged, disability, February 17, 1899. 



HAZZARD S HISTURV OF HENRY COUNTY. h»y 

George Martindale, Sulphur Springs. Enrolled June 28. 1898. Mustered out April 
30, 1899. 

James W. Miller, New Castle. Enrolled June 29, 1S9S. Mustered out .^pril 'M. 
1899. 

L,emuel Mitchell, Middletown. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Mustered out April 30„ 
1899. 

Cliff Morgan, Greensburg, Decatur Count.v. Enrolled July 4, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30. 1899. 

Charles Netz, Ashland. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

George W. Newby, Greensboro. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 
1899. 

Otis C. Newby, Greensboro. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Noah A. Nichols, Honey Creek. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 
1899. 

John J. Paul, Muncie, Delawa^-e County. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Joseph M. Pearson, New Castle. Enrolled July 5, 1898. Discharged, disability, 
December 22, 1898. 

James M. Prager, Seattle, Washington. Enrolled July 1, 1898. Transferred to Hos- 
pital Corps. 

F'red W. Puckett, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Appointed 
First Sergeant. Mustered oat April 30, 1S99. 

Winfleld Rawlins, Byers, Ohio, Enrolled July C, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899- 

Henjamin F. Reece, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 28. 1898. Mustered 
out April 30, 1899. 

Elmer Robinson, B'isher's Switch, Hamilton County. Enrolled July (.;, 1898. Ap- 
pointed Corporal. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Jesse Rothbaust, Franklin, Johnson County, Enrolled July 5, 1898. Discharged, 
disability, February 4, 1899. 

Walton D. Sears, Spiceland. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Charles Shellenbarger, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled July 4, 1898. Ap- 
pointed Corporal. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Albert Sherer, New Castle. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

William A. Sherman, Middletown. Enrolled August 8, 1S98. Recruit. Mustered 
out April 30, 1899. 

Edward C, Shuee, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Daniel V. Snider, Muncie, Delaware County. Enrolled June 29, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Clarence T. Swaini. Dublin, Wayne County. Enrolled June 27, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

John Sweezy, Franklin. Johnson County. Enrolled July .5, 1898. .Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

John VVahl. Indianapolis, Marion County, Enrolled July 8, 189S. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899. 

Edgar O. Walden, Muncie, Delaware County, Enrolled June 28. 1898. Mustered 
out April 30. 1899. 

Arthur Wilmuth, Kennard. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

John W. Wilson, Muncie, Delaware County, Enrolled June 29, 1898. Mustered out 
April 30, 1899, 

Mark E. Winings. Ashland. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

Walter A. Winings, Ashland. Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899, 

Minor Wintersteen, New Castle, Enrolled June 28, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 
1899. 

Edwin Wolfe, Mooreland, Enrolled June 28. 1898. Discharged, disability. Febru- 
ary 10, 1899. 



686 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Harry Woods, Dublin. Wayne County. Enrolled June 28. 1898. Mustered out 
April 30. 1S99. 

COMPANY H. 

PUrVATES. 

William Bock, New Castle. Enrolled August 9, 1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 
Ira H. Palmes, Rushville, Rush County. New Castle in 1902. Enrolled June 27. 
1898. Mustered out April 30, 1899. 

ARTILLERY AND INFANTRY IN THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Captain 1 

First Lieutenant - 1 

Second Lieutenant • 1 

Quartermaster Sergeant 1 

Sergeant 5 

Corporal lb 

Musician a 

Artificer v 



Wagoner 1 

Privates sy 

Total iiiu 

DEDUCTIONS. 

Non-resident infantrymen in distinctively Henry County Companies 43 

Duplication of names by reason of promotions and transfers 9 52 

Total of artillerymen and infantrymen from Henry County in Indiana Organizations 
in the Spanish-American War Bjj 



r 



w^ 





hazzard's history of henry county. 687 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF ALBERT DURET OGBORN. 

, M'TAIX, COMPANY G, 161ST INFANTRY REGIMENT, INDIANA VOLUNTEERS, SPANISH 
AMERICAN war; LAWYER AND LEGISLATOR. 

It is merit that wins. One may by study fill the mind with knowledge and in 
theory, at least, know how to do things, but success depends largely upon the 
application of such knowledge in a practical way. Ability to accomplish results 
establishes merit and on the strength of merit comes the reward — confidence, com- 
mendation and advancement. It is this ability to do things, to accomplish results, 
that has characterized the life of the subject of this sketch. 

In the pioneer days of Eastern Indiana, Wayne County was peopled by large 
numbers of vigorous, energetic men and women who came mainly from Pennsyl- 
vania, old Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Kentucky. Many of these 
.settlers, after a more or less brief residence in Wayne, moved onward to Henry 
County, and became permanent citizens of that county. Obeying the restless 
spirit of enterprise and discovery which had carried their parents away from 
established homes into the wilderness, the descendants of many of the pioneers 
of "Old Wayne'" separated themselves from the parental authoritv and came 
to Henry County, where they soon became identified with its people, grew up 
with its growth and frequently achieved civil, political and social distinction. 
This early immigration accounts for the close ties of kinship existing between 
so many of. the families of Wayne and Henry counties down to the present time. 
Descendants of the large Bond family, of the Hoovers, the Elliotts, the Brad- 
burys, the Bransons, the Drapers, the Thornburghs, the Shaffers, the Strattons. the 
Roofs, the Ezekiel Rogers" branch of the Rogers' family, the Murpheys, the Men- 
denhalls, the Martindales, the Harveys, the Clifts. the Bundys. and many 
others, whose names might be mentioned, have spread over Henry County, so 
that strong ties of blood exist between the two counties, uniting them more 
closely probably than any other two counties in the State. What is here said 
of others equally applies to the paternal and maternal families of Albert Duret 
Ogborn. 

His great-great-grandfather, Caleb Ogborn, the first, was born in New Jersey 
in the year 1729, and his great grandfather, Caleb Ogborn, the second, was born in 
the same State in the year 1755. Both lived and died in their native State. Caleb 
I igborn, the second, married Ann Parker in 1784. She was also a native of New 
Jersey where she was born in the year 1759. Their son, Samuel Ogborn, the 
grandfather of Albert D. Ogborn, was born at Egg Harbor, New Jersey, on 
March 14, 1788. He moved from that State to Ohio in the year 1824 and tlience 
to Wayne County, Indiana, in 1825, settling near Greensfork, where he died July 
14. 1839. The grandmother, Esther (Andrews) Ogborn, wife of Samuel Ogborn. 
was born in New Jersey. November 18, 1784. She died December 19, 1867, and 
tlie remains of both herself and husband are buried in the old cemetery at Greens- 
fork. They were all Quakers and their homes in New Jersey were not far 
from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where at that time, the ' Quaker or Friends' 
Church was predominant. 

Esther Andrews was a descendant of Isaac Andrews, the first, and his wife, 
I'Jizaheth Andrews. Their son, Isaac Andrews, the second, born in New Jerse\-. 



688 hazzard's history of henry county. 

September 21, 1749, married in June, 1771, Rebecca Evans, who was born in 
Eversham, Burlington County, New Jersey, June 19, 1753. To this couple were 
born November 18, 1784, the twin sisters, Hannah and Esther. Esther was mar- 
ried at Egg Harbor, New Jersey, to Samuel Ogborn in the year 1810, and died 
in Wayne County, Indiana, December 19, 1867. Of the children bom to Samuel 
and Esther (Andrews) Ogborn, there was Edwin Eothergill Ogborn, father of 
Albert Duret Ogborn, subject of this sketch; and Allen Ogborn. These were twin 
brothers, born in New Jersey, August 25, 1816. Edwin Eothergill Ogborn died 
in New Castle, July 4^ 1895. where he had resided for several years during the 
latter part of his life. His remains lie buried in Sugar Grove Cemetery, near 
Greensfork, Wayne County, Indiana. 

On the maternal side, the great grandfather of Albert Duret Ogborn, was 
David Bradbury, a native of Elizabeth, New Jersey. He was born October 13. 
1760, and in later years moved to Warren County, Ohio, where he died May 7. 
1824. He was a soldier of the Revolutionary War, who served five years and 
among other engagements participated in the historic battles of Staten Island. 
New York, and Monmouth, New Jersey, and camped with Washington at 
Valley Forge. He never lived in Indiana except for a brief period in the Wabash 
Valley. The great grandmother, Susannah (Craig) Bradbury, was born at 
Elizabeth, New Jersey, April 27, 1762, and it was there she became the wife of 
David Bradbury. She died in what is now Clay County, Indiana, May 17, 1819. 
and is buried there. 

Daniel Bradbury, the grandfather of Albert Duret Ogborn, was a native of 
Warren County, Ohio, in the Northwest Territory. He was born September 2.2. 
1800, and died May 29, 1882. He married Mary, daughter of Abraham and 
Jean (Alexander) Elliott, at Jacksonburg, Wayne County, Indiana, August 13. 
1821. She was born November 10, 1804, and died April 4, 1868. They are both 
buried in the Sugar Grove Cemetery mentioned above. During his lifetime, nc 
man in Wayne County probably was held in higher esteem by the people of 
Eastern Indiana, among whom he had a wide acquaintance, than Daniel Brad- 
bury. He was prominent in the affairs of the county. Of himself, he says in 
a brochure, relating to the events of his life, entitled "Memoirs of Daniel Brad- 
bury," published in 1879 : "I collected taxes, assessed property and appraised real 
estate for twenty nine years." Again he says : "I have in my time filled a great 
many offices of trust and among other things have settled ten estates, as executor 
and administrator, and was requested to settle many more but declined." Starting 
out in life for himself at the earlv age of eighteen years, he determined that his 
conduct should be governed by the following rule : "I would not keep bad 
company with male or female ; that I would not be a gambler or a drunkard and 
would lead an honest life, all of which I have kept up to the present time ( not 
even having drunk a dram as a beverage for over forty years) just entering on the 
eightieth year of my age." He was a man of unusual parts, well informed, earnest 
in his opinions, firm in his beliefs and possessed of a personal dignity and bearing 
that won the respect and commendation of all. 

His wife. Mary (Elliott) Bradbury, was a fit helpmeet of her husband. She 
was a sister of the late Judge Jehu' T. Elliott. Mrs. Martin L. Bundy, Stephen 
Elliott, and Elizabeth ("Aunty Betsy") Peed, the mother of Evan Peed, the well 



HAZZARd's niSTOKY OF HENRY COUNTY. 689 

known farmer, who is now and has been for several years the superintendent of 
the Indiana State Agricuhural Society. Mrs.' Bradbury was quiet in demeanor, 
possessed of a clear mind (a characteristic of her family), very domestic, very 
charitable, and to her family, true, loving and devoted. Referring to the death 
of his wife, Daniel Bradbury in his reminiscences above mentioned says: "She 
had been an exemplary Christian from her youth, and had been a member of the 
Old Christian Church since she was sixteen years old." They lived together, a 
calm, quiet, peaceful life for a period of nearly forty seven years. 

Jane (Bradbury) Ogborn, daughter of Daniel and Mary (Elliott) Bradbury, 
was a native of Wayne County, Indiana, where she was born February 24, 1826; 
she died September 10, 1882, and lies buried beside her husband in Sugar Grove 
Cemetery, already mentioned. She was married to Edwin Fothergill Ogborn on 
April 14, 1850, and to them were born the following named children: Matilda 
C now Mrs. Matilda C. Wisehart, of Flagstafif, Arizona; Esther, afterwards 
Mrs. William R. Wise, now deceased; Daniel B, of Lincoln, Nebraska; Charles 
S., now deceased; Edwin C, now-living in New Castle; Melvina, died in infancy: 
Albert Duret, the subject of this sketch; Vienna M., a resident of New Castle, and 
housekeeper for her brother, Albert Duret; and John B., a citizen of Denver, 
Colorado. These were the children of the second marriage of both parents. The 
children of Edwin Fothergill Ogborn by a previous marriage were : Mrs. Gulia 
Weyl, of Economy, Wayne County, Indiana; Mrs. Mary Tingley, of Fairfield, 
Nebraska; Julia, afterwards Mrs. Samuel McCullough, deceased; and Allen 
W., deceased. The latter was a member of Company B, 19th Indiana 
Infantry, and was mortally wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, July 
2. 1863; he died in the general hospital at Philadelphia, July 18, 1863. He was a 
brave and gallant soldier. Jane (Bradbury) Ogborn was first married to James 
Wilson and they were the parents of one child, a son, named Martin Luther, who 
was a member of Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. He died at Bufifalo, 
Kentucky, February 17, 1862, while in the service of his countn,' during the 
Civil War. Both of these patriotic soldiers are interred in Sugar Grove Cemetery, 
near Greensfork. Wayne Count)', Indiana. 

ALBERT DURET OGBORN. 

Albert Duret Ogborn was born at the old homestead on his father's farm, 
near Greensfork, Wayne County, Indiana, September 25, 1864, coming upon the 
stage of life at the time when the United States was engaged in its great conflict 
for unity and permanency. As child and youth and even to manhood, he remained 
on the farm and under the parental roof. During those years, he attended regu- 
larly, from term to term, the common schools of the neighborhood and acquired 
the best education afforded by such institutions. On January 14, 1883. he came 
to New Castle where he engaged in the sale of farm machinery until August, 
1884, when he began to clerk in a shoe store. In March, 1886, as he himself 
says, he "emigrated to Nebraska and returned in four weeks." The remainder of 
the year 1886, he spent with his brother, Edwin C, who was then engaged in the 
mercantile business at Arcanum, Ohio. In January, 1887, he took up the study of 
stenography, pursuing the subject without the aid of a teacher, and in November 
of that year, through the influence of Judge Eugene H. Bundy, he was appointed 
storekeeper in the Northern Indiana Hospital for the Insane, at Logansport. He 



690 hazzard's history uf henry county. 

remained with that institution until May, 1889, when he resigned to accept the 
position of reporter for the Henry Circuit Court. In connection with his duties 
as reporter, he took up the abstract business and has now the only set of abstract 
books in the county. He continued to hold the onerous position of reporter until 
the Spring of 1902, except during the time he was engaged in the Spanish- 
American War. \Mnle attending to his duties as reporter and abstracter, he 
read law and was in 1894 admitted to the bar of the Henry Circuit Court, Judge 
Eugene H. Bundy, presiding. 

As a reporter, Mr. Ogborn had established an enviable reputation for rajjidity 
and accuracy of service and was in the employ of the State Board of Tax Com- 
missioners of Indiana at four annual sessions ; he was the official stenographer for 
the United States Senate Committee on Territories, of which Senator Beveridge 
is chairman, during a tour of Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Indian ter- 
ritories, November, 1902, while they were making a special investigation of those 
territories with reference to their admission as States of the Union, and in addition 
on many occasions reported speeches and sermons. 

When the Spanish-American War began. Albert D. Ogborn became the 
prime mover in the recruiting and organizing of what afterwards became Company 
G, 161 st Indiana Infantry. It was mustered into the service of the United States 
July 12, 1898, and the entire regiment was mustered in at Indianapolis, July 15, 
1898. The regiment remained in Camp Mount until August 11, 1898, when under 
orders it moved to Jacksonville, Florida, where on arrival it was assigned to 
the First Brigade. Tliird Division, Seventh Army Corps, under the command of 
General Fitzhugh Lcc. The Third Nebraska, Colonel William Jennings Bryan 
commanding, was a part of the brigade. The i6ist Indiana was afterwards 
assigned to the First Brigade, Second Division of the Seventh Army Corps. 
Remaining at Jacksonville until October, 1898, it then moved to Savannah, 
Georgia, and on December 12th sailed from that point on the transport Sherman 
to Havana, Cuba, where it landed and marched through the city went into camp 
at Camp Columbia, Marianao, December 17, 1898, and there the regiment remained 
until ordered home. It arrived in Savanah, Georgia, ]\Iarch 31. 1899, and was 
mustered out there on April 30, 1899. A full and complete history of this 
splendid regiment will be found in chapter XXXI of this work, entitled the 
"Spanish- American War." The history of the regiment is the military history of 
Captain Albert D. Ogborn. 

In 1900 Captain Ogborn was elected State Senator for the district composed 
of the counties of Henry, Fayette and Union, and served in the sessions of the 
General Assembly of 1901 and 1903. He was chairman of the Committee on 
^Military Affairs : also of the Committee on Enrolled Bills ; and was a member of 
the committees on Benevolent Institutions, Public Health, Insurance. Roads, and 
Congressional Apportionment, during the session of 1901. In the session of 1903. 
he was chairman of the Committee on Railroads, and a member of the committees 
on Rules, Finance, Roads, Federal Relations, Public Health, and Legislative Ap- 
portionment. Captain Ogborn took a prominent part in the conduct gf legislative 
affairs both in committee and on the floor, every matter coming before the Senate 
for its action receiving his closest attention. 

Prior to the Spanish-American War, Albert D. Ogborn had gained con- 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUXTY. Oyl 

siderable knowledge of military tactics from the fact that he had been for a number 
of years a member of the Uniformed Rank, Knights of Pythias, which is an 
organization patterned after that of the United States Arm}-. He commanded, 
first, the New Castle Company, for a short time, and then for a period of five 
vears was Lieutenant Colonel, and then for four years. Colonel of the Third 
Indiana Regiment of that organization. He did not surrender his command at 
the time of entering the United States service during the Spanish- American ^^'ar. 
but was simply granted leave of absence, resuming the command on his return 
from the war. He was afterwards Colonel and Chief of Staff of Brigadier 
(jeneral Harry B. Smith, commanding the Indiana brigade. Unite }rni Rank. 
Kjiights of Pythias. After returning from the Spanish-American War, at the 
earnest solicitation of Governor James A. Mount, Captain Ogborn organized a 
company of militia which was mustered into the service of the State on Septem- 
ber 26, 1899, and was disbanded at the end of its three years' term of service. He 
resigned his captaincy in 1900 and went to Chicago to become the confidential secre- 
tar\- of Captain Harry S. New, of the Executive Committee of the Republican 
National Committee. In the campaign of 1904, Captain Ogborn occupied a like 
position under Captain New who was vice chairman of the Republican National 
Committee, and in charge of Western Headquarters. 



Besides the military service of Captain Albert D. Ogborn as related above, 
his brother, Daniel Bradbury Ogborn. has followed the colors. He ran away from 
home, immediately after the Custer Massacre, and enlisted in Troop E. Fifth 
Cavalrv U. S. A., and took part in the relief expedition to the Big Horn Country 
where the brave General Custer and his entire command had been wiped out by the 
hostile Indians, lead by the bloodthirsty chief, Sitting Bull. 

Mrs. Tingley's son, Edwin Ogborn Tingley, was a member of the First 
Nebraska Volunteers in the Spanish- American War. He served in the Philippines 
and was dangerously wounded in one of the battles of the Aguinaldo Insurrection. 

Mrs. Weyl's son, John Allen Weyl, enlisted April 26, 1898, in the I'nited 
States Heavy Artillery and served during the Spanish-American War. being 
stationed at Fort Myer on the Potomac River, near Washington, D. C. He 
afterwards enlisted in the Thirty Urst L". S. A'olunteers and served in the Philip- 
pines during the insurrection in those islands. 

Not to be outdone in loyalty to the flag, Daniel Dradbur}- Ogborn's son, Clyde 
C. ei-rfisted in Company G, i6ist Indiana Infantry, but much to his regret was 
rejected by the mustering officer, as he was not able to ])ass the physical 
examination. 

Besides the foregoing, two uncles and six cousins of Captain Ogborn took 
part in the Civil War. but at this date the details of their service are not obtainable. 

Though the Ogborn famih-, on the paternal side; is descended from a long 
line of Quaker ancestors to whom warfare is forbidden, yet their love of country 
has overtopped the formal dictates of religious faith. They have performed well 
their part in the service of their common country, like their maternal ancestor, 
David Bradbury, with his five years of service in the Revolutionary Vv'ar, that 
rable confiict which determined the destinv and civilization of the western 
lid. 



CHAPTER XXXII. 

miscellaneous organizations. 

Roster of Henry County Soldiers and Sailors in the Regular Army and 
Xany Since the Civil War, Including Those Who Served During the 
Spanish-American War and Philippine Insurrection — Roster of 
Henry County Soldiers Who Went to Other States to Enlist Dur- 
ing the Spanish-American War — Recapitulation. 

REGULAR ARjMY AND NAA^Y. 

Soldiers and sailors who have served in the Regular Army or Navy, since 
the close of the Civil ^^'ar: also soldiers and sailors who served, during the 
Spanish-American War and the Philippine Insurrection, in either of the above 
named branches of the service, and those who have served in either branch, since 
that time, are included in this list. 

The war with Spain was declared April 21. 1898, and anmesty in the Phil- 
ippines was declared June 20, 1900. Inspection of the date of muster-in and 
muster-out of any soldier or sailor named in this list will show whether he serveil 
at any time during those wars. 

James W. Abbott, Spiceland. Private, Company E, 24th Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in July 30, 1881. Appointed Corporal, Regimental Clerk. Sergeant Major, Ord- 
nance Sergeant. The term of his sixth enlistment expired August 6, 1905. 

John \V. Abbott, Spiceland. Private, Company A, 24th Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in July 30, 1881. Mustered out July 29, ISSO. 

Burt Albin. Mooreland. Said to have served in the Spanish-American War. Record 
is incomplete in this History. 

Edward R. Alpham, Henry County. Private, Company K. ISth Infantry U. S. A. 
Mustered in April 24, 1S99. Served in the Philippines, Transferred to Company L. 29th 
Infantry U. S. V. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out April 23, 1902. 

Charles A. Armicost, New Lisbon. Rated as Apprentice. U. S. Navy. Enlisted Oe 
tober 26, 1900. Served in U. S. S. Franklin and Lancaster and in U. S. Transport Buf- 
falo. Mustered out July 6, 1901. 

tleorge W. Bailey. Greensboro. )'ri\ate. Company C, 31st" Infantry U. S. V. Mus- 
tered in July 21, 1899. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out June IS, 1901. 

John Baker, Knightstown. Private, Company A, l-5th Infantry TJ. S. A. Mustered 
in April 25, 1870. Mustered out April 24, 1875. 

James A. Berry. New Castle. Private, Company K, 13th Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in May 11, 1870, Mustered out May 10, 1875. 

Frederick A. Bills, Lewisville. Private. Company I, 45fli Infantry U. S. V. Mus- 
tered in September 2.5, 1S99. Appointed Corporal and Sergeant. Served in the Philip- 
pines. Mustered out June 3, 1901. 

William Bird, Greensboro. Said to have served as private in Company H, 8th 
Infantry U. S. V. Record is incomplete in this History. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 693 

Alva Bowman. Greensboro. Private, Company K. 5th Cavalry U. S. A, Enlisted 
about 188B. Discharged (or disability. Record is incomplete in this History. 

Krnest B. Byrket, Ogden. Private, Company M, 10th Infantry U. S. A. Mustered 
in January 25, 1900. Appointed Corporal. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out 
January 25, 1903. 

Frederick Caldwell, Lewisville. Private, Battery A, 1st Artillery U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in November 11, 1898. Transferred to Battery A, 6th Artillery U. S. A. Trans- 
ferred to Company E, 18th Infanty U. S. A. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out 
November 10. 1901. 

John A. Castetter. Middletowu. Private, Company L, 10th Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in October 4, 1899. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out October 10. 1902. 

Adelbert B. Cock, Middletown. Private, U. S. Marine Corps. Mustered in November 
12, 1902. Serving on U. S. S. Maine. Rated as Ship's Barber. Enlistment will expire 
November 11, 1906. 

Dennis Conner, ^ooreland. Private. Company H. 10th Infantry U. S. A. Mustered 
in January 19, 1893. Appointed Musician. Mustered out May 11, 1S95. Re-enlisted as 
Musician, Company H, 11th Infantry U. S. A. Mustered in January 12, 1897. Appointed 
Corporal and Sergeant'. Served in Porto Rico and in the Philippines. Mustered out 
January 11, 1903. 

George A. Cook, Middletown. Private, Company L, 26th Infantry U. S. 'V. Mus- 
tered in January 10, 1901. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out January 9, 1904. 

James E. Cook, Middletown. Private, Company F, 11th Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in January 11, 1897. Served in Porto Rico and in the Philippines. Appointed 
Corporal and Sergeant. Transferred to Company E, 14th Infantry U. S. A. Now serving 
his third enlistment. 

James O. Crabill. Middletown. Private. Company H, 29th Infantry U. S. V. Mus- 
tered in August 6, 1899. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out May 10, 1902. 

James F. Dakins. Rogersville. Private, Company G, 16th Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in December 16, 1904. Enlistment will expire December 15. 1907. 

Walter Delaware, Millville. Private, Company K, 45th Infantry U. S. V. Mus- 
tered in September 18. 1899. Appointed Corporal. Served in the Philippines. Mustered 
out June 3, 1901. 

David P. Denny. Randolph County. Moved to Henry County (Kennard) in 1902. 
Corporal, Company I, 32nd Infantry U. S. V. Mustered in August 8, 1899. Mustered 
out August 9. 1902. 

John D. Dickerson, New Lisbon. Rated as Machinist. U. S. Navy. Enlisted October 
15. 1903. Enlistment will expire October 14, 1907. 

James Doggett. Mount Summit. Private, Company F, 31st Infantry U. S. V. Mus- 
tered in July 19, 1899. Mustered out June 18, 1901. 

Raymond Elliott, Knightstown. Corporal. Company E. 35th Infantry U. S. V. 
Mustered in August 1, 1899. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out June IS. 1901. 

John Estelle. Knightstown. Said to have served in the Spanish-American War. 
Record i? incomplete in this History. 

Roy Estelle. Knightstown. Private, Battery D. fith Artillery U. S. A. Mustered in 
March 11. 1898. Mustered out March 10, 1901. Enlisted again, as Private, Troop F, 1st 
Cavalry CJ. S. A. Mustered in November 29, 1901. Transferred to 12th Cavalry U. S. A., 
August 14, 1903. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out November 28. 1904. 

Robert L. Finnegan, Millville. Private. Troop M, 6th Cavalry U. S. A. Mustered 
in Decemter 21, 1899. Mustered out December 20, 1902. 

Charles E. Fisher, New Castle. Private. Company I, 31st Infantry U. S. 'V. Mus- 
tered m July 27. 1898. Mustered out June 18, 1901. 

Homer C. Garriott, Kennard. Private. Troop D, 8th Cavalry U. S. A. Mustered in 
June 12, 1899. Discharged, disability, August 12, ,1899. 

Thomas J. Garvis. Millville. Private. Company C. 17th Infantry U. S. A. Mustered 
in May 11, 1898. Appointed Artificer. Sergeant and Quartermaster Sergeant. Served in 
Cuba and in the Philippines. Mustered out May 10, 1901. 

Heenon Gilbert, New Lisbon. Private. Company K, 22nd Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 



6y4 IIAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

tered in May 15, 1S99. Served in the Philippines. Discharged, disability. August :;;•, 
1900. 

Panander W. Gray, New Castle. Private, Company C, 2nd Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in November 4. 18SU. Appointed Corporal, Sergeant and First Sergeant. Mustered 
out November 4, 1885. 

Daniel F. Griffin, Jr., New Castle. Private, Company C, 31st Infantry U. S. V. Mus- 
tered m July 13. 1899. Died at Prang Prang, Philippine Islands, December 21, 1900. 

William J. P. Halstead, Shirley. Private, Company G, 2nd Infantry U. S. A. .Mus- 
tered in June IS, 1900, Appointed Artificer, Corporal, Sergeant and Quartermaster Ser- 
geant. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out June 17. 1903. 

Krnest Hardway, Christian County. Kentucky. Moved to New Castle. Private, 
Company F, 24th Infantry U. S. A. Mustered in February 27, 1901. Served in the Phil- 
ippines. Mustered out February 26, 1904. 

Frank W. Harris, Morgan County. Moved to Henry County (Kennard) in 1901. 
Private, Company b. 38th Infantry U. S. V. Mustered in Septemb^- IS, 1899, Appointed 
Corporal. Transferred to the Regimental Band. Served in the Philippines. Mustered 
out June 30, 1901. 

Dallas D. Harry. Mount Summit. Private, Troop H. 13th Cavalry U. S. A. .Mus- 
tered in July 8, 1901. Re-enlisted April 3, 1903, same Troop and Regiment. Appointed 
Sergeant and detailed Acting Battalion Sergeant Major. Served in the Philippines. En- 
listment will expire April 2, 190(). 

Samuel G. Hays, Rogersville. Private, Company I, 21st Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in March 11, 1878. Discharged, disability. March 27, 1880. 

Deander E. Hazzard, Nevvf Castle. tBrother of the Atithor of this History). Pri- 
vate, Troop H, 5th Cavalry U. S/ A. Mustered in November 25.. 187G. Killed by the 
Indians in Wyoming Territory. Exact date of death and burial place unknown. 

Claude H. Heacoek. Lewisville. Private, Battery K, 3rd Artillery U. S. A. .Mus- 
tered in June 12, 1S99. Served in the China Relief Expedition ana in the Philippines. 
Transferred to Battery L. Mustered out June 23. 1902. 

Emery A. Hilkirk, Knightstown. Private, Company A, 11th Infantry U. S. A. 
Mustered in September 15. 1S97. Appointed Corporal and Sergeant. Mustered out Sep- 
tember 15, 1900. 

John S. Hill, Rush County. Moved to Henry County (Lewisville I in 1902. Private. 
Company I. 18th Infantry U. S. A. Mustered in March fi, 1S9S. Served in the Philip- 
pines. Mustered out March 5, 1901. 

John Hodson, Middletown. Private. Company A, 45th Infantry U. S. V. Mustered 
in September 30. 1899. Served in the Philippines. Discharged, disability, February 13. 
1901. 

Carl L. Holloway, Shirley. Private. Company G. 59th Infantry U. S. V. Mustered 
in August S. 1S99. Mustered out May 10, 1902. 

Louis M. Hoosier, Greensboro. Private, Company C, 24th Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in January 24, 1898. Mustered out March 18, 1899. 

William W. Hut^on, Knightstown. Private, Company E, 35th Infantry U. S. \' 
Mustered in August 1, 1900. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out August 1, 1901. 

Forest R. Jacobs, Greensboro. Private, Company H, 11th Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in March IS, 1894. Mustered out June 19, 1898. Re-enlisted same company and 
regiment September 18, 1898. Transferred to Company D. Served in Porto Rico. Mus- 
tered out September 17, 1900. Re-enlisted 1st Sergeant, Company H, Porto Rico Pro- 
visional Regiment of Infantry. Mustered in August 12. 1901. Appointed Post Quarter- 
master Sergeant U. S. A. Mustered out August 11. 1904. Re-enlisted for Post Non-Corn- 
missioned Staff August 12, 1904. Now serving at Camp Wallace. Union, Philippine 
Islands, as Post Quartermaster Sergeant. 

John N. Jacobs, Greensboro. Private. Troop I. 12th Cavalry U. S. A. Mustered 
in May 20, 1901. Mustered out May 19, 1904. 

Harvey Kahoon, Kennard. Private, Company B. 23rd Infantry U. S. A. Mustered 
in May 13, 1899. Discharged, disability, February 13, 1900. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. O95 

Lewis Kelly, Knightstown. Private, Company B, oth Infantry U. S. A. Mustered 
in January 23. 1870. Mustered out January 24. 1S75. 

Elmore F. Keough, St. Louis, Missouri. Moved to Henry County (Greensboro) 
in 1889. Private, Company E, IStli Infantry U. S. A. Mustered in August 9. 1S7S. Mus- 
tered out August 8, 1883. 

Oren E. Lambird, Mooreland. Private, Troop H, 12tli Cavalry U. S. A. Mustered in 
March 13, 1903. Died in the Philippines November 20, 1903. 

William Lehman, Wayne County. Moved to Henry County ( Sulphur Springs ) in 
1894. Private, Troop D, 7th Cavalry U. S. A. Mustered in November 8, 1881. Dis- 
charged, disability, September 14, 1882. Re-enlisted as private, Troop H, 1st Cavalry 
U. S. A. Mustered in December 23, 1883. Appointed Sergeant. Mustered out December 
21. 1888. Re-enlisted as Sergeant, Troop K, 3rd Cavalry U. S. A. Mustered in January 
15, 1889. Mustered out August 28, 1897. Re-enlisted as Sergeant, Troop C, 3rd Cavalry 
U. S. A. Mustered in November 1, 1897. Appointed 1st Sergeant. Mustered out October 
31. 1900. Re-enlisted as Sergeant, Company K, 13th Cavalry U. S. A. Mustered in Janu- 
ary 10, 1902. Supposed to be still in the army. 

James Lennington. Blotmtsville. Private, Company H. 23rd Infantry U. S. A, 
Mustered in May 19. 1899. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out May 18, 1902. 

Robert C. McConnell, ICnightstown. Private, 25th Company, Coast Artillery U. S. 
A. Mustered in November 25. 1899. Served in China Relief Expedition. Mustered out 
November 24, 1902. 

William E. McCorkle, Knightstown. Bugler, Company A, 12th Infantry U. S. A. 
Mustered in September 27. 1897. Died at home in Knightstown, Indiana. October 8. 1898. 

Harry F. McGuire, New Lisbon. Rated as Second Class Baker, U. S. Navy. En- 
listed October 15, 1903. Enlistment w^ill expire October 14, 1907. 

Frank M. Main, Mooreland. Private, Hospital Corps U. S. A. Mustered in Decem- 
ber 21, 1898. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out December 20, 1901. 

Ross G. Miller, Mooreland. Private, Troop F, 5th Cavalry U. S. A. Mustered in 
June 13, 1898. Mustered out Aiiril 21, 1899. Re-enlisted as private. Troop A, 4th Cav- 
alry U. S. A. Mustered in May 31, 1899. Discharged November 8, 1900, account of 
wounds received near Santa Crux, Philippine Islands, February. 1900. 

Herbert W. Morris, New Castle. Private, Company C, 31st Infantry U. S. V. Mus- 
tered in July 11, 1899. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out March 29, 1901. 

Otis C. Newby, Greensboro. Corporal, Company C, 45th Infantry U. S. V. Mustered 
in September 1. 1899. Killed near Bulan, Luzon. Philippine islands. August 24. 1900. - 

Boyd Nicholson, New Castle. Private, Company G, 31st Infantry U. S. V. Mus- 
tered in July IS. 1899. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out June 18, 1901. 

Eugene Otis. Raysville. Said to have served in the Spanish-American War. Record 
is incomplete in this History. 

John E. Paully, Shirley. Private, Company H, 16th Infantry U. S. A. Mustered 
in July 7, 1897. Mustered out December 19, 1899. 

William W. Pence, Ne-w Castle. Private, Company K, 7th Infantry U. S. A. Mu? 
tered in October 14, 1900. Served in the Philippines. Died at Presidio. San Francisco, 
California, July 8, 1903. 

Herman L. Pitts, Knightstown. Private. 25th Company, Coast Artillery U. S. A. 
Mustered in November 25, 1899. Served in the China Relief Expedition. Mustered out 
November 24. 1902. 

Walter E. Pitts, Knightstown. Private, 25th Company, Coast Artillery U. S. A. 
Mustered in November 25, 1899. Served in the China Relief Expedition. Mustered out 
November 24, 1902. 

John J. Powell, New Castle. Private. Reserve Hospital Corps. First Army Corps, 
U. S. A. Mustered in July 17, 1898. Served in Porto Rico. Mustered out April 9, 1899. 

Leonard M. Reeder, Mount Summit. Private, Company H, 12th Infantry U. S. A. 
Mustered in May 15. 1898. Killed at Lopez, Philippine Islands, September 10, 1900. 

Thomas B. Reeder, Junior, Mount Summit. Private, Company H, 12th Infantry U. 
S. A. Mustered in August 15, 1897. Mustered out August 14, 1900. 



(lyO HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Kalula Riley, Mkidletown. Private. Company A. 45th Infantry U. S. V. Mustered 
in September 30, 1899. Served in ttie Philippines. Mustered out October, 1901. Re-en- 
listed as Private, Troop E, 5th Cavalry U. S. A. Mustered in May 27. 1904. Enlistment 
will expire May 26, 1907. 

Clarence A. Roberts. Raysville. Private, Company M, 13th Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in August 31, 1900. Appointed Corporal and Sergeant. Served in the Philippines. 
Mustered out August 30, 1903. 

Henry C. Rozell. BIountsviIl(^ Private, Company A, 23rd Infantry U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in May 16, 1898. Mustered out October 28, 189S. Re-enlisted as private, Company 
A, 29th Infantry U. S. V. Mustered in March 9, 1901. Transferred to Company H, 5th 
Infantry U. S. A. March 22, 1901. Transferred to Troop D, 1st Cavalry U. S! A., July 10, 
1902. Served in the Philippines. Mustered out March 8, 1904. 

William B. Sanders. Middletown. Private, 80th Company. Coast Artillery U. S. A. 
Mu.stered in August 15, 1901. Mustered out August 14, 1904. 

Frank A. Shepherd. Greensboro. Rated as Apprentice, third class. Enlisted June 
11. 1901. Rated as Apprentice, second class and first class. Served in U. S. S. Constella- 
tion, Newport, Hartford, Columbia. Wabash and Newark. Enlistment expired July 

20, 1905. 

Charles Sipes, Middletown. U. S. Hospital Corps. Mustered in December 23, 1898. 
Served In the Philippines. Mustered out December 19, 1901. 

Martin Tarr, Lewisville. Private, Company E, 1st Infantry, U. S. A. Mustered in 
October 15, 1880. Appointed Corporal, Sergeant and First Sergeant. Mustered out Octo- 
ber 15, 1885. 

Earl Tipton. Knightstowu. Private, Company H. 20th Infantry U. S. A. Mustered 
in May 11, 1903. Transferred to Company I. 19th Infantry. U. S. A. Enlistment will 
expire May 10, 1906. 

Roy Tipton, Knightstown. Private. 25th Company. Coast Artillery, U. S. A. Mut- 
sered in November 25, 1899. Served in the China Relief Expedition. Mustered out No- 
vember 24, 1902. 

Edwin R. Upham, New Castle. Enlisted at Nashville, Davidson County. Tennessee, 
as Sergeant, Company L, 2nd Tennessee Infantry. Mustered In May 7, 1898. Transferred 
to Volunteer Signal Corps, November 17, 1898. Enlisted as Private, Company K, ISth 
Infantry, U. S. A. Mustered in April 24, 1899. Appointed Corporal. Transferred to 
Company L., 29th Infantry, U. S. V. Mustered out April 23, 1902. Enlisted again and 
is now in the army. 

Edward Vannatta, Mount Summit. Said to have served during the Spanish-Amer- 
ican War in Company I, ISth Infantry, U. S. A. Record is incomplete in this History. 

William Vannatta. Mount Summit. Said to have enlisted at Indianapolis, during 
the Spanish-American War, and is presumed to have served in the Philippines. Record 
is incomplete in this History. 

Ronald B. Veach, Knightstown. Private. Company A, 11th Infantry, U. S. A. Mus- 
tered in September 15, 1897. Served in Porto Rico. Mustered out September 15, 1900. 

Harry Warnock, Honey Creek. Enlisted at Hudson, St. Croix County. Wisconsin. 
Private, Company C, 3rd Wisconsin Infantry. Mustered in May 11, 1S9S. Must!-red out 
January 7. 1899. Enlisted as Private. Company F, 31st Infantry, U. S. V. Mustered in 
July 19, 1899. Mustered out June 16. 1901. 

Jesse Warnock. Honey Creek. Private. Company C and H. 2nd Infantry. U. S A. 
Mustered in March 1. 1899. Served in Cuba and in the Philippine.'^. Mustered out March 

21. 1902. 

Ora J. Warnock, Honey Creek. Private. Troop K, 11th Cavalry, U. S. A. Mustered 
in May 25, 1904. Enlistment will expire May 24. 1907. 

William F. White, Luray. Private, Battery L, 4th Artillery. U. S. A. Mustered in 
April 28, 1898. Mustered out March 4, 1899. 

John L. Willis, Straughn. Private, Company A. 2nd Infantry. V. S. A. Mustered 
in September 1, 1897. Died July 3. 1898, account of wounds at San Juan Hill, Cuba, 
July 1, 1898. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 697 

Mark E. Winings, Ashland. Embalnier. Entered the service July 10, laOl. Served 
on U. S. Army Transport McClellan between New York City and the Philippines. Dis- 
charged March 20. 1903. by reason of U. S. Army Transport going out of commission. 

Frank Woodward, Knightstown. Private, Company L, 31st Infantry, U. S. V. Mus- 
tered in July 24, 1S99. Mustered out May IS, 1901. 

Isaac H. Wrightsman, Mooreland. Private, 12th Battery, U. S. A. Mustered in De- 
cember 9, 1901. Appointed Corporal. Mustered out December S, 1904. 

HENRY COUNTY SOLDIERS WHO WENT TO OTHER STATES TO ENLIST DURING 

THE SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR. 

Charles H. Barr, New Castle. Enlisted at Benton Harbor. Berrien County, Michi- 
£cau. Private, Company I, 33rd Michigan Infantry. Mustered in May 16, 1S98. Appointed 
Quartermaster Sergeant. Mustered out January 7, 1S99. 

Arthur C. Bernard, Knightstown. Enlisted at Hamilton, Butler County, Ohio. Pri- 
vate, Company E. 1st Ohio Infantry. Mus^tered in April 26, 1898. Mustered out October 
25. 1898. 

John C. Bright. Cadiz. Enlisted at Horton. Brown County. Kansas. Private, Com- 
pany G, 22nd Kansas Infantry. Mustered in May 6, 1898. Mustered out November 3, 
1898. 

Lemuel D. Cummins, Sulphur Sprin.gs. Enlisted at Kansas City, Wyandotte 
€otinty, Kansas. Private, Company B, 20th Kansas Infantry. Mustered in May 9, 1898. 
Appointed Corporal and Sergeant. Mustered out October 28, 1898. 

Percy Donaldson, New Lisbon. Enlisted at Columbus. Ohio. Bugler, Company K, 
3rd Tennessee Infantry. Mustered in July 4, 1898. Mustered out January 31, 1899. 

'William E. Myers, Henry County. Enlisted at San Francisco, California. Private, 
Company C." 1st Tennessee Infantry. .Mustered in June 29, 1898. Mustered out Novem- 
ber 23. 1899. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

REC.-\PITlt..\TIOX. • 

Sergeant Major _■ ^ 

Ordnance Sergeant ,-, 1 

Quartermaster Sergeant 3 

First Sergeant 4 

Sergeant 1- 

Corporal 19 

Regimental Band 1 

Musician 1 

Bugler , '^ 

Artificer - 

Regimental Clerk 1 

Hospital Corps 1 

Embalmer 1 

Incomplete 7 

Apprentice (Navy) 2 

Ship's Barber (Navy) I 

.Machinist (Navy ) • • • ■ 1 

Second Class Baker ( Navy ) 1 

Privates ■ '^^ 

Total 14- 

BEDVCTIONS. 

Soldiers from other counties who have moved to Henry County since expiration 

of service •> 

Duplication of names by reason of promotions and transfers 42 48 

Total of soldiers and sailors in the Regular Army and Navy since the Civil War 94 



CHAPTER XXXIII. 

revolutionary war— war of 1812-i5. 

Soldiers of the Revolutionary War — Soldiers of the \\'ar of 1812-15. 

SOLDIERS OF THE RE\'OLUTI()X IX HEXRY COi'XTV. 

Froin the close of the \\'ar of the Revohition in 1783 until the lands in Henry 
County. Indiana, were placed on sale by the Government, a period of about forty 
years had elapsed. Many of the young-er patriots, who had taken part in that 
struggle, were. still living and it is definitely knowii that some of these came into 
the county soon after its settlement began and here found their last resting place. 

lielow are given in alphabetical order, the names of soldiers of the Revolution, 
known to have settled in the county, with the facts of their personal history, so 
far as known. Others, doubtless, located in Henry County', but by reason of the 
lapse of time, their names have not been obtainable. 

Richard Con-u-ay. Settled in Liberty Township in 1S21. where he afterwards en- 
tered government land. From what Colony he served in the Revolutionary War is not 
definitely known. 

Rhoderick Craig. Settled in Harrison Township. Remains said to be buried in the 
Reynolds Cemetery, near Cadiz. From what Colony he served in the Revolutionary War 
and at what time he came to Henry County are not definitely known. 

Hubbell. Settled in Liberty Township. Remains said to be buried 

in the Wisehart Cemetery, near New Lisbon. From what Colony he served in the Revo- 
lutionary War and at what time he fame to Henry County are not definitely known. 

Andrew Ice. Settled in Prairie Township in 1S32. Lived to an advanced age and 
/eft behind him a long line of descendants, a number of whom are now prominent citi- 
zens of the township. He served in a Virginia regiment, during the Revolutionary War. 
and was the father of Colonel Je.sse Ice, a soldier of the War of 1812-1815. 

Isham. Settled near the present site of Knightstown. Wayne Town- 
ship, where he lived and died. From what Colony he served in the Revolutionary War and 
at what time he came to Henry County are not definitely known. 

Christopher Long. A pioneer of Liberty Township. The remains of this venerable 
soldier of the Revolutionary War, together with those of his wife, lie buried at a point 
about four and a half miles, south of east, from New Castle, in Liberty Township, near 
what is known as the "Boyd Schoolhouse", and close to the southeast corner made by 
the crossing of the two turnpikes. Marking the grave, stands a marble monument, nine 
feet and six inches high, surrounded by an iron railing, four feet in height, and twelve 
feet long, north and south, by nine feet wide, east and west. On the west side of the 
monument, in plain view of the passing traveler, is the following inscription: 

■'CHRISTOPHER LONG. 

"A SOLDIER OF THE REVOLUTION. 

"dted auglst 14. 1829. aged f,r;hty-thhee years and three .months. 

"SARAH. HIS WIFE. DIED SEPTE.MliER 11. 1S22, IX HER 66tH YEAR." 



iiazzard's history of henry county. 699 

On the base of the monument is another inscription, containing this appeal: 

"POSTERITY PRESERVE THESE GRA\TES." 

Jacob Parlchurst. Settled in Greensboro Township, where he lived and died. From 
what Colonj- he served in the Revolutionary War and at what time he came to Henry 
County are not definitely known. 

Orr Scovell . An early settler in Henry County. Served in a New Jersey or Con- 
necticut regiment, during the Revolutionary War. At the time ot his death, he lived on 
what is now known as the Graham Farm, near the ''Old Stone Quarry Mill", in Spiceland 
Township. He was the father of Elisha Scovell, who was the father-in-law of John Mor- 
ris, of Wayne Township, and therefore the great grandfather of John M. Morris, the 
present judge of the Henry Qircuit Court. 

John Shadlow. Au early settler in Henry County. Remains are buried in White 
Union Cemetery, Fall Creek Township. From what Colony he served in the Revolu- 
tionary War and at what time he came to Henry County are not definitely known. 

James S. Stinson. Settled in Henry Township in 1822. He served in a North Caro- 
lina regiment, duriijg the Revolutionary War. 

SOLDIERS OF THESECOND W.\R (1812-1815 ) WITH GRE.\T BRITAIN 
IN HENRY COUNTY. 

From the time of the treaty of peace in December. 1814, in the second war 
between the United States and Great Britain, until William Owen had entered 
the first" tract of land in Henry County, but little more than seven years had 
ilapsed. This first entry of land by Owen bears the date of February 4, 182 1. 

The great majority of the veterans of that war were young men and many 
of them secured grants of land by reason of their military ser\nce. A number 
nought and found homes in Henry County. One of the most considerable of these 
was Colonel Jesse Ice. who was a Captain in the army of General Harrison, and 
who subsequently was promoted to the rank of Col<inel, for gallant and meritorious 
conduct. 

The names of all these defenders of the Republic, who came to Henry 
County, so far as known, are given' below, classified by townships. The list is 
not, perhaps, full and complete, but it contains the names of all that could be 
found by most diligent search. ' The sotirces of information from which this list 
is compiled are former publications relating to Henry County, lists on file in the 
different Posts of the Grayd Army of the Republic, and personal investigation by 
the author. The list of soldiers of this war for \\'ayne is probably more in- 
complete than that of anv other township in the county. 
BLUE UlYER TOWNSHIP. 

Abraham Corey, Joseph Corey. Jacob Jones. Samuel Marshall. William Moore. 
Jonathan Pierce. George Rinard. 

DUDLEY TOWNSHIP. 

Benjamin Dennis, John Jacoby, William Riadon. Merriman Straughn. John Van 
Buskirk. 

FALL CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

Solomon Bowers, Isaac Cooper. Charles Cummins, John Fadely, David Fleming, Wil- 
liam Graham, Joseph Gossett, Samuel Huston, Henry Isenhour , John Keesling, Reuben 



7O0 IIAZZARDS HISTORY OF HEXRV COUNTY. 

McConnell, Charles Mitchell. William Prigg. Henry Richman, Anthony Sanders, Jacob 
Shedron. Thomas "Windsor, Thomas Wisehart. 

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 

Jacob Lawson. David Messick, Samuel Templeton. 

GREENSBORO TOWNSHIP. 

Henry Camplin. Jacob Elliott. John Englerth. John Judge. 

HARRISON TOWNSHIP. 

Thomas Allen. Israel Jackson. John McCormack. Peter Spencer. 

HENRY TOWNSHIP. 

David Bowers, Henry Fitch, Alexander Johnson. William JIcDowell, David Phillips. 
■Levi Shackle. Asahel Woodward. 

JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP. 

Aaron Ballard, Samuel Beavers, John Cummins, John Hayes. 

LIBERTY TOWNSHIP. 

Isaac Baker, John Collingsworth. William Grose, John Nicholson, Hiram Perry. 
Moses Robertson, George Thornton, Ashbury Wood. 

PRAIRIE TOWNSHIP, 

.Micliael Brannon. Joseph Cowgill. James Dodd, Robert Downs, Absalom Harvey. 
Benjamin Harvey, William Hazelton. Geor.?e Howk. Jesse Ice, William Longfellow, Philip 
Shively, Alexander Winders. 

SPICELAND TOWNSHIP. 

Levi Butler. Christian Fout, Jesse L. Smith. 

STONY CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

.Andrew Blount. Bissell Burr, Edward Daugherty, Isaac Daugherty, Peter Davis, 
Daniel Hejfner, John Moore, Jonathan Ross, Nathaniel Thalls, Daniel Trowbridge. 

WAYNE TOWNSHIP. 

Waitsel M. Carey. Major William Doughty, Daniel Mason, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

The author has been unable to classify the following lj.v townships: Jacob Chrest- 
ner. Enoch Hoglin, David Landis. Martin Oder, David Porter, Humphrey Sutton, James 
Walters, 



CHAPTER XXXIV. 



[■HE MEXICAN WAR. 



UiuEF History of the Mexican War — Papers Relating to the AIexican 
War by Captain Pyrrhus Woodward — Roster of Mexican War Sol- 
diers Not Mentioned by Captain Woodward — Companies Organized in 
Henry County for the Mexican War, Not Called into Active Service 
— Personal Recollections of the Mexican War by Da\'U) Be.vrley — 
George Burton — Recapitulation. 

During the administration of Governor James Wliitcomb the war with 
]\Iexico occurred, which resulted in annexing to the United States vast tracts of 
land in the South and West. Indiana contributed her full ratio to the troops in 
that war, and with a remarkable spirit of promptness and patriotism adopted all 
measures to sustain the general Government. These new acquisitions of ter- 
ritory re-opened the discussion of the slavery question, and Governor Whitcomb 
expressed his opposition to a further extension of^the "national sin." 

The causes which led to a declaration of war against Mexico in 1846, must 
be sought for as far back as the year 1830, when the present State of Texas 
formed a province of New and Independent Mexico. During the years imme- 
diately preceding 1830, Moses Austin, of Connecticut, obtained a liberal grant of 
lands from the established Government, and on his death his son was treated in an 
equally liberal manner. The glowing accounts rendered by Austin, and the vivid 
picture of Elysian fields by visiting journalists, soon resulted in the influx of a 
large tide of immigrants, nor did the movement to the Southwest cease until 1830. 
The Mexican province held a prosperous population, comprising 10,000 American 
citizens. The rapacious Government of the Mexicans looked with greed and 
jealousy upon their eastern province, and, under the presidency of General Santa 
Anna, enacted such measures, botli unjust and oppressive, as would meet their 
design of goading the people of Texas on to revolution, and thus afford an 
opportunity for the infliction of punishment upon subjects whose crime was 
industry and its accompaniment, prosperity. Precisely in keeping with the course 
pursued by the British toward the colonists of the Eastern States in the last cen- 
tury, Santa Anna's Government met the remonstrances of the colonists of Texas 
with threats ; and they, secure in their consciousness of right, quietly issued their 
declaration of independence, and proved its literal meaning on the field of Gonzales 
in 1833, having with a force of 500 men forced the Mexican army of 1,000 to flee 
for refuge to their strongholds. Battle after battle followed, bringing victory 
always to the Colonists, and ultimately resulting in the total rout of the ?^Iexican 
arm\- and the evacuation of Texas. The routed armv after a short term of rest 



-jOl HAZZARDS HISTORV Ol-' HENRY COUNTY. 

reorganized, and reappeared in the Territory, S.ocxd strong. On April 21, a 
division of this large force under Santa Anna encountered the Texans under 
General Samuel Houston on the ba'nks of the San Jacinto, and though Houston 
could only oppose 800 men to the Mexican legions, the latter were driven from 
the field, nor could they reform their scattered ranks until their General was cap- 
tured the next day and forced to sign the declaration of 1835. The signature of 
Santa Anna, though ignored by the Congress of the Mexican Republic, and con- 
sequently left unratified on. the part of Mexico, effected so much, that after the 
second defeat of the army of the Republic all the hostilities of an important nature 
ceased, the Republic of Texas was recognized by the powers, and 'subsequently 
becanle an integral part of the United States, July 4, 1846. At this period General 
Herrera was president of Mexico. He was a man of peace, of common sense, and 
very patriotic ; and he entertained, or pretended to entertain, the great neighboring 
Republic in high esteem. For this reason he grew unpopular with his people, 
and General Paredes was called to the presidential chair, which he continued' to 
occupy until the breaking out of actual hostilities with the United States, when 
General Santa Anna was elected thereto. 

Captain Pyrrhus Woodward, a soldier of two wars, having served in the 
Mexican War, as Orderly Sergeant, Company H, 5th Indiana Infantry, and in the 
Civil War, as Captain, Coni])any C. 36th Indiana Infantry, a full biographical 
sketch of whom is published in this History (Chapter XMI). left, among his 
papers rel;iiiiiL: to ilu Mexican War. in three parts, a full account of "Henry 
County's conlrilnition to the history of that sanguinary contest."' 

Captain Woodward was th^ paternal uncle of the author o'f this History, and 
it was at his house that the latter was making his home when the Civil War began, 
and became a soldier in the company commanded by Captain \\^oodward. 

The papers relating to the Mexican War, prepared by the last named, have 
been furnished to the author for publication in this History by the daughter of 
Captain Woodward, Mrs. Belle Springer, of New Castle, and here follow in their 
several i)arts. 



The admission of Texas, which had previously ileclared its independence, into 
rhe Union in 1845, was the beginning of unfrieiitll\- relations between the United 
States and Mexico. The western boundary of lite new State was in dispute, and 
its annexation to the United States was regarded as an unfriendly act liy our 
neighboring Republic. Our Government sent General Taylor into the iiewl\- 
acquired territory with an army of occupation. On the 28th of March, 1846, 
General Taylor took up his position on the Rio Grande, opposite ^latamoras. On 
the 1 2th of April General Ampudia. the Mexican General, notified Taylor to retire 
beyond the Xueces River, which the Mexican Government claimed was the 
western boundary of Texas. General Taylor did not heed the notice, but sent a 
force of sixty three dragoons to ascertain whether the ^Mexican troops had crossed 
the Rio Grande. A strong Mexican force fell upon this small body of troops 
and after killing and wounding seventeen of them, forced the Americans to sur- 
render. This was the first act of bloodshed, and when the news of the affair 
reached the United States, the excitement rose to a high pitch. 

On ]\lay 8. 1846. General Taylor fought the battle of Palo .\lto and on the 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY 



703 



clay following the battle of Resaca de la Palma. These battles were fought upon 
Texas soil and in both engagements, the American troops were victorious. On 
-May 16, Congress formally declared war. General Taylor crossed the Rio 
( Irande on May 18, and in September following defeated the Mexicans at Mon- 
terey. On the 23d of February, 1847, the American Army, under Taylor, en- 
countered the Mexican Army, commanded by Santa Anna, at Buena Vista, and 
although the American forces were outnumbered four to one, won a decisive 
victory, which gave the Americans the possession of the northeastern part of 
Mexico. 

The second American Army consisting of about 13,000 men, under the com- 
mand of General Scott, landed near Vera Cruz on March 9, 1847, and after a 
short siege of the city, captured the strong fortress of San Juan de Ulloa on 
March 27. The Army of General Scott pressed forward towards the City of 
Mexico, two hundred and sixtv miles from the coast, successfully fighting the 
liattles of Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Churubusco. }\Iolino del Rey, and Chapultepec, 
and on the morning of September 14, the victorious American army entered the 
City of Mexico and the American flag floated over the National Palace of Mexico. 

Under the act of Congress, approved May 13, 1846, providing for the organi- 
z:ition of volunteer troops. Governor Whitcomb had issued a proclamation calling 
fi>r volunteers and the First, Second and Third Regiments of Indiana Volunteers 
had been organized in 1846, and had promptly gone to the seat of war. The popu- 
lar sentiment of the North was by no means unanimously favorable to the war, 
for its was- believed by many that its ultimate object was the acquisition of ter- 
ritory in the interests of slavery. And while the sentiment of Henry County was 
not strongly favorable to the war, yet earl}- in 1847, a company composed of 
about sixty members was recruited at New Castle and vicinity. As my grand- 
father, Thomas Woodward had served in the RevohitiMuarx Arm\ and Asahel 
Woodward, my father, had been a soldier' in Captain Sloan's company, from 
(")hio. in the War of 1812, it was, perhaps, only natural that I should desire to 
enter the army, for I was then quite a young man, and I took an active part in 
recruiting this company, and I might say that I was in about as much danger, on 
line or two occasions, from angry wives and mothers who thought I was trying 
to persuade their husbands and sons to volunteer, as I afterwards encountered in 
Mexico. This company organized by electing, as Captain, Mathew S. Ward, a 
bright young lawyer of New Castle, who afterwards removed to !\Iississippi and 
became a Major of artillery in the Confcilc-vatr aniiv. Henry Shroyer was elected 
First Lieutenant and I was chosen Secmhl 1 .initni.int. The services of the com- 
pany were not accepted because at the time the State's quota was full. 

The Fifth Regiment of Indiana was organized in October, 1847. Captain 
Ebenezer Gary of ]\Iarion had recruited about forty men in Grant County, and on 
October 4, 1847, this body of men came to New Castle in wagons, en route to 
Indianapolis. At New Castle, the following persons from Henry County joined 
Captain Gary's company : Finley Adams, Elam .\rmfield, James N. Gary, Harvey 
Copeland, Charles Fifer, Norviel Fleming, Jeremiah Gossett: David Harker, 
Qiapman ?*Iann, \Mlliam Mann, Abner Phillips, William H. Roby, James A. 
Schuman, Henr\- Shank, George Tarkleson, George W. Thompson, David 
\\'arner. Richard \\"ebster, Pvrrhus Woodward. 



704 



HAZZARDS HISTURV OI' HEXKV COUNTY. 



The greater number of those who enlisted in Captain Gary's company, from 
Henr\- County, were from Fall Creek Township. George W. Thompson and 
David Marker were from Harrison Township; James A. Schuman from Prairie 
Township; Elam Armfield from Greensboro Township; Abner Phillips and 
Harvey Copeland from Henry Township ; James N. Gary was from Knightstovvn. 
Richard Webster and myself were from New Castle. Amos Brown, a bright 
voung colored man, twenty three years of age, and nearly white, from Fall Creek 
Township, also joined the company in the capacity of officer's cook. The ages of 
the men who enlisted from Henry County, as shown by the muster-out rolls now 
on file in the office of the Adjutant General at Indianapolis, and which have been 
consulted in the praparation of this article were as follows : Finley Andrews, 20 : 
Elam Armfield, 25; James N. Gary. 24; Harvey Copeland. 19; Charles Fifer, 24: 
Xorviel Fleming, 18; Jeremiah Gossett. 32; David Harker, 19; Chapman iMann. 
22 ; William Mann, 24; Abner Phillips, 21 ; William H. Roby, 40; James A. Schu- 
man, i8;^Henry Shank, 29; George Tarkleson, 43; George W. Thompson, 21-. 
David Warner, 21 ; Richard Webster, 21 ; Pyrrhus Woodward. 25. 

Dr. James W. Montgomery, of L.ewisville, well known to the older citizens of 
Franklin Township, had enlisted in another company of the Fifth Regiment and 
William D. Schuman, of Prairie Township, and a brother of James .\. Schuman 
had previously enlisted in another regiment. 

Captain Gary's company remained in New Castle over night, and on OctolxT 
5, departed for Indianapolis in wagons, going by the way of Knightstown and 
Greenfield. With the addition of the Henry County recruits the company had 
about sixty members. On the first night after leaving New Castle we stopped at 
Greenfield and were taken to the home of the citizens. The next day we reached 
Indianapolis, where we took the train for Madison, Indiana, going by the new 
railroad, which had just been completed. Here we went into camp where several 
companies had preceded us. 

The commissioned officers of the company had been selected before the coni- 
pany'left Marion and were as follows: Captain, Ebenezer Gary; First Lieutenant. 
Thomas F. Marshall; Second Lieutenant, David Shunk; additional Second Lieu- 
tenant. Joseph W. riiillidax'. .\t Madison, about tvv"enty recruits from Jefferson 
County were assigned to our company which now had its full complement of men. 
The non-commissioned officers of the company were selected at Madison and I was 
chosen second, or duty, sergeant and Henry Shank third duty sergeant. Captain 
Gary's company was mustered into the service of the L^nited States on October 
14. 1847, as Company H. of the Fifth Regiment of Indiana Foot Volunteers, as 
the regiment was designated on the records of the Adjutant General's office. The 
members of the various companies were in the main young men, and imbued 
\vit]i a lofty spirit of patriotism. The stern realities of war had not yet worn 
oft' the glamour which surrounds a soldier'» life and every company in camp had 
chosen a name, illustrating at once the ardor as well as the light hearted en- 
thusiasm of new troops, and by these names the different companies were 
designated upon 'the rolls. The Indiana Guards, from Vernon, commanded by 
Captain Horace Hull, were mustered as Company A; Captain George Greene's 
Rough and Ready Guards from Qnarlestown became Company B ; the Covington 
Guards from Madison, commanded by Captain Robert M. Evans, became Com- 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



705 



pany C; the Hancock B'hoys from Greenfield, commanded by Captain James R. 
Bracken, were mustered as Company D ; the Shelbyville Hards from Shelbyville, 
commanded by Captain Samuel McKinsey, became Company E : the Centre 
Guards from Madison, commanded by Captain John McDougall, became Com- 
pany F; Grabbers No. 2, from Lawrenceburg, commanded by Captain Aaron C. 
Gibbs, were mustered as Company G. Our own Company H, was known as the 
Washington Guards. The Montgomery boys from Crawfordsville, commanded 
by Captain Allen T^Iay, were mustered as Company I and the Wayne Guards from 
Madison, commanded by Captain David W. Lewis, as Company K. 

The organization of the Fifth Regiment was completed at Madison and our 
regimental' officers were James H. Lane, Colonel; Allen May, Lieutenant Colonel; 
John M. Myers, Major; James Baker, was Regimental Quartermaster; James S. 
Athon, Surgeon and John M. Lord Adjutant. Colonel Lane had entered the 
army as Captain of the Dearborn Volunteers and had seen service in the Third 
Regiment, before he became Colonel of the Fifth. He was thirty three years old, 
a handsome man and a gallant soldier. His subsequent brilliant but stormy 
career in Kansas and Missouri is well known. Captain Alay of Company J. re- 
cruited at Crawfordsville, was promoted to be Lieutenant Colonel and Lieutenant 
^lahlon D. Manson, afterwards a distinguished officer in the Civil War became 
Captain of the company. John M. Myers, Major, was twenty-seven years of age, 
and a very competent officer. A few of the companies were jnot full and according 
to E. D. Mansfield's History of the Mexican War, the roster of the Fifth Regi- 
ment showed "973 men. The First, Second and Third Regiments of Lidiana had 
enlisted for one year, but the enlistment of the Fourth and Fifth Regiments was 
for the war. 

We remained in camp at Madison about three weeks where we received our 
uniforms, which were of dark blue cloth, something like those worn in the late 
war, and we wore caps. The light blue overcoats worn during the late war, were 
very similar to those issued to our regiment. A letter bearing date October 15, 
1857, in the New Albany Democrat and reproduced in the Indiana State Sentinel 
of October 23, gives a view of the Fifth Regiment at Madison as follows : "Nine 
companies have arrived and been mustered into the service. The last one, Captain 
Gary's company from Grant County, was mustered in last evening. All the 
companies are now in camp and comprise in all something like 700 men, and 
recruiting for the various companies is going on rapidly. Every one about the 
camp is in the highest spirits. Every volunteer is elated with the hope of soon 
leaving that they may aid their fellow soldiers in subduing our treacherous and 
obstinate foe and share in the revels in the halls of the Montezumas — that all ab- 
sorbing desire of the volunteer that is now being realized in the City of the 
Aztecs. The clothing of the different companies is going on rapidly and will be 
completed by the last of next week at farthest." A contemporary notice of the 
Fifth Regiment in the Madison Courier is as follows : "During the time this body 
of men have been encamped here, they have conducted themselves with great 
propriety, and their conduct has reflected credit on the character of the volunteer. 
Take them all in all, they are a fine looking body of men and appear competent to 
do good service in the field." 

On Sunday, being the last day of October, or the first day of November, the 



Vo6 HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

regiment left Madison for New Orleans. Three steamboats, the Ne Plus Ultra, 
the Phoenix and the Wave were necessary to transport the regiment down the 
river. Companies C, H and I, under command of Major Myers, went on the 
Wave. Company K, not having arrived in camp in time, did not go with the 
regiment. Our journey of ten days down the Mississippi was a delightful one, 
in a delightful season of the year, and marred only by flie death of our comrade, 
David Warner, who fell overboard in the night and was drowned. The boat 
proceeded on its way, and there was much indignation among the men toward 
the captain of the boat because he did not stop the vessel and allow the body to 
be recovered. This sad accident brought to our minds some realization of the 
horrors of war. 

CHir regiment remained a day and a night at New Orleans. I regret to 
say, that while here, two members of Company H, from Henry County, deserted. 
Their names are not included in the list of volunteers from Henry County and 
are wholly suppressed in this article. One of them was a young painter who had 
come to New Castle a short time previous to his enlistment. I knew him slightly 
and while at Greenfield, on our way to Indianapolis, we took a walk together. He 
called my attention to a ring on his finger and gave me the name and address of 
a lady, and asked me, if he should be killed in battle, to send her the ring; and 
if he should be so badlv shot to pieces as to be unrecognizable, he stated that I 
might recognize him by an artificial tooth. I think the fellow so brooded over 
the possibility of being shot to pieces that he thought the Crescent City an excellent 
place in which to disappear from sight and avoid such a horrible fate. We never 
heard of him afterward. The other member of the company who deserted was 
of a good family and his comrades could never understand why he did so dis- 
creditable -a thing. At ^ladison I had been detailed as Commissary Sergeant of 
the regiment, and at New Orleans, I separated for a time from m\- company. 
Several companies of the Fifth Regiment, myself with them, embarked on the 
steamer Alabama for Vera Cruz. The remaining companies sailed on another 
vessel. Our voyage across the Gulf of Mexico, lasting some five or six days, was a 
stormy one. During the height of the storm, there was scarcely a man who did 
not feel that our vessel would go down. I remember that many of the boys, while 
the waves surged over the ship, most devoutly prayed, while others sang that 
good old song, "The Star of Bethlehem." When the waves calmed and the 
glorious sunshine appeared. I think many good resolutions were forgotten, but 
it is ever so. 

About the middle of November, we came in sight of the grim walls of San 
Juan de Ulloa, the Mexican fortress defending the city of Vera Cruz, which had 
been captured by General Scott's army, assisted by the naval forces, seven months 
before. The sight of land was a joyous one to us after our stormy voyage, even 
though it was the land of the enemy, but we knew that a friendly garrison was 
within the walls of the city. Our regiment remained in Yera. Cruz several days, 
and here we received our arms, which were the old flint-lock muskets. 

\'era Cruz was an ancient walled city built by the Spanish invader Cortez. 
the walls of the city being fortified at inter^'als. On an island about half a mile out 
in the Gulf stood the famous fortress of San Juan de Ulloa. This was an enclosed 
fortification of large size, but the fortress had been captured by Scott's army with- 



hazzard's history of henry county. 707 

out serious difficulty. Everything was new to us ; and here, for the first time, we 
saw the dark-eyed ^Mexican senoritas of whom we had heard much. The houses 
were principally two stories high and the streets narrow. There was a fine 
cathedral here, and the members of the regiment, when not engaged in military 
duties, spent the time sight-seeing. Nothing here impressed me so much as the 
vast, illimitable ocean, and almost daily I walked with comrades out upon the 
^lole, a structure built of stone and cement and extending into the Gulf. L'pon 
the occasion of our first promenade upon the Mole, not understanding the in- 
fluence of the tides, we were nearly swept ofif our feet by the sudden appearance of 
the waves, to the great amusement of the Mexicans who witnessed our discomfit- 
ure. The yellow fever and black vomit prevailed in Vera Cruz almost the entire 
vear, and our regiment was anxious to penetrate the interior. 



We now began our long march to the City of ^lexico which General Scott 
had occupied six weeks before. The Fifth regiment had been assigned to a brigade 
with the Third Tennessee regiment, commanded by Colonel Cheatham, afterwards 
a distinguished officer in the Confederate army. For the first few miles out from 
Vera Cruz, the scenery was uninteresting. The country was sparsely inhabited, 
and to our surprise and regret, it was not a land flowing with milk and honey, 
and the most active foraging parties met with but little success, but pulque, the 
native drink of the ]\Iexicans, was plentiful and was prescribed by our surgeons. 
It was mildly intoxicating, and the use of any other kind of liquors was vers- 
unsafe for Americans. It was a common saying in our army that the first case of 
intoxication for a soldier sent him to the hospital and the second case was certain 
death. 

W'e marched in light marching order, for during the day it was oppressively 
hot, but the nights were always cool and we slept under our blankets. The country 
was filled with roving bodies of Mexican cavalry called Lancers and with numer- 
ous bands of guerrillas, but the strong holds of the enemy were in possession of 
our troops. Each company of the regiment had a wagon in which its tents and 
cooking utensils were conveyed. Our rations were crackers, bacon and cofifee. 
It was asserted that some of the cracker boxes bore the date of 1835, while others 
contended that the crackers were a remnant left from the battle of New Orleans. 
The Fifth Indiana led the advance. Then came the wagon train and the 
Third Tennessee brought up the rear. No cavalry or artillery accompanied our 
command. We marched in close order and the two regiments were always within 
easy supporting distance. This was necessary, for as we proceeded on our 
march, bodies of Mexican Lancers, sometimes 4,000 or 5,000 in number, often 
appeared in sight, but as frequently disappeared, without giving us battle. The 
Lancers were armed with lances and short carbines. They wore gray uniforms, 
leather leggings and gray sojubrcivs and were mounted on sorn,- little half-starved 
horses, which bore little comparison with the fine, large horses of our 
army. They were picturesque horsemen, but poor soldiers. With the enthusiasm 
of new troops, we were anxious for battle, but before we could effectively fight 
with our flint-lock muskets, we would have to approach so near the enemy as to 



7o8 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

see the white of their eyes. The Mexicans, to our regret, never allowed us to 
get SO close. 

Our inarch was over the great national highway from the coast to the interior 
and over the same road along which General Scott's victorious army had marched. 
Thirty-five miles from Vera Cruz, we crossed La Puenta Nacional, a splendid 
bridge, spanning Rio Antiqua. From now on, the scenery was fine, our march 
being through an undulating country with shade trees and mixed chapparral on 
either side of the road. We marched from ten to thirty miles a day, depending 
upon circumstances. If. in the middle of the afternoon, we discovered a fine 
spring of water near our line of inarch, we selected a site for a camp near by. 
Otherwise our march was prolonged until a suitable camping place was found 
when we pitched our tents and built our camp fires. Strict discipline was main- 
tained, yet the nights in camp were always happy and full of the pleasures and 
diversions of army camp life. 

The first important point we passed through was Jalapa, sixty five miles from 
the coast. This was a city of about g,ooo inhabitants. It was neat and clean, and 
there were many handsome buildings here, surrounded with orange groves and 
lovely gardens filled with fruits and flowers. The climatic fevers which prevail 
on the coasts, were much less fatal to Americans after reaching Jalapa. Here our 
regiment and the Third Tennessee went into camp for a week. Cerro Gordo is a 
high spur of the Cordilleras Mountains, fifteen miles east of Jalapa, and General 
Santa Anna, commander of the Mexican Army, had selected this point as one 
having great natural advantages for defense against the invading army, but the 
battle fought here on the i8th of April had resulted in a decisive victory for the 
American Army. 

After a week in camp, we proceeded on our march. Extensive provision 
trains, carrying supplies to our army in the City of Mexico, wound their slow 
length along over the broad macadamized road from the coast to the capital, and 
we crossed several splendid bridges, magnificent specimens of architecture. The 
Fifth Indiana and Third Tennessee, marched in friendly concord, little con- 
scious of the fact that in less than fifteen years the North and South would be 
arrayed against each other in deadly conflict. The country was not populous and 
the inhabitants lived principally in the pueblos or towns and villages. The 
grandees or owners of the soil, had comfortable habitations, but the peons or 
slaves, who composed the vast body of the people, and toiled for their masters, 
lived in mere hovels. The next important town on the line of our march, after 
leaving Jalapa was Perote. There was a strong fortification here, known as the 
Castle of Perote, being next in straigth to San Juan de Ulloa. 

After the capture of the City of Mexico, the Alexican Army was divided into 
detachments which harrassed our army and endeavored to destroy General Scott's 
line of communication with Vera Cruz, and in December a Mexican force besieged 
Puebla then held by our troops. The march of our brigade was now rapid in the 
direction of the beleaguered city, but before our arrival the garrison had marched 
out of their fortifications and defeated the Mexicans who hastily withdrew. 

The country grew more fruitful as we advanced and occasional foraging 
parties now went out, but had always to be on the lookout for the Mexican Lan- 
cers, who continued to hover on our line of march. I remember that upon one 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 709 

occasion on our march. Captain Manson of Company I was so ill that Ik- had 
been obliged to ride in an ambulance, but when the enemy's cavalry came in sight 
and a fight seemed imminent, he alighted from the ambulance with difficulty and 
placed himself at the head of his company, much to the disappointment, as I 
afterwards heard, of the First Lieutenant, who had hoped to command the com- 
pany in case of an attack. 

After a forced march of several days our brigade marched into Puebla. The 
Fourth Indiana Regiment, commanded by Colonel Gorman, and a body of regular 
troops were stationed here, and the beleagured garrison had only three or four 
days before our arrival repulsed the Mexicans. Here I met Oliver H. P. Cary 
and Decatur Car\-, brothers and members of the Fourth Regiment, both of whom 
I had previously known, for they had both lived at Knightstown and afterwards 
removed to Grant County. They were brothers of Captain Ebenezer G. Gary, who 
commanded our company and also of James N. Gary, a member of our company 
from Henry County. These four brothers held a happy family reunion here. 
Later on, I met in the City of Mexico another brother, John T. Cary, who was 
serving in the regular army. Fourteen years later, Oliver H. P. Cary and I again 
marched under the flag, L as Captain of Company C of the Thirty Sixth Regiment 
of Indiana, and he, as the Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment. He was a brave 
and gallant soldier. 

The. city of Puebla is the capital of the State of Puebla and the second city in 
population in the Republic. The city was situated upon a vast plain 7,000 feet 
high, and while wholly within the torrid zone is called tierras frias or cold lands. 
Wheat of fine quality. Indian corn, barley and fruits peculiar to this region, grew 
in abundance here. The country around is volcanic and there was little beauty of 
foliage. The cactus called the prickly pear was frequent and there were some 
palm trees growing along our line of march. In the neighborhood of Puebla 
were many cultivated fields, but the methods of farming were most primitive. The 
native Mexican plowed with oxen using a plow similar to those used 2,000 years 
ago. He seemed to have no desire for better methods and looked with contempt 
upon all improvements. We had now reached a volcanic region, and near our 
line of march, after leaving Puebla, we passed a slumbering volcano from which 
smoke was issuing. Several members of our company ascended the mountain 
and looked into the crater, but I did not. 

Our march after leaving Puebla was through Plan del Rio Frio. The pass of 
Rio Frio afforded excellent opportunities of defence. Neither ancient Greece nor 
Switzerland with their mountain defiles ofifered better opportunities for repelling 
an invader. As Mr. Marcy the Secretary of War said : "Perhaps no country 
interposed so many and such formidable obstacles to the progress of an invading 
army as Mexico." Santa Anna determined to make a stand at the fortified camp 
of Contreras and on the heights of Chrurubusco. not far from the City of Mexico. 
But, with all the advantages of their position. General Scott attacked the Mexican 
strongholds and had won decisive victories at Contreras and Churubusco on the 
20th of August. 

Shortly after passing through the village of Rio Frio, the plain of Mexico 
burst upon our view. In the distance was the historic city with its lofty steeples, 
its modern splendor and ancient magnificence. Upon every side were its mag- 



7IO 



;tory of hexry county. 



nificent lakes. The view was strand and an air of romance gave everything a 
vivid coloring. The great lake Tezcuco lay to the east. To the south, we beheld 
in the hazy distance, the extinct volcano of Popocatapetl. We were strangely 
happy. It was the land of romance surrounded with the glamour of war. 

Our regiment had been anxious to reach the City of Mexico before Christ- 
mas, and in the afternoon of December 23, our march of two hundred and sixty 
miles from Vera Cruz to the capital came to an end. and with bayonets gleaming 
in the sunlight we joyfully entered the historic city of the Aztecs and later of the 
Spaniard. Our regiment marched to the famous old Convent of Santa Clara, 
where we were quartered. The convent was a two story building, and occupied, 
as I now remember, a square. The interior was a court-yard with a fountain, and 
there were walks lined with flowers. There were numerous apartments in the 
convent and these were occupied by the diflferent companies, the ofificers occupying 
for their quarters, separate apartments. A portion of the convent completely 
separated from our quarters was occupied by nuns and Sisters of Charity. 

Everything, to us, was new and strange. The people, the language, the styles 
of architecture, the manners and customs, profoundly impressed us. No city upon 
the continent possessed a histors' so strange and romantic. Its antiquity was 
venerable, and long before the discovery of America a high state of civilization 
had existed here. The history of the city goes back as far as 1325 or 1327, when 
the Aztecs were directed after their long wanderings to settle here. A century 
later, with the progress of Aztec culture, the city had greatly improved and the 
rude habitations of early times were replaced with splendid stone structures built 
principally upon the small islands of Lake Tezcuco. The Spanish invader Cortes 
caj'tured the city in 1520. It had then reached its highest splendor and contained 
500,000 inhabitants. Numerous canals intersected the city which was connected 
with the mainland by splendidly constructed causeways. Montezuma, descended 
from an ancient imperial race, was emperor. Cortes, its conqueror, described the 
city as "like a fairy creation rather than the work of mortal hands." Two years 
after its capture the city was almost wholly destroyed. The city as we saw it was 
rebuilt on the same site, although Lake Tezcuco seems to have greatly subsided. 
From 1521- to 1821 Mexico was a dependency of Spain. It was a countrv filled 
with gold and silver, and its inhabitants were looked upon by their conquerors 
as slaves fit only to dig the precious metals out of the earth and pour them into 
the Spanish treasury. For three hundred years viceroys from Spain governed the 
City of Mexico and the surrounding country, living in kingly splendor ; but in 
1821 the Mexicans threw ofif the yoke of Spain. But the Spanish civilization, 
modified by the traditions and superstitions of the Aztecs, had left its indelible 
impress upon the great city. It was the romantic history of the Aztecs, and the 
sight of the mountains and lake in the midst of which they had dwelt, that 
inspired a young lieutenant of the Third Regiment of Indiana, commissioned as 
Lewis Wallace, to write the beautiful story of "The Fair God." 

The modern City of Mexico as we beheld it contained more than 100,000 
inhabitants and was 7,500 feet above the sea-level. Its streets all ran at right 
angles and its main thoroughfares converged on the central Plaza or Main Square. 
The plaza contained fourteen acres artistically laid out and filled with trees and 
flowers and adorned with marble fountains. The public buildings were built upon 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



711 



the plaza, and towering above the g-oveniment buildings and facing to the North 
was the great Cathedral, the largest church in America. This magnificent edifice 
was begun in 1573 and completed in 1657. On the east side of the plaza was the 
National Palace, with a frontage of 657 feet. This building was formerly the 
residence of the Spanish viceroys, but was then occupied by the government 
ofifices and contained the government archives. The Mexican Congress also con- 
vened in the building. One half of the city seemed to be composed of convents, 
churches and other ecclesiastical structures. But with all the splendor of the 
buildings on the plaza, the buildings in the outskirts of the city were principally 
one-story houses and mere hovels. One singular thing which we noticed was that 
there were no chimneys and I did not see a grate or stove while in the citv. The 
people warmed and cooked by ovens and the smoke escaped through openings 
in the roof. 

There were some fine promenades in the city. One was the famous Alameda, 
planted with stately beeches. Another fine avenue extended out to the Castle of 
Chapultepec. Along these promenades and in the plaza the soldiers were accus- 
tomed to saunter. The back streets were very narrow and the sidewalks just 
wide enough for two. It was the custom of the soldiers to go in twos, and when 
they met a Mexican he was usually shoved into the street. Fully one half of the 
population were full-blooded Indians, descendants of the aboriginal inhabitants; 
about a fourth were half-breeds, being half Spanish and half Indian. The re- 
mainder were pure whites, descendants of the Spanish conquerors. 

Our surroundings at Santa Clara were very pleasant, yet two things made our 
lot less agreeable. We were unacclimated, and on account of the exhalations from 
the lakes and the bad sanitary condition of the city, much sickness prevailed, and 
many members of the regiment were sent to the hospital. Our rations were also 
far from satisfactory both as to quantity and ciuality. 

For several reasons our army, while in the City of Mexico, was poorly fed and 
poorly clad. One of the reasons for this state of afifairs was the great distance 
from the base of supplies and the difficulties in the matter of transportation. To 
our scanty rations of hard bread, bacon and coffee, a limited supply of Me.xican 
beef was added, but we were still inadequately supplied, and there was considerable 
dissatisfaction throughout the regiment. Colonel Lane was a good officer but a 
strict disciplinarian, and on this account, was not, in the beginning of our service, 
altogether popular with the men just out of civil life and unused to military re- 
straints, and while the Colonel was young in years as well as in appearance, he 
was known throughout the regiment as "Old Jim." 

One day the members of Company H held a meeting in the old convent and 
passed some resolutions respecting our limited supply of rations. While this pro- 
ceeding was altogether unmilitary, yet the resolutions were respectful and called 
upon our commanding officer to remedy the evil, if possible. As I was now 
orderly sergeant I was designated to present the resolutions to Colonel Lane. 
With a good deal of trepidation, I went to headquarters. Saluting the Colonel, 
I briefly stated the object of my visit and presented the resolutions. He was rather 
curt, but read the communication carefully. He then turned the paper over and 
wrote that he had done everything possible to secure better rations for the men, 
and had importuned and even demanded of the commissary department better 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



supplies, but without avail. He then ordered me to form the company in line 
and read his communication to the men. I did so, and reports of the affair spread 
throughout the regiment, and while our rations were not increased the Colonel's 
popularity steadily grew. 



Amos Brown, the young colored man from Fall Creek Township, continued 
to act as cook for the officers of Company H. He had always desired to be regu- 
larly mustered into the service and the officers of the company were not unwilling 
to have him paid by the Government, rather than out of their own pockets. As 
I was supposed to have some prejudices on the color line, some of the members 
of the company, while in the City of Mexico, asked me to interpose no objections 
to his being mustered into the service, and I made none, and on December 31, 
as shown by the muster rolls, Brown was mustered into the service of the United 
States as a member of our company. And thus a colored man from Henry 
County tiecame a soldier fifteen years before colored men were enlisted in the 
great Civil War. 

On Sundays many members of the regiment attended the old cathedrals and 
beheld for the first time, the impressive religious ceremonies of the Catholic 
Church, while others attended in the afternoon the bull fights and witnessed the 
exciting contests of the arena, which never failed to attract the attendance of the 
Mexican aristocracy. Many members of the regiment, most of whom were 
unmarried, cultivated the acquaintance of the senoritas many of whom were 
handsome, with their dark eyes and olive tints, but the freedom of their manners 
was always a complete surprise to an American. Even the higher classes of 
Mexican women who were supposed to live most secluded lives, restrained by 
the traditional customs of the Spanish race and the most punctilious forms of 
etiquette, were nothing averse to little flirtations with our soldiers. 

As upon shipboard, the slightest incidents relieve the monotony, so, unim- 
portant incidents in our garrison life varied the monotony from day to day. While 
in the City of Mexico, our regiment was paid oflf, our monthly wages being counted 
out to us in silver. For risking his life in this dreadful climate, ten fold more de- 
structive than the enemy's bullets, the private soldier received seven dollars per 
month. Pay day to the soldier was an event of no little importance, and the ill 
fed soldiers, who a few weeks before, had left comfortable homes in Indiana 
were wont to frequent the restaurants so long as their money lasted and indulge 
in Mexican dishes of doubtful origin. We received our mail once a month and 
news from home was always joyfully received. But the return mails too often 
carried to homes, in the North, sad tidings of the death of some loved one. 

An event which threatened for a time to lead to the most serious consequences 
now occurred. A portion of the old convent of Santa Clara where the Fifth 
Regiment was quartered was, as I have before stated, occupied by a body of nuns 
of the Catholic Church. Their apartments were completely isolated from our 
quarters and were in a remote part of the convent. A soldier without evil intent, 
but with a desire to play a practical joke, managed to surreptitiously gain admit- 
tance to their apartments, to their great surprise and consternation. The news of 
this afifair, so sacrilegious to a Catholic, spread through the city and profoundly 




COMPANY H, 69th INDIANA INFANTRY. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



713 



excited the populace. The act was regarded as an iiisuh to their religion and a 
violation of the most sacred of its institutions. The excitement among the Mexi- 
cans was ver\- great and there were ominous threats. There were perhaps, not to 
exceed 10,000 American troops in the city and its suburbs and these were quar- 
tered remotely from each other. At the time of the greatest excitement I was in 
charge of the guard at the Custom House where eight hundred ^^lexican women 
were engaged in making clothing for our troops. Half of the guard was with- 
drawn and ordered to report at the convent where an attack by the infuriated 
populace was threatened. Fortunately the excitement subsided without serious 
results. 

The rations doled out to the regiment at Santa Clara showed no improvement. 
All of our money was spent since the last pay da}- and so with a boldness born 
of impecuniosity and a hunger never quite satisfied, I entered a bakerv and asked 
for bread. The baker placed several loaves on the counter. \Mth my limited 
knowledge of Spanish, I said to him, A poco ticinpo, meaning that I would pay 
for it in a short time. The baker reached for the bread, but I anticipated him and 
picked up the loaves. I wrote my name on a slip of paper and handed it to the 
baker, who placed it in a drawer. I took the bread to our quarters and for two 
or three days our mess fared sumptuously. A few days afterwards, our regiment 
was paid off and with my monthly stipend in my pocket, I went to the place of 
business of my friend, the baker, who remembered me, and to his great surprise, 
paid for -the bread. The news of this little transaction spread among the dealers 
along the street, and my credit was so well established, that I could, 1 think, have 
bought all the bakeries on the street, on time. 

Death was decimating the ranks of our army. Men out of an equable climate 
of the North temperate zone could not withstand the fevers of a plain in the 
torrid zone, 7,500 feet above the level of the sea. To the dangers of the climate 
to an American, were added those of the bad sanitary conditions of a great city. 
Many members of the Fifth Regiment were in the hospital. Captain Gary and 
Lieutenant Marshall died in the City of Mexico and Lieutenant Shunk was pro- 
moted to the captaincy of Company H. The bodies of our dead officers were 
placed in metallic coffins and taken to Vera Cruz, whence they were to be trans- 
ported to their homes at Marion, but the superstitious sailors would not allow the 
corpses to be brought on shipboard, and their remains were buried in the cemetery 
at Vera Cruz where several hundred American soldiers were buried. 

There was an ancient cemetery connected with the convent of Santa Clara, 
for every ecclesiastical edifice of importance had its burying ground. Here in this 
cemetery. 2.500 miles from home, many members of the Fifth Regiment were 
buried. Every cemetery of importance, whether in peace or war, is apt to have its 
grave robbers. It was discovered that Mexican ghouls were despoiling the graves 
of our dead comrades. No valuables were ever buried with the bodies of our 
comrades, but their graves in numerous instances had been opened and the 
corpses stripped of their clothing. I was ordered one night to take a squad of 
men and capture the wretches if possible. We stealthily approached the cemetery 
under the cover of night, but the ghouls who had opened three graves and stripped 
two bodies, had confederates, and fled into the chapparral. 

After performing garrison duty in the City of Mexico, for a month, the Fifth 



714 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Regiment was ordered to Molino del Re}', or The King's Mill, five miles east of 
the capital and not far from the Castle of Chapultepec. We bade farewell forever 
to the old convent and marched to our new quarters. Here we selected a pleasant 
camp and pitched our tents. The Mill of the King from which the place takes its 
sonorous Spanish name was a stone building several hundred feet long and one 
story high. Previous to the battle which was fought here, on September 8, the 
Mexicans had used the mill as a cannon factory. Here the regiment performed 
ordinary garrison duty and had daily drill. Our regiment had no chaplain, but on 
Sunday, the members of the regiment were accustomed to attend religious services 
in a grove near the Castle of Chapultepec. 

A Mexican lady of high rank who had known Colonel Lane on the Rio 
Grande paid him a visit at Molino del Rey. She was mounted on a fine horse and 
was attended hy an escort. There was nothing unusual in her visit and the only 
thing which attracted our attention was the fact that she rode astride her horse. 
Her habiliments which came well down on both sides of her horse were modest 
and decorous and I only recall the incident now to illustrate the fact that the 
strictest conventionalities of the country permitted her to ride in a manner both 
comfortable and safe. I afterwards learned that this was the usual way for all 
Mexican women and people of Spanish extraction to ride, commonly called, 
"riding Spanish." 

An armistice had been agreed upon by the commanders of the .\merican and 
Mexican armies, August 24, 1847. This armistice provided that "hostilities should 
instantly and absolutely cease between the armies of the United States of America, 
and the United Mexican States within thirty leagues of the capital of the latter 
State." Nicholas P. Trist, the commissioner for the United States, had for a long 
time been vainly endeavoring to negotiate a treaty of peace with the Mexican 
Government. Notwithstanding the armistice, bodies of Mexican Cavalry oc- 
casionally made dashes within our lines, and the monotony of garrison life at 
Molino del Rey was varied by an exciting episode one night when our regiment 
and the Third Tennessee were ordered out to disperse a body of Mexican Cavalry. 
We hastily formed in line and marched to Guadalupe seven or eight miles distant, 
only to find the enemy fleeing and hear the splashing of the water as their cavalry 
plunged into a ditch along the road side. 

Our regiment remained at Alolino del Rey about six weeks and was then 
ordered to San Augustin, eleven miles south of the City of Mexico. San 
Augustin was an aristocratic place with its beautiful residences and lovely orange 
groves, a suburb of the capital and the home of many wealthy Mexicans and proud 
hidalgos. Here our regiment was assigned to a brigade with the Fourth Regi- 
ment of Tennessee commanded by Colonel Waterhouse. I remember Colonel 
Waterhouse as an old gray bearded farmer-like gentleman, whose appearance was 
in marked contrast with that of our handsome colonel. 

Our surroundings at San Augustin were very agreeable, and our duties the 
ordinary and uneventful duties of garrison life. The regiment was quartered in 
a building used for cocking mains. There was an open space in the center where 
the cock fights took place and the benches rose one above another as in an amphi- 
theater. Here upon these benches where the Mexican rabble nvere accustomed to 
sit, our soldiers slept at night. On the 28th of May, 1848, our comrade William 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUXTY. 715 

H. Roby of Fall Creek Township died at San Augustin and his ranains repose 
there in an unknown grave. Life and property were more secure in Mexico, after 
its occupation by our troops than ever before, and our army furnished an excellent 
market to the Mexicans for all their products. And while we were invaders of 
the country and our arms had even,-where been victorious, the Americans were 
not wholly ufiwelcome and the people of all classes, descendants of one of the 
proudest races of Europe treated us with great consideration and with the polite- 
ness proverbial among the higher classes of Mexicans. 

Soldiers proverbially enjoy favor in feminine eyes and as the most attractive 
young Mexicans were at the time absent from home, riding over the country as 
Lancers, los Americanos, and the officers especially were in high favor with the 
Mexican ladies at San Augustin, and many little courtships were carried on under 
the guise of language schools, in which the Americans taui^lit IjiL^lish to the 
sciioritas and in turn received instruction in Spanish. Sunic amusing stories 
were in circulation at the time, concerning these international language lessons. 
One member of our company from Henry County confessed that he had serious 
intentions of marrying a wealthy Mexican lady and remaining in the country, 
but a feeling of homesickness so overcame him when the regiment began its 
homeward march, that he bade farewell forever to the fair lady and soon after 
his return home, found solace in a Henry County wife. 

The reflections made by General Taylor in his official report of the battle of 
Ikiena \'ista concerning the conduct of the Second Indiana Regiment in this 
engagement, and the criticisms of JeiT Davis, who commanded the Mississippi 
Rifles, and others upon the conduct of this regiment, were much discussed through- 
out the anny. The members of the Fifth Regiment were indignant at the 
reflections upon our State, and while the regiment was stationed at San Augustin 
Colonel Lane, in order to give us an opportunity of wiping out what we considered 
an unjust stigma upon the soldiers of Indiana had asked permission to lead the 
advance of our army in the direction of San Luis Potosi, and as I understand 
this privilege had been granted, in case hostilities were resumed in that direction. 

On February 2, 1848, a treaty of peace had been signed at Guadalupe Hidalgo, 
by Nicholas P. Trist, commissioner on behalf of the United States. Several 
months elapsed before the treaty received the approval of the- government of the 
L^nited States. In the latter part of May, however, it became definitely known 
that hostilities were at an end and the Fifth Regiment received orders to march 
to Vera Cruz. Leaving forever our pleasant quarters at San Augustin, and 
casting a last look upon the historic City of ^Mexico, we set out upon our long 
march. Our march to the sea was a leisurely and uneventful one over the same 
route by which we had entered the country. At Puebla, eight recruits joined our 
company only to return home within a few weeks after their enlistment. Dr. 
Montgomery' of Lewisville, had been promoted to the rank of Assistant Surgeon 
of the regiment, and on our return march died shortly before we reached \'era 
Cruz. 

About twenty five miles from \'era Cruz our regiment went into camp on the 
hacienda of General Santa Anna. Here we remained about ten days awaiting 
a steamer to carry us North. About the first of July we sailed from Vera Cruz. 
The walls of San Juan de UUoa slowly faded from our sight and we were home- 



7i6 hazzard's history of henry county. 

ward bound. On July 4, Levi Donihue, one of the eight recruits who had joined 
our company at Puebla, died on shipboard. I well remember the event and the 
muster rolls give the date of Donihue's death. As First Sergeant I had charge 
of the burial and by my direction, the dead body was sewed up in a blanket with 
stones placed at the feet, and with the ceremonies attending a sailor's burial, the 
body was cast into the Gulf. ■ With this exception our voyage across the Gulf was 
an uneventful one. Joyful anticipations of meeting loved ones at home filled our 

' hearts. But withal we could not wholly escape a feeling of sadness, for many 
of our comrades were left behind, never to return. The vessel bearing us home 
steamed up the Mississippi. The regiment disembarked at New Orleans, where, 
after a delay of a day or two, we took a boat for the North. There had been 
many changes in our company. Noting the changes among the living, I had been 

' promoted to be first Sergeant ; Henry Shank, Second Sergeant ; Richard Webster, 
First Corporal, and Charles Fifer, Fourth Corporal. On July id, while on the 
Mississippi, another member of Company H died. About the 25th of July the 
Fifth Regiment reached Madison in our own beloved State and here on July 28, 
1848, where, ten months before, we had been mustered into the service of the 
United States, we were discharged, and the members of the company regretfully 
bidding each other goodby, many of them never to meet again, were soon in the 
bosoms of their respective families. 

The war with Mexico was one of conquest undoubtedly, for when the treaty 
of Guadalupe Hidalgo was ratified, 900,000 square miles of territor}' were added 
to the domain of the United States, including California and what is now New 
Mexico and Arizona. The war in its inception and prosecution had been severely 
condemned by a large portion of the people of the Northern States. But of the 
men from Indiana, who marched under the flag, in this struggle, and the same is 
true of the vast majority of the rank and file of the anny, no one, I think, believed 
he was fighting for conquest, much less for human slavery. The men who con- 
fronted the dangers of death from disease and upon the battlefield, saw only the 
Nation engaged in a struggle with a foreign power, and rallied as patriots and 
soldiers to the defense of their country and its flag in time of peril. - 

Men propose but an overruling Providence seems often to dispose of human 
events. And thus if the war was begun in the interests of human slavery, its 
purpose wholly failed, for in 1848, California was admitted into the Union as a free 
State, and its admission gave the free States a preponderance in the affairs of 
the government. In the same year gold was discovered in the new State and the 
wealth of the Nation vastly increased. New Mexico and Arizona with their 
mountainous areas and arid climate yet remain territories, with vast possibilities, 
but the civilization of the Anglo-Saxon has supplanted that of the Spaniard in 
all this vast territory. And whatever may have been the motives which led to 
the Mexican War, there can be no doubt that its results advanced the cause of 
human freedom, increased the National prosperity and promoted human intelli- 
gence and the cause of civilization. 

When the Fifth Regiment reached Madison, death had fearfully decimated 
its ranks. Company H had sufl^ered greatly and twenty one of its members sleep 
today in unknown graves in a foreign land. Many of its members returned 
broken in health and Abner Phillips and Jeremiah Gossett died within a short time 



IIAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 717 

after their return, victims of an inhospitable chmate and as much a sacrifice upon 
the altar of their country as if they had fallen upon the battlefield. Every man 
from Henry County, so far as lies within my knowledge, did his whole duty and 
reflected credit upon his State and county. Some of them afterward did service 
in the war for the Union. But nearly all of them are now with the silent majority, 
and after the lapse of almost half a century, it affords me pleasure to pay this 
tribute to all my comrades, living and dead. 

Two of the above named Mexican War soldiers had records in the Civil War. 
Elam Armfield enlisted from Knightstown in Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry, 
as a private, and was mustered into the service of the United States, December 
13, 1861. He was discharged for disability, June 24, 1862. George W. Thomp- 
son went from Cadiz to Illinois and enlisted at Young America, Pulaski County, 
that State, in Company C, 36th Illinois Infantry, as a private, and was mustered 
into the service of the United States, September 23, 1861. He was captured and 
held in a Confederate prison, and after his release was mustered out March 15, 
1865. After his release from the Confederate prison and When about to be dis- 
charged from the army, he purposely refrained from advising his family, which 
had .remained at Cadiz, during his service in the war, of his prospective return 
home. His purpose was to go direct from Camp Parole, Annapolis, ^laryland, to 
Cadiz and surprise them by his unexpected return. He arrived in Cadiz un- 
announced and went directly to the house where he supposed his wife to be living 
and knocked at the door. Alas ! his wife had been dead for a week or more. He 
continued to. reside in Cadiz until his death and his remains are buried in the Hess 
Cemetery, near Cadiz. 

MEXICAN WAR SOLDIERS NOT MENTIONED BY CAPTAIN WOODWARD. 

David Bearley, born in Warren County, Ohio. August 27, 1829. Moved to New Cas- 
tle after the Mexican War. Enlisted in what was known as the First Rifles Company, 
First Ohio Infantry, June 29, 1846. Took part in the siege of Monterey, Mexico, and was 
mustered out v/ith his regiment, at New Orleans, Louisiana, in the Summer of 1S47. He 
also served in the Civil War, during the Morgan Raid, in Company A, 110th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

James Brown, Knightstown. Said to have ^rved in the Mexican War, going from 
Knightstown. Information furnished by Colonel Milton Peden. Record of military serv- 
ice is not obtainable. 

George Burton, born' in Jefferson County, Indiana, October 4, 1S24. Moved to New 
Castle after the Mexican War. Served in Company H, 3rd Indiana Infantry, in the Mexi- 
can War. Took part in the battle of Buena Vista, Mexico. In the Civil War, enlisted 
from New Castle in Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, and was mustered into the serv- 
ice of the United States, as a private, September 22, 1SB4. Mustered out June 23, 1865. 
He also served, during the Morgan Raid, as Captain of Company B, 110th Indiana In- 
fantry, identical with the New Castle Guards, Indiana Legion. 

John Ds^vis. Said to have served in the Mexican War, later moving to Henry 
County and living at Greensboro. Information furnished by Daniel W. Saint, now de- 
ceased. Record of military service is not obtainable. 

Theophilus Everett, born at Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, in 1806. Moved to Mid- 
dletown after the Mexican War. Enlisted in Colonel Dodge's regiment of Dragoons 
when about twenty five years old, and served on the frontier about two years. Enlisted 
in Magruder's Battery in 1847 and served in the War with Mexico, two years. Enlisted 
from Middletown in Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry, and was mustered into the service 
of the United States, as Saddler, September IS, 1S61, and was discharged for disability, 



716 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

March 28, 1863; re-enlisted in Company K, 124th Indiana Infantry, and was mustered into 
the service of the United States, as a private, December 19, 1863, and was mustered 
out August 31, 1865. He tooli part in the battles of Shiloh, Atlanta Campaign, Franklin, 
Nashville and Wise's Forks. Served in the Civil War, forty two months; total servive, 
seven years and six months. 

Oliver P. Fort, Knightstown. Served in the Mexican War in the company of the 
4th Indiana Infantry, of which Oliver H. P. Gary (afterwards Colonel of the 36th Indiana 
Infantry) was First Lieutenant. He went to Pike's Peak, Colorado, in 1859, with the 
Colonel Peden party. He remained in Colorado and, when the Civil War broke out, en- 
listed in Company K, 2nd Colorado Cavalry, and was mustered into the service of the 
United States, as a private, January 27, 1863. He died at Benton Barracks, St. I^ouis, 
Missouri, January 12, 1864. His remains were taken to his old home at Knightstown 
and there buried in the Old Cemetery. 

Ezra Gillingham, Baltimore, Maryland. Said to have served in the Mexican War. 
Record of military service in that war not obtainable. In the Civil War he enlisted from 
Weisburg, Dearborn County, Indiana, in Company I, 21st Regiment, Veteran Reserve 
Corps and was mustered into the service of the United States, as a private, September 7, 
1861. Mustered out September 12, 1864. Moved to Knightstown after the Civil War. 

George W. Hazzard, New Castle. Second Lieutenant. 4th Artillery, U. S. A. (See 
U. S. Military Academy). 

Alexander McAdoo. Said to have served in the Mexican War, later moving to 
Henry County and living at Greensboro. Information furnished by Daniel W. Saint, now 
deceased. Record of military service is not obtainable. 

Thomas Morton, born in Preble County, Ohio, August 15, 1826. Moved to Middle- 
town after the Civil War. Enlisted in Captain Hawkins' company of Ohio volunteers tor 
the Mexican War, in May. 1846. The company was not accepted and the men were mus- 
tered out in June, 1846: re-enlisted in March. 1847, in Company F, United States Mounted 
Rifles. Took part in the battles of Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Chapultepec and City of Mex- 
ico. Severely wounded in the taking of the city. September, 1847. Mustered out in Septem- 
ber, 1848. In the Civil War, enlisted at Eaton, Preble County, Ohio, in Company C, 20th 
Ohio Infantry, and was mustered into the service of the United States as a private 
April 27, 1861. Promoted Captain and Colonel. Mustered out August IS, 1861. Re-entered 
the service as Colonel of the 81st Ohio Infantry, August 19, 1861. Resigned July 30, 1864. 
Took part in the battles of Shiloh, Siege of Corinth, Town Creek, Layton and Corinth. 
Served in the Mexican War, nineteen months, and in the Civil War, thirty nine months. 

Henry Ray, St. Thomas, Franklin County, Pennsylvania. Moved to Henry County, 
Indiana, in 1852. Said to have served in a Pennsylvania regiment, for eighteen months, 
as a private, during the Mexican War. Information furnished by Henry L. Powell, of New 
Castle. Record of military service in that war is not obtainable. In the Civil War, he 
enlisted from New Castle in Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months' service), 
and was mustered into the service of the United States, as First Lieutenant, April 25, 
1861. Took part in the battle of Rich Mountain, West Virginia, July 11, 1861, and was 
mustered out August 6, 1861. Re-enlisted as a private in Company B, 5th Indiana Cav- 
alry, and was mustered into the service of the United States, August 6, 1862. Appointed 
Wagoner. Mustered out June 15, 1865. Buried in Elliott Cemetery, two miles south of 
New Castle. 

Reuben B. Stephenson. Moved to New Castle after the Mexican War. Said to 
have served in the Mexican War. Information furnished by George Burton, of New 
Castle. Record of military service in that war is not obtainable. In the Civil War, went 
to Iowa and enlisted at Des Moines, Polk County, in Company K, 10th Iowa Infantry, 
and was mustered into the service of the United States, as a private, March 6, 1862. Vet- 
eran. Appointed Corporal and Sergeant. Discharged for disability, June 25, 1865. 

Frederick Tykle. born in Preble County, Ohio, June 7, 1825. Moved to Middletown 
after the Mexican War. Enlisted in Captain Hawkins' company of Ohio volunteers for 
the Mexican War, in May. 1846. The company was not accepted and the men were mus- 
tered out in June. 1846. In March, 1847, he enlisted in Company G, 4th Infantry, U. S. A., 



IIAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. J\g 

and on arriving in Mexico was assigned to Company I. Tooli part in tlie battles of Churu- 
busco, Molino del Rey, Storming of Chapultepec and the taking of the City of Mexico. 
Mustered out in August, 1S48. General Ulysses S. Grant was at that time First Lieu- 
tenant and Quartermaster of the 4th Infantry. In the Civil War, enlisted in Company B, 
8th Indiana Infantry (three months" service), and was mustered into the service of the 
United States, as Captain of the company, April 25, 1861. and took part in the battle ot 
Rich Mountain, West Virginia, July 11, 1861. He was mustered out August 6, 1861. Re- 
entered the service and Was mustered in as Captain of Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry 
(three years' service), September .5, 1861. Resigned October 22, 1861. Served in Mexico, 
eighteen months, and in the Civil War, six months. He also served during the Morgan 
Raid as Captain of Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry. 

Jacob Wood. Said to have served in the Mexican War. Died and is buried in Lib- 
erty Township, near the old town of Chicago. Information furnished by his brothers, 
living in Liberty Township. Record of his military service is not obtainable. 

COMPANIES ORGANIZED IN HENRY COUNTY FOR THE MEXICAN WAR, NOT 

CALLED INTO ACTIVE SERVICE. 

The e.xeciitive records of tlie State of Indiana, ,on deposit in the office of the 
Secretary of State, at IndianapoHs, show that under the Act of Congress, of May 
13, 1846. the following provisional companies were organized in Henry County, 
under the authority of Governor James Whitcomb, none of which were ever 
called into active service. The first one of these companies is fully described by 
Captain Woodward, but the other five are not. They are as follows : 

Henry County Guards New Castle. January 18, 1846. Mathew S. Wai-d, Captain; 
Henry SJiroyer, First Lieutenant; Pyrrhus Wopdward, Second Lieutenant. 

Lewlsville Guards, Lewisville. July 31, 1846. William S. Price. Captain; George 
W. Truslow, First Lieutenant; Emery South wick. Second Lieutenant; Joseph Spaw, 
Ensign. 

Middletown Rifle Company, Middletown. August 1, 1S46. Simon Summers. Cap- 
tain; Henry Shank, First Lieutenant; Charles Riley. Second Lieutenant. 

Ringgold Troop. Independent Militia, New Castle. August 10, 1846. Richard Good- 
win. Captain; John Shroyer, First Lieutenant; George W. Woods, Second Lieutenant. 

An unnamed company organized in Prairie Township, August 10, 1846. Jeremiah 
Veach, Captain; Abraham W. Bouslog. Lieutenant. 

Knightstown Grays, Knightstown. September 2, 1846. Solomon McCain. Captain; 
Gordon Ballard, First Lieutenant; James Tyler, Second Lieutenant. 

PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF THE MEXICAN WAR BY DAVID BEARLEY AND 

GEORGE BURTON. 

There are three survivors of the Mexican War, now living in Henry Count\-: 
Norviel Fleming, of Sulphur Springs, and David Bearley and George Burton, of 
New Castle. Norviel Fleming served in the same company as Captain Woodward 
and his personal recollections, so far as they go, are practically covered in Captain 
Woodward's papers. A condensed- statement of the personal recollections of 
David Bearley and (jcorge Burton follow. 

D.WID BE,\RLEY. 

David Bearley was born, August 27, 1829, in Warren County, Ohio, about 
twenty miles from Cincinnati. His parents moved to the city, when he was about 
six year J old, and there he attended school and received such education as the 
times aflforded. At the age of sixteen, he apprenticed himself to A. M. and T. C. 



720 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



Davs, to learn the trade of a confectioner. Twelve months later, the war between 
the United States and Mexico was declared and, being full of patriotic spirit, it 
did not take young Bearley long to make up his mind to enlist. He volunteered 
June 29, 1846, and was assigned to the First Ohio Infantrs-. 

Mr. Bearley was attached to what was called the First Rifles Company, 
officered by Captain Ramsey, First Lieutenant Isaac Hosea and Second Lieu- 
tenant Richard Mason. They went into camp at Camp Washington, near Cin- 
cinnati, and from there on July 2, breaking camp, they marched to the city wharf 
and took steamboats for New Orleans, half of the force, on board the "New 
World," and the other half on the "Alabama." As the vessels swung into 
midstream, the bands struck up, "The Girl I Left Behind Me," and a great 
crowd on the wharf responded to the cheers of the volunteers with, "Good bye, 
boys," "good luck to you," and "God bless you." 

A short run down the Ohio River brought them to Louisville, Kentucky, and 
after passing the falls, the boat5 rounded to on the Kentucky shore, where all 
landed to listen to patriotic speeches and the reading of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence. Here also all were given an hour to go in swimming and as Mr. 
Bearley says : "I tell you, it was a great sight to see one thousand people in the 
water at one time." Once more the journey down the' Ohio was resumed and 
no stops were made until Baton Rouge, Louisiana, was reached. There they 
received their arms and ammunition and then steamed down the ^Mississippi 
River to New Orleans, where they disembarked and were sent to Camp Jackson. 
The trip from Cincinnati to New Orleans had taken about twelve days. After 
three or four days at Camp Jackson, they boarded the steamship, "Duke of 
Orleans." for Mexico. Three stomiy days and nights were taken to get to Point 
Isabel. The troops here went into camp on Brazos Island and after a week's 
rest took up the line of march for the mouth of the Rio Grande River. After 
about a week, they marched up that river some twenty miles and went into camp 
back of the river bluffs. The ground was cleaned for regimental drill, rifle 
practice and parade purposes, and was called "Camp Belknap." Three weeks 
were spent here, after which the regiment went to Camargo, on the Tiger River, 
a tributary of the Rio Grande. Three weeks later they crossed that river and 
started for Monterey. Passing through a number of important towns, they 
at last arrived at the famous Walnut Springs, in front of IMonterey, Saturday, 
September 19, 1846. The assault on this strongly fortified city was set for the 
following Monday. 

In his narration of events at this battle, Mr. Bearley says : 

"It was in this battle that I received my first 'baptism of fire' and learned 
something of the realities of war. It was here that the First Ohio Infantry and 
the First Kentucky Infantry were formed into a brigade under the command of 
General Thomas L. Hamer, of Ohio, who, while a member of Congress had 
nominated, for a cadetship at West Point, Ulysses S. Grant. General Hamer 
died and was buried at Walnut Springs but his remains were afterwards removed 
to his Ohio home. 

"After the battle I was taken with fever and ague, which was further com- 
plicated with an attack of dropsy. Because of my illness I was confined to camp 
and under the surgeon's care for about three rnonths, when the regiment was 



UAZZARDS HISTORY (JF HE.NKI- (.(lUXTY. ^2 1 

ordered to Saltillo, as Santa Anna, the Mexican General, was endeavoring to 
reach and attack that city. When the regiment moved I was sent, with others, on 
a forced march to the hospital, some distance away. In this hospital T learned 
some additional facts tonching the realities of the life of the soldier. After a few- 
weeks 1 had so far recovered my health as to warrant rejoining my regiment 
whch I did at Saltillo. ^^'e were at this latter place a week, at the expiration of 
which time, our regiment was ordered back to Monterey, where we were engaged 
mostly in performing guard duty and scouting around in that section of Mexico. 
\^^^i".e so engaged the rumor came to us that the regiment would shortly be placed 
under orders with instructions to at once return home. This order came after 
we had been at Monterey for about six weeks and you can imagine with what a 
joyful shout the welcome news was received. It was not long until we were home- 
ward bound, but our return route to the Rio Grande was over another than that 
pursued when we entered .Mexico. 

"We arrived first at Kenoso on the Rio Grande where we took boats awaiting 
our coming and going down the river came to its moiuh where we went into 
camp for a week, then marched to Brazos Island where we embarked on the 
'Duke of Orleans' and after an uneventful, but pleasant trip across the gulf, 
arrived safe and sound at New ( )rleans. Here we turned '<wr our arms and 
equipments to the government, .\fter a week's sta\- at New i )rleans we were all 
rounded up, received our pa}' and were nu'istered out of the service. At the con- 
clusion of this final event, and \vith visions- of home filling mv mind's eve, I 
secured passage on a river steamer and in the course of a week i^r ten days, the 
journey being a very pleasant one, I landed at Cincinnati and sliortl>- after had 
the pleasure of meeting and greeting relatives and friemls to sa\ nothing of 'The 
Girl I Left Behind Me.' " 

After his return from the war, ^Ir. Bearley learned the trade of a chair- 
maker and followed it for a number of years. On December 24, 1849, he mar- 
ried Sarah Jane Bell, of Montgomery County, Indiana, with whom he has lived 
happilv ever since. They have had nine children, si.x boys and three girls, five of 
wlioiu are now living, .\fter his marriage, he lived for 'about a year in Cin- 
ciimati and then luoved to Cambridge City, Indiana. After a little more than two 
}ears, he moved from there to Xew Castle, where he and his wife have lived for 
more than fifty years, having arrived there. April 14, 1853. 

After the lapse of nearly si.xty years, the grizzled veterans of the Mexican 
A\'ar are few in number and soon, very soon, none will be left to answer roll call. 

GEORGE BURTON. 

George Burton was born in JetYerson County. Indiana, near the city of 
Madison, October 4, 1S24. His parents were Henry and Mary ( Alcorne ) Burton, 
natives of Kentucky, who moved to Indiana about the year 1801. He moved to 
Xew Castle after the ^^lexican War and now resides there at the advanced age of 
eighty one years. 

When the call for volunteers for the Mexican War was luade, he enlisted in 
Coiupany H, 3rd Indiana Infantrw under Captain \'oorhis Conover, of Shelby- 
ville. The Colonel of the regiment was Jaines H. Lane, who afterwards attained 
faiue during the troubles on the Kansas border. The company was recruited in 



722 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HEXRY COUXTV. 



and around Shelbyville and when organized was sent to New Albany, Indiana, 
to receive their uniforms, and thence to New Orleans by two boats, the "James 
Hewitt" and the "Homer." Stopping at Baton Rouge to receive their arms and 
equipments, they proceeded to New Orleans and went into camp at Camp Jack- 
son, three or four miles below that city. Several days later, they were taken by 
vessels to Brazos Island, Texas, near the Gulf coast, and thence overland to the 
Rio Grande and Camp Belknap, where they remained for sometime, drilling and 
preparing for active service. Thence they marched to Palo Alto and thence in 
October to Matamoras on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. Marching to 
Camargo, they there received mules and wagons for the transportation of regi- 
mental supplies and after due preparation, started on the forward march to 
Montery, one hundred and ninety miles awa,y. 

On Christmas Eve, 1846, they arrived at Walnut Springs, four miles from 
Monterey, and on Christmas day, the soldier boys visited that city. Thence they 
marched to Saltillo, eighty miles from Monterey, reaching there on New Year's 
day, 1847. There they remained until the arrival of General \\'ool. who came 
from New Mexico, after which they moved twenty miles south to Camp Agua, 
where they tarried until General Santa Anna drove them out to the battle ground 
of Buena Vista, about four miles from Saltillo. 

In his narrative of his experiences in the Mexican War, Mr. Burton says : 
"At the battle of Buena Vista, the United States forces were under command of 
Genera! Zachary Taylor and General Wool. The battle, including preliminar\' 
fights and skirmishes, lasted from February 20 to 23, inclusive, 1847,. '^"'^ 
during that time victory hung in the balance. 

"Preliminary to the battle and under order of General Taylor the four rifle 
companies from the 2nd and 3rd Regiments, Indiana Infantry, were placed on the 
mountain side, the Sierra Madre, to guard and prevent the Mexicans from out- 
flanking us. These rifle companies were the right wing and left wing companies 
of the two regiments and were for the time under command of Major Willis A. 
Gorman. The 2nd Indiana Regiment was placed at the foot of the mountain under 
Colonel Bowles. At the right of the 2nd Indiana, the 2nd Kentucky, Colonel 
Gaines, and Lieutenant Colonel Henry Clay, was placed. Colonel Clay was the 
favorite son of the famous Henry Clay. Both Gaines and Clay were killed in 
the battle of the 23rd. The 2nd Illinois Infantry, under Colonel Bissel, was to the 
right of the 2nd Kentucky. At the right of the 2nd Illinois, in the rear of the 
mountain pass was the 3rd Indiana under command of Colonel Lane. Four pieces 
of the Washington Battery occupied the pass and were located right in front of 
the 3rd Indiana. In the rear and to the left of the regiment was General Tavlor 
and his staff. 

"On the evening of the 22nd three of General Santa Anna's staff came 
through the lines and at the fort of our regiment they were met by one of General 
Taylor's aids de camp. After saluting, one of the Mexican officers said: 'If 
you will surrender you will be treated as prisoners of war. We have ample force 
to capture }-ou.' This demand being reported to General Taylor he returned his 
reply, saying : "I never surrender.' With this reply the Mexican officers returned 
to Santa Anna. They were gone but a little while until they again put in an 
appearance. This time they not only made the former demand but added that if 



HAZZARd's history of henry CO! 



the proposition was declined the battle would be at once resumed and they would 
not leave, of us, one alive to tell the tale. This altercation was repeated to General 
Taylor who directed his aid to say to the Mexicans that Tf they want me worse 
than I do them they will have to come and take me.' There was no further 
'dickering' and shortly after the battle was resumed by about 5,000 of the enemy 
inarching out and making their first attack on the 2nd Indiana. The attack was 
bravely met by the boys of the 2nd who succeeded in driving the enemy back, 
assisted very materially by a portion of the Washington Battery. Quickly re- 
organizing their forces which were further augmented by the Mexican Lancers, 
the enemy once more advanced to the charge, the Lancers making special on- 
slaught on the four companies of rifle men stationed on the mountain side while 
the ^Texican infantry centered its charge on the 2nd Indiana, but for the second 
time the enemy was driven back. The Lancers, during the battle made three 
distinct attacks on the riflemen as did the Mexican Infantry on the 2nd Indiana, 
l)ut at each succeeding onslaught they were driven back suffering great loss in 
killed and wounded. 

"On" the morning of the 23rd Colonel Jefferson Davis came out with 'six com- 
panies of Mississippi riflemen, and was ordered by General Taylor, through 
General Wool, to take them up on the mountain side and relieve the Indiana 
riflemen who had been so long exposed and who were then without food or drink. 
While the change was being made the Mexican forces were preparing for 
another charge. When this was made the Mississippians all fired at once and 
before the}- could reload the Lancers were upon them and forced them to retreat 
dow^n the mountain followed by the Lancers who came to a point in the rear of 
the 2nd Indiana. Colonel Bowles, two or three times, ordered his men to cease 
firing and retreat but they refused to do so. and kept on fighting. The Lancers, 
however, by force of numbers, about five to one, drove the regiment back and 
following up their advantage, attacked the 2nd Kentucky. It was here that 
Colonel Gaines and Colonel Clay were killed. The enemy continued its attack, 
centering finally on the 2nd Illinois, under Colonel Bissel, who succeeded in 
driving the Mexicans back to the foot of the mountain where they again rallied. 
During this time, the 3rd Indiana was moving from the extreme right to the 
extreme left. About half way across the field Coloml l.anc linrnght the com- 
mand to a halt and brought us to a front face. At this pniiit the 2iid Kentucky 
being driven back were rallied. We then moved on to the position assigned, the 
extreme left, where we shortly after attacked the enemy. 

"It was here, probably, that the hardest battle of the conflict took place. We 
drove the enemy back and into a gorge in the mountains. At this time Colonel 
Jefferson Davis rode up to our regiment and ordered us to charge the enemy, 
which order, however. General Lane, pointing his sword to Colonel Davis and 
then to the Lancers, quickly countermanded. 

"At this time the 2nd Indiana and the 3rd Indiana were formed somewhat 
in the shape of an 'S' and the Lancers attacked the first or upper part, coming to 
the charge twenty abreast. Their charge was heroically met, the three front ranks 
being killed to a man and the remainder of the command forced to retreat in 
an utterly demoralized condition. After this, it was. I might say. a continuous 
fight for the remainder of the day. We had, in the meantime, regained all of our 
lost Erround. 



724 HAZZARUS HISTORY OF HEXRV COUNTY. 

"( )n the inorning of the 24th. sometime before dayhght. Colonel Lane ordered 
Captain Conover to bring in one of our abandoned caissons which had been left 
on the field during the heavy fighting of the 2nd Indiana. After daylight, looking 
about to see the situation it was discovered that Santa Anna's camp was deserted 
and that lying around and about were a good many dead and wounded soldiers. 
Seeing this and making further investigation we discovered the Mexican Infantry 
going over the top of the mountain. The victory was won and the battle of Buena 
\'ista, became, from that day and time famous among the annals of war. 

'"I was engaged in but the one battle. It was fierce and strong while it lasted 
and the memors- of it. in very many respects, is, after a lapse of nearly sixty years, 
as clear to my mind as if it had occurred but yesterday. 

"General Taylor, after the war, became the twelfth President of the United 
States. I saw him often during the war. He was a plain man, quite unassuming, 
short in stature, but a brave, intrepid soldier. It was, however, his fame as a 
hero of the Mexican War, rather than his fitness for the position, which made him 
the chief magistrate of the nation. 

•'Jefferson Davis, who had ccimmand of the Mississippi Rifles, was. during 
the Civil War, President of the Southern Confederacy. His history has been 
written and no words can add to or detract from his name and whatever of fame 
he may have achieved." 

In the roster of Company A. 30th Indiana Infantry, (re-organized), pub- 
lished elsewhere in this History, and again on page 717, is set out the highly 
creditable part this ^lexican ^^'ar veteran took in the Civil A\'ar, 

THE MEXICAN WAR. 

KKCAIMirL.VTIOX. 

Assistant Surgeon ^ 

Second Lieutenant 1 

First Sergeant 1 

Sergeant ^ 

Corporal - 

Privates '^'^ 

Total 'i'^ 

DKOrCTIOXS. 

Soldiers from other counties or states who moved to Henry County after the war. . H 
Duplication of names by reason of promotions or transfers 4 10 

Total of soldiers from Henry County in the Mexican War 2'^ 



CHAPTER XXX\\ 

roi.l of honor. 

Roster of Hexrv County Soldiers and Sati.oks Who Were Killed or Died 
OF Wounds or Disease Beforf. Discharge From tiif. Sek\ice — Recapitu- 
lation — National Cemeteries. 

The following" is a list of soldiers and sailors of the Civil War, and other 
wars, from Henry County, who were killed or died of wounds received in hattle, 
before discharge from the army : also those who died of disease before discharge, 
giving in each instance, the place of first burial and the present place of interment, 
so far as the same can be ascertained. 

The total actual loss thus shown is four hundred and seventy si.x. To tliis 
should be added an estimated number equal to twenty five per cent, thereof, or 
one hundred and nineteen, for those who have died, after discharge, from wounds 
incurred -in battle and disease contracted while in the army, of whom there is 
no record. Practically all of this great mortality • comes from the Civil War. 
as will be shown in the recapitulation following the roll of honor. 

From the table of National Cemeteries, at the end of this chapter, it will 
be seen that, since the Civil War, the Government has made extraordinary eflforts 
to gather the scattered remains of its dead soldiers and sailors for appropriate re- 
interment. If there is a National Cemetery located at the place where the soldier 
died and was buried, it is comparatively easy to locate his place of re-interment, 
for it is certain that, if his remains have not after the first interment been removed 
to his home in the North, and they are not found among the known dead in that 
particular cemetery, then they are there among the unknown. 

The difficulty in gathering reliable data has been when the re-interment was 
in a National Cemetery, at a point distant from and bearing no similarity in name 
to the place of first intermen-t. For example the dead from the battlefields of 
Perryville and Richmond. Kentucky, have all been moved to the National Ceme- 
tery at Camp Nelson, Jessamine County, Kentucky. The dead from the battle- 
fields of the Atlanta Campaign, from a point about fifty miles distant from Chat- 
tanooga, Tennessee, to and around Atlanta, Georgia, have all been gathered into 
a National Cemetery at Marietta, Georgia. At X'icksburg, Mississippi, the 
National Cemetery contains the dead, not only from Mcksburg proper, but from 
Port Gibson, Champion Hills, Jackson, Big Black River. ]\Iilliken's Bend. 
Young's Point, Arkansas Post and other points in that vicinity. From Chicka- 
mauga's bloody field, the dead have all been removed to Chattanooga National 
Cemetery. From Franklin and other points in Central Tennessee, the dead have 
been gathered and deposited in the National Cemetery, most convenient, either 



■J26 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Nashville or Stone's River ( Murfreesboro). The author might proceed to set 
out with particularity the different National Cemeteries, containing the dead 
gathered from other and distant points, but it is sufficient to say that in every 
instance, where a soldier is noted as having been re-interred in a National 
Cemetery, which bears no relation in name or location to the place of first burial, 
it has been ascertained by correspondence with the War Department at Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, or from other sources of official information, that 
the dead have been moved from the place of first burial to that stated in this Roll 
of Honor. After exhausting every avenue of investigation, however, it has been 
found impossible to locate a number of Henry County soldiers, in any National 
Cemeten,'. Presumably their remains have been re-interred in some National 
Cemetery of which there is no record obtainable. In such cases the entry in 
this Roll of Honor is as follows: "No record of removal. Remains probably re- 
interred in some National Cemetery. Unknown list." 

In consulting the list of National Cemeteries, it must be borne in mind that 
the number of dead, reported in the respective cemeteries, is continually increasing, 
but not to a marked degree, from the fact that it is the right of any person, who 
ever served in the army or navy of the United States, though not in that service 
at the time of death, to b^ buried in a National Cemetery-, at the expense of the 
Government, if he so requests before death or, if his family so request, after 
his death. 

The list of cemeteries, as published by the Government, was made up before 
the Spanish-American War. Consequently the cemeteries, nearest to Spanish- 
American War camps and hospitals, have had additions from that cause. Again 
the cemeteries, contiguous to regular stations, forts, arsenals or general hospitals 
for United States troops, have received a gradual increase from those sources. 
The greater number of interments, however, is of the gathered remains of dead 
soldiers and sailors, made immediately after the establishment of the National 
Cemeteries, and the list may be considered approximately correct. 

At Andersonville, Georgia, Danville, \'irginia, and perhaps all other points 
in the South, where Confederate prisons were maintained during the Civil \\'ar. 
for the confinement of captured Federals, there has been nu re-interment, the 
location and arrangements of the National Cemeteries being made to conform witli 
the place of original interment. 

This Roll of Honor contains, not only the names and places of luirial i>f 
soldiers and sailors from Henry County, who lost their lives in the Civil \\'ar. but 
also of all Henry County soldiers and sailors, who died in the service, during the 
Mexican War, the Spanish-American War and the Philippine Insurrection ; also 
of soldiers of the regular army who died in the service. 

Where an asterisk, thus *, precedes a name, it indicates that the dead soldier, 
though serving in a distinctivelv Henry County organization in the Civil War, 
was not a resident of the county, at the time of his enlistment. 

Isaac Abernathy. Company K, 3Tth Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River, Ten- 
nessee. December 31. 1S62. Buried on tbe battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River (Mur- 
freesboro) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

James Alexander. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died April 29. 1862. account 
of wounds at Shiloh. Tennessee. April 7, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in 
Shiloh National Cemetery. Unknown list. 



HAZ2ARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. -J 2"/ 

James W. Alexander. Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry (3 years). Killed at Cedar 
Creek. Virginia. October 19. 1864, Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Winchc^tei 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Amos H. AUee. Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died at Vicksburg, Mississippi 
May 14. 1865. Buried there. He-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Section L. 
Grave, No. 6,183. 

John W. AUee, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Kenesaw Mountain 
Georgia, June 23. 186J. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National Cem 
etery. Section I. Grave. No. 9.403. 

Reuben W. Allen. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Murfreesboro. Ten 
nessee, February 22, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Hicksite Cemetery. Greensboro 
Indiana. 

Albert Armstrong. Company B. 130th Indiana Infantry. Died at Anderson. Indiana 
January 10, 18C4. Buried in Old Cemetery, Anderson, Indiana. 

*Riley Bailey, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Murfreesboro. Ten 
nessee. May 4, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Stones River (Murfreesboro) National 
Cemetery. Section C, Grave. No. 1.282. 

*Franklin Bails, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died at Indianapolis. Indiana, 
February 11, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Crown Hill Cemetery. Indianapolis, 
Indiana. Military Plat. Grave. No. 53.5. 

Thomas J. Ball. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend. Louisi- 
ana, June 2, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Section 
E. Grave, No. 1,795. 

James H. Ballard. Company K. 40th Indiana Infantry. Died at Huntsville. Alabama. 
March 18, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Grave. 
No. 9.606. 

Daniel Baltzley, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Shiloh, Tennessee, 
April 7, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. He-interred in Shiloh National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

George H. Bare, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died on hospital boat, near 
Vicksburg. Mississippi, January 30. 1863. Buried on the river bank. Re-interred in 
Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Samuel Barre. Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Chattanooga, Tennessee, 
May 14, 1864, account of wounds in Atlanta Campaign, May 7, 1864. Buried there. Re- 
interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William Bateman. Company D. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Jeffer- 
son City. Missouri. March 4. 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Jeffei'son City National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Peter Baughan. Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Antietam. Maryland 
September 17, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Antietam National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

Benjamin Beaty, Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. Died at Franklin, Tennessee 
February 25. 1863. Buried there. He-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Cornelius Beck. Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. Died at Chattanooga. Tennes 
see, July 11. 1864. account of wounds in Atlanta Campaign. June 23. 1864. Buried there 
Re-interred in Chattanoo.ga National Cemetery. Section B, Grave. No. 11.851, 

Isom Beck. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. Georgia 
September 20, 1863. Biiriert on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga National 
Cemetery. Unknown list, 

William T, Beck. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at Vicks- 
burg. Mississippi. May 22. 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg 
National Cemetery. Section G, Grave, No. 4,958. 

William H. Beeson. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Memphis. Tennes- 
see, February 10, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Memphis National Cemetery. Un- 
Known list. 



728 hazzard's history of henry county. 

David R. Bell, 12th Indiana Battery. Died at Nashville. Tennessee. January 2. 
186^. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section B, Grave, No. 
6,353. 

George W. Bell, 12th Indiana Battery. Died at Honey Creek, Indiana, October 6, 
1862. Buried in Miller Cemetery, Fall Creek Township. Henry County, Indiana. 

* Isaac Bell, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Smithfield, North Caro- 
lina. February 19. 1865. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-in- 
terred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Josiah Bell. Company I, 6yth Indiana Infantry. Died at Keokuk, Iowa, February 
7. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Keokuk National Cemetery. Grave. No. 502. 

Noah Bennett, Company F, STth Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville, Kentucky. 
January 17, 1862. Buried in Hess Cemetery, near Cadiz, Indiana. 

Anson Bird, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Jeltersonville, Indiana, 
August 10, 1S64, account of wounds at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, June 23, 1864. Buried 
there. Re-interred in New Albany National Cemetery. Section B. Grave. No. 607. 

John Bitner, Company B, oth Indiana Cavalry. Died at Lexington. Kentucky. July 
22. 1864. Buried in South Mound Cemetery. New Castle. Indiana. 

James J. Black, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Big Shanty, Georgia. 
June 18. 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in .Marietta National Cemetery. 
Section C, Grave. No. 2.264. 

Josiah Blake, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend, Louisi- 
ana, April 2. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Section 
A, Grave, No. 2,912. 

Benjamin F. Bock, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at Win- 
chester, Virginia, September 19, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Winches- 
ter National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Thomas J. Bock. Company B. 21st Indiana Infantry re-organized as 1st Heavy Ar- 
tillery. Died at New Orleans. Louisiana. January 24. 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in 
Chalmette National Cemetery. Grave, No. 6,091. 

Charles Bogue, Company 1. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend. Louisi- 
ana. April 2. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Harmon Boran. Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. Died at Franklin. Tennessee. 
February 25. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

George \V. Bowers, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died in Cahaba Prison, Ala- 
bama, January, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

John Bowman. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville, Kentucky. 
April 14. 1862. Buried in Friends' Cemetery, Greensboro, Indiana. 

*James T. Bradford. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at home, in Marion, 
Indiana, December 25, 1861. Buried in Morris Chapel Cemetery, near Marion. Indiana. 

William S. Bradford. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died May 14, 1862, at 
home, in Marion, Indiana, where his family had moved while he was in the army. Bur- 
ied in Morris Chapel Cemetery, near Marion. Indiana. 

John M. Bricker, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Covington. Kentucky, 
October 30. 1862, account of wounds at Richmond, Kentucky. August 30. 1862. Buried in 
Lewisvile Cemetery. Lewisville, Indiana. 

John Bridget. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died April 19, 1862. account of 
wounds at Shiloh. Tennessee. April 7, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in 
Shiloh National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Benjamin Bright, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend, 
Louisiana, .April l(i, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

*Joseph Brooks. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River. Ten- 
nessee, December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River (Mur. 
freesboro) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 




1 24th INDIANA INFANTRY. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRV COUNTY. 729 

William Bronnenberg, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Millilcen's Bend, 
Louisiana, April, 1863. Buried there. Poseibly re-interred near Chesterfield, Madison 
€ounty, Indiana. Otherwise re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

John H. Brosius. 2nd Indiana Battery. Died at Fort Smith, Arkansas, April 21, 
1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Fort Smith National Cemetery. Section 1, Grave. No. 
10. 

James A. Brown, Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at Vicks- 
burg, Mississippi, May 22, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

James M. Brown. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died on hospital boat, near 
Vicksburg, Mississippi. February 20, 1863. Buried on the river bank. Re-interred in 
Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Moses H. G. Brown, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Louisville, Kentucky, 
January, 1862. Buried in Old Cemetery. Knightstown. Indiana. 

Riley S. Brown. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Young's Point, Louisi- 
ana. January 20, 1S63. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

George K. Brownfleld, 19th Indiana Battery. Died at Chattanooga, Tennessee, Sep- 
tember 25, 1863, account of wounds at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20. 1863. Bur- 
ied there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Francis Buckles, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee. 
January 10, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section 
A. Grave. No. 4,301. 

♦Albert Bunker, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Murfreesboro, Tennes- 
see. February 1, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Stone's River (Murfreesboro I Na- 
tional Cemetery. Section M, Grave. No. 4.923. 

John E. W'. Burch. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Murfreesboro, 
Tennessee. December IS. 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Stone's River (Murfrees- 
boro) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

*James H. Burk, Company H, 37th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennesee, 
July 9. 1864. account of wounds in Atlanta Campaign, May 27. 1864. Buried in South 
Mound Cametery. New Castle, Indiana. 

John Burr. Company G, 17th Indiana Infantry. Died at EvansvlUe. Indiana. De- 
cember 6, 1864. Buried in Old Cemetery, south of Middletown. Indiana. 

William Burt, Company E, 40th Indiana Infantry. Died at Camp Irving. Texas. 
August 14, 1865. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in 
some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Amos Butler, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Franklin. Tennessee, 
April 22, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Hiram Butler. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died near Jacksonville, Florida. 
April. 1865, after release from Confederate prison. Buried there. No record of removal. 
Remains probably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

William Butle'r, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. . Died near Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee, September 24. 1863. account of wounds at Chickamauga. Georgia. September 20. 
1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Masonic Cemetery. Greensboro. Indiana. 

John T. Byers, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died near Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee. October 8, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Samuel T. Byers. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. Died near Chattanooga. Ten- 
nessee, date unknown. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

William T. Byers, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Big Shanty. Georgia. 
July 28, 1864, account of wounds at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia. June 23. 1864. Buried 
there. Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Isaiah Byrket, Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at home, near Knights- 



-50 HAZZAKDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

town, Indiana, June 1, 1SK3. Buried in Elm Grove Cemetery, two and a halt" miles north 
of Raysville, Indiana. 

Peter Byrket, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died at Vicksburg. Mississippi, 
May 19, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Section I, 
Grave. No. 7,311. 

John J. Byrnes, Company I. K9th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond. Kentucky, 
August 30, 1862. Buried on fne battletield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

*Job Cabe, Company F, oTth Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee, Sep- 
tember 21. 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section 
A. Grave, No. 4,957. 

Henry Caldwell, Company I. S4th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee, 
November 23, 1863. account of wounds at Chickamauga. Georgia, September 20, 1S63. 
Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

James E. Calhoun. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend. 
LiOuisiana, June 6, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. 
Section E. Grave. No. 1,813. 

John W. Callahan. Junior. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond. 
Kentucky, August 30, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Charles W. Canaday, Company H. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at 
Vicksburg, Mississippi, May 20. 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg 
National Cemetery. Section G, Grave. No. 5,070. 

Stansberry Cannon, Company D. 147th Indiana Infantry. Died at Indianapolis. 
Indiana, March 19, 1865. Buried in Su,gar Grove Cemetery, two and a half miles west of 
New Castle, Indiana. 

Milton Carmichael, Company F, 37th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville. Ken 
tucky. November IS. 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National 
Cemetery. Section B, Grave, No. 41. 

Daniel Carr. Company I. Slth Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga, Georgia. 
September 20. 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Benjamin F. Carter. Company II. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Keokuk. Iowa. 
January 20. 1S63. Buried therl. Re-interred in Keokuk National Cemetery. Grave, No. 
315. 

John J. Carter. Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at St. Louis. 
Missouri, August 12, 1863. account of woimds at Vicksburg, Mississippi, May 22, 1863. Bur- 
ied there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis) National Cemetery, but disin- 
terred and removed to place unknown. 

Henry Cartwright, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at St. Louis, Missouri, 
February 22, 1864. account of wounds at Matagorda Bay, Texas, December 30, 1863. Bur- 
ied there. Re-interred in JetTerson Barracks (St. Louis) National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

James C. Cartwright. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennes- 
see, November 9, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion B, Grave, No. 6,738. 

Daniel D. Case, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at St. Louis. 
Missouri, November 10, 1861. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably 
re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William H. Caster, Company C, 84th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. 
-^Georgia. September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Jacob Chappell. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Stevenson. Alabama. 
March 18. 1S64. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

John F. Chenoweth. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. Lost on Sultana. April 27, 
1865. Body never recovered. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. -3 1 

John Clapper. Company B, 134th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee. 
.July 17, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in White Branch Cemetery, Blue River Towb- 
ship, Henry County, Indiana. Again re-interred in German Baptist Cemetery, near 
Hagerstown, Wayne County, Indiana. 

George W. Clapsaddle, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. October 23, 1863. account of wounds at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 
1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section E. Grave, No. 
131. 

Alplieus Clark. Company A. .'4th Indiana Infantry (one year). Died in Anderson- 
ville Prison, Georgia. August 16. 1864. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. 
Grave, No. 5,901. 

Benjamin Clark. Company A, .j4th Indiana Infantry (one year). Died in Ander- 
sonville Prison, Georgia, date unknown. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Milton Clark. Company H. 6Slth Indiana Infantry. Died at Big Black River, near 
Vicksburg, Mississippi, July 18, 1863, account of wounds received there, May 17, 1863. 
Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Nathan M. Clark. Company I, 123rd Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee, 
April 12, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section H. 
Grave, No. 9,929. 

William C. Clark, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died on hospital boat, near 
.Memphis, Tennessee, March 18, 1863. Buried on the river bank. Re-interred in Memphis 
National Cemetery. Grave, No. 131. 

James W. Clellan. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Keokuk. Iowa, 
.March 21, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Keokuk National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

*David Clements, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at St. Louis. 
Missouri. November 9, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis) 
National Cemetery. Section 58, Grave. No. 10,486. 

Joshua Clevenger, Company E, Slh Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Milli- 
ken's Bend. Louisiana, April IS, 1S63. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National 
Cen:etery. Unknown list. 

Seth Clevenger. Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. Died at Murfreesboro. Ten- 
nessee, April 20. 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Stone's River (Murfreesboro) Na- 
tional Cemetery. Section M. Grave, No. 5,100. 

David S. Cochran. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at New Albany. Indi- 
ana. June 17. 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in New Albany National Cemetery. Grave. 
No. 95. 

Joseph W. Connell. Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died near Corinth. Missis- 
sippi, May 24, 186.2. Buried there. Re-interred in Corinth National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Daniel Conner, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend. Louisi- 
ana. July 11. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Section 
B. Grave, No. 2,710. 

Martin V. Conner, Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennes- 
see, March 17, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Un- 
isnown list. 

George W. Conwell. Company 1. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died on hospital boat, near 
Helena. Arkansas, February. 1863. Buried on the river bank. Re-interred in Vicksburg 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Noah W. Coon, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River, Ten- 
nessee, December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River 
(Murfreesboro) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

James M. Cooper, Company D. 19th Indiana Infantry. Died a 
land, December 17, 1862, account of wounds at Gainesville, Virginii 
Buried in Shiloh Cemetery, two and a half miles south of Dunreith, 

John Cracraft, Company K, S6th Indiana Infantry. Died at L<: 



Baltimc 


)re. 


Mary- 


August 


28. 


1862. 


ndiana. 






lisviUe. 


Ken 


tucky. 



■J 2,2 HAZZARDS HISTDKV UV IIEXRY COUNTY. 

March 22, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (I^uisville) National Cemetery. 
Section A. Grave, No. 10. 

VVyatt Crandail, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Killed at Franklin, Tennessee. 
December 17, 1864, Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Nashville National Ceme- 
tery, Unknown list. 

George W. Cray, Company I, ()9th Indiana Infantry. Died at Young's Point, Louisi- 
ana, March 6, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Jacob Cripe, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Cincinnati, Ohio, Decem- 
ber 17, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in 
some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Joseph A. Cross, Company K, 84th Indiana Infantry, Killed at Kenesaw Mountain, 
Georgia. June 23, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National Ceme- 
tery. Section I, Grave, No, 9,390. 

Samuel G. Culp. 12th Indiana Battery. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, April 30, 
1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section A, Grave, No, 
4,537. 

Calvin Daniel, Company B. 9th Indiana Infantry. Died in Andersonville Prison, 
Georgia, date unknown. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Cornelius J. Davis, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennes- 
see, April 8, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Eli Davis. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died at Vicksburg, Mississippi, April 
13, 1S6.5. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Isaac Davis, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry, Died at Milliken's Bend, Louisi- 
ana, May 11. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

John H. Davis. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Young's Point, Louisi- 
ana, February 19. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Andrew J. Debord. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennes- 
see. March 27, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section 
J, Grave, No. 14,922, 

Robert Deitzer, Company B. 124th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville, Kentucky, 
March 29, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National Cemetery. 
Section B, Grave, No. 46. 

Thomas P. Dennis, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Young's Point. Louis- 
iana, March 6, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion B, Grave, No. 2,816. 

Whitesel Dennis, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Stevenson, Alabama, 
September 20, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Samuel Detrich, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond, Ken- 
tucky, August 30, 1862, Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

John R. Dillee, Company D, 36tli Indiana Infantry. Died at Cleveland, Tennessee, 
March 4. 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Levi Donihue, Company H, ,5th Indiana Infantry (Mexican War). Died on trans- 
port ship on Gulf of Mexico, July 4, 1848, Buried at sea. 

Thomas J. Dougherty. Company K, 19th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Gett.vsburg. 
Pennsylvania. July 1, 1863, Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Gettysburg Na- 
tional Cemetery. Indiana Plat, Section A, Grave, No. 2. 

*Daniel Doxtader, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennes- 
see. November 5, 1862, Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion B, Grave, No, 5,653, 



ilAZZAKDS HISTORY OF HEXRY COUNTY. 73 J 

John Driver. Company K. Silrh Indiana Infantry. Killed at Shiloh, Tennessee, 
April 7. lSi;2. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Shiloh National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

James A. Drury. Company A. o7th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee, 
December 4. 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section 
B, Grave, No. 0,100. 

William W, Dubois, Company C. Stith Indiana Infantry. Killed at Shiloh, Tennes- 
see, April 6, 1862. Buried on the battleflehl. Re-interred in Shiloh National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Wiley J. Dudley, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died on hospital boat, near 
Vicksburg, Mississippi, July 5, 1S63. Buried on the river bank. Re-inferred in Vicks- 
burg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

John R. Dykes, Company B, 5th Indiana Cavalry. Died in Andersonville Prison, 
Georgia, November 1, 1864. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

John H. Edwards, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Camp Wickliffe, 
Kentucky, February 14, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably 
re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Levi S. Edwards, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry.. Died near Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee, September 25, 1863. account of wounds at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 19. 
1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanoo,ga National Cemetery. Section 1^, Grave. 
No. 815. 

Josephus V. Elliott, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at home, in Mechan- 
icsburg, March 9, 1863. Buried in Mechanicsburg Cemetery, Mechanicsburg, Indiana. 

Jesse S. Ellison, Company H. 69lh Indiana Infantry. Died- at Richmond, Kentucky, 
September 12, 1862, account of wounds received there, August 30, 1862. Buried on the 
battlefield. .Re-interred in Camp Nelson National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

George Evans, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee, 
March 21. 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Henry Evans, Company A, o4th Indiana Infantry (one year). Died at Arkansas 
Post, Arkansas. January, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

Lemuel Evans, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
February 5, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Samuel Fadely. Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee, 
October 27, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion E, Grave, No. 2.663. 

Benjamin F. Fawcett. 4th Indiana Battery. Died at Nashville, Tennessee. April 
30, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section J, Grave, 
No. 13,707. 

William H. F^entress, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed in Atlanta Cam- 
paign, near Dallas. Georgia, May 31, 1864. Buried in the Masonic Cemetery, Greensboro. 
Indiana. 

William A. Ferry, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Richmond, Kentucky, 
September 10, 1862, account of wounds received there, Au.gust 30, 1862. Buried on the 
battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Sylvester Fisher, Company E, 130th Indiana Infantry. Died at Cfiattanooga, Ten- 
nessee. June 26, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. 
Section E, Grave. No. 11,486. 

Henry Pitch, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died at Louisville, Kentucky, Feb- 
ruary 9, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National Cemetery. 
Section C, Grave, No. 95. 

Beniah Fleming, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Middle- 
brook, Missouri March 9, 1863. Buried in White Union Cemetery, Fall Creek Township,. 
Henry County, Indiana. 



734 HAZZAKDS HISTORY OF HEXRV fOUNTV. 

Preston Fleming, Company I. (19th Indiana Infantry. Killert at Richmond, Ken- 
tucl<y. August 30. 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

*James M. Fletcher, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. Lost on Sultana, April 27. 
1865. Body never recovered. 

*Lorenzo D. Fort, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry, Died at Stone's River, Ten- 
nessee, January 1, 1863, account of wounds received there, December 31, 1862. Buried 
on the battlefield. Re-interred in Simmons' Cemetery, near Charlottesville, Hancock 
County, Indiana. 

Oliver P. Fort, Company K, 2nd Colorado Cavalry. Died at Benton Barracks, St. 
Louis, Missouri, January 12, 1864. Buried in Old Cemetery, Knightstown, Indiana. 

Randolph Fort, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Gainesville. Vir- 
ginia, August 28, 1862. Burled on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains prob- 
ably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Robert C. Foster, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond, Kentucky, 
August 30, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Ebenezer Cemetery, Franklin 
Township. Henry County, Indiana. 

Samuel "W. Foster, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Stockade No. 3, 
Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, June 5, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Lewis- 
ville Cemetery, Lewisville, Indiana. 

John W. Foulks, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennes- 
see, April 1, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemeter.,-. Section 
A, Grave, No. 4,417. 

John W. Fountain, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Champion Hills. 
Mississippi. May 16, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

David Franklin, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry, Died on hospital boat, near 
Vicksbur.g, Mississippi, July 2, 1863, of wounds received at Vicksburg, May 22, 1863. 
Buried on the river bank. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 
Washington L. Freeman, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, 
Tennessee, December 6, 1863, account of wounds at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 19, 
1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

*James Gates, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry, Died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
August 30, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

*Richard Gates, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. 
Georgia, September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

John Gibson. Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. Killed at Pulaski, Tennessee, July 
3, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains probably re-in- 
terred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

John M. Ginn, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond, Kentucky, 
August 30, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

Joseph Ginn, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Richmond. Kentucky, Sep- 
tember. 1862, account of wounds received there. August 30, 1862, Buried on the battle- 
field. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Henry Good. Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at Vicksburg, 
Mississippi, May 22. 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Joseph B. Gossett. Company E, Slh Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at Vicks- 
burg, Mississippi, June 16, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg 
National Cemetery. Section G. Grave, No. 4,809. 

Ferdinand C. Gough, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, May 7. 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY 



'iS 



Lemuel Gough, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
May 2, 1S63. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Elijah S. Gowdy, Company I, «9th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond. Ken- 
tucky. August 30. 18(;2. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Francis M. Granger. Company M, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Columbus, Ohio. 
March 10, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Green Lawn Cemetery. Columbus. Ohio. 
Soldiers' Circle. Grave, No. 28.5. 

Thomas J. Graves, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Jackson. Missis- 
sippi. July 16, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Ceme- 
tery. Section K, Grave, No. 5,965. 

♦Jeremiah Gray. Company P. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee. 
February 5, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Edwin A. Gregory, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River, 
Tennessee. December 31. 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River 
(Murfreesboro) National Cemetry. Unknown list. 

Daniel F. Griffin, Junior, Company C, 31st U. S. V. Died at Prang Prang. Philip- 
pine Islands, December 21. 1900. Buried there. Re-interred in Catholic Cemetery. New 
Castle. Indiana. 

Amos Gronendyke. Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. December 27, 1864, account of wounds at Franklin. Tennessee. November 30. 1864. 
Buried in Painter Cemetery, Pall Creek Township. Henry County. Indiana. 

Charles W. Grove. Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Ten- 
nessee. July 17, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion H, Grave, No. 10,062. 

Edward Gue. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Louisville, Kentucky, Janu- 
ary, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Amos R. Gustin. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Evansville, Indiana. 
June 25. 1863. account of wounds at Champion Hills. Mississippi, May 16. 1863. Buried 
there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some National cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Samuel E. Gustin, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Terre 
Bonne. Louisiana, June 28. 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Chalmette National Ceme- 
tery. Grave. No. 5,063. 

Henry C. Hall, Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tenntsse?. 
August 26. 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

John D. Hall, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River, Tennes-. 
see. December 31. 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River (Mur- 
freesboro) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William B. Hankins, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Champion Hills, 
Mississippi, May 16, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William H. Harris, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond. Ken- 
tucky. August 30, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Peter Harter, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. Georgia, 
September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William A. Haskett, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Memphis, Tennes- 
see. April 1, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Memphis National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Isaiah Hawhee, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River, Ten- 



-^6 hazzaud's history of henry county. 

nessee, December 31. 1802. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River 
(Murfreesboro) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

James Hayden. Company C, 5th Indiana Cavalry. Died at Indianapolis. Indiana. 
October 24, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Crown Hill Cemetery. Indianapolis. 
Indiana. Military Plat. Grave. No. 423. 

Wilson Hayden. Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. Died in Andersonville Prison. 
Georgia, date unknown. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Jeremiah Hayes. Company B. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died April 30. 1863, account 
of wounds at Stone's River. Tennessee. December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. 
Re-interred in Stone's River (Murfreesboro) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Mahlon Hayes, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville, Kentucky. 
March 26, 1862. Buried in Lewisville Cemetery, Lewisville, Indiana. 

Oliver P. Hayes, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Savannah. 
Georgia, March 27, 1865. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably le- 
interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Peter Haynes, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Franklin, Tennessee. 
November 30, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Nashville National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

George W. Hazzard. (Uncle of the author of this History). Colonel. 37th Indiana 
Infantry, and Captain, 4th Artillery. U. S. A. Died at Baltimore, Maryland. August 14. 
1862, account of Vi'ounds at White Oak Swamp. Virginia, June 30, 1862. Buried in 
Cathedral Cemetery, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Deander E. Hazzard, (Brother of the author of this History), Troop H, 5th Cavalry, 
U. S. A. Killed by Indians in Wyoming Territory. Exact date of death and place of 
burial unknown. Memorial stone erected in South Mound Cemetery. New Castle. Indiana. 

Thomas S. Heavenridge, Company A. 36lh Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chicka- 
mauga. Georgia, September 19, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chatta- 
nooga National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Joseph Hedrick. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Camp Wickliffe. 
Kentucky, February 6, 1862. Buried in Lewisville Cemetery, Lewisville. Indiana. 

*John P. Heinbaugh, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Kenesaw. Moun- 
tain, Georgia, June 23. 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

*Jacob R. Helms. Company K. SCth Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennes- 
see. April 27, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section 
A. Grave, No. 4,471. 

Mahlon Hendricks. Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Kenesaw Moun- 
tain. Georgia, June 23, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National 
Cemetery. Section C, Grave, No. 2,312. 

William B. Henshaw. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond.', 
Kentucky. August 30, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

George Hess, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville. Kentucky, 
March 20. 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National Ceme- 
tery. Section A. Grave. No. 5. 

Alfred Hewlit. 2nd Indiana Battery. Died at Fort Scott, Kansas, November 27. 
1861. Buried there. Re-interred in Old Baptist Cemetery, Knightstown, Indiana. 

Henry C. Hiatt, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died in Cahaba Prison. Ala- 
bama, January, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion L, Grave, No. 4,001. 

John C. Hiatt, Company A. 19th Indiana Infantry. Killed at North Anna River. 
Virginia, May 27, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains prob- 
ably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Joseph Hiatt. Company P. 57th Indiana Infantry. Killed in Atlanta Campaign, 
May 27. 1864. Buried on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains probably re- 
interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 




COMPANY E, 9th INDIANA CAVALRY, 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. J-iJ 

*Herman Hines, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Ashland, Kentucky. 
January 27. 1863. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred 
in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Jesse Hobbs, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Louisville. Kentucky, Janu- 
ary 1. 1862. Buried in Old Cemetery, Knightstown, Indiana. 

Volney Hobson, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Killed at Franklin, Tennessee, 
December 17. 1864. Buried in Batson Cemetery, Liberty Township, Henry County, Indi- 
ana. 

William C. Hoober, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Lost on Sultana, April 27, 
1865. Body never recovered. 

Adam Hoombaugh. Company F. 130th Indiana Infantry. Killed by guerrillas at 
Centreville. Tennessee, November 27, 1864. Buried there. No record of removal. Re- 
mains probably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Milton Hooten, Company G, 161h Indiana Infantry. Died at Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
June IS, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Charles B. Hoover, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, February 16, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

De Witt C. Hoover. Company H. 69th Indiana infantry. Died at New Orleans. Lou- 
isiana, September 14, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Chalmette National Cemetery. 
Grave. No. 4,427. 

John Hoover. Company K. 11th Kansas Cavalry. Died at Camp Solomon. Mis- 
souri. March 13, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Springfield (Missouri) National 
Cemetery. Section 14. Grave, No. 795. 

Abraham W. Hopper, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Ten- 
nessee, June 25, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion E, Grave, No. 263. 

James Horney, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died in Danville Prison, Dan- 
ville, Vir,ginia, February 15, 1864. Buried in Danville (Virginia) National Cemetery. 
Section D, Grave. No. 325. 

David Houck. Incomplete list. Died at New Orleans. Louisiana, September 2.. 
1878. Buried in Chalmette National Cemetery. Grave, No. 11,792. 

John Houser, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Shiloh. Tennessee. April 
7. 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Shiloh National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Nimrod Howren. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. 
(Jeorgla, September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield Re-interred in Chattanooga Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William A. Howren, Company A, 2i)th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Petersburg, 
Virginia. October 18. 1864. Buried on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains 
probably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Henry Hubbard. Company C. 2nd Indiana Cavalry. Killed at Nashville, Tennessee, 
December 16, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Friends' Cemetery, Milton, 
Wayne County, Indiana. 

James C. Hudelson, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. Died at Mumfordsvllle, 
Kentucky, June 25, 1864. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re- 
interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Abraham Huff. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at St. Louis. Missouri, 
April 7. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis) National 
Cemetery. Grave. No. 19. Remains have probably been removed and re-interred else- 
where. 

Jacob Huff. Company I. 69lh Indiana Infantry. Died at Youn.g's Point. Louisiana. 
January 21, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

John Hughes. Company A. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). Died at Young's Point, 



y^S HAZZAKDS HISTOKV OF HEXRV COUNTY. 

Louisiana, February 14, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicl^sburg National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

Joseph Huston, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
February 5, ISfiS. Buried there. Re-interred in Mechanicsburg Cemetery, Mechanics- 
burg. Indiana. 

William H. Huston. Company H, t;9th Indiana Infantry. Died at Young's Point, 
Louisiana, February 20, ISfio. Buried there. Re-interred in Mechanicsburg Cemetery, 
Mechanicsburg, Indiana. 

William Hutchins, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nelson's Furnace. 
Kentucky. March 1, 1S62. Buried there. Re-interred in Flat Rock Cemetery, Liberty 
Township, Henry County, Indiana. 

Jesse A. Ice, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Kenesaw Mountain, 
Georgia, June 23, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National 
Cemetery. Section I, Grave, No. 9,365. 

Samuel Irvin. Company K. 5th Indiana Cavalry. Died near Jacksonville, Florida, 
April. 1865. after release from Confederate prison. Buried there. No record of removal. 
Remains probably re-intered in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

* Jesse Jackson, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
March 31, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section 
D. Grave, No. 3,495. 

Austin W. James. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River. 
Tennessee, December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Addison Ceme- 
tery, Rush County, near Knightstown, Indiana. 

James Jarvis, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga, Georgia, 
September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Milton Jeffries, Company I. S4th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
February 24, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Charles C. Jennings, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Franklin, Ten- 
nessee, November 30, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Nashville National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William A. Jennings. Company K. 16th Indiana Infantry. Died March 2, 1863. Bur- 
ied on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some Na- 
tional cemetery. Unknown list. 

Josiah A. Jessup, Company 1, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died in Danville Prison, 
Danville. Virginia, March 5, 1864. Buried in Danville (Virginia) National Cemetery. 
Section D, Grave. No. 463. 

Hutchinson Johnson, Company D, 19th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Gainesville, 
Virginia, August 28, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains 
probably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

John N. Johnson. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River. 
Tennessee. December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River 
(Murfreesboro) National Cemptery. Unknown list. 

William K. Johnson, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Port Gibson. 
Mississippi. May 1, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

James Jones. Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died in Delaware 
County, Indiana, December 19, 1863. Buried in Sharp's Cemetery. Salem Township. 
Delaware County, Indiana. 

Henry S. Jordan, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry, Died at Milliken's Bend, Louis! 
ana, March 15, 1863, Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Absalom H. Julian, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's Kiver. 
Tennessee. December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River 
(Murfreesboro) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 



HISTORY OF HEXRY COUNTV. 



739 



Isaac B. Keesling. Company H. t;9th Indiana Infantry. Died at Youngs Point. 
Louisiana, March 18, 1S63. Buried there. Re-interred in Viclvsburg National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

John H. Kennedy. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died in Andersonville Prison, 
Georgia, July S, 1864. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. Grave, No. 3,047. 

Joseph Kennedy. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Greensboro, North 
Carolina, June 22, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Raleigh National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion 332. 

John Kenney. Company F. .57th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Missionary Ridge. 
Tennessee, November 25, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Henry Kent. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Evansville. Indiana. July 
9. 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some 
National cemetery. Unknown list. 

John A. Kern, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Kenesaw Mountain 
Georgia, June 23, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Masonic Cemetery 
Greensboro. Indiana. 

James L. Kilgore, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Chattanooga, Ten 
nessee. August 5. 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery 
Section E. Grave, No. 1,893. 

James Kingrey. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend. Louisi 
ana. April 22, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion E, Grave, No. 1,571. 

Andrew B. Kirkham, Company K, 37th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River 
Tennessee, December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Shiloh Ceme- 
tery, two and a half miles south of Dunreith, Indiana. 

Thomas'Koons, Company H, 100th Indiana Infantry. Died at Grand Junction, Ten 
nessee, February 1, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Corinth National Cemetery 
Grave. No. 2,124. 

Joseph Laboyteaux. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at New Orleans 
Louisiana, December, 18G3. Buried there. Re-interred in Chalmette National Ceme 
tery. Unknown list. 

Thomas Laboyteaux. Company E, 9ch Indiana Cavalry. Lost on Sultana, April 27, 
1865. Body never recovered. 

James C. Lacy, Company B, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Indianapolis. Indiana, 
February. 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana. Military Plat. Grave, No. 233. 

John L. Lacy, Company B, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Jefferson Barracks, Mis- 
souri. February 28, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis) 
National Cemetery. Grave. No. 10,633. 

Wilson P. Lacy. Company B, 69th Indiana Infantry. .Died at Young's Point. Louisi- 
ana, February 10, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Oren E. Lambird. Troop H, 12th Cavalry. U. S. A. Died in Philippines. November 
20, 1903. Buried there. Re-interred in German Baptist Cemetery, near Hagerstown, 
Wayne County. Indiana. 

Benjamin D. Leaveli, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, February 2, 1862. Buried in Hess Cemetery, near Cadiz, Indiana. 

William L. Leaveli. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, December 10, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. 
Section B, Grave, No. 6.340. 

Robert D. F. Lee. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Louisville, Kentucky, 
June 1, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (LouisviHe) National Cemetery. 
XTnknown list. 

*William H. Leisure. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died in Cahaba Priion, 



740 HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Alabama. January, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

William Lemberger, Company D, llth Indiana Infantry. Killed at Champion Hills, 
Mississippi. May 16, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

George W. Lennard. (Uncle of the author of this History) Colonel, 57th Indiana 
Infantry. Killed at Resaca, Georgia. May 14, 1864. Buried in South Mound Cemetery, 
New Castle, Indiana. 

James Leonard, Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Lewis- 
ville. Indiana, October 27, 1862. Buried in New Lisbon Cemetery. New Lisbon, Indiana. 

Wilson Lester. Company I. K9th Indiana Infantry. Died at Grand Gulf. Missis- 
sippi, May 29. 1863, account of wounds at Port Gibson, Mississippi, May 1, 1863. Buried 
there. " Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Samuel Level, Company E, 7th Indiana Infantry. Died in Confederate prison. 
Salisbury, North Carolina, April, 1865. Buried in the Salisbury National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Joseph Linens, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nelson's Furnace. 
Kentucky. March 1, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re- 
interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Elijah H. Lines, Company C, 5th Indiana Cavalry. Died at home, near Luray, Indi- 
ana, June 22, 1863, Buried in East Lebanon Cemetery, Prairie Township, Henry County, 
Indiana. 

*Lewis Lock, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville, Kentucky, 
January 16, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville! National Ceme- 
tery. Section A, Grave, No. 12. 

George Lockridge, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Franklin, Tennes- 
see. May 25. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Lorenzo D. Longfellow, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Fort Blakely. 
Alabama, April 9, 1865. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Mobile National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

Andrew J. Lucas. Company I. 124th Imliana Infantry. Died at Marietta, Georgia. 
August 12, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. Grave, No. 

John J. Luce, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Wilmington, North 
Carolina, March 4, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Wilmington National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Moses Luzadder. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. 
Georgia, September 20. 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Marcellus Lytle. Company D, llth Indiana Infantry. Died at Paducah, Kentucky, 
November 1, 1861. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred 
in some National cemetery. Unknown list, 

John B. McConnell, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Young's Point. 
Louisiana, February 16, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

Jonathan McConnell. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Wilmington. 
North Carolina. April 17, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Wilmington National 
Cemetery. Grave, No. 1,719. 

William E. McCorkle, Company A, 12th Infantry, U. S. A. Died at home, in Knights- 
town, Indiana, October 8, 1898. Buried in Friends' Cemetery, near Cadiz, Indiana. 

James E. McCormack. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Cairo, Illinois, 
February 18. 1863, account of wounds at Richmond, Kentucky. August 30, 1862. Buried 
there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some National cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

John R. McCormack, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Vicksburg, Mis- 



hazzard's history of henry county. 74I 

sissippi. August 11. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Viclvsburg National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Thomas McCormack, Company K, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at 
Vicksburg, Mississippi. May 21. 1S63. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicks- 
burg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William McCormack, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Indianapolis, In- 
diana, .January 26, 1863, account of wounds at Richmond, Kentucky, August 30, 1862. 
Buried there. Re-interred in Crown HIU Cemetery. Indianapolis, Indiana. Military Plat. 
Unknown list. 

Thompson W. McCune. Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years), and Com- 
pany G. First Regiment, Mississippi (River) Marine Brigade. Accidentally drowned in 
the Mississippi River, April 8, 1863. Buried on Island No. 35. Mississippi River. No rec- 
ord of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Thomas McDowell. Company B, 23rd Iowa Infantry. Died at Eddyville. Iowa, Au- 
gust 26, 1863, account of wounds at Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, June 7, 1863. Buried in 
Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Jefferson Township, Polk County, Iowa. 

James McPetridge, Company C. 9th Indiana Infantry. Died at New Orleans, Louisi- 
ana, June 17. 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Chalmette National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

William H. H. McGuffln, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died at home, near 
Knightstown, Indiana, January 30, 1862, account of wounds received near Louisville, 
Kentucky, December, 1861. Buried in Old Cemetery, Knightstown, Indiana. 

John McKenzie, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend. Louis- 
iana, May 24. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Section 
H, Grave, No. 91. 

Eli McLeland. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died in Danville Prison, Dan- 
ville, Virginia, date unknown. Buried in Danville (Virginia) National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

■ Isaac McLeland. Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Cleveland. Tennessee. 
April 2, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Hess Cemetery, near Cadiz, Indiana. 

Amos Main, Company K, 74th Indiana Infantry. Died at Willetfs Point, New- 
York, April 6, 1865. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re'-interred 
in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

James Mallory, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee, 
February 29, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Un-. 
known list. 

Cyrus Manning, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one yean. Died at Columbus, 
Ohio, May 9, 1863. Buried in New Lisbon Cemetery, New Lisbon, Indiana. 

Henry C. Manor, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stones River. Ten- 
nessee, December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River 
I Murfreesboro) National Cemetery. Section N, Grave, No. 5,437. 

Simeon Marlow, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died in Henry County. Indi- 
ana, April 20, 1862, Buried in Lewisville Cemetery. Lewisville, Indiana. 

Alexander L. Mason, Company C, 1st Iowa Infantry, Killed at Wilson's Creek, 
Missouri, August 10, 1861. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Springfield (Mis- 
souri ) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Jerome B. Mason, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga, 
Georgia, September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Richard ilay. Company D, 19th Indiana Infantry. Died November 22. 1862, account 
of wounds at Gainesville. Vir.ginia, August 28, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. No record 
of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Joseph H, Mayes, Band, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 17th Army Corps. Died near Mar- 
ietta, Georgia, November 2, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Marietta National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list, 

Timothy Mead. 19th Indiana Battery. Killed at Perryville, Kentucky, October 8, 



"42 HAZZAKD S HISTOKV OF HENRY CdUNTV. 

1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

*Kelita Mendenhall. Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died in Cahaba Prison. 
Alabama. January. 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. 
Lnknown list. 

Lewis Micha, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died in Andersonville Prison. 
Georgia, July IS, 1864. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. Grave. No. 3.519. 

John W. Miller, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend. Louis- 
iana, May 9, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vieksburg National Cemetery. Section 
E, Grave, No. 1,651. 

James W. Millikan, Company C. 3t;th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville. Ken- 
tucky, February 10, 1862. Buried in Batson Cemetery. Liberty Township. Henry County. 
Indiana. 

*Andrew J. Mills, Company K. 3tith Indiana Infantry. Died at New Haven. Ken- 
tucky, February 15. 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re- 
interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Wallenstein Mimmes, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Sandtown, Georgia. 
September, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Charles W. T. Minesin.ger, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. 
Tennessee. September 14. 1864, account of wounds at Jonesboro. Georgia, August 31, 

1864. Buried in South Mound Cemetery. New Castle. Indiana. 

*Abraham G. Misener, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Camp Denison. 
Ohio, February 2. 1865. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re- 
Interred In some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Perry Mitchell, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee. 
October 28, 1863, account of wounds at Chickamau.ira. Georgia. September 19. 1863. Bur- 
ied there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Thomas Mitchell. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennes- 
see, October 16. 1863. account of wounds at Chickamauga. Georgia. September 19. 1863. 
Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Jobn H. Modlin, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee. 
July 23 ,1864, account of wounds at Resaca, Georgia. May 16. 1864. Buried in South 
Mound Cemetery. New Castle, Indiana. 

Francis M. Moler, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died in Libby Prison. Rich- 
mond. Virginia, February 28. 1863. Buried in Richmond National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

James M. Montgomery, Assistant Surgeon. 5th Indiana Infantry (Mexican War). 
Died near Vera Cruz, Mexico, June. 1848. Buried there in unknown grave. 

William Moore. U. S. Navy. Died in hospital at Memphis. Tennessee. January 9, 

1865. Buried in South Mound Cemetery, New Castle. Indiana. 

Enoch T. Nation. Company G. 9th Indiana Cavalry. Lost on Sultana. April 27. 
1865. Body never recovered. 

Wallace Nation, 20th Indiana Battery. Died near Atlanta. Georgia, October 2S. 
1864. Buried there. Re-interred in New Lisbon Cemetery, New Lisbon. Indiana. 

James R. Nay, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died at home, in New Castle. 
Indiana, July 30, 1865. Buried in South Mound Cemetery. New Castle. Indiana. 

Robert Needham, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, February 26. 1S62. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National 
Cemetery. Section A, Grave. No. 26. 

Levi Needier. 23rd Indiana Battery. Died at Kno.xville. Tennessee. February 21. 
1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Knoxville National Cemetery. Grave, No. 646. 

William H. Newbold. Company D. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at home, 
near New Lisbon, Indiana, January 25, 1862. Buried in Wisehart Cemetery. Liberty 
Township, Henry County. Indiana. 

Isaiah J. Newby, Company C, 87th Indiana Infantry. Died at Chattanooga, Ten- 



HAZZARDS HISTORY UF HENRY COUNTY. 743 

nessee. October 7, 18C3, account of wounds at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20. 

1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Unlvnown list. 
Otis C. Newby, Company C, 45th Infantry. U. S. V. Killed near Bulan, Luzon. 

Philippine Islands, August 24. 1900. Buried there. Re-Interred in Masonic Cemetery, 
Greensboro, Indiana. 

William H, Newby, Company A, Siith Indiana Infantry. Died near Corinth, Missis- 
sippi, May 19, 1862. Buried there. He-interred in Corinth National Cemetery. Un- 

Benjamin F. Newcomer, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Pine Moun- 
tain, Georgia, June 18, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National 
Cemetery. Section H, Grave, No. 8.478. 

John Newland, Company i'. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Shiloh. Tennessee. June 
3, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Shiloh National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William T. Nicholson. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at New Albany, 
Indiana, May 16, 1863. Buried in South Mound Cemetery, New Castle. Indiana. 

George C. Nixon, Company D. 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Chattanooga. Ten- 
nessee, June 3, 1864. account of wounds in Atlanta Campaign. Buried there. Re-interred 
in Chattanooga National Cemetery, Section D, Grave. No. 12.469. 

Barzillai Osborne, Company A. -"iTth Indiana Infantry. Killed in Atlanta Cam- 
paign, June 14. 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National Ceme- 
tery, Section H. Grave, No. 8,870, 

George Osborn, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Syracuse, 
Missouri, December 28, 1861. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably 
re-mterred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

John A. Osborn. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Chattanooga, Ten- 
ne.=see. December 13. 1864. account of wounds at Kenesaw Mountain, Georgia, June 23. 

1864. Buried- there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Unknown list, 
Gideon H, Padget, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Keokuk. Iowa. 

January 13, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Keokuk National Cemetery. Grave 303. 

Samuel C. Page, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry, Killed at Richmond. Ken- 
tucky, August 30, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Washington Parkhurst. Co 
Georgia. September 9, 1864, But 
Section E, Grave, No. 6,355. 

John Pate, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Cairo, Illinois, August 25, 
1863, account of wotmds at Richmond, Kentucky, August 30, 1862. Buried there. No 
record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Joseph B. Pate. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry, Died at Young's Point, Louis- 
iana. F'ebruary S, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Un- 
known list, 

James Pattison, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Murfreesboro. Ten- 
nessee. September 30, 1864, account of wounds in Atlanta Campaign, May 30, 1864. Bur- 
ied there. Re-interred in Stone's River (Murfreesboro) National Cemetery. Section F, 
Grave, No. 2,456. 

Daniel H. Paul. Company E. 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Kenesaw Mountain. 
Georgia, June 20, 1864, Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Granville Pearson, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Ten- 
, nessee. January 25. 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Redmond Peed, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died in Andersonville Prison, 
Georgia, May 7. 1864. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery, Grave, No. 944. 

William W, Pence. Company K. 7th Infantry, U, S, A. Died at Presidio, San Fran- 
cisco, California. July 8, 1903. Buried in South Mound Cemetery. New Castle, Indiana. 



Bpany I. 


3rd 


Indiana Cavalry. Died at Sandtown 


ed there. 


Re- 


nterred in Marietta National Cemetery 



744 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



Abner Perdue, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Otterville. 
Missouri. January 24, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains proljably 
re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

George W. Perdue, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Young's Point. 
Louisiana, February 15, 186:!. Buried there. Re-Interred in Vicksburg National Ceme- 
tery. Section B, Grave, No. 2,809. 

Rut'us Perdue. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Memphis, Tennessee, 
December 27, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Memphi.s National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Mordecai Perry, Company G, 16th Indiana. Infantry. Died at Vicksburg. Missis- 
sippi, February 13, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. 
Section A, Grave, No. 3,086. 

James Personett. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. Died at Marietta, Georgia, 
July 12, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

*James F. Petty, Company F, .57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
March 27, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Andrew J. Phillips, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at Vicks- 
burg. Mississippi. May 22, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William A. Pickett, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Catlettsburg. Ken- 
tucky. December 16, 1862. Buried in Friends' Cemetery, Greensboro, Indiana. 

Hugh Pierce. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. Died at Mumfordsville, Ken- 
tucky, July 17, 1864. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred 
in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Jonathan E. Pierce. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died near Corinth, Mis- 
sissippi. July 5. 1862. Buried in Flatrock Cemetery. Liberty Township. Henry County, 
Indiana. 

Joseph H. Pike. Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Gainesville, Virginia, 
August 28. 1862. Buried on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains probably 
re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Stanford L. Pike. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee, October 13, 1863, account of wounds at Chickamauga, Georgia. September 20, 
1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Cyrus Pittser, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at New Or- 
leans, Louisiana, October 7, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Chalmette National 
Cemetery. Grave, No. 3,751. 

Henry C. Polk, Company B, 13th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Petersburg, Virginia, 
July 30, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains probably re-in- 
terred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Charles B. Post. Company A. S7th Indiana Infantry. Died at Savannah, Georgia. 
December 2S, 1864. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred 
in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Argyle A. Poston. Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. Died at Catlettsburg, Ken- 
tucky, April 14, 1S63. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Grave. 
No. 3,485. 

Edenbnrgh H. Por^ton. 19th Indiana Baltery. Died at Louisville, Kentucky. Octo- 
ber 29, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National Cemetery. 
Section A. Grave. No. 28. 

Jacob Powell, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at Austin, 
Mississippi, August 2, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Orlistes W. Powell, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. 
Georgia, September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in South Mound 
Cemetery, New Castle, Indiana. 

John W. C. Power. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. Died August 15, 1864, ac- 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 745 

count of wounds beiore Atlanta, Georgia, August 11, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. 
Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. Section I, Grave, No. 9,589. 

Robert V. Price. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond, Ken- 
tucky, August 30, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Oliver D. Protzman, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Franklin, Ten- 
nessee, November 30, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Nashville National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Daniel Pursley, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Paducah. Kentucky, 
March 25, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in 
some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Augustus D. Radclifte, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga, 
Georgia, September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

George W. Rader, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Vicks- 
burg, Mississippi. May 27, 1863, account of wounds received there. May 22, 1863. Buried 
on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Section G, Grave, No. 
4,965. 

George Rader, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, 
December 16, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Henry Ratliff, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Memphis, Tennessee, 
December 2, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Memphis National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Harmon Rayl, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Whitesides, Tennessee, 
December 18, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Friends' Cemetery, Spiceland, Indiana. 

Leonard M. Reeder, Company H, 12th Infantry, U. S. A. Killed at Lopez, Philip- 
pine Islands, September 10, 1900, Buried on the battlefield. No record of removal. Re- 
mains probably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

John Reichart, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Athens, Alabama, June 
30, 1863, Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Andrew W. Reid, Company A, 11th Indiana Infantry. Died at Carrollton, Louisiana, 
May 24, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Chalmette National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 

Henry Reynolds, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend. 
Louisiana, August 4, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. 
Section B, Grave. No. 2,674. 

*Joseph N. Reynolds, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, June 15. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Henry J. Richardson, Company I. 69(h Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond, 
Kentucky. August 30, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

James Rickard. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Maxwell, Kentucky, 
October, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in 
some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Benamin F. Ricks, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Killed at Franklin. Ten- 
nessee, December 17, 1864.' Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Nashville National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Jonathan Ricks, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed' at Richmond. Ken- 
tucky. August 30, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Mercer Ricks, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Buffalo, Kentucky, Feb- 
ruary 11, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in 
some National cemetery. Unknown li.st. 

«Avery Riggs, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at Markleville. 



74t> HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HEXRV COUNTY. 

Indiana. April 14. 1S65. Buried in Keesling Cemetery, three fourths of a mile southwest 
of Meehanicsburg. Indiana. 

Charles M. Riley, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. Died September 8, 18t;4. 
Burial place unknown. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some 
National cemetery. Unknown list. 

William G, Riley, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Young's Point. 
Louisiana, February 9, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

John H. Rinker, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Shiloh, Tennessee, 
April 22, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Shiloh National Cemetery. Section K. 
Grave, No. 148. 

George Ritchie. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Tennessee, 
November 19, 1862. Buried there. Re-Interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section 
B, Grave, No. 6,957. 

William H. Roby. Company H, 5th Indiana Infantry (Mexican War). Died at San 
Augustln, Mexico, May 28, 1848. Buried there in unknown grave. 

George W. Rogers. Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennes- 
see, February 9, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Sugar Grove Cemetery, two and a 
half miles west of New Castle, Indiana. 

Joseph B. Rogers, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at home, near Cadiz, 
Indiana, March 12. 1863. Buried in Sugar Grove Cemetery, two and a half miles west of 
New Castle, Indiana. 

William A. Rogers, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died at Baton Rouge, Louisi- 
ana, April 28, 1865. Burled there. Re-interred in Baton Rouge National Cemetery. 
Grave. No. 1,201. 

Jonathan Runyan, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry I three years). Died at St. 
Louis, Missouri. October 24. 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. 
Louis) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Abner P. Saint, Company C, 71st Illinois Infantry. Died at Columbus, Kentucky. 
.\ugust 24, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred 
in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

*Charles F. Sanders. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died June 4. 1862. Bur- 
ial place unknown. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some Na- 
tional cemetery. Unknown list. 

Francis A. Sanders. Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. Died at Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee, June 24, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Knoxville National Cemetery. 
Grave, No. 1,008. 

Luther B. Sanders, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. Died at Berryville, Vir- 
ginia, June 22, 1865., Buried there. Re-interred in Winchester National Cemetery. 
Grave, No. 3,642. 

Augustus L. Sayford. Coinpany H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Port Gibson, 
Mississippi, May 1, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Vicksburg National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Henry Scott, 19th Indiana Battery. Killed at Perryville, Kentucky, October S, 1S62. 
Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson National Cemetery. Unknown 

James M. Scott. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga, 
Georgia, September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Oliver P. Scott; 12th Indiana Battery. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, March 14. 
1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section C, Grave. No. 

Wesley W. Seward. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River. 
Tennessee, December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Meehanicsburg 
Cemetery. Meehanicsburg, Indiana. 

Jesse Shackle, Company A, 3r,fh Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River, Ten- 



r^l 



^ 



^i^^^r-nA^ S£u^C 



't^a-r^iX' 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



'47 



nessee. January 2, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River ( Mur- 
freesboro ) National Cemetery. Section D, Grave, No. 1.548. 

Leander Shepherd. Company C. S6th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. 
Georgia. September 19. 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William H. Shepherd, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Kenesaw 
Mountain. Georgia. June 23, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Jacob Shipler. Company C, 5th Indiana Cavalry. Killed in Atlanta Campaign. July 
31. 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

George Shirk, Company C. SUth Indiana Infantry. Died at home, in New Castle. 
Indiana. June 6. 1864. account of wounds at Chickamauga, Georgia, September 20, 1863. 
Buried in South Mound Cemetery, New Castle, Indiana. 

Ben.iam)n F. Shockley. Company H, 14nth Indiana Infantry. Died at home, in Blue 
River Township, Henry County, Indiana, December 2fi. 1864. Buried in Old Cemetery, 
near Messick, Indiana. 

John A. Showers, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years)." Died at St. 
Louis, Missouri. August 16, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. 
Louis) National Cemetery, Section 33, Grave, No. 2,988, 

David Shunk, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Evansville, Indiana, Au- 
gust 31, 1863. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in 
some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Joel Simons, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at St. Louis, Missouri, Feb- 
ruary 16, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis) National 
Cemetery. Section 58, Grave. No. 10.670. 

*Nixon Simons. Company F. .5Tth Indiana Infantry. Died at Louisville. Kentucky, 
January 17. 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Cave Hill (Louisville) National Ceme- 
tery, Unknown list. 

*John L. Skinner. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at ilera- 
phis, Tennessee, August 30, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Memphis National Cem- 
etery. Grave, No. 306. 

Abner Sloan. Company M. 21st Indiana Infantry, re-organized as 1st Heavy Artil- 
lery. Died at New Orleans, Louisana. January 2. 186.5. Buried there. Re-interred in 
Chalmette National Cemetery. Grave, No. 6,053. 

James E. Sloan, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend. Louisi- 
ana, April 10, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

James R. Smith. Company H, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Killed at Pea 
Ridge, Arkansas, March 7, 1862. Buried on the battlefield Re-interred in Fayetteville 
National Cemetery. Grave, No. 577. 

* Jacob Snyder. Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at St. Louis. 
Missouri, August 11, 1863, Buried there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. I-ouis) 
National Cemetery, Section 31. Grave, No. 2,547. 

George Spaw, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Resaca, Georgia, May 
15, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Sec- 
tion K, Grave, No. 10.206. 

Robert O. Spell, Company E, Pth Indiana Cavalry. Killed at Franklin, Tennessee, 
December 17, 1864, Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Nashville National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

*Harmon Sphor. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Murfreesboro. Ten- 
nessee. December 19. 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Stone's River (Murfreesboro) 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William Spurry. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Bowling Green. Ken- 
tucky. September 21. 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re- 
interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 



74<^ HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Zachariah M. Starr, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Wildcat, Ken- 
tucky, October 26, 1862. account of wounds received there, October 17, 1862. Buried on 
the battlefield. Re-interred in Danville (Kentucky) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Isaac Steele. Company A. 30th Indiana Infantry. Died at Chattanooga. Tennessee. 
June 23, 1864, account of wounds in Atlanta Campaign. May 30. 1864. Buried there. 
Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Section E. Grave, No. 11.311. 

*James A. Steele, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Stone's River. Ten- 
nessee. December 31, 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Stone's River (Mur- 
freesboro) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Nathaniel Stevens. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. Died at Cumberland. 
Maryland, July 28, 1865. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-in- 
terred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Townsend G. Stevens. Troop G. 6th Cavalry, U. S. A. Died at New Orleans. Louisi- 
ana. July 29, 1866. Buried there. Re-interred in Chalmette National Cemetery. Grave. 
No. 7,335. 

Samuel L. Stewart. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville. Ten- 
nessee. May 4. 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

William Stewart, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. 
Georgia. September 19. 1863. Buried on the '^^ttlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William F. Stewart, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. March 31, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

John.Stinson, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. Died at Indianapolis, Indiana. 
March 16. 1865. Buried in Hess Cemetery, near Cadiz, Indiana. 

Moses Straughn, Company D, Sth Indiana Infantn- (three years). Died at Memphis. 
Tennessee. June 7. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Memphis National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Peter C. Strickler. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed by accident on steam- 
boat. January 7. 1863. Buried on the river bank. No record of removal. Remains prob- 
ably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Daniel Sullivan. Company F, 1st Battalion. 19th Infantry, U. S. A. Died at U. S. 
General Hospital. Annapolis, Maryland, July 22, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in 
Annapolis National Cemetery. Grave. No. 929. 

Jeremiah Sullivan, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died in field hospital, June 
15, 1864, account of wonnds in Atlanta Campaign, May 27, 1864. Buried there. Re-in- 
terred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. Section E, Grave, No. 11,281. 

Elza Swain. Company G. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died May 4, 1863. account of 
wounds at Port Gibson. Mississippi. May 1. 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred 
in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

John K. Swain, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died at home in 
Mechanicsburg, Indiana. August 22. ]863. Buried in Mechanicsburg Cemetery. Mechan- 
icsburg. Indiana. 

Samuel H. Sweigart. Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died at St. Louis, Missouri. 
.Inly 23. 1865. Buried in Elliott Cemetery, two and a half miles south of New Castle. 
Indiana. 

Benjamin F. Symons. Incomplete list. Died in the army. No record of place, date 
or burial. Remains probably re-interred in some National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

David S. Taylor. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Danville, Kentucky. 
November 17, 1862. account of wounds at Wildcat, Kentucky, October 17, 1862. Buried in 
Masonic Cemetery. Greensboro, Indiana. 

Charles E. Thomas, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. Accidentally killed at New 
Haven. Kentucky, November 18. 1861. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains 
probably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

James Thomas. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. J^ij 

April 30. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 

list. 

Adolphus G. Thiit, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennes- 
see, May 5, 1862. Buried in Rich Square Cemetery. Franklin Township. Henry County, 
Indiana. 

John W. Timmons, Company C. 147th Indiana Infantry. Died at Indianapolis, In- 
diana, March 14. 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Crown Hill Cemetery. Indianapolis. 
Indiana. Military Plat. Unknown list. 

William Topping. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga, 
Georgia. September 19. 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Chattanooga Na- 
tional Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Benjamin F. Trail. Company C, 2Sth V. S. C. T. Killed at Petersburg, Virginia, 
July 30. 1864. Buried on the battlefield. No record of removal. Remains probably re- 
interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

James Trail. Company C, 2Sth U. S. C. T. Died at Corpus Christi, Texas. Septem- 
ber 24, 186.5. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in 
some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

William Trout. Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Drowned at St. 
Louis. Missouri. June 17. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. 
Louis) National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Robert Troxell, Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Chickamauga. Geor- 
gia. September 20, 1863. Buried on the battlefield Re-interred in Chattanooga National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Robert F. Tuder, Company M. Sth Indiana Cavalry. Killed at Black River, North 
Carolina. March 16. 1865. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Raleigh National 
Cemetery. Grave, No. 371. 

Sashwell Turner. Company E. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at St. Louis. Missouri. 
August 17, 1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Jefferson Barracks (St. Louis I National 
Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Joseph Van Matre, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died at St. Louis, Missouri, 
May 10, 1863. Buried in Painter Cemetery, Fall Creek Township, Henry County. Indi- 
ana. 

Peter Van Matre, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. Died at Greensboro, North 
Carolina, June 27, 1865. Buried there. Re-interred in Painter Cemetery, Fall Creek 
Township, Henry County, Indiana. 

Benjamin Waddell, 19th Indiana Battery. Died at Danville, Kentucky. November 
8. 1862. Buried in Holland Cemetery, near Straughn, Indiana. 

Luther Waddell, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee. 
September 16, 1863. Buried in Holland Cemetery, near Straughn, Indiana. 

Jehu Waggoner, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at New Orleans, Louisi- 
ana. September 6, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Chalmette National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

John S. Wallace, Company B, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). Died at Memphis. 
Tennessee. January 21, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Memphis National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

William H. Ward, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Indianapolis, Indi- 
ana, December 27, 1862. Buried in Lewisville Cemetery, Lewisvjlle, Indiana. 

Caleb N. Warner, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. Died date and place un- 
known. Remains probably re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

David Warner, 'Company H, Sth Indiana Infantry (Mexican War). Drowned in 
Mississippi River. November. 1847, Body never recovered. 

George W. Warner, 12th Indiana Battery. Died at Nashville, Tennessee. April 1, 
1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

Peter Warner, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennessee, 
August 30, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Unknown 
list. 



750 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRV 



George W. Warrick, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, January 9, 1863, account of wounds at Stone's River, Tennessee, December 31. 
1862. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. Section A, Grave, No. 
S.OSli. 

John D. Wasson, Company I, 124th Indiana Infantry. Died at Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee, June 15, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Chattanooga National Cemetery. 
Section A, Grave, No. 119. 

Daniel L. Watkins, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. Died in West Virginia. 
October 17, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in 
some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Francis M. Watkins, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Resaca, Georgia. 
May 14, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in South Movmd Cemetery. New 
Castle, Indiana. 

Marquis De La Fayette Watkins. Incomplete list. Died at home, near New Cas- 
tle, February 22. 1865. Buried in South Mound Cemetery. New Castle, Indiana. 

Thornton T. Watkins, Company F, .T7th Indiana Infantry. Lost on Sultana, April 
27, 1865. Body never, recovered. 

George W. Wean, Company G. S4th Indiana Infantry. Died at Nashville, Tennes- 
see, December 17, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Nashville National Cemetery. 
Section D, Grave, No. 3.205. 

Fennel West, Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. Died in Andersonville Prison. 
Georgia. June 28. 1864. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

William D. West. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Camp Wickliffe, 
Kentucky, January 8, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably 
re-interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

William Whitacre, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. Died at Indianapolis. Indi- 
ana. May 21, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Crown Hill Cemetery. Indianapolis, 
Indiana. Military plat. Grave, No. 252. 

Benjamin Whitelock, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Richmond, 
Kentucky, August 30. 1862. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Camp Nelson 
National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

James "Vt'. Whitlow. Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. Died of wounds, date and 
place unknown. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in some National 
cemetery. Unknown list. 

George M. Wilkinson. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. Died at Louisville. Ken- 
tucky, October 18, 1863. Buried in Old Cemetery, Knightstown, Indiana. 

George Williams, 15th Indiana Battery. Died in Andersonville Prison, Georgia. 
October 26. 1864. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. Grave. No. 11.497. 

Jesse L. Williams. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Milliken's Bend, 
Louisiana, February 6, 186,^. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Joseph Williams, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. Died near Vicksburg, Mis- 
sisippi. January 23. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

Nereus P. Williams. Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. Killed in Atlanta Cam- 
paign. May 31, 1864. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Marietta National Ceme- 
tery. Section A, Grave, No. 841. 

William Williams. Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. Died at Mumfordsville, 
Kentucky, July 20, 1864. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re- 
interred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

AVilliam 0. Williams, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. Killed at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania, July 1, 1863. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in Gettysburg Na- 
tional Cemetery. Indiana Plat. Unknown list. 

John L. Willis, Company A, 2nd Infantry, U. S. A. Died July 3. 1898. account of 
wounds at San Juan Hill. Cuba, July 1, 1898. Buried on the battlefield. No record of 
removal. Remains probably re-interred in Arlington National Cemetery. Unknown list. 




%t." 



^^?^— rj^^>*" 



8th INDIANA INFANTRY. 

(three months' SERV'ICE.) 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY 



751 



Luther Wilson, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. Died at Buffalo, Kentucky, Feb- 
ruary 17, 1862. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-interred in 
some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

Enoch M. Windsor, Company G, 7th Indiarra Cavalry. Died in Andersonville Prison, 
Georgia, date unUnown. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. Unknown list. 

James M. Windsor, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). Died in Libby 
Prison. Richmond. Virginia, February 17, 1865. Buried in Richmond National Ceme- 
tery. Unknown list. 

Joseph S. Winship, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. Died in Andersonville 
Prison, Georgia, August 3, 1864. Buried in Andersonville National Cemetery. Grave, 
No, 4.639. 

William H. Wise. Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. Died at Indianapolis. Indi- 
ana, November 25, 1864. Buried there. Re-interred in Crown Hill Cemetery. Indianapo- 
lis. Indiana. Military Plat. Unknown list. 

David Wisehart. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at Young's Point. Louisi- 
ana. March 10. 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. Un- 
known list. 

Philander Wisehart, Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). Killed at 
Rich Mountain. West Virginia, July 11, 1861. Buried on the battlefield. Re-interred in 
Grafton National Cemetery. Grave, No. 655. 

Seth Wood. Company I, 6Pth Indiana Infantry. Died at Big Black River Bridge, 
Mississippi, July 24, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Vicksburg National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

William F. Wright, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. Died at Cumberland, 
Maryland, April 9, 1865. Buried there. No record of removal. Remains probably re-in- 
terred in some National cemetery. Unknown list. 

George H. Zeigler, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. Died at New Orleans. Louisi- 
ana, September 12, 1863. Buried there. Re-interred in Chalmette National Cemetery. 
Unknown list. 

REC.\PITrLATION OF ROLI, OF HONOR. 

Total known list 476 

Total estimated list 119 

Grand total, including soldiers who served in distinctively Henry County com- 
panies 595 

DF.orcT. 

Soldiers of the Mexican War 4 

Soldiers of the Spanish-American War. Philippine Insurrection, and Regular Army, 9 13 

Total loss in the Civil War 582 

XATIONAL CE:METERTES. 

September q, 1861, the Secretary of Wat directed that the Quarterniaster 
(jeneral of the Anny should cause to be printed and to be placed in every hospital 
of the army, blank books and forms for the purpose of preserving accurate and 
permanent records of deceased soldiers and their place of burial, and that he 
should provide proper means for a registered head-board to be secured at the head 
of each soldier's grave. 

Act of Congress, approved July i/. 1862. authorizes the President of the 
United States, whenever, in his opinion, it shall be deemed expedient, to purchase 
cemetery grounds, and to cause them to be securely enclosed, to be used as a 



7^2 HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

national cemetery for the soldiers who shall die in the service of the country. 

April 13, 1866, it was provided by Public Resolution No. 21 "that the Secre- 
tary of War be authorized to take immediate measures to preserve from dese- 
cration the graves of soldiers of the United States who fell in battle or died of 
disease during the War of the Rebellion, and to secure suitable burial-places, and 
to have these grounds enclosed, so that the resting-places of the honored dead 
may be kept sacred forever." 

February 28, 1867, an act to establish and protect national cemeteries was 
approved, which provided in detail for the purchase of grounds, and the manage- 
ment and inspection of cemeteries; also for the punishment of any person who 
should mutilate monuments or injure the trees and plants. 

In accordance with the foregoing and the orders issued by the War Depart- 
ment from time to time, every effort has been made to collect the remains of the 
dead, to inter them decently, and to record all the facts known in connection with 
each grave. After no war, whether of ancient or modern times, have any such 
systematic exertions been made to secure the collection of the dead and their 
interment in permanent resting-places, as have been made by the Quartermaster 
De])artment of the United States Army under the above provisions of the law. 

The latest report of the Quartermaster General on the subject of the Nation's 
Dead, shows that the following National Cemeteries have been established 



Name of Cemetery. Known. 

Annapolis. Maryland 2,285 

Alexandria, Louisiana 534 

Alexandria. Virginia 3.402 

Andersonville, Georgia 12.793 

Antietam. Maryland 2,853 

Arlington. Virginia 11.915 

Balls Bluff, Virginia 1 

Barrancas, Florida 798 

Baion Rouge. Louisiana 2,469 

Baitle Ground. District of Columbia • 43 

Beaufort. South Carolina 4.748 

Beverly, New Jersey 145 

Brownsville, Texas 1,417 

Camp Butler, Springfield. Illinois 1.007 

Camp Nelson. Jessamine County. Kentucky 2,477 

Cave Hill. Louisville. Kentucky 3.344 

Chalmette. New Orleans. Louisiana 6.837 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 7,999 

City Point. Virginia 3.778 

Cold Harbor, Virginia 673 

Corinth, Mississippi 1,789 

Crown Hill, Indianapolis. Indiana 681 

Culpeper. Virginia 456 

Custer Battle Field. Mexican Territory 262 

Cypress Hills, New York 3.710 

Danville, Kentucky 335 

Danville, Virginia 1.172 

Fayetteville. Arkansas 431 

Finn's Point, Salem, New Jersey 



VTEK.\IEXT.S. 




Unknown. 


Total. 


204 


2,489 


772 


1.306 


120 


3.522 


921 


13,714 


1.818 


4,671 


4.349 


16.264 


24 


25 


657 


1.455 


495 


2,964 



1.379 


2,796 


355 


1.362 


1,165 


3,642 


583 


3,927 


5,674 


12.511 


4,963 


12.962 


1.374 


5,152 


1.281 


1,954 


3.927 


5.716 


32 


713 


911 


1.367 




262 


76 


3,786 


8 


343 


155 


1.327 


781 


1.212 


2,644 


2,644 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Florence, South Carolina 199 

Fort Donelson, Tennessee 158 

Fort Gibson, Indian Territory 215 

Fort Harrison, Virginia 239 

Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 835 

Fort McPherson. Lincoln County. Nebraska 152 

Fort Smith, Arkansas 711 

Fort Scott. Kansas 390 

Fredericlvsburg. Virginia 2.487 

Gettysburg. Pennsylvania 1.967 

Glendale. Virginia 234 

Grafton, West Virginia 634 

Hampton, Virginia 4.930 

Jeiferson Barracks, Missouri 8.584 

Jefferson City. Missouri 349 

Keokuk, Iowa 612 

Knoxville, Tennessee 2.090 

Laurel. Maryland 232 

Lebanon, Kentucky 591 

Lexington, Kentucky 805 

Little Rock, Arkansas 3,265 

Loudon Park, Maryland 1.637 

Marietta, Georgia 7.18S 

Memphis, Tennessee 5,160 

Mexico City, Mexico 284 

Mills Springs, Somerset, Kentucky ' 345 

Mobile, Alabama 756 

Mound City, Illinois 2,505 

Nashville, Tennessee 11.825 

Natchez, Mississippi 308 

New Albany. Indiana 2,139 

New Berne. North Carolina 2,177 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1,881 

Poplar Grove, Virginia 2.198 

Port Hudson, Louisiana 596 

Quincy, Illinois 240 

Raleigh, North Carolina 619 

Richmond, Virginia 842 

Rock Island, Illinois 277 

Salisbury, North Carolina 94 

San Antonio, Texas 324 

San Francisco, California 4.236 

Santa Fe, New Mexico 380 

St. Augustine, Florida 195 

Seven Pines, Virginia 150 

Shiloh, Hardin County. Tennessee ■ 1,229 

Soldiers' Home, District of Columbia 5,314 

Springfield, Missouri 1,009 

Staunton, Virginia 233 

Stone's River, Murfreesboro, Tennessee 3,821 

Vicksburg, Mississippi 3,896 

Wilmington, North Carolina 710 

Winchester, Virginia 2,094 

Woodlawn, BImira, New York 3,074 

Yorktown, Virginia 748 

177,362 



2,799 


2,998 


511 


669 


2,212 


2,427 


575 


814 


928 


1,763 


291 


443 


1,152 


1.863 


161 


551 


12,770 


15,257 


1,608 


3.575 


961 


1,195 


620 


1,254 


494 


5,424 


2,906 


11,490 


412 


761 


33 


645 


1,046 


3.136 


6 


238 


277 


868 


108 


913 


2.337 


5,602 


166 


1,803 


2,963 


10,151 


8,817 


13,977 


750 


1,034 


366 


711 


113 


869 


2,721 


5,226 


4,701 


16,526 


2.780 


3,088 


676 


2,815 


1,077 


3,254 


28 


1,909 


4.001 


6,199 


3,223 


3,819 


56 


296 


562 


1,181 


5.700 


6.542 


19 


296 


L2,032 


12.126 


167 


491 


4.56 


4,692 


421 


801 


73 


268 


1,208 


1,358 


2,361 


3,590 


288 


5.602 


740 


1.749 


520 


753 


2,324 


6,145 


.2.704 


16,600 


1.398 


2,108 


2,365 . 


4,459 


16 


3,090 


1,434 


2,182 


19,314 


326,676 



754 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Of the whole number of interments indicated above, there are about 6,900 
known and 1,500 unknown civihans, and 6,100 known and 3,200 unknown Con- 
federates. Of these latter, the greater portion are buried at Woodlawn Cemetery. 
Elmira, New York, and Finn's Point Cemetery, near Salem, New Jersey. The 
interments at Mexico City are mainly of those who were killed or died in that 
vicinity during the Mexican War, and include also such citizens of the United 
States as may have died in Mexico, and who, under treaty provision, have the 
right of burial therein. From the foregoing, it will appear that, after making all 
proper deductions for civilians and Confederates, there are gathered in the various 
places mentioned the remains of nearly 300,000 men who at one time wore the blue 
during the late war, and who yielded up their lives in defense of the Government 
which now so graciously cares for their ashes. 



CHAPTER XXXVI. 

the militia system of indiana. 

The Militia System of the Northwest Territory — The Muster and the 
Militia Laws in Indiana Territory — List of Militia Officers From 
Henry County. 

The enforced Militia System which prevailed in Indiana from the first set- 
tlement of the Territory by Enfjlish speaking- people until 1844. when a Volunteer 
System succeeded it, was an inheritance from the old Northwest Territory, for the 
g'overnment of which it was the very first legal enactment. Though often modified 
and amended by the various Territorial and State Legislatures, it embraced the 
general principal of enforced military service to the State for the defense of its 
people, their homes and their property, and the same general requirements for the 
instruction of the officers and men, and their grouping in Companies, Battalions. 
Regiments and Brigades, from the first act to the last, e.xcept that owing to the 
narrow limits of the primal settlements, the first law provided for no command 
larger than a regiment. 

The initial militia law for the country north of the Ohio River was published 
at Marietta, Ohio, on July 25, 1788, by the Governor, Arthur St. Clair, and two of 
the Territorial Judges, Samuel Holden Parsons and James Mitchell Varnum, almost 
a year in advance of the meeting of the first Legislative Assembly of the Northwest 
Territory. It was seemingly the work of the two New England Judges, Parsons 
and Varnum, and was the form by which the old methods of protecting the early 
New England settlements from the murderous assaults of the savages and re- 
pelling their frequent invasions, were brought into the wilderness, north of the 
Ohio. The immediate purpose of the enactment was the same as that which 
inspired the laws from which it was evidently fashioned. Certain clauses of the 
law itself, show how greatly the need of military preparation for the defense of 
the new settlements had impressed the men, who were leading the people of the 
older communities into a wilderness to establish the foundations of great States. 

The sweeping and arbitrary character of the first militia law will be more 
readily understood by- the incorporation of its more important sections into the 
body of this chapter, than by any mere statement of its provisions. The first five 
sections of the law are as follows : 

(1). "All male inhabitants, between the ages of sixteen and fifty, shall be liable 
to. and perform military duty, and be formed into corps in the following manner: 

(2). "Sixty rank and file shall form a company. Eight companies shall form a 
battalion. Two battalions shall form a regiment. There shall be appointed to each com- 



756 hazzard"s history of henry county. 

pany, one Captain, one Lieutenant, one Ensign, four Sergeants, four Corporals, one 
Drummer, and one Fifer. To a battalion, there shall be appointed one Lieutenant Colonel, 
one Major and one Adjutant. To a regiment, one Colonel. The corps shall be divided 
into Senior and Junior Classes. 

(3.) "Whereas, in the infant state of the Country, defense and protection are ab- 
solutely essential, all male inhabitants of the age of sixteen years and upwards, shall be 
armed, equipped, and accoutred in the following manner: with muslvet and bayonet, or 
rifle, cartridge box and pouch, or powder horn and bullet pouch, with forty rounds of 
cartridges, or one pound of powder and four pounds of lead, priming wire and brush and 
six flints. 

(4). "And whereas, for securing principles of defense and protection, it is neces- 
sary to be assembled upon certain times and at certain places for examining and in- 
specting the arms and accoutrements, and for disciplining the men in a soldierly manner: 
and whereas, the assembling of the community at fixed periods, conduces to health, civili- 
zation and morality and such assembling without arms in a newly settled country, may 
be attended with danger, therefore the corps shall be paraded at ten o'clock in the morn- 
ing of each first day of the week (Sunday), armed, equipped, and accoutred as aforesaid, 
in convenient places, next adjacent to the place or places already assigned for public 
■worship. At other times and places, the corps shall be paraded for muster, exercise and 
review, as the Commander in Chief may direct. And whereas, in the present state of 
the Territory, it is necessary that guards be established, the Commander in Chief and 
the commanding officers of counties and smaller districts shall make such detachments 
tor guards and such other military services as the public exigencies may in their opin- 
ion, or their opinions, require. 

(5). "Those who have borne commissions, civil or military, in the service of the 
United States, or either of them, or who have been honorably discharged therefrom, and 
all such as have been graduated in colleges or universities, shall comprise the senior 
class. Males over the age of fifty shall be liable to military duty in cases of actual invas- 
ion only, and then at the direction of the Commander in Chief. Officers of the Civil 
Government or commissioned b.\ the Governor are exempted from the duties aforesaid." 

The remaining si.x sections of the law provide for its enforcement, estahlish 
courts martial, and provide for their method of procedure and determine the 
penalties such courts may inflict. 

The fines for neglect of duty and other violations of the law were at first 
light, running from a ma.ximum of one dollar down to a minimum of five cents 
for a trivial oflfense. twenty five cents being the more usual fine, but all officers 
were subject to courts martial which seem to have been endowed with almost 
unlimited powers. 

Under an amendment to the law made in November, 1788. fines were assessed 
and collected against all persons subject to military duty, for neglect or refusal to 
provide themselves with the equipment required by law and established a fine 
for each separate offense, ranging from fifty cents for failure to provide a 
musket or rifle to five cents for failure to provide a priming wire or brush. .\rms. 
accouiitrements and ammimition were to be inspected bv the officers on the first 
Sabbath day of each month. Under a subsidiarv" act passed July 2. 1791, the 
regular weekly musters were permitted to take place on Saturday instead of 
Sunda>-, compelled militiamen to go armed, when attending places of worship, and 
fixed the fines for neglect; the law to be enforced by distress and sale of property. 
when necessary. 

In 1799 the General .Assembly repealed the law of 1788 and all subsequent 
Laws for the establishment of the militia and substituted for them a law of twentv 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 757 

seven articles, including altogether forty three sections and covering twelve pages 
of closely printed matter. By this law, all able bodied white male citizens, between 
the ages of eighteen and forty five years, were made subject to militia duty, except 
civil officers and ministers. It provided for artillery, one battery to be attached 
to each brigade, an Adjutant General for the territory, and for general, regi- 
mental and company officers, as well as non-commissioned officers, much as they 
exist today in the Army and in the \'olnnteer Militia. Perhaps the greatest de- 
parture from the former law was in the greatly increased severity of the penalties 
for failure or refusal to obey the provisions of the act, the fines running from 
five cents to three dollars for enrolled men. up to a maximum fine of one hundred 
dollars for certain offenses of commissioned officers, while parents and guardians 
were made responsible for fines assessed against their sons or wards. Fines werL- 
to be collected by distress and sale of property or by imprisonment of the offender. 
( )fficers and men were to be free from arrest while performing military dut}-. 
The men were required to furnish their own arms and accoutrements as under 
the old law. and the militia was subject to immediate call to repel invasion. 

There were various reasons for the increased rigor of this act. The law of 
1788 was intended for the organization of the men, young and old, of the Ohio 
Company's Marietta Colony, for defense against the assaults of Indians, and there 
was probably not a man or boy in the Company, who was not in accord with the 
ideas of the leading men of the Colonv, on the necessitv and dutv of self defense 
imiiosed on_ the citizens by the militia law of 1788. But in 1799, thousands of 
settlers from many parts of .\nierica and Europe had come into the Territory and^ 
the widely scattered settlements made it a different and more difficult task to 
provide an efficient militia system for their defense. Besides this, the rapid influx 
of Quakers and other non-combatants, for conscientious reasons, into the new 
land, doubtless kindled the old warrior zeal of Puritan and non-conscientious 
Southron alike, resulting in a determination to make the Quakers train for war 
or pav the cost of a like number of militiamen. 

It is not the author's purpose to discuss the wisdom of the n'.ore rigorous law 
but merely to point out that the law of 1799 and the- acts that preceded it. were 
the foundation upon which all subsequent militia laws, whether coercive or 
volunteer, have been based. The muster did not originate with the law. In some 
form it is, doubtless, as old as war itself, but it was this law of the Northwest 
Territory that brought it into Indiana Territory and State. It was this law also 
that provoked the long struggle with the Society of Friends and other sects, 
conscientiously opposed to war. As the danger of invasion passed away, the 
non-combatants gradually succeeded in their contention for immunity from mili- 
tary duties in times of peace. In iSoo Indiana Territory was established by Act 
of Congress and in 1802 the new Territorial Government was in full control. The 
tild Northwest Territory had passed into history, but had bequeathed its laws and 
their spirit to its successor. ^ 

THE MUSTER. AXD THE MIFJTIA LA\\"S IX INDIANA TERRITORY. 

The law of 1799 was continued in full force in Indiana Territorw having in 
• iriler to insure its binding force, been re-enacted by the first Territorial General 



758 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Assembly. In 1810 the General Assembly passed an act supplemental to the law 
of 1799, which made a number of changes in the methods of administration, the 
most radical of which related to the Society of Friends or Quakers, and their 
conscientious scruples as to bearing arms. Under the laws of 1799, the Quakers 
had been the objects of frequent persecution for neglect of military duty, and 
seizures and sales of their property for the payment of military fines had been of 
frequent occurence, for the Quakers held it to be the same in effect to pay fines 
that went to the support of the militia as to render military service in person. 
The thirteenth section of the law <>{ 18 10 provided as follows: 

•'Whereas the universal benevolence which governs said society, established b\ 
their ample contributions to all charitable and useful institutions, and particularly their 
exertions to civilize the Indians, a fund having actually been raised to be devoted to that 
object in this Territory, therefore, for these reasons, as also from the circumstances of 
the said society being always in the habit of supporting its own poor, although they 
cheerfully pay their poor tax for the support of those of other denominations, be it 
enacted that the persons composing said societies shall be, and they are hereby exempted 
from military duty, provided always, that in time of actual war, they will be subject to 
such additional tax or contribution in lieu of military service, as the legislature may 
think proper to impose." 

This section constituted one of the first legal acknowledgments of the rights 
of conscience with reference to military service, that was made .in this country. 
It was, however, of short duration, for the shadows of Indian troubles and the 
gathering clouds of the Second War with En,gland, ktiown as the War of 1812-15. 
.then beginning to thicken rapidly, caused the repeal of the section at the very 
ne.xt session of the Territorial General .\ssembly. 

The law of 1810 also forbade the sale of into.xicants within two miles of a 
parade or muster, a provision which seems to have been dropped from the next 
militia law. The last Territorial law on the subject of the militia was finally 
passed and approved at the session of 1814. It was an elaborate enactment of no 
less than seventy nine sections. It retained the principal features of the old law 
of 1799 but enlarged upon it and brought it down to the needs of the time, which 
was one of imininent danger from Indian massacres and invasions, while the 
Treaty of Ghent had not yet brought to a close the Second War wdth England. 
It substituted an exemption fee of five dollars for the free exemption given by 
the preceding law to the Quakers and renewed the old rigorous collection laws. 
Some changes were made iti the titles and duties of officers and the cavalry and 
artillery branches of the service were better organized. All regiments or parts 
of regiments were made subject to immediate call by the Commander-in-Chief, to 
repel invasion or for other specific duties connected with the public safety. 
Officers and inen were still required to equip themselves, and cavalrymen were to 
furnish their own mounts, but if the animal was killed or rendered worthless 
when the cumpany was called into active service, the owner was to be paid its 
appraised value from the Territorial Treasury. Company and battalion musters 
w-ere to be held in April and September of each year and the regimental musters 
were to take place in Septeinber of each year. The law seeins to have been silent 
as to more frequent company or squad drills ; but tradition seems to establish tliat 
they were, in most places, inatters of monthly occurrence, the hours of muster 
being from ten o'clock in the morning to three o'clock in the afternoon. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



759 



The first Constitution of the State of Indiana provided that "The Militia of 
Indiana shall consist of all free, able-bodied male persons, negroes, mulattoes and 
Indians excepted, resident in said State, between the ages of eighteen and forty 
five years ; except such persons as now are or hereafter may be exempted by the 
laws of the United States or of this State, and shall be armed, equipped and 
trained as the General Assembly may provide by law." 

It made proper exemptions for persons conscientiously scrupulous of bearing 
arms. Subalterns, captains, majors and colonels were to be elected by thcise 
persons subject to military duty in their respective Company, Battalion and Regi- 
mental districts ; non-commissioned officers of companies were to be appointed by 
the captains ; brigadier generals were to be elected by the commissioned officers 
in their respective brigades and major generals by the same class of officers in 
their respective divisions. The manner of forming troops in th€ several branches 
of the service was left to the General Assembly. The appointment of an Adjutant 
General for the State, and of a Quartermaster General and his aids de camp was 
assigned to the Governor. 

While giving the sanction of the State to the rights of conscience in the 
matter of bearing arms, it still made exemption from military duty on account of 
conscientious scruples, the subject of a money consideration to be collected by the 
civil officers. This was materially softened, however, by section three of article 
nine, which provided that the mniie>- which "shall be paid as an equivalent by 
persons exempt from military ilin\. rNiipt in times of war," should be exclu- 
sively and in equal proportion, aii]ilii-il t^ the support of county seminaries, a class 
of high schools or academies, for which the constitution elsewhere provided. This 
did not for many years, even .measurably satisfy those who resisted the collection 
<if exemption fees and fines, possibly because the money was applied to special 
•schools rather than to popular schools, in the benefits of which all might partake. 

The organization of Henry County was completed June I, 1822, and the 
county's connection with the militia system began August 23, 1823. The Adjutant 
General's office is not in possession of State military documents of any kind that 
antedate the War with ;\KxicM. wliidi began in 1846. There is, however, a record 
in the office of the Secrciary <<{ Mate, which contains the names of the militia 
officers of the State, with the lIuIlj of their commissions, and the regiments to 
which they belonged from 1816 forward. From this record it is found that Elisha 
Long was commissioned Colonel of the Forty Eighth Regiment of Indiana Militia, 
on August 28, 1823. So it may be safely assumed that the regiment came into 
existence in that year, and that the militia system of the county began then. The 
list of militia officers, who were commissioned'at various times, contains the names 
of many men, who were prominent in the early life and councils of the county, but 
perhaps no one of them was more distinguished than the first Colonel, Elisha 
Long. He was the son of a Revolutionary snldier. Christopher Long, whose grave 
is kept green at the cross roads near the Hnxd Schoolhouse in Liberty Township. 
Colonel Long was a soldier of the War of 1812-15 from Virginia, before coming 
to Henry County, and played an important part in the affairs of the country as 
is shown elsewhere in this Historv. 



760 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

LIST OF MILITIA OFFICERS FROM HENRY COUNTY. 

COMMISSIONED FOR SERVICE IN THE 48TH REGIMENT, INDIANA MILITIA FROM 1823 
TO 1846, INCLUSIVE, WITH THE D.\TES OF THEIR SEVERAL COMMISSIONS. 

August 28, 1823. — Elisha Long. Colonel: James Johnson, Lieutenant Colonel; John 
Dorrah, Major. 

November 29, 1823. — Brice Dillee, Captain; George Isham. Lieutenant; Edmund 
Liston, Ensign. 

December IB. 1823. — Achilles Morris, Captain; Michael Swope, Lieutenant; William 
Huff, Ensign; John Baker. Captain; Anthony Boggs, Lieutenant; Stephen Batson, En- 
sign; Daniel C. Priddy, Captain; Robert Johnson, Lieutenant; William Wick. Ensign; 
Jesse Forkner. Captain; George B. Bates, Lieutenant; Thomas Ralston. Ensign; Charles 
B. Finch, Captain; John Smith, Lieutenant; Asahel Woodward, (Grandfather of the au- 
thor of this History), Lieutenant; William McDowell, Ensign. 

September 13, 1824. — John Odom, Lieutenant. 

September 3, 1825. — John Whittaker, Lieutenant; Watson Roe. Lieutenant. 

March 11. 1826. — Thomas Porter, Ensign of Riflemen; Mathew McKimmey, Lieuten- 
ant of Riflemen. 

April 4, 1826. — Brice Dillee. Lieutenant Colonel; Elijah ilcCray. Captain; Nathan 
Crawford, Lieutenant. 

May 23, 1826. — It was ordered by the Governor and Commander in Chief, that the 
Militia of the counties of Rush, Decatur and Henry be organised into a brigade to be 
known as the Eighteenth Brigade, and that it comprisfe a part of the Seventh Division 
of the Militia of the State. 

August 23, 1826. — Amaziah Morgan, Brigadier General, Eighteenth Brigade; Gen- 
eral Morgan lived in Rush County. He represented the district of which Henry County 
formed a part, in the State Senate, 1826-30. 

November 1, 1826. — Michael Swope, Captain; John Shortridge. Lieutenant; Ed- 
ward Sharp, Ensign; John Keene, Lieutenant; Christopher Hedrick. Ensign; William 
Ramsey, Lieutenant. ■ 

April 17, 1827. — Samuel Howard, Lieutenant Colonel. 

August 14, 1827. — John Freeland, Captain; Samuel Griggsby, Lieutenant; John 
Whittaker, Captain of Riflemen; William Hughes, Lieutenant. 

January 14, 1828. — James R. Leonard. Lieutenant; Michael Buck, Ensign. 

December 26, 1828. — William Hobson. Lieutenant of Riflemen; John E. Templeton. 
Lieutenant; William Mnrphey, Ensign. 

August 4, 1829. — Miles Murphey, Major; Samuel Howard. Captain of Cavalry; 
Jacob Thornburgh, First Lieutenant of Cavalry; William Silver. Second Lieutenant of 
Cavalry; William Mellett, Cornet of Cavalry; Christopher Hedrick, Captain; Andrew 
Fletcher, Lieutenant; Joseph Robbing. Captain; Armstead Watkins. Lieutenant; Sam- 
uel Marsh, Ensign; Anthony Dunlavy. Captain; Richard Wilson, Lieutenant; Alfred 
Moore, Ensign; John Odom. Captain; Samuel D. Wells, Lieutenant; William Hill, En- 
sign; Watson Roe, Captain; John McShirley, Lieutenant; Joel Robinson. Ensign. 

February 1, 1830.— Jonathan Bedwell. Captain; Andrew D. Blount, Lieutenant: 
James Alexander, Ensign. 

June 17, 1830. — Richard Wilson, Captain; William B. Wilson, Lieutenant. 

August 3, 1830. — John Hill, Lieutenant; Barzillai Rozell, Ensign. 

October 11, 1830.— Robert Hudelson, Captain; Alfred M. Brattain. Lieutenant: John 
Wick, Ensign; Jacob H. Powers, Captain; Edward Jones, Lieutenant: Thomas C. Calk- 
ins. Ensign: Thomas B. Miller, Lieutenant; Edmund Liston. Ensi.gn; James Boggs. En- 
sign. 

December 13, 1830. — William Silver, First Lieutenant of Cavalry; Ezekiel T. Hick- 
man, Second Lieutenant of Cavalry. 

January 21. 1831. — John Evans, Ensign. 

February 10, 1831. — Asa Leonard. Captain; Joseph G. Cooper. Lieiitenant: William 



,^^^^^s^ 




COMPANY C. 36th INDIANA INFANTRY 



hazzard's history of henry county. 761 

Crane, Ensign; Daniel Custard, Lieutenant; Darius Berger, Ensign; William Bruner, 
Ensign. 

April 21. 1831. — Aaron Houghum, Captain; John Wilson, Lieutenant; Ransom Long, 
Ensign. 

May 25, 1831. — Stephen Cory, Ensign. 

August 22, 1831. — Miles Murphey, Colonel; Asahel Woodward. (Grandfather of the 
author of this History), Major. 

January 11. 1832. — William Parker, Captain of Riflemen; Jacob Rhinehart. Ensign 
of Riflemen; John Dennis, Lieutenant; James Holtsclaw, Ensign. 

February 27, 1832. — David Fleming, Captain; Valentine Summers. Ensign; John 
Davidson. Lieutenant; Minor Allee, Ensign. 

March 22. 1832. — Ezekiel T. Hickman, Major; William J. Hobson, Lieutenant of 
Riflemen; Jonathan Pierson, Ensign of Riflemen. 

July 30, 1832.— Levi Leakey. Lieutenant. 

September 11, 1832. — William S. Bell, Captain; Jacob Donald, Lieutenant; John 
Millis, Ensign; Jeremiah Vgach, Captain; Lemuel Evans, Lieutenant. 

October Ifi, 1832,— William A. Thompson. Captain of Artillery; James Ball. First 
Lieutenant of Artillery; Caleb Cope. Second Lieutenant of Artillery; Harris H. Pool, En- 
sign. 

April 13. 1833.— Silas Ruggles, First Lieutenant of Cavalry. 

September 19. 1833. — Samuel D. Cory. Ensign. 

December 21, 1833.— David D. Priddy. Captain of Riflemen. 

February 13, 1834. — William Templeton. Captain; James Carr, Lieutenant; James 
E. Bell, Ensign; Edward Gillgeese, Ensign. 

April 22, 1834. — Joseph Kellum, Captain; Levi Leakey, Captain of Artillery. 

March 13, 183(5. — William C. Robinson, of Rush County, Brigadier General, Eigh- 
teenth Brigade. 

November 2(). 1840. — George Tarkleson, Captain Light Infantry; Henry Shank, Lieu- 
tenant Light Infantry; James C. Murray. Ensign of Light Infantry. 

February 17, 1842. — Isaac France. Captain; James M. Whitesel, Lieutenant; Robert 
G. Emerson, Ensign. 

July 15, 1842. — Green T. Simpson. Captain of Riflemen; James Wilson. Lieutenant 
of Riflemen; Peter Harter, Ensign of Riflemen. 

January 18, 1846. — Henry County Guards, New Castle, mustered for the Mexican 
War, but not called into active service. Mathew S. ^Vlard, Captain; Henry Shroyer, First 
Lieutenant; Pyrrhus Woodward, (Uncle of the author of this History), Second Lieuten- 
ant. 

July 31. 1846. — Lewisville Guards mustered for the Mexican War, but not called into 
active service. William S. Price. Captain; George W. Truslow. First Lieutenant; Emory 
Southwick. Second Lieutenant; Joseph Spaw. Ensign. 

August 1, 1846. — Middletown Rifle Company, mustered for the Mexican War, but 
not called into active service. Simon Summers, Captain; Henry Shank, First Lieutenant; 
Charles Riley, Second Lieutenant. 

August 10, 1846. — Ringgold Troop. Independent Militia. New Castle. Mustered for 
the Mexican War, but not called into active service. Richard Goodwin. Captain; John 
Shroyer, First Lieutenant; George W. Woods, Second Lieutenant. 

August 10, 1846. — A company organized in Prairie Township. Mustered for the 
Mexican War, but not called into active service. Jer'emiali Veach. Captain; Abraham 
W. Bouslog, Lieutenant. 

September 2. 1846. — Knightstown Grays, mustered for the Mexican War. but not 
called into active service. Solomon McCain, Captain; Gordon Ballard, First Lieutenant; 
James Tyler, Second Lieutenant. 

Note. — All the companies organized in 1846 were under the Act of Congress of 
May 13, 1846, and can, therefore, hardly be classed as belonging to the Forty Eighth 
Regiment. Yet they are so set out on the record in the office of the Secretary of State 
as above referred to. Further reference to these t onipauics will be found in the Chapter 
relating to the Mexican War. 



762 hazzard's history of henry county. 

A careful study of this list will disclose several matters of iuterest to the 
student of our early local history, among which is the fact, that many of the names 
it contains are the same as those of members of the county's most substantial and 
honored families of the present time. .Another is, that as the years advanced and 
there came to be less and less danger of Indian outbreaks which might threaten 
disaster to any of the State's inhabitants, while we were at peace with all civilized 
nations, the military spirit gradually declined. In the year 1846, when the War 
with Mexico began, there does not seem to have been an active militia company 
in the county, tintil certain companies were formed for service in that war, under 
an Act of Congress approved May 13, 1846. Prior to the organization of these 
Mexican War Companies, not one of which was ever called into active service, but 
three companies of militia had been organized within the county for twelve years ; 
one at Middletown in 1840: one at Knightstown in 1842, and one in Liberty 
Township in 1842. Practically speaking the Liberty Township Company, of 
which Green T. Simpson was Captain, was the last ever organized in the countv. 
under the old militia law. 

The legislation which afTected the militia of Indiana from and after 1823, con- 
sisted of the following enactments : 

(I.) An Act approved January 11, 1823. which provided that "no major 
general or brigadier general shall be authorized to take command of any regi- 
ment, unless requested by the commandant to do so," and. made it unlawful to 
contest the election of any militia officer declared elected ; changed companv mus- 
ters from April to May, and extended exemptions to all persons who had at any 
time prior to the former act, or at the date of the act, served five years in the 
militia. 

(2.) An act to regulate the militia of Indiana, approved January 19, 1828, 
provided for taking account of public arms belonging to the militia, and their dis- 
tribution to commandants of divisions and making all persons receiving public 
arms accountable for the same. It also fixed the number of regimental musters, 
at one for each year, "at such time and place as the brigadier general shall deter- 
mine," while the company muster was to occur on the second Saturday in April, 
the captains to give notice to their companies in July of the times and places of 
muster for the ensuing year. 

(3.) An act approved February 2. 1833, provided as its most notable fea- 
ture that, "Any person subject to military duty, commissioned officers excepted, 
shall henceforth be annually exempted from such of the fines as may have been 
imposed on him by law for each annual failure to perform such duty, upon the 
payment of one, dollar to the person having charge of the seminary fund of his 
county, provided the same be paid before the first day of October in each year." 

Section Four of the same act extended, "All and singular, the rights, privileges 
and benefits, etc.," of said act, "to persons conscientiously scrupulous as to bearing 
arms, provided that every conscientiously scrupulous person wishing to avail him- 
self thereof shall make the payment in the first section of this act mentioned, to the 
officer of his county having legal charge of the seminary fund." 

Thus did the State essay to build up its seminaries at the expense of its 
militia, for the evident reason that there existed at that time no prospect of invasion 
or insurrection, and consequently there was small need of a State militia, while 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



763 



the demand for better schools was most urgent. Under this law. the busy men. 
the conscientious men and the men who simply disliked militia duties, were each 
and all released therefrom upon the payment of one dollar each to the seminary 
fund. This was approaching rapidly to a voluntary militia service and the end 
of the old system. An act approved February 24, 1840, tended in its general pro- 
visions in the same direction. It divided the militia into two classes, active and 
sedentary. All persons over thirty and under forty to belong to the sedentary 
militia, and not to be liable to military duty, except in times of war or insurrection. 
It however repealed that part of an "act for the encouragement of education" 
which related to fines, except that it continued the part thereof relative to con- 
scientious persons in full force. It returned all fines againgt members of the 
militia to the use of the militia and provided for their collection by justices of the 
peace. The same act provided for voluntary militia companies. Thus with all 
persons over thirty years of age relieved from active militia service in times of 
peace, and volunteer military companies provided for. the end of the old coercive 
system was evidently near at hand. 

The end came with an act of the General Assembly, entitled "'An Act to 
amend an Act to Organize the Militia." approved January 13. i8..)4, which pro- 
vided for the organization of a volunteer militia and repealed all former laws 
upon the subject, practically giving the sanction of the law to what the public 
iipinion of the State had several years previously decreed. All militia service in 
the State. has been voluntary since 1844 ^^d there has always been a ready re- 
.'iponse on the part of the people to the demand of the State authorities for military 
aid. 

It is to be regretted that the companies and battalions into which the Henry 
County militia was divided for purposes qf muster and instruction were not made 
a matter of public county record. From the meagre data, now obtainable, it is 
only possible to locate the various companies by the names of the commissioned 
officers. Taking the first list of officers, as commissioned in 1823, those who re- 
member the early settlers, will realize that the company of which Achilles }iIorris 
was Captain: ^Michael Swope, Lieutenant; and William Huff. Ensign, was or- 
ganized in the southeastern part of the county in the territory that now comprises 
nudlev and Franklin townships. While Jesse Forkner was evidently Captain 
I if an east side company, representing the various townships of Liberty, Blue River 
and Stony Creek. Charles B. Finch, Captain ; John Smith, Lieutenant, and 
William McDowell, Ensign, probably served in a New Castle and Henry Town- 
ship company. As we continue down the list, the location of the companies by 
this sort of approximation grows less difficult. If the space at command per- 
mitted, a comparison of the names of the commissioned officers on the list with 
the records of land entries, and the early deed records, town plats, etc., in the 
Recorder's office, would locate most, if not all of the commissioned officers with 
reasonable certainty, and the parts of the county represented by the various com- 
panies would be approximately determined; but there seems to have been nothing 
preserved to indicate how they were grouped into battalions or at what places bat- 
talion musters were held. 

Elisha Long appears to have held the office of Colonel of the Forty Eighth 
Regiment until 1831. The record does not state but he doubtless resigned in that 



764 HAZZAtlDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

> tar. on account of his election to the State Senate, unless he had reached the age 
Hmit of sixty years by that time, for on August 22, 1831, Miles Murphey was 
commissioned Colonel, he having been advanced to the Majorship in 1829. 
James Johnson was the first Lieutenant Colonel, commissioned at the same time 
as Colonel Long. August 28. 1823. Brice Dillee. of Wayne Township, was com- 
missioned in 1826, and Samuel Howard was commissioned in 1827. but there may 
have been two battalions in the county by that time. John Dorrah was the first 
Major. Miles JNIurphey, the second, and Asahel Woodward (grandfather nf the 
author of this History), the third. 

The musters were the occasions upon which the various elements of pioneer 
society met and mingled upon such terms of fellowship as their various characters, 
moods and temperaments permitted, tempered only by such discipline as the 
militia officers might be able to enforce. There was, however, one very prominent 
element in early Henry County society, that was never in evidence at the musters. 
It was composed of those who were in the language of the militia law, "Consci- 
entiously scrupulous of bearing arms." The muster days were looked forward to 
with various anticipations bv the "rank and file." To many they were times of 
pleasant reunion with friends, and were regarded as holidays, but the truth of 
history compels it to be said that even the most quiet and sober among the young 
citizens who bore arms, were never wholly without apprehensions of trouble and 
possible disaster on such occasions. 

The fruitful cause was the same which was so prolific of Saturday fist fights 
and rows in the early villages — "the good, old, unadulterated whiskey that never 
hurt anybody" — which we have all heard so much about. While the drills were 
continued and the officers had control of the men, everything was done with a fair 
degree of decorum and good order. This was the case even when the drills con- 
sisted of nothing more than double and single file movements, as tradition tells us 
was often the case, but after the men were dismissed in the afternoon and the 
whiskey began to flow freely, as was the all but universal custom, the rougher 
elements grew boisterous and challenge and counter challenge flew about rapidly, 
wrestling matches soon ripened into fights and old quarrels were settled with "far 
and squar" fistic encounters, and many a fight between friends occurred which was 
impelled wholly by the "good liquor" and the frenzy of the hour. 

There was a system of "renowning it," such as Longfellow describes as 
having prevailed at the drinking places of the students in the German universities, 
sevent}- five }ears ago', which was in vogue in certain neighborhoods of Henry 
County, on muster days, election days and other public occasions. They differed 
from the German "renownings" in this, that they were not challenges to deadly 
combats with the short sword, but to the more indecorous, though less dangerous 
"fist and skill fights." The "renowner" would take a stick and draw a large circle 
upon the ground, then stripping himself to the waist, would leap into the ring and 
with many furious oaths and floods of abuse, dare his enemy, if he had one in the 
company, to come in and join battle with him. or wanting an enemy, he would 
simply defy everybody, proclaim himself the champion of the entire countryside 
or in the usual language of the backwoods ring. "The bully that could whoop 
any other bully in the county." and dare any man to accept the challenge. Gouged 
eves, bitten ears, mashed noses and bruised faces were the usual harvests of the 



hazzard's history of henry county. 765 

old time muster day: hut this state of affairs was more ac^trravated in some 
locahties than in others. It cannot be regarded as an outgrowth of the mihtia 
system or the muster, except in this, that as all able-bodied men, under forty five, 
in the township or muster districts were required to meet for drills on those days, 
rare opportunities for settling old grudges and determining important champion- 
ships were afforded. Doubtless this was the worst foe to military discipline, de- 
corum and training, that the militia officers had to deal with. 

The above facts as to the early musters of the county have been largely 
drawn from the stories told by the pioneers who attended them and kept their 
heads sufficiently well to remember and retain vivid impressions of the scenes upon 
the muster grounds. The late Judge Joseph Farley, one of the county's early 
associate judges, remembered several such scenes as having occurred at "General 
Musters" on the farm then occupied by Colonel Long. Having been '"only fist 
fights," nobody gave them much attention as being violations of the law of good 
order, and the young man. who refused to fight when challenged, was generally 
looked upon as a coward. But on the other hand, the man who attempted to use 
a pistol, knife or other murderous weapon in such a contest was regarded as a 
criminal and treated as such. 

Judge Martin L. Bundy remembers that General James Xuble. who was one 
of the early United States Senators from Indiana, held a brigade drill, presumably 
of the Eighteenth Brigade, at New Castle, either in 1827 or 1828. It was so 
difficult to find a field sufficiently large for the maneuvers of the Jsrigade, on 
accoi'mt of the dense forests, that the late Asahel Woodward finally surrendered 
his new meadow to the "tramp, tramp^ tramping" of the men, and the great 
muster was held there to the demoralization of the meadow, a disaster that the 
strength and fertility of the newly cleared land soon repaired. It seems reason- 
ably certain that the Eighteenth Brigade consisted of three regiments, one for 
each of the three counties, Henry. Rush and Decatur, which constituted the brigade 
district, but if such were not the fact, it is not probable that more than a thousand 
men took part in the "great general muster" on Woodward's meadow, yet at that 
time this meadow was the only field suitable to the maneuvers. 

Perhaps the last public event in which the old militia was much in evidence 
in Eastern Indiana, occurred in Cambridge City on July 28, 1842, on the occasion 
of the great barbecue to celebrate the beginning of work on the Whitewater 
Valley Canal, at that place. This canal was one of the artificial waterways for 
internal communication and transportation, undertaken by the joint action of the 
National and State governments, under the old Internal Improvement System. It 
was, in the main, completed from Lawrenceburg to Brookville. before the final 
breakdown of the joint system. After the ]>roject of building further was 
abandoned by the National and State governments, a stock company was or- 
ganized to complete the work. The stock was taken by the business men, farmers 
and professional men of the counties and towns most likely to be benefited by the 
work, which means that most of it was held in Franklin. Fayette. Wayne. Rush 
and Henry counties. Farms, wild lands, almost everything that could be turned 
into money, were taken in pavment for stock. Men rode from farmhouse to farm- 
house and gave such glowing accounts of the good times that were sure to follow 
the completion of the canal, that the depressed and struggling people were so 



766 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



imbued with the new hope, that they assumed the burden of the proposed work 
with alacrity. The General Assembly of 1841 chartered the Whitewater Canal 
Company and it began work as stated. 

Andrew Young, in his History of Wayne County, published at Richmond in 
1872, says that "Samuel W. Parker, of Connersville, afterwards a member of 
Congress from this district, took an active part in getting up the company, and 
in connection with J. G. Marshall and others, secured the granting of the charter 
by the General Assembly, of which they were active members. One of the prin- 
cipal contractors under the State and company was Thomas N. Tyner." 

"The citizens of Cambridge City celebrated the commencement of operations 
by the company on July 28, 1842, by a barbecue which was attended by about ten 
thousand people. The first wheelbarrow full of dirt was dug and wheeled by 
Samuel W. Parker. The second by Judge Jehu T. Elliott, of New Castle. A 
great flood in 1847 damaged the canal to the amount of one hundred thousand 
dollars." 

It may without much digression be added here that the canal was completed 
to Cambridge City in 1846, and soon after, perhaps, to Hagerstown, and was the 
principal means of transportation until the completion of the Indana Central Rail- 
way in 1853. On the occasion of the opening of the canal, it is not recalled that 
there was any special display or parade of the militia ; but the presence of such 
large numbers of citizens who had been trained at various times, as members of 
the force, made the great parade of horsemen, which was one of the features 
of the show, one of the finest that ever occurred in the early history of the State. 
It is remembered that a number of the militia officers were present in the showy 
military uniforms of the olden times, brilliant scarfs, huge epaulets, gold laced, 
jauntily fitting coats, fairly glittering with polished brass buttons, and three- 
cornered hats, rich in flaunting plumes. These officers were in command of the 
great procession that galloped about on gaily caparisoned steeds, in a way that 
excited' the wonder and admiration of all. 

The two most conspicuous figures from Henry County, in that memorable 
parade, were Colonel Miles Murphey, of New Castle, and Colonel Jesse W. Bald- 
win, of Lewisville. Both were, at that time, fine, handsome men, to whom the 
military uniforms gave additional dignit}- of appearance. Murphey was Colonel 
of the Forty Eighth Regiment, and was for that reason made Marshal of the 
Day. Jesse W. Baldwin may have been a Colonel on the staf? of Governor Bigger, 
or may possibly have been a Colonel of militia in his native State before coming 
to Henry County. There is no record that explains how or where he came by 
the rank, or at least the title, of Colonel. He represented Henry County in the 
General Assembly in 1849, having as his colleague, Samuel W. Coffin. Baldwin 
was, for many years, a man of influence and standing in Henry County. Later 
he moved to Chicago, where he died at the advanced age of ninety years. At 
Lewisville and vicinity, many stories and interesting anecdotes are current, re- 
garding him. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 767 

grand recapitulation. 

artillery, cavalry and ixfaxtby. 

General Officers (Field and Staff) U. S. Volunteers 13 

General Officers ( State of Indiana) , 2 

Regimental Officers (Field and Staff) Indiana Vounteers 2 

Company Commissioned Officers Indiana A oluuleers 223 

Non-commissioned Officers Indiana Volunteers 4." 

Company Non-Commissioned Officers Indiana Volunteers 748 

U. S. Navy and Miscellaneous 15 

Privates 3408 

Total of officers and men furnished by Henry County in the Wars of the Republic 

from the Mexican War through the Spanish- American War 4491 



768 hazzard's history of henry county. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST A. 

This list includes the names of Henry Count_v soldiers who attained the rank 
of General Officers, Field or Staff. Also Henry Coutaty soldiers serving in Indiana 
Organizations, in the Regular Army and in the Navy, during the Civil War. Also 
soldiers from other counties in the State, who moved to Henry County, after the 
Civil War. 

Where the number of soldiers from Henry County in any regiment has 
justified the same, the full regimental staff is published with the regiment, but only 
the names of such of its members, as were from Henry County and such as are 
biographically mentioned in this History, are contained in this list. 

In the (Jistinctively Henry County companies, the full roster of the company 
is given whether the soldiers were from Henry County or not. All non-resident 
soldiers, officers and men, whose names appear in this list, are designated by an 
asterisk, thus *, before the names. All soldiers from other counties of the State, 
who moved to Henry County after the Civil \A'ar, are designated by two 
asterisks, thus "*. before the names. 



.A.bbott. Jackson. Private. Corporal, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Abbott, Levi. Private. 12th Indiana Battery. 

**Abernathy. Alexander. Private, Company G, 21st Indiana Infantry: Sergeant, Com- 
pany M; Commissary Sergeant, Non Commissioned Staff. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Abernathy. Isaac. Second Lieutenant, Company I. First Lieutenant. Company K. 
37th Indiana Infantry. 

Abernathy, John A., Musician, Company A, lOoth Indiana Infantry (.Morgan Raid). 

Abshire, James T., Private, Company F. 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Abshire. John, Private, Company F, 74th Indiana Infantry. 

Adair, Washington, Private, Company K. S7th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
K, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Adams, Alfred E., Private, Company C. oth Indiana Cavalry. 

*Adams, Byron F., Corporal. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Adams, Isaac H., Private. Company I. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Adams, James, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid*. 

*Adams, Marcellus M., Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Adams, William. Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
K, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Adams, William H.. Corporal. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Adamson. Ellas H.. Private. Wagoner, Company P, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Adamson, Simon P., Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Addington. Thomas. Private. Corporal, Company C. S7th Indiana Infantry. 

Addison. William T., Private, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Addleman, William O., Private, Corporal, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Ainsworth, Charles, Private, Unassigned, 53rd Indiana Infantry. 

Akin, James, Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. ^ 

Albert, Aaron B., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 




SOLDIERS. 
(see alphabetical list.) 



IIAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 769 

Albertson. Daniel C, Private, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
pany H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Albertson. John B.. Private, Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Albertson. Larkin L.. Sergeant, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
pany B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Albright, George H., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Albright, John. Private, Company I, (59th Indiana Infantry. 

Albright, Joseph S., Private, Company I, (i9th Indiana Infantry. 

Albright, AVilliam H., Private, Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

**Alcorn, AVilliam, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Cavalry. 

Alexander, Cyrus H., Corporal, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Alexander, Harvey W., Private. Company A. 11 0th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): 
Corporal. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Alexander, James. Private, Company K, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Alexander, James W., Private, Sergeant, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three 
years ) . 

Alexander, John M., Private, Sergeant, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. 
CO'mpany A. 4th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's A'eteran Corps). 

Alexander, William R., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Alfred, John W., Private, Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Pri- 
vate, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Alger, Isaac, Private. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

AUee, Amos H., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Allee, Henry C, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Allee, Jacob W., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Allee, John W., Corporal. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Allee, Oliver. Private, Company D, Iftth Indiana Infantry: Private, 19th Indiana 
Battery. 

Allee. Taylor, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Allen, David T., Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Allen, Reuben W., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Allen, Thomas C, Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Allen. William, Private. Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months) ; Private. 
15th Indiana Battery. 

Allis. Joseph, Corporal. Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Allison. Andrew A., Private, Company C, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

*Allison, Asa H., Sergeant, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Allison. Hiram, Private, Corporal, Company G. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Allison, James R.. Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Allison, Jesse, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Allison, Leonidas I... Musician. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

-Allison. Robert. First Lieutenant, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months) ; 
Captain. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Allison, AVilliam M., Musician, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

''*Alshouse, Hiram T.. Private, Company F, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Alspaugh, De Witt C, Private, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Alspaugh, George W., Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Alspaugh, Henry, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Alspaugh. Jacob M., Private. Company H. Oflth Indiana Infantry. 

**Anderson, Andrew J., Bugler, Company I, 13th Indiana Cavalry. 

Anderson, David, Private, Company K, 14th U. S. C. T. 

Anderson. Elias. Private, Company I. fi9th Indiana Infantry. 

Anderson, Hugh, Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Anderson. Isaiah B., Second Lieutenant, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Anderson, James S„ Private, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid ) : 
Private, Corporal, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

49 



■J-JO HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HEN'RY COUNTY. 

Anderson, John. Private. Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

**Anderson. John B., Corporal, Company I. 67th Indiana Infantry. 

Anderson, John M., Private, Corporal. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Anderson. Miles E.. Private, Sergeant, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Andrews, John \V.. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Antrim, John B. Private. Corporal, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Archibald. James, Private, 23rd Indiana Battery. 

Archibald. Peter, Private, Company E, 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Rairl) 
Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Arment, James A.. Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry, 

Armfield, Elam, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. (See Mexican War 

Armstrong. Albert. Private, Company B, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Armstrong. Cyrus. Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Armstrong. John. Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry: Corporal, Company 
D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Armstrong. Morrow P.. Captain. Company K: Captain and Chaplain, Staff, 36th In- 
diana Infantry. 

Artherhultz. Leander. Private, Company K, 74th Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
pany K, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

*Arville. Joseph, Private, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Atherton, Fenton, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Atkinson, George P., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Austin, James E., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
H, 147th Indiana Infantry, 

*Ayler, Edward, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Ayres, Josiah D„ Private, Company A, 10.5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Infantry. 



*Babcock, AVilliam M.. Private. First Sergeant. Company B. 139th Indiana 
fantry. 

*Bailey. Riley, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bailey, William, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bailey, William, Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

*Bails, Franklin, Private, Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Baker, Amos H.. Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Baker. Andrew J., Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid 

Baker. George C. Private. Corporal. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

♦Baldwin. Calvin, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

♦Baldwin, Elias, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry, 

Baldwin, James, Private, Unassigned, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Baldwin, Jonathan, Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry, 

Baldwin, Lewis, Private, Company B, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Bales, Parnel, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
84th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Ball. Henry S.. Saddler, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Ball, James W. E.. Private. Corporal. 4th Indiana Battery. 

Ball, Jerry C, Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Ball, John C, Private. Company I. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Ball, Thomas J., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Ball, William B, Private, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Ball, William D., Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry, 

Ballard, James H., Private, Company K, 40th Indiana Infantry. 

Ballard. Jesse. Private. Company K. 118th Indiana Infantry. 

Ballard, Joseph, Corporal, Company I, 69fh Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HEXRY COUNTY. 77 1 

*Ballard, Micajah B.. Private. Company H: Assistant Surgeon. Staff, 140th In- 
diana Infantry. 

Ballard. Warren F.. Private, Company G: Quartermaster Sergeant, Non Commis- 
sioned Staff; Lieutenant and Quartermaster, Staff. 47th Indiana Infantry. 

Ballenger, Ezra. Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Ballenger. Harmon. Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Baltzley, Daniel. Private. Company A, SMh Indiana Infantry. 

Bare. George H.. Private, Company H. G9th Indiana Infantry. 

**Barkdull. Philip. Private, Company I, 142nd Indiana Infantry. 

Barnaby, John H., Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Barnard, John, Sergeant, Company F, 121th Indiana Infantry. 

Barnard. Samuel, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Barnell, John W.. Private, Company K, 19th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
E, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Barnes, Abraham, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Barnes. Erastus. Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Barnes. Greenbury, Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Barnett. Charles W., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

*Barr, Henry, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Barre. Samuel. Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Barrett. Elijah J.. Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Barrett, Geor.ge W.. Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Barrett. Harvey B., Second Lieutenant. Union Guards. Indiana Le.gion: First Lieu- 
tenant. Company ,A, lii.jth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Barrett. Jeff H.. Private, Corporal, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Barrett. Samuel, Private, Company B, 118th Indiana Infantry. 

Bartee, William, Private, Company K, 148th Indiana Infantry. 

Bartlow. Cornelius V.. Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry: Corporal, Com- 
pany H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

"Bartlow. Oliver W.. Private, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Bartow, John G., Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company H, 
147th Indiana Infantry, 

Bateman, Edward, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Bateman, Henry C, Private. Company G. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Bateman, William, Private, Company D, Slh Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Bates, George W., Private, Company K. 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Bates, Sylvester, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Bates, Thomas, Private, Company E, 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid), 

Baughan! John. Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid), 

Baughan, Peter, Private, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry, 

Bayse, Noah, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company A, 4th 
Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Bayse. Thomas F., Hospital Steward. Non Commissioned Staff: Assistant Surgeon. 
Staff. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Beach. George P.. Private. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Beard. Isaac, Private, Company K, 14th XJ, S. C. T. 

Beard. Joseph. Private. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Bearley. David. Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). (See 
Mexican War). 

Beaty, Benjamin, Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Beaver, Geoige W„ Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Bechtelheimer. Samuel. Private. Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry, 

Beck, Cornelius, Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry, 

Beck, Hamilton, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Beck, Isom. Private. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Beck, Samuel H.. Private. Corporal. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 



-JJ HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Beck, Thomas S., Corporal, Company K, 105th Indiana Infanto' (Morgan Raid). 

Beck, William T., Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Becktell, William M.. Private. Sergeant, Company G. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Bedford. Collins T.. Corporal. Sergeant. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three 
years ) . 

Bedford. William S., Private. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three yearsj. 

Beeson, William H.. Private, Company 1, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Bell, David R., Private. 12th Indiana Battery. 

Bell, George W., Private, 12th Indiana Battery. 

Bell. Henry, Private, Company D. 19th Indiana Infantry. 

*Bell, Isaac, Corporal, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Bell, Josiah. Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Bell, Samuel, Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company H, 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Bell. Thomas, Private. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Private, 
Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Bell, William. Corporal, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bell, William, Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Bement, John J.. Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Benbow, Benjamin F.. Private. Corporal, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Benbow, Cyrus W., Private, Company D, 11th Indiana Infantry: Sergeant. Company 
G, 84th Indiana Infantry; Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant, Company K. and Ad- 
jutant, Staff, 109th C. S. C. T. 

Benjamin, Theodore, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Benjamin, Thomas, Private. Company I, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Bennett, Levi W., Private. Corporal. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Bennett, Noah, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry." 

Bennett. Ross E., Private. Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry: Private. 2nd Indiana 
Battery, re-organized. 

Bennett, Seth S., Musician. Company C. 128th Indiana Infantry. 

*Bennett, Thomas W.. Colonel. Staff. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Bennett. Wilberforce. Private, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bennett. William H., Private. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Benson, Andrew J.. Private. Company K. 148th Indiana Infantry. 

"Benson. George W.. Private. Corporal. Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Benson, .John W. iM.. Private. Sergeant. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Bentley. William P., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Benton, Joel, Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Berry, Abraham N.. Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Berry, Andrew J.. Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Berry, Charles P.. Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Berry, David W.. Private. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Berry, Francis M.. Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Berry, Samuel, Private. Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Bickel, Tobias, Private, Company E. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Bicknall, William E., Musician, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Biers, Samuel, Private, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

*Bigelow. Arthur M.. Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Biggers, James A.. Private. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Bird, Anson, Corporal, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bird. Wesley, Private, Corporal. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Bishop. John W., Private, Company K, 70th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
B, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Bitner, Benjamin, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Bitner, John, Private, Company B, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 



nfantry: Fri 


vate. Company 


Infantry. 




ifantry. 




ifantry. 




ana Infantr: 




a Infantry 


(three months) 



nfantr\ 


•. re-organized 


as 1st 


ifantrv. 






ifantry 


, re-organized. 


(See 



H.\ZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUXTY. -J-JT^ 

Blacli, James J.. Private. Company F. -STth Indiana Infantry. 

Black, James Wesley, Private, Company B. 1.39th Indiana Infantry: Private. Com- 
pany H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Black, Levi M., Private, Company F. .57th Indiana Ir 
110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Black, Seely A., Private, Company C, 57th Indiana 

Black, William. Private, Company I, 69th Indiana In 

Blake, Josiah, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana In 

Bland, Americus V., Private, Company K, 148th Indii 

Bloomfield. Richard. Private, Company F, 6th Indian 

Blount, Andrew J., Private, Company B, 26th Indiana Infantry. 

Bly. William G., Private, Company K, 148th Indiana Infantry. 

Boblett. Lycurgus L., Private, Company F; Adjutant, Staff, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Bock. Benjamin F., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Bock, Christopher C. M., Private, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry; Private. Com- 
pany H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Bock, James M., Private, Company H; 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Bock, John, Private, Compaiiy E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Bock, .Milton L., Private, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Private, 
Company K. liith !n. liana Infantry: Private. Company E, 2i)th Indiana Infantry, re-or- 
ganized. 

Bock. Thomas J., Private. Company B, 21st Indiana 
Heavy Artillery. 

Bock. William B.. Private. Company G. S4th Indiana ' 
" Bodmer. Jacob, Private, Company C. 32nd Indiana 
Alphabetical List C). 

Boggs, William, Private. Company K. .Seth Indiana Infantry. 

Bogue, Benjamin. Private, Company I, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Bogue. Charles, Private, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Boice, Martin E.. Private. Company D, llth Indiana Infantry. 

*Boldriny, Cyrus, Private, Corporal, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Bole, James M., Private, 25th Indiana Battery. 

Bole, William A., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Bond, Enos, Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Bond, Levi, Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bonham. Israel W., Fife Major. Non Commissioned Staff, Sth Indiana Infantry (three 
months): Principal Musician, Non Commissioned Staff, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bonham. Marcus L.. Private, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Bonham, Thomas M., Regimental Band, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Boor, William F.. Major and Surgeon, Staff. 4th Indiana Cavalry: Brigade Surgeon, 
1st Brigade. 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps. Army of the Cumberland. 

Booth. George C. Private, Corporal, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Boran. Harmon. Private. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Borroughs. Charles, Private, Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Bowers, David, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Bowers. George W., Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Bow^ers, James, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Bowers, Joseph, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Bowers, Martin L., Private. Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Bowers. Michael. Private, 25th Indiana Battery. 

Bowers, Moses, Private, Company F. o7th Indiana Infantry. 

Bowers. Salathiel. Private. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Bowers. Samuel, Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Pri- 
vate. Company B. 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Bowers, William H., Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
. Bowles, .Tames H., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Bowman, Edmund R.. Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 



774 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



Bownian, Jabez H., Private. Corporal, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bowman. John. Private. Company D, oBth Indiana Infantry. 

Bowman, Oliver H., Sergeant. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Sergeant, 4th Indiana Battery; Second Lieutenant, 4th Indiana Battery, re- 
organized. 

Bowman, Robert B., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Bowman. Shepperd, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Corporal, Company U, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Bowman. William H.. Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Second Lieutenant, Company A-, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Bowser, Edwin. Private, Company A, 3(Jth Indiana Infantry. 

Boyd. Alcander, Private, 20th Indiana Battery. 

Boyd. James. Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Boyd, William L., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Boyer, Jeremiah, Private. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Boyer. Nimrort E., Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

*Boyer, William, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Bradbury, Allison B., Private, Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Bradbury, James, Private, Company C. 3Cth Indiana Infantry. 

Bradford, George, Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

*Bradforrt. James T.. Private, Company F, 57th Indianfi Infantry. 

Bradford, William S., Captain, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Bradick, James R.. Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

**Bradway. Josiah. Private. Company A. 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Bradway. William, Private. Corporal, Sergeant. Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry. 

Brandon, Frank, Private, Company B, llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Brandon. George W., Private. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

Branham, John V.. Private, Company A, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Brannon, John, Private. Company K, oilth Indiana Infantry. 

Brannon. Thomas. Private. Company A. 4th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's 
Veteran Corps). 

Branson. .-Vrthur L . Private, Corporal, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry: Private, 
Bugler, 2nd Indiana Battery, re-organized. 

Braltain. Hiram B., Private, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Sec- 
ond Lieutenant. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

**Brattain, John W,, Corporal, Sergeant, Company E, 34th Indiana Infantry. 

**Brattain, Jonathan, Private, Company E, 34th Indiana Infantry. 

**Brattain, Solomon F.. Private. Company E, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Bray, Thomas J.. Private, Company K, 14Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Breniser, William, Private, Company I. 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Brenneman, Daniel W., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Brenneman, Eli, Musician, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Brenneman, George, Musician, Company H; Principal Musician, Non Commissioned 
Staff, f;9th Indiana Infantry. 

**Brenner, Henry, Private. Company H. 30th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Brewer. Andrew T., Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Brewer, David F.. Private, Company A, 3fith Indiana Infantry; Sergeant, Company 
H. 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Brewer, John M., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Brewington, Elijah, Private, Company K, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Brewington, John D., Private, Company I, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

**Brewington, Robert F.. First Lieutenant, Company K, 68th Indiana Infantry. 

Bricker. John M., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

**Bridget. Henry C Private. Corporal, Company G. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bridget. John. Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 775 

Brietenback, George, Private. Company I, 9th Indiana Infantry. 
Bright. Alexander. Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Bright. Benjamin. Private. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Bright. Daniel R., Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Bright. Jesse. Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Bright. John J., Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Bristol, Benjamin W.. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 
**Brodrick. James W.. Private. Corporal. Company C. 2nd Indiana Cavalry. (See 
Alphabetical List C). 

Bronnenberg. Carl. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. (See Alphabetical 
B). 

Bronnenberg, William, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
*Brooks, James, Private, Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
*Brooks, Joseph, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Brooks, Thomas, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry ( three months) ; Pri- 
, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 
Brookshire, Eli, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Brookshire, Isham S.. First Sergeant. Company C. 28th U. S. C. T. 
Brookshire. Thomas J., Corporal. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
ttaid); Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Brookshire. vVilliam, Corporal, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Brosius, Jacob F.. Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Brosius! John H.. Private. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months): Sec- 
ond Lieutenant. Company I. .jJth Indiana Infantry (three months): Private. 2nd Indi- 
ana Battery, re-organized. 

Brosius. John M.. Private. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Mor,gan Raid). 
Brosius. William, Private. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company 
A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry: 
Private, Company B. 8th Indiana CaValry, re-organized. 

Brown, Archibald, Private, Company C, 3fith Indiana Infantry. 
Brown. Benjamin F.. Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Brown. Caleb. Private. Company B. 9th Indiana Infantry. 

**Brown. Charles. Private. Company E. 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 
Brown, George, Private, Company E. .8th Indiana Infantry (three years): Private. 
Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

**Brown. tieorge H.. Corporal. Sergeant. Secoml Lieutenant, Company B. 89th Indi- 
ana Infantry. 

Brown. George J.. Private. Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years): Cor- 
poral, Company K. 54th Indiana Infantry (three months); Sergeant. Company H. 140th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Brown, Harvey F.. Farrier and Blacksmith. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry: Ser- 
geant. Company B. 110th Indirna Infantrv (Mor.gan Raid): Private. Sergeant. Com- 
pany B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Brown, Henry, Private. Company C, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 
Brown. Henry. Private. Company G, 9th Indiana Infantry. 
Brown, Isaac. Private, Company B. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Brown. Isaac G.. Private. Company D, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 
Brown. James. Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Brown. James A.. Corporal. Sergeant. Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry (three 
years). 

Brown, James M.. Private. Company H. i;9th Indiana Infantry. 
Brown. John H.. Private. 2nd Indiana Battery, re-organized. 
Brown, John H.. Private, Company E„ 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Brown, Joseph M.. Private. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company 
B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Brown, Levi, Regimental Band. 36th Indiana Infantry. 



776 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HEXRY COUNTY. 



Brown, Lewis E., Corporal, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Brown, Milton C. Private, Sergeant, Company G. 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Brown. Moses H. G., Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Brown, Nathaniel, Private, Company I, C9th Indiana Infantry. 

Brown. Nathaniel, Corporal, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Brown, Oliver S.. Private. Company H. .5.5th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Brown. Riley S.. Private, Company H, (J9th Indiana Infantry. 

Brown. Robert B.. Private, Unassigned, .53rd Indiana Infantry. 

Brown, Theodore F., Private. Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Brown. William. Private. Company C. 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Brown, William H.. Private. Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry, (one year). 

Brown, William W.. Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Brownfield. (Jeorge K.. Private. Corporal, Iflth Indiana Battery. 

Brumfield. Barton, Private, Company E, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Brunner, William, Private, Corporal. Company H. lonth Indiana Infantry. 

Bryant. John A.. Private. Company A. 3(Uh Indiana Infantry: Private. Company H, 
3(ith Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Buckles. Francis. Private. Company C, ofith Indiana Infantry. 

Buckner, William, Private, Company C. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Budd, Charles C, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Bufkin, Oliver. Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Bulger. Strather J.. Private. Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Bullock. John P.. Private. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

**Bimce. James W.. Private. Company A. 15th Indiana Infantry. 

**Bunch. George W.. Private, Sergeant. Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry: S. r- 
geant. Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant, Caplain. Company C, 20th Indiana Infantry. 
re-organized. 

Bundy. Charles. Private, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Bundy. Elias M.. Private. Company I, r.9th Indiana Infantry. 

Bundy, George R., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bundy, Jordan J.. Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid 

Bundy, Martin L.. Major and Paymaster and Brevet Lieutenant, Colonel, Sta 
TJ. S. Volunteers. (See General Officers. Chapter IX). 

Bundy. William W.. Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Bunker, Albert, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Bunker. Jesse, Private, Company A, Sfith Indiana Infantry: Private, Sergeant 
Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Bunker. Lewis. Private. 19th Indiana Battery. 

Bunker. William. Private. Company I. ,S4th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company K 
57th Indiana Infantry. 

Bunner. Christopher. Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Burch. Edwin. Private, Company I, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Burch, Erastus, Private, Company I. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Burch, John E. W.. Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Burch. Thomas H. C, Sergeant, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Burch, Thompson P.. Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three' months). 

**B>irchett. Thomas J., Private. Company G, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years I 
(See Alphabetical List B). 

Burehman, William. J.. Private. Company A. 38th Indiana Infantry. 

Burden. Zachariah. Private. Company F. Sth V. S. C. T. 

Burdette. Joseph B., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Burk. Daniel, Private, Sergeant. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Burk. Geor,ge W., Private, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) : Pri 
vate. Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 



I 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. -■]■] 

*Burk, James H., First Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant. Captain. Com- 
pany H, 37th Indiana Infantry. 

Burk, John. Corporal. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Burk, Milton. Private. Company ri. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Burks. John. Private. Unassigned. 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Burns, James. Private. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Burns. Robert. Private. Corporal. Company C. 3r(th Indiana Infantry. 

Burr. Chaimcey S,. Sergeant. Company E. .Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); Sec- 
ond Lieutenant. Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Burr, John. Private. Company G. 17th Indiana Infantry. 

Burr, Miles H., Private, Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Burris, Aaron, Private, Company A. 10.5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Burris, Arthur M., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Burris, Asahel. Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Burris. Daniel. Private, Company F. S4lh Indiana Infantry. 

Burris. Daniel H., Private, Knightstown Guards. Indiana Legion; Private. Company 
A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private. Company A, 139th Indiana Infan- 
try; Private. Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Burris. Daniel L., Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Burris, Elwood, Corporal, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): 
Private, Company A, 38th Indiana Infantry. 

*Burris, Eden, Private, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Burris, Henry J., Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Burris. Jacob. Private, Company A. 19th Indiana Infantry. 

"Burris. Mathias, Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

*Burris, Nelson. Private. Company A; Principal Musician. Non Commissioned 
Staff, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Burt, William, Private, Company E, 40th Indiana Infantry. 

Burton, George, Captain. New Castle Guards. Indiana Legion; Captain. Company B. 
110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private. Company A. 30th Indiana Infantry, 
re-organized. (See Mexican War). 

*Burton. Marcus M.. Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

**Burton, Thomas C. Private. Company E, 50th Indiana Infantry. 

Bush, Amos L.. Private. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Buson, Isaac M.. Private, Cbmimny A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Butler. Amos. Private. Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Butler. Charles M.. Quartermaster Sergeant. Second Lieutenant, 19th Indiana Bat- 
tery. 

Butler. Hiram. Private, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Private. 
Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Butler. William, Private, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Ser- 
geant, Second Lieutenant, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Bye, David M., Private, Company A, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Byerly, Wesley, Corporal. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Byers, David S.. Corporal. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Byers, Jacob S.. Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Byers. John T.. Private. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Byers. Joseph M.. Corporal, Sergeant, Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Byers. Luther J., Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Byers, Samuel T., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Byers, Squire H., Private, Company A.. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Byers, W<illiam T., Private. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Byrket. Isaiah. Private. Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry, 



yjS hazzard's history of henry county. i 

Byrket, Jacob. Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry: Private. Company F, 
84th Indiana Infantry. 

Byrket, Jesse, Private, Company I. 3rd Indjana Cavalry. 
Byrket, Peter, Private. Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Byrnes. James J., Musician. Company I. fiftth Indiana Infantry. 



*Cabe. Job. Private. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Cain. Geor.Eie H, Private. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Cor- 
poral. First Sergeant. First Lieutenant. Company G. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Cain. Patrick, Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Caldwell. Henry. Corporal. Company I. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Caldwell. Ira, Sergeant. First Sergeant. First Lieutenant. Company I, 84th Indi- 
ana Infantry. 

Caldwell. Jefferson. Private. Company I. S4th Indiana Infantry: Sergeant. Com- 
pany K. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Calhoun. James E., Private, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Callahan. Darilus D.. Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Callahan. George W.. Corporal. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Callahan. John M.. Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Callahan, John W.. Senior. Private. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Callahan. John W., Junior, Private, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Callahan. William R., Private. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Calvert, Charles L.. Cadet. (See U. S. Military Academy). 

Camblin, William, Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cameron, John D., Private. Company A, 3Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Cameron, Joseph B.. Private. Company I. 54th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Company B. 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Cameron. William M., Private, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantr.v (three months): 
Sergeant, First Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Campbell. Adam P.. Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Campbell, Edward H.. Sergeant. Company D. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Campbell, John A., Sergeant. First Sergeant. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Campbell, John B , Private, 4th Indiana Battery. 

*Campbell. Thomas J.. Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Camplin. James M.. Musician, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Camplin. John F.. Private. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Camplin. Thomas H.. Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Canaday. Charles W,. Private. Company H. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Canaday, John H.. Private. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Canfield. George W.. Corporal, Company A, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

*Canfield, William, Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Cannon, Stansberry. Private. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Cantley, George M.. Corporal, Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. Company D. 36th In- 
diana Infantry. 

Cantley. William H.. Private. Corporal. 4th Indiana Battery. 

Carl. Charles. Private, Company K. 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Carmichael, Milton, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Carpenter. De Witt C. Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Carpenter. William H., Private. Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Carper. Jacob D., Private, Company C. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Carr. Anthony P.. Private. Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Carr, Daniel, Private, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

**Carr. George W.. Private. Company A. 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Carr, Robert B.. First Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant. Company A, 
36th Indiana Infantry. 



I 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HEXRY COUXTY. 779 



Carroll, George. Private. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

*Carrol!, Henry, Private. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Carson. Samuel, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, 2nd Indiana Battery: Private. Company A. 4th Regiment. 1st Army Corps (Han- 
cock's Veteran Corps). 

Carter, Benjamin F., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Carter, Henry B., Private. Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Carter, Jesse. Private. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Carter, John J., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Carter. Reece, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Carter, Solomon F.. Private, Company A. 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Carter. Thomas, Private, Company D. Second Indiana Cavalry. 

Cartw'right, Henry, Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Cartvrright, James C, Private, Company U, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cartwright, James \\.. Private, 20th Indiana Battery. 

Cary, Oliver H. P., Lieutenant Colonel. Staff. 36th Indiana Infantry. (See Mexican 
War ) . 

Case. Charles R., Drum Major, Non Commissioned Staff. Sth Indiana Infantry 
(three months); Second Lieutenant, Captain. Company E. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Case. Daniel D., Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Cor- 
poral. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Case. Elijah H.. Regimental Band. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Case. John B., Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Case. John"B. S., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Case, John P., Private, Corporal, Company K, 148th Indiana Infantry. 

Case, John H,, Regimental Band, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Sergeant. Com- 
pany E, Sth Indiana Cavalry, 

**Casely, John T.. Private, Company A, 133rd Indiana Infantry. 

Caster, William H., Private, Company C. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

*Casterline. Ziba. Assistant Surgeon, Staff, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

**Castetter, Burton W., Private, Company B. 48th Indiana Infantry. 

Castor. Lewis. Private. Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months): Cor- 
poral, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year); Private. Company B, 21st Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized as 1st Heavy Artillery. 

Catt. Daniel C. Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. 22nd Indiana 
Battery. 

Catt. George. Private. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Catt, William F., Private, Company B. 99th Indiana Infantry. 
^ Chalfant. Jonathan, Seaman. U. S. Navy. 

Chambers, David W.. Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
First Lieutenant. Captain. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Chambers. James A., Private, Corporal. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Champ. George W.. Private, Company E. lOiUh Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company B, Assistant Surgeon, Staff. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

'Chandler. George L.. Private. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Chapman. Joseph. Private, Company G, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Chappell. Jacob. Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Chappell. Milton H.. Private. Company A. lOoth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Charles, John T.. Private. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Charles. Oliver. Second Lieutenant. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Charles. Sylvanus. Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cheeseman, David. Private, Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Chenoweth Isaac N.. First Sergeant. Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Chenoweth. John F.. Private, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 



jHo hazzard's history of henry county. 

Chew, Harvey B., Private. Corporal. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry: Private. 
Company E. 9th Regiment. 1st Army Crops (Hancocl<'s Veteran Corps i. 

Childers, Shady, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Chrisman. Ephraim, Private. 4th Indiana Battery. 

Clair. Thomas. Private, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Clair, Timothy. Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Clanton. Pinson W., Private, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months 1. 

Clapper. John. Private, Company B, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Clapsaddle, George W., Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Clark, Alpheus. Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Clark, Benjamin, Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry ( one year ) . 

**Clark, John, Private, 24th Indiana Battery. 

Clark. Joseph, Private, Company B. 99th Indiana Infantry. 

Clark. Milton. Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Clark. Nathan M.. Private. Company I, 123rd Indiana Infantry. 

Clark, Simon. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Clark. William C. Private. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Clark, William F., Private, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Clein. Simon. Private, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Clellan, James. W., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Clements, Courtland C, Acting Midshipman. (See U. S. Naval Academy). 

*CIements, David, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Clements, Milton P., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Clevenger, John R., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Clevenger. Jonathan J.. Private, Company G, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Clevenger. Joshua, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Clevenger. Seth, Private. Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Clifford, Cassius B.. Private, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry: Private. Company 
M. Sth Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Clifford. David, Private, Company B, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Clift, James M., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate. Company A. 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Clinard. Franklin S., Corporal, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cline, Adam H.. Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

*Cloiid. Henry C. Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Cloud, Joseph, Private, Company G, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Cluggish. Robert, Private. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid), 

Clutch. George H.. Private. Corporal. Sergeant. First Sergeant. 2nd Indiana Bat- 
tery. 

Clymer, John V.. Captain. Company B. 136th Indiana Infantry. 

Coats. Elijah H.. Private. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Coats. Richard B.. Private. 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Cochran. Andrew J.. Private. Company D, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Cochran. David S., Corporal, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Coe. John, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Cofa, Nicholas, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Coffman. David, Private. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

*Coftman. William A., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Coke, Jacob J., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Cole. John. Second Lieutenant, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Cole. John J.. Corporal. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Private. 
Wagoner. 2nd Indiana Battery; Private, Company A, 4th Regiment, 1st Army Corps 
(Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Coleman. James, Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Collins, Andrew J.,- Private. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
C. 24th Indiana Infantry. 




COMPANY I, 69th INDIANA INFANTRY. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 78 1 

Collins, George W., Private .Company E, lltith Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
69th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company C, 24tli Indiana Infantry. 

Collins, Joel, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Collins. John W., Corporal. Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Collins, Robert K.. Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
aptain. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Collins, William B., Private, Company A. lltith Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Compton, Evan, Private, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Comstock. Daniel W., Private, Company E; Sergeant Major. Non Commissioned 
Staff; First Lieutenant, Company F. and Captain, Company C, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Confare. Ephraim, Private, Quartermaster Sergeant. 2nd Indiana Battery; First 
Lieutenant, (Company H, Captain, Company K. 2nd Missouri Light Artillery. 

Confrey, Hugh. Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Conger, Gresham W., Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private. Company 
Sth Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

**Conklin. Henry, Private. Company A, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Conklin, John H., Private, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
42nd Indiana Infantry. 

*Conley. John. Private, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

**Conley. Thomas H., Private, Company I. 3Cth Indiana Infantry. 

Conn, Adam Eli, Private. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry; Private. Corporal, 
h Indiana Battery. 

Connell. Joseph W., Second Lieutenant, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry ( three 
months); First Lieutenant, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Connell, Zachariah D., Private, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry; Corporal. Com- 
pany H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Conner, Daniel. Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Conner. Danfel M., Private, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Conner, Martin V., Private, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Conniard. George W., Sergeant. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Conrad, George W., Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Conway, Thomas L., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Conway, William S.. Private, Corporal, Company A. 124rh Indiana Infantry. 

Conwell, David, Private. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Conwell, Ellas. Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Conwell, George W., Private, Company I, G9th Indiana Infantry. 

Cook, Daniel H.. Private. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Cook. Elwood. Private. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Cook. John H.. Private. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Cook. Thomas J., Private. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid I ; 
Private. Company D, First Lieutenant. Company K, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Cook. William. Private. Company D, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Cook. William. Private. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cook. William M.. Private. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Cook. Willis J.. Private. Company I. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Cool. John G.. Corporal. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Coon. Allen W., Private. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Coon. Calvin. Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
**Coon. Eli. Private. Company H. 72nd Indiana Infantry; Private. Company A. 44th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Coon. Isaac. Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private. 
Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Coon. Job T.. Private. Company C. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Coon. John. Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 



782 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Coon, Noah W., Private, Company. D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cooper. Caleb H., Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant, Company E. 9th Indiana 
Cavklry. 

*Cooper, Elbert. Private. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Cooper, Imla W'., Sergeant, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Cooper, James F., Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cooper. James M., Private. Company D, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Cooper, John E.. Private. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Cooper, John W., Private, Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Cooper, Richard P., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Cooper. Thomas P., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

*Cooper, William, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Cooper. "William L., Private, Company A, lii5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Copeland, Exum, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Priyate, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Copeland. Levi \v.. Private, Corporal, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Copeland, Seth, Private. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Copeland. Wesley, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

•Cornell. John F., Corporal. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Corwin, William, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Corya, William T., Private, Company D, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Cosand, Cornelius W., Private. 24th Indiana Battery. 

Cotteral. William W.. Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Cotton. James A.. Private. Company H, 47th Indiana Infantry. 

*Cottrell. Charles E.. Private. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Corporal. Company G. 7th Indiana Cavalry; Commissary Sergeant. Company F. 7th Indi- 
ana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Cottrell, David W., Private. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Cottrell. Daniel U., Private, 3rd Indiana Battery. 

Cottrell. Francis M.. Private. Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company K. 19th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company E. 20th Indiana Infantry, 
re-organized. 

Cottrell. John O., Private, 3rd Indiana Battery. 

Councellor, Elijah, Private. Corporal, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organ- 
ized, j 

Courtney. Jacob. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. I 

Courtney, Robert, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Courtney, William C., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Covalt. Cheniah, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Covey, Daniel, Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Covington, William, Private, Unassigned, 16th Indiana Infantry. ' 

Cowgill. James, Private. Company K. 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Cowiclv. Isaac. Private, Company I, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

*Cox. Edward. Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

*Cox. Edward W., Corporal, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Cox, Geor.ge Private, Company B, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Cox. Martin, Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Cox. Thomas J.. Private. Company I. 37th Indiana Infantry. 

Cracraft, John, Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cracraft. William, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Cor- 
poral, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company E, 9th Regiment, 1st Army 
Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

*Craft. Homer H.. Private. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantr.v. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 783 

*Cratt. John A.. First Sersjeant. First Lieutenant. Captain, Company A, -STth Indi- 
ana Infantry. 

Craft. Thomas E.. Private, Company A. 10.5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Craig, Caleb, Private. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company H, 
140th Indiana Infantry. 

Craig. Daniel W., Private. 151 h Indiana Battery. 

Craig. Enoch, Private, Company K, 10.5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Craig. "Hiram, Private. Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months); Ser- 
geant, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid I ; Private. Company E. 9th 
Indiana Cavalry. 

Craig. Ivason E.. Private. Corporal, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Craig, Leonard H., Corporal. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): 
Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Craig. Levi, Private, 23rd Indiana Battery. 

Craig, Samuel, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years), 

Craig, William R.. Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): 
Private, Corporal, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Crandall, Andrew J., Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Crandall, James. Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Crandall, Wyatt, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Crasher. Peter, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

**Craven. Gilliam L., Corporal, Company B, 89th Indiana Infantry. 

Crawford, Benjamin, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Crawford. Cyrus. Private. Company H; Sergeant, Major, Non Commissioned 
Staff: First Lieutenant, Company D, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

*Crawford, Porter A.. Private. Company K. Sfith Indiana Infantry. 

Crawford. William C, Private, Company I, G9th Indiana Infantry: Musician, Com- 
pany H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Cray, Daniel W., Private, Company B. 156th Indiana Infantry. 

Cray, (Jeorge W., Wagoner, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Cray. James M., Private, Company B, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Cray, John H., Private, Unassigned, 53rd Indiana Infantry. 

Cray, Richard, Private, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Crews. Francis D., Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Crickmore, John A.. Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cripe. Jacob. Private. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Cripe, Rudolph. Private, Corporal, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Cross, Calvin, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cross, Ephraim C, Private, Sergeant, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Cross. Felix G., First Sergeant, First Lieutenant. Company K. S4th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Cross, Joseph A., Private. Company K, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

**Cross. William H., Private, Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Crossley, Robert, Private, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Grouse. Henry M.. Assistant Surgeon. Major and Surgeon. Staff. 57th Indiana In-' 
fantry. 

Crow, George, Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Pri- 
vate, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry: Private, Company F, 7th Indiana Cavalry, re-or- 
ganized. 

Crull. Francis il.. Private, Company E. 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

(See Alphabetical List B). 

*Cu!bertson. Alfred. Private, Company G. 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

Culbertson. Ambrose, Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Gulp. Samuel G., Private, 12th Indiana Battery. 



j84 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

*Cummmgs, Joel, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Cummlngs, John M., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Cummings, Thomas B., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

"Cummings, William, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years), 

Cummins, James, Private. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Curry, John C, Private, Unassigned, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Curry, William, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Custer, Emmel, Private, Company B, 139lh Indiana Infantry. 

**Custer, John L., Musician. Company A, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

D 

Daily, Joseph T., Private. Company I. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Daily, William, Private. Corporal. Company C, Sfith Indiana Infantry. 

Dakins, William H., Private. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry: Private. 19th In- 
diana Battery. 

*Dale, James W., Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Dale, Lewis L., Captain and Chaplain, Staff, 19th Indiana Infantiy. 

Daniel, Abraham, Private, Unassigned. 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Daniel. Calvin, Private. Company B, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Daniel, Prear, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Corporal, 
Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Private, Company B, 9th Indiana 
Cavalry. 

"'Daniels. David, Private, Company H., 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Darling. William A., Private. Company B, ISHth Indiana Infantry: Private, Com- 
pany H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Darr, William H., Private, Sergeant, 12lh Indiana Battery. 

Daugherty, John, Private, Company E, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Davenport, Henry, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Davenport, Henry B., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**David. Will C, Private, Company A, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Davidson, Amos, Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis. Abraham, Sergeant, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, Albert T., Private, Corporal, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, Alexander, Private, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Davis, Alpheus, Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis. Amos, Private, Company B, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

**Davis, Benjamin H., Private, Company C, 155th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, Charles M., Private, Company F, Gth Indiana Infantry (three months): 
First Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, Charles M.. Private, Unassigned. 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, Cornelius J.. Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, David F., Sergeant, First Sergeant. Company I. i;9ih Indiana Infantry. (See 
Alphabetical List B). 

Davis, Eli, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Davis, Isaac, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Corporal, 
Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, John, Private, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, John H., Private, Company H. 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis. John H., Private. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

**Davis. John S., Musician. Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years): 
Private, Unassigned, 32nd Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Davis, John W., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, John W., Private, Company K, 99th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Private. Sergeant. Company B. 139th Indiana 
Infantry. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 785 

Davis, Jonathan, Private, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 
Davis. Joseph, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, Lewis W., Private. Company B, llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company B, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, Michael, Corporal. Company H. <i9th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, Milton, Private, Company G. 7th Indiana Cavalry; Private. Company F, 
7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Davis, Reason, Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Davis, Ulysses, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Davis, William, Corporal, Company A, Kfith Indiana Infantry; Sergeant, Company 
B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Davis, William M. C, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Davis, Zigler, Sergeant. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Davison, Ira H., Private. Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 
**Davy, James, Private, Sergeant. Company C, 47th Indiana Infantry. 
"Dawson, John, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
Dawson, Robert, Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Dean, Solomon, Private, Company B, 149th Indiana Infantry. 
Debord, Andrew J.. Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Debord, Drury, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
H, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Deck, John E., Private. First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Company A, 57th Indi- 
ana Infantry. 

Decker, Henry C, Private, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 
Decker, William, Private, Company B, 149th Indiana Infantry. 
Decker, William J., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Deem. "Joseph C. Second Lieutenant. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid). 

Deem, Martin. Private. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Deem, Sedley A., Private. Sergeant. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
*Deen, Samuel, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Deitzer, Robert, Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 
Delong, Gifford, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Delong, Richard, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Demick, Adolphus. Private. Corporal, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 
Demick, Milton. Private, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 
Demick, William H., Private. Company D. 19th Indiana Infantry. 
**De Moss. William, Private, Company E. 7th Indiana Infantry. 
*Demy, Philip J.. Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Dennis. Joseph R.. Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 
Dennis. Thomas P., Private, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Dennis, Van Buren, Private. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 
Dennis Whitesel, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 
Dent, James I., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

**Denton. Benjamin N., Private, Corporal. Company H. 150th Indiana Infantry. 
*Denwiddie, Samuel. Sergeant, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Derickson, Mahlon, Private, Company B. 124th Indiana Infantry. 
Deselms, Butler, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Deselms, Thomas, Private. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Detrich, Samuel. Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Dick, Stephen, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
*Dickinson, Philemon. First Lientenant, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Dickson, Dock, Private, Company F. Sth U. S. C. T. 
Diggs. Washington C. Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Dill, Marshall, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Dillee. Eli H., Private. Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 
50 



786 hazzard's history of henry county. 

*Dillee. George J., Private, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Dillee, John, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Dillee, John R., Private, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Dillee. Luther S., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Dillee, Squire. Sergeant, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company A. 
3i<th Indiana Infantry. 

Dillman. Jesse, Private, Company G, 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Dillon, Francis. Private, 4th Indiana Battery. 

Dillon. John, Private, Company A, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Dillon, Jonathan P.. Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private. Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

**Diltz. James R.. Private, Company I, 44th Indiana Infantry. 

**Dishman, Nathaniel, Private, Company C, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

**Doan. Courtland. (See Incomplete List). 

Dobbins, Wilson T„ Private, Corporal, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Doolittle, Eli, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Doran, George W.. Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
C. 1st U. S. Engineers. 

Dougherty. Thomas J.. Private. Sergeant. Company K. 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Dovey, Isaac C, Sergeant, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Dovey, Francis, Private, Corporal, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Dowell. Bradford M., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Dowell, George W.. Private. Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Downs, Robert H., Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Downs, William, Private. Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

*Doxtader, Albert E.. Corporal. Sergeant. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Doxtader. Daniel. Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Drake, Winfield H„ Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Drear, Valentine, Private, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

'DriscoU. Andrew J.. Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Driver. John, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Drury. James A.. Private. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Dubois, William W., Private. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Dudley, Anderson R., Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Dudley, Wiley J., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry 

Duke, Henderson, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Duncan, Benjamin F., Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Duncan. Daniel Davidson. Private. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (ilorgan 
Raid); Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Duncan, John S., Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Dungan. Michael M,, Private, Corporal, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Dungan, Milton R., Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Second Lieutenant, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Dunn. Robert, Private, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Mo;-gan Raid). 

Dunnington. Hugh D., Private, Company A, 4th Regiment, 1st Army Corps ( Han- 
cock's Veteran Corps). 

Dutton. Joseph. Sergeant. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Dykes. John R.. Private. Company B. 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

E 

Eagle. George. Private, Company K. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

*Earl, Isaac T.. Private. Corporal, First Lieutenant. Captain. Company A. 57th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Eastman. Lycurgus W.. Principal Musician, Non Commissioned Staff, 18th Indiana 
Infantrx-. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 787 

Eastman, William D., Regimental Band. 8th Indiana Infantry (three yearS). 

**Eastridge. John, Private, Company G, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Eaton, Peter, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Echelbarger, William, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Bdleman, Richard J.. Private. 12th Indiana Battery. 

Edmunson. George W., Private, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Edwards, Albert. Private, Company E. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Edwards, Austin M., Private. Corporal. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Edwards, James L.. Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Edwards, Joel B., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Edwards, John H., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry, 

*Edwards, John L., Private, Corporal, Company E. yth Indiana Cavalry. 

Edwards, John W., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Edwards, Levi S.. Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Edwards, William H., Private, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Edv>'ards, William M.. Private, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry: Principal Mu- 
sician. Non Commissioned Staff. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Ehman, John, Corporal, Sergeant, Company F, 63rd Indiana Infantry. 

Elder. Benjamin F., A-ssistaht Surgeon. Staff, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Elder, James P.. Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Cor- 
poral. 19th Indiana Battery. 

Ellinger, Reuben, Private, Corporal, 25th Indiana Battery. 

**Ellingwood, Cyrus. Private. Corporal, Company I, 8th Indiana Cavalry. 

Elliott. Abraham G.. Regimental Band, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Elliott, Calvin, Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Elliott. Daniel. Artificer. 19th Indiana Battery. 

EllioM, Franklin. Private, Corporal, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Elliott. Henry C, Sergeant, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): 
Private, Company F, and Adjutant, Staff, 57th Indiana Infantry: Lieutenant Colonel, 
Staff. llSlh Indiana Infantry. 

Elliott. Jabez, Private, Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Elliott. James. Private. Company P, 28th U. S. C. T. 

Elliott, Jehu T (son of Stephen Elliott), Private, Company A. lloth Indiana In- 
■fantry (Morgan Raid): Private, Sergeant. Company B. 134th Indiana Infantry: Private, 
Unassigned. 79th Indiana Infantry. 

Elliott, Jehu T. (now of Logansport ) . Private. Company A. lluth Indiana Infantry 
(Morgan Raid). 

Elliott, Jesse. Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Elliott. John H.. Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Elliott. John R., First Sergeant. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Elliott. Josephifs V., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Elliott. Nathan. Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Elliott. Richard S.. Private. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private. Corporal, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Elliott, Samuel, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Elliott. William, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Elliott, William H.. Regimental Band. ISth Indiana Infantry: Sergeant. Company 
A. 110th Indiana Intantry (Morgan Raid): Private. First Sergeant. Company E. 9th In- 
diana Cavalry. 

Elliott. William H.. Lieutenant. (See U. S. Naval Academy). 

*Elliott. William S.. Private. Company H. 147th Indiana Intantry. 

**Ellis, Isaac W., Private, Company C, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Ellis. Simon. Private. Company E, 23rd U. S. C. T. 

Ellison. Jesse 3.. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Elmori'. William P.. Private. Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. 



7<S<S HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Kltzroth. Eli. Private, Compan.v I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Corporal. Company E, 
yth Resiment. 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Elwood, Benjamin F., First Sergeant, Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three 
months); First Lieutenant. Captain. Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Emery. Jonathan, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Englerth, George D.. Private. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

English. Hugh L.. Private. Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry. 

English, James C, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Enright, Michael, Private, Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Ensminger, Samuel, Private, Company H, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

*Erwin, William, Corporal, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Eshelman. Ira. Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company H, 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Essenmacher. Charles, Senior, Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Eurick, Isaac, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Evans. Asbury C. Private, Company F, 19th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
F, 57th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Evans, Ellis E.. Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Evans, George, Private, Company A. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year); Private. 
Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Evans. Henry. Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Evans. Lemuel, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Everett, Theophilus, Saddler, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company 
K, 124th Indiana Infantry. (See Mexican War). 

Everhard, William, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months I. 



Fadely, Jacob, Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Fadely, Samuel, Private, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Falls. William D., Private, Company E, 9th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's 
Veteran Corps). 

Farmer. Amos. Private. Company F. !>4th Indiana Infantry. 

Farmer, George W.. Private. Company K. llth Indiana Infantry. 

Farmer, John S., Private, Sergeant, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Farmer. Josiah. Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Farmer, Mahlon A.. Private. Company C. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Farmer. William H., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Faweett. Alpheus, Private, Company G. 84th Indiana^ Infantry; Private, Corporal, 
Compan.v H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Faweett, Benjamin F.. Private, 4th Indiana Battery. 

Faweett. Joseph. Hospital Steward. Non Commissioned Staff. I^ith Indiana Infantry. 

Fellows. James W.. Captain. Company I. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Fentress. William H.. Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant. Company D. 
36th Indiana Infantry. 

Ferris, Warren W., Corporal. Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Perry, William A., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Fields, William M., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Fifer, Andrew, Private. Company B. 89th Indiana Infantry. 

Fifer, (Christopher S., Private. First Sergeant. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Fifer, James, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company B, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

**Fike, John A., Private. Company F, 20th Indiana Infantry. 

Filson. Charles, Private, Company D, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Filson, James. Private. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Finkborn. John. Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARO'S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY'. 789 

Finley, Michael. Private. Company C, oiith Indiana Infantry. 

*P"'irth. Robert, Private, Company B, 1391 h Indiana Infantry. 

Fish. Tilghman. First Lieutenant, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Fish, William S., Private, Company I: Hospital Steward. Non Commissioned Staff, 
3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Fisher, Sylvester, Private. Company E. 130th Indiana Infantry. 

*Pisk, Americas, Private, Corporal, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Fisk, Granville, Private. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Fitch, Henry, Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

**Fitzhugh, Frank W.. Private, Corporal, Sergeant. Company A; Sergeant Major. 
Non Commissioned Staff; Second Lieutenant, Company A, 11th Infantry U. S. A. 

Fitzmorris, Timothy, Private, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Flater, James L.. Private. Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. • 

Fleming, Andrew J., Private. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Fleming. Beniah. Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

P''leming, Charles A., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); 
Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry I Morgan Raid); Private, Corporal, Com- 
pany E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Fleming. Henry H., Sergeant, Company A, linth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Fleming. Preston, Private, Company I. G9th Indiana Infantry. 

Fleming, Stephen, Corporal, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

P'leming, William R., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

*Fletcher, James M., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Fletcher, John W., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Fletcher. Robert B.. Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant, Company C. Sth Indiana 
Cavalry. 

**Fletcher. William, Private, Company F, Sth U. S. C. T. 

Flynn. Maurice, Private, 2nd Indiana Battei'y. 

Flynn, W'illiam, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Foland, Jacob S., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Folkner, James, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raidl. 

*Foraker, Joseph, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Ford, Frederick, Private. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

*Ford, Isaac, Private, Company K, 3i)th Indiana Infantry. 

**Ford, James H. S., Private. Captain, Company B, 153rd Indiana Infantry. 

Foreman. David, Privrif, Itli Indiana Battery. 

F^oreman, Joseph, Privaii'. 4tli Indiana Battery. 

Forsha. William. Private. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Fort, Brice D., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry ( Morgan Raid ) ; Pri- 
vate, Sergeant, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Fort, Charles H., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Fort, David P.. Priiate. Corporal, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry: Corporal, 
Sergeant. Company C, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Fort, John ^\■.. Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Sergeant, Company A, 
1115th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Captain, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Fort, Lorenzo D., Private. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Fort, Milton, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Fort, Randolph, Private, Company B, 19th Ifidiana Infantry. 

Fort, Thomas C. Private, Unassigned, o3rd Indiana Infantry. 

Foster, tlideon W.. Private. Company H, 142nd Indiana Infantry. 

Foster, John H., Second Lieutenant. Company I. fiOth Indiana Infantry. 

Foster, John W., Private. Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Foster, Nathan, Private, Company I. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Foster. Robert C. Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Foster, Samuel W., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 



790 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

**Foiilke, William P., Private. Company D. 115th Indiana Infantry: Private, Com- 
pany C, 31st Indiana Infantry. 

Foulks, John W., Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Fountain. John W., Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Fox. Henry C. Sergeant. Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Fox. Leonidas, Second Lieutenant. Company I. S4th Indiana Infantry; Second 
liieutenant, Company K, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Foxworthy, Samuel T.. Private. Company F. 20th Indiana Infantry. 

Frame. William H.. Private. Company D. 3Kth Indiana Infantry. 

Franklin. Andrew D.. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry; Private. Com- 
pany H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

**Franklin. Columbits. Private. Company B. 7th Indiana Infantry; Private. Ser- 
g^nt. Company I. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Franklin. David, Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Franklin. Joseph W.. Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Franklin. Milton. Private. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (.Morgan Raid). 

Franklin. Shadrick, Private. Company B. 149th Indiana Infantry. 

Frazier. Isaiah. Private, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Frazier. William J.. Private. Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Frederick. Henry, Private, Company C. 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Freedly. Samuel. Private. Company A. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Freeman, Austin S., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. 19th In- 
diana Battery. 

Freeman. Christopher C. Pri\ate. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Freeman, George W.. Private. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Freeman, Henry C, Corporal, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Freeman. Lewis C. Fir.st Lieutenant, Captain. Company A: Major. Staff, 36th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Freeman. Lindsey. Private, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry; Private. 2nd Indiana 
Battery, re-organized. 

Freeman. Washington L.. Private. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Freeman. William, Private. Co;npany B, 128th Indiana Infantry. 

**French, Francis, Second Lieutenant, Company E, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Fricker, John A., Private, Company K, 148th Indiana Infantry. 

Fritz, Peter, Private, 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Fritzche, Walter, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Funk. Joseph, Private, Company A, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Private, 
Corporal, Company I, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Fuqua. Burden, Private, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Fuqua, James, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Furgason. J. Lee. Private. Company A; Quartermaster Sergeant. Non Commissioned 
Staff. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Furgeson. Granville S.. Private. Company K. 14th U. S. C. T. 

Fye. Charles. Private. Company I. 147th Indiana Infantry. 



Gaddis. George. Private. Company B. 130th Indiana Infantry. 
Gailer. Robert P., Private, Confpany D, 38th Indiana Infantry. 
Gales. Charles, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 
*Galycon. Milo L.. Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Galyean. Allen W.. Private. Company K. 19th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 
**Gardner. William M.. Private, Company G. 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Garman. Daniel. Private. Company C. o6rh Indiana Infantry. 
*Garriott. Henry C. Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 




COMPANY D, 36th INDIANA INFANTRY. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 79I 

Garvis, John A., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

"Gates, James, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

*Gates. Richard, Private. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Gearhead, Joseph, Private, Company E, 9th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's 
Veteran Corps ) . 

Gebhart, Wiiliam S.. Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

**George, Washington L.. Private, Company A, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Gephart, William. First Sergeant, Company A, Ki.jth Indiana Infantry (Mor.san 
Raid I. 

*Gibbs, John D., Private, Company A, .57th Indiana Infantry. 

Gibson, John, Private. Companj- D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Gibson, John, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Gibson, John. Private, Company K. I2th Indiana Cavalry. 

Gibson, Richard, Private, Company B. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Gibson. Valentine, Private, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Gilbert, Joel M., First Sergeant, Company C, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Gilbert, Jonathan N., Private, Company C, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Gilbert. Joseph, Private, Company G. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Gilbert. Josiah H.. Corporal. Company C. S4th Indiana Infantry: Corporal. Company 
G. 1st U. S. Engineers. 

Gilbert, Oliver, Private, Company C. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Gilbreath, John S., Corporal, Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. 19th Indiana Battery. 

Gilbreath, Joseph F.. Private. Corporal. Company G, Kith Indiana Infantry. 

(iilbreath, Robert, Private. Company B, 99th Indiana Infantry. 

Gilbreath. Robert W.. Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Gillespie. Charles, Private. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Gillespie. H. W.. Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Gillgeese, John, Private, Company C. 3(;ih Indiana Infantry; Private. Company H. 
i47th Indiana Infantry. 

*Gillis. Samuel M., Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

**Gilmore. James H.. Private. Company F. .'wth Indiana Infantry. (The correct 
name of this soldier is James B. Gilmore). 

Ginn. David, Private. Company I, (i9th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company H. 
140th Indiana Infantry. 

Ginn, Ezekiel. Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Ginn. .lames, Private, Company C. 3(ith Indiana Infantry. 

Ginn, Job, Private, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Ginn, Job B., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Ginn, John M.. Corporal, Company I, (i9th Indiana Infantry. 

Ginn, Jonathan J., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Ginn, Joseph. Private. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Ginn, Nicholas B., Private, Company H. G9th Indiana Infantry. 

Ginn, Taber W., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Ginn, Thomas J., Private. Company F. o7t"h Indiana Infantry. 

**Gipe. Jacob. Private. Company D. 34th Indiana Infantry. 

Glass, Francis H., Private. Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company 
H; Sergeant Major, J^Ion Commissioned Staff. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Glenn, Geor,ge, Private. Company A. 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Glidden, Augustus, Wagoner, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Glidden. Frederick E.. Corporal. Sergeant. Company I. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Glover. Silas R.. Private. Unassigned. 16th Indiana Infantry. 

**Goar, Benjamin F.. Corporal. Company F, 11th Indiana^ Infantry (three months). 

Goar, John M. (See Incomplete List). 

**Goar. Joseph N., Private. Company C, 101st Indiana Infantry. 

Goble, Elias. Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Goble, Francis M., Private, 22nd Indiana Battery. 

**Goff. Joseph. Private. Corporal. Company F. 93rd Indiana Infantry. 



7C)J HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

**Gold, William O.. Private, Company H. 52nd Indiana Infantry, 

Goldsbary, Truman, Private. Corporal, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Good, Abraham, Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Good, Henry, Private, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Good, Jacob, Private. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company G, 
1st U. S. Engineers. 

Good, Jordan, Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Good. Walton P., Corporal, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid I. 

Goodlander, William H. H., Corporal, 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Goodnoe. John, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months) : Ser- 
geant, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; First Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company 
I. 69th Indiana Infantry; Sergeant, Company A, 4th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Han- 
cock's Veteran Corps). 

Goodwin, George W.. Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Goodwin, Isaac. Private. Company C. Sth Indiana Infantry, ( three years). (See Al- 
phabetical L.ist B ) . 

Cioodwin, Robert, Corporal, Company B, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Goodwin, Wesley R., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Gordon, Benjamin, Private, Company A, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Gordon, Clarkson, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 

A, 4th Regiment. 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Gordon, Eli, Private, Company I, 54th Indiana Infantry .(three months): Private, 
Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Gordon, Henry C, Musician, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry; Principal Mu- 
sician, Non Commissioned Staff, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Gordon, Mieajah C, First Sergeant, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Gordon. Oliver C, Private, Company E, 69th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 

B, 24th Indiana Infantry. 

Gordon, Robert, Corporal, Sergeant, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Gordon, Robert P., Private, Company I, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): 
Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company F, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Gordon, Thaddeus H., Corporal. Company F, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Gorgan, Thomas, Musician, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

**Gormon. James W., Private. Corporal. Company C, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Gossett, Joseph B., Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Corporal. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Gossett. Richard S., Private. Corporal. Company G. 17th Indiana Infantry. 

Gossett. William, Private. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Gotlip, Henry, Priva,te, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Gough, Augustus F., Corporal. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Gough. Enoch, Private. Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, 2nd 
Indiana Battery, re-organized. 

Gou.gh. Ferdinand C. Farrier and Blacksmith, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Gough. Hiram. Private. Company E. 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Gough, Jacob M., Private. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Gough. Jesse. Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Gough, Lemuel, Private. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

**Gough. Thomas W.. Private. Company K. 19th Indiana Infantry. 

*GouIman. Thomas J., Wagoner. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Gowdy. Elijah S., Private. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Graf, George P.. Private. Company A, 32nd Indiana Infantry. 

Graham. Andrew J., Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Corporal. Sergeant. Company G. 16th Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 793 

*Graham, Henry R., Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Graham, James. Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Graham, Tillman, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Grandstaff, Lemnel, Private, Company F, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Granger, Francis M., Private, Company M. 2nd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company 
D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Graves, Joseph, Private. Corporal, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Graves, Samuel, Private, 4th Indiana Battery. 

Graves, Thomas J., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Graves, William, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Gray, Charles, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Gray, Elwood, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Gray, James M., Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): Pri- 
vate, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Gray, Jeremiah. Private, Company F. SVth Indiana Infantry. 

Gray, John M., Corporal. Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Gray, Joshua L., Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Gray, Thomas, Private, Corporal, 4th Indiana Battery. 

Gray, William, Private, Company C, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Gregory, Edwin A., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Gregory, Henry. Private. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Green, Alpheus, Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Green, Charles W., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Green. Jacob. Private. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Green, Jesse H.. Private. 25th Indiana Battery. 

Green.- John. Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Green. Lawrence. Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Greenwood. Harry, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Griffin, Andrew J.. Private. Sergeant. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Griffin, Elihu, Major and Paymaster, Staff, U. S. Volunteers. (See General Officers. 
Chapter IX). 

Griffin. Isom, Private. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Griffin. Samuel, Private. Company B. llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) 

Griffin. William H.. Private, Company I. G9th Indiana Infantry. 

Griffith, Daniel M.. Private, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months) : 
Private. Company A. lOStli Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

^Griffith. Hiram. Private. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Griffith, John. Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

**Griffith. Marquis D., Wagoner, Corporal, Company D, 34th Indiana Infantry. 

•Griffith. Thomas H., Private, Corporal, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Griffith, William, Private, Company E, 40th Indiana Infantry. 

Griggsby, Samuel. Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Griggsby, William J., Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Grisler. John, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Grist. John K.. Corporal, Sergeant, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Groler. John, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Gronendyke. Amos, Second Lieutenant. Middletown Rifles, Indiana Legion; Pri- 
vate. Company C. Iii9th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); First Lieutenant, Company 
F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Gronendyke. Thomas W., Corporal, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry; Private, 
Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Grose. Abijah. Private, Company E, 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Jlaid ). 

Grose. Isaac, Captain, New Lisbon Indiana State Guards, Indiana Legion: Cor- 
poral, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Grose, John W., Regimental Band, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Grose, Madison. Corporal. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 



J94 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Principal Musician, Non Commissioned Staff, :i6th Indiana Infantry: Private. Second 
Liieutenant, Company E, ?th Indiana Cavalry. 

Grose, Martin L., Private, Company A. Stli Indiana Infantry (tliree years); Private, 
Company F'. S(ith Indiana Infantry. 

Grose, William, Colonel, Staff, Stith Indiana Infantry; Brigadier General and Bre- 
vet Major General, U. S. Volunteers. (See General Officers. Chapter IX). 

Grove. Charles W.. Private, Company C, lOltth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Musician, Company V, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Grove. Henry, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Grove, Isaac, Musician, Company K, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): Musi- 
cian, Company H, eSth Indiana Infantry: Musician, Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. 
Grove, Joseph M., Private. Company H. tJSth Indiana Infantry; Sergeant. 25th 
Indiana Battery. 

Grover, Andrew. Private. Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 
*Groves. Stephen, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Grow. William. Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Grubbs, Benjamin D., Private, Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Grubbs, Robert M.. Captain, Company F; Major, Staff, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Grubbs. Thomas M., First Lieutenant, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
Grunrten. James, Private. Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
C. 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Grunden. William. Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 
Gue, Edward, Private, Company 1, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Gue, William, Corporal. Company K. 54th Indiana Infanti'y (three months). 
Gunckle. Aaron M.. Bugler. 19th Indiana Battery. 

Gundrum, Solomon. Private. Company E. !ith Regiment. 1st Army Corps (Han- 
cock's Veteran Corps). 

Gurtin, Levi P., Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 
Gustin, Amos R., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Gustin. Jeremiah W., Second Lieutenant, Middletown Rifles, Indiana Legion; Pri- 
vate, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Gustin. Joseph G.. Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Gustin, Samuel E.. Private. Company E. 8th Indiana? Infantry (three years). 

Guy, Andrew R.. Private. Company I. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Gwin. William M., Private. Company K, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

H 
Hackleman, Darwin. Bugler. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 
Hackleman, Thomas M., Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 
Hackman. Samuel. Private. Corporal, Company K, 19th Indiana Infantry; Cor- 
poral, Company E. 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

*Hadley, Samuel S., Private, Company H; Quartermaster Sergeant. Non Com- 
missioned Staff. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Haguewood, Isaac, Private, Company A, Hiith Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid i : 
Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Haguewood, Miles, Private, Company C. 3i;th Indiana Infantry. 
Haguewood, Milton, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Haguewood, Moore, Private, Company A, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 
, Haines, Edward, Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Haley. Caleb W., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Haley. Thomas L., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Hall. Branson, Private, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Hall. Ezra, Private. Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Hall, Henry C, Private, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Hall. John D.. Private. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hall. Robert. Private. Corporal. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 795 

Hall, Warren, Private. Company A, 139tli Indiana Infantry. 

Hall, William C, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Iijfantry. 

Hall, William J.. Wagoner, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

•■'Halley, John B.. Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Halpin, Patrick, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company A, 
4th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Halsey, Richard, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Ham, George W., Private, Company F: Quartermaster Sergeant, Non Commis- 
sioned Staff, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Ham, Jacob, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Ham. Jacob H.. Private, Cohipany F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Ham, Samuel, Corporal, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Ham. Samuel, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Ham. William J., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Haman, William, Private, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Hammer, John W., Corporal, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Hammond. William, Private, Company K, 14Sth Indiana Infantry. 

**Hanby, Elisha M., Private, Company F, 53rd Indiana Infantry. 

Hanesbrough, William H., Private, Company E, 9th Regiment, 1st Army Corp.s 
(Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Hankins. Absalom, Corporal, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hankins, Daniel, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hankins, James, Private. Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Hankins, Joseph, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Hankins, Richard, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Hankins, William B.. Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Hankins. William N., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

**Hansard, Patrick H., Private, Company F, 14th U. S. C. T. 

Hanson, John C, Sergeant, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Company G; Sergeant Major, Non Commissioned Staff; Second Lieutenant, Com- 
pany A, ^th Indiana Cavalry. 

Haper, Henry H., Sergeant, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

*Hardin, Albert G., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

■Hardin, Franklin A., Lieutenant Colonel, Staff, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hardin, Russell B., Corporal, Company C. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Hardin, Samuel, Corporal, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hardy, Dennis, Private, 2nd Indiana Battery; Private, 2nd Indiana Battery. I'e 
organized. 

Harley. Thomas, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Harmon. Luther H.. Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant, Company H, Sth Indiana 
Infantry (three years). 

Harned, Isaac F., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) 

Harris, Eli, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

**Harris, James "W., Private, Corporal, Sergeant. First Lieutenant, Company H, 
2nd Indiana Cavalry. ' 

Harris, Martin B., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Harris, Meredith, Private, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Harris, Milton L., Private, Company C, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Harris, Thomas G., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Harris, William H., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Harrold, Abyram, Private, Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Harrold. Andrew, Private, Company B, llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Harrold, Uriah, Private, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Harry, Martin L., Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Hart, Alfred G. T., Private. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 



796 hazzakd's history of henry county. 

Hart, Elisha, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Private, 
Corporal, Sergeant, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

**Hart, Harvey A., Private, Company F, ]30th Indiana Infantry. 

Hart, John S.. Private. 4th Indiana Battery. 

Hart. Lewis, Private, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (iVIorgau Raid). 

Harter. Henry B., Private, 20rd Indiana Battery. 

*Harter. Joseph L,., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Harter. Peter, Private, Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. * 

Hartley, John F., Private, Company I, (iflth Indiana Infantry. 

Hartley, John M., Captain, Union Guards, Indiana Legion; Second Lieutenant, Com- 
pany E. Itith Indiana Infantry (one year); Lieutenant Colonel. Staff. lOSth Indiana In- 
fantry (Morgan Raid); Lie\itenant Colonel, Staff. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hartley. Thomas L.. Private. Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Hartmau. Daniel. Corporal. Sergeant. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three 
years ) . 

Harvey. Adam. Private. 12th Indiana Battery. 

Harvey. Daniel. Private. Company A. 110th Indiana Infanti-y t Mor.gan Raid). 

Harvey, Henry. Private. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

*Harvey. Isaac W.. Private. Company A, lOStli Indiana Infantry (Mor.^an Raid); 
Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Harvey, Joel R., Private, 12th Indiana Battery. 

Harvey. John R., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company A. 
110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private, Corporal. Company B, 139th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Harvey, Joseph. Private. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
va1e. Corporal. 12th Indiana Battery, 

Harvey, Leander, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid), 

Harvey, Levi, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Harvey. Mahlon D., Corporal, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry, 

Harvey, Miles, Private, 12th Indiana Battery. 

Harvey. Milton, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry, 

Harvey, Philander T., Private. 12th Indiana Battery. 

Harvey, Pleasant W,, Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry, 

Harvey, William, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Harwood. Joseph, Private, Company B, 37th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
B, 37th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

**Haskett. Nathan H.. Private, Company G, 5th Indiana Cavalry, 

Haskett, Uriah, Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Haskett. William A,. Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Hasten, Isaac N.. Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry; Corporal ,Company 
K. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hasting. Peter, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Hastings, James J., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hasty. Geor.ge, First Lieutenant, Needmore Rangers, Indiana Legion; First Lieu- 
tenant, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hatch, Henry, First Lieutenant, Union Guards, Indiana Legion; Captain, Company 
A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid), 

Hatfield, Aaron S.. Private, Company A. 124th Indiana Infantry. (See Alphabetical 
List B), 

Hatfield. Israel. Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Hatfield, Joseph B,, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

**Haugh. Thomas S,. Musician, Company K, 52nd Indiana Infantry: Musician, 
Company K, 52nd Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Hawhee. Clinton D,. Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry, 

Hawhee, Isaiah, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry, 

Hawk, Mahlon, Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 797 

Hawk. William. Private. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Cor- 
poral, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

**Hayden. Benjamin F., Farrier and Blacksmith. Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Hayden, James, Private, Company C. Sth Indiana Cavalry. 

**Hayden, John, Private, Company H. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hayden, Wilson, Private, Company D. 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

*Haynes, Milton, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Haynes, Peter, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Haynes, Silas, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Hayes, Alexander P., Private .Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
liany I. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Hayes. Bennett, Private. Company' K, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hayes, Katon, Private. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Private, 
Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Hayes, Jeremiah, Private, Company E, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hayes. Mahlon, Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hayes, Noah, Private, Company E, 30th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company A, 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Hayes, Oliver P., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Hayes, Quinton B„ Private, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hayes, Theodore, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hayes. William, Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hazzard, (Jeorge, Musician, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hazzara, George W., Colonel, Staff. 37th Indiana Infantry. • (See U. S. Military 
Academy). 

Hazzard. John W., Private, Company H. lJ7th Indiana Infanliy. 

Hazzard. Leander E., Private. Company H, 5th Cavalry U. S. A. 

Hazzard, Samuel. Private, Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Heacock, Elwood, Private. Company A, 3Cth Indiana Infantry. 

Heaton, Amos, Private, Company A, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Healon, Eli, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Heaton, Waitsel M., Corporal. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 
Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private. Company A; 
Sergeant Major, Non Commissioned Staff. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Heaton. White, Corporal, Quartermaster Sergeant, 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Heavenridge, Thomas S., Corporal, Company A, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Hedges, Greenherry W., Private, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry; Private, Cor- 
poral, Company D. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Hedrick. Charles. First Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. Captain, Company I, 3rd In- 
diana Cavalry. 

Hedrick. Charles C. Private, 4th Indiana Battery. 

Hedrick, George W., Sergeant. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hedrick, Joseph, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hedrick, Peter, Private, Company B, 99th Indiana Infantry. 

Heichert, Henry O., Private, Company K. 72nd Indiana Infantry. 

*Heinbaugh. James, Private, Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

*Heinbaugh. John P., Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Helman. Michael. Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

*Helms. Jacob R., Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Helms, Peter, Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Helms, William J., Private. Company K. Sfith Indiana Infantry. 

Helvey. George P.. Private, Sergeant, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hemley, John, Private, Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). (The 
correct name of this soldier is John R. Hernly). 

Henderson. Henry H., Private, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). -. 
Private, Company C, 36th Irfdiana Infantry. 

Henderson. Isom P., Private, Company B, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 



798 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Henderson, Richard T., Private, Sergeant, Company D. 19th Indiana Infantry; Ser- 
geant. First Lieutenant, Captain, Company I, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Hendricks. Charles, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Hendriclis, Elijah M., Private, Company D, 11th Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
pany K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hendricks, Joel, Private. Company U. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Hendricks, John P.. Private. Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Hendricks, Mahlon, Corporal, Sergeant. First Lieutenant. Company C, 36th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Hendricks, Miles, Private, Company H. •69th Indiana Infanti-y. (See Alphabetical 
List B). 

Hendricks. Samuel, Private, Sergeant, 12th "Indiana Battery. 

Henry, Edgar, Sergeant, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Henry. John R.. Private. Sergeant, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Henry, William, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Henry, William A., Private, Corporal, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Henshaw, William B.. Private, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

'Henthorne, Adam K., Private, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

♦Herford, Hiram B.. Private. Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Herliman, Henry, Regimental Band. Siith Indiana Infantry; Private, Company A. 
110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Herman. William H., Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Hernley, Henry B.. Private. Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hernly, John R. (See Hemley, John). 

Hess. George. Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hess. Luther P., Private, Company H, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Hess, William T., Private, Company H, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

**Hewitt, Charles, Private, Company B, 132nd Indiana Infantry. 

*Hewitt, Joseph. Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Hewitt. William. Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hewitt. William. Private. 2nd Indiana Battery; Private, 2nd Indiana Battery, re-or- 
ganized. 

Hewlit. Alfred. Private. 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Hiatt. Branson. Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, 4th Indiana Battery. 

Hiatt. Daniel. Private. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Hiatt, Enoch. Private. Company F', 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hiatt, Henry C. Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hiatt. Henry (Harry) H.. Private. Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry. 

*Hiatt. James D.. Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry, 

Hiatt, Jesse M., Captain. Company D. 147tR Indiana Infantry. 

Hiatt, Joel, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hiatt, John C, Private, Sergeant, Company A, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Hiatt, Joseph, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hiatt. Oliver S., Private. 13th Indiana Battery. 

Hiatt. Richard. Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Hiatt. Robert C. Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hiatt. Seth. Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Hiatt, William H., Private, Corporal, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hicklin, Henry H., Private, Company A, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

*Hickman, Charles, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Hicks. Daniel, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Higgins. James E.. Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Higgins, John E., Private, 22nd Indiana Battery. 

Higgins, Joseph, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Higgins. William T., Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 799 

Hill. Elwood, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Hill. Henry, Corporal, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

*Hill. James ri.. Private, Blacksmith, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hill, John A., Private, Musician, Company K, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

**Hill, John W.. Private. Company I, 8th U. S. C. T. 

*Hill, Milton. Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Hill, Nathan O.. Private. Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Hill, Robert H., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Hill, Thomas C. Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hill, Thomas G. Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Hill, William, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Hilligoss, William J., Sergeant, First Lieutenant. Company G. 7.5th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Hilton. Noah, Private. Corporal, Company K, 118th Indiana Infantry. 

*Hines. Herman, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Hinkle. Joseph, Private, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hinshaw. Albert E. Private. Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hinshaw, Alonzo, Private. 2nd Indiana Battery; Private. 2nd Indiana Battery, re-or- 
ganized. 

Hinshaw. Ellas. Private, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hinsnaw. Thomas, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hinshaw. William, Corporal. Company A, lOath Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private. Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hobbs. Jesse. Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

*»Hobbs. Orville W.. Private. Company G. 133rd Indiana Infantry. 

**Hobbs. Wilson. Major and Surgeon, Staff, 85th Indiana Infantry. 

Hobsbn, Volney, Second Lieutenant. Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid ) : Captain, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hockett, Wyatt, Private, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Hodson. F. H. C, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Hodson, Hiram. Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, 25th Indiana Battery. 

Hodson. John, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Hodson. Hiram. Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Pri- 
vate. 25th Indiana Battery. 

**Hodson, John E., Private. Company F, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoftacker, Daniel, Sergeant. Company B, lOCth Indiana Infantry ( Morgan Rai<l ) . 

Holford. Richard A, Private. Company G, Kith Indiana Infantry. 

Holland, Adolphus, Private. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Holland, John E, Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant. Company C. 36th Indiana 
Infantry. (See U. S. Military Academy). 

Holler, Frederick, Corporal. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Holliday, Benjamin F., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) 

Hollingsworth, Benjamin S., Private. 19th Indiana Battery. 

Holloway, David S.. Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant. Captain. Company D. 19th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Holloway, Jonathan D.. Private. Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Holloway. Joshua L.. Private. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Holloway. William H. H., Corporal, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid); Private, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

**Holt, John G., Private, Sergeant, Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hoober. John B.. Private. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoober. William C. Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hood, Edward. Private, Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

*Hood. Julius G.. Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoombaugh, Adam, Private. Company F. 130th Indiana Infantry. 



boo HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Hoostlar. Michael, Private. Company C. Stith Indiana Infantry. 

Hooten, Jobn. Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hooten, Milton, Private, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Hooten. William F., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoover, Charles B., Private, Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoover, David, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (.Morgan Raid): Pri- 
vate, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoover, De Witt C, Private, Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): Ser- 
geant, First Lieutenant, Company H, G9th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoover, Frederick, Captain, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoover. Harrison, Musician, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Com- 
pany G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoover. James M.. Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoover, John S., Captain and Aid de Camp, Major and Aid de Camp, Brevet Lieu- 
tenant Colonel, Brevet Colonel, Staff, U. S. Volunteers. (See Alphabetical List B). 

Hoover, Moses, Private, Company A. llOtb Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Hoover, Tobias, Sergeant, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Sergeant, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoover, William, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Hoover, William H., Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 
First Sergeant, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Sergeant. 2nd Indiana Bat- 
tery, re-organized. 

Hopper, Abraham W.. Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hopper, Lewis M., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hopper, Samuel, Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hopper, Theodore, Musician, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. 2nrt In- 
diana Battery, re-organized. 

**Hoppis, Daniel, Private, Company A. ICnh Indiana Infantry: Private. Company 
1, 2(ith Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Horney. James, Private, Company I, ,1rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Hosier, Bryant, Private, Company U, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Hosier, Henderson O.. Private, 1 9th Indiana Battery. 

Hosier, Isaiah, Private, Company D, 36tb Indiana Infantry. 

Houck, David. (See Incompete List). 

Houck, Leonidas, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Houck. Thomas J., Private, Company B. 8tb Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hough, Ira, Private, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

House, Jobn, Private, Company B, 9tb Indiana Cavalry. 

House, William, Private, Company B, llOtb Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Pri- 
vate, Company A, 30tb Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Houser, John. Private, Company D., 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Howe, Edward P., Second Lieutenant , First Lieutenant, Captain. Company A. .")7th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Howell, John. Private. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Howren, Charles A. C, Private, Company A, 84th Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
pany E, 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Howren, Nimrod, Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Howren. Thomas I. Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Howren. William A.. Private, Company C. 19th Indiana Infantry: Private. Com- 
pany A. 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Hubbard, Alonzo, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months): Pri- 
vate, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry ( Mor.gan Raid). 



hazzard's history of henry county. 8oi 

Hubbard, Erlwin. Private, Company H, C9th Indiana Infantry. 

Hubbard, George, Private, Corporal, Company C, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Hubbard. Henry. Private, Company A, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate. Sergeant. Company C, 2nd Indiana Cavalry: Sergeant. Company C. 2nd Indiana 
Cavalry, re-organized. 

Hubbara. Joseph B.. Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. Company D. Sth Indiana Infantry 
(three years). 

Hubbard. Joseph L.. Private. Corporal. 19th Indiana Battery. 

Hudelson. James C. Private. Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hudelson. John W.. Sergeant. Company F. tith Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hudelson. Martin, Private, Corporal. Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hudelson, Robert I., Private. Company H. 11th Indiana Infantry; Seaman. U. S. 
Navy; Private. 2nd Indiana Battery; Private. Corporal, 2nd Indiana Battery, re-organized. 

Hudelson. Rufus I.. Private. Company K, 37th Indiana Infantry. 

Hudelson. Samuel H.. Private. Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hudelson. William H.. Private. Company K. 37th Indiana Infantry. 

Hudelson. William M.. Private, Company A.. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid). 

Huff. Abraham. Private. Company I. C9th Indiana Infantry. 

Huff, Jacob. Private. Company I. G9th Indiana Infantry. 

Huff. William. Private, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

♦Huffman, Ezekiel, Private, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

"■Huggins. Josiah. Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Hughes. John, Private, Company A". 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Hull. G£orge W., Private. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company A, 
139th Indiana Infantry. 

Humphrey. liemuel. Private, Company B. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Humphrey. William, Private. Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

*Humphrey. William W., Private, Company A; Sergeant' Major. Non Commissioned 
Staff; First Lieutenant. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hunnicutt. William H.. Private. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hunt, Edward, Private. Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Hunt. George W.. Private, Company H., 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Hunt, Herbert, Private. Company C. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Hunt. Jacob, Private. Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company C. 20th 
Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Hunt. Thomas M., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Hunt, WTIliam H.. Private, Company D. 19th Indiana Infantry. 

*Hunter. Eben B.. Private, Sergeant. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Huntsinger. Daniel. Private. Company I, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

HuntsiTi.ger, William. Private. Company E, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Hupp, Dewitt C. Sergeant. Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

*Hurley, John J.. Sergeant. Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

**Hurst, Joseph. Private, Company G, 17th Indiana Infantry. 

Hurt, Thomas M., Private. 2nd Indiana Battery, re-organized. 

Huston. James. Private. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Huston. Joseph. Private. Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

**Huston. Thomas M, Private. Company L. 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private. Com- 
pany A. Sth Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Huston. Wiliam H., Corporal, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Hutehins. William, Private. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Hutson. James. Private. Company G, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Hynes. Timothy. Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

51 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



Ice, Abraham S., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Ice, Jesse A., Sergeant, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
*lngalls, Parker, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
*Inman, John M., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Irvin, Samuel, Private, Company K, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 



*Jack, John W., First Lieutenant, Captain, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Jackson, Charles, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Jackson, Harrison, Musician, Company G, 47th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Jackson, Jesse, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Jackson, Jesse L., Private, Company E, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

**Jackson, Presley E.. Private, Corporal, Company K, 47th Indiana Infantry. 

*Jackson, William L., Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Jackson, Wilson T, Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
K, .57th Indiana Infantry. 

James. Austin W., Private. Company D, ."Cth Indiana Infantry. 

James, Benjamin F., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

James, Elwood, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company L, Sth 
Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

James, John, Private, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

James, Leander M., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

James, Morgan, Sergeant, Company D; Hospital Steward, Non Commissioned Staff, 
SUth Indiana Infantry, 

James, William, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Jamison, William, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Jarvis, James, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Jefferson, Clingman R., Corporal, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Jeffries, Milton, Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Jenkins, Alfred, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Jenkins, William, Private, Company K, 14th U. S. C. T. 

Jennings, Charles C, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Jennings, George W.. Corporal, Company K, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Jennings, William A., Corporal, Company K, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Jester, Alexander, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, 19th In- 
diana Battery. 

Jester, Avery, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Jester, Gary, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

*Jester, Isaac L., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Jester. James R., Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Jester. Philander, Private, Company K, 99th Indiana Infantry; Sergeant, Com- 
pany H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Jessup, John A., Private, Company I. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Jessup, Josiah A., Private, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Jewell, Warren D., Private, Corporal, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

**John, Stevan, Private, Corporal, Company L, Sth Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Johnson, Abraham, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Johnson, Alexander, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry; 
Private, Company K, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Johnson, Caldwell C, Private, Company B, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Johnson, Charles W., Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 803 

Johnson, David, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
**Johnson, George W., Private, Company F, 14Gth Indiana Infantry. 
Johnson, Henry, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 
Johnson, Hugh A., Private, Company C. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Johnson, Hutchinson, Corporal, Company D. 19th Indiana Infantry. 
Johnson; Israel G., Private, Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Johnson, James T., Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Johnson, John N., Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Johnson, Joseph P., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Johnson, Levi, Private. Company E, 147ih Indiana Infantry. 
Johnson, Lewis, Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Johnson, Quincy A., Private, Company B, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Johnson, Robert A., Private, Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Johnson. Samuel J., Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Johnson. Silas, Private, Company K. 57th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company B. 
134th Indiana Infantry; Sergeant, Company B. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Johnson, I'homas J., Private, Company K. 148th Indiana Infantry. 
Johnson, Turner H., Private, Company D. 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 
Johnson, William K., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
* Johnston, John D., First Sergeant, Company G, Sth Indiana Infantry (three 
months); Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, 18th Indiana Battery. 

Jones. Charles W., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Jones, Clinton, Private, Company K. 99th Indiana Infantry. 
Jones, David, Corporal, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Jones, Ephraim L., Private, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Jones. Hardin, Private, Company C. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Jones, James, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Jones, James M., Private. 19th Indiana Battery. 

Jones, Jenkins, Private, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
*Jones, Owen, Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Jones, Philip, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
*Jones, William H., Private, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 
Jones, William R., Private, Corporal. 19th Indiana Battery. 
Jordan, Anthony W., Private, Company I. 124th Indiana Infantry. 
Jordan, B. B., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Jordan, Henry S., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Judd, James, Private, Company -H, 69tli Indiana Infantry. 

Judd, John, Private, Company K, lOoth Indiana Infantry (Morgan R'aid) ; Private, 
Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Judd, John D., Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Julian, Absalom H., Private, Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): 
Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Julian, Hiram, Private, Company B, 40th Indiana Infantry. 
Julian, John D.. Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Julian. William S., Private. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private. Company E; Commissary. Sergeant, Non Commissioned, Staff, 9th Indiana 
Cavalry. 

Julius, Ferdinand. Private, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
**Junken, Henry A., Private, Company D, 19th Indiana Infantry; Private Company 
I, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

**Junken, William A., Private, Company K, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

K 

**Kaltenbach, Michael, Private, Company A, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 



8o4 . hazzard's history of henry county. 

Kaufman, Benjamin, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Kays, John, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Keal, Samuel, Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

*Keeler, John, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Keesling, Amos, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Keesling, Calvin F.. Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Keesling, Calvin F. B., Private. Company K, 10.5th Indiana Infantry ( Morgan 
Raid). 

Keesling, Calvin L.. Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Keesling, Eli, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Keesling, Isaac B., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Keesling, John W., Private, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Sergeant, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Keller. Cornelius, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Keller, Hiram E, Private, 25th Indiana Battery. 

*Keller, Jonathan, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Keller, Jonathan, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Keller, Samuel L., Private, Corporal, 25th Indiana Battery. 

Kelley, John W.. Private, Company L. 21st Indiana Infantry, re-organized as 1st 
Heavy Artillery. 

Kelly, James, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Kelly, Joseph, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Kelsey, Samuel H., Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Kelso, Hugh S.. Private, Company I, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Kemp, Charles B., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Kendall, Adam, Private, Company K, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Kendall, Silas. Private, Company K, 14Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Kennedy, John H., Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Kennedy, John W.. Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Kennedy, Joseph, Private. Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): 
Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Kenney, John. Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Kent, Henry, Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Kentley. William H., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Kenyon, William, Private, Company A, 3Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Kern, Amos J., Private, Company B, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Kern, John A,, Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Kern, Thomas C, Private, Company A, lOSlh Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): 
Private, Sergeant, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company D: Commis- 
sary Sergeant, Non Commissioned Staff, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Kerr, Marcus A., Musician, Company O; Principal Musician, Non Commissioned. 
Staff, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Kerr, William H., Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Kerr, William L., Private. Company F, 23rd Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
B, 13th Indiana Cavalry. 

Kersey, Silas, H., Assistant Surgeon and Major and Surgeon, Staff, 36th Indiana 
Infantry. 

*Kerwood, Asbury L., Sergeant, First Sergeant, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Keys, John ti.. Private, Company B, 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

Kilgore, James L., Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Kimball, David N., Sergeant, Company I, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Kimmel, Daniel. Private, Corporal, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Kimmel, Michael, Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Kinder. George. Corporal, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Kinder, Jefferson, Private, Sergeant, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry; Sergeant, 
Company C, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 805 

**KmdIey, Joseph T., Private, Company D, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Kingrey, James, Private, Company I, G9th Indiana Infantry. 

Kinley, Isaac, Captain, Company D; Major, Staff, 36th Indiana Infantry; Provost 
Marshal, 5th District of Indiana. 

Kinley. James W., Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Kinsey, David \v., Private, Corporal, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Kirkham, Andrew B.. Private, Company K, 37th Indiana Infantry. 

Kirlcham, John R-. Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Kirkham, Samuel, Private, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Kirkland, Taylor. Private, Company H, 3Sth Indiana Infantry. 

*Kirkpatrick. Thomas. Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Kirman, William, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Kiser, Frank H., Private G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Kissell, Alfred M., Private, Corporal. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Kissell, Samuel, Private, Unassigned, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Kitts, Alfred, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

*Klarman, Nicholas, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Knight, Ira J., Private, Company H, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Knight, Vv'illiam H., Private, Company H, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Knight, William H., Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Koons, George W., Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Koons, Joseph, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Koons, Thomas, Corporal. Company H, 100th Indiana Infantry. 

**Kraner, Andrew F., Musician, Company G, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Musician, Company K, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Kratzer, Samuel, Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Kunkle. Cyrus, Private, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 



Laboyteaux, Joseph, Wagoner, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Laboyteaux, Richard J., Private, Wagoner. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Laboyteaux. Stephen A., Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year); 
Private. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

].,aboyteaux. Thomas, Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Lacy, Alpheus D.. Private. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Lacy, James C, Private, Company B. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Lacy, John L., Private. Company B. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Lacy, Joseph M.. Private. Company I, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Lacy, William B., Private, Company K, 19th Indiana Infantry; Corporal, Company 
I, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Lacy, Wilson P.. Private, Company B, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Lake, Abner B., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Lakin, William F., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Lamar. Absalom, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Lamb, Caleb, Private, Company A, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Lamb, Erie. Private. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Lamb, Isaiah, Private, Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Lamb, Job, Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Lamb, Richard, Private, Company P, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Landis. Daniel. Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Landis, George W., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Landis, John, Private, Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Lane, George A., Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Lane, Jacob, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 



Hob HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Lane. John, Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Lane, Stephen R, Private, Company D., 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Lane, Thomas B., Private, Sergeant, Company F, 14Sth Indiana Infantry. 

**Langston, Emmett, Sergeant, Company I, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Lanham, Charles, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company A, S7th Indiana Infantry. 

Lanham, Elza, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Laremore, James. Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Larrowe, William, Private, Company K, 99th Indiana Infantry. 

Latehaw, William T., Private, Company D, S7th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
D, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Laven, John, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Lawrence, Thomas, Private, Corporal, Company C, 2Sth U. S. C. T. 

Lawson, Dallas, Private, Conjpany A, 3Gth Indiana Infantry; Corporal, Company 
H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Leach, George, Corporal, 12th Indiana Battery. 

Leakey, Anthony, Musician. Company A, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Leakey, Arthur M., Musician, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year); 
Private, 20th Indiana Battery. 

Leakey, Isaac R. R., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Leakey, Thomas, Private, Company A, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

**Leamon, John N., Private, Company B. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Leavell, Benjamin D.. Corporal, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Leavell, John W., First Lieutenant, Needmore Rangers, Indiana Legion. 

Leavell, William L., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Lee, John, Corporal, Company I, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Lee, Robert D. F., Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

*Leeka, Jesse, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) : Private, 
Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

**Leffingn'ell. Jonathan, Private, Company I, llSth Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
pany I, 34th Indiana Infantry. 

'Leisure, William H., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Lemay, Charles AV., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Lemberger, William, Private, Company D, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Lemon. Eli J., Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Lemon, Joseph G.. Corporal, Sergeant, Company K; Second Lieutenant, First Lieu- 
tenant, Company E, 3Cth Indiana Infantry, 

Lemon, Orange V., Senior, Captain and Chaplain, Staff, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Lemon, Orange V., Junior, Musician. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Lemon. William, Private. Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Lemon, William H., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Lemsford, Benjamin F., Private. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Lennard, George W., Adjutant, StaiT, 36th Indiana Infantry; Lieutenant Colonel 
and Colonel, Staff, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Lennington. Abraham, Corporal, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Leonard, George W., Corporal, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Leonard, James, Private, Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

**Leonard, John C, Private, Company L, 21st Indiana Infantry re-organized as 1st 
Heavy Artillery. 

Leonard, William H., Second Lieutenant, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Lesh, Groves, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Lester, Wilson, Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Level, Abraham. Private, Company B, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 




COMPANY C, 36th INDIANA INFANTRY. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. SO" 

Level. Samuel, Private, Company F, Tth Indiana Infantry (three months) : Corporal, 
Company E. 7th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Level, Solomon, Private, Company A, 6Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Leweck, Gustave W., Musician, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Lewellen, John W., Private. Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Lewelling, James M., Private, Unassigned. 22ud Indiana Infantry. 

Lewis, James N., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, 2nd Indiana 
Battery, re-organized. 

Lewis, John F, Private. Company B, 1.39th Indiana Infantry; Private, Sergeant, 
Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

*Lewis, Nelson, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Lewis, Thomas J., Private, Company C. 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Lewis, Thomas N.. Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry: Private, Com- 
pany H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

♦Lewis, William .Sergeant, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Lewis, William H.. Private, Corporal, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantrj-. 

Linens, Joseph. Private, Company A, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Lines, Elijah H., Private, Company C, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Linnen, Daniel, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

**Linville, David C, Private, Company B, 70lh Indiana Infantry. 

Little, Gambral, Private. Company B, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Livezey, George H., Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
G. 1st U. S. Engineers. 

Livezey, John C, Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Captain. Company C. 36th Indiana 
Infantry: Captain and Commissary of Subsistence, Brevet Major, Staff, U. S. Volunteers. 
(See GeneraJ Officers, Chapter IX). 

Livezey, Joseph, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Livezey, William E., Corporal, Sergeant, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

*Lloyd, Levi, Private. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Lock, Lewis, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Lockridge, George, Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Lockridge, Henry, Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Lockridge, John. Private, Company D, 3fith Indiana Infantry. 

Lodge, Oliver. Private, Company M, 21st Indiana Infantry re-organized as 1st Heavy 
Artillery. 

Loer, George, Private, Company B. 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Loer. Pearson, Corporal, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Long. Edward M., Private, Company C, 5th Indiana Cavalry; Second Lieutenant, 
Company B, 3rd North Carolina Mounted Infantry. 

Long, William, Private, Company B, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Longfellow. Lorenzo D.. Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Lott, Uriah, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Lovett, Martin D.. Prjvate. Company E, 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Lowe, David, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Lowe, George, Private, Company .B, 110th Indiana Infantry. (Morgan Raid). 

Lowe, George N., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Lowe, John. Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Lowe, John W., i-rivate. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Lowe. Joseph S., Private, Corporal, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Lowe, Nixon, Private. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Lowe. William, Private, Company C, o6th Indiana Infantry. 

Lowery, Francis M., Private, Company I. fi9th Indiana Infantry. 

Lowery. Frederick, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Lowery, Henry, Wagoner, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 



8o8 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Lowery, Jonah, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

bowery, Philander, Private, Sergeant, Company F, .57th Indiana Infantry. 

Lowery, Philip, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Liowery, Samuel, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Lowery, Walter K., Private, Sergeant, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Lowhead, John W., Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Ley, William L., Private, Company. E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Lucas, Andrew J., Private, Company I, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

**Lucas. David, Private, Company D, 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Lucas, George, Private, Company D, Sth U. S. C. T. 

Luce, Abraham, Private, Company A, llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Luce, Henry, Sergeant, Company C. 109th Indiana Infantrj' (Morgan Raidi. 

Luce, John J., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Luellen, David M., Private, Corporal, Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Luellen, Oliver F., Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Sergeant. 
Company A, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Luther, William J. B., Private, Company E, 132nd Infantry. 

Luthultz, Jacob, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. - 

Luthultz. Joachim, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Luthultz. Joshua, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Luzadder, Moses, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Lyman, George, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

*Lyman, Perry C, Private. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Lynch, Edward, Musician, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years"). 

Lynch. William A., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Lynum, John, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Lytle, John D., Private, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Ser- 
geant. Company I, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Lytle, Marcellus, Private, Company D, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Me 

McAfee, John F.. Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

McAfee. Mark,' Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

McAfee, Nicholas, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

McAlister. Alexander, Private. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

McArthur, Korac, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): 
First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant. Captain. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

McCance, John, Private. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

McCann, William, Private, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

McCarty. John. Private. Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

McConnelly. James, Private, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

McConnelly. Jonathan. Private. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

McConnell, James, Private. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

McConnell, John B., Private, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

McConnell. Jonathan, Private. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

McConnell, Joseph P.. Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid) ; Private, Company E, flth Indiana Cavalry. 

McConnell, Robert C, Second Lieutenant. Company H. HOth Indiana Infantry. 

McConner, J. P.. Private, Company A, IKith Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*McCorkhill, John, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

**McCorkhill. John H., Private, Company B, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

McCorkle. James. Private. Company B. 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

McCormack. Andrew J., Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

McCormack, Isaac N., Musician, Company 1; Principal Musician, Non Commis- 
sioned, Staff, 69th Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 8oq 

McCormack, Jackson, Private, Corporal, Company H. 140tli Indiana Infantry. 

McCormack, James E., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

McCormack, John, Private. Company H, GSth Indiana Infantry. 

McCormack, John R.., Private, Company I, C9th Indiana Infantry. 

McCormack, John W., Private, Company D, H7th Indiana Infantry. 

McCormack, Josiah, Private, Wagoner, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

McCormack, Noah, Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

McCormack, Samuel, Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

McCormack, Thomas, Private, Company K, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years) 

McCormack, William, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

**McCray, Milton, Private, Company K, 132nd Indiana Infantry. 

*McCulIouch, John Q., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

McCullum, Simeon, Private, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

McCune, Henry W., Private, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

McCune, Thompson W., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); 
First Lieutenant, Company G, 1st Regiment, Mississippi (River) Marine Brigade. 

McCurdy, William, Sergeant, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

**McDivitt, John, Private, 3rd Indiana Battery. 

McDonald. David, Private, Company K, 3Cth Indiana Infantry. 

McDougall, George, Private, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized.. 

McDowell, Andrew, Private, Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

McDowell, John, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

McDowell, Peter, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

McFarland, Davis S., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

McFeely, Aaron, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

McFet&rs, James, Private, Company A, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

McFetridge, James, Private, Company C, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

*McGeath, Martin, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

McGinnis, James P.. Private, Company K, ISth Indiana Infantry. 

McGrath. V/illiam, Private, Company I. 7th Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company 
A, 7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

McGraw, George W., Private, Company G. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

McGraw, Richard L., Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

McGuSin, Joseph B., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Com.pany A, 4th Indiana Cavalry. 

McGuffin. Samuel H., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

McGuffin. William H. H., Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three 
months): Corporal, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

**McGuire. Amos, Private, Company B, 12th Indiana Infantry. 

*McGuire, James, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

*McGuire. John. Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

McHenry. John A. J., Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Mcintosh, William M., Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Mclnturf, William T.. Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

McKee. Joseph, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company K, 
105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

McKee, William E., Private, Company if. 21st Indiana Infantry re-organized as 1st 
Heavy Artillery. 

McKenzie, David, Private, Company H, 140th Indian* Infantry. 

McKenzie, John, Private, Company I. 09th Indiana Infantry. 

McKinney, Wilson H., Private. Corporal. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
McKinzie, Barnabas, Private, Company F, 148th Indiana Infantry. 
McLaughlin, hidward L., Private. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
McLaughlin. William H., Sergeant, First Sergeant. Company A. 57th Indiana In- 
fantry. 



8lO HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

McLeland, Eli, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

McLeland. Isaac. Corporal. Company G. 84tli Indiana Infantry. 

McMillan. Charles R.. Private. Company K, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

*McNeese, Alfred, Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*McNeese, Elza, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. . 

McNew, John H., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years) ; Pri- 
vate, Company K. 10.5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Corporal, Company H, 140th 
Indiana Infantry. 

McNew, Richard, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); Pri- 
vate, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

McRoberts, Charles L., Sergeant, Company I, Sth Regiment. 1st Army Corps (Han- 
cock's Veteran Corps). 

McSherley, John, Private, Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

MeSherry, William L., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

M 

Macy, Gamaliel B., Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Macy, George F.. Private, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Sergeant, 4th Indiana Battery. 

Macy, John L., Corporal, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Macy, Lambert, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Macy, William H., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Madarea, George W., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Maddy, Isaac S., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Madison, Charles T.. Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Corporal, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Madison, John, Private, Sergeant, Company A, .57th Indiana Infantry. 

Madison. William, Private^ Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
M, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Madoris. William, Private, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Magann, E. K., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Magenhart. William, Private, Company A, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Mahan, Wesley D., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Main, Amos, Private, Company K, 74th Indiana Infantryy. 

Main, Henry, Private, Company K, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Main, Leonard, Priyate, 23rd Indiana Battery. 

Mallory. James, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Mandlin, David, Private, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Manis, Curtis, Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company H, 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Manis, George, Corporal, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Manis, Isaac G., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company H, 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Manlove, Cnarles, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Manlove, John, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Manlove, Pleasant, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Mann, Judson L., Private. Company G, 17th Indiana Infantry. 

Manning, Cyrus, Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Manning, John, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Manor, Henry C, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*MarkIe, Dewitt C, Corporal, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Marley. Ralph, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. Si I 

Marlow, Simeon, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Marlow, William, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
H. 3()th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Martin, Jefferson, Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Martin, Robert B., Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Martin, Samuel D., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Martin, Samuel G., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Martindale, James B., Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Martindale. William S., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Marvin, Doctor C, Private, Company B., 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Marvin, William, Private, 25th Indiana Battery. 

Mason, David A., Musician, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Mason, Daniel, Saddler, Company M, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Mason, Daniel W., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Mason, George, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Mason, George W., Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company G, 52nd Indiana Infantry; Corporal, Company G, 52nd Indiana Infantry, 
re-organized. 

Mason, Jerome B., Second Lieutenant, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Mason. John. Private, Musician, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry, 

Mason. Robert. Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Mason. Robert W.. Private, Company F. 16th Indiana Infantry (one year); Cor- 
poral. Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Mason, Thomas, Private, Company H, 52nd Indiana Infantry. 

Mathews, Charles, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

**Matthews, Joseph P., Farrier and Blacksmith, Company B, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Maxwell, Aaron W., Private, Company A, lOoth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Corporal, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

May, Franklin, Private, Company I, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, 2nd Indiana Battery; Private, 2nd Indiana Battery, re-organized. 

May, James. Private, Company F, 20th Indiana Infantry. 

May, John H., Corporal, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company F, 
84th Indiana Infantry. 

May, Jonathan, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

May, Richard, Private, Company D, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

May, William, Private, Unassigned, 18th Indiana Infantry. 

May, William, Private, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Mays, Wesley A., Private, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Mead, Timothy, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Meair, Charles L., Artificer, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Meek, Irvin R., Private, Corporal, Company F, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Meek, James A., Corporal, Company H, 20th Indiana Infantry. 

Meek, William J., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Meeker, Benjamin F., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Meeker, Sleaseman, First Sergeant, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid). 

Meeker, William, Corporal, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Mellett, Arthur C, Private, Company H, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Mellett, Joshua H., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Mellette, Randolph H., Seaman. U. S. Navy. 

Melross, Adam, Wagoner, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); Cor- 
poral, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Corporal, Company F, 124th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Mendenhall. Daniel. Private. Company A, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Mendenhall, Elihu T.. Private, Company A, 101st Indiana Infantry. 



8l2 HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

*Mendenhall, Kelita, Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Mercer, David W., Private. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Mercer, James M,. Private. Company A. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Meuser, George W., Private, Sergeant, 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Micha, Lewis, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Michael, Henry, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Mickle, John, Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

**M:ddleton. Joseph L., Private, Company I. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Midkiff, Wallace, Private, Company B, 15Cth Indiana Infantry. 

*Miller. Abraham, Private. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller. Abraham, Private. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Miller, Benjamin. Private. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller, Benjamin A., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller, Benjamin F., Private, Company B, 156th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller, Daniel. Private, Company A, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Miller, Francis, Private, Company B, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller, George, Private. Company B, 149th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller, Henry, Private, Unassigned, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller, Henry, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller. James. Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company H, 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Miller, James. Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller, John. Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Miller, John W., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller, Peter. Private. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller. Samuel C. Private. Corporal, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three 
years ) . 

Miller. Sylvester. Private. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Miller, Thomas. Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Miller, William B., Corporal, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Millikan, Eli F.. Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Mlllikan, James W., Sergeant. Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Millis. Frank, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Millis, John. Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Millis, Lindsay, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Mills. Andrew J., Private. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Mills. George W., Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Mills. Leander F., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Mills, Pulaski, Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Mills, Robert M.. Private, Sergeant, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Mills, Samuel H., Corporal. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Mills. William D., Private, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): 
Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Mimmes, Wallenstein. Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Mincer. Samuel, Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Minesinger. Charles W. T.. Corporal. Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant. Com- 
pany F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Minesinger. Henry M.. Musician, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months), 

Minnick, Andrew J., Corporal, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Minnick. David H., Private, Company E. 36th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company 
H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

*Misener, Abraham G.. Private, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Misener. Joseph W.. Private, Company B. 5th Indiana Cavalry. 



i\ 






i 







^>2*V 






'K/. 



HAZZARDS' HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. M3 

Mitcham, Abraham, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry, Private, Com- 
pany G, 7th Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company F, 7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Mitchell, Charles K, Corporal, Company K, 10.5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company E, 9th Indiana CavaliT- 

Mitchell, Daniel, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 
Mitchell. Leander P., Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Mitchell, Perry, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Mitchell, Samuel A., Private, Sergeant, First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Com- 
pany a, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Mitchell. Thomas, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Mitchell, Thomas J., Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Mitchell, William, Corporal, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Modlin, David, Private, Company B, 2Sth U. S. C. T. 

Modlin, Klias, Private, Company A, 19th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company I, 
20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Modlin. Henry, Private, Company C. 2Sth U. S. C. T. 
Modlin. John D.. Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Modlin, John H., Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Modlin, Oliver H., Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Modlin, Seth. Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Modlin, Sonney, Private, Company B, 2Sth U. S, C. T. 
Modlin, Thomas \V., Private, Company I, C9th Indiana Infantry. 
Modlin, William H., Private, Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Mogle, Benjamin, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Moler. Andrew J., Private, Cornpany A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Moler, Francis M., Private, Company A. 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 
Montgomery, Alexander C, Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Monticue, Benjamin F.. Private. Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid); Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Corporal. Company H. 30th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Monticue, David, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Monticue. Jesse B.. Private. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private, 4th Indiana Battery. 
Monticue. Solomon R.. Private, Corporal. 4th Indiana Battery. 
*Moon. Benjamin. Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Mooney. Eli B., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Mooney, George, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Mooney, Robert, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Moore, Abraham, Private, Company B, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Moore, Charles H. C, Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
pany K, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Moore, Cornelius M.. First Lieutenant. New Castle Guards, Indiana Legion; Pri- 
vate, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Sergeant, Company C, 36th 
Indiana Infantry; First Lieutenant, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Captain, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Moore, Gideon, Private, Company H, 59th Indiana Infantry. 
Moore. Henry H., Private. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Moore, James L., Private, Corporal, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Moore. James W., Private, Company K. 19th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
E, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Moore, John L., Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry, 
Moore, John M., First Lieutenant, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Moore, JosiahB., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Corporal, Company 
H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

**Moore, Louis N., Private, Company K, IGth Indiana Infantry. 



8 14 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Moore. Louis P., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. (See Alphabetical 
List B). 

Moore. Miles M.. Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Moore. William, Seaman. U. S. Navy. 

Moore, William M., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Corporal, First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Company F, 124th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Morau. John, Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Moreau, William C, Captain, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Captain, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Moreland, David, Junior. Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Morgan, George W., Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Morris, George S., Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Morris. Harriman, Private. 19th Indiana Battery. 

Morris, Isaac H.. Corporal. Sergeant, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Morris, Joshua, Private, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Morris, Mark M., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant. 
Company A, o7th Indiana Infantry. 

Morris, Robert, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Morris. William. Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
A, 4th Regiment. 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Morris. William J.. Private, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Morris, William W.. Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Morris. Wilson M., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Mosebaugh. George B., Private. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Moss. Jeremiah, Private, Company D, Sth U. S. C. T. 

Mowrey, Elijah, Private. Company K, lOiJth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Mullen. Emery H., Private. Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months): Pri- 
vate. Company I, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. 2nd Indiana Battery, re-organized. 

Mullen. Hugh L., Sergeant. First Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Captain. Company C. 
36th Indiana Infantry. 

Mullen. Hugh M.. Private, Company A. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Mullen. Joseph P., Private. 25th Indiana Battery. 

Mullen. Joseph R., Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Mundell. John A.. Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Murphey, Amos D., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
K, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Murphey, Benjamin F.. Captain and Assistant Quartermaster General. State of Indi- 
ana. (See General Officers. Chapter IX). 

Murphey. Henry C. Private. Company G; Commissary Sergeant, Non Commissioned 
Staff, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Murphey, Hugh A., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Murphey. James, Private, Unassigned, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Murphey. James, Private, 25th Indiana Battery. 

Murphey, Joel S., First Sergeant. Company A. llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid). 

Murphey. Jonathan, Private, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Corporal. Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Murphey. Jonathan A., Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Murphey, Joseph S.. Private. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Murphey, Miles, Colonel and Inspector General. State of Indiana. (See General 
Officers, Chapter IX). 

, Murphey, Miles E.. Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Murphey, Richard, Private, Corporal, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Murphey. William C. Corporal. Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid); Private, Corporal, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. hi 5 

Murray, Albert P., Private, Company K, 19th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
B, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Murray, Alfred L., Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Murray, Franklin W., Corporal, Sergeant, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Murray, .lohn C, Wagoner, Company K, ."iGth Indiana Infantry. 

Murray, Ralph V., Corporal, Company D, ofith Indiana Infantry. 

Murray, Samuel T., Private, Company C, 101st Indiana Infantry. 

Murray, William H., Corporal, Second Lieutenant, Company K. 19th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Musselman, John W., Private, Sergeant, Company H, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Muterspaugh, Jacob, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Muzzy, William, Private, Company A, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, 17th Indiana Battery: Private, Company E, lOSth Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid); Private, Company D, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Myers, John B., Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Myers, Joseph, Private, Company I, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

**Myers, Lewis E., Private, Company H, 153rd Indiana Infantry. 

Myers, Solomon, Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 



Nation. Enoch H., Private, Company E, 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Nation. Enoch T., Private, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Nation, James R., Sergeant, Company A, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); Cap- 
tain, Company G; Major, Staff, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Nation, Seth, Private, Company A, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Nation? Wallace, Private, Company E. 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, 20th Indiana Battery. 

Nation, William, Private, Company C, Sth Indiana Cavalry. 

Nay, James R., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Needham. George W.. Private, Company G. 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

Needham, Isaac, Private, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company F. 
7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Needham, Isaac, Private, Company F, 154th Indiana Infantry. 

Needham, Jesse W., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Needham, Joshua. Private, Company E, 19th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
E, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Needham, Robert, Private, Company A, 3Cth Indiana Infantry. 

Needham, Wintord, Musician, Company F; Principal Musician. Non-Commlssioned 
Staff. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Needier. Levi, Private, 23rd Indiana Battery. 

Neely, George P., Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Neff, Alkanah C, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Nelson, Nathan M., Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Nelson, Wilson, Private, Corporal, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); 
Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Netz, Peter, Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). (See Alpha- 
betical List B). 

Kewbold, Samuel, Private. Company A. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Mewbold, William H., Private. Company D. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

.f^Iewby, Benjamin F., Private, Corporal. Company C, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

Newby, Daniel, Corporal, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Newby, Henry F., Private, Corporal, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Newby, Isaiah J., Private, Company C, 87th Indiana Infantry. 

Newby, James I., Private, Corporal, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 



8i6 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Newby, John W., Corporal, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantrj-. 

Newby, William B., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Newby, William H., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Newcomb. F. H., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Newcomer, Benjamin F., Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Newell, Edmond, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Newell, Jeremiah, Private, Company F, 20th Indiana Infantry. 

**Newhouse, James L., Private, Company C, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Newland, John, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Newman, Alexander, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Newman, William L., Private, 12th Indiana Battery. 

*Newport, George, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry 

Niccum. Peter, Private. Company D. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Nicholson, Charles, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Nicholson, John, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company A, 
110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private. Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Nicholson, buther L.. Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Nicholson, Marquis D., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Nicholson, Merritt N., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Nicholson. Nathan, Private, Corporal, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Nicholson. Reason, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Nicholson. William T.. Sergeant, Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Nicodemus. Isaac, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Nicodemns. John, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana -Infantry. 

Nidey, Reason. Private, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

*Niles, Thomas E., Private. Corporal, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry; Corporal, 
10th Indiana Battery. 

*Nixon, Charles O.. Private. Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Nixon, Eusebius A. L., Private. 13th Indiana Battery. 

Nixon, George C, Corporal, Company D, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Nixon, Robert M.. Regimental Band, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Nixon. Sebastian E., Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Noble, Alfred, Private, Bugler, Company 1, 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private. Company 
B, Sth Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Noland, Michael, Private, Sergeant, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

*Nordbrook, William, Private, Company R, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Norton, Calvin, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Unassigned, 
22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Noyer. Peter. Private. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 



O'Bannion. Cornelius. Private. Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

O'Bannion, Joseph. Private. Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

O'Connor, Mathew, Private, Company I, 68th Indiana Infantry. 

O'Dowell, Philip, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Cavalry. 

O'lTarra, Andrew J.. Private, Sergeant. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

O'Harra, John, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

O'Harra, Joseph, Private. Company B. llOlh Indiana Infantry ( :Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

O'Neal. William. Private. Company D, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

O'Shea, James. Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Odle, Thomas W., Private, Company A, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

*Ogborn, Allen W.. Corporal, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Ogle, Lewis A., Private, Company B, 156th Indiana Infantrj'. 

Ogment. Joseph. Private. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 817 

*Ohmit, Emanuel, Private, Corporal, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Oldaker, Jolm, Private, Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Oliver, William R., Private, Company H, 18th Indiana Infantry. 

*Ormsten, Andrew, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

*Orr, Thomas J., Private. Corporal, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Oshorn, David, Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Osborn, George, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry' (three years). 

Osborn, Joel, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Osborn, John A., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Osborn, Washington, Private, Corporal, Company H. 13th Indiana Infantry, re-or- 
ganized. 

Osborne, Barzillai, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Osborne, Jacob, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Osment. John W., Private. Company D, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Otis, George K., Corporal, Company I, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Outland, King, Private, Company A, 28th U. S. C. T. 

Overman, Charles W., Private, Corporal, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Overman, Nathan. Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Overman, Samuel W., Private, Company B, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Owens, Edward R., Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Owens, Jacob, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Owens, Michael J., Private, Company K, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

*Owens, Thomas J., Corporal, Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Company A, 57th Indi- 
ana Infantry. 



Pace, William, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Padget, Gideon H., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Page, Samuel C, Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

*Painter, Alfred, Private, Corporal, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Painter, David M., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Painter, Flemmon T. W., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); 
Private, Company F; Commissary Sergeant, Non Commissioned Staff, 10th Indiana 
Cavalry. 

Palmer, Adoniram, Private, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Palmer, James, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Parker, Edwin, Private, Company D. 34th Indiana Infantry. 

Parker, Edwin E., Corporal, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Parker, James C. Private, Corporal, Company G. 16fh Indiana Infantry. 

**Parker, Samuel J., Private, Company I, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Parker, Thomas, Private. Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Parker, William B.. Private. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Parlchurst, Adam R., Private. Company B, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Parkhurst, John A., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Parkhurst, Washington, Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Parkinson, Edward W., Corporal. Sergeant, Company E, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Parris, Lewis B.. Private. Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Parrish, Reuben, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Pate, John, Private, Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Pate. Joseph B., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Pate, William A., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Pattison, James, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Patton, Francis, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Cavalry. 



8i8 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Paty, William M., Corporal, Company C, 117th Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
pany D, 35th Indiana Infantry. 

Paul, Daniel H., Private, Company E, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Paxson, Aaron S., Private, Company A, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 
**Paxson, Benjamin F., Private, Company G, S6th Indiana Infantry. 
Payne, Samuel W., First Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company C, 75th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Peacock, William H., Private, Corporal, Company G, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
*Pearce, Don Francisco, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Pearson, Daniel, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Pearson, Enos, Private, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 
Pearson, Granville, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Pearson, Jesse, Private, Company A, 19th Indiana Infantry; Private, Corporal, Com- 
pany 1, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Pearson, Zeno, Private, Company C, 3Cth Indiana Infantry; Sergeant, Company D, 
147th Indiana Infantry. 

Peden, Milton, First Lieutenant, Captain, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; 
Colonel, Staff, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Peed, Albert J., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Peed, James L., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Peed, John R., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Unassigned, 79th Indiana Infantry. 

Peed, Redmond. Wagoner, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
*Peele, Willis J., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Pence, Alfred M., Private, Corporal, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Pence, David, Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Pence, Franklin N., Corporal, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Pence, James M., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company C, 36th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Pence, William M., Seaman, U. S. Navy. 

Pennitigton, Amos E., First Sergeant,, Company B, llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid); Private, Sergeant, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Penticost, Andrew F., Private, Company H; Quartermaster Sergeant, Non Commis- 
sioned Staff, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Perdue, Abner, Private. Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Perdue, Addison L., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Perdue, Andrew J. B., Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Perdue, George W., Corporal, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Perdue, Rufus, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Perry, Henry, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Perry, John, Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 
Perry, John, Private, Corporal, Company B, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 
*Perry, Joseph, Musician, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
Perry. Mordecai, Private, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Perry, Oran, Adjutant, Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel, Staff, 69th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Perry, William, Private, Corporal, Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company E, 8th 
Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Personett, James, Private. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 
Pettitt. Joseph A., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
*Petty, James F.. Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Peyton, William, Private, Company M, 21st Indiana Infantry re-organized as l.st 
Heavy Artillery. 

Pflum, Ferdinand, Private, Company F, 148th Indiana Infantry. 
Phelps, Elias. (See Incomplete List). 



hazzard's history of henry county. 819 

Fhilabaum, James B., Private. Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Pliillips. Andrew J., Private. Company E. Stli Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Phillip.s. John E.. Private, Company C. lO'Jth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Phillips. John M., Regimental Band, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
*Phillips, Orton. Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
Pickering, Enos, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
**Pickering. Ezra. Private, Company B, 130th Indian^ Infantry. 
Pickering. Larkin, Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Pickering, Ulysses, Private, Company B, 110th Indana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Pickett, John, Private. Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Pickett, John, Private. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry: Private. Company A, 
4th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Pickett, Thomas E., Private. Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Pickett, William A., Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 
Pierce. Benjamin F., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Pierce, Frank J., Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Pierce. Hugh, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Pierce. James H., Private. Unassigned. 22nd Indiana Infantry. 
Pierce, John, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Pierce. John R., Corporal, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); First 
Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years); Sergeant, 
25th Indiana Battery. 

Pierce, Jonathan E., Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Pierce, Joseph A., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
**Pierce, William H,, Private, Company H, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Pierson. Jackson, Private, Company C, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 
Pike.' Albert H., Corporal. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 
Pike, Joseph H., Private, Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry. 
Pike, Samuel F., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Pike, Stanford L., Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
*Pittman, George W., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Pittser, Cyrus, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Pleas. Elwood. Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Pleas, Joseph H., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry; Corporal, Company 
H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Plummer, William J., First Lieutenant, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Mor- 
gan Raid). 

Poarch. Albert W.. Private. Company D. 33rd Indiana Infantry. 

*Poe, Pleasant. Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Poer, Robert F., Private, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Cor- 
poral. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Polk. Henry C, Private. Company B. 13th Indiana Infantry. 

*PoIk. Merriman S.. Private. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Polk, Milton, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Poor, Edmund, Private, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Porter. John. Private. Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Porter, William, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Post. Charles B., Private, Company A, 87th Indiana Infantry. 

Post, John M., Private, Company A, 87th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company A. 
42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Post. Mark T., Private, Company E. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Poston, Argyle A., Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Poston, Edenburgh, H., Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Powell, Albert W., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 



820 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Powell, Charles C, Private, .Company A, llOth Indiana Infanti-y (Morgan Raid). 

Powell, Elihu, Private, Company P, 6tli Indiana Infantry (three months); Private, 
19th Indiana Battery. 

Powell, Henry C, Private, 22nd Indiana Battery. 

Powell, Henry L., Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate. Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Powell, Jacob, Private. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Powell. Oliver. Private, 3rd Indiana Battery. 

Powell, Orlistes W., Corporal, Company C; Sergeant Major, Non Commissioned 
Staff, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Power, John W. C, Corporal, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Powers, George R., Private, Company B, 156th Indiana Infantry. 

Powers, James P., Private, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company F, 
7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Powers, John A., Private. Company H, 154th Indiana Infantry. 
■ *Pratt, George W., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Pratt, James C, Musician, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Pressnall, Dempsey W., Private, Company U, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Pressnall, Elijah M.. Private, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Pressnall, Henry, Private. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Pressnall, Samuel, Private. Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Preston, John V., Private. Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry; Second Lieutenant, 
Company D. 156th Indiana Infantry. 

Preston, Sanford A., Private, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Price, Robert V., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Priddy, William, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Prigg. William H, Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Pring, James M., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

*Probasco, John, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Proctor. Thomas K., Private, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private. Company 
L, Sth Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Protzman. Oliver D., Private, Company F. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Pursley. Daniel. Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Pyatte. Thomas, Musician, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantrj-. 
R 

Radcliffe, Augustus D.. Private. Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Radcliffe. Charles F.. Private, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Rader. George, Private. Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Rader, George W.. Sergeant, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three yeirs). 

Rader, Henry. Private, 'Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Ser- 
geant, First Lieutenant, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); Sergeant, 
Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Ralston, George W., Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private. Company G, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Ramsey. James, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Ramsey. Joseph, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Ranier. Charles T.. Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Ranier, Joseph G., Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Ratcliff, Abner, Private. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Ratclift. John. Private. Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private, 
Wagoner, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Ratliff, Calvin. Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Ratliff, Exum P., Private, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Ratliff, Henry, Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 521 

Ratliff, Nathan, Private. Unassigned, 36th Indiana Infantry; Corporal, Company 
H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Raugett, Josiah, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Ray, Charles A., Sergeant, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company D, 3Gth Indiana Infantry; Private, Company H. 30th Indiana Infantry, 
re-organized. 

Ray, Henry, First Lieutenant, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Wagoner, Company B, Sth Indiana Cavalry. 

Rayl, Harmon, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Reagan, Benjamin F., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Real, Martin. L., Private, Company D, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Redding, Jacob, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Sergeant, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Redding, John M., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Redding, Lemuel, Private, Corporal, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Reece, Edwin, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

*Reed, Alonzo W., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

**Reed, Collier M., Private, Company C, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Reed. Miles L'., Regimental Band. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years) ; Private, Com- 
pany K, 1st Artillery, U. S. A.; Surgeon's Nurse, U. S. Navy. 

Reed. William C, Second Lieutenant, New Castle Guards, Indiana Legion; Private. 
Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Reeder, Thomas B.. Corporal. Company I, 19th Indiana Infantry; Captain. Com- 
pany B; Major, Staff, 149th Indiana Infantry. 

Reeves, Eli. Private, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

*Reeves, George W., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

*Reeves, John M. H., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Reeves, Milton M., Private, Corporal, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Reeves. Nathaniel M.. Private. Company E, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Reichart, Henry, Private, Company C, 30th Indiana Infantry. 

Reichart, John, Private. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantrj': 

Reid, Andrew W., Regimental Band, 19th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company A. 
lUh Indiana Infantry. 

*Reid, William C, Private. Corporal. First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant. Company 
G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Reid, William E., Principal Musician, Non Commissioned Staff, 19th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Rent. Daniel. Private, Corporal. Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Rent. Frederick, Corporal, Company G, 47th Indiana Infantry. 

Rent, George D., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Rent, John H., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, First Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Cap- 
tain, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Reynolds, Andrew, Private, Corporal, 4th Indiana Battery; Private. Troop G, 
6th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Reynolds, Calvin W., Private. Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Reynolds, Henry, Private, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

'Reynolds, Hugh, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Reynolds, Isaac, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Reynolds. James, Corporal. Company E, 149th Indiana Infantry. 

'Reynolds, Joseph N., Private, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Reynolds, William, Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

**Rhine, John, Sergeant, Company K, 75th Indiana Infantry. 

**Rhinewalt. William. Private. 18th Indiana Battery. 

*Rhody. George, Private, Corporal, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Riadon, Levi, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 



}i22 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

*Rich, Elam, Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Richardson, Cornelius J., Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Richardson, Henry J., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. ' 

Richardson, Isaiah, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Ricljard, James, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Ricketts. James G., Corporal, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Rickit, John, Farrier and Blacksmith, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Ricks, Benjamin F., Sergeant, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, First Sergeant, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Ricks, Daniel, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Ricks, John W., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Ricks. Jonathan, Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Ricks, Levi, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private, 
Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Ricks, Martin W,, Private, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months): 
Second Lieutenant, Needmore Rangers, Indiana Legion; Second Lieutenant, Company 
K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private, Company E; Quartermaster Ser- 
geant, Non Commissioned Staff, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

RiclvS, Mercer, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Ricks, Peter, Private, Company K, o4th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Ricks, Thomas, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infastry (Morgan Raid). 

*Ridge, Jacob, Private, Corporal, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Ridge, Riley, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Riesner, George A.. Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Rife, John J., Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Private, 
Corporal, 12th Indiana Battery. . 

Rife, Obed C, Private, Corporal, Company H, 154th Indiana Infantry. (See Alpha- 
betical List C). 

Rife. William, Private, Sergeant. 12th Indiana Battery. 

Rifner, Peter, Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry; Private, Troop G. 6th 
Cavalry, U. «. A. 

Riggle, Daniel, Private, Company A, llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Riggle, William, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

*Riggs. Alfred, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

*Riggs, Avery, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Rigin, Martin, Private, Unassigned, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Riley, Charles M., Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Riley, John, Private, Sergeant, Company D, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Riley, William, Private, Company K, ]05th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Riley, William G., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Ringo, James M., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Rinker, Aaron, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company H. 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Rinker, John H., Private. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Risk, John W., Private. Corporal, Sergeant, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Risk^ William B., Private, 2nd Indiana Battery; Corporal, 2nd Indiana Battery, 
re-organized. 

Ritchie, George, Private, Company C, 3fith Indiana Infantry. 

Robbins. John. Private. Company D, Sth U. S. C. T. 

Robbins, Joseph W., Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Robe, Robert, Private, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Roberts, Alexander, Private, Corporal, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Roberts, Daniel, Private. Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 







INDIANA CAVALRY. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 8j3 

Koberts, Edmund, Private. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Roberts, Elijah P., Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Roberts, Isaac, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Roberts. James, Private, Company I, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

**Roberts, Jeremiah, Wagoner, Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Roberts, John D., Private, 2nd Indiana Battery; Private. 2nd Indiana Battery, re- 
organized. 

**Roberts. John Q. A.. Corporal, Sergeant, Company H, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

*Roberts, John S., Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

**Roberts, John W., Private, Company F, 117th Indiana Infantry. 

Roberts, Joseph, Private, 2nd Indiana Battery, re-organized. 

Roberts, Leander, Private, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company L, 
8th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Roberts, Patrick, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Roberts, William. Corporal, Company C, 120th Indiana Infantry. 

Roberts, William, Private, Company P, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

**Robinson. John, Private. Company H, 68th Indiana Infantry. 

Robinson. Newton, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Robinson, Peter, Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

*Robinson, Rowland, Private, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Robison, James C. Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Robuck, Henry, Private, Company A, 14Sth Indiana Infantry. 

*Rock. William H. H.. Private. Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, First Sergeant. Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry; Second Lieutenant, Com- 
pany H, 147lh Indiana Infantry. 

Rodes, Franklin M., Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Rogers, David L., Private, Company H, 3Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Rogers, George W., Private. Company C, 36lh Indiana Infantry. 

Rogers, James, Private, Company H, 51st Indiana Infantry. 

Rogers, John W.. Private. Company D, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Rogers, Joseph, Corporal, Company E, 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Rogers, Joseph B., Corporal, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Rogers, Oscar. Private, Company I, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Rogers, William A., Private. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Roney, Ellas M., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Rose, Fernandez, Private. Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Sergeant, 
Company H, 30th Indiana Infantry," re-organized. 

Ross, Henry C. Private. 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Ross, Hiram C, Private. Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company H, 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Ross, James, Private, Company C. 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Ross, Jonathan, Corporal, Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. Company K. 36th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Ross, Moses, Private, Company M. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Ross, William, Private, Company H, 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Ross, William A.. Private. Company B, 28th U. S. C. T. 

*Roszell. John E., Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Routh, Isaac W., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Rowland, Joseph, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Rozier, Jesse, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Rubush, Paul, Private, 25th Indiana Battery. 

*Runnels, Samuel, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Runyan, Abraham, Musician, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Runyan, John, Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 



824 hazzard's history of hexry county. 

Runyan. Jonathan, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Runyan, Marcus L.. Private, Company G. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Runyan, William J., Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Russell, Henry, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Ruth, Jacob, Private, Company H, 5th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Vet- 
eran Corps). 

Rutledge, William V., Private, Company D, Assistant Surgeon, Staff, 2nd Indiana 
Cavalry; Assistant Surgeon, Staff, 2nd Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

**Ryan, Dennis, Private, Company B, 124th Indiana Infantry. 



Saint, Albert W., Private, First Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company D. 36th In- 
diana Infantry. 

Saint, Henry H., Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Saint, Horace M., Private, Company H, 3rd Battalion. IGth Infantry. U. S. A.; 
Private, Company H, 34th Infantry U. S. A. 

Saint, Oliver, P., Private, Company A, 7th Indiana Cavalry; Corporal. Company 

C, 7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Saint, William M., Second Lieutenant, Company D; Adjutant, Staff. 147th Indiana 
Infantry. 

Salmon, James, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Sample, Asa E., Corporal, Sergeant, Company B, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

*Sanders, Charles F., Corporal, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Sanders, David, Private, Company F, 14th U. S. C. T. 

Sanders, Francis A., Private, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Sanders, George W., Private, 25th Indiana Battery. 

Sanders, John W., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Sanders, Luther B., Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 

D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Sapp, Andrew J., Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Sapp, John W., Private, Corporal, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Sargent, James L., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Safer, Noah W., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Safer, William, Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company A, 
4th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Saulsbury, Henry B., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Saunders, Henry, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Saunders, John, Private, Corporal, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; Corporal, 
Company H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Saunders, William L., Private, Company A, 6th Indiana Infantry ( three months ) ; 
Private, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Sayford. Augustus L., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

**Schaffer, Henry, Private, Company B, 156th Indiana Infantry. 

Schell, Isaac N., Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Schock, Jacob, Private, Corporal, Company E, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Scott. Gideon B., Private. Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Scott, Henry, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Scott. James M., Private, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Scott, John H., Private, Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Scott, Oliver P., Private, 12th Indiana Battery. 

Sears, Wilson M.. Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Ser- 
geant, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Seaton, Valentine, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 

Seely, George, Private, Corporal, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 8j5 

**Seamans, James M., Private, Company D. 26th Indiana Infantry. 

Settle, Winfield S., Private, Company F, S4tli Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
K, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

**Seward, Loveless, Private, Company B, 2nd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company 
B, 2nd Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Seward, Thomas, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Seward, Wesley W., Sergeant, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

*Seward, William T., First Lieutenant, Captain. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Shackle, Jesse, Private, Company A, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Shackles, Marshall K., Private, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

*Shaffer. Ira, Private, Company A, !' ?th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company H, 147th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Shaffer, John, Private, Company K, 3Cth Indiana Infantry. 

Shaffer, William W., Private, Company F, 14th U. S. C. T. 

Shane, George W., First Lieutenant, Middletown Rifles, Indiana Legion; Sergeant, 
Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); First Lieutenant, Company K, 54th 
Indiana Infantry (three months); First Lieutenant, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry 
(Morgar Raid); Captain, Company H, l40th Indiana Infantry. 

Shane, Thomas J.. Corporal, Sergeant, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Shane, Timothy, Private, Color Sergeant, Company G. tSth Indiana Cavalry. 

Sharp, Cyrus, Private, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Sharp, John, Private, Company 11, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Sharp, Michael, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Sharp, William M.. Captain, Needmore Rangers, Indiana Legion; Captain, Company 
K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Shatz, William, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infaatry. 

Shaw. Francis Y., Private, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Shaw, Joseph, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Shearer, Abraham, Private, Unassigned, 13th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Shearon, Thomas W.. Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
B, IlOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Sheckles, John A.. Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Shedron, Charles C, Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Company H, 69th Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Sheehan, William, Private, Unassigned, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Shelley, Benjamin F., Private. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid ) . 

Shelley, George W., Private, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Shelley, William F., Private, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry; First Lieutenant, 
Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry; Captain, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. (See 
Alphabetical List B). 

Shelley, Winford W., Sergeant, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Shelton, John J,, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Shepherd, Daniel, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Corporal, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Shepherd, Jeremiah A., Private. Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Shepherd, Leander, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
• Shepherd. Lorenzo D., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Shepherd. Martin. Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Shepherd. William, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Corporal, 4th Indiana Battery. 

Shepherd, William H., Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Corporal, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

**Sheppard, James W., Sergeant, First Sergeant. Company E, 69th Indiana In- 
fantry. 



826 hazzard's history of henry county. 

*Shepler, Charles, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Sheridan, Calvin, Private, Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Sherry, John W., Private, Company H, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Corporal, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company I. Sth Regiment, 
1st Army Corps (Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Sherry, William P., Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Shields. David. Private, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Shipler, Jacob. Private, Company C, Sth Indiana Cavalry. 

Shipman, Albert, Musician, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, 2nd Indiana Battery; Private, 2nd Indiana Battery, re-organized. 

**Shipman, Charles, Private, Company K, 132nd Indiana Infantry. 

Shirk, George, Musician, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Shirkey, John A., Second Lieutenant, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Bhively, Daniel, Private, Company B, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Shockley, Benjamin F., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Shockley, Elisha H.. Private, Company D, 3Gth Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 

E, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Shockley, James, Private, Company B, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Shoemaker, Henry, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Shoemaker, John M., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Shoemaker, John P., Private, Company C, lOyth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Private, Company B, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Shoemaker, Joseph R., Private, Company B, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Shoemaker, Levi P., Private, Corporal, Sergeant. Second Lieutenant. Company E, 
Sth Indiana Infantry (th»ee years). 

*Shoemaker, Sanford ?I., Private, Company G. 7th Indiana Cavalry: Private, Com- 
pany P", 7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

*Shoemaker, Silas M., Private, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company 

F, 7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Shopp, Henry L.. Corporal, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): 
Private, Company C, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Shopp, Hershley, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**Showalter, William H.. Private, Company I, 67th Indiana Infantry. 

Showers, John A., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Shroyer, Alexander R.. Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid). 

**Shroyer, John W., Private. Company D, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Shroyer, Peter, First Lieutenant, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Shuderlane, Jeremiah, Private, Company B, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Shultz, John, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

*Shultz, Joseph F.. Corporal. Sergeant, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry . 

Shunk, David, Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Shurrum, George, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Silvers. Samuel N., Private, 23rd Indiana Battery. 

*Silvey, William T., Private, Corporal. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Simons, Joel, Corporal, Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

*Simons, Nixon, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Simmons, Henry W.. Private, Company A, 38th Indiana Infantry. 

Simmons, John A., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
K, 132nd Indiana Infantry. 

Simmons, William, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
C, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Simmons, William H., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Simpson, Absalom J., Private, Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 827 

**Sims, Parvis, Private, Company G, 140tli Indiana Infantry. 
Sinclair, Wayman. Private, Company A, 11th Indiana Infantry. 
Sippy, Nicholas, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Sisson, Marquis L., Private, Corporal, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry . 
Sisson, Perry V., Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 
Skinner, Jacob, Wagoner, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 
*Skinner, John L., Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Skinner, William H., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Slaviris, Milton, Private, Company B, 14Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Slinger, Andrew J., Regimental Band. 3tith Indiana Infantry; First Lieutenant, 
Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry; Captain, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry 
(Morgan Raid); Private, Company B, 2Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Sloau, Abner, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private 
Company M, 21st Indiana Infantry re-organized as 1st Heavy Artillery. 
Sloan, Henry, Private, Company C, Sth Indiana Cavalry. 
Sloan, James E., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Sloat. Peter D., Private, Company E, 123rd Indiana Infantry. 
Sloniker, Joseph M., Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
*Small, Eli O., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
**Smeltzer, George W., Corporal, Company B, l-17th Indiana Infantry. 
Smith, Andrew J., Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 
Smith, David H., Artificer, 23rd Indiana Battery. 

Smith, Henry M., Private, Company F, 6th Irwcliana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, 2nd Indiana liattery. 

Smith, Isaac, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith. Isaac P., Corporal, Sergeant. Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith". J. C, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Smith, Jackson, Corporal, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, Jacob, Private, Company F, Gth Indiana Infantry (three months): Private, 
Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company H. 30th Indiana Infantry, re-or- 
ganized. 

Smith, James, Private, Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, James H., Private, Company A, S7th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company A, 
42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, James R., First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant. Company H, Sth Indiana In- 
fantry (three years). 

Smith, John, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Smith, John F., Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, John H., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, John P., Private. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, John T., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, Joseph D., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, Joshua, Private, Company C, Sth Indiana Cavalry. 

**Smith, Nelson G., Private, Company F, 99th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
F, 48th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, Robert A., Private, Company A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, Robert S., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Smith, Samuel T., Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant. Company F; 
Adjutant, Staff. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, Solomon. Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, Stephen, Private, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, Thomas C, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Smith, Thorban W., First Sergeant, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Smith, William, Corporal, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Snider, Carlisle. Musician, Company F, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Snider, William H., Private, Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 



828 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Snidman. William, Sergeant, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Snodgrass, Wesley, Corporal. Company A, llOth Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Snodgrass, Willis, Private. Company C, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Snyder, David, Private. Company F, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

*Snyder, Jacob, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Snyder, Rhynaldo, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

*Soule. William M., Private, Company G; Principal Musician, Non Commissioned 
Staff. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Sourwine. Isaac, Sergeant, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

Southard. Asbury, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Spade, Jacob, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

**Spain, Pleasant A.. Musician. First Sergeant, Company C, 58th Indiana Infantry. 

Spaw, George, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Speakman, John, Corporal, Sergeant, 12th Indiana Battery. 

Spell, Robert O., Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Speese, George W., Private, Company K. 54th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Corporal. Company H, 30th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Spencer. Charles, Private. Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Spencer, David, Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Spencer, John A., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Spencer, Lindley H., Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Sergeant, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Spencer, Milton M.. Private. Corporal. 4th Indiana Battery. 

Sperry. Samuel W.. Private. Company I, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

*Sphor, Harmoni Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

*Sponsler, Andrew W., Private, Company B. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

**Sprong, Andrew J., Wagoner, Company G. 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Sprong, James, Private. Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry; Corporal, Company K. 
57th Indiana Infantry. 

Spurry, William, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Staff, Frederick, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Staff, Henry, Private, Company F, 20th Indiana Infantry. 

Staff, Peter, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Stafford. Thomas. Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Stafford, William H., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Staht, Christopher, Private, Company B, 149th Indiana Infantry. 

Staley, Harrison. Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry, (Morgan Raid). 

*Staley, Thomas, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Stam, William G. Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Stanfield, Clayton, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid I. 

Stanley. Andrew, Private, Company I, 53rd Indiana Infantry. 

Stanley. George W., Private, Company I, 53rd Indiana Infantry. 

Stanley. Samuel B., First Sergeant. Company H. 5th Regiment, 1st Army Corps. 
(Hancock's Veteran Corps). 

Stanley, William A.. Private. Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private. Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private. Company B. 8th Indiana Cavalry, re 
organized. 

Starbuck, Henry H., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Starbuck, James M.. Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
, -Starr, Joel, D., Private. Company B. Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Private, 
Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Starr, Leander, Private, Corporal. Company D. 8th Indiana Infantry (three 
years). 



hazzard's history of henry county. 829 

Starr. Zachariah M., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Steadier. Adam A., First Lieutenant, 12th Indiana Battery. 
Steele, Alexander, Private, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Steele, Isaac, Corporal, Company F, Oth Indiana Infantry (three months); First 
).,;eiitenant. Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry; Second Lieutenant. Company B, 110th In- 
uiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Steele, James, Private, Company F, Cth Indiana Infantry (three months); Sergeant. 
First Lieutenant. Company G, IGth Indiana Infantry. 

Steele, James A., Sergeant. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Steft'ey, Abraham. Private. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
*''Steffey. Joseph, Private. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Steiner. Valentine, First Lieutenant. Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
**Stephens, Charles H., Private. Company A, 153rd Indiana Infantry. 
Stephens. William, Private. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Stephenson, Amos, Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Stevens, Nathaniel, Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Stevens, Townsend G., Private. 4th Indiana Battery; Private. Troop G. 6th Cav- 
Eilry I). S. A. 

Stevens, William H., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Stevenson, Weeliley M., Corporal, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid). 

**Stewart. Benjamin A., Corporal. Company C. S2nd Indiana Infantry. 
Stewart. David, Private, Company G, 17th Indiana Infantry. 
Stewart, Elijah H., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

*Ste*art. Henry R.. Private. Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private. Company G. 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

Stewart. James S.. Private. Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Stewart, John, Private, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Ser- 
geant, First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. 
Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant. 2nd Indiana Battery, re-organized. 

Stewart. Leander S., Private. Company A. 10.5th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Stewart, Samuel L., Private, Company F. S4th Indiana Infantry; Private. Com- 
pany A. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Stewart. Silas, Private. Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. . 
Stewart, William, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Stewart. William F., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Stewart, William W., Private, CompaTiy F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Stigleman, John, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Stilley, James. Private, Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. 
*Stines. Joseph L., Private, Musician. Company I. 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Stinson. George. Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Stinson, John, Private. Company D. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Stonebraker, Adam. Private, Corporal. Company E. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Stonebraker, John R.. Private. Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
*Stonesipher, Thomas J., Sergeant. Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Storms. John M., Private, Sergeant. Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Stotler. Obediah H., Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Stout, Hezekiah. Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Stout, John R., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Stout. William. Private, Company I, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Stowhig. Daniel. Private. Company I. 37th Indiana Infantry. 

**Strahan, David B.. Private. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private. Company C, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Strain. David F., Private, Company I. 9th Indiana Infantry. 



830 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



Stratton, Albert, Private, Company F, 84tli Indiana Infantry. 

Stratton, Benjamin F., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid); Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Straughn, Moses, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months).; Pri- 
vate, Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Stretch, William H.. Sergeant, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry. 
Strlckler. Peter C, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Strode,. Robert, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Strohm, Washington L.. Private, Company I, 11th Indiana Infantry. 
**Strong. Rosey, Private. Company D, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Stuart, Henry, Private, Company A; 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Stuart, Ithamer J., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
Stubblefield, James, Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 
Stubblefleld, Martin, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. (See Alphabet- 
ical List B). 

Stubbs, Clarkson, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 
*Studebaker, Daniel. Private. Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Sullivan, Daniel, Private, Company F, 19th Infantry U. S. A. 
Sullivan, Jeremiah, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Sullivan, Patrick, Private. Company F, 19th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
E, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized; Private, Company D, 1st Rhode Island Light 
Artillery. 

**Sullivan, William. Private, Company G, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Summers, Henry C, Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) 
Summers, Horace, Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Swafford, Laban W., Private, Farrier, Company G. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Swafford. William W., First Lieutenant, New Lisbon Indiana State Guards. Indiana 
Legion. 

Swaim, Klihu, Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Private, 
Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Swaim, Harvey W.. Private. Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Ser- 
geant, Company I, 69th Indiana Iniantry. 

Swaim, John M., Private, Company F. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Corporal. Company H. 30th Indiana 
Infantry, re-organized. 

Swain, Elza, Private, Company G, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Swain, George H., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Swain, Henry, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Swain, John K., Private, Company E., Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 
**Swain, John L.. Private. Company D. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Swain, Robert S.. Corporal, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Second Lieutenant, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Swain, Thomas M., Sergeant, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; First Lieutenant, 
Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Swain. William, Private. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Swayne, William T., Private. Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 
Swartz, George, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. 2nd Indiana 
Battery, re-organized. 

Swearingen, Demetrius, Private, Company K, 9th Indiana Infantry. 
Swearingen, Samuel V.. Private, Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Sweet, Eli M., Corporal, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Sweigart, Jacob, Private, Corporal, Com.pany C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Sweigart, Samuel H., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 
Swinney, Henry A.. Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 
Swinney, Robert J., Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Swope, Joseph A.. Private. Company C, 109th- Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company G, 17th Indiana Infantry. 



831 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



Sydruff, Robert, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Mc 
Symons, Benjamin F. (See Incomplete List). 



Tarlvleson, George W., Private. Corporal, Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Captain, Com- 
pany a. 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Tarvin, Amzi, Private, Company A, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Taylor. David S.. Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Taylor, Ethan S., Private, Company D, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Taylor, George O., Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Taylor. Henry, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 

Taylor, Thomas E.. Private, Company K. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year); Pri- 
vate. Company B, 21st Indiana Infantry, re-organized as 1st Heavy Artillery. 

Taylor. Wilson. Private. Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company K, 
57th Indiana Infantry. 

Temple. George, Private, Company F, Stth Indiana Infantry, 

Temple. Henry, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months); Com- 
pany Quartermaster Sergeant, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Templet on. Charles, Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Templin, John H., Private. Company I, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Templin, Samuel V., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, First Lieutenant. Company C. 
36th Indiana Infantry; First Lieutenant. Company H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organ- 
ized; Captain and Commissary of Subsistence and Brevet Major, Staff, U. S. Volunteers, 
(See General Officers, Chapter IX). 

Tennell, -James B.. Second Lieutenant. Middletown Rifles. Indiana Legion; First 
Sergeant. Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Terhune, Albert G., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Terhune, John H., Private, Sergeant, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Terrill. Theodore, Private, Company F, 101st Indiana Infantry. 

Tharp. Thomas D., Second Lieutenant. First Lieutenant, Company F, 57th Indiana 
Infantry, 

*Thatcher, Edwin, Corporal, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Thawley, Edward, Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
E, First U. S. Engineers. 

Thomas. A. C, Private, Company a; 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid), 

Thomas, Charles E., Private, Company K, o6th Indiana Infantry. 

**Thomas, Charles H. B,, Private, Company B. 28th U, S. C. T.; Private. Company E. 
23rd U. S. C. T. 

Thomas, Dock. (See Incomplete List). 

*Thomas. James, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas, James, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas, James W., Corporal, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Thomas, Thomas, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry, 

Thomas, William K„ Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Com- 
pany H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Thompson, Henry, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Thompson. James, Private, Company E, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Thompson. John, Private, Unassigned, 16th Indiana Infantry. 

Thompson. Joseph H., Private. Company G. Quartermaster, Sergeant. Non Commis- 
sioned. Staff. S4th Indiana Infantry. 

*Thompson. Lewis, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry, 

Thompson. Nathan. Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Thornburgh, Alfred M„ Musician, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months) ; 
Regimental Band, ISth Indiana Infantry; Private, Company E; Chief Bugler, Non Com- 
missioned Staff, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 



832 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Thornburgh, Franklin D., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid) ; Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Thornburgh, James. Private, Company B. 19th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Thornburgh, John, First Lieutenant and Quartermaster, Staff, 4th Indiana Cavalry. 

Thornburgh, John M., Regimental Band, 18th Indiana Infantry; First Sergeant, 
Second Lieutenant, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

*Thornbursh, John W., Private, Corporal. Company K. 3(Jth Indiana Infantry. 

Thornburgh, Milton, Sergeant, Company K, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Thornburgh, Weaver, Regimental Band, 18th Indiana Infantry; Sergeant, Company 
C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Thornburgh, Wilson H., Corporal, Company A. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid). 

Threevv-its. Franklin, Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Thurman, Isom. Private, Company F, 14th U. S. C. T. 

Thut. Adolphus G., Corporal, Company A, 3Kth Indiana Infantry. 

Tillman, William R.. Private. Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Timmons, John W., Private. Company C. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Tinney, James, Sergeant, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Tolbert. George W., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Topping, James S., Private, Company I, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Topping, William, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Tout, Charles, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). , 

Trail, Benjamin F., Private, Company C; Sergeant, Major, Non Commissioned Staff, 
28th U. S. C. T. 

Trail. David, Private, Company F, 14th U. S. C. T. 

Trail, James, Private, Company C, 28th U. S. C. T. 

Trail, William. Private, Company I, 28th U. S. C. T. 

Tribby, James W., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
K, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Trout. Abraham, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years): Private, 
Sergeant, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Trout, John L.. Private, Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Cor- 
poral, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Trout. William. Corporal. Company E. 8th Indiana Infantry (three year.s). 

Troxell, Ezra, Private. Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry; Wagoner. Company F, 
84th Indiana Infantry. 

Troxell, Robert. Private, Company F. 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Trumbull. Wescott S.. Private, Musician, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

*Trusler, Nelson, Colonel, Staff, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Tucker, George W., Private, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Tucker. Thomas B., Sergeant. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry ( Jlorgan Raid); 
Private, Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Tuder, Robert F., Private, Company M, 8th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Tuft. Andrew. Private, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Turner. Philip. Private. Company B, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Turner, Samuel H., Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Turner, Sashwell, Private, Company E, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Turner, William, Private, Company K, 14Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Tweedy, James L., Private, Company E, 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Tweedy, James M.. Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

**Tyer, 'Madison, Private, Company I, 132nd Indiana Infantry. 

*Tygart. Thomas N., Private. Corporal. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Tykle, Frederick, Captain, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Cap- 
tain, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); Captain. Middletown Rifles, In- 
diana Legion; Captain. Company C. 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). (See Mex- 
ican War). * 




COMPANY E. 8th INDIANA INFANTRY 



hazzard's history of henry county. 833 

**Tyner, Richard H. H., Corporal, Sergeant, First Sergeant, First Lieutenant. Com- 
pany O, 9tli Indiana Infantry. 

U 

Underwood, Enoch, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
*Unthank, Charles R., Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Upham, Nathan, Private, Corporal, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

VAN 

Van Buskirk, John, Sergeant, Company K. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Van Buskirk, William H., Private, Company E. 106th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid). 

Van Dusen, George P. S., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Van Duyn, Isaac, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Van Dyke, Marshall, Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Van Dyke, Thomas B., Musician, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Van Horn, Henry H., Corporal, Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Captain. Company A, 
57th Indiana Infantry. 

Van Matre, Abner, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Van Matre, Cyrus, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months) ; Ser- 
geant, First Lieutenant, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Van Matre, David P., Private, Company G, Sth Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Van Matre, Jasper, Private, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Corporal, 
Company L, 8th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Van Matre, Joseph, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Van Matre, Joseph J., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid); Private, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company F, 7th Indiana Cav- 
alry, re-organized. 

Van Matre, Joseph W., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Van Matre, Landy, Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months): Pri- 
vate, Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company B, 2nd Indiana Cavalry, re- 
organized. 

Van Matre, Luther D., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Van Matre, Oliver H. P., Private, Company L, 8th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Van Matre. Peter. Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Van Matre, William J., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan 
Raid). 

Van Matre, William W., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Van Matre, Winfield S., Private, Company B, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Vanneman, Hiram B., Captain. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

*Vanosdal, Argus D., Captain, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

*Vanpelt. John, Private, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Van Winkle. Robert R.. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 

V 
Vail, John M., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

**Vallandigham, Leroy, Private. Sergeant, Company D, 79th Indiana Infantry. 
Vance, John H., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid).'' 
Vance. John W.. Private. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 
Vance, John W. H., Private, Corporal, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry: Private. 
Company D. 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Vance, Samuel G.. Private. Company F, 146th Indiana Infantry. 
*Vaughn, Thomas C, Private, Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 
Veach, Benjamin H., Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
*Vest. Arthur E., Private, Sergeant, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
53 



834 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



*Vest, Rowland, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Vlclcrey. James R., Private, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Vicltrey, Rufus W., Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Videto, Willis, Private. Company E, 9th Regiment, 1st Army Corps (Hancock's Vet- 
eran Corps). 

*Vietch, Henderson. Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Vinson, Charles, Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Vores, James H., Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Cor- 
poral, Company C, Sbth Indiana Infantry. 

Voorhees, De Camp B., Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

W 

Waddell, Benjamin, Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 
Waddell, Charles M., Private, 19th Indiana Battery. 
Waddell, Henry, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Waddell, Lorenzo D., Private, 19th Indiana Batt'ery. 
Waddell, Luther, Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
*Waddy, John B., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
*Waddy, Robert A., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 
Waggoner, James L., Private, Company H. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Waggoner, Jehu, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Walker, Clinton, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Walker, George D., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 
Walker, George W., Private. Company A, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 
**Walker, Jacob S., Private. Company C, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 

Walker, James A., Private, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) ; Pri- 
vate, Company A, S7th Indiana Infantry. 

**Walker, John R., Private, Company G, 10th Indiana Cavalry. 
■ Walker, William E., Private. Unassigned, 16th Indiana Infantry: Private, Company 
G, 13th Indiana Cavalry. 

Walker. William F.. Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

*Walker. William H., Private, Corporal, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Wall. William F. N., Private, Company C, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Wallace, David, Private, Company G. 84th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company K. 
57th Indiana Infantry. 

Wallace, John S.. Private. Company B. 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Waller, David. Private, Company K, o6th Indiana Infantry. 

Waller, Thomas, Private, 3rd Indiana Battery; Private, 14th Indiana Battery. 

*Wallick, Samuel, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

** Walling, Joseph, Private, Company B, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

**Walton, Joseph P., Private. Company B, 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Wampler. Daniel S., Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Wann, Cyrus, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Ward, David, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Ward, John. Private, Company F, 130th Indiana Infantry. 

Ward, John S., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Ward, Michael, Private. Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Ward, William H.. Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Warner, Caleb N., Sergeant, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Warner, George W., Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate. 12th Indiana Battery. 

Warner. John. Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Warner, Noah W., Private, Company B. 8tb Indiana Infantry (three months); Pri- 
vate, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Warner, Peter, Private, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY". 835 

Warnock, Jacob, Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Pri- 
vate, Corporal, Sergeant, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

Warrick, George W., Private, Corporal, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wasson, Alexander, Private, Company K, 19th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company 
E, 20th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Wasson, John D., Private, Company I, 12tth Indiana Infantry. 

Waters, Thomas, Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Waters, William, Private, Company K, 9th Indiana Infantry. 

Watkins, Daniel L., Private, Company P, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Watkins, Francis M., Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Watkins, John J., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Watkins, Marquis de L. (See Incomplete List.). 

Watkins, Thornton T., Private. Company F. .57th Indiana Infantry. 

Watkins, William M., Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company G, 17th Indiana Infantry. 

Watson, Cervantus S., Private, Company A, 3Cth Indiana Infantry. 

*Watson, William C, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Watts, Harry, Private, Company F, 24th Indiana Infantry. 

*Way, Armsbee D., Private, Corporal, Company K, 3Hth Indiana Infantry. 

*Way, John S., Second Lieutenant, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Way, Thomas R., Private, Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wayman, John C, Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Company C, 36th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Wean, George W., Private, Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry, 

Weatherald, Thomas R., Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Weaver, Charles H., Private, Company K, 17th Indiana Infantry. 

*Weaver, Charles H., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Weaver, Clement H., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry; First Sergeant, 
Second Lieutenant, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Weaver, David P., Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Weaver, George C, Private. Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Weaver, George T., Private, Company E; Saddler Sergeant, Non Commissioned 
Staff, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Weaver, John R., Private, Saddler, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Weaver, John S., Private, Company K. 17th Indiana Infantry. 

Weaver, Orange R., Private. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry; Private, Company A; 
Hospital Steward, Non Commissioned, Staff, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Weaver, Thomas D., Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Weaver, Walter S., Musician, Company H; Principal Musician, Non Commissioned 
Staff, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Webb. William, Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Weber, William, Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wfeed, Harvey H., Private, Company K, 134th Indiana Infantry. 

Weeks, Edward W., Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Weeks, Nathan, Private, Company D. 36th Indiana Infantry; Private B, 110th In- 
diana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Weesner, Jesse, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

*Weesner, John S., Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Weesner, William B., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Weesner, William R., Private, Corporal, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Weist, George L., First Lieutenant, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Welborn, Henry C, Sergeant, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Welborn, Joshua T. C, Private. Company F, 11th Indiana Infantry; First Sergeant, 
First Lieutenant, Captain, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 



836 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Welborn, Shelby R., Private, Company B. 42nd Indiana Infantry. 
Welch, James, Private, Company G, 16th Indiana Infantry. 
Welch, Richard, Private, Company F, 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Welker, David, Private, Company K, 99th Indiana Infantry; Wagoner, Company H, 
140th Indiana Infantry. 

Welker, George W., Private, Company E, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Welker, James M., Private, Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months) ; 
Private, 15th Indiana Battery. 

Welker, John, Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 
Welker, Jordan, Private, Com^pany H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Wells, James A., Private, Company I, S4th Indiana Infantry. 
Werking, John, Private, Corporal, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Werking, Joseph E., Private, Corporal, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
West, Benjamin ki.. Corporal. Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years). 
West, Pennel. Regimental Band, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years): Private. Com- 
pany F. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

West, William D., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
West. William H., Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years); Cor- 
poral. Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private, Company F. 124th 
Indiana Infantry. 

*Wheeler, Jason, Private, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Whilton, William A., Private, Company A, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Whippel, David, Private, Company K, ISth Indiana Infantry. 

Whitacre, William, Private, Company E, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

White, Aaron. Private, Company D, 28th U. S. C. T. 

White, Adam W., Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

**White, Ed.gar T., Private, 7th Indiana Battery. 

♦White, Elisha B., Private, Farrier, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

AVhite. George O., Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

White, Harvey, Private. Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

White, James M., Private, Unassigned, 33rd Indiana Infantry. 
White, Noah B., Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

White. William N.. Private, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Whitehead. Jonathan R.. Private, Company G, 21st Indiana Infantry, re-organized 
as 1st Heavy Artillery. 

Wbitelock, Benjamin, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Whitesel, James L., First Sergeant, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three 
months); Sergeant, 2nd Indiana Battery. 

Whitesel, Joseph M., Assistant Surgeon, Staff, 3Gth Indiana Infantry. 

Whitlow, James W., Private, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Whitlow, John W., Corporal. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Whitlow, King S., Private. Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Whltworth, John W.. Private. Corporal, Company E. Sth Indiana Infantry (three 
years ) . 

Whitworth, Sanford, Private, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry; Private. Company 
F, 7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Wickersham, Caleb J.. Private, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wickersham, David, Private. Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Widows, William H.. Corporal, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Wigart, Michael S., Private. Company B, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Wiggins, Henry B.. Private, Company K. 37th Indiana Infantry. 

Wiggins, Walter, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Wiles, Nathan H., Second Lieutenant, Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wiles, William D., Captain. Company A, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Wilhelm. Henry. Private, Company E. 9th Indiana Cavalry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 837 

Wilkinson, George M., Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Wilkinson, James E., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Wilkinson, Rut'us A., Private, Company F, S4th Indiana Infantry. 

Wilkinson, Tliomas B., Sergeant, First Lieutenant. Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Williams, Augustus, Private, Company C. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams, Christian M., Private, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry; Private. Company 
F, 7th Indiana Cavalry, re-organized. 

Williams, Daaiel, Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams, Daniel S., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams, David A., Private, Company E, 11th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams, George, Private, 15th Indiana Battery. 

*Williams, James, Private, Corporal, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three 
years). 

Williams, Jesse L., Sergeant, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams. Jesse R., Private, Company E, 8th Indiana Infantry (three years); Sec- 
ond Lieutenant. Needmore Rangers, Indiana Legion. 

Williams, John, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams, John J., Private, Company B. 5th Indiana Cavalry. 

Williams, John W., Private. Company P. 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Williams, Joseph, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams, Joseph B.. Second Lieutenant, New Lisbon Indiana State Guards, Indi- 
ana Legion. 

Williams. Leander J., Private, Corporal, Company F, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams, Lucian B., Private. Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Williams. Milton, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. (See Alphabetical 
List B). " 

Williams, Nereus P., Private, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

♦Williams. Richard, Sergeant, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams, Thomas, Private, Corporal. Company F, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

AVilliams, William, Private. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams. William O., Corporal. Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); 
Private, Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry. 

Williams, William R.. Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Williams, Yancy, Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Williamson, Isaac, Private, Company B, 42nd Indiana Infantry. 

Williamson, J. R., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Williamson, James E., Corporal, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Willis, Zadoc H., Private. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Willits,- Irwin, Private. Company A. 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Wills, John T.. Regimental Band, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

♦Wilmington, Oscar N., Private, Sergeant, First Sergeant. First Lieutenant, Com- 
pany P. 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Wilson, Alpheus A., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wilson. Benjamin A., Private, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Wilson, Charles C, Private. Company G. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wilson, Daniel H., Private. Company F, 36th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company H, 
30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Wilson, Jabez, Private, Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid) ; Private, 
19th Inrliana Battery. 

Wilson. James, Private, Company K. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wilson. John, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Wilson. Leander R.. Private, Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Wilson. Luther, Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wilson, Michael C, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Wilson, Richard, Private, Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry. 



838 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



Wilson, Shipley S., Sergeant, First Sergeant, First Lieutenant. Captain. Company 
I, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Wilson. William E.. Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Winder, Charles, Sergeant, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Windsor, David E.. Private, Company I, 99th Indiana Infantry. 

Windsor, Enoch M., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private. Company G, Tth Indiana Cavalry. 

Windsor, .lames M.. Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

Windsor, Zachariah, Private, Company E, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 

*Wineberg, James A., Private, Company P, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Winings. Lemuel H., Private, Company A, 54th Indiana Infantry (one year). 

Winings, Samuel, Private, Corporal, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Wink, John A., Private, Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Winship, Joseph S., Private. Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Winslow, Davis, Private, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Winslow, Patrick H., Private, 22nd Indiana Battery. 

Wise, William H., Private, Company F. 124th Indiana Infantry. 

Wisehart, David, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Wisehart, Martin. Private. Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Wiseheart, Philander, Private, Company B, Sth Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Wisehart, Reuben, Private, Company K, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Wisehart, Richmond. Private, Sergeant, First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Com- 
pany f, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

Wisehart, William, Private, Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

*Wolf, Jonathan. Wagoner, Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. 

**Wolf, Samuel, Private, Corporal, Company M, 11th Indiana Cavalry. 

*Wolf, William, Private, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Wood, Seth, Corporal, Company I, 69th Indiana, Infantry. 

Woodard, William H.. Private, Company K, 3Sth Indiana Infantry. 

Wooden, Arthur M.. Private, Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

*Woodring, Benjamin F., Corporal, Company H, 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Woodruff, Jerome, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Woodruff, Oliver, Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Woods, George W.; Sergeant, 25th Indiana Battery. 

AVoods, Henry C, Sergeant, 19th Indiana Battery. 

**Woods, Jeremiah. Private; Company B, 99th Indiana Infantry. 

Woods. Robert E.. Private, Corporal. Company M, 9th Indiana Cavalry. 

Woods. William H. S., Private, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Woodward, Alpheus L., Private, Company I, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Woodward, Pyrrhus, Captain, Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry. (See Mexican 
War). 

*Woody, Ancis C. Private. Corporal, Company K, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

*Woody. Zenoah B.. Private. Company H. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Woolfecker, Francis, Private, Company A. 36th Indiana Infantry; Private. Com- 
pany H, 30th Indiana Infantry, re-organized. 

Woolters. Charles, Private, Company B. 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company E, 34th Indiana Infantry. 

Workman, Henry, Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Workman. Isaac, Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Workman, John. Private, Company C, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

*Worle. Alexander, Private, Company H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

**Worster. Lewis H.. Private. Company H. 153rd Indiana Infantry. 

Woy, George W.. Private. 12th Indiana Battery. (See Alphabetical List B). 

Wright, Alfred P., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

Wright, Henry G., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 




COMPANY G. 7th INDIANA CAVALRY. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 839 

Wright, Isaac N., Private. Musician, Company D. 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Wright, John H., Private, Company D, 36th Indiana Infantry. 
Wright, Jonathan R.. Private, Company I, 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 
Wright, William, Private, Unassigned, 22nd Indiana Infantry. 
Wright, William B., Private. Company D, 2nd Indiana Cavalry. 
Wright, William F., Private, Company D, 147th Indiana Infantry. 
Wright, William H., Private, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 
Wysong, Frederick, Sergeant, Company F, tith Indiana- Infantry (three months). 
Wysong. George W., Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Company B. 42nd Indiana Infantry. 



**Yates, Daniel, Private, Company G, 68th Indiana Infantry. 

Yates, William, Private, Company I, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

Yetter, Henry, Private, Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid): Pri- 
vate, Corporal, Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. 

Yost, Albert N., Private, Company B, 8th Indiana Infantry (three months); Cor- 
poral. Company G, S4th Indiana Infantry; First Sergeant, Company K, 57th Indiana In- 
lantry. 

Yost. Jacob W., First Sergeant, First Lieutenant, Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Yost. Lewis F., Private. Company G, 84th Indiana Infantry. 

Young, David, Musician, Company A; Principal Musician, Non Commissioned Staff, 
36th Indiana Infantry. 

Young, James H., Corporal, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 

** Young. James L., Private. Company K, 53rd Indiana Infantry. 

Young, James S.. Private, Company I, 84th Indiana Infantry; Private, Company K, 
57th Indiana Infantry. 

Young. Joseph A., Private, Company C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); 
Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company G, 7th Indiana Cavalry. 

Young, Robert A., Private. Company B, 139th Indiana Infantry; Corporal, Company 
H, 147th Indiana Infantry. 

^ oung, Theodore, Private, Company I. 3rd Indiana Cavalry. 

Youngman. Samuel, Private. Company K, 54th Indiana Infantry (three months). 

Yount, David S.. Regimental Band. ISth Indiana Infantry; PMrst Lieutenant, Captain, 
Company H, 69th Indiana Infantry. 

Yount, William H.. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry; Private. Company 
C, 109th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid); Private, Corporal, Ser.geant, Company F, 124th 
Indiana Infantry. 

Youtsey, Thomas, Private, Company D, 148th Indiana Infantry. 



Zeigler, George H.. Private. Company H. 69th Indiana Infantry. 
Zeigler, Jacob, Private, Company E, 36th Indiana Infantry. 

Zimmerly, Edward, Private. Company B. 8th Indiana Infantry (three months). 
♦Zimmerman, Charles E.. Private. Company H; Commissary Sergeant. Non Com- 
missioned Staff. 140th Indiana Infantry. 

Zimmerman. Ferris, Private, Company D, Sth Indiana Infantry (three years). 
Zimmerman, George W., Private, Company A, 110th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). 



840 hazzard's history of henry county. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST B. 

This list includes the names of soldiers of the Civil War from Henry County 
who went to other States to enlist. Soldiers from other counties in the State, 
who served in other State organizations and moved to Henry County after the 
Civil War, are also included in this list and are designated by two asterisks, 
thus **, before the names. 



**Barnard, Eugene, Private, Company I, 167th OTiio Infantry. 

Barrett, Augustus E., Private, Company D, 8th Illinois Infantry (three months); 
First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Company D, 8th Illinois Infantry (three years). 

Brenneman, Charles, Private, Company B, Benton Cadets, Missouri Volunteers (Fre- 
mont's Body Guard). 

Bronnenberg, Carl, Private, Company A, and Private, Company M. 8th Ohio Cavalry. 
(See Alphabetical List A). 

Brunner, Francis M., Private, Company B, .5Sth Ohio Infantry. 

**Burchett, Thomas J., Second Lieutenant, Company H, 74th Ohio Infantry. (See 
Alphabetical List A). 

Burr, Lafe J., Private. Company A, 137th Ohio Infantry. 

C 

Calvert. Charles L., Private, Company F, 165th New York Infantry. (See U. S. Mili- 
tary Academy). 

Confare, Ephraim, First Lieutenant, Captain. Company H, 2nd Missouri Light Ar- 
tillery. (See Alphabetical List A). 

Conn, William D., Captain, Company I, 35th Iowa Infantry. 

**Cooper, Daniel M., Sergeant, Company I, 11th Ohio Infantry; First Sergeant, 
Company K, 87th Ohio Infantry; First Sergeant, Company E, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery. 

Covey, William, Private, Company B, 23rd Iowa Infantry. 

CruU, Francis M., Private, Company H, Sth Iowa Infantry. (See Alphabetical List 



A). 



D 



Uavis, David F., Private. Company B. Benton Cadets, Missouri Volunteers (Fre- 
mont's Body Guard). (See Alphabetical List A). 

Dowell, David, Private, Company C, 12th Missouri Cavalry. 



Evans, Owen, Corporal, First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, Captain. Company A, 
2nd U. S. Sharpshooters. 

F 

Fort. Oliver P., Private, Company K, 2nd Colorado Cavalry. (See Mexican War). 
Frazier. Henry, Private, Company G, 29th Iowa Infantry. 
Frazier, James, Private, Company G, 29th Iowa Infantry. 



ISTORV OF HENRY COUNTY. 84] 



Frazier, Nathan, Private, Company G, 29th Iowa Infantry. 
Frazier, William, Private, Company G, 29th Iowa Infantry. 



Gillgeese, William, Wagoner, Company K, 2.^th Illinois Infantry; Wagoner, Sth Bat- 
tery, Wisconsin Light Artillery. 

**Gillingham, Ezra, Private, Company I, 21st V. R. Corps. (See Mexican War). 

Goodwin, Isaac, Private, Company H, 4th Ohio Cavalry. (See Alphabetical List A). 

Gray, James M., Private, Company B, Benton Cadets, Missouri Volunteers (Fre- 
mont's Body Guard). (See Alphabetical List A). 

H 

Hatfield. Aaron S., Private, Company D, (iSth Illinois Infantry. (See Alphabetical 
List A). 

Hendricks. Miles, Private, Sergeant, Company I, lS7th Ohio Infantry. (See Alpha- 
betical List A). 

Hoover, Henry, Private, Company K, 11th Kansas Cavalry. 

Hoover, John, Private, Company K, 11th Kansas Cavalry. 

Hoover, John S., Private, Company K,; Quartermaster Sergeant, Non Commissioned 
Staff: First Lieutenant, Company K, 31st Illinois Infantry; Captain and Aid de Camp, 
Major and Aid de Camp, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, Brevet Colonel, Staff, U. S. Volun- 
teers. (See General Officers, Chapter IX). 

I 

Isenhour, Nathan, Private, Corporal, Company K, 34th Illinois Infantry. 

L 

Long. Edward M., Second Lieutenant, Company B, 3rd North Carolina Mounted In- 
fantry. (See Alphabetical List A). 

Mc 

McDowell, Thomas, Private. Corporal, Company B, 23rd Iowa Infantry. 

M 

Mason, Alexander L., Captain, Company C, 1st Iowa Infantry. 

Mayes, John, Musician, Brigade Band, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 17th Army Corps. 

Mayes, Joseph H., Musician, Brigade Band, 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 17th Army 
Corps. 

Meek, Sam Carey, Private, Company G. and Private, Company B, 1st California In- 
fantry. 

Mills, William, Private, Company D, 6th Minnesota Infantry. 

Monticue, William, Private, Company A, 123rd Illinois Infantry. 

Moore, Louis P., Private, Company K, 67th Illinois Infantry. (See Alphabetical 
List A). 

Mullen, George E., Private, Company C. 54th Ohio Infantry. 

Murray. Alvin R., Private, Company A, 181st Ohio Infantrj'. 

N 

Netz. John. Private, Wallace Guards, Ohio Infantry; Private, Wagoner, Corporal, 
Company I, 2nd Ohio Cavalry. 

Netz, Peter, , Private, Company D, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery. (See Alphabetical 
List A). 

O 

**0'Neal, Joseph, Private, Corporal, Company F, 40th Ohio Infantry; Corporal, Com- 
pany I, .51st Ohio Infantry. 



842 hazzard's history of hexry county. 



Parker, Nathaniel W., Private, Company A, 3rd West Virginia Cavalry. 
Parker, Robert, Private, Company F, 8th Wisconsin Infantry. 



Saint, Abner P., Private, Company C, 71st Illinois Infantry. 

Saint, Exum, First Sergeant, Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant, Captain, Com- 
pany K, 4th Iowa Cavalry. 

Saint, Henry H., Private, Company C, 71st Illinois Infantry, (See Alphabetical List 
A). 

Saint, William M., Private, Sergeant, First Sergeant, Company B, 59th Ohio In- 
fantry. (See Alphabetical List A). 

Schildknecht, John, Private, Corporal, Company B, 5th Iowa Cavalry. 

Scott, Otho H., Private, Company C, 17th Ohio Infantry; Private, First Sergeant, 
Company A, 40th Ohio Infantry. 

Shelley. William F., Private, Company B, Benton Cadets, Missouri Volunteers (Fre- 
mont's Body Guard), (See Alphabetical List A). 

Stephenson, Reuben B., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company K, 10th Iowa Infan- 
try. (See Mexican War). 

Stubblefield, Martin, Private, Company B, Benton Cadets, Missouri Volunteers (Fre- 
mont's Body Guard). (See Alphabetical List A). 



Thompson, George W., Private, Company C, 36th Illinois Infantry, 

V 
Van Matre, Peter L., Private, Company E, 6th Illinois Cavalry. 
W 

** Welsh. .James H., Assistant Surgeon, Staff. 185th Ohio Infantry. 

Williams, Milton, Private, Company I, lS7th Ohio Infantry. (See Alphabetical 
List A). 

Woy, G«orge W., First Lieutenant, Captain, Company C, 1st Tennessee Light Ar- 
tillery. 'See Alphabetical List A). 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 843 



ALPHABETICAL LIST C. 

This list includes the names of soldiers of the Civil War from other States 
who moved to Henry County after the Civil War. The names of soldiers of the 
Civil War, presumably from other States, whose records are incomplete in this 
History, are also included in this list. Their services in the Civil War, so far 
as known, may be found by reference to the 'Tncomplete List." 



Abbott, Mathew T., Private. Company A. 35th Iowa Infantry. 

Abrams, Joseph W., Private, Company C, 22nd Kentucky Infantry; Private. Com- 
pany K, 7th Kentucky Infantry. 

Abrams, Sylvester, Private, Company E, 18th Missouri Infantry. 
Albright, Perry J., Corporal, Company B, 110th Ohio Infantry. 
Alexander, William G., Private. Company F, 54th Kentucky Infantry. 
Armicost, John W., Private, Company D, 7th Ohio Cavalry. 
Arnold. Samuel, Corporal. Sergeant, Company G, 5th Ohio Cavalry. 



Baker, John, Private, Corporal, Company E, 1st Heavy Artillery, U. S. C. T. 

Ball. John D., Private, Company D, 2nd Missouri Cavalry. 

Barrett, Philip N., Private, Company I, 193rd Ohio Infantry. 

Beardsley. Thurman H.. Private, Company D. 16Sth New York Infantry. 

Bell, Lafe, Private. Sergeant, Company F.-53rd Kentucky Infantry. 

Bennett, Samuel H., Private, Company H, 54th Ohio Infantry. 

Bodmer. Jacob. Private, Company B, 46th New York Infantry. (See Alphabetical 
List A). 

Brandon, Esley R.. Private, Company B, 71st Ohio Infantry. 

Brodrick, James W., Private, Company C, 11th Ohio Infantry. (See Alphabetical 
List A). 

Brown, Francis M., Private, Company F. 1st U. S. Sharpshooters. 

Bunnell. William. Private. Company D, Benton Cadets, Missouri Volunteers (Fre- 
mont's Body Guard); Private, Company D, 39th Ohio Infantry. 

Burke. George W., Private, Company H; Hospital Steward, Non Commissioned Staff, 
9th Pennsylvania Infantry;Assistant Surgeon, Major and Surgeon, Brevet Lieutenant 
Colonel, Staff. 4(5th Pennsylvania Infantry. 

Byraih, Silas. Private, Company K, 34th Ohio Infantry; Private, Company G, 17th 
Regiment, V. R. Corps. 

C 

Campbell. Gary. (See Incomplete List). 

Cantrell. Abner, Private, Company A, 2nd West Virginia Infantry. 

Chance, William H. (See Incomplete List). 

Chambers, Andrew J., Private, Corporal. Company D, 113th Ohio Infantry. 

Clevidence. Isaac, Private, Company E. 13th Maryland Infantry. 

Cochran, William, Private, Corporal, Company F, 18th Iowa Infantry. 



844 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Coffin, Arthur W., Musician. Company F, 120th Ohio Infantry; Musician, Company I, 
23rd Ohio Infantry. 

Coflin. Thaddeus, Private. Company G; Regimental Band. 23rd Ohio Infantry. 

Conner. Patrick, Private. Company K, 66th Ohio Infantry. 

Crandall, William J. C, Private, Sergeant. First Lieutenant, Captain. Company G. 
1st Tennessee Infantry. 

Crawford, Amos, Private, Sergeant, Company C, 91st Illinois Infantry. 

Cutler, William A., Private, Company C, i45th Illinois Infantry. 



Uavis. Joseph S. (See Incomplete List). 

Decker, Richard B.. Private. Company B, and Private, Company D, 1st New Jersey 
Light Artillery. 

Deeter, A. S. (See Incomplete List.) 

Denius. Leander S., Regimental Band. 3.5th Ohio Infantry; Captain, Company G. 
156th Ohio Infantry. 

Ue Witt, Abraham, Private, Company D, 37th Kentucky Infantry. 

Dill, John W., Private. Company I, 40th Iowa Infantry. 

Dodd, William E., Private, Company F, 7th West Virginia Infantry. 

Dowling, James H., Private. Company C, 71st New York Infantry. 

Dutton. John. Private. 3rd Ohio Independent Battery. 



Ewing, James P.. Private, Company B, ISth Ohio Infantry. 
Kwing, James W. (See Incomplete List). 



Feezer, James H. E.. Private. Corporal. Company I, 1st Maryland Potomac Home 
Brigade Infantry. 

Fleming. Andrew J. (See Incomplete List). 

Frazier. Iredell R.. Private. Company G, 3rd Maryland Cavalry. 

G 

Gibbs. Charles N.. Second Lieutenant. Captain. Conipany B. 69th Ohio Infantry. 
Gillmore, Isaac R., Private, Company I, 30th Illinois Infantry. 
Goudy, William C, Private, Company I, 32nd Ohio Infantry. 
Graham. David A., Private, Company F, 1st West Virginia Light Artillery. 
Griner, Andrew J., Private, Company D, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery. 
Grunden, Israel H., Private, Company F, 2nd Illinois Cavalry; Private, Company 
H, 2nd Illinois Cavalry, consolidated. 

H 

Hansard. Patrick H.. Frivale, Company F, 14th U. S. C. T. (See Alphabetical 
List A). 

Hartman, Richard, Private, Company D, 109th U. S. C. T. 

Hartman, Samuel. (See Incomplete List). 

Harvey, Charles W.. First Sergeant, Company D, 79th Ohio Infantry. 

Hatch, Asa W., Private, Company P, 2nd Ohio Infantry; Second Lieutenant. Com- 
pany E, 152nd Ohio Infantry. 

Hazelrigg. James T. J.. Private, Sergeant, Company D, 4th Kentucky Infantry. 

Heman, Hiekok, Private. Corporal, Sergeant, Company B, 3rd Ohio Cavalry. 

Henneigh, Martin L., Private, Company B, 74th Pennsylvania Infantry. 

Higley, Henry W., Private, Company G, 3rd Missouri Cavalry. 

Hill, John, Private, Company G, 55th Massachusetts Infantry. 

Hillock, William G,, Private. Company E, 5th Ohio Cavalry. 




OHIO SOLDIERS IX HEXRY COUNTY. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



845 



Hockersmith, Samuel M., Private. Corporal, Company D. 47th Ohio Infantry. 

Holsinger, Jacob. Sergeant, Company G, 110th Ohio Infantry. 

Hopper, Abram B., Private. Company G, 39th Ohio Infantry. 

Howard, Alonzo, Private, Company L, IGth New York Heavy Artillery; Private. Com- 
pany L,, and Private. Company D, 1st New York Mounted Infantry; Private, Company D, 
4th New York Cavalry. 

Howe. Charles H. (See Incomplete List). 

I 

Ike, John H., Private, Company E, 71st Ohio Infantry. 

Irving. James W., Private, Company H, 3rd Maine Infantry; Saddler, Company C, 
2nd Maine Cavalry. 

J 

Jacobs, William H., Private, Company A, 91st Ohio Infantry. 
Julian, Milton P., Private. Company D, 115th Illinois Infantry. 
Justice, John, Corporal. Company K, 40th Kentucky Infantry. 



Kamphere, George, Private, Company I, 13th Heavy Artillery, U. S. C. T. 



iugler, Compa 



Chief Bugler, Non Commissioned Staff, 7th 



King, David T., 
Cavalry. 

Kirby, John, Private. Company E, and Private, Company H, 92nd Ohio Infantry. 
Kirk, Allen M., Private, Company 
Riser, Levi, Private, Company C, 



98th Ohio Infantry. 
3yth Ohio Infantry. 



th Ohio Infantry; Private, Company 



Lamb, Jefferson, Private, Company K, 48th Kentucky Infantry. 
Leavens, Alfred D. W., Private, Company K, Sth Illinois Cavalry. 
Lee. Elihu. (See Incomplete List). 

Lemmon. Isaac C. Private. Corporal. Company I, 71st Ohio Infantry. 
Lewis, James J. (See Incomplete List). 
Longnecker, Michael, Private, Company 
B, 94th Ohio Infantry. 

Loring, Willard H. (See Incomplete List). 

Loucks, Dwight C, Corporal. Company H, 112th New York Infantry. 

Mc 

McGavran, William B., Major and Surgeon, Staff, 26th Ohio Infantry. 
McKenzie, Peter, Private, Company E, 91st Ohio Infantry. 
McKinney. Calvin B., Private, Company C, 17th West Virginia Infantry. 
McNaught. Gilbert. Private, Company E, 50th New Y'ork Engineers. 
McNurney. John, Private, Company A, Major Berry's Battalion, Missouri Cavalry; 
Corporal, Company L, 1st Missouri Cavalry. 

M 



Malsbary, Thomas L., Private, Company K, 138th Ohio Infantry. 
Mayes, John W., Private, Company E, 47th Ohio Infantry. 
Michels, Peter, Private. Sergeant, Company K. 72nd Ohio Infantry. 
Middaugh. Wilson C, Private, Company C. 1st Michigan Infantry; First Sergeant, 
Company M. 8th Michigan Cavalry. 

Miller. David T., Private, Company I. 9th New Jersey, Infantry, 

Miller, Isaac H. (See Incomplete List). 

Moore, Joshua C, Private, Company E, 13th Ohio Cavalry. 



846 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Morehead, Jacob. Private, Company C, 75th U. S. C. T. 
jVLorgan, William H., Sergeant, Company E, 38th Illinois Infantry. 
Morton. Thomas, Private, Captain, Company C; Colonel. Staff, 20th Ohio Infantry; 
Colonel, Staff, 81st Ohio Infantry. (See Mexican War). 
Mulford, John W. (See Incomplete List). 

N 

Nelson, William H.. Private, Company E. 69th Ohio Infantry; Private, Company M, 
13th Ohio Cavalry. 

Noftsinger, John J., Private, Company K. lS8th Ohio Infantry. 

Norviel, Rhoderick D., First Sergeant, Company K, 132nd Ohio Infantry. 

O 

Ogborn. La Fayette. Corporal, Company G, 12th Illinois Cavalry. 



Palmer, John, Seaman. U. S. Navy; Private, Corporal. Sergeant, Company B, 34th 
New Jersey Infantry. 

Patterson, Amaziah B. (See Incomplete List). 
Peyton, Edward, Private, Company I, 74th Ohio Infantry. 
Phillips, James, Private, Company D, 2nd Ohio Heavy Artillery. 
Potter. Clinton, Private. Company D. 20th Ohio Infantry. 
Pry. Henry, Private, Company E. 33rd Ohio Infantry. 

R 

Ray, Amos. (See Incomplete List). 

Reece, Daniel C, Private, Company B, 3rd North Carolina Infantry. 

Reece. Henry C. Private, Company B, 3rd North Carolina Infantry. 

Rice, John H. C, Private, Company G, 7th Maryland Infantry. 

Rife, Obed C, Private, Company D, lo2nd Ohio Infantry. (See Alphabetical List A). 

Roberson, Caleb J., Sergeant, Company I, 1st Infantry, U. S. A. 

Robson, George B., Private, Company A, S6th Ohio Infantry; Private,' Corporal, 
Sergeant, Company B, 69th Ohio Infantry. 

Rodgers, Leonidas, Private, Company C, 16th Ohio Infantry; Regimental Band ,13th 
Missouri Infantry; Private, Company E, 152nd Ohio Infantry. 

Rohrback, William H. H.. Private, Corporal, Sergeant. Company E, 1st Maryland Po- 
tomac Home Brigade Infantry. 

Ross. W. J., Private, Company C, 17th West Virginia Infantry. 



Schofleld. Jesse R., Private, Company F, 69th Ohio Infantry. 

Sharp. Russell B.. Private, Company F, 66th Ohio Infantry. 

Sherrod. Frederick, Private, Company M, 102nd Pennsylvania Infantry. 

Shockey, William. (See Incomplete List). 

Simmons. Robert, Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company H; Sergeant Major, Non 
Commissioned Staff. 125th U. S. C. T. 

Slade. Frederick, Private, Company F, 64th Ohio Infantry. 

Sloan, William C. (See Incomplete List). 

Smith, Joseph, 5th Independent Battery, Ohio Light Artillery. 

Smith, Thomas M., Private, Company G, 12th Kentucky Infantry. 

Smorzka, Joseph, Private, Corporal, Company F, 5th Ohio Infantry. 

Stafford, Freeland H. C, Private, Company F, 50th Pennsylvania Militia (State 
Service). 

Stevens, Henry H., Private, Company A. 62nd Illinois Infantry; Private, Company 
D, 62nd Illinois Infantry, consolidated. 



hazzard's history of henry county. , 847 

Stuart, Robert, Assistant Surgeon, Staff. 2nd Kentucky Cavalry. 
Swain, James W., Private. Company B. 81st Ohio Infantry. 

Sweet. William K., Corporal, Company G, 40th Ohio Infantry; Private, Company K, 
1st Ohio Infantry. 



rawney, Daniel A., Captain and Chaplain. Staff. 179th Ohio Infantry. 

Taylor. James, Private, Company B. 33rd Ohio Infantry. 

Thomas, Dock. (See Incomplete List). 

Turner, Mark. (See Incomplete List). 

Turner, Moab, Private, Company I, -Ith Tennessee Infantry or 1st Tennessee Cavalry. 

U 

Ulmer, Daniel, Private, Company I, 79th Pennsylvania Infantry. 
Upp, George W.. Private, Company E. 1st Ohio Heavy Artillery. 

V 

Van fleet. Daniel, Private, Corporal. Company C. 27th New Jersey Infantry. 
Vaughan. Theodore R., Private, Company G, S9th Ohio Infantry. 

W 

Waldron, Holman W., Corporal. Sergeant. Company C. 23rd Maine Infantry; Private, 
Corporal, Company E. 32nd Maine Infantry. 

Watson, James F.. Corporal, Company B; Hospital Steward. Non Commissioned 
Staff; Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant, Company C, 9Sth Ohio Infantry; Captain, 
Company U," and Captain, Company G, 63rd U. S. C. T. 

Weaver, Cornelius, First Lieutenant, Captain. Company B. 18th Illinois Infantry. 

Weston, Asa M., Private, Sergeant, Company K; Sergeant Major. Non Commissioned 
Staff; Second Lieutenant, Company E, 50th Ohio Infantry. 

White. Johnson A., Private, Company E, 87th Ohio Infantry. 

Willis, James L., Private. Corporal. Sergeant, Company H, 23rd Ohio Infantry. 

Wilson. Robert H., Private, Company C, 156th Ohio Infantry. 

Winkler. John R.. Private, Company C, 8th Kentucky Infantry. 

Wrightsman, David, Private, Company A, 79th Ohio Infantry; Private, Company D, 
73rd Ohio Infantry. 

Wysohg, John. Private, Company I. 71st Ohio Infantry. 



848 hazzard's history of henry county. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST D. 

This list includes the names of Henry County soldiers and sailors who have 
served in the Regular Army and Navy since the close of the Civil War. Soldiers 
and sailors who served in the regular Army and Navy and in the United States 
Volunteer Regiments, during and since the Spanish-American War and the 
Philippine Insurrection, are classified under this head. The list includes the names 
of some soldiers, who were not residents of Henry County at the time of enlist- 
ment, but who afterwards moved into the County. These are designated by two 
asterisks, thus **, before the names. 

A 

Abbott, James W., Private, Corporal. Company E; Sergeant Major and Ordnance 
Sergeant. Non Commissioned Staff. 24th Infantry. U. S. A. 

Abbott, John W., Private. Company A, 24th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Albin. Burt. (Record incomplete in this History). 

Alpham, Edward R., Private. Company K. ISth Infantry, U. S. A.; Private, Corporal, 
Company L. 29th Infantry, U. S. V. 

Armicost. Charles A.. Apprentice. U. S. Navy. 



Bailey, George W., Private. Company C. 81st Infantry, U. S. V. 

Baker, John, Private, Company A, 15th Infantry, XJ. S. A. 

Berry. James A., Private. Company K. 13th Infantry. U. S. A. 

Bills. Frederick A.. Private. Corporal. Sergeant, Company I, 45th Infantry. U. S. V. 

Bird. William. (Record incomplete in this History). 

Bowm,an, Alva. (Record incomplete in this History). 

Bundy. Omar. (See U. S. Military Academy). 

Byrket, Jb.rnest B.. Private. Corporal. Company M. 10th Infantry. IT. S. A. 



Caldwell. Frederick, Private, Company A, 1st Artillery. U. S. A.: Private, 
A. 6th Artillery, XJ. S. A.; Private, Company E, 18th Infantry, U. S, A. 

Castetter, John A., Private, Company L, 10th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Cock, Adelbert B.. Private, U. S. Marine Corps; Ship's Barber, U. S. Na\T- 

Conner, Dennis. Private, Musician, Company H. 10th Infantry. U. S. A.: 
Corporal. Sergeant, Company H, 11th Infantry, XJ. S. A. 

Cook, George A., Private, Company L. 26th Infantry. X.T. S. V. 

Cook. James E.. Private. Corporal. Sergeant. Company F. 11th Infantry, 
Sergeant. Company E. 14th Infantry. XJ. S. A. 

Crabill. James O., Private. Company H. 29th Infantry. U. S. V. 



Dakins, James P., Private. Company G. 16th Infantry. XT. S. A. 
Delaware, Walter, Private, Corporal. Company K. 45th Infantry, XJ. S. V. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 849 



**Denny, David P., Corporal, Company I, 32nd Infantry, U. S. V. 

Dickerson, John D., Machinist, U. S. Navy. 

Doggett, James, Private, Company F, 31st Infantry, U. S. V. 



Elliott, Raymond, Corporal, Company E, 35th Infantry, U. S. V. 
Elliott, William H. (See U. S. Naval Academy). 
Estelle, John. (Record incomplete in this History). 

Estelle, Roy, Private, Company D, 6th Artillery, U. S. A.; Private, Troop F, 1st 
Cavalry, U. S. A.; Private, , 12th Cavalry, U. S. A. 



Finnegan, Robert. L., Private, Troop M, 6th Cavalry, U. S. A. 
Fisher, Charles E., Private, Company I, 31st Infantry, U. S. V. 



Garriott, Homer C, Private, Troop D, 8th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Garvis, Thomas J., Private, Artificer, Sergeant', Company C; Quarterraaster Sergeant, 
Non Commissioned Staff, 17th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Gilbert, Heenon. Private, Company K, 22nd Infantry, U. S. A. 

Gray, Panander W., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, First Sergeant, Company C, 2nd 
Infantry, U. S. A. 

Grifhn, Daniel F., Junior, Private, Company C, 31st Infantry, U. S. V. 

H 

Halstead, William J. P., Private. Artificer, Corporal, Sergeant, Company G; Quarter- 
master Sergeant, Non Commissioned Staff, 2nd Infantry, U. S. A. 

**Hardway, Ernest, Private, Company F, 24th Infantry, U. S. A. 

**Harris, Frank W., Private, Corporal, Company L; Regimental Band, 38th Infantry, 
U. S. V. 

Harry, Dallas D., Private, Sergeant, Troop H; Acting Battalion Sergeant Major, 
Non Commissioned Staff, 13th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Hays, Samuel G., Private, Company I, 21st Infantry, TJ. S. A. 

Hazzard, Leander E., Private, Troop H, 5th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Heacock, Claude H., Private, Company K", 3rd Artillery, U. S. A. 

Hilkirk, Emery A., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company A, 11th Infantry, U. S. A. 

**Hill, John S., Private, Company I, 18th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Hodson, John, Private, Company A, 45th Infantry, XJ. S. V. 

Hollovfay, Carl L., Private, Company G, 29th Infantry, U. S. V. 

Hoosier, Louis M., Private, Company C, 24th Infantry, U: S. A. 

Hutson, William W., Private, Company E, 35th Infantry, U. S. V. 



Jacobs, Forest R., Private, Company H, and Private, Company D, 11th Infantry, 
U. S. A.; First Sergeant, Company H, Porto Rico Provisional Regiment of Infantry; Post 
Quartermaster Sergeant, Post Non Commissioned Staff, Porto Rico Provisional Regi- 
ment of Infantry; Post Quartermaster Sergeant, Post Non Commissioned Staff, U. S. A. 

Jacobs, John N., Private, Troop I, 12th Cavalry. U. S. A. 

K 

Kahoon, Harvey, Private, Company B, 23rd Infantry, U. S. A. 
Kelly, Lewis, Private, Company B, 5th Infantry, U. S. A. • 
**Keough, Elmore F., Private, Company E, 15th Infantry, U. S .A. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



Lamtird, Oren E., Private, Troop H, 12th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

**Lehman. William, Private, Troop D, 7th Cavalry, U. S. A.; Private, Sergeant, 
Troop H, 1st Cavalry, U.S. A.; Sergeant, Troop K, 3rd Cavalry, U. S. A.; Sergeant, First 
Sergeant, Troop C, 3rd Cavalry, U. S. A.; Sergeant, Troop K, 13th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Lennington, James, Private, Company H, 23rd Infantry, U. S. A. 

Mc 

McConnell, Robert C, Private, 25th Company, Coast Artillery, U. S. A. 
McCorkle, William E., Bugler, Company A, 12th Infantry, XJ. S. A. 
McGuire, Harry F., Second Class Baker, U. S. Navy. 

M 

Main, Frank M., Private, Hospital Corps, U. S. A. 

Miller, Ross C, Private, Troop F, 5th Cavalry, TJ. S. A.; Private, Troop A, 4th Cav- 
alry, U. S. A. 

Morris, Herbert W., Private, Company C, 31st Infantry, U. S. V. 

N 

Newby, Otis C, Corporal, Company C, 45th Infantry, U. S. V. 
Nicholson, Boyd, Private, Company G, 31st Infantry, U. S. V. 

O 

Otis, Eugene. (Record incomplete in this History). 

P 

Paully, John E., Private, Company H, 16th Infantry, U. S. A. 
Pence, William W., Private, Company K, 7th Infantry, U. S. A. 
Pitts, Herman L., Private. 25th Company, Coast Artillery, U. S. A. 
Pitts, Walter E., Private, 25th Company, Coast Artillery, U. S. A. 
Powell, John J., Private, Reserve Hospital Corps, 1st Army Corps, U. S. A. 



Reeder, Leonard M., Private, Company H, 12th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Reeder, Thomas B., Junior, Private, Company H, 12th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Riley, Kalula, Private, Company A, 45th Infantry, U. S. V.; Private, Troop E, 
5th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Roberts. Clarence A., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company M, 13th Infantry, U. S. A. 

Rozell, Henry C, Private. Company A. 23rd Infantry, U. S. A.; Private, Company A, 
29th Infantry, U. S. V.; Private, Company H, 5th Infantry. U. S. A.: Private, Troop D, 
1st .Cavalry, U. S. A. 

S 

Sanders. William B.. Private, SOth Company, Coast Artillery. U. S. A. 
Shepherd, Frank A., Apprentice, U. S. Navy. 
Sipes, Charles, U. S. Hospital Corps. 



Tarr, Martin, Private, Corporal. Sergeant, First Sergeant. Company E, 1st Infantry, 
U. S. A. 

Tipton, Earl, Private. Company H, 20th Infantry, U. S. A.; Private, Company I, 19th 
Infantry, U. S. A. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 851 



Tipton, Roy, Private, 25th Company, Coast Artillery, U. S. A. 

U 

Upham, Edwin R., Sergeant, Company L, 2nd Tennessee Infantry; Private, Corporal, 
Company K, ISth Infantry, U. S. A.; Corporal, Company L, 29th Infantry, U. S. V. 



Vannatta, Edward. (Record incomplete in this History). 
Vannatta, William. (Record incomplete in this History). 
Veach, Ronald B., Private, Company A, 11th Infantry, U. S. A. 



Warnock. Harry, Private, Company C, 3rd Wisconsin Infantry; Private, Company 
F, 31st Infantry, U. S. V. 

Warnock, Jesse, Private, Company C, and Private, Company H, 2nd Infantry, U. S. 
A. 

Warnock, Ora J., Private, Troop K, 11th Cavalry, U. S. A. 

Welborn, Luther S. (See U. S. Military Academy). 

White, William F., Private, Company L, 4th Artillery, U. S. A. 

Willis. John L., Private, Company A, 2nd Infantry, U. S. A. 

Winings, Mark E.. Embalmer, U. S. A. 

Woodward, Frank. Private, Company L, 31st Infantry, U. S. V. 

Wrightsman, Isaac H., Private, Corporal, 12th Battery, IT. S. A. 



852 HAZZABto's HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST E. 

This list includes the names of Henrj' County soldiers who served in the 
Spanish-American War and Philippine Insurrection in Indiana regiments and 
batteries. The names of six Henry County soldiers who enlisted in the mihtary 
service of other States, during this period, are also included in this list. 

Where the number of soldiers from Henry County in any regiment has 
justified the same, the full regimental stafif is published with the regiment, but 
only the names of such of its members as were from Henry County are contained 
in this list. 

In the distinctively Henry County companies, the full roster of the company 
is given whether the soldiers were all from Henry County or not. All non-resident 
soldiers, officers and men, whose names appear in this list, are 'designated by an 
asterisk, thus *, before the names. 

A 

Akers, Joseph, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Allen, Alonzo, Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 



Baldwin, Ellwood L., Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

*Barnes, Henry, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Barnett, Guy, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Barr, Charles H., Private, Company I; Quartermaster Sergeant, Non Commissioned, 
Staff, 33rd Michigan Infantry. 

*Beeson, Edward, Private, Musician, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Bernard, Arthur C, Private, Company E, 1st Ohio Infantry. 

Bock, Claud, Sergeant, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Bock, William, Private, Company H, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Bright, John C, Private, Company G, 22nd Kansas Infantry. 

Brown, Roy W., Private, Company G; Regimental Band; Private, Company L, 161st 
Indiana Infantry. 

Buckley, Guy, Private, Company G. IClst Indiana Infantry. 

Burton, William, Saddler, 27th Indiana Battery. 



Caldwell, Frederick, Private, Company H, 158th Indiana Infantry. 
Canaday, James, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Cecil, Fred P., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Cummins, Lemuel D.. Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company B. 20th Kansas Infan- 
try. 

D 

Darling. Alva, Private, Company G, IClst Indiana Infantry. 
*DarneH. Harry C. Private. Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of hexry county. 853 



Davenport, Frank N., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Detricli, George C, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*DoIan, John, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Donaldson. Percy, Bugler, Company K, 3rd Tennessee Infantry. 



Eilar, Benjamin W., Private, Corporal, Sergeant, Company G, 161st Indiana In- 
fantry. 

Elliott, George H., Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Engle. T. William. Sergeant. Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 



Fadely, Joseph H., Corporal. Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
■^Faulkner, Henry, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Filson, James L., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Fisher, Frank W., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Foster, Frank, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Frazee, Walker, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Freeland, Thomas, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
"Freeman, Perry, Private, Cook, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 



Gaddis, Max P., Private, Corporal, Company G. 161st Indiana Infantry 
Goddard. Joseph, Private, Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infanlry. 
*Gontner, Charles R., Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
•Goodman, Bud, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

H 

Hale, Frank. Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Hale ,Thomas T.. Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*HaIfaker, Edgar B., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Hamilton, Benton F., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Hamilton, -Frank M., Private. Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Hanna, John W., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Harper. Charles, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Hickman, Herbert H., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Holton, Hoyt A., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Huddleston, Arthur A., Private, Company G. 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Hutchins, Huston, Artificer, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

I 

*Irwin. George, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Israel. Wililiam G., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

J 

*Jackson, Solomon, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

K 
Keesling, Ray, Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

L 

*Lamb, Oltie F., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Dane, Fred, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
♦Leech, J. Morris F., Private, Company G, 161^ Indiana Infantry. 



854 hazzard's history of henry county. 

*L,eonard, Arthur, Private. Company G, IGlst Indiana Infantry. 
*Leonard, John M., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Livezey, Oscar, Wagoner, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Luther, E. Murray, Corporal, Sergeant, Quartermaster Sergeant, Company G, 161st 
Indiana Infantry. 

L,ykens, Sebastian, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Mc 

*McCoy, Charles, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
•McCoy, Clarence, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*McCrea, Edward, Sergeant, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*McKimmey, Linley W.. Corporal. Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

M 

*Martin, Albert O., Corporal, Sergeant, Company G. 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Martln, Henry C, Junior, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Martindale, George, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Meyers, James I., First Lieutenant, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Miller, James W., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Millikan, Harry B., Private, 27th Indiana Battery. ' 

Mitchell, Lemuel, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Morgan, Cliff, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Myers, William E., Private, Company C, 1st Tennessee Infantry. 

N 

Nash, Charles M., Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Neff, William, Artificer, Company L, 160th Indiana Infantry. 
Netz, Charles, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Netz, William, Private, Company E, 15Sth Indiana Infantry. 
Newby, George W., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Newby, Otis C, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Nichols, Noah A., Private. Company G. 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Nugent, Harry S., Corporal, Company G. 161st Indiana Infantry. 



Ogborn, Albert D., Captain, Company G. 161st Indiana Infantry. 

*Owens, Charles B.. Quartermaster Sergeant, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 



Palmes, Ira H., Private. Company H, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

♦Paul, John J., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Pearson, Joseph M., Private, Company G. 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Pitman, Charles M., Second Lieutenant, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Powell, Howard O., Corporal. Company K. 160th Indiana Infantry. 

' Prager, James M., Private, Company G. 161st Indiana Infantry. 

*Puckett, Fred W., Private, First Sergeant. Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

R 

♦Rawlins. Winfield. Private, Company G. 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Redding, James M., Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Reece, Benjamin F., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Reed, William, Private, Corporal, Company I, 159th Indiana Infantry. 
♦Robinson, Elmer, Private, Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
♦Rogers, Paul, First Sergeant, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 855 



*Rothbaust, Jesse, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana. Infantry. 
Rutledge, William F., Private, 27tli Indiana Battery. 



Sears, Walton D., Private, Company G, IClst Indiana Infantry. 

Shaffer, Daniel E., Private, Company B, 15Sth Indiana Infantry. 

*SlielIenbarger, Charles, Private, Corporal, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

Sherer, Albert, Private, Company G, IGlst Indiana Infantry. 

Sherman, William A., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

*Shuee, Edward C, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

*Snider, Daniel V., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

*Swaim, Clarence T., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 

*Sweezy, John, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry . 

V 

Van Dyke, Henry W., Musician, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 



*Wahl, John, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Walden, Edgar 0., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Weissgarber, John C, Sergeant, Company F, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Weissgarber, Frank H., Private, Corporal, Company F, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Welsbacher, John, Sergeant, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Wilrauth, Arthur, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
* Wilson, John W., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Winings, Mark E., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Winings, Walter A., Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
Wintersteen, Minor, Private, Company G. IClst Indiana Infantry. 
Wolfe, Edwin, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 
*Woods, Harry, Private, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. ■ 
Wrightsman, Homer H., Private, Company H, 158th Indiana Infantry. 



Yates, Ira 0., Musician, Company G, 161st Indiana Infantry. 



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ORGANIZATION OF HENRY COUNTY. 



ITS EARLY HISTORY, DEVELOPMENT AND GROWTH. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 859 



INTRODUCTION. 

In the year 1800, "Indiana Territory" was carved out of what was previously 
known as the "Northwest Territory," and included nearly all of the present 
States of Indiana, and Michigan, and all of Illinois and Wisconsin, and a portion 
of Minnesota. 

The population of all this vast region, according to the census of 1800, was 
but 4,875. Michigan was erected into a separate territory in 1805, and Illinois 
in 1809. Previous to the separation of Illinois, the territory had been divided into 
five counties, of which Knox, Dearborn, and Clark were within the present bounds 
of Indiana, and St. Clair and Randolph constituted Illinois. 

In 1807, an enumeration of the "free white males Over twenty one years of 
age" was had, by which it appears that there were 2,524 within the present limits 
of the State, which would indicate that the whole population was less than 12,000. 
Of this number, there were 616 white adult males in what was then Dearborn 
County, which comprised perhaps one third of the present limits of the State. 

The territory of Indiana was organized by act of Congress, May 7, 1800. On 
the 13th of the same month, General William Henry Harrison was appointed ter- 
ritorial governor and the seat of government was fixed at \'incennes, on the 
Wabash River, now the county seat of Knox County. The territorial general 
assembly which convened at Vincennes in February, 1813, changed the territorial 
capital to Corydon, now the county seat of Harrison County, at which the ter- 
ritorial business seems to have been first transacted in December, 1813. After 
the territory became a State, the capital was removed in the Winter of 1824-25, 
from Corydon to Indianapolis. The first entry in the archives of the State on 
deposit in the ofil^ce of the State Librarian shows that business was transacted 
at the new capital on January 10, 1825. 

By a joint resolution of Congress of December 11, 1816, Indiana was form- 
ally admitted to the sisterhood of States. So rapid had been the influx of popula- 
tion for the ten years preceding that the State was estimated to contain 65,000, and 
by this time was divided into eighteen counties, although more 1;han three fourths 
of the State was still in possession of the Indians. Prior to 1810, the Indian 
boundary ran east of Centreville, Wayne County, and when an additional 
"Twelve-mile Purchase" extended the limits of civilization so as to include 'the 
present sites of Milton. Cambridge City, and almost to Hagerstown, there was 
quite a flocking to the iiezi' country, even in advance of the surveyor. So early as 
181 1, Thomas Symons had settled at the mouth of a small creek that eniptied into 
West River, between Cambridge and Milton, and his brother Nathan fixed his 
residence at the mouth of another creek that unites with West River above the 
site of the ancient village of Vandalia which adjoined Cambridge City on the 
north. Their early possession of the mouths of these creeks (both having their 



86o hazzard's history of henry county. 

source in Liberty township,) served to attach their names to the streams, and 
Symons creeks were well known to the early settlers of this county. Indeed it is 
highly probable that of the whole number of persons who entered this county for 
the first five years, at least nine tenths crossed the county line between these 
streams. 

The war with Great Britain, from 1812 to 1815, and the consequent alarm 
occasioned by the hostile attitude of the Indians all along the frontier, partially 
broke up the settlements along .West River. With the return of peace, however, 
the settlers returned to their homes, and a rapid increase of immigration at 
once set in, extending to the ver\' limits of the Twelve-mile Purchase, though it is 
probable that no white family intruded itself upon the almost impenetrable wilds 
within the present limits of Henry County prior to 1819. 



CHAPTER XXXYII. 

settlement and organization of the county. 

The Indi.v^ Treaty of St. Mary's in i8i8 — Arrival of the First Settlers 
— Early Settlers in the Different Townships — Land Sales and First 
Entries — Organization of the County — First County Officers — 
The Act for the Formation of- Henry County Reproduced in Fac- 
simile — Boundaries of the County. 

The first settlers of whom any reHable information has been obtained, seem to 
have come to the county in 1819. Prior to this time, manv were "waiting and 
watching over the border," in Wayne County, for the lands between \\'est River 
and White River to become subject to settlement. 

A law of Congress (not verj- rigidly enforced) forbade the private purchase 
or occupancy of the "Indian lands". By a treaty negotiated at St. Mary's, near 
old Fort Wayne, in 1818, by Governor Jonathan Jennings of Indiana, Governor 
Lewis Chase of Michigan, and Judge Benjamin Parke — former Attorney General 
of Indiana Territory and afterwards one of Indiana's leading jurists and first 
United States District Judge for the State of Indiana, for whom Parke County 
in this State is named — Commissioners on the part of the L^nited States, the 
Indians relinquished all title to the lands south of the Wabash, except two or 
three small reservations, and also agreed to vacate the ceded lands within three 
years. The late David Hoover of Wayne County was secretary to this commis- 
sion. From this time the whole central portion of the State was looked upon as 
accessible to the whites, and the settlement of this county began at once, although 
no titles to land could be obtained for some time. 

The earliest titles are under act of Congress of April 24th, 1820, and the 
work of surveying, etc., consumed another year before they were thrown upon 
the market. About one hundred and forty persons purchased land in townships 
sixteen and seventeen north, in the last half of fhe year 1821. This was in that 
part of the county embraced in the present townships of Wayne, Spiceland, Frank- 
lin, Dudley, Liberty, Henry, Greensboro, and a part of Harrison. 

The surveys being incomplete, no lands north of Liberty and Henry town- 
ships were sold until the following year. Many had come in prospecting as early 
as 1818 and 1819. By this means the fame of this magnificent region spread 
abroad. Its great fertility, magnificent forests, fine streams, numerous springs, 
abundant game, and its perpetual dedication to the cause of human liberty, pointed 
it out to many in North Carolina, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, and Ohio, 
as the Eldorado of the West. 

The early settlers seem to have been attracted principally to three neighbor- 
hoods, for a time, and from these nuclei spread over the county. These neighbor- 



852 hazzard's history of henry county. 

hoods, after a few years, became known as the "Harvey neighborhood," extend- 
ing from the site of New Castle northward some four or five miles; the "Leavell 
neighborhood," which included the southeast part of Liberty and the eastern 
portion of Dudley townships ; while the region from old West Liberty, on either 
side of Blue River, for two or three miles above the site of Knightstown, was 
known as the "Heaton neighborhood." These neighborhoods constituted pretty 
much all there was of Henry County at the time of its organization, in 1821-22. 
It is impossible, at this day, to name all the first "settlers," but the following^ 
facts, though far from being as full as desired, will serve to show something of 
the time and order of settlement in the various townships : 

henry township. 

Early in April, 1819, Asahel ^^'oodward, the maternal grandfather of the 
author of this History, put up his cabin just north of New Castle; a Mr. Whit- 
tinger and his son-in-law, David Cray, fixed their residence just about the site ot 
Joshua Holland's old home; Allen Shepherd settled nearly two miles, north by 
east of New Castle, on what is known as the Hudelson farm : Andrew Shannon 
located just north of Shepherd, and near the former site of the Hernly Mills ; 
George Hobson on the farm now owned bv Judge Elliott's heirs adjoining New 
Castle on the southwest; William Shannon on the Holloway farm, four miles 
southwest of New Castle; Joseph Hobson came in not far from the same time, 
and settled on the west side of the Stephen Elliott farm, two miles south of town. 
At his house the first courts were held, thus making it the county seat pro tempore. 

George Hobson, Andrew Shannon, ]\Ir. Whittinger, and David Cray, 
brought their families with them. Mrs. Asahel Woodward and Mrs. William 
Shannon arrived on the thirty first of July following, and Mr. Woodward planted 
about two acres of corn, the first crop, he thought, ever raised by a white man in 
Henry County. He planted an old Indian field or clearing, and, although he 
cultivated with the hoe alone, raised an excellent crop. The Whittingers and 
Cray soon left, not liking the country. 

prairie township. 

Benjamin Harvey also came early in the Spring of 1819, with his family, and 
settled about three miles north of Asahel Woodward in the Harvey settlement. 
Very soon afterward came William Harvey, the farther of Benjamin, with 
Uriah Bulla, John Harris, Samuel Howard, and Bartley or Barclay Benbow. 
Some of the last named came out in April or Alay, 1819, but had been out as early 
as the February preceding, selected sites, and made some improvements. 

WAYNE township. 

Within the limits of this township, a few persons had settled as early as 
1820, and probably as early as 1819. Daniel and Asa Heaton were located about 
the present site of Raysville, and trading with the Indians as early as 1820. 
Samuel Furgason had a double log cabin near the mouth of Montgomery Creek, 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



863 



1.1 1821, and had made money enough hauling corn from Whitewater and enter- 
taining those in search of lands, to be able to purchase his homestead, August 11, 
1821. Samuel Goble lived just about the site of what was subsequently known 
as Church's Mill at the time of the land sale, and had a good cabin and some 
eight or ten acres partially cleared and under good fence. All these improve- 
ments were bid from under him by David Lauderback, who so well understood 
the estimate in which he would be held by the early settlers that he "made himself 
scarce" afterward. Of those who came in before or just about the time of the 
land sale may be mentioned Waitsel M. Gary, Abraham Heaton, Samuel Gary, 
Jacob Parkhurst, Joseph Watts, Shaphat McGray, and a few odiers, the exact 
date of whose arrival it is difficult to learn. 

SPICELAND TOWNSHIP. 

Among the first settlers within the present limits of Spiceland township 
were Daniel Jackson and Solomon Byrket, on Blue River, near what is known as 
Elm Grove; Thomas Greenstreet, on the Hiatt farm, one half mile southwest of 
Spiceland ; Samuel Garr, on the Henderson Hosier farm, two miles north of Spice- 
land, now owned by the Hoover boys ; and Allen Hunt, on the Amos Bond place, 
two miles west of Spiceland. These came to their lands immediately after the sale 
and very soon after came Samuel Griffin and a few others. 

FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 

Moses Keens, George and Gharles See, and Achilles Morris were among the 
earliest settlers on Flatrock, within the present limits of Franklin township. 
This was about the time of or immediately after the land sale, perhaps in the Fall 
of 1 82 1, though the precise date cannot be ascertained. 

DUDLEY TOWNSHIP. 

John Huff and a Mr. Carter are the only parties ascertained to have resided 
within the limits of Dudley, prior to the land sale. Huff lived near the junction of 
the New Castle and Dublin, and Hopewell and Flatrock turnpikes, and Mr. 
Carter about one half or three fourths of a mile west from the site of the Hope- 
well Meeting House. 

Josiah Morris, Daniel Paul, Richard Ratliff (father of Cornelius Ratliff), 
Richard Thompson, William McKimmey, William Modlin, William Owen, Joseph 
R. Leakey, Benjamin Strattan, Thomas Leonard, Thomas Gilbert, Elisha Short- 
ridge, and Jonathan Bundy were among the pioneers of Dudley Township, who 
came in the Winter of 1821 or Spring of 1822. 

LIBERTY TOWNSHIP. 

*Of those who first settled Liberty Township comparatively little has been 
learned. The author of this History is not informed whether any came in before 
the land sale, but of those who came in about the time of the sale may be men- 



864 hazzard's history of henry county. 

tioned Elisha Long, Moses Robertson, Thomas R. Stanford, David Brower, 
John Leavell, Robert Thompson, Jesse Forkner, Isaac Forkner, John Baker, and 
a number of others. Since the purchases made at the land sale exceeded those 
of any other township, it is fair to suppose that quite a number had already lo- 
cated there. 

GREENSBORO TOWNSHIP. 

Jacob Woods, Samuel Pickering, and perhaps two or three others first settled 
here in the Summer of 1821. Samuel and Jonas Pickering, Walker Carpenter, and 
Benjamin Kirk came through, prospecting in 1820, after visiting Winchester, An- 
derson, Pendleton, and other points. Jacob Elliott built a cabin about where his 
son, Jacob S. Elliott, formerly lived, in the Fall of 1821, but did not move into it 
until the Spring of 1822. 

At the time Jacob Woods located where he lived so long, one and one fourth 
miles east of Greensboro, there were no settlers on Blue River between Daniel 
Jackson's and Joseph Hobson's, except William Shannon, and for some time there 
were no neighbors on the east nearer than William Bond, who resided on the old 
Wickersham farm, now owned by Josiah P. Nicholson, about four miles south of 
New Castle. A number of persons settled Sbout Greensboro in the following 
year, and as early as 1823 a Friends' meeting was held at Duck Creek, David 
Bailey, Joseph Ratcliff, Eli Stafford, Samuel Pickering, aijd Jacob Woods 
being among the "charter members." 

H.\RRIS0N TOWNSHIP. 

Dempsey Reece and Roderick Craig settled on Duck Creek in the eastern edge 
of Harrison Township, in April, 1822. This was on land now known as the Peter 
Shaffer farm. Reece had raised a crop of corn on White River, about the present 
site of Indianapolis, the year before. 

Phineas Ratliff, Rice Price, and Joseph and Richard Ratliff all settled in the 
same year within about one and one half miles of Dempsey Reece. 

stony creek TOWNSHIP. 

\\'ithin the present limits of Stony Creek Township there were no settlers 
prior to the land sale which took place in 1822, and perhaps not until 1823, when 
John Hodgins, Mr. Schofield. Jonathan Bedwell, and Andrew Blount, the pro- 
prietor of Blountsville, settled there. There were but three or four families on 
Stony Creek, in the Spring of 1826, at which time John Hawk, a cabinet maker 
of Blountsville, took up quarters there. 

FALL creek TOWNSHIP. 

The settlement of Fall Creek seems not to have begun as early as many other 
parts of the county. John, Jacob, George, Peter, and David Keesling located 
near Mechanicsburg, about 1824 or 1825. forming what was known as* the 
"Keesling neighborhood." William Stewart and Joseph Franklin came in about 
the same time. John Hart, David Van Matre, Adam E. Conn, and the Painters 
were early settlers in the eastern part of the township, near IMiddletown. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HEXRY COUNTY. 
JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP. 



865 



Within the present limits of Jefferson Township, at an early day, perhaps 
1824 or 1825. came Samuel Beavers, Anthony Sanders, James Marsh, and the 
Flemings, with some others. This township constituted a part of Fall Creek 
and Prairie for many years. 

BLUE RIVER TOWNSHIP. 

There was considerable progress made in the settlement of Blue River Town- 
ship (then a part of Stony Creek), in 1823. Michael Conway, Richard and 
Reuben Wilson, Joseph Cory, John Koons, John P. Johnson, and several others 
moved to this part of the county as early as 1823, a few, perhaps, having located 
the year previous, the precise time, however, being difficult to learn. 

LAND SALES AND FIRST ENTRIES. 



According to the record, William Owen, of Dudley Township, purchased 
the first tract of land in Henry County ; this transaction bearing date of February 
4, 1821. David Butler next entered land, August 8, 1821. in the same township, 
and on the nth of August, Josiah Morris, of Dudley, and Samuel Furgason of 
W'ayne Township, each entered a tract. 

Judging from the number of purchases made, the settlers in Wayne Town- 
ship must have gone in a body to attend the sale, as of the twenty five purchases 
made during the year, sixteen were made on the 13th of August. The following 
is a list of purchases during the year, with date of purchase : 



Samuel Furgason. August 11. 
Waitsel M. Gary, August 13. 
Abraham Heaton, August 13. 
Daniel Heaton, August 13. 
Samuel Gary, August 13. 
David Lauderback, August 13 
Edward Patterson, August 13 
AVililam Macy, August 13. 
Jacob Parkhurst, August 13. 
Thomas Bstell, August 13. 
Henry Ballanger. August 13. 
Isaac Pugh. August 13. 
Shaphat McGray. August 13. 



David Dalrymple. August 14. 
William Criswell, August 14. 
Ebenezer Goble, August 14. 
Joseph Watts, August 14. 
Stephen Cook, August 20. 
Samuel Goble. August 20. 
John Daily, August 22. 
Jacob Whitter, August 23. 
John Freeland, September 18. 
Gharles Smith, October 13. 
Ertmond Lewis. October 31. 
John Lewis, October 31. 



The 13th of August seems to have been a field dav for the people of Wayne 
Township. On the 14th, nothing seems to have been done. Whether it was 
Sunday, or was tak^en up with calling for bids on the tracts of land now in Spice- 
land and Franklin Townships, is not known. On the 15th. the sale commencetl 
for lands in Henry Township, when seven persons responded 'to the call of their 
numbers, and subsequently some ten other purchases were made, as will be seen 
lielow : 



Allen Shepherd, August 15. 
William C. Drew, August 15. 
55 



Asahel Woodward, August 20. 
Thomas Woodward, August 20. 



866 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



Thomas Symons, August 15. 
Christopher Bundy, August 15. 
Joseph Hobson, August 15. 
William Shannon, August 15. 
Joseph Newby, August 15. 
George Hobson, August 16. 
Robert Hill, August 21. 



Joseph Holman, August 27. 
Aaron Mills, August 31. 
Ann Ward, September 21. 
Caleb Commons, September 21. 
Joseph Jliatt, September 24. 
William Blount, Senior, October 17. 



The auctioneer then passed on to Liberty Township, range eleven east, town- 
ship seventeen, and found bidders more plentiful. The list and dates below will 
serve to show something of the tone of the market. We will let William Roe, 
probably a blood relative of the celebrated Richard Roe, whom school boys will 
remember as having extensive dealings with John Doe, head the list. 



William Roe, August 16. 
Andrew Shannon, August 16. 
William Yates, August 16. 
Thomas Batson. August 16. 
Jesse Martindale, August 16. 
Moses Robertson, August 16. 
John Beard, August 16. 
Jeremiah Strode, August 16. 
William Bell, August 16. 
Daniel Wampler, August 16. 
David Brower, August 16. 
Joshua Hardman, August 16. 
John Leavell, August 16. 
George Handley, August 16. 
Samuel Southron, August 16. 
Robert Thompson, August 16. 
Micajah Chamness, August 16. 
John Dougherty, August 20. 
Henry Brower, August 21. 
Thomas Raleston, August 31. 
Daniel Miller, August 31. 
Prosper Mickels, August 31. 



Jacob Rinehart. September 4. 
Peter Rinehart, September 4. 
Jonathan Pierson. September 
John Beaman, September 4. 
George Koons, September 12. 
Enoch Goff, September 20. 
Elisha Ijong, October 20. 
Jerry Long, October 20. 
John Baker, October 22. 
Keneker Johnson, November - 
Jesse Forkner, November 12. 
Dilwin Bales, November 30. 
Jeremiah Hadley, December 5. 
Richard Conway, December 5. 
Watson Roe, December 5. 
John Koons, December 5. 
George Hobson. December 6. 
John Marshall, December 6. 
Thomas Hobson, December 6. 
Thomas Mills, December 6. 
John Stapler. December 7. 
Josiah Clawson, December 20. 



In Dudley Township, the purchasers seem to have taken it more liesurely, 
and strung their purchases out from the time of the land sale to the end of the 
vear, and are as follows : 



William Owens, February 4. 
David Butler, August 8. 
Josiah Morris, August 11. 
Stephen Hall, August 16. 
Jesse Shortridge. August 16. 
Dally Beard, August 16. 
Elisha Shortridge. August 17. 
John Wilson, August 18. 
Jesse Fraizer, August 18. 
Jonathan Bundy, August 24. 
William Modlin, August 24. 
Hampton Green, August 24. 
William Seward, August 28. 
Joseph Charles, August 30. 
Linus French, August 31. 



John Gilleland, September 1. 
Susanna Leakey, September 8. 
Joseph R. Leakey, September 8. 
Joseph Cox, October 5. 
John Green, October 6. 
William Riadon, October 17. 
William McKimmey, October 20. 
Josiah Gilbert, October 21. 
Exum Elliott, October 23. 
David Thompson, November 26. 
Aaron Morris, November 27. 
John Pool, December 1. 
John Smith, December 3. 
Daniel Paul, December 12. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 867 

The following are all the purchasers of land, in 182 1, within the present 
limits of Franklin Township : 

William Felton, August 2S. Jolin Charles, December 28. 

Cliarles See, September 16. 

Within the present limits of Spiceland Township, there were twelve entries, 
in that year, as follows : 

Daniel Jackson, August 17. William Mustard, September 1. 

Solomon Byrkett, August 27. James Carr, September 14. 

William Felton, August 28. Jacob Elliott, October 3. 

Allen Hunt, August 30. William Elliott, November G. 

Jacob Hall, August 30. William Berry. December 20. 

Nathan Davis, August 31. Joseph Charles, December 24. 

^^'ithin the limits of Greensboro Township, there were eight entries, in that 
year, namely : 

Samuel Hill, August 15. John Harvey, Senior, August 21. 

Thomas McCoy, August 15. Samuel Pickering, August 28. 

Levi Cook, August 20. John Harvey, August 30. 

Lewis Hosier, August 2,0. Jacob Eliott, October 3. 

In 1822. only three entries were made within the limits of Fall Creek Town- 
ship, as follows : 

Benjamin G. Bristol, August 27. Reuben Bristol, October 4. 

James W. Wier, September 26, 

There do not seem to have been any purchases made within the limits of 
Jefferson Township, during the year 1822, but within the limits of Prairie Town- 
ship, there was more activity, and the following names apiiear: 

Absalom Harvey, October 22. William Harvey, October 25. 

Robert Smith, October 25. John Harris, October 25. 

Barclay Benbow, October 25. Jacob Weston, November 12. 

James Harvey, October 25. Jacob Witter, December 11. 

Abijah Cox, October 25. Philip Harkrider, December 22. 
Benjamin Harvey, October 25. 

These were generally, or all, on Blue River, the bottom and second bottom 
lands of which seemed very attractive to the early settler. There seems to have 
been but one entry within the limits of Stony Creek, that of Andrew Blount, Jr., 
November 11. Within the present limits of Blue River, however, the following 
secured themselves homesteads : 

Richard Wilson, October 28. John Koons, November 11. 

Michael Conway, October 28. Jacob Huston, November 12. 

George Hobson, October 28. George Hedrick, November 13. 

Joseph Cory, October 31. Richard Alsbaugh, November 14. 

Abraham Cory, October 31. Henry Metzger, November 14, 

Bet'^y Cory, October 31. Henry Stumph, November 18. 

Reuben Wilson, November 4. John P. Johnson, November 22. 
George Koons, November 6. 



868 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Dempsey Reece entered a tract of land in Harrison Township, April 29, 1822, 
which was the only piece purchased in the township, during the year. Zeno 
Pearson and Richard Ratliff purchased land in January following, and Levi 
Pearson and Gahriel Ratliff, in June and July, which completed the transactions 
for the year 1823. 

The land office for this district was at Brookville until 1825, when it was 
transferred to Indianapolis, then a village of little consequence, there being fewer 
voters in Alarion County at that time than there are in Henry Township today. 

The manner of the land sale was to commence in a certain township in a 
certaiu range, and offer each tract or eighty acre lot, consecutively, till the whole 
was gone through with. If no one bid, the tract being called by number was 
soon passed. \\'hen a number was called, the '•'squatter" who, perhaps, had a few 
acres cleared, or a little cabin on the same, could become the purchaser at one 
dollar and twenty five cents per acre, the minimum price, unless some one ran 
it up on him. 

Where two persons had the same number and were desirous of entering the 
same eighty or one hundred and sixty acre lot, it was no uncommon thing for one 
to buy tiie other oft", with some trifling sum, say ten to twenty five dollars, and, al- 
though the law of public opinion was such that neighbors would seldom try to 
buy each other's improvements from under them, still there were cases in which 
no little feeling was excited at times, and various little intrigues were resorted to, 
to bluff or out-wit competitors. 

If for any reason a man failed to bid on a piece of land he desired to pur- 
chase, it sometimes happened that he could prevail oii the auctioneer to call it up 
"just after dinner," or the "first thing next morning." From and after the land 
sale, all lands were subject to private entry at the minimum price. 

ORGANIZATION OF HENRY COUNTY. 

The act referred to as "An act for the fixing of the seats of Justice, in all 
new counties hereafter to be laid off" in section thr.ee (3) of the hw authorizing 
the formation of the county of Henry hereinafter set forth, is Chapter i, of the 
"special acts passed and published at the second session of the General Assembly 
of the State of Indiana, held at Corydon, on the first Monday in December in 
the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen." Approved 
January 2, i8tq. 

This act is in six sections but the first section is the most important for the 
purpose of this History. It provided in brief that when a new county was or- 
ganized that the act creating the same, should appoint five commissioners who "do 
not reside in said new county, nor hold any real estate therein," thus providing 
against any real estate speculation on the part of those appointed. 

The commissioners so appointed were then instructed "to convene at such 
time as the General Assembly shall appoint," which in the case of the county of 
Henry, was "at the Home of Joseph Hobson," who, at the time mentioned, lived 
about .two miles south of the Court House Square in New Castle, on what was 
subsequently anil for a great number of vears thereafter, Vnown as the Stephen 
F.llintt farm. 



HAZZARD's history of IlKXRY COUNTY. 869 

The commissioners named in the act heretofore referred to after having met 
"at the house of Joseph Hobson," and having been duly sworn, were then directed 
to "proceed to fix on the most eligible and convenient ]ilace for the permanent seat 
of justice for such new county, taking into view the extent of the county, the 
quality of the land, and the prospective future, as w^ell as the weight of the 
present population, together with the probability of future division." They were 
authorized to acquire the necessary land bv either donation or purchase and to 
take a good and sufficient bond therefor, conditional that the land so acquire:!, 
either by donation or purchase, should be duly conveyed to such agent as the 
Board of County Commissioners might designate as their agent to receive 
the same. 

The remaining five sections of tlie act relate entirely to the proceedings of 
Boards of County Commissioners and their duties after the land so acquired was 
deeded to their agent, as provided in section one of said act. 

■In the last section, seven (7), of the act creating the county of Henry, here- 
after set out, it is provided that the qualified voters of said county shall proceed 
to hold the first comity election in the same manner and under the same condi- 
tions as the "qualified voters of Dubois County and others named" were authorized 
to proceed under an act entitled "An act incorporating a County Library in the 
counties therein named," .\pproved, January 28, 1818. The last paragraph of 
said section seven, (7), provided that the act creating the county of Henry should 
not be effective until the first day of June, 1822. . 

Accordingly, under the authority conferred on the commissioners named to 
organize-the county of Henry, acting under the Dubois County act, they must have 
called a meeting of the qualified voters of the proposed new county to meet "at the 
home of Joseph Hobson," immediately after the act became operative, for the first 
entry on the records of the Board of County Commissioners of Henry County is 
dated June 10, 1822, or ten days after the act creating the county of Henry be- 
came effective. This order will be found set out in full in the article treating 
of the first courts of the county. With this election, which would now be known 
and recognized as a mass meeting, the duty of the five commissioners named in 
the act organizing the county of Henry ended and the duties of the Board of 
County Commissioners and other countv officers, began. In short, the county of 
Henrv was organized and read\- for business. 

As was provided in the act, it was made the duty of the Sheriff of Wayne 
County to notify the five commissinners appointed to organize the" county of 
Henry, of their appointment and tlieir duties. This mandate seems to have been 
dul\' executed as the very early records of the board of commissioners show that 
"Elias \\'illets. Sheriff of Wayne County, be allowed fifteen dnllars" fur the 
service, which was certainly cheap enough considering the fact that he must have 
gone into four counties and traveled at least two hundred and fifty miles. On 
the other hand, it may be considered that the commissioners were liberal as the 
sum was nearly one tenth of the entire revenue. County and State, collected for 
the first fiscal vear of the life of the countv of Henrv. 



870 hazzard's history of henry county. 

FIRST county officers. 

For Congressional purposes, the county was attached to the Third Congres- 
sional District, represented by John Test of Brookville, tlie other counties in the 
district being Dearborn, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Randolph, Ripley, Switzer- 
land, Union and Wayne. For judicial purposes, the county was attached to the 
Third Judicial District, afterwards the Fifth, of which Miles C. Eggleston of 
Centreville. was the presiding judge. The other counties of the judicial disfict 
being, Dearborn, Fayette, Franklin, Jennings, Randolph, Ripley, Rush. Switzer- 
land, Union and Wayne. 

The law must have been that when an act was passed looking to the creation 
of a new county that it was the duty of the governor to appoint a sheriff and 
county surveyor for the proposed new county, for the records of the Executive 
Department of the State on deposit in the offices of the Secretary of State, at 
Indianapolis, show that on January i, 1822, the day after the act was approved, 
creating the county of Henry, it was "ordered that Jesse H. Healey be and he is 
hereby appointed Sheriff of the county of Henry." The same records show th^t 
on Ma>- 9, 1822, William McKimmey was appointed Surveyor for the new 
county. Thus every new county started out from its very inception with a chief 
peace officer and a county surveyor, which at that time was a highly important 
office, considering the fact that the boundaries of every piece of 'land in the county 
had to be established for the new settlers. 

At the election -lield "at the home of Joseph Hobson" the following additional 
officers were elected, all their commissions dating from July 5, 1822, viz : — Rene 
Julian, Clerk and Recorder: Thomas R. Stanford and Elisha Long, Associate 
Judges ; Allen Shepherd, Elisha Shortridge, and Samuel Goble. County Com- 
missioners. Subsequently. William Shannon was appointed, by the said Board, 
the first County Treasurer. The office of County Auditor was not created until 
1840, the duties of this office up to that time, devolving upon the County Clerk, 
who acted as "Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners." 

For Senatorial purposes, the new county was attached to the distr'ct com- 
posed of the counties of Henry, Hamilton, Johnson. jMarion, ^ladiscn. Rush and 
Shelby, the Senator being James Gregory of Shelby County. The first session of 
the General Assembly at which he represented the new county was the eighth 
regular session which convened at Corydon, (the last held there) ''on the first 
Monday in December, 1823," he having been elected for the term of three years 
"on the first Monday in August" preceding. For a member of the lower house 
of the General Assembly, the county was attached to the district composed of the 
counties of Henry, Decatur, Rush and Shelby, the Representative being Th'^mas 
Hendricks, residence probably in Shelby County, who was elected at the same time 
and sat in the same session with Senator James Gregory. 

The first County Coroner was Ezekiel Leavell, who assumed the duties of the 
office September 8, 1824, and resigned January 24, 1825. 

THE L.AW creating THE COUNTY OF HENRY. 

The ancient and musty laws of the State of Indiana in bound volumes, on 
deposit in the office of the State Librarian at Indianapolis show the following: 



hazzard's history of henry, county. 871 

chapter lx. 

.\N ACT for the formation of a new coimty out of the 
County of Delaware.* 

Sec. I. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the Names and 
State of Indiana, That from and after the first day of June tioundaries. 
next all that tract of land which is included within the fol- 
lowing boundaries shall constitute and form a new county 
to be known and designated by the name and style of the 
county of Henry, to-wit : Beginning at the southwest corner 
of Wayne County; thence west twenty miles; thence north 
twenty miles ; thence east twenty miles ; thence south twenty 
miles to the beginning. 

Sec. 2. The said new county of Henry shall, from and Privileges, 
after the first day of June next enjoy all the rights, privi- *'^- 
leges and jurisdictions which to separate and independent 
counties do or may properly belong and appertain. 

Sec. 3. Lawrence H. Brannon and John Bell, of the Commissioners 
County of Wayne, John Sample, of the County of Fayette, appointed. 
Richard Biem, of the County of Jackson, and James W. 
Scott, of the County of Union, are hereby appointed Com- 
missioners agreeably to an act entitled "an act for the fix- 
ing the seats of Justice in all new counties hereafter to be 
laid off." The Commissioners above named shall meet at When and 
the house of Joseph Hobson in the said County of Henry on wliere to 
the first Monday in July next, and shall immediately proceed ™^^t- 
to discharge the duties assigned them by law. It is hereby 
made the duty of the Sheriflf of W^ayne County to notify the sheriff of 
said Commissioners either in person or by written notifica- Wayne county 
tion of their appointment on or before the fifteenth day of to notify 
June next ; and the said Sheriflf of Wayne County shall be them, 
allowed therefor by the County- Commissioners of the County 
of Henry such compensation as by them shall be deemed 
just and reasonable, to be paid out of the county treasury 
of said County of Henry in the same manner other allow- 
ances are paid. 

Sec. 4. The circuit and all other courts of the County courts, 
of Henry shall meet and be holden at the house of Joseph where to be 
Hobson until suitable accommodation can be had at the liolden. 
county seat of said county ; and so soon as the courts of said 
county are satisfied that suitable accommodations are pro- 
vided at the county seat of said county, they shall adjourn 
thereto after which time all the courts of said county shall 
be held at the seat of justice thereof: Proz'ided, however, 
that the circuit court of said county shall have authority to 
remove from the house of said Joseph Hobson, to any more 



reserv 



buildings, 
when to be 
erected. 



■2 HAZZARDe HISTORY OF HENRY COUXTY. 

suitable place in said county previous to the completion of 
the public buildings if they should deem the same expedi- 
ent, 
per cent. Sec. 5. The agent who shall be appointed for said 

county to superintend the sales of lots at the county seat of 
said county or receive donations for said county, shall re- 
serve ten per cent, out of the proceeds of such sales and do- 
nations, which he shall pay over to such person or persons 
as by law may be authorized to receive the same, for the 
use of a county library for said county : which he shall jDay 
over at such time or times and manner as shall be directed 
b\" law. 
Putilic Sec. 6. The Board of County Commissioners of said 

county shall within twelve months after the permanent seat 
of justice shall have been selected proceed to erect the neces- 
sary public buildings thereon. 

Sec. 7. The same powers, privileges and authorities that 
are granted to the qualified voters of Dubois County and oth- 
ers named in the act entitled "an act incorporating a county 
library in the counties therein named," approved January 
the 28th, 1818, to organize, conduct and support a county 
library, are hereby granted to the qualified voters of said 
county of Henry ; and the same power and authority therein 
granted to. and the same duties required of, the several offi- 
cers elected by the qualified voters of the said county of 
Dubois and other counties named in said act for carn-ing 
into effect the provisions thereof according to its true intent 
and meaning, are hereby granted to and required of the offi- 
cers .who may be elected for the purpose aforesaid by the 
qualified voters of said County of Henry. 

This act shall be in force from and after the first day of 
June next. 

sa;muel milroy. 

Speaker of the House of Representatives. 
RATLIFF BOON. 
President of the Senate. 
Approved December 31st. 1821. 

JONATHAN JENNINGS, 

Governor of Indiana. 

* Be it remembered that there were two separate and distinct nountie,s, each named Delaware. The 
first was the " unorganized" county of Delaware, organized .Tanuarr 22, 1820, which embraced all of the " new 
purcha.se," being a va-st tract of land relinquished bv the Indians to the General Gowrnment and to the State 
of Indiana. The second was the present county of Delaware, organized out of a part of the first named coun- 
ty, January 26, 1827. It was from the first mentioned countv of Delaware that Henry county was organized. 
"Unorganized County" means no civil government established. 

BOUNDARIES OF HENRY COUNTY. 

According to Section one ( i ) of the act creating the county of Henr^^, it 
was made a perfectly square body of territopi', twenty miles from east to west 
and a like distance from north to south. From a glance at the map of the count}' 



hazzard's history of hexry county. 873 

of Henry or the map of Indiana showing the county, it will be seen that it is not 
now a body of land twenty miles square, but there is a jog of a mile in the south- 
west corner on the west side, for six miles. Then on the east side of the county 
along the center of the county there is a jog of three quarters'of a mile for a dis- 
tance of nine (9) miles. If the county was now twenty miles square as pro- 
vided in the act creating it, it would contain four hundred square miles of ter- 
ritory. 

Section one ( i ) of the act begins to describe the county of Henry, to-\vit : 
"Beginning at the southwest corner of Wayne County," jvhereas, the southeastern 
corner of the county of Henry as. now defined is located six miles northwest of 
the "southwest corner of Wayne County." When the boundaries of the counties 
of the State were finally adjusted, nearly three Congressional townships of land 
were attached to the southern tier of Congressional townships in Wayne County, 
probably taken from Fayette County. Had they extended these townships along 
the entire southern boundary of Wayne County, Favette County would not now 
join the countv of Henry. But then, the southeast corner of the coiuitv of Henry 
would be nearly six miles due north of the "southwest corner of Wayne County." 
The county of Henry-as it exists today, contains about three hundred and ninety 
square miles and approximately two hundred and fifty thousand acres of land and 
is bounded on the east by Randolph and Wayne ; on the north by Delaware : on the 
west by ^ladison and Hancock; and on the south by Rush and Fayette counties. 

The actual boundaries of the county of Henry as they exist today and as they 
have existed probably, for three quarters of a century or more, are defined in the 
following letter from the County Surveyor. Omar E. ^linesinger: 
"O. E. MINESINGER. 
"COCXTY SURVEYOR, 
"HENRY COUNTY. 

"New Casti.e. IxniAX.4, September 22. 1905. 
•'Mr. George Hazzard. New Castle. Ind.: 

"Sir: The district of country within the following boundaries constitutes the county 
of Henry, to-wit: Commencing at the southeast corner of section 31. township 16 north, 
range 12 east, and running thence north to the township line dividing townships 16 and 
17; thence east to the southeast corner of section 32, township 17 north, range 12 east; 
thence north to the northeast corner of section 20, township 18 north, range 12 east; 
thence west to the range line dividing ranges 11 and 12; thence north on said range line 
to the northeast corner of section 2-5, township 19 north, range 11 east; thence west to 
the northwest corner of section 25, township 19 north, range 8 east; thence south to the 
township line dividing townships 16 and 17; thence west to the northwest corner of sec- 
tion 1, township 16 north, range 8 east; thence south to the township line dividing 
townships 15 and 16; thence east with saiti township line to the place of beginning. 

"Very truly, 

"Omar E. MixESixiiER. 
"Surveyor Henry County." 



CHAPTER XXXVIII. 

township organization. 

Organization of the Se\-eral Townships — Population — Assessed Valua- 
tion — Taxation — Elections. 

At the time of the assembling of the first Commissioners' Court, June lo, 
1822, there were no civil townships in existence, within its jurisdiction, and one 
of its first cares was to provide a few of these indispensable dependencies, "with 
a local habitation and a name." After describing, in fitting language, the metes 
and bounds of these "territories," the Commissioners declared that "from and 
after the first Saturday in July next" they should each "enjoy all the rights and 
pririlci^rs ami jurisdictions which to separate and independent townships do or 
may properly belong or appertain." 

Whether this idea of an independent and separate existence and jurisdiction 
smacks of "State rights" or not, the reader must judge. The Commissioners were 
an authority in the land, in those days, and, it is quite safe to conclude that they 
fully intended to carve out of the territorial limits of Henry County several little 
republics, which were to be fully competent to manage their domestic institutions 
in their own way. 

The townships thus provided were four in number, viz. : Dudley, ^^'ayne, 
Henry, and Prairie. Dudley and Wayne composed the First Commissioners Dis- 
trict, Henry, the Second, and Prairie, the Third. 

The original boundaries of Henry County were not identical with those of 
the present day, and, as a consequence, the boundaries of the townships lying on 
the east and west borders of the county underwent some change when the new 
boundaries were fixed by the General Assembly in the early 'thirties. A town- 
ship meeting, notwithstanding the size of the township, must have been a small 
aff^air in those times. Three years after, when the population had probably more 
than doubled, the whole vote for Governor was but 366. 

DUDLEY township. 

Dudley, the first township called into being by the fiat of the Commissioners, 
June II, 1822, began at "the southeast corner of Henry County, of which it is a 
part," and running thence west on the county line dividing Henry, Fayette and 
Rush counties, about nine and one fourth miles from the present east line of the 
county, and was six miles in width. It consequently contained at least fifty five 
and one half sections of land, and comprised all of its present limits and about 
four fifths of the present township of Franklin. 




HENRY COUNTY CITIZENS. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 875 

At this date, it is estimated that there were not one hundred and fifty persons 
residing within the limits of the township. A round of log rollings, house raisings, 
and similar "bees" occupied much of their time, and in talking with one of these 
veterans you will very likely be told that they enjoyed themselves and felt as 
hopeful, contented, and happy as at any period since. 

A "Friends' Meeting House," a hewed log edifice, which stood about one 
mile southeast of the present site of Hopewell Meeting House, was erected in 1823 
or 1824 and was probably the first attempt at church architecture in the township 
or in the county. The congregation had been in the habit of worshiping at the 
house of William Charles, north of where Hardin's old tavern stand used to be. 
An ancient orchard still marks the spot. 

A Baptist church, a log building about eighteen by twenty feet, was erected 
about one and one half miles northeast of Daniel Paul's, so near the same time 
as to render it difficult to determine which is entitled to the claim of seniority. 
This church was used as a school house for a number of years. 

A school house soon followed, with all the elegant appurtenances and appli- 
ances of the times for assisting the "young idea to shoot." 

Dudley Township was the eatewa)- of the county, as three principal thor- 
oughfares from the east and srmtlieast led through it. Tt presents, perhaps, less 
variety of surface than any other township in the county, being almost entirely 
table land, lying on "the divide" between Flatrock and West River, with perhaps 
two thirds of its surface finding drainage to the latter. The passerby of early days 
regarded it as most unpromisingly wet. Although very little of it can be termed 
rolling, it- is now seen to be sufficiently undulating to permit the most complete 
drainage of almost every acre, and under improved culture the large average 
crops and general fertility stamp it as one of the best bodies of land in the cornty. 

Dudley is five and a quarter by six miles in extent, and thus contains about 
19.000 acres. According to the census of 1870. it was then divided into 191 farms, 
an average of about 103 acres each ; supporting an almost exclusively rural pipula- 
tion of 1,348 souls, about forty three and one half per square mile, divided be- 
tween 268 families and 267 dwellings. Of this number but thirteen were foreign- 
ers — less than one per cent., while the natives of the "Old North State" numbered 
126, or nearly ten per cent, of the whole population. The value of the lands and 
improvements for 1870 was $542,120. The town lots and improvements were 
valued at $6,300, and the personal property at $249,970, making a total of wealth 
of $798, 390, as shown by the tax duplicate for 1870. The census of 1900 seems 
to have been taken only by counties ; at least the author has been unable to find 
any subdivision less than the county that would enable him to set out for com- 
parisons, all of the items mentioned above, as taken from the census of 1870 : and 
what is true of Dudley, is true of all the other townships following. The only 
items of general interest that can be found relating to Dudley and the twelve 
townships that follow, are those regarding the population, viz. : population, accord- 
ing to the census of 1890, including Straughn, incorporated and New Lisbon not 
incorporated, 1,395 '< census of 1900, 1,359; ^ loss of thirty six in ten years. 

The tax duplicate for 1904, the township and towns combined, shows the 
following: value of lands, $637,600; value of improvements, $111,850; total, 
$749,450; value of lots, $14,410; value of improvements, $27,560; total, $41,970; 



876 hazzard's history of henry county. 

value of personal property of all kinds, $432,240: value of railroad property, in- 
cluding steam and electric lines. $370,720; total value of taxables of all kinds, 
$1,594,380; less mortgage exemptions, $40,090; leaving the net value of taxables 
for the year named, $1,554,290. 

Total taxes levied on the duplicate for the year 1904, township, Straujhn, 
incorporated, and New Lisbon, not incorporated, combined, which taxes are as 
follows, viz. : — State tax, for benevolent institutions, State debt sinking fund, 
State school. State educational institutions, free gravel road repairs. County tax, 
locil tuition, special school, road, township, bridge, court house, and co-pora- 
tion, this last being confined to the corporation of Straughn. $20,254.76. Total 
polls, being a specified head tax on each male person between the ages .of twenty 
one and fifty. 218; tax on each, distributed through different funds, $2.00; total 
polls in Straughn. 35; tax on each, $2.00. 

From the foregoing, it will be seen that the population of Dudley Township 
has not been subject to much change since the census of 1S70. But a compar- 
ifon between the tax duplicates of 1870 and 1904, exhibits the fact that the taxable 
property of Dudley has nearly doubled during that period. 

Mortgage exemption is allow-ed under the law which became effective 
March 4. 1899. I'nder this law, an exemption for mortgage on real estate, not ''n 
excess of the sum of $700 is allowed, and then only provided the real estate is 
valued for taxation at twice the sum of the mortgage exemption. Therefore, on 
all real estate valued for taxation at less than $1,400, the mortg-ige exemption 
could not be in excess of one half the value of the property. 

The first election was ordered to be held at the house of Daniel Paul, on 
Saturday, July 6th. 1822. for the purpose of electing one Justice of the Peace, 
and William McKimmey was appointed Inspector. William INIcKimmey and 
Garnette Hayden were appointed first Overseers of the Poor for Dudley Township, 
and Richard Pearson and Robert Thompson "Fence-viewers." The elections 
were afterwards held at Benjamin Strattan's for a number of years; about 1840. 
at Daniel Reynolds; then at New Lisbon. Soon two polls were opened — one at 
New Lisbon, and the other near Straughn's. Again the polls were united and 
held at James Macy's. At this time, there are two polls, one at New Lisbon, and 
the other at Straughn. The vote at the general election, held Tuesday. Novem- 
ber 8. 1904, based on the returns for the vote cast for Secretary of State, was : 
New Lisbon precinct, 200 ; Straughn precinct, 220 ; total, 420. The vote set out 
in the twelve townships following, is for the same election and based on the same 
returns. 

Today, instead of the mere "trace," the "See trail," the blazed bridle path, 
winding around through the thickets, around or over logs, through "slashes," or 
high grass and stinging nettles, high as a man's shoulders, so well remembered 
by the "oldest inhabitant." or over miles and miles of "corduroy road," of which 
"internal improvements" Dudley could, fifty or sixty years ago, vie with the 
world, the township has nearly thirty miles of fine turnpike, splendid and well 
drained farms and farm houses that equal the best. 

WAYNE TOWNSHIP. 

The second grand division named in order, on the public records, was to be 
known and designated by the name and style of Wayne Township. It was 



iiazzard's history of henry county. 877 

orig'ir.ally six miles troiii north to soutli, ami eleven in length from east to west, 
including all that territory west of Dudley. It thus included in its fair domain 
about 42,000 acres of very valuable land, much of it today the most valuable 
in the county. Its first boundaries included one fifth of the present township 
of Franklin, all of Spiceland. and one sixth of Greensboro. Although thrice shorn 
of a portion of its "independent jurisdiction," its present area is a trifle in excess 
of thirty three square miles. 

Wayne township had, at the date of its organization, from thirty to forty 
■families, though the very choice lands, fine springs, and abundant water power 
of Blue River, Buck and Alontgomery creeks, marked it for rapid settlement. A 
village was projected at the mouth of Montgomery Creek, on the county line, 
as well as "old State road," at once and known as West Liberty. This became 
the emporium of trade for the region round about, and rejoiced in all the metro- 
politan splendors of a "one-eyed grocery" and dry goods store kept by Aaron 
Maxwell. This "Chamber of Commerce," in 1822, consisted of a very indifferent 
log cabin, with a wide fire place, flanked on one side by a rude table, where Mrs. 
Maxwell compounded "red bread," and on the other by a barrel of whisky, and 
about as many bolts of calico, etc., as could be piled upon a chair. 

Raccoon pelts seem to have been the principal circulating medium, and several 
years afterward, when the stimulus of sharp competition had taxed the energies 
of the iTierchant princes of the day. the old ladies were at times under the necessity 
of sending by the mail boy for a little tea or other luxury, and young ladies in 
quest of a bridal trousseau would mount their palfreys and make a day's journey 
to Connersville for the outfit. 

The Methodists had preaching at West Liberty^ in a very early day, perhaps 
as early as 1823, Reverend Constant Bliss Jones officiating. The preaching was 
held at Mr. Hatton's private house for some tifne. Jones was succeeded by 
Reverend Mr. Brown, who seems to have resided at West Liberty. Mrs. Eliza 
Jones (then Miss Cary,) taught a school, in 1825 and 1826, and was the first 
female teacher in those parts. She, with Mrs. Peggy Jones, the minister's wife, 
organized the first Sunday school in the township, perhaps in the county. 

At the first meeting of the Board of Commissioners, an election was ordered 
to be held at the house of Joseph Watts, July 6th, for the purpose of electing the 
one Justice of the Peace for the township. Abraham Heaton was appointed 
Inspector, and seems to have been elected the first Justice. In August, Elijah 
McCray and E. Harden were appointed constables of Wayne Township, until the 
February term, next in course. In November, Daniel Priddy was also appointed 
constable. Ebenezer Goble and Samuel Furgason were appointed Overseers of 
the Poor, and Daniel Heaton, Shaphat McCray, and Jacpb Parkhurst first "Fence- 
viewers in and for Wa\iir Tow n^liip." and Abraham Heaton was also appointed 
Superintendent of the school si-ctions in Wayne Township. The elections in this 
township were afterward held at Prudence Jackson's house, till 1825; changed to 
Solomon Byrket's, in 1827; then to Jacob Parkhurst's, then to Raysville and 
Knightstown alternately, and soon afterward fixed permanently at Knightstown. 

Abraham Heaton seems to have had, at this early day, a mill erected at the 
mouth of Buck Creek, a few rods south of what has for many years been known 
as the "\\'hite ]\lill." John Anderson, afterward "Judge Anderson," then a fresh 



Hyii HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

arrival, dug the race and, receiving $ioo for the same, walked to Brookville and 
entered a part of the present site of Raysville. 

Immediately after the organization of the township was effected, the Com- 
missioners ordered the location of a road "to commence at the town of New 
Castle, and from thence the nearest and best way to Abraham Heaton's mills, and 
from thence to the county line, where sections thirty three and thirty four corner 
in township sixteen and range nine, on the line dividing fifteen and sixteen." The 
terminus was West Liberty, and the route selected was the river route from 
New Castle via Teas' mill, the stone quarry, and Elm Grove. This was the 
second ordered in the county, the first being from New Castle via John Baker's 
and David Thompson's, on Symons Creek, to the county line, on a direct course, 
to Shock's Mill, in Wayne County, which shows of what importance the opening 
of the "Cracker line" was to the early settlements. Not to be wondered at either, 
.since "going to mill" required about two to four days out of the month. 

In 1870, Wayne was the most populous and wealthy townships of the county, 
but now Henry Township holds that rank. Wayne being second. According to 
the census of 1870, its area was divided into 206 farms; an average of about 103 
acres each, and had a population of 3,334, or about 100 per square mile. The 
value of lands and improvements for 1870 was $664,710; of town lots and im- 
promevents, $433,120; while personal property footed up to the snug little sum 
of $682,540, making a total of $1,780,370. Something more than one half its 
population was then to be found in Knightstown, Raysville, and Grant and Eliza- 
beth cities, 330 of its 680 families residing in Knightstown alone. Dudley and 
Wayne, with the townships carved out of them, constitute the First Commissioner's 
District, as they always have and do now. 

The population of Wayne Township, according to the census of 1890. in- 
cluding Knightstown incorporated, Raysville, Grant City, and Elizabeth City, 
not incorporated, was 3,333 ; census of 1900, 3,370. 

The tax duplicate for 1904, township and towns combined, shows the fol- 
lowing: Value of lands, $694,530; value of improvements, $119,560; total, 
$814,090; value of lots, $172,260; value of improvements $357,570; total, 
$529,830; value of personal property of all kinds, $824,850; value of railroad 
property including steam and electric lines, $445,620; total value of taxables of 
all kinds, $2,613,790; less mortgage exemptions, $27,920; leaving net value of 
taxables for the year named $2,585,870. A comparison of the census figures 
above set forth, shows that Wayne like Dudley Township, has had a very steady 
population since 1870. 

Total taxes levied on duplicate for the year 1904, township and Knightstown 
incorporated and Raysville, Grant City, and Elizabeth City, not incorporated, com- 
bined, which taxes are all in items set out in Dudley Township, with the addition 
of township poor, corporation bond, lighting streets, school library and water 
works, the last four being confined to Knightstown corporation, $50,879.69. Total 
polls in Wayne Township. 226 ; tax on each, $2.25 ; total polls in Knightstown cor- 
poration, 283 ; tax on each, $2.25 

Formerly, there were voting precincts at Knightstown, Raysville, Grant City, 
Elizabeth City and perhaps at other points in the township, but for the general 
election, held November 8, 1904, the total vote was cast at six precincts, all in 



hazzard's history of henry county. 879 

Knightstown. Perhaps one of them was east of Blue River, at Raysville. The 
vote was, first precinct, 166; second precinct, 134; third precinct, 161 ; fourth pre- 
cinct, 154; fifth precinct, 181 ; sixth precinct, 156; total, 952. 

HENRY TOWNSHIP. 

Henry, the third township, in the "order of their going,'' upon the records, 
was also called up June, 1822, and was a strip of territory six miles wide, extending 
quite across the county from east to west, and including what is now Liberty, 
Henry, three fifths of Harrison, and nearly all of Greensboro township. This con- 
stituted the Second Commissioner's District. It at first contained 118 square 
miles, or over 75,000 acres. 

Henry Township now contains thirty-six square miles, and is nearly the geo- 
graphical center of the county, and is the only one in the county in which the 
Congressional is identical with the civil township. Ten years after the organi- 
zation of the county, this township had not over 500 inhabitants, while in 1870 it 
numbered over 2,800, nearly one-half of whom lived in the "rural districts." It 
contained 135 farms of near 160 acres each, and maintained a population of 78 to 
the square mile. There were 592 families, 67 colored persons, 121 of foreign birth, 
and 152 natives of old North Carolina, in the township. The population of Henry 
Township, according to the census of 1890, including New Castle incorporated, 
was 4,009; census of 1900, 4,682. 

Blue" River, dividing the township nearly in the center, is too sluggish to furn- 
ish good water power for a mill within the limits of the township. Duck Creek 
skirts through the northwest corner of the township, and Flatrock through the 
southeast corner. The table lands between these streams are nearly one hundred 
feet above the bed of Blue River, and, although there is perhaps as much rolling 
land in this township as any in the county, there is very little so rolling as to merit 
the term broken, or too much so to admit of culture. Repeated efforts at ditching 
and straightening the channel of Blue River have completely redeemed to cultiva- 
tion the marshy bottom lands which are of inexhaustable fertility. 

The county seat being located in Henry Township would of itself (even in 
the absence of natural advantages), have secured to this township an important 
position in the county, both financially and politically. The value of the real and 
personal property in the county, by the assessment of 1870, was shown to be: 
Lands and improvements, $689,350; lots and improvements, $300,870; per- 
sonal property, $609,400, making a snug total of $1,599,620. 

The tax duplicate for 1904, the township and New Castle, incorporated, com- 
bined, shows the following: value of lands, $912,810; value of improvements, 
$230,020: total, $1,142,830; value of lots, $677,040: value of improvements, $611- 
130; total, $1,288,170; value of personal property of all kinds, $1,182,720; railroad 
property including steam and electric lines, $403,890; total value of taxables of all 
kinds, $4,017,610; less mortgage exemptions, $155,340; total, $3,862,270. Total 
taxes levied on duplicate for the year 1904, township and New Castle, incor- 
porated, combined, which taxes include all items set forth in Dudley Township 
with the addition of the township poor tax. corporation, corporation bond, lighting 
streets, streets, school library, and cemetery, all of which, except township poor 



88o hazzard's history of henry county. 

tax, are confined to New Castle corporation : total, $82,864.85. Total polls in 
Henry Township, 202; tax, $2.50 each; New Castle corporation, 912; tax, 
$2.50 each. 

In 1904. the vote of the whole township cast at six precincts, all in New 
Castle, was as follows : first precinct, 268 ; second, 287 ; third, 340 ; fourth, 200 ; 
fifth, 268; sixth, 330; total, 1,693. This total vote indicates a marked increase in 
the population of Henry Township for 1904 as compared with the census of 
1900. In the four years intervening, the population was largely increased by the 
location of many new manufacturing establishments in New Castle. 

The first election was held at the house of Samuel Batson ; Charles Jamison, 
Inspector. Asahel Woodard, Micajah Chamness, and Thomas Watkins were ap- 
pointed Fence-viewers for Henry Township. William Shannon and Samuel 
Batson were elected first Justices of Peace. 



The fourth of the original townships, included all the territory lying north of 
Henry, and was eight miles in width and nearly twenty in length, thus giving it an 
area of nearly 160 square miles or about 105,000 acres. Within its ample limits 
were all of the present townships of Blue River, Stony Creek, Prairie, Jefferson, 
Fall Creek, and about two fifths of Harrison. 

In spite of the mutations which have since overtaken it. the township re- 
mains five miles in width by eight in length, thus containing over 25,000 acres, 
which were divided, according to the census of 1870. into 201 farms, averaging 
about 122 acres each. 

The population of Prairie_Township according to the census of 1890, includ- 
ing Luray. Springport, Mount Summit, and Hillsboro. not incorporated, was 
1,663; census of 1900, 1,662, thus showing that the township, in ten years, lost 
one inhabitant. 

Prairie contains four villages, viz. : Luray, Springport, Mount Summit and 
Hillsboro. The value of farms and improvements for the year 1870, was $559,210; 
of town lots and improvements, $10,610; of personal property $258,650; making 
a total for the township, of $828,470. The tax duplicate for 1904, the township 
and towns combined, shows the following value of land. $686,730; value of im- 
provements, $70,090; total, $756,820; value of lots, $6,900: value of improve- 
ments, $25,470; total, $32,370; value of personal property of all kinds, $287,290; 
value of railroad property, no electric lines, $222,320; total value of taxables of 
all kinds, $1,298,800; less mortgage exemptions, $45,700; leaving net value of tax- 
ables for the year named, $1,253,100. Total taxes levied on the tax duplicate for 
1904, township and towns combined, which taxes include all items enumerated 
in Dudley Township, except corporation tax. there being no incorporated town in 
Prairie, $18,750.44 ; total polls, 293 ; tax on each, $2.50. 

This is a remarkable township in many respects. Situated as it is, on the 
"divide" between White and Blue Rivers, about one half its surface finds drainage 
to the north and the remainder southward, and although thus situated on the 
"water shed," nearly one sixth of its surface consists of low, wet meadows, from 
fifty to eighty feet below the general level of the table lands. It is from these 
meadows or prairies that the townshi]) takes its name. These "flowery leas" seem 



hazzard's history of henry county. 88 1 

ever to have been coveted, although within the memory of the oldest inhabitant 
large portions of them were so flooded with water much of the year as to be 
chiefly valuable as the resort of waterfowl. Today, however, under an extensive 
system of drainage, even the wettest portions of these prairies have been thor- 
oughly redeemed, making farms which for inexhaustible fertility cannot be sur- 
passed. 

The first" election for Justice of Peace was held July 6, 1822, at the house of 
Absalom Harvey; William Harvey, Inspector. William Harvey and Abijah Cane 
were appointed first Overseers of the Poor, and Abraham Harvey, James Massey, 
and Robert Gordon, Fence-viewers "in and for said township." In 1826, the 
place of holding elections was changed to Sampson Smith's, afterward to Enoch 
Dent's, and again to Ezekiel T. Hickman's, where it remained for many years, but, 
in 1846, was changed to James Harvey's. Later, there were several changes in 
the voting place, and now there are two voting places, viz. : south precinct, Mount 
Summit; north precinct, Springport. Vote, 1904, south precinct, 209: north pre- 
cmct, 232; total, 441. 

The first school house in the township was built on Shubal Julian's land, 
better known of late as the "Shively farm," perhaps in 1824 or 1825. It was a 
small affair, with split saplings for seats, and a fire-place across the entire end. 

The late Dr. Luther W. Hess, of Cadiz, once a State Senator, and ex-County 
Treasurer, and Emsley Julian, graduated from this school. Milton Wayman, the 
last Probate Judge for Henry County, was the teacher. 

LIBERTY TOWNSHir. 

Liberty was the fifth township organized, this important ceremony bearing 
date of February 12, 1822. It was a clipping from the east end of Henry Town- 
ship, and, according to the metes and bounds prescribed, it was at first one mile 
less in extent from east to west than at present. It is now six miles wide by six 
and three fourths in length, thus embracing about forty square miles, mostly table 
land, and of a very fine quality generally. Flatrock, rising in Rlue River Township, 
enters the township near the middle of its northern boundary, passing out near 
the southwest corner. The valley of this stream is so slightly depressed as to form 
nothing worthy to be called blufifs, and, although too sluggish to be of much value 
for hydraulic purposes, it, with its small tributaries, seems in some way con- 
nected with the drainage and fertility of a wide belt of superb farming lands. The 
two Symons creeks, heretofore mentioned, find their sources in Liberty Town- 
ship, and now furnish ample drainage to many sections of fine land that, doubt- 
less, in the early days of Henry County, passed for very wet land. 

The aggregate value of the farms and improvements of Liberty Township 
exceeds that of the farms of any other township of the county, except Henry, and 
the evidence of thrift and "farming for profit" are nowhere more generally visible 
than in Liberty Township. Four villages have been projected in the township — 
Millville, Ashland, Petersburg, and Chicago, though it is presumed that the propri- 
etors of the two last named, if still living, have long since abandoned the hope of 
seeing them outstrip their namesakes. Under the old turnpike law, many miles of 
turnpike sprang into existence, and now the people of this township rejoice in the 
advantage of traveling to almost any point on good roads. 

56 



8^2 HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

According to the census of 1870, the population numbered 1,868, being almost 
exclusively rural. Its 24,000 acres were then divided into 203 farms, an average 
of about 120 acres each. The population then numbered about 49 to the square 
mile, being divided between 376 families. There were then 6 persons of color, 
19 foreigners, 64 North Carolinians, and 32 Virginians, within the township. The 
population of Liberty Township, township and towns combined, according to the 
census of 1890, was 1,538; census of 1900, 1,416; showing a loss in ten years 
of more than one hundred, which is explained by the purchase and consolidation of 
small farms into large ones. 

The wealth of the township was estimated for the purpose of taxation, in 
1870, as follows: farms and improvements, $712,430; town lots and improvements, 
$5,950 ; personal property, $325,410 ; total valuation. $1,043,790. The tax duplicate 
for the year 1904, the township and towns combined, shows the following, viz. : 
value of lands, $843,720: value of improvements. $104,130; total, $947,850; value 
of lots, $970; value of improvements, $3,120: total, $4,090: value of personal 
property of all kinds, $301,607; value of railroad property, no electric lines, $244,- 
100; total value of taxables of all kinds, $1,497,647; less mortgage exemptions, 
$42,410; leaving net value of taxables for year named, $1,455,237. Total taxes 
levied on the tax duplicate for the year 1904, the township and towns combined, 
which taxes include all items enumerated in Dudley Township, except corpora- 
tion tax, there being no incorpoi^ted town in Liberty Township, $20,854.80 ; total 
polls, 241 ; tax on each, $2. 

The first election was held at the house of Ezekiel Leavell, on the first Satur- 
day in May, 1823, for the election of two Justices of the Peace. Ezekiel Leavell 
was Inspector. John Smith was made Supervisor of all the roads in the town- 
ship. Jacob Thorp and Cyrus Cotton were appointed Overseers of the Poor. In 
1825, the elections were ordered to be held at the house of Samuel D. Wells, and 
continued to be held at his house for a number of years. After the railroad was 
built through the township and the town of Millville established, the voting place 
was moved to that town. There are now two voting precincts in Liberty, one 
at Millville, the other at Ashland. Vote, 1904. East Liberty precinct. Millville, 
209 ; West Liberty precinct, Ashland, 164 ; total, 373. 

STONY CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

This township, the next in order of organization, was established November 
II, 1828. By its creation Prairie Township lost about one third of its "inde- 
pendent jurisdiction," as Stony Creek was bounded on the west by the range line 
separating ranges ten and eleven, and extended to the eastern boundary of the 
county, including all north of Liberty Township, which made it a region of no small 
consequence. It was at first eight miles from north to south, six miles wide on the 
north, and about six and three fourths on its south line, and had in its ample area 
about forty nine and one half sections of land. A tier of eight sections has since 
been re-annexed to Prairie to compensate, no doubt, in a measure, for the loss of 
more than two townships on the west. Blue River Township has also been carved 
out of Stony Creek, thus reducing it in size to barely twenty square miles, about 
two fifths of its primal area, and leaving it the smallest of the townships. 







COMPANY E, 8th INDIANA INFANTRY, 



hazzard's history of henry county. 883 

The township is fittingly named from a creek, which, rising near, runs nearly 
parallel with, its southern border, then runs north across the township and finally 
into White River. The immense quantities of bowlders or "traveled stones" scat- 
tered over some of the highest ridges and points in the township must not only 
arrest the attention and excite the curiosity of the observer, but at once obviate the 
necessity of inquiry as to the township's name. 

This township presents, perhaps, a greater variety of surface and soil than 
any other equal area in the county, and while there was every variety of timber to 
be found in the county, there was a larger proportion of oak here than elsewhere, 
and less poplar, ash and walnut. 

There is a portion of two or more prairies in this township, similar to those in 
Prairie. The bottom lands are doubtless equal to any in the county, while the 
higher lands, which the casual observer would [lerhaps. pronounce thin or poor, not 
only produce abumlnnt crops of the smaller grains, lint Indian corn of more than 
average size. Blountsville and Rogersville are the only villages. The population, 
according to the census of 1870, was 934; divided between 197 families. There 
were then 13 colored persons, 10 foreigners, 21 natives of North Carolina, and 35 
A'irginians in the township. There were 118 farms, averaging about 109 acres 
each. 

The population of Stony Creek Township, according to the census of 1890, 
including Blountsville and Rogersville, was 1,088; the census of 1900 shows a 
less population, the number being 962. Since then, the Chicago, Cincinnati and 
Louisville Railroad has been built through the township, and now no doubt the 
township exhibits a marked increase over that of 1900. 

The assessed value of farms and improvements for 1870 was $178,940; of 
town lots, $6,500; and of personal, $112,330; making a total of $297,770. The 
tax duplicate for the year 1904, township and towns combined, shows the following: 
value of lands, $333,010; value of improvements, $43,910; total, $376,920; value of 
lots, $3,480; value of improvements, $10,140; total, $13,620; value of personal 
property of all kinds, $141,740: value of railroad property, no electric lines, $30,- 
140; total value of taxables of all kinds, $562,420; less mortgage exemptions, $25,- 
180; leaving net value of taxables for the year named, $537,240. Total taxes 
levied on the duplicate for the year 1904, township and towns combined, which 
taxes include all items enumerated in Dudley Township except corporation tax, 
there being no incorporated town in Stony Creek Township, $9,383.63 ; total polls, 
179: tax on each, $2.00. 

The first election was held at the house of Thomas Hobson, Jr., December 20, 
1828, for the purpose of electing one Justice of the Peace; William Wyatt, In- 
spector. There were formerly two voting precincts, but this was in the days of 
bad roads, and want of suitable and satisfactory conveyances. Now, since the 
days of free gravel roads and rubber tired buggies, the two precincts have been 
consolidated into one, at Blountsville. A^ote. 1904, one precinct, Blountsville, 237. 

F.MJ. CREEK TOWNSHIP. 

The next- township in order was named Fall Creek, organized August, 1829. 
This was at first declared to be eight miles in length, from north to south, by seven 
in width. It thus embraced within its limits fifty six square miles, or 35,840 acres. 



88_|. HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUXTY. 

and yet with this ample domain the township could only muster twenty nine votes 
at an exciting election, in 1830, and of these but three were Whig votes, yet now 
the township is largely Republican. Since the organization of the township a strip 
two miles in width has been given to Harrison Township, and two miles on the 
east of Jefferson, leaving the township six miles in length, from north to south, 
and five miles in width. 

Fall Creek is a well watered and very fertile township, and well improved 
farms and good buildings indicate that the husbandman is being well repaid for 
his labors. The creek from which the township takes its name, rising near the 
northeast comer, and meandering through, leaves the township, near the south- 
west corner. It once had sufficient fall to furnish valuable water power. Deer 
Creek, a tributary, rising in Harrison Township, near Cadiz, emptying into Fall 
Creek, about one and one-half miles north of Mechanicsburg. also furnished fair 
water power. A "corn cracker" was erected on this stream, about the year 1826. 
Benjamin Franklin, then a boy. afterward a noted preacher, is said to have dug 
the race. This was the first mill in that part of Henry County. 

A very rude log school house, with split pole benches and greased paper win- 
dows, did service in the Keesling neighborhood near the present site of Mechan- 
icsburg, as late as 1831 or 1832. Robert Price was the first teacher. Lewis Swain 
was afterwards principal of this institution. Some of the earlier settlers can re- 
member attending the log rollings every day for weeks together. 

Aliddletown. Mechanicsburg, and Honey Creek, are the towns and villages of 
the township. The total population of the township, according to the census of 
1870, was 2,004, or about 66 to the square mile. Of these 31 were foreigners, 36 
North Carolinians, 321 Alrginians. and 4 colored persons. There were 197 fami- 
lies living in the town and villages and 209 in the country. The population of Fall 
Creek Township, according to the census of 1890, including Middletown, Mechan- 
icsburg and Honey Creek, was 2,320: census of 1900, 3,311, the principal gain 
arising from the increase of the population of Middletown. 

The wealth of the township, in 1870, for the purpose of taxation, was as fol- 
lows : farms, $522,270; town lots, $72,650; personal property, $412,280; total, $1,- 
007,200. 

The tax duplicate for the year 1904, township, town and villages combined, 
shows the following: value of lands. $659,780: value of improvements, $124,090: 
total, $783,870: value of lots, $79,600; value of improvements, $127,410: total, 
$207,010; value of personal property of all kinds, $476,850; value of railroad prop- 
erty including steam and electric lines, incomplete. $171,810; total value of taxa- 
bles of all kinds. $1,639,540; less mortgage exemptions, $37,410. leaving a net value 
of taxables for the year named, $1,602,130. Total taxes levied on the duplicate for 
the year 1904, township, town, and villages combined, which taxes include all 
items enumerated in Dudley Township with the addition of township poor, corpor- 
ation, bond, lighting streets, and streets, the last named three, being confined to 
Aliddletown. $28,404.57, Total polls, the township, 235 ; tax, $2.50, each. Total 
polls, Middletown, 241 ; tax on each $2.50. 

All elections were ordered to be held at the house of Abraham Thomas, but in 
1832, it was ordered that they thereafter be held at Middletown. Elections are now 



hazzard's history of henry county. 885 

held at Aliddletown, ]\Iechanicsburg, and Henry Creek. Vote, 1904, Middletovvn, 
precinct "A," 118; "B," 163; "C' 105; "D," 127; ;\Iechanicsbiirg. 129; Honey 
Creek, 123; total, 765. 

FRANKLIN TOWN SHIT. 

Franklin Township was organized on January 5. 1830. It was constructed 
out of Dudley and Wayne townships, and, from the order making it a township, 
we learn that the west line was about three fourths of a mile west of the village of 
Ogden. and continued north to the line dividing townships sixteen and seventeen, 
which would make the northwest corner of Franklin as it then existed, about one 
mile west of the Masonic Cemetery, which joins Greensboro on the south. From 
this point the northern boundary ran east eight miles, or within three fourths of a 
mile of the present eastern limits of the township. This gave it jurisdiction over 
nearly all its present territory, all of Spiceland. a small fraction of Wayne (just 
north of the "Stone Quarry Mill"), and three sections now claimed by Greensboro. 
In the following year, a change was made in the western boundary, which gave 
Wayne another tier of sections and made the northwest corner of Franklin Town- 
ship, just about the location of the Masonic Cemetery, and perhaps, within the cor- 
porate limits of Greensboro. 

All elections were ordered to be held at the house of Joseph Copeland. John 
Copeland was appointed Inspector, and Joseph -Kellum, Lister: and the first elec- 
tion was ordered on the first Saturday in February, 1830. Upon the setting up of 
Spiceland .Township, in 1842, Franklin, which underwent another mutation, was 
given a slice off of Dudley, and was then contracted to its present limits of five 
miles in width, from east to west, by six miles in length. 

Flatrock "drags its slow length along" near the middle of the township, and, 
although at two or three points it was compelled to do duty as a mill stream, it 
never established much of a character for energy. It, however, is the natural drain 
of a remarkably fertile body of land. Buck Creek drains the northwest corner of 
the township. 

The present area of the township is about 17.200 acres, which according to 
the census of 1870, was then divided into 131 farms, an average of about 114 
acres each. Lewisville, the only village in the township, then contained 86 families, 
while 213 families resided in the country. Of the population in 1870, 42 were 
foreigners, 13 colored, 124 North Carolinians, and 29 Virginians: total population 
of township for 1870, 1,696; population according to the census of town and town- 
ship combined, for 1890, 1.330: census of 1900, 1,137; loss in ten years 193. How- 
ever, the recent improvement in Lewisville, must make a gain in the population of 
the township for 1905, more than equal to the loss as stated. The loss in popula- 
tion since 1870 must be accovmted for in Franklin Township for reasons given in 
other similar cases, viz. : the consolidation of small farms into large ones. 

The wealth of the township, 1870, is reported thus : farms and improvements, 
$500.750 : town lots and improvements, $42,960 : personal property, $332,260 ; total, 
$875,970. 

The tax duplicate for the year 1904, township and Lewisville combined, shows 
the following: value of lands. $591,920; value of improvements, $88,720; total, 
$680,640: value of lots, $36,400: value of improvements. $29,330; total, 65,730: 



886 hazzard's history of henry county. 

value of personal property of all kinds, $368,870; value of railroad property, in- 
cluding steam and electric lines, $325,240; total value of taxables of all kinds, 
$1,440,480; less mortgage exemptions, $25,290; leaving net value of taxables for 
the vear named, $1,415,190. Total taxes levied on the duplicate for the year 1904, 
township and Lewisville incorporated, combined, which taxes include all items 
enumerated in Dudley Township with addition of township poor, and corporation 
bond tax for Lewisville corporation, $20,626.66. Total polls in township, 136; 
tax, $1.50 each; total polls in Lewisville, 72; tax, $2.00 each. 

Formerly there was but one voting precinct in the township. Now there are 
two, both in Lewisville. Vote for 1904, West Franklin precinct, 172; East Frank- 
lin precinct, 162; total, '334. 

GKF.ENSBORO TOWNSIIIT. 

Greensboro Township, so named from an ancient village of North Carolina, 
was organized September 7, 1831.' It was at first described as "all that part of the 
territory of Henry Township west of the range line dividing nine and ten." This 
made it seven miles from east to west, and six miles from north to south, which 
would include nearly all of the present area of the township and three fifths of Har- 
rison. In 1838, one half its territory was given to Harrison, and a small addition 
— four square miles — was made to it, taken from the townships of Wayne and 
Franklin. This change removed the township line one mile south from the village 
of Greensboro, and left the township with an area of twenty five square mile-, or 
about 16,000 acres, divided, according to the census of 1870. into 118 farms; an 
average of about 135 acres each. 

Greensboro and Woodville (now extinct), on the line between Harrison and 
Greensboro Townships, were the only villages. Of the 315 families in 1870 in the 
township, 70 lived in Greensboro. The population of the township numbered 1.490. 
Of these six were reported of foreign birth; 81 colored; 221 were North Caro- 
linians; and 52 were natives of Virginia. Population according to the census of 
1890; Greensboro, Kennard, and Shirley, in Henry County, combined, 1,612; cen- 
sus for 1900, 1,658. 

The tax duplicate for the year 1904, township and towns combined, shows 
as follows: value of lands, $514,320; value of improvements, $72,760; total, $587,- 
080; value of lots. $16,610; value of improvements, $65,820; total, $82,430; value 
of personal property of all kinds, $269.850 ; value of railroad property, no electric 
lines. $137,020; total value of taxables of all kinds, $1,076,380; less mortgage ex- 
emptions, $32,330; leaving net value of taxables for the year named, $1,044,050. 

Greensboro is a well watered and fertile township. Blue River, skirting 
through the southeast corner, and Duck Creek, running across the eastern end, 
furnish fine water power. Much of the land along these water courses is quite 
rolling and there are numerous knolls, supplied with excellent gravel. ]\lont- 
gomery Creek, crossing the township near the middle, and Six-mile Creek rising 
in, and running across, the western part of the township, made the complete 
drainage of a large and fertile portion of the township (originally counted as 
wet), a matter of no great difficulty. 

The assessed value of Greensboro Township, tax duplicate of 1870, was: 
farms, $364,850; town lots, $34,190; personal. $196,330; total, $595,370. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. mj 

Total taxes levied on the duplicate for the year 1904, township and towns 
combined, which taxes include all items enumerated in Dudley township with the 
addition of corporation tax. Kennard, Shirley, and Greensboro, and corporation 
bond, Kennard, and street tax, Shirley; total, $19,259.59. Total polls in township. 
154; tax, $3.00 each; Greensboro corporation, 49; tax, $2.50 each; Kennard, 97; 
tax. $3.00 each ; Shirley, 41 ; tax, $3.50 each. 

For many years and until after the building of the Big Four railroad across 
the northern part of the township, all elections were held in the villae-e of Greens- 
boro. The first election in the township, was held on the fourth Saturday in 
September, 183 1, and Thomas Reagan was made the first inspector of elections. 
There are now two voting precincts, viz. : Greensboro, and Kennard, all voters liv- 
ing at Shirley, Henry County, voting at Kennard. \^ote for 1904, east precinct, 
Greensboro, 192; west precinct, Kennard. 302; total, 494. 

IIARKTSOX TOWNSHIP. 

The large and important township of Harrison was formed out of the north 
half of Greensboro and two tiers of sections off the south side of Fall Creek, No- 
vember 7, 1838, and all elections were ordered to be held at Cadiz. 

The general aspect of this township, which is five miles from north to south 
and seven miles from east to west, is that of high gently undulating table land, with 
considerable portions formerly inclined to be wet, but ver\' fertile under a system 
of intelligent drainage, now practically complete. A larger number of small 
streams find their head waters in this than any other township of the county. A 
small portion of the northeast corner of the township finds drainage into Bell Creek, 
and runs north, and near the same spot rises Honey Creek, also running north. 
Deer Creek, rising near the center of the township, also runs north by west, and 
empties into Fall Creek near Mechanicsburg, while two other small tributaries of 
Fall Creek have their source in the north and northwest portions of the township, 
and in the central and western portions. Sugar Creek takes its rise and runs west, 
while Montgomery Creek rises in the south part and runs south, and the west fork 
of Duck Creek rising near Cadiz, also runs south, while the principal branch of 
that creek, with some small tributaries, pretty effectually drains the eastern end of 
the township. A little south and west of Cadiz can doubtless be found some of the 
highest land in the western part of the county. Cadiz, and a part of Woodville, 
now extinct, are the only villages of the township. 

Harrison Township contains, exclusive of town lots, Cadiz and Woodville, 
more than 22,000 acres of land, which, according to the census of 1870, was di- 
vided into 183 farms, an average of about 122 acres each. The total assessed 
value of the township, villages included, on the tax duplicate for 1870 was as fol- 
lows : farms with improvements, $445,010; town lots including improvements, $11,- 
030; total value of personal property of all kinds, $217,390; grand total, $673,430. 

The tax duplicate for the year 1904, township and villages combined, shows 
the following: value of lands, $761,280; value of improvements, $102,200; total, 
$863,480; value of lots, $4,250; value of improvements, $14,450; total, $18,700: 
value of personal property of all kinds, $314,560; total value of taxables of all 
kinds, $1,196,740; less mortgage exemptions, $33,370; leaving net value of tax- 



888 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

ables for year named, $1,163,370. It will be noted that there is no railroad 
property, either steam or electric lines included in the above. Harrison town- 
ship is the only one in the county not touched bv a railroad. The total taxes 
levied on the tax duplicate for 190^, township and villages combined, which taxes 
include all items enumerated in Dudlev Township, with the addition of corpor- 
ation bond and street tax for Cadiz. Total, $20,828.12. Total polls in Harrison 
Township, 246; tax, $1.50 each ; Cadiz corporation, 33 ; tax, $2.00 each. 

At the first election, on the first Saturday in December, 1838, William Tucker, 
inspector, there were thirty two votes cast for Justice of the Peace. According to 
the census of 1870, Harrison had a population of 1,916, of whom 32 were colored, 
15 foreign born, loi natives of North Carolina, and 109 Virginians. Population, 
according to the census of 1890, township and Cadiz combined, 1,674; census of 
1900, 1,488; loss in ten years, 186; loss from 1870 to 1900, 428. The loss in pop- 
ulation can be accounted for by the purchase and consolidation of small farms 
into large ones, and the exodus of farmers and their sons and daughters from 
country to town life. 

The first church and school house was probably at Clear Springs, in the south- 
east corner of the township, constructed in 1831-2 while it was a part of Greens- 
boro Township. 

All elections have been held at Cadiz, from the organization of the town- 
ship to the present time. Formerly, there was but one voting precinct. Now there 
are two. \'ote for 1904. South Harrison precinct, ig6; North Harrison precinct, 
170; total, 366. 

SPICEI.ANn TOWNSHIP. 

This township, the smallest in the county, except Stony Creek, was organized, 
June, 1842, at which time, Ogden was the principal village. Room for it was 
found by taking a slice off Wayne and a four mile slip off the west side of Frank- 
lin Township. It is of irregular shape, being six miles in length on the eastern 
side, with an average length of five miles and width of four and one half miles. 
Blue River forms the boundary for about three miles on the northwest. Its area 
is a little short of twenty two square miles, or about 13,000 acres, which, according 
to the census of 1870, was divided into 173 farms, giving an average of only about 
75 acres each, the smallest average in the county. 

Buck Creek, running in a southwest course, crosses the southeastern corner 
of the township into Rush, where it makes a short turn and re-enters Henry 
County about the middle of the south line of the township and bearing in a north- 
west course, nearly four miles, passes into Wayne Township and falls into Blue 
River at the old Heaton or White Mills. Blue River on the northwest, and the 
classic little stream named Brook Bezor, which rises near the center of the town- 
ship and runs north two and one-half miles with an average descent of about thirty 
feet to the mile, constitute the only water courses of note in the township. 

Notwithstanding the smallness of Spiceland Township in respect to area, it is 
bytio means insignificant in some other respects, being fourth in point of popula- 
tion in the county, and up to the average in point of wealth, while its farm lands 
are assessed higher for purposes of taxation than many other townships in the 
county. This is doubtless owing in part to its division into smaller farms and 



hazzard's history of henry county. 889 

consequent thorough tillage, but much is owing to the high average quality of the 
land for general farming purposes. 

The population of Spiceland Township, according to the census of 1870, num- 
bered 2,020, or about 92 per square mile ; of these 334 were born in North Caro- 
lina, 45 in Virginia, 17 out of the United States, and 65 were colored persons. 

Population of Spiceland Township, including Ogden. Spiceland, and Dun- 
reith according to the census of 1890, 1.823: census of 1900. 1,844: the last 
census showing a total loss as compared with the census of 1870. of 176. This 
loss of population, between the years above mentioned, is explained bv the mi- 
proved general school system of the county as compared with the most prosperous 
days of the Spiceland Aca<lem>-, under Clarkson Davis, as principal, when it out- 
ranked every other school in the coimtv and many people moved to Spiceland to 
educate their children. The school is yet a most excellent one but the improved 
■educational facilities elsewhere in the countv. have stopped the migration to 
Spiceland as the great educational center. 

The first election was held at Ogden, August, 1842. A few vears afterwards, 
the poll was divided and elections held at Spiceland and Ogden. There are now 
three precincts, two at Spiceland and one at Dunreith. Vote for 1904, West 
Spiceland precinct, 132; East Spiceland precinct, 196: south precinct. Dunreith, 
185: total vote, 513. 

The assessed value of the tax duplicate for 1870. in farms was $457,460; town 
lots, $65,870; personal, $296,310; total, $819, 640. The tax duplicate for the year 
1904, township and towns combined, shows as follows: value of lands, $453,590; 
value of improvements, $101,410: total, $555,000; value of lots, $24,550; value of 
improvements, $60,830; total, $85,380: total value of personal property of all kinds, 
$393,160;, value of railroad property, steam and electric lines, $393,180; total taxa- 
bles of all kinds, $1,426,720; less mortgage exemptions, $29,410; leaving net value 
of taxables for the year named, $1,397,310. Total taxes levied on the duplicate 
for the year 1904, township and towns combined, which taxes include all items 
enumerated in Dudley Township, with the addition of township poor, lighting 
streets, corporation and street tax, the last three for Spiceland corporation, and 
corporation tax for Dunreith, total $21,988.26. Total polls in township, 159; tax, 
$2.00 each; Spiceland corporation, 81 ; tax, $2.50 each; Dunreith corporation, 30; 
tax, $2.50 each. 

JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP. 

This township was organized September 5, 1843, out of the spare territory of 
Fall Creek and Prairie. The eastern half of it is eight miles in length, while on the 
west line it is but six miles. It is four miles in width and contains twenty eight 
square miles, or nearly 18,000 acres, all passably good land, and much of it very fine 
farming land. Its principal stream is Bell Creek, which with its tributaries traverses 
nearly the entire length of the township. Honey Creek is in the southwest ; and 
a branch tributary of Buck Creek, in the northeast corner, carries into White 
River a portion of its surplus waters. Sulphur Springs is the only village. 

The population of the township, according to the census of T870, numbered 
1,234. divided into 230 families, 172 of whom lived in the agricultural districts. 



890 hazzard's history of henry county. 

There were 23 foreigners, 12 North Carolinians, and 169 Virginians in the town- 
ship. The average size of a farm in the township was about 103 acres, and the 
population numbered about 46 to the square mile. 

The farms and improvements on the tax duplicate for 1870 were valued, for 
the purpose of taxation, at $359,290; town lots, $18,800; personal, $188,050; total, 
$566,140. 

The tax duplicate for the year 1904, townships and town combined, shows the 
following: value of lands, $543,460; value of improvements, $73,010; total, $616,- 
470; value of lots, $2,310; value of improvements, $19,840; total, $22,150; total 
value of personal property of all kinds, $214,200; value of railroad property in- 
cluding steam and unfinished electric line, $143,820; total value of taxables of all 
kinds, $996,640, less mortgage exemptions, $30,470 ; leaving net value of taxables 
for the year named, $966,220. Total taxes levied on the tax duplicate for the year 
1904, township and town combined, which taxes include all items enumerated in 
Dudley Township with the addition of corporation and street tax. Sulphur Springs, 
$13,269. Total polls in Jefferson Township, 165 ; tax, $2.50; total polls in Sulphur 
Springs, 49 ; tax, $2.25 each. 

The elections were first ordered to be held at the house of Michael Swope, on 
the 2nd day of October, 1843, ^oi" the purpose of electing a Justice. Since the 
building of the Panhandle railroad through the township, 1855-56, and the es- 
tablishment of Sulphur Springs, the elections have been uniformly held at that 
place. Formerly, there was but one voting place, now there are two. \'ote, for 
1904, West Jefferson precinct, 140; East Jefferson precinct, 173: total, 313. 

Population, according to the census of 1890, township and town combined, 
1,132; census of 1900, 1,144. 

BLUE RINER TOWNSHIP. 

This was the last organized, and is one of the smallest townships of the county, 
and contains a trifle more than twenty two square miles. It was formed from 
the south half of Stonv Creek Township, bv act of the Commissioners, on June 6, 
1848. 

Blue River Township takes its name quite aptly from being the source of 
both branches of the stream of that name, so intimately connected with the pros- 
perity and history of the county. "Big Blue," as it is often called, rises near the 
middle of the western portion of the township, and runs nearly north about three 
and one half miles to within about one half mile of Rogersville, in Stony Creek 
Township, where it bears to the west and is soon wending its way amid the prai- 
ries of Prairie Township. The slashes or head waters of this branch of the river 
are known in the Duke neighborhood by the classic name of "Goose Creek." The 
stream has a fall of perhaps twenty feet ]ier mile for the first three 
and one half or four miles, and. although the volume of water is 
small, at the ordinary stage there were formerly two prettv valuable 
mill seats on it before it reached Prairie Township. "Little . Blue" 
rises near the north line and northeast corner of the township, and run- 
ning in a general southwest direction into Prairie Township, unites with the main 
branch about two miles north of New Castle. On this branch of Blue River were 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 89I 

formerly situated the flourishing woolen mills of Mowrer and McAfee and later 
of Ice, Dunn and Company, and the celebrated Hernly Mill, as well as some of the 
finest farms in the northern part of the county. Flatrock also rises in the north- 
eastern portion of this township, and takes a southerly direction, while a small 
branch of Stony Creek, almost interlapping with "Little Blue," somehow finds its 
way through the water shed of this part of the county, and runs north into White 
River, near the western boundary of Randolph County. From the number of 
streams having their initial point in the township, and running in opposite direc- 
tions, the conclusion is easily reached that some of the highest lands in the county 
are to be found here ; but being the highest by no means signifies the dryest. 
Large portions of the township required drainage to make them available to the 
husbandman, but being reclaimed are of the very best quality. 

The woolen mills mentioned in the preceding paragraph were for many 
years a land mark in Henry County. There is now no sign of this once flourishing 
industry except the remnants of a fast disappearing mill race. The factory was 
first best known as Mowrer and McAfee's and later as Ice, Dunn and Company's. 
From the destruction of the timber and the drainage of the county and the con- 
sequent immediate flow of the waters on their way to the sea, Little Blue River 
as well as all other rivers and streams in the county have been rendered practi- 
cally useless, so far as power is concerned, for mill and factory purposes. For the 
same reason, the Hernly Mill, so long another land mark, was put out of business. 
This mill and factor}- stood near each other about three miles northeast of New 
Castle and not far from the old village of Hillsboro. 

This little township was exclusively rural, having neither village nor per- 
manent postoffice within its limits until after the construction of the Big Four rail- 
road through the central part of the county, unless a half interest in the old town 
site of Centerville, on the line between Blue River and Stony Creek townships, for 
many years extinct, could have been claimed as a village. Since the building of 
the Big Four Road, the prosperous and beautiful town of Mooreland has been es- 
tablished and the postoffice has been re-established at what is now the village of 
Messick, formerly a neighborhood cross roads. 

The census of 1870 showed a population of 861, the smallest number at that 
time, of any of the thirteen civil divisions of the county. Of this population, 13 
were colored ; 7 foreigners, 25 Virginians ; and 70 North Carolinians. The pop- 
ulation, according to the census of 1890 including Mooreland, incorporated, and 
the village of Messick, was 1,032: census of 1900, 1,053. 

The farms and improvements on the tax duplicate of 1870, were valued at 
$269,250, and the personal property at $88,990: total, $358,240. The tax dupli- 
cate for the year 1904, township, town, and village combined, shows as follows: 
value of lands, $458,220: value of improvements, $37,070: total, $495,290: value 
of lots, $9,160: value of improvements, $32,160: total, $41,320: total value of per- 
sonal property of all kinds, $190,620: value of railroad property, no electric lines, 
$98,040: total value of taxables of all kinds, $825,270: less mortgage exemptions, 
$43,700: leaving net value of taxables for the year named, $781,570. Total taxes 
levied for the year 1904, township, town and village combined, which taxes in- 
clude all items enumerated in Dudley Township, with the addition of corporation 
bond, and street tax for the town of Mooreland, $13,267.09. Total polls in town- 
ship, 135: tax, $2.50 each: polls in Mooreland, 76: tax, $3.25 each. 



892 HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

At the time the township was established, all elections were ordered to be 
held at "the home of Philip Moore or at the Meeting House nearby," and they so 
continued to be held there until after the establishment of Mooreland as above men- 
tioned, since which time the voting has all been done at Mooreland where there are 
now two precincts. Vote for 1904, West Blue River precinct, 145 ; East Blue 
River precinct, 174; total, 319. 




[47tli IXDIAXA INFANTRY 



CHAPTER XXXIX. 

county buildings and county charities. 

The First Court House — The Second Court House — The Present Court 
House — The Xew Addition to the Present Court House — Earlier 
Clerk's And Recorder's Office — Earlier Auditor's And Treasurer's 
Office — The Court House Square — The First Jail — The Second Jail 
— The Present Jail — The Present Jail Site — The Stray Pen — The 
County Asylum — Superintendents of the County Asylum — The 
First Orphans' Home at Spiceland — The Aged Person's Home and 
Orphan Asylum for the German Baptist Church of the Southern 
District of Indiana — The Bundy Home at Spiceland — The County 
Board of Charities and Corrections. 

Section six of the act, providing for the organization of the county of 
Henry, made it the duty of the commissioners to provide for the erection of 
suitable colinty buildings within one year after their election. 

THE first court HOUSE. 

In obedience to this provision, the commissioners, in February, 1823, ordered 
that : 

"The agent of Henry County shall offer for sale to the lowest bidder in the 
town of New Castle, the building of the court house of Henry County, of the 
following dimensions, to-wit : being logs twenty two by eighteen feet, each log to 
face not less than twelve inches at the little end, being seven inches thick, twelve 
rounds high, with a cabin roof to consist of eleven joists, to be four inches by 
nine, the joists to be eight feet nine inches from the floor, etc., etc." 

The sills of this imposing structure were to be of durable timber, one foot 
from the ground, with a good rock or stone under each corner, a puncheon floor 
below and plank floor above, with two windows above and three below, consist- 
ing of twelve lights each ; and they further instructed that the, "Sale of the above 
described building be on the Wednesday after the second Monday in ]\Iay next, 
with a good door three feet wide, six feet, six inches high." 

At the May term following, the board rescinded the above order and at once 
substituted another with further and more "workmanlike" specifications. In these 
specifications, the side logs were to be twenty six feet long, and end logs twenty 
feet, while they were to face at least twelve inches in the middle, and sills and 
sleepers to be of good durable timber, and to be placed on six suitable sized 
stones, the floor to be of puncheons hewed smooth and solid, and the lower story 



894 hazzard's history of henry county. 

to be at least nine feet between joists. The second floor to be of plank, and the 
second story was to be at least five feet from the floor to the top of the last 
round of logs, "or square." There were also to be two doors so cut as to make 
the center of the door "nine feet from the end of the building" (which end is 
not specified), but they were to be "so hanged as to open on that end of the house 
intended for spectators," and they were to be hung on strong iron hinges, with a 
"good lock on what may be considered the front door," and a bar so as to fasten 
the other. This time there were to be two fifteen-light windows, and a strong 
partition of banisters, at least four feet high, to separate the court from the spec- 
tators, with a strong gate in it, fastening on the inside, and the second floor was to 
be reached by a "good strong set of straight steps, commonly called mill steps." 
The building was to be "well chinked and daubed and covered with good oak 
boards confined with sufficient weight poles." 

The order for letting the court house provides that it be "advertised in three 
of the most public places in the county, and in the Western Times, a paper 
published at Centreville, Wayne County. Indiana," and it was, in "height, ma- 
terials and construction, to be similar to the court house in Connersville. Fayette 
County, Indiana." 

This building was ordered to be placed on the southeast corner of lot four, 
block twelve, which located it near the southwest corner of the new addition to 
the present court house and immediately across the street, north of the Alcazar 
theatre. So soon as the building was covered, the contractor was to receive 
twenty dollars of the "purchase money," and it was also stipulated that it was to 
be completed before the second Monday in February. 

According to arrangement, the Agent did "sell the courthouse," on the 14th 
of May, 1823, to George Barnard, for two hundred and forty seven dollars, and 
in May following the commissioners adjourned from the house of John Smith 
to the new court house, which they formally accepted, as it was done according to 
contract. Once established in a building adequate to the wants and fully com- 
porting with the dignity and wealth of our flourishing county — one that cost 
them a sum about equal to the tax duplicate for three years, it cannot be. doubted 
but the commissioners felt immeasurable relief. Doubtless the tax-payers grum- 
bled at the extravagance of those fellows who could thus squander two hundred 
and forty seven dollars, and they were soon rewarded by being permitted to retire 
to the rest and quietude of private life. 

This log building, Henry County's first court house, was ready for oc- 
cupancy early in the year 1824, and it was used for the transaction of all the 
business of the county, until after the second court house was ordered constructed 
in 1831. Between the determination to build a new court house (1831), and the 
time when it was ready for use, in the Winter of 1836-37, the first court house 
came to be regarded as unfit in which to hold court, and accordingly in 1834, as 
related by Judge Martin L. Bundy : 

"The Board of County Commissioners procured for a court room, which 
was so used until the new building was ready for occupancy, the old frame 
Methodist Church, a small structure which stood where the City Hall (Old 
Methodist Church), now stands. At the first term of court held in this church. 
Charles H. Test was the presiding judge and William J. Brown, then of Rush- 



hazzard's history of henry county. 895 

ville (Father of Admiral George Brown, of Indianapolis, retired) was the prose- 
cuting attorney. My father-in-law, Abraham Elliott, appeared as counsel for 
Peter Winslow, a colored man who shot at a constable about to levy an execu- 
tion on his property. This I think was Abraham Elliott's last appearance in court 
as attorney." 

It is remembered by persons now living in New Castle, that after this first 
court house was vacated by the county, it was repaired and occupied by Samuel 
Graham, an English weaver who came to New York in 1833, and soon after to 
New Castle, where he wove coverlets and where he probably had his place of 
abode. A number of people in New Castle, and probably elsewhere in the county, 
now hold as heirlooms, fine, old fashioned coverlets woven in white and blue, 
with appropriate patterns, and date, the handiwork of Mr. Graham, a well re- 
membered citizen and the father of William D. and the late Thomas R. Graham. 
After Mr. Graham's vacation of this old log building, remembered as standing 
as late as 1850, it may have been and probably was used as a residence. 

It is mentioned in one of the preceding paragraphs, that the county com- 
missioners in May, 1824, "adjourned from the house of John Smith to the new 
court house." the first one built. This shows that the board of commissioners 
had found a new place for business and had moved from the house of Charles 
Jamison. The history regarding this removal is furnished by Judge Martin L. 
Bundy who in answer to the inquiry, "Who was John Smith?" says: 

"Well, he was the son of John Smith, a little old man who was the proprietor 
of. and laid out Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana, and whom I remember as 
far back as 1825. His son, John Smith, built a house and owned the lots where 
my son, Eugene H. Bundy, and his family now live, opposite, but a near neigh- 
bor of Charles Jamison. His house was larger than Jamison's which may have 
been the reason for the removal. Smith left New Castle, prior to 1833 and settled 
in Wabash where he lived for many years and where he died. The only two 
things that I remember about Smith were that he was very deaf and that when 
he made a visit to a neighbor, his parting salutation was, 'take notice.' I am 
not sure that he was in any way distinguished, nor do I remember his vocation, 
if he had one." 

The jail, court house, and stray pen, or pound, being completed, a "long 
spasm of retrenchment and economy" occurred, until the county, fast becoming 
rich, began to grow proud, and, in 1831, ordered the building of a 

SECOND COURT HOUSE (buILT OF P.RICK), 

which was to be "forty feet square, walls included," the foundation "to be dug 
eighteen inches beneath the surface of the ground, the walls to be two feet thick 
from the foundation three feet up," the lower story to be fifteen feet high, and 
the upper story to be twelve. 

This time, instead of a "cabin roof" sufficiently weighted down with poles. 
it was to have one of good yellow poplar "join shingles," eighteen inches in 
length, "to be pitched from each square to the center," the whole to be surmounted 
with an eight square cupola, eight feet in diameter, to "arise" twenty feet, eight 
feet of the distance to be enclosed with "Venecian blinds," and said cupola to be 



896 iiazzard's history of hexry county. 

surmounted by a suitable cap from which was to be raised a spear bearing a 
wooden ball, ten inches in diameter, "nicely gilt," and still above this a heat vane 
and higher yet "a cross with a gilt ball on each end," and the whole surmounted 
with a "neat cap" on top of the spear. 

Let the reader picture to himself the transition from the little cramped up, 
cabin roofed, puncheon floored, chinked and daubed, poorly lighted, hewed log 
concern, standing high and dry upon six "nigger heads," and an outside chimney, 
to this spacious brick, with twenty three windows of twenty four lights each, and a 
large folding door and "fan light" above, with foundations hidden away the 
enormous distance of eighteen inches under ground, and the whole surmounted 
with a cupola, which, for architectural design and finish, must have been the 
wonder of the age, and he cannot but be struck with the amazing strides in the paths 
of luxury taken by our forefathers. We are amazed at the old fellows, not one 
in twenty of whom had anything better than a cabin at home, to be willing to 
undertake the erection of a "temple of justice" of such proportions and at such 
an enormous cost, as it seemed at that time, as there were but seventy five dollars 
and three fourths of a cent in the treasury to commence on. 

The building was, nevertheless, sold to one Nathan Crawford, in the latter 
part of the year 1831, "he being the lowest bidder," for the sum of $5,315, to be 
paid on the first of January each year, for five years,' as follows : in 1832, $400; in 
1833, $700; in 1834, $1,000: in 1835, $1,200; in 1836, the balance. The walls 
were to be up and covered and all outside wood work was to be completed 
January i, 1834, and two years was to be allowed for finishing off the costly 
interior. In short, it was expected that the contractor would "push things," and 
spend something like a thousand dollars a year. Robert ■\Iurphey was allowed 
$2.50 for furnishing the design of this elaborate structure. About nine o'clock, on 
Thursday morning, January 7, 1836, Nathan Crawford moved the commis- 
sioners, Robert Murphey, Tabor W. McKee, and John Whittaker to take the job 
off his hands ; which they promptly declined to do, and declared that they had 
examined the "said court house" and "are of the opinion" that it is deficient in 
almost every particular, that the "roof leaks," plastering is not neatly done; and 
carpenter work ditto, and that the "contract is forfeited in toto, and the materials 
out of which said house is constructed are, in a great many cases, deficient." This 
was "rough" on the said Crawford, but he had to bear it till the March term, 
when a compromise was eflfected, and the building was received at $4,500, which 
was docking him $815 only. 

The second or brick court house was destroyed by fire, about the time of the 
assembling of a county convention, on February 13, 1864. 

THE PRESENT COURT HOUSE. 

After the burning of the second court house in 1864, the commissioners 
rented the Murphey Hall, now occupied by the Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks, which by adoption, became the court house of the county and continued 
to be so used until the new court house was ready for occupancy in 1869. At the 
tifne of the conflagration, some of the public records and a great mass of 
official papers, stored away in one of the jury rooms, for want of room elsewhere, 
all more or less valuable, were lost or destroved. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 8g7 

The commissionfers, Morris F. Edwards, John Minesinger, and Elias Phelps 
at once set to work to devise ways and means for the erection of a new building 
dedicated to justice. There were several essential points to be secured in this 
proposed edifice. It mvtst be free from dampness, which would destroy the 
precious records of the county, on which so much of the "peace and quiet" of 
our community depends. It must, of course, be fire proof, and sufificiently com- 
modious for all legitimate purposes not only now, but for many years to come ; 
must be of durable materials, and last, if least, it must be "good looking," a 
monument of the enterprise and taste of the people of one of the wealthy counties 
of the State. All these prerequisites, when the addition, completed in 1905, is con- 
sidered in connection with the building, have been faithfully complied with. The 
main building as completed in 1869 is sixty six feet wide by eighty two feet in 
length, while the tower, which serves as main entrance and the initial point of the 
stairway to the court room, jury room, etc., above adds some nineteen feet more, 
making the extreme length one hundred and one feet. The height of the walls is 
fifty feet and of the tower one hundred and ten feet from the foundation. 

There is a cellar under the building with a labyrinth of arched passages which 
contain furnaces and flues for heating every part of the building. 

Of the capaciousness and convenience of the rooms for the county officers, on 
the first floor of the building as completed in 1869, it would exceed the limits of this 
work to speak more minutely. There is a large fire proof and almost burglar proof 
vault cotmected with each of the offices for the storage of the abundant and val- 
uable archives on file. 

The'court rooms for the grand and traverse juries, sheriff's room, &c., as first 
completed, reached by the main stairway, are all worthy of a more extended notice 
than this work will allow. The court room itself, about sixty five feet by fifty feet, 
was in 1869 one of the finest and best appointed in the State, both as to convenience 
and tasteful ornamentations. The fresco painting on its walls and ceiling alone 
cost about $1,400 and was at that time regarded as a work of art. In August, 
1871, Elwood Pleas, in writing of this court house, said: "The entire cost of this 
magnificent 'temple of Justice,' so well constructed and of such materials as to 
withstand the ordinary ravages of the 'tooth of Time,' till several generations shall 
have passed away, has been about $120,000. This is seemingly a large sum, 
but it must be remembered that ever^-thing used, cost 'war prices,' and already, by 
comparison with other public buildings, it is coming to be regarded as not too 
large a sum for such a building. Although there has been no little grumbling 
by some of the tax-payers, it can safely be predicted that the next generation at 
least, will thank the commissioners who ordered its erection and give full credit 
to Morris F. Edwards for having efficiently superintended the construction of the 
same." 

NEW ADDITION TO THE PRESENT COURT HOUSE. 

In the Fall of the year 1903, the board of county commissioners, recognizing 
the inadequate accommodations of the court house, decided to improve the build- 
ing by an addition to the west end. The contract was let, December 29, 1903, to 
Patrick H. McCormack and Company, for the erection of the new part. This 
section of the building is sixty-eight feet, eight inches long, thus lacking but thir- 
57 



aga IIAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

teen feet of being equal in length to the original structure, and of the same width. 
The new part joins flush with the old and from appearance, inside and out, it is hard 
to imagine that the two sections were not erected at one time. In style of archi- 
tecture, the new wing is a duplicate of the original. The completed structure occu- 
pying the center of the square and surrounded by artistically kept grounds, is 
massive and imposing. 

The work on the new part was begun in the Spring of 1904. Tlie completed 
building was accepted by the board of commissioners in April, 1905. In comparing 
the two sections so nearly equal in size, one is impressed with two differences. The 
first section, a recognized necessity in 1864, was completed in 1869. The other 
was finished less than eighteen months after the matter was taken up by the com- 
missioners. The new wing cost $44,000, the old section $120,000 — Civil War 
prices. 

The two parts have been made symmetrical in interior decoration, the cost 
for re-decorating the entire structure, being $2,895. About $4,000 worth of new 
and modern furniture has been purchased giving the offices all the conveniences of 
the present time and adding the finishing touches to the otherwise handsome 
quarters. 

The new addition with its three floors and basement contains large and com- 
modious public waiting rooms and toilets on the basement floor. The offices of 
the county assessor, auditor, treasurer, and county surveyor, are on the first floor. 
The Grand Army room, the law library, judge's library, and private office, two 
jury rooms, a grand jury apartment and consultation rooms for attorneys, occupy 
the second floor. Large storage rooms for old documents are on the third floor, 
which is a subdivision of the second story. It also provides an additional room for 
the county clerk and permits the establishment of a commissioner's court room in 
the former recorder's ofice, the recorder occupying the former auditor's office 
in the old part. The county superintendent has his office in the old office of the 
county treasurer in the original building. The sheriff's office still retains its 
former location in the old building. 

Hot water heats the entire structure. Every modern convenience has been 
installed. Marble wainscotting circles the halls. The walls are calcined and fres- 
coed. The grounds are beautiful. The exterior 150 by 67 feet, is complete and 
massive, the interior being handsome and convenient. 

EARLIER clerk's AND RECORDER'S OFFICE. 

In the earliest days of the county, the position of a county officer was not a 
very lucrative one. The records of their transactions were very brief and imperfect, 
and the business for a whole term of court might have been carried on a few 
scraps of paper in a vest pocket. One man acted as clerk and recorder and per- 
formed many of the duties now devolving upon the auditor, an office not created 
for twenty years after the county was organized. In this state of affairs, some 
small room that could be rented for fifteen or twenty dollars per year was all suf- 
ficient for one of the officers, and, in fact, there was but little use for a room, ex- 
cept at stated intervals, for a few years, and a party having business with the court 
would be as likely as any way to find its clerk out in his corn field, with a hoe in 
his hand, or in his clearing, grubbing. 



hazzard's history of henry county. 899 

Of course this sort of thing could not last always, and accordingly the com- 
missioners let the building of a clerk's and recorder's office to Thomas Ginn for the 
sum of $844. The same was to be a one-story brick building, eighteen feet wide 
and thirty eight feet in length, divided into two rooms. 

earlier auditor's and treasurer's office. 

On the northeast corner of the public square, erected in 1847, by George Lowe, 
contractor, for the sum of $545, was the counterpart of the last named building 
in almost every particular. 

These little buildings, the first named, immediately south of, and the second, 
immediately north of the first brick court house and on a line fronting with it, 
doubtless answered . the purpose intended quite well, when first constructed, but 
the rapid accumulation of records and papers, and the great increase of public bus- 
iness, and number of persons doing business, had, for a number of years, ren- 
dered it apparent that their days of usefulness were drawing to a close, when the 
fire of February 13, 1864, "opened the way," rather unexpectedly, for the building 
of the present court house. 

THE court house SQUARE. 

The county of Henry, as the original owner of the townsite of New Castle, 
reserved the present public square consisting of lots i, 2, 3, and 4 of block 12 of the 
original plat for the Court House Square, and at that time for other public uses. 
Later, it was determined that lots i, and 2, constituting the east half of the square, 
would be sufficient for all county purposes, and accordingly an alley way ten 
feet wide was run through the square, north and south, on the line between lots 2, 
and 3, thus dividing it into two equal parts. 

In November. 1835, there was a subdivision made of lots three and four, 
dividing the same into five lots, three fronting on Broad Street and two on Race 
Street, which lots from said subdivision were sold by the county as follows : Lot i, 
July 30, 1837. to David Macy for $50; lot 2, October 5, 1837, to George B. 
Rogers and Alexander Michaels for $50; lot 3, October 25, 1837, to Jehu T. Elliott 
for $81 ; lot 4, November i, 1837, to Ezekiel T. Hickman for $100; lot 5. November 
I, 1837, to John Taylor for $117; total for five lots $398. This property under- 
went many trasfers and when the time came for the countv to use the entire pres- 
ent Court House Square for county purposes, the west half of the square was oc- 
cupied by residences of all the parties below named except in the case of Jacob 
Movvrer who had a residence and grocery store combined, fronting on Broad 
Street opposite the site of the present Ward Block. 

The county bought the property of the respective owners, allowing them to re- 
move the buildings, as follows: Jacob Mowrer, ,$1,300; Jacob Byer, $1,000; Helen 
E. Thornburgh, wife of Alfred ]\I. Thornburgh, $400: Harmon H. Allen, $600: 
total, $3,500, thus showing a difference of $3,102 between what the county sold the 
property for in 1837 and what it purchased it back for, less than thirty years after. 

THE first jail. 

At the February term, 1823, the commissioners also ordered the sale of "the 
jail of Henry County," which, they specify, shall be 



900 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



"Of the dimensions fourteen feet square, seven feet between the floors, the logs to 
be square ten inches, to be dovetailed at each corner and pinned; upper and lower floor 
to consist of logs squared of the same dimensions, the upper floor each log to be pinned 
down with one inch and one-half auger, one round of logs above the upper floor flt dovvTi. 
the door to be three feet wide, the shutter to be made of two-inch oak plank doubled, and 
be well spiked and hung with good and sufficient hinges to open outside with a good and 
sufllcient bar with staples and lock, a cabin roof, the lower floor to be laid on two oak 
sills, and the house to be built on the top thereof, one window one foot square with four- 
inch square bars of iron to be sufficiently let in." 

This was a very imposing- structure to a man outside, but once shut in, say 
in July or August, especially if there were several of the "four inch square"' iron 
bars across the one window (a foot square), all efforts to escape must have soon 
become quite feeble. The reader of these specifications (which were doubtless 
clear enough to the commissioners,) may be a little puzzled to determine whether 
"the house to be built oh the top thereof" was to be placed on the lower floor, or 
whether the house was to have a second story intended for a jailer's residence or 
some such purpose. It was subsequently ordered that the jail should be com- 
pleted before the second Monday in August, and that the clerk should issue a 
county order to the builder for twenty dollars so soon as the building should be 
"erected to the height of four rounds." Obediah R. Weaver, being the lowest 
bidder, undertook "the faithful performance" of the contract for $120. 

Although this building was to have been completed in August, 1823, it is 
found that, in May, 1824, the board refused to receive it, "inasmuch as it considered 
that the same had not been executed according to contract." The building was 
subsequently received of Mr. Weaver, and forty five dollars paid in full for the 
work ; twenty dollars having been previously advanced, when the structure was 
btit "four rounds high." This jail was soon found to be inadequate, and the grow- 
ing wants of the times induced the commissioners to order the "selling" of 

THE SECOND JAII.. 

which was also to be built of timber. It was really to be an extension of the old 
one, the door of which was to be taken away and the space filled with logs. The 
addition was to be built adjoining the old part, leaving only eight inches between, 
which was afterward to be filled with timber. The new part was to have one 
window like the old one, one foot square, and when carried up to the height of the 
old one, a second stor\- was to be built on, of logs, extending over both, and to be 
entered from one end by a "strong stairway," and the only entrance to the lower 
story was to be through a strong trap door, two feet square, "to be made secure 
with a strong bar of iron and good and sufficient lock, &c. Once let down into one 
of these "black holes," the most hardened desperado could dismiss all fears of "the 
dogs biting him" so long as his incarceration continued. On the 7th of January, 
1830, Moses Brown, undertook the reconstruction of said jail, for the sum of 
$97-50- which was certainly cheap enough even in those days. 

The rule that all things earthly must pass away seems to have made no ex- 
ceptions in favor of Henrv County jails. In less than five years from the comple- 
tion of the second jail or "goal," the commissioners ordered a third to be advertised 
and erected. This time the exter 'al walls were to be of brick. The foundation 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HEXRV COUXTV. QOI 

was to be set in the ground two feet, and to be twenty eight inches in thickness. 
Above, the wall was to be thirteen inches thick, and eighteen feet by twenty five in 
dimensions, and two stories in height. The floor of the prisons or "dungeons" was 
to be of good oak timber ten inches thick, and, on top of this a floor of good oak 
plank one and one half inches thick. Just inside the brick walls and on top of 
the floor, was to be "built a log wall" of "hewn timber, ten inches square, to be laid 
down half dovetailed," and seven feet high. And this was to be lined with one 
and one half inch beech plank, and "cross lined" and well spiked on with "cut 
spikes, six inches in length" and not to exceed three inches distant. The wooden 
walls were to be continued so as to make two tiers of dungeons, but the upper ones 
were not required to be so well lined, or otherwise made so strong. The upper 
story was, doubtless, intended for the more corrigible class of culprits, while the 
more hardened sinners were to be "sent below." The dungeons in the lower story 
were to be ready for occupants by the third Monday of October, and the whole 
structure, by the first Monday in May, 1836. 

"At a sale held at the court house," to "sell the building of the goals," ]\Iiles 
Murphey "bid off the same for $1,100," $500 to be paid January i, 1836, and the 
residue in one year. This work was done according to contract, and the structure, 
with little amendment, stood the racket until about 1850. 

The nmsty records of the board of commissioners showed that the constant bill 
of expense for guarding prisoners was such that February 11, 1851, they ordered 
the building of another jail. Elisha Clift appears to have been the architect and 
Jacob Elliott was selected to purchase materials and superintend it under the im- 
mediate orders of the commissioners. It was two stories in height, and thirty six 
by forty feet, was of brick with a stone floor, the cell wall being of hewn timber 
and lined with boiler iron and cost about $3,500. This iail stood until torn down 
to make room for the present court house. 

In locating the site of the last jail, it must be considered that before the build- 
ing of the present court house (without the new addition) the present public square 
was cut in two by an alley ten feet wide, running through the center of the square, 
north and south. Only that part of the square east of the alley was occupied for 
county purposes, the balance, west of the alley, being used for residences, as is 
shown, in considering the construction of the present court house. This last men- 
tioned jail stood nearly flush with Broad Street, at the northwest corner of the 
lot. made by the alley and stood about opposite the present Ward Block. The two 
preceding jails occupied practically the same ground. 

THE PRESENT JAIL. 

The present county prison is a fine well built structure, in shape, somewhat 
like p capital letter "T," with the top of the letter representing the front of the 
building, which is used as the jailor's resilience. The building is complete in all 
its appointments, is two stories in height, with a cellar underneath, containing a 
furnace, &c.. for warming the whole. Externally the building has the appearance 
of being all brick, with stone window frames secured with heavy iron rods, behind 
which are heavy plate glass of such a peculiar make that they do not obstruct the 
light while they tell none the secrets of the interior. Inside the brick wall is a 
thick stone one, or rather the wall is half stone and half of brick, and just inside 



902 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

the Stone is an iron lining of boiler iron. Next comes a corridor about three feet 
wide, and then an iron grating, made of heavy iron bars through which pass one 
and one eighth inch rods of iron. This arrangement extends through both stories. 
Inside of this formidable grating, is another passage way or corridor entirely 
surrounding the cells, or strong boxes, which are made of heavy iron grating and 
boiler iron. 

The first floor is of massive stone slabs, about fifteen inches in thickness, and 
the second floor is of iron. There are eighteen cells in the building, not likely to 
be all filled at one time. 

The structure was built with an eye to the safety of its inmates, and, not- 
withstanding a mishap or two has occurred, it is not easy to see how a safer trap 
can reasonably be constructed, and it is the opinion of good judges that, with reas- 
onable care on the part of the keeper to ward off outside influence, the most ex- 
pert jail-bird could be kept till doomsday. 

The cost of the building was about $40,000. Robert Cluggish, most efficiently 
superintended its erection. 

THE PRESENT JAIL SITE. 

The present jail' site and grounds occupy lot one and the east half of lot two in 
block five of the original plat of New Castle. The west half of lot two and all of 
lot three, thus comprising all the lots in block five, is occupied by what is known 
as the Jacob Brenneman residence. This block is bounded on the east by Twelfth 
Street, on the north by Vine Street, on the west by Eleventh Street, and on the 
south by a continuation of Livery Alley. The county was the original owner of 
this property. Through its agent. Ezekiel Leavell, on May 8, 1834, it sold lots one 
and three to Samuel Hawn for five dolUirs. The center lot, number two, was con- 
sidered so valueless that the countv abandoned the same and accordingly on Au- 
gust 25, 1834, it was sold for taxes by Wesley Goodwin, collector of taxes for 
Henry County, "to the said Samuel Hawn for thirty three cents. Thus the 
county derived a total revenue of $5.33 from the entire block. 

That part of the block occupied by the Brenneman residence has changed 
hands but few times since Hawn bought it, and as far back as the author of this 
History can remember, more than fifty years, it was in the possession of Jacob 
Brenneman and is now owned by his heirs. 

The east half of the block underwent many transfers and when the time came 
for the county to buy it for the purpose for which it is now used, it was owned and 
occupied by Thomas C. Jordan, now ahd for half a century, past, a resident of New 
Castle, the county paying him therefor, on March 11, 1868, $1,200. The frame 
house on this lot was of no particular value to the county and was immediately 
torn down to make way for the jail. Thus, what the county sold in 1834 for 
$2,665^ fone half the price of the block) it bought back, thirty four years later at 
an advance of $1,197,331^. 

STRAY PEN. 

A stray pen or pound, in early days, was considered an indispensable appur- 
tenance of every "well regulated" county. Stock was much more given to straying, 
no doubt, in early times than at the present. The love of home, or faculty of in- 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



903 



habitiveness, was probably not so well developed then as now, while the powers of 
locomotion were generally much better, especially with the porkers. The time and 
money lost in looking up lost stock in this or any other new county, seventy-five 
years ago, notwithstanding the comparatively small amount kept, was much larger 
than at present, and, doubtless, led the assembled wisdom of our general assemblies 
to give it more careful thought than they now apparently devote to some of 
the great question of the hour. 

By an act of the General Assembly, 1824, it was made the duty of the "com- 
missioners in each and every county in the State to cause a pound to be erected at 
or near the court houses, with a good and sufficient fence, gate, lock, and key, where 
all stray horses, mules and asses, above two years old, taken up within twenty miles 
of the court house, shall be kept on the first day of every circuit court, for three suc- 
ceeding terms, after the same shall be taken up, from eleven until three o'clock in 
each day, that the owner may have the opportunity of claiming his, her, or their 
property, and any person having taken up such property, and living more than 
twenty miles from the court house, shall not be compelled to exhibit it more than 
once. 

In obedience to some such act as this, the Henry County Commissioners or- 
dered to be "'sold" the 

"Erecting of a poimd, commonly called a stray pen, the said pen to be erected in 
the southwest corner of the public square, the said pen is to be forty feet square, to be 
erected at least five feet high, and of good and durable timber commonly called a post 
and rail fence, with a gate and lock to the same," 

Alinor Fox undertook this great "'public enterprise" for the sum of $12.50 and 
"gave bond with sureties approved of by the commissioners of Henry County," 
and faithfully performed the labor within four months in so satisfactory a man- 
ner that the cominissioners accepted it. and luade him tin- fir-t pi mnd-keeper. 

The stray pen or pound was located on the public >i|iKnc. immediately in the 
rear and south of the jail site which locates it in the ceiucr of the present public 
square, the south end extending to Race Street. The "gate and lock to the same"' 
was on the corner of the alley, near the Race Street side of the pound. 



The buildings and belongings of the establishment where the count\"s poor 
are cared for ought to be a matter of more interest to the people of Henry than is 
generally manifested. Caring for those unfortunate persons who have from any 
cause, become unable to care for themselves, has been accepted by the county com- 
missioners as a duty, ever since the meeting of the first board, in 1822, and. although 
the arrangement for the comfort of paupers may have seemed parsimonious at times, 
surroundirg circumstances must be taken into account. It would never do to make 
the fare, comforts, and general attractiveness of the asylum such that able-bodied,, 
but lazy, shiftless, persons, of whom there are a few in every comiriunity. would 
seek for a residence at the county home, and besides the item, "on account of poor," 
has ever been a lai-ge one in the "btidget" of Henry County, and it is largely oti the 
increase. 



904 HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUXTY. 

On March 8, 1839, Commissioners Shawhan, Corwine and Ball, purchased of 
William Silver a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, about one mile northwest 
of New Castle, for the sum of $2,000. In May following, a contract was made with 
John D. Fooshee for keeping the paupers as well as the building of a "poor house," 
and it was also ordered that "all persons who are now, or may hereafter become, a 
county charge, shall be removed, as the law directs, to the poor house provided for 
that purpose." 

Just what sort of a house this was to be (probably built of logs) or the price 
paid to the man who bought it the records do not show, but, on the 4th of January. 
1844, a special session of the board was called to receive sealed proposals for the 
building of another house, which was to be of brick with a cellar under one wing, 
fourteen by thirty feet. The size of said building is not specified, but it was to 
have a porch on three sides of the same, with fourteen posts and banisters between 
from which it maj' be inferred that it was of considerable size. The brick were 
to be burned on the place, and all the sills, sleepers, posts, and plates were to be got 
off the farm. The brick work was to be painted red and penciled with white, and 
the porch painted drab. John Shroyer, Miles Murphey, and Dr. Joel Reed were 
appointed to superintend the building of the said house. John H. Polsley under- 
took the work for $1,100, and was allowed, for extra work, the sum of twenty 
dollars. The superintendents each received twenty dollars for their services. 

This building was burned down and the paupers rendered homeless. May 9, 
T855, when the commissioners promptly ordered the building of another and 
more commodious structure at an expense of about $7,000 which is the present 
county asylum, since considerably remodeled and enlarged. 

Mark Modlin was the superintendent of the county asylum at the time of 
its destruction by fire. He then moved onto his farm, three and one half miles west 
of New Castle, the same farm being now occupied by his son, Alcander Modlin, 
and here under contract with the county commissioners, he kept the county paupers 
until March, i860, when the new building was readv for occupancv, and when the 
unfortunates were brought in and given into the care of the new superintendent, 
Alvis Haguewood. 

For two or three years after the asylum was established, the contract was made 
with Fooshee to care for the paupers that might, from time to time, be sent to 
him at the rate of $1.25 per head per week, with some little extra allowance in 
"extreme cases," he paying $150 for the rent of the farm. 

In 1841 the commissioners resolved to turn over a new leaf, and so they let the 
contract to "board, clothe and feed" all paupers, and "to treat them in a humane 
manner, and especiallv to attend to the moral instruction of said paupers." to 
Samuel Hoover and Mark Modlin, for three vears from March i, 1842, at one dol- 
lar per capita per week, they paying $125 for rent of the farm. At the end of 
this time, they called for "sealed proposals" for keeping the paupers, raising the rent 
of the farm to $1 50. The position had come to be looked upon as being so desirable 
that there was strife over it and Mr. Fooshee instituted an unsuccessful suit to 
secure possession of it, after the contract was awarded to other parties for three 
vears. In 1844, he was a successful applicant, giving twenty five dollars more than 
had been previously paid for the use of the farm, and agreeing to take, "board. 
clothe, feed, and lodge," and morally instruct all paupers, for sixty two and one 



IIAZZARDS HISTORY OF HEJIRY COUNTY. 905 

lialf cents per head per week, and bring in no other charge whatever. This was 
quite a coming down, but, after he had given bond to the satisfaction of the hoard, 
he seems to have "flew the track," and Mark Modlin was awarded the prize at sev- 
enty five cents per head per week, for one year. 

Afterward the rent of the farm was reduced to $ioo per year, and seventy five 
cents per week was allowed for keeping the paupers, and to "board, clothe, feed, 
humanely treat, arid morally instruct," &c., which was cheap as dirt. 

It is pleasant to know that our late commissioners have turned over still 
another leaf, and do not let that important charge on the sole condition of economy, 
and yet there is no loud complaint on this score. 

The farm has been enlarged to about three liundred acres, much of the later 
purchases being first class bottom land. John W. Bell is the present superin- 
tendent, having under 'his charge now, about fifty persons nearly equally divided 
in sex. The annual average cost for maintenance "for each inmate is estimated by 
Superintendent Bell to be about forty dollars. The value of the land without im- 
provements, is stated by the same authority to be $60 per acre and that the value of 
the improvements is $12,000, thus making the value of the farm at the rate of 
one hundred dollars per acre. However, in the opinion of the author of this His- 
tory. Superintendent Bell's value of the land is entirely too low. The author 
thinks the land alone, without the buildings is worth $100 per acre. Value of per- 
sonal property of all kinds is $4,000. The buildings are heated by steam, the 
county owning and operating its own plant. Mrs. Mary E. Bell, wife of the super- 
intendent, is the matron of the asylum. The annual salaries paid at the present 
time, are: superintendent, $500; matron, $130, the county paying for the services 
of extra hands when needed. 

SUPERINTENDENTS OF COUNTY ASYLUM. 

The following is approximately a correct list of the superintendents of the 
county asylum and the time for which they served respectively : John D. Fooshee, 
1830 t" March, 1842: Samuel Hoover and Mark ]\Iodlin, March, 1842, to Septem- 
ber, 1842: Mark ]\Iodlin, September, 1842, to May. 1853; Jacob Batdorf, May, 
1853, (short time) : Anthony Livezey, 1853 ^ 1855 '• Mark Modlin, 1855 to March, 
i860: Alvis Haguewood, March, i860, to March, 1867; Joel R. Hutson, March, 
1867. to March. 1869: Mahlon D. Harvev. ^March, 1869, to March, 1878; Daniel 
Harvey, March, 1878, to September. 1880: John W. Bell. September, 1880. to 
September. 1885; Daniel Harvey, September, 1885, to September, 1893; Mahlon 
D. Harvey, September, 1893, to September, 1897; Joel R. Frazier, September, 
1897. to September, 1899; John W. Bell, September, 1899, present incumbent. 

William Silver, who sold the first land purchased liv the cnuntx" for the 
county asylum farm, was a pioneer merchant of Xew Castle, and Judqe ^ilartin L. 
Bundy, being requested to give his personal recollection of Mr. Silver, says : 

"William Silver came to New Castle in 1830 from Warren County, Ohio, 
and opened a dry goods store. He was then a young married man. He subse- 
quently purchased the lot on which now stands the Shroyer Building and he built 
thereon a frame building for a store room and residence and continued his busi- 
ness until 1838, when he removed to Pendleton. The carpenter who did the work 
was Dr. James A', ^^^ayman, then a young man. 



9o6 hazzard's history of henry county. 

■'At the time Silver came, Judge Jehu T. ElHott and Miles Murphey were 
young men and both applicants for a clerkship in his store. Silver chose Murphey 
because he had $i6o which he could lend him and Elliott had no money. This 
circumstance made Murphey a merchant and Elliott a lawyer in life time bus- 
iness. 

"Silver owned and sold to the county, the present poor farm or asylum. Prior 
to this, paupers were auctioned to the person who would take them for the least 
price." 

THE FIRST orphan's HOME AT SPICELAND. 

Miss Susan Fussell, of Chester County, Pennsylvania, in March, 1877, vis- 
ited a county home conducted by a family named Johnson at Danville, Indiana, for 
the care of the county children of Hendricks County, and having under her charge 
certain soldiers' orphan children, was impressed with the plan employed in 
Hendricks County. In April of the same year she moved to Spiceland, Henry 
County, with five of the soldiers' orphan children, these alone remaining of the 
ten children of whom she had assumed charge in 1865, after the war. The plan 
for a home similar to that in Hendricks County was formed in her mind. 

"In September, 1877, she applied to the county commissioners of Henry 
county, Cyrus \"an Matre, William D. Cooper and Ithamer W. Stuart, for the 
children then in the county asvlum. offering for the sum. of twenty five cents per 
day per child, to feed, clothe, nurse, and educate them, until suitable homes could 
be found for them. 

"The proposition was kept before the commissioners at every session of their 
court for almost three years before they acceded to it. and then it was accepted on 
condition that Miss Fussell receive twenty three cents instead of twenty five cents 
per day for each child. 

"So thoroughly convinced was she of the practicability and excellence of the 
plan, and of the great need of something being done to give these children a 
chance for an independent and honorable life that she consented to the terms, 
March, 1880, rented a suitable house at her own expense and at the same time 
contributed $500 to the institution which was never repaid to her. and received 
into the home on June 8. 1880, the nine children sent her from the Henry County 
Asylum." 

It was largely due to the efforts of ]\Iiss Fussell and others interested in 
the work that the General Assembly, April 7, 1881, passed a law authorizing the 
county commissioners in each county to appoint as matron, a woman of good 
moral character, and judgment, and suitable age. haviiig experience in the care and 
training of children and to put in her care, at some suitable and convenient place 
not connected with the county asylum, all pauper children of sound mind between 
the ages of one and sixteen years. The matron was to be paid not less than 
twenty five and not more than thirtv cents daily for each inmate. Accordingly, 
after the passage of this law, the commissioners paid I\Iiss Fussell twentv five cents 
daily per child instead of twenty three cents. 

The law made it the duty of the commissioners to appoint a "committee of 
three competent persons * * * to examine into the condition of the home and the 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 9O7 

manner in which the children therein are kept and treated by the matron * * * at 
least once every three months and report to the board the result of their examin- 
ation. L 

The commissioners, June 1882, appointed Mrs. Martha A. White, of Spice- 
land : Mrs. William M. Ewing, of 'Knightstown, and ]\Irs. Sarah A. R. Boor, of 
New Castle, to serve on this committee, the duties of which in a more limited 
sphere, were very similar to those of the present county board of charities. Later. 
Mrs. Ewing, removing to Kansas, Mrs. Maggie Watson, of Dunreith, was ap- 
pointed to fill her place. When, April i, 1887, Miss Fussell having become inca- 
paciated through illness and age to act as matron and carry on the heavy duties in- 
volved, resigned, Mrs. Watson gave up her place as a member of the committee 
to permit the appointment of Miss Fussell, who lived near the home and was so 
familiar with the work. Miss Fussell served faithfully as did the other two ladies, 
until her death, July 19, 1889, when her sister, Ada Fussell, succeeded her. The 
committee as constituted, continued its service unbrokenly as long as the Spice- 
land Home was maintained. 

x\fter the plan was arranged with Miss Fussell in 1880, the county leased the 
property in Spiceland where the home was kept during its existence. A year later, 
June 24, 1881, the property was purchased of Edmund and James White for 
$2,500. It was rented to Miss Fussell at $144 annually for the house and $25 for 
the ground which consisted of about seven acres. The house and buildings were 
continually enlarged and improved. The grounds were beautified with flower beds 
and walks and with fruit trees and garden. Much of the expense of this was 
borne by. Miss Fussell who frequently contributed from her private purse to the 
success of her plan and to the welfare of the children. The property acquired b>' 
the commissioners, with improvements, grew in value to $4,200. Prior to 1885, 
the rate per child was raised to thirty cents daily and was so maintained. 

Miss Fussell was greatly assisted in her work by her sister, Miss Ada Fus- 
sell, who served without compensation and greatly improved the education of the 
children by her kindergarten work. They were taught useful facts and methods 
of house work and various out door employments. Instructors were provided for 
them. The care and attention were of the best. 

Under the supervision of the founder and her sister, the home continued to 
flourish. About ninety children had been cared for and at least two thirds of them 
had found good homes in the county, up to the 3'ear 1887. In this year, in April, 
failing health made necessary the resignation of Miss Fussell as matron. ]Miss 
Martha E. Hadley was appointed to the position and filled the same faithfully and 
efficiently during the continued existence of the home. 

On October 3'!, 1893. a contract was made by the commissioners, with Julia 
E. Work, superintendent of the Northern Indiana Orphans' Home at Lapoi-te, In- 
diana, to deliver to her from the Spiceland Home, twenty two children who were 
to be cared for by her and placed in private homes, she to receive $35 for each 
child when placed in a private home. This contract annulled a similar one previ- 
ously made on September, 28, 1893, with the Children's Home Society of Indianap- 
olis, the latter having been for $50 per child instead of $35. 

There had been considerable agitation concerning the expense attached to the 
care of the children and there was a dissension among the commissioners and inter- 



r)o8 hazzard's history of henry county. 

ested county officers regarding the advisability of maintaining the County Or- 
phan's Home at Spiceland. The money side prevailed : the conveniences resulting 
from years of hard and patient work were overlooked : the congenial surroundings 
which made the children, happy and content, completely lost their value. It was 
decided that it would be cheaper for the county to enter into the contract with 
Mrs. Work. 

On December 5, 1893. the commissioners contracted with the German Bap- 
tist Home at Honey Creek to care for the dependent children of the county, not then 
transferred to ^Irs. W'orlc's Home, at the rate of "five children at forty cents each, 
daily, ten children at tliirt} five cents each, daily, fifteen children at thirty cents 
each, daily, or forty children at twenty five cents each, daily" that institution to be 
free from taxation while acting as servant of the county. This contract removed 
the few remaining children from Spiceland and gave the finishing blow to the 
Home at that place, which had been in existence for more than thirteen years. 

The home at Spiceland was sold for a greatly reduced sum in consideration of 
the improvements made on it and the advantages it ofTered. The work of a noble 
woman was brought to naught. Miss Fussell had died before the creation for 
which she had labored so unsparingly, was wrecked. She was thus spared the pain 
of seeing her life work destroyed. The Home, which had promised so much for 
the children and for the county, was no more. 

The author of this History acknowledges himself indebted to that noble, 
charitable woman, a former member of the committee for the Spiceland Orphans' 
Home, Mrs. Sarah A. R. Boor, for the information contained in this article. 

AGED person's HOME AND ORPHAN ASYLUM FOR THE GERMAN BAPTIST CHURCH 
OF THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT OF INDIANA. 

The beginning of organized effort for the care of aged members and orphan 
children of the German Baptist Congregation, in the Southern District of Indiana 
began to be discussed as early as 1881, and the work began to take form about 
that date, by the circulation of subscription papers in the several congregations of 
the district and the soliciting of means to secure a site, and funds for building. 
In 1883, an amount of sufficient importance had been secured to permit of organiza- 
tion which was effected at a meeting held at Beech Grove in the northern part of 
Henry County in 1883. Five trustees were selected into whose hands was placed 
the power of taking out articles of association. The names of the first board of 
trustees with the length of time for which they were chosen, were as follows : 
Jacob W. Yost, five years ; James M. Wyatt, four years : John Hart, three years ; 
John L. Krall, two years : Joseph D. Neher, one year. 

On March i. 1883, Jacob W. Yost, James M. Wyatt, and John L. Krall met 
Jacob P. Miller, on the farm near Honey Creek, Henry County, Indiana, where the 
home now stands, and completed negotiations for its purchase by which they were 
to secure one hundred and forty acres of land for the sum of seven thousand dol- 
lars, four thousand of which was paid in cash, Jacob P. Miller, donating one 
thousand dollars of this amount. 

Articles of association, drawn by Frank ^^'. Fitzhugh, a lawyer of New Cas- 
tle, were entered into on July 31, 1883, and transcribed into a book which is in pos- 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. gog 

session of the secretary. The corporate seal as set out in article eight of the above 
mentioned articles of association was designed by David W. Kinsey and others. 
The legend "Pro Deo, Ecclesia et Re Publica" (For God, The Church and the 
State) is understood to have been contributed by Adolph Rogers, of New Castle. 

The names subscribed to the articles of association are John Hart, of Beechy 
Mire, Union County, Indiana; Jacob W. Yost, Sulphur Springs, Henry County, 
Indiana, and James M. Wyatt, Hagerstown. Wayne County, Indiana. In Decem- 
ber of the same }ear in a district meeting held near the home in the Upper Fall 
Creek Church, David F. Hoover was selected as one of the trustees instead of 
Joseph D. Neher, deceased. 

In i8S6, the first building was erected by Waltz and Thornburgh, of Hagers- 
town, Indiana, at a cost of $3,000. It did its duty well but was considered insuf- 
ficient for the growing work and in 1901, a second building was erected, Isaac H. 
Miller, of Middletown, being the architect, which cost about $2,500, and is fitted 
out for the aged people and is called "The Home," while tlie old building is called 
"The Orphanage." 

The first superintendent employed by the trustees was John .S. McCarty, of 
Clarksville, Indiana. He remained at the head of the institution for six years, and 
was succeeded by John Brunk, of Middletown, Indiana, who held the position for 
five years. Calvin Hooke succeeded John Brunk but gave over the work to his suc- 
cessor at the end of one year. A. C. Snowberger took charge of the work in Sep- 
tember, 1898 and continued for four years, when the present superintendent, Moses 
Smelzer^ of Noblesville, took charge. 

The first inmate was Jane Orr, of Ladoga, Montgomery County, Indiana, who 
entered the home, December 30. 1886, and remained there nearly twelve years. 
.Since she entered many have come and gone for whom the final step of life has 
been made pleasant and happy in this excellent home. Manv poor children have 
been provided with good homes through the agency of this institution, and twice, 
the county of Henry has contracted with this home to care for its dependent chil- 
dren. 

In 1899, the General .Assembly passed a law forbidding the detention of de- 
pendents between the ages of three and seventeen years for more than ten days in 
the County Poor Asylum. In 1901, this was amended, increasing the length of 
time to sixty days. 

The first contract made by the Henry County Commissioners with the Ger- 
man Baptist Home to care for its children was made December 5, 1893, as hereto- 
fore stated. On April 10, igoi, the second contract was made by the commis- 
sioners with the German Baptist Home to care for its dependent children at the rate 
of twenty five cents per day for each child. This contract continued in force until 
May I, 1905, when the Bundy Home at Spiceland, was opened. Part of the chil- 
dren at the Baptist Home and a few still remaining at Plymouth were taken to 
Spiceland and owing to the greater convenience of the Spiceland Home, the com- 
missioners decided to send all future dependents of proper age to that iilacc. 

Following the abandonment of the first County Orphan's Home which had 
been maintained at Spiceland since 1880, the children dependent on the county 
were in part taken to a home then superintended by Julia E. Work at Laporte, 
Indiana, who subsequently removed to Plymouth, Marshall Countv, Indiana, and 



9IO HAZZARDS HISTOKV OF HENRY COUNTY. 

has since maintained tliere the well known Plymouth Home which has grown to 
such large size. Until April lo, 1901, children continued to be sent to the home 
of Mrs. Work but the inconvenience of taking children such a distance and the 
expense attached to the trip decided the board to send all county children to the 
Baptist institution. Still another advantage sought by the commissioners in mak- 
ini;- ihc cliaii-c to the Baptist establishment was to give the children the benefit of a 
more individual attention than could be accorded them in the Plymouth Home 
which had grown very large. The Baptist home not only offered its cleanliness and 
well kept apartments as an inducement, but in addition, it could give the children 
more of the home life than could be given them in the larger place where so much 
routine and system is necessary. 

Thus for years the German Baptist Home has been very closely associated with 
the other benevolent institutions of the county. Many homeless, children have 
found here a good residence or through this institution, have been taken into 
good homes. Its care has always been of the best and the conditions surrovmding 
the home are very pleasant. 

The author of this History acknowledges himself indebted to the Reverend 
David F. Hoover for the information contained in this article. In the opinion 
of the author, it is owing to the attention and care that David F. Hoover has de- 
voted to this home that it has reached its present high degree of excellence and has 
accomplished so much good. 

THE BUNDY HOME .\T SPICELAND. 

On May i, 1905, for the second time, an institution for the care of orphan and 
homeless children was opened at Spiceland. The "Children's Home" as it is known, 
was the result of a joint conference of the commissioners of the counties of Henry 
and Rush. The joint meeting of the commissioners came after a proposition made 
by j\Irs. Ella Bundy, fomierly in charge of the home at Rushville, to establish a 
home for the dependent children of the two counties. Spiceland was selected by 
the commissioners as the most desirable location for such a home, on account of its 
convenient location and the many advantages ofifered there for the care of chil- 
dren. 

Acting largelv on the advice of the commissioners of the two counties, Mrs. 
Bundv purchased the Kersev K. Kirk home in the west part of Spiceland, adjoining • 
the academy on the western boundary. It is a fine piece of land particularly adapted 
for its present use. It contains six acres and has a large house, barn, and other 
buildings. The property was purchased for $4,000 and Mrs. Bundy has since 
greatly improved and added to it, at an additional expense of $1,200. Large 
dormitories have been arranged for the boys and for the girls. Play rooms and 
other conveniences for the children have been fitted up. The house now contains 
fourteen rooms. 

The commissioners of the counties of Henry and Rush entered into a three 
year's contract with Mrs. Bundv, after the purchase of the land, to care for all 
county children between the ages of two and seventeen at the rate of twenty five 
cents per day, per child, and for all children under that age at the rate of $3.00 per 
week. For this price, Mrs. Bundy feeds, clothes, educates and otherwise exer- 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. QII 

cises maternal care over the children, doctoring them when ill, at her own expense, 
save in case of contagious disease. 

The place was bought on March 2, 1905, and was opened for the reception of 
the children on May ist. At present there are twenty five children under the care 
of Mrs. Bundy. Seventeen of these are boys and eight are girls. Twelve of the 
children are from Henry County and thirteen are from Rush. They range in age 
from nine months to fifteen years. 

Practically the entire ground surrounding the house, with the exception of 
nearly an acre, which is in grass and is used for a play ground, is under cultivation. 
Mrs. Bundv raises a great variety of fruits and vegetables and interests the children 
in the cultivation so that they all have some little task to do each day and not only 
keep out of mischief but are benefited by the knowledge they gain. The children 
are also taught in a general way, the work of caring for the house, so that in a short 
time they acquire a knowledge of practical things which will always be of use to 
them. The children are kept clean and are apparently happy. Their food is of the 
best and their dining quarters are light, airy and very clean. Their dormitories 
and beds are extremely neat and as comfortable as the most fastidious could de- 
sire. 

Onlv one inconvenience is now noticeable in the home, this being the ease with 
which parents from either county may come to see their children. The tendency 
of such visits is to make the children homesick and dissatisfied. Parents, in some 
cases too, are inclined to have their children cared for at the expense of the county, 
if thev can see them frequently, whereas if the visit was not so convenient, they 
would care" for them themselves. This difficulty will be overcome soon, however, 
by the strict enforcement of a ruling limiting the number and frequency of the visits 
of the parents, 

COUNTY' BOARD OF CHARITIES AND CORRFXTIONS. 

The following, from section one of an act passed in 1899, by the General 
Assembly of the State of Indiana, for the purpose of providing "Boards of County 
Charities and Corrections," resulted in the appointment, June 19, 1902, of such a 
board in the county of Henry, by Judge William O. Barnard, then presiding. 

"Be it enacted that in each county of the State the judge of the 

circuit court may, and upon the petition of fifteen reputable citizens, shall appoint 
six persons not more than three of whom shall be of the same political party or 
belief, and not more than four of whom shall be men, who shall constitute a Board 
of County Charities and Corrections, to serve without compensation, two of whom, 
as indicated by the judge of the circuit court, shall serve for one f i) year, two 
for two (2) years, and two for three (3) years, and upon the resignation or ex- 
piration of the term of each, his or her successor shall in like manner be appointed 
for the term of three (3) years." 

The members of this board as constituted by Judge Barnard were John H. 
Hewitt living east of New Castle, Benjamin S. Parker, and Mrs. Julia A. Loer 
of New Castle, Mrs. Anna D. Welsh of IMiddletown, William S. IMofifat of Ken- 
nard, and Mrs. Richard Wagoner of Knightstown. Mr. Parker and I\Irs. Loer 
served the full three years. Mr. Hewitt and Mrs. Wagoner were appointed for 
the two-vear term. Mr. Mofifat and Mrs. Welsh were assigned to the short term. 



912 HAZZAKDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

one year. Up to the present time, all members of the board have been re- 
appointed at the expiration of their respective terms by Judge Barnard's successor, 
Judge John M. Morris. 

The law providing for the creation of the board, directs that a chairman and 
secretary shall be elected at the first meeting of the board which shall be "within 
one week after receiving the notice of appointment." At the present time and 
since the board was organized, the officers have been John H. Hewitt, Chair- 
man, and Mrs. Anna D. Welsh, Secretary. 

This board acts as "the eyes and ears of the county." It has no executive 
power. Its duties consist in visiting the various lockups, county poor asylum, 
orphan's home, jail, "and any other charitable or correctional institutions, receiv- 
ing support from public funds, that may exist in the county at least once 

each quarter," and reporting to the county commissioners once each quarter the 
results of such visits and investigations. Similar reports are transmitted to the 
state board of charities which at all times acts as an advisory board and in some 
measure directs the work and actions of the county board. 

The chief benefit of the board is in the publicity it is empowered and author- 
ized to give to the methods used in conducting the county benevolent institutions, 
and to the condition in which it finds them. It acts as an advisor to the county 
commissioners and at all tiines may report to the commissioners such plans for 
improvement or remedy as it deems advisable. It tends to act as a check on 
carelessness or mis-management on the part of county officers having charge of 
these institutions. 

The law provides that "the county council in each county shall appropriate 
and the board of county commissioners shall allow, not to exceed fifty dollars 
($50) each year for the actual expenses of said Board of County Charities and 
Corrections." The economy of the Henry County board is apparent from the 
fact that the entire expense of the board for the term of its existence has not yet 
exceeded twenty dollars. The amount is trifling when compared with the possi- 
bilities for good which exist in this board. 



CHAPTER XL. 

the first courts and first attorneys. 

The First Meeting Place of the Courts — The Commissioners' Court — Ap- 
pointment OF THE First County Agent — The Board of Justices— The 
Circuit- Court — The Grand Jury — Early Presentments — Early' Trials 
— First Attorneys. 

The act of the General Assembly organizing the county of Henry provided 
that the "Circuit Court and all other courts shall meet and be holden at the 
house of Joseph Hobson, until suitable accommodation can be had at the county 
seat." The same act, however, provided that the Circuit Court might, if in its 
wisdom it deemed it advisable, remove to some more suitable place. ' 

commissioners' court. 

In accordance with these provisions, the Commissioners' Court assembled 
"at the house of Joseph Hobson" on June lo, 1822, and we find the following as 
the first record of an official character ever made in the county of Henry : 

"Jvne Term for the year 1822. 

"At a meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, in and for tlie County of 
Henry. State of Indiana, on Monday, the 10th day of June, A. D. 1822, present Allen Shep- 
herd and Samuel Goble. Esqrs., who produced their respective certificates and were sworn 
into office by Jesse Healey, Esq.. Sheriff of the county aforesaid, as is required by the Con- 
stitution and laws of this State." 

As the Commissioners meant business, their first act, after taking" the oath of 
ofiice. was the appointment of Rene Julian, Clerk of the Board, he being the 
Clerk of the Circuit Court elect, and the second order reads : 

"Ordered by the Board, that the Court adjourn until to-morrow morning at ten 
o'clock, (Signed), 

"Allen Shepherd, 
"s.^muel goble." 

Elisha Shortridge, who was doubtless elected at the same time as Shepherd 
and Goble, did not put in an appearatice until the July term, when he "appeared 
and presented his credentials in due form," and now Goble was absent, from some 
cause not mentioned. From time to time the record shows that the Board met 
"at the house of Joseph Hobson" until the May term, 1823, following, when it 



914 



lAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



met at the house of Charles Jamison, in New Castle. Of Charles Jamison, Judge 
Martin L. Bundy furnishes the only information obtainable which is as follows : 

"The house of Charles Jamison was a double cabin, built of round logs, 
which stood flush with the south side of what is now Church Street, about half 
way between Main and Twelfth streets, which locates it in rear of the Nixon 
residence, and diagonally southeast, and across the street from the Presbyterian 
Church. I do not remember when it "disappeared. It was probably built in 1820 
and was the first house ever built on the town site of New Castle. It was a most 
convenient place for the transaction of the business of the new county of Henry, 
because there was no other house in New Castle. 

"Charles' Jamison was a small man physically, and was about the size of the 
late Andrew Nicholson. I do not know from what State he emigrated, probably, 
however from Tennessee, which was the State from which his son-in-law, Isaac 
Bedsaul, came. I do not remember his wife, but her daughter, Polly Bedsaul, 
who died of cholera in 1833, I remember very well, she being so kind to me 
when I was a small boy. I do not think Charles Jamison had any sons. He 
died, I think, at the house of Henry Courtney, two miles southeast of New Castle, 
about 1836. I do not know that he had any regular occupation, and he was 
rather too old to work when I knew him." 

The Board met in June, July, August, and November, 1823, and yet the 
records of their doings fill but eighteen small pages, while the proceedings of three 
terms are crowded into eight pages, each one of which was about twice as large as 
this page. The adopted court house was a "second-hand cabin," which had been 
moved up from the bottom, west of town, and was, perhaps, twelve by sixteen or 
sixteen by eighteen feet square, and without chinking or daubing. 

The second day of the first term seems to have been a busy day, as William 
Shannon, Dilwin Bales, and Abraham Heaton were appointed superintendents of 
several school sections. Shannon was also made Treasurer and John Dorrah 
was appointed Lister of the county. A poll tax of twenty five cents was levied for 
county purposes, and Dudley, Wayne, Henry and Prairie townships were created, 
and elections were ordered to be held in each. Inspectors were appointed for 
each, after which the Board adjourned "until the first Monday in July next" 
(1823). 

The act of the General Assembly organizing the county provided for the 
appointment of an agent for the county, who was to receive donations of grounds 
made for the purpose of a county seat, buildings, etc. The July term was called 
for the purpose of appointing such agent, and "the lot fell upon" Ezekiel Leavell, 
of whom biographical mention is made in connection with the location of 
New Castle. He was duly charged with the duty of superintending the sale of 
town lots in the New Castle that was to be, the making of deeds, and, in addition, 
when a court house, a jail, or a stray pen was to be constructed, the Agent was 
ordered to "oflFer for sale to the lowest bidder, in the town of New Castle, the 
building of the court house of Henry County," or the erecting of a "pound, com- 
monly called a stray pen." or the "jail of Henry County," as the case might be. 

The Commissioners' Court was a very important institution in early times. 
Treasurers, Collectors, Listers, Constables, Pound-keepers, Supervisors, Road- 
viewers, County Agents, Township Agents, Superintendents of school sections 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 915 

(section sixteen of every Congressional township was set aside for school purposes, 
and the proceeds of the subsequent sale of these sections, is the foundation of 
our present common school fund), County Commissioners, County Surveyors, 
Inspectors, etc., were all the creatures of this body. It not only was the keeper 
of the public funds, levied or remitted the taxes, made the allowances of the 
other officers, but granted permits to "keep tavern," "keep store," "keep grocery," 
or "peddle clocks," and with equal facility fixed the price of "liquors, lodgings, 
horse feed, and stabling." The early commissioner seemed equally at home, 
whether allowing the treasurer fifteen dollars for his annual services, or regulating 
the cost of a half pint of whisky, quart of cider or "gallon of oats or corn." 

BOARD OF JUSTICES. 

On January 31, 1824, the General Assembly enacted that the Justices of the 
Peace for the several counties should constitute a "Board of Justices" for the 
transaction of "county business," with all the powers and duties heretofore exer- 
cised by the commissioners. It was made the duty of "each and everv justice in 
the several townships to meet" at the seat of Justice on the first Monday in Sep- 
tember following, "and then and there to organize themselves into a County 
Board of Justices, by electing one of their body President," &c., "and to meet on 
the first Monday of January, March, May, July, September, and November, in 
each and every year," at such time, unless the circuit court happened to be in ses- 
sion on that day, in which case they were to meet on the Monday after its ad- 
journment. Any three of these justices were competent to transact business, ex- 
cept at the May and November terms, when it should require at least five mem- 
bers, and a less number than a quorum could meet from day to day and compel 
the attendance of others. 

It was made the duty of the justices '"'to be punctual in their attendance at 
their January, May, and November sessions, and for every failure thereof, with- 
out a reasonable excuse, "such justice might be indicted or fined not to exceed 
twenty dollars." 

The Clerk of the Circuit Court was required to attend on the sittings of the 
Board and write up its proceedings. The attendance of the She'riflf, in person or 
by deputy, was required, and it was made the duty of such ofiicer to execute the 
decrees of said board. 

On January 26, 1827, the Board of Justices was abolished, and the Board of 
Commissioners revived in the county of Henry and nine other counties lying in 
the central part of the State. This new arrangement took effect on the first day 
of August of the same year. The Board of County Commissioners, has. ever 
since, continued to exist. 

CIRCUIT COURT. 

The first term of the Circuit Court was held September 30. 1822. by Thomas 
R. Stanford and Elisha Long, Esqrs., Associate Justices, Miles Eggleston, Presid- 
ing Judge of the Circuit Court, not being present. The court assembled, as the 
law directed, at the house of Joseph Hobson, but availed itself of the privilege of 
securing better quarters at once, by adopting Charles Jamison's log cabin as the 
court house, as the following extract from the first record will show : 



9i6 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



"At a Henry County Circuit Court, begun at the house of Joseph Hobson, agreeable 
to an act of the Legislature of the State of Indiana, passed on the 31st day of December, 
in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-one, and adjourned 
to the house of Charles Jamison, in the county aforesaid, on Monday, the 30th day of 
September, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-two." 

With the exception of the recording of the official bond of Rene Julian, Clerk, 
on a fly-leaf of the docket, this is the first entry ever made by the Circuit Court of 
Henry County. After the paragraph above recited is found recorded a copy of 
the commissions of Judges Stanford and Long, bearing date of July 5, 1822, in 
which "His Excellency Governor Jonathan Jennings sends greetings to all men and 
"the rest of mankind" that he has commissioned the aforesaid Thomas R. Stan- 
ford and the aforesaid Elisha Long, Associate Judges : 

"For the county of Henry for and during the term of seven years, and until 
his successors be appointed and qualified should he so long behave well." 

On the back of each commission seems to have been the following endorse- 
ment by the Sheriff: 

"Be it remembered that, on the 7th day of August A. D. 1S22, personally came the 
within commissioned, Thos. R. Stanford (or Elisha Long), and took the oath against 
dueling, the oath to support the Constitution of the United States, the oath to support 
the Constitution of this State, and also the oath of office as an Associate Judge of the 
Henry Circuit Court. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal, this 
7th day of August, 1S22. Jessk H. He.vlet, Sheriff of Henry County." 

The credentials of the two Judges, of the Sheriff and Qerk being duly dis- 
posed of, Jesse H. Healey 

"Returned into this court the writ of venire facias heretofore issued out of this 
court, with the following panel to serve as Grand Jurors, the present term, to-wit: Dan- 
iel Heaton, whom the court appoints as foreman, Joseph Watts, Ezekiel Leavell, Absalom 
Harvey, William Bell, David Baily, John Baker, Jesse Cox, Samuel Dill, John Daugh- 
erty, Jacob Parkhurst, Richard Parsons, William Riadon, Dempsey Reece and David 
Thompson, good and lawful men, and householders of the County of Henry, who, being 
duly sworn and by the court charged, retired to their room to deliberate." 

Of this first Grand Jury consisting of fifteen members there is now no living 
representative. The room to which they "retired to deliberate" was a convenient 
log heap hard by. This log heap occupied the ground where is now situated, the 
Presbyterian Church, distant about one hundred and fifty feet northwest from 
the house of Charles Jamison. Of this first Grand Jun-. William ]McDowell 
(Uncle Billy) was the bailiff. He continued as such officer of the Courts of 
Henrv County for a period covering fifty years, when at his own request, he was 
in 1873, relieved by Judge Joshua H. Mellett, who appointed John Alexander his 
successor. Lot Bloomfield. producing a license signed by the presiding judge, 
was permitted to practise in the court, upon taking the necessary oath. He was 
also made prosecuting attorney for "this and the succeeding term of this court 
and until a successor be appointed." 

The next entry shows that Andrew Shannon so far forgot the dignity and 
solemnity of the occasion as to "swear two profane oaths in the presence of the 
court," for which he was promptly fined two dollars, and the clerk ordered to 
issue an execution for the same. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 917 

On the next day the court ordered that the '"permanent seal of Henry County 
shall be engraved on brass, with a vignette of an eagle and stars equal to the 
number of States in the Union," the size to be about that of a dollar, and around 
the margin the words, "Henry Circuit Court." An "ink scrawl, with the words 
Henry County inserted therein," was to be the temporary seal. 

On the second day of the term Henry Burkman came into court, and, being 
duly sworn, declared his intention of becoming a bona fide citizen of the United 
States, and that he "abjures all allegiance to all foreign princes and potentates 
whatever, and particularly to George IV, King of Great Britain and Ireland, 
and Prince of Wales." 

The Grand Jury then returned into court with the result of their delibera- 
tions, which consisted of four bills of indictment for assault and battery, to-wit: 
One against Solomon Byrket, two against Samuel Batson and one against Peter 
Smith. Batson then appeared at "the bar of the court" and acknowledged him- 
self guilty as charged in the indictment, and dispensing with a jury, threw himself 
upon the mercy of the court, "which after due deliberation being had therein," 
adjudged that he make his fine to the State in the sum of one dollar and stand 
committed till the same be paid. The judges then allowed themselves four dol- 
lars each, and the prosecutor, five dollars, and adjourned till March following; 
and thus ended the first term of the Circuit Court of Henry County. 

At the March term, Bloomfield failed to put in an appearance, and James 
Gilmore was appointed to prosecute "the pleas of the State." 

For this term, the following named grand jurors were selected : William 
]\IcKimmey, foreman, Solomon Byrket, Abijah Cain, Jacob . Elliott, Moses Fink, 
George Hanby, Daniel Jackson, John K. Nutt. Allen Hunt, Shaphat McCray, Wil- 
liam Morris, Thomas Ray and Asahel Woodward, of course all "good and lawful 
men," although Solomon Byrket was then under indictment for an unlawful act, 
and was on the same day, brought to the bar of the court, and, to use the quaint 
language of the record, 

"It being forthwith demanded of him how he will acquit himself of the charges set 
forth in the indictment, for plea says he is not guilty as he stands indicted, and for trial 
thereof puts himself upon the country, and the said James Gilmore. Prosecutor afore- 
said, doth the like; and thereupon came a jury, to-wit: William Shannon, Nathan Pear- 
son, James Rozell, Samuel Batson, Christopher Bundy, Minor Fox, Jacob Richey. Hugh 
McDaniel. William Row (or Roe). John Blount. Josiah Clawson. and Jacob Witter." 

and thus was formed the first traverse jury of Henry County. ]\Iarch 31. 1823, 
and of the number there is probably not one now alive. William }\IcDowell was 
also bailiflf to this, the first traverse jury that ever sat in Henry County. 

Byrket was acquitted, and the court ordered "that he go thereof hence without 
day." ' 

There was but one civil action tried, during this term, but the Grand Jury 
returned into court, on the second day. seven indictments : One against the 
ozi'iter of the court house, for selling liquor without license ; one against Wesley 
Prior. Eli Ellis, and Charles See, '"'for rout ;" one each against commissioners 
Elisha Shortridge and Allen Shepherd, for "extortion ;" and three cases of as- 
sault and battery. The cases for extortion, perhaps, were what would, at this 



Ql8 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

day, be termed taking usurious interest. At least there seems to have been no 
further notice taken of the matter, the order book not indicating that they were 
dismissed, quashed, continued or tried. 

At this distant day, it will seem a little strange that the best or foremost men 
of the times should be found among the law-breakers and among the first "hauled 
over the coals" for it. 

This March term of the court fixed a scale of prices for the clerk to be gov- 
erned by in taking bail of those charged with offenses, as follows : For assault 
and battery, $ioo; for routs, $50; for extortion, $100; selling spirituous liquor 
without license, $20; and subsequently it further instructed that for indictments 
for perjury the bail should be $300: for violations of the "estray act," $100; for 
affray, $50; and for robbery on the public highway, the sum of $100. From all 
of which it would seem that selling liquor without license was a mere peccadillo, 
that perjury was quite a grave offense and that for two, three, or four men to 
engage in a nice little "set-to" would require only half the bail demanded of one 
man who attacked another without first obtaining his consent, and it will be also 
noticed that assault and battery was placed on a par with highway robbery. 

At the ?\Iarch term, the Grand Jury, thirteen in number, were allowed nine- 
teen dollars and fifty cents for their services, and the prosecutor, eight dollars, for 
prosecuting the pleas of the .State and drawing up the seven indictments, and 
such other services as he could render, and was continued for the next term and 
until a successor should be appointed, although not at the time a licensed attorney, 
and the court adjourned, after a three days' session, without disposing of a single 
case, except the trial of one of the grand jurors heretofore alluded to. It was 
probably owing to the fact that nothing had been completed that the judges only 
allowed themselves three dollars for their services. 

Following is the substance of an act of the General Assembly of 1822, con- 
cerning vagrants : Every person who shall be suspected to get his livelihood by 
gaming, and every able-bodied person, who is found loitering and wandering about 
and not having wherewithal to maintain himself by some visible property, and 
who doth not betake himself to labour or some honest calling to procure a liveli- 
hood, and all persons who quit their habitation and leave their wives and children 
without suitable means of subsistence, whereby they suffer or may become charge- 
able to the county, and all other idle, vagrant, dissolute persons, rambling about 
without any visible means of subsistence, shall be deemed and considered as va- 
grants. — [Revised Laws, 1824, page 421.] 

Such person was to give bond in the sum of fifty dollars or be committed to 
jail, till the meeting of the Circuit Court, and if found to be a vagrant within the 
meaning of the law, he was, if a minor, to be "bound put," until twenty-one years 
of age, to some useful trade or occupation, and if over twenty-one years of age, 
he was to be hired out by the Sheriff' for any time not exceeding nine months. 
The money received for his hire was to be applied to the payment of his debts, 
and the balance to be given to him at the expiration of his time, provided, how- 
ever, that, if he had a wife and children, the surplus went to them, and he might 
also avoid being hired out by giving security that he would return to his family 
and follow some useful occupation. 

In accordance with this act, a special session was called, on .April 28, 1823, on 
account of a charge of vagrancy against a citizen of Henry county. The following 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 919 

panel of sixteen grand jurors, "good and lawful men," were selected to consider 
whether the person so charged with vagrancy was such "within the meaning of 
the law" : John Dorrah, foreman. Charles Jamison. James Stanford, Samuel Dill, 
Asahel Woodward, \\'illiam McDowell. Obediah R. Weaver, Moses Fink, senior, 
Allen Shepherd, Christopher Bundy, George Hanby, Thomas Watkins, William 
Bundy, Joshua Welborn. Andrew Shannon. IMoses Allis. William ^McDowell 
seems to have been a member of this Grand Jury and the bailiff in charge at the 
same time. Of this jury of lawful men, two were under indictment at the time for 
violating the laws of the land. 

The principal expenses for this term of court were : ' Sixteen grand jurors, 
twelve dollars ; bailiff, seventy-five cents ; prosecutor, two dollars ; two judges, 
four dollars ; total, eighteen dollars and seventy-five cents. 

Charles Jamison, for selling liquor without license, was tried at the next term 
of the court, found guilty, and fined three dollars, which was just what he charged 
the court for the use of the cabin as a court room. As he was afterward granted 
license to sell liquors, it is evident that the offense consisted not so much in the 
sale of the liquor, as in having neglected to replenish the almost empty treasury 
with the five dollars, which was levied solelv for purposes of revenue, and not in 
anywise intended to restrict the traffic. 

The August term of the circuit court was held by the associate judges. r\Iiles 
Eggleston, Presiding Judge, not, as yet, having deigned to visifour county. 

To call to the minds of some of the older citizens men once familiar to them, 
the names of the Grand Jury are given also: 

John Dorrah, foreman, as usual, Levi Butler, Ebenezer Goble, Thomas Leonard, 
Thomas Watkins, John Blount, George Hobson, James McKimmey, Robert Smith. Allen 
Hunt, Jesse Cox. John Marshall, Nathan Davis, and Josiah Morris. 

After a three davs' session, the jury returned into court two indictments for 
assault and battery, three for affray, one for violation of the estray law. one for 
robbery, and one for perjury. In the five years irnmediately succeeding the organ- 
ization of the county, ninety one "true bills" were found for various offenses 
"against the peace and dignity" of the State of Indiana. Something of the nature 
of the ills to which society was subjected at that early day will be seen from the 
character of these presentments as follows, to-wit: 

Assault and battery 44 Larceny 2 

Affray 24 Lewdness 1 

Rout 1 Violating Estray Law 1 

Rape 4 Selling Without License 1 

Gaming 5 Obstructing Process 1 

Extortion 2 Negligence in Office 1 

Robbery 1 — 

Vagrancy 1 Total 91 

Perjury 2 

What would our citizens think today of having four fifths of the time of 
our courts taken up with the adjustment of personal encounters between our 
citizens? The "fistic" proclivities of our citizens have, without doubt, very much 
improved in seventy five years. 



920 HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Miles C. Eggleston, the Presiding Judge for the Third, afterward the Fifth 
Circuit put in an appearance for the first time November 17, 1823, this being the 
fifth session since the county was organized. The following order appears on the 
docket for that day: 

"On motion, it is ordered that it be suggested on the records of this court 
that Reuben Ball, the plaintiff in this cause, is deceased, since the last term of 
this court." 

And, it is supposed, the suggestion was made accordingly. The next cause 
was "continued till the next term of court," that the court take time until then 
to consider of the law arising in said case. 

The next order was that all indictments found by the Grand Jury, at the 
August term, be quashed, and the defendants in said indictments be thereof quit 
and discharged, etc. To this his autograph is appended — the only time it occurs 
on the order book. The reason for this order seems to have been that the General 
Assembly had changed the time of holding courts for this circuit, of which our 
home judges had not been apprised, and so went on with the August term as 
usual. The indictments were all quashed, but seem to have been immediately 
revived by the jury then- in session. 

It would seem that William W. Wick, of Fayette County, was made judge of 
the circuit, in 1824, but, being elected Secretary of State, Governor Hendricks 
appointed Bethuel F. Morris, of Marion County. Presiding Judge, "in the room" 
of said Wick. 

In October. 1825, John Anderson succeeded Thomas R. Stanford, as judge. 
While Anderson was on the bench, an appeal case came up before him and his 
associate, in which Anderson was defendant, and it is noticeable that the de- 
fendant gained the case and his costs off the plaintiff, and then allowed himself 
two dollars for extra services at that session. It is not to be inferred from this 
that justice was not done, for the judge soon brought suit in his own court, as 
Paymaster of the Indiana Militia, against Sheriff Healey, for failure to. collect 
the muster fines off the conscientious people of the county, and, after continuing 
the case from day to day and term to term, he was finally beaten, Bethuel F. 
Morris, perhaps, presiding when the decision was reached. Soon after this, one 
Jacob Thorp filed an information in court to the effect that the said Judge 
Anderson was an alien, and therefore not competent to fill the position occupied. 
A rule was granted against the judge to show why he should not be ousted 
from his seat. This he must have done to the satisfaction of the court, as he 
continued to hold his position, and at a subsequent term he obtained judgment 
for costs against Thorp, Anderson and his associate apparently deciding the 
case. So much for early courts and manner of doing business. 

It cannot be doubted that the ends of justice were quite as faithfully sub- 
served in that day as at present, and that it was generally quite as speedily 
meted out, notwithstanding the quaintness of style and rather "hifalutin" ring of 
some of the proceedings. 

FIRST ATTORNEYS. 

It has already been mentioned that Lot Bloomfield was "sworn in" as the 
first Prosecutor of "the pleas of the State" for the Henry Circuit Court. There 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 92I 

were but four indictments found, all for assault and battery, and, as one of the 
culprits "lit out," another was found not guilty, and still another plead guilty antl 
was only fined one dollar for two offenses, the Prosecutor, doubtless, felt that 
his luck was none of the best. It is said that information was lodged with the 
jury that some graceless scamp had been guilty of larceny, but, just before the 
finding or returning of a bill, the foreman learned that he had left the county ; 
so it was concluded that it would be a waste of ammunition to finish proceedings 
against him, and they at once dropped the case. This did not suit the attorney, 
who grumbled considerably, and called the attention of the jury to the fact that 
it cost much labor to draw up the papers in each case, and showed them that 
he was at great expense in traveling to and from court, for board, etc., etc. The 
court made him the very liberal allowance of five dollars, which was one dollar 
more than their honors received, but it does not seem to have been satisfactory, 
as he came no more, although appointed for more than one term. James Gilmore, 
afterwards a justice of the peace, and not yet a full fiedged attorney, was ap- 
pointed in Bloomfield"s place the next term. James Noble, James Rariden, and 
Abraham Elliott, father of Judge Jehu T. Elliott, were admitted to practise in 
this first court. 

At the August term, 1823, Charles H. Test and Martin ■NT. Ray. of Wayne 
County, were admitted as attorneys and counsellors at law, "and thereupon took 
the oath of ofifice." 

At the April term, 1824, James B. Ray, James ]\Iendall, Calvin Fletcher, 
Oliver H. Smith, and Philip Sweetser were admitted to practise. 

At the April term, 1825, Harvey Gregg appeared with a regular commission 
as prosecuting attorney for the Fifth Judicial Circuit. Henry County had pre- 
viously been in the Third Circuit. At this term Abraham Elliott was appointed 
Master of Chancery and Moses Cox was admitted to the bar. In October of the 
same year, Calvin Fletcher presented his credentials as prosecutor for the Circuit. 

At the October term, 1826, James Whitcomb appeared with credentials as 
prosecutor for the Circuit, and Septimus Smith and Albert G. White were ad- 
mitted as attorneys. In 1827, Samuel C. Sample, appeared as a licensed attorney 
and "took the oath" as "counsellor at law at the bar of the court." 

In 1828, on motion of Charles H. Test, Marinus Willitt and David Patton 
were admitted. At the October term, 1828. on nioti()n of Samuel C. Sample. 
William Daily and Caleb B. Smith, having produced license signed by "two 
Presiding Judges of the State of Indiana," were admitted to practise in the Henry 
Circuit Court, and, on motion of James Rariden, John S. Newman was in like 
manner admitted. 

In 1820, William W. Wick, Prosecuting Attorney, and James T. Brown 
were admitted to the bar. In 1830, James Perry was prosecutor of the pleas of 
the State. 

From the foregoing list it will be seen that the early practitioners at the 
Henn,- County Bar included many of the ornaments of the legal profession of 
our State. At a later day, came Parker, Julian. Morton, and others scarcely less 
noted, to say nothing of resident attorneys, of whom a number have won a name 
abroad. Among those who were frequent in their attendance upon our earlier 
courts were a number who have distinguished themselves as orators, members 
of Congress, governors of our State, and eminent jurists. 



922 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



It should be borne in mind, however, that the tendency of a general diffusion 
of knowledge is to lessen the difference between men, growing out of their 
acquirements, and he who may have seemed almost a prodigy of learning- 
seventy five years ago might not today pass for much more than an ordinary 
person. Great talents and great learning will, doubtless, be treated with much 
consideration for all time to come, but the time has long passed when any man 
can wield such influence over his fellows as did Demosthenes. It is undoubtedly 
true that greater attainments are expected in many of the stations of life than 
formerly, and the legal profession is no exception. 




CITIZENS. 



CHAPTER XLI. 

henry county villages and towns. 

Distinction Between Village and Town — Number of Villages and 
Towns in Henry County — Founders and Early Merchants — 
Original Plats and Additions — Banks and Newspapers — Postal 
and Transportation Facilities — Population — Ashland — Blountsville 
— Cadiz — Chicago — Circleville — Dunreith — Elizabeth City — 
Fairfield — Grant City — Greensboro — Hillsboro - — Honey Creek — 
Kennard — ■ Knightstown — Lewisville — • Luray — JMechanicsburg — 
Messick — Middletown — Millville. 

Henry County seems to have been well supplied with villages and towns. 
There is no incorporated city in the county. A place that is not incorporated 
is referred to as a village. If it is incorporated as a town, then it is re- 
ferred to as a town. This chapter presents a brief official history of forty one 
villages and towns, past and present, alphabetically arranged, as follows : 

Ashland, Blountsville, Cadiz, Chicago, Circleville, Dunreith, Elizabeth 
City, Fairfield, Grant City, Greensboro, Hillsboro, Honey Creek, Kennard, 
Knightstown, Lewisville, Luray, Mechanicsburg, Messick, Middletown, Mill- 
ville. Mooreland, Mount Summit, New Castle, Needmore, New Lislion, Og- 
den, Petersburg, Pumpkintown, Raysville. Rogersville, Sharington. Shirley, 
Spiceland, Springport, Straughn, Sulphur Springs, Uniontown. West Liberty, 
Wheeland. White Raven, Woodville. 

The distances to all villages and towns in Hennr County are measured 
from the court house in New Castle, taken as a common center, as shown by 
the following letter from the county surveyor : 

"O. E. MINESINGER. 

"county surveyor. 

"henry county. 

"New Castle. Ind., September 1. 1905. 
"Mr. George Hazzard. New Castle. Indiana: 

"Sir: This will certify ttiat I have made a comparison of the distances on the offi- 
cial map of Henry County witli the distances as set out in the following named towns 
and villages regarding their location from the court house in New Castle and I find the 
same correct as stated. The distances given are approximately from actual measure- 
ments in a straight line and not by the usual traveled roads. 

"Very truly, 

"Omar E. Mine.sixger. 
"Surveyor of Henry County." 



924 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



The village of Ashland is situated in Liberty Township, three and one half 
miles east and one half mile south of east from the court house in New Castle, 
on the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis railway and one half mile 
north of the New Castle and Hagerstown Pike. Ashland was never laid out 
and platted into lots, the real estate in the village being described only by 
metes and bounds. It was first known as Mullen's Station, taking its name 
from the well-known family of that name, old pioneers, who were for so many 
years prominent in eastern Henry and western Liberty townships. Many of 
their descendants are yet living in Henry, Liberty and perhaps other town- 
ships of the county. 

Mullen's Station was the first railroad station for New Castle, the old 
Cincinnati, Logansport and Chicago railway having been completed to this 
point early in 1854, perhaps late in 1853, and until the road was finally com- 
pleted to New Castle in the Summer of 1854, all the lousiness for the new 
railroad, which later came to New Castle, was transacted at Mvillen's Station. 
To this point stock was driven to be shipped to Cincinnati, goods were wag- 
oned from there to be distributed to other points throughout the country and 
people went there to take the train to Cincinnati and other points. The post- 
office was established in 1853. David Millikan being the first postmaster, and 
the name of the village being changed to Ashland. 

Before removal to its present site this postoffice was for many years a 
country neighborhood affair located at the respective houses of the successive 
postmasters, near the present location of the station of Messick on the Big Four 
railway and was then as now called Messick. 

Ashland has never been incorporated, therefore its population, as shown 
by the census of 1900, is included in that of Liberty Township. (See Chapter 
XXXVIII). The name probably came from Ashland, Ohio, from the fact 
that, at the time the name was changed, some of the most enterprising citizens 
of the ^•illage had once lived in the town and county of that name in the 
"Buckeye" State. 

A list of the postmasters at Ashland, Messick included, from February 
26, 1847, to September 14. 1855, when the office was moved to its present loca- 
tion, will be found on page 34 of this Histon-. 

Ashland and Millville are the only postoffices in Liberty Township. Aside 
from Chicago which was discontinued March 24. 1855, and Devon, which was 
discontinued February 13, 1868, they are the only postoffices that have ever 
been in the township. 

BLOUNTSVn.LE. 

Blountsville, situated in Stony Creek Township, twelve miles due north- 
east from the court house in New Castk. being in the W. >4 of the N. E. 14 of 
Sec. 35, Tp. 19 N.. R. II E., was laid out and platted by Thomas R. Stanford, 
Sun'eyor, in July, 1832. and acknowledged by Andrew D. Blount, proprietor, 
September 5, 1833. The main street running east and west was then desig- 
nated as "The Logansport and Richmond Road," the road running south on 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 925 

the west line of the town as "The Centreville Road." The original plat con- 
tains twenty six lots, no blocks designated. 

The first addition, situated immediately south of the original plat, was platted June 
14, 1853, and was acknowledged by Beale Manifold, proprietor, January 26. 1S54. and con- 
tains twelve lots, no blocks designated. 

The Northeastern, the second addition, situated immediately east of the original 
plat and Manifold's addition, was platted and acknowledged by Jonathan Ross, Jesse 
Gary, William Liser, Daniel Bainter, J. W. Stanley, John Houk and Leander Priest, pro- 
prietors, Aug-ust 19, 1859. It contains twenty six lots and four out-lots, no blocks des- 
ignated. 

Blountsville takes its name from Andrew D. Blount, the original propri- 
etor of the townsite. On the county records showing the filing of the plat, the 
name is spelled "Blunt." but as far back as the memon,^ of the oldest inhab- 
itant reaches the name has been uniformly used as "Blount." This place 
from its inception has always been the commercial metropolis of our northeast- 
ern township, and on account of its close proximity to Delaware County on the 
north and Randolph County on the east, its trade has been much increased 
from those counties. 

This place was without railroad facilities until 1902, when the Chicago, 
Cincinnati and Louisville railway was built, which in a few years must add 
to the importance of the village. 

Blountsville not being incorporated must be content to be known as a vil- 
lage only, and its population, according to the census of 1900. is included in 
that of Stony Creek Township. (See Chapter XXXA'III.) 

A list of the postmasters at Blountsville from the establishment of the 
postoffice, Januar}' 22. 1835. inclusive, to the present time, will be foimd on 
pages 34-5 of this History. Also the name of the only rural route carrier. 

Blotmtsville is the only postoffice now in the township. The only other 
postoffice ever in the township was Rogersville, which was discontinued June 
15, 1901. 

CADIZ. 

The town of Cadiz is situated in Harrison Township, six miles west and 
one and one fourth miles north of west from the court house in New Castle, 
being in the S. E. 14 of Sec. 3. Tp. 17 N., R. 11 E., and was laid out and 
platted by David Pickering, proprietor, September 11. 1836, and acknowl- 
edged March 22, 1837. 

The early emigration to that part of Henry County afterwards formed 
into Harrison Township was largely from Harrison County, Ohio, and the 
town of Cadiz derives its name from the county seat of that county. In this 
emigration the Cooper family and their kinsmen, including the Pickerings, 
v.ere the most numerous, therefore, when it came to establishing a town, 
wint could be more natural than to adopt the naine of the clu'ef town of the 
county from which they emigrated? 

The main street running east and west was designated as "The Craw- 
fordsville and New Castle State Road." The original plat contains four and 
one half blocks, consisting of sixteen lots. 



926 ^ hazzard's history of henry county. 

The first addition, situated immediately west of the original plat, was platted 
March 29, 1849. and was acknowledged by Imla W. Cooper, proprietor, April 7. 1849. and 
contains four blocks consisting of twelve lots and one out-lot. 

The second addition, situated immediately east and north of the original plat, was 
platted November 7, 1849. and was on the same date acknowledged by David Pickering, 
proprietor, and contains four blocks, consisting of fifteen lots. 

A third addition, situated immediately south of the original plat, was platted Feb- 
ruary 23, 1855, and was acknowledged by Jonas Pickering, proprietor, August 10, 1860, 
and contains but two lots, no blocks designated. 

The owner of this addition of two lots only was not ambitious to have 
his small addition to Cadiz speedily a matter of official record, for it took him 
five years and six months to get the matter properly recorded. 

David Pickering, the original proprietor, was the most ambitious of all 
of the promoters of Cadiz, for the county records show that on March, 23, 
1854, he made another addition situated immediately north of his first addi- 
tion to the original plat, the same containing four blocks, consisting of eight 
lots, but like his neighbor and kinsman, Jonas Pickering, he was in no hurry 
to reach the county recorder's office, for it was not until October 3, 1861, seven 
years and six months later, that it was recorded. 

The population of the town of Cadiz, as shown by the census of 1900, was 
253. Although surrounded by a fertile country and numbering from time 
to time as it has, some of Henry County's most enterprising and enlightened 
citizens, it has never been able to secure railroad facilities. In fact, Harrison 
Township is the only one of the thirteen in the county not so far traversed by 
either steam or electric railway. Surely the repeated efifr>rts of the enterpris- 
ing citizens of the township in this direction will in time bear fruit. 

A postoffice was established December 18, 1837. A list of the postmas- 
ters from that time to the present will be found on page 35 of this History. 

Cadiz is the only postoffice that has ever existed in Harrison Township. 
There ne\-er was a postoffice at the old town of Woodville, the principal street 
of which was the boundary line between Harrison and Greensboro townships. 

CHICAGO. 

This proposed town was never laid out and platted. It is situated seven 
and one half miles east and one mile south from the court house in New Castle, 
on the New Castle and Hagerstown pike, in Liberty Township. The first 
transfer, as shown by the records, was for religious purposes and consisted of 
one acre, transferred by John McSherley and Phebe, his wife, to Christopher 
Main, George Koons and Jesse K. Platts as Trustees for Liberty Church, No- 
vember 5, 1827. 

The village is located about two miles southeast of the present site of 
Millville and a mile south of the railroad, the building of which seems to have 
ruined its prospects. At one time it was an ambitious village, numbering a 
score or more of houses, one or two stores and two hotels. It is now known 
as the "Old Chicago Neighborhood." The people who located Chicago were 
very ambitious and had visions of a great future, therefore, they named this 
place after the then young giant just coming into prominence at the foot of 
Lake Michigan. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 927 

A postoffice was established May ii, 1852 and discontinued March 24, 
1855, which is about the time the postoffice at Millville was estabhshed. 
Three of its prominent citizens served as postmasters. Their names will be 
found on page 36 of this History. 

Chicago is one of the four postoffices that have existed in Liberty Town- 
ship, the other three being Devon (discontinued), Ashland and Millville. 

CIRCLEVILLE. 

This village is on the line between Stony Creek and Blue River town- 
ships, nine miles due northeast from the court house in New Castle, and one 
and one half miles due north from the present town of Mooreland. The rec- 
ords do not show that it was ever laid out and platted into town lots. 

This place has long since passed from the zenith of its glon,- and now 
exists as a village only in the memory of the oldest citizen. Its former site is 
now commonly known as "Five Forks," for the reason that the turnpikes from 
here lead to five dififerent points of the compass. Circleville never reached 
the dignity of a postoffice. Five Forks is adjoined by some of the most fertile 
and highly improved farms of the county. 

The author of this History has been unable to find any old settler who can 
give a reason why this place was named Circleville. 

DUNREITH. 

The town of Dunreith is situated in Spiceland Township, nine miles 
south and three and one half miles west from the court house in New Castle, 
and five miles east from -Knightstown. at the crossing of the Pittsburg, Cincin- 
nati, Qiicago and St. Louis railway and the New Castle and Rushville division 
of the Lake Erie and Western railway, and at the junction of the New Castle 
branch with the main line of the Indianapolis and Eastern railway (electric 
line), and in the W. i of the N. E. ^ of Sec. 32, and the W. -J of the S. E. J 
of Sec. 29. Tp. 16 N., R. 10 E. It was laid out and platted by James M. Clem- 
ents, Surveyor, for John W. Griffin, Caleb Johnson and Thomas Evans, 
proprietors, July 22, 1865, and was acknowledged by them July 25, 1865. The 
main street running east and west was designated as "The National Road." The 
original plat contains three blocks consisting of twenty three lots. The town was 
first known as Coffin's Station. 

On the completion of the old Indiana Central railroad to this point a depot 
was established here and the place named after the proprietor of the land, Emery 
Dunreith Coffin. Soon there began to spring up a little village around the station. 
In 1865, when the town was first platted as above shown, those interested, particu- 
larly John W. Griffin, decided on a change of name, but out of respect to Mr. 
Coffin's memory and to preserve his name in connection with the town, it was 
called Dunreith. 

The first addition, situated northwest of the original plat and on the north side of 
the National Road, was platted August 31. 186G, and was on the same date acknowledged 
by Thomas Evans, proprietor, and contains six blocks, consisting of thirty six lots. 



928 hazzard's history of henry county. 

The second addition, situated immediately north of the original plat, between the 
National Road and the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis railway, being the 
narrow strip of land between the principal street and the railroad and upon which all 
of the business houses of the town are now situated, was platted and acknowledged by 
Timothy Wilson, Caleb Johnson and Thomas Evans, December 12, 1S66. It contains six 
lots, no blocks designated. 

The Eastern addition, situated immediately north of the Wilson, Johnson and 
Evans' addition, and east of Evans' addition on the north side of the National Road, 
was platted November 16, 1867, and was acknowledged by Christopher Wilson, propri- 
etor. December 16, 1867; and by Caleb Johnson on the part of C. Johnson and Company, 
June 5, 1868. It contains three blocks, consisting of fourteen lots. 

An addition, situated immediately north of Evans' addition and east of the turn- 
pike running north to Spiceland, was platted August 29. 1S6S, and was acknowledged by 
Caleb Johnson, proprietor, September 14. 1868. and contains two blocks, consisting of 
eleven lots. 

Caleb Johnson, who was one of the chief promoters of the town, was for 
many vears its leading merchant. After leaving- the county treasurer's office in 
August, 1863, he removed to Coffin's Station and established a store. He resided 
there until 1879 when, having in the meantime entered the ministry' of the Friends' 
Church, he moved to Lynnville, Iowa. Afterwards he was a resident of Wichita, 
Kansas, and Denver, Colorado. He died at the latter place in 1899 and his 
remains are buried there. 

The next addition, situated immediately west of the original plat and south of the 
old railway, was platted August 8. 1871, and was acknowledged by John W. Griffin, pro- 
prietor, August 17, 1871, and contains eight lots, no blocks designated. 

The next ambitious proprietor was James M. Crawford, who had platted May 5, 
1883, an addition situated immediately north of Caleb Johnson's addition, on the east 
side of the pike running north to Spiceland. It was acknowledged by him May 19. 1883, 
and contains one block of six lots. 

Joseph Griffin, father of John W.. made an addition, situated immediately west of 
Evans' addition and west of the pike running north to Spiceland. It was platted July 9, 
1883, and was acknowledged by Joseph Griffin, proprietor, December 11, 1883, and con- 
tains two blocks, consisting of seven lots. 

Robert M. Kenney's north side addition, situated on the extreme north side of the 
town of Dunreith, between the New Castle and Rushville railway and the road running 
north to Spiceland, was platted October 20, 1892, and was acknowledged by Kenney 
July 13, 1893. It contains ten and two thirds acres divided into four blocks, consisting 
of fifty two lots and two out-lots. 

A postoffice was established July 2, 1861, then called Coffin's Station. 
On pages 36-7 of this History will be found a list of the postmasters for the 
town as first named and as now named. Also the name of the only rural 
route carrier. 

The only postoffices that have ever existed in Spiceland Township are 
Dunreith, Ogden and Spiceland, and all are still in existence. 

The census of 1900 places the population of the town at 205. 

ELIZABETH CITY. 

This old village, now much decayed, is situated twelve and one fourth 
miles southwest from the court house in New Castle, and six miles northwest 
from Knightstown, and is in Wayne Township, being in the N. W. corner of 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 929 

the S. E. }i of Sec. i. Tp. i6 N.. R. 8 E. Elizabeth City was laid out and 
platted by Robert Overman, proprietor, and acknowledged September 17. 
1838, and contains six blocks, consisting of thirty six lots. No addition has 
ever been filed to the town. It was at an early day, a place of some promise. 
After the Civil War, Elnathan and Thomas B. Wilkinson, brothers, now of 
Knightstown, maintained here for several years a general mercantile estab- 
lishment and did a highly prosperous and satisfactory business. However, no 
postofifice was established until 1878. It was called "Maple Valley," for the 
reason that there was a prior postoffice in the State named Elizabeth City. 

The construction of the Big Four railway through the count)' west from 
New Castle and the establishment of the towns of Kennard in Henrj^ County 
and Shirley in Henry and Hancock counties, and of Wilkinson in Hancock 
County, all on the line of the railroad and within a few miles of Elizabeth City, 
was the death knell of the last named place as a business point. The establish- 
ment of the rural free delivery system from Shirley and Wilkinson was 
another blow to Elizabeth City, for then the postofifice was finally discontinued. 
On pages 39 and 40 of this History will be found a list of the respective post- 
masters of "Maple Valley." 

Elizabeth City (Maple Valley) is one of the four postofifices that have ex- 
isted in Wayne Township, the other three being Grant City, (Snyder dis- 
continued), Knightstown and Raysville. 

Robert Overman, the proprietor, was from Pasquotank County, North 
Carolina, of which Elizabeth City is the county town, hence this name. 



This defunct place was situated somewhere on the National Road. The 
county records do not show where it was located or by whom it was laid 
out and platted. Henry Lewelling appears to have been the surveyor, who 
laid out and platted the village about the year 1828. The main street running 
east and west is designated as "The National Road," and contains four blocks 
consisting of thirty two lots. Lewis Tacket was the proprietor. Its location 
was probably east of Lewisville in the neighborhood of the present town of 
Straughn. It never reached the dignity of a postofifice. 

GRANT CITY. 

Grant City, so named after our great military chieftain, General Ulysses 
S. Grant, is situated in Wayne Township, ten and one half miles southwest 
from the court house in New Castle and five miles north and one mile west 
from Knightstown. It is located on the E. 3^2 of the N. E. % and the E. yi of 
the S. E. '4 of Sec. 5 and the W. i< of the S. W. ji of Sec. 4. Tp. 16 N., R. 9 E., 
and was laid out, platted and acknowledged by Jacob Green, who was a soldier 
in the Civil War, and by Margaret Green, his wife, October 31, 1868. It con- 
tains five blocks, consisting of thirty six lots. 



930 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

Jacob Green's northern addition, situated immediately north of the original plat, 
was platted by the same parties March 24, 1869, and. was acknowledged July 14, 1869. It 
contains four blocks, consisting of twenty eight lots. 

When Jacob Green returned from the Civil War he was ambitious to 
found a town, and, being a great admirer of his old commander, named it as 
above stated. From the fact that there was a prior postofifice in the State of 
the same name, no postoffice was established until January 26, 1888, when one 
was established called "Snyder." In the meantime the Big Four railway had 
been built through the county west from New Castle and the town of Ken- 
nard located two and one half miles north and one half mile east of Grant 
City. Later the rural free delivery system abolished the postoffice. The 
stores which had been established found their way to the railroad or were 
discontinued. Thus the glory of Grant City as a business center disappeared. 
"Jake" Green, the founder of the village, was for many years a well-known 
character in Henry- County. Some years ago he moved to Iowa where he died 
and is buried. 

A list of the postmasters at "Snyder" will be found on page 45 of this 
History. Grant City (Snyder discontinued) is one of the four postoffices that 
have existed in Wayne Township, the other three being Elizabeth City 
(Maple Valley), Knightstown and Raysville. 

GREENSBORO. 

This old historic town is situated in Greensboro Township, six and one 
fourth miles southwest from the court house in New Castle, and is in the E. i 
of the S. E. J- of Sec. 35 and in the W. i of the S. W. i of Sec. 36, Tp. 17 N.', 
R. 9 E.. and was laid out, platted and acknowledged by Jehu Wickersham, 
February 2y. 1830, and contains six blocks, consisting of forty eight lots. 

The iirst or Eastern addition, situated Immediately east of and adjoining the orig- 
inal plat, was platted and acknowledged by Seth Hinshaw. Jonas Pickering, Enoch Wick- 
ersham, Abraham Moore, Jehu Wickersham and Mary Wickersham, proprietors, March 
26, 1836, and contains six blocks, consisting of twenty eight lots. 

The second or Northern addition, situated immediately north of the original plat 
and east of High Street, was platted and acknowledged by Thomas Reagan, April 13, 
1855, and contains one block, consisting of twelve lots. 

Reagan's addition to the Northern addition, situated immediately north of the 
original plat and west of High Street, was platted and acknowledged by Thomas Reagan, 
October 16, 1866. and contains one block, consisting of six lots. 

A plat of the town of Greensboro was surveyed and platted by William R. Harrold. 
Surveyor, and acknowledged August 6, 1873. This plat includes the original plat and 
all the additions above mentioned and also out-lots numbering from one to twenty four 
inclusive; and also out-lots numbers seven to thirteen inclusive, north of Reagan's 
Northern addition. 

Greensboro is situated on the east bank of Duek Creek, about one mile 
from its junction with Blue River, and nearly seven miles north by east from 
Knightstown. Being in the midst of a tract of fertile farming lands, it has 
ever enjoyed a considerable local traffic, though its growth in wealth and im- 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 93I 

portance has not been as rapid as that of some other towns in the county, from 
the fact that it is not reached by a railroad. Then the construction of the Big 
Four railroad through the county, two and one half miles north of it, and the 
establishment of the town of Kennard, two and one half miles northwest of it 
have drawn from it much of the trade that it once enjoyed. 

Greensboro has a number of excellent turnpikes radiating from it ; but it 
was as a "station" on the "underground railroad" that it won a national repu- 
tation. As the home of a number of determined and veteran abolition agita- 
tors, it had a reputation, fifty years ago, second to no place of its size in the 
whole country. In those early days a large building, known as "Liberty Hall," 
was often filled with enthusiastic audiences, who listened to such apostles of 
freedom as Arnold Bufifum, Abby Kelly. Frederick Douglas, George W. Jul- 
ian and others of note. 

The "underground railroad" was the system employed by abolitionists 
to transport slaves fleeing from bondage to the land of freedom, principally 
Canada. The plan was to move them in the night time from the home of an 
abolitionist, or some other place where they were secreted, called a "station," 
to some point or "station" further on toward their ultimate destination. This 
was all done in such a secretive and mysterious way that the term "under- 
ground railroad" was applied. Greensboro was known far and wide as a per- 
manent "station," and the abolitionists there were numerous and determined, 
having at their head the veteran Seth Hinshaw. 

The early emigration in and around Greensboro was from Guilford 
County, NoVth Carolina, of which Greensboro is the county town, and from 
this fact Greensboro Township and town are so named. 

A list of the postmasters from William Reagan, April i8, 1831, to the 
present time, will be found on page 37 of this History. Greensboro Township 
has had three postoffices. all of which are retained — Greensboro, Kennard and 
Shirley. However, at the present time the Shirley postoffice is on the west 
side of Main Street in Hancock County. 

The census of 1900 places the population of the town at 284. 



This old village on a hill is situated in the southeast corner of Prairie 
Township, three and one half miles northeast from the court house in New 
Castle, and is in the "south part of the N. E. H of Sec. 36, Tp. 18 N., R. 10 E., 
and was laid out, platted and acknowledged by Jacob Huston, Thomas Huston 
and Samuel Rinehart. proprietors, July 26. 1831, and contains twelve blocks, 
consisting of sixty lots. 

The first addition, situated immediately east of the original plat, was platted March 
2, 1852, and acknowledged by Clement Murphey, proprietor, April 19, 1852, and contains 
twelve lots, no blocks designated. 

The second addition, also by Clement Murphey. situated immediately east of his 
first addition, was platted and acknowledged by him. April 16. 1853, and contains twelve 
lots, no blocks designated. 

The name of the village undoubtedly comes from the fact that one can 
hardly reach the place from any direction without climbing a hill. It was 



932 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



once a trading point of some consequence. * The author of this History well 
remembers when as a boy he first saw Hillsboro, going there in company 
with his mother to visit her brother, Franklin Woodward, then residing there. 
At that time there were three stores, two blacksmith shops, a wagon shop, and 
a saw mill, with corresponding population. At the foot of the hill on the road 
leading to New Castle, on Little Blue River, there was then and for many 
years afterward, the most pretentious woolen mill in the county, known far 
and wide as the "Mowrer and McAfee Factory," later owned by Ice, Dunn 
and Company. Before this, at the foot of the hill on the road now leading to 
Messick, on a little stream that would not now float a duck so thorough has 
been the drainage, there was a grist mill and still house combined, known as 
the "Byrket mill." Then on the Little Blue, near the factory there had been 
a saw mill owned and operated by a man named Neziah Snyder and connected 
with it he operated one burr for grinding wheat and corn, principally corn. 
What little flour he ground was bolted by hand. Now these industries have 
all disappeared and Hillsboro has not only passed into histor>' but almost into 
oblivion. It was one of the towns projected before the days of railroads and 
with their coming it began to decay. 

A postoffice was established March lo, 185 1, named "Dan Webster," 
from the fact that there was already in Indiana a postoffice called Hillsboro. 
The first postmaster was Samuel S. Canaday, who moved around a good 
deal in the county and seemed to be the choice of the people wherever he 
lived for postmaster, for he ser\'ed as' such at Ashland, Hillsboro and New 
Castle. A list of the postmasters at "Dan Webster" will be found on page 
36 of this History. Prairie Township has had four postoffices — Hillsboro 
"Dan Webster," Luray, IMount .Summit and Springport. The two first named 
have been discontinued. 

HONEY CREEK. 

The village of Honey Creek, so named for the little stream near whose 
banks it is situated, is in Fall Creek Township, nine and one half miles north- 
west from the court house in New Castle and four miles southeast from Mid- 
dletown, on the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis railway. It was 
founded in 1858 and was called Warnock's Station, after a Henry County 
pioneer who then owned the land on which Honey Creek is now located, the 
same being in the N. E. V^, of Sec. 10, Tp. 18 X., R. 9 E. 

The only addition, known as the Western, and situated immediately west of the 
original village, on the north side of the railroad, and on the WQst side of the street run- 
ning north and south, was platted July 28. 1S73. for Joseph M. Brown, Commissioner, in 
the matter of the real estate of John Myers, deceased, of which decedent, Adam Evans 
was executor, Brown having been appointed Commissioner by the Court to sell the real 
estate. This addition to Honey Creek was made by the Commissioner to facilitate the 
sale of said real estate. It contains five acres and seven rods and is divided into three 
blocks, consisting of twelve lots. 

A postoffice was established June i8, 1861. with Zadock G. Tomlinson 
as postmaster. On pages 37 and 38 of this History will be found a list of the 
postmasters from Tomlinson to Lertin R. Fadely, the present incumbent. 



HAZZARD S HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY'. 933 

Honey Creek is one of tlie three postoffices that were estabhshed and 
that still exist in Fall Creek Township, the other two being Mechanicsburg and 
Middletown. 

Honey Creek not being incorporated the population as given by the cen- 
sus of 1900 is included in that of Fall Creek Township. (See Chapter 

xxxvni). 

KENNARD. 

This town is situated in the northwest part of Greensboro Township, 
seven and three fourths miles west and two miles south from the court house 
in New Castle and is on the Peoria and Eastern division of the Qeveland, 
Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis railway, commonly called the Big Four rail- 
way. It is located in the E. J/ of the S. E. ^ of Sec. 20 and the W. ^^ of the S. 
W. ^'x of Sec. 21 and the N. E. ^4 of the N. E. 54 of Sec. 29 and the N. W. % 
of the N. W. J4 of Sec. 28, Tp. 17 N., R. 9 E. It was surveyed and platted by 
Daniel K. Cook, Surveyor, September 6, 1882, and was acknowledged by Cy- 
rus C. Hinshaw, John W. Payne, Westphalia M. Dixon, Charles Hartley and 
Alartha A. Weasner, proprietors. September 6, 1882. and contained twelve blocks, 
consisting of fifty six lots and ten out-lots. 

The first addition, situated immediately north of the original plat and west of 
Main Street, was platted February 12, 1SS5, aiid was acknowledged by Cyrus C. Hinshaw 
and John W. Payne, proprietors, February 19. 1.S85, and contains four and sixty-nine 
hundredths acres, divided into two blocks, consisting of eleven lots. 

Then comes Westphalia M. Dixon with an addition which is situated immediately 
north of the original plat, on the east side of Main Street. It was platted February 8, 
1887. and was acknowledged by Dixon March 11. 1887. and contains two blocks, con- 
sisting of six lots. 

Alexander Younts' addition, situated immediately north of Dixon's addition on the 
east side of Main Street, was platted Ajjril 5. 1888, and was acknowledged by Younts 
December 22, 1888, and contains three and one half acres, divided into one block, consist- 
ing of eight lots. 

Alexander Younts was ambitious to add to Kennard's territory for he filed a second 
addition, situated immediately east of the original plat, on the north side of Broad 
Street, which was platted in October. 1890. It was acknowledged by Younts November 
11, 1890, and contains two and forty five hundredths acres, divided into three lots and one 
out-lot. no blocks designated. 

Martindale. Madison and Hinshaw's addition, situated immediately south of tlie 
original plat and south of the Big Four railway, was platted April 27, 1893, and was ac- 
knowledged by Frank Martindale, Martha F. Martindale. Cyrus C. Hinshaw, John Madi- 
son and Alonzo Hinshaw, proprietors, April 28, 1893. and contains nine and forty seven 
hundredths acres, divided into forty eight lots, no blocks designated. 

George I. Jenckes made the last addition. It is situated immediately west of the 
original plat and Martindale. Madison and Hinshaw's addition and was platted May 10, 
1898. and was acknowledged by Jenckes on the same date. It contains ten and one 
fourth acres, divided into two blocks, consisting of forty nine lots and one out-lot. 

Cyrus C. Hinshaw was instrumental in having the town named for 
Jenkins Kennard, an old and highly respected citizen of Henry Co'Mitv. a 
farmer who has lived for many years in the northeastern part of Wayne 
Township, not far from the Stone Ouarr}- ]\Iill. 



934 -.[AZZAUDS niSIOUY OK HEXRY COUNTY. 

A postoffice was established September 12, 1882, with Cyrus C. Hinshaw 
as postmaster. On page 38 of this History will be found a list of the post- 
masters from the establishment of the office to the present time. Greensboro 
Township has had three postoffices, all of which are retained — Greensboro, 
Kennard and Shirley. However, at the present time the Shirley postoffice is 
on the west side of Main Street, in Hancock County. 

The census of 1900 places the population of the town at 417. 

The projected Indianapolis. New Castle and Toledo railway (electric 
line) passes through Kennard. 

KNIGHTSTOWN. 

The town of Knightstown is situated in Wayne Township, fourteen 
miles southwest from the court house in New Castle, on the west bank of Blue 
River, at the crossing of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis 
railway and the Louisville and Benton Harbor division of the Big Four rail- 
way and on the main line of the Indianapolis and Eastern railway,^ (electric 
line) and is in the N. E. | and the S. E. -} of Sec. 33 and the W. I of the N. 
W. i and the W. i of the S. W. i of Sec. 34, Tp. 16 N., R. 9 E. "it was laid 
out and platted by Mr. Waitsel M. Gary in 1827, and contains twelve blocks 
consisting of eighty five lots. Main, or Clay Street, running east and west 
was then known as "The National Road." The records do not show before 
whom it was acknowledged, or by whom it was surA^eyed and platted. 

Samuel Brown's plat of out-lots, situatetl south ot the original plat, vvas platted and 
acknowledged by him February 7, 1831, and contains thirty three and three fourths acres, 
consisting of twelve out-lots, no blocks designated. 

Waitsel M. Gary's additional plat, situated west of the original plat, was platted and 
acknowledged by him November 19, 1S36, and contains three blocks, consisting of seven- 
teen lots. 

Hart's first Southern addition, situated immediately south of the original plat, be- 
tween Franklin and Adams streets, was' platted and acknowledged by Edward K. Hart, 
April 27, 1837, and contains thirty nine lots, no blocks designated. 

The first Eastern addition, situated immediately east and across Blue River from 
the original plat, was platted March 1, 1S39, and was acknowledged by Edward K, Hart 
and William M. Tate, proprietors, March 2. 1839, and contains eighteen blocks, consist- 
ing of one hundred and fifty one lots and one out-lot. 

Gary and Ghurcli's addition, situated immediately west of Gary's addition, and west 
of Madison Street, was platted and acknowledged by Waitsel M. Gary and Uzziel Ghurch, 
March 4, 1839, and contains five blocks consisting of twenty one lots. 

The second South addition, situated immediately south of Hart's first Southern addi- 
tion and east of Jefferson Street, was platted April 11, 1839. and was acknowledged by 
John Liowrey and Edward K. Hart, proprietors, on the same date and contains six blocks, 
consisting of thirty eight lots and two out-lots. 

Hiram Gaston's addition, situated immediately south of Gary's addition and south 
of Jackson Street between Madison and Franklin streets, was platted April 12, 1839, and 
was acknowledged by Gaston, April 13, 1839, and contains two blocks, consisting of ten 
lots. 

An additional plat, block 13, probably a subdivision, situated immediately west 
of the original plat, between Franklin and Jefferson streets, north of Brown Street, was 
platted and acknowledged by Waitsel M. Gary, May 28, 1839, and contains one block, 
consisting of four lots. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 935 

A plat of out-lot number two of the Second Southern addition platted and acknowl- 
edged by Jesse Charles, proprietor, January 17, 1S51, contains four lots, no blocks 
designated. 

The Northern addition, situated immediately north of the original plat, between 
Franklin and Adams streets, was platted and acknowledged by Robert I. Hudelson, Jo- 
seph M. Whitesel, Asa Heaton and Morris F. Edwards, September 6, 1853. and contains 
three blocks, consisting of twenty-three lots. 

White's addition, situated immediately south of Gaston's addition, between Madi- 
son and Franklin streets, was platted and acknowledged by Edmund White, Margaret 
White, Harriet White, Jesse F. Pusey, Jane W. Pusey, Charles White, Lucy H. White, 
James White and Jemima White, heirs of Caleb White, April 1, 1861, and contains twen- 
ty two lots, no blocks designated. 

The first Northwestern addition, situated Immediately north of Cary and Church's 
addition, and Cary's additions, between McCullum and Franklin streets, was platted and 
acknowledged by Mary M. Heaton, Phebe S. Hudelson, Joseph M. Whitesel, Morris F. Ed- 
wards, Jesse B. Hinshaw, James T. Hudelson and Ann Maria Hinshaw, proprietors, Sep- 
tember 3, 1S63, and contains eight blocks, consisting of forty two lots. 

Edwards' addition, situated immediately north of the first Northern addition, on 
the west side of Washington Street, was platted and acknowledged by Morris F. Ed- 
wards June 3. 18C8. and contains three and one-halt acres, divided into two blocks, con- 
sisting of twelve lots. 

Hudelson's addition, situated north of the First Northwestern addition on the west 
side of Franklin Street and on the south side of Lincoln Street, was platted and ac- 
knowledged by Phebe Hudelson. July 13, 1868, and contains twelve lots, no blocks desig- 
nated. 

Charles' Block, by which name this addition is known, situated immediately east 
of the first Southern addition and east of Adams Street, was platted August 3, 1868, and 
was acknowledged by John T. Charles. Oliver Charles and Eunice S. Charles, propri- 
etors, on the same date, and contains two blocks, consisting of twelve lots. 

Heaton. Peden and Scovell's addition, situated immediately south of the Panhandle 
railway, between Madison and Jefferson streets, was platted in October, 1868, and was 
acknowled.ged by John W. Heaton, Reuben Peden and Ezra Scovell, proprietors. Novem- 
ber 19, 1868, and contains eight blocks, consisting of thirty two lots. 

Stuart's addition, situated in the extreme north end of town and east of Franklin 
Street, was platted and acknowledged by Ithamer W. Stuart, January 14, 1870. and con- 
tains ten lots, no blocks designated. 

Watts' addition, situated immediately west of "White's addition, on the west side 
of Madison Street and on the south side of Pine Street, was platted and acknowledged 
by Peter and Harry Watts. June 11. ISVO, and contains two blocks, consisting of eight 
lots. 

Lowrey's addition, situated immediately south and west of White's addition, on 
the east side of Madison Street, was platted in March, 1886, and was acknowledged by 
John W. Lowrey, July 30, 1886, and contains four lots, no blocks designated. 

Harry Watts' North addition, situated immediately north of the Northwestern ad- 
dition, on the west side of Franklin Street, was platted January 12, 1887, and was 
acknowledged by Watts, oh the same date and contains seventeen lots, no blocks desig- 
nated. 

Green, Allison and Wagoner's addition is a subdivision of lot seven in Stuart's ad- 
dition and was platted November 4, 1887, and was acknowledged by Alpheus W. Green. 
Morton Allison and Peter Wagoner, proprietors, November 7, 1887, and contains six lots, 
no blocks designated. 

Barrett's addition, situated immediately north of the Northern addition, between 
Franklin and Adams streets, was platted May 27, 1889, and was acknowledged by the 
heirs of Charles A. Barrett, deceased, June 17, 1889. and contains seven and seventy four 
hundredths acres, divided into four blocks, consisting of twenty four lots. 



936 hazzard's history of henry county. 

Noah W. Wagoner's addition, situat'5d immediately north of Harry Watts' addition, 
between Madison and Pranlvlin streets, was platted January 3, 1890, and was acknowl- 
edged by Wa.goner on the same day and contains twenty lots, no blocks designated. 

James M. Woods' subdivision of a part of out-lot thirty five, situated immediately 
southwest of Lowrey's addition, on the west side of Madison Street, was platted April 8, 
1891, and was acknowledged by Woods, May 8, 1891, and contains ten lots, no blocks des- 
ignated. 

The Knightstown Improvement Company's addition, situated west of the corporate 
limits of said town, and west of Montgomery Creek, on the south side of Clay or Main 
Street, was platted March 28, 1892, and was acknowledged by Leonidas P. Newby. Thomas 
B. Deem, Frank J. Vestal, James Hall. Edward G. Mostler, George W. Williams. William 
Call, Harry Watts, Shepperd Bowman and Aaron E. Carroll, directors of the Knights- 
town Land and Improvement Company, April 23. 1892, and contains seventeen and 
thirty eight hundredths acres, divided into seventy two lots, no blocks designated. 

Sadie V. Roberts' addition, situated immediately south of Gary and Church's addi- 
tion, south of Main Street, between Hill Avenue and Madison Street, was platted Septem- 
ber 8, 1892, and was acknowledged by Sadie V. RobeiM^s and Joseph H. Roberts, Novem- 
ber 14, 1892, and contains twenty four lots, no blocks designated. 

The Merchants' and Manufacturers' Association's addition, situated immediately 
north of Stuart's addition, in the extreuie north end of town, and extending from the 
Greensboro pike on the east to McCullum Street on the west, was platted October 16, 
1902, and was on the same date acknowledged by Robert Silver, President, and John A. 
Sample, Secretary, of the Merchants' and Manufacturers' Association, and contains one 
hundred and fifty lots and two out-lots, no blocks designated. 

The town of Knightstown is pleasantly situated on Blue River, or rather 
between that stream and Montgomery Creek. Waitsel M. Car\% the original 
proprietor, kept the only hotel for some years and built the first frame house 
in town. The place was named in honor of Jonathan Knight, a United States 
Engineer, who located the Cumberland, or National Road, through the State. 
At first the town only extended back two or three tiers of lots from the river bluff. 

Levi Griffith and Isaac James owned the first dry goods establishment 
here about the vear 1830. There were about a half dozen houses in the 
place at that time, and the population was less than three hundred in 1833. 

The first church built here was by the Presbyterians, in 1834 — a frame, 
about thirty by forty feet. The Methodists erected a stnall frame building, 
about the year 1837. A distillery was erected just over the river, about 1825, 
by one John Tewis, and about 1828 a carding machine was built near the 
present Panhandle depot. 

About two years after the inception of Knightstown, the Ithamer W. 
Stuart farm of 160 acres could have been bought for $400. One of the best 
corner lots sold for $96. which was regarded as a fancy price indeed. Part 
of this Stuart farm has long since been platted as additions to Knightstown. 
and one acre of the balance of the unplatted land is now worth what the 
whole could have been bought for as above stated. 

As late as 1830 the country was such a "howling wilderness" — with little 
more than a bridle-path through the woods — that Dr. Whitesel was badly 
lost in going to see a patient on Six-Mile Creek, and bears came out of the 
river bottom and were chased through the streets more than once after that 
period. A young physician named Hiatt was the first to locate in town : his 
stay was short. James Wilson was Knightstown's first attorney. 

Whi.sky was in much more general use in early days than at present. 




HENRY COUNTY LAWYERS. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 937 

A judge. the"'squire'" and all the constables were seen drunk on one or more 
occasions in early days, and pugilistic encounters were among the cherished 
amusements. But great changes have been wrought. 

Knightstown is in the midst of splendid farming lands, the productions 
of which find here a ready market. 

About 1850 the Knightstown and Shelbyville railroad, the first which 
reached our county, was completed to Knightstown, and business received a 
new impetus, and "corner lots" rapidly appreciated in value. Phis was a 
primitive railroad, the rails of which were of wood, stripped with fla( h^r iron. 
. It was abandoned in 1853 but when the present Louisville and Benton Harbor 
division of the Big Four railway was completed in the summer of 1891, run- 
ning south through the western part of the county, it followed this old aban- 
doned right of way for a short distance in Rush County. 

The Knightstown Academy building is a commodious structure and the 
graded school has for years ranked high. 

The town has two banking institutions, but these are treated of in another 
part of this History in the chapter entitled, "Banks and Banking." Knightstown 
is one of the best towns on the line ot the old Indiana Central railroad between 
Richmond and Indianapolis. In the chapter of this Histon,- entitled "News- 
papers, Past and Present" will be found a full account of the newspapers that 
have been published and of those .now in existence at Knightstown. Knights- 
town is one of the four postoffices that have existed in Wayne Township, the 
other three- being Elizabeth City (Maple Valley, discontinued). Grant City 
( Snyder, discontinued) and Raysville. The postoffice at Knig'htstown was es- 
tablished January 30. 1833, with Joseph McCalley, as postmaster. On page 
38 of this history will be found a list of the postmasters to date, with the time 
served by each. Also the names of the four rural route carriers with the num- 
bers of their respective routes. 

The census of 1900 places the population of the town at 1,942. 

LEWISV^LLE. 

Lewisville is situated in Franklin Township, eight and three fourths 
miles south and one mile east from the court house in Neiv Castle, and nine 
miles east from Knightstown, on the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis 
railway, and the Indianapolis and Eastern railway (electric line), and on the west 
side of Flatrock. It is in the E. >< of the S. E. .H of Sec. 25, Tp. 16 N.. R. 10 E.. 
and the W. 3^ of the S. W. % of Sec. 30, Tp. 16 N., R. 11 E. The original plat was 
laid out and platted by Thomas Brown, Surveyor, and was acknowledged by 
Lewis C. Freeman and James B. Harris, proprietors, December 25, 1829. 
The main street running east and west is designated as "The Great National 
Road." The original plat contains eight blocks, consisting of sixty four lots. 

The iirst Eastern addition, situat.?d immediately east of the ori^nal plat, was 
platted March 2, tS36. and on the same date was acknowledged by Rozel Spencer and 
William D. Westerfield. proprietors, and contains ten blocks, consisting of eighty four 
lots. 

The first Southern addition, situated immediately south of the original plat, was 
platted April 28. 1S36, and was acknowledged by Dr. M. Strong, proprietor. May 2. 1S36, 
and contains fourteen lots, no blocks designated. 



Q^S hazzard's history of henry county. 

The George B. Morris' addition, situated immediately east of the school lot, on the 
south side of the National Road, was platted November 26, 1902, and was acknowledged 
by Morris on the same date and contains four and ninety four hundredths acres, divided 
into thirty lots, no blocks designated. 

It was first proposed to name this town Freeman vi lie, after Lewis C. 
Freeman, one of the original proprietors, but as it was discovered that there 
was another town of that name in this State it was finally determined to call 
it Lewisville, incorporating the first or given name of Mr. Freeman. 

Lewisville is today a better town than ever before. No saloon is per- 
mitted there, while there are two, perhaps three, fine churches, and many 
handsome residences. These taken in connection with the excellent business 
blocks all denote a prosperous and happy commimity of people. 

That the country around Lewisville is in a high state of cultivation is evi- 
denced by the fact that the First National Bank of that town, with a capital of 
only $25,000. has deposits of about five times that amount. The town only has 
the one banking institution which is treated of elsewhere in this History in 
the chapter entitled "Banks and Banking." In the chapter in this history 
entitled "Newspapers, Past and Present'' will be found a full account of the 
newspapers that have been published and of the one now in existence in Lewis- 
ville. 

Lewisville is the only town in Franklin. Township and is also the only 
postoffice that was ever established in that township. There is a tradition in 
South Franklin Township that before the postoffice was established in Lewis- 
ville there was a postoffice on the county line a mile and a qtiarter south of the 
town kept by Gamette Hayden. However, there is no official record in 
Washingt'on City of such an office. It is probable that mail was carried from 
established offices to Hayden's house, which was on the main line of stage travel, 
for distribution in that neighborhood. Lewis C. Freeman was the first post- 
master at Lewisville and opened the office for business, May 27, 1831. On 
pages 38 and 39 of this history will be found a list of the postmasters, together 
with the names of the two rural route carriers connected with the office. 

The census of 1900 places the population of the town at 404. 



This place with only a remnant of its former greatness remaining is sit- 
uated in Prairie Township, nine and three fourths miles north and one fourth 
mile east from the court house in New Castle, and is in the N. E. ^ of Sec. 
27, Tp. 19 N., R. ID E., and was laid out and platted by Lot Hazelton, pro- 
prietor, and acknowledged by him, January 19, 1836, and contains six blocks, 
consisting of eighteen lots. No addition appears to have been filed to the 
original plat. 

The early settlers of Prairie Township came principally from Virginia 
and named this town Luray, after the county seat of Page County, in the "Old 
Dominion." 

The author of this Historj' w^ell remembers wdien Luray was the most 
important point between New Castle and Muncie. At an early day, before the 
advent of railroads, aside from the fact that New Castle and Muncie were 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 939 

each county seats, Luray was as good a trading point as either and probably 
did as much business. Some of the most enterprising and prosperous mer- 
chants of the county obtained their start in Luray, notably the late Isaac R. 
Howard, for many years the leading wholesale merchant of Richmond, Indi- 
ana, and in whose name the business is yet carried on by his son John ; Jere- 
miah Page, who built the first brick hotel in New Castle, where the Bundy 
House now stands, was for many years an enterprising citizen of this place. 
One of the finest flouring mills in the county stood a half m'-\e east of Luray. 
The building, an imposing structure, still stands and is used as a barn and for 
other farming purposes. 

The decay of Luray began when the Bellefontaine railroad, now a part of 
the Big Four railway, was built north of it through Delaware County, and 
when the present Panhandle railroad was built south of it through N6w Cas- 
tle : thus the trade was drawn away from it to New Castle and Muncie. Later, 
when the road was built north from New Castle to Muncie it left Luray one 
and one half miles to the east, and the establishinent of the village of Spring- 
port in Henry County and of Oakville in Delaware County, both of which 
are but two miles distant, was the death knell of the place for business.. The 
establishment of the rural routes caused the abandonment of the postoffice 
Now there are less than a dozen houses in the place and one small store oper- 
ated by a man named McKinley. Thus do the ravages of time tell on towns 
as well as on individuals. 

Prairie Township had four postoffices — Hillsboro (Dan Webster), 
Luray, Mount Summit and Springport. The two first named have been dis- 
continued. The postoffice at Luray was established May 15, 1838, and was 
discontinued June 15, 1901. On page 39 of this Histon,^ will be found a com- 
plete list of the postmasters of this place. 

MECHANICSBURG. 

This village is situated in Fnll Creek Township, nine and three fourths 
miles west and five miles north of west from the court house in New Castle, 
and three and one half miles south and one mile west of south from Middle- 
town, and is in the S. E. } of Sec. 13 and the N. E. ^ of Sec. 24, Tp. 18 N., 
R. 8 E. and the S. W. } of Sec. 18 and the N. W. | of Sec. 19, Tp. 18 N., R. 
9 E., and was laid out and pl-itted by Peter Keesiing, Margaret Keesling, 
William Alexander, Frances Alexander, George Keesling and Elizabeth 
Keesling, proprietors, and was acknowledged by them September 22, i8=;8, 
and contains four blocks, consisting of thirty four lots. No addition to the 
town has ever been filed. 

The place is so named from the fact that when the settlement was started there 
were so many mechanics, representing the different trades, living there that it was 
determined to recognize them by calling the place Mechanicsburg. 

This is the only village or town in the county that was laid ofi" and 
platted since the advent of railroads that is not located on a railway line. Des- 
pite the fact that it has no railroad and that railroads have been built all 
around it, it has not only maintained but it has also increased its importance as a 



940 HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 

trading center. Its nearest railroad point and shipping place is Middletown, 
but the railroad stations of Honey Creek, Sulphur Springs, Kennard and 
Shirley, in Henry County, and Markleville and Emporia, in Madison County, 
are easily reached from the 'burg. 

Before the days of railroads and steam mills, and before the streams 
were all reduced to their present diminutive size by ditching and drainage, 
there were a woolen factory, a grist mill and a saw mill, all adjacent to 
Mechanicsburg. on Deer Creek ; all these have disappeared. 

Mechanicsburg is noted for the many exterprising and progressive young 
men that have gone out in the world from that village. The leading citizen 
for many years was the late Nimrod R. Elliott, a full biographical sketch of 
whom will be found elsewhere in this History. 

The author of this History in gathering the facts has found that no place in 
Henry County, according to its population, sent more soldiers to the Civil War 
than Mechanicsburg and vicinity; in fact its record in this respect is far ahead 
of many other localities having a much greater population. 

Mechanicsburg had an existence as a trading point more than a score 
of years before it was laid off and platted as a village. The first merchant 
to establish a store in that neighborhood was Thomas Dunning, who began 
business about the year iS.jq, the exact date is disputed. The year named 
is from the best information obtainable, furnished by William H. Keesling. 

A postoffice was established July 14, 1849, ^"d its first postmaster, Thomas B. 
Keesling, who was born in Preble County, Ohio, May 15, 1824, is still living in San 
Jose, California. A list of the postmasters will be found on page 40 of this His- 
tory. Mechanicsburg is one of the three postoffices that have existed and that still 
exist in Fall Creek Township, the other two being Honey Creek and Middletown. 
It shares with Cadiz and Greensboro the honor of being the only postoffices in 
the county not on the line of a railroad. 

Notwithstanding its importance, this village has never been incorporated ; 
therefore its ])opuIation is included onlv in that of Fall Creek Township. (See 
Giapter XXXVni). 



The village of Messick is situated in Blue River Township, four and three- 
Cjuarter miles northeast from the court house in New Castle, on the Big Four rail- 
way. This village was never laid off or platted into town lots by anyone and was 
founded in the year 1882. The real estate there is described by metes and bounds. 
Said village is in the S. ^\^ J of Sec. 29 and the N. W. -]- of Sec. 32, Tp. 18 
N., R. II E. 

It is so named after a well-known family that has for so many years lived 
there. The place has an existence antedating many years the building of the Big 
Four railway. Before the building of the Panhandle railway through the counts- 
and the establishment of Ashland, there was a postoffice at Messick known by that 
name which dates back to February 26, 1847. It was a countrs- affair, kept for 
some time in the respective homes of the successive postmasters and afterward in 
a country store owned bv Millikan and Messick, and perhaps by others. Later, 
Messick postoffice was discontinued and moved to Ashland, as is recorded in the 
short description of the last named place found at the beginning of this chapter. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 94I 

When in 1882 the Big Four railway was completed through the county, east 
from New Castle, Messick was again given official existence and a postoffice was 
established, dating from April 7, 1884, and on page 40 of this History will be 
found a list of the postmasters. However, the postmasters as set out under the 
head of Ashland in Chapter I of this History from James M. Conner to William 
Millikan, senior, inclusive, should be considered as at the old country office of 
Messick. Messick, Mooreland and Rockland are Blue River Township's three 
postoffices, the last named, however, having been discontinued. 

All the population of the village is included in that of Blue River Township, 
(See Chapter XXX\qn.) 

Messick is on the projected line of the Indianapolis, New Castle and Toledo 
railway (electric line). 

MIDDLETOWN. 

This town, so named for the reason that it was considered the half way point 
between New Castle and Anderson, is situated in Fall Creek Township, twelve 
miles northwest from the court house in New Castle, on the banks of Fall Creek, 
on the Panhandle railway, on the line of the Union Traction Company from An- 
derson to New Castle, and is in the S. E. ^ and the N. E. 1 of Sec. 31 and the N. 
W. J- of Sec. 32, Tp. 19 N., R. 9 E., and was laid out, platted and acknowledged 
by Jacob Koontz, October 9, 1829. The main street running north and south 
was designated as "The Nevi^ Castle and La Fayette Road," and the original plat 
contains four blocks consisting of forty lots. 

Chauncey H. Burr's addition, situated immediately east ot the original plat, was 
platted August 12, 1839, and was acknowledged by Burr. August 20, 1S39. and contains two 
blocks, consisting of twenty two lots. 

Lewis Summers' first and second additions, situated immediately north of the orig- 
inal plat, between Main and Mill streets, were platted the first, March 13, 1834, and the 
second, March 12, 1840. Both plats were acknowledged by Summers, February 24. 1842. 
They contain twenty six lots, no blocks designated. 

Joseph Yount's addition, situated immediately west of the original plat, on the west 
side of Church Street, was platted and acknowledged by Joseph Yount. August 23. 1849, 
and contains five lots, no blocks designated. 

Joseph Yount's second addition, situated immediately south and west of Summers' 
first addition and west of the original plat, and extending west across the Panhandle 
railway, was platted and acknowledged by Joseph Yount. September 25, 1854. and con- 
tains three blocks, consisting of twenty one lots. 

Frederick Tykle's addition, situated about twenty four rods east of Summers' first 
addition, was platted and acknowledged by Frederick Tykle August 22, 1865. and con- 
tains thirteen lots, no blocks designated. 

Joseph Yount's third addition, situated immediately north of the west part ot 
Yount's second addition and south of the Panhandle railway, was platted March 12, 
1866, and was acknowledged by Yount on the same date, and contains three blocks, con- 
sisting of twenty one lots. 

Willis Wisehart's first addition, situated about two hundred and eighty two feet 
north of Summers' second addition, on the west side of Main Street and south of Pine 
Street, was platted April 30. 1881, and was acknowledged by Wisehart on the same date, 
and contains three blocks, consisting of twenty one lots. 

Elizabeth Van Matre's addition, situated immediately north of Summers' second 
addition, on the west side of Church Street, was platted May 8, 1882. and was acknowl- 
edged by Elizabeth Van Matre, May 25, 1882, and contains four lots, no blocks desig- 



942 



HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY, 



William M. Moore's addition, situated immediately west of Van Matre's addition, 
om the east side of Mill Street, was platted June 20, 1883, and was acknowledged by 
Moore, May 10, 1884, and contains one block, consisting of four lots. 

Elizabeth Van Matre's second addition, situated immediately east of Van Matre's 
first addition, on the east side of Church Street, was platted June 19, 1883, and was ac- 
knowledged by Elizabeth Van Matre and Henry Van Matre, July 14, 1883, and contains 
one block, consisting of four lots. 

Willis Wisehart's second addition, situated immediately north of Wisehart's first 
addition, on the west side of Main Street, and on the north side of Pine Street, was 
platted June 3. 1885, and was acknowledged by Wisehart on the same date, and contains 
three blocks, consisting of twenty four lots. 

Painter and Watkins' first addition, situated immediately west of Yount's third 
addition and south of the railroad, was platted July 1.5, 1890, and was acknowledged by 
George Davis and Elizabeth Davis, proprietors, on the same date, and contains fifty 
eight lots, no blocks designated. 

Jackson's first addition, situated immediately west of Painter and Watkins' addi- 
tion and extending north across the Paiihandle railway, and lying between Twelfth and 
Sixteenth streets, was platted February 19, 1894, and was acknowledged by Llewellyn 
B. Jackson, Nellie J. Jackson. Erastus L. Elliott, Trustee. Andrew S. Miller. President, 
and George L. Swain, Secretary, of the Indiana Glass Company, on the same date, and 
contains ninety and twenty three hundredths acres, divided into four hundred and forty 
one lots, no blocks designated. 

The Indiana Glass Company's addition, situated immediately east and north of 
Jackson'^ first addition, on the south side of the Panhandle railway, was platted March 
26, 1894, and was acknowledged by Andrew S. Miller and George L. Swain, President 
and Secretary, respectively, of the Indiana Glass Company, on the same date, and con- 
tains ten and seventy three hundredths acres, divided into forty seven lots, no blocks 
designated. 

Jackson Wisehart's addition, situated north of Yount's third addition on the north 
side of High Street and on the east side of Ni,nth Street, was platted February 27, 1894, 
and was acknowledged by Willis Wisehart and Elmira Wisehart, proprietors, on the 
same date, and contains four and forty eight hundredths acres, divided into twenty three 
lots, no blocks designated. 

Willis Wisehart's third addition, situated immediately north of Wisehart's second 
addition, between Sixth and Eighth streets, was platted April 1, 1894, and was acknowl- 
edged by Willis Wisehart, Elmira Wisehart and Overton Cummins. President of the 
Middletown Butter and Cheese Company, on the same date, and contains six and sixty 
seven hundredths acres, divided into twenty two lots, no blocks designated. 

Tykle's second addition, situated immediately east of Jackson's first addition, and 
north of the Indiana Glass Company's addition, on the north side of the Panhandle rail- 
way, was platted May 11, 1898, and was Acknowledged by George E, Tykle and John H. 
Terhune, Trustees of the estate of Frederick Tykle, deceased, on the same date, and 
contains fourteen acres, divided into fifty two lots, no blocks designated. 

Hedrick's first addition, situated immediately east of Wisehart's first addition, on 
the north side of Columbia Street, and extending east to Third Street, was platted May 
2, 1898, and was acknowledged by John Baker. Jane Baker, J. 0. Lambert. Emma Lam- 
bert. Berry H. Painter, Jane Sanders, Elizabeth McWilliams, Charles C. Shedron, Mary 
Shedron, Willis Wisehart. Elmira Wisehart, Lillie Hedrick, John W. Hedrick. John W. 
Hedrick, guardian of James C. Hedrick, Frank A. Wisehart, Jessie M. Wisehart, Gil- 
bert Watkins and Josie Watkins, heirs of John Hedrick, deceased, an the same date, • 
and contains twenty and ninety eight hundredths acres, divided into seventy Ave lots and 
twelve out-lots, no blocks designated. 

Jacob Koontz, the original proprietor, had a ptibHc sale of lots on December 
25, 1829, and it is chronicled that the best prices obtained were very discouraging. 
At this time there was not a frame house in Fall Creek Township. 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. ^43 

In point of population and wealth and as a business point, Middletown has al- 
ways been considered the third town in the county, ranked only by New Castle 
and Knightstojvn. It is surrounded by a fine body of fertile land, all of which has 
been converted into highly improved farms. The town has always enjoye'd a good 
trade from the southern part of Delaware County, particularly from the "Rich- 
woods" neighborhood, as the county line is only two miles north from the Welsh 
hotel. 

Middletown is noted for its fine private residences, its elegant churches and 
schools and the high character of its business blocks, particularly the Welsh hotel. 
It has one bank, known as the Farmers' State Bank of Middletown, with a capital 
of $30,000, and the thrift and prosperity of its people may be measured from the 
fact that this bank with so small a capital has carried a deposit account of $200,000. 
This bank is treated of elsewhere in this History in the chapter entitled "Banks 
and Banking." 

A postoffice was established September 10, 1830. with Jacob Koontz. as post- 
master, and on pages 40 and 41 of this History will be found a list of the post- 
masters together with the names of the four rural route carriers connected with 
that office. Middletown is one of the three postoffices that have existed and that 
still exist in Fall Creek Township, the other two being Honey Creek and Mechan- 
icsburg. Its population according to the census of 1900 is given as 1801. 

Middletown was incorporated in 1840 by Chauncey H. Burr and fourteen 
others. 

MILLVILLE. 

The most eastern village in Henry County on the line of the Panhandle rail- 
road is situated in Liberty Township, six and one fourth miles east and one half 
mile south of east from the court house in New Castle, and is in the N. E. i of Sec. 
15 and the N. W. -]- of Sec. 14, Tp. 17 N., R. 11 E., and was laid out and plat- 
ted by John Minesinger, Deputy Surveyor, December 4, 1854, by order of the 
Court of Common Pleas of Henry County, in January, 1854, from the lands be- 
longing to the estate of John Hershberger, deceased, and contains eight lots, no 
blocks designated. 

Abbott's addition, situated immediately west of the original plat, was platted and 
acknowledged by Abraham Abbott, August 28, 1856, and contains five blocks, consisting 
of twenty lots. 

Forkner's additidn, situated immediately north of the original plat, was platted and 
acknowledged by Micajah C. Forkner June 20, 1870, and contains five blocks, consisting 
of twenty one lots. 

A plat of Millville, surveyed and platted by William R. Harrold. Surveyor, the 
same being a re-survey and plat of the original plat and all additions thereto was made 
and filed in the Recorder's office, August 7, 1873. 

The village takes its name from a mill which stood nearby, when the Pan- 
handle railroad was completed to that place, owned by John Hershberger. The 
railroad established a station there and called it Millville. About this time 
Hershberger was accidentally killed in the mill, and it being determined to survey 
and plat the lands into lots, an order of court was obtained therefor as above 
stated. 



944 



IIAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 



The first store room in the town was built by Mica j ah C. Forkner, father of 
Judge Mark E. Forkner, of New Castle, who, if he did not start the first store 
himself, only rented the room for a short time to other parties, and then oc- 
cupied the store room himself with a stock of general merchandise. 

;\Iillville has always been considered a half way point between New Castle 
and Hagerstown. For many years, as a shipping point, it had the trade of Blue 
River and Stony Creek townships on the north and of the northern part of Dud- 
ley Township on the south, now lost to Millville by the construction of railroads 
through New Lisbon, Mooreland and Blountsville. It now, as a point for the 
purchase and shipment of grain and live stock, ranks high from the fact that 
Samuel D. Wiseheart and Sons, most enterprising merchants in this line, have 
made it their headquarters for many years. 

A postoffice was established June 7, 1855, with Andrew J. Cromer, as post- 
master. On page 41 of this history will be found a list of the postmasters. Mill- 
ville is one of the four postoffices that have existed in Liberty Township, the other 
three being Chicago (discontinued). Devon (discontinued) and Ashland. 

]\Iillville has never been incorporated, and for that reason its population is 
included in that of Liberty Township. (See Chapter XXXVIII). 



CHAPTER XLII. 

henry county villages and towns, continued. 

Founders and Early Merchants — Original Plats and Additions — Banks 
AND Newspapers — Postal and Transportation Facilities — Population 
— Mooreland — Mount Summit — Needmore — New Castle — New Lisbon 
— Ogden — Petersburg — Pumpkintown — Raysville — Rogersville — 
Sharington — Shirley — Spiceland — Springport — Straughn — 
Sulphur Springs — Uniontown — West Liberty — Wheeland — White 
Raven — Woodville — Miles Marshall Moore and Family. 

mooreland. 

The incorporated town of Mooreland is situated in Blue River Township, 
eight miles northeast from the court house in New Castle, on the Big Four rail- 
way, and is in the E. -J of the N. E. i of Sec. 22 and the W. -J of the N. W. ^ and 
the W. I of the S. W. 1 of Sec. 23, Tp. 18 N., R. 11 E., and was laid out and plat- 
ted by Daniel K. Cook, Surveyor, and was acknowledged by Miles M. Moore, 
proprietor, August 9, 1882, and contains four and eighty seven hundredths acres, 
divided into two blocks consisting of sixteen lots and one out-lot. 

Mathew Cory's first addition, situated immediately east of the original plat, on the 
east side of Broad Street and extending south across the railroad, was platted August 
26, 1882, and was acknowledged by Cory on the same date, and contains four blocks, con- 
sisting of twenty two lots. 

Mathew Cory's second addition, situated immediately east of Cory's first addition, 
was platted August 8, 1885. and contains four blocks, consisting of twenty three lots 
and one out-lot. 

Mathew Cory's third addition, situated immediately north of Cory's first addition, 
on the east side of Broad Street, was platted December 28, 1886, and was acknowledged 
by Cory on fhe same date, and' contains two blocks, consisting of twelve lots and the 
schoolhouse lot. 

Mathew Cory's fourth addition, situated north and east of Cory's second addition, 
was platted March 13, 1888, and was acknowledged by Cory on the same date, and con- 
tains three blocks, consisting of sixteen lots and one out-lot. 

Moore's first addition, situated immediately west of the original plat and on the 
north side of the Big Four railway, was platted March 28, 1888, and was acknowledged 
by Newton B. Davis, administrator of the estate of Miles M. Moore, deceased, on the 
same date, and contains three blocks, consisting of twenty six lots. 

Mathew Cory's fifth addition, situated immediately south of Cory's second addi- 
tion, was platted January 22, 1889. and was acknowledged by Cory on the same date, 
and contains two blocks, consisting of sixteen lots. 

Eli Hardman's first addition, situated immediately north of the original plat and 
west of Cory's third addition and north of Charles Street and west of Broad Street, 
was platted April IS. 1889, and was acknowledged by Eli Hardman and Mary Jane Hard- 
man, proprietors, on the same date, and contains twelve acres, divided into five blocks, 
consisting of forty four lots and one out-lot. 



946 hazzard's history of henry county. 

HolUday and Koons' addition, situated immediately east of Cory's third addition 
and north of Blocli One of Cory's fourth addition, was platted June 12, 1901, ana was ac- 
knowledged by Eli Holliday. George R. Koons and Benjamin P. Koons, proprietors, on 
the same date, and contains twenty four lots, no blocks designated. 

Mark Huffman's first addition, situated immediately north of Hardman's addition, 
on the west side of Broad Street, was plated April 25, 1904, and was acknowledged by 
Mark Huffman and Mary Huffman, proprietors, on the same date, and contains four and 
thirty one hundredths acres, divided into sixteen lots, no blocks designated. 

One of the early settlers of Blue River Township and one of the most success- 
ftd farmers was Philip Moore, who, dying November 27, 1873, left a valu:bh 
estate and a fine farrn immediately adjoining the present town of Mooreland. One 
of his sons. Miles M., by purchase and inheritance, came into possession of that 
part of the land from which the original plat of Mooreland was surveyed, and it is 
from these facts that the town is named Mooreland. 

A postoffice was established Augtist 21, 1882. On page 41 of this History 
will be found a list of the postmasters and the names of the two rural route carriers 
connected with that office, one of whom. Henry H. ^Moore, is a brother of Miles 
M., who laid off the town. 

Mooreland is surrounded by as fine farming land as there is in Henry 
County and everything in the town and surrounding country denotes thrift and 
prosperity. The town has a bank, the history of which will be found in the chapter 
in this History devoted to "Banks and Banking." The first store was started by 
Marcus Holliday, son of Oliver Holliday, an early settler, in 1882. The popula- 
tion is given in the census of 1900 at 300. Mooreland is on the projected line of 
the Indianapolis, New Castle and Toledo electric railway. Mooreland, INIessick 
and Rockland are Blue River Township's three postoffices, the last named having 
been discontinued. 

MILES MARSHALL MOORE. 

1^- WHOSE HO.XOB THE TOWN OF MOORELAND W.\S NAMED. 

Miles Marshall Moore, the third son of Philip and Julia Ann (Wilson) Moore, was 
horn November 18, 1836, on his father's farm in Blue River Township, Henry County, 
Indiana. He died April 14, 1886, and is buried in Nettle Creek Cemetery, near the old 
town of Franklin, five miles north of Hagerstown, Wayne County. His father, Philip 
Moore, was the son of one of the first pioneer settlers of Henry County, William Moore, 
a native of Tennessee, and his wife, Catharine (Cotener) Moore, who first settled in 
Preble County. Ohio, where Philip Moore was born April 24, 1812, and who afterwards, 
when Philip was but fourteen years of age, came to Henry County with his family and 
settled in Blue River Township. William Moore was a soldier of the War of 1812-15, a 
record of which fact will be found in another place in this History. 

The boyhood days of Miles Marshall Moore were spent in the service of his father 
and he was a potent helper in clearing the land and cultivating the soil of his father's 
farm. His education was such as could be secured at the common or district schools of 
the period. In 1860, with a view to going to some new country, if the outlook proved 
promising, he took a trip to the Great West from which he soon afterward returned home 
where he remained with his father until August 27, 1861. The Civil War was then in 
progress and he enlisted as a private in Company C, 36th Indiana Infantry, and partici- 
pated in all the engagements of that famous regiment, serving a full enlistment of three 
years. He was a brave and gallant soldier and the record of his military service will he 
found in connection with that of his company and regiment in Chapter XVI of this 
History. 




^^L^Uf ^^ ^y(^Cj>^>''iS>~ 



HAZZARDS HISTORY OF HENRY COUNTY. 947 

After his honorable discharge from the army at Atlanta, Georgia, September 15, 
1864, he returned to his home in- Blue River Township, and in the following year, March 
26, 1865, was united in marriage with Nancy, daughter of Thomas and Elvira Lamb, of 
Dalton, Wayne County, Indiana. She was liorn November 17, 1845. 

Immediately after their marriage. Miles M. Moore and his wife went to White 
County, in the western part of the State of Indiana, where he and his brother, James 
H. Moore, had purchased for seven thousand five hundred dollars, two hundred and fifty 
acres of land. After making the first payment on the land, he had thirty dollars left witli 
which he and his wife began housekeeping. She was a very economical woman and a 
valued helpmeet, using as little as possible of their small store of money for the house- 
hold but spending the greater part of it for corn, hay and feed for the stock. Mrs. Moore 
not only performed her duties as the housekeeper but often went into the field and as- 
sisted her husband in tilling and cultivating the soil. This double labor, willingly per- 
formed, was continued until the birth of their first child, Philip Edgar, born May 12, 
1867. He was a very bright and interesting child and was the pride of the household. On 
January 15, 1869, Thomas Eugene, their second child, was born. From this time the 
health of Mrs. Moore declined and her husband became correspondingly depressed and 
discouraged. On May IS, 1872, the eldest son, Philip Edgar, or Eddie as he was famil- 
iarly called, was taken down with brain fever from which, after severe pain and suffer- 
ing, death came to his relief. At the earnest desire of the wife and mother, the remains 
of the child were taken to Wayne County, Indiana, and were there interred in Nettle 
Creek Cemetery. He died May 28, 1872. 

The husband and wife returned to their desolate home where they remained for 
a time but the health of the family not improving, Mr. Moore disposed of his interest in 
the White County farm and in 1874. following the death of his father, purchased a part 
of the old homestead and on August ISth returned to Henry County, from which time 
their health improved and their prospects became bright for a prosperous future. 

Mr. Moore was for many years, as his widow is now, a member of the United Breth- 
ren Church, to which he gave of his strength and means liberally during his life. Polit- 
ically, Mr. Moore was for a number of years a radical Republican but he subsequently De- 
came a "Greenbacker" and gave to that organization, of which he was a leading member 
in Henry County, his warm and active support