(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Hearings regarding Clarence Hiskey including testimony of Paul Crouch. Hearing"

F 



v-ovbVj.vYMQ^ 




Given By 

U. S. SUPT. OF DOCUMENTS 



HEARINGS REGARDING CLARENCE HISKEY INCLUDING 
TESTIMONY OF PAUL CROUCH 




HEARING 



BEFORE THE 



OMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



EIGHTY-FIRST CONGRESS 



FIRST SESSION 



MAY 24, 1949 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 




•Ml 74 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1949 






u. s. 

AUG 27 1349 



COMMITTEE OX UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
United States House of Representative 

JOHN B. WOOD, Oeorgia, Chairman 

FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania J. I'A KNELL THOMAS, Not : 

ItCliR P. HARRISON, Virpinia RICHARD M. NIXON, California 

JOHN McSWKENEY, Ohio FRANCIS CASK, Si. nth Dakol 1 

MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois 

Frank S. Tavenneh, Jr., Counsel 
Lons J. Russell, Senior Investigator 
Benjamin Mandki., Director of Research 
JOHN \V. Carkincton, Clerk of Committee 

K 



CONTENTS 



May 24, 1949: Pag* 

Testimony (in executive hearing) of Clarence Hiskey 383 

Testimony (in public hearing) of Clarence Hiskey 389 

Testimony (in public hearing) of Clarence Hiskey with Paul Crouch. 392 
Testimony (in executive hearing) of — 

Clarence Hiskey with Paul Crouch . 397 

Paul Crouch 399 

Appendix 409 

in 



HEABINGS'BEGABDING CLABENCE HISKEY INCLUDING 
TESTIMONY OF PAUL CBOUCH 



TUESDAY, MAY 24, 1949 

House of Representatives, 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D. C. 

executive session 1 

The Committee on Un-American Activities met pursuant to call 
at 11 a. m. in room 226, Old House Office Building, Hon. John S. 
Wood (chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Hon. John S. Wood, chairman; 
Francis E. Walter, Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, Richard 
M. Nixon, Francis Case, and Harold H. Velde. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; Louis J. 
Russell, senior investigator; John W. Carrington, clerk; Donald T. 
Appell, William A. Wheeler, and Courtney Owens, investigators; and 
A. S. Poore, editor. 

(The first matter in the proceedings of this day's hearing is in con- 
nection with the case of Philip O. Keeney and Mary Jane Keeney, 
and is printed under same date together with their other testimony 
under title "Hearings Regarding Philip O. Keeney and Mary Jane 
Keeney and Statement of Their Background.") 

Mr. Wood. Let the committee be in order. 

The record will show that Mr. Walter, Mr. Moulder, Mr. Nixon, 
Mr. Case, Mr. Velde, and the chairman are present. 

Mr. Russell. We have a witness who will have to be continued 
until tomorrow. 

Mr. Wood. Do you want to bring him in and have him sworn? 

Mr. Russell. Yes. The witness is Clarence Hiskey. 

(Thereupon, Mr. Clarence Hiskey, accompanied by counsel, Albert 
L. Colloms, entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Hiskey, do you solemnly swear that the testimony 
you will give this committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Hiskey. I do. 

Mr. Wood. In the light of the fact Congress has met in session 
early today and is now in session, and a quorum call has been an- 
nounced, the committee will not be able to hear you this morning. 
We will continue the taking of your testimony until 10 o'clock in the 
morning, at which time you will appear as a witness. 

Mr. Hiskey. If it please Your Honor, we are right in the midst of the 
examination week at the Institute, and I am right in the process of 

i Testimony taken in executive session and released by the committee on August 12, 1949. 

383 



384 CLARENCE HISKEY 

issuing grades that are needed for the examination. I wonder if you 
could delay the hearings for a week, so that I could get out of this 
situation. Today, I can Bandwich it in conveniently. 

Mr. Wood. -Mr. Counsel, in view of that request, what is your 
reaction? 

Mr. Tavenner. Your Honor, we would like very much to agree to 
that, but because of other witnesses who arc here, we cannot. 

Mr. Colloms. Could it be adjourned until this afternoon? 

Mr. Tavenner. That would be satisfactory as far as the staff is 
concerned. 

Mr. Wood. What about the committee? 

You understand, Mr. Attorney, if the hells ring, we will have to 
leave, but with that contingency in mind we will adjourn the hearing 
until 3 o'clock this afternoon to accommodate the witness. 

Mr. Colloms. Thank you very much. 

Mr. "Wood. We will adjourn until 3 o'clock. 

(Thereupon, at 11:25 a. m., a recess was taken until 3 p. m. of the 
same day.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

(The hearing was resumed at 3:15 p. m., same appearances as 
morning session, with the exception of lion. Francis Case, who was 
absent.) 

Mr. Wood. The committee will be in order. 

Let the record show that Mr. Walter, Mr. Moulder, Mr. Nixon, 
Mr. Velde, and the chairman are present, constituting a quorum. 

Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will ask Mr. Russell to conduct this next examina- 
tion. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Russell. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, you were sworn this morning, and at 
that time your appearance before the committee was continued until 
3 p. m. Is that correct? 

Mr. Hiskey. That is correct. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, by whom are you presently employed? 

Mr. Hiskey. I am employed by the Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn. 

Mr. Russell. What is your present home address? 

Mr. Hiskey. 2 Grace Court, Brooklyn. 

Mr. Russell. Under what name were you born, Mr. Hiskey? 

Mr. Hiskey. Clarence F. Szczechowski. 

Mr. RUSSELL. Will you spell that name? 

Mr. Hiskey. S-z-c-z-e-c-h-o-w-s-k-i. 

Mr. Moulder. I cannot hear the wit tie 

Mr. Wood. I was going to BUggest, Mr. Witness, that you elevate 
your voice sHltIi 1 1\ so the gentlemen up here can hear you. 

Mr. Ui 3SELL. Mr. Hiskey, you have appeared before the Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities upon a previous occasion; have 
you not? 

Mr. Hiskey. Yes, sir. 

Mr. RUSSELL. At thai time you declined 1«» answer a pertinent 
question directed to you on the ground thai to answer might tend to 
incriminate you. In a report issued by the committee on September 
28, 194S, it was stated that you hail been a chemist engaged in cherni- 



CLARENCE HISKEY 385 

cal research on the SAM project which had to do with the develop- 
ment of the atomic bomb. It was stated in the report mentioned 
that you were ordered to active duty in the United States Army for 
limited military service on April 28, 1944. It was stated that you 
had in your effects a personal notebook which contained notes on the 
atomic-bomb project in Chicago, 111., that on the day you were called 
to active duty in the Army you met one Arthur Adams in Chicago, 
who was described in this report as a Soviet agent who had secured 
information relating to the atomic bomb. 

The report alleges that you made a trip to Cleveland, Ohio, shortly 
after you were notified that you were to be inducted into the United 
States Army to meet with one John Hitchcock Chapin, a chemical 
engineer employed on the atomic project. It was stated in the report 
that you urged Chapin to meet with Arthur Adams and furnish him 
with information as to progress being made in the development of the 
atomic bomb. 

It was also stated in the report that at the meeting which took 
place in Cleveland, Ohio, in the hotel room of Chapin, you received a 
key from Chapin which you later gave to Arthur Adams in order that 
the key could be turned over to Chapin at the time Adams met him, 
so as to assure Chapin that the person he was meeting was actually 
Arthur Adams. 

It was stated in this report, Mr. Hiskey, that even the very fact 
that Mr. Chapin was in Cleveland was a secret within the Manhattan 
Engineering District project itself. 

Mr. Hiskey, do you wish to confirm or deny the statements which 
have just been read to you? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it may tend to degrade or incriminate me. 

Mr. Nixon. Mr. Chairman, will the reporter let the record show 
in each case when the witness confers with counsel before giving his 
answer. 

(The witness conferred with counsel before making his last answer.) 

Mr. Russell. Would counsel identify himself, please? 

Mr. Colloms. Albert L. Colloms, 170 Broadway, New York 7, 
N.Y. 

Mr. Wood. Without undertaking to infringe the right of the witness 
to confer with his counsel, the record will show that the witness did 
confer with counsel prior to the answering of a question. 

There is no objection to that? 

Mr. Colloms. No objection to that. 

Mr. Walter. What were the reasons you gave for declining to 
answer? 

Mr. Hiskey. Just now? 

Mr. Walter. Yes. 

Mr. Hiskey. On the grounds tbat (it would tend to degrade or 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Well, now, what constitutional right do you claim 
when you decline to answer on the grounds that it might degrade you? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). I am told by my 
counsel that this is the common usage stipulated or honored by custom 
in invoking the fifth Amendment, and the phrase is "tends to dis- 
criminate" — I mean the phrase is "tends to degrade or incriminate 
me." 



386 CLARENCE HISKEY 

Mr. \Y vlter. I would like to know from cither you or your counsel 
what section of the Constitution provides immunity From being com- 
pelled to answer b question that might tend to degrade. 

Mr. Colloms. So far as I know, there is none. It is merely from 
self-incrimination. 

Mr. Walter. Well, then, because a question might tend to degrade 
certainly does not give you any reason for not answering the question; 
does it? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). Well, I am standing 
on the portion which may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. So thai then your real reason for not answering this 
question is thai to answer it might tend to Incriminate yon'.' 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Incriminate you in what? 

Mr. HlSKEY. 1 refuse to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, what employee of the SAM projecl 
advised you that John Hitchcock Chapin was in Cleveland, Onio, at 
the time you visited him during the latter part of April 1944? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it may tend to degrade or mcrirninate me. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, in the report to which I have just re- 
ferred, it was stated that for a period of 5 month- in 1941 yon were 
employed as an associate chemist w it h l he Tennessee Valley Aut limit \ . 

Aluminum Nitrate Plant, Sheffield, Ala.; that after this employment 
you went to Columbia University, where you were engaged as an in- 
structor from September 1041 until approximately September 1942. 
Did you proceed directly from Sheffield, Ala., to Xew York City at 
the time you secured employment with Columbia l'ni\ crsity? 

Mr. HlSKEY (after conferring with counsel). The answer is 'Yes 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, have you ever been in the State of 
California other than at the time you were en route to Hawaii in 
connection with Army duties? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). No. 

Mr. Russell. Are you acquainted with Kenneth May? 

Mr. Hiskey. Would you give me that name again, please? 

Mr. Ri SSELL. Kenneth May. M-a-y. 

Mr. Hiskey (alter conferring with counsel). I refuse to answer 
thai question on the grounds thai it may tend to degrade or incrimi- 
nate me 

Mr. Wood. Just a moment. Is that refusal also based on the 
advice of counsel? 

Mr. IIiski.v. Yes; it is, sir. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, atone time you were employed by the 
University of Tennessee; were you not? 

Mr. 1 [iskey. That is correct . 

Mr. Ri 38ELL. In what capacity were you employed by the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee? 

Mr. IIiski.v. I was hired in 1939 as instructor in chemistry. 

Mr. Russell. While you were employed by the University of 
Tennessee, did you at any time ever attend a Communist Party 
meeting? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). 1 refuse to answer 
thai question on the grounds that it may tend to degrade or incrim- 
inate me. 



CLARENCE HISKEY 387 

Mr. Russell. Did you ever pay dues to the Communist Party of 
the United States? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it may tend to degrade or incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Did you ever attend a meeting of the central control 
commission of the Communist Party of the United States? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it may tend to degrade or incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Did you ever assist any member of the Communist 
Party or members of the Communist Party in the attempted infiltra- 
tion of the Tennessee Valley Authority? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it may tend to degrade or incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Do you know or have you ever been acquainted with 
an individual named Paul Crouch, C-r-o-u-c-h? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel) . I refuse to answer that 
question on the grounds that it would tend to degrade or incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Nixon. Before Mr. Crouch is brought into this hearing, I have 
favored, as the committee will remember in our first organization meet- 
ing, the conduct of these hearings in executive session for the purpose 
of getting what information we can, to keep information from being 
made public which might be prejudicial to the country, and so that 
the witness may have every opportunity to present the facts in his 
behalf as opposition to what facts the committee may have in its files. 

But, in view of this witness' attitude, I, for one, think that this 
hearing should be held in public session. 

Mr. Moulder. I agree with you. I don't think the witness is 
entitled to such protection that the committee had in mind at that 
time. 

Mr. Walter. I second the motion. 

Mr. Wood. All in favor of converting it into an open hearing say 
"Aye." 

(Chorus of "Ayes.") 

Opposed, "No." 

(No response.) 

The hearing is open. 

(Thereupon, at 3:40 p. m., the committee continued in open 
session.) 



94174—49 2 



HEAEINGS BEGABDING CLARENCE HISKEY, INCLUDING 
TESTIMONY OF PAUL CEOUCH 



TUESDAY, MAY 24, 1949 

United States House of Representatives, 

Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D. C. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities met pursuant to call 
at 3:40 p. m. in room 226, Old House Office Building, Hon. John S. 
Wood (chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Hon. John S. Wood, chairman; 
Francis E. Walter, Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, Richard 
M. NLxon, and Harold H. Velde. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; Louis J. 
Russell, senior investigator; John W. Carrington, clerk; Donald T. 
Appell, William A. Wheeler, Courtney Owens, and C. E. McKillips, 
investigators; and A. S. Poore, editor. 

Mr. Wood. Let the committee be in order. 

Mr. Counsel, will you begin at the beginning and just proceed? 

TESTIMONY OF CLARENCE HISKEY (ACCOMPANIED BY ALBERT 

L. COLLOMS, COUNSEL) 

Mr. Wood. The questions that will now be asked you, Mr. Witness, 
will probably be repetition of what you have already been asked in 
executive session, so that the matter may be gone over completely in 
open sessions. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, you were sworn by the committee this 
morning, and at that time your appearance before the committee 
was continued until 3 p. m. Is that correct? 

Mr. Hiskey. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, by whom are you presently employed? 

Mr. Hiskey. Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. 

Mr. Russell. Would you state your official capacity with the 
Polytechnic Institute? 

Mr. Hiskey. I am associate professor of analytical chemistry. 

Mr. Velde. May I ask that the witness be asked to speak up so 
that we can hear him? I can't hear him over here. 

Mr. Wood. Speak a little louder, please, Mr. Hiskey. 

Mr. Russell. What is your present home address? 

Mr. Hiskey. 2 Grace Court, Brooklyn. 

Mr. Russell. Under what name were you born? 

Mr. Hiskey. Clarence Francis Szczechowski. 

389 



390 CLARENCE HISKEY 

Mr. Russell. Would you spell that name, please? 

Mr. IIjskey. S-z-c-z-e-c-h-o-w-s-k-i. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, you have appeared before the Commit- 
tee on Un-American Activities upon a previous occasion; bave von 
not? 

Mr. Hiskey. Yes, sir. 

Mi-. Russell. At that time you declined to answer pertinent 
questions on the ground that to answer might tend to incriminate 

you. In a report issued by the commits d September 28, 1948, it 

was staled that you had Keen a chemist engaged in chemical research 
on the SAM project which had to do with the development of the 
atomic bomb. It Mas stated in t lie report mentioned that you were 
ordered to act ive duty La the United States Army for limited military 
service on April 28, 1944. It was stated that you had in your effects 
a personal notebook which contained notes on the atomic-bomb 
project in ( nicago, 111. ; that on the day you were called to act ive duty 
in the Army you met one Arthur Adams in Chicago, who was de- 
scribed in this report as a Soviel agent who had secured information 
relating to the atomic bomb. 

The report states that you made a trip to Cleveland, Ohio, shortly 
after you were notified that you were to be inducted into the United 
Stales Army to meet with one John Hitchcock Chapin, a chemical 
engineer employed on (lie atomic project. It was stated in the report 
that you urged Chapin to meet with Arthur Adams and furnish him 
with information as to progress being made in the development of the 
atomic bomb. 

It was stated in the report that at the meeting which took place in 
Cleveland, Ohio, in the hotel room of ( lhapin, you received a key from 
Chapin which you later gave to Arthur Adams in order that the key 
could be returned to Chapin at the time Adams met him, so as to 
assure Chapin that the person he was meeting was actually Arthur 
Adams. 

It was stated in this report, Mr. Hisky, that even the very fact 
that Mr. Chapin was in Cleveland was a secret within the Manhattan 
Engineering District project itself. 

Mr. Biskey, do you wish to confirm or deny the statements which 
have just been read to you? 

Mr. Hiskey. On advice of counsel, I refuse to answer that question 
on the ground that it will tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, what employee of the SAM project 
advised you that John Hitchcock Chapin was in Cleveland, Ohio. 
at the time yo\i visited him in Cleveland during the latter part of 
April 194 l" 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it will tend 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Russell, I believe m order to make that question 
clear an explanation should be made as to what "SAM project" is, 

Mr. Russell. The SAM project can best be described by Mr. 
Hiskey. h is an abbreviation of three scientific words— "specific 
alloy"- do you recall what the designation was? 

Mr. Hiskei (after conferring with counsel;. I never knew that 

there was any significance to the three letters. 

Mr. Russell. It was that part of the atomic project which was 
performed at the University of Chicago? That is true; is it not? 
Mr. Hiskey. Nbj that is not true. 



CLARENCE HISKEY 391 

Mr. Russell. Would you describe what the project was — within 
any regulations? If it affects security, it had better not be described. 
But, according to the report which the committee has previously 
issued, the code letters "SAM" were taken as the first letters of 
words "substitute alloy material." They were purposely chosen to 
mislead outsiders as to the true purpose of the laboratory. 

Mr. Hiskey, in a report to which I have just referred, it was stated 
that for a period of 5 months in 1941 you were employed as an asso- 
ciate chemist with the Tennessee Valley Authority, Aluminum Nitrate 
Plant, at Sheffield, Ala.; that after this employment you went to 
Columbia University, where you were engaged as an instructor from 
September 1941 until approximately September 1942. Did you pro- 
ceed directly from Sheffield, Ala., to New York City at the time you 
secured employment with Columbia University? 

Mr. Hiskey. Yes. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, have you ever been in the State of 
California other than at the time you were en route to Hawaii in 
connection with Army duties? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). The answer is "No." 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, at one time you were employed by the 
University of Tennessee; were you not? 

Mr. Hiskey. That's correct. 

Mr. Russell. What was your official capacity during your employ- 
ment at the University of Tennessee? 

Mr. Hiskey. I was instructor in chemistry. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, while you were employed by the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee, did you at any time ever attend any Communist 
Party meetings? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it will tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Did } T ou ever pay dues to the Communist Party of 
the United States? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it will tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Did you ever attend a meeting of the central control 
commission of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it will tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Did you ever assist any member or members of the 
Communist Party in the attempted infiltration of the Tennessee 
Valley Authority? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it will tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, are you now or have you ever been a 
member of the Coro.munist Party of the United States? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it will tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, do you know Paul Crouch, C-r-o-u-c-h? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it will tend to incriminate me. 

(The witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Chairman, will you swear Mr. Paul Crouch as 
a witness? 



392 CLARENCE HISKEY 

Mr. Wood. Do you solemnly BWear t hut the testimony you are 
about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the 
truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Crouch. I do. 

Mr. Russell. Will you stand, please (addressing Mr. Hiskey)? 

(Mr. Hiskey stood :it the witness table.) 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, 1 ask you if you have ever seen this 
individual? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it will tend to degrade or incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Have you ever attended any Communist Party 
mei where this individual was present? 

Mr. Hiskey. 1 refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it will tend to degrade or incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Have you ever known him as a member of the Com- 
munit Party of the United States? 

Mr. II iskkv. I refuse to answer that question — perhaps I will check 
w ith counsel. 

(The witness, Mr. Hiskey, conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Wood. You may he seated now, Mr. Hiskey, if you desire. 

(Mr. Hiskey reseated himself at the witness table.) 

Mr. Russell. Are 3 t ou acquainted with David Stone Martin? 

Mr. Hiskey. I'm taking hack my remark that I just made. I 
started to answer your last question, and I want to check with counsel 
on it. 

Mr. Russell. All right. 

Mr. Hiskey. Would you give me the question again, please? 

Mr. Russell. The last one? 

Mr. Colloms. Before the Stone Martin thing. 

Mr. Russkll. Have you ever known him as a member of the 
Communist Party of the United States? 

Mr. HlSKEY (after conferring further with counsel). I refuse t<» 
answer that question on the grounds that it will tend to degrade or 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Wai.tkk. Now, at this point, Mr. Chairman, I would like to 
ask a question. 

Mr. Wood. Very well, Mr. Walter. 

Mr. Walter. What section of the Constitution gives anyone a 
right to claim immunity to answer a question on the ground it might 
degrade him? 

Mr. Colloms. Are von asking that of counsel or the witness? 

Mr. Walter, 1 am asking the witness that question. xou de- 
clined to answer on the ground it [night degrade you. 1 would Like 
to know what Bectiou of the Constitution you are now setting up. 

Mr. Hiskey. Customary usage when invoking the fifth amendment. 

Mr. W m.i er. ( histomary w he] 

Mr. Hiskey. Well, I have to ask my counsel to answer that q 
o for you, but 1 am told by him the customary usage in invoking 
the fifth amendment is to use the words "tend t<> degrade <>r incrim- 
inate me." 

Mr. W w.ti.i;. I have heard that reason given (*>r declining to answer 
a question on numerous occasions, hut I do not know mid I have 
3ome knowledge of the Constitution what section gives anyone the 
right to refuse to answer a question on the ground that it might be 

degrading. 



CLARENCE HISKEY 393 

Mr. Hiskey. May I ask counsel to answer? 

Mr. Colloms. I will answer that if I may. 

Mr. Walter. No; I don't care to have you. 

Mr. Wood. There would be no objection, Mr. Attorney, to your 
conferring with your client if he desires to answer on your advice. 

(The witness conferred with counsel.) 

Air. Hiskey. Do you object to my using the word "degrade"? Is 
that what you want? 

Mr. Walter. No; I do not 'object to your using the word "de- 
grade," but I do not like to have read into these proceedings excuses 
for not answering questions that are not bona fide or reasons that the 
Constitution has not provided for. And nowhere in the Constitu- 
tion is the expression used that you and other witnesses who have 
testified before this committee have given as reasons why they would 
not answer a question. 

Mr. Hiskey. Well, you recall we had this discussion before, and I 
dropped the word "degrade." 

Mr. Wood. You desire to drop it now? 

Mr. Hiskey. Well, I have dropped it consistently. I may have in- 
advertently put it in before. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask one question at 
this point. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Velde. 

Mr. Velde. How would jour acquaintanceship with Mr. Crouch 
tend to incriminate you? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel) . I refuse to answer that 
question on the grounds that it may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Wood. I was preparing to ask you how would it tend to in- 
criminate you to answer whether or not you knew Kenneth May, the 
question that you were asked in executive session. Your answer at 
that time was that an answer to that question would tend to in- 
criminate you; was it not? 

Mr. Hiskey. That is correct. 

Mr. Wood. And would that be your answer to it now? 

Mr. Hiskey. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Wood. Could you explain to the committee in what manner 
it would tend to incriminate you and what reasons you have for so 
stating to say whether or not you know Kenneth May? 

Mr. Hiskey. No; I refuse to answer that question, too, on the 
grounds it may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Who is Kenneth May? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question. 

Mr. Walter. How could your answering the question incriminate 
you if you do not even know who the person is that you are being 
asked about? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it may tend to incriminate me. 

(The witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Wood. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, while in Knoxville, Tenn., or its vicinity, 
did you ever pay Communist Party dues to an individual named 
David Stone Alartin? 

Mr. Hiskey. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 
it may tend to incriminate me. 



394 CLARENCE HISKEY 

Mr. Russell. Do you still hold the Reserve commission in the 
Unit c(l States Army? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). T do. 

Mr. Russell. Have you ever been a member of the Young Com- 
munist League? 

Mr. Hiskey. 1 refuse to answer thai question <m the grounds that 
it may tend to incriminate me, 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Crouch, are you acquainted with the indi- 
vidual 

Mr. Wood. Jusl a moment now. Are you through interrogating 
this witness [indicating Mr. Hiskey]? 

Mr. Ivi —ill.. No, sir. We have some questions which we will 
have i<> ask him in executive session which were not asked heretofore. 

Mr. Nixon. To ask Mr. Crouch you mean? 

Mr. Russell. Both Mr. Cr h and Mr. Hiskey. We have some 

questions pertaining to a matter at the university where he is pres- 
ently teaching which I do not think should he asked in public session. 

Mr. Wood. Very well. Lay your foundation. 

Mr. RuBSELL. Mr. Crouch, 1 will ask you whether or mil ymi 
have ever met the individual who is sitting to the right of counsel 
at the w itness table. 

M r. ( 'i,oi en. 1 have. 

Mr. Id sskll. Would you tell the committee w 'here you mel him? 

Mr. ( 'i.oi <ii. 1 met him in Know i lie, Tenn., during L939 and 1940, 
a i various Communist Party meet ings, and at the homes of individual 

( 'oiuiuunists. 

Mr. Wood. What name was he known by at that tune? 
Mr. Crouch. 1 knew him as Professor Hiskey. 
Mr. Ri ssell. Did you ever know his first name? 

Mr. CROl ' u. I don't recall his first name. 

Mr. Russell. Did you ever attend Communist Party meetings 
with him? 

Mr. Croi i u. I have. On many occasions. 

Mr. Russell. Did you ever attend meetings of the central control 
commission of the Communisl Party with him? 

Mr. Crouch, Not of the control commission, I have attended 
meetings of I he central commit tee. 

Mr. Id ssell. In what locat ion? 

Mr. ( 'i;oi i u. New York City. 

Mr. Ri SSELL. Was Mr. Hiskey known to you as a memher of the 
( Jommunisl Partj " 

Mr. Crouch. Mr. Hiskey was known to me as an active member 
of the ( lommunisl Party. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Eiskey, you have heard the testimony i>f Mr. 

Crouch that he knew you a- an active memher of the ('uiumuni-t 

Party. Do you wish to confirm or deny the testimony which Mr. 
( 'much ha- given? 

Mr. Ih- i j . I refuse to answer that question on the grounds that 

it will tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Chairman, that is all the questions I have of 
Mr. I [iskey at the present time. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Walter, any questions? 
Mr. W \ i.i br. No quest ions. 
Mr. Wood. Mr. Moulder? 



CLARENCE HISKEY 395 

Mr. Moulder. Where are you now employed? That was not clear 
to me. 

Mr. Hiskey. Polytechnic Institute, Brooklyn. 

Mr. Moulder. What are your duties there? 

Mr. Hiskey. Associate professor of analytical chemistry. 

Mr. Moulder. How long have you been so employed? 

Mr. Hiskey. Three years. 

Mr. Wood. Any further questions, Mr. Moulder? 

Mr. Moulder. No further questions. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Nixon? 

Air. Nixon. I have no questions. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Velde? 

Mr. Velde. No questions. 

Mr. Wood. Do I hear a motion that the committee resolve itself 
into an executive session? 

Mr. Nixon. May I ask the witness a question? 

Air. Wood. Mr. Nixon. 

Mr. Nixon. Mr. Hiskey, under the Constitution, as you of course 
have been advised by counsel, you can refuse to answer questions on 
the ground that they will tend to incriminate you. The reason that 
this hearing was moved from executive into open session was that in 
executive session you followed the same line. 

Now, the matters in the committee report which the chief investi- 
gator has read to you involve, at least in the minds of the members of 
the committee, rather serious charges, and I was curious as to whether 
or not, when you were employed in the atomic installations during 
the war period, at that time you did execute or sign any kind of loyalty 
oath to the United States. Do you recall whether you did or not? 

Mr. Hiskey. There was a general personnel form which I filled out. 

Mr. Nixon. Yes. 

Mr. Hiskey. Which is about all that I can recall. 

Mr. Nixon. You do not recall whether that involved the usual 
statement of loyalty to the Government or not? 

(The witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Nixon. If you do not remember, it is all right. Say that you 
do not. 

Mr. Colloms. I am just going to ask him whether he remembers 
or not. 

(The witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Hiskey. I don't know specifically whether there was such an 
oath on there, but I wouldn't have any objection to taking such an 
oath anytime. 

Mr. Nixon. That is what I meant. Well, here is your oath 
[looking at a document handed him by a staff member] when you 
became a second lieutenant in the Chemical Warfare Service. I 
guess it was in the Army. 

Mr. Wood. Present it to him, please. 

(Mr. Nixon handed the document to Air. Hiskey.) 

Mr. Nixon. Do you recall having signed that when you went into 
the Army? 

Air. Hiskey. Yes. What's wrong with it? 

Air. Wood. Is that your signature that is on it? 

Air. Hiskey. Oh, sure. 

94174—49 3 



396 CLARENCE HISKE^ 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Chairman, may I suggesl that thai be made 
part of the record? 

Mr. Wood. I was just going to direct that it be made part of the 
record. 

Mr. Nixon. This will be placed in the record, but for purposes of 
asking a question I would like to read from the oath: 

I, Clarence Francis Hiskey, having been appointed a second lieutenant in the 
irs' Reserve < irps of the Army of the United Stati ilemnly swear I 

I will support :u nl defend the < Constitution <>f the United Stati nsl all enemies, 

I domestic; thai I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; thai 
I take this obligation freely withoul anj mental reservation or purpose of evasion, 
:vn(! thai 1 will well and faithfully discharge the duties <>f the office upon which I 
am aboul to enter. 8 

Now, in the opinion of the members of the commit tee, ha\ ing beard 
the charges which were involved in the committee's report of last year, 
the charges involved without any question reflected upon the matter 
of loyalty, because they reflected upon whether or not you were 
involved in turning over information to a foreign government in an 
unauthorized manner. 

Now, my first question is: Do you believe that turning over atomic 
information to, shall we say, Arthur Adams or any other representa- 
tive of the Russian Government would be a disloyal act? 

Mr. Hiskei (after conferring with counsel). 1 most certainly do. 

Mr. NlXON. Did you turn over any such information? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). I refuse to answer 
that question on the grounds 

Mr. Nixon. Can't you see the implication of your answer, Mr. 
Hiskey? You have indicated you have signed a loyaltj oath to the 
Government of the United States. You said that you would be per- 
fectly willing tO execute one. You h:i\e said that it would he a dis- 
loyal act to turn over information. I asked you the simple question 
as to whether you did. A "No" answer to that question would indi- 
cate clearly you were completely loyal to the United Stat* 

Now, I think that in the interest of the committee's investigations, 

you could answer "No" in the event you had not turned over infor- 
mation, and 1 would like to give you another opportunity. Did you, 
while you were attached to the atomic-energy installation-, turn over 

information to any unauthorized person? 

Mr. Hiskei (after conferring with counsel). 1 still refuse to answer 
that question on the grounds that it will tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Nixon. But you would consider it to be a disloyal act for 
30mebody to turn over such information; would you QOt? 

Mr. HiSKEY. I most certainly would. 

Mr. Nixon. Mr. Chairman, I bave no further questions. 

Mr. Wi„u». Mr. Velde? 
Mr. Velde. Yes; I bave some questions. 
Mr. Wood. Very well, Mr. Velde. 

Mt.Vki.dk. Do you now consider yourself loyal to the United 
States ( ro\ emmeht '.' 

Mr. II iski.v. I certainly do. 

Mr. Velde. You consider yourself a loyal American citizen? 

Mr. Hiskey. I do. 

' See appendix, p. 410. Hiskey oihibit 1. 



CLARENCE HISKEY 397 

Mr. Velde. Do you bear allegiance to any other foreign country? 

Mr. Hiskey. Of course not. 

Mr. Velde. Do you believe the principles of government of any 
other foreign country are better than our principles of government 
here in the United States? 

Mr. Hiskey. No. 

Mr. Velde. Do you believe in the teachings of Karl Marx? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). I refuse to answer any 
further along this line on the ground that it may tend to incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Velde. Have you ever studied the teachings of Karl Marx? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). Naturally, as a scholar, 
I have read widely. 

Mr. Velde. Now, do you believe in those teachings as being better 
teachings than our own United States Government? 

Mr. Hiskey. Well, I don't know that Karl Marx specifically 
criticizes the United States Government. 

Mr. Velde. Do you believe that the teachings of Karl Marx are 
being put in practice by the Government of Soviet Russia? 

Mr. Hiskey (after conferring with counsel). I don't know. 

Mr. Velde. How would 3^011 describe the Government of Soviet 
Russia toda}^, Mr. Hiskey? 

Mr. Hiskey. Communistic. 

Mr. Velde. Do you believe in all of the principles of our Federal 
Constitution? 

Mr. Hiskey. I do. 

Mr. Velde. I know you especially believe in the fifth amendment 
to the Constitution. 

That's all. 

Mr. Wood. It has been the previous action of the committee that 
photographs in the committee room in session should be prohibited. 
As far as the committee is concerned, the evidence of this witness is 
over. If there are photographers here that desire to take pictures at 
the moment, I will give them an opportunity to do so. 

We will continue in executive session again. 

(Thereupon, at 4:05 p. m., the hearing was continued in executive 
session.) 

(The executive session was continued at 4:05 p. m., following open 
session.) 

Mr. Wood. Now, Mr. Counsel, is there anything else you have now? 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Hiskey, are you acquainted with a student 
named Carmen M. Held at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute? 

Mr. Hiskey. Yes; I think I know of such a student. 

Mr. Russell. Does Air. Held attend any classes which you teach 
at Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute? 

Mr. Hiskey. I think he was a student of mine in analytical chem- 
istry a number of years ago. 

Mr. Russell. Do you know whether or not he is the holder of a 
fellowship granted by the Atomic Energy Commission? 

Mr. Hiskey. I wouldn't know that. 

Mr. Russell. Has he ever conferred with you regarding the fellow- 
ship granted him by the Atomic Energy Commission? 

Mr. Hiskey. You are stating now that he holds one? 

Mr. Russell. Yes. 



:\\)S CLARENCE HISKEY 

Mr. Hiskky. Well, he doesn't confer with me about any — 
I mean he obviously didn't confer with me about that fellowship, 

because I would have 

Mr. Russell. Known that he had? 

Mr. Hiskky. Known of it — that I must have advised him, because 
1 am a graduate adviser on registration. I am sure that I had contact 

with him that wav if he's a student at the Institute. 

Mr. Russell. Were you ever designated as a supervisor of a fellow- 
ship student? 

Mr. Hiskky. Of the Atomic Energy 

Mr. Russell. Commission. 

Mr. BlSKEY. No, sir. 

Mr. Russell. Are there further questions? 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Walter? 

Mr. Walter. No. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Harrison? 

Mr. Harrison. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Moulder? 

Mr. Moulder. No, sir. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Nixon? 

Mr. NlXON. You say Mr. Held was a student of yours Beveral 
years ago? 

Mr. Hiskey. In the classroom, of course, yes. 

Mr. Nixon. How long have you been teaching at Brooklyn? 

Mr. I [iskei . Since 1 9 16. 

Mr. Nixon. And he was a student of yours in L 946 or 1947? 

Mr. Hiskky. Rather early after 1 came there; yes. 

Mr. Nixon. Just the one course as far as you can recall? 

Mr. Hiskey. 1 am quite sure that it's only one course. 

Mr. Nixon. And is he a graduate student there now? 

Mr. Hiskey. He would have to he. 

Mr. Nixon. He would have to he under t ho circumstances? 
Mr. 1 liskey nodded assent . ) 

Mr. Nixon. And you have no connection with hmi in his work at 
the presenl time? In other words, i here are no Beminars or anything 
in which Mr. Held participates in which you are supervisor? 

Mr. Hiskey. No. You see. I practically never see him. I mean 
that 's all quite possible. 

Mr. Nixon. Certainly. I just wanted the information. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Velde? 

Mr. Y ii.dk. No quest ions. 

Mr. Wood. That 's all. 

M r. Ki BSELL. Thai 's all. 

Mr. Wood. Very well. Mr. Hiskey. You are excused. 

Mr. Id ssell. I would continue the subpena indefinitely, subject to 
call. 

Mr. Wood. Subject to notification. \fry well. Unless you are 
further notified to return on this suhpena you have, you may he 

excused unl il such ootificat ion. 

i I h-eii — ioti off the record. ) 



CLARENCE HISKEY 399 

TESTIMONY OF PAUL CROUCH 

(Mr. Paul Crouch, who had been duly sworn by the chairman 
in public hearing immediately preceding this executive session, was 
recalled as a witness.) 

Mr. Russell. Air. Crouch, a few moments ago you made an 
identification of Clarence Hiskey as being an individual whom you 
knew as a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Crouch. That's correct. 

Air. Russell. At that time you also said that you knew him as a 
member of the Communist Party during the years 1939 and 1940. 

Mr. Crouch. And to sometime in 1941. I don't recall the last 
time in 1941 I saw him. 

Air. Russell. You also testified that you attended Communist 
Party meetings with him. 

Air. Crouch. Yes. Branch meetings, district-committee meetings, 
and about two meetings of the central committee or national party 
conferences similar to central-committee meetings in New York. 

Air. Russell. Could you tell the committee where these meetings 
were held in Knoxville? 

Mr. Crouch. These meetings in Knoxville usually were held at 
the home of Francis Martin. One meeting at which Mr. Hiskey 
was present was held at the home of David Martin. I can recall that 
well because of the circumstances, the particular circumstances 
surrounding it in which about 10 former members of the party, 
members of the TVA branch, had been called to a meeting in an 
effort to get them to come back in the party. Air. Hiskey was present 
and joined me in an effort to persuade them to become active in the 
party again, but without success. 

Air. Russell. Do you recall actually having witnessed Clarence 
Hiskey pay Communist Party dues or did he ever pay them to you? 

Air. Crouch. I have seen Air. Hiskey on several occasions pay his 
dues to Francis Martin, who was the section organizer of the Com- 
munist Party in Knoxville through 1939, 1940, and 1941. He was 
carried on the books as a member-at-large, not attached to a branch, 
as were two or three other professors at the University of Tennessee, 
whose names I cannot recall. - He paid his dues personally to the sec- 
tion organizer, Francis Alartin, who in turn turned them over to me, 
together with other section dues. 

Mr. Russell. Do you know whether or not Hiskey had any other 
name while he was a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Crouch. I do not. I never heard of any. 

Mr. Russell. Do you recall the type of matters discussed at the 
Communist Party meetings in the vicinity of Knoxville? 

Mr. Couch. Much of the discussion was centered around the efforts 
to revive the party in TVA, which received constant effort of the 
party. Also, the question of leaflets in connection with the inter- 
national situation was discussed, and their distribution; and, in con- 
nection with Mr. Hiskey's work, the matter of party recruiting, the 
matter of mailing literature to professors of the university was dis- 
cussed with him and other contacts in the university. 

To the best of my recollection, there were two other members of 
the party on the campus whose names I cannot recall. He also co- 
operated with the work of the party at the Fisk campus in Nashville, 



400 CLARENCE HISKEY 

Trim., and made several visits to Nashville :it part} conferences held 
there, al which about six professors .-it the University of Tennessee, 
including an Addison Cutler, one David Robeson, and some four 
others whose uames I cannot recall wen present. 

Mr. Wood. For the benefit of the record, what is Fisk University? 

Mr. Ri ssell. Fisk University is the Negro educational institute in 
Nashville, Tenn. The president of Fisk University will undoubtedly 
appear before the committee in the Dear future in connection with the 
Paul Robeson matter as a friendly witness, of com 

Mr. Crouch. J would like to .- 1 < I < I that the two professors I men- 
tioned there, a Professor David Robeson and Professor AxLdiso] 

Cutler, were both white professors. 

Mr. Russell. We have the name of one previous professor that 
you mentioned or one professor that you mentioned previously under 

the name "David." 

Mr. ( Irouch. Yes. 

Mr. Russell. You did not know- his last name al the time. 

Mr. Crouch. J couldn't think of his name until I went through the 
yearbook. As soon as T saw the name "David Robeson.*' ! knew 
immediately he was the one to whom I had referred to a- David. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Crouch, you testified thai you attended meetings 
of the cenl ral com mission of the Communist Party with Mr. Hiskej 

Mr. Crouch. ( lommit tee. 

Mr. Russell. Would you describe the nature or purpose <>f those 
meet ; : 

Mr Crouch. TIcso meetings were held in \Cn York. Central- 
committee meetings are conferences called by the central committee 
on an average of about two or three times a year. They were held for 
the purpose of receiving general political reports from Earl Browder, 
who was then the secretary of the party, <>n the current line. And 
these meetings, in addition to the general political discussion and 
Laying out task<, were al ccompanied and immediately followed 

by a la rie- of conferences <>n specific fields of work, such as work 

in the South, work among scientists, and so on. And Hie functionaries 
who were presenl were divided into these various committee meeii 
according to the fields of work in which they were engaged. 
t I saw very little of Mr. Hiskey there. His contacts and his work 
apparently had been entirely in connection with the scientific work 
headed by Marcel Selierer, who is the national head of Communist 
Party work among chemists, scientists, and so on, for more than in 
rs. for perhaps. J would say, more than L2 years, to my knowl- 
edge. 

Mr. Moulder. How do you spell that name'.' 

Mr. ( JROUCH. S-e-h-e-r-C-r. 

Mr. Russell. You have previously testified concerning Marcel 
Scherer's connection with the scientific unit of the ( lommunist Party? 

Mr. ( IROUCH. 1 have. 

Mr. R i.. We have considerable information on that in his 

previous testimony, and unless you want to go into it further we will 
drop it for the time being. 

Mr. ( Touch, when you were in Kjioxville, Tenn., did you ever have 
a post-office box? 

Mr. ( [. I did. 

Mr. Russell. Do you recall whether or not you had a coholder 
of the post-office address at thai time? 



CLARENCE HISKEY 401 

Mr. Crouch. I did not have a coholder, except that Francis 
Martin also used it, but the box was in the name of one Mr. Todd, 
who had previously been the section organizer of Knoxville before 
district headquarters were established there. 

This box had been the section box when the district was elsewhere, 
at Chattanooga. So, when I moved to Knoxville and they moved 
the district there, I took over the box which had been obtained and 
was still in the name of Mr. Todd. 

Mr. Russell. Do you recall his first name? 

Mr. Crouch. No; I do not. 

Mr. Russell. Do you know the present location of Mr. Todd? 

Mr. Crouch. I do not. 

Mr. Russell. Do you recall where Mr. Todd lived? 

Mr. Crouch. No. He had moved from Knoxville before I arrived. 

Mr. Russell. Do you recall whether or not he lived on Broadway 
in an apartment? 

Mr. Crouch. Not of my personal knowledge. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Crouch, you produced yesterday a large number 
of documents which in part verify your connection with the Com- 
munist Party of the United States; did you not? 

Mr. Crouch. I did. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Chairman, I ask permission that those docu- 
ments be inserted into the record of this hearing. 

Mr. Wood. Without objection. 3 

Mr. Russell. Would you furnish the committee with any further 
information regarding your association with Clarence Hiskey? 

Mr. Crouch. Other than the fact that we had general discussions 
on efforts among the professors and so on, I went into his own field of 
work very little, since he was working independently, since this scien- 
tific work is independent of the ordinary jurisdiction of party organ- 
izers. The only think which I discussed Avith him in his work was the 
possibility of new recruits. He furnished names from time to time, as 
did other contacts. We had party literature mailed to them, and. 
so on. 

I didn't go into any extended discussion of his own field, figuring or 
knowing that was outside of my jurisdiction. This was a matter 
handled only by Marcel Scherer and by the apparatus for work among 
the scientists and chemists generally. 

Mr. Russell. Would you tell the committee who Kenneth May is? 

Mr. Crouch. Kenneth May, during the time I was in California, 
was the son of the dean of the university there, of one Dr. Samuel May. 
Kenneth May had joined the Communist Party, and at the time I was 
in California he was county educational director. He also held cer- 
tain other assignments. Particularly, he was assigned to work with a 
special section existing on the campus of the University of California, 
directing this work under the personal direction of one Rudy Lambert, 
of the district bureau, who was in charge of all underground and illegal 
activities of the party in the State of California. 

Kenneth May also and Lambert were assisted during 1941 in their 
work oyer an extended period by Marcel Scherer, who worked together 
with his wife, Lena Davis, who spent considerable time in California 
during that year. 

Mr. Rus sell.Do you recall the last time you saw Clarence Hiskey? 

3 See appendix, pp. 411-424. Paul Crouch exhibits. 



402 CLARENCE IHskky 

Mr. Crouch, The lasl time I recall seeing Clarence Hiskey was at 
the home <»f Kenneth May a1 ;i housewarming party aear the aorth 
side of Berkeley. Mr. May's wife's father had just presented them 
with a new home. There was a housewarming part} there, al which 
my wife and 1 were present, at which Steve Nelson was present, and 
where Professor Hiskey was present. And, during the course of the 
evening, we sat down near the fireplace and had a discussion in 
connection with a successful party organization at the Shell (hi 
Development ( '<>., where some kind of scientific research was going on 
and where the party had just organized a branch of about eight 
members, as I recall, and around that had organized a kind of what 
they call a mass organization, a (MO union; 1 believe the initials 
are F-A-E-C-T. 

Marcel Scherer was there, was In ( 'ah forma in connection with both 
the party's activities among scientists and he held some official 
position with the FAECT also. Marcel Scherer, however, was not, to 
the besl of my recollection, present at this particular housewarming 
party. 

This was in July, to the best of my recollection. The exact date 
could be established by checking the record of the transfer of title 
to Kenneth May's wife. But, to the best of my recollection, it was 
in July or August of 1941. 

Mr. Russell. You are certain that Clarence Hiskey attended 
that gathering? 

Mr. ( !r( n en. I am, sir'. 

Mr. Russell. Are there further questions? 

Mr. Wood. Mr. Walter? 

Mr-. Walter. Mr. Crouch, you say thai you had frequent contacts 
with Professor Hiskey at the home of one Francis Martin? 

Mr. ( Jrouch. Thai 's correct. 

Mr. \\ u.tki:. And the purposes of those conferences were to 
endeavor to prevail on certain of the TVA employees to rejoin the 
( lommunist Party? 

Mr. ( Jrouch. That 's correct . 

Mr. Walter. Do you know whether or not a lisl of those former 
members who dropped out is available anywhere? 

Mr. Crouch. 1 do not know whether a list is available of those 
who dropped out. The only names 1 can personally recall were those 
of David Martin and two other members whose name- 1 have given 
the investigator for this committee and also the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation for the purpose of interviewing them personally. 

M r. W \i. tkk. Thank you. 

Mr. W (mi). Mr. I tarrison? 

Mr. I [arrison. No, Bir. 

Mr. Woo,.. Mr. Moulder? 

Mr. Moulder. Two questions. At the meetings thai you have 
referred to in which you participated and where Mr. Hiskey was 
present, did any officer or any member presenl at those meetings 
have any connection <>r represent the international or^anizal ion oi the 
Communisl Party, or were there any foreign connection-'.' 

Mr. Crouch. Only at the meetings in New York were there 

members of the highesl officials, such as Foster and Browder, present. 

\' the meetings in Tennessee, I was, as districl organizer of the 

party, the Incest-ranking party functionary presenl at district 



CLARENCE HISKEY 403 

rte etings, both district meetings and branch meetings. There 
weren't any foreign representatives present in Tennessee. 

Mr. Moulder. Was there any correspondence or any connection 
whatsoever conducted with foreign representatives of any character? 

Mr. Crouch. Not in the district. At the central-committee 
meetings we had reports from the leading party officials, Browder 
and others, of what the viewpoint of the Communist International 
was. And we understood that those instructions were given to him 
by the representative of the Communist International in this country, 
who was referred to by Browder and others as Edwards. I never 
met this Edwards, this Communist International representative. 
He never addressed the convention. Only meetings with Browder 
and other officials outside. And I have no personal knowledge of the 
actual identity of this Edwards. 

Mr. Moulder. One more question. Was it the policy of the 
organization meetings to concentrate in solicitation of new recruits 
at points where there were Government projects or upon Government 
employees? 

Mr. Crouch. Yes. TVA, for example, was a concentration point 
for many years in the South. For example, it was in September 1939 
when I first went to Knoxville as district organizer. However, I 
was present at many conferences in New York, central-committee 
meetings, with Ted Wellman, the previous organizer, and where 
Earl Browder personally attended and emphasized that the party 
should show off its full resources to concentrate in building the 
branch, the organization at TVA. And they expressed considerable 
pleasure; they felt they had made satisfactory progress — membership 
reaching a maximum, as near as I can recall, of about 20 to 25 mem- 
bers at Knoxville, Tenn., among TVA employees. 

Mr. Moulder. Were there any other points mentioned as to 
where they should concentrate their efforts to solicit recruits? 

Air. Crouch. TVA was about the only major Government place 
that I can recall in the South. There were other concentration points. 
There was the concentration, for example, on the Black Belt among 
Negroes in Alabama. There was the concentration on certain key 
textile mills in North Carolina that were selected as concentration 
points. 

Mr. Moulder. That's all, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Wood. In the North Carolina situation that you refer to, to 
w T hat extent did the infiltration of the Communist Part} 7 control the 
textile strikes in North Carolina that resulted in considerable violence 
and bloodshed? 

Mr. Crouch. To quite a marked degree. See, I came to North 
Carolina as district organizer in June 1934, just about 2 months 
approximately before that general strike, in around August or Sep- 
tember. I can't recall the exact dates now. The Communist Party 
spent the months prior to the strike — knowing that it was coming — 
in getting their forces ready. The party members were particularly 
active in what was known as "flying squadrons," which moved from 
mill to mill, closing each mill in its path. 

The greatest concentration of the Communist Party during the 
1934 strike was at Concord, N. C, at Gastonia — well, not so much in 
Gastonia as around Charlotte, in Burlinston and in Danville. 



404 CLARENCE BISKE1 

Mr. Wood. Did the Communisl movement into thai area p - 
cipitate these strikes, or were they already set up before the Com- 
munisl movemenl got into them? 

Mr. Croi i in The Btrikes were called by the international officers, 
Francis J. (ionium primarily, without consultation al thai tunc with 
the Communisl Party. Later Francis J. Gorman was very close to 
the Communisl Party. I visited him :it his hotel room in Washington 
on many occasions, worked closelj with him. Bu1 :it the time he 
called the strike in 1934 he had do contacts with the party and was 
antiparty in his positioD. However, the ( Communists quickly assumed 
local leadership in such places as Concord :in<l Burlington, \. C. 

Mr. \V<ioi'. Whal I ;iin trying to arrive al is this: There were a< ts 
of violence. I believe there was a police officer killed down there in one 
of those -i rikes. Is thai t rue? 

Mr. ( Jrouch. The pohce? 

Mr. Wood. At ( rastonia. 

Mr. Crouch. This was on a previous tune This was in L929, 
and this was organized by the Communisl Tarty. Thai's correct. 
The Gastonia L 929 strike was the initiative, execution, and e\ erything 
done entirely by the Communisl Party. 

Mr. Russell. That was the strike thai Fred Beall participated 
in? 

Mr. Crouch. Thai was the strike in which 1 was also one of the 
organizers. 

Mr. Russell. Mr. Chairman, are you interested in further infor- 
mation on it? It is covered pretty well in the testimony of Fred 
Beall. 

Mr. Wood. All right. 

Mr. Velde? 

Mr. Velde. I am interested in your connections in San Francisco 
in that area. When were you out there, Mr. Crouch? 

Mr. Crouch. I was county organizer of Alameda County from 
April 1941 until January 7. L942, if ] remember the exact date. Near 
the end of December of 1941 the decision was made to remove me 
as county organizer and to bar me from all positions in the < lommunist 
Party, but this formally too] effect on or ahoul the 7th of January. 
I remained a shorl time, some months. 1 don't recall* the exact 
number of month-. 1 had paid due- occasionally, attended a lew 
meetings, before I dropped out and left the party completely. I con- 
tinued to live in Alameda County a- a worker in defense industry, 
an employee of the United State- St< el Product- Co., until December 
L944 or January 19 IT 

Mr. Velde. You had left the party at that time? 

Mr. ( !rouch. ^ 

Mr. \' i i.di . When was it you quit the party? 

Mr. ( !roi i u. 1 quit the party in 19 12 

Mr. \'i i.n: . V ni were succeeded by Steve Nelson a- organizer for 

Alameda ( \>uut \ ? 

Mr. I [. Tl 

Mr. Russ ll. He has a 1943 membership card which the} more or 
less forced on him. 

Mr. Crouch. The Communisl Party sent a M 13 mei Lbership hook 
to my home. Steve Nelson personally visited my home on manj 
occasions trying to L r ei me to return as a rank-and-file member, trying 



CLARENCE HISKEY 405 

to get me and my wife to return, but we refused. He sent a 1943 
book which I kept, and I have turned this book over to the committee, 
which was minus any dues stamps. 3 

Again in 1946 and 1947, when I was engaged in doing union work 
in Texas and Florida, I was subjected to every conceivable pressure 
from the party to try to force me back into the party — unsuccessfully. 
The last effort was about November of 1947, when I received a note 
from one signed "Irving," from one I knew to be Irving Gold, a branch 
organizer there who had been assigned by the party to try to pressure 
me back in every conceivable way. 

And in this note he said to attend a certain meeting at a certain 
place and date. He said, "This is your very last chance." Since that 
time, I haven't been annoyed by any further pressure efforts. 

Mr. Velde. You have probably been in Communist headquarters 
in Oakland many times; haven't you? 

Mr. Crouch. I don't recall being in Communist Party headquarters 
in Oakland since the first months of 1942. Of course, I worked in 
Communist Party there, had my offices in the headquarters in Oakland 
through 1941. 

Mr. Velde. Do you recall the names of the office force while you 
were organizer for Alameda County? 

Mr. Crouch. A George Seal was the administrative man who 
attended to sending out packages and mail and routine office work. 
The other staff there consisted of Charles Draslin, the county or- 
ganizational secretary, and Kenneth May, educational director. 
Draslin, May, Seal, and I were the people on the party pay roll in 
Alameda County. 

Mr. Velde. Was Bernadette Doyle hired at the time? 

Mr. Crouch. Bernadette Doyle was very active in the Communist 
Party in the county. She was also head of some kind of front organi- 
zation in the latter part of 1941. 

Mr. Velde. That was the Young Communist League? 

Mr. Crouch. No, no. It was some kind of mass organization; 
not a youth organization. On a State-wide scale. I do not recall 
the name of the organization. It was a party front, not like YCL. 
Then, as soon as I was replaced by Steve Nelson, Bernadette Doyle 
became county organizational secretary, working in the county office 
at Oakland about January of 1942. 

Mr. Velde. Are you acquainted with Karl Kahn? 

Mr. Crouch. No; I don't recall the name. 

Mr. Velde. You mentioned Lambert a while ago. Was that Louise 
Lambert? 

Mr. Crouch. Pardon me? 

Mr. Velde. Was that Louise? 

Mr. Crouch. No; Rudy. There were two of them. Walter 
Lambert, who was go-between for the party district bureau and the 
North American strike, and so on, and his brother Rudy Lambert, 
who headed the illegal and underground apparatus in the State. 

Mr. Velde. Were you acquainted with the staff in San Francisco 
in their headquarters there? That was on Haight Street, I think. 

Mr. Crouch. Yes. The county headquarters were in the same 
building as the district headquarters in San Francisco. The San 
Francisco County organizer during 1941 while I was in Alameda was 

a See Exhibit No. 2, testimony of Paul Crouch, May 6, 1949. 



£06 CLARENCE HISKI V 

Steve Nelson, and \\ hen Ste\ e Nelson was i ransferred he was succeeded 
there by ( fleta < )'( Tuner Yates. 

Mr. Velde. Do you remember any of the other Communists in 
the office al the headquarters in San Francisco on Haighl Street'.' 

Mr. Crouch. Only William Schneiderman, district organizer; 
Louise Todd, the State organizational secretary. The office girls, 
T don't recall their names. Schneiderman's wife, Rose Schneiderman, 
sometimes worked in the State office, but usually she worked in another 
office, a kind of front organization. T don't recall the name of it. 
It w as elsewhere in the city. 

Mr. Velde. T do not know whether any of this information has 
been brought out. 

Mr. lit ssell. We went into that pretty thoroughly. 

Mr. Velde. I just wonder if you kno^ of any leading Communists 
in that ana or any other area who have Bince quit the party and are 
now loyal Americans again. 

Mr. < Touch. No. I think that a predecessor of mine who had been 
expelled just before 1 arrived in Alameda ( !ounty, w ho quit the party — 
1 can't recall his name al the moment 

Mr. TAVENNER. YOU have given US the name. 

Mr. Velde. Well, that is all then. I have nothing further. 

Mr. Wood. Mr. ( Jounsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. At the time you quit the party in L942, to what 

extent were the activities of the Communist Tarty -o-ca||ed under- 
ground work? 

Mr. Crouch. During 1941, until the time of the invasion of the 

Soviet Union, all the entire party apparatus was maintained on what 
was virtually readiness t<> u r o underground .-it any moment. The 
party hud discontinued issuing membership book- and dues stamps, 
each of the branches merely keeping its own records. The county 
offices not keeping membership lists, and so on. Schools were being 
held. For example, from the first week of June we were holding a 
county school just across the line in Contra Costa County, where 
-elected party leaders from all the sections were given instruction on 
how to -tore underground apparatus that is, mimeographs how to 
make duplicating devices hectographs in case even the mimeo- 
graphs were not available. The party was divided into groups .if 

five members, ,ach with a captain, each of these groups to become ;i 

branch in case it went underground, and so on. Immediately after 
the German invasion of the Soviel Union in dune 1941, the party dis- 
continued these precautious as far as the genera] activities were 
concerned, but it maintained this apparatus, if it were possible, in 
even stricter form a- far a- the scientific field was concerned. 

For example, we hud a special section in Berkeley of which, as far 
as I can recall, there were about 40 members. Now, this was guarded 
so closely that even through the fall, when the party was favoring aid 
to (Teat Britain and so on, | ;! - county organizer was not permitted 
to know the names of the members of the branches. I was taken 
when I went to these branches. I was driven in a car. I don't know 
whose home I went to. Kenneth May, who was in charge of this 
work, usually drove me to the meetings. I spoke, made political 
report-, answered questions, listened to discussions, and left not know- 
home l was in. not knowing the names of the people who 



CLARENCE HISKEY 407 

were present. And this section of about 40 members, as I can recall, 
was divided into a number of smaller branches. For example, there 
was the branch at the Shell Oil Development Co. of eight members. 
I don't know the names of any of the members of that branch. There 
was one branch that was composed entirely of Government employees 
in this section. 

There were one or two branches composed exclusively of university 
professors and scientists and research workers. This work was all 
guarded with the greatest precautions at all times. 

Mr. Velde. Did you know George Eltenton? He was with the 
Shell Development Co. 

Mr. Crouch. I don't recall the name. I met the members of the 
party of Shell Oil, but I didn't know their names. 

Mr. Wood. The committee is adjourned until 10:30 a. m. tomorrow. 

(Whereupon, at 4:45 p. m., the committee adjourned, to reconvene 
at 10:30 a. m. Wednesdav, May 25, 1949.) 




APPENDIX 

Hiskey exhibit 1. — Oath of Office, Clarence Francis Hiskey upon his appoint- 
ment to the Officers' Reserve Corps, June 29, 1938* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 1. — Ticket of admission to the Ninth National Convention 
of the Communist Party, United States of America, at Madison Square Garden, 
Forty-ninth Street and Eighth Avenue, Sunday, June 28, 1936.* 

Paul Crouch, exhibit 2. — Membership card, All-America Anti-Imperialist League 
(United States section), New York branch, 1929, for Paul Crouch, rural delivery 1, 
Hays, N. C* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 3. — Card imprinted "Delegate to the National Nominating 
Convention of the Communist Party, United States of America, May 30 to 
June 2, 1940, at the Royal Windsor, 69 West Sixty-sixth Street, New York City; 
No. 1; State, Tennessee."* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 4. — Mimeographed letter from People's World Forum, 
1125 West Street, Oakland, August 29, 1941, signed by Mrs. Wilhemine Loughrey, 
chairman of the forum.* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 5. — Letter, on letterhead of the Communist Party, United 
States of America, national office, 35 East Twelfth Street, with post-office box 87, 
station D, New York City, dated April 10, 1941, "To Whom It May Concern," 
and signed "A. Benson, Assistant."* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 6.— Handbill, anti-Hitler rally, Friday, November 7, 1941, 
8 p. m., auspices East Bay Forum.* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 7.— Minutes of the NEC Buro, November 28, confidential.* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 8. — Leaflet announcing Workers School, 1723 Webster 
Street, Oakland, opening October 27.* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 9. — Letterhead, Air Transport Local 503, Transport 
Workers Union of America, CIO, undated.* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 10.— Daily Worker, Thursday, September 13, 1934, page 6.* 

Paul Crouch exhibit 11. — Unidentified newspaper clipping.* 

'Reproduced for the record. 

409 



410 



CLARENCE HISKE"! 



$?#» t*«ir*<iii««* »* ren?x« <M« 



HlSkl J i:\HIIHT 1 



- mtarmsumtm* 



** —**£*&-&&«&!*> ta*^' — .„ „ ....' , tuning hwtt appoint*! 

a ™&«fs«i li*„t<sc«iW u^^^fei .^-Cm tenia* m the Gffltm' if««« Corp* of a* 
»*!•«?# *>/" (M L f mU>t Xt'tisx, <fe< zotffitttdt? itvcw &r u$rm) (hat I tcUt-wpfmn and tt+feml 
th* €'&r*ti(iition <?/ (k>; United Ste(«* agaimf alt *»«»«&*, farei&n mid <iom«*tic< that t 
mM twar txmtfQlik i%wl iMeffrim* lo fM sam*; {Tint t tab* tht* obil$ttb»frinUy, without 
WKff zfrvnUtl ***«mx4>.m »r pn rpt&v <sf *m*im ; vttd that t tciti wvti mdjait&fully &<vti9T$e 
tte>4wtHi* *tf t&» *#•<* upi<& u>M«b / «»i obvvA t*> «»t#h ** fj«tj» »«r fcpju 

t3&t>i>«fcB r'Aa^u^. //<#J&frL. 

^>X-)W. ~^iWC*>>,j*;;:: , ?<ifc&KN.w^„,, w „ 



ty*cl&.m+&*> 



*?«*»•» to «n*I subscribe b»/%fi> n\* 4 iii*Z%**<iiLc^^ „*S?.3f.. <i«j, 






KOW0W* ** TW **>>AMU ' 



qf&o?/ 






'Hi M 



M 



9 



CLARENCE HISKEY 411 

Paul Ckouch Exhibit 1 



ADMIT ONE 

to the 

NINTH NATIONAL CONVENTION 

of the 

COMMUNIST PARTY, U.S.A. 

MADISON SQUARE GARDEN 
49th Street and 8th Avenue 
SUNDAY, JUNE 28th, 1936 



2oy 
Paul Crouch Exhibit 2, Front 



MEMBERSHIP CARD 



All- America Anti-Imperialist League 

* [UNITED STATES SECTION] 

l4&*.+ Branch 19*?.Z 




Name ~ <£Lc^J' ... ^%sfrP<*4!>TL' 



Atldlress 



-fJ4 / A^,.-^<£. 



Paul Crouch Exhibit 2. Back 



*V 



•"• % 










:* 






V 



. . . .v..s*. .>.**.; . . .......:..:....:.......'...••.•••:•::.• . . . . 



412 



CLARENCE HISKEY 



Paul Crouch Ex hi hit 3, Front 



DELEGATE 



6 



TO THE NATIONAL 

mxtitiq Lo n \k>fii ten 

o 

OF THE COMMUNIS'] PARTY, U.S.A. 



c/taim- 



No. 



J 



MAY 30th to JUNE 2nd 1940 

at Jte> ROYAL WMDSOK 
68 W*si i&*h St' <-'., -»'-.'.• ?c*k City 

Stale 



a«» 



A» 



Paul Crouch Exhibit 3, Back 



4 ' O f 







CLARENCE HISKEY 413 



Paul Crouch Exhibit 4 



P E P L E ' S WORLD .FORUM 
1125 West Street, Oakland 

August 29, 1941 



Dear Friends: 

A discussion of "Japan and the Interna- 
tional Situation" will be held at the PeoplVs 
World Forum, Hermans on' s Hall, 1125 West Street 
(corner of West and Twelfth Streets), in Oakland 
at 8 o'clock on Sunday evening, September *7th. 

The speaker will be Paul Crouch, former- 
ly editor of the magazine "New South." Following 
Mr. Crouch's address there will be a period for 
questions and discussion. 

We extend to the members of your organi- 
zation a cordial invitation to attend the meeting 
of the Forum, hear the address, and participate in 
the discussion which will follow it. 

With best wishes, I am, 

Very sincerely yours, 



IM, uj\jl vTtwr\> 



Mrs. Wilhelmine Lougtff"ey, 
Chairman of the Forum 




uopwa 34 



414 CLARENCE HISK] J 



Paul Chough Exhibit 5 

COMMUNIST PARTY of U S. A. 

2\£a tional Office 

WILLIAM Z. FOSTER 

Ch " m " n 3s EAST 12 (AST.— A L 4-1X15 

EARL BROWDER 

Cfural Srcrtljry p. o. Box 87 Sta. D. New YorA. City 



April 10, 1941 
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN i 

This it to oonfirm the feot that Paul Crouoh has bean 

•oployed by tho Coranunlrt Party for several year*. 

Very truly yours. 




CLARENCE HISKEY 



415 



Paul Crouch Exhibit 6 



ANTI-HITL 




RALLY 



Friday, November 7, 8 p.m. 

MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM 
BALLROOM 



Our coun- 
try — the en 
tire world — is 
in danger! 
Our tasks 
Mobilize the full 
power of our 
country in support 
of the Soviet-Brit 
ish military alliance 
Establish real nation 
al unity in defense of 
the United States. Es- 
tablish unity of Amer- 
ican labor in the united 
national effort against 
Hitler. Mobilize the entire 
national economy for maxi- 
mum production to crush 
Hitler and Hitlerism. Develop 
Labor's organized strength, ini 
tiative and activities for maxi 
mum production for National 
Defense. Abolish all race and na- 
tional discrimination in employ- 
ment in defense production. Expose 
and combat the pro-Hitler appease- 
ment forces that are sabotaging pro- 
duction and national defense. 
Hitler threatens all civilization! Time 
is precious! We must act before it is 
too late! Failure to give full and im- 
mediate support to the Soviet Union and 
Creat Britain would endanger the independ 
ence and national existence of our country! 
Hitler's aim is to conquer and enslave the 
entire world! He is already sinking our ships 
without warning. His agents in this country, 
the "America First," the Lindberghs, Hoovers, 
Hearsts, Norman Thomases and other fifth col- 
umn Quislings, are trying to keep us blind to the 
danger until too late. 



Oakland— 12th and Fallon Streets 



How America Can 

Defeat the Hitler 

Menace 

ILLIAM SCHNEIDERMAN 

State Secretary, Communist Party 

CHAIRMAN: PAUL CROUCH 



Stirring Films 

of the Red 

Army in 

Action 



The 24th 
anniversary 
of the Soviet 
Union is of 
greater signifi- 
cance to the 
American people 
today than ever 
before. At this mo- 
ment the heroic 
struggle of the Red 
Army is not only a 
fight for the defense 
of the Soviet Union but 
also of all democratic in- 
stitutions throughout the 
world and the national in- 
dependence of all coun- 
tries, including the United 
States. 

On its 24th anniversary the 
Soviet Union faces the power- 
ful armies of Hitler, who has at 
his disposal all the economic and 
military resources of the European 
continent. The Red Army can de- 
feat Hitler and remove the Fascist 
menace from the earth only if our 
country speeds up production and 
delivery of planes, tanks, guns, etc.; 
only if the United States aids Creat 
Britain in opening a Western Front; only 
f all our economic and military resources 
are used at once in the cause of humanity 
and civilization against Hitler and Fascism. 
July 4th, the anniversary of the first modern 
democracy, is observed officially by the Soviet 
Union. Let us here observe the anniversary 
of the Soviet Union by taking the practical 
steps necessary for the defeat of Hitler — speed- 
ing production of armaments and rushing their 
delivery to the armies fighting Fascism IMME- 
DIATELY. 



AUSPICES: EAST BAY FORUM 



ADMISSION 20 CENTS PLUS TAX 



416 CLARENCE HISKEY 



Paul Cbouch Exhibit 7, Page 1 

MI NUTES OF THE NECyjRO. sovembiR 88 . COHFIDEHTIAL 

PRESENT: Gannett, Shiffnan, Chandler, Green, Wovduid, Mates, Crouch, Pershing, 

Minor, Steuben. 
Observers: Albertson, Daniels, Totherow, Pizer, Saunders. 

AGENDA: PAUL CKOUCI! 

1. Polburo Puport — Steuben .IHIT 7 

2. Draft Thesis and Discussion on the id — Steuben Kay 2/,, 19/.9 

3. Industrial Report — Matos (pac e 1) 

4. New York Situation — Green 

5. Org. Matters. 

1 . POLBU RO REPORT. 

U3TIONS: 1. The NEC ehall send out a political letter on the meaning 
of Bucharin l a surrender. 

2. That we have an immediate discussion on Negro wor".: and the 
building of the Negro Workers League at the Next Buro meeting and that we request 
Comrade Huiewood to bo present them. 

2 . RESOLUTION AND DISCU SSION. 

1£)TI0NS: 1. Immediately after \he publication of the draft thesis we 
open a discussion thruout the League on the tasks of cur League in lina with the 
present situation in the country. The discussion shall take the following font* 
a) Press — with a page of the Young Workar to be devoted to the discussion from 
nov until the Plenum, b) That we ask the Daily Worker to give U3 two columns 
twice a week for diseussicn articles, c) That, a special weekly national bulletn 
be issued, to contain discussion articles, d) Each unit should sot a&ide a spic- 
ial evening for discussion in the unit. 3) That we organize district conferences 
thruout the League before the NEC Plenum. The agenda of the District conferences 
to be as follows: 1) Report of NEC Rop. 2) Roport of DO. 3) Discussion 
ar.d election of a DEC. The conference ehall bo organized as fellows: a) All 
DEC members and unit organizer shall attend the conference with a voice only. 
bl Two delegates to be elected from each unit. Modification as to tho agonda 
can be taken up by the individual districts with the NEC. Tho District Conference 
shall take place on the following datad: 

Boston December 29 

How York q 29 

Philadelphia '' 29 

Buffalo " 29 

Pittsburgh  29 

Cleveland " 21 

Detroit  20 

Chicago n 29 

Superior " 28 

Minneapolis " 21 

Kar.sac  29 

Seattle  29 

California " 21 

Anthracite  28 

Now Ilavon " 29 

All these dates aro tontatlvo and can be changod in consultation with the NEC. 
Shi >»ew York, Chicago, and thoso district that have had conferences after the 
district conventions shculd net elect now DEC, but rako additions if necessary. 



CLARENCE HISKEY 417 



Paul Ceouch Exhibit 7, Page 2 

Buro Minutes, Nov. 28. fa ge 2_ . 



2. That the Agitprop Departma-.it gets .out an outline on the - thesis for 
8ir«p].i£icatior. for the membership. 

3. That the YCI letter addresaed to the CEC's of the League, together 
with the thesis be 86nt out and to be one of the. basis for discussion. 

4. That the entire discussion be directed by the Buro thru its secrotar- 
at, 

All motions carried unanimously, 
All other points refervod to tho next Buro meeting. 

Fraternally submitted 



Acting Executive Socrotary. 



;3:L 



418 



CLARENCE HISKEY 



Paul Ckovch Exjiikit 8, Page 1 



Q/ft/ncu/ro< 






s 



T 





\ 

\ 

J. \- 



-— 1 ~-l 

-I 



^ n 



_ hJ 



OOL 



A 




3 





"^ster 




aid and 



Qpevung October 2,7tL 



CLARENCE HISKEY 419 

Paul Crouch Exhibit 8, Page 2 
COURSES 

First Semester, Oct. 27 to Dec. 19 

THE WORLD TODAY - An introductory course covering major 
problems — democracy and dictatorship, crises, war, so- 
cialism, trade unions and political parties. 

Tuesday, 8:C0 - 9:^0 p.m. - Thomas R. Farrell 
Friday, 8:00 - 9:?0 p.m. - Pat Miller 

FUNDAMENTALS OF MARXISM - A basic course dealing with 
economic principles, imperialism, the state, Soviet 
Uni.bn, role of working class in anti-Hitler front, 
(prerequisite: World Today or equivalent) 

Wednesday, 8:00 - 9: 50 p.m. - Paul Crouch 

POLITICAL ECONOMY I_ - An introduction to Marxist eco- 
nomics: capitalist production, value, profits and the 
struggle for better conditions. (Prerequisite: Funda- 
mentals of Marxism or equivalent) 

Friday - 8:00 -9:5^ P» m « - Kenneth May 

TRADE UNIONIS M - History, role and current problems of 
the trade unions, including such topics as strike 
strategy, labor unity, and political action. 

Time to be arranged (indicate preferences on blank) 

THE NEGRO PEOPLE - History of the Negro people, their 
essential role in the struggles of the American people, 
national liberation, the fight for jobs, etc. 

Time to be arranged (indicate preferences on blank) 

ADDITIONAL COURSES (either at the school or extension) 
will be arranged where a sufficient number request. 
(See registration blank) 



420 CLARENCE HISKEY 



Paul Crouch Exhibit 8, Page 3 

THE '.YORKERS SCHOOL 



The East Bay, with its growing labor movement, 
h33 need for an institution offering education designed 
to fit the needs of progressive workers and other who 
wish to participate more effectively in the stru.-gle 
for a better world. 

The "Workers School offers systematic training 
in the theory, principles and program of the working 
class movement* The work of the school is based on 
the principles of scientific socialism. 

Classes are open to everyone interested in the 
study of social sciences and current problems. They 
are led by teachers whose qualifications include 
not only sound theoretical training, but also prac- 
tical experience in the labor movement. 

Discussion, based on lectures and reading, 
forms the basis of the teaching method. Students 
will be given the maximum of individual attention. 

A reading room and lending library -vill be 
available to students. Non-students may use these 
facilities for a fee of 50/ a semester. 

Tuition fee for each course (eight weekly 
meetings) is $2, which must be paid at the time of 
registration. 

The Workers School is beginning modestly. -Its 
growth will depend on the interest and help of pro-' 
gressives in the East Bay. Gifts of equipment, cooks, 
and money are needed. Loans (repayable in tuitions) 
are solicited. Most important, the Workers School 
invites you and your friends to attend its classes — 
and to register immediately . (See over) 



CLARENCE HISKEY 421 



Paul Crouch Exhibit 8, Page 4 

REGISTRATION BLANK 



Last Nanie__ _First Name_ 

Address 



Age Sex Organization 



Course Day Fee paid 



I am not taking any courses, but wish to register for 
the use of the reading room and librar y (50/ pd ) 

I wish tc give to help the school. 

If additional courses were organized on the subjects 
and at the times indicated, I would enroll: 

World Today Fundamentals 



Current Events Political Economy 

Public Speaking and ParlioT&entary Law_ 



American History_ Labor History 

Vabor publicity and Journalism 

leaflet Vfriting and production 

History of the C.F.S.V. 

The Soviet Union Soviet Flanning_ 

Spani sh Engl i sh 

Dialectical and Historical Materialism 



Return this blank with fees immediately to The Twentieth 
Century Book Shop, 2475 Bancroft Way, Berkeley or 95^ 
Broadway, Rm. 215, Oakland. (School premises open Cet.27..) 



422 



CLARENCE HISKEY 



^_ c 

c -fi ^ fe 

■o '5 o ^ 

s S « S 

^- . ^ o 

z > _- *; 

< oc U q, 
I uj J - 
uj * O i 
?f < <* < 

I- CO (_» IX 

U uJ - O 

< at a. -i 



E 
o 

5 



O 

Z ff> 



r ui —  <* 
8 * • O 

3 a: 3 s 



05 

ca 

n 

K 
W 

5 

OS 

o 



2 



o 
a. 

c 
a 



n 



a 


a. 




o 


<Tj" 


>- 


• — 


£ 


«_ 


LU 





2 


E 
< 


t— " 

LU 
LLI 



o 



o 

a. 
«/> 

c 



CO * 

PI 



2 3 



o o 



a> 

« 

IT 
TJ 

a> 

I 



^ 




o a> 



< =2 



E 
o 
o 



c 
o 

CD 



CLARENCE HISKEY 



423 



Paul Crouch Exhibit 10 



Page Sis 



DaihiigWorker 



mot i»j. iwaaa. •« «••»•«» Mtmnnommt 



"America's Only Working CJass Daily Newspaper" 

FOUNDED 19S4 
PUBLI&H&D DAJI.Y. EXCEPT SI NDAY, BY THE 
COMPRODAILY PUBLISHING CO., INC., W E. IStti 
Strwi, New York, N. T. 
Telephone: ALgonquIn 4-7954. 

Cable Ad-Ires* "Dalwork." New York. N. Y. 
Washington Burei'r Room K*. National Presa Building. 
14tb >.<rs. Wasblnjton D C Telephone Nat.onjl ™» 
Mld»est Bureau: >0l South Wells. St.. Boom 70S, Chcagoi ill, 
Telephone: Dearborn 3931. 

Subsrrlptinn Rates: 

ar> Mat): leneept Manhattan and Broox', 1 f*r. »« «. 
■I 'month*. DM: 3 month?. $3 00. 1 month, h.75 'en«s 



Manhattan, Bronx, Foreign and Canada 

S months, $600; 3 months. $3.00. 

Ft Carrier: Weekly. 18.centa; monthly, 76 rents 



year, $9.W; 



THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 13. 1134 



rpr 



An Appeal to Troops 

W& COMMUNIST PARTY and Young: 
I Communist League of District 16 have 
Issued a joint appeal at Charlotte, S. C, 
to members of the National Guard 
stationed in the southern strike area 
to refuse to act as strikebreakers and to shoot down 
workers now on the picket line in the textile strug- 
gle. The appeal was made to the National Ouards- 
men a* workers and farmers whose interests are 
Ihe same as those of the underpaid and over- 
worked textile strikers. 
The appeal follows; 

"NATIONAL GUARDSMEN 

"REFUSE TO BE 'STRIKEBREAKERS! 

"DONT SHOOT DOWN YOUR 

"FELLOW WORKERS'. 

"Fellow Workers in Uniform: 

"When you joined the National Guard you had 
no thought of becoming strikebreakers. You did 
not loin to protect scabs; to shoot down striking 
working men and women. But that is what the 
officers of the National Guard want you to do. 

"All of you are workers and farmers, many of 
Whom have been called off the picket line in one 
c4ty and sent to another In the uniform of a 
soldier to flHhtr against your fellow workers. 

"True, you mav not be called upon to shoot 
down your own father, or your brother, but you 
mav be ordered to fire on textile workers whose 
sons in the National Ouard are in your home town 
under orders to fire on your own father, brother, 
sister or friend. 

"This is no exaggeration. The danger Is a real 
one. Manv strikers have already been murdered In 
South Carolina, and Georgia. 

"Some of you are not textile workers. You may 
be furniture or tobacco workers. You mav be farm- 
ers. But if you should help crush this strike, which 
Is a fight for the very right to live, you will be help- 
ing to drive the entire working class bo a lower 
living standard. 

"You may not intend to actually shoot workers. 
But the strikers cannot read your minds. Your 
very presence with rifles, bayonets and machine 
puns is intended to frighten and intimidate the 
strikers, to prevent mass picketing and drive the 
workers back Into the mills under unbearable con- 
ditions and starvation wages. 

"You should Immediately refuse to aot £>. a 
strikebreaker! Tell your officers you will not .-hoot 
down striking workers! 

"Quit being used against the strikers! .Torn i»nth 
the strikers op Ihe picket, lines and hcVp prevent 
scabs from pivenng the mills!" 

Communist Party of ?J. S. A^ 
Youn^ Communist League, 
District lfj, Charlotte, N. C. 



424 



CLARENCE HISKEY 



P.u i. Cuon 11 i:\innir 11 



FeartoJailNMU 
Utah Head at 
Meet ing of 1,500 

'Coal Output Zero; Scabs Armed With Rifles; 
Picket Lines Re-established As Miners 
Face Terror With Determination to Win 



Protests Pour In 
on Utah Officials 
from Penna. Miners 

Call United Front Meet 

Today in N. Y. for 

Workers' Rights 



HELPER, Utah, Sept. 4. — Armed deputies here yestcr- 

l day were prevented from arresting Charles Guynn when ho 

| spoke at a mass meeting of 1,500 workers in Helper Public 

: Park on the strike led by the National Mirjers Union. Th? 

deputies did not dare to make an arrest, though warrants are 

-lit for Guynn. Chi 
Whetherbee and Paul Crouch 
on the charge of criminal 

syndicalism 

Coal production here is practically 
:ero despite the [act that sc;b are 
imported and go to work armed  I h 
rifles and wearing deputy sh:rifl : 
badges. 

Picket lines were established Mon- 
day r.iorning. and the miners aie 
preparing (or a determined and mili- 
tant resistance to the attacks of the 
armed guards 

Several members of the DM.W.J. 
were fired for refusal to become 
armed mine guards. 

The general strike call and lsaBctJ 
and the Carbon County Miner " of- 
ficial organ of the N.M.U. here, were 
printed and effectively distribute in 
every mining camp despite the efforts 
of armed deputies to stop their cir- 
culation. 

The strikers" ranks are unbroken. 
Wholesale evictions of miners Is go- 
ing on without even the usual :ejal 
formalities 

There is an urgent need of tents 
and funds for food and defen-- 

The National Guard is now camped 
within five miles of Carbon Count;, 
the storm center of the strike. 

There Is a countywide school stnk» 
against the use of teachers as crmei' 
thugs, also demanding free tuition and 
books. 

Around looon miners are striking 
In Utah and New Mexico. Martial 
law has been declared In th" N»w 
Mexico coal fields. The atrlke b:gan 
here when the operators bro,. 

 ihev had original)', 
with the NMU. 



NET".'  YORK —Protests from th: 
Pennsylvania coal fields are pouring 
in on Sheriff Bliss of Helper. Utah, 
and on Governor Seligman of New 
Mexico, and Governor Blood of Utah 
asalnst the armed attacks on strik- 
ing miners, led by the NMU. 

Mathho Soldo, secretary of the 
Worn ns Auxiliary of the NJvf V. in 
C. ..[dale. Pa, sent a message of 
protest Local 126 of the NMU 
through its secretary. John Hartus. 
also sent a protest. 

On Wednesday, at 2 P M . there 
will be a united front conference at 
4 West 12th St . to plan a nation- 
wide protest against the terror In the 
Utah and New Mexico mine strike 
u well as to organise united front 
action of all workers to preserve the 
workers' nghls against the offensive 
of the bosses under the NRA. 



Vote lo Continue Strike 
GALLUP. New Mexico. Sept. 4 — 
One thousand miners vot'd lo ton- 
l.nue their strike ricspue man 
which has b-'n declared in I 

General Wood. National Guard 
head, told the miners at a meeimi; 
with a committee of the strike 
they would be perm. lied to 
All meetings, however, are prohib- 
ited, as the decree says not more than 
three people can congregate at a 
time 

In groups of three, six hundred 
pickets marched past the Garr.erco 
Mine, the largest In New M-xIco. 

Early Thursday morning ih- wi re 
driven away al the point of b.. 
on the order of General Wood 
the miners demanded to see him thev 
were told "he Is not at home." 
A nu-s niertme of miners w.i 
across the state line from C 
21 miles away. 

Relief committees are 
smash-d hv the National Quard In 
an effort to drive the men back Into 
the mmt6 

Local NRA officials have car 
the town and told business men no' 
to donate food or supplies to the 
strikers because they are stnkinj 
"atalnet the spirit of the nra " 

Anna Starkovsk, chairman of the 
relief committee, reports s' 
families totally without food. I 
relief Is rushed Immediately aorre r' 
the miners face starvation. Turn. 
should be sent for relief Immediately 
to Box 318. G.i Hup New Mexico Fncd 
should be sent directly lo Relief 
Headquarters, S23 Princeton, Gallup. 
New Mexico 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 




3 9999 05018 307 6 




mm 



.JUL 

ggHHMM 



■:■■.'' -v- 



BBSS 



»ne 



mm 



ttSBXXXtXE 



M11WH. 

flgtaea 



488 



9«B88 



858885 



• *'• * 






.Jag