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Full text of "Hearings regarding communist activities in the Territory of Hawaii. Hearings"

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HEARINGS REGARDING COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN 
THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII— PART 1 



HEARINGS 



BEFORE THE 



14 •CT'. ':i^ : 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-FIRST CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



APRIL 10. 11, AND 12, 1950 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 




'H.eo'ifi 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1950 




S S. SOftRINTENDENT OmcuSklS^ 

JUN 23 1950 HA 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 



United States House of Rei-eesentatives I 

JOHN S. WOOD, Georgia, Chairman I 
FRANCIS B. WALTER, Pennsylvania RICHARD M. NIXON, California 

BURR P. HARRISON, Virginia FRANCIS CASE, South Dakota ' 

JOHN McSWEENEY, Ohio HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois [ 

MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York ! 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel i 

Louis J. Russell, Senior Investigator 
John W. Carrington, Clerk of Committee 
Benjamin Mandel, Director of Research 

n 



CONTENTS 



April 10, 1950: , , 

Testimony of — - Paet 

Richard M. Kageyama 1355 

Ichiro Izuka 1372 

Itsuruo Ogoshi 1390 

Ichiro Izuka (resumed) 1393 

April 11, 1950: 

Testimony of — 

Ichiro Izuka (resumed) 1423 

William K. Kamaka 1441 

Emil M. MuUer, Jr 1457 

David K. Kamaka _ 1467 

April 12, 1950: 

Testimony of — 

Ichiro Izuka (resumed) 1471 

Ralph Tokunaga 1472 

William A. Wheeler 1475 

Ralph Tokunaga (statement played on Sound Scriber) 1477 

Easter J. Doyle 1492 

Donald Uesugi 1512 

Harry Kuhia, Jr 1520 

Harold E. Yamashita 1528 

Ichiro Izuka (resumed) 1535 

Harry Kuhia, Jr. (resumed) 1533 

in 



HEABINGS REGARDING COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN 
THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII 



MONDAY, APRIL 10, 1950 

United States House of Representatives, 
Subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Honolulu, T. H. 

PUBLIC SESSION 

The subcommittee of five met, pursuant to call, at 9 : 30 a. m., in the 
Senate Chamber, lolani Palace, Hon. Francis E. Walter, as chairman 
of the subcommittee, presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Francis E. Walter, 
Burr P. Harrison, John McSweeney, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold 
H. Velde. 

Staff members present : Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel ; William A. 
Wheeler and Courtney E. Owens, investigators; and John W. Car- 
rington, clerk. 

Mr. Walter. The hearing \\'ill come to order. 

I would like to admonish you that there is a large crowd here and 
ask you to be as quiet as you possibly can. 

Pursuant to statutory authority and in response to requests embodied 
in a joint resolution of the Legislature of the Territory of Hawaii 
and in resolutions of certain civic organizations, which resolutions 
were referred by the Speaker of the House of Representatives to this 
committee, the subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activ- 
ities of the House of Representatives opens its hearings today in 
Honolulu on the subject of communism. 

This committee from time to time has investigated un-American 
activities of Fascist, Nazi, and other totalitarian isms designed to 
overthrow by force and violence the democratic form of government 
under which we live. The Communist conspiracy in many forms, 
including that of espionage by foreign agents, has been brought to 
light in investigations conducted by this committee. With the revela- 
tion of Communist infiltration in education, entertainment, govern- 
ment, labor, and other fields of endeavor, this committee has devoted 
much of its time in the past few years to the subject of communism. 
These investigations have been conducted in numerous cities and 
States on the mainland, the latest being in the western part of my 
own State, Pennsylvania. It is the duty of this committee to expose 
communism wherever found within its jurisdiction. 

The purpose of this investigation is to determine the extent, char- 
acter, and objects of Communist activities in the Territory of Hawaii. 
There is no greater power than the power of public opinion, and if, as 
a result of these hearings, there be a public disclosure of Communist 

1353 



1354 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

activities in the Territory of Hawaii, this committee believes that the 
integrity, character, and loyalty of the people of these islands, of all 
races and creeds, are such that communism will find no haven here, 
and that it will be promptly eradicated by an informed public opinion. 

In approaching its task, the committee cannot be unmindful of the 
fact that Hawaii is our Gibraltar of the Pacific—a vital link in the 
security of our west coast. Nor can we be unmindful of the aggressive 
designs of Soviet imperialism in the Pacific area. Our hearings should 
alert Hawaii and the entire American Nation to the dangers of a Red 
Pearl Harbor. 

Anticipating, from our experience in other important investiga- 
tions, the smear campaign which will be directed against this inquiry 
by the Communist slander apparatus and its supporters, I wish to clear 
up certain possible misconceptions at the outset. 

It will be said that the facts sought out at these hearings will in- 
jure the campaign for statehood for Hawaii. Our hearings will in no 
way involve the merits of this proposal. Speaking for myself as an 
individual Member of Congress, I wish to make it plain that I am a 
strong advocate of granting immediate statehood. Other members 
of our committee have taken a similar position in the House of Repre- 
sentatives. But this matter is outside of the specific purview of our 
present inquiry. If loyal citizens expose the machinations of this 
subversive organization during the course of this investigation, then 
the menace, if one exists, can be fought by the people in their own 
way, and those favoring statehood will owe a great debt of gratitude 
to those who assist in such an exposure. 

It will also be alleged by the Communists and their apologists that 
we are motivated by a desire to injure the labor movement. Nothing 
could be further from the truth, as will be demonstrated by an im- 
partial review of the investigations conducted by this committee. 

Make no mistake about it. The Communists will shriek from the 
very housetops that the present inquiry is directed against persons of 
Asiatic descent, that we are interested in promoting racial discrimina- 
tions. They would have you forget that it was before our committee 
on July 18, 1949, that Jackie Robinson, that famous second baseman 
of the Brooklyn Dodgers, made his ringing statement which echoed 
all over the United States. Let me recall a few words from the 
memorable statement : "I and other Americans of many races and faiths 
have too much invested in our country's welfare for any of us to throw 
it away because of a siren song sung in bass. I am a religious man. 
Therefore I cherish America where I am free to worship as I please, 
a privilege which some countries do not give. And I suspect that 999 
out of almost any thousand colored Americans you meet will tell you 
the same thing." 

It is quite possible that Communists' cunning has succeeded in mis- 
leading some people in Hawaii just as it has misled some people else- 
where in the United States with their glorious but false promises. 
They should not be victimized for such mistakes. But you cannot 
win people and hold them in any part of the world with lies. Sooner 
or later truth will triumph, right here in Hawaii, elsewhere in the 
United States, and in foreign countries. We have arrived at the 
inevitable day of reckoning for the Reds. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1355 

•As one who has had some experience with the methods of Com- 
munists, I know that they will not liesitate to resort to any and every 
method of terrorism to prevent exposure. Red gangsters can be ex- 
pected to act true to form. Let me issue this stern and solemn 
warning, however. I shall not hesitate to invoke all the power at 
my command as chairman of these sessions against any individual or 
individuals who attempt to interfere with the duly authorized func- 
tions of this congressional committee. 

The citizens of Hawaii have written a noble page in American 
history during the last war against totalitarian fascism. They have 
faced death with unflinching heroism and self-sacrifice. Today we 

are confronted with a new menace the menace of totalitarian 

communism, which would destroy our democracy and lead us all down 
the road to slavery. This menace must be pitilessly exposed for 
what it is. It is my firm conviction that the people of Hawaii will 
leave no stone unturned to unmask this hideous conspiracy. After the 
last war, we all expressed our deepest gratitude toward those who 
had saved our democracy from its enemies. Today we must have 
the courage to face and defy the Communist smear bund and speak out. 

The Subcommittee on Un-American Activities of the Legislative 
Holclover Committee of the Hawaiian House of Representatives and 
the Commission on Subversive Activities were invited to have repre- 
resentatives sit with this committee as observers during the hearings, 
and I am pleased at this time to welcome Representative Charles E. 
Kauhane, chairman of the subcommittee, and Mr. Edward N. Sylva, 
Chairman of the Commission. 

Mr. Tavenner, call your first witness, please. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I desire to call Mr. Richard M. 
Kageyama. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Kageyama, will you be sworn, please? Raise 
your right hand. Do you swear that the testimony you are about 
to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth ? 

Mr. Kagetama. I do, sir. 

TESTIMONY OF RICHARD M. KAGEYAMA 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state your full name ? 

Mr. Kageyama. My full name is Richard M. Kageyama. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented here by counsel ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record? 

Mr. FuKUSHiMA. My name is Yasutaka Fukushima. I would like 
to enter my formal appearance on the record as counsel for Mr. 
Kageyama. 

Mr. Walter. Your appearance will be noted. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Kageyama, do you appear here in response to 
a subpena from this committee ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes. I appear here before this committee by the 
subpena issued to me. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. Kageyama. I was born on the Big Island of Hawaii, in the 
village of Honokaa. 

Mr. TA^^ENXER. What is your present occupation ? 



1356 coMMuisriST ACTivrriES in hawah 

Mr. Kageyama. My present occupation is that of an insurance agent 
and an elected official of the city government and an elected delegate 
to the Territorial convention. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state to the committee, please, your edu- 
cational background? 

Mr. Kageyama. My early education was given to me down in the 
village of Honokaa on the Big Island, where I was born. Some time 
we had intermediate school only. So the only way I could com- 
plete my high-school education was to travel to the city of Hilo, which 
is still located on the Big Island. Having gone to the city of Hilo, 
I took my first sophomore course at that city, and later, unable to con- 
tinue my education, high-school education, I took a leave of absence 
in my fateful career. That was caused by the death of my father, and 
unfortunately I could not continue and therefore I had an occupation. 
I worked for one firm in the city of Hilo and later I joined the CCC, 
which was then created by the Federal Government. Later I decided 
to complete the high-school course, which I required three more credits 
to complete. I did go back to school in order to secure the three more 
credits, and then I completed my high school here. 

Mr. Tavennee. Will you give us a brief statement of your employ- 
ment backgi'ound ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Since I graduated from high school? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Kageyama. Upon graduating from the high school of the Hilo 
High School, I decided to come to the city of Honolulu, and that was 
during the so-called inter-island strike of the shipping that was in 
effect. The only possible route existing at that time was the water 
transportation, in which cattle from the island of Hawaii are trans- 
ported to this island. And, having sufficient room on the cattle boat, 
I took opportunity to travel to this city, arriving in this city of 
Honolulu in the year 1938. Before coming to this city, it was during 
the summer months, I took employment at the Hawaiian pineapple 
cannery. Upon completion of the cannery season, I took up the occu- 
pation of house painting. Later on, the national defense activities 
were then in motion in this Territory, and as a result I worked for 
one of the large companies at the naval air base at Kaneohe, and it was 
during this period of defense, public work you might say, that I was 
called upon by the President of the United States for war service, 
and that was in the year of March 1941. 

Mr. Tavenner. At this point, tell us what was the nature of your 
service in the Army. 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, in 1941, March 20, very close to my birth- 
day, I was drafted and entered the war service at Schofield, on this 
island. We had our basic training, that is, the recruits, you might 
say, for the first 3 months. Upon completion of that service, I was 
transferred to the local battalion known as the Two Hundred and 
Ninety-eighth Infantry Battalion. Having served there for a couple 
of months, I was later given transfer to what was known as the Quar- 
termaster Corps in the United States Army. Having transferred to 
the Quartermaster Corps, the duties of this Quartermaster Corps was 
that of a stevedore and to load and unload steamers, during that period 
of the war, and to see that those materials were unloaded and shipped 
to the various parts of the islands and beyond the seas. Later, from 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1357 

the Qiuii'terniaster Corps, we were replaced by u new battalion of col- 
ored men from the States, and we were then transferred to the Engi- 
neer Corps of the United States Government. There, for the remain- 
ing year and nntil my discharge, I served under the engineer. My 
duties at that time, serving under the engineer, varied from labor 
battalion, j-ou might say, up to a position known as the information 
and educational adviser of noncommissioned officers. 

The war was getting hot and the information that was to be relayed 
to the veterans was necessary to be found a part of the United States 
training unit. And therefore a training department of the United 
States Army did establish this information and educational depart- 
ment to provide information to all the veterans, you might say, then 
during the war. At this time, gentlemen, I would like to state that 
my purpose as information and educational officer did carry fur- 
ther than the required duty. I have taken upon myself to correspond 
with many of the local veterans, who were then known as the One 
Hundredth, the Four Hundred and Forty-second, and the Two Hun- 
dred and Ninety-eighth. The Four Hundred and Forty-second and 
the One Hundredth was scattered all over the European area, and the 
Two Hundred and Ninety-eighth was somewhere dowm under. I have 
several letters and correspondence between the veterans at that time 
and which I have kept because of the sentimental reason for the vet- 
erans, for their appreciation, while they are in active service, some 
of the highlights of the correspondence in which we made with the 
veterans at that time indicated that they were always looking forward 
to receiving communications from the people of Hawaii. Most of 
these veterans were then in many of these hospitals, scattered through- 
out the States, in which some of them, the Dewitt General Hospital, 
and many other hospitals of which lists were made available in the 
local newspaper, and I took it upon myself to carry on a correspond- 
ence with some of these veterans and they found I was doing some 
service for them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you mind letting me see the correspondence ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; this is the correspondence that I saved with 
some of the veterans from overseas. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, we will review this correspondence and enter 
in the record such portions that may be of special interest to the com- 
mittee. Now, when were you discharged from the Army ? 

Mr. Kageyama. I was discharged from the Army on December 1, 
1945. Here is my honorable discharge paper, issued by the United 
States Army, and this is my separation record from the United States 
Army. Also I have here a statement from the President, President 
Truman, acknowledging our service to the Nation. Also I wish to 
submit my expatriation paper for the year 1938. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Now, suppose that you take up from the date of 
your discharge from the Arm.y, and tell us what your employment 
record was from that time on. 

Mr. Kageyama. Upon discharge from war service in 1945-194:6, I 
began hunting for jobs. At the time the local Veterans' Administra- 
tion was beginning to get organized. Therefore, I made my applica- 
tion with the local Veterans' Administration and in a few weeks was 
accepted as one of the clerks in their department. I served for about 
9 months with the Veterans' Administration, and decided that I should 
seek a public office. Knowing that the veterans who were then coming 



1358 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

into the veterans' organization were looking for guidance in the way 
of about the local condition. So, it became necessary for me to resign 
the further position, in which the civil service requirement was that 
one is not eligible to be a political candidate, you might say, while 
holding a Government position. Then leaving the Veterans' Admin- 
istration, I took up the work of insurance agent, and until this day 
I have been working as an insurance agent. 

Mr, Tavenner. Now, you have told us that you took your high 
school education at Hilo ? 

Mr, Kageyama. Yes ; that is correct. 

Mr, Tavenner, Upon your coming to the main island of Hawaii, did 
you meet one or some of your professors from Hilo ? 

Mr, Kageyama. Way back in the elementary grade I had one school 
teacher, who then was my close friend at the time, and they were 
then also transferred to the city of Honolulu. 

Mr. Ta\^nner, What was his name ? 

Mr. Kageyama. I happened to be a student of Mr. John Reinecke. 

Mr. Tavenner. Dr. Reinecke? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you have occasion to renew your acquaintance- 
ship with him after you came to Honolulu? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; being now in the city of Honolulu, and having 
occasion to meet John Reinecke, I did make an occasional social call 
at his home. 

Mr. Tavenner. After your severance from the Armed Forces, did 
you continue to meet Dr. Reinecke ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee about that, please ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, in the year of 1946, I continued my relation 
with my former school teacher, and having gone to his residence, it 
later developed into something of what is known as a discussion group 
at his residence and in the discussion or talk, the subject matter or 
discussioi) was of problems. And having taken a greater interest in 
the field of labor for which I had an opportunity to take an extension 
course at the university, for which I have a certificate, of 3 months, so 
my interest in labor was very hot at the time, and the problem of dis- 
cussing the local labor problem situation did interest me, and so the 
group discussion under the labor field was also discussed at this 
residence. 

Mr. Ta%^nner. What was Dr. Reinecke's position at the time ? 

Mr. Kageyama. I presume his position was a public school instruc- 
tor. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have stated that you attended a discussion 
group or discussion meetings? 

Mr. Kageyama. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. With Dr. Reinecke. Now, will you tell the com- 
mittee what was the nature of these discussion groups, that is, what 
character of discussions did take place ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, in the early part of this discussion group the 
problem of labor developed, and later it developed into the starting 
of the study of Marxism, its history and its principle, and some of 
this, you might say, of Marxism's hold on labor. And in the discussion 
of Marxism, a course of 9 weeks, you might say I started a group by 
myself, studying this whole problem of labor and Marxism. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1359 

Mr. Tavenner. So, you attended <a 9 weeks' discussion course? 

Mr. Kageya]ma. Yes, something like that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was the discussion course held ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, at the residence of Mr. John Reinecke. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, at the end of that discussion course what 
proposal if one of any kind was made to you ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, upon the completion of this course, 9 weeks, 
you might say, a development took place at his place, and whereby I 
was requested whether I want to be a member of the Communist 
Party. Prior to that I was approached by Mr. Charley Fujimoto on 
the street of the city, whether I would be interested in joining the 
Communist Party. Later on, the next meeting at the residence of 
John E. Reinecke's home, they showed me a card, as a membership to 
the Communist Party, and I happened to sign that party card at the 
time. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Wlio showed that card to you? 

Mr. Kageyama. Mr. John E. Reinecke did show me that card. 

Mr. Ta%t:nner. Will you repeat that for us? 

Mr. Kageyama. Mr. John Reinecke. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. John Reinecke ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Dr. John Reinecke. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Dr. John Reinecke. Do you recall now who had a 
card beside yourself ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, there was quite a group of young fellows like 
I was that did commit themselves to the party, by their signatures. 

Mr. Ta\tnner. Did any other person join the party at the time, or 
w^as any other person issued a card at the same time that you were 
issued a card ? 

Mr. Kageyama. I would say yes, three more others at the time may 
have joined the organization. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Who were they ? 

Mr. Kageyama. They were Ruth and Doris Ozaki, and there were 
Eunice Hamano. 

Mr. Walter. We will suspend for just a moment. I would like to 
state to the photographers that they get a picture, and then stop taking 
them. 

Mr. Kageyama. They were 

Mr. Tavenner. Just a moment, let's get the photographic business 
over, please. 

Mr. Walter. The committee will be in order. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, how long did you remain a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Kageyama. I remained a member for about 9 months, in the 
year of 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall what was the occasion of your quitting 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Kageyama. The occasion of my quitting the Communist Party, 
I found that the Communist Party was not meant for the people who 
live in a democratic nation. I was disillusioned by the belief that 
they were for the common and unprivileged people, which, in later 
years, has proven to be otherwise. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall the issuance of a pamphlet by Izuka ? 

Mr. Kageyama. That is correct. 



1360 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAn 

Mr. Tavenner. With relation to the time when that pamphlet was 
issued, will you state the time when you withdrew from the party ? 

;Mr. Kagetama. The time that I withdrew from the party, I would 
say, would have been about December or November of 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, you have stated that you were a member 
of the party for about 9 months ? 

Mr. Kagetama. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. So that would fix the time of your entry into the 
party at around February of 1947 ? 

Mr. Kagetama. Officially ? 

Mr. Tavenner. That is the time you received your card. 

Mr. Kagetama. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. You had taken this 9 weeks discussion group course 
prior to that time ? 

Mr. Kagetama. That is correct. There were quite many others 
beside myself, but probably there were some of the old members who 
were then a member of the party at that period. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, let us go back to the time that you entered 
the discussion group. Will you tell the committee, as well as you 
can, who took part in these discussion groups ? 

Mr. Kagetama. Well, by the appearance of the discussion, I would 
say that one person known as David Hyun took the job of taking 
all the discussion group. 

Mr. Tavenner. He acted as the leader of the discussion group, is 
that what I understand you to say ? 

Mr. Kagetama. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us at this point about David Hyun, will you 
identify him further, do you know who he was employed by, or how 
he was employed at the time ? 

Mr. Kagetama. Well, I understand that his occupation was that 
of an engineer, but what type of engineer I could not state, as not 
knowing the type of engineer he was, if he was an engineer. 

Mr. Tavenner. So, David Hyun acted as a leader of this discussion 
group. 

Mr. Kagetama. Tliat is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Name another who participated. 

Mr. Kagetama. Well, Dr. John Reinecke did come in that picture 
for discussion. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what part did Dr. Reinecke play in these dis- 
cussions ? 

Mr. Kagetama. He is known as a member of the party, you might 
say, who was acting as treasurer or advisor to the group. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you name others who took part in this 
discussion group ? 

Mr. Kagetama. Well, there was Alice Hyun, who took part in the 
discussion. 

Mr. Tavenner. What relation to David Hyun, if any ? 

Mr. Kagetama. I think that relationship would be established as 
a sister of David Hyun. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right, name any others that were there, please. 

Mr. Kagetama. There were others, if I have the name right, he 
was a tall fellow, Mr. Wenkam. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was his occupation ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1361 

Mr. Kageyama. His occupation would be that of engineer, drafts- 
man. 

Mr. Tavenner. For whom did he work ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, at the time, as I remember that discussion 
group, I had no idea where he worked. But later on I discovered that 
he was employed in the city and county parks board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what is the name of the individual to whom 
you referred ? 

Mr. Kageyama. The description of his being called is Robert 
Wenkam. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Robert Wenkam. 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; that is the bald description of the person. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is he the person that you ]ust described? 

Mr. Kageyama. That is correct. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. Are there others that you can name who were in 
attendance at these discussion groups ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, the wife of Dr. Reinecke, that would have 
been a housewife or would have been 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know the wife of Robert Wenkam ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes. She was also present at the time that I was 
attending these discussion groups. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. Do you know her first name? 

Mr. Kageyama. I cannot recall the first name now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, can you recall the names of others who at- 
tended the group sessions ? 

Mr. Kageyama. No ; not by name, but by the description. Probably 
these persons that did come off and on were members from the outside 
who were then in the city of Honolulu to travel or to be in service. 

Mr. Tavenner. In your earlier testimony you mentioned the name 
of Ozaki. 

Mr. Kageyama. That is correct. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Sisters, I believe. 

Mr. Kageyama. That is correct. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Will you give their first names. 

Mr. Kageyama. One was Doris, and the other was 

Mr. Ta-s^nner. Doris Ozaki and her sister. 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; that's, right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did they attend the discussion groups, or did they 
come into the scene later on ? 

Mr. Kageyama. They were joining in the discussion group. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, can you give some further descriptive 
information relating to the Ozaki sisters? Do you know how they 
were employed at the time ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes; they were employed as secretary to the local 
union. 

Mr. Tavenner. What do you mean by local union ? 

Mr. Kageyama. In the ILWU local organization. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you name any others who took part in the 
discussion groups? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; as far as I can recall the names ; I feel that 
I am unable on that point. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, of this group of people who attended the 
discussion meetings, how many went into the Communist Party ? 



1362 coMMUisrisT activities in haw An 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, I would not know how many did go in from 
the discussion group, but I would state that myself, if I am positive, 
two more other persons were signed at the time. There might have 
been others, and others might have been old-time members who had 
then been in the party many more months than I had been at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner, In other words, some persons who were members 
of this discussion group may already have been members of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Kageyama. That may be correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, what branch of the Communist Party 
were you assigned to ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, in the early part of this activity, after the 
discussion group, then discussing further the theory of Marxism, 
then we were instructed to divide. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, before we come to talk about when you 
were dividing, when the group was divided, I want to ask something 
more about the first group. What was the name of this first group 
or branch ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, it was known as the Kaimuki branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Kaimuki branch. Will you tell us whether 
those assigned to that branch of the Communist Party were from any 
particular walk of life, or did it represent a membership from mis- 
cellaneous walks of life ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, I would say the miscellaneous walks of life. 
In other words, you might call it a recruiting station. 

Mr. Tavenner. A recruiting station. 

Mr. Kageyama. Where they undertook discussion of principles 
from tlie basic standpoint, that is, not knowing anything, but getting 
together as a group discussion. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you tell us who were the members of the 
Kaimuki branch of the Communist Party which you were first 
assigned to ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, aside from those listed 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, I think you should name all that you know 
who were membei-s of that branch, whether you have mentioned their 
names before or not. 

Mr. Kageyama. I would say Peggy Uesugi. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give me that name? 

Mr. Kageyama. Peggy Uesugi, 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the first name ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Peggy. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. Kageyama. There were some other Caucasian ladies and men. 
I cannot recall who they were at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did Dr. Reinecke, or was Dr. Reinecke affiliated 
with that group in any way? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; from the group discussion right throughout. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned in your earlier testimony that 
Charles Fujimoto propositioned you about joining the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Kageyama. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he in any way connected with this branch, 
the Kaimuki branch ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1363 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes; and I understand in the attendance he was 
one of the members. 

Mr. Tayenner. Now, will you name others wlio were members, if 
you can recall ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Aside from that list, I don't think I can add any 

more. 

Mr. Tayenner. Well, 1 am not interested in excluding the list 
that you already named, so I will ask you about these individually. 
The two Ozaki sisters, were they members of this branch ? 
Mr. Kagey'ama. I am positive of one, but not the other. 
Mr. Tayenner. Which one are you positive of ^ 
Mr. IvAGEYAMA. That was Doris. 

Mr. Tayenner. Doris. Do you recall that the other sister's name 
was Ruth ? 
Mr. Kageyama. Yes. 
Mr. Tayenner. Eileen Fujimoto. 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes; she happened to be the wife of Mr. Charles 
Fujimoto, also secretary with the CIO. 

Mr. Tayenner. Did she attend the meetings of the Kaimuki branch? 
Mr. Kageyama, I would say "Yes." 

Mr. Tayenner. Did David Hyun, whose name that you mentioned 
as being the leader of the discussion group, attend the meetings of the 
Kaimuki branch ? 

JSIr. Kageyama. What was the question? 

Mr. Tayenner. I say, did David Hyun attend the meetings of this 
branch? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; he was always there, in my opinion. 
Mr. Tayenner. Did Alice Hyun attend? 
Mr. Kageyama. Yes. 

]Mr. Ta\t:nner. You mentioned Robert Wenkam as being one of 
the members of the discussion group. Did he attend the meetings of 
the Kaimuki branch ? 

]\Ir. Kageyama, So far as attending the discussion group. 
Mr. Tayenner. I mean, did he attend the meetings that w^ere held 
of the branch of the Communist Party to which you were assigned ? 

Mr. Kageyama, That I am not so positive, as being a member of the 
Communist Party. 

]Mr. Tayenner. Do you know about his wife ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; so far as the description, but not her occupa- 
tion, as to where she works. 

Mr. Tavenner. What about her membership in the Kaimuki branch 
of the Communist Party? 

jSIr. Kageyama. Well, she attended the regular discussion group, 
ISIr, Tam<:nner, Do you know Eunice Hamano ? 
Mr, Kageyama, Yes, She was probably one of — at the time, if I 
recall, her occupation was with one of the institutions. Whether she 
was a social worker or not, I am unable to state, but she was connected 
with the institutions. 

l\Ir. Tayenner. Well, do you know Adele Kensinger? 
Mr. Kageyama. Well, so far as describing her, w^hat her occupation 
was then, I am unable to state, but she was quite an elderly woman with 
white hairs. 

Mr. Tayenner. Did she attend any of the meetings to which you 
referred ? 



1364 COMMUN^IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Kageyama. I am not positive whether she did come to the 
Kaimuki branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, can you name some of the other persons who 
are said to be, or who were members of the Kaimuki branch? 

Mr. Kageyama. No; not any more than I can suggest, or I have 
suggested. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Jeanette Nakama ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes, I do. She probably was a social worker, and 
she came to my attention later, when the Makiki branch was separated. 

Mr. Tavenner. You knew her as a member, but not as a member of 
the Kaimuki branch ? 

Mr. Kagpyama. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, where did the meetings take place, while you 
were a member of the Kaimuki branch ? 

Mr. Kageyama. At the residence of Dr. Reinecke. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did they meet at any other place ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Not of the Kaimuki branch; not that I know of^ 
any other places. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you a member of the Kaimuki 
branch ? 

Mr. Kageyama. "Well, I would say for about 4 or 5 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat is the reason for your transfer to another 
branch ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, during the course of the Kaimuki branch, we 
were instructed to segregate our members by professional occupation^ 
and if it happened to be in the white collar, we must send to a different 
unit, and that unit became known as the Makiki branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Makiki branch ? 

Mr. Kageyama. The Makiki branch. By the way, Makiki is not a 
certain district in the Kaimuki area. We have the Makiki district, 
which is different, another district, aside from the Kaimuki district. 

Mr. Tavenner. And how many branches was the Kaimuki branch 
divided into? 

Mr. Kageyama. The only one I know was the one which I was later 
transferred to ; and that was the Makiki group. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, prior to your transfer to that group, to whom 
did you pay your dues as a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Kageyama. Prior to that I paid my dues to Dr. Reinecke. It 
was paid to him at that time. The assessment of dues were based on 
the ability of the person, or, in other words, if you are poor you are 
assessed ten cents. 

Mr. Tavenner. A month, or what ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Ten cents a month. And those who could afford 
are usually charged $1, and the membership cards were divided into 
a 12 months' period. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you given a book to the Communist Party ; a 
Communist Party book? 

Mr. Kageyama. Do you mean the membership cards ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Kageyama. I was issued a token book. In other words, the 
custodian of the membership cards, they were in the hands of Dr. 
Reinecke, and at no time were the members allowed to carry in their 
possession. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1365 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Were you given any reason as to why you were not 
to carry the card in your possession ? 

Mr. Kageyama. No; all they did was to— all they did was to 
purchase those stamps, and then they were pasted on these membership 
cards, and they were taken back at the same time. 

Mr. Tavenner. And Dr. Reinecke held those cards? 

Mr. KL\GEYAMA. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. You said that he was the treasurer of the Kaimuki 
branch, were there other officers of that branch whose names you 
can recall? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, they moved about in various capacity, and so 
probably one may have had more duties than the other one. 

Mr. Taa-enner. Now, let's come up to the period when you trans- 
ferred to the Makiki branch ; will you give us the names of those who 
were members of the Makiki branch at the time you were a member ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Some of the members listed in the Makiki group 
were, at that time: Charles Fujimoto; Peggy Uesugi; and Wilfred 
Oka. 

Mr. Tavenner. You state Wilfred Oka was one of the persons who 
was a member ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Of the Makiki group. 

Mr. Tavenner. Identify him a little further for us; how was he 
employed ; and what do you know about him ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, as far as the occupation, then, it was with the 
miscellaneous group of the ILWU, in which he was probably the 
leader. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat is his present occupation, if you know ? 

Mr. Kageyama. His present occupation was that of a liquor sales- 
man in one of the downtown stores. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does he hold any political office, to your knowledge ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Why, yes; he were elected then as the secretary 
to the Democratic committee. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, then, continue with your recital of the names 
of those who were members of the Makiki branch ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, there were others ; Miss Nakama. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is, Jeanette Nakama ? Is that correct ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes. And, Mr. Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat is the first name of Imori ? 

Mr. Kageyama. The first name — I cannot recall, now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is it Koichi ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; he used to go by that name. 

Mr. Tavenner. Koichi? 

Mr. ICageyama. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Will you identify him for us ? 

Mr. Kageyama. As far as I know, his duties were that of a labor 
organizer for the different islands. 

Mr. Ta\'Enner. Do you know how he is presently employed? 

Mr. Kageyama. I just happened to see the paper where he is still a 
labor organizer, but of what branch I cannot recall now, what it is. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Can you name others ? 

Mr. Kageyaima. Then there was Donald Uesugi. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you further identify him ? 

6663ft— 50— pt. 1 2 



1366 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Kageyama. I assume he is one of the bookkeepers for one of the 
local firms. He has a white-collar position. 

Mr. Tavenner, Do you know how he is employed at the present 
time? 

Mr. Kageyama. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Proceed. Are there others? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, there are some other new members, who were 
then introduced, and I will say there were about 10 or 11 of which I 
can recall 3 or 4, who were persons who did not attend at that time. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. You mentioned the name of Adele Kensinger, in 
your prior testimony ? 

Mr. Kageyama. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was she a member of the Makiki Branch, or not? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; she was a member of that section. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you have also mentioned Eileen Fujimoto, the 
wife of Charles Fujimoto? 

]Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; that is correct. 

Mr. TA\'ENNfj{. She was a member of the Makiki Branch? 

Mr. Kageyama. Of the Makiki Branch ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall any others ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Not by name, but by, you might say — the others — 
there were 3 others, or 4, that did make their appearance, probably by 
their attendance or absence, while I was there, they were absent, so 
I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere were the meetings held at this branch ? 

Mr, Kageyama. Well, at that time, in the residence of Jeanette 
Nakama. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was chairman of the Makiki frroup ? 

Mr. Kageyama. The chairman of the group was Mr. Charlie 
Fujimoto. 

Mr. Ta\t5nner. Who was the educational director? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, the educational director, I would say was 
the person who supplied the materials. Whether they acted as the 
official educational director or not, but during the time, at the residence 
of Jeanette Nakama ; she was the custodian of the materials that was 
sold to the members. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a photograph, and ask you if you can 
identify it ? 

Mr. Kageyama. It is pretty hard to identify a photo, or by that 
picture. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. You are unable to identify the person from this 
photograph ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner, The name has not been mentioned. Do you know 
James Freeman ? 

Mr. I^GEYAMA. Yes; I happen to have met him at the Kaimuki 
branch. He made his appearance during one of those meetings, 

Mr, Tavenner. What function did he perform in the meetings of 
the Kaimuki branch ? 

Mr, Kageyama. Well, as far as I can see, he made no participation 
in the discussion, but he did attend as a bodily spectator, or witness, 
or some observer, you might say, at that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he also attend the meetings of the Makiki 
branch ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1367 

Mr. Kagetama. That I cannot recall, because my memory of it— 
I have seen him at the Kaimuki branch, where I first met him. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the Hawaiian Civil Liberties 
Committee? 

JNIr. Kagetama. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who asked you to join? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, I was asked to contribute $1 for member- 
ship in the Civil Liberties Union, and feeling that $1 was nothing, 
without making any investigation I did give the $1 to the lady, who is 
down at pier 15. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. When did you join ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, I would say the time would be about 3 years 
ago. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Now, did you pay dues other than the initiation due 
of$l? 

Mr. Kageyama. No. This Civil Liberties had many social fimctions, 
and which I did not attend one of those occasions. That was probably 
due to — I never did attend one of those meetings, nor went to any 
of the social functions. That was an annual membership fee, which 
I believe I paid twice, and as of this date I have not paid a cent to the 
membership of the Civil Liberties group. 

Mr. Tamsnner. Mr. Kageyama, did you ever purchase any literature 
from the Kaimuki or Makiki cells of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Ivageyama. Yes; like any other classes where on is being 
taught, being taught a subject, we are given, as you might say, not at 
the price listed on this pamphlet, in order that probably the funds may 
be raised as they need ; probably the books are purchased at 25 cents 
and they are sold for 35 cents, like any literature would be bought and 
sold. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you made available to the investigators of this 
committee the literature that you purchased ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes ; I have made available the literature and pam- 
phlets, at that time ; requested to furnish these materials. 

Mr. Taat:nner. And from whom did you make your purchases of 
this material ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, at the home where, you might say, the person 
living at that home would handle or be the custodian of the material, 
in order that they may not carry very long, and they would advance 
the material for the party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, who would those persons be? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, at the Kaimuki — we had Mr. Reinecke, at 
his home, and now at Makiki w^e have Jeanette Nakama, at her home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I would like to offer in evidence, as 
an exhibit, Kageyama No. 1, a number of pieces of literature pur- 
chased, and the title of which I desire to read into the record.^ 

Our Country Needs a Strong Communist Party, by William Z. Foster. 
Wage, Labor, and Capital, by Karl Marx, with an introduction by Freiderich 
Engels. 

What Happens to Democracy Is Your Business, Too, by Elizabeth Gurley Flynn. 
The Constitution of the Communist Party of the United States of America. 
The Communist Manifesto, by Karl Marx and Freiderich Engels. 
The Constitution of the U. S. S. R. 
Pattern for Fascism, by John L. Spivak. 
State and Revolution, by V. I. Lenin. 



* Retained in the files of the committee. 



1368 coMMUisrisT activities in hawau 

Political Affairs, the July issue of 1946, and other issues of the same publica- 
tion for December 1946, January 1947, April 1947, August 1947, and July 1947 ; 
October 1947. 

Your Questions Answered, by William Z. Foster. 

Dialectical and Historical Materialism, by Joseph Stalin. 

Is Communism Un-American V 

Questions to the Communist Party. Answers, by Eugene Dennis. 

The Task of Youth, by Joseph Stalin. 

The Story of a Fighting American, by Eugene Debs. 

Foundations of Leninism, by Joseph Stalin. 

The Proletarian Kevolution, by V. I. Lenin. 

Communism, Utopian or Scientific, by Freiderich Engels. 

Socialism, What is in it for you? 

The Young Generation, by V. I. Lenin. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Kageyama, in the course of your experience in 
the Communist Party, and in the attendance at those meetings, upon 
what subject did the Communists put their main stress ? 

Mr. IvAGEYAMA. Before going on to that, I would like to explain my 
position on these materials. 

Mr. Tavenner. Very well. 

Mr. Kageyama. I have two points to make at this time, regarding 
the possession of this material. As I understand, at that time, where 
the pamphlets were issued to the public, there was a memorandum to 
the effect that all materials should be destroyed, and it was sent to all 
the members of the party, but I would like to state for the record that 
at no time did I receive such a memorandum of a letter from the 
Communist Party to the effect that all such material should be de- 
stroyed. Wliat I am trying to quote here is that my list, or my name 
on the list published, was not listed in the literature. The second 
point, which I would like to go on record on, is that you will note that 
on this tablet the name is stamped, on each pamphlet, of the people. It 
is my habit, in possession of any material, and documents, to scratch 
my name, or to print my said name on these materials. If I did believe 
at that time that this material were to be destroyed then I would be 
in no position to have my name stamped on this material, as an 
evidence to show the possession of this material. Like any other 
materials I found, that it would have been a good thing to have the 
material placed on the bookshelf, in order that I might be able to 
know what was in it and discuss it, should it come up on that subject 
matter; I would be prepared to know what was in the argument 
presented. That is all I have to say on that possession of this material. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now in these group studies, both within and without 
the party, what was the main emphasis— what subject was the main 
emphasis placed upon ? 

Mr. Kageyama. Well, the main emphasis, in this — oh, as you 
might say of the Communist Party, the keynote of the Communist 
Party would be the word "discipline," and to define discipline it means 
the carrying out of an order. In other words, when an order is issued, 
no one should disregard such an order, and, after all, discipline was 
the keynote of the party. In other words, contact was not to be made 
by phone, communication by phone, but rather by contact. 
Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold any present political position ? 

Mr. Kageyama, Yes ; I do, I have the honor, that is I was elected 
as a member of the city and county board of supervisors, which, in 
relation to the States, is like a city council, and later, running for 
delegate to the Constitutional Convention, and also elected as a dele- 
gate. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1369 

Mr. Walter. The hearing will be recessed for 5 minutes. 

^Whereupon a recess was taken for 5 minutes.) 

(Following the recess, the proceedings were continued as follows:) 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Tavenner, do you have any further questions? 

Mr. Tavenner. I think that is all I desire to ask the witness. 

Mr. Walter. Is there anything further you would like to say? 

Mr. Kageyama. Yes. Mr. Chairman, I have two important pamph- 
lets I would like to present, but before proceeding to that phase of my 
conclusion, I would like to present some information on the pamphlet 
issued by the Catholic Information Society, which is one of the great- 
est institutions in the world that is fighting against communism. They 
have issued a separate pamphlet and I would like to present that to 
this committee here. Before proceeding on this statement, Mr. Chair- 
man, Members of Congress, I would like at this time to make a brief 
statement. 

My statement before the Congressional Committee on Statehood 
appears on the Statehood for Hawaii hearing, in Honolulu, January 
5, 1946, and on page 446 to 451 is my statement issued before the sub- 
committee of the committee on Territorial House of Representatives, 
Sixty-ninth Congress, Seventy-ninth Congress, House Resolution 436. 
Probably you will refer to that part for my statement. 

At this time, I would like to present a copy to the committee of my 
statement, that I would like to issue at this time. 

Mr. Walter. Received. 

Mr. Kageyama. Mr. Chairman, I wish to state that I, as an elected 
member of the board of supervisors and an elected delegate to the 
Territorial constitutional convention, shall continue in the future, as I 
have in the past, to represent the people who elected and have faith 
in me, to the best of my ability. I further wish to state to you and to 
the people of Hawaii that my action and expression as supervisor 
represented the highest behavior and thought and with sincerity and 
at no time demonstrated the tactics of the Communist Party or its 
principle and philosophy. 

I further want to state that on December 23, 1949, 1 signed and sub- 
mitted to the Territorial government an oath of loyalty wherein was 
stated that I had not been a member of the Communist Party for the 
last 5 years; and also on Af)ril 4, 1950, as delegate to the constitutional 
convention. With reference to signing this oath of loyalty I wish to 
state that in November 1949, Mr. Wheeler, an investigator for this 
committee contacted me and obtained from me at that time a full and 
complete statement of my activities within the Communist Party, just 
as I have given here today, Mr. Wheeler at that time told me that I 
would be called by this committee as an important witness when hear- 
ings were held here in Hawaii. He also impressed upon me the im- 
portance of disclosing this information to no one, no matter what the 
cost, and told me to do nothing that would reflect in any way that I 
had given this statement to this committee. Therefore, in line with 
his instructions and to prevent the disclosure of this information at 
that time, I signed the oath. I, in my own judgment, did not think that 
I was a Communist at any time, although it is true that I was issued 
a membership card. I, through ignorance, joined the Communist Party 
in 1946 but when the true objectives of this organization were dis- 
covered by me, I immediately removed myself from the underground 



1370 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

movement completely. In spite of the present embarrassment caused 
by my mistake in accepting a Communist Party card, I am thankful to 
be able to do some good now by exposing the movement. 

When contacted by the investigator of your committee on November 
7, 1949, I cooperated fully with them and submitted a statement 
setting forth in detail my activities within the Communist Party. 
Having once been a former student member of the Conmiunist Party 
in 1946, 1 feel in a small way that I am in a qualified position to fore- 
warn the citizens of the Territory of Hawaii of the dangers of com- 
munism. The greatest fight we have on our hands today is the fight 
against communism. Communism is a totalitarian form of govern- 
ment and has no place in our American way of life. My study ex- 
perience as a Communist clearly proves to me that it is a subversive 
organization which seeks to gain power and eventual control of our 
Government by infiltration, subterfuge, and propaganda. When you 
are not in accord with their own thinking you become the subject of 
such name calling as stool pigeon and phony. In addition to these 
activities, their design for revolution in our country is furthered by 
throwing race against race, creed against creed, and any other methods 
which will hasten the day of communism in the United States and the 
Territory. They take advantage of democracy as it exists but fail to 
adopt such democracy when in control. 

Had I known of the true objectives and picture of the Communist 
Party as I do now, I would have never become a member. I want to 
inform the people of Hawaii that communism is an underground 
organization and that it refuses to enter the open political arena 
when the objectives can be accomplished by other methods. I want 
to warn the people of the Territory of Hawaii to refuse to be duped 
and enlisted into this foreign directed conspiracy, as it will eventually 
lead to your own destruction. As a citizen of the United States and 
an elected representative of the people, I will fight communism as 
long as its threat exists. The Communist movement in Hawaii tries 
to lead us into believing that Americans can be Communists, but a 
true American can be neither a Communist or a sympathizer and we 
must realize that the first loyalty of every American is to weed out 
and counteract communism and convert American Communists to 
Americanism. 

My sole purpose to testify here today is to help and save the 
Territory and this Nation by stating what I know of the Communist 
movement right here in Hawaii. If I did not do this, then I have 
failed in my mission to carry out the last wishes of the fallen veterans 
who now are buried in our National Punchbowl Cemetery, We who 
are the beneficiaries of the sacrifices of American soldiers who through- 
out our life as a nation have fought for our given rights, our religious, 
industrial, educational and social freedom, freedom of speech and of 
press, must never surrender them. Time again and again our young 
men have been called upon to spend their youth, their dreams, their 
blood, their lives in war to preserve our liberties and bring freedom to 
the people of the earth, 

I believe in America, her freedom, her ideals, her traditions; my 
first love and loyalty are hers, I believe that communism violates these 
freedoms and is opposed to those ideals, I believe that every real 
American if he but knew the truth would strive to defend this Nation 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1371 

from Communists who, while wielding their weapons of conspiracy 
and disgrace, are imposing on our country, their pattern of serfdom. 
Too many Americans consider communism only a nuisance, and con- 
sider it a movement to improve the condition of the poor and under- 
privileged. If this were true communism would be a pattern for 
perfect and peaceful living. There is no middle course between de- 
mocracy and communism. 

Wherever communism appears, slavery reappears. Would we want 
to read one type of news or listen to one radio broadcast, regardless of 
the paper we bought or the station into which we tuned. Wherever 
communism rules, the press conforms, or dies, and radio is an absolute 
state monopoly. In America if a worker belongs to a union he can 
bargain collectively with his employer, he is free to argue with his 
fellow workers. Strikes are possible because workers are free. When 
the American citizen goes to work, it is to a job of his own choice, 
though it may not be entirely to his liking. 

If we w^ant to protect America against the invasion of communism 
we must act wisely and promptly to check its propaganda through 
truth and patriotism. In our daily human affairs there is a time for 
silence and a time for speech. There is time for thought and a time 
for action; eventually there comes a time for decision, for courage 
and for greatness ; such a time is upon every one present here today. 
It is not for me to cut a perfect pattern of Americanism. The founders 
of our Nation, our fallen veterans, our patriotic citizens down through 
the years of our Nation's life, have formed this pattern and left to us 
the sacred trust of living and preserving it. Today Hawaii is making 
her transformation to join the 48 States to cut a pattern of that 
Americanism. 

It is not my duty to seek out those pseudo-Americans who would rob 
fellow Americans of this heritage. That is the responsibility of in- 
formed and competent men in our Government who are aware of un- 
American activities. But I feel that I would not be a true American 
if I did not express my conviction that no American can dare to com- 
promise with the crooked courses of communism, or surrender to it, 
without jeopardizing the security of our country. I feel that I would, 
not be a true American if I entered into the conspiracy of silence and 
did not raise my voice above those who, privately and in whispers, 
talk about communism, but neither act nor speak publicly against this 
enemy of the American Nation. 

Mr. Walter. Anything further, Mr. Tavenner ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, Mr. Chairman, there are one or two further 
questions I would like to ask. 

Mr. Kageyama, you have testified that the person who first ap- 
proached you with regard to entering the Communist Party was 
Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. Kageyama. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you last see him ? 

Mr. Kageyama. The last I saw him was when I was confined to my 
home, on Thursday night, where he came to my residence and inquired 
whether I did receive a subpena from this committee, and if I did 
receive such a subpena, to take it over to Mrs. Bouslog. And my reply 
at that time was at no time did I receive a subpena up to that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was any statement made about the payment of 
legal fees to represent you? 



1372 coMMuisriST activities in haw ah 

Mr. Kagetama. No mention was made as to the legal fees or the 
other information that would have been provided. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were any instructions of any kind given you by 
Mr. Fujimoto, or advice? 

Mr. Kagetama. Well, if I did receive a copy of the subpena, to have 
it taken to Mrs. Bouslog. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was any further statement made to you about 
your appearance as a witness? 

Mr. Kagetama. A statement was made to the point where if I did 
testify as a matter of one cause that I could be the stool pigeon and 
can be so testifying in that fashion. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was any further suggestion made as to what other 
course you could take in appearing here as a witness ? 

Mr. Kagetama. No. The two suggestions were as just explained 
to you. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you receive another caller that same night? 

Mr. Kagetama. Yes, I did receive another call at the last moment, 
in the name of Mr. Reinicke, but at that moment I happened to be 
in bed. 

Mr. Tavenner. So you did not actually talk to Dr. Reinecke? 

Mr. Kagetama. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. But he came to your house ? 

Mr. Kagetama. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was any suggestion made to you by Mr. Fujimoto 
relating to your right to claim constitutional immunity from testi- 
fying? 

Mr. Kagetama. Well, he did mention something about the constitu- 
tional right, whatever they meant, on the subpena. I couldn't under- 
stand. New words appeared. Probably he was trying to inform me 
that I could stay in silence upon the questions. 

]\Ir. Ta\tenner. But you just came here before this subcommittee 
and told the truth, didn't you ? 

Mr. Kagetama. Yes, that is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Kageyama, may I express the appreciation of this 
committee for your contribution to our hearing? 

Mr. Kagetama. Before I leave 

Mr. Walter. Do you wish to make a further statement ? 

Mr. Kagetama. That is all. 

Mr. Walter. In the course of your testimony you mentioned the 
names of various individuals. If any of the people just mentioned 
desire to appear before the subcommittee and make statements on their 
own behalf, we will be very glad to permit them to do so. 

Thank you very much. 

Mr. Tavenner. I call as the next witness Mr. Ichiro Izuka. 

Mr. Walter. Raise your right hand, please. Do you swear that 
the testimony that you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 

TESTIMONY OF ICHIRO IZUKA 

Mr. Taa^nner. You are Mr. Ichiro Izuka ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you presently reside ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1373 

Mr. IzuKA. At present I reside at Hanapepe, Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I was born June 5, 1911, at Hanapepe, Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner, Will you please state briefly your educational back- 
ground ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I had 8 years of elementary education. That is all I 
had, as far as education is concerned. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you have done a great deal of study and indi- 
vidual research outside of school, have you not? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. When I joined the Communist Party I thought 
that I could learn lots of various economics. During my 10 years in 
the Communist Party, I studied quite a lot. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Will you state to the committee briefly your em- 
ployment background ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Do you mean at the present time? 

Mr. Tavenner. From the time you left the school in general and 
briefly, in a brief way, until the present time. 

Mr. IzuKA. Wlien I left school in 1927 I was employed by Kauai 
Railway Co. Later the name was changed to Kauai Terminals, Ltd. 
At 16 years of age I worked as a longshoreman on a lighter barge, and 
worked for almost 17 years, up to 1942. In 1941, after the attack 
on Pearl Harbor, I was held in custody by the military government 
and released on August 8 of that same year — 1942. After that I 
worked for the Army engineers, until 1947, I think, and then I got a 
job working for the joint teamsters organizing drive. I worked for 
about a month and a half and then that organizing fund dissolved, 
so automatically I was out of a job. Then I decided to sell my home. 
Before I decided that, I had lots of discussion with Communist mem- 
bers and their attitude toward me of undemocratic methods. I de- 
cided that I am going to write my whole story and once and for all 
let the people of Hawaii know how the Communists operate in the 
Territory. I did this because the Communist Party was out to even 
stop me from making a living. Any place where I tried to get a job 
they had members in there to undermine my position. 

And, before writing my pamphlet, I saw Mr. Kimoto and I asked 
him, "Not only Communists are trying to fight for a better living 
conditions, there are many people, for instance, Christians, Catholics, 
the Social Democrats, the Socialists, all of those groups, every one, 
their ultimate aim was so that every people can be given a good 
society." And I think even if I did believe in the Communist Party, 
any more than my aims are, it is the same, and I believe that we should 
have, all of us should have a good living standard. The union or 
Mr. Kimoto was always saying, "If I am going to Red-bait, if I am 
going to Red-bait," so I told him, "If you put it that way, I am going 
to write the story from beginning to end, and once and for all expose 
communism and let the people decide whether I am wrong or whether 
I am right." Then I decided to write the pamphlet and get some 
help. 

In the meantime, I sold my home and through the income of the 
pamphlet I started. At the present, including my own business of 
raising chickens, because prior to my Communist membersliip, I had 
studied poultry raising for a couple of years, so I thought I would 
go back to poultry raising. 



1374 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAU 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, let's go back to the time when you first be- 
came a member of the Communist Party. Will you describe to the 
committee the steps leading to your membership in the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. IzuKA. During my employment at the Kauai Terminals I did 
my best honestly to work for the company. 

Mr. Tavenner. What date? 

Mr. IzuEiA. That was 1927 up till 1942, during my first employment 
since I was a young kid ; they say that I don't deserve adult wages, but 
my work was in fact much heavier than the adult longshoremen, and 
during my employment at Kauai Terminals I seen that honest workers 
cannot get any consideration by the bosses for better jobs even if they 
work honestly for the company, and to me, through my experience, 
high-school graduates who work for 1 or 2 years, had all the prefer- 
ence even if they loaf on the job. And the bosses were just hollering 
their heads off, calling the workers all kinds of names. Of course, all 
during that time I did not laiow about — I thought capitalists had that 
right of firing a man and raising hell and everything. But in 1987 
they had some feuds between the bosses on Kauai Terminal, so one 
group of bosses were trying to fire another group of bosses. There 
was a fight on the dock. So that one group of bosses had the working 
people on their side and their stooges that went out in the camps 
and they told the people "Tomorrow we are going to strike the ship 
Mminalani.'''' All this time there were many honest workmen who be- 
lived that companies should consider a little more wages because 
we were working long hours, from 10 hours, we had been working 
over 48 hours straight, and wages were low, and the majority of the 
employees followed the leaders and we struck on the very next day. 
We didn't know what to do about union organization, collective bar- 
gaining, we didn't know about the Wagner Act, we didn't know 
nothing about Federal legislation, so we called Honolulu and we called 
two advisers. One of the advisers was Jack Hall and the other was 
George Goto. So they came over there. At that time I did not know 
they were Communists. And they brought a lot of literature, pam- 
phlets, and gave it to the strikers. And I was eager and I gi'abbed a 
lot of the pamphlets and read them, and through a certain time I find 
out the feeling of capitalist and the feeling of labor. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. About when was that ? 

Mr. IzuKA. That was in 1937, during the strike. After reading all 
the pamphlets and literature, "Welcome, Communist Party Member," 
"What is a Good Communist?" and what they told them, and all 
those convincing articles, which during the time I was working in 
Port Allen, the system of capitalist, so I made up my mind to get 
my education in California, and I took off the application blank from 
the pamphlet. In the meantime, Kimoto came to Kauai. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. What is the first name of Kimoto? 

Mr. IzuKA. Denichi Kimoto. He was dispatched to Kauai and he 
contacted me and we had a discussion. I was eager to join the Com- 
munist Party because I thought there was nothing wrong with com- 
munism because the Democratic Party and the Republican Party were 
antiunion, they were everything anti, so I thought the Communist 
Party was actually the vanguard of the labor class. Kimoto gave 
me some information, gave me a card, and I signed the card, and 
he gave me a book and I paid my dues. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 1375 

Mr. Tavennp]k. That was a party ineiiiborshi]) book? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. It was a niembtnship book, with the constitution 
and bylaws in it, and a phice where you put the stamps. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was a new card issued to you each year during 
your membership in (he party? 

ISIr. IzuKA. Usually each year we had a new card. The old card 
is given back. Well, I gave my card to Mr. Kimoto and he took it 
back and he issued me a new card. Every year it is a different card. 

Mr. Tamsnner. When you joined in 19o8, to whom did you pay 
your dues ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I paid my dues to Mr, Kimoto. 

Mr. Tam<;nner. Whom did you continue to pay your dues to from 
that period on ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Later on the organization had a small card and that 
card collects the dues from the members, the party members send 
dues to Mr. Kimoto, who was in charge of all the organization, in 
general of the organization, in the Territory. 

Mr. Tavenner. I wish you would describe in a little more detail 
the card that was issued to you. 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, it was not a card, but it is a book, and they have 
the constitution of the Communist Party and then a section where 
you put the stamps in it. I believe that w^as about all in the book, 
the Communist Party book. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now you have told us how Jack Hall came to your 
island. And the name of that island is what ? Kauai ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner. Kauai. And it was there that you first learned 
about communism. Were there other persons induced to become 
members of the Communist Party on the island of Kauai at that time? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. I made my contacts and I was advised to get 
about 9 or 10 members in the party, and they all paid dues. And 
as far as I can see, any party member who does not read and study 
the Marxist philosophy is eventually forgotten. And I don't want 
to reveal their names, but I can tell one name. Mr. Ogoshi. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you spell it, please ? 

Mr. IzuKA. 0-g-o-s-h-i. Tsuruo Ogoshi. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you spell the first name, please ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I have forgotten. 

Mr. Tavenner. T-s-u-r-u-o? 

Mr. IzTJKA. I think so. Well, he was the one of our party members 
in Kauai, and he was sent at a delegate to the first ILWU convention 
at Aberdeen, Wash. 

Mr. Ta\tsnner. Was this the first organization of the Communists 
in the islands, the one you referred to ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. On your island of Kauai ? 

IVIr. IzuKi. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you expose to the members of the union publicly 
the fact that you were a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Izuka. I did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why ? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, we were not supposed to disclose our membership 
in the Communist Party because it might weaken the union and the 
employers might start attacking the unions because we exposed our 



1376 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

membership in the Communist Party. As far as we are concerned, 
we were to conceal our membership. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that a direction that was handed down to you ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did that direction emanate from, where did 
it come from ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, we had our direction from them, like Mr. Jack 
Hall and Kimoto. Two of those men were the ones we got instructions 
from. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend any Communist Party school, and 
if so, where ? 

Mr. IzuKA. In 1938, since I was taking an active part in union 
activity and at the same time being militant Communist Party mem- 
ber, I was contacted by Mr. Kimoto to take course of Communist 
philosophy in San Francisco. That was the State training school of 
the Communist members. In 1939 I sailed on the President Taft, 
having a comrade from Los Angeles who was paralyzed and thought 
that he could do some physical recovery in Hawaii, but he said, "Ha- 
waii is no place for him." So on the way back I took care of him up 
to San Francisco. And when I arrived in San Francisco we were 
directed to go to 121 Haight Street, headquarters of the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you accompanied by any other Communist 
Party member from Hawaii ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. I was instructed that Jack Hall left ahead of me 
on a ship, working his way, and then when I arrived in San Francisco 
he was coming to meet me down at the dock, and he did so. At that 
time he asked me, "Well, if I didn't come to you, where did you expect 
to go?" He told me that. So I told him, "Well, I go to this head- 
quarters, take a taxi and go to 121 Haight Street, headquarters." 

Mr. Tavenner. That is the headquarters of what organization f 

Mr. IzuKA. The headquarters of the Communist Party in the State 
of California. During school hours I met Robert McElrath. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let's go back a moment. After you went to the 
State headquarters of the Communist Party, what did you do ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, we had instructions when the school was going to 
start and where we should meet. 

Mr. Tavenner. "V^Hio gave you those instructions? 

Mr. IzuKA. At the time I do not know whether she is Miss or Mrs., 
but the name was Louise Todd. 

Mr. Tavenner. Louise Todd ? 

Mr. IzuKA. And Rudy Lambert. They were in charge of these 
various students from Hawaii and Alameda County and Centralia 
and all over California. 

Mr. Tavenner. They gave you instructions as to when the school 
would -open ? 

Mr. IzuKA. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was the school located ? 

Mr. IzuKA. 121 Haight Street, San Francisco. We had our lessons, 
I believe, on the third floor of that building. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say there were representatives there from dif- 
ferent sections of the United States ? 

Mr. IzuKA. It is not the United States. It is representatives from 
the State of California, including Hawaii. We had students from San 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1377 

Diego, Alameda County, from Berkeley, from Hawaii, and all over 
the State of California only. 

Mr. Tavenner. About what was the membership of the school ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I figure probably around, not over 50, from 47 to 49 
members. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long a course was it? 

Mr. IzuKA. rhey told me the course was a 6 weeks' course. Six 
weeks' course. In other words, within 6 weeks they are going to put 
in about 2 years of high school ; by the third week, say, if we cannot 
take it, might as well forget about it and go back to Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. How often during the year was a course of this kind 
given at this school ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I believe it was once a year. This year I heard that 
Jack Kawano went to that school in 1938. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he ever tell you that he had gone there? 

Mr. IzuKA. Oh, yes ; he told me, and he also gave me instructions 
who are the best instructors, like Betty Gannett and Louise Todd. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Proceed. 

Mr. IzuKA. Like Bill Schneiderman. 

Mr. TA\nENNER. Now the teachers at this school, did you see Rudy 
Lambert there or do you recall, in the headquarters of the Commu- 
nist Party? 

Mr. IzuK.v. Eudy Lambert was not an instructor. He was some- 
thing like a business manager, having charge of the hotels and food 
and that sort of thing. He was a brother of Walter Lambert. He 
was a teacher and director of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to make a part of the record, Mr. Chairman, 
the committee information relating to Rudy C. Lambert. 

Mr. Walter. Received. 

Mr. Tavenner. You described Betty Gannett as one of the teachers 
at the school, did you ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr, Walter. Mr. Tavenner, that may be marked and received. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. I desire to introduce the record relating to Rudy 
Lambert as Izuka Exhibit No. 1. 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received. 

Mr. Tavenner. And I desire also to offer in evidence the committee 
record relating to Betty Gannett, and have it marked "Izuka Ex- 
hibit No. 2." 

Mr. Walter. Have you identified that record as being the record 
of the person whose name you just mentioned? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. I may be marked and received without objections. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated another person was Louise Todd i 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Wiat were her duties and functions? 

Mr. Izuka. She was an instructor at the school and at the same time 
she was, I believe she was educational director, 

Mr. Tai-enner, I desire likewise, Mr. Chairman, to introduce the 
record of Louise Todd. 

Mr. Walter. Received. 

* See appendix for Izuka Exhibits 1, 2, and 3. 



1378 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned the name of William Schneider- 
man ; what were his duties and functions ? 

Mr. IzuKA. He was also an instructor and at the same time he was 
executive secretary of the Communist Party, State of California. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire also to introduce in evidence and have 
marked "Exhibit 4," the record of Schneiderman. 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it is received. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were there any other persons whose names you can 
call who were actively engaged in the work at the Communist school ? 

Mr. Izuka. I had a,nother name, two names with me. Oleta O'Con- 
nor Yates 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer in evidence the record with regard 
to that person and have it marked "Exhibit 5." 

Mr. Izuka. Another name, a man by the name of Bob Cole. 

Mr. Tavenner. Bob Cole ? 

Mr. Izuka. Bob Cole. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you go back and tell us the functions and duties 
of Oleta O'Connor Yates? 

Mr, Izuka. At that time Oleta O'Connor Yates was not — she hadn't 
such an important role as Betty Gannett or Louise Todd, to my mem- 
ory, because they were in the lead in the party in the State of Cali- 
fornia. At present I heard that she is State chairman, I believe she 
is State chairman now for the Communist Party of the State of 
California. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what were the functions of the man Cole, to 
whom you referred? 

Mr. Izuka. Cole was an instructor. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are there any others ? 

Mr. Izuka. No. I believe that is all I remember, concerning the 
instructors. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did you complete the 6 weeks' course at that 
school ? 

Mr. Izuka. The school lasted for about 10 days, I believe, because 
of the German attack on Poland, and due to the Soviet-German non- 
aggression pact. During the 10 days we had instructions by Louise 
Todd, saying that all the schools were ordered to be dissolved because 
of the attack, and we were instructed that we should get back to 
Hawaii as soon as possible because the Soviet-German nonaggression 
pact might force the Communist Party to go underground. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now can you establish that date ? 

Mr, IzuicA. Well, not exactly the date, but all that incident took 
part from the latter part of September 1939. 

Mr. Tavenner. I think the date of the nonaggression pact was prob- 
ably August 23, 1939. 

Mr. Izuka. I understand that, but the instructions I had was after 
the nonaggression pact. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Izuka. Because we were instructed the school should be dis- 
solved. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did anyone from the Territory of Hawaii attend 
that school with you ? 

Mr. Izuka. Jack Hall, I was instructed by Mr, Kimoto that Jack 
Hall and I would represent Hawaii, And when I went to San Fran- 

3 See appendix for Izuka Exhibits 4 and 5, 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1379 

cisco the first time I met Mr. Robert McElrath. He said that he made 
some money in Alaska, in the cannery union, and he was spending some 
money in San Francisco and bou<2:ht a car and we rode around San 
Francisco, and he wanted to attend the school because he can spend 
some money by not working and he could not pretend to be one of 
the State of California voters, so I believe he wrote back to Hawaii 
and Hawaii okayed that McElrath can be entered in the school as com- 
ing from Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then he did attend the classes that you attended? 

Mr. IzuKA. That is right. So Hawaii had myself, Jack Hall, and 
McElrath as students to that Communist Party school. 

Mr. Taa-enner. Now who selected those that were to represent the 
Territory of Hawaii in the Communist school in California? 

Mr. IzuKA. I was told that the executive board of the Communist 
Partv at that time was not strong, it was kind of weak, but I was told 
that it was the Territorial Communist Party that instructed that Jack 
Hall and I should go and get through the training. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know the names of any of the members of 
the executive board ? 

Mr, IzuKA. At that time I believe it was Jack Kawano, Jack Hall, 
Dr. Reinecke, Kimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. What Kimoto ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Denichi Kimoto and Ah Quon Leong. 

Mr, Tavenner. Will you pronounce that name again ? 

Mr. IzuK.\. Ah Quon Leong. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Do you know the person's first name? 

Mr. IzTjKA. Do you mean all those names I mentioned ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether the person that you men- 
tioned is now married? 

Mr. IzuKA. Oh, yes ; she is at present Mrs. McElrath. 

Mr. Tavenner. "\V1io paid the expenses, your expenses? 

Mr. IzTjKA. My expenses were paid by the Communist Party mem- 
bers of the Territory^ and they paid my steerage fare and gave me 
some pocket money to spend in San Francisco. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. With whom did you live while in California, at- 
tending this school ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Before the school started. Jack Hall and I rented a 
hotel room at Folsom Street, a hotel by the name of Folsom Hotel, 
I believe. Folsom Hotel. And we stayed there for a couple of weeks 
and when school started we moved to Ellis Street. The house num- 
ber — I am trying to get the correct address of the house number 
where I stayed with Jack Hall. 

Mr. Ta\T!:nner. I think it is not important as to the exact street 
number. 

You have mentioned Jack Kawano was one of the members of the 
executive committee here in the Territory of Hawaii. Will you fur- 
ther identify him? Wliat position, what employment he had then 
and now ? 

IVIr. IzuKA. At that time Jack Kawano was the president of Local 
137, ILWU, in Honolulu. He was in that position, to my knowledge, 
from 1939 up to the time he did not run for officp- 

Mr. Tavenner. "N^^ien was that, do you know ? 

Mr. IzuKA. It was in 1949, the last water-front strike. 



1380 COMMIINriST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat position did Dr. Reinecke hold at that time, 
at the time you have testified he was a member of the executive com- 
mittee ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Dr. Reinecke — you mean during the time vehen I was 
sent to the Communist Party school ? 

Mr. Ta\^nner. That is right. 

Mr. IzuKA. I was told that Dr. Reinecke represented the upper 
branch of the Communist Party. He was in the school. I don't know 
whether it is a high school, but I know that he was — ^he instructed at 
one of the high schools. 

Mr. Tavenner. From your observation, was there any connection 
between the Communist Party of the Territory of Hawaii and the 
Communist Party of the State of California ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes; in Hawaii a branch of the Communist Party is 
directly under that jurisdiction of California. Anything that we 
referred back, we had to refer back to the State of California, and 
then the State of California is under control of the State of New York. 

Mr. Taatenner. I hand you a four-page document, and I ask you to 
identify that, please. 

Mr. IzuKi. Yes ; these are one of the study outlines which I forgot 
to destroy when I was told I should destroy all evidence concerning 
the Communist Party. I don't know what happened, but afterwards 
I found these out in my files, and this is a study outline. 

Mr.. Tav'enner. What was the occasion for you being advised to 
destroy all Communist Party documents? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, as I said previously, during the term of the Soviet 
nonaggression pact, the Communist Party might be forced under- 
ground and there should be no evidence for the Government, the FBI, 
to grab hold of. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer this document in evidence, mark it 
"Exhibit Izuka No. 6." 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received. 

IzuKA Exhibit No. 6 
The Study of History — The Role op Marx, Engels, Lenin, and Stalin 

I. WHY STUDY history? 

1. Working class heritage: traditions of all past struggles of mankind for 
progress, against forces of reaction. 

(a) Learn conditions giving rise to present contending classes. 
(6) Learn from past conditions for solution of present-day conflict. 

2. Marxism-Leninism enables scientific study of historical development. 

(a) "People make their own history ; but what determines their motives, namely 
the motives of people in the mass ; what gives rise to the clash of conflicting 
ideas and endeavors ; what is the sum total of these clashes among the whole 
mass of human societies ; what are the objective conditions of production of 
jnaterial life that form the basis of all the historical activity of man ; what 
is the law of the development of these conditions — to all these matters Marx 
directed attention, pointing the way to a scientific study of history as a unified 
and true-to-law process despite its being extremely variegated and contra- 
dictory." — Lenin. 

(6) Not only explains conditions of social change and great historical move- 
ments of past but conditions for social change and movements of today, 
(c) Bourgeois historians — and their approach to history. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1381 

II. UTOPIAN SOCIALISM PREDECESSOR OF MARXISM 

1. Conditions at tnrn of nineteenth century- 
(a) Capitalist methotl of production in Infancy. 

(h) Rise of modern working clas.s and early struggles. 

(c) Working class not yet capable of independent political action. 

(rif) To this condition — immature theories arise — Utopian Socialism. 

2. Outstamling representatives of Utopian Socialism — Robert Owen, St. Simon, 
and Charles Fourier. 

(a) Criticized "wrongs" of existing society. Their remedy: fancy pictures 
of perfect social order based on imagination of individual. 

(?>) Placed main hope not on role of proletariat but on appeal to reason and 
justice — appeals to rich. 

III. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF SCIENTIFIC SOCIALISAI RISE OF MARXISM 

1. Changing conditions brought about change in conception of history. 
((/) Development of large-scale production advances wnth new inventions. 

(b) Division of society into capitalists and proletarians proceeds rapidly. 

(c) Struggles of working class : 

Uprising of textile w^orkers in Lyon, France, 1832. 
Chartist movement in England, 18.37-42. 

IV. MARX AND ENGELS FOUNDERS OF SCIENTIFIC SOCIALISM 

1. Development of human society conditioned by development of productive 
forces. 

(«) Production necessary for existence of man. 

(&) What are productive forces and production relations? 

(c) Given mode of production, corresponds to given stage of human society: 
Primitive communism, slavery, feudalism, capitalism, socialism: 

( (/ ) Mode of production determines social, political, and intellectual relations 
of mankind. 

2. "The history of hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles" 
(Com. Man). 

(a) Origin of classes with origin of private property, those who have and 
those who have not. 

( & ) Basic classes in former historical systems : 
Primitive communism, no classes. 
Slave system, slaves and slave owners. 
Feudalism, serfs and feudal landowners, 
(c) Basic classes in capitalist .society : 
Working class, capitalist cla.ss. 
Proletariat revolutionary class. 

By overthrowing capitalism and building socialism; proletariat elimi- 
nates basic of classes and class struggle; establishes classless 
socialist society. 

3. Analysis of laws of capitalist development shows necessity of socialism. 

(a) Marxism "laid bare the essence of modern capitalist economy, explaining 
the manner in which the hire of the laborer, the purchase of labor power, marks 
tbe enslavement of millions of proj^eityless people by a handful of tapitalists. the 
owners of the land, factories, mines, etc. It showed that the whole trends of the 
development of modern capitalism is towards the ousting of small production by 
large, and the creating of the conditions which make a socialist system of society 
possible and inevitable" (Lenin). 

(6) Social character of production, material basis of new socialist society. 

(c) Capitalism, progressive in origin, becomes reactionary. Capitalist rela- 
tions retard further development of productive forces. 

(d) Need to "expropriate the expropriators." Proletariat by very conditions 
of existence compelled to organize and fight to overthrow capitalists. Proletariat 
leads all exploited. 

(e) Transition from capitalism to communism; whole epoch, epoch of dic- 
tatorship of the proletariat. 



66636—50 — pt. 1- 



1382 coMMUisriST activities in hawaii 

V. LENIN FURTHER DEVELOPS MARXISM IN Ea»OCH OF IJIPEEIALISM AND 
PROLETARIAN REVOLUTION 

1. Lenin rescues revolutionary Marxism from opportunism of Second (Social- 
ist) International. 

(a) Opportunism adaption to the existing capitalist regime for sake of limited 
immediate concessions, becomes widespread in Second International. 
Economic conditions of that period. 
Character of struggles of working class. 

Distortions of Marxism, develop into system of opportunism. 
(6) Lenin's struggle against opportunism of Second International prior to, 
during, and after imperialist war. 

2. Lenin's contributions to Marxism based on new conditions of capitalist 
development — new phase of capitalism, imperialism. 

(a) Lenin develops laws of capitalist development as analyzed by Marx to 
new and higher stage of capitalist development, imperialism. 

(6) Imperialism, as eve of proletarian revolution. Proletarian Revolution 
becomes a direct and urgent task of the day. 

(e) Center of Leninist teachings — The Dictatorship of the Proletariat. 
The Dictatorship of the Proletariat, special alliance of the working class 

and the peasantry in which the proletariat has the leadership. 
Soviet as new form of state, expressing this alliance. 
id) Forms and methods of building Socialism. 

(e) Union of tlie struggle of the Proletariat in imperialist countries with the 
liberation movement in the colonies. 

(/) The creation of a Party of a new type— able to prepare and lead the work- 
ing class in the struggle for power. 

Struggle against Menshevism and Trotskyism. 

The building of the Bolshevik Party which successfully led people of Russia 
in October 1917, Revolution. 
{[/) Science of revolutionary leadership; Strategy and Tactics. 

VI. STALIN FURTHER DEVELOPS MARXISM-LENINISM IN PERIOD OF SOCIALIST 

CONSTKUCTION AND VICTORY OF SOCIALISM 

1. Developed all fundamental theses of Lenin in building Socialism. 
(a) Possibility of building socialism in one country. Struggle against Trosky- 
ism and Right Opportunism of Bukharin. 

(ft) Industrialization, establishment of large-scale socialist industry; need of 
economic independence of the Soviet Union from the capitalist world, 
(c) Reorganization of Agriculture on socialist basis; collectivization, 
(ri) Soviet Democracy; New Soviet Constitution. 
(e) First phase of Communi.sm ; Socialism. 

Against theory of Equalitarianism. Socialism : "From each ac- 
cording to his abilities ; to each according to his deeds." 
Overcoming difference between town and city. 
Classless Socialist Society, changes in class structure. 

Vn. BRIEF SUMMARY OF TEACHINGS OF MARXISM-LENINISM 

1. Scientific analysis of laws of capitalist development, showing the inevitabil- 
ity of its downfall (as previous historical systems disappeared), the conditions 
under which the working class would gain its emancipation and come to power; 
the transition from capitalism to communism ; the building of a Socialist Society. 

2. Marxism-Leninism ; product of existing class struggle ; shows how to change 
existing conditions. 

(a) Center of Marxism-Leninism; recognition of necessity of Dictatorship of 
Proletariat. 

3. Marxism-Leninism not a dogma but a guide to action. 

4. Marxism-Leninism ; unity of theory and practice. 

VIII. APPLICATION OF MARXISM-LENINISM TO AMERICA 

1. Marx, Engels, Lenin, and Stalin contributions on American development. 

(a) Marx and Engles on American Revolution of 1776, Civil War, labor move- 
ment, character of capitalist development, etc. 

(h) Lenin on American monopoly capitalism, agriculture in America, labor 
movement, and revolutionary traditions. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1383 

(c) Stalin on American development, crises, struggle against Lovestonism, 
help to unity our I'arty, etc. 

2. In liuht of Marxism-Leninism must study American economic and political 
development and our tasks for today. Apply Marxism-Leninism to specific and 
peculiar characteristics of capitalist development in America, American labor 
movement, and specific tasks for accomplishing our objectives of socialism. 

3. Contributions of Comrades Browder and Foster in helping Party to get cor- 
rect Marxist-Leninist understanding to American development and American 
democratic traditions. 

(a) "Few countries have a richer heritage of traditions of revolutionary strug- 
gle for human freedt)m than our own United States. Yet tliis heritage has been 
shamefully neglected by the modern fighters for liberation from oppres- 
sion. * * * The revolutionary gold in the ore of American history is so rich 
and abundant that even the i-eactionary miners digging here turn up a great 
wealth for us to begin work on" (Bro) . 

{h) Embodied in our slogan "Communism Is 20th Century Americanism." 

CONTROL QUESTIONS 

1. Why is it necessary to study history? Why is the study of history of one's 
own country especially important today? 

2. What is Utopian Socialism? How did they propose to solve the "seeming 
injustices"? 

3. How do you explain "human society is conditioned by development of pro- 
ductive forces?" What are the productive forces and productive relations? 

4. Why is there a conflict between productive forces and production relations 
under capitalism? How can this conflict be overcome? 

5. What is a class? Is there a miity of interests between the working class 
and capitalist class? Why is the working class the revolutionary class? 

6. What were, in brief, Lenin's contributions to Marxism? Would you say 
Marx was the theoretician and the Lenin the practical man? 

7. What were Stalin's contributions to Marxism-Leninism? 

8. Is Marxism-Leninism a dogma or a guide to action? What is the relation of 
theory to practice ? Give an example. 

BEADING MATERIAL 

1. Communist Manifesto; Chapter 1. 

2. Socialism Utopian and Scientific ; Chapters 1 and 2 and 3. 

3. What is Leninism? I'ages 41-47 ; 49-55 ; 66-70 ; 102 ; 103 ; 110-111. 

4. Browder; Who are the Americans? 

ADDITIONAL READING MATERIAL 

1. Leontiev, Political Economy, pages 14-19. 

2. Dlmitroff, Report 7th Congress of CI, pages 73-79. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Communist Party discipline discussed and 
taiiffht at the California school which you attended? 

Mr. IzuKA, Yes ; we were told that all Communist Party members 
should accept discipline, should accept self criticism, and should mas- 
ter Marxism on a theoretical basis, so that it can be applied to trade- 
union organization, and if you want further information on the set-up 
of the Communist Party school, Louise Todd, who was instructor, 
divided our group into about 5 or 6 separate groups, and all of those 
groups have individual Communist names, some people, like the name 
of Hellman, or Lrenin, or the Marx group, that is, anybody who is a 
martyr, who was martyred in the Communist struggle, and these 
groups were divided, with each group representing about 5 or 6 mem- 
bers. We were assigned questions, but before the questions were 
assigned to the members we had about 2 or 21/^ hours of a lecture from 
each one of these instructors. We were in school from 9 o'clock 
in the morning to 5 o'clock in the afternoon, and in the evening we 



1384 coMMuisriST AcrivrTiES in Hawaii 

would take current events from 6 to 9. In other words, our activity 
was from 9 to 9. 

Mr. Tavennek. Was this school open to the public, generally, or 
did you have to have a special recommendation and approval to join? 

Mr. IzuKA. You had to have special recommendation to attend this 
school of the Communist Party. The Connnunist Party sign outside 
was like that it was public, but the school was not for the public to 
attend. 

Mr. Tavennek. It was advertised to be a public — to be open for 
the public, but in practice it was not? 

Mr. IzuKA. No, it was not advertised to the public, but the sign of 
the Communist Party outside, that was outside, something like any 
business, but the school was not for the public to go in. 

Mr. Tavenner. How did you return from California to Hawaii? 

Mr. IzuKA. After I got instructions from Louise Todd, I went to^ 
I did not have the money to come back to Hawaii as a passenger. So, 
I saw one of the seamen by the name of Walter Stack, and I told him 
of my situation, and he said that he was going to fix me up by me 
working my way back on the ship. And he gave me a note saying to 
take this note to the Marine Cooks and Stewards dispatcher over there, 
and give this note to the dispatcher. The note says, "Paul, fix this man 
up. Stack." Then he told me that I should get my seaman's paper, 
which I got it. I waited unt il the day the Lurl'me sailed. I believe that 
I sailed that evening on the LurUne as a dishwasher. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Stack a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, he was a known Communist Party member. I 
heard he even went to the Lenin ITniversity at Moscow. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer in evidence committee information 
relating to Walter Stack, and mark it as "Exhibit Izuka No. 7." * 

Mr. Walti<:r. Without objection, it will be marked and received- 
Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, upon your return to the Territory of 
Hawaii from this school, did you become active in Communist affairs 
here ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, at the time, that was the period of the Hitler-Soviet 
pact, and our instructions was that we should do everything within 
our power to keep America out of the imperialistic war. We started 
calling this war a phony war, and a slogan, "The Yanks are not 
coming," and "Ashcan plan," and "Roosevelt is a warmonger." There 
were many more slogans to keep America out of this imperialistic war. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat use were you directed to make of these 
slogans ? How were you expected to use those slogans ? 

Mr. Izuka. Once the slogan we made, "The Yanks are not coming," 
we posted that in front of the union hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was it the design of the Communist Partj^ to pas^ 
this policy of the Communist Party line down to the members of the 
union? 

Mr. Izuka. That's right. We were told that all these slogans should 
be told to the union rank and file, and at the time I think the rank and 
file actually followed the slogans. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was due, in part, at least, to the fact that some 
of you who were prominent Communists, were also prominent in union 
affairs ? 

* See appendix. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1385 

Mr. IziTKA. That's rioht. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, did that party line change, and did you 
at any time reverse the party line? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, as soon as Germany attacked Russia, well, onr 
party line changed completely overnight. Then we have to explain 
out ourselves why the phony war became a war for the survival of 
democracy, and everything that we can think of to change the slogan. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you just as energetic in passing the Communist 
line down to the rank and file of the labor unions as you had been the 
former line ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, that's correct. We did everything, then we took 
advantage of the rank and file. They didn't know much about it, so 
we could advise them as to how we think. I think it is the same old 
proposition that exists today, wdiere the union leaders of the Com- 
munist Party — the union leaders here think for the entire membership 
in the Territory of Hawaii. At that time, we did the same thing. We 
have to explain out the Chamberlain appeasement policy, but the coun- 
tries of the world was trying to let Stalin and Hitler fight it out, 
explain that. Since that w^orld imperialism was trying to put some- 
thing over on Soviet Russia, it was to Soviet Russia's advantage to 
sign the pact. "Wlien the pact was broken, then charge Hitler with 
all kinds of names, and then America much actually take part in the 
war, not to save Russia, but to save the world from democracy and 
fascism. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Now, what was the source or direction of this change 
of policy of the party line? Where did you get your instructions 
from ? 

Mr. Izuka. All party members are compelled to read party litera- 
ture, so we have our instructions and party literature, and party 
pamphlets, some very important instructions. We get them from cour- 
iers on the ship, and when there is, we get instructions from Honolulu 
on this various change of party line. 

Mv. Tavenner. Now, at the time of the change of this party line, 
were any instructions given regarding sabotage, back prior to this 
change of party line? 

Mr. Izuka. So far as I can remember, I don't think we got instruc- 
tions as far as sabotage. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were there any instructions given when the original 
party line that you discussed was made known to you, to slow down 
production? 

Mr. Izuka. During the phony war, during the phony war when thej 
called Roosevelt a warmonger, we did anything in our power to slow 
down or stop shipments, like lend-lease, and those things for Europe, 
to tight Hitler. It was our instruction that we should do those things. 
Not sabotage actually, but provoke slow-downs, strikes, anything to 
sabotage the shipments to Europe. 

JSIr, Tam^nner. Anything to slow up or retard the defense of this 
country? 

Mr. Izuka, Oh, that's right. During the phony war. That means 
it was not after. 

Mr. Tavenner. I understand. Now, where did these instructions 
come from? 

]\Ir. Izuka. Well, we had some different instructions, but most of 
the instructions comes in the form of a pamphlet, by reading the politi- 



1386 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

cal orders at the time, used by tlie Communist Party, political orders, 
but the important instructions usually — I got them through Mr. Hall 
when I visited Honolulu. In general, we have those Communist Party 
instructions through pamphlets and leaflets, and all these other things. 

Mr. Tavenner. You also got such instructions from Jack Hall? 

Mr. IzTjiiA. Yes ; Jack Hall, and Kimoto. 

Mr, Tavenner. Are there any persons whose names you can now 
recall who discussed those instructions with you ? 

Mr. IzuKA, Well, usually I received the instructions myself, which, 
in return, I will instruct the rest of the members. That is how we 
operate. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, were you as successful in passing down the 
party — the new party line, to the rank and file of the labor unions, as 
you had been in the first instance, during what we call the phony war? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, we had no trouble in persuading the rank and file 
from the phony war to the war to save democracy. We had no stiff 
opposition in doing that. We put it over nicely. The majority of 
the members saw to it that it was all right. 

Mr. Tavenner. So that the leadership in the ILWU changed the 
party line to match and to meet that of the Communist Party, is that 
what I understand you to say? 

Mr. IzuKA. That is correct. 

Mr. Ta%t2nner. Mr. Izuka, do you recall a strike on the island of 
Kauai, when the central committee of the Communist Party met in 
Honolulu, at which a decision was considered as to whether Honolulu 
was to go out on a sympathy strike ? 

Mr. IzUKA. During the time when the executive board of the Com- 
munist Party met in Honolulu, I was attending the ILWU conven- 
tion in Los Angeles. When I came back I was told by Kawano the 
details that actually happened in this executive meeting of the Com- 
munist Party, and at the time Jack Hall and McElrath and Dr. 
Reinecke was all in favor of involving Honolulu to sympathize with 
Kauai in the 10-month strike, and at the time they had various differ- 
ences of opinion between Kawano and Jack Hall, because during that 
time the Honolulu union was not strong. The morale was weak. If 
they were to pull out of the Honolulu local, the union would be 
smashed. And they had this discussion in the executive board of the 
Communist Party, and finally the board ruled that Honolulu should 
not be involved. I heard that McElrath, Hall, and Reinecke took a 
strong stand that Honolulu should be involved. Kawano at the time 
was — Kawano and Kimoto was against the involvement of Honolulu. 
To my experience I believed that they were correct, because if at the 
time they ever involved Honolulu, I think there would be no union 
today. If I am correct, Honolulu is strong afterward, and they organ- 
ized the sugai- plantations in the Territory. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let's come up to the period of Pearl Harbor. Im- 
mediately after Pearl Harbor, did you receive any directions as to 
what procedure of the Communist Party should be ? 

Mr. Izuka. After the Pearl Harbor attack, we were again ordered, 
because prior to the Pearl Harbor attack, during that period we re- 
ceived many more leaflets and pamphlets, and after that attack we 
were also ordered that everything should be destroyed. I got those 
instructions when I visited Honolulu, and saw Jack Hall. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1387 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did you have any contacts at that period with 
Jack Hall regarding the destruction of Communist Party documents 
and literature? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes; I met him twice — once at the union hea<l<iuarters 
at 1010 Kekaulike Street. That night I stayed overnight wilh Jack 
Hall on the corner of Vineyard and Ennna Street. They had an 
apartment over there. I stayed with them overnight. I also got 
further instructions from him. During the night I stayed with him. 

Mr. Tavexxeh. What were those instructions? 

Mr, IzuKA. "Well, at the time he said that since Russia was involved 
in the war, and any Japanese was Fascist, and they were against our 
policy, we should report those names to the FBI, because he was very 
close, working together with Mr. Shivers and Colonel Bicknell. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Mr. Izuka, were you arrested by the police in 
April— on April 11,1942? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, I was arrested on April 11. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Will you tell the committee about that, please? 

Mr. Izuka. After that attack on Pearl Harbor, I was very careful, 
because I was very militant toward the company, and the company 
had its eye on me. I was very scared, because they were in a position 
to shoot anybody that was opposed to their policy. So. I was very 
scared. After the commanding general change in the Territory, we 
got a little privilege, and I started sticking my neck out, beginning 
union activity. I came to Honolulu, and I was instructed by Mr. 
Hall and O'Brien who was the attorney at that time, they told me 
I should keep up my good fight to preserve the union, and after I 
went back, I still — I did the things, I started to collect dues and make 
contact with members, during martial law. One incident, I remember 
the thing well, looking at the Manoa defense project, the men were 
paid 2 months — they were paid 2 months before tliey were — no ; they 
were paid after 2 months, they put their work in, so they got paid a 
third month. That was one of the biggest problems of Bridges among 
the defense employees. So, I thought that they were not going to help 
the war, Russia not being in a bad position, to hurry up and build 
our runway, to help defeat the Axis, and I wrote a letter to Honolulu 
explaining the details, what is actually taking place at the Manoa 
defense job. Right after I wrote the letter the men received their 
pay promptly after every 2 weeks. I don't know if that caused it 
or not, but after that I had a Federal man come in my place and 
ask me questions. I thought, well, I did my duty, and I did not pay 
attention too much, because I was all out to win the war. I do every- 
thing in my power to see the building of the air runway should be 
fast. 

At the same time I remember that my personnel director was in 
charge of the defense yard, and he knew I was the guy that could 
make trouble for him. They found some ways and means of trying 
to pin me down. They even provoked one of my ex-union officials 
to have a fight with me during working hours. I said I did not want 
to fight, because I got a responsibility. I think that responsibility 
comes first. They could not pick anything on me to get me locked 
up, but finally on April 11, 1942, one of the policemen from I^udoa 
district came over to ni}^ house at 1 o'clock in the morning. He told 
me that the sheriffs want to see me next day. I went up and I saw 



1388 coMMumsT activities in hawaii 

him. I didn't know that I was going to be locked np for the first 
half day. I took m}' lunch can and work clothes. I worked as long- 
shoreman. I seen Mr. Pikii, he was acting manager, that I want some 
time off so that I can see the chief of police, and he gave me permis- 
sion, so I took my Innch can, my working clothes, and my car, and 
I went up to the Lihne police station. From there, they took me 
over to the circuit court, and I waited there 5 or G hours without 
food or nothing. Finally, four men came out, I think they repre- 
sented some sort of civilian defense, Mr. Caleb Burns, who was man- 
ager of the Lihue plantation, Mr. Lindsay Fave, of the Kekaha planta- 
tion, and Mr. Hector Moir, of the Puuloa plantation. Without say- 
ing a word, Mr. Burns told a policeman to lock me up. Of course, 
with me, it was two more Japanese, and they also suffer the same 
consequences and they took us over to Waiahia, the jailhouse, for 1 
week. 

They kept us in jail without us contacting anybody. And I asked the 
policemen what are they going to do with my car, because my wife 
doesn't know, and my children doesn't know, and I am not going back 
home after work, and somebody should take my car back. They said, 
"We don't give a damn what happens to your car," he said, "That is 
too bad." We were held for 1 week without making no contacts or 
an3'thing. When we went to the toilet, we got two guards follow us 
every place we go. I got very jittery, because we could not make any 
false move, because they had rifles and guns with them. Anyway, 
after a week, we were called in to aiipear at the hearing. At this 
hearing the same men which I mentioned, the three mentioned planta- 
tions — Moir and Peterson conduct the hearing. They asked me all 
kinds of questions, whether I belong to the Connnunist Party, and 
what I think of Harry Bridges, and many things concerning my union 
activity and the Conmiunist Party. That was the first hearing. The 
second hearing was the same, repetition. On the first hearing I was 
told after I was released that they have no ground to hold me any 
further, so I should be released right away, but the plantation man- 
agers, they went around looking for some other incident to hold me 
back in jail, and just pointed out the time when this ex-union member 
tried to provoke a fight with me. So, my second charges were based 
on that particular incident, and they charge me for another 2 or 3 
days, or 120 days in jail. Finally, I got out. 

Mr. Tavenner. During that period, was there any contribution 
made to you by the Communist Party ? 

Mr. IzuKA. At the time when I was released. Jack Hall wrote to me 
about two or three times, telling me that I should go to see Major 
Selby, who was in charge of the Military Intelligence in Kauai, and to 
get a permit to leave Kauai and to come to Honolulu to work, for na- 
tional defense project. Well, I saw Mr. Selby, and he told me, he 
said, "Well, Izuka, you know it is touah for you," and he says, he 
told me that, "You should not stay in Kauai anyway, because, well, 
the big plantation managers, they would not give you a job. You 
should go to Honolulu and work for the Government." So, I came 
to Honolulu. Wlien I came to Honolulu, Jack Kawano saw me. We 
had a long talk, a discussion. Finally he went to the party member- 
ship, and he got about $180. He said that "this is not enough, but at 
least you can get a good start." And he told me the money came from 
the party members, and I received about that amount. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1389 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned Major Selby, what is his first name, 
do you know ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I don't know his first name. 

Mr. Tavenneu. Wliat position did he hold? 

Mr. IzuKA. He was Military Intelligence officer in Kauai at the 
time. 

Mr. Walter. The hearinir will .stand in recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Whereupon, a recess was taken until 2 p. m. of the same day.) 

afternoon session 

The subcommittee met at 2 p. m., pursuant to the I'ecess, 
Mr. Walter. The committee will be in order. Mv. Izuka will 
resume his testimony. 

TESTIMONY OF ICHIEO IZUKA— Eesuined 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Izuka, will you tell the committee something of 
the plan that the Conmiunists used in recruiting membership ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, according to the Communist Party line, first of all 
they look in the field to finding good prospects in militant, honest 
union men, and give them some literature to get started to read. And 
once in a while ask them questions about Russia, what do you think 
of the party leaders, Stalin, anything. Then, gradually, if they can't 
l^ersuade them locally, their program is to either send him to Honolulu 
or further to San Francisco for further education. And if they can't 
do it locally, usually they send these union men to San Francisco to 
some kind of labor school or party school, and over there they actually 
work on that particular delegate or representative that represents 
Hawaii. 

In this case, take, for instance, this man, Mr. Ogoshi. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is the name, please ? 

Mr. Izuka. Mr. Tsuruo Ogoshi. 

Mr. Owens. The last name is 0-g-o-s-h-i. 

Mr. Izuka. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And the first name is what ? 

Mr. Izuka. Tsuruo. 

Mr. Tavenner. T-s-u-r-u-o. 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. All riglit. Proceed. 

Mr. Izuka. Before Mr. Ogoshi left for the convention, at that time 
he wasn't a Communist. He was only an honest union leader for union 
men, and he wanted to make the trip because it was his first opportunity 
to go to San Francisco and travel over to the convention. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what convention was this? 

Mr. IzLnvA. That was ILWI^ convention, held in Aberdeen, Wash., 
in 1938. And after he left, we told Kawano and Hall and other party 
members in Honolulu that Ogoshi is leaving for this ILWU conven- 
tion in 1938 at Aberdeen, Wash., and making sure that the Communist 
Party members in San Francisco and Seattle make every elTort to 
recruit him in the party so that when he returns back to our local in 
Port Allen, Kauai, that we can utilize his services to recruit more party 
members. And that is one way how a Communist, how a member is 
recruited in the Comnumist Party. If they cannot recruit him locally, 



1390 coMMinsriST activities in hawait 

they will send him either to Honolulu or San Francisco for further 
indoctrination. And in this case it was the other way around. 
Og'oshi was recruited up in the States. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, Ogoshi was a member of the ILWU on what 
island ? 

Mr. IzuKA. That was in the island of Kauai, Port Allen, Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, we have Mr. Ogoshi here from the 
island of Kauai. We would like to interrupt his testimony and call 
him at this time . 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

Will you stand and be sworn? Stand and raise your right hand. 
Will you swear that the testimony you are about to give is the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. TsuRuo Ogoshi. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF TSURUO OGOSHI 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state your full name, please ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Tsuruo Ogoshi. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your present address? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Kilauea, Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Makaweli, Kauai, September 1, 1910. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are in attendance before this committee as a 
result of a subpena being served upon you, are you not? 

Mr. Ogoshi. That's right. 

Mr. TAMiNNER. Will you give the committee a brief statement of 
your employment record ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. I first started working in 1925 for the Hawaiian Sugar 
Co., now Olokele Sugar Co. 

Mr. Walter. Will vou keep your voice up? 

Mr. Ogoshi. I stayed there iip to 1928. Then I left for Wahiawa, 
Oahu, stayed thei'e up to 1933, and then came back to Kauai; stayed 
for a year at the Hawaiian Sugar Co., and then transferred myself to 
Kauai Terminals, Port Allen; and then stayed; I stayed there up to 
1940 and then left for Oahu, where I worked at Hickam Housing — I 
mean Makalapa Housing — and then, well, after the break of the war 
in 1942 I left for Kauai, and then entered with the USED in Kauai. 
I stayed there up to "44, and then got myself in with Kauai Motors, 
where I am now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Ogoshi, have 3^011 ever been a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you become a member of the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. I first joined up with the Communist Party in 1938, 
up in Aberdeen, Wash. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, tell us about that. First of all, tell us how 
you happened to be in Aberdeen, Wash. 

Mr. Ogoshi. I was first — well, in 1938, the ILWU convention asked 
members to go up to represent them from Port Allen, Kauai. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1391 

Mr. Tavenner. Yon were a delegate from the local ILWU union? 

Mr. Ogosiii. That's right; local 135 of Port Allen. 

Mr. Tavenner. To a convention being held in Aberdeen, Wash? 

Mr. Ogosiii. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Now, you went as a delegate to that con- 
vention? 

Mr. Ogosiii. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, tell the committee what happened? 

Mr. Ogosiii. AVell, as we got up there, prior to the — I mean, before 
the convention was over, a companion delegate of me, myself, John 
Aukai of Hilo, was, T think 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give us that name again, please? 

Mr. Ogosiii. John, A-u-k-a-i, yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. John Aukai? All right. 

Mr. Ogosiii. Well, previous to that, I didn't know whether he was 
associated with the Connnunist Party or not, but he asked me to attend 
a Communist Party in Aberdeen, which I went with him. 

Mr. Tavenner. What kind of a party was this? 

Mr. Ogosiii. A Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. A Communist Party meeting? All right. Proceed. 

Mr. Ogosiii. And then, well, after the meeting he didn't say much 
to me, but when we got back to San Francisco he asked me to join up 
with that party, so without hesitation I went in, see, into the Com- 
munist Party, signed up, and then later transferred to Honolulu when 
I came back. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know where you went to join the party? 

Mr. Ogoshi. 121 Haight Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. San Francisco? 

Mr. Ogoshi. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And then you were transferred? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Transferred to Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Your membership was transferred to Honolulu? 

Mr. Ogosiii. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. 121 Haight Street, San Francisco, Calif., has been 
established as the headquarters of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Ogosiii. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of the state of California ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, on j^our return to Honolulu, what did you do 
with reference to the Communist Party ? 

]Mr. Ogoshi. I saw Jack Hall about my membership and I was 
transferred to Kauai unit. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did Jack Hall say to you about your becom- 
ing a member of the Communist Party, do you recall ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he issue you any credentials, or any card of 
any character? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Well, I can't say right off. 

Mr. Tavenner. You do not recall ? 

Mr. Ogosiii. I don't recall. 

Mv. Tavenner. But you stated he transferred you to Kauai, where 
you lived ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. That's right. 



1392 commuintist activities in hawaii 

Mr. Ta^'enner. Did Jack Hall give you instructions as to what you 
were to do or who you were to see on the return to your native island? 

Mr. Ogoshi. That's right. He told me to contact Ichiro Izuka. 

Mr. Tavenner. Ichiro Izuka, who is sitting here at the table? 

Mr. Ogosiii. Thafs right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you do that ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were j^ou a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Ogoshi. As I recall, it is not quite a full year. 

Mr. Taa'enner. During that period of time, did you attend meet- 
ings of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many in all do you think you attended? 

Mr. Ogoshi. About six to eight meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were these meetings held ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. At three or four meetings at Mr. Kin jo's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. K-i-n-j-o? 

Mr, Ogoshi. That's right. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. And what was the lirst name? Is it Chinei, 
C-h-i-n-e-i? 

Mr. Ogoshi. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were other meetings held that you attended? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Other meetings, I recall, were held in Mr. Izuka's car. 

Mr. Tavenner. In Mr. Izuka's automobile? 

Mr. Ogoshi. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Hoav well did you know Jack Hall before you joined 
the Communist Party, or did you know him at all before you joined 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Eight offhand, I can't say. Mostly, I knew him 
through the party, contact with the party. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have had no personal contact with him before 
you became a member of the Community Party, is that what you mean 
to say? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Yes ; that's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, after you joined the Communist Party, did 
you have occasion to see him personally and to talk with him? 

Mr. Ogoshi. No ; outside of the meetings, I didn't have any personal 
contact with him. 

Mr. Ta\t3nner. The only personal contact with him was at the 
meetings ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Meetings, that's right. 

Mr. Taa^nner. What meetings? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Our Communist Party meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Communist Party meetings? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did Jack Hall attend the Communist Party meet- 
ings on your native island which you stated you attended? 

Mr. Ogoshi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many of these meetings did he attend, to your 
best recollection ? 

Mr. Ogoshi. To my knowledge, well, on almost every meeting he 
was there. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1393 

Mr. Tavenner. Almost every meeting that you attended, Jack Hall 
was there? 

Mr. Ogosiii. That's right. 

Mr. Taa^nnek. Well, what did Jack Hall do at those meetings? 

Mr. Ogosiii. He presided at the meetings and educated us on Com- 
munist Party politics. 

Mr. Ta\exxer. Educated you on Communist Party politics? 

Mr. Ogosiii. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you told us that you were a Communist Party 
member for less than a j^ear? 

Mr. Ogosiii. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, why did you join the Communist Party? 

Mr. Ogosiii. I joined, not knowing anything about the workings 
of the party or what they stood for or how they operated. The only 
thing, the reason why I went in, because, because John Aukai begged 
me to go in. 

Mr. Tax'enner. Why did you leave the Communist Party ? 

]\Ir. Ogosiii. Well, I don't know what to say right, what nobody, 
I figured this thing is altogether different than working — I mean 
works different scale than trade-union principles, so I left the party 
on my own account. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Mr. Izuka a member, an active member of the 
party while you were there ? 

Mr. Ogosiii. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. To whom did you pay your dues as a party member? 

Mr. Ogoshi. If I recollect, I paid it to Mr. Izuka. 

Mr. Tavenner. No further questions. 

Mr. Walter. The witness will step aside. You may be excused^ 
Thank you very much. 

TESTIMONY OF ICHIRO IZUKA— Resumed 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall, Mr. Izuka, whether or not the Com- 
munist Party was disbanded for a period of time in the Territory of 
Hawaii ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, after the attack on Pearl Harbor, we were in- 
structed that the Communist Party in Hawaii is disbanded, just 
forget about it, nothing existed, and everything in reference to Com- 
munist Party connections should be destroyed completely, and as 
far as I am concerned I had many, many magazines like the Commu- 
nist International, The Communist, Imprecorr, and many more study 
outlines, party instructions that were given to me during my member- 
ship of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. From whom did you receive those instructions? 

]Mr. Izuka. Some I got. Those instructions, those pamphlets, from 
Jack Hall, and some I ordered by mail which was sent to me from 
the Maritime bookshop and Golden Gate Bookshop. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, I want to return for a moment here to your 
experience in the Communist school in San Francisco. You have 
told U6 about the teachers who appears there and about your courses, 
and I want to ask you this : Did your group of about 50 in attendance 
sing the Star-Spangled Banner? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, our usual start of the school is that we start by 
singing the Star-Spangled Banner. We were sitting. As the Star- 



1394 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Spangled Banner — we all sat down when we sang the Star-Spangled 
Banner, and after that we sang the Internationale. And when we 
sang the Internationale, when we heard the first words sing, "Arise, 
ye prisoners," everybody jumped up on their feet, and at that time 
Betty Gannet was our instructor. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Proceed. 

Mr. IzuKA. Betty Gannet was our instructor for that day. And as 
soon as we sang that Internationale, they stood up and said everybody 
to get up, get up, get up, and that's how we sang the Internationale, 
at the opening of the school in the morning. 

Mr. Tavenner. So that as far as the Star-Spangled Banner would 
be sung, it would be sitting down, and the Internationale standing 
up'^ 

Mr. Izuka. Well, we were told that it was the Internationale, is not 
only a national, a mere emblem, but it is a world proletariat song. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Now, were there others present and engaged in 
singing of the Star-Spangled Banner, and the Internationale, in the 
way you have described, who are now residents of the Territory of 
Hawaii ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, I remember some students, that represent Alameda 
County and San Pedro, but I am very sure that Mr, Jack Hall and 
Mr. McElrath, also sat in at that school, at the same time when we 
sang the Star-Spangled Banner and the Internationale. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you returned to the Territory of Hawaii, did 
you attend discussion groups here? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes; we organized many discussion groups, but this 
particular discussion group which I am referring to is during the 
martial law, when the Military Governor gave the civilians no civil 
rights, where they could go to court and get a court trial. We started — 
the members of the party, of course they were not official, of course, 
but they were told that they should organize discussion groups in 
various communities, and invite the community-interested people to 
take up a discussion of the Japanese problem, of morale committees, 
and anything that was interested in the community. That was the 
forerunner — the forerunner — that is, the forerunner of the time when 
we were permanently told that the Communist Party should be 
reactivated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, during this period of time, did you continue 
to pay Communist dues? 

Mr. Izuka. During the discussion group, we did not have no party 
cards, or party instructions, or constitution, but we were told from 
San Francisco that the Communist Party in the United States needs 
lots of finance, and we were told that every party member should try 
and donate as much as possible to the Communist funds. For that 
reason, during the discussion period we met together, especially in 
this particular case, I was told that myself, Jack Kimoto, Alice Hyun, 
Mr. and Mrs. McElrath, should meet at McElrath's home, and pay 
our dues, and for further instructions. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who gave you that information that you were to 
meet there? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, the instructions came from Jack Kimoto and 
Jack Hall, and Kawano. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you recall what occurred during that 
meeting? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1395 

Mr. IzuKA. At this particular Sunday — but prior to that I was 
working: in national defense, and we worked 7 days a week, and this 
was the first Sunday that the National Government policy was no work 
on Sunday, and I took my children, and I went to Mr. McElrath's 
home, to have this particular meeting, which was arranged. 

Mr. TA^^iNNER. Can you fix the date of the meeting? Approxi- 
mately ? 

JNIr. IzuKA. "Well, I don't recall, particularly, the date, but I pre- 
sume it was — I think around May, or the early part of 1945. I am not 
so particular on that. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Now, what occurred during the course 
of that meeting? 

Mr. IzuKA. As soon as we started to discuss our problems, Alice 
Hyun was pretty much in a nervous stage. 

Mr. Tavenner. Repeat that, please. 

Mr. IzTjKA. She was in a nervous stage, and later on she told our 
group that she had word from the particular ones who lives down 
at Koko Head that the farmer had struck the trunk with a plow, and 
then the farmer — Alice Hyun thought that we should send Peter over 
to pick the trunk out. On this particular occasion, I don't know why 
Mr. Hyun did not go, but Alice Hyun time and time brought the 
matter up, that I should go with my car and help her pick the trunk 
up, together with Mr. Kimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. And, do you know, is that a trunk that had been 
buried in the ground? 

]Mr. IzuKA. That's right, and I am sure that Mr, and Mrs. McElrath 
informed us that we should go even to Charlie Fujimoto, who lives a 
couple of hundred yards below Mr. McElrath — that he should also be 
urged to go to pick this trunk up. We went to Mr. Charlie Fujimoto's 
home, but he was not in, and so, on that particular incident, he was left 
out, and, of course, I was — I did not agree with that, because during 
that time we had gas rationing, and I had very few gasoline to go to 
Koko Head, and 1 would use 5 or 6 gallons of gasoline, but Kimoto 
and I were discouraged from going, because those books are no 
good, and they should be destroyed. In other words, he said that when 
he buried those books they breached party discipline, because they 
should have burned it, instead of buried it, but we believe in majority 
rule. Mr. McElrath and Mrs. McElrath, and Alice Hyun, talked that 
we should go, and so we went to Koko Head, and found the place where 
that particular trunk was hidden, and when we went there we could 
not find the place, so Alice Hyun talked to the Korean farmer, and he 
directed us to the very particular position where the trunk was hidden, 
and I did all the digging, and we displayed the books, around the hole, 
and Kimoto and I decided that these books should be burned, because 
useless for further use. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were they Communist publications ? 

Mr. IzuKA. All of them were Communist books, and I further said 
that these books should not have been burned, in the first place, because 
there is nothing un-American about having these books, but, anyway, 
we decided to destroy or burn the books, and it happened that Alice 
Hyun did not smoke, and Kimoto does not smoke, and I did not smoke, 
and we told Alice to go to the farmer's house to get a match, and 
Ximoto and I wanted to pick up brush and get some old Kiawe tree 



1396 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



wood, and we were preparing to burn tlie books, when some Govern- 
ment agents came over right away, and they said that three of us were 
under arrest, 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlio were the Government agents who appeared on 
the scene? 

Mr. IzuKA. I remember one particularly well, Mr. Everett xlh Fook. 

Mr, Tavenner. Will you spell the last name ? 

Mr. IzuKA. A-h F-o-o-k, 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a photograph, and I will ask you if you 
can identify any of those ? 




IzuKA Exhibit 8. 
Left to right : Jack Kimoto, Alice Hyun, and Ichiro Izuka. 

Mr. Izuka. Well, this picture — well, they must have got this picture 
from a mile away, but this shows that I was actually digging the 
trunk out. 

Mr. Tavenner. You were digging the trunk out ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who else? 

Mr. Izuka. Kimoto was on the side, also trying to help, and Alice 
Hyun was standing just like a foreman. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the photograph in evidence and to 
ask that it be marked "Izuka Exhibit No. 8." 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a second photograph, and I will ask you 
to identify that. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1397 



Mr. IzuKA. This picture also was taken witli — about a mile away, 
because I don't remember that we actually took this picture. This 
j^icture shows that I went to oet tAvigs and dry wood, wliile Alice 
Hyun was walkin^: over to the farmhouse to get a match, and Kimoto 
was trying to put the dry twigs in thei-e, and while I was going around 
the woods to get some dry wood. 

INIr. Tavennkr. I offer the ])hotograph in evidence, and ask that 
it be marked "Jzuka Exliibit No. 9." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received and so marked. 




IzuKA Exhibit 9. 






Left to right: Ichiro Izuka, Alice Hyun, and Jack Kimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a third photograph, and ask you if 
you can identify the person appearing in it? 

Mr. Izuka. This photograph was taken when we took all the books 
out from the trunk, and displayed it on the side of the hole, and 
was ready to put it on fire, and at that time the Government agents, 
and they said we were under arrest, and took our pictures. These 
pictures, and the other picture, I remember; that the Government 
agent actually took it in our presence. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you identify the persons whose pictures ap- 
pear in that photograph? 

Mr. Izuka. Alice Hyun at the extreme left, and Kimoto in the 
center, and myself on the right. 

Mr. Tavenner. I offer the photograph in evidence, and ask that 
it be marked "Izuka Exhibit No. 10." 

66636— 50— pt. 1 4 



1398 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be marked. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a fourth photograph, and ask you to 
identify that in the same way. 

Mr. IzuKA. This was taken after the — after we went in the car, 
and the Government agents took it when we left. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. I offer the photograph in evidence, and ask that 
it be marked "Izuka Exhibit No. 11." 

Mr. Walter. Let it be marked and received in evidence.^ 




IzuKA Exhibit 10. 
Left to right : Alice Hyun, Jack Kimoto, and Ichiro Izuka. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you look again at photograph, exhibit No. 11, 
and state what appears around the margin of the pit? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, those books that were hidden in the trunk, we 
displayed those books around the hole. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, can you tell the committee the nature of the 
books which were hidden in the trunk, and which appear in that 
photograph ? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, there are many, and I can pick out some books, 
like books written by Earl Browcler, What is Communism?, the 
Communist magazine which is the official organ of the Communist 

» See p. 1399. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1399 



Party of the Ignited States, Political Economy, by I^eontev, and 
many more books, which I do not recollect at the ]:)resent tiino. 

]\rr. Tavenner. This trunk was located at Koko Head, I under- 
stood you to say. 

Mr. IzuKA. That is rifjht. It is about 2 miles from the main hi<^h- 
way, in Koko Head Valley. 

Mr. Tavenner. How far is that from Honolulu? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, I don't know particularly, about how many miles, 
but I presume it is about 35 minutes' ride from here, in the car. 




IzUKA Exhibit 11. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you tell the committee how that material 
happened to be buried there, if you know ? 

^Ir. IzuKA. Alice Hyun said that those books were buried by — they 
were buried by Dr. Reinecke and her brother, Peter Hyun. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know anything more about the burying? 

Mr. IzuKA. And, furthermore, Alice Hyun, she said that we should 
dig and dig the books out, and bring it to Reinecke's home, because 
those books belong to him. 

Mr. Tavenner. How much literature did the trunk hold? 

Mr. IzuKA. It was a trunk full of literature, and the trunk was 
packed full, as, later on, I was told that those books could have been 
used later on in case the party needs some valuable literature ; in case 
the party should go underground, if made illegal, and, furthermore, 
I said that after we were ordered to go in the car, we were told by the 
officers that we have to go to the Dillingham Building, and go through 
some investigation, and we stayed there for about 5 to 6 hours, and Mr. 
Ah Fook did some questioning about my Communist Party affilia- 
tions. He asked me if I am a Communist, and I said "No," and he 
asked me if I believed in the overthrow of the American form of gov- 
ernment by force and violence, so I — I told him, "Wliat do you mean? 



1400 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

How do you define communism ? I may answer 'Yes,' or 'No,' accord- 
ing to how you define the meaning of communism." And he got mad 
at me, and he said, "Well, you Commies are always the same, the same 
kind of a question, and the same kind of an answer," and, of course, he 
could not put nothing over me, and anyway, we were still, and, while 
still, until they have some other witnesses that they can examine, and 
we were released around 10 o'clock that evening. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did Jack Hall have occasion to talk to you 
about this incident ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, as soon as we were released, the next day, some 
time, and I went to Jack Hall's place, and we reported, and, oh, he 
got mad, and he said that ; he says that : "Like you, Kimoto ; especially 
like you. You were hidden up to now, and why is it you pulled such 
a foolish incident," you know, "that is going to be known, not only to 
the public but to the Government agencies," and at that time Kimoto 
told me: "Well, might as well we be known Communists, since Gov- 
ernment officials have our picture and everything," and so I told 
Kimoto at that time, I told him, "that is nothing, to be known Com- 
munist, if we are sincere; we are honest in our convictions." I said, 
"If people going to prove ^^'hether we were no-good citizens, if — but, 
we have proven ourselves that we have self-respect, and we believe in 
honesty and truth," and I said, "it is nothing to be scared of, being 
known Communist," and at that time I told Kimoto that "I am not 
scared." 

Mr. Tavenner. But Jack Hall was very mad because 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, Jack Hall was really mad, and he says, "We 
have to get together and really discipline Peter Hyun, and Dr. 
Reinecke, for doing things like that," but Peter Hyun at that time was 
running away, and they could not get him to criticize his actions, and 
I was very interested, and always asked Jack Hall and Kimoto what 
happened, and what results of criticizing Peter Hyun for taking that 
action, and he said that Peter Hyun will not attend meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, I am anxious to know exactly the reason that 
Jack Hall assigned for his being mad about this incident ? 

Mr. IzuKA. W^ell, he was mad because we were caught redhanded, 
and find this evidence out there, and he said it was a foolish move on 
the part of the people, like Kimoto, who actually mastered Marxism, 
and he says that "I don't know how people like Kimoto, how he 
take action like that," and he was mad, but, of course, he could not 
blame Kimoto about it, but the blame should lie in both Peter Hyun 
and Dr. Reinecke. 

Mr. Tavenner. But he was disturbed because their identity as Com- 
munists had become known publicly, isn't that right ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, that is probably correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Had he, at that time, made it known, publicly, that 
he was a member of the Communist Party — I mean Jack Hall ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Jack Hall never did admit that he was a member of 
the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether he has denied that he was a 
member of the Communist Party, publicly ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I read in the papers, many, many times, that he says. 
that he was not a member of the Communist Party. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1401 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whetlier Dr. Ileinecke was ever disci- 
plined for violation of Communist instructions about the destruction 
of this material? 

Mr. IzuKA. AYell, he accepted criticism, and well, he admitted that 
it was a mistake. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now after these things occurred at Koko Head, 
were the discussion "roups continued ? 

Mr. I/.UKA. After that tlie discussion groups were dissolved. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you have told us about the party disbanding 
at the attack on Pearl Harbor, when was the Connnunist Party re- 
activated in the Territory of Hawaii? 

Mr. Izuka. During tlie war. when the American forces were drag- 
ging the Japanese and the Germans back and back, toward the homes, 
toward the homeland, and we got more civilian rights restored, for the 
civilians, and then at that time we were instructed that the Com- 
nuniist Party should be reactivated, and Jack Hall, Kimoto, and 
Kawano met together and they suggested who— who should be con- 
tacted to be members and be dues-paying members again. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Do vou recall the date of the reactivation? 

Mr. Izuka. Oh, I believe it was some time in November 1945. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed at that time? 

Mr. Izuka. At that time I was working for the Army, United States 
engineers, at base 3'ard 6. 

Mr. TA^TNNER. Now, do you know what instructions were given in 
connection with the reactivation of the party, in November 1945? 

Mr. Izuka. Well 

Mr. Tavenner. And where they came from ? 

Mr. Izuka. I don't know how it came. I presume it came from 
California, because we were told that the party must be reactivated, 
and they had orders the party must reactivate ; through some couriers, 
I believe. 

Mr. Tavennj:r. Tell us what you mean by couriers. 

Mr. Izuka. Thej^ are the people who work on the ships, that travel 
between Honolulu and San Francisco, and important messages are not 
written in letters, or in any form of a written statement; it is orders 
that come from San Francisco, from and by seamen who actually work 
on ships. They are the ones who bring the instructions in their heads 
to local party leaders. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you think that these instructions were received 
in that manner? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes ; I believe it was in that procedure. The party was 
ordered to reactivate. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Who informed you, individually, that such instruc- 
tions had been received? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, I heard Jack Kimoto, Jack Hall, and Kawano 
mention that we had orders that we must reactivate. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you tell the committee how the party 
was reorganized in November 1945; that is, tlie Communist Party? 

Mr. Izuka. At the time of reorganizing the Connnunist Party they 
suggested — Hall, Kawano, and Kimoto, and I think Reinecke— sug- 
gested that the party should be divided into trade-union groups, which 
represent, I mean, it is not trade-unions, but CIO grou]:)s, ILWU, CIO 
groui)s in one fraction, and miscellaneous Communist Party members 



1402 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

of tlie union in one fraction, and white-collar workers in one fraction, 
and the white-collar workers to meet at Dr. Reinecke's home, and the 
ILWU, CIO party members, to meet at the home of either Kimoto, or 
any other party member. 

Mr. Tavennek. At whose home? 

Mr. IzuKA. Mr. Jack Kimoto, or any other party member, whose 
homes are available, and I was instructed that since I do not belong 
to this ILWU any more, that I should attend the party fraction of 
miscellaneous unions, which includes machinists and carpenters, and 
white — not white-collar, but union leaders, w^elfare men, and any other 
independents, and I was instructed that I should meet at Elizabeth 
Bristow's home, in Waikiki. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you spell that? Is that B-r-i-s-t-o-w? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who advised you you should go down to the ineet- 
ings at Elizabeth Bristow's home? 

Mr. Izuka. Jack Hall had instructed that he should contact me, 
and at the time of reactivation Jack Hall took the leading role in our 
pai'ticular fraction or branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you tell us who comprised the member- 
ship of this miscellaneous fraction that you were a member of? 

Mr. IzuKA. At the first meeting, when we got together, we elected 
officers, and Jack Hall was elected chairman and Mr. McElrath was 
elected, I believe it was, educational program, and Ralph Voss- 
brink 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that V-o-s-s-b-r-i-n-k? 

Mr. IzuKA. That is correct. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Go on. 

Mr. IzrKA. I was elected as — the literature committee, and I was 
elected treasurer. 

Mr. Tavenner. How man}' individuals were in this miscellaneous 
group at the time of its organization? 

Mr. IzuKA. Of course, I myself at that time, I was engaged in 
organizing Army workers, so I came under this independent union, 
and Imori 

ISIr. Ta%'enner. I-m-o-r-i? 

Mr. Izuka., Koichi Imori, he was together with me, representing 
independent unions, and Ernest Arena represents the drydock work- 
ers, together with Ralph Tokunaga and Frank Thompson, and he 
represents the international officers, and like Lou Goldblatt, but he 
also came under the miscellaneous group, like Jack Hall, and McElrath 
comes under the miscellaneous group. 

Mv. Tavenner. Those were people who met with you in the mis- 
cellaneous group fraction of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, at Mrs. Elizabeth Bristow's home. 

Mr. Ta^t^nner. As secretary-treasurer of the organization, what 
were your duties? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, since I had no responsible role in the union 
activities, they said that I should take charge of the money, and they 
elected me as treasurer, and I collected the dues, and the dues, in 
return, jro to Dr. Reinecke, who is the treasurer of the entire terri- 
torial central committee, which 80 percent goes to the territorial 
central committee, and 20 percent stays to the local fraction. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1403 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you keep records of the payments of member- 
ship dues? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, I kept records, because I had to do that, because 
even many Communist Pai'ty menil)ers they do not want to ])ay dues. 
One time,' I know, Mr. McElrath owed about, ahnost G months' dues, 
and he won't pay, and I always check on him and I said, "How about 
your dues, you are back? You shouhl be discipline(h" And one time 
he take out his weekly check, and tell me, if 1 can chan<i:e the check, 
and I said I can't, an'd the second time he take out a 5^20 bill, and I 
took it, and I deducted about 6 months' dues at one time, and gave 
him tlie rest. 

Mr. Tavenner. So Mr. McElrath paid up? 

JSIr. IzuKA. That is the reason I have to keep records; otherwise 
I cannot check up who paid, and wdio did not pay, and the only way 
I can check up who paid or not is throuoh the stamps, and we issue 
no receipts, and they pay $2 and I give them one stamp, a green 
stani}), and a yellow stamp, and I see — I say to show^ me your card, 
and when I see there is no stamp, and so then, "you have to pay," and 
I have it on my card, and actually find out whether they pay or not, 
and that is the reason I kept that card. That is for my own informa- 
tion. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Is this the card to which you refer ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, this is the card. 

Mr. Tavenner. Explain it to the committee. 

Mr. IzTjKA. This card is dated: this card begins from November 
1945, and at that time, and since I have to keep this, for these dues, 
this is kept in code, and I use Japanese figures, and I use Russian 
figures, and English figures. 

Mr. Tavenner. What kind of a figure do you use for Mr. Mc- 
Elrath? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, I use a Russian "M" for ^Mr. McElrath, and I use 
a Russian "H" for Jack Hall, and I use a Russian "T" for Thomp- 
son, and I use a Japanese alphabet for Jeanette Nakama, and a Japa- 
nese alphabet for Koichi Imori, and I use, in my case, I use my English 
name, "I" because I was not afraid of being known Communist, and 
it indicates the party book number, the party book number in 1945, 
and mine were 74515, but in this party card,' in 194G, those members 
who receive a 1945 party card, carried over the party card to 1946, 
and new members, who were recorded in 1946 had used a party card 
from their members, or set, who had before a 1945 card. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is the lowest number, and the highest number, 
over the period of time for which you kept the records ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, the lowest number is 74515, and the highest num- 
ber is 91633. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now. was a different serial number given for the 
year 1946 than for 1945 ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, that's right ; 1945 we had difl'erent serial num- 
bers, and 1946 we have new serial numbers. 

Mr. Taat.nner. Therefore, you cannot accurately determine the 
membership by those party book numbers? 

Mr. IzuKA. Oh, that i's about — yes, that's right. The accurate 
membership could be recorded only in Dr. Reinecke's book, because 
as far as I am concerned, I am responsible for only our fraction. 



1404 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you exphiin every other item that ap- 
pears. You have explained the method by which you designated the 
members of your group. Now, what is the other information that 
appears on the card ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, in 1945, and December 1945, and the first line, you 
see, this is one and one, which represents a dollar, for a dollar dues. 
Anybody who earns below $G0 a week pays a dollar dues, and any- 
body that receives beyond $(>0 pays $2 dues, so where you 
see these figures one and one, and two and two, and on the extreme 
right you will see 50 cents, that is the initiation fee, which we collect 
together with the partly dues [indicating]. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, from the beginnnig, from the very beginning, 
of that list, read the name of each person appearing as a member, and 
the amount of dues collected from the individual. 

Mr. IzuKA. The first name is Russian "A"; book number is 74515 f 
dues are $1 for the month of November; $1 for the month of Decem^ 
ber, and on January 1, January of 1946, he got the rest, $2; he got a 
raise in pay, so he paid $2, and June 1946 — - — 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Just a minute, whose name does that indicate 
Eussian "A"? 

Mr. IzuKA. This is Ernest Arena. The next is Russian "B" which 
represents Ralph Vossbrink. He earns beyond $60, so he pays dues 
of $2, and the next is Japanese alphabet, Naka, which represents 
Jeanette Nakama. and she was recorded on April 1946, and she earns 
less than $60, so the dues are $1. The next alphabet is Russian "H" 
which stands for Jack Hall, and the book number is 74519, and he 
earns beyond $60, so he paid $2 to June 1946. And the next is Eng- 
lish "I"- which represents, or means that it is less than $60, and I pay 
$1 dues. Russian "M," which stands for Robert McElrath, book 
ninnber 74521, and he earns beyond $60, so he pays $2 dues, up to 
July ; he paid up to July 1946. And the next is Frank Thompson, who 
is a Russian "T.'- and he paid up to March of 1946, and he did not 
pay after that, because he left for San Francisco. And the next is 
Japanese alphabet, which signifies Tokunaga. 

Mr. Tavenner. What Tokunaga ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Ralph Tokiuiaga, and he became a member on December, 
and he earns less than $60, so his dues are $1. The next number is 
English "O" which represents Vossbrink. He was recorded on Feb- 
ruary, February 1946, and he makes beyond $60, so he pays $2 dues, and 
the next is Japanese alphabet Okuhara. 

Mr. Ta\'exner. What is the first name? I am sorry, I didn't get it. 

Mr. Izuka. Oh, I cannot recall his first name. I have only his last 
name, Okuhara. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Is that spelled 

Mr. Izuka. 0-k-u-h-a-r-a. He was recorded on June 1946, and paid 
2 months' dues, June and July. The next figure represents Japanese 
words, signifying Wallie Ho. He did not pay no dues, because we 
were working on his transfer card from San Francisco. At that time 
he was assistant business agent to Rudy Eskovitz. The next alphabet 
is Russian "D'' and that refers to Dave Thompson, who is at present 
educational director for the ILWU. He also was waiting for his 
transfer card. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many months did he pay ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1405 

Mr. IzuKA. He did not pay, because — ^^tho ]r.uiy in Hawaii was 
awaitin<r for his reconnnendntion from Snn Francisco. At, that time 
all I <>-ot — I jnst <i()t liis book munber, and 1 did not know nuich 
about Dave Thompson. Later on, as I will explain to you, about 
Dave Thompson, why I put his initials and number down. The next 
alphabet is Russian "P, and that stands for Pe<;jxy Tesu^i, and she 
is oflice clerk for, 1 believe, the secretary-treasurer of the ILWTJ. 
The next, the Japanese alphabet stands for Uesugi, Donald Uesugi, 
the husband of Pecroy Uesu<2:i, and they did not pay dues. They were 
under scrutiny, and they had to go through Marx's beginner course. 

Mv .Tavexner. What" is the name of that beginner's course? 

Mr. IzuKA. Marx Beginner's Course. The name is Marx Begin- 
ner's Course. The next hgure represents Pauline Rosenthal. She was 
office manager at the ILWU, and she also is waiting for her transfer 
card, and the report from San Francisco of her activities in the Com- 
munist Party of San Francisco. 

The next figure is in Japanese words, and represents Abe. The 
Abes came from the mainland. 

The next figure is, too, Japanese figure. This represents Mrs. Carol 
Abe, and at the bottom is a Russian B, and that signifies Elizabeth 
Bristow, who paid dues for the month of — no, November and De- 
cember, and left on January, for New York. This is about all of the 
cards. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Now% why is it that the date of January 1946, seems 
to be the last date on which you credited payments to any of these 
members ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, I did that because in 1946, some time around 
June anly July, we w^ere told that the party, then we w^ere getting 
larger, and the records were getting bigger and we cannot meet at one 
place, and it is the practice of the Communist Party that no more than 
10 to 12 members should meet in one branch, or approximately that, 
and that is the reason wdiy the executive board should insist that all 
the fractions should split up in various communities, instead of three, 
and they decided that each branch to be split up by districts. For 
instance, the ILWU, CIO group should be broken up into McCabe, 
Hamilton & Renny branch, and Castle & Cooke branch, and the sugar 
and pineapple in one branch. And, Dr. Reinecke's branch should be 
broken up into the Manoa group, the Moiliili group, and the Kaimuki 
group, and the Waikiki branch should be split up into Manoa group, 
Sloiliili group and the Punchbowl group, and the Puunui group, they 
met at my home, at the time of the breaking up of the branches in 
various districts. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer this record in evidence, and mark it 
as "Exhibit, Izuka, No. 12." 

Mr. Walter. It will be so marked and received." 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Now, did you state a moment ago that 80 percent of 
the dues that were received were remitted to the central committee 
of the Connnunist Party in the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Before the action was took, we had a discussion in our 
branch that the 20 percent left should be transferred to the central 

committee, and I was told by Dr. Reinecke that I should be that 

I should pay him the total amount left. 

* See p. 1406. 



1406 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



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IzTjKA Exhibit 12. 

Mr. Tavenner. Which would be 80 percent ? 

Mr. IzUKA. No, that 80 percent goes to the central committee, and 
then the branch holds 20 percent. 

Mr, TA^^:NNER. All right. Now, then to whom do yon remit; make 
3 our remittances, when you give it to the central committee? 

Mr. IzuKA. The money was paid to Dr. Eeinecke. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Tavenner, I suggest you subpena Dr. Keinecke's 
records. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Mr. Chairman, Dr. Eeinecke has been subpenaed as 
a witness, and we will carry out your directions with regard to his 
records. 

Mr. Izuka. And, that 80 percent that goes to the central committee, 
part of that goes to the national committee, and the State committee, 
and part to the national committee. At this time when our branch was 
not liquidated, but was broken up to the various gToups, we had 20 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN. HAWAII 1407 

percent left in our treasury, and I was told that money was to go to 

the central tlie territorial central committee, and if I am not 

mistaken, at that time when I saw Dr. Reinecke at the ILWU head- 
quarters, I told him that I was instructed to pay the balance of 20 
percent to tlie central committee, and whether he wants it in cash or 
check, and he requested that a check will do all right, and at that time 
I wrote a check out, and he had a stamp. 

Mr. Tavenner. To whom did you make the check payable? 

]Mr. IzuKA. He told me to make the check payable to him. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you herewith a check drawn on the Bishop 
National Bank, King-Smith Street branch, dated Jvdy 13, 194(), pay- 
able to John E. Reinecke, in the amount of $45.10, and signed by you, 
and endorsed on the back thereof with the name of John E'. Reinecke. 
Will you examine that check and state whether or not that is the check 
to which you referred? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, this is the check which I wrote to Dr. Reinecke. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was for to represent what money? 

Mr. IzuKA. That was the balance which I was told that shoidd be 
given to Dr. Reinecke, as he is the treasurer of the territorial central 
committee. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the check in evidence, and desire 
to mark it "Izuka, Exhibit No. 13." 

Mr. Walter. Let it be marked and received in evidence. 



,-',''' ' .. C .■'-■A ' \ ■! ■.■ T^OfJ.xRb 



IzuKA Exhibit 13. 

]Mr. Tavenner. I hand you another paper, with insertions appearing 
thereon, and ask you to tell us what that is. 

Mr. Izuka. Well, this was for my own reference. I kept a record 
of dues paid by each member, which I entered into the card. In 
other words, it is something of a sort of keeping my records straight, 
to check up, who paid the dues for so many months, and concerning 
the initiation fees and 80 percent that goes to Dr. Reinecke, and 20 
percent that goes to our local branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do those figures appear in your own liandwriting? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes; this is in my oM'n handwriting. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the paper in evidence, and marl< 
it "Izuka, Exhibit No. 14." 



1408 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be marked and received.'^ 

Mr. TxWENNER. Now, yon have testified that when these dues are 
paid to you that yon issue stamps, which would be entered in the 
party book. From what source did you obtain these stamps? 

Mr. IzuKA. On any dues received, to start out with, we have to 
report to Dr. Reinecke that we have so many members, with those 
$2 dues, and so many members, party members who pay $1 dues, and 
we have to have $2 stamps and $1 stamps, so after the first payment 
I gave Dr. Keinecke an amount of work in $2 dues and $1 dues, and 
in return he gives me the stamps, and that stamp is stamped in that 
particular card. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did you make all 3^our remittances to Dr. 
Eeinecke by check, or did you pay him on occasion in cash? 

Mr. IzuKA. INIy monthly payments were all through cash, at either 
his home, or at the ILWU headquarters on pier 11. On the last 
money I paid, which was the balance, the total of the 20 percent for 
the past 8 months, was made out in checks, but the monthly remittances 
was in cash. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your reason for paying the balance by 
check ? 

Mr. IzuKA. That was not my — I asked Dr. Reinecke how he wants 
the money to be paid, "Do you want it in cash, or do you want it in 
check?" And he said, "Well, make it in check,'' ])ayable to him and 
this took place in the Marine Cooks and Stewards' office, at pier 11, 
and I borrowed his pen, and at that time I remember, it was in green 
ink, and I wrote it out in his name. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Was that about the time you left the Communist 
Party, did you not ? 

Mr. IzuKA. No ; at that time I did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you mentioned a moment ago that the mis- 
cellaneous group began to grow, and it split up, as I understand you, 
or divided into groups. Will you tell us about that ? 

Mr. IzuKxV. Our branch was split up; our membership, some of 
them were a Punchbowl fraction; some were a Manoa fraction, and 
some were a Kainmki fraction, and some were a Puunui fraction. 
The ILWU fraction was split up into sugar and pineapple branch, 
or fraction, and the McCabe fraction, or branch, and the Castle & 
Cooke branch. The Kaimuki fraction was divided up into the Puunui 
branch, and the Punchbowl branch, and the Manoa branch. That is 
all. 

Mr. TA^^5NNER. Do you know how many branches you have named ? 

Mr. Izuka. There is the Kaimuki branch, the Moiliili branch, the 
Manoa branch, the Puunui branch, and the sugar and pineapple 
branch, and the McCabe branch, and Castle & Cooke branch, and that 
is seven, in Honolulu itself. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, to which branch did you go ? 

Mr. Izuka. Since I live in the Puunui section, we decided that we 
meet — the Puunui branch meet at my house, 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was chairman of that branch ? 

Mr. Izuka. At that branch we elected Ralph Vossbrink as our chair- 
man, and Willis Wong as our treasurer. 

Mr. Tavenner. You speak of the Kaimuki group. Is that the 
correct pronunciation? What is the correct pronunciation? 

' Retainpd in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1409 

Mr. IzuKA, Kai-mu-kee. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who ^Yas chairman of that ^jrouji? 

Mv. IzuKA. The chairman of the Kaimnki j^roup was Dr. Reinecke. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know the names of any of the other officers 
of that group? 

Mr. IzuKA. I don't recollect, but I know that Mrs. Reinecke belongs 
to that group, and Henry 

Mr. Tavenner. Just a moment, you are getting a little too rapid. 
AVould you name them over again, please? 

Mr. IzuKA. Dr. Reinecke was chairman of that group, and Mrs. 
Reinecke was a member of that group, and I am sorry, I mentioned 
Henry, but he was a member of our branch; he lives at Puunui, and 
Ernest Arena belonged to that group for a short while, and he later 
on — he was transferred to the Moiliili branch, and Peggy Uesugi also 
belongs to the Kaimuki branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Peggy Uesugi? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are there others that you can name ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I know the Manoa group chairman was Mrs. IVIcElrath, 
and that the members in that particular group were Jack Hall, Frank 
Thompson, Dave Thompson, Mrs. Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you have mentioned Frank Thompson several 
times. Will you tell us more about him ; what was his occupation, then, 
and now, if you know ? 

Mr. IzuKA. At that time Frank Thompson w^as international repre- 
sentative, representing Louis Goldblatt, and as a field organizer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Field organizer for what ? 

Mr. Izuka. For the ILWU in the Territory of Hawaii, and at pres- 
ent I don't know what— I know he is not in Hawaii, but he went back 
to his city in California, and I don't know what his job is — his present 
job is now. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Tavenner, I think this would be a good time for 
a recess, and the committee will stand in recess for 5 minutes. 

(Following the recess, the hearhig was resumed at 3: 45 p. m.) 

Mr. Walter. The hearing will be in order. 

Resume, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Izuka, you were telling us at the time of the 
recess about the membership in the Kaimuki 

Mr. Izuka. Kaimuki. 

Mr. Tavenner. -group. How many, in all, constituted the 

membership of that branch, according to your best recollection? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, I was told that each branch should not get more 
than from between 10 and 12 members to each branch. If a branch 
acquire more membership, then they have to break away in more 
groups. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. So you have told us seven different branches were 
formed by them on the island of Oahu ? 

Mr. Izuka. That is right 

Mr. Tavenner. And the membership in every branch, I mean the 
membership was 10 to 12 in each of those 7 branches? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. That was in 1916? 

Mr. Izuka. 1916. 



1410 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN" HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you have referred to the names of these 
various branches. 

Mr. IzuKA. You mean the names of the branches? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. IzuivA. Kaimuki branch, Moiliili branch, Manoa branch, Punch- 
bowl branch, Puunui branch, Castle & Cooke branch, McCabe, Hamil- 
ton & Renny. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, just a minute. You said Castle & Cooke 
branch. 

Mr. IzTJK^v. Well, that represents the Castle & Cooke stevedoring 
employees. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Does that mean that the membership of that branch 
was made up of the employees from that concern ? 

Mr. IzTTKA. That is right. The employees working for Castle & 
Cooke stevedoring company. 

Mr. Tavenner. And which at that time meant only 10 members? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. That is right, of the particular Castle & Cooke 
employees, and anybody who is a member of the ILWU, at the same 
time a member of the Communist Party, belongs to that particular 
Castle & Cooke branch. And McCabe, Hamilton & Renny stevedoring 
employees should belong to the McCabe-Hamilton branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. And when you used that name, it was merely a 
name to designate the Communist Party insofar as it was made up of 
members from that source of employment? 

Mr. IzuKA. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you used the term a while ago of "CIO- 
ILWTJ." I think that was at the time you said there was a miscellane- 
ous group in the CIO and the ILWU group. And still a third group. 
Am I correct in that? 

Mr. IzuKA. That group was before we split it up. That was the 
original branch. Originally, when we were ordered to reactivate, we 
reactivated in three separate groups. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. IzuKA. The Kaimuki group, the ILWU-CIO group 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Just a minute. Explain what you mean by the 
ILWU-CIO group. 

Mr. Izuka. This was during the time when we were ordered to 
reactivate. Everybody wdio belongs to the CIO-ILWU group at the 
time of reactivation should belong to that particular group. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you just used the name 

Mr. Izuka. "Miscellaneous." 

Mr. Tavenner. Of this CIO-ILWU to designate the members from 
that group who were in the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. That means they are members of the ILWXT. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Now, at that time approximately how many con- 
stituted the entire membership of the ILWU-CIO branch, when the 
party was reactivated ? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, during that time I think it was about — not 
exactly — but from 12 to 15. 

Mr. Tavenner. 12 to 15. Now, what was the other branch? I be- 
lieve you said there were 3, did you not? 

Mr. Izuka. That is right. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. What was the name of the third branch ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1411 

Mr. IzuKA. The second branch is the Kainmki branch, whicU 
Reinecke represents, and the other one was this miscellaneous branch. 
This miscellaneous branch consisted of the CIO union, two unions, 
like the Marine, Cooks and Stewards Union, the Marine Drydock 
"Workers Union. Like McElrath and Ernest Arena and Ralph 
Tokunao-a, who represents the CIO — not the ILWU group but tlie 
drydock and bakery, machinists independent, carpenters' union. And 
like Frank Tliompson, David Thompson, and Rosenthal. They come 
under the miscellaneous group. 

Mr. Tavenner. Approximately how many in this miscellaneous 
group were employees or were members of these unions you have just 
mentioned ? 

Mr. IzUKA. Ernest Arena and McElrath belongs to the drydock and 
bakery workers, bakery union, and Okuhara represents the carpenters' 
union. Koichi Imori represents or at that time represented the inde- 
pendent union. I believe that is about all. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated "represented various unions." What 
did you mean b}^ that? 

Mr. IzuKA. For instance, Koichi Imori, he represents the machinists 
union. 

Mr. Tavenner. "When you say "represents," do you mean that he 
was a member of that union or that he had been elected by the union 
in some way in a representative capacity ? 

]Mr. IzuKA. "Well, Koichi Imori was a business agent. He was a 
business agent for the international association of machinists union ; 
he was also a short-time business agent for the teamsters union. 

Mr. Tavenner. But he was a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr, IzuKA. I did not mean that he actually represented the union, 
but he actually represents as a party member from that particular 
craft. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, did you mean to snj, when you 
refer to a person being from a certain union, to say that he was a 
member of that union and also a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is what you mean ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, that is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. But he was not in any sense representative of a 
union, an elected representative to the Communist Party? 

Mr. IzuKA. No. When I mentioned about certain names in con- 
nection with the Communist Party I always refer to him as a member 
of the Communist Party and not of the particular union. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Yes. Actually, those who affiliated with the unions 
represent only a very small fraction 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenn«i:r. of the union membership in any one of these 

unions, isn't that true? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, that is right. The party members of any par- 
ticular branch of the union are the ones that arranges the agenda and 
the business program of a particular union. They meet secretly before 
any general membership meets together, even before the executive 
board meets together. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. I don't understand what you said. Will you repeat 
that? 



1412 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. IzuKA, What I meant is this. That before any bona fide nnion 
meeting takes phice the Communist Party members get together and 
bring the matter up in the Communist Party fraction meeting, and 
they decide what should be taken up in the executive board of the 
particular union. Then when the executive board decides policies 
and the agenda of the general meeting, and before going there the 
Communist Party prearranges all the business transactions. In other 
words, they are the brains behind these ILWU unions in the Territory, 
the Communist Party members. For instance, Jack Hall, he might 
be regional director, but in fact he is Communist Party first. The 
Communist Party comes first, see? 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, by the method that you have de- 
scribed, a comparatively small handful of Communists who hold 
important positions in a union or any other organization could impart 
the Communist line to that entire organization by decisions ahead of 
their meetings? 

Mr. IzuKA. That is right. Everything is prearranged, and in this 
particular, from my experience, the ILWU, the party members are 
actually the brain trust of any union in the Territory. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let's be more specific about that. I am speaking 
now of 194G, at the time when you were — how long did you remain 
in the Communist Party? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, I joined in 1938 and I resigned in 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1946. Well, during the time that you were in the 
Conununist Party, let's be specific, say in the year 1946, can you tell 
this committee what action of the Communist Party was imparted 
to any union by the method you have described ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I can bring out one instance that actually took place at 
Jack Kimoto's home at Makanani Drive. At that time I believe that 
the sugar workers had back pay on wages and hours pending. In that 
particular meeting we had party discussions as to what they should 
do about that $1,800,000 in back wages under the Fair Labor Standards 
Act. At that meeting the party recommended that the money — that 
some party member should make a motion saying that the $1,800,000 
should be used as a strike fund to bolster the position of the 1946 
negotiations. And that meeting was prearranged for the convention 
that was going to be held in Hilo, Hawaii. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Convention of what union ? 

Mr. Izuka. ILWU, in Hilo ; that took place in 1946. And the party 
members got together and arranged what action they should take at 
the convention in Hilo. At that time, of course, that one particular 
party program did not hold true because all the field representatives, 
the workers, in the ILAVU wanted the fair labor standards wages, 
the back pay, and they did not want to use that money for the strike 
fund. And when the party members brought the motion up on the 
floor, made a motion, I believe it was Yoshikawa Muramoto from 
Kauai who made the motion that $1,800,000 money should be kept in 
reserve as a strike fund to prove to the employers that this money 
was going to be used as a bargaining position on the side of the union. 

Mr. Tavenner. But in this instance, if I understand, the decision 
that had been previously reached by the Communist Party was not 
carried out by the ILWtl ; it was unsuccessful ? 

Mr. Izuka. It was unsuccessful because after the convention was 
held in Hilo, at that particular time, I think instead of the party 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1413 

getting together and coming to one coiiclusion tliey had many troubles 
by the leaders over there. Officer Kawano reported that Jack Hall got 
drunk and McElrath got drunk and everything went haywire and 
nothing concrete could be established. And then after the conven- 
tion met some of the delegates were real sore because the i)rogram 
failed and the convention did not come out the way the party planned. 
Mr. Tavenner. That is one instance in which the Connnunist Party 
was unsuccessful. Do you know of any instance in 15)46, when you 
were a member of the Connnunist Party, when it was successful? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, 1 mentioned previously 

Mr. Tavenner. By the methods you have described ? 
Mr. IzuKA. Previously, I say that during the 1940 10-month strike, 
wnich was in 1940, lO-month strike, like Jack Hall and McElrath 
and John Reinecke, John Reinecke said that the Honolulu local, 
ILWU local, should sym])athize in the strike with Port Allen local, 
and Jack Kawano did not want Honolulu local to be involved in that 
sympathetic strike. And they had a conflict between Jack Hall and 
McElrath and Reinecke and the Kawano group. And they could not 
get this thing thrashed out, so what they did, they called an executive 
board meeting of the Connnunist Party and they thrashed this thing 
out and finally they agreed that the Honolulu local, being so weak 
as it is, should not sympathize with the Port Allen strike, 6-month 
strike, and once a decision was made Jack Hall and McElrath abided 
by the decision and it was carried through that Honolulu did not in- 
volve in the sympathy strike in Port Allen. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, you mean to state that this was an 

example of the efforts that were made by the Communist party 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. To impose its will and its decisions upon unions, 
members of which were members of the Communist Party? 
Mr. IzuKA. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What type of membership of the various unions 
and other organizations did the Communist Party endeavor to induct 
into the Communist Party ^ I mean by that, was it a campaign 
established for the rank-and-file memberships of these organizations 
or was it an effort to capture the leadership in these various organi- 
zations? 

Mr. IzuKA. Do you mean what activity the party members stood in 
capturing officers of the political party or some kind of organization? 
Mr. Tavenner. No. I mean in recruiting membership from these 
various organizations. Was any special effort made to recruit mem- 
bership from the leadership of these organizations or merely to be 
contented with the rank and file membership ? 
Mr. IzuKA. I don't get that question clearly. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. I will repeat it. The Communist Party 
made a constant drive for membership, did it not? 
Mr. IzuKA. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. In making this drive for membership, did it en- 
deavor to solicit those who were in the position of leadership in the 
\ arious unions and other organizations of the Territory or did they 
merely content themselves with the attempt to solicit the rank and 
lile members of those other organizations? 

66636 — 50— pt. 1 5 



1414 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Izuka. Well, their main point or drive is to try to get the lead- 
ership, the leaders of that particular organization, and not the entire 
rank and file members. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall attending a meeting of the executive 
central committee of the Communist Party in 1946, at which time the 
Hawaii Youth for Democracy was discussed ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 

Mr. Taatenner. Who were present at that meeting? 

Mr. Izuka. At that meeting the members present were Jack Kimoto, 
Charles Fujimoto, Eileen Fujimoto, David Hyun, John Reinecke, 
Jack Kawano, Mrs. McElrath. 

How many was that ? 

(The answer was read by the reporter.) 

Mr. Izuka. Do you have Jack Kimoto ? 

The Eeporter. Yes. 

Mr. Izuka. That is about all. Oh, Ralph Vossbrink. 

Mr. Tavenner. What occurred at that meeting, if anything, that 
you recall ? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, at that meeting they said that since that particu- 
lar branch, they did not have an active part in their union, that they 
should try to work with the Hawaii Youth for Democracy to build 
that organization up. And it was the Kaimuki branch that should 
take an active part in that, and they assigned Dr. Reinecke and Charles 
Fujimoto for that particular organization. 

Mr. Ta\t5nner. In your testimony a few moments ago, Mr. Izuka, 
you talked about the influence and effect of the Communist Party upon 
labor unions, and I frankly did not understand just to what extent 
you meant the Communist Party was in a position to affect or influence 
labor unions. I wish you would explain what you meant. I think 
you used the term, in describing it, as "any labor union." What did 
you mean? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, in this particular case I mean that where the 
ILWU union exist, the ILWU does not in a union like, for instance, 
the A. F. of L. union in Honolulu, I don't think they have many Com- 
munists in the A. F. of L. union. But when you mention Communists 
taking the leading role 

Mr. Tavenner. Wait a minute. I didn't understand. 

Mr. Izuka. I said in the A. F. of L. unions they have very few 
Communists taking the leading role, but in the ILWU unions the 
Communist Party members in the union are a brain trust in the form- 
ing of the policies. That means in the ILWU unions in the Territory. 

Mr. Tavenner. So that is what you referred to when you used the 
term "any union" ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. I meant particularly about those ILWU unions. 

Mr. Tai'enner. You are speaking of the time in 1946 when you 
were a member or are you speaking of any other time? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, during the time from the time I joined the Com- 
munist Party until 1946, and I assume even today they are in the saddle, 
they are dictating the policies. 

Mr. Tavenner. In 1946, I believe you testified that there were 7 
different groups on this island, of about 10 to 12 members each ? 

Mr. Izuka. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know how many branches there were on 
the other islands in the Territory at that time ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1415 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, at that time I was informed tliat at that time the 
outside islands had very few members and they should have one branch 
each on each island. 

Mr. Tavenner. What in your judgment was the total membership 
of the Communist Party at that time, Mr. Izuka ? 

Mr. Izuka. At the time when I resigned I heard a report that they 
had about 130 in the whole Territory, the entire Territory. 

Mr. TA^TNNER. Now, do you know at that time what the total mem- 
bership of the ILWU was in the Territory ? 

Mr. Izuka. Oh, I heard it represented about thirty-five to forty 
thousand employees — membership. 

Mr. Ta%tenner. How many of the ILWU union members were 
members of the Communits Party in your judgment, at that time? 

Mr. Izuka. I believe about 90 percent belonged to the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean 90 percent of the Communists members 
belong to the ILWU? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. Communist members out of the 130 I mentioned, 
over 90 percent of theme belong to the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. You testified this morning about the passing down 
of the party line to the rank and file of different organizations. You 
w^ere referring, I take it, to the Communist Party line, were you not? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. That is right. I was referring to — when I say 
"party line" that means Communist Party line. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, members of the Communist Party 
would decide upon a policy 

Mr. Izuka. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And those Communist Party members who were 
leaders in the various organizations would then take that policy of 
the Communist Party line to their own organizations ? 

Mr. Izuka. That is right. Yes, sir. Because I can give you an 
example. Prior to the time when Earl Browder was the general sec- 
retary of the Communist Party in the United States, at that time 
we had a party line called the so-called labor-management no-strike 
program, and during that time I know that union leaders made friends 
with the bosses and had a good time, but after the party line changed 
strikes were called in Hawaii, one after another. I think it started 
with the party line, the first strike that took place was the dry dock, 
then it was followed up with the sugar strike, with the pineapple 
strike, and those orders all came from San Francisco. It is not a local 
decision because I remember it very clearly, because Frank Thompson 
told me, and even Lou Goldblatt told me. 

Well, he says, "Izuka, the people in Hawaii cannot get good condi- 
tions, wages, until this struggle ; you have to learn through the hard 
way; they have to go through a struggle." And that struggle he 
meant was that the people of Hawaii had to go through a strike. And 
that was the time when the Communist Party changed, when Brow- 
der was kicked out and Mr. Foster took over, and they had a big 
feud in San Francisco during the time of the committee for maritime 
unity, when Joseph Curran had a hot argument with Bridges. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us in what other fields of activity the Com- 
munist Party during the period that you were a member attempted 
to impart the Communist line to other organizations. 

Mr. IzuTCA. AVell, I remember very clearly about — in 1946 — dur- 
ing the sugar strike, when the Communist Party — when these leaders 



1416 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

like Jack Hall, Kawano, and McElrath and Frank Thompson, when 
they tried to impose the endorsement of such political candidates to 
support them, and during that time I brought a man out in our frac- 
tion, the Puunui fraction — that the party should give decisions, and 
what the branch should do, during that 1946 sugar strike. And at 
that time they ad a political campaign going on, and nothing was 
reported, and Ralph Vossbrink said, "Well, we should make up our — 
we should do as we were told." So nothing happened. And certain 
leaders in the ILWU said the union should endorse certain candidates, 
so-called PAC candidates, for the primary election. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, were there any other fields of endeavor in 
which the Communist Party attempted to impose its policies and its 
views ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, they had a mind to enter — to introduce a con- 
sumers' co-op. In Honolulu they organized a consumers' co-op and 
they were instructed that they should infiltrate in the consumers' 
co-op and either control the co-op lock, stock, and barrel, or if they 
can't control, to just try and make it so that it cannot organize 
itself. 

In another instance, the Communist Party was trying to infiltrate 
into this — what is this — Hawaiian Association of Civic Unity. Their 
policy is either rule or destroy. If they are in the saddle, well, they 
are in the front, and if they cannot be in the front, the only thing 
is to sabotage it, just make it so it won't work effectively. 

Mr. Ta%^nner. In other words, you have described now the manner 
by which the Communist Party endeavors to control through its 
membership all types of civic endeavor? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, yes; that is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And is it not true that their success depends upon 
their ability to bring into the Communist Party leaders, or to make 
leaders in the various lines of endeavor? 

Mr. IzuKA. Oh, yes; their job is to build leadership. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Jim Freeman? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you attended any Communist Party meetings 
with him? 

Mr. IzuKA. After the primary election, sometime in October 1946, 
Jim Freeman was dispatched from California; he was a man that 
California appointed to be a full-time party functionary in the Terri- 
tory, and his pay should come — half of his salary should be paid 
by the State of California and half of his salary to be paid by the 
Territorial Communist Party. 

Mr.. Tavenner. How many meetings do you think you attended 
which he attended ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I believe I attended two meetings with him in the 
central committee. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall an incident in which Mrs. Reinecke 
came to you regarding certain advertising? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, when I attended — when I was instructed to attend 
a Communist Party meeting. Before the meeting started, she asked 
me, well, she said, "The strikers on Kauai are soliciting advertising 
for the strike fund." And he asked me — she asked me to donate 
some money, in which that advertising cost a dollar. She said that 
T can write any kind of slogan they would print it. Any amount of 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1417 

money would be used for a strike fund. So I paid her a dollar. She 
told me that ad was ^oing to be in this strike bulletin. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, was it used? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, I thought it was used, but she mailed that ad and 
the money back to me. 

Mr. Tavenner. What had happened in the meantime? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, in the meantime 

Mr. Tavenner. Between the time that she spoke to you about the 
ad and the collection of a dollar from you, and the time that you 
received the letter from her ? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, during that time I still was a party member. 
That was after the primary election of 1946, during the general 
election. Right after that, after the meeting, well, after going into 
further detail, why that came about that she sent this letter back to 
me. When she solicited my ad, during that executive board meeting, 
of course, we had terrible trouble about the Political Action Com- 
mittee endorsement, and the whole Territory for instance, from Maui, 
Kauai, and Oahu, was confused on the issue of the endorsement. Take, 
for instance, on Kauai. Maui, and Hawaii, the PAC endorsed all 
Democrats, except one Republican, and the rank and filers were con- 
fused: Wliy is it that we should have Democrats on one side, and 
then a Republican on this side. People like me supported labor, and 
he is now district president, Takemoto from Mauri ; from Kauai, we 
had Marumoto and Kunemura. All these people that came to Honolulu 
to try to see what was the trouble with that endorsement, with only 
one Republican taking place in the other island. During that time, 
of course, so far as I am concerned, I was working for the army 
engineers, and I had no part in taking in the union activity. The 
people outside, the delegates, they found out that they had to get 
somebody who can be represented by us to bring this problem to the 
union leaders, people like Kawano, Hall, McElrath, and Goldblatt 
started, to help them out, because they requested that this endorse- 
ment be withdrawn. And they held a caucus at pier 11 meeting, and 
I can say that Jack Hall, Goldblatt, and McElrath were worried 
about it. That is the reason why I was called in by the central com- 
mittee that disciplined me, because I was going against the party 
leaders in their program. So that is the reason why, before the 
meeting started, Mrs. Reinecke solicited that ad„ and during the 
general election, well, before the general election, at that Communist 
Party meeting, in the Communist Party meeting, t/hen the meeting 
started, they asked me, "Well, what have you got to say about the 
endorsement of Delegate Farrington?" 

So I said the outside island delegates were mostly against the 
endorsement, and I think it is more than proper that the party could 
not endorse no delegates and let the Democrat candidates fight it for 
themselves, because the outside island delegates wanted it that way. 
Then Jimmy Freeman asked the question, he said, "If there is any 
cause for dissention among the rank and file on this political issue, 1 
think, and the party should withdraw the endorsement of Farring- 
ton." Then Kawano and Jack Hall jumped up on their feet, and 
said, "Well, there is no sign — what do you call — there is no sign of 
confusion," and they said everything would be all right if we endorse 
Farrington. In the meantime we had a discussion. Finally Mrs. 
McElrath asked if the motion is ready, the chairman said yes, and she 



1418 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

made a motion that — slie moved that the endorsement of Farrington 
be retained. They took a vote, and everybody agreed to it. The 
majority of them agreed that Farrington should be endorsed. So 
right after that, I thought that I didn't belong in the party, because 
the outside delegates wanted to support the Democratic program. 
The things which I said in the central committee was not my personal 
opinion, but the opinion of the outside island delegates. So after that 
decision took place, I went home, and I wrote a letter of resignation to 
the Communist Paity, and that letter, together with my book, I gave 
it to Dr. Reinecke. Then, in the general election I went around in 
support of the Democratic delegate to Congress, and we went from 
island to island, and made campaign speeches on every Democratic 
candidate, and we almost succeeded. In the meantime, since I took 
opposite action from the Communist Party, Mrs. Reinecke sent me 
my ad back and the letter, together with the money. That was after 
the general election. 

Mr. Tavenner. I offer the letter in evidence. Mark it "Exhibit 
Izuka Number 15." ^ 

Did you make a copy of the resignation ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, at the time I wrote I held a copy of the letter of 
resignation. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is this a copy ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, this is a copy. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you read it, please? 

Mr. Izuka (reading) : 

Ichiro Izuka, 2714 Liliha Street, Honolulu, T. H., October 20, 1946. Executive 
board of the party. Dear Comrades : I am handing in my resignation, together 
with my book, from the party, to take effect immediately. I am doing this after 
long and careful thinking following the executive board decision, because I 
want to go ahead and do what I am sure is right. My first duty is to the workers, 
and I intend to carry out that duty. The time is too short to appeal to any 
other higher body, and I cannot afford to waste it. I feel I can do more at this 
time by working outside the party. I must bring the truth to the workers, and 
whether you doubt me or not, I remain a Marxist and Leninist. The class strug- 
gle is first in my heart, and I am going to the workers and help them in this 
strike, and I want to be free, and I am convinced that the Governor of this 
Territory can help us win this strike, and get behind him, and get him behind 
the workers to win this struggle in the easiest way out. 

The party is not supporting the Governor, and if I remain within the party, 
I am not free to take such action, and this will not be helping the workers. I 
hope some day that you will see this position, and when you do, I will immedi- 
ately ask for my reinstatement, if you wish to have me back. I want to assure 
you I will do everything to keep the unity and solidarity of the workers and 
will do nothing that will cause a split in their ranks. I know that my actions 
and work will prove that to the party. Very truly yours. Ichiro Izuka. 

Mr. Tavenner. I oflfer the letter in evidence. Mark it "Exhibit 
16."^ 

Mr. Izuka. Mr. Chairman, at the time I wrote the letter, I still 
could not get away from my Marxist thinking, so I wrote the letter 
at the time when I was still believing in this particular philosophy. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you still believe in the philosophy you expressed 
in that letter ? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, at the present, or at the time I wrote that letter, 
you mean ? Well, my thinking is the very opposite. Of course, so far 
as a certain part of it, but now it is not. Everything that I am against, 

* Retained in commltee files. 

* See appendix. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1419 

the things that I wrote in there, certain things in the Marxists and 
Leninists, that particular things that I want to be left out. 

Mr. Tavknner. To whom did you deliver that letter? 

Mr. IzuKA. At the time I wrote the letter, I gave the letter to — I 
brought that over to John Reinecke's residence, and told John Rein- 
ecke, "I am sorry, but I am going to resign from the Communist 
Party." And I gave him the letter and the book. 

Mr. Tav-enner. Did you receive a reply to that letter ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, he said, "Before you take that action, let's go and 
see Jimmy Freeman." And at the time Jimmy Freeman was living 
about two or three houses back of John Reinecke. Both of us went to 
Jimmy Freeman's home, but he was not in. So, well, I told him I 
cannot stay in the party any more, I am going to resign, and he shook 
hands, and he said, "Izuka, well, you are making a wrong mistake." 

Mr. Ta\^nner. I hand you this letter, and I ask you to identify it. 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, this letter was sent to me by Wallace Ho. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did he hold at the time ? 

Mr. Izuka. At the time, Wallace Ho was only a member of the 
Punuui branch. As soon as I resigned from the Communist Party, 
he may have been elected to this chairman of the trial committee, and 
he sent me this letter, that I have offered before the committee to suet 
a trial. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you read the letter. 

Mr. Izuka (reading) : 

Honolulu, T. H. November 18, 1940. Dear Comrade : You are hereby notified 
that charges have been placed upon you by the Territorial executive board of 
the Communist Party of the United States of America, for your direct violation 
of our article 4, section 2, and article 9, section 1, of our constitution. 

For the immediate disposal of your case, the trial committee will meet on 
Sunday, November 24, 1946, at 2 p. m., at 62 Laimi Road, Honolulu, T. H. 
In accordance with our constitution you have the fullest rights to appear 
before this committee to defend yourself from any injustice. Yours truly, Wal- 
lace Ho, chairman of the trial board. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will ask this be introduced in evidence.^" 

Mr. Izuka. Mr. Chairman, of course I did not present the answer 
to this letter, during the Reinecke trial, in the other trial, but I have 
a copy of the letter, which I wrote to the Communist Party, under 
registered mail, my answer to this letter. I don't know whether it is 
proper to read that now or not, but I would like to, at least, express 
what I thought, what kind of a trial I am going to face. 

Mr. Tavenner. Proceed. 

Mr. Izuka. At this time I would like to read the letter I answered. 
This letter was dated November 21, 1946. Dear Mr. W. Ho, chairman, 
trial committee. 

I wish to request further extension of my case, in referring to your letter, 
dated November IS, 1946, because I think I would like to prepare my case 
meticulously, based on the following points of arguments. 

1. Prior to the primary endorsements absolutely no discussion nor decision 
was made by the party, on the matter of sugar and PAC endorsement. I am 
sure, I mentioned this subject at our fraction meeting more than once, about 
2 weeks before the primary endorsements, but nothing was discussed upon the 
most important issue of the party program as to strike question and political 
activities. I think the sole mistake of the PAC program and endorsements were 
left up to individual union leaders and was not the decision of the party to 
endorse Farrington. I think as far as the primary endorsements are con- 



** See appendix. 



1420 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

eertied. it was not the party's piograra, and the party sliould have compelled the 
neutral stand on the delegateship race, instead of concurring the recommenda- 
tions of a few union leaders, when it was known definitely, that it was a mistake 
for endorsement of Farrington. 

2. Breach of party discipline should apply to all who are not carrying out the 
decision of the party, for the following reasons : How did the union members 
of Hawaii know the endorsements of Keawe and Wingate, about 2 months prior 
before the meeting of the endorsement committee in Honolulu. 

Even Harry Kamoku, according to Fred Low, who told me, Kamoku was 
for Doc Hill in the primary, regardless of the PAC endorsements. Moreover, 
during the Democratic campaign on the island of Hawaii, we were informed by 
Mr. Nelson Ahuna, who came back from a mainland vacation trip, that Kamoku 
and another person came to the Hilo Airport and offered him $500, plus the 
PAC support, if he should accept the candidate race for the short-term senate. 
Mr. Ahuna refused this offer, so R. Chang was their man. This offer was made 
just before Mr. Ahuna left for the vacation trip to the States. 

Is it right for Jack Hall, who after the primary election, failed to convince 
Hiaoka from Kohala, who is 100 percent for Senator Silva, to switch to Keawe 
and Wingate? Failure to convince Hisoaka, Hall told Hisaoka, well you support 
Silva and Wingate, and to fight Hill, but not to withdraw the endorsement of 
Farrington. 

3. The party admitted the mistalie of endorsing Farrington during the primary 
election, and at the time said that the delegate race was not the important 
issue, the important issue is to elect local representatives and senators, and 
the delegate race meant nothing. Who gets elected. But the action of the union 
leaders, by means of libel leaflets and undemocratic tactics proved otherwise, 
when the voters of Kauai and Maui were switching to Mr. Borthwick. On 
Kauai and Maui no attack was made on the leadership of the ILWU, but to the 
contrary, the strikers were more solidified against the HSPA. The strikers 
of Kauai and Maui can prove this, and even Kimoto can pi-ove this because 
when Berman and Mr. Borthwick and Governor spoke on Kauai at the Democratic 
meeting, Kimoto was there. 

But when the leaflets were distributed on Kauai libeling Berman undemo- 
cratic and gangster tactics used on Hawaii ; and when last minute phone calls to 
Maui, giving orders to Maui union leaders, stating that by voting for Farring- 
ton the strikers are helping to win the strike. This was the time during the 
campaign on Hawaii that the attack was made at Mooheau Park on Hall and 
Kewano because foul means were started by the union leaders first. 

4. At the last executive board meeting before my resignation, the board 
believed that if the endorsement of Farrington will create dissention among the 
workers, the delegate race should be withdrawn. Hall and Kewano argued very 
strongly that there is nothing to worry about dissension, and everything will 
be all right for the endorsement of Farrington. I argued my best to convince 
the board that the outside island voters will vote for Borthwick, because 
nearly every delegate from the outer islands w^as instructed to investigate on 
the delegate race on the question why, only one Republican should be on the 
PAC endorsement; and why is that economically the strikers are fighting the 
HPSA, or the "big five," and politically the PAC is supporting Farrington, who 
is one of the representatives of the "big five," and the owner of a million dollar 
newspai>er publication. Mr. Farrington's record, historically speaking from 
1932 up to 1944, his editorials were viciously antilabor, and everything anti-New 
Deal. I think one of the basic principles of the party is to study the historical 
background, and to draw the best conclusion to be the vanguard of the workers. 

5. On Maui and Kauai, where Mr. Borthwick, Berman, and the Governor were 
well received by the PAC and the Democratic Party, and after their campaign 
all of the candidates won by overwhelming votes, with the exception of Farring- 
ton, K. K. Kam, who led by a mere 100 votes in the primary, won by more 
than 700 votes in the general, to the support of Berman and Borthwick on the 
island of Molokai. On Kaua, Tom Ouye, who lost out to Marcalino (who is a 
very reactionary Republican and stooge for HSPA, whom Farrington supported 
and stumped for on Kauai) in the primary by a very small margin of Niihau 
votes, got a bigger vote in the general and was elected even with all Niihau votes 
went to Marcalino. Where Borthwick, Berman, and the Governor spoke for 
the Democratic candidates, every candidate made a good showing, but on the 
islands of Hawaii and Oahu where undemocratic and gangster tactics were used, 
the PAC candidates made a very bad showing. I think this proves that no 
disunity among the strikers were created and all local representatives and sena- 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1421 

tors were elected overwhelmingly. I fui-ther think a good lesson should be 
drawn from the results and the mistakes from the past campaign. 

6. If the leaflet which Kawano signed accusing: Berman was correct and had 
convinced the party, I. for one, was willing to go out and campaign for Farring- 
ton, based on the argvunents contained in the leaflets, but even the i)arty wasn't 
too sure of the leaflet and kept quiet. The most important argument in favor 
of supporting Farrington wei"e on statehood and appeasement of the Star Bul- 
letin. The membeis should know what liappened to Chamberlain after ap- 
peasing Hitler. I like to know since when the party went for the "umbrella" 
policy. 

7. How can the party members build the party stronger, and at the same time 
be the vanguard of the workers by concealing the truth from the working masses. 
The PAC endorsement of Farrington to the striker and the public was just like 
shoving down triple dose of castor oil down the workers throat which was taken 
reluctantl.v. When we speak of revisionism and Browderism as reactionary, I 
think over here, we have the combination of the two ; first by forgetting to edu- 
cate the workers in preparation for the strike, and the PAC program, and sec- 
ondly, by collaborating then with reactionary Star Bulletin and Farrington, the 
owner. The last election proved this when the voters gave the vote of confi- 
dence to Borthwick, despite the vicious attack on Berman by the leaflets and 
the attack on the Governor by the Farrington and the Star Bulletin, in other 
words, million-dollar paper and the PAC were against Borthwick, but the people 
and the workers of Hawaii gave their vote of confidence to Borthwick. The peo- 
ple of Hawaii and even the union members were convinced that only through 
the votes and the support of union members in the plantations, saved Farring- 
ton by a mere margin of 8,000 votes in the entire Territory. 

8. In conclusion I wish to remind the party members that by the lessons of 
political economy that we learned that politics, economics, and society must 
go hand in hand and cannot be separated. When the union leaders or anybody 
forgets where the strength of the union lies and forgets to convince the workers 
with the most mightiest weapon for the workers, the truth on all issues with 
time and patience, I think that it is time that something should be done and 
corrected. 

9. To clarify my position, I would like to again enclose a copy of my resigna- 
tion, because I think the full content of my letter was not read in full to all the 
party members, which I think it should be read. Very truly yours, I. Izuka. 

This letter was written in answer to the letter that I received from 
Wallace Ho. 

Mr. Tavenner. I would like to offer this letter in evidence. 

Mr. Walter. You may mark it. It would not be received until we 
have a chance to consider it.^^ 

How long will you be with this witness ? 

Mr. Tavenner. I will take an hour for this witness. 

Mr. Walter. Well, the subcommittee will stand adjourned until 
tomorrow morning at 9 : 30. 

" Under direction of Hon. Francis E. Walter, this letter is ordered to be designated aa 
Izuka Exhibit 17-a, and retained in committee files. 



HEAEINGS KEGARDINCt COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 

TEKRITORY OF HAWAII 



TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 1950 

United States House of Representatives, 
Subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Honolulu^ T. H. 

PUBLIC session 

The subcommittee of five met, pursuant to call, at 9 : 30 a. m., in the 
senate chamber, lolani Palace, Hon. Francis E. Walter (subcommittee 
chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representative Francis E. Walter, 
Burr P. Harrison, John McSweeney, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold 
H. Velde. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; William 
A. Wheeler and Courtney E. Owens, investigators ; and John Carring- 
ton, clerk. 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will be in order. 

Mr. Tavenner, you may proceed. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to recall Mr. Izuka. 

TESTIMONY OF ICHIRO IZUKA— Resumed 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Izuka, in describing to the committee yesterday 
your employment background, you stated that at one time you pre- 
pared and issued a pamphlet ; what was the nature of that pamphlet ? 

Mr. Izuka. You mean the Truth About Communism in Hawaii ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. Is this the pamplet to which you referred? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the pamphlet into evidence and 
mark it "Exhibit No. 18." ^^ 

Mr. Izuka, in the course of this pamphlet you mention names of a 
number of persons and you state that they are either members of the 
Communist Party or affiliated with the Communist Party in one form 
or another. You have mentioned a number of those names in the 
course of your testimony here. I would like now to ask you a few 
questions to see if we can identify other names of persons who were 
known to you to be members of the Communist Party. In the course 
of your pamphlet there is mentioned the name Uesato. Can you fur- 
ther identify him? 

Mr. Izuka. Mr. Uesato lived in Los Angeles. I don't know the 
proper address, but the street address was City View, Los Angeles. 
Wlien I went there for that ILWU convention in 1941 I stayed there 

" Retained in committee files. 



1424 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

for a day. And at that time he was suffering a stroke, kind of half 
paralyzed, and he told me that he would like to visit Hawaii, because 
the climate in Hawaii is favorable. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now don't go into so much detail. Wliat I want 
to know is his Communist affiliations, if any. 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, he told me that he belonged to the Communist 
Party, 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know his first name ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I am sorry ; I don't know his first name. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you mentioned in the course of your testi- 
mony Jeanette Nakama ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have already mentioned her? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yukio Abe? 

Mr. IzTJKA. I did not mention Yukio Abe. I think you are refer- 
ring to Kaoru Abe. Kaoru Abe and Carol Abe, husband and wife. 
At the time, before I resigned, I did not have any connection with 
Yukio Abe. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were the two persons you mentioned affiliated with 
the Communist Party in any way, to your knowledge ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes, they were assigned to this Moiliili branch. And 
Mr. Chairman, before we go any further, I saw in the papers that 
Mr. Kageyama mentioned the Makiki branch, and I want to make it 
very clear that the Moiliili members and the Makiki members are to 
meet at that particular branch, so it is the same style of branch. For 
instance, like Koichi Imori lives in Moiliili and attended this Makiki 
branch, and Mr. Kageyama referred that that was the Makiki branch 
at the time. It is the same branch I referred to as the Moiliili branch. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Any explanation you desire to make about matters 
of that kind, I hope you will make them. 

Mr. IzuKA. I am sure some "famous" radio commentator will say 
we are confusing the names of the branch, so I would like to state it 
very clearly that the Moiliili branch and the Makild branch are the 
same branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you mentioned in the course of your testi- 
mony the name of Pauline Rosenthal ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes; I mentioned Pauline Rosenthal. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was she known to you to be a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I was instructed to contact Pauline Rosenthal to collect 
dues and check on her membership card, but she told me she joined 
the party for past 7 years and they issued her dues — she had a lot 
of dues to pay, and in the meantime she told me that she was waiting 
for the transfer card from San Francisco. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Mrs. Jack Hall ? 

Mr. IzTJKA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you testified regarding her or not ? 

Mr. IzuKA. As far as our miscellaneous branch in Waikiki, she did 
not belong to our branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. She did or did not ? 

Mr. IzUKA. She did not belong to our branch. And, as far as I 
know, she belongs to the Communist Party. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1425 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat do you mean by the language "as far as I 
know" ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, I sat in myself and talked and we discussed, 
problems and I stayed with Jack Hall, lived over there and slept 
with them, and I seen many of this — well, we talked party problems, 
and even I think at one time during our discussion meeting in our 
Waikiki branch, when Elizabeth Bristow's home was not available 
w^e met at Jack Hall's home at Waikiki, and she took part in that 
discussion. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Easter Doyle ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes ; I know Easter Doyle. Not for a long time, because 
when he was recontacted to join the party, the only thing I know, that 
I got his name and where he worked. I believe he attended a Puunui 
meeting once at my home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, then, Kaahawinui ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, I knew Ben Kaahawinui for a long time. He 
was most of the time part-organizer for the ILWU, and he belongs to 
this — when they were first reactivated he belonged to the ILWU 
fraction. Later on the fraction broke up into two groups, known as 
McCabe and Castle and Cook group, and Kaahawinui belongs to that 
fraction. 

Mr. Tavenner. Julian Napuunoa? 

Mr. IzuKA. Julian Napuunoa, was recruited just before I left the 
party, and I attended about three meetings with him at Jack Kimoto's 
residence at Makanani Drive. 

Mr. Tavenner. What branch or fraction of the party did he belong 
to? 

Mr. IzuKA. At that time the branch was splitted up, and Napuunoa 
belonged to this McCabe branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Joseph Kealalio? 

Mr. Izuka. Joseph Kealalio was also recruited before I resigned 
from the party, and he was employed at Castle & Cooke, and I at- 
tended about three meetings at Jack Kimoto's residence with him. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, what branch or fraction of the party was he 
a member of ? 

Mr. Izuka. He belongs to the Castle & Cooke branch. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Richard Shigemitsu ? 

Mr. Izuka. Richard Shigemitsu also joined the party just before 
I resigned, and he worked for Castle & Cooke, and belonged to the 
Castle & Cooke branch, and I attended above five or six meetings with 
him. 

Mr. Tavenner. Harry Kamoku? 

Mr. Izuka. Harry Kamoku, I knew him from as far back as 1938, 
and we were very good friends, and since we lived in different islands 
we could not get together on party meetings, but when we had any 
conference in Honolulu, ILWU conferences, or Territory- wide confer- 
ences, we always get together and discuss problems there at Kimoto's 
home, or Dr. Reinecke's home, and I sat with many meetings with 
Harry Kamoku during those party meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. John Elias? 

Mr. Izuka. John Elias, I knew him for a long time. We worked 
together organizing, and when first I met him he was unemployed, and 
during the war time he had a job with the War Shipping Adminis- 



1426 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

tration, and I sat with him many, many meetings, in the Communist 
branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what fraction or branch of the Communist 
Party did he belong to ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Elias, he belonged to the Kaimuki branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you testify to what branch Harry Kamoku was 
a member? 

Mr. IzUKA. He was a member of the Hawaii branch. Island of 
Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tadashi Ogawa? 

Mr. IzuKA. Tadashi Ogawa, I knew him just before I left the 
party, in 1946, and his business, I think, was officer of the Waipahu 
sugar local, and I sat in with him in meetings of the Communist 
Party at Jack Kimoto's residence. 

Mr. Tavenner. What branch of the party was he a member of ? 

Mr. IzuKA. At that time Tadashi Ogawa, I think it was this, I be- 
lieve it was miscellaneous groups. I was invited to sit in at this ILWU 
party fraction meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Ma j. Hideo Okada ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Hideo Okada is a business agent in the sugar local, 
and I knew him just before I left the party. Hideo Okada was kind 
of a problem about being recruited in the party, because he was a 
transfer party sent to San Francisco, and I believe he was recruited at 
San Francisco, but I did not sit at any meetings with him. 

Mr. Tavenner. Harry Shigemitsu? 

Mr. IzuKA. Harry Shigemitsu also joined the party before I left, 
and I believe he left ; he did not stay with the party for a long time, 
but that fraction, the Communist Party fraction, that was held at 
Kimoto's home, and it was reported that Harry Shigemitsu was re- 
cruited in the party, but I did not attend meetings with him. 

Mr. Tavenner. Richard Kunemura ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Robert Kunemura, I knew him during the 1946 sugar 
strike, and he told me that he joined the party, and he stayed with me 
during the 1946 strike, while in Honolulu, at my residence in Puunui, 
2714 Liliha Street. He stayed with me, and I helped him out in Hono- 
lulu in many details, as far as union problems are concerned, and he 
definitely told me that he was recruited by Yoshikazu Morimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what branch of the party ? 

Mr. IzuKA. He belongs to the Kauai branch, the Island of Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yoshikazu Morimoto? 

Mr. IzuKA. Mr. Yoshikazu Morimoto, I knew him during 1946, the 
sugar strike, and he told me they came on and recruited him, and I sat 
in meetings with him, in the Communist Party discussions. 

Mr. Tavenner. "Slim" Shimizu? 

Mr. IzuKA. "Slim" Shimizu, I didn't sit at meetings with him, but 
I was definitely told by Shigemitsu and Robert Kunemura, that "Slim" 
Shimizu is a strong party member, from Lihue Plantation. 

Mr. Tavenner. Frank Silva? 

Mr. IzTJKA. Frank Silva, I knew Frank Silva for a long, long, long 
time in the plantation, and many efforts was made to recruit Frank 
Silva in the Communist Party, but the only one who can contact him 
was Jack Hall, and Jack Hall did, or was instructed, many, many 
times, to recruit Frank Silva, but I think that no contact was made for 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1427 

a lono; time, ofllcially, but after Frank Silva volunteered for the Army, 
and after discharge from the Army, I had many, many talks with 
him in the restaurant, and finally one day, at pier 11, he told me, "Well, 
Ic'hi, are you a Communist'^ Did you join the Communist Party?" 
And I saitl, "Yes, I joined the party way back in 1938." And he told 
me that he joined the party, and he showed me his card. That is the 
only incident I know that Frank Silva told me that; he showed me the 
card. He said, "See, my card, this is my card." 

Mr. Tavennf.r. Approximately when was the date of that con- 
versation ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Oh, that was, I believe it was, after the sugar strike, 
some time early in W-il. 

Mr. Tavenner. Bert Nakano? 

Mr. IzuKA. Bert Nakano, I knew him for a long, long time, just like 
Harry Kamoku, and Bert was also a problem around the party, and 
could not be recruited during long years I knew Bert Nakano, but 
finally, during the sugar strike, and some time about a few months 
afterward, I was told that Bert Nakano was recruited in the party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yasuki Arakaki ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yasuki Arakaki, was the biggest problem for the Com- 
munist Party, because during his Communist membership in the party, 
lie was raising hell with the mternational representatives; very un- 
cooperative, and it was a big problem that Yasuki be recruited no 
matter — the party should use every effort to recruit him in the party, 
and they suggested the best manner is to send him to San Francisco to 
be indoctrinated, but before he left for San Francisco, Eileen Fujimoto 
and Jack Kimoto had a long, long talk at Eileen Fujimoto's home, and 
finally around 3 o'clock in the morning they convinced Arakaki that 
Arakaki will join the party when he registered in San Francisco, and, 
well, of course, during this time of discussion we did not sit in 
meetings with Arakaki; but all those discussions that actually took 
place at Charles Fujimoto's home was told to me by Charles and 
Eileen, and Jack Kimoto, on Arakaki's affairs. 

Mr. Tavenner. Henry Schmidt? 

Mr. IzuKA. Henry Schmidt, I remember him very well, because 
when the ILWU, early in 1947, had proposed to handle some condi- 
tions in the Honolulu water front, he was dispatched from San Fran- 
cisco as a trouble-shooter. Upon his arrival in Honolulu, the executive 
board of the Communist Party met at John Eeinecke's home, and at 
that meeting we were invited to attend, and he and Henry Schmidt 
gave a general report of what his plans are in handling those condi- 
tions in the common fight with the employer on the dock, and I am 
sure that if you will read the Star-Bulletin and the Advertiser, the 
ground was laid by Henry Schmidt, during this quickie strike, and 
stopwork, that actually took place, and happened during a beef on 
sling-loads, and he definitely reported that this quickie action should 
not drag for a long time, or get the men out of the jobs, but for a couple 
of days, and send them right back, right away, because that was only 
to bring the spirit up of the strikers; I mean the union members. 

Another time I knew Henry Schmidt, is during my campaigning 
in Hawaii, and that was in 1946, and when there I was told by Joseph 
Kealalio to attend the strike strategy meeting, and when I attended in 
Hilo, on one side of the room they had a strike strategy meeting, com- 



1428 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

mittee meeting, but I was led into this smaller room, where Henry 
Schimidt, and Frank Silva, and Bert Nakano, and Sam Stevens, were 
present, and right there I was told very angrily that I should comply 
with the party line, and not to work for any other candidate except 
the PAC endorsement, and Henry Schmidt was present at that 
meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned the name of Sam Stevens. Do you 
know any more about him? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, at that time I did not know much about Sam 
Stevens, and in the presence of that meeting I did not know his name 
was Sam Stevens, but I was told in Honolulu that they had one able 
salesman in the Communist Party, who was working for the electrical 
union, and I found out his name was Sam Stevens, during the Reinecke 
trial, because he was called as Reinecke's witness, to call me a liar, and 
at that time his name, I actually remembered his name was Sam 
Stevens. 

Mr. Tavenner. And he is the same man who attended the meetings 
which you just referred to? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes; and he said that is was not a Communist Party 
meeting, but I am sure it was, all party members. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. You have mentioned in ydur pamphlet the name 
of Louis Goldblatt, what information do you have regarding his mem- 
bership, if any, in the union ? 

Mr. Izuka. As far as I — I did not sit in with Louis Goldblatt in 
any of these Communist Party meetings. I don't know much about 
Louis Goldblatt, except his official capacity as secretary-treasurer 

Mr. Tavenner. Of what ? 

Mr. IzTOA. The ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mrs. Wilfred Oka is another person mentioned in 
your pamphlet. 

Mr. Izuka. That is Mr. Oka. 

Mr. Tavenner. I understood it was Mrs. Wilfred Oka? 

Mr. Izuka. I think you are referring to that meeting we had at 
Ed Berman's home, but that was not the Communist Party meeting, 
and that meeting was, of course, it was not a meeting, it was a general 
discussion we were in. We talked this matter over, about the indorse- 
ment, in Ed Berman's home, and Charles Fujimoto, and Mr. and 
Mrs. Oka, were all in sympathy, and we had endorsements of parents, 
the control of PTA — should take my opinion against Jack Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. At whose home did that take place? 

Mr. Izuka. At Ed Berman's. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long had you known Ed Berman? 

Mr. Izuka. I had known Ed Berman from way back in 1937, when 
he first was editing the Voice of Labor, and up to the present time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever attend a Communist Party meeting 
at which he was present ? 

Mr. Izuka. I never did attend a Communist Party meeting with 
Ed Berman, in his presence, but I made many efforts, to the party, 
that he should be contacted and recruited in the party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he recruited into the party, according to your 
own personal knowledge? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, I mentioned many, many times his name to our 
fraction, and the central-committee fraction, but the executive-board 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1429 

members in the executive board definitely refused to accept Ed Ber- 
man, because during the 1938 interisland strike they said that he sold 
the workers, the strikers, down the river, and, in other words, destroyed 
the labor movement, and they claimed that he also took some money, 
and after the 1938 interisland strike he was sent to San Francisco 
for further education, and in San Francisco, I think, he did not — he 
did not work closely with the Communist Party in San Francisco. 

Mr. Taa^nner. I am asking about what you know here in the Terri- 
tory of Hawaii. From what I understand you to say, he did not 
become a member of the Communist Party; is that your statement? 

Mr. IzuKA. I never did — I never did sit in with Ed Berman in any 
of the party meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. You described, or referred to, Frank Silva ; do you 
know his occupation ? 

Mr. Izuka. The first time I met Frank Silva was when he was a 
luna at the McBryde plantation on Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner. For the purpose of identification, do you know what 
his present occupation is ? 

Mr. Izuka. His present occupation is business agent of the ILWU, 
section of Kekaha plantation, and Olokele plantation. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does he hold any political office, or position, to your 
knowledge ? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, I don't know whether he holds any political office, 
but I know definitely at the last January election he was elected to the 
constitutional convention. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Izuka, did you ever attend a meeting of the 
Central Committee of the Communist Party, at which couriers from 
San Francisco were present ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. Well, one meeting, I remember, when Earl 
Browder was kicked out from the Communist Party, we had two 
couriers, and one was Ralph Yossbrink, and the other I could not 
remember the name, but they made a general report of the State con- 
vention they held in kicking out Browder, and what the party should 
do, according — according to Browder's religionism. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that the same Ealph Yossbrink to whom you 
have previously referred in your testimony ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. Later on I was told that he was elected assistant 
business agent to Rudolph Eskovitz. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were present at that meeting, if you can recall ? 

Mr. Izuka. At that meeting. Jack Kimoto was present ; John Rei- 
necke was present; Eileen Fujimoto; Charles Fujimoto; David Hyun; 
Jack Kawano; Jack Hall; Robert McElrath and Mrs. McElrath. I 
was there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you fix the approximate date of the meeting? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, I cannot recall now, right away, but I know it was 
during the time of Browder's expulsion from the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall, at any time, engaging in a conference 
or discussion regarding the problem of bringing the Communist Party 
in the open 2 

Mr. Izuka. Well, there were many, many times 

Mr. Tavenner. That is bringing the Communist Party out in the 
open. 

6G636 — 50— pt. 1— — 6 



1430 COMJVTDTSnST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, as far as being a known Communist, I was not 
afraid of it. During the recruiting of members in the Communist 
Party there were many, many times when some leading officials, 
leading party members, in labor unions, were very much afraid— 
that the recruits would double-cross the Communist Party, but I said 
there is nothing to be afraid of, provided that the party members are 
sincere and honest, and do the right thing, and when they want to 
expose any party members, those people should — who is going to ex- 
pose the party members, are going to be exposed, so I told them that as 
far as I am concerned I don't care whether I be known or not. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have testijfied regarding the purchase of Com- 
munist books and Communist literature ? Where did you make those 
purchases ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I remember buying some pamphlets from Jack Hall, 
and during my visits to Honolulu, during 1938, that I was instructed 
that I can buy some party books at the Nuuanu Second-Hand Book 
Store. That is, not in the lower stairs, but they said upstairs, in 
the back side of the small alleyway, where you could buy, and I went 
up there, over there, and I bought some books. That was about the 
first book I bought after I joined the Communist Party, but later 
on I ordered many books from the party headquarters, the National 
Book Shop, and the Lucas Library Book Store. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know how long that second-hand book store 
continued to sell Communist books and literature in the manner you 
have described ? 

Mr. IzuKA. To my memory, I don't think that lasted for a long 
time. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have stated in your earlier testimony that the 
date on which you and Jack Kimoto and Alice Hyun went out to 
Koko Head area, or farm, to burn the literature, was May 1945. Since 
so testifying, have you further examined the matter of refreshing 
your recollection as to the date ? 

Mr. IzTjKA. I believe I was too — that I made that date without a 
careful thinking, and I believe the date was made without my carefully 
thinking, and I think that probably there is some kind of a mistake. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was it ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Oh, it was — I believe it was some time in 1943, or 1944. 

Mr. Tavenner. In referring again to the Nuuanu Book Store, and 
the purchases you made of literature or books, can you recall the date 
when you made that purchase ? 

Mr. Izuka. I believe it was in 1938 when I bought the literature. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you made any purchase there since that time? 

Mr. Izuka. No ; I think I made one purchase at the Nuuanu Book 
Store. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have testified regarding Robert Wenkam. I 
am mistaken in that, I believe you have not so testified. Do you know 
Robert Wenkam ? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, I don't know Robert Wenkam, but I know his wife. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is his wife's name ? 

Mr. Izuka. The only thing I know is she is Mrs. Wenkam. I don't 
know the first name. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether you have attended any Com- 
munist meeting at which she was present ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1431 

Mr. IzuKA. I did not attend any meetin^^ which she was present, 
but I can give you an instance that took place at pier 11. And dur- 
ing that time, wlien T made my visit to pier 11, Eileen Fujimoto, 
Peggy Uesugi, and all the united office workers and professional union 
members were upset on the issue of Jack Hall and about Dave Thomp- 
son, without no notice, no reinstatement, firing Carol Abe, his assistant, 
to Pauline Eosenthal and Dave Thompson. So, it was quite a griev- 
ance amongst the party members. And they had nobody to bring 
the grievance up to Jack Hall. Since I went to pier 11, they told 
me the whole story, that I should contact Jack Hall and bring the 
matter to his attention. So, I met Jack Hall in his office, and I 
told him what was the big idea. I said, "Here, unions like you, union 
leaders like you are fighting the employers not to fire any man without 
a reinstatement, without an investigation." I said, I told Jack Hall, 
"It is improper for you to fire a girl just like an employer will fire 
a worker." I told him that some of the union members wanted to 
throw a picket line around pier 11 to protest for the reinstatement 
of Carol Abe to her former position. I said it was very improper, 
"What if the Star-Bulletin and the Advertiser would carry such news 
to the public, to hear the union is trying to fight for better wages, 
better working conditions and job security, and they are doing the 
very opposite to the things they are preaching?" 

So, after I met Jack Hall, I went out of the office, and on the way 
back I met Fujimoto and Wenkam, and they were very much in- 
terested in the discussion that I had with Jack Hall. After that 
we went to the Mission House — Fujimoto, Wenkam, and myself, and 
I gave a report of what conversation I had with Jack Hall at the 
office. That was the only time T heard Eileen Fujimoto thought 
Mrs. Wenkam can be trusted, because she belongs to the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did she tell you that in the presence of Mrs. 
Wenkam or not ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes; the three of us were sitting at one table for our 
lunch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, Mr. Izuka, I hand you a typewritten docu- 
ment, and I will ask you to state what it is. 

Mr. IZUK.V. Well, this is my study outline for my personal advan- 
tage. During my membership in the Communist Party, many, many 
times we were told that we should master the theory of political 
economy and Leontiv, and I got confused very much, and to my 
benefit I made this outline, made this study outline for my own 
benefit, from chapter 1 up to the last chapter. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of what work ? 

Mr. Izuka. This is the very beginning, before they join the Com- 
munist Party. After they join the Communist Party, they could 
master Marx political economy, written by Leontiv. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Where did you get the works ? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, these instructions w^ere all discussed at the Com- 
munist Party fraction meeting on which a member is compelled to 
go through with this course. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you prepare that outline? 

Mr. Izuka. I prepared this course between 1945 and 1946. 



1432 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the outline in evidence. Mark it 
"Izuka Exhibit No. 19." " 

Extracts From Ichiro Izuka Exhibit No. 19 
what is political economy — chapter i 

1. What aim does Marxism-Leninism set before the proletariat?. 

Marxism-Leninism created and developed a powerful revolutionary theory of 
the proletariat in its struggle against capitalist exploitation. Furthermore, 
teaches us the scientific approach to the history of mankind, through severe class 
struggle taking place in society, especially during the period of transition, from 
slavery to feudalism to capitalism and finally socialism. It also uncovered the 
essence of modern capitalism economy and exploitation, the hireling of labor, 
purchase of labor poveer, mass enslavement of millions of propertyless people by 
small group of capitalist, the owners of the laud, factories, mines, and etc. 
Showed how the small enterprises are crushed by the large ones. Furthermore, 
teaches that through capitalist own contradictions, leads toward its own 
destruction. 

WHAT IS POLITICAL ECONOMY — CHAPTER I 

5. How does the abolition of class takes place? 

Marxist-Leninist teachs that capitalist relation rise from the ruins of previous 
system, how they develop and how their development, sharpens their eternal 
contradictions of capitalism leads to its own destruction, by creating unemploy- 
ment, economic crisis, and etc., leads to the victory by the proletariat through 
socialist revolutions, by abolishing the ruling classes, eliminating the exploitation 
of one class by another through the dictatorship of the pi'oletariat as a vanguard 
of the working class. 

WHAT IS 3P0LITICAL ECONOMY — CHAPTB3B I 

6. What is the subject of the study of political economy? 

Political economy, in the widest sense, is the science of the laws governing 
the production and exchange of the material means of subsistence in human 
society, Marx. 

The study of production relationship in a given, historically determined society, 
in their genesis, their development, and their decay * * * such is the content 
of Marx teaching. 

It is a guide to the proletariat, in its struggle against capitalist exploitation, 
to scrutinize capitalist contradictions, its decay, and to lead the proletariat in 
its final victory over capitalism, for socialism. 

WHAT IS POLITICAL ECONOMY CHAPTER I 

7. Of what importance is the study of revolutionary theory to the proletariat? 
The theory must be mastered by the proletariat as a guide and a vanguard 

against capitalist exploitation, counter-revolutionist, deviationist trends and, 
finally, it shows the way for the building socialism for the masses. 

WHAT IS POLITICAL ECONOMY — CHAPTER H 

8. Why is political economy a class science? 

Political economy is a sharp weapon in the struggle against capitalism, in the 
sti'uggle for socialism to communism. It is like all science primarily dealing 
with human society, and the laws of its development, is a class science. Further- 
more, to expose the laws of capitalist production which the bourgeoise economist 
tries to prove eternal and immutable. 

WHAT IS POLITICAL ECONOMY CHAPTER II 

9. Of what does the party character of political economy consist? 

Of strong, vigilant, unrelenting struggle against all deviationist line, against 
right opportunism, leftist, extreme, or otherwise and against counter-revolu- 
tionary Trotskyism. 



" Izuka Exhibit 19 in its entirety in committee files. Excerpts only printed in this 
Dublication. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1433 

HOW DID SOCIETY DEVELOP INTO CAPITALISM CHAPTER II 

2. How did class originate? 

2. Through the decay of primitive society, and throiijj:h the discovery of fire 
a new stage began ; the art uf pottery making, taming of domestic animals, 
cultivation of grain, discovery of how to smelt iron ore, the invention of writ- 
ing, puts an end to pi-imitive communism and a new era of civilization begins. 
INIarx-Engels says : "that lH\ginning at this point the entire history of human 
society is the history of class struggle.'" 

The domestication of cattle brings products of animals, wool, meat, hide, and 
etc., thus products of exchange takes place. Cultivation of land brings the 
origin of private property. 

Furthermore to increase production, labor power must be maintained. One 
source to maintain labor power was through war, captured enemies were trans- 
formed into slaves. 

Under given historical conditions, first great division of social labor arose, 
created the first great division of society into classes — masters and slaves, and 
exploiters and the exploited. 

1. At early stages productivity, just enough, barely keeping man alive. 

2. Fighting for good hunting ground, prisoner cannot be kept but eaten. 

3. Cultivation, started division of class. 

4. Victors used losers as slaves. 

5. Amer. Civil War was result of slaves from Africa. 

6. Hitler used conquered people as slaves. 

7. During Slavery, the masters owned the slaves bodily. 

COMMODITY PRODUCTION CHAPTER II 

8. Can commodity production exist without money? 
No. 

"Capitalism has been victorious all over the world, but its victory is the 
only eve of the victory of the labor over capital." 

"The development of the contradictions of capitalism at the same time lays 
the basis for the final triumph of the proletariat." 

THE ESSENCE OF CAPITALIST EXPLOITATION CHAPTER IV 

1. Of what does primitive accumulation of capital consist? 

Capitalism rose after the ruins of feudal economy, also capitalism grows on 
petty commodity production. Primitive accumulation separates the i)etty pro- 
ducer from his means of production. This method is brought about by the 
crudest methods of robbei'y and plunder, murder and violence. 

Some of the methods are : 

(1) Robbing the riches of overseas countries. 

(2) Pillaging of vanish or concord countries. 

(3) By means of usuries. 

(4) Charging high usury prices on overseas trade. 

(5) Direct robbery, mainly piracy. 

Primitive aceumnlation creates the necessary prerequisites for the rise of 
capitalism, without primitive accumulation capital cannot exist. 

THE ESSENCE OF CAPITALIST EXPLOITATION CHAPTER IV 

5. What is capital? 

Capital means to create excess surplus value, by sucking living labor. 

Value is result of labor. 

Value is nothing but crystallized labor. 

Value is expanded dead labor. 

Capital is accumulated labor to create surplus value. 

ESSENCE OF CAPITALIST EXPLOITATION — CHAPl'lCU IV, PAGES 91 AND 92 

In the Soviet Union, the enterprises are the property of the Soviet State, of the 
proletarian dictatorship. The class owns the plants and the factories, and the 
classes laboring at these enterprises are the one and the same class. Under 
Soviet condition the worker does not sell his labor power to a representative of 
an alien and hostile class. There is not and there cannot be any production of 
surplus value in the socialist economy of the USSR. The excess created by the 



1434 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

labor of the worker above and over his earnings goes to cover the collective 
requirements of that same class and its dictatorship for the general needs of 
the country, for socialist accumulation, for defense, requirements, etc. 

The inventions of the Trotskyists to the effect that the industries of the Soviet 
Union presumably are state capitalist and not socialist are therefore nothing 
but malicious counter-revolutionary slanders. With these slanders Trotskyists 
tries to cover up its traitorous attempts to undermine the work of the socialist 
construction in the USSR. 

THE ESSENCE OF CAPITALIST EXPLOITATION — CHAPTER IV 

Capital is a special historically, definite, social production relation. The social 
relation between exploiters and the exploited. 

Under capitalism the wealth is concentrated in the hands of the bourgeoisie. 
The bourgeoisie owns all the means of production and subsistence. 

Capital is dead labor, that vampire like, only lives by sucking living labor. 

WAGES AND IMPOVERISHMENT OF THE WORKING CLASS — CHAPTER V 

2. How does the form of wages help to mask capitalist exploitation? 
Usually when a worker works for the capitalist he does not understand how he 

is exploited under the capitalist system, between the actual necessary labor time 
(which is the actual cost of the production) and '"he unpaid surplus labor, that 
goes into the pockets of the capitalist, and not a cent to the worker. 

When a worker asks for more wages, the capitalist will tell him to double up 
your production or to work double time, then you will get more wages. The 
worker believes he is getting paid more because he worked harder and produced 
more, not knowing the tremendous surplus labor he has created for the capitalist. 
This surplus labor is in turn used to ruin the life of the worker for capital 
expansion and not for the welfare of the worker. 

Through the above methods of capitalist exploitation, their henchmen, the econ- 
omist, churches, schools, science, literature, theatre, etc, tries to bring about 
the existence of the capitalist system are natural and eternal as the light of the 
sun, rain, etc., to change this method of capitalist system is sinful. 

3. What is the significance of the struggle of labor unions under capitalism? 
To curb the dictatorial power of the capitalist in firing and hiring of the 

worker, through effective collective-bargaining methods. 

To utilize the power of economic action against severe exploitation to drive 
the wages backward to zero, when other peaceful methods fail. 

To win freedom from the capitalist, by overthrowing the system of exploita- 
tion, of man by man. 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it is received. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Velde would like to ask some questions. 

Mr. Yelde. Mr. Izuka, you have given a very interesting history 
of communism in Hawaii and made a very great contribution to our 
cause here, in attempting to eradicate communism in Hawaii. You 
mentioned, I think, in your testimony, that the Communist Party of 
Hawaii was controlled by the Communist Party of California. Is 
that true? 

Mr. Izuka. That is right. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have an opinion as to who controls the Com- 
munist Party of California? 

Mr. Izuka. Well, in the party our headquarters belongs in San 
Francisco, but the San Francisco State Communist Party, I know — I 
think the higher body is in New York, the central committee. 

]\Ir. Velde. In other words, the Communist Party at California 
was the thirteenth district, is that right? 

Mr. Izuka. That is right. It is the thirteenth district. 

Mr. Velde. In other words, the Communist Party of the United 
States was divided into various districts ? 

Mr. Izuka. That is right. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1435 

Mr. Velde. And that is the tliirteenth district? 

Mr. IzuKA. And since California comes in the thirteenth region, 
Hawaii came under that, also. That is correct. 

Mr. Velde. Actually, the Communist Party of California was con- 
trolled by the national committee of the Communist Party? 

Mr. IzuKA. That is right. 

Mr. Velde. In your opinion, then, who controlled the policy of 
the national committee of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, it is the executive committee. 

Mr. Velde. Where do they get their party line? Where do they 
get their ideas, and principles? 

INIr. IzuKA. That is a little too far for me to explain to you, but 
we were told that we should follow the national committee instruc- 
tions from New York, because their instructions comes in pamphlets, 
and in magazine form. 

Mr. Velde. You also received some instructions by courier? 

Mr. IzuKA. That is right. 

Mr. Velde. Are you of the opinion that the Communist Party 
line was dictated from the Kremlin, by Soviet Russia? 

Mr. IzuKA. During my membership in the Communist Party, we 
followed nearly all that party line which the Pravda announced 
in the press, for instance, like the Munich sell-out with Czechoslo- 
vakia, the Soviet-German nonaggression pact, the intervention of 
Spain, and all those things. I think the American party followed 
that Moscow line very clear right down, and I still believe, I don't 
know how they get the others, but I am definitely sure that it follows 
the Moscow line. 

Mr. Velde. You mentioned a change in the party line in June 27, 
1941, at the time that Germany attacked Russia. Are you of the 
opinion that that change in the party line was dictated by Soviet 
Russia ? 

Mr. IzuKA, I am definitely sure it was dictated by Soviet Russia. 

Mr. Velde. You were in San Francisco attending a labor school. 
While you were there, did you meet with Harry Bridges? 

Mr. IzuKA. During my time in San Francisco, during my party 
schooling, I did not meet Harry Bridges. But, when I was to this 
ILWU convention in Los Angeles, I met Harry Bridges in Los An- 
geles, on my return from San I'rancisco, to go over the instructions 
from Harry Bridges, due to the 10 months' strike. I walked into 
his office. In that office I met many delegates over there. 

Mr. Velde. Well, delegates from where? 

Mr. IzuKA. Delegates from the various locals on the Pacific coast, 
and the California coast. As soon as I opened the door and walked 
in, well, I am quite sure that they paused awhile, and they changed 
the subject, and they said — Bridges said, "You know, you can't fool 
Wayne Morse, because you cannot put over anything on him on sling 
loads, arbitration, or things of that sort." Because at the time they 
were on the issue of the arbitration of working conditions, especially 
sling loads, and that was the conversation that I heard, when I met 
Bridges at the time, when I opened the door. The only time I think 
that I talked to Bridges. 

Mr. Velde. That was — will you fix the date of that ? 

Mr. IzuKA. That was in 1941. I believe it was in April, because 
the convention was open in April 1941. 



1436 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr, Velde. That was just prior to the strike here? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, the strike was from 1940 to 1941. 

Mr. Velde. In California, too ? 

Mr. IzuKA. No; there was no strike in California. It was about 
the strike at Port Allen. We were striking 10 months. During the 
10-month strike we had the convention in Los Angeles. That was 
the time I went to the convention and got instructions from Bridges 
on our 10-month strike, what policy the 10-month strike should fol- 
low. And his instructions were that the Port Allen local went out 
on strike on a wrong issue, and, therefore, that they should take a 
severe beating, and get back to work, regardless of what happens. 
If we don't accept his report, through Clifford O'Brien, who was his 
representative locally, he further instructed me that he is going to 
revoke our charter at Port Allen. 

Mr. Velde. Anyway, the meeting with Harry Bridges at Los An- 
geles — was that Los Angeles? 

Mr. IzuKA. That was in San Francisco, after the convention. 

Mr. Velde. Were any members of the Communist Party present 
besides yourself? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, I saw Henry Schmidt, and I think I saw B. B. 
Jones. He told me he was a party member. We were very friendly 
during the convention. 

Mr. Velde. Now, I don't suppose that you know, or do you have 
information as to whether Harry Bridges was a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I didn't see Bridges at any of the Communist Party 
meetings. The only thing I knew, during my Communist Party 
schooling at 121 Haight Street, that I was told by the instructors that 
actually who built Bridges up to his present knowledge and efficiency 
was the Communist Party, under Betty Gannett. 

Mr. Velde. Now, I think in the letter that you wrote to some mem- 
ber of the Communist Party here, in which you attacked the candidacy 
of Mr. Farrington, you mentioned that that was the reason that you 
quit the Communist Party, because the Communist Party was sup- 
porting Mr. Farrington, is that true ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, that is not the only reason. I had many, many 
reasons, because during my previous experience with the Communist 
Party membership, I always had arguments with Jack Hall, Kawano, 
and McElrath, that I did not believe that the labor union should be 
led blindly. Any program that is applied the labor-union leaders 
should go out and educate the workers as to negotiations, wages and 
hours, and those things are very contrary to my beliefs. There were 
many, many times that I found, as I told Jack Hall that I did not like 
the way how you are trying to lead the union to a strike, like shooting 
dice. For instance, if you get a natural, you gain, but if you have a 
crap, you are going to lose. If the employer is weak and ignorant, 
and gives in within 1 or 2 days, well you would be looked up to by 
the rank and filers, but what if the employer is intelligent and for 
a small little beef they might let the union strike 5 or 6 months, I think 
you are going to destroy the union. I said, "So far as I can see, I 
would rather still discuss it. Prepare a contract for 6 or 7 months, 
then go out on strike for a month or two and get results." 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1437 

Mr, Velde. Generally, though, you, as a Communist, and the Com- 
munist Party members at the time were opposed to a Kepublican can- 
didate, generally speaking? 

Mr. IzuKA. Generally, many, many times it is said during my mem- 
bership in the Communist Party, that between the Republicans and 
the Democrats, that the Democrats are the lesser evils. 

Mr. Walter. A great many people agreed with you, several years 
ago. 

Mr. Velde. We know the Democratic Party is a good party. There 
is no question about that, but what I want to get from you, and I want 
you to answer truthfully, is whether the Communist Party in Hawaii 
has generally supported Democratic candidates, or Republican can- 
didates. 

Mr. IzuKA. The Communist Party actually supported both parties. 
Democrats and Republicans. 

Mr. Velde. Can you mention any time, other than 1946, that tlie 
Communist Party supported a Republican candidate :f 

Mr. IzUKA. Yes. I remember very clearly when Clem Gomes 
from Hawaii was running for Senator on Kauai, against Mrs. 
Elsie Wilcox, at the time, of course. Jack Hall, myself, and our group 
from Kauai, actually endorsed Senator Clem Gomes, and we worked 
for him very strongly, and he got elected. That was prior to 1946. 

Mr. Velde. By and large, and I wish you would answer this question 
truthfully, do you feel that the Communist Party supported the Re- 
publicans, the principle of the Republican platform, or the Republican 
policies ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I didn't get the question. 

Mr. Velde. Do you reel that the Communist Party here generally 
supported Republican principles and the Republican platform and the 
Republican policy ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I don't recall any time that the Communist Party actu- 
ally supported the Republican platform. 

Air. Walter. Well, I think before you do that, I think you ought to 
let the witness know what the policies of the Republican Party are, 
because a great many people think they have no policy. 

Mr. Velde. I want to say that the Republican Party are proud of 
the position taken by the Communist Party. 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, when I was a member of the Communist Party, I 
think even the Communist Party did not even endorse even the Demo- 
cratic platform, not only the Republican, I think it is also for the 
Democrats, because they had their own program. 

Mr. Velde. Generally, you said that the Communist Party did not 
support the Republican Party, or were opposed to the Republican 
Party principle and platform, didn't you say that a moment ago? 

Mr. IzuKA. I say that, but it is not only Republicans, they are also 
opposed to Democrats. During my membership in the Communist 
Party, they were also against the Democratic platform. I know that 
they never did accept the Democratic platform, because they had their 
own program during my membership in the Communist Party. I 
think the only time that they utilized to the fullest extent the Re- 
publican leaders, like Lincoln, was that Browder wrote a pamphlet on 
that Lincoln was a Communist. I think he probably states that it 
was the present Republicans that are using the name of Lincoln to 
their advantage. 



1438 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr, Velde. At any event, I feel that you have given us quite a 
history of the Communist Party, and I want to compliment you on 
the testimony that you have given to help us in our job here. I 
am sorry that you had to bring up this political issue in town, not 
that anybody on this committee — I am sure that the chairman and 
the other members of the committee, also, regret, and the counsel and 
the staff. Outside of that, I certainly do appreciate your information 
that you have furnished the committee. 

Mr. IzuKA. Mr. Chairman, if there is no more further questions 
before I am excused, I would like to make a short statement 

Mr. Walter. Before you proceed, I believe Mr. Moulder would like 
to ask some questions. 

Mr. Moulder. As I recall your testimony, going back to the subject 
of communism in Hawaii, these figures that you have given us are 
based on the year 1946? 

Mr. IzuKA. That's right; 1946. 

Mr. Moulder. At which time you say, according to your knowledge, 
there was approximately 130 known Communists in Hawaii? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. And out of that number, 90 percent of them were 
members of the union ? 

Mr. IzuKA. The ILWU. 

Mr. Moulder. That would make probably 117 known Communists. 

Mr. IzuKA. Known Communists, among our party members, not 
known to the public. But among our members; that is correct. 

Mr. Moulder. Out of a total of 30,000 members in the union, is that 
correct ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. Now, do you have any knowledge or information 
concerning whether or not the number of Communists has increased 
or decreased since that time? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, I know that — not officially, but I am sure that it 
has increased tremendously. Take, for instance, during the last water- 
front strike, by the reaction of the rank and file, the strikers, prior 
to the strike, and after the strike, there was more militants. 

Mr. Moulder. I know, but that is no proof that they are Com- 
munists. 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. Now, you say that the total population in Hawaii is 
approximately 500,000 people? 

Mr. IzuKA. That's right. 

Mr. Moulder. So that your proportion is far less than the figures, 
according to the FBI, and the report of this committee, as to the 
number of Communists in the population on the mainland of the 
United States, isn't that so ? 

Mr. IzuKA. I don't know that. 

Mr. Moulder. I think that is all. 

Mr. IzuKA. I wish to summarize my testimony in a couple of pages. 
In conclusion I would like to quote one sentence from the preface of 
my pamphlet, "Truth About Communism in Hawaii." 

Because of all that I did to strengthen the Communist Party in 
the days of my blindness, I desire now to tell you the truth of my 
experience, whatever the consequences may be to myself. There are 
some minor errors in my pamphlet, such as the date of the Hitler 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1439 

attack on Russia, but the many important facts I give in my story 
have never been disproved. The Communists never brought a libel 
suit against me, because they knew I was telling the truth, and 
they feared to face the acid test in court, so tliay put on a big smear 
campaign. They said I was a moron, and that I had received money 
from the Big Five. 

In tlie memorandum from Jack Hall to all the members of the 
ILWU, subject: The Izuka Pamphlet, Hall said that "We now have 
proved that the pamphlet is part of the bosses' plot against our 
union." 

He said Izuka was merely a willing pawn in this plot, and that 
ex- Communist Izuka lies when he says Jack Hall is a Communist. 
Then they issued a pamphlet entitled "A Mysterious Stranger," in 
which Lee Ettleson formerly first president, was reported to have 
advised the representative of the Big Five as follows: "Find some 
€x-Communist, give him plenty, give him some money, and put his 
name to the pamphlet, and be sure to expose every militant leader 
as a Red." This pamphlet was just as such a libelous attack on the 
Big Five, especially on the pineapple representatives, with whom 
Lee Ettleson did confer, and was attacking their character and in- 
tegrity, just as they attacked mine, and had a great influence among 
the employees of both the sugar and pineapple industries, and I was 
held up to scorn and contempt. But, as far as I know, there was 
never a word of rebuttal or denial from this representative of the 
industry. Their silence gave a color of plausibility to the accusations, 
that I had been paid to be a traitor to the labor movement, and to 
my fellow employees, although I never received a cent from the 
industry for writing the pamphlet. I was smeared as a filthy stooge, 
who would sell out for 30 pieces of silver. Moreover, I could not get 
a job from big industry. My old employer would not give me my 
former job back, or even a job as a casual laborer. Everywhere I got 
the brush-off. There were hundreds of facts alleged in my pamphlet, 
many of which an enterprising newspaper could have checked in the 
public interest. No such check was ever made to my knowledge. 

Today I am an independent poultryman, barely making a living, 
but still independent. I believe if those leaders of industry who pre- 
fer Communists to militant, honest Americans, are making a serious 
mistake. They think and believe that it is easy to deal with Commu- 
nists, because in the first place, when the party line is right, they can 
make deals with them without any trouble. When the party line is 
left, then the employers can throw a big Red scare. In other words, 
the Communists are vulnerable to this type of employer, where Com- 
munists are to be preferred to real Americans. 

Some employers are no more honest than the Communists. They 
approach their dealings to practice falsity and exploitation. To me, 
such employers, as well as Communists, are enemies of our country, 
and that is why we will prove, once and for all, that when I wrote 
my pamphlet, I wrote the truth. I did it, not under pressure, but 
of my own free will. It will also prove that even though some Com- 
munists occupy key positions in Hawaii's largest union, they are, in 
fact, only a handful. Once exposed, these Communists will lose much 
of their influence. They are quick to call other people liai-s, but a 
hearing will prove that they are Hawaii's expert liars. Therefore, 
this hearing should assist us in obtaining statehood. 



1440 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Every State in the Union has its Communists, and their misguided 
followers. Even as a Territory, there has been a more effective and 
longer attack on Communists than in most States. I believe as a 
State the people will be able to do even a better job. 

Mr. McSwEENEY. I would like to ask you, how were you selected, 
by what method were you selected to go to San Erancisco, to the meet- 
ing, and also over to the school in San Francisco ? How was that se- 
lection made, by appointments, or were you voted to receive that 
honor ? 

Mr. IzuKA. Well, usually the method of selecting the members, pros- 
pects for Communists, they always look into the honesty and sincerity 
of the worker. If they find a worker is honest and sincere, and reads 
the pamphlets and leaflets, and the Communists' literature, they would 
not make contact right away, they give you leaflets and pamphlets for 
on or about 3 months, and then they observe whether 1 can be trusted 
on that. But, then, when 1 joined the party, Kimoto told me it is a 
big advantage for you to advance my knowledge in Marxism, and they 
said that an executive member of the Communist Party said that you 
are going to San Francisco and get this training. 

Mr. McSwEENEY. So, their later estimate of your ability was con- 
tradicted or contradictory of what they thought about you in the ear- 
lier case? 

Mr. IzUKA. T didn't understand. 

Mr. McSwEENEY. Their later estimate of your ability, in which they 
criticized you, and called you different names, is contrary to their 
former estimate of you? 

Mr. IzuKA. Oh, yes, yes ; I know that. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Izuka, I notice in your paper that you are in favor 
of statehood for Hawaii. I will say that the majority of us are doing 
all we can, and that Delegate Farrington, as a Hawaiian, has con- 
tributed largely to that move. Do you agree with that? 

Mr. Izuka. You mean Mr. Farrington agreed to obtain statehood 
for Hawaii? 

Mr. Velde. Yes. 

Mr. Izuka. Well, I have no opposition on that, but only for further 
clarification, I want to make one argument. 

Mr. Velde. Do you agree with that ? You understand my question. 
You know that Mr. Farrington has favored statehood for Hawaii 
for a long time ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, I understand that. 

Mr. Velde. That's all. 

Mr. Izuka. Well, before I am excused, before that, I want to bring 
out this matter very clearly, because before I wrote the pamphlet, 
when the pamphlet was in the stage of writing, I was talking to the 
leaders, and 1 told them that the issue of communism is a big problem 
in Hawaii, so why not the Farrington group, and this Borthwick group 
bury the hatchet and then educate the people from communism. I 
discussed this matter with Mr. Hung Wai Ching two times, and with 
even Dr. Kometani's office, and I offered them that I would not — if 
they were to accept my offer, I would not even put the chapter in the 
pamphlet, but since they disregarded and didn't want to bury the 
hatchet, well, I have no other alternative than to put the chapter inside. 
But, they have been given a chance, I gave them the chance. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1441 

Mr, Velde. I am sure Representative Walter and the Democratic 
Party are opposed to communism. We will do what we can to eradicate 
any communism in the islands here. But, as I said before, I regret 
that you had to bring in the political matter. But that is not the 
purpose of the committee. 

Mr, Walter. Is that all? 

Mr. Tavenner. That's all of this witness. 

Mr, Walter. I want to take this opportunity to congratulate you 
on the courage that you have displayed in coming here, and making 
this straightforward statement that you have made. I know that it 
took a great deal of courage. You have the thanks of this committee 
and of the entire Congress of the United States. 

Mr. Izuka. Thank you very much. 

(Applause.) 

Mr. Walter. I will have to admonish the audience that we will not 
tolerate any demonstration. This is not the Un-American Activities 
Committee that you have heard about and read about in recent years. 

Mr. Tavenner. This would be a good time for a recess. 

The subcommittee will be in recess for 5 minutes. 

(After the recess the proceedings were continued as follows:) 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will be in order. 

Mr, Tavenner, will you call your next witness ? 

Mr. Tavenner, Mr. William K, Kamaka, 

Mr, Walter. Stand up, please. Hold up your right hand and be 
sworn. 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr, Kamaka, I do. 

Mr, Walter, Sit down, and state your name, please, 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM K. KAMAKA 

Mr. Ta^^nner. Will you state your full name ? 

Mr. Kamaka, My name is William Kaili Kamaka. 

Mr, Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. E^AMAKA. I was born in Honolulu, Oahu, April 28, 1908. 

Mr. Tavtenner, Will you tell the committee the companies you have 
worked for? 

Mr. Kamaka, I first started with McCabe, Hamilton and Renny 
Co. in 1925; during my slack period I was also employed with the 
United Standard Dredging Co., in 1927, and also during the slack 
period I was working for Hawaiian Dredging Co., during the NRx^, 
and also with the city and county of Honolulu. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. '\Aniere are you presently employed ? 

Mr. Kamaka. I am now presently employed at the McCabe, Hamil- 
ton & Renny Stevedore Co., Ltd. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you ever a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes ; I was a member of the Communist Party in the 
latter part of 1937 or the early part of 1938. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlio approached you and solicited membership in 
the Communist Party, if anyone ? 

Mr. Kamaka. I was first approached by Mr. Jack Kawano. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did Jack Kawano hold at that timo, 
to your knowledge ? 



1442 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Kamaka. During that time Jack Kawano was an executive 
board member of the longshoremen's union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee the circumstances sur- 
rounding his solicitation of your membership into the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Kamaka. I was first approached at Irwin Park, that he was 
going to have a meeting and at this meeting they would talk about 
the importance of trade-unions, and I wanted to get in and get more 
information pertaining with our union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall whether there were other persons ap- 
proached by Kawano at the same time ? 

Mr. Kamaka. No, sir. I was approached on the second time by 
Mr. Jack Kawano and then we attended another meeting in the Occi- 
dental Cafe, and in that meeting we discussed becoming a member of 
the Communist Party in Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were present at that meeting at the Occidental 
Cafe? 

Mr. Kamaka. Those who were present with myself in that meeting 
at the Occidental Cafe were Mr. Jack Hall — I made an error on that 
first one. Jack Kawano, Benjamin Kaahawinui, and Frederick 
Kamahoahoa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Those were the three persons present ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you have your next meeting? 

Mr. E^AMAKA.. Our next meeting took place on Kaahumanu and 
Richards Streets, the old Voice of Labor. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were present on that occasion ? 

Mr. Kamaka. In that meeting, myself was present, Jack Kawano, 
Benjamin Kaahawinui, Frederick Kamahoahoa, and Jack Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you remember what took place at that meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. In that meeting I was introduced to Jack Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who introduced you to him ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Jack Kawano. 

Mr. Tavenner. In introducing Jack Hall to you, were you told 
what Jack Hall's position was ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was it? 

Mr. Kamaka. That he was the Communist Party organizer from 
the mainland. 

Mr. Tavenner. Xow, what year was this ? 

Mr. Kamaka. 1938, early part of 1938. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall anything else that occurred at this 
meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. In this meeting Jack Hall — I mean Jack Kawano — 
introduced me to Jack Hall and Jack Hall wanted me to sign the 
Communist Party application. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you join the party and sign a card? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you pay dues at this time or not, do you recall V 

Mr. Kamaka. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you mean you don't recall or you did not pay 
dues at that time? 

Mr. Kamaka. I did not pay any dues at that time. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1443 

Mr. Tavenner. When was the next meeting that you attended 
with the membei-s of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Kamaka. The next meeting we attended was at the same place, 
Kaahumanu and Richards Street, corner, the old Voice of Labor office. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was present on that occasion? 

]\Ir. Kamaka. In that meeting Jack Kawano, Jack Hall, Benjamin 
Kaahawinui, Frederick Kamahoahoa, myself, and John Elias. 

Mr. Tavenner. You had not mentioned Elias before. Will you 
tell us what he was doing at that meeting, why he was there? 

Mr. Kamaka. As I recall, that Elias probably sat in the meeting 
as an observer. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. What was the purpose of this meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka.. The purpose of this meeting for I becomes a member 
of the Communist Party. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Was the question of dues brought up at that time? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Well, just tell us what occurred. 

Mr. Kamaka. On unemployment, you pay 10 cents dues per month. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you told that at that meeting? 

Mr. Kamak^v. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And did you pay your dues at that meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir 

Mr. Tavenner. Who gave you the instructions in regard to the dues 
that you were to pay? 

Mr. Kamaka. Mr. Jack Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, when did this take place, approximately ? Do 
you recall in what year this was, at about what time of the year? 

Mr. Kamaka. 1938. 

Mr. Tavenner. About what time in 1938 ? 

Mr. Kamaka. I will say in March. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend any more meetings at the Voice of 
Labor office on Kaahumanu Street? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 
^ Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell us about those meetings, that is, prin- 
cipally who were present? 

Mr. KL^maka. We had this one more meeting at Kaahumanu Street. 
Myself was present, Jack Kawano was present, Jack Hall, Benjamin 
Kaahawinui, and Frederick Kamahoahoa, and John Elias. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall whether there were any new recruits 
appeared at that meeting ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. The new recruit we had in that meeting 
was John Elias. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right, now, do you recall any other meetings 
that you attended at that place, or did you say that there was only one 
other meeting, or was that the last meeting, or were there any other 
meetings held at that place? Let me ask you this. Can you recall 
when you next attended a meeting of Connnunist Party members ? 

Mr. Kamaka. We held one more meeting at Jack Kawano's place, 
Pauoa Valley. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall who attended that meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. Myself attended that meeting, Jack Ka- 
wano, George Mayenschien, Louis Welch, James Cooley, John Elias, 
Rachel Saiki, and Jack Hall. 



1444 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned the name of Louis Welcli. Had 
he by this time joined the Communist Party or not, or do you know 
whether he was a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Kamaka. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know ? 

Mr. Kamaka. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned George Mayenschien, Do you know 
whether he was a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you know that; how did you know that? 

Mr. E^AMAKA. Because George — I mean Jack Kawano — told me that 
George Mayenschien was also a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned Kachel Saiki. Was she a member 
of the Communist Party, to your knowledge ? 

Mr, Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How did you know it? 

Mr. Kamaka. I was also notified by Jack Kawano. 

Mr. Moulder. May I ask, Mr. Tavenner, if someone else told him? 
He did not know of his own knowledge ? 

Mr. Tavenner. That is what he said. 

Where were you when you received the information that these per- 
sons were members of the Communist Party ; That is, where were you 
when Jack Kawano told you that ? 

Mr. Kamaka. At Kaahumanu and Merchant Street, before the 
meeting took place to Jack Kawano's house. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that a Communist Party meeting which you 
attended at Jack Kawano's house ? 

Mr, Kamaka, Yes, sir, 

Mr, Tavenner, What took place at Jack Kawano's house during 
that Communist Party meeting? 

Mr, Kamaka. In that meeting was introduced to all of those who 
were present, as I mentioned, and also because I was a comrade in 
that meeting, 

Mr, Ta\t.nner, Do you recall whether anything else took place at 
that meeting? 

Mr, Kamaka, Yes, sir. In that meeting we were supposed to elect 
a temporary chairman, 

Mr, Tavenner, Chairman of what? 

Mr, Kamaka. Of the Communist Party, 

Mr. Tavenner, You mean for that group which you were attending ? 

Mr, Kamaka, Yes, sir, 

Mr, Tavenner. AVell, state just what was done. 

Mr, Kamaka, In that meeting I nominated Jack Kawano for chair- 
man for that meeting, and he declined in favor — that I would become 
the chairman of the particular meeting, 

Mr, Tavenner. What was the piactice about the appointment of 
chairmen for the meetings? 

Mr. Kamaka, Tlie purpose of the meeting is to educate any new 
members of the Communist Partj' of Hawaii to be familiar of con- 
ducting a meeting. Communist Party meeting, as the chairman, 

Mr, Tavenner, Then, do you mean that different people served as 
chairmen at different meetings? 

]Mr, Kamaka, Yes, sir. In every meeting they were supposed to 
elect a chairman on each meeting. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1445 

Mr. Taat,nner. Well, now, did the persons that you have men- 
tioned a moment ago, George Meyenschein, Rachel Saiki, Louis Welch, 
take part in that meeting and vote in the meeting^ 

Mv. Kamaka. Yes, sir. In that meeting. Jack Hall was the 
chairman. 

Mr, Tavenner. When was it that you were made chairman? 

Mr. Kamaka. On the second meeting, on the same place. 

Mr. Tavexner. Were you voted upon at the first meeting to be the 
chairman at the next meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. How long after this first meeting w^as it that the 
second meeting was held in Jack Kawano's house? 

Mr. Kamaka. About 2 weeks. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who attended this meeting, that is, the meeting at 
Avhich you were the chairman? 

Mr. Kamaka. Jack Kawano, Benjamin Kaahawiiuii, Frederick 
Kamahoahoa, George Mayenschien, James Cooley, Louis Welch, and 
iRachel Saiki. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are those the same people that had attended the first 
meeting, at the time you were voted upon to be the chairman? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. What took place at this meeting, that you can recall ? 

Mr. Kamaka. In this meeting we elected a chairman and I liecame 
chairman of this meeting. I told the committee, the members there 
present in that meeting, because I did not want to become chairman, 
because I don't know beans about conducting a meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat was done at the meeting ? 

Mr. Kamaka. In that meeting, anyway, we go right ahead with it. 
I was elected chairman. Since I don't know beans, I was chairman of 
the Communist Party for that particular meeting. So first point on 
agenda two — on the agenda was the report of trade-unions. Second 
was recruiting, and third, political discussion. 

Mr. Tavenner. You state that recruiting was discussed. What 
occurred under that subject? Had you been able to obtain any re- 
cruits, new recruits, by that time? 

Mr. Kamaka. After that meeting I had two prospects in mind to 
recruit, which I did recruit. Samson Chang and 

Mr. Tavenner. Samson Chang? 

Mr. Kamaka. Right. Fi-ank Chow. 

Mr. Tavenner (spelling). C-h-o-w ^ 

Mr. Kamaka, Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Did they join the Communist Party? 

Mr. Kamaka. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did they at any time join the Communist Party, 
to your knowledge ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was at some later time, was it? 

Mr. Kamaka. 1938. 

Mr. Moulder. Did you ask him as to the source of information? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, w^hen did these two men become members of 
the Communist Party and how do you know they became members? 

Mr. Kamaka. After the meeting took place at Jack Kawano's place, 
which I w^as the chairman, I made a personal contact to Samson Chang 

66636— 50— pt. 1 7 



1446 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

and Frank Chow that we were going to have a meeting, and if it's all 
right with him that I would like to have the both of them sit in on this 
special meeting. The reason to that is I didn't come out direct explain- 
ing to them that this meeting becomes the Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Continue and tell us how you know that they became 
members, if they did become members. 

Mr. Kamaka. In their opinion, Samson Chang and Frank Chow, 
they thought this meeting was for trade unions and they were in- 
teresting in building our trade-unions. After we sit in this meeting 
over at Kaahumanu Street, which was not a Communist Party meet- 
ing there, but we took them aside and explained to Samson Chang 
and Frank Chow that I wanted to have the both of them away from the 
union hall in order we can talk privacy, so we moved downstairs on 
Kaahumanu Street on one corner. Then I asked the both of them if 
they were interested of joining the Communist Party. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Well, then, continue. What occurred? Wliat 
happened ? 

Mr. Kamaka. They really thought that this was a good meeting 
and they wanted to sit in in order to get more information, so I in- 
structed tliem to think it over, we give them a week or two, that I was 
going to make a personal contact again if they were ready to attend 
the Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. Ta\t:xner. Did you see them again? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about it. 

Mr. Kamaka. It was some time between a week or two later. I 
asked the both of them if they were ready to join the Communist 
Party and if they were I was going to take them to the place where 
the Communist Party going to have their meeting. 

Mr. Ta^tnner. Go ahead and tell us the rest of it. Just what 
occurred ? 

Mr. KLamaka. So as I previous stated before that I took Samson 
Chang and Frank Chow to Jack Kawano's place where the Communist 
Party meeting was held. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Did you see them at Communist Party meetings 
after that? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether they joined the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. ICamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you know that ? 

Mr. Kamaka. We held two more meetings over at the same place,. 
Jack Kawano's house, and they signed the Communist application 
to join the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who did they give the application to ? 

Mr. Kawano. They gave the application to me, and I turned the 
application over to Jack Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were they members of the Communist Party from 
that time on ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. All these meetings which you have told us about 
were in 1938, from what you have stated. 

Mr. Ka-maka. Yes, sir. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1447 

Mr. Tavenner. And did tliey occur before or after the interisland 
steamsliip strike in 1938 ? 

Mr. Kamaka. This was before the inland boatmen's union strike, 

Mr. Tavenner. When was the next Communist Party meeting held 
after the strike had started ? 

Mr. Kamaka. After the strike had started, 3 days after that. 

Mr. Moulder. How many attended ? 

Mr. Tavenner. I thought he hadn't quite finished. You say a meet- 
ing- was held 3 days after the strike began ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta"\t:nxer. Let me ask you this : Wer-e there any meetings held 
before the strike, that is, Communist Party meetings ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, tell us about that first. 

]Mr. Kamaka. We had two meetings before the strike in the old 
Voice of Labor Hall, Kaahumanu Street. 

Mr. ]\IouEDER. How many attended? 

Mr. Tavenner. Who attended this meeting, if you recall ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Jack Kawano, myself. Jack Hall, Benjamin Kaahawi- 
nui, Frederick Kamahoahoa, and John Elias. 

Mr. Ta^t:nner. Wliat took place at that meeting? Wliat was 
discussed? 

Mr. Kamaka. In that meeting we discussed — in that meeting Jack 
Hall made the report that the IBU- 

Mr. Tavenner. IBU, what does that stand for ? 

Mr. Ivamaka. Inland Boatmen's Union was going to go out on 
strike. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat did he say about the strike ? 

Mr. Kamaka. He said, "It looks bad now in case they do go on 
strike now," and they wanted to keep the negotiation in peace in order 
to avoid the strike. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Did he give you any instructions as to what should 
be done in the event a strike should occur ? 

Mr. IL4MAKA. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tax^enner. Tell us what he said. 

Mr. Kamaka. We were instructed in this meeting that we should 
make a recruiting drive in the IBU, to look for an active, progressive 
member in the IBU, in other words, to look the situation of the IBU 
in the whole picture and to organize the active member of the IBU 
into the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what did you do after receiving those instruc- 
tions ? 

Mr. Kamak.\. Jack Hall asked that we need volunteers, members 
on the Communist Party, to attend this IBU meeting and to feel out 
the new prospects and to bring the report back to the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Ta^^enner. Who went to the IBLT union meetings for that 
purpose ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Myself and Benjamin Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Tavenner. What type of men did you endeavor to pick out to 
interview as prospects? Wluit kind of men ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Well, we saw four good jjrospects in the IBU. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why do you call them good prospects? 



1448 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Kamaka. Because one member was active in their own union, 
and after looking all the clear picture of the prospect we figured it 
was ripe to organize. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, tell us what you did. 

Mr. Kamaka. After that meeting we got the prospects lined up. 
We brought it back to Kaahumanu Street again, the old Voice of 
Labor, hold a meeting there — the Communist Party — we proposed 
four names to be included, or to be recruited, in the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavennee. Did any one of the four join the party ? Or, at this 
time, you had just proposed their names, is that what you stated? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. State what happened next. 

Mr. Kamaka. Then we was instructed in this particular meeting, 
myself and Benjamin Kaahawinui, to organize Emil Mullcr, Jr., in 
that party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Emil Muller? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you then contact Muller? Did you go to see 
him? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Tavenner. Tell us what happened. 

Mr. Kamaka. During the contact with Muller, which I had extra 
business to attend, Benjamin Kaahawinui contacted Emil Muller, 

Mr. Tavenner. Then after contacting him, what was done ? 

Mr. Kamaka. After Benjamin Kaahawinui interviewed Emil Mul- 
ler. he gave me the information ; Benjamin Kaahawinui gave me the 
information that he contacted Emil Aluller, and he had a long con- 
versation with him, that we were going to call him to sit in some 
special meeting. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Was a special meeting called of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Kamaka^. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was it held ? 

Mr. Kamaka. At the same place, Kaahumanu Street, the old Voice 
of Labor. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who took Muller to that meeting, do you recall ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Benjamin Kaahawinui and myself. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you recall who was the chairman at that 
meeting ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was it? 

Mr. Kamaka. Jack Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. And did Emil Muller know that he was being taken 
to a Communist Party meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What occurred at the meeting? What was told to 
Muller? 

Mr. Kamaka. In thi.s meeting he just sat as an observer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he later become a member of the Communist 
Party, or not ? 

Mr. Kamak.\. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you know that ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Three days after the strike 

Mr. Moulder. What occurred 3 days after? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1449 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Yes, you have not finished the sentence, huve you? 

Mr. Kamaka, No, sir. 

Mr. Tavennek. Will you read the question back? 

(Question read by the reporter.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, how do you know that Muller joined the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Kamaka. I knew Muller joined the Communist Party — was the 
later part of 1938. 

Mr. Ta\-ennfjr. AVell, now. tell us how he became a member, who 
was present when he became a member, and how it was done. Do you 
under.stand what I mean? You said he w^as a Comnninist Party 
member. Now, we want to know how you know^ that. Did 3^ou see 
him at any Communist Party meetings after this time that he appeared 
there as an observer? 

Mr. IVi^MAKA. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings do you think you saw him at? 

Mr. Kamaka. Is this question before the strike or pending the 
strike ? 

Mr. TA^T.NNER. Well, I am asking you, it is at the time that you 
took Emil jNIuller to your party meeting as an observer, and then 
after that you said he became a member of the Communist Party. 
Now when did he become a member of the Comnmnist Party, and tell 
us how he joined. 

Mr. Moulder. If he knows of his own personal knowledge. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes; that is true. That is, if you know. 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. The later part of August 1938. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what? What happened? 

Mr. Kamaka. As I was saying in the beginning, the meeting held 
at Kaahumanu Street where Muller was an observer without his 
knowledge — I knew that this meeting was a Communist meeting. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Tavenner. I think this would be a good place to 
recess. The subcommittee will stand in recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Thereupon, at 12 o'clock m., Tuesday, April 11, 1950, a recess was 
taken until 2 o'clock this afternoon.) 

afternoon session 

(The hearing was resumed at 2 : 10 p. m., same appearances as morn- 
ing session.) 
Mr. Walter. The meeting will come to order. 
Mr. Tavienner. Mr. Kamaka. 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM K. KAMAKA— Resumed 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Kamaka. this morning I asked j^ou questions 
about your joining the Communist Party, and about various meetings 
you attended. Now, will you tell us the name of the Communist 
group that you were a member of? Was there a name for the branch 
or particular group that j^ou attended meetings with? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the name ? 

Mr. Kamaka. The name of the party group that I was affiliated 
with was the longshore group. 



1450 COMMXTNIST ACTIVITIES IX HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you stay in the party after you joined 
in 1938? 

Mr. Kamaka. Eleven months, 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you withdraw from the party after 11 months' 
membership; did you leave the party after being there 11 months? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. I left the party on my free — on my own 
accord, 

Mr. Ta-s^nner. Did anyone come to see you at a later date, to ask you 
to come back to the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner, All right. Tell us when tliat was, 

Mr, Kamaka, I was approached back between the latter part of 
November or December of 1945. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who came to see you ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Jack Kawano. 

Mr. Taa^nner. What did he say to you ? 

Mr. Kamaka. We had a personal contact down below the union 
hall on pier 11, and he told me that the party — that the Communist 
Party was going to reorganize all the old members who were in the 
party. 

Mr. Ta\T3nner, Then did you join the party again ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. If I recall it right, I joined the party in 
December of 1945. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Were you given a new card in the Communist Party, 
a new Communist Party card ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner, Who gave it to you ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Jack Kawano. 

Mr. Tavenner. To whom did you pay your dues after you joined 
the second time ? 

Mr. Kamaka. I paid my dues to Jack Kawano during the time I 
first got in the Communist Party, in 1945 ; then we discussed in a meet- 
ing that we were going to have another meeting, electing officials for 
the longshore group, on a later date. 

Mr. Tavenner, Now, let me stop you there a moment. When you 
say "longshore group," you mean those in the longshore group who 
were members of the Communist Party ; is that what you mean ? 

Mr, Kamaka, Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr, Kamaka. I mean exactly those members, particularly as myself, 
was the Communist member of the longshore group, that were going to 
hold a Communist meeting. 

Mr, Ta\'enner, Where was the meeting held ? 

Mr, Kamaka. The meeting was held above Lanakila Park, Kealakai 
Road, Benjamin's house, Benjamin Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Tavenner, What took place or what happened at that meeting? 

Mr, Kamaka. In that meeting we nominated officials for the coming 
year of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlio were the officers for that group that were 
elected for the coming year ? 

Mr. Kamaka. In that meeting I was elected secretary-treasurer of 
the Communist Party; Jack Kawano, educational director; Benjamin 
Kaahawiimi was literature agent, and Julian Napuunoa was the chair- 
man of the meeting for the coming yefi r. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1451 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you give us the names of any other persons who 
attended that meeting. 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. ISIyself, Benjamin Kaahawinui, Frederick 
Kamahoahoa, Julian Napuunoa, Jack Kawano, Herman Ing, Satur- 
nino Cablay, John Akana, Simeon Bagosol, Domingo Cariaso, and 
Jack — I mean Jack — I mean Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend other meetings then of the party 
after that organizational meeting? After you were organized by the 
election of officers, did you have other meetings ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, we did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you recall whether at one of the meet- 
ings that you held after this that the matter of the PAC was discussed ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. After this meeting we held another joint 
meeting on Makanani tract, Jack Kimoto's house. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you take up there the question of the PAC 
organization ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, we did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, tell us just what was said and by whom. 

Mr. Kamaka. In that meeting on Makanani tract, we had the meet- 
ing up at Kimoto's house, we discussed a little bit about what candi- 
date are we going to support on the coming year. So we discussed 
pro and con on the question of some candidates we had in mind, that 
we thought the proper time to support. 

Mr. Tavenner. Weil, did you talk about the PAC organization? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. At the time we talked about the PAC ques- 
tion, right in that particular meeting, that each comrade or member 
of the Communist Party should go back on their various group, in 
tlieir own unit, and make a report and start pushing a drive to form 
the PAC. That was the early part, if I recall it right, was in Febru- 
ary of 1946. 

'Mr. Tavenner. Wlio took part in that discussion ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Myself, Jack H. Kawano, Benjamin Kaahawinui, 
Julian Napuunoa, and John Akana. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you go back to your own union and carry 
out the decision that had been made at that Communist meeting and, 
if so, what did you do 'i 

Mr. Kamaka. We started off to go back and start electing com- 
mittees to start forming the PAC. 

Mr. Tavenner. After that work was started, were there more meet- 
ings held of the Communist Party about that matter ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. But if I recall it right, it was the latter 
part of February or the early part in March. We discussed it, dis- 
cussed the PAC problem, that we should get the balls rolling early, 
before it is too late and we would not get a chance of supporting 
Avhatever candidate we want. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, after you got started on the formation of the 
PAC committees, which you referred to, what further instructions, 
what other instructions, were given about your activity in politics; 
what were you told to do as a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Kamaka. After the PAC problem got started, all members 
were instructed to start organizing the Democratic Party, which I 
mean those Democratic Party precincts rather which were dead, that 
every comrade, member of the Communist Party, to organize that 
precinct and become the leader of that precinct. 



1452 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. That is, that you members of the Communist Party 
were directed to go to the precinct and have yourselves made leaders 
in that precinct ? 

Mr, Kamaka. Yes, sir. 
Mr. Tavenner. Did you do that? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir, we did. The committee made a decision that 
all party members in the Communist Party in the longshore group 
and to those of the uptown group to take part in the drive of taking 
over the Democratic Party, as well as the Democratic precincts. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were reports made of the progress of that work to 
Communist Party meetings ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir, we did. We had another meeting at Benny's 
house in Lanakila Park. In that meeting Benjamin Kaahawinui 
brought back a report that they made certain gains, a little progress 
in his precinct, in Lanakila Park, and also another Communist Party 
member, John Akana, made a report on Manoa housing. 
Mr. Tavenner. Made a report on what'^ 

Mr. Kamaka. Made a report that good progress had been started 
of forming a Democratic Party in the Manoa district. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you meet at any time in the Communist Party 
meetings with representatives from other branches of tlie Communist 
Party where this question was discussed, that is, the question of taking 
over the leadership in various precincts ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir, we did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about that. 

Mr. Kamaka. We held another meeting on Jack Kimoto's house, 
on Makanani Drive. We discussed the problems of forming PAC and 
the progressive methods of organizing the Democratic precinct in 
this joint mass meeting. In other words, the meetings over at Jack 
Kimoto's house was a joint mass meeting of the Communist Party—' 
I mean various representatives not sent by the union but instructed by 
the Communist Party, such as I, for one, for the longshore gi'oup, 
McCalje, Hamilton, and Renney, Major Okada for sugar, Joseph Kea- 
lalio for Castle and Cooke, and so on, 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Tavenner, approximately how many attended 
that meeting? 

Mr. Tavenner. I want to ask him, too, the names of others who 
he can recall were there. 

I want to ask you if you can recall how many were in attendance 
at that meeting, approximately, about how many people were present ? 

Mr. Kamaka, Twenty-seven, or more. 

Mr. Tavenner, Now, you named Major Okada, for sugar; can you 
recall the names of any others ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir; myself. Benjamin Kaahawinui; Julian 
Napuunoa; Saturnino Cablay; David Pahinui, and Herman. 

Mr. Tavenner, Do you recall who represented the uptown group 
of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who? 

Mr. Kamaka. Mr. Jack Kimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Levi Kealoha ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. He was also present in that meeting, Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Fujimoto. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1453 

Mr. Ta\t,nner. Had Levi Kealoha been present at otlier Coinnnniist 
meetino:s that you attended? 

Mr. Kamak^v. Yes, sir; he attended one Coninninist — he attended 
one Communist meeting, when we met at Benny's house, and were 
present. 

Mr. Tavexn?:r. Let's <ro back to that nieetinc^ a<z:ain where you say 
Levi Kealoha attended. Do you know Kobert Lum i 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he present at that meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever attend a Communist meeting with 
^Robert Lum? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir; the next meeting after this meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what occurred at this meeting which you 
called the mass meeting, what occurred at that meeting? 

Mr, Kamaka. In that meeting we were introduced that certain 
individuals here represent certain groups, and so on, right down the 
line. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall who acted as chairman of that 
meeting ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir, I do; Jack Kimoto was the chairman of 
this meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are now speaking of the mass meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were reports made at that meeting of the progress 
that was being made in the organization of the precincts? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir; it did; that all Communist member who 
belongs to each group, to make the report in this meeting, 

Mr. Tavenner. And what was the kind of reports that were made ? 
What did they report ? 

Mr. Kamaka. The delegates present there in the meeting, such as 
myself, made reports of the longshore gi'oup, by which I mean the 
Communist member in the longshore group, that what took place in 
our Communist Party meetings, and who were elected as officials for 
the coming year, and that some of our members made good progress 
of organizing Democratic precincts which they lived in. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Now, by organizing the Democratic precincts, what 
do you mean ? 

Mr. Kamaka. I mean exactly this; that the member of the Com- 
munist Party start to form that which is a dead precinct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you say "dead precinct" ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, it means a precinct without a chairman or presi- 
dent, for 1 or 2 years ; to reorganize that precinct, and to put a leader 
from the Communist Party to organize a group there, and to form a 
quorum, in order to build this precinct club of the Democratic Party, 
and also, to take down how many members attended that meeting, and 
have some connnittee from the Democratic central committee to recog- 
nize that precinct, and sign tlie membership card to join the Com- 
munist Party — I mean the Democrat Party. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. Did Emil Muller attend this mass meeting that 
you mentioned ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, he did. He attended this meeting as an observer. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Did you have a conversation with him ? Did you 
talk with him at that meeting, and did he give you any advice? 



1454 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWMI 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes; we met at Jack Kimoto's house, in that mass 
meethig, and lie was instructed by Jack Kimoto if he will be kind 
enough to stay back after the meeting adjourned, for 5 minutes, 
which he wanted to talk to Emil Muller. When the meeting was 
adjourned we left Emil Muller, and Emil Muller met Jack Kimoto, 
Kimoto was concerned because he — Emil Muller, an old Party mem- 
ber, to come back into the Communist Party, then, myself and Benny 
Kaahaw^nui went downstairs, and the meeting adjourned, and wait 
until Emil Muller came out from the conversation with Jack Kimoto. 
After he came out, I met him, and we went to his car, and myself and 
Benny Kaahawinui, and he told us, before we sat down, that we would 
be smart enough that we should jump out. 
Mr. Tavenner. That you should jump out? 
Mr. Kamak^v. That's right. 
Mr. Tavenner. Jump out of what? 

Mr. Kamaka. Wliich means that if we were smart enough that 
we should get out from the Communist Party, and he also told us, 
because this is no place to talk about it, if we had no place to go, and 
to go over to his house, and then talk this thing over, which we did. 
We landed at his house about 5 minutes after we left the meeting, 
and we got in his house and sit down, and relax a little while, and 
take a glass of ice Avater, and sit down, and chat, and then he told 
me and Benjamin Kaahawainui that certain phrase he did not want, 
and on that phrase he thought it was logical thing for us to do so, to get 
out from the Coimnunist Party. 

Mr. Ta\t^nner. What was the phrase that he did not like? 
Mr. Kamaka. He said Jack Kimoto read to him the Communist 
Manifesto, which phrases the overthrow of the existing government. 
For that reason he thought that because we were all friends together, 
and it is wiser for us to remove ourselves from the Communist Party. 
Mr. Tavenner. Now did you stay in the Communist Party after 
that? 

Mr. Kamaka. If I recall it right, I left the party 6 months. 
Mr. Tavenner. You mean 6 months from that time? 
Mr. Kamaka. From 1945 until the latter part of May some time. 
Mr. Taatsnner. You mean 6 months after the time that you joined 
the second time ? 

Mr. Kamaka. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall the date of the last Communist meet- 
ing that you attended? Do you know about when it was and where 
it took place ? 

Mr. Kamaka. If I recall it right, it was either the latter part of 
April, or the first week of May, of 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you state how successful the Communists had 
been at that time in getting themselves elected to positions of leader- 
ship in the various precincts which you referred to as Democratic 
precincts ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. As I said before, it was in February of 
1946, we started the first drive of electing a chairman and cochairman 
of the Political Action Committee. His problem was to take in, in 
between times, our various meetings, we met, as well as the organ-^ 
izing of the Democratic precincts. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now tell us a litle bit more about the way in which 
you attempted to organize the precincts ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1455 

Mr. Kamaka. If I recall it right, the second week of February we 
pushed all members of the Communist Party from the longshore group 
toward, or throughout various precincts, and to assist, and to elect 
president, secretary-treasurer, and so forth, in each district. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, who were these persons that you tried 
to elect? Were they members of the Communist Party that you tried 
to elect as committeemen ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. We were all members of the Communist 
Party, but our main hopes and aim was, we wanted to indorse William 
Borthwick for Delegate to Congress. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, I am asking you about your form of 
work, and the way in which you did the work in committees, or rather, 
in the precincts? What about the rank and file of the Democratic 
Party ? Did they appear at the meetings and take part in the precinct 
meetings, or did you, as Communists, control those meetings ? 

Mr. Kamaka. We had some of the places that are not tied up in 
the Connnunist Party, and had them in the Democrat Party, and sug- 
gested that either one of them, he or she, maybe could get elected 
at the place as chairman, or president of that precinct, and that 
would start the ball rolling. In other words, to have some person 
to bring us to life, and then, to such time that the member of the 
Communist Party should take control of this precinct club. That 
was the main purpose, and the research work of the committee is 
to feel out on the various districts, whatever precincts was weak, 
or whatever precinct was funny enough, and that precinct should, as 
member of the Communist Party, should take over on it, and take 
control of that precinct in the Democratic Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, where the interest was very low 
in the precinct, on the part of the rank and file of the Democratic 
Party, you endeavored to take it over; take over the precinct organi- 
zation ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you also attempt to elect committeemen from 
those precincts where you were able to outvote the rank and file of 
the Democratic Party? 

Mr. Kamaka. I am pretty sure they did, and they made a good 
job of it. In the twenty-sixth of the fourth, which is Palolo Valley, 
one of the Communist Party members was elected as president of the 
Democratic Party in that precinct. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is his name ? 

Mr. Kamaka. His name is Jack Kawano. Also, Benjamin Kaaha- 
winui was elected county committeeman of the Democrat Party, of 
the Lanikala Precinct. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, those were two of the precincts 
where the Communists were able to control the vote by the use of 
Communist members ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you spoke of these two persons who were 
elected as committeemen; what committee, if you know, were they 
elected to from these precincts? 

Mr. Kamaka. Jack Kawano was the president of the Democratic 
Party in that precinct, the twenty-sixth of the fourth. 



1456 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Possibly I misunderstood you. I think you said 
that one of the persons was elected as committeeman? Did you say 
that? 

Mr. Kamaka. Benny Kaahawinui ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position was he elected to ? 

Mr. Kamaka. County committeeman. 

Mr. Tavenner. County committeeman? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir; of the Democratic Party of that precinct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether or not by his election as 
county committeeman, he became any member of any higher commit- 
tee, or the central committee of the Territory ? 

Mr. Kamaka. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean he did not, or you do not know? 

Mr. Kamaka. I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe that is all I have. 

Mr. Moulder. At the beginning, Mr. Chairman, I want to call your 
attention that two persons were named as being Communists, by the 
witness, and he stated that someone had told liim so. Is that the 
testimony that you will produce? It is purely hearsay, and I want to 
call your attention to the fact. 

Mr. Walter. I think, in view of that answer it might be well for the 
Chair to state at this time that the names of many people have been 
mentioned, and any of those people who care to come to this hearing, 
and, under oath, state they are not now members, and have never 
been members of the Communist Party, will be accorded that privilege 
at any time. 

Mr. Moulder. You say, on the attempt on the part of the Com- 
munists you have mentioned, to work in the precincts, it succeeded in 
making headway only in two; is that so? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes ; as to what I recall. 

Mr. Moulder. How many precincts are there in Hawaii, in the 
Territory ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Sixty-seven, if I recall it correctly. 

Mr. Moulder. The total number of precincts? 

Mr. Kamaka. The total number of precincts. 

Mr. Moulder. Is that on this one island, the 67 ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, on Oahu ; yes. 

Mr. Moulder. At the time you joined the Communist Party, or 
became affiliated with the party, did you know, or have any informa- 
tion, as to the principles or political philosophy, or purposes, of that 
party, or did you know what you were joining? 

Mr. Kamaka. That is a very nice question. 

Mr. Moulder. A very nice question * 

Mr. Kamaka. To give you first-hand information, I would say this 
much: That any member, plus myself, that joined the Communist 
Party do not know beans, from the top to the bottom. 

Mr. Walter. You may be excused. 

Mr. Velde. I have a question. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Velde. 

Mr. Velde. You quit the party in 1938, for the first time; is that 
right ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1457 

Mr. Velde. What were your reasons for quitting at that time? 

Mr. Kamaka. I had two reasons for quitting. First, I cannot make 
head or tail wliether the discussion was political discussion, concern- 
ing Germany, China, Russia, and the United States. That was one. 
The second part of it, I did not want it very bad. That is hard for 
me to keep up, paying dues to the Communist Party and not having 
any return come back to me. That is another reason. 

^Ir. \'i:LDE. You are now aware that the purpose of the Comnumist 
Party is the overthrow of our form of government, or Constitution of 
the Government, by force and violence, if necessary, aren't you? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Thank you very much. 

(Excused.) 

TESTIMONY OF EMIL M. MULLEU, JK. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand? Do you solemnl}' 
SAvear that the testimony that you are about to give will be the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. MuLLER. Yes. 

Mr. Taa-enner. Will you state your full name, please? 

3Hr. MuLLER. Emil M. Muller, Jr. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you appear before this committee in response 
to a subpena served on you ^ 

Mr. iMuLLER. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. Muller. I was born in North Kona, Hawaii, April 2, 1915. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you briefly sketch your employment back- 
ground for the committee? 

Mr. Muller. Well, I started in 1929, when I was employed by the 
Hawaiian Contracting Co., up until 1935, when I went to Maui, and 
I was employed by Maui County. Then, in 1937, I was employed by 
the Inter-Island Steamship Navigation Co., up until 1938, October. 
In 1939, I was employed by the WPA. In 1940 I worked with the 
W. S. Ching Contracting Co., and also the Oahu Construction Co. 
In 1941 I took a civil-service examination for the board of water 
supply. I was employed by the board of water supply up until 1943, 
in May. In May 1943. I then went to the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard. 
I have been employed at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard up until April 
6, 1950. I was one of those that was put on the reduction-in-force 
slip, and it was my turn to leave the yard, and now I w^ill be employed 
by the O. R. & L, Taxicab Service. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Muller. Yes ; I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. When? 

Mr. Muller. Well, it was during the Inter-Island strike, either in 
the month of September, or August. It was after the negotiations 
which were held with the Inter-Island officials that I was on the 
bridge near River Street, about 7 : 30 in the evening, when I was 
picked up by William Kamaka, Benjamin Kaahawinui, and Edward 
Berman. From there 1 was taken to Mr. Bartlett's place out at 
Wailupe. 



1458 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Let me stop you at that place. You said that you 
were taken to the home of John Bartlett ? 

Mr. MuLLER. That's right. 

Mr. TA\TEN]srER. Mr. Kamaka has testified, I believe he stated, that 
the meeting was held at the home of, or rather, at the old Voice of 
Labor House. Was he in error about that, or could you be in error? 

Mr. MuLLER. I think there was an error made in his statement, 
because he picked me up, also with Mr. Berman and Mr. Benjamin 
Kaahawinui, and took me to Bartlett's place. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. Proceed. 

Mr. MuLLER. Well, at Bartlett's place 1 was not really familiar with 
the meeting that they had, but Mr. Bartlett was in charge- of the meet- 
ing. He told me that these meetings, these kind of meetings, were 
held quite often. That I was a member well-looked on by the ILAVU 
workers, that these meetings would help me out with my education. 

Mr. Tavenner. You did not know at the time that it was a Com- 
munist Party meeting ? 

Mr. MuLLER. No, I did not know, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Had you, immediately before this, been active in the 
organization of your own union ? 

Mr. MuLLER. Yes, I was. I was one of the delegates on one of the 
ships. I was a delegate from the Humuula. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was the representation made to you here that the 
meetings of the type which you attended, were designed to help you 
in your education ? 

Mr. Muller. That is, so far as my education is concerned, yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, tell us more about your education in 
this group. 

Mr. Muller. Well, at that meeting held there, they were talking, 
they talked on a political discussion, and on the negotiations, what was 
the outcome of the negotiations with the Inter-Island Steamship Co., 
they talked about the war with China and Japan. I really did not 
grasp all what was said there. And the next meeting I attended was 
up at Mr. Kawano's house. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, before we go to the next meeting, can you recall 
the names of some of the people who were present at this first meeting 
which you attended ? 

Mr. Muller. Yes, I can. There was Mr. Bartlett, William Kamaka, 
Andrew Kipapa, Basil Mayo, Haili Kapu, and myself. Jack Hall, 
and Mr. Berman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you know Mr. Berman prior to this time? 

Mr. Muller. I knew Mr. Berman prior to this time as the regional 
director for the CIO Longshoremen, and the IBU. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you said he was one of those who picked you 
up on this occasion ? 

Mr. Muller. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you learn at any time in the future, or did it 
come to your own personal knowledge, that Ed Berman was a member 
of the Conununist Party ? 

Mr. Muller. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. It did not? 

Mr. Muller. No, sir. In fact, it was the only meeting, the only time 
or place of meeting like this that I seen Mr. Berman. 

Mr. Tavenner. This is the only one of the meetings ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1459 

Mi'. MuLLER. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Which he attended? 

JNIr. MuLLER. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you were present? 

Mr. MuiJLER. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Xow, I interrupted you. Proceed to the next meet- 
ing which you started to mention. 

Mr. Muller. Well, the next meeting was held at IVIi'. Kawano's place, 
and at this meeting practically the same persons that 1 mentioned was 
present at this meeting. I did not take much interest as to what was 
going on, but they took up the subject of tlie outcome of the negotiations 
with the Inter-Island Steamship Navigation Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe that if you will lean a little further away 
from the microphone, and speak louder, we will be able to understand 
you better. Now, if you will speak loud, please. 

Where was this meeting held ? 

Mr. Muller. At Mr. Kawano's place up in Pauoa Valley. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend any other meeting after that? 

Mr. Muller. There was another time that I attended a meeting at 
Jack Kawano's place, I think about a week later after thai. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, tell us when you found out that you were 
attending a Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. i\luLLER. It was at this meeting that I attended at Jack Kawano's 
place where Mr. Jack Kimoto was introduced, to whoever was present 
there, by Mr. Jack Hall, as one of the comrades that had come from 
Los Angeles, and it was at that meeting there I was notified that was 
a Communist meeting, and that I was one of the Communist members, 
a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Ta\isnner. Well, did you formally join the Communist Party at 
that time ? 

Mr. Muller. Well, so far as joining the Communist Party, I did not 
fill out any card, or anything, but there was a meeting held after that 
one, down at the — I mean the New Voice of Labor, which was at the 
corner of Alakea and Merchant Street. 

Mr. Ta^tnner. What occurred at that meeting? 

Mr. Mui.LER. Well, at that meeting I was issued my Communist 
book, and I paid an initiation fee of 25 cents, and at the time we were 
on strike, so the dues were 10 cents a month for those who were un- 
employed. 

Mr. Ta%t;nner. Who gave you the Communist Party book ? 

Mr. Muller. Mr. Kimoto. 

Mr. TA\Ti;NNER. To whom did you pay your dues ? 

Mr. Muller. To Mr. Kimoto. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Will vou describe for us the Communist Party book ? 

Mr. Muller. Well, the Conununist Party book, to me, the color was 
sort of a bluish color, very dark. And with pages in the book giving 
you the months, from January to December, of various years, and this 
was for 1938. 

Wlien you paid your dues, you were issued a stamp, on this stamp 
there was the insignia of the hammer and the sickle. 

Mr. Tavenner. And who would be present at this meeting when you 
received your book ? 



1460 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. MuiXER. When I received my book, those that were present at 
the meeting was Mr. Kimoto, Kachel Saiki, Benjamin Kaahawinui, 
myself, Hideo Okada, Andrew Kipapa, and Samson Chang. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings did you attend, that is, Com- 
munist Party meetings, which were attended by the person who is 
referred to as Chang '^ 

Mr, MuLLER. I think that was the only meeting that Mr. Samson 
Chang attended with me, so far as I am concerned. I think that was 
the only meeting that I had seen Mr. Samson Chang. 
Mr. Tavenner. Did he take part in the discussions '. 
Mr. Muller. No ; no part was taken by him in the discussions. 
Mr. Tavenner. Who advised you that this meeting would be had? 
Mr. Muller. I was advised by two members. One was Mr. Ben- 
jamin Kaahawinui, and William Kamaka. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend other meetings after this? 
Mr. Muller. There was another meeting I attended at the Voice 
of Labor. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about that. 

Mr. Muller. Well, there were some of the same members present, 
with the exception of Mr Jack Hall, who was present at the next 
meeting. 

Mr. Ta^T5Nner. Can you fix the date approximately w^hen that 
meeting was held ? 

Mr. Muller. Well, probably about the latter part of 1938. 
Mr. Tavenner. Do you know who were the olficers of this group? 
Mr. Muller. No, I don't, but Mr. Kimoto presided at all the meet- 
ings, for the two meetings that I attended at the Voice of Labor. 

Mr. Tavenner. What part did Jack Hall play in the meetings that 
you attended? 

Mr. Muller. Well, at the meeting that I attended with Jack Hall, 
he was talking about the sympathy, for the outcome of the negotia- 
tions, and I also discussed the morale of the union and the question 
of wantino- to find a wav of boosting the morale of the men who were 
out on strike. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you leave the Communist Party, or have 
you ever left the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Muller. Well, it was during the early part of 1939, and I 
believe it was either in February or March, I was called to another 
meeting, held at the Voice of Labor, and there I was notified I was 
expelled from the Communist Party. 

^Ir. Tavenner. Were you assigned any reason ? 
Mr. Muller. Well, the reason for being expelled from the Com- 
munist Party was relayed to me by Mr. Jack Kimoto and was that 
because — we had domestic trouble. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you ever asked to rejoin the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Muller. Well, in the latter part of — yes; I w\as. • 
Mr. Tavenner. When was that? 

Mr. Muller. That was about, oh, about the latter part of 1945. 
Mr. Tavenner. Who asked you to join ? 

Mr. Muller. Well, I was picked up at my house by William Ka- 
maka and Benjamin Kaahawnnui, and then from my house we went 
to Benjamin Kaahawinui's house. Then, w4ien I got there, right off 
the bat, I knew that there was going to be a Communist meeting. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1461 

Mr. Tavenner. "\^1io asked you to join again? 

Mr. MuLLER. Mr. Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. Tam'^xner. Fujimoto. Can you tell us what led up to your 
being asked to rejoin the Communist Party? 

Mr. MuLLER. Well, right after the war, in 1945, in the meantime, 
previous to tliat, I kept very close contact with the union and the 
waterfront. The union members were beginning to slack awiiy, get- 
ting out of the union, and things did not look good to me. So, I 
started a campaign to reorganize the union. That was started at 
my i)lace. Benjamin Kaahawinui and myself, and William Kamaka, 
started the drive. My sole purpose for the drive was to find out the 
reason for the workers quitting the vmion and a lot of them came up 
with a lot of reasons. Some of them good reasons. They felt at 
the time that they did not like Jack Kawano. Kawano should be 
removed. That they had heard Communist activities taking place. 
They felt something should be done. I continued these meetings 
until I had a little over 100 members attending the meetings at my 
house. Then it was through this particular part that I took an in- 
terest in, that I was commented on during the time the meeting was 
held at Mr. Kaahawinui's house m 1945. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, when you became active again in 
union work, and displayed leadership m the organization, in your 
union, you were then asked to come into the Community Party again? 

Mr. Muller. Yes. 

Mr. Tavexner. Well, then, tell us what occurred? Did you go 
back to the union, or the Communist Party? 

Mr. Muller. No, I didn't go back to the Commimist Party. When 
Mr. Charles Fujimoto asked me to rejoin the Communist Party I told 
him then I was working for the Government and that I had no busi- 
ness in the Communist Party. 

Mr. Ta\t:xx^er. Did you continue on with your efforts at the organ- 
ization of 3'our own union ? 

Mr. Muller. Well, then, during the time I was having these meet- 
ings at my house, there was one night there when Mr. Jack Hall and 
Mr. Thompson and Mr. Jack Kawano and Mr. Frederick Kamahoahoa 
came to the house. 

Mr, Tavenxer. Was that after j'ou turned down the request to 
become a member of the Communist Party again? 

Mr. Muller. No. This was before that. 

Mr. Tavexxer. This was before that ? 

Mr. Muller. Yes. 

Mr. Tavex'xer. What Thompson did you refer to as the Thompson 
who came to your house ? 

Mr. Muller. Probably Frank Thompson. 

Mr, Tavexxer. I interrupted you. Proceed. 

Mr. Muller. Then Mr. Jaclc Hall took the meeting over and felt 
that whoever was doing the job was doing a fine job in reorganizing 
the waterfront union, and he said that the next meeting we were 
going to have held for the longshoremen's union would be at the Kala- 
kaua Intermediate School. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Well, after this occasion when Jack Hall and others 
came to your house, were you approached again to become a memlxT 
of the Communist Party ? 

66636 — 50— pt. 1 8 



1462 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. MuLLER. Yes, I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. By whom ? 

Mr. MuLLER. Mr. Kaahawinui and myself, Mr. Kaahawinui came 
over to the house, and we drove up to Jack Kimoto's house. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were at Jack Kimoto's house ? 

Mr. MuLLER. There was Jack Kimoto himself, E'ileen Fujimoto, 
Charles Fujimoto, Jack Hall, myself, Benjamin Kaahawinui, Yukio 
Abe, and John Elias, and Frederick Kamahoahoa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were those persons the persons that you had met 
with before in the Communist meetings ? 

Mr. MuixLER. Well, there were some other faces there, like Yukio 
Abe and this Joseph Kealalio. 

Mr. Tavenner. You had never met with them as Communists? 

Mr. Mtjller. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us what took place. 

Mr. Muller. Well, I did not stay at the meeting. I left the meet- 
ing early. They were going to sell literature. 

Mr. Tavenner. What kind of literature were they selling at this 
meeting ? 

Mr. Muller. Literature on Marxism and the U. S. S. R. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was this a Communist Party meeting? 

Mr. Muller. Yes, it was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you asked at that meeting about joining the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Muller. No, that was the meeting after that, that I attended 
with Mr. William Kamaka and Benjamin Kaahawinui at the same 
address, Mr. Kimoto's place. As the meeting went on, I stayed after 
the meeting to have a little talk with Mr. Kimoto after the meeting. 
It was then that Mr. Kimoto asked me to rejoin the Communist Party, 
and there, at the same time, we went over the constitution of the Com- 
munist Party and the Communist Manifesto. As he went down the 
line, I, for granted, took the understanding 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you speak a little louder, please ? 

Mr. Muller. I took for an understanding one paragraph in the 
constitution which advocates the overthrow of the Government. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall out of what books or writings that 
expression appeared ? 

Mr. Muller. It was out of either from the constitution of the Com- 
munist Party or the Communist Manfesto. Which one it was, I 
can't recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlien you saw the reference to the overthrow of 
the Government by force and violence, to which you referred, what 
decision did you make about joining the Communist Party? 

Mr. Muller. Well, right there and then I did not give any decision 
to Mr. Kimoto. When I left the meeting, I went out to meet Mr. 
Kamaka and Benjamin Kaahawinui and I asked them what they 
were going to do that night, and they said, "Nothing." I said, "Well, 
let's go on down to the house." Well, we left Kimoto's place and 
went to my house. We talked the thing over. I told them that the 
thing did not look right to me, that it was the wisest thing for them, 
the best thing they could do was to get out, to leave the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Since that occurred, were you approached again to 
join the Communist Party? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1463 

Mr. MuLLER. Yes, down at the ILWU hall, there was one evening 
that I went doMn with Benjamin Kaahawinui. Then we landed at 
the meeting and there was a Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about that. 

Mr. MuLLER. Well, at this Communist meeting, present at the time 
was Jack Kawano, Frederick Kamahoahoa, myself, Kaahawinui, Mrs. 
Pearl Freeman, Mr. John E. Elias, and at the meeting the discussion 
"was taken up on the 

Mr. Tavenner. Speak a little louder, please. 

Mr. MuLLER. The discussion that was taken up was on the recruit- 
ing of new members into the party, and at the time Mr. John Elias 
was in charge of this meeting that they were holding with the delegates 
from the different companies, at the union hall, but he was to use 
his judgment in recruiting the new members into the Communist Party. 

Mr. TxVVENNER. Have you already referred to Ben Kaahawinui in 
your testimony ? I don't recollect whether you mentioned him or not. 

Mr. MuLLER. Well, so far as Benjamin Kaahawinui is concerned, 
it was in 1947 that Benny was supposed to submit his decision to the 
Communist Party, as to whether he would run for business agent or 
not. Well, at one time, as I mentioned in my statement before, that 
we met up at Mr. Kimoto's place, and at one of these meetings the 
discussion took place under the subject of Mr. Frederick Kamahoa- 
hoa. Mr. Frederick Kamahoahoa had a little trouble with his wife, 
and they were separated. Fred sort of lost his mind and was sent 
to the hospital. Well, then, at that meeting there was the decision 
made that when Fred was to return to the water front, after he was 
through with the hospital, he was not to hold any office within the 
ILWU or within the Communist Party. That was the decision made 
at one of these meetings held at Mr. Kimoto's house. 

Mr. Tavenner. That decision was made by what group of people ? 

Mr. Muller. By the Communist comrades who were attending the 
3neeting at the time, so far as I am concerned. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean that the members of the Communist 
Party decided that he should not hold office in the ILWU union? 

Mr. Muller. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Proceed. 

Mr. Muller. Well, then, when 1947 came along, I guess there 
had been — I guess he was cured of whatever he had, and went back 
to the water front to work. Well, then, there was a — they elected 
new officers within the ILWU, and then the Communist Party, to 
what I take from Benjamin Kaahawinui, they had Frederick Kama- 
hoahoa to run against Benjamin Kaahawinui. Mr. Kaahawinui was 
supposed to withdraw, in favor of Kamahoahoa. Then, when Benny 
came to me, I told him, irregardless of what the decision — or what 
the decision was made by the Communist Party at the time, was to go 
ahead and run, whether irregardless of what the decision was made 
by the Communist Party. But, he told me at the time that he had to 
let the Communist Party know whether he was going to run or not. 
So, he went down and he turned in his papers, and he told them he 
"was going to run. 

Mr. Tavenner. So, he defied the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Muller. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 



1464 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX HAWAII 

Mr. MuLLER. So, after that. I found out he was automatically 
thrown out from tlie party for not living up to the decision of what 
the party had made, 

Mr. Tavenner. So, party discipline was applied, and he was put out 
of the party ? 

Mr. MuLLER. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did tlie ILWU elect him, in spite of the oppo- 
sition of the Communist Party? 

Mr. MuLLER. Yes, Benny was elected. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is Benny Kaahawinui a member of the party now, 
to your knowledge ? 

Mr. MuLLER. Well, the last time I saw Benny was when I got my 
interrogatory from the Navy Department, wlien I talked to Benny. 
Benny said he was no more a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was that that Benny was elected to the office 
you spoke of ? 

Mr. MuLLER. In 1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know of any other person who was a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party and is now out of the party, who was 
connected with your unioji in any way? 

Mr. MuLLER. Mr. Jack Kawano and Mr. Julian Napuunoa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you explain your statement? 

Mr. Muller. I beg your pardon ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you explain 3'our statement ? How do you 
know that ? 

Mr. MuLLER. Well, I met Jack Kawano and I asked Jack if he was 
in the party, and he said no, he was getting out. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. When did he tell you that he was getting out. 

Mr. Muller. Oh, that was the very latter part of 1949, I think he 
was out then when he told me tiiat, because I felt interested in Jack 
when I found out that he was not running for the president of the 
union for the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say he is not running: he did not run for the. 
presidency ? 

Mr. Muller. No, he did not run for president. 

Mr. Tavenner. He had been president ? 

Mr. Muller. He had been president all the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. And when did he make the decision not to run 
again ? 

Mr. Muller. That, I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did he leave the office of president of the 
ILWU? 

Mr. Muller. I think when the new seated officers took place for the 
1950 year. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. For the year 1950? 

Mr. Muller. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have mentioned Samson Chang. 

Mr. ]\IuLLER. Yes, I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether he is noAv a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Muller. That I cannot say. I don't know whether he is stilil 
within the Communist Party or not. But, as far as I know I only 
met with Mr. Samson Chang once, at one meeting, at the Voice of 
Labor. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1465 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, are you familiar with the branch or cell of the 
Communist Party which you became a member of in the first instance? 

Mr. MuLi.ER. No, in the Hrst instance, I cannot i-ecall, but then 
when I attended — 1 attended the meetings after that, then 1 learned 
about the uptown group, and the downtown group. The downtown 
group M'as supposed to be consisted of the waterfront workers. 

Mr. Tavenner. And the uptown group? 

Mr. MulLip:r. That I don't know. Probabl}^ school teachers, pro- 
fessors. 

(Laughter in the audience.) 

Mr. Tavenner. You never met with the uptown group, did you ? 

Mr. MuLLER. No, I had never met with the uptown group. 

Mr. Tavenner. I think that is all, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. McSweeney. Mr. Muller, what caused the people of your 
union to formulate a new union ? 

Mr. MuLLER. 1 beg your pardon? 

Mr. McSweeney. Why did you have to re-establish your union? 
What happened to your union ? 

Mr. Muller. The members were beginning to leave the union, and 
and some of the men brought up the fact that they have heard, that 
my interest was to find out the cause of the men leaving the union 
they themselves have heard that some of the leaders in their organiza- 
tion belong to the Communist Party, and that they felt that Jack 
Kawano 

Mr. McSweeney. And it was for that reason they left the union? 

Mr, Muller. Yes, sir. 

Mr. McSweeney. That is all. Thank you. 

Mr. Walter. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Muller. During the latter part of 1949 I met with Mr. William 
Kamaka at my house, and that was the first time for quite some time 
that I had met Bill, and we talked the situation over. And I have 
kept reading in the newspapers about this un-American Activities 
group that was comming to town to investigate on the functions of 
the Communist Party, so I spoke to Bill about it. I told Bill that 
"there is going to be a day soon that you are either going to have to 
choose on which side of the fence you are going to be on." And he 
said yes, he knew that was coming. And then I asked Bill then if he 
didn't belong to the Communist Party. And Bill told me no. Then 
in April 1950, 1 received an interrogatory from the Navy Department, 
which I filled out and turned in to the Navy Department, and also over 
to the FBI, and I have here my loyalty oath, wdiich I have been cleared 
of, from the Navy Department. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you like for this to be made a part of the 
record ? 

Mr. Muller. Yes, I would. 

Mr. Tavenner. We will have it copied and we will return the origi- 
nal to you. 

Mr, Muller. Well, there are two copies there, one duplicate and 
one original. 

Mr, Tavenner, Then we shall use the copy now and and I offer it in 
evidence as Muller exhibit No. 1.^* 

Mr. Walter. Let it be marked and received. 

" Copy of original retained in commitee files. 



1466 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

(The letter referred to is as follows:) 

Pearl Habbob Naval Shipyabd, 

c/o Fleet Post Office, 
San Francisco, Calif., March 8, 1950. 

REGISTEKEiD CONFIDENTIAL 

From : Commander, Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard. 

To : Muller, Emil M., Jr., Engineman 1/c, Check No. 03-283, Shop 03, Pearl Harbor 

Naval Shipyard. 
Subj. : Federal Employee Loyalty Program, 
Ref. (a) NCPI 29. 

(b) Loyalty Interrogatory. 

1. The Commander and the Shipyard Loyalty Board have studied reference 
(b), and in conformity with the provisions of reference (a), have determined 
that reasonable grounds do not exist to believe you disloyal to the Government 
of the United States. 

2. This decision constitutes your loyalty clearance but is subject to post-audit 
by the Loyalty Review Board of the Civil Service Commission on the record 
transmitted, with respect to matters of procedure, and also subject to the right of 
the Loyalty Review Board of the Civil Service Commission to institute a review 
of the case on its merits. In the event of a review of the case on its merits, 
you will be given due opportunity to be heard. 

R. T. COWDEET. 

Mr. Moulder. From the testimony of some of the witnesses that have 
testified here relative to Communist meetings, it is not clear in m}' 
mind how they sometimes distinguish as to whether it is a Com- 
munist meeting or just a meeting of some of the men who are active 
in the labor union. Can you tell us how to distinguish as to whether 
it was a Communist meeting or whether it was just a meeting of the 
men getting together to discuss labor problems? 

Mr. Muller. Wlien we got together at this meeting that I have 
described to you as being a Communist meeting, it was talked — 
it was said in the meeting that this was a Communist meeting, and your 
dues were collected and stamps were placed in the comrade's books 
and also literature on communism was sold in these meetings, and 
that convinced me surely that these meetings were Communist 
meetings. 

Mr. Moulder. Those you have referred to ? 

Mr. Muller. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Thank you very much Mr. Muller. 

The subcommittee will stand in recess for 5 minutes. 

(At 3 : 30 p. m. a recess was taken until 3 : 4Y p. m.) 

(Mr. Moulder was absent from this point until adjournment today.) 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will be in order, please. 

Mr. Tavenner, call your next witness. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. I desire to call Mr. David K. Kamaka. 

Mr. Walter. Will you stand up, please, and raise your right hand ? 

Do you swear that the testimony j'ou are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Kamaka. I do. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed. 



COMIMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1467 

TESTIMONY OF DAVID K. KAMAKA 

JNIr. Tavennek. You are Mr. David K. Kamaka ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavsnner. When and where were you born? 

Mr. Kamaklv. Honohilu. 

Mr. Tavenner. On what date? 

Mr. Kamaka. March 7, 1907. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your present address? 

Mr. Kamaka. 2218 Sunset Road, Palolo. 

Mr. Taa^nner. Will you state to the committee where you have 
worked in the past 5 or 10 or 15 years? 

Mr. Kamaka. From 1925 to the present date. I worked for the 
same company, McCabe, Hamilton & Renny, as a winch driver. 

JMr. Tavenner. Have vou e^er been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Kamaka. I was. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. When ? 

Mr. Kamaka. 1938. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Kamaka. About 5 or 6 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlio approached you to ask you to join the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Benny Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us just how you became a member. 

Mr. Kamaka. I first joined the Communist Party; I don't know 
nothing about it ; I just joined. 

(Laughter in the audience.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend a meeting before the time you 
joined ? 

Mr. Kamaka. As an observer, yes. I was at Kawano's house at 
Pauoa Valley. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you join the first time you went to the meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. No, I was an observer. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long after it was it that you attended another 
meeting ? 

Mr. Kamaka. About one week later, at Otani Building, Aala Park. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you join at that time? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you sign a party card ? 

Mr. Kamaka. I did sign a party card. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Who gave it to you ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Jack Kimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you pay dues? 

Mr. Kamaka. I did not pay dues at that meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Not at that meeting? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you pay dues later ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. ' 

Mr. Tavenner. To whom did you pay the dues ? 

Mr. Kamaka. To Jack Kimoto. 



1468 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII j 

j 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell the committee who were present at the ] 

meeting when you joined the party? 

Mr. Kamaka. My brother, Bill Kamaka, Benny Kaahawinui, Jack ' 

Kawano, Ah Quon Leong. , 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you buy or were you given any Communist [ 

literature while you were a member of the party ? j 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. ; 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about that. Did you buy it or was it given j 

to you ? '. 
Mr. Kamaka. It was given to me. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. Who gave it to you '? . 
Mr. Kamaka. Jack Kimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you paid your dues to Jack Kimoto, did he i 

give you a receipt of any kind ? 

Mr. Kamak.\. No; he gave me a stamp. j 

Mr. Tavenner. What did you do with the stamp ? I 

Mr. KIamaka. Pasted it in the membership book. I 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings did you attend ? i 

Mr. Kamaka. Five meetings. . 
Mr. Tavenner. Five? 
Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 
Mr. Tavenner. Can you name any other persons you have not 

already named who attended those meetings when you were there ? 
Mr. Kamaiva. Yes ; I can. Peter Hyun, Alice Hyun, Samson Chang, 

Fred Kamahoahoa, Emil Muller, Rachel Saiki, Peggy Uesugi. j 

Mr. Tamsnner. What w^as the last name ? i 

Mr. Kamaka. Peggy^ — I can't pronounce her last name. ' 

Mr. Tx^^vENNER. Can't pronounce it ? I 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes. , 

Mr. Tavenner. Uesugi? I 

Mr. Kamaka. Uesugi. ! 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that the correct name ? : 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. , 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Jack Hall present at any meeting when you i 

you were there i 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. All the meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. You said that you attended about five meetings and 

you were a member about 5 months ? , 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir.  

Mr. Tavenner. After you dropped out of the party, were you ever | 

asked to come back in the party again? ' 

Mr. Kamaka. Yes ; they approached me about 19^:0. \ 

Mr. Tavenner. About 1940 ? ' 
Mr. Kamaka. Yes, sir. 
Mr. Tavenner. Who asked you ? 

Mr. Kamaka. Benny Kaahawinui. ' 
Mr. Tavenner. Did 3^ou join again? 
Mr. Kamaka. No. That is the last time. 
Mr. Tavenner. Have jou ever been approached since 1940 to join 

the party — the Communist Party? : 

Mr. Kamaka. No, sir. \ 

Mr. Tavenner. When you dropped out of the party, after being in ; 

it about 5 months, what did you do with your membership book ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1469 i 

Mr. Kamaka. I p;ave it to my brother to n;ive back to Jack Kiinoto. J 

Mr, Tavenner. What did you do \vith the literature that luid been I 

given to you. } 

Mr. Kamaka. I burned it. | 

Mr. Tavenner. No further questions. I 

Mr. Walter. Thank you very much. f 

Mr. Tavenner. Tliat is all, Dave. i; 

Mr. Walter. The tirst witness who will be called tomorrow will be ' 

Ealph Tokunaga. The subcommittee will adjourn now to meet at 9 r 

instead of 9 : 30. _ | 

(Thereupon, at 4 p. m., Tuesday, April 11, 1950, an adjournment { 

was taken until 9 a. m., Wednesday, April 12, 1950.) ; 



HEAEINGS EEGARDING COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 

TEEEITORY OF HAWAII 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12, 1950 

United States House of Representatives, 
Subcommittee of the Comimittee on Un-American Activities, 

Honolulu^ T. H. 

public session 

The subcommittee of five met, pursuant to call, at 9 a. m., in the Sen- 
ate Chamber, lolani Palace, Hon. Francis E. Walter (subcommittee 
chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Francis E. Walter, 
Burr P. Harrison, John McSweeney, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold 
H. Velde. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; William 
A. Wheeler and Courtney E. Owens, investigators ; and John W. Car- 
ringlon, clerk. 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will come to order. I suppose that most 
of you people received a pamphlet as you came in early this morning 
from the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee. I would like to in- 
form you that that organization is on the list of subversive organiza- 
tions, as designated by the Attorney General of the United States. 

All right, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. I would like to recall Mr. Izuka. 

TESTIMONY OF ICHIKO IZTJKA— Eesumed 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Izuka, do you have any explanation or cor- 
rection to make of any matter that you testified to when you were 
here yesterday? 

Mr. Izuka, Yes ; by reading the papers, I found out that I would 
like to make a correction, on the part when I said that Frank Silva 
showed me his party card in 1947. I am sure it is all of the members 
who joined the Communist Party, including Frank Silva, that was 
during the time before I resigned from the party in 1946, and that 
actually took part during the same time, instead of 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, it was during 1946 instead of 1947 ? 

Mr. Izuka. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is there anything else? 

Mr. Izuka. Another correction I would like to make is, I think I 
said during the Koko Head incident, which was in 1943 or 1944, 
I am sure it is definitely 1943. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Walter. The next witness, Mr. Tavenner. 

1471 



1472 coMJsruNiST activities in hawaii 

TESTIMONY OF RALPH TOKUNAGA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 



Mr. Walter. Do you solemnly swear to speak the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? ^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state your full name ? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. My name is Ralph Tokunaga. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented here by counsel ? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself? 

Mr. Stmonds. Myer C. Symonds. At this time, Mr. Chairman, on 
behalf of my client, I wish to file with the committee a motion to 
quash service of the subpena, for the reason stated therein. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received. Yoli want this of record? 

Mr. Symonds. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. For the purpose of the record. 

Mr. Symonds. I, of course, urge the motion for the record. 

Mr. Walter. Of course, that motion is not in order in this forum. 

Before the Committee on Un-American Activities of the House of 
Representatives of the United States 

motion to quash service by sxjbpoena by rai*ph tokunaga 

Now comes the witness above named by his attorney and moves to quash the 
service of the subpoena directing the witness to appear before the Committee on 
Un-American Activities of the House of Representatives of the United States 
on April 11, 1950, in the Senate Chamber, lolani Palace, at the hour of 9 : 30 a. m., 
upon the following grounds : 

I 

The Committee's utilization of congressional power, as an agency of govern- 
ment, to compel disclosure of private political opinion and association is 
forbidden in that — 

a. It interferes with, obstructs, coerces and abridges the exercise uf the rights 
and duties of political expression through speech, assembly, association and pe- 
tition, in contravention of the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United 
States. 

b. It deprives the witness of the right to privacy and silence in such matters 
in contravention of the Fourth and Fifth Amendments to the Constitution of 
the United States. 

c. It interferes with, obstructs, coerces and abridges the exercise of the gov- 
ernmental powers reserved to the people of the United States in contravention 
of the Ninth and Tenth Amendments to the Constitution of the United States. 

II 

The statute creating the House Committee on Un-American Activities on its 
face and particularly as construed and applied is unconstitutional in that : 

a. It permits investigation of, and as construed and applied has been used 
to investigate, the content of speech and ideas, an area in which no legislation 
is possible, thereby exceeding the boundaries of legislative power under Article I 
of the Constitution of the United States. 

b. It permits the process of investigation to be used, and as generally con- 
strued and applied it has been used, to expose and stigmatize the content of any 
and all speech and ideas disapproved by the members of the Committee, thereby 
impeding and placing a burden upon free thought, speech and association in 
violation of the First, Ninth and Tenth Amendments to the Constitution of the 
United States. 

c. It deprives witnesses of property rights without due process of law in con- 
travention of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution of the 
United States. 

" See appendix for response of Ralph Tokunaga to this question. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1473 

d. It seeks to coinpel witnesses to testify against themselves in contravention 
of the Fifth AuKMuluient to tlie Constitution of the United States. 

Wherefore the witness prays tliat tliis motion to quash said subpoena be 
granted. 

Dated : Honolulu, T. H., this 12th day of April, 1950. 

(Signed) Mykr C. Symonds, 

Attorney for Witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mr. Ralph Tokiinaga ? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are appearing here before the committee in 
response to a subpena that was served on you, are you not? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you reside, Mr. Tokunaga? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I live at 808 l^iani Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. Tokunaga, I was born January 3, 1914, in Kona, Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe if you sit back a little further, and speak 
a little louder, that Avould be the best combination. 

^Vliere are you presently employed? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I am now working for the Rite-Way Electric Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is the nature of your employment? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I am an electrician. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you at any time been an officer in the ILWTJ ? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes; I was. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. State what official positions you held, and the dates. 

Mr. Tokunaga. So far as I can remember, I was vice president 
in 1945 ; president in 1946-47. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Were vou acquainted with Ernest Arena during the 
jear 1946 ? 

Mr. Symonds. I advise my client not to answer the question upon 
the ground that it might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. Walter. You, of course, know the consequences of the advice 
that you have given to your client? 

Mr. Symonds. Yes, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. All right. I just don't want you to be misled — so 
long as you understand fully. 

Mr. Symonds. I have explained the situation to my client to the 
best of my legal ability. 

Mr. Walter. Will you answer the question ? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I refuse to answer, on the ground that it might tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Before I ask another question, why do you think 
it would incriminate you to answer the question as to whether you 
knew a certain individual ? 

Mr. Tokunaga. My counsel told me. 

Mr. Walter. AVas that the only reason why you refused to answer 
the question as to whether you knew an individual, because your 
lawyer told you that to know somebody might incriminate you; 
is that it? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position, if any, did Ernest Arena hold in 
local 150, ILWU, in the year 1946? 

Mr. Tokunaga. He was secretary and treasurer. 



1474 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. What position does lie now occupy ? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. President. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he have a conversation with you in the early 
part of 1946, regarding membership in the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Symonds. I advise my client not to answer the question, upon 
the ground that it might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Will you answer the question ? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he ask you to become a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Symonds. I advise my client not to answer, on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Will you answer the question ? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I refuse to answer, on the ground that it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you become a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Symonds. I advise my client not to answer, on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Will you answer the question ? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I refuse to answer the question, on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Do you know William A. "Wlieeler, the gentleman 
sitting to my left, an investigator for this committee ? 

Mr. Sytmonds. I advise my client not to answer, on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. Walter. Now, may I ask a question? Why do you think it 
would incriminate you to admit that you knew ^Iv. Wheeler, one of 
the investigators of the committee ? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. My attorney told me. 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you meet him in room 680 — that is, Mr. 
Wheeler — of the Alexander Young Hotel, Honolulu, T. H., on the 
22d of November 1949 ? 

^Ir. Syjionds. I advise my client not to answer, upon the ground 
it might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I refuse to answer, on the ground that it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. At that time and place mentioned, were you asked 
by Mr. Wheeler if jon had ever been a member of the Communist 
Party, and to which you replied, "I was once" ? 

Mr. Stmonds. I advise my client not to answer the question, on 
the ground it might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. Ta^t^nner. Wh^t is your answer ? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I refuse to answer, on the ground that it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you asked the question : "Did you join the 
Communist Party, or when did you join the Communist Party," ta 
which you replied : "It was sometime in 1946, 1 believe"? 

Mr. Symonds. I advise my client not to answer, upon the ground 
it might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I suggest for the purpose of saving: 
time, that if the witness proposes to make like answers to all these 
questions, that he merely state the same reply rather than 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1475 

Mr. Walter. I think it might save time, if tlie witness would care 
to answer this question : Do you intend to make the same reply to 
everv question asked vou bv Mr. Tavenner? 

Mr. Symonds. Wc do not know wliat all the questions are going 
to be. 

Mr. Walter. Thej^ certainly could not be any more unimportant, 
irrelevant and unimportant, than some of the questions already asked, 

Mr. Symonds. If there are any questions asked about Mr. Wheeler, 
1 will state I will advise my client to give the same answer. 

Mr. Walter. Then, Mr. Tavenner, I suggest that you have the 
witness step aside and proceed in another method. 

JSIr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. I am going to ask one question : Are you now, or have 
you ever been, a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Stmonds. I advise my client not to answer, upon the ground 
it might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. Walter. I would like you to answer this question. 

JNIr. ToKUNAGA. I refuse to answer the question, on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

INIr. TA^'ENNER. I think it would be a waste of time for me to ask 
the other questions which were propounded to him at the conference. 

ISIr. Walter. Step aside. You are still under subpena, and subject 
to the further call to testify. 

Mr. Symonds. ^lay the witness, however, leave with the under- 
standing that I will see that he returns any time that the committee 
wishes, if you wish him ? 

Mr. Walter. I don't care if he stays, but when he is called, he will 
have to answer. 

Mr. Symoxds. Does that mean that the chairman wishes him to 
remain in the building? 

Mr. Walter. I don't care where he is. You understand what the 
sub])ena means, I hope. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Will you take the stand, please, Mr. Wheeler? 

ISIr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? Do you swear 
that the testimony you are about to give w^ill be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Wheeler. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM A. WHEELER 

Mr. Tavenner. State your full name. 

Mr. Wheeler. William A. Wheeler. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. What official position do you occupy? 

Mr. Wheeler. I am investigator for the Committee on Un-Ameri- 
can Activities. 

Mr. Taa^exner. Hoav long have you been investigator of this com- 
mittee? 

Mr. Wheeler. Since August 1947. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Prior to your employment as investigator with this 
committee, what investigative experience did you have? 

Mr. Wheeler. In 1943 I went to work for the United States Secret 
Service, where I remained until 1947, to accept this position with the 
committee. However, I served 23 months in the Army as an agent 
in the CID. 



1476 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Wheeler, do 3^011 know Mr. Ralph Tokunaga? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you meet with him on November 22, 1949, in 
room 680, Alexander Young Hotel, Honolulu ? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you propound certain questions to him at the 
time and receive answers from him? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were those answers made voluntarily by him ? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have a record of the questions and the an- 
swers that you propounded, and the answers made ? 

Mr. Wheeler. I do, sir. The entire interview was made on the 
Sound Scriber, in the presence of Ralph Tokunaga. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, your questions were recorded on 
the Sound Scriber, and likewise his answers were? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. On a machine of the character that this is that 
you see ? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Taking down the testimony in this hearing? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes. Identical to the machine behind the one there 
used in the hearing. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you the disks which recorded the questions 
and the answers? 

Mr. Wheeler. I do, sir. 

Mr. Taa^enner. Mr. Chairman, I desire to have those recorded disks 
heard. 

Mr. Walter. Before you do that, did the witness that preceded you 
know that this hearing was being recorded ? 

Mr. Wheeler. Absolutely, sir. It was done in his presence. 

Mr. Walter. Did he object to the recording? 

Mr. Wheeler. No, sir. 

Mr. Symonds. For the purpose of the record, I would like to object, 
upon the ground that any records that are being played were not 
under oath, and, second, were not taken under oath, on behalf of my 
client. 

Mr. Walter. The committee will recess for a minute. 

(Recess.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Wheeler, the disks which you are about to play 
are the recorded statement or statements of questions propounded by 
you and the replies made to those questions by Ralph Tokunaga, is 
that correct? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And is that Ralph Tokunaga the same person who 
preceded you on the witness stand? 

Mr. Wheeler. The same individual. 

Mr. Tavenner. And who refused to testify regarding the statements 
he had made to you ? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Proceed. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1477 

(Mr. Wheeler then phxced disks upon a Sound Scriber and the 
following is a transcript of the recordings on said disks:) 

The following statement was taken from Mr. Ralph Tokunaga, November 22, 
1049, room GSO, Alexander Yonnff Hotel, Honolnln, T. H. 

Mr. Whkeleu. ^Iv. Tokunaga, would you state your full name? 

Mr. TOKUXAGA. My name i.'^ lialpli Tokunaga. 

Mr. Whepxer. Ralph Tokunaga, where do you reside? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I live at SOS I'aani Street. 

Mr. WHia-xER. Paani Street. Would you spell the street, please. 

Mr. Tokunaga. P-A-A-N-I. 

Mr. WiiEELEai. When and where were you born? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I was born January 13, 1914, in Kona, Hawaii. 

Mr. Wheeler. Kona, K-O-N-A, Hawaii. Where are you presently employed? 

I\Ir. Tokunaga. I am now employed at the Inter-Island Dry Dock. 

Mr. Wheeler. The Inter-Island Dry Dock. And what is the nature of your 
occupation? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Machinist. 

Mr. Wheeler. You're a machinist by trade, 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. Are you a member of any union now? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I am. 

Mr. Wheeler. You are. 

Mr. Tokunaga. Local 150. 

air. Wheelee. Local 150— is that ILWU? 

Sir. Tokunaga. Yes. 

Mr. Wheelee. Are you an oflBcer in that union? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No. Just the rank and file. 

Mr. Wheeler. Just the rank and file. Have you previously held any office in 
the union? 

Mr. Tokunaga. At one time I was vice president of the union and then I was 
president. 

Mr. Wheeler. What year were you president? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I was president in 1946, I think. 

Mr. Wheeler. 1946. And what year were you vice president, 1945? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I believe it was 1945. 

Mr. Wheeler. You believe it was 1945 — I want you to speak up — you can lean 
over here if you want to, so we will be sure to get all of this down. Are you 
married? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Wheeler. You are married. What is your wife's name? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Shigeko Tokunaga. 

Mr. Wheeler. How do you spell that first name? 

Mr. Tokunaga. S-H-I-G-E-K-0. 

Mr. Wheeler. S-H-I-G-E-K-0. Where did you go to school? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I attended grammar school in Kona, Hawaii. 

Mr. Wheelek. Grammar school in Kona. 

Mr. Tokunaga. And Kohia School in Honolulu. 

Mr. Wheeler. And Kohia School. Is that a high school? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No, it's a grammar school too. 

Mr. Wheeler. That's a grammar school also. 

Mr. Tokunaga. And Washington Junior High School, Washington Intermediate 
School. 

Mr. Wheeler. Washington Intermediate School. 

Mr. Tokunaga. Ajid McKinley High School. 

Mr. Wheeler. And McKinley High School — McKinley High School is in 
Honolulu. 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes ; that's right. 

Mr. Wheeler. Have you ever been a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I was once. 

Mr. Wheeler. You were at one time. Now, when did you join the Communist 
Party? 

Mr, Tokunaga. It was sometime in 1946, I believe. 

Mr. Wheeler. It was sometime in 1946 — do you know what time of the year? 

Mr. Tokunaga. It was the the early part of the year. 

66636 — 50 — pt. 1 9 



1478 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 

Mr. Wheeler. The early part of the year— the first 3 months of 1946? 

Mr, ToKUNAGA. I believe it was around then. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who asked you to join the Communist Party? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Ernest Arena. 

Mr. Wheeler. Ernest Arena — who is Ernest Arena? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. He was our secretary-treasurer, sort of business agent. 

Mr. Wheeler. He was business agent of local 150, ILWU? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. What is his present occupation? : 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. He is president of local 150. ' 

Mr. Wheeler. He is now president of local 150. Did Mr. Arena issue to you ; 

a Communist Party card? | 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No ; a fellow named Ichiro Izuka. 

Mr. Wheeler. Ichiro Izuka. i 

Mr. Tokunaira, to what unit or cell did you originally belong to? : 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. First it was the Waikiki group. 

Mr. Wheeler. The Waikiki group. 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. And we were transferred over to the Makiki group. ' 

Mr. Wheeler. You were transferred to the Makiki group. ; 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Then they formed us into the 150 group. { 

Mr. Wheeler. And then to the local 150 group. Let's go to the Waikiki group ; 

first. At whose home were the meetings of the Waikiki group held? I 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. They were held at a fellow's named Ralph Vossbrink. | 

Mr. Wheeler. Ralph Vossbrink — now where did Mr. Vossbrink live? j 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I don't know the address. \ 

Mr. Wheeler. In what section of town? ' 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. It was in Waikiki, somewheres in the back of the theater. | 

Mr. Wheeler. Some place back of the Waikiki Theater. And you could iden- i 

tify the place now? ' 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I believe so. 

Mr. Wheeler. You believe so — how many meetings did you attend at Mr. , 

Vossbrink's home? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I'd say about three. I 

Mr. Wheeler. About three meetings at Mr. Vossbrink's home. Who attended 
the meetings at Mr. Vossbrink's home? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. When I first went there there was Jack Hall. 

Mr. Wheeler. Jack Hall. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Ichiro Izuka, Ralph Vossbrink, Koichi Imori, and a lady j 
named Elizabeth Bristow. 

Mr. Wheelfb. Elizabeth Bristow. 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. And Jeanette Nakama dropped in before the meeting was over. j 

Mr. Wheeler. Nakama. j 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Ernie Arena. | 

Mr. Wheeler. And Ernest Arena. How many individuals were in this group? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Well, I don't know. I couldn't say offhand who else besides 
the ones I named, excepting McElrath. j 

Mr. Wheeler. Robert McElrath. 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. He was at the next meeting. And I remember now, a fellow 
named Frank Thompson was there. i 

Mr. Wheeler. Frjink Thompson. Were these the ones in attendance at the 
first meeting, or the ones you remember as being in attendance at the three ! 
or four meetings that you attended at the Vossbrinks. ^ 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. At the three or four meetings. - ] 

Mr. Wheeler. Would you identify Mr. Hall? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. If you showed me a picture of him, I could point him out to , 
you. • I 

Mr. Wheeler. Was he the representative of the ILWU here? : 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Regional director. 

Mr. Wheeler. Regional director of the ILWU. Now, Ichiro Izuka — who was i 

Mr. Izuka? 

Mr TOKUNAGA. Well, he was collecting the dues. When I first went there I 
didn't pay any money or wasn't issued anything, but at the second meeting was 
when I officially began, I guess. ' 

Mr. Whes;ier. At the second meeting you were issued a card. Who did you 
say issued this card to you? 
Mr. TOKUNAGA. Ichiro Izuka, he was secretary. j 

\ 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1479 

Mr. Wheei-eb. Is Ichiro Izuka the one who issued the pamphlets? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I think so. 

Mr. Wheeler. He's the same individual. You mentioned Imori — is that 
Koiehi Imori V 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Koiehi Imori. 

Mr. Wheeler. Wlio is Mr. Imori? What was his occupation at that time? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. At that time I believe he was a business agent for the ma- 
chinists union. 

Mr. Wheeler. Business agent for the machinists union. Do you know what 
he does now? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No ; I don't — all I know is that he lives over in Maui. 

Mr. Wheeler. He lives on the island of Maui. How about Bristow — Esther 
Bristow (Elizabeth)? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. She was there at the first two meetings, I remember. Then 
she left for the mainland. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who is Esther Bristow (Elizabeth)? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I don't know. From rumors I heard that she was connected 
with the Labor Canteen. That's all I know. 

Mr, Wheeler. What did she look like? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. A very big woman. 

Mr. Wheeler. Is she in the island at the present time? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I don't know — I've never seen her since. 

Mr. Wheeler. You've never seen her since. Who is Jeanette Nakama? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Jeanette Nakama at that time, I believe, was an employee of 
the National Martime Union here, as secretary to Sam Baringer or whatever his 
name was. 

Mr. Wheeler. Sam who? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Sam Baringer. 

Mr. Wheeler. B-a-r-i-n-g-e-r? Is this Jeanette Nakama a sister-in-law to 
Cliarles Fujimoto? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I guess so. 

Mr. Wheeler. That's the same individual. I think we've identified Ernest 
Arena. How about Robert McElrath? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Right now he's in public relations for the ILWU. 

Mr. Wheeler. Is he the same McElrath who's on the radio every night? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. That's the same one. 

Mr. Wheeler. That's the same one. Now, who is Frank Thompson? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Frank Thompson was an ILWU representative at that time, 
helping to organize the sugar workers. 

Mr. Wheeler. Is he still here? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I don't think so — I haven't seen him since. 

^Ir. Wheeler. Did you see Charles Fujimoto at any of these meetings of the 
Waikiki Club? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. How about Wilfred Oka? 
Mr. ToKUNAGA. He showed up about the third meeting. 
Mr. Wheeler. How about Donald Uesugi? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Donald Uesugi showed up at the Makiki group, when we were 
transferred there. 

Mr. Wheeler. You never saw Donald Uesugi at the Waikiki group? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. You're positive. 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. Well, now, let's see, you've named 11, or that is 10, you've named 
10 individuals, including yourself, as being members of the Waikiki group. Can 
you think of anybody else who may have attended these meetings? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. You'll have to give me time to go back in my memory. I didn't 
pay any attention^ 

Mr. Wheeler. How about Adele Kensinger? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Adele Kensinger, I remember, was the haole [white woman 
from the mainland] lady who showed up at the Makiki group meetings just before 
we were formed into a group of our own, local 150. 

Mr. Wheeler. You don't recall her being at the Waikiki group? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. WHEELB21. How about Pauline Rosenthal? Do you know Pauline Rosen- 
thal? 



1480 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



Mr. ToKUNAGA. There were two other girls at the time Frank Thompson was 

here — I don't know which is which — both of them were nice looking. 

Mr. Wheelee. Both of them were nice looking. While we're still discussing 

the Waikikl group that met at the home of Mr. Ralph Vossbrink, do you recall 

anyone else who attended these meetings — Wallace Ho — was Mr. Ho there? 
Mr. ToKUNAGA. I'm not very sure whether he was there or at the Makiki 

group — I don't remember very well. 

Mr. Wheeler. Well now, these two women that we were discussing — do you 

remember the name of Pauline Rosenthal? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I believe she did show her face at one of the meetings, now j 

that I 

Mr. Wheeler. What does Pauline Rosenthal look like? < 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. She's a tall, pink-faced, soft-featured woman. ' 

Mr. Wheeler. Soft- featured — how old would you say she was? | 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Roughly around 26.  

Mr. Wheeler. Twenty-six. Do you know this girl's occupation at that time? ] 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No, no ; I don't. 

Mr. Whe:eler. You don't know where she worked? : 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. She was supposed to work in one of the oflBces at the union ; 

headquarters. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you recall a woman by the name of Gladys Patton? i 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. Or Gladys Ward? '1 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. WHEEr.EE. What did this other woman look like who was with Pauline | 

Rosenthal? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. She was a dark-haired woman. 
Mr. Wheeled. How old was she? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. She wasn't very old — she was about 24 or 25. 

Mr. Wheeler. Was she nice looking? | 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. She was better looking than Pauline. 
Mr. Wheeler. She was — you don't know where she worked? 
Mr. TOKUNAGA. I think it was Martha, I think it was. 

Mr. Wheeler. Martha something — maybe we can identify this person later. i 

Now, you were issued your card by Ichiro Izuka at the second meeting? i 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Yes. j 

Mr. Wheeler. And that would be in the first two or three months of 1946? 
Mr. ToKUNAGA. Around then. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who was president of the Waikiki group? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. There was no president of the Waikiki group — they had a 
chairman of the group. 

Mr. Wheeler. Chairman, well who was the chairman of the group? 
Mr. TOKUNAGA. Ralph Vossbrink. : 

Mr. Wheeler. Ralph Vossbrink was chairman. Who was the secretary? '; 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I believe Ichiro Izuka was. ' 

Mr. Wheeler. Ichiro Izuka — was he the treasurer, too? | 

Mr. TOKUNAGA, Treasurer — yes — that's the title they gave him. i 

Mr. Wheeler. Who was the educational director? I 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Vossbrink. 1 

Mr. Wheeler. He was also chairman and educational director? i 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. The educational director was changed over meeting after meet- 
ing- ! 
Mr. Wheeler. Meeting after meeting? j 
Mr. TOKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. How about Wallace Ho? [ 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I remember him very well when we were swung over the Makiki \ 

group. < 

Mr. Wheeler. Well, let's stay with the Waikiki group for just a few more ] 

minutes. At the Waikiki group did you buy any literature from anybody? ! 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I bought some from Ralph Vossbrink. 

Mr. Wheeler. You bought literature from Ralph Vossbrink? ' 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. That's right. ,\ 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you recall what literature you purchased from him? ' 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No, I don't — so many I can't remember. ! 

Mr. Wheeler. Well, maybe we can refresh your memory on that. I have quite ', 

a bit of literature here — see if we can identify some of it. Did you ever subscribe 
to the Daily Peoples' World? ! 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1481 ' 

1 
Mr. TOKUNAGA. No, 

Mr. Wheeler. You never did — that's the Communist paper on tiie Pacific coast, j 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Daily Peoples'? PW? I 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes — Peoples World. | 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes ; I did subscribe to it. | 

Mr. Wheeler. Who asked you to subscribe to that? } 
Mr. ToKUNAGA. I didn't I'emember now, but I know we used to get the paper 

here. They used to give it to us here at the union hall. It was delivered here.  

Mr. Wheeler. It was delivered to the union hall and you paid for it there? ,■ 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. ! 
Mr. Wheeler. Now getting to these books, do you recall receiving a book 

called Socialism by A. B. Magio? j 
Mr. ToKUNAGA. I've read that. 

Mr. Wheeler. You've read that — did you buy that? j 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I did — 1 believe I did. ' ' 

Mr. Wheeler. How about The Young Generation, by Lenin? j 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. You don't recall that — do you remember Political Affairs? ' 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes ; I did buy that. ' 

Mr. Wheeler. You bought that. j 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I don't know if that's the same copy or not, but I know 

Mr. Wheeler. That's a monthly publigation. : 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes.  

Mr. Wheeler. Do you recall The Proletarian Revolution and Renegade [ 

Kautsky? '■ 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No. I 

Mr. Wheeler. You don't recall that. How about the Foundations of Leninism, 
by Joseph Stalin? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. Our Country Needs a Strong Communist Party, by William 
Foster? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No. \ 

Mr. Wheeler. How about State and Revolution, by Lenin? Blue book j 

there do you recall that? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I've never seen it — I don't recall reading it or buying it. j 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you still have the literature that you purchased? 1 

Mr. Tokunaga. No, I threw it away. j 

Mr. Wheeler. How about the Constitution of the U. S. S. R. ? , 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. You don't recall that. The Communist Manifesto, by Karl 

Marx? ' i 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes, I purchased that. ] 

Mr. Wheeler. Our Country Needs a Strong Communist Partv, by William i 

Foster? ' ! 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. T don't recall that. : 

Mr. Wheeler. Wage, Labor, and Capital? ' 

Mr. Tokunaga. I did buy that. j 
Mr. Wheeler. The Constitution of the Communist Party, this small blue 

book? i 

Mr. Tokunaga. I believe I was given one. i 

Mr. Wheeler. Were you given The Constitution of the Communist Party when | 

you got your Communist Party book? i 

Mr. Tokunaga. No. j 

Mr. Wheeler. No— later? ' 
Mr. Tokunaga. I'^es.  ' 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you recall buying most of this type of literature from Voss- ' 

brink at the Waikiki group? : 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes. i 

Mr. Wheeler. While you were with the Waikiki group, do you remember at j 

any time being assigned to study any particular subject and the following week ' 

make a report on it? , 
Mr. Tokunaga. AVe were all told to read the book called Political Economy. 
Mr. AVheeler. Political Economy? 

Mr. Tokunaga. They got me a copy of it around the second meeting. 

Mr. Wheeler. Around the second meeting. ! 
Mr. Tokunaga. We were told to read a few chapters and we would have a 

discussion on it. I 



1482 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Wheeler. Did you ever discuss it in front of the group yourself — the 
Wailviki group? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I wasn't very hep to the whole thing so I just sat and they 
led the discussions. I listened to everything that was going on. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who was the most active in this group V 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. How do you mean, active? 

Mr. Wheeler. Well, who appeared to be the most interested in the group at 
the Waikiki cell? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I would say Vossbrink was. 

Mr. Wheeler. Ralph Vossbrink. How about Jack Hall — did Jack Hall par- 
ticipate in any discussion? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. He was there when the debate over this Political Economy 
was going on. 

Mr. Wheeler. He was there — did he participate in it? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes, he participated in it. 

Mr. Wheeler. On how many occasions did you see Mr. Hall at this Waikiki 
group? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I guess every time I was there. 

Mr. Wheeler. Every time you were there he was also. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. After you were issued your Communist Party card there was 
no question in your mind that all these individuals were members of the Com- 
munist Party, was there? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

.Mr. Wheeler. In your own mind you were certain that everyone who was 
there was a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Everyone was a member of the Communist Party, 

Mr. AVheeler. Is there anything else that you can tell us about the Waikiki 
group that hasn't been discussed? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. Outside of always having the point stressed that we 
should try to recruit some more members. 

Mr. Wheelee. I see. Who informed you or stressed the point about recruiting 
more members? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. The chairman. 

Mr. Wheeler. The chairman — that was Mr. Vossbrink. Now, you don't recall 
anyone else attending the Waikiki group? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I don't remember any more. 

Mr. Wheeleb. You don't remember any more. Part of the Waikiki group was 
transferred to another group ; isn't that correct? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. What was the name of the second group? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Those who were living nearest to Jeanette Nakama's were the 
Makiki group. 

Mr. Wheeler. Makiki group — and the other people were to stay in the Waikiki 
group ? 

Mr. ToKUNAQA. I think that was it. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who was transferred to the Makiki group? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Koichi Imori, Oka, and myself. 

Mr. Wheeler. Oka and yourself — just the three of you were transferred from 
the Waikiki group to the Makiki group? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I think so. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you know if any of these individuals were transferred to 
any other group other than the Makiki group? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No ; I don't. 

Mr. Wheeler. You do not. What was the object of splitting the Waikiki group 
in half? 

Mr. TOKLT!TAGA. I had my own ideas about it, but I don't know whether that's 
the truth or not. 

Mr. Wheeler. What are your own ideas? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Well, it was growing too big, so they split it up in bunches. 

Mr. Wheeler. I see. How many people would you say were in the Waikiki 
group when they split it up? 

Mr. TokunagA. Around an even dozen. 

Mr. Wheeler. We have 13 names here, 12 identified, and the other individual 
whose first name is Martha, so we've evidently covered. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. That lady was (unintelligible). Pauline was at one time 
owner, and I remember seeing her at the old Kaahumanu Street union hall. She 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1483 

was there doing some research work for our union, that's how I happened to 
notice. 

Mr. Wheeler. In the Makiki group we have three individuals we have identi- 
fied, Koichi Imori, Wilfred Oka, and yourself, and, of course, Jeanette Nakama. 
The meetings were held at Jeanette Nakama's home. Is that correct? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheellb. Where did Jeanette Nakama live? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I don't know the house number, but I know it was Kaihee 
Lane. 

Mr. Wheeler. Kaihee Lane? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I believe it was. 

Mr. Wheelek. Jeanette Nakama you've already identified. Who else attended 
the meetings at the home of Jeanette Nakama? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Mr. and Mrs. Uesugi, Peggy and Donald, Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Kunemarxi. 

Mr. Wheeler. What is Mrs. Kanemaru's name? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Alice Kanemaru. 

Mr. Wheeler. Alice. Of what racial extraction is Alice? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. She's a Korean girl. 

Mr. Wheeler. She's a Korean girl. Do you recall anybody else? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. Wheeler. Anybody else? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Eddie Hong, Ruth Ozaki. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who is Edward Hong? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Edward Hong is secretary-treasurer of local 150. 

Mr. Wheeler. At the present time? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who is Euth Ozaki? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. She's one of the office clerks at the ILWU headquarters. At 
that time she was a typist-clerk at local 150. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you recall anybody else who attended the Makiki group? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Mr. and Mrs. Karou Abe. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you recall Mrs. Abe's first name? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Carol. 

Mr. Wheeler. Carol. Do you recall anybody else in the Makiki group? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Adele Kensinger showed up. 

Mr. Whbieleb. These Abe's that you mentioned — what racial extraction is 
Mr. Abe? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Mr. Abe is a Japanese boy. 

Mr. Wheeler. How old is he? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Oh, he's about 24 or 25 and his wife is a haole [white girl from 
the mainland] girl from away back East. 

Mr. Wheieler. How old is she? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. She was about 20 or 21, I think. 

Mr. Wheeoler. What did Mr. Abe do? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA, I don't know. He was a seaman as far as I knew. He didn't 
have a .iob in town. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you know where the Abe's live? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. They were living with Jeanette Nakama. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you recall anybody else who attended these meetings of the 
Makiki group at the home of Jeanette Nakama? 

INIr. TOKUNAGA. I met a number of people who were there at some of the parties 
that they had there with members, I guess, the name of a few other people, but I 
don't know if they were there at one meeting or not. 

Mr. Wheeler. How about Richard KageyamaV 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No. — I know Masao Mori and Harry Kuhia showed up at a 
couple of meetings, and James Freeman. 

Mr. Wheeler. What does Mr. Mori do. Masao Mori? 

Mr, ToKUNAGA, He's an electrician at the Hawaiian Brewery. 

Mr. Wheeler. How about Harry Knliia? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Harry, I don't know. He was supposed to be a business 
agent for some union, I don't know which. 

Mr. Wheeler. You don't know which union? 

Mr, ToKUNAGA. No, I don't know which union. 

Mr, Wheeler. How about Mr. Freeman? 

Mr, ToKUNAGA. Mr. Fmeman was an organizer for the Communist Party. 

Mr. Wheeler. How did you find that out? 



1484 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. He was introduced as. 

Mr. Wheeler. By whom? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. Wheelee. By Charles Fujimoto — did you meet his wife? 

Mr. ToKTJNAGA. Later on, at the party. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you recall anybody else who attended the meetings of 
the Makiki Club? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No, I have to stop and think. 

Mr. Wheeler. Looks like you had a pretty big group there. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. That's one of the reasons why they broke it up again and 
transferred it to another group. 

Mr. Wheeler. How about Paul Hyun? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Paul Hyun never participated in any of the discussions or 
gatherings or anything. He was there only at the parties, as I recall. 

Mr. Wheeler. How about David Hyun? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. He never was around. I don't know what he looks like. 
He was supposed to be Jeanette Nakama's boy friend, that's the reason he 
was around, I think. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did he live at Nakama's home? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No, I don't know — I don't think so. 

Mr. Wheeler. In the Makiki group, who was the chairman? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. The chairmanship swung around from one person to the next. 

Mr. Wheeler. Now, first, how long were you in the Makiki group? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I can't say in days, weeks, or months now, I don't remember. 

Mr. Wheeler. Well, approximately. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. It must have been about 3 months. 

Mr. Wheeler. About 3 months — did you attend all the meetings? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Most of them I attended unless I had a union meeting of 
my own. 

Mr. Wheeler. On what nights were the meetings held? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I believe it was Thursday. 

Mr. Wheeler. On Thursday night. Did you drive up there yourself? Do 
you have a car? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No, I don't — I did at that time. I was picked up several 
times by Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Wheeler. By Koichi Imori. What kind of a car did Koichi Imori 
have? 

Mr. Tokuxaga. He had a Ford 1938, I believe, or 1937, sedan. 

Mr. Wheeler. Sedan. Did anybody else ride with him to these meetings? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Oka. Wilfred Oka. 

Mr. Wheelee. Wilfred Oka. You say the chairmanship passed around at 
the meetings — who was the chairman? 

Mr. Tokunaga. In the beginning Charlie was. 

Mr. Wheeler. Charlie who? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Fujimoto. I don't know who came next, but there were several 
people I know, Jeanette 

Mr. Wheeler. Jeanette Nakama? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I just can't remember now. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who was the secretary-treasurer of the Makiki group? 

Mr. Tokunaga. It was passed around to — the fellow I remember most is 
Donald Uesugi. 

Mr. Wheelee. Donald Uesugi, of the Makiki group. Did he collect dues from 
you? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Wheelee. How much dues did he collect? 

Mr. Tokunaga. $1 a month dues. 

Mr. Wheeler. $1 a month. 

Mr. Tokunaga. As long as we didn't make over $50 a week we paid $1 a 
month dues. If we made over $50 we paid .^^2 a month. 

Mr. Wheeler. What was your salary then? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Somewhere around $54 a week. 

Mr. Wheeler. What did Donald Uesugi give you in return for the money? 

Mr. Tokunaga. He gave us small, teeny-weeny, little bitta stamp, which we 
pasted in our little green book. 

Mr. Wheeler. In your little green book. That's the book that was issued 
to you by Ichiro Izuka. Did you keep the same book that Mr. Izuka issued 
to you when you were transferred over to the Makiki group? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1485 

Mr. Tokunaga. I believe I did. 

Mr. Wheelkr. You believe you did. Do you know who the educational 
director of this Maliiki group was? 

Mr. Tokunaqa. Charles Fujiinoto. 

Mr. Wheeler. Charles Fujimoto : Do you recall who else may have been the 
treasurer of your organization? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No, I don't. I can't recall. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did you ever give any money to Jeannette Nakama? 

Mr. Tokunaga. She might have been dues secretary at one or two meetings, 
I know I got a lot of literature from her. 

Mr. Wheeler. You bought a lot of literature from Jeanette Nakama, did you? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. And that's some of the literature that you've already identified — 
that type of literature? 

Mr. Tokunaga. That type of literature — something else. 

Mr. Wheeler. When did the Makiki Club break in two, or form new groups 
out of that? 

Mr. Tokunaga. It was along sometime around the summer. 

Mr. Wheeler. Tlie summer. 

Mr. Tokunaga. We were told that we had enough members to form our own 
local group, local union group. 

Mr. Wheeler. I see. Now, you say you think you went in about the first part 
of 1946 and remained with the Waikiki group for about four meetings — that 
would be about a month. 

Mr. Tokunaga. No, more. 

]Mr. Wheeler. Longer than a month because you didn't attend every meeting. 

Mr. Tokunaga. The meetings weren't held every week. 

Mr. Wheeler. Oh, they weren't held every week? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. Every other week? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Every other week. 

Mr. WHEHiLER. I see. And then you were with the Waikiki group for about 
3 months? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No, it was with the Makiki group that I stayed 3 months. 

Mr. Wheeler. With the Makiki group. Yes, the Makiki group about 3 months, 
so that would bring it up to the summer of 1946. 

Mr. Tokunaga. Somewhere in the latter part of the summer. 

Mr. Wheeler. And then the 150 cell was born from the Makiki group. What 
individuals left the Makiki group and went into the 150 cell? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Eddie, myself 

Mr. Wheeler. Eddie? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Eddie Hong, myself, and Ruth Ozaki. 

Mr. Wheeler. What other individuals were members of the 150 cell of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Easter Doyle, Douglas Inouye, a fellow named Marumo. 

Mr. Wheeler. Is that M-a-r-u-m-o (Yoshita). 

Mr. Tokunaga. Marumo. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you recall his first name? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No, I don't. 

Mr. Wheeler. What did he do? 

Mr. Tokunaga. He was a steward at Love's Bakery. 

Mr. Wheeler. He worked for Love's Bakery. 

Mr. Tokunaga. He was an agent or steward, or whatever you want to call it. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who else were members of the 150 Club? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Frank Maehara. 

Mr. Wheeler. Frank Maehara — that's M-a-e-h-a-r-a, is that the correct 
spelling? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct. And where did he work? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Frank worked at Love's Bakery too. 

Mr. Wheeler. Frank Maehara worked at Love's Bakery also. Douglas 
Inouye — where did he work? 

Mr. Tokunaga. He was business agent for local 150. 

Mr. Wheeler. Local 150. And Easter Doyle — where did Easter Doyle work? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Honolulu Gas Co. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who else were members? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Chibu Tamayose. 



1486 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. Wheeler. You'll have to spell that for me. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. T-a-m-a-y-o-s-e. 

Mr. Wheeler. T-a-m-a-y-o-s-e — now what's his first name? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. It's a nickname. 

Mr. Wheeler. How do you spell that nickname? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. C-h-i-b-u. 

Mr. Wheeler. C-h-i-b-u. Where did he work? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Inter-Island Dry Dock. I 

Mr. Wheeler. Inter-Island Dry Dock — the same place that you worked. How 
many meetings did he attend? \ 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Oh, not very many. j 

Mr. Wheeler. Not very many. < 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. He came along toward the last, at the close of the year, I | 

believe. | 

Mr. Wheeler. The close of 1946. ; 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I believe so. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who else were members? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. That's all I recall right now. How about Ernest Arena? 

Mr. Wheeler. Ernest Arena. , 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. He was. ! 

Mr. Wheeler. How about Jack Hall? Did Jack Hall belong to local 150? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. He was supposed to have been a member of local 150. ; 

A union member. But outside of that we never saw him. 

Mr. Wheeler. You never saw him. , 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. I 

Mr. Wheeler. How long were you a member of this 150 cell? i 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. It nmst have been about 3 or 4 months, I guess. I 

Mr. Wheeler. Three or four months; and that was when you dropped out of | 

the Communist Party? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I believe it was just about that time. 

]\Ir. Wheeler. That would be the end of 1947 or the first part of 1948? I 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Just about then, I think. I 

Mr. Wheeler. Just about then. 
Mr. TOKUNAGA. Or 1946 or the beginning of 1947. 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes, that's right; the beginning of 1947. How about Robert 
McElrath? ' 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I never saw him at any of these meetings since we left Waikiki 
group. ' 

Mr. Wheeler. You never saw him after the Waikiki group. How about Pete 
Racela? 

Mr. ToKUNAOA. Oh, yes ; that's right— I couldn't think of that guy's name. Yes. 
Pete Racela — he was there. I overlooked that guy. He was treasurer; no, he \ 

was connected with the railroad union. j 

Mr. Wheeler. He was with the railroad union. How many individuals be- 
longed to 150 group? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. All I named. 

Mr. Wheeler. How many in numbers, would you say? J 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Roughly? j 

Mr. Wheeler. Roughly. | 

Vr. ToKUNAGA. Oh, about seven or eight. j 

Mr. Wheeler. We have 10 people here. j 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. They never were at a meeting at one time. 

Mr. Wheeler. Now, were you chairman of the 150 group? I 

IVir. ToKUNAGA. I was for a while. ! 

Mr. Wheeler. How long were you chairman? '. 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I don't know ; about two or three meetings, I think. i 

Mr. Wheeler. Whose place did you take? ] 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. They tried to push that job on me after Charley left. 

]\'r. Wheeler. After Charley who? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Charles Fujimoto. j 

Mr. Wheeler. Was Charles Fujimoto also in 150? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. he came down to Waikiki. 

Mr. Wheeler. Oh, he came down to attend and he acted as chairman — ^ ; 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Yes. j 

Mr. Wheeler. For the first couple of meetings? i 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Yes. j 

Mr. Wheeler. And then they gave you the chairmanship? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1487 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yps. 

Mr. WiiEEi-ER. IIow did you become chairman? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. They just had an election against my will and they pushed 
me into the chair. 

Mr. Whkekk. Who nominated you for chairman? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I don't renieniber. 

Mr. Wheeler. "Sou don't remember. Who was tlie secretary-treasurer? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Ruth Ozaki, I think, started off and then they changed around 
and Ruth was elected chairman and Easter Doyle was elected secretary-treasurer. 

Mr. Wheeler. Ruth Ozaki replaced you as chairman? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. That's right. 

Mr. Wheeler. And Easter Doyle was secretary-treasurer. Who collected dues 
from you? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Easter Doyle. 

Mr. AVheeler. Easter Doyle did? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. How much a month? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. The same — ■$! a month. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did Ruth Ozaki ever collect dues from you? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes ; I believe she did once, maybe once. 

Mr. Wheei-er. Maybe once. Who was the educational director of this particu- 
lar 150 unit? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. When Charlie left, Jim Freeman's wife, Pearl, came in, I 
remember. 

Mr. Wheeler. What did Pearl Freeman talk about? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. About most anything, current events and pamphlets and labor. 

Mr. Wheeler. Was Marxism discussed? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. In a mild manner. 

Mr. Wheeler. In a mild manner — by Pearl Freeman? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did Jim Freeman ever attend these meetings? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I believe he sat in as an observer maybe once or twice. 

Mr. Wheelek. Once or twice. And you knew him to be the organizer for llio 
Communist Party here in Hawaii? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. Where were these meetings held — the 150 unit? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. They were held at the union hall. 

Mr. Wheeler. The union hall — is that pier 11? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Pier 11. We had several meetings at NMU hall. 

Mr. WuEELER. NMU — is that National Maritime Union? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. National Maritime Union on Kaahumanu Street. 

Mr. Wheeler. Why don't you spell it? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. K-a-a-h-u-m-a-n-u. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did anybody from the National Maritime Union belong to this 
Communist Party cell? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Not that I know of. 

Mr. WHEE2.ER. How come you held the meetings over there? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Sam Baringer gave Ernie permission, I guess — I don't know 
how they fixed it up. 

Mr. Wheeler. Is this Sam Baringer a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. That I don't know. He was a business agent for the National 
Maritime Union in Honoluhi. 

Mr. Wheeler. Is he still here? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. What nights were these meetings held at NMU hall and also 
at the ILWU? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I don't know They were held several times at night and 
several times in the afternoon. 

Mr. Wheexer. Several times in the afternoon. Who set the place for the 
meetings? Did you set the place for the uietlings when you were the chairman? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No. That generallj- was all decided. 

Mr. Wheeleb. By whom? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. When we first was formed to the local luO group we set the 
time and date. I believe I was chairman at the night meetings. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did anyone else come down and discuss the Communist Party 
with this group other than Pearl Freeman and Charles Fujimoto? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Wallace Ho came down once. 



1488 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Wheeler. Wallace Ho came down once. What did he discuss? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I can't recall right now. 

Mr. Wheeler. Wallace Ho was a member of the Waikiki branch of the Com- 
munist Party, is that right? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I don't know. 

Mr. Wheeleb. Well, I think you named Mr. Ho. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Maybe, I — I believe he did sit in on one of the meetings; I 
don't know whether he was officially one of the group of the Waikiki or not. 

Mr. Wheeler. You being chairman of the 150 unit, you'd be quite sure that 
the individuals you have named were members of the Communist Party? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Those that were there. 

Mr. Wheeleb. Those that were there. 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Outside of Frank Maehara — he didn't show up very regularly. 

Mr. Wheeler. Frank Maehara didn't come very often? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeleb. Well, did anyone else come down to the 150 unit and talk to 
the members? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No ; I don't remember anybody else. 

Mr. Wheeler. You don't remember anybody else — now, you were the only 
chairman of this unit for a very short period of time. Do you know any 
reason why you were relieved of your duties, so to speak? Did you ask to become 
rank and file again in the organization? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I put it strongly that I didn't want the responsibility. 

Mr. Wheeleb. You didn't want the resiwnsibility — who did you tell that to, 
do you know? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I believe I told it to the group. 

Mr. Wheet.er. The group itself. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeleb. How were these meetings conducted? How did you open the 
meetings? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. The first thing we did was to sit down, naturally, and rap the 
gavel on the table for the meeting to come to order and we made out an agenda 
for the meeting and followed it right down. 

Mr. Wheeleb. Did you have a roll call? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I believe our dues secretary took care of that. 

Mr. Wheeleb. Your dues secretary took care of that. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. It was part of the points on the agenda. 

Mr. Wheeleb. What other points were on the agenda? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Collection of dues for literature. 

Mr. Wheeler. The selling of literature? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeleb. And who sold the literature in this particular 150 group? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Ernie Arena. 

Mr. Wheeler. Ernest Arena. And what other matters were brought up? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. The recruitment of new members. 

Mr. Wheeler. The recruiting of new members. 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. And a discusison of current events, political economy or what- 
ever the subject was for discusison. 

Mr. Wheelbr. Did you ever recruit anybody into the Communist Party? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I guess I did. 

Mr. Wheet.er. Who did you ask to join? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Edward Hong. 

Mr. Wheeler. Edward Hong. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. At the time that I recruited him he was a delegate at 
one of the plant departments. One of the departments in the plant I worked in 
and I was shop steward as well as president and I got Eddie interested in this 
economy, about wages and how capital works and what happens in a negotia- 
tion and he saw the light. I never talked much about communism to him, but 
I discused Marxism a little bit anyway of what I knew and he told me it was 
a good thing and he came along and sat in at several meetings at the Makiki 
group. 

Mr. Wheeler. You brought him up to the Makiki group. In other words, it 
was probably a couple of months after you joined the party that you brought 
Mr. Hong in. 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Chibu Tamayose. 

Mr. Wheeler. That's the individual whose name is spelled T-a-m-a-y-o-s-e? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1489 

Mr. Wheeler. You recruited him also? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Well, I wouldn't say I was the only guy. Eddie Hong did a 
lot of talking to him to convince him that he should learn more about what's 
going on so that when we do seek negotiations with the bosses we'll know what 
we're arguing about, and he came along. He was curious about what was going 
on, I guess. 

Mr. Wheelkr. Now with Edward Hong you said you discussed a little Marxism. 
Just what did you discuss along the lines of Marxism? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. About wage, labor, and capital. How it works and how capital 
started man-days right up to 

Mr. Wheeler. Well, how did it start. I want you to tell me just in your own 
words. 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. It started out when a cave man made arrows. Another hunter 
exchanged arrows for game. When a fellow gave a big bear for one arrow, it 
wasn't fair, so he had to give maybe 10 arrows for one big bear, you know. And 
the value of exchange was then created. Right now I'm kind of hazy — I can't — 
I've forgotten most of it now. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who informed you of all this? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. This is my own story. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did you influence anybody else to become members of the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No, not outside of those two fellows. 

Mr. AVheeler. Did you ever talk to anybody who refused to join the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you know anybody who has been approached by any member 
of the Communist Party who refused to join? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No, I don't. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you know Jack Kawano? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I was introduced to him; 

Mr. Wheeler. You what? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I was introduced to him. 

Mr. Wheeler. Were you introduced to Jack Kawano as a member of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No — as president of local 136 when I was president of local 
150. 

Mr. Wheeler. Yukio Abe? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I was introduced to him, too. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you know him to be a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. Were you ever in anybody else's home who held a meeting of 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. Tokunaga, No. 

Mr. Wheeler. Just the four places you've named — Ralph Vossbrink's home, 
Jeanette Nakama's home, ILWU, and the NMU. 

Mr. Tokunaga. I recall being up to Vossbrink's new home at Punchbowl just 
once. 

Mr. Wheeler. What was the purpose of that visit? 

Mr. Tokunaga. I can't remember — there was only a handful of us. 

Mr. Wheeler. Was that a Communist Party meeting? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No, it was local 150 boys and there was another fellow there. 
I don't remember his name now. He was a young fellow. 

Mr. Wheeler. You don't recall his name? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. From the Island of Kauai? 

Mr. Tokunaga. He was living in town at the time. He was very much 
interested in fish marketing. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you I'ecall his name? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Tony — Tony something. I don't know what his last name 
is. He was around several times. 

Mr. Wheeler. His first name is Tony. 

Mr. Tokunaga. Yes. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did you ever attend any so-called "fraction" meeting of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr, Tokunaga. You mean the leaders of each group — no. I shied away from 
those meetings for I didn't want to be chairman. They asked me to attend one. 

Mr. Wheeler. Who asked you? 



1490 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I believe it was Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. Wheeler. Charles Fujimoto? Did he say where it was going to be held? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes, he did ; but I can't remember now. I didu't go so I can't 
say where it was. 

Mr. Wheeler. You've never been in Jim Freeman's home? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. He was always moving around from place to place so I don't 
know where he lived. 

Mr. Wheeler. You've never been to his home? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes, we did go up to his small, little apartment once — Makiki, 
I think it was. 

Mr. Wheeler. What was the purpose of going to 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Some kind of a get-together. I don't remember — something 
of an educational meeting. 

Mr. Wheeler. Do you rementber who was there? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. I remember " was there, Ruth Ozaki, Easter Doyle 

and 

Mr. Wheeler. Eddie Hons? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Eddie Hong — no. Let's see now, I think he was — Eddie, I 
don't remember which now. 

Mr. Wheeler. You don't know whether it was Ernest Arena or Eddie Hong? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I think it was Eddie. We rode up in Easter Doyle's car. 

Mr. Wheeler. What was the purpose of the meeting? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I don't remember now. 

Mr. Wheeler. You don't remember now — when did you leave the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. I left around the latter part of 1946. 

Mr. Wheeler. The latter part of 1946? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. 1 remember election was held in Honolulu. 

Mr. Wheeler. That was for delecrate to Congress? 

Mr. TokunAga. Delegate for Congress. 

Mr. Wheiiler. For what reason did you, leave? 

Mr. T(!KUNA(iA. At that time I wasn't very well, and the party was always 
hollering for mure finances. They wanted more money for this and for that. 

(New record started.) 

Mr. Wheeler. O. K., will you continue now? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Just about that time Ichiro Izuka put out a pamphlet about 
communism in Hawaii and tliat thing made such a big splash in the newspapers 
that I was scared. I didn't know what it was all about and just from what I 
saw at the meetinics and Ichiro Izuka said did not jibe and I started thinking 
and I told myself that there might be more than what's on the surface. This 
idea about Communists being the vanguard of the working people sounded all 
right but the ideas about communism taking over the world and making this a 
people's world, etc. had me scared. I didn't like the idea of any revolutionary 
overthrow of American Government. I like this Government. It's done all 
right by me. 

Mr. Whebxhsj. You use the term "revolutionary overthrow" of this Govern- 
ment. Where did .vou learn that? 

Mr. Tokunaga. In one of the pamphlets which I read — I believe it was in the 
Communist Manifesto — it used that phra.se. 

Mr. Wheeler. Used that phrase — and that's when you began to think about 
what the Communist Party actually is? 

Mr. Tokunaga. That's right. They gave us the pamphlets. 

Mr. Wheeler. Was your wife a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Tokunaga. No ; she doesn't even know I was one. 

Mr. Wheeler. She's read it in the pamphlet, hasn't she? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Well, then, yes — that's when she found out. 

Mr. Whee:lek. What does she think about it? 

Mr. Tokunaga. She just damn near pulled her hair out. 

Mr. Wheeler. You mentioned a minute ago that when you were in financial 
diflJculty that you had just iiotten some money paid back to Ruth Ozaki for the 
paper. Now what was this money that you owed her? 

Mr. Tokunaga. It was for the Peoples World flown to Honolulu by airplane 
and it cost — I think it was about $18 a year. I believe at the time I didn't have 
any money and they just wanted to increase the subscribers — or something like 
that, and I put my name down and Ruth advanced the money. She said, "Take 



18 Name inaudible on Sound-Scriber disk. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1491 

your time about paying it back," so I said, "Fine, O. K." — so tiicy imt me down 
as a subscriber. 

Mr. Wheei.eu. And you picked the papers up in ILWU? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. They were given to us whenever we did show up at the ILWU 
oflSces. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did it have your name on it or just a stack of papers? 

Mr. ToKUNAQA. Just a stack of papers. 

Mr. Wheei.eu. Did you formally resign from the Communist Party or did 
you just stop attending meetings? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. i just told them I wasn't going to attend any more meetings. 
I didn't sign anything telling them I was resigning or anything like that — I just 
told them, "Well, I quit. I can't aiford to stay in this kind of party and I want 
to get out." 

Mr. Wheeler. To whom did you tell that? 

Mr. ToKUNAG.x. Well, I told that to Ruth and- 

Mr. Wheeler. I'o Ruth Ozaki? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Ruth Ozaki, yes, and Ernest Arena. 

Mr. Wheeler. Ruth Ozaki was then chairman. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. She was at that time. 

Mr. Wheeler. Have you ever been asked to rejoin the Communist Party? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Whp:eler. Haven't they ever contacted you since you left? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. No ; they haven't. 

Mr. Wheeler. Not for money or anything? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No. 

Mr. Wheeler. They haven't? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. No. At the time when I did tell them I quit they told me they 
would put me on the inactive list and if 1 wanted to join up again I could join up. 
Mr. Wheeler. In other words, you think you're on the inactive list now? 
Mr. TOKUNAGA. I don't know — I don't know how I stand. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I would like to interrupt the play- 
ing of the disk at this point, by reason of the fact that the rest of this 
record relates to the exploratory matters which are possibly not proper 
in evidence in a public hearing, but I would like to have Mr. Wheeler 
to play the very end of the disk, which shows the name, and the spell- 
ing of the name of the party making the statement. 

Mr. Walter. Instead of doing that, I think he could read it from 
the record to save time. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Very well. 

Mr. Walter. As I was saying, the questions and answers which you 
have before you were questions and answers asked and answered by 
the man whose voice was just heard on the record. 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed. 

Mr. Wheeler (reading) : 

Mr. Wheeler. Well, I have no further questions to ask at the present time. 
However, there may be some more in the future, and in the event there is, would 
you have any objection to talking to us again? 

Mr. TOKUNAGA. Only if I can find time, I will cooperate in giving you any 
testimony you are looking for. 

Mr. Wheeler. Did you ever talk to the FBI? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Yes; I have. Two fellows were up at my place one night 
and we talked along the same line. 

Mr. Wheeler. How long ago was that? 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. About 3 months back, I think. 

Mr. Wheeler. About 3 months ago? I wonder if you were— we'll make this 
the end of the interview. I want you to state your full name, with your middle 
name, and spell that out. I want your middle name now. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. Ralph M-a-s-a-k-i. 

Mr. Wheeler. M-a-s-a-k-i. 

Mr. ToKUNAGA. That's right. 

Mr. Wheeler. Ralph Masaki Tokunaga. 



1492 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

That is the end of the statement, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Tavenner. And is this the same lialph Tokunaga who ap- 
peared on the witness stand immediately prior to your appearance? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. When transcribing this testimony, or rather the 
recording of this testimony took place, was the machine placed close 
to you and the witness, in plain observation of both of you ? 

Mr. Wheeler. The machine was between myself and the witness, 
Mr. Tokunaga, and I had to stop the witness when I changed the 
records. 

Mr. Tavenner. After the completion of the recording did you play 
the recording back to the witness ? 

Mr. Wheeler, That I am not sure. I played the recording back 
for many witnesses. It would be very unusual if I had not on that, 
because I did on most of them. If I did not, I requested if he would 
like to hear the record played back. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you examined the transcript of these record- 
ings, with the recordings from the disks, to ascertain if they are 
correct ? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes, sir ; upon my return from Washington I played 
back the disk and checked it against the transcript. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then is the transcript a correct transcript of these 
recordings ? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee, in executive session, adopted this 
resolution : 

The Committee on Un-American Activities sliall present to and move the 
adoption by the House of Representatives of a resolution that Ralpli Toliunaga 
is guilty of contempt of the House of Representatives and the Congress of the 
United States in his refusal this 12th day of April 1950 to answer questions 
propounded to him by this committee, and that such resolution shall be ofBcially 
certified to the appropriate district attorney of the United States for criminal 
prosecution. 

Call your next witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. Easter J. Doyle is the next witness, 

Mr. Walter. Raise your right hand, please. Do you solemnly 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Doyle. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF EASTER J. DOYLE 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mr. Easter J. Doyle ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Do you appear here in response to a subpena served 
upon you ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was one subpena served upon you by Mr. Wheeler 
back in November of 1949 'i 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And then another of recent date? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born, Mr. Doyle ? 

Mr. Doyle. I was born on the Island of Hawaii. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1493 

Mr. Tavenner. On what date? 

Mr. Doyle. April 3, 1921. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee, briefly, what your 
educational background has been ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, 1 was educated in local schools, graduating at the 
twelfth grade, and I was educated at Kamehameha School for Boys. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where have you been employed within recent years ? 

Mr. Doyle, My last employment was at the Hawaiian Gas Prod- 
ucts, and now I am presently being employed at Queen's Hospital. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. About when did you join the party? 

Mr. Doyle. I would say about the middle of 1946. 

Mr, TA^^ENNER. Are you still a member of the party ? 

Mr. Doyle. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you leave the party ? 

Mr. Doyle. My termination with the party occurred when the con- 
tract with the ILWU Local 150 was terminated at Hawaiian Gas 
Products. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then were you employed at the Hawaiian Gas 
Products at the time you became a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle, Will you repeat the question again? 

Mr, Tavenner, How were you employed, and where were you em- 
ployed at the time you became a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Doyle. I was employed in the Hawaiian Gas Products, in the 
position of maintenance machinist. 

Mr. Tavenner, Now, will you tell the committee just how it hap- 
pened that you became a member of the party ? 

Mr, Doyle. Well, the officials of local 150 approached me and told 
me that one means of being a militant leader in the union would be to 
join up with the party, and by doing so I would be gathering inf orma- 
ation as to what a union leader should be doing. 

Mr. Tavt^nner. So you were told by the leaders of your local 
union 



Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. That you should become a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What particular leader in your local union told you 
that? 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Ernest Arena. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Ernest Arena? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was Mr. Ernest Arena's position at that time? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, at that time L think his position was secretary- 
treasurer of the local. 

Mr. Tavenner. I did not understand your answer. 

Mr. Doyle. At that time Mr. Ernest Arena was the secretary- 
treasurer of the local. 

Mr. Tavenner. What local ? 

Mr. Doyle, Local 150. 

Mr. Tavenner. Local 150 ? 

66636— 50— pt. 1 10 



1494 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. DoYUE. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of what unit ? 

Mr. Doyle. The ILWU unit. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did any other officials of that local union talk to 
you about going into the party ? 

Mr. Doyle. There were several others up there who I guess were 
already members, and they had told nie that would be a good means 
of my getting an education, as far as being a leader was concerned. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were those people who made that statement to 
you? 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Ralph Tokunaga was one of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Ralph Tokunaga ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you seen Ralph Tokunaga here today ? 

Mr. Doyle. No; I have not, at yet; but I heard he was on. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is, you heard that he was on the witness stand? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. I would like to call Ralph Tokunaga at this time. 

Mr. Walter. Ralph Tokunaga. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will Ralph Tokunaga come forward? (Mr. Ralph 
Tokunaga appears before the committee.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat is your name, please ? 

Mr. Tokunaga. Ralph Tokunaga. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you look at the person who has just given his 
name as Ralph Tokunaga and state to the committee whether he is 
the person to whom you referred as having talked to you 

Mr. Doyle. It is. 

Mr. Tavenner. About the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. It is. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all, Mr. Tokunaga. 

(Mr. Ralph Tokunaga leaves.) 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did Mr. Tokunaga hold in the local 
union at that time? 

Mr. Doyle. He was the president of the union at that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. He was the president ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And Mr. Tokunaga advised you that you should get 
into the Communist Party in order to become a militant leader? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you know at that time that both of these offi- 
cials in your local union were members of the Communist Party them- 
selves ? 

Mr. Doyle. No; but then I expected them to be, since they \vor(> 
talking about it to me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you find out later whether they were in fact 
members of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Doyle. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, was there any other leader of the unions, in 
your local union, who gave you that same advice ? 

Mr. Doyle. Not that I can recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, as a result of the advice that you received 
from Ernest Arena, and Ralph Tokunaga, what did you do ? 

Mr. Doyle. We joined — I joined with the express idea of going in 
there to get some education so far as a union leader is concerned. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1495 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, then, just tell the committee what you did, 
and what occurred? Where you joined, and under what circum- 
stances ? 

Mr. Doyle. When I first started, they needled me into attending 
meetings, but then I held ott' for quite a while; that was after the first 
meeting with the president and secretary of the local, and until about 
the middle of 1946, and then I actually started attending meetings 
at Mr. Izuka's home at Puuimi. 

Mr. Tavennek. Now let's go back to the time when you first became 
a member of the party. Did you attend a meeting at that time? 

Mr. Doyle. I was not actually a member, although a card was is- 
sued to me, which was at about the second meeting, 1 think, at Izuka's 
home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about the first meeting before we go into that 
meeting. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, the first meeting, there were about half a dozen 
people there, Mr. Izuka himself, and myself, and Rachel Saiki; 
Mr. and Mrs. Vossbrink. There w^ere several people 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what Vossbrink's first name was? 

Mr. Doyle. Ralph. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Ralph Vossbrink ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes: that's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you name those persons over again. 

Mr. Doyle. Ichiro Izuka, Rachel Saiki, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Voss- 
brink. There were several people missing at that place also. 

Mr. Tavenner. What? 

Mr. Doyle. There were several people missing at that time, also. 
I later found out who they were. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall their names? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes ; Wallace Ho and Willis Wong. 

Mr. Tavenner. Their names were mentioned there? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, 

Mr. Tavenner. But, they were not there in person ? They were not 
present ? 

Mr. Doyle. Not present at the first meeting I attended. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Now, let's go on to the second meeting ; 
where did that take place? 

Mr. Doyle. It also took place out at Mr, Izuka's home, with the 
other people attending and the people that I had mentioned as not 
being present at the first meeting. 

Mr. Ta\tnner. And what took place at that meeting? 

Mr. Doyle. They had a regular meeting, which was conducted in 
the manner that you would say would be conducted in any meeting. 
They had the minutes read and then a report. \ 

Mr. Tavenner. It was a regularly conducted meeing? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner, Well, was it just a labor party meeting? 

Mr. Doyle. It was a regular Communist Party meeting, 

Mr. Tavenner. It was a Communist Party meeting? 

Mr, Doyle, That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner, You are absolutely certain about that? 

Mr. Doyle. I am sure. 



1496 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner, I believe you stated that all the persons were present 
at this meeting that were there before, as well as two others whose 
names had been mentioned at the first meeting ? 

Mr. DoTLE. That's true. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were these two persons ? 

Mr. Doyle. Wallace Ho and Willis Wong. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wallace Ho ? 

Mr. DoTLE. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And the second one? 

Mr. Doyle. Willis Wong. 

Mr. Tavenner. All of these persons took part in the meeting ? 

Mr. Doyle. In what manner ? 

Mr. Tavenner. In any manner. Do you recall ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, discussions were carried out in the meeting, and 
everyone takes part. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, tell us what you know about Rachel Saiki, as 
to affiliations with the Communist Party. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, at the time that I had started attending meetings 
at Mr. Izuka's home, Rachel Saiki was — she collected dues anyway. 
Of course, she was the secretary of the unit at that time. Then, in the 
previous years — or rather in the months that followed that I had been 
a member — she was connected with the central committee as dues 
collector. 

Mr. Tavenner. Walter Ho? 

Mr. Doyle. Wallace. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wallace Ho. Tell us what you know about his, or 
learned later about his. Communist affiliations ? 

Mr. Doyle. He was supposed to have been educational director at 
the Puunui Club, at which I had attended several meetings. That 
made me conscious of the fact that he was one. 

Mr. Ta\t3nner. You mentioned Ralph Vossbrink. What was his 
connection with this particular club or group ; do you know ? 

Mr. Doyle. He was the chairman of the group. 

Mr. Tavenner. He was the chairman. Now, this is the meeting at 
which you joined? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you issued a card at that meeting? 

Mr. Doyle. At the second meeting I was issued a card. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Who issued the card to you ? 

Mr. Doyle. Mr. Vossbrink. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Vossbrink. Did you pay dues then or at a 
later time ? 

Mr. Doyle. I think I did pay dues at that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, when you paid your dues, to whom did you 
pay them ? 

Mr. Doyle. Rachel Saiki. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have a membership card at the present time ? 

Mr. Doyle. No ; I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. What became of the old membership cards which 
you had? 

Mr. Doyle. Those my wife confiscated. [Laughter] And she made 
a good job of it too. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what employment Rachel Saiki had 
at that time ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1497 

Mr. Doyle. No ; I did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know how she is employed now ? 
Mr. Doyle. No ; I don't. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did this particular group of the Communist Party 
to which you first became affiliated have a name? 
Mr. Doyle. It was known as the Puunui Club. 
Mr. Tavenner. Puunui Club? 
Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many members were there in that club? 
Mr. Doyle. As far as I can recall, there were about six or seven; 
that is all. 

jVIr. Tavenner. Now, when Ernest Arena or Ralph Tokunaga talked 
to you and advised you to enter the Communist Party, did they make 
any statement to you as to how that would affect your position in your 
labor union ? 

Mr. Doyle. No ; not that I can recall of. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold an official position in your local union 
at that time ? 

Mr. Doyle. Not that I can recall of. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you later become an official in your union ? 
Mr. Doyle. Yes; I did. 
Mr. Tavenner. When? 
;Mr. Doyle. That was in 1947. 
^ Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member of the Communist Party at the 
time you were elected to office in your union ? 
Mr. Doyle. I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. To what office were you elected ? 
Mr. Doyle. I was the secretary of the local at that time, and then 
later on, in 1948, I was appointed the vice president of the local. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell the committee the approximate month 
of the year when you became a member of the party ? 
Mr. Doyle. I would say roughly about June or July. 
Mr. Tavenner. Now, where were these meetings, this first meeting, 
held when you were made a member of the Puunui Club? 

Mr. Doyle. It was up at Mr. Izuka's home, and we also — I think 
it was after the rift that Mr. Izuka had with the ILWU that we 
had changed locations to Mr. Wallace Ho's home, which was up in 
Kaimuki. 

Mr. Tavenner. So, after Izuka split with the party, you met at 
the home of Wallace Ho? 
Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you name those who attended the meet- 
ings while you were a member of that party? Do not answer the 
question. Let me go back for other questions first. 
How long were you a member of this particular club ? 
Mr. Doyle. I would say about five or six meetings. 
Mr. Tavenner. You attended about five or six meetings? 
Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Over how long a period of time? 
Mr. Doyle. That would be a period of about 3 months — about 3 
months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, who attended the five or six meetings which 
were attended by you ? 



1498 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. Doyle. The same people. The same people I have mentioned 
previously. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever hold any office in that branch of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. DoTLE. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. At the time of the meetings, what employment was 
Ralph Vossbrink engaged in ? 

Mr. Doyle. I think he was business agent of the marine cooks and 
stewards union, affiliated with the CIO. 

Mr. Tavenner. How was Wallace Ho employed at that time? 

Mr. Doyle. He was also with the marine cooks and stewards, as 
business agent. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, while you were a member of that branch of 
the Communist Party, did you subscribe to any of the Communist 
publications? 

Mr. Doyle. No; I did not subscribe to any, but I had purchased 
some pamphlets and leaflets that they had at the meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall what any of them were? 

Mr. Doyle. Political Affairs would be one of them. That is about 
all I could remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. What were the circumstances under which you 
made those purchases ? 

Mr. Doyle. It was the express purpose of getting the reason of the 
work that they had arranged for discussion in the meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. And from whom did you make the purchases ? 

Mr. Doyle. From Mr. Ralph Vossbrink, in the absence of Wallace 
Ho. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall subscribing to the educational pro- 
gram of the — did you meet Ruth Ozaki? Did you learn to know 
RuthOzaki? 

Mr. Doyle. I did, but not at those meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Not at those meetings. Did you ever sit in the 
Communist Party meeting when she was present ? 

Mr. Doyle. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. After having attended the five meetings at this 
original branch of the Communist Party which you had joined, named 
the Puunui Club, were you transferred to some other cell or branch 
of the union ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes ; I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about that. 

Mr. Doyle. That was when the groups were changed into local 
union groups. They were — the people were broken up into organiza- 
tions that were — that would closely connect themselves with the 
work that they were doing in their daily life. In other words, 
take a longshore group, they had a group at McCabe, Hamilton & 
Renny, and also at Castle & Cooke, and they were two separate cells, 
and then local 150 came under the miscellaneous cell. In other words, 
all the Communist members within the local were segregated within 
units, and they were placed in units that were closely connected with 
their work. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. And as a result of the reorganization 
of the Communist Party, these cells, the Communist Party cell, was 
broken into local units? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1499 

Mr. Doyle. Yes; that's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVhat is your local? 

Mr. Doyle. Local 150 cell. 

Mr. Tavenner. You were a member of the local 150? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And then the Communist Party forms a group, or 
cells, of Communist members who were also members of that union? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And by that method the Communist Party adopted 
the name and the number of your local union ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's true. 

Mr. Tavenner. And applied it to the union or to the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is correct, isn't it ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And so that the Communist Party cell that you 
were a member of was known as the 150 cell ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes ; that's right. Well, they called it local 150 cell. 

Mr. Tavenner, Now, how many persons from local 150 of your 
union were members of the local 150 cell of the Communist Party ^ 

Mr. Doyle. I would say roughly about 12 to 16 people. 

Mr. Tavenner. Twelve to sixteen people ? 

Mr. Doyle, Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you give us their names ? 

Mr. Doyle. Ruth Ozaki, Jack Hall, Robert McElrath, Douglas 
Inouye. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is that last name ? 

Mr. Doyle. Inouye. 

Mr, Tavenner, I-n-o-u-y-e ? 

Mr, Doyle, That's right, Pedro Racela, myself, and Ralph Toku- 
naga, 

Mr, Tax-enner, That is the same Ralph Tokunaga whom you identi- 
fied a few moments ago ? 

Mr, Doyle, That is right, Edward Hong, 

Mr, Tavenner. Hong? H-o-n-g? 

Mr. Doyle, That's right, Yoshito Marumo, 

Mr, Ta\t:nner. Spell the last name, 

Mr, Doyle, M-a-r-u-m-o, 

Mr, Tavenner, Yoshito Marumo, is that correct? 

!Mr, Doyle, Yes. Mr, Ernest Arena. 

Mr, Ta\\enner, Ernest Arena ? 

Mr, Doyle, And, for a while, we had Frank Maehara in there also. 

;Mr. Tavenner. Did you know Pearl Freeman ? 

Mr. Doyle. I did. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Was she connected in any way with your particular 
local? 

Mr, Doyle, Yes; she was at times sort of an educational director 
with the group. 

Mr. Tavenner. With your group? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 



1500 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, were all these persons known to you to be 
members of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, who was the chairman, or president, of this 
group ? 

Mr. Doyle. Ralph Tokunaga, for a while was chairman of the 
group, and then Ernest Arena was elected chairman of the group. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was the educational director ? 

Mr. DoTLE. Ralph Tokunaga was supposed to have been the educa- 
tional director in the same capacity as — that he was holding as presi- 
dent. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was the secretary-treasurer? 

Mr. D0YI.E. I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. And then, as secretary-treasurer, did these people 
pay their dues to you ? 

Mr. Doyle. They did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you collect dues of all of these persons? 

Mr. Doyle. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. That includes — you collected the dues of Ralph 
Tokunaga, the man whom you identified here this morning? 

Mr. Doyle. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. You collected the dues of Ernest Arena ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. You collected the dues of Ruth Ozaki ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you collect the dues of Jack Hall ? 

Mr. Doyle. That I would not be able to say, if I did collect it from 
him, offhand. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, why would there be any question about that? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, it seems — it seemed that as at all of the meetings, 
except one of the local 150 cell, that they had, he was not there, 

Mr. Tavenner. He only attended one of these meetings ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what other positions, or what position 
that Jack Hall held in the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. You do not? Robert McElrath — did you collect 
dues from him ? 

Mr. Doyle. I did ; from his wife. 

Mr. Tavenner. You collected Robert McElrath's dues from his 
wife ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. Well, was there anything unusual about that? 

Mr. Doyle. Not necessarily so; I guess his wife was the one who 
paid the bills for him. 

Mr. Tavenner. Edward Hong ? 

Mr. Doyle. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you collect the dues from Pedro Racela? 

Mr. Doyle. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. From Douglas Inouye ? 

Mr. Doyle. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yoshito Marumo? 

Mr. Doyle. 1 did. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1501 

Mr. Ta\t.nnkr. Frank Muehtira? 

Mr. DoYLK. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. From Pearl Freenuui ? 

Mr. Doyle. No. 

Mr. Tavennek. Wliy ? 

Mr. Doyle. She was not a regular member of our regular cell. 

Mr. Tavenner. She was assigned for special duty and services to 
your group? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you know how Robert McElrath was 
employed at that time? 

Mr. Doyle. He was publicity chairman, I think. No; he was in 
charge of publicity for the ILWU union in the Territory at that time. 

ISIr. Tavenner. And at the same time a member of your cell of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. How is he now employed, do you know ? 

Mr. Doyle. No; I do not. Probably in the same position. 

J\[r. Tavenner. How was Edward Hong employed at that time? 

Mr. Doyle. Edward Hong was working with the Inter-Island Dry- 
dock for a period of time, and then later was employed by the ILWU, 
local 150 office, as business agent. He also held a position of vice 
president under — no, secretary-treasurer, that's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what position he holds at this time? 

Mr. Dotle. No, I do not. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Pedro Racela, how was he employed at that time? 

Mr. Doyle. He M^as employecl up at the union office, servicing the 
railroad workers which were members of the local 150 union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Douglas Inouye ? 

Mr. Doyle. Inouye was also working with the railroad workers. 
He was employed by the local union office. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yoshita Marumo ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yoshita Marumo was an employee of Love's Bakery; 
Love's Bakery & Bread Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated that he was with your cell a compara- 
tively short time, I believe? 

Mr. Doyle. No, not him. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was another person ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Frank Maehara, I believe ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was he employed ? 

Mr. Doyle. At Love's Biscuit & Bread Co. also. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated that he was a person who had been as- 
sociated with that cell, or a member, for only a short period of time? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Explain that. 

Mr. Doyle. It seems from information I was given, Mr. Mae- 
hara — given by Yoshita Marumo — that he was afraid of the whole 
set-up. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Maehara was afraid of the set-up ? 

Mr. Doyle. Of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of the Communist Party ? 



1502 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, bj' that do you mean that he withdrew from 
the party ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know about when he withdrew ? 

Mr. Doyle. No, I don't seem to recall as to when he did withdraw. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he have any discussion with you when he 
withdrew ? 

Mr. Doyle. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was Pearl Freeman's position at that time? 

Mr. Doyle. She was not connected with the union, as far as our local 
was concerned, but then, I guess, she was here with her husband, Jim, 
on an organizational program. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you know her husband, James Freeman ? 

Mr. Doyle. 1 had met him. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was his position in the Communist Party, if 
you know ? 

Mr. Doyle. If I recall correctly, he was supposed to have been sent 
down here on an organizational drive, in the Territory. 

Mr. Tavenner. From where? 

Mr. Doyle. From Los Angeles.  

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you have told us who were the officials of 
your cell of the Communist Party, within your local union, did the 
officials change and waS' anyone else elected chairman at a later date ? 

Mr. Doyle. That I cannot recall. They may have changed. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe you told us that Ralph Tokunaga was the 
chairman of this group ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right ; at one time. 

Mr. Tavenner. And Ernest Arena succeeded him? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, was it part of your duty, as secretary and 
treasurer, to issue Communist Party books or cards ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How often would that be done ? 

Mr. Doyle. Once every year. 

Mr. Tavenner. What became of the old cards that had been used ? 

Mr. Doyle. These old cards were turned back in to the secretary 
and treasure of the central committee. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you collect the old cards when you issued a 
party member a new card ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Then, what would you do with the old cards? 

Mr. Doyt.e. These I would turn in" to the — I had turned them over 
to Eileen Fujimoto, who was the middleman for me, and she, in turn, 
I guess, turned in to the central committee secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Eileen Fujimoto was the middleman? 

INIr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Explain that. 

Mr. Doyle. She had given me the stamps that were needed in our 
group, and also turned in the money that I had given her for the sale 
of the stamps. 

Mr. Tavenner. She acted as the party or as the person who gave 
out the stamps ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1503 

Mr, Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Which you used, and collected the money which you 
turned in? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you know what disposition was made of 
the money that you turned in to her ? 

Mr. Doyle. That, no. 

Mr. Tavenner. And the old books? 

Mr. Doyle. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was the secretary of the Communist Party in 
the Territory of Hawaii at the time ? 

Mr. Doyle. I don't know exactly at the time, but probably it could 
have been Rachel Sakai. 

Mr. Tavenner. It could have been Rachel Saiki at the time? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, when you took the old books, and you issued 
new ones, can you recall whether — or who it was that you issued new 
books to, out of this group that you mentioned that were member^ 
of your cell? 

Mr. Doyle. I had issued the books to all but Jack Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now ,while you were serving as secretary and treas- 
urer of the local 150 of the Communist Party, did you learn who were 
the members of the executive committee of the Territory, that is, the 
Communist Party executive committee? 

Mr. Doyle. I had learned of several names indirectly, some of which 
are — were — Jack Kawano, Benjamin Kaahawinui. That would be 
about all, I guess. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, how many cells were there that you knew of? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I knew of three, which consisted of the McCabe 
group, and Castle & Cooke, and ours. 

Mr. Tavenner. How did you learn of the existence of these other 
two cells? 

Mr. Doyle. There was some discussion in the office as to the segre- 
gation of the different members of the — what would be called — district 
cells. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was back at the time that they adopted the 
plan ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. At the time of organizing the various industries in 
groups in the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. That you learned that there were other cells ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. So, you only actually knew yourself of the proposal 
to establish two other cells ? 

Mr. Doyle. No; I assume it was — it would have been done to all 
the different groups. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why is it that you did not know the names of all 
the groups ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, they were segregated into two different sections, 
that we did not actually know what they were called. There was a 
group of office workers, we don't know what their group was called. 
We don't know whether they were segregated at all. 



1504 communtist activities in hawaii 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever meet with any of the other groups? 

Mr. DoTLE. No ; I have not. I did not have a chance to. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, was it the custom or the practice in the Com- 
munist Party for a member of one cell to know of the membership of 
another cell ? 

Mr. Doyle. That was not the practice. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was not the practice? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Explain that. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, for security measures of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Just speak a little louder, please. 

Mr. Doyle. For security measures, that was not a general practice 
that Communist Party members should know who the other members 
were, outside of their group. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you explain that further, as to the reasons for 
that, how you know that that was the security provision, what you 
were told about it? Now, you have said that as a security provision, 
a No. 1 cell was not supposed to know who were the members of 
another cell. 

Mr. Doyle. That is sure. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, why? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, it could have been this way: That an individual 
in the Communist Party might divulge his identity to someone out- 
side of the party, which would — well, give somebody else the infor- 
mation as to what was going on. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, it was the plan and purpose of the 
Communist Party to keep its movements and even its membership 
secret ? 

Mr. Doyle. Probably so. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did the different cells ever meet together ? 

Mr. Doyle. At social gatherings, that would be about the only time 
that they would get together. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Now, were there any other security measures that 
you recall now ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, I do. One would be speaking over the telephone, 
divulging the time and place of a meeting. That was strictly tabu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who gave you those instructions, or how did you 
first learn these policies ? 

Mr. Doyle. From members who were in the Communist Party be- 
fore I was in. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, as secretary and treasurer, how did you main- 
tain your records ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, the records were kept on a month-to-month basis, 
with dues payments made, and names of individuals were not in that 
list at all, and it listed numbers, and also nicknames, to identify the 
person. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why was that ? 

Mr. Doyle. That was another measure of 

Mr. Tavenner. Of security? 

Mr. Doyle. Of protection. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you make any report or reports of the number 
of the members in your gi'oup, in your cell, and if so, to whom did 
you make these reports ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1505 

Mr. Doyle. I did make reports, to whom it went, I don't know. We 
had listed on the report the number of dues paying members, and the 
different classification as to the amount of dues paid. 

Mr. Tavennek. Well, what disposition did you nuike of this record? 

Mr. Doyle. They were handed over to Eileen Fujimoto, and in 
turn, she had turned it over to someone else. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you ever able to learn, while you were a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party, how many cells there were on this island ? 

Mr. Doyle. No, I was not able to. 

Mr. Tavenner. Or how many members there were in a particular 
cell? 

Mr. Doyle. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Other than the one that you were a member of ? 

Mr. Doyle. No, I didn't have the information as to that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was it possible for anyone in the position that you 
were in, even though secretary and treasurer of your cell, to obtain 
such information? 

Mr. Doyle. I don't think so, not unless the records were gotten 
from the central committee secretary. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know who comprised the central committee? 
I believe you named several. 

Mr. Doyle. I did. I think it was — one of them was Jack Kawano, 
and another one was Benjamin Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, at the time that you were required to report 
the membership dues to Eileen Fujimoto, and while you were required 
to receive the stamps from her, how was she employed ? 

Mr. Doyle. She was employed as secretary of local 137 union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what her present employment is ? 

Mr. Doyle. No, I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us the approximate date when the dis- 
trict cells were abandoned as a plan, or clone away with as a plan of 
the organization, and the Communist Party went into the unions and 
other organizations, and organized their own cells, within those organi- 
zations. Can you tell us about when that happened ? 

Mr. Doyle. Approximately the latter part of 1946, or the early part 
of 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall what position Jack Hall had at the 
time that that movement was made, or that change in the plan of 
organization was made? 

Mr. Doyle. Position as to what? 

Mr. Tavenner. Within the union. 

Mr. Doyle. He was the regional director at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. He was the regional director of the ILWU ? 

Mr. Doyle. Of the ILWU, in Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what position he held in the Com- 
munist Party at that time? 

Mr. Doyle. No, I didn't. I think he was chairman of a meeting of 
the local with the 150 — that the 150 cell had, that was up at his home, 
up in Manoa. He was chairman of the meeting. The officers were 
appointed, at which time the officers took over. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, he took part in the organization? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of that first meeting ? 



1506 COMMUNIST ACnvmES IN HAW AH 

Mr. Doyle. That's right, 

Mr. Tavenner. Within your local group, or your local union ? 

Mr. Doyle. True. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever attend any of the schools or the labor 
schools, or Communist Party schools in California? 

Mr. Doyle. No, I did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us anything about the plan of the 
Communist Party in having its representatives attend Communist 
schools in California ? 

Mr. Doyle. No; I don't think I would be able to give you any 
information on that. I was never approached as to attending school 
there. 

Mr. Ta%'enner. Do you know whether Ernest Arena, whom you 
have described as a member of the Communist Party, was a delegate 
to the ILWU convention in California ? 

Mr. Doyle. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was that? 

Mr. Doyle. That was in, I think in, 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is there anything about the Communist Party disci- 
pline, or the effort of the Communist Party to discipline its members, 
which you can tell us ? 

Mr. Doyle. Will you repeat that question? 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, let's put it this way: To what extent was 
Communist Party discipline emphasized in your Communist Party? 

Mr. Doyle. They were very strict, so far as the party line was 
concerned. In other words, you went the way the central committee 
told you, or else you would be reprimanded for it. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, the party line was handed down to 
you from higher up? 

Mr. Doyle. That is true. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you have anything to do with the formation of 
the party line yourself? 

Mr. Doyle. No ; I don't think so. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you ever consulted in any way about what the 
policy of what the Communist Party should adopt ? 

Mr. Doyle. Not that I can remember; not that I recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say the party line was handed down to you 
from the central committee ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is true. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know where the central committee got its 
policies ? 

Mr. Doyle. No ; I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you say that they were very strict about 
following the party line or the instructions which came down from 
the central committee? 

Mr. Doyle. That is true. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you explain that a little more, how do you 
mean, they were strict about it? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, there was one incident that I can recall, that 
was told me by someone else. I don't know whether it was true or not^ 
but it is the case of B'en Kaahawinui, in an election they had at local 
137 office. Candidates ran for office at that time, and he was on the 
list as being business agent. It seemed that he was not supposed to 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 1507 

have run for office, for \vhat reason I don't know. Then, he insisted 
on i-nnninr^. What happened afterward was, somethinj^ I never 
really got to find out the end of it, but anyway, he was called on the 
carpet for it. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, you mean to say that a member of 
the Communist Party could not run for an office unless the executive 
committee or unless the central committee said so ? 

Mr. Doyle. That could be that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Not even in the local union ? 

Mr. Doyle. I guess he probably had some difficulties with the local 
officials themselves. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you say that you had to follow the party line ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is true. 

Mr. Tavenner. Or you would be disciplined? What do you mean 
by being disciplined ? 

Mr, Doyle. They would try to expel you from the union, or probably 
assess you with a fine or something. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say expel you from the union. 

Mr. Doyle. Not from the union, from the party. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean from the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that what the membership of the Communist 
Party were taught, that you must obey the instructions of the central 
committee? 

Mr. Doyle. That is what I understood. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that what you were taught ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, if you, as an official of your local union, were 
given the party line by the central committee, would you consider, as 
a Communist Party member, it was your duty to carry out that party 
line in your local union ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, I would. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you consider, if you were a loyal and regular 
member of the Communist Party, and it developed in the local union, 
in which you were an official, that the interest of your union was con- 
trary to the interest of the Communist Party, as expressed by the 
instructions that came down from the committee, your central com- 
mittee, would you consider yourself bound to carry out the Communist 
Party instructions, regardless of the interest of your local union ? 

Mr. Doyle. No : I would feel that way as a Communist. 

Mr. Tavenner. As a Communist, you would be disciplined ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. If you did not carry out those instructions; is that 
what you mean ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did any members of the central committee ever 
attend your local 150 cell of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Doyle. Jim Freeman, I think, would be the only person who 
could classify as such, being as he was in the organizational work down 
here, he attended several of our meetings. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Did you know David Hyun ? 

Mr. Doyle. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did David Hyun ever talk to you about com- 
munism ? 



1508 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Doyle. He did. He was one of the few people that had ap- 
proached me, previous to joining the party. He asked me one time to 
attend a class that they had conducted up at Dr. Reinecke's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. He asked you to attend this discussion group or 
class at Dr. Reinecke's ? 

Mr. DoTLE. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. When was that ? 

Mr. Doyle. That was way back in 1946. That was before I had 
joined the party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know of any other persons who attended 
those discussion groups ? 

Mr Doyle. No ; I did not. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. What reason did he give you for asking you to 
attend Dr. Reinecke's discussion groups ? 

Mr. Doyle. No specific reason, just that it would be something 
interesting to learn. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. How was David Hyun employed at the time ? 

Mr. Doyle. I think he was employed at the — in an office in town, 
working as a draftsman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend those discussion groups ? 

Mr. Doyle. No ; I did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, I understood you to say that he approached 
you about entering the Communist Party? 

Mr. Doyle. No. He approached me to attend the meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. To attend what meeting? 

Mr. Doyle. Meetings, probably Communist Party meetings, but 
he did not divulge it at the time. He told me it was 

Mr. Tavenner. I am sorry, I didn't understand you. Will you 
repeat that ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, David Hyun approached me and asked me to 
attend some discussion meetings that they had up at Dr. Reinecke's 
home. 

Mr. Tavenner. So those were the meetings to which you referred ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, after you had established your local 150 cell 
of the Communist Party, where did you hold your meetings ? 

Mr. Doyle. At first our meetings were held over at the old NMU 
Hall, which is on Kaahumanu Street. Then, later on, the meetings 
were held in the local 150 office, and then later in the Marine Cooks 
and Stewards office. Then, after a while, when the Izuka pamphlet 
came out, we had meetings in a car. 

Mr. Tavenner. In a car? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, your meeting place moved around? 

Mr. Doyle. That's true. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why was that? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, they did not want to have it in the same place all 
the time. They were afraid people coming up there and catching them 
red-handed, I suppose. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say that you changed your place of meeting 
after the Izuka pamphlet came out ? 

Mr. Doyle. That's true. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1509 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us more about the effect of the Izuka pamphlet 
on the conduct of tlie Communist Party, or on the activity of the 
members of the Communist Party? 

Mr. DoTLE. Well, when the Izuka pamphlet first came out, no 
policy was sent out to the different cells of the Communist Party. 
So, the members took it upon themselves to play it safe. Some of 
them conliscated material that they had collected over a period of 
time. Others just sat tight, and waited for word from the central 
committee as to what to do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what word came down from the central 
committee? 

]Mr. Doyle. They mentioned something that there wasn't anything 
to be afraid of, nothing was going to be done at the present time, 
although a lot of talk was going to be around town, so far as the 
Communist Party and the ILWU is concerned. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. You have spoken of security measures generally, and 
some measures in particular; did you have any instructions as to the 
security move as to what reply should be made, if anyone accused you 
of being a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, when the pamphlet first came out, I was still 
employed at the Hawiian Gas Products, until word got around that 
I was mentioned in the pamphlet, and the bosses approached me, and 
the}^ asked me, "Are you a member?" I told them — before then, word 
was given me if they should ask you, why tell them I was one, but not 
anymore. That was the answer that I gave them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you receive any instructions by anyone known 
to you in the past to have been a member of the Communist Party, as 
to what attitude you should take here as a witness, when called before 
this committee ? 

Mr. Doyle. I was approached last week, Tuesday or Wednesday, by 
Ernest Arena, and he asked me if I was subpenaecl by the committee. 
I told him not yet, which was actually true. And he, in turn, told me 
that it would be a wise thing for me to consult their lawyers, as to 
what position I should take. 
Mr. TA^-ENNER. Whose lawyers? 

Mr. Doyle. The lawyers for the ILWU, Bouslog and Symonds. 
Mr. Tai-enner. Did Mr. Arena say why it would be wise, it would be 
a wise thing for you to consult their lawyers ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes; he had mentioned something about the Smith- 
Connally Suit Act, which I think was something all wrong, which 
actually should have been the Smith Act, about perjury, and he men- 
tioned the Alger Hiss case, also, and also the 11 men who were con- 
victed of perjury in New York City. 

Mr. Walter. Did he tell you anything about the immunity statute ? 
Mr. Doyle. He told me that the immunity statute would not apply 
in the case of the Federal Court, if occasion should come up. 

Mr. Walter. Of course, there are a line of decisions to the contrary. 
Proceed, Mr. Tavenner. Excuse me. 

Mr. Ta^-enner. In other words, he pointed out to you the dangers 
of perjury? 

Mr. Doyle. That is true. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. Therefore, you better see their lawyers? 

Mr. Doyle. That's right. 

66636 — 50— pt. 1 11 



1510 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, you were not worried about prosecution for 
perjury, if you intended to come here and tell the truth, were you ^ 

Mr. Do^-LE. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And is that the course that you have followed vol- 
untarily, in coming here in response to the subpena, and telling the 
truth to this committee ? 

Mr. Doyle. I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned James Freeman, did you ever 
attend a Communist Party meeting at the home of James Freeman? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes; I did.' 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about that, please. 

Mr. Doyle. It was an instructional meeting for the officers of the 
different cells. The meeting was conducted by his wife, at the time 
he wasn't present. We were given a sheet of paper with questions and 
answers on it, which was supposed to have been used in meetings, 
or questions similar to what was to be used in meetings. We were 
given a chance to answer some of the questions. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us who were present there represent- 
ing the various cells of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Doyle. I didn't recognize very many of the people there, 
although some of them were known. Ralph Tokunaga, Ruth Ozaki, 
and Doris Ozaki, and Jeannette Nakama. 

Mr. Tavenner. Jeannette Nakama? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know anything about her party member- 
ship? 

Mr. Doyle. No; I didn't know anything about it until I saw her, 
until she was at the meeting. 

Mr. Ta\"enner. All right, proceed. 

Mr. Doyle. That would be about all I did recognize there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you, in the performance of your duty as sec- 
retary of your local cell, distribute Communist literature, or sell it? 

Mr. Doyle. No; I didn't handle the sales of literature that were 
within our cells, but then, while holding the office of secretary and 
treasurer with the CIO council, I was given the job to distribute the 
leaflets throughout the Territory, to different people in the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. You w^ere given that job ? Who gave it to you? 

Mr. Doyle. I don't recall exactly who had given me the job at the 
present time, but I did it. I think, twice. Then someone else took 
over. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right, tell us just what you did. 

Mr. D0YI.E. All right. The leaflets were bundled up and addressed 
to different people in the Territory who were supposed to have been 
the literature directors of the different islands. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who furnished you the list of names? 

Mr. Doyle. I cannot seem to recall that, but anyway, a list of names 
was there. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many names? 

Mr. Doyle. One for each island. 

Mr. Tavenner. Just one person for each island ? 
Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you remember the names of the one person 
from each island ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1511 

Mr. Doyle. No. I never came in contact with them often enough 
to remember that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you tell us any instructions that came 
down from the executive committee that you know of, directing what 
you should do, as members of the Communist Party, with regard to 
political action? 

Mr. Doyle. No; I cannot seem to recall anything like that, although 
it could have been possible that something like that was handed down. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you sever your connection with the Com- 
munist Party here ? 

]Mr. Doyle. I severed my connection with them about the middle of 
1948, but not officially. I did not hand in a resignation of any sort, 
but then being that there was a contract with the Hawaiian Gas Prod- 
ucts, and local 150, 1 felt that my attending a Communist Party meet- 
ing was not necessary any longer, being that I was in no capacity an 
official of the local. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. You say that you did not hand in a resignation? 

Mr. Doyle. No ; the constitution, I think, in part, of the Communist 
Party, reads that any misattendance at meetings consecutively 
for about 3 months is enough to expell anyone from the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. I neglected to ask you who was the chairman of 
this party fraction, where there were representatives from the dif- 
ferent unions present, I mean the different party cells present? 

Mr. Doyle. Pearl Freeman was conducting the meeting. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Who is that ? 

Mr. Doyle. Pearl Freeman was in charge of the meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have anything that you desire to add ? 

Mr. Doyle. No ; I don't think that I have anything else to add. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your present attitude toward the member- 
ship in the Communist Party? 

Mr. Doyle. In my experience, being that the educational set-up in 
the Territory is not sufficiently covered, as far as the bad effects of 
communism is concerned, I felt that it was a very good experience, 
and something that I had learned about, but I feel that if at any time 
it is possible for you to stop anyone from joining up with any sub- 
versive organization, I would be glad to do it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that the reason why you have been willing to 
come here to tell the truth and not perjure yourself before this com- 
mittee ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is true. 

Mr. Walter. We appreciate very much your contribution to our 
records, and we congratulate you. Thank you very much. 

I might state that under section 3486 of the United States Code, 
witnesses testifying before this committee are given immunity from 
any prosecution, or because of any testimony that they have given, 
unless it is perjured testimony. 

The subcommittee will stand in recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Whereupon, the hearing was adjourned until 2 o'clock p. m., 
on Wednesday, April 12, 1950.) 



1512 COMMUKIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

(The hearing was resumed at 2 p. m., same appearances as at the 
morning session being Hon. Francis E. Walter (subcommittee chair- 
man) , Burr P. Harrison, John McSweeney, Morgan M. Moulder, and 
Harold H.Velde). 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will be in order. 

Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. I would like to recall the witness Easter Doyle for 
one further question. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed. 

TESTIMONY OF EASTER J. DOYLE— Resumed 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Mr. Doyle, you testified at some length regarding 
the formation of Communist Party cells within the local unions or 
union locals. 

Mr. DoTLE. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. There is one question that I failed to ask you, which 
I would like to ask you now. In your case, that is, in the case of local 
150, did the rank and file of your labor union know that the Communist 
Party had selected as its name "Local 150 of the Communist Party"? 

Mr. Doyle. I am most positive that the members of the union did 
not know that the Communist Party had adopted the local 150 name. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all. 

Mr. McSweeney. That was the point I had in mind, Mr. Tavenner. 

When you selected your name, were you told from above what name 
to select or did you vote among yourselves in that one little cell, as 
to what your name should be. 

Mr. Doyle. As far as that is concerned, I am not quite sure as to 
how the origination of the name occurred, but then it may have been 
that the name was handed down from up above as being a designation 
of the group. 

Mr. McSweeney. Was there any purpose in choosing 150 as your 
name ? 

Mr. Doyle. As I have stated previously, it probably came about 
from the fact that the members of the Communist cell were members 
of local 150 of the union. 

Mr. Walter. Thank you very much. Call your next witness, Mr. 
Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Donald Uesugi. 

Mr. Walter. Will you stand up and raise your right hand? 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I do. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down. 

TESTIMONY OF DONALD UESUGI 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Donald Uesugi. 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you appear here in response to a subpena ? 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Served on you? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1513 

Mr. Uesugi. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ^ 

Mr. Uesugi. I was born on Kauai, in Hanamaulu. 

Mr. Tavexnek. Wliere are you presently employed? 

Mr. Uesugi, I am presently employed at the Mutual Telephone Co. 
in Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that the telephone company which renders serv- 
ice generally over the Island of Oahu ? 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been employed by that 
company? 

Mr. Uesugi. I have been employed about 17 years by them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you complete the grade schools in your edu- 
cation? 

Mr, Uesugi. Well, I only had grade-school education, that is all. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is the nature of your employment with the 
telephone company ? 

Mr. Uesugi, Well, I am an accounting clerk there. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Are you married? 

Mr. Uesugi. I was married. 

Mr. Tavenner. What Avas your wife's first name? 

Mr. Uesugi. My wife's first name was Peggy Uesugi. 

Mr. Tavenner. Peggy? 

Mr. Uesugi. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. You are now divorced? 

jNIr. Uesugi. We are divorced now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where is she presently employed; do you know? 

Mr, Uesugi. Eight now I receive letters from her that she took a 
leave of absence from the ILWU and she is residing in California now, 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been divorced ? 

INIr. Uesugi. It is almost a year now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Uesugi, have you ever been a member of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Uesugi. I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about it. Tell us just how you became a 
member and what led up to you becoming a member. 

Mr. TFesugi. AYell, when I first got married, my w^ife was working 
for the ILWU, which w^as on Kekaulike Street, if I am correct, a 
little office up there. Then, at that time, I did not know anything 
about unions. And later on I got married to her, and, Avell, we had a 
baby, and 2 years later she talked to me about the Communist Party, 
.which at that time I did not know what was a Communist, anyway. 
So, months after that I remembered being with friends, with Charles 
Fujimoto and Eileen Fujimoto, who knew my wife. Well, they are 
talking to me about unions. xU that time the telephone company had 
a union which I wasn't interested in that union, so I listened to them. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. Now, when you say that you listened to them, 
what did you mean ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Mr. Fujimoto and Mrs. Fujimoto, they always used 
to come over to the house and talk things over between the meals, 
and one day my wife approached me to join the Communist Party. 
I asked her what was the nature of the Connnunist Party. Well, I 
still remember her correctly saying it is for the interest of labor. So, 



1514 COMMUN"IST ACTTVITIES IN HAW AH 

but yet, I did not want to join the party, because I just don't want to 
join something. I have enough things to do. To cut the story short, 
one day I was forced to join the union. If I did not join the union, 
she will threaten me for a divorce. So I said, "Well, if it is not going 
to be any trouble, I will join the union," which they assured me there 
won't be any trouble at all. And, as I stay in, I don't remember cor- 
rectly what year, I remember they had a Territorial investigation, 
which was the first time I found out I was doing something wrong. So 
I told her, "I am going to quit and I don't want to go any more to 
the meetings." But I still hung on to the party quite some time after 
that, but I wasn't going to meetings regularly unless I was pushed to 
go to the meetings, which I know was on Thursday nights, which I 
purposely stallecl around and come home late or something. But she 
was right there pushing me to go to the meeting, which I think Charlie 
Fujimoto would pick me up. Of course, I go to the meeting, which 
I am always afraid about going to, thinking people will follow me, 
and I used to wait for the meeting to get over quick, as soon as possible. 

That is all I know about joining the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, do you recall the first meeting that you at- 
tended of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Uesugi. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was that meeting held? 

INIr. Uesugi. It was not exactly a meeting, but it was down at 
Waikild. I don't know what the number is, but it was on Manukai 
Street, and that was at the Ralph Vossbrink home there. At the time 
he was living in Waikiki. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Mr Vossbrink there at the time of the meeting? 

Mr. Uesugi. He was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall the names of other people who were 
there ? 

Mr. Uesugi. As far as I can remember, Izuka was there. That 
is where I first met him. And Jack Hall was there and Wilfred Oka 
was there. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Wilfred Oka? 

Mr. Uesugi. Wilfred Oka. And what is that fellow's name who 
was here today ? Tokunaga. Tokunaga was there. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Tokunaga? 

Mr. Uesugi. Ralph Tokunaga. 

Mr. Tavenner. Ralph. Wliat was his first name? 

Mr. Uesugi. Ralph. ' 

Mr. Tavenner. Ralph Tokunaga. 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. 

Mr, Tavenner. Were you here in the hearing room this morning? 

Mr. Uesugi. No, I wasn't here. I came this morning but they told 
me to come back at 2 o'clock. There were some people there which I 
don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the date of that meeting? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, I can't recall dates because I wasn't interested, 
but I think it was about 1945, the year 1945. What month and day, 
I wouldn't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you told us the names of the persons that you 
can recall who attended that meeting? 

Mr. Uesugi. At Waikiki? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 1515 

Mr. Uesugi. That is about all I can recall at that place there. 

INIr. Tavenner. Was your wife Pe<»;gy there? 

Mr. Uesugi. No. She just dropped me by the corner and told me 
that is the place to go to. 

(Laughter in the audience.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Koichi Imori ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he attend any meeting of the Conmiunist Party 
when you were there ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Not at Waikiki, but other meetings, at other places, I 
met him. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. Other meetings, at other places ? 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you tell us at what other places? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, at Waikiki. I recall that is the first place. 

Mr. Tavenner. S])eak a little louder, please. 

Mr. Uesugi. At a Waikiki meeting and at the Makiki meeting, which 
is on Kaihee Street, at Charlie Fujinioto's home, and at Mr. Voss- 
brink's home at Pacific Heights, I seen him. 

Mr. Tavenner. First, at that meeting at the home of Charlie Fuji- 
moto, who were present at that meeting? 

]\lr. Uesugi. Those who were present there, I can remember, was 
Wilfred Oka, Imori 

Mr. Tavenner. When you say Imori, what Imori are you referring 
to? 

Mr. Uesugi. What was his first name now? He was around the 
ILWU. Koichi. 

Mr. Tavenner. Koichi Imori ? 

Mr. Uesugi. That is the Imori that was over there. Paul Kane- 
ma ru was there. 

Mr. Tavennee. Who? 

Mr. Uesugi. Paul Kanemaru. Oh. Eileen Fujimoto was there and 
Jeanette Nakama. She has a married name now, wdiich I don't know. 
And — well — Charlie Fujimoto was there, and Mrs. Kanemaru was 
there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat Kanemaru is that; what is her husband's 
name? 

Mr. Uesugi. Her husband's name was Paul Kanemaru. Paul 
Kanemaru. 

Mr. Tavenner. Paul Kanemaru ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, Kalph Tokunaga used to come there too. There 
were some other ones which I cannot seem to recall now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Harry Kuhia, Jr. ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Oh, yes. He was there for a while too. Is that the 
fellow- that is working for the Gas Products, or something, or used 
to work there ? 

Mr. Tavenner. I will ask you, where did Harry Kuhia, Jr., work, 
so far as you know ? 

Mr. Uesugi. So far as I know, he was working for the gas company. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you see him at more than one meeting or not? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, I saw him at about two meetings, to be correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what meetings were these ? 

Mr. Uesugi. What do you mean ? 



1516 COMMUISriST activities in HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. I want to know whether they were labor meetings, 
whether they were social meetings or whether they were Communist 
Party meetings, or whatever kind of meetings they were. 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, they were labor meetings and Communist meet- 
ings, too. 

Mr. Tavenner. What do you mean by "labor meetings and Com- 
munist meetings, too" ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, discussing the labor situation, dock strikes, and 
all that. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean you discussed the labor situations there ? 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. The persons who were present at these meetings, 
did you know them merely as members of labor unions or did you 
know them as members of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I know them, most of them, in both ways, labor and 
Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know who presided over these meetings ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Yes, I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who? 

Mr. Uesugi. That is Mr. Charles Fujimoto and Mr. Wilfred Oka 
was presiding at all the meetings at Makiki.. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many different cells or branches of the Com- 
munist Party did you belong to ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, let me see. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Let's take up first the cell that you became a mem- 
ber of when you first went into the Commnist Party. 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, that was at Makiki. 

Mr. Tavenner. Makiki? 

Mr. Uesugi. Makiki branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you a member of the Makiki cell ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, I think about a year we were there. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. While you were in that branch of the party, to 
whom did you pay your dues? 

Mr. Uesugi. I used to pay my dues to Eileen Fujimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. ^\1io gave you your card, or did you receive a card, 
a Communist Party card? 

Mr. Uesugi. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who gave it to you ? 

Mr. Uesugi. My wife gave that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you transferred from the Makiki branch to 
another branch of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the name of that branch ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I don't recall which one I went to first, but I can name 
any one. I went up to Mr. Vossbrink's home, up Pacific Heights, and 
there was another one, which I told Mr. Wheeler about, that was up 
Punchbowl. I don't know what street it is but I know where it is. 
That was at the Hyun family's residence there. 

Mr. Tavenner. The one that you are talking about now was at 
the home of Ralnh Vossbrink ? 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. But did you go to another branch of the party before 
that? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1517 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. I am pretty sure I go to the Punchbowl 
branch there for a while, about two or three meetings there. 

Mr. Tavenner. At whose home did that meeting take pUice? 

Mr. Uesugi. That was one of the Hyun boys. I don't know wliat 
his name is. It is the short one there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you say that over again, please? 

Mr. Uesugi. One of. the Hyun homes. 

Mr. Tavenner. One of the Hynn's homes ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Yes. The short one. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you don't recall what his first name is i 

Mi\ Uesugi. His first name, no. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you attending meetings at his home? 

Mr. Uesugi. About three meetings there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give us the names of any persons who 
attended meetings at these other two branches that you have spoken 
of whose names you have not given us ? 

Mr. Uesugi. All right. There was this lady, Adele Kensinger, and 
the Hyiins. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wait just a minute. What was that name? 

Mr. Uesugi. I am pretty sure it is Adele Kensinger. 

Mr. Tavenner. Adele Kensinger. All right. 

ISIr. Uesugi. And then the Hyuns. Of course, I don't — and just 
the same old group that I mentioned before. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Ruth Ozaki? 

Mr. Uesugi. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did you meet her ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, I met her through my wife, down at the 
ILWU. That is how I got to know her. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever attend a Communist Party meeting 
with her ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you recall the names of any other persons 
that you met in Communist Party meetings ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I do by reading the paper. I recall something else. 
1 remember I went to a Waikiki meeting, to another place down next 
to the Niumalu Hotel, and that was the place I was transferred to later 
on. I don't know what time it was, but I was attending there for 
about two meetings down there, or three meetings, and I recall two 
more new names, such as Mr. McEuen, Marshall INlcEuen. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. McEuen ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Yes. He was there. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say "Yes"? 

Mr. Uesugi. Yes. Will, there is more than one there. 

Mv. Tavenner. How many was this you can name ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Let's see. Marshall McEuen, Mrs. Reinecke was there, 
so was John. 

JVIr. Tavenner. Speak a little louder, please. 

Mr. Uesugi. Mr. and Mrs. John Reinecke were there. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is Dr. Reinecke and his wife? 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. And Mr. Robert Greene, who is with 
the ILWU. Robert Greene. I am pretty sure. They call him Bob 
Greene or something. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what position Robert Greene held 
here at that time ? 



1518 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Uesugi. I didn't know exactly, only I know that he was meet- 
ing with our group there. I think he is connected with the Hawaii 
Civil Liberties — something. 

Mr. Tavenner. Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee ; is that what you 
are referring to ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Something like that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what his position was with that 
organization? 

Mr. Uesugi. I don't know because I never went to any of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you know he was connected witli it ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, are there any others ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, not at the moment; I can't recall any more. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Wallace Ho ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Yes; I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever sit in a Communist Party meeting 
with him ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I never did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you at any time hold an office in any of these 
groups to which you were assigned, that is. Communist Party groups? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, you may call it as an officer's job or what, but I 
think I was a dues collector. That is all 1 know. 

Mr. Tavenner. A dues collector? 

Mr. Uesugi. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, whose dues did you collect? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, I collected myself, Wilfred Oka, Tokunaga. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say Wilfred Oka ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Wilfred Oka and Charles Fujimoto and Jeanette Na- 
kama and Paul Kanemaru and Mrs. Kanemaru and Imori, Koichi 
Imori's dues, and I collected Kuhia's dues for a couple of times. 

Mr. Tavenner. You said Harry Kuhia? 

Mr. Uesugi. Harry Kuhio or Kuhia. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Senior or junior? 

Mr. Uesugi. I don't know whether it is junior or senior. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, can you tell us about what age he was ? 

Mr. Uesugi. He should be about 30 years old. 

Mr. Tavenner. About 30 years old. 

Mr. Uesugi. Or 34 by today. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, when you collected the dues, did you give 
books or stamps to the individuals who paid you ? 

Mr. LTesugi. The individuals who paid me, well, I gave them the 
stamps there, a little greenish or bluish, a little stamp about half an 
inch block or less than that. 

Mr. Tavenner. "Wliere did you get those stamps ? 

Mr. LTesugi. Those stamps were given to me by either Eileen or 
Charlie Fujimoto, and if they don't see me they used to give them to 
my wife and she, in turn, would pass the stamps to me. I don't know 
from where they get them. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did you do with the money that you collected ? 

Mr. Uesuigi. The money I turned in, most of the time, to the Fuji- 
motos, Charles or Eileen. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, which one of the cells was it in which you 
held the position of dues collector ? 

Mr. Uesugi. That was at Makiki. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 1519 

Mr. Tavenner. The Makiki ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know James Freeman ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I do; 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere did you meet him ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, I first met him, probably, at the Fujimoto's resi- 
dence, I think, but I met him at his home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall about when that was, what year ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, it must be, some time after 1945, way back, I 
think, about 2 years later that I met him, maybe in 1947 that I met 
James Freeman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what happened at his home on that occasion? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, on that occasion, that was just an ordinary din- 
ner, I guess ; perhaps some shish-kebab and stories is all I know. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Did you go back again to the home of James 
Freeman ? 

Mr. Uesugi. I never did ; at least till the strike came over for the 
Mutual Telephone. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what happened then ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, at that time I was in a — well, I was in a daze, 
I guess, and I went up, and since I had it together, I had my family 
trouble, and the strike was due the next day, and I was in town, walk- 
ing around, I don't know where the place, and I don't recall if I met 
Charles Fujimoto, or he met me, but anyway, he took me down to 
James Freeman's home, and then they asked me : "What you want to 
do?" And I said, "I don't know." I told them first, "tomorrow I 
am walking right through the picket line. I am going to work, be- 
cause I had already quit the union," but then they told me I do not 
need to cross the picket line and go on strike, because they will rein- 
state me then, and I was reinstated the following day, and I was on 
the strike for 1 month. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the date of this conversation you had 
with James Freeman regarding the strike; the telephone strike? 

Mr. Uesugi. That was on the night of December 20, 1948, that I had 
a talk with him. 

Mr. Tavenner, Did he make any threat of any kind to you ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Xo ; he never did. 

Mr. TA^•ENNER. Did you buy Communist literature while you were 
a member of the Party ? 

Mr. Uesugi. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. From whom did you buy? 

Mr. Uesugi. Well, I bought it from Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. TA^TNNER. Did you at any time sell Communist literature for 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. Uesugi. Literatures, I never did sell one of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you still a member of the party ? 

Mr. Uesegi. No ; I am not a member. I quit that some time in the 
early part of 1948, 1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you write any letter of resignation, or did you 
just quit? 

Mr. Uesegi. I just walked up to Charles Fujimoto's home, and I am 
pretty sure I come to them about it now ; I gave him a card back, and 
I said, "I don't want any part of it any more." 



1520 COMMUN"IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. That you did not want any more part of it ?^ 

Mr. Uestjgi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been requested since that time to 
join the party again? 

Mr. Uesugi. Ko; never did. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1 have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

JNIr. Harrison. On behalf of the committee, we desire to express to 
you our appreciation for coming here today, and aiding us in the in- 
vestigation, and on behalf of the committee, I thank you. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Ta^'enner. The next witness is Harry Kuhia. 

Mr. Harrison. Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are 
about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the 
truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Kuhia. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF HARRY KUHIA, JR. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Kuhia, will you state your full name, please? 

Mr. Kuhia. Harry Kuhia, Jr. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Harry Kuhia, Jr. ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Correct. 

Mr. Ta\"enner. When and where were you boi-n ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. On what date ? 

Mr. Kuhia. April 27, 1916. 

Mr. Ta\t2nner. Do you appear here in response to a subpena asking 
your appearance before this committee ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where are you presently employed ? 

Mr. Kuhia. At the Honolulu Gas Co. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. What other woi'k, positions, have you held prior 
to this time ? Where have you worked before this ? 

Mr. Kuhia. I was in the CCC camp for about 18 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been employed by your present 
employers ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Thirteen years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you a member of a labor union ? 

Mr. Kuhia. I am ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What union is it ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Gasoline and Oil Drivers, Local 904, affiliated with the 
Teamsters' International Union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that American Federation of Labor ? 

Mr. Kuhia. AFL ; yes. 

Mr. McSweeney. Affiliated with whom, please? 

Mr. Kuhia. The AFL, with Teamsters' International. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold any position with your local union? 

Mr. Kuhia. I am business representative. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member ? 

Mr. Kuhia. No, sir. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. When did you join the Communist Party? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1521 

Mr. KuHiA. I think it was the latter part of 1946, or tlie early part 
of 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who recruited you into the Coiiunuuist, Party '^ 

Mr. KuiiiA. Koichi Iniori. 

Mr. Tavenner. Koichi Iniori? 

Mr. KuiiiA. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the connnittee the circumstances under 
which you became a member ? 

Mr. KuiiiA. Well, at the time I was president of the local union, 
Koichi Imori was the business agent; he and 1 worked together 
trying to get a union contract with the Honolulu Gas Co., and he 
thought that I needed more education, because of the fact that my 
literacy was not enough, in the presence of the local. He invited me 
to join the Communist Party, but at that time he did not tell me 
the name of the party, he told me that it was more especially for an 
educational program than anything else, something pertaining to a 
trade-union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you know at that time that he was a member 
of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. KuHiA. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, as a result of his invitation to you, what did 
you do? 

Mr. Kuhia. I attended the meetings that he invited me, and then 
later on he asked that I could join as a member, or sign a card, so 
that I can continue to go to the meetings, or get an education from — 
which I understood was going to be held after the present class was 
going on, which was held at Doc Reinecke's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend these classes at Dr. Reinecke's home ? 

Mr. Kuhia. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you understood you were to attend classes to be 
held later; is that what I understood you to say? 

Mr. Kuhia. It was my understanding from Imori that I was sup- 
posed to ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did Koichi Imori have in addition 
to his being president in your local union ? 

Mr. Kuhia. He was the business representative of our local union. 
I really do not know what position he held at that time, but later on 
I understood — he told me himself that he was elected to the Territorial 
Communist executive board. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. lo the executive board of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, where was the first meeting held which you 
attended ? 

Mr. Kuhia. It was held at Kaihee Lane, up in Makiki some place ; 
the Makiki district. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whose home ? 

Mr. Kuhia. It was my understanding it was Jeanette Nakama's 
home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you give us the names of the persons who at- 
tended that same meeting? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes; it was Charles Fujimoto, Wilfred Oka, Koichi 
Imori, Masao Mori. 

Mr. Tavenner. Not quite so fast. Go ahead. 



1522 coMMUJsrisT activities in Hawaii 

Mr. KuHiA. And a lady by the name of Kensinger, Paul Kaneniaru, 
Alice Kanemaru, Tokunaga, and Richard Tokunaga. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you say Richard Tokunaga ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I guess his name is Richard, but anyway his last name 
is Tokunaga. There were a few other fellows there, but I don't recall 
their names at this time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know a person by the name of Donald 
Uesugi ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he there ? 

Mr. KuHiA. He was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you know his wife? 

Mr. KuHiA. I never met her, but I saw her at the meetings that were 
held at that place. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what her name is; her first name was? 

Mr. KuiiiA. Peggy. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Ernest Arena ? 

Mr. Ktjhia. Yes, he was there, too. I could not recall his name. 

Mr. Tavenner. Richard Kageyama, do you know him? 

Mr. KuHiA. I saw him once in one of the meetings that I attended, 
but that was one of the later meetings that he was there ; not at the 
first meeting ; no. 

ISIr. Tavenner. Do you know James Freeman ? 

Mr. KuHiA. James Freeman attended some of the meetings ; about 
three of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. "VNHiat was the occupation of James Freeman, did he 
have a position of some kind ? 

Mr. KuHiA. According to Imori, James Freeman was the organizer 
of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings did you attend of this group ? 

Mr. KuiiiA. On, about over six; from six to maybe eight, or some- 
thing like that. 

]\lr. Tavenner- Were you issued a Communist Party card ? 

Mr. KuHiA. "Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. '^Vho issued it to you ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you pay dues ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. To whom did you pay it ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Donald Uesugi. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall the name of this group, how they were 
designated ? 

Mr. Kuiiia. No, I never knew the name of the group itself, or 
whether they were called a group or a cell, until I reported to the 
FBI, and they told me the name of it. 

Mr. Tavenner. You got the name from the FBI, of the group 
that you were a member of ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you reported to the FBI the names that you 
have given us here today ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now what was the name of the group, as you 
learned it to be ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 1523 

Mr. KuHiA. Makiki Cell. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe you told us that Charles Fujimoto was the 
chairman of that group, or president of it ? 

Mr. KuHiA. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was its secretary ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I really do not know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know the name of the educational director? 

Mr. KuHiA. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you buy any literature ; this Communist litera- 
ture? 

Mr. KuHiA. I did ; yes. 

Mr, Tavenner. Who did you buy it from ? 

Mr. KuiiiA. Jeanette Nakama. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe you stated you paid your dues to Koichi 
Imori ? 

Mr. KuHiA. To Donald Uesugi. 

Mr. Tavenner. Donald Uesugi ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How often did this Makiki group of the Communist 
Party meet ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Well, they used to meet on Thursday; I guess it is once 
a month. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned that one of the parties who was 
present at this first meeting was Adele Kensinger. Did sho attend 
other meetings ? 

Mr. KuHiA. She was there at all the meetings I was there. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was her principal function at these meetings? 
That is, what part did she play in the meetings, if any ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Oh, she just got into discussions, of what the thing was 
that was to be taken up at that moment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, can you recall the details of any of the pam- 
phlets or other literature that you bought from Jeanette Nakama ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I would not remember ; it has been so long ago. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you subscribe to the Daily People's World, pub- 
lished on the west coast ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I did, yes; a year's subscription. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who took your subscription ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, while you were a member of the Communist 
Party did you have an occasion to go to California ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the purpose of your g:oing ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I was elected a delegate to the meeting, the Eleven-State 
Western Conference. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlien was that? 

Mr. KuHiA. In 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you given an address before you left here? 

Mr. KuHiA. The address I found in the brief case that I took with 
me to the mainland, which belonged to Koichi Imori, had an envelope 
in there with the address in it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let me see if I understand that properly : First, 
whose brief case was this ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Koichi Imori's. 



1524 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. Tavenner. How did you happen to be carrying his brief case? 
Mr. KuHiA. He loaned me the brief case to carry some papers, when 
I was making the trip to the mainland. 
Mr. Tavenner. He let vou use it ? 

« 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you found in that brief case an envelope? 
Mr. KuHiA. Correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, explain a little more in detail what you 
found in there. 

Mr. KuHiA. Well, when I went to the mainland my wife gave me, 
supposed to give me some address, to some of her family in San Fran- 
cisco, and that I thought was one of the addresses that I was sup- 
posed to look up, her cousin. The address, I think, was on Market 
Street, and it was on the second floor, and when I arrived there, on 
the door it says: "Communist Party of California," and I turned 
around and came back downstairs. 

Mr. Tavenner. I want you to explain a little more in detail how you 
got this note; whether it was just a note that was loose in the brief 
case, or whether it was given to you? 

Mr. KuHiA. It was just an address, that is all ; an address of Market 
Street ; on Market Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, had that address been brought to you, or did 
you just merely find it in the brief case ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Well, I put everything in the brief case when I left 
here, and being that I thought is belonging to my wife, and I went 
up and tried to look for her cousin, who was away for 18 years, and 
she never saw him before for a long time, and that is how I came to 
come across the address. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, when you returned from California did 
you continue attending Communist Party meetings in Honolulu? 
Mr. KuHiA. No, sir. 
Mr. Tavenner. Well, why not? 

Mr. KuHiA. I was then told that I was in the Communist Party, and 
refused to continue to belong to it, and I mean the meaning of the 
communism, and what they stand for. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, had you been advised to get out of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes, by the teamsters' officials in Santa Barbara. 
Mr. Tavenner. The heads of your own union told you to get out 
of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Well, they were here in 1947, and Imori was a repre- 
sentative of our local union, and their understanding was that Imori 
was a Communist, and that for me to come back in Honolulu and get 
rid of Imori out of the union. At the time they found out, somehow, 
that I was also a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you were given directions by the AFL to sever 
} our connections with the Communist Party ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes, after I explained how I got into the Communist 
Party, without knowing what it was for, and what it stands for. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you get rid of — or was the local of the 
American Federation of Labor able to get rid of Koichi Imori ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I came back in May 19, 1947, and asked Koichi Imori 
to resign from the local union. He then turned in his resignation to 
the executive board of the local union. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1525 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, in the course of your testimony you men- 
tioned Wilfred Oka as one of those who attended Communist Party 
meetings with you. Do you know what position Wilfred Oka held 
at this time? 

Mr. KuHiA. It is my understanding that he is some kind of a secre- 
tary of the Democratic Party of Hawaii. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Do you know whether he is secretary of the Demo- 
cratic central committee? 

Mr. KuHLv. I really don't know, sir, 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Did you see from the press that the central Demo- 
crat connnittee expelled a witness who had appeared and testified 
before this committee? 

Mr. KuHiA. I did, sir. 

Mr. Tamsnner. Is this man. Oka, who you say was the secretary of 
the Democratic Party committee, the same person you mentioned 
attended the Communist Party meetings with you ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes. 

Mr. TA\Ti:NNER. Do you have any knowledge of who were the mem- 
bers of the executive committee of the Communist Party while you 
were a member ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Well, as told to me by Koichi Imori, he said that he 

Mr. Ta\'exner. Well, had you been advised to get out of the Com- 
munist Party, and at the same time Doc Reinecke, Jack Kawano, was 
docked, and he then also named all of the members of the — at least 
some of them that I have in my mind, and he named Jack Kimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Jack Kimoto. 

Mr. KuHiA. Bob McElrath. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. That is Robert McElrath ? 

Mr. KuHLA.. Ah Quon McElrath. That is Bob's wife. Jack 
Hall 



Mr. Ta\t:nner. Do you mean Mrs. McElrath was also elected to 
the executive board ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. All right. Excuse me. Go ahead. 

Mr. Kuhia. Jack Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Jack Hall. Who else, if you can recall ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Charles Fujimoto. I guess that is all I can remember 
now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, after being advised by the heads of your own 
local union, or after having explained to them the circumstances un- 
der which you got into the Communist Party, and that you should 
sever your connection with the Communist Party, what did you do ? 

Mr. Kuhia. I then resigned as president of the local union, and 
then had a talk in later months with the investigators of the Terri- 
torial Attorney General's office, Mr. Miller, and Mr. Ah Fook, and at 
that time I told them that I was a member of the Communist Party, 
and named every one whom I met and had contact with. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, after you found out the situation 
you had gotten into, you did everything you could to correct it, didn't 
you? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes, including going to the FBI. 

Mr. Tavenner. And including, also, appearing before this com- 
mittee ? 

66636— 50— pt. 1 12 



1526 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes, sir; and I also turned in my resignation after I 
was advised that in telling the people that I no longer belong to the 
Communist Party, I was told by Izuka, when he put out his pamplilets 
that they do not accept your resignation unless you make it known, or 
put it in letter form of some kind, and if they answer it all right, 
but I don't think you can get any answer to your resignation. I have 
here my resignation, dated November 25, 1947, and it is addressed to 
Koichi Imori, when he was in Maui, and it is sent by air mail, reg- 
istered letter, with a receipt requested. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have a copy of it ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I have, yes. It is dated November 25, 1947, and ad- 
dressed to Mr. Koichi Imori, post office box 1062, Wailuku, Maui. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you read it ? 

Mr. KuHiA (reading) : 

Dear Sir : You will recall that I tendered my resignation from the Communist 
Party to you in my home in Honolulu, sometime early in June 1947. I have not 
received any word that my resignation was accepted by the faction to which I 
belong. You informed me that the Communist Party had accepted the fact that 
I am no longer associated with it. Your verbal statement, from the faction, is 
not satisfactory to me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you read that slower, and speak plainly. 
Mr. KuHiA (reading) : 

Furthermore, I wish to have the acceptance of my resignation in writing, and 
would much prefer it to have you send it to me early, so my position will be 
clear in this matter. Yours very truly. 

Signed by myself as president of the local union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who assisted you in the preparation of this letter? 

Mr. KuHiA. Ed. Berman. He dictated this letter. 

Mr. Tavenner. Ed. Berman? 

Mr. KuHiA. Mr. Ed. Berman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, will you read the reply that you got ? 

Mr. Kuhia. There was no reply. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, at that time, you say 3^ou were president of 
your local union ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the number of your local union? 

Mr. Kuhia. Local 904. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you continue on as president after this had 
occurred ? 

Mr. Kuhia. I resigned after signing this letter. I resigned in 
December. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you write a letter of resignation? 

Mr. Kuhia. No; I resigned in the meeting held on Kaahumanu 
Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were minutes kept of that meeting ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. The subpena issued by the chairman of this com- 
mittee directed that you produce the minutes of that meeting. Now, 
I don't want to know anything in your minutes about any matter 
other than the matter we are talking about. 

Mr. Kuhia. I -was just going to ask you, because I would not want 
to bring in any of the minutes, or any part of the minutes that has 
nothing to do with the union hearing. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1527 

Mr. Tavenner. We are not concerned with any other phases of the 
meeting that the American Federation of Labor may liave had, but 
only with the question of commniiism. I wouhl like for you to pro- 
duce, and if you desire, read yourself the minutes of that meeting 
which pertain only to the question of your resignation, or any other 
matter dealing with the Communist Party. 

Mr. KuniA. This is the minutes of December 5, Thursday, 1947. 
In the minutes under "New business" : 

Member Kuhia explained that he would like to resiffn as president of the local 
committee, December 7, i;)47, because of a mix-up with the Communist Party. 
He said, in order to save the oil companies' case, still pending in Washington, 
he is tendering his resignation. It was moved by Brother Yamashita, and 
Brother Marcus, that his resignation should be accepted. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. What was the date of these minutes? 

Mr. KuiiiA. December 5, 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, Mr. Chairman, we have no need for the 
minutes themselves, and I suggest that he should be permitted to 
take them back with him, and return them as part of their records. 

ISIr. Walter. He has read the pertinent part of the record? 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Yes; he has read the pertinent part of the record, 

]Mr. Kuhia. Thank you, sir. 

jNIr. Tavenner. I am going to hand you a copy of a paper which 
purports to be a copy of the minutes of a different council, or the 
same council, and ask you if you can identify it ? 

Mr. Kuhia. This is a meeting held in June, when we asked Imori 
to resign from the local union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then that is the minutes of your own local organi- 
zation? 

Mr. Kuhia. Well, before he resigned he joined the Council of 
Teamsters and they threw him out of the local union. 

Mr. Tavenner. So you identify that as a copy of the minutes of 
your local ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Correct, 

Mr. Tavenner. I would like to read this into the record. 

Minutes, Gasoline and Oil Drivers, Warehousemen, Helpers Union, Local 904. 
Thursday, June 5, 1947. 

The regular meeting of all units of local 904 came to order with president 
Harry Kuhia, Jr., presiding. 

The regular order of business was dispensed with and the subject of Koichi 
Imori. who had resigned recently as organizer and representative of local 904, 
was brought forth. 

It was moved and seconded that Koichi Imori be present at the meeting to 
state his views as to his resignation from the local. The motion was ruled out 
of order by the president, because the executive board has already accepted his 
resignation, and Koichi Imori no longer being a member of local 004. 

Brother Rutledge reiterated as to the hiring of Koichi Imori as an organizer 
and representative for local 904, and his activities up until his resignation. 
He also stated that the constitution of the teamsters states that anyone who 
has espoused himself to the Communist Party and its doctrines could not be a 
member of the teamsters' union, article 2, section 3. 

As for proof, Brother Rutledge stated that he knows that Mr. Izuka, former 
secretary of the Communist Party here, and said that Koichi Imuri was connected 
with them. 

Brother Rutledge then read the constitution, where the joint council has the 
power to act in such cases of all locals affiliated with the teamsters' union. 
Article XV ; section XI. 

He also gave a report on the three oil companies' "beef," and said that he is 
still waiting for the decision before the contracts are signed. 



1528 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

There being no further business, the meeting adjourned at 8 : 15 a. m. 

Brother Correa objected to the motion. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Eugene Aiwohi, 
Recording Secretary. 

I desire to introduce this copy of the minutes in evidence, marked, 
"Kuhia exhibit No. 1" ^' 

Mr. Walter. It will be received. 

Mr. Tavenner. That's all, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. I want to thank you for the contribution you have 
made to our work, it is because of the courage of the men who have 
testified here, like yourself, that the ultimate day of statehood is going 
to be very much closer. 

Mr. Kuhia. I am happy to be that. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will recess for 5 minutes. 

(Recess.) 

Mr. Walter. The meeting: will be in order. 



'to 



TESTIMONY OF HAROLD E. YAMASHITA 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn? Do 
you solemnly swear to speak the truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Harold Yamashita ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes; that is the Japanese way of saying it. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you say it? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yamashita. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. What is your present address ? 

Mr. Yamashita. 2128 Kaolo Way. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you appear here in response to a subpena by 
this committee ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give the committee a brief record of your 
employment background ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Well, I have been with the gas company for the 
last 12 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. What gas company? 

Mr. Yamashita. The Honolulu Gas Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at any time approached to become a 
member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who approached you ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. Koichi Imori? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did that occur ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Well, that was sometime in May 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1947 ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, will you tell the committee the circum- 
stances that surrounded his talk with you ? 

" Retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1529 

Mr. Yamashita. Well, I know he tried to get in touch with me, or, 
rather, get with me a lot of times, and we generally postponed it. 
One evening, after the regular meeting, he approached me, and he 
said that he has a very important matter to talk to me. So, I said, 
"O. K.." I said, "Then I will wait downstairs for you." So, I was in 
my car. He came in, and lie told me that, " Yama," he said, "I don't 
know how to approach you,'' but he told me, "You are a very mili- 
tant union man." Then he asked me how nmch education I had. So, 
I told him that I only went to the eighth grade. And he said, "Well, 
we are setting up a program where you can have a good education." 
So, I asked him what kind of education. He said. Well, all about 
being a labor leader in the labor movement." I told him, "Well," I 
said, "What kind of school?" Well, he said, "We will come to that 
later." So, he took out his Communist card, which I didn't know what 
card it was, but I saw "Communist Party of America," or "Cali- 
fornia," but it was a blue — light-blue card. And he told me that 
he is not ashamed to show me the card which he was a member for a 
quite a few years. I told him, well, so far as I am concerned, I said, 
about joining the party, "Well, I don't know anything about the Com- 
munist Party," so, I said, "I would have to think it over and find out 
more about it." Then, he stopped short, and he said not to say any- 
thing about this meeting. And he said, "I know I could trust you to 
keep it secret for the time being." That was all he said. And he said, 
"Now, I am going to leave for across the street to conduct a meeting 
for a class of his own." 

]VIi\ Tavennek. He actually showed you his Communist Party card ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. When he left for the meeting, which he said he ex- 
pected to hold, did he tell you who he expected to see at that meeting ? 

Mr. Yamashita. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. After you told him that you needed time to think 
it over, did he ask you to think it over, or did you tell him that you 
wanted to have time to think it over ? 

Mr. Yamashita. I wanted time to think it over. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. After you had time to think it over, what occurred? 

Mr. Yamashita. Well, he did not approach me after that, and when 
Harry Kuhia came back from the mainland, from the convention, I 
reported to Harry Kuhia about this incident. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you sav Harrv Kuhia. Is that Harry Kuhia, 
Jr.? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes, that is right, he was the president at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you in this room when the witness just ahead 
of you testified ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that the same person who testified just now? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. The man to whom you reported ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. And this was after Harry Kuhia, Jr., returned from 
the convention, the A. F. of L. convention? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. In California ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 



1530 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 

Mr, Tavenner. "Well, now, after you reported this conversation, and 
this effort on the part of Koichi Imori to get you into the Communist 
Party, I say after you reported that to Harry Kuhia, Jr., what 
happened ? 

Mr. Yamashita. "Well, lie told me that an investigation was going 
on, because they had orders from the mainland, from the A. F. of L 
Teamstere' "Union that there was a Communist — some rumpus in 
our union, so, there is going to be an investigation. So, he told me 
to wait until things came up. 

Mr. Ta\t:nnek. In other words, those high in the American Federa- 
tion of Labor had heard that there were Communists in the locals? 

Mr. Yamashita. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. In the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes, that is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And they were going to investigate? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether any further investigation 
was made by the American Federation of Labor? 

Mr. Yamashita. No, not after that. I don't know anything about 
it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do j^ou know what action was taken by the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, when it discovered that one of the officials 
of its union 

Mr. Yamashita. Well 

Mr. Tavenner. Just a minute. When one of the officials of its local 
union here was a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Well, at the time Mr. Rutledge held a meeting 
at the Kaahumanu Hall, and he said that Imori — Koichi Imori — 
is no more business representative for local 904, because of the fact 
that he was a Communist. And at the time Koichi Imori was outside 
of the door, and he tried to come in, but Rutledge brought up the 
constitution of the Teamsters' "Union, and said that no Communist 
is allowed in a Teamsters' Union meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you what appears to be a co]3y of a letter 
addressed to the membership of the Teamsters' Union of Hawaii, and 
I ask you if you can identify that ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes, this is the resignation, or letter that Koichi 
fmori wrote out. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I desire to read this letter. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed. 

Mr. Tavenner (reading) : 

May 26, 1947, to the membership. Teamsters' Union of Hawaii. From : Koichi 
Imori, ex-business representative, local 904. Subject : My resignation. 

For your information I am giving you herewith a copy of my letter resigning 
as business representative for local 904 and a letter from the executive board of 
local 904. I ask that you carefully read the two letters and urge you to remain 
calm in this period of Red-baiting and anti-CIO hysteria being whipped up by 
Arthur Rutledge. 

Mr. Rutledge in violation of the Teamsters' constitution ousted me, the elected 
business representative of local 904, for alleged "Communist" activities. The 
charge is, of course, without foundation. I am more concerned with his com- 
plete disregard of all constitutional rights our members are supposed to possess 
than with any name calling or Red-baiting. He refuses to permit me to have a 
fair hearing before the membership, a hearing which would expose his union- 
smashing plans, and refers me to the international president of the imion for 
redress. This procedure is thoroughly abhorrent and undemocratic. Even Hit- 
ler made more of a show at "iving justice to his victims. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1531 

1 urge you to resist the attempts of Rutledge and the CIO renegade Mookini 
from splitting the unity of all Hawaiian workers regardless of national 
affiliation. Fraternally yours, Koichi Iniori. 

Now, the instruction to investigate and to take action on the local 
matter, that had come down from the American Federation of Labor 
headquarters, had it not, on the mainland; is that correct? 

Mr. Yamashita. I didn't get you. 

Mr. Tavenner. The instructions were sent down from the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor headquarters in California for the local 
American Federation of Labor to take action in this matter ? 

Mr. Yamashita, Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that correct? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. In this letter Mr. Koichi Imori uses this language, 
"The charge." that is the charge of communism on his part, "the 
charge is, of course, without foundation." Do you know it to be a 
fact from Mr. Imori's own statements to you that he was a member 
of the Communist Party at that time ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. May I get one fact straight in my own mind ? 

Mr. Imori had been expelled from the union when he sent a letter 
of resignation, is that correct ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Well, before he sent — I mean after he sent in his 
resignation. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the letter in evidence and mark it 
"Yamasliita's Exhibit No. 1." '^ 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it may be received. 

Mr. Tavenner. This letter refers to a copy of his letter of resigna- 
tion. I hand you a copy and ask you if that is the copy referred to 
in that letter ? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes. 

Mr. Tav'enner. I will read this letter in evidence (reading) : 

May 24, 1947, Gasoline and Oil Drivers, Warehousemen and Helpers' Union, 
Local 904, Honolulu, T. H. Dear Sirs and Brothers : I am herewith tendering 
my resignation as your business representative, I am taking this action with 
deep regret and for the following reasons : 

1. Ever since I have been your business representative, Arthur A. Rutledge, 
president of the Joint Council of Teamsters, has insisted that I join with him 
in a raiding campaign against the ILWU and the International Association of 
Machinist, Independent, with whom I was associated before I became your 
business representative. This I have consistently refused to do. I know and 
you know that any inter-union warfare at this time can only play into the 
hands of the enemies of labor. In fact, I am convinced that the entire Rutledge- 
Dave Beck raiding program has been inspired, if not conceived by Hawaii's 
Big Five. As you know, I have been active in organized labor in Hawaii since 
1937, and have always worked in the interest of the workers, both organized and 
unorganized. I have never and will never be used, either willingly or unwillingly, 
as a tool of Mr. Rutledge to smash any labor organizations, whether they are 
AFL, CIO, or Independent, and specifically I will not at this time attempt to 
wreck the pineapple workers' union when these workers are desperately engaged 
in a life or death struggle with the Hawaiian pineapple industry. 

2. Yesterday a rump session of the executive board of the joint council of 
teamsters "suspended" me. Of course, neither the joint council of teamsters 
Itself for that matter, have any authority to suspend me to your business 
representative. I was hired by local 904. I receive my instructions from local 

^* Retained in committee files. 



1532 commutntist activities in hawait 

904, and I am paid by local 904, and even though Mr. Rntledge and the joint 
council of teamsters have certain dictatorial powers, they do not have the 
power to hire, fire, or suspend employees of local 904, or any other local unions. 
I am confident that if I take this matter before the membership I will receive 
the fullest support, but I know that Mr. Rutledge will eventually get the inter- 
national ofiice of the union to appoint him or the joint council of teamsters 
as a "receiver" for local 904, thus further restricting the limited democratic rights 
of our membership. 

3. Mr. Rutledge who now receives almost $1,000 per month in salaries and 
allowances from the dairy workers' union, bartenders' union, and the inde- 
pendent transit workers' union, now associates himself with one of the most 
discredited, incompetent, and questionable characters in Hawaii's labor move- 
ment, and is at this time using this person to further his scheme of smashing 
the pineapple workers' union. I, of course, cannot associate myself and risk 
my personal reputation with this individual. In view of the above, it is obvious 
that I can no longer remain business representative of local 904. I have pre- 
viously said that I am resigning with regret but I want to pass on a word of 
warning to you and your membershij) — do not enter into the jurisdictional battle 
that Mr. Rutledge is fomenting. Confine your activities to getting better wages, 
hours, and working condition from your employer and organizing unorganized 
workers and cooperate with all otlier workers in the Territory in doing the same 
for themselves. Do not start sinking hatchets in each other's backs because once 
these hatchets are in, the forces that want to divide and weaken us will drive 
them deeper and we will all be driven back to the days of 1936 and 1937, when 
wages were 20 cents an hour and the workday was 10 hours and when Mr. 
Rutledge was selling dresses, perfumes, etc., to certain professional women who 
worked on Hotel Street. I do not know what lies ahead for me in the future 
but I feel that in all honesty to myself and to my fellow workers I must offer 
my services to the pineapple workers in an effort to save them from the catas- 
trophe that Mr. Rutledge is attempting to bring about. I will offer ray services 
to them without compensation, if necessary, as I have so often done in the past. 
Fraternally yours, 

K. IMORI. 

Now, in spite of the fact that Mr. Imori's resignation was requested 
and was the result of his Communist Party membership, this was the 
line of his resignation. 

There is attached at tlie bottom of that letter a copy of a letter on 
the letterhead of Gasoline and Oil Drivers, Warehousemen and Help- 
ers Union, Local 904, of I. B. of P. C. W. and H. [reading] : 

May 24, 1947. 
K. Imori, 

Business Representative, Oasoline and Oil Drivers, Warehousemen and 
Helpers Union, Local 90Jf, Honolulu, T. H. 

Dear Sib and Brother: It is with a great deal of reluctance that we accept 
your resignation as business representative for our local. With your capable 
and honest assistance our local and our members have made more progress than 
at any time in the past. "W'e want you to know, too, that we fully understand 
your views on the present pineapple situation and that we hope there will be no 
serious jurisdictional disputes here in Hawaii that will harm the labor move- 
ments. As you have always told us, cooperation, regardless of national affilia- 
tions, is necessary if Hawaii's workers are to make progress. We agree with 
yoti. Wherever you may seek employment we are sure that you will continue 
your unselfish work for the working people of Hawaii. 

With best wishes, we are, 

Fraternally and regretfully. 

Executive Board, Gasolinf and Oil Drivers, Warehousemen and 
Helpers Union, Local 904 : Eugene Aiwohi, Recording Secretary ; 
Richard W. T. Lee. Financial Secretary; Albert Wong, Trustee; 
Harry Kuhia. Jr., I'resident : Ernest Pung, Vice President; 
Kiyoto Mori, Trustee. 

I offer the copy in evidence and ask it be marked "Yamashita Ex- 
hibit No. 2." ^^ 



" Retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1533 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it is received. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, after Mr. Koichi Imori was put out of local 
904 because of his Communist membership and activity and as a 
result of the action of the American Federation of Labor, what did 
he do? 

Mr. Yamasiiita. Well, as far as I know, he went back to the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. Went back to the ILWU? 

Mr. Yamashita. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. In what capacity? 

Mr. Yamashita. That I would not know. 

Mr. Tavtenner. You don't know ? 

Mr. Yamashita. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is he still a member of the ILWU ? 

Mr. Yamashita. I guess so. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know ? 

Mr. Yamashita. I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. There are no further questions. 

Mr. Yamashita. Mr. Chairman, may I be excused? 

Mr. Walter. Thank you, Mr. Yamashita. 

The subcommittee will be in recess. 

(A short recess was taken at 3 : 55 p. m.) 

Mr. Walter. Proceed. 

Mr. Tavenner. ^Mr. Chairman, I desire to recall Harry Kuhia, Jr. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed, Mr. Tavenner. 

TESTIMONY OF HARRY KUHIA, JR.— Resumed 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Kuhia, I hand you a copy of the letter purport- 
ing to be the letter of resignation of Koichi Imori, at the bottom of 
which is a copy of a letter signed by you as president, and other per- 
sons, in reply to that letter of resignation, both of which are marked 
"Yamashita Exhibit No. 2." Will you look at the second page of that 
exhibit and look at the writing above your signature? Did you sign 
the original of that letter? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee the circumstances under 
which that letter was composed and signed ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Well, we held a meeting of the executive board and he 
brought that, already written, to us. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who brought it already written ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was Koichi Imori's letter ? 

Mr. Kuhia. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Which he composed ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. And brought to you and the other members of your 
local for your signatures ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Yes. All we did was sign the letter. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why did you sign it ? 

Mr. Kuhia. Well, at the time 

Mr. Tavenner (continuing). In its present form, I say, why did 
you sign it in its present form ? 



1534 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. KuHiA. Because of the membership in local 904, we thought it 
was much better to stay away from trouble aiid don't get in any more 
trouble with Arthur Rutledge and the Joint Council of Teamsters. 
At that time I knew then I was a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. So you and the members of your committee signed 
the letter that Imori presented to you ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Correct. 

Mr. Taai:nner. Acknowledging his resignation? 

Mr. KuHiA. That is correct. 

Mr. Ta^t:nner. Have you told us whether you know James Free- 
man ? I don't know whether I asked you that question or not. 

Mr. KuHiA. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know him ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend a meeting at James Freeman's 
house ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was there any matter discussed at that meeting 
regarding the A. F. of L, and the Communist Party ? 

Mr. KuHiA. Well, we were brought there to his house. It was my 
understanding that all the fellows there were members of the A, F. 
of L. unions. 

Mr, Tavenner. What occurred there? 

Mr. KuHiA. Well, we discussed the matter of putting up a cell of 
our own as an A. F. of L. cell. At that time I refused because none of 
us knew anything about communism or what it stands for. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, then, you discussed the problem or 
the possibility of forming a Communist cell within the American 
Federation of Labor ? 

Mr. KuHTA. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were present at that meeting, do you recall? 

Mr. KuHiA. Masao Mori, myself, Koichi Imori, Paul Kanemura, 
and two other fellows from the carpenters' union of the A. F. of L. 
I don't recall their names. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was it successful ? 

Mr. KuHiA. No, sir, because I was opposed to it. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all. 

Mr. Walter. Is Koichi Imori an educated man ? 

Mr. KuHiA. I really don't know, sir. 

Mr. Walter. That'is all. 

Mr. Tavenner. One other question. Do you know what employ- 
ment Koichi Imori took after his services with your union were dis- 
pensed with, after he was compelled to resign ? 

Mr. KuHL\. Yes. He went with the ILWU Pineapple Workers' 
Union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know in what capacity, that is, what posi- 
tion or what work he did with that union ? 

Mr. KuHiA. No, I don't. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all. 

Mr. Walter. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Iznka, please. 



CoJmUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1535 

TESTIMONY OF ICHIRO IZUKA— Resumed 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Izuka, I think you have ah-eady, in your testi- 
mony, identified Koichi Iniori as a member of the Communist Party 
while you Avere a member ; is that correct? 

Mr. Izuka. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavennek. Do you know what position Koichi Imori tooli after 
he left or resigned or was compelled to resign from the American 
Federation of Labor position which he held ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes, Because after Kqichi Imori resigned I was offered 
his job as the business agent, and I definitely know that Koichi Imori 
tooK a job as an ILWU organizer and something like a trouble- 
shooter, going from island to island. And when I wrote my pam- 
phlet and things were getting hot for Mr. Imori, I found out that he 
was dispatched to Maui as an ILWU organizer. In 1949, before the 
longshore strike, I was on Kauai, and before the strike action was 
called Imori was dispatched to Kauai, and he was the organizer who 
actually agitated all the rank-and-filers to participate in that strike. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will stand adjourned until tomor- 
row morning at 9 o'clock. 

(Whereupon, at 4 : 07 p. m., Wednesday, April 12, 1950, an adjourn- 
ment was taken until 9 a. m., Thursday, April 13, 1950.) 

X 



3 9999 05018 387 8