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Full text of "Hearings regarding communist activities in the Territory of Hawaii. Hearings"

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HEARINGS REGARDING COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN 
THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII— PART 2 



HEARINGS 

COmilTTEE m UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-FIRST CONGEESS 

SECOND SESSION 



APRIL 13, 14, AND 15, 1950 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
eofiHh WASHINGTON : 1950 




WINTENOEI^FMCUMH^ 

^UG 251950 (//77^ 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Repkesentatives 

JOHN S. WOOD, Georgia, Chairman 

FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania RICHARD M. NIXON, California 

BURR P. HARRISON, Virginia FRANCIS CASE. South Dakota 

JOHN McSWBENEY, Ohio HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois 

MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel 
Louis J. Russell, Senior Investigator 
John W. Carrington, Clerk of Committee 
Benjamin Mandel. Director of Research 

n 



CONTENTS 



April 13, 1950: 

Testimony of — Page 

Jack Hall 1537 

Masao Mori 1539 

Wilfred Oka 1549 

Charles Fuj imoto 1558 

Frank Silva 1573 

William A. Wheeler (resumed) 1575 

Ichiro Izuka (resumed) 1576 

Llovd M. Stebbings 1577 

Frank Chow 1582 

Louise Johanson Hollingsworth 1584 

April 14, 1950: 

Testimony of — 

Adam A. Smyser 1587 

Richard Brome 1589 

David Pahinui- 1589 

Dwight James Freeman 1603 

William A. Wheeler (resumed) 1620 

Harold J. E. Gesell (read into record) 1626 

William A. Wheeler (resumed) 1629 

Pearl Freeman 1638 

William A. Wheeler (resumed) 1644 

Ernest Arena 1645 

Edward Hong 1647 

Yoshito Marumo 1649 

Jeanette Nakama Rohrbough 1650 

April 15, 1950: 

Testimony of — 

Esther M. Bristow 1653 

Courtney E. Owens 1656 

Stephen Murin 1666 

Marshall L. McEuen 1671 

Rachel Saiki 1676 

Courtney E. Owens (resumed) — 1677 

m 



HEAEINGS EECtAEDING COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES 
IN THE TERRITOEYOF HAWAII 



THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 1950 

United States House of Representatives, 
Subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities, 



HONOLULU, T. H. 



PUBLIC session 



The subcommittee of five met, pursuant to call, at 9 a. m., in the 
senate chamber, lolani Palace, Hon. Francis E. Walter (subcommittee 
chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Francis E. Walter, 
Burr P. Plarrison, John McSweeney, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold 
H.Velde. 

Staff members present : Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel ; William A. 
Wlieeler and Courtney E. Owens, investigators; and John W. Car- 
rington, clerk. 

Mr. Walter. Tha subcommittee will be in order. 

Call your first witness, IMr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Jack Hall. 

Mr. Walter. Raise your right hand, Mr. Hall. Do you swear that 
the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God. 

Mr. Hall. I do. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down. 

TESTIMONY OF JACK HALL, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. You are JSIr. Jack Hall ? 

Mr. Hall. That is correct. 

INIr. Tavenner. Are you represented here by counsel ? 

Mr. Hall. I am. 

Mr. Taatenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record? 

Mr. Stmonds. Myer C. Symonds. And, at this time, on behalf of 
]\[r. Hall, I wish to file with the committee a motion to quash the 
sabpena, on the grounds as set forth therein. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received in the record.^ 

Mr. Harrison. Is it upon the same grounds that were assigned 
yesterday ? 

Mr. Symonds. Yes. 



^ See p. 1472. Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Jack Hall is identical with 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. 

1537 



1538 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. Mr. Hall, when and where were you born ? 

Mr. Hall. I was born in Ashland, "Wis,, February 28, 1914. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you lived in Honolulu ? 

Mr. Hall. I established residence in Hawaii in, I believe, August or 
September 1935. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you presently employed ? 

Mr. Hall. I am now regional director for the International Long- 
shoremen's and Warehousemen's Union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Hall, are you now or have you ever been a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Sy]vionds. I advise my client not to answer the question upon 
the grounds that it might tend to incriminate him. 

(Conference between Mr. Tavenner and Mr. Symonds.) 

Mr. Symonds. Thank you, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let me repeat the question. 

Mr. Hall. All right. Go ahead. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Hall. On the advice of counsel, I refuse to answer the question 
on the ground it might tend to incriminate me. I want to add, how- 
ever, that I have filed with the National Labor Relations Board the 
customary non-Communist affidavit. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Mr. Chairman, the witness declines to answer the 
question I just asked. I see no point in my asking him any further 
questions relating to his allegecl activity in the Communist Party. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Hall, would you like an opportunity to answer 
some of the charges that have been made against you ? 

(Mr. Hall confers with his counsel.) 

Mr. Hall. I have no prepared statement on this matter. 

Mr. Walter. I did not ask you about a prepared statement. I 
asked you whether you would like to have an opportunity to make any 
comment upon the statements testified to during the hearings. 

Mr. Hall. So far as I know, I have not been charged with any 
crime. 

Mr. Walter. That is all. Thank you. 

The subcommittee will take a short recess. 

(A short recess was taken at 9 : 15 a. m.) 

Mr. Walter. Call your next witness, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. Masao Mori. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Counsel, the subcommittee unanimously voted to 
cite Mr. Hall for contempt of Congress. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then I shall prepare the proper resolution for you 
at a convenient time. 

Mr. Walter. Well, we have already adopted the resolution in the 
usual form. 

Mr. Tavenner. I see. 

Mr. Walter. AVill you raise your right hand, please? Do you 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1539 

TESTIMONY OF MASAO MORI 

Mv. Taa-enner. You are Masao Mori? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live, Mr. Mori ? 

Mr. Mori. I live at 2664 Rooke Avenue. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Were you served with a subpena ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Requiring your attendance before this committee? 

Mr. ]\Iori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How old are you ? 

]Mr. Mori. I am 44 years old. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Where are you now employed ? 

ISIr. Mori. I am employed as supervising electrician at Hawaii 
Brewing Corp. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been employed there? 

Mr. JMoRi. About 10 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before you were so employed, what position did you 
have or what work did you do ? 

Mr. Mori. I was supervising electrician at Pacific Chemical, and 
before that I was electrician's helper. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. ]\IoRi. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever attended any Communist Party 
meetings ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Who asked you to attend ? 

Mr. Mori. Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. Koichi Imori? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Will you tell us when that was? 

JNIr. Mori. I think it was in the latter part of 1946. 

Mr. Ta-\t:nner. What did Mr. Imori say to you ? 

Mr. Mori. He said, in order to be a good union leader, you could be 
educated by coming to our meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend the meetings? 

Mr. JMoRi. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavi:nner. Where were the meetings held ? 

]\Ir. Mori. The first meeting that I attended was at Mr. Izuka's 
home in Puunui. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Izuka ? 

Mr. ]\IoRi. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many people were at the meeting? 

Mr. Mori. Four or five. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Was it an organized meeting, that is, a meeting 
that had a chairman or a president ? 

Mr. Mori. I am not sure of that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who conducted the meeting ? 

Mr. Mori. Mr. Vossbrink. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Vossbrink? 

Mr. Mori. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall his first name? 



1540 COMMUN"IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAU 

Mr. Mori. I think it was Ralph Vossbrink. 

Mr. Tavenner. Ealph Vossbrink? 

Mr. Mori. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What other meetings did you attend? 

Mr. Mori. I attended Makiki meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Makiki meetings ? 

Mr. Mori. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What do you mean by the "Makiki meetings"? 

Mr. Mori. Well, there is a certain group that have a discussion of 
trade-union principles at that meeting. 

Mr. Moulder. Will you ask the witness to speak a little louder ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you speak a little louder, please ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

]SIr. Tavenner. Who told you where the meeting would be held ? 

Mr. Mori. Usually Koichilmori told me about it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did Koichi Imori go with you to the meetings ? 

Mr. Mori, Yes. Some of the meetings. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who were the officers at the Makiki group ? 

Mr. Mori. As far as I know, it was Charley Fujimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did Charley Fujimoto have ? 

Mr. Mori. I take it for granted he was the chairman because he did 
most of the talking. 

j\Ir. Tavenner. Do you recall the names of any of the other officers 
of that group ? 

Mr. Mori. I don't know who the officers were. 
. Mr. Tavenner. Before you started going to the Makiki group, did 
you go to another group meeting? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. ^Miat was that group meeting known as ? 

Mr. Mori. I think it was the Puunui group. 

INIr. Tavenner. Puunui group ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You started out going to the Puunui group ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you go there ? 

Mr. Mori. Once. 

Mr. Tavenner. Once. Did you know many of the people attending 
that group meeting ? 

Mr. Mori. Not one of them. 

]Mr. TxV%'ENNER. How did it happen that you stopped going to the 
Puunui group meetings ? 

Mr. Mori. Koichi Imori told me that I will know more people when 
I go to this other meeting at INIakiki. 

Mr. Ta\t;nner. At Makiki. Well, then, how did you get instruc- 
tions as to where to go for the next meeting after you were told you 
would be placed in a group where you knew more people? 

Mr. ]\IoRi. Koichi Imori told me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, in this second group, which you call the 
Makiki group, will you give us the names of all those who attended? 
Just a moment. Before answering that question, let me ask you : How 
many meetings do you think you attended of the Makiki group ? 

Mr. Mori. Maybe about five. 

Mr. Tavenner. About five ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1541 

l\rr. ]\roRi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Over how long a period of time ? 

INIr. Mori. About 5 or 6 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, during that period of time, I would like for 
you to tell me who attended the meetings. 

Mr. ISIoRi. There were Charles Fujiihoto and Mrs. Fujimoto. 

INIr. Tavenner. Will you give us that name over, please? 

Mr. Mori. Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. Ta^-enner. Yes. 

Mr. INIoRi. And Mrs. Fujimoto, Jeanette Nakama, Ralph Tokunaga, 
Harry Kuhia, Jr., Ernest Arena, Wilfred Oka, Koichi Imori, Paul 
Kanemura and Mrs. Kanemura, James Freeman, and there was an 
elderly woman there, I couldn't very w^ell recollect her name right 
now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who presided over the meetings as a general rule? 

Mr. Mori. To all the meetings that I attended, Charles Fujimoto 
presided. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether they had a secretary and 
treasurer of that group ? 

Mr. Mori. I don't recall who was secretary or treasurer or who the 
officers were. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let's see if you can recall the names of any other 
persons who were there, particularly who took some part in the 
meetings. 

Mr. Mori. At one of the meetings Wilfred Oka was, they told me, 
was the discussion chairman. 

INIr. Taa^nner. The discussion chairman ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall what Mr. Oka discussed ? 

Mr. Mori. I dont' recall most anything about that because, the 
reason is I haven't been attending those meetings regularly, and at any 
time that I attended there were different topics put up, and I don't 
know anything about it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you given any books or pamphlets ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir ; the book was delivered to me, and that's when 
I found out it was the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. So you found out that these meetings were Com- 
munist Party meetings ? 

Mr. Mori. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall now the name of the book? 

Mr. Mori. It says "Communist Party." 

Mr. Tavenner. Oh, you mean — well, tell me a little more about the 
book that you spoke of. 

Mr. Mori. Oh, it was more of a pamphlet, and I don't know exactly 
what was the title of those books because I gave it all to — what few I 
had, I turned it over to the FBI. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, were there other books or pamphlets given 
you? 

Mr. Mori. We had to buy it. 

Mr. Tavenner. You had to buy it? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner, From whom did j ou buy ? 



1542 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. Mori. If I am not mistaken and if I am correct, that is, I think, 
it was Jeanette Nakama. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall the names of any of those books or 
what they were about ? 

Mr. Mori. I recall very well one phamphlet that was kicking around 
on my desk. It was something concerning China. It was a small 
pamphlet, and that little pamphlet is in the hands of the FBI, too. I 
can't recollect the rest of the pamphlets. 

Mr. T.w'ENNER. Were you given any instructions about these pam- 
phlets and literature as to what you should do with it ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes. 

Mr. Ta^^enner. Ttell us about that. 

Mr. Mori. We supposed to read that and have a little discussion 
about it, but I didn't have a chance to read it because I didn't attend 
enough meetings to know much about it, and another thing is this, 
that we were told not to throw those books all over the place. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. What do you mean "told not to throw the books all 
over the place"? 

Mr. Mori. Well, keep it where everybodj^ couldn't see it. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. To keep them concealed or hidden ? 

Mr. Mori. Well, hidden, or anyway to take it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell me whether or not it was in one of these 
discussion groups that Mr. Wilfred Oka took charge of the meetings ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did that meeting last, or, rather, let me 
ask you this : How long a period of time did Mr. Oka use, as far as you 
can remember, in talking to the group on the subject that was assigned 
to him? 

Mr. Mori. Well, maybe an hour or so. 

Mr. Tam^nner. Do you remember whether that subject involved 
some book or pamphlet ? 

Mr. Mori. I think it was a book. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Was it one of the books which had been sold to you ? 

Mr. Mori. I didn't get any book. 

Mr. Tavenner. You didn't get any book. Well, was it about one of 
the pamphlets that you purchased ? In other words, I want to know 
whether Mr. Oka was talking about matter contained in one of these 
pamphlets like you got. 

Mr. Mori. No; I am pretty sure it was in the — from one of those 
books. 

Mr. Tavenner. One of the books ? 

Mr. Mori. That's right, because when I attended these meetings, 
there wasn't enough books to go around, and we had to buy those 
books, and then I didn't get any. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall at this time anything about the 
book which Mr. Wilfred Oka was making the subject of his hour 
talk? 

Mr. Mori. Not on Mr. Oka's discussions, no. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many of these meetings did Mr. Wilfred Oka 
attend when you were present? 

Mr. Mori. Just once. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall the names of any other people 
that you have not already mentioned who attended these meetings? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1543 

Mr. Mori. Oh, in the first group in Puiinui there was Eachel Saiki 
and a Chinese boy. His name is Willis Leong or something. 

Mr. Tavenner.' Willis ? His first name was Willis ? 

Mr. Mori. Willis. Had a hair lip, that's why I recognized him. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now you started to give us his last name. 

Mr. Mori. Willis Leong, I am pretty sure. 

Mr. Tavenner. Could it have been Wong [spelling] W-o-n-g? 

Mr. Mori. Leong, I am pretty sure. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall the names of any other persons? 
Just take your time and try to remember. 

j\Ir. Mori. I can't recall it just now. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Do you know a man by the name of Abe? 

Mr. Mori. Oh, yes. He was a short fellow. I don't know his first 
name. Maybe it was Kaoru or something like that. He and his 
Mrs., a white woman, Mrs., I believe. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did they attend these meetings? Is that what you 
mean to say ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes. 

Mr. Taat.nner. Where were these meetings held ? 

Mr. Mori. In Makiki. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know in whose home ? 

Mr. Mori. They told me it was Jeanette Nakama's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Jeanette Nakama at the meetings ? 

:Mr. Mori. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And the person by the name of Wilfred Oka, who 
attended this one meeting which you spoke of, and conducted the 
meeting, that is, the discussion group, do you know what his present 
position is? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\t3nner.' What is it ? 

Mr. Mori. He is the secretary of the county committee of the 
Democratic Party 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. Did he hold that position at that time? 

Mr. Mori. I am not sure of that. 

Mr. Ta^t:nner. Can you tell us, or will you tell us, as nearly as you 
can, when that meeting was held, which was attended by Wilfred 
Oka? 

Mr. Mori. You mean the date or 

Mr. Ta'st.nner. The month or the week, if you can, and the year. 

Mr. Mori. Maybe it was in the latter part of 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. The latter part of 1946. Can you fix it more 
definitely than that ? 

Mr. Mori. Well, I can't very well, because, you see, I have attended 
just five or six meetings at the most, and it was in a period of 6 or 
7 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know a person by the name of Mrs. Ken- 
singer ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes ; that is the name that I couldn't recollect, and she is 
an elderly woman that I met — I seen h«r once. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere did you see her? 

Mr. Mori. At the Makiki meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner- At one of these meetingfs ? 



Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 



1544 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall her first name? Do you know her 
first name. 

Mr. Mori. I don't know. I can't recollect right now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Mr. Harry Kuhia, Jr- 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he attend any of these meetings ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. This was the same group that Mr. Kuhia belonged 
to? 

Mr- Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you ever given a Communist Party card? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about that. 

Mr. Mori. After attending the meetings, 5 or 6 meetings all told, I 
was delivered a Communist card, and it was delivered by Koichi Imori. 
I looked at the card, I looked at him, I stuck it in the drawer, and when 
he left I burned the card up. 

Mr. Taveni>,er. Did you say that after he left you burned the card? 

Mr- Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now what did Koichi Imori tell you when he gave 
you the card ? 

Mr. Mori. He didn't say anything. 

Mr. Taa^nner. While you were attending these meetings, were you 
asked to subscribe to any publication or newspaper. 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about that. 

Mr- Mori. Well, Koichi Imori told us — told me to subscribe for one 
of these papers from the mainland. I think it was the People's — 
People's World or something like that. 

Mr. Ta\'t:nner. The Peoples Daily World. 

Mr. Mori. Yes; something like that. I guess it was that, and it 
cost $17.50 a year. And I paid half of it. But I didn't have a chance 
to read it, because my wife used to throw it in the crap can. 

Mr. Tavenner. Your wife would destroy the papers ? 

Mr- Mori. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before you had a chance to read it ? 

Mr. Mori. When I say "Crap can," it is the garbage can. Don't take 
it the other way. 

Mr. Tavenner. Speak a little louder, please. The members of the 
committee cannot quite hear you. Was this a daily paper? 

Mr. Mori. I guess it was a daily paper. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you know at the time that it was an official 
paper of the Communist Party, published in California? 

Mr. Mori. Nobody told me about it. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you were told to subscribe to it 

Mr. Mori. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner (continuing) : By Koichi Imori? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you take the paper ? 

Mr. Mori. Well, the paper used to come down to the house, and I 
didn't have a chance to read it, as I stated before a little while ago. 
And we got a bill to pay the second installment, but we never did pay 
it, and my wife got mad about it and wrote a letter that they have 
nothing to do with them. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1545 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, was your wife mad about it because she 
thought you were spending money that you shouldn't spend or what 
was her reason ? 

Mr. MoHi. Her reason all the time, I could say riglit now that I felt 
the same Avay, she felt that everything, every meeting that I attended, 
was so secretive and I had — I was not supposed to tell her where I 
was going. All I had to say was to attend a meeting, but at the time 
and today on 24-hour call from the shop, and I had to leave a message 
Avherever I am, 1 go, so I am on the other end of the string all the 
time, so they know where I am at, and she told me right from the 
start that she didn't like the meetings that I am attending on and off 
that are so secretive. 

JMr. Tavenner. Why did you burn the Communist Party card that 
had been given you by Koichi Imori ? 

Mr. Mori. Because he didn't tell me the true facts. He didn't tell 
me until I have — after I have attended 5 or 6 meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. He didn't tell you what ? 

Mr. Mori. That it was a Communist meeting. And I would further 
state even today that he never did admit to me that he is a Commu- 
nist, and I used to call him a Communist all the time he was trying 
to — while he was coming down to talk to me I used to call him a Com- 
munist, not knowing he was a Communist, after all this evidence. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you pay anything for the Communist Party 
card ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. How much ? 

Mr. Mori. $2. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you make monthly payments while you were 
attending these meetings ? 

Mr. Mori. They got it when they catch me. 

Mr. Tavenner. They got it when they caught you ? 

Mr. Mori. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. How often did they catch you ? 

Mr. Mori. Well, when I attended the meetings. They got me when 
I attended those meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who caught you ? 

Mr. Mori. Well, they told me to pay, so I paid. 

Mr. Ta\7enner. Whom did you pay it to ? 

Mr. Mori. I think it was Jeannette Nakama or Mrs. Fujimoto; I 
don't know who. One of the two, I guess. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are not real certain which of the two — — 

Mr. Mori. No. 

Mr. Ta^tunner (continuing). You paid it to? 

Mr. Mori. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you know you paid monthly dues ? 

Mr. Mori. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. And how much were those monthly dues ? 

Mr. Mori. $2. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did they tell you how the dues were assessed, as 
to why you i^aid $2 ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Whether that was the same amount that others 
had to pay? 



1546 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. Mori. No ; they told me that there is a different arrangement on 
dues. There is a certain graduation and over so much a month you 
pay a maximum of $2. 

Mr. Tavenner. And what about under so much? 

Mr. Mori. I understand they paid as low as 5 or 10 cents, I guess. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you were in the higher bracket, weren't you? 

Mr. Mori. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. $2. You mentioned the name of James Freeman 
in the early part of your testimony. 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend any meeting at which he was 
present ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. In one meeting Koichi Imori told me that — just 
before the meeting, anyway — that he is going to organize an A. F. 
of L. group at Mr. Freeman's home. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Koichi Imori told you that they were going to 
organize what? 

Mr. Mori. An A. F. of L. group. 

Mr. Tavenner. An A. F. of L. group where ? 

Mr. Mori. At — well, I guess at Mr. Freeman's home, because we 
went there once. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, an A. F. of L. group of what party ? Wliat 
did he mean by forming an A. F. of L. group ? The A. F. of L. local 
was already in existence, wasn't it? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir ; but the way he told me was that this would be an 
educational group, to educate those boys. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, Mr. Koichi Imori and Mr. Freeman 
were going to educate the A. F. of L. ? 

Mr. Mori. That's right ; a certain group. 

Mr. Tavenner. And then they held a meeting, you say, at Mr. 
Freeman's ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How did they decide they were going to educate the 
A. F. ofL.? 

Mr. Mori. Well, I didn't get much of it, because I was sitting on 
the side. I didn't get anything out of it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now who else was present at that meeting? 

Mr. Mori. Harry Kuhia, Jr., at that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Harry Kuhia, Jr. 

Mr. ISIoRi. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Can you recall the names of any others? 

Mr. Mori. Mr. Freeman was there, and Koichi Imori was there, and 
Mrs. Freeman and I can't recall anybody else right now, but at that 
time one — a fellow dropped in. I don't know who he was. I don't 
know even today. I don't know who he is. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say you do not know who he is ? 

(Nodding negatively.) 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Was Mr. Koichi Imori at that time an 
office holder in a local union of the A. F. of L., or otherwise employed 
by a local union of the A. F. of L. ? 

Mr. Mori. If I am not mistaken — I might be wrong on this — ^but 
he might have been a member organizer for the machinists' union or 
he might have been on the latter part, might have been business agent 
for 904 teamsters. 



COMMUNIS! ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1547 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, as far as you know, were Mr. Koichi Imori 
and Mr. Freeman successful in their attempt to educate the A. F. of 
Li. 

Mr. ]\[oui. I doubt 



Mr. Tavenner. According to the plans that they were trying to 
make? 

Mr. ]\IoRi. I doubt it, because I never heard anything about it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, when I was asking you about the names of 
persons who attended the Makiki group 

Mr. ]\[oRi. Yes. 

Mr, Tavenner. Which you attended, you mentioned th^ name of 
a man whose first name was Willis, but you appeared to be uncertain 
as to his last name. 

IMr. ISfoRi. Oh, that was on the Puunui group. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Puunui group? 

Mr. Mori. The first meeting that I attended. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you recall that his first name was Willis? 

Mr. ]\IoRi. I won't say I am positive on that, but it is Willis Leong 
or W^ong. 

Mr. Tavenner. Willis Leong or Wong? 

Mr. Mori. Leong or Wong. Willis. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Well, now, tell us more about that individual. Do 
you know how he was employed at that time? 

Mr. Mori. No, sir. The only thing I know is by his physical defect 
on his lip. 

Mr. Tavenner. The physical defect on his lip ? 

Mr. Mori. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What do you mean by a i:»hysical defect? 

Mr. Mori. He had a harelip or what you call. it. 

Mr. Tavenner. A harelip? 

Mr. Mori. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever seen him since ? 

Mr. Mori. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now did you continue to attend meetings after you 
were given a Communist Party card and after you burned up the 
card ? 

Mr. Mori. No, sir ; not at all. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. You did not go to any more meetings ? 

(Nods negatively.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you stay in the Communist Party or did 
you get out, or what did you do? 

Mr. Mori. I told Harry Kuhia one time when he dropped in that 
I burned the card up, to tell the boys that I am not going to attend 
any more meetings. 

Mr, Ta\'enner. You told Mr. Kuhia that you were not going to 
attend any more meetings and for him to tell the rest of them ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Tavenner, All right. Then what did he say to you ? 

Mr, Mori. He didn't say anything, 

Mr. Tavenner. And what did you do? 

Mr, Mori, I just didn't do anything until the attorney general of 
the Territory called our sales manager about concerning myself, 
that he wanted to see me, so I came down and saw the attorney general 



1548 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

at that time, and then when I went back I called up the FBI and made 
an appointment with Mr. Doyle at that time that I wanted to talk 
to him, and since then I have contacted the FBI quite a number of 
times, and I feel now that my conscience has been clear at all times. 
I feel that I have tried to help the FBI as much as I could. I give 
them all the pamphlets what I got, what I could pick up around 
the shop. 

Mr. Tavenner. In order that your conscience might be clear, you 
have made a clean breast of all your connections with the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you did that when? When was it that you 
did that? 

Mr. Mori. Well, sometime in 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Back in 1947 ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you give the Communist Part}' any writ- 
ing to show that you were getting out of the party ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVell, tell us about that. 

]Mr. JSIoRi. Well, in order to run for oJSice in the Territory, in the 
AFL union, you have to sign an affidavit that you am not, and has 
not been a member of the Communist Party, and I talked to Mr. 
Arthur Rutledge concerning my case, and I talked to him before on 
a lot of times, and he told me if I had attended meetings "you are 
a Communist," and I said, "I am not," and how to come out of there, 
and he said he will help me out, and draft a letter to Koichi Imori 
about my resignation. 

Mr. Tavenner. And did you do that ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes ; with the help of Mr. Berman ; Ed. Berman. With 
the return receipt requested. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have a copy of the letter which you sent in? 

Mr. Mori. No, sir. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. To Koichi Imori? 

Mr. Mori. No, sir ; I looked all over the place, and the stenographer 
that took the letter is not here any more, and I looked over the files, 
and, three or four times, with this office clerk, and I could not find any 
copy of it. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you have been unable to find a copy of your 
letter? 

IVIr. Mori. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. But I understand you to say that you sent out the 
letter with the return receipt requested. 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, you sent it by registered mail ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Well, did you get a return receipt ? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have it? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you let me see it ? 

(Mr. Mori hands paper to Mr. Tavenner.) 

Mr. Tavenner, Now this is the return receipt of the Post Office 
Department, dated — bearing date November 28, 1947, Honolulu, Ha- 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1549 

waii, Avhich bears the following information: Return to M. Mori, 
266:1: Rooke Avenue ; Registered Article No. 10274. On the reverse 
side there is what is called a Return Receipt, which reads as follows : 

Received from the Postmaster the Registered or Insured Article, the original 
number of which appears on the face of this card, in tlie name of the addressee, 
Koichi Imori. Signature of authorized agent, M. Sera. Date of delivery, No- 
vember 20, 1947. 

Mr. Tavennek. Who is M. Sera ? 

Mr. Mori. I don't know. I have never seen her. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know who she is ? 

Mr. Mori. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And she signed this as agent for — as the card says. 

I desire to offer this card in evidence, and mark it "Exhibit Mori 
No. 1." 

INIr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received.^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, we have a photostatic copy of this 
card, which I would like to substitute for the original, and return the 
original to the owner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. McSweeney. 

Mr. McSweeney. When did you definitely recognize and know, 
when you received the Communist card, and you were first notified to 
attend, that you belonged to the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Mori. When I got m}^ card, the Communist card, which says 
"Communist Party." 

JMr. McSaveeney. That was the first evidence you had? 

Mr. Mori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. McSweeney. Thanks. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Wilfred Oka. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please? 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you, God? 

Mr. Oka. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF WILFEED OKA 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mr. Wilfred Oka ? 

Mr. Oka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Are you represented here by counsel ? 

Mr. Oka. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel identify herself for the record. 

Mrs. BousLOG. I would like my name, Harriet Bouslog, to be entered 
as counsel for Wilfred Oka, and at this time I would like to file with 
the committee a motion to quash the service of subpena upon Mr. Oka, 
for the reasons stated thereon. 

Mr. Walter. These are the same grounds ? 

Mrs. BousLOG. These are, Mr. Committee Members, and I would like 
and urge the committee members to consider the grounds stated in the 
motion. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received for the purpose of the record. 



^ Retained in files of the committee. 
66636— 50— pt. 2 2 



1550 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

(The matters referred to is as follows:) 

Before the Committee on Un-American Activities of the House of Repre- 
sentatives OF the United States 

Motion to Squash Service of Subpena 

(By Wilfred Oka) 

Now comes the witness above named by his attorney and moves to quash 
the service of the subpena directing the witness to appear before the Committee 
on Un-American Activities of the House of Representatives of the United States 
on April 13, 1950, in the Senate Chamber, lolani Palace, at the hour of 9 : 30 a. m., 
upon the following grounds : 



The committee's utilization of congressional power, as an agency of govern- 
ment, to compel disclosure of private political opinion and association is for- 
bidden in that — 

a. It interferes with, obstructs, coerces, and abridges the exercise of the 
rights and duties of political expression through speech, assembly, associa- 
tion, and petition, in contravention of the first amendment to the Constitution 
of the United States. 

b. It deprives the witness of the right to privacy and silence in such 
matters in contravention of the fourth and fifth amendments to the Con- 
stitution of the United States. 

c. It interferes with, obstx'ucts, coerces, and abridges the exercise of the 
governmental powers reserved to the people of the United States in contra- 
vention of the ninth and tenth amendments to the Constitution of the United 
States. 

II 

The statute creating the House Committee on Un-American Activities on its 
face and particularly as construed and applied is unconstitutional in that — 

a. It permits investigation of, and as construed and applied has been 
used to investigate, the content of speech and ideas, an area in which no 
legislation is possible, thereby exceeding the boundaries of legislative power 
under article I of the Constitution of the United States. 

&. It permits the process of investigation to be used, and as generally con- 
strued and applied it has been used, to expose and stigmatize the content 
of any and all speech and ideas disapproved by the members of the com- 
mittee, thereby impeding and placing a burden upon free thought, speech 
and association in violation of the first, ninth, and tenth amendments to the 
Constitution of the United States. 

c. It deprives witnesses of property rights without due process of law in 
contravention of the fifth and fourteenth amendments to the Constitution of 
the United States. 

d. It seeks to compel witnesses to testify against themselves in contra- 
vention of the fifth amendment to the Constitution of the United States. 

Wherefore the witness prays that this motion to quash said subpena be 
granted. 

Dated : Honolulu, T. H., this 13th day of April 1950. 

Harriet Bouslog, Attorney for Witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you reside, Mr. Oka ? 
Mr. Oka. 1151-A Sixteenth Avenue. 
Mr. Tavenner. In Honolulu? 
Mr. Oka. Yes, sir ; In Honolulu. 
Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 
Mr. Oka. I was born in Honolulu, November 11, 1911. 
Mr. Ta'V'enner. I am certain the members of the committee are not 
able to hear you. Will you speak a little louder, please. 
Mr. Oka. ^November 11, 1911. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1551 

Mr. Tavenner. Is there something Avrong with the microphone. 
Try again. When and where were yon born? 

Mr. Oka. Honolnhi. 

Mr. Tavenxer. "\A'ill you tell the committee what your present 
occupation is? 

Mr. Oka. Liquor salesman. 

INIr. Tavenner. I cannot hear you. Will you state it again ? 

Mr. Oka. Liquor salesman. 

Mr. Tamsnner. Liquor salesman. Do you hold any official position 
of any character within the Democratic Party ? 

Mr. Oka. 1 do. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is that position? 

Mr. Oka. Secretary of the Oahu County committee, Democratic 
Party of Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you state you are secretary of the County 
Committee of Oahu County, does that include the entire island of 
Oahu, or not ? 

Mr. Oka. Yes ; it does. 

Mr. Ta-s^nner. When were you elected, or appointed to that 
position ? 

Mr. Oka. I was elected by the Oahu County committee, which is 
composed of approximately 72 persons on the island of Oahu. They 
represent people from all racial groups, all classes, all different occu- 
pations, and that happened approximately 2 weeks after the conven- 
tion of the Democratic Party, which occurred in 1948, if I remember 
right ; I think it is approximately in April or May ; I am not positive 
about the date. 

Mr. Tavenner. As secretary of the county committee, would you 
tell this committee whether Jack Kawano is president of the twenty- 
sixth precinct of the fourth district ? 

Mr. Oka. He is the president of the twenty-sixth precinct of the 
fourth district. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was he elected to that position ? 

Mr. Oka. He was elected to that position in 1948. I think it was 
in the month of April, and then, subsequently, he was elected — I 
cannot remember what happened the last time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether Ben Kaahawinui was elected 
convention delegate from the nineteenth precinct of the fifth district 
in 1948, or any other date ? 

Mr. Oka. I will not be positive about that. I cannot say positively 
that he was elected in 1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, was he a convention delegate ? 

Mr. Oka. I cannot say positively whether he was an official delegate 
or not. He may have been an observer, or a spectator. 

Mr. Ta\t2Nner. What convention are you speaking of? 

Mr. Oka. I am speaking of the 1948 Democratic Party convention 
that was held at the McKinley High School. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. You are unable to state whether the person men- 
tioned held an official position as a delegate in that convention? 

Mr. Oka. Yes. May I explain the reason why? 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Yes. 

Mr. Oka. Approximately 500 to 600 delegates, and I cannot remem- 
ber them all. 



1552 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. Tavenner. That's riglit, but I have only asked you about two 
so far. 

May I ask you "whether Denichi Kimoto was the treasurer of the 
nineteenth precinct of district 5 of the Democratic Party? 

Mr. Oka. I am not positive about that. 

Mr, Taatennek. Well, do you say that you do not know whether he 
was or not? 

Mr, Oka, Mr. Chairman, there was approximately 6 or 7 officers 
in each precinct, and there are approximately 72 precincts. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, you know Denichi Kimoto, do you not? 

Mrs. BousLOG, I advise my client not to answer the question. 

Mr. Walter, What is your answ^er? 

Mr. Oka. Mr. Chairman, on the advice of my counsel, I refuse to 
answer that question, on the ground it might incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter, Why do you think it might incriminate you to admit 
knowing the individual named? 

Mr. Oka. I have been advised of my legal rights by my attorney. 

Mr. Walter. When a question is innocent on its face, then it is 
incumbent on the witness to show wherein it might incriminate him 
to answer it. I think that is almost verbatim what the court held in 
United States v. Weissman (C. P. A. 1940). Do you still make the 
same answer? 

Mr. Oka. Yes; I do. 

Mr. Ta\^enner. In other words, Mr. Oka, you decline to testify as 
to whether you know a person who is alleged to be in a precinct, a 
precinct officer in the party of which you are the secretary ; is that the 
position you take? 

Mr, Oka, Yes ; I refuse to answer the question, 

Mr. Tavenner. Is Ruth Ozaki the secretary of the second precinct 
of the fourth district? 

Mr. Oka, In 1948 she may have been, but about 1950 I do not know. 

Mr, Ta^^enner, Do you know whether Ruth Ozaki was a convention 
delegate to the Democratic convention in 1948, from the second pre- 
cinct of the fourth district ? 

Mv. Oka, She may have been, but I am not positive, 

Mr. Tavenner, Do you know whether Doris Ozaki was likewise a 
convention delegate ? 

Mr, Oka, She could have been. 

Mr, Tavenner. Are you acquainted with Ruth Ozaki, and Doris 
Ozaki? 

Mr, Oka, I refuse to answer the question, on the advice of my coun- 
sel, because it might incriminate me, 

Mr, Tavenner, Will you state whether or not Hideo Okada was 
named president, or elected president of the ninth precinct of the 
fifth district in 1948, or any other time ? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, as county committeeman, don't you know 
whether he was or not ? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was president in 1948, but 1950 1 don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know ? 

Mr. Oka, No, 

Mr, Tavenner, But you think he was in 1948 ? In 1948 was there 
a county committeeman from the ninth precinct of the fifth district 
by the name of Tadashi Ogawa ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1553 

Mr. Oka. Yes. 

Mr. Tavennek. Do you know him? 

Mr. Oka. Yes. 

Mv. Tavenner. Was Ernest Arena the president of precinct No. 6 
of district 4, in 1948? 

Mr. Oka. Will you kindly repeat that question, please? 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Ernest Arena the president of precinct No. 6, 
in district 4 of the Democratic Party, in 1948? 

Mr. Oka. What 3'ear are you referring to? 

Mr. Tavenner. 1948. 

Mr. Oka. 1948. I think he was president up to 1948-49. 

Mr. Ta^'enner. Was he also county committeeman from that pre- 
cinct, of the same committee of which you were then and now are the 
secretary ? 

Mr. Oka. I don't remember positively. 

]Mr. Tamenner. You don't remember whether he was the committee- 
man on your committee ? 

Mr. Oka. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he a convention delegate to the 1948 conven- 
tion of the Democratic Party, from precinct 6 of district 4? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. When you say you think he was, do you mean to your 
best knowledge and belief that he was ? 

Mr. Oka. Yes. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. Was Jack Hall also a convention delegate from pre- 
cinct 6 of district 4 to the Democratic convention in 1948 ? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, according to your best knowledge and belief 
he was ? 

Mr. Oka. That's right. 

Mr. Tam^nner. Do you know Jack Hall ? 

Mr. Oka. I refuse to answer the question on the advice of my coun- 
sel, on the ground of incrimination. 

Mr. Tavenner. On what ground? 

Mr. Oka. On the ground that it might incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Why do you think it might incriminate you to answer 
a question as to whether or not you know Jack Hall? 

Mr. Oka. On the advice of my attorney. 

Mr. Walter. 'V^^iat do yoti know about Jack Hall that makes you 
feel that to admit knowing him might incriminate you ? 

Mr. Oka. On the basis that he has been listed in various reports. 

Mr. Walter. Listed as what ? 

Mr. Oka. As a radical. 

Mr. Ta\"enner. Now, do you know Ernest Arena ? 

Mr. Oka. I refuse to answer the question, on the advice of my coun- 
sel, that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Ralph Vossbrink a member, a delegate rather, 
to the Democratic convention held in 1948, from the eighth precinct 
of the fourth district ? 

Mr. Oka. That I do not know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know 

Mr. Oka. Mr. Chairman, I would like to explain that this is a Terri- 
torial matter, and I do not know all these little details that goes on 
at the convention ; that is a matter for a central committee. 



1554 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. Walter. Well, it is not just a matter of little details. It is just 
a i^lain single question of whether 3'ou know these persons were mem- 
bers of the convention. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you know Ralph Vossbrink ? 

Mr. Oka. I refuse to answer the question, on the advice of my 
attorney that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Mr. Robert Greene vice president in 1948 or 
any other time, of precinct 10, district 4, of the Democratic Party ? 

Mr. Oka. I don't remember positively. 

Mr. Tavenner. Explain your answer. 

Mr. Oka. There were so many officers, I can't remember what par- 
ticular position they held. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, was he an officer of that precinct? You know 
that, don't you ? 

Mr. Oka. I don't remember positively. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Robert Greene ? 

Mr. Oka. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer the question, on the 
basis of the advice of my counsel that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Marshal L. McEuen delegate to the forty- 
eighth convention of the Democratic Party from the tenth precinct or 
the fourth district ? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is according to your best knowledge and belief, 
he was ? 

Mr. Oka. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Marshal L. McEuen personally? 

Mr. Oka. ]Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer the question, on the 
advice of my counsel that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you, in 1948, president of the twelfth pre- 
cinct of the fourth district ? 

Mr. Oka. Yes. 

ISIr. Tavenner. Are you, or do you still hold that position ? 

Mr. Oka. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you hold that position ? 

Mr. Oka. I held it for approximately 2 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. When were you first elected to that office ? 

Mr. Oka. About approximately April of 1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you, or were you also county committeeman 
from that same precinct ? 

Mr. Oka. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you still county committeeman ? 

Mr. Oka. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. And were you also a convention delegate to the 
convention, the Democratic convention in 1948? From this same 
precinct ? 

Mr. Oka. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Edward Hong secretary of the fourteenth pre- 
cinct of the fourth district of the Democratic Party in 1948 ? 

Mr. Oka. I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he also treasurer of that precinct ? 

Mr. Oka. I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall whether he was county committee- 
man along with you in 1948 ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1555 

Mr. Oka. I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he also a delegate to the convention along 
Avith yon? 

JNIr. Oka. I am not ]:)Ositive abont that, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know him ? 

Mr. Oka. Mr. Chairman, on the advice of my counsel, I refuse to 
answer the question, because it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Levi Kealoha vice president of the sixtieth pre- 
cinct, district No. 4? 

Mr. Oka. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. During what period of time? 

Mr. Oka. I think approximately 2 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Beginning when? 

Mr. Oka. x\pproximately April 1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does he still hold that office? 

Mr. Oka. I am not positive about that, because I don't know the 
total results of the elections that were held. 

JNIr. Tavenner. When? 

Mr. Oka. It was held souietime last week. 

jNIr. Tavenner. Do vou know whether Adele Kensinger was the 
treasurer of this precinct, the sixteenth precinct of the fourth district? 

Mr. Oka. I don't remember. 

Mr. TA^T.NNER. Do 3^ou know whether Levi Kealoha was a conven- 
tion delegate to the 1948 convention of the Democratic Party? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

]Mr. Ta\tenner. And whether or not Adele Kensinger was also a 
convention delegate? 

Mr. Oka. I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1 asked j^ou awhile ago if Jack Kawano was presi- 
dent of the twenty-sixth precinct of district 4, and I would like to 
ask you whether he was delegate to the Democratic convention in 
1948*? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Tax^enner. That is, according to your best knowledge and be- 
lief, he was? 

Mr. Oka. I said "Yes." 

Mr. Taa^nner. You nod your head, that does not reflect in the rec- 
ord. So, if you will answer, please. 

Was Rachel Saiki secretary of precinct 31 of the fourth district? 

Mr. Oka. She may have been some kind of an officer, but I don't 
remember exactly what particular office. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was she also county committee woman from that 
precinct ? 

]\fr. Oka. I think she was. 

Mr. Tavenner. And also a delegate to the 1948 convention? 

Mr. Oka. I think she was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Yukio Abe secretary of the thirty-fifth pre- 
cinct of the fourth district ? 

ISfr. Oka. I don't know. I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Yukio Abe ? 

Mr. Oka. Mr. Chairman, on the advice of my counsel, I refuse to 
answer the question, on the ground that it might incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Douglas Inouye president of the fifteenth 
precinct of the fifth district ? 



1556 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mrs. BousLOG. Would you hold the question just a minute, please? 

(Counsel confers with the witness.) 

Mr. Oka. In order to help the matter here, I would be glad to go 
and get the records of the list of officers. I cannot remember every 
detail. 

Mr. Walter. So I understand. Well, testify to the best of your 
recollection. I realize, of course, that it is difficult to remember. 
But, testify to the best of your recollection, and if we decide that 
we want you to look up the records, we will advise you. 

Mr. Tavenner. My last question was this: Was Douglas Inouye 
president of the fifteenth precinct of the fifth district ? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he also county committeeman from that 
precinct ? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Tavenner. I asked you earlier in j-our testimony as to whether 
Denichi Kimoto was treasurer of the nineteenth precinct of the fifth 
district. I would like to now ask you whether he was a convention 
delegate from that precinct to the Democratic convention in 194:8? 

Mr. Oka. I am not positive, I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Yoshito Marumo vice president of the twenty- 
first precinct, fifth district of the Democratic Party ? 

Mr. Oka. I don't know, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall whether he was a convention delegate ? 

Mr. Oka. No ; I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know^ whether Fred Kamahoahoa was 
president of the twenty-second precinct of the fifth district? 

Mr. Oka. Wliat year are you referring to ? 

Mr. Tavenner. 1 camiot hear you. 

Mr. Oka. What year are you referring to ? 

Mr. Tavenner. 1948. 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is according to your best knowledge and belief ? 

Mr. OicA. Yes. 

Mr. TA\nENNER. Was he also county committeeman at the same time? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he also a delegate to the 1948 convention of 
the Democratic Party? 

Mr. Oka. I think he was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Oka, are you now, or have you ever been a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Oka. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer the question, on the 
advice of my attorney, in that it might tend to incriminate me, under 
the first amendment of the Constitution. 

Mr. Walter. The first, or the fourth ? 

Mr. Oka. I refuse to answer the first question. 

Mr. Walter. Do you think it will incriminate you to tell me which 
section of the Constitution would be violated by your answer ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Oka. Under the first amendment, and also under the fifth, free 
speech and free thought. 

Mr. Walter. We cannot hear you. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1557 

Mr. Oka. Under the fifth amendment about free speech and free 
thought, the fifth amendment of the Constitution of tlie United States. 

Mr. Tavenxer. We still cannot hear you. 

Mr. Walter. Well, I think the witness has answered the question. 

I would like to ask you some questions as to the business engaged 
in at the forty-eighth convention. 

INIr. Oka. The business of writing a plank of the Democratic Party 
of Hawaii. 

Mr. Walter. Any other business? 

]Mr. Oka. There was other business, such as the election of the cen- 
tral committeemen, the election of the national committeemen, and 
committeewomen, and other matters that would help to keep the 
Democratic Party going for the next 2 years. 

Mr. AValter. Was any position taken with respect to the candidacy 
for the President of the United States? 

Mr. Oka. I don't remember positively, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Did you elect the delegates to the Democratic National 
Convention ? 

Mr. Oka. Yes. 

]\Ir. Walter. Who were those delegates pledged to ? 

Mr. Oka. I have no idea who they were pledged to, but so far as 
I know, I think it was President Truman. 

Mr. Walter. Did not that convention go on record as endorsing the 
candidac}^ of Henry Wallace? 

My. Oka. No ; I am positive it was Harry Truman. 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

ISIr. Moulder. May I ask a question ? 

Mr. Walter. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. You were not secretary of that convention ? 

Mr. Oka. Positively not. 

Mr. Moulder. You have no records of the names of delegates or the 
officers of that convention, do you? 

Mr. Ok.v. The central committee of the Democratic Party of 
Hawaii keeps all those records. I am only secretary of this particular 
county, sir. 

]Mr. Moulder. The only record you would have would be pertaining 
to your own county ? 

Mr. Oka. That is right. 

Mr. Walter. Is tlrat the committee that expelled Mr. Kageyama? 

Mr. Oka. My committee ? 

Mr. Walter!^ The conmiittee that j'ou were secretary of? 

JNIr. Oka. No; my committee is only the count}^ committee, the 
Oahu County committee, which is only — I mean the committee of this 
particular county. 

]\Ir. Walter. Are you on the committee that expelled him ? 

Mr. Oka. No. 

]\Ir. Walter. Thank you very much. Any further questions ? 

Mr. Ta\ti:nner. No. 

Mr. Walter. The witness is excused. The subcommittee will take a 
5-minute recess. Just a minute. 

(INIr. Walter confers with Mr. Tavenner, examining counsel; at the 
conclusion of the conference, the subcommittee recessed.) 

(Upon reconvening, subsequent to the recess :) 



1558 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Walter. The hearing will adjourn now and will reconvene at 
1:30. 

(Wliereupon, the hearing was adjourned until 1 : 30 p. m., of the 
same day.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

(The hearing was resumed at 1 : 30 p. m., Representatives Francis E. 
Walter, Burr P. Harrison, John McSweeney, Morgan M. Moulder, 
and Harold H. Velde being present.) 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will come to order. 

Mr. Tavenner, call your next witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. I would like to call Mr. Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. Walter. Stand up, raise your right hand, please. Do you 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I do. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down. 

TESTIMONY OF CHAELES FUJIMOTO 

Mr. Tav'enner. You are Mr. Charles Fujimoto. 

Mr. Fujimoto. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your present address ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. 1526 Kaihee Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I was born on the island of Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented here by counsel ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. Yes ; I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel 

Mr. Fujimoto. Mrs. Bouslog is my counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please state her appearance for the 
purpose of the record. 

Mrs. BousLOG. I would like my name, Harriet Bouslog, to be entered 
of record as appearing for Charles Fujimoto. And at this time I 
would like to file with the committee a motion to quash the service of 
the subpena on Charles Fujimoto and I would like to ask that the 
groimds therein be considered by the committee. 

Mr. Walter. Let it be made a part of the record.^ 

Mrs. Bouslog. It is the same, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlien and where were you born, Mr. Fujimoto? 

Mr. Fujimoto. When I was born? dn December 25, 1917, and I 
was born at Kapaa, Kauai, in the Hawaiian Islands. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee what positions you have 
held and what work you have done ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Wliat was the question? 

Mr. Fujimoto. And on the further ground that this committee is 
attempting to compel me to disclose what may or may not be my 
private political opinions and present beliefs, and on the further 
ground that the procedures of this committee in this hearing is a viola- 



^ Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Charles Fujimoto Is identical with 
the motion filed on behalf of Wilfred Ol^a by his attorney, Harriet Rouslog. See p. 1550. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1559 



COMMUNIST ON THE AIR 

Fujimoto tells aims 
of Hawaiian party 

Special to Tbe Dally People's World 

HONOLtlLU, Oct. 24 — Charles K. Fujimoto, well-known young 

scientist, began his duties as the ne\vly-electe4 chairman of the 

Communist party of Hawaii last week with a press conference 

which attracted wide attention. 

The party, he told the nine reporters from leading Island 

dailies, wilt go on the air Friday, 
Oct. 29, on station KHON, Hono- 
lulu, in its first broadcsist. 

Fujimoto, who resigned his 
post as a soil chemist at the uni- 
versity to become the Commu- 
nists' chairman, was quizzed for 
an hour on the aims and ob- 
jectives of his party in the 
islands. 
He said: 

"Our immediate program Is 
anti-war, anti-fascist, and work- 
ing for the needs of the people. 
We are fighting for continued 
rent control, lower prices, un- 
employment compensation and 
such programs. We favor state- 
hood." 

The Communist party will not 
endorse candidates in the coming 
election, he said, but looks for- 
ward to running party members 
for office in the future. 

Fujimoto explained he had de- 
cided to work publicly for the 
party because he "felt the people 
should be warned of the critical 
situation we are In, of the dan- 
gers of a third world war and the 
dangers of growing fascism 
within the country." 

The young scientist also talked 
of his youth as the son of a 
plantation worker, his education 
smd his .gradual acceptance of 
Marxism. 

Fujimoto 
Exhibit 1 

tion of due process, and finally on the further ground that this com- 
mittee is illegally constituted. 

Mr. Walter. Is legally constituted? 

Mr. Fujimoto. Yes, sir. 

(Laughter in the audience.) 




CHARLES FFUJIMOTO 



1560 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. FujiMOTO. Illegally. 

Mr. Walter. Illegally? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. What was the question? 

]Mr. Ta\^nner. Read the question, Mr. Reporter. 

(The question was read by the reporter.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give the committee a brief review of your 
employment background or em])loyment record ? 

Mr. FujiMOTO, I refuse to answer the question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that I have 
alread}^ stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you employed in any capacity, as a professor 
or teacher, in a local institution, educational institution? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I have been employed by a local educational institu- 
tion but not in the capacity of teacher or professor. 

Mr. Tavenner. A^-liat was the nature of your employment ? 

Mr. FujiMOTO, I was research chemist. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the institution at which you were em- 
ployed ? 

]\Ir. Fuji:moto. The Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station, Uni- 
versity of Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you take up your duties there? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I believe it was in the summer of 1943. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you continue to serve that 
institution ? 

Mr. FujiMOTo. I believe I served that institution for approximately 
5 years. 

Mr. Ta"s^nner, T\Tien did you resign, or did you resign? 

Mr. FuJiMOTO. I resigned from the University of Hawaii, or the 
Agricultural Experiment Station, on October 15, 1948. I think that 
is the correct date. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Mr. Fujimoto, I have before me a photostatic 
copy of the Monday, October 25, 1948, issue of the Daily People's 
World, the heading of which is — 

Communists on the Air — Fujimoto Texls Aims of Hawacian Party 
[Special to the Daily People's World] 

Honolulu, October 24. — Charles K. Fujimoto, well-known young scientist, 
began his duties as the newly elected chairman of the Communist Party of 
Hawaii last week with a press conference which attracted wide attention. The 
party, he told the nine reporters from the leading dailies, will go on the air 
Friday, October 29, on station KHON, Honolulu, in its first broadcast. Fu.1imoto, 
who resigned his post as a soil chemist at the university to become the Com- 
munist chairman, was quizzed for an hour on the aims and objects of his party 
in the islands. He said, "Our immediate program is antiwar and anti-Fascists 
and working for the needs of the people. We are fighting for continued rent 
control, lower rates, unemployment compensation, and such problems. We favor 
statehood. The Communist Party will not endorse candidates in the coming 
election, but looks forward to running party members for office in the future." 
Fujimoto explained he had decided to worli publicly for the party because he 
felt the people should be warned of the critical situation we are in, of the dan- 
gers of the third world war, and the dangers of world fascism within the coun- 
try. The young scientist also talked of his youth, as the son of a plantation 
worker, his education, and his gradual acceptance of Marxism. 

Will you examine that article and state to the committee whether 
it constitutes a statement of fact, that is, whether the facts and matter 
stated therein are true ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1561 

Mr. FujiMOTo. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that I 
have already stated. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Fujimoto, I notice that at the start of this article 
there is a picture. That is your picture, is it not i 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer on the same grounds. 

(Laugliter.) 

Mr. Walter. This is not as funny as you think it is. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer this photostatic copy in evidence 
and mark it Fujimoto No. 1. 

Mrs. BousLOG. We object to the introduction of it. 

Mr. Walter. Let it be received." 

Mr. Tavenner. I have before me, Mr. Fujimoto, a photostatic 
copy of the Thursday, October 21, 1948, edition of the Daily People's 
World, which has a heading across the top of the page "Famed 
Scientist Takes Hawaiian Communist Post. Special to the Daily 
People's World. Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii, October 20," which 
reads as follows : 

Charles K. Fujimoto, 30, an outstanding research chemist, has announced 
publicly his acceptance of the chairmanship of the Communist Party of Hawaii. 
His action is the first open declaration of Communist Party activity in the 
history of the islands. At the same time, Fujimoto resigned his post with the 
department of agriculture, chemistry and soils, of the University of Hawaii. 
His resignation stressed the right of Communists to be employed at the uni- 
versity or in any other position and emphasized that the action was due to the 
full-time nature of his new responsibilities. In making public his acceptance of 
the new post through a letter to Dr. Donald Sherman, head of the department of 
agricultural chemistry at the university, Fujimoto declared that despite his 
continuing deep interest in science, he believes "by this action I can make my 
greatest contribution to the general welfare of the people of Hawaii." Fujimoto's 
first otBcial act in his new post was to send the following wire to William Z. 
Foster, chairman of the Communist Party of the United States : "Wish success 
in your legal fight against outrageous charges. Will do our utmost to mobilize 
broadest mass support for dismissal of charges." Fujimoto, son of a Japanese 
sugar plantation worker, was born at Kapaa, on the island of Kauai. He was 
student body president at Kauai High School, from which he graduated in 1936. 
He received a bachelor of science degree from the University of Hawaii, 1943, 
and master of science degree in 1947. From 1943 until his resignation he 
worked at the University of Hawaii Agricultural Experiment Station. He has 
had several articles published in scientific journals on various aspects of soil 
chemistry in Hawaii. His letter of resignation to Dr. Sherman said further : 
"The Communist Party of the United States is contributing immeasurably to- 
ward the welfare of the American people and the people of the world. It ia 
courageously and consistently fighting against the drive of the monopolists to- 
ward fascism and the third world war. Because of this unceasing struggle on 
behalf of the people, the Communist Party is subjected to constant attack.. Be- 
cause of these considerations," he concluded "I feel compelled to actively parti- 
cipate in the political struggle of the people to preserve the present peace won 
at so great a cost" 

I will ask you to examine that issue of the People's Daily World and 
state whether or not the statements contained therein are true. 

Mr. Fujimoto. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer the question for 
the reasons that I have already given. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the photostatic copy in evidence 
and asked that it be marked "Fujimoto Exhibit No. 2." 

Mr. Walter. Let it be received.^ 



* See p. 1559. 

' Retained in committee files. 



1562 COMMUXIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavennek. I notice, Mr. Fujimoto, that a telegram is quoted in 
this news article, in which it is alleged that you sent a telegram to 
William Z. Foster, chairman of the Communist Party of the United 
States, wishing success in his local fight against outrageous charges. 
What outrageous charges did you refer to, if any ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer for the reasons that I have already 
given. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you answer the question as to whether you 
sent such a wire or telegram to Foster ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question for the same reason 
that I have already given. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you not, in that telegram, referring to the 
charges which were finally brought to trial in the prosecution of the 
11 Communist conspirators in New York? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were the outrageous charges to which you referred, 
the charges which constituted the indictment m that case and for which 
those men were convicted ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question for the reasons al- 
ready stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you become the chairman of the Communist 
Party, as stated in the news articles which I have handed you ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. Is that a question ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question for the same rea- 
sons already given. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you willing to appear publicly and announce 
yourself as chairman or secretary, as chairman of the Communist 
Party of Hawaii, but you are unwilling to answer that question here? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question for the same reasons. 

Mr. Tavenner. As chairman of the Communist Party of Hawaii 

Mrs. BousLOG. Mr. Tavenner, perhaps to save the time of the com- 
mittee, we can stipulate that in respect to affiliations or activities, al- 
leged affiliations or activities in the Communist Party of the Terri- 
tory of Hawaii, or questions along that line, Mr. Fujimoto's position, 
I believe, will be the same as it has been as to the line of questions on 
activities and alleged activities in the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. I can, of course, accept your word that his answers 
will be the same. 

Mr. Walter. I would like, Mr. Tavenner, at this time to call the 
witness' attention to something. I don't know whether the people 
who were at this press conference, the reporters, are available, but I as- 
sume that they are, but if you had a press conference at which you 
stated the things that appear in this article, then under no theory of 
law, no matter how it is stretched by people who would destroy the 
law, are you entitled to any immunity. 

Mr. Fujimoto. Mr. Chairman, I have been advised as to my legal 
rights by my attorney. 

Mr. Walter. You have been advised as to what your attorney be- 
lieves your legal rights to be. I am afraid that you are going to find 
that we are not all in agreement as to that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you make the statements attributed to you at 
a news conference of nine or more news reporters from leading island 
dailies during the week of October 24 or the week prior thereto? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1563 

Mr. FuJiMOTO. Mr. Chairman, will you please repeat the question 



again? 



Mr. Tavenner. Will you read the question, Mr. Reporter? 

(The question was read by the reporter.) 

Mr. Tavenner. As I read to you from the Monday, 25th, issue, 1948, 
of the Daily People's World. 

Mr. FuJiMOTO. I refuse to answer the question for the reasons I have 
already given. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Daily People's World, which was printed in 
San Francisco, Calif., announced in November 1947 that the fund 
drive in Hawaii had succeeded in raising a total of $1,423.35, which was 
over the assigned quota of $1,000. Did you take part in raising those 
funds, or were you in any way responsible for the handling of the 
transaction ? 

ISIr. FuJiMOTO. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it miofht tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that I 
have already stated. 

Mr. Taatenner. How many persons belong to the Communist Party 
in the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for all the other reasons that I 
have already stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you a member of the Hawaiian Civil Liberties 
Committee? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that I have 
already stated. 

INIr. Ta^t:nner. Well, what is your belief, Mr. Fujimoto, and your 
desire with regard to the Communist Party obtaining control of 
the Government of the United States ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Is the Communist Party of the Territory of Hawaii 
affiliated with the district 13 of the Communist Party, with its head- 
quarters in California ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. And is district 13 a part of the Communist Party 
of the United States ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground 
that it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that 
I have given. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Mr. Fujimoto, I inform you, and I believe according 
to the return of Emmanuel Moses, Jr., United States deputy marshal!, 
dated the 31st day of March, 1950, a subpena duces tecum was issued 
requiring you to produce before this committee all the membership 
records, and all the records of dues payments ; and any and all official 
records, registers, or books, and all correspondence files. Have you 
responded to that subpena ? Do you have such records and books. 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other grounds that I 
have already given. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then you refuse to produce before this committee 
the membership records ? My question was : Do you refuse to produce 



1564 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

110,1 

ISSUED BY SECTION 1, COKIUMST P/iR-iT: OF IIAliTAII 

We In EB.Tijs.i.l can retard rising unemployment by supportinc the 
striking longGhoreraen in their struccl© ^ov higher wageoo 

Small nerchanto Icnow that higher varies for t/oricers brings more 
dollaro into naiehborhood storeo»«'brinGB better living into ti» 
majority of people's homes. 

Federal and Territorial prodjects should be started Immediately 
to give work to. the uner-ployede 

UI'JEMPI.OTOpT Hf.a BESN WITH US A 1,0 H& TIM?; 

Big FivVbusini aemen fired vrarkers and'out paycheolce long befcre 
the present lonsehoreaen^ a strlkeo The 25,000 woriiera now out of 
work means. the beclnning of a depression— a depression that vtIII 
tdpe out hundreds of small business and bring raisery to thousand? 
of vorkora© 

pi^Y SOC IAI.I3M CAH ELIMimTE PSPRI^S &lOK'3 
'Il^ie'^Ti'tinStV achievement of tke rl^^hts and dicnity.Of man &e 
expressed in our Declaration of Indepondonce can oBly be 
achieved in a society rlirae eoonoray is based on the oolleotlv© 
ownership of all industry by the workers t:heraeclves. The end to 
aH depresaion, exploitation, and v-rar vrill oocur when \7e end o«J? 
existenoe as vra.ge clavea I'or profiteering monopolists and to 
begin to live ac free people in a eoclallot i;atlon». 

EOR MORE INFOBMATION ABOUT SOCIALISM 

Hw Advertiser and the Star-JBulletin ar© not Eoi"S to *ell you 
aboux sooiaiisnw-thcy don" t MCint you to est the idea that yovi 
can run things. Get your facts from the. people vAio not only 
believe in, but fi^ht for sooialisri—THi: COMMUNISTS, Read for 
Xourself v.diat the Communists stand for«« 

Your address on a post card vdll bring you pamphlet© such as 
*The twilight of World Caplitalleai'' by v/illiam Zo Foster, National 
Chairman of the Communist Party of the United State©* 

For more information, write to thes 

c OM4UWI3T Party of Hawaii 

p. 0. Box 3204 
Honoltilu, Haviail 

fujimoto 
Exhibit 4 

before this committee the membership records, which were in your 
custody ? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons ah*eady 
stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that subpena served upon you ? 

Mr. FujiMOTo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer in evidence the subpena upon which 
the return is based, and to have it marked "Fujimoto Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received.^ 



' Retained In committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1565 

Mr. Tamdnner. Mr. Fujimoto, do you recognize William Z. Foster 
as the controlling head of the Communist Party of the United States? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that 1 have 
already stated. 

INIr. 'Ta\^nner. I hand you what purports to be a throw-away sheet, 
entitled at the top : "C. P. News Letter No. 1, September 15," issued by 
section 1, Communist Party of Hawaii. Will you examine it? 

(Witness looks at the document. ) 

Mr- Taa-enner. Will you identify that as a throw-away sheet issued 
by the Communist Party? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and on the other grounds that I have 
already stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. At the end of this throw-away sheet appears the 
statement : 

For more information write to the C'ommunist Party of Hawaii, p. O. Box 
3204, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Do you know in whose name that post-office box is ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that I have 
already originally said. 

Mr. Tavenner, Did you have anything to do with the procurement 
of that post-office box ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground it 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. I notice that this throw-away sheet states : "Issued 
by section 1, Communist Party of Hawaii." How many sections were 
there in the Communist Party of Hawaii? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the original reasons that 
I have already stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the letter in evidence, and marked 
it "Fujimoto Exhibit No. 4." 

Mr. Walter. Without objection it will be received.^ 

Mrs. BousLOG. May I ask the record show an objection to the intro- 
duction, for the reasons stated in the motion to quash ? 

Mr. Walter. This committee has no objections. 

Mrs. BousLOG. Lawyers will disagree with the judge. 

Mr. Walter. Mark it. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you now another Newsletter, purporting to 
be issued by section 1, headed: "The Communist Party of Hawaii, 
Box 3204, Honolulu," as No. 2, will you examine it and say whether 
you can identify it as a throw-away sheet of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the grounds that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that I have 
already stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to read this paragraph in the letter to you, 
and I desire to read to you this paragraph of the letter : 

The assertion that the Communists are the agents of a foreign power is a lie 
projected with the intent of preventing the American people of understanding 



« See p. 1564. 

666€6— 50— pt. 2- 



1566 COMMUXIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



 THE COMMUNIST PARTY OK HAWAII Box 3204 

Honolulu 




m 

Issued by Section One ^— — — — — — ^— (No. 2) 

THE LEGISLATURE OF HAV/AII. trading on the recent "DEAR JOE" hysteria 
whipped up by the local employers to break the longshore strike, have 
created an un-American activities commission for which it has appro- 
priated $7 5, 000.. -.This has been done at a time when the unemployed, the 
slum dwellers, and the underprivileged children of the territory are 
in desperate need of economic aid. But they are virtually ignored 1 

THE CO!,!MUNIST PARTY of the United States holds the belief that un- 
American activities committees and similar bodies are formed for the 
ultimate purpose of curtailing the rights of ALL Americans, We bclieye 
this is true for the following reasons: 

IN ©very country ■viiero the government sets about dividing and 
enslaving the citizens of that nation, the first n»VB is to 
persecute as "disloyal" all those ^o speak for a fuller and 
richer life for the great majority of the people. 

group 

num- 
■Filipino", 



THE ASSERTION THAT COIMUNISTS are the agents of a foreign power is 
a lie projected with the Intent of preventing the American people 
from understanding the true purposes of the Communist Party. For, 
on the contrary, American Communists have established a long and 
honorable record of independent progressive action in the affairs 
of • this country. We have consistently fought for a better life for 
those who do the work of our nation. 

SHORTER WORKING HOURS, higher pay, social security, improved housing, 
greater democracy within trade unions, the fight against racial dis- 
crimination - these arc but a few of the things for which Communists 
have fought with the rest of the American working class to achieve. 
For the Communist Party fights by every legal means to bring about 
genuine equality - economic , social , political - for all Americans, 

UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES COMMITTEES are aimed only firstly at Communists. 
Their long range purposes Include the destruction of militant trade 
unions and all other groups and individuals that protest the ruthless 
tcctics of vested Interests such as the Big Five. These powerful groups 
are now intent upon increasing their already enormous profits at the 
expense of the people - THE VAST MAJORITY TO WHOM OUR COUNTRY BELONGS - 
even more brazenly than they have In the past... 

IF YOU WORIC FOR A LIVING - 

HATAIAII'S UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES COMMISSION IS AIMED AT YOU l 

fujimoto 
Exhibit 5 

the true purposes of the Communist Party, for, on the contrary, American Com- 
munists have established a long and honorable record of independent, progres- 
sive action in the affairs of this country. We have consistently fought for a 
better life for those who do the work of our Nation. 

Mr. Fujimoto, did you prepare, or assist in preparing this para- 
graph, which I have just read, and particularly that part of it denying 
the Communists are in any way an agent of a foreign power ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1567 

YOUR CIVIL LIBERTIES IN DANGER I 

There is a great danger confronting the people *t 
Hawaii. This danger ccmes from Senate Joint Reaolutl:>n 27. 
If this measure passes the legislature and becomes law, the 
first big step In the denial of civil liberties will take 
place. This lefiislation, which creates an Un-American activities 
committee has been condemned by many Americans, including 
the Honolulu Star Bulletin and the Advertiser. 

WHAT IS THIS RESOLUTION SUPPOSED TO DO ? 

According to the provisions it will: 

1 "Investigate groups or organizations whose activities indicate a 
purpose to foment internal strife" or, "impede the normal progress of 
our territory either in a war time or peace time economy" Therefore 
as a lo«al mlnistor has said, anyone seeking to slow down the amount 
of whiskey drinking in the Territory would be guilty of "impeding the 
normal progress of the Territory" and could be sub.lect to Investiga- 
tion according to this Bill. 

2 Investigate organizations whose members Include communists, or 
even non- communists who have ever kno\vn or associated with communists. 

WHAT WILL THE RESOLUTION ACTUALLY DO ? 

1 Under the provisions of the Bill, anyone or anything can be invest- 
igated. If you belong to a union and you strike for higher pay, you are 
subject to investigation. If you belong to a church or other commun- 
ity group that Is against war, you can be supoenaed and your house 
searched, 

2 It provides no protection for people called before the committee. 
You can be slandered, lied about, and your character defamed. You will 
have no chance to defend yourself. You will be denied a lawyer, end 
you will not^be able to question your accusers. 

WHAT YOU CAN DO 

DO THIS BEFORE IT IS TOO LATEll 

Write to the Representative of your district. Tell 
them you will not stand for any invasion of your rights 
and liberties. Tell them that this is a bill directed at 
organized labor and progressive oivic groups, and the people 
of Hawaii, 

Tell them to vote against SJR 27 and for Democracy 



WRITE NOW tt ( 



fujimoto 
Exhibit 6 



CLUB LINCOLN 
Communist Party 
Box 3204 



Mr. FujiMOTO. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that I have 
ah'eady stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the throw-away sheet in evidence, 
and have it marked "Fujimoto's Exhibit No. 5." 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received.^ 

Mr. Ta\t^,nner. I have here another throw-away sheet, which I hand 
to you, entitled, "Your Civil Liberties in Danger," at the end of which 



' See p. 1566. 



1568 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

appears, "Club Lincoln, Communist Party, Box 3204." Will you 
examine that ? 

( Witness examines document. ) 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you identify that as a throw-away sheet of 
Club Lincoln of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. FujiMOTo. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons already 
stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is Club Lincoln a club of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I refuse to answer the question on the gound that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for the other reasons that I have 
already given. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. I offer the throw-away sheet in evidence and ask that 
it be marked "Fujimoto No. 6.'' 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.^ 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you now an additional throw-away sheet, 
marked No. 1, bearing date October 6, 1949, signed at the bottom: 
"Communist Party of Hawaii, P. O. Box 3204, in Honolulu, Hawaii," 
and ask you to examine it. 

(Witness examines document.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you identify that as a photostatic copy of the 
throw-away sheet of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground it 
might tend to incriminate me, and for all the other reasons I have 
already given. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the photostatic copy in evidence, 
and ask that it be marked "Fujimoto's Exhibit No. 7." 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received.^ 

Mr. Tavenner. I will read the last paragraph. 

Mrs. BousLOG. Mr. Chairman, let the same objection, in the record, 
be noted to the introduction of all these documents, or should I 
make an objection to the receipt of them 

Mr. Walter. I think not. Proceed, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner (reading) : 

Your address on the postcard will bring you pamphlets such as The Twi- 
light of World Capitalism, by William Z. Foster, national chairman of the 
Communist Party of the United States. 

I hand you another throw-away sheet, or a photostatic copy of a 
throw-away sheet, headed at the top : "Wlio are the real conspirators? 
The Communist Party of the United States of America, or the Un- 
American Committee, and its bosses, the Wall Street Monopolists," 
issued by — or at the end, "The Communist Party of Hawaii." Will 
you examine that photostatic copy and state whether or not you can 
state if that was issued in fact by the Communist Party of Hawaii ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I have examined it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you answer the question ? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I think you asked me to examine it, and I told you 
that I had examined it. _ 

Mr. Tav^enner. I thought I included in my question the question 
of whether or not you would identify it as a throw-away sheet of the 
Communist Party. 



8 See p. 1567. 

9 See p. 1569. 



rt . .w^ 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1569 






t'  r .-■<', *' ,^ ' ^ N' .J > ' ^ '■  << V '♦■' * ' • <  '  

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ij.\v-r ^OT'V tc tin- un, rrrl"< ■?::-? . 

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J^:::.!;.^ f^:,;- i. y ;.r:r,l.n>; -f  i. ;: r -sji^n- -:, -;v;rr<>ft;r-;^vn thv,t ^:ill •';ir<; *>'-^t 

•:Sf:-.r will f-^j-C.XxX* '■s':.:yA >■■■:.■ "rA ;■>:■ :^Xi- VC;'5r,vv :.« >^- cr : nl'.'^cs f^r '::^'-'>f i t '•(^r» 

Bt:.:Sd r<^r. 

J'-ur '.ilr-.-:^>5 .■?rt  r^st ':?^.M "ill brlu^ 7c>\-s r^«^^-^'^*:« 5^<:Si ^ s '^iia 



fujimoto 
Exhibit 7 



I 



Mr. FujiMOTO. All right. I will answer j^oiir question now. I re- 
fuse to answer the question on the ground it might tend to incrimi- 
nate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the throw-away sheet in evidence, 
and ask that it be marked "Fujimoto Exhibit No. 8." 



1570 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 






-tRSf <si??ri> t>liX '5««srrt.^ fr<>>s jr:::-';-; >. ?:;*>;.«? ss^xtw*; 
' f^iS <!'0iAJJfJiS5 iv^iX ; :>; i:iC-' v,5«A-.< 3>1«* a^ it* ^^^»>^i<w gf a3.i|.4--^n:i ^'f Ajitc;. !;■;■-» 

«^J*S»«v, liJ';"*-^;'!^;**, <;-fcSv) Ji^fc» S^-s -,?.r>35 ftf ■Sw fc-«:- rf^i ■■■.;■» rixiyi?^ !.o> 

iitei »>fe|t«i^ m ^■;^ 52n!S ^ .- V/**^ =isi*;^ mates® t 

fujimoto 

Exhibit 8 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received. 

Mr. Ta\^:nner. Mr. Fiijimoto, did you receive in 1947 directions 
from William Sclineidermann, of aims and objectives of the Com- 
munist Party of Hawaii, back in the month of October 1947, in which, 
among other things, the aims and objectives of the Communist Party 
of Hawaii was stated to be: 

Essential establishment of the third party of Hawaii ; 

Development of a following in the Democratic Party in Hawaii that would 
back Communist causes ; 

The establishment of a political movement in Hawaii on a broader basis, com- 
posed of all sections of the labor movement, and union labor forces, instead of as 



COMMUXIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1571 

prpvious\v, when it linrt been based on the left wing of the labor movement as 
represented by the ILWU ; 

Establishment of a leirislative conference or caucus which would act as a 
pressure group in the event the Democratic Party in Hawaii failed to work for 
objectives favorable to the Communist Party. 

Mr. FujiMOTo. Is that the end of the question? 

]Mr. TAM3NNEK. Yes. 

]Mr. FujiMOTo. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Taatrxner. AVill you state to the committee whether in the 1948 
registration of the Communist Party members in Hawaii the Com- 
munist Party headquarters at San Francisco allocated a total of 225 
membership books for Hawaii, the numbers of which ran in sequence 
from 88.551 to 88775? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for all the other reasons that I 
have already stated. 

Mr. Ta\"exner. I desire to ask you whether or not in your alleged 
capacity as chairman of the Communist Party in the Territory of 
Hawaii j^ou have subscribed to and influenced others among that group 
to the view expressed by William Z. Foster, head of the Communist 
Party in the United States, which, according to his sworn testimony, 
is as follows : 

No Communist, no matter how many votes he should secure in a national elec- 
tion, could, even if he would, become President of the present Government. 
When we have a Communist head of the Government of the United States — 
and that will come just as surely as the sun rises — the Government will not be 
a capitalist government but a Soviet government, and behind this government 
will stand the Red Army to force the dictatorship of the proletariat. 

Mr. FtiJiMOTO. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Do you know that William Foster made such a state- 
ment? 

Mr. FujiaioTO. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me, and for all the other reasons that I 
have already stated. 

jNIr. Walter. Why do you think it would incriminate you to admit 
that you knew that 5lr. Foster made that statement ? 

j\Ir. FujiMOTO. I have been legally advised by my lawyer here as to 
my legal rights. 

Mr. Walter. All right. Never mind. Continue. 

Mr. Tam2xxer. Mr. Fujimoto, in your alleged capacity as chairman 
of the Communist Party of Hawaii, did you advocate the views ex- 
pressed by William Z. Foster, president of the Communist Party of 
the United States — — 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I refuse to answer on the ground 

Mr. Ta\t:nxer. Wait just a minute. 

Mr. Fujimoto. Oh, sorry. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Regarding his views of religion in communism? 

Mr. Fujimoto. I refused to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Are you acquainted with the fact that William Z. 
Foster, president of the Communist Party of the United States, testi- 
fied to the following effect, under oath, before the Fish committee, in 
1935, when he was asked this question : 



1572 COMMXJTSIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

To be a member of the Communist Party, do you have to be an 
atheist ? — 
and he said : 

There is no formal requirement to this effect. Many workers join the Com- 
munist Party who still have some religious scruples, or religious ideas, but a 
worker who will join the Communist Party, who understands the elementary 
principle of the Communist Party, must necessarily be in the process of liquidat- 
ing his religious beliefs, and if he still has any leanings, when he joins the party, 
he will soon get rid of them. 

Mr. FuJiMOTO. No. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Your answer is that you did not know that he had 
made such a statement ; is that it ? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. My answer is, to the question that you propounded 
that I am not aware, or if I am aware of such a statement, my answer 
is "No; that I was not aware of any such statement he made." 

Mr. Tavenner. And if that statement be correct, which I read to 
you, and if that be the sworn statement of William Z. Foster, would 
3^ou advocate it ? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might incriminate me, and for the other reasons that I have already 
given. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. In other words, you will not say whether or not 
you would advocate to the members of the Communist Party, assuming 
that you are its chairman, or any other organization, as far as that 
is concerned, that a person joining the party would soon get rid of 
any religious leanings that they may have ? 

^Ir. FujiMOTo. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate, and for the first reasons that I have 
already given. 

]\Ir. Tamdxner. Then, do I understand you are unwilling to state 
to this committee whether in your alleged capacity as a member, or 
rather as chairman of the Communist Party of Hawaii, you would 
recommend to the people of these islands that regardless of their reli- 
gious convictions; whether they be Mohammedan, Confucius, Shinto, 
Buddhism, or Christianity, that if they became members, in the lan- 
guage of Foster, of the Communist Party, and if they understand the 
principles of the Communist Party, they must necessarily be in the 
process of liquidating their religious beliefs, and if they had any reli- 
gious beliefs when they joined the party they would soon get rid of 
them ? 

Mr. FujiMOTO. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me, and for the further reasons that I have 
already stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Wali'er. You are excused. We will stand in recess. 

(Witness excused.) 
. (Kecess.) 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will come to order. 

TESTIMONY OF CHARLES ETJJIMOTO, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, HARRIET BOUSLOG— Resumed 

M'r. Tavenner. Mr. Fujimoto, I believe possibly you answered this 
question indirectly, if not directly, but in order that the record may be 



COMMUXIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1573 

clear, I want to ask you this specific question : Have you or are you 
now, or have you ever been a member of the Communist Party ? 

(Witness confers' with counsel.) 

Mr. FujiMOTo. I refuse to answer the question on the ground tliat 
it might tend to incriminate me, and on the further ground that this 
committee is attempting to disclose what may or may not be the private 
political opinions and political associations, and on the further ground 
that the procedure of this committee in this hearing is a violation of 
the due process of law, and finally, on the further ground that this 
committee is' illegally constituted. 

Mr. Walter. You might be interested in knowing, in connection 
with this latter part of your answer, that at a recent session of Congress, 
of th^ entire membership of Congress, only 12 members voted against 
this committee. 

Is that all, Mr. Tavenner ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mv. Walter. You may be excused. 

(Witness excused.) 

TESTIMONY OF FEANK SUVA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Walter. Will 3'ou stand up, please ? Mr. Silva, do j^ou solemnly 
swear that the testimony that you are about to give in the matter now 
before the committee will be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but 
the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Silva, I do. 

Mv. Tavenner. You are Frank Silva ? 

Mr. Silva. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that your full name ? 

Mr. Silva. No. My name is Frank Gunza Silva. 

Mr. Ta'S'enner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Silva. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Walter. Will counsel please identify himself for the record? 

Mr. Sy^ionds. Myer C. Symonds. At this time, Mr. Chairman, I 
would like to file a motion to quash the service of the subpena, in the 
same form as the previous motion.^" 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Silva, you appear here in response to a subpena 
asking you to come? 

Mr. Silva. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. During the course of the testimony, Mr. Silva, Mr. 
Ichiro Izuka testified before this committee on Tuesday, April 11, as 
follows, at the time when I was asking him to identify before this 
cominittee those persons whom he knew to be members of the Com- 
munist Party. To my question: "Frank Silva?" Mr. Izuka's reply 
was: 

Frank Silva ; I knew Prank Silva for a long, long, long time in the plantation, 
and many efforts was made to recruit John Silva in the Communist Party, 

Mr. Tavenner (interpolating). I assume that that means Frank 
Silva. 

but the only one who can contact him was Jack Hall, and Jack Hall did, or was 
instructed many, many times, to recruit ]Frauk Silva, but I think that no contact 
was made for a long time officially, but after Frank Silva volunteered for the 
Army, and after discharge from the Army, I had many, many talks with him in 

" Text on motion to quash subpena by Frank Silva is identical with the motion filed 
on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer Symonds. See p. 1472. 



1574 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

the restaurant, and finally one day, at pier 11, he told me, "Well, Ichi, are you a 
Communist? Did you join the Communist Party?" and I said, "Yes, I joined the 
party 'way back in 1938," and he told me that he joined the party, and he showed 
me his card. That is the only incident I know that Frank Silva told me that; 
he showed me the card. He said, "See, my card, this is my card." 

Question. Approximately when was the date of that conversation? 

Mr. IzuKA. Oh, that was, I believe it was, after the sugar strike, sometime 
early in 1947. 

And then, on the following day, April 12, Mr. Izuka was, brought 
back to the witness stand and was asked this question by me : 

Mr. Izuka, do you have any explanation or correction to make of any matter 
that you testified to when you were here yesterday? 

The answer of Mr. Izuka : 

Yes, by reading the papers, I found out that I would like to make a correction, 
on the part when I said that Frank Silva showed me his party card in 1947. I am 
sure it is all of the members who joined the Communist Party, including Frank 
Silva, that was during the time before I resigned from tlie party in 1946, and 
that actually took part during the same time, instead of 1947. 

Question. In other words, it was during 1946, instead of 1947? 

Mr. Izuka. That is right. 

Now, Mr. Silva, do you wish to either deny or affirm that statement ? 

(Confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Silva. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Silva, did you attend a California labor school? 

(Confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Silva. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta's^nner. On what ground ? 

JNIr. Silva. That it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a photograph, and you will notice there 
the figure 10 above a person at the upper right hand margin of the 
photograph. Will you look at that photograph carefully, particularly 
the person appearing under the figure 10, and state whether or not 
that is your picture ? 

JNIr. Silva. It is the same answer for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the photograph in evidence and 
mark it "Silva Exhibit 1." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received and so marked." 

Mr. Tavenner. On the back of this photograph appears this printed 
statement, "Fillmore Photographic Studio, Portrait, Commercial, 
1561 Fillmore Street, San Francisco 15, Calif," which I assume indi- 
cates the name of the people who took the photograph. 

Have you ever been in California ? 

Mr. Silva. Yes. 

JNIr. Tavenner. Did you ever have your picture taken with a group 
of persons while you were there ? 

(Confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Silva. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might incrim- 
inate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know a person by the nameof Daniel Frias ? 

]\Ir. Silva. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me. 



" Retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1575 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you this envelope, and I ask you if you ever 
saw it before ? I will ask you particularly to look up in the left-hand 
margin, where the person usually places his address, when he sends 
a parcel or a letter through the mail, and I will ask you to read the 
name of the person appearing up in the left-hand margin of the enve- 
lope. Will you read it, please? 

Mr. SiLVA. "Frank Silva, CLS, 216 Market Street, San Francisco, 
Calif." 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, after showing you that, does this refresh your 
recollection, relating to Daniel Frias? 

Mr. Silva. I refuse to answer this question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. What is the name 

Mr. AVAL'iTiR. Excuse me, Mr. Tavenner, Mr, Silva, did you live 
at 216 Market Street, San FrancisCo, when you were there? 

Mr, SiLVA. No. 

Mr. Walter. Where did you live? 

Mr. Silva, I cannot recall the address, 

Mr, Walter, Is this in your hand writing? 

JNIr. Silva. I refuse to answer the question on the ground it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr, Tavenner, You said that you did not live at 216 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Calif,, but, did you go to a labor school at that placed 

Mr, Silva, I refuse to answer that question on the ground that it. 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever mail to Daniel Frias from the labor 
school in California, this envelope, in which this photograph which 
was marked "Exhibit No. 1," your exhibit No. 1, was enclosed? 

]Mr. Silva. I refuse to answer for the same reason, 

Mr, Tavenner, I desire to offer the envelope in evidence, and mark 
it "Exhibit Silva No, 2," 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.^^ 

Mr. Ta\tnner. Mr. Silva, are you now, or have you ever been a 
member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Silva. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might tend to 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. You may be excused, Mr. Silva. Under the rule, the 
subcommittee will recess for executive session, to take whatever action 
that they may determine. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, there is one or two further bits of 
evidence in connection with this matter, which probably should be 
attended to. Would you like to hear it now ? 

Mr. Walter. Yes ; we would. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Wheeler. 

FrRTHER TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM A. WHEELER— Resumed 

Mr. Ta^tenner. You have been sworn ? 
Mr. Wheeler. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner, Mr, Wheeler, you are investigator for the committee, 
and you have previously testified during this hearing? 
]\Ir. Wheeler. That is correct, sir. 



" Retained In committee files. 



1576 COMMUNIST activities in hawah 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you look at the envelope marked "Silva Ex- 
hibit 2," and read the address in the left-hand corner? 

Mr. Wheeler. The address occurring in the left-hand corner is, 
"Frank Silva, % CLS, 216 Market Street, San Francisco, California." 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have an official citation of the labor school ? 

Mr. Wheeler. I do, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. A citation by whom? 

Mr. Wheeler. There are three, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you read them, please ? 

Mr. Wheeler (reading) : 

Cited as a subversive and Communist organization at 216 Marliet Street, San 
Francisco, Calif. (Attorney General, Tom Clark, letters to Loyalty Review 
Board. Released June 1, 1948, and September 21, 1948.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, the address appearing in the official citation 
by the Attorney General is the same address as that appearing on the 
envelope ? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee the source of that photo- 
graph and envelope? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes, I will. On December 8, 1949, at 9 : 30 p. m. I in- 
terviewed Mr. Daniel Frias at his home on the Big Island of Hawaii. 
Mr. Frias, in the interview, stated to me that he attended the ILWTJ 
convention as a delegate in April 1947, after which he attended the 
California Labor School. 

He also advised me that he attended the labor school with an in- 
dividual named Frank Silva. He made available to me the envelope 
that was introduced into the record as "Silva Exhibit No. 2" and also 
. the photograph that was introduced in the record as "Silva Exhibit 
:N"o. 1." 

1 would like to point out that the person whom I interviewed, Mr. 
Daniel Frias, also appeared in the picture. He is designated by the 
numeral 6. 

Mr. Tavenner. No further questions. 

Mr. Moulder. Do you know what the CLS stands for on the 
envelope ? 

Mr. Wheeler. It is awfully close to the California Labor School. 
That was the address at 216 Market Street. 

Mr. Walter. That's all. The subcommittee will go into executive 
session. 

(Recess.) 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will be in order. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Mr. Izuka. 

TESTIMONY OF ICHIRO IZUKA— Resumed 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Ichiro Izuka ? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have been previously sworn, and you have 
taken an oath before, during this hearing. 

Now, were you present in this room when the witness who just 
preceded you testified? 

Mr. Izuka. Yes. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1577 

Mr, Tavenner. Was the person who answered to the name of 
Frank Silva the same person to whom you referred in your testimony 
as Frank Silva who had a party card that you have seen? 

Mr. IzuKA. Yes; that was the gentleman. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. No further questions. 

(Witness excused.) 

TESTIMONY OF LLOYD M. STEBBINGS 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand and be SAVorn? Do 
you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give at this 
hearing will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing hut the truth, 
so help you God ? 

Mv. Stebbings. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mr. Lloyd M. Stebbings? 

Mr. Stebbings. I am, sir. 

Mr, Tavenner. What is your present address ? 

Mr. Stebbings. 3166 Oahu Avenue. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born? 

Mr. Stebbings. I was born in Des Moines, Iowa, October 28, 1918. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you give us a brief statement of your em- 
ployment background ? 

Mr. Stebbings. I formerly worked at Libby, McNeill & Libby. 
After that I worked at the United States engineers. I worked for 
the Star Bulletin, and at Pearl Harbor, and I am presently employed 
at the City Transfer Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you lived in the Territory of 
Hawaii? 

Mr. Stebbings. Since 1937, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. I understand that for a period of time you served 
in a confidential capacity for the Government ? 

Mr. Stebbings. I did, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state whether while serving in that 
capacity, you attended any Communist Party meetings in the Terri- 
tory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. Stebbings. I did, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us briefly about that. 

Mr. Stebbings. Back in 1938, when I resided at the Central YMCA, 
located at the time at the corner of Hotel and Alakea, I ran into some 
boys who belonged to the Communist Party. They wanted to know 
if I would like to attend some of the meetings. They rather felt me 
out on my — well, would I be willing to attend. I said I would be 
interested in it, and I attended a couple of meetings with them. 

One evening, at a friend's home, while I was up there for dinner, I 
mentioned that I had attended a couple of Communist meetings down 
there at Honolulu, and he said, "I wonder if you would be Avilling to 
w^ork for the Government, and give us information on what goes on 
in the meetings." I said I would be willing to. He said, "We cannot 
hire you as an intelligence agent. We do not have the money at 
present. But, if you would be willing to serve in the capacity of one, 
on a volunteer basis, why, we would appreciate it." I still have reason 
to believe that my friend is connected with the intelligence agents in tlie 
same position that he held at the time. 



1578 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, in pursuance of that arrangement, did you 
continue to attend Communist Party meetings ? 

Mr. Stebbings. I did, sir. And after that offer, made a report to 
him of what went on, if there was anything of importance, and I 
later served with another intelligence agency later on. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who first invited you to attend a Communist Party 
meeting ? 

Mr. Stebbings. Hiram Harris, who was the desk clerk at the Cen- 
tral YMCA, and his uncle at the time was a professor of the University 
of Hawaii, I believe. He told me that he was his uncle, anyway. Led 
me to believe his name was Blake Clarke, professor of the University 
of Hawaii, and he told me that although he did not belong himself, 
personally, that he believed his uncle belonged. I am referring to 
Blake Clark, of course. 

Mr. Tavenner. You didn't know that his uncle was a member ? 

Mr. Stebbings. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. You never sat in any Communist Party meeting 
with his uncle, did you? 

Mr. Stebbings. Yes; one. 

Mr. Tavenner. With his uncle? 

Mr. Stebbings. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was that? 

Mr. Stebbings. That was located at the Nuuanu Book Store, a sec- 
ond-hand book store, located on Nuuanu Street, just mauka of Hotel 
Street, on the right-hand side, and we met on the second floor right 
there. 

Mr. Tavenner. I understand you to say that Hiram Harris told 
you that he was not a member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Stebbings. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings did you attend at the Nuuanu 
Book Store? 

Mr. Stebbings. I attended approximately 15 meetings. During 
tliat time I reported each one to my friend, and reported on what 
went on at the meetings, and what we did in the meetings, and who 
attended. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you present? You were present at the 
meetings ? 

Mr. Stebbings. I was personally present ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell us who attended the meetings that you 
were present at? 

Mr. Stebbings. Yes. Well, at the time there was a newspaper 
reporter, by the name of Lou Jo Hollingsworth who presently is em- 
ployed by the Star Bulletin, and she is in the courtroom here with us 
now, has been present, sir. And also Peter Hyun, who was an artist, 
and there was Alice Hyun, who was a school teacher in the public- 
school system here, and Paul Hyun, who was a brother of the other 
two mentioned formerly, and Dr. Reinecke, and Mrs. Ah Quon Leong, 
presently Mrs. Robert McElrath, Howard Clark, Hiram Harris, Blake 
Clark, and John Bartlett. 

If I can refer to my notes, sir, I would try to have a list of the mem- 
bers who did attend with me, who signed a list at the time, if that 
would be all right with you, I would "like to refresh my memory. I 
do have them marked. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1579 

Mr. Tavenner. Tliat i-s permissible for you to refresh your memory. 

Mr. Stebbings. All right, sir. There was a man named P. P. Her- 
man, an elderly German man, who spoke with a very strong accent, and 
he definitely stated he was a member of the Communist Party. I 
went down to his room many times, where he resided, and he had Com- 
munist literature, and Communist pictures on the wall, sir. 

There was a Chinese girl by the name of Faith lug. She was for- 
merly married to, or, rather, has recently, since the \var, married a boy 
who was of Jewish descent, I understand he is from Brooklyn, N. Y 
He told me that he was a member of the Communist Party in New 
York City. 1 think he was working on an Army publication, whicii 
was located at the University of Hawaii. I do not mean that the Uni- 
versity of Hawaii was the Army publication, but they had their quar- 
ters there, where they produced it. He said he was putting out the 
Communist line through the Army publication, for me not to men- 
tion it. 

At one of these meetings we received a letter from the secretary of 
the Communist Party in New York City, he said he was secretary, 
identified himself as the secretary of Earl Browder, I believe, sir, at 
the time, and he asked us if we would not try to overthrow the Gov- 
ernment in Hawaii and set up a Communist regime, to show how well 
communism could work in America. 

There was also a man who attended there, who was another news- 
paperman. His name was William Costello. I believe he is now 
located in Japan, as head of one of the newspaper syndicates out there. 
Which one, I don't know, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, how do you know that he was a member of 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. Stebbings. I merely stated that he attended the meetings of 
the Communist Party at the Nuuanu Book Store, and I was led to 
believe that he was a member, because you could not get in unless you 
were vouched for by one who was a Comnmnist member, or was in 
fairly good standing, and was well known. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, where were these meetings held in the 
bookstore ? 

Mr. Stebbings. Well, they were held on the second floor, right there 
in this second-hand-book store, the Nuuanu Bookstore. 

You could not get in unless the owner of the bookstore identified 
you, or you were with someone who was well known. I understand 
that they had at the time a leader or an organizer of the Communist 
Party from New York City here. They would work their w^ay to 
Hawaii in the merchant marine, and there we would study at the 
Communist Party. We would go to the meetings, and during the 
meetings there, the original part of it was, we would sit down and 
have a social hour, have a party in the store, and then we would break 
up into study groups. We would study Communist literature and 
theory, how to organize the Communist Party, and how to get new 
members, and how to increase the membership here in Hawaii. After 
that, why, we would have — we Avould take up a collection of 25 cents 
to defer the expenses of the cookies and wine. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Well, at the place of this meeting, in the upstairs 
part of this bookstore, was there any place where the Communist 
Party literature was kept constantly ? 



1580 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAU 

Mr. Stebbixgs. Yes. There was a Commimist library there, where 
one could check out books on Communist literature, and there also was 
a wooden chest, filled with the notes and minutes of the meeting of 
the Communist Party here locally, which was kept locked at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was this open to the public generally? I mean 
this section of the building? 

Mr. Stebbings. No, sir. You could not get in unless you were a 
member of the Communist Party, or passed by the owner of the 
Nuuanu Bookstore at the time. 

Mr. Ta^tsnnek. Well, was it a part of the bookstore, where you 
could enter from one part of the bookstore to this particular place? 

Mr. Stebbings. No, sir, there was only one entrance to the bookstore, 
other than the rear entrance. There was a front and a rear entrance, 
and then there was a small stairway in the back here, which led up to 
the second floor. Even myself, rmless I was with other members of 
the party, I could not go up alone, unless I was with someone else. 

Mr. TA\'EN]srER. I want to understand you. That stairway began in 
the bookstore, or outside of the bookstore ? 

Mr. Stebbings. Inside of the bookstore, in the back, behind some of 
the tall bookshelves. It was fairly well hidden. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Now, you have mentioned the names of a number 
of people, among whoili I recall was Peter Hyun and Alice Hyun, do 
you know wliether they were members of the Communist Party or 
not ? If 3' ou do, how do you know it ? 

^Ir. Stebbings. Well, Alice Hynn asked me personally one evening 
when she drove me home after a meeting, whether I was interested in- 
joining the Communist Party. I said, "Alice, how do you feel about 
the party?'' She said, "Well, I have been a member, and still am a 
member. I want to know how you stand. Are you really interested 
in joining?" And at the time, also, P'eter asked me the same question 
at ills place, where the party moved to at one other time. Also Howard 
Clark asked me to join, many times. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe you mentioned the name of Marshal 
McEuen ? 

Mr. Stebbings. I did, sir, only in the one report, and that is that 
he signed for Communist literature only. I don't remember exactly 
meeting him there, sir. I could not say that I did or did not. I 
would not want to say at this time. 

Mr. Tavenner. You would not want to say whether or not he 
was present? 

Mr. Stebbings. No ; I would not. 

Mr. Tavenner. At any of these meetings ? 

Mr. Stebbings. That's right; because I honestly don't remember, 
although he did sign for Communist literature there at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us what you mean by that. 

Mr. Stebbings. They have — being a library, just like a regular 
library, you had to sign out for Communist literature, in and back. 
It was a small, looseleaf , black leather notebook. 

Mr. Tavenner. Could not any member of the public go enter that 
room and get Communist publications and sign out for them? 

Mr. Stebbings. They could not, sir. You had to be a member of the 
party, or identified with it in some way, or vouched for by a member. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated Dr. Reinecke, as I understand you. 
attended some of these meetings ? 



COMMUXIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1581 

Mr. Si'EBBixGS. That's right, sir. 

Mr. Tam^nnek. Well, do you mean to say that he was a member 
of the Communist Party? 

Mr. S'l-EBBiNGS. I ^Yas told he was by Howard Clark. At the time 
they also — I was inquiring if there were any other cells in Hawaii. 
They told me that there was a cell in the ILWU at the time, headed 
by jack Hall, and that he was the leader of the Connnunist cell in 
the ILWU. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Well, I want to confine you to just the things that 
you know yourself. 

Mr. Stebbings. All right. 

Mr. Tavenxer. In my questioning to you, don't refer to just some- 
thing that someone told you about someone else. 

Mr. Stebbings. Yes. 

Mr. Tavexner. Noav, you mentioned the name of John Bartlett. 

Mr. Stebbings. Yes. I attended meetings with him there. 

Mr. Tavenner. How is that? 

Mr. Stebbings. I did attend meetings with him. 

^Ir. Tavenner. You attended meetings ? 

Mr. Stebbings. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether he was a member of the 
Communist Party or not? 

^Ir. Stebbings. I have never seen a Communist Party card in my 
life, other than the fact that I was told by some of the members 
personally that they were members, and that you could not get into 
the bookstore unless you were vouched for by a Communist member. 

Mr. Taat:nner. Did any other person ask you to become a member 
of the Communist Party other than the persons you have already 
testified to? 

Mr. Stebbings. Just those three sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all. 

Mr. Walter. That is all. Thanks very much. 

Mr. Stebbings. You are welcome. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will stand in recess for 5 minutes. 

(A short recess was taken.) 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will be in order. 

Mr. Tavenner who is your next witness? 

Mr. Ta^tenner, Mr. Chairman, we have subpened for this after- 
noon the following additional witnesses: Eileen Fujimoto, Robert 
Wenkam, Bessie Wenkam, and Adele Kensinger. It is my sugges- 
tion, Mr. Chairman, that you release them, if you see fit, from their 
subpenas, and if they desire to make any statement to the committee, 
you give them permission to do so. 

Mr. Walter. Will you repeat the names, please ? 

Mr. Tavenner. The names are : Eileen Fujimoto, Robert Wenkam, 
Bessie Wenkam, and Adele Kensinger. 

Mr. Walter. The witnesses whose names have just been read are 
released from the subpena and they are now given the opportunity 
to make whatever statement they care to make. Under oath, of course. 

Mrs. BousLOG. I am representing those witnesses. I do not believe 
they are in the room and if you will give me an opportunity, I will 
consult with them. 

66636— 50— pt. 2 4 



1582 COMMUN-IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII , 

Mr. Tavenner. While counsel is talking with her clients, there 13 
another witness that we may call, 

Mr. Walter. Who is the witness ? 

Mr. Tavenner. I am not certain, Mr. Chairman. If you will ex- 
cuse me for a moment. Mr. Chairman, the witness' name is Frank 
K. Chow. 

Mr. Walter. Frank Chow? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. Mr. Frank Chow, come forward, please. 

Mr. Wali-er. Mr. Qiow, will you stand up, please ? Do you swear 
that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Chow. I do. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down, please. Mr. Tavenner. 

Mrs. BousLOG. I will state to the committee now that I represent 
Mr. and Mrs. Wenkam and Mrs. Charles Fujimoto and Adele Ken- 
singer. I have consulted with them and they do not desire to make 
any statement before this committee. 

Mr. Walter. You understand they are released. 

Mrs. BousLOG. Yes. Thank you. 

Mr. Walter. That is all the witnesses that were named, that she 
spoke of ? 

Mr. Tavenner. That is right. In other words, counsel for the four 
persons called, Eileen Fujimoto, Robert Wenkam, Bessie Wenkam, 
and Adele Kensinger, has notified the subcommittee that none of her 
clients desire to make any statement to the subcommittee. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed, Mr. Tavenner. 

TESTIMONY OF FKANK CHOW 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please ? 

Mr. Chow. Frank Chow. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live? 

Mr. Chow. Waimanalo Homestead, lot 10. 

Mr. Tavenner. How old are you ? 

Mr. Chow. Thirty-three. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend any Communist Party meetings at 
any time ? 

Mr. Chow. Well, I have attended several meetings, not knowing 
that it was a Communist meeting. I was shocked when I seen or I 
heard my name in the papers yesterday. That is the reason why I am 
up here, to clarify myself. I want to have my name cleared on it, due 
to the fact it might jeopardize the rights of one of the clients of the 
bureau of sight conservation, and I have a chance of being excommuni- 
cated from the church and also expelled from the board of the Lions 
Club. That is the reason why I am here this morning, and in regard 
to myself, to explain my brief cause, which I have attended during 
the last 10 years when I was a member of the ILWU, that is the 
longshoremen down at McCabe, Hamilton & Renny. 

I also been to a meeting, which they usually call it a council meet- 
ing, and we talk nothing else but union activities. I admit I have 
been to about 4 or 5 meetings during that time, but I didn't know that 
it was a Communist meeting because it was said nothing else but 
labor or union activities, as you can put it. The only time I found 
out I was attending a Communist meeting was when this person who 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1583 

calls himself William Kamaka, at that time he called himself William 
Palaiii, had approached me and told me I had attended a Communist 
meeting and if I would wish to join. After that I have known that 
it was a Communist meeting during that time, I have never attended 
another meeting until to this present day. Therefore, as I seen last 
night my name in the paper, 1 have volunteered myself to come down 
here and express my opinion that I have never known and never has 
been a Communist. 

Mr. Tavennek. Now, can you recall the names of any of the persons 
who were present at the meeting which you found out afterward was 
a Communist Party meeting? 

Mr. Chow. Yes, I could. I may not have the full amount of names, 
it has been so long, but I could remember several of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell us who they were, please? 
.Mr. Chow. Well, one of them is Jack Hall, Jack Kawano, Jack 
Kimoto, Bob McElrath, Harry Kamaku, Ben Kaahawinui. And if 
I am not mistaken, I think my good friend Izuka was there too at one 
meeting. I think I seen hini because I went there several meetings, 
as I say. I found out Emil Muller was in there at one meeting, I 
think, I am not quite sure of that. But the meeting I attended, I 
cannot clarify it, as far as that is concerned, that they were Coni- 
munists meetings or whatsoever, but I only found that out after it 
was approached to me by William Kamaka that it was a Communist 
meeting. I can't say whether they are members of the Communist 
Party because they have not told me they were or I have not seen their 
book. However, I have attended to those meetings only as council 
meetings pertaining to the union activities. In other words, we have 
meetings there to solve the problems of what the unions want or what 
is going to be. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state again the name of the person who 
asked you to join the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Chow. Yes. William Kamaka was the person that asked me 
to join the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. He is the same person who told you that the meeting 
you had attended was a Communist Party meeting ? 

Mr. Chow. That is right. In fact, he was the person that took me 
to the meeting. He mentioned about, "We have a council meeting." 
During that time I was on the executive board of the ILWU, so, 
therefore, holding a position as director there, I found that I was sort 
of responsible for the discussion in that meeting, so I went. 

Mr. Tavtenner. Before the meeting you were told it was a council 
meeting of your union ? 

Mr. Chow. That is right. 

Mr. Taa'enner. But after you got out there you were told it was a 
Communist Party meeting? 

Mr. Chow\ Not right off the bat. I attended about 4 or 5 meetings 
and then after that they told me about that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who presided at this meeting, who acted as chair- 
man? 

Mr. Chow. Well, I can't remember. They have several chairmen 
there. Every time they have a meeting they have several chairmen 
there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall who they were ? 



1584 coMMUisriST activities in hawaii 

Mr. Chow. Well, sometimes they have Jack Kawano there as the 
chairman of the meeting and sometimes I think they have Jack Hall. 
I am not so sure of that. I am not definite on that because it has been 
so long. 

Mr. Tavennek. After you found out that it was a Communist Party 
meeting, did you go back again? 

Mr. Chow. I never did go back until this present day. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Ciiow. Why I come here, the reason why I wanted to come here 
was to clarify and to clear up my name because I am afraid I might 
be excommunicated from my church and also be expelled from the 
member of the Lions Club and also jeopardize my affiliation with the 
bureau of sight conservation. 

Mr. Tavenner. We are very glad to have you explain. 

Mr. Walter. Thank you. 

Mr. Tavenner. Louise Hollingsworth. 

Mr. Walter. Raise your right hand, please. Do you swear that 
the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God. 

Mrs. Hollingsworth. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF LOUISE JOHANSON HOILINGSWOETH 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mrs. Hollingsworth? 

Mrs. Hollingsworth. I am Louise Johanson Hollingsworth — Mrs. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you signify your desire to make a statement to 
the committee as a result of your name having appeared in the 
testimony ? 

Mrs. Hollingsworth. I did. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Just 15 or 20 minutes ago? 

Mrs. HoLLiNGSW^ORTH. Ycs. 

Mr. Tavenner. We would be very glad to hear anything that you 
have to say. 

Mrs. Hollingsworth. I am told that I was at a meeting or a party 
where only Communists were allowed. I think it was held at a book- 
store above the Nuuanu Second-Hand Book Store, in 1938. I recall 
that I was there. I was invited to a cocktail party and I understand 
that that marked the opening of it. I was invited by Howard Clark 
who, I believe, was the manager. I recall the incident because there 
were some people by the name of Bartlett there. Bartlett was said 
to be, or it was told me to be, a writer on Freudian subjects, and they 
had with them a 2- or 3-year-old child, who was very annoying, and I 
lost my temper and spanked the child. And then I was ushered out 
because the Bartlets were very distraught because their child had never 
been spanked before in its life. And that is the first and only time I 
was there, and that is the reason I recall it. I remembered it the 
other day. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell us the names of the other persons that 
you recall who were there ? 

Mrs. Hollingsworth. As I say, the Bartletts and Howard Clark, 
but aside from them 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you remember Mr. Bartlett's first name? 

Mrs. Hollingsworth. I remember it as Francis. He had written a 
book on Freudian interpretation or something or other. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 1585 

Mr. Tavenxer. Do you recall seeing the person there who just 
preceded you on the witness stand a little while ago ? 

Mrs. HoLLiNGSwoRTii. I do not. I recall having seen him around 
here and around places. I have had a speaking acquaintance with him, 
just seeing him on the street and around town. 

Air. Tavenner. Did you notice any particular literature or books 
being there, upstairs ? 

Mrs. HoLLiNGSw^oRTH. I am aware there were books there because it 
was a bookstore, but what it was, I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know the type of books that were in 
this particular room where the meeting was held ? 

Mrs. PIoLLiNGSwoRTH. Well, I assume it was radical literature. 

Mr. Tavenner. "V^^iy do you assume it was radical literature? 

Mrs. HoLLiNGSwoRTH. Mr. Clark was rather advanced in his think- 
ing, as was Mr. Bartlett and his wife. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who told you where this meeting was to be held? 

Mrs. HoLUNGSwoRTii. I believe it was ]Mr. Clark. I believe I went 
with him or met him in that neighborhood. 

Mr. Tavexner. Did he take you up tliere? 

Mrs. HoLLiNGSwoRTH. As I recall ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was it in the back of the building or store? 

Mrs. HOLLINGSWORTH. As I remember, we went into the Nuuanu 
Second-Hand Book Store, and went back and went up some steps, as 
I recall it, and there was a smaller room up there. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Did you ever go back ? 

Mrs. HOLLINGSWORTII. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. No further questions. 

Mr. Walter. Do you care to say anything further ? 

Mrs. HoLLiNGswoRTH. That is all. Thank you for the opportunity 
to be heard. 

Mr. Walter. I assure you that the opportunity that has been given 
you will be given to anybody who cares to come here and under oath 
make a statement, because it is not the desire of anybody on this 
committee to smear anybody or to let anj name be used in connection 
with any subversive activities without giving them an opportunity to 
answer. 

Mrs. HOLLINGSWORTH. Thank you. 

Mr. Walter. Anything further ? 

Mr. Tavenner. No. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will stand adjourned until 9 o'clock 
tomorrow morning. 

(Whereupon, Thursday, April 13, 1950, at 3 : 50 p. m., an adjourn- 
ment was taken until Friday, April 14, 1950, at 9 a. m.) 



i 



HEAKINGS EECtARDING COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES 
m THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII 



FRIDAY, APRIL 14, 1950 

United States House of Representatives, 
Subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Honolulu, T. H. 

PUBLIC session 

The subcommittee of four met, pursuant to call, at 9 a. m,, in the 
senate chamber, lolani Palace, Hon. Francis E. AValter (subcommittee 
chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Francis E. Walter, 
Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold H. Velde. 

Staif members present: Frank S. Ta vernier, Jr., counsel; William 
A. Wheeler and Courtney E. Owens, investigators ; and John W. Car- 
rington, clerk. 

Mr. Walter. Are you ready to proceed? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will be in order. Call your first 
witness, please. 

Mr. Tavennfji. I desire to call Mr. A. A. Smyser. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand. Do you swear that 
the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God. 

Mr. Smyser. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ADAM A. SMYSER 

Mr. Walter. Sit down, please. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mr. A. A. Smyser ? 

Mr. Smyser. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed, Mr, Smyser ? 

Mr. Smyser. I am reporter for the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a reporter for that paper in October 
1948? 

Mr. Smyser. I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do j'^ou appear here in response to a subpena served 
on you this morning. 

Mr. Smyser. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner, Mr. Smyser, were you present at a news conference 
in October 1948, or, rather, a press conference with Mr. Charles 
Fujimoto? 

Mr. Smyser. I was. 

1587 



1588 coMMUisrisT activities in haw ah 

Mr. Tavf.nner. How many members of the press were represented 
at that conference, if you recall? 

Mr. Smyser. I don't recall exactly, but I think there must have been 
at least six or seven reporters, and a number of photographers there. 

Mr. Tavennee. And can you fix the exact date of the press con- 
ference ? 

Mr. Smyser. It was Monday, October 18, 1948. I can tell that by 
a clipping we have in our library. 

Mr. Tavenner. At that press conference, did ]Mr. Charles Fujimoto 
make a statement to the members of the press regarding his affiliation 
with the Communist Party of Hawaii ? 

Mr. Smyser. He told us at the time that he was chairman of the 
Communist Party in Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you state there were also news photographers 
present ? 

Mr. Smyser. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. And was a photograph taken of Mr. Fujimoto, with 
his consent ? 

Mr. Smyser. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t2Nner. And with his approval at that time ? 

Mr. Smyser. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. And in your presence? 

Mr. Smyser. Yes. After the reporters left, or as the reporters left, 
the photographers stayed around, again taking photographs, 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you have photographs taken at that time ? 

Mr. Smyser. Yes, I had two that were taken on that day by the Star- 
Bulletin photographer. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer this photograph in evidence. Mark 
it "Exhibit Smyser 1." 

Mr. Walter. It will be marked and received.'^ 

Mr. Tavenner. That's all, Mr. Chairman, 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. I will call Richard Brome. 
^ Mr. Walter. In this morning's newspaper, the Honolulu Adver- 
tiser, there appears a statement issued by Jack Hall, in which he is 
quoted as having said : 

My refusal to answer many questions on the ground that the answer might 
tend to incriminate me should not be misunderstood by our membership or level- 
headed, clear-thinking people. A "yes" or "no", or "don't know" answer could 
result in a perjury indictment with perjured witnesses against me. 

I feel it is my duty to point out to the people of this community that 
any testimony adduced here cannot be used anywhere else against 
anybody. In my opinion this statement was issued for the purpose 
of influencing the people who might be inclined to come here to assist 
the committee in its efforts. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Brome. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand. Do you swear that 
the testimony you are about to give willbe the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God. 

Mr. Brome. I do. 



" Retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1589 

TESTIMONY OF RICHARD BROME 

Mr. Taatenner. You are Richard Brome? 

Mv. Brome. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. AATio are you employed by, Mr. Brome? 

JMr. Brome. Reporter for the Honohilu Advertiser. 

Mr, Tavenner. How long have you been employed in the capacity? 

Mr. Brome. Since August 1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you appear here in response to a subpena served 
on you this morning? 

Mr. Brome. I do. 

JMr. Ta\^nner. Mr. Brome, were you present at an occasion of a 
•press conference in October 1948, when Mr. Charles Fujimoto was 
interviewing the press? 

Mr. Brome. I was. 

Mr, TA^^NNER. Can you fix the date ? 

]\Ir. Brome. It was October 18, 1948. I fix that by checking in the 
files of the Honolulu Advertiser. 

Mv. Ta\'enner. Did you hear a statement made by Mr. Fujimoto 
to the members of the press, regarding his Communist Party affilia- 
tions ? 

Mr. Brome. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did he state, in brief? 

]Mr. Brome. He said that he had been elected chairman of the Com- 
munist Party in Hawaii by the central committee of the party. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Did he state the names of the members of the cen- 
tral committee at that time ? 

Mr. Brome. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. .That is all. 

IMr. "Walter. Thank you very much. 

(Witness excused.) 

INIr. Tavenner. David Pahinui is the next witness. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand please. Do you swear 
that the testimony that you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth so help you God. 

Mr. Pahinui. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF DAVID PAHINUI 

Mr. Tai-enner. You are David Pahinui ? 
Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t3nner. Do you appear here in response to a subpena served 
on you ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tamsnner. Where were you born ? 

Mr. Pahinui. In Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. How old are you ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Twenty-nine. 

ISIr. Tavenner. How are you employed ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, I am a company man right at this time. 

Mr. Ta\t5nner. Working where ? 

Mr. Pahinui. McCabe, Hamilton & Renney, stevedore. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you speak just a little louder, please. 

Mr. Pahinui. McCabe, Hamilton & Renney, stevedore. 



1590 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been so employed ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, I would say about 12 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you join? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, at the moment, I did not join because I was 
taken into a meeting, which was something like a union meeting. That 
is what I understood when I went to the meeting, which we didn't 
know it was a Communist meeting until I had a Communist card 
served on me. 

Mr. Tavenner. The first meeting that you attended, you didn't know, 
that it was a Communist meeting? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, when was that ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, it was somewhere in the beginning of February, 
in 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, will you tell us a little more about that, where 
the meeting was held, and who asked j^ou to come to it ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, Ben Kaahawinui and Julian Napuunoa told 
me to go to the meeting, that it was good for me, and the fellow work- 
ers, too, which they told me to recruit later on, which I did not because 
I wanted to make sure if it is a benefit for me, it will be a benefit 
for all. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was that meeting held ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Held at Ben Kaahawinui's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you later find out whether Ben Kaahawinui 
and the other person whom you mentioned, which I believe was 
Napuunoa, were members of the Communist Party with you? 

Mr. Pahinui. While we were going there, we didn't know. Nobody 
knew. 

Mr. Tavenner. But, you later found out? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes, after I had the Communist card. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell me the names of the other persons who 
were at the first meeting which you attended ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. There was Julian Napuunoa. 

Mr. Tavenner. I am sorry, I didn't hear you. 

Mr. Pahinui. Julian Napuunoa, Ben Kaahawinui, Jack Kawano, 
and David Kamaka, and William Kamaka. 

Mr. Tavenner. This morning I believe you said this meeting was 
held at the home of Ben Kaahawinui ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How soon after that was it that you attended an- 
other meeting? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, after four or five meetings at Benny's home, we 
went to Jack Kimoto's home, where they held a joint meeting of two 
groups. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, let me find out first, when it was that 
they gave you a Communist Party card. 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, after, say, 3 or 4 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. After 3 or 4 months. How many meetings do you 
think you attended, or which meeting was it, at which you were given 
the Communist Party card? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1591 

JNIr. Pahinui. At Benny Kaahawinui's home. 

Mr. Taatenner. And do you remember how many meetings you 
attended before you were given a Communist Party card ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes, about five meetings, five or four, at the most. 

Mr. Tavenner. Four or five meetings. Who gave you the Commu- 
nist Party card? 

Mr. Pahinui. Julian Napuunoa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you pay dues ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How much were the dues ? 

Mr. Pahinui. I paid a dollar a month. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who did you pay your dues to? 

Mr. Pahinui. To Benny — I mean Julian Napuunoa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you have told us that you attended, I believe, 
about five meetings at the home of Ben Kaahawinui. You have also 
told us the names of those who were present at the first meeting. W^ill 
you give me the names of any others who were present at any of these 
five meetings ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, they had Kobert Lum. 

Mr. Tavenner. Robert Lum. L-u-m. 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. And John xVkana, I believe. 

Mr. Ta'stenner, I didn't understand the last name. 

Mr. Pahinui. John Akana, and Tim Freeman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Jim Freeman ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No, Tim. I think it was Tim Freeman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tim Freeman. Did you say "Tim" ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know how this man Freeman, whom you 
say was Tim Freeman, was employed ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No, I don't. He just came up there giving advice to 
the leaders up there, most of the time, but I don't know whether he is 
employed any place any time. 

Mr. Tavenner. He came and gave advice? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. To the members at the meeting? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a photograph, and I ask you to examine 
it, and state whether or not that is the man to whom you referred as 
Tim Freeman ? 

Mr. Pahinui. That is the man. 

Mr. TA\Ti:NNER. He is the man? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer this photograph in evidence, and 
mark it "Exhibit Pahinui No. 1." 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received.^* 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether the person whose photograph 
you have just identified, is also known as James Freeman ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No, that is the only name he came under, so far as I 
know. 

Mr. Tavenner. As you understood it, it was Tim Freeman and not 
Jim Freeman ? 



" Retained In committee files. 



1592 coMMuisriST activities in Hawaii 

Mr. Pahinui. Not Jim Freeman. 

Mr. Tavenner. But, at any rate, the man whose photograph you 
identified is the man who attended this meeting? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, can you give us the names of other persons 
who were present at these meetings ? 

Mr. Pahinui. At Ben Kaahawinui's home ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, Yukio Abe, onetime secretary of the ILWU, 
I think, and Jack Kawano, onetime president of the ILWU. And 
there was Harry Kimoto, president of 136 local ILWU. I think that is 
all I can remember at this time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us just how you were offered the Communist 
Party card. 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, it was just given to me. It was just given to 
me like if I give a paper to somebody else. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were those Communist Party meetings which you 
were attending at the home of Ben Kaahawinui ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Ta-\^nner. How do you know they were Communist Party 
meetings ? 
Mr. Pahinui. Well, on the card it says, "Communist Party, 
U. S. A." 

Mr. Ta\t.nner. Well now, tell me of anything that happened at 
those meetings which would indicate to you that they were meetings 
of the Communist Party. 

]Mr. Pahinfi. No ; I cannot give you any certain estimate of finding 
out whether it was a Communist meeting, but it was always about 
union activities mostly. 

Mr. Tavenner. They talked mostly about union activities. 

Mr. Pahinui. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you given any literature ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Can you tell us what kind of books or pamphlets 
were given you? 

Mr. Pahinui. I don't take a look at that. 

Mr. Tavenner. You didn't take a look at it ? Do you recall whether 
some of them were about the Communist Partv, in the talk about 
them ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. There was a lot of them. All of them, in fact, 
what I had were all about the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. They were all about the Communist Party. Did 
they ask you to buy those pamphlets and books ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. From whom did you buy them ? 

Mr. Pahinui. From Ben Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Tavenner. From whom ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Ben Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, were you required to buy them or did they 
just leave it up to you whether you wanted to buy them or not? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, if you (didn't have the money to buy it right 
away, they buy it for you and you pay them later. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, it was required that you have the 
books, whether you paid for them then or not ? 



COMMUKIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1593 

Mr. Paiiinui. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did tliey tell you to do witli these books? 

_ Mr, Paiiinui. Well, they told me to read it. After I am through, 
give it to my friend, and I could have him come in, too, maybe he 
might like the way the pamphlet is written. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, after you had read it and became 
acquainted with it, to use it to get some friend 

Mr. Paiiinui. Into the Comnuuiist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you try to get a friend into the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Paiiinui. No. I wanted to make sure it was a benefit to me, 
it will be of benefit to my friend. 

Mr. Tavenner. You wanted to make certain first that it was going 
to benefit you before you would ask a friend to come in ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Oh, yes. I didn't want my friend to have any hard 
feelings toward me because of making a foolish move or like that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ask any friend to come in ? 

Mr. Paiiinui. No, I never did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliy? 

Mr. Pahinui. Because when I had the Communist card I thought 
maybe it was a bad move to make until I am sure I am going to have 
something or my money's worth before I do such a thing. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever become sure of whether or not it was 
of benefit to you ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, to find out I kept on going. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you get your money's worth? 

Mr. Pahinui. No, I never did get a cent's worth. 

(Laughter in the audience.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Therefore, you did not ask any of your friends 
to come in. 

Mr. Paiiinui. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you said the first five meetings were held at 
the home of Ben Kaahawinni. 

Mr. Paiiinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. After that time, where were the meetings held, or 
tell us about the next meeting after that. 

Mr. Pahinui. Do you mean to the different places? 

Mr. Tavenner. The different places. 

Mr. Paiiinui. The next place I went to was Jack Kimoto's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Jack Kimoto ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. That is where we have a joint meeting of two 
longshore groups. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Wlien you say "two longshore groups," you are not 
talking of members of the union as such, are you ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. See, they organize that as two groups instead 
of one, one longshore group as a whole. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you say "two longshore groups," you mean 
two groups of Communists who were also members of the longshore 
union? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes ; that is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What were those two groups ? 

Mr. Pahinui. One was called McCabe-Hamilton group and the 
other one was called Castle and Cooke group. 



1594 COMMUN"IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. The reason tliey were called by those two names is 
that those were the unions working for those companies; is that it? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. But the groups you mentioned were Communist 
Party groups. 

Mr. Pahinui. Communist Party groups. 

Mr, Tavenner. Were the persons who attended those meetings 
members of the Communist Party, so far as you knew ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the reason for this meeting of the two 
groups together ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, they still talk about union activities. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state that over again ? 

Mr. Pahinui. They still talk about the union activities. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who told you that the two groups would meet 
together ; do j^ou know ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Ben Kaahawinui and Julian Napuunoa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he tell you why the two groups were meeting 
together at that time ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. They just told me they always get together 
after three or four meetings a month, they combine together to find out 
whether they are recruiting their grouj)S. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who acted as chairman of the two groups when they 
met together ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Jack Kimoto. 

The Ta\T5nner. Well, did he give any instructions at that meeting 
to the members ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, he just stated mostly, the talk, tried to tell you 
how to conduct a meeting and we have leadership in the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us who were present at that meeting? 
Will you name all you can think of, and when you give us the name of 
each person, tell us how he was employed, if you know. 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, Wilfred Oka. Wilfred Oka was one-time 
organizer of the ILWU. Henry Schmidt. 

Mr. Tavenner. Just a moment. Was Wilfred Oka the same person 
who testified here yesterday, or were you here yesterday ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes ; I was here, yesterday. I was in back there, 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you see him on the witness stand? 

Mr, Pahinui. That is right. 

Mr, Tavenner. Was he the same person ? 

Mr. Pahinui. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. Pahinui. And Henry Schmidt, a trouble-shooter for the 

Mr. Tavenner. Henry Schmidt? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner, Is that the same Henry Schmidt who was tried 
along with Bridges and convicted recently in California ? 

Mr, Pahinui, That is right. 

Mr. Ta\t]nner. You say he was present at the meeting? 

Mr, Pahinui. At the meeting at Kimoto's home. Then Yukio Abe, 
one-time secretary — I don't know if he is still the secretary — of the 
ILWU. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1595 

Mr. Tavenner. At any rate, he was an oflicial ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Something like that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Had an office or position? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. With the ILWU? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. Pahinui. Jack Kawano. 

Mr. Tavenner. Jack Kawano? What position did he hold at that 
time? 

Mr. Pahinui. President of 137 at that time. , 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Pahinui. And Frank Kalua. He was in the executive board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Frank who? 

Mr. Pahinui. Kalua. 

Mr. Tavenner. Kalua. Wliat position, if any, did he hold at that 
time ? 

Mr. Pahinui. He was in the executive board at the same time I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. He was on the executive board. 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of what union? 

Mr. Pahinui. One hundred and thirty-seven. 

Mr. Tavenner. One hundred and thirty-seven. And did you say 
you were on the same executive board ? 

]Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

JSIr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. Pahinui. They had Julian Napuunoa there. 

Mr. Ta^-enner. Now, how was he employed or what position did 
he hold, if any ? 

Mr. Pahinui. I think he was second — well, he had some kind of 
official position right next to Jack Kawano, I think, at that time. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Official of what? 

Mr. Pahinui. ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. ILWU. 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was it local 

Mr. Pahinui. One hundred and thirty-seven. 

Mr. Tavenner. How is that? 

Mr. Pahinui. One hundred and thirty-seven. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you gentlemen hear him ? 

Mr. Walter. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. Pahinui. They had Ben Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Pahinui. He was business agent at that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. He was business agent for what ? 

Mr. Pahinui. For the ILWU, local 137. And they had Frank 
or John Akana, his name was, which he was in the executive board, 
too. 

Mr, Tavenner. What position did he hold? 

Mr. Pahinui. As executive board. He must be some kind of 
official, I guess. And they had Cablay. I don't know his first name. 

ISIr. Ta\t:nner. AVhat was the last name? 

Mr. Pahinui. Cablay. 



1596 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Cablay? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. Cablay. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Wliat was his first name, do you know ? 

Do you think you would know it if you heard the name? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, I cannot say about that because I just know the 
last name. 

Mr. Tavenner. You just know the last name. Now, see if you can 
recall others. 

Mr. Pahinui. Jack Kawano was president of that union. 

Mr. Tavenner. I think you have given us his name. 

Mr. Pahinui. Eileen Fujimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. What Fujimoto? 

Mr. Pahinui. Eileen Fujimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. Eileen Fujimoto. How was she employed, do you 
know ? 

JNIr. x^ahinui. I think she was working in the office at the ILWTJ at 
that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was she a secretary to any particular individual ? 

Mr. Pahinui. That I really don't know. And they had David 
Kamaka. 

Mr. Tavenner. David Kamaka ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. He has already testified. 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before the committee. 

Mr. Pahinui. Either him or William Kamaka. 

Mr. Tavenner. Speak a little louder, please. 

Mr. Pahinui. It is either William Kamaka or David Kamaka. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are not certain whether it is William or David ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No, because the name is between David and William. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you know it was one of those two ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Can you recall any others? 

Mr. Pahinui. I am not very sure. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know a person by the name of Domingo 

Mr. Pahinui. Cariaso. 

Mr. Tavenner. Cariaso. 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was he there ? 

Mr. Pahinui. He was there in Ben Kaahawinui's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. He attended the meeting at Ben Kaahawinui's 
home? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Cariaso. What position did he hold, if any? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, at that time he was in the executive board, too. 

Mr. Tavenner. Executive board. Executive board of what? 

Mr. Pahinui. ILWU, 137. 

Mr. Tavenner. And his first name was what? 

Mr. Pahinui. Domingo Cariaso. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you know a person by the name of Joe Blurr? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes ; I think he was on the executive board, too, at 
that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did he attend any of those meetings ? 



1 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1597 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes ; at Kimoto's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether "Joe Bhirr" is his true 
name ? 

Mr. Paiiinui. No; I don't think that is his real name, but I think 
that is his professional name on the water front. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is his professional name. 

Mr. Pahinui. On the water front, like they use all the time, or 
something like that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Explain that a little further to me. I didn't under- 
stand it. 

Mr. Paijinui. Most of the boys know him by that name — "Joe 
Blurr.'' Nobody else knew him by his real name unless he work side 
by side with him, with the people he works with, I guess. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know his real name ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No; I don't. 

Mr. Tavenner. How is that ? ^^ 

Mr. Pahinui. I don't. 

Mr. Tavenner. All of these persons whom you have named that at- 
tended the joint meeting at the home of Jack Kimoto and who were 
members of a union seems to have had some official position in the 
union. Do you know why that was, why the members of the Com- 
munist Party were officials in the union ? 

Mr. Pahinui. AVell, the way I see it, they tried to run the thing 
their way, instead of how the rank and filers think. 

Mr. Tavenxer. I am not certain iliat was plain what you said. Will 
you state hat over ? 

Mr. Pa^ , inui. They wanted to run the meeting according to the way 
they wanted to run it, not the way the rank and filers want it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Explain a little more what you mean. 

Mr. Pahinui. AVell, as you know, when they conduct a meeting and 
want to pass some kind of minutes in a meeting, like maybe make 
something to benefit the men, that if the men want to pass it, they 
will, and if they don't, they won't. 

Mr. Tavenner. If I understand you correctly, the Commuist Party 
would endeavor to get into its membership persons who were leaders. 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And who held official positions. 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. In the various unions. 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that right ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, do you know whether or not these persons 
you kneAv as members of the Communist Party endeavored to get their 
own members promoted to higher positions in the union ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. You see, any one person won't have a chance 
to run against the ones that are running already. Like if you have a 
president running, the opponent won't have a chance. 

Mr. Tavenner. The average man, rank-and-file man, of the labor 
union, would not have a chance, you say ? 

Mr. Pahinui. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did it work out the same way with regard to 
policies? 

6663G— 50— pt. 2 5 



1598 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Pahintiti. Well, policies were made by the executive board and 
taken to the rank and file. If the rank and file don't want it, they 
throw it away, but most of the time the people that do the talking are 
always Communists themselves. They do all the talking. 

Mr. Tavenner. I wonder if you would change chairs. That is an 
unusually noisy chair. Is that one better ? 

Mr. Pahinui. I think this one is a little worse. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did the rank and file of the membership of 
your local union know that you and the other persons you have men- 
tioned, who occupied high positions in the union, were members of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why didn't you tell them you were a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Pahinui. I wasn't so sure I was doing the right thing at the 
moment. 

Mr. Tavenner. ^Y[\y didn't the other persons like the ones whose 
names you have mentioned tell the rank and file that they were mem- 
bers of the Communist Party ; do you know ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, if they told them, I think they would tell them 
to go to Russia, I think. [Laughter in the audience.] 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, if the rank and file of your local 
union had known that those men who were their leaders were mem- 
bers of the Communist Party, they would likely have changed their 
leadership ? 

Mr. Pahinui. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you told by the membei-s of the Communist 
Party whether you should tell other people whether you were a Com- 
munist or not ? 

Mr. Pahinui. They told me not to tell. 

Mr. Tavenner. Not to tell. Did they tell you why they didn't want 
you to tell ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No; they didn't say anything about that. They just 
said, "Don't tell," that is all. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you think if it had been told that those leaders 
were members of the Communist Party, the rank and file would have 
put them out of their leadership ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Oh, yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, tell the committee, if you can, how these vari- 
ous officials, how these men who occupied positions in the union, were 
chosen to be candidates. , How did they select the candidates ; who 
selected them ? 

Mr. Pahinui. That I don't know very much about, but the point is 
that always the Communist Party members are the active ones to move 
everything that they want to move on their side. You can't ever beat 
them. They are active. And they are known among their fellow 
workers and they always have the chance to always move their fellow 
workers with them and go and get what they want. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings did you attend at the home of 
Jack Kimoto ? 

Mr. Pahinui. About three meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. About three meetings. These pei-sons whose names 
you have mentioned as having attended this joint meeting of the 
"Communist Party groups from the two employers that you men- 
tioned, how do you know those persons that attended that meeting 
were members of the Communist Party ? 



COMMUN-IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 1599 

Mr. Paiiiniti. Well, that is tlie only kind of people that shows up 
there, and nobody else. [Laughter in audience.] 

And I saw only "Joe Blurr's" party group, so far as I know, and 
that is what makes me, gives me the impression that they all must be 
Connnunists. 

Mr. Tavennek. You had been asked to become a member of their 
group and were given a card, weren't you? 

Mr. Paiiiniti. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have told us the name of the chairman of this 
meeting, this first meeting, but I have forgotten the name you men- 
tioned. The first meeting at Kimoto's house. 

Mr. Pahinui. That was Jack Kimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, who were the other officials of these groups, 
do you know ? Did they have a secretary and treasurer ? 

Mr. Pahinih. Well, they never bring up to me who was the chair- 
man of the group, or secretary, or anything like that. 

]\Ir. Ta\tnner. Now, you say there were three of these meetings 
held at the home of Jack Kimoto ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. AVhat kind of meetings were they? Meetings of 
what group? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, they always talked about the union activities. 
That is what they always talk about, and they don't talk about other 
things. 

Mr. Tavenner. They were talking about union activities? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Tell us more about the group, the designation, the 
name of the group that met at Jack Kimoto's. 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, that is the one I just gave the name. 

Mr. Tavenner. The one you just named? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr Tavenner. Well, what was that ? I am not talking now about 
the names of the persons, but what did they call the group ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, they just called them a Communist group, that 
is all according to my understanding. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, who attended these other two meetings you 
have told us about ; the first one, as to who attended? 

Mr. Pahinui. And the second one. 

Mr. Ta\tjnneb. The same ones? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. The two. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Did the same persons attend the second and third 
meeting at Jack Kimoto's who attended at the first, or substantially 
the same? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. Well, they recruited some more fellows, but 
I don't know their names. They were just recruiting at that time, too. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are not able to recall the names of the persons 
that they recruited at these other two meetings ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what was their plan for recruiting new mem- 
bers? Tell us how that was done, and what was said in the meetings 
about it ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, they usually say, at the meeting, that it was a 
good thing, and a benefit for the labor cause, at which most of the 



1600 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

recruits showed up, and after that they did not show up any more. 

Mr, Tavenner. In their meetings did they discuss their plans for 
recruiting new members ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. New members for what? 

Mr. Pahinui. For the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. I would like for you to think and see if you can 
recall the names of any of those recruits who were brought in, in the 
same way you had been brought in, to begin with ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, I don't think I can pick their names out. 
There were some Filipino boys, and it is hard to pronounce their names. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know a man by the name of Herman Ing? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes ; he was one of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. And who is that? 

Mr. Pahinui. He was one of the recruits, too. 

Mr. Tavtsnner. He was one of the recruits? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How was he employed, do you know ? 

Mr. Pahinui. He was employed at McCabe, Hamilton & Renney 
at this time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did lie stay in? 

Mr. Pahinui. He must be, because I understand he is, and he was 
while I was attending the meeting; he was still there. 

jMr. Tavenner. He was still there when you left ? Is that it ? I don't 
know whether I understood. 

Mr. Pahinui. When I was going to the meetings he was still there, 

Mr. Taat:nner. Oh, yes. While you were attending the meetings 
he was still there? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Can you recall the names of any others? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know" a person by the name of Levi Kealoha ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us w^hat you know about his connection with 
the Communist Party group, if any ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, he was at Kimoto's home, and sometimes he was 
out at Ben Kaahawinui's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us how many meetings of the Commu- 
ninst Party he attended ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, I figured he attended about six meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what position he held, if any? 

Mr. Pahinui. At that time I think he was third vice president of 
the ILWU, 137. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can 3^011 name any persons who came into the Com- 
munist Party and then quit? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, there was one. a Robert Lum ; that is the only 
one I knew who came in the party. When they gave him a party card 
he broke it all up, and so h© stopped going to the meetings, and did 
not go again. 

Mr. Tavenner. He broke the card up ? 

]\Ir. Pahinui. Yes; that's right. 

Mr. Ta\t3nner. Did he come to any meetings after he broke the 
card up ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1601 

IVIr. Pahinui. Never again. 

Mr. Tav^nner. Do jou know of any other person besides Lum? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yon mentioned tlie fact that a Mr. Sclimidt attended 
this first nieetino- at tlie home of »Iack Kimoto, when the two groups 
met together? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us more about Schmidt. What was his first 
name, do you recall ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Henry. 

Mr. Tavenner. What part did he take in the meetings? 

Mr. Pahinui. Pie did not do anything. He just sat there all through 
the meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what position he held at that time? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, he came from the mainland at that time. He 
was down here to represent the dock strike threat, I think, in 1937 — 
19-47. That is what he was down here for. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he attend more than one of the Communist 
Party meetings? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, he only showed up at that one time, and never 
came again, because he went back home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever talk to him yourself? 

Mr. Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tav-enner. Did he ever have anything to say to you about the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned a person that you referred to as 
Tim Freeman. Tell us more about his attendance at the Communist 
Party meetings. 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, he was something like an organizer for the 
Communist Party. He was organizing, or tried to organize, some 
more of the members. He was trying to tell the members how to 
organize the party. 

Mr. Tavenner. He would tell them what ? 

Mr. Pahinui. How to organize the party, but which I did not use. 
I guess somebody else did, maj'be, the other boys, maybe they did, 
but I did not use anything ; so I did not make an effort to try. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings did he attend ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Two meetings at Ben Kaahawinui's home, and one 
at Kimoto's home. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, w^hen this man Freeman gave instructions 
about organizing the Communist Party, would he give these instruc- 
tions openly in the meetings to all the members? 

Mr. Pahinui. No ; just mostly to the ones that are active. 

Mr. Tavenner. Just to the ones that were active ? 

Mr. Pahinui. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you hear him giving the instructions? 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, I only heard a little bit, how he mentioned it, 
to go out and try to bring the members in, see, but it is not easy the 
way he said it, but I think about how it is. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, see if you can tell us something about the 
way in wliich he said it should be done. 



1602 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, he says to talk to the person, and then give 
him some of the literature we had, to let the person read it first, to 
get so he can refresh his memory after that; he might want to think 
it over, and might come in, and you can have a talk with him now 
and then. That is as far as I went through that talk we had. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you subscribe to any Communist Party papers 
or publications? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Now, after having testified this far about Com- 
munist Party activities, can you recall at this time the names of any 
other persons who took part in the Communist Party meetings, or 
who were present at the Communist Party meetings with you ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, how long were you in the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Pahinui. About 7 to 8 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the party ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us about how- you got out, and why. 

Mr. Pahinui. Well, I just left the party, being I never had my 
money's worth, and I left it on account of my wife, and she told me 
if I did not like to live with her I could leave, and so I decided to 
give up. She said if I quit now it would be much better than if I 
quit later, or get hurt later, and I took my wife's advice. It some- 
times pays off. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you stopped going to the Communist Party, 
did you tell any member that you were withdrawing from the party? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you write any letter of any kind ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you turn your book in ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No ; I burned everything. My wife helped me do it. 
She told me to burn everything, and not to go to any more meetings. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. Your wife helped you to burn everything? 

Mr, Pahinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you been asked to go back since ? 

Mr. Pahinui. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Moulder. You say that you received a Communist Party mem- 
bership card. Who delivered the card to you ? 

Mr. Pahinui. Julian Napuunoa; he delivered the card to me 
personally. 

Mr. Walter. Thank you very much. 

(Witness excused.) 

( Recess. ) 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will be in order. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. James Freeman. 

Mr. Walter. Is Mr. Freeman in the room ? 

Mrs. BousLOG. I think he is outside. Here he is. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand. Do you swear that 
the testimony you are about to give to be the truth, the whole truth^ 
and nothing but the truth, so help you Grod. 

Mr. Freeman. I do. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1603 

TESTIMONY OF DWIGHT JAMES FREEMAN, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 

COUNSEL, HARRIET BOUSLOG 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you Mr. D wight James Freeman? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Freeman. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify herself for the record ? 

Mrs. BousLOG. I would like my name, Harriet Bouslog, to be en- 
tered of record as counsel for Dwiglit James Freeman, and at this 
time I would like to file with the committee a motion to quash the 
subpena served upon Dwight James Freeman. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received for the record." 

Mr. Harrison. The motion is the same as the other. 

Mrs. BousLOG. Yes ; Mr. Committeeman. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Are you sometimes known or referred to as James 
Freeman ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tav-enner. And also as Jim Freeman ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you presently reside? 

Mr. Freeman. 30 Dewey Court, Honolulu, T. H. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you resided there ? 

Mr. Freeman. Several months. I don't know the exact date we 
moved there. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed ? 

Mr. Freeman. Ask that question again, please. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed ? 

Mr. Free]\j*an. 1 am unemployed at the present time. 

Mr. TA\^ENNER. How long have you been unemj^loyed ? 

Mr. Freeman. Since Friday of last week. 

Mr. Ta-venner. What was your position prior to Friday of last 
week? 

Mr. Freeman. I was working on a construction job. 

Mr. Tavenner. For whom ? 

Mr. Freeman. C. W. Winstedt, Ltd. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold any other position at that time? 

(Confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Freeman. On the advice of counsel, I refuse to answer that 
question on the ground that it might tend to incriminate me, and for 
the other reasons stated in the motion to q[uash this subpena. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your educational background, Mr. Free- 
man? 

Mr. Freeman. I went through grade school. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. Freeman. Born in Oklahoma, January 2, 1912. 

Mr. Tavenner, Will you please give the committee a brief outline 
of your work record or occupation record ? 

Mr, Freeman. On the advice of counsel I refuse to answer that, 
on the ground that it might tend to incriminate me, and for the fur- 
ther reasons as stated in the motion. 



" Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Dwight James Freeman is identical 

with the motion filed on behalf of Wilfred Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. See 
n 1 ?^Rn 



p. 1550 



1604 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you come to Hawaii ? 

Mr. Freeman. It was sometime in the first part of 1942. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you remained in Hawaii all the time since 
1942? 

Mr. Freeman. No, sir. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Where were you living before you came to Hawaii 
in 1942? 

Mr. Freeman. If I remember correctly, I think I was living in 
Oakland, Calif. 

Mr. Tavenner. Oakland, Calif.; where did you live in Oakland, 
Calif.? 

Mr. Freeman. I am not real positive of that address. I think it 
was 100 Ninth Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long had you lived there ? 

Mr. Freeman. I think I had lived there something over a year, but 
I would not say exactly how long it was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you live there as early as February or March 
of 1941? 

Mr, Freeman. I think it is possible. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Prior to that — prior to j'our living in Oakland, 
Calif., where did you live? 

Mr. Freeman. If I remember correctly, I think I was staying with 
my mother, in southern California, Garden Grove. 

Mr. Tavenner. Garden Grove, Calif. Where did you live in 
Garden Grove? 

Mr. Freeman. I don't remember the number. 

Mr. TA^nENNER. Do you remember the street ? 

Mr. Freeman. I would not be positive, not on that, but I think it 
was G Street. . • 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you at any time live at 33 Fourth Street, Gar- 
den City — I mean Garden Grove, Calif. ? 

Mr. Freeman. It is possible. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you live there in 1940, say, during the month 
of October 1940? 

Mr. Freeman. I was staying at my mother's address in Garden 
Grove in 1940. 

Mr. Tavenner. In October 1940. Would that include October 
1940? 

Mr. Freeman. I don't remember for sure, sir. 

]\Ir. Walter. What was your mother's address ? 

Mr. Freeman. That is what I stated. I don't remember for sure. 
I lived a lot of places in the last few years. To remember them all is 
an impossible job. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let's see, let's see where some of the other places are. 
Have you ever lived in Salt Lake City? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. I have lived in Salt Lake City. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you live there in November 1942? 

Mr. Freeman. I don't remember whether it was November or not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere were you living in November 1942? 

Mr. Freeman. As' I stated, I don't remember whether it was in Salt 
Lake City or not. I am not sure of the exact dates. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, when did you come to Salt Lake City to live? 

Mr. Freeman. Sometime in the fall of 1942. 

Mr. Ta'V'Enner. When did you leave? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1605 

MV. Freeman. In the spring of 1943. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then when you — well, now, let me ask you, where 
did you live when you wore in Salt Lake City? 

Mr. Freeman. I lived in Provo, Utah — well, I lived also in Prove, 
Utah, and Salt Lake City ; what the addresses were, I don't remem- 
ber. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you remember the name of the street on which 
you lived while you were in Salt Lake City ? 

Mr. Freeman. No; I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Could it have been Third Avenue ? 

Mr. Freeman. It could have been. Even mentioning it, it does not 
bring it back to mind exactly. It was an apartment house. It was on 
the third floor. 

Mr. Tavenner. I think that this might help to refresh your recol- 
lection. Might it have been 217 Third Avenue, where you lived at 
Salt Lake City ? 

Mr. Freeman. I would have to check through my records, perhaps, 
to answer that question, sir. 

M'r. TA^^NNER. Now where did you move to in 1943 ? I understood 
you left Salt Lake City in 1943. 

Mr. Freeman. I think I went to San Francisco. 

Mr. Tavenner. You moved there in the spring of 1943. How long 
did you live there ? 

Mr. Freeman. It was just for a short period. I enlisted in the serv- 
ice. I think it was either in July or August. 

Mr. Tavenner. So, you may have been there in the latter part of 
July or the first of August ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes; I don't remember the exact dates I went in 
the service, sometime, I think it was — I enlisted one night sometime 
in August, if I remember correctly. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall what street you lived on when you 
were in San Francisco? 

Mr. Freeman. I think it was Washington Street, but I would not 
be positive of that. 

Mr. Ta\tdnner. Was it 2572 Washington Street ? 

Mr. Freeman. I would not remember the number, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now you stated you enlisted in August, probably, 
of 1943 in the Army. 

Mr. Freeman. No ; in the Navy Seabees. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what w^as the draft board to which you were 
subject? 

Mr. Freeman. Southern California. I asked for a transfer to one 
of the draft boards in San Francisco, and then I enlisted in the Navy 
Seabees. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was your draft board No. 173, Anaheim, Calif.? 

Mr. Freeman. It was in Anaheim. I don't recall the number. I 
could check that. 

Mr, Tavenner. But it was in Anaheim, although you don't recall 
the number of your board? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t.nner. I show you an application for voluntary induc- 
tion, dated July 22, 1943, to Local Board 173 of Anaheim. Will you 



1606 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

state if that is the draft board to which you referred as having made 
the application to? 

Mr. Freeman. So far as I know, that is. I think this may be the 
letter to the United States Navy. 

Mr. Tavenner. It appears to be signed by yon, Dwight James 
Freeman. That is correct, isn't it ? 

Mr. Freeman. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is your signature ? 

Mr. Freeman. It looks like it. I signed such a form. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, is there any doubt about it ? 

Mr. Freeman. I said it looked like my signature. I signed such a 
form. I am not a handwriting expert. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you know your own signature, don't you ? You 
know what you signed ? 

Mr. Freeman. I stated it looked like my signature. I signed such 
a form. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you believe it is your signature ? 

Mr. Freeman. I believe so. 

Mr. Tavenner. Here is a photostatic copy of a letter, addressed to 
Local Board 173. If there is any doubt about it, will you examine 
that letter and state whether or not you wrote it? [Handing docu- 
ment to witness.] 

You have examined the letter ? 

Mr. Freeman. I have. 

Mr. Taat^nner. Is it your letter ? 

Mr. Freeman. It looks like it ; yes. I think I wrote such a letter ; 
yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, it is written in longhand, isn't it ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Signed in longhand ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tamsnner. Well, did you write the letter? 

Mr. Freeman. I said I wrote such a letter, 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you write this letter? 

Mr. Freeman. I said I w^rote such a letter. That could very well 
be it. It looks like my signature. I am not denying 

Mr. Ta\^enner. I know, but neither are you admitting it. 

Mr. Freeman. All right, then ; it is. So far as I know% it is. 

Mr. TA^^SNNER. It is your letter ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes, 

Mr. Tavenner. Signed by you ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes ; I said as much to start with. 

Mr. Tavenner. No ; you did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you now a third letter, dated November 15, 
1942, addressed to the Local Board No, 3, in longhand, ancl ask you 
to examine that, and in order that there may be no misunderstanding 
about it, state whether or not you wrote the letter. Is this your letter, 
written by you ? 

Mr, Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. That is a photostatic copy of his letter. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. That is a photostatic copy. 



COMMUN"IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1607 

I hand you noAv a registration card from the draft board, and ask 
you to, or rather a photostatic copy of it — it appears to be signed with 
your name at the bottom. Will you examine it, please, and state 
whether or not you signed it ? 

(Witness examines document.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that your signature? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you now a photostatic copy of a typewritten 
letter, addressed to the Selective Service System, in which you request 
permission to leave the United States for 12 months in order to accept 
employment with the Pacific Bridge Co., contractors at Pearl Harbor, 
Territory of Hawaii, in which your name appears to be signed. Will 
you examine that photostatic copy and state whether or not that is your 
signature ? 

(Witness examines document.) 

Mr. Tavenner, Will you answer the question ? 

Mr. Freeman. State it again. 

Mr. Tavenner. After having examined the document I handed you, 
will you state whether or not it was signed by you, Dwight James 
Freeman. 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1 hand you a photostatic copy of a request for trans- 
fer for delivery, bearing date July 22, 1943, addressed to your local 
board, and ask you whether or not your name is signed to it, and 
whether it is your signature ? 

(Witness examines document.) 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Is that your signature ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes, 
Mr. Ta\t2nner. I hand you now a photostatic copy of your selective- 
service questionnaire, on which there appears the registrant's affidavit, 
and ask you whether or not that is your signature to the affidavit. 

( Witness examines the document. ) 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Have you identified the signature forming part of 
the registrant's affidavit as your signature ? • 

Mr. Freeman, It appears to be my signature. There is some on 
that there, I was a little confused about, because the letter "V" is not 
the w^ay, the same type of "V" I make now. Compared with the others, 
it is not quite the same as the other signatures. I think it is my signa- 
ture, and I remember giving this information contained on there in 
some form or other. 

Mr. Tai'enner. You remember filing your selective-service question- 
naire ? 

Mr. Freeman, Yes, The exact details of it I don't recall. 

Mr, Tavenner. I understand; but you recall signing it, do you not? 

Mr, Freeman, Yes, 

Mr, Ta\tenner, And after having examined the signature, you are 
satisfied that it is your signature? 

Mr, Freeman. I think it is my signature, 

Mr, Tavenner, What do you mean by "think" ? 

Mr, Freeman, I told you, on the first name, it is a little different 
compared with the other signatures that you have there — it is slightly 



1608 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

different. The "F" is exactly or appears to me to be the same, and I 
think it is my signature, and I signed such a statement to the Selective 
Service Board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you satisfied it is your signature? 

Mv, Freeman. Yes, yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you now a photostatic copy of a page relat- 
ing to the naming of the beneficiary in your war-risk insurance, which 
carries the name, the signature, "Dwight James Freeman," and ask 
you to examine your signature on that document and state whether or 
not you signed that document. 

Mrs. BousLOG. Mr. Tavenner, this appears to be the eighth page 
of an additional document. Do you have the rest of the document 
present ? 

Mr. Ta\t5Nner. I have addressed my question to the witness. 

Mr. Freeman. I don't know that 1 understand the question. 

Mr. Walter. Wliat is the question ? 

Mr. Freeman. The rest of the document that this is the eighth page 
of, is it present? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, Mr. Chairman. I do not have any paper other 
than the one I have handed relating to that document. 

Mr. Walter. For what purpose is tliis question asked? 

Mr. Tavenner. For the purpose of identifying his signature. 

Mr. Walter. I don't see any valid reason why you cannot answer 
that question. 

Mr. Freeman. I was merely wanting to know what is on the rest 
of the document, that is all. As far as I know, that is my signature. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you another document, which is the oath of 
allegiance when you were inducted in the Navy, bearing date August 
19, 1943, which bears the signature "Dwight James Freeman," and ask 
you if you signed the original of that document, and whether that 
is a copy of your handwriting, your signature. 

(Witness examines document.) 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Is that your signature ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I now hand you a photostatic copy of shipping 
articles, bearing date August 19, 1943, which purports to bear your 
signature, "Dwight James Freeman," and ask you to examine your 
signature and state whether or not that is a copy of your signature. 

(Mr. Freeman confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that your signature ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you now a letter bearing date June 21, 1943, 
addressed to local board 173, Anaheim, Calif., purporting to bear 
your signature, the signature "D. J. Freeman — D. F. — D. J. Freeman," 
relating to an appeal. Will you examine that letter and state whether 
or not it was written by you and whether or not you signed it ? 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Chairman, may I suggest to counsel don't you 
think it would be better to mark those documents as exhibits before 
submitting them to the witness, so that the record will properly reflect 
the documents ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Each of these documents has already been admitted 
in evidence and bears an exhibit number on the document. 

Mr. Moulder. I hadn't heard you make any reference to the exhibit. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1609 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. That was done in Washington. I will pre- 
sent thcni here presently. 

Was that letter written by you, in your own handwriting? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And signed by you ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes ; well, I would like to correct that. It was signed 
by me. I would not guarantee the answer. I did not examine the 
whole letter. Whether or not it was my writing or I had somebody 
else write it. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will hand it back to you and ask you to examine it. 

(Witness examines letter again.) 

Mr. Freeman. I cannot say by looking at it whether it is my hand- 
writing or not, but I will say, if it is not, I did dictate this letter. 

Mr. Walter. Did you write such a letter ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. To the best of your recollection, it is that letter, that 
3'ou wrote, you signed. 

Mr. Freeman. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. You gave us your Honolulu address for the past 
few months, I believe. AVhere else have you lived in Honolulu other 
than the address that you gave? 

Mr. Freeman. At what period are you referring, sir ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, from the time you took up your residence in 
Honolulu. 

Mr. Freeman. On advice of counsel I refuse to answer that ques- 
tion on the ground that it might tend to incriminate me, and on the 
other grounds already stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. In November 1948, did you live at 1920 Kahakai 
Street, in Honolulu ? 

Mr. Freeman. Would you state that address again, sir? 

Mr. Tavenner. 1920 Kahakai. My pronunciation is not reliable. 

Mr. Freeman. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta^^enner. Mr. Chairman, each of the documents as to which 
the witness has identified his signature were received in evidence be- 
fore this committee in testimony which I will presently present to you 
again to refresh your recollection. I ask that they be marked "James 
Freeman Exhibits K-1, K-2" — were marked as follows : The appli- 
cation for voluntary induction, of July 22, 1943, as "James Freeman 
Exhibit K-1." 

Mr. Walter. I don't think you should offer that because that is the 
one document, as I recall it, in which he expresses some doubt as to 
his signature. 

Mrs. BousLOG. I think there is some misunderstanding. I think 
there is a misunderstanding. 

Mr. Freeman. I don't think that is the document I had doubt on. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes ; I did not understand that there was any doubt 
regarding his signature on any of them, Mr. Chairman. That is my 
recollection. 

Mr. Walter. Let them be marked and received, and I will examine 
the testimony and if there is any doubt as to any one of them, as to that 
particular exhibit, it will be excluded. ' 



16 



" Retained In committee files. 



1610 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAU 

Mr. Tavenner. I say this first document has been admitted in evi- 
dence as "James Freeman Exhibit K-1." The letter of June 6, 1943^ 
addressed to the local board, as "Exhibit James Freeman K-2," 
another letter of Local Board 173, bearing date November 15, 1942, 
as "Exhibit K-3," the registration card as "Exhibit K-4," the letter 
to the Selective Service System, requesting permission to leave the 
United States for 12 months, as "Freeman Exhibit K-5," the request 
for delivery of July 22, 1943, "James Freeman Exhibit K-6," the 
selective service questionnaire as "James Freeman Exhibit K-7," the 
page relating to the beneficiary in an insurance policy as "James 
Freeman Exhibit K-8," the oath of allegiance as "K-9," the shipping 
articles as "K-10," and the letter of June 21, 1943, to local 173 as 
"K-11." 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, they will be received. I might 
state to counsel, if there is any reason you feel the documents should 
not be received 

Mrs. BousLOG. I would like to say that, not being aware of any 
prior testimony before this committee, not being appraised of the pur- 
pose for which this line of questioning is offered, or what its purpose 
or point is, I don't believe that there is any showing of any relevance 
to the purposes of this committee. 

Mr. Walter. I think your mind will be set straight with respect to 
that as we proceed. 

Mr. Moulder. The first one was K-1, and so on, but the witness 
hasn't testified as to K-1 except by your remarks when offering them. 
That is the reason I suggested they be marked before submitting them 
to the w^itness and referring to them as "Exhibit so-and-so." 

Mr. Tavenner. Each exhibit as presented to him was described and 
I used the same description in reading into the record the exhibit 
number, but if the committee desires, I will hand the entire group back 
to the witness and have him look them over again, if he desires to do^ 
so. 

Mr. Walter. I think they have been sufficiently identified. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Freeman, did you make an application for a 
domestic money order on November 29, 1948, in the amount of $15, 
made out to Felice Clark, 942 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif., 
and also three other money orders, one October 18, 1948, in the amount 
of $24.05, to the same person at the same address, one of November 18, 
1948, in the amount of $74.63, to the same person at the same address, 
and the last dated December 28, 1948, to the same person at the same 
address? I hand you photostatic copies of such money orders or 
applications for such money orders and ask you to examine them in 
order to refresh your recollection. 

(Witness examines documents referred to.) 

Mr. Freeman. On advice of counsel I refuse to answer the question 
on the ground that it might tend to incriminate me, and on the other 
grounds already stated. 

Mr. Harrison. May I see the other exhibits, K-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 ? 

Mr.TAVENNER. Each of the four applications for money orders 
are marked at the lower right hand corner as "Q-1, Q-2, Q-3, and 
Q-4," respectively, having been introduced in evidence heretofore as 
"James Freeman Exhibits Q-1, Q-2, Q-3, and Q-4." " 

" See pp. 1611-1614. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1611 




James Freeman 
Exhibit Q-1 



1612 



COMMUKIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 




James Freeman 
Exhibit Q-2 



COMMUmST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1613 




James Freeman 
Exhibit Q-3 



66636— 50— pt. 2 6 



1614 



COMMUN'IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 




James Freeman 
Exhibit Q-4 

Mr. Walter. Are you offering them in evidence? 

Mr. Tavenner. Having already offered them, I don't believe it is 
necessary to offer them in evidence, but I state it is merely for the 
purpose of identification. 

Now, the payee on these applications, Mr. Freeman, is one Felice 
Clark. Who is Felice Clark? 

Mr. Freeman. I refuse to answer the question on advice of counsel, 
on the ground that this might tend to incriminate me, and on the 
other grounds which have already been stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. The address given of Felice Clark is 942 Market 
Street, San Francisco, Calif. Do you know what institution or 
organization has its headquarters at that address ? 

Mr. Freeman. On advice of counsel I refuse to answer the question 
on the grounds that it might tend to incriminate me and for the other 
reasons already stated. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1615 

Mr. Tavenner. You know it to be the headquarters of the Com- 
munist Party in San Francisco, do you not? 

Mr. Freeman. On advice of counsel I refuse to answer the question 
on the ground this might tend to incriminate me and for the other 
reasons already stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1920 Kahakai Street, appearing below your sig- 
nature, was the place of your residence on the dates of these appli- 
cations, was it not ? 

Mr, Freeman. On advice of counsel I refuse to answer the question 
on the ground it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Isn't it a matter of fact that you have already told 
the committee that that was your address in November 1948? 

Mr. Freeman. I think the record will speak for itself. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you prompted to make that reply by counsel ? 
I withdraw the question. 

But, if the chairman please, I think the witness is entitled to benefit 
of counsel but not to be prompted as to the replies that should be 
made. 

Mr. "Walter. I don't agree entirely. If counsel wants to assume 
the responsibility of indicating what the answer ought to be 

Mrs. BousLOG. It seems to me, Mr. Chairman, that as a matter of 
law that is the correct interpretation. Let the record speak for 
itself. 

Mr. Tavenner. I now hand you, Mr. Freeman, photostatic copies 
of four money orders which have previously been admitted in evi- 
dence and designated, respectively, "Q-5, Q-6, Q-7, and Q-8," and 
I will ask you whether or not you obtained these four money ordere 
in response to your own application and that you mailed those money 
orders, mailed them to Felice Clark ? ^* 

Mr. Freeman. On advice of counsel I refuse to answer the question 
on the grounds this might tend to incriminate me, and for the other 
reasons already stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will read for the record, first, Q-5, which is Fe- 
lice Clark, and it is marked "Paid, December 7, 1948," and the sec- 
ond, which is Q-6, is payable to Felice Clark, and is marked "Paid 
January 3, 1949," and the third is, Q-8, and is payable to Felice Clark, 
and it is marked "Paid, November 24, 1948," and the last which is 
Q-7, is payable to Felice Clark, and marked "Paid, October 22, 1948." 

Mr. Freeman, I hand to you a photograph which has been intro- 
duced in evidence as "Pahinui Exhibit No. 1," and I ask you if 
that is your photograph ; a photograph of you ? Will you answer the 
question, please? 

Mr. Freeman. State the question, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have examined the photograph which I handed 
you? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is it a photograph of you ? 

Mr. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you know Jack Hall ? 

Mr. Freeman. On the advice of counsel I refuse to answer on the 



'8 See pp. 1616-1619- 



1616 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 




^ 3 
^ td 

i-s 



COMMUXIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1617 




< 


rD 






<5 


C? 


UJ 




a 


•H 


fa 






M 


a 




1^ 


w 


t-s 





U ff^y^;^; 






1618 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 







COMMUN'IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1619 




1620 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAU 

ground that it might tend to incriminate me, and on the further 
grounds stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position does Wilfred Oka hold ? 

Mr. Freeman. On the advice of counsel, I refuse to answer on the 
grounds it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know him ? 

Mr. Freeman. On the advice of counsel, I refuse to answer the 
question on the grounds it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Harriet Bouslog? 

Mr. Freeman. Harriet Bouslog is my attorney. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Mr. Wheeler ? 

Mr. Freeman. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now, or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Freeman. On advice of counsel, I refuse to answer, on the 
ground that it might tend to incriminate me, and on the further 
grounds already stated in my objection. 

Mr. Tavenner. For what purpose were you sent to Honolulu ? 

Mr. Freeman. On advice of counsel, I refuse to answer the question, 
on the ground it might tend to incriminate me, and for the further 
reasons already stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Harrison. Mr. Freeman, you say you were in the United States 
military service? 

Mr. Freeman. I was, sir. 

Mr. Harrison. For what period of time did you serve? 

Mr. Freeman. I served, I remember the date he stated there. July — 
August 1943 to December 2, 1945. 

Mr. Tavenner. And where were you in the service ? 

Mr. Freeman. That is, at different camps, sir? 

Mr. Harrison. No. Where did you serve in the military service? 

Mr. Freeman. I was in the Navy ; the Seabees, in overseas service. 

Mr. Harrison. Did you receive an honorable discharge ? 

Mr. Freeman. I received an honorable discharge. 

Mr. Walter. You served your country well during the shooting 
stage of the war, Jim, why don't you answer those questions ? 

Mr. Freeman. I have been advised by counsel of my legal rights. 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

(Witness excused.) 

WILLIAM A. WHEELER— Resumed 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Wheeler has already been sworn. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Wheeler, as an investigator of this committee, 
did you conduct an investigation in the State of California, for the 
purpose of determining the receipt of Communist Party funds in 
California ? 

Mr. Wheeler. I did, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And also for tlie purpose of determining whether 
or not those funds, or any part thereof, were remitted to the head- 
quarters of the Communist Party in the cities of the United States ; 
and the city of New York ? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct, sir. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1621 

Mv. Tavenner, Will you state to the committee the results of your 
investigations, and then what you did ? 

Mr. Wheeler. Information in the files of the Committee on 
Un-American Activities reflects that the Communist Party of Hawaii 
constitutes a subdivision of district 13, Connnunist Party, State of 
California, San Francisco, Calif., and also that district 13 of the 
Communist Party is affiliated with the Comnnmist Party, United 
States of America, with offices in New York City. 

To conclusively prove that the Communist Party of Hawaii is 
affiliated with district 13, and to show district 13's relationship to the 
Communist Party, United States of America, the following facts are 
set forth : 

In the course of tlie investigation of subversive activities in the Ter- 
ritory of Hawaii, 1 examined the bank account of the Communist 
Party of California, Day and Night Branch, Bank of America, Powell 
and Market Streets, San Francisco, Calif. An examination was made 
on Thursday, July 14, on Friday July 15, and on Monday, July 18, 
1949. 

Mr. Tavenner. In what name does that account appear ? 

Mr. Wheeler. The Communist Party of California, 701 Garfield 
Building, 942 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Prior to the examination, preliminary investigation disclosed that 
the Bank of America requires depositors of commercial accounts to 
include on deposit slips the numerical symbol designating the payor's 
bank. Information developed that the numerical symbols designating 
banks in Hawaii are from 59-101 up to, and including, 59-139. In the 
examination of the bank account, no such items appeared on the 
deposit slips. 

The Bank of America also requires the numerical symbol designating 
the post office station issuing money orders to be included in the 
deposit slips. St?.tions in Hawaii are identified by four digits pre- 
fixed by the letter "X." Post office stations in JEIawaii run from 
X-1000 to X-1198. Only four such money orders were noted during 
the period of time covered by the examination of the bank account of 
the Communist Party, State of California, in San Francisco. During 
the examination^ four items of interest were noted, the first appearing 
on the deposit slip of November 20, 1948. The description of the slip 
is as follows: Commercial account, San Francisco; the date, October 
20, 1948, for the credit of the Communist Party of California, 942 
]\Iarket Street, Room 701, San Francisco 2, Calif. On this deposit 
slip appears item X-1000 in the amount of $24.05, and the total 
amount deposited was $169.30. Then a certified copy presented to me 
by Mr. E. J. Darbey, assistant cashier of the bank, I previously 
mentioned. 

I would also like to say a subpena was served on the Bank of 
America, and all this material was received, under the subpena, Mr. 
Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce this deposit slip in evidence, 
and mark it "l^Hieeler Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.^® 

Mr. Wheeler. I also examined the statement of account of the 
Communist Party for the mo ith of October 1948, and listed under 



1" See p. 1622. 



1622 



COMMUN-IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



R-8 1.48 



COMMERCIAL 

NATIONAL s'AvaNo's ASSOCIATION 

SAN FRANrigro October 20 lo AB 
FOR CREDIT OF 

Commimist Party of California 
942 Market St., Room 701 
San Francisco 2, Calif. 

PLEASE SPECIFY THE BANKS ON WHICH CHECKS ARE DRAWN 
AMERICAN BANKERS' ASSOCIATION NUMBERS SHOULD BE USED WHENEVER 
GIVEN. OTHERWISE. FOR CHECKS DRAWN ON OUT OF TOWN BANKS, LIST 
NAME OF TOWN DRAWN ON. 



DESCRIPTION 



DOLLARS 



CURRENCY 

COIN 

r-utrnK^CL f properly ^ 

^rlt.V.I\0 VenDORSED-' 




8.00 
.51 



2A.38 
25.70 
52. A6 
2/,. 05 
25.00 
9.20 



169.30 



CERTIFIED TO BE A TRUE AND CORRECT 
copy OF ORIGINAL ON FILE 



BANK OF AMERICA NT^^ 



^ 




Wheeler 
Exhibit 1 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1623 

the heading "Deposits" appeared the item $169.30, which was depos- 
ited on October 20, 1948. Botli the date and the amount deposited 
correspond with the deposit slip. This substantiates the fact that 
item X-1000 appearing on the deposit slip of October 20, 1948, was 
deposited in the Communist Party bank account. 

As I previously said, an amount corresponding to the deposit slip 
is on the ledger sheet of the Communist Party of California, with the 
address, 701 Garfield Building, 942 Market Street, San Francisco 
Calif. 

I present a certified copy of this document. 

Mr. Tamsnner. I offer it in evidence as Wheeler exhibit No. 2. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.^" 

Mr. Tavenner. Proceed. 

Mr. Wheeler. The second item appeared under deposit slip of No- 
vember 20, 1948, described as follows: "For the credit of the Com- 
munist Party of California, 942 Market Street, room 701, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif." The total amount deposited at this particular time was 
$788.03, included as an item is the figure, X-1000, in the amount of 
$74.63. I would like to present this to Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. I offer the credit slip in evidence, and ask that it be 
designated as "Wlieeler Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.-^ 

Mr. Wheeler. Also examined was the statement of account of the 
Communist Party for November 1948. Under "Deposit" it is noted 
that the amount is $788.03, and was deposited on November 20, 1948. 
Said amount and date correspond to deposit slip. This discloses that 
the item referred to as X-1000, in the amount of $74.63, appearing on 
the deposit slip of November 20, 1948, was credited to the Communist 
Party bank account. 

I w^ould like to introduce the statement of account of the Communist 
Party for that month. 

Mr. Tavenner. It is offered in evidence as "Wheeler Exhibit No. 4." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received. 

Mr. Wheeler. The third item of interest appearing on the deposit 

slip of December 3, 1948 the deposit slip, is described as follows : 

"Commercial, Bank of America, for the credit of the Communist Party 
of California, 942 Market Street, room 701, San Francisco 2, Calif." 
The total amount deposited this day was $1,070.75. Among the items 
deposited was the figure X-1050, in the amount of $15. 

I would like to introduce this. 

Mr. Tavenner. It is offered in evidence as Wheeler Exhibit No. 5. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received. 

Mr. Wheeler. Also examined was the statement of account for the 
Communist Party, for December 1948. Under the heading "Deposits" 
$1,070.75 was credited to the Communist Party's account on December 
3, 1948. This amount, likewise, corresponds to the deposits that 
entered as exhibit No. 5. 

Mr. Tavenner. This is offered in evidence as Wheeler Exhibit 
No. 6. 



=» See p. 1624. 

21 Wheeler Exhibits 3, 4, and 5 retained in committee files. 



1624 



COAIMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT WITH 

OAT AND NIGHT OFFICE 

%attk of Atttctrira 

WATIONAU I'^V.T-^rS ASSOCIATION 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



' COMMUHIST PARTY OP CAUPOBHIA 
70a Garflald Building 



L 



942 li&ricat Strast. 
San Fi«nol*oo, Calif. 



"1 



J 



OLD BALANCE 



1,356.95 
1,308.25 
1,278.25 
632.66 
532.64 
512.23 
174.05 



978.92 
963.92 
7 01.04 
1,978.80 
1,722.08 
326.78 



286.20 



-LISTED IN ORDER OF l^AYMIWT . Ht*P ACROSS 



48.70- 
30.00- 
31.39- 
75.00- 
20.41 - 
35,00- 
25.00- 



15.00- 

250.00" 

215.00" 

215.00- 

1.564.60- 

1 3.3 9- 

4.81  

29.43- 

6.70- 



280.00- 334.20- 
25.02- 



303.18- 
4 0.00- 



12.88" 

334.20- 

4 1.72- 

189.20- 
93.53- 



25.00- 



10.83- 



145.00 
43.08- 



NEW BALANCE 



246.03 
310.97 
357.82 



1,837.79 

482.86 



375.00 



CKRTIPIKD TO BE i TRUE k COEEBC^' 
OF THE 0BI8IHAL 0)1 FILE 
BAHK OF AMERICA V.T. k S.A 
DAY A BSrp^^rrTp? 5f6 



SEP 26 48 
SEP 27 48 
SEP 29 48 
Oa 1 48 
Oa 4 48 
oa 548 
Ca 618 



OCT 8 48 
0CT11 48 
XT 13 48 
0ai4 48 
i48 
2048" 



0a22 48 
0025 48 



COPY 



1,356.95 
1,308.25 
1,278.25 
632.66 
532.64 
512.23 
174.05 



978.92 
963.92 
701.04 
1,978.80 
1,722.08 
326.78 



286.20 
654.50 



S 

s 
s 
s 
s 
s 



s 




PUatt ekamine this nahrxiem st once. If no error u niporwrd in tn d«y» th- aa^anml wiH be consuStrtd cvttkU 

Afi orau are crt^kad rabfcct to &tial ^y^cnl. 

rLEASE ADVISE US OF ANY CHANGE IN ADOdESS 

tM)ia maiiud SC — LS — LST corec Soviet aaargc lor Pncediag Uoalli. 

■■..OS A-rr owviMO) USB lEVEIiSE SIDE FOB BEGONCOING TCHjS AtXXJUNT 

Wheeler 
Exhibit 2 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.^^ 

Mr. Wheeler. The fourth and last item appeared on the deposit 
slip for December 30, 1948. Deposit slip dated December 30, 1948, 
Communist Party of California, 942 Market Street, room 701, San 
Francisco 2, Calif. The entire amount of this particular deposit cor- 
responds with the exact amount of the money order, $46.68, the only 
item deposited. 

Mr. Ta^^enner. It is tendered in evidence, and request that it be 
marked. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received. The money order referred to 
is one in the name of whom ? 

Mr. Wheeler. They were identifying the money orders that they 
previously had introduced as exhibits Q-5, Q-6, Q-T, and Q-8. 

Mr. Walter. Issued by who? 

Mr. Wheeler. They were purchased by Jim Freeman ; payable to 
Felice Clark, San Francisco, Calif., and deposited to this account at 
the address of 942 Market Street. 



-2 Retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1625 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

Mr. Tavennek. Do you know what the address of 942 Market Street, 
in San Francisco is? 

Mr. Wheeler. Well, it is the headquarters of the Communist Party 
of the State of California. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to oifer the last document, to which you 
referred in evidence, and request that it be marked "Wheeler's Ex- 
hibit No. 7." 

Mr. Walitiir. It will be received.^^ 

Mr. Wheeler. The examination of the statement of account dis- 
closes that the exact amount, $46.68, referred to as item X-1000, ap- 
pearing on the deposit slip of December 30, was credited to the account 
of the Communist Party on December 81, 1948. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. I would like to present the ledger sheet of the Com- 
munist Party, December 31, 1948, That is offered in evidence and 
asked to be marked "Wheeler Exhibit No. 8." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received. 

Mr. Wheeler. From the examination of the bank records, it is 
established that the amounts, $24.05, $76.63, $46.68, and $15, were 
postal money orders purchased from two post offices in Honolulu, 
and later deposited to the account of the Communist Party, Day and 
Night Branch, Bank of America, Powell and Market Streets, San 
Francisco, Calif. 

The above information, as well as the deposit dates, was furnished 
to the Post Office Department, San Francisco, Calif., and with the 
foregoing description they were able to describe the subject money 
orders as follows : 

Money order 728S5T ; date issued : Ocotber 18, 1948 ; date deposited : October 
20, 1948 ; amount $24.05 ; date paid October 22, 1948 ; station : Main post office, 
Honolulu, X-1000 ; remitter : Jim Freeman ; payee : Felice Clark. 

Money order 737391 ; date issued : November 18, 1948 ; date deposited : Novem- 
ber 20, 1948 ; amount $74.53 ; date paid : November 24, 1948 ; station : main post 
oflSce, Honolulu, X-1000; remitter: Jim Freeman; payee: Felice Clark. 

Money order 594829 ; date issued : November 18, 1948 ; date deposited : Decem- 
ber 3, 1948; amount $15; date paid: December 7, 1948; station: Bethel station, 
Hawaii, X-1050 ; remitter : Jim Freeman ; payee : Felice Clark. 

Money order 749760 ; date issued : December 28, 1948 ; date deposited : Decem- 
ber 31, 1948 ; amount $46.68 ; date paid : January 3, 1949 ; station : main post 
office, Honolulu, X-1000 ; remitter : Jim Freeman ; payee : Felice Clark. 

With the complete identification of the subject money orders, the 
Post Office Department was requested to furnish to the committee 
photostatic copies of said money orders, and also money order appli- 
cation forms. In response to this request, the Post Office Department 
forwarded to the committee photostatic copies of the money orders, 
and they have been introduced into the record, as Q-5, 0,-6, Q-7, and 
Q-8. They also furnished to the committee the money order applica- 
tion form, which has previously been introduced into the record as 
Q-1, Q-2, Q-3, and Q-4. 

The committee now has in its possession documentary evidence of 
money being forwarded from Hawaii to the Communist Party, State 
of California, and deposited in the Communist Party bank account, 
by an individual named Felice Clark, who w^as the payee of the sub- 
ject money orders. The post office money order application forms 



*' Wheeler Exhibits 7 and 8 retained in committee files. 



1626 COMMUmST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

were executed by one Jim Freeman in Honolulu. AVitnesses appear- 
ing before this committee have identified Jim Freeman as being active 
in the Communist Party in the Territory. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now Mr. Chairman, at this point I would like to 
say that in anticipation of the failure of Mr. Freeman, when called on 
the stand, to admit his signature to the money-order application forms, 
and all the receipts here, and all the money orders and the forwarding 
of them to Felice Clark in California, we have undertaken, in advance, 
to prove by expert testimony, his signature to the application — to the 
money-order applications. Those money-order applications, as stated, 
are exhibits, James Freeman, Q-1 to Q-4, inclusive. 

Now, the proven, or known, signatures of James Freeman were ob- 
tained from various governmental sources, but each of which were 
admitted by James Freeman on the stand, and questioned this morning. 
However, it is still necessary, as originally contemplated, that we 
show a number of signatures of James Freeman. 

Now, I would like to read into the record, and think I should read 
into the record in this proceeding here, the testimony of a handwriting 
expert on this subject, taken before a subcommittee, which met on 
February 27, 1950, in the committee hearing room, in Washington. 
[Reading :] 

The subcommittee of one met, pursuant to call, at 3 : 30 p. m. in room 226, Old 
House OflSce Building, Washington, D. C, Hon. John S. Wood (chairman) 
presiding. 

Committee member present: Hon. John S. Wood (chairman). Staff membei's 
present : Louis J. Russell, senior investigator ; William A. Wheeler and Donald T. 
Apell, investigators ; and A. S. Poore, editor. 

Mr. Wood. Let the record show this hearing is proceeding by a subcommittee 
composed of the chairman only. 

Will you raise your right hand and be svporn? You solemnly swear the testi- 
mony you give the subcommittee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Gesell. I do. 

Testimony of Harold J. E. Gesell 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mr. Harold Gesell? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you please state your full name? 

Mr. Gesell. Harold J. E. Gesell. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live? 

Mr. Gesell. Takoma Park, Md. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where are you presently employed? 

Mr. Gesell. Veterans' Administration. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your title and what are your duties in the United 
States Veterans' Administration? 

Mr. Gesell. My title is Chief of the Identification and Detection Division of 
the Inspection and Investigation Service. My duties are to direct the laboratory 
in its various functions, particularly with respect to identification matters, such 
as handwriting, forgeries of various kinds, tampering of documents, firearm 
activities, and so forth. 

Mr. Tavenner. What study or preparation have you made with respect to your 
profession? 

Mr. Gesell. My background studies, I am a graduate of the Valparaiso Law 
School with an LL. B. degree, and a member of two State bars and the United 
States Supreme Court. 

I have also studied the subject under the tutelage of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, and am a graduate of their National Police Academy, back in 1937 ; 
and also a graduate of the detector laboratories at Northwestern University, Chi- 
cago ; and a graduate of the United States Treasui'y Department Law Enforce- 
ment School. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1627 

Mr. Tavenxer. How Ions h.ive you been employed as an examiner of questioned 
documents in the Veterans' Administration? 
Mr. Gesell. About 7 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you please relate the positions you have held prior to 
your employment with the Veterans' Administration? 

Mr. Gesell. For a period of years I was with the attorney general's office 
of the State of Iowa. I was employed as special agent of the bureau of identi- 
tication, serving as superintendent for a period of 5 years out of the 6. 

I was deputy sheriff at D^^s Moines, Iowa, 6 years in charge of the identifica- 
tion division of that office. 

I spent 2 years, qualified by United States civil-service examination as exam- 
iner of questioned documents, in the employ of the Treasury Department as 
an examiner of questioned documents there; and then my present position. 

Mr. Tavenner. All together, how long have you been engaged in this type 
of work, the examination of questioned documents? 

Mr. Gesell. I would say, in round figures, 20 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. How much of your time is devoted to this particular type of 
work? 

Mr. Gesell. All of my time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you rendered conclusions on questioned document prob- 
lems in courts of law or before congressional committees on previous occasions? 

Mr. Gesell. I have testified before this committee several years ago involving 
questioned documents and my opinions concerning same. I have qualified and 
testified in 14 States in the United States before Federal judges, and many 
State courts. 

Mr. Tavenner. I now show you a document identified as exhibit Q-1, which is 
a post-office mbney-order application, Form No. 6001, No. 594829, in the amount 
of $15, to be paid to Felice Clark, San Francisco, Calif., sent by Jim Freeman, 
1920 Kahakai Street, Honolulu, T. H. I desire to introduce this document in 
evidence as Dwight James Freeman Exhibit Q-1, 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. The next document, identified as Exhibit Q-2, is a post-office 
money-order application. Form No. 6001, No. 728857, in the amount of $24.05, to 
be j)a*id to Felice Clark, 942 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif., sent by Jim 
Freeman, 1920-3 Kahakai Street, Honolulu, T. H. I desire to enter that in 
evidence at Dwight James Freeman Exhibit Q-2. 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. The next document, exhibit Q-3, is a post-office money order 
application, Form No. 6001, No. 737391, in the amount of $74.63, to be paid to 
Felice Clark, 942 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif., sent by Jim Freeman, 
1920-3 Kahakai Street, Honolulu, T. H. I desire to enter this document in 
evidence as Dwight James Freeman exhibit Q-3. 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted,^ 

Mr. Tavenner. The next document, exhibit Q-4, is a post-office money order 
application. Form No. 6001, No. 749760, in the amount of $46.68, to be paid to 
Felice Clark, 942 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif., sent by Jim Freeman, 
1920 Kahakai Street, Honolulu, T. H. I desire to introduce this document in 
evidence and ask that it be marked "Dwight James Freeman Exhibit Q^." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenne:b. Have you examined the writings appearing on the exhibits 
received in evidence as Dwight James Freeman exhibits Q-1 through Q-4? 

Mr. Gesell. I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. I now show you exhibits bearing the alleged handwriting of 
one Dwight James Freeman. 

The first exhibit, K-1, is a photostatic copy of an application for voluntary 
induction, DSS Form 165, dated July 22, 1943. 

The next exhibit, K-2, is a letter dated June 6, 1943, addressed to local board 
No. 173, Anaheim, Calif., bearing the handwriting of one D. J. Freeman. 

The next exhibit, K-3, is a letter dated November 15, 1942, directed to local 
board No. 173, 206 East Center Street, Anaheim, Calif., bearing the handwriting 
of one D. J. Freeman. 

The next exhibit, K^, is a registration card, DSS Form 1, serial No. 286, order 
No. 1943, bearing the signature of one D. J. Freeman. 

The next exhibit, K-5, is a typewritten document addressed to the Selective 
Service System of Anaheim, Calif., under the heading of Pacific Bridge Co., 



»♦ See pp. 1611-1614. 



1628 COMMUN-IST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

contract NOy-5049, builders, Pearl Harbor dry dock No. 4, which bears the 
signature of one Dwight James Freeman. 

The next document. K-6, is DSS Form 154, identified as a request for transfer 
for delivery, dated July 22, 1943, which bears the signature of Dwight James 
Freeman. The document also bears the date of July 28, 1943. 

The next document, K-7, is a selective-service questionnaire, bearing the date 
of May 1, 1941, and subscribed and sworn to on May 5, 1941, bearing the signature 
of one Dwight James Freeman. 

The next document, K-8, is a certification, subscribed and sworn to on August 
19, 1943, bearing the signature of one Dwight James Freeman. 

The next document, K-9, is Form BNP 603-B, Navy inductee form, subscribed 
and sworn to on August 19, 1943, bearing the signature of one Dwight James 
Freeman. 

The next exhibit, K-10, is identified as a document of shipping articles, sub- 
scribed and sworn to on August 19, 1943, and contains the signature of one 
Dwight James Freeman. 

The next exhibit, K-11, is a two-page letter written in longhand, dated June 
21, 1943, addressed to local board 173, Anaheim, Calif., and bearing the signature 
of D. J. Freeman. 

I desire to mark these various exhibits for identification only, as they will 
be introduced in evidence at a later time, and ask that they be marked "Dwight 
James Freeman Exhibits K-1 to K-11," inclusive, for identification. 

Mr. Wood. They will be so marked. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Gesell, have you examined the writings on the documents 
identified as Dwight James Freeman exhibits K-1 through K-11, and have you 
compared the writings on these exhibits with the writings appearing on Dwight 
James Freeman exhibits Q-1 through Q-4? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, I have. 

Mr. TAVENNB25. From your examination and comparison of these writings, 
have you formed an opinion as to whether they were excused by the same 
person? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, I have. 

Mr. Tavexner. What is your opinion? 

Mr. Gesell. My study has resulted in the conclusion that Dwig' t .. 
man, whose purported known writings and signatures appear i jjes 

Freeman exhibits K-1 through K-11, did prepare post-ofiice m' . .. -r appli- 

cations, Form No. 6001, Nos. 594829, 728857, 737391, and 749760, ,vith the excep- 
tion of the figures appearing above the printed matter "Application for Domestic 
Money Order." These four documents were previously described as Dwight 
James Freeman exhibits Q-1 through Q-4. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the Committee on Un-American Activities how 
you arrived at the conclusion to which you have just testified? 

Mr. Gesell. The process employed is a very simple one. The same process is 
employed as anyone would employ in the identification of your car or an in- 
dividual walking down the street with whom you had previous acquaintance ; 
for example, by certain scars, marks, characteristics, or dents in your car 
fenders that particularly set out your car in a group of 500 cars in a parking lot. 

In other words, each individual has his own individual handwriting char- 
acteristics, practically born with him, so to speak, and they stay with him until 
he passes from this earth. 

First we study the known handwritings, and carefully study all characteristics, 
including designs of letters, forms of letters, proportions in connection with other 
letters, and these are all tabulated on what we call the work sheet. Sometimes 
it is quite tedious ; sometimes it is quite easy. 

The questioned documents are examined in like manner and tabulated. 

Then the questioned and the known documents are brought together and they 
are examined very carefully and minutely, and compared one with another to 
see how the characteristics tie in. When they have the same slope, same letter 
ratio, and so forth, then we must come to the conclusion, and do come to the 
conclusion, they are written by the same person. 

If we found two signatures written exactly the same size, height, width, and 
breadth, that would be highly suspicious evidence of a traced forgery. We have 
a certain range, and if the characteristics stay within that range, it is written 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1629 

by tlio same person ; if not. it is written by someone else. That is principally 
the theory that no two thinjjs are alike, so to speak. 

Mr. Tavenner. I now show you a photostatic copy of postal money order 
No. r)n4S20, in the amount of ipir). the remitter being Jim Freeman and the payee 
of the .'-ul'ject money order one Felice Clark. 

I desire to offer tiiis document in evidence and ask that it be marked "Dwight 
James Freeman Exhibit Q-f)." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. I show you also another document which is a photostatic copy 
of postal money order No. 740700. in Ihe amount of .$4().6S, the remitter being 
Jim Fret-man and the payee Felice Clark. 

I desire to introduce this document in evidence, and ask that it be marked 
"Dwight James Freeman Exhibit Q-6." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. The next document is po.stal money order No. 728857, in the 
amount of $24.0.5, the remitter being Jim Freeman and the payee Felice Clark. 

I desire to offer this document in evidence, marked "Dwight James Freeman 
Exhibit Q-7." 

Mr. Woon. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. The nest document is postal money order No. 737391 in the 
amount of $74.53, the remitter being Jim Freeman and the payee Felice Clark. 

I desire to offer this document in evidence, marked "Dwight James Freeman 
Exhibit Q-S." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. [Reading stopped.] 

Mr. Whefxer. On the identification of the money order, the payee 
Avas one Felice Clark. The examination of canceled checks given on 
account of the California Communist Party, photostatic copies of the 
checks were obtained. The first check, 130, dated San Francisco, 
Calif., July 11, 11)49, from the Day and Night Branch, Bank of 
America, payable to cash, $200, from the civil rights defense fund 
of the Con^liunist Party. The person executing the check was Carl 
R. Lambert i On the reverse of this check appears the endorsement 
"Felice Clal '." 

I would like to give this to Mr. Counsel. It has already been 
introduced in the testimony. 

The second check, Communist Party of California, dated June 10, 
1949, payable to cash in the amount of $400, signed Carl R. Lambert, 
drawn on Bank of America, San Francisco, Calif., the Day and Night 
Branch. Ilie reverse of this check also bears the endorsement of 
one Felice Clark. 

The third check, the Communist Party of California, No. 17G7, 
dated ISIay 27, 1949, payable to cash in the amount of $160.70, drawn 
on the Day and Night Branch, Bank of America, San Francisco, 
Calif., bearing the signature Carl E. Lambert. The endorsement 
appearing on the check, on the back of that check, is one Felice Clark. 

We have handwriting testimony, Mr. Tavenner, in regard to the 
fact that this Felice Clark, whose signature appears on these checks, 
is the same person whose endorsement appears on the money order. 

Mv. Tavenner. And I think, Mr. Chairman, I should read that 
testimony into the record here, which was taken at the same time as 
the testimony previously read, so with your permission I will continue 
reading it. 

Mr. Walter. Continue. 

Mr. Tavenner (reading) : 

Mr. Tavenner. The next document is a photostatic copy of a check made pay- 
able to cash in the amount of $200, dated July 11, 1949, bearing the signature 

66636— 50— pt. 2 7 



1630 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Carl R. Lambert, drawn from the civil rights fund of the Communist Party in 
California. The endorsement appearing on the reverse side of the check is that 
of one Felice Clarlc. 

Mr. Wood. What bank is the check drawn on? 

Mr. Wheeler. Bank of America, Day and Night Branch, San Francisco, Calif. 

Mr. Tavennek. I desire to offer this document in evidence, and ask that it be 
marked "Dwight James Freeman Exhibit Q-9." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. The next document is a photostatic copy of a check made pay- 
able to cash in the amount of $400, dated .June 10, 1949, bearing the signature 
of Carl R. Lambert and drawn on the account of tlie Communist Party of Cali- 
fornia. On the reverse of the check appears the endorsement of Felice Clark. 

Mr. Wood. Drawn on the same bank? 

Mr. Tavenner. Drawn on the same bank. 

I desire to offer this document in evidence, and ask that it be marked "Dwight 
James Freeman Exhibit Q-10." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Taveis^ner. The next exhibit is a photostatic coiDy of a check drawn on the 
same bank, made payable to cash, in the amount of $160.70, dated ]\Iay 27, 1949, 
signed by Carl R. Lambert and drawn from the bank account of the Communist 
Party of California. On the reverse side of the check appears the endorsement 
of Felice Clark. 

I desire to offer this document in evidence, and. ask that it be marked "Dwight 
James Freeman Exhibit Q-11." 

Mr. WcoD. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Gesell, have you examined the signature of Felice Clark 
appearing on Dwight James Freeman exhibits Q-5, Q-6, Q-7, and Q-S with the 
endorsement of Felice Clark appearing on the reverse of Dwight James Freeman 
exhibits Q-9, Q-10, and Q-11? 

Mr. Gesell. I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. And also Dwight James Freeman exhibits Q-6 and Q-7? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. From your examination and comparison of these signatures, 
have you formed an opinion as to whether they were written by the same person? 

Mr. Gesell. I have. 

jMr. Tavenner. What is you opinion? 

Mr. Gesell. My opinion is they were all written by the same person. 

Mr. Tavenner. You used the same metliod of arriving at that conclusion as in 
the former conclusion as to questioned documents Dwight James Freeman ex- 
hibits Q-1 through Q-4; is that correct? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, sir. [Reading concluded.] 

Mr. Wheeler. Further investigation of the bank account of the 
Communist Party of California also established documentary evidence 
to substantiate the affiliation of district 13, Communist Party of 
California with the Communist Party, United States of America. 
The first document is a check, Communist Party of California, No. 
1758, dated June 21, 1949 ; payable to the Communist Party, United 
States of America, in the amount of $1,038.58; with the signature, 
Carl R. Lambert ; drawn. Bank of America, Day and Night Branch, 
San Francisco, Calif. The endorsement on the back is "The Com- 
munist Party of the United States of America," whose bank account is 
in the Amalgamated Bank of New York City. 

I would like to introduce this in the record, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. I offer the check in evidence, and ask that it be 
marked "Wheeler Exhibit No. 9." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received." 



25 See p. 1631. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1631 







1632 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Wheeler. The next : Communist Party of California, No. 1770, 
dated July 1, 1949, payable to Communist Party, U. S. A., in the 
amount of $1,522.88; the signature "Carl R. Lambert." Drawn from 
the Day and Night Branch, Bank of America, San Francisco, Calif., 
and tlie endorsement on the back 'Communist Party, U. S. A., deposit 
to the Amalgamated Bank of New York City." 

I think that further establishes the link between the Communist 
Party of Hawaii and the Communist Party in New York City. 

Mr. Tavenner. I offer it in evidence, and ask that it be marked 
"Wheeler Exhibit No. 10." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.-^ 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all. 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will recess until 2 o'clock, 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

(The hearing was resumed at 2 p. m.. Representatives Francis E. 
Walter, Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold H. Velde 
being present.) 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will come to order. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. AVheeler. 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM A. WHEELER— Resumed 

Mr. Tavenner. The exhibits Dwight James Freeman, exhibits K-1 
to K-11, inclusive, as shown from the testimony which I have read, 
and which was taken in Washington on February 27, 1950, were used 
in that testimony, and identified only by the exhibit number referred 
to. I desire now to offer these exhibits formally in evidence. Do you 
have those exhibits in your hand? 

Mr. Wheeler. Correct, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state the source of each one, and I would 
desire that when you complete it, that they be admitted and given 
numbers which have already been designated. 

Mr. Wheeler. Exhibit I^-l was received from the Selective Service 
Office in Washington, D. C. Exhibit 2 from the same source. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is exhibits K-1 and K-2. 

Mr. Whp^eler. Exhibits K-1 and K-2. Exhibit K-3, from the same 
source. Exhibit K-4, from the same source. Exhibit K-5, from the 
same source. Exhibit K-6, from the same source. Exhibit K-7, from 
the same source. Exhibit K-8 was furnished by the personnel office 
of the United States Navy. Exhibit K-9 was furnished by the per- 
sonnel oflice of the United States Navy. Exhibit K-10, from the per- 
sonnel office of he United States Navy. Exhibit K-11, by the Selec- 
tive Service Office in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, Mr. Wheeler, the name of William Schneider- 
mann has been mentioned during the course of the testimony, and you 
yourself have mentioned the name of Carl R. Lambert. 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of California. 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes. 



2" See p. 1633. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1633 




1634 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAU 

Mr. Tavenner. In the course of your investigations in California, 
did you obtain proof of the position of the affiliation of each of these 
individuals with the Communist Party of the State of California? 

Mr. Wheeler. I did, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee about that, please ? 

Mr. Wheeeer. During the examination of the bank account of the 
Communist Party of the State of California, signature cards by the 
Communist Party were subpenaed. I have them here in front of me, 
as civil rights defense fund. Communist Party of California, by Wil- 
liam Schneidermann and Carl K.. Lambert. Carl R. Lambert, secre- 
tary. William Schneidermann as chairman, Carl Lambert as secre- 
tary. The address is 942 Market Street. Secretary's address the 
same. Telephone No. EX 2-2990. These were taken March 3, 1949, 
the first carcl enclosing the files of the Comnumist Party of California, 
civil rights defense fund. The signature, Carl R. Lambert, official 
secretary. The signature of William Schneidermann, chairman. Do 
you desire all four cards be introduced ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, I desire it, and instead of reading the entire 
card, would you just read that part which shows the Communist 
designation. 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And the date. I desire to offer the document which 
you just read in evidence, and request that it be marked "Wheeler 
exhibit." '-' 

Mr. Wheeler. The next card is stamped "Communist Party of 
California." This card was taken March 3, 1949, as holding the en- 
closed files, and will give reference to the date. The signature on it 
is Carl R. Lambert, official secretary, and the second signature is Wil- 
liam Schneidermann, chairman. 

Mr. Tavenner. I offer that in evidence as "Wheeler exhibit 12." 

Mr. Walter. The}' will be received.^® 

Mr. Wheeler. The signature card is dated February 26, 1949, 
Communist Party of California, civil rights defense fund, and on it 
appears the signature of William Schneidermann, chairman ; Carl R. 
Lambert, financial secretary. It also bears here the name of Loretta 
Starvus. It appears that she maj^ have signed the name of William 
Schneidermann on this document. 

Mr. Ta\t.nner. I offer the document in evidence and ask it be marked 
"Wheeler exhibit 13." 

Mr. Walter. Without objection, it will be received.^^ 

Mr. Wheeler. The next is dated February 26, 1949, Communist 
Party of California. William Schneidermann, chairman; Carl R. 
Lambert, financial secretary. The signature that appears thereon, on 
this card also, appears the name of Loretta Starvus. 

Mr. Tavenner. I present the document in evidence and ask it be 
marked "Wheeler exliibit 14." 

Mr. Walter. No objection, it wdll be received.^" 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you stand aside, please. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Ta^'enner. The next witness will be Mrs. Pearl Freeman. 



" See p. 1635. 

28 See p. 1636. 

29 See p. 1637. 
8» See p. 1638. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1635 




Wheeleb 
Exhibit 11 



1636 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



m^idi^mM miiMM 



'■■'..  ^ ...,-■ : -' ,. - ..- ' ---^ 







Wheeler 
Exhibit 12 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1637 




Wheeler 
Exhibit 13 



1638 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 




Wheeler 
Exhibit 14 

TESTIMONY OF MRS. PEARL FREEMAN, ACCOMPANIED BY HER 

ATTORNEY, HARRIET BOUSLOG 

Mr. Walter. Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give 
will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God. 

Mrs. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mrs. Pearl Freeman ? 

Mrs. Freema^t. I am. 

Mr. TA\'E]srNER. Are you represented here by counsel? 

Mrs. Freeman. I have my attorney. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Will the attorney please identify herself for the 
record. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1639 

Mrs. BousLOG. I would like the name of Harriet Boiislog to be shown 
in the record as attorney for Mrs. Pearl Freeman, and at this time I 
would like to file with the committee a motion to quash the service 
of the subpena for Pearl Freeman upon the <i;rounds as stated in the 
motion. 

Mr. Walit^r. Let it be made a part of the record.^^ 

Mr. Harkisox. It is the same as the other. 

Mrs. BousLOG. It is the same. 

Mr. TA^'EX^^ER. Are you the wife of Dwight James Freeman? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Freeman. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Thank you. What is your present occupation. Mrs. 
Freeman ? 

Mrs. Freeman. Unemployed. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. How long have you been unemployed ? 

Mrs. Freeman. A little over a year. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. Prior to that time, how were you employed? 

Mrs. Freeman. As a cook. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. By whom ? 

Mrs. Freeman. Mothers Doughnuts, w^as the name of the place. 

INIr. Tavenner. How long have you been in Hawaii ? 

Mrs. Freeman. Since October 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did you live prior to that time ? 

Mrs. Freeman. Oakland, Calif. 

Mr, Tam^nner. Were you employed there? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Freeman. On the advice of my attorney, I refuse to answer 
oh the ground it might tend to incriminate me, for the reasons stated 
in the motion. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, w^eren't you employed by the United States 
Navy? Is there anything incriminatory about that, if that be true? 

Mrs. Freeman. I was employed by the United States Navy. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, when were j^our services dispensed with by the 
Navy ? Wlien did you leave the Navy ? 

Mrs. Freeman. In June 1945, as near as I can recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were you living then ? 

Mrs. Freeman. Oakland, Calif. 

Mr. Tavenner. Whereabouts in Oakland? 

Mrs. Freeman. 100 Ninth Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was in June 1945. Did you live there from 
that time on until you came to Japan — to Hawaii ? 

Mrs. Freeman. That was my residence, yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Until you came to Hawaii ? 

Mrs. Freeman. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will ask you whether or not in September 1945 
you made a complaint in Oakland, Calif., regarding the treatment by 
police of certain persons who were distributing literature? 

(Witness confers with counsel). 

jSIrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, according to the Friday, September 21, 1945, 
issue of the Daily World, in an article entitlecl, "Cop intimidation 



^ Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Pearl Freeman is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Wilfred Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. See p. 1550. 



1640 COMMXJNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

spurs clash in race relations," and the following language appears, 
"Mrs. Pearl Freeman made the complaint to Schwanenberg that while 
she and two others were distributing leaflets advertising a Communist 
mass meeting, two cops tried to intimidate them." 

I hand you the article, and I ask you if that statement there is true? 

]\Irs. Freeman. On the advice of my counsel, I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner, Speak louder, please. 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer, on the same ground. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the photostatic copy of that issue 
into evidence, mark it "Pearl Freeman exhibit 1." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received. 

Mr. Tavenner. While you were living in Oakland, were you en- 
gaged in any business other than that of working for the Navy? 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer that question on the same 
grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your position with the Navy, what were 
you doing? 

Mrs. Freeman. I was a chauffeur. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you assist in the sale or engage in the sale of 
the Communist publication known as the Daily World? Let me hand 
you this. 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr, Tavenner. Let me hand you the Monday, September 17, 1945, 
issue of the Daily World, showing an article — a photostatic copy of 
an article — "Sub-getting Alamedians are doing an outstanding job." 
Under the paragraph this is said : 

Nine new readers. Pearl Freeman of "West Oakland, Calif., works in tlie oflSce 
of the Alameda Communist Party. She obtained nine new readers for a total 
of $40.50. 

State whether or not that expresses the fact, or whether it is true. 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I offer the page in evidence, and ask it be marked 
as "Pearl Freeman Exhibit 2." 

Mr. Walter. Mark it, and it will be received.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were you living in California, in 19tt4 ? Let 
me put it this way : How long did you live at Oakland, Calif? 

Mrs. Freeman. As nearly as I can remember it was approximately 
1941 until 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. To 1946. I hand you a photostatic copy of a docu- 
ment entitled, "Application for refund on retirement," purporting to 
be signed by Pearl E. Freeman, 100 Ninth Street, Oakland, Calif. 
Will you examine it and state whether or not it is your signature. 

Mrs. Freeisian. I refuse to answer the question on the advice of my 
attorney, on the ground it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. May I see that, please? Mrs. Freeman, why do you 
feel it might incriminate you to admit that you had signed a form on 
which you made this application ? 

Mrs. Freeman. I refused on the advice of my attorney. 

Mr. Walter. Then the reason why you did not answer the question 
is because your attorney told you not to, is that it ? 



3' Pearl Freeman Exhibits 1 and 2 retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1641 

Mrs. Freeman. Yes. 

Mr. AValter. All right. 

So that so far as you were personally concerned, you do i)ot feel that 
you would be incriminated in answering that question, do you? 

Mrs. FREE:\rAx. On the advice of my attorney, I refuse to answer, 
on the ground it miglit tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. You refused to ansAver the (i[uestion that I asked you 
for the same reason ? 

Mrs. BuusLOG. Would you restate your question, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. INIr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. The application for refund shows on its face that 
the title of the last position of the individual making this application 
is chauffeur. You were a chauffeur at that time, were you not? 
Didn't you tell us a moment ago that you were a chauffeur in the 
Navy? 

Mrs. Freeman. I was chauffeur in the Navy, that's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. So that that adequately describes your position at 
the time, didn't it? 

Mrs. Freeman. At the time I Avas in the Navy ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And this application shows that the street address 
of the person who signed this was 100 Ninth Street, Oakland 7, Calif. 
That was the same address which you gave us a few minutes ago, as 
the place where you lived. 

IMrs. Freeman. I lived at that address; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to mark this document for identification 
only at this point, and ask that it be given the number of "Pearl Free- 
man exhibit 3." 

Mr. Walter. It will be so marked. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, I hand you what purports to be an affidavit 
cancelling prior registration in another comity, that is, voting regis- 
tration, on which there appears at the end : 

Subscribed and sworn to before me February 11, 1946. 

G. E. Wade, County Clerk. 

By Edward A. King, Deputy. 

(Signature of affiant:) Mrs. Pearl E. Freeman. 

Will you examine that photostatic copy and state whether or not 
that is your signature ? 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire that the document be marked at the moment 
for identification as "Q-1." 

Mr. Walter. It may be so marked for identification.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. And I would like to read it. [Eeading :] 

State of California, 

County of Alameda: 

The undersigned affiant, Mrs. Pearl E. Freeman, being duly sworn, says : I am 
a native Californian, registered from 2572 Washington Street, San Francisco, 
county of San Franci.sco, State of California ; I have removed from said county 
and hereby authorize cancellation of my registration therein. 
Subscriljed and sworn to before me, February 11, 1946. 

G. E. Wade, County Clerk. 
By Edward A. King, Deputy. 



"" Retained in committee files. 



1642 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

And a line for signature upon wliich appears the name "Mrs. Pearl 
E. Freeman." I liand you now an affidavit which states that it is an 
affidavit in accordance with section 223, elections code, relating to pri- 
mary elections, that is, a photostatic copy thereof, which purports 
to have been sworn to on the 27th day of September 1944, before W. W. 
Sands, deputy registrar of voters, and to have been signed by Mrs. 
Pearl E. Freeman. Will you examine it and state whether or not 
that is your signature ? 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer at the moment for identification 
this document and have it marked for identification only.^* 

Mr. Walter. Let it be marked for that purpose. 

Mr. Tavenner. As "Q-2," and I desire to read it. 

Mr. Harrison. Will you ask her how she spells her name when she 
signs it and how it is spelled on the exhibit ? 

Mr. Tavenner. I will be very glad to. 

How do you spell your name? 

Mrs. Freeman. Pearl — P-e-a-r-1 — E period, F-r-e-e-m-a-n — Free- 
man. 

Mr. Tavenner. An examination of this affidavit shows the same 
spelling. I will read this affidavit. [Reading:] 

ArFIDA\-IT 

In accordance with section 223, elections code, relating to primary elections. 
State of California, city and county of San Francisco. Mrs. Pearl Elizabeth 
Freeman, address 2572 VVashington, being duly sworn, deposes and says : That 
she is registered on the great register of the said city and county of San Fran- 
cisco as a Comnumist : that since the date of said registration she has changed 
her political views and in good faith declares that her aflSliation is with the 
Democratic Party. 

(Signature:) Mrs. Pearl E. Freeman. 

2572 Washington Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you change your registration from that of a 
Communist to Democratic, in accordance with this affidavit? 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, I hand you a photostatic copy of a canceled 
registration, bearing date of 28th day of August, 1943, signed "George 
Miller, Deputy Registrar of Voters," and signed "Mrs. Pearl E. Free- 
man, 2572 Washington," in which the word "Communist" appears to 
have been lined through three times and the word "Democratic printed 
above it, and the date September 27, 1944. Will you examine it, please, 
and state whether or not you did change your voting registration in 
accordance with that canceled registration ? 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you examine it again and state whether or not 
that is your signature at the bottom of the card ? 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I ask that this document be identified for the present 
as "Q-3." 

Mr. Walter. It may be marked for that purpose.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you live in Alameda County, Calif. ? 

INIrs. Freeman. So far as I know, it was from 1941 to 1946. 



^ See p. 1644. 
M See p. 1643. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1643 



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Mr. Tavenner. 
Mrs. Freeman, 
Mr. Tavenner, 
were there ? 
Mrs. Freeman, 
Mr. Tavenner. 
Mrs. Freeman, 
Mr. Tavenner 



Pearl Freeman 
Exhibit Q-3 

Did you know Steve Nelson ? 

I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Was he an organizer for Alameda County while you 



I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 
I mean a Communist Party organizer. 
I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 
Did you at any time work in the office of the Com- 
mun.ist Party in Alameda County? 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 
Mr. TA^^ENNER. Did you know Bernadette Doyle ? 
Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 
]Mr. Tavenner. Have you attended Communist Party meetings since 
you have been in Hawaii ? 

IVIrs. Freeman.. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 
INIr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the Communist Party or 
have you ever been a member ? 

Mrs. Freeman. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 
Mr. Tavenner. I have no more questions. 

Mr. AValter. That is all. "Who is your next witness, Mr. Tavenner ? 
Mr. Tavenner. Mr. "Wlieeler. 



1644 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM A. WHEELER— Resumed 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you a document, a photostatic copy of a 
document entitled "Application for Refund of Retiring Deductions,-' 
which was presented a few moments ago to Mrs. Pearl Freeman and 
which AA-as marked only for identification at that time as "Exhibit No. 
3." Will you state the source of that document, please ? 

Mr. Wheeler. I identify the source of this document as having been 
made available to the conmiittee by the United States Civil Service 
Commission. 

Mr. Taatnner. I desire to read it in evidence, and that it be given 
the same number, Wheeler Exhibit 3. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.^® 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, ]\Ir. Chairman, I would like to continue with 
the testimony, the reading of the testimony at this time which was 
taken on February 27, 1950, before a subcommittee, Hon. John S. 
Wood, chairman, in Washington, relating to the identification of the 
handwriting of the previous witness. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed. [Reading :] 

Mr. Tavenner. I now show you an exhibit which is a photographic copy of 
Form 7-5M-3/44, an affidavit canceling a prior registration in another county, 
signed by Mrs. Pearl E. Freeman and dated February 11, 1946. 

I desire to offer this document in evidence and ask that it be marked "Pearl 
Freeman Exhibit Q-1." 

Mr. Wood. It wiU be admitted. 

]\lr. Tavenner. I show you also a photographic copy of Form 34, which is an 
affidavit in accordance with section 223, Elections Code, relating to primary elec- 
tions, signed Mrs. Pearl E. Freeman, dated September 27, 1)M4. 

I desire to offer this document in evidence and ask that it be marked "Pearl 
Freeman Exhibit Q-2." 






Aifficfavil in accordaoce "mtii Sectiwi 223» Elecdans Code r^'::/y 

Rdating to Primary Elecfibns. j^'»° ^ 



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Subscribed »ut A'sDcns ho before mi tteSv.*?^_^.^^y 



Signatvirt. 



Adireit 



Pearl Freeman 
Exhibit Q-2 



■•" Retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1645 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tave.nneu. I show you a photographic copy of duplicate affidavit of regis- 
tration No. S37U09, State of California, dated August 28, 1943, signed by Mrs. 
Pearl E. Freeman. 

I desire to olTor this document in evidence and ask that it be marked "Pearl 
Freeman Exhibit Q -3." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. I now show you a photostatic copy of United States Civil Serv- 
ice Connnissioii Form 3005, which is an application for refund of retirement 
deductions, bearing the signature of Pearl E. Freeman, dated May 10, 1946. 

I desire to offer this document in evidence and ask that it be marked; "Pearl 
Freeman Exhibit K-1." 

Mr. Wood. It will be admitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. At this point I would like to explain that I have 
just introduced this document again, and ask it be marked "Wheeler 
3" when it was already in evidence. [Reading :] 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Gesell, have you examined the writing on the documents 
identified as Pearl Freeman exhibits Q-1 through Q-3, and have you compared 
the signatures on these exhibits with the signature appearing on Peai'l Freeman 
Exhibit K-1? 

Mr. Gesell. I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. From your examination and comparison of these signatures, 
liave you formed an opinion as to whether they were written by the same person? 

Mr. Gesell. I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your opinion? 

Mr. Gesell. That the documents therein identified as Pearl Freeman Exhibits 
Q-1, Q-2, and Q-3 were written by the same person who wrote the name Pearl E. 
Freeman on the photostatic copy of United States Civil Service Commission 
Form 3005, which is an application for refund of retirement deductions, also 
identified as Pearl Freeman exhibit K-1. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you please tell the committee whether or not you arrived 
at that conclusion through the same type of examination and consideration as 
that previously testified to by you with regard to the documents Dwight James 
Freeman Exhibits Q-1 through Q^? 

Mr. Gesell. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Wood. Very well. Thank you. 

(Thereupon, the hearing was adjourned.) 

INIr. Tavenner. Mr. Ernest Arena. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Arena, will you raise your right hand, please? 
Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Arena. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ERNEST ARENA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mr. Ernest Arena. 

Mr. Arena. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live ? 

Mr. Arena. 3911 Keanu Street, Honolulu, T. H. 

Mr. Tavenner. How old are you ? 

Mr. Arena. Thirty-five. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold any official position in local 150 of the 
ILWU? 

Mr. Symonds. Mr. Tavenner, I would like to enter my name as 
counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. I beg your pardon. That was an oversight. Will 
you please identify yourself for the record ? 

66636— 50— pt. 2 8 



1646 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Symonds. Myer C. Symonds, appearing for the witness Ernest 
Arena. And at this time I woukl like to file a motion to quash the 
service of the subpena. It is in the same form as that previously made 
a part of the record. 

Mr. Walter. It may be made a part of the record.^^ 

Mr. Symonds. What was the last question? 

Mr. Tavenni r. The question is : AVhether or not the witness has at 
any time been an official or held any official position with local 150 of 
the ILWU. 

Mr. Arena. I am tlie president of ILWU Local 150. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been president? 

Mr. Arena. I believe it was since 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to 1947 what official position did you have 
with that local ? 

Mr. Arena. I was the executive secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the date of the trial of Dr. Reinecke ; do 
you remember ? 

Mr. Arena. No ; I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. How is that ? 

Mr. Arena. I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was it during the year 1948 ? 

Mr. Arena. I don't recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, do you recall what official position you held 
in the ILWU at the time the Reinecke trial took [)lace '. 

Mr. Arena. I believe it was president of ILWU local 150. 

Mr. Tavenner. It was while you were president ? 

Mr. Arena. I believe so. 

Mr. Tavenner. During that period of time did you hold any official 
position in the HCLC ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Ta\^nner. I think you know that by HCLC I mean the Ha- 
waiian Civil Liberties Committee. 

Mr. Arena. I know what it means. 

Mr. Tavenner. I thought you did. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Arena. Will you please repeat that question ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Read the question. 

(The question was read by the reporter.) 

Mr. Arena. No. 

Mr. Ta\t<:nner. Were you a member during that time, during that 
period of time ? Or at any time while you were president of the local, 
were you a member of the HCLC ? 
(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Arena. On the advice of my counsel I refuse to answer the 
question on the ground that it may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you engage in any business transaction in be- 
half of the ILWU and the HCLC or either of them in connection with 
the Reinecke trial? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Arena. I refuse to answer the question for the same reasons. 



3' Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Ernest Arena is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. See p. 1472. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1647 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee whether at any time 
you were president of the ILWU Local 150, that you were a member 
of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Arena. On the advice of my counsel I refuse to answer for 
the same reasons as stated before. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party at any time other than the period which 1 have 
just asked you about? 

Mr. Arena. On the advice of my counsel I refuse to answer on tlie 
same grounds. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Arena. Is that all ? 

Mr. Tavenner. I don't know. The chairman will have to decide 
whether you are dismissed. 

]\Ir. Walter. You may be excused for the moment. It may be that 
after the next testimony you would like to make some statement. 

The subcommittee will be in recess. 

(A recess was taken from 2 : 50 to 3 : 20 p. m.) 

Mr. Walter (exhibiting typewritten document). I understand 
that this statement was circulated in this room during the recess, on 
the bottom of which appears the name D. J. Freeman. Of course, this 
committee and its predecessors are accustomed to this sort of tactics, 
and we realize the source of them, and of course pay little attention to 
them. But I do want to say that we will not tolerate the circulation 
of this sort of thing in this hearing room. 

Mr. Tavenner. 

-Mr. Tavenner. The next witness is Edward Hong. Will Mr. Hong 
come forward, please. 

Mr. Walter. Raise your right hand, please. Do you swear that 
the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Hong. Yes. 

TESTIMONY OF EDWARD HONG, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SIMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mr. Edward Hong ? 

Mr. HoNG. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will wait until the photographers have finished. 

Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Hong. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you identify yourself again, please? 

Mr. Symonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds. I appear for this 
witness Edward Hong, and at this time I wish to file the same form 
of motion to quash service of subpena as heretofore. 

Mr. Walter. Let it be received in the record at this time.^® 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Hong, when and where were you born ? 

Mr. Hong. On the island of Oahu, March 6, 1911. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Will you give the committee a brief statement of 
your record of employment? 



^ Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Edward Hong is Identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. See p. 1472. 



1648 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Hong. I was employed at the paper company, I have forgotten 
the name of it, and the United States district engineer, Inter-lshind 
Drydock, and I am now an officer of ILWU Local 150. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are now an officer of local 150, did you say? 

Mr. Hong. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been an officer of local 150? 

Mr. Hong. Three years. 

Mr. Tavenner. What office? 

Mr. Hong. Secretary-treasurer. 

Mr. Tavenner. While you were an officer of local 150, did you 
take part in Communist Party meetings ? 

Mr. Hong. On the advice of my counsel I refuse to answer the 
question on the grounds that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Is that all ? 

Mr. Tavenner. I will ask one more question. 

Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Hong. The same answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. What do you mean by "the same answer"? 

Mr. Hong. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. Walter. Call your next witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yoshito Marumo. Is this the witness? 

Mr. Symonds. Yes. No ; it isn't the one I spoke to you about. 

Mr. Harrison. Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask counsel a question 
to clarify something. 

WTien Mrs. Freeman was on the witness stand you asked her if she 
had worked in California for Steve Nelson and Bernadette Doyle. 
Are they the same persons who, according to a report made by this 
committee in an earlier investigation, conducted during the war a 
Communist espionage among the atomic scientists at Berkeley, Calif., 
and the people who were successful in obtaining information about: 
the atomic experiment there being conducted during the wartime? 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, Judge Harrison, first of all, I don't believe 
I asked the question whether the witness worked for Steve Nelson; 
I asked her the question whether she knew him. But Steve Nelson 
is the person whom I referred to and is the same person who is the 
subject of an extensive investigation by our committee, and Berna- 
dette Doyle was shown to have been his secretary, and that Steve 
Nelson was the organizer of the Communist Party for Alameda 
County during the period that the scientists, to wit. Dr. Weinberg 
and others, at Berkeley, were involved. 

Mr. Harrison. That is the same man that this committee has sub- 
mitted a recommendation to the Attorney General for prosecution 
of Dr. Weinberg for having delivered secret atomic information to 
Steve Nelson, an agent of the Soviet Government ? 

Mr. Tavenner. The precise recommendation was that Dr. Weinberg 
be prosecuted on the charge of perjury in connection with the investi- 
gation about the matter which you have spoken of. 

Mr. Harrison. Of course, he denied having attended certain meet- 
ings with Steve Nelson. 

Mr. Tavenner. He denied that he attended certain meetings with 
Steve Nelson and Bernadette Doyle in iVugust 1943. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1649 

MV. AValtku. Will you raise your right hand, please? Will you 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Marumo. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF YOSHITO MARUMO, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. AVhat is' your name? 

Mr. Marumo. Yoshito INIarunio. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. IMarumo. Yes. 

MV. Tavenner. Will counsel identify himself, please. 

Mr. SY^roNDS. Myer C. Symonds. And at this time I wish to file 
a motion to quash the service of the subpena, in the same form as on 
behalf of the previous witnesses represented by me. 

Mr. Walter. It may be placed in the record.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. JNIarumo, will you state your age, please? 

Mr. Marumo. I am 28. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were you born? 

M'r. Marumo. Honolulu. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Tell the committee briefly what jobs you have held. 

Mr. Marumo. I am employed at 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state that over? I didn't understand. 

Mr. Marumo. I am employed at Love's Biscuit & Bakery Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been employed there ? 

Mr. Marumo. Five years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell this' committee what other positions you have 
held. 

Mr. Marumo. I am working foreman now. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you worked for that company ? 

Mr. Marumo. Five years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold any position of any kind or office in 
any party or unit? Let me divide the question. Do you hold an 
office or position of any kind in a union ? 

Mr. Marumo. No, sir. 

M'r. Tavenner. How is that? 

IVIr. Marumo. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever held such a position? 

Mr. Marumo. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you a representative of any character of your 
local ? 

Mr. Marumo. I am a steward, shop steward. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are a shop steward. Well, you do hold a very 
responsible position with your union, do you not? Isn't that right ? 

Mr. Marumo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you say "Yes" ? 

Mr. Marumo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been a shop steward ? 

Mr. Marumo. Four years. 



^ Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Yoshito Marumo is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokuuaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. See p. 1472. 



1650 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tamsnner. Four years. What union is it? 

Mr. Marumo. ILWU, local 150. 

MV. Tavenner. Local 150? 

Mr. Marumo. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Ernest Arena, president of your local 

150? 

Mr. Marumo. On the advice of my counsel, I refuse to answer the 
question on the ground that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are uneasy about bein^ incriminated by men- 
tioning the name of the president of this local f 

Mr. Marumo. On the advice of my counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who are the other officers of your — well, I will not 
ask you that question — now, will you tell the committee whether you 
now or ever have been a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. MARU3I0. On the advice of my counsel, I refuse to answer the 
question on the ground that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr, Tavenner. Edward Hong. 

(No response.) 

Mr. Ta^^nner. Mr. Frank Maehara. 

(No response.) 

Mr. Tavenner. JNIr. Chairman, I think there was some mistake on 
my card as to the time that these witnesses should be present. 

I will call Mrs. Jeanette Nakama Kohrbough. 

TESTIMONY OF JEANETTE NAKAMA EOHRBOUGH, ACCOMPANIED 
BY HEK COUNSEL, MRS. HARRIET BOUSLOG 

JNIr. Walter. Do you swear the testimony that you are about to give 
will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth ? 

Mrs. RoiiRBOUGH. I do. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. You are Mrs. Jeanette Nakama Rohrbough. 

Mrs. RoHRBOUCxH. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented here by counsel? 

Mr. Rohrbough. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify herself. 

Mrs. BousLOG. I wish the name of Harriett Bouslog be entered on 
the record as counsel for Jeanette Nakama Rohrbough. At this time 
I would like to file on behalf of Mrs. Rohrbough the same motion as 
has been filed before.*" 

Mr. Ta\^nner. What was your name before you were married ? 

Mrs. Rohrbough. Nakama. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVhen were you married? When did your name 
become Mrs. Rohrbough ? 

Mrs. Rohrbough. If I remember correctly, in September 1949. 

Mr. Ta\t5nner. Before the date referred to, in September 1949, 
were you commonly referred to or known by the name of Jeanette 
Nakama ? 



"» Text of motion to qnash service of s bpena by Joannette Nal?ama Rohrbough is iden- 
tical with the motion filed on behalf oi Wilired Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. 
See p. 1550. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1651 

Mrs. RoiiRBOUGH. Well, a lot of people, I guess, know me as 
Nakama. 

Mr. Tavexner. Well, is that the customary name under which you 
were known '^ 

Mrs. RoiiRcouGii. I have been known by that name for a long time. 

JSIr. Tav-ennek. The reason I am asking were you married before 

you were married to Mr. Rolirbough is 1 am only asking because 

J don't want to be mistaken regarding the names. 

Mrs. RoHRBOUGii. On the advice of my attorney I shall refuse to 
answer the question on the ground that it might tend to incrimi- 
nate me. 

Mr. TA^^1N^^ER. I feel certain that you and the attorney misunder- 
stood my question. Were you married prior to your marriage to Mr. 
Hohrbough ? 

Airs. RoHRBOUGH. Yes, I think I can answer that question. Yes, I 
was Mrs. Jeanette Hyun. 

Mr. Ta^tinner. When were you married to Mr. Hyun? 

Mrs. RoHRBOUGH. If I remember correctly, it was in August 1948. 

^Ir. TA%T:]srNER. What was the name of your husband ? What was 
Mr. H3ani's name ? 

Mrs. RoHRBOUGH. Paul. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Paul Hyun ? Are you now or have you been, have 
you ever been a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mrs. RoHRBOUGH. On the advice of my counsel, I shall refuse to 
answer the question on the ground that it might tend to incrimi- 
nate me. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. No further questions. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will stand adjourned until 9 o'clock 
tomorrow morning. 

(Whereupon, the meeting was adjourned until Saturday, April 15, 
1950, at 9 a. m.) 



HEARINGS REGARDINCt COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES 
IN THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII 



SATURDAY, APRIL 15, 1950 

United States House of Representatives, 
Subcommittee of the Ccmmittee on Un-Amekijan Activities, 

Honolulu^ T . II. 

ruBLic session 

The subcommittee of four met, pursuant to call, at 9 : 08 a. m., in the 
Senate Chamber, lolani J^alace, Hon. Francis E. Walter (subcommit- 
tee chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Francis E. Walter, 
Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold H. Velde. 

Staff members present : Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel ; William A. 
Wheeler and Courtney E. Owens, investigators; and John W. Car- 
rington, clerk. 

]Mr. Walter. The hearing will be in order. 
- JSIr. Tavenner. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. The first witness this morning is Esther M. Bristow. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? Do you swear 
that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mrs. Bristow. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ESTHER M. BRISTOW, ACCOMPANIED BY HER 
COUNSEL, HARRIET BOUSLOG 

Mr. Tav-enner. You are Mrs. Esther M. Bristow ? 

Mrs. Bristow. I am. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Mrs. Bristow, there was a subpena served upon 



you 

Mrs. BousLOG. Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. I beg your pardon. 

Are you represented by counsel. 

Llrs. Bristow. Mrs. Bouslog is my counsel. 

Mr. Ta^T3nner. Will ISIrs. Bouslog identify herself for the record ? 

Mrs. Bouslog. May my name be entered of record, Harriet Bouslog, 
as attorney for Mrs, Esther M. Bristow. And at this time I would 
like to file with the connnittee a motion to quash the service of the 
subpena. 

Mr. Walter. It will be placed in the record. 



41 



<i Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Esther M. Bristow is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Wilfred Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. See p. 1550. 

1653 



1654 coMMuisrisT activities in hawaii 

Mr. Ta\t2Nner. Mrs. Bristow, a subpena was served on you direct- 
ing your appearance here and as treasurer of the Hawaiian Civil 
Liberties Committee to produce any and all financial statements, in- 
cluding canceled checks and ledgers, of the Hawaiian Civil Liberties 
Committee; this subpena was served on you on March 31, 1950, ac- 
cording to the return of the United States marshal for this district ; 
do you have the record with joii ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Beistow. I refuse to answer the question on the grounds it 
might incriminate me and on the further ground— — 

Mr. Tam2XXer. Instead of asking you a question, I will ask you to 
produce the records in pursuance to the direction of this subpena. 

Mrs. Bristow. I have already refused to answer the question on 
the grounds that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you mean you refuse to produce the records in 
accordance with the direction of this subpena ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. I refuse to answer the question. 

Mr. Ta\^xner. Do you refuse to produce the records ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. I refuse to produce the records on the grounds that 
they may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta^t^nner. You are treasurer of the Hawaiian Civil Liberties 
Committee, are you not? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Taatexxer. Are the records in your custody ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Ta-s^nxer. Speak a little louder. There has been produced, in 
response to a subpena, from the commercial department of the Ameri- 
can Security Bank, a signature card for the year 1950, in fact, it is 
dated January 23, i950, or rather it is a photostatic copy of it. Will 
you examine it, please ? 

(Witness examines document.) 

Mr. Tavexner. Is it not a fact that in pursuance to that identifi- 
cation card that the persons, the signatures appearing thereon of 
Esther M. Bristow and Stephen Murin were the only persons author- 
ized to sign the checks for the Hawaiian Civil Liberties Committee 
as of January 23, 1950; is that correct? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Tavenner, I would like to ask the witness a 
question. 

Why do you think it might incriminate you to answer the question 
as to whether you are authorized to withdraw funds from that bank 
account ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. My counsel has advised me of my legal rights. 

INIr. Walter. The only reason why you refuse to answer these ques- 
tions is because your attorney advises you not to; is that it? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. My attorney advises me of my legal rights. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1655 




Esther Bristow 
Exhibit 1 

Mr. Walter. Did j^our attorney tell you that any testimony given 
here is privileged and that it could not be used against you or anybody 
else in any other proceedings? 
, (Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. My attorney has advised me. 

Mr. Walter. Keep 3' our voice up ; we cannot hear you. 

Mrs. Bristow. INIy attorney advises me. and my decision is ni}' own. 

Mr. Walter. Yes ; but did your attorney tell you that any testimony 
given here could not be used against you and that you could not be 
prosecuted because of what you said here before this congressional 
committed ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. I believe that is a privileged communication between 
myself and my attorney. 

Mr. Walter. That is probably true, I don't know, but I am asking 
you merely : Were you told that you could not be prosecuted because 
of any testimony you gave here? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. I hardly know how to answer the question except 
as I have already answered it. I have decided that I had the legal 
right not to answer the question because of incrimination. 

Mr. Walter. It is very distasteful to me and to the other members 
of this committee to be compelled to take action that we have taken 
in adopting resolutions to cite people for contempt. We don't want 
to make trouble for anybody. And that is the only reason why I am 
asking you if you know exactly what you are doing when you say 
that you are afraid you may be incriminated by answering an innocent 
question. 

INIrs. Bristow. Yes. I know exactly what I am doing. 

Mr. Walter. Yes. All right, 



1656 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you examine again the card which I handed 
you, obtained from the commercial department of the American Se- 
curity Bank, and state whether the signature Esther M. Bristow is 
your signature? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Bristow. I refuse to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the photostatic copy in evidence and 
mark it "Bristow Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Walter, Without objection, it will be received*'- 

]Mr. Tavenner. That is all. Wait just a minute, 

Mr. Walter. Just a minute, please. Call your next witness. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Mr. Owens. 

INIr. Walter. Do you SAvear that the testimony you are about to give 
will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God? 

Mr, Owens, I do. 

TESTIMONY OF COURTNEY E. OWENS 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state your full name, please, sir? 

Mr. Owens. Courtney E. Owens. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold a j^osition with the Un-American 
Activities Committee of the House of Representatives? 

Mr. Owens. Yes, sir, I am an investigator for the Un-American 
Activities Committee. 

Mv. Tavenner. How long have you been an investigator of this 
committee? 

Mr. Owens. Since September 1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to your employment as an investigator, what 
experience or training did you have in preparation for this work? 

Mr. Owens. I immediately after the war, after serving in the Navy, 
I required another semester of college to get my degree in business 
administration, majoring in accounting. I returned to Tijlane Uni- 
versity in New Orleans. On my return to Washington I was employed 
in the office of Howard Smith, of Virginia, for approximately a year 
and 2 months, and then I went to work for the committee. 

Mr. Tavenner, Mr, Owens, in response to a subpena duces tecum 
was there presented to you certain records of the Hawaiian Civil 
Liberties Committee? 

Mr. Owens, Yes, sir. 

Mr, Tavenner. Upon whom was that subpena served? 

Mr. Owens. Mr. Katsuto Nagaue, room 202, Terminal Building, 
Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. What period of time was covered by the records 
which were turned over to you in pursuance to that subpena ? 

Mr, Owens, These records cover the period December 17, 1947, to 
February 7, 1949, 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have those records with you? 

Mr. Owens, Yes; I do, 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you analyzed those records? 

Mr. Owens. Yes, sir. 



^ See p. 1655. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1657 

Mr. Tavknnkr. I desire at this time to ask you to cive the coniiiiittee 
the benefit of your examination of those records, and then I will desire 
to put part if not all of them in evidence. 

Mr. Owens. Mr. Chairman, this is a short financial analysis of the 
records that Avere snbpenaed and what they showed : 

The Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee opend a trust account 
with Mr, Katsuto Na,G;aue, accountant and auditor, room 20^, Ter- 
minal Building, Honolulu, on December 17. 1047. Mr. Nagaue's 
function in connection with the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee was 
merely that of an accoinitant and was performed on a strict business 
basis. This account was opened by Mr. Nagaue at the instruction of 
Marshall McEuen, who, on December 15, 19-1:7, at the formal organiza- 
tional meeting of the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee had been 
elected to head their organization committee for the coming year, that 
is, 1948. Marshall McEuen gave Mr. Nagaue $96.95 with which to 
open a trust account in Mr. Nagaue's name for the Hawaii Civil 
Liberties Conmiittee. This trust account was maintained from 
December 17, 1947, until February 7, 1949, a period of just about 14 
months. The committee is now in possession of all financial records, 
statements, and canceled checks covering this period as a result of a 
subpena served on Mr. Nagaue. 

During this 14 months' period the income of the Hawaii Civil Lib- 
erties Committee was $9,790.34. This figure breaks down as follows, 
as show^n by the financial records now in the possession of the 
committee. 

I would like to add that those three sources are the only sources 
of income on this statement. 

Donations, $8,510.44; benefit dances and parties, $1,195.90; member- 
ship dues $84. 

With the exception of the first 5 weeks of this account, when 
Marshall McEuen, John Reinecke, Aiko Reinecke, and Doris Ozaki 
turned in a few donations, all money turned over to Mr. Nagaue for 
deposit was given to him by Rachael Saiki, who would give him a 
certain amount of money and tell him the source, tell him whether it 
was a donation, social, or membership fees. 

The disbursements for this same 14 months' period were $8,460.57. 
The committee is in possession of the canceled checks representing 
this entire disbursement. Of this amount— $8,460.57— $3,009.88 was 
paid to individuals identified before this committee as members of the 
Communist Party ; $1,500 was paid to Mr, Richard Gladstein for his 
representation of John Reinecke during the Reinecke hearing in 1948, 
August and September 1948 ; $1,128.11 was paid to Mrs. Harriet Bous- 
log and/or Mr. Myev Symonds; $152.42 was paid to the International 
Longshoremen and Warehousemen's Union as donations or reimburse- 
ment for services; and $102.50 was paid to the Honolulu Record, a part 
of which was for the purchase of stock in that corporation. This makes 
a total of $5,918.71, which represents 70 percent of the total disburse- 
ments for that period. The remaining disbursements will be obvious 
from the face of the checks and are purely routine business. 

Mr. Nagaue gave the Hawaiian Civil Liberties Committee a final 
accounting on February 7, 1949, at which time he issued a check to 
their order in the amount of $1,195.77. This was their net balance 
after deducting bank-service charges and a charge for accounting' 



1658 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAU 

service over this li-month period, that gross balance having been 
$1,349.77. 

Since February 8, 1949, the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee has 
maintained their own bank account at the American Security Bank 
here in Honolulu. On this date, Kobert Greene and Kachael Saiki, 
president and treasurer, respectively, of Hawaii Civil Liberties Com- 
mittee for the year 1949, executed the proper signature cards at this 
bank and deposited their check of $1,195.77. 

I have here that signature card and the ledger sheets subpenaed from 
the American Security Bank, which clearly shows the deposit of 
February 8, 1949, in that amount. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. I desire to offer the photostatic copies in evidence 
and have them marked "Exhibit Owens Xos. 1 and 2," respectively. 

Mr. Walter. They will be received.*^ 



Owens 
Exhibit 1 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, is it the record of the deposits and the expendi- 
tures covering the period shown by that bank statement which would 
have been included within the siibpena duces tecum served upon Mrs. 
Bristow ? 

Mr. Owens. Yes, sir. For the period February 1949 to February 
1950, 13 months, there has been deposited in this account the sum of 
$879.04; disbursements for this same 13-month period have been 
$1,694.40. Their balance as of March 1, 1950, was $380.41. 

It is interesting to compare the average monthly income and the 
average monthly disbursements for these two periods just discussed, 
namely, the 14-month period of December 1947 to January 1949, dur- 
ing which period Doctor and Mrs. Reinecke were suspended, their 
case investigated, and a long public hearing held with regard to their 
alleged Communist activities, as a result of which they were suspended 
from their positions in the teaching profession here in Honolulu. Dur- 
ing this period, December 1947 to January 1949, the average monthly 



*' Owens exhibit No. 1, see above. Owens exhibit No. 2, retained in committee flies. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1659 

income for that period was $G99.31 and the average monthly dis- 
bursement "was ^60-±,31, whereas the average monthly income for the 
second period, F'ebruary 1949 to February 1950, was $67.(52, and the 
average monthly disbursement was $130.35. 

This Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee has been cited by the Attor- 
ney General of the United States as being dominated by the Commu- 
nist Party and a Communist-front organization. The committee 
staff of this connnittee will very shortly present to the members of 
this committee for their appi"Oval and issuance, a complete and de- 
tailed report on this organization from its very inception to date.** 

INIr. Tavenner. Mr. Owens, you mentioned the fact that there had 
been an accounting at the end of the period covered by the trust 
officer in his handling of the funds of this concern. 

]Mr. Owens. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have that with you ? 

Mr. Owens. Yes ; I do. 

^Ir. Tavenner. I desire to offer that statement of the account into 
evidence and have it marked "Exhibit Ow^ens No. 2." 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.*^ 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. It should be marked "No. 3." 

jNIr. Owens. I have also, Mr. Tavenner, the cash book, the book of 
original entry, of Mr. Nagaue, w^hich indicates in addition to the 
Hawaii Civil Liberties Connnittee trust account numerous other trust 
accounts. Therefore, the names and amounts in this book are not all 
pertaining to the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee. 

Mr. Tavenner. In that event, I desire that the cash book be marked 
only for identification and not be placed in evidence. I ask it be 
identified as "Owens Exhibit No. 4." 

IMr Walter. It will be received.*® 

Mr. Owens. I have also, IMr. Tavenner, 10 financial statements 
w'hicli were submitted to the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee by Mr. 
Nagaue periodically. There are 10 copies of this statement, which I 
would like for jou to have at this time. 

jMr. Tavenner. I desire to offer these financial statements in evi- 
dence and have them marked as one batch of papers, and request that 
they be marked ^'Owens Exhibit No. 5." ^'^ 

Mr. Ow^ENS. I have here also 143 checks drawn on this trust account 
by Mr. Nagaue, and I would like to present them to you at this time. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer these checks in evidence as one 
batch of checks and request that they be marked as "Owens Exhibit 
No. 6." 

Mr. Walter. They wdll be received.*^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Owens, in the course of your investigation, did 
you procure, as a result of the subpena duces tecum, records of a 
transaction with the Bergstrom Music Co., bearing date August 12, 
1948, and also one with the same company bearing date September 
15, 1948? 

Mr. 0"WENS. Yes, sir. In the follow-up investigation which these 
checks disclosed, those documents were turned over to the committee 
as a result of the subpena served upon that company. 



** See report on Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee. 

" Retained in committee files. 

■*' Retained in committee flies. 

•" Report on Hawaii Civic Liberties Committee. 

■** See appendix for list of checks. 



1660 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



Mr. Tavenner. I desire to have identified these two documents 
only at this time and mark them "Owens Exhibit No. 7 and 8," re- 
spectively. And will you mark them right now ? 

DATE 8/12 AS 

OUR INVOICE Ho. 3^30-16 

YOUR ORDER No. Robt. Greene 




I04J FORT STREET 
HONOLULU 9, HAWAII 



SOLD TO 



I.L.V.U. Educational & Legal Dept 
Fier 11 
Honolulu, T.H, 



DSSCIUPnON 



1-Hour Wire Spools 



Certified true copy of fhe 
original invoice. 

BERGSTROM MUSIC COMPA!i 




^Z^ 




df/.Mgt 



Owens 

ExiiiiiiT 7 



5.00 



I 20 



.00 




io«3 FORT STREET 
HONOLULU 9, HAWAII 



DATE 9/1 5 A8 

OUR INVOICE No. 3942-9 

YOUR ORDER No. Robt. Greene- 



SOLO TO 



I.L.W.U. Educational k. Legal Dept 
Pier 11 
Honolulu, T. H. 



QOAKtTTY 


oesouFnoN 


^S AMOUNT 


Jl2 


l-Hour Wire Spools 

Certified true copy of thA 
original invoice. V\ 
BERGSTROM MUSIC CDMPAffi? 


5.00 


1 60 


00 




Off.Mgr N^ 





Owens 
Exhibit 8 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1661 



Mr, Owens. These are invoices No. 3830-10 and invoice 3942-1, 
of the Bergstrom Music Co., 1045 Fort Street, Honohihi, Hawaii, 
which were turned over to me as a result of the subpena served on that 
company. 

Mr. Tavenner. As a result of. your further investigation did you 
procure by subpena duces tecum otlier customers' invoices, which I 
hand you now and which are bound together, and whicli I will ask 
you to identify only and that they be marked for identification only 
as "Owens Exhibit No. 9." 



■rtANCHtr If AGENCIES 

Hlt^ HAWAII 
WAILUKI'. MAUI 
KOLOA KAUAI 



CUSTOMER'S 
ORDER NO. 6 DATE 



REQUISITION NO. 
CONTRACT NO. 



CUSTOMER'S INVOICE 

ALEXANDER BROS., LTD. 

Office Equipment — Service ond Supplies 

1687 KAPIOLANI BLVD., HONOLULU, HAWAII 

P. 0. BOX 2814 — PHONE 90S96 

REf ER TO .„ccA 
INVOICE NO. AdDbD 

INVOICE DATE 8/24/ 48 

VENDOR'S NOS. 



FOR CUSTOMER'S USE ONLY 



SOLD 

TO 



I L W 

ToniJ.nal Bids. Pier 11 

Honolulu, T. a. 



C. Kelson 



SHIPPED TO 

AND 
DCSTINATION 

HOW SHIPPED 

BATE SHIPPED 

TERMS NET 30 DAYS NO CASH DISCOUNT. 



Deliver 



FROM 

F.O.B. 



PREPAID 
OR COLLECT 



F. 0. B. Checks 



Termt AppravMi 



Prln A p piwd 



Colculotlons CheckAd 



Ffe.glit Bill No. 



Materiol Received 
19 _ 



Date, Slgnotu/e 

SolitfoctofV and Appfowd 



Accounting Distribution 



Quantity" 
Ofdered 



_Stiipped 



DESCRIPTION 



10 



6nl7 



One Hour Spools for Webster iVire Recorder 



5.00 



SO.OO 



SO.OO 




I certify fhot the obove bl't H corr«f and |ust; thot poymcnt therefor 
hoi not been received, thot olt ita'ufory fequirementi as to Amcricon 
production ond lobof stondcrds and oil conditions oi purchoM OppJico- 
bM to tt>e trarnoctioni hove been compiled wiih; ond thot State of locot 
soles toxei ore rwt irkclwded in the omounts billed. 

ALCXANOER BROTHERS, LTD. 



Certified and just; poyment not rtceited. The orttdes covered 
by this invoice ore ot the growth, production or monufoctura o* 
the United Stotes. 

ALEXANDER BROS^ LTD. 



vie© Pr«s*dent-Tr»o»ur» 



Vice Preshlent-Treasuret 
Make All Checks Poyoble to ALEXANDER BROTHERS, LTD. 
GOODS COVERED BY THIS INVOICE WERE PRODUCED IN ACCOftOANCE WITH THE APPUCABU PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR lABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1^8. 



Owens 

Exhibit 9 

(p. 1) 



66636—50 — pt. 2- 



1662 



COMMUISriST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



SKANCHB ly AGCNCieS 

HIV^ HAWAII 
WAILUKII. MAUI 
KOLOA KAUAI 



REQUISITION NrO 
COKTRACT NO. 



CUSTOMER'S INVOICE 



ALEXANDER BROS., LTD. 



fOR CUSTOMER'S USt ONVf 



Offic. Equipment — Service and Supplies 

1687 KAP10LA,NI BLVD., HONOLULU. HAWAII 

P. 0. BOX 2814 — PHONE 90:S6 



INVOICE DATE 
VENDOR'S NOS. 



A2729 
8/28/48 



SOLD 
TO 



I L W U 

Legal & Education Fund 
I ler U Terrdnal Bldg. 
Honolulu, T. H. 



C, Nelson 



SHIPPED TO 

AND 
DESTINATION 

HOW SHIPPED 

DATE SHIPPED 



FROM 
f.O.B. 



PREPAID 
OR COLLECT 



TERMS: NET 30 DAYS NO CASH DISCOUNT. 



F. O. B. Ch.clud 



T#mtt Apc^'sd 



Calculation! OMckad 



Tronsportotlon 



FreioHt Btll No. 



Material Received 
.19 ^ 



Date Signature 

Sotiiroctorv and Approved 



Accounting Dlftrbutien 



Quantity 



50 
5 




(inly 1 hour Spools of VJire 
File Boxes 



DESCRIPTION 




5.00 

1.00 



250.00 
5.00 



2SS.00 



I ct't.ty ttVJt the above biTl li coffcet ond lust, thot payment tt>efetc.' 
hos not been leceivcd, that all sta'Litorv requi'cmenli as lo Amencon 
production ond loboi stondaidi and all condmons o( purchove opplico- 
ble to the itoniO'iiions hrawe been complied with, ond Ihot Stare of locol 
wiet tQ"es ore not included in the amounts billed, 

ALEXANDER BROTHERS, LTD. 



Certified ond just, poyment not received. The articles covered 
by this invoice ore of the growth, production or manufocture o* 
the United States. 

ALEXANDER BROS., LTD. 



8v- 



Vrce President -Treasure 



Vice President -Tfeosurer 



Make All Checks Payoble to ALEXANDER BROTHERS, LTD. 
QOOOS COVERED BY THIS INVOICE WERE PROOUCED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDAPC.. ACT OF I9M. 



Owens 

Exhibit 9 
(p. 2) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1663 



f«AMCHtf. AOINCta 
HIIO HAWAII 
WAILUKII, MAUI 
KOIOA KAUAI 



CVSTOMER-S 
ORDER NO. OATf 



KtOUISITION NO. 
CONTRACT Na 



CUSTOMER'S INVOICE 

ALEXANDER BROS., LTD. 

Offk* fqulpNMnl-^StnrlcB and SuppIlM 

1687 KAPIOLANI BLVD., HONOLULU, HAWAII 

P. O. 0OX 2(14 — PHONC 90986 

REFER TO „ „„-, 
INVOICE NO. A2701 

INVOICE DATE 8/27/48 

VENDOR'S NOJ. 



FOR CUSTO»tER'S UU ONtY 



SOLD I L W tJ 

TO Fler 11 Teanlsal Oldg. 

Honolulu, T. R« 



SALESMAN C« Nelson 



SHIPPED TO 

AND 
DESTINATION 

HOW SHIPPED 

DATE SHIPPED 




P. 0. B. ChKkn) 



Voudar Na, 



Xtm Appfw^d 



"Prte* Awi«¥«i~ 



Calculotlo<« CfMdkAd 



TronjiJOrtotlon 



Ffslght Bill No. 



Moterlol RMalvad 
19 _ 



Dot* Signotura 

SoTlsloctorv and Acpfovwl 



Accounting Dlatrlbwtlon 



10 



Only 



One Hour Spools for Webster ,(ire Recorder 






5.00 



50.00 



50.00 



I certify thot tht ot>ove biH i} ccyrvct ant} lull, fttot poymtnt Thereto' 
ho* not been received; thoi oil itatutorv requjrem»r>r» at To Amtncon 
production ond lobof standordi oAd oH condittorvi of pwrchau opplico- 
blc to 'he Ironioct.oni hOve De^n Complied with; ond Thot SfoTe or locol 
Mtes Toxe* or* rtet irtcluded m tht oriKMinti blll»d. 

ALEXANDER BROTHERS, LTD. 



Certified and jusT; poyment not received. The orttcles covered 
by fhlj invoice ore of the growth, production or monufacTure o* 
the United Stoles 

ALEXANDER BROS, LTD. 



8v_ 



vice P™«ld«nT-Tr»o»urer 



Vic« PretidenT-Treoiurtr 
Mokt AH ChecKi Poyofale to ALEXANDER BROTHERS, LTtt, 
COOOS COVEReO BY THIS INVOICE WWe PRODUCED IN ACCOftOANCC WITH THC AfniCABLl PROVISIONS 0^ Th| fAlR LABOR tTANOARDS ACT OT I9»B. 



Owens 

Exhibit 9 

(p. 3) 



1664 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAU 



BRANCHET. a AGINCieS 

Hll,*^ HAWAII 
WAILUKII, MAUI 
KOLOA KAUAI 



REQUISITION NO. 
CONTRACT UO. 



CUSTOMER'S INVOICE 



ALEXANDER BROS., LTD. 

Office Equipmenf — Service and Supplies 

1687 KAPIOLANi BLVD., HONOLULU, HAWAII 

f. O. BOX 2814 — PHONE 905S6 



FOR CUSTOMER'S USE ONLY 



SOLD 

TO 



I 1 VJ u 

Tennlnal BlOg. I'ier 01 

Honolulu, T, f.. 



INVOICE NO. A 2623 

INVOICE DATE 8/20/48 
VENDORS NOS. 



0. Kelson 



Voucher Neu 



F. O. B. Checked 



Terms Approved 



Colcuiatlone Checked 



Tronsportotlon 



Freight Bill No. 



Moterial Received 
.19 _ 



Date Signetore 

Splilfoctory and Approved 



' -)»nt» 



SHIPPED TO 

AND 
DESTINATION 

HOW SHIPPED 

DATE SHIPPED 

TERMS: NET 30 DAYS NO CASH DISCOUNT 



vccountir^o Dtttributlon 



Dellverad 



FROM 
F.O.B. 



PREPAID 
OR COLLECT 



Quel 
Ord 



10 



Quantity 
Shlppe<j 



Only 



Rnal Approval 



DESCRIPTION 



One Hour Sppols for Vfebater V/ire Recorder 




SeOO 



50.00 



50.00 



t 



I certtfY thot tte above bill ii coffccr ood iv«t; that poymenr tbeftfof 
fm nor been received, fnot all ttatulofy »eguirementi a* to American 
pfOducnon and tobof standords oml all coodidons of purchoie opplico- 
ble to the ifoniociions hove been compiled with; and that Slote w toGOl 
Mies taxes ce no* lnclu<Jed In the omoonti billed. 

ALEXANDER BROTHERS, LTD. 



Certified and iust; poyment not received. The orticles covered 
by this invoice ore of the growth, production or rrttnufocture o* 
the United Slotes. 

ALEXANDER BROS.. LTD. 



By- 



Vice Preaident-Treosurw 



Vice PrssJiient-Tfeasurev 



Moke All Checks Poyofile to ALEXANDER BROTHERS, LTD. 
GOODS COVERED BY THIS INVOICE WERE PftOOUCEO IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPUCABU PROVIStOMS OF THE PAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF W3S. 



Owens 

Exhibit 9 
(p. 4) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



1665 



•ItANCHr. % AGINCIII 

Hl',"^ HAWAII 
WAILUKIi. MAUI 
KOLOA KAUAI 



CUSTOMER'S INVOICE 



ALEXANDER BROS., LTD. 

OHk« Cqujpmanf — Service ond Supplio 

1637 KAPIOLANl BLVD., HONOLULU, HAWAII 

P. 0. BOX 2814 — PHONE 90586 



FOR CUSTOMED S USC OM.T 



cusTowERS Lr. Arena 

ORDER NO. b DATE 
REOUCSITION NO. 
CONTRACT NO. 



REFER TO HQAOn 
INVOICE NO. ^^IISI 



INVOICE DATE 
VENDOR'S NOS. 



SOLD 

TO 



SHIPPED TO 

AND 
DESTINATION 



I L •* D 
Pier U 



12 Lee 



Educational k Legal Fund 



will call 



DATE SHIPPED 

TERMS NET iJ DAYS NO CASH DISCOUNT. 



FROM 

Fo.e. 



PREPAID 
OR COLLECT 



F. 0. 8. a»ck«l 



T«nTi« Awxo v d 



Colculotlon* QMck«J 



Freigt^l Bill No. 



Motviol R«c«lv«d 
.19 _ 



Dola Signolura 

SotufoctorY and Approved 



Accountir>o DlitrlbutlM^ 



Quontiiy 
Ordered 



(Xjoitiiv 
Shipped 



DESCRIPTION 



Only 



>v one hour Recording Jlre 






5.0O 



30.00 



30.00 



I certify thot the above bll 'S correct ond just, thot povment therefor 
hos rxrt been received, thot oil stotutory requirementi oi to American 
production end lobor stonJords ond oil conditions of purchose opplico- 
ble to ttie tronsoctions hove been conspired with; ond that Stole or local 
sole) taxes are r^ot included in tt>e amounti billed. 

ALEXANDER BROTHERS. LTD. 



Certified and just; poyment not received The orticles covered 
by this invoice ore of The yrowth, production or monufacture o* 
the United Stotes, 

ALEXANDER BROS., LTD. 



By- 



Vice President-Treasurer 



Vice President-Treosurer 
Moke All Checks Poyoble to ALEXANDER BROTHERS, LTD. 
C00D5 COVERED BY THIS INVOICE WERE PRODUCED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE APPLICABLE PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR LA30R STANDARDS ACT OF 1938. 



Owens 

Exhibit 9 

(p. 5) 

Mr. 0"SVENS. These are five invoices, bearing Nos. A-2660, A-2729, 
A-2701, A-2623, and A-2487, of the Alexander Bros., Ltd., which 
invoices were turned over to me as a result of the subpena served on 
that company. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Did you also, through the use of the subpena duces 
■tecum, secure other documents, which I now hand you ? 

Mr. Owens. Invoice No. 2784 and invoice No. 3121. 

Mr. Tavenner. The first one is what number ? 

Mr. 0^^t:ns. 2784. 



66636— 50— pt. 2- 



-10 



1666 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to have it marked for identification only 
as "Owens Exhibit No. 10." 

Mr. Walter. It will be so marked. 

Mr. Owens. And invoice No. 2784 of the Pacific Frontier Broad- 
casting Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to have it identified, marked for identifi- 
cation only, as "Owens Exhibit 11." 

Mr. Owens. This is a certified true copy and was turned over to 
me as a result of the subpena served on the general manager of this 
company. This invoice No, 3121 of the Pacific 

Mr, Ta\t:nner, Just a minute. I want to make certain that our 
record is correct. I want to straighten it in the record if there is any 
question about it. Will you examine the paper again, which I now 
hand you, and state what company it refers to and its date? 

Mr. Owens. Invoice No, 2784, dated August 31, 1948, of the Pa- 
cific Frontier Broadcasting Co., which w^as produced as a result of 
the subpena served on the general manager of that corporation- 
Mr. Tavenner, I desire that exhibit be marked for identification 
only as "Ow^ens Exhibit No. 10," 

Mr, Walter, It may be so marked,*'' 

Mr. Owens, This is invoice No. 3121, dated September 30, 1948, of 
the Pacific Frontier Broadcasting Co., Ltd., and was produced as a 
result of the subpena served on the general manager of that company, 

Mr, Tavenner, I desire to have it marked for identification only as 
"Owens Exhibit No, 11," 

I have no further questions. 

Mr. Velde. I believe you stated that the account of the HCLC was 
closed in February 1950, did you not ? 

Mr. Owens. Yes. 

Mr, Velde, Do you know what happened to the balance ? 

Mr. Owens, The investigation, Mr, Velde, was made shortly after 
we arrived in Honolulu, and my examination of their account, which 
is still a current account, stopped at the end of February, and I made 
my records accordingly as of February 28, and the present appearance 
and activity of that account will show from the ledger sheet which 
was subpenaed from that bank. 

Mr, Velde, Then the account is still active? 

Mr, Owens. Oh, yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter, That is all. 

Call your next witness. 

Mr, Tavenner, I would like to call as my next witness Mr. Steve 
Murin. 

TESTIMONY OF STEPHEN MTJEIN, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

HARRIET BOUSLOG 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Murin. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. I understand counsel, Mrs. Harriet Bouslog, is ask- 
ing about the return of the checks, which have just been introduced 
in evidence. I w^ant to assure her that the checks will be safe and that 



*^ Retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1667 

she will be able to get them back when we have completed with our 
examination of tliem and tlie nse of them. 

Mrs. BousLOG. Well, I am the attorney who is — I have been the at- 
torney and I am the attorney of the Hawaii Civil Liberties Com- 
mittee and I assume you would follow the same practice as I have 
with others in duplicating their financial records and not holding 
the originals in the records of the connnittee. 

Mv. Tavenner. There was not a single record of that group which 
you will not be permitted to obtain when we complete with our use 
of it. As I understand it, you represent the organization of the Hawaii 
Civil Liberties Connnittee in making that request. 

Mrs. BousLOG. "Well, I represent the Hawaii Civil Liberties Com- 
mittee and I noted sitting here that instead of offering duplicate 
copies as has been your practice in other instances you have been 
putting original records into the record as an exhibit. I was merely 
making a request as one attorney to another tliat you duplicate them 
and return the original records to the organization. 

Mr. Tavenner. I just learned now that we have duplicates here. 
We will return the originals when the committee chairman authorizes 
it and directs it. 

Mr. Walter. Well, for your purpose would the duplicates be sat- 
isfactory ? 

Mrs. BousLOG. Is there any reason why the duplicates are not sat- 
isfactory for the committee, so that the Hawaii Civil Liberties Com- 
mittee may have those ? 

Mr. Walter. Of course, we both know what we have in mind, 
d6n't.we? 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Mr. Chairman, may we proceed ? 

Mr. Walter. Proceed. 

Mr. Tavenner. Has he been sworn ? 

Mv. Murin. I have been sworn. 

JNIr. Tavenner. You are Mr. Stephen Murin ? 

Mr. Murin. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Murin. I am represented by attorney Bouslog. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will the attorney identify herself for the record? 

Mrs. Bouslog. May the name of Harriet Bouslog be entered of 
record as counsel for Stephen Murin. At this time I want to file the 
usual motion to the committee.^" 

Mr. Tavenner, Mr. Murin, what official position, if any, do you 
hold at this time with the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. MtTKiN. I have discussed this entire matter with my counsel and 
I have been advised and I fully agree that I cannot answer this ques- 
tion and other questions like it on the basis that it would tend to in- 
criminate me, and I also believe that my association of this committee 
in tlie past and at the present time may act — act against the liberties 
not only of myself, but against larger numbers of the people. For this 
reason, in addition to tlie fifth amendment, I believe I must refuse to 
answer that question and possibly others. 



^ Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Stephen Murin is identical with the 
motion filed in behalf of Wilfred Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. See p. 1550. 



1668 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAU 

Mr. Walter. Why do you think you would be in trouble if you ad- 
mit membership in this organization ? 

Mr. MuRiN. We are living in a very unusual time. 

Mr. Walter. Yes. 

Mr. MuRiN. I am aware of it. I think you are. I think that one of 
the most serious things that I have ever been faced with is this oppor- 
tunity to appear before you. I considered very seriously what I might 
do and I don't believe that I would be serving the x\merican people 
and the labor movement or myself in justice, not injustice, but in 
justice, if I were to answer questions, which because of the peculiar 
atmosphere of the era we live in could be used against these larger 
groups of people. I believe that sincerely. Given the opportunity, I 
would like to enlarge upon that. 

Mr. Walter. Of course, that dangerous situation that you talk 
about is the imminence of another dictatorship, isn't it ? 

Mr. MuRiN. I am almost tempted to refer to you as your Honor. 
What would be the proper title to call you, sir ? 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Walter. 

Mr. MuRiN. Mr. Walter. I don't believe 

Mr. Walter. You can call me Francis if you felt like it. 

Mr. MuRiN. Possibly a few years ago, Mr. Walter, I may have, 
because I come from your State. I come from the Thirty-second Rep- 
resentative District of Pennsylvania. I don't believe that your formu- 
lation of the danger is one that I would agree w^ith. The question that 
we are faced with today is not the imminence of another dictatorship. 

Mr. Walter. Don't you realize that this committee was set up by 
the Congress of the United States, and that it is a part of the Govern- 
ment of the United States? 

Mr. MuRiN. I realize that. 

Mr. Walter. It is set up in the democratic manner that we in Amer- 
ica know. 

Mr. MuRiN. I agree it is according to the official machinery of the 
United States Government and I believe it was set up for the purpose 
which, I forget your formulation of it, an official proceeding for which 
committees have been set up in the past. 

Mr. Walter. Then why do you think that in view of the fact, times, 
rather, recently we got adopted a law that makes the testimony given 
before this committee privileged ? It can't be used against anybody, 
and those of us who were interested in the activities of this committee 
in an endeavor to see to it that people would feel free to testify, had 
this law adopted. Now why do you think, that being the fact, that 
you might get in difficulty if you refused to answer questions? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. MuRiN. I have discussed this matter earlier with my attorney 
and again now on the advice of counsel I think that I cannot answer 
that particular question. 

Mr. Walter. Then your refusal to answer the questions comes 
from the fact that you have been told by your attorney not to answer 
it, not because of any feeling that you individually have ? 

Mr. MuRiN. No ; that would not be correct. I have been advised by 
my counsel of my rights. I have thought the matter over very seri- 
ously from the dictates of my own conscience, and I have taken it 
upon myself with full concurrence with my counsel's advice that J. 
cannot answer that question. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1669 

Mr. WAL'n:R. Proceed, Mr. Tavenner. 

Air. Tavennkr. Mv. IVIurin, did I understand you to say that you 
were from the State of Pennsylvania ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. MuRiN. I answered that "Yes." 

Mr. Tavenner, Wlien were you last in Pennsylvania ? 

Mr. MuRiN. In 1947. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Have you been in the Territory of Hawaii since 
that time, since 1947? 

ISIr. INIuRiN. Yes; except — yes. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. I understood you to say you were from the Twenty- 
third District — Thirty-second District of Pennsylvania. Identify 
more definitely the location of your residence when you lived in 
Pennsylvania. 

Mr. MuRiN. I lived in a small town 4 miles outside of Pittsburgh. 
It was called McKee's Rocks. 

INIr. Tavenner. McKee's Rocks. How long did you live at McKee's 
Rocks, Pa.? 

Mr. MuRiN. I lived there from the time I was about 3 years old 
until I was 24. At that time I enlisted in the Navy and never returned 
as a resident. 

Mr. Tavenner. While you were living there did you know a Steve 
Nelson, the Communist Party organizer? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. IMuRiN. I have been advised and I agree that I cannot answer 
that question, on the basis that it would tend to incriminate me. 
' Mr. Tavenner. Do you refuse to answer that question on the ground 
of self-incrimination ? Is that what I understand ? 

Mr. MuRiN. That is right. 

Mr. Walter. Well, why do you think that merely knowing Steve 
Nelson would get you into any trouble? 

Mr- MuRiN. I think that, Mr. Walter, that if I were to enlarge on 
all of these questions I would take up much time. I think that the 
important thing here before us is the activities of myself, and I want 
to know whether this committee can produce any evidence about any 
unlawful activitv on my part. If the committee can. I will be very 
glad to discuss that, but matters relating to my own affairs, I feel that 
their discussion, an enlargement upon them, might tend to incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Taatenner. Well, did you learn to know or were you acquainted 
with Matthew Cvetic, in Pittsburgh ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Murin. Under the advice of counsel, and again with my full 
concurrence, I must refuse to answer that because it might tend to 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Now, just to refresh your recollection, Mr. Cvetic was 
a member of the Communist Party for upward of 8 years, very active 
in the Communist Party. During that period, he w^as an FBI agent. 
Now, does that refresh your recollection any? 

Mr- ]\Iurin. I still will say that there is no reason why, to change 
my mind to answer that question. 

Mr. Walter. Wliat do you think it might incriminate you if you 
admit you know the FBI agent ? 



1670 COMMUKIST ACTIVITIES IX HAWAII 

Mr. MuRiN. You want me to answer that ? 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Yes. 

Mr. MuRiN. I interpret that as a type of question, I don't think 
that it is to the point, and I would like to repeat again that I refuse 
to answer the question on the ground that it might tend to incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Walter. Well, what is incriminating about knowing an FBI 

agent ? 

Mr. MuRiN. I have, Mr. Walter, nothing more to say on that par- 
ticular qiiestion, because unless you wish to delve deeper into this 
thing and go into matters which have no relationship to my ability  

Mr. Walter. My only interest is to see that a fellow Pennsylvanian 
doesn't get into trouble. 

Mr. MuRiN. I think, Kepresentative Walter, that in my own mind I 
have done no wrong. I have lived a pretty honest life, and as long as 
we discuss my life I think I am on safe ground. 

Mr. Walter. I am absolutely positive of that. One of the radio 
commentators described me as being a "kind, white-haired old gentle- 
man." I suppose with that goes the knowledge of human nature that 
the years bring to white-haired old men, and I feel positive that you are 
a good American. 

Mr. MuRiN. Thank you. 

Mr. Walter. I don't see why, as a good American, you won't try to 
help us clarify the atmosphere. 

Mr. MuRiN. Representative Walter, it is, I would like, there is 
nothing I would like better than to be recorded in the minutes of 
this meeting as having done my best for my country. It is because I 
believe that the actions that I am taking today is in the long run for 
the good of my country. If it were not for that I wouldn't take this 
attitude. It would be much easier for me to say, "Gentlemen, I have 
never been this ; I have never been that." But if I believed that the 
interest of the American people, I mean larger numbers of the people 
would be served by having me swear to that, I would be glad to do it. 
It would save me ; it would save my family ; it would save me from the 
attitudes that we have in the group here today. I don't enjoy being 
here and facing the prospect of being cited for contempt. 

Mr. Walter. We don't enjoy being here either to do that. 

Mr. MuRiN. I know that, and that is why I say that there are people 
in America, people like Tom Paine and more recently people like 
Franklin Roosevelt, people like even Truman, in the 1948 election said 
that any attempt to encroach upon the right of the people to think 
for themselves, to associate with whom they please, to say what they 
will, is not itself American. If I myself were to say to save my 
own skin, in order to protect myself from the laughter of large num- 
bers of people here, I could go ahead and do it, but I feel that I 
would be betraying those people who in the long run, who in the 
historic past had made America what it is. It is not because I want 
to get you gentlemen angry, because I enjoy the job of sitting here 
and have the people say, "That dirty this and that." It is not because 
of that. I think in the long run history will bear me out, those of 
us who are standing up today and having the guts, if you want to call 
it that, having the guts to say, "No agent of the Government can tell 
me that it is wrong for me to associate with John Doe, or wrong for 
you to read that book," we are serving the American people. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1671 

Mr. Walter. Let me say this, that this committee, as presently con- 
stituted, doesn't think anybody is guiky of anything through asso- 
ciation. 

Mr. MuRiN. I am ghxd to hear that. 

Mr. Walter. Then, will you answer the question? 

Mr. MuRix. I hope, Representative Walter, that it won't be neces- 
sary for me to repeat that I think I am serving my country best by my 
refusal to answer that question. 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

Mr. Tavtinner. The question, did I understand, you refused to 
answer is that whether or not you knew Matthew Cvetic ? 

Mr. MuRiN. As I recall, that was the question to which I answered 
that an answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you know Bessie Steinberg? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. MuRiN. I did know Bessie Steinberg. 

Mr. Tavenner. She was your wife? 

Mr. MuRiN. She was my wife. 

Mr. Tavenner. And Bessie Steinberg was educational director of 
a committee of the Communist Party, wasn't she ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. MuRiN. By advice by my counsel that the answer to that ques- 
tion would tend to incriminate me and that information regarding th(^ 
activities of my former wife is privileged matter. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you take part in Communist activities 
when you lived in Pittsburgh^ 

Mr. Murin. I have been advised not to answer the question on the 
same grounds as previously. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now, or have you at any time been a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Murin. I have been advised by my counsel not to answer that 
question on the grounds that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Walter. Call your next witness. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Mr. Marshall L. McEuen. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God. 

Mr. McEuen. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MARSHALL I. McEUEN, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 

COUNSEL, MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Mr. Marshall L. McEuen? 

Mr. McEuen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented here by counsel ? 

Mr. McEuen. I am. Mr. Symonds is my counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will Mr. Symonds identify himself for the record? 

Mr. Symonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds. I appear for the 
witness, and I file at this time the same motion with the committee in 
the same form as heretofore, Mr. Chairman. 



1672 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



Mr. Walter. It will be received. Mr. Symonds, do you want these 
motions right at the very beginning? ^^ 

Mr. Symonds. I beg your pardon. 

Mr. Walter. I say, do you want these motions right at the beginning 
of the statement, the beginning of the testimony ? 

Mr. Symonds. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. Make the record clear that the motion was filed before 
any questions. 

Mr. Symonds. Oh, yes ; thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. McEuen, are you a resident of the Territory of 
Hawaii ? 

Mr. McEuEN. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Taa^nner. How long have you lived in the Territory of Ha- 
waii? 

Mr. McEuEN. Since 1930, with two interim periods when I was 
away. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. With the exception of two periods 

Mr. McEuEN. Interim periods when I was on the mainland. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you state the time and duration of the periods 
when you were on the mainland? 

Mr. McEiTEN. I went to the mainland about the middle of May 194T 
and returned the 5th of November 1947 and went to the mainland last 
year about the 1st of July and returned the latter part of January. 

Mr. Tavenner. "What is your present occupation? 

Mr. McEuEN. I am a printer. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed? Are you self-employed? 

Mr. McEuEN. No; I am working for the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you worked for the Honolulu Star- 
Bulletin ? 

Mr. McEuEN. This time, since the 23d of January. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Of what year? 

Mr. McEuEN. This year. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. How were you employed prior to that time? 

Mr. McEuEN. I was during the period from approximately the 
latter part of June 1946 until the middle of May 1947 codirector of 
the Political Action Committee for the ILWU, and from about the 
5th of November until May o f las t year — ^July of last year — I was 
director of education for the ILWU. 

Mr. Ta\"enner. You say you were codirector of the PAC ? 

Mr. McEuEN. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tav'enner. And from what period ? 

Mr. McEuEN. I think I went to work for them on the 27th day of 
June 1946, and I was codirector of political action for the committee 
for the ILWU until about the 11th or 12th of May 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall whether Wilfred Oka was the record- 
ing secretary of the PAC during October 1946 ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. McEuEN. I don't know. I don't remember. 



^^ Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Marshall L. McBuen is identical witb 
the motion filed in behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. See 
p. 1472. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1673 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, you know that he was a member of the PAC? 

JNIr. McEuEN. No, sir; I don't remember that. 

Mr. Tavenner. You do not remembei' that ? 

Mr. jNIcEuen. No, sir. 

JSIr. Tavenner. Let me hand you what purports to be a copy of 
minutes of October 10, of October 11, 194G, and ask you to look a.t it 
and see if it refreshes your recollection regarding Mr. Oka's position. 

(Witness examines document.) 

Mr. Tavenner. It is on the front page. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. McEuEN. Will you repeat the question? 

Mr. Ta\^nner. I asked you if the paper I handed you would refresh 
your recollection about Mr. Oka's position in the PAC. 

Mr. McEuEN. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. It does refresh your recollection ? 

Mr. McEuEN. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then what is your present recollection? 

Mr. McEuEN. I was honest in the statement that I didn't know that 
or remember, at least, that Mr. Oka had been the recording secretary 
of the PAC, since there has been a good deal of water that went under 
the bridge in very large volumes since that time. 

Mr. Ta%t:nner. I didn't question the honesty of the answer. 

Mr. McEuen. However, apparently, if the minutes are correct, he 
was recording secretary of the PAC. 

Mr. Tamlnner. From your examination of this paper, do you now 
recall that he was a member of the PAC and was the recording 
secretary ? 

Mr. McEuEN. I still don't have any personal recollection of Mr. 
Oka as recording secretary of the PAC. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a delegate who attended the meeting on 
October 11, the minutes of which I showed you ? 

(AVitness examines document and confers with counsel.) 

Mr. McEuEN. Let me point out, Mr. Tavenner, that to ask me if I 
attended a meeting on a certain date is an extremely confusing thing, 
because, as a matter of actual fact, there were times when I attended 
three meetings in 1 day, and to ask me to go back for 3 years and ask 
a question about attendance is almost an impossible thing from the 
standpoint of memory. 

Mr. Tavenner. I am not interested so much in a meeting as I am 
to determine the names of persons who were members of the PAC 
and whether you recall you attended a meeting on this particular date 
or not I am not interested in it, but you were a member from the Oahu 
district, were you not, of the PAC ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Ta\'enner. My only purpose in giving you the minutes is to 
help you refresh your recollection. 

Mr. McEuEN. Dealing with the technical point of organization, 
Mr. Tavenner, my impression is that, although my name may be listed 
as a delegate officially, I didn't come as a delegate, because my recol- 
lection is that the delegates were on the basis of a question of repre- 
sentation, something of that kind, and, not being a member of any 



1674 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

CIO union, I would not have been officially a delegate. I should have 
been listed as codirector. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, was Jack Kawano one of the delegates from 
the same district where you were listed as a delegate ? 

(Witness confers with his counsel.) 

Mr. McEuEN". I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. Let me hand you the minutes and see if this refreshes 
your recollection. 

(Witness confers with his counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Does that refresh your recollections ? 

(Witness confers with his counsel.) 

Mr. McEuen. I am giving you the appearance of dodging the issue. 
I am not dodging any issue. I don't remember. However, I would 
have referred to the minutes myself to find out whether I was or was 
not a delegate. I assume, since he was at most of the meetings, he 
probably was a delegate. 

Mr. Ta\t5nner. You recall his attendance as a delegate ? 

Mr. McEuEN. Yes. 

Mr. Ta%^nner. Well, I would like to ask you the same question 
regarding Jack Kimoto. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. McEuEN. I don't remember of any specific time. There is no 
remembrance there to any specific time. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. Let me hand you the minutes and see if they refresh 
your recollection. 

(Witness examines document and confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you answer the question now ? 

Mr. McEuEN. Would you restate the question, please? 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. I handed you the paper and asked you if — for you 
to examine it to see if it would refresh your recollection as to whether 
or not Jack Kimoto attended as a delegate meetings of the PAC ? 

Mr. McEuEN. I believe that he did. I am not certain. 

Mr, Ta\'t:nner. As a delegate from Oahu, would you say? 

Mr. McEuEN. Let me answer on the general statement, Mr. Taven- 
ner, as to the situation. I was asked sometime the early part of June 
1946 to become a codirector of the PAC. Now, up until that time I 
had almost no knowledge whatsoever of the performance and organi- 
zation of the CIO unions of the Territory of Hawaii. I stepped into 
a job that came pretty close to putting both the other codirector and 
myself in the hospital because we worked our heads off. Now, very 
unfortunately, I would have been smart if I had taken a couple of 
weeks away from the office after the election was over, but I simply 
took it for granted these groups. I don't remember who was in any 
particular group, and I didn't check into the question of delegates, 
regarding the delegates, or anything of that kind. I didn't know the 
organization, because there was too much immediate work to be done. 

Mr. Walter. Did you keep any record yourself? 

Mr. McEuEN. No, sir. I left that entirely to the clerical staff. 

Mr. Walter. Did you confer with the clerical staff concerning the 
preparation of these records ? 

Mr. McEuEN. What was that question ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1675 

Mr. Walter. Did you confer with the clerical staff in connection 
with the preparation of these records? 

Mr. MgEuen. No; I did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, are you a member of the Hawaii Civil Liberties 
Committee? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. McEuEN. On advice of my attorney and with my full concur- 
rence with that advice, I refuse to answer on the ground that it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Why do you think it might incriminate you to answer 
the question ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. McEuEN. My attorney has so advised me and I have confidence 
in his judgment. 

Mv. Walter. And that is your only reason for not answering the 
question ? 

Mr. McEuEN. No ; that is not my only reason. 

Mr. Walter. What is your other reason ? 

IMr. McEuEN. I feel that the present type of investigation, in view 
of the fact that the United States Government was set up and has 
maintained over a good many years what we as a people considered a 
democratic process functioning through the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation, functioning through the Federal grand- jury system and 
through the United States Department of Justice, and that that set-up 
should be proper and adequate to take care of any necessary investiga- 
tion of conditions which might alarm the Congress. And I feel also 
that the people who are called in those investigations are protected, 
surrounded with the protection which the democratic people have 
found to be necessary. 

Mr. Walter. What protections? 

Mr. McEuEN. The right to cross examine, for instance. That is 
prohibited here. When a person is brought in before the courts, our 
ordinary established courts, they are given the opportunity to sub- 
pena witnesses, to a jury trial. 

Mr. Walter. Yes; but this is no trial. We are not prosecuting 
anybody. This is merely an investigation, and anything that any 
witness testifies to is privileged and will not be used against you unless, 
of course, it is perjured testimony. 

Mr. McEuEN. I am quite well aware, Mr. Walter, of the significance 
of your statement. 

Mr. Walter. All right. Go ahead, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Did you open the account of the Hawaii Civil Lib- 
erties Committee on December 17, 1947, with the deposit of $96.95, or 
by the delivery of a check for that amount to Mr. Katsuto Nagaue ? 

(Witness confers with his counsel.) 

Mr. McEuEX. I refuse to answer on the ground it might tend to 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Why do you think it might incriminate you to admit 
that you opened a bank account. It has never been a crime to open a 
bank account. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now, or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party? 



1676 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. McEuEN". The same answer. 

Mr. Walter. What is that answer ? 

Mr. McEuEN. I refuse to reply on the ground that to do so might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. There are no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr, Walter. The subcommittee will be in recess. 

(A short recess was taken.) 

Mr. Walter. The subcomittee will be in order. 

Mr. Tavenner, call your next witness, please. 

Mr. Tavenner. Rachel Saiki. 

Mr. Walter. Will yo^^ raise your right hand, please? 

Do you swear that the testimony you are al)out to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Miss Saiki. Yes, I do. 

TESTIMONY OF HACHEL SAIKI, ACCOMPANIED BY HER COUNSEL, 

HAEEIET BOUSLOG 

Mr. Tavenner. You are Rachel Saiki ? 

Miss Saiki. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel? 

Miss Saiki. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify herself in the record, 

Mrs. Bouslog. I would like my name, Harriet Bouslog, to be entered 
of record as counsel for Rachel Saiki. And at tliis time I would like to 
file with the committee a motion to quash the service of the subpena 
upon the grounds stated in the motion, and I ask it appear at the open- 
ing of this testimony so that these grounds will be indicated as in this 
case for all the answers that Miss Saiki may or may not give.^^ 

Mr. Harrison. Is it in the same form as heretofore? 

Mrs. Bouslog. Yes ; it is. 

Mr. Walter. It will be placed in the record. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live ? 

Miss Saiki. 2218 Liliha Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. "Wliere are you employed ? 

Miss Saiki. I am now employed at the Honolulu Recoid Pub- 
lishing Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is it Miss or Mrs. Saiki ? 

Miss Saiki. Miss Saiki. 

Mr. Tavenner. Miss Saiki, I have here among the checks contained 
in "Owens Exhibit No. 6" a check of March 19, 1948, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, for $15. This check is drawn on the American Security 
Bank and signed by Katsuto Nagaue, trust account. The cash book 
of Mr. Nagaue shows an entry regarding this. This cash book is 
"Exhibit Owens No. 4." Will you examine the cash book and state 
what it says with regard to this check of March 19, 1948, payable to 
you in the amount of $15? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 



'^' Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Rachel Saiki is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Wilfred Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. See p. 1550. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1677 

Miss Saikt. I liave been avised by my counsel, and I a<;ree with 
her, that I refuse to answer the question on the grounds that it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you the check referred to, of March 19, 1948, 
and ask you if that is j'our endorsement on the back of it? 

(Witness confers with counseL) 

Miss Saiki. I refuse to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walter. Why do you think you may be incriminated by your 
answer ? 

(AVitness confers with counsel.) 

Miss Saiki. I have been advised by counsel and have been told 
concerning my legal rights, and that is the reason I have taken the 
stand tliat I have. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. The check of March 19 is entered in cash book, 
"Exhibit Owens 4," as follows : "March 19, Rachel Saiki. Robeson 
shirts." W^ill you tell us what this purchase was entitled "Robeson 
shirts" ? 

(AVitness confers with counsel.) 

Miss Saiki. My attorney advises me to refuse to answer the question 
on the same grounds that I have stated. 

Mr. Ta-s^nner. I have a number of other checks here. Do I under- 
stand that, if I asked you the questions relating to them, you will 
give the same answers ? 

INIrs. BousLOG. We will stipulate that in respect to the checks that 
you have in front of you that the answer would be the same. Is 
that right? 
' JNIiss Saiki. That is right. 

Mr. Walter. Then, as I understand it, as to each of these checks you 
refuse to answ^er the question propounded to you by the attorney? 

Miss Saiki. That is right. 

Mr. Ta%^enner. There has been testimony here. Miss Saiki, of your 
attendance at Communist Party meetings. Do you desire to affirm 
or deny that ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Miss Saiki. My answer will be the same as to the other questions 
that I have been asked, and on the same grounds. 

IVIr. Tavenner. Are you now or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party ? 

Miss Saiki. I have been advised by my counsel, and I agree with 
her, that I refuse to answer on the same grounds already stated. 

Mr. TA^^:N]s^ER. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. That is all. 

Mr. Ta\tnner. I would now like to recall Mr. Owens to the stand. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed, Mr. Tavenner. 

TESTIMONY OF COURTNEY E. OWENS— Eesmned 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Owens, I hand you from "Owens Exhibit No. 6,'^ 
check No. 162, dated June 8, 1948, and ask you to examine it and see 
if from the cash book entry the purpose of that check is mentioned 
or is listed.^^ 



«« See p. 1678. 



1678 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 





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COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1679 

Mr. Owens. Yes, sir. The disbursement section of the cash book 
shows that this clieck was made payable on Jinie 8 to the ILWU build- 
ing committee, and the reason stated therein is "telephone tolls." 
That same statement appears on the financial statements submitted 
to the HCLC periodically by their accountant, with the identical rea- 
son given for the expenditure. 

JSii-. Tavenner. Do you know or can you ascertain from the records 
where that telephone was located; does it so appear from the records? 

Mr. Owens. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. I show you check No. 184, dated July 3, in the amount 
of $11.45, payable to Rachel Saiki. Is there a notation in the cash 
book of the purpose for which this check was used ? 

Mr. Owens. Yes, there is.^* 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you please state it? 

Mr. Owens. In July, disbursements for July 1948, it is recorded on 
July 3, a check payable to Rachel Saiki, and the reason stated is "gift 
for Robeson"; that appears also on the financial statement submitted 
to the HCLC for that period. 

Mr. Walter. Gift for whom? 

Mr. Owens. Robeson. 

Mr. Tavenner. Robeson. 

Mr. Walter. Paul Robeson ? 

Mr. Owens. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you from the same "Exhibit Owens 6" a 
check of July 7, payable to Pacific Record Co., in the amount of $50, 
drawn on the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee's account. Will you 
examine the cash book entries and state the purpose for which that 
check was used?^^ 

Mr, Owens. July 1948 disbursement page shows that July 7 there 
was a check drawn payable to the Pacific Record Co., the following 
notation immediately thereafter: "Shares." The same notation ap- 
pears on the financial statement for that period submitted to the HCLC, 
and beneath the financial statement is the recapitulation by Mr. 
Nagaue, on the same statement that was submitted, which states: 
"Pacific Records, shares, $50." That appears on the financial state- 
ment submitted. 

Mr. Tavenner. I show you a check taken from the same account, 
from the same exhibit, "Owens Exhibit No. 6", bearing date August 
20, 1948, payable to Pacific Frontier Broadcasting Co., in the amount 
of $68.50, on the account of the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee. 
Will you examine the financial statement rendered by the accountant 
and state what it says the purpose of that check was ? 

Mr. Owens. The financial statement submitted for that period to 
the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee states on August 20 the check 
was drawn payable to the Pacific Frontier Broadcasting Co. for radio 
time, in the amount of $68.50.^^ 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. I now hand you the exhibit marked for identifica- 
tion only as "Owens Exhibit No. 10," and ask you what connection 
it has with the check j^ou have just read, you have just examined? 

Mr. Owens. This is the paid invoice which was obtained from the 
files of the Pacific Frontier Broadcasting Co. whereby the Hawaii 

" Cash book referred to is introduced as Owens exhibit No. 4, and is retaine4 in com- 
mittee files. Cheek, Owens Exhibit 6-65, on p. 1680. 
^» See p. 1681. 
" See p. 1682. 



1680 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



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COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1683 

Civil Liberties Committee paid for one-half hour prop;ram on the date 
of August 8, 19-iS, from 10 to 10 :30, and the broadcast type is described 
as follows : 
One-half hour program (discussion of Roinecke case) 

This was obtained from the general manager of that corporation. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you another check obtained from "Owens 
Exhibit No. C."' bearing date September 17, 1948, payable to radio 
station KULA, in the amount of $90, and drawn on the same account." 
Will you examine the financial statement submitted to the Hawaii 
Civil Liberties Committee for this period and I ask you what the 
purpose of that check was ? 

Mr. Owens. The financial statement submitted to the HCLC for 
this period shows that on September 17 there was distribution to radio 
station KULA in the amount of $90 for radio time. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you exhibit marked "Owens Exhibit No. 11 
for identification only," and ask you to state what relation it has to 
the check you have just described and the entry you have described ? 

Mr. Owens. This is a paid invoice from the files of station KULA, 
stating that — 

one-half hour program, from 7 to 7:30 p. m., on September 17, 1948; was paid for 
by the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee, in the amount of $90— 

a certified true copy by the general manager of that corporation pro- 
duced in answer to a subpena served on him. 

Mr. Tavenner. I take the following check from "Owens Exhibit 6," 
check bearing date of September 7, 1948, payable to Masaru Shimoni- 
shi, in the amount of $46, and drawn on the funds of the same account, 
and ask you to examine the financial statement submitted to the HCLC 
covering this period and state what the entry is covering that disburse- 
ment. 

Mr. Owens. The financial statement submitted to the HCLC for 
that period shows this to be a distribution on September 7 to Masaru 
Shimonishi in the amount of $46, with the notation "Witness." 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, the committee has received a report 
from the attorney general's office of the Territory of Hawaii giving the 
names of the witnesses at the Reinecke hearing and the dates of their 
appearances. The first on the list is that of Masaru Shimonishi, 
Tuesday, August 31, 1948. 

I hand you another check from the same exhibit, bearing date of 
September 7, 1948, payable to Sam K. Stevens, and drawn on the 
same account, and ask you what notation appears in the records regard- 
ing the purpose of that check? 

Mr. Owens. The record of this distribution of this sum appears 
directly beneath the previous one with the same notation, as "witness," 
in the amount of $46.50. 

Mr. Tavenner. The report from the attorney general's office, Mr. 
Chairman, shows that Samuel K. Stevens was a witness at the Reinecke 
hearings and appeared on Wednesday, September 1, 1948. 

I hand you now check No. 261, from the same source, payable to a 
man whose last name is Richard — I don't know whether it is Richard 
Hirakami or Hirakami Richard, in the amount of $10, drawn on the 
same account. Will you examine the financial statement and tell us 
the purpose of that check ? 

•' See p. 1684. 



1684 



COIVIMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 




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COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1685 

Mr. Owens. The financial statement submitted for tliis same period 
shows that this was a disbursement of September 7 payable to Richard 
Hirakami, with (he notation "witness" following, in the amount of $10. 

Mr. Tavenner. The attorney general's report shows that Richard 
Plirakami appeared at the Reinecke hearing on Tuesday, August 31, 
1948. 

I hand you another check. No. 2G2, bearing date September 7, pay- 
able to Inagaki, Louis. The first name is Louis and the last name is 
Inagaki, in the amount of $10. Will you state for the record the 
notation appearing as the purpose of that check? 

Mr. Owens. The same financial statement as referred to previously 
shows this to be a distribution on September 7 to Louis Inagaki for $10, 
with the notation "witness" on this financial statement. 

Mr. Tavenner. The attorney general's report, Mr. Chairman, shows 
that Louis Inaeaki aj^peared as a witness at the Reinecke hearings on 
Tuesday, August 31, 1948. 

Mr. Walter. These witnesses appeared on behalf of the defendant ? 

Mr. Owens. I can answer that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Owens, did your investigation disclose in whose 
behalf these witnesses appeared? 

Mr. Oavens. Yes, sir. These witnesses appeared in behalf — were 
^called in behalf of Doctor Reinecke at his hearing during August and 
September 1948. 

Mr. W^ALTER. Do you know whether or not the witnesses in that type 
of case are compensated for court costs ? 

Mr. Owens. I don't know, Mr. Chairman. No, sir. That was at a 
liearing of the department of public instruction, as I understand it. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you check No. 263, dated September 7, 1948, 
payable to Juliette Ballenti, and I will ask you to examine it. It is in 
the amount of $10. Will you state the purpose for which it was used ? 
It is spelled B-a-1-l-e-n-t-i. 

Mr. Owens. The same statement referred to before. This state- 
ment, by the way, of all these witnesses, is an official statement, the 
Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee, up to and including September 30, 
1948. This statement shows that on September 7 there was a dis- 
iDursement of $10 to Mrs. Juliette Ballenti, the reason being, "witness." 

Now the attorney general's report shows that JNlrs. Juliette Ballenti 
appeared as a witness in the Reinecke hearing, Tuesday, August 29, 
1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. I now hand you check No. 273, bearing date Febru- 
arj'^ 13, 1948, Maximino Santiago, in the amount of $10, drawn on the 
same account. 

Mr. Owens. In the financial statement submitted to the Hawaii Civil 
Liberties Committee for this period, there is a disbursement, Septem- 
her 15, 1948, to Maximino Santiago, for $10, for the reasons "witness." 

The report of the attorney general's office shows that this individ- 
ual appeared as a witness at the Reinecke hearing August 31, 1948. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. I hand you now check No. 397, in the amount of 
$25.86, bearing date September 1, payable to Tsuneto Kunimura, and 
I will ask you to examine that account, and state the purpose of it. 

Mr. Owens. In the financial statement submitted to the Civil Liber- 
ties Committee for the period up to and including January 7, 1949, 
there appears a disbursement under date of December 6, 1948,* to 
Tsuneto Kunimura; in the amount of $25.86, and the reason is for 
"^'hearing." 



1686 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

The attorney general's report shows that this individual appeared 
as a witness in the Reinecke hearing, on Wednesday, September 1, 
1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. I now hand you check No. 264, payable to Steve 
Murin, in the amount of $110. Now, will you examine the financial 
statement and state what the purpose of it is ? 

Mr. Owens. On the financial statements submitted to the Hawaii 
Civil Liberties Committee, up to and including September 30, 1948, 
there appears a disbursement under date of September 7, 1948, to 
Stephen Murin, in the amount of $110 for "travel." ^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. I now hand you another check bearing the same 
date, payable to Robert Greene, in the amount of $110, and will you 
state what the purpose is, that is shown ? 

Mr. Owens. On the same financial statement as the last there ap- 
pears a disbursement, on September 7, 1948, to Robert Greene, in the 
amount of $110, reason "travel." ^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you another check, bearing the same date, 
payable to Celeste Strack, in the amount of $110, and I will ask you 
to examine the record, and state what is shown with regard to the pur- 
pose of the issuance of that check ? ®° 

Mr. Owens. On the same financial statement as Murin, to Mrs. 
Strack, there appears a disbursement under date of September 7, 1948, 
to Celeste Strack, in the amount of $1 10. It has the reason : "travel." 

Mr. Tavenner. Did your investigation disclose whether or not the 
individual mentioned by you, that is. Celeste Strack, appeared on the 
radio program here in Honolulu, while she was here on that occasion? 

Mr. Owens. No, sir; I endeavored to, and the investigation dis- 
closed that this trio toured the islands here during the Reinecke hear- 
ing, and over on the island of Hawaii appeared on Radio Station 
KIP A. I wrote a letter to that station, and I believe you have the 
answer there before you. 

Mr. Tavenni:r. Is this a report of the manager, Big Island Broad- 
casting Co. ? 

Mr. Owens. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. To which you referred ? 

Mr. Owens. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does it give an account of the records of their 
company with regard to the appearance of Celeste Strack ? 

Mr. Owens. Yes, sir. I believe, as I recollect the letter, the second 
paragraph gives you the date of the appearance, and the subject of 
the program, and who appeared on it. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will read the paragraph to which you refer 
[reading] : 

In checking our records, I find that the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee, on 
September 11, 1948, contracted with this station for a broadcast, 30 minutes, 
to be released on the 12th of September 1948 ; 6 : 30 p. m. The arrangement for 
the contracts were made and signed for by Stephen Murin, of Honolulu, who at 
that time, I understand, was chairman of the Civil Liberties Committee. Mr. 
Murin signed, and gave his address at that time, as Civil Liberties Committee, 
post office box 1123, zone 2, Honolulu, T. H. 

The people who appeared on the program were Celeste Stracl?, educational 
director of the Communist Party of California ; Mr. Steve Murin, chairman of 
the Civil Liberties Committee, of Honolulu, and Robert Greene (no relation to 



" See p. 1687. 
«» See p. 1688. 
~Seep. 1689. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



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1690 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

the writer), it is written; also of Honolulu. The program was entitled "In- 
vasion of Civil Liberties." 

^nd it is signed A. H. Greene, vice president and manager of Big 
Island Broadcasting Co. 

I hand you now another check, bearing date of October 19, 1948, 
payable to Bergstrom Music Co., in the amount of $80, and drawn 
on this same account, and I will ask you to look at the financial state- 
ment introduced in evidence, I believe as Owens Exhibit 5, and state 
the purpose of the issuance of that check ? ^ 

Mr. Ow^ENS. On the financial statement submitted to the Hawaii 
Civil Liberties Committee for the period October 1 to November 5, 
1948, inclusive, the following disbursement appears, under date of 
October 19, 1948 : The payee, Bergstrom Music Co. ; the amount $80, 
and the reason, "hearing." 

In the lower left-hand corner appears the notation : "HCLC W-175. 
wire spool," and next to that notation is a pencil notation of "ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. ILWU, is there any explanation on the records as 
to the reason for "ILWU" appearing on the check of the HCLC? 

Mr. Owens. No, sir. The financial statement contains no refer- 
ence to the ILWU, but that is the notation on the check itself, when 
it was turned over to us. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you two documents, which you have pre- 
sented, and are designated Owens Exhibits 7 and 8 for identification 
only, and ask you what bearing those documents have on that trans- 
action 'i 

Mr. Owens. The two invoices; the first of which is dated August 
12, 1948, from the Bergstrom Music Co.; your order No. Robert 
Greene, sold to ILWU educational and legal department, pier 11, 
Honolulu, T. of H., calling for four 1-hour wire spools ; unit price of 
$5, to the amount of $20. 

The second invoice is identical to the first, as to your order number, 
and to whom it was sold, and calls for twelve 1-hour wire spools, at the 
unit price of $5, and for $60; the total of the two units being $80.00. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that the amount of the check to which you 
referred ? 

Mr. Owens. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, it is to be noted from reading these two bills, 
that they are both directed to, or addressed to ILWU educational 
and legal department, pier 11, Honolulu, T. of H. 

Will you state, if the checks in payment of these bills were run 
through the HCLC account; is that what you state? 

Mr. Owens. Yes, sir; the references substantiate that. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire at this time to offer the two documents in 
evidence. They are designated as 7 and 8 for identification only, and 
I ask that they be given the numbers 7 and 8. 

Mr. Walter. So, mark them.^^ 

Mr. T.WTiNXER. I hand you now a check in the amount of $435, 
I)earing the date October 19, 1948, payable to Alexander Bros., 
Ltd., and drawn on this same account. Will you examine the financial 
statement that you have, as exhibit 5, for identification only, and 
state the purpose ? ^^ 

« See p. 1691. 
82 See p. 1660. 
^. See p. 1693. 



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1692 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Owens. The financial statement submitted to the Hawaii Civil 
Liberties Committee for the period October 1 to November 5, 1948, 
inchisive, shows a disbursement on October 19, to the Alexander 
Bros., Ltd., in the amount of $435. The reason, "hearing." I take 
that check back for a moment. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is there a notation in the lower left-hand corner 
of that check ? 

Mr. Owens. Yes, there is a notation in the lower left-hand corner 
of the check, bearing the following notation: "Credit, ILWTJ, pier 
11, Honolulu, T. of H." 

Mr. Tavenner. Is there any further explanation of the matter in 
the books or records of the HCLC as to this credit item ? 

Mr. Owens. No, that notation regarding the ILWU appears only 
on the check, and not on the statement, or in the cash book. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Is there any account carried under the heading of 
"ILWU" ? 

Mr. Owens. There is no account in this cash book under the head 
of ILWU. There are seven accounts here, one of which is the HCLC, 
but the ILWU does not appear. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, this is an instance in which there was a 
transaction, a financial transaction, on the part of the HCLC which 
involved tlie ILWU. That is correct, isn't it ? 

Mr. Owens. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, I hand you Owens Exhibit 9, so marked 
for identification only, and ask you to state what the relationship 
of that document is to the transaction you have been describing. 

Mr. Owens. These are five invoices from the Alexander Bros.. Ltd.» 
the first of which is dated August 24, 1948 ; sold to ILWU, Terminal 
Building, pier 11, Honolulu ; calling for ten 1-liour spools for Webster 
wire recorder; unit price $5, Total amount of invoice $50. 

The second invoice is dated August 28, 1948, "Sold to ILWU, 
legal and educational department, pier 11, Terminal Building, Hon- 
olulu, T. H.," and calling for fifty 1-hour spools of wire, and five file 
boxes ; the total of these invoices being $255. 

The third invoice is dated August 27, 1948; sold to ILWU, pier 
11, Terminal Building, calling for ten 1-hour spools for Webster wire 
recorder, the total of the invoice, $50, and these invoices seem to be 
in inverse order. 

The next invoice. No. 4, is dated iVugust 20, 1948, sold to ILWU, 
Terminal Building, pier 11, Honolulu; calling for ten 1-liour spools, 
Webster wire recorder; total $50 on this invoice. 

The fifth invoice, dated August 12, 1948 ; sold to the ILWU, pier 
11. This invoice has in the upper left-hand corner : "Customer's order 
number and date" and following that "Mr. Arena." 

Invoice 6, calls for six 1-hour recording wire, total price $30, and 
the total of these five invoices is $435. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall from your investigation of the mat- 
ter what position Mr. Arena held at the time ? 

Mr. Owens. At the time of this, no I don't. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire at this time to offer in evidence Owens Ex- 
hibit No. 9, that has previously been designated for identification 
only. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.^* 



** See pp. 1661 to 1665. 



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1694 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. And did the total amount of the invoices and the 
bills which you have just presented in the name of ILWU, and on 
one of which appeared the name "Mr. Arena" — was that the same 
as the check of $435, to which you refer ? 

Mr. Owens. Yes, sir, the amount, the total amount is exactly the 
same, but you must remember the first invoice has Mr. Arena's name 
on it, August 12, and the subsequent invoices did not have Mr. 
Arena's name on them. 

Mr. Tavenner. I recall, but the name of the ILWU was on the 
other three, was it not ? 

jSlr. Owens. On each one of the five. 

Mr. Tavenner. And the number, and the party to whom the mer- 
chandise had been sold ? 

Mr. Owens. Exactly. 

Mr. Tavenner. And, as I believe, it is clear from your statement, 
that the funds which paid the ILWU accounts, were paid from the 
account of the HCLC ? 

Mr. Owens. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you as yet been able to make a thorough check 
of these records in your possession to determine whether or not the 
ILWU at any time repaid that amount ? 

Mr. Owens. There is no indication in this period, from December 
17, 1947, to February 7, 1949, that this amount was repaid. Our rec- 
ords only go up to and including February 7, 1949. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you have produced here, under the subpena 
duces tecum, the bank account covering the subsequent period up to 
February of 1950, and which has been introduced in evidence as Ex- 
hibit Owens 2. 

Will you examine the debit charges in that bank account, and state 
whether or not you find an item of $435, or any greater sum drawn 
during that period ? 

Mr. Owens. This is a later account of the Hawaii Civil Liberties 
Committee, bank account from February 8, 1949, up to the present 
date. There is shown on this ledger sheet the original deposit of 
$1,195.77, which was a check turned over to them by their account- 
ant. Since that time there have been no deposits totaling more than 
$158.60 at one time. 

Mr. Tavenner. I am not speaking of deposits. I am speaking of 
charges. That is, withdrawals from the account. That is, if a check 
had been drawn for $435 on the account, the amount would appear in 
that bank statement? 

Mr. Owens. That's right. You mean since February 7, 1949 ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Owens. There is no check in that amount having been drawn 
from this account, since February 1949. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, is there a check for an amount larger than 
$435, drawn on that account during that period ? 

Mr. Owens. There is not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, so far as you are able to determine from all 
the records which have been made available to you, you have not 
been — there has not been any repayment? 

Mr. Owens. No, sir. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1695' 

Mr. Tavennek. I now hand you a check, No. 318, dated October 
19, 1948, payable to ILWU, educational and leo;al fund, in the amount 
of $9.11. Is there any statement appearing in the iinancial state- 
ment describing the purpose of that account, for the issuance of that 
check ? 

Mr. OwEXS. The financial statement submitted to the Hawaii Civil 
Liberties Connnittee, from October 1, 1948, shows a disbursement, 
October 19, 1948, to the ILWU educational and legal fund, for the 
purpose of "hearing" in the amount of $9.11, and there appears in the 
lower left-hand corner of this check the following notation : "HCLC." 

Mr. Tavexnek. Is there any further description in the record of 
that? 

Mr. Owens. There is no further description of this transaction. 

Mr. Tavexnek. I now hand j^ou check 319, dated October 19, payable 
to the United Sugar Workers* ILWU, CIO, in the amount of $34.50,. 
and marked at the bottom as '"First statement." Is there any record 
in the — in either the cash book, or financial statement, describing that 
transaction ? 

Mr. OwEXS. Yes ; in the same financial statement as referred to in 
the last question and answer, there appears a disbursement on October 
19, to the United Sugar Workers, ILWU, CIO, in the amount of 
$34.50 ; the reason being "hearing." 

Mr. Tavenxer. I now hand you check No. 382, bearing date Novem- 
ber 15, 1948, payable to ILAVU, Educational and Legal Fund, in the 
amount of $43.55. Will you examine the financial statement sub- 
mitted to the HCLC, and say if you can determine the purpose for 
which this check was issued ? 

Mr. Owexs. On the financial statement submitted to the Hawaii 
Civil Liberties Committee, covering the period November 6, 1948, to 
December 6, 1948, there appears a disbursenient, under date of Novem- 
ber 15, to the ILWU, Educational and Legal Fund, in the amount of 
$43.55, the reason being "papers and program." 

Mr. Tavexner. I now had you a check, No. 485, bearing date Febru- 
ary 7, 1949, taken from exhibit Owens' 6, as all of the other checks 
have been, and made payable to Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee, 
in the amount of $1,195.77, and I will ask you to state what that check 
lepresents ? 

Mr. Owexs. This check is a check given to the Hawaii Civil Liber- 
ties Committee in the final accounting, submitted to them by Mr» 
Nagaue, February 7, 1949, and represents their net balance after de- 
ducting bank services, charges, and account funds. 

Mr. Ta\^xner. In other words, that closes out the accounting of 
Mr. Nagaue? 

Mr. Owens. Exactly. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. And was that the identical check which was de- 
posited in the establishment of the new account which is set forth in 
the bank statement, constituting Owens' exhibit No. 1? 

Mr. Owens. Exactly ; it is. 

Mr. Ta\'enxer. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. AValter. The meeting will adjourn until Monday, at 9 : 30. 



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