(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Hearings regarding communist activities in the Territory of Hawaii. Hearings"

^ 







:'''J^ 













Given By 



t 



U. S. R^TPT O" 



:UM££'4TS 



3^ 




HEARINGS REGARDING COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN 
THE TERRITORY OF HAWAII— PART 3 



HEARINGS 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIYES 



EIGHTY-FIRST CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



APRIL 17, 18, AND 19, 1950 



APPENDIX 



INDEX 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
66636 WASHINGTON : 1950 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Representatives 

JOHN S. WOOD, Georgia, Chairman 
FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania RICHARD M. NIXON, California 

BURR P. HARRISON, Virginia FRANCIS CASE, South Dakota 

JOHN MCSWEENEY, Ohio HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois 

MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York 

Frank S. Tavennek, Jr., Counsel 
LOUIS J. Russell, Senior Investigator 
JOHN W. Carrington, Clerk of Committee 
Benjamin MANDiitt., Director of Research 

II 



CONTENTS 



April 17, 1950: 

Testimony of— !*»«• 

Fedrico Lorenzo 1939 

Frank G. Silva (resumed) 1 955 

Robert McElrath 1956 

Ralph Vossbrink 1960 

August I. Asau 1964 

Bert Nakano 1 970 

Henry Johnson, Jr 1976 

Ruth Ozaki 1986 

Koichi Imori 1987 

Herman Ing 1990 

April 18, 1950: 

Testimony of — 

Domingo R. Cariaso 1997 

Saturnine Cablay 2002 

John E. Reinecke 2005 

Hideo Okada 2012 

John Akana 2014 

Julian Napuunoa 2014 

Douglas Inouye 2016 

Levi Kealoha 201 9 

Mitsuo Shimizu 2020 

Robert Lum 2021 

Adele Kensinger 2029 

Yasuki Arakaki 2031 

Denichi Kimoto 2031 

April 19, 1950: 

Testimony of — 

Frank Kalua 2039 

Shigeo Takemoto 2040 

Thomas S. Yagi 2041 

Frank Takahashi 2042 

Yukio Abe 2044 

Robert Murasaki 2045 

Kameo Ichimura 2047 

Thomas Tagawa 2048 

Tadashi Ogawa 2053 

Jack H. Kawano 2055 

Benjamin Kaahawinui 2057 

William A. Wheeler (resumed) 2058 

Edward Berman 2065 

Appendix 2073 

Index 2099 

in 



/' 






U. 8. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

AUG 251950 



HEAKINGS EECtARDING COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 
TEKRITORY OE HAWAII— PAET 3 



MONDAY, APRIL 17, 1950 

House of Representatives, Subcommittee 
OF THE Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Honolulu^ T. H. 
PUBLIC session 

The subcommittee of four met, pursuant to call, at 9 : 40 a.m., in 
the senate chamber, lolani Palace, Hon. Francis E. Walter (subcom- 
mittee chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Francis E. Walter, 
Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold H. Velde. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; William 
A. Wheeler and Courtney E. Owens, investigators ; and John W. Car- 
rington, clerk. 

Mr. Walter, The hearing will come to order. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. I would like to call as the first witness this morning 
Federico Lorenzo. 

Mr. Walter. Will you stand up, please, and raise your right hand. 
Do you swear that the testimony that you are about to give will be 
the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Lorenzo, Yes. 

TESTIMONY OF FEDRICO LOEENZO 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell us your full name, please ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Federico Lorenzo. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you known by any other name ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes ; a nickname, Fedrico. My new name is Fedrico. 

Mr. Tavenner, How old are you, Mr. Lorenzo ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I am 36 years old. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you repeat your answer ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. At present, I am 36 years old. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere were you born? 

Mr. Lorenzo. 1 was born in the Philippines. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you an American citizen ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live at the present time ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. At Puunene, for the Hawaiian Commercial Sugar 
Co., Maui. 

Mr. Tavenner. I suggest that the photographers finish with their 
work. 

Mr. Walter. They know the rule. 

1939 



1940 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. What island is that, please ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. The island of Maui. 

Mr. Tavenner. Maui. In what camp? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Spanish A camp, of Hana. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your occupation ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. E-iijht now I am a crane operator in the H. C. S. Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where are you employed? 

Mr. Lorenzo. In the H. C. S. Co. 

Mr. Tavenner, How long have you been employed there? 

Mr. Lorenzo. About 7 years. 
. Mr. Tavenner. Prior to that time, where did you work? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I came from Hana, on the same island. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who did you work for there? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Kaeleku Sugar Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, before that, where did you live ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Molokai, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Molokai. Who did you work with there ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Libby Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. For how long a period of time did you work there ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. About 5 years, 4 years, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before coming to the Territory of Hawaii, where 
d,id you live? I mean where did you come from before coming to 
the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. My province. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of the Philippine Islands ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Lorenzo, have you ever been a member of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I was, sir, back in 1947. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. What year did you say? 

Mr. Lorenzo. It was sometime back in 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1947. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the members of the committee how 
it was that you became a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes; three persons approached me in my office, in 
my ILWU office, at the time when I was business agent, and they 
told me that they needed an aggressive leader, such as me, at the time, 
because I could influence the Filipinos, and that if there is a recom- 
mendation from the top officials of the ILWU, they just can push 
it through effective like that [snapping his fingers]. 

Mr. Tavenner. You were business agent of the ILWU at the time ? 

Mr, Lorenzo. Yes ; at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Three persons came to you and talked to you 
about joining the Communist Party? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And they told you, if I understood you correctly, 
that they needed you to influence the Filipino workers? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that what you said ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us a little more about your position with the 
ILWU at the time. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1941 

^fr. Lorenzo. I was, at the time, where I conUl inniience tlie ma- 
jority of Filipinos, and also was well known, at any time that they 
called me in any trouble, or any reconnnendation whatsoever, to pass 
it more quickly. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is, you occu])ied a position of importance in 
your leadership in the ILWU union? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Exactly, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what did you — what were you told about a 
higher position? Did I understand you to say something was said 
to you about other positions, or of a higher nature in your local 
union ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Will you repeat the question? 

Mr. Tavenner. I understood you to say, in your answer a moment 
ago, to say something about getting a better job in the union if one 
became vacant? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Well, all I know is that if I stick with these people 
who approached me at the time, who belong to the Communist Party, 
I would be secured in my job, and I will stay w^ith them working 
with them, the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, who were those three men ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. They were Frank Takahashi, Robert Murasaki, and 
Thomas Yagi. 

Mr. Tavenner. Thomas Yagi ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Takahashi, did you say? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was his first name? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Frank Takahashi. 

Mr. Tavenner. And Murasaki ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Robert Murasaki. 

Mr. Tavenner. What positions did they hold at the time in the 
union, if any ? 

Mr, LoRONzo. Frank Takahashi was working as business agent 
with me, in the unit at Puunene. 

Mr. Tavenner. As business agent with you ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say that was Takahashi ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what position did Murasaki have in the 
union there? 

Mr. LoRONzo. He was chairman of the unit. 

Mr. Tavenner. Chairman? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat position did Yagi have? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yagi's position was vice president of the local there 
in Maui. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere was it that they approached you about 
joining the party, and made the statements which you told us about? 

Mr. LoRONzo. In the ILWU office. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that your office? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, what did they ask you to do? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Will you repeat that question ? 



1942 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. After they asked you about joining the Communist 
Party, what did they ask you to do, if anything? Did you go to 
any meetings with them ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did they say to you about that ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Frank Takahashi called me, "Comrade" at the CP 
meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. He said what ? 

Mr, Lorenzo. "Comrade, I want you to be in the CP meeting," 
which is the Communist Party meeting at 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you go to the Communist Party meeting ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere was that meeting held ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. The first meeting I attended was at Lahaina, Maui. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings did you attend, do you think? 

Mr. Lorenzo. About six meetings, altogether. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was this the first meeting that you attended ? Com- 
munist Party meeting ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you know that it was a Communist Party 
meeting ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Pamphlets were in front of the spokesman at the time, 
and when we were through having the meeting they distributed the 
pamphlets. Communist pamphlets. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us who were present at that first 
meeting ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. Those that I know was Mr. Freeman, and a 
Chinese woman, who was introduced to me by Thomas Yagi in the 
name of Mrs. McElrath. 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe I asked you the question who were present 
at the meeting. Will you give me your answer again, please ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Mr. Freeman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know his first name ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was the next person ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Comrade Ichimura. 

Mr. Tavenner. Ichimura? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Ichimura. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Mr. Ichimura's first name ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Kameo. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now you spoke of a woman being present? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us that again, please? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I was introduced to her by Thomas Yagi, and that 
her name was Mrs. McElrath. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, can you recall — and I will ask you: Was 
Thomas Yagi present? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes ; and he was present at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Takahashi present — the three persons that saw 
you? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliich includes also Murasaki ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1943 

Mr. Ta\T2nner. Now, can you remember any others being present? 
Mr. Lorenzo. All I know are the names that I mentioned because 
there was around 30 present at the time. That's all of them I know 
that were there. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you actually become a member; was it 
at a meeting or before the meeting, or when, with reference to the 
meeting? 

Mr. Lorenzo. They came over and saw me again after 2 days, I 
think. 

JNIr. Tavenner. After 2 days ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. They came to see you again ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, who was it that came to see you ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. The three persons. 

Mr. Tavenner. The same three j^ersons ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did they have to say to you then ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I have stated, when you asked me the question, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what was said about your actually joining at 
this time? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Well, they said I could influence the majority of the 
Filipinos, when they passed some recommendations, the recommenda- 
tions come from the top officials of the ILWU, they can just push 
them through like that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you join ? 

Mr. Lorenzo, I was forced to join, sir. I had my little function 
in the plantation, sir, and I was afraid that I would be unemployed 
at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. So you joined ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. So I joined ; I decided to join. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, were you given a Communist Party card? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who gave it to you ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Thomas Yagi, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Just when was it that he gave you the card ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. All that I recall was back in 1947, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether the card that was given you 
was in two parts, that is, one part to be torn off and kept, and another 
part to be kept by you ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. One part had been torn off. Thomas Yagi tore it off 
at the time, and one part I kept myself. 

Mr. Tavenner. You kept the one. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you sign the party card ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You were asked to look through your papers to see 
if you could find the part of the card which was torn off and given 
to you. Did you find it ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir ; I found part of it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is this it? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir ; exactly ; this is it. 



1944 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the card in evidence and mark it 
"Lorenzo Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Walter. It may be received. May we see it, please.^ 

(Handed to Mr. Walter.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Does the card have the preamble to the Communist 
Party constitution on the back of it ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will read it into the record : 

Preamble : The Communist Party of the United States is the political party 
of the American working class, basing itself upon the principles of scientific 
socialism, Marxism-Leninism. It champions the immediate and fundamental 
interests of the workers, farmers, and all who labor by hand and brain against 
capitalist exploitation and oppression. As the advanced party of the working 
class, it stands in the forefront of this struggle. 

The Communist Party upholds the achievements of American democracy 
and defends the United States Constitution and its Bill of Rights against its re- 
actionary enemies who would destroy democracy and popular liberties. It un- 
compromisingly fights against imperialism and colonial oppression, against racial, 
national, and religious discrimination, against Jim Crowism, anti-Semitism, and 
all forms of chauvinism. 

The Communist Party struggles for the complete destruction of fascism and 

for a dural)le peace. It seeks to safeguard the welfare of the people and the 
Nation, recognizing that the working class, through its trade-unions and by its 
independent political action, is the most consistent fighter for democracy, na- 
tional freedom, and social progress. 

The Communist Party holds as a basic principle that there is an identity 
of interest which serves as a conmaon bond uniting the woi'kers of all lands. 
It recognizes further that the true national interests of our country and the 
cause of peace and progress require the solidarity of all freedom-loving peoples 
and the continued ever-closer cooperation of the United Nations. 

The Communist Party recognizes that the final abolition of exploitation and 
oppression, of economic crises and unemployment, of reaction and war 

I am not certain of that because the page is torn — 

will be achieved only by the socialist reoi-ganization of society^ — ^by common 
ownership and operation of the national economy, under the people, led by the 
working class. 

The Communist Party, therefore, educates the working class, in the course 
of its day-to-day struggles, for its historic mission, the establishment of social- 
ism. Socialism, the highest form of democracy, will guarantee the full realiza- 
tion of the right to "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," and will turn 
the achievements of labor, science, and culture to the use and enjoyment of all 
men and women. 

In the struggle for democracy, peace, and social progress, the Communist 
Party carries forward the democratic traditions of Jefferson, Paine, Lincoln, 
and Frederick Douglass, and the great working-class traditions of Sylvis, Debs, 
and Ruthenberg. It fights side by side with all who join in this cause. 

For the advancement of these principles, the Communist Party of the United 
States established the basic laws of its organization in its constitution. 

Now that is the part which was given to you, and the rest of it was 
retained by Mr. Takahashi. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Mr. Yagi. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. By Mr. Yagi, I meant to say. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. I notice that the card appears to have been torn 
in the center, torn entirely through, and is now pasted together by 
scotch tape. Can you explain that, how that happened, and why? 

Mr. Lorenzo, I handed it to Mr. Freitas, who is the chief of police. 
Will you repeat that question? 

* Retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1945 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes; I said, it sliows that the card had been torn 
into half and then pasted together with scotch tape. How did it 
happen to be torn ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I was really opposed to the program of this Commu- 
nist Party at that time, t* nd so I tore it off and threw it in my file. 

Mr. Tavenner. But then you were able ihially to find the pieces? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I was able to find the pieces. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were you when that card was given to 
you ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. In my office — ILWU office. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, were you charged an admission fee or dues? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How much was charged you ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. First time I gave to Thomas Vagi was $2 and the 
second time was $6. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you pay the $2 when you received the card ? 

ISIr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. And after that how much did you pay ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I paid $6 more, for back dues. 

Mr. Tavenner. $6 for what ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Back dues. 

Mr. Tavenner. For back dues. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How much would that be a month, do you know? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I don't know because 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know exactly how long you were in 
there ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you have told us about attending the one 
meeting at Lahaina schoolhouse. "V\Tiere were the other meetings held 
that you attended ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Four meetings was held down at Mr. Yagi's house. 

Mr. Tavenner. Down at Mr. Yagi's house ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. There were four meetings held ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Four meetings, of which the rest of the meetings 
Koichi Imori was there, too. 

Mr. Tavenner. Koichi Imori, you say, was there? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was his position ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. He was an organizer of the ILWU at that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were these just merely social gatherings or were 
they meetings of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. They were understood from Frank Takahashi, the 
oldest comrade, "We attend the Communist Party meeting tonight 
down at Yagi's house." 

Mr. Tavenner. What took place at those meetings ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Pamphlets were distributed there. 

Mr. Tavenner. What kind of pamphlets ? 

Mr. Ix)RENzo. Communist pamphlets, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Mr. Wheeler here, an investigator 
of the committee, this gentleman to my left? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 



1946 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlien he first talked to you about this back on 
December 10, did you give him the Communist Party literature that 
you had received at these meetings ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. I'll ask you to look at each of these pamphlets and 
state whether or not on December 10 you signed your name on them, 
indicating your delivery of them to Mr. Wheeler on that day. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. These were all the pamphlets that were 
given to me by Thomas Yagi. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to introduce in evidence the following docu- 
ments: Reaction Beats Its War Drums, by Wililam Z. Foster, and 
request it be marked "Lorenzo Exhibit No. 2." 

Mr. Walter. It may be received. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Communist Party and You, by Betty Gannett, 
and ask that it be market "Lorenzo Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Walter. It will be marked. Are you offering them at this 
time ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. It may be received. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat You Should Know About the Communists. 
The author is not stated but it is published by the Communist Party, 
USA, New York City, and ask it be marked "Exhibit No. 4." 

Lincoln and the Reds, and I ask that it be marked "Lorenzo Exhibit 
No. 5. 

Organized Labor and the Fascist Danger, by William Z. Foster, and 
I request it be marked "Lorenzo Exhibit No. 6." 

Communist Review, issue of June 1947, and ask that it be marked 
"Exhibit No. 7." 

Mr. Walter. It may be received. 

Mr. Tavenner. The Menace of a New World War, by William Z. 
Foster, and I request that it be marked "Lorenzo Exhibit No. 8." 

Is Communism American? by Eugene Dennis — Nine Questions 
About the Communist Party Answered, and request that it be marked 
"Exhibit No. 9." 

What Are We Doing in China, by Joseph North, and ask that it be 
marked "Exhibit No. 10." ^ 

Mr. Walter. May I see the exhibit, please ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

[Handed to Mr. Walter.] 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, were you asked, Mr. Lorenzo, to make a fur- 
ther search of your home to see if you had obtained any additional 
Communist literature 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir 

Mr. Tavenner. From the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you find some ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I found some, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. I will ask you to look at these pamphlets and state 
whether they are the ones you have produced in response to that request 
that you make another search. 

* Lorenzo exhibits 2-10, retained in committet flies. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1947 

Mr. Lorenzo. These were all the pamphlets I found. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now how did you get these various pamphlets ? 

;Mr. Lorenzo. Thomas Yagi gave me all of those pamphlets. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. "When were they given to you? I am not speaking 
of the day, I am s|)eakin<^ of the place. I should have said where. 

JNIr. Lorenzo. The ILWU union office. 

Mr. Tavenner. Hoav is that? 

Mr. Lorenzo. The ILWU office, sir. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. 1 desire to offer this additional group of pamphlets. 
Constitution of the Comnuuiist Party of the United States of America. 
Mark it "Exhibit No. 11." 

Mr. Walter, It may be received. 

Mr. T.wTiNNKR. Two more coi)ies of a pamphlet entitled "What you 
Should Know about the Comnnuiists," which I ask be marked "12" 
and "13." 

]Mr. Walter. It may be marked and received. 

Mr. Tavenner. Marxism versus Liberalism — an Interview, at the 
head of which appears "Joseph Stalin-H. G. Wells, Marxist Pam- 
phlets No. 2," and ask that it be niarked "No. 14." 

Ml'. Walter. It may be received. 

Mr. Tai-enner. The State, by V. I. Lenin, Marxists Pamphlets No. 
4. I request the designation "Lorenzo No. 15." 

Mr. Walter. It may be received. 

Mr. Tavenner. Program for Survival, the Communist Position 
on the Jewish Question, by Alexander Bittelman, which I ask be 
given the designation of "Lorenzo exhibit No. 16." 

Mr. Walter. It may be received.^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, we were talking about the meetings. Com- 
munist meetings, held at the house of Thomas Yagi. Will you tell us 
who were present at those meetings ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. The persons who were present were Frank Taka- 
hashi, Robert Murasaki, Thomas Yagi, Kameo Ichimura, Ben Naka- 
mura, Shigeo Takemoto, myself, and Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the last name ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. Koichi Imori. Do you recall whether there was a 
Filipino boy present besides yourself ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Tom Tagawa ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I also forget to mention his name. He was also in 
that meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tom Tagawa was there ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did Tom Tagawa hold in the union, 
if any, or did he hold any position, any office or other position in the 
union ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I don't know, sir. All I know is that he was elected 
representative of the legislature. 

Mr. Tavenner. He was what? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Elected representative of the legislature. 

Mr. Tavenner. He was elected as a senator to the legislature, did 
you say ? 

3 Lorenzo exhibits 11-16 retained in committee files. 



1948 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAH 

Mr. Lorenzo. Representative. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. You mean by that he is a member of the House of 
Representatives of the Territory? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Exactly. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned Ben Nakamura. Do you know 
what position he held at that time, if any ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. He is also an employee of Lanai. 

Mr. Tavenner. Employee of 

Mr. Lorenzo. Employee of Lanai. 

Mr. Tavenner. You spoke about Mrs. McElrath being introduced 
to you at the first meeting you attended. Did she take any part in 
the meeting ? Did she have anything to say ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat was it? 

M'r. Lorenzo. She spoke about Communist pamphlets. 

Mr. Tavenner. Spoke about Communist pamphlets. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you mention a person being present at the meet- 
tings at Thomas Yagi's house by the name of Takemoto? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was his first name? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Shigeo Takemoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did he hold at that time, if you 
know? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what position he holds' now? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I don't know now. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know. Now at this first meeting that you 
were telling us about, you said there was a man bv the name of Freeman 
there. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did Freeman do at that meeting; do you 
know? Do you remember? 

Mr. Lorenzo. He was the spokesman at that meeting. 

MV. Tavenner. He spoke at the meeting? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the general nature of his talk? 

Mr. Lorenzo. He talked about the Communist pamphlets, too. 

Mr. Tavenner. Communist what? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Communist pamphlet. 

Mr. Tavenner. Communist pamphlet, too. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you see Communist pamphlets at that meet- 
ing? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. WTio had them? 

Mr. Lorenzo. It was all in front of him, and when the meeting 
was through, all were distributed to the persons. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say they were in front of him. 

Mr, Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is Mr. Freeman? 

Mr, Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlien you say "in front of him," what do you 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1949 

Mr. Lorenzo. On the desk. 

Mr. Tavenxeh. On the table or something? 

Mr. Lorenzo. On the table. 

Mr. Tavenner. And after the meeting, those pam[)hlets were dis- 
tributed? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Tavenner. Now, do you remember who was in charge of the 
meeting, that first meeting that you attended when you said Mrs. 
]\lc'Elrath was present and a man by the name of Freeman? Do you 
remember who was in charge of the meeting? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Kameo Ichimura. 

Mr, Ta\-enner. ^Vlio was in charge of the meetings that were held 
at the home of Thomas Yagi? 

Mr, Lorenzo, Thomas Yagi (pause). Kameo Ichimura. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did you attend any other meeting after you 
attended these four meetings at Thomas Yagi's? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir ; I attended 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, before I ask you about that, you have de- 
scribed these people who were present at Thomas Yagi's house when 
the meetings were held. You have told us who they were. Do you 
know which meetings they attended of those held at Thomas Yagi's? 
Whether they were present at more than one of the four meetings 
or not? 

Mr, Lorenzo, They were the same group, except that Nakamura 
was called to some other appointment some place there in Lanai, 

Mr, Tavenner, In other words, the same group attended ? 

Mr, Lorenzo, Yes, sir, 

Mr. Tavenner. Each of the four meetings ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner, Now you say you attended another meeting after 
these four meetings at Thomas Yagi's. Where was that meeting held ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. The meeting was held here in Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. In Honolulu? 

Mr. Lorenzo. At Jack Hall's house, 

Mr, Tavenner, At the house of Jack Hall ? 

Mr, Lorenzo, Yes, sir. 

Mr, Tavenner, Now, how did you happen to be in Honolulu at that 
time? 

Mr, Lorenzo, This was a union conference held in Honolulu and 
after the conference was to the meeting at Nuuanu YMCA, Frank 
Takahashi 

Mr, Tavenner, Yes; now just a moment. You say there was a 
union meeting being held. 

Mr. Lorenzo, Yes, sir, 

Mr, Tavenner. In the YMCA here in Honolulu. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner, That is an ILWU meeting ? 

Mr, Lorenzo, Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't mean to say that that was the Communist 
meeting? 

Mr, Lorenzo. That wasn't the Communist meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was a regular union meeting? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Regular union meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was that meeting held in the YMCA? 



1950 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Can you fix the year and the month, if you can ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. That was — all I can recall was in the year 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. You would not undertake to state the month or 
the day when it was held. 

Mr. Lorenzo. I cannot remember the exact day and month at the 
time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us anything that happened at the 
ILWU meeting which impressed itself on your mind that would make 
you remember it? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Will you repeat that question. 

Mr. Tavenner. What happened at the ILWU meeting that you 
can remember? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I remember Ignacio accused the ILWU that it is 
a Communist-infiltrated union. 

Mr. Tavenner. You remember at that meeting — — 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner, That Ignacio accused the union of having been 
infiltrated by the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is Ignacio's first name? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Amos Ignacio. 

Mr. Tavenner. Amos? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Amos. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you started to tell us about something that 
occurred after the union meeting. 

Mr. Lorenzo. After the union meeting Frank Takahashi told me,, 
"Comrade, we have to go and attend the C. P. meeting." 

Mr. Tavenner. To attend what kind of meeting ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. C. P. 

Mr. Tavenner. C. P. meeting. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. I asked him what did he mean with the 
word "C. P." He told me the Communist Party, and that he told 
me also that I should know about the Communist Party. I had to 
shut up. 

Mr. Tavenner. Had you ever been to Jack Hall's home before this ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you know where Jack Hall's home was before 
that? 

Mr. Lorenzo. All I recall — no, sir. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Well, then, how did you get there ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Major Okada picked us up by the hotel — Emma 
Hotel. 

Mr. Tavenner. What hotel ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Emma Hotel ; and dropped us some place, and then 
a jeep picked us up again. 

Mr. Tavenner. Major Okada? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Picked you up and took you where? Do you re- 
member ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. He dropped us by one corner some place here in 
Honolulu, up near the liills there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Took you to a corner near the hills ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1951 

Mr. Tavenner. And who was in the car with you? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I was witli Frank Takahashi. 

Mr. Tavenner. Frank Takahashi? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Frank Takahashi. 

Mr. Tavenner. And yon o:ot out of the car? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes; he dropped ns by one corner some pLace and 
then one jeep picked ns up, then we <^o straight to 

JSIr. Tavenner. The other car picked you up? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you see Major Okada later that evening ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes ; he was in that meeting. 

Mv. Tavenner. That same meeting ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. The same meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, do you know why he didn't take you straight 
to the home of Jack Hall instead of letting you off and having another 
car pick you up and take you ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Well, I asked Frank Takahashi. He said that every- 
thing should be confidential, so 

Mr. Tavenner. That everything should be confidential? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who drove the jeep that picked you up? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I can't remember who is the fellow that drove us to 
Jack Hall's. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then you went to the home of Jack Hall ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What kind of meeting was it that was held at Jack 
Hall's home that night ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. It was a Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell me who was there ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Some of the first persons I know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before we go into the matter of who was there, 
what business was taken up at that meeting ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. They discussed about throwing Ignacio out of the 

n.wu. 

Mr. Tavenner. About throwing Amos Ignacio out of the ILWU? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What reason did they give ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Because he is opposed to the Communist Party 
program. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was there any business that you can remember or 
that you discussed there besides throwing Ignacio out of the union, 
that you can remember ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was it? 

Mr. Lorenzo. They said if Ignacio opposed to the party, they 
throw him out completely. 

Mr. Tavenner. If he was opposed to the party ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. To the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. To the Communist Party, he would be thrown out 
completely ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir, from the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do 3^ou know whether he was thrown out completely 
later? 



66636— 50— pt. 3- 



1952 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Lorenzo. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know? 

Mr. LoRExzo. I don't know. 

Mr. Tavexner. Now, who were present at this meeting? 

Mr. LoREXzo. The persons that I know was Jack Hall 

Mr. Tavenner. Jack Hall. 

Mr. LoREXzo. Frank Silva. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Frank Silva. 

Mr. LoREXzo. "Slim" Shimizu. 

Mr. Ta\^xxer. Shimizu. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Shimizu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Oh, Shimizu. What is Shimizu's first name? 

Mr. Lorenzo. ''Slim"; they call him "Slim," Morimoto. 

Mr. Tavexxer. What is his first name ? 

Mr. Lorexzo. I don't know his first name. 

Mr. Tavi^xxer. Morimoto? Is that the name — Morimoto? 

Mr. Lorexzo. Morimoto. 

Mr. Tavexxer. M-o-r-i-m-o-t-o? 

Mr. Lorexzo. Yes, sir. And Fred — small fellow with pointed face. 

Mr. Tavexxer. His first name was Fred? 

Mr. Lorexzo. Yes. 

Mr. Taven^xer. But you don't know his last name? 

Mr. Lorexzo. If I am not mistaken, I think it is Taniguchi. 

Mr. Tavexxer. You think it was Taniguchi ? Do you know where 
he was from ? 
Mr. Lorexzo. Kauai, sir. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Kauai. Do you know what he did, whether he held 
a position in the union or not. 
Mr. Lorexzo. I don't know at the time. 

Mr. Tavexxer. You don't know. Now, see if you can recall the 
names of others. 

Mr. Lorexzo. Yes, sir. James Okada. 
Mr. Tavexxer. James — who did you say ? 
Mr. Lorexzo. Okada. 

Mr. Tavexxer. You referred a while ago in your testimony to 
Major Okada ; is he the one who picked you up in the car? 
Mr. Lorexzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavex^ner. Is that the same person to whom you are referring ? 
Mr. LoREX^zo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, whether the first name James is cor- 
rect or not, it was the person known as Major Okada. 

Mr. Lorenzo. I am still in doubt if that is his right name. His 
name is Oltacla. They call him Okada — Major Okada. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you positive he was known as Major Okada ? 
Mr. Lorenzo. Major Okada. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you are in doubt about James being the correct 
first name. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Arakaki was there, too. 

Mr. Tavtenner. Arakaki. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is his first name. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yasuki. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1953 

Mr. Tavennkr. Wliere was he from? 

Mr. LoKKNzo. From Hilo. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether he occupied any position in 
the union, wliether he lield any office^ 

Mr. Lorenzo. I don't know, at tliat time. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know. Any otliers that you can recall? 

Mv. Lorenzo. Ernest Arena was there, too. 

Mr. Tavenner. Ernest Arena. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, see if you can recall the names of any others. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Dave Thompson was there, too. 

Mr. Tavenner. Dave Thompson. 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did Dave Thompson do ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. He is also an officer of the ILWU at the time. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. An officer of the ILWU. Can you recall any 
others? Did yon know^ a man by the name of Shigemitsu? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. Harry Shigemitsu. Oh. I am in doubt as 
to the second — or the first name. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was this man Shigemitsu there ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mv. Tavenner. Can you recall his first name ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I cannot recall his first name, but I can by his picture. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Do you know his first name ; would you know it if I 
were to refresh your recollection ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Richard? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. Richard Shigemitsu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yon spoke of Mr. Frank Silva being present. How 
often had you seen Mr. Frank Silva before that night, as far as you 
know ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Sometimes when we have union meetings down at 
pier 11, delegates from various islands are all introduced. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you know'n Mr. Silva? Do you 
know how long you had known him ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I don't know how long. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many times do you think you had seen him; 
how often do you think you had seen him? 

Mr. Lorenzo. When we have ILWU conference here in Honolulu, I 
often meet him here. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many times do you think that was, wdien you 
saw him ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I cannot tell you exactly how many times. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, I understand that would be difficult. Had 
you seen him more than once? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Had you seen him more than 

;Mr. Lorenzo. More than, say, about four or five times. 

Mr. Tavenner. As nearly as you can recall, four or five times ? 

]VIr. Lorenzo, Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. So you are certain you knew Frank Silva when you 
saw him? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 



1954 COAOIUXIST ACTIVITIES IN HAW AH 

Mr. Tavenner. "Would you be able to identify him now if you saw 
him? 

Mr. Lorenzo. If he came here in person, I would be able to. 

LIr. Tavenner. I would like to call Mr. Frank Silva. 

(Mr. Frank Silva entered the hearing room, accompanied by his 
attorney, Myer C. Symonds.) 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all right. Just stand there. Do you see 
Mr. Silva in the room ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir [indicating]. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you point him out? 

Mr. Lorenzo. That is him, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all. 

(Mr. Silva and his counsel left the room.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Lorenzo, did you attend any other Communist 
Party meetings after this meeting at the home of Jack Hall ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. No more, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Why ^ 

Mr. Lorenzo. I am really opposed to the Communist Party pro- 
gram. 

Mr. Tavenner. I am sorry : I could not hear you. 

Mr. Lorenzo. That was the last meeting that I have attended with 
the Communist Part}' because I was opposed to the program of the 
Communist Part}'. 

Mr. Tavenner. You Avere opposed to the program ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you tell any member of the Communist Party 
that you were dropping out ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes. sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who did you tell? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I told Thomas Yagi at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. And have you had any connection with the Com- 
munist Party since that time ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. No more, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have anything further that you would 
like to say to the committee or anything that you could say that could 
help the committee in its investigation ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. I would like to say this : that I realize I made a mis- 
take by joining the Communist Party and that I don't believe in the 
program of this Communist Party any more. I want to clear myself, 
that I believe in this American form of government, and this is the 
first and last Government that I will fight for. 

Mr. Walter. Is that all you care to state ? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter, You have the thanks of this subcommittee for doing 
a very courageous thing this morning. It is not easy to make the kind 
of statement you made, but it is because of people like yourself and 
those who have been in favor of statehood feel more firmly convinced 
than ever that statehood should be given to the people of Hawaii. 
You have made a great contribution to that cause. Thank you 
very much. 

The subcommittee will be in recess. 

(Whereupon, at 10: 44 a. m. a recess was taken until 11 : 35 a. m.) 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will be in order. Call your witness, 
Mr. Tavenner. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX HAWAII 1955 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr, Jack Hall. Mr. Frank Silva. 

INIr. Walter. Mr. Silva, will you raise your ri^lit hand. Do you 
swear that the testimony you are about to j^ive will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Silva. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF FEANK G. SILVA (Resumed). ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 

COUNSEL, MYER C. SYMONDS 

]Mr. Tavexxer. Mr. McElrath — excuse me, Mr. Silva, you appeared 
as a witness here a few days ago. That is correct, isn't it? 

Mr. Silva, That is correct. 

Mr. Taatnner. This morning the witness by the name of Fedrico 
Lorenzo testified that he attended a Communist Party meeting at the 
home of Jack Hall, at which you were present. Were you present 
at such a meeting, held in 1947? 

C Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Silva. I refuse to answer the question on the ground it may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavex'xer. I asked you when you were on the stand before if 
you had attended a labor school in California. My recollection is 
3'ou refused to answer the question. Did you attend that school at the 
time under the GI bill of rights and was that school removed from the 
list at a later date from recognition as a school in which Federal funds 
could be used for that purpose ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Silva. I refuse to answer the question for the same reasons. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Silva, why do you refuse an answer to that ques- 
tion on the ground it would be self-incriminatory if, at the time you 
attended the school, it was recognized as a proper institution for the 
training of men who, like yourself, served their country so well ? 

Mr, Silva. Again, on the advice of my counsel and my own deci- 
sions, I feel that I do not want to answer the question. 

Mr. Walter. As I understand it, during the period when it is 
alleged that you went to that school, it was an accredited school, many 
GI's took advantage of the laws of the United States and were edu- 
cated at this school. How did you ever reach the conclusion, if you 
were one of those men that took advantage of the Government's gen- 
erosity, that that would in any wise criticize or incriminate you ? 

Mr. Silva. I refuse to answer that question for the same reasons. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Silva, I understand that you have an outstand- 
ing war record, and, being a veteran of both wars myself, I am dis- 
turbed at the position you take. Do you realize that anything you 
testify to at this hearing is privileged, and by that I mean cannot be 
used against you in any other proceeding. Do you realize that? Let 
him answer the question. Do you realize that ? 

Mr. Silva, I do, 

Mr, Walter, All right. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Mr. Silva, do you realize that as a result of your 
refusal to answer the questions which I have asked you this morning, 
that you may be subjected to further contempt proceedings by the 
committee, if it so desires to act ? Do you understand that 2 

Mr. Silva. I do. 

Mr, Ta\t:xner. No further questions. 



1956 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Walter. Call your next witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Robert McElratli. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please. Do you swear 
that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. McElratii. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT McELRATH, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please. 

Mr. McElrath. Robert McElrath. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented b}' counsel ? 

Mr. INIcElrath. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record 1 

Mr. Symonds. Myer C. Symonds, appearing for this witness. And 
I would like at this time to file, in the same form, the motion to quash 
and suppress service of the subpena. 

Mr. Walter. Motion denied. It will be placed in the record.* 

Mr. Harrison. It is in the same form ? 

Mr. Symonds. Yes, Mr. Harrison. 

Mr. Tavenner. You appear here in answer to the subpena served 
on you ? 

Mr. McElrath. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. McElrath. Spokane, Wash., May 27, 1916. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you give this committee a brief outline of 
your educational background ? 

Mr. McElrath. I went to school in Spokane, Wash., Freewater, 
Oreg., and possibly other places I don't recall. 

(Laughter in the audience.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Maybe I will ask you. Did you go to any Com- 
munist school for part of your education? 

Mr. McElrath. I decline to answer the question on the ground it 
might tend to incriminate me. I do so on advice of counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, outside of the Communist schooling, which 
you have refused to testify to, what other education did you have? 

Mr. McElrath. I attended classes at Berkeley, YMCA school, in 
Seattle. I don't recollect, honestly. 

Mr. Walter. Just to the best of your recollection. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is good enough. Now, will you give the 
committee a brief statement of your employment background and 
record ? 

Mr. McElrath. The major portion of my working life is as a sea- 
man and as a labor representative, as a machinist for Inter-Island Dry- 
dock during the first few years of the war ; I woiked in a wholesale 
grocery warehouse. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, let me ask you a little more in detail. When 
did you come to the Territory of Hawaii and make this your residence ? 

Mr. McElrath. January 1941. 

* Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Robert McElrath is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on page 1472 (Parti). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1957 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you lived here constantly since that period? 

Mr. McP-^LKATir. Yes; I have. 

Mr. Tavenneh. Well, prior to your connn<^ to Hawaii in 1941, how 
were you employed? 

Mr. McElrath. I was a seaman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was your residence at that time when not 
at sea? 

Mr. McElrath. My father's home is in Seattle. I stayed in various 
hotels throu<z:hout the country. Galveston, Tex., San Francisco, Port- 
land, Seattle, New York, Baltimore. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you married prior to 1041 or not? 

Mr. McElrath. No; I was a single num. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you live at the home of your father in Seattle 
from the time you first went to work until 1941, when you came here? 

Mr. McElrattl At certain times I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. At what times? 

Mr. McElrath. During the 193G maritime strike. I happened to 
be involved in that strike at Seattle, and I stayed at home. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed at that time? 

Mr. McElrath. I was a member of the crew of the steamship 
MageriThic^ and we were tied up in Seattle. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the address of your father's home ? 

Mr. McElrath. I can't recollect. I believe it was on East Jefferson 
Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then did you live there after that ? 

Mr. McElrath. In 1940 I was there for a short while. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long? 

Mr. McElrath. I would say not over a week. 

Mr. Tavenner. What month? 

Mr. McElratji. I was a member of the crew of the steamship 
Aleutian^ and that ship does not operate in the winter because of the 
ice in Alaska, so it was just prior to the winter, possibly July or 
August. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right ; now, were there any other periods when 
you lived at your father's home prior to 1941 and after 1936 ? 

Mr. McElrath. Yes. In 1937, for several weeks, after I returned 
from Japan, 

Mr. Tavenner. In what month do you think ? 

Mr. McElrath. It was the month after the Sino-Japanese War 
began. I was in the Orient when it started and I remember returning 
right afterward. 

Mr. Tavenner. Any other periods of time when you lived there at 
your father's home, between 1937 and 1941 ? 

Mr. McElrath. If I had my ship discharges with me, I could 
recollect, but I don't believe so. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Now, wdien you came to the Territory of Haw^aii in 
1941, how^ were you employed after your arrival here? 

Mr. McElrath. Will you please repeat the question ? 

Mr. Ta\tenner. How were you employed in the Territory of Hawaii 
after your arrival here in 1941 ? 

Mr. McElrath. I worked with the Kauai longshoremen, who were 
on strike at the time I arrived here. I was asked to go over to Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner. For wdiom did you work there ? 



1958 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. McElratii. The ILWU and the United Cannery, Agricultural, 
Textile, and Allied Workers. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you continue in that employment? 

Mr. McElratii. I stayed on Kauai until the longshore stril^e ended, 
which I believe was May 19-41. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then what was your employment after that ? 

Mr. McElratii. I worked on a paper, the Herald was the name of it. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. How long did you work for the Herald ? 

Mr. McElrath. Perhaps 4 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then come right on through and tell us what your 
employment was. I just want you to give the committee a record 
of your employment background. 

Mr. McElrath. And then I took a job on the Kilauea. That is a 
ship owned by the Inter-Island Steam Navigation Co. I stayed on 
that ship, traveling to the South Pacific islands until, I believe, May 
or June 1942. I left the Kilauea and went to work for the Inter- 
Island Steam Navigation Co. as a machinist. I believe I worked for 
Inter-Island until the middle of 1944, when I became a full-time official 
of the Independent Marine Engineers and Drydock Workers Union. 

Mr. Tavenner. What date was that, do you think? About what 
date was that ? 

Mr. McElrath. I believe it was in the middle of 1944. We or- 
ganized the union in February 1943. I was the organizer, and I did 
not infiltrate the union either. I say 1944. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you employed in that capacity ? 

Mr. McElrath. Until the end of the union; the union voted to 
affiliate with the ILWU. 

Mr. Walter. Was that an independent? 

Mr. McElrath. It was an independent union; yes. It was 
organized by the men during the war. Ernest Arena, myself, Bill 
Perry were the organizers. I had book No. 2 in the union. In 1945, 
I believe, we voted to go into the ILWU. And then I was hired by 
the ILWU as Territorial representative. No, as editor. I don't recall 
the title I had. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then you were a Territorial representative, at one 
period ? 

Mr. McElrath. At one period I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was that ? 

Mr. McElrath. When Frank Thompson left, which I believe was 
immediately after the sugar strike began in 1946, the latter part of 
1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. How long were you employed in that 
capacity ? 

Mr. McElrath. Until later on, a year and a half ago, when the 
position was changed and I was set up as public relations director. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you still hold that position as public relations 
director ? 

Mr. McElrath. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live, Mr. McElrath ? 

Mr. McElrath. 1112-B Elm Street. 

Mr. TAi'ENNER. In Honolulu? 

Mr. McElrath. Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you lived there ? 



I 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1959 

Mr. McElkath. Nine years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, Mr. McElrath, in 1945, from then on for 
a considerable period of time you held a very important position 
with the ILWU, did you not, the title of which you gave us? And 
what was it? 

Mr. McElrath. Territorial representative. 

Mr. Ta\"enner. While you were Territorial representative did you 
hold any official position with the Communist Party such as a mem- 
ber of its executive board, of the Communist Party of the Territory 
of Hawaii ? 

Mr, McElrath. I decline to answer the question on the gromids 
that it may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. Do you realize that and understand that by your 
refusal to answer the question you may subject yourself to contempt 
proceedings ? 

Mr. McElrath. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at any time a member of the executive 
board of the Communist Party of the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. McElrath. I decline to answer the question on the same 
grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever attended Communist Party meetings 
in the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. McELRiVTH. I decline to answer that question on the same 
grounds. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party of the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. McElrath. I decline to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the Communist Party 
of the Territory of Hawaii? 

Mr. McElrath. I decline to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you a member of the HCLC ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. McElrath (after long pause). Has the HCLC been listed on 
this Attorney General's list as a subversive organization? 

Mr. TA^TNNER. Would that make any difference as to whether you 
were a member or not ? 

Mr. McElrath. It surely would ; absolutely. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Do you mean that would change the fact of whether 
vou were a member ? 

Mr. McElrath. I beg your pardon ; I did not get your last question. 

Mr. Ta\tnner. I said, would it change the fact of whether or not you 
were a member, as to whether it was cited as a Communist-front organi- 
zation or not ? 

Mr. McElrath. People are winding up in jail these days for even 
knowing people. 

Mr. Ta\-enner. Will you answer the question. 

Mr. Walter. In what case did that happen ? 

Mr. McElrath. Harry Bridges is the best example I can think of. 

Mr. Walter. I think you had better read the decision in that case. 

Mr. McElrath. I decline to answer the question on the grounds it 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. What does HCLC stand for ? 

Mr. McElrath. The newspapers identify it as Hawaii Civil Liber- 
ties Committee. [Laughter.] 



1960 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN" HAWAH 

Mv. T.WEXXER. I have no further questions. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Ralph Vossbrink. Ralpli Vossbrink. 

Mrs. BousLOG. He is here. Has he been called ? 

Mr. Tavenxp:r. Yes. I have just called him. 

Mrs. BousLOG. Well, he is not in the room. I wonder if you would 
have him called outside. 

]Mr. Tavexxer. Yes. We will have him called out. Mr. Owens, will 
you look through the corridors and see if you can find Mr. Vossbrink. 

Do you represent Mr. Vossbrink? 

Mrs. BousLOG. I do, 

Mr. AValter. Will you raise your right hand? Do you swear that 
the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God. 

Mr. VossBRixK. I do. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down, please. 

TESTIMOlfY OF RALPH VOSSBRINK, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COII^EL, HARRIET BOUSLOG 

Mr. Ta\t:nxer. You are Mr. Ralph Vossbrink? 

Mr. Vossbrink. Yes, sir, I am. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Is that your full name? 

Mr. Vossbrink. My middle name is Vernon. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. VossBRiXK. Yes, sir. Mrs. Harriet Bouslog is my counsel. 

Mr. Tavex'xer. Will you identify yourself for the record and make 
the usual motion, please? 

Mrs. Bouslog. I want my name, Harriet Bouslog, entered as coun- 
sel for Ralph Vossbrink, and I want to file with the committee a motion 
to quash the service of the subpena on Mr. Vossbrink. 

Mr. Walter. The motion will be received.^ 

Mr. Harrisox. It is in the same form, Mrs. Bouslog? 

Mrs. Bouslog. It is the same. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Mr. Vossbrink, when and where you born ? 

Mr. VossBRixK. I was born in San Francisco in the year 1918. 

Mr. Tavexxer. How long did you live in San Francisco? 

Mr. VossBRixK. Up until the year 1945. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Where did you live ? 

Mr. VossBRixK. I lived at 2686 Twenty-second Avenue. 

Mr. Tavexxer. After 1945, where did you go ? 

Mr. VossBRixK. It was not a question of after 1945. In the early 
part of 1942 I enlisted in the merchant marine and I worked as a 
seaman all during the war. 

Mr. Tavexx^er. But you maintained San Francisco as your place of 
residence ? 

Mr. VossBRixK. Yes, sir, I did. Subsequent to that time I took resi- 
dence in Honolulu. 

Mr. Tav-exxer. Will you tell the committee briefly your educational 
background, please? 

° Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Rklph Vossbrink is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Wilfred Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. This motion 
appears on p. 1550 (Part 2). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1961 

Mr. VossBRiNK. I griidiuited from the Hi«rli School of Commerce in 
San Francisco, and I v^ent to a trade school for the period of about 
1 year, studying; draf(in<2;. 

Mr.TAVENNEK. Did you attend any other schools? 

Mr. VossHRixK. No, sir. That is the only hi^h school that I at- 
tended. I also went to gi-annnar school in San Francisco. No other 
schools. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you <j;ive us briefly your employment record, 
please i Where have you worked '( 

Mr. VossHRiNK. I have worked for the Southern Pacific Railroad. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did you live while you worked for that rail- 
road? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. In San Fi'ancisco. I have worked for the Pontiac 
motor division of the General Motors Ck)rp. ; I have worked for 
various steamship companies, including Matson, American President 
Lines, American South African Lines, Northland Transportation Co.; 
I have been a patrolman for the Marine Cooks and Stewards Union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are all of those periods or all this employment 
before you came to the Territory of Hawaii? Suppose we divide it 
between the time of coming here and the time before. Complete your 
statement as to where you were employed before coming to Honolulu. 

Mr. VossBRiNK. That just about summarizes it. 

Mr. Tavenner. After coming to Hawaii in 1945, how have you been 
employed ? 

Mr. Vossbrink. I first came here as a patrolman for the National 
Union of Maritime Cooks and Stewards, then I was national represen- 
tative for the Culinary and Service Workers Union. I still have that 
capacity and I am also associated with the United Public Workers, 
Local 646, as their executive secretary. 

Mr. Tavenner. During this period of time did you hold any other 
positions in a union or locals? 

Mr. Vossbrink. I have had the title of president of the Oahu CIO 
council for the last 8 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you reside? 

Mr. Vossbrink. 2340 Pacific Heights Road, Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you lived there? 

Mr. Vossbrink. About 3 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to that where did you live ? 

Mr. Vossbrink. I lived on Kapiolani Boulevard. I don't remember 
the exact address. And I also lived on Manukai Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you live on the first street that you 
just mentioned? 

Mr. Vossbrink. Approximately 9 or 10 months, I would say. 

Mr. Tavt.nner. During what year? 

Mr. Vossbrink. I think that was 1945. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you remember when you left that address and 
moved to your present address? 

Mr. Vossbrink. I would say the early part of 1946. 

Mr. Tavtinner. And then when did you take that address? 

Mr. Vossbrink. When did I take the address? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. I believe you said you lived there about 10 
months. 

Mr. Vossbrink. About 10 months, I would say. I w^ould say that I 
took that address around the middle of 1945. 



1962 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Ta\^enner. And prior to that, where did you say you lived? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. Prior to that — well, that is the only really perma- 
nent address that I have. There was a period of a couple of weeks 
on two different occasions where I boarded at different people's homes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, will you give us that, please? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. I boarded at 3571 Pahoa Avenue for about 3 weeks 
and I boarded in an address at 

Mr. Tavenner. When was that? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. In 1945, the early part of 1945, when housing was 
bad, and I was looking around for a house of my own. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, the other two times that you mentioned. 

Mr. VossBRiNK. The other two times — that is one time. The other 
time I boarded at a house up in Manoa Valley, but I can't remember 
the address. 

Mr. Tavenner. Whose house was it ? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. That was the house of Mrs. Hyun. H-y-u-n. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the first name ? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. Alice. 

Mr. Tavenner. Alice. When was that? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. That was in around the middle of 1945, possibly 
May or June. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever attend a Communist Party meeting 
at which Alice Hyun was present ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. VossBRiNK. My attorney has just advised me not to answer 
that question on the grounds that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of or attended the 
Puunui group meetings of the Communist Party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. VossBRiNK. I would refuse to answer that question on the same 
grounds stated previously. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a delegate to the Democratic convention 
from the eighth precinct of the fourth district in 1948 ? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. I don't know if it was exactly the eighth precinct 
of the fourth district, but I was a delegate to that convention at ap- 
proximately that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Elected at a precinct primary ? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the precinct? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. It may have been the eighth of the fourth. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been or are you now a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. VossBRiNK. I have been advised by counsel to refuse to answer 
that on the same grounds stated previously. 

Mr. Walter. You do refuse to answer the question ? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. Yes, sir. On the same grounds stated previously, 
that it would tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. The other questions which I asked you and which 
you failed to answer, do you refuse to answer them? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. No. sir. My answer still remains as they were 
given to you. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, then, let's go back and see. Now, did you 
ever attend a Communist Party meeting with Alice Hyun ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IIST HAWAII 1963 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. VossiiRiNK. Again, my attorney advises me to refuse to answer 
that question on the grounds it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr, Harrison. Do you know Alice Hyun ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr, VossBRiNK. Likewise, to that question I refuse to answer it 
any further, because it may tend to incriminate me. But, for the 
record, I have stated that I lived at her house as a boarder. 

Mr. Walter. Then you know her? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. I think the record will show that. 

Mr. Ta\t5NNer, Do you refuse to answer the question ? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. No, sir, 

Mr Ta\t:nner, You stated a moment ago when I asked you if you 
attended Communist Party meetings at which Alice Hyun was pres- 
ent that your counsel advised you not to answer, but I am asking 
you, do you refuse to answer the question ? 

Mr, VossBRiNK. I don't refuse to answer that last, but I do believe 
that such a question would tend to incriminate me, and on that basis 
I refuse to answer it. 

Mr. Ta^t:nner. Then you do refuse to answer; is that what you 
mean to tell us? 

Mr. VossBRiNK, On the grounds that I have previously stated. 

Mr. Walter. In other words, you are not going to answer the 
question ? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. I think it is clear. 

Mr. Walter. Very clear. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you understand the consequence of your refusal 
to answer, that it might result in contempt proceedings by this 
committee ? 

Mr. VossBRiNK. I have weighed this question very thoroughly in 
my mind, and I haven't answered these questions like — I believe as 
an American I take my citizenship very seriously, that I must, in 
order to defend my Americanism, take the position that I am taking 
before this committee. 

Mr. Tavenner. No further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Whereupon, at 12 : 15 p. m., April 17, 1950, a recess was taken until 
this afternoon at 2 p.m.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

(The hearing was resumed at 2 p. m.) Representatives Francis 
E. Walter (subcommittee chairman), Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. 
Moulder, and Harold H. Velde being present. 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will be in order. Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr, Ta\t:nner, Mr. August Asau. Mr. Chairman, before calling 
that witness, I would like to call two witnesses, and see if you desire 
to Release them from the subpena, and give them an opportunity to be 
heard at this time, if they desire to be heard. 

One witness is Mrs. Eobert McElrath. Another is Mrs. Ealph Voss-. 
brink, and the third is Mrs. Jack Hall. 

Mr. Walter. I understand they are represented by counsel. Per- 
haps we can expedite the matter by inquiring of counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. Call Mrs. Bouslog. 



1964 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

(Mrs. Boiislog appears in the hearing room.) 

Mr. Walter. I understand that you represent three ladies here 
whose names were called ? 

Mrs. BouSLOG. I was not in the room. I don't know whose names 
have been called, Mr. Chairman, 

Mr. Tavenner. Mrs. Robert McElrath, Mrs. Ralph Vossbrink, and 
Mrs. Jack Hall, 

Mrs. BousLOG. I represent Mrs. Ralph Vossbrink and Mrs. Jack 
Hall. Mr. Symonds represents Mrs. McElrath, I believe. 

Mr, Tavenner. Are your clients here now ? 

Mrs. BousLOG. They are. 

Mr. Walter. They do not care to testify voluntarily? 

Mrs. BousLOG, They do not, although if you wish me to specifically 
ask them at this time, I would like to do so, 

Mr, Walter. If they do not care to testify voluntarily, they may 
be released, 

Mrs, BousLOG. I would rather speak to them and let them make 
the decision, at the request of the chairman. 

(Mrs. Bouslog leaves the room, and returns.) 

Mrs. Bouslog. I have spoken to Mrs. Ralph Vossbrink, I believe 
as she was subpenaed, and Mrs. Jack Hall. They both state they do 
not desire to voluntarily appear before this committee, or to mak« any 
statement before this committee, 

Mr, Walter. All right, they will be released from the subpena. 

Mr. Myer C. Symonds. For the record, I represent Mrs. A. Q. Mc- 
Elrath. She has no desire to make any voluntary statement, Mr. 
Chairman, 

Mr, Walter, Released from the subpena, 

Mr. Symonds. Thank you. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Asau. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand? Do you swear to 
speak the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God ? 

Mr, AsAU. I do. 

TESTIMONY OP AUGUST I. ASAU 

Mr. Ta\'enner. W^hat is your name, please ? 

Mr. Asau, August I. Asau. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were you born ? 

Mr. Asau, Born in Maui, 

Mr. Tavenner. How old are you ? 

Mr. Asau. I will be 45 on August 12. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your present occupation ? 

Mr. Asau, Dock foreman, Hilo Transportation & Terminal Co. 

Mr, TA^^NNER. How long have you. been foreman for the Hilo 
Transportation & Terminal Co. ? 

Mr. Asau. I cannot give you that exact date, because it has been — the 
company has changed from C. Brewer & Co. to the Hilo Transporta- 
tion & Terminal Co. Really, I don't know what year it was, 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, approximately how long have you been em- 
ployed in that same work, for that company, or its successor, or its 
predecessor ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1965 

Mr. AsAU. Twenty years, in May. 

Mr. Tavenner. How lonjj:? 

Mr. AsAu. It will be 20 this coming May. 

Mr. Tavenner. Twenty years? 

Mr. AsAu. Yes. 

^Ir. Tavenner. What was tlie nature of the work that yon have clone 
for that company ? "What kind of work ilid you do ? 

Mr. AsAU. I started oil' as lon<;slioreman, and worked up to machine 
oi)erator. At present, the ])osition I am holding now is dock foreman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did vou go to school ? 

Mr. AsAU. I attended public school in Hilo, and also St. Mary's 
School of Hilo. 

Mr. Tavenner. You went through the seventh grade ? 

Mr. AsAu. That's right, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVhen you first joined the union, what union was it? 

Mr. AsAu. I believe it was 1935. It was known as the Hilo Long- 
shoremen's Union, something like that. I really cannot recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was it an independent union at the time? 

Mr. AsAu. Well, when we first started, it was, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. About what year was it, do you remember ? 

Mr. AsAu. About 1935. 1935. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is the name of that union now^ ? 

Mr. AsAU. It is known as the International Longshoremen's and 
Warehousemen's L^nion. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what local is it that you are a member of? 

Mr. AsAu. I am sorry. I am not a member of the union now. 

Mr. Tavenner. I see. Do you recall that when this union was an 
independent union it tried to become affiliated with the American 
Federation of Labor? 

Mr. AsAU. I do, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. It did not become affiliated with the American 
Federation of Labor? 

Mr. AsAU. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you hold an office in that unit, and 
what office did you hold ? 

Mr. Asau. When it first started off, I was vice president. During 
the war, when the president was inducted into the Army, I held the 
position for 2 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was that president? 

Mr. AsAu. Kamoku. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you vice president ? 

Mr. Asau. About 5 years. The first stretch, then, I believe John L. 
Kerr became vice president 1 year, and then I served as vice president 
for another 3 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. You served as vice president until you became fore- 
man in 1937? In the Hawaiian Transportation & Terminal Co., is 
that correct, or, rather, the Hilo Transportation? 

Mr. Asau. I beg your pardon, I didn't get that first part of it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. Were you vice president the second time right 
up until the time that you became foreman in the Hilo Transporta- 
tion & Terminal Co. ? 

Mr. Asau. That is correct. 



1966 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold any other offices or positions of any 
kind in your community from 1946 right up until the present time? 

Mr. AsAU. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What offices? 

Mr. AsAU. Member of the hospital board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you run for political office? 

Mr. AsAU. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat office ? 

Mr. AsAU. Board of supervisors. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, have you ever been a member of the Commu- 
nist Party? 

Mr. AsAU. Could I say the way I want it ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes; just exactly like you want it. 

Mr. Asau. I have never actually signed any pledge or roster of the 
Communist Party, but I have received a card of the party. The way 
I received that card, being vice president of the union, my corres- 
pondence used to come at the office. One evening, after I got through 
work, I went up to the office and got hold of this group of literature 
that I had coming to me, and I took it to my home. As I opened up 
the package there, I found this card in it. So, I got very angry about 
it, I went up to the office to find out who had stuck it in my package. 
The boys that were around there started to laugh. I said, "This is not 
a joking matter." From the year 1935, I have always been called a 
Communist, from the fact that we went out on strike in 1935. Wlien 
the boys started to laugh, thinking that it was a joke, so, I laughed 
with them. It was my mistake. I can see it now. It is a fact that 
I kept that card. 

Mr. Tavenner, Well, did you find out who gave you the card ? 

Mr. AsAU. At the time, I could not find out. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you find out later ? 

Mr. Asau. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was it ? 

Mr. AsAU. Harry Kamoku asked me for some money. 

Mr. Tavenner. Harry Kamoku ? 

Mr. AsAU. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. He asked you for some money? 

Mr. Asau. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. For your membership dues in the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Asau. He just called it the committee on policy, the CP. I 
didn't know what it was, so 

Mr. Tavenner. He called it what ? 

Mr. Asau. The committee on policies. 

Mr. Tavenner. The committee on policies ? 

Mr. Asau. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, when did you find out what the committee 
on policies was ? 

Mr. Asau. When I found out, it is the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. He asked you for money. What did he say to you 
about the money ? 

Mr. Asau. He said, "That covers your dues." 

Mr. Tavenner. Who did you pay your dues to ? 

Mr. Asau. Harry Kamoku. 

Mr. Tave^j ner. How long did you pay dues to him ? 

Mr. Asau. I just gave him 4 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Four months ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1967 

Mr. AsAU. That's right, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings did you attend 'i 

Mr. AsAU. Just those four meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Four meetings'^ 

Mr. AsAU. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How much did you pay each meeting? 

Mr. AsAU. Half a dolhir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, at these meetings, did you see any Communist 
Party literature, that is, pamphlets^ 

Mr. Asau. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you given any Communist Party pamphlets? 

Mr. Asau. No, never saw them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Never saw them. 

Mr. Asau. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, where were these meetings held ? 

Mr. Asau. In the union hall, the union office. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. In tlie union office ? 

Mr. Asau. That's right. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Were you told what kind of meetings they were? 

Mr. Asau. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVell, how did you — you say they first called them — 

Mr. Asau. Committees of policies. 

Mr. Tavenner. Committee of policies. How long was it before 
you found out that the committee of policies was the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Asau. Well, just through my — in the beginning, we used to 
just make up the policies for the union, and we decide whether we can 
bring it back to the rank and file. There was times they used to get 
off the issue, and try to force the thing through, and I felt it was 
getting a little too one-sided. 

Mr. Tavenner. In this meeting they were attempting to fix policies ? 

Mr. Asau. That's right. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Those of you who attended the hearings, attempted 
to carry those policies down to the rank and file of the members? 

Mr. Asau. The union policies, yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, were the rank and file consulted about 
these policies ? 

Mr. Asau. They were consulted. Certain issues were consulted 
with the rank and file, but those that they had trouble with, with the 
committee, they had to keep it away for a while. 

Mr. Ta%^nner. Well, just tell me just how you found out that the 
committee of policy was the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Asau. Well, to tell the truth, I really didn't know it was the 
Communist Party, or anything like that. I just did not like the way 
that they were running things. So I figured that maybe that had 
something to do with it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, how long was it — well, who first talked to you 
about the committee, this man Harry Kamoku ? 

Mr. Asau. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you already have your Communist Party card 
at the time ? 

Mr. Asau. Yes, I kept the card, see, when I found it in the literature 
that I got. 

66636 — 50— pt. 3 3 



1968 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Who attended these four or five meetings that you 
attended ? 

Mr. AsAU. I cannot recall all the — there's just a few of them I 
can 

Mr. Tavenner. About how many, do you remember ? 

Mr. AsAU. Well, about, at the most, I think there are about 12 or 
13 of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. I can't quite hear you, 

Mr. Asau. Twelve or thirteen of them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Twelve or thirteen ? 

Mr. Asau. Yes. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. Can you give us their names ? 

Mr. Asau. Well, there was Harry Kamoku there, and Isaac Kauwe. 

Mr. Tavenner. Kauwe? 

Mr. Asau. And Arakaki was there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Arakaki? 

Mr. Asau. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. What was his first name ? 

Mr. Asau. I really don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did he work ? 

Mr. Asau. At Olaa Sugar Co. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. What position did he hold there? 

Mr. Asau. I wouldn't know. You mean with the company, the 
position that he held with the company? 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Yes. 

Mr. Asau. I really don't know that. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Wlio else? 

Mr. Asau. Bert Nakano was there, and Albert Okutani. 

Mr. Tavenner. Albert Okutani ? 

Mr. Asau. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. Asau. I cannot think of any others. 1 cannot think of the 
others now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know a man by the name of Johnson, Henry 
Johnson ? 

Mr. Asau. Henry Johnson ; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he attend those meetings, do you recall? 

Mr. Asau. I am not sure. I cannot recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall the names of any of the others of 
the 12 or 13 people whom you saw at the meetings? 

Mr. Asau. A lot of them I don't know them by their names. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know them by their names ? 

Mr. Asau. That's right, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you have any position in that group yourself ? 

Mr. Asau. No, sir ; only sitting at those meetings ; I took the min- 
utes down. 

Mr. Tavenner. You took the minutes down at the meeting? 

Mr. Asau. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you help collect any of the money for the dues ? 

Mr. Asau. Some of the boys gave me some money, I handed it to 
Harry. 

Mr. Tavenner. "Wlio were some of them that paid money, their 
dues to you? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1969 

Mr. AsAU. Arakaki o:ave me some money. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who? 

Mr. AsAU. Arakaki jrave me some money, and Albert Okutani. 

Mr. Tavenner. I didn't quite liear you. 

Mr. AsAu. Albert Okutani. The rest, I cannot think of. 

Mr. Tavennek. Did you ever do any(hin<; to ^et out of this gi'oup 
that you were in, which you found out finally to be the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. AsAU. I got right out, as soon as I found out about it, what 
I thought it was the Connnunist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell the committee just what you did about that. 

Mr. AsAU. Well, I just left. I would not go to no more meetings 
that they called, even if it was a union meeting, I would not even 
have attended. 

Mr. Ta^t.nner. Did yon say anything to any of these members 
about it ? Did you tell them why you were not going to the meetings ? 

Mr. AsAU. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did you do with your Communist Party card ? 

Mr. AsAtj. I tore it up. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you meet at any place other than at the union 
hall? 

Mr. AsAU. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavt.nner. How long were you a member of the group ? 

Mr. AsAU. Just about 4 months. 

Mr. Ta\t>nner. Is there anything further that you would like to 
say in regard to this 

Mr. AsAU. I cannot recall anything. 

Mr. Tavenner. Communist Party membership? 

Mr. AsAu. I cannot recall anything just now. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Moulder. I would like to ask a question. 

Do you know of your own knowledge whether or not any other per- 
son who attended the policy committee meetings was a member of 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. AsAU. No, sir. 

Mr. ]Moulder. What occurred there, if anything, that indicated 
to you that it was a meeting of the Communist members? 

Mr. AsAU. Well, the way I figured it, at the election. 

Mr. Moulder. Sir? 

Mr. AsAu. The election that they were about to have, they were 
endorsing the candidates, and most of the rank and file that I spoke 
to wanted Borthwick as a Delegate, and not Farrington. Wlien I 
saw the group going after — that they wanted Farrington, then I felt 
something was going pretty wrong, because Honolulu was having the 
same trouble here, too. I felt it was being Communist. 

Mr. Moulder. That's all. 

Mr. Walter. That's all, thank you. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Ta\t.nner. Bert Nakano. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand ? Do you swear that 
the testimony that you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Nakano. I do. 



1970 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

TESTIMONY OF BERT NAKANO, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

CHUCK MAU 

Mr. Mau. Mr. Chairman, I would like the record to show that I 
represent the witness. My name is Chuck Mau. 

Mr. Walter. Your name may be entered as appearing for the 
witness. 

Mr. Mau. I have no motions to file at this juncture. I do hope, 
Mr. Chairman, and gentlemen of the committee, that the Democrats 
are not in disrepute at this hearing. 

Mr. Walter. I certainly don't think so. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your full name ? 

Mr. Nakano. My name is Bert Nakano. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Nakano. Yes. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. I think you have already identified yourself. 

Mr. Mau. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were you born, Mr. Nakano ? 

Mr. Nakano. I was born Kukaiau, T. H. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. How old are you ? 

Mr. Nakano. 39 years. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. Will you give the committee a brief statement of 
your employment record? 

JNIr. Nakano. I am now connected with the ILWU, Local 150. I 
am vice president of this association. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. How long have you been vice president? 

Mr. Nakano. For 2 years now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to that time, how were you employed ? 

Mr. Nakano. Part of that time, I was with local 136 as secretary 
and treasurer. 

Mr. Tavenner. For how long a period? 

Mv. Nakano. Since August 1941, up to 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Nakano, have you ever been a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Nakano. I was, in the past. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell the committee about it. 

Mr. Nakano. Well, I attended a party in 1946. I think it was about 
July, I think. I quit in some time about February 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell the committee about just how you became a 
member, and why. 

Mr. Nakano. I was asked by Mr. Fujimoto to come into the party. 
I hesitated at first. They told me that the party was going to help 
the labor movement. So, I got kind of curious. After a while I found 
out that things was not going to help, it wasn't going to help me with 
the labor movement, so I decided to get out. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you given a Connnunist Party card? 

Mr. Nakano. I had one. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you charged — did you pay dues ? 

Mr. Nakano. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. To whom did you pay your dues ? 

Mr. Nakano. I turned my money over to Harry Kamoku. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who gave you the card ? 

Mr. Nakano. I was given a card, it was personally given to me by 
Mr. Reinecke. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1971 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you fix the year and tlie month when he gave 
yon the card ? 

Mr. Nakano. I think I received the card — I am not so sure, but I 
think it was somewhere about July, I think the Gtli. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend meetings then witli Di*. Reinecke, 
when he was present? 

Mr. Nakano. I did not. 

Mr. Tavenner. But he was the one who gave you the card ? 

Mr. Nakano. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you pay any money at the time that you got 
the card? 

Mr. Nakano. I tliink I paid a half dollar, I think. I don't know. 
I am not sure, but I think I paid about 50 cents at the time. 

Mr. Ta\^enner. To whom did you pay it ? 

Mr. Nakano. Mr. Reinecke. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, 3'our home is on what island ? 

Mr. Nakano. Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. Dr. Reinecke lives in Honolulu, doesn't he? 

Mr. Nakano. That's right, but he gave me the card while I was 
down here. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you were here in Honolulu ? 

Mr. Nakano. Yes. 

^Ir. Tavenner. Did you become a member here, or were you trans- 
ferred back to your own island ? 

Mr. Nakano. That, I don't know, but I was given a card. Of 
course, that card meant, I think, for Hilo, I think. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. How many meetings did you attend ? 

Mr. Nakano, Well, I attended many meetings, but those meetings 
were all concerning all union matters. Actually, I could not tell you 
how much I attended. I think I went to one meeting where we dis- 
cussed some political activities. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Now, just a minute. When I asked you how many 
meetings you attended, I meant how many meetings of the Commu- 
nist Party, not talking about labor union meetings now, or PAC meet- 
ings, or some other kind of meetings. I mean Communist Party meet- 
ings, Communist groups, where were the meetings had ? 

Mr. Nakano. I don't remember very well, you see, because they 
had just come around and asked me to go out to the meetings, never 
told me it w^as a Communist meeting, or PAC, when things were dis- 
cussed, except one meeting w^e discussed politics. In my opinion it 
was not a Connnunist meeting, but it was 

Mr. Tavenner. I didn't understand your last statement. 

Mr. Nakano. They didn't tell me it was a Communist meeting, as 
a Communist meeting. In my opinion, I didn't think it was a Com- 
munist meeting, I felt it was a political meeting. That is my opinion. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. You mean for political purposes? 

Mr. Nakano. Well, we discussed about candidates before the 
election. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. Yes, but who was it that told you to come to the 
meeting? 

Mr. Nakano. I just can't remember who told me to come, but I 
happened to be there, because I was PAC director in Hawaii. 



1972 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Well, now, let's go back to the time when you first 
became a member of the Communist Party, after you were given the 
card, the Communist Party card, didn't you attend a Communist 
F'arty meeting after that? 

Mr. Nakano. That, I could not — T am not so sure now, see, be- 
cause they just asked me to come to the meeting. Of course, I under- 
stand somebody told me that this meeting that I attended to discuss 
politics was a Communist meeting, but the point is this, now, see, in 
that meeting I brought over a friend, whom I considered not a Com- 
munist. I brought him there as a guest, to show him how that this 
PAC — the union members — discussed things, and how we selected 
candidates, and that man's name was Victor Morita, he was not a 
party member, but I brought him down as a guest to the meeting, 
because I wanted to show him how the union worked. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, there were other persons there at the meeting 
that you knew were Communists ? 

Mr. Nakano. So far as being sure who was Communist or not, I 
am not so sure, because none of the fellows showed me their member- 
ship card. I have not seen them with the membership card. I have 
not seen them pay dues. I know Harry Kamoku, because he collected 
my dues, and Henry Johnson once told me that he was a party member. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is Henry Johnson one of those who attended the 
meeting ? 

Mr. Nakano. Yes ; that's right, he was there, because he was chair- 
man of the endorsement committee of the PAC. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Well, now, when you were told to attend this par- 
ticular meeting that you were talking about, were you told to attend 
the PAC meeting, or were you tokl to attend some other kind of 
meeting? 

Mr. Nakano. My understanding was that we were going to discuss 
political candidates, so come to the meeting. If it was a Communist 
Party meeting, I would not have brought Mr. Morita because I did 
not want to get that man involved in the thing. But this is it now. 
After the endorsement or the discussion on the political candidates 
was over, I left the place and what took place after that, I don't know. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Well, how many meetings did you attend with 
Kamoku ? 

Mr. Nakano. Well, the only meetings I went to Kamoku was there 
because he was president of the local at that time. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you stay a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Nakano. I believe it was about 8 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Eight months ? 

Mr. Nakano. That's ri^ht. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Wliy did you get out of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Nakano. I got out of the Communist Party because I did not — 
I just could not believe in communism — and I thought by being a 
member of the Communist Party I wasn't going to be of any help to 
the labor movement. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us the names of any of the other persons 
who attended the meetings that you attended? 

Mr. Nakano. Well, Harry Kamoku — and August Asau was one of 
them ; Henry Johnson was in that meeting also and Arakaki was there 
also and Carl Fukumoto, I believe. I can't remember the rest. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1973 

Mr. Velde. Before you ^o ahead, could you distinguish a little 
further as to the meeting that you attended? In other words, how 
did you know that these were Communist Party meetings that you 
attended ? 

Mr. Nakano. AVell, a little while ago 1 made the statement I didn't 
know it was a Communist Party meeting. They asked me to come to 
the meeting. 

Mr. Velde. How did they ask you, by telephone or by personal 
contact ? 

Mr. Nakano. Well, they told me by personal contact, "We are going 
to have a meeting tonight, come up." We held a meeting in the union 
hall, where we had the PAC office. 

Mr. Velde. That's all. 

Mr. Tavenner. And who told you to come to the meeting? 

Mr. Nakano. I think it was Harry Kamoku, I think. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now is there anything else that you can tell us 
about your withdrawal from the Communist Party as a member? 
When you got out. Tell us how that happened. 

Mr. Nakano. Well, I made up my mind that being affiliated with 
the Communist Party was not going to help me or the labor unions 
or labor organizations I represented, and I decided I would get out. 
I tore up my card, and I just stepped out. I told Mr. Freeman that 
I was going to get out of the party when I met him. 

Mr. Tavenner. You told Mr. Freeman ? 

Mr. Nakano. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is Freeman's first name ? 

Mr. Nakano. I think it is James Freeman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did James Freeman come over to your island? 

Mr. Nakano. When I saw him in Honolulu I told him I was going 
to get out, but already I had torn up my card. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall his attending any of the meetings on 
jour island ? 

Mr. Nakano. I think he came to Hilo once — and I think, yes, he 
sat down in one of the meetings and we discussed about the dili'erences 
between Harry Kamoku and myself. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Mr. Freeman a member of one of the unions? 

Mr. Nakano. Well, he used to be a member of local 136, the long- 
shoremen's. I understand he was working as a longshoreman in 
Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what position he had in the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Nakano. The position he held was — I don't know that, but 
I knew he had been a member of the party because I found out that 
he Avas a party member. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he attend more than one meeting? 

]\Ir. Nakano. Maybe. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you were present? 

Mr. Nakano. Maybe there might have been some meetings, but I 
just can't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you know he was at least at one of the meetings 
that you have testified to? 

Mr. Nakano. I think so. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who acted as chairman of the meeting when Free- 
man was there? 



1974 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Nakano. In that meeting there was no — there was no chair- 
man. It was just a round-the-chair discussion about the differences 
between Kamoku and myself. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. You appear here today in answer to a subpena that 
was served on you? 

Mr. Nakano. That is right. 

Mr. TA\rENNER. No further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Moulder. May I ask a question. The witness examined 
a card that was introduced in evidence a while ago. May I ask the 
witness whether or not it is similar or identical as to form as the card 
that he received ? 

(Witness examines card.) 

Mr. Nakano. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether the card was in two parts? 

Mr. Nakano. It was folded up, book type. 

Mr. Tavenner. Book type ? 

Mr. Nakano. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that a part of the card, do you know ? 

Mr. Nakano. You mean that card there ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Nakano. The one that I got was something like, just like that 
card there, it was just folded up, with space made for stamps. 

^Ir. Ta^^enner. Well, was the part that you saw and which you 
signed, was the top card to it which could be torn off when the top 
part was like what you see here ? 

Mr. Nakano. No, sir. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. It was not. "V^Tien did you get your card, the part 
of the card that you got? The part of the card that you got was a 
different piece of paper than that? 

Mr. Nakano. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether it had anything to the top of 
it, or had it been torn off before you got it? 

Mr. Nakano. That I don't remember. I just got a card and with 
space marked for dues stamps. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Were you given any Communist Party literature 
or pamphlets ? 

Mr. Nakano. I did receive some. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did you do with them ? 

Mr. Nakano. Well, I just packed it up and later on I threw it 
away. I didn't open it. I didn't read it. I didn't have the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who gave it to you ? 

Mr. Nakano. They sent us some down to our place. Bundles used 
to come down, and I got some. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know who sent the bundles to you ? 

Mr. Nakano. That I don't know. At one time, of course, they had 
a lot of literature lying around. I picked it up but I just threw them 
away later on. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all. 

Mr. Harrison. Mr. Nakano, as I understand, you tendered your 
resignation of the Communist Party to Mr. Freeman ? 

Mr. Nakano. I did not. I just tore up my card, and when I met 
Mr. Freeman I told him I was quitting the Party. 

INIr. Harrison. What did he say ? 

Mr. Nakano. He didn't say anything. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1975 

Mr. PIarrison. Didn't say anything at all? 

Mr. Nakano, That is riglit. 

Mr. Harrison. How did you know ho was a member of the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Nakano. Well, I definitely knew that he was a party member 
because he told me the ones (hat belonged to the party. 

]\Ir. Harrison. He told you? 

Mr. Nakano. Yes. 

Mr. Harrison. Under what circumstances did he tell you? 

Mr. Nakano. When he asked me, "How is things going in Hawaii ?" 
Then he told me that he was — he came out and told me he was a 
party to it. 

Mr. Harrison. Now you said there was Communist literature lying 
around. Is that your answer? 

Mr. Nakano. Bundles were sent down. 

Mr. Harrison. Sent to whom ? 

Mr. Nakano. Down to the office. 

Mr. Harrison. Down to whose office ? 

Mr. Nakano. To the ILWU office. 

Mr. Harrison. To the ILWU office? 

Mr. Nakano. That is right. 

jNIr. Harrison. Have you found this literature lying around the 
ILWU office; is that right? 

Mr. Nakano. That is right. 

Mr. Velde. Do you remember any of the titles of the pamphlets or 
the literature? 

JNIr. Nakano. I don't remember. 

Mr. Walter. Is that all, Mr. Tavenner ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Mau. Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Walter. Is it still lying around the office ? 

Mr. Nakano. What is that ? 

Mr. Walter. Is it still lying around the office, the Communist 
literature? 

Mr. Nakano. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Walter. You stopped it from lying around; is that right? 

Mr. Nakano. Not in my office. 

Mr. Mau. Mr. Chairman, and gentlemen of the committee, I wonder 
if I might ask the witness a couple of questions ? 

Mr. Walter. No. That is not the procedure. The attorney may 
merely advise the witness, because this is not a trial, not a hearing. 
We will have to conduct it 

Mr. Mau. May I then, Mr. Chairman, correct a misimpression ? 
At the beginning, I jokingly mentioned that I hoped the Democrats 
were not in disfavor here. My purpose was to elicit a smile from the 
chairman, but it "laid an egg.^^ Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the 
committee, I wonder if the witness may make a statement for the 
record. 

Mr. Walter. Certainly. 

Mr. Nakano. Gentlemen of the committee, I am a union man. I 
believe strongly in labor. In the August 1938 interisland strike on 
Hawaii, the strikers were fighting for recognition and better wages. 
We believed the strikers were fighting a just cause. The abhorrent 



1976 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

thing about the strike was that the employers had the police on their 
side. The police were armed with machine guns mounted on tripods, 
which were placed in strategic positions. They were also armed with 
riot guns, with fixed bayonets, and with tommy guns. Even the fire 
department was called to help the employers. 

Wlien we tried to enter the public pier, the police used tear gas. This 
led to the dispersal of the demonstrators, who broke through the police 
line and took refuge in the apron of the pier, where we sat down for 
about 45 minutes, without police resistance. During this peaceful 
demonstration, the police suddenly fired into the union crowd and shot 
about 50 of us, including a woman. As the result of this brutality, I 
am maimed for life. Incidentally, the offenders were not prosecuted. 

As you know, I am now strongly opposed to communism. I don't 
believe that communism can help organized labor. I strongly believe 
in free enterprise and in the dignity and work of the individual. On 
the other hand, my reference to the 1938 strike is to indicate to you 
Congressmen and to the people on the mainland that there are em- 
ployers in the Territory of Hawaii who are Fascists in their thinking 
and actions. I am opposed to fascism and to any other form of totali- 
tarian methods in Government or business. 

Recently, Mr. Dwight Steele, of the Hawaii Employers Council, and 
several leaders of industry in the Territory made statements that it 
is their desire to treat their employees as human beings. I hope that 
these are not mere words, that they will change their attitude and 
conduct toward all those who work for and under them. If they do, 
they will go a long way toward eradicating those conditions that lead 
men to look to other ideologies. If they do not and there should come 
another strike like that of 1938, as a union man I would again fight any 
injustice to labor. 

Mr. Mau. We would like to file tliat statement with the record. 

Mr. Moulder. Does that refer to 1938, the reference you make? 

Mr. Nakano. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. That is all. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. Mr. Henry Johnson. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? Do you swear 
that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Johnson. I do. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down, please. 

TESTIMONY OF HENRY JOHNSON, JR. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please ? 

Mr. Johnson. Henry Johnson, Jr. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live at the present time ? 

Mr. Johnson. 395 Todd Avenue. 

Mr. Tavenner. Todd Avenue is in 

Mr. Johnson. Hilo, Hawaii. 

Mr. Tavenner. Hilo. How old are you ? 

Mr. Johnson. Twenty-six. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you presently employed ? 

Mr. Johnson. General mechanic for the Hawaii National Guard. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have a rank in the National Guard ? 

Mr. Johnson. Master sergeant. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1977 

Mr. Tavennek. Master sergeant. How long have you been in the 
National Guard? 

Mr. Johnson. November G, 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was your employment before that time? 

Mr. Johnson. iSecretary-treasurer for local 142, ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. And did you leave that position in order to take 
your position in tlie National Guard? 

JSIr. Johnson. I resigned from the ILWU in 1946 and was unem- 
ployed for about a year before I got a job with the National Guard. 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to your position as secretary-treasurer of tlie 
local union, were you also business agent for the local union? 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Tavi:nner. Now, prior to that, how were you employed? 

Mr. Johnson. Welder for Honokaa Sugar Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you employed with that company? 

Mr. Johnson. About a year. 

Mr. Tavenner. What type of work did you do for that company? 

Mr. Johnson. Honokaa Sugar Co. ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Johnson. Welder. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you had a high-school education ? 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. At Hilo?. 

Mr. JoHivsoN. Hilo High School. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Johnson, have you ever been a member of the 
Connnunist Party? 

Mr. Johnson. I carried a card. I had a membership card. 

Mr. Tavenner. You carried a card for how long? 

Mr. Johnson. I received the card sometime either October — let 
me see. September or October of 1945, and I turned the card back 
in either April or March 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who asked you to join the Communist Party? 

Mr. Johnson. W^ell, I was first approached in San Francisco by 
Alice Meigs. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, tell us how you happened to be in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Mr. Johnson. I went to San Francisco in 1945, March, the latter 
part of March, to attend an ILWU convention. I was one of the 
delegates from Hawaii, I stayed over for the convention, and after 
I got through the convention I attended a California labor school. 
I stayed in California about 3I/2 months — about 3 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at the labor school at the time you were 
approached to join the Communist Party? 

Mr. Johnson. I was not approached at the labor school. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. But were you going to the labor school at the time? 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was there anyone else from the Territory of Hawaii 
attending the school at the same time you were, do you recall? 

Mr, Johnson. No ; I don't. I can't recall that. I don't remember 
whether there was anybody else or not, 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, tell us all about you being ap])roached by 
Alice Meigs regarding joining the Connnunist Party, Just tell the 
committee all you know about it. 



1978 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Johnson. Well, I boarded at Alice Meigs' home there while 
attending the labor school and she indirectly began talking to me 
about some of the different things, as she put it, that some of the 
Communist principles and ideas — she put this thing — she put it in — 
she said it was educational and would be beneficial to myself after 
I got back to Hawaii and got into the labor movement. Then there 
was an evening there when she asked me if I would care to sit in 
on a meeting that they were going to hold at her home; so I asked 
her what sort of a meeting it was, and she told nie it was more or 
less discussion on different principles and different things and there 
was nothing wrong with it. And she said I could learn some- 
thing by sitting in on the meeting. So I sat in on the meeting. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. How did you happen to stay at the home of Alice 
Meigs? 

Mr, Johnson. When I first went to San Francisco I stayed at 
the Pickwick Hotel until tlie convention was over and the rest of 
the delegates came back to Hawaii. I was living there by myself, 
and staying at the hotel was kind of too expensive, so I approached 
Louis Goldblatt and suggested that maybe he could suggest a finer 
place for me to stay that may be cheaper, and he in turn made 
arrangements and he was the one that told me to go up and see 
Alice Meigs. He gave me the address and her name, and I went up. 

Mr. Tavenner. You attended this Communist Party meeting in her 
home. Do you recall the names of any of those present? 

Mr. Johnson. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. After attending the meeting, what did you do ? 

Mr. Johnson. What do you mean, "What did I do" ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Was the question of Communist Party member- 
ship taken up with you again ? 

Mr. Johnson. Well, Alice — after that, Alice Meigs began talking 
to me more about different things and the party line, and she sug- 
gested I visit or meet different people in San Francisco and she 
arranged a meeting between me and two people in the Garfield Build- 
ing on Market Street, and I met a man there. I went up and I met 
a man, I don't remember his name, and I met a woman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know her name ? 

Mr. Johnson. O'Connor Yates. This was in the Garfield Building 
on Market Street. I talked to the man and he told me, after I got to 
talking to him, he told me when I got back to Hawaii to go to see 
and get in touch with either Jack Hall or Harry Kamoku. 

Mr'. Tavenner. This man whose name you don't recall, but who 
was with O'Connor Yates ? 

Mr. Johnson. No. He wasn't with her. They were in two sepa- 
rate offices. 

Mr. Tavenner. They were in two separate offices ? 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. At any rate, this man told you when you got back 
to get in touch with Jack Hall ? 

Mr. Johnson. Or Harry Kamoku. 

Mr. Tavenner. Or Harry Kamoku. Wliere was this office in San 
Francisco? Can you tell us that; give us some description of the 
place? 

Mr. Johnson. In the Garfield Building on Market Street. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1979 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether that was 942 Market Street? 

Mr. Johnson. I would not. Offhand, I wouldn't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us whether the Communist Party 
headquarters were in the same buildmg or not? 

Mr. Johnson. From what I understood, at the time, it was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is there any way you can identify the man who 
gave you those instructions ; can you tell us more about him ? 

Mr. Johnson. No. That was the first time I ever saw him or met 
him or talked to him, and that was the last. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, tell us more about the conversation you had 
with that man, that you can recall. 

Mr. Johnson. I can't recall much of it, only that when we ended 
up, when I was just about ready to leave, that is when he told me when 
I got back to Hawaii to be sure and get in touch with Kamoku and 
Jack Hall. 

Mr. Tavenner. About what matter? 

Mr. Johnson. What do you mean? 

Mr. Tavenner. 1 mean, why did he want you to get in touch with 
Jack Hall or Harry Kamoku ? 

Mr. Johnson. During the conversation he informed me that the 
part}' in Hawaii, established in Hilo there, was supposed to have been 
dead or underground, was not active. 

Mr. Tavenner. What party? 

Mr. Johnson. The Communist Party was not active at the time, 
and he said that that — that was in 1945 — and he said it would be pretty 
close to the time when it would be becoming active again. To come 
back to Hawaii and get in touch with Hall or Kamoku and get it 
going again. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the conversation that you had with Mrs. 
O'Connor Yates? 

Mr. Johnson. It was nothing ; nothing much ; more or less intro- 
duction and just hello. Nothing much. Nothing too much. She was 
kind of busy. So after the meeting, why, I went over and met this 
fellow. 

Mr. Ta-v^enner. Where did you meet her; was it in the same 
building ? 

Mr. Johnson. In the same building, in a different office. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then how long after that was it that you returned 
to the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. Johnson. I got back in Honolulu on July 3. 

Mr. Tavenner. This was 

Mr. Johnson. 1945. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1945. Had you known Jack Hall before that time ? 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Ta"s^nner. You knew him? 

Mr. Johnson. I had met him at meetings and at the ILWU meetings 
and conventions in Honolulu and Hilo. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, did you go to see Jack Hall when you 
came back? 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. You did. Well, tell the committee just what 
happened. 



1980 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Johnson". I got off the boat, it was late in tlie evening, it was 
Sunday, and the place was all closed, I shipped back to Honolulu as a 
cook on the ship and when I got pretty close to Honolulu I expressed 
the desire that I wanted to leave the ship in Honolulu- and the captain 
kind of put a stop to it. They didn't want me to leave the ship. So 
when I got to Honolulu I got with the passengers and got off the ship 
and I called Jack Hall and told him the situation I was in and asked 
him if it would be possible for him to get me off that ship because 
I did not want to go back to San Francisco again. At that time it 
was still blackout. I spent the night at Jack Hall's home out in 
Kaimuki. And I mentioned to him that I had met these people in 
San Francisco. And we did not talk communism or Communist Party 
on this occasion. I just told him that I met these two people in San 
Francisco. And he suggested when I got back to Hilo to get in touch 
with Harry Kamoku and tell him who I met. 

Mr. Tavenner. To get in touch with Harry Kamoku and tell him 
what ? 

Mr. Johnson. And tell him that Jack Hall told me to talk to him. 

Mr. Tav-enner. Well, did you follow his suggestion? 

Mr. Johnson. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. And after returning to Hilo, you saw Harry 
Kamoku ? 

Mr. Johnson. I did not see him first. I talked to August Asau 
and then August Asau talked to Kamoku, and after a while I got 
around to Kamoku. But at first they were reluctant to take me in 
or tell me anything. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, tell us about your conversation with 
Asau first. 

Mr. Johnson. I approached him one day. I met him in the union 
hall, and I approached him and started to talking about tlie Com- 
munist Party with him. And he wouldn't commit himself or say 
anything to me concerning the Communist Party there. So I kind 
of forgot it for a while, and then after a while I was approached by — 
I think Asau told Kamoku that I had approached him. So I don't 
remember whether I approached Kamoku or he approached me, but, 
anyway, we got together and talked over different things, about my 
trip and who I talked to in the States, and stuff like that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he talk to you about the persons that you had 
talked to? And you remember their names at that time, I suppose, 
didn't you ? 

Mr. Johnson. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. You didn't. Then just tell us what occurred at that 
time ? 

Mr. Johnson. Well, I told Kamoku that I was told in San Fran- 
cisco by this fellow that maybe that would be about the time for the 
party to come out again and start being activated. We didn't talk 
much about that. We let it go for a while like that. And Hilo was 
oetting slow. Everything was getting slow. Nobody did nothing. 
There wasn't any break or anything like that, so far as union activities. 

Mr. Tavenner. "Wliat was said to you about the Communist Party, 
joining the Communist Party? 

Mr. Johnson. What do you mean ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Up to this time you had not got the card, had you ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1981 

Mr. Johnson. No. I did not get a card for some time. Either 
September or October. I think it was September of 1945. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell us what led up to you getting the Communist 
Party card? 

Mr. Johnson. Let's see. September or October 1946; 1946 was 
election year. There was a PAC on and at that time I was elected 
chairman of the PAC endorsement committee. And, being chairman 
of the endorsement committee, quite a few of the politicians were 
trying to get endorsed, and they would bring — kind of hang around — • 
and I talked to Kamoku, and quite a few of them were trying to get 
endorsed. So Kamoku told me not to do anything about it, not to 
make any conmiitments until we got together with the boys. 

Mr. Tavenner. What do you mean by "got together with the boys'' ? 

Mr. Johnson. Well, until we held a meeting and decided how the 
thing would run, who would be endorsed, who would be recognized, 
who would be recommended for endorsement. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was such a meeting held ? 

iMr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What kind of a meeting was that ? 

Mr. Johnson. Well, it started out as a PAC endorsement committee 
meeting. 

Mr. Ta\tsnner. Up to that time had you gotten your Communist 
Party card ? 

Mr. Johnson. No. I got my card at that meeting, toward the end 
of the meeting. I got the card — it was given to me by Arakaki. 

IMr. Tavenner. You mean at this meeting, at this very meeting, 
you were giA'en your Communist Party card ? 

ISIr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, now, you discussed endorsements at that 
meeting? 

Mr. Johnson. We discussed endorsements. After we got through 
with the endorsements we discussed the party. 

Mr. Tavenner. The party? 

Mr. Johnson. Some of the members who were in the meeting there 
left the meeting early, but I don't recall who left and who didn't. 

JNIr. Tavenner. So the meeting that started out as a PAC meeting 
wound up as a Communist Party meeting? Is that what you mean? 

Mr. Johnson. Well, I don't 

Mr. Tavenner. You state it just as you feel. 

Mr. Johnson. All I say, I went to a PAC endorsement committee 
meeting. I worked on recommending endorsements for candidates, 
and after that was over we discussed the Communist Party business 
and I got my card at that meeting. So whether it was a Communist 
Party meeting or not, I would not be able to say. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right, now, who were those persons in that part 
of the meeting when you received your Communist Party card? 

Mr. Johnson. I would not remember. I have forgotten some of 
them. I don't remember. Some of the boys walked out before that 
part of the meeting went on. As I remember it, Kamoku was there, 
Arakaki gave me my card ; there was Isaac Kauwe. 

JNIr. Tavenner. He was there ? 

Mr. Johnson. He was there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know where Isaac Kauwe is now? 

Mr. Johnson. No. 



1982 COMAIUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you remember the names of any others wiio 
were there at that time ? 

Mr. JouNSON. Offhand, no. If I would see them, I would be able 
to identify them, but their names I have forgotten. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you know those persons whose names you have 
given to be members of the Conununist Party? 

Mr. Johnson. I would not say that. I had never seen them get 
their cards, or never seen their cards, so I was left with the impression 
they were boys who could be talked to, who could be trusted. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend any other meeting after that which 
you could identify as a Communist Party meeting? 

Mr. Johnson. No. No meeting that I could really say was a Com- 
munist Party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at any meeting at any time when litera- 
ture, Communist Party pamphlets and, literature, was distributed? 

Mr. Johnson. Not in Hawaii. In San Francisco; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Alfonso Lorenzo ? 

Mr. Johnson. Alfonso Lorenzo ? I know one fellow by that name. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever attend a Communist Party meeting 
with him? 

Mr. Johnson. No. Let me see. There was another fellow. There 
was one Filipino at that meeting in Hilo. It was not Lorenzo. It was 
Valesco, from Olaa Sugar Co. I might have gotten the names twisted. 
Valesco of the Olaa Sugar Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. And did you know him to be a member of the Com- 
munist Party or not? 

Mr. Johnson. I did not see him get a card or see his card, so I would 
not say "Yes" or "No." 

Mr. TA^^CN^7ER. Now, at this meeting which you said started off as a 
PAC meeting and some of them left and then you began to talk about 
other matters, what matters did they talk about? 

Mr. Johnson. Reactivation of the Communist Party in Hilo. 

Mr. Tavenner. They talked about reactivation of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Johnson. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And what did they say about it? 

Mr. Johnson. At that time the discussion was sort of along the lines 
of reactivating the party and also to select different individuals who 
might be — who we might be able to get into the party, might be 
recruited. 

Mr. Tavenner. You talked about the persons that should be 
solicited ? 

Mr. Johnson. Not the persons. It was just that the party — it was 
brought up that the party should be activated and would be activated 
about that time, to kind of increase the membership there, tr}'- to gei 
different people to come in if possible. 

Mr. Ta\t3nner. What did they say about getting in new people 
or recruits; what people were discussed, what class of people? 

Mr. Johnson. Well, there was no class, or who to get in. It was 
more or less people who might be, who might be in line with the party 
ideas or who might be beneficial to the party to get in, for us to get 
them in. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. In other words, at that time the party had not been 
fully reactivated. Is that what you mean to say ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1983 

Mr. Johnson. That is ii<ilit. 

Mr. Tavennp:k. And the (hite of that was about wlicii ? 

Mr. Johnson. About SepttMuber of l'J4(>. I Avouldn't say. Either 
September or October ll)4G. 

Mr. Tavennek. Now, as a result of your discussions there that ni<;lit, 
did you talk to anybody about coming into the Connnunist Party? 

Mr. Johnson. Yes. 

Mr, Tavennek. Who? 

Mr. Johnson. Otl'hand, I can't remember. I talked to, 1 would 
say, about a dozen boys. Well, I would say a half dozen of the boys, 
but I don't remember all their names. I only remember two people. 

Mr. Tavennek. Did you talk to Amos Ignacio'^ 

Mr. Johnson. I approached him on it. 

Jklr. Tavennek. Did you ask him to come into the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Johnson. I asked him to come into the party? I asked him 
his ideas about, what did he think about the Communist Party. There 
is a ditference of opinion along that line. I did not ask him to come 
into the party. 

Mr. Tavennek. But you talked to him about the party ? 

MV. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Taa'enner. Did he give you any encouragement about joining 
the party? 

Mr. Johnson. No. He said he would think about it for a while. 

Mr. Tavennek. That he w^ould think about it. Did you report that 
back to the group ? 

Mr. Johnson. No; I didn't, because there was no meeting of any 
kind held after that, so nobody to report to. 

Mr. Tavennek. Now, when you got your Communist Party card 
there at the meeting which you said you attended, did you pay your 
dues? 

Mr. Johnson. At that time I was on strike, the sugar union. I paid 
10 cents dues. 

Mr. Tavennek. To whom did you pay it ? 

Mr. Johnson. I can't remember whom I paid it to because I re- 
member paying dues about twice, that is all. 

Mr. Tavennek. I think you have already named all who wxre pres- 
ent. 

Mr. Johnson. That I can remember. 

Mr. Tavennek. At the time that you discussed reactivation of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Tamennek. Whose names you can now remember. 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Tavennek. Were there other jDersons there whose names you 
cannot remember at this time? 

Mr. Johnson. Yes, yes. 

_Mr. Tavennek. How many do you think in all were at that part 
of the meeting? 

Mr. Johnson. About a dozen. 

Mr. Tavennek. I understood you to say that the meeting, when it 
started out, there were only 12 or 13 there. 

66636— 50— pt. 3 4 



1984 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. Well, I would say about two or three 
walked out. 

Mr. Taat5nner, Do you remember the person to whom you paid your 
dues after that night? 

Mr. Johnson. No. 

INIr. Tamsnner. Did Mr. Arakaki talk to you about the reactivation 
of the party or Communist matters at any time other than at this 
meeting ? 

Mr. Johnson. We discussed the thing a couple of times outside. I 
don't recall what mostly went on, what was said there. It was not 
too much. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what did you finally do with your card ; did 
you turn it in to anyone? 

Mr. Johnson. I gave the card to Arakaki. 

Mr. Tavenner. You gave it back to Arakaki ? 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. I met him at a service station some- 
time in March or April 1946, and that card was for 1945. It was a 
1945 card and he told me at the time that the cards had been taken 
back in and new cards would be issued eventually, but I never did 
get a card. I gave him my old card and never did get a new one. 

Mr. Tavenner. You paid 10 cents the first time, did you? How 
much did you pay for the other months ? 

Mr. Johnson. Ten cents. I paid 10 cents, I think I paid dues 
about twice. 

Mr. Tavenner. What did other members pay ? 

Mr. Johnson. I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavennt:r. Were you told how much was paid by Harry 
Kamoku? 

Mr. Johnson. No. It was supposed to be, I think, if I remember 
correctly, a percent, supposed to be according to how much you made. 
At that time I was on strike so I paid a dime and after I was on strike 
I was unemployed, so I didn't pay anything after that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you subscribe for the Daily Worker? I 
mean — yes, the Daily Worker or the Peoples World ? 

Mr. Johnson. I was given a subscription by Alice Meigs as a gift 
when I left San Francisco, and I received the paper for about a year, 
but I did not keep it up, 

Mr, Taa^nner, Did you receive any other Communist papers or 
pamphlets ? 

Mr. Johnson. Before leaving San Francisco she gave me quite a 
few books. Political Economy, by Lenin, I think. Capital by Karl 
Marx. A whole pile of books and pamphlets. Quite a few. I can't 
remember all their titles. I still have the books. 

Mr. Ta\^enner. Did you ever discuss the Communist Party with 
Jack Hall after the time he sent you to Harry Kamoku ? 

Mr. Johnson. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, after that first meeting, when you talked 
about reactivating the Communist Party on your island, do you know 
whether much work was done at that time to reactivate it ? 

Mr. Johnson. Not too much. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is there anything else you can tell the committee 
that would be of help in finding out the facts relating to Communist 
organizations in the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. Johnson. No, 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1985 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, I don't Iwlieve you have told us how you with- 
drew from tlie Communist Party, if you did withdraw from it. Did 
you withdraw? 

Mr. Johnson. Well, after resi<rnin^ fi-oni the union in — let's see — • 
I think it was in November — October — the latter part of October, I 
was unemployed there for a while. 1 bejran to think the thing over. 
It did not look too good, did not sound too good, so I got in touch 
with the CIB gentleman in Hilo. 

Mr. Tavenner. With whom? 

Mr. Johnson. The Counter Intelligence Bureau, I think it is. I 
cannot remember correctly. But its otlice is in the Federal Building in 
Hilo. I got in touch vr\th him and talked to him about it, and he in 
turn got in touch with the FBI agents in Honolulu and a week later 
an FBI agent in Honolulu came dow^n to Hilo. I talked to them and 
gave them all the information I had and showed them my member- 
ship card and everything. x\nd they urged me to continue member- 
ship in the party, not to withdraw. And I have kept it up and every 
once in a while they would come back to Hilo, about every 2 months 
or 6 weeks, they would come back to Hilo and I would talk to them 
and tell them what I knew, or it may be that nothing new came up. 
So I finally turned in the card to Arakaki. As far as paying dues or 
anything like that, and that was the end of it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend any Communist Party meeting after 
you handed in your card? 

Mr. Johnson. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

ISIr. Moulder. Mr. Chairman, may I ask, to whom did you pay 
your dues ? 

Mr. Johnson. I don't remember who. 

Mr. Moulder. One other question. Did you read the literature 
that was given to you in California, the Communist Party pamphlets 
or books ? 

Mr. Johnson. Some of it. 

Mr. Moulder. Before or after you quit paying dues ? 

Mr. Johnson. Some of it before and some of it after. 

Mr. Moulder. That is all. 

Mr. Velde. At the time you joined the Communist Party, you say 
you were in San Francisco at the home of Miss Alice Meigs ? 

Mr. Johnson. No, I did not join it there. I was not given a card 
until I got back to Hilo. I was told about the party. 

JNIr. Velde. You discussed it with Alice Meigs at that time ? 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Velde. Did she tell you the real purposes of the Communist 
Party? 

]\Ir. Johnson. No. The way she put the thing to me, it was an 
educational organization and it would be beneficial to me and the 
union when I got back to Hawaii. 

Mr. A^ELDE. You now feel that the Communist Party movement is 
of no benefit to the labor movement ? 

Mr. Johnson. No. 

Mr. Walter. You will be excused. Thank you. That is all. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is there anything you want to add ? You indicate 
yon want to say something further ? 



1986 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. I would like to say at this time that 
I am kind of relieved that I have had a chance to talk to you people, 
and as far as I am concerned I don't want to have nothing to do 
any more with the Communist Party or anything like that. 

Mr. Walter. In other words, you have reached the conclusion that 
reforms can best be brought about through democratic processes, 
rather than through the establishment of the most vicious form of 
totalitarianism that has ever been known. 

Mr. Johnson. That is right. 

Mr. Walter. That is all. Thank you. 

Mr. Tavenner. Thank you. 
, Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will be in recess. 

( A recess was taken from 3 :30 until 3 :40 p. m. ) 

Mr. Walter. Mr. Tavenner, call your next witness, please. 

Mr. Tavenner. Ruth Ozaki. 

Mr. Walter. Will you stand up, please, and raise your right hand ? 
Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God'^ 

MissOzAKL I do. 

TESTIMONY OF RUTH OZAKI, ACCOMPANIED BY HER COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. AVliat is your full name, please? 

(Witness confers with attorney.) 

Miss Ozaki. Ruth Ozaki. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Miss Ozaki. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel identify himself for the record, 
please. 

Mr. Symonds. Myer C. Symonds, appearing for the witness Ruth 
Ozaki. And I desire to file at this time a motion to quash the service 
of subj^ena. It is in tlie same form as those heretofore Jiled^*^ 

Mr. Walter. It will be placed in the record. 

JNIr. Tavenner. Are you a resident of Honolulu ? 

Miss Ozaki. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you lived here? 

Miss Ozaki. 2T years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you born here ? 

Miss Ozaki. I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee how you have been 
employed in recent years ? 

Miss Ozaki. I have been employed by the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. In what capacity? 

Miss Ozaki. As stenographer-clerk. 

Mr. Tavenner. As stenographer ? 

Miss Ozaki. Stenographer-clerk. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you secretary to any particular individual? 

Miss OZAKL No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now or have you ever been a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

8 Text of motion to ojiasli service of subpena by Ruth Ozaki is identical with the motion 
filed on behalf of Ralph Tokuuaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion appears 
on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1987 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Miss OzAKi. On advice of counsel I refuse to answer the question 
on the ground that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavennek. Have you attended Communist Party meetings in 
Honolulu since 1945 ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Miss OzAKi. On advice of counsel, I refuse to answer the question 
on the ground that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you a member of the HCLC? 

Miss OzAKi. I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. You make the same answer? 

Miss OzAKi. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is, you refuse to answer. 

Miss OzAKi. On the ground it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Walter. Will you stand up, please, and raise your right hand ? 
Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
trutli, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Imori. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF KOICHI IMORI, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Will you state your full name, please ? 

Mr. Imori. Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you presently employed, Mr. Imori ? 

Mr, Imori. As international representative of the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Imori. Yes, sir: I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself ? 

Mr. Symonds. Myer C. Symonds, appearing for Koichi Imori. And 
at this time I would like to file the same motion to quash the service 
of subpena as we have filed in these matters. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.'^ 

Mr. Tavenner. You are at the present time the international repre- 
sentative of the ILWU? 

Mr. Imori. ILWU. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. ILWU? 

Mr. Imori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been so employed ? 

Mr. Imori. For approximately 21/0 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. And now, prior to that time, how were you 
employed ? 

Mr. Imori. As organizer and business agent for the A. F. of L. 
Teamsters Union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you put out of that union for the reason that 
you were charged to be a member of the Conmiunist Party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

' Text of motion to quash service subpena by Koichi Imori Is identical with the motion 
filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion appears 
on p. 1472 (Parti). 



1988 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. laroKi. The reason that I resigned from the A. F. of L. Team- 
sters Union as business agent was because I had refused to go along 
on a proposed raid of ILWU pineapple workers who at that time — 
that is, the pineapple workers were in negotiation^ with the employers 
for a wage increase. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, you state to the committee that the severance 
of your connection with the A. F. of L. was due entirely to a legitimate 
difference in policy between you and your employer? 

Mr. Imori. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then how do you explain your letter of May 26, 
1947, to the membership of the teamsters union of Hawaii, in which 
you state: 

Mr. Rutledge, in violation of the teamsters constitntion ousted me, the elected 
business representative of local 904, for alleged Communist activities. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

]\Ir. Imori. May I see the letter ? 

Mr. Tavenner. At the beginning of the first sentence in the second 
paragraph. 

Mr. IiNtORi. I will explain this. That the cause of my refusal, which 
was known to Mr. Rutledge, that I was refusing to go along on this 
program of raiding the ILAVU, he had publicly charged that I was 
engaging in certain Communist activities, and had a secret meeting, 
that is, I say a secret meeting because it was secret to me, I had no 
knowledge of a meeting, of what was known as the joint council of 
teamsters executive board. That meeting was called without my knowl- 
edge and certain charges were filed against me. I didn't know and 
I was not informe 1 of the charges against me by the joint council of 
teamsters nor did the officers of the local that I was working for, and 
as far as I knew, as I say in my letter here, this charge of engaging 
in certain Communist activities was unfounded, and I so state in my 
letter. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, was that a true statement? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Imori. I would like to know what you mean by "a true state- 
ment." What was the 

Mr. Ta^t:nner. The statement that you just made and read from 
that letter. If you will hand me the letter, I think I can call what 
you said. You read from the letter. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. You read from this letter the first sentence in the 
second paragraph, which is this, "The charge is," meaning the charge 
of communism, "of course without foundation," in your letter of 
May 26, 1947. I ask you if that was a correct statement. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Imori. Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask you whether your 
question is : Is the charge true or not or whether the reason that I was 
ousted from the teamsters' union was correct? I didn't quite under- 
stand your question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Imori, I don't see how I could state the ques- 
tion more plainly than I have. You state in your letter, "The charge 
is of course without foundation." That is, the charge of communism. 
Now, is that a correct statement ? Was it without foundation ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1989 

Mr. Imori. Mv. Chairman, that was not — that was not the reason 
tliat I was outside. 

Mr. Tavenner. But I have not asked you that. 

(AVitness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. TA^^!!NNER. Please answer my question. 

Mr. Imori. I refuse to answer the question. [Laughter in the 
audience,] 

Mr. Walter. I would like to remind the audience that you are 
here as guests. I trust that you will be orderly. No demonstrations 
or indications as to how you might feel about any answers that come 
from the witness. 

May I see that letter? 

You wrote this letter, did you not, Mr. Imori? 

Mr. Imori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. The letter went to the entire membership of the 
teamsters' union of Hawaii. Is that correct? 

Mr. Imori. I just submitted that letter to the executive board of 
local 904, the local that employed me as business agent. 

Mr. Walter. But it was addressed to the membership of the team- 
sters union of Hawaii. 

Mr. Imori. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. In the letter you said, "The charge of course," of 
Communist activity, "is of course without foundation." Now, if you 
were willing to tell all of the members of the teamsters' union that 
you were not a Communist, why aren't you willing to tell us the 
same thing ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Imori. I have already stated that I refuse to answer that 
question on the ground that it may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. You were not under oath when you wrote that letter, 
were you? 

Mr. Imori. Mr. Chairman — 

Mr. Walter. I say, you were not under oath when you wrote the 
letter, of course? 

Mr. Imori. No, sir. 

Mr. Walter. But you are now. 

Mr. Imori. I understand that. 

Mr. Walter. Is that why you refuse to answer the question? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Imori. For the reason that I have already stated. 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did you hold in the Communist 
Party of the Territory of Hawaii from 1945 until the present date? 
Or rather, what positions have you held during that period? 

Mr. Imori. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Harry Kuhia, Jr. ? 

Mr. Imori. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walter. Why do you think you may incriminate yourself by 
saying that you know him ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Imori. Mr. Chairman, I take that position on the advice of my 
counsel. 



1990 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Imori. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. All right. That is all. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Robert Wenkam. 

(Mr. Tavenner and Mrs. Bouslog conferred together.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, that witness and another witneat* 
were released on the 13th of April, and I desire to have them resub- 
penaed, but I believe the subpena has not been served. My next wit- 
ness is Herman Ing. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please? Do you 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, thw 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Ing. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF HERMAN ING 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Will you state your full name, please? 

JNIr. Ing. My name is Herman Ing. 

IVIr. Tavenner. Wliat is your present address? 

Mr. Ing. 274 Halemaumau Eoad. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born? 

Mr. Ing. I was born on the island of Maui. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. When? 

Mr. Ing. February 19, 1914. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where have you worked or rather, let me ask you 
this, where are you working now ? 

Mr. Ing. I am now employed at McCabe, Hamilton & Kenny. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you worked there ? 

Mr. Ing. For about 9 or 10 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before that time where did you work? 

Mr. Ing. Tripler General Hospital. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr, Ing, have you ever been a member of the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Ing. Yes, I have. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you become a member ? 

Mr. Ing. As far as I recollect, it was in 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee just how you happened 
to become a member, who approached you and talked to you about it ? 

Mr. Ing. Pardon me. Before I go any further, Mr. David Pahinui 
in his testimony last week said I was recruited in 1947. I am quite 
sure he is wrong in the year. 

Mr. Tavenner. You think that the date was wrong? 

Mr. Ing. Yes, sir. I am sure the date was wrong. 

Mr. Tavenner. He said 1947 and you state it was when? 

Mr. Ing. 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1946. All right, sir. Just tell us what happened. 

Mr. Ing. Will you kindly repeat the question again ? 

Mr. Ta-s^nner! Yes. Who talked to you about becoming a member 
of the Communist Party ? Who asked you to become a member of it, 
if anybody did? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1991 

Mr. Ing. Well, prior to joining the Commnnist Party I was very 
active in union affairs on the water front, and one of the boys on the 
water front apin-oaehed me and told me to join the clnb; what they 
call the Progressive Labor, and I was very active at the time, I was 
very interested in learning more about labor, so I joined this particular 
party, not knowing it was a Communist Party at first, 

Mv. Tavenner. Did you hold a position at that time in the labor 
union ; your labor union ? 

Mr. Ing. No ; I was not, I was just rank and file. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVho was it that came to you and told you that ? 

Mr. Ing. Julian Xapuuiu)a, 

JNIr. Tavenner. That is N-a-p-u-u-n-o-a. Is that the way you spell 
his name? 

Mr. Ing. That is right, 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Now, just tell the committee what hap- 
pened after he told you or asked you to become a member of this group ? 

Mr. Ing. Well, he told me to attend a few meetings, and I am quite 
sure it was about a couple of months I attended these meetings, and 
then he gave me a card to sign, which I did. In fact, when I joined the 
Connnunist Party I did not know communism from anything else. 1 
thought it was just one of those names, 

Mr. Tavenner. Was it the Communist Party card ? 

Mr. Ing. It was, 

Mr, Tavenner. Did you sign it? 

Mr. Ing. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you pay any initiation fees or dues ? 

Mr. Ing. Yes. I paid a dollar dues every month. 

Mr. Tavenner. To whom did you pay the money? 

Mr. Ing. It was to Mr. William Kamaka. He was then the secre- 
tary-treasurer of our unit. 

Mr. Tavenner. He was the secretary-treasurer of the union, you 
mean ? 

Mr. Ing. No. Of the branch I was m. It happened to be the Mc- 
Cabe branch. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, are you speaking of the union or are you 
speaking of the Communist Party? 

Mr, Ing. The Communist Party, 

Mr, Ta\tenner. Yes. You paid your dues to him ? 

Mr. Ing. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the name of this branch of the Com- 
munist Party that you joined ; what did they call it? 

Mr. Ing. They called it the McCabe branch. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. The McCabe branch ? 

Mr. Ing. That refers to McCabe, Hamilton & Renney. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was because the membership was made up of 
persons who were employed at that place ? 

Mr. Ing. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is on the island of Oahu, isn't it ? 

Mr. Ing. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where was the first meeting held, that you at- 
tended ? 

Mr. Ing. It was at Benny Kaahawinui's house up at Lanikila. 



1992 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Was that before you had gotten your membership 
card or after you had gotten it, that you went to Benny Kaahawinui s 
house ? 

Mr. Ing. That was before. Before and during the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before and during membership ? 

JNIr. Ing. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many meetings did you attend at Ben Kaa- 
hawinui's house ? 

Mr. Ing. There were several meetings. I don't remember exactly 
how many meetings, but I think it was a number of months. 

Mr. Tavenner, How long ? 

Mr. Ing. Oh, I would say about 3 or 4 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. How do you know it was a Communist Party 
meeting? 

Mr. Ing. Well, at first 

Mr. Tavenner. How did you know it was a Communist Party meet- 
ing, that these were ? 

Mr, Ing. At first I didn't know, but later on there was distributed 
literature on the Communists, and then I asked one of the boys there 
and he said, "Yes, it was a Communist meeting." 

Mr. Tavenner. What were you told ? 

Mr. Ing. I was told this was a Communist meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did I ask you how many meetings you attended up 
at Ben Kaahawinui's house? Let me ask it this way. How many 
meetings were held there after you got your card, your Communist 
Party card, if you can recall? 

Mr. Ing. Maybe about five or six meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. And can you tell us the names of those who attended 
the meetings? 

IVIr. Ing. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is, these meetings which you have termed Com- 
munist Party meetings, 

Mr. Ing. Yes. There were Jack Kawano. He was then president 
of local 137. 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Ing. Julian Napuunoa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he hold any official position in a local union? 

Mr. Ing. I don't recall. Ben Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Ta-stenner, Did he hold any position at that time in a local 
union ? 

Mr. Ing. I am not so sure because I know at the time he was business 
agent. I don't recall whether it was 1946 or 1947. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. All right. 

Mr. Ing. There was John Akana. 

Mr. TA^T.NNER. John Akana? 

Mr. Ing. That is right. And Cablay. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. Do you know Cablay's first name ? 

Mr. Ing. I think it is Saturnino. Is that right ? 

Mr. Taa^nner. I will have to ask you. 

ISIr. Ing. I really don't know his first name. There were a few others. 
I cannot recall their names at present. 

Mv. Tavenner. You mentioned a while ago a man by the name of 
Pahinui. 

Mr. Ing. That is right. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1993 

Mr. Tavenner. Who lias testified here. 

Mr. Ing. That is ri<2;ht. He was at some of the meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have his first name? 

Mr. Ing. David. 

JNIr. Tavenner. David. Did he attend the meetings? 

Mr. Ing. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall others? 

Mr. Ing. I think Mr. Lum. I saw him there at about one or two 
meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is that name ? 

IVIr. Ing. Lum. I don't remember his first name. 

Mr. Tavenner. See if there are others. 

Mr. Ing. I beg your pardon ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall whether there were any others? 

INIr. Ing. No ; I don't recall. 

iSIr, Tavenner. Do you know Kamaka, Bill Kamaka? 

Mr. Ing. Tliat is right. Bill Kamaka was there. He was our secre- 
tary-treasurer. 

Mr. Tam2nner. He was the secretary and treasurer? 

Mr. Ing. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. To whom did you pay your dues ? 

Mr. Ing. I believe it was to William Kamaka. 

]Mr. Tavenner. William Kamaka. 1 think you told us that. Was 
Bill Kamaka William Kamaka's brother? 

I mean, was David Kamaka William's brother? 

Mr. Ing. Yes, sir; he was. But I don't recall going to any meetings 
with David Kamaka. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know a man by the name of Cariaso? 

Mr. Ing. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was his first name? 

Mr. Ing. Domingo Cariaso, 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall whether he was present at those 
meetings ? 

Mr. Ing. Yes ; he was present at a few meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Jack Osaka or Osakada. 

Mr. Ing. Yes ; he was present at the meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. What about Frank Kalua ? 

Mr. Ing. Yes. That is right. He was present at the meeting, too. 

Mr. Tavenner. He was there, too ? 

Mr. Ing. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are certain that all those persons were present ? 

Mr. Ing. Yes ; I am certain. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who told you when the meetings were to be called ? 

Mr. Ing. It was usually one of the boys would tell us, "There is a 
meeting tonight" or "No meetings tonight." They would pass the 
word around. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you paid your dues every month, were you 
given a receipt or anything to show for the money you paid? 

Mr. Ing. As far as I can recollect, they gave us small stamps to 
insert in the book. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you remain a member of the party 
after you had received your membership card? 

Mr. Ing. Oh, I would say about 7 or 8 months. 



1994 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Were meetings held at any place other than at the 
home of Ben Kaahawinui ? 

Mr. Ing. Yes. We held about two or three meetings down at pier 
11, in the marine cooks and stewards office there. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean in the company's office ? 

Mr. Inc. Well, the marine cooks and stewards is part of the CIO. 
They have an office right down at pier 11 and we have our meetings 
in that office, 

Mr. Tavenner. Communist Party meetings ? 

Mr. Ing. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who presided over these meetings, particularly the 
ones that were held down at pier 11 ? 

Mr. Ing. Julian — I believe Julian Napuunoa was chairman at the 
time. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did any other person act as chairman, that you can 
recall, during the 7 or 8 months that you were a member ? 

Mr. Ing. I don't recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned that literature was given out. Tell 
us how that was done. That is, pamphlets. 

Mr. Ing. Well, usually the pamphlets were given out, small little 
pamphlets, and they were given out, just given out; the rest of them, 
we had to pay about 5 or 10 cents for them. 

Mr. Tavenner. Some were given to you and some you paid for? 

Mr. Ing. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who gave them out? 

Mr. Ing. If I remember correctly, it was Jack Osakada. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you buy some of them ? 

Mr. Ing. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. Whom did you pay the money to? 

Mr. Ing. I don't recall who I paid the money to. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you recall the names of any of those pamphlets 
that you got ? 

Mr. Ing. No ; I haven't. 

Mr. Tavenner. "Wliat were they about; can you tell us what they 
were about? 

Mr. Ing. Well, I bought quite a number of pamphlets but I did not 
take the time to read them. I glanced over a few and they mentioned 
about socialism and things of that sort. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Are you still a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Ing. No ; I am not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell the committee when you stopped being a mem- 
ber? 

Mr. Ing. I will start from the beginning. When I joined the Com- 
munist Party I thought it was for progressive labor. As I went fur- 
ther — I did not mention it to my wife. When I finally did, about 2 
or 3 months later, she jumped up in the air and said it was something 
that I should not belong to because she knows something about com- 
munism. She reads a lot. And I disagreed with her. And she told 
me, "Well, you will find out later on." And after that time I went back 
to the meetings and had my eyes wide open. I began to think : Why are 
the meetings held so secretly and pamphlets given out ? And that is 
when I took more interest in the pamphlets, started reading them, 
and I put two and two together and I figured it must be something that 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1995 

I sliouldn't belong to. And wlien I listened to a lot of those broad- 
casts over the radio, I believed then it was programs for spearhead for 
Americanism, and they were saying a lot of tilings about connnnnism; 
saj'ing it was for the overthrow of the Government, and 1 figured tiuit 
organization was trying to overthrow our present form of government, 
it is no place for me to begin. So I made up my mind I am going to 
get out. But I figured it would be a hard time for me to get out be- 
cause I know very well if I go down there and tell the boys I am 
quitting and I go out, naturally the boys will say, "You are just a 
phony." That is what I figured the boys would call me. 

So T talked it over with my wife, and we talked it over, and she 
said, ''Don't forget. When you go to the next meeting, tell them you 
Just resigned." I went to that meeting but I hadn't enough guts to 
come out with it. So I went home that night and she asked me and 
I told her no; I didn't say anything. She said, "You make sure when 
you go back in the next meeting." So I really made up my mind then. 
And when I went back to the next meeting, when the first order of 
business came up. I told the chairman, "I made up my mind and I 
was going to get out of the party and there was no two ways about it, 
I really meant what I said. I don't want no part of it. And besides, 
my wife threatened to lea^e me if I don't get out of this party." So 
the boys talked it over and finally agreed, well, if I had to get out 
there is nothing they could do about it. Well, even if they wanted to 
do something about it I would still leave the party anyway. So I re- 
member when I got through talking to the boys in there and I walked 
out. Jack Kawano, the president of the local at the time, he walked 
out and told me, "Well, if you are leaving the party, I hope you don't 
have any feelings against labor, I hope you will always remain a 
good union man." 

I told Jack Kawano — I then told Jack Kawano, "I believe in the 
unions and I will always remain a good union man." Which I did. 
Since then I have not attended any Communist Party meetings and 
I have always remained a good union man and I am still now a mem- 
ber of that same local. 

JNIr. Tavenxer. Is there anything else that you want to say? If 
there is, go ahead and say it. 

Mr. Inc. You mean in conclusion ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. IxG. In conclusion, I wish to state that I am an American citi- 
zen. I am proud to be one. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, I don't think there is anyone can say any- 
thing more than that. 

Mr. Ing. May I continue ? 

Mr. Tavtjnner. Yes. 

Mr. Ing. As I said, I am an American citizen, and proud to be 
one. I am the father of three children, and I am a Christian. The 
v'ery thought of me being in tlie Communist Party, and the very idea 
of the members that belonged to that party, entertaining the idea of 
the overthrow of our present form of government, I don't want to 
have any part of it. 

And I wish to state further that maybe after my testimony a lot 
<'>f my fellow union brothers and sistere may think that I was a rat. 
But they may even call me a stool pigeon, but I say that, if they 



1996 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

expect this union to exist, and still entertain the thought of the over- 
throw of this present form of government, I don't think that this 
union will ever exist. All our efforts that a lot of men have put forth 
building up this union, the very idea of thinking to overthrow this 
Government, is just destroying the union. It is not a constructive 
way of thinking for the labor man. I think it is destroying every- 
thing that they have built these past number of years. 

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for giving me this privilege of express- 
ing myself. 

Mr. Walter. No good union man, particularly no leader deserving 
the name of a labor man, will call you a rat. It will be only those 
who have some ulterior motive in mind when they participate in their 
activities will describe you as that. Thank you. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Walter. We will adjourn now until 9 o'clock tomorrow morn- 
ing, 

(Whereupon, the hearing adjourned until Tuesday, April 18, 1950, 
at 9 a. m.) 



HEARIiNGS RECtARDINCt COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 
TERRITORY OF HAWAII— PART 3 



TUESDAY, APRIL 18, 1950 

House of Representatives, 
Subcommittee or the Committee on Un-Amekican Activities, 

Honolulu^ T . H. 

PUBLIC SESSION 

The siibcomniittee of four met, pursuant to call, at 9 a. m., in the 
Senate Chamber, lolani Palace, Hon. Francis E. Walter (hubcom- 
mittee chairman) presiding. 

Subcommittee members present : Representatives Francis E. Walter, 
Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold H. Velde. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; William 
A. Wheeler and Courtney E. Owens, investigators ; and John W. Car- 
rington, clerk. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will be in order. Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Cariaso. Domingo R. Cariaso. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand. Do you swear that 
the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Cariaso. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down. 

TESTIMONY OF DOMINGO R. CARIASO 

Mr. Ta\^nner. What is your full name, please ? 

Mr. Cariaso. Domingo Cariaso. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Where do you live, Mr. Cariaso ? 

Mr. Cariaso. 430 North King Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed ; what work do you do ? 

Mr. Cariaso. I am a dock foreman. 

Mr. Tavenner. I didn't understand your answer, state it again, 
please ; what work do you do ? 

Mr. Cariaso. I am dock foreman — in the loading. 

^Ir. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Cariaso. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell us who came to see you and asked you 
to become a member ? 

Mr. Cariaso. Julian Napuunoa, Kaahawinui, Jack Kawa.no. 

Mr. Tavenner. Go ahead. 

Mr. Cariaso. That's all. They came to me in the morning, to take 
me down, put me in the car, take me down to Jack Kimoto's house. 

1997 



1998 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

and told me, "Your name on Political Action Committee." Told me 
in the meeting. Go down and discuss CIO Political Action Commit- 
tee, but I don't know that it was a Communist Party, because he no 
told me Communist Party. He told me union meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. He told you it was a union meeting? 

Mr. Cariaso. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was this? Do you know what year this was? 

Mr. Cariaso. I remember 1945 — around November. 

Mr. Tavenner. What took place at that meeting ? "Wliat happened ? 

Mr. Cariaso. Just discuss about the union, the ILWU, tell us, "Tell 
all my friends to elect for delegate to convention in the States, would 
like to vote for delegate for convention in the States." Tell me, "Tell 
all your Filipino friends, 'For this guy.' " And so and so. 

Mr. Tavenner. What kind of meeting did you say it was? 

Mr. Cariaso, They tell me Political Action Committee. That is 
what I understand. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is what you understood then ? 

Mr. Cariaso. That's right. 

Mr, Ta^^nner. Well when was anything said to you about the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Cariaso. Oh the second time, they call me again. Where are 
you going again ? He told me that to go to discuss the union, Political 
Action Committee, Benny's house. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere? 

Mr. Cariaso. Benny's house, Benny Kaahawinui's house. 

Mr. Ta\"enner. Benny Kaahawinui's house? 

Mr. Cariaso. Yes, 

Mr, Tavenner. Benny Kaahawinui, that is the right pronuncia- 
tion? 

Mr, Cariaso, It is hard to understand Hawaiian words. 

Mr, Tavenner, All right. Did you go to his house ? 

Mr. Cariaso. He push me again to go inside that house. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who came to see you that second time ? 

Mr, Cariaso. That same guys; they put me in the car, to Jack 
Kawano's car. 

Mr. Tavenner. Took you there? 

Mr. Cariaso. Take me down there. I got nervous, too, because I 
think that they going to lick me, see? That's right. I don't know 
nothing about that place, because I never been down there. From the 
time I came down from Palolo. Then I see one paper, big sign, Com- 
munist Party. So. God damn this house, I don't like that much, see ? 
Because this against the United States Government. I told them the 
next time, "You folks don't call me again." 

Mr. Taa'enner. You saw that paper. 

Mr. Cariaso. I saw that paper, but I never hold that paper. Only I 
saw that paper, at big sign. Communist Party. I said, "God damn this 
house, it is part of Eussia." 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Who were there at that meeting? 

Mr. Cariaso. Oh, I saw Jack Kaw^ano and Freeman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who? 

Mr. Cariaso. Freeman. I don't know what the last name, one haole 
from the States. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you say that name over again ? 

Mr. Cariaso. Freeman. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 1999 

Mr. Tavenner. Freeman? 

Mr. Cariaso. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what Freeman's first name was ? 

Mr. Cariaso. I don't know the first name, but they called him Free- 
man. That is what I heard. Tliat is what I understand. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. Who else? 

Mr. Cariaso. Benny, and William Kamaka, and Simeon Bagosol, 
and Bob Lum, Herman Ing, John Akana, and Frank Kalua. That's 
all I can remember. 

]Mr. Tavexxer. Were there any women there at the meeting? 

Mr. Cariaso. No, sir ; only the first meeting we had. 

Mr. Tavexn^er. At the first meeting? 

Mr. Cariaso. Yes. 

Mr. Ta%'enx"er. Who was there at the first meeting? 

Mr. Cariaso. Fujimoto. 

]Mr. Tavex^x^er. Well, now, did you see more than one pamphlet 
about communism? 

i\Ir. Cariaso. No, sir. 

Mr. Ta^tcxx'er. Just the one ? 

Mr. Carlaso. Yes; just only one; because he did not show me. "It 
is entirely secret," he said. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Now, did you see anyone paying dues, paying any 
money at that house at the time of the second meeting? 

Mr. Cariaso. The second meeting, sir, they collected $1 each person. 

Mr. Taa^x^xer. What was that dollar for? 

Mr. Cariaso. He said for the dues. I told him, "Well, I am broke. 
I no can pay this $1." He said, "That's all right. You broke today. 
You give $1, pay your dues." I said, "I don't want to pay." He said, 
"You buy kau-kau for here." That is Benny Kaahawinui told us. 
You pay for the food. 

Mr. Tavexner. Now who was that collected this money ? 

INIr. Cariaso. Ben Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Ta'S'enxer. What did they say the money was for ? 

Mr. Cariaso. He said for to buy food ; that's all. 

Mr. Ta\T!:xxer. For food? 

Mr. Cariaso. Yes. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Did you get a card of any kind ? 

Mr. Cariaso. No. He showed me one card, but no let me hold. 

Mr. Ta^t.nner. He would not let you hold it? 

Mr. Cariaso. That's right, sir. 

Mr. Taa-enx^er. What kind of a card was it? 

Mr. Cariaso. Well, if I no make mistake, just like a blue card; blue 
card. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Well, explain that. 

Mr. Cariaso. A blue card. 

ISIr. Tavexxer. Blue ? 

Mr. Cariaso. That's right. 

Mr. Ta\t:xner. How big was it? 

Mr. Cariaso. Well, about 2 inches wide and about 3 inches long. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Did he ask you to sign it ? 

Mr. Cariaso. He didn't tell me to sign, but somebody here picked my 
name. He said, "Your name inside," he told me. That's all. 

Mr. Ta\^xner. That your name was inside ? 

66636 — 50 — pt. 3 5 



200U COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr, Cariaso. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you see any writing on the card ? 

Mr. Cariaso. Well, I don't remember, sir, because too far for me. 
It is like you and I, so far ; besides, it is at nighttime. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what did you undei'stand this card meant ? 

Mr. Cariaso. Well, they got the big sign, the sign is "Communist 
Party," that is why I understand that it was a Communist card. 

Mr. Tavenner. You understood that it w^as a Communist Party 
card you saw ? 

]SIr. Cariaso. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner, Well, did you pay any money yourself ? 

Mr. Cariaso, Well, they collected me about two dollar, that is what 
they collect me, 

]\Ir. Tavenner, Well, when you paid the money, did you pay it then, 
or did you pay it later? 

]Mr. Cariaso. Oh, they collect me in our office on the job. He told 
me, "Give them $2 for to pay dues." Well, I told him, "Wliy only 
me, $2?" 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you find out whether some people were 
being charged less than that ? 

JNIr. Cariaso. No. 

ISIr. Tavenner. Did you pay the money at one time, or at different 
times? I mean, $1 one time, and $1 another. How did you pay it? 

Mv. Cariaso. I paid one time $2. 

Mv. Tavenner. That is, you paid $2 more than once ? 

Mr. Cariaso. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you get any receipt or anything for the money 
that you paid? 

]Mr. Cariaso. No, sir. They no give me receipt. These guys, they 
hide from me, don't give me nothing. Just like my one enemy for 
that. So that time they too far from me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was this meeting open to the public ? Could any- 
body attend this meeting ? 

Mr, Cariaso, No, sir. That is what they told me. 

Mv. Tavenner. Well, was the meeting secret ? 

]\Ir. Cariaso. No ; the second time T went, that was at Benny's house, 
they close all the windows. "Wliat for they close the window?" I 
told them, "By and by, somebody hear us." That is why I find out it 
is against American Government. It is part of Kussia then. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, at any of these meetings, was anything said 
about the Communist Party, and if so, what was said ? 

Mr. Cariaso, Well, he don't say anything about meetings, only 
discuss about the Political Action Committee, PAC, he said. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold any office in the local union at the time 
that they asked you to come to these meetings? 

Mr. Cariaso. They put up my name on the executive board, in the 
meeting, about every Wednesday, for us to meet again, executive board 
nieeting. I told them what, nobody put me in the office. "That's all 
right, you are a strong union man. You go down to the union and 
discuss about union meeting. You can talk to your countrymen, and 
tell them about that. Tell them to pick that man. Never mind, you 
go down and talk." I go down in the meeting, and they do mostly 
the talking, Benny and Julian, John Akana, and this guy, they give 
me — they no give me a chance for talk. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2001 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you elected to this office after you went to 
the meeting ? 

Mr. Cakiaso. They were elected from the office, in the union office. 
They pull up my name without asking me a question. 

Mr. Ta\^nnek. They put up your name without asking? 

Mr. Cariaso. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is, after you had gone to these meetings ? 

Mr. Cariaso. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you elected ? 

Mr. Cariaso. They check my name off, without asking me a question. 

Mr. Tavenner. I know, but the election was in your favor, I mean? 

Mr. Cariaso. Well, they told me 

Mr. Tavenner. I mean, you won the election ? 

Mr. Cariaso. I won the election, but nobody vote for me. 

Mr. Tavenner. If I understood you right, you say that you won 
the election, and nobody voted for you ? 

Mr. Cariaso. That's right, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner, How do you explain that? 

Mr. Cariaso. Well, I see my name on the list, executive board com- 
mittee. They put my name as Domingo Cariaso. I tell him, "Wliat's 
the matter? I am not an educated man. I am not a smart man." 
They tell me, "That's all right, you can talk for your countrymen, can 
tell them all about it." So, I no like this kind of job, work labor 
enough, but Benny and Julian push me inside. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you go to any more of these meetings ? 

Mr. Cariaso. Well, the last time they told me, "Your committee 
meet again." He told me executive board meeting down pier 11. He 
puts down, "What's the matter, got another executive board meeting? 
That's not this office." He said, "You go inside." And they closed the 
door. Just like make me calaboose man, he put me inside. 

Mr. Tavenner. What kind of a meeting was this ? 

Mr. Cariaso. At the time that they called the meeting, they said, 
"You got people, friends, Filipino, who can vote, who want elected, 
just like delegate, that to sign up. That's what he told us, and I got 
friend to tell all our friends vote for these guys. That forced us, 
tell all these people how they can vote for these people, PAC, Political 
Action Committee, that's what he said, 

Mr, Tavenner, Were the same people present at that meeting, most 
of them ? 

Mr, Cariaso. Not most, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner, Who were there? 

Mr. Cariaso. I seen, but I don't remember the name. I seen two 
Japanese from Kauai, Jack Kawano introduced me. Jack Kawano, to 
the two Japanese guys. William Kamaka, Andrew Naeole, John 
Akana, and Herman Ing, and Frank Kalua. 

That's all I can remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. At this meeting that this man Freeman attended, 
the earlier meeting, what did he have to say in the meeting, do you 
remember ? 

Mr. Cariaso. They told us that down at Benny's house, make strong 
union, force all the people, they no can understand that union, they like 
more union, more profit for strong union. 



2002 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. After you were shown tlie card, your Communist 
Party card, how long did you stay in the Communist Party, or did you 
stay in it at all ? 

Mr. Cariaso. I didn't stay in there so long, because I found out I 
am against American Government. God damn. I don't like this party 
over here. It is part of Russia. That is, if I could get him, I would 
shoot this guy. Because I don't like this against United States 
Government. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you go to any more meetings? 

Mr. Cariaso. No; that is the last meeting I go, pier 11. They call 
me go to down to the meeting, and I said — I told them no like, no like 
to go. He scratch my name ort', scratch my name from the CIO, because 
I no like any more to join any party. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. You are excused. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Saturnino Cablay. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, do you swear that the 
testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Cablay. Yes. 

TESTIMONY OF SATURNINO CABLAY 

Mr. Tavenner. "VMiat is your name, please ? 

Mr. Cablay. Saturnino Cablay. 

INIr. Tavenner. Where were you born? 

Mr. Cablay. I was born in the Philippine Islands. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you lived in the Territory of 
Hawaii ? 

Mr. Cablay. I lived here for about 20 years now. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you an American citizen ? 

Mr. Cablay. I was on the naturalized list, for naturalization, at 
1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you work ? 

Mr. Cablay. I am working for McCabe, Hamilton, Renney Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you worked for that company ? 

Mr. Cablay. I worked with the company for about 8 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. What type of work do you do for that company 
at the present time? 

Mr. Cablay. I am stevedore foreman. 

Mr. Tavenner. What type of work is done by the men of whom you 
are the foreman? 

Mr. Cablay. I direct my men, to show how they handle the job. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. What is their job ? 

Mr. Cablay. It is loading and discharging the boat. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you join the Communist Party at one time? 

Mr. Cablay. Yes ; I joined the Communist Party. 
• Mr. Tavenner. When was that? 

Mr. Cablay. That was the early part of 1945, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee how you happened to 
join the party, the reason for your joining, how it came about? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2003 

Mr. Cablay. On the first beginninrr, I did not know it was tlie 
Communist Party. I was approaclied by Mr. William Kamaka to 
join tliat party. At that nieetin<»: I didn't know it was a Connnunist 
Party, because we were brou«2:ht, during the evening, to go to Mr. 
Benny Kaahawinui's house. When we were there in that house, we 
were locked up, nobody can hear us. I didn't know it was a Com- 
munist meeting. But, on the last four more meetings I attended, I 
found it out that it was the Communist line, because they distributed 
us Comnumist pamphlets, in order to learn something about the 
Russia lines. That is on this last meeting. The meeting I attended. 
I realized to myself that it is against America. After all, I think 
America is my country. So, I told them not to call me for any more 
meetings. I quit entirely those meetings. I was forced to pay my 
dues for a dollar a month. I was given a membership card, iDut I 
was forced to turn it back to Mr. Julian Napuunoa. So, I turn back 
my membership card, because they forced me to take it back. Then 
on those meetings we had, we were taught to obey in the Communist 
line, because they show us how to go in the Communist line, and 
which Julian Napuunoa gave me. When I realized it is bad for me, 
so I resigned that party line, sir, in the early part of 1946. 

]Mr. Ta\^nxer. Who gave you the Communist Party card? 

Mr. Cablay. Julian Napuunoa gave me the Communist Party 
card. 

Mr. Tamsnner. How many times did you pay your dues, do you 
think ? 

Mr. Cablay. Well, if I was not mistaken, it was the early part of 
the month of March 1945, up until the last day of 1945, and in a few 
months on the part of 1946. I stop paying my dues since that time. 
I think it over and over, to quit from that line. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who did you pay your dues to? 

Mr. Cablay. I paid to Julian Napuunoa or Mr. William Kamaka. 

ISIr. Tavexner. Now, did they give you any reason why they wanted 
you to join the Communist Party, any of them? 

Mr. Cablay. Well, Mr. William Kamaka approached me, and he 
wanted me to be elected on the Filipino side. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Did you hold a position in the union at the time, 
in your local ? 

Mr. Cablay. Yes ; I was once ; I was voted as second vice-president 
on the Filipino side, on the board of trustees, without my consent. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you elected to that position before you joined 
this group, or after you joined the group? 

Mr. Cablay. I was elected before I joined this group. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you elected to any position after you joined 
the group ? 

Mr. Cablay. No; I was not elected any more when I joined the 
gi'oup. 

]Mr. TA^T.NNER. Now, will you tell us the names of those persons 
who attended these meetings which you attended? 

Mr. Cablay. They are Mr. William Kamaka, Julian Napuunoa, 
David Pahinui, Domingo Cariaso, Robert Lum, Simeon Bagasol, Mr. 
Jack Kawano. George Kamaka, Herman Ing, Joseph Akana, Levi 
Kealoha, Joe Blurr, Richard Shigemitsu, Jack Kimoto, Eileen 



2U04 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Fujimoto, John Elias and Fred Kamhoahoa, Frank Kalua, and Pedro 
Damolan. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mentioned the fact that Communist pamphlets 
were given out to the members. Can you remember what those-' 
pamphlets were about, that is, the names of any of the people who 
wrote the pamplilets or who were mentioned in the pamphlets. 

Mr. Cablay. Well, I can — I don't quite remember now who were 
the authors of those pamphlets, but it is a pamphlet as written in 
Communist propaganda on the headlines and were distributed, a 
small size, about half a foot in length and 6 inches in width, and 
they are thin books, they are very thin books. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you asked to pay for those pamphlets or 
were they given to you, the pamphlets or books ? 

JNIr. Cablay. I used to pay from 10 cents up to 25 cents. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who distributed the pamphlets ? 

Mr. Cablay. Mr. Julian Napuunoa distributed the papers and Mr. 
Benny Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Walter. Did those pamphlets explain that in Communist 
dominated and controlled countries labor unions were not permitted ? 

Mr. Cablay. I beg your pardon. 

Mr. Walter. Did you learn from those pamphlets that in Com- 
munist-controlled countries labor unions are not allowed? 

Mr. Cablay. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Did the pamphlets explain that? 

Mr. Cablay. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. Couldn't have a labor union ? 

Mr. Cablay. Yes. 

Mr. Walter. Did the pamphlets explain that workers could not 
strike in Communist-dominated countries? 

Mr. Cablay. No. What I think, I remember in my mind is that — 
how to always win over the employers and how to whip them by doing 
false ideas. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have anything else that you would like to 
say about your membership in the Communist Party or the activities 
of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Cablay. Well, I am sorry to say, sir, that I joined such Com- 
munist Party line and I hope that from now on I am not be betrayed 
by those people because I love America and I love this country and 
now I told the truth to help my country, Ainerica. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. My attention has been called to the fact that on sev- 
eral occasions witnesses have been criticized who have testified here, 
and I would like to announce that it is a very serious thing. Some- 
body might find themselves in difficulty if they persist in that. 

You are excused. With thanks of tlie subcommittee. 

Mr. Tavenner. Dr. John E. Reinecke. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please? Do you 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Dr. Reinecke. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner- Sit down. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2005 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN E. REINECKE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTORNEY, HARRIET BOUSLOG 

Mr, Tavenner. Will yoii state your full name, please? 

Dr. Reinecke. John E. IJoinecke. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live? 

Dr. Reinecke. 1555 Piikoi Street, Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Dr. Reinecke. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify herself for the record. 

Mrs. BousLOG. I would like the name of Harriet Bouslog to be en- 
tered of record for John E. Reinecke. And at this time I would like to 
file with the committee a motion to quash service of the subpena. It is 
in the same form as the other motions filed. 

Mr. Walter. It may be made a part of the record.* 

Mr. Tavenner. I believe you stated your address. 

Dr. Reinecke. I did. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are also known as Dr. Reinecke ; you are a doc- 
tor, are you not? 

Dr. Reinecke. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born? 

Dr. Reinecke. I was born near Fort Scott, Kans., in 1904. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state to the committee briefly your educa- 
tional background? 

Dr. Reinecke. I hold bachelor of science, master of arts, and doctor 
of philosophy degrees. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state briefly your record of employment ? 

Dr. Reinecke. Most of my life I was employed as a teacher in the 
public schools here in Hawaii. During the past 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state the period, please? 

Dr. Reinecke. Y^es. From 1927 to 1947, except for a year and a 
half, I was employed — I was at times on leaves of absence to attend 
school. 

ISIr. Tavenner. Particularly since 1947, how have you been em- 
ployed ? 

Dr. Reinecke. Self-employed as a research worker. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, in doing research work, do you do that work 
for different customers, is that it, or different patrons? 

Dr. Reinecke. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you been employed by any particular group 
on a salary basis since 1947? 

Dr. Reinecke. Not on a salary basis ; on a fee basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. On a fee basis. Was it constant employment? 

Dr. Reinecke. Fairly constant; yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you so employed now ? 

Dr. Reinecke. I am not ; no. 

Mr. Tavenner. Dr. Reinecke, I hand you a photostatic copy of a 
letter written allegedly by one S. Weinman, addressed to you as 
"Dear Comrade Reinecke," and ask you if you will identify it — that 
letter — as having been received by you? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

" Tfxt of motion to quash service of subpena by John E. Reinecke is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Wilfred Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. This motion 
appears on p. 1550 (Part 2). 



2006 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST HAWAII 

Dr. Reinecke. I claim the privilege of not testifying on the ground 
of self-incrimination regarding this letter. 

Mr. Walter. May I see the letter, please ? 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Do yon refuse to answer the question? In the lan- 
guage in which you framed your reply, I am in some doubt as to just 
what you meant. 

Dr. Eeinecke. I said that I declined to answer the question on the 
ground of self-incrimination. 

Mr. Moulder. Did you ask him whether he ever received the original 
letter? 

Mr. Ta^'enner. Yes. I included the identification of the letter as 
having been received by him. 

Mr. Walter. Dr. Reinecke, why do you feel that if you received 
a letter it might incriminate you ? 

Dr. Reinecke. Well, in these days it does not take very much to 
incriminate a person, I gather from the press. Having the wrong sort 
of phonograph records in one's home might incriminate one. 

Mr. Walter, Wliat newspapers did you get your information from? 

Dr. Reixecke. The general press. 

Mr. Walter. Then, as I understand it, you refuse to answer this 
question because you feel that you would be incriminated in some way 
by admitting that somebody wrote you a letter ? Is that it ? 

Dr. Reinecke. Yes; that was the substance of what I said. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed, Mr. Tavenner. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer a photostatic copy of the letter in 
evidence, and ask it be marked "Reinecke Exhibit No. 1." 

Mr. Walter. Mark the exhibit and let it be received in evidence.^ 

Mr. Ta\^nner. How long have you known Mr. Weinman prior to 
thedateof May29, 1935? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Dr. Reinecke. I decline to answer the question on the same ground. 

Mr. Tavenner. I hand you an envelope containing a letter and cer- 
tain enclosures, and I will ask you to examine it and state whether or 
not it was mailed by you. 

(Witness confers with counsel and examines document.) 

Mr. Ta\"enner. Will you let me look at it just a moment — the last 
page. 

Dr. Reinecke. You mean that letter ? 

Mr. Tavenner. That letter. To expedite the matter. Dr. Reinecke, 
I ask you to look at the last page and state whether or not you find 
your signature there and, if so, whether or not you signed the letter? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Dr. Reinecke. Mr. Tavenner, I decline to answer the question re- 
garding the signature on the ground that it might tend to incriminate 
me. I have read over the letter and I stand on the contents of that. 

Mr. Walter. You deny that that is your signature? 

Dr. Reinecke. I did not say that. I said that I decline to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I desire to read the letter and not 
refer to any names mentioned in it. 

Mr. Walter. Let me see the letter. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you enclose in that letter a two-page list of 
articles and books, chiefly on the subject of Soviet Russia, which list 

» See pp. 2007 and 2008. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2007 



>:-:■ 



Ve7 ?9, I93d 



V«Bt Cot*r«d« fiein«ok«t 

©f tnt«r«»t. I «xp«Ot to taaira a pruCtlcal u«» of yot»r it»t «<f Con- 

>f th« ««jr, I a« writing yen ao» becaut* «icotb«)r Co«» 
MnJ» hes iniMAlata bio«iJ of «p«;lf ic InfonniticB euataralac H^mlt. 

H»r« »r« •om* of tb« prtwlag q[»«»ti<»a« »M<!fe B»i»t ^ 

* Xt Puljlo MasUplt In tb« t»i«n<l«? What X* M 4©ta«t 

Is th« yiJlpltto tfi>»r»r» l'«<l«r»tton ttJll la •j£t»t*B««t 
What l« tt» frtAt-at, lofiuoflo«, m«nb*r«hip, •tc? Ar« ttM»re •ay »th«r 
l«lMr tmtoa«t If so, itv»t i* tlt«lr polle^, *tc, xl<w, «ddr«sf«s »f 
IsVor tu»t«ft« to that we c»n c«ntft«t th«aj dlMtctXy. 

that it the ccaditioo of tia paaasotiryf Ho* ornKf t* 
tb#r«; how many aef«» «€ aacji holaingT Whjtt orojx planta^T t«a*at 
f»r«lB«t aw>ra-oroppin^ tJtoryt faxa*? »»«t«t Any or«»alMitl«» 
aso8« ps*«ant«r i^vtloca oa Iftnd ««&«r«Mp d»o«ld b« stallahla at 
pttMtc ttiai Cffico, t«t ua too* atjqut th« coffaa «fow«r«, rlc« (prow- 
«ra, teJuuHia, ate. 

y«U «I7 the (proup hft« ^0«B «tu^ls$ the sttoatiOSt to 
BawftU. Hhat oxACtl/ htrre they tf«tt stud/ia<» and can w« havo ««^i<a 
of their coJJoctlTa atuAiee for uw horo' y«j*«p« they caa «»»»»r 
the <}tt«ftlon» about Jahor laatan* and pea«aatry. 

Ea» the croup forsacdeted th«lr ideas as to «4s«t la t3M 
a«rt «typ ifi Saali^ *l»t WauH Vo the polttt<sal aad aooaowto 4w»«ads 
o3t th« vorkere 1a town and count r/T that eWoi « daan&d for MtttOflAl / / 
todapandeacoT 

Troa here It m«m»s to b< that it i« tlsw to do at^ tha» 
giSSX* I»'* 1* *t»* »J»** atrucsl** ***^ dowoJoja'l tia*»f th« la««oT~ 
rtJlp of the C? «to*{>T tit oaanot hopa to wait tor a ttae <«b«t ho»4r»4s 
of UanUsts ara dawiopad ha/ore fl^la^ fPf ^* hattonaaat of »«rtt- 
•r«* condition*. Ihoy wlU ieartj la th« cowf«a of tho atrujgiaa* fti 
vtmld like to hai^ /ou traoaBtt this thron«^ to the i^rovp, ««t their 
r«tpon«e, and retara it to «a. Can you e«t «• laafJots, iaa«a«iJM« 
(atatoo^Mipbad) or othar «»torl»l i»t •*% Vy «» g^wtpt Wo ho*T tlwt 



2008 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



)f»$M4 *iO0 tc l)ull4 *J55Heat«« of the i|raaJ-«>d r'aXlta Otjrki aJr- 
plaz!«. Save 7<mh»ar< «f JtT 

We h*»« <U«eus*«<l Unkln« the S«»aUan ntorexstnX t« 
the «r>* t« the U. 3, tt plan to <Jo «0!wthln« definite ahovt tt 
•hflrtly. 

It f»ouJ<J be well If yotj coruld f^t thl» latter lat* 
the h»na» of the CF gT<^P "J^i *><*▼« thwj Commmtcate with a* 41- 
fe^tljr, teXllns b* what »e oan do epecUlCaily tc Slit tkem« 

t ica*if thie iB a biJ5 order for one tla«. 3ee nhttt 
fxm otM do. 

yraternelly, 

f 



9tm 

Hftoss 634, 

«0 tait IJ St., 

%vm Tork City 



"1 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2009 

composed a reading course which you were then giving or recom- 
mending to the addressee of this letter and which you were also teach- 
ing or presenting to your classes in school ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Dr. Reinecke. Well, I believe your question can be broken into two 
parts, can it not? 

Mr. Tavenner. That is right. 

Dr. Reinecke. I decline to answer both of them on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. You decline to answer the question either as one 
question or as two questions? 

Dr. Reinecke. Correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer in evidence this two-page list of 
books and articles and mark it "Reinecke exhibit No. 2." 

]VIr. Walter. Let it be received.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. When I handed you the letter, I believe I asked 
you whether or not you had posted such a letter. I don't know whether 
you refused to answer that or not. 

Dr. Reinecke. I don't recall your having asked me the question, no. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, I ask you now: Did you post this letter? 

Dr. Reinecke. Again I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

INIr. Tavenner. There appears up at the left-hand corner of the 
envelope the address "1555 Piikoi Street, Honolulu, T. H." Was that 
your address on April 5, 1948? 

Dr. Reinecke. Yes, it was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, I hand you a small booklet entitled "Consti- 
tution of the Communist Party of the United States of America." 
Will you look at it, please, especially on the back cover. What do you 
find written on the back? 

Dr. Reinecke. I find here : "John E. Reinecke" and underneath 
"P. S. — Read it with discrimination." 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that your signature? 

Dr. Reinecke. Again, I decline to answer on the ground it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta\t.nner. I desire to introduce the book in evidence and mark 
it "Reinecke Exhibit No." " 

Mr. Walter. How do you spell your name, Mr. Reinecke? 

Dr. Reinecke. R-e-i-n-e-c-k-e. 

Mr. Tavexner. Dr. Reinecke, I show you checks dated during the 
period February 28, 1948, to December 2, 1948, payable to John 
Reinecke; these checks total $1,150 and are drawn on the HCLC trust 
account during the above period. Each of the checks appear to be 
endorsed on the back thereof by a person using the signature "John E. 
Reinecke." Will you examine those checks and state whether or not 
you received them and whether you endorsed them and whether you 
ol)tained the money on them ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Dr. Reinecke. I decline to answer the question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the date of your suspension from your 
position as a teacher? 1947 or 1948 — whatever it was. 

'" See appendix. 
" See p. 2010. 



2010 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES UST HAWAII 



< '^ ^-v i.--- 



/' 



M:- 



■4}^ 



(; ■>•■ 




Dr. Keinecke. 1947, late in November. I don't recall the exact day 
of the month. 

Mr. Tavenner. The hearing which was held in regard to that 
matter began, I believe, in August 1948? Is that correct? 

Dr. Keinecke. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. The checks which I hand you begin with February 
28, 1948. Will you state whether or not you were paid a weekly or 
monthly compensation by the HCLC from February 1948 until De- 
cember 1948? 

Dr. Reinecke. Again, I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer these checks — these checks have pre- 
viously been offered as part of exhibit Owens No. 6.^^ 

Dr. Reinecke, there has been testimony by quite a number of persons 
during the investigation and during the hearings conducted here 
to the effect that you issued Communist Party cards to various per- 
sons and collected the dues. Do you have any record of the names of 
the persons whose dues you collected? Or, first of all, I ask you 
whether you did so issue Communist Party cards for membership 
in tlie Communist Party ? 

Dr. Reinecke. Again, that question I decline to answer, on the 
same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you have a record of a Communist Party list? 

Dr. Reinecke. That question also, I decline to answer also on the 
same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. You refuse to state whether you have in your cus- 
tody any such list ? 

Dr. Reinecke. I have already given my answer on that question. 



^2 See p. 2011 for Owens exhibit 6 — 131. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 



2011 




2012 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tav-enner. It is the same. 

Dr. Reinecke. It is the same. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you draw any checks — first of all, did you 
make any deposits of money in any bank account, whether in your 
name or in the name of any other person or organization, which 
were received from Communist Party dues? 

Mr. Reinecke. I decline to answer that question on the same 
grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you make any remittances of money collected 
by you, either in cash or by check, money order, or any other means, 
to the Communist Party headquarters or any other person or organi- 
zation in California or New York? 

Dr. Reinecke. I decline to answer the question on the same 
grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party? 

Dr. Reinecke. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will take a short recess. 

(A short recess was taken.) 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will be in order. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, I would like to suggest the release 
from subpena of Aiko Reinecke, the wife of Dr. Reinecke, and give 
her the opportunity to make any statement she desires to make re- 
garding the evidence introduced liere involving her. 

Mr. Walter. I have been informed that IVIrs. Reinecke does not 
care to make any statement. Call your next witness. 

Mr. Taa^nner. Hideo Okada. 

Is Mr. Symonds here ? 

Mrs. BousLOG. I think he just went out into the corridor. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? Do you swear 
that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Okada. I do. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down. 

TESTIMONY OF HIDEO OKADA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS ATTORNEY, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your full name ? 

Mr. Okada. Hideo Okada. 

Mr. Taa^enner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Okada. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself ? 

Mr. Symonds. Myer C. Symonds. And at this time I want to 
file a motion to quash the service of subpena on behalf of the witness. 
It is in the same form as those previously filed. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live, Mr. Okada ? 

Mr. Okada. Waipahu. 

Mr. Tavenner. How old are you? 

Mr. Okada. Thirty-nine. 



" Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Hideo Okada is identical with the motion 
filed on behalf of Ralph Tokuuaga by his attorney. Myer C. Symonds. This motion appears 
on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2013 

Mr. Tavenner. Where were you born ? 

Mr. Okada. Aiea, Oahu. 

JNIr. Tavenner. How are you now employed? 

Mr. Okada. Employed by Oahu Sugar Co. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. How long have you been employed there ? 

Mr. Okada. Since 1933. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you also known as Major? 

Mr. Okada. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. SYhat official position do you hold in your union, 
if any? 

Mr. Okada. I am a trustee. 

Mr. Tavenner. What positions have you held since 1945 ? 

Mr. Okada. I was secretary of local 145 also. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. During what period ? 

Mr. Okada. 1945. I also was business agent for local 145. 

Mr. Tavenner. During what time? 

Mr. Okada. Since we consolidated. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. When was that? 

Mr. Okada. In 1948 or 1949. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you an official in your political precinct? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Okada. I am precinct chairman. 

Mr. Tavenner. Of what precinct? 

Mr. Okada. Ninth of the fifth. 

Mr. Ta\"enner. Ninth precinct of the fifth district? 

Mr. Okada. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. When were you elected to that position? 

Mr. Okada. In 1948. 

Mr. Tavenner. It has been testified here that on the night after 
a convention meeting of the ILWU at the YMCA Hall, in Honolulu, 
in 1947, that vou attended a Communist Party meeting at the home of 
Jack Hall? Did you? 

(Witness consults with counsel.) 

Mr. Okada. I refuse to answer that question, on the ground that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you see Frank Takahashi that night? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Okada. I refuse, also on that ground. 

Mr. Taat:nner. Did you take Frank Takahashi and Fedrico Lor- 
enzo in a car part of the way, and let them out, and they later appeared 
at Jack Hall's ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Okada. I refuse on the same basis. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Are you now, or have you ever been a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Okada. I refuse, on the same basis. 

Mr. Taat:nner. No further questions. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Mr. John Akana. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please. 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Akana. I do. 



2014 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN AKANA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. You. are John L. Alcana ? 

Mr. Akana. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live, ]\Ir. Akana ? 

Mr. Akana. I live up Manoa Housing. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Akana. Yes. 

ISIr. Tavenner. Will counsel identify himself? 

Mr. Symonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds, and I have filed the 
same motion as heretofore made on behalf of the other witnesses I 
represent.^* 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Akana, are you now, or have you ever been a 
member of the Communist Party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

^Ir, Akana. On the advice of my attorney, I stand on the ground 
that it will — it might incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. And, therefore, you refuse to testify ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Akana. Yes, sir. 

]VIr. Tavenner. Xo further questions. 

( Witness excused. ) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Julian Napuunoa. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please. 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mv. Napuunoa. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JULIAN NAPUUNOA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, MYER C. SYMONDS 

IMr. Tavenner. What is your name, ]:)lease ? 

INIr. Napuunoa. My name is Julian Napuunoa. 

Mr, Tavenner. Where do you live ? 

]Mr. Napuunoa. 2098 Tenth Avenue. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed ? 

Mr. Napuunoa. I am employed hj McCabe, Hamilton & Renny Co., 
Ltd. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr, Napuunoa. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Tavenner, Will counsel, please, identify himself ? 

]\Ir, Symonds. ISIy name is Myer C. Symonds, and I have filed the 
same motion with respect to this witness, as I have with respect to the 
other witnesses.^^ 

INIr. Walter, All your motions will be placed on file. 

Mr. Symonds. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Do you hold any official position in your local union ? 

Mr. Napuunoa. I am a member of the executive board of our union. 



^* Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Jacli Alcana is identical with the motion 
filed on hehnlf of Ralp Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Svmonds. This motion appears 
on p. 1472 (Part 1). 

15 Toxt of motion to quash service of subpena by Julian Napuunoa is identical with the 
motion filed on helialf of Ralph Tolsunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. Tliis motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2015 

Mr. Tavenner, ITow lono; have you been a member ? 

Mr. Napuuxoa. Since 1942, the year of 1942. 

Mr. Tavennek. During that time have you held any other position 
in your union? 

Air. Nai'uuxoa. "Well, later years, I believe since 1945, I was assist- 
ant, Avell, vice president of our division. You see, in our union we have 
one local combining all the outside islands, and also divisions in Hono- 
lulu here, and I was \ice president of our division. 

Mr. Walter. Wliat does the division consist of? 

Mr. Napuuxoa. Well, in our union we have one union known as 136, 
and that includes Hawaii, Maui, Kauai, and Oahu, and we have a 
division also jnst of the Honolulu oroup, just for those who work for 
McCabe, Hamilton & Kenny, and Castle & Cooke. We have formed a 
division just for the Oahu group, and we are known as 137. 

Mr. TA^^:x^"ER. Did you have an opportunity to travel behind what 
is known as the iron curtain back in 1948 ? 

Mr. Napuuxoa. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Tavexner. Who gave you that opportunity ? 

Mr. Napuuxoa. My union, the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavex^xer. Where did you go ? 

Mr. Napuuxoa. Well, in fact, I visited 13 countries of Europe; 
France, Italy, Yugoslavia, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Russia; all of the 
Scandinavian countries, and England, and back to the United States. 

Mr. Walter. Did you retain your passport ? 

Mr. Napuux-^oa. Will you repeat that question again? 

Mr. Walter. Do you still have the passport? 

Mr. Napuuxoa. Yes ; I still have the passport, but I did not bring 
it here to this meeting. 

Mr. Walter. Did it contain visas to all these countries you visited? 

Mr. Napuuxoa. I believe it did. 

Mr. Tavexxer. There has been testimony offered here, which you 
probably know about. If you don't, I will be specific, in detail; 
that you issued Communist Party cards to various individuals. Do 
you know what I am referring to? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Napuuxoa. Well, will you put your questions more specific, 
please? 

JNIr. Ta\^xxer. Yes. Did you issue a Communist card to Saturnino 
Cablay? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Napuuxoa. I refuse to answer that question, for the reason 
that it might tend to incriminate me. 

JNlr, Tavexxer. Did you issue Communist Party cards to any other 
persons ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

]\Ir. Napuuxoa. I refuse to answer that question, on the same basis, 
of incrimination. 

jNIr. Tavexxer. Are you now, or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Napuuxoa. I refuse to answer that question for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Who selected you for the trip which you took 
abroad ? 

66636 — 50 — pt. 3 6 



2016 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN" HAWAII 

Mr. Naputjnoa. The members of the ILWU, throughout the Terri- 
tory, and also in the States, the executive board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did they know about your Communist Party activi- 
ties when they made that choice? 

(Witness confers with counseL) 

Mr. Napuunoa. I refuse to answer that question for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. No further questions. 

Mr. Walter. Is it not a fact that no one but a Communist can get 
a visa to visit in the Communist countries? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Napuunoa. I don't know. 

Mr. Moulder. I would like to know what your purpose was ; what 
was the object and purpose of your trip ? 

Mr. Napuunoa. Well, before the time I made the trip I was made to 
know by my executive officers of the union that the purpose of the trip 
was to study various working conditions throughout the various coun- 
tries of Europe and come back here in Hawaii and try to improve our 
working conditions in this Territory. 

Mr. Velde. Did anyone else from this Territory accompany you on 
this trip ; any members ? 

Mr. Napuunoa. No, sir; just three from the mainland. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Ta\'t:nner, Mr, Douglas Inouye. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please. 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Inouye. I do. 

TESTIMONY OP DOUGLAS INOUYE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, what is your name, please? 

Mr. Inouye. Douglas Inouye. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Inouye. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself ? 

Mr. Symonds. I am Myer C. Symonds, and I have filed a motion to 
quash service of subpena in the same form as those previously filed. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received for the record.^® 

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born ? 

Mr. Inouye. Aiea. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. When? 

Mr. Inouye. 1910, January 3. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you presently employed ? 

Mr. Inouye. Well, not exactly employed. I am helping my wife 
in a small store. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you at one time a member of the Communist 
Party? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Inouye. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that it 
might incriminate me. 

w Text of motion to quash service of subpena for Douglas Inoufe is Identical with the 
motion filed on bphalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, :Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2017 

Mr. Tavennek. Do you recall talking to Mr. Wheeler here on the 
3d day of November 1949 ? 

Mr. Inouye. I do. 

Mr. Tavennek. Did he ask yon that same question, as to whether 
or not you had at any time been a member of the Connnunist Party? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Inouye. I refuse to answer that question, on the same grounds. 

Mv. Walter. Why do you think you would be incriminated if you 
answered the question and made an answer as to whether or not you 
had answered the question? 

JSIr. Inouye. I cannot hear you. 

Mr. Walter. Why do you state that you would be incriminated if 
you were to admit that he asked you a question? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Inouye. Well, that is my privilege, not to answer, as I — my 
attorney 

Mr. Walter. That is your privilege, not to answer anything you 
don't want to answer? 

Mr. Inouye. Yes. 

Mr. AValter. Is that your conception of your constitutional rights? 

Mr. Inouye. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. If that is his conception, it is certainly an erroneous 
one, and I would like to make certain that the witness understands 
that before I question him further. 

Mr. Walter. I think you had better. 

Mr. Tavenner. And I believe I should ask him to consult with his 
attorney before I ask him anything else. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Symonds. For the record, I have advised my client of his con- 
stitutional rights, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. I cannot hear you. 

Mr. Syinionds. For the record, I have advised my client of his con- 
stitutional rights. 

]Mr. Tavenner. Did you pav membership dues in the Communist 
Party? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Inouye. I refuse to answer that question, on the ground that it 
might incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall that on this 3d day of November 1949, 
you talked to Mr. Wheeler, and also to Mr. Appell, the investigators 
of the Committee on Un-American Activities ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Inouye. I refuse to answer, on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. You refuse to answer whether you talked to them or 
not? 

Mr. Inouye. Yes. 

]Mr. Tavenner. On what ground do you refuse ? 

Mr. Inouye. That it might incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Do you feel it would incriminate you to answer a ques- 
tion as to whether or not you talked to Mr. Wheeler? 

INIr. Inouye. I was advised by my counsel. 

Mr. Ta\'Enner. You state that you refuse to answer on the ground 
that it would incriminate you. What do you mean by "incriminate"? 

Mr. Symonds. Why, I 



2018 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Inouye. Well, my attorney told me that it is was my privilege. 

Mr. Tavenner, Your attorney told you it was your privilege. Now, 
that is what you said to begin with, isn't it ; you thought it was your 
privilege to refuse to answer if you wanted to'^ 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Inouye. Because it might incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Because it might incriminate you. Well, what do 
you mean by "incriminate''? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Inouye. Because my attorney advises me that it is my privilege. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is what you said before, but you have not told 
us what you mean by "incriminate." 

Mr. Moulder. He is not called upon to give the explanation of his 
attorney. 

Mr. Tavenner. We must know Avhat he understands by his answer. 

By "incriminate," do you mean that it might tend to constitute 
some evidence against you for the prosecution of some offense? If 
that is what you mean by it, you are correct. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. InoUye. Well, my lawyer informed me it might tend to in- 
criminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold any position in your local, of the 
ILWU, since 1945 ? 

Mr. Inouye. In 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. Since 1946. 

Mr. Inouye. I was a chairman of local 146, railroad transportation 
workers, ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, have you held any other positions since that 
time ? 

Mr. Inouye. Well, in 1947 we consolidated to 150 local; 150, that 
is the miscellaneous group, and I Avas acting as business agent. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend any Communist Party meetings 
during that period of time? 

Mr. Inouye. I refuse to answer that question on the ground that 
it might incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold an office in the political precinct of 
which you are a member? 

INIr. Inouye. AVhat precinct is that? AVhat precinct is that that 
you are talking about; what club is that? 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what is your precinct, your voting precinct? 

Mr. Inouye. The fifteenth of the fifth. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, do you hold any position in it? 

Mr. Inouye. In the Democratic Club? 

Mr. Taatcnner. In any club? 

Mr. Inouye. Well, I was just elected as chairman. I don't take 
office until after the Democratic convention. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you a member, or did you hold an office in 
that club any time from 1946 on up to this present election? 

Mr. Inouye. Just before the last election. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, when was that ? 

Mr. Inoute. It was in 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. 1947. What position did you hold then? 

Mr. Inouye. As chairman. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2019 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now, or have you ever been a member of 
tlie Communist Party? 

Mr. Inouye. I refuse to answer that question, on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Taa^nner. Mr. Levi Kealoha. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please. 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Kealoiia. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF LEVI KEALOHA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tai-enner. You are Levi Kealoha ? 

Mr. Kealoha. My English name, yes; Levi. My Hawaiian name 
*'Lawai." 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold any official position ? 

Mr. I^ALOHA. When? 

Mr. Tavenner. In your local union ? 

Mr. Kealoha. When? 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Any time since 1945 on. Excuse me, before an- 
swering that question: Are you represented by counsel? Do you 
have an attorney here with you ? 

Mr. Kealoha. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel identify himself ? 

Mr. Symonds. Myer C. Symoncls. I filed a similar motion.^'^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Possibly you could tell us first, how are you em- 
ployed ? Wliere do you work ? 

IMr. Kelaoha. Well, my true occupation is a stevedore. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is what? 

Mr. Kealoha. A stevedore. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you worked at that occupation? 

Mr. Kealoha. Well, since 1931 — up until I was elected an officer 
of the union, under the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was that? 

Mr. Kealoha. On January of 1949. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold any position with the union before 
January 1949? 

Mr. Kealoha. I was acting as the vice president of the Honolulu 
Longshore Union, as the Oahu division, since 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold any position with the union before 
that ? 

Mr. Kealoha. I was a member of the executive board of the divi- 
sion, the Honolulu Longshore; as the committee of the executive 
board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Over how long a period of time ? 

Mr. Kealoha. I cannot recall just how far back. 

Mr. Taa-enner. Back as far as 1945 ? 

Mr. Kealoha. I presume it was somewhere around 1945. 

" Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Levi Kealoha is identical witli the motion 
filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion appears 
on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



2020 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Have you been a member of the Communist Party 
at any time since 1945 ? 

Mr. Ke ALOHA. Upon the advice of my attorney, I refuse to answer 
the question on the ground that it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. I have no further questions. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tav-enner. Mitsuo Shimizu. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand. Do you swear the 
testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Shimizu. I do. 

Mr. Walter. Sit down. 

TESTIMONY OF MITSUO SHIMIZU, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. TA^^3N]^rER. Your name is what? 

Mr. Shimizu. My name is Mitsuo Shimizu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you accompanied by counsel ? 

Mr. Shimizu. Yes. 

Mr. Symonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds. I have filed the same 
motion as made on behalf of the other witnesses.^^ 

Mr. Walter. It may be made a part of the record. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live ? 

MV. Shimizu. I live at Hanamaulu, Kauai. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your occupation? 

Mr. Shimizu. Ciirpenter at the Liliue plantation. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been employed there? 

Mr. Shimizu. Oh, about 20 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you now hold a position with the ILWU? 

Mr. Shimizu. Right, as vice chairman of the union, 23, Lihue. 

Mr. Taa^nner. How long have you held that position? 

Mr. Shimizu. Oh, for about, I would say 3% months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before that time, did you hold a position with the 
same union? 

Mr. Shimizu. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was it? 

Mr. Shimizu. As vice chairman for the particular unit in the Lihue 
plantation. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was that unit? 

Mr. Shimizu. Lihue plantation, on the Lihue plantation. 

MV. Tavenner. How long were you vice president of that unit? 

Mr. Shimizu. About a year. 

Mr. Tai-enner. Before that, did you hold a position with the same 
union ? 

Mr. Shimizu. After that? 

Mr. Tavenner. Before that. 

Mr. Shimizu. Before that? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes'. 

Mr. Shimizu. Well, first I was vice chairman. 



^3 Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Mitsui Shimizu is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Parti). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2021 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, then, when were you first made vice chair- 
man ? 

Mr. SiiiMizu. In the year 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did you hold any position before you were 
made vice president? 

Mr. SiiiMizu. No. No, I don't recall. Yes ; only as member of the 
executive board. 

Mr, Tavenner. When were you made a member of the executive 
board ? 

Mr. Shimizu. The year of 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party at any time since you were a member of the executive board of 
your local union? 

Mr. SiiiMizu. On the atlvice of my counsel, I refuse to answer that 
question, on the basis that it may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

( Witness excused. ) 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all the witnesses that have been subpenaed 
for this morning, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will stand in recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Thereupon, a recess was taken until 2 p. m., Tuesday, April 18, 
1950.) 

afternoon session 

(The hearing was resumed at 2 p. m., Representatives Francis E. 
Walter, Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold H. Velde 
being present.) 

Mr, Walter, The meeting will come to order. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Robert Lum, 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand. Do you swear that 
the testimony that you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Lum. I do. 

Mr. Walter, Sit down, please. 

TESTIMONY OP ROBERT LUM 

Mr. Tavenner, Wliat is your name, please ? 

Mr. Lum. I am Robert Lum. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live, Mr. Lum, at the present time? 

Mr. Lum. My home, now, you mean ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes ; where you live now. 

Mr. Lum. Waipahu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you work ? 

Mr. Lum. McCabe, Hamilton & Renny, stevedore. 

Mr. Tav-enner. How long have you worked there ? 

Mr. Lum, Since 1942— '42, 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. 1942. Have you ever held a position in your local 
union ? 

Mr. Ltjm. Yes; member of the executive board, 137. 

Mr. Tavenner. When were you made a member of the executive 
board of your unit, your local ? 

Mr. Lum, I guess it was about '46, 1946. 



2U22 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you hold any position before that time? 

Mr. LuM. No. 

Mr. Taatenner. In your local union ? 

Mr. LuM. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Will you tell the committee about that, how you 
happened to join, and who asked you to join? 

]\Ir. LuM. Well, to start with my story, you see, when I was an 
executive board member, local 137, I attend that meeting, as a labor 
board meeting, see, and this person, John Akana, approached me, well, 
say every — almost every day, anyway, to try to convince me to attend 
a certain kind of a meeting. So, see, finally, I agi'eed with him, I 
said — "Well, I will go to the meeting just — " for my part, just to 
please him. So, he told me to meet him at Aala Park. Then we got 
on the bus, and then we went up to — it is going to Benny Kaahawinui's, 
he has got a big nose. So, we call him Big Nose. 

Mr. Tavenner. That was Benny — — 

Mr. LuM. Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Tavenner, Kaahawinui. 

Mr. LuM. We called him Benny Big Nose, anyway. So, I was 
left outside on the porch. And then this person, John Akana, went 
in, and they had a discussion, I guess for about 5 minutes, and then 
they called me in. So, I went in. I went in there, and the room was 
kind of dark, dim. They had dim lights. The windows was down. 
The curtains were pulled over. So, I felt, gee, this must be some 
kind of a funny kind of meeting, so, I didn't know it was a Com- 
munist Party meeting. Then they had a discussion. They had a 
discussion about some kind of work, I don't remember. But when they 
addressed the chair, they said, "Comrade Chairman." 

Mr. Tavenner. They said what? 

Mr. LuM. "Comrade Chairman." That is how they addressed the 
chairman. And there I saw a lot of the boys from my company which 
worked there, attending the meeting. 

Mr, Tavenner, Well, now, I understood you to say that John 
Akana had asked you a good many times to join the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. LuM. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, then, did you agree to join the — did you agree 
with him that you would join the Communist Party or did you first 
want to £ro to a meeting:? 

Mr. LuM, No. I agreed with John Akana to go. I did not agree 
to join the Communist Party at the time. 

Mr. Tavenner. You did not agree at that time ? 

Mr. LuM. No. But he always was after me, every day, and finally 
I got tired, and just to please him, I went to that meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. You went to the meeting ? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. ^Vliat kind of a meeting was this that you went to? 

Mr. LuM. Well, the first I went to, anyhow, at first, I did not know 
what kind of a meeting it was, until after the meeting, and they gave 
me a book, a great big red book, I remember the title, it says, "The 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2023 

Great Conspiracy Against Russia." That is the big red book they gave 
me. They told me to read it, if I have time to read it. Don't let any- 
body see that book. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. Not to let anybody see that book? 

Mv. LuM. That's riglit. 

Mr. AValter. The title of that book was, "The Great Conspiracy 
Against — ^" 

Mr. LuM. "Against Russia." 

Mr. Tavenner. AYas this the meeting that John Akana wanted you 
to go to? 

:Mr. Lui\r. That's right. 

Mv. Tavp.nxer. Who did you go to this meeting with? Did you 
go with anyone ? 

Mr. LuM. I went with him. 

ISIr. Tavenner. Went with him ? 

]\f r. Lu:\r. Yes ; I met him at Aala Park that afternoon. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did you get a Conmiunist Party card? 

Mr. LuM. Yes ; I did have one. 

Mr. Tavenner. When did you get your card? 

ISIr. LuM. In the early part of 1946, 1 guess. 

Mr. Tavenner. AVell, with reference to this first meeting, did you 
have a card before you went to this meeting, or did you get your card 
after you went to this meeting? 

IVIr. LuM. After the meeting. 

INIr. Taa-enner. After ? 

ISIr. Lu:\r. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, was it the same night or was it at some 
later date ? 

Mr. LuM. No ; later. The later part. 

Mr. Ta^'enner. Later. 

Mr. LuM. You see, before I had the card I attended another 
meeting. 

Mi\ Tavenner. Another meeting? 

]\Ir. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. Well, tell us about that. 

Mr. LuM. Well, this meeting was held at Jack Kimoto's house. You 
see. we were told that they were having a meeting that day. 

Mr. TA^TNNER. Now, tell us a little more about that. AVho told 
you ? What kind of a meeting did they tell you that they were going 
to have? 

Mr, LuM. Well, this Julian Napuunoa, or something like that, is 
his name, he was the one that told me that they were going to have 
a party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. A party meeting? 

Mr. Luji. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, what do you mean by a party meeting, there 
are lots of parties. 

Mv. LuM. Communist Party meeting. 

:Mr. Tavenner. All right. Who told you that? He told you that? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And did anybod}^ else tell you anything about that 
meeting? 

Mr. LuM. No. 



2024 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he tell you where the ineetin<>- was to be held? 

Mr. LuM. No; but he told me to meet at Benny's house, Benny's 
Kaahawinui's house. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, did you go to Benny Kaahawinui's house? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. By yourself, or with someone else? 

Mr. LuM. No; by myself. 

Mr. Tavenner. By yourself. Then, tell us what happened. 

Mr. LuM. I went there by myself, because I knew it was — first I 
went there once before, see? Then I met Benny over there. Then 
I waited for a while over there, and then he told me that we are going 
to catch the bus. So we got the same bus that goes up that way. 
We rode on the bus, and we dropped off some place. We dropped 
off at the bus also, and we started — and he started to walk backward, 
back again. You know, I mean, after he dropped off. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean he went beyond the place? 

Mr. LuM. That's right. Beyond the place. Then started to walk 
back. I asked him where he was going. He said it is farther down, 
you see. So I kept w^alking with him. 

Mr. Tavenner. Just a second. Did he tell you why he went on 
beyond the place? 

Mr. LuM. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. LuM. Then he kept on walking, and then he started to return 
again the same way. 

Mr. Tavenner. Keturn again? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. In other words, he went down, then went back? 

Mr. LuM. He went back again. That's right, see ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Just a minute. I want to find out about that. 
Where did you go when you got off the streetcar, I mean the bus, 
and came back, did you go to anybody else's house ? 

Mr. LuM. No, Just on the highway. 

Mr. Tavenner. Just on the highway. You turned around ? 

Mr. LuM. He turned around. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did he tell you why he was going to turn 
around and go back again ? 

Mr. LuM. No. He didn't tell me why. I asked him. So, "Wliat 
are we doing now ?" I told him. He said, "Oh, just going back again." 
Then he went there to the house, and he looked around if anybody 
was around there, and we just walked up the stairs and entered in 
Jack Kimoto's house. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, who else were in the house ? 

Mr. LuM. Jack Kimoto was there, and a woman, Eileen. 

Mr. Tavenner. A woman by the name of Eileen ? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know what her last name was ? 

Mr. LuM. Eileen Fujimoto. 
. Mr. Tavenner. All right. 

Mr. LuM. And then there was Joe Kealalio, and Levi Kealoha, John 
Elias, Richard Shigemitsu, There was David Kamaka, there was 
Herman Ing, and Frank Kalua, and John Akana. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you remember any others? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2025 

Mr. LuM. Well, at the first meeting at Benny's house, I remember 
some of the boys from the McCabe side, there was Simeon Bagasol, 
Benny, Jack Kawano, Kamaka, and Sam Cabigon. 

Mr. Tavenner. "Wliat Kamaka was that? 

Mr. LuM. William Kamaka, at Benny's, William Kamaka. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean to say William? 

Mr. LuM. Yes, that's right. At Benny's house, there was Frank 
Kalua and — I don't know what his last name was, Naeole, something 
like that, Herman Ing. I mentioned Herman Ing, I guess. Julian 
Napuunoa. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Did you say Naeole ? I didn't understand. 

Mr. LuM. Naeole. He works where I am working at McCabe. 

Mr. Taatenner. He works at McCabe ? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Do you remember his first name? 

ISIr. LuM. Andrew. 

jSIr. Ta^t2nner. Now, were all these persons employed at the same 
place where you were working? 

Mr. LuM. Except Joe Kealalio. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is this Joe Kealalio known by any other name? 

Mr. LuM. Joe Blurr, I guess. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Joe Blurr ? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Ta^-enner. Now, who was the chairman of the meeting? 

Mr. LuM. Jack Kawano. That was at Benny's house. 

Mr. Taat^nner. Who was the chairman of this second meeting? 

Mr. LuM. Jack Kimoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. Jack Kimoto ? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. At this fii^t meeting, can you tell us what they dis- 
cussed, what they talked about, do you remember? 

Mr. LuM. Well, they were discussing about extending the labor 
movement, and the party, so far as the party is concerned, the Com- 
munist Party. 

Mr. Taa^nner. Now, I didn't quite hear you. 

Mr. LuM. They were discussing about the labor movement, and 
about the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. The labor movement and the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Ltjm. The Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, can you tell us what they said about the labor 
union, or the labor movement and the Communist Party? Do you 
remember anything that they said, or that was said by anyone ? 

Mr. LuM. Well, they were discussing about recruiting more mem- 
bers, to attend this party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you say party meeting 

]\Ir. Ltjm. Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean Communist Party ? 

Mr. LuM. That's right. 

jVIr. Tavenner. Can you remember anything more that was said? 

Mr. LuM. Well, they asked me to try to get a few persons to attend 
that kind of meeting, which I did not do. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. To attend what? 

Mr. LuM. The Communist meetings, to get recruits, or recuit more 
men to attend the meeting. 



2026 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, at tliis second meeting, at the home of Jack 
Kimoto, who was the chairman of that meeting? 

Mr. LuM. Kimoto, Jack Kimoto, 

Mr. Tavenner. Can you tell us what was talked about, what was 
discussed at that meeting? 

Mr. LuM. Well, I heard this woman, Eileen, say she was here about 
the sugar strike, that is what I heard, I know that she mentioned 
something about the sugar strike. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you remember whether there were present per- 
sons at that meeting from other locals besides yours ? 

Mr. LuM. You mean union locals ? 

Mr. Tavenner, Yes. 

Mr. LuM. There was the McCabe group, and the Castle & Cooke 
group, 

INIr. Tavenner. So that was a joint meeting? 

Mr. LuM. Joint, that's right. Joint. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, when you say joint meeting, it was a joint 
meeting of what ? 

Mr. LuM. Party meeting. Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Communist Party meeting? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. You mean of different branches? 

Mr. LuM. Different branches, that's right, 

Mr. Tavenner. When you called these branches by the names of 
the company, you mean that people who were members of the Com- 
munist Party were working at these places ? 

Mr. LuM. That's right. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Is that correct? 

Mr. LuM. That's right. That's correct. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Now, did you see Communist pamphlets distributed 
among the members at any time, other than at that first meeting, when 
you received your big red book ? 

Mr, LuM. No. 

Mr. Tavenner, To whom did you pay dues ? 

Mr, LuM. I remember I paid my dues to William Kamaka. 

Mr. Tavenner. How many times did you pay him ? 

Mr. LuM. I remember just one time, I guess, that is when he — I 
was w^orking on pier 15, and he was the superintendent, of course, over 
there. He is in charge over there. He asked me for my dues. So, 
he told me I was $6 back, which I did not pay dues at the beginning. 
Well, I had a little money at the time, so I gave him $6. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, were you put on the executive board before 
you became a member of the Communist Party, or after you became 
a member. 

Mr. LuM. I was put on, you see, I didn't know I was elected as an 
executive board member until when they had the election, and they 
told me I was elected, which I did not run for that office. In other 
words, I was railroaded in. 

Mr. Ta^^nner. You were railroaded into office? 

Mr. LuM, That is what I think of it, 

Mr. Taa^nner, It was without your knowledge? 

Mr. LuM. That's right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, how do you account for that, how did that 
happen, when you did not stand for election yourself ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2027 

Mr. LuM. Well, they had, they had held a rank and file meeting, 
which they had, and they named me, which I was not there, and they 
had my name on the list. 

Mr. Taa'enner. Who had your name on the list? 

]\Ir. LuM. Well, the secretary of the union, I ouess, when we had the 
regular rank and file union meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Who was the secretary then? 

Mr. LuM. It was Abe, Yukio Abe. 

Mr. Tamdnner. Did Yukio Abe attend any of these meetings? 

Mr. LuM. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. That you attended? 

IMr. LuM, What meeting ? 

Mr. Tavenner. The Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. LuM. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, I started out by asking you whether you were 
put on the executive board after you became a member of the Com- 
munist Party, or before, in other words, when you joined the Com- 
munist Party, were you a member of the executive board, or did you 
become a member later? 

Mr. LuM. Well, I was a member of the executive board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before you became a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. LuM. That's right. Well, from there on, after I was a mem- 
ber of the executive board, John Akana started to work me in. 

Mr. Tavenner. What is that ? 

Mr. LuM. You see, when I was a member of the executive board, 
then this fellow, John xVkana, approached me to attend these Com- 
munist Party meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. I see. Then, if you were a member of the executive 
board before you became a Communist, or a member of the Commu- 
nist Party, then the Communist Party did not have anything to do 
with your being made a member of that board ? 

Mr. LuM. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. So far as you know, is that right? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long before you were made a member of the 
Communist Party was it that you were elected to the executive board? 
How long had you been on the executive board before you became a 
member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. LuM. Well, from January 1946, to about March or February, 
anyway. 

Mr. Tavenner. January, until ISIarch ? 

Mr. LuM. Yes, between March and February. 

Mr. Tavenner. What position did Jack Kimoto hold in the union at 
that time ? 

]Mr. LuM. I don't know what position he was holding. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know whether Ben Kaahawinui held any 
position at that time? 

]Mr. LuM. In the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Whether he held any position in your local union? 

Mr. LuM. Well, he was business agent. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, you told us tliat Jack Akana, or John Akana — 
that John Akana had asked you many times to become a member of 



2028 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

the Communist Party. Can you tell us when he first asked you to be- 
come a member ? 

Mr. LuM. I can't remember, even in the year 1946, the early part 
of 1946. 

Mr. Tavenner. It was the early part of 1946. Now,_ do you re- 
member whether it was before you became a member of the execu- 
tive board, or whether it was after you became a member that he first 
talked to you about it ? 

Mr. LuM. After I was a member of the executive board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, how long were you a member of the Commu- 
nist Party ? 

Mr. LuM. Well, about, say, about 9 or 8 months. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did 1 ask you who gave you the Communist Party 
card ? 

Mr. LuM. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would you tell us ? 

Mr. LuM. To tell you the story, one morning, when I was going to 
my job, Julian Napuunoa called me over on the side. So I went over 
there to see him. Then he gave me a small little card, and he told me 
to keep it hid, keep it hid all the time, so, I did not look at the card 
at first, I put it in my pocket. Then 1 contiiuied on my way. After 
I got through work, then when I was home, then I took a look at the 
card, and I seen it didn't have my name on it, but there were code 
numbers, some kind of numbers on the card, on the top of the card, 
and there was some kind of a signature, almost at the bottom, but at 
the bottom there was a signature of William Z. Foster. 

Mr. Tavenner. William Z. Foster? 

Mr. LuM. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you find out who William Z. Foster was? 

Mr, LuM, No, I suppose I didn't know, then I started reading the 
paper, and then I found out who ijt was. 

Mr. Tavenner. And who was he ? 

Mr. LuM. He w^as the Communist Party, some kind — he held office 
in the Communist Party, anyway, some kind of office. 

Mr. Tavenner. He w^as chairman of the Communist Party for the 
United States? 

]Mr. LuM. Yes, that's right. I think that is how it was reading on 
the card. William Z. Foster, chairman of the Communist Party, 
United States of America. That was on the bottom of the card, the 
Communist Party card. 

Mr, Tavenner. Did you, while you were in the Communist Party, 
did you learn to know the name of William Schneidermann? 

Mr. LuM, I don't know. I don't remember. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't remember. Why did you leave the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. LuM. Weil, I don't believe in what they preach. They ain't 
doing no benefit for me, 

Mr Ta^^nner. Well, how did you get out of the Communist Party? 

Mr, LuM. Well, I just didn't go to that kind of meeting no more, 

Mr. Tavenner. Wlien did you stop going? 

Mr. LuM. Well, I think — I remember, I think it was, see, about 
October. 

Mr. Tavenner. What year ? 

Mr. LuM. October 1946. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2029 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been back to the Communist Party 
meetin<2: since that? 

Mv. LuM. No. 

JSIr. Tavenner. Is there anythino: that you want to say about your 
membership in tlie partv, or anythino^ that you can tell us about 
that, that 1 have not asked you about ( 

Mv. LuM. Well, I am ^lad that I am out of the party now. I am 
glad that I am living in this country, the United States of America. 
1 am very proud to live in this country. It is a great America, and I 
shall oppose any group or any party that wants to overthrow my 
Government of the United States of America. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

jNIr. Velde. Do you still have the red book entitled "Conspiracy 
Against the Soviet Russia"? 

Mr. Luivr, No, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Have you ever read it through 'i 

Mr. Ltnvr. No. 

Mr. Velde. You are satisfied that the Communist doctrines are 
un-American, and teach the overthrow of our form of government by 
force and violence? 

Are you satisfied that the teachings of the Communist Party, that 
the teachings or the principles of the Communist Party are un- 
American ? 

Mr. LuM. I am not satisfied with that kind of preaching. 

Mr. Velde. You are not satisfied with the Communist preachings? 

Mr. Ltim. Yes. 

Mr. Velde. And that is one of the reasons that you left the party, 
isn't it? 

Mr. Ltjm. That's right. 

Mr. Harrison. On behalf of the committee, we desire to thank you 
for your appearance here today, and your courage in giving us your 
assistance. That's all. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Mrs. Adele Kensinger. 

Mr. Harrison. Will you stand and hold up your right hand, please ? 
Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mrs. Kensinger. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ADELE KENSINGER, ACCOMPANIED BY HER 
COUNSEL, HARRIET BOUSLOG 

Mr. Tavenner. "Wliat is your name? 

Mrs. Kensinger. Adele Kensinger. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented here by counsel? 

Mrs. Kensinger. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify herself. 

Mrs. BousLOG. May my name, Harriet Bouslog, be entered of record 
as the attorney for Adele Kensinger. And at this time, on behalf 
of Adele Kensinger, I would like to file a motion to quash the service 
of subpena.^^ 

1" Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Adele Kensinger is identcal with the 
motion filed on behalf of Wilfred Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. This motion 
appears on p. 1550 (Pait 2) . 



2030 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Harrison. I understand that all of these motions are similar 
to the ones heretofore filed. 

Mrs. BousLOG. That is right. The motion is in the same form 
and on the same constitutional grounds as the other motions, and I 
understand from the chairman that they will appear before any 
testimony of the witness in all the cases. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live? 

Mrs. Kensinger. 1658 Piikoi Street, Honolulu. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. How long have you lived there ? 

Mrs. Kensinger. About 10 years or 11 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you lived in the Territory of 
Hawaii ? 

Mrs. Kensinger. Almost 30 years. 

Mr. Tavenner, Have you been employed at any time since you have 
been living in the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mrs. Kensinger. I have been employed all the time. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. How were you employed ? 

Mrs. Kensinger. For a number of years I was doing stenographic 
and clerical work in the Territory for different employers; for the 
past 11 years I have been a housekeeper. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Ralph Vossbrink ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Kensinger. I refuse to answer that question on the ground 
it may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta^tenner. Do you know Charles Fujimoto? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Kensinger. I refuse to answer that question on the same 
grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you, on the night of April 21, 1948, meet at 
the home of Ralph Vossbrink with Ralph Vossbrink and Charles 
Fujimoto? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. I^NSiNGER. I refuse to answer that question on the same 
ground, that it may incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. You have been identified by a number of witnesses 
during the course of these hearings as having attended Communist 
Party meetings. Have you attended such meetings ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mrs. Kensinger. I refuse to answer that question on the same 
grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now or have you ever been a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mrs. Kensinger. I refuse to answer the question on the ground 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

(The witness was excused.) 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Robert Wenkam. I might say for your informa- 
tion, Mr. Chairman, that this witness has not been served with a sub- 
pena for his appearance today. However, he was in the hall yester- 
day and I did not know it until after we had adjourned. We will try 
to have service on him for tomorrow. 

Yasuki Arakaki is the next witness. Mr. Arakaki. 

Mr. Walter. Raise your right hand, please. Do you swear that the 
testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Arakaki. I do. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2031 

TESTIMONY OF YASUKI ARAKAKI, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please ? 

Mr. Arakaki. Yasiiki Arakaki. 

Mr. Ta%t.nner. Where do you live ? 

Mr. Arakaki. Olaa, T. H. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. How old are you ? 

]\Ir. Arakaki. I am 33 years old. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

JNIr. Arakaki. Yes. 

Mr. Symonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds. I wish to file the 
same motion as has been filed on behalf of the other witnesses.^" 

Mr. Walter. It may be received. 

ISIr. TA^^ENNER. Are you employed ? 

Mr. Arakaki. I am employed at the Olaa Sugar Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been employed there? 

Mr. Arakaki. Fifteen years and five months. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are appearing here in answer to a subpena 
served on you. 

Mr. Arakaki. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Just a minute. Didn't I make myself clear, or are 
you hard of hearing? [Remarks addressed to photographer.] 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. I don't believe, Mr. Chairman, that that gentleman 
was here when you made your announcement. 

Mr. Walter. I discussed this matter at great length with these 
photographers. Proceed. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Arakaki, you have been identified as having 
been present at Communist Party meetings by witnesses who have 
testified during the course of this hearing. Have you ever attended 
a Communist Party meeting? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Arakaki. Upon the advice of counsel, in discussion, I refuse 
to answer that question because it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. Arakaki. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. I have no further questions. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Jack Kimoto is the next witness. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? Do you swear 
the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Kimoto. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF DENICHI KIMOTO, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL. 

HARRIET BOUSLOG 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. What is your name, j^lease? 
Mr. Ki:moto. Denichi Kimoto. 



^ Text of motion to (luash sorvico of siilipoiia by Yasuki Arakaki is iilciitical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokuuaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 

60630—50 — pt. 3 7 



2032 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Are you represented by counsel? 

Mr. KiMOTO. Yes, sir. I am represented by counsel. 

Mrs. BousLOG. At this time I would like to file a motion to quash 
service on Mr. Kimoto. Mr. Kimoto has been on and off to appear 
before this committee so many times that the motion reads, "April 10, 
1950, from 9 : 30," but I think it will be sufficient for the most recently 
served subpena.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. You received two different subpenas to appear be- 
fore the committee, one to appear on the first day and one for today? 

•Mr. Kimoto. I received one before that, for the 20th. 

Mr. Tavenner. For the 20th ? 

Mr. Kimoto. That was the first one. The second one was last month, 
and the third one was for today. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are here in answer to those subpenas? 

Mr. Kimoto. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are commonly known as Jack? 

Mr. Kimoto. Yes : I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Kimoto, I hand you Form 57, an application for 
Federal employment, or rather, a photostatic copy of it ; it bears the 
signature "Denichi Kimoto"; and I ask you if you filed that appli- 
cation for Federal employment. 

(Witness examines document and confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kimoto. Will you repeat the question again, please? 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you read the question to the witness? 

(The question was read by the reporter.) 

Mr. Kimoto. I refuse to answer the question on the ground that it 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Walter. Did you ever apply for Federal employment? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kimoto. Yes ; I have had — I applied for a Federal job. 

Mr. Walter. Where ? 

Mr. Kimoto. With the Office of War Information. 

Mr. Tavenner. When? 

Mr. Kimoto. That was toward the end of 1944, if my memory is 
correct. 

Mr. Ta\t^.nner. In fact, on the first day of November 1944 you 
took an oath of office and executed it on that day, did you not? Ex- 
amine it, please. 

(Witness examines document and confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Harrison. Was this man employed by the OWI ? 

Mr. Kimoto. Will you please repeat the question? 

Mr. Tavenner. Read the question to the witness. 

(The question was read by the reporter.) 

Mr. Kimoto. I refuse to answer that question on the ground it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Moulder. The question is directed to the photostatic copy of 
the instrument you hold in your hand? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Moulder. The record doesn't reveal it. 

INIr. Tavenner. The paper I hand you is a photostatic copy of oath 
of office, affidavit, and declaration of appointee, the signature "Denichi 

2' Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Denichi Kimoto is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Wilfred Oka by his attorney, Harriet Bouslog. This motioiii 
appears on p. 1550 (Part 2). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2033 

Kimoto" "Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of No- 
vember A. D. 1944, at Honolulu, Territoi-y of Hawaii, Elsie IM. Mc- 
Nicoll, Administrative Assistant, OPA. Act of June 2G, 1943, sec- 
tion 2()()." 

Do I miderstand that you refuse to admit the execution of this oath 
of office to the very position that you say you were applying for? 

Mr. Kimoto. I have already refused to answer that question on ad- 
vice of my counsel. 

Mr. Taa-enner. Jjet me read your oath of office from this copy of 
oath of office executed in your name. 

I, Dpniclii Kimoto, do solomnly swear or affirm that T will support and defend 
the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; 
that I will hear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obliga- 
tion freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion ; that I will 
well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on wliich I am about to 
enter, so help me God. 

Now what is there about that oath of office that would incriminate 
you if you admitted that you signed it? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kimoto. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. You stated to the chairman that you had applied 
for and that you served with the Office of War Information in 1944,, 
and yet you are unwilling before this committee to admit that you^ 
took the oath of office and that you swore to defend the Constitution 
of the United States. 

Mr. Kimoto. So far as defending the Constitution of the United 
States, I have been doing that. My record as an employee of the 
Office of War Information proves that. And I have a statement from 
the person in charge of that office acknowledging the excellent effi- 
ciency of my service. 

Mr. Tavexxer. And where was that service performed ? 

Mr. Kimoto. Performed at the office of OWI on Kapiolani Boule- 
vard. Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did vou serve anj' place other than in Hawaii? 

Mr. Ktmoto. For the OWI? 

Mr. Taa-enner. Yes. 

Mr. Ki3roTo. I have not. 

]\Ir. TA^^:NXER. The same oath of office states : 

I further swear that 1 do not advocate nor am I a member of any political 
party or organization that advocates the overthrow of tlie Government of the 
United States by force or violence and, during such time as I am an employee of 
the Federal Government, I will not advocate nor become a member of any 
political party or organization that advocates the over^^hrow of the Government 
of the United States by force or violence. 

Now do you still desire to refuse to answer that question, as to 
whether you signed an affidavit stating those facts? 

Mr. Kimoto. I have already answered that question, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. Answer it again. 

Mr. Ki:\raro. I refuse to answer the question on the same grounds 
as previously stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Isn't the reason for your refusal to answer that 
question the fact that you were a member of the Commimist F'arty at 
the time you executed that oath ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 



2034 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. KiMOTO. Accordino; to the advice of my counsel, I refuse to 
answer that question on the oround it might tend to incriminate me, 
and on the furtlier ground that this committee is attempting to compel 
me to disclose what may or may not be my private political belief and 
association, and that the purpose for which this committee was 
created is unconstitutional. 

Mr. Walter. With that statement the Supreme Court of the United 
States is not in accord. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. I desire to offer in evidence Form 57, application 
for Federal employment, and ask it be marked "Kimoto Exhibit No. 
1" ; and the oath of office Standard Form No. 61, as "Kimoto Exhibit 
No. 2." 

Mr. Walter. Let them be marked and received for the record.^^ 

Mr. Taa-enner. Turning now to exhibit No. 1 

Mrs. BousLOG. We will stipulate that any questions of and per- 
taining to the documents, the answer will be the same, and perhaps we 
can save the time of the committee. 

Mr. Ta%'enner. When the question is asked, the witness can answer 
it. 

Mrs. BousLOG. In other words 

Mr. Walter. We have plenty of time. Go ahead with your ques- 
tions. 

Mr. Tavenner. According to the record of employment given on 
Form 57, 1 find the following : 

Honolulu, T. H., September 1928 to May 1931, newspaper reporter ; employer 
Hawaii Hochi Sha, South Queen Street, Honolulu. Newspaper publisher. Su- 
pervisor — Sadasuke Terasaki (editor). Reason for leaving — to go to mainland. 

Is that a correct statement of your employment at that time ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kimoto. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds 
as previously stated. 

Mr. Ta\'i:nner. How were you emploved between September 1928 
and May 1931? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kimoto. Will you please repeat the question, please? 

Mr. Tavenner. How w^ere you employed between September 1928 
and 1931? 

Mr. Kimoto. I was employed by the Hawaii Hochi, a Japanese daily 
language newspaper. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed now ? 

Mr. Kimoto. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds 
as previously stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been so employed ? [Laughter 
in the audience.] 

Mrs. BousLOG. Mr. Chairman, will the chairman permit such a 
question? 

Mr. Tavenner. No; that is a facetious question and I will with- 
draw it. 

After you were employed with the newspaper to which you re- 
ferred, how were you employed? In other words, what job did you 
take after finishing your job with the newspaper. 

Mr. Kimoto. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds. 

22 Retained in committee files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2035 

Mr. Taa'enner. Did you go to the mainland after you completed 
your employment in May 1931 with the newspaper in Honolulu? 

Mr. KiMOTO. Yes; I did go to the maiidand. 

Mv. Tavexner. When tlid you return to the Territory of Hawaii? 

Mr. KiMOTO. lOoS. 

Mr. Tavenner. How were you employed between 1931 and 1938? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds 
I have pre\iously stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where did you live during that period? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

INIr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Can j^ou point out to the committee what the basis 
of your claim is for refusing to answer a question as to where you 
lived between 1931 and 1938 that might tend to incriminate you? I 
think under the decided cases there is an obligation in that situation 
on 3'our part to give the committee some idea as to why and on what 
you base such a claim. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

IMr. KiMOTO. I reply to the question on the basis of the advice of 
my counsel. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. That is no answer of yours; that is an answer of 
your counsel. Will you state what your reasons are ? 

Mr. KiMOTO. I know that these questions is motivated by the ulti- 
mate airii of somehow t^dng up myself w^ith something that might 
tend to incriminate me. That is the purpose of the hearing, as I 
understand. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well now, your Form 57 has an entry of this char- 
acter. First, let me ask you what type of work did you do while you 
were on the mainland ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mi\ Tavenner. Just what general type of work ? 

INIr. KiMOTO. The general type of work has been writing and tranS' 
lating. 

Mr. Tavenner. You translate. In other words, you were translat- 
ing from English to Japanese or Japanese to English. 

Mr. KiMOTO. That is right. 

IMr. Taatnner. Then is this statement correct, which I read from 
Exhibit No. 1, which is your form 57, correct? 

Los Angeles, Calif. June 1931 to April 1938, self-employed, translator English- 
Japanese, 577 Central Avenue, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Is that true or false ? 

Mr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds 
as previously stated. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Roy Lane ? 

Mr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question on the same ground 
as previously stated. 

ISIr. Ta'stenner. Did you at any time use the name Roy Lane while 
Tou were in the Communist Party? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. KiMOTO. In the first place, that is a question that is based on 
the assumption that I am a member of the Communist Party, and then 
asking another question, whether I used the name Roy Lane. 



2036 COMMUNIST ACTRITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. I will be very glad to divide it. Did you ever use 
the name Boy Lane any place, any time? 

Mr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you ever a member of the Communist Party 
at any time or any place? 

Mr. Ktmoto. I refuse to answer that question for the same reasons. 

Mr. Tavenner. Didn't you go by the name of Eoy Lane in the 
Communist Party and were you not issued a Communist Party book 
No. 75649 in 1937? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question for the same reasons. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you look at this photostatic copy of a regis- 
tration blank and a receipt for a notebook, a party book, membership 
book, and what appears to be an index card, and state what they mean 
to you ? 

(Witness examines the documents and confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Just explain the whole transaction, as you see it 
there. 

Mr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question on the ground it may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the photostatic copy in evidence 
and mark it Exhibit No. 3. 

Mr. Walker. Mark it and let it be receivecl.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to read exhibit No. 3 [reading] : 

1938. Registration blank. Please write in ink. Section DT. 

Do you know what "DT'' means? Downtown? Is that correct? 
(Witness confers with coimsel.) 
Mr. Tavenner (reading) : 

Unit blank, branch A-S. Real name, Jack Kimoto ; party name, Roy Lane. 
Correct address — 

there are figures there blurred over with ink as if they were struck 
out, followed by the figures 156 North Beaudry. 

Year joined, 1931, book No. 37-75649; 1938, 59367; nationality, Japanese; 
county of birth, Hawaii ; age, 31 ; present occupation, translator ; employed, yes. 
Other mass organizations : Japanese-American Citizens League. What function : 
Round table. 

Is that a Communist Party registration blank, as far as you know? 

Mr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Walter. What does that "round table'' mean ? 

Mr. IviMOTO. I think — [witness confers with counsel]. Not based 
on that thing that Mr. Tavenner is talking about, I guess "round 
^able" means something distinguished from table of other shape. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, Mr. Kimoto, we are not talking about articles 
of furniture here; we are talking about organizations. What does 
"round table" mean in your judgment, when used as a f miction of an 
organization such as the Japanese-American Citizens League? 

Mr. Kimoto. Not referring to the particular matter you are talking 
about. I have noticed that "round table," the term "round table" has 
been used in connection with some organizations having discussions 
on various issues, forums. 

^ Retained in committee flies. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2037 

Mr. Tavkxnek. No-vv, I will read to you nnothor part of exhibit No. 
3. At the top there appears No. aOoGT, under which appears this: "I 
have received membership book. Roy Lane, signature; State, Cali- 
fornia; district, 13; county, L. A.; city, L. A.; section DT, unit A-8; 
date, December !). 1<)37." ^ 

I desire to read the photostatic copy of the card, at the head of which 
are the words "at lar^e. No. 75649. 1931. R: Denichi Kimoto." I 
assume that '*R'' means real name. "P," assumin<2: it means party 
name, "Ray or Roy Lane. A," assuming it means address, "2001 
Arapahoe Street." Did you ever live on Arapahoe Street? 

Mr. KiMOTO. On advice of my counsel, I refuse to answer that ques- 
tion for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. Followed by the words "Translator, USA. 1906. 
Japanese." 

(Mr. Tavenner handed documents to Chairman Walter.) 

Mr. TAMi:NXER. Are you now or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question for the same reasons 
previously stated. 

Mr. TA^^:NXER. I have no further questions. Oh, just a moment. 

In response to a question by the chairman, you stated you were em- 
ployed in the Territory of Hawaii by the Office of War Information. 
How lono; were you employed at that position ? 

]Mr. KiMOTO. Approximately 1 year. 

ISIr. Tavenxer. Who employed you ? 

IVIr. KiMOTO. You mean the man in charge of that office at that time ? 

Mr. Tavexx-^er. Yes. 

Mr. KiMOTO. jVIr. Bradford Smith. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Were you ever an editor of the Hawaii Star ? 

Mr. KiMOTO. I refuse to answer that question for the same reason. 

iVIr. Tavexxer. You refuse to answer that question ? 

]Mr. Kimoto. Yes. 

JNIr. Tavexx'er. On what ground ? 

Mr. KiMOTO. On the grounds I have previously stated, that it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Will you assign to this committee any evidence 
that they might consider which would lead them to believe that there 
is some danger of incriminating you by such a reply to that question? 

Mr. KiMOTO. Well, this is an unusual time. At normal time 

Mr. Tavexxer. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. That is all. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. KiMOTO. I would like to add to that question, if you will permit, 
that I have seen a person discharged from his job before the cliarge 
against him was proved. Like in the case of Dr. John Reinecke. He 
was fired from his teaching position even before he was called before 
a committee like this. 

JSfr. Walter. Well, I would like to correct your impression. I have 
been informed that he lost his position because he refused to cooperate 
or indicated that he intended to refuse to cooperate with a branch 
of this Government, whose protection so many people seek. So you are 
misinformed. 



2038 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. KiMOTO. Well, those who have the reputation of being a radical 
have very slim chance of getting a job around here. That is another 
reason. 

(Witness was excused.) 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will stand adjourned until 9:30 
tomorrow morning. 

(Whereupon, at 3 : 38 p. m., Tuesday, April 18, 1950, an adjourn- 
ment was taken until 9: 30 a. m., Wednesday, April 19, 1950.) 



HEAEINGS REGARDING COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 
TEERITOEY OF HAWAII— PART 3 



WEDNESDAY, APRIL 19, 1950 

Subcommittee or the House of Representatives, 

Committee on Un-American Activities, 



Honolulu^ T. H. 



public session 



The subcommittee of four met, pursuant to call, at 9: 30 a. m., in 
the senate chamber, lolani Palace, Hon. Francis E. Walter (subcom- 
mittee cliairman) presiding. 

Committee members present : Representatives Francis E, Walter, 
Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold H. Velde. 

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel; William 
A. Wheeler and Courtney E. Owens, investigators ; and John W. Car- 
rington, clerk. 

Mr. Walter. The meeting will be in order. Mr. Tavenner, will 
you call a witness ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Yukio Abe, please. 

Mr. Chairman, the witness is not subpenaed until 2. I thought he 
might be here. 

Mr. Frank Kalua. 

Mr. Walter. You swear the testimony that you are about to give 
will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God ? 

Mr. Kalua. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF FRANK KALUA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliat is your name, please ? 

Mr. Kalua. Frank Kalua. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live, Mr. Kalua. 

Mr. Kalua. Honolulu, 2027 Colburn. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Kalua. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself? 

Mr. Symonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds, and I want to file 
on behalf of the witness a motion to quash the service of the subpena, 
in the same form as those previously filed.^* 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed ? 

^ Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Frank Kalua is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 

2039 



2040 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Kalua. Stevedore, McCabe, Hamilton & Renny. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been em[)loyecl there? 

Mr. Kalua. About 8 or 9 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you occupied any position in your local union 
since 1945 ? 

Mr. Kalua. Pardon, sir? 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you held any position in your union since 
1945 ? Any office of any kind ? 

Mr. Kalua. Yes, executive board. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Saturnino Cablay? 

Mr. Kalua. I refuse to answer, on the ground it might tend to in- 
criminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you attended any Communist Party meetings 
at which he was present 

Mr. Kalua. I refuse 

Mr. Tavenner. Just a minute. From 1945 up until the present 
time? 

Mr. Kalua. The same answer, for the same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now, or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. Kalua. The same answer. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. No further questions. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Ta\t3Nner. IMr. Shigeo Takemoto. 

Mr. Walter. Will you stand up please. Raise your right hand. 
Do you swear the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Takemoto. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF SHIGEO TAKEMOTO, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, MYEE C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tam^inner. What is your full name, please ? 

Mr. Takemoto. Shigeo Takemoto. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live ? 

Mr. Takemoto. Wailuku, Maui. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Takemoto. I am. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. Will counsel please identify himself? 

Mr. Symonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds. On behalf of this 
witness, I desire to file a motion to quash the service of the subpena.^^ 

Mr. Ta^tsnner. Will you please give to the committee a brief resume 
of your educational background ? 

Mr. Takemoto. I am a graduate of the Ohio State University, with 
a degree of bachelor of electrical engineering. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee briefly what record of 
employment you have had ? 

Mr. Takemoto. I have been working for the Wailuku Sugar Co. 
for the past 17 or 18 years as electrician. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you so employed now ? 

Mr. Takemoto. I am. 



25 Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Shicreo Takemoto is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2041 

Mr. Tayknner. Do you hold any position of any character of a 
political nature, or an administrative nature in the Government? 

Mr. Takeimo'1'0. I do. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. What is that ? 

Mr. Takemoto. I am a member of the Maui Civil Service Commis- 
sion. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. There was testimony j^iven before the committee by 
Fedrico Lorenzo. Do you know Fedrico Lorenzo? 

Mr. Takemoto. On the advice of my counsel, I refuse to answer, 
on the ground that it mi<iht tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now, or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party? 

Mv. Takemoto. For the same reason, I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you want to explain the testimony given by Mr. 
Fedrico Lorenzo relating to your presence at an alleged Communist 
Party meeting? Do you not have some statement that you want to 
make to this committee regarding that? 

Mr. Takemoto. I refuse to answer for the same reasons. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Frank Takahashi ? 

Mr. Take:moto. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever attended a Communist Party meet- 
ing with Frank Takahashi ? 

]Mr. Takemoto. For the same reason, I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. Excused. 

(Witness excused.) 

INIr. Tavenner. Tom Yagi. 

Mr. Walter. Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give 
will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God? 

Mr. Yagi. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF THOMAS S. YAGI, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please ? 

Mr. Yagi. Thomas S. Yagi. 

Mr. Tax^enner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Yagi. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself? 

Mr. Symonds. Myer C. Symonds. I file on behalf of this witness a 
motion to quash the service of the subpena, in the same form as has 
been filed for the other witnesses. 

Mr. Walter. It may be received.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live ? 

Mr. Yagi. Wailuku, ISIaui. 

Mr. Ta^t3nner. How long have you lived there? 

Mr, Yagi. For 28 years. 

INIr. Ta\t.nner. How old are you ? 

]Mr. Yagi. Twenty-eight. 

2" Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Tliojnas S. Yagi is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



2042 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed? Where do you work? 

Mr. Yagi. For the ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. In what capacity? 

Mr. Yagi. Division vice president. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you held that position ? 

Mr. Yagi. Since 1948. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Before that, did you hold a position with your local 
union ? 

Mr. Yagi. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. What position was it ? 

Mr. Yagi. Secretary and treasurer. That was under local 1-42. 

Mr. Taat.nner. Wliile you were holdino; such a position with your 
local union, did you collect dues from persons for membership in the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Yagi. On the advice of counsel, I refuse to answer, on the 
ground it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Do you know Dr. Keinecke? 

Mr. Yagi. The same answer, for the same reason. 

Mr. TA\Ti:NNER. Will you advise the committee why you think it 
would incriminate you to give tliem some information upon which 
they can make a decision, as to wliether or not your possible acquaint- 
anceship with Dr. Reinecke would incriminate you? 

Mr. Yagi. On the advice of my counsel. I refuse to answer. 

Mr. TA^^:NNER. Do you know Fedrico Lorenzo ? 

Mr. Yagi. The same answer, for the same reason. 

Mr. Taat:nner. Did you attend a meeting of any character with 
Fedrico Lorenzo ? 

Mr. Yagi. The same answer, for the same reason. 

INIr. Tavenner. Are you now, or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Yagi. The same answer, for tlie same reason. 

Mr. Tavenner. There are no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. Excused. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Taa'enner. Frank Takahashi. 

Mr. Walter. Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give 
will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God? 

Mr. Takahashi. I do, 

Mr. Walter. Sit down. 

TESTIMONY OF FRANK TAKAHASHI, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please? 
Mr. Takahashi. Frank Takahashi, 
Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 
Mr. Takahashi. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Will counsel please identify himself? 
INIr. Stmonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds, and I file on behalf 
of this witness a motion to quash service of the subpena.-^ 

2T Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Frank Takahashi is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2043 

Mr. Tavexnee. Mv. Takahashi, liow old are you? 

INIi-. Takahashi. Twenty-nine years old. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live ? 

Mr. Takahashi. Piuuiene, Maui. 

Mr. Tavenxek. How are you employed, what job do you have? 

Mr. Takahashi. Draftsman. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. By whom? 

Mr. Takahashi. H. C. & S. Co. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you worked for that company in 
that capacity? 

JSIr. Takahashi. Oh, say about a little over 2 years, I guess. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. And before that, how were you employed? 

Mr. Takahashi. I was employed in the machine shop. 

Mr. TA^^ENNER. By whom? 

Mr. Takahashi. The same company. 

Mr. Tavenner. And for how long a period of time ? 

Mr. Takahashi. The last 2 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before that, how were you employed ? 

INIr. Takahashi. As business agent for the union, for local 144. 

INIr. TA^^NNER. How long were you business agent for local 144 ? 

Mr. Takahashi. A little over a year, I guess. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before that, did you hold any position with your 
local union? 

Mr. Takahashi. Before that, I have been chairman of the union. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long were you chairman? 

Mr. Takahashi. About 2 or 3 years, I guess. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend as a delegate, a convention of the 
HL-WU, which met in the YMCA Building here in Honolulu, dur- 
ing 1947? 

Mr. Takahashi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. What was the date of that convention, as near as 
you can recall? 

Mr. Takahashi. I don't recall. Some place around in 1947, 1 guess. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you remember what month it was held? 

Mr. Takahashi. I don't recall it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Lorenzo, or Fedrico Lorenzo, also a delegate 
to that same convention with you? 

Mr. Takahashi. Yes, there was a Fedrico Lorenzo, a delegate. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you recall at the time whether the Izuka pam- 
phlet had come out? 

Mr. Takahashi. Yes. 

Mr. Ta\^enner. It had? 

Mr. Takahashi, Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Amos Ignacio? 

Mr. Takahashi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did Amos Ignacio claim that the leadership of the 
ILWU had been infiltrated by the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Takahashi. I don't know. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know? 

Mr. Takahashi. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Had it been infiltrated by the Communist Party? 

Mr. Takahashi. On the advice of counsel, I refuse to answer, on 
the ground it might tend to incriminate me. 



2044 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. You think by answering the question as to whether 
other people who were members, or other people who were in a high- 
ranking position in the ILWU were members of the Communist Party 
would incriminate you ? 

Mr. Takahasiii. Yes ; on the advice of my counsel. 

Mr. Tavenner. After the meeting of the ILWU was over, that is, 
the one that was held in 1947 at the YMCA hall, when you said you 
and Fedrico Lorenzo worked together, did you attend a conference 
in the home of Jack Hall on the same day or night ? 

Mr. Takahashi. I refuse to answer, on the ground that it might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Major Okada? 

Mr. Takahashi. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Was Major Okada a delegate to that convention 
that you attended at the YMCA hall ? 

;Mr. Takahashi. I guess so. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. Did you drive any place in an automobile with 
Major Okada after that meeting? 

Mr. Takahashi. I refuse to answer, on the same ground. 

Mr. Tavenner. You refuse to answer. 

Mr. Walter, Are you afraid that because you were associated with 
somebody that you might be incriminated by that ? 

jNIr. Takahashi. On the advice of my lawyer. 

Mr. Walter. Well, I attended a Connnunist convention in London 
seyeral years ago. Do you think that incriminates me ? 

(No response.) 

Mr. Walter. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you state to Fedrico Lorenzo, after the ILWIT 
meeting at the YMCA'^hall in 1947, in Honolulu 

Mr. Takahashi. I beg your pardon ? 

Mr. Tavenner. I will state the question over again. Did you say 
to Fedrico Lorenzo, after the ILWU meeting was over, that you 
wanted him to go to a Communist Party, or a CP party meeting 
with you, at the home of Jack Hall, or any other place ? 

Mr. Takahashi. I refuse to answer, on the same ground. 

Mr. Tax^enner. Are you now, or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Takahashi. I refuse to answer, on the same gi'ound. 

Mr. Ta%tenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. Excused. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Yukio Abe. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please? Do you 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Abe. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF YUKIO ABE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYEE C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state your name, please? 
Mr. Abe. Yukio Abe. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 
Mr. Abe. Yes, sir. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2045 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel identify himself for the record. 

Mr. Symonds. Myer C. Synionds. And 1 hie the same motion to 
quash service of the subpena as I have heretofore liled. 

Mr. Walter. It will be received.'^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Mi-. Abe, where do you live? 

Mr. Abe, I live at 2007 Third Avenue. 

Mr. Tavenner. How old are you 't 

Mr. Abe. Thirty-four years old. 

Mr. Tavenner. You referred to the street address. At what place, 
what city? 

Mr. Abe. Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed ? 

Mr. xVbe. In the capacity of laboi- union official, secretary-treasurer. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you served in that capacity ? 

Mr. Abe. Since 1945, I guess. 

Mr. Moulder. What was the position, Mr. Tavenner? I did not 
get it. 

Mr. Tavenner. Secretary-treasurer. 

Was that secretary-treasurer of a local union? 

Mr. xVbe. Local 136, formerly 137. 

Mr. Tavenner. There has been evidence introduced at this hearing, 
Mr. Abe, that you attended Communist Party meetings at the home 
of Jack Kimoto. Did you attend any Communist Party meetings at 
the home of Jack Kimoto since 1945? 

( Witness confers with counsel. ) 

Mr. Abe. On the advice of my attorney, I refuse to answer the 
question on the grounds that it will tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner, Are you now or have you ever been a member of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Abe. I refuse to answer on the same grounds, for the same 
reasons. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. You are excused. 

Mr. Tavenner, Robert Murasaki. 

Mr. Walter. Will you hold up your right hand, please? Do you 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Murasaki. I do. 

Mr, Walter, Sit down. 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT MURASAKI, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Ta\t5NNEr. What is your name, please? 
Mr. MuRASAKT. Robert Murasaki. 
Mr. Tav'exner. Are you represented by counsel ? 
Mr. Murasaki. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself? 
]\Ir. Symonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds. And I file a motion 
to cjuash the service of the subpena in behalf of this witness.'^' 



29 



-' Text of iiKition to quash service of subpena l)y Yuklo Al>e is identical witii tlie motion 
filed on behalf of Ralph Tokiuiaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 

2» i^ext of motion to quash service of subpena by Robert Murasaki is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



2046 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX HAWAII 

Mr. TA\-Ex>rER, Where do vou live. Mr. Murasaki ? 

Mr. MuKASAKi. Piiimene. Maui. 

Mr. Ta\'exxer. How old are you? 

Mr. Murasaki. Forty-five. 

Mr. TA^"Ex^'ER. How are you now employed? 

^Ir. ^luRASAKi. I am employed with the United Sugar "Workers. 

Mr. TA^"EXXF.R. How long have you been employed there i 

Mr. Murasaki. A little over a year now. 

Mr. Tavexxer. Prior to that time, how were you employed? 

Mr. ^Murasaki. Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co.. Puuneue. 

Mr. Ta^-exxer. How long were you employed there? 

Mr. Murasaki. I think about 13 or 14 years. 

Mr. TA^-EX^*ER. Have 3011 been an official of a local union at any 
time since 1945? 

Mr. ]\IuRASAKi. Yes. 

^Ir. TA^•EX-^'ER. What position did you hold ? 

Mr. ^Murasaki. As unit chairman. 

Mr. Ta'S'ex'xer. During what period of time? 

Mr. ^Iurasaki. Probably about 1946. 

^Ir. TA^'E^'x'ER. And for how long? 

]Mr. ^Murasaki. And for a little over a year. Probably a year. 

Mr. Ta^-exxer. While you held such an office, did you take part in 
any Communist Party meetings at Thomas Yagi's home or at the home 
of any other person i 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Murasaki. On the advice of my counsel, I refuse to answer 
because it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavex'xer. Are vou now or have vou ever been a member of 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. Murasaki. I refuse to answer the same question, the same 
answer. 

Mr. Ta^-exx'er. On the same ground ? 

Mr. Murasaki. Yes. 

Mr. TA^-EX'XER. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Moulder. May I ask a C[uestion? Do you recall the ILWTJ 
union convention meeting which was held at the YMCA in Honolulu 
in 1948 ? 

Mr. Tavexxt:r. In 1947. 

^Ir. Moulder. In 1947? 

Mr. Murasaki. I recall it. 

Mr. Moulder. You recall that meeting ? 

Mr. Murasaki. I recall it. 

Mr. Moulder. Wliile it was in session, did vou attend anv meetings 
of any other character other than that? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Murasaki. I refuse to answer on the same grounds, for the same 
reasons. 

]Mr. Moulder. That is all. 

(Witness was excused.) 

Mr. TA^^:x'x-ER. Kameo Ichimura. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? Do you swear 
that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Ichimura. I do. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2047 

TESTIMONY OF KAMEO ICHIMURA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please? 

Mr. IcniMURA. My name is Kameo Ichimnra. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Will you stale your name ayain, please? 

Mr. IciiiMURA. Kameo Icliimura. 

Mr. Symonds. I represent this witness, and I Avant to call attention 
to the fact that on the subpena his name was spelled Uchimura ; his real 
name is Icliimura. I file on behalf of this witness a motion to quash 
the service of the subpena.^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Was a subpena served upon you, INIr. Icliimura? 

Mr. IcHiMURA. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And in response to that subpena you have appeared 
here ? 

ISIr. Ichimura. Yes, sir. 

JVIr. Tavenner. Where do you live ? 

Mr. Ichimura. Lahaina, Maui. 

Mr. Ta\t2Nner. How old are you ? 

Mr. Ichimura. I am 40 years old. 

Mr. Tavenner. Probably you did not speak quite loudly enough. 
Where do you live ? 

Mr. Ichimura. Lahaina, Maui. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed ? 

IMr. Ichimura. At the present time I am business agent of the 
ILWU. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been business agent ? 

Mr. Ichimura. Approximately 3 years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Before you were a business agent, what position or 
positions did you hold with the ILWU ? 

Mr. Ichimura. I was vice president of the unit at Lahaina and also 
president of the unit at Lahaina. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long did you hold those positions? 

Mr. Ichimura. You mean the combined? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes. 

Mr. Ichimura. About 2 years, I think it is. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Ichimura, I want to call to your attention the 
testimony of a witness before this committee, a Mr. Fedrico Lorenzo. 
I asked him this question : 

Now, we were talking about the meetings, Communist meetings, held at the 
house of Thomas Yagi. Will you tell us who were present at those meetings? 

Mr. Lorenzo. The persons who were present were Frank Takahashi, Robert 
Morasaki, Thomas Yagi, Kameo Ichimura, Ben Nakamura, Shigeo Takemoto, 
mjself, and Koichi Imori. 

Did you attend a meeting at the home of Thomas Yagi at which 
any of the persons mentioned were present ^ 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Ichimura. On the advice of my counsel, I refuse to answer the 
question on the ground it tends to incriminate me. 

"•Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Kameo Ichimura is identical with the 
motion filed on bfhnif of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Mver C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 

66636—50 — pt. 3 8 



2048 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend a meeting of any kind at the home 
of Thomas Yagi? 

]\Ir. IcHiMUKA. For the reasons stated, I refuse to answer the 
question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you issued Comnmnist Party cards to any 
members of your imion, your local ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. IcHiMURA. For the same reasons, I refuse to answer the 
question. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you collected Communist Party dues from 
any of them ? 

Mr. IcHiMURA. For the same reason, I refuse to answer. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now or have you ever been a member of the 
Communist Party? 

jNIr. IcHiMURA. For the same reason, I refuse to answer the question. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Moulder. Are you now or have you ever been by belief or as 
a member affiliated with any political party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. IcHiMURA. Will you please repeat the question? 

Mr. Moulder. I said, are you now or have you ever been by belief 
in or as a member of any political party ? 

Mr. IcHiMURA. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. All right, that is all. 

(Witness was excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Thomas Tagawa. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please? Do you 
swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the truth, the 
whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Tagawa. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF THOMAS TAGAWA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

CHUCK MAU 

Mr. Mau. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, may the 
record show that I, Chuck Mau, represent this witness. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state your name, please? 

Mr. Tagawa. Thomas D. Tagawa. 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live? 

Mr. Tagawa. Wailuku, Maui. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you please state your age? 

Mr. Tagawa. Thirty-six years old. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed ? 

Mr. Tagawa. I am employed at Maui Pineapple Co. at Kahului, 
Maui. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you been employed there? 

Mr. Tagawa. Fifteen years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you hold any political office at this time? 

Mr. Tagaw^jl. Yes. I am Territorial representative from Maui. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Mr. Tagawa, during the course of this hearing, Mr. 
Fedrico Lorenzo testified in the matter in which your name was men- 
tioned, and I would like to read the testimony to you [reading] : , 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, we were talking about the meetings. Communist meet- 
ings, held at the house of Thomas Yagi. Will you tell us who were present at 
those meetings? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2049 

Mr. LoKKNzo. The persons who wore present were Fraiik Takahaslii, Robert 
Morasaki, Thomas Yagi, Kameo lehiuiura, Ben Nakauiura, Shigeo Takemoto, 
myself, and Koiehi Imori. 

iMr. Tavennku. What was the last name? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Koichi Imori. 

Mr. Tavenner. Koichi Imori. Do you recall whether there was a Filiijino 
boy present besides yourself? 

Mr. Lorenzo. No, sir. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know Tom Tagawa? 

Mr. LouExzo. I also forget to mention his name. He was also in that meeting. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tom Tagawa was there? 

Mr. Lorenzo. Yes, sir. 

Will you please state to the committee whether or not you were 
present at such a meeting? 

Mr. MoirLDER. You mean present at a meeting there ? 

Mr. Tavenner. Yes, sir. xVt such a meeting. At a meeting at Tom 
Yagi's house and, if so, what kind of a meeting it was, if you know. 

Mr. Tagawa. Did it state the date, the year of the meeting? 

Mr. Tavenner. The date was in 19-1:7, according to the testimony, 
and I am endeavoring to ascertain between what months. Let me 
ask you a question. Do you recall attending a meeting in 1947 at the 
home of Thomas Yagi ? 

Mr. Tagawa. On Lorenzo's allegation, I can honestly say that I 
have never been to a meeting with Lorenzo at Yagi's house. I have 
been to several meetings, that is, union meetings, in the union office, 
because at that time, if I recall correctly, he was the union business 
agent, and I have attended meetings, stewards' meetings, council 
meetings, and so forth. 

Mr. Tavenner. At the union ? 

Mr. Tagawa. At the union office. 

Mr. Tavenner. The question I asked you was about your attend- 
ance at a meeting at the home of Thomas Yagi. Do you recall whether 
you attended a meeting at the home of Thomas Yagi? 

Mr. Tagawa. I do not. 

Mr. Tavenner. You mean you don't recall. 

Mr. Tagawa. I don't recall any meeting with Lorenzo. 

Mr, Tavenner. Well, do you recall attending a meeting at Thomas 
Yagi's house, wliether Lorenzo, whether you remember whether 
Lorenzo was there or not. 

Mr. Tagawa. I don't recall any such meetings. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, do you recall attending any meeting at the 
home of Thomas Yagi, during 1947, regardless of the kind of meeting 
it might have been, regardless of who were present at the meetings? 

Mr. Tagawa. Well, we had gatherings, that is, political gatherings, 
social gatherings, and otherwise. Go over there to have some hekka 
dinner and discuss things. That is, union matters, political matters, 
or even the weather. 

Mr. Tax-enner. At the home of Thomas Yagi ? 

Mr. Tagawa. That is not the official meetings. Just go over there. 
Yagi would call me up and say, "Let's have a chicken hekka dinner 
tonight." But no such thing was discussed as far as communism is 
concerned. I can assure 3"ou that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, do you recall attending a meeting at Thomas 
Yagi's at which Frank Takahaslii was present and also Robert Mura- 
saki. Kameo Ichimura, Ben Nakamura, Koichi Imori, and Fedrico 
Lorenzo ? 



2050 COMMUXIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tagawa. Not all at one time. Sometimes I am there and 
sometimes I am not. Sometimes Yagi — I mean these other people 
were there, 

Mr. Tavenxer. Well, do you recall being there at any time when 
Fedrico Lorenzo was there? 

Mr. Tagawa. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Tavenner. You say not that you know of ? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you mean you don't remember, or do you mean 
that you were not at any such meeting ? 

Mr. Tagawa. That is right. That is, I don't remember. 

Mr. Ta^^enner. You don't remember. 

Mr. Tagawa. Being there. The only meetings, as I stated, that I 
seen him were in the union meetings, in the union office. 

Mr. Tavenner. At the union office. In other words, you don't re- 
call ever seeing him at the home of Thomas Yagi ; is that what you 
mean to say ? 

Mr. Tagawa. That is right ; that is right. 

Mr. Ta^t.nner. You say you don't remember. Do you mean that it 
is possible he was there and yet you don't recall it ? 

Mr. Tagawa. I am sure. I am very sure he was not there. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. But you are not positive about that ? 

Mr. Tagawa. I am positive. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. What was that? 

Mr. Tagaw^a. I am positive he was not there on these alleged meet- 
ings. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. Then, it is not a mere matter of you not remember- 
ing ; you are positive that he was not there, is that it ? 

Mr. Tagawa. I am positive he w-as not there. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever attended a Communist Party meet- 
ing, knowing it to be a Communist Party meeting? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been requested by anyone to become 
a member of the Connnunist Party ? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Ta-\^nner. Are you a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you ever see any Communist Party pamphlets 
or literature at the house of Thomas Yagi at any of the meetings you 
attended there ? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Ta\t]nner. Did you see any of the same type of material at the 
place where you say you did meet on union mattei"S, in the ILWU 
union office? 

Mr. Tagaw^a.. No. Just union literature. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Just union literature. 

Mr. Tagawa. Yes. 

Mr. Taa^nner. Did you see any Communist Partv literature there ? 

Mr. Tagaw^a. No. 

(Counsel confers with witness.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2051 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever 

Mr. JMau. I am sorry. 

Mr. Tavenneh. No, I did not want to interrupt you. If you desire 
to consult with liini, I don't mean to interrupt. 

]\Ir. T.v'awa. How do you distinouish between Comnnniist litera- 
ture and union literature? 

Mr. Tavennek. Well, wouldn't you think that the Communist Party 
constitution mi<iht constitute Communist Party literature^ Did you 
see that at any time? 

Mr. Tagaava. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Tavenner. Here is some of the Communist Party literature, 
for instance, which Mr. Fedrico Lorenzo introduced in evidence here, 
which was liiven to him, accordino- to his testimony, by Thomas Yagi, 
and in order that you might know just what that Communist Party 
literature was, in response to your inquiry, I will just give you the 
titles of some of the papers and some of the pamphlets. Constitu- 
tion of the Communist Partv of the United States of America. Did 
vou see that ? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Air. Tavenner. What You Should Know About Communism and 
About Communists. Did you see that pamphlet there ? 

JNIr. Tagawa. I did not see that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Marxism vs. Liberalism — An Interview, at the head 
of which appears the name "Joseph Stalin — H. G. Wells, Marxist 
Pamphlets No. 2." Did you see that? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Taa-enner. V. I. Lenin, Marxist Pamphlets No. 4, entitled 
"The State." Did you see that? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Does that give you a fairly clear idea of what 
Communist 

Mv. Tagawa. I do. 

Mr. Tavenner. Pamphlets and literature consist of ? 

Mr. Tagawa. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Another is this: Is Communism American? by 
Eugene Dennis — Nine Questions About the Communist Party An- 
swered. Organized Labor and the Fascist Danger, by William Z. 
Foster. Did you see that ? 

]\rr. Tagawa. I have seen that. 

]\Ir. Tavenner. You did see that in the union hall ? 

Mr. Tagawa. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Taatsnner. Now, let me ask you about some others. What You 
Should Know^ About the Communists, published by the Communist 
Party, U. S. A., New York City' Did you see that? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. Communist Review. Did you see that? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. The Menace of a New World War, by William Z. 
Foster. ' 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Ta\t5nner. Then all you can recall is having seen one of those 
pamphlets that I mentioned? 

Mr. Tagawa. That is riglit. 



2052 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Were any of them offered to you? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. AYere any pamphlets offered to yon, whether you 
recall their names or not, relating to communism? 

Mr. Tagawa. I don't recall. 

Mr. Tavenner. Or Russia? 

Mr, Tagawa. No. Well, once in a while I have throuo:h the mail ; 
I have some pamphlets sent over, pam])hlets like The Truth About 
Unionism; Why Work for Nothing? and so forth. 

Mr. Tavenner. I am sorry; I could not understand you, 

Mr. Tagawa. Well, pamphlets like Why Work for Nothing? 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Well, that is a good subject. Wlio sent you that ? 

Mr. Tagawa. Maybe it is from the union, because that happens 

Mr. Taa^nner. Well, I am not talking about union documents ; I am 
asking you whether or not at any of these meetings Communist litera- 
ture was distributed, handed out to you or other persons. 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is the question I am getting at. At none of 
the meetings that you attended was any Communist literature dis- 
tributed. Is that what you mean to say ? 

Mr. Tagawa. No literature was distributed. 

Mr. Velde. Did I understand you to say that some literature of the 
same type was sent to you through the mail? 

Mr. Tagawa. That is the one I just mentioned. 

Mr. Velde. That was just dealing with union activities. 

Mr. Tagawa. That is right. 

Mr. Velde. There was nothing sent to you through the mail dealing- 
with communism ? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

]Mr. Ta\'enner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Moulder. I did not clearly understand whether or not the wit- 
ness stated that he never did visit in the home of Thomas Yagi or 
not. 

Mr. Tagawa. I did visit in his home. 

IVIr. Moulder. You have visited in his home ? 

Mr. Tagawa. Yes ; as a friend, when he was holding a hekka party 
or some gathering, but that is all. 

Mr. Moulder. That is all. 

Mr. Velde. Did anyone appear to be in charge of those meetings 
or gatherings that j^ou attended at Mr. Yagi's home? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. No chairman or anything. 

Mr. Moulder. Did you know whether or not any of the persons who 
attended any of the meetings were members of the Communist Party 
or not? 

Mr. Tagawa. I don't know. 

Mr. Moulder. You don't know ? 

Mr. Tagawa. Yes. 

Mr. Moulder. Whether they were or were not ? 

Mr. Tagawa, I don't know. I didn't inquire. 

Mr. Tavenner. Do you know any person who is a member of the 
Communist Partv in the Territory of Hawaii ? 

Mr. Tagawa. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. You don't know a single soul who is a member of 
the Communist Party, to your knowledge. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2053 

Mr. Tagawa. Yes. 

Mr. Tam2NNer. 1 have no further questions. Do you know Koichi 
Imori ? 

Mv. Tagawa. I do. 

]Mr. Tavennfr. At the time tlmt you met with liim at tlie liome of 
Thomas Yafji, had he been kicked out of the American P'exUn-ation of 
Labor because of his Connnunist activity ; do you know whether tliat 
was before or after? 

Ml-. Tagawa. I believe that was after. Whether lie was kicked out 
or not, there are two stories about that, I <!;ather from the newspaper. 
One story is that he was kicked out and another story is that he 
resi<2:ned. 

]\Ir. TA^^:xxER. All yon know about that is from hearsay, what you 
saw in the paper. 

Mr, Tagawa. From news])aper accounts, 

Mv. Tavenner. You don't know anything of your personal knowl- 
edge? 

^Ir, Tagawa, No, 

Mr, Tavenner. As to whether he was a Communist or whether he 
was not ? 

Mr, Tagawa. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. That is all, 

Mr. Mau, Mr. Chairman, I wonder if the witness could read a state- 
ment into the record. 

INIr. Waltet?. You leave the statement with us and we will file it as 
part of the record. 

Statement by Representative Tom Tagawa 

I am a union man. I am also a businessman. I liave never believed in com- 
miinisni and do not believe in it now. 

As a union man, I believe that unionism need not and should not be tied in with 
comnmnism and that communism in the labor movement will weaken rather 
than streuiithen that movement. 

As a businessman I want to be independent and follow the true American way 
of life — but not the American way of life as followed by reactionaries who disre- 
gard the rights of the little man and labor. 

I am a good, loyal American and I want to remain a good, loyal American. 

As a representative of the people, by reason of my memt)ership in the Terri- 
torial legislature, I am happy to have this opportunity to clear my Americanism. 

(Witness excused.) 
Mr, Tavenner. Tadashi Ogawa, 
Mr, Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? 
Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 
Mr. Ogawa. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF TADASHI OGAWA ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYEE C. SYMONDS 

Mr. TA^^NNER. What is your name, please ? 

Mr. Ogawa, Tadashi Ogawa, 

Mr, Tavenner, Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr, Ogawa, Yes, I am, 

Mr, Tavenner, Will counsel please identify himself. 



2054 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Symonds. I am Myer C. Symonds, and while the subpena in 
this case was addressed to Castner Tadashi Ogawa, I have tiled on 
behalf of the witness a motion to quash the subpena.^^ 

Mr. Ta\':enner. How did yon say the subpena was prepared? 

Mr. Symonds. I suppose it is the way it shows on here. It says 
"Castner." 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your first name ? 

Mr. Ogawa. Tadashi. I am known as "Castner." That is my 
nickname. 

Mr. Tavenner. Your real name is what ? Your correct name is 
what? 

Mr. Ogawa. Tadashi Ogawa, 

Mr. Tavenner. But jDeople refer to you as "Castner"? 

Mr. Ogawa. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you are also known by the name of "Castner" ? 

Mr. Ogawa. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. And the subpena that was served on you gave the 
name "Castner," is that correct? 

Mr. Ogawa. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. But it was served on you, and you are here in 
answer to that subpena, are you not? 

Mr. Ogawa. Yes. 

Mr. Tav-enner. Where do you live ? 

JNIr. Ogawa. Waipahu, 

Mr. Tavenner. How old are you ? 

]\Ir. Ogawa. Thirty-nine years. 

Mr. Tavenner. Wliere do you work? 

Mr. Ogawa. At present I am working as a business agent for Local 
142, United Sugar Workers, Oahu division. 

Mr. Ta\'enner. How long have you worked in that capacity ? 

Mr. Ogawa. Since February 1, 1950. 

Mr. Tavenner. And before that, what position did you hold with 
the union. 

Mr. Ogawa. Last year I was chairman of tlie Waipahu unit. 

Mr. Tavenner. And how long were you chairman ? 

Mr. Ogawa. I held the chairmanship for about 3 years, since the 
union was formed in Hawaii. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. Before you held that position, what position did 
you hold with the union, if any? Did you hold some office in your 
local union, before you were president of it ? 

Mr. Ogawa. Yes. I Avas secretary-treasurer, I believe, the first 
year. 

ISIr. Tavenner. And how long were you secretary and treasurer ? 

]Mr. Ogawa. I cannot remember how long. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Several years ? 

Mr. Ogawa. No, I believe in the last 2 years — about a year or 
something. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, did you attend any Communist Party meet- 
ing at the home of Jack Kimoto while you held the position, the 
official position, with your local union ? 

31 Text of motion to quash service of subpena by Tadashi Ogawa is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myers C. Symonds. This 
motion appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2055 

Mr. Ogawa. On the ;ul\ ice ol' my counsol, I refuse to answer the 
question, on the jirounds that it niight tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did you attend a meeting of any kind at the home 
of Jack Kimoto that you can reniembei-? 

INIr. Ogawa. I answer on the same ground. 

INIr. Tavenner. Are you now, oi- have you ever been a member of 
the Connnunist Party? 

Mr. Ogaava, I refuse to answer, on tlie same ground. 

Mr. Tavennek. No further questions. 

Mr. Walter. Do you know- the acklress of Jack Kimoto; where he 
resides ? 

Mr. Ogawa. Are you addressing that to me? 

jSIr. Walter. Yes. 

]Mr. Ogawa. I refuse to answer the question, on the grounds that it 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta\t^nner. I have no further questions. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tavennp:r. Jack H. Kawano. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please ? 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give wall be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

INIr, ICvwANO. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JACK H. KAWANO. ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

MYER C. SYMONDS 

]Mr. Ta\'enner. What is your name, please, sir? 

Mr. Kawano. My name is Jack Kawano ; Jack H. Kawano. 

Mv. Tavenner. Are you represented by counsel ? 

Mr. Kaw^ano. I am. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel proceed to identify himself. 

Mr. Symonds. My name is Myer C. Symonds, and I have filed a 
motion on behalf of this witness to quash the service of the subpena. 
It is in the same form as all the others.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you please state your place of residence? 

Mr. Kaw^\no. 3190 Booth Koad, Paoa Valley. 

Mr. Tavp:nner. How long have you lived there? 

Mr. Kawano. It is hard to remember. I have been there for a very, 
very long time. 

]Mr. Taatinner. How are you employed ? 

Mr. Kawano. I am not employed at the present time. 

Mr. Taa-enner. What was your last employment? 

Mr. Ivawano. My last employment was that as a stevedore w4th 
Castle & Cooke Terminals, Ltd. 

Mr, Tavenner. And how long were you employed by them? 

Mr. Kaw^^no. From shortly, very short, just about for a couple of 
weeks, for the most. 

Mr. Tavenner. When was that ? 

Mr. Kaw^vno. That was in the month of January. 

Mr. Tavenner. This year? 

Mr. Kawano. This year. 

^ Text of motion to quash f?ervice of subpena by Jack H. Kawano is identical with the 
motion filed on behalf of Ralph Tokunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This motion 
appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



2056 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Tavenner. Prior to that what was your employment? 

Mr. Kawano. Prior to that I w^as employed as president of the 
ILWU, local 137, which is the longshore division. 

Mr. Tavenjs^er. IIow long were yon president? 

]\Ir. Kawano. It is hard for me to remember, because I have been 
president for a very long time. 

Mr. TA^'ENNER. You were president up until what time ? 

Mr. Kawano. Up until the last day of last year. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you president as early as 1945, or 1946 ? 

Mr. Kawano. I was, even before that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Were you president back to 1038 of your local 
union, wdiatever the union might have been known by at that time? 

Mr. Kawano. I think I was. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, there has been testimony introduced here, Mr. 
Kawano, that Communist Party meetings were held in your house. 
Is that true or not? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kawano. I refuse to answer that question, on the grounds that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Kawano. I am not a Communist. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. You are not a Communist now, is that what you 
mean ? 

Mr. Kawano. I just said I am not a Communist. 

Mr. Tavenner. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Kawano. I refuse to answer that question, on the grounds that 
it might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. At the time that you were president of your local 
union, were you a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Kawano. I refuse to answer that on the some grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. When you were working, in January 1950, at the 
employment that you mentioned, were you a member of the Commu- 
nist Party at that time ? 

Mr. Kawano. I refuse to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state to the committee, then, what you 
mean when you say you are not a member of the Communist Party? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kawano. I refuse to answ^er that on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. But you contend you are not a member of the Com- 
munist Party at this time ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kawano. I refuse to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then let me ask you : I understood you to say 
a few moments ago — to say ; to use this language in your testimony, 
that "I am not a Communist." 

Mr. Kawano. I said that. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that what you said ? 

Mr. Kawano. I said that "I am not a Communist." 

Mr. Tavenner. What do you mean when you say you are not a 
Communist 

Mr. Kawano. Just that. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2057 

Mr. Tavenner. And at the same time, you have no further ex- 
phmation 

Mr. Kawano. No further explanation. 

Mr. Tavenner. That you want to make ? 

Mr. Kaw.vjvo. No. 

Mr. Tavenner. I do not believe I have any other questions, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. You will be excused. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Benjamin Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Walter. Will you raise your right hand, please? 

Do you swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Kaahawinui. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF BENJAMIN KAAHAWINUI, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 

COUNSEL, MYER C. SYMONDS 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please? 

Mr. KAAHA^VINUI. Benjamin Kaahawinui. 

Mr. Taa^enner. Are you represented by counsel? 

Mr. Kaahaavinut. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel identify himself. 

Mr. Stivionds. Myer C. Symonds. On behalf of this witness I 
filed the same motion to quash service of the subpena, as has been 
filed on behalf of the other witnesses represented by me.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you live? 

Mr. Kaahawinui. 1918 Gulston Street. 

Mr. Tavenner. Is that in Honolulu? 

Mr. Kaahawinui. That's right. 

Mr. Ta\^nner. How old are you ? 

Mr. Kaahawtlnui. Forty-seven. 

Mr. Tavenner. How are you employed? That is, what work do 
you do? 

Mr. Kaahawinui. McCabe, Hamilton & Renny Co., longshoreman. 

Mr. Tavenner. How long have you worked there ? 

Mr. Kaahawinui About 9 years. 

Mr. TA^^NNER. There has been testimony presented to the com- 
mittee in which it was said that the Communist Party members met 
at your home; that is, that Communist Party meetings were held in 
your home on a number of occasions. Will you tell the committee 
whether the Communist Party meeting was ever held at your home ? 

Mr. Kaahawinui. I refuse to answer that question. It might 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, did you ever approach any individual and 
ask them to join the Communist Party? 

Mr. KAAHA^VINUI. I refuse to answer that question on the same 
basis. 

Mr. Tavenner. What positions have you held in the local unions, 
the local of your unions ? 

*' Text of motion to quash service of sulipena by B«^njainin Kaahawinui is identical with 
the motion filed on behalf of Ralph Towunaga by his attorney, Myer C. Symonds. This 
motion appears on p. 1472 (Part 1). 



2058 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

]\Ir. Kaahawinui. I used to be a member of the executive board, 
and ex-business agent. 

Mr. Tavenner. For how long a period have you held these 
positions ? 

Mr. Kaahawinui. Oh, at different times, I think, for about 8 or 9 
years, 

Mr. Ta\"enner. For 8 ot 9 years? 

Mr. Kaahawinui. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Well, were you continuously an officer of your 
local, in one capacity or another, for a period of 8 or 9 years ? 

Mr. Kaahawinui. Yes ; one or the other. 

Mr. Tavenner. Now, during that period of time were you ever 
a member of the Communist Party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kaahawinui. I refuse to answer that question, on the grounds 
that it would tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you now a member of the Communist Party? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Kaahawinui. I answer on the same ground. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Walter. You will be excused. 

(Witness excused.) 

Mr. Tavenner. Dave Thompson, please. 

(No response.) 

Robert Wenkam. 

(No response.) 

Mr. Chairman, that is all for the present. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will stand in recess. 

(Whereupon, at 11 : 45 a. m. April 19, 1950, a recess was taken to 
2 p.m. April 19, 1950.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

(The hearing vras resumed at 2 p. m.. Representatives Francis E. 
Walter, Burr P. Harrison, Morgan M. Moulder, and Harold H. Velcle 
being present.) 

Mr. AValter. The committee will come to order. Mr. Tavenner, 
call your witness, please. 

^'h\ Tavenner. I would like to recall Mr. Wheeler to the stand. 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM A. WHEELER— Eesumed 

Mr. Tavenner. What is your name, please ? 

Mr. Wheeler. William A. Wheeler. 

Mr. Tavenner. You are an investigator of this committee ? 

Mr. Wheeler. Correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have previously testified during the course of 
this hearing? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes. 

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state to the committee whether or not, 
during the course of your investigation, you obtained a photostatic 
copy of the minutes of a meeting of the Hawaii division executive 
board, United Sugar Workers, ILWU, local 142, bearing the date of 
December 14, 1947, and if so, whether that is a photostatic copy which 
you received ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2059 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes; I identify this as a copy of the minutes that 
you refer to. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the document in evidence, and mark 
it as "Exhibit Wheeler X." 

Mr. Walter. It will be so marked and received.^* 

Mr. Tavenner. j\Ir. Chairman, 1 vould like to read into the record 
j)ortions of the minutes. 

Mr. Walter. Proceed. 

Mr. Harrison, What is the date? 

Mr. Tavenner (reading) : 

December 14, 1947 : The meeting was called to order at 9 : 40 a. m. by Chairman 
Amos Ignacio. 

Brother Amos Ignacio announced that as of today he will resign as division 
vice president of the ILAVU, local 142, and return to his own unit 6 at Pepeckeo. 
He added that his unit (J is not going to afhliate with the ILAVU. lie stated: 
"I'eople might accuse me of being bought by the bosses. I would like to make 
particular references to the pamphlet by Izuka pointing out commvinism in the 
ILVi^U. I know that what was printed in tlie pamplilet, in some instances, not 
all, are members of the Communist Party. I realize that tlie union is for the 
betterment of the working people. I want to be a free man and want no part 
of communism. In the intei-est of the workers in the plantations, we will set up 
an independent union. I realize that we are going to i*un on rough sailing with 
the ILWU out to destroy us. I realize that there are other units that would 
like to take the same stand. I would like to tell you now that I am dead broke 
and I am going to stay dead broke. The ILWU local may withhold my wages 
for the last 2 weeks. I can go to the trust company. My leave of absence with 
the company expires the end of December. 

They may accuse me of listening to Stainback, Elks, and others that com- 
munism liave been practiced in the ILWU and local 142 and other locals in the 
Territory. I am sick and tired. I want to be called a free American. I be- 
lieve in the Constitution of the United States, and as a free American I take this 
stand. Any laws passed by Congress that have been enacted are to be respected 
as such, even if they hurt. Any law passed for the advantage, we can use it to 
the best advantage. This is what I would like to discuss witli this group, be- 
cause I am positive that unit 6 as of this morning is an independent union. Has 
anyone anything to say?" 

Brother Cipriano Coloma stated that as a delegate from Laupahoehoe unit 
he will take the same stand as Brother Ignacio. 

Brother William De Lima took tlie same stand as Brother Ignacio for the 
Paauhau unit. 

Brother Eddie De Mello took the same stand as Brother Ignacio for tlie 
Naalehu unit. 

Brother Yoshito Murai took the same stand as Brother Ignacio for the Hilo 
Sugar unit. 

Brother Akira Okayama toolc the same stand as Brother Ignacio for the 
Honokaa unit. 

Brother Daniel Frias took the same stand as Brother Ignacio for the Pepeekeo 
unit. 

Brother UitATARO Muramaru. Do we know whether or not the ILWU is 
actually running on a communistic plan? If there is no proof I don't think 
there is any good reason to split at the present time — with negotiations coming 
on. I think this thing should not be taken up in the moment of excitement, when 
communism is in the air. We should thiiU< a little further until we take any 
further action. I don't know a thing about communism. As long as labor is 
concerned we should know something about it. As long as ILWU is concerned 
it has given us a good cliance. Splitting from them at this time without going 
into the thing further is rather hasty. So at tlie present time as far as the 
officials of Paauilo is concerned, we are going to stay out and watch. 

Brother Ignacio. Comnuinism have been preached in one unit and also to the 
steward council and it has been going on for the last 2 years. I was approached 
2 years ago to go under the Communist Party and I refused. I will not have no 
part of it. Ever since then they are after my necli. If they are after my neck 
I am willing to get out. 



^ Retained in committee files. 



2060 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Brothei" Muramaru. This is the first time this thing has been brought up to us^. 
What we are interested in, is in the betterment of labor, and first thing we should 
consider is betterment of worliing conditions. 

Brother Dave Thompson. This comes as a great shock to me. Riunors have 
been going around about communism, but in spite of these rumors that I have 
heard I, as international representative, have been worliing here, trying to help 
the people of this island. I have not given these rumors much credence. I have 
had difterences of opinion in the past with Brother Ignacio, but I thought we 
were working along an honest program. I trusted him and I trusted them. At 
this time we are going into negotiation — time which is difficult for labor union. 
We had to have unity at all cost. We tried to work with anyone who tried to 
follow the union program. So this comes as a surprise to me. This action i.s^ 
going to destroy the labor movement in the Territory if you are successful. The 
ILWU Is not going to sit down. This is going to be taken to the membership. 

Now, I would like to point out to you what you are doing. There is a move 
being made of communism. Communism is not the issue. Many of us in the 
unions have diffex'ent beliefs, but we all have one common interest, and that is to 
form a union of working people of all the working people to win and hold for 
themselves what working people want. Because we have united up to now, we 
have succeeded in obtaining these things. Without unity ycm are going to lose 
what you have now- — now or 2 years from now. As an independent union your 
units will have favors for a couple of years, until the employers can succeed in 
destroying the union here. You must realize the power the international has 
given you. I don't see how you can take this step in honesty. You are not 
representing the wishes of the rank and file. 

There is one other thing. On the question of communism, I don't know what 
Amos means when he mentioned that in one unit communism was preached for 
2 years. Union officers and representatives are not preaching communism. I 
don't think that anybody in this audience can ever say that I have preached 
communism to the rank and file. Communism is not the issue. It is a weapon 
that the bosses are using to destroy the union in the Territory. liut if that is 
the issue, you are off the beam. The ILWU is not a Communist organization. 
It may be that some ILWU members are Communists, but the program of the 
ILWU is what the people make it. 

Brother Yosiiito Murai. When we first started the organization in November 
194.3 we didn't know anything. I approachc^d lots of the old .Japanese people and 
this is what they said, "We trust you, Murai, as long as we have no Communist 
in our union." I cannot mention his name, but I was approached by an ILWU 
organizer to join the Communist Party. 

Brother Dave Thompson. I don't know what some individuals said to change 
your mind to become Communist. But what has it got to do with the program 
of the union? This move is going to .split the labor movement in the Territory. 

Brother Yastki Arakaki. I am one of the guys in the pamphlet — one of the 
first ones. AVe are going on to negotiations and preparing for a possible lock-out, 
and meet the take-it-and-like-it attitude of the employers. Ever since Bridges 
split from the ILA and Joe Ryan he has been nccused of being a radical and 
Communist. He was even offered $."50,000 to leave the rountry and go to Australia. 
He spent seven long years fighting his case in court to prove that he was not a 
Communist. If we issue a lawsuit, we have one of the best attorneys in the 
Territory. The Hawaiian court will condemn anyone in it and it will go to the 
Supreme Court. Will this help the union? Bridges spent 7 years fighting in the 
courts, during which time he could not help his union. You make your decisions 
now. We can leave our job and fight the ca.se. Ever since we organized they 
have been calling us radicals, and now they are using the same thing as they did 
in the Pacific coast — we are being called Communists. 

When this consolidation move came in, some of the leaders have been putting 
a block in it. Some of the people who are not in favor of consolidation. 

Brother Cipriano Coloma. When Frank Thompson was here it was you 
(Arakaki) and Bert who blocked consolidation. 

Brother Arakaki. I will not answer it now. The pamphlet of Izuka is trying 
to mislead the memberhip. The history of American labor movement tells of 
Red baiting. Whatever you decide here is going to be history. 

Brother Ignacio. I was approached by Henry Johnson to join the Communist 
Party. 

Brother Masato Hirata. I was also approached by Henry Johnson. 

Brother Yoshito Murai. I was approached by Wilfred Oka, UPWA and 
ILWU business agent. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2061 

Brother Arakaki. How many of you know what communism is? 

Brother Yosurio Mukai. Owned by the state and run hy the state. 

Brother H. Jionsen. The government takes care of everything. Even when your 
wife needs a doctor, you must report to the office and they will inform you when 
the doctor will see your wife— maybe 1 week later. I have been with the 
United States (Government for 18 years and I want to keep it that way. 

Brother William Df, Lima. No free enterprise. 

Brother Akakaki. Do you know what free enterprise is? 

Brother Ignacio. You have no right to cross-examine the delegates. You 
have said in one steward council meeting that the union will take over the 
plantation and run it. And at Pahala y(m have said that in 20 years we can 
take over the plantation. And also you said that comuuinism is for the union. 

Broth(>r Auakaki. I did not. 

Brother Cipuiano Coloma. We are not going to break this thing to the 
members. He can come and talk to the rank and file what his opinion is con- 
cerning communism. Since the start of the organization Brother Arakaki and 
Bert Nakano came to me with all kinds of propositions. He wanted me to 
run as business agent and wanted to run Amos out as official of the local 142, 
but my conscience does not accept these things. The rank and file have decided 
that they don't want to accept this program of Communists. During the time 
of consolidation, my union was against it. The results prove to be true. 

Brother Mukai. I am not running for unit office, and I will have no part 
in leading the rank and file one way or the other. 

Brother Arakaki. Did you take this step because you hate communism? 

Brother Murai. We were first to start the union. When we approached the 
men to join they asked me about communism. 

Brother Arakaki. Because of Communist infiltration you are going to quit 
the union? 

Brother Murai. I am not quitting the union. I will still be a member. 

Brother Muramaru. We must be sure if the present ILWU is being led 
by Communists or not. Our program now is for the betterment of the working 
conditions. I hesitate to form an independent union. If I am convinced that 
the present program is led by the Communists, we must do something. 

Brother Ignacio. Are there Communists in the ILWU? 

Brother Thompson. Y'^es ; there are. I am sure that there are Communists 
in the ILWU. 

Brother Ignacio. Are they a threat to the welfare of the workers? 

Brother Thompson. So far as communism is concei-ned in the United States, 
I don't think that the United States is willing to be a Communist country 
next week or 10 years from now. I don't think that they will become Communists. 

Brother Ignacio. The ultimate goal of the Communist Party is to overthrow 
the United States Government. 

Brother Thompson. There are people who believe something different. There 
are people with all kinds of beliefs. Our union is not going to overthrow the 
Government and overthrow the industry. Some of the ILWU and the CIO 
men who approached some members saying that communism was a good thing, 
talked to just a few men. We have 8,tX)0 workers in our membership. I don't 
think that our union is trying to make Communists out of the members. 

If Amos asks me if I am a Conmiunist, I will tell him it's none of your 
business. If he asks me if I am trying to break the working conditions for the 
woi'king people. I will tell him. "No." 

Brother Louis De Rego. We don't want to have any Reds in the union. 

Brothei- William De Lima. If comnuinism is so good, why beat around the 
bush? We want to stick to the United States. We want to be free Americans. 

Brother Thompson. It is not a question to discuss in a union meeting. We 
came together to discuss union program. Do you think that if I'm a Communist, 
then I am not a good American? I fought in the last war for America and 
have a wooden leg now. 

You can't run as an independent union. Y"ou are not going to make the grade. 

Brother Leoncio Velasco. In the United States we have two parties. Democrat 
and Republican. These two parties check on each party to correct any wrong 
program. Our program is to fight collectively, to fight the bosses. We must have 
an honest union. We are here to correct anything wrong and work for the 
betterment of the working people. If we foi"m an independent union we cannot 
accomp'ish our union's progranu We must study what the issues are and what 
we have to do. We must consolidate ourselves. 

Brother Victor Dela Cuadba 



2062 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

I don't know whether it is C-u-a-d-r-a or G-u-a-d-r-a. I believe it is 
C-u-a-d-r-a. 

This is a very grave issue. Our unit is the smallest. We have about 230 to 
240 members and you can push them around like a ball, and they are weak to 
stand by themselves. I would like to say this, that out of the 240 members none 
of them have said that the ILWU had done nothing to them. They are very 
thankful of the services of the ILWU. For example, I myself realize the services 
the international had done for me. If I tell you the working condition I went 
through you will not believe me. Before the union came I had 24 cents per hour — 
after our successful strike my wage was doubled and tripled. What faults can 
we find with the ILWU that we cannot find in ourselves. If the leaders have 
been preached or are being preached communism in the ILWU, that is the 
greatest and gravest issue. AVe cannot present it to the rank and file. If we 
present that issue it will split our union and break our solid unity. If that 
solid unity is crushed, we will be going back blinded as before. Brother Amos 
spoke of forming an independent union. ]Maybe he is correct but I still doubt 
it, whether we can reach the object of gains and better conditions as we have 
gained up to now. As a delegate of 240 members I am not taking any sides. 
I am not going to hold my members in anything I don't know. I am just going 
to hold my members to stay where they think and where they know it's right. 
Speaking of communism, if we go back to our Constitution, it says that we can 
impeach any officers in the organization if he is not doing his services to the 
members and if we members in the organization think that our leadership are 
Communists why should we not impeach them? 

Brother Jacinto Conol. I am in favor of the independent union although I 
am thankful of the ILWU. We learned the hard way in the ILWU and if we 
set up an independent union we will learn the hard way again. We have always 
wished for a union organization in the Territory, and the ILWU has helloed us. 
But, we want an honest union, we must fix the house that we have built. 

Brother Akira Okayama. Every one of us have made mistakes. We are not 
human if we do not make mistakes. As far as any organization goes, it is 
understood that they make a lot of mistakes. It is O. K. if we make mistakes 
and later benefit from it, but instead of improving it if we get worse it is the 
wrong direction we are traveling. As far as the ILWU is concerned, it did good 
for the workers, but coming down to myself I have been told to sacrifice and 
sacrifice. Sacrifice is O. K., provided someone benefits from it. There is a 
limit to everything. Pertaining to myself, at one time I lost 30 pounds and as 
far as finances go, I sacrificed about $500 in lost time and as far as sticking my 
neck out, I stuck it out as far as it would go. Security to my family comes first, 
Reds and communism, I don't go for that. 

Brother H. Jensen. The HRT is an independent union in Honolulu. I don't 
see why we can't make a go of it. 

Brother Muramaru. If we can stand as an independent union is another 
question. I hope you will succeed. I don't know if the past program of the 
ILWU was a communistic one or not. In any organization there are different 
beliefs, religious and otherwise. As long as it is not practiced in the movement, 
let's leave that thing alone. Employers are trying to break down the union by 
calling us Communists, and so forth. If we do take communism as an issue we 
are just falling into their trap. Even if you are intending to withdraw from 
the ILWU and form an independent union, I hope you form a good organization. 

Brother Victor Dela Cuadra. If you will ask me if I belong to the Commu- 
nist Party, I will say I am not. I don't belong to a Communist Party and I 
don't like communism because it holds back my freedom and rights. If I was 
smart I will speak on foreign policies. If we think communism is being prac- 
ticed in our union we must ban the business agents. The public is against the 
ILWU. It means we have no help from anyone but stand as we are. The law 
is oppressing us. The public is against us. We want to live free — free from 
fright, free from trouble, et cetera. We have not proven yet that communism 
is in our union. When we find out that our top leaders are Communists, we can 
throw them out. 

Brother Murai. Dave, you .said that we have no right to question a man's 
belief and all that but in the unit executive board meeting we decided that if 
the leaders cannot answer our question, then they have something to hide. 
We are having a meeting next Sunday at 9:00 a. m. and the executive board 
feels that if the people named in the pamphlet can convince them that they are 
not Communists they can speak to the rank and file. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2063 

Brothor Masato Hirata. T am in no position to spoak for nnit r? A at present 
due to the fact tliat after the end of the year I phm to leave and not being the 
top officer it is not fair to them and not fair to myself to decide. I will take this 
question to the executive board. 

Brother Fai'stino Koluan. Officers of the old local 142 felt at the time of the 
Territorial consolidation that it was too big a bite to take. Since consolidation 
it seems that the top leaders are planning fantastic ideas which is very con- 
fusing and demoralizing to us who are very yound members — 

The word is spelled y-o-u-n-d. Whether it is sound or young mem- 
bers, I am unable to say— 

Ytnuig members in this organization. We need more time to decide anything — 
it is really hard for us to settle our mind in a short time. If the majority goes 
to the other side, it is of no use going on the minority group. Majority rules. 

Brother Richard Iida. It seems that the members are opposed to commu- 
nism. They didn't give a concrete reason why communism is doing damage to the 
union. Leaders may believe in communism if they do not try to overthrow 
the Government. We are about to get our classification and wage openings 
started and here we are trying to split up. I am not asking anyone to stay in 
the ILWU. You officers more or less can answer by yourselves. But what is 
wrong if we stay in tl)e ILWU? 

AVe should stay until INIarch or February and if employers refuse to deal 
with the ILWU as a communistic union, then we can drive them out. If we 
have to strike to gain all our demands all the time, it is better for us to stay in 
the independent union. In March if the employers will sit on the table and bar- 
gain as in the past we should stay in the ILWU. Maybe some of the leaders 
belong to the Conunuuist Party. The Government can take care of it. If they 
don't mix communism with the union program, it is O. K. 

Brother Thompson. The bosses don't care what beliefs your leaders have as 
long as they believe in something to help the workers. The bosses are scared of 
that. The bosses will give you a good deal at first. But once you have the 
ILWU wiped out and you have just the independent union, then the bosses will 
say, we won't pay you any more. The bosses will pay you off to keep you in 
an independent union and when the time comes when no international union is 
around, the bosses will say, no dice, and when you fight them, they will start 
calling you Communists or some other name. 

If I am enrbarrassing the ILWU, I will go out of the organization as an indi- 
vidual. If you form an independent union you are either going to play ball with 
the bosses or fight. If you fight you are going to get the same treatment the 
ILWU is getting now. 

Brother Elias Domingo. I didn't expect that this meeting was going to be 
to decide whether this union in the Territory will live. I have worked with you 
for 1% years. We have tried to build our union in order to help our brothers. 
We have helped with the aid of the ILWU. I am not against any action that is 
going to be taken at this meeting. But we must see that, when we started this 
union, we tried to build it up and gain something for our people. For the coming 
few months, that will be the test to see whether or not this union in the Territory 
will live or not. There is a lot of propaganda going on. For myself, I am a 
Catholic and I don't belong to the Communist Party. This is an issue to 
destroy our union. I know that. It is under the freedom of the United States 
Constitution to belong to any belief. Catholic, Protestant, Communist, or and so 
forth. But as long as they are not going to harm the people it is all right. I 
can't see why we must pusjh that issue to break the imion. Let's wait a while, 
2 or 3 months, to see whether or not this union is going to live or not. If we live 
now we are going to break the union right now. As an executive board member 
I urge you to reconsider and retract your position taken today. We must bring 
this issue to the rank and file, whether to join the ILWU or belong to the inde- 
pendent union. 

Brother Daniel Frias. I have pushed the organization of the ILWU right 
along. .1 was proud of the ILWU and the leaders. If there are no communism 
in the organization I don't know why no charges have been taken against Izuka. 
And all the men named in the pamphlet proved to the members that they are 
not Communists. 

Brother Murai. I suggest that we bring this matter up to the rank and file 
to decide for themselves. 

G6636 — 50— pt. 3 9 



2064 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Brother Victoe Dela Cuaeba. We should bring this issue to the rank and file. 
If a special meeting is necessary we should call one and present our decisions. 
Right now our ranli and file doesn't know anything. The only thing they have 
in mind now is to get something from the coming negotiations. 
Meeting was adjourned at about 1 p. m. 
Respectfully submitted, 

Jean Matsubara, Offlce Secretary. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. A^Hieeler, during the course of the hearings 
here, mention has been made of the testimony of Matthew Cvetic, 
or relating to, and pertinent matter. I would like for you to read 
the excerpt of the testimony of Matthew Cvetic. First, before reading 
it, I will ask you if 3'ou know who Matthew Cvetic is ? 

Mr. Wheeler. ]\Ir. Matthew Cvetic worked as an undercover agent 
for the Federal Bureau of Investigation for the years 1942 to 1949. He 
became prominent in Communist Party circles in western Pennsyl- 
vania, holding many positions within the party, as well as numerous 
positions in front organizations in that area. In addition he held 
offices in the Communist Party of the United States on a national level, 
serving as Slovene representative on the Nationality Commission of 
the Communist Party, U. S. A. 

Mr. Tavenner. Did he testify from time to time over a period of 
several weeks before this committee in Washington ? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tamsnner. What was the date of the testimony which you have 
before you ? 

Mr. Wheeler. February 23, 1950. 

Mr. Ta\t.nner. Will you read the pertinent excerpt from his testi- 
mony ? 

Mr. Wheeler (reading) : 

Question. You mention Bessie Steinberg as the national director of the com- 
mittee. Do you know whether she was married to a person other than Steinberg 
at one time? 

Answer. Yes. She isn't married at the present time, as I recollect. Her 
maiden name was Steinberg and she was married to a Communist Party member 
whose last name was Murin. 

Question. Was that Steve Murin, M-u-r-i-n? 

Answer. Steve — that is correct. 

Question. Did Steve Murin live in Pittsburgh? 

Answer. When I met Bessie Murin Steinberg she had already been divorced 
and I have never had contact with Steve Murin except I know from conversa- 
tions within the organization that she was married to him at one time. 

Mr. Ta\t:nner. I would like to clear up this question. During 
the course of your investigation, I believe you contacted a person by 
the name of Lloyd M. Stebbings. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct. 

Mr. Ta\'exner. Prior to your contacting Lloyd M. Stebbings in 
Honolulu, did you know in what capacity he had worked several years 
prior to that time ? 

Mr. Wheeler. It was established from the investigation that during 
the period of time covered in the testimony of Mr. Stebbings that 
he was in contact with and cooperated fully with a Government agency 
here in Honolulu. 

Mr. Tavenner. And that he was acting for a Government agency ? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Ta^-enxer. With that knowledge, did you then interview Mr. 
Stebbings and obtain his cooperation in testifying here ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2065 

Mv. "WiiKELER. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavkxxeh. 1 have no further (luestions. 

Mr. Walter. Mr. AVheeler, this man Cvetic you mentioned, during 
tlie ])eri()d between 1 941 and 1949, was it ? 

Mr. "Wheeler. That is correct, sir. 

]\[r. AValteh. When he became a leader of the Conniiunist Party of 
tlie United States, he was actually an FBI agent? 

Mr. Wheeler. That is correct, sir. According to his testimony, he 
Avas on the pavroll of tlie FBI during that period of time. 

Mr. Walter. All right. 

Mr. Harrisox. They paid him a little better than the Communist 
Party, didn't they ? 

Mr. Wheeler. I think so. 

Mr. Tavexx'er. Do you recall that durin<2: the course of his testi- 
mony he described a Conmiunist Party cell which he assisted in or- 
ganizing in the Crucible Steel Co., where the membershij) was as low 
as 10 or 12 members, that is, a cell of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Wheeler. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tavexx^er. Did his testimony develop that that cell, composed 
of 10 to 12 members, was able to organize and take over a union com- 
posed of 2,800 individuals ? 

]\Ir. Wheeler. That is coi'rect, ]Mr. Tavenner. 

]\Ir. Taaenxer. And that the cell did control that union until the 
leadership of that union were identified as members of the Communist 
I 'arty, when the union members ousted them ? 

]Mr. Wheeler. Yes, sir. 

Mr. TaveX' xer. I have no further questions. 

(The witness was excused.) 

i\Ir. Walter. The subcommittee will take a short recess. 

(Recess was taken from 2 : 55 to 3 : 08 p. m.) 

]Mr. Walter. The subcommittee will be in order. Call your next 
Avitness. 

Mr. Tavex'x^er. Mr. Ed. Berman. 

Mr. Walter. Raise your right hand, please. Do you swear the 
testimony you are' about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Bermax. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF EDWARD BERMAN 

]\Ir. Tavex^xer. "WTiat is your name, please ? 

Mr. Bermax'. Edward Berman. 

]\Ir. Tavex^xer. Where do you live, Mr. Berman ? 

Mr. Berman. At 5311 Paiko Drive, Aina Haina, Honolulu. 

Mr. Taat:x'xer. What is your occupation ? 

]Mr. Bermax'. I am an attorney at law. 

ISIr. Taa'exxer. How long have you lived in the Territory of 
Hawaii ? 

Mr. Bermax\ I first came to Hawaii in 1931 ; I left in 1938 to study 
law and I returned in 1946. So I have been of the islands or close to 
the islands since 1931. 

Mr. Tavenxer. Were you. ever affiliated with an organization known 
as the Hawaiian Association for Civic Unity ? 



2066 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Berman. I joined that organization and was a member of it 
for about two meetings, in 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Tell the committee briefly the history of that 
organization, 

Mr. Berman. The Hawaiian Association for Civil Unity was or- 
ganized back around 1946, was supposed to be a liberal organization 
for the purposes of civic unity, and so on, and social matters, and as I 
got the background of the organization, it had a very good response 
from the liberal and conservative people of this community, as an 
organization that they could join. I learned in 1947 th^t a lot of peo- 
ple had moved into the organization who were repugnant to the orig- 
inal membership and that the organization, which had originally had 
about 200 members, dwindled down to around 25 or 30. 

At the meeting where I was invited to attend, where I joined, I was 
invited to see if something could be done to neutralize the group that 
entered into the organization, who had practically taken it over. The 
situation on that particular night was that the organization was try- 
ing — 'I believe it was during a legislative session here — to put over 
a FEPA bill, a Fair Employment Practices Act, and that they were 
trying to propagandize the organization, this small element there, that 
there was need for a bill here to eliminate racial discrimination, and 
were trying to create the impression within the organization that racial 
discrimination was very, very wide in these islands. The group that 
1 joined with there included ]\Ir. Arnold Wills, of the National Labor 
Relations Board, and I remember specifically was trying to show that 
no evidence had been produced by this other element that there was 
rank discrimination against races in these islands and until such 
evidence could be produced before the legislature itself, it would be 
almost hopeless to get such a bill enacted. This element argued that 
regardless of whether there was any evidence of discrimination or not, 
I recall in this meeting, a bill like this should be forced through the 
legislature so that if any discrimination should develop here they 
would have an ax that they could chop someone's head off with, and 
so forth. Finally, as a result of this fight and conflict between what I 
would call the left-wing and right-wing groups of HACU, Hawaiian 
Association for Civic Unity, the organization just collapsed. In other 
words, the left-wing element lost its strength and it just went out of 
existence, and that was the end of HACU, toward the end of the 
legislative session of 1947. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then, did you become associated or affiliated with 
another organization, that is known as NAACP, meaning National 
Association for Advancement of Colored People? 

Mr. Berman. Yes, I did. Sometime in 1948 I got a call from a Mrs. 
Catherine Christopher, who lived at that time at Pearl City, whose 
husband was in the Government service, and also from a Miss Mary 
Noonan, who is secretary of the local Republican Club, and they asked 
me if I would not get into the NAACP, that the same elements who 
had once controlled HACU had moved into the NAACP, and she 
mentioned the Reineckes and the Fujimotos and a few others. I went 
out there to the first NAACP meeting, and I found that the same group 
that had been in the HACU meeting had now moved over to the colored 
people out there at CHA 3, out there at Pearl City, and had prac- 
tically taken over that organization and were using that as a spring- 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2067 

board for putting over an FEPC bill among the colored people who 
are working in the Government service. AVe got a few more people 
and moved in there and were soon in a position where our own strength 
was about equal to theirs. As a result of bringing in about 15 or 20 
new ]>eople wlio could combat this group, there was an election held — I 
think the newspapers publicized it — for a left-wing president and a 
right-wing pi-esident, the right wing backing one and the left wing 
another, in which the election resuhed in a tie vote. Following that, 
there was another election a few months later- and again the election 
resulted in a tie vote. Both groups were trying to bring in people 
to offset each other. Finally, Walter AVliite came through here, secre- 
tary of the NAACP, on the Denny Tour of the Air that was here last 
year. And as a result of a report made to him of the situation, 
members of the executive board of the NAACP received letters from 
the national headquarters as to Mrs. Catherine Christopher's position 
and not to hold a third meeting because of the situation in the NAACP, 
and we were asked to correspond with the organization. And as a 
result of correspondence back to New York, the charter of the NAACP 
was revoked over here. 

Mr. Ta\^nner, I hand you what purports to be a photostatic copy 
of a letter written by you on September 2'r), 1949, to Mr. Roy Wilkins, 
acting secretary. National Association for the Advancement of Colored 
People, and I will ask you if you can identify that as a copy of your 
letter? 

Mr. Berman. Yes. This is the letter that I wrote. 

Mr, Tavenner. Will you read it, please? 

Mr. Berman. This is dated September 26, 1949, and is addressed 
from Honolulu [reading] : 

Mr. KoY WiLKixs, 

Acting Secretary, National Ar'<sociation for the Advancement of Colored 
People, 20 West Fortieth Street, New York 18, N. Y. 

Dear Sir : In reply to your letter of the 16th, this is to advise you that I am a 
iwember of the executive committee of the Honolulu branch and believe that Mrs. 
Catherine Christopher, acting president of the Honolulu branch, NAACP, acted 
in good faith and for the best interest of the organization by not holding an 
election under the circumstances that prevailed here in Hawaii. 

I was at one of the election meetings at which one Frank Marshall Davis, 
formerly of Chicago (and formerly editor of the Chicago Communist paper, the 
Star) suddenly appeared on the scene to propagandize the membership about 
our "racial problems" in Hawaii. He had just sneaked in here on a boat, and 
presto, was an "expert" on racial probles in Hawaii. Comrade Davis was sup- 
ported by others who recently "sneaked" into the organization with the avowed 
intent and purpose of converting it into a front for the Stalinist line. 

These others were the same party liners who tried to take over and dominate 
an organization known locally as the Hawaii Commiittee for Civic Unity. The 
organization collapsed, due to their tactics. 

Having destroyed tliat organization they would now destroy the local branch 
of the NAACP. 

They create a mythical racial problem here. They agitate with the same fervor 
that the Communist press does on the mainland. The result is discord and dis- 
trust, not unity. 

We have no Harlems, little or big, in Hawaii. We have no Chinese quarter, 
or Japanese quarter, or Hawaiian quarter. 

I am a Caucasian. A Hawaiian lives to my right : a Japanese family across 
the street from me and a Chinese family to my left. We are staunch friends. 

There is no segregation here. 

You have probably heard there are one or two disreputable barrooms on 
Nuuanu Street (slum area) that exclude Negroes. My answer to that is that 
no self-respecting citizen of African descent or any other race would go near 



2068 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

those places with a 10-foot pole. The Royal Hawaiian, the Moana, the Haleku- 
lani (there Walter White stopped) do not exclude Negroes or any other race. 

The point I am making is that the Communist Party was deliberately trying 
to stir up racism in an area where there is fine racial unity and harmony. 

It is better to have no organization than to have these tactics continue. Mrs. 
Christopher acted in good faith. She knew what was going on and it was her 
method of checking them. Already, scores of Negi'o members were frightened 
away from these meetings because of the influx of this element. Only by a 
reorganization with a policy that will check this infiltration, can we hope to 
get former members back into a local NAACP branch. We are going to have 
to have that authority over here — otherwise you'll have a branch exclusively 
composed of yelping Stalinists and their dupes— characters who are more con- 
cerned about the speedy assassination of Tito than they are about the advance- 
ment of the colored people of these United States. 

Mr. Walter. You ought to write that same kind of letter to Bill 
Boyle, chairman of the Democratic National Committee. 

jSIr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the letter in evidence and mark it 
"Berman Exhibit No. 1." 
*- Mr. Walter. It will be received.^^ 

Mr. Tavenner. I now hand you a letter and ask you if that is an 
acknowledgment of the receipt of the former letter ? 

Mr. Berman. I received this subsequent to October 26, 1949. It is 
addresed to my law office [reading] : 

Deab Mb. Beeman : Your letter of September 26, addressed to Mr. Roy Wilkins, 
has been referred to me for submission to the committee on branches. The com- 
mittee meets on November 4, at which time it will review the Honolulu matter. 
Very truly yours, 

Glostbsi B. Cubrent, 
Director of Brunches. 

It is out of New York City. 

Mr. Ta\'enner, I desire to offer the letter in evidence and mark it 
"Exhibit Berman 2." 

Mr. Walter. Let it be marked and received for the record.^^ 

Mr. Ta\tenner. I hand you a third letter and ask you if that repre- 
sents the action taken by the national organization of the NAACP? 

Mr. Berman. Yes. This is a copy of the letter I received, which is 
addressed to Mrs. Christopher, who was acting president of the Hono- 
lulu branch while these elections were going on. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. Will you read it? 

Mr. Berman. It is addressed to Mrs. Christopher, acting president, 
Honolulu Branch, NAACP, 808 Fifteenth Street, CH A 3, Honolulu 
60, T. H. [reading] : 

Dear Mrs. Christopher: The national board of directors, at its meeting on 
November 14, 1949. upon recommendation of the committee on branches, voted 
to revoke the charter of the Honolulu branch for the following reasons : 

1. The oflScers of the Honolulu bi-anch have, by their failure, refusal, or 
neglect to complete the holding of the election of officers as required by the 
constitution and bylaws for branches and as ordered by the national oflSce, 
been guilty of conduct inimical to the best interest of the NAACP. 

2. The difference in the problems of racial discrimination in the continental 
United States and their solution as contrasted with the problems of the Terri- 
tory makes difficult the applicability of techniques and methods used by 
branches and the nationtal office to effect the policy of the association in the 
Territory. 



^ Retained in committpe files. 
^ Retained in committee fles. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2C69 

3. Tliis difference in proirrfim and (lie distance of tlie Iloiioluln branch from 
the national otiioe has made it dillicult for tlie national olRcc to adequately and 
properly supervise the activities and proj^rani of the branch. 

The above matter was considered by the conmiittee on branches at length. 
Various members of the executive committee were communicated witli and 
their opinions considered. 

The constitution and bylaws for branches in article X, section 2 states 
that 

Notice of the findings and action of the board shall be sent by the secretary 
of the association, by reftistered mail to the president and secretary of the 
branch, and may be published in the official organ of the national association. 
In case the charter of the branch is suspended or revoked upon receipt of notice 
by the president or secretary by mail, publication, or otherwise, the branch 
shall cease to function and the officers shall forthwith forward all records, 
property and monies of tlie branch to the national office where the same may 
be applied in its discretion for the benefit of the community wherein the branch 
was located. 

In accordance with the above, will you kindly forward the charter of the 
branch, all records, property and monies of the branch to the national office 
immediately upon receipt of this notice. 
Very truly yours, 

EoY WiLKiNS, Acting Secretary. 

Mr. Tavenner. I desire to offer the copy of the letter in evidence 
and mark it "Berman Exhibit No. 3." 

Mr. Walter. It may be marked and received.^'^ 

Mr. Tavenner. I notice from the letter that all members of the 
executive board were invited to comment upon the problem of dis- 
continuance of the chapter here. 

Mr. Berivian. That is correct. 

Mr. Tavenner. And you were one of the members of that board? 

Mr. Berman. I was a member of the executive board. 

Mr. Tavenner. And it was in response to that question that you 

Mr. Berman. I wrote the letter in evidence. 

Mr. Ta\tenner. That you wrote your letter of September 26? 

Mr. Berman. That is right. 

Mr. Tavenner. Are you affiliated with the HCLC ? 

Mr. Berman. I am not. 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Berman, your name has been mentioned prob- 
ably three times during the course of this hearing, one reference was 
made to your having assisted an individual by the name of Harry 
Kuhia, Jr., in the preparation of a letter of resignation from the Com- 
munist Party. 

Mr. Berman. Yes, sir, that is true. This was in 194:7 or early 1948, 
after the Ichiro Izuka pamphlet appeared. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then Masao Mori testified that you assisted him 
in the preparation of a letter of resignation ? 

Mr. Berman. That is true. 

Mr. Tavenner. Which he addressed to the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Berman. That is true. Mori is a member of the Brewery 
Workers Union. 

Mr. Tavenner. Then earlier in the testimony a witness by the name 
of Emil Muller testified that you and another individual picked him 
up in an automobile when he was being taken to a meeting at the home 
of a man by the name of Bartlett, either John Bartlett, or John Bart. 
Do you recall that incident ? 

*'' Retained in committee files. 



2070 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Mr. Berman. I have wracked my brain to recall the incident and 
I have talked to both Muller and Basil Mayo, whose name was men- 
tioned. I don't know the name Kipapa. That brings back no recol- 
lection. Muller testified that this happened in August or September 
of 1938, as people have told me. During that time we were in the 
midst of negotiations after the incident in Hilo, where this shooting 
occurred, which I believe the witness Nakano testified about, and I can 
say unequivocally if I was at a meeting with Mayo or Muller during 
that time it was a trade-union meeting for the purpose of settling 
that dispute at that particular time. 

Mr. Taveistner. Are you now, or have you at any time been a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Berman. I am not a member now and have never been a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Tavenner. You have testified here about two organizations 
in which you played a part, you might say, in their interment. Why 
was that? Why did you take that action ? 

Mr. Berman. Well, here is a community that shouts about a certain 
organization being Communist dominated. They are open-front 
organizations and people talk about them. But nobody seems to do 
anything about them. Now, I would say this. I don't know any- 
thing about the HCLC except what I have read in the papers and 
what I have heard from the testimony at this hearing. It was organ- 
ized at the time of the Reinecke hearing. If 20 or 30 people in this 
town would go into the HCLC, they could take it over and reform its 
policy and end any subversive activity in that organization, but no, 
they let it exist and go on. 

Mr. Tavenner. Would that same argument hold true in connection 
with the operation and control of party precinct matters ? 

Mr. Berman. Absolutely. You will find today in these recent 
elections that wherever there was an alertness and awareness in the 
community about the publicity with regard to the Democratic Party, 
those precincts have been taken back b^^ the people and away from 
the Communist domination of those precincts. But wherever there is 
apathy in any particular area, and that apathy still continues here in 
many areas, the same people will attend the convention of the Demo- 
cratic Party at the end of this month. 

Mr. Tavenner. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Walter. Do you recall the time in 1948, I think it was, when 
one Lau Ah Chew dissolved the Democratic Committee ? 

Mr. Berman. Yes, I do. 

Mr. Walter. And made provision for a new election ? 

Mr. Berman. Yes, I do. I fought against that policy, Mr. Walter. 
I fought very strenuously for a year here without getting an audience 
from anyone in the Democratic Party. I think he opened the door 
for them. 

Mr. Walter. And after the committee was dissolved, new commit- 
tee people were elected ? 

Mr. Berman. That is right. 

Mr. Walter. Anything further, Mr. Tavenner? 

Mr. Tavenner. No, sir. 

Mr. Walter. Thank you, Mr. Berman. 

(The witness was excused.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2071 

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Chairman, that is all the evidence that the 
staff desires to present to the subcommittee at this time. I might 
say that there is other evidence which it desires to present to the com- 
mittee at a later time, when you reassemble in Washington, but at the 
present time that is as much as we plan to present to you. 

Mr. Walter. On behalf of the members of this subcommittee, I 
wish to thank most sincerely the people of this very lovely community 
for the cooperation they have given this subconnnittee. It is indeed 
educational for those of us who have never had the privilege of visit- 
ing this beautiful place to see democracy at work. The cooperation 
that we have gotten from the local officials, the police, has been very, 
very helpful, and I repeat, we appreciate it very much. 

Now, if there are people who would like to make statements, whose 
names have been mentioned, Mr. William Wheeler and Mr. Courtney 
Owens of our staff are living at 1547 Ala Wai Boulevard, Apartment 
244; their telephone is 917844. These people will remain here until 
Monday. 

]\Ir. Velde. ISIr. Chairman, on behalf of the minority of the sub- 
committee, I want to concur in the chairman's statement of apprecia- 
tion of the cooperation of the people, all you good Ajuerican people of 
Hawaii, have shown us in this hearing. We have tried to make them 
impartial and fair as possible, and I hope that you will agree that we 
have done that to the greatest extent. 

Mr. Walter. The subcommittee is now adjourned. 

(Thereupon, at 3 : 30 p. m., Wednesday, April 19, 1950, an adjourn- 
ment was taken sine die.) 



APPENDIX 



EXHIBITS 



(Note. — The following exhibits were introduced into the testimony of Hear- 
ings Regarding Communist Activity in the Territory of Hawaii — Pt. 1.) 

Kageyama Exhibit 1 

Communist literature purchased by Richard M. Kageyama. (See p. 1367, 
pt. 1.) 

IzuKA Exhibit 1 

Information from the files of the Committee on Un-American Activities regard- 
ing Ruby Lambert. ( See p. 1377, pt. 1 and p. 2088, pt. 3.) 

IzuKA Exhibit 2 

Information from the files of the Committee on Un-American Activities re- 
garding Betty Gannett. ( See p. 1377, pt. 1 and p. 2089, pt. 3.) 

IzTJKA Exhibit 3 

Information from the files of the Committee on Un-American Activities re- 
garding Louise Todd. ( See p. 1377, pt. 1 and p. 2091, pt. 3. ) 

IzxjKA Exhibit 4 

Information from the files of the Committee on Un-American Activities regard- 
ing William Schneiderman. (See p. 1378, pt. 1 and p. 2092, pt. 3.) 

IzUKA Exhibit 5 

Information from the files of the Committee on Un-American Activities re- 
garding Oleta O'Connor Yates. (See p. 1378, pt. 1 and p. 2093, pt. 3.) 

IzuKA Exhibit 6 

The Study of History — The Role of Marx, Engels, Lenin, and Stalin. (See p. 
1380, pt. 1.) 

IzUKA Exhibit 7 

Information from the files of the Committee on Un-American Activities regard- 
ing Walter Stack. ( See p. 1384, pt. 1 and p. 2095, pt. 3. ) 

IzUKA Exhibit 8 

Photograph showing Jack Kimoto, Alice Hyun, and Ichiro Izuka digging up a 
trunk. (See p. 1396, pt. 1.) 

Izuka Exhibit 9 

Photograph showing Ichiro Izuka. Alice Hyun. and Jack Kimoto preparing 
to burn hooks taken from trunk mentioned in exhibit 8. (See p. 1396, pt. 1.) 

Izuka Exhibit 10 

Photograph showing Alice Hyun, Jack Kimoto, and Ichiro Izuka standing 
before a pile of books mentioned in exhibit 9. (See p. 1398, pt. 1.) 

2073 



2074 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

IzuKA Exhibit 11 

Photograph showing hole from which trunk mentioned in exhibit 8 was dug, 
together with implements used in digging and books and papers taken from 
trunk. This photograph was taken by Government agents after Alice Hyun, 
Jack Klmoto, and Ichiro Izuka had left the scene. (See p. 1399, pt. 1.) 

IzuKA Exhibit 12 

Card on which Izuka kept records of Communist Party dues which he collected, 
beginning with Novemlier 1945. (One side showing the code symbol with which 
he designated various members reproduced on p. 1406, pt. 1.) 

Izuka Exhibit 13 

Check drawn on P>ishop National Bank, King-Smith Street branch, Honolulu, 
T. H., dated July 13, 1946, payable to John E. Heinecke, in the amount of $45.10, 
signed bv Ichiro Izuka, reverse side endorsed by John E. Reinecke. (See p. 1407, 
pt. 1.) 

IzxiKA Exhibit 14 

Record kept by Ichiro Izuka on Communist Party dues, initiation fees, and 
distribution of these moneys. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1407, pt. 1.) 

IztTKA Exhibit 15 

Ad for which Ichiro Izuka was solicited by Mrs. Reinecke, to be used in con- 
nection with the strike fund, and letter from Ichiro Izuka referring to this ad. 
(Retained in committee files. See p. 1418, pt. 1.) 

Izuka Exhibit 16 

Letter written by Ichiro Izuka resigning from the Communist Party under date 
of October 20, 1946. ( See p. 1418, pt. 1. ) 

Izuka Exhibit 17 

Letter dated November 18, 1946, to Ichiro Izuka from Wallace Ho notifying 
Izuka of the charges placed upon him by the Territorial Executive Board of the 
Communist Party, U. S. A., for direct violation of article 4, section 2 and article 
9, section 1 of the constitution of the Communist Party. ( See p. 1419, pt. 1. ) 

Izxtka Exhibit 17-A 

Letter dated November 21, 1946, from Ichiro Izuka to Wallace Ho in reply to 
letter appearing as Izuka Exhibit 17. (See p. 1419, pt. 1.) 

Izuka Exhibit 18 

Pamphlet entitled "The Truth About Communism in Hawaii" written by Ichiro 
Izuka. (See p. 1423, pt. 1. Original retained in committee files.) 

Izuka Exhibit 19 

Outline prepared by Ichiro Izuka of treaties on Marxist writings written by 
Leontiv. ( See p. 1431, pt. 1. Photostat of outline retained in committee files.) 

MuLLER Exhibit 1 

Loyalty clearance of Emil M. Muller under Federal employee loyalty program 
from Commander, Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, signed R. T. Cowdrey. ( See p. 
1465, pt. 1. Copy retained in committee files. ) 

Harry Kuhia Exhibit 1 

Minutes, Gasoline and Oil Drivers. Warehousemen, Helpers Union, Local 904, 
Thursday, June 5, 1947, signed by Eugene Aiwaki, recording secretary. (See p. 
1527, pt. 1. Copy retained in committee files.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2075 

Hauot-d Yamasiiha Kxmiar 1 

Letter dated May 20, 1947, to the members, Teamsters Union of Hawaii from 
Koiclii Imori, ex-business representative, local 904 ; subject, resignation of Koichi 
Imori as business representative. (See p. 1530, pt. 1. C^opy retained in com- 
mittee files.) 

Hakold Yamashita Exhibit 2 

Letter dated May 24, 1947, to Koichi Imori, business representative, Gasoline 
and Oil Drivers, "Warehousemen and Helpers Union, Local 904, Honolulu, T. H., 
in acceptance of Imori's resignation as business representative of the named 
union, signed by the executive board and officers of this union. (See p. 1532, 
pt. 1. Copy retained in committee tiles.) 

(Note. — The following exhibits were introduced into the testimony of liearings 
Regarding Communist Activity in the Territory of Hawaii — Pt. 2.) 

Masao Mori Exhibit 1 

Return receipt of the Post Office Department, Honolulu, T. H., bearing date 
November 28, 1947. (See p. 1549, pt. 2. Original retained in committee files.) 

Charles Fujimoto Exhibit 1 

Daily Peoples World, October 25, 1948, page 2, article entitled, "Communists on 
the Air." Charles Fujimoto tells aims of Hawaiian [Communist] party. (See 
p. 1560, pt. 2.) 

Charles Fujimoto Exhibit 2 

Daily Peoples World, October 21, 1948, article entitled "Famed Scientist Takes 
Hawaiian Communist Post."' (See p. 1561, pt. 2. Original retained in commit- 
tee files. ) 

Charles Fujimoto Exhibit 3 

Subpena duces tecum served upon Charles Fujimoto on March 31, 1950, re- 
quiring Charles Fujimoto to produce before the Committee on Un-American 
Activities all the membership records, all the records of dues payments, and 
any and all official records, registers or books, and all correspondence files. 
(Seep. 1561, pt. 2.) 

Charles Fujimoto Exhibit 4 

Communist Party News Letter No. 1, September 15, issued by section 1, Com- 
munist Party of Hawaii. (See p. 1564, pt. 2.) 

Charles Fujimoto Exhibit 5 

Communist Party News Letter No. 2, Issued by the Communist Party of Hawaii, 
(Seep. 1566, pt. 2.) 

Charles Fujimoto Exhibit 6 

Throw-away sheet entitled "Your Civil Liberties in Danger" issued by Club 
Lincoln, Communist Party, Box 3204. (See p. 1567, pt. 2.) 

Charles Fujimoto Exhibit 7 

Throw-away sheet marked "No. 1," dated October 6, 1949, signed at the bot- 
tom "Communist Party of Hawaii, Post Office Box 3204, Honolulu, T. H." (See 
p. 1569, pt. 2.) 

Charles Fujimoto Exhibit 8 

Throw-away sheet with heading "Who Are the Real Conspirators, the Com- 
munist Party of the U. S. A. or the Un-American Committee and Its Bosses, the 
Wall Street Monopolists':"' issued by the Communist Party of Hawaii. (See 
p. 1570, pt. 2. ) 

Frank Silva Exhibit 1 

Photograph noted by figure 10 above the person in upper right-hand portion. 
Frank Silva was asked if he would identify this person as himself. (See 
p. 1574, pt. 2. Photograpb retained in committee files.) 



2076 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Fbank Silva Exhibit 2 

Envelope addressed to Daniel Frias, Post Office Box 141, Local 142-6, Honolulu, 
Hawaii. T. H., from Frank Silva, care of CLS [California Labor School, 216 
Market Street, San Francisco, Calif.] with notation photo in lower left-hand 
corner. (See p. 1575, pt. 2.) 

Smyser Exhibit 1 

Photograph taken of Charles Fujimoto at a press conference on Monday, Octo- 
ber 18, 1948, during which Charles Fujimoto stated that he was chairman of the 
Communist Party in Hawaii and at which Adam A. Smyser, reporter for the 
Honolulu Star-Bulletin, was present. (Retained in committee files. See p. 
1588, pt. 2.) 

PAHiNtn Exhibit 1 

Photograph of person identified by David Pahinui as being Tim Freeman with 
whom Pahinui had attended Communist Party meetings. (This person was 
known to Pahinui as Tim Freeman, but is actually Jim Freeman, from other evi- 
dence introduced by the committee. Retained in committee files. See p. 1591, 
pt. 2.) 

James Feeeman Exhibit K-1 

Application for voluntary induction under Selective Training and Service Act 
of 1940, dated July 22, 1943, signed "Dwight James Freeman, applicant" (D. S. S. 
Form 165, revised January 15, 1943). (Retained in committee files. See p. 
1609, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit K-2 

Letter dated June 6, 1943, to Local Board No. 173, Anaheim, Calif., signed "D. 
J. Freeman." (Retained in committee files. See p. 1610, pt. 2.) 

James Fbeeman Exhibit K-3 

Letter dated November 15, 1942, to Local Board No. 173, Anaheim, Calif., signed 
"D. J, Freeman." (Retained in committee files. See p. 1610, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit K-4 

Registration card (under Selective Service) D. S. S. Form 1, filed by Dwight 
James Freeman, Order No. 1943, 133 Fourth Street, Garden Grove, Calif., signed 
by Goldie E. Cornett; date of registration, October 16, 1940, Local Board 173, 
200 Fast Center, City Hall, Anaheim, Calif. (Retained in committee files. See 
p. 1610, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit K-5 

Letter from contractors. Pacific Bridge Co., contract NOy-5049, to Selective 
Service System, Local Board No. 173, 200 East Center, Anaheim, Calif., re Dwight 
James Freeman, Order No. 1943. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1610, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit K-6 

Request for transfer for delivery from Local Board (Selective Service) 173, 
Anaheim, Calif., to Local Board No. 76, 463 Bush Street, San Francisco, Calif., 
dated July 22, 1943, signed by Dwight James Freeman, applicant for transfer, 
and approved July 28, 1943, signed by Jesse J. Bullis. (Retained in committee 
files. See p. 1610, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit K-7 

Selective Service questionnaire dated May 1, 1941, of Dwight James Freeman, 
Local Board No. 173, 200 East Center, City Hall, Anaheim, Calif. (Retained in 
committee files. See p. 1610, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit K-8 

Designation of beneficiary dated August 19, 1943, signed by Dwight James 
Freeman. ( Retained in committee files. See p. 1610, pt. 2. ) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2077 

James Fkeeman Exuimr K-9 

Induction articles, part 1, for BuPers jacket, for use of Navy employees, dated 
Au,u:ust 19, 1943, of Dwiglit James Freeman; including oath of allegiance to the 
United States of America, and signed by Dwiglit James Freeman. (Retained in 
committee files. See p. IGIO, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit K-10 

Shipping articles, part 1, for RnPers enlisted man's jacket, dated August 19, 
1943, of Dwight .lames Freeman, signed by Dwight James Freeman. (Retained 
in in committee files. See p. 1610, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit K-11 

Letter, dated June 21, 1943, to Local Board No. 173, Anaheim, Calif., from 
Dwight James Freeman, signed "D. F. Freeman." (Retained in committee files. 
See p. 1610, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit Q-1 

Application for domestic money order. No. 594829, in the amount of $15, dated 
November 29, 1948, made by Jim Freeman, payable to Felice Clark. (See p. 1611, 
pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit Q-2 

Application for domestic money order No. 728857 in the amount of $24.05, dated 
Octol)er 18, 1948, made by Jim Freeman, payable to Felice Clark. (See p. 1612, 
pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit Q-3 

Application for domestic money order No. 737391 in the amount of $74.63, dated 
November 18, 1948, made by Jim Freeman, payable to Felice Clark. (See p. 
1613, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit Q-4 

Application for domestic money order No. 749760 in the amount of $46.68, 
dated December 28, 1948, made by Jim Freeman, payable to Felice Clark. (See 
p. 1614, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit Q-5 

United States postal money order No. 594829 in the amount of $15, dated 
November 29, 1948, remitted by Jim Freeman, payable to Felice Clark. ( See p. 

1616, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit Q-6 

United States postal money order No. 749760 in the amount of $46.68, dated 
December 28, 1948, remitted by Jim Freeman, payable to Felice Clark. (See p. 

1617, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit Q-7 

United States postal money order No. 728857, in the amount of $24.05, dated 
October 18, 1948, remitted by Jim Freeman to Felice Clark. (See p. 1618, pt. 2.) 

James Freeman Exhibit Q-8 

United States postal money order No. 737391, in the amount of $74.63, dated 
November 18, 1948, remitted by Jim Freeman to Felice Clark. (See p. 1619, 
pt.2.) 

Wheeler Exhibit 1 

Deposit slip. Bank of America, San Francisco, October 20, 1948, for credit of 
Communist Party of California, 942 Market Street, room 701, San Francisco 2, 
Calif., showing deposits in the amount of $169.30, of which one item, XIOOO, in 
the amount of $24.05 is a part. (Certified to be a true and correct copy of the 
original on file. Bank of America NT&SA, by E. J. Darbey, proassistant cashier. 
Seep. 1622, pt.2.) 



2078 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Wheeler Exhibit 2 

Statement of account with day and night office, Bank of America, San Francisco, 
Calif., of Communist Party of California, 701 Garfield Building, 942 Market 
Street, San Francisco, Calif., from September 26 to October 25, 1948. (Certified 
to be a true and correct copy of the original on file, Bank of America NT&SA, 
day and night office No. 66, by E. J. Darbey, proassistant cashier. See p. 
1624, pt. 2.) 

Wheeler Exhibit 3 

Deposit slip. Bank of America, San Francisco, November 20, 1948, for credit 
of Communist Party of California, 942 Market Street, room 701, San Francisco 2, 
Calif., showing deposit in amount of $788.03, of which one item, XIOOO, in the 
amount of $74.63 is a part. ( Certified to be a true and correct copy of original 
on file. Bank of America NT&SA, by E. J. Darbey, proassistant cashier. Re- 
tained in committee tiles. See p. 1623, pt. 2. ) 

Wheelee Exhibit 4 

Statement of account with day and night office. Bank of America, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif., of the Communist Party of California, 701 Garfield Building, 942 
Market Street, San Francisco, Calif., from October 26 to November 24, 1948. 
(Certified to be a true and correct copy of the original on file. Bank of America, 
NT&SA, day and night office No. 66. by E. J. Darbey, proassistant cashier. 
Retained in committee files. See p. 1623, pt. 2. ) 

Wheeler Exhibit 5 

Deposit slip. Bank of America, San Francisco, December 3, 1948, for 
credit of Communist Party of California, 942 Market Street, room 701, San 
Francisco 2, Calif., showing deposit in amount of $1,070.75, of which one item, 
X1050 in the amount of $15 is a part. (Certified to be a true and correct copy of 
original on file, Bank of America NT&SA, by E. J. Darbey, proassistant cashier. 
Retained in committee files. See p. 1623, pt. 2. ) 

Wheeleb Exhibit 6 

Statement of account with day and night office. Bank of America, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif., of the Communist Party of California, 701 Garfield Building, 942 
Market Street, San Francisco, Calif., from November 26 to December 23, 1948. 
(Certified to be a true and correct copy of the original on file. Bank of America 
NT&SA, day and night office No. 66, by E. J. Darbey, proassistant cashier. Re- 
tained in committee files. See p. 1623, pt. 2.) 

Wheexee Exhibit 7 

Deposit slip. Bank of America, San Francisco, December 30, 1948, for credit of 
Communist Party of California, 942 Market Street, room 701, San Francisco 2, 
Calif., showing deposit in the amount of $46.68, consisting of one item identified 
as XICKX). (Certified to be a true and correct copy of original on file. Bank of 
America NT&SA, by E. J. Darbey, proassistant cashier. Retained in committee 
files. Seep. 1625, pt. 2.) 

Wheeler Exhibit 8 

Statement of account with day and night office. Bank of America, San Fran- 
cisco, Calif., of Communist Party of California, 701 Garfield Building, 942 Market 
Street, San Francisco, Calif., from December 27, 1948, to January 24, 1949. (Cer- 
tified to be a true and correct copy of the original on file. Bank of America NT&SA, 
day and night office No. 66, by E. J. Darbey, proassistant cashier. See p. 1625, 
pt. 2.) 

Wheeler Exhibit 9 

Check No. 1758, on account of Communist Party of California in the amount of 
$1,078.58, payable to Communist Party, U. S. A., dated June 21, 1949, drawn on 
account of the Communist Party of California in day and night office. Bank of 
America, San Francisco, Calif., signed "Carl R. Lambert." (See p. 1631, pt. 2.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2079 

WHEaixKR Exhibit 10 

Check No. 1770, on account of Communist Party of California, in the amount 
of $l,r)r)2.SS, payable to Communist I'arty, U. S. A., dated July 1, l'J4'J, drawn 
on account of the Communist I'arty of California in day and night oflice, Bank 
of America, San Francisco, Calif. (See p. 1033, pt. 2.) 

Wheeler Exhibit 11 

Siixnature card for the Communist Party of California, civil ri^'hts defense 
fund account with the Bank of America, day and niyht office, San Francisco, 
Calif., showing Carl R. Lambert, financial secretary, and William Schneiderman, 
chairman, as authorized signers for the Communist I'arty of California, dated 
March 27. 1947, and showing amount deposited in account $10,245.48. (See p. 
1635, pt. 2.) 

Wheeler Exhibit 12 

Signature card for the Communist Party of California, account with the day 
and night office. Bank of America, San Francisco, Calif., showing Carl K. Lam- 
bert, financial secretary, and William Schneiderman, chairman, as authorized 
signers for the Communist Party of California. Card originally dated October 
2, 1945, and noted as having been taken on March 3, 1949, and that the account 
had been transferred from the account of the Communist Political Association 
of California. ( See p. 1636, pt. 2. ) 

Wheeler Exhibit 13 

Signature card for the Communist Party of California, civil rights defense 
fund account with the Bank of America, San Francisco, Calif., showing Carl R. 
Lambert, financial secretary, and William Schneiderman, chairman, as authorized 
signers for the Communist Party of California, civil rights defense fund. Card 
reflects that authorization was granted to these signers at a meeting of the 
Communist Party of California, civil rights defense fund, held on February 26, 
1940, and was certified with the bank on March 1, 1949. (See p. 1637, pt. 2.) 

Wheeler Exhibit 14 

Signature card for the Communist Party of California account with the Bank 
of America, San Francisco, Calif., showing Carl R. Lambert, financial secretary, 
and William Schneiderman, chairman, as authorized signers for the Communist 
Party of California. Card dated March 1, 1949. (See p. 1638, pt. 2.) 

Pearl Freeman Exhibit 1 

Daily World, September 21, 1945, page 4, article entitled, "Cop Intimidation 
Spurs Clash in Race Relations." (Retained in committee files. See p. 1640, pt. 
2.) 

Pearl Freeman Exhibit 2 

Daily World, September 17, 1945, page 3, article entitled, "Subgetting Alame- 
dans Are Doing an Outstanding Job." (Retained in committee files. See p. 
1640, pt. 2.) 

Pearl Freeman Exhibit 3 

Application for refund of retirement deductions. United States Civil Service 
Commisison Form 3005, of Pearl E. Freeman, dated May 19, 1945. (Retained in 
committee files. See p. 1641, pt. 2.) 

Pearl Freeman Exhibit Q-1 

Affidavit canceling prior registration in another county, State of California, 
county of Alameda, Mrs. Pearl E. Freeman, affiant, dated February 11, 1946. 
(Retained in committee files. See p. 1641, pt. 2.) 



66636 — 50 — pt. 3 10 



2080 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Peael Feeeman Exhibit Q-2 

Affidavit in accordance with section 223, Elections Code Relating to Primary 
Elections, State of California, city and county of San Francisco, filed by Mrs. 
Pearl E. Freeman, September 27, 1944, showing change in party affiliation from 
Communist to Democratic. (See p. 1644, pt. 2.) 

Peakl Feeeman Exhibit Q-3 

Affidavit of registration No. 837909, State of California, city and county of San 
Francisco, of Mrs. Pearl E. Freeman, originally filed on August 27, 1943, as 
Communist ; changed on September 27, 1944, to Democratic. (See p. 1643, pt. 2.) 

ESTHEE BeISTOW EXHIBIT 1 

American Security Bank, commercial department, signature card for the Ha- 
waii Civil Liberties Committee account for the year 1950, showing signatures of 
Esther M. Bristow and Stephen Muriu as authorized by the Hawaii Civil Liber- 
ties Committee. Card dated January 23, 1950. (See p. 1655, pt. 2.) 

Owens Exhibit 1 

American Security Bank, commercial department, signature card for the 
Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee account for the year 1949, showing signatures 
of Robert Greene, chairman, and Rachel Saiki, treasurer, as authorized by the 
Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee. Card dated February 8, 1949. (See p. 1658, 
pt 2.) 

Owens Exhibit 2 

Ledger sheets, Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee account with the American 
Security Bank reflecting transactions from February 9, 1949, through April 10, 
1950. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1658, pt. 2.) 

Owens Exhibit 3 

Accounting of the Hawaii Civil Liberties trust fund account vsdth the Ameri- 
can Security Bank, made by Katsuto Nagaue, accountant and auditor, 9 North 
Pauahi Street, Honolulu, T. H., covering period from December 1947 to January 
1949. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1659, pt. 2.) 

Owens Exhibit 4 

Cash book of the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee, December 1947 through 
February 1949. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1659, pt. 2.) 

Owens Exhibit 5 

Ten financial accounting statements of the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee, 
compiled by Katsuto Nagaue, accountant and auditor, Honolulu, T. H., from 
December 17, 1947, through January 7, 1949. (See p. 1659, pt. 2, and also pp. 
28-37, Report on the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee issued by the Committee 
on Un-American Activities.) 

Owens Exhibit 6 

The following checks were introduced into the record as Owens Exhibit No. 6 
during the testimony of Investigator Courtney E. Owens on April 15, 1950. Sub- 
ject checks were drawn on the trust account of Mr. Katsuto Nagaue, the ac- 
countant for the Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee. The account was main- 
tained at the American Security Bank, Honolulu, T. H. : 

6-1: Check No. 3, dated December 19, 1947, in the amount of $5, payable to 
Marshall McEuen, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-2: Check No. 4, dated December 19, 1947, in the amount of $36, payable 
to Tongg Publishing Co., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee 
files. 

6-3 : Check No. 12, dated December 29, 1947, in the amount of $116, payable 
to Honolulu Star-Bulletin, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee 
files. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2081 

6-4: Cliock No. 211 dated January 2. lO-lS, in tlio amount of $2, payable to 
Marshall McEuen, signed by Katsuto Naj;aue; retained in committee files. 

6-5: Cli'-ck No. ;'.;'.. dated January 20, 1J)1.S. in th«> amount of $2, payable to 
Marshall McEuen, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

t>-U: Check No. .SU, dated January 27, 1U48, in tiie amount of .$.">, payable to 
Stephen Murin, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee hies. 

6-7: Check No. 40, dated January 27, 1948, in the amowit of $202.80, payable 
to Bouslog iV: Symonds, siyned l)y Katsuto Xa'j:aue; retained in committee files. 

6-S: Check No. 41, dated January 27, 11)48. in the amount of $r)0, payable to 
Rachael Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee hies. 

(^-9: Check No. 50, dated February 4, 1948, in the amount of .$18, payable to Kob- 
ert Greene, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-10: Check No. .51, tiated February 4, 1948, in the amount of $200, payable 
to William Shook, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-11 : Check No. 52, dated February 4, 1948 in the amount of $5, payable to 
Stephen Murin, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-12 : Check No. 63, dated February 18, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee tUes. 

f>-13 : Check No. 71, dated February 25, 1948, in the amount of $6, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee liles. 

6-14: Check No. 72, dated February 28, 1948, in the amount of $100 payable 
to John Reiuecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-15: Check No. 86, dated March 2, 1948, in the amount of $48.78, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee tiles. 

6-l() : Check No. 97, dated March 8, 1948, in the amount of $5, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-17 : Check No. 98, dated March 8, 1948, in the amount of $220, payable to 
Tongg Publishing Co., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-18 : Check No. 103, dated April 1, 1C48, in the amount of $200, payable to 
John E. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; i-etained in committee files. 

6-19: Check No. 104, dated April 4, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
John E. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee tiles. 

()-20: Check No. 105, dated April 4, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-21 : Check No. 106, dated April 7, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
John E. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-22: Check No. 107, dated April 7, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-23: Check No. 108, dated April 7, 1948, in the amount of $6, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-24 : Check No. 110, dated March 12, 1948, in the amount of $200, payable to 
John Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-25 : Check No. 110, dated April 12, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
John Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files.^' 

6-26 : Check No. Ill, dated April 12, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-27 : Check No. 112, dated April 12, 1948, in the amount of $15.27, payable to 
Ofiice Appliance Co., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-28 : Check No. 114, dated April 12, 1948, in the amount of $125, payable to 
Tongg Publishing Co., Ltd., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee 
files. 

6-29 : Check No. 118, dated April 20, 1948, in the amount of $5, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-30: Check No. 119, dated April 20, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-31 : Check No. 120, dated April 20, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
John E. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-32 : Check No. 121, dated April 20, 1948, in the amount of $100, payable to 
cash, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-33 ; Check No. 122, dated April 23, 1948, in the amount of $100, payable to 
Harriet Bouslog, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-34: Check No. 123, dated April 23, 1948, in the amount of $100, payable 
to Myer C. Symonds, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-.35: Check No. 123, dated March 19, 1948. in the amount of $15, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-36 : Check No. 124, dated March 19, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 



^ Two checks carry numerical designation of No. 110. 



2082 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

6-37: Check No. 124, dated April 24, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable to 
Library of Hawaii, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-38 : Check No. 125, dated April 24, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
Ingram Defense Fund, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 
•-39: Check No. 125, dated March 19, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
John Reineeke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee flies. 

6-40 : Check No. 120, dated April 20, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable to 
Stephen Murin, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-41 : Check No. 127, dated April 26, 1948, in the amount of $110, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-42 : Check No. 127, dated March 22, 1948, in the amount of $5, payable to 
Stephen Murin, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files.^ 

6-43: Check No. 128, dated March 22. 1948, in the amount of $25, pa.vable 
to. John Reineeke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-44 : Check No. 129, dated March 22, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
Aiko T. Reineeke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-45: Check No. 139, dated May 5, 1948, in the amount of $43.20, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-46 : Check No. 140, dated May 5, 1948, in the amount of $5, payable to Rachel 
Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-47: Check No. 142, dated May 3, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable to 
John E. Reineeke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee tiles. 

6-48: Check No. 143, dated May 3, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable to 
Aiko T. Reineeke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-49: Check No. 147, dated May 11, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
John E. Reineeke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-50: Cheek No. 148, dated May 11, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
Aiko T. Reineeke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-51 : Check No. 150, dated May 17, 1948, in the amount of $30.22, payable to 
Bouslog & Symonds, attorneys at law, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in 
committee files. 

6-52 : Check No. 151, dated May 17, 1948, in the amount of $8.30, payable to 
Tongg Publishing Co., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-53 : Check No. 152, dated ^Nlay 17, 1948, in tlie amount of $9.60, payable to 
Advertiser Publishing Co., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee 
files. 

6-54 : Check No. 153, dated May 17, 1948, in the amount of $21.20, payable to 
Advertiser Publishing Co., signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee 
files. 

6-55 : Check No. 154, dated May 17, 1948, in the amount of $30.80, payable to 
Honolulu Star-Bulletin, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-56: Check No. 155, dated May 24, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable to 
John E. Reineeke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-57 : Check No. 156, dated May 24, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable to 
Aiko T. Reineeke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-58: Check No. 157, dated May 24, 1948, in the amount of $5, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-59: Check No. 160, dated June 5, 1948, in the amount of $5, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-60: Check No. 161, dated June 8, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable to 
August Ahren School, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-61 : Check No. 162, dated June 8, 1948, in the amount of $8.76, payable to 
ILWU Building Committee, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; reproduced for the 
record. ( See p. 1678, pt. 2. ) 

6-62 : Check No. 178, dated June 1948, in the amount of $5, payable to Rachel 
Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-63 : Check No. 179, dated June 14, 1948, in the amount of $48, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-64: Check No. 181, dated June 29, 1948, in the amount of $5, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-65 : Check No. 184, dated July 3, 1948, in the amount of $11.45. payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; reproduced for the record. (See 
p. 1680, pt. 2.) 

6-66: Check No. 185, dated July 7, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable to 
Pacific Record Co., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; reproduced for the record. 
(See p. 1681, pt. 2.) 



89 Two checks carry numerical designation of No. 127. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2083 

6-67: Check No. 188, dated July 12, 194.S, in tlie uiiiouiit (.f $5, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Kalsuto Nayaue; retahied in coiiunitteo tlh's. 

6-68: Check No. mi, duted July 26, 1!)48, in the amount ol" $.'{, payable to 
YWGA, signed by Katsuto Na.sjaue ; retained in committee tiles. 

6-60: Check No. L'17, dated August 2. I'.MS. in the amount of .$10.1, payalile to 
Honolulu Star-Bulletin, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in (•(inunitlee tiles. 

6-70: Check No. 21S, dated August 2, 1048, in the amount of $2.1, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee tiles. 

6-71 : Check No. 221, dated August 9, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-72: Check No. 222, dated Augnst 9, 1948, in the amount of $60, payable to 
Harriet Bouslog, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-73: Check No. 223, dated August 11, 1948, in the amount of $1,000, payable 
to Richard Gladstein, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

<;-T4: Check No. 224. dated August 17, 1948, in the amomit of $100, payable 
lo Raciiel Saiki, signed by K itsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-75 : Check No. 226, dated August 20, 1948, in the amount of $173, payable to 
Tongg Publishing Co., Ltd., signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee 
files. 

6-76: Check No. 227, dated August 20, 1948, in the amount of $68.10, payable 
to Pacific Frontier Broadcasting Co., Ltd., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; reproduced 
for the record. ( See p. 1682, pt. 2.) 

6-77 : Check No. 233, dated August 21, 1948, in the amount of $60, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-78: Check No. 234, dated August 25, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-79 : Check No. 235, dated August 25, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable to 
John E. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-80 :Check No. 237, dated August 25, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable to 
Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-81 : Check No. 249, dated September 1, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-82 : Check No. 252, dated September 3, 1948, in the amount of $58.40, payable 
to Bouslog «& Symonds, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-83 : Check No. 256, dated September 4, 1948, in the amount of $10, payable 
to Makiki Florist, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-84 : Check No. 257, dated September 7, 1948, in the amount of $46, payable 
to Masaru Shimonishi, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-85 : Check No. 258, dated September 7, 1948, in the amount of $46.50, payable 
to Sam K. Stevens, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-86 : Check No. 261, dated September 7, 1948, in the amount of $10, payable 
to Richard Hirakami, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-87 : Check No. 262, dated September 7, 1948, in the amount of $10, payable to 
Louis Inagaki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-SS: Check No. 263, dated September 7, 1948, in the amount of $10, payable to 
Juliette Ballenti, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-89 : Check No. 264, dated September 7, 1948, in the amount of $110, payable to 
Stephen Murin, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; reproduced for the record. (See 
p. 1687, pt. 2.) 

6-90 : Check No. 265, dated September 7, 1948, in the amount of $110, payable 
to Robert Greene, signed bv Katsuto Nagaue ; reproduced for the record. ( See 
p. 1688, pt. 2.) 

6-91 Check No. 266, dated September 7. 1948, in the amount of $110, payable 
to Celeste Sti'ack. signed by Katsuto Nagaue; reproduced for the record. (See 
p. 1689, pt. 2.) 

6-92 : Check No. 237, dated September 7, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable 
to John E. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-98 : Check No. 268, dated September 7, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable to 
Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue: retained in committee files. 

6-94 : Check No. 273, dated September 15, 1948, in the amount of $10, payable 
to Maximino Santiago, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-95 : Check No. 274, dated September 14, 1948, in the amount of $25. payable to 
John Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-96 : Check No. 275, dated September 15, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable 
to Aiko Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-97 : Check No. 276, dated September 15, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable 
to Yasuki Arakapi, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in conunittee files. 



2084 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

6-98 : Check No. 277, dated September 15, 1948, in the amount of $53, payable 
to David Thompson, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

(>-99 : Check No. 278. dated September 15. 1948, in the amount of $28.50, pay- 
able to J. Jaeger, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-100 : Check No. 279, dated September 15, 1948, in the amount of $10, payable 
to Thomas Yagi, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-101 : Check No. 282, dated September 16, 1948, in the amount of $26.85, pay- 
able to Mineo Kotogiri, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-102 : Check No. 283, dated September 16, 1948, in the amount of $12.38, pay- 
able to Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Ltd., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in 
committee files. 

6-103 : Check No. 286, dated September 17, 1948, in the amount of $90, payable 
to Radio Station KULA, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; reproduced for the record. 
(Seep. 1684, pt. 2.) 

6-104 : Check No. 295, dated September 22, 1948. in the amount of $3, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-105: Check No. 305, dated September 29, 1948, in the amount of $25.45, 
payable to Rachel Saiki, signed Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-106 : Check No. 306, dated September 29, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable 
to John E. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-107 : Check No. 307, dated September 29, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable 
to Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-108: Check No. 308, dated October 4, 1948. in the amount of $16, payable 
to Judith Meislan, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-109 : Check No. 309, dated October 4. 1948, in the amount of $25, payable to 
cash, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-110 : Check No. 311, dated October 4, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-111 : Check No. 315, dated October 19, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-112: Check No. 316, dated October 19, 1948, in the amount of $80, payable 
to Bergstrom Music Co., signed by Katsuto Nagaue; reproduced for the record. 
(See p. 1691, pt. 2.) 

6-113 : Check No. 317, dated October 19. 1948, in the amount of $435, payable 
to Alexander Brothers, Ltd., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; reproduced for the 
record. (See p. 1693. pt. 2.) 

6-114 : Check No. 318. dated October 19. 1948. in the amount of $9.11, payable 
to ILWU Educational and Legal Fund, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in 
committee files. 

6-115 : Check No. 319, dated October 19, 1948. in the amount of $34.50, pay- 
able to United Sugar Workers, ILWU, CIO, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained 
in committee files. 

6-116: Check No. 320, dated October 19. 1948, in the amount of $77.43. pay- 
able to Bouslog & Symonds, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee 
files. 

6-117 : Check No. 31'1. dated October 19, 1948, in the amount of $.52.50, payable 
to Honolulu Record, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-118 : Check No. 322. dated October 19, 1948, in the amount of $19, payable to 
Hawaiian Electric Co., Ltd., signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee 
files. 

6-119 : Check No. 324, dated October 19. 1948, in the amount of $.57.44, payable 
to Office Appliance Co., signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-120 : Check No. .835, dated October 30, 1948, in the amount of $100, payable 
to Dr. John Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-121 : Check No. 336, dated October 30, 1948, in the amount of $100, payable 
to Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-122 : Check No. 370. dated November 5. 1948. in the amount of $500. payable 
to Richard Gladstein, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-123 : Check No. .372. dated November 5, 1948, in the amount of $500. payable 
to Bouslog & Symonds. signed by Katsuto Nagaue : retained in committee files. 

6-124 : Check No. 374, dated November 8. 1948. in the amount of $3, payable to 
Rachel Saiki. signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-125: Check No. 375. dated November 9. 1948. in the amount of $.50, payable 
to ILWU Local 142, Olaa Unit, signed by Katsuto Nagaue r retained in committee 
files. 



I 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2085 

6-126 : Check No. 376, dated November 10, 1948, in the amount of $6.r>0, pay- 
able to ILWU Building Committee, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in com- 
mittee files. 

(j-127: Check No. 382, dated November 15, 1^8, in the amount of $43.55, pay- 
able to ILWU Educational and Legal Fund, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained 
in coiniuitteo files. 

6-128 : Check No. 386, dated November 23, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

()-120 : Check Is'o. 303", dated December 2, 1948, in the amount of $50, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-130: Check No. 394, dated December 2, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable to 
Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-131 : Check No. 395, dated December 2, 1948, in the amount of $100, pay- 
able to John E. Reinecke. signed by Katsuto Nagaue. ( See p. 2011, part 3.) 

6-132 : Check No. 3913, dated December 2, 1948, in the amount of $100, payable 
to Aiko T. Reinecke, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in counnittee files. 

(>-133 : Check No. 397, dated December 6, 1948, in the amount of $25.86, pay- 
able to Tsuneto Kunimura, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee 
files. 

6-134: Check No. 407, dated December 13, 1948, in the amount of $139.30, 
payable to Honolulu Star-Bulletin, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in com- 
mittee files. 

6-135 : Check No. 413, dated December 18. 1948, in the amount of $6.50, payable 
to Henry Epstein, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in connnittee files. 

6-136 : Check No. 416, dated December 21, 1948, in the amount of $25, payable 
to Robert Fames, signed by Katsuto Nagaue; retained in committee files. 

6-137 : Check No. 417, dated December 21, 1948, in the amount of $3, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-138: Check No. 425, dated January 7. 1949, in the amount of $2, payable to 
Central Intermediate School, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee 
files. 

6-139 : Check No. 426, dated January 7, 1949, in the amount of $75, payable 
to Hui Hanoli Hula, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

6-140: Check No. 430, dated January 10, l'.>49, in the amount of $3, payable 
to Rachel Saiki, signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in committee files. 

(i-141 : Check No. 444, dated January 26, 1949, in the amount of $03.48, pay- 
able to Office Appliance Co., Ltd., signed by Katsuto Nagaue ; retained in com- 
mittee files. 

6-142 : Check No. 445, dated January 26, 1949, in the amount of $36, payable 
to Pacific Display Co., Ltd., signed by Katsuto Nagaue : retained in committee 
files. 

6-143: Check No. 485, dated February 7, 1949, in the amount of $1,195.77, 
payable to Hawaii Civil Liberties Committee, signed by Katsuto Nague ; retained 
in committee files. 

Owens Exhibit 7 

Invoice No. 3830-16, August 12, 1948, for four 1-hour wire spools sold by 
Bergstrom Music Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, to the ILWU Educational and Legal 
Department, Pier 11, Honolulu, T. H. ; total cost, $20. (Certified true copy of the 
original invoice, Bergstrom Music Co., signed O. T. Matsumoto, oflSce manager. 
See p. 1660, pt. 2. ) 

Owens Exniiur 8 

Invoice No. 3942-9, September 15, 1948, for 12 1-hour wire spools sold by 
Bergstrom Music Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, to the ILWU Educational and Legal 
Depai-tment, I'ier 11, Honolulu. T. H. ; total cost, $60. (Certified true copy of 
the original invoice, Bergstrom Music Co., signed O. T. Mat.sumoto, office man- 
ager. See p. 1660, pt. 2.) 

Owens Exhibit 9 

Five invoices, Alexander Bros., Ltd., Honolulu, T. H., to ILWU, Terminal 
Building, Pier 11, Honolulu, T. H. : 

1. Invoice No. A2660, August 24, 1948, for 10 1-hour spools for Webster wire 
recorder ; total cost, $50 ; 

2. Invoice No. A2729, August 28, 1948, for 50 1-hour spools of wire and 5 file 
boxes at a total cost of $255 ; 



2086 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

3. Invoice No. A2701, August 27, 1948, for 10 l-hour spools of Webster wire 
recorder at a total cost of $50 ; 

4. Invoice No. A2623, August 20, 1948, for 10 1-liour spools for Webster wire 
recorder at a total cost of $50 ; 

5. Invoice No. A2487, August 12, 1948, for six l-hour Webster recording wire 
at a total cost of $30. 

(See pp. 1661-1665, pt. 2.) 

Owens Exhibit 10 

Invoice, Pacific Frontier Broadcasting Co., Ltd., KULA, Honolulu, No. 2784, 
August 31, 1948, to the Hawaii Civil Liberties League, Pier 11, Honolulu, T. H., 
for one half -hour program (discussion of Keinecke case, including one produc- 
tion charge), at a total cost of $68.50. (Retained in committee files. See p. 
1666, pt. 2.) 

Owens Exhibit 11 

Invoice, Pacific Frontier Broadcasting Co., Ltd., KULA, Honolulu, No. 3121, 
September 30, 1948, to Hawaii Civil Liberties League, Pier 11, Honolulu, T. H., 
for one half-hour program, class A, at a total cost of $90. (Retained in com- 
mittee files. See p. 1666, pt. 2. ) 

(Note. — The following exhibits were introduced into the testimony of Hearings 
Regarding Communist Activity in the Territory of Hawaii — Pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 1 

Outside cover of Communist Party card given to Fedrico Lorenzo with 
preamble to constitution of Communist Party printed on reverse side. (Retained 
in committee files. See p. 1944, pt. 3. ) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 2 

Pamphlet, Reaction Beats Its War Drums, by William Z. Foster. (Retained 
in committee files. See p. 1946, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 3 

Pamphlet, the Communist Party and You, by Betty Gannett, assistant organi- 
zation secretary of the Communist Party, U. S. A., published by the Communist 
Party of the U. S. A., 1946. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1946, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 4 

Pamphlet, What You should Know About the Communists, published by the 
Communist Party, U. S. A., March 1947. (Retained in committee files. See 
p. 1946, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 5 

Pamphlet, Lincoln and the Reds, reprint of article by Rob F. Hall in the Daily 
Worker, February 12, 1947, published by the Communist Party of San Francisco. 
(Retained in committee files. See p. 1946, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 6 

Pamphlet, Organized Labor and the Fascist Danger, by William Z. Foster, pub- 
lished bv New Century Publishers, August 1947. (Retained in committee files. 
See p. 1946, pt. 3.) , 

Lorenzo Exhibit 7 

The Communist Review, a monthly theoretical journal of the Communist 
Party of Great Britain, June 1947. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1946, 
pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 8 

Pamphlet, the Menace of a New World War, by William Z. Foster, published 
by New Century Publishers, March 1946. (Retained in committee files. See 
p. 1946, pt. 3.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2087 

Lorenzo Exhibit 9 

Pamphlet, Is Connuuuisin Un-Amorlcaii? Nine Questions About the Commu- 
nist Party Answered, by Eugene Dennis, publisiied by the New Century Pub- 
lishers, March 1947. (Retained in conmiirtee tih^s. See p. 194G, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exunnr 10 

Pamphlet, What Are We Doins in China'? by Joseph North, published by New 
Century Publishers, December 1915. (lietained in committee tiles. See p. 1946, 
pt. 3.) ' 

Lorenzo Exiiihit 11 

Pamphlet, Constitution of the Communist Party of the United States of Amer- 
ica. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1947, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 12 

Pamphlet, What You Should Know About the Communists, published by the 
Communist Party, U. S. A., March 1947. (Retained in committee files. See p. 
1947, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 13 

Pamphlet, What You Should Know About the Communists, published by the 
Communist Party, U. S. A., March 1947. (Retained in committee files. See p. 
1947, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 14 

Pamphlet, Marxist Pamphlet No. 2, Marxism vs. Liberalism, an Interview, 
Josef Stalin — H. G. Wells, a New Century publication, September 1945. (Re- 
tained in committee files. See p. 1947, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 15 

Pamphlet, Marxist Pamphlet No. 8, The State, by V. I. Lenin, a New Century 
publication. May 1947. (Retained in committee files. See p. 1947, pt. 3.) 

Lorenzo Exhibit 16 

Pamphlet, Program for Survival: The Communist Position on the Jewish 
Question, by Alexander Bittelman, New Century Publishers, January 1947. (Re- 
tained in committee files. See p. 1947, pt. 3. ) 

Reinecke Exhibit 1 

Letter, dated May 29, 1935, addressed "Dear Comrade Reinecke," signed, "S. 
Weinman." ( See pp. 2005 and 2007, pt. 3. ) 

Reinecke Exhibit 2 

Two-page list of articles and books, chiefly on the subject of Soviet Russia, 
which list composes a reading course which Reinecke recommended. (See pp. 
2009and2096, pt. 3.) 

Reinecke Exhibit 3 

Pamphlet, Constitution of the Communist Party of the United States of Amer- 
ica, with pen-written note on back cover, "P. S. — Read it with discrimination, 
John E. Reinecke." ( See p. 2010, pt. 3. ) 

KiMOTO Exhibit 1 

Form 57, Application for Federal Employment of Denichi Kimoto, Record 
Group No. 208, records of the Office of War Information, personnel file of Denichi 
Kimoto, on file in National Archives, Washington, D, C. (Retained in committee 
files. See p. 2034, pt. 3.) 



2088 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

KiMOTO Exhibit 2 

Form 61, Oath of Office, Affidavit, and Declaration of Appointee, Office of 
War Information, Central Pacific Operations, Honolulu, T. H., made by Deuichi 
Kimoto, November 1, 1944. (Retained in committee files. See p. 2034, pt. 3.) 

KiMOTO Exhibit 3 

1938 registration blank. Communist Party, of Jack Kimoto, showing party 
name as being Roy Lane ; receipt for membership book for year 1937, No. 59367 ; 
1931 record as being No. 75649, R.— Denichi Kimoto, P.— Ray Lane, A.— 2001 
Araphoe Street, translator, USA, 1906, Japanese. (Retained in committee files. 
See p. 2036, pt. 3.) 

Wheeler Exhibit X 

Minutes of meeting. United Sugar Workers, ILWU, Local 142, Hawaii divi- 
sion, executive board, December 14, 1947. (Retained in committee files. See 
p. 2059, pt. 3.) 

Bekman Exhibit 1 

Letter, dated, September 26, 1949, to Mr. Roy Wilkins, acting secretary. Na- 
tional Association for the Advancement of Colored People, 20 West Fortieth 
Street, New York IS, N. Y., from Edward Rerman. (Retained in committee 
fQes. See p. 20^57, pt. 3.) 

Berman Exhibit 2 

Letter received by Edward Berman on October 26, 1949, from Gloster B. 
Current, director of branches. National Association for the Advancement of 
Colored People. (Retained in committee files. See p. 2068, pt. 3.) 

Berman Exhibit 3 

Letter addressed to Mrs. Christopher, acting president, Honolulu branch, 
NAACP, 808 Fifteenth Street, CH A 3, Honolulu 60, T. H., from Roy Wilkins, 
acting secretary. (Retained in committee files. See p. 2068, pt. 3.) 



IztJKA Exhibit 1. — Information From the Files of the Committee on Un- 
American Activities, United States House of Representatives, Concerning 
RuDiE O. Lambert 

The files, records, and publications of the Committee on Un-American Activi- 
ties contain the following information concerning Rudie C. Lambert : 

A Statement of Vote in the State of California (p. 20) listed Rudie C. Lambert 
as a candidate of the Communist Party for State senate, sixteenth district of 
California, 1934. A membership list of the Communist Party, Los Angeles 
division, 1938-39, showed him to be a member of the Communist Party repre- 
senting the Machinists Union, downtown section. 

In testimony of John L. Leech in executive hearings before the Special Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities (p. 1126) he stated that "* * * leading 
members of the section executive committee (of the Communist Party) * * * 
Rudie Lambert, and myself, had many meetings with Jerome ^ in the home of 
Dr. Inez Decker, * * * ^jj^j i^q ^qj^ ^g ^hat his instructions were not only to 
bring about a general strengthening of the party's apparatus in the Hollywood 
district, such as increasing its financial income and party membership, but that 
he was also to devote special attention to the development of cultural organiza- 
tions and to trade-union problems." 

Mr. Leech also stated in his testimony that Rudie Lambert was an "active 
member of the Communist Party." (Executive hearings. Special Committee on 
Un-American Activities, August 16, 1940, p. 1390. ) 

It was pointed out by Ichiro Izuka, during his testimony in the case of Dr. 
and Mrs. John E. Reinecke, August 12, 1948, that Rudie C. Lambert was a 
director of the Workers School in San Francisco. (Transcript of proceedings, 
Hawaiian Department of Public Instructions versus Dr. and Mrs. John E. 



^ V. J. Jerome, cultural head of the Communist Party. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII "2089 

Reinecke. p. 100.) The Workers School of San Francisco is one of the Com- 
munist workers' schools scattered throuiihout the United States. 

Rudie lianibert was a delegate of the Bay Region Congress Against War and 
Fascism as shown in the March 19'i4 (p. 15) issue of Fight, the olhcial organ 
of tlie American League Against War and Fascism, later known as the American 
League for Peace and Democracy. 

The American Ivcague Against War and Fascism was cited as subversive and 
Communist by Attorney General Tom Clark in lists furnished the Loyalty 
Review I'oard and released to the press by the United States Civil Service Com- 
mission December 4, 1947, and September 21, 194S. 

The American League Against War and Fascism was cited as a Communist- 
front organization by Attorney General Francis Biddle. (In re Harry Bridges, 
May 28, 1942, p. 10.) 

"The American League Against War and Fascism was organized at the First 
T'nited States Congress Against War which was held in New York City, Septem- 
; >r 29 :-> Octolier 1. 1033. Four years later at Pittsburgh, November 26-28, 1937, 
the name of the organization was changed to the American I^eague for Peace 
and Democracy. * * * It remained as completely under the control of 
C(.)mmunists when the name was changed as it had been before." (Special 
Committee on Un-American Activities, report March 29, 1944. p. 53; also cited in 
reports, January 3, 1939, pp. 69 and 121; January 3, 1940, p. 10; June 25, 
1942, p. 14.) 



IzuKA Exhibit 2. — Information From Files of the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, United States House of Representatives, Concerning Betty 
Gannett 

The records, files, and publications of the Committee on Un-American 
Activities contain the following information concerning Betty Gannett: 

In sworn testimony before the Committee on Un-American Activities, May 6, 
1949. Paul Crouch, for 17 years a member of the Communist Party, told the 
committee that he had been acquainted with Betty Gannett from 19.37 until 
1941. and that "she was district organizer, in 1937. of the Young Communist 
League of Ohio. She came to New York in 1938 for full-time work, and for 
some time was a member of the secretariat of YCL with me. She was in 
charge of the trade-union department. * * * in later years I knew little of 
the exact party responsibilities assigned to Betty Gannett but met her at all 
meetings of the central committee of the party from 1932 through 1939. When 
I went to California in 1941, I found that she was in the party in San Francisco, 
but, to my surprise, did not attend meetings of the district bureau." (Testimony 
of Paul Crouch, May 6, 1949. pp. 206 and 207.) 

In sworn testimony before the Special Committee on Un-American Activities, 
Augiist 16. 1938. the name of Betty Gannett appeared on a list of California 
State officials of the Communist Party, U. S. A., submitted by Mr. Walter S. 
Steele, the witness. Mr. John L. Leech, former member of the State committee, 
Communist Party of California, testified in executive session before a sub- 
committee of the Special Committee on Un-American Activities. July 16. 1940, 
that Betty Gannett was the educational director of the Communist Party in the 
California district (executive hearings, p. 939). Later, during the same hear- 
ings, evidence was submitted to show that the Communist Party bank account 
in the California Bank, in the name of Betty Gannett (jointl.v with Sam Cher- 
nick"), showed $15,872.70 deposited (executive hearings, p. 1139); in an 
affidavit by William B. Holther (Jul.v 19. 1939). submitted as evidence in 
testimony of George Oliver Bertholon. former member of the C'Ommunist Party, 
Bettv Gannett was referred to as "perhaps the foremost female Communist in 
California." (Ibid., p. 1178.) 

The Communist publication, the r)aily AYorker, for January 13. 1937 (p. 5), 
revealed that Betty Gannett was elected a member of the resolutions and pro- 
posals committee of the Communist Party at the California State convention. 
May 14 and 15. 1938, and made a report to the convention on building the party 
in California (minutes of the convention, pp. 3 and 5). The Worker of July 28, 
1946 (p. 4. sec. 3). reported that Betty Gannett had been elected astsistant or- 
ganization secretary of the Communist Party. She was the principal speaker 
at a membership meeting of Unity Center Section, Communist Party, to launch 
a recruiting drive (Daily Worker, March 11. 1947, p. 8) ; she was identified in 
this source as a.ssistant national organization secretary. 



2090  COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

She was named by Walter S. Steele in sworn testimony before the Committee 
on Un-American Activities (July 21, 1947, p. 8), as Assistant Secretary, Organiz- 
ing Commission, Communist Party, USA. Contact (issued by the National 
Organization and Education Commissions, Communist Party, USA), identified 
Betty Gannett in its issue of February 1947 (p. 1) as Assistant National Or- 
ganization Secretary of the Communist Party. She spoke at a membership meet- 
ing of the East New York branch of the Communist Party, as shown in the 
Daily Worker of February 7, 1949 (p. 5), and was identified as Assistant Or- 
ganization Secretary of the Communist Party, USA. 

In 1930, the Daily Worker published an article (date-lined Cadiz, Ohio, March 
30), in which it was stated that "the trial of Betty Gannett * * * cliarged 
under the vicious criminal syndicalism law begins here Monday. They were 
arrested for distributing a shop bulletin in St. Clairville, Ohio." 

Ichiro Izuka, a witness in behalf of the Hawaiian Department of Public 
Instruction, August 12. 1948, testified that Betty Gannett had been one of his 
instructors at the Communist Party Workers School in California, and that 
she was a member of the Communist Party (pp. 103 and 104 of the testimony). 

Betty Gannett contributed articles on Marxism and Idealism : A Re.ioinder, 
on a Study of Marxism and Idealism, and Win the Youth for I'eace, Democracy, 
and Socialism, to Political Affairs (issues of July 1948, p. 628; May 1947, p. 44i ; 
and September 1948, p. 916, respectively). The Committee on Un-American 
Activities cited Political Affairs as an "official Communist I'arty monthly theo- 
retical organ" which calls itself a magazine devoted to the theory and practice of 
Marxism-Leninism (Report 1920 of May 11, 1948, and Report 209 of April 1, 
1947, of the Committee on Un-American Activities). 

In May 1944 the Communist Party, USA, a.ssumed the name of the Communist 
Political Association "for strategic reasons" and resumed the orignal name, 
Communist Party, USA, in July 194.'") (Report 209 of the Committee on Un- 
American Activities dated April 1, 1947). Attorney General Tom Clark cited 
the Communist Political Association as subversive and Communist and also 
that it "sought to alter the form of government of the United States by uncon- 
stitutional means" (Press release of the U. S. Civil Service Commission dated 
September 21, 1948). Betty Gannett was a member of the committee on or- 
ganization and education of the Communist Political Association, as shown on 
the Proceedings of the Constitutional Convention of the Communist Political As- 
sociation. May 20-22, 1944 (p. 134). 

Announcement was made in the Daily Worker of January 30, 1948 (p. 7), 
of the opening session, student section convention (Communist Party), on the 
subject of Toward a Progressive Victory in 1948, and named Betty Gannett as 
the national .vouth director. 

"All-out support for the fight of young Americans to repeal the draft was 
pledged by the youth panel of the Communist Party convention which met 
Wednesday night. Nineteen party leaders, young and old, from all parts of 
the country spoke in discussion following tbe report of Betty Gannett in behalf 
of the national committee" (Daily Worker, August 6, 1948, p. 2). The same 
article stated that as a ma.ior responsibility facing American Communists, Miss 
Gannett proposed "the formation after the elections, of an independent nonparty 
youth organization basing itself on the principles of Marxism-Leninism." 

Joseph Bucholt and Julian Lowitt, leaders of the organizing conference for a 
labor youth league, were pictured in the Daily Worker of July la. 1949 (p. 4), 
selling "honorary memberships in the league to four Communist Party leaders 
at a reunion dance of former Young Communist League members," including 
Betty Gannett. 

The following announcement appeared in the Daily Worker on January 26. 1950 
(p. 8) : "All student Communists : Orientation for new semesters activity- Hear 
Betty Gannett, representing national committee on the new stage in the fight for 
peace, democracy, and economic security. * * * Sponsored : Student division, 
CP." 

The New York Times of March 30, 1949 (p. 11), reported that "Federal 
authorities here announced yesterday that Betty Gannett, assistant organiza- 
tional secretary of the National Communist Party, had been released from Ellis 
Island on $1,000 bail after her arrest Monday evening for a deportation liearing. 
Miss Gannett, 42 years old, who immigration authorities say has used 11 aliases, 
is charged with being a member of an organization that advocates the over- 
throw of the United States Government by force and violence. She is believed 
by officials here to be a native of Russia, although it was reported in Washington 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2091 

that liei- birthplace is said to be Kii'lce. Poland. Her true name is said to be 
Rebeka or Rifka Yaroszowska. She arrived for 'permanent residence' in this 
country in 1014. from Poland." Tlie article further states that she was released 
under bail of $1.()()0 which was "furnished by the American Connnittee for tlie 
Protection of Foreign-P.orn." A photoi^raph of Miss (Jannett, together with her 
attorney, Carol King, during deportation hearings, appeared in the Daily Worker 
of October 5, 104!) (p. (5). 

Attorney General Tom Clark cited the American Committee for Protection of 
Foreign-Born as subversive and Connnunist (news rel'-nses of June 1 and 
September 21, 1948) ; and the Special Connnittee on Un-American Activities 
found that the organiaztion was "one of the oldest auxiliaries of the Communist 
Party in the United States" (reports of June 25, 1942, and March 29, 1944). 

In an article concerning deportation hearings against Betty (iannett which 
appeared in the New York Times on September 21. 1949 (p. 19), it is noted 
that "Russian-born Miss (Jannett, who is 42 years old, was admitted into this 
country in 1914. The Immigration Service said that she is also known as Betty 
Tormey, Betty Grayson, Rifka Yaroshefsky, Rebecca Yaroshefsky, and Betty 
Yaros." 

Reference to one Betty Grayson appears in public records, files, and publications 
of this committee ; the catalog of the Jefferson School of Social Science for 
September-December 1947 (p. 52) lists the name of one Betty Grayson as a 
guest lecturer at the school. Attorney General Tom Clark has cited the Jeffer- 
son School of Social Science as an "adjunct of the Communist Party" (press 
release of December 4, 1947) ; and the Special Committee on Un-American 
Activities found that "at the beginning of the present year (1944) the old 
Communist Party Workers School and the School for Democracy were merged 
into the Jefferson School of Social Science" (report 1311 of March 29, 1944, by 
the special committee * * *.) 



IzuKA Exhibit 3. — Information From the Files of the Committee on Un- 
American Activities, United States House of Representatives, Concerning 
Louise Todd 

The files, records, and publications of the Committee on Un-American Activi- 
ties reveal the following information concerning Louise Todd : 

The Daily Worker for April 29, -1935, page 2, and May 1, 1935, as well as the 
Western Worker of April 25, 1935, page 1, refer to Louise Todd as a Communist 
Party section organizer at Los Angeles. The California Young Communist 
League Yearbook of 1937, New Frontiers, page 27, refers to Louise Todd as former 
State organization secretary of the Communist Party of California and a member 
of tlie Young Communist League district committee in 1927, 1928, and 1929. 

According to the Daily Worker of January 14, l!i36, Louise Todd was in the 
women's prison, Techachipi, Calif. Further reference to the fact that she had 
been jailed appeared in the Daily Worker, March 26, 193(j, page 3, which also 
shows that she had been a collector of Communist Party petitions. 

Louise Todd was a delegate from California to the national convention of the 
Communist Party in New York City. Wliile there, she was coniirmed as a mem- 
ber of the national committee of the Communist Party and participated in the 
discussion when the decision was made that (Communist Party branches would 
become community political clubs. She reported to the California committee on 
her return to San Franci.sco (see Daily Worker, December 3, 1942, p. 4, and 
People's World, December 14, 1942, p. 2. ) 

In the Daily Worker of December 3, 1942, page 4, Louise Todd is shown as a 
member of the national committee of the Communist Party ; and she is listed as 
a member of a subcommittee of the national committee of the Communist Party 
by the Daily Worker of January 12. 1944, page 4. 

From May 1944 to July 1945 when the Communist Party was known as the 
Communist Political Association, Louise Todd was also a member of its national 
committee, as shown in the Daily Worker, May 23, 1944, page 2, and in the 
Proceedings of the Constitutional Convention of the Communist Political Asso- 
ciation, May 20-22, 1944, page 4. 

The Worker of August 13, 1944, page 10, lists Louise Todd as the secretary of 
the California Communist Political Association. 



2092 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Louise Todd has hold the office of legislative director of the Communist Party 
of California according to People's World, January 28, 1948. page 2 ; February 
(j, 1048, page 8; November 13, 1948, page 3; and the Daily Worker, October 1, 
1948, page 10. 

-' s shown in the Daily Worker, December 3. 1042, page 4, Louise Todd was a 
speaker at a Communist Party conference ; and, according to People's World, 
January 28, 1948, page 2, slie spoke at a Lenin memorial meeting held by the 
California Communist Party. 

In the case of the Hawaiian Department of Public Instruction versus Dr. 
and Mrs. John E. Reinecke, Ichiro Izuka testified that he had known Louise Todd 
as a Communist Party member and as an instructor at the party's Workers 
School in California when he was a student at that school. ( See Transcript of 
Proceedings * * * August 12, 1948, ]jp. 103, 105, 106, and 108; August 27. 
1948, p. 31.) 



IzuKA Exhibit 4. — Information From the Fili s of the Committee on IJn- 
Americ.\n Activities. United States Hoi'se of Kepi:esentatives, Concerning 
William Schneiderman 

The records, files, and publications of the Committee on Un-American Activi- 
ties reveal the following information concerning William Schneiderman : 

William Schneiderman was a member of the national committee of the Com- 
munist Party as shown by the hearings of the Special Committee on Un-Ameri- 
can Activities (1939, vol. 7, p. 4281), and a memorandum from Earl Browder dated 
November 27, 1939. The Daily Worker for D: cember 3, 1942 (p. 4), and the 
Daily People's World for December 14, 1942 (p. 2), reported that William Schnei- 
derman was confirmed as a member of the national committee of the Couununist 
Party at the national conference of that organization held in New York, N. Y., 
November 29-December 1, 1942, and that he gave a report at that conference 
on regional war production and its relati'^n to ejections. A letter from the Se •- 
retary of State of Minnesoia listed William .S^/hnciderman ju> the Couimunist 
Party candidate for Governor in the State of Minnesota in 1932. An official organ 
of the Communist Party, Party Organizer. Augaist-September 19.33 (p. 30) listed 
William Schneiderman as a Communist Party district organizer in Minnesota. 

A statement of vote from the secretary of state of California listed William 
Schneiderman as candidate for Presidential elector in California in 1936. The 
Daily Worker of June 17, 1036 (p. 2), reported that William Schneiderman was 
an organizer for the Communist Party in California. He was listed as State 
secretary of the Communist Party in California in the Dailv Worker of Febru- 
ary 22, 1938 (p. 6) : the Communist, July 1038 (p. 663) ; October 1938 (p. 919) ; 
Young Communist Review, Mav 19.39 (p. 37) : Dailv Worker, April 29, 1940 (p. 4) : 
Challenge, July 14, 1940 (pp. 1, 4) : the Worker, November 8, 1942 (p. 3) ; and 
Daily Worker, November 27, 1942 (p. 4). 

In his capacity as State secretary of the Communist Party for California, 
Mr. Schneiderman was a member of the presiding committee for the tenth 
national convention of the Communist Party as shown by the Daily Worker of 
May 28, 1938 (p. 5) ; he gave the report from California at the convention as 
shown by the Daily Worker of May 31. 1938 (p. 4) ; he sent a telegram to the 
California State committee of the National Election Campaign Committee on 
the Browder campaign as shown by the Daily Worker of Septemlier 6. 1940 (p. 
4) : he spoke at an election rally in Los Angeles, according to the Daily Worker 
of September 10, 1940 (p. 4) ; he spoke at a I'ally honoring Earl Browder in Los 
Angeles, as shown by the Daily People's World of January 20, 1943 (p. 4) : and 
he spoke on Jobs for West Coast Workers Depend on Postwar Unity as shown 
by the Daily People's World of May 12, 1944 (p. 7). 

The Daily Worker of June 25, 1936 (p. 2) , reported that William Schneiderman 
was a member of the convention presiding committee of the Communist Part.v. 
The Daily Worker of June 1, 1938 (p. 5), reported that he was chairman of the 
Organization-Education-Literature-Press Committee of the Communist Party and 
a speaker at the tenth national convention of the organization. Mr. Schneider- 
man presided at an election rally held by the Communist Party in San Francisco, 
Calif., in 1940 as shown by the Daily Worker of September 14, 1940 (p. 1). The 
text of a speech delivered before the California State Assembly by William 
Schneiderman in defense of the Communist Party appeared in the September 
27. 1940, issue of the Daily Worker (p. 4). The Daily Worker of January 12, 
1944 (p. 4), reported that Mr. Schneiderman was a member of the executive 



I 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2093 

committee of the National Election and Political Action Committee of the Com- 
munist Tarty. 

Willinm Schneiderman contributed to Party Ort^anizer, an official publication 
of the Communist Party, as shown by the March-April li)32 (p. 25) and Au^'ust- 
Septombcr 1!)8:> (p. HO) issues. He contributed to tlie Communist as shown by 
the issues of April li«7 (p. 342) ; October 19:W (p. 911>) ; July VSAH (p. (50.3) ; 
June 11)41 (p. 5().S) ; and Tarty Oruanizer for Aujiust T.I37 (j). 45). Mr. Scbiicider- 
man contributed tlie Anti-Filipino Race Riots to the Daily Worker as shown by 
th(> March 1, 1930, issue (p. 6). 

The Proceedings of the Constitutional Convention of the Connnnnist Political 
Association, May 2(*-22. 1944 (p. .".), and a letterlu>iul of the orjiani/ation dated 
June 12, 1944. lists William Schneiderni.-m as vice president. The Daily Teople's 
World of June 14, 1944 (p. 4), reported that Mr. Schneiderman was president of 
the Communist Political Association, the name of the Commuinst Party from 
May 1944 to July 1945. The Daily People's World of June 12, 1944 (p. 1), re- 
ported that Mr. Schneiderman recommended that the Communist Tarty dissolve 
and in its place create the Communist Political Association, which was done. 
Mr. Schneiderman was in charge of the CommunLst Political Association office 
at 121 Haight Street, San Francisco, Calif., as shown by the Worker, July 16, 
1944 (p. 7) ; and he spoke at a Communist Political Association in-ogram on the 
United Nlations Conference, May 17, 1945, as shown by a photostat of the 
program. 

The Daily Worker of December 5, 1946 (p. 12), reported that William Schnei- 
derman spoke at a meeting of the national committee of the Communist I'arty. 
The Daily Worker, April 17, 1947 (p. 17), and the Daily People's World of No- 
vember S, 1947 (i>. 3). listed Mr. Schneiderman as chairman of the Communist 
Party in California. The Daily People's World of March 9. 1948 (p. 1), listed 
Mr. Schneiderman chairman of the Communist Party in California, as one of 
those who pledged support of the publication. 

William Schneiderman was mentioned in the testimony of Ichiro Izuka in the 
proceedings of the Hawaiian Department of Public Instruction v. Dr. and Mrs. 
John E. Reinecke, as shown by the transcript of proceedings, August 27, 1948- 
(p. 19) ; and he signed the Communist Party book of Paul Crouch as an official 
of the California district in 1943 as shown by the testimony of Paul Crouch, 
May 6, 1949 (pp. 182 and 220). 

Mr. Schneiderman spoke at an anniversary meeting of the Communist Party 
as shown by the Daily Worker of September 15, 1942 (p. 2) ; he urged support 
for French Communists as shown by the Daily People's World of I>ecember 10, 
1947 (p. 2) ; he urged support for the World Federation of Trade Unions as^ 
.shown by the Daily People's World of December 10, 1947 (p. 2) ; and he wrote 
an introduction to the Communist Manifesto in Pictures as shown by the Daily 
People's World of February 13, 1948 (p. 5). A photograph of William Schneider- 
man appears in the March 12, 1948, issue of the Daily People's World (p. 3). The 
Daily People's World of March 21, 1948 (p. 1), reported that Mr. Schneiderman 
spoke on Marxism and the American form of government. The Daily Worker 
of March 10, 1948 (p. 3), reported that Mr. Schneiderman was a witness at the 
Peter Harisiades hearing; and the Daily Worker of October 28, 1949 (p. 9), re- 
ported that he made a speech in behalf of Benjamin J. Davis, Communist. 



IzTTKA Exhibit 5. Inforimation Feom .the Files of the Comaiittee on Un- 
American Activities, United States House of Representatives, Concerning 
Oleta O'Connor Yates 

The following information is contained in the files, records, and publications 
of the Committee on Un-American Activities concerning Oleta O'Connor Yates: 

The Statement of Vote in the State of California (p. 20) listed Oleta O'Con- 
nor Yates as a Communist Party candidate for State assemblv, Twentv-second 
District of California, 1938; the Daily Worker of February 5,' 1942 (p." 3) also 
named her as a candidate of the Communist Party. She was a Communist Party 
candidate for the San Francisco Board of Supervisors according to the May 25, 
1944 (p. 5), issue of the Daily Worker. 

In testimony of Walter S. Steele during public hearings before the Commit- 
tee on Un-American Activities, July 21, 1947 (p. 13), it was brought out that 
Oleta Yates was chairman of the San Francisco section of the Communist Party, 
U. S. A. 



2094 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

The Daily People's World of August 16, 1947 (p. 3), reported that Oleta O'Con- 
nor Yates was chairman of the Communist Party, San Francisco, and that she 
paid tribute to Mike Quinn. Her photograph appeared in the August 25, 1947 
(p. 1), issue of the Daily People's Woi"ld, in which connection she was identified 
as chairman of the Communist Party of San Francisco. The October 24, 1947 
(s. 2, p. 1), issue of the Daily People's World also carried her photograph with 
the statement that she was a member of the Communist Party. She was identi- 
fied as chairman of the Communist Party, San Francisco, in the Daily People's 
World of March 29, 1948 (p. 1) ; August 19, 1948 (p. 3) ; and September 14, 
1948 (p. 1). 

Oleta Yates was chairman. Communist Political Association's United Nations 
Conference as shown on the program of May 17, 1945. She was identified in tliis 
connection as president of the Communist Political Association, San Francisco. 
The Proceedings of the Constitutional Convention of the Communist Political 
Association, May 20-22 (p. 4), listed her as an alternate member of the national 
committee of the Communist Political Association. The Daily Worker of May 
23, 1944 (p. 2), also referred to her as an alternate member of the national com- 
mittee of the Communist Political Association. The same statement was found 
in the May 25, 1944 (p. 5), issue of the Daily Worker. 

The Communist Party assumed the name of Communist Political Association 
from May 20, 1944, to July 26, 1943. 

It was pointed out in the testimony of Ichiro Izuka during the case of Dr. and 
Mrs. John E. Reinecke that Oleta O'Connor Yates was a party member and in- 
structor at the Communist Party Workers School (California). (See transcript 
of proceedings of Hawaiian Department of Puhlic Instruction v. Dr. and Mrs. 
John E. Reinecke, August 12, 1948, pp. 104, 106.) 

The Daily People's World of August 9. 1949 (p. 5). stated that Oleta O'Connor 
Yates was discussion leader at the California Labor School. 

The California Labor School was cited as a "subversive and Communist organ- 
ization at 216 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif.," by Attorney General Tom 
Clark in lists furnished the Loyalty Review Board and released to the press 
by the United States Civil Service Commission June 1 and September 21, 1948. 

Oleta O'Connor Yates was endorsed as Communist candidate for county chair- 
man, San Francisco, by the International Workers Order (Daily People's World, 
September 18, 1947, p. 1). The October 31, 1947 (p. 3), issue of that paper 
also stated that she .was supported by the International Workers Order. The 
International Workei's Order was cited as a Communist organization by Attorney 
General Tom Clark in lists furnished the Loyalty Review Board and released 
to the press by the United States Civil Service Commission December 4, 1947, 
May 28 and September 21, 1948. 

Mrs. Yates contributed an article to the December 1946 (pp. 1092-1103) issue 
of Political Affairs, cited as an "official Communist Party monthly theoretical 
organ." "Political Affairs, formerly known as the Communist, 'a magazine of 
the theory and practice of Marxism-Leninism published monthly by the Com- 
munist Party of the United States of America,' now calls itself 'a magazine de- 
voted to the theory and practice of Marxism-Leninism.' Its chief editor is Eugene 
Dennis, executive secretary of the party." (Congressional Committee on LTn- 
American Activities, Rept. No. 1920, May 11, 1948, pp. 5 and 36; also cited in 
Rept. No. 209, April 1, 1947, p. 25. ) 

The following is taken from the testimony of Harper L. Knowles during 
executive hearings before the Special Committee on Un-American Activities, 
August 20, 1940 (p. 1499) : 

"Mr. Knowles. The officers of the Yanks Are Not Coming Committee are 
both Communists. They are J. Sauers and A. T. Yates. Yates' wife, Oleta 
O'Connor, is a candidate for political office at the present time. 

"In Los Angeles the American Peace Crusade is the organization used to 
front for them. They are bringing in church groups and the like." 

Oleta Yates' photograph appeared in the April 29, 1949 (p. 12), issue of Daily 
People's World, with the following statement : 

"* * * Yov the next 3 hours a barrage of protest against the sneak endorse- 
ment they had given State Senator Jack B. Tenney's pending 'loyalty' oath 
bill roared about their heads. * * * Speaking near the close of the meeting 
for the San Francisco Communist Party, Oleta O'Connor Yates told the 
supervisors : 

" 'It is up to the people — not Jack Tenney — to judge the principles of the 
Communist Party for themselves. This is the essence of political freedom,' " 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2095 

IzuKA Exhibit 7. — Infoui^iation From the Files oi'' the Commiitee on Un- 
Amekican AcTiviriEs, United States House of Representatives, Concerning 
Walter J. Stack 

The records, files, and publications of the Committee on Un-American Activ- 
ities has revealed the following information concerning Walter J. Stack: 

Walter Stack was elected to the presiding committee, Communist Party of 
California, at a convention held May 14 and 15, 19,S8; and was chairman of the 
second session Avhich was held Saturday afternoon, May 14 (minutes of the 
proceedings, pp. 2 and 3). 

In sworn testimony of Ichiro Izuka, during proceedings of the Hawnidan 
Department of Public Instructions v. Dr. and Mrs. John E. Reinccke, Walter 
Stack was identified as a Communist Party man (from a transcript of the pro- 
ceedings, August 13, 1948, p. 4). Walter Stack was also identified as a memher 
of the Communist Party in sworn testimony of Mr. H. C. Armstrong, member 
of the Communist Party from 19:->6 until 1940, before the Un-American Activities 
Connnittee in Washington State in 1948 (first report, p. 420). 

In an affidavit of William P. M. Brandhove, dated December 9, 1946, which 
was made a part of the record during hearings before the California (State) 
Committee on Un-American Activities in 1947, Walter Stack, of the Marine 
Firemen, Oilers, and Water Tenders Union, was called a leading Communist 
(third report of Joint Fact-Finding Committee on Un-American Activities, 
submitted to the California State Legislature, March 24, 1947, p. 163) ; in the 
same report (p. 227) it is stated that Walter Stack was elected as an alternate 
deleiiate to the national convention of the Communist Party, U. S. A., to be 
held in New York, July 26, 1945. 

In sworn testimony of John P. Frey, president of the metal trades depart- 
ment of the American Federation of Labor, before the Special Committee To 
Investigate Un-American Activities, August 13, 1938, the following statement 
was made concerning Walter Stack : "Walter Stack, San Francisco : Official of 
Marine Firemen and Engineers. Prominent member Communist Party." (Hear- 
ings, Special Committee * * * y^^j -^^ p 132.) 

In testimony of John E. Ferguson before the Special Committee on Un-American 
Activities in 193S, John E. Ferguson made the following reference to Walter 
Stack, in connection with a negotiating committee, appointed l)y the Pacific 
Coast IMarine Firemen, Oilers, Water Tenders, and Wipers' Association : 

"Mr. Ferguson. Prior to the strike breaking out, we elected a coastwise nego- 
tiating committee, and they were to conduct negotiations. 

"Mr. Starnes. Who were they? 

"Mr. Ferguson. Three of them were members of the Communist Party. 

"Mr. Starnes. Three of them. Do you mind naming them for us? 

"Mr. Ferguson. Yes. Of their Communists, there was H. T. O'Neil, Walter 
Stack, and John E. Ferguson — that is me. 

"Mr. Starnes. So that the Communist Party had control of that committee? 

"Mr. Ferguson. Complete control." (Ibid., p. 2932.) 

In further testimony before the special committee * * * William C. Mc- 
Cuistion, seaman and ex-member of the Communist Party of the United States, 
had the following to say concerning Walter Stack : 

"This shows the marine workers not only organizing the American seamen in 
this country but they made special efforts to organize clubs for various inter- 
national groups. This deals with the early organization of the Scandinavian 
seamen's club ; the same group that was organized by Communists whose names 
are known here, Walter Stack and LaRocca, and others. That was organized by 
these Communists originally. This same group works in perfect conjunction 
with the National Maritime Union of today." (Ibid., p. 6563.) 

The Daily People's World of June 14, 1944, announced that Walter Stack had 
been elected to the State committee of the newly formed Communist Political 
Association. The Communist Political Association was cited as subversive and 
Communist by Attorney General Tom Clark who also characterized the associa- 
tion as an organization which sought "to alter the form of government of the 
United States by unconstitutional means." (Press release of the U. S. Civil 
Service Commission dated September 21, 1948.) 

In report 209 of the Committee on Un-American Activities, we note that "after 
assuming the name of the Communist Political Association on May 20-23, 1944, 
for strategic reasons, the party resumed the name of the Communist Party of 
the United States un July 26-28, 1945" (p. 29. report 209, dated April 1, 1947). 

66636— 50— pt. 3 11 



2096 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Walter Stack spoke at a water-front mass meeting sponsored by the water- 
front section, Communist Party U. S. A., as shown in the Daily People's World 
October 27, 194S (p. 3) ; he was identified as a member of the Marine Fisher- 
men's Union, and he discussed "the meaning of the 'smear' attack by the Kersten 
subcommittee." Mr. Stack also spoke before the water-front section, Commu- 
nist Party, when he attacked the arrest of Communist leaders ; he was identi- 
fied as chairman, seamen's branch, CommunLst Party (Daily People's World, 
July 23, 1948, p. 1). 

Walter J. Stack, San Francisco seaman, won second prize in a contest spon- 
sored by the Civil Rights Congress, as announced in the Daily People's World 
for January 27, 1950 (p. 5). 

In report 1115 of the Committee on Un-American Activities, dated September 
2, 1947 (pp. 2 and 19), the Civil Rights Congress was cited as an organization 
formed in April 194(5 as a merger of two other Communist-front organizations 
(International Labor Defense and the National Federation for Constitutional 
Liberties), "dedicated not to the broader issues of civil liberties, but specifically 
to the defense of individual Communists and the Connuunist Party" and "con- 
trolled by individuals who are either members of the Communist Party 6r openly 
loyal to it." 

Attorney General Tom Clark cited the Civil Rights Congress as subversive 
and Communist (press releases of December 4, 1947. and September 21, 1948) . 

Walter Stack was a member of the American League Against War and Fas- 
cism, as shown in testimony of Mr. H. C. Armstrong before tlie Committee 
on Un-American Activities, Washington State, in 1948 (p. 420). Tlie Ameri- 
can League Against War and Fascism was established in the United States "in ar. 
effoit to create public sentiment on behalf of a foreign policy adapted to the 
interests of the Soviet Union" (Attorney General Francis Biddle, Congressional 
Record, September 24, 1942, p. 7688) ; the organization was cited as subversive 
and Communist by Attorney General Tom Clark (press releases of December 
4, 1947 and September 21, 1948) ; it was cited as a Communist-fi'ont organization 
by Attorney General Francis Biddle in connection with the Harry Bridges trial 
(brief dated May 28, 1942, p. 10). The Special Committee on Un-American 
Activities has cited the group in several of its reports : January 3, 1939 ; Janu- 
ary 3, 1940 ; June 25, 1942 ; and March 29, 1944. 

The Daily Worker on March 11, 1942 (p. 5), reported that Walter J. Stack 
was one of those who signed a statement of the Citizens Committee to free 
Earl Browder, cited as a Communist organization by Attorney General Francis 
Biddle (Congressional Record, September 24, 1942, p. 7687). 

"When Earl Browder (then general secretary. Communist Party) was in 
Atlanta Penitentiary serving a sentence involving his fraudulent passports, the 
Communist Party's front which agitated for his release was known as the 
Citizens' Committee to Free Earl Browder * * * Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, 
one of the few outstanding women leaders of the Communist Party in this 
country, headed it" (Special Committee on Un-American Activities, report 1311 
of March 29, 1944). 

Walter J. Stack wrote an article for the Daily People's World (April 22, 1948, 
p. 2) , entitled "Harry Lundeberg Makes Another 'Deal' " ; and reviewed William 
L. Standard's the Merchant Seaman for the October 25, 1947, issue of the same 
publication (p. 5). The Daily People's World has been cited as "the official 
organ of the Communist Party on the west coast" by the Special Committee on 
Un-American Activities (reports of March 29, 1944, and January 3, 1941). 

Walter J. Stack was one of those who sent a communication to District 
Attorney Mattliew Brady, San Francisco, Calif., protesting the prosecution of 
Samuel Adams Darcy, a Communist (information from a report of a committee 
investigator. Special Committee on Un-American Activities, June 3-5, 1941). 



Reinecke Exhibit 2 
politics and foreign affairs 

Borkenau. Franz. World Communism. 1939. "Valuable history by a hostile 

German ex-Communist." 
Bullitt, William C. The great globe itself, a preface to world affairs. 1946. 

310 p. Drop-the-bomb-now point of view. 
Carr, Edward H. The Soviet impact on the Western World. 1947. 170 p. 

Highly praised in all reviews. Not so much on foreign affairs in the narrow 

sense as on the challenge of a new civilization. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 2097 

Dallin, David J. Soviet Russia's foveijrn policy, li)3!)-42. 1!)42. The IJig Three, 
194"). Both l)0()l<s hiiilily anti-Sovii't ; influential in consi-rvativo circles — and 
considerably lacking;- in accuracy. 

Joesten, Joachim. What Kussia Wants. 1944. 214 p. "A straightforward 
analysis of the questions involved without favoring either side of the argu- 
ment." 

Keeton, George W. Russia and her western neighbors. 11)42. 160 p. Clear 
sympathetic account of Russia and the Central European question. 

Neariug, Scott. The Soviet Union as a world power. lt)45. Short, semi-Marx- 
ist analysis. 

Pares, (Sir) Bernard. Russia and the peace. 1944. 293 p. Conservative 
British view ; objective on the whole. 

Schuman, Frederick L. Soviet politics at home and abroad. 194(5. 663 p. 
Highly readable but very detailed account from left-wing liberal point of view. 
Chapter 7, "The Soviet State," gives a good account of Soviet internal organi- 
zation, point of view, and spirit. 

Sayers, Michael, and A. E. Kahn. The great conspiracy ; .the secret war against 
Soviet Russia. 1946. 4o3 p. 25 cents. Popularly written ; accurate facts, 
somewhat highljf selected for propaganda purposes. 

Yakhontoff, Victor A. U. S. S. R. foreign policy. 1945. 311 p. Well written, 
gives Soviet point of view. 

Pope, Arthur U. Maxim Litvinoff. 1943. 530 p. Good account of the (un- 
successful) fight for w^orld peace. 

SOME SPECIAL TOPICS 

Crowther, J. G. Soviet science. 1942. Penguin Books. 25 cents. 

Bienstock, Gregory, and others. Management in Russian industry and agri- 
culture. 1944. 198 p. Scientific study by three Russian emigres ; conclusions 
generally favorable. Takes up the question of whether the new managing 
groups form a new economic class. 

Dobb, Maurice. Soviet planning and labor in peace and war. 1942. "Brief but 
essential account of the fundamentals of Soviet planning, finance, economics, 
and labor ; favorable to communism." Int. Publishers, 35 cents. 

Kerr, Walter B. The Russian army ; its men, its leaders, and its battles. 1944. 
250 p. Good analysis. 

King, Beatrice. Changing man ; the education system of the U. S. S. R., 1936. 
"Informed, first-hand ; a strong admirer." 

Moore, B. The Communist Party of the Soviet Union: 1928-44, A Study in 
Elite Formation and Function, American Sociological Review, June 1944. 

Harris, Lem. Some Comparisons of Socialist and Capitalist Agriculture, 
Science and Society, X, 2:159-171 (spring 1946). Shows how Socialist 
agriculture is outstripping American agriculture. 

National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, Inc. (232 Madison Avenue, 
New Yoi'k.) Organized labor in the Soviet Union. 1943. 42 p. 10 cents. 

Soviet children and their care. 1943. 48 p. 10 cents. 

Varga, Eugene. Two systems : Socialist economy and capitalist economy. 1939. 

268 p. Careful — but rather dry — analysis by a Communist economist. 
Lamont, Corliss. The peoples of the Soviet Union. 1946. 229 p. Popularly 

written. 
Sommerville, John. Soviet philosophy, a study of theory and practice. 1946. 

269 p. If one reads nothing else, he should read the first three chapters, which 
explain how Soviet Communists think and act. Highly sympathetic. 

Stalin, Joseph. Foundations of Leninism. 1932. 128 p. 10 cents and 40 cents. 
Problems of Leninism. 1934. 95 p. 25 cents. These two cover much the 
same ground. The author is a leading authority. 

GEOGRAPHY AND H! STOUT 

Cressey, George B. The liasis of Soviet strength. 1945. 287 p. Detailed, read- 
able, well-illustrated geography. 

Durauty, Walter. U. S. S. K. ; the story of Soviet Russia. 1944. 293 p. Very 
popular. 

Mlrsky, D. S. Russia, a social history. 1931. 312 p. "Oversweeping but stimu- 
lating : semi-Marxist." 

Sumner, B. H. A short history of Russia. 1943. 453 p. By key topics rather 
tlian chronologically: the frontier, the state, the land, the church, the Slavs, 
the sea, the west. Well written. 



2098 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN HAWAII 

Vernadskj', George. A history of Russia. 1914. .517 p. New York : New Home 
Library, 79 cents. Probably tlie best available general history ; full on recent 
years. 

Reed, John. Ten days that shook the world. 1929. 371 p. One of the classic of 
reporting. 

Chamberlain, William H. The Russian revolution 1917-21. 1936. 2 volumes. 
The author was not so anti-Soviet when he wrote this book as he is now. It is 
probably the best general account of the revolution available — there is no 
really well-written and authoritative one. 

Fox, Ralph. Lenin, a biography. 1934. 320 p. Popular and interesting. 

GENERAL SURVEYS, BIG AND LITTLE 

Dalliu, David J. The real Soviet Russia. 1944. 260 p. All that's wrong with 
Russia — and how ! — presented in quasi-scholarly fashion under Yale University 
Press auspices, by an emigre not completely wedded to the truth. 

Dean, Vera M. Russia at war; 20 key questions and auswer.s. 1942. 96 p; 
Russia — meanace or promise, 1946. 96 p. Two pamphlets jsimply but authori- 
tatively written ; liberal viewpoint. 

Florinsky, Michael. Toward an understanding of the U. S. S. R. ; a study in gov- 
ernment, politics, and economic planning. 1939: 245 p. "Short, ci-itical 
analysis of Soviet institutions." 

Gibberd, K. Soviet Russia, an intrixluction. 1942. 77 p. Royal Institute of 
International Affairs publication; objective in the British manner. 

Johnson, Hewlett, The Soviet power. 1940. 352 p. By "the Red dean," "popular 
and entirely favorable." 

The secret of Soviet Strength. 1944. Like the preceding. 

Pares, (Sir) Bernard. Russia. 1943. 245 p. Penguin Books, 25 cents. Very 
British : conservative and authoritative. 

Maynard, (Sir) John. The Russian peasant and other studies. 1942. 491 p. 
of fine print on bad paper — a great pity, for it "covers also most other aspects 
of Soviet life and institutions ; independent, very informative and very under- 
standing." U. H. library. 

Mandel, William. A gaiide to the Soviet Union. 1946. 511 p. The best and most 
up-to-date l)ook of its sort. Very sympathetic point of view. 

Webb, Sidney and Beatrice. Soviet connnunism : a new civilization? 1936, 1941, 
2 volumes. "A massive and very well arranged repository and interpretation, 
still useful." Read the 1941 introduction, reprinted (1942) as The Truth 
About Soviet Russia. 

Williams, Albert R. The Soviets. 1937. 544 p. 

The Russians; the land, the people, and why they fight. 1943, 248 p. 

The former is better, the latter is simpler. Both are very interesting and 
clearly written. Highly sympathetic, liberal viewpoint. 

Stern, Bernhard J. and S. Smith (editors). Understanding the Russians; a 
study of Soviet life and culture. 1947. 24,6 p. Well chosen selections from 
other writers. 



INDEX 

(Including Appendix) 

Page 

Abe 1405 

Abe, Carol (Mrs. Kaoru) 1405, 1424, 1431, 1483 

Abe Kaoru 1424, 1483, 1543 

Abe, Yidiio 1424, 1462, 1489, 1555, 1592, 1594, 2027, 2044, 2045 

Advertiser Publishing Co 2082 

Ab Fook, Everett 1396, 1525 

Ab Chew, Lau 2070 

Abuna, Nelson , 1420 

Aiwaki, Eugene 2074 

Alwohi, Eugene - 1532 

Akana, John 1451, 1452, 1591, 1595, 1992, 1999-2001, 2013, 2022-2024, 2027 

Akana, Joseph 1 2003 

Alexander Bros., Ltd 1662-1665, 1690, 1692, 2084 

Alger Hiss case 1509 

Amalgamated Bank, New York City — 1632 

American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born 2091 

American Federation of Labor 1533-1535, 

1414, 1520, 1524, 1527, 1529, 1531, 1547, 1548, 1965, 2053, 2095 

American Federation of Labor, Teamsters Union 1530, 1987, 1988 

American League Against War and Fascism 2096 

American League for Peace and Democracy 2089 

American Peace Crusade 2094 

American Security Bank 1656, 1658, 1676, 2080 

Arakaki, Yasuki 1427, 

1952, 1968, 1969, 1981, 1984, 1985, 2030, 2031, 2060, 2061, 2083 

Arena, Ernest (Ernie) 1402, 1404, 1409, 

1411, 1473, 1478, 1486, 1488, 1490, 1491, 1493, 1497, 1499, 1500, 1502, 
1506, 1509, 1522, 1541, 1553, 1645-1647, 1650, 1692, 1694, 1953, 1958 

Armstrong, H. C 2095, 2096 

Asau, August I 1964-1969, 1972 

August Abren School 2082 

Aukai, John 1391, 1393 

Bagosol, Simeon 1451, 1999, 2003, 2025 

Ballenti, Juliette 1685, 2083 

Bank of America 1630-1632, 2077-2079 

Baringer, Sam 1479, 1487 

Bartlett, Francis 1584, 1585 

Bartlett (Bart), John 1457, 1458, 1578, 1581, 2069 

Bay Region Congress Against War and Fascism 2089 

Beck Dave _ 1531 

Berg.strom Music Co 1659-1661, ~169~0,"2()S4, 2085 

Berman, Edward (Ed)-__ 1420,1421,1428,1429,1457,1458,1526,1548,2065,2088 

Bertbolon, George Oliver 2089 

Bicknell, Colonel 1387 

Bienstock, Gregory 2097 

Big Island Broadcasting Co 1686, 1690 

Bishop National Bank 1407, 2074 

Blttelman, Alexander 1947, 2087 

Blurr, Joe (see also Joe Kealalio) 1596, 1597, 1599, 2003 

Borkenau, Franz 2096 

Bortbwick. William 1420, 1421, 1455, 1969 

Bouslog, Harriet 1371, 1372, 1509, 1549, 1558, 1603, 1638, 16.50, 

1653, 1657, 1666, 1676, 1960, 1963, 2005, 2029, 2031, 2081, 2083 

Bouslog & Symonds 2081-2084 

Brady. Matthew 2096 

Brandhove, P. M 2095 

2099 



2100 INDEX 

Page 

Brewery Workers Union _ 2069 

Bridges, Harry 1387, 138S, 1415, 1435, 1436, 1594, 1959, 2060, 2096 

Bristow, Elizabeth 1402, 1405, 1425, 1478, 1479 

Bristow, Esther M 1479, 1653-1656, 1658, 2080 

Brome. Richard 1588, 1589 

Browder, Earl 1398, 1415, 1429, 1437, 1579, 2092, 2096 

Bucholt, Joseph 209O 

Bullis, Jesse J 2076 

Bullitt, William C 2096 

Burns, Caleb 1388 

Cabigon. Sam 2025 

Cablav, Saturnine 1451, 1452, 1595, 1596, 1992, 2002-2004, 2015, 2040 

California Labor School 1576, 1955, 2076, 2094 

California Young Communist League 2091 

Cariaso. Domingo 1451, 1596, 1993, 1997-2003 

Carr, Edward H 2096 

Castle & Cooke 1425, 1452, 1498 

Castle & Cooke Terminals, Ltd 2015, 2055 

Catholic Information Society 1369 

C. Brewer & Co 1964 

CCC : 1356, 1520 

Central Intermediate School 2085 

Challenge 2092 

Chamberlain 1421 

Chamberlain, William H 2098 

Chang, R 1420 

Chang, Samson 1445, 1446, 1460, 1464, 1468 

Chew, Lau Ah 2070 

Ching. Hung Wai 1440 

Chow. Frank K 1445,1446,1582 

Christoplier, Catherine 2066-2068, 2088 

CIB 1985 

CID 1475 

CIO 1363, 1401, 1402, 1405, 1411, 1531, 1674, 1994, 2002, 2061 

CIO Longshoremen 1458 

CIO, Oahu Council  1961 

CIO Political Action Committee 1998 

Citizens Committee to Free Earl Browder 2096 

City Transfer Co 1577 

Civil Liberties Union 1367 

Civil Rights Congress 2096 

Civil Service Commission 1466 

Clark, Felice 1610, 1614, 1624, 1625, 1629, 1630, 2077 

Clark, Howard 1578, 1580, 1581, 1584, 1585 

Clarke, Blake 1578 

Cole. Bob 1378 

Coloma. Cipriano 2059-2061 

Communist, Tlie (magazine) 2092,2093 

Communist International 1393 

Communist Manifesto 1462, 1481, 1490 

Communist Party (pamphlet) - 1541 

Communist Party, A. F. of L. gi'oup 1546 

Communist Party, California 1376, 1378. 1380, 1391, 1524, 

1529, 1621, 1623, 1625, 1630, 1634, 1643, 2077-2079, 2095 

Communist Part.v, Castle & Cooke group 1405,1408,1410,1425,1503,1593 

Communist Party, Central Committee 1429 

Communist Party, Club Lincoln 1567,1568,2075 

Communist Party, Kaimuki group 1362-1367, 1405, 1408-1411, 1414, 1426 

Communist Party, Kauai group 1426 

Communist Partv. Makiki group 1364-1367, 

1424, 1478-1480, 1482-1485, 1488, 1516, 1518, 1523, 1540, 1543, 1547 

Communist Party, Manoa group 1405, 1408, 1410 

Communist Party, McCabe, Hamilton & Renny group 1405, 

1408, 1410, 1425, 1503. 1593. 1991 

Communist Party, Moiliili group 1405, 1409, 1410, 1424 

Communist Party, National Election and Political Action Committee 2093 



INDEX 2101 

Page 

Communist I'aity, New York 1(J32 

Commuuist Party, laO group 1408, 

1485, 1487, 1488, 1404, 1408, 1400, 150.3, IHOf), 1.507, 1.508 

Commnnist Party, Oraianizatiou-Educatiou-Lilerature-Press Committee 2002 

Comuuuiist I'arty, Punchbowl group 1405, 1408, 1410, 1517 

Communist Party, Puunui group 1405, 

1408, 1410, 1416, 1410, 1406, 1407, 1540, 1543, 1547, 1062 

Communist Parly. San Francisco 1434,1015,2086 

Communist Party .Schools, California 1.506 

Communist Party, Sugar and Pineapple group 1405 

Communist Party, Territory of Hawaii 1370, 

1380, 1405, 1442, 1503, 1561-1563, 1570, 1571, 1588, 1621, 1625, 1632, 
2075, 2076. 

Communist Party, Territory of Hawaii, Territorial Executive Board 2074 

Communist Party, U. S. A 1368, 

1304, 1502, 1621, 1630, 2070, 2086, 2087, 2080, 2005, 2006 

Communist Party, Waikiki group 1405, 1425, 1478-1482, 1485, 1486 

Communist Political Association 2000, 2001 

Communist I'olitical Association, Calif 2079 

Communist Political Association, Constitutional Convention 2093 

Communist Political Association, United Nations Conference 2094 

Conol, .Jacinto 2062 

Consumers' Co-op 1416 

Cooley, James 1443, 1445 

Correa 1528 

Costello, William 1579 

Council of Teamsters 1527 

Cowdrey, R. T 1466, 2074 

Cressey, George B 2097 

Crouch, Paul 2089 

Crowther. J. G 2097 

Crucible Steel Co 2065 

Culinary and Service Workers Union 1961 

Currau, Joseph 1415 

Current, Gloster B 2068, 2088 

Cvetic, Matthew 1669, 1671, 2064 

C. W. Winstedt, Ltd 1603 

Daily People's World 1480, 1481, 

1523, 1544, 1560, 1561, 1563, 1639, 1640, 2075, 2092, 2093, 2095, 2096 

Daily World 1400, 2079, 2086. 2002 

Dallin. David J 2097, 2098 

Damolan, Pedro 2004 

Darbey, E. J 1621,2077,2078 

Darcy, Samuel Adams 2096 

Davis, Benjamin J 2093 

Davis, Frank Marshall 2067 

Dean, Vera M 2098 

Debs, Eugene 1368 

Decker, Inez 2088 

Dela Cuadra, Victor 2061, 2062, 2064 

De Lima, William 20.59,2061 

De Mello, Eddie 2059 

Democratic Committee 1365 

Democratic Party Convention, McKinley High School 1551 

Democratic Party, Territory of Hawaii 1451-14,53, 

1455, 1456, 1525. 1543, 1.551, 1.5.54. 1.557 

Dennis, Eugene 1368, 1946, 2087 

De Rego, Louis 2061 

Dewitt General Hospital 1.357 

Dobb, Maurice 2097 

Domingo, Elias 2063 

Doyle, Bernadette 1643 

Doyle. Easter J 142.5,1485,1487,1490,1492-1512,1548 

Duranty, Walter 2097 

Elias, John E 1425, 1426, 1443, 1447, 1462, 1463, 2004, 2024 

Elks 2059 



2102 INDEX 

Page 

Emma Hotel 1950 

Epstein, Henry 2085 

Eskovitz, Rudy 1404, 1429 

Ettleson, Lee 1439 

Fames, Robert 2085 

Farrington, Delegate 1417, 1418, 1420, 1421, 1436, 1440, 1969 

Fave, Lindsay 1388 

FBI 1387, 1465, 1522, 1525, 1541, 1542, 1548, 1626, 1675 

FEPA 2066 

FEPC bill 2067 

Ferguson, John E 2095 

Fish committee 1571 

Florinsky, Michael 2098 

Flynn, Elizabeth Gurley 1367, 2096 

Foster, William Z 1367, 

1415, 1481, 1561, 1562. 1565, 1568, 1571, 1572, 1946, 2028, 2086 

Fook, Everett Ah 1396, 1525 

Fox. Ralph 2008 

Freeman, James Dwight (Jim; Jimmy; Tim) 1366, 

1416, 1417, 1419, 1483. 1487, 1490, 1502, 1507, 1519, 1522, 1534, 1541, 
1546, 1547, 1591. 1592, 1601-1620. 1626-1630. 1632. 1639, 1942, 1M8, 
1949, 1973, 1974, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2076, 2077. 

Freeman, Pearl E. (Mrs. James Dwiaht) 1463, 

1487, 1499, 1502, 1511, 1546, 1634, 1638-1644, 2079, 2080 

Fi-eitas 1944 

Frey, John P 2095 

Frias, Daniel ^ 1574-1576, 2059, 2063, 2076 

Fujimoto. Charles (Charley) 1359, 

1362, 1363, 1365, 1366, 1371, 1372, 1395, 1414 1427-1429, 1431, 1451, 
1452, 1461, 1462, 1479. 1484-1487, 1490. 1513-1516. 1518. 1519, 1521, 
1523. 1525, 1540. 1541, 1558-1572, 1587-1589, 2066, 2075, 2076. 

FuJimoto, Eileen (Mrs. Charles) 1363, 

1366, 1414, 1427. 1429. 1431, 1452. 1462, 1502, 1505. 1513, 1515, 1516, 
1518, 1541, 1545, 1581, 1596, 1999, 2004, 2024, 2066. 

Fukumoto, Carl , 1972 

Fukushima. Yasutaka 1355 

Gannett, Betty (Betty Tormy; Betty Grayson; Rifka Yaroshefsky; Re- 
becca Yaroshpfsky; Betty Yaros) 1394, 1436. 2073, 2086, 2089-2091 

Garfield Building 1978 

Gasoline and Oil Drivers, Warehousemen and Helpers' Union, Local 

904 1520, 1531, 1532, 2074. 2075 

Gesell, Harold J. E 1626, 1645 

Gibberd. K 2098 

Gladstein, Richard 1657, 2083, 2084 

Goldblatt, Louis (Lou) 1402, 1409, 1415, 1417, 1428, 1978 

Golden Gate Bookshop 1393 

Gomes. Clem 1437 

Goto. George 1374 

Greene, A. H 1690 

Greene. Robert 1.517, 1554, 1658, 1686, 1690, 2080, 2081, 2083 

Hall. Jack 1374-1376, 

1378, ]379, 1386-1389. 1391-1394, 1400-1404, 1409. 1412. 1413. 1416, 

1417, 1420. 1425, 1426, 1428-1431, 1436, 1437, 1439. 1442, 1443. 1445- 
1448, 1458-1462, 1468, 1478, 1482, 1486, 1499, 1500, 1503, 1505, 1514, 
1537. 1538, 1553, 1581, 1583, 1588, 1615, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1954, 1955, 
1978-1980, 1984, 2013, 2044. 

Hall, Mrs. Jack 1409, 1424, 1963, 1964 

Hall. Rob F 2086 

Hamano, Eunice 1359, 1363 

Harisiades, Peter 2093 

Harris, Hiram 1578 

Harris, Lem 2097 

Hawaii Brewing Corp 1.539 

Hawaii Civil Liberties League, Pier 11 2086 

Hawaii Employers Council 1976 

Hawaii Hochi 2034 

Hawaii National Guard 1976 



IxNDEX 2 J 03 

Page 

Hawaii Star - 2037 

Hawaii Youth for Democracy — 1414 

Hawaiian Association of Civic Uuity 1416,2065,2060 

Hawaiian Brewery 1483 

Hawaiian Civil Lil)erties Committee — 1367, 

1518, 1563, 1646, 1654, 1656-1659, 1666, 1667, 1675, 1679, 168:3, 1685, 
1686, 1690, 1692, 1694, 1695, 1959, 1987, 2009, 2069, 2070, 2080, 2085 

Hawaiian Commercial Su^ar Co 1939, 1940, 2043, 2046 

Hawaiian Connnittee for Civic Uuity 2067 

Hawaiian Coutractinj; Co 1457 

Hawaiian Dredging Co 1441 

Hawaiian Electric Co., Ltd 2084 

Hawaiian (Jas Products 1493, 1509, 1511 

Hawaiian Sugar Co 1390 

Hawaiian Transportation & Terminal Co 1965 

Henry 1409 

Herald (newspaper) 1958 

Herman 1452 

Herman, P. P 1579 

Hickham Housing 1390 

Hill, Doc 1420 

Hilo Longshoremen's Union 1965 

Hilo Transportation & Terminal Co 1964, 1965 

Hirakami, Richard 1683, 1085, 2083 

Hirata, Masato 2060, 2063 

Hitler-Soviet Pact 1384 

Ho, Wallace (Wallie) 1404, 1419, 1421, 1480, 1487, 1488, 1495-1498, 1518, 2074 

Hollingsworth, Louise Johanson (Lou Jo) 1578,1584 

Holther, William B__-: 2089 

Hong, Edward (Eddie) — 1483, 1485, 1488-1490, 1499, 1500, 1501, 1554, 1647, 1648 

Honckaa Sugar Co 1977 

Honolulu Advertiser (newspaper) 1427,1431.1567,1588,1589 

Honolulu Gas Co 1485, 1520, 1521, 1528 

Honolulu Longshore Union 2019 

Honolulu Record (newspaper) 1657.2084 

Honolulu Star-Bulletin (newspaper) 1421, 

1427, 1431, 1567, 1577, 1578, 15.S7, 1672, 2076, 2080, 2082-2085 

HRT (Union) 2062 

HSPA 1420 

Hui Hanoli Hula 2085 

Hyun 1516 

Hynn, Alice — 1360, 1363, 1394-1399, 1430, 1468, 1578, 1580, 1962, 1963, 2073, 2074, 

Hyun, David 1360, 1363, 1414, 1429, 1484, 1507, 1508 

Hyun, .Teanette (Mrs. Paul) (Mrs. Jeanette Nakama Rohbough) 1651 

Hyun, Paul 1484, 1578 

Hyun, Peter 1399, 1400, 1468, 1578, 1580 

Hyuns 1517 

Ichimura, Kameo 1942, 1947, 1949, 2047, 2048 

Ignacio, Amos 1950, 1951, 1983, 2043, 2059, 2060 

lida, Richard 2063 

Imori, Koichi 1365, 

1402, 1403, 1411, 1424, 1458, 1478, 1479, 1482-1484, 1515, 1518, 1521, 1522, 
1524-1528, 1530-1535, 1539-1541, 1544-1549, 1947, 1987, 1990, 2049, 2053, 
2075. 

Imprecorr 1393 

Inagaki, Louis 1685, 2083 

Independent Marine Engineers and Drydock Workers Union 1958 

Ing, Faith 1579 

Ing, Herman 1451, 1600, 1990, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2024, 2025 

Ingram Defense Fund , 2082 

Inland Boatmen's Union 1447 

Inouye, Douglas 1485, 1499, 1500, 1501, 1555. 1556, 2016-2019 

Inter-Island Dry Dock 1477,1486,1501,1648,1956 

Inter-Island Steamship Navigation Co 1457-1459, 1958 

International Association of Machinist, Independent Union 1531 

International Labor Defense 2096 



2104 INDEX 

Pafre 

International Longshoremen's and Warehonsemen's Union 1361, 

1365, 1375, 1386, 1389, 1390, 1401, 1402, 1404, 1405, 1408-1416, 1420, 1423, 
1425-1429, 1435, 1438, 1439, 1458, 1463, 1464, 1473, 1478, 1483, 1487, 1491, 
1497, 1501, 1505, 1506, 1509, 1513, 1515, 1517, 1531, 1533, 1535, 1538, 1571, 
1576. 1581-1583, 1592, 1594-1590, 1657, 1672, 1679, 1690, 1692, 1694, 1695, 
1940, 1941, 1943, 1945, 1947, 1949-1951, 1953, 1958, 1959, 1965, 1975, 1977, 
1979. 1986, 1987, 1998, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2019, 2020, 2042, 2044-2047, 2050, 
2059, 2060-2063. 
International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, building com- 
mittee 2082, 2085 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, educational 

and legal fund 1695, 2084, 2085 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 135 1891 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 136 1489, 

1970, 1973, 2015 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 137 1379, 

1505, 1595, 1596, 1600, 1992, 2015, 2021, 2022, 2056 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 142 1977, 

2042, 2059, 2061, 2084 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 144 2043 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 145 2013 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 146 2018 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 150 1473, 

1477, 1478, 1489, 1493, 1501, 1508, 1511, 1645-1647, 1650, 1970, 2018 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local 904 1534 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Pineapple 

Workers Union 1534 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Political Action 

Committee 1672, 1673 

International Workers Order 2094 

Internationale 1394 

Izuka, Ichiro 1359, 

1392-1441, 1471, 1478-1480, 1484, 1490, 1495-1497, 1514, 1526, 1535, 
1539, 1573, 1576, 1583, 2059, 2069, 2073, 2074, 2088, 2090, 2092-2095. 

Jaeger, J 2084 

Japanese-American Citizens League 2036 

Jefferson School of Social Science 2091 

Jensen, H 2061, 2062 

Jerome, V. J 2088 

Joesten. Joachim 2097 

Johnson, Henry, Jr 1968, 1972, 1976-1986, 2060 

Johnson, Hewlett 2098 

Joint Council of Teamsters 1531, 1534 

Jones, B. B 1436 

Kaahawinui, Benjamin (Ben; Bennv) 1425, 

1442, 1443, 1445, 1447, 1448. 1450-1452. 1454-1458. 1460-1463, 1467, 
1469, 1503. 1505, 1506, 1551, 1583. 1590-1595, 1600, 1601, 1991, 1992, 
1994. 1997-2001, 2003, 2004. 2022, 2024. 2025. 2027, 2057, 2058. 

Kaahumanu Street Union Hall 1482 

Kaeleku Sugar Co 1940 

Kageyama, Richard M 1355-1372, 1424, 1483, 1522, 1557, 2073 

Kahn. A. E 2097 

Kalua. Frank 1595. 1993, 1999. 2001. 2004. 2^24, 2025, 2039. 2040 

Kam, K. K 1420 

Kamahoahoa, Frederick (Fred) 1442 

1443. 1445, 1447, 1451, 1461-1463, 1466, 1556, 2004 

Kamaka 2025 

Kamaka, David K 1467, 1590, 1596, 1993, 2024 

Kamaka, George 2003 

Kamaka, William Kaili (Bill; also known as William Polani) 1441- 

1458, 1460-1462, 1465, 1468, 1583, 1590, 1596, 1991, 1993, 1999, 2001, 
2003, 2025. 2026. 

Kamoku. Harry 1420, 1425-1427, 1965-1968, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1978-1981, 1984 

Kanemura, (Kanemaru), Paul 1483,1515,1518,1522,1584,1541 

Kanemura (Kanemaru), Mrs. Paul (Alice) 1488,1515,1518,1541 

Kapu, Haili 1458 



INDEX 2105 

Page 

Kauai Motors __ 1390 

Kauai Railway Co 1373 

Kauai Terminals Ltd 1373,1374,1390 

Kauwe. Isaac IOCS, 1981 

Kawauo. Jack 1377, 1379, i;{8(i, 1388, 1389, 1394, 1401, 1413, 1414, 1416, 

1417, 1421, 1429, 1430, 1441-1447, 14r.O, 14r)l, 14r.r), 1458, 14r)9, 1461, 
146;3-140r., 1468, 14cS9, 1503, 150.-,, 1525, 1551, 1555, 1583, 1584, 1590, 
1592, 1595, 159(5. 1674, 1992, 1995, 1997. 199S. 2001, 20(t3. 2025, 2055. 

Kealalio, Joseph (Joe) (see also Joe Blurr) 1425, 1427, 1452, 1462, 2024, 2025 

Kealoha. Levi (Lawai) 1452, 1453, 1555, 1600, 2003, 2019, 2020, 2024 

Keawe . 1420 

Keeton, George W 2097 

Kekaha Plantation 1429 

Keusinger, Adele 1363, 

1366, 1479, 1483, 1517, 1522, 1523, 1543, 1555, 1581, 2029-2030 

Kerr, John L 1965 

Kerr, Walter B 2097 

Kimoto, Jack (Denichi) (see also Roy Lane; Rav Lane) 1374- 

1376, 1378, 1379, 1386, 1394-1398, 1400-1402, 1412, 1414, 1420, 1425- 
1427, 1429, 1430, 1440, 1451-1453, 1459, 1460, 1462, 1467-1469, 1525, 
1552. 1556, 1583, 1584, 1590, 1593, 15S»4, 1597-1601, 1674. 1997, 
2003, 2023-2027, 2031, 2045, 2054, 2055, 2073, 2074, 2087, 2088. 

King, Beatrice 2097 

King, Carol 2091 

King. Edward A 1641 

KIPA (radio station) 1686 

Kipapa 2070 

Kipapa, Andrew 1458, 1460 

Knowles, Harper L 2094 

Kohala 1420 

Kometani 1440 

Kotogiri, Mineo 2084 

Kuhia. Harry. Jr___ 1483, 1515, 1518, 1520-1534, 1541, 1544, 1546, 1547, 19«9, 2069 

KULA (radio station) 1683, 2084 

Kunemura, Robert (Richard) 1417, 1426 

Kunimura, Tsuneto 1685, 1686, 2085 

Labor Canteen 1479 

Lamliert, Carl R 1629-1634, 2078. 2079 

Lambert, Rudy C. (Rudie) 1376,1377,2073,2088,2089 

Lambert, Walter 1377 

Lamont, Corliss 2097 

Lanai 1948 

Lane, Roy (Ray) (see also Jack Kimoto) 2035-2037 

LaRocca 2095 

Lee, Richard W. T 1532 

Leech, John L 2088,2089 

Lenin LTniversity 1384 

Leong. Ah Quon (Mrs. Robert McElrath) 1379,1468,1578 

Leong, Willis (see also Willis Wong) 1543.1547 

Libby Co 1940 

Libb.v, McNeill & Libby 1577 

Library of Hawaii 2082 

Lihue Plantation 2020 

Lions Club 1582 

Longshore group 1449, 1450, 1452 

Lorenzo, Alfonso 1982 

Lorenzo, Fedrico 1939-1955, 2013, 2041-2044, 2047-2051. 2086 

Love's Bakery & Bread Co 1485, 1501 

Love's Biscuit & Bakery Co 1649 

Low, Fred 1420 

Lowitt, Julian 2090 

Loyalty Review Board 1466 

Lucas Library Book Store 1430 

Lum. Robert (Bob) 1453, 1591, 1600, 1601, 1993, 1999, 2003, 2021-2029 

Lurline (steamship) 1384 



2106 INDEX 

Page 

Maehara, Frank 1485, 1488, 1499, 1501 

Magio, A. B 1481 

Makalapa Housing 1390 

Makiki Florist 2083 

Mandel, William 2098 

Manoe Defense Job 1387 

Marcalino , 1420 

Marcus 1527 

Marine Cooks and Stewards OflSce, pier 11 1408, 1508 

Marine Cooks and Stewards Union, CIO 1411, 1498 

Marine Drydock Workers Union 1411 

Marine Firemen, Oilers, and Water Tenders Union 2095 

Maritime Bookshop 1393 

Martha 1480 

Marumo, Yoshita (Yoshito) 1485, 1499, 1500, 1501, 1556, 1648-1650 

Marumoto 1417 

Matsubara, Jean _ 2064 

Matsumoto, O. T 2085 

Mau, Chuck 1970, 2048 

Maui Civil Service Commission 2041 

Maui Pineapple Co 2048 

Maunalani (steamship) 1374 

Mayenschien, George 1443-1445 

Maynard, (Sir) John 2098 

Mayo, Basil 1458 2070 

McBrvde Plantation 1429 

McCabe, Hamilton & Renny Co 1441, 1452, 1467, 

1498, 1582, 1589, 1600, 1990, 2002, 2014, 2015, 2021, 2040, 2057 

McCuiston, William C 2095 

MsElrath, Robert (Bob) 1376. 

1379, 1386, 1394, 1395. 1402-1404, 1411, 1413, 1416, 1417, 1429, 1436, 
1478, 1479, 1486, 1499, 1500, 1501, 1525, 1583, 1956-1959 

McElrath, Ah Quon (Mrs. Robert) (Ab Quon Leong) 1394, 

1395, 1405, 1409, 1414, 1429, 1942, 1948, 1949, 1963, 1964 

McEuen, Marshall (Marshal) I 1517. 1554, 1580, 1657, 1671, 2080, 2081 

McNicoll, Elsie M 2033 

Meigs, Alice 1977, 1978, 1984, 1985 

Meislan, Judith 2084 

Military Intelligence, Kauai 1388 

Miller, George 1525, 1642 

Mirskv. D. S 2097 

Moir, Hector 1388 

Mookini : 1531 

Moore, B 2097 

Mori, Kiyoto 1532 

Mori, Masao 1483, 1521, 1534, 1538-1549, 2069, 2075 

Morimoto. Yoshikazu 1426 

Morita, Victor 1972 

Morse. Wayne 1435 

Moses, Emmanuel, Jr 1563 

Mothers Doughnuts Co 1639 

Muller, Emil, Jr 1448, 1449, 1453, 1454, 1457, 1468, 1583, 2069, 2070 

MuUer, Emil M 2074 

Murai, Yoshito 2059, 2060, 2061, 2063 

Muramaru, Umataro 2059-2061 

Muramoto, Yoshikawa 1412 

Murasaki, Robert 1941. 1942, 1947. 2045, 2046, 2049 

Murin, Stephen (Steve) 1654. 1666-1671, 1686, 2064, 2080-2083 

Mutual Telephone Co 1513,1519 

Mysterious Stranger, A (pamphlet) 1439 

Nakama, Jeanette (Mrs. Paul Hyun ; Jeanette Nakama Rohrbough__ 1364-1.367, 
1403, 1404, 1424, 1478, 1479, 1482-1485, 1489, 1510, 1515, 1518, 1521, 
1523, 1541-1543, 1545. 

Naeole, Andrew 2001. 2025 

Nagaue, Katsuto 1656, 1657,1659, 1676, 1695, 2080-2085 

Nakamura, Ben 1947-1949 



I 



INDEX 2107 

Page 

Nakano, Bert 1427, 1428, 1908-197(5, 2001, 2070 

JS'apuuuoa, Julian 1425, 1450-1452, 

1464, 1590, 1591, 1594, 15!>5, 1002, 1991, 1992, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2003, 

2004, 2014, 2023, 2025, 202S. 

National Archives 2087 

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People 2000-2008, 2088 

National Book Store 1430 

National Council of American-Soviet Friendship, Inc 2097 

National Federation for Constitutional Liberties 2090 

National Laljor Relations Board 1538,2006 

National Maritime Union 1487, 1489 

National Maritime Union Hall 1508 

National Police Academy, FBI 1626 

National Union of Maritime Cooks and Stewards 1961 

Navy Department- 1464, 1465 

Navy Seabees 1605, 1620 

Nelson, Steve 1643, 1648, 1669 

New Century Publishers 2087 

Noonan, Mary 2066 

North, Joseph 1946, 2087 

Northwestern University 1626 

NBA 1441 

Nuuanu Second-Hand Book Store 1430, 1578-1580, 1584, 1585 

Oahu Sugar Co 2013 

O'Brien 1387, 1436 

Occidental Cafe 1442 

Office Appliance Co., Ltd 2081, 2084, 2085 

Office of Price Administration 2033 

Office of War Information 2032, 2033. 2037, 2087, 2088 

Ogawa, Tadashi (Castner) 1426, 1552, 2053-2055 

Ogoshi. Tsuruo 1375, 1389-1393 

Ohio State University 2040 

Oil Drivers, Warehousemen, Helpers Union, Local 904 1527 

Oka, Wilfred 1365, 1479, 1482, 1483, 1514-1516, 

1518, 1521, 1525, 1541-1543, 1549-1557, 1594, 1620, 1672, 1673, 2060 

Oka, Mrs. Wilfred 1428, 1516 

Okada, Hideo (Major ; James) __ 1426, 1452, 1460, 1552, 1950, 1952, 2012-2013, 2044 

Okayama. Akira 2059, 2062 

Okuhara 1404, 1411 

Okutani, Albert 1968, 1969 

Olaa Sugar Co 1968,1982,2031 

Olokele Plantation 1429 

Olokele Sugar Co 1390 

O'Neil, H. T 2095 

O. R. & L. Taxicab Service 1457 

Osakada, Jack 1994 

Otani Building 1467 

Ouye, Tom 1420 

Owens, Courtney E 1656, 1677-1695 

Ozaki, Doris 1359, 1361, 1363, 1552, 1657 

Ozaki, Ruth 1359,1361, 1363, 

1483-1485, 1487, 1490, 1491, 1498-1500, 1510, 1517, 1552, 1986, 1987 

Pacific Bridge Co 1607,1627,2076 

Pacific Chemical 1539 

Pacific Display Co., Ltd 2085 

Pacific Frontier Broadcasting Co., Ltd 1666,1679,2083,2086 

Pacific Record Co 1679,2082 

Pahinui, David 1452, 1589-1602, 1990, 1992, 2003, 2076 

Pares, (Sir) Bernard 2097,2098 

Park, In\nn 1442 

Patton. Gladys 1480 

Pearl Harbor Navv Yard 1457, 1466 

Pickwick Hotel 1978 



2108 INDEX 

Page 
Pikii 1388 

Political Action Committee .' 1416, 1417, 

1420, 1421, 1428, 1451, 1452, 1454, 1971-1975, 1981, 1982, 2U00, 2001 

Political Affairs 1481, 1498, 2094 

Pope, Arthur U 2097 

President Taft (Steamsliip) 1376 

Progressive Labor Club 1991 

Proletarian Revolution, The (pamphlet) 1481 

PTA 1428 

Queen's Hospital 1493 

Quinn, Mike 2094 

Racela, Pedro (Pete) 1486,1499,1500,1501 

Reed, John 2098 

Reinecke, Aiko T. (Mrs. John E.) 1409, 

1416, 1517, 1G57, 1G58, 2012, 2066, 2074, 2081-2085, 2088, 2092, 2094 

Reinecke, John E 1358- 

1360, 1362, 1364, 1367, 1372, 1379, 1380, 1386, 1399-1402, 1405-1409, 
1411, 1413, 1414, 1418, 1419, 1425, 1427, 1429, 1508, 1517, 1521, 1525, 
1578, 1580, 1646, 1657, 1658, 1686, 1970, 1971, 2005-2012, 2037, 2042, 
2066, 2074. 2081-2085, 2087, 2088, 2092, 2094. 

Renegade Kautsky (pamphlet) 1481 

Rite-Way Electric Co 1473 

Robinson, Jackie 1354 

Rohrbough, Jeanette Nakama {see also Jeanette Hyun ; Jeanette Nakama) _ 1650 

Roldan, Faustino 2063 

Rosenthal, Pauline 1405, 1411, 1424, 1431, 1479, 1480 

Rutledge, Arthur A 1527, 1530, 1531, 1534, 1548, 1988 

Ryan, Joe 2060 

Saiki, Rachel 1443-1445, 

1460, 1468, 1495, 1496, 1503, 1555, 1657, 1658, 1676, 1677, 2080, 2085 

Sands, W. W 1642 

Santiago, Maximino 1685, 2083 

Sauers, J 2094 

Sayers, Michael 2097 

Schmidt, Henry 1427, 1428, 1436, 1594, 1601 

Schneiderman, William (Bill) 1377, 

1378, 1570, 1632, 1634, 2028, 2073, 2079, 2092, 2093 

Schuman, Frederick L 2097 

Schwanenb9rg 1640 

Selby, Major 1388, 1389 

Selective Service System (Board) 1607, 1608, 1627, 1632, 2076 

Sera. M 1549 

Sha, Hochi 2034 

Sherman, Donald 1561 

Shigemitsu 1426 

Shigemitsu. Richard (Harry) 1425,1426,1953,2003,2024 

Shimizu. Mitsuo 2020, 2021 

Shimizu. Morimoto (Slim) 1426,1952 

Shimonishi, Masaru 16S3, 2083 

Shivers 1387 

Shook, William 2081 

Silva, Frank Gunza__ 1426-1429, 1471, 1573, 1576, 1577, 1952, 1954-1956, 2075, 2076 

Silva, Senator 1420 

Sino- Japanese War 19 "7 

Smith, Bradford 2037 

Smith-Connally Suit Act 1509 

Smith, S 2098 

Smyser, Adam A 1587, 1588, 2076 

Somerville, John 2097 

Southern Pacific Railroad 1961 

Soviet-German Nonaggression Pact 1435 

Spivak. John L 1367 

Stack, Walter J 1384, 2073, 2095. 2098 

Stainback 2059 

Standard. William L 2096 

Star Spangled Banner 1394 



1 



INDEX 2109 

Pape 

Starviis, Luivtta 1634 

SU'bliiug-s, Lloyd M 1577, 2()iJ4 

Steok", Dwight i;)76 

Steele, Walter S '2080, i:0'.« 

Steinberg, Bessie l(i71, L'()()4 

Stern, IJernh.inl J 2098 

Stevens, Sam K 1428. 1683. 2,)83 

Strack, Celeste 16S6, 2083 

Sumner. R. II 2097 

Symomls, Myer C 1472 

l.".()!), inai, ir)73, 164r>, 1647, 1640, 16.J7, 1671, li).''>4-10.16, 1964, 1986, 
19S7, 2012. 2014, 2016, 2019, 2020, 20.31, 2039-2042, 2044, 2045, 2047, 
2054. 2055, 2057, 2081. 

Tagawa, Thomas (Tom) 1947. 2048-2053 

Takahashi, Frank___ 1941, 1942, 1944, 1945, 1947, 1949-1951. 2013, 2041, 2042, 2049 

Takemoto, Shigeo .1947, 1948, 2040 

Tamayose, Cliilm 1485, 1486, 1488 

Tanigmhl. Fred 1952 

Teamsters" luteruatlomil Union 1520 

Teamsters' Union. Local 904 1530, 1989 

Teamsters' Union of Hawaii 2075 

Tenney, Jack B ^ 2094 

Terasaki, Sadasuke ..ii 2034 

Thompson 1403, 1461 

Thompson, Dave (David) 1404, 1405, 1409, 1411, 1431, 1953, 2060, 2084 

Thompson. Frank 1402, 1404, 1409, 1411, 1415, 1416, 1478-1480, 1958, 2060 

Todd, Louise 1376, 1377, 138^-2073, 2091, 2092 

Tokunaga, Ralph Masaka ^— 1402,1404.1411, 

1472-1492, 1494, 1497, 1499, 1500, 1502, 1510, 1514, 1515, 1518, 1541 

Tokunaga, Richard 1522 

Tokunaga, Shigeko (Mrs. Ralph) 1477 

Tongg Publishing Co L 2081-2083 

Tony V 1489 

Tripler General Hospital 1990 

Truth About Communism in Havpaii (pamphlet) 1438 

Uesato 1423 

Uesngi, Donald 1365, 1405, 1479, 1483, 1484, 1512, 1522. 1.523 

TJesugi. Peggy (Mrs. Donald)— 1362,1365,140.5,1409,1431,1468,1483,1513,1515 

United Cannery, Agricultural, Texile and Allied Workers 1958 

United Public Workers, Local 646 1961 

United Standard Dredging Co 1441 

United States Army 1401 

United States Army, Quartermaster Corps 13.56 

United States Civil Service Commission 1044. 2079 

United States Engineer Corps , 1357 

United States Secret Service 1475 

United Sugar Workers, ILWU, CIO 1695, 2046, 2084 

United Sugar Workers, ILWU, CIO, Local 142 2054, 2058, 2088 

University of Hawaii . 1578, 1579 

University of Hawaii, Agricultural Experiment Station 1.560 

University of Hawaii, Departntent of Agriculture, Chemistry and Soils 1.561 

UPWA 2060 

USED i;?90 

Valesco, Leoncio , 1982, 2061 

A'^alparaiso Law School 1626 

Varga, Eugene . 2097 

\>rnadsky, George 2098 

Veterans' Administration , 13.57 

Voice of Labor 1428 

Voice of Labor Hall 1442, 1443, 1447, 1448, 14.5,8-1460, 1464 

Vossbrink, Ralph Vernon 1402, 1404, 1408, 1414, 1416, 1429, 1478, 

1480-1482, 1498, 1514-1516, 1539, 1540, 1553, 1554, 1 960-1 9(i3. 2030 

Vossbrink, Mi-s. Ralph 1495, 1963, 1964 

Wade, G. E l(i41 

Wailuku Sugar Co 2040 

Waipahu Sugar Local , 1426 



2110 INDEX 

Page 

Wallace, Henry 1557 

War Shipping Administration 1425 

Ward, Gladys 1480 

Weinberg 1648 

Webb, Beatrice 2098 

Webb, Sidney 2098 

Weinman, S 2005-2008, 2087 

Welch, Louis 1443-1445 

Wenkam, Bessie 1581 

Wenkam, Robert 1360, 1361, 1863, 1430, 1431, 1581, 2030 

Wenliam, Mrs. Robert 1430, 1431 

Wlieeler, William A 1474-1492, 1575, 1576, 1620-1637, 1644, 1645, 2058-2065 

White, Walter 2067, 2068 

Wilcox, Elsie 1437 

Wilkins, Roy 2067, 2069, 2088 

Williams, Albert R 2098 

Wills, Arnold 2066 

Wingate 1420 

Wohl, Eugene A 1528 

Wong Willis {see also Willis Leong) 1408, 1495, 1496 

Workers School, San Francisco 2088, 2089 

WPA J> 1457 

W. S. Ching Contl-acting Co 1457 

Tagi, Thomas S. (Tom) 1911-1947,1949, 

1954, 2041, 2042, 2046-2049, 2051, 2052, 2084 

Yakhontoff, Victor A 2097 

Yamashita, Hftfiold E 1527, 1528, 2075 

Yaroszewska, Rifka (Rebeka) (see oZso Betty Gannett) 2091 

Yates, A. T-l-iJi^ 2094 

Yates, Oleta O'Connor 1378, 1978, 1979, 2073, 2093, 2094 

Young Communist League 2089, 2090 

Young Communigtteleview 2092 

YMCA iv 1577, 1949, 2046 

YMCA Hall (building) 2013,2043,2044 

YWCA c 2083 

X 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 

llllllllllliliiil „ 

3 9999 05018 348