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2^t> 



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2n 



HEBREW MELODIES. 



k 



T. DAVISON, Lombard.street, 
Whitefnurs, London. 



2.^0 ^. ^'«S 



BODLEIAN LIBRARY 

Ex Uhris Matthew Nathan 

THE GIFT OF 

E. J. NATHAN 

1 96 1 



« « I 



HEBREW MELODIES. 






BY LORD BYRON. 



LONDON: 

PRINTED FOR JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE-STRBET. 

  " ' 

1815. 



The subsequent poems were written at the re- 
quest of the author's friend, the Hon. D. Kinnaird, 
for a Selection of Hebrew Melodies, and have 
been published, with the music, arranged, by 
Mr. Braham and Mr. Natjhan. 



CONTENTS. 



^ 



She wftlki in beauty 3 

The harp the monarch minitrel swept 5 

IT that high world 7 

The wild gaielle 9 

Oh ! weep for thoie 11 

On Jordan's banks 12 

Jephtha's davf hier 13 

Oh ! snatched away in beauty's bloom 15 

My soul is darlL 17 

I saw thee weep 19 

niy days are done 91 

It is the hour 23 

Sonf of Saul before his last batUe 34 

Saul 96 

" All is yanity, saith the preacher" 38 

When coldness wraps < .30 



CONTENTS. 

VifiMiofBeiibanur 33 

SvaoftlMslecplcn! 37 

Wcffemyboto^Mfclie — A— dcwititlobc ... 38 

Herod*! laoMiil for Mftriuuie 40 

OatiMdayortbedflttnictioBof JcmsalemlijTitiii 42 
By Urn rivers of Bebylon wo lat down mod wept .44 

TbedestmetioiiorSeouiodicrib 46 

From Job 49 



lines on Sir Peter Porker 5t 



HEBREW MELODIES 



HEBREW MELODIES. 



SHE WALKS IN BEAUTY. 



h 

She walks in bbautt, like the night 
Of cloudleM climes and starry skies ; 

And all that's best of dark and bright 
Meet in her aspect and her eyes : 

Thus mellowM to that tender light 
Which heaven to gaudy day denies. 

B fi 



L... 



IL 

Hud balf imiNw'd dbe aaado* gnce 
WmcIi W9?€0 IB cftfj ffsvira iitrn. 

Or foftly Bg^frag oVr bcr fiice; 
Where Jioo^ti ierendy sweet expre» 

Iloir pure^ how dear ihar dwdliog ^ace. 

IIL 

And on that cheek, and o'er that brow. 

So foft, §o calm, yet eloquent^ 
The •miles that win, the tints that glow. 

But tell of days in goodness spei|t, 
A mind at peace with all below, 

A heart whose love is innocent ! 



HEQREW MELODIES. 



THE HARP THE MONARCH MINSTREL 

SWEPT. 



I. 

The harp the monarch minstrxi swept. 
The King of meOy the loved of Heaven, 
Which Music hallowed while she wept 

O^er tones her heart of hearts had given, 

Redoubled be her tears^ its chords are riven! 
It softened men of iron mould, 

It gave them virtues not their own ; 
No ear so dull, no soul so cold, 

That felt not, fired not to the tone. 

Till David's Lyre grew mightier than his throqe ! 



S HEBREW UBU^DOM. 

n. 

It told the trittmphs of our Kkig, 

It wafted glory to our God ; 
It made our gladdened valfies ring. 

The cedars bow, the momitaiiiB nod; 
Its sound aspired to Heaven and there abode! 
Since then, thoi^h heard on eardi no more. 

Devotion and her daughter Love 
Still bid the bursting spirit soar 

To sounds that seem as ftpm above, 
In dreams that ds^'s bnnid Ijgbl Oiii.iiQt removes 



> i^ '" 



f ->.> 



IltBfitEW MELODIES. 



I* THAt HIGH WORLD. 



I. 

If that high world, which lies beyond 

Our own, surviving Love endears; 
If there the cherish'd heart be fond, 

The eye the same, except in tears-^ 
How welcome those untrodden spheres ! 

How sweet this very hour to die ! 
To soar from earth and find all fears 

Lost in thy light— Eternity ! 

IL 

It must be so : 'tis not for self 

That we so tremble on the brmk ; 
And striving to o'erleap the gulph. 
Yet cling to Being's severing link. 



HEBREW IfSLODIBS. 



Oh ! in that future let us think 

To hold each heart the heart that diares. 
With them the immortal waters drmk. 

And soul iu soul grow deadiless tfieiiisl 



HBBB£W IfBMDIBS* 



THE WILD GAZELLE. 



L 

The wild oazelle on Judah's hills 

Exulting yet may bound. 
And drink from all the living rills 

That gush on holy ground ^ 
Its airy step and glorious eye 
May glance in tameless transport by :*^ 

II. 

A step as fleet, an eye more bright, 
Hath Judah witness'd there ; 

And o'er her scenes of lost delight 
Inhabitants more fair. 

The cedars wave on Lebanon, 

But Judah's statelier maids are gone ! 



10 HiiBkElt MSLObnUifk. 

III. 

More blest each palm that shades those plains 

Than IsraeFs scattered race ; 
For, taking root, it there remains 

In solituy grace : 
It cannot quit its place of birth, 
It will not live in other earth. 

IV. 

But we must wander Withenrigly, 

In other lands to di6 ; 
And where our fethers*^ aslies be, 

Our own may never lie:' 
Our temple hath not left a stone, 
And Mockery sits on Salem's throne. 



aSBMBW MEtOBIBS. 11 



OH ! WIEE? F6R THOSE. 

t 

Oh ! WEEP FOB firosE tfaaft \v«pt by %6ePs streatif; 
Whose shrines aiedesokte, whose land' a dream ; 
Weep for die harp 6f JddidiV broken riidf ; 
Mouni^where dicir God hitdi dwelt die Godless dWcAl! 

ii: 

And where shall I^ntd Iftvie'hei' bleeding telbtl 
And when shall^ Ziisn^ songff agahi sebiti sWe^t i 
And Judah's melody onc^-iiiorlf rljoiee 
The hearts that leapVl>b«fbre'it^ heaveifly^ vole^? 

IIL 

Tribes of. the wancferifigibot^abdWeaiy breast, 
How shall ye flee aWajr «id be at rest! 
The wild-dove hath^ het itest^ the fox his cave, 
Mankind their Comtry-^Israel but the grave ! 



12 HEBREW MEliODIES. 



ON. JORDAN'S BANKS. 

L 

On Jordan's ^M^^f^ ^^^ A^bs' camels stray. 

On Sion's hill the False One's votaries pray. 

The Baal-adorer bows on Sinaifs steep — 

Yet there — even there — Oh God ! thy thunders sle^p ; 

IL , 

There-— where thy finger scorch'd th^ tablet stone ! 
There — where thy shadow to thy people shone I 
Thy glory shrouded in its garb of fire : 
Thyself — ^none living see and not expire ! 

in. 

Oh ! in the lightning let thy glance appear ! 
Sweep from his shiver'd hand the oppressor's spear: 
How long by tyrants shall thy land be trod f 
How long thy temple worsbipless, Gh God ! 



HEBREW MELODIES. is 



JEPHTHA'S DAUGHTER. 

I. 

Since our Country, our God — Oh, my Sire ! 
Demand that thy Daughter expire ; 
Since thy triumph was bought by thy vow-— 
Strike die boaom Aiifs bared for thee Dow ! 

II. 
And the v^ce of my mofii'ttitig fe o'er. 

And the moiitttains behold tde no mlore : 
If the hand that I lov^ lay me low, 
There cannot be pain hi the blow ! 

III. 
And of this, oh, my Father ! be sure-^ 
That the bl6od of thy child » as pure 
As the blessing' T beg ere it flow. 
And the last thought that soodies me below. 



14 HEBREW MELODIES. 

IV. 
Though die vpiguif of Sfd^m lament. 
Be the judge and die hero unbent ! 
I have won the great balde for thee. 
And my Ft A^ mid Coiintlry are free! 

V. 
When diip bl9o4 of ^y giving k^ guA'd, 
When the voice diat thou lovest is hushed. 
Let my memory dtill be thy pride, 
And forget not I sn^iled as I died ! 



HICBItEV MWUODUCS. tS 



OH! SNATCHED AWAY ;N IffiAUrV'S 

BLOOM. 



I. 

Oh ! SNATCHED AWAY IN BXAUTy's BL00M| 

On thee shall press no ponderous tomb ; 
But on thy turf shall roses rear 
Their leaves, the earliest of the year ; 

And the wild cypress wave in tender gloom : 

II. 

And oft by yon blue gushing stream 
Shall Sorrow lean her drooping head. 

And feed deep thought with many a dream> 
And lingering pause and lightly tread; 
Fond wretch ! as if her step dirturb'd the dead ! 



1 6 HBBMBW BIBLOBIES. 

m. 

Away; we know tkat tears are rtin, 
lliat dealh nor lieeds nor hears distress 

Will this vateach us to complain? 

~ Or make one asoomer weep dieless? 

And tkoii — ^wlio ttffst me to forget, 
Tlijr loakfl ane wan, dune ejes are wet. 



maoKw jtiHAiMfEs. 1 7 



MY SOUL IS DARK. 



I. 

My soul is dark — Oh! quickly string ^ 

The harp I yet can brook to hear ; 
And let thy gentle fingers fling 

Its mehii]^ murmurs o'er mine ear. 
If in this heart a hope be dear. 

That sound shall charm it forth again ; 
If in these eyes there lurk a tear, 

'Twill flow, and cease to bum my brain 

II. 
Bu|bid the strain be wild and deep, 

Nor let thy notes of joy be first : 
I VfUl thee, minstrel, I most weep. 

Or else this heavy heart will burst ; 



IS i^ttiNMtf^mimKs 



For it hath been by sorrow nnrst. 
And ach'd in sleepless silence long ; 

And now 'tis doAhfU'to^ Ididiritle <^Artl/ 
And break at once — or yield to song. 






J/ 






nvffftm*mm»m- >» 



I $AW-THfiEfWtB£R. I. 



I. 
I SAW THEE WBBP — ^thc big blight tear 

Came o'er that eye of blue ; 
And tfa^d raethought if did appear 

A violet dropping dew : 
I saw thee snule— >the sapphire's blaze 

Beside thee ceased to shine ; 
It could not match the living rays 

That fill'd that glance of thine. 

11. 

As clouds from yonder sun receive 

A deep and mellow dye, 
Which scarce the shade of coming eve 

Can banish from the sky, 



c2 



M 



^Those smiles unto the moodiest mind 
Their own pure joy impart; 

Their sunshine leaver a glow behind 
That lightens o'er the heart. 



i . •  J 



,«•' 



• « I t >, 






HEBREW MELODIES. 21 



. ) 



THY DAYS ARE DONE. 



I. 

Thy DATS ABE DONE, thy fame begun; 

Thy country's strains record 
The triumphs of her chosen Son, 

The slaughters of his sword ! 
The deeds he did^ the fields he won. 

The freedom he restored ! 

11. 

Though thou art fall'n, while we are free 
Thou shalt not taste of death ! 

The generous blood that flowed from thee 
Disdun'd to sink beneath : 

Within our v^ns its currents be. 
Thy spirit on our breath ! 



'22 ^ebreW n^EiiabiEs. 



J ►* .11 * A, t • • 



III. 

Thy name, our chargmg hosts along. 

Shall be the battle-word ! 
Thy fiedl, the the^e pf) f^orfl ^Qfi j 

From virgin voices poured ! 
To weep would do thy glory wrong ; 

Thou shalt not be deplored. 

-vl 'i>j VI.* vi^' iV-  .:.:'■.■ .^ 

5<-j^ -/'.K ^»A''.i -Jib fi,, •- ^ ,vfK f'Cl/- 



«Wi9WW»»W»P^8- *^ 






\.' - • 



■' ' «. 11 , i 



IT B TtoE HOUW. 



U 



I ^ 



•^ / :.■ f.i t I Vvt '■ '■' 
It is the hour when from the boughs 

The nightingale's high note is heard ; 
It is the hour when lovers' vpws 

Seem sweet in every whispered word ; 
And gettde winds and waters near 
Make music to the lonely ear. 
Each flower the dews have lightly wet. 
And in the sky the stars are met ; 

And on the wave is deeper blue. 

And on the leaf a browner hue ; 

And in the Heaven that clear obscure. 

So softly dark^ and darkly pure. 

That follows the decline of day 

As twilight melts beneath the moon away. 



24 . HwrniMV AIHMIWES. 



^ r < 1 



SONG OF SAUL BEFORE HIS LAST 

BATTLE. 



L 

Warrio&s and Chiefs 1 BhoiiM the shaft or the sword 
Pierce me in leading the host of the Lord, 
Heed not the corse, though a kiilg'si io your path : 
Bury your steel in the bosoms of Gath ! 

n. 

Thou who art bearing my buckler and bow. 
Should the soldiers of Saul look away from the foe^ 
Stretch me that jnoment in blood at thy feet ! 
Mine be the doom which they dared not to meet 



lISBtdBW imjQMES. £5 



IIL 

Farewell to odiers^ but never we part. 
Heir to my royalty, son of my heart ! 
Bright is die diadem, boundless the sway, 
Or kingly the death, which awaits us to-day ! 



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I. 

Thou whose spell can ^aise the dead^ 

Bid the prophet's form appear. 

^'^ Samuel, raise ^hj burieid head ! 

*' Kintr, behold the .phantom seer !'' 

£arth yawn'd ; he stood the centre of a cloud : 

Light changed its hue, retiring from his shroud. 

Death stood all glassy in his fixed eye ; 

His hand was withered, and his veins were dry ^ 

His foot, in bony whiteness, glittered there, 

Shrunken and sinewless, and ghastly bare : 

From lips that moved not and unbreathing frame. 

Like cavem'd winds, the hollow accents came. 

Saul saw, and fell to earth, as falls the oak. 

At once, and blasted by the thunder-stroke. 



II. 

" Why is my sleep disquieted i 

'* Who is he that calls the dead .' 

« Is it thou, Oh King; Qehold 

** Bloodless are these limbs^ and cold : 

" Such are mine: and such shall be 

** Tbine^ to-morrow, when with me : 

^ £re the coming day is done, 

^* Such shalt thou be» such thy son. 

*^ Fare thee well, but for a day ; 

^ Then we mix our mouldering clay. 

<' Thou, thy race, lie pale and low, 

'' Pierced by shafts of many a bow; 

'' And the falchion by thy side, 

'^ To thy heart, thy hand shall gmde: 

'^ Crownless, breathless, headless fdi, 

'' Son and sire, the house of Saul !" 



 •! ,». ."•'■.•* 






^8 aSMUPRI/MBadDlKS. 



i7 



. J I'. ! ;» ■- « » ;. "J ►' 

, ) •'. .'-..it '1 I ;Mi; •.<. 1 ■' * 

« ALL IS -VAi^ltTY; 'sJil*rift 'ttifii ' 

PRBAC«*!R»" ^ ' ' '^ 

I 

L 

Fa M£^ wisdom, love^ and p<y#eirw€teittUir/ ' 
And health and youth p^ssew^l tke^ 

My goblets bhi8l[^d>fi-otn*e¥ery viae; 
And lovely &f ftis <6ardS8'd me^ 



i- "^ ' 



' I . / .' 'M 



I sunn'd my heart in beaut^tf ey<es/ 
And felt my soul grow tender ; 

All earth can give, or mortal prize/ 
Was mine of regal splendour. 






.>• r 



«r r 



90 



II. 

I strive to number o'er what days 
Remembraoce can diacover. 

Which all that life or earth displays 
Would lure me to live over. 

There ^qse pp^da^y, thejseViiaU'^ 90 Uqur 
Of pleasure uaeodpiililef ed | * ^ 

And not a trapping deck'd my power 
That gaU'd not while it glittered. 

III. 

Theserpeiit>9fthefield, by art i 
And spells^ is won from harming ; 

But that which coils around the beart> 
Oh! who hath power of charming ? 

It will not list to wisdom's Iore> 
Nor music's voice can lure it ; 

But there it stings tor evermore 
The soul that must endure it. 



•I i:\ 



WHEN COLI>NES^ IfRAl'S TlTtS - 

I , . 
. •  

When coLi>N:^p3^RA^.sTH^s,^DFf earing cijAY, 

Ah. whither atniy^ the immortal mind i 
It cannot die, it cannot stav. 

But leaves its darkened dust behind. 
Then, unembodied, d^tfa it trace 

By steps each planet's heavenly way ? 
Or fill at once the realms of space, 

A thing of eyes, that all survey^ 

IL, 

Eternal, boundless, undecay'd, 

A thought unseen, but seemg all^ 
All, all in earth, or skies dLsplayd, 






Shall it survey, shall it recal : 



t'r-'i^ .« 



• »:r I 



l& 31 



» • * 



Each fainter trace (hat memory holds 

So 4#}y of}4eiw*4lW^n r J V V) 

In one broad g^cp^f^s^l^hf^?^: 
And all, that was, at once appears. 



III. 

Before Creation peopled ^arth, 
Its eye shalf ^ll'dirou'gti^^^^^ 

And where the furihest Heaven tia^S Birth, 



The spirit trace its rising track. 
And where the Future mars or inalces. 



1 , It. 



Its glance dilate 6*er all to be,' 
While sun is queni^n d or system breaks, 



\*; 



^i/ . '.' V , , ^ -• »..*.• I : J • ; « . '  ,7. '". .■ .' 



Fix'd in its own etermty. 

Above or Love, Hope^ Hate, or Fear, 
It lives all passionless and pure : 

An age shall ileet like earthly year ; 
Its years as moments shall epdure. 



32 



Away, away, without a wiogy 

O'er all, dirough all, its thoii|lil shall fly ; 
A nameless aod ettnial things 

Forgettilii; what it was to die. 



» V 



-. •' ' 



J . • 



uuiypiw M^Lonss, 33 



VISION OF BELSHAZZAR. 



I. 

Thk King wtt on hit Hmm, 

The Sfttnps UMTongM dw hdU; 
A dieusand bri|^t lamps dKiM 

O'er that high feitivd. 
A tbmuaDd cupa of gold. 

In Jttdah deem'd ditma  
JchoTah'a fe»a]a hoU 

The goittMa Headtan't wine ! 



34 nmmiii'f'Kbdmp^' 

In that same hour and hall. 
The fingers of a hand 

Came forth ^^g^nst th^ "WftP, , 
And wrote as if qt^ sand; 

The fingers of a ni^n;j- .,.,., 
A solitary haod ^ .,;.,.. 

Along the letters ra%.. 
And tra^jth^ipiilifeiai wand#. 



III.. 
The monarch saw, an4«h0ok|  t . j -.: tK 

And bade no more rejpiQe4 . » , < >v ( 
AUbloodlessviy^ft^fdMslookii -; >^ «) j}\ 

And tremulM^hifl ^mce^ ■- • a\ 

" Let the m^ofioi^ appoary. -. i ?l 

<< The wisest^f the^^aithy ; ^^ 

'' And expound the wqrdf of ^% h 

•* Which mar Qur ipjaliyijtlb^" .^^ 



V I 



s*t^ 









» .« 



ttt/m^^'Mt^lMMi^. 35 



IV.' 

» 

Chaldea'8 seers ate good. 

But here theyliave Ho siaT; 
And the unknown letters sImA 

Untold and awftii still 
And Babel's men of iig6 

Are wise and deep in lot^ ; 
But now they were no^'sag^, 

They saw^— bnt knew no inore. 



I' 



A captive in the lttn#, ' 

A stranger 9Mn fo^A^ 
He heard the kmg^s ^sommatid^ 

He saw that wfitklg^tt tmlbv 
The lamps arotfnd Were bright 

The prophecy itt view ; ' 
He read k oft feat night^^ 

The morrow proved it true. 



d2 



:iG 



HSBHBtv* umAmiBs 



\ 



VI. 

** Belshazzai^s grave is made, 

^' His kingdom pass'd away, 
*' He in tbe balaiice we i|^ed, 

'' Is light and worthless clay. 
** The shroudy his robe of state^ 

<^ His canopy, the stone ; 
'' The Mede is^i tb gate! 

" Th^ IPersian on his throne!*' 



1 -A 



I * 



«* ^;. ..? 



IIBDRjeW MBUMIIBa 37 



SUN OF THE SLEEPLESS ! 



jSuN ov THE sLEEPtESs! Q>e)ancholy'»tar i 
Whose tearful beam glows tremulously far. 
That show'st the darkness tliou canst not dispel. 

How like art Ifaou to joy remembered well ! 
So gleams the past, the light of other days. 
Which shines, but warms not with its powerless rays ; 
A nighNbeam Sorrow watcheth to behold^ 
Distinct, but distant — clear^but, oh bow cold ! 



38 WfflWK.MJI^pii^ 



. r- ■! i -.Mi I 'm: t ;,5: V >/ ( -lit h T h r^ -.\T' 

WERE MY BOSOM AS FALSE AS THOU 
DEEM'ST IT TO BE. 



L 

Were mt bosom as false as thou seem'st it 

TO BE, 

I need not have wandered from far Galilee ; 

It was but abjuring my creed to efface 

The curse which, thou say^st, is the crime of my race. 

11. 

If the bad never triumph, then God is with thee! 
If the slave only sin, thou art spotless and free ! 
If the Exile on earth is an Outcast on high. 
Live on in thy faith, but in mine I will die. 



m[:li)ttWMli:£.6D]S8. 39 

III. 
I have lost for that faith more than thou taiist bestow. 
As the God who permits thee to prosper doth know ; 
In Ills hand is my heart and my hope — and in thine 
The land and the life which for him I resign. 



^. *  \  ' ' • • • .' ' 1 , A 



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40 H£8RSW MELDDIEIft. 



9 



»   ' \ 



HEROD'S LAMENT FOR MARIAMNE. 



I. 

Oh, Mariamne ! now for thee 

llie heart for which thou bled^st is bleeding ; 

< ' • »' . . . - ^ 

Revenge is lost in agony, 

And wild remorse to rage succeeding. 
Ohy Mariamne ! where art thou ? 

Thou canst not hear my bitter pleading: 
Ahy could'st thou — ^thou would'st pardon now, 

_ » 

Though heaven were to my prayer unheeding. 



HEBAKW HEhOBlES. 41 

11. 

And is she dead ?— «iid did they dare . 

Obey my phrensy's jealous raving f 
My wrath but doom'd my own despair : 

The sword that smote her *8 o'er me waving.- — 
But thou art cold, my murdered love ! 

And this dark heart is vainly craving 
For b^v who .soar^^ alpne above, , 

And leaves my soul unworthy saving. 

HI. 

She's gone, who shared my diadem ; 

She sunk, with her my joys etitMibiiig ; 
I swept that flower from Judah's steiii 

Whose leaves for me alone were bloaoiing. 
And mine's the guilt, and mine the helJ, 

This bosom's desolation dooming ; 
And I have eam'd those tortures wril, 

Whiob UQconsumed are tftiU consuming ! 



42 HBBRSir MBUMDieS. 



^ \^ If-..;:, 



« V • .«, ' » • k. . 



ON THE DAY OF THE DESTRUCTION OF 
JBttUSALEM BY.TITUSv , .A 



'''•', I , ' '  111' , .  ' 4 . « 



y 



. » '. •': ' "• if, . '^ ' ■•'' ...I.''' .' ^ i 



From the last bill that looks on thy once holy dome 
1 beheld thee, OhSiON! ^tien rendered to Rome: 
Twas thf last scto l^t tbwii^ afad'the^iimes of'tby fill 

Flasb'd back onthe Ifist glanbe I gave to thy waH/ ~ 

..,{-,..■, I . . , / 

I look'd for thy temple, I look'd for my home. 

And forgot for a moment my bondage to come ; - 

I beheld but the death-fire that fed on thy fane^ 

And the fast*fettered hands that made vengeance in vain. 



HflBRBWMBIlWDieS. 43 

III. 
On many an eve, the high spot whence I gazed 
Had reflected the last beam of day as it blazed ; 
While I stood on the height, and beheld the Recline 
Of the. rays from the mountain that shone on thy shrine. 

And now on'tMdt 'lAoubUtidi I &t66d'obthat day. 
But I mark'd not the twilight beam melting away ; 
Oh ! would that the lightning had glared in its stead. 
And the thunderbolt burst on the conqueror's head! 

'■ > ^ ■•■ .•■•','.' 

."..V 

Bii^tthp Gods of ^« Fagim shall nevfor profane 
The 4]irin^ wb«re Jehpvab,;iuid^'d.ooit to reign ; 
And scattered and scomM as thy people may be, 
Our worshipi oh Father! tsf only for thee. 



^  "■} •: J t .■ 






44 HEBREW M£L0DI£9. 



BY THE RIVBRS OF BABYLON "WE SAT 

AN0WKPT.  > 



I. 

We sate down and wept by the waters 
Of Babel, and thought of the day 

When our foe, in the hue of his sUughters, 
Made Salem's high places his prey ; 

And ye, oh her desolate daughters ! 
Were scattered all weeping away. 

II. 

While sadly we gazed on the river 
Which rolPd on in freedom below, 

They demanded the song; but, oh never 
That triumph the stranger shall know ! 

May this r^ht hand be withered for ever, 
Ere it string our high harp for the foe! 



IIBBREW M£|X>D1]SS, 46 

III. 

Ou the willow that harp as suspended. 

Oh Salem ! \\s sound should b» free \ 
And the hour when tfijr gloi^^ were eatdled 

But left me that token of thee : 
And ne'er shall its soft tones be blended 

With the voice of the spoiler by me ! 



«' . 



46* HBBRkw M£IX)jil£k ' 



4 : . 



». i \ 



THE DESTRUCJTION OF SEMNACHERIB. 



I. • 

The Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold, 
And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold ; 
And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea^ 
When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee. 

Like the leaves of the forest ^ilien SiimtAef is gfeet). 
That host with their banners at Sunset wefre scent* 
Like the leaves of Ifie fbH6si\^eii'Adlumii^ltiifdi bioWn/ 
That host on the morrow lay withered and strown. 



III. 
For the Angel of Death spread his wings on the blast/ 
And breathed in the face of the foe as he pass'd ; 
And the eyes of the sleepers Mrax'd deadly and chill, 
And their hearts but once heaved, and for ever grew still ! 



IV. 

And there lay the steed with his nostril a^l wide, 
But through it there roll'd not the breath of his pride : 
And the foam of his gasping lay white on the turf, 
And cold as tlie spray of the rock-beating surf. 



-.> 



V. 
And there lay the rider distorted and pale. 
With the (Jew pa his brpw,,and, the rust.on his mail ; 
And the tept3 v^ArftMlijl^at,. thfj jj^ppepij^ope. 
The kiiqfp .fl94jffg^,^h^ tfwfpej, wl^lp^^ 



48 U£BRSW BfSLODUBS, 

VI. 

Aud tbe widows of Ashur are loud in their wail, 

And the idols are broke in the temple of Baal ; 
And the m^ht of the Gentile, upsmote by the sword. 
Hath melted like snow in the glance of the Lord! 



HBBSBW MBEADOa 49 



•' " .-  ,,. ,.' 



FROM JOB. 



I. 

A SPIRIT pass'd before me: I beheld 

The face of Immortality unveilM— 

Deep sleep came down on ev'ry eye save mine 

And th»^ it stood, — all formless — ^but divine : 
Along my bones the creeping flesh did qusike; 
And as my damp hair stiffen'd; thus it spake : 



E 



50 HXBREW 1IBL0DIS& 

U. 

^' Is man more just than God ? Is man more pure 
Than he who deems even Seraphs insecure ? 
Creatures of clay — ^vain dwellers in the dust ! 
The moth survives you, and are ye more just t 
Things of a day! you wither ere the night, 
Heedless and blind to Wisdom's wasted light !" 



OK Tilfi MAtH 



OF 



SIR PETER PARKER, BAJIT. 



Thbre is a tear fariU duit 4i»» 
A mourner o'er the )Hiaihl«ift9 

But nations swell Ike fiuieral cry, 
And Trkunph weeps above te 



For them is SonroWls ^oreslaigh 
O'er Ocean's houmg bolDflgi) sent: 

In vain dieir bones uabwied lie, 
All earth becomes their monnmeDl! 



52 ^N THE DEATH OF 

A tomb 18 theirs cm eresj pBge, 
An epitaph on every t&mgae : 

The present hours, thefiitare age^ , 
For them bewaS, to dMoibdoai;. 



For them the voice of festal mirtb 

^  • .' 

Grows hushed, their name the only sound ; 
While deep Remembrance pours to Worth 
The goblet's tributary round. 



A theme to crowds that kne^v'them nc^ i : 
Lamented by admiring'fdes^ . . ' . 

Who would not share' tlidr glorious lot? 
Who would not die the death they chose i 



And, gallant Parker 1 thidi enshrined 

Thy life, thy faU, thy fame shall be ; 
And early valour, glpwing^ find 

A model in thy memory. 



SIR P£TBR PARKfill, BART. 53 

But tbere are breasts that bleed with thee 

In woe, that glory caanot quell ; 
And shuddering hear of victory. 

Where one so dear, so dauodess, feU. 

Wliere shall they turn to mourn thee less? 

When cease to hear thy cherished name ? 
Time cannot teach forgetfulness, 

While Griefs full heart is fed by Fame. 

Alas ! for them, though not for thee, 

They cannot choose but weep the more ; 

Deep for the dead the grief must be 
Who ne'er gave cause to mourn before. 







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