(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Helena, Montana : its past, present and future"

BANCROFT 
LIBRARY 



[BRARY 



UNIVERSITY 
CALIFORNIA 




'- 



i^fe 

^vS^v-.ptea ->v.. 
*&%* 



K **%! 

M 




WitK 1 1 1 u^fr ectfor\| f ror\v 




. - 



F 73? 
H3 I ^ 




BIRDS-EYE VIEW OF HELENA. 



CITY Op 



Its Past, Present and Future. 



BY A. W. LYMAN. 

Helena, the capital city of Montana and of Lewis and Clarke County, is situated near the geographical centre of the 
State, on the eastern slope of the main range of the Eocky Mountains. Like most cities of destiny, its location 
was a matter of accident. Originally a mining settlement along the fringes of Last Chance Gulch, the early settlers 
believed that it would prove a transitory camp and pass away with the exhaustion of the golden treasures washed down 
the mountain streams into the Gulch; but that was not to be. After the twenty millions of dollars in gold had been 
mined and carried away the camp still remained. It had gained a foothold as the distributing point for a vast region 
of country. Here were established the banks which handled the money for nearly the entire territory, and it was not 
long before everybody saw that here for all time was to be the central metropolis of this Northwestern empire. The 
coming of the Northern Pacific Railway removed the last lingering doubt as to the permanent character of Helena, 
and since the advent of that road, seven years ago, Helena has been steadily putting off the habiliments of the mining 
camp and putting on the garments of a metropolitan town. The visitor to Helena can still see traces of the old min- 
ing life, but they are only traces and leave little impress on the character of the town. Here and there are seen the 
rude cabins of the miners, but they are fast disappearing before the march of progress, and their sites will soon be 
entirely covered by great commercial structures. The traveler who arrives by the Northern Pacific Railway and 
alights at the station down in the valley, which the foresight of that corporation selected as the point toward which 
the city must inevitably grow, gets rather an unfavorable first impression of the place. He sees big stretches of gravel 

3 



Statement of Condition of the 

MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK, 

Helena, Montana, at Close of Business, Feb. 26,1891. 



ASSETS. 

Loans and discounts, .... $1,446,241 32 CASH RESOURCES. 

Real estate, furniture and fixtures, . . 20,746 96 Due from banks, (Eastern exchange), . $323,357 12 

United States bonds and premiums, . 177,268 02 Cash on hand, 158,766 35 

Other bonds and warrants, . . . 40,215 36 Du<? from U. S. Treasury, . . . 2,502 00 

Total, . $2,169,097 13 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital stock paid in, ... $ 350,000 00 Dividends unpaid, . . . 180 00 

Surphisfund, 61,00000 Circulation, ...... 50,04000 

Undivided profits 43,093 90 Deposits, .... 1,664,783 23 

Total, $2,169,097 13 

State of Montana, County of Lewis and Clarke SS. 

I, Aaron Hershfield, cashier of the above named bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true to the 
best of my knowledge and belief. AARON HEHSHFIELD, Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 7th day of March, 1891. JOSEPH W. CHIVERS, Notary Public. 

{L. H. HERSHFIELD, 
A. K. PRESCOTT, Directors. 

J. SWITZER, 



beds and furrowed ground dug up in the eager search for gold, but which are now platted into city lots, soon to be 
covered with stores and warehouses and factories of the wholesale and manufacturing section of the city. 

A short drive up the gulch, however, and the turn of a sharp corner, is a revelation to the visitor. 

Beginning at Sixth Avenue and extending for half a mile toward the base of the mountains, is one almost un- 
broken line of substantial or elegant business structiires. At the corner of Main street and Sixth Avenue the first 
building to strike the eye is the Power Block, one of the finest business buildings in the entire West. It is built 
entirely of Montana granite, quarried about three miles from the city, and is seven stories in height. A little further 
along are the Bailey Block, a handsome and solid brick structure five stories in height, and the Gold Block, the present 
headquarters of the Montana Club, while a stone's throw further up the street looms up the beautiful five-story Gran- 
ite Block, another edifice with a front of the beautiful Montana building stone. On the left side of the street is the 
First National Bank Building, of granite and red sandstone, the first of the bank buildings in the city of modern ar- 
chitecture and construction. Both within and without it is a model building for the purpose. Diagonally across from 
the First National is the new Merchants National Bank building, a substantial four-story structure of graiiite, pressed 
brick and terra-cotta, and on the opposite corner the granite and pressed brick building just completed by the Mon- 
tana National Bank. Other buildings on this thoroughfare that attract attention for their solid construction and ar- 
chitectural appearance are the Pittsburgh and Thompson Buildings, the Atlas Block, the Gans & Klein Building, and 
the Iron Front Building. 

But the fine buildings are not restricted to Main street. One of the first objects the traveler sees in driving up 
from the station is the Lewis and Clarke County Court House, standing on an eminence at the crest of Broadway, two 
blocks east of Main street. The graceful architecture of this building has been much admired, and it is generally ad- 
mitted to be one of the finest buildings for the purpose in the United States. The material used in its construction is 
Montana granite and Lake Superior sandstone. The building is occupied by the Governor and State officers, the 
United States, State and District Courts and the County officers. Between the Court House and Main street, on 
Broadway, is the newly remodeled Merchants Hotel, one of the best hostelries in the West. It is five stories in height 
beautifully furnished and contains all the luxuries and necessaries of a first-class house. On Grand street, two blocks 
to the north, is the Hotel Helena, which was completed about one year ago and has already gained an enviable repu- 



tation with the traveling public as second to no hotel in the country. It is a handsome pressed brick building, five 
stories high, and in every appointment it is strictly first-class. 

Indeed, Helena is well supplied with accommodations for the traveling public. Besides the hotels mentioned, the 
Grand Central, the Cosmopolitan and International are old and well-known stopping places, and scattered throughout 
the city are smaller hotels which furnish excellent accommodations. 

One of the most pleasing sights to the visitor, and a source of great pride to the citizens of Helena, is the Pub- 
lic School buildings. On the east side of the city, on a conspicuous elevation, rises the new High School building, a 
beautiful stone edifice, which will cost when completed about one hundred thousand dollars. Near it stands the pres- 
ent substantial but outgrown High School building, which is still in use and will be occupied by the lower grade 
schools another year. The two buildings standing in contrast make a striking exhibit of the city's growth. On the 
west side of the city is another handsome school building of brick, which is to be enlarged the present season to meet 
the rapid growth of the schools, and far out in the valley to the northwest the foundations of another beautiful building 
are being laid. In all about two hundred thousand dollars will be spent on school buildings in Helena in the next year. 

The schools, in their management and discipline keep pace with the buildings, and are not surpassed in excel- 
lence by the schools of Eastern cities. The course of study pursued includes everything taught in the best grade of 
schools. Forty-two teachers are employed and the salary roll amounts to about thirty thousand dollars. About seven- 
teen hundred pupils are enrolled. As an adjunct to the school system, the Public Library is worthy of note. This in- 
stitution is supported by a tax levy of three-tenths mills, which furnishos a steadily increasing fund for the purpose 
of purchasing new books. The library rooms are large and pleasant, and are well patronized by all classes of readers. 

Helena is provided with thirteen well organized Church associations. The Methodists have erected within the 
past two years a handsome stone Church, the Hebrews have just completed a new Synagogue, which is a handsome and 
solid building on the east side of town, while the Congregationalists, Christians, Episcopalians, Boman Catholics, Bapt- 
ists, German Lutherans, and African Methodists are all provided with siibstantial houses of worship. The Presbyte- 
rians will erect probably the handsomest Church edifice in the city during the coming year, on a lot already purchased. 
The Koman Catholics, in addition to their Cathedral, have completed within the past two years a Convent for girls and 
a boys' school, and this year will erect a new Church in the valley and a College for young men. 

8 



I 
o 

H 





Statement of the Condition of the 

MONTANA NATIONAL BANK, 

Helena, Montana, at Close of business, Feb. 26, 1891. 



Loans and discounts, 

Real estate, 

Expenses, 

U. S. Bonds, . 

Cash and exchange, 



Capital, 
Surplus, 

Undivided profits, 
Circulation, 
Deposits, 



RESOURCES. 



LIABILITIES. 



$1,594,305 47 

94,375 00 

5,051 42 

154,000 00 

381,833 G8 

$2,229,625 57 

500,000 00 

100,000 00 

91,470 50 

45,000 00 

1,493,149 07 



$2,229,625 57 
DIRECTORS. 

C. A. BROADWATER, President. Louis G. PHELPS, Vice-President. 

S. E. ATKINSON, Asst. Cashier. 

D. A. CORY, PETER LARSON, HERMAN GANS, 
A. L. SMITH, E. C. WALLACE, C. W. CANNON, 

A. G. CLARKE, H. F. GALEN. 

10 



s 
o 
z 
H 





z 
> 
r 

CD 

> 
z 




Of the hundreds of beautiful and costly private residences in Helena, there is not space to speak within the 
limits of this article. Our illustrations give some idea of the character and architecture of the many beautiful homes 
that adorn our hillsides and make Helena the wonder and admiration of every visitor. While on this subject it may 
be as well to speak of the other attractions of Helena on the social side. 

An Eastern man may imagine that one of the deprivations in Helena will be the lack of amusements. He will 
not find a half a dozen theatres in this city playing star attractions, but he will find better sources of amusement than 
in cities of similar size in the East. Mings Opera House is not exactly what we would like, though it is a comfortable 
theatre well adapted for entertainments. It is furnished with modern chairs and the seating capacity is 1,000. Within 
a year it will be one of the finest theatres in the West. The owner will spend $75,000 on the house, and the work will 
be under the charge of a famous theatre builder. In addition there is a proposition now under way to build a magnifi- 
cent grand opera house on lower Main street. The entertainments in Helena are many and are of the best class. The 
attractions that play St. Paul, Kansas City and Denver, go over this circuit, playing Salt Lake, Butte, Helena, the coast 
towns and San Francisco. The growing popularity of this circuit is bringing to it all of the best operatic and theatri- 
cal companies in the country. All of the celebrities who visit San Francisco stop in Helena, going or coming. 

There are other means of entertainment. The course of the Y. M. C. A. includes the best lyceum attractions. 
Several of the best quartettes, chalk talkers and elocutionists appear during the season. A well managed concert hall 
and a variety theatre are among the places of entertainment. 

The great paradise of amusement during the summer months is at the Broadwater. This resort includes many 
attractions. First of all is the hot springs. These are reached by a twenty-minute ride on the electric car. A few 
years ago it was a wooded and barren spot set like an uncut jewel between wooded mountains. Nature did her part and 
Col. Broadwater did the rest. First of all were springs of bubbling hot water spurting from subterranean furnaces. 
These were covered and the water run down the valley two miles. Here a park was laid off and then the improve- 
ments began. A natatorium so large and so imposing in its Moorish architecture as to bring thousands of visitors here 
for the sole purpose of viewing it, was constructed at one end. The natural hot water was forced over a pretty cleft of 
rocks into the greatest swimming bath in all the world. In the winter this is transformed to an ice rink. Certainly 
no city in America has anything like this great pleasure palace. During the summer months it is filled in afternoon 

12 




IRON FRONT BUILDING. 




Beport rendered Com ptroller of the Currency by 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 



Helena, Montana, Feb. 26, 1891. 



RESOURCES. 

Loans and discounts, 

U. 8. bonds and city and county securities, 

Banking house and other real estate, 

Expense and tax, 

Cash and sight exchange, . 
liedemption fund with U. S. Treasurer, 



LIABILITIES. 

Capital stock, ..... 
Surplus and undivided profits, 
National bank notes outstanding, ' . 
Deposits individual and banks, 



$3,190,770 38 

609,898 75 

113,110 80 

19,342 90 

478,802 15 

2,250 

$4,414,174 98 

$ 500,000 00 

700,093 78 

45,000 

3,169,081 20 



$4,414,174 98 

Six per cent interest paid for deposits made for one year, and 
five per cent, interest for six mouths deposits. 

OFFICERS. 

S. T. HAUSEK, President. E. W. KNIGHT, Cashier. 

T. H. KLEINSCHMLDT, Asst. Cashier. GEO. H. HILL, Sec. Assl. Cashier. 

u 



and evening with gayly costumed bathers reveling in its limpid luxuries. A walk out of the natatorium carries you 
through a beautiful park of bright flowers, playing fountains, stately trees, all on a background of sparkling green. 
Then comes the Hotel Broadwater, a hotel so luxurious in its appointments and in the perfection of its service as to 
cause a nine days' wonder to the stranger guest. It is not too much to say that it is one of the best hotels in America. 
During the summer months a military band gives concerts in the park and an orchestra furnishes delightful music for 
dancing within. This is the Broadwater, Helena's great place of summer amusement, a place so charming and delight- 
ful as to be almost beyond the reach of description. 

The lover of good sport will linger around the grounds of the Montana Agricultural, Mineral and Mechanical 
Association. Down in the valley is the finest racing park west of the Twin City grounds in Minneapolis, while the 
mile track is ranked by turfmen as one of the very best in the land. Two meetings are held here in July and August of 
each year. The latter is part of the Montana circuit and lasts seven days. Nearly $20,000 in purses attracts some of 
the best horses in the West. 

Across the electric road from the Broadwater is the new park of the Helena Athletic Club. This organization 
was formed last year by the leading young men and athletes in the city. On its rolls are found the names of many of 
the leading citizens of Helena. The park was purchased last year and laid out for athletic purposes. A fine ball 
ground covers the center of the field surrounded by a fast running track. In the rear is a grand stand that will seat 
1,000 people. Beneath are dressing rooms. The park is admirably situated and very well arranged. 

On the line of the road and a little beyond the Athletic Park are the grounds of the Rod and Gun Club, a very 
popular organization, composed of the crack shots in the city. Weekly shoots are held during the season, and occa- 
sionally a State tournament is held on these grounds. About the only place a stranger will see a " gun " in active use 
in Helena is at the Gun Club Park. 

The athletic Scotchman, if he is a good fellow, who comes to live in Helena, will soon find his name on the books 
of the Caledonian Club. The yearly games of the Caledonians are always interesting and are well attended. 

The leading social organization for gentlemen is the Montana Club. It is the oldest club in the State. The 
membership of over 200 includes the leading men of Helena and Montana. 1 he initiation fee is $100, and the dues are 
$10 a quarter. The rooms of the Club occupy an entire floor of the Gold Block and part of #n adjoining floor in the 

16 




DENVER BLOCK, . 



Report of the Condition of the Statement of the Condition of the 

HELENA NATIONAL BANK, AMERICAN NATIONAL BANK, 



Helena, Montana, at Close of Business, Feb. 26, 1891. 



Helena, Montana, at Close of Business, Feb. 26, 1891. 



RESOURCES 

Loans and discounts , 

Overdrafts, secured and unsecured, ...... 

U. S. bonds to secure circulation, 

Due from approved reserve agents, 

Due from other national banks, 

Due from State banks and bankers, 

Banking house, furniture and fixtures, 

Current expenses and taxes paid, 

Premiums on U. S. bonds 

Checks and other cash items, . 

Bills of other banks, 

Fractional paper currency, nickels and cents, .... 

Specie, 

Legal tender notes, 

Redemption fund with U S. Treasurer (5 per cent, of circulation). 

Total 

_ . . LIABILITIES. 

Capital stock paid in, ......... 

Surplus fund, 

Undivided profits 

National bank notes outstanding, 

Individual deposits subject to check, .... 
Demand certificates of deposit, .... 

Due to other national banks 

Due to State banks and bankers. 



$32,223 >8 

45*58o 79 

14,839 04 

'3'59 84 
156,522 85 

$707,877 37 



Total 

State of Montana, County of Lewis and Clarke, SS. 

I, Frank Baird, Cashier of the above named bank, do solemnly swear that the 
above statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

FK\NK BAIRD, Cashier. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this ?th day of March, 1891. 

SII.NKV H. MLINTVKK, Notary Public. 

(JOHN T. MCRPHV, 
A. B. CLEMENTS, Directors. 

SHIRLEY C. ASHB\\ 

18 



RESOURCES. 

$546,494 21 Loans and discounts, 

4,884 63 Overdrafts, secured and unsecured, 

50,000 oo U. S. bonds to secure circulation 

20,409 32 Stocks, securities, claims, etc 

13,691 72 Due from approved reserve agents, ...... 

9,969 96 Due from other national banks 

7,890 67 Due from State banks and bankers, 

3,270 87 Banking house, furniture and fixtures, 

11,500 oo Current expenses and taxes paid, ...... 

3,529 01 Premiums on V. S. bonds 

19,150 03 Checks and other cash items, 

16 98 Bills of other hanks 

7,680 oo Fractional paper currency, nickels and rents 

7,140 oo Specie, 

2,250 oo Legal tender notes, 

Redemption fund with U. S. Treasurer, (5 per cent, of circulation), 

*77-877 37 _ 

Total, : 

$500,00000 LIABILITIES. 

3,000 oo Capital stock paid in, 

3,724 52 Undivided profits, 

45,000 oo National bank notes outstanding, ...... 

Individual deposits subject t check, ...... 

Demand certificates of deposit, 

Time certificates of deposit, 

Cashier's checks outstanding, 

Due to other national banks, . ...... 

Due to State banks and bankers 



Total, 



$271,258 93 

8,156 05 

50,000 oo 

272 70 

20,382 77 

18,791 02 

161 42 

8,879 70 

992 46 

7,689 25 

005,61 

18,175 

21 I 3 

12,787 oo 
19,750 oo 
2,250 oo 



$440,473 04 



$200,000 oo 

9,212 54 

45,000 oo 

77-37 83 

752 75 

52,344 99 

15 oo 

672 58 

55,104 35 

$440,473 04 



State of Montana, County of Lewis and Clarke. SS. 

I, A. C. Johnson, Cashier of the ab'>ve named bank, do solemnly swear that the 
above statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief. 

A. C. JOHNSON, Cashier. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this ioth day of March, 1891. 

JOHN R. MII.I.KK, Notary Public. 



Correct-Auest : 



Directors. 






tt m 



r^S] " 
' "^w^feiKi 



*. if -ir* 

Eiii 







POWER BLOCK. 



Power Building. These rooms are luxuriously furnished with everything to be found in the best clubs in the country. 
The costly art collection is one of the features of the Club. Billiard rooms, card rooms, a library and reading rooms 
and a cafe are to be seen. Plans are now well under way for the construction of a $75,000 Club House. 

One of the delightful organizations for amateur musicians is the Encore Club. The new resident will find that 
admission to the Encore is an open sesame to many hours of pleasure. The Club owns a large and handsome hall, 
well iurnished for the amateur entertainments which are frequently given during the winter. The best amateur talent 
in Helena belongs to the club and an excellent orchestra is maintained. Light operas are sometimes given and the 
work of the club in other ways is always a delight to the members. The German societies are strong in membership 
and popularity. The Helena Turnverein owns a splendid new building on Helena Avenue. It is finely fitted up for 
entertainment purposes and includes a gymnasium with a competent instructor. It is the strongest organization of the 
kind in the Northwest. The Harmouia Singing Society is another creditable social organization of the Germans. 

The military organizations form a popular side to Helena life. Gov. Toole, the commander-in-chief, and 
Adjutant-General Douglas; Mustering Officer Col. Holmes; Col. C. D. Curtis, aide-de-camp; Lieut. Zastrow, assistant in- 
spector-general; Chief of Ordnance Col. J. E. Miller, and Quartermaster Veazie, of the general staff, N. G. of M., reside 
in Helena. Co. C, Meagher Guards, Troop A, unattached cavalry, and Battery A, unattached artillery, are stationed 
in this city, where a new and handsome State armory has recently been opened. Military balls are frequently given 
and last summer a successful kirmess was held. It was a great social event. 

All of the prominent secret organizations have lodges in this city. The three lodges A. F. and A. M. occupy fine 
quarters in the new Masonic Temple at the corner of Broadway and Jackson Streets. The Commandery is one of the 
strongest west of St. Paul. Algeria Temple No. 1, Mystic Shrine, is very popular. Last summer the shriners gave a 
magnificent entertainment to visiting brethren from New York. The Independent Order of Odd Fellows includes Mon- 
tana Lodge No. 1, Canton Schuyler Colfax, Patriarch Militant, Excelsior Lodge No. 5, and Rocky Mountain Encamp- 
ment No. 1, 1. O. O. F. The Canton is the best drilled in the State. The Knights of Pythias and the Patriotic Sons of 
America have strong lodges in this city. The young men of the Catholic Church maintain a fine literary society. 

The means of transit in Helena are unexcelled by those of any city of its size in the country. Two years ago 
there was one solitary street car track on Main street. To-day the city has nearly twenty-five miles of street car lines 

20 > 



completely equipped with electric power and with cars of the most modern and luxurious pattern. The investments of 
the three principal companies, whose lines run to the Broadwater Hotel, the Northern Pacific and Montana Central 
depots, during the past eighteen months have been 
fully four hundred thousand dollars, and new lines are 
yet to be extended the coming season far down into 
the valley, to meet the growth of the city in that direc- 
tion and supply the demand of suburban residents. 

A word as to the industries of Helena. It is 
essentially a commercial city. Chance located her 
where she is, but nature has truly meant her for the 
great distributing point of a vast and wealthy region. 
Within a radius of a hundred miles are the greatest 
copper, gold and silver mines on the continent, vast 
coal deposits and, to the eastward, the paradise of the 
wool grower and stock raiser. Three great transcon- 
tinental lines, the Northern Pacific, the Great North- 
ern, and the Union Pacific, have already centered here, 
and within a year the fourth line, the Burlington and 
Missouri River, will reach Helena from the eastward. 
The Northern Pacific Company has already, by means 
of feeders connecting at Helena with its main line, se- 
cured control of the business of some of the richest 
mining districts and made them tributary to Helena, 
and the other lines will adopt a similar policy. Her 
situation as a supply point for the surrounding coun- 
try has built up a great wholesale and jobbing trade PENN BLOCK. 

21 




Report of the Condition of the 

SECOND NATIONAL BANK, 

At Helena, in the State of Montana, at the Close of business, December 19, 1890. 



Loans and discounts, 
Overdrafts, secured and unsecured, 
U. S. bonds to secure circulation, 
Stocks, securities, claims, etc., 
Due from approved reserve agents, 
Due from other national banks, 
Due from State banks and bankers, 
Furniture and fixtures, 

Total, 



RESOURCES. 

$242,264 52 Cureut expenses and taxes paid, . . $ 

6,450 57 Premiums on U. S. bonds, 

20,000 00 Checks and other cash items, 

3,576 93 Fractional paper currency, nickels and cents, 

18,888 57 Specie, 

5,918 85 Legal tender notes, .... 

7,734 51 Redemption fund with II. S. Treasurer (5 per 

5,096 47 cent, of circulation,) 



LIABILITIES. 



Demand certificates of deposit, 
Cashier's checks outstanding, 
Due to other national banks, 
Notes and bills rediscouuted,. 



6,911 84 
1,200 00 
1,005 85 
103 03 
4,349 55 
12,740 00 

900 00 
$337,140 66 

$ 67,680 27 
10,075 66 
5,962 19 
28,711 57 

$337,140 66 



Capital stock paid in, .... $ 75,000 00 

Surplus fund, 10,000 00 

Undivided profits, 24,666 71 

National bank notes outstanding, . 18,000 00 

Individual deposits subject to check, . 97,044 26 

Total, .... 

State of Montana, County of Lewis and Clarke, SS. 

I, George B. Child, cashier of the above named bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true to the 
best of my knowledge and belief. GEORGE B. CHILD, Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 29th day of December, 1890. JOSEPH N. KENCK, Notary Public. 

( J. B. SANFORD, 

CORRECT Attest :< CHAS. K. COLE, Directors. 

( C. G. EVANS, 



D 
O 

r 
o 



o 
o 





VIEW OF MAIN STREET LOOKING NORTH FROM BROADWAY. 




VIEW OF MAIN STREET LOOKING SOUTH FROM SIXTH AVENUE. 




WM. E. WALTON, President. 



j. M. TUCKER, CASHIER. 



MONTANA SAVINGS BANK, 



Annex-Granite Building, No. 36 North Main St. 



HELENA, MONTANA. 



Cash Capital, 



$100000 00 



TRUSTEES. 
C. A. BROADWATER, JOHN T. MURPHY, JAS. L. LOMBARD, 

JAS. M. TUCKER, WM. E. WALTON. 

Interest at 5 par cent, on Deposits of one dollar or more. 



> 

z 





of 
o 

z 
> 

I 



or 
o 



o 

I 
I- 



for her merchants in hardware, machinery, dry goods, groceries and mining and mill machinery. A foundry and iron 
works, carriage factory, three breweries, five cigar and tobacco factories, brick yards, marble works, lumber yards, fur- 
niture factories, bottling establishments and a great variety of small industries have sprung up here to meet the de- 
mands of a growing tributary population. 

The surest index of a city's growth and condition is afforded by its banks, and an analysis of the sworn state- 
ment made by these institutions, tells a story that cannot be gainsaid or refuted. Let the figures speak for themselves. 
Here they are on the first day of March, 1891 : 



BANKS. 






UNDIVIDED 


BANK NOTES 


DEPOSITS. 








ING. 




9 500,000 oo 
350,000 oo 
500,000 oo 
75,000 oo 
500,000 oo 
200,000 oo 
100,000 oo 
100,000 oo 


$100,000 oo 
61,000 oo 
100,000 oo 
10,000 oo 
3,000 oo 


$600,093 78 
52,352 69 
91,476 50 
1 7,985 63 
3,724 52 
9,212 54 


.$ 45,000 oo 
50,040 oo 
45,000 oo 
18,000 oo 
45,000 oo 
45,000 oo 


$3,169,081 20 

1,664,783 23 
1,492,749 07 

170,632 07 

156,152 85 

186,260 50 
337,153 53 














30,801 60 


















Totals 


$2,325,000 oo 


$304,801 60 


$774,845 66 


$248,040 oo 


$7,176,812 45 





* From close of business December 31, 1890. 
t Opened for business May i, 1891, 
Number of banks, eight. 

Total banking capital, surplus and undivided profits, $3,404,657.26. 
Total deposits, $7,176,812.45. 

Per cent, of available cash items to deposits, or seven per cent, in excess of legal requirements, 
22 per cent. 



As to the financial condition of the municipality it may be here stated that the total assessed valuation of city 
property amounts to $19,000,000, or a little more than two-fifths of the actual value, which is put at about $46,000,000. 
The tax levied is seven mills on the dollar of assessed valuation, or less than three on the dollar of actual tax. The taxes 

29 




o 

o 




MERCHANTS HOTEL. 



collected in 1890 were $133,000, and the licenses paid $20,000, making a total revenue of $153,000. The disposition 
made of the taxes was as follows: 

General revenue fund, .......... 3 mills. 

Fire department fund, 2 1-5 mills. 

Street improvement, ......... . \ mill. 

Library fund, . . 3-10 mills. 

Interest and sinking fund, .......... 1 mill. 

Total, 7 mills. 

The bonded indebtedness of the city is about $400,000. It should be explained that a large part of the city's ex- 
penditure in the last two years has been for a complete sewerage system, costing $280,000, which gives perfect drainage 
to every part of the town and adds to public health and comfort. In fact it is as a health resort that Helena offers at- 
tractions to the delicate and invalid which have not been properly set before the public. Situated in a sheltered nook 
of the mountains, in latitude 46 degrees North and longitude 112 degrees West, at an elevation of 4,200 feet above tide 
water, Helena offers almost every favorable climatic condition. Dr. McDonald, of Helena, in a recent paper says : 

"In no part of the world has the influence of climate upon disease been so conspicuously shown as in the Kocky 
Mountains. From Montana to Mexico the slopes of the Rocky Sierra present conditions of climate that are peculiar, 
and that differ widely from those of any other region, with the effect that consumption that scourge of the race is 
here practically non-existent. If we consider that this disease alone does nearly one-half the slaughter of men during 
the years of active life, we shall appreciate the importance of this immunity. 

" What is true of A'egetation in general is true also of those organic germs whose presence in air and water are 
the oauses of disease. It has always been noticed that the conditions most favorable for, and in a degree essential to 
fermentation, are heat and moisture. The growth of diseased organisms is a fermentative process. In the dry air of 
this country animal and vegetable matter undergoes a slow decay, a drying rather than the fat rotting of a moist cli- 
mate. In a torrid clime, whose air is saturated with moisture, vegetable growth is most active and so, also, is the pro- 
cess of decay. 

" The year has 300 sunshiny days, and there are not many of the rainy days in which the sun does not shine at 

32 




BROADWATER HOTEL. 



intervals. The rainy weather comes mostly in April, May and June, and these are the trying months for such as have 
chronic lung troubles. Absence of moisture has a remarkable influence upon susceptibility to cold and heat. Neither 
high nor low temperatures are so trying as is the case in a moist climate, and except where blizzards blow, cold, how- 
ever severe, is more endurable than in lower altitude. The prevailing dry and sunny weather allows invalids to spend 
a great part of the time out of doors, and for months men may sleep in the open air with safety and advantage to health. 
The rarefied air makes a demand upon lung activity proportionate to the altitude. The mountain Indian is deeper 
chested and breathes in greater volume than the plains Indian. The white man who comes here becomes larger in 
chest girth and develops an increase of lung capacity. This change is very observable in persons with lung disease, 
providing their health improve. Thus far we have referred alone to climatic influences upon diseases of the lungs. 
Sunstroke is never seen and malaria is of extreme rarity." 

Another physician says : " The air being very dry you escape those bronchial disorders so prevalent in damp, 
wet countries, and it seems to me quite plain that you escape more effectually the ravages of such diseases as are al- 
ways lurking about one's lungs, than do the inhabitants of any other section of our country. 

"Besides, you are so lavishly supplied by nature with nature's cure that we are almost tempted to court sick- 
ess that we may revel in the cures, which are pleasant as well as sure. 

" You have immense mineral springs on all sides and of all kinds hot sulphur springs and hot soda springs- 
all in their iutensest powers, and can almost 'throw physic to the dogs.' ' 

The number and variety of Mineral Springs in Montana, indeed, which are accessible from Helena make this 
point the health seeker's paradise. 

The best known of these are the Hunter's Hot Springs, in the Upper Yellowstone Valley, reached from Spring- 
dale Station, on the Northern Pacific llailroad. They have identical properties with the famous Hot Springs of Ar- 
kansas, being almost a specific for diseases resulting from blood poison. The White Sulphur Springs, in Meagher 
County, reached from Towusend or Livingston Stations on the Northern Pacific ; the Jefferson, Clancy and Boulder 
Warm Springs of Jefferson County, reached from Helena ; and the Warm Springs in Deer Lodge County, reached from 
Garrison Station, on the Northern Pacific, have been known for many years for their remedial properties. 

Such in brief and incomplete outline is the young metropolis of Montana to-day a city of twenty thousand in- 

35 




BROADWATER NATATORIUM. 



; ' 




SWIMMING BATH 300X100 FEET. 



habitants with all the improvements and advantages of 
modern civilization; with streets well lighted with gas 
and electricity ; with an abundant, pure and wholesome 
water supply from mountain streams, with complete tran- 
sit systems, with schools and churches and clubs and 
hospitals and- charitable and benevolent institutions 
in a word with all the advantages of older civilizations 
and the most glorious promises of the new. A recent 
writer has said of it : 

" The future of every city must depend largely 
upon its situation and surroundings, and when these are 
considered it is not difficult to predict with tolerable 
accuracy the degree of development it is likely to attain. 
Situated midway between the Pacific coast and the head 
of navigation upon the Mississippi River and the Great 
Lakes, and already the centre of a system of railways 
radiating in every direction, and connecting it with every 
inhabitable part of the continent, would of itself be 
enough to justify the belief that Helena must become a 
very important industrial and trade centre. But this is 
not all. It is the capital of the third largest State in 
the Union ; of a State that produced last year $35,000,- 
000 worth of gold and silver, $11,000,000 of copper and 
very considerable quantities of iron and coal ; that has 
an ample extent of exceedingly fertile agricultural coun- 
try ; whose forests cover a large proportion of its sur- 




WOODS BLOCK. 



T 
O 



o 
o 




face and comprise many varieties of excellent timber trees ; whose ranges and meadows yield pasture and hay for the 
support of vast herds of cattle and sheep, and which has besides quarries of numerous varieties of the most durable 
and highly valued building stones. Here are found the best of clays for brick, terra-cotta and pottery, and in the 
pocket gulches of the mountainous vicinity are vast quantities of precious stones. Surrounded by this inestimable 
aggregate of wealth it cannot be otherwise than that Helena will attract to herself vast multitudes of enterprising peo- 
ple. Here is work for all, no matter in what branch of industry they may desire employment, and here labor cannot 
fail to produce abundantly. Under such circumstances the progress of Helena must not only be rapid but coutiuuoiis 
for many years to come, and it is no exaggeration to expect that within half a century she will take rank among the 
greatest and wealthiest cities of the Western world." 




40 




MT. HELENA. 




MOTOR LINE. SCHOOL BUILDING- BROADWATER HOTEL i NATATORIUM. ELECTRIC LIN E. KESSLERS. 

KENWOOD HELENA'S WEST END. 




h 
z 

(r 
o 



o 
_i 
_j 
< 
t- 
u 
2 

m 



o 
z 



CO 

z 



o 

X 



JVIontana's ]VIineral Resources 



BY JOHN W. EDDY. 



leading, most important, and thrifty industry in the State of Montana to-day is mining. lu some of its many 
phases, it enters into every department of trade, it absorbs about nine-tenths of the labor, and represents a very 
large proportion of the aggregate wealth of the State ; and yet, it has hardly begun to realize the great possibilities 
that lie within its near future, when it shall be directed by the requisite skill, fostered by ample capital, and its affairs 
honestly administered. 

No other State, or region of equal extent, can show so many mining camps of acknowledged richness and per- 
manency as Montana ; and in this connection, it should be remembered that long before we had the means of develop- 
ing to such an extent as to establish the character of our mines, other mineral regions had already received the bene- 
fits which their proximity to the channels of commerce had rendered easily procurable. It is not very long since Mon- 
tana was regarded as an inaccessible region in the distant fastnesses of the great rocky banders of the arid North- 
west, and because of this it was difficult to bring our wonderful mineral wealth to the notice of capitalists. Again, 
more camps in Montana have built up their prosperity from their own resources, than in any other locality. Some of 
the most active and promising camps we have are of the character denominated " Poor Man's Camp," where well di- 
rected energy and skill are the chief requisites of success, because with good management, the abundance and quality 
of the ore products at and near the surface, are such as to render mining operations very simple and largely remun- 
erative. 

In the world-famous camp of Butte, many of the enterprises that have attained gigantic proportions were begun 
and maintained with the slender means of the sagacious and frugal laborer, until treasure was exposed sufficient to 

43 



tempt the cupidity of the rich, and enable them to secure the benefits so easily multiplied by capital. If some of the 
owners of the plethoric purses of the East could be induced to make incursions to our State, and make personal exam- 
ination of the advantages here offered for judicious investment in this vast mineral domain, Montana would be enabled 
to show a large increase of her treasure ; while a corresponding benefit would accrue to the promoters of systematic, 
intelligent, and persistent development of our acknowledged resources. 

One item of importance in the inception of operations in mining, is the abundant timber growth upon our min- 
eral ranges in the immediate vicinity of the mines ; and the perennial water-flow from the countless streams that rise 
among the mountains. It is well known that in localities where the supply of timber is inadequate, the cost of min- 
ing is greatly increased, and where water is not obtainable in liberal supply, placer mining is impossible, and the dress- 
ing and reduction of ores is difficult and expensive. But with these important aids in such profusion as they are found 
in all our mineral ranges, the cost of manipulation is reduced to a minimum. 

The question of fuel is already placed beyond the realm of doubt, both as to quantity and quality, as well as 
economy of production. With every new development, better grades of coal are found, while the area is already ex- 
tended so far as to render the supply absolutely inexhaustible. 

With the opening of new mining districts such ores as are valuable in the furnaces are coming to light, and very 
few ore shipments, comparatively, will be made out of the State when our own internal resources shall have assumed 
the important position their merits ought to command. While it is true that unusual progress is being made in the 
methods and facilities offered for the reduction of ores, it is no less true that valuable knowledge is being acquired 
concerning the character of the different rock formations, and the law of probabilities to be followed in their develop- 
ment. The contour of our mountain ranges is such as to give assurance of regularity in the geological formation, and 
therefore of permanency and continuity of the fissures. Our mountains are not broken and ragged, as though having 
been tossed up by some great upheaval, but they are rounded and symmetrical, and in repose, as if they had been 
gently lifted into place above the general level. 

What has been so often said, that " no man can see into the rocks farther than he has made a hole " is in its tech- 
nical sense true, and yet in a wider and truer sense a man may become so well versed in the character and "make-up" 
of a region as to be able to lay good foundations upon which to base an expectancy from data which appear intelligible 

44 



o that man only, who, by careful study and practical training, has become expert in translating the lithologic history. 
There are wiseacres who know so much as to be able to determine the results of exploitation without having previously 
studied even the prominent characteristics of a locality, and who rely on the maxims of some empiric whose narrow 
experience has taught him the wonderful secret that " no mine is worth anything that does not pay from the grass- 
roots," and these often do infinite harm by their ignorant and obtrusive counsels. 

The magnitude of this industry, and its far-reaching effects upon the national economy, are such as demand for 
its promotion the soundest scientific training, and the highest practical skill in every department. In some of the dis- 
tricts of this State, where in earlier days prospectors believed that the lodes, although wide, well formed and strong, 
were barren and worthless, it has been found by actual demonstration that a zone of rich pay exists deeper than their 
limited means allowed them to penetrate ; and that 
when they left off development, they were at the very 
threshold of a grand hoard of riches which far exceeded 
their wildest dreams. It is not many years since Butte 
was considered by the mining public to be good only 
down to the point then reached, or the "water line." 
But as soon as the nerve and requisite money had 
demonstrated the fact that pay ore existed below that 
mystic level, then Butte began her transcendentlyjbril- 
liant history, until now she stands without a peer 
among the mining camps of the world. 

As soon as it was known to be a fact that the 
deep formation was undisturbed, and that pay ore gen- 
erally continued under certain well defined circumstan- 
ces, then it was no longer a mere chance to attempt de- 
velopment of a promising prospect, but a good, sound 
business venture, whenever the conditions were such DRY CRUSHING CHLORIDIZING MILL OF BI-METALLIC MINING co., PHILIPSBURG. 

45 




as to justify the outlay. A better knowledge of the 
characteristics that should govern in the selection of 
properties for development, and some understanding of 
the rudiments of mining, would divest this all important 
industry of much of its uncertain and hazardous char- 
acter, and place it more nearly upon the solid basis of 
business calculation. 

The creators of wealth are the manufacturers of 
the blood of the nation ; and while the quack may be 
able to count the sturdy beatings of the pulse whose 
vigor is our just pride, it would be inexcusable folly to 
seek from him the prescription that would effect an in- 
crease in the current and volume of the life tide ! Wis- 
dom that is born of experience is valuable ; and the 
proud position Montana now occupies in the fore front 
of the nation, is due first to her wonderful resources, 
and then to the wisdom that has guided their transmu- 

COOLING FLOOR OF BI-METALLIC MINING CO.'S CH LORIDIZING MILL, PHILIPSBURG. tatlOn UltO " Coin of the realm." 

For the actual amount of capital invested in mining, Montana can boast of larger returns than any other state 
or territory in the Union ; and fewer failures are chargeable to this industry here than in any other mining region of 
equal extent. Beyond question there is a larger number of productive mining camps, covering a more extensive region, 
and wider range of operations, now in this State than exists in any other, and yet we have hardly done work enough 
upon these highlands of promise to be able to realize the vastness or value of the ventures already inaugurated. 

The great desideratum of our mining industry is development ; and thus far, wherever it has been secured under 
circumstances justifying the hope of even a moderate success, the outcome has been most uniformly satisfactory. 

The first mining was done in this State in 18G2, on Gold Creek, about five miles below the little village of Pio- 

46 








HELENA AND LIVINGSTON SMELTERS. 



neer, in Deer Lodge County, when James and Granville Stuart opened and operated the first placer mine in Montana. 
In the same year the placers of Grasshopper Creek at Bannock were opened, and the year following Alder Gulch was 
discovered. In August, 1864, Last Chance was found, and in October of the same year the name of Helena was given 
to the embryo city, which has grown into a position of commanding importance, and is destined to take rank arnoiig 
the great cities of the New Northwest. For many years the principal product of Montana was gold from her incom- 
parably rich placers. In 1875 quartz mills began to be erected, and as the placers furnished less, the lodes produced 
more, and from that date scientific mining began ; although under great disadvantages, because of the utter lack of ade- 
quate transportation facilities, as well as the requisite metallurgical skill to successfully manipulate the ores. How- 
ever, the tide of production began to rise from that date, and has greatly increased of late years. While the percent- 
age of gold is far less than previous to 1875, the percentage of silver is vastly greater. The yield of the precious met- 
als from 1862 to date, according to the best obtainable data, is as follows : 



1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 



600,000 


1872 


8,roo,ono 


1873 


16,000,000 


1874 


18,000,000 


1875 


17,500,000 


1876 


n;.:;i 10,000 


1877 


15,000,000 


1878 


11,200,000 


1879 


9,000,000 


1880 


8,000,000 


1881 



7,000,000 


1882 


5,200,000 


1883 


4,000,000 


1884 


4,100,000 


1885 


4,500,000 


1886 


3,750,000 1887 


5,867,000 


1888 


5,900,000 


1889 


6,000,000 


1890 


6,050,000 





$ 6,920,000 

7,800,000 

9,170,000 

14,922,000 

18,271,000 

23,000,000 

24,616,558 

23,832,881 

34,814,955 



The gold product from some of the most famous placer mines operated, is estimated as follows : 

$13,000,000 
60,000,000 



Pioneer, Independent, and Pike's Peak districts on Gold Creek and vicinity 
Alder Gulch and tributaries 



Confederate Gulch 

Last Chance Gulch and tributaries 

Grasshopper Creek and tributaries 



r 4,000,000 

15,000,000 
5,000,000 



Besides large contributions from Ophir, Bear, Elk, and numerous other gulches and the many bars along the 
Missouri river. 

While Montana cannot claim the veneration due to enterprises that date as far back into the cloudy past as 
many of her western neighbors, yet her record of production of the noble metals has already placed her in the van, 
and given her the palm among them all, as capable of the grandest possibilities on account of her exceptionally rich 
resources. The output of the metals for the year 1890, as compiled by John J. Valentine, general manager for Wells, 
Fargo Express Co., is generally conceded to be as reliable as any information to be obtained. According to Mr. Val- 
entine, who occupies a position of great advantage in the collection of reliable mineral statistics, Montana not only 
stands at the head as a producer of the high grade metals, but has increased her lead during the year 1890 very con- 
siderably. The figures are as follows, Montana leading by $7,539,508 over all competitors : 



Montana 

Colorado 

Idaho 

Utah 

California 

Nevada 

Arizona 

New Mexico 



$34,814,955 

27,275,447 

13,824,500 

12,259,175 

11,761,114 

9,240,536 

7,597,349 

4,658,985 



Dakota 

Oregon 

Alaska . 

Washington 

Texas 

British Columbia 

Total, 



$ 3,045,560 
1,036,000 
762,811 
279,000 
249,423 
361,555 

$127,166,410 



Montana's copper product is larger than that of any other state or territory in the Union. A few years ago 
Michigan was looked upon as possessing the copper mines par excellence of the world ; but now the Anaconda pro- 
duces two thirds as much copper as all Michigan, and will increase her output yearly. The following table shows the 
comparative product of the three leading sections, in pounds, for the years named. 

49 




PRUMLUMMON MINE, MARYSVILLE. 



YEAR. 


MONTANA. 


LAKE SUPERIOR. 


ARIZONA. 


1882 


9,058,284 


57,155,991 


17,984,415 


1883 


24,664,346 


59,702,404 


23,874,963 


1884 


43,093,054 


69,353,202 


26,734,345 


1885 


67,798,864 


72,147,889 22,706,336 


1886 


557,611,485 


79,918,460 


16,000,000 


1887 


78,699,677 


76,028,697 


17,790,000 


1888 


98,500,000 


86,587,424 


33,200,000 


1889 


104,539,353 


87,504,103 


32,933,000 


1890 


122,950,000 


99,570,000 


35,720,000 



While Montana stands pre-eminent as a producer of the noble metals, her record as a dividend payer is becom- 
ing equally noteworthy. The following are some of the best known companies in the State that have disbursed divi- 
dends during the year 1890 : 



NAME OF COMPANY. 



Alice (Butte) 


$ 95,000 


$ 900,000 


Bannister ......... 


24,000 


24,000 


Si-Metallic 


290,000 


290,000 


Bald Butte 


30,000 


30,000 


Boston & Montana ....... 


625,000 


1,675,000 


Cumberland ........ 


125,000 


125,000 


Elkhorn, limited 


225,000 


225,000 


Granite Mountain 


2,400,000 


10,000,000 


Hecla Consolidated ....... 


122,500 


1,560,000 


Helena & Frisco ....... 


133,750 


. 133,750 


Iron Mountain ........ 


50,000 


. c . 75,000 


Jay Gould ......... 


22,000 


r 459,000 


Montana, limited ........ 


178,000 


2,559,428 


Parrott ......... 


252,000 


768,000 


Total 


$4,572,250 


$18,824,178 



PAID IN 1880 I TOTAL TO JAN. 1, '91. 



51 



The following table shows the comparative standing of the precious metal producing states and territories, as 
regards the dividends paid during the past year : 



Montana .... $4,572,250 

Michigan .... 3,665,000 

Utah 2,850,000 

Colorado .... 1,119,000 

California .... 440,528 

Nevada .... 417,500 



Arizona 240,000 

Dakota . ,..,.. . . . 213,200 

New Mexico .... 200,000 

Idaho 160,000 

Mexico 140,000 

Canada . . : . . . 37,500 



It will be readily seen that Montana leads the list by considerable, and were we able to add the profits made by 
such great establishments as the Anaconda Company, over $3,500,000, and the Colorado and Montana Smelting Works, 
and the hosts of mines that are shipping ores at large profits to the individual owners, like the East Pacific, which 
has made as high as $15,000 net profits per month, and the Agua Frio, with its pay chute of 2000 feet in length, and 
not a break in it ; the Kennedy mines, only eight miles from Helena, already up to $15,000 per month of output of high 
grade ore, and others that might be named by the score, the dividends would be swelled to an amount that would as- 
tonish one not familiar with the facts concerning our great industry. 

Undoubtedly the Granite Mountain mine takes rank as the greatest silver producer now operated on this con- 
tinent. During the year 1890 its three mills crushed 60,212 tons of ore, which yielded 3,930, 329 ounces of silver, and 
8,538 ounces of gold, or $171,660. During the year the aggregate of levels, shafts, and cross-cuts driven was 6,455 feet, 
which added to the distances already accomplished makes a grand total of 25,182 lineal feet of openings in the mine 
without reference to stopes or stations. Aside from the payment of the enormous dividends, this company expended 
in 1890 over $1,300,000 in the necessary development of their property, and for current expenses in operating their ex- 
tensive works. 

The Bi-metallic, owned and operated largely by the same persons who have promoted the Granite Mountain, 
have reached the position which enables them to pay $70,000 per month in dividends ; and they are now preparing to 
enlarge their works by the addition of another mill/' Doubtless other properties now being developed there will add to 

the renown of Granite and Philipsburg in the near future. 

53 



1? he largest reduction works on the western continent are located at Anaconda, in Deer Lodge County. The ag- 
gregate capacity of the upper and lower works, owned by the same persons, is about 3000 tons per day, and the mines 
owned by the company in Butte are capable of producing ore enough to keep this enormous plant running up to full 
capacity. 

There are more good paying properties in Butte than in any camp of equal extent yet discovered, and her 
record has proved this to the world. 

With every step of substantial progress made in the development of the many districts that are tributary to He- 
lena, it becomes more certain that within a radius of thirty miles of this place, there are mines of such solid merit as 
will in the near future command wide attention, that have as yet been scarcely named to the public, while there are 1 
scores of properties whose names are almost as familiar as that of our fair city. 

About twenty miles northwesterly from Helena is the Drum Lummon mine, the largest and most important of 
any of the mining ventures of the county. This mine was located nearly twenty years ago by Thomas Cruse, who sold 
it to an English syndicate in 1883. Subsequently the mine was sold to an English company who organized under the 
name of the Montana Company, limited, with a capital of 600,000 shares, par value $5 each. Active work was begun 
by the new company in the latter part of the year 1883, and a very large expenditure was made in the erection of a 
plant and in development of the mine ; and at the close of the following year it was found that the company had been 
operating at a loss, and was in debt nearly $140,000. In December 1884, the administration of the Montana Company's 
affairs was changed in London, and the property at Marysville was placed in the charge of the present management, 
since which time its history has been one of great satisfaction to the company and credit to our State. The mine has 
produced 414,628 tons of ore, which has yielded the gross sum of $8,472,976, and has returned a profit of $3,238,334, 
out of which twenty-one dividends have been paid to stockholders, amounting to $2,559,428, and the sum of $678,906 
has been expended in permanent improvements upon the company's property, and in the purchase of numerous min- 
ing claims adjoining the old Drum Lummon. At the time Mr. Cruse sold the property, he had made an aggregate de- 
velopment of 1,031 lineal feet in drifts, shafts, cross-cuts and tunnels ; now the total underground development repre- 
sents 45,000 feet, or about eight and one-half miles of drifts, shafts, cross-cuts and tunnels. In addition to the 414,628 
tons of ore extracted, there is estimated to be still in sight not less than 200,000 tons of ore already available for ex- 

55 




NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD DEPOT. 



traction. This company has 120 stamps in operation, with a crushing capacity of about 85,000 ton s per annum- 
About 300 men are kept in the direct employment of the company, but the camp of Marysville, containing about 1,500 
people has been practically dependent upon the operations of the Montana Company. The mines of this company are 
operated through a tunnel 1200 feet long, which cuts the vein 400 feet vertically from the surface. From the level of 
this tunnel two shafts have been sunk which have now attained a depth of 1,400 feet from the surface, and sinking is 
still continued at the rate of about 300 feet per annum. To observant persons, it is apparent that it is about as nec- 
essary to have good management as to have a good mine. 

A most interesting chapter in the history of mining is furnished by the Golden Leaf, limited, at Empire, in this 
county. Formerly the property was a conspicuous failure, although dividends were declared at the expense of the bank 
account, which added nothing to the credit of the management of the company. Lately the mill has- been repaired and 
set in motion, and the work of developing the mine prosecuted under a management of such intelligence and economy 
as to result in the reduction of the cost of mining and milling, including all charges, to not over $1.75 per ton of ore. 
During November the ore only averaged $2.80 per ton, and there was found in the tailings $1.10 a ton, leaving the net 
product $1.70 a ton. The expenses were $8,900. In December the ore was of better grade, averaging $3.70 per ton, 
$1.20 of which was lost in the tailings, leaving a net profit of $2.50 per ton. The expenses for December were $7,100. 
For January, owing to shortage of water, now remedied, only 3,500 tons were crushed, producing $11,100 or $3.20 per 
ton at a cost of $7,500 or $2.15 per ton ; exclusive of cost of development worth $2,500. 

The manager reports that the developments in the Empire mine show very favorable results as depth is at- 
tained, with every indication of a large body of rich ore below any of their present workings. The sixty stamps are 
now plentifully supplied with water, from a system of water works recently constructed, and in the near future this 
company expects to refit the mill entirely with steel, and thus greatly increase its crushing capacity. There is hardly 
a mine in Montana that will not average more than the Empire ; and with the same energy and thrift in the manage- 
ment, splendid results will surely be achieved. 

Four miles westerly from Marysville is a group of five mines that give promise of becoming famous. These are 
owned by the Bald Butte Mining Company. The Albion has been developed by a shaft to a depth of 200 feet, and 
levels run aggregating about 700 lineal feet. The Genesee has a shaft 150 feet deep and levels 120 feet long, and the 

57 




MONTANA CENTRAL RAILROAD, 



Is 





ii 












Pus. 




HIGH SCHOOL. 



v -* i ''* 

I If p 




CENTRAL SCHOOL. 




OLD LAND MARKS, MAIN STREET. 



veins exposed are not less than five feet in width. The Sterling, Black Douglas and Kenawa are also being developed. 
The ten stamp mill of this company is crushing ten tons of ore per day, and saving very closely, as the ore is friable 
and very free. These mines are owned by a close corporation, who have abundant reason to be satisfied with the re- 
sults of its operations. They have paid since last November, twenty per cent, in dividends on their capital stock of 
$250,000, and have enough left in the treasury in the middle of February to pay an eight per cent, dividend if neces- 
sary. Careful estimates of their reserves place the value of the ore in sight and available for milling at $750,000. 

Of the mines tributary to Rimini, the Crescent is now showing an improved conditionof property, and character 
of product. A tunnel has penetrated this claim about 400 feet, and a depth of nearly 200 feet has been reached. At 
present about one car load of ore per week is taken for shipment from stopes at the end of the tunuel, and the car load 
nets from $300 to $500. The company's estimate of ore now on the dump is 6000 tons, carrying about $25 per ton ; 
and a fifty-ton concentrator is to be erected in the spring, when the whole width of thirty-three feet of vein will be 
worked, and only concentrates shipped. A test recently made at the Gates Works, of ore carrying a value of $21.93 
per ton, resulted in the concentration of about three tons into one, carrying a value of $56.21. 

The Park district, near Placer, on the Northern Pacific Railway, about twenty miles southeast of Helena, is mak- 
ing a remarkably fine record. The East Pacific shipments for the year 18!)0 aggregated over $500,000. The Agua 
Frio, which for the first half of the year did nothing but development work, has shipped $75,000. The Gold Dust has 
constantly increased its shipments. The Park Mine has paid for its own development by shipments from its tunnel, 
and is now reported to be "in bonanza." The Little Bonanza is becoming a big bonanza. The Switzerland, Silver 
Wave, Hawkeye, Hard Cash and hosts of others are bringing that district, hitherto almost unknown, into prominence. 

Twenty-five miles south of Helena is Wickes, which is a great producer of ore. The Helena and Livingston 
Smelting and Reduction Co. own the Alta and its allied group of mines, and during the year have kept 125 men em- 
ployed about the mines and 35 at their concentrator at Corbin, besides wood contractors and haulers to the extent of 
probably 40 more. The company has a narrow gauge, 30-inch railway, from the concentrator into the mine, three 
miles long ; over this 225 tons of ore is daily carried into the works. During 1890, 55,000 tons of ore was taken from 
the Alta mountain, and $275,000 added to the world's wealth as the quota of this group of mines. The Miiiah, in the 
near vicinity, has made a magnificent record, and the Pen Yan and Bluebird are also very valuable properties. The 

62 




THOMPSON BLOCK. 




HAWTHORNE SCHOOL. 



great Elkhorn, lied Mountain, Cataract and Basin are quietly adding to the precious metal output; while the wide 
range of rich country adjacent to Wickes, including the Boulder Eange, the great silver lead camps of Castle and the 
Belt Range, and the rich fissures of Cook City, Neihart, Barker, Maiden, and the hundred camps that make Montana's 
resources the Nation's pride, are steadily forging the hinges upon which the doors to their vast treasure houses will 
soon swing open to the gaze of the waiting and wondering world. 

The following statistics from official data are taken from the Governor's message to the legislature of the State, 
which adjourned March 5, 1891 : 

Mineral output in 1889 $24,012,000 

" 1890 47,748,000 

Number quartz mills and reduction furnaces operated in 1889 .... 188 

" 1890 207 

Number bushels of coal mined in 1889 907,500 

1890 17,612,000 

The Inspector of Mines reports the number of claims recorded in the Slate during the past year to be 8,745. 

Eastward from Helena about thirteen miles, are the famous sapphire and ruby placers. Some of the gems found 
along the Missouri river are pronounced by eminent experts to be fully equal to the Oriental sapphires, and Montana 
will undoubtedly become noted for her gems, as well as her pre-eminent position as a prodiicer of the noble metals. 




Vs^ 

JH..S5. 



ova 



m 
aj 
o 



CD 
C 



Z 
CD 





CL 
O 






u 

< 



o 
7; 




Irrigation in jVIontana. 



Exhaustive Review of tl\e \^orK r]oW dor\e arid to be dor\e soor\. Dependerice of flgriculture or\ Irrigation.- 

Car\als already built and others ir\ Process of Construction. 



BY CHARLES A. GBKGORY, BOZEMAN, MONTANA, MAY, 1891. 



r T" r erritorially Montana is the third largest State in the United States. It embraces 93,349,200 acres. It is wholly 
within the arid region. Agriculture cannot be carried on in this State without irrigation, to the extent to supply 
the population. There are meager exceptions when under favorable conditions irrigation may be dispensed with. The 
most extensive agricultural valleys are those of the Yellowstone, the Missouri and the Milk River. Important valleys, 
though less extensive, are the Bitter Root, the Gallatin, the Madison, the Jefferson, the Dearborn, the Sun River, the 
Flathead country, in Missoula County ; the Deer Lodge River valley, in Deer Lodge County; the Beaverhead, in Mad- 
ison County and Beaverhead County, and the Judith River country, in Fergus County. In all these valleys there is 
more or less irrigation. 

The United States, west of the one hundredth meridian of longitude, presents the most extensive connected field 
for irrigation on the earth, and within this field Montana is the best watered section of intra-mountain country; has 
conditions which warrant, physically and economically, the profitable expenditure of capital in irrigation. Agriculture 
is the foundation of material prosperity. The development of our mines, the success of stock growing, the sustaining 
of our towns and cities, rest on irrigation. Not much is yet done in this particular, if we consider the opportunities 

71 




STEAMBOAT BLOCK. 



and needs. It is useless to attempt an accurate statement of the condition of irrigation in Montana. The State has re- 
centlj provided a bureau of agriculture, but has not any collected and preserved statistics on irrigation; nor is there 
any requirement upon any bureau or officer to investigate and report on this subject of prime importance. Floating 
newspaper mentions and some personal, but not extensive knowledge of the subject, are the basis of the following state- 
ments : 

We should mention the Gallatin Canal, on the east side of the West Gallatin River, in Gallatin County, about 
twenty miles long, fourteen feet wide on bottom and twenty-four feet wide on top and three feet deep, grade two and 
one-half feet to the mile, constructed two years ago. The West Gallatin Irrigation Company's canal, locally known as 
the Gregory High Line Canal, issuing from the west side of the West Gallatin River, in the same county, is now con- 
structing. The head gate is made of heavy timbers bolted together, with five gates, the lower part of which is four 
feet below the water of the river. The head gate is lo- 
cated in the northeast quarter of section twenty-eight, 
township three south, range four east. The capacity 
for passing water through head gate is fifty thousand 
miners' inches ihe first section of the canal is twenty- 
four feet wide on bottom, thirty-four feet wide on top, 
five feet depth of water, with fall six feet per mile, and 
will carry 40,000 miners' inches. One quarter of a mile 
below head gate there is a waste gate, 6x12 feet, so con- 
structed that the amount of water entering the second 
section of canal is entirely under control of the person 
operating the canal. The canal runs northerly some 
twelve miles, then turns westerly and covers high bench 
lands. The fall of the river for some miles below the 
head gates is fifty feet to the mile. In the main part of 
its length the canal is fourteen feet wide on bottom, 




HELENA CEMETERY. 



74 



5 

o 

X 

2 

IS 

c 

T> 
CD 







abcmt twenty-four feet wide on top, carrying four feet of water in dapth, on a grade of thirty-eight inches to the mile 
carefully and permanently constructed to be at least thirty miles in length, and prospectively much longer, having 
under it upwards of 70,000 acres of irrigable lands, of as fine cereal producing quality as are found in the State. 

The Excelsior Canal, on the east side of the same river, iu the same county, is a large ditch now constructing, 
adapted to water some of the same lauds that lie under the East Gallatin Canal. 

On the west side of the West Gallatiu River there 
is the large ditch of the Manhattan Malting Company's 
ranch, nineteen miles in length, twelve feet wide on 
the bottom. 

There is also another ditch, now twelve feet wide 
on the bottom and now being enlarged to sixteen feet 
wide on the bottom, to carry as the flow in the ditch ten 
thousand miners' inches, called the Flowers ditch. 
Here, also, is the Neeble ditch, Lewis ditch and Anceny 
ditch. 

Gallatin valley is the best watered and the most 
extensively irrigated valley in the State. 

THE DEARBORN CANAL 

begins about section sixteen, township eighteen, north 
of range eight west, unsurveyed lands, which lie in the 
canyon of the North Fork of the Dearborn River, in 
Lewis and Clarke Count}'. The waters of the river are 
diverted by an immense dam, 300 feet long, composed 
of cribs built of twelve-inch logs bolted together and 
filled with rock, the whole being placed upon solid rock 
in the bed of the stream ; the canal runs thence over a 




TURN HALLE. 



76 







A MONTANA RANCH. 



hill which separates the Dearborn from the head of Flat creek ; this portion of the canal being four and one-half miles 
long, twenty feet wide in the bottom, thirty -eight feet at the top, and will convey six feet depth of water. The canal is 
so planned that a raft 100 feet long and twenty feet wide can be floated down by the force of the current and the guid- 
ance of two men. The main continuous canal will be, when entirely completed, 119 miles in length, and the lateral 
ditches 475 miles long. Creek beds and lakes are utilized to a very large extent, thus saving the construction of the 
same length of canals, covering 75,000 acres of land with an expenditure of about $150,000. 

The laud covered is of excellent quality, of a sandy loam character, and varies in depth from two to twenty feet. 
The farmers will be charged about $2 an acre per annum. It is the purpose of the company to extend its system to 
the great body of land lying southwest of Great Falls. The new Montana and Canada railroad will cross its lands, 
thus affording the farmers easy access to the markets with their cattle, sheep and grain. 

The company will be ready to deliver water during the coming irrigation season. 

Wilson & Thompson's Canal, known as the Crown Butte Canal. This is one of the enterprises that will cover 
a large amount of land in Cascade County. This work of irrigating some of the excellent land of that region has been 
undertaken as a private enterprise by Wilson & Thompson, of Helena, and by a system of reservoirs they will have, 
when completed, a canal twenty-five miles in length. 

The Glendora Keservoir, Canal and Irrigation Company's undertaking is situated near the village of Choteau, 
in Choteau County. There is a low bank which separates the Teton and Muddy Rivers, comprising fifty or sixty thou- 
sand acres of fine land, and this company is organized with a view of irrigating this land. The system comprises about 
twenty-five miles of main canals, fed by two reservoirs which are natural depressions in the prairie ; one of them a 
mile and a quarter long by about a half mile wide and about forty-two feet deep ; the other covers about eighty acres 
of land and is about thirty feet deep. These two reservoirs are connected by a canal ; they lie along the Teton Kiver 
about three miles apart ; the upper or larger one is connected with the river by a canal ; and from this reservoir a 
canal runs to the smaller reservoir, and the irrigation begins within 1,200 feet after leaving the lower reservoir. The 
canals are carried over this bench land, from which run mains and laterals to suit the natural fall of the country, which 
is about twelve feet to the mile. The land lies smooth and level, and is deep and rich in soil. The work to be done 
this year (1891) will irrigate about 30,000 acres, and the system may hereafter be continued so as' to embrace all the 
land lying between the Teton and Muddy Eivers and below the reservoir sites. 

79 




BRYANT SCHOOL- 




DIAMOND, BLOCK. 



The Florence Canal and Keservoir Company was engaged in constructing its improvements in 1884. The source 
of the water supply is the South Fork of the Sun River, and the canal runs easterly, and there is opportunity for im- 
provement in this undertaking. There is fine land under the line of this canal. 

The Sun River Canal Compajiy contemplates improvements to reclaim lands lying between the Tetoii River on 
the north, the Missouri River on the east, the Sun River on the South and the Rocky Mountains on the west, compris- 
ing a very extensive area, as may be seen by consulting the local maps. The size of the constructed part of the canal is 
said to be fifteen feet wide on bottom and twenty-four feet wide on top and four feet deep, and about six miles have 
been excavated and the project is incomplete. The source of water for the main canal is at the base of the mountains, 
on the North Fork of Sun River, aud the line runs easterly along the main ridge on the divide between Bun River and 
the Teton. 

The Teton Canal is completed for a distance of twenty miles, and takes its name from the Teton River, as also its 
heading, near the mountains, and runs easterly about thirty miles. About midway upon the line is an immense flume 
one and one-half miles in length and forty -five feet high ; it is connected in the centre by 2,000 feet of heavy iron pipe, 
two feet in diameter, which carries water over the top of the ravine. The extensive and important part of the Sun 
River enterprise is the constructing of a storage reservoir covering an area of some twenty-one square miles. This is 
done by using the old Benton Lake. The lake is tapped at the south end by a cut one and one-half miles in length 
and thirty-five feet deep. Two canals, each about twenty-five miles long, are constructed from the cut to carry water 
on to the table lands lying between the lake and Fort Benton. 

The Chestnut Vallay Canal takes its heading at Half-Breed Rapids, on the right bank of the Missouri River, and 
runs northerly twenty miles and covers the Chestnut valley. This is a small canal, some twelve feet wide and three deep. 

The Tongue River Canal, near Miles City, and leading to the marginal lands on the Yellowstone, and fifteen 
miles in length, deserves mention, as also the local improvements at and near Billings on the Yellowstone. Here is 
Clark's Fork Bottom Canal, above Billings, some twenty-five or thirty miles long in Yellowstone County. 

It would be a censurable omission not to state that the frequency of small creeks and rivulets leading to fertile 
valleys in many localities furnish opportunities for irrigation which are already availed of by the resident ranchers. 
The aggregate of these is considerable. In the Gal latin valley, so famous for its extent of area and for high yield of 

82 




ARMORY. 




r 
o 

[T 



Q 
O 
I 




CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. 



crops, all the streams are availed of by ranchers' ditches, and it may be said that by far the largest part of agriculture 
is carried on by this minute ditch system. It is thought that at present upwards of 80 per cent, of the agriculture of 
this State is maintained by irrigation from small marginal ditches. Much and little ! The rancher, the 

dweller in towns, and the miner rejoices that so much 
is accomplished bv their individual efforts at irrigation. 
The citizen who looks at the State as a whole and sees 
its needs and opportunities will regret that so little is 
done where so much more is needed. There are only 
about 400,000 acres under irrigation and actually culti- 
vated in this State. This shows the small extent of use 
of this art in this State. The blanks for irrigation sta- 
tistics sent from the agricultural department at Wash- 
ington to all the arid tracts of the United States, will 
ultimately provide extensive statistical information of 
irrigation in the arid region, but their defect is they take 
no note of individual low line and marginal ditches, 
which in the aggregate are so important a feature, and 
which this State is at present relying upon. But the 
small ditch system has about reached its limitations, 
and we must in future rely upon large high-line ditches 
for further development of agriculture. 

Over $30,000,000 of agricultural products are im- 
p irted from the east into the arid region. Only a small 
part of what Montana consumes is raised in this State. 
It is a pity to be forced to haul hay from Iowa into 
Montana. 




MASONIC TEMPLE. 



87 




KETCHUM, DENOIELLE & co. 




KESSLERS BREWERY. 




MOUNT HELENA, LOOKING WEST. 



The following suggestions from the Governor's 
Message (January, 1891, Montana) may appropriately 
be introduced. He says : " Every person who is con- 
versant with our climate and the character of our soil 
must know that great possibilities await a general and 
comprehensive system of irrigation of our lands. It 
will be a glad day for Montana when the stock inter- 
ests of the State shall be divided among ranchmen in 
small lots. This will insure the proper feeding and 
shelter of stock, and furnish employment to a large 
number of persons, who must also be provided with the 
necessaries of life, all of which will be conducive of a 
more general prosperity of the State." Agriculture 
should be stimulated and promoted within this State. 
Behold the splendid progress of California and of 
Colorado growing out of irrigation. These are not the 
less for this reason mineral producing States, and they 
are high on the roll of honor of agriculture and horti- 
culture. Let Montana profit by these examples. Ag- 
riculture and irrigation are blessed arts. 

Honor waits o'er all the earth, 

Through endless generations, 
The art that calls her harvests forth, 

And feeds the expectant nations. 

The grass crop is the most valuable crop raised GRAN DON BLOCK. 

in the United States, if we consider it in its various forms, as hay and as wrought into stock and dairy products, 

91 





GANS & KLEIN BUILDINGS. 



o 

c 

33 
Z 



TJ 

C 

a 
r 

CO 

I 





I 
o 



DC 

uj 
CT 




VIEW OFjjEWING STREET, LOOKING NORTH. 




o 
o 

o 
z 

I 
<f> 
3 

DO 
CL 

H 
z 

UJ 





CHURCH OF THE SCARED HEART. 



Taking a due proportion of the annual increase of stock together with dairy product, and the annual \alue of the 
grass crop is not less than $1,000,000,000. It is a crop of priceless value to Montana, and yet it is raised in small 
quantity, though capable of being carried to large proportions under irrigation in this State. It is the sure winner of 
profit to the grower. We are far behind many European countries in the yield to the acre of this crop, yet not neces- 
sarily so, but only so by our own neglect and supineness. All flesh is grass, but not all the grass is made for making 
flesh, that flesh is heir to ! 

Gov. White, of Montana, in his official report for 1889, says : " On well-irrigated farms crops of forty to sixty 
bushels of wheat and eighty to one hundred bushels of oats per acre are common, and where water was abundant even 
an exceptionally dry season had no effect in diminishing the crops. When the traveler over the sun scorched plains 
of Western Dakota and the lower Yellowstone during the past summer entered the Gallatin valley and saw richer crops 
of grain and hay than any in Illinois and Kansas, and then realized that not one drop of rain had moistened those 
crops, he was taught by an object lesson the value of irrigation, as nothing else could teach it; and yet there are to-day- 
many millions of acres in Montana only waiting for the fructifying application of those great streams of water, which 
are now running to waste to produce crops equal to those of any lands in the world. The land is there, the water is 
there ; while they are kept separate, Montana cannot feed her present population ; bring them together and you add 
another great grain-producing State to the union." 

Montana is a mining and a grazing State, picturesque and beautiful, of a healthful climate and full of sunshine. 
The small area that is cultivated is, by reason of its productiveness and smallness, very valuable. If we take ten per 
cent, of its area as adaptable for agriculture, we have only about 9,200,000 acres. Of the total area about 4,000,000 
acres are returned for taxation, and this includes surveyed railroads and much land not cultivable. Lands assessed 
for taxation in 1888, 3,741,459 acres ; number of farms in 1888, 4,882 ; number of acres on which crops were raised in 
same year, 331,382. On 26,155 acres were raised 770,200 bushels of wheat. On 84,978 acres were raised 3,020,572 
bushels of oats. If we took into account only crops grown under irrigation the average yield per acre would be great- 
ly increased. 

These figures show that the agriculture of Montana is still in its infancy. Over one-half of the total amount 
of grain produced is raised in two valleys, those of the Gallatin and Bitter Root. Nineteeu-twentieths of the tota 

99 




ST. ALAYSIUS SCHOOL. 




EMERSON SCHOOL. 




"^iE". :;'". 'T^ 



o 
o 
I 



Q 

O 

o 




VIEW OF LENOX ADDITION. 



amount is raised in the western or mountainous third of the State. This is due to several reasons. The mines have 
afforded the best local market, and therefore those valleys lying contiguous to the mining regions are most thickly 
populated, and have been settled longer than those countries lying east of the mountains. The mountain valleys are 
most easily irrigated. 

A circuit of country having the radius of 100 miles from the metropolis of the State and its capital, Helena, \\ill 
embrace most of the finest agricultural valleys, and these are contributary to the growth of that city, and are most 
accessible to the best mining portion of the State. Agriculture, irrigation and immigration are inter dependent. Pro 
mote any one of these and you foster and extend both the others. These conditions here afford ground for belief of 
greatly increasing immigration into this State. 




IOC 




STEDMANS FOUNDRY. 




CATHOLIC HOSPITAL. 





RESIDENCE OF EX-GOV. MAUSER. 




RESIDENCE OF MAYOR T. H. KLEINSCH Ml DT. 



rm 

* '. \ I.J J 




RESIDENCE OF W. E. COX. 




RESIDENCE OF GOV. B. P CARPE 








RESIDENCE OF GEO. B. CHILDS. 



MRS. W. C. CHILD'S FLAT. 



RESIDENCE OF THOMAS CRUSE. 




RESIDENCE OF E. W. KNIGHT, JR. 



RESIDENCE OF W. A. CHESSMAN 





CHESSMANS FLATS. 



o 
o 

H 
m 

3J 

-n 

-i 

TO 




RESIDENCE OF N. J. MoCONNELL. 




RESIDENCE OF SAMUEL LANE. 



RESIDENCE OF D. A. Q. FLOWERREE 




RESIDENCE OF S. C. ASHBY. 




RESIDENCE OF A. J. SELIGMAN. 




BANCROF- 




RESIDENCE OF J. V. JEROME. 



RtSIDtNCE UF MARCUS E. DOWNS 




RESIDENCE OF C. W. CANNON. 



few* 



RESIDENCE OF MORRIS SILVERMAN 




RESIDENCE OF FRANCIS POPE. 



Comparative Statement of Rational Banks o? States and Territories. 

C O M P I I. E D B V 

T. H. KLEINSCHMIDT, FOR THE HELENA BOARD OF TRADE FROM OFFICIAL REPORT OF THE COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY FOR 1890. 



MONTANA. 


SOI IH DAKOTA 


N. DAKOTA.. 


ARIZONA. 


OREGON. 


IDAHO. 


WASHINGTON. 


NEW MEXICO. 


UTAH. 


WYOMING. 


RESOURCES. 

25 National 

Banks. 


39 National 
Banks. 


29 National 
Banks. 


2 National 
Banks. 


37 National 
Banks. 


7 National 
Banks. 


51 National 
Banks. 


9 National 
Banks. 


10 National 
Banks. 


IT National 
Banks. 


Loans and discounts . . . $14*414, 141 26 
U. S. bonds .... 1,005,25000 
Real Estate 572,og2 85 
Expense and Premium . . 183,059 53 
Cash and Exchange . . . 4,339,062 89 


$5,482,485 19 
980,750 oo 
492,888 23 

20 5i733 3 
1,710,311 84 


$4,342,461 42 
509,000 oo 
582,549 59 
75,57 40 
1,669,057 12 


$376,107 01 
37,500 oo 
19,000 oo 
6,489 81 
96,581 oo 


$11,817,15709 
1,276,050 oo 
399,303 33 
'75,285 73 
3,890,526 oo 


$1,306,154 59 
175, 3 
86,247 3 1 
40,524 20 
635,651 28 


$16,407,613 68 
1,335,00000 
886,487 95 
374,901 80 
5,125,184 52 


$2,301,775 37 
427,500 oo 
198,954 03 
60,073 44 
1,360,880 67 


$5,314,983 84 
589,400 oo 

343,131 27 

116,929 26 

1,987,907 63 


$3, 2 38,773 06 
292,500 oo 
125,556 15 

58,322 12 
1,048,724 92 


$20,513,606 53 


$3,872,068 56 


$7,178,635 53 


*535,677 82 


$17,558,322 15 


$2,243,877 3 8 


$24,129,18795 


$4.349,i83 51 


$ 3 , 343, 352 


S4,763.87 6 25 



LI \BILITIES 












































Capital Stock , 
Surplus and Profits . 
Circulation 


$3,315,00000 
2,499,591 23 
546,^40 oo 


$2i545iCOO oo 
821,169 29 
580,120 oo 


$1,998,350 oo 
587,829 47 
457,705 oo 


$150.000 oo 

45.752 89 

33,250 oo 


$2,975,000 oo 
1,915,968 05 
590,130 oo 


$400,000 oo 
222,388 36 
92,770 oo 


$5,326,720 oo 

2.136,713 79 
1,065,230 oo 


$975,000 oo 
299,727 67 
248,570 oo 


$2,060,000 oo 
944.434 97 
301,050 oo 


$1,285,000 oo 
339> 6 59 75 
262,345 o 


Deposits 


14,014,542 76 


4,714,15804 


3,907,991 92 


306,674 93 


11,993,694 74 


1,515,219 02 


I5.57I.33 1 66 


2,789,083 78 


4,992,99003 


2,823,293 32 


Bills Payable 


























93,500 


12,000 




' 75 4 


1 ' 











Per capita of capital and deposits . 


$20,513,606 53 
150-48 


$3,872,068 5 6 
24.64 


$7,'78,635 53 
35-59 


*535,677 82 
8.42 


*i7,558,322 15 
54-3 2 


$2,243,877 38 
25-37 


$24,129,187 95 
65.94 


$4,349,183 5' 
28.05 


$3,343.352 oo 
41.15 


$4,763,876 25 
73-4" 


Population June i, 1890 . 


131,760 


327,848 


182,425 


59,691 


312,490 


84,229 


349,5i6 


,44,862 


206,498" 


L..- 
60,589 



125 



RESIDENCE OF F. R. WALLACE. 




RESIDENCE OF HON. W. F. SANDERS. 



B 'fe i V 



IDE'S 

Map of 

5 MONTANA 

Jt 1 .,..., ?'iJ(..l IJ.Vk 

Compiled & drawn by Reeder &. Helmick -J.*^. :..-, . ;; ;'-/\ ' . :, 

ROC^x' . ^i w\'V'V ' 



Helena, Montana. 

Published by ARTHUR W. IDE. 
No. 20 Bitilev Block, Helena, Montana 

IK Ale 1891. | 



w 




it 



m 






1