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Full text of "The Hellenian [serial]"

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Library of the 
versity of North Carolina 

oAved by the Dialectic and Philan- 
thropic Societies. 



















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— «:;;r:^^>0:;:^^S E. M. UZZELL, PRINTER, RALEIGH. ^fe>^^^^~.;.<i::;:is»»^ 



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^7 i7 



Seta ©l^apter. 

Established 1851. 

Fratkr in Facultate. 

F. P. Venable, Ph. D Professor of Chemistry 



Students in Law. 

Malvern Hill Palmer, '88. Mills Roberts Eure,' 89. 

Samuel Masters Blount, '90. Joseph Flanner Hendren, '91. 

Class of '92. 
Charles Felix Harvey. Bart. Moore Gatling. 

Class of '93. 
Edward Payson Willard. William Young Warren. 

Class of '94. 

Joseph Fairfield Hester. W^illiam Mayhew Hendren. 

David Robert Kornegay. Eugene Johnston. 

Harry West Whedbee. Joseph Walker Yates. 

Medical Student. 
Howard Alston. 







Founded 1848. 



praliernity ©irectory 



Grand Chapter P. O. Box 112, New York City. 

GRADUATE CHAPTERS. 

Delta --._ Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Epsilon Columbus, Ohio. 

Zeta 1214 Main St., Kansas City, Mo. 

Eta Cleveland, Ohio. 

Theta __., Williamsport, Penn. 

Delta Club.--. 116 W. 41st St., New York City. 

ACTIVE COLLEGE CHAPTERS. 

B M Johns Hopkins Universit}' Baltimore, Md. 

N A Yale University.-- New Haven, Conn. 

1 M Mass. Institute of Technology-^Boston, Mass. 

T College City of New York 305 E. 53d St. 

Q Columbia College 68 E. 49th St., New York City. 

-^ Colgate University Hamilton, N. Y. 

K X Cornell University' Ithaca, N. Y. 

A Washington and Jefferson Col. Washington, Penn. 

B Universit}' of Pennsylvania- Philadelphia. 

A Bucknell University Lewisburg, Penn. 

S Pennsylvania College Gettysburg, Penn. 

II Alleghany College - Meadville, Penn. 

E A Muhlenberg College AUentown, Penn. 

It A Lafayette College Easton, Penn. 

B X Lehigh University Bethlehem, Pa. 

T <I> Pennsylvania State College State College, Penn. 

K University of North Carolina __ -Chapel Hill, N. C. 

O University- of Virginia _ L'niversit}- of Virginia, Va. 

B A Roanoke College Salem, Va. 

8 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/hellenianserial1891univ 



A A Hampden Sidne}- College --.Prince Edward county, Va. 

Z A Washington and Lee University-Lexington, Va. 

P X Richmond College Richmond, Va. 

H Marietta College Marietta, Ohio. 

v Wittenberg College- Springfield, Ohio. 

A Ohio Weslej-an L'niversity Delaware, Ohio. 

A A Denison University Granville, Ohio. 

(3 A Ohio State L^uiversity Columbus, Ohio. 

PA Wooster University — ..-Wooster, Ohio. 

A 't> University of Michigan .- . Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Z Indiana State L^niversit}- Bloomington, Ind. 

A De Pauw University Greencastle, Ind. 

T Hanover College Hanover, Ind. 

ip- Wabash College Crawfordsville, Ind. 

A A Illinois Wesleyan L^niversit}'-. -Bloomington, 111. 

T A Knox College Galesburg, 111. 

M 2 L^niversity of Minnesota -Minneapolis, Minn. 

X Bethel College Russellville, Ky. 

K T Universit}- of Tennessee - Knoxville, Tenn. 

11 A L'niversity of Kansas Lawrence, Kansas. 

Z $ William Jewell College Libert}-, Mo. 

A H University of California Berkeley, Cal. 

Active Chapters, 41 ; inactive, 24 ; membership, 5,000. 



Our official organ. The Phi Gamma Delta Quarterly, is published by 
Frederic C. Howe, 927 Madison Avenue, Baltimore. 



Sp^ilon ©l7(^p{er. 



Established 1851. Suspended 1861. 

Reorganized 1887. 



ROLL OF ALUMNI. 

1851. 

*David M. Carter, Raleigh, N. C. -James A. Pattoii, Asheville, N. C. 

1852. 

\Vm. D. Barnes, Jackson Co., Fla. Alex. R. Smith, Cumberland, N. C. 

Thos. B. Burton, Halifax Co., N. C. Jas. C. Smith, Washington, N. C. 

-"Thos. H. Gilliam, Hartford, N. C. Wm. H. Smith, Halifax Co., N. C. 

■■Rev. L. F. Siler, Franklin, N. C. Maj. J. VV. Wilson, Morganton, N. C. 

1853- 
John Harding. Nashville, Tenn. . *Jno. M. Mickle, Lowndes Co., Ala. 
*S. S. Jackson, Ashboro, N. C. *J. M. Spencer, Green Co., Ala. 

Prof. Alex. Mclver. Pittsboro, N. C. *G. M. White, Elizabeth, N. C. 
A. F. Merritt, Nashville, Tenn. 

1854. 
David C. Hall, Warrenton, N. C. *B. M. Thompson, Richm'd Co, N. C. 
*Col. W. L. Scott, Greensboro, N. C. Hon. Z. B. Vance, Asheville, N. C. 
W^m. H. Spencer, Chicago, 111. 

1861. 

*L. R. Bell, Richmond, Va. 
1862. 

John A. Cameron, Somerville, N. C. J. E. Moore, Williamston, N. C. 
J. M. Covington, Rockingham, N. C. Angus Shaw, Laurinburg, N. C. 
Thos. J. Hadly, Wilson, N. C. 

1863. 

Robt. W. Jo3'ner, Falkland, N. C. Augustus P. Young, Selma, Ala. 
Jas. S. Lucas, Washington, N. C. 

1864. 

*Hou.B. P. Clifton, Louisburg.N. C. R. G. Russell, Greenville N. C. 
Maj. J. M. Johnson, Marion, S. C. 

1888. 
E. M. Armfield, High Point, N. C. R. L. Smith, Norwood, N. C. 

1889. 
D. J. Currie, Laurinburg, N. C. W. M. Hammond, Archdale, N, C. 

10 



IS90. 
Paul Chatam. Charlotte, N. C. H. D. Ledbetter, Rockingham, N. C. 

Prof. H. J. Darnall, Mexico, Mo. G. E. Petty, Archdale, N. C. 
Julius I. Foust, Graham, N. C. W. T. Whitsett, Gibsonville, N. C. 

1892. 
R. M. Davis, Tarboro, N. C. J. M. Ledbetter, Rdckingham, N. C. 

E. J. Keech, Tarboro, N. C. F. L. Robbius, Statesville, N. C. 



*Deceased. 

ACTIVE MEMBERSHIP. 

189I. 

C. G. Peebles, Jackson, N. C. (Law). J. V. Lewis, Darlington, N. C. 

1892. 
J. M. Cheek, Sparta, N. C. Thos. R. Foust, Graham, N. C. 

1893- 
Jas. B. Sellars, Mebane, N. C. V. E. Whitlock, Asheville, N. C. 

1894. 
T. Bailev Lee, Mocksville, N. C. Jas. Sawyer, Asheville, N. C. 






II 



Ha Clfftu |ti. 



Beta Theta Pi Fraternity was founded at Miami Univer- 
sity, Oxford, Ohio, in 1839. Jo^^^ Riley Knox first sug- 
gested the idea, and liaving taken eight other gentlemen 
into his confidence, the first meeting was held on July 4th, 
1839. The University of North Carolina Chapter was 
established in 1852 as Eta Prime and lived until 1861. Its 
initiates numbered forty-eight men. The Chapter was 
re-established in 1889 by a union of Beta Theta Pi and 
the Mvstic Seven Fraternities. The Mvstic Seven Fra- 
ternity was founded at Wesleyan in 1837 by Hamilton 
Brewer, and its membership numbered about four hundred. 
After protracted negotiations a union was effected with 
Beta Theta Pi. The ''Star of the South" Chapter of the 
Mystic Seven thus became the Eta Beta of Beta Theta Pi. 



£t(a "©eta IV^ember^l^tp. 

1891. 
Edwin R. McKethan. 

1892. 
Wallace E. Rollins. 

1893- 
Frank W. Thornton, Alfred S. Barnard, 

Lawrence O'B. B. Jones. 

1894. 
William B. Guthrie. Herbert Bingham. 

Thomas S. Rollins. Thomas C. Smith. 

Thomas E. W. Brown. 



12 




IDPiEKA-. PHILA. 



©hapter l^oll. 



Harvard (Eta), 
Brown (Kappa), 
Boston (Upsilon), 
Maine State (Beta Eta\ 

Stevens (Sigma), 
Cornell (Beta Delta), 
St. Lawrence (Beta Zeta), 
Colgate (Beta Theta). 



DIST. I. 

Amherst (,Beta Iota), 
Dartmouth (Alpha Omega), 
Wesleyan (Mu Epsilon), 

DIST. II. 

Union (Nu), 

Columbia (Alpha Alpha), 

SN^racuse (Beta Epsilon), 



Dickinson (Alpha Sigma!, 
Johns Hopkins (Alpha Chi), 



DIST. III. 

University of Pennsylvania (Phi), 
Pa. State College (Alpha Upsilon). 

DIST. IV (Mystic Seven Dist). 

Hampden Sidney ^Zeta), Richmond (Alpha Kappa), 

Univ. of North Carolina (Eta Beta), Davidson (Phi Alpha), 
Univ. of Virginia (Omicron), Randolph-Macon (Xi). 

DIST. V. 

Vanderbilt (Beta Lambda \ 
Texas (Beta Omicron), 



Centre (Epsilon), 
Cumberland (Mu), 
Mississippi (Beta Beta) 



Miami (Alpha), 
Ohio (Beta Kappa), 
Western Reserve (Beta), 
Wash. -Jefferson (Gamma), 
Ohio Wesleyan (Theta), 
Bethany (Psi), 



De Pauw (Delta), 

Indiana (Pi), 
Michigan (Lambda 



DIST. VI. 

Wittenberg f Alpha Gamma), 
Denison (Alpha Eta), 
Wooster (Alpha Lambda), 
Kenyon (Beta Alpha), 
Ohio State (Theta Delta), 
University of Cincinnati (Beta Mu). 

DIST. VII. 

Wabash (Tau), 
Hanover (Iota), 

DIST. VIII. 



Knox (Alpha Xi), 

Beloit (Chi), 

Iowa State (Alpha Beta), 

Iowa Wesleyan (Alpha Epsilon). 



Wisconsin (Alpha Pi), 

Northwestern (Rho), 

University- of ^Minnesota (Beta Pi), 



DIST. IX. 

Westminster (Alpha Delta), Denver (Alpha Zeta). 

Kansas (Alpha Nu), Nebraska (Alpha Tau), 

California (Omega). 



"©eta Tl^eisi "Pt Or^an'xzQ^Won^. 

TENNIS CLUB. 

Edwin R. McKethan President. 

Wallace E . Rollins Vice-President. 

William B. Guthrie - Secretary and Treasurer. 

L. O'B. B. Jones Manager. 

whist club. 

E. R. McKethan, '91, W. B. Guthrie. '94, 

L. O'B. B. Jones, '93. F. W. Thornton, '93. 

chess club. 

W. E. Rollins, '92, A. vS. Barnard. '93, 

T. C. vSmith, Jr.. '94, " Thomas S. Rollins. '94. 



^X 



P 



14 



|tJ|i fiappn Slfitna^ 



F/^A TRE IN FA CUL TA TE. 

Prof. H. H. Williams. 

LAW. 
Henry Johnston, '90. 

Cl,ASS OF '91. 
F. H. Batchelor. 

Class of '92. 
P. P. Wiuborne. 



Class of '93. 



Ed.. S. Battle, 
F. H. Argo, 



R. L. Thompson, 



J. A. Gilmer, Jr., 
S. A. Ashe, Jr. 



Class of '94. 



W. A. Bonitz. 



l^oll of ©h<3^pter5. 

Alpha _ University of Pennsj-lvania, Pa. 

Delta Washington and Jefferson College, Pa. 

Zeta Franklin and Marshall College, Pa. 

Eta University of Virginia, Va. 

Lambda . . University of North Carolina, N. C. 

Tau - -Randolph-Macon College, Va. 

Upsilon North Western University, 111. 

Phi Richmond College, Va. 

Psi Pennsylvania State College, Pa. 

Q, --. Sub Rosa. 



15 



^igma 3^lpi)n eiJ0U0tt^ 



©^pter N- ®- ^l— "province 



Established 1857. 



CivASS OF '91. 

William J. Andrews, J. Motley Morehead, 

William W. Ashe, Andrew H. Patterson, 

George Ransom. 

C1.ASS OF '92. 
George W. Connor. 

Class of '93. 
Alex. B. Andrews, Jr.. Howard E. Rondthaler. 

Class of '94. 

John D. Bellamy, 3d, Owxn Kenan, 

Bowman Gray, William R. Kenan. 

LAW class. 
W^illiam M. Little, '88. • Albert S. Williams, ex-'gi 

medical class. 
W, Street Jones, '94. 



h^t^tory. 

Chapter N. C. XI of the Sigma Alpha Epsiloii Frater- 
nity was established at the University of North Carolina 
in 1857, one year after the foundation of the Order, which 
took place at the University of Alabama, March 9, 1856. 

The Chapter continued its existence until 1861, when 
it, in common with all other Chapters of Fraternities here, 
was discontinued wl:en the students left college to rally 
around the Southern battle flag. The University closed 

16 



j^ jr\ ^ij^^ 




its doors in 1868, but was re-opened in 1875. For some 
years the laws of the Facult}' forbade Fraternities here, 
but in 1885 these were repealed, and Chapter Xi was re-es- 
tablished on February 21st of that year. The Chapter 
at present numbers fifteen men, and is, as it has always 
been since its re-establishment, the largest Chapter in the 
University. 

There have been admitted to the Order through N. C. 
Xi up to date seventy-three men, whose names and present 
addresses are as follows: 



J. W. Alexander, '89, 
A. B. Andrews, Jr., '93, 
W. J. Andrews, '91, 
W. W. Ashe, '91, 
J. W. Atkinson, '88, 
J. D. Bellamy, Jr., '90. 
J. D. Bellamy, 3d, '94, 
Russell Bellam}', '91, . 
T. C. Belsher, '57, . 
A. P. Branch, '92, 
O. C. Bynum, '86, . 
Herbert Clement, '89, . 
James A. Cody, '61, 
G. W. Connor, '92, 
W. M. Curtis, '89, . 
^Thomas B. Davidson, '61, 
Claudius Dockery, '87, 
Ovide Dupre, '62, 
W. E. Edmonson, '88, 
A. H. Eller, '85, 
T. Cr. Empie, '92, . 
James A. Everett, '61, 
J. M. Fleming, '59, 
*J. W. Fleming, '57, . 
*J. F. Foster, '60, . 
A. H. Galloway, '59, . 
Charles E. Gay, '60, 
S. P. Graves, '86, 
Bowman Gray, '94, 
Oscar F. Hadley, '59, . 
J. S. Hill, '89, 



Charlotte, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Richmond, Va. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Aberdeen, Miss. 
Wilson, N. C. 
Concord, N. C. 
Mocksville, N. C. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Wilson, N. C. 
Thomasville, N. C. 
Mansfield, La. 
Rio Janeiro, Brazil. 
New York, N. Y. 
Morganton, N. C. 
Winston, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Fort Valley, Ga. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Forkland, Ala. 
Shreveport, La. 
Reidsville, N. C. 
Starkville, Miss. 
Mt. Airy, N. C. 
Winston, N. C. 
Livingston, Ala. 
Faison, N. C. 



17 



Louis Hilliard, '58, 
*J. D. Hodges, '60, 
W. I. Holt, '91, 
Thomas W. Jarratt, '59, 
D. E. Jiggitts, '60, 
M. L. John, '88, 
A. C. Jones, '62, 
W. S. Jones, '94, 
Owen Kenan, '94, 
W. R. Kenan, '94, 
William J. King, '60, . - 
J. H. Little, '88, 
W. M. Little, '88, 
H. A. London, Jr., '88, 
J. H. London, '90, 

A. W. Long, '8 , . 

B. S. Martin, '60, 

W. DeB. McEachin, '88, 
B. C. Mclver, '85, 
^M. J. McSween, '61, 
J. M. Moreliead, '91, . 
*RobertT. Murphy, '61, 
J. K. Norfleet, '90, 
A. H. Patterson, '91, 
G. B. Patterson, '86, . 
R. L. Patterson, '93, 
George Ransom, '91, . 
P. E. Ransom, '90, 
H. E. Rondthaler, '93, 
J. C. Shepard, '59, . 
R. C. Sykes, '60, 
H. F. Shaffner, '87, 
W. F. Shaffner, '90, . 
H. R. Starbuck, '87, 
*H, M. Varner, '62, 
*V. H. Vaughan, '60, 
R. G. Vaughn, '91, 
A. S. Williams, '91, 
R. B. Whitehead, '92, . 
Francis Womack, '85, 
R. F. Yarborough, '92, 
W. J. Yates, '91, 



Norfolk, Va. 
Bellevue, La. 
Burlington, N. C. 
Montgomery, Ala, 
Vernon, Miss. 
Mocksville, N. C. 
Matagorda, Texas. 
Goldsboro, N. C. 
Kenansville, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Castalia, N. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Little's Mills, N. C. 
Pittsboro, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Harvard University. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Laurinburg, N. C. 
Goldsboro, N. C. 
Rockingham, N. C. 
Leaksville, N. C. 
Clinton, N. C. 
Winston, N. C. 
Salem, N. C. 
Maxton, N. C. 
Concord, N. C. 
Garj'sburg, N. C. 
Garysburg, N. C. 
Salem, N. C. 
Scott's Hill, N. C. 
Columbus, Miss. 
Salem, N. C. 
Salem, N. C. 
Winston, N. C. 
Macon, Ga. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilson, N. C. 
Reidsville, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 



*Deceasecl. 



18 



^tia P&i, 



Established at University of City of New York, 1S46. 



Upsilon Chapter of Zeta Psi was founded at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina during the spring term of 
1857-58 by J. G. McNabb, Wm. Adams, R. F. Kolb, 
R. C. Swain, W. J. Jones, T. C. Evans and W. H. Pinnix. 
At the time there were some eight or ten secret societies, 
among which stood prominent the /A 0. 17.^ J. A. A'., 
J. '/. and A. ¥. With these the Upsilon was soon a rival 
and grew in prosperity from 1858 to 186 1, when the news 
of the secession came. Into that vortex wherein was 
plunged the largest portion of our wealth and much of the 
best youth of our country Zeta Psi rushed, returning with 
the loss of nine or ten of its members. 

Of the twenty-seven Chapters at the University before 
the civil war only Z. ¥. and the X. 0. were alive at the 
close. The Upsilon was one of the few Southern Chapters 
of the Fraternity that survived the civil war. It increased 
steadily in rank and numbers and initiated members up to 
the class of 1868, but died during the dark days of recon- 
struction, to be reorganized after a sleep of seventeen years 
on March 12th, 1885. Its course since its re-opening has 
been very prosperous, and at present numbers the following 
members : 

FRATRES IN UNIVERSITATE. 

post - GRADUATE. 

J.J. Philips. H. B. Shaw. 

'91. 
P. C. Graham. G. M. Graham. 

C. S. Maugum. 



19 



F. C. Mebaiie. 



J. C. Biggs. 



'92. 
R. H. Johnston. 

'93- 
T. D. Toy. 

'94. 
Nathan Toms. 



Perrin Busbee. 



W. B. Snow. 



Phi University of New York. 

ZEXa Williams College. 

Delta Rutgers College. 

Sigma University of Pennsylvania. 

Chi Colby University. 

Rho Harvard University. 

Kappa Tufts College. 

Tau - Lafayette College. 

Xi University of Michigan. 

Pi Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

Lambda Bowdoin College. 

Psi Cornell University. 

Iota University of California. 

Theta Xi University of Toronto. 

AivPHA Columbia College. 

AI.PHA Psi McGill University. 

Nu Case School of Applied Sciences. 

Epsilon Brown University. 

UPSII.ON University of North Carolina. 

Eta Yale College. 



.z^T^^^ 



20 




BreJiM^Phjlfi 



Jll)ft|H Can COmrga* 



Founded at Richmond, Va., 1865. 



l^oll of ©^pter^. 



Alpha Epsilon Alabama A. & M. College. 

Beta Beta Southern University. 

Beta Delta University of Alabama. 

Alpha Omega University of Florida. 

Alpha Beta University of Georgia. 

Alpha Theta Emory College. 

Alpha Zeta Mercer University. 

Beta Iota . _- Georgia School of Technology. 

Beta Nu Middle Georgia A. & M. College. 

Beta Alpha Simpson College. 

Zeta Central University, 

Beta Epsilon Tulane University. 

Alpha Mu Adrian College. 

Beta Kappa Hillsdale College. 

Beta Lambda University of Michigan, 

Beta Omicron Albion College, 

Alpha Omicron St. Lawrence University. 

Beta Theta - - Cornell University. 

Alpha Delta University of North Carolina. 

Alpha Eta 

Alpha Nu Mt. Union College. 

Alpha Psi Wittenberg College. 

Beta Eta Wesley an University. 

Beta Mu University of Wooster. 

Alpha Iota-- Muhlenberg College. 

Alpha Rho Lehigh University. 

Alpha Upsilon Pennsylvania College. 

Alpha Chi South Carolina Military Institute. 

Alpha Phi University of South Carolina. 

BetaXi __- Charleston College. 

Omega University of the South. 

Alpha Tau South Western Presbyterian Universit}^ 

Lambda Cumberland University. 

Beta Pi Vanderbilt University. 

Beta Zeta University of Vermont. 

Beta Washington and Lee University. 

Delta University of Virginia. 

Epsilon Roanoke College, 

21 



/^Ipl^a ti)eU(3i (B\iap{ev. 



Established 1879. 



FRATRES IN FACUI^TATE. 

George H. Ci.afi.in, C. E., Assistant Professor Mathematics. 
Hugh L. Miller, Assistant in Chemistry. 

FRATER IN URBE. 

Rev. Edward H. Davis. 



LAW. 



E. Wray Martin. 



A. S. Heilig. 



1891. 
Shepard Br3'an. 

1892. 
W. Sloan Huggins. 

1893. 
George L. Peschau. 



1894. 



William Bingham. 



William E. Holt, Jr. 



ALUMNI OF ALPHA DELTA CHAPTER. 

1879. 



Jouh C. Winston, . 
Thomas D. Stokes, 

Donnell Gilliam, 

Thomas RadclifFe, 
R. Percy Gray, 
Edmund Ruffin, 
Julian Wood, 
■^Walter Temple Jones, 
Thomas M. Vance, 
*William A. Jenkins, . 
Fred. C. Bryan, 
William T. Dortch, 



1880. 
1881. 



Minneapolis, Minn. 
Richmond, Va. 

Tarhoro, N. C. 

New York City. 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Edenton, N. C. 
Jonesboro, N. C. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Warrenton, N. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Goldsboro, N. C. 



22 



Bartlett Shipp, 
Frank S. Spruill, 

J. Frank Wilkes, 
M. Ambler Glazebrook, 
James C. Roberts, . 
Sterling Ruffin, 

Frank F. Patterson, 
W. P. McGehee, 
Herbert W. Jackson, 
George Howard, Jr., 
Mike Bradshaw, 

W. N. Everett, 
Robert L. Holt, 
Edward J. Gill, 
William C. Ruffin, 
W. R. Tucker, 
K. W. Pou, 
E. H. Davis, 

Lacy L. Little, 
Walter E. Borden , 
E. B. Borden, Jr., 

Frank Drew, 
W^illiam Williams, 
Hugh L. Miller, 
Henry R. Bryan, Jr., 

Rufus R. Little, 
C. C. McAlister, 
Charles W. Grainger, 
Samuel Patterson, 

J. Ludlow Skinner, 
James S. Worth, 
George C. Worth, . 



Douglas D. Haigh, 



^Deceased. 



1882. 



1883. 



1884. 



1885. 



1886. 



1887. 



1888. 



1889. 



Lincolnton, N. C. 
Louisburg, N. C. 

Charlotte, N. C. 
Richmond, Va. 
Anniston, Ala. 



Salem, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Tarboro, N. C. 
Ashboro, N. C. 

Norfolk, Va. 
Graham, N. C. 
Rockingham, N. C. 
Warrior, Ala. 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Smithfield, N. C. 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Little's Mills, N. C. 
Oxford, N. C. 
Goldsboro, N. C. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Goldsboro, N. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 

Little's Mills, N. C. 
Ashboro, N. C. 
Goldsboro, N. C. 
Concord, N. C. 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Wilmington, N. C. 

Fayetteville, N. C. 



23 



ptjt pplttt CljPta. 



Phi Delta Theta Fraternity was founded at Miami Uni- 
versity in 1848. Its growth has been very rapid and it 
now has sixty-six active and twenty-three <7//^w/// Chapters 
in twenty-seven States with a membership of six thousand 
eight hundred. Among its distinguished initiates are: 
President Benjamin Harrison; Senators Blackburn, Vilas 
and Allen; Congressman J. A. Anderson, of Kansas; 
E. H. Conger, Minister to Brazil; J. W. Foster, ex-Minis- 
ter to Mexico, Russia and Spain; T. J. Morgan, Commis- 
sioner of Indian Affairs; Gov. A. C. Mellette, of South 
Dakota; ex-Congressmen A. E. Stevenson, T. B. Ward, 
J. C. Sherwin, A. H. Hamilton; J. C. Black, ex-Commis- 
sioner of Pensions; W. E. Spencer, Chief Clerk of Senate; 
W. A. Woods, United States District Court; B. K. Elliott, 
Chief Justice of Indiana; J. F. Phillips, of Missouri 
Supreme Court; W. B. Fleming, ex-Chief Justice of New 
Mexico; Professors W. B. Yonce, of Roanoke; J. V. 
Logan, of Cleveland University, and W. A. Keener, of 
Harvard Law^ School. 



24 




C A .WRsen-r, Fhila. 



N. ©■ t^et 



0^. 



\V. p. Byiium. 



Established 18S5. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS. 

'91- 
W. W. Davies, Jr. 



93- 



John B. Stronach. 



Michael Hoke. 

LAW. 
Alex. Stronach. 



ALUMNI. 



O. D. Batchelor, A. B., '88, 

G. W. Bethell, '89, 

W. H. Carroll, A. B., '86, 

\V. H. Grimes, '90, 

W. E. Headen, A. B., '88, 

Joell Hines, Law, 

Van Wyck Hoke, '91, 

\V. H. McDonald. A. B., '89, 



Graham McKiunon, '88, 

A. G. Mangum, '93, 

T. A. Marshall, '88, 

A. B. Shaw, '90, 

A. C. Shaw. '88, 

A. M. Simmons, A. B., '87, 

R. S. White, Law. 

P. L. Woodard, B. S., '90. 



25 



^I0t1 4 |ltU 



DIVISION [. 

Alpha - ... . - Virgini - Military Institute. 

Beta __. .._ .. .. _ U Diver's .y of Virginia. 

Gamma Bailey- Lpav School. 

Delta - - 'Jnlver?' y of South Carolina. 

Epsilon -- - Beihan} ColHge. 

lyAMBDA - Washin;.^ton and Lee. 

Tau -- ---South Carolina Militar}- Institute. 

Psi rniversit}- of North Carolina. 

.DIVISION II. 

Theta --- Vnh ersity of Alabania. 

Phi - - - -University of Louisiana. 

Beta Phi - Tulane University. 

Iota Howard College. 

Upsilon --. Universit}' of Texas 

Beta Theta l _ - Alabama A. and M. College. 

DIVISION III. 

Zeta ---Central Universit}-. 

Sigma Vanderbilt University. 

Omicron - .- Bethel College. 

Beta Omicron University of the South. 

• Beta Beta De Pauw University. 

DIVISION IV. 

Nu University of Kansas. 

Rho University of Missouri. 

Chi Cornell College. 

DIVISION V. 

Pi Lehigh University. 

Beta Alpha Yale University. 

DIVISION VI. 
Eta Mercer University. 

Kappa North Georgia College. 

Mu L^niversity of Georgia. 

Xi -Emory College. 

alumni assocl\tions. 

Birmingham Alumni Association. 
Louisiana Alumni Association. 
Georgia Alumni Association. 
Texas Alumni Association. 

26 



'&' 




■■''''^. 



'•^si-ARaca.N^'^ 



vO«^ 



■p^i ^h<^p^^T — UniVer^liy of N}oHh ©o^rolina. 



ESTABI^ISHED IN THE FaLIv OF 1 888. 



MEMBERS. 

Walter Murphy, CI. '92, 

George E. Butler, CI. '91. . 

Johu T. Bennett, CI. '90, 

W. E. Darden, CI. '91, . . . 

Frank H. Beall, CI. '92. 

John M. Covington, CI. '92, 

W. H. White, 

James F. Gaither, CI. '93, 

E. A. Moye. CI. '93, 

Douglas Hamer, CI. '93, 

Victor H. Boyden, CI. '93. 

E. C. Williams, Law Student, 

W. W. McKenzie, Medical Student. 



Salisbury, N. C. 
Huntley, N. C. 
Norwood, N. C. 
Kinston, N. C. 
Linwood, N. C. 
Laurinburg, N. C. 
Salisbury, N. C. 
Salisbury, N. C. 
Greenville, N. C. 
Laurinburg, N. C. 
Salisbury, N. C. 
Monroe, N. C. 
Salisbury, N. C. 



27 



January ist, 1891, ushered in the twenty-second birth- 
day of the Sigma Nu Fraternity; and its founders, who, 
on the same day of the year 1869 met at the Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute to organize a society with only local inten- 
tions, may be well pleased to-day with the growth of their 
work and expansion of their ideas. 

Shortly after its inauguration its members determined 
on expansion. Two Chapters were established. These 
died. In 1879 the parent Chapter alone survived. But in 
1883 a remarkable degree of interest again sprang up. 
Three Chapters were founded. This trio suggested the 
name of the official organ of the Fraternity, which was 
called Sigjua Nu Delta and began to be published at the 
same time. This interest keeps up, and to-day thirty 
active Chapters and four large aliiinni associations are its 
fruits. 

In the fall of 1888, a dispensation having been secured, 
Psi Chapter of Sigma Nu was founded at the University 
of North Carolina by Walter Murphy, of Salisbury, N. C. 
Since that time it has enjoyed a liberal membership. 



28 




-^..-^ 



Ji^-e^wr.. I>/tli<i . 



Founded at Miami University, Ohio, 1S55. 



©hs^pter t^oU. 



Gamma Ohio Wesleyaii Universit}- 1855 

Eta University of Mississippi 1857 

Lambda Indiana Universit}^ 1858 

Xi De Pauw University 1859 

Omicron Dickinson College 1859 

Psi University of Virginia i860 

Theta Pennsylvania College _ 1863 

Kappa Bucknell University 1864 

Rho Butler University 1865 

Zeta Washington and Lee University _' 1866 

Mu Denison L^niversity 1S68 

Omega Northwestern University 1869 

Chi Hanover College 1871 

Tau Roanoke College 1872 

Beta University of Wooster 1873 

Gamma Gamma Randolph-Macon College 1874 

Delta Delta Purdue University 1875 

Zeta Zeta Centre College 1876 

Theta Theta University of Michigan 1877 

Delta Chi Wabash College 1880 

Zeta Psi University of Illinois 1S81 

Alpha Theta Massachusetts Institute of Technology 18S2 

Alpha Gamma Ohio State University 1882 

Alpha Zeta Beloit College 1882 

Alpha Epsilon University of Nebraska 1883 

Alpha Delta Stevens' Institute of Technology 1883 

Alpha Lambda Universit}^ of Wisconsin 1884 

Alpha Xi University of Kansas 1884 

Alpha Nu University of Texas 1884 

Alpha Omicron Tulane University 1886 

Alpha Pi Albion College 1886 

Alpha Beta University of California 1886 

Alpha Rho Lehigh University 1887 

Alpha Sigma University of Minnesota 1888 

Alpha Tau University of North Carolina 1889 

Alpha Upsilon University of South California 1889 

Cornell University 

29 



Al<PHA 

Eta - - - 
Theta 
Iota -.. 
Omega 
Beta .. 



/\lumnt (Bl^G^pter^. 



--Springfield, Ohio 1874 

Lafayette, Indiana . -1881 

Cincinnati, Ohio .-- i88t 

Indianapolis, Indiana 18S2 

.. Chicago, Illinois . 1882 

Montgomery, Alabama . 1887 

EPSiiyON Washington, District of Columbia 1889 

Gamma New York, New York 1890 



/\lp^ Ta\Ji ©^G^pter— pi "province. 



A. W. McLean. 



J. V. McGougan. 



Charles F. Toms. 



Established 1889. 



IvAW. 



MEDICINE. 



R. B. Redwine. 



J. W. Duguid. 
R. D. V. Jones. 

ACADEMIC. 

W. H. Williams. 



ALUMNI. 



W. B. Ricks, Buena Vista, Va. 
N. A. Currie. Clarkton, N. C. 
F. M. Clark, , N. C. 



H. F. Murphy, Murphy, N. C. 

F. M. Shannonhouse, Charlotte, N. C. 

R. A. Urquhart, Lewiston, N. C. 



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Hi^^ory of {\ie ©1^55 of '91. 



Reaf on C1.ASS Day, April 15TH, 1891, by W. H. Wills, Class 

Historian. 



Those who have left their Alma Mater and have become 
involved in the serious cares of the world tell us that the 
transition from student life to business life is so gradual as 
to be scarcely perceptible; that when the young graduate 
first finds himself thrown upon his own resources, he is still 
in feelings merely a college boy: and perhaps not until some 
circumstance forces him, does he awake to the fact that he 
is, in very truth, a "man of the world," and when he 
looks back he cannot see the steps by which the transfor- 
mation has been made. So it is with the college student. 
When we entered, only the "cheekiest" regarded them- 
selves as otherwise than far dowm in the scale, and the 
gulf between us and seniorhood seemed wide indeed. But 
here we are very near the end, and so gradual has been the 
change which has come over us we can scarcely realize 
it. There is indeed a wide gulf between us now and when 
at the beginning of our college course, but as Time has 
advanced, each one of us has kept pace with him, and we 
now find ourselves, as we always have and always will, 
fully abreast the hoary-headed monster. 

But it has not been an uneventful four years. The histo- 
rian who would undertake to chronicle faithfullv the 
career of the Class of '91, and to explain the philosophy 
of the events connected with it, would require not only 
great talent, but inspiration. The present writer having 
neither, and not being allowed time requisite for a very 
full treatise, must content himself with a recital of only a 

34 



few of the more important transactions, and will be 
obliged to omit the philosophy of them altogether. 

As a class we have snflfered many changes. After all 
Time has remorselessly committed his depredations. We 
entered colleo-e with over sixtv men: manv have fallen bv 
the wayside, and we now stand, after passing through the 
storms and battles of nearly four years, a band of twenty- 
three, greatly reduced in numbers it is true, but all gallant 
and brave. One more stand, one more fight, and our 
triumph is complete. So with stout hearts and renewed 
courage we will nerve ourselves to this last conflict, and, 

"Come foes like the forest, an' fast life bluid flows, 
(We'll) aye stan' thegitlier, Montrose \vi' Montrose." 

The four years spent by this class have not been an 
uneventful period in the history of the University. By 
the establishment of the Agricultural College in the State, 
and the withdrawal of the Land Scrip Fund from the 
University consequent upon this. Professors Atkinson, 
Phillips and Henry w^ere compelled to leave at the end of 
our first year. This was the beginning of many and rapid 
changes in the Faculty. 

During the Spring of the second year Professor Graves 
was eranted a brief leave of absence on account of ill 
health. Before the summer was ended the hand of Time 
had beckoned him away, and he had entered his endless 
rest. Beneath the spreading branches of a young oak 
tree in the village grave-yard lies the slumbering genius, 
and his leave of absence has never been re-called. In the 
same spring Professor Peed came and went. He will be 
rememb^r<i^ as the gentleman who w^as over-anxious to 
get married, but couldn't, and as having over a dozen 
photographs of himself, all taken in different positions. 
Professor Love left us at the end of this year and be- 
came a resident Fellow in Harvard University. He is 
now a popular and successful teacher of mathematics in 

35 



that seat of learning-, and is steadily winning honor and 
promotion. At the beginning of the third year, as Pro- 
fessor Graves's successor, came Major Cain, a fiddler, a 
hunter and a bachelor. At the beginning of the present 
year he brouo:ht back with him as his assistant, Professor 
Claflin, who in turn, after half a year's loneliness, brought 
back with himself a wife. 

In the latter part of the third year the good and 
lamented Dr. Mangum was removed from our midst. He 
had for nearly one year after disease had laid a heavy hand 
upon him bravely kept up his work in his department, 
and yielded only after a hard and unequally matched fight. 
Day after day this venerable man, waiting for his classes 
as usual, his snow-white beard falling upon his bosom, his 
face beaming with purity and stern with resolution, served 
to guide us in our search for truth and to teach us, by his 
example, of fortitude and devotion. 

Dr. Mangum was succeeded by Professor Williams. 
Some executive officers win the reputation of being "veto 
presidents" or "veto governors." Our new Professor of 
Philosophy has earned the distinction of mercilessly 
"throwing" men, especially Seniors. It would be a mat- 
ter of surprise if half the Senior Class at each examina- 
tion did not "fall" on the Philosophical Basis of Theism, 
It is unnecessary to state that our battles have been much 
harder since the arrival of this Professor, in spite of the 
previous exertions of Professor Toy, and often to come out 
ahead or retrieve what we have lost has been, to use a 
philosophical and Kant term, a "thing in itself," very 
hard to do. 

The Medical School was re-opened at the beginning of 
the fourth year, and Dr. Whitehead came to take charge. 
He is also College Physician, and has proved a great boon 
to the students. To him and to our ever-faithful friend, 
Mr. McRae, we cordially make our bow. 

36 



Our diplomas will be the last to receive the signature of 
Dr. Battle as President of the University. For the last 
fifteen years Dr. Battle's name has been so closely iden- 
tified with the institution that it is difiicult to think 
of them apart. It is a source of gratification that there 
is to be no severance of connection. Taking hold of 
the institution at a time when it was struggling to rise 
from the wreck which civil war left it, and when its 
resources were meagre, our President has achieved great 
success in putting it on the high grade which it now occu- 
pies, its course of study greatly enlarged, its opportunities 
greatly multiplied and its resources, though still small, 
o-reatlv increased as the direct result of his efforts. There 
is not one of us who will not always entertain for this kind 
and genial man the warmest affection, and as men who 
leave the University at the same time that his administra- 
tion closes, though we will not be here to witness the 
installment of his successor, we say: "Welcome the com- 
ing, speed the parting guest." 

When we entered college, the Sophomores, under com- 
pulsion by our friends, the Faculty, dared not openly lift a 
hand against us. The temptations offered by some mem- 
bers of the class (no longer to be denominated "Fresh- 
men," but "Gentlemen who had just arrived on the 
Hill") were more than our enemies could stand. The 
"cheekiest" of the class were blacked, one man eleven 
times, and as a parting salute was painted with red ink to 
make out the twelfth. It was a striking combination of 
colors, for the ink and the Freshman's hair were of the 
same hue. Needless to say, all these visitations were made 
at the imminent peril of the visitors. 

In the fall of the first year of our course that thing of 
the past, college politics, was in full blast. We had no 
sooner arrived than we were beset to join such and such a 
political party; were dragged from our beds in the middle 

37 



of the night to attend caucuses; were treated with many 
blandishments by enterprising candidates; in short, we 
were the lions of the day. It was the most exciting con- 
test for many years. Politics smashed the o-ood feeling of 
the students, threatened to smash the usefulness of the 
Societies, and was itself finally smashed by the Faculty, 
and the career of the youthful politician was closed. Only 
the ball managers are now elected by the students, and 
those elections beget no great interest. Since this change 
there haye been, we regret to say, no big political treats 
giyen by successful candidates. We haye had one, how- 
ever, after all. That one was giyen last year by the 
worthy gentleman who is now our Class Marshal, who, as 
defeated candidate for ball manager, gaye a "swell" din- 
ner to his one hundred adherents. It was the bio-orest 
thinor for years. 

At the close of our second year the University cele- 
brated her Centennial, and the quiet village of Chapel 
Hill was filled with illustrious visitors, many of whom 
were here for the first time since graduation. 

The Junior year is generally a commonplace one. The 
glory and newborn greatness of the Sophomore has been 
put away, and the dignity of the Senior has not been 
reached. Consequently many of the Juniors are restless, 
and ready to undertake anything to break the monotony 
of their life. This may account for the celebrated duel 
fought in the third year back of the Episcopal rectory, in 
which John Person, college z'a/e/ du chanibre^ first won his 
celebrit}'. The President was asked to interfere and pre- 
vent the shedding of blood, but he "smelled a mouse," 
and kept away. The Rector was then applied to, who 
readily "bit," and rushed to the scene wnth a flask of 
brandy, to find no one on the field. At the end of this 
year Ditto and Cov were forced to separate, and Ditto, 
who still abides with us, always seems to have in his eyes 

38 



a far-away, longing look. This class has had some rare 
characters in it, many of whom are now well-nioh foro^ot- 
ten. Babe and Bat and Freddie and Hen and Little Edge 
and all that crowd; we were very lonesome when they left. 
All these worthies got religion when the Y. M. C. A. 
revival swept over College in onr second year, as did every- 
body else except Pnnch and Pos and Alott and Benny 
Green, and, like all the others, they lost it as soon as the 
knncks season opened. 

Onr friends, the members of the Facnlty, have not, we 
mnst say, shown a very enterprising spirit in exerting 
themselves to give ns a good time in the way of amnse- 
ments, dnring onr sojonrn in this place. As is generally 
the case, however, with people who do not often exert 
themselves, when they were roused up they went at it in 
dead earnest. The following notice was tacked on the 
bulletin-board one day last Spring: 

INIINvSTREL SHOW BY THE FACULTY. 
Proceeds to be Applied to Repairing Roof of South Building. 

PROGRAMME. 
Joke By Pres. 

Bow and Smile By Muncher 

Lecture on "Whatnot " B}^ Wince 

Violin Solo _ By Hj-perbola 

How to Tell a Smutty Joke in a Literary Style B}- Tommie 

How to Rule a Class by Force By Ven 

How to Smoke By Aleck 

How to Chew with the Teeth By Joe 

Railroads a National Curse B}' Old Man John 

The Spy's Soliloquy B}- Josh 

Hester, Callison, Little Pres. and Joe's Rock Pecker will join in the 
final chorus. 

MUSIC BY JOHN PERSON'S BAND. 

Wilkes Caldwell Stage Manager. 

Eli Merritt Business Manager. 

Bill McDade Door-keeper. 

Sims Duberry Chief Cook and Bottle Washer. 

39 



As the programme shows, when the Faculty do go at 
anything they do it in royal good style. 

As Seniors, absorbed as we are in a college career fast 
drawing to its close, and anxiously, if not apprehensively, 
looking forward to life in the world, now well-nigh upon 
us, it IS not to be deemed strange if we know but little of 
the sporting life around us. The fierce war between the 
Sophs and the Freshmen (for these latter are now again 
called by their original name), and all such transactions we 
pass over as things of no interest to us. Our attention has 
been engrossed by graver affairs. Inter-collegiate athletics, 
we rejoice to say, has been revived, and in this work many 
of our class have figured very conspicuously. Indeed, the 
record of the class in athletics has been unusually brilliant. 
We have never been beaten at foot-ball in our contests 
with the other classes. When we, as Sophomores, chal- 
lenged the Sophomore class of Wake Forest College to a 
game of foot-ball, we may be considered as having set the 
athletic ball rolling in this State. The activity of some of 
our members, coupled with that of students of some other 
classes and departments, heartily aided by some of our Pro- 
fessors, has wrought a great change among us. There has 
never before been such interest in the matter, and the re- 
sults are highly satisfactory. The best and most active 
athletes in the class are, as a rule, the best students. So 
there seems to be an awakened interest in everything con- 
nected with the University. The courses of study have 
never been better or more comprehensive. The Literary 
Societies are prosperous. The department of History is to 
be opened shortly. A high grade is characteristic of every- 
thing. We say, and confidently believe, that each suc- 
ceeding year of our stay in the University has seen a 
marked improvement in the efficiency of the institution 
and the excellence of the work done. 

And now, fellow-class-mates, I say to you what has been 

40 



said so many times on like occasions. The time will soon 
be here when we must part. We will not find all as plain 
sailing as we have found it here. We will not be able to 
indulge our idle fancies while strolling through "Battle 
Park." A contest, much harder than the one we have 
passed through, awaits us. The time will come when we 
will cast many "longing, lingering looks behind." And 
then the memory of the happy days spent here, of the quiet 
village of Chapel Hill, of "Battle Park" and " Piney 
Prospect" and "Otey's Retreat " and Purefoy's Mill " and 
"Glen Burney" will come over us like a pleasant dream. 
And let us remember now that in that battle of life all 
rests upon ourselves and the equipment we have received, 
and the manner in which that equipment shall be per- 
fected. The success to be made of life, the enjoyment to 
be had out of it, the welfare it has, its good, and all that 
is in it — all depends upon ourselves. And so again I say 
to you, fellow-class-mates, with reference to that life, let us 
nerve ourselves to the contest, and with brave hearts 
"(We'll) aye stan' thegither, Montrose wi' Montrose," 




41 



®la00 of *92. 



Frank C. Mebane, .... President. 

Fred. L. Willcox, . . . . . Vice-President. 

George W. Connor, .... Historian. 

COLORS : 
White, Old Gold and Black. 

CI.ASS JOKE : 

l^he best and most renowned bet ever made zvas the alpha-bet. 



Our class, while fully sustaining its brilliant record of 
the first two years, has done little within the past year 
which will be of interest to the general reader. We had 
been told that the Junior year would be the easiest of the 
whole course, but we have not found this to be true. On 
the whole we have worked hard, and for the result of this 
work we point to the future, not the present. However, 
we have made high marks in our studies and have won 
some success in the college world. As a class we can com- 
pare well with any that ever entered the University, both 
in the character of our members and in our work. 

Our former President and other valuable members failed 
to return this year, and we have missed them no little in 
the class-room and on the Campus. We will always remem- 
ber them wnth kindly feelings. Already over half our 
original number have left us, and wherever they are they 
may feel sure they have the best wishes of those of us who 
have continued the quest for the sheep-skin. 



42 



]\Iebane continues to lead in the race for the Valedictory, 
although Hunter, Cheek, Harvey, Winborne and others 
are close upon him. Cheek is Chief Marshal fqr '91, with 
Mebane, Rollins, Edwards, Winborne, Johnston, Harvey 
as sub-marshals, Pearsall is a ball manager and editor of 
the Mao-asiJie, Our bovs have won other colleg^e honors, 
and you who have left us will never have cause to be 
ashamed of your class. 

As a class we are not inclined to politics, but look to 
the sciences and literature for fame. Few expect to study 
law, more will study medicine, several will be civil engi- 
neers, and all will get married, we think. 

In athletics we have taken a prominent stand. Busbee is 
captain of the base-ball team, Ferguson is one of the best 
foot-ball players of the State, and many others are actively 
interested in tennis and other college sports. Gatling is 
the logician and statistician of the class, without even a 
second. It is said that he sits by himself, argues against 
himself, proves that it is a lie, and ends in a free fight — all by 
himself. Mebane is probably the most successful with the 
fair sex, although Harvey will not heart//)' admit it. Buie 
and Cheek are the philosophers of the class; they are fast 
becoming bald. Hamlen is the most graceful man, although 
Connor denies. Hunter is the sporting character, and Rol- 
lins, without doubt, the handsomest man in college. Proba- 
bly Johnston and Pearsall are the most pious, although 
Winborne is nearly as much so as Pearsall. Foust is pre- 
eminently the politician of '92. Davis, Allen and Will- 
cox all claim to be the dude since Robbins has ceased to be 
hereabouts. 

The above estimate the Historian has labored hard to 
make with perfect impartiality. Of course every one knows 
that Rollins would have to give way to Urquhart were this 
prince of beauties to return. 

Our Junior year will soon take its place among those 

43 



that have gone but are ever fresh in memory. Few have 

done all that they expected, but who ever does that? In 

many respects it has been a happy year — happy because 

most of us have tried to do our duty. We will soon forget 

the failures, and, corrected by our mistakes, w^e confidently 

hope that when we leave these happy haunts we may add 

honor and orlorv to our Abna Mater. Our Senior vear 

alone remains for us; may it be pleasant and profitable to 

us all is the sincere wish of 

The Historian of '92. 



pcact^ /\lsoUt U5. 



WHY '92 WII.I, I,EAVE COI,I.EGE. 

^//^;/— Because ' ' Cov ' ' left. 
Albritton — To teach a Sabbath-school in Africa. 
Buie — To see the girl he left behind. 
Busbee — To find out why he came. 
Cheek — "Syke's corn" has given out. 
Connor — Physics does not agree with him. 
Crowell — He couldn't do better. 
Davis — Can't get N. Y. styles here. 
Edzuards — To ride a bicycle home. 
Ferguson — Because "Hubie" left. 
Foust — To be Township Constable. 
G ailing — To find a "cause thereof." 
Hanilen — 'Cause Pa said so. 
Harvey — To live in Durham. 
HiiJiter — Has fallen in love. 
Johnston — 'Tis all he can do. 
Mebane — Can't get enough to eat. 
Pearsall — To run cross-roads politics. 
Rolliiis — Luck is not on him ; Lewis beat him seven-up. 
Wittcox — Pres. said so. 
Winborne — Afraid he will beat Mebane. 



44 



CIH00 Of '93- 



COI.ORS : 
Old Gold, Red and Black. 

Rah, Rah, Rah, 
Ree, Ree, Ree, 

Hoopla, Hoopla, 
Nmety-three. 



OFFICERS 



F. P. ElvI^ER 
F. H. Argo 



M 



V. H. BOYDEN, ) 

E. W. Lehman, >' 

E. A. MoYE, Jr. , \ 
K. A. Jones, > 



R. T. Wyche, 
L. O'B. B. Jones 



,} 



E. P. WlI<I.ARD, \ 
J. B. SEIvI^ARS, j 

A. B. Andrews, Jr. , > 
J. C. Biggs, ) 

T. G. PoE, 

M. Hoke, 

G. L. Peschau, 



Presidents. 

Vice-Presideuts. 

Secretaries. 

Treasurers. 

Poets. 

Historians. 

Orator. 

Essayist. 

Prophet. 



History of <BU55 of '93. 



Another year has winged its rapid flight and again it 
falls to the lot of the Historians to pen the record of '93 
from that o-lorious antumnal morn when we first assembled 
on the Campus as '^Sophomores," determined to stand by 
our own and come off victors in whatever we entered. 



45 



But there lay before us a uew duty — to keep a fatherly 
eye over the Freshmeu, and in the fulfillment of this duty 
ten of us were hauled over the coals bv the Facultv and 
were thinking of packing our trunks and seeking a more 
congenial place, but after a few days all became quiet again. 

The first fact worthy of note was the election of officers 
by one faction, and owing to a misunderstanding in regard 
to the former election it resulted in two sets of officers for 
our class. It having been decided to adopt a class hat, the 
mortar-board was chosen by "Tammany" and the crush 
plug by the "Conservatives." So '93 has the honor of 
introducing the mortar-board into the University of North 
Carolina. 

The well-known Fresh water-melon treat which, '92 had 
neglected, was revived by '93, and it was a terrible occasion 
for the Fresh, for although they paid for the melons they 
were given only the rinds, and these on the back of their 
heads, much to the amusement and delight of the other 
students. From this the Fresh learned how insignificant 
they were and which was The class of U. N. C. 

Again we tried our skill at foot-ball with the Seniors, 
and although we played a good game and did ourselves 
credit, vet we were defeated bv a close score, owine to the 
superior training of our opponents. Then came the De- 
cember examinations to the sorrow of manv, and at their 
close most of us went home to spend the Xmas holidays, 
and that we enjoyed ourselves goes without saying. We 
returned with pleasant remembrances of the happy time 
just spent, only to knuckle down again to hard work. The 
election of Ball Managers for the Commencement of 1891 
took place the second Saturday after our return, and '93 
carried off" more than her share of the honors, the Chief, 
Hoke, and four of the six subs being members of our class. 
Next came the exercises of Washington's Birthday to 
divert our minds from our labors, and on this occasion we 

46 



were represented by one of the Marshals. In the afternoon 
came the annual election of medalists from the Fresh class, 
and it is useless to say that all the medals were awarded 
strictly on merit. Great interest w^as manifested in foot- 
ball, with the expectation of playing Wake Forest and 
Trinity, but neither would accept our challenge. On the 
eleven we were well represented by Ashe, Gaither and Hoke. 
The Class of '93 has always taken great interest in athletics, 
and has been foremost in all athletic movements. Indica- 
tions on all sides point to a favorable representation from 
our class on the base-ball team, and our tennis players who 
rank among the best are too numerous to mention. 

To enumerate the vast amount of knowledge that we 
have accumulated during the past months would take more 
space than is allotted to us in these pages. Suffice it to 
say that '93 has come up to the greatest expectations of her 
supporters. We will mention only the fact that of the 
eight inter-society debaters four were from '93. The mem- 
bers of '93 are noted for their untiring devotion to their 
class and their desire of "office holding." Our class will 
compare favorably in intellect and numbers with any that 
has preceded it for many years. 

Upon examining the roll we find forty-four of the origi- 
nal sixty-nine of our Fresh year, but we were joined by 
five men at the beginning of this session, thus swelling 
our number to forty- nine. 

And now, fellow-class-mates, as we think the chief events 

of the past have been touched upon, we w^ill draw this 

short and imperfect sketch to a close, referring you to the 

words of Pope, that '^It is to history he trusts for praise," 

and hoping that you will ever honor your class, we are, 

with best wishes. 

Historians of '93. 



47 






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Ciii00 0f *94. 



CLASS colors: 

Crimson and Old Gold. 

YELL : 

Rip I Rip ! Rip ! 
Roar! Roar! Roar! 
Buck Binni Wigo, 
Ninety-four ! ! 



OFFICERS 



W. Hendren. 

J. D. Bellamy, Jr. 

O. H. Kenan, 

J. L Gilmer, 

W. R. Kenan, 

T. B. Lee, 

W. F. Harding, 

j! W. Yates, 

H. W. Whedbee. 

R. NUNN, 



' o 



n. 



President. 

ist Vice-President. 

2d Vice-President. 

Treasurer. 

Secretary. 

Historian. 

Orator. 

Poet. 

Prophet. 

Essayist. 



It is not necessary to g^ive account of the first few weeks 
of the term after our arrival. The incidents of that period 
are well known, and to be remembered. As a matter of 
fact, daily, or rather nightly^ bulletins appeared on the 
faces of the "cheeky Fresh." To the careful observer 
the visages of *' Durham Buck," " Ellen of Wilkes" and 
"ye luckless scribe" often changed their ruddy color to 
darker hues — this, according to the laws of nature, and 
especially of man, resulting from an over and ever green 
supply of wit and jowl. Through many trials and tribu- 
lations we passed at length to the Battle of Water-melons, 
and had 'our faces bathed in the cool, sandy water of the 
Rhine (8) (rinds). 

After two months of stead^• work examinations rose 



50 



darkly in the view of coining holidays, but as soon as sun- 
dry and several victims had fallen the ordeal was satisfied 
and passed away leaving, behind a bright record of duties 
faithfully accomplished. The new year recalled the 
"half years" ready for action, and inasmuch as they had 
been mentally refreshed at home, they were cordially 
re- Freshed physically on their return. In token of our 
sincere gratitude a liberal (?) banquet was given to our 
entertainers. To say that the occasion was enjoyed by 
our friends of '"93" is needless, and it is even rumored 
that hay and cobwebs from certain village barns were seen 
the following morning on the coats, collars and backs of 
innocent-looking Freshmen. We have never deemed our- 
selves particularly dangerous, yet once at midnight with 
white lips it was tremblingly declared that we, in an 
organized body, were bringing terrible retribution upon the 
beloved Sophomores. Perhaps the success of the class has 
depended much on the harmony and hearty co-operation of 
its members. None of our undertakings have been failures, 
and we are at peace luith all men. It seems that we have 
been exceedingly fortunate as to the time of our matricula- 
tion, for to us, the youngest class in the University, the 
vounp^est in the administration, is and shall be the honor of 
first taking a stand against that dreaded apparition to all 
Freshmen, the ghostly ' ' Mollie. ' ' The men of " ' 93 " have 
at last joined with us, and now^ there are "righteous men in 
Israel," although we feared there were none. "No, not 
one." By no means perfect, as a whole, we have com- 
mitted some errors which omitted would have rendered our 
first year far more pleasant, and in view of these, in con- 
sideration of our experience and in accordance with prin- 
ciples which we know to be true, "'94" desires to start 
in upon her second year anew and hold out a warm hand 
and hearty welcome to the coming Freshman of "'95." 

Historian of '94. 



51 



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^tpnvtmtnt of Xam. 



PROFESSORS OF COMMON AND STATUTE I^AW : 

Hon. JOHN MANNING, LL. D., 
Hon. JAMES E. SHEPHERD. 

professor of constitutional and international law 
Hon. KEMP P. BATTLE, LL. D. 



MOOT COURTS. 

university court of appeals. 

Ho7i. John ]Mayi7iing, Judge. 

Clerk Alex. Stronach. 

Marshal M. R. Eure. 

]Meets first Thursday in each month. 

university superior court : 

Judges : 

R. B. Redwine, E. W. Martin, C. G. Peebles. 

Clerk — Alex. Stronach. 

Sheriff --- ---M. R. Eure. 

Meets every Saturday at 8 p. m. 



©Ig\55 l—i^t. 



candidates for the degree of bachelor of laws. 

Alexander Stronach, .i> a E Raleigh, N. C. 

Robert B. Redwine, 2 X Wolfesville, N. C. 

Calvert G. Peebles, <i> r a Jackson, N. C. 

Edwin Wrav Martin, a T Q. Little Rock, Ark. 



William Staton Bailey Littleton. 

Samuel M. Blount, A K E -Washington. 

James M. Bodenhamer Dobson. 

54 



James H. Bridgers — Henderson. 

Victor Br3^aiit Pineville. 

Ausfustin S. Burroughs Williamston. 

Percy Cook-- Louisburg. 

W. T. Crawford Waynesvillc. 

Rufus A. Crowell Bilesville. 

Mills R. Eure, a K E ■ Norfolk, Va. 

Alphouzo L. Gregory New Berne. 

Frank R. Harris Seaboard. 

Alberts. Heilig, A T i2 Salisbury. 

Joseph F. Hendren, a K E --Winston. 

John D. Humphreys Beson. 

Henry Johnston, «^ K X Tarboro. 

William H. Long Knoxville, Tenn. 

William M. Little, S a E Little's Mills. 

Floyd J. Lawrence Murfreesboro. 

Angus McLean Lumberton. 

Lucius P. McGehee, K A Raleigh. 

Walter H. Michael Minneapolis, Minn. 

James H. Milam Oakville. 

Gilbert B. Patterson, S A E Maxton. 

Malvern H. Palmer, a K E Greenbacks. 

H. B.Parker Murfreesboro. 

William Stone Roberson Chapel Hill. 

James G. Scott Jacksonville. 

John Waites Smith - --Bedford City. Va. 

Alberts. Williams, X A E Wilmington. 

Ellis C. Williams, v x Monroe. 



)Uper'ior ©oUrt Calendar. 



SPRING TERM, 1891. 

I. Saturday, January 10 — Redwine. 

state, vs. J. B. Stronach — Assault and Battery. 
Peebles & Bailey, for State. 
Little & Bryant, for Defense. 
Verdict— Guilty. 



55 



2. Saturday, January 17 — Martin. 

State z'S. George M. Roberts — Bigann-. 
Little & Bryant, for State. 
Redwine & Henderson, for Defense. 
Verdict— Guilty. 
Motion in Arrest granted. 

3. Saturday, January 24 — Peebles. 

State vs. Thomas Dunston — Larceny. 
vStronach & McLean, for State. 
Martin & Lawrence, for Defense. 
Verdict — Not guilty. 

4. Saturday, January 31 — Redwine. 

University Magazine Z'S. Chapel Hillian — Libel. 
vStronach & Crowell, for Plaintiff. 
Martin & Gregory-, for Defendant. 
Verdict for Plaintiff, ^3,000. 

5. Saturday, February 7 — Martin. 

Ellis e^ al. vs. Brown et al. — Devisavit vel non. 
Redwine & Parker, for Caveators. 
Jokntson & Cook, for Propoiuiders. 
Verdict for Caveators. 

6. Saturday, February 14 — Peebles. 

State vs. Al. Houie and Roane Houie — Larceny. 
Hendren & Martin, for State. 
Redwine & Eure. for Defense. 
Verdict — Not guilty. 

7. Saturd.\y, February 21 — Redwine. 

State vs. Andrew Jackson — INIurder. 
Little & Peebles, for State. 
Bryant & Baile}-, for Defense. 
Verdict — ]\Ianslauohter. 

8. S.\TURDAY, February 28 — Martin. 

Planner vs. Dunston. 
Gregor\- & Parker, for Plaintiff. 
Cook & Lawrence, for Defendant. 
Verdict for Plaintiff. 

9. Saturday, March 7 — Peebles. 

State vs. Brown — Larceny. 

Eure & McLean, for State. 

Little & Bailey, for Defense. 

Verdict— Guiltv. 

56 



lo. Saturday, March 14 (Pubwc)— Redwine. 

State vs. Lon Craige and John Craige — Murder. 
Bryant & Hendren, for State. 
Stronach & Martin, for Defense. 
Verdict — Not guilty. 

II. Saturday, March 28— Martin. 

Creston Clarke z'S. Richmond & Danville Railroad Company 
Johnston & Cook, for Plaintiff. 
Eure & Crowell, for Defendant. 
Verdict for Plaintiff. 

12. Saturday, April 4— Peebles. 

Derby & Kilmer Desk Company vs. Ransom. 
Hendren & Lawrence, for Plaintiff. 
Martin & McLean, for Defendant. 

13. Saturday, April 18 — Martin. 

Smith vs. Richmond & Danville Railroad Company. 
Redwine & Parker, for Plaintiff. 
Williams & Gregory, for Defendant. 

14. Saturday, April 25 — Redwine. 

Webb vs. McCracken. 
Peebles & Bailey, for Plaintiff. 
Little & Br3^ant, for Defense. 

15. Saturday, May 2 (Public)— Martin. 
State vs. Charles Harworth — Burglar}-. 



Specimen IV^id^Ummer ^"^o^mino^Uon. 

1. Tell all the statutes passed in the reign of Edward I., Edward IL 
and Henry VHL, and state provisions of each. 

2. Give a concise digest of all the cases reported (a) in the Year Books ; 
(b) in the Chancery Reports, tempore George III. 

3. Give all the cases in the North Carolina Reports, referring to volume 
and page, bearing on the law of executors and administrators ; state 
what was decided in each case, and in each case refer to the section of 
Schouler where that doctrine is treated. 

4. Expound the doctrine of eclee. 

5. Estate to Lazarus for life, remainder over after the death of Lazarus 
to Mar}^ in fee. L. dies but after four days returns to life ; is M.'s remain- 
der defeated ? If yea, wherefore ; if nay, then wherefore. 

6. Define all the Latin maxims in Bouvier's Law Dictionary. 

57 



7- Quote verbatim et literatim all Mr. Feme's writings on the subject 
of contingent remainders. 

8. Explain at large the functions and jurisdictions of [a] Court of 
King's Bench ; [b) Court of the Exchequer; {c) Court of Equity. Name 
the present Justices of the K. B., the Chief Baron and Barons of the 
Exchequer, the Chancellor and Vice-Chancellors of the Chancery Court. 

9. Mention the volume, page and line of my Lord Coke's Institutes 
where the law of Owliiig is explained. Give an abstract of that law. 

10. Quote in full the statutes de do7iis and quia emptores, retaining the 
original orthograph^^ 

N. B. — The remainder of this examination will be posted to-morrow. 




58 




|ttrM((tl PtpatUmtxt 



Established 1890. 



" Ph3'sicians are, of all men, most happy: what success soever they 
have the world proclaimeth ; what faults the}' commit the earth covereth. ' ' 
— Ouarles. 



R. H. Whitehead, M. D Instructor. 

MEDICAL CLASS. * 

J. V. McGouGAN President. 

Iv. C. Morris Vice-President. 

J. W. DuGUiD Secretar}- and Treasurer. 

J.J. Philips Historian. ^ 



W. C. Ayres .--Nichols, S. C. 

D. G. Beckwith Ascend, N. C. 

J. W. Duguid New Berne, N. C. 

A.J. Edwards Elk Creek, N. C. 

T. A. Hathcock Norwood, N. C. 

R. D. V.Jones New Berne, N. C. 

W. S. Jones Goldsboro, N. C. 

W. W. McKenzie Salisbury, N. C. 

J. V. McGougan -, Lumber Bridge, N. C. 

L. C. Morris Montpelier, Va. 

W. B. Normant ---Lumberton, N. C. 

J. J. Philips Tarboro, N. C. 



History of M^^ical ©1(3^55 of '91. 

Standing between the living and the dead, scarcely liv- 
ing, mostly dead, around the stretcher or out the window, 
as feeling may dictate, is grouped the Medical Class of '91. 

Masters of the occult sciences, the magic of the philoso- 
pher's stone and the great secret of the Arabians ; well 

59 ■ 



practiced in witchcraft, divination, demonology and all 
other 'ologies wherennto the science of medicine pertains ; 
possessing- the cine throngh the intellectnal labyrinth of 
necromancy and prone to prodnce great signs and wonders 
and all resnlts that a league with the devil can effect, 
stand we like sheeted ghosts upon the plains of Death. 

The histor}' generall}^ imputed us we disown, though 
we will make no bones about it, but we have neither the 
intellectual nor moral courage to divest ourselves of the 
supernatural lustre with which the ignorance of the vulgar 
has encircled us. But why should we ? Are we not 
thirteen? And is not the light that conducts us "the 
sunbeam that has lost its way ' ' ? 

The universal remed}^ is ours and so the power to raise 
the dead, for are we not the bridge between the living and 
the dead? 

But we can prove what we claim beyond a shadow of a 
doubt and without any insult to sober reason or any injury 
inflicted upon sound morality. Mark }-e. 

Possessed of the art of the magician and directed by the 
hand accustomed to the grasp of his rod, have we been able 
to make the following merited selections : 

For President, McGougan, who is an acknowledged 
impostor ; for Vice-President, Morris, who is nearest the 
ghost of any man of the class ; for Secretary, Duguid, who 
is nearest nothing as we could select ; and for Historian, 
Philips, who must know the nature of spiritualism or be 
himself a ghoul as to presume interest enough manifested 
by the public as that they will shed a tear of sympathy 
over the fate of the ]\Iedical Class of '91. 

Historian. 



60 





-!* 






i^oerf Qf jNii irfiaTQiiy 



OF THE 



littiunaiti) of %\ovH) €avoiina. 



ESTABLISHMENT. 

The University of North Carolina was established in 
obedience to a clause of section 41 of the Constitution of 
the State adopted on the i8th of December, 1776, viz.: 
' ' x\ll useful learning shall be duly encouraged and pro- 
moted. ' ' 

The charter was granted by the General Assembh' on 
the nth of December, 1789. The corporators named 
therein as Trustees were forty of the most distinguished 
men in the State, the first named being Governor Samuel 
Johnston, who had been Chairman of the Provincial Coun- 
cil in 1775, and was one of the first Senators of the United 
States. 

A supplemental act passed at the same session endowed 
the institution with all the property that should escheat to 
the State. From this source after many years a considera- 
ble amount was realized. Unclaimed land warrants o-ranted 
to soldiers of the Revolution were located in the State of 
Tennessee, and of these the General Assembly of that 
State allowed the University of North Carolina title to 
one-third. The proceeds of this share constituted the 
chief part of the endowment, about $150,000 ; which was 
lost in the civil war of i86i-'65. 

At the first meeting of the Board of Trustees, General 
Benjamin Smith, subsequently Governor of the State, 
donated warrants for twentv thousand acres of land located 
in Obion county, Tennessee. The gift was not, however, 
of immediate value, as the land was claimed by the Chicka- 

61 



saw Indians, which claim was afterwards extinofuished. 
The lands were sold abont 1835 for $14,000. 

The village of Chapel Hill was laid off, the first lots 
sold, and the corner-stone of the old East Building was laid 
on the 1 2th day of October, 1793. William Richardson 
Davie, afterwards Governor and Commissioner to France, 
as Grand Master of the Free and Accepted Order of 
Masons, was foremost in the ceremony. Other Trustees 
present were Alfred Moore, afterwards Judge of the 
Supreme Court of the United States ; William H. Hill, 
member of the National House of Representatives from 
the New Hanover District; John Haywood, for forty years 
Treasurer of the State ; Alexander Mebane, member of 
Congress from the Hillsboro District ; Thomas Blount, 
member of Congress from the Tarboro District ; John Wil- 
liams, one of the three Judges first appointed under the 
Constitution of 1776 ; Frederick Hargett, State Senator, 
who was one of the Commissioners for selecting the site 
for and laying out the city of Raleigh, and Dr. Samuel 
F. McCorkle, one of the most noted teachers of the State. 

THE PRESIDING OFFICERS AND FACULTY. 

At the opening of the University in 1795 there was no 
President appointed. Rev. David Ker, a graduate of 
Trinity College, Dublin, Professor of Ancient Languages, 
as presiding Professor, had general charge. Charles W. 
Harris, a citizen of the State and a graduate of Princeton, 
was appointed Professor of Mathematics. After holding 
the ofhce for one year he resigned in favor of Rev. Joseph 
Caldwell, D. D., hh. D., also a graduate of Princeton, a 
native of New Jersey. Caldwell was chosen President in 
1804 and held that ofhce until his death in 1835, with 
the exception of an inter\'al of four years from 181 2 
to 1 816, during which occurred the administration of 
Rev. Dr. Robert H. Chapman, of Virginia. David L. 

62 




EDITOR-IN-CHIEF : 

ALEX. STRONACH, 0. J. S. 
F. H. BATCHELOR, 0. K. 1.^ SHEPARD BRYAN, A. T. 0., 

J. J. PHILIPS, Z. W.^ 
C. G. PEEBLES, 0. F. J., R. B. REDWINE, 2'. A'., 

V. H. BOYDEX, ^. A'., 
E. P. WILLARD, J. A'. A'., L. O'b. B. JOXES, B. 6. U. 

BUSINESS MANAGER : 
J. M. MOREHEAD, 2'. ./. A'. 







flrMrcttiott^ 



To our retirhig President, 
HON. KEMP PLUM MER BATTLE, 

as a token of our appreciation 
of his untiring zeal and devotion to the University, this 
Second Volume of the '' Hellenian " is affec- 
tionately dedicated by the 



Editors. 





^alxttaiovi). 



For the second time The Hellenian is presented to the 
public, despite the rather cold reception with which the 
first issue met. We trust that it deserves some small word 
of commendation and that at least we may be credited 
with an honest endeavor to make the publication a suc- 
cess. The Editors. 



Prlta itnfi)}^ ^p&iiotu 



Founded at Yai,e, 1844. 



l^otl of (^ho^pter^. 



Phi Yale Collesje. 

Theta Bowdoin College. 

Xi Colb}' University. 

Sigma Amherst College. 

Psi University of Alabama. 

UpsiIvON ---Brown University. 

Chi University of Mississippi. 

Beta University of North Carolina. 

AI.PHA Harvard College. 

Eta University of Virginia. 

Lambda " Kenyon College. 

Pi Dartmouth College. 

Iota Central University. 

Alpha Prime Middlebury College. 

Omicron University of Michigan. 

Epsilon Williams College. 

Rho Lafayette College. 

Nu -College of the City of New York. 

Tau Hamilton College. 

Mu - Madison University. 

Beta Phi University of Rochester. 

Phi Chi Rutgers College. 

Psi Chi — Indiana Ashbur}- University. 

Gamma Phi Wesleyan University. 

Psi Omega Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

Beta Chi Adelbert College. 

Delta Chi Cornell University. 

Phi Gamma Syracuse Universit}'. 

Gamma Beta Columbia College. 

Theta Zeta University- of California. 

Alpha Chi Trinity College (Conn.). 

Gamma Beta --.University of New York. 

Phi Epsilon University of Minnesota. 

Kappa Miami Universit3^ 

Gamma Vanderbilt University. 

Sigma Tau Boston Institute of Technology. 






Brtios A^jj^ 




Ej^.W**IGtiZ^'LA. 



Swain, Governor ot I'ue State rrun. iSi^z tt> 1^35, was then 
President until 186S. On the aHoption of the O-nstitn- 
tion of 1868, under the Recon^^truction x\cts of Conoress, 
all the members of th- Pacult\ were displaced by a new 
corps, of w^hom, Rev. Solomoii Pool, D. D. , was President, 
serving until 1874, thv le being, however, no exercises after 
1870. In 1875 tJie Trustees being elected by the General 
Assembly in pursuance of a constitutional amendment, 
re-opened the doors with a Faculty of which Rev. Charles 
Phillips, D. D. , Lh. D. , was .chairman. In 1876, Kemp P. 
Battle, IvL. D. , \vas elected President and has held the 
position continuously since. At the meeting of the Board 
of Trustees held on the nth of Februan', President Battle 
resigned his office, to take effect on the 15th of August, 
1 89 1, and was unanimously elected Professor of the Chair 
of Histors^ recentlv endowed bv the alumni and friends of 
the institution. A new President is to be elected on 
Wednesday of Commencement week. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND GOVERNMENT. 

The University is by the State Constitution intrusted to 
the General Assemblv. Thev have committed it to eiofhtv 
Trustees, who are usually chosen from different sections of 
the State, and the Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
who is a Trustee ex officio. The eighty Trustees hold 
office for eight years, one-fourth being chosen ever}' two 
years. The Governor is ex officio President of the Board. 
Ten members constitute a quorum. At the annual meet- 
ing an Executive Committee of nine Trustees is appointed, 
who hold office for one year and have all the power not 
expressly forbidden by the Board. 

The offices of Secretary and Treasurer are combined and 
this officer resides in Raleigh and is a member of the 
Executive Committee. 



63 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two Literary Societies in the University, the 
Dialectic and Philanthropic. Both were established in 
1795, the former having a few months' priority in time. 
The motto of the former is ' ' Love of Virtne and Science, ' ' 
and its colors are bine — the emblem of truth. The motto 
of the latter is "Virtne, Liberty and Science," and its 
color is wdiite — the emblem of pnrity. The members, 
until a few years ago, selected one or the other from 
social or other personal motives. Lately there has grown 
np the cnstom, not founded on any law, that those from 
the western counties shall join the Dialectic and those 
from the eastern counties the Philanthropic Society. The 
dividing line is not fixed, but well enough understood to 
prevent disputes. Some of the central counties are con- 
sidered debatable territory, but etiquette forbids active 
effort to influence the decisions of those coming from this 
territory 

The influence of the University of North Carolina on 
the South has been very g^reat. Besides a President of the 
United States (Polk), a Vice-President (King), sundry Cabi- 
net officers, foreign ministers, and numerous Federal Sena- 
tors and Representatives, it has provided ever\' State south 
of the Potomac with either Governors, Judges of the Su- 
preme Court or prominent legislators, and leaders in every 
profession and pursuit. It had many generals and other 
officers, as well as privates, in the Confederate service in 
the recent civil conflict, and lost over 270 by the casual- 
ties of war. In 1858 its numbers reached 461. It is now 
better equipped than ever for affording the best character 
of university instruction. It has a good library formed b}' 
the union of the libraries of the two Societies and the 
University, five well-equipped laboratories and nine good 
buildings, one of which. Memorial Hall, is a grand speci- 
men of architecture and will hold an audience of 4,000. 

64 



Jl Ii^oeub of tlje ^ribe of 5^rmorit^0. 



And it came to pass in the sixth month of the third year 
that certain of the rulers in Israel* did meet together at 
Commencement, and one among them arose and said: "Be- 
hold the sins of the Seniorites wax great; yea, verily, it is 
a stiff-necked generation, who forget the god of their fathers 
and walk after strange gods, the gods of the Ammorites and 
the Fenialites, neither do they study the law which the Lord 
orave unto Moses. For thev sav, ' Surely we will graduate 
in '91, for there is none that dare throw us.' Now, go to, 
let us send a prophet unto them who shall warn them of 
their sins, and if they turn not from walking after strange 
gods let him utterly destroy them out of the land, for this 
is an hauo^htv greneration." And this seemed good unto 
them; and they cast lots, and the lot fell upon him whose 
name is the parson. x\nd after they had communed with 
one another thev did 0-0 forth and take a drink. But the 
wicked generation wist not that consuming wrath was soon 
to smite them. Howbeit, the fame thereof went forth, but 
they hearkened not, neither did they turn from following 
stranofe eods; for thev did arise and go unto the land of the 
I^ejfia/ ites.t and they did worship their gods, and they 
brought back idols with them and did set them up in their 
houses and did bow down to them and worship them. 

Now it came to pass on the first month of the fourth year 
that the tribe of Seniorites did go up into the temple for to 
worship, and a new chief priest did perform the sacrifice at 
the altar; for he was the prophet which was sent by the 
rulers in Israel unto the Seniorites. His face was not fair 



*Trustees. 
fWatering-plaeep, etc. 

65 



to look upon, neither was it beautiful. He wore sackcloth, 
for he mourned greatly for the sins of the Seniorites, albeit 
he had blood in his eye. And he girded up his loins and 
prophesied, saying, "Repent you and turn from your sins, 
for behold in times past you did grievously transgress, neither 
did V ju study the book of the law, but you did follow strange 
gods, the gods of the I^ema/ites, and you did worship images 
which are the work of the pJiotograpJicr^ neither is there 
any help in them, for they will desert you in the day of 
trouble. Therefore offer no more burnt sacrifices unto 
them, neither put your trust in thou^ for they are vain^ 
And behold the tribe of Seniorites did mock him, saying: 
"Prophesy unto us smooth things, for we will not study 
the law of Moses. Verily, I say unto you it is as easy as 
falling off a. log. But we will worship idols; truly we will 
worship the gods of the /^v/z^/ites, and we will sing praises 
unto them, and we will take them out driving with chariots 
and horses, and we will send a grievous livery bill unto our 
o^overnors, and when thev receive the bill thev will cuss — 
and when the day of trouble draweth nigh, even the night 
before it is upon us, we will cram up the book of the law, 
and verily I say unto \'OU we will get through in great 
shape; neither will we be cut off in that day when diplomas 
are awarded." But they wist not what they say, for when 
the prophet gave them the book behold it was a strange book, 
and none amone them had ever seen it before; the name 
thereof was the Philosophical Basis of Theism. It was a 
prophecy of a prophet in the land of Yale — he that is chief 
priest in the synagogue there. But the tribe of Senior- 
ites hearkened not unto the prophet. And it came to pass 
on the third week from that time that certain of the tribes 
of Seniorites and Juniorites and Sophomorites, which were 
of the class of Pokerites, w^ere assembled in an upper room 
to initiate certain of the Freshmanites into the mysteries of 
the Pokerites — this was a grievous sin, for it was a worship 

66 



of the god Mammon and was forbidden by the chief priests 
and scribes— and wlien they had entered into the jack-pot, 
even while tlie cards were being- shnffled, one of the tribe 
of Seniorites said unto another, '^Beliold I have read in the 
new book of the law where it saith that Herbert Spencer 

and the Agnostickites are liars and fools; now it seem- 

eth nnto me that the book is as hard as — ," bnt he said no 
more, neither did he meditate thereon again, for one of 
them opened the pot and he communed with himself 
whether he should stick upon a pair of deuces. And while 
he yet mused in his heart he prayed a prayer unto a Femal- 
itish idol, and when he did draw, behold his store of deuces 
was not increased, but he did bluff boldly an did win the 
pot; that the saying might be fulfilled: ten thousand shall 
flee at the rebuke of one. But his heart was hardened and 
he neglected to give thanks for his blessing, but he trusted 
yet more in his idols. Thus the Seniorites did pass the 
time with eating and drinking. 

But the prophet ceased not to prophesy of the wrath to 
come. And it came to pass on the fourth month of the 
fourth year that the sins were full — as the Seniorites had 
frequently been — and the prophet did say, "Surely I will 
destroy this people," and on the night before the day of 
trial the Seniorites did try to cram up the law. But the 
fury of the prophet was kindled against them, and an exam- 
ination which destroyeth at noonday was in their midst, 
and on the day of wrath there w^as weeping and wailing and 
gnashing of teeth, for the Seniorites wist not what was 
written in the law, and man}- of them perished utterly. 
Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by the prophet, 
saying: "There cometh a voice of lamentation out of the 
University; Seniorites weeping for their diplomas and re- 
fusing to be comforted because thev couldn't oraduate." 



67 



@lt0lja piitfljfW ^*drttti|!c ^'odfttj* 



OFFICERS FOR 189I : 

Prof. Geo. F. Atkinson, . President. 

F. B. Dancy, . . . Vice-President. 

Prof. WiIvLIAM Cain, . Resident Vice-President. 

Prof. F. P. VenabIvE, . . Permanent Secretary and Treasurer. 

Prof. J. W. Gore, . . Recording Secretary and Librarian. 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS : 

Howard Alston, W. R. Little. 

A. B. Andrews, Jr., , H. L. Miller, 

W. J. Andrews, J. M. Morehead, 

George H. Claflin, A. H. Patterson, 

Caswell Ellis, M. J. Pearsall, 

A. J. Edwards, H. E. Rondthaler, 
J. F. Gaither, H. B. Shaw, 

B. T. Green, T. C. Smith, 
W. R. Kenan, W. L. Spoon, 
J. V. Lewis, C. F. Toms. 



The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society was founded bv 
three or four gentlemen connected with the University on 
September 24th, 1883. The plan of its foundation was a 
broad one, proposing to include among its members every 
scientific worker in the State, and aiming at the fostering 
and developing of original work in natural science. 

The success of the Society along some of the lines of its 
work has been far beyond the expectations of its founders. 
It has finished seven years of prosperous existence. During 
these years over sixty meetings have been held and three 
hundred and fifty papers on various scientific subjects have 
been read. Many of these have been published in its 

68 



Journal, which appears now twice every year, with from 
one hundred and tw^enty-five to one hundred and sixtv 
printed pages. In all, nine hundred and fifty-three pages 
have been issued, with a great many portraits, engravings 
and cuts. One-seventh of all the papers printed in the 
Journal have come from the students of the Universitv. 
These papers are reports upon original researches and show 
well the stimulus the Society has given to such work. 

Through donations, but chieflv bv wav of exchano-e for 
the Society's Journal, a valuable collection of scientific 
periodicals and books has been secured, numbering now 
nearly eight thousand books and pamphlets and increasing 
at the rate of more than one hundred monthlv. 

The exchange list now numbers more than three hun- 
dred and all parts of the civilized world are represented on 
it. Scientific societies and institutions in eighteen dif- 
ferent nations correspond with the Society. They are dis- 
tributed as follows: Canada, lo; Great Britain, 20; Ger- 
many, i^\ Austria-Hungary, 10; Belgium, 3; Brazil, i; 
Chile, i; Mexico, 3, Netherlands, 6; Italy, 11; France, 9; 
Russia, 7; Switzerland, 12; Sweden, 4; Luxembourg, i; 
Japan, I; Portugal, i; Argentine Republic, i. The 
remaining exchanges are from the United States. 




69 



^i)t Itortl) CaroUtm gtatointal JSodetij, 



This Society was founded about 1842, Hon. David L. 
Swain, LL. D. , being its President. Many valuable col- 
lections were made of old files of newspapers, Legislative 
Acts, books, documents and letters of eminent men of the 
past. The Society was not incorporated, and so far as can 
be learned Governor Swain was the only officer. In fact, 
he seems to have been the entire Society. Among other 
treasures he became possessed of the books and historical 
papers which Judge A. D. Murphey gathered when he con- 
templated writing a history of the State. In July, 1868, 
when the Reconstruction Acts went into operation, he lost 
his place as President of the University and soon after died 
without making any disposition of the property of the 
Historical Society. His w^idow, who was the executrix of 
his will, found a memorandum stating that certain bound 
volumes were its property, and these she turned over to 
President Battle. Many rare autographs were sold to a 
Northern collector. She bequeathed by will the residue of 
the papers either to the State or to the University, as her 
executors, Hon. R. H. Battle and Judge Walter Clark, shall 
determine. No final decision has as yet been made, but it 
is confidently hoped that it will be in favor of the Univer- 
sity. 

The present Historical Society was chartered by act of 
the General Assembly ratified March 2 2d, 1875, the follow- 
ing being the corporators: William A. Graham, William 
Hooper, Thomas Atkinson, Charles Phillips, Fordyce M. 
Hubbard, Charles F. Deems, Braxton Craven, William H. 



70 



Battle, Matthias E. Manly, B. F. Moore, R. M. Pearson, 
E. G. Reade, Nerens Mendenliall, John H. Wheeler, Z. B. 
Vance, Calvin H. Wiley, George Davis, William Eaton, 
R. B. Creecy, Gen. D. H. Hill, S. D. Pool, W. C. Kerr, 
W. Shakspere Harris, K. P. Battle, G. D. Bernheim, 
George V. Strong, Cyrus L. Hunter and Cornelia Phillips 
Spencer. 

It will be noticed how man}' of these eminent men have 
died in the sixteen years since the passage of this act — 
Gov. Graham, Dr. Hooper, Bishop Atkinson, Dr. Phillips, 
Dr. Hubbard, Dr. Craven, Judge Battle, Judge Manly, Mr. 
Moore, Chief Justice Pearson, John H. Wheeler, Dr. Wiley, 
Mr. Eaton, Gen, Hill, Professor Kerr, Mr. Shakspere 
Harris and C. L. Hunter. Mrs. Spencer is the only lady 
among the corporators. All will admit the eminent pro- 
priety of this recognition of her literary accomplishments. 

Governor Graham called a meeting of the corporators on 
May 4th, 1875, in Raleigh. Rev. Dr. William Hooper 
was the first President. After his death Judge John Kerr 
was chosen at the Commencement of 1877. He was suc- 
ceeded by President Battle. At the same time Rev. J. F. 
Heitman was chosen Secretary. He was succeeded by Dr. 
Stephen B. Weeks, and on his resignation Mr. W^illiam 
Johnston Andrews, the present efficient officer, was unani- 
mously elected. 

The Historical Society has done much service already in 
elucidating the history of our State. Many publications 
of great value were made prior to 1861 in the North Caro- 
lina University Magazine, the nnmbers of which are much 
sought after by those engaged in historical research. Simi- 
lar papers may be found in recent issues of the same peri- 
odical. Good judges say that in consequence of the per- 
manent value of such contributions this is the best college 
magazine in the United States. 

President Battle tells us that after he lavs aside execu- 



71 



tive duties, which have been very exacting, he proposes to 
devote considerable attention to the Historical Society, with 
the view of making it greatly more efficient in gathering 
historic material and rescuing from oblivion the facts 
throwing light on the development of our State. An 
earnest effort will be made to interest in the work not only 
our students, but the intelligent people of the State as well. 



G^g^; 




72 



Cljr ^ijAh&ptvt €lttl>. 



This Society is intended to stimulate and oruide those 



fc>' 



who study the dramatic authors of our own and other lan- 
ofuaoes. It was org^anized in November, 1886, and has had 
a successful career from the first. Its scheme of reading 
and study for the next year is printed in each annual cata- 
logue of the University and is observed in the monthly 
meetings of the Club. The Professor of English Litera- 
ture, Dr. Thomas Hume, presides over the exercises and 
calls to his aid all the teachers and students who may be 
ready for this interesting department of research. The 
Society may be profitably used by the student of the antique 
drama, of the French classical and romantic school, 
of the earlier and later German forms, as well as by the 
Shakspere specialist. All those lines of literature that 
are related to the drama, e. ^. , the old romances and novels, 
ballad poetry, etc., are made to run into the work of the 
Club. Opportunity is given for that most effective and 
inspiring of all training in composition and criticism 
which,.springs from following the bent of one's genius. 
Thus the theories and dry details of class-room may be 
happily supplemented by volunteer essays. During this 
last session the lovely romance of "Cymbeline" was com- 
pared with its sources in lively Boccacio and stiff Holin- 
shed and the master's art of re-handling old material well 
illustrated. Interesting resemblances or contrasts of char- 
acters to those of ''Othello" (Imogen and Desdemona, 
lachimo and lago, Posthumus and Othello) were marked 
out carefully. One paper finely discussed Shakspere' s con- 
ception of heredity. The general subject of the Cymbe- 



line evening found Dr. Hume in his element in an exami- 
nation of "The Man Behind the Different Shakspere Por- 
traits." "Much Ado About Nothing" repaid us. We 
found the story in Ariosto and Spenser, and the same 
eraceful situations we had seen in "Love's Labor Lost." 
We rollicked with Beatrice and Benedick, laughed at the 
Constables and studied the points of the stage villain. 
Then we had a grim pleasure in old Timon in Plutarch's 
and Lucian's and Shakspere's accounts compared with 
Moliere's great Misanthrope and with rare Ben Jonson's 
type. Shakspere's Philosophy of Fate and Free-will was 
handled as well as possible without "metaphysical aid." 
The next month brought us a view of Shakspere's con- 
temporaries. We glanced from the Elizabethan and Jaco- 
bean court to his fellow-playwrights. We studied, in Dr. 
Hume's characteristic paper. Miss Delia Bacon's "craze" 
on the joint authorship by the Raleigh-Sidney-Bacon- 
Shakspere cycle. Judge Holmes's more valuable discussion 
of the single Baconian authorship and Donnelly's absurd 
cypher or cryptogram; and we'll not soon forget Professor 
Winston's humorous discussion of Dogberry and Donnelly 
as one and the same. Nor will the classic charm of that 
evening fade when Professor x^lexander gave us a survey 
of Old, Middle and New Comedy among the Greeks, with 
happy versions of best passages interspersed, and showed 
how much of modern wit was already in Menander and 
Aristophanes. Our symposium on Shakspere's Method of 
Treating Historical Subjects was not to be despised ; how 
he had no politics of his own, but a loyal, national spirit; 
whether he was distinctively Protestant or only and every- 
where English; wdiy Magna Charta was left out of "King 
John"; how Scott's view of the miserable King differed 
from his; why and how so many plays were used to develop 
Prince Hal's character; the fire-eater. Hotspur, and the 
Welsh magician, Glendower; — didn't the bright students 

74 



1/ 



flash vividly through that hour aud a quarter? Time 
would fail to tell what Victor Hugo iu his preface to Ruy 
Bias was discovered to meau by his three classes of readers 
and spectators of the historical drama — the critics, the 
women and the crowd, and the elements of such a drama 
that appeal to them; and how all this was rounded off with 
readings in French comedy and in Congreve's and Sheri- 
dan's brilliant embezzlements of Moliere's and others' best 
repartees and situations. 

The Club Library has been enriched and will be still 
more so by the generous offering of the admirable eradu- 
ating class of '91— a beautiful set of Furnen's Variorum 
Editions of Shakspere. The officers of the Club for this 
year are: 

Dr. Thomas Hume President. 

Prof. G. T. Winston Vice-President. 

F. H. BaTchelor Secretary. 

P. C. Graham Treasurer. 

W. W. Davies Librarian. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Dr. Hume, F. H. Batchelor. 

Prof. Winston, p. c. Graham, 

Prof. Alexander, Shepard Bryan, 

A. H. Patterson. 




75 



Noting |llen'0 ^tjvwtian ^00ottation. 



The Young jNIen's Christian Association of the Univer- 
sity was organized in May, i860, being among the first of 
the College Associations in the world. Little, however, 
can be said of its early history, for it was soon to perish in 
the troublous times of the war. It was revived Septem- 
ber 17th, 1876, to fill out a longer and more useful life. 
Ever since its revival the work and influence of the Asso- 
ciation have been steadily increasing, until now it occupies 
a prominent place in our University life. A large number 
of the students are members and take an active interest in 
all of its undertakings and in whatever pertains to its wel- 
fare. 

Through the kindness of the ladies of the village, the 
Board of Trustees of the Universitv, the Facultv and the 
students in eeneral two rooms on the first floor of the 



J!5 



South Building have been neatly furnished for the use of 
the Association. 

Short and interesting services are held four nights in the 
week. These meetings are well attended by the students 
and have been found quite helpful. All lovers of music 
are cordially invited to take part in the singing. Aside 
from the regular meetings Bible classes of different kinds 
are organized every year to meet the demands of the stu- 
dents. The Missionary Volunteer Band is quite active, 
having^ raised a ofood sum each ^'ear to send one of the stu- 
dents to Japan as a teacher in the government schools and 
to do Christian work. 

In addition to the spiritual the Association tries not to 
overlook the physical side of our student life. The g}in- 
nasium has lately been refitted by the Faculty and placed 

76 



under the supervision of the Association. The Associa- 
tion accordingly employs a graduate of tlie Springfield, 
Mass., Training School as Director, and one who is well 
qualified to assist the students in this line. The exercise 
has been found light, agreeable and extremely beneficial. 
The field day exercises which come off in the spring 
term are a source of great amusement and recreation, 
several medals being gi\'en to the winners in the various 
contests. The Association endeavors to assist the new 
students in every way possible. There is a bureau of 
information at the Association parlors for the first few days 
of each term where any information in regard to entrance 
examinations, rooms, boarding-houses, etc., is gladly 
given. The Association also publishes each year a small 
Hand-book which contains much useful information to new 
students, and it will be to their interest to apply for one to 
the Bursar of the University before leaving home. At the 
beginning of each term a thorough canvass is made among 
the new students to give all wdio desire it the opportunitv 
to join with us. All those who are members of evaneeli- 
cal churches are admitted into the Association as active 
members. Those not members of any church, but of good 
moral character, are admitted as associate members, having 
all of the privileges of the active members except those of 
voting and holding ofiice. 

The Association is by no means isolated in its work, 
but keeps in close touch with the great organization of 
which it is simply a part. By means of the District, State 
and International Conventions, ^Moody's Summer School 
and such gatherings the Association is enabled to keep 
apace with the improved methods of work, and thus to 
render more valuable servdce to the students of the Uni- 
versitv. 

The Association Hand-book will supply any other infor- 
mation that mav be desired alongr this line. 

77 



|()ttun'0tt^ Ptitt0tfd0. 



'[@ro^r(S\mme for Vs/e<^ne5d0ky, /\prll 25/1891, 



PART I. 

interlocutor : 
Mr. F. H. BATCHELOR. 

TAMBOS. BONES. 

E. W. Martin, 
G. h. Peschau, 



1. Rig a Jig, 

2. Afloat, 



Mr. H. C. Hamlen. 



J. A. GlIvMER, 


JR., 


W. R. Kenan 


,JR. 


. 


Chorus 


• • 


Solo 




Chorus 


• • 


Solo 


^ 


Chorus 


. 


Quartette 



3. Rosalie, .... 

4. Old Home Down on the Farm, 

w. M. Little. 

5. Carve dat 'Possum, 

6. Thou art my own Love, 

Roseoe Nunn, H. C. Hamlen, VV. M. Little, H. L. Miller. 

7. Paddy Duffy's Cart, ...... Chorus 

PART II. 

1. The discourse of Dr. Lampblack interrupted by ex-Senator Snowflake. 

E. W. Martin and J. A. Gilmer, Jr. 

2. The Serenaders, .....-.• 

F. H. Batehelor, H. L. Miller, VV. M. Little. 

.3. E. W. Martin discourses briefly on the merits and demerits of the 

Vere de Vere family. 

4. Forsaken, ...... Quartette 

F. H. Batehelor, C. S. Mangum, H. L. Miller, H. C. Hamlen. 

Flute and Violin Obligato. 
Roseoe Nunn. W. M. Little. 

78 



I. Jolly Tumblers, 



2. La Polotna, 



PART III. 



C. S. Mangnm, W. R. Kenan. Jr. 



Roscoe Nunn. 



3. {a) Song for Dear Old Father, 

H. C. Hamlen. 

(d) Little Dftrliiig, Dream of Me, 

VV. IVJ. Little. 



A FARCE IN TWO ACTS. 

cast: 

Dr. Keepum, ..... 

Mrs. Dr. Keepum, . . . . . 

Joe, ...... 

Sam, ....... 

Mr. Edmuud Keau Docurious, 

Alonzo Dismal, . . . . . 

Ghosts, Lunatics, etc. 



Flute Solo 
Solo 
Solo 



H. L. MiLIvER. 
G. L. Peschau. 
J. A. GiivMER, Jr. 

E. W. Martix. 

F. H. Batchelor. 
W. W. Davies. 



Stage Manager, 
Musical Director, 
Business Manager, 



E. W. Martin. 
W. M. L1TTI.E. 

F. H. BatcheIvOR. 




79 



^diiatitst. 



It is a great fallacy to think — 

That Prof. Toj-'s horse can do nothing but walk. 

That Pres. never gets a new joke. 

That Judge laughs all of the time. 

That Tommy ever gets tired of talking. 

That Mot never goes to church. 

That everybody leaves the Hill when rtwj'thing happens in Durham 
or Raleigh. 

That the Parson throws ^z'^ri'body on Moral Science. 

That Windy never tells the truth. 

That it is a?iy evidence of want of brain for a man to fall on Conies. 

That Ven will certainly annihilate you if you applaud on his class. 

That our teams get beat every time they leave the Hill. 

That Pat never gets a night off. 

That the train ever gets here on time. 

That Jo never meets his classes. 

That Snake is ever still. 

That Mebane and little Buck 7iever get enough to eat. 

That the girls vi\^o promise to come to a class day dance will do it. 

That rt;n'body knows on which side Josh parts his hair. 

That 3'ou ever get out of the Societies without being fined. 

That Collins will graduate with '91. 

That Stronach talks «// of the time. 

That Spring Chemistry and Godology are eas}-. 

That Cook will ever have a mustache. 

That there 

Thatthishellenianain'tamosthellofabook. 



80 




"O, wad some power the giftie gi'e us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us." 



' ' He shall return no more to his house, neither shall the place know 
him any more." — McMichaei.. 

" Marriage is the best state for man in general." — Prof. Claflin. 

" His horrid image doth unfix m\' hair."— The Younger Crowell. 

"A little, round, fat, oily man." — Punch Currie. 

*' He multiplieth words without knowledge." — Ai^i^EN. 

"Blackest toughness my desire." — A. Andrews. 

" Let him now speak or else hereafter ever hold his peace." — Senior 
AT Commencement. 

"How long. Oh! Lord, how long?" — French Hour. 
"And of his part as meek as is a maid." — Henry Johnston. 
' ' \Vlio would have thought our Joe would have amounted to so much ? ' ' 
— Prof. Hoi^mes. 

"And departing, leave behind us 
Footprints ( No. ii)4 on the sands of time. ' ' 

— W. J. Andrews. 
"Be it scroll or be it book, 
Into it, Knight, thou must not look." 

— Peschau. 

' ' Laughter has one use — it helps digestion ; but since we have not always 
food to digest we should not always be on the grin." — Toy. 

"One skilled at games of hazard." — GaTling. 

"They yelleden like feends doon in helle. "— Soph. Class. 

"A man of unbounded stomach — a wandering abyss." — Mebane. 

8i 



** Poor boy ! when he got salted the job was not half done, " — Ellis. 

"He had a contract with the Almighty to run the universe on shares." 

— Bryant. 

Per aspera 

' ' You have to study like h 11 

ad a sir a. 

to learn any astronomy." 

"Full graduates, Class '91, Thursday night of Commencement, ITgh ! ! " 
— M. J. Pearsai.1.. 

"Fours (Knaves)."— Sid, Sam, Pos, Judge. 

"Side Card (Deuce)."— Bart. 

" Maybe I am a man; maybe I am not a man; T)ut God help me if I am 
an ass." — Warren. 

' ' With parenthetical legs. ' ' — Bai^Iy. 

" Innocence Abroad." — Ben GreEN. 

"Can there be so fine a creature formed from mortal clay?"— Fei,ix 
Harvey. 

" His face would stop a clock." — Alston. 

" Of modest mien, and graceful in his gait." — Connor. 

" Pray God he be not as mean as he looks." — Bonitz. 

" He opened his mouth and the hills trembled." — Barnard. 

" I lack not vanity nor brazen gall ; 
What I can't do cannot be done at all." 

— Busbee. 

"How are the mighty fallen." — Senior Cl.\ss after The Ex. on 

PHIIvOSOPHY. 

" God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man." — Walser. 

" Tarry in Jericho till thy beard be grown." — Cooke. 

" That simpering smile, don't think, foolish youth. 
When the}'^ call you a masher they are telling the truth." 

— Will Bingham. 

" Ful longe were his legges and ful lene, 
Al like a staff, there was no calf, 

Y' se' n. ' ' — Hunter. 

"Satan came also." — Sam Ashe. 

"His study was but little on the Bible." — R.\nsom. 

"We act by fits and starts like drowning men." — The Faculty. 

" The long and short of it." — Bailey and Martin. 

"The gladsome light of jurisprudence." — Redwine. 



82 



"A ruddy, hollow-eyed, sharp-looking wretch; a living dead mau."— 

KOONCE. 

"As merry as the days are loug." — Thompson. 

"Tell it not in Gath ; publish it not in the streets of Askelon— that 

'Flighty' Buck got 49 on Conies." 

"Rejoice we, Nature formed but one such man, 

And broke the die in moulding." 

— Prof. Caix. 

" Rejoice, oh, young man, in the days of thy youth." — Snow. 
" I am a man of unclean lips." — Gregory. 

" Rocks whereon greatest men were oftenest wrecked." — Conics and 
Spring Chemistry. 

"Multitudes in the valley of decision."— Jury of Moot Court. 
"Have left a name behind them."— Laughinghouse, Bingham, 
Blount. 

"And both were young and one was beautiful."— Albritton and 
Cheek. Query, Which one was beautiful ? 

"Thrice happy he whose name has been well spelt."— W. W. Davies, Jr. 
** For most men, 'till by wisdom rendered sager,' 
Will back their own opinions with a wager." 

—A. S. Williams. 

"As tedious as a twice-told tale."— German Hour. 

"So wise, so 3'oung, they do ne'er live long." — Wilson. 

" How I love its giddy gurgle, 
How I love its fluent flow ; 
How I love to wind my mouth up. 
How I love to hear it go. ' ' 

— Batchelor. 

"A shadowy phantom of the thing called man."— Hugh Miller. 
"W^ho shows himself more idle than if laziness were sister to him." — 
Street Jones. " 

" Those who sorrow on earth in heaven shall sing."— Bobby Wyche. 

" Much Ado About Nothing."— Shakspere Club. 

"A fair example of untainted youth."— Hickerson. 

"Lewd fellows of the baser sort."— Class of '94. 

" There is no truth in him."— ALBERT Sidney Williams. 

" Every man's work shall be made manifest."— BulLETIn-board. 

' ' Let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall. ' '— McKethan. 

♦' Whose God is his belly."— A. Stronach. 



"Take a little wine for thy stomach's sake." — Gilmer. 

" One of the lazy, lolling sort unseen at church, at senate or at court." 

— MOREHEAD. 

"He was of stature very small ; 
His highest hope was to be tall." 

— Martin. 

"Na.ure has formed strange fellows in her time.' — Jimmie D. Barnes. 

"Oh, ye Gods, I hate to hear him sing." — R. H. Johston. 

" That unlettered, small, knowing soul." — Brown. 

"Hedraweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the .staple of 
his argument." — Croweli^. 

"Two lovely berries moulded on one stem." — Paul and George. 

"Beauty provoketh thieves sooner than gold." — L. O'B. B. Jones 

NEED not fear. 

"I would the gods had made thee poetical." — Patterson, Poet '91. 
"A fellow of infinite jest."— Eure. 

"It is not good for man to live alone. " — Prof. Toy. 

"In a good old age." — Spoon. 

" Unstable as water, thou shalt not excel." — Argo. 

"Certain stars shoot madly from their course to hear the undying mu- 
sic."— Glee Club. 

"A land flowing with milk and honey." — NoT THE Town Hotels. 

"And like a wounded snake, drags his slow length along." —J. F. Hen- 
dren. 

"Blessed shall be thy store." — Ransom, Gaither, Gatling. 

"As thy days so shall th}' strength be." — Boarding-house Butter. 

"Thou troubleth me." — Biggs. 

"But you are past your dancing days." — Prof. Winston. 

"Was ever book contained such vile matter?" — Hellenian. 

"A good judge of cigars, and smoke." — Prof. Alexander. 

"What if we fail? We fail." — Seniors at May Examinations. 

"I must become a borrower of the night for a dark hour or two." — 
Boyden. 

" A deed without a name."— Greasing the Blackboards. 

"This is the ver^- ecstacy of love." — Chas. Mangum. 

"I am Sir Oracle, and when I ope my lips let no dog bark." — Parker. 

"A politician, one that could circumvent God." — Shep. Bryan. 

"An omnipresent d— nd eternal noise." — Ed. S. B.\ttlE. 

" In arguing too the Parson owned his skill." — Fog.\rty. 

84 



"All Gaul is divided into three parts." — Morehead, Snow, Busbee. 
" Be not pronounced ere you have thought." — Chapel Hili,i.\x. 
"Too much gravity argues a shallow mind." —Owen Kenan, 
" The melancholy days have come. May 15 to" — June i (ExAMrN.\- 

TIONS). 

"Oh ! like a dog he hunts in his dreams." - Mike Hoke. 

"Oh ! yet we trust that somehow good will be the final goal of ill." — 

Philosophy. 

"So much to do — so little done." — Senior English. 

" Ring out wild bells."— Soph., i to 2 a. m. 

"And one far off divine event, to which the whole creation moves." — 
Commencement. 

"Oh! good baldhead, which all men know." — Prof. Winston. 

" My life is one damned eternal grind."— C. F. Toms. 

" When found make a note of it." — A Sensible Soph. 

" So we'll go no more a roving, — 
vSo late into the night." 

— EURE. 

" Oh ! mirth and innocence ! Oh ! milk and water ! ! " — Collins. 
"Absence makes the heart grow fonder." — The Girl from Balti- 
more. 

* ' Gaily the Troubadour 

Touched his guitar." 

— W. M. Little. 

" Rich in good works."— The University. 

" A wretched, ragged man, o'er grown with hair." — Prof. Venable. 

"An outward and visible sign of an inward spiritual grace." — 70 on 
Moral Science. 

" Nowhere so bus}- a mau ther n'as, 
And yet he seemed busier than he was." 

— Dr. Hume. 
"Small Latin and less Greek." — Peschau. 

"Grinders cease because they (rations) are few." 

" There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, 

Than are dreamed of in ^-our philosophy." 

— Prof. Horace Williams. 
' ' The end crowns all. ' ' 



85 




Jltljl^ttfS. 



Prof. Wii^liams, Chairman. 



Stronach, '89, 
Busbee, '92, 



Graham, G., '91, 
Biggs, '93- 



Tl^e UniVer^Hy of IN}. ©. poot-baU f\^^oc\aVion. 



Organized Fall, 1888. 



OFFICERS 



G. Ransom, 
P. C. Graham, 
W. J. Andrews, 


• • 
> 


President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary-Treasurer 


J. J. Philips. 
G. M. Graham, 


• 


Manager. 
Captain. 


Ashe, L. E. R. 
King, L. T. 
McGougan, L. G. 

Shaw, Q. B. 
Hoke, R. H. B. 


TEAM. 

rushers. 

Snipes, C. 
backs. 


Mangum, R. E. R. 
Patterson, R. T. 
Thompson, R. G. 

Ferguson, L. H. B. 
Graham, G., F. B. 



Substitutes — Gaither, Jones, K., Barnard, Bynum. 

November 25th, iSgo. 
Seniors vs. Sophomores. Score 12 to 8. 



86 




UntVer5i^y "Tenni^ ©luls. 



ESTABI^ISHED 1 884. 



H. Johnston, 
S. A. Ashe, 
J. J. Phii^ips, 

Eure, M. R. 

Johnston, H. 

Batchelor, F. H. 
Currie, G. H. 



Williams, A. S. 



Ashe, S. A. 
Hoke, M. 
Peschau, G. S. 



OFFICERS : 

President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

Little, W. M. 

CI.ASS OF '90. 

Philips, J. J. 

CI,ASS '91. 

Graham, G. M. 
Morehead, J. M. 
Patterson, A. H. 

CI.ASS '92. 
Mebane, F. C. 

civASS '93. 

Willard, E. P. 

Whitlock, V. E. 

Toms, C. F. 
Toy, T. D. 



87 



/\lpl7(a Tennl5 ©lub. 



Established 1889. 



OFFICERS : 



W. \V. Davies, . 

W. Ashe, 

C. F. Harvey, . 

Harvey, C. F. 
Davies, \V. W. 
Andrews, W. J. 
Whedbee, H. W. 
Jones, S. W. 
Ellis, Caswell 
Morris. L. C. 
Hendren, J. F. 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretar3'-Treasurer. 



MEMBERS 

Busbee, P. 
Gatling. B. M. 
Hendren, W. 
Ashe, W. 
Move, E. A. 
McKethan, E. R. 
Rollins, W. E. 
Kornega}-, D. R. 



■pan-h^ellenic Tennt^ ©luls. 



Organized 1888. 



OFFICERS 



A. Stronach. 
H. Johnston. 

P. BUSBEE, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



Johnston, H. 
Brvan, S. 



Battle, E. S. 
Biggs, J. C. 



MEMBERS. 

CIvASS '89. 
Stronach, A. 

CLASS '90. 
Philips, J. J. 

CLASS '91. 

Batchelor, F. H. 

CLASS '92. 
Busbee, P. 

CLASS '93. 

Gilmer, J. A 
Hoke, M. 



Miller, H. L. 
Graham, G. M. 



88 



[JnWev^'ds/ of ^sf. ©. tSca^e-ball /^^^octation, 



Organized 1891. 



OFFICERS : 



Ransom, G., 
Johnston, H., 
Pearsall, M. J., 
Patterson, A. H., 
BUSBEE, P., . 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 
Manager. 
Captain . 



TEAM : 



Busbee, P., C. F. 
Hamlen, H., L. F. 
Graham, G., R. F. 
Oldham, J. M., C. 

Shaw, H. B., S. S. 

Substitutes — Ellis, C, Hendren, Ferguson. 



Johnston, R., P. 
Willard. E. R., ist B. 
Johnston, H., 2d B. 
Jones. L. O'B. B., 3d B. 



Winston, April jjth, i8gi. 
University. Trinity. 



PLAYERS. 



« j I w 



Busbee, C. F. 

Graham, R. F. -_- 

Oldham, C 

Jones, 3d B. 

Shaw, S. S 

Hamlen, L. F 

R. Johnston, P. ._- 
H. Johnston, 2d B. 
Willard, ist B 



5 o 

5, I 

5' 

4 

% 

5 
4 



2 

2 
I 2 
I 2 
000 

I 2 
2 



o 2 



o; o 



I 

I I II 



o 
10 

2 
O 



Totals ^41 8 15 27 13' 5 



PI^AYERS. 



ml 






o 



Harper, S. S 

Daniels, C. F 

Sutton, P 

Durham, 2d B 

Harris, ist B 

Jones, L. F. 

Ardrey, C. 

Barnes, 3d B 

Taylor, R. F 



4i oj 01 o 



41 

4: 

4; 
4 
4' 
4 
4' 
3' 



2j 
2' 

i! 
o 
oj o 

o' o 
oj o 
o o 



3 
o 

3 

9 
I 

7 
I 

2 



< ' K 

2 I 
O O 

6 I 
o 
o 
o 
o 
I 

o o 



Totals 35' 3' 526-18I 3 



*Graham out — running out of line. 

University vs. Trinity, Score 8 to 3. 
innings. 1234567 



8 



University 20021 102 o — 8 

Trinity 10000200 o — 3 

Summary. — Earned runs — Trinity 2, University 4. Home runs — Dur- 
ham, Jones (University), H. Johnston. Left on bases —Trinity 4, Univer- 
sity 6. Struck out — Trinity 7, University 3. Umpires — Sumners and 
Williamson, of Winston. 

89 



Raleigh, April 25th, i&gi. 
University. Wake Forest. 



PI^AYERS. 



<i3 



Busbee, C. F 5 

Graham, R. F 5 

Oldhari, C 5 

Jones, 3d B. 6 

Hamlen, L. F 2 

Heudren, L. F. 3 

H. Johnston, 2d B. _- 5 

R.Johnston, P | 5 

Shaw, S. S 5i 

Willard, ist B 5 



Totals 



.J46 





W 


d 




! 


p< 


P3 


^ 


< 


w 


2 


2 








1 
I 


3 


2 


I 


I 


2 


I 


3 


9 


2 


I 





I 























2 





I 


I 











I 


8 


4 


5 





3 





10 


3 


I 








6 2 i 








14 








7 


13 


33 


23 


16 



PI^AYERS. 






Jones, L. F 

Mills, S. S 

Howell, 3d B. --- 

Powell, C. 

Sledge, ist B - 
S. Holding, 2d B. 

Rovster, C. F 

T. Holding. P. __ 

I Young. R. F. --•- 

Davis, R. F. 





2 









I 




I 




I 











I 



I I 

3 5 
3' 2 
10 
8 

il 

3' 
o 

i| 

2 



Totals '55'ioi3 33i9 6 



o 
2 
o 
I 
o 

2 
O 
O 
O 
I 



Wake Forest z>s. University. vScore 10 to 7. 

INNINGS. I 23456789 10 II 



University --- 





I 











2 


I 











7 


Wake Forest _ 


I 





T 
1 


2 





I 








2 





3-10 



Siiniinary. — Two base-hits — Mills, R. Johnston (2K Howell (2 , Powell. 
Double play— Shaw to H. Johnston to Willard. Passed balls — Oldham 2. 
Hit by pitched ball — Young. Struck out — University 5, Wake Forest 8. 
Base on balls — University 6. Wake Forest 3. Left on bases— University 
II, Wake Forest 14. Umpires — Engelhard and Ha3'nes, of Raleigh. 

Richmond, May ist, iSgi. 
University of N. C. University of Virginia. 



PI.AYERS. 



Busbee, C. F. 

Graham, 2d B. 

Oldham, C 

Jones, 3d B 

Hamlen, L. F 

Johnston, P. 

Ferguson, R. F 

Shaw, S. S. - j 3 

Willard. ist B. -_-. 



Totals 



m 




W 


• 

01 


1 

1 


< 


^ 


pa 


P^ < 


wi| 


4 








4 


I 


3 








6 2 


I 


3 








5 


4 


ol 


3 








2 


I 


i! 


3 














I 


3 








4 


I 





3 


I 


I 








I 


3 








I 


4 


2i 











5 


2 


Q! 


28 


I 


I 


27 


14 


7I 



PLAYERS. 



Benner, 3d B. 

Smith, ist B.- 

A.Greenwav, C.F. 
vSchley, L. F. _. 
Thurman, S. S. -- 
T. Green wav, C. -- 

Abbott, 2d B. 

McGuire, P. - - - 
Winston, R. F. __ 



< 

5 
5 
5 
5 
4 
5 
5 
5 
4 



JW|c5| I 



1 o 
' 5 

2| O 

O I 

2 16 

3 3 

Oj o 

o; 2 



I o 

2 

01 o 

o 

1 o 



o 
o 



o o 
o o 



Totals 43 611 271 61 2 



Summary. — Earned runs — U. of Va. i. Left on bases— U. of Va. 9, 
U. of N. C. I. First base on balls— Thurman. First base on errors — U. 
of Va. 5. Struck out— U. of Va. 4. U. of N. C. 16. Passed balls— Green- 
way I. Double play — Shaw to Jones to Graham. Umpire — Graves, of 
Richmond. 



90 



GAMES PLAYED, PERCENTAGES, ETC. 



Players According to Rank. 



S Willard, ist B. - 
\ Heudreu, L. F. 



2. Oldham, C. 

3. Graham, 2d B. 

( Busbee, C. F 

4- t H. Johnston, 2d B. 

<Sha\v, S. S 

^' ~(R. Johnston, P 

6. Jones, 3d B 

7. Graham, R. F 

8. Hamlen, L. F 

9. Ferguson, R. F 



11 


■a 


S> 


^' 


?^ 


^ 


S 





S 


8 


.^ 


t- 




^^ 


r5i 


5 


l"^ 




S 


-^^ 
« 


^ 


1 


■^ 




f5 



3 
I 

3 
1 

3 
2 

3 

3 

3 
2 

I 



Team Work 1 3 



30 
I 

23 
6 

6 

9 
I 

5 

4 

I 

I 

o 



2 
o 

7 
2 

o 

6 

10 
6 
I 
I 
o 
o 



87 



35 



o 
o 
I 
I 

2 

5 

4 

4 

3 

4 

3 
I 



28 



I 
31 

9 
8 

20 

15 

15 

8 

6 

4 

T 



150 






q; 



1. 000 

1. 000 

.967 

.888 
•750 
•750 

.733 

•733 
.625 

•333 
.250 

.000 
.813 



BATTING AVERAGES. 



Players According to Rank. 



H. Johnston _. 

(Oldham 

(R. Johnston - 

Graham 

J Hendren 

( Ferguson _ . . 
Busbee 

6. Jones 

7. Hamlen 

8. Willard 

9. Shaw 



Team Work 3 



1 

« 




4i 

•<s» 


<o 


5^ 






•>* 


(1 


•K 


^ 
^ 


•V4 


2 


9 


4 


7 


3 


13 


5 


5 


3 


13 


5 


7 


3 


13 


4 


4 


I 


3 


I 


I 


I 


3 


T 


I 


3 


14 


4 


4 


3 


13 


3 


6 


3 


9 


I 


I 


3 


12 


I 


I 


3 


13 








3 


115 


29 


37 






444 
384 
384 
307 

1 •> -> 

>r)3o 

285 
230 
III 
083 
000 



.252 



91 



SACRED TO THE MEMORY 



OF 



4^f 



^tft %aU** littitin'eittj ptatl. 



Due to arrive at 1,15. 
Arrives at 4—5. 



" Slowly and sadly " it came to us, 

And we hope it has gone to perdition ; 
It wouldn't come sooner for all our fuss 
And Capt. Pa^-ne's lengthy petition. 



92 




&mv ii^t 3atti0tn% 



Over the banister leans a face 

At half past two in the morning, 
While her old man as mad as h 



Gets out of his bed a-y awning. 

He creeps around and he strikes a light, 
And he's got blood in his eye — 

For the poor young man down there below 
Tenderly saving; orood-bve. 

He goes out-doors and looses the dog; 

Beware, young man, bew^are; 
You'd better go home and stop fooling with 

Her beautiful golden hair. 

A slight commotion and an ominous growl, 
He's fled like a hind from the hallway; 

But over the banister comes a dog 

Which tears out the seat of his trousers. 



93 




Chas. Maugum. 
H. L. Miller. 
F. H. Batchelor. 
W. W. Davies. 



mtt ®utb. 



W. M. Little. 
Hugh Hamleii. 
George Peschau. 
E. P. Willard. 



Howard Rondthaler. 



©rrljcotra* 



W. M. LiTTlvE, 

Chas. Mangum, 
F. C. Mebane, 
H. L. M1L1.ER. 
W. B. Snow, 
Mike Hoke, . 
roscoe nunn, 
Hugh HamIvEn, 



ist Violin. 
2d Violin. 
Violoncello, 
ist Guitar. 
2d Guitar. 
2d Guitar. 
Flute. 
Trombone. 



94 



Ptiuing CClub. 



Professor Toy. 
Hugh Miller. 
A. S. Williams. 



George Ransom. 

Shepard Br\-aii. 

Professor Alexander, "Spike Team." 



JS^ueit Sleeji^ro. 



Holt. 


Miller. 


Morehead. 


Ransom. 


Eure. 


Stronach 



Gaither. 




^\)t ^ni0t)t0 of tljt |?ounb ^ablt. 



Organization sud rosa. 
[We only know that it will cost you fifty cents ''to come z;/."] 



95 



Par^elor'a ®lttb» 



F. H. Batchklor, 

Prof. Cain, ) 
Pro?. Toy, / 

Prof. Claflin. 

Prof. WilIvIams, 
Prof. Whitehe 



AD, j 



President. 

Belong because they can't help it. 

Resigned. 

Resignation before the Club. To 
be acted on earlv in vacation. 




^nbt eiub. 



President : 

A. S. WlLI^IAMS. 

Vice-President : 
F. H. Batchelor. 

Secretaiy : 
Mike Hoke. 

[No Treasurer Needed.] 

W. B. Guthrie, 

Percy Cooke, 

A. Stronach, 
W. I. Holt, 

\V. R. Kenan. 



96 



©nnttan fflub. 



E. W. Martin. 
A. S. Williams. 

V. S. BOYDEN. 

Mike Hoke. 



President. 
Vice-President. 
Secretary and Treasurer. 
Leader. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

E. W. Marti x, A. S. Williams, 

V. S. BoYDEN, J. J. Philips, 

P. P. WiNBORNE. 



cVo! 



d;^oiW6r!f 



tirOf/tl*: 




pinjde €Utb, 



J. M. MOREHEAD, 

J. N. Edwards. 
C. F. Toms, . 



J. V. Lewis, 
W. R. Kenan. 



President. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 

Business ManaRer. 



members. 



W^illiam B. Guthrie, 
B. E. Tiegue. 

honorary members. 
Dr. K. P. Battle, Dr. John Manning, 

Maj. W. T. Patterson. 



97 



lUljij '91 €amf to Coilrge* 



Andrews — Because he could not get foot-room in Raleigh. 

Ashe — Very uncertain. 

Ball — To show his pretty dimples. 

Balchelor — To furnish the University with a new era from 
which to date its chronology. 

Bryan — Because he thought the University needed him. 

Collins — As an example of greenness. 

Ciuininggbn — To learn the art and science of poker-play- 
ing. 

Cnrrie — Because his old nian made him. 

Dalrymple — Because the sheriff ran him away from home. 

Davies — To find complete rest. 

Eason — To learn to dance. 

Fleming — To sharpen his wits. (Failure). 

Graham^ P. — To enlist our sympathies. 

GraJiam^ G. — To play ball. 

Leivis — To fatten for a missionary feast. 

Mangum — Damfino. 

McKethan — To enlighten the Faculty. 

Morehead — Onlv the Lord knows. 

Patterson — Because the chain-gang had broken up. 

Ransom — To wear out his old clothes. 

Spoon — " To do himself ju.stice." 

TJiompson — For fun and frolic. 

Wills — To become proficient in Conic Sections. 



98 




yroijinmmr of ^ommtnttmttxt. 



^^t^lS^l.^^^^^ 



SUNDAY-BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 



Rev. W. W. Moore, D. D., Virginia. 



WEDNESDAY-ALUMNI DAY. 



ADDRESS BY 



Col. John M. Galloway, North Carolina. 



WEDNESDAY EVENING. 



Representative Speaking. 



THURSDAY-GRADUATION DAY. 



Speeches by Members of Class 1891. 



HONORS AWARDED. 



DEGREES CONFERRED. 



99 









CHIEF' BALL iMAISiAGER, 

Michael Hoke. 

P/ii. Society. Di. Society. 

Howard Alston, ' J. F. Gaither, 

William Kenan, J, F. Watlingtoii, 

W. B. Snow. G. L. Peschau. 



CHIER MARSHAL. 

J. M. Cheek. 

Di. Society. Phi. Society. 

F. C. Mebane, P. P. Winborne, 

W. E. Rollins, R. H. Johnston, 

A. J. Kdwards. C. F. Harvey. 



kef»re:semsitatives. 

Z. I. Walser, Roscoe Nunii, 

H. R. Ferguson, G. W. Connor, 

S. \a. Davis, A. H. Koonce. 






lOO 



5.tatt0tii*0. 



A paper bearing thirty-nine printed questions was given 
to every student in the University, irrespective of class, 
fraternity, society or building, with the request that the 
blanks be filled out and the papers returned. About nine- 
tenths of these came back, and from the answers thus 
gotten the following statistics are made out : 

Prof. Winston was considered by right big odds to be the 
most intellectual member of the Faculty ; next to him in 
intellectualitv stood Dr. Alexander, who was considered 
by much larger odds the most popular member, while Prof. 
Winston in turn stood second in popularity, crowded pretty 
close, however, for second place by Dr. Venable. By a big 
majority Dr. Hume is the hardest-working member, Dr. 
Venable coming next at a respectful distance. The effi- 
cient business manager of our base-ball nine for the last 
season, Mr. A. H. Patterson, of Salem, enjoys the reputa- 
tion, the most enviable of all, of being the most intellectual 
student in all the assemblage of intellectual geniuses. He 
is considered, also, the most all-round popular man in the 
University. These two, coming both at once, would make 
anybody except " Uigious Pat " conceited. F. H. Batch- 
elor and P. P. Winborne ran a close race for the hardest- 
working man in college ; first Batchelor and then Winborne 
would be ahead, the latter finally beating by a majority of 
four. Knowing the modesty and retiring disposition of 
our editor-in-chief, and his aversion to seeing his name in 
print, the question, " W^hom do you consider the most 
handsome man in college?" was left out. To the ques- 
tion, " What does the University most need?" the answer 



lOI 



"money" being ruled out, there were almost as many 
answers as there were papers, a majority, however, agree- 
ing- that since the resionation of our most excellent Presi- 
dent, Dr. Battle, the most important thing now needed was 
some one to fill his place, and it was also agreed that 
Prof. Winston was that one. From the scores of other 
wants and needs we select the following : "PVee Tuition," 
"More Men,'' "More Athletics," ''A first-class Gym.," 
"Repairs," "A new Board of Trustees," "A Medical 
Building," "An Infirmary," "Electric Lights," "Adver- 
tisement," mainly by college athletics, "Bath-rooms," 
"Nothing," "Everything," and "Co-education." 

But to proceed to more uninteresting details. The average 
student is 5 feet 8j^ inches high, weighs 151 pounds 3^ 
ounces, wears a No. 6.8 shoe and 7.1 hat ; he goes to bed 
at 11.30, gets up at 7.25, and studies every day a little over 
5 hours, exclusive of the 17.5 hours a week which he spends 
in the recitation-room. One in every four has a mustache, 
one in every seven attends prayers, and ten in every nine- 
teen attend church regularly ; the rest go to church occa- 
sionally. Out of every 100, 60 play foot-ball, 33 play 
base-ball, and 50 play tennis. One out of every two take 
the Gym. Every man in the Universit}' except one ap- 
proves of college athletics. Six out of every thirteen play 
cards, three out of every seven visit ladies in the village, 
five out of every nine dance, and one of every two owns a 
dress suit ; one of every four performs on some musical (?) 
instrument, barring the larynx, two in every five belong to 
the Y. M. C. A., and three in every five to some one of the 
ten fraternities represented here. Five of every nine have 
fallen on something since they have been here, and; of the 
remaining four at least three will fall before they get their 
sheep-skins. 

Being from the South, and being white, we are politi- 
cally almost a unit, with Zeb. Vance the favorite public 



102 



man, Cleveland coming next. The majority of the bovs 
who are anything are Methodists, the Presbyterians and 
Episcopalians coming next. 

"Have you been true to the girl you left behind you?" 
To this question, out of lOO, 49 say that they have, 38, 
with more regard for the truth, admit that they have not, 
and the remaining 13 refuse to answer. We infer that 
they have not, and presume that they were either ashamed 
to admit it or were afraid that the girl might find it out. 

These statistics, as has been said, are based on answers 
turned in by about seven-eighths of the entire student 
body. They furnish, no doubt, a fair average of the per- 
sonal characteristics and habits, and voice the general senti- 
ments of the two hundred boys collected here, upon the 
various subjects set forth. 




103 



^i)t ®Mtor0» 



F. H. Batchelor. 

Frank H. Batchelor, Class '9], was born in Raleigh on 
March 19th, 1869. He entered Horner's in '85, where he 
was prepared for the University, and joined the Fresh. Class 
here in '87. Many honors have fallen to his share dnring 
his college conrse, beginning with Ugly man's Medal and 
Marshal in '88, and cnlminated in the nmch-coveted posi- 
tion of Valedictorian of his class. He was also a Repre- 
sentative- from the Phi. Society, Magazine editor and one 
of the snccessfnl debaters from the Phi. Society in '90. 
Is the only editor of The Hellenian who also served on 
the last year's Board, and is Secretary of the Shakspere 
Club. He takes the Classical Course, and has received a 
diploma for proficiency in Greek. Member of the Phi. 
Society and Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity. 

Victor H. Boyden. 

Victor Hugo Boyden, Class '93, was born in Ansonville, 
May 2d, 1870. His preparation was obtained at Davis 
School and he matriculated at the University in the Spring 
of 1890; was Marshal Washington's Birthday (1891), and 
is Vice-President of the Soph. Class. At present he is 
trying the Philosophical Course, but will probably follow 
"Punch's" example and take the degree of B. Lit., which 
is free from all curves, both hyperbolical and diabolical. 
Is a Di. and a Sigma Nu. 

Shepard Bryan. 

New Berne is the birthplace of this gentleman, and 
December 8th, 1871, his natal day. He was prepared at the 

104 




E. P. WiLLARD 



T. O'B. B. Jones. 





M. MOREHEAD, 

Bus. Manager. 



Alex. Stroxoch, 

Ed. in Chief. 






Victor Bovden. 



Shepard Bryan. 



C. G. Peebles. 





J. J. Philips. 



R. B. Redwine. 



Graded School of his native town and joined the Class of 
'91 at the University in 1887. Both merit and popularity 
have combined to make him a much-honored individual. 
In his Fresh, year he captured the Declaimer's Medal given 
bv the Phi. Societv, and was Marshal both Washington's 
Birthday and Class Day. The Greek prize was won bv 
him in his Soph, year, and his Junior year adds Representa- 
tive to his long list. On last February 2 2d he introduced 
the orator, and is now President of the Senior Class and 
instructor in Latin. Is a Phi. and an Alpha Tan Omega. 

L. O'B. B. Jones. 

Lawrence O'Brien Branch Jones, Class '93, first saw the 
light in Raleigh on the 25th of August, 1872. Entered 
the University of North Carolina in 1889, having been pre- 
pared for college at Bingliam's. Is pursuing the yet dis- 
tant Ph. B. Holds the office of Class Treasurer. Is a 
Phi. and a member of Beta Theta Pi Fraternitv. 

J. M. MOREHEAD. 

J. Motley Morehead, Class '91, honored Ueaksville bv 
being born there on November 3d, 1870. Was prepared 
at the " Ueaksville Practical High School" and began to 
illumine the University in 1887. Deser\-edly and unani- 
mously received the Cheeky Man's Medal in his Fresh, 
year. Is a graduate in Chemistry, Takes the Scientific 
Course and Conies. Member of the Di. Societv and Siema 
Alpha Epsilon Fraternity. Is our able Business jManager. 

C. G. Peebles. 

Calvert G. Peebles, Law Department, was born in Jack- 
son, September 13th, 1870. Was a cadet at Davis' School 
and entered the University Law School in 1890. He 
obtained his license to practice law in Januaiy, 1891, and is 
now taking the degree course. A Phi. and a Phi Gamma 
Delta. 

105 



J. J. Philips. 

James J. Philips was born in Tarboro on the 14th of 
January, 1870, and entered the University in the fall of 
'86, having been prepared at the Tarboro Male Academy. 
Was a Ball Manager in 1889. He graduated with the 
degree of A. B. in 1890 and entered the Medical Depart- 
ment the following fall. Was manager of the last foot- 
ball team, member of the Executive Committee, and His- 
torian of the Medical Class. Has the honor of being an 
ex-Phi. and a Zeta Psi. 

R. B. Redwine. 



W^olfsville was the cradle of our mild associate, Robert 
B. Redwine, who was born there July 12th, i860. Took 
a course at Bingham School and entered the Law Depart- 
ment here in 1889. Was licensed to practice his profession 
in September, 1890, and is now taking the B. L. course. 
Is a "Judge'' of the University Moot Court and appears 
frequently in the court of Justice (?) Cunninggim. Is a 
Di. and a Sigma Chi. 

Alex. Stronach. 

August yth, 1869, is a day long to be remembered in 
Raleigh on account both of a total eclipse of the sun and 
the birth of Alex. Stronach. He was prepared at the 
Raleigh Male Academy and entered the University in 1885. 
Was a candidate frequently, and made a great record as a 
runner, but honors obtained he none, saving Introductory 
Orator, February 2 2d, 1889. Graduated with the degree 
of Ph. B. in 1889, and returned to the University after a 
year's absence, in July, 1890, to take law. Received his 
license in January, 1891, and is now a candidate for B. L. 
Is post-graduate member of Advisory Committee, mem- 
ber of Foot-ball Executive Committee and Editor-in- 
Chief of this publication. An ex-Phi. and a Phi Delta 

Theta. 

106 



E. P. WiLLARD. 

E. Payson Willard, Class '93, was born in Wilson, 
December yth, 1873, and prepared at Cape Fear Academy. 
Matricnlated at the University of North Carolina in 1889, 
and hopes to gradnate with the degree of Ph. B. Is poet 
of half the Soph. Class and for the rest of college. A 
member of the Phi. Society and is a Delta Ka2:>pa Epsilon. 




lo"; 



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SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

OF THE 

University of North Carolina. 



The Session of 1801-02 will open the first Thursday in September, and last nine 
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CHAPEL HILL, N. C 







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Illiistratio^is by our processes are all made from Photographic Nega- 
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Samples and estimates furnished on application. 

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VISITS CHAPEL HILL APRIL isT OF EVERY SESSION. 



^iUNiV/Sl^glTy LAW (i)©HOOL,!^ 

Hon. K. p. BATTLE. LL. D., 
Professor of International and Constitutional Law. 

Hon. JOHN MANNING, LL. D., 

Professor of Concimon and Statute Law and of Equity. 

This school has two se.ssions : 1. Regular, beginning on 1st Thursday in Septem- 
ber and closing on 1st Thursday in June, 40 weeks. 

Tuition, per session, $90.00 

Matriculation fee, 10.00 

Medical fee, 5.00 

Board from $12.50 to $15.00 per month. 

2. Summer Session begins July 15th and ends October 1st. Two classes, fee for 
each, S30.00; for both, $60.00. Board same as regular session. At this session Hon. James 
E. Shepherd, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of North Carolina, and Hon. John 
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lina, the scenery is picturesque, the climate delightful, water excellent, and it is a pleas- 
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^'p. IB. Q.'' 

(finest beyond question). 



CLOTHING 



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Prices always marked in plain figures. Suits sent on approval anywhere, 
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21 West Trade Street, CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



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Mark of the Bull on 
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\ THE VERV 



University of North Carolina. 



Hon. KEMP P. BATTLE. LL. D., President, 
I'rot'essor of Political Economy, Constitutional and International Law. 

GEORGE TAYLOE WINSTON, A. M., LL. D.. 
Prole?sor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

FRANCIS PRESTON YEN ABLE, Ph. D., F. C. S., 

Professor of General and Analytical Chemistry. 

JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, B. Agr., F. G. S. A., 
Professor of Geology and Natural History. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C. E., 

Professor of Natural Philo.sophy. 

Hon. JOHN MANNING, A. M., LL. D., 

Professor of Law. 

Rev. THOMAS HUME, D. D., LL. D., 

Professor of the English Language and Liteiatui-e. 

WALTER D. TOY, M. A., 

Professor of Modern Languages. 

EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph. D., 

Profe.ssor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

WILLIAM CAIN, C. E., 

Professor of Mathematics and Engineering. 

RICHARD H. WHITEHEAD, M. D., 

Professor of Anatomy, Physiology and Materia Medica. 

Rev. henry HORACE WILLIAMS, A. M. B. D., 

Profe.><sor of Philo.--ophy. 

GEORGE H. CLAFLIN, C. E., 
Instructor in Mathematics, Drawing and Engineering. 

SHEPARD BRYAN, 
Instructor in Latin. 

WILLIAM M. LITTLE, A. B., 
Instructor in English. 

HUGH L. MILLER, Ph. B., 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

J. V. LEWIS. 
Instructor in Natural History. 

VICTOR S. BRYANT, Ph. B., 
Librarian. 

Professor GORE, Registrar. 
Proficssor toy, Secretar\\ 
W. T. PATTERSON, Bursar. 



Instruction is offered in four regular courses of study. Special and optional courses 
are provided in Mineralogj% Chemistry, and other sciences relating to Agriculture. 
Schools of Law and Medicine are fully organized. The session begin.s the first Thurs- 
day in September and ends the first Thursday in June, with a vacation of about one 
week at Christmas. For catalogues or other information, address 

Hon. KEMP P. BATTLE, President, Chapel Hill, N. C. 





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