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FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD, jj • ^ 

BEING BISSE^jr5ET'OR 1 EAP YBAJlr /^"5; [j 
OF AMERICAN INC^.PENDENCE36th^.3nb. I 

CALCULATED FOR THE STATE Oi* NOl ■ V C APOLlNA, (b"V 
JOSHUA SHARP, OF NEW ' i iU- £Y;~~ EE f i G PRLdPEJ.Y 
ADAPTED TO TEE MEJU' I A .N AND LATITUDE OF RA- jjj V 
LEGH, 1 DEG. 44 M. W. LONG. FROM WASHING 3N, AND ' \j^~ 




DEG, 36 M N. LAT. 



1 -Containing the Rising, SettinfFTTTaccs arc! ££'• err of the Sun ;f'" 
| and MoOti : the Phases, Node, Latitude snd Sou' hi;i,,: of the Moon ; if 
ij the places and aspects of 'he Planets, --with the Rising, Setting and 'I ,: 
j -?oi!t!iing-of the most conspicuous Planets and fixed Stars : Toge- -j £ 
I ther with a Table of the iSqiiation-of Time, for regulating (Hocks II 



id Watches. ». *~. 



^ 



#4 

^o^&ta- Art 







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J 



fc, 



IffW 



t: 







£«£* 



£> 






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>K% 



P - », — ■ , »»■ 2 ■ /.. . , — — , 

Notes to the Reader. 

1st. The Calculations of this Almanack are made to Solar 
or Apparent time ; to which add the . equations in the 
Table on Page three, when fejie clock is fast, and subtract 
it when slow, for the mean or clocl^tinie. 

2d. As the day ends at "mfclqight, the rising, setting and 
southing of the Mpon, when after that time is found a- 
gainst tjie su'ccee'ding day : So on the night of or (follow- 
ing) the 8th of January, the Moon rises at 2 h. 15 min. 
afte'r midnight, viz. in the morning of the 9th, not at 
1 hour 19 minutes, the time opposite the 8th, which is 
that of its rising the preceding morning. 
3d. The risings, settings or southing of a Star may be 
carried several days backwards by adding, or forward by 
subtracting 4 minutes per day. For instance, on the 1 2th 
day of January Sirius is south at 1 1 hours 3 minutes, 
adding 12 minutes for three days sooner we have 11 h. 
15 minutes for the southing on the 9th, and by deducting 
8 m. for two days later we have 10 h. 55 m. for that of 

, the 1 4th of the same month. 



Chronological Cycles. 

Dominical Letters E. D. |j Solar Cycle 
Epact - - 1 7 || Lunar Cycle 

Moveable Feasts. 



SepCuagesima, January 26 J 
Quinquagesima, Feh'ry 9 j 
Ash Wednesday, Feb'ry 12 
twiddle Lent, March 8 

Palm Sunday, March 22 
Easter, March - 29 



Low Sunday, April 
Rogation, May* 
Ascension, May 
Whitsunday, May 
Trinity, May 
Advent, November 



.5 
3 
7 

•17 

24'. 
29 



Astronomical Characters Explained, 



or p Sun 
"(J Mpcn 

.$, Mercury 
i ^ Venus 
I S Mars 
|j y. Jupiter 
}j h Saturn 

Herschell 



&l fl's Asc. Node 
d Conjunction 5 " 
(O Opposition 
□ Qua rule 
y" Aries 
# Taurus 
n Gemini f 
dg Caucer 



ft Lea. % • 
t% Virgo 
£: Libra 
]J\ Scorpio 
£ Sagitanus 
V? Capricorn us 
2£ Aquarius 
K Pisces. 



*9 







A TABLE OF THE EQUATION OF TIME, 

For regulating Clocks and Watches for 1812. 
Note, fa- Clock too fast, that is, )<our Clock, to be set right, must 
be so much faster than the Sun Dial. Slo. Cloek too slow, that j 
is, your Clock must be so much slower than the Sun Dial. 



Days. 
1 

3 
5 
7 
9 

11 
13 
15 

17 
• 19 
21 
23 
25 
27 
29 
31 



Days. 



J ami 
min 

3ia 

4 

5 

6 

7 



avy 
tec: 
.$? 

36 
31 

25 

1C 

5 

52 
36 



10 


18 


to 


56 


11 


32 


12, 





12 


35 



Feb 

mi n. 

14 ■: 

14 

u 

14 
U 

14 
14 
14 
14 
14 
13 
13 
13 
1 2 



['Mai 
'mi?i. 
;12?a 
12 
11 

: n ■ 

■10 

I 

N 

6 
5 

4 
I 4 



ch. 

ii 

44 
15 

45 

13 

39 

5 

SO 
54 
17 
41 
4 
27 
50 
13 



Apr 

■/>■,■ 



it. 

5c 1 C. 



May. 



" June. 
vrniii, sec. 



8 


a. 55 3 si 


o. b 


2 slo 


33 


3 


18 3 


20 


2 


15 


2 


43'3 


32 


1 


55 


o 


8 3 


4i 


1 


34 


1 


So 3 


49 


1 


11 


1 


0|3- 


5t4 





48 





28|3 


$?: 





24 


o* 


lo. 2 r 3 


58 


fa. 


1 


Q 


52:3 


56 





27 





59.3 


52 





58 


1 


25 


3 


45 |l 


19 


1 


49 


3 


35 


1 


45 


2 


1. 


o 


26 


2 


11 


2 


- 31 


3 


1J 





36 


2 


50 


i 


59 

42 


3 






July. 

ni'i. sec 



1 |3 

S3 

5\€ 

7 4 

9 4 

11 is 

13 5 

U |5 

17 !S 

19 |5 

21 ! 5 

23 ' 



20 

27 

29 
.11 



24 

46 
8 

27 

46 
2 

17 

30 

40 

51 

58J2 
32 
6 I 
C 1 
4 

50 



August r,S'eptem.|OctobcT.|Xc)vem .Decern. 
i tin. sc'C. \.'iwi. secA&iin. sec}.min. see.' min. tee, 
fa 56 iiFslalS |l0 sio.25 1 Iosio.15 , iO*iio»34 



i'J 
47 JO 
36 j 1 . 
23J2 
7 2 
49 3 
29 4 



40 7 
19 7 
47 8 
24 9 
39 9 



54 fll 
53 jli 
13112 
54'l2 
35:13 
17 13 

*»Q h A. 

4134 

23 \U 
4 j 15 

46il5 

2711 5, 
7 16 

46.16 
16 



2|16. 


• 16 


38 16 


13 ! 


13 16 


? ! 


47 15 


58 


17*15 


45 


ASM 


29 


12 15 


8 


37 


14 


45 


58 


14 


IS 


18 


lo 


48 


35 


13 


15 


49 


12 


39 





12 


(J 


18 


11 


19 


14 




_ 



43 
58 
7 
13 
18 
22 
23.. 
24 
25 
25 
24 
36 
35 
34 
32 



How to set a Clock or Watch by this Table. Tor example, Ja- 
nuary 1st. I find by looking into the Table, that the Clock to be 
right must be 3 minutes 39 seconds faster than a Sun Dial ; there- 
fore, 1 set it sq much faster. And so of the rest. Tv.'elve o'clock 
is the best time to set a Clock or Watch by a sun dial. 

Note. A Sun Dial strews Solar 6? apparent time, but a Clock, 
he. should be set to eqnal or mean time, as the Table directs. 






y 






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Solar and Lunar Eclipses in 1812, 

first of the Sun, on the twelfth day of February at 2 h. 45 m. in 
the afternoon, invisible, by reason of the moon's great North 
Latitude. 

Second of the Moon, on the 26th and 2rth dava of February, 
visible as follows, viz. 

of the Eclipse at 10 
of total darkness at 1 1 
filtptical 8 at 

Middle at 

Oof total d aa'kness at 1 
£of the Eclipse at 2 



**, 



Beginning' 



End 



39 J 
44 1-23 

36 Ik 



Afternoon. 



36 U&\ 

37 \ .. • 

c r j 1-2 >• morning. 



25 



Digets Eclipsed 20 1-2 ¥> om the South side of the- Earth shadow. 



mg, mvjsiwe. 

Fourth of the Sun, on the 6di day of August, at 11 h. 43m. in 

the afternoon, invisible:. 
Fifth of the Moon,, on the 22d day of August, at 9h. 43 m. in the 

morning, invisible. 
Sixth, of the Sun, on the 5th day of September, at 2h. 7 m. in the 
afternoon, invisible, by reason of the moon's gre * North Lati- 
tude. 

Varus -until be evening Star until the first day of August t ihen morn- 
ing titui 1 to ilie end oj the yeui\ 



' 



ORTGIN OF THE NAMES OF THE SEtERAL MONTHS. 



January, so called from the Roman Idol Janus. 
February, from a feast held by the Romans, in behalf of the 
Shades of the Dead, called Ftbrua. 

*\larck. — Nuvna, King- of Rome, is said to have given this month 
} the name of his supposed Father Mars. 

April, derived i\-i>m the Latin Jprilis- or ^pjerioi, to open, because 
tY Earth' then begins to open hej bosom 
I ^M«#, cailed by Romu us Minus, in honour of his Senators and 
| Nobles, who were named Mujotes — Others derive the name from 
Jd^ja, the mother of Mercury. 

June, called by Romulus, jftbtriiis, in honour of the youth of Rome, 
who served him in war.— Ovid says, it took its name from Juno- 

July, antientiy called Qpintilfo, the fifth of Romulus* his year 
began at, March. Mark Anthony gave it its present name m ho- 
nour of Julius C<?sar,\v\\c was born in it- 

,'bigust, formerly Sextiii*, but .changed in honour of Augustus. 
September, still retains its old name, derived from Septimus, the 
r seventh from Mu'cki 

October, has also retained its old name, from its being the 
eigiuh month in ilonuilus's Calendar. 

.Yovember, from JS'owm, the ninth month in the year of Romulus. 
December, from Decern, ten, being the tenth month, as above. 
,*.. «.. . « 

... Kwi i m i »i»>m »i w m i i ■ ! ■« i» iw ■ni a»», iii»..n i. ^ i — , m mtmm „ , 



wmmxmm 



4> 



1 lAt <kj^$*A>J>$0 <fM/*A-£ S 

~T1^7h~JANUARY, hatiT" 



Moon's Phases. 



D. 

First]) 6 

New@14~ 
First]) 20 
Full Q28 



H. 

3 

3 



M. 

4 A. 

3-M 

35 A. 

23 M 



1 &* 



| 2 


T 


1 $f; 


4jS 


m 


aM 


7 


T 


8 


W 


9 


T 


10 


F 


11 


S 


\ 12 


E 


13 


M 


14 


T 


15 


VV 


16 


T 


17 


F 


18 


S 


19 


E 


20 


M 


21. 


T 


2i 


W 


23 


T 


2t 


F 


2, 


S 


26. 


E 


2Z 


M 


29 


T 


2Q 


W 


3 i 


T 


31 


£ 



MslceUaneous 
Particulars. 




<$ Sets 9, 36. 

n W 

Windy; 

<[ in- Perigee. 

^ Stationary 

Epiphany. 

^ South 10 45 

Snoiv. " 
Days 9 h.44m, 

long. ^ 
Sirius, so. 113. 

T? rises 5 38. 

Clear 1st Cold 
Spicaris. 1.1 58 
Din Perigee. 
Days incr. 20 m 



© Enters 



$ rises 2 3. 
B's. eye, so. 8 5 



% South 9 19 
£ Stationary. 



7H sets 2 7,. 
Din Apogee. 



Mf** 



tlA.'.rfil'VV, 



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f 



=■6. 



THE WAY TO WEALTH, 

Written by Dr. Franklin. 
?! Being a Preface to an old Pennsylvania Almanack, called 
Poor Richard imfiroved. 

Courteous Reader !,— -I have heard, that nothing gives an 

fj authour so great a pleasure, as to find his works respect- 

li ! ul ly quoted by others. Judge, then, how much I must 

I |[ have been gratified by an Incident I am going to relate you. 

t+ m ii I stopped my horse lately, where a great number of people 

!' v ere collected at an auction of merchants- goods. The 

Ii hour of sale not being come, they were conversing on the 

|| badness of the times, and one of the company called to a 

r ' Ii plain clean old man, with white locks— 4 Pray, Father Abra- 

il ham, what think you of the times ? Will not these heavy 

J j| taxes quite ruin the country? How shall we ever be able 

•| to pay them ? What would you advise us to-?* — Father A- 

?: ...(ham stood up and replied, i If you would have my ad- ; 

|| vice, I will give it you in short, "for a word to the wise is 

(I ■r.ough," as Poor Richard, says** They joined in desiring 

j !j|m to speak his mind, and gatheiing around him he pro- 

• fi cceded as follows : < Friends, says he, the taxes are indeed 

|j vjry heavy: and if those laid on by the government were 

J i he only ones we had to pay, we might more easily dis- 
charge them ; but we have many others, and much mure 
,11 grievous to some of us. We ate taxed twice as much by 
f our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four. 
fj timeias much by our folly ; and from these taxes the com- 
|j inissioners .cannot ease or deliver us, by allowing an abate- 
jj merit, however, Ictus hearken to good advice, and soroe- 
i-j thing may be done for us; {t -God helps them that help 
f] . ^mseives," as Poor Richard, says. 

'I. ' It would be thought a hard government that shoul J 
jj *x its people one tenth part of their time, to be employed 
| in if s service : but idleness taxes many of us much rnoie ; 
6| sloth, by bringing on diseases, absolutely- shortens life. — 
* fj •'-' Sloth like rust, consumes faster than labour wears, while 

jj the key used is. always bright," as Poor Richard says.— 
|j But dost thou love life, then do not squander time, for that 
|[ is the stuff life is made of," as Poor Richard says.— How 
|j much more than is necessary do we spend in sleep; for- 
jfj getting that g The sleeping fox catches no poultry, and 
j| that there will be sleeping enough in the grave," -^ Poor 
}\ Richard says. 



*y$^+M* 


1 


^ c^feu< ji*'" ^^ 


II. Month FEBF 


ARY hath 29^1ays. 




. . t>, I 


Planet's Places. See. 


' $ : s. ! 
^Lat. 


< 


Moon s Phases, 
;l D. H. M, 




©!_f_jb 


^pPI 


M& 


: 


75 


jsftiv* 


QiriK 


«% R^;Oeg 




Last <L 5 7 25 M 


1 


12 23 


4 


27 3! 8 


17l K;2 N. 




fj New ©12 2 45 A. 


7 


i8|23 


4 


26; 7jl 6 


22 9J5 N.j 




1 First Jr 19 6 12 M 


1-3 2 4' 2 3 


5 


26 12J23 


29 


9!0 N . i 




1 Full O 2T ° 3G M 


l9b0-3 


5 


£6-J6,y 


^X 


9,1 5 S. j 




1 [25iH)23 




6j20|20i t 


15 8J2.S. ! 

1 ... 1 


5 ' 


«^ U'-i Miscellaneous \ Sw> 




>v,:rCs 


*\loo?is { J>ioon ■ Jiloooii 


h p 


Particu ars. i n ^ s 


if&8 


i'.clirie 


place rises South i 


£ 




j 


H. M . 

6 52 


5 8 


ftirtfc 


S.D. {*?• M- H. Ai 




<£ sets 9, 18. j 


17 17j 2~s| 9 12 2 44 




±E 


Sexagesinra. i^ 51 


5 9 


17 00 il lOilO 7 3 26 




3M 


You. may look 1 6 50; 5 10 


16 42 *2 11 2 4 8 




: 4 I T 


/or i?aw ' 16 49 5, 11 


16 25*rrt 4JJ 1 56 4 51 


- 


5|W 


about this % 48. 5 12 


i6 7J 16; Morn.! 5 36 




6| T 


/r/we. 


6 47 


5 13 


15 49 ! ; 28! 53 6 22 ] 




7jF 


T£ south 8 23 A 


6 47 


5 13 


15 30' £ 1 1 1 1 48 


7 11 1 




1 3S 


7*s sets 1 54. 


6 46 


5 14 


15 ill ' 24 2 46 


8 3 




9\E 


Q,innquagesima 


6 45 


5 154 4 52 'vf $i 3 43 


8 58 j 




\ io;m 

ll : T 




6 44 


5 16 14 33 22 4 38 


9 55 ! 




Frost, 


6 43J5 17 14 14 ~ 6] 5 30 


10 53: 




12 W 


Eclip.invis. 6 42|5 18 13 54 21 6..20 


11 51 




13:T 


Tp rises 3.45. 6 41J5 19 13 34^, 6 1 Sets. 


A. 48 




• 14 F 


Valentine 6 40;5 20.13 14 '2.1 7 47 


1 44 




J "15|S 
i'l7!M 


fierhafis 6 >39 5 211^ 5 4; y- 6; -.8 55 


2 39 




Snow. 6 3S ; 5 22 12 33 2 1 1 10 5 


3 33 




Day 10 h. 4.6, m 6 37 5 25,12 12 n 5jll 12 


4 26 


18JT 


7*s sets 1 15 


6 36 5 24 ( 11 51; 19'Morn. 


5 19 


[ 19{W ! enter K 


6 35 5 25|11 30 n 3| 16J 6 12 


20 T 1 


6 33 5 27 


11 9 16; I 17; 7 5 




r 2l|F 


% Stationary. 6 37 5 28 


10 47 ! 29 2 15; 7 58 




22 S 


Hard Frost. 


6 315 29 


10 26 op 12 


3 9! 8 49- 




23 


K 




6 295 31 


10 4 25 


3 54; 9 39 




j 24 


M 




6 28 


5 32 


9 42 £ 7 
9 20' ' 19 


4 42i 10 27 




25 


T 


Windy. 


6 27 


5 33 


5 24* I 1 13 


: 


26 


W| 


6 2f 


5 34 


8 ^7 ^ 1 
8 33 13 


6 OO; 11 58 




27 


1 J> Fclip. vis. 


6 25 


5 36 


Rises JMoin 


■ 


i 28 


F J) in Apogee 6 24 


5 £6 


8 12 25 


7 13 42 




j 29 S | . . |6 23 


5 37 


7 50 £h 7 


8 $] 1 24 






I 



■■ 




I 



I 



* If lime be of all things the most precious, wasting time 
must be,' as Poor Richard, *.' the greatest prodigality ;" since 
as he elsewhere tells us, " Lost time is never found again ; 
Sc wnat we call time enough, always proves little enough :" 
Let us then up and be doing, and doing, to the purpose ; 
for by diligence we shall do more with less perplexity. — 
" Sloth makes ail things difficult, but industry all easy ; and 
he that riseth late, must trot all day, and shall scaite over- 
take his business at night ; whilst laziness travels so slowly, 
that poverty soon overtakes him. Drive thy business, let 
not that drive thee ; and early to bed, and early t<|> rise, 
makes a man-healthy, wealthy and wise," . as Poor Hichard 
says. 
j 'So what signifies wishing and hoping for better times ? 
We may make these times better, if we bestir ourselves. 
Industry need not wish, and he that lives upon hope will 
j die fasting. " There are no gains without pains ; then help 
j hands, for I have no lands," or if I have, they are smartly 
1 taxed. " He that hath a trade, hath an estate ; and he that 
hatha calling, hath an office of profit and honour,-' as 
Poor Richard says ; but then the trade must be worked at, 
j and the calling well followed, or neithei the estate nor the 
office will enable \is to pay our taxes. If we are industri- 
ous, we shall never starve; for,-" at the working man's 
I house hunger looks in, but dares not enter." Nor will the 
j bailifFor the constable enter, for " Industry pays debts, while 
despair encreaseth-them." What though you have found 
no treasure, nor has any rich relation left you a legacy, " di- 
ligence is the mother of good luck, and God gives ail things 
co industry. Then plough deep while the sluggards sleep, 
and you shall have corn to sell and to keep." . Work while 
it is called to-day, for you know not how much you may 
be hindered to-morrow. " One to day is wouh two to- 
morrows," as Poor Richard 'says; and farther, "never leave 
that till to-morrow which you can do to day." If you were 
a servant, would you not be ashamed that a good- master 
j should catch you idle ? Are you then your own master ?— 
Be ashamed to catch yourself idle,when there is so much 
to be £one for yourself, your family and your country. -r- 
j Handle your tools without mittens ; remember, that " The 
cat in gloves catch.es no mice," as Poor Richard says. It 
is true, there is much to be done, and perhaps, you are 
weak handed ; but stick to it steadily,and you will see great 
e fleets ; for, "Constant dropping wears away stones ; and j 



J 



Ill Month MARCH, hath 31 Days. 



Moon's Phases. 



Last <l 
New 
First ]> 
Full o 



D. 

6. 
13 

19 

27 



Planet's Places, &c. 

6 

7 

7 



> 'AIiscetfancGtis 
P** i 
r ^ ^ f particulars. 






1 i; •■ J sets 9 06 

2 M 
Cold, 



3r T 

4 W 
5T 
6P 
7 S 

9 M 

H l0 T 
1 1 w 

12T 

13F 

i4lS 

15 D 

itix 

U|W 

19|"1 

oft? 

2 -Is 
22i/; 
3 M 



% :■' ts 00 46 
D Apogee 

I J [fawnt. 




Day 1 lh24m;6 

ex/wcl high 6 

^sets I 44 ;6 

7*ssets H 34 6 

wind* which ' 6 

*&£& 6w7g j : 6 

rem. |6 

declip invis.|6 

])iri Perogee 6 

F? rises 2 ^ 16 

blustry 
Siriussl 1 57 

♦ iv < either. 
(J>cts 9 i 1 
Q tuts y* 
# south 3 1 8 
Palm Sunday 

/vict. so 1 55 



1. 



K' y 






#; 



by diligence and patience the mouse ate in two the cable ; 

< and little strokes fell great oaks " 

4 Methinks I hear some of you say, " Must a man afford 
himself no leisure ?" I will tell thee, my friend, what Poor 
Richard says; "Employ thy time well, if thou meanest to 
gain leisure ; and, since thou art not sure of a minute, throw 
not away an hour.'* Lehure is time for doing something 
useful ; this leisure the diligent man wHl obtain, but the far 
zy man never ; for « A life of leisure and a life of laziness 
are two things, . Many without labour, would live by their 
wits only, but they break for the want of stock >" whereas 
industry gives comfort, and plenty, and respect. " Fly 
pleasures ai*d they will follow you, The diligent spinner 
has a large shift ; and now I have a sheep and a cow, every 

j body bids me good -morrow." 

II. ' But with, our industry, we must likewise be steady, 

| settled, and careful, and oversee our ovviv affairs with our 
own; eyes, and not trust too much to others ; for, as Poor 
Richard says. 

" I never saw an ^ft-removed tree, 
• Nor j et an oft removed family, 

That throve so well as those that settledbe." 

| And again, "Three lemovcs are as bad as a fire ;" & again, 
i( i Keep thy shop" and thy shop will keep thee; and again, 
" If you would have your business done, go, if not 3 send." 
And again, -, 

*' He that by the plough would thrive, , 
v Himself niu^t, either hold or drive." 

| And again, " The eye of a master will do more work' than j 
both his hands ;" and again, " Want of care does us more 
damage than want of knowledge; and again, "Not to 
oversee workmen, is to leave them your purse open ; trust- 
ing too much to others care-is the^uin of many ;" for " If 
you would have a faithful servant, and one that you like, 
serve yourself. A little neglect may breed great mischief ; I 
, for want of a nail the shoe was lost ; for want of a shoe the 
I horse was lost ; and for want of a horse the rider was lost," 
( being overtaken and slain by the enemy ; all for want of a 
little care about a. .horse-shoe nail. 

III. ' So much for industry, my friends, and attention to 
one's own business; but to these we must add frugality, if. 
we would make our industry more certainly successful, 
I A man may, if he knows not how to save as he gets 



IV Month, APRIL, hath 30 days. 




Planet's Places, &c. | J> % 


Moon's Phases. 


(0 


© 


Ijb /V .'! J 2 $ 'ft ;La v 


D. H. M. 


*•< 

U3 


r 


in. vf n'o b r;n^ Deg 


Last { 4 5 50 A 


1 


12 


23 


8 29 16 21 20 


6 5 $ 


New ® ll 10 12M 


7 


18 


23 


8 29 20 j2 8 g 


61 N 


First ]) 18 7 26 M 


13 


2 4 


23 


8 05 24 n 12 


65 S. 


Fuil O 25 11 55 M 


19 29 


22J 8 1 29 


12 19 


5 2 S 


25 


s 


22] 8; 2 D 


18 13 


54 N 


*£ (;> T Miscellaneous '$#n j 5 


mi 


iSiiffs r .J\ voiii> 


tfl Vp?i . JVIOGTI 


.r Paitculars, \rim,\ : s0ts. 


dec line phxe 


rises -.south. 


QQ | KOH M W'6*3.!>; -v. i x 


H.\ ie.n. 








1 1 W '<j' sets" 9, 3. i 5 46 6 1 4> 4 4C 4 3 


10 38 


3 Id 


2-T 5 4516 15 


5 3 16 


11 34 


3 58 


3;F £ $£ 5 44J6. 16 


5 26 29 


m orn 


4 49 


*S Showry, 15 43 6 17 


; 5 49vf 12 


30 


5 4 1 ! 


5 


D Low-Sundav. 5 42 6 18 


6 12 25 


1 19 


6 3 r 1 


6 


M -7*s. sets 9,50 5 41 6 19 


6 -34 2S 8 


2 8 


.7 30 


7 


T j ; 5 40i6 20 


6 57. *2 


2 56 


8 26 ! 


8 


W % sets 00 5. ^5 39J6 21 


7 I9^K f 


3 38 


9 21 


9 


T j J5 386 22 


7 42 


22 


4 20 


10 17 


10 


l ' DinPerop;ee. 5 37,6 23 


8 4 


y^ 7 


5 2 


11 13 


11 


S : j5 36,6 24 


8 26 


■ 22f sets 


A. 8 


12 


£>¥<? 5 35 6 25 


8 48 (j 7 7 54 


1 6" 


13 


M Day 12 h. 52m 5 34 6 26 


9 lOt 22 9 3 


2 3 


14 


T b"ses00 16. 5 33 6 27 


9 31 Q 7*10 9 


3 1 


15 


Wi 


5 32 6 28 


9 53j 2111 10 


3 bfl 


16 


*■ j h Sationary 


5 3i;6 29 


10 14 ^5 5 morn 


4 52 


17 


F 


You may 


5 30 


6 30 


10 35\ 18 4 


5 45 


18 


S 


look for 


5 28 


6 32 


10 56 ^ lj.O 53 


6 35 


19 


® i £ Elongation. 


5 27 


6 33 


11 17. 1 3 } 1 35 


7 24 


20 


M j Rain 


5 26 


5 34 


11 37" 2 5; 2 16 


8 9 


21 


* enters Y" 


5 24 


6 36. 


11 58'rrp 7\ 2 51 


8 53 ! 


22 


& | $ south 1 2 1 


5 23 


6 37 


12 18 


19| 3 24 


9 36 I 


23 


' j about these 


5 22 


6 38 


12 38 


£. i! 3 53 


10 18.1 


24 


z, ! 2> in A pogee 
§_ Insets 8 56. 


5 21 


6 39 


12 58 


" 13 4 26 


u ij 


25 


5 20 


6 40 


13 17 


25 4 56 


11 44 1 

" i 


26 


~ ibsouth4 21 


5 19 6.41 


13 37 


m Arises. 


ruom 1 


27 


M 


days. 


5 18 ; 6 42 


13 56i " 18 1 7 46 


29 1 


28 


T 


5 176 43 


14 15! ♦ lj 8 40 


1 15'| 


29 


W 


£ Stationary 


5 16 6 44 


14 33! 13', 9 37 2 2 ! 


30 


T 




5 15 6 45 


14 52 26 to 33 2 53 J. 


jL . 



' 






a 



ii^jAXS. 






" -keep his nose all his life to the grindstone, and die not 
worth a groat at last. A fat kitchen makes a lean will ;** 
and 

" Many estates are Spent in the fretting, 

Since women for tea forsook spinning and knitting, 

And men for- punch forsook hewing and splitting.* 

« If you would be wealthy, think of saving, as well as of get- 
ting. The Indies have not made Spain rich, because her 
outgoes are greater than her incomes.*' 

« Away, then, with your expensive follies, and you will 
not then have so much cause to complain of hard times, 
heavy taxes, and chargeable families For 
"Women and wine, game and deceit, 
Make the wealth sm:dl, and lie want great.*, 

And farther, " What maintains one vice, would bring up 
two children " You may think, perhaps, that a little ica 
or a Httle punch now and then, diet a little more costly, 
deaths a little frner, and a liule entertainment now and 
tl. ■:.'">. can be no great matter; but remember, " Many a 
little makes a mickfe.'" Beware of little exptnces;"A 
small leak wili-sin^ a great ship," as Poor Richard says ; 
and again, " Who dainties love, shall beggars prove ;" and 
moreover, " Fools make feasts, and wise men eat them." 
Her?, you are all got together to this sale of fineries and 
nick-nacks. You 'call them goods : but, if you do not take 
care, they will prove evils to some of you. You expect 
they will be sold cheap, and, perns -ps, they ma> for less 
than they cost ; but, if yen have no occaaion for them, they 
must -be dear to you. Remember what Poor fiicharch 
says, « Buy what fhou hast no need of, and ere long thou 
shaft sell thy necessaries " And again, " At a gre t pen 
ny worth pause awhile" He means, that perhaps the] 
cheapness is apparent only, and not real ; or the bargain, 
by straitening thee in thy business, may do thee more ^ 
harir* thSn good, Form anoO er place he says, " M any | 
bayi been ruined by buying good pennyworths." Again, ■ 
t. T t j s foolish toby out money in a purchase ofrepen-j 
tance ;" and yet this folly is practised every day at auc- 
tions, for want of minding the Almanac, Many a one, for 
the sake of jinery on the bid.., h.s gone with a hungry bch 
lv, and have starved their families ; « Silks and *; ttins, 
scarlets and velvets, put out the kitchen fire," as Poor 
l Richard say's, These arc not the necessaries of life 4 they 
I car. scarcefviwB called the conveniences ; and yet only be 



*>, 



V Month MAY, fa ath 3 1 days. 



: ll 



Moon's Phases, 

D. H 

Last & 



New® 10 
First D 1 7 
Full Q26 



6 
11 





M. 

22 M. 
24 A. 
1 A. 
19 M-. 



gk 


0|$ IfcjsB 


J 


9 


g 


U! 


aim. ^.25 


n 


n 


8 


1 


U22 : 8 


3 


725 


24 


7 


17 22 r 8. 


4 


ws 


22 


13 


2321j 7 


5 


15| 7 


18 


1 9 ; 2 8 s 2 1 J 7 


K 


19 14 


16 


25 


ini2l! 7 


3 


i23 


19 


15 



5 

4 

45 
41 
3 5 



Q Q 

lfri 

2 sat 

3Z> 

4m 

5-tu 

6:w 

7|th 

Sifi'i 

9 ! sat 

IOJjD 

M'ai 

12|tu 

13|w 



Miscellaneous 
Particulars. 



j &tm | »S;/n/| 5Ws \MoQii 
i rise*, j se* 

■H.M.iH. 



(J Sets 8, 5 3. 



Rogation, 



Fain. 

6 W$ 
Ascension 
])ib Perigee. 

d U 9 
§ south 12 2. 
A ret. sets 10 3 
% sets 10 16 



5 1 



th| 

In] 
sat 
Z) 
m > 

tu! 

W 
th 

fii 
sat 
D 
25 m 
^6jtu 
27ivv 
2f;kh 
2ofri 

30 sat 

3 1 \D 



14 



Hard Rain U 
Lyra south 2 56:5 
Whit-Sunday 

Holiiday. 



J ? so2 44£T?'3£ 
enters a 

£ Stationary- 
Trinity. 
J sets 8 >6 
h so. 2h. 19 m 



6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
6 
6 
4J6 
s'g 

s!e 

2|6 

15 

16 

07 

OJ-7 

59|7 

58j7 

58 7 



M 

46 
4 7 

4 7 
48 
49 
50 
5 

52 
53 
54 

5 5 
5 6 
5? 
57 
58 
55 

5-' 
C: 
G 



Sfioivry. 


4 54 7 
4 54J7 


Days 14 h 14 m 


4 5 3|7 


long. 


4 53j7 




4 $217 



55 7 
5 5)7 



lecline i place, 

15 lb y? j 
15 28' 



15 46 

16 3 
16 20 
16 37 
16 5 4 



10 

26 
42 
5 7' 
13 
27 
42 
56 
) 10 
24 
37 
50 



,9 
19 
19 

20 3 

20 15 

20 27 

3120 38] fit 

4 20 50| 

5 21 
5121 
6J2 1 

ej2i 

fbl 

R ;. 1 



2li 
3i!v? 



vKogtz Moons 
rises. 



10 22 

Morn 

12 

57 

1 41 

2 24 

3 OC' 

3 42 

4 24 

5 2 



n liSets. 

15 I 8 56 

29; 9 56 
55 13 j 10 49 

26J1 1 36 
& 9iMorn 

22! 17 



1 2.6 



28| 2 00 

9| asi 

2;l 3 3 
3j 3 31 

15| 

27: 

10 Rises 



4 41 



South 
hi. M 

3~44 

4 36 

5 30 

6 23 

7 17 

8 10 

9 4 
9 58 

10 53 

11 50 
A, 47 

1 45 

2 42 

3 37 

4 30 

5 20 

6 07 

6 52 

7 36 

8 18 

9 00 
'- 42 

lQ 2,6 
1 1 12 

i 1 %<r 



8 28! 49 

9 20J 1 40 
9] 2 S3 

5o! 3 2o 

1 c'j\ 4 i.> 






— ggga s T 4->»^»gaBeaggas=^ 

cause they look pretty, how many want to have them ? By 
these, and other extravagancies, the genteel are reduced 
to poverty, and forced to borrow of those whom they for- 
merly despised, but, who through industry and frugality, 
have maintained their standing; in which case it appears 
plainly, that " A ploughman on his legs is higher than a t 
gentleman on lis knees," as Poor Richard says. Perhaps 
they have had a small estate left them, which they knew 
not the getting of; they think, " It is day, and will never 
bo night ;" that a little to be spent out of so much is not 
worth minding ; but" Always taking out of the meal-tub, 
and never putting -in, soon comes to^the bottom," as Poor 
Richard says ; and then, " When the well is dry, they 
know the worth of water." But this they might have 
known before, if they had taken his advice : If you would 
know the value of money, go and try to borrow some; 
for " He that goes a borrowing goes a sorrowing," as Poor 
Richard says ; and, indeed, so does he that lends to such 
people, when he does not g^t it again. Poor Dick farther 
advises and says, 

Ai Fond pride of dress is sure a very curse ; ' ; 

Ere fancy you consult, consult your purse." 

And again, li Pride is as loud a beggar as Want, and a 
great deal more saucy." When you have bought one 
hne thing, you must buy ten more, that your appearance 
be all of a-piece ; but Poor Dick says, " It is easier to sup- 
press the first desire, than to satisfy all that follow it :" 
And it is as truly folly for the po«r to ape the rich, as for 
the frog to swell, in order to equal the ox. 
*' Vessels larg*e may venture. more, - 
But little boats should keep near shore." 

It is, however, a folly soon punished : f or, as Poor Rich- 
ard says, "Pride that dines on vanity, sups on contempt: 
Pride breakfasted with plenty, dined with poverty, and sup- 
ped with infamy." And, after all, of what use is this 
pride of appearance, for which so much is risked, so much 
is suffered ? It cannot promote health nor ease pain ; it 
makes no increase of merit in a person ; it creates envy; 
it hastens misfortune. 

« But- what madness must it be to run in debt for these 
superfluities? We are offered, by the terms of this sale, 
six months credit ; and that perhaps, has induced some of 
us to attend it, because we cannot spare the ready money, 
and hope now to be fine without it. But ah ! think what 
you do when you run in debt ; you give to another power 




%&&/ e-^S*^'^*^**^*^^ 



VI. M6&. 



hath 30 days. 



Moon's Phases, 

Last ([/ 2 9 55 M 

New Q 9 2 35 M 

First ]>• 16 3 52 A. 

Full O 24 2 18 A. 



IjIJIO 

2 ( tue 
3 we 
4thu 

\T 

6]sat 

: 7/> 

8;mc 
) 9/lut 
HO we 

lllhu 
-12|fri 

ISjsat 

\4,D 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 



mc 
tue 
we 
hii 
hi 
sat 
D 
mo 
tue 
we 
thu 
in 

Slit 

D 

mo 

tue 



Miscellaneous 
Particulars, 



$ sets b, 29. 

Spica sets 2 3. 
Din Perigee. 

$ Elongation. 
1/ sets 8 56. 
Pcrhajis Rain, 

but if not, 
Arc. so. 8, 52 
$ south 9 52 
gtoi ? 2 blame me. 

V south 00 56. 
Day 14 h. 26 m 
Spica sets 1 9 

])in Apogee 
J sets 8 6 

enter 55 the 
longest day. 
Cloudy 

south 12 3 

<?3b 



4% a 




- 









|I6=5 






jj over your liberty. If you cannot pay at the time, you' 
(J mil be ashamed to see your creditor ; } : gu will be in fear 
|; w hen you speak to mm ; you will make poor, pitiful, sneak- 
|] ing, excuses ; and, by degrees, come to lose your veracity, 
jj and sink into base downright lying ; &r " The &?cezd vice 
|j is lying, the</£r«t is running in debt," as Poor Richard says ; 

!'{ and again to the ^irae purpose, " Lying rides upon Debt's 
| beck ;*' whereas a free-born American ought sjot to be 
|! «t shamed to see or to speak to any man living. But pover-' 
| ij often deprives a man of all spirit and virtue. <4 It is 

i] hard ior an empty bag to sL.nd upright.** Wlwft would I 
j.you think of thai pnjek^pr of that government, w ho should 
§ issue aii edict forbidding you to dress. 'ike a gentleman 01 
gentlewoman, on pain of imprisonment or servitude ? — 
Would you not say you were iVee, have a right to dress 
as you please, and that such an edict wou*d be a breach of 
your privileges* &&■& such a government tyrannical ? .And. 
yet you are about to put youiself under that tyranny, when j 
i you run in dent for such dress ! Your creditor has authori-' 
| ty, H his pleasure, to deprive you of your liberty, by con- 
j fining you in goal for Hfe, or by selling you for a servant, 
i if yoQ should not be able to pay him. When you have got 
perhaps, think little of payment ; 
>, *<■ Creditors have better memo- 
ries than debtors ; creditors are a superstitious sect, great 
observers of set days and times." The day comes round !j 
before you are aware, and the demand is made before you , 
are prepared to satisfy it : or, If you bear your debt in 
I mind, the term which* at fet seemed so long, will? as it 
Ij lessens, appear extremely short. Time will seem to have j 
I! added wings to his heeisus well as his shoulders. " Those 
fj have a short Lent who owe money to be paid at Easter.'" 
ij At present, perhaps-, you may think y em selves in thriving 
fj circumstances, and that you can bear a little extravagance 
|j without injury . but 



N ) our bargain, you may 
' but as Poor Richard s. 



*- For a?re and 
Kg mar,-.\m: si 



save while youraay*. 
its a w iioie day, ' 



I din may be temporary and uncertain, but ever, while you 
| live, ex pence is constant and certain ; and, " It is easier 
■lj to build two chimnies, than to keep one inTuei," as Poor 
jj Richard says : So, « Rather go to bed supperless than rise 
| in debt." 

* ( Oct ulia* you can, and what yon get hold,. 

'Tis the stone thai wiil turn ail your lead into geld." 



L 



i 



"TH — k " <1 "" ' ""T;miM hi ii u„ 



AS: 



And when you have got the philosopher's stone, sure you 
will no longer complain of bad times or the difficulty of 
paying taxes. 

IV. 4 This doctrine> my friends, is reason and wisdom ; 
but, after all, do not depend too much upon your own in- 
dustry and frugality, 8c prudence, thuugh excellent things ; 
for they may all be blasted without the blessing of Heaven ; 
and thereiore, ask that blessing humbly, and be not uncha- 
f ritable to these that at present seem to want it, but com- 
J fort and help them. Remember Job suffered, and was 
afterwards prosperous. 

'And now, to conclude, "Experience keeps a dear 
school, but fools will learn in no other," as I J oer Richard 
says, wd scarce in that ; for, it is true, « We may give 
advice, but we cannot give conduct ;" however, remem- 
ber this, " They that will not be counselled, cannot be help 
ed ;" ancl further, that, " If you will not hear Reason, she 
will surely rap your knuckles," as Poor Richard says. 
Thus the old gentleman ended his harangue. The 
* people heard it, and approved the doctrine, and immedi- 
ately practised the contrary, just as if it had been a com- 
mon sermon ; for the auction opened, and they began to 
buy extravagantly. — I found the good man had thoroughly 
studied my Almanacs, and digested all I had dropt on 
these topics during the course of twenty-five years. The 
frequent mention he made of me must have tired any one 



else ; but my vanity 



was wonderfully delighted with it, 



ough I was conscious that not a tenth part ot the wisdom 
was my own, which he ascribed to me ; but rather the 
gleanings that I had made of the sense of all ages and na- 
tions. However, I resolved to be the better for the echo 
of it ; and, though I had at first determined to buy stuff for 
a new coat, I went away, resolved to wear my old one a 
little longer. Reader, if thou wilt do the same, thy profit 
will be as great as mine. 

I am, as ever, thine to serve thee, 

RICHARD SAUNDERS. 

A REMARKABLE ACCOUNT 

Of the Resuscitation of Life> in the Case of the Rev. Wil- 
liam T&twpnt, of Freehold, News Jersey. 
The late Rev. William Tennent, of Freehold, in the 
county of Monmouth, in the state of New Jersey, of whom 
is the 'following .■< count, was tin second son of the Rev. 



u 



VIII Month AUGUSI, ha th 31 Days, 
l P 
Moon's Phases,. m u% j 



D. 

New® 6 
First]) 15 
Full Ql22 
Last <[ 29 



II. 

11 

2 

9 




M. 
SO A. 
13 M. 
44 M. 
46 M. 



l.sar 
22} 

3 mo 

4 tur 

5 'we 
6jthu 
7jfri 
8'sat 
9\D 

10 mo 



Miscdlaneoi 
Particulars 
d0? inT~" 

7 *s rises 1 1- 
.Raia 

Q eclipsed in- 
visible. 

% rises- 3 23 
Sultry, 



Su, 

risen 
[11. M 





Pal 


net 


•s i 


'lac 


$Q w h\%\S 




£»■ 


sl n\ v? 


35 


SI 


1 


9J19J 2 


23 


7 


7 


1.5 19l 2 


*4 


11 


13 


21 19 2 


25l 15 


19 


26 19 


2 


27J19 


25 

■ 


^]19 


2 


*s| 


23 



»b'?m 



ljtueday 3- h 



12, we; { in Apogee p 



13jthui 

I4fri 
1 5 sat 



16 
17 

1:8 

19 
20 
21 
22 
2-3 
24 
25 
26 
.'7 

2£ 

2', 
30 
31 



mo 

tue 

v.e 

thu 

fri 

sat 

/; 

m< 

tlif 

wt 

thu 

fii 

sat 

V 

mc 



J-p sets 



^ Elongation 
7 *s rises 10 28 

% vises 2 56 

<[ eclipsed in v. 
© -ent jr£ 9sta 3 

h south 7 49 
< in perigee 
hiirius rises 3 4 

Rain 

$ stationary 




i 






•20= 







« 



William Tennent,, minister of the gospel at Ncshaminy, 
: in Buck's county, Pennsylvania. After a regular course 
of study in theology, Mr Tennent was preparing for his 
examination by the presbytery, as a candidate for the gos- 
pel ministry. His intense application affected his health, 
i and brought on a pain in his bieast, and a slight hectic. 
He soon became emaciated, and at length was like a liv- 
ing: .sk el eton. His life was now threatened. He was at- 
tended by a physician, a young gentleman, who was attach- 
ed to him by the strictest and warmest friendship. He 
grew worse and worse, till little hope of life was left. In 
this situation, his spirits failed) and he began to entertain 
doubts of his final happiness. He was -conversing one 
morning with his brother, in Latin, on the state of his 
soul, when he fainted and died away. After the usual 
time, he was laid out on a board, according to the common 
practice of the country ; and the neighbourhood were in- 
vited to attend bis- funeral on the next day. 

In the evening his physician and friend returned from a 
ride into the country, and was afflicted beyond measure at 
the news of his death. He could not be persuaded it was 
certain ;■ and on being told that one of the persons who 
had assisted in laying out the body thought he had observ- 
ed a lktle tremor of the flesh, under the arm, although the 
body was cold and stiff, he endeavoured to ascertain the 
fact. He first put his hand into warm water, to make it 
as sensible as possible, and then felt under the arm, and at 
the heart, and affirmed he felt an unusual warmth, though 
no one else could. He bad the body restored to a warm 
bed ; and insisted that the people, who had been invited to 
the funeral, should be requested not to attend. To this the 
brother in whose house he then Was) objected,. the eyes 
being sunk, the lips discoloured, and the whole body cold 
and stiff : however, the doctor finally prevailed; and all 
probable means were used, to -discover symptoms of re- 
turning life. But the third . day arrived, and no hopes 
were entertained of success, but by the doctor, who never 
left him night nor day. The people were again invited, 8c 
assembled to attend the funeral. The doctor still objected ; 
and at last confined his request for delay" to one hour, then 
to half an hour, and finally to a quarter of an hour. He 
had discovered that the tongue was much swoln, and 
threatened to crack : he was endeavouring to soften it 
by some emollient ointment, put upon it with a leather, 






IMJMIBi'lIJi 






p 



IX Month, SEPTEMBER, hath 30 days. 
"Planet's Places,. &c. 



Moon's Phases, 






New 

First $ i 3 

Full O 20 

Last a 27 




Miscellaneous 
Particulars. 



Siixi \ Stifis \J>To&n's\ Jtscii Jfoan 



lithe] 

2 ! we \& rises 4, 35 
3;lhu| 

mi ib Stationary. 
5W QEciip.invisib 5 416 19 
6JD 
7 mo 
tue 



Rainy. 



9 we 
lOftnft 

11 

12 
13 
N 

15 

u 

17 

ia 



"!£ rises 2 3. 
Din Apogee. 



42 6 18 
43|6 17 
44Jfr 16 
45J6 15 
4.6 1 5 14- 
fri 5 47<6 13 

sat 15 48 6 12 

D 6 & $ inferior 5 49 6 
mo] [S 50 6 

me iB's eye rise 10,2 5 
we 

thu] -R<h«. 
hi 



19;sat \h sets lo7 ' 



D 
mo 



[ ]> in Per 
22 tue Enters £z 
23iwe $ stationary 
24 thu i umh 
25|fri j 

sat. "^ rises 112. 

D I Cftar «5* Coo/ 

mo 

tue ^ elongation. 
ni2 





,1 



,<£•* 



mmmm 



mm 



MwUW 



' 



\ 






3 



!«a;22-s=ss 



when the brother came in* about the expiration of tfre last 
period, and mistaking what the doctor was doing, for an 
attempt to feed him, manifested some resentment* and in 
a spirited tone said, >lt is shameful to be feeding a life- 
(efi corpse j* and insisted with earnestness, that the fune- 
ral should immediately proceed. At this critical and im- 
portant moment* the body, to the great alarm and aston- 
ishment .of ail present, opened its eyes, gave a dreadful 
groan, and sunk again into apparent death. This put an 
end to all thoughts of burying him, and every effort was 
'again employed, in hopes of bringing about a speedy re- 
suscitation- In about an hour the eyes again opened, a 
jieavy groan procceeded from the 6ody, and again all ap- 
pearance >o$ animation vanished. In another hour, liie j 
seemed to retain with more power, and a complete revival j 
took place, to the great joy of the family and friends, and 
to the no small astonishment and conviction of very many 
who had been ridiculing the idea of restoring to life a 
dead body* 

Mr, Tennent continued in so weak and low a state for 
six weeks, that great doubts were entertained of his final 
recovery ; however, after that period he recovered much 
Dster, but it was about twelve weeks before he was com- 
pletely restored.. Alter he -was able to walk the rpom, 
f : ind to take notice of what passed around him, on a Sunday 
-afternoon, his sister, who had staid from church to attend 
him, was reading in the Bible, when he took notice of it, 
and asked her what she had in her hand. She answered, 
that slie was reading the Bible. He replied 4 'What is 
the Bible ? I know not what you mean.' This affected 
the sister so much that she burst into tears, and informed 

i'Ti that he was once well acquainted with it. On her 
reporting this to her brother, when he returned, Mr. Ten- 
nent was found, upon examination, to be totally ignorant of 
(very transaction of his. life previous to his sickness. He 

ould not read a single word, neither did he seem to have i 
.. :<y idea of what it meant. As soon as ne became capable f 
of attention, he was taught to read and write, as children are 
usually taught, and afterwards began to learn the Latin 
language under the tuition of his brother. One day as he 
was reciting a lesson in Cornelius Nepos, he suddenly 
started, clapped his hand to his head, as if something had 
hurt him, and made a pause. His brother asked him 
what was the matter : he said that he felt a sudden, shock 

Cg ^ l . l l' l i ll »" ■■ « ■ ! ■ ■ ^ M M .;^5i^.. V, ll W l.» M I » nii.l»» H i ■■■ ■ ■■I Mil M i n i . •i l l. • I ■ | 5 




Moon's Phases. 



D 

New© 5 
Fir - i> 13 
Full'O 20 
Last <J 26 



H M 

6 55 M 

9 10 M 

3 36M 

9 38 A. 



1H CH1M lfc8Lm*£g 



21 2 

21 2 

22 2 



5116 

©fed 

7i24 



127. ' S. 



22,21 j 27 
28 ; 29 26 j 5 N 
iro £: !26 3 N 
22 ' 3; 7.28 io T 20 26 4 N 
9 2 I 3 8 & 16 :30 ]25 | 3 S. 



-m\\V {Miscellaneous! ? un 
*** I rises 

D. D I P articular s'\\\. M. 



Sun 1 Sun's 
sets declin 
H. M.i &>«*/*- 



Moons! Moon {Moon 
place, rites. iSoulh 
S. D. H. M.lH. M 



ihur. 

fridj .prises 4,- 21 

satiij 

\ B \ 

jmonpay Hh30m|6 

jtues J> ia Apogee 

jwetV 

jthur % rises 00 39 

frid | Rain. 

satulB's eye r8 34 

! D 9 Elongation 

jmon 

itues -ij sets 9 45 

wed 

thur 

frid | Cool. 

satu 

D 
raon $ sets 6 43 
jtues Days LI hours jG 
iwed ] 6 

'thur Sirius rll 37,6 
frid enters \l[ 6 
satu 6 

D prises 11 41 6 
mon _ j, 6 

wed d © s su ? r - 6 

thur. B m 6 

fridc*<T9 6 

satu D0 1 ; »6 



10 
II 

l: 

13|5 

155 

16|5 

17 5 

13:5 

19;5 

20 ; 5 

215 

22 5 

23 5 

24 5 

25 5 
265 
■27 5 

28 5 
29'5 
30-5 
31|5 
32;5 
34J5 

35 j 5 

36 5 
3? 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 



50. 
49, 
48 
47 

45 
44 
43' 
42 
41 
40 



4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
6 
6 
6 
7 

38 7 
37; 7 
36; 8 
35 8 
34 9 
33- 9 
32' 9 
3110 
30 10 
2910 
28 11 
26 11 
2511 
2412 
23 12 
21 12 

20 is 

1913 
13 13 
17 14 



18\„ 

$w 

4 

28V^s 
51 
14' 

3? m. 

00: 

23- ? 
45- 
8 
31 Vf 

38 

£ r 

27 '« 

49 

10 n 

34 i 

52 "«B 
13 j 
34 

54 SI 
14 

34;$ 
54 
131 



27] 2 27 
9 



21 

3 

15 
26 

8 
20 

2 
14 
26 

9 
21 

5 
18 



4 21 

4 17 

5 15 
sets. 



9 19; 

10 A 

11 49 
11 32 

A 



;6 45 

7 19 

7 51 

8 32 

9 13 
9 59 

10 51. 

1 1 47 
morn . 

47 



14 

57 
1 40 
2'24 
3 10 

3 57 

4 47 

5 38' j 



6 30 

7 23 



$ rises 

P 6 59 
-2l 7 O 

iri 8 37 

li 9 32 
15-10 28 

28;U 26 
111 morn 
23, 84 



1? 

ii.i 

64 



1 22 

2 18 

3 13, 



Boar and forbear, is short and g-oodphilosopl 
noblest conquest is that of a man's reason over his 



y. The be 
passion's & 



4 47 

5 m 

6 33 

7 33 
3 S 

^5S 
9 36 

st and 
foflies. 






g$* 



« 



in his head, and it now seemed to him as if he had read 
that book before. By degrees his recollection was restor- 
ed, and he could speak the Latin as fluently as before his 
sickness. His memory so completely revived, that he 
gained a perfect knowledge of the past transactions of his 
life, as if no difficulty had previously occurred.* This 
event, at the time, made considerable noise, and furnished 
a subject of deep investigation and learned inquiry to the 
real philosopher and curious anatomist. 

The candid reader is left to his own reflections oh this 
interesting ^subject. The facts have been stated, and they 
are unquestionable. 

As soon as circumstances would permit, Mr. Tennent 
was licensed, and began to preach the everlasting gospel 
with great zeal and success. The death of his brother, 
who^had been some time 'settled as minister of the Pres- 
byterian church at Freehold, in the county of Monmouth, 
New Jersey, left that congregation in a destitute state. 
They had experienced so much spiritual benefit from the 
indefatigable labours and pious zeal of this able minister 
! of Jesus Christ, that they soon turned their attention to 
I ins brother, who was received on trial, and after one year 
j was found to be no unworthy successor of so excellent a 
I predecessor. In October, i?3S, Mr- Tennent was regu- 
i larly ordained their pastor, and continued so through the 
j whole of a pretty long life, one of the best proofs of minis- 
i terial fidelity." 



a 






In a letter from the successor of Mr. Tennent, in the pastoral 
j euarge of his church, to the author ol this account, elated Mon- 
mouth, New Jersey, December 10, 1805, we find the folio wing 
paragraph. 

" Mr Tennent informed me, that lie had so entirely lost the re- 
collection of his past life, and the benefit of his former studies^ 
that he could neither understand what was spoken to him, nor 
write nor read Ins own name. That he had to begin all anew, a«J. 
did not recollect that he had ever read before, until he had agatu 
learned his letters, and was able fopronounee the monosyllables, 
duch as thee and thou -; butfhat asj'iis strength returned^ which 
was very slowly, his memory alsoTeturncd." 

A person about to open a Dram Shop, "asked another 
what he should -put on his sign ?— « JJcggxirs made litre ;" 
was the it ply. 

Two men happening to jostle each other in the streets, 
says one " I never permit a bhr.kguard to tt-ke the 



I do," said the other, and instantly made way- 



,,U"j 






!25a-S! 



XI Month, NOVEMBER, hath 30 days. 



*m 



Moon's Phases. 

D. H. M. 

New © 4 59 M 

.First J) 1 1 10 00 A 

Full O 18 1 15 A 

Last (( 25 2 5 A 



Planet's Places, &c. 



7 

19 

2o 





m }T i 

9 23 
15 23 
21 23 
27 24 

$ 124 



D 

mo 
3jtue 
4iwe 
stthii 



7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
15 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
2G 
27 
28 
29 



fri 

sat 

D 

mo 

tue 

we 

thu 

fri 

sat 

D 

mo 

tue 

we 

thu 

fri 

sat 

D 

mo 

tue 

we 

thu 

fri 

sat. 

D 



Miscellaneous 
Particulars. 



30 mo 



cf rises 3, 59 
j)iii Apogee. 

C/ear and cool. 



^ south 9, 52 
Cold Rain. 

Tj sets 7 55. 

d0 T # 

Sinus so. 3 11 
D in Perigee 
Pleasant. 
Day 10 h. long. 

# rises 6 32 
© Enters £ 

V Stati. <$ cS 2 

<J rises 3 34 
Perhafis snow 
7*s south U 17 
Advent 



Sun 

rises. 

H. St: 



i. M 



44 

45 

46 5 

47;5 

48!5 

48 ( 5 

49 5 

50 5 

51 5 

52 5 
53|5 
54*5 
555 
565 
575 
58 5 



4 

4 

4 

414 



Sun's 

decline 

Mori] 



54 55 

5 4 55 
64 54 

6 4 54 

7 4 53 
7 4 53 21 



mi 



6 24 
10 £i: 

13; 



11 
21 

. tit 

17 14 9 
2121 8 



D's 
Lat. 



Deg 

3 N I 

4 N 
1 S. 

5 S. 

iN 






Moon't 
place 
S. D 



17 48 

i8 4 



8 50 



19 
19 

19 
19 

20 
20 



20 26 
20 38 
20 50 



m 



Vf 



Moon 
rises 

K.M. 

~~4 7 
5 2 

5 56 
sets 

6 33 

7 13 

7 58 

8 47 

9 40 



12 
23 

5 
17 
29 
11 
23 

6 
18 

ljlO 40 
14*11 39 
27 morn 
11 43 
25 ' 1 49 



2 t 
13j 
23 
33 
43 m 2} 3 46 



2 57 

4 6 

5 18 
rises 

6 23 

7 17 

8 12 

9 11 

10 11 

11 8 
morn 

6 

1 2 

1 59 

2 51 



Moon 


SQ1 


th. 


H. 


M. 


10 


18 


11 





11 


42 


A. 


26 


1 


12- 


1 


58 


2 


46 


3 


37 


4 


28 


5 


19 


6 


11 


7 


2 


7 


53 


8 
o 


47 






10 36 

11 32 
morn 

30 

1 3i 

2 30 

3 27 



l 



& 



is 






ni 






i 




;! 



RURAL (ECONOMY. 

I. Of the Situation and Plan of Dwelling Houses. 

The Island of Great Britain is of great extent from 
North to South, but narrow from East to West. Hence 
the raw piercing winds of one season and the refreshing 
breezes of the other come across the Island from the oce- 
an either from East or West. Hence also to have a pro- 
tection at one time, and to be sufficiently exposed at ano- 
ther, the best situation of houses in that Island is a west or 
east front— doors that open to the east and west.— In the 
cold season the doors and windows next to the wind are 
closed while the other side has a comfortable front & in the 
warm season are favourable to the reception of breezes 
accordingly that is the fashionable situation of houses, a 

\fashion which has grown out of long continued observa- 
tion and which is governed by utility. 

The United States were settled originally from Eng- 
land ; all their habits and fas hions have been transcribed 

| into our manners, and transplanted into our soil — among 
the rest the position of a house. It is difficult to eradicate j 
old habits in common minds : Men who do not think and 
enquire for themselves resist all improvements and con- 
sider them as deviations from the standard ot correctness. 
They refuse to be wiser than their fathers. A planter 
will not use a plough of a different construction from that 
which he was first taught to use — a mechanic does not 
enquire whether a proposed alteration will be an improve- 
ment, but he instantly rejects it because he was taught j 
differently, because it is against rule ; and cannot be 
right. 

Look to the history of the arts and jou will find that 
most of the great mechanical improvements which have 
been made, did not originate with the professors of the 

«, trades themselves ; — A penny barber (now Sir Richard 

] Arkwright) invented the Spinning Machine, which has 






="-.27=== 



X 1 1 MoNiH DECEMBE R, hath 3 i Days. ^ 
Palace's Places, &c. 




I 




) 



f enriched England ; and a School-master (Mr. Whitney) 
invented the Cotton Gin which has enriched America. 
This indisposition m the mind to receive ruvv truths, 
i winch makes all raen act as tho' they believer wh&t a 
| Polemic Divine once declared? that "an ok! en our was 
j better than a new truth ;■" has made too many in this 
! country still cling to the £ood old customs of o^r forc- 
j fathers, to still front oar houses to the east when our cli- 
|| mate and prevailing- winds declare so strongly against 
fl.iis propriety. 

In this country our cold winter winds are commonly 
|| from the north and north-west ' T a south front is therefore 
1 the most agreeable in winter. — In summer cur cooling 
fj breezes are generally from the south ; befrce a south 
fj front is the most agreeable also in summer.. It is* that which 
|! is suited to all seasons. Men of observation have long 
known this/, but the million have it yet to learn. 

Also there is another consideration » hicb should deter- 
mine the cardinal points of exposure in a house in ii.is 
| country which has little relative consequence to influence 
$uch a determination in the " fog wrapt isle" of Britain. 
It is the exposure to the sun, 

A h' ->usg which has an east and west front has at all 
hours the sun's rays pouring with full force into the doors 
and windows, and upon the body of the house on one side 
or the other during the whole day. The afternoon's sun 
in such houses shoots his long beams with burning in- j 
I tettseaess through their doors and windows and upon the 
jj whole side of the house. This might make a tolerable 
|; residence for a Salamander* but is an intolerable one for 
l" the human species. It is the nmsery of iever and de- 
)j piives even the healthy of comfort.— But a house that has 
[j a southern aspect with few or no inlets to the sun's rays 
| on the east, or west, receives so few directly within it that 
j it seems to be situ/.te in another climate.-— Will not these . 
[j remarks occasion those who read them to observe the ad- J 
fj vantages and disadvantages of a house having a paiticular 
|j direction of front? If U does, a greater innovation than 
|| ever will be made upon tliu-iini^lish Law of Custom, and 
i Tyrant II -hit witi loose some of ins blinded votaries, 
■i II. fyfafizding Jiou^cs unci the ground in their vicinity by 
j trtrx, 

j Some modern traveller speaks, in terms of high satis- 
{ faction of the comforts he enjoyed in a summer house by j 
j its being enclosed with canvas, upon which servants were |j 



i 






;29- 



-^ 



constanlly throwing water, This" must have been grate- 
ful and healthful m a hot climate and season, but a man 
who has sense enough to let the natural forest trees re- 
main when he builds a new house, or ingenuity enough 
to plant same where none at present exists, will derive 
from their shade and balmy persphation, all the advanta- 
ges which the nabob derives from his cloth summer 
house, water, engines and servants ; and at no expei.ce at 
all. Tire health will be benefitted in the same degree 
that comfoit is promoted. Heat, often times alone, but 
sometimes m conjunction with other agents, is the com- 
mon cause of fever. The inhabitants of houses exposed 
by position and by want of shades, and particularly the un- 
happy tenants of lodging rooms annexed, as is often times 
the case here* to the west side of a house, or of a second 
story that has small or high Windows, are usually its vic- 
tims, while those better exposed to the summer breezes 
and better protected from the sun, usually escape. The 
town of Edenton has been rendered much healthier than 
formerly by having its streets Kind houses shaded by trees. 
The vicinity of trees to buildings have been objected to, 
because it is said they will occasion the latter to rot. In- 
deed ! 1 Then are ru.t health and comfort objects for which 
nouses are uuilt ? md it is not the fact that they occasion 
houses to rot unless they confine the dampness to the 
north side of a -house where they are never wanted ; on 
every other side, if they are not too close to prevent the 



circulation of the air, if their branches do not rest 



upon 



the houses they have a contrary effect. Those then who 
sacrifice their health and comfort to prolong the existence 
of a few shingles, manifest a folly and receive a punish- 
ment that commonly awaits the narrow principles of ava- 
rice. 

IPX. To preserve buildings from danger by Fire. 
Shingles by being suddenly wetted and as suddenly dried 
by a hot sun very soon suffer a change that gives them 
the nature of spunk : A spark of fire failing on this is very 
liable to produce a flame. To prevent this rot the roof 
of a house, in preference to any other part, should be paint- 
ed. The common oil paints, or the durable lime & chalk 
washes which are of hit e getting into use, and on accomt 
of their chetmness are to he preferred, will secure it against 
sparks or even coals of fire. The police of all towns, ; s a 
[measure of general safety ought t ■> require that all roofs, 
particularly of old houses, should he painted 








€2 






V 



s 



IV. Of the colour Jiro/ier to render a house cool, and to give 
to an assemblage of them a sightly afxfiearance. 
Philosophers tell us that while is produced by the re- 
flection of all the rays of light falling upoiia substance 
thus denominated, and black by the absorption of all.— 
Hence the reason for what all experience tells you, what 
every body who has worn black dresses in a summers sun 
can inform you, that black is warm and white cool. Hence 
j houses and particularly the rooffs ought to be white. A 
white house exposed to the sun makes a habitation many 
degrees cooler than one of a dark colour ; and the appear- 
ance, particularly in a town, is an object of some moment. 
When towns are viewed at a distance the roofs are most 
conspicuous, and black roofs give a gloomy arid dismal ap- 
pearance, that might suit Monks or the tenants of a Peni- 
tentiary, but are abhorrent to every person of taste. The 
methods of painting white are various and cheap. The 
following is piactised in South-Carolina : — Take from 5 
j to 6 quarts of unslackedlime, (stone lime is best,) the flour 
I of two quarts of rice, previously 
j (wheat or rye flour may perhaps 

1 square of raw cowhide (or what is better in place of the 
| hide, a pound of glue) and a pint or a little more of salt, 
! boil the whole in 5 or 6 gallons of water until thoroughly 
| dissolved and mixed, and then to be laid on hot and rubbed 
smooth with a brush. A more smooth and sightly paint 
is purified chalk, commonly called Spanish whiting, with 
a small quantity of rosin boiled in milk. There is also 
Whipple's Stucco Wash, for which patent rights are sold 
by Henry Gorman in Raleigh, and which is recommend- 
ed by Mr. L trobe. Nothing is said of the durability these 
give to roofs and houses, for ihat, though not inconsider-. 
able, is little compared to comfortable and healthy dwel- 
lings and the safety of a town. 



n 



made into thin paste, 
be substituted) a foot 




MEDICAL. 

Directions for recovering Persons who are supposed to be I 
dead from. Drowning ; also, for fireven ling and curing the 



»»WtiMffflffpiM|W 



~=n 



Disorder produced by driuking cold Liquors, and by the . 
action of noxious Vafiers, Lightning, and excessive Heat ! 
upon the human Body. Published by the Humane Socie- 
ty of Philadelphia.* 1805- 

Directions for recovering Persons who are supposed to be 
dead, fro m Drowning . . 

1. As soon as the body is taken out of the water, it must 
be conveyed on a board or bier if at hand, to a house, or 
any other place, where it can be laid dry and waim, avoid- 
ing the usual destructive methods of hanging it by the heels, 
rolling it on a bai~rel, or placing it across a log on the belly. 

2. The clothes must be immediately stripped off, and 
the body wrapped up m blankets, well warmed. It should 
be laid on its back, with the head a little raised. If the 
weather be colcl, it should be placed near a lire, and an 
heated warmingpan should be passed over the body ; but 
in warm weather it will be sufficient to place it between 
two blankets well heated, or in the suns b T ^e, taking care 
to prevent the room from being crowded, with any persons 
who are not necessarily employed about the body. 

3. At the same time, the whole body should be rubbed 
with the hand, or with hot woollen cloths. The rubbing 
should be moderate, but continued with industry, and 
particularly about the breast. Apply also heated bricks to 
the feet belly, and breast. The immediate application of 
frictions is of the utmost importance, as many have been 
recovered by frictions only, when early used. 

4. As soon as it can possibly be done, a bellows should 
be applied to one nostril, while the other nostril and the 
month are kept closed, and the lower end of the promi- 
nent part of wind-pipe (or that part which is called by the 
anatomists, pomum adami) is pressed backward. The bel- 
lows is to be worked in this situation ; and when the 
breast is swelled by it, the bellows should stop and an as- 
sistant should press' the belly upwards, to foi ce the air 
out. The bellows should then be applied as before, and 
the belly again be pressed ; this process should be repeat- 
ed from tweny to thirty times i r < a minute, so as to imitate 
natural breathing as nearly as possible. Some volatile spi- 
rits, heated may be held under the Valve of the bellows 
whilst it works. If a bellows cannot be procured, seme 
person should blow into one of the nostrils, • icugh a pipe 
or a quill, whilst the other nostril and mouth are closed as be- 
fore ; or if a pipe or quill be not at hand, he should blow 



* 

i 

i 



( 



< 






; 



) 



into the mouth, whilst both nostrirs are closed ; but when- 
ever a bellows can be procured, it is to be preferred, as 
air forced in by this means, will be much more servicea- 
ble than air which has already been breathed. 

5. During this time a large quantity of ashes, water, 
salt, or sand, should be heated ; and as soon as it is milk- 
warm, the body must be placed m it ; the blowing and 
rubbing are then to be continued as before ; and when the 
water, ashes, or salt ore cooled, some warmer must be 
added, so that the whole may be kept milk-warm. 

Loud noises have sometimes proved successful in reco- 
vering 'such persons and restoring to life. When signs 
of returning life are apparent, the frictions must be con- 
tinued, but more gently. 

These methods must be continued three or four hours, 
as in several instances they have proved successful, al- 
though no signs of life appeared until that time. When 
the patient is ableto swallow, he must take some wine, 
brandy, or rum Sc water. Bleeding or purging ought not to 
be used, without consulting a pnysician, who should be 
called in as soon as possible : salt and water may be in- 
jected. 

After life has returned, if convulsions come on, blood 
should be taken, by directions of a physician. 
// To prevent ihe fand Effects of drinking cold Water, or 
cold Liquors of any kind in warm Weather. 

If the disorder incident to drinking cold water hath 
been pro duced, the first, and in most instances, the only 
remedy to be administered, is sixty drops of liquid iaud- 
[ num in spirit and water, or warm d ink of any kind. 

If this should fail of giving relief, the same quantity may 
be given twenty minutes afterwards. 

When 1 mdnum cannot be obtained, mm and water, or 
warm water should be given. Vomits and bleeding should 
not be used without consulting a physician. 
III. Tlic dangerous Effects of noxious Vapours from Wells, 
Cellar*, f-rmeniing Liquors, b*r, may be prevented, 

By procuring a free circulation of air, either by ventila- 
tors, or opening the doors ; r windows, where it is confin- 
ed, or by r hanging the air, by keeping fires in the infect- 
ed place r or by throwing in stone-lime recently powdered. 

These precautions should be taken, before entering in- 
fo siicli suspected places ; or a lighted candle should be 
first introduced, which will go out if the air is bad.— - 
Wl!*»ii a person is let down into a well, he should be care- 



=33= 

fully watched, and drawn up again on the least change.— 
But when a person is apparently dead, from the abcve- 
mcntioned cause, the first thing to be done is to remove 
the body to a cool place in a' wholesome air ; then let the 
j body be stripped, and let cold water be thrown from buck- 
ets over it for some time. This is particularly useful in 
casesrof aparent death- from drunkenness—Lei the treat- 
ment now be the same as that ibr drowned persons. — 
1'he head should be raised a little ; and continued fric- 
j lions, with blowing into the nostril with a bellows, should 
j be practised ibr several hours. 

J IV. In case cf Suffocation from the Fumts of burning 

Charcoal, 
The general treatment recoil: mepded for curing the 
sorders brought on by noxious vapours, is te be applied ; 



ut the dangerous effects of this 



he prevented, by 



taking cure not to sjt near it when burning ; to burn it in 

| a chimney ; and where there is no chimney, to keep the 

ooor open, and to place a large tub of water in the room. 

In <iii these, as well as in cises of drowne*! persons, 
moderate purges and bleeding are only to be used, with 
J the advice of a physician. 

V. To {ircrent the fatal Ijfccts cf Lightning-. 
Let your house be provided with an iron conductor ; 
but when this cannot be had, avoid sitting or standing near 
the window, doer, or walls of an house, curing the time 
of a thunder gust. The nearer ycu are placed to the 
^CJ* middle of a room, the better. When you are not 
in a house, avoid, flying to the cover of the weeds, or oi a 
solitary tree for safety. 

When a person is struck by lightning, strip the body 
I and throw buckets full of cold water over it for ten or fif- 
teen minutes ; let continued frictions and inflations of the 
j lungs be also practised ; Bleed freely at the arm. 
VI. To prevent Danger from Ex/wsure to the excessive 
Heat of the Sun, 
Disorders from this cause, or (as they are commonly j 
j termed) strokes of the tun, may be expected, when a per- \ 
son who is exposed to his rays is affected with a violent j 
head-ache, attended with throbbing or wi;h giddiness ; | 
where the disorder '.a-kes place, the so symptoms ere follow- 
ed by fuintness and great insensibility, with violent heat 
and dryness of the skin, redress and dryness of the eyes, 
< ithculty of breathing, and, according as the disease is more 
r less violent, with a difficulty, or entire inability of moving, j 



J 



I 



) 



% 



To guard against these dangerous effects of heat, it 
will be proper, 

1. To avoici labour* violent exercise, or exposing your- 
self to the rays of the sun, immediately after eating a 
hearty meal : 

2. To avoir] drinking spirits of any kind, when you are 
thus exposed. These add an internal fire to the heat oi 
the sun. Vinegar and water, sweetened with molasses or 
brown sugar, butter-milk and water, small beer, whey, or 
milk and water, are the most proper drinks for people 
who are exposed to excessive heat. But the less ap r- 
son drinks of liquors of any kind in the forenoon, the bet 
ter will he endure the heat of a warm day. 

3. To wear a white hat, or to cover a black one with 
white paper, when you are necessarily exposed to the hot 
sun, and to avoid standing still when in such a situation. 

4. To retire into the shade as soon as you bee/in to be 
affected with pain oi throbbing in the headpvith giddiness 

jor with faintness* 

If these precautions have been neglected, and thesyrrvp 
toms, above described have come on, it will be pivy.-er, 

1. To remove the ptisan so .affected into a cool, dry 
j : place, and to kx>s&# all wis garments particularly t.»ose 

around his neck and breast- 

2. fo examine wixesher the- pulse at the wrists or 
temples heats forcibly., and if it does, to bleed immediate- 
ly ; but if the pulse be weak, or cannot be perceived, 
bleedin? must not be performed.. 

3. To place nis feet and iegs (or if it can be done) the 
lower half of his body in warm water. But if this remedy 
fails, 

4 To apply linen clothes wet with cold water, or wkh 
cold water and vinegar, to the temples and all over the 
head, 

5. To administer plentiful draughts of vinegar and wa- 
ter sweetened. 

In all cases of this kind, a physician should be sent for, 
unless the patient recovers speedily. 



RELIGIOUS. 

Beautiful and descri/itive extract, taken from Sermons fiub- 
Linked under the title, of the " Scotch i'reacher." 

"Twice had the sun gone down upon the earth and all 
' as yet was quiet at the sepulchre ; death held his seeps 



/I 



: 35- 



ue over the Son of God ; still and silent the hours pas- 
sed on ; the guards stood by their post ; the rays of the . 
midnight moon gleamed on their helmets, and on their 
spears ; -the enemies of Christ exulted in their success ; 
the hearts of his friends were sunk in despondency and 
in sorrow ; the spirits of glory waited in anxious suspense 
to behold the event, and wondered at the depth of the 
ways of God. At length the morning star arising in the 
east announced the approach of light j the third day be- 
gan to dawn upon the world, when on a sudden the earth 
trembled to its centre, and the powers of heaven were 
shaken ; an angel of God descended, the guards shrunk 
back from the terror of his presence, and fell prostrate 
on the ground ; his countenance was like lightning, and 
his raiment was as white as snow : He rolled away the 
stone from the door of the sepulchre, and sat upoit it*i — 
But who is this that cometh forth from the tomb, with 
dyed garments from the bed of death ? He that is glo- 
rious in his appearance, walking in the greatness of his 
strength 1 It is thy Prince, Zion ! Christian, it is your 
Lord. He hath trodden the wine press alone ; he hath 
stained his raiment with blood ; but now, as the first-born 
from the womb of nature, he meets the morning of his 
resurrection. He arises a conqueror from the grave ; he 
returns with blessings from the world of spirits ; he 
brings salvation to the sons of men. Never did the re- 
turning sun usher in a day so glorious ! it was the jubilee 
of the universe. The morning stars sung together and 
all the sons of God shouted aloud for joy ; the Father ol 
Mercies looked down from his throne in the heavens ; 
with complacency he beheld his world restored ; he saw 
his work that it was good. Then did the desert rejoice ; 
the face of nature was gladdened before him, when the 
blessings of the Eternal descended as the dew of heaven 
for the refreshing of the nations." 

Sir John Mason, Dn His death-bed, said, "I have 
lived to see five p'rinces, and been privy-counsellor 
to f ur of th- m. I have seen the most remarkable 
things in foreign parts, and have been present at 
most state transactions for thirty years together; 
I and I have learnt this after so many years experi- 
ence— -« That seriousness is the greatest wisdom, 
[temperance the b. st physic, and a good conscirm- 

1« i iniw "n - i — nil '- m hiiimiii ■iM ~ ii« S Mi mpi i wn itii< n i m iii »i i i ip M«M irlnl— nilwil w Mn 'nu iir i— n 




;36; 



the best estate. And, were I to live agaiii, I would 
change the court for a cloister, my privy-counsellor's 
hustle for a hermit's retirement, and the whole life 
I have lived in the palace, for an hour's enjoyment 
of God in the chapel." 




POETICAL. 
PATI&NCE. 

Twas at some country place, a parson preaching", 

The virtue of long- sufferance was teaching: 
And so pathetically did exhort 
His liat'ning - congregation, and in short 

Discours'd so much of Job, and how he bore 
With such exceeding pleasantly his woes, 
Faith 'twas enough to make a man suppose 

Job wish d fore more. 

Meaning, perhaps, that since 'tis plain, 
How needlessly we grieve at pain j 

How would it be if man 

Puvsu'd a different plan, 
And were to laugh and treat the matter lightly .;• 

And not, when tortur'd with the gout, 

To make wry faces, roar and shout, 
But look agreeable and sprightly. 

'* And pray, d'ye think, mv dearest life," 
Exclaim'd the parson's wife, 

As after church they sat, 

In courteous chat, 
" That 'tis in human nature to endure 

"The sad extremity of woe, 

M Thgt Job, you say, did undergo ? 
" 'Tis more than you or I couid do, I'm sure.? 

" My dear," quoth he, " this diffidence, 
M Shews, let me tell you, great good sense, 

" A talent in your sex we seldom see ; 
" And doubtless the remark is true, 
" As far as it extends to you, 

" Tho' not, I think, to me. 

•»i « . ■■." ,i i. ■' »m\mS.Xim-\,K;<nm l II. i, Ym 1 1 iff ' i » ' ill 1 1 1 - i !ii Jmm 



i 



ri 



** No woman, since the world began, 
" Could bear misfortune like a man — 

" And in good truth, 'twixt you and me, 

" And that without much vanity, 
" J do conceive that I myself have shewn 

" That patience and that strengh of mind 

" Were not entirely confin'd 
" To Job alone." 

Thus said the modest priest, & would have said much more, 
But for the sudden opening- of the door, 

When out of breath, in slumps 

His clownish servant " Numps," 
His mouth wide open, on the parso.t gazing— 

Just like the wight, 

Who drew old Priam's curtains in the night, 
To tell him Troy was blazing. 

" Well, Numps, the matter ? speak ! why look so pale! 
" Has any thing gone wrong ?" quoth Numps, " the ale." 

" What," ciues the priest, " the ale gone sour ?" 

(And then hie phiz began to lower;) 
" Turn'd sour ? no measter, no," reply'd the fellow ; 

" But just now, as I went, d'ye see, 

" f o tilt the cask — away rolled he, 
* And all the liquor's spilt about the cellar." 

The fact was, Numps a cask of ale had stav'd : 
Now, prythee, tell me, how the priest behav'd ? 

Did he pull off his wig, or tear his hair ? 
Or like that silly fellow Job, 
Throw ashes on his head, or rend his robe ? 

Say, how did he this dire misfortune bear; 
Twasthus, in voice of pious resignation, 
He to the man address'd this mild oration. 

" May God confound thee, Uigu d — n'd stupid bear ; 
(The best of priests, you know, will sometimes swear) 

"What, you must meddle, must ye 

" With the barrel, and be cusrt.t' ye ? 
•' I wish thy paws were in the fire — -Odd rot 'm— 

'* Get thee down stairs, this instant, wretch, 

" Or by the living G — d, I '11 kick thy breech 
"From top to bottom." 

" Nay, now, my dearest," cried the dame, 
" Is this your patience ? — Fie for shame ! 

" I beg you 'il recollect your text, 

" Job whs not half so vext 
" When !ie"d ids sons and daughters to bewail." 

"D — n all hi* sons and daughters if you choose, 

" Answer me this, I say — did Job e'er lose 
«« A barrel of such ale?" i 










) 



THE DOCTOR AND HIS APPRENTICE. 

A Pupil of the iEscukipian school 
Was just prepar'd to quit his master's rule ; 
Not that he knew his trade, as it Appears, 
But that he then had learnt it seven years. 

Yet think not that in knowledge he was cheated—* 
All that he had to study still, 
"V\ as, when a man was well or ill, 

And how, if sick, he should be treated. 

One morn he thus address'd his master-*- 
"X>ear sir, my honor'd father bids me say, 
* 5 Jf I could now and then a visit pay, 
" He thinks, with you, 
" To notice how you do, 
" My bus'ness I might learn a little faster.^* 

" The thought is happy," the preceptor cries ; 
& A better methodhe could scarce devise ; 
"So Bob, (his pupil's name) it shall be so, 
" And when I next pay visits you shall go." 

To bring- that -heur, alas ! time .briskly iled- 

With dire intent, 

Away they went, 
And now behold them at a patient's bed. 

The master-doctor solemnly perus'd 
His victim's face, and o'er his symptoms mus'd j 
liOok'd wise, said nothing — an unerring way, 
When people nothing have to say : 

Then felt his pulse, and smelt his cane. 
And paus'd and blink'd, and smelt ag-ain, 

Andbrkfly of his corps perform each motion : 
Manoeuvres that for death's platoon are meant, 
A kind of a " make ready" and "present?' 

Before the fell discharge of pill and potion. 

At length the patient's wife he thus address'd : 
" Madam, your husband's danger's great f 
,( And (what will never his complaint abate) 
*' The man's been eating oysters 1 perceive,'* 

" Dear ! you're a witch, T verily believe, 
Madam replied, and to the truth confess'd." 

Skill so prodigious Bobby too admir'd % 
And home returning, of the sage inquir'd 

How these same oysters came into his head ; 
•"■Psha! my dear Bob, the thing was plain-** 
■" Sure that can ne'er distress thy brain: 

" I saw the shells lie underneath the bedi" 

So wise by such a lesson grown, 



F= 



Next day Bub ventur'd forth ;done, 
And to the self-same suff 'rer paid his court — 
But soon, with haste and wonder out of breath, 
Return'd the stripping minister of death, 
And to his master made this dread report : 

"Why sir, we ne'er can keep that patient under- 
*' Zounds ! such a maw I never came across 1 

"The fellow must Be. dying, and no wonder, 
For— if he hasn't eat a horse 1" 

" A horse !" the elder man of- physic cried, 
As if he meant his pupil to deride-— 
"How came so wild a notion in your head V 3 

" How ! think not in my duty I was idle 5 
"Like you, I took a peep beneath the bed, 
. "And there 1 saw— *a saddle and a bridle !'* 



1 



'lie following lines Vere chalked on the bed chamber door of j 
witty, insincere and profligate Charles- the Second, King- of I 



the 

England". — The two last lines will apply to jnany who are not kings. 

Here lies our- sovereign lord the king, 

Whose word no man relies on, 

Who never said a foolish thing, 

Nor never did a wise one, 

1. During the Hkgunot persecution,, a poor French pfo- 
testant made his escape to London, and not being over 
buidened with largati, was soon put to "his wits to get a 
living* He, however, hearing that that troublesome insect 
called tlverjleay at that time was laying heavy contribulions 
on the blood of the lower orders of the inhabitants, princi- 
pally about St* Giles's, fell upon the following cxrecicrd. 
He pounded tome brick dust very line, and made up some 
neat packages in the same manner-that physicians put up 
'heir powders ; thus prepared, with a small basket on Ids 
. rm, he began his march, calling out as he went, " Who 
buy my fioudre, kite dejiea." An old" woman who kept a 
ttlet fiing house Tor porters, chairmen, &c. and who was 
;very much annoyed with the insects in question, called to 
I rim, and bought his slock. The poor Frenchman, elate 
:vith his success, the next day renewed his tour, and was 
again called by the same woman, who pcured upon him 
a torrent of abuse, complaining that his power had no ef- 
!ect. " Ah, M 'dam, s ys he, " how you use my pcudre t" 
She replied that she had strewed it over the beds and floors. ]j 
u YU, ar da be de thing 1 Mon Dieti, you no do rig It : |J 



l 







i 



; 



I. But you have no poudre left ; you buy sonic, I tell you 
[ how you do." She bought again, and he gave her the loi- 
| lowing instructions r. " Madame, de first ting,, ycu catche 
[{ <!e ilee. You hold him so, Madame, you tickle him un- 

Ider \\\q fi(-:ttte rib % till lie ope him mouth, and den, begar 
you putte de poudre down him throat." 

2. The Duke of Bedford, whose name was R usse l, falling in com - 

ptoij. with a poor ragged fellow of the same name, saw to him, 

., " iV;end, is your coat of arms the same as mine ?' r — '* 'As to Ctiir 

; iwm.s, replied the poor fellow, I believe they are very much alike, 

but there is a deal of difference between ouv coats." 

S. Not long since, a slim s|>a1 k bespoke a pair of pantaloons at a 
French tailor's ; " be sure/' said he " to ru;»ke them very full."* — 
f* Ye.s, Sure, 1 uuderstaud you veiy well ; tank you, Saie, }our cus- 
tom will rm.iwo me too much homn-uv- — tendering him the homage 
li of a prelum. d bow. When the pantaloons were brought - In me, 
how was he disappointed to find them of the same dimensions as 
his skin ! lie stamped, he swore, he raved at the tailor—and the 
whole French nation; durhig which, the poor tailor stood in a 
corner with his hands clasped, uM*?rmgr '* JHgh cjieu / man du%t f 
m the utmost consternation. "bidlr.ot give \ou particular di- 
jj rtcuons to make them large ?" " Large ! i«j ge ! no, Sare, you say 
*tjuU; ami suppose he is large, 1 believe he is very empty" 

.4 Young "Squire Boody, just come horn his first term, at the 
university, was willing to give his parents a specimen oi his im- 
pr*'"- ment th re. 'Father,'". Says he, '] can chop logic. 7 'Ay,' 
ii <* .is father, 'how is tliat 'i cm ?' * Why,' says Tom, 'here d'ye 
.>i e iUiher are a couple of iowh at table, 1 can prove they are three 
fowls. 5 ' i low's that V quoth the father. 'Why, there's one,' says 
1 oui, ' and there's two,' pointing to one di.-:h, and then to both, 
'and one and two male three, father.' 'W f ell done,' says the fa- 
ther, turning vo his wife; ' i om'-s a conjurer ; you take one fowl, 
and i'li eat the oilier, and let 1 om have the third for his logic.' 

5. A certain Vicar was very unwilling to permit any stranger to 
preach for him, and did absolutely, on occasion, refuse his pulpit, 
lie said if the gentleman preaches better than I, my parishoncrs 
may not relish me so well afterwards, and if worse,, he is not fit to 
preach at all. 



Government of the United States. 

DEPARTMENTS. 

President of the U. States, James Madison, (per. ann.) £$25,000 



I 



Vice President of the U. S.George Clinton, 
Secretary .of State, James Monroe, 
Secretary of the Treasury, Albert Gallatin, 
Secretary of War, Wiiiiatn Eustis, 
Secretary of the Navy, Paul Hamilton, 
Comptroller, Gabriel Duval, - 
Auditor, Richard Harrison, 

S tiiSi i iT i T -— i »■,....■■ i.i. i iiS5 w ..ir. i S S 



5,000 

5,000 
5,000 
4,500 
4,5u0 
3,500 
3,000 



\\ ' " 

ini 



I 

Si 



, ^ —.4,1 ■ ■ . ■ ■■ — 

Treasurer, Tliomas T.Tucker, - - - - jg 3,000 

Commissioner of the Revenue, W.Miller, - - 3,000 

Register, Joseph Nourste, - - - i r : 2,400 

Accountant of War Department, W Simmons, - \ 2,000 

Acqoimtantofthe Navy, Thomas Turner, - - 2,000 

Postmaster General, Gideon Granger, - 3 ; 000 

Assistants do. Abraham Rrad'y, jr. & Setli Pease, - 1,700 

Purveyor of Public Supplies, Tench Cox, - - 2,000 

Surveyor General, Jared Mansfield, - - - - 2,000 
Paymaster of the Army, Robert Brent. 

Members of the Twelfth Congress, 

SENATE. 

J\*e-LV-Hampshire: — Richard Cutts, Nicholas Gillman. 
Massachusetts — James Lloyd, junr. Joseph B Varnum. 
Connecticut. — Chauncy Goodrich, Samuel W. Dana. 
Rhode-Island. — C G. Champlin, Jeremiah B Howell. 
Vermont — Stephen R Bradley, Jonathan Robinson, 
A'ew-York.— -Obadiah German, John Smith. 
Js'eiv- Jersey.— -John Lambert, John Condit. 
Pennsylvania.- — Andrew Gregg*, Michael Leib. 
Delaware— -James A. Bayard, Outerbridge Horsey. 
.Maryland- — Samuel Smith, Philip Reed. 
Virginia.— -Richard Brent, Wm. B. Giles. 
A'oi-th- Carolina.— -James Turner, Jesse Franklins 
South-Carolina.-— John Gaillard, John Taylor. 
Georn-ia.— -Charles Tail:, Wm, H. Crawford. 
Kentucky .-—J (Am Pope, George M. Bibb. 
Tennessee —-G o W Campbell, Joseph Anders^. 
Ohio.— -Thomas Woi-thmgton, Alexander C^ mpbell. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENT A I1YL3. 
,\"exv-Hamltshire.-— Wm. Hale, Sam Dins more, John A. Harper, 

rtlett. 

Reed, Rich'd Cutts, Ebenez 

L. Wheaton, Leon White, I. 

A BigeioAy, B 



u mange, 
, jun. 
mraoE 



Elijah <'?ad, George Sul'ivan. B 

Aliss'ichusetts. — J. Quincy, Wm. 
Saav^'-, Ez. Bacon, C. Turner, junr 

T, Ocen, S. TAggart, Wm Ely Br;ghan 

Gannett, P Ta-lman, Wm. Wid^vry, one vacancy 

C*mnecl''-t/t ~~L. B. Stnrges, J. O Mosdey, B T 
Champ'o , V P'.tk'm, junr. Lyman Law, J DaWi pbr 

Rho'le- Island.— -EiisMi \i. Potter, Richard J; ckson 

Vermont — S. Shaw. J^mes F-.sk, W. Strong, SI Chittenden. 

Ae-.v -York. --S. L. Miijchill, Tbos. Sammons. Ebiii. Sa^e, Wm 

Paulding-, jmv P. Van Oortlandt, jun Jas. Emo.t. Tho. B (>><:k, 

Rob. fce Ro\ Liv'ngstonj Asa Fitch, Tho hLGold Uriah ."jfracvj 

)n . Avc.-y, -\ rimmus mi -eker, Aruirnah Mctcaife, P. B Povter, 

William Pond, Si'ow Sli.w. 

Ae-iv-Jersey -— Ad B >Vd, Jac Huf:.y, Lewis Condit, George Q. 
Ma.v.v •'!, .his. Morgro-JThos Nevvbold. 

Pemuy'v niu — -Adam Sey.beft, Wm. Anders rm, Jas M lip or, 
Robert Brawn, Will R 1dm an, Jona. Roberts Will. F'.ndlev. Jno. | 
SmUie, A Lvlo, Rob. Wh'u< h.li. Day Bkral, (tog .P-m.-j Jos Le-j. 
■°<:vrr, J. M. ifynemanJWiK. Piper, Abner Lac<Vh, Will Craw- II 
Poi-id, George Smith- [I 



I>3 






■■UttniiiMHi 






ii 



) 



>42- 



Delaware 



Ridgely. 



Maryland.— -P. B. Key, Jos. Kent, Fhil. Stewart, Cha. Goldsbb- 
rongh, P. Little, Alex. M'Kim x _S.- Ringgold, R. Wright, 1. vacancy. 

Virginia. — J. Randolph, Hugh Nelson, Tlv Gholson, P; Good- 
win, Tho. Newton, Dan. Sheftey, Jno- Hungerford, Edwn. Gray, 
Jos. Lewis, jun. Jno. Baker, Jas. Breckenridge, Jno. Dawson, M. 
Clay, Burwell Bassett, Tho- Wilson, Will. A.Burwell, J. Smith, 
Aylett Haws, J. Roane, W. M'Koy, J< Pleasants,' jun. J. Clopton. 

JKorth-Carvlina.—Wm- Blackledge, W. Alston Thos. Blount, 
Jos. Pearson, Arch'd M'Bryde, Nat. Macon, Mesh. Franklin, R. 
Stanford, Will. R. King, Lem. Sawyer, Jas. Cochran, Is. Pickens. 

Sotith-Carolina.^-D, R. Williams, L" Cheeves, Will Lowndes, 
Will. Butler, John C. Colhoun, Eiias Earle, R. Winn, Tho. Moore- 

Georgia.— George M- Troup, Will. W. Bibb, B- Hall H. Cobb, 

Kentucky^- — Richard M. Johnson, Joseph Desha, Henry Clay. 
Anthony New, Samuel M'Kee, Stephen B. Ormsby- 

Tennessee. — John Rhea, Felix Grundy, John Sevier.; 

Ohio. — Jeremiah Morrow. 

Federal Courts. 

The U. S. Circuit Court is held in Raleigh for the District of N. 
Carolina, by Chief Justice Marshall and Judge Potter, on the 12th 
of May and November in each year. 

The District Courts of N. Carolina are held at 

Wihningto7i, 1st Monday of Feb. 8c June, and 3d Monday" in Oct. 

Net&berh on the Friday next after the 1st Monday in February 
and June, and on the Friday next a&er the 3d Monday, of Octo. 

Edenton, on the 1st Tuesday which shall follow the Friday next 
after the 1st Monday in Feb. k June, and m* the 1st Tuesday 
which shall follow the Friday next after the 3d Monday of Oct- 
Clerk of the circuit court, William H. Haywood, Raleigh. 

' Ditto of the district court at Wilmington, Carleton Walker. 
Ditto of the district court at Newbern, Thomas S. Singleton. 

, Ditto of the district court at Edenton, Edmund Hoskins. 
District Attorney, Robert H. Jones, Warrentoiv 
Marshal, Beverly Daniel, Raleigh. 

Government- of North-Carol ina D 

' Benjamin Smith Governor, salary sixteen hundred dollars. 

Secretary to the Governor, A. G. Glynn,, sal aiy $300 and fees. 
Councillors of State, Needham Whitfield, fohn Umstead, Gideon 

Alston, Starkie Armi stead, Gabriel Hoimes, James Houston 

and James Murphey, 

Secretary of State William White, salary*g600 and fees. 

Treasurer, John Haywood, §1,_500— Clerk .400. . 

Comptroller, Samuel Goodwin, salary 1000; dollars. 
Judges of the Superior Courts, John L. Tajdor, John Hall, Fran- 
cis Locke, Samuel Lov/rie, Leonard Heoderson, and Henry 

Seawell, salary 1600 dollars. 
Attorney General, H. G. Burton, Solicitor* General, Edward 

Jones, William Slade, Isaac L» Guion, Mathew Troy, and 

,_>——. twenty do'lars for every court they attend. 



. 



ii 



=43- 



fc-r 

I 



The Supreme Court 

Is held in. Raleigh twice a year (on the 1st day of July, and 1st 
day of January) by all the Judges of the Superior Courts, for the 
purpose of settling all questions of law or equity arising on their 



circuits. 

Archibald D, Murphey, Clerk. 



Major-Generals of 'Militia— -Thomas Brown* 2d Division, appoint- 
ed 1793. William Lenoir, 5th Division, 1794. Thomas- Blount, 
3d Division, 1303. Thomas Wynn, 1st Division, 1806. Joseph 
T. Rhodes, 6th Division, JL810. George Graham, 4th Division r l810 

Brigadier-Generals— Jamea Welborn, 9fn Brigade, 1801. Tho- 
mas. Davis, 4th B- 18o3- Kphraim Davidson, 7th B.18o3; John 
Scott, 13th B. 18©6. Benjamin Lee, 14th B. 18o7: Peter Forney, 
loth B. 18o8. Jeremiah Bright, 1st B. 18o8, Thomas Love, 15th 
B. 18o8. William Arrington,5th B. 18o8. Abraham Philips, 8th 
B. 18o9>- William Croom, 12th B. 18o9. William . W. Jones, 
3d B. 18lOo Hardy Smithy 2d B. 18lo. Alexander Gray,. 6th 
B. I8I0. David. Hart, X lth B.I8I0. Azariah Graves, 16th B. I8L0. 

Adjutant-General— Calvin Jones. 

MEMBERS OF THE ASSEMBLY FOR 1811. 

COUNTIES- SENATORS. COMMONERS. . 

Alison, James Marshall,- William R. Pickett, D. Cuthbertson 
Ashe, Richard Williams, Martin Gambill, David Miller 
Brunswick, Thomas Leonard, Jacob. Leonard, Thomas Russ 
Buncombe, R. WiUutmson, Philip Brittain, Samuel Davidson 
Beaufort, Frederick Grist, Everand Mall, Latham 

Burke, David Tate, Charles M'Dowell, Isaac T". Avery 
Bladen, Isaac Wright, James Owen, Thomas Brown 
Bertie, George Outlaw, David Stone, William Sparkman 
Craven, John W. West, John Sedgwich Nelson, Vine Allen 
Cartaret, Belcher Fuller, John Robards, and 
Currituck, Jonathan Lindsey, Brickhouse Bell, Tliomas Garrett, 
Camden, Caleb Perkins, Dempsey Sawyer, Peter. Mercer 
Caswell, Azariah Graves* James Yancey, Isaac Rainey 
Chowan, k. chard Hoskins, Samuel M'Guire, Thomas Coffield 
Chatham, Roderick Gotten, John Mebane,jun'r. Andrew Deaden 
Cumberland, John Dickson, Thomas Gilmore, Farquahar M'Kay 
Cabarrus, Robert W; Smith, Paul Barringer, John Phifer 
Columbus, Wynn Nance, Thomas Frink, Jonathan Pearce 
; Duplin, Charles Hooks, David Wright, Joseph Gillespie 
Edgecombe, Henry 1. Toole, James W. Clark, William Balfour 
Frankhn, Benjazain Brickell, Eppes Moody, B, F Hawkins 
Guilford, Jonathan P:ukvr, Robert Hannah, John Howell 
Gates, Joscpii itiddick, John B. B kev Humphrey Hlidgins 
Granville, Thomas Taylor, W, Hawkins, Daniel Jones 
Greene, Win. V.Speight, Jonas Williams, Darden 

J/aJfax, John Branch, W. E. Webb, Joseoh J. Daniel 
Hertford, Thomas VVynns, Boon Felt on, William Jones 
..Hyde, Benjamin SandVrson, Thomas Spencer, Zachariah Eborn 
Haywood, John vrFirl.nd, Thomas Love, Thomas Lenoir 
Jredeli, Joseph Guy, Samuel King, G L Davidson 
iJoncs, Benjamin Simmo?-is, Cihistophcr Bryan, Eimuud Hatch, jr 



3* 



; 






^Johnston, John Williams, Samuel No rsworthy, Henry Guy 
Llacol'i, John Reid, Peter Hoyle, Daniel Hoke 
Lenoir, James Bright, F. Kilpatrick, Alexander Mosley 

Hoove, Archioald Ai'Neill, Atlas Jones, John M'Lennaii 
^Montgomery, Edmund De berry, Joseph Parsons, James Legraud 
.Mecklenburg, George Graham, Henry Massey, Jonathan Harris 
ifWarthi, Jeremiah Siade, Joel Cherry, Andrew Joiner 
J\*e:L<~ Hanover, William Hill, John D. Jones, Joseph Lamb 
JViish, W|nfti Arl'inff^lJ, E.vum Philips. Michael Collins 
A'orihampton, Wm. Edmunds, Cornelius Moore, Andrew Jones 
Onslow, Edward Ward,, Edward B Dudley, George Nobles • 
Omnge, James Mebahe, John Thompson, John Craig- 
Persian, Wm. Cunning-ham, Robert Vanhook, Benjamin Chambers 
Pasquotank, Thaddeus Freshwater, Bcnj. Baiiy, Marm. Scolt 
Pitt, Wm. May, Hardy Smith, h\ Cor!) am 
Perquimans, Willis lliddick, Isaac Barber, Jesse Copeland 
llo-van, Jacob Fisher, George Mtunford, Daniel Leatherman 
Randolph, Lewis Spinks, Josiah Lyndon, John Long- 
^ockiug/iam, Nathaniel Scales, Win-. Doug-las, Josepli S. Gen-try 
Robeson, Alfred Rowland, Jolin Gilchrist, Duncan M'Alpin 
Rkhmom^ Alexander M'Millan, Neill Smith, John Blue 
Rutherford, William Greene, William Porter, Dan el Gold 
Sampson, <jim Mobley, James Mathews, Hardy liyal 
Surry, Thomas Wright, Charles Taiiafero, Nicholas Horn . 
Stokes, Henry B Dobsoo, James Martin, jr. Joseph Wilson 
Tyrrel, Zebulon Tarkington, Levi Bate man, Solomon Hassell 
Washing-ton, Levin Boa z man, William Garrett Samuel Blount. 
Wilkes, J'irnes Welborn, Edmund Jones, Ailtn 

Warren, Phil. Hawkins, William II. Johnston, William Miller 
Wayne, John Davis,. C alien Blackmail, James Deans 
| W'fke, William Hinton, Kimbro' Jones, Nathaniel Jones. 

To-iun of Edentoii, Matthias E. Sawyer Wihuiugton, Wm. W. 
Jones. FayetteviJIe, .lohn A. Cameron. Aeu-bern, Daniel Carthy 
Thilsborouq-h, Henry Thompson. Salisbury, John Steele. Halifax, 
] JepthaDupree. — ■ — — 

ORIGIN OP THE NAMES OF THE DAYS OF THE WEFJC. 
The names of the days of the week were derived from 
the Romans. Sunday was so called, because it was 
H dedicated to the Sun ; Monday was- so called, Because it 
J was dedicated to the, goddess Diana, .or« the Moon. Tues- 
day, according to Johnson, is derived from Tuv, the Saxon 
name of Mars. Wednesday is derived from Wodin, or 
Ordin, who was worshipped in ancient Denmark. Tburs- ! 



day is derived irom the 



ward Thor, which was the Saxon 



name of Jupiter, or Jove. Friday is derived from the 
Saxon word Fridgedag, which is supposed to have been j 
the Venus of the ancieui rS:.»xons.- Saturday has taken its 
name from Saeter, a Saxon idol. 

By reason of the derivation of the names of the Months of die 
year & days of the week from heathen gods and gooddosses, tl e 
Quakers have a ~ansc'nmeious objection against using those. names. 



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ultford 3d do February \iay<a?igu;=t Novembej? 
ates 3d do February May A^jgisi November.'* ' 
Gi- un iii(Hm-do February MajrtSiugust November 
H ali fas 3d do February .May August November 
lertfovd 4th do February May August November 
Hyde last doT^bruary May August Novemheif {fJ~l 
Maywood 3d do M'trcli June September December/ VlCl 
JOimston 4th do February May August Noven&jW-- |\f 
Jones 2d do Ft bruary M;.y August November 
Iredell 3d do February M<y August November- 
Lincoln 3d do January April July October 
Lenoir 1st do January Ap;il July October- 
Moore 3d do February August ami in May and Novc^^se 

Wednesday of each Sup< riour Court term 
*A arti a :>d do March ,h\ne September December 
VfeckWifburg 4th do February May August Noveml 
•omgoniery lsjtxl£ January April J'S.y October 
'Northampton 1st do March Jane September Decern 
<j.sh M do February May August November 
r ' New Hanover 2d do February May August Novemto 
Onslow "M do January April Jiuly October 
Orange 4th do February Kay August November 
I'vcjuokink Itftdo Aia.fb June September December 
f \rquun:,ns 2d do February May August November ( i 
>itt 1st do February May August Novesubcr '^^t^L 

Person Id do Feb. the Wednesday nest after the 2d do in Ma; 

the 2d do. in Aug 1 , the Wednesday alter the 2d do in Nov. 
Robeson 4th do February May August Novemberc-rf 
to wan 2d do February May August November ^" " Wm ^ a - 

Rutherford 2d do January April July- October ^ 

Randolph 2d do February May August November 
ii\ .hmond 3d do March June S< tn'ptwhnv n^*mH*>t» i 
Rockingham la >t do February Ma) 
Surry id do February May August 
Stokes 2d do March- June September December- 
Sampson 3d do February May August November 
Tvrrel 2d do January April July October 
Warren 4ih do February May August November- 
Wake 3d do February May August November 
Washing! on 3d do March June S 
Wr:vnc 3d do February May Au^ 
II' Wilkes the Mundax follow in '4; the 




.plember December y 
August Ncvembci?^ 

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