(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Henry Cornelius Robinson : born in Hartford, August 28, 1832, died in Hartford, February 14, 1900"

F 104 

. H3 R634 



1900z 






^ *o„o* ^ 




<£- 






■/' 



^c? 






»°^, • 



J, j ^VNip- 












v-cr 



> 



h° ^°<* \^^' * ^ "life'* £°* 












c? 4 °. 









Henrp Cornelius &crtrinson 

2£>orn in ^artforti, 2Eugu£t 2S r 1832 
2Dicti in i^artforti, f entruarn 14, 1900 






3 y /f 4. 3 




?</-/£ /J/ 7 



It is a great thing to have lost such a man. 

It is much greater to have had such a man to lose. 

He was the child of the people : 

He was the type of the people. 

From Mr. Robinson' s Eulogy on General Grant. 

I would the great world grew like thee, 
Who grewest not alone in power 
And knowledge, but by year and hour 
In reverence and charity. 

Tennyson. 

Heart-affluence in discursive talk 
From household fountains never dry; 
The critic clearness of an eye 
That saw through all the Muses' walk ; 

Seraphic intellect and force 
To seize and throw the doubts of man ; 
Impassioned logic, which outran 
The hearer in its fiery course ; 

And manhood fused with female grace 
In such a sort, the child would twine 
A trustful hand, unasked, in thine, 
And find his comfort in thy face ; 

All these have been, and thee mine eyes 
Have looked on : if they looked in vain, 
My shame is greater who remain, 
Nor let thy wisdom make me wise. 

Tennyson. 



The Hartford Times of Wednesday, February 14, 1900, con- 
tained the following announcement : 

The Hon. Henry C. Robinson died at his home, No. 420 
Main street, at a quarter before six o'clock this morning. All 
the members of his family were present at the final hour, and 
his death occurred in the midst of the group that held the ten- 
derest and most affectionate of places in his heart. 

In the same edition of the Hartford Times which an- 
nounced his decease, the following editorial article ap- 
peared : 

A genial and kindly presence was ex-Mayor Henry C. Rob- 
inson's, whose death occurred this morning. The full account 
of his useful and honorable life will be read with interest tinged 
with sadness, for his death will be felt to be a real loss to the 
community which he loved and helped. It seems hard to real- 
ize that his pleasant greeting on the street will be heard no 
more. 

Mr. Robinson had the gift of conciliating personal friend- 
ship, and the ability to impress respect for his ability on all 
who came in contact with him. The important part he played 
in Connecticut affairs is of itself abundant proof of this, for it 
began early in his life, and it continued to the end. In law he 
was accustomed to take the broader view of a case, and his ar- 
guments were constantly marked by this quality, whether at 
the bar or before a legislative committee. His ability was mul- 
tiform. As a lawyer he stood very high, but as counsel for the 
New York, New Haven & Hartford road he was as valuable 
as an adviser in business affairs as for his opinion on any legal 
point, or on the conduct of a case at law. He was almost as 
well known as a writer and speaker in two or three other de- 
partments as for his legal and political addresses, and in his 
Bible class in the South church he was always listened to with 



interest, and almost always gave his hearers something that 
struck them forcibly and lingered in their memories. 

He was a man much loved by his family and friends, and 
when this is true it speaks volumes for the kindliness and lova- 
bleness of a man. He was cheerful and hopeful, and in all 
these ways he confirmed his claim to regard, and set a whole- 
some example to others. 

The graves grow thicker, and life's ways more bare, 

As years on years go by ; 
Nay, thou hast more green gardens in thy care 

And more stars in thy sky. 

The Hartford Courant of Thursday, February 15th, con- 
tained a variety of articles concerning Mr. Robinson, which, 
by permission, are here reprinted ; and first, the following 
sketch of his personal history and public relations : 

Henry Cornelius Robinson, LL.D., was born in this city 
August 28, 1832. He was a younger son of David Franklin 
Robinson and Anne Seymour Robinson, and through them was 
descended from the first Puritan settlers of New England. He 
traced his ancestry on the paternal side to Thomas Robinson, 
who was, probably, a kinsman of the Rev. John Robinson, the 
pastor of the Mayflower pilgrims, and who came from England 
among the earlier arrivals and settled at Guilford, in 1667. 
His mother, who was a daughter of Elizabeth Denison, wife of 
Asa Seymour of this city, was a descendant in a direct line from 
Elder William Brewster, who was born in Nottinghamshire, 
England, and was one of the leaders of those who came over in 
the Mayflower, and the ruling elder of Plymouth colony. 

Mr. Robinson was educated at the Hartford Grammar 
School and at the Hartford Public High School after its con- 
solidation with the Grammar School. He was graduated from 
the latter in the class of 1849, and immediately entered Yale 
College, from which he was graduated with high honors in the 
"famous class of 1853." Among the members of this class, 
which was one of much distinction, were the Hon. Andrew D. 
White, ex-president of Cornell University and ambassador to 
Germany, Bishop Davies of Michigan, Dr. Charlton T. Lewis 
and Dr. James M. Whiton of New York, the late Isaac H. 
Bromley, George W. Smalley, Washington correspondent of 
the London Times, for many years the London correspondent of 

6 



the New York Tribune, United States Senator R. L. Gibson, 
the Hon. B. K. Phelps, E. C. Stedman of New York, the poet, 
the late S. M. Capron, Julius Catlin, General Edward Harland 
of Norwich, Dr. William M. Hudson, Wayne MacVeagh, the 
late Judge Edward W. Seymour of the Supreme Court, Judge 
Shiras of the United States Supreme Court, Dr. Henry P. 
Stearns, the late George H. Watrous, formerly president of the 
" Consolidated " road, and a number of others who have attained 
distinction in law, medicine, politics, and the arts and sciences. 

After graduation, Mr. Robinson studied law in the office of 
his elder brother, Lucius F. Robinson, and after three years of 
practice by himself became a partner of his brother. This 
partnership was severed by the death of the elder brother in 
1861, and Mr. Robinson continued in business alone until 18S8, 
when his eldest son, Lucius F. Robinson, became a member of 
the firm. Recently, John T. Robinson, the youngest son, was 
admitted to the firm, the style of which is Robinson & Robin- 
son. The firm is easily one of the most prominent in the Con- 
necticut bar and is widely known throughout this section of 
the country. The firm has charge of a great many corporation 
interests, besides Mr. Robinson's well-known connection as one 
of the leading counsel of the "Consolidated" road of which he 
was for many years a leading director and a member of the 
standing committee. 

Mr. Robinson all through his life was a disciple of Izaak 
Walton, and delighted especially in trout fishing, taking fre- 
quently days of relaxation from the duties of his profession 
during the season. He was, also, in his earlier days fond of 
hunting and gained a large knowledge of the surrounding 
country in his trips, thus developing his innate love for the 
beautiful in nature. Early in his professional career he became 
interested in the science of pisciculture, considering it from its 
important bearing on the food supply. In 1866, General Haw- 
ley, then governor of the state, appointed Mr. Robinson a fish 
commissioner. He accepted the appointment and at once 
bent his efforts towards the development of the fish industry 
in the state. He advanced fish culture by legislative enact- 
ments preventing pound-fishing in the Connecticut River, and 
by experiments in hatching. Wise legislation in this direction 
was repealed before it had become fully operative, owing to 
adverse influences of a partisan character. The first artificial 



hatching of shad was made under Mr. Robinson's direction as 
fish commissioner, associated with the late F. W. Russell of 
this city. Mr. Robinson's methods and theories had the full 
approval of the late eminent naturalist, Professor Agassiz, who 
was deeply interested in the experiments and the legislation on 
the subject. 

Mr. Robinson was elected mayor of his native city in 1872, 
overcoming a large democratic majority by the personal popu- 
larity he enjoyed and the confidence felt in him by the commu- 
nity generally. He served one term and gave the city an 
administration notable for efficiency. Municipal affairs were 
conducted on business principles and there was an economical 
administration of affairs. During his administration, Hartford 
became the sole capital of the state, in which movement Mr. 
Robinson took a large part. He was the instigating force in 
the establishment of several of the city commissions. In 1879 
Mr. Robinson was elected a member of the General Assembly, 
having for his colleague General Lucius A. Barbour. His prom- 
inence in public affairs and his legal knowledge and brilliant 
eloquence made him chairman of the judiciary committee and 
leader of the House. He was successful in procuring the 
enactment of several important matters of legislation which 
included the change in legal procedure. Always a republican 
in politics from the formation of the party, Mr. Robinson con- 
tinued to support its principles all through life, and his influ- 
ence in party politics was always felt. He received the repub- 
lican nomination for governor three times, in the spring of 
1876, the fall of the same year, and again in 187S at the cele- 
brated convention in Allyn Hall, when he declined and Gov- 
ernor Andrews was nominated and was subsequently elected by 
the General Assembly, the greenback defection from the dem- 
ocratic party throwing the election into the Legislature. Each 
nomination Mr. Robinson received was by acclamation. He 
was a member of the national republican convention at Chi- 
cago in 1880 as one of the delegates from this state, which 
nominated Garfield and Arthur, and he drafted a large portion 
of the platform which was finally adopted. 

Mr. Robinson's large law practice prevented him from 
accepting many appointments which were tendered him. He 
was counsel for many leading corporations in the state, and in the 
the contest for the governorship growing out of the dead-lock 

8 



of 1 89 1-3, and the quo warranto proceedings which followed, 
was the senior counsel for the republican party. Mr. Robinson, 
besides his position as a leading director of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad Company, was a director of the 
Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company, the Connecticut 
Fire Insurance Company, the Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 
and Insurance Company, a trustee of the Connecticut Trust & 
Safe Deposit Company, a member of the Hartford Board of 
Trade, and was for several years president of the Republican 
Club of Hartford. Mr. Robinson was also a charter member 
and president of the City Missionary Society for several years, 
president of the Henry C. Robinson Troop, a campaign organi- 
zation, a director of the Hartford Hospital, American trustee 
for the Scottish Union Insurance Company, trustee of the 
Wadsworth Atheneum, and an original member of the Monday 
Evening (Literary) Club. 

Mr. Robinson had been for over fifty years a member of 
the South Church and one of Dr. Parker's warmest friends. 
He was always very influential in church matters and had been 
a member of the church and the society committees, besides 
being for several years superintendent of the Sunday-school. 

Mr. Robinson's well-known sympathy with philanthropic, 
charitable, religious, and educational movements led to his 
active participation with many enterprises of that character, 
his counsel being frequently sought in matters of that kind, as 
that which could be implicitly relied upon. For many years he 
served on committees, boards of directors, and ecclesiastical 
associations throughout the state, doing a large amount of work 
in these lines. He was a member of the Hartford Tract Society, 
a trustee of the Wadsworth Atheneum of this city, a trustee of 
the Hartford Grammar school, vice-president of the Bar Asso- 
ciation of Connecticut and of that of Hartford county, the third 
president of the Yale Alumni Association of this city, following 
Judge Shipman and Mr. Twichell, and was one of the founders 
of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, his title in the latter being gained from the service of 
his great-grandfather, Colonel Timothy Robinson, who served 
in the Revolutionary War. 

Mr. Robinson's pre-eminent position in the practice of the 
law was gained by great natural gifts of oratory, diligent study, 
and much arduous toil and a large practice of much variety. 



He had professional attainments of a high degree of scholarship 
added to which was high personal character. Few excelled 
him in brilliant eloquence, and his efforts in that line have been 
marked by a broad grasp of his subject and a full and sincere 
patriotism. His great gifts in this direction found expression 
in many addresses breathing patriotism, loyalty, and devotion to 
the broad interests of humanity and the interests of his country 
and his native city. Among his most prominent addresses, 
some of which commanded the attention of thousands at the 
time, were his oration at the dedication of the Putnam eques- 
trian statue at Brooklyn, Conn.; the Hartford services at the 
deaths of President Garfield and General Grant ; the semi- 
centennial of the Hartford Public High School ; the nomi- 
nating speech for Colonel Frank W. Cheney in the republican 
state convention in Foot Guard Armory ; the address at the 
first banquet of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution at the Allyn House, where he presided ; 
and the address at the celebration of the 400th anniversary of 
the birth of Martin Luther, at the Park Church. Especially 
interesting as models of eloquent oratory, fine diction, and fer- 
vent patriotism, were his many addresses on Memorial Day 
before members of the Grand Army of the Republic. He was 
also the orator at the dedication of the Putnam statue on Bush- 
nell Park, and at the celebration of the 250th anniversary of 
the General Assembly. 

Mr. Robinson was for many years lecturer at Yale on the 
ethics of the legal profession. He has written extensively for 
magazines, principally for the New Englander and the Yale Law 
Journal. The most ambitious of his more recent writings was 
the "Constitutional History of Connecticut," lately published 
in " Hurd's New England States." The public bath-house, 
which has proved of so much benefit, was one of Mr. Robin- 
son's ideas which found expression in his message as mayor, 
and was established during his administration. He was also 
an earnest advocate of a public market for this city. Mr. Rob- 
inson was tendered the appointment of minister to Spain by 
President Harrison, which he declined, and was also tendered 
the presidency of the " Consolidated " road several years ago. 

Mr. Robinson was married August 28, 1862, on his thirtieth 
birthday, to Miss Eliza Niles Trumbull, daughter of John F. 
Trumbull of Stonington. Mrs. Robinson and five children sur- 



vive him. The children are Lucius F. Robinson and John T. 
Robinson, law partners of their father, Henry S. Robinson, sec- 
retary of the Connecticut Trust & Safe Deposit Company, 
Lucy T., the wife of Sidney T. Miller of Detroit, and Miss Mary 
S. Robinson of this city. Mr. Robinson also leaves four grand- 
children, who are, Elizabeth Trumbull and Sidney Trowbridge 
Miller, children of Mrs. Miller, and Lucius Franklin and Bar- 
clay Robinson, children of Lucius F. Robinson. Two sisters 
survive Mr. Robinson, Mrs. Sarah A. Trumbull, widow of Dr. 
J. Hammond Trumbull, and Mrs. Shipman, the wife of Judge 
Nathaniel Shipman. 

Mr. Robinson's office has always been a school for lawyers, 
some of whom have attained eminence in the bar and in other 
pursuits. Among those who studied law in Mr. Robinson's 
office are the following : Sylvester C. Dunham, vice-president 
of the Travelers Insurance Company, Judge W. F. Henney, 
James A. Barnes of New Bedford, Mass., Henry C. Gussman of 
New Britain, Daniel J. Griffin, now dead, George P. McLean 
and Austin Brainard, members of the firm of Sperry, McLean 
& Brainard, Andrew F. Gates, T. Dwight Merwin of New 
York, and a son of the Hon. Henry Barnard, now dead. 

The Courant, in an editorial article, also said : 
The death of Hon. Henry C. Robinson brings a sense of 
loss, not only to this community, but to the whole State. His 
was a unique figure in our Connecticut life ; the place he occu- 
pied was all his own. As an orator, he stood foremost in the 
State ; as a politician, he was a leading republican from the 
early days of that party ; as a lawyer, he was at the head of the 
profession ; as a citizen, he was full of patriotic impulse and 
public spirit ; and, as a friend, he was sympathetic, cordial, and 
demonstrative in a way that bound others to him by a peculiar 
affection. 

In the widespread grief that followed the first announce- 
ments of his critical illness, there were, of course, many allu- 
sions to the large outside successes of his life. But always the 
uppermost thought was of the man's great heart, of his kind 
and affectionate disposition, of the wide range and the wit and 
brilliancy of his conversation, of the charm of his sympathetic 
companionship — of the greatest of all his successes, his hold 
upon the hearts of those who were admitted to the privilege of 



his abundant friendship. His encouraging way with young 
men has especially endeared him to many, now no longer 
young, who remember with gratitude his helpful friendliness 
in the days of their early struggles. 

One of the most noticeable elements of Mr. Robinson's na- 
ture was his great enthusiasm. He was of an emotional tem- 
perament and easily moved, sometimes even to tears, by a ten- 
der strain of music or a burst of eloquence. His feeling was 
intense, and in his large and many sympathies he was always 
abounding in enthusiasm, whether for friends, for books, for 
music, or for art. He was a genuine and devoted lover of na- 
ture, with the spirit of the true poet in him. He was fond of 
outdoor life, and, so long as he had the strength, was a devoted 
fisherman and hunter. No one knew better than he the brooks 
and fields of this county, or the delight of communion with 
them. A few years ago he fell down the steps that lead to his 
office, and the injuries then incurred incapacitated him for out- 
door exercise and undoubtedly in that way shortened his life. 

He was one of the founders and most enthusiastic members 
of the Monday Evening Club of this city, and his essays there 
were of a choice literary quality and were often enjoyed later 
by the public as Kent Club lectures, and at other occasions. 

Of his lovely home life it is not for a newspaper to speak, 
but none who enjoyed his hospitality need be reminded of the 
pleasure it gave them, or the sweetness of the atmosphere 
which pervaded the household as it was revealed to them. Mr. 
Robinson, in his more than sixty years of life here, had come 
to be an essential part of Hartford. He will be missed in many 
ways, and mourned by very many outside the immediate circle 
of his intimate friends. 

The following tributes from some of Mr. Robinson's per- 
sonal friends are taken also from the Courant of February 
1 5th : — 

from Ris pastor, Dr. Parker. 

To the Editor of the Courant : 

In the great sorrow, and in the shock and confusion of 
thought and feeling caused by the death of my dear friend and 
brother, how can I write what I would and should, concerning 
him ? 



Love sees him through a mist of tears, 
Transfigured in a new, strange light, 
Wherein each virtue shines so bright, 

That every frailty disappears. 

For more than forty years we have walked together in an 
uninterrupted companionship of mutual confidence and affec- 
tion. I have looked to him, and never in vain. I have leaned 
upon him, nor ever found him wanting or weak. I have de- 
rived wisdom, strength, comfort, and courage from him at 
every stage of the long way. We have taken sweet counsel to- 
gether. No man ever had a more loyal, steadfast, and faithful 
friend than he has been to me. 

And he has gone ! 

This complaint of personal feeling might be unsuitable for 
publication, but for the fact that it probably voices the feeling 
of many others in this community and elsewhere. Mr. Robin- 
son had a host of friends, in all classes and conditions, for he 
showed himself friendly and made and kept friends. 

There is but one feeling concerning him in this community 
— the feeling of bereavement. It is literally true that "the 
mourners go about the streets." Hartford mourns not only 
the loss of a distinguished citizen of whom she was justly 
proud, but of a good man of whom she was justly fond. No 
one of her sons loved her more or served her more devotedly 
and efficiently. No one of them was more intimately associ- 
ated with her best traditions and interests. No one of them 
was a truer or more typical representative of her social, civic, 
and religious life. He seemed builded, as a living stone, into 
the very structure of her commonwealth. Universally and al- 
most familiarly known, he was universally respected, honored, 
admired, and beloved. Omitting all consideration of his strictly 
professional qualifications, services, and successes, of which his 
legal brethren may more suitably testify, we recall the diver- 
sity of intellectual gifts which he possessed, and his culture and 
employment of the same, by which he achieved singular dis- 
tinction, and rendered highly important service in the elucida- 
tion of public questions and concerns. His naturally vigorous 
and fertile mind was subjected to the discipline of hard study 
and close thought. A wide range of good reading in all depart- 
ments of literature enriched him with the materials of apt illus- 
tration for his own discourse. He had imagination, and the 

13 



vision of it, and the poetic temperament. He had the logical 
faculty, and reasoned cogently, though not in supreme respect 
of logical terms and forms. His command of language was re- 
markable, and his use of it, in writing or speaking, was alike 
forcible and felicitous. 

He seldom spoke without careful preparation, although the 
ease and grace of his speech seemed spontaneous and unpre- 
meditated. The rhetorical efflorescence of earlier years proved 
to be only the condition and harbinger of that fruitfulness, both 
of thought and expression, which characterized the public utter- 
ances of his riper age. 

We had come to regard him as our "chief speaker," the one 
to be brought forward on important public occasions. He was 
capable of eloquence. He had the oratorical art and power. 
Since Richard D. Hubbard died, no man among us surpassed 
him in these respects. 

Mr. Robinson had in his nature an interesting commixture 
of conservative and progressive elements. He liked and clung 
to old ways, old forms, old customs, old traditions, yet not with- 
standing reasonable innovations. But no one was more hospi- 
table to new ideas, to new interpretations of truth, to new light 
from any quarter. 

He welcomed the investigations of sober scholars. He 
would not muzzle criticism. He was not afraid of new depart- 
ures in theology, but would bid them depart in peace. His 
Christian sympathies were catholic because his human-hearted- 
ness was so large and warm. 

Mr. Robinson was radically and unalterably democratic in 
principle and spirit. He believed in men, in the common peo- 
ple. He trusted them, and had no respect for aristocracy in 
Church or State. I have never known a man who had more 
faith in his fellowmen, and this, conjoined with a faith in God, 
made him an optimist. I have never known a man who ex- 
ceeded him in respect of charity towards men. Those clear, 
keen eyes of his searched out and saw through shams and in- 
sincerities and lies, and made them blench. But those same 
eyes were ever detecting the better things in weak and erring 
mortals. His excuses and apologies for human faults and frail- 
ties were often as ingenious as they always were ingenuous. 
Out of the loving-kindness of his heart, he was a strength to 
the poor and to the needy in their distress. The thing he most 

14 



hated was inhumanity. Mr. Robinson had a practical Christian 
philosophy of human life as related both to nature and to God, 
as conditioned by infirmity and mortality and yet embraced in 
some good purpose of Divine Love, which enabled him to en- 
counter and sustain great trials and sorrows with singular for- 
titude and serenity of mind. 

He was splendidly courageous and hopeful. This, with his 
loyalty, made him a most helpful friend. 

He bore up and fared on so heartily, so cheerily, so 
bravely ! Weakness found strength, discouragement found 
courage in his presence and counsel. Somehow he contrived 
to turn the edge of complaints, and to divert the currents of 
despondency, and to set one in a higher and brighter and bet- 
ter course of thought and feeling. Minor music was not to his 
taste. Mr. Despondency was not his type of a Christian. 

He had a good, sound judgment, a rich and saving common 
sense, underneath all the more brilliant gifts which delighted 
men's eyes. He was a great believer in human freedom, — in 
freedom of thought and speech and action. Within the sphere 
of his liberty as a conscientious and Christian man, he moved 
freely as he would, and thought others should do likewise, with- 
out overmuch regard to criticism. It was of great importance 
to him that people should diligently and religiously mind their 
own business. Virtue by repression and compulsion seemed 
impracticable to his mind. 

Mr. Robinson was a very high-minded, as well as a strong- 
minded man ; a great and pure-hearted man ; a just, kind, gen- 
erous, affectionate man ; and, I may add, a profoundly religious 
man. He worked no ill, spoke no ill, thought no ill of his neigh- 
bor. He had less reason than most of us to pray for deliver- 
ance from "all uncharitableness." He was a bright and shin- 
ing light in this city. He was a tower of strength in the church 
of God here. 

It was pathetic to see this man who, only a few years since, 
rejoiced in almost perfect health of body, and exulted in ath- 
letic recreations by stream or wood or shore, cast down in griev- 
ous physical disabilities and pains, but it was beautiful to see 
his patient acceptance of his lot, and his fine exemplification of 
his own philosophy. 

A friend who visited him one day said to me, speaking of 
his protracted and severe sufferings, " He bears them like an 
early Christian ! " 

15 



Another man, of humble occupation, spoke the truth, who 
said to me but yesterday, " I suppose there was no man in Hart- 
ford so well known, and who will be so much missed by every- 
body, as Mr. Robinson." On the whole, what a fortunate, suc- 
cessful, happy, useful, and honorable life his has been ! God 
be thanked for it. But what shall we do without him ? 

E. P. P. 

from president Greene of the Connecticut Mutual* 

To the Editor of the Courant : 

For thirty years I have had a double relation with Mr. Rob- 
inson. He has been my business associate and my friend. In 
both relations he had a distinctive and characteristic value. 

As a director in the corporation of which we were mem- 
bers, and in which he was for many years the senior director, 
he took an enthusiastic interest in both the scientific and the 
practical side of its problems and affairs. His acute and clear 
intelligence, his zeal, his tact, his courage, his experience, his 
wide knowledge of men and of affairs of moment, as well as his 
great professional acquirements, made him a counselor of unu- 
sual value. Like every man of power, he made his own place, 
which another may never wholly take. The sense of his loss 
will never pass from the minds of those who were associated 
with him. 

But who can describe his friend : the man who brought to 
every day's intercourse the cheerful face, the hearty voice, the 
personal interest, the intelligent sympathy, the helpful consid- 
eration, and the high spirit, that made an atmosphere of hope 
and strength wherever he moved. No picture of the man can 
be made by a recitation of the powers of his brilliant mind, his 
wit, the charm of his cultivated gifts of imagination and expres- 
sion. It was their summation and blending in his personality, 
and made vital with his broad human sympathy and his strong, 
warm, sunny nature, that made the man who won the personal 
affection of all who touched him, and whose memory will re- 
main to every such a distinct and precious possession. 

Jacob L. Greene. 

from ex-President Dwigbt of ^ale. 

To the Editor of the Courant : 

May I ask the privilege of saying a few words in your 

16 



columns in testimony of my high esteem and warm friendship 
for the Hon. Henry C. Robinson, the tidings of whose death 
will bring sorrow to a very wide circle of friends who respected 
and loved him. My first meeting with him was at a time when 
I was called into the service of our college as a teacher for a 
short period, about four months after my graduation in 1849, 
and in the early part of his freshman year. In common with 
his classmates he opened his heart kindly towards me in those 
days of our first acquaintance, and, as a consequence, the 
friendship of a life-time was begun. The class of 1853 has had 
a very honorable record in the history of the half-century 
which has passed since they entered upon their course as 
students at Yale, but the happiest part of their record, as 
related to my own personal life, is connected with the friendly 
association in which I have been permitted by them to share. 

Henry Robinson — for so I like to speak of him — was in 
his college days what he has been in the long years that have 
followed them. In his case, the boy was truly father of the 
man. He had the same generous spirit, the same kindness of 
heart, the same enthusiasm, the same readiness of thought and 
of speech, the same manly character, the same truthful life, the 
same warm affection. Those days were, indeed, at the begin- 
ning, and were far distant from the end. But the beginning 
for him was the beginning of growth, and the end was but the 
richness and ripeness of the fruitage. I am glad that I saw the 
progress and development of the years and knew, in their 
passing onward, the fulfillment of the youthful promise. 

I think of him now — as I have often thought of him 
before — as having had a unique and a very happy career. It 
was his good fortune to pass through his whole life in the 
home of his childhood — in the city which he loved and of 
which he became, as he moved on in his manhood, no unim- 
portant part. He had the best elements of the old Hartford 
character, and he carried in himself those elements of goodness 
and of strength in all his living. He had, from the beginning, 
a delightful home and gave to it, out of his own generous love 
and devotion, a large measure of its joy. No one could see 
him, or think of him, without knowing that his children must 
love him as one of the kindliest of fathers. No one could enter 
the circle of his friendship without realizing yet more fully 
what he must be to those to whom he was bound by still closer 



ties. The company of his friends was a large one — made up 
of younger men, as well as older. The younger ones were 
happy in the youthfulness of his affection. The older ones 
renewed their youth as they met him and talked with him. In 
his professional and public life he had most gratifying and 
most honorable success — that success which comes from 
ability and worth, from right principle and from true devotion 
to the welfare of others. In his Christian living he was large- 
minded, generous, full of love and good works, a disciple of the 
Master, who had received much of the Master's spirit. As life 
was advancing he gained more and more of that which makes 
the later years full of satisfaction and of peaceful enjoyment, 
and became more joyfully prepared for the future. He has 
died in the fullness of his ripe and complete manhood. Surely 
we may say that his career has been a happy one, ordered 
in loving kindness by the Divine Father. Surely we may 
follow him in our thoughts into the life beyond with much 
thankfulness for the past, and with great and blessed hopes for 
the future. 

I know that his friends in his own city, who have been so 
long and so intimately acquainted with him, will say to one 
another, in these passing days, what is more worthy of him and 
more justly appreciative than I have said. But, as we bid him 
farewell, I hope that the words of a friend who, though living 
elsewhere, recalls in pleasant memory the earlier days and the 
later ones, may be allowed a place among the testimonies of 
friendship and of affection. 

Timothy Dwight. 

New Haven, February 14, 1900. 

from president Perkins of the County Bar, 

To the Editor of the Courant : 

Death has removed from us the most shining ornament of 
the bar of this county, if not of the state. As one who has 
known him as long and perhaps as well as any one not of his 
own family, allow me to say a few words. 

We were born within a few months of each other and 
attended school together from the time we were old enough 
till 1849, when we both went to college. We studied law 
almost together — I with my father and he with his brother 
Lucius, were admitted to the bar in the same year, and have 

18 



since practiced law together. His kindness of heart and sweet- 
ness of temper were such that, during - all that period, there has 
never been an unpleasant word, or, as I believe, an unkind 
thought between us, and this is perhaps the more remarkable 
as to the best of my remembrance we were never engaged 
together in a case, but were always on opposite sides, where it 
so often happens that hasty words are spoken in the excitement 
of a trial. 

This is not the place to speak of his abilities as a lawyer, an 
orator, or in any other of the many positions which he so well 
and ably filled. I know of no other man in the state who 
could fill his place. His death is a loss to the state, to his 
family, and his friends, and especially to the few remaining 
members of the bar, like myself, who have known, loved, hon- 
ored, and respected him all our lives. 

Charles E. Perkins. 

from the F)on. George p. McLean. 

To the Editor of the C our ant : 

As one of Mr. Robinson's students and as one of his younger 
friends for twenty- two years, it is unnecessary for me to say 
that I learned to love him, and it is impossible for me to 
express the deep sorrow that comes to me in the announcement 
of his death. 

I came to his office in 1879, having with me a letter of 
introduction from a friend whom he knew. Mr. Robinson 
told me that, as he already had three students in his office, I 
could remain there only until he could find another place for 
me. Daily after that I expected the dreaded change, but it did 
not come. 

I had heard much of his eloquence and learning before I 
met him. I had not been in his office a month before I knew 
that his heart was as sympathetic as a mother's. During the 
eight years that I occupied the room next to his, his strong 
and generous hand always seemed to be in mine. No matter 
what I did or how I did it, he not only excused but defended 
it. He did for me what my father could not do, and some- 
times I felt that he helped me to the disadvantage of his own 
sons. 

When I was a member of the General Assembly he had 
many important interests to protect, but he never allowed him- 

19 



self to discuss any of them in my presence. One day I went 
into his room and called his attention to this fact. His reply 
was, " My boy, I want you to look into both sides of my bills 
and do as you think right without a suggestion from me, and 
remember, vote as you want to." It was then I realized that 
his sense of honor was absolute and his friendships uncon- 
ditional. I always saw in him that safe, sure poise of the 
qualities that make the highest order of citizenship. In the 
home, in the office, in the court-room, in the capitol, on the 
platform, in the forest, on the ball ground, in the parlor, he 
was always the same cultured, brilliant, fearless, upright man 
and friend. 

The world to him was beautiful, full of good men and 
women and noble purposes. He loved truth and family and 
his fellowmen better than position or wealth. Life to him was 
a precious link in the bright chain of eternity. If he had 
faults they were as the dust invisible, in a book full of sweet 
poetry, sound philosophy, charity, courage, and hope. 

George P. McLean. 

The Hartford Times of February 14th said : 

Mr. Robinson was a foremost figure in New England Con- 
gregationalism. He was known as a leader in notable assem- 
blages of the denomination. Last fall he was a member of the 
international council which met in Boston, and was an active 
participant in its deliberations. 

His writings were voluminous, covering wide and distinct 
fields of research. His paper on the " Constitutional History 
of Connecticut " was one of the best efforts from his pen, and 
will be of unquestioned authority in the deliberations on that 
subject which are to take place hereafter in legal and legislative 
halls. His public addresses and orations were of the most 
brilliant literary merit. The oration delivered at the unveiling 
of the Putnam equestrian statue in Brooklyn was one of the 
most remarkable specimens of oratory that have been produced 
in Connecticut. 

One of the most eloquent expressions of patriotism that the 
veterans of the Civil War have listened to in this state came 
from his lips, May 30, 1S85. Under the auspices of the Grand 
Army in this city, he was the Memorial Day orator. 

In this oration, the memory of which still lingers in the 



hearts and minds of its hearers, Mr. Robinson laid down the con- 
viction that : " There is such a thing as Christian thought in states- 
manship, and it is consistent with the highest, truest manliness." 
In the memorial address delivered in Rockville in 1897, Mr. 
Robinson spoke with the old enthusiasm of Connecticut's ser- 
vices in the country's behalf. 

Mr. Robinson was kindly and generous at all times in his 
dealings with men. His cheery word of " comrade," as he met 
them in the street and in the office, had a tonic that could not 
be forgotten in the duties and exactions of daily life. Mr. 
Robinson was the enthusiastic friend of out-door games and 
athletics, taking an increasing pleasure as the years advanced 
in the athletic life at Yale. And here it may be said that he 
was the typical Yale man, loving the university with the loy- 
alty of a son, and counting its progress and history as of the 
greatest value. He was a member of the Hartford Yale 
Alumni Association, and was one of its first presidents. 

Most of all, Mr. Robinson was a man of Christian belief and 
character. He was a member of the South Congregational 
church, and his religious life was exemplified in that body and 
in the home of rare interest and charm which was dignified by 
his presence and spirit. The catholicity of his faith was appar- 
ent in every act and thought of his life. Religion presented no 
narrowing influences in his examples of citizenship and neigh- 
borly courtesies. His faith bore fruit that cannot be thought 
of except with thankfulness that so good a man has lived and 
worked and been an example to be imitated in the community 
which he loved and honored so much. 

6eneral F)awk/s tribute to Mi*. Robinson. 

Special to the Coura?it : 

Washington, February 14. / 

On hearing of the death of the Hon. Henry C. Robinsoii 
to-day, Senators Hawley said : " One more old friend gone — 
during the nearW fifty years of our acquaintance, I never met 
him when his kind soul failed to show itself in a pleasant smile 
and a cordial grip of the hand, and his bearing toward all was 
that of a friend. He was a gentleman of honor, able in his 
profession, a lover of his country, public spirited, and sound in 
judgment. His private life was stainless. His departure will 
be sadly mourned by a great circle of friends and relatives." 



New Haven Journal and Courier : 

Henry C. Robinson, who died in Hartford yesterday, was a 
good lawyer, a good business man, a good speaker and writer, 
and a good citizen. Indeed, he was capable and efficient in 
whatever he undertook, and the range of his activities was 
wide. During a large part of his life he was prominent in 
politics and public affairs, and his state and city have profited 
by his public spirit, his sagacity, and his skill. He was wise 
and tactful in his dealings with his fellowmen, kindly in spirit, 
and given to good works. The Congregational church and the 
American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions have 
long felt the influence of his zeal and wisdom. He will be 
greatly missed by many who have been accustomed to rely on 
his counsel, and he will be long and sincerely mourned by 
many who have been accustomed to rely on his friendliness 
and good will. In his death, his family, his friends, his church, 
his profession, his business associates, his city and his state 
have met with a great loss. 

New Haven Register : 

To lose such a man is to reflect the more seriously and 
fondly upon those who are left behind, and who are still in the 
turmoil and battle of life which so often compel us to put off 
appreciation of what is, in human character and association, 
until its influence and radiance are stilled. It was a pleasure 
to meet Mr. Robinson ; it was an honor to know him. 

Springfield Republican : 

Death came to Henry C. Robinson of Hartford, yesterday 
morning, and in his departure that city and the State of Con- 
necticut lose much. His ability as a lawyer was commanding 
and his position at the bar long sustained, while as an influ- 
ential personality in legislation and affairs he took rank among 
the strongest men his state has produced. In literary acquire- 
ment and eloquent speech the same rank was his, and he was a 
leader among the Congregational laymen of New England. 
He thus measured large in many lines. 

New York Evening Post : 

Mr. Robinson was very prominent in Congregational church 
matters. As a corporate member of the American Board of 



Commissioners for Foreign Missions he took a leading part as 
a liberal in the series of "great debates" on the question of 
orthodox qualifications for missionaries. It was in one of those 
debates that he coined the phrase, famous at the time, about 
" venerable incorporators who elect venerable successors to the 
venerable dead." 

New York Tribune : 

His grace and power as an orator caused him to be fre- 
quently called upon to make memorial, welcome, and dedica- 
tion addresses. He was the memorial orator at the Hartford 
obsequies of President Garfield and General Grant, and he 
delivered eulogies upon many prominent members of the 
bar. 

From the Hartford Post of February 14th : - 
Henry C. Robinson, who died this morning at the age of 68, 
united character with capacity, courage with courtesy, and 
strength with sympathy, and he was at once a student and a 
man of affairs. His death, not unexpected, removes from this 
community a great personal force, and the regret which his loss 
will beget will not be confined to Hartford or bounded by Con- 
necticut. 

Mr. Robinson represented an original type of mind, and he 
didn't waste any time loitering around stores which dealt in sec- 
ond-hand intellectual furniture. He was not disposed to take 
things for granted, and with a faculty for mastery, he loved to 
go to the bottom of matters and find out for himself. This 
habit of thoroughness made him a recognized authority within 
the range of his specialties, and gave to his views and utter- 
ances an influence which a shallow intellect might envy but 
could not achieve. Upon the constitutional and ecclesiastical 
history of Connecticut he was an expert, and in delving into 
this subject with his industrious shovel he spent many happy 
hours. The breadth of his activities and the range of his sym- 
pathies and of his scholarship may be indicated by the state- 
ment that he could address a religious gathering on Sunday, 
deliver a talk before a historical society on Monday, act as coun- 
sel in some technical and complex case on Tuesday, be a felt 
force in a railroad conference on Wednesday, and so on through- 
out the week. The State has developed few men who have 

23 



had a greater fund of basic information on a larger class of 
subjects than Mr. Robinson. He was never inclined, even for 
the sake of temporary advantage, to permit a point to get the 
better of a principle, and in his intellectual outfit no love for 
professional trickery was listed and no fondness for double- 
dealing was found. His robust character was a personal as 
well as a public asset, and it enhanced his influence in courts of 
justice as well as in the community. 

Mr. Robinson was a man of eminent public spirit, and his 
ten talents and much of his time were at the disposal of the 
public, although upon him a large private business made many 
and constant demands. The things which concerned the prog- 
ress and upbuilding of the community concerned him, and for 
any cause which promoted the general welfare he had a prompt 
and helping hand. With numerous philanthropic and religious 
enterprises has his name been officially linked. His judgment 
was keen, and to it all accorded an attentive ear, and upon it 
many were wont to rely. He knew Hartford and loved it 
cordially. He knew Connecticut and was proud of it. He 
knew his country and admired it. He was familiar with out- 
door life, and in green fields, in the singing of birds, and in the 
study of wild animals he found delight and recreation. 

In the larger and better sense Mr. Robinson was a politi- 
cian, and although he never cultivated the practice of shaking 
the plum-tree, he was many times honored by positions of pub- 
lic trust, and he never violated the confidence which his fellow- 
citizens reposed in him. With legislation and with legislatures 
he had much to do, but for what he did on Capitol hill, even in 
the stormiest times, no apology was ever necessary and upon it 
no shadow of suspicion was cast. The literary style with which 
he clothed his utterances, oral and written, was incisive and 
forceful, and his words were as direct as his statements were 
lucid. 

Mr. Robinson represented the best type of Connecticut citi- 
zenship — and no citizenship is better than the best Connecticut 
citizenship. Hartford is fortunate in having had such a man, 
and is unfortunate in losing him forever, although the work 
that he did and the influence which he exerted are not per- 
ishable products. 



24 



&$r. ftobht£on'£ funeral. 

The funeral services were held on Friday forenoon, Febru- 
ary 1 6th, at eleven o'clock, in the Second Church of Christ 
in Hartford, where Mr. Robinson had been so many years a 
regular attendant upon public worship. The last service he 
attended in that place most dear to him, was on Sunday 
evening, December 31st, to hear the beautiful midnight ser- 
vice for New Year's Eve, composed by his honored towns- 
man and dear friend, Dudley Buck. The ensuing report of 
the funeral services is taken, with slight alterations, from 
the columns of the Hartford C our ant : 

Simple but deeply impressive were the funeral services for 
the late Henry Cornelius Robinson, ex-Mayor of Hartford, at 
the South church yesterday morning. The church was crowded 
to the doors with a representative gathering of business and 
professional men, those connected with Mr. Robinson in the 
various enterprises with which he was identified, clients and 
friends all testifying by their presence to the regard and esteem 
they felt for the distinguished lawyer and citizen. In the con- 
gregation were clergymen, lawyers, judges, merchants, and 
business men from all ranks, with a large number of railroad 
officials and others from out of town. A corps of ushers seated 
the people as they arrived, seats in the body of the church 
being reserved for the various organizations with which Mr. 
Robinson was identified. The ushers were George H. Gilman, 
Francis R. Cooley, Austin Brainard, Robert P. Parker, Arthur 
Day, Andrew F. Gates, Robert W. Huntington, Jr., and Col. 
Francis Parsons. The bearers were Lucius F. Robinson, Henry 
S. Robinson, and John T. Robinson, sons ; the Rev. Frank R. 
Shipman of Andover, Mass., and Arthur L. Shipman of this 
city, nephews ; Sidney T. Miller of Detroit, son-in-law ; Henry 
Robinson Palmer of the Providence Journal, a nephew, and 
Major Louis R. Cheney, a nephew by marriage. 

4 25 



The pulpit platform was banked with a wealth of floral 
pieces composed of roses, violets, lilies-of-the valley, palms, 
orchids, and other blossoms arranged in wreaths, placques, 
sprays, and bouquets, all from organizations with which Mr. 
Robinson was identified, and personal friends. 

The services were conducted by Mr. Robinson's friend and 
pastor, the Rev. Edwin P. Parker, D.D., assisted by the Rev. 
Joseph H. Twichell, ex-President D wight of Yale University 
also occupying a seat in the pulpit. The choir of the church, 
under Mr. John M. Gallup's leadership, sang the evensong Re- 
sponses, Newman's " Lead, Kindly Light," " How Gentle God's 
Commands " to Dr. Parker's tune, " Dawn," which Mr. Robin- 
son loved to hear, and the "Nunc Dimittis" set to music by 
Mr. Robinson's old friend, Henry Wilson. There was no ad- 
dress, but only the words of Holy Scripture, prayers, and sweet 
music. Just before the closing prayer and Responses, Dr. 
Parker read the verses composed by him and read at the 
funeral, in the same place, of Richard D. Hubbard, prefacing 
the recital by saying that the verses had much interested Mr. 
Robinson at the time of their dear friend's funeral service, and 
that they seemed no less pertinent to this than to that occasion. 

The interment was in Cedar Hill Cemetery. 

For the reasons given above, and because the verses are 
a link of love between the souls of three very dear friends, 
the following In Memoriam, read at Mr. Hubbard's funeral, 
was also read at that of Mr. Robinson : 

The lips are silent which alone could pay 
His worthy tribute. We can only lay 

The laurel on his breast, 

And bear him to his rest, 
And say, farewell, dear soul, till break of day. 

Amid the fickle and faint-hearted throng, 

His heart was ever steadfast, brave, and strong. 

His counsel gave us light, 

His courage gave us might — 
To see the right, to wrestle with the wrong. 

That sturdy, stalwart presence was a tower 
Of strength and hope, in many a trying hour. 

In friendship warm and wise, 

In large self-sacrifice, 
In countless kindnesses we proved his power. 

26 



Dear brother-soul ! within that realm unknown 
Where thy good spirit now from us hath flown, 

Canst thou look back and see 

How lonely, without thee, 
And how impoverished our world has grown? 

In purer light dost thou now clearly scan 
The lines of truth so dim to mortal man? 

Dost see, amid our gloom, 

The beauty and the bloom 
Of some inclusive and unfolding plan ? 

Are mysteries disclosed? Misgivings stilled? 

Dark doubts disproved? Hope's prophecies fulfilled? 

We only hear our cries 

Re-echoed from the skies, 
In the vast, awful silence God has willed. 

Oh, brother sweet ! What would'st thou have me say ? 
Sleep well, fare well ; the night is for the day 

And not the day for night ! 

Sleep well, till morning light 
Shall break thy rest, then rise and go thy way. 



27 



At a meeting of the Hartford County Bar, held on Friday, 
February 15th, a committee, consisting of Judge William 
Hamersley, Judge David S. Calhoun, and Hon. William 
Waldo Hyde, was appointed to draft resolutions on the 
death of Mr. Robinson, and to report the same at an ad- 
journed meeting. On the forenoon of Monday, February 
19th, the adjourned meeting was held in the superior court 
room. President Charles E. Perkins presided, and opened 
the meeting with a few introductory remarks. Judge Ham- 
ersley presented the Report of the Committee, as follows : 

" On behalf of the committee appointed at our last meeting, 
I present for your consideration a minute upon the death of 
Mr. Robinson, and move its adoption." 

Report of Resolutions Committee. 

The Hartford County Bar places upon record this minute in 
memory of Henry C. Robinson, who died Feb. 14, 1900. 

Mr. Robinson was admitted to the bar in 1855. He became 
at once engaged in practice, which soon increased in extent and 
importance. For the past thirty years and more he has been 
one of the few foremost lawyers whose ability and character 
have influenced and distinguished the State bar. In consulta- 
tion he was suggestive and resourceful, in preparation thorough, 
in the combats of trials equipped with all the weapons of a sin- 
gularly clear and alert mind, directed with the force of a com- 
bative and intense earnestness. In addressing a jury he was 
eloquent, forceful, and persuasive ; in the discussion of pure 
questions of law he sought above all to discover the controlling 
principle of law, and had a clearness of statement and wealth 
of illustration in its presentation that made his arguments ever 
attractive and powerful. 

His strong personality produced a marked influence peculiar 

28 



to himself, not only in the profession, but in all the relations 
of life. In the church with which he was associated he was a 
power for good from his earliest years. As a citizen he was 
progressive and patriotic, urging with his ardent insistence 
whatever seemed to him for the public good. The highest 
honors of public life in the State and nation were within his 
reach, but had not the power to draw him from his chosen pro- 
fession. He twice accepted the nomination for the chief mag- 
istracy of his native State, when defeat was probable, and de- 
clined it when election followed nomination. He put aside the 
offer of an important foreign mission pressed upon him with 
flattering urgency. But his eloquence of speech and pen were 
always at the service of the public. The field of literature was 
most attractive to him, and his efforts in this direction indicate 
the success he might have won as an author. As friend and 
companion his charm was of a rare quality ; it was all his own ; 
the mingling of cordiality, humor, thoughtfulness, and enthu- 
siasm. 

His long career as a member of this bar has been marked 
by continuous work which has aided in raising the standard of 
the profession, in developing a sound jurisprudence, in increas- 
ing the respect for justice, and which will always associate his 
memory with our most treasured traditions. 

Judge Hamersley, in speaking to the resolutions, said : — 

In taking this action I assume for the time being my place 
as an active member of this bar. I join once more the circle 
most dear to me, which has marked the limits during a lifetime 
of my work and aspirations and closest friendships ; and I ask 
the privilege of saying a few words of our late associate from 
an open heart — as brother speaks to brother. 

Very soon after my admission to the bar, my office joined 
that of Lucius and Henry Robinson. It was at Henry's sug- 
gestion that Lucius, whose brilliant capacity had already won 
for him a high place as leader, asked me, a boy of 21, to appear 
with him in a case of some importance before the Supreme 
Court of Errors. The following year the death of his brother 
left to Henry the unexpected preparation of several cases for 
the next term of the Supreme Court, and he associated me with 
him in those cases. The opportunity thus given was largely 
influential in further advancement. There are many others at 

29 



this bar who are deeply indebted for their early progress to 
friendly aid from Mr. Robinson. I dwell on this because it 
furnishes, in some degree, a key to the character of the man. 
He had, not as an occasional impulse, but as an ever-present 
motive, a certain instinct of helpfulness which dominated often- 
times unconsciously his whole life. There are some lives that 
are like a smooth sheet of water, which changes not, except as 
it reflects with pleasing faithfulness its surroundings. The life 
of Mr. Robinson was far from such as this ; it was more like a 
cluster of springs, each different from the other, and sparkling 
with the freshness of youth, uniting in unexpected combi- 
nations, but moving on in obedience to an unseen and unceas- 
ing force in a mission of wholesome service. It was this vari- 
ety of characteristics, some seemingly contradictory, all bub- 
bling with the spirit of irrepressible youth, that was his great- 
est charm ; and it was the ceaseless motive behind all, the con- 
stant pervading purpose of helpfulness and right doing, that 
was his greatest power. His was a very human nature, full of 
impulse, enjoying the manly excitement of strife, swift to in- 
dignant repelling of wrongful attack, most responsive to healthy 
merriment ; but backed by a tender and true conscience that 
sooner or later impressed its soft controlling influence on all his 
impulses and purposes. He had an intense repugnance to in- 
justice and wrong that would seek expressions in vigorous de- 
nunciation and opposition ; but he was tolerant, most tolerant 
of the unhappy wrong-doer. He loved to help his friends, but 
more than all he loved to help. His heart was catholic. Is it 
strange that such a man, in the many diverse relations of life 
which he has been called to fill, has found in each a host of 
warm personal friends ? Is it strange that such a character, 
when united with the highest intellectual gifts, should have left 
those results of faithful work that compel us to honor his mem- 
ory, and which form for his children a legacy beyond value ? 

In asking the adoption of this minute I represent your com- 
mittee and the whole bar ; but in doing so, I wish also to ex- 
press for two friends of more than fifty years, my own heartfelt 
tribute of admiration, respect, and love. 

Olbat ludgc Calhoun Said. 

Judge David S. Calhoun spoke as follows : 
The death shaft which struck down Henry C. Robinson has 

30 



wounded me sorely. Not only did it despoil the little travel- 
marked company of us, the elders of this bar, of our brightest 
and most hopeful companion, but for me it ended, except in 
memory, an exceptional and valued friendship of more than 
forty years. 

I have known Mr. Robinson since, in the ardor of youth, he 
commenced the study of law in the office of his gifted brother. 
I have watched his intellectual and professional growth and his 
so expanding influence, that in his later life he seemed to be 
an almost omnipresent and necessary force in every important 
public movement in this community. And I have gladly seen 
him reaping from his wide labors abundant harvests of success 
and honor. 

And now that this strong and manful brother and stanch 
friend has gone, it would seem that words of just estimate 
and loving tribute would come easily. But his death was to 
me so unexpected, so startling and remindful, that as yet a 
voiceless feeling demands the first place. 

Still I would not come empty-handed into this gathering of 
his generous brothers of the bar. With the other more fitting 
tributes to his memory I will offer a brief and simple one. 

Mr. Robinson's position and influence did not rest on his 
professional ability alone ; that, though of the first rank, was 
only a block in the structure. 

We of the bar are naturally given to estimate each other by 
a purely professional standard ; which, in a sense, seems a 
measurement of comparative height rather than of dimensions. 
In thus saying I would in no wise depreciate the attainments or 
the honors of the great lawyer. They are worthy of any man's 
best efforts, and are generally satisfying. 

But occasionally one comes whose gifts and ambitions are 
so manifold that they cannot be hemmed within the usual 
bounds of a professional path, but they break out into other 
fields of thought and labor for their full expression and 
achievement. 

And such a rare man was Mr. Robinson. His mind was so 
versatile — his tastes so varied — his enthusiasm so pervading, 
and his activity so restless, that the law, in which he was 
eminent, did not give him " ample room and verge enough." 

Exacting as were his professional labors, he was yet a care- 
ful and loving observer of nature ; he shared with men of 

31 



business the direction of great enterprises ; as a citizen, or a 
trusted magistrate, his keen interest in public affairs and his 
thorough study of the true principles of wise government were 
conspicuous ; his admirable essays on various subjects, and 
given to the public, show how wide was the range of his 
research and thought ; he gathered and assimilated the best of 
general literature, and he was ever earnestly and intelligently 
helpful in the higher work of Christian benevolence. 

Whatever he did was with a fervid impulse ; and controlling 
and inspiring the whole man was his generous and sympathetic 
heart. 

He was indeed a man of many parts ; each so strong and 
attractive that together they showed a rare and finely com- 
posite character. 

One referring to him can add no limiting appellation — it 
must be only as Henry C. Robinson. 

Perhaps as little as any lawyer I have known, did he carry 
the impress of the office or the court room. 

But doubtless the many will most vividly recall him as a 
public speaker, whose addresses on widely different subjects 
and occasions showed a store and variety of knowledge, a style 
clear and vigorous, yet enriched by illustration and imagery, a 
masterly perception of the power, beauty, and refinement of 
our mother-tongue, and greater than all, the uplifting senti- 
ment and the strong and sincere feeling without which words 
are vain. 

No wonder that with such ability, to instruct, and charm, 
and move, he became, as so well expressed by his pastor, " Our 
' chief speaker.' " But — 

The silver trumpet's sound is still. 

Sdbat RKUtam SCJatdo f)yde Said. 

Ex-Mayor William Waldo Hyde said : 

Mr. President : I do not feel that I can remain silent on 
this occasion, although I know how ill-fitted I am to speak of 
the life of our deceased friend and leader. For thirty-five 
years I have felt the good influence of the strong friendship 
which he ever showed to four generations of my immediate 
family. From my grandfather to my children — we have all 
felt the benefit of his love and good will, and, representing 

32 



those who have gone before, I most gladly testify to the rever- 
ence and love which I feel toward our departed friend. As I 
look back on the long period which has passed, every event of 
special joy and every occasion of especial trial has in some way 
a sweet association with Mr. Robinson. He was always ready 
with his love and approbation to make happier those things 
which we could enjoy, and in time of sorrow his sympathy did 
much to lighten oiir grief. His hearty handgrasp and strong 
words of encouragement were always ready, and he little 
realized how much we had learned to depend on him. 

The great dominating feeling in our hearts to-day is one of 
wonder as to how we shall get on now. It seems impossible to 
think of Hartford without him. To speak of his great ability is 
a needless task for me. Others older and better equipped can 
do that more happily than I. 

I have always, however, felt that in him was evidenced a far 
greater share of those gifts which belong to greatness than 
most men possess. Jealousy, which belittles so many natures, 
was absent from him. He loved to see others succeed. He 
was ready to help on those less fortunate than himself and let 
them get the credit of many things which but for him they 
would never have thought of. The results of his ministering 
love can be found in many younger men who have grown up 
under his influence, and who to-day shed their tears at his 
grave. He had another quality which seems to me pertains to 
all the great men of our profession. He could fight as hard as 
the hardest, and yet, after the battle was over, the sting was 
never left to rankle. He was of that large family of lawyers 
who could give and take without afterwards either remember- 
ing the wounds he had received or glorying in those he had 
given. Our admiration has often been awakened by his ability 
in getting at the important point and driving it home so as to 
convince the court or the jury. 

It sometimes seems as if the lawyers of the old school had 
more of these qualities than have we to-day. We all feel, I 
think, that there are two distinct classes of lawyers recognized 
throughout the profession : the lawyer who is feared for his 
ability, and, while taking no undue advantage nor resorting to 
underhanded methods or acts, is sure to prove no mean antag- 
onist. And then there is that other class of lawyers — happily 
not numerous, but that they do exist we must all admit — who 

5 33 



are feared not for their ability but rather for the methods and 
means which they are willing to employ. 

I sometimes wonder whether the times are changing and 
the spirit pervading the bar is different, or whether it is 
because with increasing years the ranks of those whom we 
have made our examples and whom we have learned to respect 
and to love, are constantly growing less, that it seems difficult 
for us to believe that there is to-day in the bar the same 
strength and the same devotion to law for its own sake which 
were taught by those older men as the foundation of true 
success in the profession. Doubtless it is because of the latter 
rather than the former reason that such a question is some- 
times raised. 

As one by one those strong men have passed away and the 
question is presented to us whether it has paid for them to 
live and work and then die and be forgotten except by those 
who have known them intimately, it seems to me that there is 
only one answer which can be given. It has been their privi- 
lege to give to us ideals, which, if we can but realize, will 
make us in our day as worthy of remembrance as were they in 
theirs ; and to us on our part, how inestimable is the advantage 
simply to be able to remember them, to have known them, and 
that we have had the privilege of seeing their successes. 
Surely, when a man has lived and gone through all the vicissi- 
tudes which pertain to the successful lawyer's career, most of 
his time being given to the aid of others, and but little time to 
think solely of himself, it is a great reward, if, when he has 
passed away, others may feel the effect of his influence and 
good works and try in the days to follow to imitate his course. 
This is about all there is left to us when death removes a shin- 
ing member of our profession. 

It seems to me that it is enough should it be our fortune to 
occupy such a position at the end as our friend does to-day. 

Remarks by ludgc Dwigbt Loomis. 

Judge Dwight Loomis spoke as follows : 

I think such a remarkable character as that of Mr. Robin- 
son, in order to do justice to his memory, requires some pre- 
sentation, some careful anatysis, of that remarkable character ; 
but I concur in all that has been said most heartily. No one 

34 



could have had greater admiration or respect for Mr. Robinson 
than myself. His well-rounded character in every respect was 
most remarkable. He was a practical business man, and yet he 
had a most aesthetic taste ; he was practical, and yet he was 
ideal — idealic in his aspirations ; no man was ever more so. 
And it is most remarkable that he touched so many sides in a 
most eminent degree ; he was gifted as an orator, gifted in the 
use of elegant language and rhetoric, and yet he was gifted in 
his logical power. But, as I say, I feel as if were I to continue 
with unpremeditated remarks I should fail to do justice to his 
memory. I feel his loss keenly, as I have felt keenly the loss 
of many eminent lawyers that have taken their departure. 
When you come to think of it, what a long procession of emi- 
nent men have departed from us. 

Remarks of ^wdgc 8. O. prentice. 

Judge Samuel O. Prentice said : 

Mr. President : I feel quite as Judge Loomis has expressed 
the matter, that this, of all occasions, is the one most unfitted 
for unpremeditated remarks. I came here this morning with- 
out knowing that this meeting was to be held, and consequently 
have thought of nothing to say, and I feel it would be worse 
than folly, for me at least, to attempt to express my feelings 
without any premeditation whatever. 

When I came to the bar twenty-five years ago, I found here 
a coterie of men who had won their honors at the bar, and 
among them was Mr. Robinson, in the full panoply of his mid- 
life hours. During all my professional and judicial career until 
now he has remained, in my thoughts at least, and in fact, one 
of the leaders of the bar of this county and this State — one of 
the men to whom I have been wont, as long as I have thoughts 
of law at all, to look up to as a man to imitate and emulate. It 
was not my privilege to be thrown with him especially inti- 
mately, as has been the privilege of some men, but it was my 
privilege to be thrown with him with some degree of intimacy ; 
and added to the respect and honor which I paid him as man 
and lawyer, there came to me a love for his manly qualities, for 
the heart side of him, which has endeared him to me and made 
him represent to me not only one of the leaders of our profes- 
sion but one of the leaders we may well cherish with honor, 

35 



love, and affection. So that I feel to-day as if we had lost not 
only one of our foremost but one of our best. I wish that I had 
thought of speaking further to-day, but not having done so I 
think I will say no more. 

3udge Rentiers Remarks. 

Judge William F. Henney spoke as follows : 

As one of the older graduates of Mr. Robinson's office, it has 
been thought appropriate that I should say a word in favor of 
these most fitting resolutions. But the performance of a task 
demanded by every consideration of gratitude and friendship is 
rendered well-nigh impossible by the shock of personal loss. 
As I stand here to-day thronged upon by the memories of a 
thousand kindnesses, surrounded, as it were, by so great a cloud 
of witnesses to his loyalty and love, it were idle for me to 
attempt analysis. 

It must suffice to call attention briefly to a few of the char- 
acteristics, professional and personal, which most sensibly im- 
pressed me through twenty-five years of happy intimacy. 

Like truth, our friend was many-sided, and presented from 
whatever point of view a unique and charming personality. In 
the forty-five years he practiced his profession he enriched the 
jurisprudence of the State. In the great causes that were liti- 
gated during that period he bore a prominent part. 

His death, as it seems to me, marks the closing of an epoch 
in the professional life of the State. Hitherto professional abil- 
ity was one thing and business capacity quite another. To-day 
the commercial spirit is predominant, and great interests 
are looking to the bar not so much for legal attainments as for 
competent business sagacity, the ability to bring things to pass. 

Busy commercialism with its demands upon the profession 
may produce lawyers of comprehensive business grasp, of 
shrewd financial forecast, of large administrative capacity ; but 
never will it bestow upon a grateful community a Hubbard or 
a Robinson. They belong to an epoch when law was a science 
and the practice of it a profession. Prevailing influences at no 
distant day will make of the law a trade and of the law office a 
shop. Mr. Robinson saw this tendency and deplored it. He 
wanted no one in the profession who had not a genuine zeal for 
the law, or who followed it only for what there was in it. His 

36 



arguments always bore testimony to his legal acumen and 
scholarship, and his brief was invariably an elegant epitome of 
legal principles. 

In any forum he was a dangerous antagonist ; for his intense 
earnestness, his facility of illustration, his incisive logic, his 
fervid delivery, his ready and sparkling wit, above all the hon- 
esty and candor of his argument, armed him with hypnotic 
power. He looked with distrust on novel and multiplying rules 
of practice, on technical pleadings and fattening files. The 
technical controversies of the short calendar had no charms for 
him. 

In his professional relations he was ever generous and con- 
siderate of others. The gratification afforded by his forensic 
triumphs was always chastened by a manly sympathy for his 
fallen antagonist. His knowledge of Constitutions, federal and 
State, was acute and ample, and the discussion of constitutional 
questions called into fullest exercise his marvelous powers. He 
had an instinct for legal principle that was unerring, and a mind 
quick to grasp and to analyze. In a search for authorities he 
would seem to digest a library while less gifted counsel was 
conning a book. 

Viewed from other standpoints Mr. Robinson was still inter- 
esting and attractive. He loved simplicity. Ceremonies, pa- 
geants, and liveries were all distasteful to him as so many out- 
croppings of aggressive vanity. He indulged a hearty con- 
tempt for all things tainted with sham or insincerity ; and yet, 
over the multitude of human foibles, many of them amusing, 
not a few distressing, he spread the generous mantle of a 
matchless charity. He was mindful in all his public utterances 
of the warning of Scripture, " Though I speak with the 
tongues of men and angels, and have not charity, I am noth- 
ing." 

In his judgment of his fellows I never knew him — I ven- 
ture to say none in this presence ever knew him — assign to 
conduct an unworthy motive when explainable on any other 
ground. 

Mr. Robinson's instincts and aspirations were all scholarly. 
He reveled in the domain of letters. The most grateful tri- 
umph of his literary career was the graceful act of the univer- 
sity he loved in conferring on him the degree of Doctor of Laws. 
He was a teacher in the best sense of that term, and preferred 

37 



example to precept. He saw truth clearly ; and in his life and 
conversation, it found abundant and adequate expression. 

It is this teacher element in a man that lasts longest and 
rings truest. Were the influence of attainments and charac- 
ter limited to the narrow span of the individual life, its sphere 
of usefulness were pitifully contracted. Not for the day and 
hour only did the supreme intelligence mould, build up, and 
develop this splendid personality. Untold generations have 
each contributed their just proportion to the make-up of this 
masterful manhood, and the myriad generations that follow 
shall know his potent manifestations in ever widening circles of 
influence and power. 

It was a sense of this truth, as it always seemed to me, that 
inspired his well-known views of the dignity and responsibility 
of life. He felt that his influence for good or ill was an influ- 
ence forever, and to this view may be attributed his moral 
power. It was from this fountain that he drew the intensity of 
thought and expression which constituted his real charm as an 
orator. His elegant rhetoric was but the result of a desire to 
present his convictions becomingly dressed. But the most in- 
teresting side of Mr. Robinson's character was the spiritual. 
Once in touch with that, you saw the man himself. He con- 
fronted one with a prodigal splendor of moral excellences. He 
was above all things cheerful and hopeful, and saw in the stress 
of present evil but the transient shadow beclouding the infinite 
love. There was no tinge of agnosticism in his make-up. In 
him faith was knowledge, and the trust breathing lines of Whit- 
tier were dear to his heart. His views of nature and of his rela- 
tions to it were vast and comprehensive. He realized instinct- 
ively the oneness of the universe, and recognized the same 
supreme intelligence regulating the beatings of his own heart, 
prompting the aspirations of his own spirit, pulsing through 
limitless spaces, and guiding the remotest star. 

For the cynic and the pessimist his heart went out in pity. 
He shared the sentiment so beautifully expressed in the verses : 

Alas ! for him who never sees 

The stars shine through his cypress trees ; 

Who, hopeless, lays his dead away 

Nor looks to see the rising day 

Across the mournful marbles play. 

Who has not learned, in hours of faith 

38 



The truth to flesh and sense unknown, 
That Life is ever lord of Death, 
And Love can never lose his own. 

And so it came to pass that upborne by the unflagging faith 
that was in him he attained a nobler eminence on " life's 
rugged mountain side," than it is given most of us to know, 
commanding from day to day, through a widening horizon, 
ever broader expanses and sublimer realities of ineffable good- 
ness and power. 

Looking backward over his fifty years of industry and 
endeavor, so large, so various, so brilliant, and above all else, 
so honest, who shall assign limitations to the activities of that 
lofty spirit ? By what means shall we estimate the values of 
the lessons of that instructive tongue ! 

Such are some of the aspects of this remarkable and gifted 
man as I knew him in the seclusion of his study and in the 
varying phases of his public life. What he was, what he must 
have been, to those endeared to him in the intimacies of the 
family circle, we partly may conjecture, but they alone can 
know. 

And now in this hour of sadness, when silent is the voice so 
often lifted in generous eulogy of others, when dumb and 
speechless are the lips whose loftiest eloquence alone could do 
him justice, we are cheered by the reflection that that intense 
and inspiring personality shall continue to permeate the hearts 
and homes of the community he loved, with the myriad influ- 
ences of a beautiful life and the fragrance of a blessed memory. 

Remarks by fdr. Hustin Brainavd. 

Mr. Austin Brainard spoke as follows : 

Having attained pre-eminence in the esteem of the bar of 
this state, Henry C. Robinson has passed into wider activities 
and fields of greater usefulness and greater peace. 

So many members of the Hartford county bar have seldom 
been together as when they joined in the simple and harmoni- 
ous services of Friday last. All felt that the law had lost an 
eminent disciple, the state a useful citizen, and each and all of 
us a friend. 

As mayor of this beautiful and typical American city he 
anticipated in fact if not in words the dictum that " Public 

39 



Office is a Public Trust," and put into the commonplace of 
everyday administration the most advanced theories of official 
integrity. His motto was always " I serve," and no finer motto 
has ever graced the shield of chivalry. 

As a private citizen he was always with the forces of 
progress, no good cause lacked his support, no evil cause but 
felt the weight of his condemnation. 

As a friend his counsel was wise and his sympathies 
catholic. As a counselor in matters professional his advice 
was daily sought by young members of the bar. Generously 
given, it was helpful, forceful, and invaluable. 

As was said on the death of Lowell : " Intellectual excel- 
lence, noble character, public probity, lofty ideals, art, litera- 
ture, honest politics, righteous laws, conscientious labor, public 
spirit, social justice, the stern, self-criticising patriotism which 
fosters only what is worthy of an enlightened people, not what 
is unworthy — such qualities and achievements, and such alone, 
measure the greatness of a state, and those who illustrate them 
are great citizens. They are the men whose lives are a glorious 
service, and whose memories are a benediction." 

Remarks of Charles €. Perkins. 

President Perkins, being asked by Mr. Hungerford to 
speak, said : 

I do not feel, gentlemen, like speaking on this subject. Too 
many sensations would come over me, and I would hardly be 
able to trust myself. We all know what Mr. Robinson was. 
We all know that everything that has been said here is, if any- 
thing, less than the truth ; and it is entirely unnecessary for 
me to retail again his abilities, his capacities, his kindness, 
goodness, and all his qualities ; and I could not trust myself to 
speak to you on the subject. I should not desire, in the pres- 
sence of this meeting, to be unable to speak, and I think I 
should be if I should try. 

Remarks of Joseph L. Barbour. 

The Hon. Joseph L. Barbour said : 

I did not mean to say a word, but I have very great affec- 
tion for Mr. Robinson — very great affection from the time 
when I was admitted to the bar, when I was beginning, when I 

40 



was feeling my way — as for a while we all are. From the 
first, whenever I wanted to ask a question, whenever I wanted 
advice, and found my way to Mr. Robinson's office — and I 
did often — I shall never forget the quickness with which 
he would abandon whatever he was doing, and devote himself 
earnestly to the service I asked. It is one of the things a 
young man, starting out, appreciates. One of the lessons we, 
growing older, might learn from his life is to extend a helpful 
hand to the young men beginning, and not to ride roughshod 
over them when we get a chance. If we can learn that lesson 
from him, it will be a good thing for us. 

While Brother Henney was speaking, what he said suggested 
to me as singularly appropriate some lines that have been float- 
ing in my mind ever since Mr. Robinson's death, running some- 
thing like this : 

" Were a star quenched on high, 
For ages would its light, 
Still traveling downward from the sky, 

Shine on our mortal sight. 
So when a great man dies, 

For years beyond our ken 
The light he leaves behind him lies 
Upon the paths of men. " 

It seems to me that is an apt simile. And another quotation 
I found in reading, the other night, a translation of a funeral 
oration by Georgius, an old Grecian orator, and which seemed 
particularly applicable to Mr. Robinson : " For what was there 
lacking in this man which good men ought to possess ? And 
what qualities did he possess which men ought not to possess ? " 

The resolutions were then passed unanimously and the 
meeting adjourned. 



41 



In almost all the newspapers of Connecticut, and in a great 
many of other States, far and near, the tidings of Mr. Rob- 
inson's departure was noted with tender tributes to his 
memory, and often with appreciative and felicitous com- 
ments upon his personal character and public services. 
From these numerous and varied notices the following are 
selected for reproduction here : — 

From Colonel Norris G. Osborn's Letter to the New 
York Sunday Herald : 

Connecticut is constantly called upon to bear the loss of ser- 
vices of some man who has added materially to her honor, and 
at the same time been jealous of her good men. I have been 
called upon to review the life and career of several within the 
few years the Connecticut edition of the Herald has enjoyed its 
existence, and it is always a task made heavy by the realization 
that the loss to the State was a real one. 

Every man who has reached the age of middle life has had 
occasion to see good men and noble women drop by the 
wayside, causing a real vacuum in particular places, but that 
the great human procession moves on without delay. This ob- 
servation has brought to many a keen sense of the ridiculous, 
and straightway made of them cynics. To others it has un- 
folded the well-ordained purposes of Providence, and put upon 
them that great sense of duty which reveals itself in a cheerful, 
industrious, helpful, and useful life. 

Henry C. Robinson was a splendid representative of the lat- 
ter class. I recall him by the graveside of the late Isaac H. 
Bromley, his classmate, to whom he was an appreciative and 
devoted friend. The body had been lowered and the services 
concluded. A tear stole down his cheek as he remarked to me, 
" Dear old Ike has gone. It is for us to go back to our work 
more determined than ever. That is the righteous law of life." 

42 



Mr. Robinson occupied a solid and at the same time a char- 
acteristic place in the life of Connecticut. He had seen some- 
thing of public office, but more of public men. What he saw 
of the former was due more to the recognition, by others, in 
him of superior worth and honesty than to any fancy on his 
part for office. He would have been a power in Congress, the 
nomination for which he could have had for the asking, but it 
seemed to be his fate in life to let his own sense of usefulness 
have full sway and lead him where it would. 

There is little sordid ambition in such a nature, no pluming 
of self over neighbor, and no suspicion of undervalued worth. 
He was sunniness and warmth itself, and when surrounded by 
those of whom he was fond or in whom he felt a confidence, his 
reserve burst its iron bounds and expressed in the most 
genial ways the delicious sense of humor and philosophy that 
was his. 

Mr. Robinson was best known to the people of Connecticut 
as a lawyer and orator. As the years rolled by and his ascent 
up the professional ladder continued without a break, his name 
was mentioned early by men who were at the moment naming 
the leading lawyers of the State. If there was a dignified pub- 
lic oration to be delivered, his services were first sought ; if the 
gathering were a Yale one it was his democratic utterance and 
charming imagery that brought the men to their feet with 
cheers and laughter. 

I have always been accustomed, without a good reason other 
than my desire, to regard him as I did Bromley, as belonging 
to the people generally, as distinguished from the man or men 
who are forever posing as the conservator of one idea or one 
philosophy. 

He was strong in his religious and political faith, but his 
heart was open and his sympathies at the disposal of men who, 
though equally intent upon their beliefs, were charitable and 
liberal-minded. A lover of nature and a creature of the soil, 
he was a hater of shams and humbug, and could be found fight- 
ing them wherever exposed. 

Such a career as Mr. Robinson's was suggests to those who 
see value and example in it how much more substantial the 
legacy is he leaves to his family and friends than that left in 
immense piles of gold. The usefulness of the producing mil- 
lionaire is by no means to be underestimated, for he employs 

43 



labor and stimulates industry, but, after all, the man who does 
his work well and honorably, as did Mr. Robinson, and leaves a 
name which is synonymous with charitable work, with genial 
accomplishments, modest wants, and true friendship, has done 
more to my fancy and imagination. 

From the Yale Alumni Weekly : — 

Of all the older Yale men one could hardly be selected 
whose death meant a personal loss to so many, both young and 
old, as does the death of the Hon. Henry C. Robinson of Hart- 
ford. It was not because of his public positions and public ap- 
pearances, although the former were many and honorable, and 
although the latter won hearts as well as applause. Mr. Rob- 
inson is missed and mourned in the Yale family because he was 
such a good friend to so many — and particularly to so many 
young men. It was often a wonder to those of us who were 
given, from time to time, evidence of his thoughtful friendli- 
ness, that our affairs and hopes were a matter of concern to one 
whose mind and heart were so crowded with great interests 
and close intimacies. 

It need hardly be said that, as senior member of the Advis- 
ory Board of this paper, he was always ready to give its plans 
and its problems his disinterested thought. How much of a dif- 
ference his presence made at Yale meetings at Hartford and 
Yale meetings in other places ; and indeed everywhere. How 
interested he was in everything that went on here, and how 
sanely and helpfully he viewed things and advised men. He 
was a good and helpful friend and supporter of Yale, just as he 
was of very many men of Yale. 

From the Hartford Courant : 

The death of Henry C. Robinson is, to me, an irreparable 
loss ; I have not seen him in ten years — but what of that? The 
influence of Christian manhood upon the human soul is not 
measured by years but by the " power of an endless life " ; 
Henry Robinson was a Christian optimist ; he could not have 
been otherwise ; his inherited tendencies were Christian, and 
with his cheery temper and wealth of affection, love of God and 
love of man were most natural and easy. During my five 
years' residence in Hartford (1853-1858) I saw him almost daily 
and deeply loved him. His power with young men was won- 

44 



derful — a tower of strength both to him and to them ; during 
the great religious awakening of 1857 no man could have re- 
placed Mr. Robinson in his peculiar Christian service with the 
young, — tactful, generous, manly, affectionate, frank, sincere, 
gracious, resourceful, and free as a child from cant, his service 
was most beautiful and rewarding ; while Bushnell (single 
handed) was strangling Edwards's death-doom theology, Rob- 
inson (Bushnell taught) was singing of the boundless mercy of 
God and the pitying love of the Man Divine. 

I am quite aware, Mr. Editor, that I am unveiling sacred 
things, but as no man liveth to himself so no man dieth to him- 
self, and what Henry Robinson was, as mirrored in what he 
did, though a sacred possession, compels one to break silence, 
even in sorrow, and in joyful memory of the past, to bid him 
" Hail and Farewell." 

Others may speak of Mr. Robinson as orator, lawyer, states- 
man, man of letters or of business, but I prefer to speak of him 
as manhood Christianized, for every work of his life, sacred or 
secular, testifies to his enthusiastic devotion to noble ends. 

Imperfect ? — yes, thank God for that ; but why tarry upon 
imperfections which are incident to all human life, when we 
have found the run of the river which has already borne our 
brother into the city of God. 

He was 

One who never turned his back, but marched breast forward, 
Never doubted clouds would break, 

Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would triumph. 

S. L. WOODHOUSE, 

February 16th. 809 President St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



45 



®$tnute£ an& ftc£olution£ 

ADOPTED BY DIFFERENT ORGANIZATIONS WITH WHICH MR. 
ROBINSON WAS INTIMATELY ASSOCIATED. 

At the annual meeting of the Hartford Republican Club, 
Dr. William M. Hudson, in behalf of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Club, offered the following minute regarding 
the death of Mr. Robinson, the first President of the Club, 
which was unanimously adopted : 

The members of the Republican Club, assembled at their 
annual meeting, place on record this minute of their apprecia- 
tion of its first president, Henry C. Robinson, who died on the 
14th day of February, 1900. How much of the success of the 
organization is due to the genial presence, kindly manners, and 
administrative ability of its first presiding officer it is difficult 
to estimate or express ; but it is fully realized by all who have 
known the grasp of his friendly hand and the sound of his wel- 
coming voice. While his enthusiasm, energy, and judgment 
made the success of the association a certainty, his devotion to 
clean politics, gentlemanly methods and sound manners made it 
a power for good in the community. 

As scholar, lawyer, and legislator the state is deeply his 
debtor. To him as its chief magistrate the city owes many of 
its most useful institutions and wholesome regulations ; and 
much of his thoughtful suggestion is engraven in its organic 
law. As a member of this organization his social qualities were 
pre-eminent, endearing him to all who were privileged to know 
him as a charming companion and friend. 

Sharing with the city and state that he loved the rich legacy 
of his attainments and character, we spread upon our records, 
in memory of him, this tribute of esteem and affection. 

At a meeting of the Directors of the Hartford Steam 
Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company, held in their 
office March 9, 1900, the following minutes upon the death 

46 



of Henry C. Robinson was adopted, and it was voted to 
spread it upon the records of the company : 

It is with profound sorrow that we record the death of 
Henry C. Robinson, who has been a member of this Board for 
nineteen years, having been elected February 15, 1881, and its 
legal adviser from its early beginnings. His wide experience 
in insurance and financial matters rendered his counsel and 
advice invaluable. As an associate he was generous and con- 
siderate of the opinions of others, kindly in his bearing, sympa- 
thetic and courteous to all. His life and character have made 
an enduring impression upon those who were brought into inti- 
mate official and personal relations with him. We shall sadly 
miss his kindly greetings, cheery words, and wise counsel. A 
sense of loneliness pervades the atmosphere of our meetings as 
we look upon the vacant chair. We record this minute as a 
tribute to his memory and as a mark of our high esteem for his 
life and character. Attest, 

J. B. Pierce, Secretary. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of The Connec- 
ticut Fire Insurance Company held at the office of the Com- 
pany the fourteenth day of February, 1900, the following 
minute was on motion adopted, viz. : 

The loss which has fallen on the city in the death of Henry 
C. Robinson bears with peculiar weight upon this Company and 
each one of its directors. For nearly thirty years he had as a 
member of its Board given it the support and advice of an 
earnest nature and a brilliant mind. In the varied experiences 
of those years his courage never failed in adversity and his ap- 
plause was never withheld in prosperity. His financial experi- 
ence and legal attainments have played an important part in 
the success which has attended the Company, and the directors 
are doing but justice in paying this tribute to his memory. 

Of the qualities which made him beloved his business friends 
also may speak. Successful effort won his unstinted praise, 
and he was more reluctant to criticise others than himself. He 
never lost the enthusiasm of youth, and the brilliancy of his wit 
was not tinged with malice or unkindness. His associates will 
never forget his loyalty, the unrestrained and generous cora- 

47 



mendation of his broad and great nature, and the charm of his 
most interesting personality. 

A true copy from the minutes. Attest, 

Charles R. Burt, Secretary. 

At a special meeting of the Directors of the Hartford 
Hospital, held at noon on February 17, 1900, at Number 815 
Main street, Dr. Russell presented the following minute, 
which the secretary was requested to spread upon the rec- 
ords, and to send a copy of the same to the family of Mr. 
Robinson : 

It is fitting that we should notice the death of Mr. Henry C. 
Robinson, who for many years was a Director in this Hospital. 
While we join in the universal regret at his death, we may ex- 
press our own views at the great loss we have specially sus- 
tained. He gave to us at various times such good counsel, that 
he ought to be particularly remembered. In whatever he was 
interested, he gave his full thought, and that was considerate 
and wise ; he was seldom absent from our meetings, and real- 
ized that his duty as a good citizen was to support thoroughly 
this institution. The claims made upon his time for this and 
other benevolent objects were cheerfully granted, not grudg- 
ingly, but as a part of the duty which we all owe to the public. 
The claim fell upon him because he recognized this duty, and 
thus proved himself a true friend of humanity. 

He was genial, frank, honest. To his high professional 
attainments he added a sense of right and goodness, that is 
commendable in any man, which brought to him universal 
esteem. His reputation as a good citizen will long live after 
him, and will be a bright example for those who follow. 

At a meeting of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, held February 23, 1900, the following minute and 
resolution were unanimously adopted : 

Henry C. Robinson was elected a Director of the Connecti- 
cut Mutual in March, 1864. His associate directors at that time 
were James Goodwin, president ; Zephaniah Preston, vice-pres- 
ident ; Guy R. Phelps, secretary ; John C. Palmer, E. B. Wat- 
kinson, Edwin D. Tiffany, General Nathan M. Waterman, Ed- 
ward W. Parsons, Judge George S. Gilman, Marcus F. Hodges, 

48 



of New York, and Charles Lowell Thayer of Boston. By death or 
resignation these one by one have passed out of the directorate 
until in 1894 Mr. Robinson alone remained of their number. 

The humane purpose of life insurance appealed strongly to 
his sympathetic nature ; its technical and business problems and 
relations enlisted his intellectual interest, and he familiarized 
himself with them to a greater degree than is usual in one not 
holding an executive position. He acted throughout as the legal 
adviser of the company, and made a thorough and special study 
of insurance law. By natural endowment, by intellectual acu- 
men and broad grasp, by sympathetic interest, by study and 
discipline, by great acquirements and unusual skill, he was a 
strongly-equipped director. During the thirty-six years of his 
service many important questions of policy and practice had the 
action of the directors, and to them all he gave careful and in- 
telligent attention. Most prominent, perhaps, among these 
were the changes made in the basis and methods of distributing 
surplus soon after his accession to the board, and the change in 
the interest assumption in 18S2. To the consideration of all 
questions he brought with his strong powers of clear analysis 
and close reasoning a quick apprehension of what was progress- 
ive and developmental, and its natural accompaniment, an en- 
thusiastic courage ; but he also saw clearly what was funda- 
mental and vital and must be conserved as such in existing 
plans and methods. While the legal point of view was habit- 
ual, it was tempered and held in balance by his humane and 
generous nature, and the question of essential equity was never 
out of sight. To his intellectual, business, and professional val- 
ues, Mr. Robinson added that personal charm which made offi- 
cial association a pleasure and a privilege ; and the directors 
desire to place upon record their high appreciation of the value 
of his long and faithful service, their deep sense of official and 
personal bereavement, and the expression of their profound 
sympathy for his sorrowing household. 

Resolved, That the foregoing minute be spread upon the 
records of the Company and that a copy thereof be transmitted 
to the family of the deceased. Attest : 

Herbert H. White, Secretary. 

A Resolution adopted at a Special Meeting of the Board 
of Managers of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, held at New Haven, April 13, 1900 : — 

In the removal, by death, of our late associate, Henry Cor- 
nelius Robinson, our Society suffers one of the most serious 
losses which it has ever experienced. 

7 49 



The influence of his wise counsel and eloquent utterances 
has stamped upon our organization an impress of dignity and 
fidelity to its purposes to which we owe, in large measure, the 
standing which we have held among the State societies of our 
order. The memory of his rare personal character will ever 
remain with us as a shining example of patriotic citizenship 
and Christian manliness. 

This feeble tribute to his memory is recorded with a pro- 
found sense of personal loss which finds no utterance in words, 
but finds a compensation in the reflection that our Society is 
better because he was our fellow-member, and that the world 
is better because he lived in it. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of The New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company, held 
pursuant to legal notice at the office of the company in the 
city of New York, on Saturday, March 10, 1900, the follow- 
ing minute was adopted : — 

" With the deepest regret this Board minutes the death of 
Hon. Henry C. Robinson, our late associate, who died on Feb- 
ruary 14, 1900. Elected a Director of the Hartford and New 
Haven Railroad Company in 1865, he served as a Director of 
that company until its consolidation with this Company in 1872, 
and thereafter continuously as a member of this Board. A 
man of stalwart integrity, broad culture, gifted with rare ora- 
torical ability and intellectual vigor, he brought honesty, cour- 
age, and wisdom to all his duties. He has served as a member 
of all the important committees appointed by the Board, and 
has long been identified with the activity, progress, and success 
of this Company. His long service, experience, and ability, 
made him a conspicuous member of- this Board, and his enthu- 
siastic devotion to the interests and usefulness of the Company 
have been of inestimable value. Endowed with the most 
charming social qualities and gifted with brilliant conversa- 
tional powers, he was always welcome at our meetings. We 
shall miss his genial courtesy not less than his sound advice. 
This corporation, to whose development he gave the benefit of 
his ripe experience, his great knowledge of men and affairs, and 
his loyal service, has lost a most valuable officer. 

" The Board directs that this minute be entered upon its 
records and a certified copy thereof be forwarded to his imme- 
diate family." 

A true copy from the records. Attest : 

Wm, D. Bishop, Secretary. 
50 



Zfyt pipe anti tjje p£altcrp mafce gtoeet meiofcip; but 
a pleasant tongue i£ afcotoe tjem fcotj), 

Mr. Robinson's unremitting industry, well known to all 
who were familiar with his habits of study and work, is 
attested by the number and diversity of discourses, essays, 
lectures, reviews, and other papers, which, in addition to 
his professional work, he was called or moved to prepare, 
most of which were printed in the newspapers, or in 
periodicals, or in pamphlets. In all this extra-professional 
labor, not only his industry, but the fruitfulness of his 
mind, the versatility of his intellectual gifts, and the breadth 
of his thoughts and sympathies were also manifested. He 
was deeply interested in all that pertains to human culture 
and welfare, and his voice and pen were freely employed 
for the elucidation and advocacy of those things which 
make for the illumination and improvement of human life. 
The range of topics which, from time to time, he discussed 
was a wide one, and his treatment of the subjects which 
engaged his attention was always intelligent and luminous. 
Whether he spoke or wrote, or whether his subject was 
legal, political, historical, religious, literary, educational, 
civic, or artistic in its nature, his discourse or essay was 
marked by careful study, original thought, apt illustration, 
and a peculiarly felicitous and often eloquent form of 
expression. His strictly extemporaneous talks were always 
suggestive and often brilliant. He had, as his mother 
before him also had, the poetic temperament, and could, and 
did, on occasion, write graceful verse. Under the title of 
" Hartford Authors," he wrote, many years ago, a series of 
papers which appeared in one of the city newspapers, and 
were marked by a distinct literary discrimination and del- 
icacy. When Mr. Dudley Buck's " Forty-sixth Psalm" was 

51 



first produced here, in his native town, the most appreciative 
review of it came from Mr. Robinson's pen. When Parepa 
sang here in oratorio, his " Few Thoughts about Parepa," 
published in the Courant, were recognized by many as the 
thoughts which had arisen in their minds, but which they 
could not utter. When, later, Nilsson came, he rendered a 
similar service. His obituary notices of prominent persons, 
published from time to time in our city papers, were not 
only tender tributes of friendship and affection, but admi- 
rable specimens of fine character-portraiture. He could find 
time to write an elaborate review of a new collection of 
hymns and music, ora" Word about the Lobby," or a criti- 
cism of the Life of Charlotte Bronte, or an essay on Fish 
Culture, or a paper on " The Significance of Dome and 
Tower," or a review of " Doctor Bushnell on Progress," or 
an article on the " Reduction of Railway Fares and 
Freights," or a series of sparkling letters to the New Haven 
Palladium. One of the best of his earlier diversions was a 
lecture in the old Hartford Seminary course on, " Art as a 
Flower"; and another thoughtful and scholarly discourse 
on a kindred subject was delivered by him before the 
Hartford Art Association. 

Meanwhile his political speeches and writings were 
frequent. When Mr. Capron, of beloved memory, was 
taken from this scene of his most valuable services as Prin- 
cipal of the High School, Mr. Robinson delivered an 
address which deeply moved all hearts, and revealed him 
to Hartford people as their eloquent orator. His frequent 
addresses at the High School, on different occasions, are 
well remembered. His oration on the unveilins: of Ward's 
statue of Putnam, and his later and more elaborate oration 
at the dedication of the monument to Putnam, were every- 
where applauded as singularly forcible, thoughtful, and 
graceful works of genuine eloquence. 

The pages of the New Englander were enriched by his 
brilliant review of Arnold's " Light of Asia," by his argu- 
ment for a " Liberal Construction of Creeds," drawn from 
the usage of law, and by other articles as well. 

Many still remember his noble address on the death of 

52 



President Garfield, spoken in the Second Church of Hart- 
ford, and that on Luther, spoken in the Park Church. 

His lectures, earlier and later, before the Law School in 
New Haven, and those before the Kent Club in the 
same city, were received with unusual favor. 

His Decoration Day orations, at Hartford, at South 
Manchester, and at Rockville, and his oration on Robert 
Burns, are comparatively fresh in the remembrance of our 
citizens, and are cherished with equal gratitude and pride. 

At the Legislative Reunion, 1886, he was the orator of 
the day, and his historical address on that occasion was 
described as " a compendium of colonial and state legis- 
lative history." 

At the General Conference of Congregational Churches 
at Norwalk, 1892, his address on " What shall We Do with 
the First Day of the Week " was a most timely and sug- 
gestive discussion of the " Sunday Question." Mention 
may be made of his address on " Medicine and Law " at the 
centennial celebration of the Hartford Medical Society ; of 
his eulogy on General Grant ; of his discourse on Christian 
Unity, at the Memorial Church in Springfield ; of his talk 
to the Hartford ministers on the " Temperance Question as 
Viewed from a Legal Standpoint " ; of his lecture in the 
Y. M. C. A. course on " Representative Government " ; of 
his Letter to the Courant on " Towns and Representation " ; 
and of his article in the Yale Law Journal in favor of " Con- 
stitutional Reform in Connecticut." Many important 
papers of his are not even mentioned here. His strictly 
political speeches are not noticed, nor the frequent talks on 
various subjects, which he freely gave at request at 
banquets, conferences, and festival occasions, nor the many 
delightful papers which he read, from time to time, at dif- 
ferent clubs. 

The purpose of this sketch is simply to indicate how 
versatile were his gifts, how broad was his culture, how 
catholic were his intellectual and moral sympathies, and 
how freely and generously he poured out from the treasures 
of his fruitful mind things of delight and refreshment for 
his fellowmen. This sort of work, enough for most men, 

53 



seemed to be a sort of recreation with him, and yet it all 
came out, naturally enough, from the wide range of his 
professional studies and interests. During his last illness he 
told the writer how he had meditated and purposed to write 
out a paper for the comparison and estimation of Drs. 
Horace Bushnell and Samuel Harris, whom he regarded as 
the two greatest theologians of our country in recent times. 
In another conversation he spoke at length and most inter- 
estingly of " The Old Jeflersonians " of Hartford, naming 
and describing many of them, and speaking fondly of " the 
last, but not the least of them," Mr. Alfred E. Burr, and 
saying that he would like to write an article about them. 
One of the last things which he wrote, and the last that was 
printed was a brief, tender note to the son of Mr. Burr, in 
which he expressed his regret that he was unable to pay the 
tribute to his old friend which it was in his heart to do. 
The last note which he penned or dictated was a brief 
message, unique and precious, to his old friend and Pastor. 

From the mass of miscellaneous discourses, essays, and 
other papers by Mr. Robinson which fortunately have been 
preserved, a few selections have been made, and are herein 
appended, as fairly showing, perhaps, the quality of his 
thought, and the diverse phases of his meditations and 
expressions of truth. No attempt has been made to repro- 
duce his forensic speeches, or even to present any illustra- 
tions of them. Nor has it seemed wise to dismember his 
more solid and substantial historical papers and addresses, 
for the sake of taking fragments from them. 

In justice to his comprehensive grasp of constitutional 
and political principles, to his powers of argumentation, to 
his lore as a scholar, and to his best literary gifts, it should 
be said that quite a different selection might have been 
made, which would have seemed not less suggestive and 
instructive than that which has been made. But such a 
selection must of necessity have been far more extensive 
and less varied than was deemed suitable for the purposes 
of this memorial. 

Edwin P. Parker. 

54 



Sortie £eIectiott$ 

PROM VARIOUS DISCOURSES AND PAPERS BY MR. ROBINSON. 

"^ut of), for tbe toucb of a toanijsljcb franb, 
nnit lf)C jsounb of a rioice tbat i£ £tifl." 

From the oration at the unveiling of Ward's statue of 
Gen. Putnam : — 

The lifted veil has just disclosed to us the first entrance of 
art into our places absolutely public. I cannot pass such an 
event without expressing congratulations in it. No beautiful 
thing comes to society without beautifying it. Good and true 
works of art made free to the people must instruct and refine 
the people. All such plantings yield a fruitage of culture and 
liberal thought and elevated taste. The very sight of choice 
things in art develops the love of the beautiful which it charms. 
Our cities centralize intelligence and industry and enterprise 
and wealth and enthusiasm and benevolence. Into these cen- 
ters let art pour her refining influences. Let her reproduce in 
color the crises of history. Let her repeat in marble and bronze 
the forms and features of heroes and benefactors. Let her 
teach the people the lessons which the face of a good man may 
teach, recalling the good man's deeds, and the good fights 
which he fought, and the good discoveries which he made, and 

the sweet charities which he perfected 

Let me express the hope that this day shall not complete the 
memorials of our great men. Of this charity, of this consecra- 
tion to art, and of this unveiling of patriotism, let us say " tran- 
seant in exemplum." Connecticut's history is rich, almost beyond 
a rival. A century before Bunker Hill, Connecticut produced a 
hero who dared to brave the haughtiness of oppression to save 
our charter from tyranny — the intrepid Wads worth. The brav- 
est, gentlest soldier of the Mexican War was from Connecticut, 
and rests in yonder cemetery — Col. Thomas H. Seymour. We 
have not yet any memorial, in statue or column or chapel, of 
the heroes of our great war for the integrity of the Union, upon 

55 



whose graves the flowers of Decoration Day have just withered. 
In the War of the Revolution and the War of the Rebellion, 
Connecticut was most justly proud of the patriotism and execu- 
tive excellence of her governors, Trumbull and Buckingham. 
Here in the capital of our State, by its legislative halls, now ris- 
ing in white beauty, should these and other representative men, 
creators and benefactors, authors, orators, inventors, artists, 
and philanthropists be honored and memorialized. 

From the address before the Alumni Association of the 
High School: — 

The high school, as included in the system of public schools, 
is free. I shall not enlarge upon the importance, almost su- 
preme, to our republic of free popular education. Let me sim- 
ply say that in making this fontal blessing free, a nation follows 
the laws of the Great Ruler himself. In the world of nature 
the best blessings are free. There can be no patent in the blue 
sky, nor monopoly of the pure air, and the sharpest land title 
to green fields cannot prevent the whole community of rich 
and poor from their enjoyment. The pure water, the warm 
sunshine, the glitter of stars, the tides of ocean, the rustle of 
leaves, the murmur of waves, the ripple of brooks, and the 
crimson of clouds can be controlled by no human fiat, nor be 
locked in by any miser's key. Such blessings in nature are too 
great for any exclusive use. In the spiritual world, too, the 
best gifts are open to the whole race of spiritual beings. The 
true light lightens every man. The true way is for all. The 
fountain of waters is at every thirsty man's right hand. And 
so the nation which offers to all its people free education makes 
gift of its best possibilities. 

From the Historical Address at the first Legislative 
Reunion of the General Assembly of Connecticut, May 6, 



Two hundred and fifty years and a few days ago, on April 
26, 1636, Roger Ludlow and four associates, representing Hart- 
ford, Wethersfield, and Windsor (then called Newtown), Water- 
town, and Dorchester, met in Hartford, as a General Court, for 
the government of the first planters of Connecticut. This body 
passed a law forbidding the sale of firearms to the Indians, con- 

56 



of New York, and Charles Lowell Thayer of Boston. By death or 
resignation these one by one have passed out of the directorate 
until in 1894 Mr. Robinson alone remained of their number. 

The humane purpose of life insurance appealed strongly to 
his sympathetic nature ; its technical and business problems and 
relations enlisted his intellectual interest, and he familiarized 
himself with them to a greater degree than is usual in one not 
holding an executive position. He acted throughout as the legal 
adviser of the company, and made a thorough and special study 
of insurance law. By natural endowment, by intellectual acu- 
men and broad grasp, by sympathetic interest, by study and 
discipline, by great acquirements and unusual skill, he was a 
strongly-equipped director. During the thirty-six years of his 
service many important questions of policy and practice had the 
action of the directors, and to them all he gave careful and in- 
telligent attention. Most prominent, perhaps, among these 
were the changes made in the basis and methods of distributing 
surplus soon after his accession to the board, and the change in 
the interest assumption in 1882. To the consideration of all 
questions he brought with his strong powers of clear analysis 
and close reasoning a quick apprehension of what was progress- 
ive and developmental, and its natural accompaniment, an en- 
thusiastic courage ; but he also saw clearly what was funda- 
mental and vital and must be conserved as such in existing 
plans and methods. While the legal point of view was habit- 
ual, it was tempered and held in balance by his humane and 
generous nature, and the question of essential equity was never 
out of sight. To his intellectual, business, and professional val- 
ues, Mr. Robinson added that personal charm which made offi- 
cial association a pleasure and a privilege ; and the directors 
desire to place upon record their high appreciation of the value 
of his long and faithful service, their deep sense of official and 
personal bereavement, and the expression of their profound 
sympathy for his sorrowing household. 

Resolved, That the foregoing minute be spread upon the 
records of the Company and that a copy thereof be transmitted 
to the family of the deceased. Attest : 

Herbert H. White, Secretary. 

A Resolution adopted at a Special Meeting of the Board 
of Managers of the Connecticut Society of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, held at New Haven, April 13, 1900 : — 

In the removal, by death, of our late associate, Henry Cor- 
nelius Robinson, our Society suffers one of the most serious 
losses which it has ever experienced. 
7 49 



The influence of his wise counsel and eloquent utterances 
has stamped upon our organization an impress of dignity and 
fidelity to its purposes to which we owe, in large measure, the 
standing which we have held among the State societies of our 
order. The memory of his rare personal character will ever 
remain with us as a shining example of patriotic citizenship 
and Christian manliness. 

This feeble tribute to his memory is recorded with a pro- 
found sense of personal loss which finds no utterance in words, 
but finds a compensation in the reflection that our Society is 
better because he was our fellow-member, and that the world 
is better because he lived in it. 

At a meeting of the Board of Directors of The New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company, held 
pursuant to legal notice at the office of the company in the 
city of New York, on Saturday, March 10, 1900, the follow- 
ing minute was adopted : — 

" With the deepest regret this Board minutes the death of 
Hon. Henry C. Robinson, our late associate, who died on Feb- 
ruary 14, 1900. Elected a Director of the Hartford and New 
Haven Railroad Company in 1865, he served as a Director of 
that compan}?- until its consolidation with this Company in 1872, 
and thereafter continuously as a member of this Board. A 
man of stalwart integrity, broad culture, gifted with rare ora- 
torical ability and intellectual vigor, he brought honesty, cour- 
age, and wisdom to all his duties. He has served as a member 
of all the important committees appointed by the Board, and 
has long been identified with the activity, progress, and success 
of this Company. His long service, experience, and ability, 
made him a conspicuous member of this Board, and his enthu- 
siastic devotion to the interests and usefulness of the Company 
have been of inestimable value. Endowed with the most 
charming social qualities and gifted with brilliant conversa- 
tional powers, he was always welcome at our meetings. We 
shall miss his genial courtesy not less than his sound advice. 
This corporation, to whose development he gave the benefit of 
his ripe experience, his great knowledge of men and affairs, and 
his loyal service, has lost a most valuable officer. 

" The Board directs that this minute be entered upon its 
records and a certified copy thereof be forwarded to his imme- 
diate family." 

A true copy from the records. Attest : 

Wm. D. Bishop, Secretary. 
50 



€{)e pipe anti tfje p^alterp mafee £toeet meloop; but 
a pleasant tongue i$ afcotoe tfjem cotf), 

Mr. Robinson's unremitting industry, well known to all 
who were familiar with his habits of study and work, is 
attested by the number and diversity of discourses, essays, 
lectures, reviews, and other papers, which, in addition to 
his professional work, he was called or moved to prepare, 
most of which were printed in the newspapers, or in 
periodicals, or in pamphlets. In all this extra-professional 
labor, not only his industry, but the fruitfulness of his 
mind, the versatility of his intellectual gifts, and the breadth 
of his thoughts and sympathies were also manifested. He 
was deeply interested in all that pertains to human culture 
and welfare, and his voice and pen were freely employed 
for the elucidation and advocacy of those things which 
make for the illumination and improvement of human life. 
The range of topics which, from time to time, he discussed 
was a wide one, and his treatment of the subjects which 
engaged his attention was always intelligent and luminous. 
Whether he spoke or wrote, or whether his subject was 
legal, political, historical, religious, literary, educational, 
civic, or artistic in its nature, his discourse or essay was 
marked by careful study, original thought, apt illustration, 
and a peculiarly felicitous and often eloquent form of 
expression. His strictly extemporaneous talks were always 
suggestive and often brilliant. He had, as his mother 
before him also had, the poetic temperament, and could, and 
did, on occasion, write graceful verse. Under the title of 
" Hartford Authors," he wrote, many years ago, a series of 
papers which appeared in one of the city newspapers, and 
were marked by a distinct literary discrimination and del- 
icacy. When Mr. Dudley Buck's " Forty-sixth Psalm" was 

51 



first produced here, in his native town, the most appreciative 
review of it came from Mr. Robinson's pen. When Parepa 
sang here in oratorio, his " Few Thoughts about Parepa," 
published in the Courant, were recognized by many as the 
thoughts which had arisen in their minds, but which they 
could not utter. When, later, Nilsson came, he rendered a 
similar service. His obituary notices of prominent persons, 
published from time to time in our city papers, were not 
only tender tributes of friendship and affection, but admi- 
rable specimens of fine character-portraiture. He could find 
time to write an elaborate review of a new collection of 
hymns and music, or a " Word about the Lobby," or a criti- 
cism of the Life of Charlotte Bronte, or an essay on Fish 
Culture, or a paper on " The Significance of Dome and 
Tower," or a review of " Doctor Bushnell on Progress," or 
an article on the " Reduction of Railway Fares and 
Freights," or a series of sparkling letters to the New Haven 
Palladium. One of the best of his earlier diversions was a 
lecture in the old Hartford Seminary course on, " Art as a 
Flower " ; and another thoughtful and scholarly discourse 
on a kindred subject was delivered by him before the 
Hartford Art Association. 

Meanwhile his political speeches and writings were 
frequent. When Mr. Capron, of beloved memory, was 
taken from this scene of his most valuable services as Prin- 
cipal of the High School, Mr. Robinson delivered an 
address which deeply moved all hearts, and revealed him 
to Hartford people as their eloquent orator. His frequent 
addresses at the High School, on different occasions, are 
well remembered. His oration on the unveiling of Ward's 
statue of Putnam, and his later and more elaborate oration 
at the dedication of the monument to Putnam, were every- 
where applauded as singularly forcible, thoughtful, and 
graceful works of genuine eloquence. 

The pages of the New Englander were enriched by his 
brilliant review of Arnold's " Light of Asia," by his argu- 
ment for a " Liberal Construction of Creeds," drawn from 
the usage of law, and by other articles as well. 

Many still remember his noble address on the death of 

52 



President Garfield, spoken in the Second Church of Hart- 
ford, and that on Ltither, spoken in the Park Church. 

His lectures, earlier and later, before the Law School in 
New Haven, and those before the Kent Club in the 
same city, were received with unusual favor. 

His Decoration Day orations, at Hartford, at South 
Manchester, and at Rockville, and his oration on Robert 
Burns, are comparatively fresh in the remembrance of our 
citizens, and are cherished with equal gratitude and pride. 

At the Legislative Reunion, 1 886, he was the orator of 
the day, and his historical address on that occasion was 
described as "a compendium of colonial and state legis- 
lative history." 

At the General Conference of Congregational Churches 
at Norwalk, 1892, his address on " What shall We Do with 
the First Day of the Week " was a most timely and sug- 
gestive discussion of the " Sunday Question." Mention 
may be made of his address on " Medicine and Law " at the 
centennial celebration of the Hartford Medical Societ}^ ; of 
his eulogy on General Grant ; of his discourse on Christian 
Unity, at the Memorial Church in Springfield ; of his talk 
to the Hartford ministers on the " Temperance Question as 
Viewed from a Legal Standpoint " ; of his lecture in the 
Y. M. C. A. course on " Representative Government " ; of 
his Letter to the Courant on " Towns and Representation " ; 
and of his article in the Yale Law Journal in favor of " Con- 
stitutional Reform in Connecticut." Many important 
papers of his are not even mentioned here. His strictly 
political speeches are not noticed, nor the frequent talks on 
various subjects, which he freely gave at request at 
banquets, conferences, and festival occasions, nor the many 
delightful papers which he read, from time to time, at dif- 
ferent clubs. 

The purpose of this sketch is simply to indicate how 
versatile were his gifts, how broad was his culture, how 
catholic were his intellectual and moral sympathies, and 
how freely and generously he poured out from the treasures 
of his fruitful mind things of delight and refreshment for 
his fellowmen. This sort of work, enough for most men, 

53 



seemed to be a sort of recreation with him, and yet it all 
came out, naturally enough, from the wide range of his 
professional studies and interests. During his last illness he 
told the writer how he had meditated and purposed to write 
out a paper for the comparison and estimation of Drs. 
Horace Bushnell and Samuel Harris, whom he regarded as 
the two greatest theologians of our country in recent times. 
In another conversation he spoke at length and most inter- 
estingly of " The Old Jeffersonians " of Hartford, naming 
and describing many of them, and speaking fondly of " the 
last, but not the least of them," Mr. Alfred E. Burr, and 
saying that he would like to write an article about them. 
One of the last things which he wrote, and the last that was 
printed was a brief, tender note to the son of Mr. Burr, in 
which he expressed his regret that he was unable to pay the 
tribute to his old friend which it was in his heart to do. 
The last note which he penned or dictated was a brief 
message, unique and precious, to his old friend and Pastor. 

From the mass of miscellaneous discourses, essays, and 
other papers by Mr. Robinson which fortunately have been 
preserved, a few selections have been made, and are herein 
appended, as fairly showing, perhaps, the quality of his 
thought, and the diverse phases of his meditations and 
expressions of truth. No attempt has been made to repro- 
duce his forensic speeches, or even to present any illustra- 
tions of them. Nor has it seemed wise to dismember his 
more solid and substantial historical papers and addresses, 
for the sake of taking fragments from them. 

In justice to his comprehensive grasp of constitutional 
and political principles, to his powers of argumentation, to 
his lore as a scholar, and to his best literary gifts, it should 
be said that quite a different selection might have been 
made, which would have seemed not less suggestive and 
instructive than that which has been made. But such a 
selection must of necessity have been far more extensive 
and less varied than was deemed suitable for the purposes 
of this memorial. 

Edwin P. Parker. 

54 



FROM VARIOUS DISCOURSES AND PAPERS BY MR. ROBINSON. 

"^ut ol), for tftc toucb of a toanisfocb foano, 
Knb (be ?ounD of a tioice tfrat \$ jstin." 

From the oration at the unveiling of Ward's statue of 
Gen. Putnam : — 

The lifted veil has just disclosed to us the first entrance of 
art into our places absolutely public. I cannot pass such an 
event without expressing congratulations in it. No beautiful 
thing comes to society without beautifying it. Good and true 
works of art made free to the people must instruct and refine 
the people. All such plantings yield a fruitage of culture and 
liberal thought and elevated taste. The very sight of choice 
things in art develops the love of the beautiful which it charms. 
Our cities centralize intelligence and industry and enterprise 
and wealth and enthusiasm and benevolence. Into these cen- 
ters let art pour her refining influences. Let her reproduce in 
color the crises of history. Let her repeat in marble and bronze 
the forms and features of heroes and benefactors. Let her 
teach the people the lessons which the face of a good man may 
teach, recalling the good man's deeds, and the good fights 
which he fought, and the good discoveries which he made, and 

the sweet charities which he perfected 

Let me express the hope that this day shall not complete the 
memorials of our great men. Of this charity, of this consecra- 
tion to art, and of this unveiling of patriotism, let us say " tran- 
seant in exemplum" Connecticut's history is rich, almost beyond 
a rival. A century before Bunker Hill, Connecticut produced a 
hero who dared to brave the haughtiness of oppression to save 
our charter from tyranny — the intrepid Wadsworth. The brav- 
est, gentlest soldier of the Mexican War was from Connecticut, 
and rests in yonder cemetery — Col. Thomas H. Seymour. We 
have not yet any memorial, in statue or column or chapel, of 
the heroes of our great war for the integrity of the Union, upon 

55 



whose graves the flowers of Decoration Day have just withered. 
In the War of the Revolution and the War of the Rebellion, 
Connecticut was most justly proud of the patriotism and execu- 
tive excellence of her governors, Trumbull and Buckingham. 
Here in the capital of our State, by its legislative halls, now ris- 
ing in white beauty, should these and other representative men, 
creators and benefactors, authors, orators, inventors, artists, 
and philanthropists be honored and memorialized. 

From the address before the Alumni Association of the 
High School : — 

The high school, as included in the system of public schools, 
is free. I shall not enlarge upon the importance, almost su- 
preme, to our republic of free popular education. Let me sim- 
ply say that in making this fontal blessing free, a nation follows 
the laws of the Great Ruler himself. In the world of nature 
the best blessings are free. There can be no patent in the blue 
sky, nor monopoly of the pure air, and the sharpest land title 
to green fields cannot prevent the whole community of rich 
and poor from their enjoyment. The pure water, the warm 
sunshine, the glitter of stars, the tides of ocean, the rustle of 
leaves, the murmur of waves, the ripple of brooks, and the 
crimson of clouds can be controlled by no human fiat, nor be 
locked in by any miser's key. Such blessings in nature are too 
great for any exclusive use. In the spiritual world, too, the 
best gifts are open to the whole race of spiritual beings. The 
true light lightens every man. The true way is for all. The 
fountain of waters is at every thirsty man's right hand. And 
so the nation which offers to all its people free education makes 
gift of its best possibilities. 

From the Historical Address at the first Legislative 
Reunion of the General Assembly of Connecticut, May 6, 



Two hundred and fifty years and a few days ago, on April 
26, 1636, Roger Ludlow and four associates, representing Hart- 
ford, Wethersfield, and Windsor (then called Newtown), Water- 
town, and Dorchester, met in Hartford, as a General Court, for 
the government of the first planters of Connecticut. This body 
passed a law forbidding the sale of firearms to the Indians, con- 

56 



demned Henry Stiles for trading a " peece " for corn, ordered 
him to " regaine the saide peece from the saide Indians in a 
faire and legall waye or els this Corte will take it into further 
consideracon ; " selected and qualified a constable for each of 
the three settlements, made orders relative to " divers strange 
swine," and ratified the formation of the earliest church in this 
valley. 

In this little gathering was the beginning of Connecticut's 
legislature and court. By what method of appointment the 
magistrates, who constituted this court, arrived at their office, it 
is not certain ; but of the fact that they acted with the consent 
if not by the express choice, of the planters, there can be no 
doubt. 

One year later, May i, 1637, when the court, which had held 
several intermediate sessions, was convened to consider the im- 
portant subject of a war with the Pequots, the several towns 
sent their committees to participate with the magistrates in the 
counsels of the Assembly. There is somewhere in the mount- 
ain ridge that divides the watersheds, whose rainfall ultimately 
reaches northerly to the Gulf of St. Lawrence and southerly to 
Long Island Sound, a single spring, farthest away of all which 
feed the latter sea ; perhaps no investigation has yet traced it, 
but it is there, and if we could to-day go to it, taste it, analyze 
it, and bathe in it, we should find that it is of the same pure 
stream which, for uncounted centuries, through four hundred 
miles of mountain and meadow, in waterfall, cascade, ripple, 
and lake, has made the beautiful river in whose baptismal 
waters our commonwealth found its name. And so the legisla- 
tive gatherings of our State for two and a half centuries find 
their type in this gathering of 1637. It was a supreme, law- 
making body, representing the people and the towns of the col- 
ony. A year later the Rev. Thomas Hooker, in his discourse 
before the General Court, at Hartford, May 31, 1638, declared 
for doctrine : " That the choice of public magistrates belongs 
unto the people by God's own allowance," and " that they who 
have power to appoint officers and magistrates, it is in their 
power also to set the bounds and limitations of the power and 
place unto which they call them," and for reasons of this doc- 
trine he urged, first, " Because the foundation of authority is 
laid firstly in the free consent of the people ; " second, " Because 
of a free choice the hearts of the people will be more inclined 

8 57 



to the love of the persons chosen and more ready to yield 
obedience." 

His lesson of exhortation was, " To persuade us, as God has 
given us liberty, to take it." 

One year later, on the 14th of January, 1639, all the free 
planters of the colony convened at Hartford and prepared the 
first American constitution, and it may fairly be called the first 
written constitution of history which was adopted by a people. 
We can do no less than pause a moment and do homage to this 
great historical event. We honor the limitations upon despot- 
ism which were written on the twelve tables ; the repressions 
of monarchial power in magna charta, in the bill of rights, and 
in that whole undefinable creation, as invisible and intangible 
as the atmosphere, but, like it, full of oxygen and electricity, 
which we call the British constitution. But in this, our Con- 
necticut constitution, we find no limitations upon monarchy, for 
monarchy is unrecognized ; the limitations are upon the legis- 
lature, the courts, and the executive. It is pure democracy 
acting through representatives and imposing organic limita- 
tions. Even the suffrage qualification of church membership, 
which was required by our older sister colony of Massachusetts, 
was omitted. Six hundred years before, the head of the Christian 
church had said that he had "power to depose emperors, and 
absolve the subjects of wicked princes from their allegiance." 
The "grand monarch " of France declared, "I am the State." 
The civilizations of the Orient had been the history of despo- 
tism and monarchy and nobilities. Law was the rule of civil 
conduct, made by the supreme power, commanding what was 
right and forbidding what was wrong ; but the supreme power 
had been an individual. The Mosaic code was a long string of 
" Thou shalts," and a longer string of " Thou shalt nots." The 
Roman Senate was the legislature and the Roman Senators 
were nobles. If a plebiscite made a new law, it was the voice 
of a mob in the comitia. Here, in a New England wilderness, 
in the heart of winter, a few pilgrims of the Pilgrims, alive to 
the inspirations of the common law and of the British constitu- 
tion, so full of Christianity that they felt the great throb of its 
heart of human brotherhood, and so full of Judaism that they 
believed themselves in some special sense the people of God, 
made a written constitution to be a supreme and organic law 
for their State. 

58 



Two hundred and fifty years have passed, and despotism is 
hiding in corners, while constitutional law is flooding the world 
with its light and bathing it in its peace. 

From an address on Luther : 

This man stands, in my thoughts, as a great emancipator of 
his race. It is difficult for us of to-day, girt with freedom as by 
an atmosphere, and protected by the majesties of constitutional 
law, to appreciate, even when we read of them, the chains and 
oppressions of that other day, tied upon human hands and 
human minds and human hearts. The assumptions of imperial 
princes and imperial pontiffs were unlimited, and were only 
endurable because of their jealousies of each other. The eman- 
cipating movement, of which Luther was the hero, was fol- 
lowed by others in England where a king went to the scaffold, 
and in France where liberty ran riot, until, at the extreme west, 
and over unknown seas, a purer free state was founded, to be 
forever separate from ecclesiastical government. . . . It is 
a narrow vision, indeed, which limits this influence of Luther, 
as a moral reformer, to the new churches. The old church felt 
it deeply, and confessed it. The old church listened to Luther's 
outcries for the decencies, and admitted their justice. His 
ecclesiastical and doctrinal variations from the old standards of 
tradition and decree were heresies to be stamped out with fire 
and sword, but his demands for a purer life found welcome. 
But thirty-five years after the Diet of Worms, a Roman pontiff, in 
his first bull upon taking his sacred office, said : " We do prom- 
ise and swear to make it our first care that the reform of the 
universal church and of the Roman court be at once entered 
upon." 

Where was the great personal power of this man ? 

Let me give but one of the many answers. It was because 
he was in all respects a man. He was full to the brim of human 
nature. Man is naturally patriotic, because he is born into gov- 
ernment, and it is so within the universal consciousness. Luther 
was a patriot of patriots. Dominion of Germany by Italy or 
Spain or France was to him intolerable. Man is naturally do- 
mestic, he is born into the family. Luther was intensely domes- 
tic, and sang the sweetest songs of home. Man is naturally 
religious, for he is born with a spiritual and trustful nature. 
Luther carried his reverence and obedience to the throne of the 

59 



Infinite, and walked under His shadow in the burning sun, and 
in His light by night, and his courage and faith and enthusi- 
asm and sociality and love of music were manly. Luther's 
grandeur is in his being a great, rough, noble specimen of 
humanity. 

From an article in New Engla?ider, on " Assent to 
Creeds" : 

There have always been two methods of construing things 
written or spoken, be they constitutions, charters, public stat- 
utes, wills, contracts, symbols, creeds, or statements. One 
method is broad, catholic, liberal. It reaches the underlying 
principles of the instrument. It notes relations. It does not 
destroy the dial, because the shadows which were written on 
its west side in the morning are missing at noon, and have gone 
over to the east in the afternoon. It notes fallibility in every- 
thing human, and sees that all human utterances are more or 
less imbued with inconsistency, want of harmony, and imper- 
fection. But it still trusts human nature and human achieve- 
ment, and the Divine inspirations in man. It sees spots on the 
sun, but continues to plant, relying upon the source of heat, 
and to open its eyes for vision, relying upon the source of light. 

The other method is strict, narrow, literal, petty, sticks 
always in the bark, yellows in dust, and glories in punctuation 
and syntax. It sees things only by the light which struggles in 
through a single window. Universal light makes it blind. At 
night its torch must still be a tallow dip. Electricity would be 
impious. 

The former method contemplates systems, is comparative, 
analogical, feels outward facts and forces of which all things 
are more or less resultants. To it the moon is a satellite of a 
moving planet, that planet a single member of a solar system, 
and that system an integral part of a universe, each with rela- 
tions and changing relations to the rest. 

To the other method the moon is ever only itself, a cold, 
blackened, worn out, uninhabitable lump of matter, answerable 
only to some laws of chemistry and philosophy, which are sup- 
posed to be unchangeable. But the moon itself is too far away 
for the latter method. While the former finds daily and nightly 
use for the telescope, the eye of the latter is always at the 
microscope. 

60 



The broad physician studies the whole physical system of 
man and searches the universe for analogies, and treats his 
patients constitutionally ; the narrow one feeds his own hobby ; 
sees in each patient a disordered liver, if that is his specialty, 
and indulges only in local treatment. The strict construction- 
ist in our Lord's time swore by the temple and said his oath was 
nothing ; but bowed in reverence before his oath if he had 
only sworn by the gold within it. Shylock was a strict con- 
structionist, and Portia gave his philosophy homoeopathic treat- 
ment by fighting the fire of his strict construction with the fire 
of her own. The difference was that Shylock believed in his 
strict method of construction, while Portia redeemed hers by 
the broad charity and decency which inspired it. The Phari- 
sees were strict constructionists, they were scrupulously partic- 
ular to tithe cheap herbs, and were immaculate in their vest- 
ments. And, whoever else, in the progress of the world's his- 
tory, have disappeared through an indefinite failure of issue, 
these strict constructionists have never lacked for lineal de- 
scendants in the governments, and churches, and theological 
schools of the world. 

The argument of this article claims : 

i. That a liberal construction of instruments is wiser and 
better than a strict one. 

2. That creeds and symbols afford no exception to this rule. 

3. That reasonable liberty of construction should be allowed 
to the undertaker of a trust. 

(And incidentally) 4. That the limitation of the use of 
property to the progagation of unalterable opinion is an offen- 
sive form of entail and against public policy. 

From an address at the Memorial Church, Springfield, 
Mass., December, 1888: 

It is a time of agitation, but agitation means life. It is a day 
of sincerity ; the messages are direct and practical. It is a day 
of decency ; the barbarities which have clung to historic Chris- 
tianity have been buried in a soundless sea. 

It is a day of search for pure truth. Christian men, simple 
men and scholars alike, are going back to the shores of Galilee, 
to find the words of absolute truth and the life of absolute 
holiness. They are thirsting to find the pure waters of life at 
the fountain. 

61 



It is the day of toleration and consideration. Ancient 
Oxford, home of much learning and patriotism, home, too, of 
some bigotry and subservience to authority, delivers her 
highest degree to James Martineau. The gates of the uni- 
versities have swung open to dissenters. 

The revival of learning and architecture three centuries 
ago was closely associated with a reformation in religion which 
created a new church and purified an old one. The intense 
zeal of science to-day has improved and quickened the religious 
world into a new devotion to truth, into new tolerations, and 
into purer worship of the one God and Father, Creator of all 
things visible and invisible, ruling material nature, and, as 
well his children, the sons of men in social life, in organized 
government, and in the renewal and inspiration of their spirit- 
ual nature, by the majestic girdings and ongoings of supreme 
law. And in discovering our own growth and progress, in 
seeing that yesterday's wisdom is so often to-day's folly, man- 
kind is learning modesty and reverence. Few men now fancy 
that their garments inclose infallibility, or that their fathers' 
did. The large-minded, great-souled men hesitate at attempts 
to measure the being of the Infinite with their petty calipers. 
In a life where we can know only in part, we learn the immense 
value of probabilities and working hypotheses. The verities 
which may be demonstrated by mathematical science or math- 
ematical logic are few. Science has sought for centuries for a 
standard of measurement. It has asked the eternal rocks for 
assistance, has appealed to the law of gravity in the swing of 
the pendulum, has summoned frost and fire to give a possible 
unbroken temperature, has called on the densities of the ores, 
has invoked the vibrations of light, and to-day, after expend- 
itures most lavish, and fret of mind most subtle, science blushes 
to tell us that she cannot give us a perfect yard-stick. And 
shall we ask for demonstrations of things invisible ? Demon- 
strations are not the law of our being. The day sky is blue, 
but it is not cloudless. 

And while the sincere Christian thinker has no hesitation in 
admitting that there are clouds and shadows in the day, he yet 
rejoices in the sun in its course, for when he goes away from 
the region which sustains and guides and controls him, he goes 
out into night. Our blessed religion answers the tremendous 
inquiries which have always thrilled humanity. Is there a first 

62 



cause ? Christianity points to the eternal Creator. What is 
his being ? A loving father. What of my own weakness and 
wrong ? He wants to forgive them. What means the 
grave ? Behold the empty tomb of Joseph, and hear of the 
mansions in the Father's house. What of history's long story 
of tyranny and crime ? Every son of man is a son of God, and 
the hairs of his head are numbered. What of the emptiness of 
circumstance and power ? The Son of Man came to minister. 
What of the struggles and defeats and the injustices and 
inequalities of this troubled world ? Out of them comes char- 
acter, manly faith the corner-stone of the temple, its crowning 
arch built into a keystone of love, which fills a world of sorrow 
with music, and makes the dry land sweet with the lily of the 
valley. Into the service of our inspired and inspiring religion, 
here in this goodly spot, we welcome this minister of good 
things. 

From the Oration on Burns : 

It is the poets who move the world's thought. The con- 
querors make territorial lines, preserve and confuse races, and 
fill the largest pages in the histories. The statesmen build 
governments, and frame constitutions and laws. The scholars 
select and save from the wreck of time the fittest of human 
efforts. The speculative philosophers work away at the 
insoluble problems which constantly roll back upon them, like 
Sisyphus' stone, and their lectures and treatises engage the 
attention of a select few, to their improvement chiefly by way of 
intellectual gymnastics. But the poets, and they do not all write 
in rhyme, see the invisibles, which are the realities, and report 
them to our souls. They sing the songs of our noblest nature ; 
they deal with the themes which in individual and social and 
organized life are the great and eternal things ; their methods 
are unhampered by chop logic, they move by intuitions ; they 
are limited by no narrow curtains of " pure reason," so-called, 
they scan and traverse the boundless realm of imagination ; 
they wait not at the finite, they compass the infinite ; they 
measure not with the limited span of fingers and hands, they 
take in the spaces open to human vision with the eye of 
body and the eye of soul ; they walk not with feet in the dusty 
roads, they fly with wings in the upper air. 

When the human mind is shut up in the conclusions of 

63 



demonstration, it is shut into a prison. It is at its best when it 
is aflame with enthusiasm and inspired with imagination. 
Then it makes report, not from tables of logarithms and verbal 
results drawn from major and minor premises of statement ; 
but it draws down, as light from the sun, flashes of intuitive 
truth, and sounds into human ears the universal things which 
the past of human experience suggests and the future of human 
development assures. 

I know of nothing in the history of our western Christian 
civilization which is more disgraceful to it than its treatment 
of the Jews. For centuries the Christian nations denied them 
citizenship, denied them even a domicile, denied them domestic 
peace, hung badges of dishonor upon their persons, and hunted 
them like wild beasts to the hills. Even enlightened England, 
not so enlightened then, drove them out and forbade them to 
touch her borders. Oliver Cromwell, the greatest of England's 
rulers, partially wiped out the disgrace. And now, after 
having thrown upon the Semitic people every political oppres- 
sion and every social obloquy open to ingenuity for centuries, 
and just as the Christian world has come into decency in the 
matter, a revival of the old hate is agitated. And what is this 
race that is treated to such persecution ? The toughest, most 
sinewy, most elastic race in history. Centuries of infamous 
oppression have not chilled their manhood, and now, after all 
these ages of persecution, the fomenters of this strife are 
enraged because, they say, a race of seven millions of people is 
usurping positions of influence and power. What a tribute to 
their royalty these bitter pens are unconsciously making ! 
And what has this race done for humanity ? Look at its great- 
ness. Its sacred literature is held by the Christian world in 
reverence, and by much of it even in idolatry. Think of its 
long roll of law-givers and leaders, of poets, prophets, and 
philanthropists, its service for learning and scholarship and 
literature and art. 

The men who lift up the lowly, who exalt the valleys, who 
scatter broadcast the blessings of education and health and 
music and flowers and green trees and babbling brooks and 
the story of the stars and the sweet comforts of home and the 
enlightenment of a pure and free press, who emphasize man's 
right to life and liberty and self-government, who call us to 

64 



the Heavenly Father, who substitute service for attention 
and glory, peace for war, love for selfishness, law for imperial 
decree, the uplift of the many for the supremacy of the few, 
democracy for despotism, are the great men, for they are the 
men of humanity, the universal men. 

From the Eulogy of General Grant : — 

It is a great thing to have lost such a man ; it is much 
greater to have had such a man to lose. He was a child of the 
people, he was a type of the people, and the hearts of the peo- 
ple are keeping sad time to the funeral march of twenty thou- 
sand soldiers. The nation pauses in its activities. The reaper 
and the loom are at rest, and even the money-changers have 
locked their vaults. Upon the billows of every sea and in the 
repose of every harbor drooping halliards have compelled the 
flags of all nations to tell a story of death. The courts of 
Europe and kings' houses in the Orient wear symbols of sor- 
row. The gates of the great Abbey have swung open, and in 
the company of buried soldiers and statesmen and poets and 
kings the chief singers and organists and orators have ex- 
pressed England's unaffected grief. Millions of moistened eyes 
are turned to the new tomb upon the Hudson. 

Is it all for the sword which he wore to victory? Is it that 
he planned campaigns with the skill of Csesar, waited with the 
wisdom of Scipio, pounded with the sledge-hammer of Welling- 
ton, charged with the thunderbolts of Napoleon ? Is it that 
he surveyed the whole vast field, friends and enemies, in for- 
tresses, camps, and battle-lines, with the eye of an eagle in the 
sky ? Is it that military success never betrayed him into care- 
lessness, nor repulse led him into discouragement ? Is it that 
while some of his associates and antagonists were chivalrous, 
some prudent, some tenacious, some brilliant, he was all of 
these ? Man has always admired and idolized the martial 
heroes. Dominion, power, civilizations, have moved on in the 
track of the conquerors, and have crowned them. But there 
have been heroes and heroes. Heroes there have been whose 
genius waited as a slave upon the lust of power, and heroes 
who bowed in their service only to the nobilities, patriotism, 
freedom, and righteousness. Admiration, wonder, and subser- 
vience are attendants upon the obsequies of the former ; around 
the graves of the latter are the hush of devotion, the tears of 

9 65 



gratitude, the tides of love, and the exultation of human broth- 
erhood. 

These heroes, with supreme purpose, unshaken by tempta- 
tion, to bless man and to obey God, are the flowers and types 
of humanity in its great success. The genius of our hero has 
already had much discriminating eulogy — nothing has yet been 
said finer than the words of his tent comrade of so many cam- 
paigns : " He was the manliest man." Such a character is an 
inspiration to the race. For the world grows truest and best, 
not in its books, but in its characters. We learn in them what 
man can be. By what our hero was, and even more by what 
he was not, he has put high honors upon human nature. A 
soldier who sought not paeans or pageants, a statesman who 
yielded no single span to the tugs of injustice and the mad 
thunders of the hour. Unskilled in the ways of political life, 
untrained in the philosophies of statesmanship, he yet dared to 
lift that strong arm, and that voice which was often so mightily 
silent, to scatter the tempest which urged the inflation bill, 
when politicians and statesmen retired to their chambers. For 
the Indian, so many times a victim of fraud and bad faith, he 
had counsels and measures of protection and defense. When 
an un-American insanity raged and chafed against an Oriental 
race, and political leader after political leader bowed before it, 
his lips, so often closed, opened to condemn it. When a Presi- 
dent of the United States asked him, it is said commanded him, 
to stain his soldierly honor, his quick response of firm refusal 
and the unconcealed hilt of his invincible sword assured the 
mistaken executive that he was endeavoring to command the 
impossible. Higher than all men, higher than the President, 
yes, even than himself, were those invisible forces of right and 
truth and honor and patriotism, whose power to him was as ex- 
acting as are the attractions of the heavenly bodies to the sea. 
And like the other great leaders, like Washington and Caesar, 
Cromwell and Napoleon, Mahomet and Joan of Arc, he believed 
with more than an intellectual assent, even with the belief of 
his whole nature, in an individual force behind all things, visi- 
ble and invisible, in whose guidance his own career was held. 
Napoleon called it fate. Grant saw in it an infinite personal 
God, whom he reverently worshiped. 

And what demonstrations has our history given of the pos- 
sible purity of free government by the lives of two men ? Once 

66 



our country, delivered from colonial dependence, was ushered 
into a course of national history, and its warrior leader forbore 
to be a conqueror or to build up a throne for a family. And 
then the nation was rent by disunion and rebellion, and its life 
hung in the issues, long - contested, of war vast beyond prece- 
dent, and its warrior-deliverer laid aside his sword and com- 
pelled the restoration of peace and industry. Can records, 
other than the pages of our history, show two such soldier- 
patriots as Washington and Grant ? They teach us that man 
is greater than thrones, than traditions, than institutions ; and 
this is democracy. 

Under God, Grant saved a nation by the victories of war ; 
saved it from disunion, discord, broken life, and a future of 
endless jealousy and battle ; saved it for freedom ; saved it for 
peace. He believed in peace. His wise interventions, coming 
like a gospel from the west, scattered the clouds of war that 
overhung the lands of China and Japan. He believed in his 
country. He was an American in every atom of his being 
and in every throb of his heart. Alive to the good things in 
other people's, he loved his own matchless land more than the 
rest. 

And, as if his mission was not fulfilled when he laid aside 
his stars, nor when he surrendered the executive chair, nor 
when he called forth in his trip around the world such honors 
from prince and peasant as had never been yielded to an Amer- 
ican, in these last days of suffering and sickness, while he has 
fought his fight against pain and weariness, with no word of 
complaint nor sigh of selfishness, his heart has gone out, like 
the blessing of a sunset, to the whole people whom he loved 
and saved. It has been like the holy words of benediction, 
spoken again and again by the prophet of Patmos in the last 
days of his century life. He must be deaf, indeed, — deaf as 
the granite ledge, which hears not the everlasting anthem of 
the billows which beat upon it, — who hears no command to 
national peace and love in those dying messages spoken to the 
battalions who called him chief and to the battalions who called 
him foe. 

When his last will and testament is offered to the courts of 
law, it may dispose of few acres, few bonds and shares, little 
which political economy calls wealth, but to every American 
he bequeathed a legacy better than lands or jewels, as he 

67 



breathed out upon them from his chamber of death his 
moritumus saluto. 

Right life ! And in the hour when life is ending 
With mind set fast and truthful piety, 
Drawing still breath beneath calm brows unbending 
In happy peace that faithful one doth die. 

From the Decoration Day address, at Hartford, 1885 : — 

For seventeen years the members of the Grand Army of the 
Republic have added new charms to these hours, already charm- 
ing in the calendar of nature, by setting- them apart for a sac- 
rament of soldierly love. Seventeen years ago, with strong 
arms and in the full vigor of manhood, to the music which then 
seemed an echo from yesterday's battlefields, in long lines, you 
bore to these sacred acres bunches- and wreaths and crowns of 
spring flowers to ninety-three graves. To-day, with closer 
ranks and fewer battalions, and with many a ripple of silver 
locks below your caps, you are decorating the mounds of four 
hundred and eighteen graves. 

By these rites of beauty which you have established, all the 
more impressive because they are expressed in no mystic words, 
but only in the language of love, and wear no vestments but 
the wreaths of Nature, you have been educating the youth of 
our land in lessons most sweet and sacred. For what is indi- 
vidual or social life without sentiment ? Without it let us go to 
the caves. If there is nothing for us here but to chase a dollar 
in mines and shops and stores and fields, with no thought of the 
unmaterial joys of home and country, then is your march to-day 
a waste of muscle, and the incense of these roses is a mockery. 
But man is man, and not alone an animal, hungering and thirst- 
ing and sleeping. He is born into the family and into society ; 
his are all the manifold possibilities of development in social 
life. As well say that a man's hands and feet have no use, as 
to say that his sentiments and affections and virtues are use- 
less. Your memorial marches and songs and flower chaplets 
are teaching the people lessons of love and reverence for the 
martyrs, and of devotion to the nation which they died to save. 

The web of the stars and stripes is but a creature of the 
shuttle, and the old bell in the tower of Independence Hall 
only broke the atmosphere into certain vibrations, but the col- 

68 



ors of the one will last as long as the hues of nature, and the 
music of the other is as undying as the music of the spheres. 

And it is here, noble veterans, survivors of this brave band 
of heroes, that you have strange power above the power of 
other men. It is the consummate power of tragedy. From 
these graves which you are honoring, and from your own 
graves which will be honored to-morrow, voices are speaking 
and will speak, which must find a hearing ; for the struggles 
and sufferings of man are universal in their sway, and so, as 
tragedy is the ultimate of struggle and suffering, its power over 
human hearts is universal and measureless. The leaves which 
are stained with blood are the text-books of human life. 

Veterans, to-day we bow before you in gratitude ; with you 
we bend before these graves in reverence and love. Yonder 
sleeps one whose burial wrote a long page of life to many of 
us. We had witnessed military funerals before, but his was 
the first burial of real war, — a noble soldier, slain by the red 
hand of treason and the first-fruits of the patriot martyrs, to be 
laid to sleep in these sacred fields. He fell on the deck of the 
Freeborn in the last of June, 1861. A few days before the coun- 
try was in tears by the dead body of the young and heroic The- 
odore Winthrop. He was carried to the New Haven cemetery 
on the same howitzer on which he leaned a few weeks before on 
his way to the front, and followed by soldiers and friends, and by 
the students of the old Yale which he had loved and honored. 
It was the 3d day of July when yonder sod was broken to re- 
ceive the body of Captain Ward. It had lain in state in the old 
capitol, and thence was brought to this sacred resting-place. 
How the hearts of this community were thrilled and their eyes 
glistened as that body, wounded to death for our country, was 
borne through the streets wrapped in red, white, and blue. 
The minute-guns, the tolling bells, the muffled drums, the re- 
versed arms, the orchestral dead march, the body-guard of ma- 
rines, the long battalions of soldiers in escort, some of them our 
home companies and some of them volunteers waiting for the 
field, the burst of sympathy, the resolve of patriotism and holy 
vengeance girding all, like a uniform, the halo-crown of mar- 
tyrdom hovering, as a presence almost visible, above the dead, 
made a scene altogether strange, and lifted the curtain upon 

69 



the realities of war, the wickedness of rebellion, and the beauty 
of sacrifice. How little did we then know that a half million 
more of noble lives must be given to establish peace upon right- 
eousness ! Not all that precious dust was to be gathered, like 
his, to its final rest in the outburst of sympathy from loving 
friends, but whether at home or on the bloody field, in the 
shadow of night and by the wearied hands of comrades, or under 
the waters of the deep, the bodies of those martyrs shall sleep 
forever in the benedictions of patriotism and in the guardian- 
ship of angels. 

Your wreaths of flowers, like the sacred dust they honor, 
will be lost in the atoms of nature, but the light from these 
graves will shine as long as the stars shall burn in the belt of 
Orion. 

From a Speech delivered at a New York Yale Alumni 
Banquet : 

When we drop our knives and forks we turn from things 
material to things invisible. And after all, in spite of the ma- 
terialist, the invisibles are our largest realities. First in order 
we drink to Alma Mater, but our eyes may not find her shelter- 
ing arms, and her fostering bosom we cannot touch. And then 
we drink again to this sentiment to which you have asked me 
to respond, the Yale Spirit. Where is the camera which shall 
shadow a likeness of the Yale Spirit, and where is the brush 
and what are the pigments which shall paint its portrait ? 
How and where shall we find it ? We may go to the old fence 
and whittle its fibers, and we are taught again the old lesson 
that no golden eggs are discovered by dissecting the goose. 
We go to Chapel, sit 'neath the elms, walk around the relics of 
the old Brick Row, but neither mensuration, nor chemistry, nor 
optics will reward our search. We watch the blue blades of the 
crew, as they dip into the waves and rise to the sunlight with the 
accuracy of the pendulum and the power of the driving-wheel ; 
we look at the blue stockings and blue " Y "s on the breasts of 
the boys, as the team trots down the field ; we see the flutter 
of a thousand blue flags, and hear the rifle crack of a thousand 
'rahs, and the sonorous choruses of Brek-ke-ke-kex Ko-ax-ko-ax 
and the oceanic roar of ten thousand Ya-a-les, as the ball sails 
through the goal post winging its flight to victory ; but all these 
things material and sensational report to us that until we have 

70 



added the invisible sentiments to the sensations we cannot find 
the Yale Spirit. Electricity is not locked in the dynamo — the 
dynamo only sets free the subtle and invisible power. The 
spirit of '76 is not in the Bunker Hill monument, nor in the 
bronze statues of Washington and Putnam, but in the patriot- 
ism and self-sacrifice of the men who fought by the rail fence 
with Putnam, or crossed the Delaware, bled and starved at 
Valley Forge, and triumphed at Yorktown with Washington. 

Where and what then is the Yale Spirit ? Pick up the seal 
of dear old Alma Mater and read its legend, Lux et Veritas. In 
the invisible sentiments which these words enshrine, the Yale 
Spirit has its inmost home. 

Light ! At daybreak the Yale Spirit waits for high noon, 
and at sunset it looks for another sunburst " with new spangled 
ore" to "flame in the forehead of" another " morning sky," 
and in hours of midnight darkness it cries to the watchman, 
" Watchman, what of the night," and listens in undoubting 
faith for the reply, " The morning cometh." 

Truth ! The Yale Spirit waits by the everlasting rocks of 
Truth, upon which billows of lies and bigotry and selfishness 
and despotisms and wars and anarchies and chaos break in 
froth and foam. It hears truth — harmonies in law — the laws 
of science and religion and progress and civilization. And to 
the final judgments of truth uttered after full and fair trial, it 
yields obedience — no matter at what cost of prejudice and 
bias, no matter what record of semi-sacred traditions and phi- 
losophies are tumbled into the waste basket. 

But the Yale Spirit is not complete in the motto of the seal. 
To the foundation words, Lux et Veritas, it adds " et fortitudo" 
which translated for the benefit of the fading memories and 
incomplete scholarships of the alumni brethren means "sand." 
This is the quality which wins debates after many a defeat, — 
a quality in this regard incarnated in many an undergraduate, 
and conspicuously in that accomplished professor, scholar, and 
loyal son of Yale, Arthur T. Hadley. This is the quality which 
carries the batsman to the winning run when two men are 
out and when two strikes are called in the ninth inning ; it 
scatters flying wedges and guards back formations on the grid- 
iron, and it has carried the blue to the front in so many a 
fight, moral, intellectual, and physical, and so many times in 
face of so many odds. 

71 



We have now added fortitudo to our Lux et Veritas. We 
must add one more word, " lux et Veritas et fortitudo et fraterni- 
tas." This last is after all the supreme characteristic of Yale. 
On the campus brother meets brother and man meets man. 
As the sum of ethics is found in that combination of love and 
justice, the brotherhood of man, so Yale is stronger than the 
strongest in her recognition of worth and nobility in her men, 
without criticism of their antecedents of lineage or wealth, and 
in her sons standing together as brothers in peace and as a 
phalanx in strife. 

Among the latest absurdities of our rage for societies whose 
membership relates only to the past, I observed a society whose 
membership is limited to Americans who may rightfully claim 
for some buried ancestor a coat of arms. Fraternity needs 
stronger cords than that. When a maniac upon that subject 
once asked the late President Pierce what was his coat of arms, 
the President replied, " My father's shirt sleeves at Bunker 
Hill." 

Last fall a football trophy was in peril and it almost seemed 
a certainty that the tradition that Yale is never beaten twice 
by the same team would be broken. This Yale spirit of broth- 
erhood, which we find added in the quartet to light, and truth, 
and sand, seized the bugle and rang an alarm like Robin 
Hood's through Sherwood Forest. And from the East and the 
West and the North and the South the heroes of many victories, 
football experts beyond compare, came in troops to the athletic 
field to save the blue flag, and to keep the old motto from breach. 
I should like to name this loyal legion from Walter Camp, 
facile princeps ! to Captain Butterworth, honor to him ! Yale 
enthusiasts all, coming to help as plucky a captain and 
plucky a team as ever honored Yale at football, but Brother 
Twichell will do that thing better than I can. But that 
spirit of Yale brotherhood was invincible, and another victory 
over brave and stalwart Princeton was added to the long 
catalogue. 

It is this element of Yale Spirit which has led so many of 
our loved professors, Brush and Sumner, and Lounsbury, and 
Brewer, and Gibbs, and Chittenden, and others, to reject many 
an offer of a higher salary and a more pretentious title. Like 
Moses of old, in the language of one of my old deacons who 
had a way of mixing scriptural phrases, " preferring rather to 

72 



suffer affliction with the people of God than to be called the 
son of Pharaoh's daughter." It was this sense of loyal broth- 
erhood which led that remarkable specimen of mathematics, 
angles, and learning, our old friend Prof. Loomis, to give so 
much of his private fortune to the University. Recently it 
has led that professor, easily first of all Americans, perhaps 
of all living men, in his special science, Professor Marsh, to 
give his valuable private archaeological collection to Peabody 
museum. 

This then, in brief, for we have many voices to hear, is the 
Yale Spirit — light and truth and courage and brotherhood. 
And why do we rejoice in it ? Not alone nor chiefly because it 
makes a fine ideal, but because it adds to the best resources of 
individual manhood. It makes us as lawyers better, as clergy- 
men better, as journalists better, as merchants, farmers, rail- 
road men, all better and stronger and braver and purer. And 
more, it makes us better Americans. And what a privilege, 
what a duty to be a true American ! What legacies of honor 
and bravery and patriotism ! What traditions of freedom and 
independence and minding our own business is his heritage ! 
While yielding to no one in admiration of the English com- 
mon law and English literature, I pity the man with an Amer- 
ican birthright who is a modern anglomaniac paying his devo- 
tions to the weaknesses of the English aristocracy, waving 
palm branches and weaving halo crowns for Charles I. as a 
martyr, sending messages of congratulation to that highly re- 
spectable woman who by the accident of birth is queen of 
England upon New York's relations to her ancestor, George 
III. You remember the lines written or quoted by Thackeray : 

George the ist was very vile, 
George the 2d viler, 
And no mortal ever heard 
Any good of George the 3d. 
When the 4th to hell descended, 
Praise to God the Georges ended. 

It is often and truly said that the life of the scholar is an- 
tagonistic to the life of the soldier. But the scholar has no 
antagonism to the patriot, and when patriotism calls to arms, 
the scholar's ear is quick to catch the sound. In 1774 Yale's 
President Stiles said : " We are to have another Runnymede in 

10 73 



America," and in 1775 he was busy in camp. In 1779 old ex- 
President Naphtali Daggett, with his fowling piece blazing at 
British regulars, made one of the most striking pictures of the 
Revolution, and a greater man than either of these presidents, 
a tutor at College, and a brigade chaplain in the Army, edu- 
cated the youth of Yale, and everybody else in the reach of his 
influence, in the burning lessons of American independence, 
Timothy D wight, grandfather of our own loved Timothy. 
Don't forget that from her small number of alumni, less than 
one thousand in all, Yale sent 234 officers and soldiers to active 
service in the Revolution. What seat of learning can tell a 
better story of devotion ? And when our country again called 
to arms in 1861, Yale sent 758 of her alumni to defend the 
Union. And what a catalogue of heroes these earlier and later 
wars made for Yale ! We may not name them — let us rather 
remember the " glorious milky way of their multitude." But, 
as to young Lycidas, dead ere his prime, let us drop one leaf, 
be it Judge Finch's " fame leaf or angel leaf," to that incarna- 
tion of the Yale Sprit, Nathan Hale. 

May the breath of the old Simon Pure triple X Yale Spirit 
never forsake the Campus, nor the bosoms of the alumni, nor 
the activities of the nation ! May it long live in its purity and 
power to make good students in the republic of letters, good 
citizens of the republic of Old Glory, and good men in the 
brotherhood of humanity ! 

An Address at a New York city Banquet of the Sons of 
the American Revolution, in 1 892 : — 

The distinguished president of the New York society, who 
fails to fulfill his destiny unless he secures seven oratorical tri- 
umphs a week, in his characteristic opening address told us we 
had no politics and all kinds of politics here. His words and 
this company of eminent statesmen upon my left suggest to 
me possibilities. Perhaps the Sons may be called to larger 
political duties in the coming nominating conventions than we 
suspect. 

It is not impossible that our friends at Chicago may fall into 
confusion and anxieties for a fresh candidate. What more 
seemly thing could they do than to come to the Sons and drop 
their honors on the head of him who sits by my side ? Our pres- 

74 



ident says that he is always young. Let him be the young 
men's candidate of the Sons ! 

The heart, the heart is the heritage 
That keeps the old man young. 

(Turning to Mr. Dana and bowing.) 

And if our other friends at Minneapolis become confused 
and anxious for a new candidate (it is understood that New 
York State has none as yet), what better could they do than to 
come for one whose thorough agricultural experience at Peeks- 
kill will insure him the support of the Alliance, and whose nine- 
teenth-century railroad experience will gain him the votes of 
the rest of the country, and whose brain is large enough to fill 
out any grandfather's hat in the National Museum, and who sits 
to-night at the head of our table. 

Let me congratulate the society upon to-day's work of the 
convention in its important step toward a union with our sister 
organization. This separation should not be continued. Two 
associations with kindred inspirations, banners, and legends, 
but living in different tents, are yet separated by the narrowest 
kind of a stream, and one so easily bridged. God send that the 
bridge be built at once ! 

You have introduced me as hailing from Connecticut ; it is 
the best place to hail from. We point to our roll and its 650 
members with honest pride, but with larger pride for the rea- 
son of it. The Connecticut Sons of the American Revolution 
are many because the Connecticut fathers in the Revolution 
were many. 

Connecticut's territory was seldom the scene of battle. Her 
zeal was more than the zeal of self-defense and the protection 
of farm and home. There was no border-line between Connect- 
icut and Bunker Hill, and Connecticut and Trenton. Enjoying 
as we do to-night the princely hospitality of the New York 
Sons, the close ties that bound Connecticut to New York in the 
Revolution rise to our thoughts. There is Fort Washington, 
and we recall the heroic defense of it by the colonists from 
Pennsylvania and Maryland and Connecticut against the over- 
whelming assault of British grenadiers, infantry, and Hes- 
sian hirelings, and we see watching the conflict, and with un- 
checked tears in their eyes as they saw the bloody bayonets 
driven into the hearts of the garrison, side by side, George 

75 



Washington and Israel Putnam, and with them Gen. Greene 
and Col. Knox. 

There was Bowling Green with its gilded leaden statue of 
George the Third, torn down and sent to the hills of Litchfield, 
where the brave women of Connecticut melted it into bullets 
and loaded them into 40,000 cartridges to replenish our slender 
stores of ammunition. 

I think of yonder Long Island, — Long Island which you 
stole from us, as well as several other Islands, not to mention 
the east banks of the Hudson, including Peekskill and all the 
then unguessed greatness which has since come out of it. Long 
Island — to it we sent our most charming sacrifice — bright 
with the light of youth and hope, purest of soul, and noblest of 
purpose, willing to die as a spy for a cause which held his 
heart. And if we gave Nathan Hale to Long Island, Long 
Island gave to Connecticut Benjamin Tallmadge, the most 
effective of the Revolutionary dragoons, the pet of Washing- 
ton ; and the tie which then bound Connecticut and New York 
in that noble colonel has bound us together ever since in his 
worthy descendants. 

In the winter of '76 Washington sent for cavalry to Colonel 
Sheldon's regiment at Wethersfield. To Colonel (then captain) 
Tallmadge was committed the charge of four companies. They 
crossed Connecticut and the Hudson and down to the headquar- 
ters at Morristown. The horses of Captain Tallmadge's own 
company were dapple-gray and accoutred in black leather. 
They reached Litchfield on Saturday and spent the Lord's day 
there. Connecticut people went to church on Sunday then, and 
they do now, although it looks as if those of us who are with 
you to-night would have to worship in New York this time. 

It was a striking scene in the old church upon the Green. 
Cornwallis's fleet was almost at our shores, and rumor had an- 
nounced it and added to its size. In the old pews were the vil- 
lagers and the patriotic troops ; in the pulpit was the Rev. 
Judah Champion. 

To refresh your memories of the inspirations of the Revolu- 
tionary church militant in New England, and to remind you of 
the oratorical powers of the Reverend father, let me read you 
his prayer at morning service : 

O Lord, we view with terror the approach of the enemies of Thy holy 
religion. Wilt Thou send storm and tempest to toss them upon the sea and 

76 



to overwhelm them upon the mighty deep, or to scatter them to the utter 
most parts of the earth. But, peradventure, should any escape Thy ven- 
geance, collect them together again, O Lord, as in the hollow of Thy hand, 
and let Thy lightnings play upon them. We beseech Thee, moreover, that 
Thou do gird up the loins of these Thy servants who are going forth to fight 
Thy battles. Make them strong men, that "one shall chase a thousand, 
and two shall put ten thousand to flight." Hold before them the shield with 
which Thou wast wont in the old time to protect Thy chosen people. Give 
them swift feet that they may pursue their enemies, and swords terrible as 
that of Thy Destroying Angel, that they may cleave them down when they 
have overtaken them. Preserve these servants of Thine, Almighty God, and 
bring them once more to their homes and friends, if Thou canst do it con- 
sistently with Thine high purposes. If, on the other hand, Thou hast de- 
creed that they shall die in battle, let Thy spirit be present with them and 
breathe upon them, that they may go up as a sweet sacrifice into the courts 
of Thy temple, where are habitations prepared for them from the founda- 
tion of the world. 

And now a word or two of the duties of our society. 

We have learned by the hardest of lessons that we are a 
nation with a nationality, an indestructible nation beyond the 
assault of secession and division — that the Declaration was by 
the people, and that the Constitution was by the people. This 
elemental truth on which our life depends must never again be 
questioned. 

When it is yielded, it will be time to go again to Riverside, 
where the cornerstone of our great soldier's tomb was laid a 
few hours ago with the earnest words of the president of our 
national society, and the memorial eloquence of our chairman 
of this evening, and to pull down the pile and to scatter ashes 
over the sacred acres. It will be time to tear the name of Lin- 
coln from our histories. 

But there is another truth which we must never forget and 
which our society may well memorialize. 

If the Declaration was made by the people, it was made by 
the colonies struggling to Statehood. If the Constitution is an 
organic law by the people, it is also a treaty between newly- 
born sovereignties. If we are a Nation, we are also a Union. 
Ours is the Nation of the United States. Our early legend was 
" E Pluribus Unum" When the fathers lighted up the sky for 
their descendants and for humanity, it was not by a single sun, 
it was by a constellation, whose song was as joyful as the song 
of the morning stars at the birth of creation. 

And the best future of the republic calls upon us to keep 

77 



alive the flavors and traditions of the several communities. It 
would be dull indeed if we were fused into a uniform manhood 
like that bastard of art — a composite photograph. 

Geography forbids it ; nature forbids it. The hills, the prai- 
ries, the seas, the lakes, the rivers, the mountain laurels, the 
golden-rod, the arbutus, the violets, the daisies, the roses, the 
fruits, the trees, the climates, all tell us that our enormous power 
is in our diversity in unity. Keep up the local histories. Tell 
and tell again the old tales of the East and the West and the 
North and the South, and let the local treasures of character 
and industry and wisdom and love come in to carry us on far- 
ther in growth and development. 

Another thought for the society. Pardon me for saying it 
is not unimportant. 

Our duties to the fathers, of filial reverence and affection, 
are sacred. Our sonship is also a precious gift. But if our son- 
ship stands only in the written disclosures of a genealogical 
tree, it is but a mockery. 

The pedigree of honey does not concern the bee, 
A clover any time to him is aristocracy. 

For us the question is one of honey and not of stalk. 

My reverend and honored friend upon my right, a bishop of 
the Church, I am sure will assent to my proposition that the 
best Apostolical succession is the one which succeeds to the 
qualities of the Apostles. 

If we would be worthy sons of the fathers, let us not rest 
our credentials upon entries in the family Bibles. Let us in- 
herit their virtues — their faith, no night was too dark for them 
to see the stars ; their hope, no night was too long for them to 
wait for the coming, from below the horizon, of the sun ; their 
courage, which no snows of New England or floating ice in the 
Delaware could chill, which hunger and thirst and nakedness 
could not cast down ; their patriotism, which tolerated no per- 
sonal ambitions nor selfishness, but which suffered and strug- 
gled on and on, by day and night, in winter and summer, to 
build a republic, whose banner — may it float forever ! — shines 
with the stars of " old glory." 



78 



An Essay on Christian Missions, read at the Monday 
Evening Club in Hartford: 

The question suggested for our discussion to-night is girt 
with difficulties on every hand, and the little stock of wisdom 
which the essayist has been able to bring to its consideration 
has only made it clear to his mind that in this matter we are 
walking as yet only in twilight ; but it is the twilight of a ris- 
ing and not a setting sun. 

This essay, which is intended as a suggestion to bring out 
the wisdom of the club, moves from the standpoint of enthusi- 
astic adherence to a pure Christianity as declared and inaugu- 
rated by its founder, whose Lordship and mastery it unquali- 
fiedly admits. This Christianity is assumed to be the complete 
system of religious life and truth open to man. While on the 
one hand the claims of many of its adherents that all other re- 
ligions excepting the Hebrew religion are false and abomina- 
ble, are not supported by the words or life or principles of the 
Master, who claims for himself a fulfilling and not a destructive 
mission, on the other hand, the suggestion now not infre- 
quently made that Christianity is to be succeeded by something 
better in future larger development of the race, is rejected. 

It is true that historic Christianity is constantly changing, 
swinging now nearer to and now farther from its pure original, 
as it conforms more or less to the composite elements which 
have come into the chemistries of its constitution, or obeys 
more or less the extrinsic forces which have rushed in, like a 
flood, upon it. And doubtless it is true that the Christianity of 
the future must and will come back more and more to its sim- 
ple sublime original thoughts and purposes — the dross of all 
kinds which encompasses the pure ore, the chaff of all kinds, 
wood, hay, and stubble in which the solid grain is found, must 
all be burned. 

There are a thousand things which are and have been of 
this historic Christianity, many of which have already dropped 
away and many more of which will drop away, while the most 
fitting of them will survive. Thus, while our Lord was par- 
ticular to avoid all ecclesiastical establishments, His church 
has taken on, as it must have done in the nature of the case, all 
kinds of methods and incidents of ecclesiasticism, as Popes, 
and Priests, and Prelates, and Princes, and Presbyteries, and 

79 



Metropolitans, and Councils, and Synods, and Convocations. 
And while our Lord founded no school of philosophy, His 
church has assumed all kinds of philosophy — Augustinianism, 
Calvinism, Scholasticism, Neo-Platonism, Nominalism, Real- 
ism, and countless other "isms." 

Savageries, too, have attached to the church, as inquisitions, 
the sword of the crusader, excommunications, and heresy hunt- 
ing. Most of these have dropped altogether out of church his- 
tory, and the rest are only lingering for a few days in the sere 
leaf. 

But despite all the occasional tyrannies and violence of its 
ecclesiasticism, the occasional subtleties and absurdities of its 
philosophy, Christianity has gone forward to elevate and civil- 
ize mankind, and there has been no period so dark but in many 
hearts there burned the pure fire of Christian life, and in many 
minds there reigned in purity the unutterably great truths of 
Christianity. 

And this last thought is our first point in discussing the 
subject of Christian Missions. 

Christianity is essentially an aggressive and pervasive thing, 
and that universally. It is tied to no nation, is controlled by 
no climate, is bound up in no single age or aeon, is chained to 
no dynasty nor family. Its field is the human heart, its family 
the human race, its scene, time and eternity. Its Divine mas- 
ter charged his friends and disciples to preach the gospel — 
good news — to every creature. 

From his own lips the assurance came that He incarnated 
the everlasting love of God ; that he came to save men's lives, 
not to destroy them ; that he was the way, the truth, and the 
life ; that he died to attract a world, and his last legacies were 
peace of soul and the promise of his own everlasting presence. 

This gospel was to be preached to every creature. He 
compared its nature to the most rapid upspringing and growth 
of vegetable life, from the tiniest seed to the measureless fruit, 
from the dying kernel to the diffusive leaven, elevating the 
material of the single human heart and of the heart of society, 
and making them healthful. 

He fulfilled the righteousness of Judaism ; He took gifts 
from the learned men of the Orient ; He talked with the Greeks 
before his tragic death ; He pictured his Kingdom here and 
hereafter as flooded with incomers from the East and the West 

80 



and the North and the South. His picture of the crisis of souls 
revealed all the nations parting to the right hand and to the 
left in the discriminations of character. 

The Christian system has prevailed nearly nineteen centu- 
ries, but the world, counting by heads, is still pervaded by the 
leaven of his Kingdom, to less than one-half of its population. 

The work must go on, and it falls to our generation, as it 
has to its predecessors, to carry it forward. 

And we ought to come to the duty with no less devotion 
and with more wisdom and power than did the fathers. True, 
we have not the accident of the great Roman Empire reaching 
out over all the world as at the first ; but we have much greater 
elements of power in our modern inventions and the processes 
of modern civilization. For the first time in history we know 
who and what the so-called heathen are. 

Our missions have largely aimed at the conversion of savage 
tribes. We are discovering in worlds only yesterday almost 
unknown great strength of civilization and intellectual culture 
and moral goodness. 

And, as significant of the immense assistance given to Chris- 
tianity by our modern inventions, remember that in the last 
twenty-five years in which the English have introduced rail- 
roads and telegraphs and canals and education into India, the 
pervasion of Christianity has been greater than in all the pre- 
vious history of missions there. 

One fact which has hitherto been a great hindrance to 
missions is likely, by and by, to be a great advantage. I 
refer to the differences of view in Christian philosophy and 
in church organizations, as marked by differing sects and 
religious bodies, and which have heretofore been the subject of 
jealousy, quarrel, hate, strife, and often even of bloodshed. 
These differences are to become a source of missionary strength. 
The idea of Christian Unity is taking on a more rational form. 
It is getting to be conceded that men will not think alike until 
they look alike — the analogy of differing features in human 
faces — of differing trees and flowers and rocks and hills and 
streams and clouds in nature are absolutely significant of intel- 
lectual distinctions which will never fuse, and ought never to 
fuse, into a monotony. Unity is to be sought in a common 
obedience to God, a common discipleship to His sublime Rep- 
resentative, a common love to man. The common meeting of 

ii 81 



Christian disciples will soon be at the Lord's table, and not at 
man's table, furnished by men, with tickets of invitation issued 
by men only to other men who have certain antecedent outfits 
of philosophical opinion or ecclesiastical degrees. And when 
Christian unity stands in Christian character, with no surrender 
of individual or denominational views, except as they interfere 
with that mutual respect for and charity to our neighbors 
which the gospel requires, and which in all other matters but 
religion the present tolerant age requires, then the separation 
into sects, which is both natural and wise, will give the really 
United Christian Church a power of extension never before 
known. For as there are and will be sectarian differences in 
Christendom as it is, they must also exist in extended Christen- 
dom as it will be. 

These well-known facts can be used in the true economy of 
missions. The African will be left to his natural preferences — 
to the fervors of Methodism or even of the Salvation Army, to 
the comprehensive and complete ablutions of Anabaptism, and 
to the gorgeous tinsel and gorgeous beauties of the Roman 
Ritual. The Buddhists and Theosophists will naturally come 
to Christianity through the most highly cultivated and thought- 
ful and broad communions. 

The benighted heathen, in many places where Rome and 
the Greek Church and the Abyssinian and Coptic Churches 
have nominal power, would be best set right by the beautiful 
decencies, and by the respect for historic office and authority 
of the Reformed Episcopal Communions, and doubtless that 
austere and chilling philosophy, which has done so much for 
civilization from the time of Augustine to Calvin, and from 
Calvin to the present century, but which now seems to be 
everywhere yielding in Christendom to more reasonable and 
wholesome views of God and man, will still have a part to play 
in lands whose culture and development is behind that of the 
United States and England and Germany. 

Intellectual and temperamental distinctions will be recog- 
nized and the form of Christianity which best fits the place and 
the man will be not only given the field, but assisted in the 
field by other Christians. This is already conceded in litera- 
ture and education of the mind, and why not in religious edu- 
cation ? 

This mutual respect involves no surrender of individual 

82 



belief, partiality, or love. I may fancy the social life and 
ways of my own household, but I may not treat with disrespect 
the conscientious views of my neighbor who sits up an hour 
later at night, dines at noon, and wears full dress at family 
table. 

Society is broad enough for great differences in the pres- 
ence of underlying principles of courtesy and refinement. 

And the immense advantage of sectarian differences, in 
presence of individual charity and respect, must be apparent 
to any student of history. The Roman Catholic Missions, 
which at times have been distinguished by great success, have 
usually treated Protestant churches as heretical, and the paths 
of heresy and heathenism as only two highways to a common 
hell. 

Much has been already accomplished. I know that it is 
easy to show that in some quarters, particularly in savage 
lands, the relapses of so-called converts have been very 
marked. Usually these men have been induced to submit to 
baptism as an escape from a flaming hell, or to assent to some 
statements of which their ideas were as clear as the clouds of 
chaos (if there were clouds in chaos), and their relapse, if made, 
has not been very large ; but without counting so-called con- 
verts, the influence of our missions has been grand and good. 
And that at least in these two regards : first, by giving to other 
nations our Scriptures ; and second, by giving them our edu- 
cational methods. Whatever one may think about the unity of 
the Scriptures, and of the dishonor which superstition has often 
placed and does now often place upon our sacred literature by 
idolizing it, it is submitted without fear of dispute by fair men, 
that it is better and truer and more highly inspired, and when 
we include in it, as we may and must, the words of our Lord, 
incomparably better and truer than any other literature that is 
or has been. 

And it is quite possible that portions of the old Hebrew 
Scriptures, which have been more or less of a hindrance and 
stumbling block to pure Christian souls, by reason of bad edu- 
cation as to what they were and wherein they were profitable, 
may be even an element of great power in Christianizing some 
of the old nations. 

Doubtless Old Testament history helped Mahomet, as doubt- 
less the apostolic misapprehension of our Lord's second advent 

83 



and of the end of the world helped the early church to great 
success. 

The oriental mind has no apprehension of the value of time, 
of individual rights, or of the beautiful mission of woman — 
absolutely elemental things in Christianity. 

Given now our methods of education, our advances in the 
sciences, our railroads and steamboats and telegraphs and in- 
credibly ingenious machinery telling the story of the value of 
time and the worth of industry, and our democratic ideas of 
the rights of the individual under constitutional law, and the 
dignity which we give to woman, Christianity has got a civili- 
zation to carry it along, her own civilization too, so certain to 
supersede the inferior civilizations of the East, that it must 
ultimately leaven the whole lump of humanity. And while, if 
we look only at the square miles where Christianity is the dom- 
inant religion, and count only the number of faces which are up- 
lifted to the highest ideal of God, we must admit that the harvest 
seems to be afar off, yet, if we look beneath the surface to the 
civilization which has been already wrought in these peoples 
by our education and by the inspirations of our Scriptures, we 
shall see that in spite of untoward agencies made by the greed 
of Christian folks, as by the opium trade and rum trade, and 
by bodily lust, India, and Japan, and China are becoming per- 
vaded with the Kingdom whose real coming is not with obser- 
vation, as of processions and drums and banners and cannon. 

It is a fair question whether certain things in Scripture 
which have been interpreted to mean that Christianity must 
first triumph in the hearts of the unlettered have not been 
pressed too far. Passages like " The foolishness of preach- 
ing," " Not many wise, not many mighty," " Out of the mouths 
of babes," etc., have been often quoted as somehow forbidding 
us to hope for progress in the schools of other philosophies 
than ours. When we look at the culture of India it would seem 
as if the ripeness of its intellectual life must be a ripeness for 
intellectual truth. 

While Christianity always weakens when it aims at conflicts, 
it cannot weaken while anywhere engaged in honest contest for 
truth, and an intelligent and courteous and loving effort to 
bring the philosophy of life declared by our Lord into the 
thought of the great and good men of India, and Japan, and 
China must be successful. 

84 



A word now about statistics. I have not gone into the 
history of missions, it would take too long ; nearly all branches 
of the church, and all Christian nations have attempted to 
carry them forward ; on the whole, our American people have 
done their fair share, and as well as the others, and better than 
most. But our doing is, after all, not over large. England 
spends $5,000,000 a year in foreign missions. The United 
States perhaps one-half that amount. 

It is doubtful if over $20,000,000 to $25,000,000 is spent by 
the whole of Christendom upon foreign missions, and yet the 
United States spends $900,000,000 a year upon ardent spirits, 
wine, and beer. 

Our American people spend for this investment, which on 
the whole is a horrible one, forty times as much as the Christian 
world spends directly to carry on this work. But as has been 
before referred to, this Kingdom of Heaven comes not by 
observation, and the agencies of our century are radiating 
Christianity as never before in ways which do not appear in 
the books of religious statistics. 

This age with its justice to history, its critical interpreta- 
tions, its scholarship, its new science of comparative religion, is 
gradually discovering as the real stars in our sky at night and the 
sun in our sky at day, the elemental truths of Christianity. A 
personal God, and He a loving, forgiving Father, maker of 
heaven and earth and all things visible and invisible, a perfect 
life in humanity bringing us back to His love and revealing to 
us in the supreme of moral character the true being of the 
Invisible God, man His child with a divine nature and a per- 
sonal immortality, good character the condition of eternal life 
and bad character the condition of eternal death, the everlast- 
ing distinctions between right and wrong, the brotherhood of 
the human race, the greatness of the individual soul, the beauty 
of self-sacrifice, righteousness the foundation and love the 
consummation of moral being, the ugliness of selfishness, the 
charm of ministration, the beastliness of aggrandizement and 
greed, the worth of sincerity, the hollowness of sham and 
hypocrisy, the rewards of charity and consideration, and the 
hideousness of intolerance and bigotry. 

In the presence of such immortal living truths as these, 
catholic facts for the experience of human life, how petty do 
our sectarian distinctions, to which we are so much attached, 

85 



appear ! Let our missionaries be equipped with these things, 
no matter what their names may be. 

And if we could only complement the good words and 
good works of our missionaries with good lives in business and 
society of our sailors and merchants and visiting midshipmen, 
and our East India Bombay companies and our horse railway 
companies, the triumphs of our missionary labors would be 
immensely increased. The gospel was radiated from Jerusa- 
lem. Let us go there to-day. At what is supposed to be the 
Holy Sepulchre, representatives of two large communions, each 
claiming to be the only orthodox and the only catholic church 
of Christ, celebrate religious ceremonies. They are preserved 
from violence and personal conflict by the scimitar of the 
Musselman soldier, who keeps the peace between them. 
Greek, Roman, and Armenian Christians look at each other in 
disdain and hate. Is that all there is of Christianity in Jeru- 
salem ? Oh, no, there is lineal succession of the Master in 
spiritual things there. I read only a few weeks ago in a letter 
which sketched in a graphic way the idolatries and mummeries 
and quarrels at the sepulchre, of a little band of American 
young men taught of an American layman in their own coun- 
try, who passed in and out on missions of love and charity and 
mercy and education, and were cordially welcomed by Moslem 
and Armenian, and were honoring and promoting a living 
Christianity. 

Doubtless the gentlemen in brilliant wardrobe, quarreling 
at the tomb, consider these young men to be uncommissioned 
adventurers and schismatical heretics. 

We sometimes wonder that Buddhism numbers more ad- 
herents than Christianity, that Mohammedism contests with us 
in Asia and Africa, and this, two thousand years after the Res- 
urrection. 

But the world was many thousand years old before the Sun 
dawned, and it is yet only morning. The world was full of 
individual despotisms entrenched in force and in the forms of 
law. Where is personal despotism now ? Human slavery is of 
the past. The nobility of woman has been discovered. The 
infinite capacity and value of each individual man and his 
rights and wrongs — human ability for self-government — 
education becoming universal — superstition and idolatry dis- 
appearing — the insane no more hunted to the hills — the sick 

86 



and the sad the objects of tender ministration — rank and 
heritage and accidental superiority yielding- to virtue and 
worth — these, and how much more has Christianity wrought ! 
And now we are discovering the merits and demerits of other 
religions, and of their sacred books, and the many precious 
things which we hold in common with them, the demerits, 
too, in our own historic religion, for demerits it has none in its 
original purity. We have learned that one seer is worth to his 
age a dozen fore-seers, one benefaction worth a hundred wink- 
ing images, that the Son of man and all true sons of men " came 
not to be ministered unto, but to minister " ; that the Almighty 
Father has written every law in love, that truth is harmonious, 
that there can be no warfare between science which discovers 
laws of God, and the study of invisible things which discovers 
other laws of the same Infinite Being. 

And in this regeneration of an imperfect humanity, know- 
ing in part and easily drifting to selfishness and to the engross- 
ing pursuit of things which are seen, Christianity has wrought 
greatly, in spite of fightings and fears without and within, and 
has even greater works to appear in the coming centuries. 

Decoration Day Address at Rockville, 1897, to Burpee 
Post, G. A. R.: 

Our holidays seem to be few when we look abroad to some 
other nations and back to other ages. To the pious fathers the 
word itself was significant of idleness and superstition. It was 
entered into the statute-book by indirection, but it is there now, 
and is not a bad word. Of the few days which our calendar 
calls holidays, none is so tender in its sentiment as Decoration 
day. It comes when the brook of May's budding life meets the 
river of June's mantle of luxuriant verdure. Its symbols are 
not the ripe grain of Thanksgiving nor the evergreens and 
holly berries of Christmas, but the unfolding blossoms of roses 
and honeysuckle and laurel. 

Twenty-nine years ago you instituted this sacrament of love 
for your comrades — a sacrament whose visible elements are 
pure and sweet flowers, and whose inspirations are patriotism 
and fellowship. A great nation uncovers before you in your 
march, salutes you in reverence and gratitude, and, as you leave 
your garlands upon the graves of the dead, kneels with you in 
benediction. The friends of law and free government all over 

87 



the round globe beat time to the music of your tread. Thirty- 
six years ago the first cannon-ball broke the masonry of Sum- 
ter ; thirty-two years ago the clouds of war rolled away at Ap- 
pomattox. A new generation of men has been born, new tides 
of immigration have poured upon our shores, new inventions 
have been made, distances have been beaten down, the nations 
are in close touch, and there is no isolation in the peoples of the 
earth. The children who listened in wonder to your stories 
of battles are men and women now, and are studying the news 
from Cuba and Thessaly. Your column is smaller by the birth 
of each new spring, and the majority, which is at rest, is grow- 
ing larger and larger. 

It is an honor to contribute to the services of the hour words 
of sympathy and gratitude — to meet with this vigorous Post 
and to salute it — to recall the noble officer whose name is hon- 
ored by your selection, and which honors you by its use. He 
was a typical Connecticut soldier ; clean, pure, unselfish, brave, 
and patriotic. His career, from his enlistment in the Four- 
teenth to his mortal wound at Cold Harbor, won him a high 
place in the long catalogue of heroes who died to preserve un- 
broken the union of the States. He left us in the morning of 
life, but he had finished a work of devotion and sacrifice. And 
who shall say that the stream of his young life, lost to our sight, 
like the sunken river Humboldt, has not somewhere already 
reappeared and found fairer banks and bluer skies than ours ? 
What son of Connecticut, though his tongue stammers and his 
voice is feeble, can speak of the Connecticut soldier but in words 
of enthusiasm ? Her contributions of men and means in the 
colonial wars, in the war for independence, and in the war for 
freedom and the preservation of the nation, have given our 
commonwealth an enviable eminence. And yet no hostile 
camp has been pitched within her borders. Her soldiers, un- 
disciplined and untrained, but hardy and tough, under Putnam 
and Knowlton, at first recruits, but later veterans, under Terry 
and Birge, Hawley and Harland, Foote and Burpee, and the 
other leaders, left friends and homes for the common causes of 
the colonies and the nation. 

And what pages of history show such an army of volunteers 
as rallied around Old Glory from '61 to '65 ? It was an army of 
the youth of the North stirred by conscience and honor and 
duty-call. The adventurer was an exception. The rank and 

88 



file were patriots. They loved home, they loved law, they loved 
education, they loved liberty, they loved the flag, and for these 
sanctities they were ready to offer themselves for service and 
suffering and death. It has been well said that the signal suc- 
cesses of the German army in '66 and '70 were due less to Ger- 
man generals than to German schoolmasters. It is equally true 
of the success of the Army of the Republic. They went to the 
front not as conscripts or hirelings, but as volunteers, whose 
minds have been educated in the school, whose hearts were 
warm with love of country, and whose souls burned with devo- 
tion to God and duty. For them it was a short step from the 
awkward-squad stage of the recruit to the easy swing and cool 
courage of the veteran, not only, or chiefly, for their tough 
fibers of muscle and nerve, but for the intelligence and con- 
science which were inclosed in the folds, and under the caps, of 
blue. 

We look to our books, and the stories of wars are chiefly of 
generals and officers, whose names are written in capitals — the 
private soldier is unnamed, though his bravery is recorded. 
Rarely does his name appear in the newspapers. By and by, 
when he dies, it is carved upon a headstone or written upon a 
wooden slab. But where would the record of the brave officers 
appear but for the valor of the unnamed hosts ? You did not 
enlist to get your individual records into print, but to save your 
country and to fulfill your own sublime sense of duty. Who 
can tell me the name of anyone of the three hundred Spartans 
or the seven hundred Thespians who fell with Leonidas at 
Thermopylae ? Who can give us the name of any one of the 
six hundred and seventy cavalrymen of the Light Brigade who 
rode into the " Valley of Death " at Balaklava under Lord Car- 
digan ? And is the substance of their immortality lost because 
these heroes have left on the pages of literature no " shadow of 
a name " ? 

We are doing honor to the memory of patriots and founders 
by many organizations. The descendants of the Pilgrims, of 
the founders, and the Colonial warriors, of the Revolutionary 
soldiers, and the sons of Grand Army sires, are forming associ- 
ations to honor their distinguished and patriotic predecessors. 
Sisters and daughters and wives join the movement. It is well, 
and more than well ; and organizations to honor you and your 
devotion will and should multiply. These organizations are 

12 89 



wholesome. They develop sentiment, and what is life without 
sentiment ? They induce historical study ; they bring out local 
traditions and the lessons of good individual lives. They bind 
us closer to our native land. But they bring also new dangers. 
We have no classes in our country, and need none. Lincoln 
split rails, Grant worked in a tanyard, Cleveland was a sheriff. 
If our patriotic societies stand upon gold badges and insignia 
and only the glory of the fathers, they will develop snobbery 
and pride. If they keep alive the virtues of the fathers, and 
educate the people in lessons of liberty and law and education 
and religion and American principles and Connecticut tradi- 
tions, they will add to the strength and progress and best de- 
velopment of the nation. So may they always do ! 

This year abounds in memorials. The City of Brotherly 
Love, the home of the Liberty Bell, and the birthplace of the 
Constitution has added to the memorials of the Father of his 
Country a statue of noble proportions and commanding form. 
And with fitting words the President of the United States has 
delivered to the commercial metropolis the memorial tomb 
at Riverside, where shall rest, side by side with the companion 
of his struggles and his glories, the great captain of the armies 
of the Republic. The magazines and journals, after peppering 
us for a year and a half with endless charges of birdshot in 
the cause of realistic fiction, and until our skins were full and 
our blood tainted with Trilby, opened upon us with Napoleon, 
and for months and months cannonaded us with Napoleon by 
hot shot and bombshell. At last they have given us a welcome 
rest from exploiting his career, and have refreshed us with 
stories of Grant. What a blessed change ! These two generals 
had a community of skill in the art of war. Napoleon, by what 
is called genius, carried the so-called science of war to large re- 
sults. Grant, by getting up earlier than the enemy, by staying 
longer on the battlefield, by renewing an attack when his op- 
ponents and most of his associates fancied he was whipped, by 
hammering away at anything and everything in front of him 
with the power and persistence of the storm-waves of ocean, by 
never for a moment losing his presence of mind, or dropping 
from his thoughts any part of his own army and its necessities, 
and the enemy's as well, gave the students of the art of war 
food for thought. But, if these two eminent personages had in 
common the distinction of military eminence, as men they 

90 



were antipodes. One incarnated selfishness, the other patriot- 
ism ; one reveled in glitter and glory, the modesty of the other 
was only equaled by his graceful simplicity ; one loved and 
worshiped himself, the other loved his fellow men and wor- 
shiped his God ; one studied the heavens to find the star of 
his own bloody destiny, the other looked for the sun of right- 
eousness arising with healing wings upon a day of peace and a 
re-united country ; one thirsted only with zeal to draw his 
sword, the other hastened to return his to its sheath ; one hes- 
itated before no cruelties and lies, the other sought only mer- 
cies and truth ; one cared for no promise nor regarded any, the 
other kept his word in the keeping of a white soul and an in- 
vincible courage. The sufferings of his troops were nothing 
to one, the galled flesh of an artillery horse touched the com- 
passion of the other ; to one his country was a desirable scaf- 
folding to use in building for himself and his a throne and a 
dynasty, to the other his country was a supreme object for ser- 
vice and consecration. Humiliation of a conquered foe was 
sweet to the Corsican ; there was no room in the hand of Grant 
for the hilt of Lee's sword, and the cavalry horses surrendered 
to him by the men whom he had fought for four years were 
returned to them for the peaceful services of agriculture. Na- 
poleon was a great soldier by the standards of death and destruc- 
tion, but when his soul was weighed against truth and honor, 
and chivalry and sympathy and the charity of St. Paul's epistle 
his scale flew into the air like a balloon. Grant was a great 
soldier, perhaps the greatest captain of his age, but when the 
scales which weigh character are brought forth (how trivial 
now are swords and shoulder straps !) and righteousness, sin- 
cerity, purity, magnanimity and modesty are the weights, we 
have a standard of human excellence on hand rarely surpassed 
in the world's list of military heroes, not by Gustavus Adolphus, 
not by Joan of Arc, hardly even by Washington. The mag- 
nificence of the demonstrations which surrounded the last com- 
mittal of his sacred dust to its tomb by the Hudson was less in 
real power than the silent tribute of love and gratitude which 
moved from the hearts of millions and was eloquent above the 
roar of cannon. The tears of the boys in blue mingled with 
the tears of brave men in gray, the children of the heroes of 
the Grand Army marched side by side with the children of 
Confederates. Stern soldiers kept guard by Napoleon's coffin 

91 



when it was laid down in the Paris chapel. Armies and navies 
honored the burial of Grant, but more, a civilized world wept 
at his tomb. The magnificent tribute to the silent soldier was 
deserved. The tribute to the unique character and nobility of 
the man was even better. 

And what are you telling us to-day, survivors of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and what are we saying to you ? To 
you blessings and honors and grateful hymns ! You risked 
life for us, and for yourselves, and for the generations to come. 
The best we can say, the best we can do, is all too little for 
you. The greater rewards of your own consciousness of duty 
nobly done, of a nation saved, of humanity advanced, of liberty 
and self-government re-established, will ring as bells in your 
heart as you go down the " slopes of sunset," led, may it be, by 
the Father's hand, and till you go to rest, one by one, with the 
bugle call sounding "good night." 

And what are you saying to us by your memorial services 
to-day ? You are bidding us look up to the hills from whence 
came your strength and to join in your doxologies and alleluias 
to the God of our fathers. You are bidding us look about us and 
see this fair land, with its vast resources of commerce and agri- 
culture, with its factories and farms and schools and colleges 
and churches, with its manifold and many peoples, all covered 
by the protections of its Constitution and laws, and to love it. 
You are bidding us look forward to its inestimable future of 
greatness and progress. You are bidding us remember that 
there are other enemies than the bayonets of armed resistance 
to law ; enemies less conspicuous, but no less dangerous — cor- 
rupt morals, physical, intellectual, and spiritual degeneracy, 
snobbery and pride, irreverence for law, breaches of faith and 
denials of human rights, oppressions on this side and license on 
that. You are bidding us hold the Stars and Stripes in love 
and reverence, and to let them never be waved and tossed 
about at the hands of demagogic adventurers nor blatant jin- 
goes. You are telling us that our country is large enough for 
our best activities and statesmanship, and that the government 
of the world has not yet been confided to us. You are bidding 
us sympathize with every righteous struggle for freedom and 
self-government. You are bidding us bury all bitterness of the 
past in the onward and friendly activities of the Republic in 
all its climes and latitudes. You are bidding us to be kind to 

92 



our neighbors and to be strong in the strength of minding our 
own measureless business. You bid us be true to our tradi- 
tions, jealous of our history, enthusiastic for our advance ; to 
rejoice in the old pillars of fire and cloud, and to look for new 
light and shade to guide and protect our future. You are tell- 
ing us of the manliness and success of a life which you con- 
secrated to your country's service in the days of battle, that 
so you might make a highway for the feet of the blessed mes- 
sengers who are bringing in the gospel of peace, a peace that 
endures. If we would learn the bitterness of war and the in- 
finite mercies of peace, we go to you whose scars and empty 
sleeves are your credentials. To you, in this regard, would we 
commend the loud-mouthed orators who breathe fire and flame 
from their tongues, and shake swagger from their arms, in 
the protection of the chamber walls of the United States 
Senate. 

March on, veterans, to the city of the dead! Lay your fresh 
flowers upon the dust of your comrades ! Their voices call to 
you from tent and battle front. 

The picket-line in Virginia, the camp-fire in Carolina, the 
mine, the trench, the hospital, the storm of battle, the bayonet 
charge, the thirst, the wounds, the martyr's death, the victory, 
are in your souls to-day, as flashed from the lenses of a bio- 
graph. 

Ring out again the old chorus, " Marching thro' Georgia," 
shout again the " Battle-cry of freedom." The voices of your 
sleeping comrades may be in the harmony, though you may 
not hear them ; their forms, clad again in blue, may be by 
your side, though you may not see them. 



93 



Two Carols by Mr. Robinson from a volume of " Christ- 
mas Carols " prepared and published by the " Union for 
Home Work," of Hartford, 1876 : 

Exult, ye sons of men, 

'Tis clearest morn! 
Exult, ye sons of men, 

The child is born ! 
Born into human life, 

O Light Divine ! 
Through clouded human life 
Forever shine. 

Chorus : Glory, peace, good- will, 
To God, to men; 
Glory, peace, good-will, 
To God, to men. 

Carol sweetly, children, 

The Holy Child ! 
Carol gently, children, 

The mother mild ! 
Carol in the twilight 

Of matin gray ; 
Carol in the twilight 

Of closing day. 
Glory, etc. 

O Jesu, fill the mountain, 

And fill the grove ; 
Fill prairie, sea, and mountain 

With thy sweet love. 
Ye sons of men acclaim Him, 

The Holy Child ! 
The Son of God, acclaim Him, 

And Mary mild. 
Glory, etc. 
94 



BETHLEHEM STAR. 

When Bethlehem's star upon the sky 

Its light of glory flamed, 
The Orient sages caught its ray, 

Its heavenly guidance claimed; 
Obedient to its holy charm, 

Rich gifts of love they bore, 
Prostrate at gentle Mary's feet 

The Saviour-child to adore. 

From manger birth, through life of toil, 

To waving palm from scorn, 
From palm to cross, from cross to crown, 

Thy path, O Woman-born ! 
And heavenly star, and halo-wreath, 

And light white robe were Thine ; 
And thunder voice and resting Dove 

Declared Thy life Divine. 

O Bethlehem's star! bright morning star! 

Guide us to Jesus' feet! 
Our souls to love, our lips to praise, 

Our hearts with His to beat! 
From sin to penitential tears 

To purify our night ; 
Through tears to faith, in faith to peace, 

In peace to purest light. 



95 



H. C. R. 

The gracious heart that overflowed 

At every suffering human call ; 
The pity without drop of gall, 

The sympathy that warmed and glowed ; 
The kindly eyes not keen of sight 

For wrongs that weaker brothers wrought, 
But through the fog of folly caught 

A flash of something that was bright ; 
The soul that throbbed in quick response 

To deed of flame and winged word, 
That bathed in Nature's healing fonts, 

And sought the flower and loved the bird ; 
The brain of power, the speech of grace — 

Whose tones for truth and honor fell — 
The faith that saw Redemption's face, 

And heard the whisper, "All is well." 



Here in this world they told of Thee, 
Lord, didst Thou need them more than we ? 

Atinic Eliot Trumbull. 



H 289 85 



96 




4? • 






**t- <."»• o. 



r oV 









^oV^ 







V 






ci^ 






°^ 






.,> 








1> 


•fe 


*< 


5 


x° 


^ 
** 












«/» C| W * cC\\ $5K //>1 n «5» 



/.•^X V/^.V. ./\-^t\- 



<* *' .. 



bv* 



0-r 



*A 



*. * 


















ECKMAN 

\IDERY INC. 



^ APR 85 

^W N. MANCHESTER, 
<? INDIANA 46962 















LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



014 111 873