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Full text of "The Hibernia fire engine company, no. 1. have caused this volume to be issued in remembrance of their visit to ... New York, Boston, Brooklyn, Charlestown and Newark, in November, 1858 .."

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THE 



Hibcvuia Jive (jjuginf O^omijattg, 




No. 1. 



HAVE CAUSED THIS VOLUME TO BE ISSUED IN REMEMBRANCE OF THEIR VISIT TO THE CITIES OF 



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AND TO COMMEMORATE THE HONORS AND HOSPITALITIES EXTENDED TO THEM BY THE 
PUBLIC AUTHORITIES, FIREMEN AND CITIZENS OF THOSE PLACES, 



THIElII^e. BI^OTHEI^ in 1 1^ E Is^ E I<r 



ON THEIR RETURN TO THE 



CITY OF PHILADELPHIA^, 



TO EACH AXD ALL OF WHOM IT IS DEDICATED AS . 



kmovial 0f O^vatitudc. 




PHILADELPHIA: 

PRINTED BY J. B. CHANDLER, 306 & 308 CHESTNUT STREET, [GIRARD BUILDLVG.] 
185 9. 






ENTERED ACCORDING TO ACT OF CONGRESS IN THE YEAR 1859, BY 
THE HIBEHJSriA. FIK,E C01«^F-A.3Sr-Z-, 



I THE CLERK S OFFICE 










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OFFICERS. 



JAMES PAGE. 



VICE PEESIDENT. 

HENRY A. COOK. 



JOHN R. DOWNING, Secretauy. WILLIAM DICKSON, Assistant Secretary 

GEORGE H. HOLMES, Treasurer. WILLIAM F. McCULLY, Recorder. 

ALEXANDER RANKIN, Enuineer. JOHN M. SIEGRIST, Hostler. 



DIRECTORS. 



MICHAEL KEEVAN, 
JAMES C. WHALLEY, 
FRANCIS FOX, 



ERHARD PAUL, 
JAMES M. COLGAN, 
EDWARD GOWAN, 





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IIIBEKMA IIAXI) KIKE EXGIXE OF 1S«, (BUILT EV AOXEW,) AXD EXGIiNE HOUSE, EVELINA 
PRErARIXa FOR TAKADE, OCTOBER 5, 1357 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



THE 




^i$ (!)ri]nn.i,s,trHon .and COrnrriVl Jvi.jstory. 

The preliminary movements towards giving a iDermanent organization to the 
HIBERNIA FIRE COMPANY, were made during the latter part of the year 1751; but 
it was not until the 20th day of February, 1752, that the Constitution was fully adopted 
and signed. This docun-.ent is in some respects interesting, not only of itself, but from the 
light it sheds upon the mode of extinguishing fires in those days, and the index afforded 
to the character and standing of its members. The following are extracts given with 
scrupulous exactness, word and letter of the original being followed : — 

"The 20th day of February in the year of our Lord 1752. We whose names are 
hereunto Subscribed, reposing Special confidence and Trust in each others Friendship, do 
for the better preservation of our own and our Fellow Citizens' Houses Goods & Eflects from 
Fire mutually agree in manner and form following, that is to say. 

" First — That we will each of us with all possible expedition at each of our own proper 
charge provide two Leathern Buckets, two Baggs and one large Wicker Basket with two 
handles, the Baggs to be made of Good Oznaburgs or wider linen, whereof each bagg shall 
contain four yards at least and shall have a String fixed near the mouth ; which said 
Buckets, Baggs and Basket shall be marked with our own respective names & Company, 
kept Ready at hand & apply'd to no other use, than for preserving our own and our fellow 
Citizens' houses. Goods & Effects in case of Fire as aforcs'' — 

" Second''' — That if any of us shall neglect to provide his Buckets, bags & Basket as 
afores'" or when so provided shall neglect to keep them ready at hand and in good order, i 
a Convenient place near the street door or shall aply them to an}- other use, but for the 
Use herein mentioned, he shall forfeit to the use of the Company & pay unto the Clk. for 




"To uiiit the lufforing and protect the wonk.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




time being the sum of two shillings, except any of them shall be lost or damaged 
at a fire. 

* * * * * :i: * * 

" Fourth'' — That wo will immediately upon hearing of a fire break out repair to the same 
with our buckets, bags & Baskets & there employ our utmost endeavors to preserve the 
Goods & Effects of such of us as shall be in danger; and if — more than one of our Goods, 
Houses and Effects be in danger at the same time, we will divide ourselves as near as may 
be, to be equally helpful, and such of us as may be spared may assist others in like danger; 
and to prevent as much as in us lies suspicious persons from coming into or carrying any of 
the Goods out of such of our houses as may be in danger, two of our Number shall con- 
stantly attend at the doors, until all the Goods & Effects that can be saved, are pack'd up 
and convey 'd into some place, where one or more of us shall attend until they are delivered 
to or secur'd for the owner. — And upon our first hearing of Fire, we will immediately cause 
two or more Lights to be placed in our windows, and such of our Company whose Houses 
may he in Danger sliall place Candles in every Room to prevent Confusion & that their 
Friends may be able to give the more speedy & effectual assistance. — And further as this 
Association is intended for General benefit, we do mutually agree, that in case a fire should 
hereafter break out in any other of the Inhabitants' Houses and when none of our own 
Houses, Goods and Effects are in Danger, we will immediately Repair thither with our 
Buckets, Bags & Baskets, and give our utmost assistance to such of our Fellow Citizens as 
shall stand in need thereof. And if it shall appear that any of our members neglected to 
attend with their Buckets, Bags & Baskets, or to set up Lights in their windows as afores'* 
every such neglecting Member shall forfeit and pay to the use of the Company Two Shill- 
ings, unless he shall assign some Reasonable Cause to the satisfaction of the Company. 

" Ninth''' — That upon the Death of any of our Company, the Survivors shall be in Time i 

of Danger as afores^ aiding & assisting unto the Widow of such Decedent during her Widow- j 

hood as if her husband had been Living & of our Society. She only keeping the Buckets, i 
bags and Basket in Repair and causing them to be sent to every Fire as afores"" 

This constitution was signed as follows : — 

" Hu : Donnaldson, Randle Mitchell, Walter Shoe, Jam' Wallace, Abm. Usher, W" Henry, 
Plun' Fleeson, W" West, John Johnston, John FuUerton, p order, Rob' Taggart, B. Fuller, 
Geo: Bryan, James Fullton, James Mease, Jas. Hunter, Blair M" Clenachan, Jno. Mitchell, 
Geo: Fullerton, Geo: Campbell, Samuel Duffield, Sharp Delany, Edw'' Batchelor, W" Allison, 
Vill"- Baxxell, Will : Miller. 



■ To assist the suffering and protect the \ 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




The name of James Ilalilane apjjears also at the head of the second column, just over the 
name of James Hunter; but a line is drawn through it. and a minute added, which informs 
us that the owner has " quit the province." 

In going over the original minutes of the time, we notice that they w^rc kept very 
loosely — in man\- instances remaining upon slips of paper, froni which tiny were never 
transferred into the minute-book. Some of these records contain quite curious and charac- 
teristic entries. Thus in one, we find it recorded that " Mr. Jo° M'Michal is find for having 

his baskett with glasses in it 2«." At the next meeting we learn that "Mr. John 

M'Michael is to show cause for having Merchandize in his Baskett & but one Bag, find 2s." 
At the same time, " James Wharton wanted a string in one of his bags," and was punished 
therefor according to the constitution. Members were fined for having holes iu their bags, 
and for not keeping their bags clear of oats, and getting them burned occasionally. John 
M'Michael and James Wharton, who came in after the original organization, .seem to have 
been the depositor}^ of a sort of reserved fund, upon which the company could draw at 
pleasure. Continually eng igjd in same peccadillo, connected with their " Buckets, Basketts 
and Bagges," they were fined at almost every meeting. The punishment seemed to have no 
monitor^' effect. AnKjug the original members, Blair M'CIenachan was, by far, the most 
frequent sufferer; and paid innumerable two shilling fines, principally for the offence of 
having merchandise of one kind or other deposited in his baskets. We find occasional 
traces of conflagrations, in members reporting the loss of buckets and bags at ^■arious great 
fires, in Water street, on Society Hill, and other well known localities ; but it was not until 
December 4th, 1758, that anything is rcorded concerning the engine. By the minutes of 
that meeting, we find that the new engine from England has been landed ; and at the next 
meeting, an assessment of three pounds on each member, was levied and collected, to pay 
Messrs. Scott and M'Michael their account against the company. At the same time, a 
committee previously appointed, and consisting of Handle Mitchell, Isaac Snowden, Enoch 
Story and Cornelius Bradford, reported that they had caused a house to be built at the 
corner of Walnut and Second streets. They were instructed to place the engine in the new- 
building. 

This engine was doubtless capable of being fed ,by suction, and used to l)e taken to the 
river occasionally, when fires were scarce, for the members to keep thcms(l\cs in proper 
practice — ^,just as wo ourselves have seen done in our boyish days, in tin' villages adjoining 
Philadelphia. In IT-j'J, at the March meeting, we find the following minute : — 

" Orderd That the succeeding Clerk give Notice to the Members of the company that the 
Committee appointed to take care of the Engine will play said Engine at Carpenters AVharfl' 
at two oClock of the 1" Tuesday after next meeting of this Company & that the attend" of 
the Members of the Company be Requested at said Time & place." 



•C 




"To UBiit the •uffering and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



'?^?^ 




8 

In 17C)0, at the meeting of Septemlier 2d, the company took into consideration what 
amendments were necdfid to the constitution, and passed the following, among other 
resolutions : — 

"Resolved 1^ That ten Members mett shall make a board and arc inipower'd to admit 
any new Members, provided always that all the members of the Company arc didy served 
with written notices, of the proposal of such mcndjor with his name at length before the 
time of such meeting agreeable to our articles 

" Resolved 2"''^ That the extra fine for not attending when a new member is to be balloted 
for, be no longer demanded Collected or paid, and that the fines of one shilling pr month for 
not meeting and three shillings for not attending once in three months and the fine of ten 
shillings for not attending the meeting of the Company once in Twelve months, being regu- 
larly summoned to attend are and shall be the only fines Collected and paid by the members 
of this Company for non attendance on the Company, and are hereby enacted substituted 
and placed in liew of all former fines for absentees." 

In 1768, an amendment was adopted at the July meeting, that each member admitted 
should pay three pounds, and furnish himself, two bags, two baslccts and one bucket, beside 
two other buckets to be furnished by the company. 

A new constitution, containing little substantial difference from the previous ones, was 
adopted in 1773. The minutes now appear to be pretty full, until about 177-"), when the 
revolutionary troubles scatter the members in various directions; many, as the minutes 
show, being at camp. In 1775, at the October meeting, Blair M'Clenachan m as the only 
member present, and he entered on the minutes that he had not chosen to sup alone, and so 
had invited some good fellows, at an expense of sixteen shillings, to pass the evening, 
charging the same to the company. At the next meeting, November Gth, there appears to 
have been some ill-natured ideas afloat in members' minds, for we find on the minutes the 
following : — 

" The Company find by the Minutes that several clerks of Late have charged the 
Company with eight Suppers, when no other Members attended, not choosing as they say to 
sup alone. ' Quiry. K the Company are to treat the Clerk in such cases the charge is 
right.' — If the Clerk should have \)a\d himself no Doubt the Company will put a stop to the 
like charge in future." 

During the revolutionary excitement, the members being staunch patriots, the meetings 
were held only bi-monthly, and even then were frequently deserted. The engine was also 
neglected, for the members were engaged in putting engines of a difierent character in 
motion. Some of the minutes about this time are curious, and afford no contemptible 



list the suffering and protect the i 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY 




material for the historian. For instance, at the meeting of August ITlli. 
among other minutes, the following : — 

"John Mitchell informed the Clk that the reason why lie had not delivered the hook in 
proper Time to the succeeding elk after being elk him.self, was that he was abroad eschorting 
General Washington. & returned only one Day before be should have deli%'crcd the Book ; 
which day he was so fatigued he forgot it. He leaves to the Company to determine whether 
he ought to pay the fine, & will pay it if they think he ought." 

On December 2d, 177G, occurs the following entry : — 

" Plunket Fleeson the Clerk in Rotation Reports That he summoned the Company agree- 
able to the Rules, at which time The Inhabitants were in Great Confusion on account of the 
approach of the Troops under Gen' Howe to Trenton, many of the members out of Town, 

& that none Init Himself Attended at the time of Meeting." 

But the patriotism of the members did not stop here. There was a time toward-s the 
close of the revolution, when it was almost impossible to obtain money for the use of the 
army, which wa.s perishing of famine. At this dangerous crisis, ninety-three individuals 
and firms stepped forward, and contributed the sum of £300,000, payable in gold or silver. 
Of this amount, the following, who were at the time or afterwards, members of the Hibeniia 
Fire Company, subscribed £71,500 : — 

" Robert Morris, £10,000 ; J. M. Ncsbitt & Co., £-3,000 ; Jas. Mease, £5,000 ; Samuel 
Meredith, £5,000; Jno. Nixon, £5,000; Geo. Campbell, £2,000; John Donnaldson, 
£2,000; Samuel Caldwell, £1,000; George Meade & Co., £2,000; Blair M'Clenachan, 
£10,000; Tench Francis, £5,500; Hugh Shiell, £5,000; Henry Hill, £5,000; Kean & 
Nichols, £4,000 ; Benj. Fuller, £2,000; Jas. Caldwell, £2,000 ; Sharp Delany, £1,000." 

Three of the five inspectors of tlic bank, Robert Morris, J. M. Nesbitt and Blair 
M'Clenachan, the first named director, John Nixon, and the factor. Tench Francis, were 
members of the Hibernia, and all volunteered to serve without compensation. 

During the occupation of the city by the British, the company did not meet at all, part of 
the members being too highly compromised, as adherents of the popular cause, to remain 
about the quarters of the enemy, and the other part serving in the revolutionary' arm_\-. On 
the 22d of November, 1781, however, a meeting was held at the house of Patrick Byrnes, 
where there was a revision of the constitution made, and tlie following, among other new 
members elected : — Samuel Caldwell, James Crawford, John M. Nesljitt, D. H. Con\ngham, 
George Henry, Thomas Fitzsimmons, John Donnaldson, Robert Morris, John Nixon, Wm. 
Constable, Thomas Morris, Samuel Meredith, and Sam'l C. Morris. On the 1st of May, 
1782, a committee was appointed to have the engine repaired. This they attiiuled to, and 



,^^r- 

'To assist the saiferlng and protect tho weak." - 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 





lO 

placed it in the care of Mr. Hunter. This committee, having reported on the 3d of 
September, that the engine was in complete order, but witliout a proper house, the following 
resolution was passed : — 

"Resolved, that the same Committee be hereby empowered to build a house for the 
Engine on the same place where it formerly stood in Walnut street or as near it as a 
place can be obtained for the purpose, & also to endevour to find the Ladder & Hooks 
& have them deposited as near the Engine house as possible, & to draw on the Treasurer for 
the Amount." 

Tn October of the same year, the minutes inform us that : — 

" The Engine is now in its House in Walnut st, near Second street. The Pipe and One 
Key at Mess". S C & F Morris's." Another Key at Sharp Delaney's. One at John Donald- 
son's and One at Whiteheads, Opposite the Engine House. The Ladder and Hooks, at Mr. 
Owens, the Corner of Walnut street Bridge." 

In 1783, the company was again re-organized, by the adoption of another constitution. 
Indeed, the company, who must have been a jolly set of gentlemen, seemed to make it their 
duty to quench fires, and their pleasure to eat good suppers, and revise the constitution. 

In 1790, the old engine which had been imported from England, became so dilapidated as 
to be unfit for use, and on the 6th of February, the company contracted with Richard 
Mason, who had his shop in St. James street, at that time called Mulberry Court, to build a 
new one, at a cost of £100. In looking over the minutes we see an entry, at one time of 
£90, in silver, and £30, in paper money, paid to Mason, on account. The remainder of the 
debt was afterwards discharged. Up to 1812, the minutes present little worthy of notice. 
Early in that year, certain young gentlemen applied to be elected engineers ; but on the 5th 
of February, after full consideration, the matter was refused. Among the names of those 
elected during that year, we find Samuel Jackson, Nicholas Biddle, (afterwards celebrated 
as President of the Bank of the United States,) Samuel Ewing, Jesse Wain, Joseph R. 
Ingersoll, (who represented the City in Congress many years) and Bernard Henry. 

On December 1st, 1813, David Lennox, the first honorary member on the roll, was 
elected. The Major, growing tired of his long service, had resigned, when the company paid 
him the compliment of honorary membership. Previously, however, in 1801, when George 
Campbell resigned, after thirty-five years of active service, the company made him, in effect, 
an honorary member, pennitting him to participate at all meetings, without either dues or 
fines. 

On the 27th of June, 1814, Wm. Hamilton, John P. Nisbet, Joseph Kemble, John 
Donnaldson, Jr., John P. Earhart, Wm. McDowell, Robert Tempest, and Archilaus AVilletts 
formed themselves into an organization, called "The Engineers of the Hibernia Fire 



; the suffering and protect the weak.' 



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THE HIBEENIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




11 J. 

Compain." The old meiiihers now iiretty much reth-ed from active service, leaving work in 
the hands of the younger, and more enthusiastic engineers, Avho in the space of the four 
following years added sixty-two to their original number, among them their present 
President, James Page; and in 1818, drew up a very excellent revised constitution. On 
February 7th, 1821, the old members withdrew entirely from service, and surrendered the 
entire property of the company to the hands of the engineers, first electing them members 
of the ancient oganization, and so keeping it alive. In the inontli of June, of tlie same 
year, the engine was rebuilt by the celebrated Patrick Lyon. 

In 1829, the engine made by Patrick Lyon was rebuilt and re-fitted. In 18.36, a new 
engine was built by John Agnew. In 1841, tlie company was incorporated, when the 
present equipments were adopted. These consist of a coat, hat and cape. The coat is drab. 
The hat is painted green, with an eagle and gilt harp, and the word " Hibernia," in gilt 
letters, and on a scarlet scroll, in front. On the back are the figures " 1752." The cape is 
painted green, w'ith the word " Hibernia," in gilt letters, with an eagle and gilt harp. 

In 1843 a new engine was built by John Agnew, which is the machine last in use. A 
correct drawing of this, is to be seen in one of the plates of this work. It stood in Wahiut 
street, near Second, and was for years in Pear street, below Third, and in the ne'w house 
located in York street, where the new Steam Fire Engine substituted in its place now 
stands. 

The celebrated Gloucester Fox Hunting Club, the Schuylkill Fishing Club, and the First 
Cit}' Troop, were composed in the main of members of the Hibernia, which also contributed 
considerably to the membership of the Cincinnati. It may be mentioned here, that the 
First City Troop was one of the most distinguished for its services and good conduct, of any 
engaged in the revolutionary struggle. General Washington, in hi.s letter, discharging them 
from duty, returns them " his most sincere thanks for the many essential services which 
they have rendered to their country, and to himself personally during the course of that 
se\ere campaign." Furthermore he says of them, " Though composed of gentlemen of 
fortune, they have shown a noble example of discipline and subordination, and in several 
action.s, have shown a spirit and bravery, which will ever do honor to them, and will ever 
be gratefully remembered by me." 

Among the records of this troop is still kept a very spirited letter, which is worthy of 
preservation. In 17'.llt, when we were threatened with civil war, there was a draft on the 
Phihidelphia forces. Tiie following reply to an order was given by the (then) captain of the 
troop : — 



M 




"To atiiat the infferin; and protect tho \ 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




" Wednesday evening, March 20"", 1799. 
" Sir : — About an hour ago I received through you, the general orders of the Commander- 
in-Chief, dated thi.s day, with a letter directing me to report when the First Troop of Phila- 
delphia Cavalry will be ready to march. "With pleasure I tell you, that when the laws 
and government of this happy country recjuire defence, the First Troop of Philadelphia 
Cavalry wants but one hour's notice to march. I have the honor to be, with esteem, your 
obedient and humble servant, JOHN DUNLAP." 

It is not necessaiy to speak of the long and faithful service of the Hibernia — her history 
is evidence of that. But, it was solely by accident that much of that history was rescued 
from oblivion. The first volume of her minutes was lost, and it was thought irrecoverably, 
for nearly fifty years; but it was found in the old Custom House, and coming into the 
possession of Mr. Robert Wilson, was Ijy him transmitted to the Company on the 20th of 
March, 1838. 

The centennial anniversary of the company was celebrated with great spirit on the 20th of 
February, 1852. The following account is extracted from the papers of the day : — 

" Yesterday afternoon, the centennial anniversary of the Hibernia Fire Engine Company, 
took place at Parker's Adelphi Saloon, Fifth street, below Walnut. During the day, the 
difi'erent fire bells of the various companies were rung in honor of the occasion, and flags 
were streaming from numerous quarters — including the fire engine and hose houses, the 
new.spjiper offices, and various public places generally. At 12 o'clock. Col. Murphy fired a 
salute of one hundred guns from Shippen street wharf. The table, as prepared by the 
host, was of the most sumptuous character, perhaps one of the finest that ever firemen sat 
down to. 

"Among the invited guest.?, we noticed Maj. General Patterson, Dr. J. K. Mitchell, Major 
Peter Fritz, and the Presidents of the different Fire Engine and Ho.se Companies of the City 
and County of Philadelphia. 

" The room was most tastefully decorated with the American flag, and sundry beautiful 
wreaths and flowers. 

"Gaul's celebrated bra.ss band was in attendance, and its music was never more admired 
or warmly applauded than upon this occasion." 

After the removal of tlic cloth. Col. Page, the President upon tlie occasion, made some 
exceedingly appropriate and interesting remarks upon the origin of the Hibernia Fire Com- 
pany. The speaker illustrated his observations with a series of the doings of the old 
centennial apparatus, and made many happy hits at the minutes of the company in "olden 
time." Col. Page was warmly applauded in his brief speech, and upon reference to several 
inguished <ruests, tliere was a most cordial enthusiasm manifested. 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



13 



Tlie President then read the followhi"r toasts : 




TO A.STS. 

1. The Day we Celebrate — Ma^- its recurrence, a century hence, find the Cunipany still 
in existence, with an engine always ready for active service, manned by willing hearts and 
stout hands. Tune — "Away with Melancholy." 

2. The Memory of the Founders of our Association, the original Twenty-seven — Men 
whose work has stood the test of time. " Old Lang Syne." 

3. The President of the United States. Nine cheers, and " Hail Columbia." 

4. The Governor of Pennsylvania. Three cheers and "Governor's March." 

5. The Army and Navy — They have ever gallantly and triumphantly sustained the 
national stripes and stars; as brave in battle as they are merciful in victory. Three cheers 
and " Star Spangled Banner." 

6. The memory of Washington, Morris, Jefferson and Jackson, and the other patriots and 
statesmen of our glorious Republic. Drank standing, with the " Dead March." 

7. Civil and Eeligious Liberty — Wherever struggled for by the people, may God prosper 
the right, tyrants be overthrown, and rational liberty firmly secured. Nine cheers, "Yankee 
Doodle." 

8. The Fire Association of Pliiladelphia — An organization happily conceived and wisely 
managed. May the design of its projectors be fully realized, and it pro\e a sustaining 
power to the Fire Department. Three cheers — Music. 

9. The Hibernia Society— Started by men who belonged to both institutions, and almost 
a contemporai-y association with our own, we extend the right hand of fellowship, and wish 
them every success. Three cheers — Music. 

10. The Engine, Hose, and Hook and Ladder Companies of the City and Districts — A 
noble band for noble purposes. May the only strife between them be, which can best aid 
the cause of humanity. Three cheers — Music. 

11. The Association for the Relief of Disaliled Firemen — A fountain of charity, from 

an adlicted, deserving, and heroic brother. 



which flows the healing stream lor ; 
Cheers — Music. 

12. Our Departed Members — Although tlie century now 
from earth, they yet live in their examples, and their mem- 
our hearts. Drank in silence, " Dead March." 

13. The Ladies— Wreaths from their fair hand 
from their grateful hearts, our strong incentives 
Music — Gallopade. 




.■nibalmed in 



nd lo\ 



; the lafftring and protect the weak. 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




1-4 

la response to the ninth toast, Gen. Patterson replied. His remarks were mainly in com- 
mendation of Philadelphia firemen, as the very best of volunteers in the Mexican war. Ho 
said, that no one had a better opportunity of witnessing the conduct of these men — they 
were precisely what they started to be — Philadelphia firemen, in defence of their country 
and its institutions. He had tried them — knew them from Vera Cruz to the City of 
Mexico — and, as a man, as a soldier and a commander, knew full well they had not their 
superiors. In every instance where the fight raged the warmest, they were the foremost. 

In reply to the toast to the Fire Association for the Relief of Disabled Firemen, Maj. 
Peter Fritz, one of its original founders, responded. He said it was his pride and pleasure 
to meet at all times with his brother firemen ; and there was not a festival where it did him 
more gratification to mingle with the whole department, than upon the centennial of the 
Hibernia. 

The. press being toasted, Col. W. F. Small, of the Ledger, replied. 

Speeches were also made by Dr. J. K. Mitchell, and others, and after a numljer of 
sentiments and songs, the party separated at an early hour, much pleased with the enter- 
tainments of the evening. 



VOLUNTEER TOASTS. 

By the Phoenix Hose Company : Tlie Hibernia Fire Company — We reverence her years, 
we admire her activity, and freely accord the position in the Fire Department to whicli not 
age alone, but usefulness entitles her. 

By the President of the Columbia Engine Company : Hibernia Emjine Company, No. 1 — 
The Head and Front of the Fire Department. They occupy a brilliant " Page" in its 
history, and although they have brought forth a "Tempest," may they never lack Hope or 
Resolution to be Vigilant in their glorious career. 

By the President of the William Penn Hose Company — Like Hibernia and Carroll, while 
the name of one is a star in our country's glory, the other is a star in the Fire Department. 

From the Hibernia Hose Company to the Hibernia Fire Company, No. 1 — That their 
honor may last till time is no more. 

The Pennsylvania Cornet Brass Band — Their music the first to greet us on this 
Centennial Day, will be remembered for its beauty and power. 

By the Hibernia Company — The Companies who honored us this day by ringing their 
bells — May the Hibernia return the compliment on their Centennials. 

By P. C. Ellmaker: The Firemen — Bound by a common cause, and burning with a 
common zeal: may they hereafter acknowledge no emulation but that of excellence, and no 



I eufforing and protect the weak." 




pirn 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

15 

lity but against the wasting element, our common enemy. May their motto be 
'• Courtesy to our comrades, Courage to meet the foe .'" Hearts and hands for Duty and 
Fraternity, till all men hail the heroes of humanity as a phalanx of friends, and a band of 
brothers. 

The Hibernia Fire Company, No. 1 — With a Tempest at it.s head that produces no 
storms, on the Page of its records you will find that SiERLiNfi merit, that in time of 
pecuniary distress they can fall back on their Holmes for relief. 

Hibernia Fire Company — First in existence — first to celebrate their one hundredth 
anniversar}- — first in the hearts of all the fire companies of Philadelphia. 

By the President of the Schuylkill Hose Company : The old Hibernia Eiujine Company — 
May it never want water while the Schuylkill runs. 

From the United States Hose Company — The •' Hibernia Fire Company" like its badge, 
with the eye of an eagle to see the Hames, the sound of the brakes like the music of the 
Harp to the ears of the distressed. 

By Thomas Nelms : The Hibernia Fire Company — A hundred years ago its great object 
was to render " material aid" in time of danger, as it is our object still. And a hundred 
years to come, we trust it will still be engaged in the same good cause, standing as " No. 1." 

By J. H. Lex, President Philadelphia Hose Company — The Hibernia Engine Company: 

Here's a health to this old Company, 

In age now reckoning a century. 

Being in our city, Engine number one. 

Enrich'd with actions proudly done — 

Rendered cheerfully, but paid 

Not by lucre, but be it said. 

In honor, praise, and worthy fame. 

A gift more grateful to Ilibernia's name. 

By Thoma.s Kiernan : Our venerable President — May he who rules the storm direct tin- 
"Temi'KSt" in his every action, and inalu' his futuiv Hie as hapi)y as liis past one has been 
useful. 

Our Badge: The Eagle and the Harj) — The harp sliows IVoiii whence we derive our 
name — the eagle, what we are. 

By B. F. Keenan, of the Carroll lIo.se Company : To the Hibernia Fire Engine Company. 
No. 1 — May she last till the Stars and Stripes shall float over the world. 



^ " "To utiit the •offering and protect tho weak.' 



i 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




16 

By the Prci^ident of the Reliance Fire Company : Hibernia, No. 1— May she always 
as Humane, and by the Assistance of Good Will, may she cherish that Friendship and 
Harmony that will reach from the Delaware to Schuylkill, and from Kensington to South- 
wark, and thence to the United States of America. 

By C. K. Bicldng, President of Humane Hose Company : The Old Hihernia and her 
cherished number— Long has she borne it, with credit to herself, and honor to the Fire 
Department. Well has she won her No. 1. 

The Hibernia Fire Company, No. 1— Although One Hundred Years old, their laurels are 
still green. Should their rights be invaded, let them call for Assistance, and their cry shall 
not be in vain. 

By Thomas Kiernan: The Active il/em&ers— Amid the fury of the flames, and the crash 
of falling walls, may they never falter, nor the fire of their zeal be quenched save by the best 
of spirit —the only true fire-icater. 

By the President of the Niagara Hose Company : The Hibernia Fire Company— }>lAy it 
continue to be as active and efficient as it has ever been, and may the second centenary 
find them A No. 1. 

By the Phoenix Hose Company : The Centennial Anniversary of the Hihernia — A century 
of usefulness, crowned by a century of honor. May her years and honors thus be piled by 
centuries into a pyramid more lofty and lasting than those of Egypt. 

By Dr. Bournonville : The Hibernia Fire Engine Company, No. 1 — The pride of the Fire 
Department — the boast of Philadelphia — an honor to humanity. Health and prosperity to 
its members, and hundreds of centennial anniversaries to their company. 

By James Fleming, President of the Good Will Hose Company : The Hibernia Engine 
Company — The acknowledged Pioneer of the Fire Department of Philadelphia. May her 
praiseworthy acts never be obliterated, but remain Green in the memory of our citizens, and 
may she ever be recompensed with a hearty Good Will from those whom she has benefitted. 
By W. C. W. — May no Tempest ever blow away a Page of the records of this night. 
By George W. Haas, President of the Neptune Hose Company : The Philadelphia Fire- 
man — In Peace, our city's shield ; in War, our country's bulwark. 

Gaul's Original Philadelphia Brass Band, No. 1 — Without their eloijuent music to-night, 
we should have felt there was something wanting. May they always continue as they are 
at present, A No. 1. 

By George D. Haswell : The Firemen of Philadelphia — They showed in the ti-ar of 
Mexico, at Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, La Hoya, Puebla, Huamautla, Chcpultepec, and the 
Gates of Mexico, that they are equal to all kinds of fire. 




; the suffering and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



On that occasion, the following 
reat enthusiasm : 



17 

song, composed by the presiding ofTieer, w; 





' Our social hearts witli ardor burn — " 
To greet this hour, our thoughts now turn. 
An hundred years have rolled away 
Since old Hibemia's natal day. 

The noble men who gave her birth. 
Have long since left their mother earth ; 
Their deeds remain for us to love — 
Their bright examples to improve. 

The " Firemen," a glorious name — 
They climb the roof, they dare the flame, 
'Tis for humanity they Ry, 
And rescuing others, bravely die. 

To them, indeed, all praise is due ; 
Such generous hearts, so kind and true : 
Nor midnight drear nor winter cold 
Can stay the work of men so bold. 

Conspicuous in this worthy band. 
Thy sons, Hibernia, take their stand ; 
A long career of ser\-ice, too. 
Has honor gained for them and 3-ou. 

And here on this centennial night, 
With hearts sincere and spirits light. 
We pledge the cup, the hand extend 
To every Fireman, as a friend. 

Long life to each, and health to all. 
May we respond to duty's call ; 
Still nobly daring, quench tlio ihiuw — 
The public good our only aim. 

Fill up the glass and raise it high, 
Then drain it to the bottom dry : 
Kepeat the toast ; again, again, 
Health to the gallant Firemen. 



ist the suifering and protect Ibo 







THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 





18 

At various times, controversies have taken place as to the question of rank lietween the 
Hiberuia and the Hand in Hand Fire Company; the hitter chiiniing to he the ancient 
organization of the same name which originated as far back as 1741. The question was 
settled in 1832, by a Committee of the Firemen's Convention, in favor of the Iliberni i m 
1850, by the Fire Association, again in fiivor of the Hibernia; and a third time with i liki 
result in February, 1858, by the Board of Directors of the Fire Department, so tint ^lu | 
now stands as the senior company of that department, and is justly entitled to i ink is 
No. 1. 



SOME ACCOUNT OF THE ORIGINAL MEMBERS. 

HuGU DiiNNALDSO.v. — Of this gentleman we have no positive facts, except that lie i\ is tiic 
father of John Donnaldson, also a member. 

Randle Mitchell. — A very respectable gentleman, brother to John Mitchell, of a\ horn 
more will be said. Both brothers were natives of Ireland. 

Walter Shee. — A relative of Gen. John Shee, taken prisoner after the battle of I ong 
Island. 

Abraham Usher. — With all the efforts we have made, we could discover little concernnig 
this gentleman, who was a member from its foundation in 1752, and Treasurer of the 
company from 1738 to 1771. We infer that he was a dry goods merchant or else a gcncril 
dealer, for in the accounts of the Overseers of the Poor, for 1759, we find that " R. and Ab 
Usher" are charged with cash paid for " G pr. of cotton bromalls," received from them 
What " bromalls" may be, unless it be an error from " overalls," it is difficult for us fo saj 

Plunkett Fleeson. — An upholsterer by trade, an Irishman by birth, and altogtthci i 
very queer fellow. Some of his advertisements are to be found in the papers of that dn, 
and show him to be the founder of the present style of attracting attention to vended a\ lies 
In Watson's Annals, an extract is given from a presentation made by a grand jury in 1750 
which says that "the pavement in Chestnut street, near Flecson's shop, (corner of 1 oiiith 
and Chestnut street,) is exceedingly dangerous, occasioneil by the arch being fallen down 
and no care taken to replace it." 

From some of the minutes of the coiiqiaiiy kept Iiy him while clerk, his moveuKuts at 
the meetings, his queer advertisements of his upliolstx-ny, and some queer stori( s told 
concerning his oddities, we should infer that Fleeson was the wag, pre-eminently, xmon.^ 
the original members. He bore, however, an exceedingly fair reputation. 

W.M. West. — He was tlie father of Francis West, afterwards a member, and the ^i md 
father of Captain AVest, of the Steamer Atlantic, and Dr. Francis West, of this cit\ Ik 



\ 






: the snffering and protect the weak.' 



M 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY 




was a dry goods merchant, afterwards Quarter-master 
Irishman by birth. 

B. Fuller. — This was a celebrated ship-broker of his time, and an excecdin.uly eccentric 
man, in some particulars. The following letter from him is preserved among the minutes: — 

'• Col Thomas L Moore, President of the Hibernia Fire Company- — or said Company at the 

City Tavern, Philadelphia. 

" D' Sir, I am so much indisposed, that I have not been from my house for upwards of 
two weeks w"*" puts it out of my power to attend the Fire Institution, therefore have to 
request you will be so obliging as to acquaint the Company met that the year before last I 
was under the necessity of having my baskets new painted, or otherwise loose them in case 
of Fire they being greatly defaced, this cost me 25s and the bill was lodged with the 
Company when Mr Hill presided or was Clerk — there was not then met a sufficient number 
of members to do business, therefore an order could not issue. Since then — Say when the 
great Fire happened in Water street — I lost two buckets w'" I never have been able to 
recover. I beg you will obtain an order for my replacing the Two lost buckets, with direc- 
tions to the Treasurer to pay the Cost, as also the 25s paid for painting. I shall thank you 
for your answer, and am respectfully, 

" D' Sir your most obed' hhble Serv'' 

" Col Thos L Moore. B. FULLER. 

"Phil»4 Jany— 1797." 

He was no admirer of the medical faculty, as the following anecdote told in Hood's 
Sketch of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, abundantly proves ; — 

" At one time, while lying dangerously ill, in his snug little bed, in his bachelor chamber, 
over his counting house, a consultation of physicians was held in his room. The doctors 
conversed together in an audible voice, and just as they had concluded him past recovery, 
and that nothing farther could be done in his case, to their great astonishment, he drew 
aside the curtains, and exclaimed in his usual energetic manner, 'Gentlemen, I am greatly 
obliged to you ! — I feel much better since you entered the room ! — You may go away now, 
gentlemen, I shall not want your services any longer.' While the physicians looked at each 
other in amazement, he rang the bell, and addressing the servant, desired him to 'show the 
gentlemen down stairs.' They assured the servant his master wa.s delirious, and presuming 
there was no hope of recovery, were proceeding to give directions that he might be indulged 
in anything he should desire to have, when Mr. F. cut them short by calling out ' John, 
John, turn them out, and fasten the doors after thera; — I'll take no more of their infernal 
drugs.' On the return of the servant, he had all the bottles and medicines thrown out of , 




the laffering and protect tho wonk.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



20 f''' 

the -vviiidow, and the crisi.s of the disease having passed, he from that moment rapidly 
recovered. He lived for many years afterwards, and when his friends joked with him on 
his treatment of the doctors, he would reply, ' The scoundrels wanted to kill me with their 
cursed stuffs, but I lived to attend both their funerals.' " 

He was an Irishman. He was Treasurer of the company from ITCj to 17CS, and his 
accounts are exceedingly neatly kept. 

George Bryan. — He was a very respectable citizen, an Irishman, we believe. Among 
other items concerning him, we discover that in 1758, he was fined £b for refusing to serve 
as constable, in conjunction with four others, who were each mulcted in the same penalty. 
As he was a man of wealth, he was probably elected to the office by way of a joke; just as 
his neighbors once elected an e.K-president, overseer of the roads, and were quite astonished 
when he called them out to mend the highways, in the middle of the harvest — which they 
•were obliged to do under a heavy penalty. 

James Mease. — An Irishman, a wealthy merchant, and one of the originators of the 
celebrated First Troop of Philadelphia Cavalry, in which he served with gallantry during 
the Revolution. 

Blair M'Clenaciian. — A very prominent man in his day. He was one of the First 
Troop, in which he served. He aided Eobert Morris in his financial efforts in behalf of the 
American cause. His name appears with that of Morris, at the head of a subscription list 
to supply the army with provisions. M'Clenaciian subscribed and paid, for' that purpose, 
£10,000. He ruined himself pecuniarily in his zeal for the country. He was a warm 
politician of the Democratic school, and some queer anecdotes are told of him by friends 
and foes. He opposed Jay's Treaty very warmly, and when asked what should be done 

with it, as it was already ratified, answered, in his usual impetuous way — "Kick it to , 

sir." The Federalists immediately issued a caricature representing Blair playing football 
with the treaty, which under the vigorous application of his toe, was just about descending 
into the lower regions. Watson, in his Annals, tells the following incident, occurring 
during the excitement of 1794, consequent on the French Revolution : — 

" I remember several boyish processions ; and on one occasion the girls, dressed in white 
and in French tri-colored ribbons, formed a procession too. There w.as a great liberty 
pole, with a red cap at top, erected at Adet's or Fauchet's house, (now Girard's square, up 
High street,) and there I, and one hundred others, taking hold of hands and forming a ring 
around the same, made triumphant leapings, singing the national airs. There was a band 
of music to lead the airs. I remember that among the grave and elderly men, wlio gave 
the impulse and prompted the revellings, was a burly, gouty old gentleman, Blair 
M'Clenaciian, Esq., (fumed in the democratic ranks of that day.) and with him and the 



the safforing and protect the weak." *-^— 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




21 

white misses at our head, we marched down the middle of the dusty street, and when 
arrived opposite to Mr. Hammond's, the British minister's house, (High street, above 
eighth, Hunter's house, I beheve,) there were several signs of disrespect manifested to his 
house." 

He was an Irishman, and the father-in-law of General Walter Stewart, afterwards a 
member. His remains lie in St. Paul's Church-yard, in this city. Thos. Penn Gaskill, of 
this city, married his grand-daughter. 

Jno. Mitchell. — An Irishman, a member of the First City Troop, a merchant, was after- 
wards U. S. Consul, at St. Jago de Cuba, and then Admiralty Surveyor of the Port of 
Philadelphia. 

Geo. Fcllertox. — An Irishman, a member of the First City Troop. At a review near 
Trenton, in 1776, he received a wound by the accidental discharge of his pistol, from the 
effects of which he died. 

Geo. Campbell. — An Irishman, a lawyer, and one of the originators of the First City 
Troop, in which he served until the close of the Revolution. He was afterwards elected to 
the legislature, and was for seventeen years, Register of Wills in Philadelphia. On occasion 
of his resignation in 1801, he sent the following letter, which is preserved in the archives of 
the company : — 

" To the Members of the Iliberuia Fire Company : 

"Gentlemen: — Having had the Honor of a Scat in your Society for upwards of thirty- 
five j-ears, and having introduced a Substitute that I hope will be an active member as well 
as a useful one, I take the Liberty of sending you my Resignation. 

" Wishing you Happiness & long Life, I am with Esteem, 

•'• Your very humble serv' 
" Reserving a Liberty of spending a sociable GEO CAMPBELL 

Evening when it may not interfere with S*" Feb" 1807. 

the Business of the Company." 

The substitute alluded to was his son, George Campbell, Jr. Tlie coiniiany pa.ssed a 
resolution giving him all the privileges of membership, and exenipthig liim from all fines 
and dues; thus, in fact, constituting him an honorary member. 

Mr. Campbell was the President of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick, and Chairman at 
the dinner given to General Washington, on occasion of adopting him into the society. At 
that famous dinner, Washington, Generals Lincoln, Steuben, Howe, Moultrie, Knox, Hand 
and M'Intosh, Counts Dillon and Do la Touche, Messieurs Rendon, Marbois, Otto and 
Halker, and the French and Spani-sh Ministers were present. Of the thirty-five gentlemen 



'To assist the suiforing and protect the wuak.' 







THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



who gave the dinner, twenty -five were members of the Ilibeniia I 
Presidents of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick from 1771 to 1708, wer 
the Hibernia. So were all its Treasurers. 

Sharp Delant. — An Irishman and a druggist. He was afterwards a member of the 
legislature, an honorary member of the Society of the Cincinnati, and Collector of the Port 
of Philadelphia, under the administration of General Washington. He enjoyed the respect 
and confidence of all the leading men of his day. 

The following note, addressed "To Capt. Allison," is preserved among the archives of the 
company : — 

'SS. Delany's compliments to M' Alison- — not having it in his power to attend the Fire C° 
this evening — begs M' Alison would lay Tho' Morris's Ace' before the C° — & take the 

necessary steps to have him paid for moving the Engine house, &c it has been delayed 

now above two months. 

"Monday Evening C" Nov' 1775." 

John Barclay. — An Irishman and an importing merchant. He was a member of the 
; First City Troop, for many years President of the Bank of Pennsylvania, and Mayor of 
i Philadelphia from 1791 to 1793 or 4. During his administration, the yellow fever raged 
fearfully in the city, and most of the wealthier inhabitants fled. Mayor Barclay remained 
I .steadfast at his post, and pursued his usual avocations unconcernedly. His daughter 
I married Clement Biddle, of this city. 

\ John Barry. — We find him on the roll, in 1785. He was the celebrated Irish naval 

I officer, the first Commodore in the American navy. He served from the commencement to 
I the close of the Kevolution, with great distinction, and contributed greatly to the success of 
the struggle. The British Government, through General Howe, offered him 15,000 guineas 
j and the command of a British frigate, to come over to their side ; but Barry spurned the 
1 bribe with disdain. He died in this city, 1803, at the age of fifty-eight years. 
I John Boyle — An Irishman also, a linen-draper, and a member of the First City Troop. 

Richard Bache. — An Englishman, who emigrated to this country when a boy. He 
espoused the part of the colonies during the revolutionary struggle, and became the Chair- 
man of the Republican Society in this city, at the breaking out of the contest. He was the 
son-in-law of Benjamin Franklin, whom he succeeded as Post Master General of the United 
States, which office he held during the war. His grandson, Alexander Dallas Bache, is well 
known in the scientific world. We think Dr. Franklin Bache, one of the authors of the 
U. S. Dispensatory, and Professor of Chemistry in the Jefferson Medical College, is also a 
grandson. The late Vice-President of the United States, and present Minister to tlio 




'To assist the suffering and protect the weak." 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




23 

Court of St. James, George M. Dallas, is connected with tlie family. Mr. Bache died on 
the 2!)th of Juh', ISll, in Berks county, Pennsylvania, aged seventy-four. 

John Browx. — An Irishman and a merchant. He was Secretary of the Board of War 
during the Revolution. He was highly esteemed by the prominent men of his time. 

Nicholas Biddle. — A celebrated financier, famous from his connection with the United 
States Bank, and a gentleman of great literary acquirements. He died a few years since. 
His political life is well known. 

James Caldwell. — A merchant, and a member of the First City Troop. He died soon 
after the termination of the Revolution. 

Samuel Caldwell. — An Irishman, a merchant, and one of the founders of the First City 
Troop. He was a partner of James Mease, one of the original members of the company. 
He was the first Clerk of the United States District Court, at Philadelphia, which ollice he 
held until he died in 1794, when he was succeeded by his son. 

Wm. Constable. — He was a partner of Robert Morris, in New York, to which city he 
removed, and where most of his descendants reside. 

David II. Coxyngham. — An Irishman, a merchant, and member of the First City Troop. 
He died but a few years since. He was a blood-connection of Commodore Conyiigham, of 
Ireland, and was the father of Nesbitt Coiiyngham, of Lancaster, and Judge Conyngham, of 
Wilkesbarre. 

James Crawford. — An Irishman, a merchant, and a member of the First City Troop. 
He traded to the West Indies, after the Revolution, became a partner of John Donnaldson, 
as an insurance broker, and finally lost his fortune, through the plunder of Lord Rodney, at 
St. Eustatius. 

John Donnaldson. — An Irishman, a merchant, and a member of the First City Troop. 
He was the son of Hugh Donnaldson, an original member, and the father of John Donnald- 
son, Jr., one of the first engineers, who still survives, and is one of our most rc-^pected 
citizens. 

Thomas Fitzsimmons. — An Irishman, a merchant, and commander of a volunteer company 
actively engaged during the Revolution. After the war, he was for some time a member of 
the State Legislature, and became a distinguished member of Congress. He was one of the 
firm of George Meade & Co., and one of the Convention for framing the Constitution of the 
United States. He held the ofSce of Director in the Bank of North America Ibr many 
years, and was President of the Insurance Company of North America at the time of his 
death. He was highly respected, as he well deserved to be. lldnd. in his Sketches, very 
justly calls him one of the most efficient and able of those men who laid the foundations of 




; the aaffaring and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




34 

commercial and financial systems of the United States. '• He, and Mr. Goodhue, of 
Salem," says Mr. Hood, " though they spoke but seldom and briefly, -were always looked to 
in Congress for facts and the correction of errors in practical questions of commerce, 
exchange, &c., and the operation of legislative measures thereto." He was the counsellor 
and adviser of Jefferson, Hamilton, Franklin and Morris, in all the great financial and 
commercial questions of the time. 

Tench Francis. — The father of this gentleman was the Attorney General of the 
Province of Pennsylvania, and a relative of the celebrated Sir Philip Francis, the great 
opponent of Warren Hastings, and by many supposed to be the author of the letters of 
Junius. Tench was a long time the agent of the Penn family, in this country, and was 
elected Cashier of the Bank of North America, at its organization, which office he held until 
his death, now nearly thirty years since. Among his descendants are Senator Francis, of 
Rhode Island, and Charles Francis, Mrs. Joshua Fisher and Mrs. George Harrison, of this 
city. 

Henrv Hill. — A merchant, M-hose jmncipal trade was with Madeira, from which he 
imported a deal of celebrated wine. A noted hon vivant of this city, recently spoke to us 
most feelingly of the excellence of " Hill's Madeira." He became a member of the legisla- 
ture. He died, without issue, in 179S, of the yellow fever. 

Charles Heatlt. — An Irishman and a lawyer. He had been a wealthy barrister at 
homo, but having been tot) prominent a republican, was obliged to fly or risk a State prose- 
cution. He was for man}- years a distinguished member of the bar in this city. Of him is 
told the story, that, on one occasion having been annoyed by an opposing lawyer, who was 
remarkable for a wonderfully thin pair of legs, he meditated a good-humored revenge. He 
obtained the longest and thinnest pair of eels to be found in the market, had the skins 
taken off and neatly put together, by a tailor, and then sent them to the object of his fun, 
in a sealed envelope. The old lawyer opened the present in court, to the great amusement 
of his surrounding friends, which was heightened still more when the accompanying note 
from Ileatly was read. The eel-skins had been sent as " an exact pattern for a pair of 
breeches." 

George Hughes. — An Irishman, a merchant, and a member of the First City Troop. 
He was the first Cashier of the Bank of Pennsylvania, and held the ofiBce until the time of 
his death. 

George Henry. — An Irishman and a merchant. He was an exceedingly active whig of 
the Revolution. 

George H. Holmes.— He is the present Treasurer of the company, and formerly Secre- 




list tho suffering and protect the i 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




He is a lapidary, and a higlily respectable and worthy gentleman, as well a? a most 
efficient member. He has been in his present office for the last nine years. 

Joseph K. Ingersoll. — A noted lawyer of Philadelphia, brother of Charles Jared 
Ingersoll ; a member of a very distinguished family, and for many years the representative 
of the City of Philadelphia in Congress. He declined to serve, a few years since, and was 
succeeded by Joseph R. Chandler, at present Minister at Naples. He was subsequently 
appointed Minister to the Court of St. James. 

Fraxcis Johnston. — This gentleman, who was born at New London Cross Roads, in 
Chester County, served during the whole of the Revolution with great distinction, and rose 
to the rank of Colonel. He was a famous wit in his day, and his waggish exploits, as the 
Secretary of the celebrated Fishing Club, whose droll declaration was said to be from his pen, 
are well known to old Philadelphians. He was afterwards Sheriff of Philadelphia, and was 
one of the Commissioners who made the Indian treaty at Fort Stanwix, in 1784. 

Tnos. Lea. — An Irishman and a merchant. He was the son-in-law of Chief Justice 
Shippcn. 

John Leajit. — An Irishman and a merchant. He lived until about fifteen years since. 
He was for a long time the President of the Marine Insurance Company, of Philadelphia. 

John Mease. — An Irishman, a merchant, and one of the originators of the First City 
Troop. He was the father of Dr. James Mease, an eminent physician of this city, and a 
grandfather of Captain John Butler, who for many years, in modern days, commanded the 
City Troop, and who died in Mexico. Mr. Mease was an active member of the Troop 
during the Revolution, and was with that portion of it, consisting of twenty-four men, that 
crossed the Delaware with General Washington the night previous to the Battle of Trenton. 
When it was necessary to deceive the enemy by lighting false fires along the line of the 
encampment, while the Americans marched to the attack at Princeton, Mr. Mease, with 
four others, were detailed for the duty. He served till the close of the war, and lost much 
of his property through the enemy. For thirty years before his death, which hapi)ened so 
late as 1820, he was one of the admiralty surveyors of the Port of Philadelphia. He was 
familiarly known as "the la.st of the cocked hats," from the Aict that he continued to the 
last to wear the old three-cornered hat of the Revolution. 

Robert Morris. — An Englishman, a merchant, the distingvuslied linancicr, and a signer 
of the Declaration of Independence. During the year 17S1, tlie most critical period of the 
Revolution, he took charge of the national finances, and it is not too much to say, that, 
without his powerful aid, the struggle would have either been i'M:\\ or jirotracted for many 
years. His devotion to the cause of the country laid the foundation nl' liis ruin, which was 
completed by profuse hospitality, and he died, much imiroverished, in 180G. lie w 
father of Henry Morris, a few years since Sheriff of the County of Philadelphiii. 



; the sutToring and protect tho woak," *— — 







THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

26 

A Relic. — A gontk-mau of this State, who is the fortunate possessor of the following 
interesting relic of Robert Morris, the great fniancier of the Revolution, has allowed us to 
copy and publish it : 

" Messrs. Henry Banks, David Allison and Robert Morris, present their compliments to 
John Nicholson, Esq., and request the favor of his company to dine with them at the Hotel 
with Grated Doors, in Pruen street, at one o'clock, on Sunday next, pledging themselves 
most solemnly that to him the doors will be open for admission and departure on that day. 

"Friday Morning, 11th May, 1798. 

" Dear Sir : I have written the above not only with the consent, but at the request of the 
Parties, and it is done after consulting Mr. HofTner, who solemnly assures us that nothing 
can operate as a detainer but a Bail-piece, and I think you have no such thing to fear; or if 
there is any Special Bail for you, it is John Baker, on whom you can safely rely. Come, 
therefore, my Friend, as early in the Forenoon as you can, that we may have some conver- 
sation before as well as after dinner. We will show you how we live here, that you may Ije 
prepared to bear your Fate, should it be decided that you are to become a boarder at this 
Hotel. " I am your Frd. and Servt., 

" May 11th, 1798. " ROBT. MORRIS. 

"Jno. NicnoLSOX, Esq." 

Samuel Mekeditu. — A gentleman of large fortune, a particular friend of General 
Washington, by whom he was appointed Treasurer of the United States. He fought 
bravely as a Colonel of Militia during the Revolution. He died about twenty-eight years 
since, in Luzerne County. 

Thos. L. Moore. — The son of Governor Moore, of the Province of Pennsyhania, and a 
Colonel in the army. Thos. M. Willing of this city is a grandson. 

Jasper Moylan. — An Irishman, a lawyer, and a member of the First City Troop. 
Robert Walsh, the writer, late Consul at Paris, is his son-in-law. He was the lirotlier of 
General Moylan. 

Stephen Moylan. — An Irishman, and a Brigadier General in the Revolutionary army. 
One of his brothers was the Catholic Bishop of Cork, Ireland. After the war, he was 
Prothonotary of the Court, in Chester County. He died in this city, and his monument 
may yet be seen in the burial ground of St. Mary's Church. 

John M. Neshitt. — An Irishman, a merchant, and a member of the Fir.st City Troop. 
He was one of the most eminent merchants of his day, and risked everything in the cause 
of American freedom and independence. In Hazard's Register it is mentioned that, — 

" So great was the distress of the American army in 1780, that General Washington was 
apprehensive that they would not be able to keep the field. The army, however, was 




'To uaiat the anfforing and protect the weak." 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. />^&'^:^^^^?XS 




37 

by a combination of providential circumstances; Gen. Wasbington baving -written to 
Ricbard Peters, Esq., giving bim full information of tbe state of tbe army, tbat gentleman 
immediately called on J. M. Nesbitt, Esq., and explained to bim tbe distresses of tbe army, 
and tbe wisbes of tbe General. Mr. Nesbitt replied, tbat a Mr. Howe, of Trenton, bad 
offered to put up pork for bim, if be could be paid in bard money. He contracted witb 
Howe to put up all tbe pork and beef be could possibly oljtain, for wbicb be sbould be paid 
in gold." 

Mr. Howe fulfdled bis contract, and wa.s paid according to promise ; in addition to wbicb, 
a valuable prize, laden witb provisions, wbicb bad just arrived, was put at tlie control of 
Wasbington. Tbe provisions were sent in time, and tbe army saved. During all tbis 
period, Mr. Nesbitt acted as tbe faitbful coadjutor of Robert Jlorris, and upbeld bim in bis 
efforts for tbe country, witb botb money and credit. 

Alexander Nesbitt. — An Irisbman, we believe, a dry goods mercbant, and a memljer of 
tbe First City Troop. 

Francis Nichols. — Colonel in tbe Revolutionary army, tbe fkst Marsbal of tbe District 
of Pennsylvania, appointed by Wasbington, and afterwards a member of Congress. He died 
at Norristown, in tbis State, not many years since. 

Jno. Nixon. — A mercbant of Pbiladelpbia, born in Westcbester, and a Colonel in tbe 
army during tbe war. He was at tbe battle of Long Island, and at Valley Forge. He first 
read tbe Declaration of Independence from tbe central window of tbe State House, to tbe 
people assembled in tbe square beneatb. His country seat was destroyed by tbe Britisb. 
He was tbe first President of tbe Bank of Nortli America, and died in office. At tbe 
procession after tbe establisbment of the Constitution, he carried tbe national flag. lie died 
in tbe early part of 1809. We find the following letter from bim among the minutes : — 

'• Mr Lulu- W. Morris. 

"Wednesday, Fcl/ 1" 1797. 

" Sir : — I would have attended tlie Fire Corap>" tbis Evening witb pleasure, was I not pre- 
vented by a particular Circumstance, I must therefore request you to inform the Gentlemen, 
that I have reported to tbe General Clerks, tbat two of my buckets wore lost at tbe Fire of 
tbe Dutch Church and in Water Street; tbe otiier at D'^ Andrew's house. On wbicb 
Occasion one of my servants sercbed diligently two days witbinit Ell'ict. 

" The Rules of tbe Fire Comp'' in an other place. 

"Tbe List of tbe Members is lost, but shall be replaced iniinediately. If the ('onipaiiy 
will direct me to provide New Bucketts, with an order on the Treasurer for Payment, I will 
have them provided. " I am with great Respect 

" Your most b Ser' 

'•.lOll.X MXON 





"To MBiat tbe •offoring and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



Michael M. O'Bbiex. — An Irislniian, a merchant, and afterwards Consul to Algiers. He 
died in France, about the year 180-1. 

James Page. — A lawyer, afterwards Postmaster of the city, under Jackson, Counts- 
Treasurer, and then Collector of the Port under Polk. He joined Engineers 22d May, 
1817; was elected a member of the company 7th February, 1821 — its President 27th April, 
1821 ; again, 29th April, 1842, resigning in March, 1844, and is now President of the 
company, having been elected to that office in April, 1857. He is very much esteemed for 
his intellect and social qualities. 

Robert Rainy. — An Irislnnan and a merchant, and a very respectable and esteemed 
gentleman. 

Hugh Siiiell. — An Irishman and a physician. He was drowned in crossing a river in 
Kentucky. 

Walter Stewart. — An Irishman and a soldier. He came to this country when a boy, 
entered the army, and was appointed a Colonel at twenty-one, to the great annoyance of 
rival aspirants, who nick-named him " the boy Colonel." But his ability in service proved 
tlie appointment to have been a good one, and he soon rose to the rank of General of 
Brigade. 

Enoch Story. — All that we can find concerning him, is a presentation of a Grand Jury. 
prior to the Revolution, which speaks of his well, in Third street, as a nuisance on account 
of its insufficient covering. 

Robert Tempe-st. — A Philadelphian, a jeweller, for some years President of the company, 
which he entered as one of the original engineers in 1814. He had previously belonged to 
the " Sun Engine Company," and attracted the attention of members of the Hibernia, by 
the activity and energy he displayed at a fire. He is well known and highly respected. 

John West. — Francis West. — These two gentlemen were brothers, and sons of William 
West, one of the original members. Francis West was the father of the present Dr. Francis 
West, of this city, and Captain West, commanding the Atlantic, one of the Collins' line of 
steamships. He died in 1843. 

Such is a brief sketch of the Hibernia Fire Engine Company, and its prominent spirits, 
for a period of more than one hundred years. It has had the fortune to have among its 
members, signers of the Declaration of Independence, ministers, members of Congress, State 
and national officers, revolutionary chieftains, financiers, merchants, physicians, mechanics, 
philosophers, and, in one instance, a clergyman, tlie Rev. Mr. Sturgeon. It has been 
enabled to do a great deal of good to the public, and will perhaps liourish foi anothci 
century yet, witli unimpaired vigor. '^v'Z 




.<r^ 



; the suffering aad protect the weak,' 



Ill' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

29 
THE STEA.M EI^ai]^^E. 




Ill consequence of the introduction of steam power for the extinguishment of fires, the 
attention of the members of the Hibernia Fire ComjKiny was early drawn to the subject, 
and at a special meeting held at the engine house on the evening of the 20th January, lt58, 
Robert Tempest, Francis H. Finney, R. Sterling Wilson, Michael Keevan, Henry A. Cook, 
John R. Downing and Anthony Morin, were appointed a committee for the purpose of 
devising a plan lor the procurement of a first class steam fire engine, and were invested with 
full power to make the necessary arrangements for carrying it into effect. They selected a 
Board of Trustees, whose duties were to raise by subscription the sum necessary to purchase 
or build such an engine, which was to be passed over by them to the company, for the 
public benefit. The Board consisted of John Thomley, President, Jacob Bennett, George 
Griscom, John Eisenbrey, jr.. Dr. David Jayne. William Woodside, and Caleb S. Wright, 
members, prominent citizens of Philadelphia. These gentlemen so earnestly attended to 
their trust, that as early as July, 1858, they had obtained subscriptions to such an amount 
as justified thein in entering into a contract with Messrs. Reaney, Neafie & Co., the cele- 
brated engineers, which they did on the 27th of that month. By the terms agreed on, the 
steam fire engine was to be of the following dimensions: the steam cylinder Hi inches bore, 
]4 inches stroke; pump 6i inches bore, 14 inches stroke; 178 copper tubes in the boiler; 
weight of engine, 7,775 lbs. with wood and water, with tender, two sections of suction hose, 
three twelve-feet sections of forcing hose, three branch pipes, eight nozzles of proper sizes, 
with spanners furnished, and all proper apparatus for working, together with hand and 
horse tongue and running-gear for the same, and the price $4,500, toward which, the 
builders contributed the sum of $175. 

In June, 1858, the necessary arrangements were also made for the enlargement of the 
engine house, and a contract for that purpose was entered into with Mr. William R. Green, 
bricklayer, on the 2.3d day of August, 1858. This improvement cost upwards of two thou- 
sand dollars, a part of which was subscribed by a few private citizens. 

The contributions to the steam engine amounted to the handsome sum of $4,000, a liberal 
proportion of which was subscribed by the following Insurance Companies, to wit: The 
Philadelphia Contributionship, Franklin Fire, Pennsylvania, Delaware Mutual, and North 
America, each $200; the Mutual Assurance, $150; the Commonwealth, Girard Fire and 
Marine, Quaker City, Royal, America and Reliance Mutual, $100 each; Philadelphia Fire 
and Life, Liverpool and London, and Equitable Mutual, $50 cacii; Howard Fire and 
Marine, $25, and the balance by private citizens. 




"To assist the suffering and protect tho ^ 





The steam engine was finished and handed over to the Trustees for trial in November 
1858, when by permission of tlie builders, she was taken to New York, Brooklyn, Boston, 
Charlestown and Newark, by the members of the Hibernia, and finally delivered to them 
and housed, on the 30th December, 1858. 

In the following pages will be found an account of the excursion, which was one of the 
most pleasant, exciting and successful tours ever undertaken by a similar organization. 

Previous to starting, the whole body was divided into seven companies, and officered as 
follows: JOHN THORNLEY and JACOB BENNETT, Esqs., Trustees; Chief Marshal, 
Col. JAMES PAGE; Special Aid — James M. Colgan; Assistant Marslials — Henry A. 
Cook, John R. Downing, John T. Doyle, George Megee, William A. Thorp, William A. 
Delaney, and Thomas Dillon ; Pay-Master — Erhard Paul ; Engineers — Joseph L. Parry 
and George W. Hollow ay ; Guides — Casper M. Berry, Francis Fox, James A. Sawyer, 
John Delany, James R. Nightingale, Alexander W. Grant, and Edward Gowan. 

The members selected to assist the Engineers in working the Engine when in service 
were, James L. Upton, Francis Fox, Joseph Barton, William F. Flemming, Michael 
Keevan, Thomas M'Donough, William M'Keegan, James A. Sawyer and Brian Feeley. 

Thomas D. Smith, John Haviland and Jacob Loudenslager, Esquires, and Col. Tlioma.s 
Fitzgerald were also attached to the Excursion. 




at the suffering and protect the weak." 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

31 

The Philadelphia (Beck's) Band, No. 1, consisting of seventeen performers, accompanied 
the excursionists, and were fully uniformed and equipped. The members were — 




GEORGE S. DOUGLASS.. ..l8t E Cornet. ANTHONY BECK 1st Alto. 

J. G. STEVENSON BECK. ..2d •' WM. G. STEVENSON 2d " 

HENRY GEBHART 3d •• A. KORND0EFFER(Vicerre3.), lstTen< 

HENRY BECK (Leader) 1st B - MARCUS F. ALEDO 2d ' 

JACOB H. BECK 2d " ERNEST SIEM Baritone. 

JAMES M. BECK (Secretary) Solo Alto. FREDERICK WIESENBORN, E Basso. 



J. WM. BECK Contra Basso. 

GODFREY W. BENDER. ..Fife & Cymbals. 
. BENJ. G. S. WILKS (rres'i)...Side Drum. 

AUGUSTUS ELMORE 

JACOB BECK Bass Drum. 



NAMES OF THE EXCURSIONISTS. 



AHERN, JOHN P. 
ANDRESS, ISAAC T. 
BARSLEY, .JAMKS 
BARTON, JOHN S. 
BARTON, JOSEPH 
BERRY, RICHARD M. 
BICKING, C. R. 
BRECHEMIN, CHAS. 
CAMPBELL, WILLIAM 
CARLIN, DANIEL J. 
CONWAY, CHARLES 
DALY, JOHN A. 
DAVIS, HENRY 
DE HAVEN, JACOB 
DIAMOND, JOHN 
DICKSON, WILLIAM 
DOLAN, EDWARD 
DOUGHERTY, WM. W. 
DUNCAN, CHARLES 
EARP, GEORGE 
FEELEY, BRIAN 



FENNER, JOHN R. 
FINNEY, FRANCIS H. 
FISCHER, LOUIS 
FLEMING, WM. F. 
FRANCLS, LOUIS 
FRAZIER, CHARLES 
GALLAGHER, PETER 
GILTNAN, DAVID 
HAMILTON, JERH 
HAMMILL, JAMES 
HARDING, J. MORRIS 
HARLAND, HENRY 
HOLLOWAY, GEO. W. 
HONE, PATRICK 
JONES, JOHN H. 
KEEVAN, MICHAEL 
KELCU, JOHN 
KOPP, FREDERICK 
LEDDY, JAMES M. 
LIND, BERNARD 
LONG, WILLIAM 



Attenda.nts— CHAS. S. HAILSTOCK, 



MALONEY, JOHN 
MARMEIN, HENRY 
MEAD, JOHN, Jr. 
MOAN, DENNIS 
MOONEY, JOHN 
MORAN, JOHN 
MURRAY, HENRY 
M'CALL, JOHN A. 
MCLAIN, DAVID 
MDONOUGH, JAMES 
M'DONOUGB, PAT'K 
M'DONOUGH, THOS. 
MFADDEN, JOHN P. 
M'GINNIS, GEORGE 
M'GRATH, WM. V. 
MGOVERN, JOHN 
M'GOWAN, DENNIS 
M'lLWAIN, JOHN K. 
M'KEEGAN, WILLIAM 
M'LAUGHLIN, JOS. 
NAGLE, DAVID A. 
T. EVANS, WILLIAM 



NAPIElt, GEORGE A. 
NEAL, JOSEPH B. 
NELMS, THOMAS 
O'BRIEN, EDWARD 
PARRY, JOSEPH L. 
PARSONS, FRANCIS 
PLUMLEY, GEORGE W. 
REESE, MARTIN 
RAINER, BENJAMIN 
ROACH, JOHN 
RUNNER, J. 
SAGE, THEODORE 
SIMPSON, ROBERT 
SLAVIN, THOMAS 
UPTON, JAMES L. 
WARD, THOMAS 
WINSLCtW, R015ERT 
WOOD, CHARLES 
WOODSIDE, ROBERT 
ZANE, SAMUEl, 

WALLACE. 




The parade all told, amounted to 127 men, and moved with military accuracy under tl 
direction and command of the Chief Marshal and his Assistants. 

- -r"" 

"To uiist the tufftring and protect the weak." ^ 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




32 

THE DEPARTURE FROM PHILAOELPKIA* 

The principal exciting event of the week, among tlio firemen, M-as the departure of the 
Hiberuia Engine Company on their long-talked-of trip to New York and Boston. The 
Company started yesterday, and a finer day could not have been gotten up for the occai^ion. 
The weather was sufficiently cool to render the red flannel shirts and heavy drab overcoats 
of the men comfortable, while a bright sun shone from a clear sky. Early in the day it 
must have been manifest to all who journeyed along Third Street, towards Spruce, that 
something unusual was in progress ; for the friends of the Company were gathering in force, 
and every few minutes, thoroughly equipped men came upon the ground, and wended their 
way towards the engine-house in York Court. 

By ten o'clock one hundred gallant fellows wore in line, every man dressed neatly 
enough for a drawing-room, and substantially enough to do service during an all-night fire 
at mid-winter. The dress worn consisted of black pants, red shirts, drab coats, white 
gloves, and the regular green hats and capes of the Company. The members also wore 
belts bearing the name and date of the organization of the Company upon a silver plate in 
front, with a fatigue cap suspended from the side. The Marshal's aids carried massive silver 
fire-horns. At 11 o'clock. Col. James Page, Chief Marshal of the Company, ordered the line 
to " dress" to receive a beautiful American flag, which was to be presented to the Company 
by the ladies of the Fifth Ward. The flag was brought upon the ground by the Trustees of 
the Company, headed by Col. John Tiiornley, and accompanied by Beck's band. The cere- 
mony of presentation took place in York Street. The flag having been unfurled. Col. Thorn- 
ley, as the organ of the fair donors, presented it to the Company with the following 
remarks : 

"Mr. President: — I have been requested by the ladies of the Fifth Ward to present to 
the Hiberuia Fire Engine Company a flag as a token of respect and esteem. And, sir, it 
gives me great pleasure in having the honor, although the task might have been in better 
hands ; yet I take great pleasure in representing them on this occasion, seeing that they 
take such a great interest in the new mode of extinguishing fires, by the introducing of 
steam fire-engines in place of the old-fashioned ones, although they have been of great 
service; but, like all other improvements, they give way. And, sir, it gives me great 
pleasure to see that not only a few of our fire companies .are about to introduce steam, but 
the whole fire department. And, sir, I am happy to be one of the first in helping to make 
the change. I will not trouble you with a long speech at present, as I know there is not 
much time this morning. I therefore ask, iu the name of the ladies of the Fifth Ward, that 
you accept this flag, and when you have finished your excursion, you may return safe to your 
native city, with credit to yourselves and honor to the donors, the ladies of the Fifth Ward 



. the suffering and protect the weak. 






-4SH.Wf.IB, Pri 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

33 

Col. Page received the flag on behalf of the company, and i-e?ponded as follows: — 
Mr. Thornlet : — I receive, sir, with emotions of pride and feelings of gratitude, this 
appropriate present. The thought is a happy one, and its execution is equal to the 
conception, and the day of its presentation most opportune. There is not a man attached 
to this company, who does not feel and know, that the equipments which he wears 
cover not only his own character, but the character of the company to which he belongs, 
the noble Fire Department of which he is a part, and the State of which he is a citizen. 
Noting these things, it devolves upon each and all of us to do and act like men. And if 
the considerations which I have stated are not sufficient to keep men within due bounds, I 
shall ask them to look upon this flag ; and if this be not a talisman to keep them right, I 
know not what I can offer them. I accept this gift of the ladies of the Fifth Ward, and 
you may say to them that the Hibernia Fire Compan}- will keep, honor and glor}- in it, and 
if need be, rally to it when called upon to act, whether again.st a domestic traitor or a 
foreign foe, and bear it aloft in the thickest of the fight. 

The ceremony of presentation having been concluded, at the suggestion of Col. Page, 
nine cheers and a " tiger" were given for the flag and its donors, and the standard having 
been placed in the care of a veteran of the Mexican war, the line of march was taken up in 
the foUo^ving order : — 

A DOUBLE PLATOON OF THE RESERVE CORPS OF POLICE IN THEIR 
NEW UNIFORMS, COMMANDED BY LIEUT. HENDERSON. 

BECK'S BAND. 

CHIEF MARSHAL PAGE. 

THE MEMBERS OF THE COMPANY. 

THE STEAM ENGINE AND TENDER, DRAWN BY FOUR FINE BL.\CK HORSES WITH 
WHITE PLUMES UPON THEIR HEADS. 

There were thirty men of the Fifth Ward Police upon duty, besides the Reserve Corps, 
and their services were needed, for the crowd was immense. 

When passing the State House, on the route to Market street wharf, where the company 
embarked, they were reviewed from the steps of the Mayor's Office, at the corner of Fifth 
and Chestnut streets, by Mayor Henry. An open space was kept clear in front of the 
steps, by a double line of Lieutenants of Police thrown out by Chief Ruggles. As tl: 
procession passed, the members of the company saluted the Mayor, and the coiiipliineiit was 
returned by his Honor. 



, the Bufforing and protect the we 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




34 

The company left Camden, N. J., at 2 o'clock, amid the jshouts of nearly the entire popu- 
lation of that city, and the same enthusiasm was manifested at all the towns along the 
route to Amboy. On the arrival of the company at Amboy, they were met by a delegation 
from New York, composed of James L. Miller, President of the Old Guard; Robert 
McGinness, Chairman of the Committee of Americus Engine Company, and Messrs. William 
H. King, M. D. Greene, George Mountjoy, J. L. Holdridge and Thos. Lawrence, Committee 
of Exempt Firemen. The Hibernians were welcomed in neat speeches by Messrs. Miller 
and McGinness, both of whom alluded in an eloquent manner, to the determination of the 
New York firemen to receive their guests in a manner never before surpassed in New York. 
Col. Page, the President of the Hibernia Company, replied to both addresses, in a manner 
which drew forth the applause of all assembled on the deck of the steamer. 

The invitation of the Old Guard, which was promptly accepted, was as follows : 

New York, Novr 20rt, 1858. 
CoL. James Page, 

Grand Marshal of Hibernia Engine Companj-, No. 1, of Philadelphia:— 

Dear Sir, — The Old Guard of the New York Fire Department, having been apprised of 
your intended visit to our city, desire as far as lays in their power, to assist in making your 
time pass agreeably. 

Through the politeness of Americus Engine Company, No. 6 (who have conceded to our 
wish), we extend to you and your company, an invitation to meet us at the St. Nicholas 
Hotel, to partake of a banquet, on Tuesday evening, Nov'r 23d, 1858, at 8J o'clock. • 

JAMES L. MILLER, President. 

CHARLES L. CURTIS, Secretary. 




"To assist the sufforiiig aud protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY 



?v-^^^ 



35 



GRAXD TORCH-LIGHT PROCESSION OF THE MW YORK FmEMEN 




THE RECEPTION OF HIBERNIA ENGINE CO., NO. U OF PHILADELPHIA. 



Y'-< ■): 



On Saturday night the New York Firemen joined in an imposing demonstration on the 
occasion of the reception of Hibernia Engine Company, No. 1, of Phihadelphia. The parade 
was second only to the grand pageant of the Cable celebration, which, however, excelled it 
merely in point of numbers. At an early hour the streets were crowded by the fire 
companies, as with bands of music they marched to their different rendezvous; and the 
sidewalks on the line of the proposed march were thronged with people, who stood for hours 
to secure good locations from which to view the procession. The show amply rewarded 
their patience, for the parade was one of the most enthusiastic affairs that the department 

ever engaged in. The Hibernia Company 
■were the special guests of Americus Engine 
Company, No. G, a committee of whom went 
down and met the visitors at Perth Amboy. 
The boat reached the pier about half-past 7 
P. M., and after she was moored, the Phila- 
delphians landed on the wharf. They were 
divided into seven sections, with a marshal 
and guide over each section, and the whole 
under the marshalship of Col. Page. On 
landing, they were received by Chief Engi- 
neer H. H. Howard, the Board of Assistant 
Engineers, Supervisor W. M. Tweed, the Pre- 
sident of the Committee of Arrangements, 
and several of the Fire Wardens. After the 
usual cheers and tigers had been given with 
genuine fireman gusto, the Philadelphians 
were addressed by Chief Engineer Howard, 
who said : — 
(lEXTi.KME.v, members of Hibernia Engine Company; brother liremon of Philadelphia — 
Hy an invitation (which 1 consider a very flattering compliment) of Americus Engine 
Company, No. 0, whose guests you are, and representing the New York Fire Department, I 



: the Buiforing and protect the weak.' 






,^^, 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



36 



^ y fireet you, and bid you welcome to our city. We have anxiously waited your arrival, and 
(^ are prepared to receive you as you deserve to be received by the firemen of this metropolis. 
I am not here to pay homage to your mammoth steam fire engine, nor can I disparage or 
defame it. My duty is to assure you all that while you honor us with your presence, every 
exertion will be made by New York firemen to malvc your visit an agreeable and a 
happy one. 

Col. Page, on behalf of the Hibernia, returned thanks in a few appropriate remarks. 
The company then rested while the line Avas being formed, and became immediately the 
centre of attraction to a large concourse of people. A great many natives of the " ould 
sod" were among the crowd, and on their countenances a shade of disappointment seemed to 
linger, the solution of which may be found in the following remark uttered by a by-stander : 
" Why, they are not Irish after all." At half-past 8 o'clock the line was formed, and the 
procession commenced to move about a quarter to 9, in the following order : 

FIRST IDI'VISIOISr. 

PLATOON OF POLICEMEN UNDER SERGEANT TRAFORD. 
I ASSISTANT ENGINEER PETER N. CORNWELL, MARSHAL. 

BAND. 
\ YOUNG AMERICUS GUARD, THIRTY MEMBERS, (WITH FIELD PIECE) UNDER 

'■ COMMAND OF CAPT. JOHN McGEE. 

; MINIATURE BELL TOWER, 

1 Twenty-one feet in height, standing on a large spring cart, and drawn by four horses. In 
! the interior of the tower was a large bell, which was rung at intervals by Messrs. Morgan 

and Vaughn. The tower was illuminated with torches, and fireworks were discharged 
from it at intervals. It was quite a prominent feature in the parade. 
AMERICUS BASE BALL CLUB. 

JAMES McCONNELL, Thesident. 

The members of this Club were on a wagon drawn by four horses. In the centre of the 

wagon was a mammoth American flag, on each side of which were arranged the members, 

to the number of thirty, in Base Ball Club costume, which afforded a very pleasing 

contrast to the red shirts of the firemen. This feature of tin 

nd elicited repeated cheers. 

SHELTON'S BAND. 
Open Barouche, drawn by four gray horses, containing lleur\ 



parade was well got up. 




II. How: 



:;<D^ 



rd, Chief Engi- 






tho suffering and protect the weak.' 








siifi § 







*^E) l/f^lV^" ■' f ^ -^ M JAMES M. COLGAN. ^^l| | '.U: jf] 




v-.'v;, ,">\>r^> 1 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



37 

ncor of the New York Fire Department, D. T. Milliken, President New York Fire Depart- 
ment, Philip "W. Engs, Chairman of Board of Exempt Firemen. 
BOARD OF FIRE COMMISSIONERS. 
BOARD OF FIRE WARDENS. 
ASSISTANT ENGINEER JACOBS, AS GRAND MARSHAL. 
ASSISTANT ENGINEERS BAULCH AND DECKER, AS SPECIAL AIDS. 
AMERICUS ENGINE COMPANY, No. 6. 

SUPERVISOR TWEED, Maksiial, W. B. DUNLEY, Foeema.v. 

This company paraded with one hundred men on the ropes; the engine was the Large appa- 
ratus belonging to the company; its side panels were elaborately painted, and it was 
decorated with lamps on all sides. It was drawn by four noble horses belonging to 
Adams' Express Company (string team). The admirable tact with which the horses were 
managed, excited general commendation along the entire line of march. Indeed, we 
have known men who might profit by the intelligence exhibited by these horses. 
BECK'S PHILADELPHIA BAND. 

Henry Beck, leader; the band numbered seventeen pieces, and the men were dressed in 

white overcoats, from which hung their fatigue caps, black pants, and regulation caps. 

THE TRUSTEES OF THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA. 

HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1, OF PHILADELPHIA. 

This is the oldest Fire Company in this country — probably in the world — having been insti- 
tuted February 20, 1752. There were 100 men under the following officers: Col. James 
Page, Chief Marshal (who joined the company A. D. 1817) ; Henry A. Cook, Jolni R. 
Downing, John T. Doyle, George Magee, William A. Thorp, W. Delaney, and Thomas 
Dillon, Assistants ; Erhard Paul, Pay-Master ; Casper M. Berry, Frank Fox, James A. 
Sawyer, John Delaney, James R. Nightingale, Alex. W. Grant, Edward Gowan, Guides of 
Sections ; and James M. Colgan, Chief Marshal's Aid. 

The men were all dressed in white overcoats, from which hung fatigue caps, 
pants, and a black oilskin cape, bearing in the centre the inscription — 



L-d shirts, black 



n I B E mr I -A-. 




running around the rim — the initials F. A. meaning Fire Association. In the centre of 
the cape was an eagle on a harp, the device of the company. A finer set of men than 
this company, probably never paraded; and tlieir deportment while mareliing, evinced 
great and careful discipline. 



To utist the tuiTering and protect tlio weak.' 






THE HIBEKNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



38 

THE IIIBERNIA STEAM FIRE ENGINE, 
Drawn by the eight premium horses of the American Express Company, and driven by Z. 
M. Hewitt, Esq. On the apparatus, which is one of the largest of its kind, were the 
Engineers, Messrs. Parry and Holloway. As the Philadelphians passed up from the boat 
to the head of the procession, the other companies were drawn up in line, and received 
the visitors with cheers, ringing of bells, firing of Roman candles, the men standing- 
uncovered. After the Piiiladelphians, came 

WARREN HOSE COMPANY, No. -3.3. 

A. YEOMAN, Foreman. 

This company paraded witii tliirty men on the ropes. The carriage was decorated with 
tlowers, flags and lamps, on all sides. 




SBCOnSTD IDI-VISI03Sr. 

ENGINEER KINGSLAND, Marshal. 

CHIEF AND ASSISTANT ENGINEERS OF THE BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT (E. D.) 

BROOKLYN AND WILLIAMSBURGH COMPANIES. 

ZEPHYR BAND. 

ZEPHYR ASSOCIATION OF EXEMPT FIREMEN, 

Numbering fifty men, in citizen's dress, each man carrying a lantern in his hand. 

ZEPHYR HOSE COMPANY, No. 4. 

T. 11. BROWNI.SG, FiiHEMvN 

This company paraded with forty-five men on the ropes, each man carrying a lamp with his 
initials stamped on it. The carriage was decorated with lamps on all sides. Across the 
reel was hung a small arch of flowers. This company was very much admired for their 
neat appearance. 

WILLIAMSBURGH BAND. 
NORTHERN LIBERTIES ENGINE COMPANY, No. 5. 

T HADDEN, F.ibemax. 

I 

With .seventy men on the rope.'^. 1 

MARION HOSE COMPANY, No. 1. 

W. LAWRENCE, FoBEMAS. W, 

Tliis company paraded with forty men on the ropes. kl 



■To assist the suffering and protect the weak." 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




39 

NATIONAL BRASS BAND. 

EAGLE ENGINE COMPANY, No. C. 

p. HENKY, FuncMAN. 

This company presented a very beautiful appearance. The macliine \va.s elegantly painted 
and decorated, and hung around with lamps on all sides. There were about sixty men on 
the ropes. 

MEYER'S BRASS BAND. 
CONTINENTAL BUCKET COMPANY, No. 1. 

WILLIAM JONES, Foeemas. 

This company paraded in blue shirts, and with their uniipie apparatus, looked very neat. 
TURL'S BAND. 
VALLEY FORGE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 11. 

CIIAIJLES ELLIOTT, Foreman. 

This was the Greenpoint Company-. They paraded with about forty men, and looked very 
well. 



ENGINEER W. T. MAWBEY, Marshal. 
THE CHIEF AND ASSISTANT ENGINEERS OF THE BROOKLYN FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

(W. D.) 

ROHENS BAND. 

EAGLE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 4. 

ADAM HOFFMAN, Foreman. 

This engine was decorated with lamps and lanterns, and looked very well. Sixty men 
paraded on the ropes. 

LAFAYETTE HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 1. 

J. MONTEOSS, FoEBMAN. 

This truck was drawn by eighty men on the ropes, and looked very well. 
STUARTS BAND. 
NIAGARA ENGINE COMPANY, No. 8. 

J. HENDKICKSON, Foeemas. 

With sixty men on the rope.s, and lamps on the engine. There was also a large signal lamp 
with the number of the company, on the engine. 

MANAHAN'S BAND. 
CRYSTAL HOSE COMP.\NY, No. 4. 

G. L. Il.VlGllT, FojiKMAs. 

ith thirty firemen on the ropes. 



"To UiUt the suffering and protoct tho weak.' 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




40 

ALERT HOSE COMPANY, No. 3. 

J. B. .St. JOn.V, Foreman. 

With forty men on the ropes. 

SIXTH REGIMENT BAND. 
MOUNT PROSPECT ENGINE COMPANY, No. 16. 

JOHN ACKER, Foreman. 

With eighty men on the ropes. This company looked very well, and were repeatedly 
cheered. 

NAVY YARD BAND. 

EMPIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 19. 

C. WOLFE, Foreman. 

With seventy men on the roj^es. The apparatus was decorated with lamps on all sides, and 
presented a creditable appearance. 



foxjiith: r)ivisi03sr. 

ENGINEER WEST, Marshal. 

SEVENTY-FIRST REGIMENT DRUM CORPS. 

PROTECTION ENGINE COMPANY, No. 5. 

W C. LYOXS, Foreman. 

With eighty men on the ropes. The engine was decorated with lamps, and looked very 
neat. 

EXCELSIOR ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2. 

D. W. KNEVELS, Foreman. 

With sixty men on the ropes. This machine was repeatedly cheered for her pretty and 
clean appearance. 

NEW YORK HOSE COMPANY, No. 5. 

F. W. RAYMOND, Foreman. 

With twenty-five men on the ropes. On the top of the carriage was a splendid gilt eagle, of 
large size, with out-stretched wings. On each side of the bird was a large American Hag 
of silk, besides which, a number of lanterns bung from every possible point of the 
carriage, and made a very admirable display. 



'To assist the suffering and protect the weak." 









~f. 






^^BRAJ^ J.SH.VE.ID. rr(n(,r 




^. ,^^^^^ , THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

^; 41 

EAGLE HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 4. 

T. WILDING, Foreman. 

Tliis company panideil with eighty men. On top of the truclv wais a life-boat, with oars 
&c. ; in the boat were seated three small boys. From all sides of the truck lanterns were 
suspended, and the truck was loudly cheered as it passed. 

WANNEMACKEN'S BAND. 
MOHAWK ENGINE COMPANY, No. 16. 

T. ROE, FonEMAN. 

This company paraded with ninety men on the ropes. On the top of the engine was a large 
Calcium light, which shed a broad glare a considerable distance before the procession itself 
could be seen. 

LIBERTY HOSE COMPANY, No. 10. 

G. ItlCKERT, FoKEMAN. 

With forty men on the ropes. On the top of the carriage wa.s a large flag, which, with a 
variety of lamps, completed the decorations. 

JACKSON HOSE COMPANY, No. 1-3. 

A. IRVING, Foreman. 

This company paraded with thirty-five men. On the top of the carriage wa.s a large 
American Hag. 



FIFTH IDI-VISIO]Sr. 

ENGINEER WENMAN, Maksual. 

RUBEHL'S BAND. 

FRANKLIN HOSE COMPANY, No. 18. 

E. J. CONNELLY, Foreman. 

Fifty men on the ropes. 

UNION BAND. 
UNION HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 5. 

GEORGE REILEY, Foreman. 

With eighty men on the ropes. 

TOMPKINS HOSE COMPANY, No. 10. 

.lAMES WIIELAN, Fubeman. 

AVith forty men on the ropes. 



To aesist the sufforing and protect tho weak. 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



42 

WHITWORTH'S BAND. 

FULTON ENGINE COMPANY, No. 21. 

J. McCULLOUGH, Fokeman. 

With eighty men on the ro])es, and a large silk flag on the top of the engine, 

HUMANE HOSE COMPANY, No. 20. 
J. TIMPSON, Fciheman. 

With forty men on the ropes. 




sixixii iDi-visionsr. 

ENGINEER G. JOSEPH RUCH, Marshal. 

WALLACES BAND. 

WASHINGTON HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 9. 

JOHN n. FORM.\N, Fokkman. 

With forty-five men on the ropes. On top of the truck was a beautiful arch of flowers, and 
the carriage was hung around with a variety of variegated colored lanterns. 

JACKSON ENGINE COMPANY, No 24. 
W. M. MITCHELL, Fokeman. 

With eighty men on the ropes. On top of the engine was a large Drunimond light, whicli 
showed off to good effect. 

HUDSON HOSE COMPANY, No. 21. 

WILLIAM CALLAN, Fokeman. 

With forty men on the ropes, and the carriage decorated M'ith flags and lamps. 
WASHINGTON BRASS BAND 
CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, No, 25. 

W. LAMB, Foreman. 

With eighty-five men on the ropes. On the top of this engine was a life-boat, manned by a 
crew of four boys. 

PUTNAM HOSE COMPANY, No, 31. 
J. H. GREKR, Fobeman. 

Witli forty-two men on the ropes. 



'To assist tho suffoiiug and piotect the weak,' 





^->^,'i^# , 

<:,- -' 



THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY 



43 

SE-VEISTTH 3DI-VISI03Sr. 

ENGINEER JOHN BRICE, Marshal. 

ROBERTSON'S BAND. 

GUARDIAN ENGINE COMPANY, No. 29. 

E. BATES, Foreman. 

With eighty men on the ropes. 

LAFAYETTE HOSE COMPANY, No. 34. 
J. IRVING, Foreman. 

With forty men on the ropes. 

McCONNELL'S BAND. 

BLACK JOKE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 33. 

P. MASTEKSTON, Foreman. 

With eighty-six men on the ropes. 

LAFAYETTE HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 6. 
J. K. KELLOCH, Foreman. 

This company paraded with ninety men on the ropes. From end to end of the truck 
hung a line of colored lamps, which had a very pleasing effect. 
ADKIN'S BAND. 
EMPIRE HOSE COMPANY, No. 40. 
W. EVANS, Foreman. 

This company paraded with forty men, and, instead of lanterns, the carriage was 
round on all sides with bright metal lamps, containing camphine. 

PETERSON LIGHT GUARD, WITH FIELD-PIECE. 
SAMUEL JACKSON, Captain. 

NEWARK BRASS BAND. 

ADRIATIC ENGINE COMPANY, No. 31. 

W. HOTTOX, Foreman. 

With eighty men on tlie ropes. 



'i^^.^y^ 




hunsj 



ASSISTANT ENGINEER D. DONOVAN, Maksii.- 
DODWORTirS FIRST BAND. 
EMPIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 42. 
R. P. MOORE, Foreman. 



With eighty 



the ropi 



With forty men on tlie ropes. 




NASSAU HOSE COMPANY, No. 50. 
T. UOWXING, Foreman. 



'To assist the suifering and protect tho i 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



44 



METROPOLITAN HOSE COMPANY, No. 39. 
B. GORMLEV, Foreman. 

With forty-two men on the ropes. 

LIVE OAK VOLUNTEERS, WITH FIELD-PIECE. 
CHARLES MILLER, Captain. 

MANAHAN'S BAND. 

LIVE OAK ENGINE COMPANY, No. 44. 

J. L. HAWKINS, FoEEMAN. 

With eighty-five men on the ropes. 

ALERT HOSE COMPANY, No. 41. 
w. McLaughlin, foreman. 
With forty-six men on the ropes. 

DODWORTH'S SECOND BAND. 
HARRY HOWARD HOSE COMPANY, No. 55. 

S. SINGEBLAND, Foreman. 

With seventy-five men on the ropes. 




ASSISTANT ENGINEER WILLIAM HACKETT, Marshal. 

WHITWORTH'S BAND. 

HARRY HOWARD HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 11. 

CHARLES L. KENT, Foreman. 

With ninety men on the ropes. 

MECHANIC'S HOSE COMPANY, No. 47. 

C. RICE, Foreman. 

With thirty-five men on the ropes. 

LADY WASHINGTON HOSE COMPANY, No. 49. 
J. L. SMITH, Foreman. 

With forty men on the rojx's, and their new carriage, which looked remarkably well. 

CASTLES BAND. 

MAZEPPA ENGINE COMPANY, No. 48. 

J. FOLEV, Foreman. 

With eighty-five men on the ropes. 

FRANKLIN ENGINE COMPANY, No. 39. 
BERNARD M. SWEENY, Foreman. 

With seventy-five men on the ropes. 

POLICE. 

\:%^ 

' -^ "To assist the suffering and protect the weak." 




■Wf'^^^. 



'%- 



\\* 



W \ 



r 



1%,. 



, ' i .J liliiiiilTlir-'l '"• !»■■' 



I iwffmFrwil 



I 

jJiiiiiJI 






r^^^A^ 



^feiiSSiSfeli^^ ti^iiiiii'i:; 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



45 



THE MARCH-SCENES-INCIDENTS. 




As soon as the word to march had been given, a salute was fired b\ the Peterson Light 
Guard, and the procession started amid a blaze of fireworks, the music of the bands, and the 
cheers and huzzas of the multitude, who, in dense masses, crowded the sidewalks, the roads, 
the house-tops, the awning-posts and the trees ; and more than one adventurous urchin was 
seen climbing to lamp-posts. As the procession passed up Broadway, the cheering was 
immense — there was scarcely a male voice that did not give its note of welcome to the 
Philadelphians. The ladies, who were out in great numbers, as they could not very well 
shout with propriety, made up for the restriction by an energetic waving of handkerchiefs. 
Three cheers were given at Crooks', No. 100 Broadway, which was illuminated from top to 
bottom. When the Hibernias reached Barnum's, a display of fireworks was made by the 
engine companies located in that neighborhood. On reaching the Park, two of the horses 
attached to the wagon containing the Americus Base Ball Club, became restive, and fearing 
that they might impede the progress of the procession, the club turned the horses out and 
chartered a stage, with which they joined the parade. As the Hibernias entered the Park, 
a salute was fired by the Live Oak Volunteers, after which the procession passed in review 
before the Presidents of the Boards of Aldermen and Common Council. 

As the guests marched out of the Park, three cheers were given for Gooderson, whose 
building was illuminated from basement to attic. Going through Chatham street, the fire- 
men were greeted with enthusiasm, the windows being filled with the fair ladies who reside 
in that quarter of the city, and who extended a hearty welcome to the Philadelphians. At 
101 Chatham street, the enthusiasm was carried so far that a young lady, fearing a pocket 
handkerchief would not be seen, waived a small petticoat from the window, for which 
exploit she was greeted with cheers by the gallant red shirts who saw the dimity. From 
Benjamin's Hotel, a banner was suspended with the words "Welcome Hibernia," upon it. 
At the corner of Baxter and Chatham streets, a lot of fireworks were displayed by Mr. 
Palmer. The procession continued from Chatham street up Bowery to New Canal, at the 
corner of which, a large American flag was hung, with the inscription, "Engine 31, 
Welcome Hibernia." , Through Canal to Centre, and through Centre to Leonard, the 
procession was everywhere greeted with cheers. On turning into Leonard street, the 
firemen passed through a lane of waiving handkerchiefs, and on coming to the corner of 
Elm, they entered a lane of illuminated colored lanterns, which were strung on each side of 



the suffering and protect the weak.' 





N-JS. /? 



THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



|\V >' the street. The ('hicf Engineer's residence is located on this block, and presented a 
'•i magnificent appearance. From the house on the opposite side to this place, a banner was 
hung, on which was the inscription : — 




WEIiCOME. 



Over the banner an arch had been erected, from which hung garlands and illuminated 
colored lanterns. On the outside of the house was the statue of a fireman in full costume, 
mounted on a wooden pyramid some ten feet in height. Over this fireman was a golden 
eagle, with the words Harry Howard suspended from its beak. Over the eagle was 
displayed the old banner of the Fire Department. 

The exterior of the house was completely hidden by festoons of flowers. As the firemen 
passed, a disj^lay of fireworks was made. The procession then passed up Broadway, thence 
through Spring to Sullivan street ; at the corner of which, a pyramid of illuminated colored 
lanterns was suspended. On turning into Sullivan street, the scene was like that related in 
some of the old fairy tales, for as far as the eye could reach, nothing but illuminated 
lanterns suspended from all points, met the sight. The private dwellings were also illumi- 
nated. On this block is situated the house of Warren Hose Company, No. 3.3, outside of 
which a triumphal arch had been erected, on which, in jets of colored flame, were the 
words : — 



-WT E L C O 3VI E , 



On each side of the arch wore huge pyramids of colored illuminated lanterns, and on the 
top of tlie arch was a miniature globe some ten feet in circumference. This display by 
Warren Hose Company, was an acknowledgment of the handsome treatment they received 
lately in Philadelphia. At the corner of Prince and Sullivan streets another pyramid of 
colored lanterns was erected. 

The march was continued through Sullivan, Houston, and Hudson streets, to the corner 
cjf Barrow, at which point the Adriatic Saloon is situated. This building was illuminated 
throughout. On turning the corner, Barrow street presented the scene of an eastern 
bazaar, being lined on both sides with colored lanterns illuminated. The houses on the two 
blocks between Hudson and Bleecker streets, including the house of Hose Company 




"To assist the suffering and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




47 

were all lighted up. The lane of lanterns was two blocks in length, and must have taken 
at least seven hundred candles. From here, the procession marched through Bleecker 
street and Broadway, to Union Square, where a salute was fired by the Adriatic Club. 
Thence through the Bowery to Grand street, at the corner of which street and Ludlow. 
Manhattan Engine No. 8 turned out and received their brethren with a display of fireworks. 
From thence the march was down Grand and Henry streets, to the house of Americus 
Engine Company, No. 6, outside of which a magnificent arch was erected, covered with 
evergreens, and surmounted by a Temple of Liberty ten feet high. As the Philadelphians 
passed under the arch, a shower of colored balls was set off; then a revolving wheel was 
fired, after which, on the arch appeared the words in letters of variegated fire, '• Welcome 
Ilibernias." 

A display of fireworks was also given by the neighbors, who had their dwellings 
illuminated, one of the neighbors named having presented the company with a check for 
$100. At this point the parade was dismissed, the companies passing the Hibernia, the 
Chief Ensjineer and No. 6, bare-headed. 



A COLLATION. 

After the companies had left, the member.s of No. C with their guests, marched to 
Thalian Hall, in Grand street, where a collation was spread. Mr. Tweed, in behalf of 
No. 6, welcomed the Hibernia, and hoped that when they took their departure, it would be 
with a feeling that they had been treated as well as they deserved. 

Col. Page responded by saying he was not going to bore them with a long speech, and at 
tliat time he would only return thanks on behalf of himself and the company. The party 
then attacked the viands with appetites which were sharpened by a four hours march, and 
after the good things had been disposed of, the Philadelphians marched to their hotel, the 
Brandreth House, where they retired, delighted with their entertainment and their enter- 
tainers. 



THE PHtLAOELPHtANS AT TRINITV CHURCH. 

On Sunday tiie Philadelphia firemen attended morning .-iervice at Trinity Ciiurch. The 
Ilibernias appeared in their firemen's uniform, and occupied scats in the centre aisle. At 
the close of the services, they marched through the vestry rooms and paid their respects to 




"To usiit th« •offering and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




48 

officiating clergymen, Rev. Dr. Haight and Rev. Morgan Dix. Mr. Dix preached an 
excellent sermon from the text : — 

"And I saw another angel fly in the midst of heaven, having the everlasting Gospel to 
preach unto them that dwell on the earth, and to every nation and kindred, and tongue and 
people." — Revelations xiv., C. 

The everlasting Gospel, he said, was such, because it was an expression of the will of the 
everlasting God. In the will of God there was no change, for His wisdom was perfect, and 
from His wisdom resulted His will. The Gospel, which existed before the creation, could 
not be altered, and the terms of the Almighty were eternally the same. How should the 
Gospel be presented to those who were without it ? What were they doing ? They were 
struggling against a purpose coming down from eternity. They were throwing away their 
power, and, in view of their own inevitable doom, their existence was one of spiritual 
solicitude and lowliness. They were beings cut off from all holy purposes. The Gospel 
taught that there was a God, a Heaven, and a Judgment ; and both mercy in Christ Jesus 
and Eternal doom. 

Rev. Dr. Haight pronounced the Benediction. 



RANDALL'S ISLAND, ^C. 

In accordance with previous invitation and announcement, the Hibornia Engine Company, 
No. 1, accompanied by a large delegation of the members of Americus Engine Company, 
No. C, visitod yesterday, the noble institutions, which on Randall's and Blackwell's Islands 
attest the importance and liberality of New York. The morning was most auspicious, and 
as the sun dispelled the mists, and cast its golden tints on earth and sky, it brightened the 
rows of stately buildings and the hundreds of graceful vessels, which made up so 
magnificent a panorama, as the steamer and excursionists passed down North and up East 
river. At a few minutes before 9 o'clock, A. M., about forty members of No. 6 arrived at 
the Brandreth House, and from thence escorted the Philadelphians to the foot of Spring 
street, N. R., where the whole party embarked on board the steamer C. P. Smith. Beck's 
Philadelphia Band performed patriotic airs as the vessel passed down the bay in sight of 
Governor's Island, and the beautiful shores of Jersey. The Philadelphians numbered about 
one hundred and twenty men, hearty, burly, good humored, whole-souled fellows, among 
whom we noted Mr. W. V. McGrath, City Treasurer of Philadelphia; George Megee, late 
Shcrifi" of the same place; John Fenner, a Coroner; James Leddy, City Commissioner; the 
Hon. David McLean, a member of the Pennsylvania Legislature ; Casper M. Berry, Captai 




'To assist the suffering and protect the weak.' 




W3 m. 



X 



w 'mm-w^^^i^ 



^<^'^^X'^^^^^^''^^^ 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




49 

of the Minute Men, a noted Philadelphia company ; and many other men of position and 
acknowledged ability. To make the time pass more pleasantly, a crowd collected near the 
bow of the boat, and members of No. 6, and Messrs. Delaney, Nightingale, and other Hiber- 
nia boys, sang songs or told comic stories, while others admired and lauded the magnificent 
scene, and the abundant evidence of the greatness of New York. William M. Tweed, Esq., 
accompanied the party to Eighty-sixth street, and then returned to his duties as one of the 
County Canvassers at the City Hall. A motion to visit Staten Island, or as it was 
denominated, Sepoy Island, was negatived; as also was a proposition to visit the Navy 
Yard ; but the steamer passed close by the Navy Yard dock, and was greeted with three 
cheers by the crew of the North Carolina, to which they responded by three and a tiger. 
At Governeur and other streets, a number of other members of No. 6, and of the Hibernia 
Company, No. 1, got on board the steamer, which steamed slowly by Wallabout, and up 
East river to Randall's Island. When they came in sight of this place, a row of three 
hundred and sixty boys, ranging from nine to fourteen years of age, was seen drawn up 
along the shore. As the boat approached the shore, the boys who constituted the Randall's 
Island Light Guard, cheered loud and long, and the Hibernia boys responded. The party 
landed, and being escorted by the Randall's Island Light Guards, marched to the boys' 
play ground, where the Guards, under the direction of Warden Tappen and the efficient 
Rufus Ripley, performed a great number of very fine manoeuvres. Governor Moloney, who 
on behalf of the Ten Governors, welcomed the guests of the city, made a neat speech of 
welcome, and intoduced Col. Page to a bright little fellow named Stansbury, who then came 
forward and made a brief but very happy address of welcome. Col. Page, who was deeply 
affected, responded, and in a feeling manner referred to his boyhood struggles, the guidance 
of his mother, and the gratitude that should be felt for the care exercised in their behalf. 
Tlie strangers were then taken to all the different departments, and saw altogether some 
twelve hundred children, who sang for them, practised gymnastics for them, and cheered for 
them. Col. Page addressed the little giris in a touching farewell address, which brought 
tears to the eyes of all who heard him. The Philadelphians were delighted with our 
institutions, which were on a scale and conducted in a manner more grand and admirable 
than they had previously any idea of. They were profuse in their eulogies on the 
institutions in which the children, though very generally inheriting scrofulous constitutions, 
were healthy, and where extreme cleanliness, order, neatness, and kindly interest supplied 
the place of parental care — where the children were well trained, but it was evident not so 
from slavish fear. Before leaving, one little fellow went on board the steamer among the 
visitors, cap in hand, bidding good bye, and returned with it almost full of halves and 
quarters, as a parting gift for himself and comrades. As the boat pushed off, the little 
fellows lined the shore, and gave cheer upon cheer, which was heartily responded to. No 



■ To siiiit the lufforiag and protect the weak.' 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




50 

wonder the New Yorkers were proud of our institutions and of the h-iudations expressed by 
the visitors. Mr. Moloney, to whose constant care much of the excellence of the manage- 
ment of the homes on Randall's Island is attributable, took the strangers through all the 
buildings, and then accompanied them to the boat, where the last scene was nine cheers and 
a tiger given by the Randall's Island Light Guards for the Hibernia Engine Company, and 
'a similar response by the party on the steamer. On reaching the Work-house dock, the 
party landed, and walking to the Lunatic Asylum, where the excellent Dr. Ranney and his 
corps of assistants have six hundred and fifty-six demented persons under their care. A 
brief walk through the main building, and the performance by the band of several pretty 
pieces for the pleasure of the insane, were the only features of this visit. From thence the 
Philadelphians were taken to the Alms-house, the Work-house and the Penitentiary, in all 
of which, thanks to the care of Mr. Keen, Mr. Fitch, and the other officers, the most 
extreme cleanliness was manifest. At the Penitentiary, the male prisoners, over five 
hundred in number, were being returned in squads to their cells, and it was painful to note 
that of the crowd of wretches, nearly all were boys. There was scarce an old man among 
them, and this fact is a tremendous sermon on the necessity that exists for greater efforts for 
the moral education of the youth of New York. From the Penitentiary, the party of 
visitors, over two hundred in number, repaired to the Governors' room, where a very hand- 
some collation had been provided. Gov. Moloney invited the guests to partake, and Col. 
Page responded on behalf of the Hibernia Company, expressing the great pleasure they had 
enjoyed during the day, and promising to reciprocate if any or all of the Ten Governors 
should visit Philadelphia. At the close of the repast, the party returned to the steamer, 
and were taken to Williamsburgh, where the invitation tendered to the Philadelphians by 
Zephyr Hose Company, No. 6, of that city, was accepted, and the party landed at the foot 
of South Third street, where they were received by Zephyr Hose Company, No. G, in a 
body. They then paraded through the principal streets, and were taken to the Odeon, 
where a collation had been provided by Zephyr Hose Company. On arriving at the rooms, 
the guests were welcomed by T. H. Browning, Esq., foreman of the Zephyrs, and responded 
to by Col. Page, on the part of the Hibernias. The company then " fell to," and passed a 
pleasant hour in enjoying the substantial spread before them. They then returned to the 
city, which they reached at dark. During the day, several police officers accompanied 
the party, but there was not the slighest unpleasant incident requiring their services, or 
marring the pleasantness of the excursion. 

From Brooklyn they came across the river, landed, and proceeded up Montgomery street, 
through Henry street, past the house of No. 0, which was finely illuminated, and where a 
grand display of fireworks was made; tlieiice through Grand street to the Brandruth House. 



'To asflist the suffering and protect tlio weak." 




'^\si>^Q-i -^- ® 



r., 








THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




51 



BANQUET AT MOZART KALL. 

In the evening, the "Hibernias" were invited to a banquet at Mozart Hall. Over the 
table at the end of the hall, was a large scroll with the words " Thrice welcome, Hibei- 
nias," in gilt letters. Three long tables were set, reaching nearly the whole length of the 
hall. Prominent among the decorations, were two very fine sugar models of the engines of 
the two companies — Hibernia and Americus. The bill of fare comprised all the delicacies; 
of the season, and ample justice was done to the good things provided. Amongst the guests 
present, we observed Mr. Richard Busteed, Corporation Counsel; Mr. George Purser; 
Deputy Superintendent of Police, Carpenter; Mr. Fields; Mr. Moloney, one of the Ten 
Governors ; Mr. Sickles, and other leading and influential gentlemen. 

At nine o'clock the entire party sat down to the feast, to which they did ample justice, 
after which, the following toasts were given and heartily responded to, not only by the 
Philadelphians, but by the friends and guests of the Americus, No. G. William M. Tweed, 
Esq., presided. The first regular toast was : — 

The President of the United States — James Buchanan — The honored Chief of our Nation; 
the illustrious son of the " Keystone" State. Received with three cheers. 

'J'he second toast was : — 

Our Guests — The Officers and Members of Hibernia Engine Company, No. 1, of the Cily of 
Philadelphia — In the time of duty, they are second to none; we hail them as worthy Links 
in our glorious Brotherhood. 

The sentiment was warmly reciprocated by tlio compan}'. 

Col. Page, of the Philadelphia Company, responded in the following words :— 
Mr. Chairman, gentlemen of Americus Engine Company, No. G, and friends — I rise to 
respond to the sentiment given by the company, and I really confess that upon this occasion 
I am at a loss for language to convey to our friends of New York the impressions which 
have been created, not only upon my own mind, but that of the \vliole company of 
Hibernia, No. 1, by the kindness shown us by Americus Company, No. C, IVom the time we 
set foot in this magnificent city up to the present moment. More than a quarter of a 
century ago, I had occasion to visit this city at the head of a public body, in a military 
capacity, and then, as now, I was received in the kindest and most hospitable manner. 1 
look around me in vain for the gentlemen who bid me welcome years ago. Many have 
gone to that " bourne from whence no traveller returns," and others, perhaps, are engaged 
in duties which prevent their appearance here this evening. New York has changed — tj^f^ 

I 




M 



'To usiit tho inffering and protect the weak " ^-— "(:•■. .liVy'' 




'^^^^\1^^^^ THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

changed in lier extent, in her commerce and in her institutions — in everything, in fact, that 
marks progress in human annals. But there is one thing in which she has not changed, 
and that is in her hospitality — for the evidence which we have experienced to-day proves 
that fact. In determining upon this excursion, the members of Hibernia Fire Company had 
two objects in view — the one was the pleasure which resulted from companionship and 
conviviality, and the other was the display of science ; and as far as the first is concerned, 
it is calculated to make the deepest and most lasting impression upon us. Our second 
object : well, we have yet to show our friends in New York what will most contribute to 
the public benefit — the power of a steam fire engine. We had our prejudices against this 
modern improvement, but we were at last obliged to yield, as all people must, to the force 
of time and the progress of human improvement. Much can be done with a stout heart 
and a strong arm; but the pulse will not always beat nor the arm retain its spirit, and 
when you have steam engines to work, I may say everlastingly, they will effectually abate 
a fire, that terrible enemy to a large city. I know not how to thank you for your kindness 
to the Hibernia Company. I have heard of the " Big Sixes," and I know not how I can 
match them, unless I raise a company of "long nines." The speaker, in eloquent language, 
then referred to the pleasure he and the company derived from their visit to Randall's 
Island, and spoke in glowing terms of the drill of the poor orphans that were cared for 
there. After paying several compliments to the Ten Governors, Col. Page concluded 
by giving as a sentiment — 

Americus Engine Company — The '^Bitj tSixes" as they are called in New Fo;-/;— Big indeed 
they are in everything that gives credit and character to human nature. 

The Press — Its freedom one of the noblest monuments, and its gigantic inllucnce one of 
the surest safeguards of our liberties ; at once the champion of the free, and an advocate of 
the oppressed. 

Mr. Richard Busteed, Corporation Counsel, very unexpectedly responded. He apologized 
for his appearing as the exponent of the press, and succinctly gave a history of his own and 
his brother's early labors as a printer and compositor in various offices, particularly com- 
menting on the composition room of a city newspaper office, where he " worked at case." 
However, he concluded his address with an eloquent and able dissertation on journalism 
and printing in general. 

The CuAiUMAN then gave:— Owr worthij Chief, Harry Howard — May he be blessed with 
iiealth ; tliat priceless boon, secured to him, gives to us an equalled leader. 

Which was most enthusiastically responded to. 




the suffering and protect the weak.' 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

53 

Tho following toasts were then given and oloqncntly responded to : — 
Woman — The poetry of creation ; a work that is universally admired. 

The Bar — A beacon light on the intricate paths of life ; may it never be severed from its 
handmaids, Truth and Justice. 

Responded to by D. E. Sickles. 

Steam — The new motor for working fire apparatus ; if it can secure greater benefits to 
our fellow men than they have heretofore enjoyed, let them have it. 

The Ma^'or of the City of New York, Daniel F. Tiemann — We recognize in him a worthy 
citizen and an efficient magistrate. 

Our Brother Firemen of the Union — Small in numbers, great in achievements. 

The Spirit of Patriotism — Ma}- it be called to new trials onl}- to achieve new triumphs. 

To this toast, Mr. TnoMAS C. Fields responded : — 

Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen : — I am much pleased to be with you to-night to partake 
of the bountiful spread laid out before us, and to enjoy the feeling of good fellowship so 
freely and frankly exchanged between guests and entertainers. I have been delighted this 
evening at the spirit of genial friendship so fully marked between Americus Engine 
Company, No. 6, of the City of New York, and Hibernia Engine Company, of our sister 
City of Philadelphia. Sir, jour committee have done me the honor to request that I 
respond to the toast just drank. The toast opens up a wide field of thought. It gives to 
the mind an unlimited range — it lifts the curtain and presents to our view the great good 
men who have lived before us — it embraces all that is devoted in Religion — all that is 
honest in politics — all that is great in Statesmanship — all that is glorious in heroism. It is 
confined to neither sex, nor solely embodied in any race or nationality; it mingles and 
mixes with the highest impulses of our common humanity, and finds its utterance in the 
throbbings and pulsations of the noblest and stoutest hearts. It is a shield to the Repub- 
lican soldier more impenetrable than steel or brass — more efficacious than the magician's 
wand ; it is the consolation of the exiled patriot, and in the hour of his trial and tribulation 
the consciousness of having disinterestedly performed his duty, is more soothing and 
consoling to his spirit than music from a thousand strings. It is often seen struggling 
against tyranny, but alas ! it is sometimes overborne ; it frequently clothes the body in rags 
while it studs the mind with jewels ; it has no anxiety but for the welfare of country, and 
finds its greatest enjoyment in the liberty of mankind. Its struggles have been from the 
beginning, and will continue to the end of time; for when it has succeeded in winning 
the freedom of a people, it devotes itself to insure their happiness, and protect their rights. 




; the fiuiforiog and protect tho weak." 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



'?^^?^ 




54 

Love of country, next to the love of our Creator, should be the controlling feeling of all 
men ; and, therefore, Patriotisna iu man is as pure and devoted as a mother's affection for 
her child; while in some respects it is nobler and less selfish. Sir, any labor or service 
rendered to our country, when the end in view is to advance the interest of the State and 
confer a benefit upon the citizen, is a patriotic action — whether it be on the field or in the 
Senate — whether it be in the advancement of the arms, or the development of the arts of a 
nation. The poor emigrant, who subdues the wild forest by his toil, is deserving of praise 
as well as the soldier who protects the land from invasion, or bears our flag in triumph over 
oppression. So, too, the fireman, who, taking his life in his hand, and without pay or 
reward, protects our property from the burning element, or snatches a fellow-creature from 
the worst of deaths, is equally entitled to a niche in the temple of fame, for he exhibits a 
true spirit of patriotism. 

'' And his reward you ask — reward he spurns — 
For him a father's generous bosom burns — 
For him on high the widow's prayers shall go. 
For him the orphan's tear-drop flow. 
His boon the richest e'er to mortals given, 
Approving conscience and the smile of heaven." 

The spirit of patriotism is cosmopolitan — its history is written in every language — it 
lives in every clime — it struggles in every contest, and its trials and triumphs are prominent 
throughout the world. We find its embodiment in the noblest names of antiquity — we 
have seen its living expression in the great men of our own day and generation. It 
flourishes and waxes strong in the transition stages of a people — when one form of govern- 
ment having become oppressive, another more beneficial to the governed is sought to be 
established ; then, calling to its aid its twin feeling, enthusiasm, it sets on fire a whole race, 
and creates a force that nothing can resist. It illumined the whole face of our country 
when our fathers struggled to obtain the liberty we now enjoy. The Revolutionary history 
of the United States is lighted up on every page, Avith the heroic patriotism of the 
inhabitants of the Colonies. Washington and his companions in arms, Jefferson and his 
compatriots in council, have set an example which many may emulate, but none can equal. 
They stand out on the great picture of the world's history, the most prominent and 
interesting figures. Ah, Sir! if it has had its triumphs, it has also had its trials; gathering 
strength from its success in our Revolution, it sought to free the noble and generous 
countrymen of Montgomery, and snatch from the hand of a tyrant and consecrate to 
freedom, the "emerald of the sea." Stimulated by the teachings of Lafayette, and 
impressed by the eloquence of Mirabeau, it unfurled the tri-color flag of France over a people 



the suffering and protect the weak.' 










THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



55 

hoping for Liberty, and anxious to win it at the point of the bayonet. While in Irehand, 
it succumbed to the power of the Government, in France it was strangled by the child of 
its creating. Greece, cherishing the traditionary history of her ancient renown, and fired 
by the stimulating strains of the patriotic poet, struggled to attain a place among the liberal 
nations of the world, and though the spirit of patriotism filled the breast of her people, she 
yielded to the necessities which surrounded her, and sank into obscurity. Sir, there can be 
no question but that here on the Western Continent, the spirit of patriotism has had its 
greatest trials, and achieved its noblest triumph; but not alone is it now among our 
people — it still lingers amid the mountains of Hungary — it is checked only by French 
bayonets in Italy, and it still inhabits the land of Tell. It is the " boon of Providence to 
the human race." It has done much ; it has much more to do ; it has yet to give Freedom 
to all people who inhabit the earth. It is the oracle of Delphos, and is now prophesying 
the liberation of all races. Sir, I have said that the spirit of patriotism has had many 
trials to encounter. There are more, before it can accomplish its mission ; but when it has 
overcome them, it will present a glorious spectacle. Old superstitions shall be dispelled. 
Kings shall become men, and princes honest. Monarchies, kingdoms and empires shall 
crumble and decay. And over this universal wreck of tyranny and oppression which has 
blackened the face of the world for centuries, the spirit of patriotism shall rise in its 
glory — its armor Justice ; its support, High Heaven's Arm. Sir, methinks I can see it now 
in all its resplendent beauty. It is rising on the eastern boundaries of Asia Minor, tinged 
by the first rays of the King of Day coming up from the far southern and mellow 
atmosphere of the land washed by the. Mediterranean and Hellespont — from the frozen 
regions where the American navigator looked out upon the Polar Ocean, and from the 
homes of the Chinese and J.apanese. It rises like a mighty army intent upon the overthrow 
of tyranny — it advances with a steady pace — conscious of the moral courage that pervades 
every nerve. It is headed by music that comes from the rejoicings of a redeemed and 
regenerated manhood, making converts at every strain, and attracting the forces of the 
enemy till he shall fall the victim of his own vice — unregretted and forgotten. But this 
mighty army, led by the spirit of patriotism, conquers not for possession of wealth or 
empire, nor for the majesty of pomp and glory — it wreathes no victor's brow in the blood- 
stained crown of carnage and victory. It will not be the persecution of particular sects, 
creeds or faiths which rages with the cry of Christianity against skepticism, strangling the 
very germ of liberty, and satisfying the vengeance of a deluded hypocrisy with a dagger 
steeped in the blood of Christ or the corpse at the stake of religious persecution. Thank 
God ! those times are passed, and those feelings of bigotry are buried in the sepulchre of 
departed ages ; their places have been supplied by the spirit of patriotism. This, clothed 
the garb of fortitude, with Ithureal's spear, whose touch reveals the beauty which exists 

. --C 

"To uiitt tb« lafferiD; and protect the woak." 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. ^^^^^/^^ 



56 



^ 



in all things, liatli met the Lion of Oppression, and with the "he.aven directed" fctrength 
that revealed the arm of Sampson, it broke his ponderous jaws asunder. Sir, when the 
spirit of patriotism .shall finally triumph — when its trials shall have ceased, and its triumph 
certain — when it has succeeded in making all governments rest upon the will and wish of 
the governed — then and not till then, will all the children of men have the pleasure to 
drink from the fountain of human happiness. Then, indeed, shall we have a Temple of 
Liberty more magnificent than Solomon's — more beautiful than the columned structures of 
ancient Greece or Rome — more lasting than the pyramids of Egypt, for it will rest upon the 
wisdom and virtue of mankind. Its altar will be the spirit of Christian faith — it will be 
floored by the earth itself, and its dome the broad canopy of heaven, where the Almighty 
" makes His dwelling place." 

Our Army and Navy — Over the world they wave an unstained flag, protecting alike our 
interests and our honor. 

Our Union — Its perpetuation secured in the hearts of the people; its dissolution only 
threatened by faithless braggarts. 

The Field Cable and the Atlantic Ocean — May their present apparent difficulties be 
speedily restored by a dose of Morse fluid. 

Joke and song followed one after the other, and the company kept the mirth and joy 
flowing till a late hour, when they separated. 



TRIAL OF THE STEAM FIRE ENGINE IN THE CITV HALL PARK- 

VISIT TO BROOKLYN, AND RECEPTION BY COMPANY No. 7— GRAND PARADE OF THE 
BROOKLYN FIRE COMPANIES— VISIT TO THE NAVY YARD — COLLATION — BANQUET AT 
ST. NICHOLAS HOTEL, &c., &c. 

Pursuant to announcement, the Hibernia Company, No. 1, of Philadelphia, gave the fire 
companies and citizens of New York an opportunity of witnessing the power of their steam 
fire engine yesterday morning. Notwithstanding the unpropitious state of the weather, the 
vicinity of the City Hall was crowded from an early hour by the leading members of the 
New York Fire Department and delegations from several of the city companies. At eleven 
o'clock the Hibernia Company, accompanied by the members of Americus, No. 6, marched 
to the Park, and the steam fire engine was driven to the southern end of the building, 
where it was quickly surrounded by a large number of spectators. The engine was built 
by Rcaney, Neafie & Co., of Philadelphia, and is of thirty horse power. It weighs 8,000 




"To assist the suffering and protect the weak.' 




~/n^^ 






^frVc^- B? '^tffW:<r ^i^^^:^.^ 








THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




57 

pound?, and has attached, a neat hose carriage, carrying one thousand feet of hose. The 
cylinder is eleven and a lialf inches, with six and a half inch steam pump and fourteen inch 
stroke. It was completed on the IGth of October, 1858, and yesterday was the second time 
it has ever been tested. It is stated that steam can be got up in eight minutes, but owing 
to the wood used yesterday being somewhat damp, twelve minutes was occupied in making 
the preparatory arrangements. The steam engine first threw an inch and one-eighth 
stream, and then an inch and three-eighths. The altitude to which the water was thrown 
surprised the spectators, who loudly cheered the company. After playing for some time 
over the Hall, four hose streams were thrown at one time, upwards of one hundred and 
seventy-seven feet. At this time the water was found to be rather scarce, as the engine 
completely dried the tank. In consequence of the scarcity of water, the trial was not 
looked upon as complete. There is no doubt, however, that the steam fire engine possesses 
many advantages over the hand engine, and will unquestionably throw a more powerful and 
larger stream, and extinguish a conflagration in a shorter space of time. After playing for 
about an hour, the Philadelphia and Americus Engine Company, No. G, were drawn up in 
front of the City Hall, and a daguerreotype taken of both companies. The Philadelphians 
then proceeded to ship their engine for Boston, (it being necessary to send it by a freight 
train instead of the passenger train in which the members were taken,) and then marched 
to Fulton ferry and crossed to Brookl3n, where they were received by Engine Company 
No. 7, of Brooklyn, on whose invitation the}' visited that city. Companies 1, 3 and 5, with 
their hose carriages, engines, &c., were drawn up in line in Fulton street, and thousands of 
spectators enthusiastically cheered the Philadelphians. The line of procession was then 
taken up to the Navy Yard, where Lieutenant Leroy and Lieutenant Duncan were in- 
troduced to Colonel Page and his company, and they were conducted through the Lyceum 
and the Yard. The procession then marched through York, Bridge, Henry, Atlantic and 
Court streets, Myrtle avenue and Adams street, and to the City Hall, which Avas crowded 
with people who enthusiastically cheered the Philadelphians as they marched by. After 
parading the streets, much against the wishes of the Philadelphia Company for nearly an hour, 
the party were conducted to the Gothic Hall, in Adams street, where a very splendid 
collation prepared by Mr. Edward Arent, at the expense of Engine Company No. 7, was 
provided. Col. Page expres.sed his dissatisfaction at the length of the march, and statud 
that had he known his company would have l)oen subjected to such a tramp, he certainly 
should have declined the invitation. 

After the collation, the Hon. F. B. Spinola, in a very elo(|iient and aiipropriate address. 
welcomed the Hibernia Company to the City of Brooklyn, and paid a neat tribute to the 
City of Philadelphia. Colonel Page replied in suitable terms, when the company were 
escorted to the ferry, and proceeded to their hotel. 



; the Buffering and protect the 





.^i'~^ 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




58 
BANQUET AT THE ST, NICHOLAS. 

In the evening the Philadeli^hians were entertained by the " Old Guard," composed of the 
exempt members of the Fire Department, at the St. Nicholas Hotel. Mr. D. T. Milliken, 
President of the Board of Representatives of the New York Department, welcomed them in 
a neat speech, to which Col. Page responded on behalf of the Philadelphia Company, in 
appropriate terms. 

The company then entered the banquet hall, where they were welcomed by the Chair- 
man, James L. Miller, Esq., in the most hearty manner — Col. James Page again returning 
thanks on behalf of his company. Among the guests at the festival were the Mayor, 
Zophar Mills, John S. Giles, Jonas N. Phillips, Philip "W. Engs, James Kelley, William M. 
Tweed, and other gentlemen prominently connected with the firemen of New York. The 
banquet was got up in excellent taste, nothing being omitted that could please the eye or 
gratify the palate. During the festivities, Dodworth's Band occupied the orchestra. The 
ofiicers were : — 

President — J.\mes L. Miller. 

Vice Presidents — Robert McGinnis, Owen W. Brennan, Charles McDougall, Zophar 
Mills. 

Committee of Arrangements — Aaron Seelet, Lawrence Taylor, Samuel B. Thcmpson, 
Robert McGinnis, William Williams, James L. Miller. 

Committee on Reception — David T. Milliken, Charles McDougall, A. M. C. Smith, 
Daniel Berrian, Lawrence Taylor, D. Gorman, S. B. Thompson, J. King, Owen W. 
Brennan, John R. Platt, Aaron Seeley, Robert McGinnis, William Williams, 
William H. Wickham, John C. Ham. 

After dinner came the toasts, which were honored with an enthusiasm peculiar to 
firemen. First came — 

The President of the United States. 

2. The Governor of the State of New York. 

3. The Governor Elect of the State of New York. 

Each of these was drank with three times three. Letters from Governor King and the 
Hon. E. D. Morgan, were read. The latter excused himself on the ground that he was 
busily engaged in preparing for the duties of the station to which he had recently been 
elected. 

4. The Mayor of the City of New York, Daniel F. Tiemann— As Chief Magistrate of our 
city, we honor him for the devotion he has exhibited to its interests, and are proud to claim 
him as a brother in our ranks. 




the suffering and protect the weak.' 



-«€. 



v^'>^ 





trVr^'f^f^'Vr-n THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

<;^- ■^■^- ^. 

. K 59 

Mayor Tiemanx, in responding, said the pleasure of meeting with his friends and 
colleagues of the Old Guard, had drawn him from a sick bed, to which he had been 
confined for the past three days. It afforded him infinite pleasure to greet Ilibernia Steam 
Fire Engine Company of Philadelphia; he was glad to see steam fire engines in this city, 
for he believed that without such auxiliaries the voluntary system must soon cease to exist. 
Formerly improvements travelled westward, but now the West were sending them East. 
He did not intend to make a speech, but he desired to express his happiness, as Mayor of 
the city, in meeting firemen and citizens of a sister State, and making them welcome to the 
Empire City. 

5. The Common Council of our Cit}- — Their prompt legislation in behalf of the Depart- 
ment claims for them our warmest acknowledgments. 

Ald. John Clancy briefly responded. 

C. Our Guests — The Officers and Members of Ilibernia Engine Company, No. 1, of Phila- 
delphia — The Old Guard of the New York Fire Department extend to you the hand of 
fellowship, and bid you welcome to their hospitality. 

Col. Page, on behalf of the Philadelphians, said that the Hibemias resolved, some 
months since, to visit New York as soon as their new steam fire engine was completed, so 
that they might, in some degree, combine pleasure with instruction, so far as they might 
be able to impart instruction in the use of a new motor in the extinction of fires. He was 
happy to say, that so far as the first part of their purpose was concerned, they were amply 
satisfied ; as to the latter, that he would leave to the firemen of New York to determine. 
As new friends usually explained something of their antecedents, he would tell the New 
Yorkers that the Hibernia Company dated its organization back to February 20, 1752. It 
had sur\'ived pestilence and the Revolution, and had ever been foremost in the performance 
of its duty in the Fire Department of Philadelphia. The speaker then proceeded to give a 
humorous account of the apparatus and usages of the company in the early period of its 
existence. Its entire machinery consisted of buckets, baskets and bags — the former for 
bringing water, the second and third for conveying property to a place of safety. John 
Brown was fined because his bags wanted a string. Thomas Phillips was fined because his 
bags had holes in them, and so on. There was a clause in the Constitution, by which, if a 
member died, his widow might enjoy all the privileges of the association, provided she kept 
her husband's buckets, bags, and other implements in repair. The speaker* referred to the 
distinguished men who had belonged to the Department in times past. The first engine 
was purchased in 1759 ; it was then thought a great thing to own lengths of hose of 
twenty feet each. After some further reminiscenses of the past, including the reading of 
letters from some of the old members of the company written forty or fifty years ago, lie gave 




t tbe luifering and protect tho woaV.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




60 

The Old Guard of the Fire Department of New York — They may Ije old in years, but 
they are young in generosity and hospitality. 

Mayor Tiemann said he could well remember when all householders in the City of New- 
York, males and females, were bound to keep their baskets, buckets and bags in order, and in 
case of a fire at night, to pitch them out of their windows, and then go to bed again. Then 
they had a floating fire engine, of which his grandfather was foreman. The City of New 
York was now obliging every ferry company, to which she granted a new lease, to have a 
serviceable steam force fire pump on each boat, to be used on every available occasion. 

7. Our time-honored institution, the New York Fire Department — Mutual trials in its 
voluntary duties, have generated a friendship which time cannot sever. 

Morris Franklin responded. 

8. The President, Treasurer and Trustees of the New York Fire Department — The 
custodians and almoners of our benevolence ; the gradual increase of the fund, and econom\' 
of expenditure, are the best proofs of their fidelity. 

D. T. MiLLiKEN and Joun S. Giles spoke to this toast. 

9. The Chief and Assistant Engineers of the New York Fire Department. 
Zophar Mills, Esq., was called to respond. 

10. The Board of Commissioners of the New York Fire Department — The faithful 
discharge of their duties has given character and efficiency to the Department. 

R. H. Ellis, Esq., responded. 

11. The Steam Fire Engine — The greatest auxiliary to a Volunteer Department. 

Mr. Coleman, of the Philadelphia Ledger, gave a history of the introduction of the Steam 
Fire Engine in Philadelphia. 

12. The City of Philadelphia — Distinguished for its patriotic devotion in the American 
Revolution, its statesmen and heroes are embalmed in the pages of its history; in its 
increased prosperity, population and power, we see evidences of its olden energy, enterprise 
and independence. 

Mr. Smith, of Philadelphia, responded. 

13. The Press — The power that has raised the mantle of darkness : civilization has 
progressed where its influence has been exerted. 

"Was supported by the Hon. Ekastus Brooks. 

14. Woman — The star that guides our course through life ; the light that cheers our 
homes. 

W. T. B. Mii.LiKEN took the ladies' part. 



: the suffering and protect the i 







THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



61 

On no occasion was there ever a more agreeable union. Tlie magnificence of the 
banquet, the order -which prevailed, the talent displayed, and the enjoyment of the entire 
companj', presented a scene seldom equalled, but never surpassed in the way of a festive 
entertainment. The speeches of the many distinguished gentlemen present, were models of 
eloquence and good taste, and lent a charm to the whole as unusual as it was delightful. 
The "Old Guard' may well be proud of the eflFort. It was indeed, worthy of the St. 
Nicholas Hotel, and proved that its proprietors could not be excelled in their line. 

Keturning at a late hour to their quarters at the Brandreth House, corner of Broadway 
and Canal street, where the company had been liberally and kindly treated by the 
proprietor, J. G. Briggs, after a short rest they took the morning train for Boston, having 
sent the steam engine ahead by the freight train. 

The Americus Engine Company, No. G, took special charge of the Hibernias during their 
stay in the City of New York, and the members were constantly in attendance, providing 
for the comfort and arranging for the amusement and gratification of their guests, the 
preparation of an acceptable repast after the dismissal of the splendid illuminated escort 
and parade got up by the Americus, under the direction of Marshal Tweed and the Com- 
mittee of Arrangements — the superb dinner at Mozart Hall, where everything to please 
the eye and gratify the tastes abounded, and the delightful and impressive trip to Ran- 
dall's and Blackwell's Island, and other places of interest in the East river, were among the 
prominent and striking features of their generous and untiring exertions to make all pass 
off happily — nothing was left undone that good taste and kind hearts could accomplish, and 
no time passed without some act that denoted a generosity not to be tired, and a welcome 
that was never to grow cold. 

Along the entire route, the greatest excitement prevailed, and at every stopping place the 
excursionists were warmly welcomed and loudly cheered. They were met by the Governor 
elect of New York, D. Morgan, Esq., who addressed them in brief and eloquent terms, and 
they were happy to have the opportunity of seeing and honoring so distinguished an 
individual. The ride to Boston was by the New York and New Haven Railroad, and not- 
withstanding the exertions and accommodating disposition manifested by B. F. Iloyt, Esq., 
of New York, it proved a very uncomfortable one after leaving Springfield, the Conductons 
at this point seeming to care but little about the welfare of the party, and appearing to lack 
system in their movements. 




"To uiist the laffering and protect the weak." 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



63 



receptio:N' by the bostoa^ fire departmej^t, 




The Philadelphia Hibemia Engine Company, No. 1, arrived in our city last evening, by 
the New York train. Long before the hour at which the train should have arrived, the 
depot and the adjoining streets were crowded with citizens anxious to welcome the 
strangers, and much disappointment was manifested when it was understood that the cars 
would not arrive until an hour after the usual time. 

Anxious to testify their respect for their brethren from Philadelphia, our entire Fire 
Department turned out, with torches, to act as escort to them on their arrival, and it is 
seldom a more attractive display is made in our city. Had the weather been propitious, it 
must have been exceedingly gratifying to our visitoi-s, but unfortunately the rain of the 
past two days rendered the streets anything but comfortable to march through, and on this 
account the advertised route of the procession was much shortened. 

Precisely at 7 o'clock the New York train reached the Worcester depot with the 
Philadelphians on board. On alighting from the cars, they were received by Tremont 
Engine Company, No. 12, under command of Capt. 0. R. Bobbins, with the usual 
formalities. They were then marched to the position assigned them, during which the 
entire line was lit up by brilliant fireworks. 

The ijrocession then commenced its march, each company being formed four abreast, and 

each man carrying a lighted torch, in the following order : — 

CHELSEA BRASS BAND. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 2— Capt. G. Brown, fifty men. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 3— Capt. E. W. Milliken, thirty men. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 4— Clerk C. P. Stetson, com., forty-eight men. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 6— Capt. C. C. Wilson, fifty-four men. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 7— Capt. T. Whipple, fifty men. 

HOSE COMPANY No. 1— C. S. Dunton, eighteen men. 

HOSE COMPANY No. 2— M. C. Thompson, twelve men. 

HOWARD CORNET BAND. 

HOSE COMPANY No. 6— Capt. W. Lovell, thirty men. 

HOSE COMPANY No. 6— Capt. J. Barnes, thirty men. 

BOSTON CORNET BAND. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 12— Capt. 0. R. Rouuins, fifty-two men. 



'To assist the suffering and protect the weak." 







THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

63 

BECKS PHILADELPHIA BAND. 

HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1, of Philadelphia— One hundred men under proper officers. 

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 2— Capt. C. Simmons, twenty men. 

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 3— Capt. G. W. Warre.v, twenty-four men. 

LOUD'S WEYMOUTH CORNET BAND. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 8— Capt. B. Tarbox, fifty men. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 9— Capt. J. P. Somerby, thirty men. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 11— Capt. C. Maxfield, thirty-two men. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 13— Capt. H. Westox, twenty-six men. 

This comprised tlie procession, which was highly creditahle to our firemen, ha^•ing been 
got up at so short notice. 

All along the route, notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, crowds assembled to 
see the show and greet the Philadelphians with cheers, and at numerous points grand 
displaj-s of pyrotechnics were made. The entire route at the South End, as advertised, was 
marched rapidly over, and the head of the procession reached Court street shortly after 
8 o'clock. 

On arriving at the Ward room on Warren street, (which was especially appropriate for 
the occasion, on account of its close proximity to No. 12's house,) the procession halted, and 
Tremont Company with their guests, filed in to partake of a supper, while the others were 
dismissed. 

We had expected to find a mere collation at the hall, as the regular festival takes place 
at the Sturtevant House to-day, but on entering it, we found a banquet in active progress, 
of a style and a quality to do honor to any purveyor. The hall was beautifully decorated 
with flags, ornaments, and bunting. From the centre of the coiling streamers were 
extended across the hall in each direction. Trees of evergreen were arranged around the 
sides, hung with Chinese lanterns. At the head of the hall, on a ground-work of bunting 
were two arches, the one inscribed " Tremont," and the other " Hibernia ;" and over these 
respectively, " Mass.," and " Penn." The platform at the head of the hall contained three 
tables, facing the door, for the principal officers, and in front of these were three long tables 
extending to the door. The sides of the platform were hung with bunting. The tables 
were spread with a splendid supper, and the whole appearance was very attractive. 

As soon aa all were in the hall, Capt. Robbins, in a few remarks, welcomed the company, 
and then all were bade to partake of what was before them. Appetites sharpened by 
xercise were not easily satisfied, and ample justice was done to the repast. 



: the luffering and protect the weak." 








THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY 

^ *^j 

64 ^'Wo- 

Capt. RoBBiNS, at the close of the supper, introduced Chief Engineer Bikd, who was ( % 1 
received with three cheers and a tiger. He spoke but briefly, and was followed by Capt. (^ 
Dameell, Assistant Engineer in the Boston Fire Department. He welcomed the company 
to the City of Boston in behalf of the Board of Engineers, and alluded to the pleasant 
acquaintance he had formed with some of the members while on a visit to New York. He 
was heartily applauded. 

Col. Page, Chief Marshal of the vi.«iting company, was next speaker, and made a fine 
speech. He spoke of the hospitality he had received in this cordial reception, and said if it 
were possible that a positive infliction of hospitality could quicken memory, he should long 
remember this visit to Boston, as it stiffened him in every joint. He also complimented his 
entertainers for the attractions of their bounteous board, and alluded to a visit to Boston 
twenty-five years ago, and the improvements which had since been made here. Their visit 
was not one merely of conviviality — they had a higher object in view ; they had brought 
their new machine to show the superiority of steam over hand power. 

Common Councilman Cobb was then introduced, and was received with three cheers by 
the Hibernias. He expressed his great satisfaction at the appearance of the company, and 
his desire to do all in his power to make their stay agreeable. He closed with giving — 

"The Hibernia Engine Company of Philadelphia." 

John Tuoknley, a contributing member of the Hibernia Company, and one of the 
merchants of Philadelphia, was next introduced, and spoke well of the success of the steam 
engines. He closed with — 

" The Fire Department of the City of Boston." 

This was received, standing, with three cheers, by the Boston Department. 

Assistant Engineer Damrell then made some remarks expressive of the confidence of 
the Boston Fire Department in the ultimate success of steam for Fire Engines. 

Capt. Bird endorsed what he had said, and then took his leave of the company, receiving 
three cheers from the Hibernias, and they also honored Engine Company No. 12 with tlie 
same compliment. 

The President of the Hibernias then made a few remarks to his company, and they wert' 
then escorted to their quarters at the American House. 

At this hotel the company was not only handsomely accommodated, but abundantly 
served, and the proprietor, Lewis Rice, Esq., made a decidedly favorable impression upon 
the visitors. At no place on the route, wore more pains taken to please, and the American 
House in point of excellence, is deserving of special notice, and worthy of the most llbonil 
patronage. 



the suffering and protoct the weak.' 











w 



v^-r-;^:/- 



^-^ 






/ISHAfiJO, frinlsr. 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



65 



EXHIBITION OF THE HIBERNIA STEAM ENGINE ON STATE STREET. 

A large crowd assembled in State street, in front of the Traveller office, yesterday 
morning at 9 o'clock, to witness the exhibition of the Steam Fire Engine of Hibemia 
Engine Company, No. 1, of Philadelphia. The visiting company was escorted to the placi' 
of trial from their quarters at the American House, by Tremont Company, No. 2, of this 
city. Besides its own band, it was also accompanied by the Germania band, and the 
combined music conduced to increa.se the crowds attracted to the spot. 

The following is a report of the trial : 

At 54 i minutes past 9, commenced firing up. 

At 7 minutes and 40 seconds past 10, commenced to play with 44 pounds steam pre.ssun- 
and 45 pounds water pressure. 

At lOi o'clock, her steam pressure was 51 pounds, water pressure 90. 

At 10.20 o'clock, steam pressure 70, water pressure lOS. 

At 23 minutes 50 seconds past 10, stopped. 

The alxive playing was through 1 i inch nozzle. 

At 10.24 i, started with eighty pounds steam pressure, 84 pounds water pressure. 

At 10.20 J stopped; steam pressure 80 pounds, water pressure 84 — li inch nozzle. 

At 10.28 started — steam pressure 87 pounds, water pressure 57 pounds. 

At 10. .35 stopped; steam pressure 100 pounds, water pressure GO — 3; inch nozzle. 

At 10.40 started — steam pressure 100 pounds, water pressure 100 pounds. 

At 10.45 stopped; steam pressure 70 pounds, water pressure 20 poinids — through four 
1 inch nozzles. 

At 10.48 started— steam pressure 90 pounds, water pressure 125 pounds — thnmgli two 1 i 
inch nozzles. 

Ilose burst — this was 3 inch hemp hose, 2 ply. Another piece was then put on, 125 feet 
long, 3 ply, of the same material and size ; they then played through a 1 i inch nozzle, a 
single stream, 20 feet over the flag stalls on the old State House, with the w ind mifavor- 
able — steam 95, water 120 



; the «uffering and protoct the weak 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




66 



SUMMABV, 

Time from firing to commencing to play, 13 minutes 10 seconds. 

Greatest horizontal distance, 280 feet — li inch nozzle. 

Four streams vertically, estimated one hundred feet high — 1 inch nozzles. 

One stream vertically, estimated 125 feet high — li inch nozzle. 

Some disadvantages were labored under— a strong wind, wet fuel, &c. But notwith- 
standing this, and the extreme cold weather of the day, it was a successful affair, and 
Philadelphia still maintains her high position in regard to the utility and effect of her 
steam engines. 



The above trial wa.s made under the superintendence and direction of the engineers of 
the Boston Fire Department, and the results given are from the official document. Great 
care was taken by these gentlemen, and their preliminary arrangements reflected the 
highest credit upon them, for all was done that they deemed necessary for a fair trial of the 
powers of the steam engine. State street was crowded with spectators, and several 
amusing incidents occurred. Water from the pipe in one instance, having struck a lad with 
such force as to throw him a considerable distance, fortunately without doing him any 
personal injury. The effect when throwing four streams at once, was very fine, and elicited 
shouts of applause. The exhibition seemed to give entire satisf\iction, and at no time 
during the excursion, were the powers of the engine so fairly proven as on this occasion. 





"To usiat the safieriiig and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY 



67 



RECEPTIO]Sr ^^T CH^RLESTOAVI^. 




The Hiternia Fire Engine Company of Philadelphia was received at the draw of Charle;^ 
river bridge (which forms the dividing line between the cities of Boston and Charlestown). 
by a committee of Washington Engine Company, No. 5, of Charlestown, consisting of 
Benjamin Brintnall, M. F. Webster, B. S. Drew, B. F. Gardner, M. P. Smith, T. J. 
Whittemore, J. L. Perry, under the marshalship of the foreman, Mr. Albert Chandler. 

After marching through some of the principal streets, by invitation of Hon. G. Washing- 
ton Warren, President of Bunker Hill Monument Association, they were escorted to Bunker 
Hill, and inspected the monument ; the remains of the breast-work thrown up by Ameri- 
cans on the night previous to the battle ; the spot where Warren fell on the ever memorable 
June 17, 1775, and also the statue of Warren erected to his memory. From thence the 
guests marched through some of the principal streets, passing the house of Washington 
Engine Company, on Harvard street, from which was extended numerous tiag-s, bearing the 
inscription " Welcome Hibernia, Welcome." They then marched to Harvard Hall, where 
tables were spread for two hundred persons. 

The repast being concluded, Mr. Chandler, foreman of Washington Engine, welcomed 
the Philadelphians to Charlestown, which was responded to by Col. James Page, President 
of the Hibernia. His Honor James Dana, Mayor of Charlestown, was next introduced, and 
extended the freedom of the city to the Philadelphia firemen so long as they would remain. 
He spoke highly of the organization of the Philadelphia department, of the introduction of 
steam fire engines as a valuable auxiliary for the extinguishment of fires, and comi)limented 
the firemen of Philadelphia for their progressive spirit in introducing them. Col. Paiii; 
responded in an eloquent speech. 

CiiAS. Field, Esq., Councilman of the First Ward, and also a momlier of the Washington 
Engine Comjjany, was next introduced, and presented to the Hibernia Coiujiany in behalf of 
the Washington Engine Company, a beautiful engraving of " The Father of our Country," 
handsomely framed. To this Col. Page also replied in a very eloquent and patriotic speech. 

The time of the Hibernia being very limited, they were obliged to retire, and were 
escorted from the hall to the draw of the bridge, by the members of Washington Engine 
Company, No. 5, who were well pleased with the acquaintance formed with so gentlemanly a 
body of men as composed the Hibernia Fire Engine Company, No. 1, of Philadelphia. 



-/■- 




"To uiiit the •nfiaruig and protect tho ^ 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



68 „ ,_^^ 

George Stimpson, Jr., Esq., a member of No. 5, a very patriotic gentleman, extended the \^l 

hospitalities of his mansion, abounding in beautiful specimens of art, to the officer.s of both (^, 
companies, who were much gratified with their visit. 



COIiI?.ESI'03SriDE3>TCE. 

CiiARLESTOWN, Dec. Id, 1858. 
Dear Sir : — 

We have sent you this day, per Adams' Express, the picture of " Washington," which we 
had the pleasure of presenting to you and your command on the 25th November last. 
I am, sir, 

Eespectfully your obed't servant, 

BAllTLETT S. DREW, 

Secdj W. E. Co. 
Col. James Page, 

President Hihernia Fire Co., 

Philade72)Iiia, Pa. 



PllILADELPUIA, Dec. ?,d, '59. 
Dear Sir : — 

The box, containing the picture of Washington presented by your company to tlie 
Hibernia Fire Engine Company, No. 1, on its recent visit to Boston and Charlestowii, 
is received. 

We shall ever cheri.sli this testimony of the kind feelings of your organization ; hang up 
the picture in some prominent place in the room where we assemble, and as we gaze upon it 
full of the patriotic emotions it is calculated to inspire in the heart of every true American, 
remember the unbounded hospitality which induced its presentation, and strive on all 
occasions, to imitate, if we cannot equal, the noble spirit of your comrades. 

I pray you to present to the company, in whose behalf you write, my grateful acknow- 
ledgments, and assure them that their cordial and gentlemanly reception will long be 
remembered by those who were fortunate enough to fall under its in.spiring influence. 
Very respeetfidly, 

Your ob't scrv't, 

J. PAGE, 

Chief MaiJiah ami 
PremhnI Ilibcniia Fire Co. 
liAuiLF.Ti S. Drew, 

Sec. W. E. Co. 




^ 



To assist tho suffering and protect the weak.' 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY 



69 



BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL» 




Under cover of the discharges of artillery, the British army moved up the slope of 
Breed's Hill toward the American works, in two divisions, General Howe with the right 
wing, and General Pigot with the left. The former was to penetrate the American lines at 
the rail fence ; the latter to storm the redoubt. They had not proceeded far before the 
firing of their artillery ceased, in consequence of discovering that balls too large for the 
field-pieces had been sent over from Boston. Howe ordered the pieces to be loaded with 
grape ; but they soon became useless, on account of the miry ground at the base of the hill. 
Small arms and bayonets now became their reliance. 

Silently the British troops, burdened with heavy knapsacks, toiled up the ascent toward 
the redoubt, in the heat of a bright summer's sun. All was silent within the American 
intrenchments, and very few provincials were to be seen by the approaching battalions; 
but within those breast-works, and in reserve behind the hills, crouched fifteen hundred 
determined men, ready, at a prescribed signal, to fall upon the foe. The provincials had 
but a scant supply of ammunition, and, to avoid wasting it by ineffectual shots, Prescott 
gave orders not to fire until the enemy were so near that the whites of their eyes could be 
seen. "Then," he said, "aim at their waistbands; and be sure to pick off the commanders, 
known by their handsome coats !" The enemy were not so sparing of their powder and 
ball, but when within gunshot of the apparently deserted works, commenced a random 
firing. Prescott could hardly restrain his men from responding, and a few did disobey his 
orders, and returned the fire. Putnam hastened to the spot, and threatened to cut down 
the first man who should again disobey orders, and quiet was restored. At length the 
enemy reached the prescribed distance, when, waving his sword over his head, Prescott 
shouted " Fire !" Terrible was the effect of the volley that ensued. Whole platoons of 
the British regulars were laid upon the earth, like grass by the mower's scythe. Other 
deadly volleys succeeded, and the enemy, disconcerted, broke, and fled toward the water. 
The provincials, joyed at seeing the regulars fly, wished to pursue them, and many leaped 
the rail fence for the purpose ; but the prudence of the American officers kept them in 
check, and in a few minutes they were again within their works, prepared to receive a 
second attack from the British troop.s, that were quickly rallied by Howe. Colonel 
Prescott praised and encouraged his men, while General Putnam rode to Bunker Hill to 
urge on re-enforcements. Many had arrived at Charlestown Nock, but were deterred from 
crossing by the enfilading fire of the Glasgow and two ai-raed gondolas near the causeway. 
Portions of regiments were scattered upon Bunker Hill and its vicinity, and these General 



: the toffering and protoct tho weak." 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




70 

Putnam, by entreaties and commands, endeavored to rally. Colonel Gerrish, who was very 
corpulent, became completely exhausted by fatigue; and other officers, wholly unused to 
warfare, coward-like kept at a respectful distance from danger. Few additional troops 
could be brought to Breed's Hill before the second attack was made. 

The British troops, re-enforced by four hundred marines from Boston, under Major Small, 
accompanied by Dr. Jeffries, the army surgeon, advanced toward the redoubt in the same 
order as at first, General Howe boldly leading the van, as he had promised. It was a 
mournful march over the dead bodies of scores of their fellow-soldiers; but with true 
English courage they pressed onward, their artillery doing more damage to the Americans 
than at the first assault. It had moved along the narrow road between the tongue of land 
and Breed's Hill, and when within a hundred yards of the rail fence, and on a line with the 
breast-works, opened a galling fire, to cover the advance of the other assailants. In the 
meanwhile, a carcass, and some hot shot, were thrown from Copp's Hill into Charlestown, 
which set the village on fire. The houses were chiefly of wood, and in a short time nearly 
two hundred buildings were in flames, shrouding in dense smoke the heights in the rear 
whereon the provincials were posted. Beneath this veil the British hoped to rush 
unobserved up to the breast- works, scale them, and drive the Americans out at the point of 
the bayonet. At that moment a gentle breeze, which appeared to the provincials like the 
breath of a guardian angel — the first zephyr that had been felt on that sultry day — came 
from the west, and swept the smoke away seaward, exposing to the full view of the 
Americans, the advancing columns of the enemy, who fired as they approached, but with 
little execution. Colonels Brener, Nixon and Buckminster, were wounded, and Major 
Moore was killed. As before, the Americans reserved their fire until the British were 
within the prescribed distance, when they poured forth their leaden hail with such sure aim 
and terrible effect that whole ranks of officers and men were slain. General Howe was at 
the head, and once he was left entirely alone, his aids and all about him having perished. 
The British line recoiled, and gave way in several parts, and it required the utmost exertion 
in all the remaining officers, from the generals down to the subalterns, to repair the disorder 
which this hot and unexpected fire had produced. All their efforts were at first fruitless, 
and the troops retreated in great disorder to the shore. 

General Clinton, who had beheld the progress of the battle with mortified pride, seeing 
the regulars repulsed a second time, crossed over in a boat, followed by a small re- 
cnforcement, and joined the broken army as a volunteer. Some of the British officers 
remonstrated against leading the men a third time to certain destruction ; but others, who 
had ridiculed American valor, and boasted loudly of British invincibility, resolved on 
victory or death. The incautious loudness of speech of a provincial, during the second 
attack, declaring that the ammunition was nearly exhausted, gave the enemy encouraging 




the suffering and protect the weak.' 





1) 



THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY, 

71 

and important information. Howe immediately rallied his troops and formed them for a 
third attack, but in a different way. The weakness of the point between the breast-work 
and the rail fence had been discovered by Howe, and thitherward he determined to lead the 
left wing with the artillery, while a show of attack should be made at the rail fence on the 
other side. His men were ordered to stand the fire of the provincials, and then make 
a furious charge with bayonets. 

So long were the enemy making preparations for a third attack, tliat the provincials 
began to imagine that the second repulse was to be final. They had time to refresh them- 
selves a little, and recover from that complete exhaustion which the labor of the day had 
produced. It was too true that their ammunition was almost exhausted, and being obliged 
to rely upon that for defense, as comparatively few of the muskets were furnished with 
bayonets, they began to despair. The few remaining cartridges within the redoubt were 
distributed by Prescott, and those soldiers who were destitute of bayonets resolved to club 
their arms, and use the breeches of their guns when their powder should be gone. The 
loose stones in the redoubt were collected for use as missiles, if necessary, and all resolved 
to fight as long as a ray of hope appeared. 

During this preparation on Breed's Hill, all was confusion elsewhere. General Ward was 
at Cambridge, without sufiicient staff ofiicers to convey his orders. Henry (afterward 
general) Knox was in the reconnoitering service, as a volunteer, during the day, and upon 
his reports Ward issued his orders. Late in the afternoon, the commanding general 
dispatched his own, with Paterson's and Gardner's regiments, to the field of action ; but to 
the raw recruits the aspect of the narrow Neck was terrible, swept as it was by the British 
cannon. Colonel Gardner succeeded in leading three hundred men to Bunker Hill, where 
Putnam set them intrenching, but soon ordered them to the lines. Gardner was advancing 
boldly at their head, when a musket ball entered his groin and wounded him mortally. 
His men were thrown into confusion, and very few of them engaged in the combat that 
followed, until the retreat commenced. Other regiments failed to reach the lines. A part 
of Gerrish's regiment, led by Adjutant Christian Febiger, a Danish officer, who afterwai-d 
accompanied Arnold to Quebec, and was distinguished at Stony Point, reached the lines just 
as the action commenced, and effectually galled the British left wing. Putnam, in the 
meantime, was using his utmost exertions to form the confused troops on Bunker Hill, and 
get fresh corps with bayonets, across the Neck. 

All was order and firmness at the redoubt on Breed's Hill, as the enemy advanced. The 
artillery of the British swept the interior of the breast-work from end to end, destroying 
many of the provmcials, among whom was Lieutenant Prescott, a nephew of the colonel 
commanding. The remainder were driven within the redoubt, and the breast-work was 
abandoned. Each shot of the provincials was true to its aim, and Colonel Abercrombie, 



To uiitt the luffering and protoct the weak.' 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



73 ^ • 

Majors Williams and Speedlove fell. Howe was wounded in the foot, but continued 
fighting at the head of his men. His boats were at Boston, and retreat he could not. His 
troops pressed forward to the redoubt, now nearly silent, for the provincials' last grains of 
powder were in their guns. Only a ridge of earth separated the combatants, and the 
assailants scaled it. The first that reached the parapet were repulsed by a shower of 
stones. Major Pitcairn, who led the troops at Lexington, ascending the parapet, cried out, 
" Now for the glory of the marines !" and was immediately shot by a negro soldier. Again 
numbers of the enemy leaped upon the parapet, while others assailed the redoubt on three 
sides. Hand to hand the belligerents struggled, and the gun-stocks of many of the 
provincials were shivered to pieces by the heavy blows they were made to give. The 
enemy poured into the redoubt in such numbers that Prescott, perceiving the folly of longer 
resistance, ordered a retreat. Through the enemy's ranks the Americans hewed their way, 
many of them walking backward, and dealing deadly blows with their musket-stocks. 
Prescott and Warren were the last to leave the redoubt. Colonel Gridley, the engineer, was 
wounded, and borne off" safely. Prescott received several thrusts from bayonets and rapiers, 
in his clothing, but escaped unhurt. Warren was the last man that left the works. He 
was a short distance from the redoubt, on his way toward Bunker Hill, when a musket ball 
passed through his head, killing him instantly. He was left on the field, for all were flying 
in the greatest confusion, pursued by the victors, who remorselessly bayoneted those who 
fell in their way. 

Major Jackson had rallied Gardner's men upon Bunker Hill, and pressing forward with 
three companies of Ward's, and Febiger's party of Gerrish's regiment, poured a destructive 
fire upon the enemy between Breed's and Bunker Hill, and bravely covered the retreat from 
the redoubt. The Americans at the rail fence, under Stark, Reed, and Knowlton, re- 
enforced by Clark's, Coit's, and Chester's Connecticut companies, and a few other troops, 
maintained their ground, in the meanwhile, with great firmness, and successfully resisted 
every attempt of the enemy to turn their flank. This service was very valuable, for it 
saved the main body, retreating from the redoubt, from being cut off. But when these saw 
their brethren, with the chief commander, flying before the enemy, they too fled. Putnam 
used every exertion to keep them firm. He commanded, pleaded, cursed and swore like a 
mad-man, and was seen at every point in the van, trying to rally the scattered corps, swear- 
ing that victory should crown the Americans. " Make a stand here," he exclaimed ; " we 
can stop them yet ! In God's name, fire, and give them one shot more !" The gallant old 
Pomeroy, also, with his shattered musket in his hand, implored them to rally, but in vain. 
The whole body retreated across the Neck, where the fire from the Glasgow and gondolas 
slew many of them. They left five of their six field-pieces, and all their intrenching tools, 
upon Bunker Hill, and they retreated to AVinter Hill, Prospect Hill, and to Cambridge. 




; the suffering and protect tho 1 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



The British, greath- exhausted, and properly cautious, did not follow, ])ut contented them- V(®^y 
selves with taking possession of the peninsula. Clinton advised an immediate attack upon (^ 
Cambridge, but Howe was too cautious or too timid to make the attempt. His troops la}- 
upon their arms all night on Bunker Hill, and the Americans did the same on Prospect 
Hill, a mile distant. Two British field-pieces played upon them, but without effect, and 
both sides feeling unwilling to renew the action, hostilities ceased. The loss of the 
Americans in this engagement was one hundred and fifteen killed and missing, three 
hundred and five wounded, and thirty who were taken prisoners ; in all, four hundred and 
fifty. The British loss is not positively known. Gage reported two hundred and twenty- 
six killed, and eight hundred and twenty-eight wounded ; in all, ten hundred and fifty-four. 
In this number are included eighty-nine officers. The Provincial Congress of Massa- 
chusetts, from the best information they could obtain, reported the British loss at about 
fifteen hundred. The battle from Howe's first attack until the retreat, occupied nearly two 
hours. The number of buildings consumed in Charlestown, before midnight, was about four 
hundred; and the estimated loss of propertjr (most of the families, with their effects, having 
moved out) was nearly six hundred thousand dollars. 

The number engaged in this battle was small, yet cotemporary writers and eye-witnesses 
represent it as one of the most determined and severe on record. There was absolutely no 
victory in the case. The most indomitable courage was displayed on both sides; and when 
the provincials had retired but a short distance, so wearied and exhausted were all, that 
neither party desired more fighting, if we except Colonel Prescott, who earnestly petitioned 
to be allowed to lead a fresh corps that evening and retake Breed's Hill. It was a terrilile 
day for Boston and its vicinity, for almost every family- had a representative in one of the 
two armies. Fathers, husbands, sons, and brothers were in the aff'ray, and deep was the 
mental anguish of the women of the city, who, from roofs, and steeples, and e^■cry 
elevation, gazed with streaming eyes upon the carnage, for the battle raged in full view of 
thousands of interested spectators in the town and upon the adjoining hills. In contrast 
with the terrible scene were the cloudless sky and brilliant sun. 

" The heavens, the calm pure heavens, were bright on high ; , 

Earth laughed beneath in all its freshening green ; , 

The free, blue streams sang as they wandered by ; 

And many a sunny glade and flowery scene 
Gleamed out, like thoughts of youth, life's troubled years Ijetween," 

[Wn.i.is Gavloui) Clark. 

while upon the green slopes, where flocks were quietly grazing but a few hours before, War 
had reared its gory altars, and the earth was saturated with the blood of its victims. Fear- ((^ 

^ ^aO^x 

tho fluffering and protect the weak. 







THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



74 

fully augmented was the terror of the scene, when the black smoke arose from Charlestown 
on fire, and enveloped the redoubt on the summit of Breed's Hill, which, like the crater of 
a volcano, blazed and thundered in the midst of the gloomy curtain that veiled it. 

" Amazing scenes ! what shuddering prospects rise ! 
What horrors glare beneath the angry skies ! 
The rapid flames o'er Charlestown's heights ascend ; 
To heaven they reach ! urged by the boisterous wind. 
The mournful crash of falling domes resound, 
And tottering spires with sparkles reach the ground. 
One general burst of ruin reigns o'er all ; 
The burning city thunders to its fall ! 
O'er mingled noises the vast ruin sounds, 
Spectators weep ! earth from her center groans ! 
Beneath prodigious unextinguished fires 
Ill-fated Charlestown welters and expires." 

[EuLOGiu.M ON Warren, 1781. 

" It was," said Burgoyne, who, with Gage and other British officers, was looking on from 
a secure place near Copp's Hill, in Boston, "a complication of horror and importance, 
beyond anything that ever came to my lot to witness. Sure I am that nothing ever can or 
has been more dreadfully terrible than what was to be seen or heard at this time." But it 
is profitless to dwell upon the gloomy scene. Time hath healed the grief and heart- 
sickness that were born there ; and art, in the hands of busy men, has covered up forever 
all vestiges of the conflict. 

Many gallant, many noble men perished on the peninsula upon that sad day ; but none 
was so widely and deeply lamented, because none was so widely and truly loved, as the self- 
sacrificing and devoted Warren. He was the impersonation of the spirit of generous and 
disinterested patriotism that inspired the colonies. In every relation in life, he was a model 
of excellence. " Not all the havoc and devastation they have made, has wounded me like 
the death of Warren," wrote the wife of John Adams, three weeks afterward. " We want 
him in the Senate; we want him in his profession; we want him in the field. We mourn 
for the citizen, the senator, the physician, and the warrior." General Howe estimated liis 
influence, when he declared to Dr. Jefl^ries, who recognized tlie body of Warren on the field 
the next day, that his death was worth, to the British, five hundred of the provincial 
privates. Eulogy and song have aided history in embalming his memory with the 
immortality that rests upon the spot where he fell. He was a hero in the highest sense of 
the term, and so were Prescott and other compatriots in the struggle; but all were not j^^} 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




heroes who surroiiiuk'd them. Unused to war; some entirely ignorant of the sound of a 
cannon ; inferior, by two-thirds, in number, and vastly so in discipline, to the enemy, the 
wonder is that the provincials fought so well, not that so many used their heels more 
expertly than their hands. Many officers, chosen by the men whom they commanded, 
were totally unfitted in knowledge and spirit for their stations, and a few exhibited the 
most arrant cowardice. They were tried by court martial, and one was cashiered for 
disobedience and for being a poltroon. But they have all passed away; let us draw the 
curtain of charity around their resting-place, remembering that 
" Hero motives, placed in judgment's scale. 
Outweigh all actions where the heart is wrong." 



The time spent in Boston was brief; short a.s it was, however, the Ilibernias experienced 
a full share of that genuine hospitality for which the modern Athens is so justly and widely 
celebrated. Tremont Engine, No. 12, with its Chief, Oliver R. Bobbins, Esq., had the 
custody of the visiting company, and manifested an earnest desire to make their stay- 
pleasant and agreeable. The excursion to Charlestown, and inspection of the grounds and 
towering monument of Bunker Hill, are incidents that will long be remembered. To look 
upon the beautiful tribute erected to the memory of one of the first and noblest of martyrs 
in the cause of freedom, the gallant Warren, and stand on the spot where he fell, yielding 
up his life in the first great battle of the Revolution — was indeed, a source of melancholy 
gratification to the visitors. The}' naturally brought the Hall of Independence and Faneuil 
Hall — the one the birth-place of liberty, and the other its cradle — into closer association, and 
made the truth that we were all one people, inheritors of the same rights, and bound to 
preserve the same Unio.v, sink deeper into their hearts, and give a stronger and iiolier glow 
to their patriotism. 



GENERAL JOSEPH WARREN. 



Joseph AVarren, son of a Massachusetts farmer, was born in Roxbury in 1740, and 
graduated at Harvard College in 1759. He studied the science of medicine under Dr. 
Lloyd, and rapidly rose to the head, or, at least, to the front rank of that profession in 
Boston. Sentiments of patriotism seemed to form a part of his moral nature, and courage 
to avow them was always prompting him to action. He became necessarily a politician, at 
a time when all men were called upon to act in public matters, or be looked upon as drones. 
He was one of the earliest members of the association in Boston known as the Sons of 




,-^.-: 



-. .pi' 

" To a»iat tho jufforing and protect the weak." C^ 




^ 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

76 

Liberty, and from 1768 was extremely efficient in fostering the spirit of rational liberty and 
independence in the wide and influential circle in which he moved. His mind, suggestive 
and daring, planned many measures, in secret caucus with Adams and others, for resisting 
tlie encroachments of British power. In 1771 he delivered the oration on the anniversary 
of the Boston Massacre. He solicited the honor of performing a like duty on the 5th of 
March, 1775, in consequence of a threat of some of the British officers that they would take 
the life of any man who should dare to speak on that occasion. The old South meeting- 
house was crowded on the appointed day, and the aisles, stairs, and pulpit Avere filled with 
armed British soldiers. The intrepid young orator entered a window by a ladder, back of 
the pulpit, and, in the midst of a profound silence, commenced his exordium in a firm tone 
of voice. His friends, though determined to avenge any attempt at assassination, trembled 
for his safety. He dwelt eloquently upon the early struggles of the New England people, 
their faith and loyalty, and recounted, in sorrowful tones, the oppressions that had been 
heaped upon them. Gradually he approached the scene on the 5th of March, and then 
portrayed it in such language and pathos of expression, that even the stern soldiery that 
came to awe him, wept at his words. He stood there in the midst of that multitude, a 
striking symbol of the revolt which he was leading, firm in the faith of that sentiment, 
" Kesistance to tyrants is obedience to God." Looking at him, it might be said, as Magoon 
remarks, in classic quotation, 

" Thou hast seen Mount Athos ; 

While storms and tempests thunder at its brows 

And oceans beat their billows at its feet, 

It stands unmoved, and glories in its height. 

Such is that haughty man ; his towering soul, 

Mid all the shocks and injuries of fortune. 

Rises superior, and looks down on Caesar." 
When John Hancock went to the Continental Congress, Warren was elected to fill his 
place as President of the Provincial Congress. Four days previous to the action on Breed's 
Hill, that body gave him the commission of Major General, and he was the only officer of 
that rank engaged in the conflict ; yet he was without command, and fought as a volunteer. 
"He fell," as Everett has beautifully expressed it, "with a numerous band of kindred 
spirits — the gray-haired veteran, the stripling in the flower of youth — who had stood side 
by side on that dreadful day, and fell together, like the beauty of Israel in their high 
places!" Warren's body was identified, on the morning after the battle, by Dr. Jefiiies, 
who was his intimate acquaintance. He was buried where he fell, and the place was 
marked. After the evacuation of Boston in 1770, his remains were disinterred, and, on the 
8th of April, were carried in procession from the Representatives' chamber to Kin^''-- 




'To aseiBt the suffering and protect the weak. 



'^v-^CS 



^ 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



77 




Chapel, and buried with military and Masonic honors. The Reverend Di'. Cooper oflered ^^^ 

(§ prayers, and Perez Morton pronounced an oration on the occasion. Warren's remains now ^ ! 

rest beneath St. Paul's Church. He was Grand Master of Freemasons for North America 

at the time of his death. A lodge in Charlestown erected a monument to his memory in 

1794, on the spot where he fell. It was composed of a brick pedestal eight feet square, 

rising ten feet from the ground, and supporting a Tuscan pillar of wood eighteen feet high. 

This was surmounted by a gilt urn, bearing the inscription "J. W., aged 35," entwined with 

Masonic emblems. On the south side of the pedestal was the following inscription : — 

"ERECTED A. D. MDCCXCIV., 

BY KING SOLOMON'S LODGE OF FREE-MASONS, 

CONSTITUTED IN CHARLESTOWN, 1783, 

IN MEMORY OF 

3VEA.0"OE.-C3-EI:TEI?,.A.L JOSEPH "V^7".A.E,IIEIT 

AND HIS ASSOCIATE.S, 

WHO WERE SLAIN ON THIS MEMORABLE SPOT JUNE IT, 

1775. 

None but they who set a just value upon the blessings of liberty are worthy to enjoy her. 

In vain we toiled ; in vain we fought ; we bled in vain, if you, our oll'spring, want valor 

to repel the assault of her invaders. 

Charlestown settled, 1G28. Burned, 1775. Rebuilt, 177G." 

This monument stood forty years, and then was removed to give place to the present 
granite structui-e, known as Bunker Hill Monument. A beautiful model of Warren's 
monument stands within the colossal obelisk. 

On the 8th of April, 1777, Congress, by resolution, ordered "that a monument be erected 
to the memory of General Warren, in the town of Boston, with the following inscription : — 

IN HONOR OF 

josEi>ia: -w-A.E,E,E3sr, 

MAJOR GENERAL OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY. 

HE DEVOTED HIS LIFE TO THE LIBERTIES 

OF HIS COUNTRY; 

AND IN BRAVELY DEFENDING THEM, FELL 

AN EARLY VICTIM, 

IN THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL, 

JUNE 17Tn, 1775. 

THE CONGRESS OK THE UNITED STATES, 

AS AN ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF HIS SERVICES, 

HAVE ERECTED THJS MONUMENT TO HIS MEMORY. 

Congress also ordered " that his eldfst .•^on be educated at the expense of the United 
The patriotic order for the erection of a monument has never been obeyed. 




"To Uiiit the anffering and protect tho woak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




78 



RETURW TO BOSTON. 

The refreshments so seasonably and liberally provided after the long route, on entering 
Boston, by Tremont Engine, No. 12 — the splendid and luxurious banquet by the same 
company at the Sturtevant House, East Boston, graced by his Honor Mayor Lincoln, 
where wit, eloquence and wine were happily mingled, and the magnificent ball given by 
them in honor of the Hibernias — beauty lending enchantment to the scene — are prominent 
among the features of the excursion. 

Washington Engine Company, No. 5, of Charlestown, and Deluge Ho.se, No. G, of East 
Boston, were also marked in their attention, and their acceptable oflcrings are well 
remembered and gratefully appreciated. 

In truth, Boston and its vicinity abounding in objects of historic and revolutionary 
interest, were made doubly attractive to the Hibernias by the warm and cordial greeting 
which met them on every hand from all classes of people. Imperative engagements at 
other points, compelled them to leave that city sooner than they wished. With feelings of 
sincere regret, and a gratitude of no ordinary character, the visiters bade adieu to their 
friends, and turned their faces homeward. 



RETTjrti^i:^a home. 



The company left Boston on Friday morning, in the 8 o'clock train. At Hartford, on the 
stopping of the train, a committee from the ^tna Fire Company of that city, waited upon 
the Chief Marshal, and presented through him to the Hibernia Fire Company, a piece of the 
celebrated Charter Oak, wliich is highly valued, and now constitutes a part of the museum 
of the latter company. 

THE CHARTER OAK. 

James II. succeeded Cliarles II. in 108"), and upon coming into power, resolved to carry 
out a pet scheme of entirely subjugating the New England Colonies. Massachusetts had 
been deprived of her charter, Rliode Island and Connecticut remained — he issued three 
writs of quo warranto upon the latter. The Assembly, after an anxious discussion, returned 
for answer that they desired to be attached to Massachusetts; this James took for a virtual 
submission, and did not push the writs, and hence the charter was eventually preserved. 



the Buffering and protect the weak. 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



Sir Edmund Audross, who liad been lately appointed Governor of New England, left Boston 
with seventy soldiers, and proceeded to Hartford, to receive the formal submission of the 
Assembly. That body being in session, he demanded the charter, which was produced and 
laid on the table ; the point was then discussed until after night, very ably, on the part of 
the Colonists, by Governor Trent, the room was warm and the windows low, an excited 
crowd stood on the outside, suddenly they threw their jackets upon the lights and 
extinguished them; before they were relit, Capt. Wadsworth, of Hartford, seized the 
charter and escaped with it. He concealed it in a large oak in front of the house, and it 
remained hidden until better times, some two years afterward, when William of Orange 
deposed James, and James' favorite, Andross, was deprived of his power in the Colonies. 

The Charter Oak stood till very recently, a memorial of the early and stormy days of 
Connecticut. It was blo\vn down in a severe storm, August 20th, 1856, in the afternoon of 
said day. Fragments are scattered in all directions, as keepsakes, in the hands of the sons 
of Connecticut and others; a massive chair constructed from its roots, has been placed in 
the ofiBce of the State Secretary, and as one of the notabilities of Hartford, is temporally 
occupied by many strangers visiting the city. 



RETURN TO NEW VORK. 

On their arrival in the City of New York, which they reached on the evening of Friday, 
the 2Gth, ou the way to Newark, N. J., the Hibernia Company were again met by the 
untiring members of Americus, No. G, and their indefatigable chief, William M. Tweed, 
Esq., and warmly welcomed. An escort was formed at the depot, consisting of Americus, 
No. G, and Warren Hose, No. 33, and with banners and torches, proceeded through a 
number of the principal streets, to the house of the latter, in Sullivan street, where a most 
timely and sumptuous repast had been prepared by the members of that spirited organiza- 
tion, which was fully enjoyed by a large number of persons. During the festivities, C. E. 
Blumenthal, Esq., in an eloquent speech, presented to Col. Page, on behalf of the Tompkins 
Hose Company, one of their hat fronts elegantly framed. A hat front of the Warren Hose 
was presented at the same time. Suitable replies were made by Col. Page, and the 
testimonials are now part of the treasures of the Hibernia Fire Company, and with many 
others, are carefully preserved in their cabinet. After doing justice to the well supplied 
board set before them, the line of march was again taken up, the streets being thronged 
with .'spectators, and on reaching the ferry on the North river, the Hibernia Fire Company 
were met by a committee from Newark, and being placed in their charge l)y Marshal Tweed, 
started in the cars for the latter city. 



"To uiiat th« loffering and prstaot ths wsak." 





%^M^ THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




80 
RECEPTION ^T ISTE^V^RK 




A very brilliant and flattering reception was given to Hibernia Engine Company, No. 1, 
of Pbiladelphia, by almost the entire Fire Department of this city, last evening. The 
arrangements were carried put successfully, producing a demonstration of welcome such as 
our Fire Department never gave to any company before. The principal credit of the affair 
is of course due to Lafayette Engine Company, No. 4, which, however, since the subject 
was first proposed to the other companies, has received the hearty co-operation of the entire 
Department. 

The streets during the entire evening, were crowded with an immense throng, which 
blockaded the walks and filled all the stoops on the line of the route, and particularly at 
the depot, where the populace were present by thousands. Shortly after dark, the partici- 
pating companies proceeded to the place of forming, with their apparatus, the lanterns and 
torches not being lighted. They were then arranged in line by their respective marshals, 
and at about 8 o'clock marched to the depot, and halted with the right resting at Ailing 
street, and the left at Mulberry street. 

At about 9 o'clock the Hibernia Company arrived in the 8.30 train, and were received at 
the depot with a few appropriate remarks by the Chief Engineer, welcoming them to the 
city, to which Col. Page briefly responded. A salute was fired during these proceedings, by 
Engine Company No. 8, which also fired a salute at the upper Park when the procession 
passed that point. The Hibernia Company then formed in line, escorted by Lafiiyette 
Engine Company, and passed up Market street, in front of the receiving companies. 

The display at this time was remarkably brilliant. Nearly every man's head was 
uncovered, the machines were illuminated, rockets and balls of fire constantly streamed 
into the sky, bengola lights and Roman candles kept up a steady blaze, and cheers upon 
cheers rent the air. The whole line was in a blaze of light, and excited much admiration 
from the immense crowd. All the windows at this part of the route were crowded with 
spectators, and some of the places were illuminated. 

After this splendid ovation, the route of the parade, as previously announced, was 
marched over. The line was headed by Rubsam's Brass Band, followed by Lafayette 
Engine Company, No. 4, with their apparatus illuminated with Chinese lanterns, their 
members also bearing similar lanterns. They were followed by the Chief Engineer, W. H. 
Whittemore, after whom came the Hibernia Company, headed by Beck's Band. The 
following was the order : — 



'To assist the suffering and protect the weak.* 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




i 






81 

BAND, 
Numbering seventeen pieces, with the men dressed in white overcoats (from which hung 
their fatigue caps), black pants, and regulation caps. 

THE TRUSTEES OF THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY OF RHILADELPHIA. 
THE HIBERNIA COMPANY 
Marched in platoons about fourteen deep, and bore an American flag. Their steam appa- 
ratus, unfortunately-, was not with them, having been delayed for the freight train from 
Boston, the company having come through on an express train. The apparatus, 
liowever, reached here with the midniglit train, and was housed by No. 4, -whose engine 
was placed in the hose depot. 

ENGINE COMPANY No. 1 
Followed, with their engine lighted with Chinese lanterns. The men wore red shirts. 

NEPTUNE HOSE COMPANY, No. 1, 

AVas next, with their beautiful carriage lighted up with two signals and two lanterns. The 

members were dressed in dark coats and red shirts, and bore lanterns of various colors. 

RELIEF ENGINE COMPANY, No. 2, 

Followed, the men bearing lanterns. 

WASHINGTON ENGINE COMPANY, No. 3, 
Was next, its members also bearing lanterns. 

CROCKETT HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY, No. 2, 
Had their apparatus handsomely lighted up with Chinese lanterns. The members appeared 
in red shirts, and bore torches. 

PROTECTION ENGINE COMPANY, No. 5, 
Had their apparatus adorned with an arch, in which two game cocks wore placed, witli a 
lantern in the centre. 

COLUMBIAN ENGINE COMPANY, No. (3, 
Was adorned with Chinese lanterns. 

HARRY MARTIN, No. 10, AND SOUTIIWARK, No. 11, 
Were illuminated with lanterns. 

A salute was fired by the Third Ward Artillery, Capt. Nichols, composed of members of 
No. 3, as the procession passed Court street. 

\'arious engine houses and other places on the route were illuminated, and transparencies 
and other devices were exhibited. No. 4 and No. 2 displayed tran.sparencies, " Welcome 
Hibernia." 

After the procession, the line was dismis.^ed, the Hibernia being escorted by No 4 to tlicir 
juarters at Kolb's Union Hotel, in Market street, where they were treated to a collation. 



; the infforing and protect the wc-ik ' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



82 

IM^Ji the guests being welcomed to this city by Dr. J. J. Craven, on behalf of Lafayette Engine 
W Company, No. 4. This was responded to by Col. Page, of the Hibernias. After partaking 
of the provision, the Hibernia Company retired for the night. 

A collation was also partaken of at the house of Hook and Ladder Company, No. 2, at 
which a number of invited guests, including some of the Hibernias, were present. 




THE TRIAL AT NEWARK. 

This morning a trial of the steam apparatus was made in Broad street, in front of the 
Tower, water being obtained from the canal, which, we learn, gave them the best supply 
which the company have had since they left Philadelphia. The fire was lighted fifteen 
minutes before 11 A. M., and in eight minutes steam was up, in twelve minutes the 
machine was in operation, and in seventeen minutes she had eighty pounds pressure to the 
square inch on the boiler. 

Water was first forced through one length of hose and a 1 i inch nozzle, to a distance of 
160 feet, with 160 pounds pressure to a square inch upon the hose, the greatest amount 
which it will bear. A stream was then thrown over the top of the Tower, its extreme 
height being about 160 feet, and the pipe being about 100 feet from the base of the Tower ; 
the length of the stream was some 190 feet. 

Four streams were then thrown — two through a f inch nozzle, and two through a i inch 
nozzle, and water was forced, with 120 pounds pressure on the hose, 162 feet in distance. 

It should be stated that the water was drawn from the canal to the engine, a height of 
about 20 feet — thus illustrating the immense powers of suction of the engine. Tlie trial 
was made under the superintendence of Messrs. John Thornle}', Jacob Bennett, and Joseph 
Parry, the Engineer. 

The apparatus weighs 7,000 pounds without water, 7,700 with, and cost |4,500. 

A large number of the exempt firemen, who have it in contemplation to procure a steam 
engine, were present, and the measurements given above were made by their committee. 
The trial was very satisfactory, and was witnessed by an immense concourse of spectators. 

They then formed in line and marched to the house of Engine Company No. 4, and 
thence proceeded to have a photograph of the company taken by 0. C. Benjamin, who also 
took a fine picture of Union Hook and Ladder Company. 

This afternoon both companies partook of a dinner at Kolb's, at which John Y. Foster 
presided, and speeches were made by Messrs. J. Y. Foster, Dr. Baldwin, and J. J. Craven, 
of this city, and Col. Page and Mr. Coleman, of Philadelphia. s 

The Company return home at 4 J P. M., and will bo received in Philudcliihia !>_) thirty- /\\ 
four companies. c ^ _ 



the Bufforing Bud protect tno weak. 




OU&j/^ ^^Hytt 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



83 



RETURjST to PHILADELPHIA. 




GBANO ILLUMINATED PARADE-A HEARTV HOME RECEPTIOM-THmTY-FOUR 
COMPANIES IN LINE. ^C. 



Last night will long be remembered in the history of the Philadelphia Fire Department, 
for never within our recollection was there such a magnificent display as the occasion of the 
return of the members of the Hibcrnia Engine Company, with their new steam fire engine, 
from the cities of New York, Boston, and Newark, which they have visited since last 
Saturday. The arrangements were made for the escort by the Convention of firemen held 
during the past week, presided over by Col. T. G. Morehead, Thos. C. Thompson, Secretary, 
and John E. Neal, being Chairman of the Committee ; but though these preliminaries induced 
us to anticipate a demonstration worthy of our city, we had no idea that the reception would 
be on as grand and magnificent a scale as it really was. Honored as the Hibernia members 
have been elsewhere during the week which has just closed, the evidence of the genuine 
respect entertained for them here, where they are best known, and where their laudable 
efforts in the great field of enterprising philanthropy, have been so often witnessed and 
commended, which was extended to them last evening, must have affected them more 
pleasantly than any tribute of hospitality received abroad. 

At an early hour, the companies which designed participating in the escort left their 
respective localities, and, accompanied by excellent bands of music, marched to the vicinity 
of the Kensington depot. The streets were l)rilliantly illuminated with thousands of 
torches, and alive with excitement. 

Previous to the formation of the line, the companies composiiii;- tlie diflereiit divisions 
formed in the following order : — 

Chief Marsii.^i. and Aids, Chief En'cinkkr and As.sistants, on i'ranklbrd road, north of 
Montgomery street. 

First Division on Fraukford road, right resting on Montgomery. 

Second Division on Frank ford road ; right, on Oxford. 

TuiRD Division on Fraukford road ; right, on Jeflerson. 

FouRTU Division on Fraukford road ; right, on Master. 

Fifth Division on Fraukford road ; right, on Phoenix. 

Sixth Division on Frankford road; riglit, immediately in the rear of the Fiftli Division. 

Seventh Division on Franklin street ; right, on Fraukford road. 



' To assist the suffering and protect the ' 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




84 

It having been previously announced that the Hibernia members would arrive at the '\^i'^ 
Kensington Depot at 7 J o'clock, the companies were promptly at their allotted places at 
that time. It was subsequently ascertained, however, that the train would not reach the 
city until 8 i o'clock, and, in the meantime, the firemen passed the hour as best they could. 
We noticed that the publicans in the neighborhood did an exceedingly thriving business. 
Bonfires were started, music was heard in all directions, and a vast scene of excitement 
prevailed. 

The Hibernia members reached the city at twenty minutes before 9 o'clock, having come 
in a .special train from Tacony. Their arrival was the signal for some enthusiastic cheering 
by those within the depot enclosure, and shouts of welcome for squares around. When the 
members had left the cars, and formed in order under the skilful marshalship of Col. James 
Page, they were addressed by Philip S. White, Esq., who was selected to present a 
beautiful wreath of flowers, and who, in a clear and strong voice, spoke as follows : — 

Mr. President — You and your associates, actuated both hy pleasure and a desire to 
enlarge the sphere of benevolence and patriotism among your brother firemen of the 
country, have returned from a visit characterized by unusual and extraordinary manifesta- 
tions of urbanity and hospitality. The public papers along your route seemed to vie with 
each other in paying respectful homage to the excellence of your motives and the gallantry 
of your deportment. You have returned with your blushing honors thick upon you — you 
have come back crowned with victorious wreaths — your laurels are unstained with human 
blood. I have been made by the vast concourse around me, the honored instrument of 
bidding you all a heartfelt welcome home. They might have selected a medium of more 
ability to do so, but they could not have found one who can embark a bigger heart in such 
an agreeable duty. 

A member of one fire company m3-self, I feel that I am a member of all of them. I love 
the motive, the glory, the heroism — I venerate the pride that is watchful to hear the first 
alai-m, and eager to be the first to respond to it. It is interesting at all times to see a noble 
spirit struggling successfully with misfortune ; it is animating to see a warrior entering a 
breach amid a shower of musketry and the thunders of artillery ; but to see a gallant fire- 
man in the fourth story of a burning building, enveloped in smoke, and encircled in the 
lurid flames, seizing upon, enfolding to his bosom, bearing safely to the ground, and placing 
in its distracted mother's arms, the unscathed infant that she loves, is a spectacle too 
sublime for descrijition — too towering to place the actor in any other light than that of 
being " but a little lower than the angels." 

But, Mr. President, besides tlicse gallant spirits who have oome to welcome you home, /^-\ 
there is another human element here to welcome you back, which is nearer still to tli(> 




d: 



' To assist the suffering and protect the i 



C.> 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



85 

angelic circle. It is the wives aud daughters of the firemen, who are here to present you 
and your associates an humble testimony of their affectionate devotion. I am requested by 
Mrs. Henry Marmein to present you this beautiful wreath of flowers. Its composition 
speaks for itself. Cherish it, for next to an angel's blessing is the suitable gift of a beautiful 
and virtuous woman. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, accept our deep and heartfelt congratulations upon your safe 
return to the smiling faces, the warm hearts, and bright eyes that await you at your several 
homes. 

Col. Page resjionded gracefully and feelingly. He referred to the cordial reception which 
had been extended to them in the cities of New York, Boston and Newark, and said that 
unprecedented hospitalities had everywhere been shown them. They could never forget 
the many lunduesses of their brother firemen of their sister cities, and the recollection 
of them would be cherished to the last moments of life. 

But after all these reception courtesies abroad, he was glad to sec the glorious demonstra- 
tion made by the department in Philadelphia. It assured him and the members of the 
Hibernia, that Philadelphia was greatly glad that during their absence from the homes 
aud the hearts which they had left, they had done nothing of which they had 
not just cause to be proud. Col. Page also spoke of the responsibility which rested upon 
him as the Marshal of the company during the visit, and said that he had earnestly 
endeavored to discharge the really onerous duties which had devolved upon him. Now his 
gratification commenced. Abroad, he was uneasy under the weight of his charge, but here, 
in the city of his birth, he was indeed gratified to see that his labors had not been in vain. 
As the best and brightest event of his life, he would ever consider the hearty home 
reception which had been extended to the Hibernia. It was indeed, a gratifying spectacle 
to behold in the immense gathering by which he and his companions were surrounded, so 
many of the fairer part of creation assembled to bid them welcome. To know that he 
returned to their mothers, wives, sisters and daughters, each and every of his command, 
improved by what had been seen, and worthy of the hospitalities all had so liberally 
experienced, was a source of infinite gratification. To him and to them, therefore, the 
wreath was a most acceptable ofl'ering, since it assured them that the eyes that watched, 
and the hearts which beat for them in their absence, were not disappointed in the result. 
They returned happy in the consciousness of duty performed and reputation maintained. 
To the cherished homes that impatiently awaited them, he would soon be able to dismiss 
his comrades with a warm and grateful remembrance of their excellent deportment, and a 
heart that should never cease its wi.«hing for their individual prosperity and happiness. 
Enthusiastic cheers greeted the conclu.sion of both speeches, which were in excellent 




"To assist the sufforing and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



86 



Shortly after 9 o'clock the line of procession commenced moving in the following ordi 

Cordon of Reserve Officers under Chief S. G. RUGGLES and Lieut. HENDERSON, 
OF THE Reserve Corps. 

DAVID M. LYLE, Chief Marshal. 

GEO. W. SHOESTER, Special Aid. 

TIIOS. TIIOMrSON, THOS. SHARP, H. J. GARINGER, C. S. AUSTIN, Aids. 

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

EAIRMOUNT FIRE COMPANY, 
With over two hundred equipped members, with torches and transparencies. 

GUARD OF HONOR, 
Consisting of one member from each company in the line. 

HIBERNIA FIRE COMPANY. 

The members, notwithstanding what they had gone through during their trip, looked 
exceeding well ; their steam engine was drawn by six horses, (which were kindly loaned 
to the company on their departure and return, by Simon Gartland, E«q.,) and was 
covered with bouquets and wreaths. 

Then came the companies in the following order : — 

fx:rst iDi'Visioisr- 

HENRY. ROBINSON, Marshal. 

NORTHERN LIBERTY FIRE COMPANY. 

PHILADELPHIA HOSE COMPANY. 

EMPIRE HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY. 

VIGILANT ENGINE. 

GOOD INTENT HOSE COMPANY. 




'To assist the suffering and protect tlio weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



87 



GEORGE W. DOWNING, Maksual. 

RELIANCE ENGINE COMPANY, NEPTUNE HOSE COMPANY, 

ASSISTANCE ENGINE COMPANY, HOPE HOSE COMPANY, 

FRANKLIN ENGINE COMPANY. 




JOHN CURRY, Mar.<iiai,. 

PH(ENIX HOSE COMPANY, HUMANE ENGINE COMPANY, 

UNITED STATES HOSE COMP.VNY, COLUMBIA ENGINE COMPANY, 

NORTHERN LIBERTY HOSE COMPANY. 



.lOSEPH ROBINSON, Marshal. 

PHILADELPHIA ENGINE COMPANY, PENNSYLVANIA HOSE COMPANY, 

UNITED STATES ENGINE COMPANY, LAFAYETTE HOSE COMPANY, 

WEST PHILADELPHIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



FIFTH IDI^VISIOlSr. 




JOHN M'GIRR, Maushal. 

MARION HOSE COMPANY, UNION ENGINE COMPANY, 

MoVAMENSING hose COMPANY, MECHANIC ENGINE COMPANY 

GOOD-WILL HOSE COMPANY. 



^- 



"To HtUt the Buffering and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



SIXITH IDIAT-ISIOnST- 

AMOS E. DRESSLER, Marsual. 

WESTERN ENGINE COMPANY, FRANKLIN HOSE COMPANY, 

WARREN HOSE COMPANY, KENSINGTON HOSE COMPANY, 

GENERAL TAYLOR HOSE COMPANY. 




MORRIS RODGERS, Marshal. 

UNITED HOSE COMPANY, WEST PHILADELPHIA HOSE COMPANY, 

COHOCKSINK HOSE COMPANY, ROBERT MORRIS HOSE COMPANY, 

WASHINGTON HOSE COMPANY. 



Nearly every company in the line had a fine band of music. The sidewalks and streets 
were thronged with spectators all along the route ; a number of the houses in the vicinity { 
of the depot were brilliantly illuminated, and the bells of several of the fire companies kept 
constantly ringing. There must have been between three and four thousand firemen in the 
line, and the flaring of as many torches upon the broad expanse of night, was strikingly ' 
suggestive of an extensive conflagration. Never before have our eyes greeted such a 
remarkably brilliant sight, and never have we, within our reportorial experience, 
witnessed such a heartfelt reception. A number of the companies carried blue lights, 
others set oiF an indefinite quantity of rockets, Roman candles, and other fireworks — I 
the pyrotechnic exhibition being worthy of Professor Jackson. Throughout the line wore 
large transparencies, containing the words " Welcome Home," " Ilibernia, No. 1," ' 
"Hearty Welcome," and numerous others of a similar sort. The members of the 
Philadelphia Ho.se walked in citizens' dress, and presented an exceedingly neat appearance. 
Every company turned out in unusual force. We noticed this more especially of the a 
Columbia Engine, who had all their members in the line. In fact, the di.splay was univer- ^^ 
sally admitted on all sides, to be the largest and best that has ever occurred in this city. '''^'^ • 



■To assist the suifering and protect the weak." \^- 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



89 

The reception, unexpected as it was to the Hibernia boys, must have been most grateful 
to their feelings. Cheers were given at every corner to each company as they passed. All the 
engine houses were illuminated, and the bells kept ringing while the line was moving. The 
route was not gone over until midnight, when the Hibernia members reached their destination. 

The house of the Hibernia, in York street, was brilliantly illuminated, and tastefully 
decorated with numerous American flags. A large flag was suspended across Third 
street, and many others were displayed in the immediate neighborhood. An arch of 
gas jets, with a large star in the centre, kindly furnished by Messrs. Archer & "Warner, 
for the occasion, was erected across York street, from the engine house to the residence of 
Mrs. Willing, directly opposite. The entire front of the house was illuminated with gas, 
on either side of the front were two stars, formed of gas jets, and a large figure " 1," 
consisting of seventy jets, in the middle window of the second story front, all fitted up 
gratuitously, by Mr. Lewis H. Plum. 

Flags of every size were hung about in what may well be termed " a perfect state of 
looseness." Large bonfires were kindled in the neighborhood, and kept up until midnight. 
Upon the arrival of the Hibernia at the house, a salute of one hundred guns was fired by 
Col. John K. Murphy, of the National Artillery. 

The display reflected the highest credit upon David M. Lyle, Esq., the Chief Marshal, 
and the Fairmount Engine Company, under whose auspices the whole was arranged, and 
the prompt and splended manner in which their call was responded to by the various 
companies taking part in the parade, convinced the Hibernias of the kind feeling entertained 
for them by their brother firemen of the city, a feeling they will do their utmost to preserve 
and cherish, by faithfully jjerforming their duty to the public and to each and every member 
of the department. 

The Hibernias did not reach their engine house until late at night. For some time before 
the close of the procession, the snow fell in abundance. The members, wearied by the 
fatigues of the day, and the long march they had undergone, were anxious to be dismissed 
and return to their homes. Col. Page called them to order, and in a brief and touching 
address, bid them farewell. In dismissing them, he stated that the baton which he then 
held in his hand, the evidence of the authority which had been confided to him for a given 
period, had been used by him for the first and last time — he now surrendered it, witliout 
stain — never more by him to be resumed; to be cherished, he hojied, by them a.>< a memorial 
of their brilliant excursion. 



Thus was brought to a happy termination tlie excursion of the Hiljernia Fire Company, 
(all the preliminary arrangements for which were made by John R. Downing, Esq., its 
Secretary,) after a visit to New York, Brooklyn, Boston, Charlestown, Mass., and 




list the suffering and protect the weak." 




% 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



90 

Newark, N. J. The time occupied was eight days, for thej left Phihidelphia on the 
morning of Saturday, the 20th of November, 1858, and returned on the evening of 
Saturday, the 27th of the same month, without having encountered the slightest occurrence 
to mar tlic harmony or disturb the pleasure of the jaunt; and every member of the body 
improved and instructed by what he had seen, and gratefully impressed by what he 
had experienced. The descriptions contained in the preceding pages convey hut a faint 
idea of the splendor of the recepti(m which everywhere awaited the company, and no 
language can do justice to the warm and generous devotion of their brother firemen in all 
the cities vi.sited, and along the route, and the attention of the citizens and municipal 
bodies. It was from the start to the close, a march of triumph never to be forgotten 
by those who were the objects of so much and such extraordinary courtesy and 
nospiTALiTV, an out-pouring of welcome without a parallel in the annals of the Fire 
Department. 

After the return, the Ilibernias, to make glad the hearts of the children at Randall's 
Island, and show this multitude of little ones that neither time nor absence had driven 
them from the memories of their visitors, sent on to them in season for the New Year 
of 1859, a large quantity of pound cake and a variety of confectionary, which were 
distributed among them, much to their gratification and enjoyment. 

For the boys, there was prepared and will be presented to them, a small national 
standard of silk, handsomely ornamented, to be borne in their ranks wliile parading and 
performing their military evolutions, with a view to inspire in their young hearts a proper 
feeling and love for the glorious stars and stripes, so that in the language of one of the 
.iiifted poets of the city, which is their common mother and protector, they may be at all 
times ready to exclaim — 

" Flag of the free heart's hope and home ! 

By Angel hands to valor given ; 
Thy stars have lit the welkin dome. 

And all thy hues were born in heaven. 
Forever float that standard sheet ! 

Where breathes the foe but ftxlls before us, 
With Freedom's soil beneath our feet 

And Freedom's banner streaming o'er us?" 

The incidents of the visit to Randall's Island, the most touching episode in the excursion, 
will be long and pleasantly rembered by all who were present on the interesting occasion. 
The great commercial emporium lias no institution of which she has greater reason to be 
proud, than this home for her destitute children. 



: the Buffering and pioteot the weak.' 





^^V^'^J 










r.'-ij 










'^'^ ' ' ^\ -^ _ J 1/ JOHN EISENBREY, Jr. Eso. 



,, =UBLICJ ^ 




THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 
91 



RECEIA^i:N^a COMF».^l^IES. 




NEW YORK* 



AMERICUS ENGINE COMPANY, No. 6. 

Stationed at No. 269 Henry street, near Gouverneur street. 

Instituted January 1, 1849. 

OFFICERS. 

William Axspacii, Foreman, "William B. Duxley, Assistant Foreman. 

Thomas Shandlet, Secretary, William Gayte, Treasurer, 

James Mahon and John McGarigal, Representatives. 



WARREN HOSE COMPANY, No. 33. 
Stationed at No. 118 Sullivan street, between Prince and Spring streets. 

omcEns. 

Anthony Yeomaxs, Foreman, James T. Cratt, Assistant Foreman, 

John Stoothoff, Secretary, John S. Anderson, Treasurer, 

Henry C. Dennett and William Meighan, Representatives. 



THE OLD GUARD* 

In the Fire Department of a great city, as in all bodies composed of many member.s, an 
honest difference of opinion exists as regards the manner in which it.s duties are performed, 
and its general discipline, and by the time an election takes place, resolves itself down into 
two parties, administration and anti-administration men, although all aim at one point, and 
that is, the general good of the department. Still in the anxiety of both to claim the 
greatest amount of usefulness, they are apt to over-step the bounds of moderation and 
propriety, and in the absence of wholesome influence and mediation, would lay themselves 
open to public condemnation, and injure the institution to wliich all l)ear .so strong an 
attachment. 



' To assist tho Buffering and protect the weak.' 







THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



9^ 



There is in the City of New York, a body, composed of men whose time of ser\'ice 
has expired, and who, to a certain extent, have withdrawn from active duties as firemen, 
but yet retain all their interest for the welfare of the department. From the absence 
of association, and giving more time to reflection, their feelings and prejudices have become 
mellowed, and they stand ready to take the breach and defend it from external injuries, or 
preserve it from internal dissentions, irrespective of party — this body has been familiarly 
styled the Old Guard. 

It never assumed the shape of organization until November 3, 1858, when on receipt of 
the news that the Hibernia Engine Company was about to pay a visit to New York, a few 
of its present members accidentally met, and the conversation turning to that visit, it was 
proposed that a meeting should be called for the purpose of tendering a banquet. It met 
with so spirited a response, that an organization at once took place under the name of the 
Old Guard — James L. Miller was elected President, Charles L. Curtis Secretary, and 
Lawrence Taylor Treasurer. It numbered at the time of the visit, eighty members, and 
had been in existence about two weeks. Among its members are men of all political 
parties, many of them occupying very prominent positions ; of the re.spectability, wealth, 
and intelligence of that city, they claim a full share. The only requisites for membership, 
are good character and exempt firemanship. 



BROOKIVN, 




CONSTITUTION ENGINE COMPANY, No. 7. 
Instituted October 24, 1828. 

OFFICERS. 

James Lynch, Foreman, James Burns, A.ssistant Foreman 

Michael Kennedy, Second As.sistant Foreman, 
John F. O'IIara, Secretary, Thos. D. Farrall, Treasurer, 

William A. Furey and John Kelly, Representatives. 
P. Dougherty', Trustee, J. Fitzpatrick, Steward. 



the Buffering and protect the weak." 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



93 



WILLIAMSBURG* N. V. 




ZEPHYR HOSE COMPANY, No. 4. 

In-stituted July 28, 1853. 
Located No. 114 South Third, between Fifth and Sixth streets. 

F. H. Brottxixg, Foreman, C. "W. Hats, Assistant Foreman. 

Francis Smith, Secretary, T. W. Lewis, Treasurer. 



BOSTON. 



TREiMONT FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 12. 

The old organization dates beyond June, 1790. At that time, Capt. Jonathan Levering 
was Foreman, and the engine was stationed where the liberty tree stood in 1775. This tree 
was cut down by the English troops because of its name. In addition to the civility already 
noticed on the part of this company, they gave the Hibernias a grand dinner at the 
Sturtevant House, East Boston, of which, the following account is taken from the Firemen'.* 
Advocate : — 

The line formed and marched to the Sturtevant House, where dinner liad been provided. 
At the tables we noticed his Honor Mayor Lincoln, Ex-Alderman Drew, Col. French, 
Francis Richards, Noah Sturtevant, Engineer Damrell, and others. "Mine host," Tafts, 
had provided a most excellent dinner, which was well appreciated. It was alike creditable 
to the host and the Tremonts, and they may well be proud of it. Tlie lar^'c dining hall 
was well filled, and everything looked like contentment througliont. After the inner man 
had been provided for, the intellectual feast was opened by Capt. Roljbins, wlio. after a l)rief 
speech, gave the first regular toast : — 

The True Fireman — His history is before the world ; we are proud to have with us one 

its brightest Pages ! 



•r 

, the sutforing and protect the weak." 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




94 

Col. Pack responded in .in eloquent and coniplinicntary manner ; he spoke of the uses of 
the Steamer, and alluded to Charlestown, Bunker Hill, Faneuil Hall, and the surroundings, 
of the firemen ; and said that they could be no otherwise than patriotic. 

Second regular toast — 

His Honor the Mayor — A true man ; the friend of the true man, especially of true fire- 
men ever^'where. 

His Honor Mayor Lincoln, responded in a patriotic manner, and alluded to the dangers 
of the firemen. 

Third regular toast — 

Our Guests — Thrice welcome in their intercourse with us; may they find us gentlemen as 
well as firemen. 

Mr. Coleman, of the Hibcruia, spoke in an eloquent manner, and alluded to the 
introduction of steam engines into Phihidelphia. 

Fourth regular toast — 

The Cities of Philadelphia and Boston — One had a Penn, the other her Franklin : may 
their descendants emulate their virtues. 

Responded to by Col. French, who .spoke of the reception of the City Guard in Phihidel- 
phia, in 18.31, and paid a fitting tribute to the niilitar\' of both cities, and gave a 
sentiment : — 

Firemen and Soldiers — Their interests are identical, their friendship should be lasting. 

Fifth regular toast — 

The Firemen of the Quaker City — They ignore slow coaches, and go by steam. 

Sixth regular toast — 

Steam Fire Engines — Give them fair play, a free fight, and a fivir field, and they will ask 
no quarters. 

Ex-Alderinan Drew responded and defined his position. 

Seventh regular toiist — 

The Trustees of the Hibeniia Steam Fire Engine — They de.serve the thanks of the 
friends of the Steam Fire Engine, for their untiring efibrts to have a machine constructed 
which cannot fail. 

John Tiiornley, of the Ilibernia, responded, and gave as a sentiment: — 
The Boston Firemen. 



'To asBisl tho suffering and protect the weak.' 







THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

95 

A sentimeut compliiiieutary to the Chief was read, but as he was not present, a letter was 
read excusing himself for not being present. 

A sentiment complimentary to the Assistant Engineer, was responded to by Capt. Jonx 
Damrell. Citizens and friends were next toasted, to which Mr. Francis Ricuards 
responded. The Press was next toasted, and responded to by the editor of the Firemen's 
Advocate, who gave in conclusion — 

The Firemen of the City of Brotherly Love, and the Firemen of the City of Notions — 
May each soon take a notion to continue to entertain hrotherhj love for each other. 

A letter was read from Wm. Long, stating his inability to be present. A splendid 
bouquet of artificial flowers was presented to the Hibernias, by Capt. Bobbins, in behalf of 
Miss L. Lindsay, 27 Hanover street, Boston, which was received by Col. Page in a brief 
but eloquent address. 

After gi^^ng three times three cheers, the company retired to the American House to 
prepare for the ball, which was a grand afli'air, and held at the LTnion Hall. It broke up 
about day-light. 

The Union Hall, the place selected for the ball, stands upon and covers the spot where 
the liberty tree stood. On the front of this building is a large free-stone block with the 
liberty tree cut in relief The ball was a superb affair, the rooms being crowded with the 
youth and beauty of Boston. Banners and transparencies, interspersed with festoons of 
flowers, added to the general effect. 

OmCEHS OF THE TK.E3yrOlNrT. 

Oliver R. Robbins, Foreman, John Hawkins, Assistant Foreman, 

Levi W. Shaw, Secretary, Charles H. Prince, Steward. 




EAST BOSTON. 

DELUGE HOSE COMPANY, No. 0. 
Instituted January 1, 1852. Located on Paris street. 

OEFICER.S- 

Josepu Barnes, Foreman, Wm. H. Poole, Assistant Foreman 

Wm. H. Rvmill, Clerk. 



"To usiat th« suffering and protect the weak.' 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



96 



CHARLESTOWN, MASS. 



f^^ 




WASHINGTON ENGINE COMPANY, No. 5. 
Instituted September 18, 1826. 

Benjamin Brintnall, Foreman, 
Baetlett S. Drew, First Assistant, Alfred Morse, Second Assistant, 

M. P. Smith, Secretary, Elias Crofts, Jr., Treasurer. 



HARTFORD* C0N1\I» 



The jEtna Fire Coinijany, and Damper Engine Company, No. 4, had deputations on the 
arrival of the Hibernias at this point, and hat fronts were presented by each of them. 



NEWARK, N. J. 



LAFAYETTE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 4. 

Instituted June 5, 1834. Located No. 19 Academy street. 

Motto — " Veni, vidi, vici." 



"William O'Brien, Acting Foreman, 
Albert Smith, Secretary, 

Isaac B. Piiluukn, Treasure 



Ezra S. Axtell, Assistant Foreman. 
Thomas Steven.son, Steward, 



coivir^ittee 01>t e.ecei»ti01>3". 
Willl\m O'Brien, William W. Smith, Francis Sterling, 



John II. Ball, William Godber, Joh 

The Foreman of this company, Mr. Jacob Allen, was accidentally 

May, 1857, at a fire which occurred in the India Rubber Work.s, ;i 



Nugent. 

ailed cm the ^Sth of 

high brick chimney 

falling upon him while conversing with Assistant Engineer John B. Thorn, who was also 

severely hurt. 

Mr. Allen was much respected and esteemed by all who knew liim, and the company have 

encased his hat and trumpet, which are preserved by them as a sad memento of the past 



BiBt the suft'ering and protect the weak." 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. ,«:^^'^^ 

97 





Short as was the staj of the Hibernias iu Newark, the attention of their brother firemen 
and the citizens generally, enabled them to see much of that jjrosjjerous and beautiful cit^-. 
Specially the guests of Lafayette Engine Compan3-, No. 4, the members of that excellent 
body were constant in their efforts to please, and deeply impressed their visitors bv their 
generous deportment. The following account of the dinner given just before leaving that 
city, is thus descriljcd iu the papers of the day : — 

DINNER AT NEWARK. 

At 2 o'clock, the Ilibernia.s, with their hosts, and several invited guests, sat down to a 
sumptuous dinner at Kolb's Union Hotel, in Market street. Upon marching into the dining 
hall, the company took their places at the tables, of which there were four, and were 
welcomed to the festive board by a representative of No. 4, in a few remarks. 

Col. Page responded on behalf of the Hibernias, and said that, although greatly wearied, 
he yet had sufficient tongue-power to acknowledge the kindness of the Newark firemen, and 
to say that while his company had been the recipients of marked kindness elsewhere, they 
would never forget the hospitable attentions bestowed upon them here. 

Due attention having been paid to the viands, the following regular toasts were given : — 

1. Our Guests — The Officers and Members of Eibernia Engine Company, No. 1, of Phila- 
delphia — Lafayette No. 4, of Newark, extends to them one and all, the hand of fellowship, 
hoping that the friendship this day established may be perpetual. 

2. The City of Philadelphia — Distinguished for its patriotic devotion in the American 
Revolution, its statesmen and heroes are embalmed in the pages of its history; in its 
increased prosperity, population and power, we see evidences of its olden energy, enterprise 
and independence. 

.3. The Common Council of our city — Their prompt legislation in behalf of the depart- 
ment claims for them our warmest acknowledgments. 

4. The Fire Department of the City of Philadelphia — Foremost in any work that 
promises for the public good, may their reward be commensurate with their zeal and deserts. 

5. Woman — Mistress of our hearts and homes — the best gift of Heaven to Man — the true 
fireman is always her servitor and defender. 

The first toast was received with three cheers and a tiger, and was responded to by Col. 
Page, who, iu concluding, gave a sentiment in honor of Lafayette Engine Company, No. 4 
which was received with the usual honors. The second toast was responded to by Mr 
CoLE-MAN, of the Philadelphia Ledger, who spoke of the position which Philadelphia occupies 



"To assist the suffering and protect the weak." ^ 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

98 

among the cities of the Union ; the imj^ortance of the ap[)liciitlon of steam to the nses of 
firemen, and the pleasure which the Hibernias had experienced during their stay in Newark. 
His remarks were loudly applauded at the close. 

The last toast — To Woman — was responded to by Dr. J. J. Craven, in some excellent 
remarks. No one, he said, could so well appreciate the value of woman as the fireman. It 
is she who, when he comes in from the performance of his duty, comforts and cheers him 
with her genial attentions — having the warm slippers and dry clothing ever ready, and kind 
words in abundance to crown her welcome. He did not doubt that many a wife and sister 
was eagerly awaiting the return of the Hibernias, and his wish was that they might all 
safely reach their homes, and find all their receptions eclipsed by that of the circle at home. 

The sentiments having all been duly honored, the company rose, and with hands linked, 
closed the festivities with the good old air of "Auld Lang Syne" — every voice mingling in 
the chorus. Few banquets, from commencement to close, have been more agreeable than 
was that which thus pleasantly terminated. 



PHtLAOELPHIA. 



FAIKMOUNT ENGINE COMPANY. 

Instituted February 22, 1823. 

Incorporated April 19, 1850. Located on Ridge Avenue, above Vine. 

Motto — '• Prompt to action." 



omcEns. 




David M. Lylk, President. 

Edmund Burkk, Vice President, William S. Mann, Treasurer, 

A. C. Steveson, Secretary, Jno. J. Bates, Assist. Secretary. 

David M. Lyle and Joun Fredericks, Delegates to Fire Association. 

Alfred Ruhl, Director to the Fire Department. 



the Buffering and protect the weak.' 













f-lfl 




^'\ 



W^ 



( ^ '. 



DR DAVID JAYNE 



:^ 















THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

99 

Among the illustrations of the work will be found likenesses of the following gentlemen 
who are not active members of the Ilibernia Fire Company : — 

Hon. ALEXANDER HENRY, 

At present Mayor of the Consolidated City of Philadelphia. He is a gentleman of dis- 
tinguished ability and popular manners, and has occupied numerous public positions, having 
been a Director of the Public Schools, Manager of the House of Refuge, Director of the 
Girard College, Member of the Common Council of the City, Inspector of the Eastern 
Penitentiary, aiid other posts. 

JOHN THORNLEY, Esq., 

A well known and enterprizing citizen, celebrated for his industry and correct business 
habits, and for the introduction of India Rubber Goods in all their varieties. President 
of the Board of Trustees of the Company. 

JACOB BENNETT, Esq., 
Formerly Captain of Police under Mayor Gilpin, at present engaged in his business as a 
Jeweller. He was an able and efficient officer, and is deservedly esteemed for his good 
qualities, a useful, experienced and active member of the Board of Trustees. 

JOHN EISENBREY, Jr., Esq., 

An estimable and liberal member of the community, extensively engaged in business, 
and highly esteemed for his general courtesy and excellent heart. A member of the Board 
of Trustees. 

Dr. DAVID JAYNE, 

Of world-wide celebrity and a public spirited citizen, as his many splendid and substantial 
improvements in the city attest. To no one of her opulent sons is Philadelphia more 
indebted than she is to this gentleman ; for her streets abound with the beautiful palatial 
edifices he has erected without regard to cost. The University at Lewisburg, Pa., recentlv 
conferred upon him the honorary degree of LL.D. 

GEORGE MEGEE, Esq., 
Late High Sheriff of the City and County of Philadelphia. Captain of tlie First 
Company of National Guards, a well known and prominent citizen. He acted as one of the 
Assistant Marshals. 

CASPER M. BERRY, Esq., 
This gentleman acted as right guide on the excursion. lie served in the Mexican War. 
holding the commission of Second Lieutenant of Company C, Capt. Wm. F. Small, Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Regiment, and was at Vera Cruz and other places during the campaign, 
present he is Captain of the Minute Men of '70, and is an ivctive and popidar office 



. the Buiforiog and protect the weak.' 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 
lOO 

THE H^I^D EjSrai^ES. 

LOCATIONS, PRESENTATIONS, AND OTHER MATTERS 





The hand engine represented in the plate, was built by John Agnew in 1836. When she 
was received from the builder in September of that year, she was found to play so badly 
that the members refused to keep her, and she was at once returned to him. He discovered 
on examination, that a small piece of leather had got into one of the valves, and prevented 
her from being properly worked. She was again delivered to the company, and a trial of 
power took place between her and the Peterson Fire Company, No. 15, of New York, then 
on a visit to Philadelphia — the guests of the Good Intent Hose Company — in front of the 
Exchange on Dock street, in which the Hibernia proved successful. The result gave 
general satisfaction to the company, and .she ever after proved a reliable hand engine. At 
this time the engine house was in Dock street, two doors east of Upton's hotel, where the 
company had been located for over seventy years. The engine stood there until 1839, 
when in consequence of some difficulty as to title to the ground, they had to give up the 
possession, and were out of a situation for upwards of a year. During this period, the 
engine was placed in a stable in Fourth street above Harmony court, back of where the 
auction mart of Moses Thomas & Sons now stands. While on this spot, a levy was made by 
the Sheriff, on the tenant's property, the levy including the hand engine as well as other 
articles belonging to the company. After considerable trouble, the engine was released, but 
the other property was detained and sold by that officer. 

The engine was then taken to Coates alley to be repaired and re-painted. Here by some 
rogue, she was stripped of all her brass work, which was afterwards found in a junk shop in 
Water below Race street, and recovered. This year (1839) the City Councils refused an 
appropriation on the ground that the engine had not been in service, but the minutes of the 
recorder of the company showed that she had been at the great fire at the corner of Front 
and Chestnut streets, where some fifty stores were destroyed (a well-remembered and 
disastrous conflagration), and at other fires, and upon this evidence the company obtained 
the money, which placed them in a condition for increased usefulness, and enabled them to 
negotiate for the purchase of a house and lot in Pear street, just below Third, south .side, 13 
by 44 feet. Here they placed the engine after she had been repaired and painted anew, on 
the Cth of May, 1840. She continued in active service until 1844, when a new and y^\^ 
improved hand engine (the present one) was provided by the same builder, and housed on 



'To assist the suffering and protect the weak.' 



d' 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 

lOl 

the 20tli of February of that year, beuig the anniversary of the compan}-, and the e 
celebrated by a supper at the old Indian Queen Hotel, in Fourth street below 
attended by over one hundred and twenty persons. 

In 1851 the company sold the property in Pear street, because it proved too small for 
them, and purchased a lot in York (now Evelina) street. They removed the hand engine to 
a temporary building put up on a lot in Walnut above Second street, north side, which they 
had rented from F. Lennig, Esq., while waiting the completion of their new house in York 
street. Tliis new building, of which the engraving conveys a correct idea, was finished and 
taken possession of in 1852, the same year in which the centennial anniversary was held. 
It has since been enlarged, to accommodate the Steam Fire Engine, and has stabling in the 
rear for horses. The first story, 57 feet by 17 feet 4 inches, is appropriated to the Steam 
and Hand Fire Engines, Tender and Spider, with closets for the use of the members. The 
second story has the Engineer's office, alarm telegraph, and a large meeting room 50 by 17 
feet 4 inches, furnished with lounges, carpet, desks, and mirrors, and is ornamented with a 
number of portraits and paintings. The third story is occupied as a library, sitting and 
reading room, and is of the same size. In it are cases for books, and a museum, and at the 
head of the stairs a recess for the Directors and Recorder. The fourth story, also of same 
size, is used as a sleeping room, with twenty iron bedsteads, and is handsomely furnished 
and kept scrupulously neat and clean, and governed by rigid rules. The whole building is 
admirably arranged, and fitted up in a complete manner. 

Among the numerous testimonials held by the company, are the following: 

An octagon shaped Silver Horn, presented by Mr. William Maroney, September 1, 1838. 

Two Silver House Horns, with this inscription — "Presented to the Ilibernia Engine 
Company, No. 1, by the Young Men's Social Assembly, 20 February, 1855." 

Two Silver Fire Horns delivered after addresses by the Hon. Robert T. Conrad and 
Philip S. White, Esq., in behalf of the donors, immediately before the triennial parade of 
the Fire Department, with the following inscriptions : — " Presented to the Ilibernia Fire 
Engine Company, No. 1, by their neighbors, October 5, 1857." "Presented to the 
Hibernia Fire Engine Company, No. 1, by their friends, October 5, 1857." 

A Brass Horn, silver mounted, to be run for by the members monthly, was also presented 
by Mr. Francis H. Finney, on the 2d of June, 1837. And one of like description by tlie 
Page Assembly. 

A Silk Banner beautifully embroidered and splendidly decorated, was presented with 
appropriate ceremonies, on the 27th of March, 184.3, (trienni.al parade of department) by- 
Miss Emily Tempest, daughter of Robert Tempest, Esq., the President, in testimony of her 
respect for the company who had so long reposed confidence in her father. 




and protect the weak." 





THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 




103 

A Silver Pitcher was provided by the company, with tiie following inscription :- 
" Presented to 
ROBERT TEMPEST, President 
of the 
HIBERNIA FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1, 
by his fellow-members, as a token of their high regard for him as 
a Fireman and Presiding Officer, 
February 20th, 1851." Reverse — " Reward of merit." 
On the Gth August, 1858, the company gave a testimonial to its present chief officer, in 
the shape of a massive Silver Pitcher, two Goblets and a Salver. The inscription on the 
plate is as follows : — 

"HIBERNIA FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, No. 1, 

Instituted February 20, 1752. 

To 

Col. JAMES PAGE, 

their President, 

In testimony of their esteem for him as a faithful member and efficient officer." 

There arc numerous portraits (the gift of David L. Donnaldson, Esq., a member and 
artist) and other paintings on the walls of the meeting room, forming subjects for study and 
instruction. These latter are presents from Hibernia Fire Engine Target Company, an 
association of the members who make an annual parade on Thanksgiving Day, and fire for 
prizes, the first of which is always appropriated as a decoration for the engine house. 





the suffering and protect the weak.' 







THE HIBEENIA ENGINE COMPANY. 
103 

FIIsrA.L CA.IID. 



The undersigned, a conunittee in behalf of the Hibernia Fire Engine Company, No. 1, of 
the City of Philadelphia, charged with the duty of making some suitable acknowledgment 
for the very noble reception and unstinted ho.spitality exhibited everywhere upon the route 
which that company pursued on its excursion to New York, BrookljTi, Boston, Charlestown, 
and Newark, and back to Philadelphia, in November, 1858, have deemed the publication of 
the preceding pages as the most acceptable card of thanks they could offer to the thousands 
who united to bid them welcome, since it best serves to perpetuate the occurrences of which 
the members of the Hibernia have so much reason to be proud, and records for them the 
impressions which can never be eradicated from grateful hearts. Where so many extended 
welcome and lavished kindness, it is impossible to particularize, yet the committee would 
but poorly discharge the trust reposed in them, if they failed to speak specially of the 
untiring and indefatigable attentions of Wilham M. Tweed, Esq. ; the Americus Engine 
Company, No. 6 ; Warren Hose Company, No. 33 ; The Old Guard and its President, James 
L. Miller, Esq., and Governor Moloney and his associates, of the City of New York ; 
Zephyr Hose, No. 4, of Williamsburg; Engine Company No. 7, of the City of Brooklyn: 
Chief Engineer George W. Bird, William C. Long, Esq., Capt. 0. R. Bobbins, and the 
Tremont Engine, No. 12, of the City of Boston ; Hon. George W. Warren, and Washington 
Engine, No. 5, of the City of Charlestown ; William W. Smith, William O'Brien, William 
Godber, and Lafayette Engine Company, No. 4, of the City of Newark, and David M. 
L} le, Esq., and the Fairmouut Engine Company, of the City of Philadelphia. 

To their Honors Daniel F. Tiemann, Mayor of the City of New York; Frederick W. 
Lincoln, Jr., Mayor of the City of Boston; James Dana, Mayor of the City of Charlestown, 
and Alexander Henry, Mayor of the City of Philadelphia, thanks are specially due for the 
municipal courtesies so freely offered, and the distinction of a public notice. 

The manner in which Messrs. Louderback & Hoffman have engraved the portraits 
(decidedly the most difficult branch of the art) is especially worthy of mention, and proves 
them fully entitled to the high rank tliey hold in their profession. The likenesses are 
admirable, and the expression and character so well preserved, that it is with great pleasure 
the committee accord to them the credit due for the style in which they have executed 
them and the other cuts engraved by tliem for this Work. 



^-a^, 



. the suffering find protect tho ^ 






THE HIBERNIA ENGINE COMPANY. 



104 



To J. B. Chaniller, the committee are also under obligations for the care and skill he has 
manifested in getting up the printing and press-work. The book is a beautiful specimen of 
the typographical art, and reflects the highest credit upon him and all those of his 
establishment engaged in its production. 

The compilation embraces extracts from the Fireman's Magazine, published in 1851, 
and the details of the excursion are taken nearly word for word, from the various 
newspaper reports of the time, on the correctness of which the committee were obliged to 
depend, as it was deemed most advisable not to interfere with or alter them in any respect. 
Many incidents are omitted which no doubt ought to have been mentioned, and many 
names passed entitled to honorable notice, but where so much was done, and so many took 
part in doing, perfect accuracy is not to be expected, and great allowances should be made. 
The delay in getting out the work is to be accounted for by its contents — the matter and 
illustrations requiring time for their production in a desirable shape. 

" The Battle of Bunker Hill" and " Life of Warren," are from Lossing's " Field Book of 
the Revolution," a work which should be in the hands of every American. The picture of 
the battle is from an engraving specially prepared for Virtue, Emmins & Go's work, " Battles 
of America by Sea and Land," now being published by that house, and every way worthy 
of patronage. 

The only errata to be noticed are that the name on page 12 should be read Mr. Robert 
"Milnor," instead of "Wilson;" and on page 61, "J. H." instead of "B. F." Hoyt. 

The company reached New York on the night of Saturday, the 20th November, 1858. 
They remained in that city, visiting Blackwell's and Randall's Islands, on the morning of 
Monday, the 22d, and Brooklyn, the afternoon of the 2.3d; left New York on the morning of 
Wednesday, the 24th, and arrived in Boston the evening of that day, visiting Charlestown, 
Bunker Hill, and East Boston, on the 25th ; left Boston on the morning of the 20th, and 
arrived at Newark, N. J., the night of that day, and finally left Newark on the afternoon of 
the 27th of November, 1858, for Philadelphia. 

JAMES PAGE, \ 

JOHN THORNLEY, 1 

HENRY A. COOK, j 

JACOB BENNETT, \ Committee. 

JOHN R. DOWNING, ( 

JAMES M. COLGAN, | 

JOHN T. DOYLE, / 



PiiiLADKLi'iiiA, Septemher 1, 1859. 




'To assist the suffering and protect the weak.' 




O-I^/E^T TI^IJ^L OIF- SICILXj 



FAIR OF THE PENI^SYLVANIA STATE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



mm^j immmMm w nmm ^\m %.mim^. 



The contest for the prizes designed for the best Steam Fire Engines, took jjlace on the 
Society's grounds, "West Philadelphia, on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, the 28th, 29th 
and 30th of September, 18-59, in presence of the judges and thousands of spectators, 
causing the most intense excitement. The engines entered were the Southwark, Good 
Intent, "Weccacoe, Baltimore, Independence, Washington, Mechanic and Hibemia. The 
official report of the judges is as follows: — 

The judges of Fire Engines report that the eight Steam Fire Engines entered for 
competition, exhibited their performance on the three days allotted for their trial. Their 
names and general dimensions are as given below. 



Name. 


Builders. 


steam Cj-llndt 


r. Pump.. 


Weight. Stated Co.t. 


Southwark, - - 


- Lee & Larned, N. Y., 


7 J by 14, 


Rotary, 


9,000 lbs., 


§0,250 


Good Intent, - - 


- Reany & Neafie, Phila., 


8 " 12, 


41 by 12, 


5,400 " 


3,150 


Weccacoe, - - - 


- Merrick & Son, " 


Si " 14, 


•' 1.-), 




3,500 


No. 7, Baltimore, 


- Poole & Hunt, Baltimore, 


14 " 12, 


4i " 12, 


5,4 -jG " 


3,000 


Independence, 


- People's Works, Phila., 


lOi •' 14, 


5} " 14, 




3,800 


Washington, - - 


- Poole & Hunt, Bait., 


12 J •' 12, 


Oi " 12, 


8,582 " 


3,000 


Mechanic, - - - 


- Reaney & Neafie, Piiila., 


8 " 10, 


45 " 10, 


5,700 « 


3,300 


Ilibernia, - - - 


. . " •• •• 


Hi •' 14, 


CJ " 14. 


8,000 " 


4,325 



106 

Although three only of these can be distingiiislied by the award of premiums, the judges 
are happy to express their opinion that all are highly creditable to the skill of the 
mechanics who have brought these valuable machines to such a degree of excellence so 
soon after their first introduction. The points most accurately observed and recorded as 
the basis on which the award of the judges should be founded, were the time occupied 
in getting up steam from the lighting of the fire, the pressure of steam at starting, and 
at intervals of five minutes, the pressure in the air vessel at like intervals, the regularity 
and apparent ease of working, and the hydraulic efficiency as shown by the size and 
distance of water thrown. 

In the points of steady action and free generation of steam, the Good Intent surpasses all 
her competitors, but in consequence of her small capacity of steam and pump chambers, the 
amount of duty performed was below that of several others. In the latter characteristic 
the Hibernia occupied the first rank, and the Washington approached nearly to the same 
standard. Their mechanical action was also very good, though not quite equal to that of 
the Good Intent. 

To these three engines, after carefully weighing their respective merits in comparison 
with each other, and with all their competitors, the judges have awarded the three 
premiums in the following order : — 

First premium to the HIBERNIA. (A Silver Horn, $250.) 
Second " " WASHINGTON. (A Silver Horn, $150.) 

Third " " GOOD INTENT. (A Gold Medal, $100.) 

Below is a tabular statement of the facts noted respecting each of the successful 
machines : — 

HIBERNIA. WASHINGTON. GOOD INTENT. 

Time of getting up steam, - - - 12'.21". IS'.,;!)". 14'.20". 

Pressure of steam, GO lbs. 85 lbs. 35 lbs. 

At five minutes interval, - - - 105,05,90,95. 90,80,80,70. 63,75,77,90. 

Pressure of air vessel, - - - -0,190,135,75,210 0,125,160,120,143 0,119,125,1.30,142 

Diameter of nozzle, 1 A- inches. li inches. 1 inch. 

Maximum horizon'l distance of stream, 254 feet. 239 feet. 203 feet. 

Mean distance estimated, - - - - 200 " 190 " 169. 

Maximum vertical distance estimated, 188 " 178 " 140. 

Length of hose & pipe played through, 203 " 205 « 219. 

The Hand Engines were two of the fust <l:iss, namely, the "Citizens'" of Harrisburg and 
the "Assistance" of Philadflphia; and five of the second class, "Washington," "Philadel- 
phia," '• Weccacoe," "Globe," and the -'Franklin" of Frankford. 



lOT 

Making the allowniice required by the regulations on account of tlie difference in size ol' 
chambers, the first jjrize was Aron by the "Assistance," and the second prize by the 
•• PhiLadelphia," and are accordingly awarded. There were two hose reels exhibited, both 
were well finished and very creditable to their makei-s — the premium is awarded to the 
" Perseverance." 

The only lot of ha^^e sho^vn the judges, was a short piece of double ri vetted, which 
appeared to be well made, and of excellent quality, deposited by Konigmacher & 
Baumau, of Lancaster. 

The hose coupling of Lawton & Bliss' patent, is deemed very su^xirior to those in couniion 
use, and worthy the award of a diploma. 

(Signed) PHILir G. EASTWICK, 

PETER FRITZ, 
JOHN A. FISHER, 
JOHN C. CRESSON, 
JOSEPH HARRISON, Jr., 
A. W. EASTWICK. 



■For Tabular Statement, see page 108. 



108 



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The firm of Reaney, Neafie & Co., is composed of Thomas Reaney, Jacob G. Neafie, 
and John P. Levey. The Messrs. Reaney & Neafie have each had a long and' practical 
experience in machine shops— the latter having served his apprenticeship with Mr. 
Holloway, the first marine engine builder in Philadelphia; while Captain Levey, the 
financial partner, is a practical seaman and shipwright, possessing a familiar knowledge of 
the rules, rigging, and engines of steamers. The result of this union, is that the firm are 
prepared to build any description of steam vessel outright, and owners have but one 
contrax;t to make, and that with a very responsible firm. In the construction of iron boats 
of all classes, both side wheels and propellers, this firm do a large business. They also 
make all kinds of engines and boilers, high and low pressure, heavy and light forgings, and 
iron and brass castings of all sizes and patterns— the stock of patterns is very large. 

Their establishment, which commenced operation in 1845, and since that time has gone 
on increasing rapidly, and is now one of the largest in the country, is situated on the river 
Delaware, contiguous to the spot of ground where William Penn made his famous treaty 
with the Indians. The works throughout, consist of several docks and wharves along four 
hundred feet of river front of deep water; a marine railway for hauling out vessels for re- 
pairs; a boat yard occupied for building iron steamers; a large and commodious boiler 
shop; a substantial and spacious brick smith shop, containing two steam liammers, besides 
the various smaller forges; a large and well ventilated three story brick machino shop, 
abundantly supplied with tools for doing all kinds of work, from the smallest fire en-ines 
up to the heaviest marine or stationarv engines. 



j-^^^