Skip to main content

Full text of "High Shoals, Gaston county, N.C., a Southern cotton mill town"

See other formats


Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/highshoalsgastonOOchar 




BELOW THE DAM 



Tfigl) Skoals 



<i> 




4& 



FROM THE BRIDGE. LOOKING UP THE RIVER 



(Bastott Count?. M. <L 



1908 

OBSERVER PRINTING HOUSE 
CHARLOTTE. NORTH CAROLINA 






HIGH SHOALS 



GASTON COUNTY, N. C. 



A Southern Cotton Mill Town 



Published and Copyright by 

OBSERVER PRINTING HOUSE, Inc., CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

All Rights Reserved 
















■tfW .X3& ■ .- : % ." .«|w..,; ^*^hb1 




> 

1 " 


• 


• ■ ■''" **2i£=#i* 




it. »• 


"T--» 


» " '• >,.• 


> * • . j 


1 s^KE 

: M ■. r . 




ff^ 




-, ■-#* 




- "7 

• 






THE COTTON COMES FROM THE NEARBY FARM TO THE MILL 











ESTLING down among the stately pines, oaks, and 
hickories of North Carolina, in the heart of the Pied- 
mont Region, lies the cotton mill town of High Shoals. 
At an altitude of a thousand feet, with its ever-cool 
mornings and evenings, its golden sunshine at all seasons, 
its pure mountain air, added to the cleanliness of the 
town itself, High Shoals may be called a natural health resort, and an 
appropriate location for a working population to live. 

The village is about thirty miles from Charlotte, on the Carolina and 
North -Western Railway. The town is situated on the banks of the 
picturesque South Fork of the Catawba River, whose waters, as they rush 
over dam and foaming shoals, from which the name High Shoals is derived, 
resemble the roar of the ocean, and at night lull one to peaceful slumber. 




OST of the working pop- 
ulation of High Shoals 
are carolers, spinners, and 
weavers. The manufacture of cot- 
ton cloth requires f he work of 
other trades, but almost all are 
comprised in the above enumera- 
tion. The cloths made are plain 
white sheetings, of about the weight 
and quality of ordinary bed sheets. 



STREET SCENE-EVENING 



HILE High Shoals is 
essentially a mill town, it 
is an ideal one. The ac- 
companying pictures show two of 
its streets, well kept and free from 
rubbish as they always are, with 
the simple but well-built houses 
on either side — the comfortable 
homes of the mill employees. 



PI 




MORNING STREET SCENE 







A COTTAGE HOME AT HIGH SHOALS 




LMOST every yard has 
its sweet blooming mass of 
shrubs and flowers, while 
luxuriant vines of the lovely old 
fashioned roses or sweet smelling 
honeysuckle cover the piazzas. 
Here on a summer afternoon the 
babies may play safe from the 
heat of the sun, while their mothers 
sit contented at their sewing. 
The people take great pride in 
their gardens, and the competition 
among them is keen. 



SPRINGTIME-1N THE PARK 



S an extra incentive, five 
prizes are given annually 
for the best gardens, as 
follows: 1, for flowers, $10.00; 
2, for flowers, $5.00; I, for vege- 
table garden, $10.00; 2, for vege- 
table garden, $5.00; and for best 
kept general premises, $ 1 0.00. 
These prizes have been given for 
the past six years. A committee 
chosen by the residents awards 
these, after carefully inspecting 
each garden. 




COMFORT IN THE SHADE OF THE FLOWERS 



■ to • ., 




■ 

■ ■■**.*■* 






ANOTHER HIGH SHOALS COTTAGE HOME 




x 



•5 - ***S 



mm 








u a — 



H »" 



-= a *s 



_£ E 



S E 





c/> _E - 


Q 
Z 


-J - 

< - 


3 


o ■ - 


as 


X ?! 


u. 


in § 


_ 
< 
3 


-r od 

o' 5 - 






3 


MP"* 


2 


il- 







fcLS 








3> t 


Pfet-ji; 1 


^ JJB 


■ m t w 






n>-- -* 








if 


KM'; > 


m 


» . lR£^i 


3 \ 




*-; ,(• Ml 

Pi ! f 


f" * 

« 


■•• 1* ■, * '-'1 ' 








SB « T3 



2 J 1 



5 o U 



UJ 



I 




a> 




(J 




c 






u 

CD 






I 




_C 


g 


u 


> 






-I 




_* 


u 


< 




to 


Or 








o 


c 






u 


- 


Df 










1 


4) 


"c 


H 




_£ 


e 


_*: 


> 


g 


2 


£ 


££ 


H 


3 


q 


if) 


X 




o 


cC 


O 


fl 


LJ 






-a 






















< 






p 




£ E 



(J p- 

"a I 
i — 

-a 
< 



— 



■J. 


Sz 


_! 


u s 


< 

N 

_] 


S en 


q -a 

3 3 










^ 


PkM 




V^SB 




s v 



a. 



UJ 
■J. 

— 


£ 


V 


^ 


4» 






« 


B 


u 

2 


s 


V 


< 


U] 








--. 


tn 






c/3 








f 


• 


2 


H 


■* 




\T 












THE MILL AND FALLS BELOW THE DAM 







METHODIST SUNDAY SCHOOL 




CO 

3 
2S 



Q ~ 



ul 


k. *; 


I 


c 3 


h 


F J 






z 


c 




Wl " 


;> 


3 j_ 


E/} 


c. o 


H 


CD S 


*-- 




QQ 


uJ S 




X " 








^— 




^2 



U .5 







Sf-*. .*""»* 



BAPTIST CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL 




BARACA CLASS-BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOL 




GIRLS' CLASS- BAPTIST SUNDAY SCHOOL 




BAPTISMAL SCENE-THE BENEDICTION 



ITUATED at the end of the long village street on which 
the others stand, is the Baptist Church, with a large and 
active congregation. The regular services are twice a month, 

with extra services frequently. The Sunday School, large and 

still growing, is held every Sunday. 



w 



HE children of the Episcopal Church take a great interest 
in the already large Sunday School, which is growing 
rapidly. Those of the Sunday School who have unusually 

good voices are trained by the Deaconesses, and a very pretty choir 

of sweet little children sing during church services. 






- 


£$■ 


= 1 




KfeMW* 


?**'■' i 






i 


— t 


."---:* a 








- 




. 1 


",1 




S*£ 




-.-■■;■' 

■ 




- *^*^fp^EI 




' 


5jB 




■ V ^V- 


V 


- 


(HL.22 


tZi.-^^f^^ 3 








' 


-&s .., j, 


- 3 








BAPTIZING A YOUNG LADY 



NE of the large congregations in High Shoals is the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. Services are held regularly twice 
a month, the pastor having several other churches else- 
where of which he takes charge. The Methodist Sunday School is 
large and flourishing. 



« 



N THE above picture, showing the baptism of a young lady, 
the man on the right at the top of the steps will lead the 
new convert to the Baptist faith out of the water, and the 

one on the left holds a cloak to throw over her as she goes to the 

tent dressing-room near by. 




'W / N THE village there are two 
V, M^ splendid schools — one 
-%=. — I the regular public school, and 
the other the Parochial School 
of the Episcopal Church. The 
Public Graded School is always 
well filled, and is taught by a 
competent force of teachers. The 
building is a modern wooden struc- 
ture, with large, light rooms. It has 
a seating capacity of about 200 
pupils. The course is the same as 
may be found in any graded public 
school of high standing. 



GIRLS' SENIOR CLASS IN THE PUBLIC SCHOOL 



I^-w " \|IHE Episcopal School 
\«^ and Kindergarten, 
■■fr* s I which are under the 
supervision of the Church, are 
taught by the Deaconesses 
Eva and Mary. These gen- 
tle Deaconesses divide their 
work — one teaches, the other 
nurses the sick of the village. 
And both are loved by every- 
body for the good they do. 




THE KINDERCARTNERS 




« -= 





U 


o 




fl ~0 






_c 




«i « 














CQ 




r 


c 


at I 


D 


_* 


V 


P 5 


fM 


LL 


. 


2 




Ld 


u 


r 


11 > " 1 


■1 




















CO 






£ 3 



4J w. 




■r. 


c 




"M 














< 




>» 


. "D 


















s 














cd 




>^ 






3 


V 


L 
















/ 


UJ 




s 



^J 






I 

u 
c 

< 

X 
U 

X 

z 
< 

< 
> 








THE FRESHET 




THE HIGH SHOALS BAND 




FOURTH OF JULY PICNICKERS 



JOYOUS celebration of the Fourth of July is always had at 
High Shoals. In the old days before the Revolutionary War, 
the rifle makers of the Piedmont went to the Shoals to gel 
the fine iron which 
they used for their 
rifle barrels. In those 
old days, there was 
one of the best iron 
works in America at 
High Shoals. The 
rifles made from 
High Shoals iron 
were an important 
factor, on the Ken- 
tucky frontier against 
hostile Indians, and 
at Cowpens, King s 
Mountain, and other 




AN IDLE HOUR BY THK PAVILION IN THL PARK 



battlefields against the British forces, during the War of the 
Revolution. From the hills about High Shoals, one may obtain 
a distant glimpse of King's Mountain, where the historic battle 
was fought. 



N THE last "Fourth," there were addresses, picnic dinners, 
more addresses, and multitudinous games. Perhaps the 
most interesting was what was called the "Egg Race, with eight 

young lady entries. 
Each one was re- 
quired to hold a tea- 
spoon by the han- 
dle, bowl up. An 
egg was placed in 
each spoon. They 
ran, at the word 
"Go," from one 
end of the river 
bridge to the other. 
When an egg was 
dropped, that girl 
was out of the 
race. Only two or 
three got to the goal end of the bridge wilh their eggs still 
safe in the spoon. Many other sports were indulged in — in- 
ning, jumping, etc. — prizes being awarded to the winners of 
the different events. 




X 

< 

- 

O 

- 

I 

u 
o 



I 

H 



-• 

. ... 




0/ *••'■ «— 

' ; '; '■'•*■ 

V IRA 


i 


TW^^HKf.M il 

< jk; *■>, -H IE— H 


ji&t"' 




^B. lAtMUfl l_<^l^Ml_SKJS^^e^^1^ ^ „■*. I'M! 





5S 

O 




u 

z 
< 

CD 
[i] 



2 fr 



5 S 



- 



I 


of 5 


H 


r r 


U] 







a -g 







H 


J " 


_i 


z s 


< 


— E 




E 8 


- 


/} 




^2s» 






< 


uu 




^^ 



OS 

a 

2 



<§*^^i 



4- 









Q 
J 
O 



O 












'5. 



n DJ 



^T 



UJ •= 



O 



m 



UNTING is excellent in the surrounding country. The 
boys hunt rabbits in the daytime, and opossums by night. 
The best hunting is for quail, and this particular hunting is very 
excellent. There are 
foxes, not much hunt- 
ed, and some few 
golden - winged 
pheasants. The boys 
catch many turtles in 
the river, so that real 
turtle soup is no un- 
common thing at the 
Shoals. 



[pJJIGH Shoals is 
■M-y-l-l in a mineral 
country. Near the 
place is a sulphur 
spring, an arsenic 
spring, and a 1 i t h 1 a 



N THE smaller streams in the country about High Shoals 
are a number of old-fashioned waterpower gristmills. 
From these the Shoals people get supplies of real old-fashioned, 

water-ground cornmeal 
and hommy, and whole 
wheat. A little higher 
up the mountains, the 
real water-ground 
buckwheat flour can be 
had, and also maple 
syrup. The cream 
and the butter are the 
real homemade article. 







m 



IGH Shoals 
was settled, 
about 1 760, by John 
Fullenwider. He built 
an iron works, having 
a number of Catlan 



HUNTERS AND THEIR BIG GAME-THE BOYS HAVE KILLED A CRANE 

forges, several trip hammers, and a number of trains of rolls 



spring. The hthia spring is owned by the Lincoln Lithia Country 
Club, but is available to visitors from High Shoals if accompanied 
by a member of the Club. 



to make round, flat, and square bars. These works were of great 
service to the patriots during the Revolutionary War. 



















IS[ 


EAR High Shoals is the Lincoln Lithia Country Club. 
Visitors can reach the Club via the Carolina and North- 


l^jTpMJHE Club has nearly three hundred 
j ((EMS i of which is laid off in building lots 


acres of land, a portion 
Many of the owners 


N 


Veste 


n Railway (leaving the train at High Shoals, and going 


of these contemplate erecting cottages on their property. 


thence to the Club 






Bowling alleys, 


in a surry), or via 




■H 


golf links, good 


the Seaboard Air 


I n 


11 


livery, and excellent 


Line Railway, 


1 1 




■Jl 


quail shooting 


getting off at 


1 ■ II 


| jB .1 


constitute some of 


Lincolnlon Station, 
and again via surry 


Jf 1 

1 


iki*^-^*. 


the principal 
attractions. 


to the Club. 


^^^w i ' ff^flHB^. 


.M1j/J A^m - ^ 


There is a good 


The membership 






system of water 


of the Club is near 


I^l^l ^r^Vn S ^k Jn 




works, and the club 


200, and is com- 






house is equipped 


posed almost en- 


[w9 


■/ If l^^^t 


with all modern 


tirely of ladies and 




**il^^ I 


convenience s 


gentlemen from 






throughout. The 


various southern 




^^HHMMm 


Club keeps a herd 


cities and localities. 


\T THE LINCOLN LITHIA COUNTRY CLU 


B 


of cattle on its own 


The location of the Club, being on the foothills of the moun- 


pastures, from which its milk and butter supply comes. 


tains, and possessing an ideal climate, makes it an all-the-year-round 


There is a "Sulphur Mine * (iron pyrites) within a couple of 


resort for health and recreation. 


miles of the town, and the Sulphur Branch comes from this mine. 




HIGH SHOALS IN 1750 



T 



HE above cut shows the High Shoals waterpower as it appeared in I 750, when the surrounding country was largely inhabited 
by Indians, and the white population was very scant. 



4L±*£im**», 




HIGH SHOALS IN 1800 



u 



ERE is shown ihe waterpower as it appeared in 1800. Inside the fifty years preceding, there had been developed in the neighborhood 
a very considerable manufacturing interest. Amongst other industries, there were numerous blast furnaces, making charcoal pig iron. At 
High Shoals there was an extensive iron works, making bars, nails, plowshares, and other products in wrought iron. The waterpower 
operated the rolling mills. This was before the institution of slavery became of dominant influence in the South. These iron works and most of 
the other industries were operated by intelligent free white labor, which was then abundant. 



. 



, 




& - *^ m*hBB9KPEEL 




W 




HIGH SHOALS IN 1 850 



i HE. appearance of this High Shoals iron works in 1850 is represented in the above picture. As the influence of slavery grew, 
* v I the manufacturing interests of the Piedmont region not only made no progress, but actually retrograded. The illustration 
shows the wreck of the former prosperous iron works at a time when agriculture and slave labor had become dominant. 




HIGH SHOALS IN 1900 



N THE early part of the preceding half-century, slavery was abolished, and after the restoration of civil order and good government 
there was immediately a revival of the manufacturing interest. The illustration shows a new development of the waterpower, and a 
cotton mill which has been constructed over the site of the old iron works. As in the first fifty years of the nineteenth century the 
adverse influence of slavery is made apparent, so in the last fifty years of the same century the wholesome influence of free institutions is equally 
illustrated by the new development at High Shoals. 



«*