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v HSL NO.J9MO 

\ OCTOBER 1979 








U.S. Department Of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 




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ABSTRACT CITATIONS 



SAMPLE ENTRIES 

FORMAT OF ENTRIES IN HIGHWAY SAFETY LITERATURE 



NHTSA accession number. 
Title of document 



Abstract 



Personal author ( s ) _ 

Corporate author (or author's affiliation}- 
Publication date; pagination 

Supplementary note 



Availability 



.HS-013 124 

MAXIMUM BRAKE PEDAL FORCES PRODUCED BY 
" MALE AND FEMALE DRIVERS 

The object of this research was to obtain data concerning the 

- maximum amount of brake pedal force that automobile drivers 
were able to sustain over a period of ten seconds. Subjects 
were told to apply the brakes in the test car as they would in a 
panic stop, and to exert as much force as possible on the 
pedal over the entire ten second test period. A total of 84 sub- 
jects were tested, including 42 males and 42 females. The 
results indicated that there is a wide distribution of values 
which characterizes the pedal force that the subjects were able 
to generate. Male subjects produced generally higher forces 
than did females. Over half the women tested were unable to 
exert more than 150 Ibs. of force with either foot alone, but 
when both feet were applied to the pedal, force levels rose sig- 
nificantly. 

- bv C. R. VonBuseck 

- General Motors Corp. 

- 1973? ; I8p 

- Excerpts from Maximum Parking Brake Forces Applied by 
Male and Female Drivers (EM-23) BY R. L. Bierley, 1965, are 
included. 

- Availability: Corporate author 



NHTSA accession number , 
Title of document 

Abstract 



Personal author (s) 

Journal citation 

Publication date 

Availability, 



-HS-018924 

- NATURAL FREQUENCIES OF THE BIAS TIRE 

. The lowest natural frequencies of a bias tire under inflation 
pressure are deduced by assuming the bias tire as a composite 
structure of a bias-laminated, toroidal membrane shell and 
rigorously taking three displacement components into con- 
sideration. The point collocation method is used to solve a 
derived system of differential equations with variable coeffi- 
cients. It is found that the lowest natural frequencies calcu- 
lated for two kinds of bias tire agree well with the correspond- 
ing experimental results in a wide range of inflation pressures. 
Results of the approximate analysis show that the influences 
of the in-plane inertia forces on natural frequency may be con- 
sidered small, but the influences of in-plane displacements are 
large, particularly on the natural frequency of the tire under 
low inflation pressure. 

- by Masami Hirano; Takashi Akasaka 

- Pub!: Tire Science and Technology v4 n2 p86-114 (May 1976) 

- 1976; 6refs 

. Availability: See publication 



HS-025 288 

RISKS OF ROAD TRANSPORTATION IN A 
PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

A review is presented of the literature and psychological facts 
which may explain why the individual driver and modern 
society seem willing to accept higher risks in road transporta- 
tion than in most other activities. Risky driving behavior may 
depend on a driver's overestimation of his driving skill in a 
particular situation, his conscious decision to drive under high 
risk, or his failure to perceive risk in a particular situation. 
Among the different means used in order to effect a change in 
these factors are training programs, the dissemination of infor- 
mation to change attitudes toward traffic risks, and environ- 
mental design changes to reduce risk. Empirical research in- 
dicates that greater risks are accepted if some kind of control 
is experienced in a situation; this is especially applicable to 
driving. Although objective and subjective estimates of the 
risk inherent in different traffic elements seem to coincide 
fairly well with a road's physical characteristics, objective 
risks are underestimated in relation to speed, black spots, 
night driving, and narrow roads. The importance of these fac- 
tors, and of alcohol intoxication and imitative behavior for risk 
taking, is discussed, as are comparisons of the estimated risks 
of different transportation systems and other risk sources. 
Responsibility for an accident is a very important element in 
risk acceptance. If the responsibility can be attributed to in- 
dividual risk takers, as in car driving, society is willing to ac- 
cept higher risk levels. The prevailing within-system perspec- 
tive on risks in road transportation is contrasted with the more 
important and difficult global perspective which puts the risks 
of the road transportation system in a societal context. 

by Ola Svenson 

Publ: Accident Analysis and Prevention vlO n4 p267-80 (Dec 

1978) 

1978; 67refs 

Sponsored by Com. for Future Oriented Res., and Swedish 

Council for Social Science Res. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 289 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

Motorists' reluctance to wear seat belts is examined in light of 
research showing that protective behavior is influenced more 
by the probability of a hazard than by the magnitude of its 
consequences, and that people are not inclined to protect 
themselves voluntarily against very low probability threats. It 
is argued that the probability of death or injury on any single 
automobile trip may be too low to incite a motorist's concern. 
Maintenance of a ''single trip" perspective makes it unlikely 
that seat belts will be used. Change of perspective towards 
consideration of the risks faced during a lifetime of driving, 
may increase the perceived probabilities of injury and death 
and therefore induce more people to wear seat belts. 

by P. Slovic; B. Fischhoff ; S. Lichtenstein 

Perceptronics, Inc., Decision Res., 1201 Oak St., Eugene, 

Oreg. 

NSF-ENV77-15332 

Publ: Accident Analysis and Prevention vlO n4 p281-5 (Dec 

1978) 

1978; 26refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 290 

BLOOD TEST LEGISLATION IN NEW ZEALAND 
[ALCOHOL LEVELS IN DRIVERS] 

The 1969 compulsory blood test law, which also established an 
absolute blood alcohol limit of 100 mg/100 ml for New Zealand 
drivers, is evaluated in terms of reported incidence of alcohol 
in road crashes and according to various surrogate measure- 
ments involving road crashes. These measurements include be- 
fore and after studies of total fatal crashes, total nonfatal inju- 
ry crashes, fatal crashes during nighttime, nonfatal injury 
crashes during nighttime, weekend night injury crashes, and 
single vs. multivehicle crashes. Before and after comparisons 
with Great Britain and Canada were made regarding total road 
deaths, total injuries from road crashes, and percentage killed 
and injured during main drinking hours (U.K. comparison 
only). The 1974 amendment, which liberalized the criterion for 
"due cause to suspect" alcohol consumption by requiring only 
"suspicion", is evaluated in terms of enforcement activity. It is 
concluded that the 1969 law did not have the kind of im- 
mediate effect that was achieved in Great Britain in 1967. 
There may have been a more gradual effect in New Zealand, 
but it cannot be certain. The difference in impact was almost 
certainly due to attendant circumstances and the quite dif- 
ferent types of publicity given the alcohol campaigns in the 
two countries. It was clearly not attributable to differences in 
the statute's content or in its enforcement, which has always 
been relatively active and has increased over the years. The 
increase in enforcement activity seems to have been ac- 
celerated by the 1974 amendment. There was a marked in- 
crease in the number of blood tests, more pronounced in the 
lower range of blood alcohol concentration. 

by Paul M. Hurst 

Publ: Accident Analysis and Prevention vlO n4 p287-96 (Dec 

1978) 

1978; ISrefs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 291 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE STUDY OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

The predictive power of driver demerit points and other rou- 
tinely-collected driver history data was analyzed using 
prestratified samples of younger and older male drivers in 
Nova Scotia who had similar driver demerit point histories in 
1971 and 1972. Analysis of points accumulated by these 
drivers in 1973 and 1974 revealed positive and statistically-sig- 
nificant associations between past and future demerit point ac- 
cumulations for both age groups, with stronger positive as- 
sociations among younger drivers. Other variables such as 
type of traffic violation, size of community in which driver 
lived, and property damage associated with violations also ex- 
hibited predictive power in the multivariate regression models 
tested. Restrictions are discussed on use of these predictive 
models in accident prevention programs, because of relatively 
low coefficients of correlation. It is noted that a traffic viola- 
tion conviction for an individual driver, even one with a recent 



HS-025 292 

history of violations, is typically a rare event when measured 
in terms of months or years between convictions. 

by M. G. Brown; H. J. Thiebaux 

Publ: Accident Analysis and Prevention vlO n4 p297-312 (Dec 

1978) 

1978; Srefs 

Sponsored in part by Dennis Medical Fund. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 292 

BRAKES: FORGOTTEN BUT APPRECIATED 

Major design changes in automobile brakes in the past decade 
are discussed, as are basic functions of a braking system and 
future trends in car brakes. Three major design changes in 
braking in the past ten years, excluding antilock systems 
which are still to become a true production item, are disc 
brakes, self-adjusting brakes, and divided hydraulic circuits. 
Almost all volume production cars now have disc brakes on 
the front wheels at the very least; a similar proportion of cars 
have a self-adjusting brake system; all cars sold in the Europe- 
an Economic Community, the U.S., Japan, Norway, Sweden, 
Switzerland, and Australia have to have divided hydraulic cir- 
cuits, and systems that are wholly approved by relevant 
authorities. The basic capabilities of a brake system include 
the following: ability to stop the car; ability to stop it stably; 
ability to dissipate the energy of the. car during stopping as 
heat, without causing an excessive temperature rise or fade, a 
pedal effort which at all times is acceptable, and an effective 
parking brake. Future trends in brakes include use of alu- 
minum (e.g. in calipers) and plastic parts (e.g. in master cylin- 
ders and servos) to reduce weight, and longer life. There is 
considerable interest in producing brakes that will continue for 
24,000 mi without any servicing, in including pad/lining 
replacement, and in inclusion of brake linings as a warranty 
item. Diagrams and photographs of brake valves and calipers 
are included, as well as a diagram of a handbrake mechanism. 

by Rex Greenslade 

Publ: Motor v!55 n3981 p29-32 (27 Jan 1979) 

1979; 3refs 

At head of title: Technicalities Untangled. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 625 

SELF-ADAPTIVE ANTI-SKID BRAKING SYSTEM 

The history, design features, system components, operation, 
rotational accelerometer unit, and experimental results are 
described for a prototype antiskid braking system by PCB 
Controls Ltd., Dublin, Ireland, which is truly adaptive to 
changing tire/road conditions. The system continuously moni- 
tors road surface friction and adjusts braking pressure ac- 
cordingly, using a new method of measuring wheel accelera- 
tion. The system is independent of tire and brake wear and 
requires no adjustment after initial calibration. The decelera- 
tion of the wheel during braking is detected by a rotational ac- 
celerometer sensor and compared with both minimum and 
maximum reference values of deceleration in a hysteretic unit. 
This unit is an electronic package designed so that the 
minimum reference level is fixed, but the maximum reference 
level is variable and dependent upon the maximum frictional 
force between wheel and road surface. The deceleration signal 
from the wheel controls a pneumatic reservoir brake pressure, 
independent of driver braking action, so that pressure is 



HSL 79-10 

released from the wheel if its actual deceleration exceeds the 
maximum reference value, and pressure is fully reapplied to 
the wheel if its actual deceleration decreases below the 
minimum reference level. The system not only adjusts braking 
effort precisely according to the degree of road slipperiness in- 
dicated in each previous cycle, but it also shapes each braking 
pulse in a manner which approaches the point of maximum 
friction rather than blindly traversing it. This continual learn- 
ing capability of the system results in a pulsing sequence 
which varies widely from 5 Hz to virtually Hz, the latter oc- 
curring when the system is ideally tuned momentarily to sur- 
face conditions. The present prototype rig is electro-pneu- 
matic, but the same principles can readily be incorporated into 
electrohydraulic or electromagnetic systems. 

by Desmond F. Moore; Peter Byrne 

Publ: Automotive Engineer v4 nl p50-2 (Feb-Mar 1979) 

1979; 4refs 

Sponsored by Industrial Devel. Authority, and National 

Science Council (Ireland). 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 626 

DIESEL VEHICLE NOISE CONTROL 

An account of the Transport and Road Res. Lab. (TRRL), En- 
gland, Quiet Heavy Vehicle (QHV) project is followed by 
details of recent developments in diesel engine noise control at 
the Inst. of Sound and Vibration Res. (ISVR), Southampton 
Univ. (England), and of noise research on production engines 
at Perkins (U.K.). Although the 238 kW (320 bhp) Rolls-Royce- 
engined, 38-ton Foden S83 tractor (QHV) was demonstrated in 
Nov 1978 at TRRL to have a drive-by noise level of 81 dB(A), 
a full report on the vehicle will not be available for six 
months. The Foden QHV meets much more closely than the 
Ley land Buffalo QHV (demonstrated by TRRL several years 
ago) the objective that all essential features of the vehicles 
were to be suitable for incorporation in practicable production 
vehicles. The only obvious difficulty seems to be that of ex- 
ceeding the 15-m overall vehicle length limit by 0.4 m due to 
the space required by the cooling system. The general design 
philosophy was to reduce sound emission from the engine by 
means of structural changes and to provide a structural enclo- 
sure around the engine and transmission, to isolate airborne 
noise transmitted from the engine structure and its ancillaries, 
to use a totally-ducted cooling system which employs a mixed- 
flow fan, and to redesign the exhaust system. Major develop- 
ment of the QHV engine, a specially-adapted Rolls-Royce 
Eagle engine, was carried out by ISVR. Tire noise was ex- 
amined independently by TRRL. Work by Foden resulted in 
reduced in-cab noise levels of the QHV. Under conditions of 
maximum acceleration, the maximum noise level in the vicini- 
ty of the driver's ear is 77.5 dB(A). In 1967, Perkins began its 
noise reduction program in three main sections: reducing noise 
level without major design change, assisting customers with 
noise reduction on complete vehicles, and designing new en- 
gines. In an ongoing engine research project, overall engine 
noise has been reduced to date by 7 dB(A); another project 
has led to a reduction of up to 12 dB(A) in a conventional 
cooling fan. 

Publ: Automotive Engineer v4 nl p23-7 (Feb-Mar 1979) 

1979; 6refs 

Availability: See publication 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 630 



HS-025 627 

PROJECT CHILDSAFE COULD SAVE YOUR 
CHILD'S LIFE [CHILD RESTRAINTS] 

Project Child safe, a safety/health education program originally 
sponsored by the Wisconsin Hosp. Assoc., and its auxiliaries, 
in cooperation with the Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction, 
is alerting parents to the hazards children face when traveling 
unrestrained in automobiles. The project is also providing in- 
formation on proper safety devices and other traveling aids. 
Initially designed to be given in hospitals to new parents, Pro- 
ject Childsafe has been expanded and adapted for use in other 
situations (e.g. company safety meetings). Project Childsafe is 
a short (about 10 min) slide/sound show, with a kit including 
brochures to be given to observers. The materials are based on 
information collected by Physicians for Automotive Safety and 
Action for Child Transportation, its citizen affiliate. Project 
Childsafe explains the need for effective, crash-tested 
restraints that distribute forces of impact over a wide area of 
the child's body in case of an accident. The car's safety belt 
holds the restraint in place. Infants up to 9 mo or 20 Ib should 
face backward; after that, they should face forward. Once the 
child reaches age 4 and weighs at least 40 Ib, he is probably 
ready to use an adult safety belt, but he should be 55 in tall 
before using a shoulder strap. Groups presently reinforcing the 
Childsafe message include local safety councils, public health 
nurses, local pediatricians, local law enforcement personnel, 
university extension homemakers clubs, car dealers, infant 
specialty stores, and civic clubs. In addition to providing infor- 
mation about effective crash protection, Project Childsafe 
stresses the regular use of car restraints. It is noted that the 
project has increased seat belt usage by parents. 

by Craig Fischer 

Publ: National Safety News vl!9 n4 p56-7 (Feb 1979) 

1979 

At head of title: Off the Job. Adapted from a presentation by 

C. Ernest Cooney, Wisconsin Dept. of Public Instruction, and 

Susan Kummerow, Wisconsin Hosp. Assoc. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 628 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND 
TRAFFIC CONTROL. OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: 
JAPAN (AUGUST 1977) 

Discussions are reported which were held with the two major 
motorcycle manufacturers of the Japan Automotive Manufac- 
turers Assoc., Hoeda Motor Co., and Yamaha Motor Co., con- 
cerning their motorcycle safety activities. An account is given 
of meetings with various road transport authorities and area 
traffic control units in Japan to obtain background information 
on the country's highway /traffic operations. These discussions 
were held as part of a two-week visit to Japan in Aug 1977 to 
attend the 7th International Symposium on Transport and 
Traffic Flow which was held in Kyoto. Appended are a com- 
prehensive list of documentation obtained during these 
meetings (reference to files in Australian Road Res. Board Re- 
gistry), a list of pertinent color slides taken during visit; names 
and addresses of individuals consulted on trip; names and ad- 
dresses of foreign participants in Symposium; itinerary of 
Japan visit; a summary of Japanese driving license types, driv- 
ing license examinations, and driving school facilities and or- 
ganization; and Japanese emission and noise control standards. 
As a result of information gathered during the visit, it is 
recommended that a comprehensive view of motorcycle users 



be compiled, that training for motorcyclists be specifically 
directed at avoidance abilities and that skills assessment be 
quantized, and that testing procedures be developed for wet 
weather braking performance of disc brakes. 

by M. R. Wigan 

Australian Road Res. Board, Box 156 (Bag 4), Nunawading, 

Vic., 3131, Australia 

Rept. No. ARRB-ARR-78; ARRMS 77/183; 1977; 74p refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 629 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MOTORCYCLE 
POPULATION IN USE IN AUSTRALIA, AND THE 
RATE OF EFFECT OF DESIGN CHANGE 

In an initial study, available data on motorcycle life expectan- 
cy in Australia are analyzed in an effort to determine the rate 
at which design changes introduced for safety or other reasons 
(Australian Design Rules) will spread through the in-use mo- 
torcycle population. It is suggested that if design modifications 
are to be promulgated for safety reasons, they should be in- 
troduced if possible before the end of 1978, in order to have 
the most effective impact on traffic safety. The scrapping and 
new registration rates of motorcycles and cars are compared. 
The average life expectancy of motorcycles in Australia is 6 
years vs. 13 years for cars (5% of the motorcycle population 
drops out of the registration figures in 1 year vs. 5 years for 
5% of the car population). Socioeconomic and demographic 
factors, not considered in the present study, should be given 
specific attention in the future. Present data on the charac- 
teristics of the motorcycle population are restricted to the 
publicly-available Australian Bureau of Statistics data derived 
from Motor Registry records. Improvements in the data would 
include disaggregation of the motorcycle market into types of 
machines (i.e. agricultural, trail, street, dual-purpose 
(street/trail), competition), information on the machine itself 
(power rating, engine type, gross weight, etc.); and inclusion 
of nonregistered motorcycles. It is recommended that safety 
improvements be encouraged in motorcycle design rather than 
stressing regulation of use. 

by M. R. Wigan; T. Thoresen 

Australian Road Res. Board, Box 156 (Bag 4), Nunawading, 

Vic., 3131, Australia 

Rept. No. ARRB-AIR-812-l; 1977; 23p 13refs 

See also HS-025 633. 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 630 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

The introduction of a new Australian Standard for motorcycle 
helmets (AS 1698-1974) in 1975 has been followed by legisla- 
tive action. Evidence given before the House of Representa- 
tives Standing Com. on Road Safety has indicated a number of 
possible or potential problems. A summary is presented of 
material pertinent to the Standards Assoc. of Australia Com- 
mittees AU/12 (Vehicle Users Helmets), AU/13 (Automotive 
Eye Protection), and CS/14 (General Purpose Helmets) as 
raised by the Standing Com. on Road Safety in its Report on 
Motorcycle and Bicycle Safety (HOR 1978), and of recommen- 
dations of the Standing Com. which cover motorcycle helmets 
(AS 1698-1974), motorcycle helmet visors (AS 1609-1974), and 



HS-025 631 



HSL 79-10 



bicycle helmets (now covered by AS 2063-1977). Extracts from 
a report by the author (1978) relating to consultations with 
foreign researchers (U.K., U.S.) studying helmet performance 
are also presented. The evidence and recommendations 
presented suggest that the definitions and scope of AS 2063- 
1977 and AS 1698-1974 require careful consideration and com- 
bination of use to ensure effective standards coverage for on- 
and off -road helmet users for all types of single-track vehicles. 
It is suggested that many of the needs or desires of interested 
parties could well be met by the drafting of a further helmet 
standard with more stringent impact-attenuation requirements. 
It is also suggested that AS 1609 be reviewed with the aim of 
including quality assurance standards for tinted visors. 

by M. R. Wigan 

Australian Road Res. Board, Box 156 (Bag 4), Nunawading, 

Vic., 3131, Australia 

Rept. No. ARRB-AIR-812-2; 1978; 44p 35refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 631 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF 
INFORMATION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: 
JANUARY, 1978 [UNITED STATES AND UNITED 
KINGDOM] 

Information gathered at various meetings with researchers in 
motorcycle safety in the U.K. and U.S. in Jan 1978 is collated, 
incorporating material subsequently collected by or sent to the 
author. In the U.K., consultations were made with government 
representatives (Transport and Road Res. Lab., Dept. of 
Transport), and the Inst. of Motorcycling, and contact was 
made with representatives from the motorcycle industry 
(manufacturers of motorcycles, helmets and visors, and motor- 
cycle tires). Motorcycle products were viewed in displays at 
the January Motorcycle Show at the Royal Horticultural Halls. 
In the U.S., visits were made to the National Hwy. Traffic 
Safety Administration, Insurance Inst. for Hwy. Safety, Mo- 
torcycle Industry Council, Motorcycle Safety Foundation, 
Systems Technology International (Los Angeles), California 
Dept. of Motor Vehicles, Univ. of Southern California's Inst. 
of Safety and Systems Management, and the Bell Helmet Co. 
(Norwalk, Calif.). The 57th Annual Meeting of the Transporta- 
tion Res. Board (TRB) was attended (including a meeting of 
Moped Subcom. of TRB Bicycle Com., discussion with 
representatives from Hwy. Safety Res. Center at the Univ. of 
North Carolina, and a presentation on motorcycle daytime 
visibility aids). This compilation of motorcycle safety informa- 
tion covers the subjects of motorcycle dynamics, wet weather 
and antilock braking, accident analysis, education, training, 
licensing, legislation, motorcycle visibility, helmet per- 
formance, helmet and visor standards, U.S. motorcycle and 
moped legislation, and moped issues. 

by M. R. Wigan 

Australian Road Res. Board, Box 156 (Bag 4), Nunawading, 

Vic., 3131, Australia 

Rept. No. ARRB-AIR-812-3; 1978; 91p refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 632 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

An up-to-date review of wet-weather braking problems of mo- 
torcycles and the associated test procedures is presented, com- 
plemented by a review of the Transport and Road Res. Lab. 
(U.K.) Seminar on Wet Braking held on 19 Sep 1978, with 
emphasis on the reported effectiveness of sintered-metal brake 
pads. Problems of motorcycle disc brakes in wet weather re- 
late to reduced power of the brake and considerable delays (of 
up to 3 sec to 4 sec) before any braking action starts. U.S. 
(Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 122) and Australian 
(Australian Design Rule (ADR) 33) regulations are inadequate 
for testing motorcycle disc brakes for wet-weather per- 
formance. The National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration's 
Office of Defects Investigation of Honda GL 1000 and CB 
750F models which led to the adoption of grooved pads for 
motorcycle brakes is cited. It is stated that adoption of suita- 
ble standards for wet-weather braking will bring forward the 
need for both a reliable antilock brake and improved technical 
capability of the braking system to make best use of it. 
Recommendations include: revision of ADR 33 for wet braking 
test procedures; encouragement of Australian brake friction- 
material manufacturers to develop suitable replacement sin- 
tered-metal pad materials, and encouragement to service the 
existing Australian motorcycle fleet with sintered-metal pad 
replacements; initiation of research on rider braking behavior 
patterns as a basis for improved training, and more ap- 
propriate and effective vehicle braking standards for motorcy- 
cles; and initiation of review and research on the effect of an- 
tilock braking systems on rider behavior, rider training, and 
vehicle braking standard drafting and revision. 

by M. R. Wigan 

Australian Road Res. Board, Box 156 (Bag 4), Nunawading, 

Vic., 3131, Australia 

Rept. No. ARRB-AIR-812-4; 1978; 47p refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 633 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF 

MOTORCYCLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE 
IMPLICATIONS FOR DESIGN R RULES 

This analysis updates and expands on earlier work which con- 
sidered one aspect of the motorcycle accident countermeasure 
problem in Australia, namely, the rate at which design changes 
introduced for road safety and other reasons (Australian 
Design Rules) spread through the population of motorcycles 
registered for road use. An analysis of available data on life 
expectancy of motorcycles in Australia strongly suggests that 
if design modifications to new motorcycles are to be promul- 
gated for safety reasons, significant penetration of the motor- 
cycle population would follow from their early introduction. 
Despite declining new registrations of motorcycles in Aus- 
tralia, the short registered life of motorcycles suggests that 
design rules, draft regulations, and normal competitive market- 
ing safety innovations applying to new vehicles can substan- 
tially affect the characteristics of the registered motorcycle 
population in a relatively short period of time. Socioeconomic 
and demographic factors were not considered in the present 
study in any detail but should be given specific attention in the 
future. Present data on the motorcycle population in Australia 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 638 



are restricted to Australian Bureau of Statistics data derived 
from Motor Registry records. Improvements would include 
disaggregation of the motorcycle markets into types of 
machines (i.e. agricultural, trail, street, dual-purpose 
(street/trail), competition), better data on the machine itself 
(e.g. power rating, engine type, gross weight), and inclusion of 
nonregistered motorcycles in statistics. 

by M. R. Wigan; T. Thoresen 

Australian Road Res. Board, Box 156 (Bag 4), Nunawading, 

Vic., 3131, Australia 

1979?; lip 15refs 

Galley proofs of an article to appear in Australian Road 

Research v9 nl (Mar 1979). See also HS-025 629. 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 635 

DRIVERS LICENSE GUIDE 1979 

For the purpose of detecting altered and fraudulent driver's 
licenses, all necessary information on license format, colors, 
and markings are provided for the individual states and 
provinces of the U.S. and Canada. License formats cover all 
but the special licenses issued for restricted, minor, special- 
vehicle, or other use. All valid formats are included not just 
current issue. Color photographs of sample driver's licenses 
accompany information on formats (description, minor's 
license, validation, license number, operator's license term, 
operator's minimum age, ownership proof in car, registration 
expiration date). The following license information is also pro- 
vided: state and province policies covering operation of motor- 
cycles, state procedures for military personnel license exten- 
sions, identification card policies of state motor vehicle de- 
partments, description of Remington Rand SOUNDEX system 
for assigning license numbers, color photographs of major 
bank credit cards, and addresses and phone numbers for law 
enforcement purposes, color photographs of current (valid 
during some part of 1979) automobile registration plates in 
U.S. and Canada, and a table showing the state of issuance for 
social security numbers. 

Drivers License Guide Co., 1492 Oddstad Dr., Redwood City, 

Calif. 94063 

1979; 96p 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 636 

SAFETY FIRST [IN AUTOMOBILES] 

Safety information is provided for the British motorist. Seat 
belts are pointed out as probably the best and cheapest forms 
of injury prevention in automobiles. Standard and automatic 
seat belt systems for adults and child safety seats are 
described and regulations regarding restraint system installa- 
tion and use in the U.K. are cited. Legal requirements for the 
operating condition of seat belt systems are outlined. The use 
of separate, red, rear fog lamps, as stipulated by the law, is 
explained. The transport of spare gasoline in cans approved by 
the law ("iron" container, painted red, and marked "Petroleum 
Spirit-Highly Inflammable") is mentioned; several recom- 
mended brand names of gasoline containers are mentioned. 
Procedures are outlined for the safe use of jump cables for 
starting a dead battery. Characteristics of good tow ropes and 
the proper use of tow ropes are described. Advice is given on 
what to do in case of a shattered windshield; two brand names 
of temporary (plastic) windshields are mentioned. Ways to 



help avoid fires caused by electrical faults (protect high-risk 
areas by grommets, check for carburetor leaks) are con- 
sidered, and a plumbed in fire extinguisher system for automo- 
biles is described. 

by Martin Lewis 

Publ: Autocar v!50 n4292 p32-4 (10 Feb 1979) 

1979; Iref 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 637 

COMPUTERIZED TRAFFIC CONTROL SAVES TIME 
AND FUEL 

Computer-controlled traffic systems, operating at various 
levels of sophistication, are now in use in some 200 cities in 
the U.S. Information on traffic conditions around a city flows 
continuously into a computer, which continuously calculates 
where the heaviest traffic is accumulating and how to turn 
traffic lights on and off to move the greatest number of people 
in the shortest possible time. By keeping traffic moving, these 
systems help save fuel, reduce travel time, and cut pollution 
and accidents. In principle, a computerized traffic control 
system consists of a computer and sensors throughout a city 
which detect the movement and concentration of cars. The 
computer, which is connected to and is in control of all traffic 
lights in a city, figures when each light should be on red and 
green, and for how long. Traffic can also be monitored by TV 
and manual control of signal lights applied to solve a con- 
gestion problem. Engineers are working to develop new hard- 
ware to make such equipment even more effective. 
Microprocessors are being developed to fine-tune the flow of 
traffic and reduce the amount of information that has to flow 
back to the central processor. Laser-communications links are 
solving the information -transmission problem. Developments 
are also being made in traffic-control computer programs, of 
which there are three generations. First-generation software 
uses prestored timing patterns for each signal cycle based on 
previously-collected traffic data. Second-generation software, 
instead of selecting a prestored timing pattern based on traffic 
flow, creates a new traffic pattern every time the flow 
changes. Third-generation programs enhance the control sen- 
sitivity by developing individual timing patterns for each inter- 
section. Third-generation software is still being studied, but a 
second-generation program has been developed for testing. 
One problem with current traffic control systems is the high 
telephone utility cost. 

by Mort LaBrecque 

Publ: Popular Science v214 n3 p56, 59-60, 62 (Mar 1979) 

1979; Iref 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 638 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ- 
MATCH WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC 
CHAMPS 

Automotive problems are presented which are based on five of 
eight malfunctions encountered by the high-school, state- 
championship teams who competed in the last national finals 
of Plymouth's Trouble Shooting Contest, held on 20 Jun 1978 
in Kansas City, Mo. In this annual competition, originated by 
Chrysler-Plymouth in 1949, two-person teams of high school 
students from the 50 states try to identify and correct the 



HS-025 639 



HSL 79-10 



same malfunctions in identical cars. The winning team is deter- 
mined by combining a team's repair time, quality of work, and 
scores from a written test taken earlier. The contests are 
designed to encourage mechanically-talented students to 
complete their educations and become auto mechanics. The 
automotive trouble-shooting quiz covers the following 
problems: starter will not crank engine, engine cranks but will 
not start, engine starts but will not idle, left-front turn signal 
does not operate, and temperature gauge on the dash panel in- 
dicates the engine is cold at all times. 

by Ray Hill 

Publ: Popular Science v214 n3 p!30, 135-6 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 639 

TIRES >79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

U.S. tire manufacturers face challenges in trying to meet the 
demands of fuel-economy-conscious automakers, recall-con- 
scious government regulators, wage-conscious United Rubber 
Workers, economy-conscious motorists, and investment-con- 
scious tire-company stockholders. Faced with fuel economy 
requirements, automakers demand lighter-weight, smoother- 
rolling tires and wheels. The third generation radial tires have 
higher inflation pressure and are a few pounds lighter. 
Michelin and Goodyear are pushing low-profile TRX and Ellip- 
tic tires, respectively. These tires take higher inflation 
(resulting in less rolling resistance), but require a special rim to 
keep sidewalls from absorbing excessive road shocks. Tire 
companies are taking two approaches by eliminating spares 
and cutting wheel weight. Run-flat tires, puncture-sealing tires, 
and self-supporting tires with reinforced sidewalls that keep 
sharp edges of the wheels elevated away from the rubber (and 
requiring a warning system) are potential alternatives to spare 
tires. The most attractive option is a temporary spare that 
takes less space than a full-size tire. Another alternative is a 
deflated-type spare requiring a container of compressed air. 
Another idea is a thin, full-size tire. Also underway is research 
to reduce wheel weight. Many cars now are using aluminum 
wheels. Some companies are investigating reinforced-plastic 
rims. Tire industry sales are expected to rise 7% to about $12 
billion in 1979. Tire companies worry about new contract de- 
mands by rubber workers, about declining demand for cars in 
1979 and about possible production shutdowns due to United 
Auto Workers strikes. The rubber companies hope to bolster 
their financial positions by entering other businesses. The most 
astonishing move to diversify is a tentative merger agreement 
between Firestone and Borg-Wamer (automotive parts, chemi- 
cals, and air conditioning). 

by Douglas J. Oplinger 

Publ: Ward's Auto World v!5 n2 p83, 85-6 (Feb 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 640 

MOST '81 CARS MAY HAVE TUNGSTEN/HALOGEN 
LAMPS 

Tungsten/halogen (t/h) headlights will be standard equipment 
on most cars starting with the 1981 model year, if the rest of 
the industry, as expected, follows Ford Motor Co.'s product- 



planning schedule. Improved fuel economy, rather than better 
lighting, is the main reason. The t/h cycle consumes less elec- 
trical energy for an equal or even greater amount of light than 
conventional sealed-beam headlights, which enables cars to he 
equipped with smaller alternators to reduce overall weight. In 
operation, the alternator also soaks up less hp from the engine 
when t/h lamps are used. In conventional sealed beams, the 
lens acts as one large bulb with built-in filament leads. With 
t/h, the lens encloses another bulb using the t/h cycle. With 
two bulbs, t/h headlights are more expensive to make, but 
volume and smaller alternators can offset the added cost. In 
addition to fuel economy improvements, the t/h lamps will 
offer better lighting due to the stronger allowable cp 
(maximum cp up from 75,000 cp to 150,000 cp), achievable 
with conventional sealed beams only at the expense of a 
greater power drain on the engine. The whiter light from the 
t/h lamps also has a greater aesthetic appeal. 

by Richard L. Waddell 

Publ: Ward's Auto World v!5 n2 p88 (Feb 1979) 

1979 

At head of title: Technical Takeout. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 641 

LIGHTS: PT. 1. TO HAVE OR HAVE NOT 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS, U.S. REGULATIONS] 

The use of quartz-halogen automotive headlights (as used in 
Europe) as standard equipment on U.S. automobiles is ad- 
vocated instead of the present conventional sealed-beam 
headlights. It is stated that U.S. lighting standards are archaic. 
From measurements and determinations made in 1940, which 
in turn were based on the technology of 1937 sealed-beam 
headlamps, the Society of Automotive Engineers has set stan- 
dards that the National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration 
(NHTSA) incorporates by reference in overall Federal Motor 
Vehicle Safety Standard 108. European lights have a tremen- 
dous advantage in effectiveness over conventional sealed 
beams not only because of their uniformly bright light, but 
also because of more accurate use of photometries. Thomas 
Fender, Jr., a lawyer and lobbyist for the Northwest 
Headlamp Conference, Inc. which supports U.S. approval for 
quartz-halogen headlights, maintains that NHTSA has failed to 
develop any kind of objective performance criteria for forward 
lighting. It is suggested that NHTSA needs to adopt the Inter- 
national Standard (Economic Commission for Europe) for 
quartz-halogen headlights. NHTSA has based its previous 
refusals of European-type quartz lights on a number of fac- 
tors, including their high initial cost, their incompatibility with 
mechanical aimers, and glare when improperly adjusted. It is 
pointed out that the ECE quartz-haolgens are easier to aim 
than conventional lights and that any light, when misaimed, 
creates a glare problem. NHTSA unexpectedly decided in 1978 
to approve sealed-beam tungsten-halogen high-beam headlights 
of twice the normal output. Under the new regulation, 
NHTSA will allow a total of 150,000 cp for high beams, but 
they must be of sealed-beam construction. The standard is ap- 
plicable only to cars with quad lights that have separate high- 
beam units. Nevertheless, although the new lights do not make 
use of the latest quartz photometries as seen in Europe, it is 
stated that NHTSA is making progress. 

by Larry Griffin 

Publ: Car and Driver v24 n9 p93-4, 98, 100, 103 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Pt. 2 is HS-025 642. 

Availability: See publication 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 644 



HS-025 642 

LIGHTS: FT. 2* WHAT WORKS AND WHAT 
DOESN'T [AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS] 

Advice is given to the consumer on selecting automotive 
headlight conversions and auxiliary lights. It is pointed out that 
in converting from standard sealed-beam headlights to quartz- 
halogen headlights, there are many different types from which 
to select (different types, colors, ranges, and purposes). Un- 
less it is impossible to avoid, special lights should not be 
purchased unless the beam pattern has been observed; various 
lights from the same manufacturer, ostensibly for the same 
purpose, are designed to differ completely in their patterns 
and intensity. Whatever patterns and strengths of special aux- 
iliary lights are under consideration, it is necessary to look for 
even distribution within a pattern, a sign of good photometries 
and thorough development. In general, the deeper any given 
reflector is, the more efficient its light output. The more flut- 
ing a lens has, the shorter and wider its throw. The largest- 
diameter lamps are likely to make more power from any bulb 
that gets plugged in than smaller housings. Beyond these con- 
siderations, a lamp should be chosen for the motorist's 
specific needs. Fog lights should throw a short, wide beam 
with an exceptionally sharp cutoff that runs straight across the 
top of the pattern. The evenness of the light in fog lamps is 
very important, as it is with driving and pencil beams. Amber 
lenses are a good choice for real fog use, but if cornering is 
the object, clear lenses are probably better. Booster or passing 
beams are usually smallish rectangular lights that neatly fill in 
the gaps left by low beams. Wide-beam driving lights, beyond 
headlight conversions, are probably the most useful of all; 
their patterns vary more than those of any other family of 
lights, but ideally they throw a lot of light down the road 
without sacrificing all spread to the sides. Bulbs for headlights 
or auxiliary lights are of two outputs (55 watts and 100 watts, 
the former more practical). Driving and cornering lights should 
be mounted above the bumper, fog lights below. The use of 
relays is essential in wiring up a set of high-intensity lights. 
Care needs to be taken in choosing an accessible on/off switch 
location, such as on the driver's door. 

by Larry Griffin 

Publ: Car and Driver v24 n9 pi 05-11 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Pt. 1 is HS-025 641. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 643 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS 
[UTAH] 

Statistics on fatal traffic accidents in the State of Utah during 
1977 (and comparison years) are provided in graphs and tables. 
The following types of data are presented: national compara- 
tive (1977 Utah data, 1976 national data); fatal accidents by re- 
sidence; 1977 summary; Utah comparative (1976 vs. 1977); 
county fatalities; county population and accident rate; all ac- 
cidents by counties; fatal accidents according to time, 
weather, roadway conditions, seat belt use, vehicle type, ac- 
cident type, traffic violations, speed limit, objects struck, 
directional analysis, operator's age and sex, and type of 
highway; pedestrian accidents (at intersection/not at intersec- 
tion, pedestrian action, accidents/fatalities by age and sex of 
pedestrian, operator's age, fatalities contributed to alcohol or 
other drugs); monthly interstate fatalities; 1940-1977 com- 
parison among vehicle miles/fatalities/fatality rate; accident 



statistics (1934-1977); mileage and travel; accidents and ac- 
cident rates by highway system (1977); fatalities/fatal ac- 
cidents; traffic trends (1967-1977); urban and rural accident 
rates; interstate and non-interstate fatality rates; and alcohol- 
related fatalities by county. In 1977 in Utah, there were 310 
fatal accidents involving 360 fatalities compared to respective 
figures of 225 and 254 for 1976. The fatality rate/100 million 
vehicle miles was 4.0 in 1977 vs. 3.0 in 1976. 

by C. Arthur Geurts; Lillian J. Witkowski; Faye Bennion; 

Charles J. Bertolina; Monte R. Yeager 

Utah Dept. of Transportation, Div. of Safety 

1978; 36p 

Cover title: 1977 Utah Fatal Accidents 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 644 

GUARDRAIL/VEHICLE DYNAMIC INTERACTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

A research program was undertaken to obtain insight into the 
effects of the modified bumper configurations specified by 
Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 215 on the 
collision behavior of a variety of guardrails and median bar- 
riers. FMVSS 215 specifies that automobiles manufactured 
after 1973 must survive a series of front and rear bumper im- 
pact tests without damage to safety-related components. The 
program was designed to: develop and implement a general- 
ized simulation model capable of depicting the three-dimen- 
sional, nonlinear, dynamic response of guardrail/median barri- 
er systems; develop and implement a three-dimensional vehicle 
model that accounts for the bumper modifications of FMVSS 
215 and is capable of three-dimensional interaction with the 
guardrail/median barrier simulation model; identify, through 
parametric analysis, selected guardrails and median barriers 
that are particularly sensitive in their respective performances 
to FMVSS 215 modifications; and establish whether FMVSS 
modifications significantly alter barrier performance to a 
degree warranting barrier modification and/or FMVSS 215 
revision. The basic formulation of the GUARD simulation 
model is presented, and capabilities and applications of the 
guardrail and vehicle/interaction models are discussed. Valida- 
tion procedures employed in verifying the GUARD model are 
described. A summary is provided of the results of numerous 
test simulations performed as part of the parametric analysis. 
Recommendations for future analyses and direction are given. 
Appended are a complete derivation of governing dynamic 
equations employed in the GUARDRAIL model, a description 
of the three-dimensional dynamics of the vehicle/interaction 
model, and detailed descriptions of the computer program 
input, basic program operations, and program listing. It was 
concluded that modifications to vehicles produced by FMVSS 
215 possibly could have an adverse effect on G2, G4S, and 
G4W guardrail systems, all of which are equipped with W-sec- 
tion rails. When stiffened, as is the case with the MB2, MB4S, 
and MB4W median barriers, the bumper effects are negligible. 

by R. W. Bruce; E. E. Halm; N. R. Iwankiw 

IIT Res. Inst., 10 W. 35th St., Chicago, 111. 60616 

DOT-FH-1 1-8520 

Rept. No. FHWA-RD-77-29; PB-286 119; IITRI-J6346; 1976; 

242p 14refs 

Rept. for 1 Jul 1974-31 Dec 1975, 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-025 645 



HSL 79-10 



HS-025 645 

SAFETY BELTS: THE UNCOLLECTED DIVIDENDS 

A sample of ideas is presented in a manual on techniques to 
increase safety belt usage for use by state legislators and state 
officials. The potential of police traffic services, accident in- 
vestigation, traffic records, traffic courts, motor vehicle in- 
spection, driver licensing, driver and traffic safety education, 
and physicians in promoting seat belt usage is outlined. Legal 
approaches to the encouragement of safety belt usage are 
discussed, short of an across-the-board mandatory safety belt 
usage law. Such laws could include the requirements that belts 
must be in good working order for a vehicle to pass inspec- 
tion, that vehicles for hire must have safety belts available and 
in good working order, and that special classes of drivers (e.g. 
truck drivers, bus drivers, ambulance drivers) must wear belts 
for the protection of others. Particular attention is given to 
legal requirements for belt usage among beginning drivers. 
Mandatory belt usage by this group would not only decrease 
the injuries and deaths occurring as a result of their inex- 
perience but also increase the probability of the development 
of the safety belt habit among new drivers. There is ample 
evidence that young, inexperienced drivers are worthy of spe- 
cial consideration from the standpoint of licensing. Since it is a 
fact that young drivers, as a group, are likely to have more 
crashes, increased belt usage by this group should have a 
greater payoff than that of any other age group. The linking of 
belt usage to licensing of the beginning driver is a relatively in- 
expensive way to promote belt usage. All occupants could be 
required to wear seat belts when a young person is driving. It 
is contended that efforts to increase safety belt usage by legal 
means would stand a better chance of success if they were 
limited initially to the requirement of belt use by children and 
youths. 

by Patricia F. Waller 

Publ: Traffic Safety v79 nl p8-10, 30-1 (Jan 1979) 

1979; Iref 

Based on "Safety Belts: The Uncollected Dividends," by P. F. 

Waller, L. K. Li, B. J. Campbell, and M. L. Herman, Univ. of 

North Carolina, Hwy. Safety Res. Center, May 1977, a manual 

sponsored by National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 646 

PROFILE OF THE FATAL PEDESTRIAN RAILROAD 
ACCIDENT 

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has 
completed a study of 269 railroad pedestrian accidents, involv- 
ing 280 fatalities (attempt to exclude suicides), investigated 
from 1 Mar 1976 to 30 Oct 1977. Based on the 280 fatalities, a 
composite profile of fatal trespasser accidents was developed 
consisting of the following 11 elements: accidents occurred 
most frequent on Saturday; the typical victim was a male, 
over 15, who had been drinking heavily, and was not a 
transient; clear weather and good visibility prevailed, with a 
straight track and flat surface; and the accident site consisted 
of a main line with multiple tracks, in a built-up area 
(commercial, industrial, and residential), with a high number 
of trains daily. It was found that 82% of the accidents were in 
unfenced areas. Selective fencing is suggested as an effective 
countermeasure. The NTSB recommends that the Federal 
Railroad Administration develop criteria for the selection of 
fence sites. In addition to the number of tracks, the frequency 
of trains on the tracks, and built-up areas nearby, the 



proposed criteria should consider such items as the direction 
and purpose of pedestrian traffic movement and the topog- 
raphy of the site. 

Publ: Traffic Safety v79 nl p!4-5, 29, 30 (Jan 1979) 

1979; 2refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 647 

DDC [DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE] SUPPLEMENT 
LAUNCHES ALCOHOL CAMPAIGN 

A two-hour alcohol information course, "Drinking, Driving, 
and You," has been launched by the National Safety Council. 
The ready-made educational program is intended for any group 
interested in ameliorating the problem of alcohol abuse, and 
can be given separately or as an extension of the Council's 
Defensive Driving Course (DDC). The course spells out the 
facts about the build up of alcohol concentration after a series 
of drinks, the effect of certain concentrations on the brain, 
and the effect of alcohol on a person's perceptual, judgmental, 
and psychomotor skills that renders him unfit to drive. A 20- 
min color film, "So You Think You Can Drink and Drive", is 
a documentary of an actual drunk-driving test conducted under 
the supervision of the Los Angeles Police Dept. Other visual 
aids include a colorful, 10-page flip chart, with excellent 
graphics, and a flannel board stage. For the student, there is a 
two-color 40-page student handbook with a section which ex- 
pands on the information presented in the lecture portion of 
the course; a section containing student outlines; two quizzes 
that measure alcohol knowledge before and after the course, 
and exercises determining blood alcohol concentration (BAG); 
and a section about problem drinking and additional informa- 
tion on alcohol, such as its long-range effects. The pre-test and 
post-test provided in the handbook are optional. On the back 
cover of the handbook is a serially-numbered graduation card 
on the back of which is a handy BAC calculator. Although the 
problem drinker as such is not discussed in the course, a list 
of state and national organizations providing assistance for the 
problem drinker is provided in the instructor's manual. Any 
DDC instructor, experienced with the DDC format, should be 
able to teach the course effectively without special training. 

by Chris Imhoff 

Publ: Traffic Safety v79 nl p!8-9, 31-2 (Jan 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 648 

AUTOMOTIVE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS 
PROGRAM. FINAL REPORT 

An effort was undertaken to generate experimental data to 
support assessment of the relationship between automobile 
fuel economy and emissions control systems. Tests were made 
at both the engine and vehicle levels on a 1975 Plymouth 
Valiant with 6-cylinder engine. In Environmental Protection 
Agency certified tests, this vehicle/engine combination gave a 
fuel economy in the Federal urban and highway driving cycles 
which was among the best achieved in the 3500-lb inertia 
weight class. By selecting a vehicle from among the best fuel 
economy cars, any positive results achieved during the pro- 
gram are more meaningful. A vehicle in the 3500-lb class was 
chosen since lighter vehicles seem to be the trend of the fu- 
ture. Detailed investigations were made on cold-start emission 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 732 



devices, exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) systems, and air in- 
jection reactor (AIR) systems. Based on the results of engine 
tests, an alternative emission control system (electrically- 
heated catalyst unit) and modified control (EGR/spark ad- 
vance) strategy were implemented and tested in the vehicle. 
The stock AIR strategy and stock EGR delay time were main- 
tained. With the same fuel economy and NOx (nitrogen ox- 
ides) emissions as the stock vehicle, the modified vehicle 
reduced hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions by 
about 20%. By removing the NOx emissions constraint, the 
modified vehicle demonstrated about 12% better fuel economy 
than the stock vehicle. 

by Mack W. Dowdy; Ronald L. Baisley 

California Inst. of Tech., Jet Propulsion Lab., 4800 Oak Grove 

Dr., Pasadena, Calif. 91103 

DOT-RA-75-41 

Rept. No. NASA-CR-157604; JPL-78-21; N78-32426; 1978; 

211p47refs 

Rept. for Jun 1975-Dec 1976. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-025 649 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON- 
COMMERCIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. 
VARIATIONS BY MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, 
PICKUPS, AND UTILITY VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS 
DURING THEIR FIRST YEAR, 1977 MODELS 
DURING THEIR FIRST TWO YEARS 

Variations in frequencies and sizes of collision claims for 
damage to individual 1977 and 1978 model year vans, pickups, 
and utility vehicles are reported, based on the experience of 

1977 models in the calendar period Sep 1976 through Aug 
1978, and of 1978 models in the period Sep 1977 through Aug 
1978. Collision coverage and loss data were supplied by Aetna 
Life and Casualty, Allstate, Kemper, Liberty Mutual, Nation- 
wide, Prudential, State Farm, and Travelers insurance compa- 
nies. Appended are descriptions of the sources and nature of 
the data; a discussion of data analysis methods; definitions; a 
list of vehicle series designations by class, make, and series; 
and detailed claim frequency and average loss payment per 
claim results. The frequencies of collision claims for the three 
groups of vehicles were very similar. The 1978 model year 
utility vehicles had the highest claim frequency, 10.3 
claims/100 insured vehicle years; the 1978 vans had the lowest, 
9.6 claims/100 vehicle years. The average loss payment per 
claim, varied greatly among the three vehicle groups. It was 
highest ($1020) for 1978 utility vehicles, a figure 54% greater 
than that for 1978 vans, which had the lowest average loss 
payment per claim ($663). In each model year, vans had the 
lowest average payment per claim, followed by pickups and 
utility vehicles. The 1978 utility vehicles had the highest 
average loss payment per insured vehicle year ($105), and the 

1978 vans had the lowest ($64). The Jeep CJ-5 Universal and 
the Jeep CJ-7 Universal had average loss payments per insured 
vehicle year exceeding $100 in both model years. Within each 
vehicle group, there was great variation in the average loss 
payments per insured vehicle year for individual makes and 
models. 

Highway Loss Data Inst., Watergate 600, Washington, B.C. 

20037 

Rept. No. HLDI-V78-1; 1979; 39p 2refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 731 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. 
VOL. 1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY 
ANALYSIS. FINAL REPORT 

Basic information is provided to transportation planners and 
engineers for analyzing local or regional air quality impacts. 
Subjects discussed include basic characteristics, sources, 
removal processes, and air quality standards for five pollutants 
(hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, participates, 
and photochemical oxidants); emissions; control devices, and 
legislation on vehicular emissions; nonvehicular anthropogenic 
and natural sources of those five pollutants; construction of 
emissions inventories; relative contributions of vehicular emis- 
sions to air quality at regional, urban, and roadway spatial 
scales; physical and chemical processes that affect pollutant 
concentrations; an assessment of types of air quality models 
including algebraic (Gaussian), trajectory, and grid numerical 
models; and the design and use of air quality monitoring pro- 
grams. Appended is a list of air quality models and references 
in which they are described. A glossary and subject index are 
provided. This report may be useful as a general reference 
work, particularly on the subjects of emissions, atmospheric 
processes, and air quality models. 

by R. I. Pollack; T. W. Tesche; S. D. Reynolds; M. J. Hfflyer; 
T. N. Jerskey; M. J. Meldgin 

Systems Applications, Inc., 950 Northgate Drive, San Rafael, 
Calif. 94903 
DOT-FH-1 1-9143 

Rept. No. FHWA-RD-78-99; EF78-28R; 1978; 418p refs 
Vol. 2, Guidance for Highway Planners and Engineers, is HS- 
025 732. 
Availabtfity: NTIS 



HS-025 732 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. 
VOL. 2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS 
AND ENGINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

Guidance is provided for highway planners and engineers in 
selecting and designing air quality analyses to evaluate the im- 
pact of a land use or transportation planning project. The legal 
framework within which such analyses are performed is 
described. Available resources are reviewed for analyzing air 
quality (techniques for estimating travel demand, highway 
usage, vehicular and nonvehicular emissions inventories, and 
resultant air quality). The various issues that arise in evaluat- 
ing land use plans, transportation policies, and facility and 
operation plans at both regional and subregional levels are 
described, including the selection of the appropriate spatial 
and temporal scales for the analysis, the accuracy necessary in 
the analysis methods, the application of screening procedures 
to determine the level of analysis required, the comparison of 
air quality predictions to legal requirements on air quality, and 
the reporting of modeling results. Summaries of relevant air 
quality and transportation legislation are appended. This report 
is designed to familiarize the highway planner or engineer with 



11 



HS-025 733 

the issues that must be considered and allow him to determine 
the appropriate air quality analysis method. 

by R. I. Pollack; T. W. Tesche; T. Austin 

Systems Applications, Inc., 950 Northgate Drive, San Rafael, 

Calif. 94903; JHK and Associates, 1617 E. 17th St., Santa 

Ana, Calif. 92701 

DOT-FH-11-9143 

Rept. No. FHWA-RD-78-100; EF78-34R; 1978; 164p refs 

Vol. 1, Introduction to Air Quality Standards, is HS-025 731. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-025 733 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

On 27 Apr, 1978, Thursday, at 4:10 AM, on Interstate 40, 7 mi 
west of Morganton, N.C., a tractor-semitrailer combination, 
operated by Southern Screw Div. of NL Industries, Inc. 
(N.Y., N.Y.), collided with the rear of a slower-moving trac- 
tor-semitrailer combination, operated by Thurston Motor 
Lines, Inc. (Charlotte, N.C.), which was in the right lane of 
travel. Upon collision, the Thurston truck veered to the left, 
crossed one lane of travel, ran partially onto the grass median, 
then returned to the roadway, coming to rest in the right lane 
and partially on the right shoulder, Its final position was 756 ft 
from the point of impact. The NL truck, after the collision, 
continued its forward motion straight ahead, and came to rest 
432 ft from the point of impact. The driver of the NL truck 
was crushed in the cab of his tractor and killed instatly. The 
driver of the Thurston truck was injured. Property damage 
was $32,600. The probable cause of the accident was inatten- 
tion as the result of fatigue or use of drugs on the part of the 
NL driver, and excessive speed (estimated to be between 70 
mph and 75 mph). The Thurston driver claimed that he was 
traveling at 45 mph prior to the accident. The NL driver had 
covered about 700 mi to the accident scene in 17 hr without 
any appreciable rest. Sometime during the trip, he relied on 
amphetamines to stay awake. The speed of the NL truck and 
the slower-moving and mechanically-deficient Thurston truck 
contributed to the serious consequences of the rear-end colli- 
sion. Both drivers had previously had their licenses suspended 
and revoked and both drivers had prepared false logs, indicat- 
ing a callous disregard for compliance with state and Federal 
regulations. The Thurston driver was operating without a valid 
chauffeur's license, a fact unknown to his employer. 

Bureau of Motor Carrier Safety, Washington, D.C. 20590 
Kept. No. BMCS-78-1; 1979; 17p 
Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 734 

1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. 

AUGUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

A compilation is provided of presentations at a conference to 
promote implementation of grade crossing safety improvement 
projects authorized by Federal, state, and railroad industry 
programs. In the first session, bimodal safety and efficiency of 
grade crossings were addressed from the viewpoints of the 
National Transportation Safety Board, the state (Utah) depart- 
ment of transportation, the railroad industry (Burlington 



HSL 79-K 

Northern, Inc.), Amtrak, labor (Brotherhood of Railroat 
Signalmen), and the Federal Hwy. Administration. The secom 
session treated the strengths and weaknesses of the nationa 
grade crossing safety program (Federal, state, and railroad in 
dustry viewpoints), and the roles of labor, the media, and edu 
cation in crossing programs. The first part of the third sessioi 
was concerned with establishing new priorities for crossing 
safety programs and included presentations on the status oi 
the National Inventory data file on U.S. railroad-highwa) 
crossings, on passenger considerations, and on the Canadian 
government's role; the second part of the session dealt witt 
the administration of grade crossing programs, with individual 
treatment of split jurisdictions, rail relocations, and the 
systems approach. New directions were discussed in the final 
session which included the following presentations: research 
projects (Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, use oi 
the National Inventory data file for state rail planning activi- 
ties, Canadian research, U.S. research), role of the railroad 
signal department (the Santa Fe Railway Co. approach, the 
Seaboard Coast Line Railroad approach), and crossing warning 
systems and surfaces and their proper application (separate 
treatment of equipment, application, and surfaces). 

Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C. 20590 

1977; 133p refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 735 

DYNAMIC TESTING OF LUMINAIRE SUPPORTS 
WITH AN IMPROVED PENDULUM IMPACT 
FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

Results are presented of a study leading to the development oi 
a validated pendulum substitute for the full-scale tests of lu- 
minaire supports as required by current American Assoc. oi 
State Hwy. and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) specified' 
tions (Federal Hwy. Administration Notice N 5040.20, 14 Ju 
1976). The resulting pendulum test procedure adequately simu 
lated a 20 -mph, full-scale, head-on test with a pre-1973 Vegj 
design vehicle in terms of change of momentum, structure 
deformation, impact duration, peak loads, and failure modes 
As a byproduct of this effort, added insight has been obtaine< 
on pendulum and target structure parameters that may be criti 
cal in affecting the momentum transfer of the impacting vehi 
cle. As a minimum requirement to ensure pendulum test 
which are compatible with full-scale tests, the pendulum nos 
configuration adopted for the design vehicle must posses 
comparable mass, aggressivity, and stiffness to the desig 
vehicle, must result in identical target failure modes, and mu: 
reproduce faithfully the force-time, force-deformation charac 
teristic of the given design vehicle with the given targe 
Minimally required are the avoidance, in calibrating the tei 
facility, of target structures known to exhibit extensh 
scatter, and modification of target structures known to exhib 
extensive scatter in fracture loads to improve their repeatabi] 
ty. 

by D. B. Chisholm; L. C. Meczkowski 

Federal Hwy. Administration, Protective Systems Group, 

Washington, D.C. 20590 

Rept. No. FHWA-RD-78-204; 1978; 115p lOrefs 

Availability: NTIS 



12 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 739 



HS-025 736 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A 
MOVING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. 
FINAL REPORT 

The configuration and evaluation are described of an auto- 
mated moving merge control system in Tampa, Fla. (Ashley 
St. entrance ramp to Interstate Hwy. 275). The traffic control 
system, known as the green band system, was designed to pro- 
vide a visual indication of the existence of the acceptable gaps 
in the freeway traffic stream which then could be used as ad- 
visory information for vehicles on the ramp. Its purpose is to 
promote a more efficient match between the arrival of ramp 
vehicles and freeway gaps in the merge area. The operational 
performance characteristics are described; they generally re- 
late to the quality of traffic operations as measured on the 
ramp, the freeway, and the merge area. The safety considera- 
tions, including driver stress, traffic turbulence, and accident 
experience, are addressed. Public acceptance factors are 
presented, based on two questionnaire surveys. A cost/benefit 
analysis of a number of alternatives for operational and safety 
improvements (green band system, ramp metering system, and 
ramp reconstruction) is provided. From a mechanical, electri- 
cal, computer, and software technological point of view, the 
moving merge system was operated successfully. The system 
improved the merging operation within the area of the ac- 
celeration lane, and improved traffic operations in the freeway 
right lane immediately upstream of the merge area. A three- 
year comparison of accidents before and after installation of 
the system showed that all accidents in the merge area had 
been reduced by 38%, rear-end collisions by 45%, and ac- 
cidents in the freeway right lane upstream of the merge area 
by 26%. It is concluded that most drivers found the system 
useful. Although most drivers understood how to use the 
system, many drivers chose not to use the rampside-presented 
information. The system did not produce an adverse effect in 
terms of driver stress. The best cost-benefit ratio was found 
for the ramp metering system. It is stated that the use of the 
green band concept should be limited to those applications 
where redesign of the ramp and merging area is impractical, 
but safety improvements on the freeway and in the merge area 
are needed. 

by K. G. Courage; J. A. Wattleworth; J. K. Sturgis; G. C. 

Price; S. L. Shaw; C. S. Bauer 

University of Florida, Transportation Res. Center, Gainesville, 

Fla. 32611 

DOT-FH-1 1-8285 

Kept. No. FHWA-RD-78-29; 1978; 103p lOrefs 

Also sponsored by the Florida Dept. of Transportation and the 

City of Tampa. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-025 737 

EFFECT OF CARGO SHIFTING ON VEHICLE 
HANDLING. FINAL REPORT 

A study was undertaken to determine if and to what degree 
shifting cargoes affect the handling of heavy vehicles. The 
first phase involved surveying several trucking companies to 
determine the procedures used by the industry when transport- 
ing shifting cargoes. The findings helped in planning a full- 
scale test program in which two types of cargo were used, 
water in tank trailers, and hanging beef halves in refrigerated 
vans. Handling performance was compared to that of a 
nonshifting-cargo vehicle. The same tractor was used to tow 



the different loads. Tests were conducted in braking, corner- 
ing, and combined maneuvers. Acceleration measurement and 
driver reaction were used to compare the handling per- 
formance. It was concluded that some handling deterioration 
occurred in almost every case of shifting cargo. The degree of 
stability problems encountered when transporting partial loads 
of liquid cargo can be reduced through driver training and in- 
struction, and by recommending that this type of operation be 
kept to a minimum. The problems with transporting swinging 
meat loads could be ameliorated by driver training and instruc- 
tion and by a concerted effort on the part of packers and ship- 
pers to pack each load as tightly as possible. 

by C. Culley; R. L. Anderson; L. E. Wesson 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1850 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., Phoenix, 

Ariz. 85027 

DOT-FH-1 1-9195 

Rept. No. FHWA-RD-78-76; 3989-78-22; 1978; 139p 

Rept. for Oct 1976-Dec 1977. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-025 738 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

Some of the data collected on a sample of 225 students on the 
written and riding skill tests they took as pan of a Morotcycle 
Rider Course administered by the Univ. of Illinois during Apr- 
Sep 1977, were used to evaluate the statistical properties and 
overall effectiveness of the tests. The free motorcycle riding 
instruction supported by the Illinois Dept. of Transportation, 
was offered to residents of an 11 -county area; of over 1000 
persons completing the course, most obtained a motorcycle 
operator's license. The written test was administered on the 
first day, prior to any instruction, and on the last day of in- 
struction so that the change in knowledge due to the course 
could be measured. The range riding skill test was given on the 
last day of instruction. The curriculum and the tests were 
those of the Motorcycle Safety Foundation. Based on the anal- 
ysis of the data, it is recommended that some revision of the 
written test would be appropriate. A number of test questions 
could be safely omitted since the information is already known 
to the students prior to taking the course. Some items on the 
written test are ambiguous and require revision or deletion. 
Other questions require review by the instructors to insure 
that proper emphasis is placed on them during the course. The 
reliability of the written test indicated lower internal consisten- 
cy reliability values (pre-test and post-test) than was desirable. 
In the riding skill test, exercises pertaining to controlling the 
engine, operating the controls, stopping quickly, and weaving 
could be omitted to reduce time and administration costs 
without any significant loss in overall reliability. 

by R. G. Mortimer; E. A. Satrun; D. L. Gilliland 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept. of Health 
and Safety Education, Champaign, HI. 61820 
Rept. No. Safety-RR-78-1; 1978; 16p 
Availability: NTIS 



HS-025 739 

SUOMEN TIELIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET 
VUONNA 1977 9 LISANA ERAITA TBETOJA 
VUODESTA 1958 ALKAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC 

ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 1977, WITH SOME 



13 



HS-025 740 



HSL 79-10 



. 



ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING FROM THE 
YEAR 1958) 

Tables and graphs provide statistical data on road traffic ac- 
cidents in Finland in 1977, as well as some time-series accident 
data for the years 1958 through 1977. Included is a table of 
statistics for road traffic accidents in some other European 
countries during 1976. The source material is information on 
traffic accidents reported by the police to the Central Statisti- 
cal Office. Data are provided on motor vehicle registrations; 
fatalities; injuries; pedestrian, bicyclist, mopedist, and motor- 
cyclist fatalities and injuries, by age groups; vehicles involved 
in accidents; fatalities and injuries per 1000 cars and per 
100,000 mean population, by province; fatalities and injuries 
by month, day, hour; accidents involving injury to persons by 
type of accident; pedestrian action at the time of accidents at 
railroad crossings; fatalities and injuries according to road-user 
group of those intoxicated; and road traffic accidents and their 
consequences per 100 million vehicle kilometers. The 1958- 
1977 data include total number of fatalities and injuries, 
number/1000 motor vehicles, number/100,000 mean population, 
number/1000 road traffic accidents, and number by age 
groups. 

Liikenneturva, Helsinki, Finland 
1978; 37p 

Text also in Finnish. 
Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 740 

NEW RESEARCH ON THE ROLE OF ALCOHOL 
AND DRUGS IN ROAD ACCIDENTS 

A state-of-the-art review of alcohol and other drugs in relation 
to traffic safety is presented, examining the research results 
obtained since a 1968 report on the subject by the Organisa- 
tion for Economic Co-operation and Devel. (OECD). The ex- 
amination of the drug problem is limited almost entirely to a 
discussion of the epidemiological evidence. The alcohol 
problem, on the other hand, is followed through to an ex- 
amination of the information related to drinking-driving coun- 
termeasures and their effectiveness. The subject is treated in 
the following five sections: examination of statistical and 
design considerations necessary for an accurate assessment of 
the interaction of drugs, alcohol, and traffic; evaluation of the 
extent and nature of the alcohol and drug problem with 
respect to traffic safety; identification of the driver at risk and 
the effects of alcohol and/or drugs on driving performance; 
examination of countermeasure programs; and conclusions and 
recommendations. Appended are a recommended methodology 
for roadside surveys of drinking-driving behavior, a slightly 
modified version of the methodology established by OECD in 
1972; and a summary of available devices for measuring driver 
alcohol levels and their accuracy. The principal recommenda- 
tion specifies that the major countermeasure activities con- 
tinue to be focused on efforts to resolve the alcohol problem 
in traffic safety. The major task related to drug and traffic 
safety is the design of valid research studies to establish the 
extent and nature of drug use among drivers and pedestrians. 
The most urgent need in this area is the development of more 
sensitive and practical assay techniques. 

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Devel., Road 

Res. Group, 2, rue Andre-Pascal, 75775 Paris Cedex 16, 

France 

Rept. No. OECD-40.927-1978; 1978; 154p refs 

Availability: Corporate author $9.00 



HS-025 741 

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR BRAKING TECHNIQUE 

Effective motorcycle braking technique can be learned through 
practice. The front brake can provide up to 75% of stopping 
power if the cycle is upright on a stable surface. The lever 
should be in line with the forearm, with the cable lubricated so 
that two-finger pressure can operate it. The rear brake should 
lie directly under the sole of the foot, with the pedal moving 
about 3/4 inch before it activates the brake. Careful adjust- 
ment and repositioning, if necessary, of the lever and pedal 
are vital to effective operation. The rear brake should be ap- 
plied an instant before the front, for stabilization; downshift- 
ing quickly through the gears while braking takes advantage of 
engine compression, an effect provided more strongly by a 
four- than by a two-stroke engine. Operating the front brake 
and throttle while downshifting is done by rolling the throttle 
on and off with the side of the thumb. Wheel lockup must be 
avoided; practicing stops at gradually increasing speeds while 
noting the braking pressures and stopping distances required 
will familiarize the cyclist with the critical point between max- 
imum braking and wheel lockup. 

by Bill Hampton 

Publ: Popular Mechanics v!51 n3 p41-2 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 742 

TWILIGHT [DANGERS OF DRIVING] 

The hazards of driving in evening twilight are suggested by the 
fatality statistics: nearly 1/3 of all auto accidents occur from 4 
to 8 p.m., and 1/3 of all traffic-caused pedestrian deaths. 
Visual adaptation to increasing darkness lags, decreasing the 
driver's depth perception, and fatigue at the end of the work- 
ing day also affects vision and alertness. Alcohol, poor health 
and problems of aging decrease driving efficiency. Low-beam 
headlights should be turned on at sunset, or whenever light 
conditions become less than optimum. Other recommendations 
for twilight driving include: careful upkeep of car's head and 
taillights, reflectors, windshields and wipers; interior illumina- 
tion kept to a minimum; no smoking; constant watchfulness 
for pedestrians; decrease in speed by at least 10 mph at dusk; 
pulling off the road for a rest for a few minutes until full dark- 
ness; and, when possible, having a car in a visible color such 
as white, off-white or yellow, the most easily seen in twilight 
conditions. The average driver experiences more visual dif- 
ficulty at dusk than at night with headlights. 

by Michael J. Mooney 

Publ: Populat Mechanics v!51 n3 pi 16-7, 190, 192 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 743 

HOW TO STOP STALLING 

Letters requesting advice about problems of engine stalling in- 
dicate that 85% of the cars experiencing stalling have a mal- 
functioning emissions control or vacuum -related component as 
the cause. Such problems have resulted in two recalls and one 
ongoing investigation by DOT; cars involved in such recalls 
should be taken to a dealer. For other cars, the first step 
should be an engine tuneup, concentrating on the following 



14 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 746 



procedures: a compression test with the engine warm, to 
establish if stalling results from excessive carbon in the en- 
gine; servicing sparkplugs, cables, ignition timing and distribu- 
tor parts, and adjusting the point dwell of nonelectronic igni- 
tion systems; testing the automatic choke to be sure it isn't 
sticking, and setting it to the manufacturer's specifications; 
setting slow (curb) and fast-idle speed to specification, over- 
hauling carburetor and checking throttle linkage; checking fuel 
system; seeing that pollution control (PCV) valve is not 
clogged; checking for weak fuel pump. If these measures fail 
to prevent stalling, the problem may be one of the following: 
an inoperative thermostatic air cleaner; vacuum loss around 
the carburetor and intake manifold; split, kinked or loose 
vacuum hoses; damaged vacuum break; inoperative manifold 
heat-control valve or vacuum-controlled fuel vaporization 
valve; leaking exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) valve; or 
cracked or loosely connected ignition wires. Instructions are 
given for checking the thermostatic air cleaner, tracking down 
vacuum loss, and testing heat (early fuel evaporation, or EFE) 
and EGR valves. Detailed drawings illustrate each component 
to be investigated. Further solutions to the stalling problem 
may be found in service bulletins, obtainable through a service 
manager for the particular make of car. 

by Mort Schultz 

Publ: Popular Mechanics v!51 n3 p!28-30 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

At head of title: Saturday Mechanic. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 744 

THE 12 MOST-ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT RV 
[RECREATIONAL VEHICLE] TIRES 

Definition of an off -road tire, and information about price, ad- 
vantages and disadvantages of specialized tires for recreational 
vehicles are offered as replies to a series of questions. Since 
most owners of RV's with four-wheel drive spend much more 
time on the highway than off, the off-road tire should be 
designed for both kinds of service. Off -road is defined as the 
outback where chunks of rock, deep ruts, mud and sand 
prevail; regular tires suffice on average hard-packed country 
roads. The conventional heavy-duty truck tire is a good com- 
promise. Tread pattern for off -road tires, open and deep- 
grooved, comes in conventional or traction design (snow tires). 
The wide soft tread paddle tire for sand and mud would wear 
rapidly in highway use. For a vehicle used often for both 
areas, the most practical plan is two sets of tires and of 
wheels, to avoid mounting and demounting. Off -road traction 
snow tires are best for snow, adequate for other terrain 
(rocky, sandy, muddy) but not as comfortable on paved roads. 
For driving on ice, tire chains are best. Using wider tires than 
recommended by the car's manufacturer can involve modifica- 
tions and, in some cases, unnecessary wear on the engine. As 
tires of the same size designation may not have the same 
overall diameter, tires should not be mixed on four-wheel 
drive vehicles; drive-train damage may result. Radial tires are 
best and strongest; belted-bias a second choice; bias tires, the 
least expensive, not suitable for extensive off-road use. Before 
the vehicle is fitted with tires having a heavier load range, the 
weight limit should be checked on the axle rating label at- 
tached to the cab. The required tire load range can be deter- 
mined by having the loaded vehicle weighed, one axle at a 
time, dividing the weight by the number of tires on the axle, 
then using a load and inflation table, available at tire dealers 



or from the Tire Industry Safety Council, Washington, D.C., 
20004. 

by Mort Schultz 

Publ: Popular Mechanics v!51 n3 p!06-7, 176 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 745 

WHY EATON GOT OUT OF THE AIR-BAG 
BUSINESS 

Investment in mandated markets has proved to be risky, af- 
fected by start-stop Federal programs and inconsistent legisla- 
tion. Easton Corp., pioneer developer of the air bag, has given 
up the program after spending 13 years and more than $20 mil- 
lion on research; Allied Chemical has also discontinued work 
on inflation systems. Current rulings allow either air bags or 
automatic seat belts to meet Federal standards up to 1984; the 
cheaper, less controversial belts are assumed to be a probable 
choice, with air bags as an option. Production of a reliable, 
long-lasting air bag requires a higher degree of technology than 
that of most other car components. Questions of price and lia- 
bility insurance have not been settled. Indications are that the 
three-point shoulder belt, buckled by the wearer, is more ef- 
fective. The 1971 mandate for passive restraint systems in all 
new cars with a 1974 deadline did not allow enough lead time, 
producing an industry backlash. Similar confusion resulted 
when the anti-skid truck brake was mandated prematurely, be- 
fore complete development, and got a quick reputation for un- 
reliability. Work on air bags is continuing, with Talley Indus- 
tries, Thiokol Corp. and the Hamill division of Firestone, in 
spite of adverse proposed legislation and uncertainty about en- 
vironmental and liability problems. Second- and third-genera- 
tion air bags are a possibility for cars in the mid-eighties. 

by Donald D. Holt 

Publ: Fortune v99 n5 p!46-9 (12 Mar 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 746 

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES. PART 1, [TRAILED 
TYPES] 

A definition is made of types of recreational vehicles: the 
trailed, the motorized or self-propelled (truck or slide-in cam- 
pers and motor homes), and mobile homes, which are now 
designated "manufactured housing." The varieties of trailed 
types are considered here; a later article will deal with self- 
propelled (motorized) types. Conventional travel trailers can 
be towed by an auto, van or pickup truck; fifth wheel travel 
trailers have a raised forward section over the box of a pickup 
truck with a fifth wheel hitch mounted in the truck bed; fold- 
down camping trailers have plastic or fabric walls which fold 
down for travel and open out when set up for use. These last 
are the lowest-priced, smallest and lightest, varying from 
about 1000 to over 2000 pounds, with a wide range of facili- 
ties. Solid-body trailers are more suitable for long periods of 
time; they may or may not be "self -contained" with ail neces- 
sary facilities for living a limited period of time without being 
attached to any outside services. The fifth-wheel trailer has 
similar facilities in less total length, but requires a pickup 
truck or especially adapted vehicle for towing. Folding camp- 
ing trailers are priced from $1475 to $3025, and fifth-wheel 



15 



HS-025 747 



HSL 79- 



trailers from $4055 to 11,570 and "Conventional" trailers from 
$4055 to $9150. Suggestions for consideration before making a 
purchase decision are offered, and a number of informative 
books and magazines are recommended. 

by Carl Edwards 

Publ: Consumers' Research Magazine v62 n3 pll-4 (Mar 1979) 

1979; 4refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 747 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN 
EVALUATION OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL 
REPORT TO THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE 
OF CALIFORNIA IN ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764- 
1976 REGULAR LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE 
BELL 2033-GARCIA) 

A study was made to determine the justifiability of Calif. 
Dept. of Motor Vehicles (DMV) policies with respect to 
drivers having mental or physical conditions affecting their 
ability to drive safely. Disabilities considered included neu- 
rological disorders which may cause lapses of consciousness 
or control; diabetes mellitus; cardiovascular or cerebrovascular 
disease; conditions associated with aging; miscellaneous dis- 
ease categories; excessive alcohol use; excessive drug use 
(including drugs used as medication); mental or emotional ill- 
ness; and mental retardation. Approaches used included a 
review of traffic safety literature, a compendium of medical 
opinion and data, a review of laws and administrative policies 
in Calif, and other states and countries relating to impaired 
drivers, a presentation of statistics relating to the role of im- 
pairment in Calif, accidents, an experimental study of the ef- 
fect of three types of DMV treatment (formal probation, infor- 
mal probation, and no action) on accident records of subjects 
with lapses of consciousness or other physical or mental im- 
pairments, and opinion surveys of the general driving popula- 
tion and impaired drivers. It is concluded that the identifica- 
tion and driver's license control of medically disabled drivers 
fulfills an essential pubb'c safety need and should be con- 
tinued; further recommendations are made for clarifying infor- 
mation and instructions given to drivers and physicians, for 
protecting the rights of the subjects, and for making greater 
use of license restrictions instead of refusing licenses. Further 
research should be done on the medical reporting law, and the 
form should be modified to include more comprehensive and 
relevant medical information. There is not enough evidence to 
indicate that the benefits of a medical advisory board outweigh 
the costs. 

by Mary K. Janke; Raymond C. Peck; Dell R. Dreyer 
California Business and Transportation Agency, Dept. of 
Motor Vehicles, 2415 1st Ave., Sacramento, Calif. 95818 
Kept. No. CAL-DMV-RSS-78-67; 1978; 379p refs 
Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 748 

CONSUMER DECISION PROCESSES IN 
AUTOMOBILE PURCHASING: AN EXPLORATORY 
STUDY 

A pilot study is offered of consumers' decision processes in 
choosing a new automobile, focussing on the how and why of 
the decision process with emphasis on psychological elements 
such as perception, cognition and affect. The purpose is to 



establish causality among decision stages and to develop 
sequence of stages representing time priority and the influei 
of one stage on the other. General information influences 
decisions include extent of knowledge, confidence in se\ 
different information sources (advertising, car magazines s 
newspaper articles, "Consumer Reports", dealers a 
salesmen, friends, garagemen, and service station men), inil 
tion of word of mouth, and salience of three different wo 
of -mouth sources (dealers and salesmen, friends and fami 
service station attendants). Variables influencing brand cho 
processes are advertising breadth (number of different mei 
one is exposed to), advertising rate (number of exposures), 
titude, awareness, car literature, confidence, favorableness 
word-of-mouth, intention, ownership, predisposition, repres< 
tativeness (of the subproduct class), satisfaction, and word* 
mouth rate. These variables were measured for each of thi 
brands, Maverick, Toyota and Volkswagen, both static a 
dynamic models of car buying. Appended are operation 
definitions of variables, frequency and percentage distril 
tions, and examples of Tau computations. 

by Terrence V. O'Brien 

Marketing Science Inst., 14 Story St., Cambridge, Mass. 021 

Kept. No. MSI-PRR-76-121; 1976; 102p 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 749 

SCHOOL BUS MAINTENANCE OUTLINED. 
CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR 
DISCUSSES COSTS AND PROCEDURES 

An overview is presented of a school bus maintenance pi 
gram, together with the repair history of one vehicle. Eta 
Bequette, transportation supervisor for the Ocean Vi< 
School District in Huntington Beach, Calif., provided inforn 
tion on his fleet of buses, whose advanced average age, 
years of use, may be partly due to the fact that Ocean Vi 
buys only a few vehicles per year, the new buses becomi 
additions to the fleet rather than replacements. Of the 80-ve 
cle fleet including buses, trucks and cars, 28 buses carry re] 
lar, mentally gifted, handicapped and Head Start class me 
bers. The vehicles include transits, requiring a special licen 
72-passenger conventional; 66 passenger conventional w 
electric clutch; 12-passenger minis accommodating t 
wheelchairs; 16-passenger minis; and 22-passenger minis, 
formation is provided on maintenance records, mileage, i 
gines, drive trains, tires and bodies. The inspection and prev< 
tive maintenance program involves a preliminary check and 
spection report by the driver each day on tires, fluid lev* 
lights, mirrors and emergency exits; an inspection during fu 
ing of tires, oil, water, etc.; and an inspection every thi 
days or 2,000 miles by a mechanic, including a check of i 
del-carriage and brakes. Weekly inspections by a qualif 
preventive maintenance mechanic will shortly be required b; 
new Calif, law. The addition of an AM/FM radio on every n 
bus has improved student behavior. A breakdown of appro 
mate costs is presented for the 1958 International/Wayne 
passenger bus. Assuming costs for the first five years to hi 
been approximately $420, total repair costs for 20 years hi 
been $8400. 

Publ: School Bus Fleet v24 nl p!2, 14, 16, 19 (Feb/Mar 197< 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



16 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 753 



HS-025 750 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED 
MOTOR VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF 
DISCLOSURE AND REGULATION 

An investigation was conducted into the effects of disclosure ,, 
requirements for used vehicles, suggested by the similarity 
between the proposed Federal Trade Commission (FTC) rule 
(1976) and the existing Wisconsin disclosure regulation (1972). 
Information was sought on the overall nature of the used vehi- 
cle retail transaction from the perspective of both the con- 
sumer and the dealer, and on the impact of the Wisconsin 
dealer disclosure regulation. Because this regulation requires 
more than disclosure (disclosure and mandatory safety repair) 
comparison was also made of Wisconsin with Iowa, which 
requires safety inspections in all used vehicle sales but no ad- 
ditional disclosure, and with Minnesota, where neither disclo- 
sure nor inspection is required. Data were developed to deter- 
mine the effects of disclosure on consumer and dealer 
behavior, market structure and used vehicle prices, and on en- 
forcement mechanisms. An overall cost-benefit analysis distills 
the findings and describes the effects of disclosure regulation. 
Results are seen to be lower purchase prices and repair costs, 
improved information for consumer decision-making, safety 
benefits, and benefits from the dispute resolution system and 
the complaint handling and enforcement activities of the Dept. 
of Motor Vehicles (DMV) Dealer Inspection Unit. 

by John R. Nevin; David M. Trubek 

University of Wisconsin; Center for Public Representation, 

520 University Ave., Madison, Wis. 

1977; 229p refs 

Prepared for the Federal Trade Commission hearings, 

Washington, D.C., 25 Apr 1977. 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 751 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODK DES ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

In an energy comparison of battery-powered vehicles with 
those of conventional drive, a uniform methodology in testing 
is important. A number of factors influence the energy 
requirements of the vehicle, besides such obvious ones as 
technical design, design of the vehicle and its work load, and 
the essential character of the traffic. In the course of simu- 
lated traffic tests with reproducible driving cycles, the progres- 
sion in the driving speed is largely irregular. In the "Europa" 
cycle of city traffic conditions four distinct operating phases 
occur: steady-state phases in which driving speed is quasi-con- 
stant; acceleration phases when increase in kinetic energy 
causes an increased demand for performance; braking phases 
in which kinetic energy is reduced by power feedback to 
brakes or power plant; and static phases in which vehicle is 
stationary, power plant idling or even shut off. In these dif- 
ferent operating phases the individual types of traction are to 
some extent highly divergent in their energy operating 
behavior. 

by Manfred Rudolph 

Publ: ATZ Automobiltechnische Zeitschrift v80 nil p531-5 

(1978) 

1978; Iref 

Translated from German (original 3p; translation 7p). 

Availability: Reference copy only 



HS-025 752 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

An electrical method to observe formation and breakdown of a 
lubricant film between a cam and a lifter of an overhead valve 
(OHV) engine has been developed. In this method, an electri- 
cal dc voltage is supplied between the surfaces, and the 
behavior of the lubricant film is observed through electrical 
voltage (conductivity) variation. Preliminary experiments were 
conducted in which a "cross-pin type" lubricant tester was 
used to examine the feasibility of the method for the study of 
lubrication phenomena. The method then was applied to the 
cam and lifter of the OHV engine to observe the effects of en- 
gine oil viscosity, the film-forming process during running-in 
and cold start, and the influence of pitting growth on film for- 
mation. Breakdown of the lubricant film increased with 
decreasing oil viscosity, increasing valve-spring load, and 
growth of pits on the lifter surface. A computer-aided data 
processing system was developed to determine the relationship 
between the cam angle and the average electrical voltage 
across the lubricant film. 

by Kiyoshi Ninomiya; Masuhiko Kawamura; Kenji Fujita 
Toyota Central Res. and Devel. Labs., Inc., Nagoya, Japan 
Kept. No. SAE-780930; 1978; 12p 6refs 
Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 
Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 
Availability: SAE 



HS-025 753 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

By appropriate used-oil analysis it is possible to calculate in- 
dices such as Dispersion Efficiency (DE) and Dispersancy 
Index (DI) of an engine oil's performance which are largely in- 
dependent of the type of engine used and test procedure fol- 
lowed. The DE represents the percent of insolubles suspended 
in the oil relative to the total insoluble products; the DI 
represents the percent of very fine insolubles out of the total 
oil insolubles. The DI, in particular, is and will be of great 
value in studying long-drain lubricants. One method of used-oil 
analysis is ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materi- 
als) D 893 which consists of two determinations of pentane in- 
solubles, with and without the use of a coagulant (total sludge 
and precipitable sludge). This method has been used success- 
fully for many years until the dispersant power of oils has 
been increased to such an extent that the coagulant becomes 
ineffective. An alternative method, membrane filtration, has 
been of value in recent years. The method consists of filtering 
a sample of oil diluted with pentane over membrane filters; the 
pore sizes selected are for obtaining the total sludge weight 
and the precipitable sludge. Major changes in additive 
technology have generated analytical difficulties (part of addi- 
tives trapped by membrane, extremely small samples used 
with oils with many insolubles make repeatability too operator- 
dependent, and dilution with pentane of some lubricants in- 
duces formation of a precipitate which clogs the filter). How- 
ever, a newly-developed photometric method seems promising 
in overcoming most present difficulties. This method, 
originally developed for analyzing used oils from Indirect In- 
jection Diesel engines, consists of diluting a used-oil sample 
and making a reading of light absorption by means of a spec- 



17 



HS-025 754 



HSL 79-10 



trophotometer. A comparison is made with the reading from 
an undiluted oil which has been centrifuged for an hour. 

by F. L. Badiali; F. Berti; A. A. Cassiani Ingoni; G. Pusateri 

Assoreni, Petroleum Products Dept., Milan, Italy; Agip 

Petroli, Rome, Italy 

Kept. No. SAE-780932; 1978; 14p Srefs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 754 

PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL 
DEMAND AND EMISSIONS 

Methodologies were developed and applied to project motor 
vehicle fuel demand, air quality improvements through emis- 
sion reductions, and the effect of stringent vehicle emission 
controls on energy consumption. Fuel consumption was com- 
pared between cars with catalyst and non-catalyst emission 
systems (catalyst systems require unleaded gasoline), and the 
effect of fuel quality on energy consumption was investigated. 
Motor gasoline demand for both the U.S. and Canada is pro- 
jected to peak about 1980 at about 2% above the current level, 
followed by a gradual decrease through 1990. Total U.S. motor 
fuel use will increase through 1990 due to increasing diesel 
fuel demand. Ozone air quality projected from hydrocarbon 
(HC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions shows more im- 
provement resulting from control of other sources than from 
further tightening of vehicle emission standards. Vehicle emis- 
sion standards significantly more stringent than the 1975 
Canadian level (25 g/mi carbon monoxide (CO), 2.0 g/mi HC, 
and 3.1 g/mi NOx) or certainly the 1977 U.S. levels (15 g/mi 
CO, 1.5 g/mi HC, and 2.0 g/mi NOx) increase energy con- 
sumption by as much as 20% at the 1981 U.S. level. Main- 
tenance of the current emission standards in the U.S. could 
allow sufficient future improvements in gasoline consumption 
to cause total motor fuel use to decrease after 1982. 

by Edward N. Cantwell, Jr.; Eugene N. Castellano, Jr.; John 

M. Pierrard 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Petroleum Lab. 

Kept. No. SAE-780933; 1978; 52p 36refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 755 

URBAN TRAFFIC, FUEL ECONOMY AND 
EMISSIONS-CONSISTENCY OF VARIOUS 
MEASUREMENTS 

A number of investigations are reviewed which were carried 
out by the Traffic Science Dept. of the General Motors Res. 
Labs, of the effect of traffic conditions on fuel consumption 
and emissions. A model based on driving vehicles in traffic is 
described in which the fuel consumption of a vehicle in urban 
traffic is expressed as a simple function of trip speed. Data 
from a variety of sources, including additional field data, 
detailed computer simulation, the same vehicle tested on dif- 
ferent fixed urban driving schedules, and small segments of 
the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) are shown to fit the model. 
A similar model of hydrocarbon (HC) emissions as a simple 
function of trip speed is derived from analyzing small seg- 
ments of FTP data. Data from published Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency relations, detailed computer simulation, and 



dynamometer replication of street data are shown to fit this 
model. No simple models have been found for carbon monox- 
ide and nitrogen oxides. In general, it has been found that 
urban traffic, despite its seemingly disorganized appearance, 
yields rather consistent relations between fuel consumption 
and average speed, and between HC and average speed. 

by Leonard Evans 

General Motors Res. Labs., Traffic Science Dept., Warren, 

Mich. 

Rept. No. SAE-780934; 1978; 14p 25refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 756 

THE EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ON 
AUTOMOBILE FUEL ECONOMY UNDER CANADIAN 
CONDITIONS 

As part of the Canadian Combustion Res. Lab.'s ongoing pro- 
gram to evaluate the performance of automobiles with ad- 
vanced engine technology under Canadian climatic conditions, 
major results to date are reported for trials conducted by the 
Oakville Res. Centre of Shell Canada Ltd. to measure tem- 
perature effects on fuel economy under closely-controlled, 
cold-room chassis dynamometer conditions. It has been deter- 
mined that fuel economy degrades significantly as ambient 
temperature decreases. Diesel, stratified-charge, lean-burn, 
and turbocharged, knock-limited engined automobiles show 
significantly less degradation in fuel economy and emissions 
than do conventionally-carbureted, catalyst-equipped vehicles, 
In particular, the new diesel cars offer large benefits in 
weight-normalized fuel economy and emissions for the wide 
temperature range found in Canada's climate. 

by A. C. S. Hayden 

Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, Canadian Combustion 

Res. Lab. 

Rept. No. SAE-780935; 1978; 12p 5refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 757 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TEE THERMAL 
EFFICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR 
VEHICLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER 
CONDITIONS 

On the basis of thermal efficiency and engine load factor, a 
comparison is made of the performance of 1977 and 1978 
model year vehicles submitted to the Environmental Protection 
Agency for emissions certification purposes. Projections are 
made of fuel savings which could have been achieved if all 
vehicles had been at or above the thermal efficiency regres- 
sion line (median powertrain technology) or the plus one sigma 
line (better than average technology). It is shown that at anj 
load factor, the spread in thermal efficiencies is in the order o1 
2 to 1. The calculated mean thermal efficiency for 1978 models 
on the Federal Test Procedure (10.8%) is lower than the com- 
parable value for 1977 models (11.0%). Automatic transmis 
sions impose a significant penalty on thermal efficiency ol 
small vehicle-engine combinations (impact not determined fo] 
large vehicle-engine combinations). Mpg improvements havt 



18 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 760 



been achieved through means other than improvement in 
powertrain thermal efficiency. If all vehicle manufacturers had 
utilized median powertrain technology or better, the projected 
fuel savings for the 1978 model year fleet would have been 245 
million gallons in the first year and 1.36 billion gallons through 
ten years of operation. If vehicle manufacturers had utilized 
better than average technology in all vehicles, fuel require- 
ments could have been reduced by approximately 12%. Ex- 
pressed in gallons of fuel saved, this reduction represents one 
billion gallons in the first and over six billion gallons through 
ten years. These facts suggest that with existing technologies, 
vehicle manufacturers can improve fuel economy by better 
matching of engines (specific fuel consumption), transmis- 
sions, and final drive ratios to vehicle power requirements. 

by F. Peter Hutchins; James M. Kranig 

Environmental Protection Agency 

Kept. No. SAE-780936; 1978; 14p Iref 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 758 

TFC/IW [TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION/INERTIA 
WEIGHT] 

The use of the TFC/IW (total fuel consumption divided by in- 
ertia (test) weight) concept in analyzing fuel economy data is 
discussed and illustrated using information from SAE (Society 
of Automotive Engineers) papers in the EPA (Environmental 
Protection Agency) fuel economy series on sales-weighted 
values of various fleets and subfleets, and EPA certification 
and fuel economy data on 1978 vehicles as of 3 Feb 1978. 
TFC/IW is a measure of drive train efficiency that requires no 
additional complicating assumptions; it is as applicable to a 
single test on a vehicle as it is to a fleet. CID (cu in displace- 
ment) vs. IW is explained. Using 1978 industry 50-states sales- 
weighted figures for passenger cars, plots of IW vs. TFC/IW 
are presented giving isometric fuel economy lines. Similar 
plots are shown for 1974 and 1978 sales-weighted car values, 
1968 to 1978 sales-weighted car fleet values, 1978 car values 
by EPA class, 1978 49-states and California car values, and 
1978 49-states and California truck values. Passenger car data 
are separated into diesel and gasoline subfleets. The effect of 
weight reduction on fuel economy, in terms of TFC/IW, is 
discussed. TFC/IW in 1985 is considered. Appended are 1978 
EPA data, which are not sales -weighted, but sorted by engine 
and IW for each of the 4 major subfleets, 49 states and 
California, passenger car and truck. The mean, standard devia- 
tion, minimum and maximum values are given for the follow- 
ing parameters: urban fuel economy, highway fuel economy, 
total (combined) fuel economy, inertia weight, TFC/IW, CID, 
SAE hp rating of engine, dynamometer load hp, axle ratio, 
N/V and the urban values of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, 
and nitrogen oxides emissions. 

by Doran K. Samples; Richard C. Wiquist 

Chrysler Corp. 

Kept. No. SAE-780937; 1978; 20p 7refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 759 

A FUEL ECONOMY MEASUREMENT DILEMMA: 
CERTIFICATION TESTING VS. CUSTOMER 
DRIVING 

The EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) fuel economy 
measurement procedure and its relationship to customer driv- 
ing, the problem of generating "representative" fuel economy 
labels, and the accuracy of fuel demand projections are 
discussed. Factors such as use of standard test conditions, the 
use of a chassis dynamometer, and the difficulty in quantify- 
ing such factors as road and environmental conditions and 
customer maintenance schedule contribute small biases which 
can cause the EPA composite fuel economy figures to differ 
from those found in average customer service. The main value 
of the test procedure is that it has provided a uniform test 
method for all manufacturers which produces vast amounts of 
comparative fuel economy data. Historically, small changes to 
the procedure to make it more "representative" have been 
made without any attempt to quantify their effects. Extensive 
engineering data should be acquired to justify any procedural 
changes, and if these changes affect the established baseline, 
the mandated fuel economy standards should be modified ap- 
propriately. The labeling of cars with a "representative" fuel 
economy value is certain to result in some customer misinfor- 
mation and dissatisfaction. At best, current labeling methods 
can be expected to indicate real vehicle differences only when 
label values differ by more than 2 mi/gal (0.85 km/1). Further- 
more, wide variations exist in customer fuel economy (ranging 
up to 15 mi/gal) for the same EPA label value. Changes in new 
car fuel economy have a significant impact upon future fuel 
demand projections. A stable fuel economy measurement 
procedure and an understanding of the factors which relate 
certification to average customer economy are needed to 
reduce the uncertainties in such projections. 

by Craig Marks 

General Motors Corp. 

Rept. No. SAE-780938; 1978; lip lOrefs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 760 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF 
AUTOMOTIVE GEAR OILS AT LOW 
TEMPERATURES 

A review is presented of the work of the ASTM (American 
Society for Testing and Materials) Res. and Devel. Div. VII 
during 1973-1977 related to the low-temperature flow charac- 
teristics of automotive gear oils. The first phase of the 
research program was designed to compare the operability, re- 
peatibility, and reproducibility of Federal Test Method 3456.1 
and the Canadian Test Method 29. Ib. The purpose of the 
second phase was to obtain full-scale axle performance data at 
low temperatures on a representative group of reference oils, 
and to evaluate the correlation of the oil performance in the 
full-scale axle with its performance in laboratory test methods. 
Results of Phase 1 showed that the former Canadian method 
was superior in discrimination and operability to the former 
U.S. test method. Some changes were recommended to the 
Canadian method (therm ometry and other procedures), which 
have been adopted in the proposed Canadian Channel Point 



19 



HS-025 761 



HSL 79-10 



Method 29. 1C and in the current channel point procedure 
described in U.S. Military Specification MIL-L-2105C for au- 
tomotive gear oils. In the second phase, the National Res. 
Council of Canada torque-to-break test, and the AutoResearch 
Labs., Inc., Chicago (ALI) time-to-lubricate test were used to 
study flow properties of gear lubricants at low temperatures in 
full-scale axles. Based on the test results, the ALI test is 
judged suitable for such measurements, and as such is a 
meaningful basis for comparing laboratory tests for their suita- 
bility. Three laboratory procedures (channel point, Brookfield 
viscosity, pour point) were investigated for their ability and 
usefulness in determining low-temperature flow characteristics 
of gear oils. The Brookfield viscosity test proved the most 
suitable, and is recommended as the only criterion needed. It 
is recommended that channel point be dropped as an evalua- 
tion of cold fluidity of gear oils, 

by H. F. Hitchcox; D. L. Powell 

Exxon Res. and Engineering Co., Linden, N.J.; AutoResearch 

Labs., Inc., Chicago, 111. 

Rept. No. SAE-780939; 1978; 43p 4refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 761 

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PRECISION OF 
BROOKFIELD VISCOMETRY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
LUBRICANT FLUIDS 

A summary and analysis are made of data that have led to a 
proposed generalized Brookfield procedure for measuring the 
low temperature, low shear rate viscosity of automotive lubri- 
cant fluids. The data were collected between 1974 and 1977 by 
ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) Commit- 
tee D-2, Res. and Devel. Div. VII, Brookfield Viscometry 
Task Force in cooperation with the Institute of Petroleum, the 
Groupement Francaise de Coordination, and the National 
Research Council of Canada. The sources of error in the 
generalized Brookfield procedure are examined in detail. A 
system based on the known viscosity-temperature function of 
Newtonian reference fluids is proposed for estimating error 
magnitudes from existing cooperative data. Application of 
these estimated error magnitudes to engine and gear oil data 
produced repeatability and reproducibility estimates that are 
functions of viscometer rpm for non-Newtonian products. 
Viscometer rpm is shown to be a critical test parameter at low 
temperature. RPM sensitivity is largely due to the Brookfield 
viscometer' s ability to sense the strength of the wax or wax- 
additive gels that exist below the cloud point. The physical and 
rheologic reasons for this sensitivity are outlined. Major points 
of the proposed generalized method are: Application of New- 
tonian reference oils to monitor temperature control, calibra- 
tion and general viscometer operation; tabulation of the ac- 
ceptable viscosity range for each rpm; tabulation of precision 
as a function of rpm; tabulation of a range of acceptable sam- 
ple cooling rates; reporting of viscometer rpm, along with ap- 
parent Brookfield viscosity; and description of the effect of 
low temperature gel on Brookfield viscosity. Extensive tables 
of data are included. 

by J. F. Gyer 

Mobil Res. and Devel. Corp. 

Rept. No. SAE-780940; 1978; 31p 7refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 762 

ROAD SURFACE BULK WATER DRAINAGE--A 
THEORETICAL STUDY 

A theoretical approach to bulk water drainage properties at the 
tire/road surface interface for a freely rotating tire is 
presented. The overall conclusion drawn from the theoretical 
study is that it is possible to optimize the road surface 
macrotexture conditions (aggregate size, aggregate spacing, 
and absolute texture depth) to give the minimum time for 
removal of bulk water from the interface yet give sufficient 
area of contact between the tire and road surface to obtain the 
maximum possible friction levels. The drainage theory also 
shows how the contact patch pressure distribution of a plain- 
treaded tire affects the bulk water drainage properties at the 
tire/road surface interface. The contact pressure distribution 
(high shoulder pressure or uniform contact patch pressure) 
does not appear to have any effect on the drainage properties 
for tires having a full tread pattern and operating under normal 
speed conditions, since the tread pattern also plays an impor- 
tant role in the removal of bulk water. 

by R. Bond; G. Lees 

Publ: Tire Science and Technology v6 n2 p!25-58 (May 1978) 

1978; 16refs 

Research supported by Dunlop Ltd. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 763 

DRUNK DRIVING PROBLEM GROWS WORSE 

A new law became effective in Calif. I Jan 1979, by which bar 
owners and party hosts are no longer legally liable for highway 
accidents and deaths caused by adult drinking drivers to whom 
they served liquor. A 1971 ruling by the Calif. Supreme Court 
had allowed the legal liability of bars and restaurants for ac- 
tions of customers to whom they served too much liquor, and 
in 1978 the Court extended the liability ruling to include 
private partygivers. In April, 1978, the Liquor Lobby spon- 
sored a bill introduced by State Senator Ruben Ayala to re- 
lieve the bars and hosts of civil liability for drunk driving ac- 
cidents. The bill was denounced as placing the financial in- 
terest of bar owners above the interests of innocent persons 
who may be killed or injured by drunken drivers. Its constitu- 
tionality, which seems to deny certain basic rights in seeking 
redress for wrongful death and injuries, is sure to be tested, 
probably before the Supreme Court. One provision, however, 
is countered by a new bill, (SB-1175) which provides stiffer 
criminal penalties for bartenders and others who serve liquor 
to obviously drunk persons, as well as liability for injuries 
caused by obviously intoxicated minors they have served. 
Dissatisfaction with the Ayala bill seems certain; the need is 
for laws that deter drunken driving, not encourage it. In many 
deadly crashes caused by intoxicated drivers the offenders 
were repeaters or habitual drunk drivers. One new law makes 
a drunk driving conviction cost $25 more, the extra money to 
pay for blood tests. Several "diversion" programs are being 
tried, treating repeat offenders as alcoholics, with encouraging 
results; yet many of the repeaters continue to drive <^an- 
gerously. A further problem revealed by blood testing is the 
use of marijuana. Research is continuing. Legal authorities be- 
lieve that swiftness and certainty of punishment are always 
more effective in dealing with criminal behavior; judges in 



20 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 767 



Calif, are criticized for being too lenient in sentencing persons 
convicted of felony drunk driving. 

by William L. Roper 

Publ: California Highway Patrolman v42 n!2 pll, 38-9, 41-2, 

46-7 (Feb 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 764 

DRUGS AND HIGHWAY SAFETY: RESEARCH 
ISSUES AND INFORMATION NEEDS 

A study was conducted to assess present knowledge of how 
and to what extent drugs other than alcohol contribute to traf- 
fic crashes. An extensive review of the research literature 
showed that the problem has not been adequately defined. The 
review also indicated that much past research in the area has 
been less than fully reliable because of limited research 
designs and methodological weaknesses. The major problem 
areas are study of actual driving performance in the laborato- 
ry, analysis of the driving task, and experimental design. 
Methodological requirements and research priorities are 
discussed; the term "drug" is defined, factors in drug usage 
and drug effects and methods of epidemiological research are 
considered. Research programs recommended as having the 
highest priority are large-scale field studies designed to identi- 
fy specific drugs most prevalent in accident-involved drivers. 
Effective counte measures depend on assessment of such in- 
formation. 

by Kent D. Joscelyn; Alan C. Donelson 

DOT-HS-4-00994 

Publ: HSRI Research Review v9 n2 p2-17 Sep/Oct 1978 

1978; 70refs 

Also supported by Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Assoc. 

Earlier Version presented at 22nd Conference of the American 

Assoc. for Automotive Medicine. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 765 

LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST AT-FAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN 
FATAL TRAFFIC CRASHES 

An exploratory study was made of legal and administrative ac- 
tions taken against 2361 surviving drivers involved in fatal 
traffic accidents in Michigan in 1962. The objectives were to 
assess the capability of centrally maintained traffic record 
systems to provide data on legal and administrative actions 
taken against at-fault drivers; and to estimate the frequency 
with which at-fault drivers in fatal crashes were charged, adju- 
dicated and sanctioned. In Michigan, for the year 1972, the 
central records systems could not provide the needed data, ap- 
parently because courts of record did not report the disposi- 
tions of traffic cases to the Michigan Dept. of State. Therefore 
the study was broadened to examine other record systems to 
address the second objective. The review of accident reports, 
centrally maintained criminal records, and locally maintained 
court records resulted in these estimates: one driver in four 
who was involved in a fatal crash could have been charged 
with a felony (manslaughter or negligent homicide); only one 
in twelve was actually charged with a felony; only one in 
twenty-four was convicted of a felony; and, of those con- 
victed, only half had their convictions entered on their driving 



records. Most drivers involved in fatal crashes were sum- 
moned for reexamination by the Dept. of State, the driver 
licensing authority in Michigan, and license revocations or 
suspensions were more frequent in cases of at-fault drivers. 
The two major problems, i.e. the low rate of felony charges 
and deficiencies in information transfers among record 
systems, should be explored to define the problems more 
precisely and to recommend specific actions needed. Such a 
study should include in-depth interviews with police officials, 
prosecutors, judges, court clerks, and DSP (Dept. of State Po- 
lice) and DOS (Dept. of State) staff members concerned with 
improving central record systems. 

by Paul A. Ruschmann 

Publ: HSRI Research Review v9 n2 pl8-23 (Sep/Oct 1978) 

1978; Iref 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 766 

MANIFOLD FUEL FILM EFFECTS IN AN SI [SPARK 
IGNITION] ENGINE 

A test program was conducted with a carbureted 2.3-liter en- 
gine in which a map of engine operating conditions promoting 
intake manifold wall films of appreciable magnitude was 
defined on the basis of visual observations. It was found that 
the largest maldistributions of fuel/air ratio among the four 
cylinders of the engine occurred during operation at conditions 
characterized by the presence of extensive fuel puddles on the 
intake manifold floor. It was also found that while the intake 
manifold fuel films and puddles could essentially be eliminated 
by heating the manifold floor, the fuel/air ratio distributions 
among cylinders under such conditions were virtually identical 
to those measured under conventional operating conditions. 
On the basis of these data, it was concluded that the steady- 
state distribution of fuel among the cylinders was not affected 
by the presence of liquid films or puddles within the intake 
manifold but rather that the resulting maldistributions were at- 
tributable to other charge stratification effects in the intake 
flow process. Performance mapping data are appended for 
fuel/air ratio and airflow distributions with conventionally- 
heated and steam-heated intake manifolds. 

by I. W. Kay 

United Technologies Corp., United Technologies Res. Center, 

East Hartford, Conn. 

Rept. No. SAE-780944; 1978; 26p 5refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 767 

ROLLOVER INJURIES OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY 
[OFF-ROAD VEHICLES] 

Eleven patients were treated from 1971 to 1976 for rollover in- 
juries of the upper extremities resulting from the rollover ac- 
cidents of off-road vehicles in rough terrain. Injuries to the 
volar surfaces of the extremity were most common, but injury 
to the extensor surfaces seemed to be more severe. Soft-tissue 
injuries predominated as did injury to the nondominant hand. 
The majority of patients returned to their original jobs after 
sometimes prolonged recovery and rehabilitation. The roll bar 
and roll cage are definitely a safety item in these vehicles; 
there were no head injuries in any of the patients. However, 



21 



HS-025 768 



HSL 79-10 



severe upper extremity injury can occur in spite of or in con- 
junction with these safety items; a reduction in such injuries 
might be produced by constructing a hand hold on the inside 
of the rollover cage, and by advising that the extremities be 
kept within the rollover cage at all times when the vehicle is in 
motion. 

by Curtis N. Harris; Virchel E. Wood 

Publ: The Journal of Trauma v!8 n8 p605-7 (Aug 1978) 

1978; Iref 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 768 

ALCOHOL AND THE DRIVER 

The properties of alcohol as a drug increasing the risk of 
motor-vehicle accidents should be recognized. Accident sur- 
veys show that the high risk driver is the regular drinker of 
large amounts of alcohol, with a previous conviction for drink- 
ing and driving, and not the ordinary driver who has inadver- 
tently exceeded the statutory limit by a small amount. Coun- 
termeasures considered to be ineffective include the publicity 
campaign ("Don't drink and drive"), which does not register 
with a heavily drinking driver; random breath tests, which are 
inconvenient to motorists, not cost-effective in terms of police 
time, and detect very few drivers who have exceeded the 
limit; and lowering the statutory limit, which would have little 
effect on the heavy-drinking drivers who pose the chief threat, 
while threatening with prosecution and loss of license a large 
group of ordinary social drinkers. In addition, the number of 
hit-and-run accidents would increase if drivers knew they 
might be prosecuted after having taken only very small 
amounts of alcohol. Increasing the level of enforcement of the 
existing law on a selective basis is recommended instead: e.g., 
on roads where and at times when alcohol-related accidents 
are likely to occur. The reluctance of the courts to accept a 
situation where guilt depends almost exclusively on the results 
of a blood alcohol concentration test is understandable but not 
logical, and demoralizing to police officers attempting to en- 
force traffic laws. Public opinion should support stricter en- 
forcement, and high-risk drivers convicted of the offence 
should not have their licenses returned to them automatically 
after a year, as at present, but should be required to show 
their driving is no longer a danger to other road users. Further 
research is needed in the distribution of blood alcohol concen- 
trations in a representative sample of the driving population, 
possibly by voluntary road surveys using breath samples. 

by J. D. J. Harvard 

Publ: British Medical Journal vl p!595-7 (17 Jun 1978) 

1978; 2refs 

Based on a paper read at the Government's National Road 

Safety Conference, London, 13-14 Jun 1978. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 769 

CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL ARRESTS IN A 
RURAL STATE [WYOMING] 

Arrest and conviction rates for public intoxication, driving 
while intoxicated, and liquor law violations were correlated 
with population, population change, liquor sales, number of 
law officers, Indian population and overall crime rate for 23 
counties in Wyoming. It was concluded that increased liquor 
sales, but not arrest rates, are associated with population in- 



crease. Alcohol arrests are related positively to population 
magnitude and overall crime rate, but not to number of law of- 
ficers. Counties with larger Indian populations report higher 
arrest rates for public intoxication and liquor law violations, 
but conviction rates for alcohol arrests in these counties are 
not different. Results suggest that the style or outcome of 
drinking might be of central importance for minority groups 
with high rates of arrest, such as Indians, since consumption 
rates do not differ. It would appear that treatment programs 
for such groups should concentrate on modifying the time, 
place, and social outcomes of drinking. 

by Kenneth R. Olson; Roderick S. Carman; Richard A. 

Pasewark 

Publ: International Journal of the Addictions v!3 n3 p415-25 

(1978) 

1978; 15refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 770 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES 
AFFECTING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND 
EMISSIONS OF SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

A fundamental thermodynamic model of the complete spark- 
ignited, homogeneous charge engine cycle has been used in 
several parametric analyses to predict the effects of engine 
design and operating alternatives on fuel consumption and 
emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and unburaed hydrocar- 
bons (HC). The simulation includes sub-models for wall heat 
transfer, NOx and HC emissions, and the engine breathing 
processes. This work demonstrates the power and utility of a 
comprehensive engine simulation by presenting several inde- 
pendent parametric studies that were carried out in response 
to genuine engine design and/or operating strategy questions. 
Included in this compilation are the effects of cycle heat loss, 
exhaust port heat loss, combustion duration, and charge dilu- 
tion (exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and/or lean air-fuel 
ratio). The influence of the design variables associated with 
bore-stroke ratio, intake and exhaust valve lift, and cam timing 
are also considered. Actual engine data are shown to enhance 
and lend validity to the analytical results when appropriate. 

by J. M. Novak; P. N. Blumberg 

Ford Motor Co. 

Kept. No. SAE-780943; 1978; 30p 20refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 771 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE 
BROOKFTELO VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A 
NEW LIQUID BATH METHOD 

The present methods available to measure the viscosity of 
fluids at low temperature with the Brookfield viscometer do 
not give entire satisfaction because of their low precision. A 
new "liquid bath" method is proposed for measuring the 
Brookfield viscosities; it offers several improvements over 
other "air bath" methods: shortened test duration, rate of cool- 
ing very near the one observed in service and well controlled, 
and better precision due to a good control of the regulation of 
the liquid bath and to the fact that the test cell tube is kept in 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 775 



the bath throughout the determination. The new method, ap- 
proved by the Coordinating European Council as a tentative 
method numbered CEC L18-T76, is summarized in the appen- 
dix. 

by Andre Vidal 

Compagnie Francaise de Raf linage, TOTAL TECHNIQUE, 

Centre de Recherches 

Rept. No. SAE-780941; 1978; 12p Iref 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 772 
ANTI-LOCK BRAKING 

A report is given on the Institute of Electrical En- 
gineers/Institution of Mechanical Engineers colloquium on an- 
tilock braking, held Nov 1978. A representative from the Dept. 
of Transportation (U.K.) spoke of the limitations of load-ap- 
portioning valves for controlling inter-axle brake distribution in 
the interests of braking stability leading to the introduction of 
antiskid systems in the mid- 1 960' s. Mention was made of the 
imminent publication of Economic Commission for Europe 
Annex 13 on test requirements for antilock braking systems 
(annex to United Nations Regulation 13/E/ECE/324; 
E/ECE/TRANS/505). A Girling representative discussed some 
of the confusion surrounding the apparently premature in- 
troduction of U.S. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 121 
covering general requirements for air-braked vehicles and in- 
cluding specific requirements for preventing wheel lockup. A 
discussion by a representative of Milliard pointed to the four 
main areas affecting the reliability of electronics: temperature, 
vibration, atmosphere, and electrical (mainly electromagnetic) 
interference. A National Freight Corporation representative 
explained that the Transport and Road Res. Lab. (TRRL, 
U.K.) evaluation of in-service antilock systems had taken 
place within his fleet of 21,000 articulated vehicles. A Dunlop 
representative explained that articulated vehicle antilock instal- 
lations began in 1968 and that today there are about 6000 trac- 
tors, around 600 semitrailer axles, and a growing number of 
rigid vehicles in service in the U.K. with antilock systems. The 
U.S. experience with antilock requirements was further 
discussed. It was explained that antilock braking has been 
legally mandatory on all air-braked trucks since 1975. A TRRL 
representative discussed the effects of weight transfer on the 
adhesion of motorcycles. A description of the Bosch ABS an- 
tiskid system for cars, a modular design, was given by a com- 
pany representative. 

Publ: Automotive Engineer v4 nl p43-8 (Feb-Mar 1979) 

1979; Iref 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 773 

HANDBOOK OF HIGHWAY SAFETY DESIGN AND 
OPERATING PRACTICES. REV. ED. 

This revised an expanded version of the 1973 Handbook 
presents information and guidelines for highway authorities at 
the state, city, and local levels who are involved in highway 
design and operation. It is intended as an educational tool and 
reference guide. Chapters cover cross sections and slopes, 
bridge design, signing, highway traffic barriers, small drainage 
structures, railroad grade crossings gores, lighting, skid 



prevention, construction and maintenance operations, and spe- 
cial design considerations. The construction and maintenance 
operations chapter is a new addition, and the special design 
considerations chapter has been expanded from the 1973 edi- 
tion. An added introductory chapter provides the reader with 
information which puts specific safety concerns in perspective 
with all others as candidates for funding from a limited budget. 
A list of references is included at the end of each chapter. 
Photographs and illustrations accompany the text. 

Federal Hwy. Administration, Washington, D.C. 20590 
1978; 127p refs 
Availability: GPO 



HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

by James H. Sanders; Hugh W. McGee; Chang S. Yoo 

BioTechnology, Inc., 3027 Rosemary Lane, Falls Church, Va, 

22042 

DOT-FH-1 1-9192 

Rept. No. FHWA-RD-78-40; 1978; 23p Iref 

Rept. for Oct 1976-Apr 1978. For abstract, see HS-025 775. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-025 775 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. 
TECHNICAL REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

A study was undertaken to determine the advantages and dis- 
advantages of selective use of highway stop signs as safety im- 
provements at rail-highway grade crossings and to develop 
guidelines for their appropriate use or non-use. Literature and 
inventory surveys were performed to compare accidents for 
crossings with crossbucks only to those for crossings with 
crossbucks and standard highway stop signs. Field studies 
were performed to compare driver behaviors for crossbuck- 
only crossings and for crossbuck/stop sign crossings. Driver 
behavior investigations included speed profiles, looking 
behavior, and observance of stop signs. Results indicate that 
stop signs are used more frequently in urban areas, and that 
crossings having stop signs tend to have higher train volumes. 
Accident rates for stop sign crossings are lower than rates for 
cross buck -only crossings for higher vehicle-train exposure 
values. Stop signs, when properly used, result in improved 
driver behaviors adequate for the detection and avoidance of 
trains. It is suggested that stop signs be applied selectively 
only at hazardous passive grade crossings and not be used in- 
discriminately at all passive grade crossings. Requirements for 
effective use of stop signs at grade crossings are as follows: 
installation to be believable, (i.e. be valid to the driver), vehi- 
cle-train exposure value not to exceed 100 (i.e. train value 
higher than average, average annual daily traffic value lower 
than average), inability of driver to detect trains adequately 
unless he nearly stops, level of enforcement at least equal to 
that applied to intersection stop signs, selective use of stop 
sign to reinforce expectancy, high level of traffic engineering 
to avoid hazardous traffic conflicts, treatment of stop sign in- 
stallation as a system (including proper deployment and main- 



23 



HS-025 776 



HSL 79-1 



tenance of advance warning for both grade crossing and stop 
sign), and periodic review of crossing. 

by James H. Sanders; Hugh W. McGee; Chang S. Yoo 

BioTechnology, Inc., 3027 Rosemary Lane, Fails Church, Va. 

22042 

DOT-FH-1 1-9192 

Rept. No. FHWA-RD-78-41; 1978; 171p 41refs 

Rept. for Oct 1976-Mar 1978. For summary report, see HS-025 

774. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-025 776 

SOFTENING THE BLOW, CAN A TRUE 
EXPERIMENTAL SAFETY VEHICLE BE MADE 

PRACTICAL? 

Under sponsorship of the National Hwy. Traffic Safety Ad- 
ministration, Minicars Inc. (Goleta, Calif) has developed a 
small, practical experimental safety vehicle, Eagle II, which 
not only meets all the Federal targets on exhaust emissions, 
fuel economy, and safety to the 1985 standards, but also could 
be put into production at a cost very similar to that of the VW 
Rabbit, Ford Pinto, or Toyota Corolla. Among the mass 
production problems are those of cleanly welding very thin 
steel sheet main body panels into the closed box sections and 
the sensitive procedure involved in injecting foam into these 
panels to ensure perfect filling. Minicars have turned to Japan 
and Italy for major components (engine/transmission package 
from Honda Civic, front and rear suspension of the Fiat Xl/9). 
The weight of the Eagle II is around 2190 Ib. The foam-filled 
gull- wing door panels, front wheel arches, and hood are 
mounted on a steel platform/backbone chassis. The front and 
rear ends are made from an impact-absorbing skinned plastic 
(not damaged in 10-mph front and 5-mph rear impacts). The 
bumpers can withstand 40-mph head-on crashes without the 
main structure of the car being affected, and afford a good 
deal of pedestrian protection. Front/rear sections can be 
quickly and easily replaced, cutting repair costs. Much of the 
car's overall strength comes from double-roll protection bars 
which form the frames to the front and rear screens. Air bags 
are installed. The fuel tank, located in the center back bone, is 
afforded protection from all sides. Run-flat tires on alloy 
wheels are specified. More advanced equipment includes an- 
ticollision radar, and alphanumeric instrument displays. On a 
part-by-part basis, Eagle II could be put into production at a 
cost of $3446 at an annual volume of 300,000. 

by Martin Lewis 

Publ: Autocar v!50 n4293 p52 (17 Feb 1979) 

1979 

Additional page of photographs. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 777 

TRAUMATIC NEUROSIS [FOLLOWING A MOTOR 
VEHICLE CRASH] 

A new kind of injury, recently recognized as part of the post- 
traumatic clinical state following a motor vehicle crash, is 
referred to as psychic disability following trauma. Four types 
of post-traumatic psychiatric symptom complexes have been 
described: the conversion reaction, the phobic reaction, the 
tensive reaction, and "traumatic neurosis" itself. The traumatic 
neurosis can be contemplated as a specific psychiatric entity 



characterized by such symptoms as the startle reaction, fear < 
loud noises, irritability, insomnia, tremulousness, anxiety, ii 
pairment of concentration and memory, frequent nightmare 
significant decrease in social awareness, social contact, ai 
sexual activity, and often profound depression. The traumat 
neurosis can result from a great dissimilarity in the precipite 
ing incidents, and may be a fundamental, organismic reactic 
to severe external stress. Most people who are subject to inj 
ry with no (or only a few seconds) preparation will suffer 
high degree of fright. It is understandable that the drama! 
quality of the accident, together with the intensity of the em 
tional reaction to it, encourages the sufferer to assume to 
other difficulties in his life subsequent to the accident are t] 
result of the accident. Adversary roles are accentuated 
cases such as these. Physicians are urged to get patients in 
therapy as soon after the accident as possible, as this is like 
to lessen the emotional, as well as the financial, damage. 

by Dorothy Rasinski Gregory 

Publ: American Association for Automotive Medicine 

Quarterly/Journal vl nl p21-3 (Jan 1979) 

1979; 5refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 778 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION SYSTEMS PILOT 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

The essential elements and characteristics of the automoti 
industry are reviewed, with emphasis on the fundamental m\ 
tinational importance of highway vehicles to the industr 
countries of the world. Both the evolution of requiremei 
placed on the industry and the changes in emphasis over t 
years 1970-1977 are discussed as a background for the su 
sequent summary of the technical content of the four inten 
tional symposia held in 1973, 1974, 1975, and 1977 (in i 
cordance with 1972 Memorandum of Understanding (MO 
signed by auto-producing NATO countries) on low polluti 
power systems/automotive propulsion systems. The appan 
trends and directions of development observed from the 
meetings are identified. Resolutions are made regarding i 
tional programs for automotive energy research and develc 
ment; recommendations are made for future internatioi 
exchange of information and implementation of research a 
development activities on automotive propulsion systems. T 
adoption and implementation of these resolutions and reco 
mendations will insure that the member countries of the Noi 
Atlantic Treaty Organization have recognized the need to d> 
with the pollution problem in a systematic and dynac 
fashion. The following areas are recommended for initial < 
ploration of specific international cooperative projects: pov 
systems and components, high-temperature materials, alten 
tive fuels, electric and hybrid vehicle systems, and harmoni 
tion or correlation of emission standards and procedures. 1 
pended are the texts of the MOU and its 1973 Am 
(establishing mechanisms for information exchange), a list 
national representatives for each symposium, a list of 
ganizations participating in the symposia, and descriptive 



24 



October 31, 1979 

formation on key organizations involved in principal areas of 
technical activity involving automotive propulsion systems. 

by A. C. Gullon; Claude Lamure; Jurgen Bandel; Renzo 

Strampelli; Johan G. Kuiperbak; H. G. Dormer; George M. 

Thur 

NATO/CCMS Automotive Propulsion Systems Pilot Study 

Working Group 

Kept No. CCMS-76; 1977?; 114p 4refs 

Prepared for the Com. on the Challenges of Modern Society, 

North Atlantic Treaty Org. Title also in French. See HS-023 

609 and HS-023 072 for related reports Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. 

Availability: GPO, stock no. 061-000-00225-1 



HS-025 779 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING 
PRINCIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD 
RENEWAL APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE 
INTERMEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF 
CALIFORNIA'S SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

Drivers applying to renew their California drivers licenses are 
normally administered written tests to assess their knowledge 
of the California Vehicle Code. An experiment was conducted 
which utilized new tests, somewhat longer than the standard 
Dept. of Motor Vehicles (DMV) tests, which stressed 
knowledge of safe driving principles not included in the vehi- 
cle code. The primary purpose of the experiment was to deter- 
mine the comparative effects of the test on a subject's sub- 
sequent driving record. The new tests were administered to 
renewal applicants who had moderate numbers of collisions 
and convictions on record, with a control group of comparable 
drivers receiving standard DMV law tests. The data for the 12- 
month period following written knowledge testing revealed no 
statistically significant differences between experimental or 
control group driving record means, indicating the administra- 
tion of written tests on safe driving procedures did not result 
in a significant reduction in collisions or convictions. Correla- 
tion of test scores with driving record variables were similar in 
magnitude for both the DMV and safe driving test series, and 
indicated a slight tendency for drivers marking fewer wrong 
answers on either test series to have fewer collisions and con- 
victions before and after testing than drivers who made more 
errors. Because no identifiable safety benefits appear likely 
from adopting the expanded safe-driving forms and additional 
costs would be incurred, it is recommended that this com- 
ponent of the selective testing program for driver's license ap- 
plicants not be implemented. 

by David W. Carpenter 

California Dept. of Motor Vehicles, Res. and Devel. Section, 

Sacramento, Calif. 

Kept. No. CAL-DMV-RSS-78-63; 1978; 27p lOrefs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 780 

RISK EXPOSURES. STRUCTURING OF THE NEED 
FOR RISK EXPOSURE DATA FOR TRAFFIC 
ACCIDENT ANALYSIS 

Risk exposure are discussed as traffic indices that show strong 
correlation with traffic accidents. By relating the number of 
accidents defined in time and space to the vehicle mileage for 
the corresponding temporal and spatial units, a risk factor or 



HS-025 781 

accident rate is obtained. The vehicle mileage is an example of 
a risk exposure. Methods of determining risk exposures are 
outlined and include collection of data (by surveys) on in- 
dividual trips with respect to journey type, method of travel 
and length of trip for a given period; recording of the presence 
of vehicles in time and space with the aid of traffic calcula- 
tions at various points on the road network; traffic simulation; 
and recording techniques (e.g. observers, film or videotape). 
Calculations of simple risk exposures, risk exposures on link 
roads, and risk exposures at intersections are explained. The 
suitability of intersections for traffic studies of risk exposures 
is mentioned. An example is given of how different risk fac- 
tors can be broken down into ratios between different traffic 
indices so that they can be better used as a basis for making 
decisions concerning measures to be taken in the road traffic 
system for link roads and intersections. 

by Goran Nils son 

Statens vag- och trafikinstitut (VTI), Pack, 58101 Linkoping, 

Sweden 

Rept. No. VTI-144-A; 1978; 41p 2refs 

Swedish National Road and Traffic Res. Inst. 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 781 

THE INCIDENCE OF VEHICLE MISFUELING IN 
MAJOR CITIES IN CANADA 

Results are presented for a gas station survey in seven major 
Canadian cities (Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Regina, 
Calgary, and Vancouver) during 1-21 Mar 1978 which at- 
tempted to estimate the incidence of the misfueling of vehi- 
cles. Misfueiing was defined as the use of leaded gasoline in 
cars designed to use unleaded gasoline. The data were col- 
lected by on-site observers. In addition to fuel type used, in- 
formation is compiled on the frequency of pump-nozzle sub- 
stitution and fuel inlet tampering. A third misfueling method is 
that of fueling slowly without modification. It was found that a 
significant and growing rate of misfueling existed in all cities 
except Toronto and to a lesser extent Montreal. The misfuel- 
ing rate is vehicle age-related and increases after the vehicle 
warranty period has passed. The principal method of misfuel- 
ing is inlet tampering. The full-service stations have a much 
higher rate of misfueling than self-serve stations. The size of 
the price differential does not correlate well with the misfuel- 
ing rate. Although the overall incidence of nozzle substitution 
is moderate, it is very high in certain areas, and it is usually 
higher at full-serve than at self -service stations. Currently, the 
misfueling problem is in its infancy, but data on older vehicles 
indicate that between 20% and 40% misfueling will be the 
minimum in the years to come. It is also considered possible 
that as these unleaded vehicles are transferred gradually to the 
used car market, the misfueling rate will increase even more. 
Misfueling thus presents a severe problem to the present au- 
tomotive emission control program. 

by G. W. Taylor 

N. D. Lea and Associates Ltd. 

Rept. No. SAE-780947; 1978; 8p 2refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov 1978. Survey 

sponsored by Canadian Dept. of Fisheries and the 

Environment. 

Availability: SAE 



25 



HS-025 782 



HSL 79-1C 



HS-025 782 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND 
UNDESIRABLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN- 
FUELED PISTON ENGINES 

Direct cylinder injection for hydrogen-fueled piston engines 
was studied experimentally with an American Society for Test- 
ing and Materials/Cooperative Fuel Res. engine. An injection 
scheme was devised for which the combustion occurs during 
the period of hydrogen injection so that little unburned 
hydrogen accumulates in the cylinder. This scheme, called 
LIRIAM (late injection, rapid ignition and mixing) should 
preclude flashback and pre-ignition, and lowers the rate of 
cylinder pressure rise to acceptable levels. The potential of 
hydrogen as a low pollution fuel was investigated by compar- 
ing the NOx (nitrogen oxides) emissions from the same engine 
operated on hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuel. NOx emissions 
for hydrogen were very low provided the equivalence ratio 
was less than 0.5, and provided the hydrogen and air were well 
mixed. For equivalence ratios greater than 0.5, NOx emissions 
for hydrogen fuel were higher than for hydrocarbon fuel. With 
hydrogen injection, indicated mean effective pressure was 
varied between 0.07 MPa and 0.78 MPa without intake air 
throttling. Indicated efficiencies higher than 40% were 
achieved for part-load equivalence ratios, near 0.3. The timing 
of hydrogen injection had a significant effect on NOx emis- 
sions (decrease in NOx as injection is retarded). Appendices 
provide a review of experiments with hydrogen-fueled engines 
performed by previous investigators, with emphasis on un- 
desirable combustion, and a description of methods used to 
calculate indicated thermal efficiency from data presented by 
previous investigators. 

by H. S. Roman; P. C. T. DeBoer; W. J. McLean 

Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N.Y. 

Kept. No. SAE-780945; 1978; 20p 42refs 

Technical Paper Series. Presented at International Fuels and 

Lubricants Meeting, Toronto, 13-16 Nov. 1978. 

Availability: SAE 



HS-025 783 

VISIBILITY DURING NIGHT DRIVING ON 
UNLIGHTED ROADS 

The visibility level necessary for the performance of a visual 
task is defined relative to the visibility reference function. This 
function gives the threshold contrast required for visibility (at 
50% detection accuracy) of a 4" reference task, exposed for 
0.2s, as a function of background luminance. The visibility 
reference function, as presently proposed by the International 
Commission on Illumination (CIE), is to be considered illustra- 
tive only at background luminances below 1 cd/sq m. It may 
therefore not be representative of actual threshold values for 
visual tasks performed in this luminance region. Driving at 
night on unlighted roads with dipped-beam headlights is an ex- 
ample of such a task. It is shown that experimental data for 
this case (reference to European lights with ordinary incan- 
descent lamps) indicate lower threshold values than those 
given by the visibility reference function. 

by B. Hisdal 

Publ: Lighting Research and Technology v9 n3 p!51-3 (1977) 

1977; lOrefs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 784 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN 
INCANDESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT 
TEMPERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 
[METHYLENE BROMIDE] CONTENT 

An experimental study was made of 20 V, 100 W halogen in- 
candescent lamps using different filling pressures for the 
halogen additive (0.25 torr CH2Br2 (methylene bromide) to It 
ton CH2Br2) and the inert gas krypton (4 atm to 16 atm), and 
burning at two voltages (20.0 V and 23.0 V). The maximum lu- 
minous flux and life were found for lamps with halogen filling 
pressures in the range of 1 torr CH2Br2 to 4 ton* CH2Br2. II 
was found that lamps with low halogen filling pressures 
blacken. At high pressures, attack on the cold coil ends deter- 
mines life. The blackening or nonblackening of the lamps is in 
agreement with the transport criterion derived from the solu- 
bility of tungsten in the gaseous phase. Halogen lamps with 
properly operating transport cycles fail due to a local tempera- 
ture increase leading to burning-through of the filament. The 
experimentally found relationship among life, filament tem- 
perature, and filling pressure agrees approximately with the 
theory of the radial transport of tungsten in these halogen 
lamps. A simple correlation was found between the time at 
which the first hot turn is perceived and the life of the lamp, 
This agrees with the theory for the development of a hot spot 



by J. R. De Bie; J. C. M. A. Ponsioen 

Publ: Lighting Research and Technology v9 n3 p 14 1-50 (1977) 

1977; 30refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 785 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]~2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] 
SYMPOSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON 
ROADS AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 
1977 

A special journal issue contains extensive summaries of 43 
papers to be presented at an international symposium whose 
theme is the dynamics of vehicles and vehicle systems on 
roads and tracks. Particular attention has been given to those 
problems where the contact or guiding forces acting between 
road or guiding system are of primary importance. The dynam- 
ical aspects of vehicles ranging from bicycles to magnetically 
levitated trains are covered. Representative topics include 
front wheel vibrations; steady state and transient vehicle per- 
formance; computing and measurement of the handling quali- 
ties of the belted tire; automated guideway transit vehicles; au- 
tomatic lateral control of vehicles; the influence of vehicle 
control dynamics on driver- vehicle performance; and motorcy 
cle dynamics and rider control. 

by Hans B. Pacejka, ed. 

Publ: Vehicle System Dynamics v6 n2-3 p41-216 (Sep 1977) 

1977; refs 

See also HS-025 786. 

Availability: See publication 



26 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 792 



HS-025 786 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

Four state-of-the-art articles on vehicle dynamics are 
presented which were prepared in response to an invitation by 
the Scientific Committee of the 5th Vehicle System Dynamics- 
2nd International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics 
Symposium on dynamics of vehicles on roads and tracks, held 
in Vienna, 19-23 Sep 1977. The articles (not for oral presenta- 
tion at the Symposium) cover the following topics: handling 
characteristics of car-trailer systems, sensitivity of driver- vehi- 
cle performance to vehicle characteristics revealed in open- 
loop tests, adaptation of a general multibody dynamical for- 
malism to dynamic simulation of terrestrial vehicles, and bi- 
lateral model of manual steering system. 

by Hans B. Pacejka, ed. 

Publ: Vehicle System Dynamics v6 n4 p217-308 (Oct 1977) 

1977; refs 

Includes HS-023 818, HS-023 819, HS-025 789, and HS-025 

790. See also HS-025 785. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 790 

BILATERAL MODEL OF MANUEL [SIC] STEERING 
SYSTEM 

The bilateral model of the vehicle manual steering system is 
constructed in the matrix form of two variables, displacement 
and torque, simultaneously describing the dynamic relations 
between the variables of both sides of the steering wheel and 
tires. The frequency characteristics of the variables are mea- 
sured by the bench test, and the transfer parameters of the 
model, given in the form of transfer functions, are obtained 
through the identification technique based on experimental 
data of frequency response. Comparison of the bilateral model 
derived using equations of motion of manual steering vs. the 
model derived using the identification technique clarifies the 
usefulness of the latter in the dynamic simulation of the steer- 
ing system. Good agreement between dynamic responses ob- 
tained using the identified bilateral model and those obtained 
in vehicle field tests validate the model. 

by Sado Iwamoto; Kaneo Hiram atsu; Shigeru Inoue 

Publ: HS-025 786, Vehicle System Dynamics v6 n4 p297-308 

(Oct 1977) 

1977; 17refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 789 

ADAPTATION OF A GENERAL MULTIBODY 
DYNAMICAL FORMALISM TO DYNAMIC 
SIMULATION OF TERRESTRIAL VEHICLES 

The development of general Eulerian dynamic formalisms for 
the digital simulation of multibody systems is reviewed. Digital 
dynamic simulation on a large scale seems to have been rela- 
tively limited for terrestrial vehicles, in contrast to the 
development of that for extraterrestrial vehicles. Two kinds of 
dynamic systems programs are generally available. One is the 
canned "general system" program, the software for which is 
available for nearly any large-scale computer. The other is the 
"general multibody" program, some varieties of which have 
recently become available almost exclusively for aerospace ap- 
plications. The first type of system necessitates initial deriva- 
tion by the user of a suitable set of dynamical equations for a 
specific system, to be implemented by the computer program. 
Since the multibody type system is based specifically on more 
general dynamical formalisms, the user need only tell the com- 
puter how the system is hooked together, as well as some par- 
ticulars about rotational and translational modes in the joints 
between bodies. In addition to the review of the current status 
of multibody formalisms, the formalism of Rober- 
son/Wittenburg is generalized to systems whose configuration 
includes closed loops, thereby adapting it to the dynamic simu- 
lation of terrestrial vehicles. 

by Robert E. Roberson 

Publ: HS-025 786, Vehicle System Dynamics v6 n4 p279-95 

(Oct 1977) 

1977; 25refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 791 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF 
YELLOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER 
RESPONSE 

Driver response to the onset of the yellow phase of traffic 
signals was observed at two suburban arterial intersections by 
means of time-lapse photography. In each lane, the last vehi- 
cles to cross the intersection after the onset of the yellow 
phase in green-yellow-red signal cycles were identified. The 
percentages of these last-to-cross vehicles that did not clear 
the intersection prior to red onset were determined for two 
settings of yellow-phase duration in peak and off-peak traffic 
on both wet and dry pavements. Under all conditions, these 
percentages were found to be substantially lower when the du- 
ration of yellow was longer than when it was shorter. It is con- 
cluded that the number of times vehicles fail to clear the inter- 
section prior to red onset can be controlled by adjusting the 
duration of the yellow phase. Potential conflicts at signalized 
intersections were found to occur more frequently during peak 
traffic and on dry pavement. It is therefore concluded that 
conflicts are dependent not only on intersection geometry and 
travel speed, but on traffic density and pavement condition. 

by William A. Stimpson; Paul L. Zador; Philip J. Tarnoff 
Alan M. Voorhees and Associates, Inc.; Insurance last, for 
Hwy. Safety 
1979; 26p llrefs 
Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 792 

DRIVER ED ATTACK BACKFIRES ON INSURANCE 
GROUP 

Major conclusions of an Insurance Inst. for Hwy. Safety 
(IIHS) study "Driver Education and Fatal Crash Involvement 
of Teenaged Drivers," along with a statement issued by IIHS 
subsequent to the announcement, are provided, as well as 



27 



HS-025 793 



HSL 79-10 



comments of non-IIHS researchers who have reviewed the 
study and found it invalid. The IIHS study concluded that at 
least 2000 fatal crashes per year result from increased licen- 
sure of 16- and 17-year-olds because of driver education, and 
that raising the age of licensure to age 18 or eliminating driver 
education, separately or in combination, would prevent these 
fatal crashes. Researchers from the Pennsylvania Dept. of 
Education, Div. of Res.; the Florida State Univ. Traffic Safety 
Education Evaluation Proj.; the National Hwy. Traffic Safety 
Administration; and the Transportation Res. Board, Driver 
Education Com. all have expressed opposition, in one form or 
another, to the IIHS study. Subsequent to the Nov 1977 an- 
nouncement of the study, IIHS, in Dec 1977, stated that its 
study made no finding that driver education be abolished nor 
did it suggest that driver education is not needed as a way of 
teaching young people to drive. 

by William D. Cushman 

Publ: Journal of Traffic Safety Education v25 n3 p7-8 (Apr 

1978) 

1978; 9refs 

See also HS-022 375. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 793 

UPDATE: MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS IN 1977 

Statistical information on U.S. motorcycle accidents during 
1977 covers motorcycle population, fatalities, mileage death 
rate, injury severity, types of accidents, directional analysis of 
accidents, contributing circumstances, time and day of week 
and month, road and weather conditions, operator charac- 
teristics (age, sex, residence), experience of operators, and 
part of body injured. Speeding was the most frequent cause of 
fatal accidents according to selected state studies, which also 
indicate that many motorcycle accident victims were not regu- 
lar motorcycle operators or passengers or had mishaps early in 
their cycling experience. Based on their percentage of the total 
vehicles registered in 1977, motorcycles had fewer than their 
share of all accidents, but had more than their share of fatal 
accidents. Deaths of motorcycle operators and passengers 
totaled 3870 in 1977, representing a 29% increase over 1976. It 
has been suggested by some authorities that varying enforce- 
ment of helmet laws, changes in the laws, and lack of helmet 
legislation have had an adverse effect. A Univ. of Kansas 
study is cited that found that following repeal of that state's 
helmet law, head trauma was the cause of death in 93% of 
fatalities of motorcyclists not wearing helmets and 33% of 
fatalities where helmets were worn, traumatic head injuries 
rose 70% in cities studied, and head injuries were 56% more 
serious for nonhelmeted cyclists. Use of off-road vehicles 
(minibikes, go-carts, and motorcycles) by unlicensed and un- 
trained drivers is considered a contributing factor in increased 
motorcycle injuries. The current status of motorcycle legisla- 
tion (special license, helmets, inspection, headlight, eye pro- 
tection) is tabulated by state. The importance of motorcycle 
instruction, proper licensing, and insurance coverage is 
emphasized. The availability of the National Safety Council's 
Defensive Driving Course Motorcycle Supplement is men- 
tioned. 

by Barbara Carraro 

Publ: Traffic Safety v79 n2 p8-ll, 29-32 (Feb 1979) 

1979; 2refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 794 

WISE WALKERS IN THE MILE-HIGH CITY 
[DENVER PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PROGRAM] 

In response to an alarming increase in Denver's pedestrian 
fatalities, the Denver Police Dept., in cooperation with the 
Colorado Div. of Hwy. Safety, undertook development of a 
Comprehensive Pedestrian Safety Prog, for the City and Coun- 
ty of Denver, assisted by Applied Science Associates, a firm 
with extensive experience in pedestrian safety research. The 
first of three major phases of the project, begun in Oct 1976, 
involved a thorough analysis of more than 2500 pedestrian ac- 
cidents that had occurred in Denver during 1972-1976. The 
second phase of the project involved countermeasure develop- 
ment and implementation. Four major approaches are cur- 
rently being employed: a massive public information cam- 
paign, traffic engineering modifications at selected locations, 
selective enforcement of existing pedestrian and driver or- 
dinances at high-risk locations, and educational programs 
aimed at such high-risk groups as children aged 5-9 and the el- 
derly. As part of the education effort, a program from kin- 
dergarten to 3rd grade to teach children to Stop-Search-Detect 
at both intersections and midblock locations was designed, 
pilot-tested, and will be fully implemented in the Denver 
Public Schools in 1979. The third phase of the project, begun 
in Oct 1978, involves maintenance, updating, and refinement 
of Denver's Comprehensive Pedestrian Safety Prog. An 
evaluation of the program will be conducted after one year of 
operation. 

by Robert L. Luby; Richard M. Thackray, Jr.; Jesse Blatt 

Publ: Traffic Safety v79 n2 pi 8-20, 28-9 (Feb 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 795 

RX: DRUGS AND DRIVING 

The positions of the patient, the physician, and the drug manu- 
facturer are discussed in relation to the law on driving while 
under the influence of drugs. There would appear to be a 
responsibility on doctors to advise patients concerning driving 
while taking such drugs as psychotropic drugs, hypnotics 
(especially barbiturates), antihistamines, amphetamines, and 
antidepressants, including a warning about mixing other drugs 
with alcohol. The problem exists, however, of obtaining infor- 
mation regarding acceptable doses in terms of driving safety. 
It may be that verbal warnings are insufficient and that con- 
tainers should be labeled with warning notices. This would cer- 
tainly apply to proprietary over-the-counter medicines. This 
places an obligation on drug manufacturers to test drugs for 
their effect on driving. Such tests are generally limited to nor- 
mal volunteers in single-dose studies. Little is known about the 
effects of most commonly-used drugs when administered to 
diseased subjects who drive when there is likely to be a dis- 
ease-drug interaction. Manufacturers must test their drugs in 
the driving situation and make appropriate recommendations; 
doctors who prescribe must advise their patients about drugs 
and driving; if a drug has been tested and cautionary advice 
given, the patient who drives regardless ought to be punished 
in the same way as the driver who drinks. 

by George Beaumont 

Publ: Traffic Safety v79 n2 pi 4-5 (Feb 1979) 

1979 

Reprinted from Medical Tribune (15 Jul 1978). Adapted from 

an article by Dr. Beaumont in Medical News-Tribune. 

Availability: See publication 



28 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 800 



HS-025 796 

CRASH THEORIES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS 
FOR RESEARCH 

Five underlying theories about the nature of the crash 
phenomenon are presented, and their implications for crash 
research discussed. The single event theory is based on the as- 
sumption that an accident consists of a single event that has a 
cause. The chain-of -events theory follows the premise that if a 
set of "unsafe conditions" set up a row of vulnerable do mines, 
an "unsafe act" would start them toppling. The determinant 
variable theory assumes that some common factors are present 
in accidents, and that they can be discerned from the right ac- 
cident data. The branched events chain theory is based on the 
perception that events can flow in a chain -like sequence from 
a variety of origins in a system toward an accident event. The 
multilinear events sequences theory views the accident 
phenomenon as the transformation process by which a homeo- 
static activity is interrupted with accompanying unintended 
harm. The implications of these theories for accident 
researchers are discussed in terms of investigative, data, and 
methodology traps. Increased awareness of crash theories by 
accident researchers and investigators and increased dialogue 
between the two groups are advocated. 

by Ludwig Benner, Jr. 

National Transportation Safety Board, Hazardous Materials 

Div., Washington, D.C. 

Publ: American Association for Automotive Medicine 

Quarterly /Journal vl nl p24-7 (Jan 1979) 

1979; Hrefs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 797 

WORLD MOTOR VEHICLE DATA. 1978 ED. 

This statistical compilation of international motor vehicle data 
through 1977 includes production totals by manufacturer as 
well as by country. The data were supplied by foreign govern- 
ment agencies, trade associations, private services, and the 
press. World data on production/assemblies, exports, and re- 
gistrations are tabulated. Tables provide applicable data on as- 
semblies/production, exports, imports, and registrations/sales 
for the following countries and geographical areas: Africa 
(Morocco, South Africa, Africa), Asia (India, Japan, Korea), 
Western Europe (France, West Germany, Italy, Sweden, 
U.K., Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands, Nordic countries, 
Denmark, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, European 
Community), Eastern Europe (Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Po- 
land, Russia, Yugoslavia, Eastern Bloc countries, Eastern Eu- 
rope countries), Oceania (Australia, New Zealand), and 
Western Hemisphere (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Peru, 
Uruguay, Venezuela, Latin-American Free Trade Assoc. coun- 
tries, Canada, U.S.). 

Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Assoc. of the United States, 

Inc., Statistics Dept., 300 New Center Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

48202 

1978; 246p refs 

Availability: Corporate author $20.00 



HS-025 798 

HIGHWAY HAZARDS: WHAT SOME STATES ARE 
DOING FOR THEM 

Solutions to hazardous locations on highways by various state 
departments of transportation are reported. A variety of ap- 
proaches are being taken by the states including the effective 
identification of problem locations, and use of detailed and 
often computerized surveillance systems. In light of limited 
availability of funds, prioritization of correctional projects is a 
major point of focus. Another aspect of highway safety receiv- 
ing attention is tort liability for highway maintenance. Most 
states are also dealing with hazards caused by narrow, one- 
lane bridges. Hazardous-location identification and surveil- 
lance activities of the Connecticut Bureau of Highways and 
the North Carolina Dept. of Transportation are described, as is 
prioritization of highway safety projects as carried out by the 
Washington State Dept. of Transportation and the New York 
State Dept. of Transportation The experience of the Michigan 
Dept. of State Highways and Transportation regarding tort 
litigation, and the state's efforts to improve highway crew 
safety are reported. Efforts by the transportation departments 
of Kansas, California, North Carolina, Arkansas, and Virginia 
to ameliorate the narrow, one-lane bridge safety problem are 
cited. 

Publ: Better Roads v48 n9 p!6-9 (Sep 1978) 

1978; 2refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 799 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND 

HARINGEY [ENGLAND] 

The one-year trial experience of speed control bumps designed 
by the Transport and Road Res. Lab. and installed on two 
public roads in England (Motum Rd., Norwich, and Palace 
Rd., Haringey) is reported. The speed bumps were designed to 
overcome the disadvantages of the short, high, rather severe 
design of bumps commonly used, i.e. vehicle underside 
damage, and discomfort to vehicle occupants with increased 
vehicle speed. The newly designed bumps are3.7 m long and 
100 mm high and semicircular in profile. Details are given of 
public notification, the method of construction, siting and sig- 
ning, public reaction, and effects on traffic and accidents. The 
speed bumps on these roads appeared to be effective in reduc- 
ing vehicle speed and traffic flow. They were acceptable to the 
majority of residents and drivers. Traffic casualties were 
reduced during the one-year period. 

by R. Sumner; C. Baguley 

Transport and Road Res. Lab., Road User Characteristics 

Div., Crowthorne, Berks., England 

Rept. No. TRRL-SR-423; 1978; 24p 4refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 800 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES 
ON RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

Close-following behavior by drivers on rural, two-lane roads 
has been studied at two locations in England (between junc- 
tions 23 and 22 on the M4, and between junctions 4 and 3 on 
the M5), and results have contributed to an International 



29 



HS-025 801 



HSL 79- 



Drivers* Behaviour Res. Assoc. project on possible national 
differences in drivers' risk taking. Video equipment was used 
to monitor 7325 vehicles, during periods of maximum and 
minimum traffic flow conditions at each site. Close following 
was analyzed in relation to the flow, lane, speed, and vehicle 
type. Platoon size distribution was also considered. It was 
found that 31% of drivers were following the vehicle ahead 
with a gap of less than 2 sec and that one-half of these were 
within 1 sec. A greater proportion of heavy-goods vehicles 
than lighter vehicles was found to follow closely, particularly 
in the passing lane. The percentage of heavy-goods vehicles 
leading platoons in this lane was almost double that of lighter 
vehicles. A platoon is defined as at least one vehicle following 
another with a gap of 2 sec or less, where the difference in the 
vehicles* speeds is less than 10%. 

by R. Sumner; C. Baguley 

Transport and Road Res. Lab., Road User Characteristics 

Div., Crowthorne, Berks., England 

Kept. No. TRRL-LR-859; 1978; 22p 5refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 801 

INJURIES TO OCCUPANTS OF HEAVY GOODS 

VEHICLES 

Findings are presented of an in-depth investigation into the 
patterns and causes of injury in a sample of 59 seriously or 
fatally-injured occupants of heavy-goods vehicles (HGV*s) 
who were involved in accidents in England between May 1965 
and Jun 1974. All fatal injuries were found to be associated 
either with massive intrusion of the cab structure or with ejec- 
tion of the occupants. This pattern of death is different from 
that found among unbelted passenger car occupants. A com- 
parison between the patterns, causes, and mechanisms of inju- 
ry, more severe than minor, sustained by HGV occupants and 
car occupants showed differences in the injury patterns and 
causes of injury, particularly with respect to head, pelvis, and 
lower leg injuries. The data suggest that the wearing of seat 
belts by HGV occupants might have reduced the injury severi- 
ty for about 1/3 to 1/2 of the casualties in this small sample, 
and that making the cab more resistant to the crushing of its 
occupants, with careful component design to alleviate injury to 
the lower limbs, torso, and head, could add to the protection 
offered by the seat belt. 

by E. Grattan; J. A. Hobbs 

Transport and Road Res. Lab., Accident Investigation Div., 

Crowthorne, Berks., England 

Rept. No. TRRL-LR-854; 1978; 14p 8refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 802 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

An overall explanation is provided for the travel patterns of 
the elderly, and the role of transport in their everyday lives, 
based on a Oct 1975 survey conducted among 647 retired but 
active old people living in Guildford, England. Variations in 
travel patterns are explained in terms of personal background, 
health, type of household, and area of residence in the town. 
Ill health and car availability are shown to have important ef- 
fects upon travel behavior; ill health became increasingly sig- 
nificant among older respondents and became more important 



than the influence of financial position and social backgrou 
Some groups were found to be able to cope with transj 
problems better than others. Those living alone had to ca 
out more everyday activities than others, but had more - 
ficulty in traveling. The people living near the town center ] 
better access to a range of facilities, even if they had diffici 
in traveling, than those who had to use motorized transpor 
reach a full range of facilities. It is suggested that imprc 
ments in transport and land-use planning, and in the provis 
of personal social services could assist the elderly in meei 
their essential requirements. Appended are explanation of 
sampling method and questionnaire, description of data t 
dling, and sample characteristics. 

by Jean M. Hopkin; P. Robson; S. W. Town 

Transport and Road Res. Lab., Access and Mobility Div., 

Crowthorne, Berks., England 

Rept. No. TRRL-LR-850; 1978; 66p 21refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 803 

THE CHALLENGE OF ENERGY CONSERVATION 
TO THE COMPOUNDER [RUBBER INDUSTRY] 

An explanation is given of a method to save energy in the 
ternal mixing stage of rubber processing by optimizing c 
pounding ingredients, processing conditions, and mac! 
parameters. Subdividing the rubber charge into various n 
bers of pieces can result in peak power and/or total em 
savings of 10% to 15% during an upside-down mixing cj 
Further savings can be achieved by using rubber in pcrv 
form, although production of powdered rubber itself reqi 
energy. The loading and type of carbon black can affect 1 
peak and total power. By using high structure, high sur 
area blacks, which are often required for maximum end 
performance, energy consumption is maximized. It is ecom 
cally worthwhile to determine whether adequate product 
perties can be maintained with a high structure, low sur 
area black or with blends of low and high structure bla 
There are a number of compounding ingredients which 
specifically designed to reduce energy usage during mixinj 
terms of processing conditions, it is important to optii 
batch size, the mixer metal temperature for each elast( 
(which is dependent on the circulating water temperature), 
order of adding compounding ingredients. The criterion 
for dumping can also significantly influence the energy 
sumption of a mix. Recent studies have shown that power- 
trolled mixing can reduce energy consumption by up to 
compared to conventional time and temperature co 
methods. It is advantageous to monitor power usage to ol 
reference points necessary in any energy conservation prc 
Optimization of machine parameters involves such item 
monitoring cooling water flow rates and changes in tern] 
ture, using a power override on the ram pressure to prc 
power surges, maximizing the power factor, and measurin 
clearance between rotor and chamber wall at regular inter 

by P. S. Johnson 

Publ: Elastomerics vlll n2 p30-3 (Feb 1979) 

1979; 14refs 

Based on paper presented to Southern Rubber Group, Tan 

10 Nov 1978. 

Availability: See publication 



30 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 809 



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HS-025 804 

AUTOMOBILES: NEW VIGOR FOR AN 
ENDANGERED SPECIES 

The evolution of automotive engineering in the U.S. auto in- 
dustry is reviewed, including considerations of overcoming the 
fuel knock problem, improvements in engine design, optimiza- 
tion of materials, front- wheel drive applications, advances in 
automatic transmissions, research in electric vehicles, 
aerodynamics in vehicle design, response to safety regulations, 
and application of electronics. The auto industry has displayed 
an astonishing ability to adapt to the times. Specific emphasis 
is placed on the industry's approaches to meeting current fuel 
economy standards by downsizing cars, using lightweight 
materials (plastics, aluminum, high strength steels), applying 
electronics and aerodynamics in vehicle design, and develop- 
ing more efficient engines. It is pointed out that automotive 
design is coming full circle, with renewed emphasis on small, 
lightweight vehicles powered by four-cylinder engines. 

by Clare E. Wise 

Publ: Machine Design v51 n4 p26-30, 34-8, 44-8, 50-1 (22 Feb 

1979) 

1979; 2refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 805 . 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY 
TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS 
THAT REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS 
THE MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 
MOTORCYCLE FATALITIES 

After an examination of available current data on motorcycle 
accidents, fatalities, registrations, and licensure, as well as 
such relevant topics as weather conditions, the American Mo- 
torcycle Assoc. finds that the National Hwy. Traffic Safety 
Administration (NHTSA) is altogether premature in its 
judgment that the approximate increase of 23% in motorcycle 
fatalities in the U.S. in 1977 over 1976 is primarily the result of 
the reduced use of helmets by motorcyclists after 26 states 
repealed their helmet laws. It is pointed out that NHTSA has 
used noncomprehensive data and has failed to give other fac- 
tors adequate consideration. NHTSA has overlooked the fact 
that 18 of the 26 repeal states in 1977 maintained a helmet law 
for individuals under 18 years of age, a group whose ex- 
perience level makes it heavily represented in accident data, 
indicating that a significant portion of the fatalities were in 
fact helmeted. No assessment was made of what portion of 
the increase actually involved motorcycles. There was accu- 
rate recording of motorcycle accidents by 13 of 50 states; 
others included mopeds and other vehicles. There were incon- 
sistencies in describing causes of overall fatality increases, de- 
pending on whether the subject was cars or motorcycles. The 
NHTSA conclusion is contradictory to Fatal Accident Report- 
ing System data. NHTSA cannot be accurate within 31% as to 
whether or not a fatally-injured cyclist was wearing a helmet. 
Of the 9 states with the worst fatality/registration ratios in 
1977, 8 maintained their helmet laws; two traditional non-law 
states (California and Illinois) had increased ratios in 1977. 
NHTSA did not adequately acknowledge a growing motor- 
cycling population indicated by increased licensing of new mo- 
torcyclists, use and weather indicators that suggest increased 
exposure per vehicle, and increased exposure per vehicle 
resulting from possible increased passenger use. A comparison 



of repeal vs. helmet law states shows a higher fatali- 
ty/registration ratio in the latter. No significant difference is 
evident in fatality-accident ratio in helmet law vs. repeal 
states. 

American Motorcycle Assoc., Dept. of Government Relations, 

P.O. Box 141, Westerville, Ohio 43081 

1978; 16p 5refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 806 

RECENT ADVANCES IN ELASTOMER PROCESSING. 
SPECIAL REPORT 

Among recent elastomer processing developments for use in 
the auto industry is the first production Reinforced Reaction 
Injection Molding (RRIM) machine (Cincinnati Milacron's 
Plastics Machinery Div., Batavia, Ohio) delivered to Ford 
Motor's Detroit Res. and Devel. Center. The unit reportedly 
has a 50-lb shot size and injection rate of 10-11 Ib/sec of filled 
ure thane and 15 Ib/sec of polyure thane. General Motors is re- 
ported to have solved the major processing problem of con- 
tinuously drying the very hygroscopic milled glass reinforce- 
ment and continuously metering it into the agitated polyol 
tank. Bulk handling systems and automation have combined to 
radically improve output from sheet molding process lines. 
Another GM development in the sheet-molding compound area 
is "in-mold coating" which reportedly eliminates the need for 
priming the part surface before painting. The latest trend to in- 
crease productivity of molding operations is to provide compu- 
terized control logic; these controls, in general, periodically 
monitor process parameters at critical times and locations, 
compare obtained values with optimum conditions stored in 
processor memory, and institute signals to machine controls to 
adjust and maintain machine conditions. For productivity pur- 
poses, a microprocessor-based unit, Midas I (Control Process, 
Inc., Plantsville, Conn.), is available to collect and display 
production and management information on injection molding 
machines, up to 60 machines at a time. For combined machine 
control and management information monitoring capabilities, 
Hunkar Labs., Inc. (Cincinnati) has announced the MPC-IIL 
The Taylor Instrument Co. offers a new 450R microprocessor- 
based sequence controller that can provide on-off control for 
up to 24 machine or process functions through a l-to-29 step 
cycle. A new Universal Programmable Timer, the UP-Timer, 
is offered by Xanadu Controls (Springfield, N.J.), and is capa- 
ble of simultaneously controlling up to 10 parallel, time-based 
operations. There are also a number of programmable con- 
troller and/or monitor units that can be adapted to a variety of 
process control applications. 

by W. O. Murtland 

Publ: Elastomerics vlll n2 p25-8 (Feb 1979) 

1979; 5refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 809 

THE PROFITABLE EXHAUST SYSTEM BUSINESS 

Information is provided by the National Tire Dealers and 
Retreaders Assoc. (NTDRA) for the independent tire dealer 
and/or retreader who considers adding an exhaust system 
repair and replacement business to his tire operations. Muf- 
flers, piping, and fittings are a product line that fits in per- 
fectly with the facilities and services offered by tire dealers 



31 



HS-025 810 



HSL 79-10 



and retreaders, who have the lifts, qualified personnel, and 
many of the tools to do the job. Only storage space and some 
specialized equipment and training pose problems, none insur- 
mountable. Profitability is discussed; based on a $56 per job 
average and a 32.8% profit margin, some $6000 in annual 
revenue is possible for service stations with two bays and two 
mechanics, with $2045 representing gross profits. Availability 
of parts is assured, since there are a host of manufacturers of- 
fering high-performance mufflers and components in a wide 
variety of shapes and sizes. Other equipment on the market in- 
cludes pipe-bending machines, kits for measuring exhaust 
noises, and special tools such as pipe-end reshapers and muf- 
fler-cutting chisels. Exhaust systems manufacturers are op- 
timistic about the market prospects, due to decreased longevi- 
ty of new car exhaust systems, the trend in service station 
closings and conversions, growth of the imported car market 
(imports requiring service sooner), and boom in recreational 
vehicles. Shop operations are discussed; expertise and top 
quality service are deemed prime requisites. Objections ex- 
pressed by some tire dealers to expansion into the exhaust 
system business are answered; points of contention concern 
compatibility with tire servicing schedule, adequate inventory, 
and capital investment. It is pointed out that once the decision 
has been made to enter the exhaust business, it pays to adver- 
tise. 

Publ: NTDRA Dealer News v42 n4 p!3-4, 19-20 (26 Feb 1979) 

1979 

At head of title: The Tire Service Specialist. Based in part on 

information provided by Goerlich's of Toledo, Ohio. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 810 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. 
ADAMS CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

After learning that many vehicles were being modified until 
they did not comply with the auto exhaust standard they 
originally met, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
decided in Jan 1979 to require manufacturers to limit the 
amount of adjustability in emission control systems. Respond- 
ing to manufacturers' requests for more lead time, EPA 
delayed implementation of the new regulation until the 1981 
model year. With authority to set standards only and not to 
decree manufacturing specifications, EPA expects car makers 
to fit physical limiters on the adjustable features to prevent 
changes that would result in excess emissions. After emissions 
controls were introduced, EPA announced that a mass pro- 
gram to remove emission controls from cars would most likely 
result in no net gain and possibly a loss in fuel economy, a 
claim that was borne out later by the results of a test program 
conducted by EPA itself. In 1977, a new tampering prohibition 
clause was included in amendments to the Clean Air Act, 
broadening the scope to cover repair facilities and fleet opera- 
tors (in addition to any person with respect to unsold new cars 
and to manufacturers and car dealers with * Aspect to sold 
cars). In the wake of this concern for air pollution and fuel 
economy, Secretary of Transportation Brock Adams has chal- 
lenged the auto industry to join in a maximum effort to search 
for the engine of the future and has called for an automotive 
summit conference early in 1980. A detailed definition of il- 



legal tampering with automotive emission controls is presented 
in a separate section. 

by Inez Watson 

Publ: NTDRA Dealer News v42 n4 p22-3 (26 Feb 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 811 

AUTO MAKERS USING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 
IN NEW EMISSIONS SYSTEMS 

Introduced by General Motors on some 1979 models in 
California, the three-way converter called C-4 (Computer Con- 
trolled Catalytic Converter) System is expected to be used on 
all GM cars in 1981. This advanced control system provides 
the technology to meet stricter emission standards of the 
1980's while giving good fuel economy and driveability. The C- 
4 System uses a three-way converter which, aided by elec- 
tronic engine controls directed by an on-board computer, 
reduces nitrogen oxides as well as "burning" hydrocarbons and 
carbon monoxide. Ford Motor's latest advance in exhaust 
systems, EEC-II (Electronic Engine Control), was offered on 
the optional 5.8 L (351 cu-in-displacement Windsor) V-8 engine 
in the 1979 Mercury Marquis in all 50 states and on the same 
engine in the 1979 Ford LTD in California. The EEC-II system 
interactively controls engine spark advance, exhaust gas recir- 
culation, and air-fuel ratio. By recognizing all of the modes in 
which the vehicle is operated and making all of the necessary 
adjustments to these key engine functions, the EEC-II system 
provides optimum control of emissions and fuel economy, and 
helps provide top engine performance. 

by Ed Janicki 

Publ: NTDRA Dealer News v42 n4 p8-9, 21 (26 Feb 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 812 

LET'S DECLARE WAR ON TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 

The Dealers Safety and Mobility Council, an arm of the Hwy 
Users Federation, has placed emphasis in its traffic safety pro 
gram on two high-payoff safety improvements: the greater us 
of safety belts and observance of the 55 mph speed limit. Wit 
the cooperation of the automobile and tire manufacturers, 
program has been devised which will reinforce the efforts c 
dealerships to get their communities to observe safety belt us 
and the 55 mph speed limit. Dealers are aware of the potenti; 
of seat belt usage in saving an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 live 
a year, but they are also aware that very few people do buck] 
up. The dealer realizes that alternative safety devices to tr 
seat belt may be mandated by the government and he fee 
that he and his customers can ill afford the higher cost < 
vehicles with new equipment which may not be as effective 3 
the safety belt. Dealers are aware that the highway fatal! 
rate fell dramatically after the implementation of the 55 mi 
speed limit and that observance of the limit conserves fu 
(estimated saving of 1 billion gal in 1975, when the 55 mph la 
was made permanent). Dealers around the U.S. are going to 
everything possible, through the cooperative Dealers Count 



32 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 816 



a 
ri 
a 
f 
e 
i\ 
s 
e 
e 
Is 
>f 

IS 

-y 

>h 
el 
w 
to 



informational program, to promote the use of safety belts and 
compliance with the 55 mph limit. 

by Lee J. Beaudry 

Publ: Cars and Trucks v51 nl p32-3 (Feb 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 813 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES 
AND MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE 
BOOK [MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 
MANUALS] 

Based on a review of 44 states* driver* s manuals, the motorcy- 
cle section of these manuals is criticized. A review of each 
state's approach to motorcycle operator licensing procedures 
(in tabular form) and of some salient features of states* 
manuals is included. It is pointed out that most manuals have 
been written by persons who are unacquainted with motorcy- 
cles. Although it is felt that riding a motorcycle is not easily 
learned from a manual, it. is pointed out that 12 states were 
aware that in order to write adequately about the subject of 
motorcycling, expertise is required. These states (Alabama, 
Alaska, Kansas, Mississippi, Nevada, New York, North 
Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Utah, Wyoming) 
have adopted the new MSF/NHTSA (Motorcycle Safety Foun- 
dation/National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration) Motorcy- 
cle Operator's Manual. It is emphasized that the MSF/NHTSA 
manual reads as if it were written by motorcycle riders, and 
that this manual is vastly superior to those written for the 
states. The new manual's emphasis is on reasonable caution, 
expertise, and positive thinking rather than on shrill warnings 
about danger. NHTSA and MSF are also working on getting a 
more uniform and realistic approach to the licensing of motor- 
cycles in all 50 states, including programs for rider education 
similar to those for automobiles, and on continuing to upgrade 
the present generation of manuals. 

by George C. Larson 

Publ: Cycle Guide v!3 n4 p80-l, 84-5, 88 (Apr 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 814 

COMPOSITE BRAKE PEDAL TESTED 

A graphite/epoxy composite brake pedal assembly has been 
designed and built, with strength and stiffness exceeding that 
of steel at less than half of steel's weight. The pedal meets all 
the specifications for the equivalent high strength low alloy 
steel production pedal assembly and is directly interchangeable 
with it. Failure mode is noncatastrophic. The pedal blade was 
formed from a hollow graphite/epoxy tube in a matched die 
mold. Potential for high-volume production is excellent. To use 
continuous fibers efficiently, the hollow tube shape was 
selected since this configuration has an efficient section modu- 
lus to resist both bending and torsional stresses. An orientation 
of plus/minus 30 degrees from the axis was selected for the 
blade design. The shape of the blade was dictated by tradeoffs 
between maximum resistance to applied loads and constraints 
of envelope and fabrication. The round tube was flattened in 
the vertical direction between pin and hub, to improve section 
modulus and bending resistance. To have the blade conform to 
the proper envelope and to make foot pad attachment easier, it 



was bent and flattened horizontally from the pin to the pad 
end. To increase section modulus, the tube diameter was 
selected at the largest value (38 mm) which could be shaped 
and bent to fit envelope constraints. A significant portion of 
the composite brake pedal assembly weight is due to steel 
components. Preliminary experiments indicate that these may 
possibly be replaced by composites. 

Publ: Automotive Engineering v87 n3 p38-40 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Based on SAE-790393 "High-Performance Composite Brake 

Pedal Assembly," by R. S. Kiwak, R. M. Rusnak, and K. H. 

Fulmer. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 815 

REINFORCEMENT STRENGTHENS INJECTION 
MOLDED PARTS [AUTOMOTIVE PARTS] 

Bailey Div., USM Corp., an Emhart subsidiary, has developed 
a process for producing injection-molded glass-fiber reinforced 
thermoset polyesters which offers a new set of opportunities 
to the designer, fabricator, and assembler of external auto 
parts. The process competes with sheet molding and provides 
some advantages in surface quality, part-to-part uniformity, 
and manufacturing economics not found with the compression 
process. The first commercial application is the headlamp ar- 
mature for the 1979 model Chevrolet Monza 2-plus-2. Fascia 
retainers for the Plymouth/Dodge Horizon TC3/Omni 024 and 
the Ford Granada/Monarch grille opening panels are other ap- 
plications, with more to come in the 1980 model year. Some of 
the key advantages of the Bailey process include lighter and 
thinner parts (ribs can be added), no sink marks on Class A 
surfaces, dimensionally-accurate parts (filling a closed mold), 
uniformity from part to part, attachment holes molded in, 
minimal deflashing, strong stud bosses, and no blistering in 
paint ovens. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. has shown that 
the physical properties of reaction injection molded (RIM) 
compounds can be modified by selecting appropriate reinforce- 
ment type and concentration, as has been possible with normal 
injection molding. Studies have been made using milled 
fiberglass and mica flake as reinforcing agents in the rein- 
forced reaction injection molding of ure thanes. Milled glass of 
1.59 mm length and mica flakes were found to have a com- 
parable effect on flexural modulus, coefficient of linear ther- 
mal expansion, and notched Izod impact, although elongation 
was severely reduced by the mica. A combination of low elon- 
gation and poor impact resistance indicate a major weakness 
of mica flake, with respect to milled fiberglass, as a reinforce- 
ment in RIM urethanes. 

Publ: Automotive Engineering v87 n3 p50-6 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Based on SAE-790209 "A New Process for FRP Auto Parts," 

by Robert G. Nelb; and SAE-790166 "Controlling the Physical 

Properties of RIM Urethanes with Non-Organic 

Reinforcement," by C. J. MacGregor and R. A. Parker. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 816 

AUTOMOTIVE HSLA [HIGH STRENGTH, LOW 

ALLOY] STEEL ENTERS BAR AREA 

A new as-hot-rolled high strength, low alloy steel which has 
been developed for round and flat bar applications has a 550 
MPa (80 ksi) minimum yield strength with good bendability, 



33 



HS-025 817 



HSL 79-K 



weldabiUty, and fatigue performance. This material offers au- 
tomotive designers and manufacturers flexibility either to up- 
grade from lower-strength materials through increased load- 
carrying ability of their present structures or to realize impor- 
tant weight and energy savings via lighter sections for present 
load ratings. Cost of the higher strength steel is less than that 
of heat-treated grades. The product's composition is basically 
that of a carbon-manganese steel with appropriate microalloy 
additions to optimize the precipitation-strengthening 
mechanism. The microstructure is typically fine-grained fer- 
rite-pearlite, significantly finer than that of as-hot-rolled 1018 
steel; the grain size typically ranges from American Society 
for Testing and Materials size no. 10-11. Several production 
trials have been conducted to date, and materials have been 
provided for evaluation by potential customers. Successful use 
of the material has been made by several manufacturers in the 
following applications: automotive (steering components, 
suspension components), truck-trailer (main load-bearing I- 
beams (flange materials), holding straps), and fork-lift truck 
(vertical extension arm, flange material, and base legs). 

Publ: Automotive Engineering v87 n3 p60-3 (Mar 1979) 
1979 

Based on SAE-790027 "The Development of a New HSLA As- 
Hot-Rolled Bar Product/' by D. R. DiMicco, G. M. Waid, D. 
W. Demianczuk, D. W. Dickinson, and A. T. Davenport. 
Availability: See publication 



HS-025 817 

HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOYS MINIMIZE 
BODY PANEL WEIGHT 

Alcoa engineers have developed alloy selection and/or geomet- 
rical design guidelines which lead to least-weight aluminum 
auto body panel designs, both outer and assembled. Rather 
than establishing minimum thickness values, which depend on 
performance requirements set by vehicle designers, the en- 
gineers considered trends for least-weight designs. Per- 
formance relative to steel has been identified where possible, 
since some requirements are based on its historical per- 
formance. Denting, local stiffness, torsional and/or bending 
stiffness, strength, and vibration were considered in develop- 
ing these design aids. When denting, permanent set, and crip- 
pling are the governing criteria, high-strength alloys provide 
lowest panel weights. If stiffness governs, redesign to reduce 
size of unsupported outer panel areas or to increase inner rib 
size is most effective. 

Publ: Automotive Engineering v87 n3 p66-71 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Based on SAE-790164 "Minimizing the Weight of Aluminum 

Body Panels," by R. L. Rolf, M. L. Sharp, and W. C. Herbein. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 818 

WINDSHIELD WIPER SYSTEMS EXPAND PLASTIC 
USE 

Use of plastics in windshield wiper systems has evolved to the 
point where wiper sets, consisting of motor, linkage, arms, 
and plastic blades, contain 8% plastic by weight, and washer 
sets, consisting of pump, reservoir, and nozzles, contain 73% 
plastic by weight. Gradually, plastics have brought wiper 
designers more desirable characteristics than traditionally used 
metals; advantages of plastics include higher tensile strength, 



fatigue resistance, service at greater temperature extremes 
lower coefficient of friction, self -lubrication, electrical insulat 
ing properties, and resistance to heat aging, oxidation, an< 
weathering. After numerous attempts at design and materia 
selection; the plastic wiper blade was developed as an alterna 
live to the long-standing all-metal superstructure blade foi 
some applications. The superstructure is molded of a rein 
forced polyester compound with high strength and dimensiona 
stability and with excellent thermal properties. The wipei 
blade has high resistance to longitudinal, transverse, and tor 
sional loading, and provides impact resistance. It is unaffectec 
by the range of chemicals encountered in automotive produc- 
tion and use. It remains stable under ultraviolet radiation and 
remains unchanged after continuous exposure to weather. The 
windshield is uniformly cleaned throughout the length of the 
blade over various windshield curvatures and with a wide 
range of wiper arm loads. The blade element reverses at the 
start of each wiping stroke. Blade friction is within the range 
established to achieve wiping without exceeding torque outpul 
of the power source. Vision is maintained at highway speeds 
even with gusting crosswinds. Operation is quiet. A modest 
weight reduction compared with some metal blades is offered. 

Publ: Automotive Engineering v87 n3 p74-8 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Based on SAE-790201 "Plastic Components for Windshield 

Wiper Systems," by Richard A. Batt. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 819 

COATING MATERIAL ENHANCES ALUMINUM 
SURFACES [AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS] 

A new technology involving a highly inorganic Dow Corning 
proprietary material has been developed which forms a clear, 
thin, hard coating for protecting bright aluminum surface: 
from environmental degradation. Excellent resistance to bolt 
abrasion and humidity is exhibited, compared to more familial 
alternative coatings (anodizing, chrome plating). Many autc 
parts, particularly those of steel and zinc, are potential can 
didates for replacement by aluminum in the interest of weigh 
saving; of these, a substantial number require a bright, reflec 
tive surface finish for styling purposes (e.g. wheels, bumpers 
trim). The new coating material can be handled and applied bj 
conventional organic paint techniques while providing proper 
ties similar to inorganic finishes. The inorganic material make 
use of organosilicon chemistry to facilitate handling in ; 
manner typical of organics. Its low potential for further reac 
tion provides exceptional resistance to a wide variety o 
chemical attack, and its low reactivity to sunlight prevents yel 
lowing from exposure. The degree and nature of the chemica 
bonding involved allow this material to withstand extreme tern 
peratures and temperature fluctuations. The material's re 
sistance to salt-induced corrosion and its excellent adhesio 
and abrasion resistance make it a strong candidate for style 
aluminum wheels. It could allow use of lower-purity, less ej 
pensive alloys for aluminum bumpers which would be polishe 
to the desired surface appearances. It could be used to protec 
aluminum trim in all but the most abrasive areas. 

Publ: Automotive Engineering v87 n3 p80-2 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Based on SAE-790446 "A New Concept in Aluminum Surface 

Protection," by Pete Didrichsons. 

Availability: See publication 



34 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 823 



HS-025 820 

SPEED CONTROL UNIT GETS SMALLER, ADDS 
FUNCTION [1979 FORD CARS] 

A new Ford Speed Control Amplifier has been designed using 
an Integrated Injection Logic custom integrated circuit (1C). 
The IC's contain both analog and digital functions on a single 
substrate. Designs have resulted in a speed control unit provid- 
ing more features, reduced package size, and lower warranty 
return projections than the prior design (introduced on 1969 
models). The new system, with its custom hybrid, large-scale 
integrated circuit which uses Integrated Injection Logic 
technology, replaces the all-discrete-component electronics of 
its predecessor. A "resume" feature, not previously offered, 
has been incorporated into the system, which is now available 
for manual transmission applications. The new 1C design can 
replace any Ford speed control module original equipment 
back to 1974 and will be used for service stock for these vehi- 
cles. Steering wheel assemblies (containing the control 
switches) for pre-1979 cars will preclude the resume function 
(reestablishing a previously set speed) so that functionality of 
the replacement amplifier will remain identical to the replaced 
unit. Though a small contributor to weight reduction, the 
weight of the 1979 speed control electronic module decreased 
by about 40% over its predecessor while also decreasing 
package size by the same amount. The reliability/warranty pre- 
diction for the new module shows about a 20% improvement 
from the earlier design. Manufacturability is enhanced by 
reductions in parts count and assembly procedures due to 
more integrated electronic functions. Pin-compatible IC's from 
all vendors are possible, and a common set of external com- 
ponents may be used with any of the IC's. 

Publ: Automotive Engineering v87 n3 p84-7 (Mar 1979) 

1979 

Based on SAE-790339 "Ford Speed Control Utilizes I2L 

Technology," by L. N. Benoit, S. A. Leszczynski, and R. R. 

Pilkingtpn. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 821 

UTANIA: A NEW OPTION IN EXHAUST SENSORS 
[AUTOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM] 

Development of an exhaust gas sensor based on titania (Ti02) 
vs. zirconia (Zr02), to determine the oxygen content of au- 
tomotive exhaust, has continued for several years at Ford 
Motor Co. and has evolved to the pilot production stage. A 
key element of three-way catalytic converters (for removal of 
carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nitrogen oxides in ex- 
haust) is an air-fuel ratio (A/F) sensor used in a feedback con- 
trol loop to sense and maintain that ratio in a narrow range 
near stoichiometric balance; overall efficiency of a three-way 
catalyst peaks near that ratio. Present emission control 
systems are based on the exclusive use of a Zr02 sensor which 
senses the large change in oxygen partial pressure at the 
stoichiometric A/F. Because of the magnitude and sharpness 
of this change, the Zr02 sensor output exhibits a stepwise 
change in output, which constrains the control system to 
operate in a limit-cycle mode. The temperature-compensated 
Ti02 element sensor developed by Ford is rapidly responsive 
to these large excursions in exhaust gas oxygen partial pres- 
sure. Engine dynamometer and vehicle tests of the sensor's 
performance and durability have demonstrated its suitability 



for use with today's emission control equipment develop- 
ments. 

Publ: Automotive Engineering v87 n3 p88-94 (Mar 1979) 

1979; Iref 

Based on SAE-790140 "Titania Exhaust Gas Sensor for 

Automotive Applications," by M. J. Esper, E. M. Logothetis, 

and J. C. Chu. 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 822 

TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO 

OCCUPANCY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARCH 
RESULTS. FINAL REPORT 

Research was directed to observing variations in peak hour 
auto occupancy on different days of the week, monthly, 
seasonally, and along major corridors in the Seattle, Washing- 
ton area during a 15-month period in 1977 and 1978 (12 months 
of data analyzed). Data were also collected on time of day 
variations, central business district (CBD) cordons, and special 
traffic generators and tested for error in field collection 
through redundant counts at various stations. Data collection 
procedures, statistical analysis procedure (including an evalua- 
tion of applicability and usefulness of different procedures for 
exploring different kinds of variations), and study results, 
along with an evaluation of their relevance for future auto oc- 
cupancy studies, are discussed. Appended are guidelines for 
conducting a vehicular occupancy monitoring program. None 
of the variables investigated (type of facility, traffic volume, 
level of transit service, distance to the CBD, and urban vs. 
suburban location) showed a relationship with average auto oc- 
cupancy. There was also no significant predictable variation by 
day of week, month, or season, counter to the study hypothes- 
is. It is concluded that to accurately assess changing commuter 
patterns, a long-term program should be instituted to monitor 
carefully selected sites at regular intervals, perhaps monthly. 
Occupancy rates should be plotted regularly to view changes 
in terms of external circumstances. In the Seattle area, 9 of 
the 18 sites from the present study have been chosen for such 
an ongoing program. In cases where ongoing programs are not 
feasible, it may still be of interest to attempt to assess the im- 
pact of an individual ridesharing promotion effort or other 
change in circumstances. 

by William T. Roach; Martha Lester 

Seattle-King County Commuter Pool, Arctic Bldg., Room 600, 

704 Third Ave., Seattle, Wash. 98104 

DOT-FH-11-9261 

Rept. No. FHWA-RD-78-198; 1978; 43p 3refs 

Provision of some data collection funds through 

Comprehensive Employment and Training Act. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-025 823 

SMASHED. THE MAGAZINE ON DRINKING-AND- 
DRIVING (IMPACT. LA REVUE DE L'AUTOMOBELE 
ET DE LA SOBRIETE) 

In a magazine format, up-to-date information is provided on 
the effects of alcohol and other drugs on driving ability and 
the laws related to drinking- an d-driving. Individual articles 
provide discussions of the likelihood of the impaired vs. the 
unimpaired driver to be killed in a motor vehicle accident; 
blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and drinking-driving laws 



35 



HS-025 824 



HSL 79-10 



in Canada; the physiology of alcohol; the effect of drinking on 
behavior; the effect of drinking on driving; the effects of mix- 
big alcohol and other drugs on driving ability; BAG (including 
charts for females and males on estimating BAG according to 
person's weight and number of drinks consumed); methods of 
self-evaluating impairment (Romberg's test, collecting small 
objects, counting backwards); helpful hints for parties; and a 
quiz to help one stay sober. "Cartoons" and "advertisements" 
on the theme of drinking-and-driving are included. Wallet-size 
BAG charts are attached. 

Transport Canada, Road and Motor Vehicle Traffic Safety 
Branch, Ottawa, Ont. K1A ON5, Canada 
Kept. No. TP-1535; 1978; 74p 
Duplicate volume in French (36p). 
Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 824 

THE 79'S ARE LARGER INSIDE AND STRONGER 
OUTSIDE, BUT...WHERE DID THE WEIGHT GO? 
[UJS. AUTOMOBILES] 

The two basic ways the auto industry reduced vehicle weight 
in 1979 model year cars are briefly explained: by downsizing 
and by using lighter-weight or lighter-gauge materials. High- 
strength and lighter-weight steel, and aluminum were sub- 
stituted for ordinary low-carbon steel and cast iron in various 
areas to reduce total vehicle weight without sacrificing 
strength or durability. In actual practice, automotive engineers 
were able to reduce vehicle weight by 630 Ib on a production- 
type vehicle of the theoretical engine variety. A weight com- 
parison table of 1979 aluminum vs. 1978 cast iron engine com- 
ponents shows a 39.4 Ib reduction for the former. An interior 
space comparison chart of the 1978 vs. 1979 Newport shows 
that 715 Ib (curb weight, V-8) were removed from the basic 
vehicle in the newer model without sacrificing interior room 
and seating comfort. Weight savings have also been achieved 
by using thinner, but equally strong and durable, window and 
windshield glass. The Ford Fairmont and Zephyr lines are 
cited as representing excellent weight-savings techniques, e.g. 
use of much aluminum and plastic, thinner doors with less cur- 
vature, and trimmer and lighter axle housings, despite their 
construction from ferrous metal. Examples of future weight 
reduction include a "4x8" Ford engine, which will run on 
either four or eight cylinders depending on operating condi- 
tion; a lockup converter bypass applied to an over- 
drive/automatic; and graphite fiber material, which results in 
weight savings of 1250 Ib in a car over a 1979 model of con- 
ventional construction. 

by Herb Carrier 

Publ: Brake and Front End v49 n2 p28, 30-1, 34 (Feb 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



tricts, and sampling locations. Charts indicate the trends of 
selected properties (distillation temperature, Reid vapor pres- 
sure, octane numbers) of motor fuels since 1946. Twelve oc- 
tane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 
(Eastern and Guld Coast states, Central states, Mountain 
states, and Western states) for unleaded, regular, and premium 
grades of gasoline are presented. The antiknock (octane) index 
averages of gasolines sold in the summer of 1978 were 88.5, 
89.5, and 94.3 for unleaded, regular, and premium grades of 
gasolines, respectively. The report does not discuss the sig- 
nificance of the data presented. 

by Ella Mae Shelton 

Department of Energy, Battles vffle Energy Technology 

Center, Bartlesville, Okla. 

Rept. No. BETC/PPS-79/1; 1979; 81p 2refs 

Supported in part by the American Petroleum Inst. 

Availability: NTIS $6.00 paper copy, $3.00 microfiche 



HS-025 826 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO 
SIMULATION OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO- 
LANE RURAL ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF 

STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND 
SIMULA-67 LANGUAGE 

A description is given of a computer program for simulating 
vehicle traffic on two-lane, rural roads which is part of a long- 
term research and development project by the National Road 
and Traffic Res. Inst. of Sweden to determine the effect on 
traffic of road and traffic engineering schemes in order to 
establish traffic quality and road-user costs in the rural road 
network. The Jackson Structured Programming technique was 
used, in the SIMULA 67 program language. The simulation 
model describes the dynamic sequence of vehicle traffic over 
defined stretches of road for given traffic volumes and com- 
positions. On the basis of its applications, one part of the 
model gives the speed of the freely-moving vehicle along the 
road (free-flow traffic), and another part shows the interac- 
tions of individual vehicles in the traffic stream. Input data 
consists of road parameters (road geometry, surface type, 
speed limits, and overtaking restrictions) and traffic parame- 
ters (total flow, or number of vehicles/hour, flow in each 
direction, flow changes, and traffic composition). Validation off 
the basic traffic model is in progress in both Sweden and the 
U.K. A preliminary program description is provided, as well as 
a source program list. 

by Anders Brodin; Gosta Gynnerstedt; Goran Levander 

Statens vag- och trafikinstitut (VTI), Pack, 58101 Linkoping, 

Sweden 

Rept. No. VTI-143; 1979; 80p 6refs 

See also HS-025 838 (VTI-44), and HS-025 839 (VTI-43). 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 825 

MOTOR GASOLINES, SUMMER 1978 

Analytical data for 2433 samples of motor gasoline, from ser- 
vice stations throughout the U.S., were collected and 
analyzed. The samples represent the products of 50 compa- 
nies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. 
These data are tabulated by groups according to brands 
(unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing areas and districts into 
which the U.S. is divided. A map shows marketing areas, dis- 



HS-025 827 

BMCS [BUREAU OF MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY] 
ROADSIDE SAFETY INSPECTIONS 1976-1977 

A summary of roadside inspection activities of the Bureau oi 
Motor Carrier Safety (BMCS) for the years 1976 and 1977 is 
divided into four parts: trucks 1976, trucks 1977, drivers 197 
and 1977, and buses 1976 and 1977. The BMCS administers 
and enforces the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulation: 
and Hazardous Materials Regulations applicable to motor car 



36 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 830 



riers of passengers and/or property engaged in interstate 
and/or foreign commerce. Tables provide the total number of 
vehicles inspected, the total number of types of vehicle de- 
fects found, and the total number of these violations which 
caused a vehicle (truck, bus) to be placed out of service, for 
authorized carriers, private carriers, exempt carriers, and 
other carriers. Pie charts show percentages of such types of 
driver violations as medical certificate, log violations, and 
miscellaneous (e.g. seat belt use, safe loading, transportation 
of unauthorized passengers) by carrier type; the total number 
of driver violations and the number causing drivers to be 
placed out of service are indicated. In 1976, 14,730 vehicles 
engaged in the transportation of property in interstate com- 
merce were inspected, and 35% (5225) of these were placed 
out of service; in 1977, 18,421 vehicles were inspected, with 
34% (6214) placed out of service. In 1976, 16,172 driver viola- 
tions were found, with 419 drivers being placed out of service 
for driving or being on duty in excess of the maximum hours; 
the corresponding figures for 1977 are 18,412 and 427. In 1976, 
1533 interstate buses were inspected, and 6% (97) were placed 
out of service; the corresponding 1977 figures are 1423 and 9% 
(123). The attention of the trucking industry is called to the 
sizeable segments of their industry which do not have effec- 
tive inspection/maintenance programs and to the abundance of 
easily found defects in important areas such as brakes, 
wheels, and tires. Credit is given to the passenger carriers for 
their efforts in reducing out-of-service frequency and for the 
fact that, in almost half of the inspections, the buses were free 
of even minor defects. Concern is shown regarding the 1977 
rise in both frequency of defects and out-of-service defects, a 
reversal of the declining trend in recent years. 

Bureau of Motor Carrier Safety, Washington, D.C. 20590 

1978; 38p 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 828 

EVALUATION OF THREE-WAY INTERSECTION 
REGULATION [WESTERN AUSTRALIA] 

Findings are outlined of a study which evaluated the regulation 
introduced in Western Australia in Jun 1975 determining right- 
of-way obligations of drivers at uncontrolled, three-way inter- 
sections. Under the new regulation, drivers on the terminating 
road must give the right-of-way to all drivers on the continuing 
road. It was found that prior to the new regulation, the majori- 
ty of drivers were already adopting the major/minor road con- 
cept, a pattern found to be strengthened by the new regula- 
tion. The new regulation has apparently been beneficial in 
reducing driver hesitancies and in embodying a self -enforcing 
law, which is of benefit to the law enforcement authority. An 
analysis of 200 intersections provided no statistically signifi- 
cant changes with respect to road accidents, although there is 
some indication that the new regulation may have reduced 
rear-end collisions on the continuing road involving vehicles 
approaching from the left of the terminating road. A limited 
study has indicated that driver delays on the terminating road 
may have increased slightly as a consequence of the new law. 
Although not directly measured in this study, it is considered 
that further possible benefits of the new regulation include 
smoother traffic flow on the continuing road and the designa- 
tion of major roads as priority roads, thus eliminating the need 



to sign three-way intersections unless warranted on the 
grounds of safety. 

by P. Willett 

Publ: Australian Road Research v8 n2 p39-43 (Jun 1978) 

1978 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 829 

THE EFFECT OF PRESENCE LIGHTS [RUNNING 
LIGHTS] ON THE DETECTION OF CHANGE OF 
VEHICLE HEADWAY 

A laboratory study was undertaken to investigate the effect of 
vehicle rear tights on the detection of change in visual angle of 
a lead vehicle by a following vehicle (change in headway). The 
elements of car following on the road were simulated by 
reproducing the angular relationships on a screen which was 
viewed from a fixed distance. A test object representing the 
rear of a car was projected onto the center of a large, other- 
wise stimulus-free, screen of uniform luminance. The initial 
distance between the observer in the following vehicle and the 
rear of the lead vehicle (headway) was simulated by the initial 
angular size of the test object projected onto the screen. Ac- 
celeration of the lead vehicle was simulated by subsequent 
change in the angular size of the test object. Visual per- 
formance was measured by recording the reaction time to 
positive detection of change in headway. Test object configu- 
rations were square test object (vehicle only (VO)), vehicle 
plus presence lights (VPL), and presence lights only (PLO). It 
was found that the reaction time increases as the initial head- 
way increases, as the light level decreases, and as the test 
stimulus is reduced to presence tights only. There was no sig- 
nificant difference between reaction times for the VO and 
VPL conditions, but reaction times for the PLO condition 
were significantly different from those for both VO and VPL. 
It can be inferred that road lighting can considerably improve 
driver response merely by making the outline of vehicles visi- 
ble. Fixed lighting has the benefits of revealing the rear of 
vehicles and of raising the driver light adaptation level. Both 
front (headlights) and rear presence/brake tights and turn 
signals should not be so intense as to cause disability glare 
which veils the vehicle outline, and presence tights should be 
as close as possible to the sides of vehicles. 

by A. J. Fisher; R. R. Hall 

Publ: Australian Road Research v8 n2 p!3-6 (Jun 1978) 

1978; Srefs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 830 

WAYS TO MAKE CYCLING SAFER 

It is suggested that a fundamental rethinking of the bicycle in 
American society is required, that the "bicycle as a toy" men- 
tality must be eliminated. Buying a bicycle should be a respon- 
sible act, and one should be as careful in riding a bicycle as in 
driving a car. The adult's role in bicycle matters is significant 
since the parent purchases the bike for a child and imparts his 
attitudes about cycling. It is suggested that bicycles bought at 
department or hardware stores, for example, need a lot more 
.repair and maintenance than those purchased from local bike 
shops. In a cheaper production bike, as is often sold in depart- 
ment stores, the metal is thinner and the frame tubing is of 
poor quality. One common feature of department store bikes 



37 



HS-025 831 



HSL 79-10 



(and a significant cause of accidents) is a bike being out-of-ad- 
justment. Department store bikes are not sold in perfect ad- 
justment and come out of adjustment easily. A relationship 
between "junk bikes" and "junk bike attitudes" is seen. 

by James C. McCullagh 

Publ: Bicycling v!9 n8 p8-10 (Aug 1978) 

1978; Iref 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 831 

MAKING 55 MPH PAY 

Continental Oil Co. (Conoco) has reaped benefits from its pro- 
gram to comply with the 55 mph speed limit, the principal one 
being a 25% increase in fuel economy (from 4 mpg in 1974 to 
about 5.1 mpg today). Conoco's fleet of 200 tractors and 400 
trailers also relies on radial tires, fuel-efficient diesels, fan 
clutches, and aerodynamics to boost its fuel savings. Conoco 
was one of the principal sponsors of a research program at 
Texas A and M Univ. which studied tank trailer aerodynamics. 
Based on the study findings, Conoco has gone to conventional 
tractors vs. cab-over types, where possible, to cut drag and in- 
crease fuel economy. Conoco had already installed air shields 
on tractors hauling van trailers, but the company is now in- 
vestigating air shields on tractors in tanker service. (The most 
promising shield is one originally designed for a recreational 
trailer.) Conoco installed tachographs in all its tractors in mid- 
1975 to monitor drivers* speeds. If a driver is found to have 
been speeding, he receives a written reprimand for his first of- 
fense, a week's suspension without pay for a second, and ter- 
mination for a third infraction in a 12-month period. Another 
aspect of Conoco's 55-mph policy is mandatory attendance at 
monthly safety meetings. Signs of the rear of every Conoco 
trailer advertise the company's policy on observance of the 55 
mph limit for safety and fuel economy reasons. Conoco also 
believes its policy has helped its safety record and lessened 
wear and tear on equipment. 

by Brian Taylor 

Publ: Commercial Car Journal v!36 nl p!03-5 (Jan 1979) 

1979; Iref 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 832 

MEASURING FUEL ECONOMY...ON THE ROAD 

After three and one-half years of preparation, the Dept. of 
Transportation/Society of Automotive Engineers Fuel Econo- 
my Prog, is currently carrying out its objective of testing vehi- 
cles in fleet service to measure fuel consumption and to identi- 
fy the most fuel-efficient operating practices for future use in 
heavy-vehicle and component design. Tractor comparisons fea- 
tures standard components vs. high torque rise engines, tem- 
perature-controlled fan drives, radial tires, and air deflectors. 
Straight trucks will be tested with gas and diesel engines. With 
as many as 50 major carriers expected to participate, the initial 
test fleets include Gateway Transportation, Carolina Freight, 
Associated Truck Lines, and Gordon's Transport. Ford, Inter- 
national Harvester, General Motors, and White are providing 
the power units while Monon and Dorsey have donated the 
vans. (Specifications of test vehicles are tabulated.) Four pairs 
of vehicles are being evaluated; in each set, one truck will be 
equipped with fuel-saving components, the other with standard 
components. To make in-service verification possible, 



Rockwell International developed a compact, on-board com- 
puter and a series of sensors that could evaluate 26 vehicle 
functions. Each volunteer carrier will operate the test vehicles 
for a maximum of one month. The in-service test vehicles are 
now completing their first run with a volunteer fleet. The pro- 
gram concludes at the end of the year. It is hoped that the in- 
service results will corroborate those of preliminary tests that 
indicate up to 40% fuel saving on vehicles equipped with fuel 
economy devices. 

by Claude Travis 

Publ: Commercial Car Journal v!36 nl p98-102 (Jan 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 833 

THE CURRENT STATUS OF AUTOMOBILE 
RUNNING LIGHTS 

Studies are cited which have demonstrated the traffic safety 
benefits of running lights (lighted when the engine is running) 
to increase motor vehicle conspicuity. Various accident studies 
have shown reductions in accidents ranging from 7% to 59% 
as a result of using either headlights during the daytime, park- 
ing lights in daylight hours, a light in the center of the grille, a 
high-mounted signal system, or an auxiliary truck-mounted 
brake light. One study found that a significant quickening of 
following driver response occurs when a lead vehicle has high- 
mounted brake and turn signals. A stabilizing effect of daytime 
headlights with regard to the lane position of oncoming cars 
has been found in another study. A series of studies has 
demonstrated that lighted vehicles (in the daytime) can be de- 
tected sooner, that lighted vehicles hold constant visibility 
with a logarithmic decrease in natural illumination, and that 
passing performance is safer if the oncoming vehicle has 
running lights. Increased visibility has been reported for vehi- 
cles with just two small running lights, as well as for motorcy- 
cles with low-beam headlights. The author advocates a high- 
mounted, 360 degree-visibility forward showing brake-turn 
signal light and running light combination, a system he be- 
lieves could reduce accidents by 50% or more. This system 
(illustrated) is being tested in a three-year study by the Iowa 
Dept. of Transportation. 

by Merrill J. Allen 

Publ: Journal of the American Optometric Association v50 n2 

p!79-80 (Feb 1979) 

1979; 16refs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 834 

GOOD DRIVERS USE THEIR MIRRORS 

Even the experienced driver, who uses his vehicle's mirrors 
more often and more effectively than the novice driver is han- 
dicapped by the limited rear field of view afforded by today's 
mirror systems. The traditional rear-view mirror, changed 
comparatively little since its introduction, is inadequate in 
providing rear vision information on today's highways. 
Modern car designs add to the problem; small back windows 
reduce the driver's rear field of view, and low, sloping roofs 
necessitate location of the inside mirror low on the windshield, 
where it can block the forward vision of the taller driver. The 
Dept. of Transportation is preparing a new standard that will 
require car makers to improve blind spots on either side of the 



38 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 839 



car. One approach, although costly and requiring development, 
would be an electronic or fiber optic system that displays the 
rear scene on a TV monitor on the dashboard. The simplest 
solution would be a large interior mirror mounted above the 
drivers line of vision, and more window space to the back 
and side; a serious drawback is a blocked view with a full load 
of passengers. The best solution would be a wide-angle 
periscope. An alternative is the multiple-mirror system (left 
and right outside mirrors to cover blind spots in addition to the 
central interior mirror); this approach complicates the viewing 
task. Flat mirrors cannot eliminate completely blind spots, and 
under new standards they may have to be replaced or supple- 
mented with convex mirrors, which provide a greater field of 
view. Convex mirrors create a problem in judging distance and 
strain the focusing power of the eye, but they pinpoint vehi- 
cles in the driver's blind spot. 

Publ: Bulletin Virginia Department of Highways and 

Transportation v45 n2 p!3, 32 (Feb 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 835 
TRANSPORTATION ISSUES 

This study, based on the General Accounting Office's (GAO) 
plan for audit work of Federal transportation agencies and 
programs, presents a perspective on current and future trans- 
portation issues, by providing the background and analytical 
framework for identifying the major transportation programs, 
and problems to be addressed by GAO. Eight major transpor- 
tation issues on which GAO will focus over the next two years 
are analyzed and recent GAO work in each area summarized. 
These issues include: developing and coordinating balanced 
national transportation policies and programs; restructuring 
and rehabilitating the railroad freight transportation system; 
developing a safe motor vehicle-highway transportation 
system; developing and maintaining an adequate and cost-ef- 
fective national highway system; determining the continued 
justification for and effectiveness of surface transportation 
economic regulation; developing economically viable urban 
public transit systems; determining the role of intercity rail 
passenger service in the U.S. transportation system; and 
developing a safe, efficient, and reliable air transportation 
system. Emphasis is placed on Congressional interests and 
potential Congressional needs for GAO assistance. An appen- 
dix presents an overview of major government agencies, Con- 
gressional committees, private-sector lobby groups, and 
research organizations involved in transportation. 

General Accounting Office, Community and Economic Bevel. 

Div., Washington, B.C. 20548 

Kept. No. CED-78-159; 1978; 75p refs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 837 

MICHIGAN DRIVER PROFILE. SOME BASIC FACTS 
ABOUT THE TRAFFIC CONVICTION AND 
ACCIDENT RECORDS OF MICHIGAN DRIVERS 

This booklet summarizes the results of a comprehensive study 
which examined Michigan Dept. of State records in order to 
develop a profile of the state's drivers. It is the first of a 
number of publications which will examine the point system 
and other programs intended to identify and assist drivers with 



problems. Profiles are based on the driving records of a ran- 
domly-selected 1% sample of all Michigan drivers, represent- 
ing 60,554 drivers. Profiles present percentages of drivers 
falling into categories defined by characteristics available in 
the driving records. Some profiles show the age, sex, and re- 
gional distribution of drivers; others show the distribution of 
driving-related incidents, such as accidents, alcohol involve- 
ment, and traffic convictions and the points they carry. 

Michigan Dept. of State, Office of Prog. Analysis, Lansing, 

Mich.48918 

1978; 63p 

Prepared in cooperation with Univ. of Michigan, Hwy. Safety 

Res. Inst. 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 838 

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF ROAD TRAFFIC 
(ABBREVIATED VERSION OF INTERNRAPPORT 
NO. 160) 

A systems analysis approach to obtain information on the traf- 
fic process, particularly the rural traffic process, in order to 
optimize the road traffic system, is outlined, (as part of a long- 
term project by the National Road and Traffic Res. Inst. of 
Sweden). The approach is to regard the traffic system as part 
of a control system, consisting of an administrative unit with 
its inherent decision-making process and a related information 
system. In principle, the approach enables an optimization of 
the road traffic system in terms of transport quality (i.e. level 
of service). The traffic system is the transfer function between 
input and output. The input of the controlled traffic system 
consists of operational measures (e.g. road factors such as 
cross section, alignment; traffic regulations; vehicle and driver 
characteristics), and strategic measures (e.g. resources and 
transportation need and demand which influence traffic 
volume and composition). The output of the traffic system are 
the measures of effectiveness describing the quality of the 
traffic process (e.g. operational costs such as journey time, 
fuel consumption, traffic safety). The simulation technique, 
the only feasible method to describe the traffic process, has 
been applied in the analysis of road improvements in the Eu- 
ropean road network (in particular, roads in Sweden and the 
U.K.) and is continuing to be developed in such applications. 
After the systems analysis, a road traffic simulation model is 
to be developed, as well as equipment for field studies to col- 
lect traffic data, including an integrated data processing 
system for validation of the simulation model. The simulation 
technique is to be applied and implemented in the decision 
process. 

by Gosta Gynnerstedt 

Statens vag- och trafikinstitut (VTI), Pack, 58101 Linkoping, 

Sweden 

Rept. No. VTI-44; 1977; 24p 

See also HS-025 826 (VTI-143), and HS-025 839 (VTI-43). 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 839 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE- 
CARRIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

As part of a long-term research project by the National Road 
and Traffic Res. Inst. of Sweden regarding optimization of the 



39 



HS-025 840 



HSL 79-10 



level of service of the rural road network, a model has been 
developed for the simulation of traffic flow on two-lane, rural 
roads. The model assumes that each vehicle on the roadway 
has a basic desired speed at which it would like to travel, but 
usually is prevented from doing so by the road geometry, 
and/or speed limit, and the presence of other vehicles on the 
road. The simulation model is described in terms of the effects 
of these factors individually and in combination, the input 
data, various results and analyses which can be obtained as 
output, calibration of submodels vs. observed data, continuing 
validation of the various submodels, and past and proposed fu- 
ture applications of the model. A brief description of the 
equipment used to collect the vehicle data used in the calibra- 
tion and validation processes is appended. 

by Gosta Gynnerstedt; Arne Carlsson; Bengt Westerlund 

Statens vag- och trafikinstitut (VTI), Pack, 58101 Linkoping, 

Sweden 

Rept. No. VTI-43; 1977; 70p 

See also HS-025 826 (VTM43), and HS-025 838 (VTI-44). 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 840 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT 
AND OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE 
OF NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR 
VEHICLES 

Motor vehicle statistical data for 1977 are compiled for the 
State of New York in two sections, one devoted to accident- 
related data, the other to frequently-requested data on New 
York State Dept. of Motor Vehicles programs and activities. 
Accident statistics include the following: 1976-1977 accident 
data comparison; ten-year accident summary 1968-1977; death 
and injury accident rates; age and sex distribution of persons 
killed and injured; seriousness of injury; manner of collision 
(two- vehicle accidents); pre-accident vehicle action and loca- 
tion of collisions; characteristics of drivers involved in ac- 
cidents; road, light, and weather factors; accidents by hour of 
day and day of week; accident involvement by type of motor 
vehicle; age and sex distribution of pedestrians killed and in- 
jured; pedestrian actions and accidents by time of day and day 
of week; motorcycle and bicycle accidents (five-year summary 
and figures for 1977); summaries of motor vehicle accidents 
(MV-144A) Jan-Dec 1977, statewide and in New York City, 
and accidents involving pedestrians, motorcycles, bicycles, 
and school buses; and county accident data. In 1977, 974 re- 
portable accidents occurred in New York every day, 54% of 
which resulted in death or injury. One vehicle out of every 13, 
and 1 driver out of every 15 was involved in an accident. One 
person was killed every 31/2 hours; 7 persons were killed 
every day. Thirty-two persons were injured every hour; 770 
persons were injured every day. Operational statistics relate to 
motor vehicle licenses and registrations, convictions, suspen- 
sions and revocations, vehicle and driver safety programs, and 
motorboat and snowmobile registrations. 

by Joan A. S chuff, ed. 

New York State Dept. of Motor Vehicles, Empire State Plaza, 

Albany, N.Y. 12228 

Rept No. RD-20-U1/78); 1978; 70p 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-025 841 

TARGETS HIGHWAY RISKS. 1. TAKING 
INDIVIDUAL AIM 

In this fifth in a series of articles on hazard assessment and 
management prepared by the Clark Univ. Hazard Assessment 
Group, the risk of being killed in a motor vehicle accident and 
how to reduce the risk are discussed. The variation of risk is 
discussed in terms of international comparisons, long-term 
trends in the U.S., state-by-state variation, and other corre- 
lates of highway mortality (time of day or week, accident 
type, age, sex, roadway type, and vehicle type). It is pointed 
out that a large fraction of highway fatalities are, in principle, 
preventable. A possible prescription for individual risk reduc- 
tion is outlined (avoid alcohol and certain other drugs before 
driving, use seat belts at all times, avoid driving at night 
(particularly on Friday or Saturday), avoid the use of motorcy- 
cles and bicycles on major streets and roads, choose a woman 
over a man to drive (all other things equal) and a middle-aged 
man over a young man, opt for turnpikes and inter states, and 
choose a large over a small car). Consideration is given to 
some of the more significant aspects of the physical theory un- 
derlying highway collision losses: the role of acceleration, 
frontal barrier crashes, multivehicle crashes, and passenger 
restraints. Vehicle and highway design criteria, based on the 
physics of crashing, are outlined. The use of cost-effectiveness 
studies in the setting of vehicle and highway standards is 
discussed. It is stated that the overall gains from highway 
design improvement are substantial; in contrast, only modest 
progress has been made in vehicle design, although the Dept. 
of Transportation's Experimental Safety Vehicle Prog, in- 
dicates that engineers have solved many of the problems 
raised by conflicting design criteria. It is felt that the highway 
fatality problem continues, not for lack of scientific knowledge 
but because of the multiple ways the automobile is embedded 
in the society, economy, bureaucracy, and in individual activi- 
ties and attitudes. 

by Thomas Bick; Christoph Hohenemser 

NSF-ENV-77-15334 

Publ: Environment v21 nl p!6-20, 37-40 (Jan-Feb 1979) 

1979; Hrefs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 842 

THE ALUMINUM-AIR BATTERY FOR ELECTRIC 
VEHICLES 

Lawrence Livermore Lab. is currently assessing an attractive 
candidate for energy storage for electric vehicles, i.e. the alu- 
minum-air battery. The concept for the battery couples an ex- 
tremely high specific energy that could conceivably provide a 
range of 1600 km with rapid mechanical refueling (on the order 
of minutes). The battery's life-cycle costs are projected to be 
close to those of the internal combustion engine. Adding a 
small flywheel to the aluminum-air power system would 
enhance both the battery's efficiency and the vehicle's market 
appeal. The flywheel/battery vehicle could match the range, 
acceleration, top speed, and rapid refueling capability of 
today's gasoline-powered vehicles. The development program 
for the battery includes system studies to determine optimal 
operating conditions for given vehicle specifications and to as- 
sess the power cell's technical and economic feasibility for 
transportation. Also underway are electrochemical studies of 



40 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 846 



the electrodes and the design of processes to control elec- 
trolyte composition during discharge. 

Publ: Energy and Technology Review p25-32 (Nov 1978) 

1978; Srefs 

Based on article by John F. Cooper and E. L. LiHauer (see 

Ref. 1). 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 843 

BIG BROTHER IS STEPPING ON YOUR HEAD. 
[MOTORCYCLE SAFETY AND HELMET USAGE] 

Available information is presented concerning the effort 
recently launched by the National Hwy. Traffic Safety Ad- 
ministration (NHTSA) to make motorcycle helmet use manda- 
tory nationwide. The latest press conference address (11 Jan 
1979) by Joan Claybrook, the Administratrix of NHTSA, is 
presented verbatim; the release is announced of a report sum- 
marizing the results of five recent NHTSA studies whose 
results demonstrated the positive effects of helmets and hel- 
met usage laws on highway safety. The preliminary report 
(prepared by NHTSA's National Center for Statistics and 
Analysis) is presented of a study being conducted by the Univ. 
of Southern California (USC) on 1976-1978 motorcycle ac- 
cidents in the Los Angeles area. Key findings to date of the 
USC study, to be completed late in 1979, are based on an 
analysis of 899 on-scene, in-depth motorcycle accident in- 
vestigations; the findings reconfirm that dramatic gains in mo- 
torcycle safety can be achieved if motorcyclists wear helmets 
and if they and their cycles are made as conspicuous as possi- 
ble. A position paper from the American Motorcycle Assoc. 
(AM A) on NHTSA's desire to reinstate mandatory helmet 
laws contends that NHTSA's recent studies on motorcycle 
safety and helmet usage laws suggest that the studies were un- 
dertaken with a preconceived outcome, that the results point 
to a very selective use of data with complete disregard for 
conflicting information, and that the final injury countermea- 
sure recommendation (mandatory helmet laws) is not war- 
ranted and is a distortion of the joint priorities in the studies. 
Cycle News contributing editor, Mary Grothe, briefly presents 
tier views on the press conference and on a subsequent meet- 
ing to announce the USC continuing study; she expresses the 
belief that arguments by motorcycle groups (e.g. AM A, Motor- 
cycle Safety Foundation) against motorcycle legislation are 
very weak, and that NHTSA's statistics cannot be disproved if 
the motorcycle organizations do not have enough of their own 
data. 

I>ubl: Cycle News - West v!6 n5 p!2-4, 37 (14 Feb 1979) 
1979 

Outsize pages. 
.Availability: See publication 



HS-025 844 

HIGHWAY CAPACITY, MEASURES OF 
EFFECTIVENESS, AND FLOW THEORY 

Ten articles (some including discussion and author closure) on 
f&ighway capacity and flow separately consider the following 
topics: the Swedish Road Administration traffic capacity 
manual, weighing vehicles in motion, estimation of left-turn 
saturation flows, signal cycle length and fuel consumption and 
emissions, traffic conflicts as a diagnostic tool in highway 
safety, design considerations of traffic conflict surveys, traffic 



conflict and collision analysis, evaluating highway guide sig- 
ning (abridged), macroscopic simulation models for use in traf- 
fic systems management (abridged), and some properties of 
freeway density as a continuous-time, stochastic process. 

Transportation Res. Board, 2101 Constitution Ave., N.W., 

Washington, D.C. 20418 

Rept. No. TRR-667; 1978; 90p refs 

Includes HS-025 845-HS-025 852. 

Availability: TRB $5.00 



HS-025 845 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. 
OBJECTIVES, SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF 
THE MANUAL. PT. 2. CAPACITY OF 
UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. PT. 3. CAPACITY 
OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

The new (1977) Swedish Road Administration traffic capacity 
manual is described in three parts, each by the individual 
author, followed by discussions of each part. The first part 
gives an overview of the objectives, scope, and arrangement 
of the manual; the second part presents the theoretical 
developments, field studies, and recommended methods for 
improving the efficiency of unsignalized intersections; the 
third part deals with the same aspects for signalized intersec- 
tions. The manual treats motor vehicle traffic, bicycle traffic, 
and pedestrians. The main efficiency factors are capacity, 
queue length, delay, and proportion of stopped vehicles. Ex- 
planatory models based on the queue theory of motorist 
behavior have been chosen to limit the empirical evidence to 
parameters such as critical-time headway. The main new types 
of facilities covered in the manual are unsignalized intersec- 
tions, including traffic circles, and bicycle and pedestrian 
facilities. For signal-controlled intersections, new develop- 
ments have been made for left-turning traffic with opposing 
conflict, right-turning traffic with pedestrian conflict, various 
lane divisions, and calculation of cycle length. The calculation 
of different measures of efficiency has been systematized. The 
methods are reported as a series of steps in a computation. 

by Bo E. Peterson; Arne Hansson; Karl-Lennart Bang 

National Swedish Road Administration; Vattenbyggnadsbyran 

(VBB), Malmo, Sweden; Swedish Transport Res. Commission 

Publ: HS-025 844 (TRR-667), "Highway Capacity, Measures of 

Effectiveness, and Flow Theory," Washington, D.C., 1978 pl- 

28 

1978; 22refs 

Availability: In HS-025 844 



HS-025 846 

WEIGHING VEHICLES IN MOTION 

A scale for weighing vehicles in motion is described in terms 
of its development and evaluation. (Discussions and authors' 
closure follow.) The scale utilizes the hydraulic pressure prin- 
ciple. Loads applied to any point on the load platform are 
transmitted evenly around the perimeter of the platform by 
four torsion arms. The load platform can move only vertically 
as a rigid unit. This vertical motion is extremely small, i.e. in 
the order of 0.015 cm (0.006 in) at 4500 kg (10,000 Ib), and is 
nearly frictionless due to the roller pad contacts between the 
load platform, the torsion bars, and the support frame. The en- 
tire load is then supported by a single, centrally-located load 
cell, an oil-filled piston cylinder arrangement with a strain 



41 



HS-025 847 



HSL7S 



gauge transducer. The scale was operated unmanned at two lo- 
cations in Saskatchewan (Canada) during 1975 and 1976. This 
preliminary testing and evaluation revealed that the scale is 
capable of weighing vehicles in motion with sufficient accura- 
cy to meet the information requirements of pavement and 
bridge engineers, and is rugged and reliable enough to be 
operated on a continuous, unmanned basis in the harsh 
Canadian environment. An expanded evaluation program to in- 
clude locations in Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick was 
undertaken in 1977 by a project committee of the Roads and 
Transportation Assoc. of Canada. 

by A. T. Bergan; G. A. Sparks; G. Dyck 

University of Saskatchewan, Coll. of Engineering, Saskatoon, 

Sask., Canada 

Publ: HS-025 844 (TRR-667), "Highway Capacity, Measures of 

Effectiveness, and Flow Theory," Washington, D.C., 1978 

P28-34 

1978; llrefs 

Availability: In HS-025 844 



HS-025 847 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

The best known methods for estimating left-turn saturation 
flow at intersections (Tanner; Webster; Drew; Fambro, 
Messer, Anderson; Highway Capacity Manual; Australian 
Road Capacity Guide) were tested for reliability against field 
data (some 4000 left-turn movements at five different intersec- 
tions in upstate New York recorded by time-lapse photog- 
raphy). The situation under consideration is left-turning traffic 
flowing through gaps of suitable size in the opposing traffic 
without the protection of a special signal phase. Both one and 
two lanes of opposing traffic were considered, as were un- 
signalized intersections. Data also were examined to determine 
the distribution of gap sizes accepted by left turners con- 
fronted with opposing traffic. Gap-acceptance functions were 
derived by allowing the estimation of the percentage of drivers 
accepting a gap of a particular size. Statistical analysis showed 
that most of the original models are unsatisfactory for predict- 
ing the saturated conditions observed in the field. Drew's 
equation, when used at signalized intersections with two op- 
posing lanes, provides a very reliable estimate, and the Aus- 
tralian method is fairly satisfactory for signalized intersections 
with one opposing lane and unsignalized intersections with two 
opposing lanes. None of the models is satisfactory for an un- 
signalized intersection with one opposing lane. Adjustments to 
the models to better reflect real-world conditions improved the 
models but not satisfactorily for some cases. For this reason, a 
new model was developed for each type of intersection stu- 
died. From the gap-acceptance study, it is concluded that cu- 
mulative accepted gaps are uniformly distributed over the 
range of permissible sizes. 

by Panos G. Michalopoulos; Jerome O'Connor; Sergio M. 

Novoa 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, N.Y.; Catholic Univ. of 

Valparaiso, Chile 

Publ: HS-025 844 (TRR-667), "Highway Capacity, Measures of 

Effectiveness, and Flow Theory," Washington, D.C., 1978 

p35-41 

1978; 9refs 

Sponsored by Com. on Hwy. Capacity and Quality of Service. 

Availability: In HS-025 844 



HS-025 848 

SIGNAL CYCLE LENGTH AND FUEL 

CONSUMPTION AND EMISSIONS 

A microscopic network simulation model (NETSIM, form 
UTCS-1) was used to evaluate the relationship between 
consumption and signal cycle length. A single intersection 
simulated for three scenarios having different volumes 
left- and right-turn percentages on each approach of the ii 
section. One result of the study, which differs from tha 
other researchers (Bauer; Courage and Parapar), is that 
cycle length that minimizes delay also minimizes fuel i 
sumption and hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emiss 
This discrepancy probably results from the fact that N 
SIM's microscopic logic automatically includes the fuel i 
sumption increment due to cars that slow down but do 
stop, as well as accounting for the effect of multiple stops 
to left turns. Another finding of interest is a variance f 
Webster's expression that predicts that number of s 
decreases as the cycle length increases. The discrepanc 
probably the result of different assumptions, e.g. constant 
rivals and departures in Webster's model vs. random am 
and departures with the NETSIM model. A regression anal 
was performed to examine relationships between vet 
average speed and fuel consumption and emissions. It 
found that there is a strong correlation between these i 
sures but that the relationships are not linear. 

by Stephen L. Cohen; Gary Euler 

Federal Hwy. Administration, Office of Res., Washington, 

D.C. 20590 

Publ: HS-025 844 (TRR-667), "Highway Capacity, Measure 

Effectiveness, and Flow Theory," Washington, D.C., 1978 

p41-8 

1978; 15refs 

Sponsored by Com. on Methodology for Evaluating Hwy. 

Improvements. 

Availability: In HS-025 844 



HS-025 849 

TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL 1 
HIGHWAY SAFETY 

Various studies are reported by the Kentucky Dept. of Tr 
portation to identify and evaluate high-accident sites, 
discussion follows.) To test the reliability of accident data 
predicting future accidents at a location, an analysis was it 
of 60 intersections in central Kentucky. The number of 
cidents for a given year vs. the number for the following ; 
resulted in a correlation coefficient (r- value) of only 0.& 
similar analysis for 170 rural spot locations resulted in a 
value of 0.59. In view of the usefulness of accident data v, 
complemented by traffic conflict data, an effort was mad 
gain a better understanding of traffic conflicts. Conflict co 
were conducted at five intersections in central Kentucky u 
the General Motors (GM) procedure for identifying 
recording conflicts at intersections. Traffic events were < 
sified in terms of increasing severity. Accident data re< 
only the last three links (property damage, injury, fatal 
while traffic counts provide the others (traffic volumes, 
tine conflicts, moderate conflicts and erratic maneu\ 
severe conflicts or near misses, and minor collisions, usi 
not reported). Good reliability was found between observe! 
simultaneous counts of conflicts and weaves with r value 
high as 0.93. Only 37% of the variance in conflicts was di 
mined to be associated with traffic volume. Observation 



42 



October 31, 1979 



HS-025 852 



one moderately high-volume intersection revealed that conflict 
numbers and types were similar for each of two days (11 
hr/day data collection). A revised GM procedure was 
developed for use in Kentucky; several modifications were 
made in data collection (times, conflict categories). Several 
evaluations of safety improvements have been completed in 
Kentucky in recent years in terms of both accidents and con- 
flicts. Reductions in conflicts and accidents have resulted from 
such improvements as installing left-turn signal phasing, raised 
pavement markers, and green-extension systems. Based on the 
successful use of conflict and erratic maneuver data in Ken- 
tucky since 1972, increased use of such data on a routine basis 
is recommended. 

by Charles V. Zegeer; Robert C. Deen 

Kentucky Dept. of Transportation, Bureau of Highways, 

Lexington, Ky. 

Publ: HS-025 844 (TRR-667), "Highway Capacity, Measures of 

Effectiveness, and Flow Theory," Washington, D.C., 1978 

P48-57 

1978; Srefs 

Sponsored by Com. on Methodology for Evaluating Hwy. 

Improvements. 

AvaUability: In HS-025 844 



HS-025 850 

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS OF TRAFFIC 
CONFLICT SURVEYS 

The traffic conflicts technique for indirectly measuring safety 
is discussed in terms of accuracy and dependence on the 
design of the field survey. (A discussion and author's closure 
follow.) Current practices in conflict-count duration are 
reviewed, and the relationship between count duration and 
estimation accuracy is examined. Using data from several 
sources, the daily variability of conflict counts is described. It 
is concluded that the expected conflict rate varies from day to 
day. Use of negative binomial distribution is suggested as ap- 
propriate for representing the distribution of sample means ob- 
tained from conflict studies. On this basis, confidence limits 
and probabilities of type I and type II errors in hypothesis 
testing are obtained and tabulated. Their use in study design is 
illustrated by numerical examples. The marginal increase in 
estimation accuracy diminishes rapidly as conflict-counting 
time increases; there is little to be gained by counting longer 
than three days. This establishes a practical limit to the accu- 
racy with which expected daily conflict rates can be estimated. 

by E. Hauer 

University of Toronto, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Ont., 

Canada 

Publ: HS-025 844 (TRR-667), "Highway Capacity, Measures of 

Effectiveness, and Flow Theory," Washington, B.C., 1978 

p57-66 

1978; 15refs 

Sponsored by National Res. Council of Canada, and Transport 

and Road Res. Lab. (England). 

Availability: In HS-025 844 



HS-025 851 

ANALYSIS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AND 
COLLISIONS 

Results are reported of a two-year study which investigated 
parameters intrinsic to the sequence of events leading to vehi- 
cle collisions and traffic conflicts in an attempt to develop a 



more practical and reliable application of the traffic conflicts 
technique (TCT). (A discussion and authors' closure follow.) 
The TCT, introduced by General Motors, defines a traffic con- 
flict in a way that includes visible evasive actions taken by 
drivers and the occurrence of traffic violations. It suggests 
that evasive actions be identified by brake lights or lane 
changes. In the present study, sequences of collisions and con- 
flict events were videotaped and analyzed in detail. Prelimina- 
ry investigations have revealed that using the common method 
of brake application is not adequate for describing conflict. As 
a result, several methods of defining a conflict situation have 
been developed. The proportion of stopping distance (PSD) is 
defined as the ratio of the distance available for a driver to 
maneuver to the distance remaining to the projected location 
of collision. A measure of gap time (GT) indicates the duration 
of time between the end of encroachment by the left-turning 
vehicle on the through lane and the expected arrival of the 
through vehicle at the potential point of collision. En- 
croachment time (ET) is defined simply as the time during 
which the left-turning vehicle infringes upon the right-of-way 
of the through vehicle. The deceleration rate (DR) is an event 
that occurs during the intermediate stage of a traffic conflict 
and can be interpreted as indicative of the severity of the 
situation. Post encroachment time (PET) for a conflict is 
identified as the time from the end of encroachment to the 
time that the through vehicle actually arrives at a potential 
point of collision. Initially attempted post encroachment time 
(IAPE) is another conflict measurement. It is concluded after 
an evaluation of the TCT measurements, that at least two of 
the proposed methods (PET, DR) will provide practical in- 
vestigative tools. 

by Brian L. Allen; B. Tom Shin; Peter J. Cooper 

McMaster Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering, Hamilton, Ont., 

Canada; Transport Canada, Road and Motor Vehicle Safety 

Branch, Ottawa, Ont., Canada 

Publ: HS-025 844 (TRR-667), "Highway Capacity, Measures of 

Effectiveness, and Flow Theory," Washington, D.C., 1978 

p67-74 

1978; 8refs 

Sponsored by Transport Canada. 

Availability: In HS-025 844 



HS-025 852 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

Traffic density is viewed as a continuous-time, stochastic 
process, and consideration is given to some of the charac- 
teristics of that process. Freeway traffic data previously ob- 
tained by sequential aerial photography are utilized. Position 
data were smoothed and interpolated to construct individual 
trajectories, which were aggregated to obtain continuous vehi- 
cle counts in roadway sections of various lengths. Autocorrela- 
tion functions and power spectra were calculated for these 
records. It was found that, for the traffic flow under con- 
sideration, correlation time was proportional to freeway sec- 
tion length. The power in the process was concentrated below 
a cutoff frequency that was related inversely to section length. 



43 



HS-025 853 



HSL 79- 



The implications of these results for sampling real traffic 
processes are discussed. 

by A. V. Gafarian; J. Pahl; T. L. Ward 

University of Southern California, Dept. of Industrial and 

Systems Engineering, Los Angeles, Calif. 

Publ: HS-025 844 (TRR-667), "Highway Capacity, Measures of 

Effectiveness, and Flow Theory," Washington, D.C., 1978 

p79-83 

1978; 20refs 

Sponsored by Com. on Traffic Flow Theory and 

Characteristics. 

Availability: In HS-025 844 



HS-025 853 

HOW TO BREAK IN A NEW BIKE [MOTORCYCLES] 

Tips are provided for the new-motorcycle owner to operate his 
bike properly during early mileage so that its life will be 
lengthened. The components that benefit most from break-in 
are the pistons, piston rings, and cylinders. Until they have 
worn off their roughness and developed adequate working 
clearance, they will generate considerable friction. In some en- 
gines, the pistons may be a press fit. If they expand too much 
from overwork, the pistons can distort and squeeze through 
the oil film separating them from the cylinder walls; tiny bits 
of aluminum are torn loose from the pistons* high spots and 
lodge on the cylinder walls. It is necessary not to abuse a new 
engine nor to allow it to overheat. The bike should be operated 
in a medium rpm range. Cruising rpm limits can be exceeded 
for brief periods of time. An occasional spurt of speed above 
cruising rpm followed by closing the throttle and coasting will 
break in the new engine faster and more effectively. Engine 
speed is more critical than ground speed. If there is no 
tachometer on the cycle, the operator can listen carefully to 
the engine to determine its operating condition. The engine 
also must be given progressively more work to do as the mile- 
age accumulates. Other aspects of break-in include lubrication 
(proper oil levels, first oil change by 200 mi or 300 mi, oil 
change at 500 mi for separate gearbox oil supply and fork oil, 
no use of oil additives during break-in); tightening of 
fasteners; adjustment of various components, such as rear 
chain, clutch, and valves (four-stroke engine); and use of 
moderate braking pressure for first few miles and avoidance of 
riding the brakes. 

by Bill Hampton 

Publ: Popular Mechanics v!51 n4 p72, 209-10 (Apr 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 854 

ESTIMATES OF FUEL SAVINGS THROUGH 

IMPROVED TRAFFIC FLOW IN SEVEN U.S. CITIES 

A study was undertaken to estimate fuel savings obtainable by 
improvements in traffic flow in specific major metropolitan 
areas (Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York, San 
Francisco, and Washington, D.C.), utilizing the Chase Car data 
collected by the General Motors Proving Ground which consist 
of speed profiles from randomly-selected car trips. These data 
permit calculation of fuel consumption estimates for average 
speeds represented in the data and for hypothetical variations 
in these speeds that could represent the results of traffic flow 
improvements. Two flow-improvement assumptions explored 
were raising the average speeds of all trips that have average 



speeds below a specified minimum speed to that minim 
speed, and raising the average speeds of trips with aver 
speeds less than 64 kph to a speed equivalent to driving at 
speed limit on all road segments. The Chase Car data indie 
that the potential for fuel savings through traffic flow 
provements depends primarily upon the metropolitan area : 
only secondarily upon the time of day. It was generally e 
mated that increasing average speeds of all trips in the se 
cities to at least 24 kph, for example, could result in i 
savings up to 2.5%. It was also estimated that if all trip spe 
in the cities were raised to the speed limit or to a maximua 
64 kph, whichever is lower, fuel savings would be appn 
mately 15%. 

by Man-Feng Chang; Alan J. Horowitz 

Publ: Traffic Engineering and Control v20 n2 p62-5 (Feb 19 

1979; llrefs 

Availability: See publication 



HS-025 855 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETC 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS' BUT IT'S 
THE SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY 
MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE] 

In a recent press conference, NHTSA (National Hwy. Tra 
Safety Administration) Administrator Joan Claybrook 
nounced the agency's renewed pressure on states to retail 
reenact mandatory motorcycle helmet usage laws, w 
releasing data from four new state helmet use studies 
preliminary findings of a major motorcycle accident stud} 
the Univ. of Southern California (USC). Ms. Claybrook st 
that the helmet use studies from Oklahoma, Kansas, S< 
Dakota, and Colorado, where helmet laws were repes 
show conclusively that helmets are effective in prever 
head injuries and deaths, and that mandatory helmet u 
laws are effective in getting cyclists to wear helmets. 
American Motorcycle Assoc.'s Government Relations Dire 
Ed Youngblood, who attended the conference, states thai 
injury-reduction and increased-usage effects are not in coi 
tion, but that NHTSA ignores the opinions of motorcyc 
who favor voluntary use. Ms. Claybrook did not address 
fact that fatalities increased in 17 states with mandatory 
in a period comparable with the repeal states* study, that i 
of 10 highest fatality rates occur in states with helmet 1 
and that there is a high level of voluntary helmet use in re 
states. Mr. Youngblood points out that the initial findings 
the USC study indicate that the motorcycle safety pro 
results from causes that helmets do not influence. He sug 
that NHTSA discontinue its unpopular stand on mand; 
helmet laws and devote more energy to better licensing 
education programs. 

Publ: American Motorcyclist v33 n3 p27 (Apr 1979) 

1979 

Availability: See publication 



HS-803 543 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN U.S. AUTOMOB1 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST FEDERAL 
INITIATIVES. FINAL REPORT 

It is argued that there are at least two other dimensio 
government intervention in industrial activity other than 
la tion, viz. technology creation action and market modific 



44 



October 31, 1979 



HS-803 722 



'fie 
in- 

or 
lile 
ind 

by 
ted 
nth 
ed, 
ing 

B|C 

The 
stor 
the 
;en- 
ists 
the 
iws 
out 

W8, 

>eal 
rom 
km 
ests 
lory 
and 



s to 
egu- 
ition 



action. The former, which seeks to induce change through the 
creation of superior new technologies, is designated as 
"technology push" intervention. Market modification action 
and regulation (which really is a part of a more generic inter* 
vention called "product characteristic intervention") seek to in- 
duce producers to create new products or modify existing 
ones. This process is termed "technology pull". Technology 
push and technology pull are independent but complementary 
actions; differing balances between the two has major sig- 
nificance for the nature and rate of technological innovation. 
A framework is presented relating combinations of the actions 
to their joint consequence for technological innovation. The 
pattern of past Federal initiatives in the auto industry (i.e. 
emission control, safety, fuel economy) and the effect of these 
initiatives on automotive performance are studied. The initia- 
tives and response to them are explained in terms of the 
framework. It is suggested that the present mix of Federal in- 
itiatives can entrench technology, and that should radical in- 
novation be desired in the industry, a different set of Federal 
initiatives would be required. It is suggested that in order to 
induce innovation, both a stronger Federal commitment to 
research and development programs and positive steps in 
creating incentives that are appropriate for innovative products 
are needed. 

by William J. Abernathy; Balaji S. Chakravarthy 

Lexington Technology Associates, 10 Wingate Rd., Lexington, 

Mass. 02173 

DOT-TSC-1355 

Kept. No. DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-13; 1979; 103p 42refs 

Kept, for Jun 1977-May 1978. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 545 

THE NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER PROGRAM 
USERS' GUIDE 

The National Driver Register (NDR), a nationwide repository 
of information on problem drivers which complements the 
driver licensing operations of the 56 states and territories, is 
described. The NDR, a program of the National Hwy. Traffic 
Safety Administration, is a central contact point for Federal, 
state, and territorial authorities in their efforts to ascertain 
problem drivers applying for original or renewal licenses. 
Descriptions are given of the operation of the NDR (file check 
related to a license application), the NDR product (Report of 
Inquiry Searched), delayed search, routing codes for search 
requests, preparation of NDR data, privacy requirements, 
availability of records, request for records, locations of 
records, and request to correct or alter records. Appended are 
Public Law 89-563, 80 Stat. 730, Title IV-National Driver Re- 
gister (expansion of original authority of NDR), magnetic tape 
record formating instructions used in request for file check 
and report of license withdrawal/denial, abridged listing of 
American Assoc. of Motor Vehicle Administration codes used 
by NDR for recording driver license denials/withdrawals, state 
identification codes and abbreviations, Federal department and 
agency identification codes, driver eye color code, and data 
elements required by NDR in making privacy file checks. A 
glossary is provided. 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, 
D.C. 20590 
1978; 35p refs 
Availability: GPO 



HS-803 680 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE IN 
COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 

A study was undertaken to assess the postcrash injury con- 
sequences to motorcycle drivers and passengers in Colorado, 
in particular to compare the differences in frequency, severity, 
and location of injuries sustained by riders wearing a safety 
helmet and by helmetless riders. The study also sought to as- 
sess the impact of the repeal of the mandatory helmet usage 
law in Colorado on helmet use throughout the state. Data col- 
lection took place during Jul-Sep 1976 (pre-repeal data) and 
during those same months of 1977 (post-repeal data). Findings 
pertaining to injury consequences were derived from in-depth 
medical evaluations of 1700 motorcycle riders involved in ac- 
cidents during both time periods. The Abbreviated Injury 
Scale was used by medical personnel to standardize injury 
data. Rates of occurrence of both fatal and critical injuries to 
riders were found to increase substantially from the pre-repeal 
to the post-repeal period, occurrence rates of these two groups 
of injuries to riders were considerably less for hehneted vs. 
nonhelmeted riders, rates of injury occurrence to the head., 
neck, and face were influenced significantly by helmet use (far 
lower rate for all three sites among helmet wearers), and the 
severity of head injuries was significantly greater for helmet- 
less vs. hehneted riders. Findings concerning helmet usage are 
based on roadside observations, at randomly-selected sites, of 
16,000 riders for 1976 and of 24,500 riders for 1977. Among 
the findings are that helmet use in Colorado prior to repeal of 
the law approached perfect compliance (99% helmet use), that 
subsequent to repeal, use of helmets dropped to 58%, and that 
after repeal, the highest rate of helmet use (72%) was on rural 
freeways, the lowest (47%), on urban, four-lane streets. 

by Charles E. Dare; J. Cuthbert Owens; Sigmund W. Krane 

Colorado Dept. of Highways, Div. of Hwy. Safety, 4201 B. 

Arkansas Ave., Denver, Colo. 80222 

DOT-HS-6-01429 

Rept. No. 403-2-A; 1978; 382p 12refs 

Rept. for Jul-Sep 1976 and Jul-Sep 1977. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 722 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL 
COMBUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL 
CONSUMPTION. FINAL REPORT 

A review is presented of the present level of understanding of 
the basic thermodynamic, fluid dynamic, and chemical kinetic 
processes which affect the fuel economy and levels of pollu- 
tant exhaust products of diesel, stratified-charge, and spark-ig- 
nition (SI) engines. The major factors which control fuel con- 
sumption and pollutant emissions are reviewed, and it is in- 
dicated, in a general way, how these factors interact for each 
of the major engine types. In a similar way, the competitive 
position of the diesel and the stratified-charge engines relative 
to the carbureted (homogeneous) SI engine is discussed. 
Technology transfer from gas turbine combustion systems to 
heterogeneous combustion piston engines is considered. Areas 
which appear to offer substantial returns for research invest- 
ment, either in reduced fuel consumption, reduced emissions, 
or both, are indicated. The ability to operate under lean burn 
conditions, providing higher fuel economy and lower nitrogen 
oxides emissions, would seem to bias future research and 
development efforts for light-duty vehicle engines in favor of 



45 



HS-803 783 



HSL 79 



heterogeneous (diesel or stratified-charge) engines. These 
potential benefits must be weighed against the fact that current 
models of heterogeneous systems produce high levels of ex- 
haust emissions due to incompletely-combusted fuel (and 
lubricating oil). These emissions include carbon monoxide 
(CO), soot, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), 
malodors, light aromatic s, and aldehydes. Each of these emis- 
sion types poses potentially serious health or environmental 
problems. Heterogeneous engines have the theoretical capabili- 
ty of completely oxidizing all fuel (and entrained lubricating 
oil) to carbon dioxide and water. The challenge is to achieve 
this result more nearly in practice. The major impediment to 
controlling and improving CO and incompletely-burned 
hydrocarbon emission levels is the lack of understanding of 
the fluid mixing processes which control combustion in 
heterogeneous systems. A second set of challenges involves 
the elucidation of chemical mechanisms and rates which con- 
trol the formation and destruction of complex, incompletely- 
burned emissions. 

by J. L. Kerrebrock; C. E. Kolb 

Aerodyne Res., Inc., Bedrord Res. Park, Crosby Drive, 

Bedford, Mass. 01730 

DOT-TSC-1487 

Rept. No. ARI-RR-131; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-78-47; 1979; 92p 

82refs 

Rept. for Dec 1977-Apr 1978. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

Results are presented for the fifth of 11 tests conducted to in- 
vestigate and improve crashworthiness of compact vehicle side 
structures. Run at 35 mph at a striking angle of 60 degrees, the 
test involved a 1975 Ford Torino as the bullet vehicle and a 
modified 1976 Plymouth Volare as the target vehicle. Volare 
modifications included a heavier door beam, stronger beam-to- 
door connections, and tying the door structure into the sill. 
The modified vehicle showed significant improvement in intru- 
sion and door velocity as compared to baseline tests. Provided 
are a crash test summary, before and after photographs, 
camera location information, diagram of intrusion-measure- 
ment locations, interior and exterior damage measurements, 
instrumentation summary, dummy injury criteria values, and 
electronic data. 

by E. Enserink 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1850 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., Phoenix, 

Ariz. 85027 

DOT-HS-5-01104 

1979; 62p 

Rept. for Jun 1976-Mar 1978. See also HS-803 788. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 788 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 



IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. 
FINAL REPORT 

Results are presented for the tenth of 1 1 tests conducted to 
vestigate and improve crashworthiness of compact vehicle ! 
structures. Run at 35 mph at a striking angle of 60 degrees, 
test involved a 1978 Chevrolet Impala as the bullet vehicle 
a modified 1976 Plymouth Volare as the target vehicle. Vo 
modifications included a heavier door beam, stronger beam 
door connections, and tying the door structure into the 
The modified vehicle showed significant improvement in in 
sion and door velocity as compared to baseline tests. Provi 
are a crash test summary, before and after photograf 
camera! location information, diagram of intrusion-measi 
ment locations, interior and exterior damage measureme 
instrumentation summary, dummy injury criteria values, 
electronic data. 

by E. Enserink 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1850 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., Phoeni: 

Ariz. 85027 

DOT-HS-5-01104 

1979; 81p 

Rept. for Jun 1976-Mar 1978. See also HS-803 783. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 791 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAG1 
ON HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAC 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES, A 
PRELIMINARY REPORT 

Data are summarized from the census of all fatal era; 
maintained by the National Hwy. Traffic Safety Ad mini: 
tion (NHTSA) in the Fatal Accident Reporting System, 
from NHTSA-sponsored studies. These studies include 
studies of safety helmets, a continuing, in-depth study of 
motorcycle accidents in Southern California, and four sp< 
studies in states which repealed their mandatory helmet u 
laws (Colorado, South Dakota, Kansas, and Oklahoma), 
overview of some of the most significant findings is one 
to the evaluation of the impact of helmet wearing and th< 
fectiveness of usage laws. The findings make a strong cast 
the efficacy of helmet use and helmet usage laws in redi 
the incidence and severity of head injuries among eras 
volved motorcyclists. Motorcyclists who do not use safety 
mets have twice as many total head injuries and three to 
times as many fatal head injuries as helmet wearers. In s 
with mandatory usage laws, helmet wearing is high (90' 
100%), but the usage rate falls rapidly to less than 60% fo 
ing repeal of such laws. As a result of the reduction in he 
usage, the post-repeal total head injury rate per crash-in v< 
rider rises and fatal head injury rate doubles. The det 
study of the 899 Calif, crashes indicated that hearing wa: 
very important to crash avoidance and, in any case, there 
no evidence that the helmet interfered with hearing. The : 
reduction of 3% in the field of vision produced by the s 
helmet was not judged important, because most hig] 
threats are more or less directly in front of the motorc> 
In the same study, of over 980 head injuries, there were 
four cases of minor injury attributed to the helmet out o 
head and neck injuries to 355 helmeted riders. In each of 



46 



October 31, 1979 



HS-803 794 



fi- 
de 
be 
od 
ire 
to- 
ol 



18, 

re- 

ts, 
Ad 



I 

ffi 



ihes 
itra- 
and 
four 
899 
scia! 
sage 
This 
nte<i 
sef- 
5 for 
tcinj 
h-in- 
he!- 

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tales 
% to 
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jlmef 



cases, a much more serious injury would have resulted had the 
helmet not been worn. 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, 

B.C. 20590 

1979; 16p llrefs 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-803 792 

CALIBRATION OF THREE YEAR OLD CHILD 
DUMMIES (PHASE 2). FINAL REPORT 

Test procedures, equipment, and results are summarized, and 
test data are presented for a test program to refine previously 
developed appropriate calibration procedures for measuring 
the dynamic response of a three-year-old dummy using ac- 
celeration measurements. Chest impact, head/neck pendulum 
impact, and lumbar spine flexion tests were conducted. It is 
concluded that acceleration and force measurements can be 
used to determine the dynamic response of a three-year-old 
dummy. All tests gave repeatable data, but the chest impact 
test required care during the setup for each impact in order to 
obtain repeatable data. The head/neck pendulum test repeata- 
bility can be improved by first running practice tests to obtain 
the proper pendulum acceleration pulse shape; the aluminum 
honeycomb can be trimmed to produce the desired shape. 

by Anthony R. Bayer 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, Engineering 

Test Facility, P.O. Box 37, East Liberty, Ohio 43319 

Kept. No. NHTSA-OVSS-678-2; 1978; 222p 

Kept, for Jun-Sep 1978. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL 
DIFFERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER 
INATTENTION 

The main part of an evaluative review is provided of existing 
knowledge in the fields of traffic safety, driver behavior, and 
psychology with respect to driver inattention. The review 
covers literature on driver behavior and traffic safety, human 
factors and experimental psychology in the fields of percep- 
tion, cognition, and physiological psychology. The assessment 
of traffic accidents due to driver inattention was based on a 
review of published literature and some reanalysis of accident 
data statistics. The Indiana Univ. accident files were re- 
analyzed in order to identify the situational and personal 
characteristics associated with inattention-type accidents. The 
following information is presented: a discussion of basic con- 
cepts, theories, measurement techniques, and research 
paradigms in studies of attention and driver performance; a 
multidimensional definition of attentional performance in the 
context or driving behavior; an analysis of inattention-related 
traffic accidents; a survey of behavioral and psychological in- 
dicators of inattention; a survey of individual differences in at- 
tentional performance; a detailed delineation of unresolved 
research issues; and recommendations for future research 
aimed at developing driver-oriented inattention countermea- 
sures. Research recommendations include the following: the 
role of driving experience (especially early) on the formation 
of habits of attentional performance; the trainability of atten- 
tional performance (especially looking behavior); size esti- 



mates of potential target groups for countermeasures; stability 
of attentional performance indices; inattention-related criteria 
for selection of professional drivers; the potential of low- 
event, noninterfering subsidiary task as an alerting device for 
drivers; driver-coupled monitoring devices based on com- 
posites of physiological, looking-behavior, and performance in- 
dicators; and autoregulation of attentional performance. 

by David M. Zaidel; William T. Paarlberg; David Shinar 

Indiana Univ., Inst. for Res. in Public Safety, 400 Seventh St., 

Bloomington, Ind. 47405 

DOT-HS-8-01819 

Rept. No. DOT-HS-8-01819-78-DAP; 1978; 247p 190refs 

Rept. for Oct 1977-Nov 1978. Vol. 2, Field Dependence and 

Highway Safety, is HS-803 794. 

Availabmty: NTIS 



HS-803 794 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL 
DIFFERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD 
DEPENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

As part of an evaluative review of existing knowledge in the 
fields of traffic safety, driver behavior, and psychology with 
respect to driver inattention, a detailed review of the research 
on the personality characteristic of field dependence as it re- 
lates to highway safety is provided. Field dependence was 
chosen for particular attention because of recent and ap- 
parently promising research results relating this characteristic 
to accident involvement. The first of two parts of the review is 
concerned with the nature of field dependence as a theoretical 
concept, its relationship to other measures of individual dif- 
ferences, and its methods of measurement. The second part 
deals with the relationship between field dependence and 
highway safety in terms of driving behavior and accident in- 
volvement. It is recommended that future research should 
replicate and extend the findings of field dependence and 
driver behavior to natural and typical driving situations. The 
research on the relationship of field dependence to accidents 
should focus on the class of accidents which theoretically 
could be attributed to behaviors associated with field depen- 
dence rather than on all accidents. Two areas of research sug- 
gest that a training program could be developed to improve the 
visual search pattern of field-dependent drivers. There is some 
evidence to indicate that performance on field dependence 
tests such as the Embedded Figures Test and the Rod and 
Frame Test can improve with practice. Field dependence ap- 
pears to be correlated with eye movement patterns which are 
known to change with experience in driving. Some basic 
research is needed before a plausible hypothesis can be 
generated concerning the implications of field dependence for 
accident involvement and the potential for highway safety im- 
provement through reduction of field dependence. 

by David Shinar; David M. Zaidel; William T. Paarlberg 

Indiana Univ., Inst. for Res. in Public Safety, 400 Seventh St., 

Bloomington, Ind. 47405 

DOT-HS-8-01819 

Rept. No. DOT-HS-8-01819-78-FD; 1978; 60p 54refs 

Rept. for Oct 1977-Nov 1978. Vol. 1, Driver Inattention, is 

HS-803 793. 

Availability: NTIS 



47 



HS-803 795 
HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE 
ADJUDICATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

Results are presented for a research study undertaken to com- 
pare the relative "fairness," "efficiency," and "effectiveness," 
of processes in the administrative adjudication of decriminal- 
ized traffic offenses in two geographic areas, Buffalo, N.Y. 
and the State of North Dakota, with traditional adjudication 
programs in similar geographic areas, Syracuse, N.Y. and the 
State of South Dakota, respectively. To accomplish this goal, 
information common to all areas was identified, collected and 
analyzed to determine possible significant differences in im- 
pact on a series of criterion measures, the type and degree of 
impact, and possible causative factors attributable to such dif- 
ferences. Results show that although the Buffalo Administra- 
tive Adjudication Bureau system operated more efficiently 
than the Syracuse traditional traffic court system, there was 
no difference in terms of fairness or highway safety impact. It 
is indicated that, in order to obtain significant changes in the 
impact upon highway safety through traffic adjudication 
procedures, special facilities and programs must be made 
available for identified habitually-deviant drivers to change 
their errant attitude and driving behavior patterns, and special 
adjudicators must be trained to conduct unbiased hearings and 
to utilize these special programs appropriately. 

by Marvin Wagner; Milton Goldsamt; Nancy Lester 

PRC Systems Sciences Co., 7600 Old Springhouse Rd., 

McLean, Va. 22102 

DOT-HS-6-01285 

Rept. No. PRC-R-1857-Vol-l; 1978; 213p 

Rept. for 30 Sep 1975-Jul 1978. Vol. 2, Discussion, 

Interpretation, and Appendices, is HS-803 796; Vol. 3, Special 

Summary Report, is HS-803 797. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE 
ADJUDICATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, 

INTERPRETATION, AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC 
OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

A discussion and interpretation of findings, and appended in- 
formation, are provided for a study which examined the issues 
of "fairness," "efficiency," and "effectiveness," of processes 
in the administrative adjudication of decriminalized traffic of- 
fenses vs. processes in the traditional (court) adjudication of 
traffic offenses. Two sites presently using administrative adju- 
dication techniques for most moving-traffic infractions, Buf- 
falo, N.Y. and the State of North Dakota, were compared 
respectively to Syracuse, N.Y. and the State of South Dakota, 
which currently use traditional adjudication processes for 
these offenses. Results show that decriminalization of traffic 
offenses alone, without a corresponding change within the 
traffic adjudication system itself, will not appreciably improve 
the fairness, efficiency, or impact on highway safety of that 
system. Even when a basic change in the system has been 
brought about, such as the Administrative Adjudication Bu- 
reau system in N.Y. State, for there to be an appreciable im- 
provement in fairness and a beneficial impact on highway 
safety, special facilities and programs must be made available 
for habitually-deviant drivers to change their attitude and 
behavior. Special adjudicators must be trained to conduct un- 



HSL 79-10 

biased hearings and to utilize these special programs ap- 
propriately. 

by Marvin Wagner; Milton Goldsamt; Nancy Lester 

PRC Systems Sciences Co., 7600 Old Springhouse Rd., 

McLean, Va. 22102 

DOT-HS-6-01285 

Rept. No. PRC-R-1857-Vol-2; 1978; 108p 16refs 

Rept. for 30 Sep 1975-Jul 1978. Vol. 1, Analysis and Findings, 

is HS-803 795; Vol. 3, Special Summary Report, is HS-803 

797. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 797 

DECMMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE 
ADJUDICATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY 
REPORT [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

by Marvin Wagner; Milton Goldsamt; Nancy Lester 

PRC Systems Sciences Co., 7600 Old Springhouse Rd., 

McLean, Va. 22102 

DOT-HS-6-01285 

Rept. No. PRC-R-1857-Vol-3; 1978; 70p 16refs 

Rept. for 30 Sep 1975-Jul 1978. For abstract, see HS-803 795 

(Vol. 1, Analysis and Findings); Vol. 2, Discussion, 

Interpretation, and Appendices, is HS-803 796. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 799 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY 
OF SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON 
TRUCK AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL 
REPORT 

A literature review, a nationwide (U.S.) survey of commercial 
truck and bus driver work patterns, an analysis of accident 
data, and three extensive field experiments were conducted to 
establish evidence concerning driver fatigue as a function of 
regularity or irregularity of work schedules, duration of on- 
duty cycles, participation in supplemental cargo loading work, 
and type of operation (relay vs. sleeper). In this, the second 
phase of the study, drivers on irregular schedules were evalu- 
ated. Data are presented concerning the relative amounts of 
fatigue experienced by truck and bus drivers under these vari- 
ous conditions, as reflected in their subjective ratings, in vari- 
ous measures of physiological status, and in the quality of 
their driving performance. The results are related to accident 
data in which fatigued, drowsy, or inattentive drivers were re- 
portedly involved. Conclusions are drawn regarding current 
Dept. of Transportation regulations on hours of service. The 
results of Phase 2 support the conclusions drawn from Phase 
1: that significant increases in driver performance errors and 
decreases in psychophysiological arousal occur within current 
Dept. of Transportation limitations on driving time; that 
sleeper drivers experience more severe fatigue than relay 
drivers; that cumulative fatigue effects appear after four con- 
secutive days on duty; and that there are marked variations in 
arousal level which correlate strongly with accident occurrence 



48 






October 31, 1979 



HS-803 809 



(accidents in which the driver was judged to be drowsy, inat- 
tentive, or sleeping). 

by Robert R. Mackie; James C. Miller 

Human Factors Res., Inc., 5775 Dawson Ave M Goleta, Calif. 

93017 

DOT-HS-5-01142 

Rept. No. 1765-F; 1978; 281p 86refs 

Rept. for May 1975-Oct 1978. 

Availability: NTIS 



x 2, 35 mm trauma slides was prepared to aid instructors of 
the EMT course. 

by Arlene M. Cleven 

Dunlap and Associates, Inc., One Parkland Drive, Darien, 

Conn. 06820 

DOT-HS-5-01244 

Rept. No. ED-77-2; 1978; 59p Srefs 

Rept. for Jun 1975-Jun 1978. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 801 

UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 

COURSE MONITORING--4. FINAL REPORT 

Continued evaluation of certain previously selected course 
monitoring tires (CMT's) and monitoring of the 400-mi public- 
roads course at San Angelo, Texas, used in the Uniform Tire 
Quality Grading program, were accomplished during the period 
Jun 1976-Sep 1977. Four new 1976 Chevrolet Malibu Chevelles 
(GR78-15 original equipment) were used because the G78-15 
(GR78-15 Radial) tire is specified as the CMT size and because 
the 1975 model Chevelle had been used during three previous 
phases of this test program. In this fourth phase of the pro- 
gram, 99 test series of 6400 mi each were conducted in 33 suc- 
cessive convoys of three cars each. Each of the three cars in 
the convoy ran radial, belted bias, or bias construction tires as 
assigned for each test set. Resultant tread wear rates for each 
tire and the related projected mileage estimates are tabulated. 
Details of the test procedures are presented. 

by Richard N. Pierce 

Southwest Res. Inst., Tire Evaluation Section, P.O. Drawer 

28510, San Antonio, Tex. 78284 

DOT-HS-6-01348 

1978; 339p 7refs 

Rept. for Jun 1976-Sep 1977. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 806 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY 
TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] 
CURRICULUM PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

Sixteen National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration in-print 
curriculum packages were analyzed, and three were selected 
for revision: the highway traffic records course, the traffic 
court judge workshop, and the emergency medical technician 
(EMT) course. Selection was based primarily on value to the 
states in carrying out annual programs. The revision process 
resulted in an essentially new traffic records course; the 
revised course focuses on the fundamental relationship 
between the traffic records system and the highway safety 
program, and emphasizes crash data and safety program 
management data subsystems. The revision effort for the traf- 
fic court judge workshop essentially represented a repackaging 
of the original program. The revision process for the EMT 
course consisted primarily of an extensive technical update 
with added emphasis on patient assessment and reinforcement 
of basic emergency care procedures. A standardized three-part 
curriculum package was prepared for each program, consisting 
of a course guide for the training administrator, lesson plans 
for the instructor, and a study guide for the student. A set of 2 



HS-803 807 

DEVELOP AND TEST AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE 
PROGRAM FOR TRAFFIC RECORDS ANALYST. 
FINAL REPORT 

An effort was undertaken to identify a community college to 
pilot test a traffic records associate degree program using the 
National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) 
three-part training package, Traffic Records Analysis. A 
review is presented of the role of the American Assoc. of 
Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC) in previous 
highway/traffic safety education activities for NHTSA, traffic 
records system personnel requirements, the approved plan for 
AACJC to select an accredited community college to develop 
and offer the traffic records analyst program, and recommen- 
dations concerning pilot testing NHTSA programs. From a list 
of approximately 100 colleges likely to have an interest in traf- 
fic records programs, Northern Virginia Community Coll., 
Alexandria, Va., and Harrisburg Area Community Coll., Har- 
risburg, Pa., were selected as meeting all of the criteria for a 
demonstration institution and as being conveniently located, 
near NHTSA and AACJC. Although community college and 
Dept. of Transportation personnel in Va. and Pa. revealed a 
desire to employ traffic records analysts who graduated from 
associate degree programs, it was impossible to obtain any as- 
surances from potential employers. In addition to fiscal 
restraints of the highway departments, it is noted that commu- 
nity colleges have been forced to limit their expenditures and 
to avoid developing new programs unless there are very clear 
indications that enrollments will be sufficient to justify a new 
program. Because of this, no community college was able to 
assume the added cost of developing and offering new courses 
for the associate degree program. 

by Richard E. Wilson 

American Assoc. of Community and Junior Colleges, One 

Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 

DOT-HS-5-01239 

1977; 27p refs 

Rept. for 1 Jul 1975-31 Aug 1977. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 809 

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFICATIONS FOR 

PASSIVE BELT SYSTEMS. FINAL REPORT 

A study was undertaken to test the applicability to passive belt 
systems of the comfort and convenience of recommended ac- 
tive belt changes to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 
(FMVSS) 208; to modify and/or verify recommended changes; 
and to provide the National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administra- 
tion with recommendations to provide front seat occupants 
with a passive belt system that is comfortable, convenient to 
use, and acceptable to the consumer while providing optimum 
protection in the event of a crash. The study approach in- 



49 



HS-803 810 



HSL 79-10 



volved a state-of-the-art survey to determine the nature of 
potentially viable belt systems likely to meet the new passive 
belt edict, conduct of an evaluative experiment designed to ar- 
rive at a better understanding of the comfort and convenience 
implications of the various configurations, formulation of a 
preliminary set of passive belt system design/perfromance 
requirements based on the results of the experiment, and for- 
mulation of a final set of recommendations for modifying 
FMVSS 208. Results of the study show subjects rank passive 
belt systems in the following order of decreasing preference: 
nonmotorized two-point, motorized three-point, motorized 
two-point, and nonmotorized three-point. Convenience of the 
system was found to be the main consumer concern. The most 
critical problem areas that appear to require rulemaking atten- 
tion include proper torso belt fit, belt pressure, head clearance 
(for motorized torso belt system), torso belt articulation rate 
(for motorized torso belt systems), ability to adjust the seat 
without belt restriction, and location of emergency-release 
buckle where most people expect to find it. Recommended is 
future research to clarify the safety implications of using pas- 
sive belt or air bag systems with adjustable seat backs that can 
be folded all the way back, and to clarify the safety implica- 
tions of using a two-point system for the right front passenger 
in a vehicle equipped with a front bench seat. 

by W. E. Woodson; T. L. Black; P. H. Selby; R. Coburn 

Man Factors, Inc., 4433 Convoy St., San Diego, Calif. 92111 

DOT-HS-7-01617 

Rept. No. MFI-78-109-(R); 1978; 230p 61refs 

Rept. for Jul 1977-Dec 1978. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 810 

FATAL ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (FARS). 
W77 ANNUAL REPORT [NO. 3] 

This first of two volumes of the third annual Fatal Accident 
Reporting System report provides statistical data on the vehi- 
cles and persons involved in fatal accidents in the U.S. in 1977 
(with some comparison data for 1975 and 1976). The second 
volume contains supporting data. A total of 47,715 people 
were killed in the U.S. in 42,064 fatal accidents during 1977. 
Over 40% of the vehicles involved in fatal accidents were in 
single-vehicle accidents. Although 58% of the fatal accidents 
occurred in rural areas, only 46% of the total vehicle miles 
were in these areas. Fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles in- 
creased between 1976 and 1977 by 1.2%, the first increase 
since 1966. Young drivers (under 25) were more likely to have 
been drinking, had more previous traffic offense convictions, 
and were more likely to be involved in fatal accidents at night 
and on weekends. In passenger car/truck accidents there were 
2673 car occupant fatalities and 122 truck occupant fatalities; 
for passenger car/motorcycle accidents there were 21 car oc- 
cupant and 1405 motorcycle occupant fatalities. The number of 
vehicles in fatal accidents increased by 7% over 1976; in con- 
trast, the number of motorcycles in these accidents increased 
by 24%. There were 157 fatalities in school bus accidents: 19 
school bus passengers, 1 school bus driver, 83 occupants of 
other vehicles, 54 pedestrians or pedalcyclists (70% of the last 
group under 16 years of age). Only 20% of the 7705 pedestrian 
and 916 pedalcyclist fatalities occurred at intersections. 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, National Center 

for Statistics and Analysis, Washington, D.C. 20590 

1978; 51p 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-803 812 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING 
RESISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON 

CALSPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL 
REPORT 

A test program designed to characterize the rolling resistance 
characteristics of those tires to be used for the ongoing Dept. 
of Transportation/Society of Automotive Engineers Truck and 
Bus Fuel Economy Verification Prog, was conducted at the 
Calspan Tire Res. Facility. The tire sample included both radi- 
al ply and bias ply tires in four of the most popularly used 
sizes (9.00-20/F, 10.00-20/G, 9.00R20/F, and 11522.5/G). 
Rolling resistance coefficients for the bias ply tires were about 
50% larger, on the average, than those for the radial ply tires. 
The radial tires equilibrated thermally in a much shorter 
distance. Within a given tire size, the range of rolling re- 
sistance coefficients among tires was significantly larger for 
the bias tires. In general, at tire equilibrium temperatures, the 
coefficients increased slightly with increasing load. At tire con- 
stant temperatures, the normal load sensitivity was 2 to 3 
times as large. Radial tires showed less sensitivity of rolling re- 
sistance coefficient to normal load. At constant temperatures, 
coefficients increased with velocity at substantially similar 
rates for both bias types, the magnitude of velocity effect 
decreasing as tire temperature increased. At equilibrium tem- 
peratures, rolling resistance coefficients decreased slightly 
with velocity at similar rates for both tire types, the absolute 
magnitude of the velocity effect being about 1/3 of that for 
constant temperatures. The equilibrium coefficient was a 
strong function of inflation pressure and decreased with in- 
creasing pressure. At constant temperatures, the effect of nor- 
mal load on the coefficient was relatively independent of infla- 
tion pressure. Coefficients increased drastically with transient 
changes in slip angle, approximately doubling in value at 
plus/minus 2 degrees relative to degrees. At equilibrium tem- 
peratures, the radial ply tires, on the average, showed coeffi- 
cients about 6% larger for a flat roadway vs. a 67.23-in diame- 
ter drum (compared to 8% lower for bias ply tires). Coeffi- 
cients for all tires, as measured under conditions of tire con- 
stant and equilibrium temperatures, decreased with increasing 
positive wheel torque (coefficient generally larger at constant 
temperature). 

by I. Gusakov; G. A. Tapia; L. Bogdan 

Calspan Corp., 4455 Genesee St., Buffalo, N.Y. 14221 

DOT-OS-60156 

Rept. No. ZM-5947-T-2; 1979; 137p 8ref s 

Rept. for Nov 1977-May 1978. Also conducted under 

Agreement for Services No. 40097 with Rockwell 

International. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND 
PRELIMINARY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: 
SUMMARY [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

by H. B. Pritz; C. R. Hassler; E. B. Weis 

Bate He, Columbus Labs., 505 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio 

43201 

DOT-HS-4-00961 

1978; 29p 

Rept. for Jul 1974-May 1978. For abstract, see Vol. 2, 

Technical Discussion, HS-803 817. 

Availability: NTIS 



October 31, 1979 



HS-803 834 



HS-803 817 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND 
PRELIMINARY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: 
TECHNICAL DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE 
ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

An experimental study was conducted to investigate the sig- 
nificance of vehicle front design parameters on pedestrian im- 
pact dynamics, specifically to quantify the present pedestrian 
hazard and to assess the injury reduction potential of a 
number of selected vehicle configurations. Highly-instru- 
mented experimental impacts were conducted using adult and 
6-year-old-child anthropomorphic dummies and unembalmed 
cadaveric specimens. In all, 80 dummy impacts (36 child and 
44 adult) and 11 unembalmed cadaveric impacts were con- 
ducted over the speed range from 10 mph to 30 mph with 
present production vehicles, candidate injury-mitigating con- 
cepts, and the first-generation Research Safety Vehicles. 
Results indicate that significant reductions in injury severity 
can be realized through vehicle front design changes and in- 
creased surface compliance. 

by H. B. Pritz; C. R. Hassler; E. B. Weis 

Batelle, Columbus Labs., 505 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio 

43201 

DOT-HS-4-00961 

1978; 151p 6refs 

Rept. for Jul 1974-May 1978. Vol. 1, Summary, is HS-803 816. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. 
THIRD SERIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 
CID (4.9 LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

Experimental data are presented which were obtained in 
dynamometer tests of a 1978 Pontiac 301 cu-in-displacement 
(CID) engine to determine fuel consumption and emissions 
(hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides) at steady- 
state engine operating modes. This engine is intended for use 
in a 49-states (Federal) vehicle equipped with automatic trans- 
mission. Pontiac uses the engine in vehicles in the 3500 Ib to 
4500 Ib weight class. This engine is one of a series of 15 en- 
gines to be tested in a program to obtain engine performance 
data for estimating fuel economy and emissions for varied en- 
gine service and duty. The purpose is to provide basic engine 
characteristic data required as input for engineering calcula- 
tions of fuel consumption and emissions involving ground 
transportation. Manufacturer's engine specifications, engine 
break-in schedule, and fuel analysis are provided. 

by D. E. Koehler; W. F. Marshall 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 

Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

RA-77-07 

Rept. No. BETC/OP-78/21; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-2; 1979; 59p 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. 



THIRD SERIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID 
(2.0 LITERS), 2V, INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

Experimental data are presented which are obtained in 
dynamometer tests of a 1978 AMC 121 cu-in-displacement en- 
gine (CID) to determine fuel consumption and emissions 
(hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides) at steady- 
state engine operating modes. This engine is intended for use 
in a 49-states (Federal) vehicle equipped with manual transmis- 
sion. American Motors Corp. uses the engine in vehicles in the 
2750 Ib to 3000 Ib weight class. The engine is one of a series of 
15 engines to be tested in a program to obtain engine per- 
formance data for estimating fuel economy and emissions for 
varied engine service and duty. The purpose is to provide 
basic engine characteristic data required as input for engineer- 
ing calculations of fuel consumption and emissions involving 
ground transportation. Manufacturer's engine specifications, 
engine break-in schedule, and fuel analysis are provided. 

by Don E. Koehler 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 

Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

RA-77-07 

Rept. No. BETC/OP-78/20; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-3; 1979; 59p 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. 
THIRD SERIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 
CID (2.5 LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

Experimental data are presented which were obtained in 
dynamometer tests of a 1978 Pontiac 151 cu-in-displacement 
(CID) engine to determine fuel consumption and emissions 
(hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides) at steady- 
state engine operating modes. This engine is intended for use 
in a 49-states (Federal) vehicle equipped with automatic trans- 
mission. Pontiac uses the engine in vehicles in the 3000 Ib to 
3500 Ib weight class. The engine is one of a series of 15 en- 
gines to be tested in a program to obtain engine performance 
data for estimating fuel economy and emissions for varied en- 
gine service and duty. The purpose is to provide basic engine 
characteristic data required as input for engineering calcula- 
tions of fuel consumption and emissions involving ground 
transportation. Manufacturer's engine specifications, engine 
break-in schedule, and fuel analysis are provided. 

by D. E. Koehler; W. F. Marshall 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 

Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

RA-77-07 

Rept. No. BETC/OP-78/22; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-4; 1979; 62p 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. 
THIRD SERIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 
200 CID (3.3 LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 
1978 

Experimental data are presented which were obtained in 
dynamometer tests of a 1978 Chevrolet 200 cu-in-displacement 
(CID) engine to determine fuel consumption and emissions 



51 



HS-803 835 

(hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides) at steady- 
state engine operating modes. This engine is intended for use 
in a 49-states (Federal) vehicle equipped with automatic trans- 
mission. Chevrolet uses the engine in vehicles in the 3500 Ib 
weight class. The engine is one of a series of 15 engines to be 
tested in a program to obtain engine performance data for esti- 
mating fuel economy and emissions for varied engine service 
and duty. The purpose is to provide basic engine characteristic 
data required as input for engineering calculations of fuel con- 
sumption and emissions involving ground transportation. 
Manufacturer's engine specifications, engine break-in 
schedule, and fuel analysis are provided. 

by D. E. Koehler; W. F. Marshall 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 

Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

RA-77-07 

Rept. No. BETC/OP-78/30; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-5; 1979; 61p 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. 
THIRD SERIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN 
DIESEL, 90 CID (1.5 LITER), F. L [FUEL 
INJECTION]. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

Experimental data are presented which were obtained in 
dynamometer tests of a 1978 VW 90 cu-in-displacement diesel 
engine to determine fuel consumption and emissions 
(hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides) at steady- 
state engine operating modes. This engine is intended for use 
in a 49-states (Federal) vehicle equipped with manual transmis- 
sion. Volkswagen uses this diesel engine in the VW Rabbit, 
which is in the 2250 Ib weight class. The engine is one of a se- 
ries of 15 engines to be tested in a program to obtain engine 
performance data for estimating fuel economy and emissions 
for varied engine service and duty. The purpose is to provide 
basic engine characteristic data required as input for engineer- 
ing calculations of fuel consumption and emissions involving 
ground transportation. Manufacturer's engine specifications 
and fuel analysis are provided. 

by D. E. Koehler; W. F. Marshall 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 

Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

RA-77-07 

Rept. No. BETC/OP-78/33; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-6; 1979; 42p 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. 
THIRD SERIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID 
(1.6 LITERS), IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

Experimental data are presented which were obtained in 
dynamometer tests of a 1978 Ford 98 cu-in-displacement (CID) 
engine to determine fuel consumption and emissions 
(hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides) at steady- 
state engine operating modes. This engine is intended for use 
in a 49-states (Federal) vehicle with automatic transmission. 
Ford uses the engine in the Fiesta which is in the 2000 Ib 
weight class. The engine is one of a series of 15 engines to be 
tested in a program to obtain engine performance data for esti- 



HSL 79-10 

mating fuel economy and emissions for varied engine service 
and duty. The purpose is to provide basic engine characteristic 
data required as input for engineering calculations of fuel con- 
sumption and emissions involving ground transportation. 
Manufacturer's engine specifications and fuel analysis are pro- 
vided. 

by D. E. Koehler; W. F. Marshall 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 

Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

RA-77-07 

Kept. No. BETC/OP-78/34; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-7; 1979; 63p 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF 
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. 
THIRD SERIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 
CID (3.8 LITER), 4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM 

REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

Experimental data are presented which were obtained in 
dynamometer tests of a 1978 Buick 231 cu-in-displacement 
(CID), turbocharged engine to determine fuel consumption and 
emissions (hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides) 
at steady-state engine operating modes. This engine is intended 
for use in a 49-states (Federal) vehicle equipped with auto- 
matic transmission. Buick uses the engine in the Regal Sport 
Coupe and the LeSabre Sport Coupe which are in the 3500 Ib 
to 4000 Ib weight class. The engine is one of a series of 15 en- 
gines to be tested in a program to obtain engine performance 
data for estimating fuel economy and emissions for varied en- 
gine service and duty. The purpose is to provide basic engine 
characteristic data required as input for engineering calcula- 
tions of fuel consumption and emissions involving ground 
transportation. Manufacturer's engine specifications, engine 
break-in schedule, and fuel analysis are provided. 

by D. E. Koehler; W. F. Marshall 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 

Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

RA-77-07 

Rept. No. BETC/OP-78/43; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-8; 1979; 60p 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. 
THIRD SERIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID 
(4.9 LITER), IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 

1978 

Experimental data are presented which were obtained in 
dynamometer tests of a 1978 Ford 300 cu-in-displacement 
(CID) truck engine to determine fuel consumption and emis- 
sions (hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides) at 
steady-state engine operating modes. This engine is intended 
for use in a 49-states (Federal) pickup or van with automatic 
transmission. Ford uses the engine in pickups and vans in the 
4000 Ib to 4500 Ib weight class. The engine is one of a series of 
15 engines to be tested in a program to obtain engine per- 
formance data for estimating fuel economy and emissions for 
varied engine service and duty. The purpose is to provide 
basic engine characteristic data required as input for engineer- 
ing calculations of fuel consumption and emissions involving 



52 



October 31, 1979 



HS-803 858 



ground transportation. Manufacturer's engine specifications, 
engine breakrin schedule, and fuel analysis are provided. 

by D. E. Koehler; W. F. Marshall 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 

Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

RA-77-07 

Rept. No. BETC/OP-78/43; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-9; 1979; 59p 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 839 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF 
AUTOMOTIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. 
THIRD SERIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 

CID (1.6 LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 
1978 

Experimental data are presented which were obtained in 
dynamometer tests of a 1978 Honda 98 cu-in-displacement 
(CID) engine to determine fuel consumption and emissions 
(hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides) at steady- 
state engine operating modes. This engine is intended for use 
in a 49-states (Federal) vehicle equipped with automatic trans- 
mission. Honda uses the engine in the Accord which is in the 
2250 Ib weight class. The engine is one of a series of 15 en- 
gines to be tested in a program to obtain engine performance 
data for estimating fuel economy and emissions for varied en- 
gine service and duty. The purpose is to provide basic engine 
characteristic data required as input for engineering calcula- 
tions of fuel consumption and emissions involving ground 
transportation. Manufacturer's engine specifications, engine 
break-in schedule, and fuel analysis are provided. 

by D. E. Koehler; W. F. Marshall 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 

Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

RA-77-07 

Rept. No. BETC/OP-78/55; DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-10; 1979; 

42p 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 840 

EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN 
COMPONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. 
FINAL REPORT 

Wide ratio range automatic transmissions with lockup torque 
converters could be in production by the early 1980's. In order 
to evaluate their impact upon fuel economy, emissions, drivea- 
bility, acceleration, and durability, four 1975 Chrysler automo- 
biles with inertia weights and engine sizes typical of that time 
period were equipped with Multi-Purpose Test Transmissions. 
These transmissions could duplicate current three-speed auto- 
matic transmissions; wide-range, three-speed automatic trans- 
missions; and wide-range, four-speed automatic transmissions 
with or without torque converter lockup. The following trans- 
mission modes were tested: baseline or production three-speed 
automatic; baseline automatic with lockup in second and third 
gears; wide-ratio, three-speed automatic; wide-ratio, three- 
speed automatic with lockup in third; wide-ratio, three-speed 
automatic with lockup in second and third, with and without 
lockup below 30 mph; wide-ratio, four-speed automatic; wide- 
ratio, four-speed automatic with lockup in fourth; and wide- 
ratio, four-speed automatic with lockup in third and fourth. 
Predicted fuel economy values agreed with actual fuel econo- 



mies within the resolution of the test method. Composite fuel 
economy improvements up to 14% were achieved with no 
change in acceleration and durability. Further development 
work is required to bring emissions and driveability to accepta- 
ble levels. Maximum increases in fuel economy due to 
drivetrain improvements have not been demonstrated due to 
the possibility for further optimization of engine road load 
matching and the impacts of emission and driveability modifi- 
cations. 

by Donald Hurter; Philip Gott 

Arthur D. Little, Inc., Acorn Park, Cambridge, Mass. 02140 

DOT-TSC-1046 

Rept. No. DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-12; 1979; 115p llrefs 

Rept. for Jun 1975-Nov 1977. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 858 

EMS [EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES] 
COMPATIBILITY STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

A project was undertaken to provide design standards and 
recommendations for the implementation of compatible, effec- 
tive communications systems for emergency medical services 
(EMS) utilizing the UHF frequencies allocated by the Federal 
Communications Commision. Five major task areas involved 
visiting seven major operational EMS communications 
systems, formulating design standards, investigating disaster 
situations, studying the interaction of EMS with other public 
safety services, and studying the possible use of innovative 
communications concepts in EMS systems. Major recommen- 
dations on design standards include the following: adopt stan- 
dard nomenclature, channelization, and designation of the ten 
UHF frequency pairs; provide full ten-frequency capability in 
base, mobile, and high-power portable radios, and eight- 
frequency capability in low-power portable radios; adopt four 
UHF frequencies for mobile relay control purposes; adopt 
standards to allow interarea access between systems 
(continuous monitoring of 4*67.975 MHz, designated as the 
MED-COMMON channel to be used for interarea access; im- 
plementation of a common tone frequency for interarea ac- 
cess, 210.7 Hz, in UHF EMS radio equipments); and adopt 
standards to prevent or defeat potential system 'lockup* that 
can be caused by two-way vehicular repeaters operating into 
an area utilizing mobile relays (select local tone frequencies 
from distinct groupings, provide positive control of mobile 
relays at control point). Additional recommendations ad- 
dressing system vulnerability in disaster situations include the 
following: provide base stations and control equipment with 
emergency back-up to commercial power; where landlines are 
used for base station control, provide an alternate control 
method, such as radio or local control, for a portion of the 
total base station complement; and provide back-up to hospital 
switching matrix. 

by Sandra Archambault; Frank Pethel 

Systech Corp., Codd Professional Bldg. , Severna Park, Md. 

21146 

DOT-HS-7-01818 

1978; 116p 

Rept. for Oct 1977-Sep 1978. 

Availability: NTIS 



53 



HS-803 867 



HSL 7940 



HS-803 867 

COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE 
NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 15T78, 
AND FEBRUARY 15, 1979 

A compilation is presented of correspondence and comments, 
the major portion being a cost-benefit study of bumper regula- 
tions. These were submitted to the National Hwy. Traffic 
Safety Administration (NHTSA) by Houdaille Industries, Inc. 
which undertook to determine what bumper standard is most 
cost-beneficial to the American Consumer. Phase 1 of 
NHTSA's two-phase Part 581 bumper standard, which became 
effective in Sep 1978, requires that the car body, other than 
the bumper, not be damaged in barrier and pendulum tests at 5 
mph. Phase 2, to become effective in Sep 1979, requres that 
there be only limited damage to the bumper itself in such 
tests, as well as no damage to the rest of the car. The study 
was developed by Dr. David Wise of Harvard Univ. and im- 
plemented by a computer program designed by Dr. Niel Roth. 
NHTSA endorsed the work of both participants. Also commis- 
sioned by Houdaille were crash tests conducted at Calspan 
Advanced Technology Center to compare two 1978 
Volare/Aspen production bumper designs, one built in com- 
pliance with Part 581, Phase 1, the other a Mexican version of 
the bumper (equivalent to a 2.5-mph barrier-only standard). 
The cost-benefit study of the Volare/Aspen, the first com- 
parison undertaken to isolate the real-world impact of Federal 
bumper regulations, revealed that the current 5-mph Federal 
bumper regulation costs American consumers $70 per car more 
than the benefits it provides, including the cost, due to extra 
weight, of 55 extra gallons of gasoline over the lifetime of 
each car. The more stringent Phase 2 regulation will add 
further to the cost. The Mexican version of the bumper was 
found to be cost-beneficial. 

Houdaille Industries, Inc., One Financial Plaza, Fort 

Lauderdale, Fla. 33394 

1979; 284p refs 

Availability: National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, 400 

7th St., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20590 



HS-803 868 

CALCULATIONS AND SUPPORTING MATERIAL 
FOR THE PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE 
BUMPER STANDARD 

Information is presented in support of the National Hwy. Traf- 
fic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) preliminary analysis of 
the Part 581 bumper standard, submitted to Congress on 26 
Jan 1979. The analysis indicated that the performance require- 
ments of the bumper standard provide substantial net benefits 
to consumers over the lifetime of a vehicle, but that the 5-mph 
standard does not necessarily result in the greatest net 
benefits. Accompanying this information is an Advance Notice 
of Proposed Rule making indicating that NHTSA is considering 
whether modification to the standard is appropriate and is 
seeking additional data from interested parties (Docket No. 73- 
19; Notice 25). Phase 1 of the Part 581 bumper standard, ef- 
fective on 1 Sep 1978, requires no damage to the vehicle in a 
5-mph barrier equivalent crash but permits unlimited damage 
to the bumper itself. Phase 2 of the standard which takes ef- 
fect 1 Sep 1979, permits only limited damage to the bumper it- 
self. This cost-benefit analysis has shown that both 2.5-mph 



and 5.0-mph bumpers yield substantial net benefits. The net 
benefits of aluminum and soft-face bumper systems are nearly 
equal at both 2.5 mph and 5.p mph, and the net benefits of 
steel systems appear significantly greater at 2.5 mph than at 
5.0 mph. At both 2.5 mph and 5.0 mph, the net benefits of 
steel bumper systems are less than those of aluminum and 
soft-face bumper systems. Material choices of this type point 
out the role of manufacturers in determining the amount of 
benefits that consumers actually achieve. Automobile fuel 
economy is a major factor in these design decisions. 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, 400 7th St., 
S.W., Room 4423, Washington, D.C. 20590 
1979; 75p 19refs 
Availability: Corporate author 



HS-803 871 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

Total consumer out-of-pocket costs have been estimated for 
four Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS): 
FMVSS 214, Side Door Strength; FMVSS 215, Exterior Pro- 
tection; FMVSS 301, Fuel System Integrity; and FMVSS 208, 
Occupant System Integrity. For each standard a representative 
sample of makes and models of vehicles was established. The 
parts required to meet the safety standard were purchased and 
their costs estimated. The first year of standard implementa- 
tion and the year immediately preceding it were emphasized. 
By analysis, the consumer costs attributable to the standard 
for each make and model were determined. A weighted 
average was developed from the sample vehicles and applied 
to the total industry volumes to determine the out-of-pocket 
cost for the implementation of each standard. The weighted 
average of weight variance per vehicle due to standard imple- 
mentation also was determined for FMVSS's 214, 215, and 
301. For FMVSS 214, the implementation out-of-pocket cost 
was found to be $30.08 with a weight increase of 36.1 
Ib/vehicle; for FMVSS 215, a cost of $26.54 and a weight in- 
crease of 54.3 Ib/vehicle for the 1973 version of the standard, 
and an accumulative cost of $48.47 and a weight increase of 
76.7 Ib/vehicle for the 1973 and 1974 versions; for FMVSS 
301, a cost of $.05 and a weight increase of .6 Ib/vehicle for 
the 1968 version, and a cost of $6.89 and a weight increase of 
1.8 Ib/vehicle for the 1976 version; and for FMVSS 208, a cost 
of $14.05 for the 1968 version, and a cost of $46.46 for the 
1968 Gap belt) and 1972 (shoulder belt) standards. Addition of 
1972 shoulder belt system to original lap belt system for front 
seats only cost $11.00 per vehicle. 

by Robert F. McLean; Clifford Eckel; David Cowan 

John Z. De Lorean Corp., Res. and Engineering Div., P.O. 

Box 427, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013 

DOT-HS-7-01767 

1978; 127p 

Rept. for Oct 1977-Oct 1978. See also HS-803 873. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 873 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 



54 



October 31, 1979 



HS-803 892 



BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

A detailed automotive type cost analysis and weight study was 
made of the following bumper systems to determine if con- 
sumer cost variance was directly attributable to changes in 
FMVSS (Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard) 215, Exteri- 
or Protection, or to the latest design and manufacturing 
technology employed over subsequent model years since 
FMVSS 215 implementation: 1979 Chrysler Volare, 1979 
Chrysler LaBaron, 1979 Ford Pinto, 1979 Ford Fairmont, 1979 
Ford LTD II, 1979 Ford LTD, 1979 Firebird, 1979 GM 
(General Motors) Camaro, 1979 GM Nova, 1979 GM Grand 
AM, 1979 GM Malibu, 1979 GM Caprice, 1971 Volvo, 1973 
Volvo, 1979 Volvo, and Tayco Design (front bumper only). 
For each bumper system, subassemblies and subassembly 
components are identified, with data on weight, general 
material types, processing methods, high-volume industrial 
fixed and variable cost, manufacturing cost, tooling cost, 
number of years for tooling amortization, other corporation 
costs and profit, dealer markup, and manufacturing cost per 
pound. The 1979 model production year economics and 1978 
model production volume were utilized. Consumer replace- 
ment cost information on the bumpers is included. Com- 
ponents of the bumper system are identified by manufacturer's 
part numbers, part names, quantity, and over-the-counter 
customer prices (those valid in Nov 1978). An overview photo- 
graph study of all systems except the Tayco system is pro- 
vided. In general, it was found that the weight per studied 
vehicle was decreased over the baseline (1973 model year for 
front bumper system, and 1974 model year for rear bumper 
system). The maximum weight reduction was 85.26 Ib and the 
maximum weight increase was 12.67 Ib. The cost varied from 
$67.40 reduction to a $37.55 increase. It is believed that the 
variation in consumer out-of-pocket cost and weight of the 
sample vehicles was not attributable to FMVSS 215, but to 
design and manufacturing technology. 

by M. R. Harvey; Clifford Eckel; David Cowan 

John Z. De Lorean Corp., Res. and Engineering Div., P.O. 

Box 427, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013 

DOT-HS-7-01767-Mod-3 

1978; 126p 

Kept, for 31 Aug-31 Dec 1978. See also HS-803 871. 

Availability: National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, 400 

7th St., S.W., Room 4423, Washington, D.C. 20590 



HS-803 879 

DRUGS AND DRIVING: A SELECTED 
BIBLIOGRAPHY. SUPPLEMENT ONE. FINAL 
REPORT 

This first supplement to a bibliography of literature dealing 
with the relationship between drug use (other than alcohol 
alone) and highway safety updates both the parent volume and 
expands coverage in certain research areas related to the field 
of drugs and highway safety (in particular, literature pertaining 
to drug usage patterns and drug analytical methodology). A 
detailed description of the literature scope and document 
selection process is provided. The bibliography consists of a 
topical index, an author index, a title index, and abstracts of 
nearly 400 articles. A revised topical index was developed to 



improve user access to document abstracts. Within the topical 
index are cross-reference lists of drugs by name and by usage. 

by Kent B. Joscelyn; Alan C. Donelson 

University of Michigan, Hwy. Safety Res. Inst., Huron Pkwy. 

and Baxter Rd., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48109 

DOT-HS-7-01530 

Rept. No. UM-HSRI-78-3; 1978; 276p 371refs 

Rept. for Jul 1975-Nov 1976. See also HS-802 187, HS-802 188, 

and HS-802 189. 

Availability: NTIS 



HS-803 892 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE 
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND 
DRIVER INJURY IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

An analysis is presented of the effect of vehicle weight on 
driver injury using North Carolina accident data for 1973, 
1974, and 1975. The descriptive analysis is based on a series of 
cross-tabulations of driver injury by vehicle weight across 
various subsets of the data (single- vehicle crashes, rural 
crashes, urban two-car crashes, high-speed crashes, etc.). As 
expected, single-vehicle accidents are found to be more seri- 
ous than two-vehicle accidents, and rural accidents more seri- 
ous than urban ones. Increased car weight is shown clearly to 
lessen the risk of serious or fatal injury for all accident types 
combined and for two-vehicle crashes. For single-vehicle 
crashes, a consistent relationship between car weight and 
driver injury is not found. In order to examine more closely 
the vehicle weight-driver injury relationship, linear categorical 
models are constructed for predicting serious (killed or seri- 
ously injured) driver injury as a function of vehicle weight and 
other related variables. The models are for single-vehicle 
crashes, belted drivers in two-car crashes, and for unbelted 
drivers in two-car crashes (three models corresponding to 
three speed categories). The incorporated variables are a basic 
(assumed) set of control variables based on previous research 
plus additional variables as suggested by 1973-1975 data. For 
the single-vehicle model, the variables are vehicle weight, re- 
gion of impact, accident speed, belt use, and driver age. For 
the two-car models, the weight and region of impact for the 
second car are added to this set, and driver age omitted. The 
results of the modeling, for the most part, follow expectations. 
For the single-vehicle crash model, belted drivers have lower 
predicted serious injury rates than unbelted drivers, and 
younger drivers lower rates than older drivers. Drivers in the 
lightest weight category cars consistently have the highest pre- 
dicted injury rates, but the other three weight categories are 
not always differentiated. For the two -car crash models, the 
vehicle weight categories are differentiated as expected for all 
but the low-speed crashes. An added dimension to this analy- 
sis is a series of tables showing predicted driver injury rates as 
a combined function of the weights and regions of impact for 
both cars. 

by J. Richard Stewart; Jane C. Stutts 

University of North Carolina, Hwy. Safety Res. Center, 

Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514 

DOT-HS-4-00897 

1978; 93p 15refs 

Rept. for 30 Jun 1977-31 May 1978. 

Availability: Corporate author 



55 



HS-803 893 



HSL 79-10 



0< 



HS-803 893 

FACT BOOK. STATISTICAL INFORMATION ON 
HIGHWAY SAFETY. ANNUAL ISSUE NO. 2 

This compendium of highway traffic safety information 
presents statistical data on principal factors related to motor 
vehicles and motor vehicle accidents in the U.S. Data are 
presented variably for the years 1950 through 1976, and di- 
vided into the following categories and subcategories: highway 
safety highlights (exposure, accidents, injuries and fatalities, 
National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) safety 
programs, highlights of selected research); exposure (general 
highway statistics, driver population characteristics, vehicle 
population characteristics, travel speed statistics, modes of 
transportation and trip characteristics); accidents (general ac- 
cident statistics, accident speed statistics, accident mode 
statistics); and injuries and fatalities (general statistics, fatali- 
ties and fatality rates, vehicle, speed, and mode statistics of 
fatalities). A glossary of terminology in the highway safety 
field is included. Sources of statistics are cited, including those 
from NHTSA and from other publications. 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, National Center 
for Statistics and Analysis, 2100 2nd St., S.W., Washington, 
B.C. 20590 
1977; 166p ref s 
Availability: GPO 



HS-803 897 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, 
EXTERIOR PROTECTION 

An analysis was made of the incremental costs to already ex- 
isting vehicle bumpers as a result of the implementation of the 
original Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 215, 
Exterior Protection, and its various revisions. Out-of-pocket 
cost and weight changes for pre-standard 1972 vehicle 
makes/models were compared with post-standard vehicle 
makes/models, based on 1973 model production year 
economics and volumes. FMVSS 215 became effective on 1 
Sep 1972 (1973 model year) and was subsequently revised to 
affect the 1974, 1975, 1976 and 1977 model years. The analysis 
shows that implementation of the 1973 FMVSS 215 resulted in 
a consumer out-of-pocket cost of $26.54 and a weight increase 
of 54.3 Ib per vehicle over the 1972 pre-standard models. Im- 
plementation of the 1974 FMVSS 215, in addition to the 1973 
standard, resulted in an accumulative consumer out-of-pocket 
cost of $48.47 and a weight increase of 76.7 Ib per vehicle over 
the 1972 pre-standard models. The 1975, 1976, and 1977 model 
year FMVSS revision requirements were combined with styl- 
ing changes to such a degree that a clear assignment of cost 
and weight to either was not feasible. A trend study of the 
1977 Chevrolet Caprice and the 1978 Chevrolet Malibu in- 
dicated that there was a weight and cost reduction in the 
bumper system from the baseline 1973 vehicle. It is believed 
that these reductions are a result of downsizing and styling 
changes. It is believed that the major cost to the consumer of 
the implementation of FMVSS 215 occurred in 1973 and 1974. 

DOT-HS-7-01767 

Publ: HS-803 871, "Cost Evaluation for Four Federal Motor 

Vehicle Standards. Vol. 1. Final Report," 1978 p38-62 

1978; 27p 

Availability: National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, 

Washington, D.C. 20590 



HS-803 963 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT 
PROJECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 

VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

A preliminary analysis is presented of the weight reduction 
capabilities of four European automakers (Mercedes-Benz, 
BMW, Volvo, and BL Ltd., formerly British Leyland) who 
may have difficulties meeting the U.S. fuel economy standards 
through the mid-1 980* s due to their limited product offering, 
i.e. luxury and/or sports vehicles with low fuel economy 
ratings. An overview of these manufacturers* product plans, 
financial status, and production status was developed from 
publicly available sources; actions to improve corporate and 
vehicle fuel economy ratings are highlighted. Even with ex- 
panded use of diesel engines (development of which is subject 
to stricter emission standards) and turbochargers, substantial 
weight loss probably would be needed to meet legislated goals. 
An analysis of potential weight reduction through the mid- 
1980 's was performed based on engineering analysis and the 
manufacturer's known product plans to the extent available, 
Individual manufacturer's strategies of weight loss due to all 
new vehicle design, major sheet metal change, and component 
redesign and material substitution were formulated, drawn in 
part from weight reduction successes achieved by U.S. manu- 
facturers. Results are presented at the detail level by manufac- 
turer and model and at the summary level by series and En- 
vironmental Protection Agency market class. Weight loss 
potentials from 11% to 32% (depending on vehicle size and en- 
gine type) were estimated for the period 1978-1986. 

by Theodore Taylor, Jr.; Madelyn C. Isaacs; Katherine E. 

Blythe 

Corporate-Tech Planning Inc., 275 Wyman St., Waltham, 

Mass. 02154 

DOT-HS-7-01789 

1978; 145p refs 

Kept, for Aug-Oct 1978. 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-810 339 

REMARKS AT MAINTENANCE COMMITTEE 
MEETING [REGULAR COMMON CARRIER 
CONFERENCE], NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 17, 1979 
[TRUCK SAFETY] 

Current NHTSA (National Hwy. Traffic Safety A Administra- 
tion) truck safety activities are outlined for representatives of 
the trucking industry. Recent changes have been made to 
NHTSA's draft five-year rulemaking plan for heavy trucks 
which was issued in 1978 and to which response has been 
received from manufacturers, the American Trucking Associa- 
tions, Inc., and labor groups. The changes consist of moving 
several proposed near-term rulemaking efforts into the longer- 
term exploratory category (i.e. tire inflation warning systems, 
hydraulic truck brake performance, controls and displays, and 
conspicuity), and adding a proposed standard on interior noise 
levels to the near-term standards list. These actions are in line 
with trucking industry suggestions that NHTSA take more 
time, and work with the industry, to develop substantial 
cost/benefit data on prospective standards. A new office at 
NHTSA to work with industry on an expanded program of 
truck safety research will undertake projects including an 
evaluation of test procedures and performance levels for both 
hydraulic and air brake trucks without antilock systems, a 
comprehensive field evaluation of engine and driveline retar* 



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;tober31, 1979 



HS-810 342 



rs, longer-term studies of advanced braking systems, and 
aiuations of ride quality, handling and stability, and tire 
ction. NHTSA also is considering the early issuance of 
commended Practices on brake knob layout, trailer wiring, 
hide weight distribution, exhaust outlet location, road speed 
liters, heated rearview mirrors, and splash and spray reduc- 



Howard Dugoff 

itional Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, 
C. 20590 
79; 7p 
liability: Corporate author 



5-810 340 

EMARKS BEFORE THE CHRYSLER RETREAT, 
W ARBOR, MICHIGAN, JANUARY 18, 1979 [FUEL 
:ONOMY REGULATORY PROGRAM] 

ie background, purposes, anticipated benefits, and problems 
d limitations of Federal fuel economy regulations are ad- 
sssed in brief. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 
jc 1975 created the Automotive Fuel Economy Regulatory 
og., providing for the establishment of average fuel econo- 
f standards applicable to passenger cars beginning with the 
79 model year. By statute, the 1985 fuel economy standard 
is set at 27.5 mpg, a virtual doubling of the 1974 model year 
;ure. The standards will result in the conservation of 220 bil- 
n gallons of gasoline over the life of vehicles covered by 
;se regulations, projected through model year 1990. Total 
tional petroleum consumption will be reduced by about 13% 

the 1990*s as a result of these standards. Conservatively 
luing gasoline at $.65/gai, the total value of the fuel saved in 
78 dollars (discounted at 10%) is $60 billion. The combined 
tentia! savings of other measures, including carpooling, the 

mph speed limit, the voluntary program for trucks and 
ses, and highway efficiency improvements, are expected to 
lount to only about 1/7 of the total savings yielded by the 
el economy program. Another benefit is the significant 
duction in net ownership costs to consumers over the 
'Crating life of new vehicles (lifetime fuel savings of $900 for 
typical 1985 model year car vs. $300 increase in cost of vehi- 
5 as a result of regulation). A unique measurement instru- 
ct of the program, the Corporate Average Fuel Economy 
/el, permits diversity in the market and assures steady im- 
ovement in fuel conservation. It is indicated that the 27.5 
pg level will be both technologically feasible and economi- 
lly practicable for the auto industry, although the program's 
;pact on each manufacturer will be distinctly different. The 
rrent economy program is oriented toward the short term; 
vernment and industry need to cooperate in a program of 
vanced research to develop truly revolutionary advance- 
snts in automotive fuel economy. 

' Howard Dugoff 

itional Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, 

C. 20590 

79; 5p 

/ailability: Corporate author 



S-810 341 

PATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
rTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE 
OMMITTEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS 



FOR AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL 
TRAFFIC AND MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, 
AND THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND 
COST SAVINGS ACT, FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

Authorizations for the National Hwy. Traffic Safety Adminis- 
tration (NHTSA), the agency's recent performance, and plans 
for fiscal year 1980 are addressed. Of the $60 million in 
authorizations NHTSA is seeking for 1980, one of the major 
items is the National Center for Statistics and Analysis (60% 
funded under Vehicle Safety Act) which is designed to provide 
the agency as well as industry and the public with a statisti- 
cally sound projection of the extent and nature of highway ac- 
cidents. Much of the data are used to evaluate and to substan- 
tiate the benefits and costs of safety standards. The pilot 
phase of the Center's National Accident Sampling System is 
complete, and the data collection teams will expand from 10 to 
20 in FY 1980. In FY 1980, $4 1/2 million will be spent on the 
research safety vehicle program. NHTSA will continue 
developing new safety standards for side-impact and pedestri- 
an protection, and to extend other standards to cover light 
trucks and vans. NHTSA's 5-year plan will be periodically 
revised, based on public comment and in response to continual 
changes in the motor vehicle safety field. Authorizations for 
FY 1980 will also permit continuation of the defect recall pro- 
gram. NHTSA now has pending before it three major fuel effi- 
ciency issues: whether to lower 1981 model year standards 
slightly for light trucks and vans, whether to revise passenger- 
car standards already in place through 1985, and what the 
standards should be for light trucks and vans in model years 
1982 and beyond. Since the Uniform Tire Quality Grading 
Standards issued by NHTSA in 1975 have been reaffirmed, 
consumers will have comparative data on all bias tires made 
after 1 Apr 1979 and bias belted made after 1 Oct 1979. 
NHTSA expects to establish an effective date for radial tires 
as well. NHTSA is now working to make the consumer ratings 
provision (concerning crashworthiness and repairability) of the 
Cost Savings Act a reality, and has improved its consumer 
participation via its town meetings and Hotline. NHTSA 
remains firmly convinced that the statutory directives set forth 
in the Vehicle Safety Act and the Cost Savings Act contribute 
vitally to the safety, health, and well-being of the public, and 
deserve to be pursued with as much support in the future as 
they have been to date. 

by Joan B. Claybrook 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, 

B.C. 20590 

1979; 17p 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-810 342 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING 
AUTOMOTIVE FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS 
UNDER TITLE V OF THE MOTOR VEHICLE 
INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 
13, 1979 

The requirements of the fuel economy standards for passenger 
cars through model year 1985, and for light trucks through 
model year 1981, correspond to a reduction of 220 billion gal- 
lons of gasoline from 1978 through 1990, or a savings of $60 
billion in imported fuel costs. At $.80 per gallon, a net savings 
of $700 over a vehicle's lifetime is projected for 1985 models 



57 



HS-810 343 



HSL 79-10 



meeting the standards now in place. Changes in vehicle 
technology will be sufficient to allow manufacturers to meet 
the standards without significantly changing their traditional 
product mix, and the projected amount of capital needed to 
achieve these improvements is within the industry's capability. 
Ford Motor Co. and General Motors Corp. have asked the Na- 
tional Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to revise 
passenger car standards for model years 1981-1984 to make 
them more cost-effective. NHTSA is presently examining 
documentation from these two companies to see if there has 
been a significant change in the basis for the fuel economy 
standards from Jul 1977 when manufacturers indicated their 
capability to comply with the standards. NHTSA is also con- 
sidering Chrysler Corp.'s petition for a reduction in standards 
for 1981 model light trucks. NHTSA has recommended minor 
changes in Title V concerning the treatment of low volume 
manufacturers, carry-forward and carry-back of credits for ex- 
ceeding fuel economy standards, and the treatment of foreign 
manufacturers that begin production in the U.S. There has 
been excellent coordination among the Dept. of Transporta- 
tion, the Dept. of Energy, and the Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) regarding automotive fuel economy proposals 
and rules. It is NHTSA policy to set fuel economy require- 
ments at levels that do not require the use of diesel engines, 
until there is more information on the health-effects issue. 
Another item of concern is the growing discrepancy (from less 
than one to over three mpg) between fuel economy measured 
on the EPA test cycle and on-road fuel economy. 

by Joan Claybrook 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, 

B.C. 20590 

1979; 4p Iref 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-810 343 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE 
COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WORKS AND 
TRANSPORTATION, CONCERNING THE 
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE HIGHWAY SAFETY 
ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 19, 1979 

A section-by-section account is presented of National Hwy. 
Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) efforts to implement 
the provisions of the Highway Safety Act of 1978, and budget 
requests for fiscal years 1979 and 1980 are attached. In 
cooperation with the states, a comprehensive study is being 
made of the need for and means to establish an automated Na- 
tional Driver Register. NHTSA is looking at those states 
whose penalties for 55 mph violations are noticeably weaker 
than for other types of speed violations so that an assessment 
can be made of their conformity with the law. Efforts to sup- 
port the states in speed enforcement shall be continued via 
technical assistance and funding. NHTSA is working with the 
states to implement changes in highway safety programs 
resulting from amendment of section 402. The necessary 
guidelines, procedures, and criteria are being developed for 
making and administering grants for developing innovative ap- 
proaches to highway safety problems. A complete study is 
being made of the effect of revocation of penalties for states 
not enacting motorcycle helmet use laws. Several studies have 
been made by NHTSA over the past two years on the effects 
of helmets and helmet use laws on highway safety. Based on 
their findings which show the effectiveness of helmets in 
reducing head injuries, and the higher use rates in states with 



helmet laws, NHTSA is urging states to retain or reenact hel- 
met laws, and encouraging manufacturers, insurance person- 
nel, the medical community, safety organizations, and citizen 
action groups to support helmet use laws. A study is underway 
to evaluate efforts to detect and prevent the use of marijuana 
and other drugs by drivers. Efforts are being made to aid 
states in developing programs for encouraging safety belt and 
child restraint use, as well as expanding the public education 
program on safety belt use. A study is being conducted by the 
National Academy of Sciences on methods of encouraging 
safety belt use. States have been advised of the ban on using 
highway safety funds to retrofit state-owned vehicles with pas- 
sive restraint systems. An amendment has been made to 
NHTSA's regulation on tire identification and recordkeeping, 
concerning exemptions for retread tire manufacturers. 

by Joan Claybrook 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, 

D.C. 20590 

1979; 16p 

Availability: Corporate author 



HS-810 344 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 
COMMITTEE, MARCH 20, 1979 

The research and development programs of the National Hwy. 
Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) are discussed. Follow- 
ing the Experimental Safety Vehicle program begun in 1968, a 
second generation of experimental vehicles, begun in the mid- 
1970's, is being developed under the Research Safety Vehicle 
(RSV) program. Full working prototypes have been built by 
Minicars, Inc. and Calspan Corp. and will be tested in the 
U.S., Europe, and Japan to demonstrate that advanced safety 
features can be designed into production cars by the mid- 
1980's, in fuel-efficient, low-emission, practical, and economi- 
cal automobiles. Minicars has also constructed and is testing a 
Large Research Safety Vehicle. In addition to the Integrated 
Vehicle Research program, research is being conducted in 
both passenger and heavy-duty vehicle safety, in automotive 
fuel economy, and in highway safety involving nonvehicle fac- 
tors such as the driver. The National Center for Statistics and 
Analysis, the primary highway accident data collection and 
analysis institution in the U.S., is a cornerstone of NHTSA's 
research and development program. NHTSA also operates a 
vehicle engineering research and test center in Ohio with 
laboratories and other facilities for testing vehicles, vehicle 
equipment, and tires. To guide motor vehicle research activi- 
ties, NHTSA has just completed a five-year plan that identi- 
fies research needs according to priorities in rulemaking. The 
identification is made by analysis of accident data, motor fuel 
conservation needs, technological potential, and industrial 
capability. 

by Joan Claybrook 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, 

D.C. 20590 

1979; 15p 

Availability: Corporate author 



58 



ctoberSl, 1979 HS-810 344 

5-900 018 

NANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF STATE HIGHWAY 
PROGRAMS. COURSE GUIDE 



L js course guide provides guidelines for planning, administer- 
$, and teaching a 3 1/2 day course in the financial manage- 
nt of state highway safety programs. The participant's edu- 
tional background should include at least 60 credits (a B.A. 

B.S. degree preferable) at the undergraduate level with a 
ong background in accounting, business, and management. 
ie participant also should have an ability to learn in a partici- 
nt-centered environment. Class size should be between 8 
d 20 participants. All instructor material is directed at the in- 
nctor who has experience in financial management and 
lowledge of highway safety programs at the Federal, state, 
d local levels. Twenty-one hours of instruction are divided 
to 14 90-minute sessions. The content of each day's instruc- 
n has a single theme (planning, initiating, administering, and 
ssing) which gives direction to the day's presentations and 
issroom activities. Multiple-choice tests are provided for use 

the discretion of the instructor. Evaluation questionnaires 
e provided which may be used by the instructor, the partici- 
nt, and a third party in order to assess the course. Slides 
ve been prepared to accompany the course. 

Kenard McPherson 

inlap and Associates, Darien, Conn.; National Public 

irvices Res. Inst, Alexandria, Va. 

78; 68p 

earinghouse training materials. Subject: State Highway 

fety Program Financial Management. Educational level: 

>llege Undergraduate Courses, 60 Credits Minimum, B.A. or 

S. Preferable. Format: Course Guide. See also HS-900 019 

d HS-900 020. Type of audience: Financial Managers. 

^liability: NHTSA General Services Div. 



59 



INDEX to ABSTRACTS 



61 



KWOC Title Index 



ABBREVIATED 

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF ROAD TRAFFIC 
(ABBREVIATED VERSION OF INTERNRAPPORT NO. 
160) 

HS-025 838 

ACCORD 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033--GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

ACTIONS 

LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST AT-FAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL 
TRAFFIC CRASHES 

HS-025 765 

ADAPTATION 

ADAPTATION OF A GENERAL MULTIBODY DYNAM- 
ICAL FORMALISM TO DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF 
TERRESTRIAL VEHICLES 

HS-025 789 

ADAPTIVE 

SELF-ADAPTIVE ANTI-SKID BRAKING SYSTEM 

HS-025 625 

ADDS 

SPEED CONTROL UNIT GETS SMALLER, ADDS 
FUNCTION [1979 FORD CARS] 

HS-025 820 

ADJUDICATION 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY REPORT 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 797 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY REPORT 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 797 



LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST AT-FAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL 
TRAFFIC CRASHES 

HS-025 765 

ADVANCES 

RECENT ADVANCES IN ELASTOMER PROCESSING. 
SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 806 

AGE 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

AGENCY 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

AIM 

TARGET: HIGHWAY RISKS. 1. TAKING INDIVIDUAL 
AIM 

HS-025 841 

AIR 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

THE ALUMINUM-AIR BATTERY FOR ELECTRIC 
VEHICLES 

HS-025 842 

WHY EATON GOT OUT OF THE AIR-BAG BUSINESS 

HS-025 745 

ALCOHOL 

ALCOHOL AND THE DRIVER 

HS-025 768 

BLOOD TEST LEGISLATION IN NEW ZEALAND 
[ALCOHOL LEVELS IN DRIVERS] 

HS-025 290 

CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL ARRESTS IN A RURAL 
STATE [WYOMING] 

HS-025 769 

DDC [DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE] SUPPLEMENT 
LAUNCHES ALCOHOL CAMPAIGN 

HS-025 647 

NEW RESEARCH ON THE ROLE OF ALCOHOL AND 
DRUGS IN ROAD ACCIDENTS 

HS-025 740 

ALKAEN 

SUOMEN TIELHKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 



63 



HSL 79-10 



KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

ALLOY 

AUTOMOTIVE HSLA [HIGH STRENGTH, LOW 
ALLOY] STEEL ENTERS BAR AREA 

HS-025 816 

ALLOYS 

HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOYS MINIMIZE 
BODY PANEL WEIGHT 

HS-025 817 

ALONG 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

ALTERNATIVES 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

ALUMINUM 

COATING MATERIAL ENHANCES ALUMINUM SUR- 
FACES [AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS] 

HS-025 819 

HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOYS MINIMIZE 
BODY PANEL WEIGHT 

HS-025 817 

THE ALUMINUM-AIR BATTERY FOR ELECTRIC 
VEHICLES 

HS-025 842 

AMC 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

AMEOATORY 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 

AMERICAN 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LO* TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

ANALYST 

DEVELOP AND TEST AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PRO- 
GRAM FOR TRAFFIC RECORDS ANALYST. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 807 



ANALYTICAL 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 

APPLICANTS 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

APPLIED 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

APPRAISALS 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

APPRECIATED 

BRAKES: FORGOTTEN BUT APPRECIATED 

HS-025 292 

ARRANGEMENT 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

ARRESTS 

CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL ARRESTS IN A RURAL 
STATE [WYOMING] 

HS-025 769 

ART 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

ARTICLES 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 



October 31, 1979 



ASKED 

THE 12 MOST-ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT RV 
[RECREATIONAL VEHICLE] TIRES 

HS-025 744 

ASSERTIONS 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

ASSESSING 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN U.S. AUTOMOBILE 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST FEDERAL INITIA- 
TIVES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 543 

ASSESSMENT 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE BROOK- 
FIELD VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A NEW 
LIQUID BATH METHOD 

HS-025 771 

ASSOCIATE 

DEVELOP AND TEST AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PRO- 
GRAM FOR TRAFFIC RECORDS ANALYST. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 807 

ASTM 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

ATTACK 

DRIVER ED ATTACK BACKFIRES ON INSURANCE 
GROUP 

HS-025 792 

ATTENTION 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

AUSTRALIA 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MOTORCYCLE POPULA- 
TION IN USE IN AUSTRALIA, AND THE RATE OF 
EFFECT OF DESIGN CHANGE 

HS-025 629 

EVALUATION OF THREE-WAY INTERSECTION 
REGULATION [WESTERN AUSTRALIA] 

HS-025 828 



THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

AUTHORIZATIONS 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

AUTO 

AUTO MAKERS USING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 
IN NEW EMISSIONS SYSTEMS 

HS-025 811 

TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO OCCUPAN- 
CY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARCH RESULTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 822 

TIRES '79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 639 

AUTOMOBILE 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

CONSUMER DECISION PROCESSES IN AUTOMOBILE 
PURCHASING: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY 

HS-025 748 

EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN COM- 
PONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 840 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

SMASHED. THE MAGAZINE ON DRINKING-AND- 
DRIVING (IMPACT. LA REVUE DE L'AUTOMOBILE 
ET DE LA SOBRIETE) 

HS-025 823 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN U.S. AUTOMOBILE 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST FEDERAL INITIA- 
TIVES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 543 

THE CURRENT STATUS OF AUTOMOBILE RUNNING 
LIGHTS 

HS-025 833 

THE EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ON AUTOMOBILE 
FUEL ECONOMY UNDER CANADIAN CONDITIONS 

HS-025 756 



65 



HSL 79-10 



AUTOMOBILES 

AUTOMOBILES: NEW VIGOR FOR AN ENDANGERED 
SPECIES 

HS-025 804 

SAFETY FIRST [IN AUTOMOBILES] 

HS-025 636 

THE 79>S ARE LARGER INSIDE AND STRONGER 
OUTSIDE, BUT...WHERE DID THE WEIGHT GO? [U.S. 
AUTOMOBILES] 

HS-025 824 

AUTOMOTIVE 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

AUTOMOTIVE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS 
PROGRAM. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 648 

AUTOMOTIVE HSLA [HIGH STRENGTH, LOW 
ALLOY] STEEL ENTERS BAR AREA 

HS-025 816 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION SYSTEMS PILOT 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 778 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

COATING MATERIAL ENHANCES ALUMINUM SUR- 
FACES [AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS] 

HS-025 819 

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PRECISION OF 
BROOKFIELD VISCOMETRY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
LUBRICANT FLUIDS 

HS-025 761 

LIGHTS: PT. 1. TO HAVE OR HAVE NOT 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS, U.S. REGULATIONS] 

HS-025 641 

LIGHTS: PT. 2. WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS] 

HS-025 642 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 



PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

REINFORCEMENT STRENGTHENS INJECTION 
MOLDED PARTS [AUTOMOTIVE PARTS] 

HS-025 815 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

TITANIA: A NEW OPTION IN EXHAUST SENSORS 
[AUTOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM] 

HS-025 821 

AVIATION 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

BACKFIRES 

DRIVER ED ATTACK BACKFIRES ON INSURANCE 
GROUP 

HS-025 792 

BAG 

WHY EATON GOT OUT OF THE AIR-BAG BUSINESS 

HS-025 745 

BAR 

AUTOMOTIVE HSLA [HIGH STRENGTH, LOW 
ALLOY] STEEL ENTERS BAR AREA 

HS-025 816 

BASELINE 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 



66 



October 31, 1979 



PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 
DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 

BATH 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE BROOK- 
FIELD VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A NEW 
LIQUID BATH METHOD 

HS-025 771 

BATTERY 

THE ALUMINUM-AIR BATTERY FOR ELECTRIC 
VEHICLES 

HS-025 842 

BEHAVIOUR 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

BELT 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFICATIONS FOR PASSIVE 
BELT SYSTEMS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 809 

BELTS 

SAFETY BELTS: THE UNCOLLECTED DIVIDENDS 

HS-025 645 

BENZ 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

DRUGS AND DRIVING: A SELECTED BIBLIOG- 
RAPHY. SUPPLEMENT ONE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 879 

BIKE 

HOW TO BREAK IN A NEW BIKE [MOTORCYCLES] 

HS-025 853 

BILATERAL 

BILATERAL MODEL OF MANUEL [SIC] STEERING 
SYSTEM 

HS-025 790 

BILL 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

BL 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 



BLOOD 

BLOOD TEST LEGISLATION IN NEW ZEALAND 
[ALCOHOL LEVELS IN DRIVERS] 

HS-025 290 

BLOW 

SOFTENING THE BLOW. CAN A TRUE EXPERIMEN- 
TAL SAFETY VEHICLE BE MADE PRACTICAL? 

HS-025 776 

BMCS 

BMCS [BUREAU OF MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY] 
ROADSIDE SAFETY INSPECTIONS 1976-1977 

HS-025 827 

BMW 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

BODY 

HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOYS MINIMIZE 
BODY PANEL WEIGHT 

HS-025 817 

BOOK 

FACT BOOK. STATISTICAL INFORMATION ON 
HIGHWAY SAFETY. ANNUAL ISSUE NO. 2 

HS-803 893 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 

MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 

BR 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

BRAKE 

COMPOSITE BRAKE PEDAL TESTED 

HS-025 814 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 

BRAKES 

BRAKES: FORGOTTEN BUT APPRECIATED 

HS-025 292 

BRAKING 
ANTI-LOCK BRAKING 

HS-025 772 

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR BRAKING TECHNIQUE 

HS-025 741 

SELF-ADAPTIVE ANTI-SKID BRAKING SYSTEM 

HS-025 625 

BREAK 

HOW TO BREAK IN A NEW BIKE [MOTORCYCLES] 

HS-025 853 



67 



HSL 79-10 



BRIEF 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

HS-025 630 

BROMIDE 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

BRQOKFIELD 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE BROOK- 
FIELD VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A NEW 
LIQUID BATH METHOD 

HS-025 771 

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PRECISION OF 
BROOKFIELD VISCOMETRY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
LUBRICANT FLUIDS 

HS-025 761 

BROTHER 

BIG BROTHER IS STEPPING ON YOUR HEAD. 
[MOTORCYCLE SAFETY AND HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 843 

BUICK 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISES OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 



BULK 

ROAD SURFACE BULK 
THEORETICAL STUDY 



WATER DRAINAGE-A 



HS-025 762 



BUMPER 

CALCULATIONS AND SUPPORTING MATERIAL FOR 
THE PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE BUMPER 
STANDARD 

HS-803 868 

COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE NA- 
TIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRA- 
TION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 1978, AND FEBRUA- 
RY 15, 1979 

HS-803 867 

BUMPERS 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

BUREAUCRATS 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 

MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 



BUS 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

SCHOOL BUS MAINTENANCE OUTLINED. CALIFOR. 
NIA TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR DISCUSSES 
COSTS AND PROCEDURES 

HS-025 749 

BUSINESS 
THE PROFITABLE EXHAUST SYSTEM BUSINESS 

HS-025 809 

WHY EATON GOT OUT OF THE AIR-BAG BUSINESS 

HS-025 745 

CALCULATIONS 

CALCULATIONS AND SUPPORTING MATERIAL FOR 
THE PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE BUMPER 
STANDARD 

HS-803 868 

CALIBRATION 

CALIBRATION OF THREE YEAR OLD CHILD DUM- 
MIES (PHASE 2). FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 792 

CALIFORNIA 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

SCHOOL BUS MAINTENANCE OUTLINED. CALIFOR- 
NIA TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR DISCUSSES 
COSTS AND PROCEDURES 

HS-025 749 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

CALLS 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS' BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

CALSPAN 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 



68 



October 31, 1979 



CAM 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

CAMPAIGN 

DDC [DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE] SUPPLEMENT 
LAUNCHES ALCOHOL CAMPAIGN 

HS-025 647 

CANADA 

THE INCIDENCE OF VEHICLE MISFUELING IN 
MAJOR CITIES IN CANADA 

HS-025 781 

CANADIAN 

THE EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ON AUTOMOBILE 
FUEL ECONOMY UNDER CANADIAN CONDITIONS 

HS-025 756 

CAPACITY 

HIGHWAY CAPACITY, MEASURES OF EFFECTIVE- 
NESS, AND FLOW THEORY 

HS-025 844 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

CARGO 

EFFECT OF CARGO SHIFTING ON VEHICLE HAN- 
DLING. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 737 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

CARLO 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

CAROLINA 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 

CARRIAGEWAY 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

CARRIER 

BMCS [BUREAU OF MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY] 
ROADSIDE SAFETY INSPECTIONS 1976-1977 

HS-025 827 



MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 

REMARKS AT MAINTENANCE COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING [REGULAR COMMON CARRIER CONFERENCE], 
NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 17, 1979 [TRUCK SAFETY] 

HS-810 339 

CARS 

MOST '81 CARS MAY HAVE TUNGSTEN/HALOGEN 
LAMPS 

HS-025 640 

SPEED CONTROL UNIT GETS SMALLER, ADDS 
FUNCTION [1979 FORD CARS] 

HS-025 820 

CASE 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE STUDY OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 

CATEGORICAL 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 

CERTIFICATION 

A FUEL ECONOMY MEASUREMENT DILEMMA: 
CERTIFICATION TESTING VS. CUSTOMER DRIVING 

HS-025 759 

CHALLENGE 

THE CHALLENGE OF ENERGY CONSERVATION TO 
THE COMPOUNDER [RUBBER INDUSTRY] 

HS-025 803 

CHAMPS 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

CHAPTER 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

CHARACTERISITCS 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

CHARACTERISTICS 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MOTORCYCLE POPULA- 
TION IN USE IN AUSTRALIA, AND THE RATE OF 
EFFECT OF DESIGN CHANGE 

HS-025 629 



69 



HSL 7940 



PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CED (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

CHASSIS 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL EF- 
FICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR VEHI- 
CLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER CONDI- 
TIONS 

HS-025 757 

CHEVROLET 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

CHILD 

CALIBRATION OF THREE YEAR OLD CHILD DUM- 
MIES (PHASE 2). FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 792 

PROJECT CHILDSAFE COULD SAVE YOUR CHILD'S 
LIFE [CHILD RESTRAINTS] 

HS-025 627 



CHILDSAFE 

PROJECT CHILDSAFE COULD SAVE YOUR CHILD'S 
LIFE [CHILD RESTRAINTS] 

HS-025 627 

CHRYSLER 

REMARKS BEFORE THE CHRYSLER RETREAT, ANN 
ARBOR, MICHIGAN, JANUARY 18, 1979 [FUEL 
ECONOMY REGULATORY PROGRAM] 

HS-810 340 

cro 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CED (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

CITIES 

ESTIMATES OF FUEL SAVINGS THROUGH IM- 
PROVED TRAFFIC FLOW IN SEVEN U.S. CITIES 

HS-025 854 



I 



70 



THE INCIDENCE Ob VEHICLE MISFUELING IN 
MAJOR CITIES IN CANADA 

HS-025 781 

CITY 

WISE WALKERS IN THE MILE-HIGH CITY [DENVER 
PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PROGRAM] 

HS-025 794 

CLOSE 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

COATING 

COATING MATERIAL ENHANCES ALUMINUM SUR- 
FACES [AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS] 

HS-025 819 

COLLISION 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

COLLISIONS 

ANALYSIS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AND COLLI- 
SIONS 

HS-025 851 

COLORADO 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE IN 
COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 680 

COMBUSTION 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

COMMERCE 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 



COMMERCIAL 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

COMMITTEE 

REMARKS AT MAINTENANCE COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING [REGULAR COMMON CARRIER CONFERENCE], 
NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 17, 1979 [TRUCK SAFETY] 

HS-810 339 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

COMPACT 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

COMPARATIVE 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL EF- 
FICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR VEHI- 
CLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER CONDI- 
TIONS 

HS-025 757 

COMPARISON 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DBS ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

COMPATIBILITY 

EMS [EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES] COMPATI- 
BILITY STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 858 



71 



HSL 7940 



COMPONENT 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

COMPONENTS 

EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN COM- 
PONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 840 



COMPOSITE 

COMPOSITE BRAKE PEDAL TESTED 



HS-025 814 



COMPOUNDER 

THE CHALLENGE OF ENERGY CONSERVATION TO 
THE COMPOUNDER [RUBBER INDUSTRY] 

HS-025 803 

COMPUTER 

AUTO MAKERS USING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 
IN NEW EMISSIONS SYSTEMS 

HS-025 811 

COMPUTERIZED 

COMPUTERIZED TRAFFIC CONTROL SAVES TIME 
AND FUEL 

HS-025 637 

CONCEPTS 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 
DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 

CONFERENCE 

REMARKS AT MAINTENANCE COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING [REGULAR COMMON CARRIER CONFERENCE], 
NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 17, 1979 [TRUCK SAFETY] 

HS-810 339 

1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. AU- 
GUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

HS-025 734 

CONFLICT 

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICT 
SURVEYS 

HS-025 850 

CONFLICTS 

ANALYSIS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AND COLLI- 
SIONS 

HS-025 851 

TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN 
HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-025 849 



CONSERVATION 

THE CHALLENGE OF ENERGY CONSERVATION TO 
THE COMPOUNDER [RUBBER INDUSTRY] 

HS-025 803 

CONSISTENCY 

URBAN TRAFFIC, FUEL ECONOMY AND EMIS- 
SIONS-CONSISTENCY OF VARIOUS MEASURE- 
MENTS 

HS-025 755 

CONTENT 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

CONTINUOUS 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

HS-025 852 

CONTROL 

COMPUTERIZED TRAFFIC CONTROL SAVES TIME 
AND FUEL 

HS-025 637 

DIESEL VEHICLE NOISE CONTROL 

HS-025 626 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC 
CONTROL. OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: JAPAN 
(AUGUST 1977) 

HS-025 628 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND HARIN- 
GEY [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 799 

SPEED CONTROL UNIT GETS SMALLER, ADDS 
FUNCTION [1979 FORD CARS] 

HS-025 820 

TITANIA: A NEW OPTION IN EXHAUST SENSORS 
[AUTOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM] 

HS-025 821 

CONVICTION 

MICHIGAN DRIVER PROFILE. SOME BASIC FACTS 
ABOUT THE TRAFFIC CONVICTION AND ACCIDENT 
RECORDS OF MICHIGAN DRIVERS 

HS-025 837 

CORRELATES 

CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL ARRESTS IN A RURAL 
STATE [WYOMING] 

HS-025 769 

COST 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, EXTERIOR PRO- 
TECTION 

HS-803 897 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 



72 



VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

COSTS 

SCHOOL BUS MAINTENANCE OUTLINED. CALIFOR- 
NIA TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR DISCUSSES 
COSTS AND PROCEDURES 

HS-025 749 

COURSE 

DDC [DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE] SUPPLEMENT 
LAUNCHES ALCOHOL CAMPAIGN 

HS-025 647 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF STATE HIGHWAY 
SAFETY PROGRAMS. COURSE GUIDE 

HS-900 018 

UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 
COURSE MONITORING-4. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 801 

COVERAGES 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

CRASH 

CRASH THEORIES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR 
RESEARCH 

HS-025 796 

TRAUMATIC NEUROSIS [FOLLOWING A MOTOR 
VEHICLE CRASH] 

HS-025 777 

CRASHES 

LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST AT-FAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL 
TRAFFIC CRASHES 

HS-025 765 



1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. AU- 
GUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

HS-025 734 

CROSSINGS 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 

CURRICULUM 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 806 

CUSTOMER 

A FUEL ECONOMY MEASUREMENT DILEMMA: 
CERTIFICATION TESTING VS. CUSTOMER DRIVING 

HS-025 759 

CYCLE 

SIGNAL CYCLE LENGTH AND FUEL CONSUMPTION 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 848 



CYCLING 

WAYS TO MAKE CYCLING SAFER 



DANGERS 

TWILIGHT [DANGERS OF DRIVING] 



HS-025 830 



HS-025 742 



DDC 

DDC [DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE] SUPPLEMENT 
LAUNCHES ALCOHOL CAMPAIGN 

HS-025 647 

DECISION 

CONSUMER DECISION PROCESSES IN AUTOMOBILE 
PURCHASING: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY 

HS-025 748 

DECLARE 

LET'S DECLARE WAR ON TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 

HS-025 812 

DECRIMINALIZATION 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY REPORT 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 797 



73 



DEFENSIVE 



HSL 79-K 



DEGREE 



Hs ' 025 *47 



THB FUBL 
SPARK-IGNfTBD 



TPP 

l LTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
EMISSI NS OF 



DESIGN R RULES 

DETECTION 

THE EF 
LIGHTS] ON TH 
IMPACT TEST OF COUwm. HS-803 783 CLE ^ADWAY 

I-SSL 

DEMAND HS - 803 788 

riON"52 nt? \rr\^^^ _. 

' FUEL 



^PLICATIONS FOK 

HS-025 633 



[RUNNING 

CHANGE OF VBHI- 



DEMERIT 



HS " 025 754 



QUIZ-MATCH 
DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

TRAFFIC CONFLICT* AC . HS-025 638 

HIGHWAY SAFETY DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN 

HS-025 849 



DIESEL 

DIESEL VEHICLE NOISE CONTROL 

PERPORMANn? 
T 



DENSITY 

s 

DENVER 

S 

DEPARTMENT 



HS-025 291 

AS A 
HS-025 852 



HS-025 626 



HE F - 

S. REPORT NO 6M97? vo E c STATES - THIRD E- 

cm d.5 Ln-ER) pi 19 ! 8 L SWAGEN DIESEL, 90 

REPORT, JULY im EJECTION]. INTERIM 

HS-803 835 



DDTERENCES 



cm 



HS-025 794 



^OCBSSING. 



OP 

DEPENDENCE HS " 25 84 

?S R c ES PE S R A ^S Io r D ^VID UAL WF 

DESIGN HS " 803 794 



DILEMMA 



HS ' 803 794 



., AND THE 

DESIGN CONSIDER ATmxro ^ HS-025 629 

SURVEYS ^ 5iDERATI ONS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICT 

HANDBOOK OF mi-w., HS-025 850 

f"iPT?i> A i^T^Tr . -"-lUHVyAY SAFPTV rv-r-mr^* 

^^ERATING PRACTICES. REV ED DESI N AND 

HS-025 773 



74 



DISC HS-025 759 

MOTORCYCLE DlSr PA^T, 

REVIEW OF AMFTfl-i? p EFORMANCE- A 

PROCEDURES LMTORY ^ASURES AND TEST 

DKCLOSURf; HS " 025 632 

HS-025 750 



DISCUSSES 



Su^R^SPO^^ 
COSTS AND PROCEDURES 



P^ 
SWER VISOR 



HS-025 749 



October 31, 1979 

DISPERSANCY 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 

DISTRIBUTION 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

DIVIDENDS 

SAFETY BELTS: THE UNCOLLECTED DIVIDENDS 

HS-025 645 

DRAINAGE 

ROAD SURFACE BULK WATER DRAINAGE-A 
THEORETICAL STUDY 

HS-025 762 

DRINKING 

SMASHED. THE MAGAZINE ON DRINKING-AND- 
DRIVING (IMPACT. LA REVUE DE L'AUTOMOBILE 
ET DE LA SOBRIETE) 

HS-025 823 

DRIVER 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 
ALCOHOL AND THE DRIVER 

HS-025 768 

DRIVER ED ATTACK BACKFIRES ON INSURANCE 
GROUP 

HS-025 792 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE, FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

MICHIGAN DRIVER PROFILE. SOME BASIC FACTS 
ABOUT THE TRAFFIC CONVICTION AND ACCIDENT 
RECORDS OF MICHIGAN DRIVERS 

HS-025 837 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 



THE NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER PROGRAM 
USERS' GUIDE 

HS-803 545 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE STUDY OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 

MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 

DRIVERS 

BLOOD TEST LEGISLATION IN NEW ZEALAND 
[ALCOHOL LEVELS IN DRIVERS] 

HS-025 290 

DRIVERS LICENSE GUIDE 1979 

HS-025 635 

GOOD DRIVERS USE THEIR MIRRORS 

HS-025 834 

LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST AT-FAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL 
TRAFFIC CRASHES 

HS-025 765 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

MICHIGAN DRIVER PROFILE. SOME BASIC FACTS 
ABOUT THE TRAFFIC CONVICTION AND ACCIDENT 
RECORDS OF MICHIGAN DRIVERS 

HS-025 837 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE STUDY OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 

DRIVETRAIN 

EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN COM- 
PONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 840 

DRIVING 

A FUEL ECONOMY MEASUREMENT DILEMMA: 
CERTIFICATION TESTING VS. CUSTOMER DRIVING 

HS-025 759 

DDC [DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE] SUPPLEMENT 
LAUNCHES ALCOHOL CAMPAIGN 

HS-025 647 

DRUGS AND DRIVING: A SELECTED BIBLIOG- 
RAPHY. SUPPLEMENT ONE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 879 

DRUNK DRIVING PROBLEM GROWS WORSE 

HS-025 763 

RX: DRUGS AND DRIVING 

HS-025 795 

SMASHED. THE MAGAZINE ON DRINKING-AND- 
DRIVING (IMPACT. LA REVUE DE L'AUTOMOBILE 
ET DE LA SOBRIETE) 

HS-025 823 



75 



MEDIATE MOVE* COmotafS? %* T?* ""- 



HSL 79-10 



DISCUSSION 
DYNAMICS]. 



2: TECHNICAL 



DRDGS 

fflg. 



F THE 



DYNAMOMETER 

S?^ 
UNDER 



THERMAL EF- 



: DRUGS AND DRIVING 



HS-025 740 EATON 



HS - 25757 



DRUNK HS-025795 *** EATON OT UT OF B AIR-BAG BUSINESS 

DRUNK DRIVING PROBLEM GROWS WORSE E T^T 

HS-025 763 CE RTIFTCATlbN7ESTING X V l 4' UKMENT DILEM1 *A: 

^j V5. CUSTOMER DRIVING 

OLD 



DUMMIES 



DURAHON 



PORT 



FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 



DYNAMIC 



HS - 025791 



IPUBL 



DYNAMICAL 



TERRESTRUL VEHICLES 



- 
SI MULATION OF 



DYNAMICS 



HS - 25789 



THE MOTOR VEHICLF 
SAVINGS ACT, 



V OF 
COS? 



HS-025 785 



HS-025 755 



76 



October 31, 1979 



EFFECTIVENESS 

HIGHWAY CAPACITY, MEASURES OF EFFECTIVE- 
NESS, AND FLOW THEORY 

HS-025844 

EFFICIENCY 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL EF- 
FICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR VEHI- 
CLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER CONDI- 
TIONS 

HS-025 757 

ELASTOMER 

RECENT ADVANCES IN ELASTOMER PROCESSING. 
SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 806 

ELECTRIC 

THE ALUMINUM-AIR BATTERY FOR ELECTRIC 
VEHICLES 

HS-025 842 

ELECTRICAL 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

EMERGENCY 

EMS [EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES] COMPATI- 
BILITY STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 858 

EMISSION 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

TITANIA: A NEW OPTION IN EXHAUST SENSORS 
[AUTOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM] 

HS-025 821 

EMISSIONS 

AUTO MAKERS USING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 
IN NEW EMISSIONS SYSTEMS 

HS-025 811 

AUTOMOTIVE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS 
PROGRAM. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 648 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL DEMAND 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 754 

SIGNAL CYCLE LENGTH AND FUEL CONSUMPTION 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 848 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 



BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

URBAN TRAFFIC, FUEL ECONOMY AND EMIS- 
SIONS-CONSISTENCY OF VARIOUS MEASURE- 
MENTS 

HS-025 755 

EMS 

EMS [EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES] COMPATI- 
BILITY STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 858 

ENDANGERED 

AUTOMOBILES: NEW VIGOR FOR AN ENDANGERED 
SPECIES 

HS-025 804 

ENERGETISCHEN 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DBS ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHR2EUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

ENERGY 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

THE CHALLENGE OF ENERGY CONSERVATION TO 
THE COMPOUNDER [RUBBER INDUSTRY] 

HS-025 803 

ENGINE 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 

MANIFOLD FUEL FILM EFFECTS IN AN SI [SPARK 
IGNITION] ENGINE 

HS-025 766 

ENGINEERS 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

ENGINES 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 



77 



HSL 79-10 



ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISES OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CBD (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

ENGLAND 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND HARDST- 
GEY [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 799 



THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 

ENHANCES 

COATING MATERIAL ENHANCES ALUMINUM SUR- 
FACES [AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS] 

HS-025 819 

ENTERS 

AUTOMOTIVE HSLA [HIGH STRENGTH, LOW 
ALLOY] STEEL ENTERS BAR AREA 

HS-025 816 

ENVffiONMENTAL 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

EPA 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

EQUILIBRIUM 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

ERATTA 

SUOMEN TIELnKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

ESTIMATES 

ESTIMATES OF FUEL SAVINGS THROUGH IM- 
PROVED TRAFFIC FLOW IN SEVEN U.S. CITIES 

HS-025 854 

ESTIMATION 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 

EVALUATION 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, EXTERIOR PRO- 
TECTION 

HS-803 897 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 



78 



October 31, 1979 



EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN COM- 
PONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 840 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

EVALUATION OF THREE-WAY INTERSECTION 
REGULATION [WESTERN AUSTRALIA] 

HS-025 828 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033--GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 
DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

EXECUTIVE 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

EXHAUST 

THE PROFITABLE EXHAUST SYSTEM BUSINESS 

HS-025 809 

TITANIA: A NEW OPTION IN EXHAUST SENSORS 
[AUTOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM] 

HS-025 821 

EXPAND 

WINDSHIELD WIPER SYSTEMS EXPAND PLASTIC 
USE 

HS-025 818 

EXPERIMENTAL 

SOFTENING THE BLOW. CAN A TRUE EXPERIMEN- 
TAL SAFETY VEHICLE BE MADE PRACTICAL? 

HS-025 776 



EXPLORATORY 

CONSUMER DECISION PROCESSES IN AUTOMOBILE 
PURCHASING: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY 

HS-025 748 

EXPOSURE 

RISK EXPOSURES. STRUCTURING OF THE NEED 
FOR RISK EXPOSURE DATA FOR TRAFFIC AC- 
CIDENT ANALYSIS 

HS-025 780 

EXPOSURES 

RISK EXPOSURES. STRUCTURING OF THE NEED 
FOR RISK EXPOSURE DATA FOR TRAFFIC AC- 
CIDENT ANALYSIS 

HS-025 780 

EXTENSIVE 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

EXTERIOR 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, EXTERIOR PRO- 
TECTION 

HS-803 897 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

EXTREMITY 

ROLLOVER INJURIES OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY 
[OFF-ROAD VEHICLES] 

HS-025 767 

FACILITY 

DYNAMIC TESTING OF LUMINAIRE SUPPORTS 
WITH AN IMPROVED PENDULUM IMPACT FACILI- 
TY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 735 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

FAHRZEUGEN 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DBS ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

PARS 

FATAL ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (PARS). 1977 
ANNUAL REPORT [NO. 3] 

HS-803 810 

FATAL 

FATAL ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (FARS). 1977 
ANNUAL REPORT [NO. 3] 

HS-803 810 



79 



HSL 79-10 



LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST ATtFAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL 
TRAFFIC CRASHES 

HS-025 765 

PROFILE OF THE FATAL PEDESTRIAN RAILROAD 
ACCIDENT 

HS-025 646 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 

FATALITIES 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAP- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

FATIGUE 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

FAULT 

LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST AT-FAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL 
TRAFFIC CRASHES 

HS-025 765 

FEDERAL 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, EXTERIOR PRO- 
TECTION 

HS-803 897 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

HS-025 630 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN U.S. AUTOMOBILE 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST FEDERAL INITIA- 
TIVES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 543 

FIELD 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

FIGURES 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 



FILAMENT 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

FILM 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

MANIFOLD FUEL FILM EFFECTS IN AN SI [SPARK 
IGNITION] ENGINE 

HS-025 766 

FINANCE 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

FINANCIAL 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF STATE HIGHWAY 
SAFETY PROGRAMS. COURSE GUIDE 

HS-900 018 

FINLAND 

SUOMEN TIELnKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

FLOW 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

ESTIMATES OF FUEL SAVINGS THROUGH IM- 
PROVED TRAFFIC FLOW IN SEVEN U.S. CITIES 

HS-025 854 

HIGHWAY CAPACITY, MEASURES OF EFFECTIVE- 
NESS, AND FLOW THEORY 

HS-025 844 

FLOWS 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 

FLUIDITY 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

FLUIDS 

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PRECISION OF 
BROOKFIELD VISCOMETRY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
LUBRICANT FLUIDS 

HS-025 761 



October 31, 1979 



FLUX 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

FMVSS 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, EXTERIOR PRO- 
TECTION 

HS-803 897 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

FORD 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

SPEED CONTROL UNIT GETS SMALLER, ADDS 
FUNCTION [1979 FORD CARS] 

HS-025 820 

FOREIGN 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

FORGOTTEN 

BRAKES: FORGOTTEN BUT APPRECIATED 

HS-025 292 

FORMALISM 

ADAPTATION OF A GENERAL MULTIBODY DYNAM- 
ICAL FORMALISM TO DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF 
TERRESTRIAL VEHICLES 

HS-025 789 

FREEWAY 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

HS-025 852 



FUEL 

A FUEL ECONOMY MEASUREMENT DILEMMA: 
CERTIFICATION TESTING VS. CUSTOMER DRIVING 

HS-025 759 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

AUTOMOTIVE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS 
PROGRAM. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 648 

COMPUTERIZED TRAFFIC CONTROL SAVES TIME 
AND FUEL 

HS-025 637 

ESTIMATES OF FUEL SAVINGS THROUGH IM- 
PROVED TRAFFIC FLOW IN SEVEN U.S. CITIES 

HS-025 854 

EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN COM- 
PONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 840 

MANIFOLD FUEL FILM EFFECTS IN AN SI [SPARK 
IGNITION] ENGINE 

HS-025 766 

MEASURING FUEL ECONOMY...ON THE ROAD 

HS-025 832 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL DEMAND 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 754 

REMARKS BEFORE THE CHRYSLER RETREAT, ANN 
ARBOR, MICHIGAN, JANUARY 18, 1979 [FUEL 
ECONOMY REGULATORY PROGRAM] 

HS-810 340 

SIGNAL CYCLE LENGTH AND FUEL CONSUMPTION 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 848 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

TFC/IW [TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION/INERTIA 
WEIGHT] 

HS-025 758 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 



81 



THE EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ON AUTOMOBILE 
FUEL ECONOMY UNDER CANADIAN CONDITIONS 

HS-025 756 

URBAN TRAFFIC, FUEL ECONOMY AND EMIS- 
SIONS-CONSISTENCY OF VARIOUS MEASURE- 
MENTS 

HS-025 755 

FUELED 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

FUNCTION 

SPEED CONTROL UNIT GETS SMALLER, ADDS 
FUNCTION [1979 FORD CARS] 

HS-025 820 

GARCIA 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

GASOLINES 

MOTOR GASOLINES, SUMMER 1978 

HS-025 825 

GATHERED 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 

GEAR 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

GOOD 

GOOD DRIVERS USE THEIR MIRRORS 

HS-025 834 

GOODS 

INJURIES TO OCCUPANTS OF HEAVY GOODS VEHI- 
CLES 

HS-025 801 

GOT 

WHY EATON GOT OUT OF THE AIR-BAG BUSINESS 

HS-025 745 

GRADE 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 



HSL 79-10 

GRADING 

UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 
COURSE MONITORING--4. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 801 

GROWS 

DRUNK DRIVING PROBLEM GROWS WORSE 

HS-025 763 

GUARDRAIL 

GUARDRAIL/VEHICLE DYNAMIC INTERACTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 644 

GUIDANCE 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

GUIDE 

DRIVERS LICENSE GUIDE 1979 

HS-025 635 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF STATE HIGHWAY 
SAFETY PROGRAMS. COURSE GUIDE 

KS-900 018 

THE NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER PROGRAM 
USERS' GUIDE 

HS-803 545 

GUILDFORD 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 

GUN 

TIRES '79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 639 

HALOGEN 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

MOST '81 CARS MAY HAVE TUNGSTEN/HALOGEN 
LAMPS 

HS-025 640 

HANDBOOK 

HANDBOOK OF HIGHWAY SAFETY DESIGN AND 
OPERATING PRACTICES. REV. ED. 

HS-025 773 

HANDLING 

EFFECT OF CARGO SHIFTING ON VEHICLE HAN- 
DLING. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 737 

HARINGEY 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND HARIN- 
GEY [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 799 

HAZARDS 

HIGHWAY HAZARDS: WHAT SOME STATES ARE 
DOING FOR THEM 

HS-025 798 



82 



HEAD 

BIG BROTHER IS STEPPING ON YOUR HEAD. 
[MOTORCYCLE SAFETY AND HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 843 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

HEADLAMPS 

LIGHTS: PT. 1. TO HAVE OR HAVE NOT 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS, U.S. REGULATIONS] 

HS-025 641 

LIGHTS: PT. 2. WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESNT 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS] 

HS-025 642 

HEADWAY 

THE EFFECT OF PRESENCE LIGHTS [RUNNING 
LIGHTS] ON THE DETECTION OF CHANGE OF VEHI- 
CLE HEADWAY 

HS-025 829 

HEAVY 

INJURIES TO OCCUPANTS OF HEAVY GOODS VEHI- 
CLES 

HS-025 801 

HELMET 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

BIG BROTHER IS STEPPING ON YOUR HEAD. 
[MOTORCYCLE SAFETY AND HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 843 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE IN 
COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 680 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS' BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

HELMETS 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

HS-025 630 

HIGHWAY 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 



COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE NA- 
TIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRA- 
TION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 1978, AND FEBRUA- 
RY 15, 1979 

HS-803 867 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

DRUGS AND HIGHWAY SAFETY: RESEARCH ISSUES 
AND INFORMATION NEEDS 

HS-025 764 

FACT BOOK. STATISTICAL INFORMATION ON 
HIGHWAY SAFETY. ANNUAL ISSUE NO. 2 

HS-803 893 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF STATE HIGHWAY 
SAFETY PROGRAMS. COURSE GUIDE 

HS-900 018 

HANDBOOK OF HIGHWAY SAFETY DESIGN AND 
OPERATING PRACTICES. REV. ED. 

HS-025 773 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 
HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

HIGHWAY CAPACITY, MEASURES OF EFFECTIVE- 
NESS, AND FLOW THEORY 

HS-025 844 

HIGHWAY HAZARDS: WHAT SOME STATES ARE 
DOING FOR THEM 

HS-025 798 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS* BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 806 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 



83 



HSL 79-10 



TARGET: HIGHWAY RISKS. 1. TAKING INDIVIDUAL 
AIM 

HS-025 841 

TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN 
HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-025 849 

1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. AU- 
GUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

HS-025 734 

HONDA 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

HOUDAILLE 

COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE NA- 
TIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRA- 
TION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 1978, AND FEBRUA- 
RY 15, 1979 

HS-803 867 

HOURS 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

HOUSE 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

HSLA 

AUTOMOTIVE HSLA [HIGH STRENGTH, LOW 
ALLOY] STEEL ENTERS BAR AREA 

HS-025 816 



HUMPS 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND HARIN- 

GEY [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 799 

HYDROGEN 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

IGNITED 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

IGNITION 

MANIFOLD FUEL FILM EFFECTS IN AN SI [SPARK 
IGNITION] ENGINE 

HS-025 766 

IMPACT 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

DYNAMIC TESTING OF LUMINAIRE SUPPORTS 
WITH AN IMPROVED PENDULUM IMPACT FACILI- 
TY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 735 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE IN 
COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 680 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 

REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS], 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 
DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 



84 



October 31, 1979 



SMASHED. THE MAGAZINE ON DRINKING-AND- 
DRIVING (IMPACT. LA REVUE DE L'AUTOMOBILE 
ET DE LA SOBRIETE) 

HS-025 823 

IMPAIRED 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033--GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

IMPALA 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

IMPLEMENTATION 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

IMPLICATIONS 

CRASH THEORIES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR 
RESEARCH 

HS-025 796 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

IMPORT 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

IMPROVE 

EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN COM- 
PONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 840 

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR BRAKING TECHNIQUE 

HS-025 741 



INATTENTION 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

INCANDESCENT 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 



INCIDENCE 

THE INCIDENCE OF VEHICLE 
MAJOR CITIES IN CANADA 



MISFUELING IN 
HS-025 781 



INCREASED 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

INDIVIDUAL 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

TARGET: HIGHWAY RISKS. 1. TAKING INDIVIDUAL 
AIM 

HS-025 841 

INDUSTRIES 

COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE NA- 
TIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRA- 
TION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 1978, AND FEBRUA- 
RY 15, 1979 

HS-803 867 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 

INDUSTRY 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN U.S. AUTOMOBILE 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST FEDERAL INITIA- 
TIVES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 543 

THE CHALLENGE OF ENERGY CONSERVATION TO 
THE COMPOUNDER [RUBBER INDUSTRY] 

HS-025 803 

TIRES *79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 639 



85 



HSL 79-10 



INERTIA 

TFC/IW [TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION/INERTIA 
WEIGHT] 

HS-025 758 

INFORMATION 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

DRUGS AND HIGHWAY SAFETY: RESEARCH ISSUES 
AND INFORMATION NEEDS 

HS-025 764 

FACT BOOK. STATISTICAL INFORMATION ON 
HIGHWAY SAFETY. ANNUAL ISSUE NO. 2 

HS-803 893 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

INITIATIVES 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN U.S. AUTOMOBILE 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST FEDERAL INITIA- 
TIVES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 543 

INJECTION 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

REINFORCEMENT STRENGTHENS INJECTION 
MOLDED PARTS [AUTOMOTIVE PARTS] 

HS-025 815 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 

PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 



INJURIES 

INJURIES TO OCCUPANTS OF HEAVY GOODS VEHI- 
CLES 

HS-025 801 

ROLLOVER INJURIES OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY 
[OFF-ROAD VEHICLES] 

HS-025 767 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

INJURY 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 

INQUIRY 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

HS-025 630 

INSIDE 

THE 79'S ARE LARGER INSIDE AND STRONGER 
OUTSIDE, BUT...WHERE DID THE WEIGHT GO? [U.S. 
AUTOMOBILES] 

HS-025 824 

INSPECTIONS 

BMCS [BUREAU OF MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY] 
ROADSIDE SAFETY INSPECTIONS 1976-1977 

HS-025 827 

INSURANCE 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

DRIVER ED ATTACK BACKFIRES ON INSURANCE 
GROUP 

HS-025 792 



INTERACTION 

GUARDRAIL/VEHICLE 
FINAL REPORT 



DYNAMIC INTERACTION. 



HS-025 644 



INTERIM 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 



86 



October 31, 1979 



RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

INTERMEDIATE 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

INTERNAL 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

INTERNATIONAL 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 



INTERNRAPPORT 

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF ROAD TRAFFIC 
(ABBREVIATED VERSION OF INTERNRAPPORT NO. 
160) 

HS-025 838 

INTERPRETATION 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 7% 

INTERSECTION 

EVALUATION OF THREE-WAY INTERSECTION 
REGULATION [WESTERN AUSTRALIA] 

HS-025 828 

INTERSECTIONS 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL, PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

INTERSTATE 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

INVESTIGATION 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 

ISSUE 

FACT BOOK. STATISTICAL INFORMATION ON 
HIGHWAY SAFETY. ANNUAL ISSUE NO. 2 

HS-803 893 

ISSUES 

DRUGS AND HIGHWAY SAFETY: RESEARCH ISSUES 
AND INFORMATION NEEDS 

HS-025 764 

TRANSPORTATION ISSUES 

HS-025 835 



HSL 7940 



IUTAM 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-m2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICSJ-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

IW 

TFC/IW [TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION/INERTIA 
WEIGHT] 

HS-025 758 

JAPAN 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC 
CONTROL, OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: JAPAN 
(AUGUST 1977) 

HS-025 628 

KINGDOM 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 

KNOWLEDGE 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

LAMPS 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

MOST '81 CARS MAY HAVE TUNGSTEN/HALOGEN 
LAMPS 

HS-025 640 

LANE 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

LANGUAGE 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 



ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

LARGER 

THE 79'S ARE LARGER INSIDE AND STRONGER 
OUTSIDE, BUT...WHERE DID THE WEIGHT GO? [U.S. 
AUTOMOBILES] 

HS-025 824 

LAUNCHES 

DDC [DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE] SUPPLEMENT 
LAUNCHES ALCOHOL CAMPAIGN 

HS-025 647 

LAWS 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

LEARNING 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 

MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 

LEFT 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 

LEGAL 

LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST AT-FAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL 
TRAFFIC CRASHES 

HS-025 765 

LEGISLATION 

BLOOD TEST LEGISLATION IN NEW ZEALAND 
[ALCOHOL LEVELS IN DRIVERS] 

HS-025 290 

LEGISLATIVE 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

LEGISLATURE 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BELL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 



88 



LENGTH 

SIGNAL CYCLE LENGTH AND FUEL CONSUMPTION 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 848 

LET 

LET'S DECLARE WAR ON TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 

HS-025 812 

LEVELS 

BLOOD TEST LEGISLATION IN NEW ZEALAND 
[ALCOHOL LEVELS IN DRIVERS] 

HS-025 290 



LICENSE 

DRIVERS LICENSE GUIDE 1979 



HS-025 635 



LICENSES 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 

MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 

LICENSING 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

LIFE 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

PROJECT CHILDSAFE COULD SAVE YOUR CHILD'S 
LIFE [CHILD RESTRAINTS] 

HS-025 627 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

LIFTER 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

LIGHTS 

LIGHTS: PT. 1. TO HAVE OR HAVE NOT 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS, U.S. REGULATIONS] 

HS-025 641 

LIGHTS: PT. 2. WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS] 

HS-025 642 

THE CURRENT STATUS OF AUTOMOBILE RUNNING 
LIGHTS 

HS-025 833 

THE EFFECT OF PRESENCE LIGHTS [RUNNING 
LIGHTS] ON THE DETECTION OF CHANGE OF VEHI- 
CLE HEADWAY 

HS-025 829 



LINES 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 

LIQUID 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE BROOK- 
FIELD VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A NEW 
LIQUID BATH METHOD 

HS-025 771 

LISANA 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

LITER 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

LITERS 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 



89 



LITERS). T**W*Eg>?% E S& ^ <" 
LOADING HS - 8 3 " 39 



HSL 79-10 
LUMINOUS 

HSB&sssai 



MAGAZINE 



LOCK 

ANTI-LOCK BRAKING 



HS - 8 37 " 



HS-025 772 



LOSSES 

cS TSS u ?5S^f Es v. NON - COMMM - 

JSfflMfssra^SKSffSMf 

Sffi "" U M " ^^^ 
low HS ' MS "' 



ET DE LA SOBRIETE) " 

MAINTENANCE 



L>A UTOMOBILE 
HS-025 823 






MAJOR 



MAKERS 



LTD 



HS-025816 



WEIOHT 



LUBRICANT 

BETWEEN^ R N 
[OVERHEAD 



BMW - 



MALE 



HV 



NOVASCOTU 
MANAGEMENT 



DWVER 

MALE DRIVERS IN 



LUBRICANT FLUIDS 
LUBRICANTS 



OF AUTOMOTIVE MANDATORY 
A REPLY TO 



HS-900018 



LIQUID BATH METHOD 
LDMINAIRE 



A NEW 



FATALITIES 



MOTORCYCLE 



. FINAL REPORT 



IMPACT FACILI- 
HS-025 735 



MANIFOLD 



EPFECIS 



HS-025 766 



90 



October 31, 1979 



MANUAL 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

MANUALS 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 
MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 

MANUEL 

BILATERAL MODEL OF MANUEL [SIC] STEERING 
SYSTEM 

HS-025 790 

MARKET 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

MATCH 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

MATERIAL 

CALCULATIONS AND SUPPORTING MATERIAL FOR 
THE PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE BUMPER 
STANDARD 

HS-803 868 

COATING MATERIAL ENHANCES ALUMINUM SUR- 
FACES [AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS] 

HS-025 819 

MATERIALS 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

MEASURED 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

MEASUREMENT 

A FUEL ECONOMY MEASUREMENT DILEMMA: 
CERTIFICATION TESTING VS. CUSTOMER DRIVING 

HS-025 759 

MEASUREMENTS 

URBAN TRAFFIC, FUEL ECONOMY AND EMIS- 
SIONS-CONSISTENCY OF VARIOUS MEASURE- 
MENTS 

HS-025 755 

MEASURES 

HIGHWAY CAPACITY, MEASURES OF EFFECTIVE- 
NESS, AND FLOW THEORY 

HS-025 844 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 



MEASURING 

MEASURING FUEL ECONOMY...ON THE ROAD 

HS-025 832 

MECHANICS 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]~2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

MEDICAL 

EMS [EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES] COMPATI- 
BILITY STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 858 

MEDICALLY 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

MERCEDES 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

MERGE 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

METHOD 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE BROOK- 
FIELD VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A NEW 
LIQUID BATH METHOD 

HS-025 771 

METHODIK 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DES ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

METHODOLOGY 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DES ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

METHODS 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 



91 



HSL 79-10 



METHYLENE 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

MICHIGAN 

MICHIGAN DRIVER PROFILE. SOME BASIC FACTS 
ABOUT THE TRAFFIC CONVICTION AND ACCIDENT 
RECORDS OF MICHIGAN DRIVERS 

HS-025 837 

REMARKS BEFORE THE CHRYSLER RETREAT, ANN 
ARBOR, MICHIGAN, JANUARY 18, 1979 [FUEL 
ECONOMY REGULATORY PROGRAM] 

HS-810 340 

MILE 

WISE WALKERS IN THE MILE-HIGH CITY [DENVER 
PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PROGRAM] 

HS-025 794 

MINIMIZE 

HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOYS MINIMIZE 
BODY PANEL WEIGHT 

HS-025 817 



MIRRORS 

GOOD DRIVERS USE THEIR MIRRORS 



HS-025 834 



MISFUELING 

THE INCIDENCE OF VEHICLE 
MAJOR CITIES IN CANADA 



MISFUELING IN 



HS-025 781 



MOBILITY 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 

MODEL 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL EF- 
FICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR VEHI- 
CLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER CONDI- 
TIONS 

HS-025 757 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

BILATERAL MODEL OF MANUEL [SIC] STEERING 
SYSTEM 

HS-025 790 

MODELS 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

MODIFIED 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 



IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 



MOLDED 

REINFORCEMENT STRENGTHENS 
MOLDED PARTS [AUTOMOTIVE PARTS] 



INJECTION 



HS-025 815 



MONDAY 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

MONITORING 

TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO OCCUPAN- 
CY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARC H RESULTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 822 

UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 
COURSE MONITORING--4. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 801 

MONTE 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

MORGANTON 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 

NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 



MOTION 

WEIGHING VEHICLES IN MOTION 



HS-025 846 



MOTOR 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

BMCS [BUREAU OF MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY] 
ROADSIDE SAFETY INSPECTIONS 1976-1977 

HS-025 827 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, EXTERIOR PRO- 
TECTION 

HS-803 897 



92 



COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DBS ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 
MOTOR GASOLINES, SUMMER 1978 

HS-025 825 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT AND 
OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE OF NEW 
YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

HS-025 840 

PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL DEMAND 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 754 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

TRAUMATIC NEUROSIS [FOLLOWING A MOTOR 
VEHICLE CRASH] 

HS-025 777 

WORLD MOTOR VEHICLE DATA. 1978 ED. 

HS-025 797 

MOTORCYCLE 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

BIG BROTHER IS STEPPING ON YOUR HEAD. 
[MOTORCYCLE SAFETY AND HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 843 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MOTORCYCLE POPULA- 
TION IN USE IN AUSTRALIA, AND THE RATE OF 
EFFECT OF DESIGN CHANGE 

HS-025 629 



EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE IN 
COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 680 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

HS-025 630 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC 
CONTROL. OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: JAPAN 
(AUGUST 1977) 

HS-025 628 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS* BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

UPDATE: MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS IN 1977 

HS-025 793 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BO<OK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 

MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 

MOTORCYCLES 

HOW TO BREAK IN A NEW BIKE [MOTORCYCLES] 

HS-025 853 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

MOTORWAYS 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

MOVING 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

MPH 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 



93 



HSL 79-10 



IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

MAKING 55 MPH PAY 

HS-025 831 

MULTIBOBY 

ADAPTATION OF A GENERAL MULTIBODY DYNAM- 
ICAL FORMALISM TO DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF 
TERRESTRIAL VEHICLES 

HS-025 789 

NATIONAL 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE NA- 
TIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRA- 
TION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 1978, AND FEBRUA- 
RY 15, 1979 

HS-803 867 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS' BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 806 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

THE NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER PROGRAM 
USERS' GUIDE 

HS-803 545 

1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. AU- 
GUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

HS-025 734 



NEUROSIS 

TRAUMATIC NEUROSIS [FOLLOWING A 
VEHICLE CRASH] 



MOTOR 



HS-025 777 

NEWS 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS' BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 



NHTSA 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAP- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS' BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 806 

NIGHT 

VISIBILITY DURING NIGHT DRIVING ON UN- 
LIGHTED ROADS 

HS-025 783 

NITROGEN 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

NL 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 



NOISE 

DIESEL VEHICLE NOISE CONTROL 



HS-025 626 



NORWICH 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND HARIN- 
GEY [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 799 

NOVA 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE STUDY OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 

NOX 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

OBJECTIVES 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

OBSERVATION 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 



94 



TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO OCCUPAN- 
CY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARCH RESULTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 822 

OCCUPANTS 

INJURIES TO OCCUPANTS OF HEAVY GOODS VEHI- 
CLES 

HS-025 801 

OFFENSES 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY REPORT 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 797 

OHV 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

OILS 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 

OPERATIONAL 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT AND 
OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE OF NEW 
YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

HS-025 840 

OPTION 

TITANIA: A NEW OPTION IN EXHAUST SENSORS 
[AUTOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM] 

HS-025 821 

ORLEANS 

REMARKS AT MAINTENANCE COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING [REGULAR COMMON CARRIER CONFERENCE], 
NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 17, 1979 [TRUCK SAFETY] 

HS-810 339 

OUTLINED 

SCHOOL BUS MAINTENANCE OUTLINED. CALIFOR- 
NIA TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR DISCUSSES 
COSTS AND PROCEDURES 

HS-025 749 

OUTSIDE 

THE 79'S ARE LARGER INSIDE AND STRONGER 
OUTSIDE, BUT...WHERE DID THE WEIGHT GO? [U.S. 
AUTOMOBILES] 

HS-025 824 



OVERHEAD 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

OVERSEAS 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC 
CONTROL. OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: JAPAN 
(AUGUST 1977) 

HS-025 628 

OXIDES 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

PACKAGES 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 806 

PANEL 

HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOYS MINIMIZE 
BODY PANEL WEIGHT 

HS-025 817 

PARAMETRIC 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

PART 

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES. PART 1, [TRAILED 
TYPES] 

HS-025 746 

PARTS 

REINFORCEMENT STRENGTHENS INJECTION 
MOLDED PARTS [AUTOMOTIVE PARTS] 

HS-025 815 

PASSENGER 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

PASSIVE 

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFICATIONS FOR PASSIVE 
BELT SYSTEMS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 809 

PATTERNS 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 



PAY 

MAKING 55 MPH PAY 



HS-025 831 



95 



HSL 79-10 



PEDAL 
COMPOSITE BRAKE PEDAL TESTED 



HS-025 814 



PEDESTRIAN 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 
DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 

PROFILE OF THE FATAL PEDESTRIAN RAILROAD 
ACCIDENT 

HS-025 646 

WISE WALKERS IN THE MILE-HIGH CITY [DENVER 
PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PROGRAM] 

HS-025 794 

PENDULUM 

DYNAMIC TESTING OF LUMINAIRE SUPPORTS 
WITH AN IMPROVED PENDULUM IMPACT FACILI- 
TY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 735 

PEOPLE 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 

PERFORMANCE 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 



PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

PERSPECTIVE 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 

RISKS OF ROAD TRANSPORTATION IN A 
PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 288 

PICKUPS 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 



PILOT 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 



SYSTEMS PILOT 



HS-025 778 



PISTON 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

PLANNERS 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 



96 



October 31, 1979 



PLASTIC 

WINDSHIELD WOERSL SYSTEMS EXPAND PLASTIC 
USE 

HS-025 818 

POINTS 

THE PREDICTIVE P"OW:ER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE S^UI>Y OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 

POLICY 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POUKTY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OW TMOE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CMUFTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033--GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

PONTIAC 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES INI THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NTO. 2: 1 978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTRUMI REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHAU CTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES INI THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. -4: 1 978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTE. "KMi. REPORT 

HS-803 833 

POPULATION 

CHARACTERISTICS OF TEE MOTORCYCLE POPULA- 
TION IN USE IN AITSTR:ALIA, AND THE RATE OF 
EFFECT OF DESISN CHA NGE 

HS-025 629 

POWER 

METHODOLOGY OF" POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DBS EMBR. GETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEINF-AHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

STATEMENT BEE?OR I THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMME ICE, C ONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MAJRCM1*. 1979 

HS-810 342 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE ST^UD^Y OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 

PRACTICAL 

SOFTENING THE mC3W. CAN A TRUE EXPERIMEN- 
TAL SAFETY VEHICLJB BE MADE PRACTICAL? 

HS-025 776 

PRACTICES 

HANDBOOK OP EilGJHW^AY SAFETY DESIGN AND 
OPERATING PRACTICES. JREV. ED. 

HS-025 773 



PRECISION 

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PRECISION OF 
BROOKFIELD VISCOMETRY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
LUBRICANT FLUIDS 

HS-025 761 

PREDICTIVE 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE STUDY OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 

PRELIMINARY 

CALCULATIONS AND SUPPORTING MATERIAL FOR 
THE PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE BUMPER 
STANDARD 

HS-803 868 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 
DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

PRESENCE 

THE EFFECT OF PRESENCE LIGHTS [RUNNING 
LIGHTS] ON THE DETECTION OF CHANGE OF VEHI- 
CLE HEADWAY 

HS-025 829 

PRESSURE 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

PRINCIPLES 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

PROBABILITIES 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 

PROBLEM 

DRUNK DRIVING PROBLEM GROWS WORSE 

HS-025 763 

PROCEDURES 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 



97 



HSL 79-10 



SCHOOL BUS MAINTENANCE OUTLINED. CALIFOR- 
NIA TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR DISCUSSES 
COSTS AND PROCEDURES 

HS-025 749 

PROCEEDINGS 

1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. AU- 
GUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

HS-025 734 

PROCESS 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

. HS-025 852 

PROCESSES 

CONSUMER DECISION PROCESSES IN AUTOMOBILE 
PURCHASING: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY 

HS-025 748 

PROCESSING 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

RECENT ADVANCES IN ELASTOMER PROCESSING. 
SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 806 

PROFILE 

MICHIGAN DRIVER PROFILE. SOME BASIC FACTS 
ABOUT THE TRAFFIC CONVICTION AND ACCIDENT 
RECORDS OF MICHIGAN DRIVERS 

HS-025 837 

PROFILE OF THE FATAL PEDESTRIAN RAILROAD 
ACCIDENT 

HS-025 646 

PROFITABLE 

THE PROFITABLE EXHAUST SYSTEM BUSINESS 

HS-025 809 

PROGRAMMING 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

PROJECT 

PROJECT CHILDSAFE COULD SAVE YOUR CHILD'S 
LIFE [CHILD RESTRAINTS] 

HS-025 627 

PROJECTIONS 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 



PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL DEMAND 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 754 

PROPERTIES 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

HS-025 852 



PROPULSION 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 



SYSTEMS PILOT 
HS-025 778 



PROTECTION 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, EXTERIOR PRO- 
TECTION 

HS-803 897 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

PSYCHOLOGICAL 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 

RISKS OF ROAD TRANSPORTATION IN A 
PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 288 

PUBLIC 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

PURCHASING 

CONSUMER DECISION PROCESSES IN AUTOMOBILE 
PURCHASING: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY 

HS-025 748 

QUALITY 

HIOHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 



98 



October 31, 1979 



HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS, VOL. 
2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 
COURSE MONITORING--4. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 801 



QUESTIONS 

THE 12 MOST-ASKED QUESTIONS 
[RECREATIONAL VEHICLE] TIRES 



ABOUT RV 
HS-025 744 



QUIZ 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

RAIL 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 

RAILROAD 

PROFILE OF THE FATAL PEDESTRIAN RAILROAD 
ACCIDENT 

HS-025 646 

1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. AU- 
GUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

HS-025 734 

RATE 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MOTORCYCLE POPULA- 
TION IN USE IN AUSTRALIA, AND THE RATE OF 
EFFECT OF DESIGN CHANGE 

HS-025 629 

RATES 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

RECENT 

RECENT ADVANCES IN ELASTOMER PROCESSING. 
SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 806 

RECORD 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

RECORDS 

DEVELOP AND TEST AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PRO- 
GRAM FOR TRAFFIC RECORDS ANALYST. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 807 



MICHIGAN DRIVER PROFILE. SOME BASIC FACTS 
ABOUT THE TRAFFIC CONVICTION AND ACCIDENT 
RECORDS OF MICHIGAN DRIVERS 

HS-025 837 



RECREATIONAL 

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES. 
TYPES] 



PART 1, [TRAILED 

HS-025 746 
MOST-ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT RV 

HS-025 744 



THE 12 

[RECREATIONAL VEHICLE] TIRES 



REGISTER 

THE NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER PROGRAM 
USERS* GUIDE 

HS-803 545 

REGULAR 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

REMARKS AT MAINTENANCE COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING [REGULAR COMMON CARRIER CONFERENCE], 
NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 17, 1979 [TRUCK SAFETY] 

HS-810 339 

REGULARITY 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

REGULATE 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

REGULATION 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

EVALUATION OF THREE-WAY INTERSECTION 
REGULATION [WESTERN AUSTRALIA] 

HS-025 828 

REGULATIONS 

LIGHTS: PT. 1. TO HAVE OR HAVE NOT 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS, U.S. REGULATIONS] 

HS-025 641 

REGULATORY 

REMARKS BEFORE THE CHRYSLER RETREAT, ANN 
ARBOR, MICHIGAN, JANUARY 18, 1979 [FUEL 
ECONOMY REGULATORY PROGRAM] 

HS-810 340 



REINFORCEMENT 

REINFORCEMENT STRENGTHENS 
MOLDED PARTS [AUTOMOTIVE PARTS] 



INJECTION 



HS-025 815 



99 



HSL 7940 



RELATIONSHIP 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 

RENEWAL 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

REPEAL 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

REPLY 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

RESEARCH 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

CRASH THEORIES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR 
RESEARCH 

HS-025 796 

DRUGS AND HIGHWAY SAFETY: RESEARCH ISSUES 
AND INFORMATION NEEDS 

HS-025 764 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

NEW RESEARCH ON THE ROLE OF ALCOHOL AND 
DRUGS IN ROAD ACCIDENTS 

HS-025 740 

TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO OCCUPAN- 
CY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARCH RESULTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 822 

RESISTANCE 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

RESPONSE 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 



RESTRAINTS 

PROJECT CHILDSAFE COULD SAVE YOUR CHILD'S 
LIFE [CHILD RESTRAINTS] 

HS-025 627 

RESULTS 

TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO OCCUPAN- 
CY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARCH RESULTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 822 

RETAIL 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

RETREAT 

REMARKS BEFORE THE CHRYSLER RETREAT, ANN 
ARBOR, MICHIGAN, JANUARY 18, 1979 [FUEL 
ECONOMY REGULATORY PROGRAM] 

HS-810 340 

REVIEW 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

HS-025 630 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 

REVISION 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 806 

REVUE 

SMASHED. THE MAGAZINE ON DRINKING-AND- 
DRIVING (IMPACT. LA REVUE DE L'AUTOMOBILE 
ET DE LA SOBRIETE) 

HS-025 823 

REDE 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 
MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 

RIDER 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

RIDING 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 



100 



October 31, 1979 



RISK 

RISK EXPOSURES. STRUCTURING OF THE NEED 
FOR RISK EXPOSURE DATA FOR TRAFFIC AC- 
CIDENT ANALYSIS 

HS-025 780 

RISKS 

RISKS OF ROAD TRANSPORTATION IN A 
PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 288 

TARGET: HIGHWAY RISKS. 1. TAKING INDIVIDUAL 
AIM 

HS-025 841 

ROAD 

MEASURING FUEL ECONOMY...ON THE ROAD 

HS-025 832 

NEW RESEARCH ON THE ROLE OF ALCOHOL AND 
DRUGS IN ROAD ACCIDENTS 

HS-025 740 

RISKS OF ROAD TRANSPORTATION IN A 
PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 288 

ROAD SURFACE BULK WATER DRAINAGE-A 
THEORETICAL STUDY 

HS-025 762 

ROLLOVER INJURIES OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY 
[OFF-ROAD VEHICLES] 

HS-025 767 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF ROAD TRAFFIC 
(ABBREVIATED VERSION OF INTERNRAPPORT NO. 
160) 

HS-025 838 

ROADS 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICSJ-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

VISIBILITY DURING NIGHT DRIVING ON UN- 
LIGHTED ROADS 

HS-025 783 

ROADSIDE 

BMCS [BUREAU OF MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY] 
ROADSIDE SAFETY INSPECTIONS 1976-1977 

HS-025 827 



ROLLING 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

ROLLOVER 

ROLLOVER INJURIES OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY 
[OFF-ROAD VEHICLES] 

HS-025 767 

RUBBER 

THE CHALLENGE OF ENERGY CONSERVATION TO 
THE COMPOUNDER [RUBBER INDUSTRY] 

HS-025 803 

RULES 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

RUNNING 

THE CURRENT STATUS OF AUTOMOBILE RUNNING 
LIGHTS 

HS-025 833 

THE EFFECT OF PRESENCE LIGHTS [RUNNING 
LIGHTS] ON THE DETECTION OF CHANGE OF VEHI- 
CLE HEADWAY 

HS-025 829 

RURAL 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL ARRESTS IN A RURAL 
STATE [WYOMING] 

HS-025 769 

RV 

THE 12 MOST-ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT RV 
[RECREATIONAL VEHICLE] TIRES 

HS-025 744 



RX 

RX: DRUGS AND DRIVING 



HS-025 795 



SAFE 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 



101 



HSL 79-10 



SAFER 
WAYS TO MAKE CYCLING SAFER 



HS-025 830 



SAME 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS' BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

SATURATION 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 

SAVE 

PROJECT CHILDSAFE COULD SAVE YOUR CHILD'S 
LIFE [CHILD RESTRAINTS] 

HS-025 627 

SAVES 

COMPUTERIZED TRAFFIC CONTROL SAVES TIME 
AND FUEL 

HS-025 637 

SAVINGS 

ESTIMATES OF FUEL SAVINGS THROUGH IM- 
PROVED TRAFFIC FLOW IN SEVEN U.S. CITIES 

HS-025 854 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

SCHEDULES 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

SCHOOL 

SCHOOL BUS MAINTENANCE OUTLINED. CALIFOR- 
NIA TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR DISCUSSES 
COSTS AND PROCEDURES 

HS-025 749 

SCIENCE 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

SCOPE 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 



2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

SCOTIA 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE STUDY OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 

SEAT 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 

SEATTLE 

TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO OCCUPAN- 
CY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARCH RESULTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 822 

SECY 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

SELECTIVE 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

SELF 

SELF-ADAPTIVE ANTI-SKID BRAKING SYSTEM 

HS-025 625 

SENATE 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

SENSORS 

TITANIA: A NEW OPTION IN EXHAUST SENSORS 
[AUTOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM] 

HS-025 821 

SERIES 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 



102 



October 31, 1979 



PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CBD (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO, 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

SERVICE 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

SERVICES 

EMS [EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES] COMPATI- 
BILITY STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 858 

SESSION 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

SHIFTING 

EFFECT OF CARGO SHIFTING ON VEHICLE HAN- 
DLING. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 737 



SHOOTING 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

SI 

MANIFOLD FUEL FILM EFFECTS IN AN SI [SPARK 
IGNITION] ENGINE 

HS-025 766 

SIDE 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

SIGNAL 

SIGNAL CYCLE LENGTH AND FUEL CONSUMPTION 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 848 

SIGNALIZED 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

SIGNALS 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 

SIGNIFICANT 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

SIGNS 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 

SIMULA 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

SIMULATION 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 



103 



HSL 79-10 



A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

ADAPTATION OF A GENERAL MULTIBODY DYNAM- 
ICAL FORMALISM TO DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF 
TERRESTRIAL VEHICLES 

HS-025 789 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

SINGLE 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

SITES 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

SKID 

SELF-ADAPTIVE ANTI-SKID BRAKING SYSTEM 

HS-025 625 

SKILL 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

SMALLER 

SPEED CONTROL UNIT GETS SMALLER, ADDS 
FUNCTION [1979 FORD CARS] 

HS-025 820 

SMASHED 

SMASHED. THE MAGAZINE ON DRINKING-AND- 
DRIVING (IMPACT. LA REVUE DE L 'AUTOMOBILE 
ET DE LA SOBRIETE) 

HS-025 823 

SOBRIETE 

SMASHED. THE MAGAZINE ON DRINKING-AND- 
DRIVING (IMPACT. LA REVUE DE L' AUTOMOBILE 
ET DE LA SOBRIETE) 

HS-025 823 

SOCIETY 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

SOFTENING 

SOFTENING THE BLOW. CAN A TRUE EXPERIMEN- 
TAL SAFETY VEHICLE BE MADE PRACTICAL? 

HS-025 776 

SONG 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS* BUT IT'S THE 



SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

SPARK 

MANIFOLD FUEL FILM EFFECTS IN AN SI [SPARK 
IGNITION] ENGINE 

HS-025 766 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

SPECIES 

AUTOMOBILES: NEW VIGOR FOR AN ENDANGERED 
SPECIES 

HS-025 804 

SPECIFICATIONS 

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFICATIONS FOR PASSIVE 
BELT SYSTEMS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 809 

SPEED 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND HARIN- 
GEY [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 799 

SPEED CONTROL UNIT GETS SMALLER, ADDS 
FUNCTION [1979 FORD CARS] 

HS-025 820 



STALLING 

HOW TO STOP STALLING 



HS-025 743 



STANDARD 

CALCULATIONS AND SUPPORTING MATERIAL FOR 
THE PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE BUMPER 
STANDARD 

HS-803 868 

COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE NA- 
TIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRA- 
TION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 1978, AND FEBRUA- 
RY 15, 1979 

HS-803 867 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, EXTERIOR PRO- 
TECTION 

HS-803 897 

STANDARDS 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 



104 



October 31, 1979 



FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

STARTING 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

STATEMENT 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

STATES 

HIGHWAY HAZARDS: WHAT SOME STATES ARE 
DOING FOR THEM 

HS-025 798 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 



RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2,5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CH> (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 

MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 

STATISTICAL 

FACT BOOK. STATISTICAL INFORMATION ON 
HIGHWAY SAFETY. ANNUAL ISSUE NO. 2 

HS-803 893 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT AND 
OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE OF NEW 
YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

HS-025 840 

STATISTICS 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT AND 
OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE OF NEW 
YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

HS-025 840 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 

STEEL 

AUTOMOTIVE HSLA [HIGH STRENGTH, LOW 
ALLOY] STEEL ENTERS BAR AREA 

HS-025 816 

STEERING 

BILATERAL MODEL OF MANUEL [SIC] STEERING 
SYSTEM 

HS-025 790 



105 



HSL 79-10 



STEPPING 

BIG BROTHER IS STEPPING ON YOUR HEAD. 
[MOTORCYCLE SAFETY AND HELMET USAGE) 

HS-025 843 

STOCHASTIC 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

HS-025 852 

STOP 

HOW TO STOP STALLING 

HS-025 743 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 

STRASSEN 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DES ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

STRENGTH 

AUTOMOTIVE HSLA [HIGH STRENGTH, LOW 
ALLOY] STEEL ENTERS BAR AREA 

HS-025 816 

HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOYS MINIMIZE 
BODY PANEL WEIGHT 

HS-025 817 

STRENGTHENS 

REINFORCEMENT STRENGTHENS INJECTION 
MOLDED PARTS [AUTOMOTIVE PARTS] 

HS-025 815 

STRESSING 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

STRONGER 

THE 79'S ARE LARGER INSIDE AND STRONGER 
OUTSIDE, BUT...WHERE DID THE WEIGHT GO? [U.S. 
AUTOMOBILES] 

HS-025 824 

STRUCTURE 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 



STRUCTURED 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

STRUCTURING 

RISK EXPOSURES. STRUCTURING OF THE NEED 
FOR RISK EXPOSURE DATA FOR TRAFFIC AC- 
CIDENT ANALYSIS 

HS-025 780 

SUBCOMMITTEE 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

SUBMISSIONS 

COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE NA- 
TIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRA- 
TION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 1978, AND FEBRUA- 
RY 15, 1979 

HS-803 867 



SUMMER 

MOTOR GASOLINES, SUMMER 1978 



HS-025 825 



SUOMEN 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

SUPERVISOR 

SCHOOL BUS MAINTENANCE OUTLINED. CALIFOR- 
NIA TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR DISCUSSES 
COSTS AND PROCEDURES 

HS-025 749 



106 



October 31, 1979 



SUPPLEMENT 

DDC [DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE] SUPPLEMENT 
LAUNCHES ALCOHOL CAMPAIGN 

HS-025 647 

DRUGS AND DRIVING: A SELECTED BIBLIOG- 
RAPHY. SUPPLEMENT ONE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 879 

SUPPORTS 

DYNAMIC TESTING OF LUMINAIRE SUPPORTS 
WITH AN IMPROVED PENDULUM IMPACT FACILI- 
TY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 735 

SURFACE 

ROAD SURFACE BULK WATER DRAINAGE-A 
THEORETICAL STUDY 

HS-025 762 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

SURFACES 

COATING MATERIAL ENHANCES ALUMINUM SUR- 
FACES [AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS] 

HS-025 819 

SURVEYS 

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICT 
SURVEYS 

HS-025 850 

SWEDISH 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

SYMPOSIUM 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]~2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

TAKING 

TARGET: HIGHWAY RISKS. 1. TAKING INDIVIDUAL 
AIM 

HS-025 841 

TAMPA 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 



TARGET 

TARGET: HIGHWAY RISKS. 1. TAKING INDIVIDUAL 
AIM 

HS-025 841 

TASK 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

TECHNOLOGICAL 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN U.S. AUTOMOBILE 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST FEDERAL INITIA- 
TIVES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 543 

TECHNOLOGY 

AUTO MAKERS USING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 
IN NEW EMISSIONS SYSTEMS 

HS-025 811 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

THE EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ON AUTOMOBILE 
FUEL ECONOMY UNDER CANADIAN CONDITIONS 

HS-025 756 

TEEN 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

TEMPERATURE 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE BROOK- 
FIELD VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A NEW 
LIQUID BATH METHOD 

HS-025 771 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

TEMPERATURES 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

TERRESTRIAL 

ADAPTATION OF A GENERAL MULTIBODY DYNAM- 
ICAL FORMALISM TO DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF 
TERRESTRIAL VEHICLES 

HS-025 789 

TEST 

BLOOD TEST LEGISLATION IN NEW ZEALAND 
[ALCOHOL LEVELS IN DRIVERS] 

HS-025 290 

DEVELOP AND TEST AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PRO- 
GRAM FOR TRAFFIC RECORDS ANALYST. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 807 



i 



107 



HSL 79-10 



EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 



.ROAD SURFACE BULK 
THEORETICAL STUDY 



WATER DRAINAGE--A 



TESTED 

COMPOSITE BRAKE PEDAL TESTED 



HS-025 814 



TESTING 

A FUEL ECONOMY MEASUREMENT DILEMMA: 
CERTIFICATION TESTING VS. CUSTOMER DRIVING 

HS-025 759 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

DYNAMIC TESTING OF LUMINAIRE SUPPORTS 
WITH AN IMPROVED PENDULUM IMPACT FACILI- 
TY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 735 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

TESTS 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

TFC 

TFC/IW [TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION/INERTIA 
WEIGHT] 

HS-025 758 

THEORETICAL 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 



HS-025 762 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

THEORIES 

CRASH THEORIES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR 
RESEARCH 

HS-025 796 

THEORY 

HIGHWAY CAPACITY, MEASURES OF EFFECTIVE- 
NESS, AND FLOW THEORY 

HS-025 844 

THERMAL 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL EF- 
FICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR VEHI- 
CLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER CONDI- 
TIONS 

HS-025 757 

THURSTON 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 

TIELHKENNEONNETTOMUUDET 

SUOMEN TIELHKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

TIETOJA 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

TIME 

COMPUTERIZED TRAFFIC CONTROL SAVES TIME 
AND FUEL 

HS-025 637 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

HS-025 852 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 

TIRE 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

TIRES '79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 639 



108 



October 31, 1979 



UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 
COURSE MONITORINGn-4. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 801 

TIRES 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 



THE 12 MOST-ASKED QUESTIONS 
[RECREATIONAL VEHICLE] TIRES 



ABOUT RV 

HS-025 744 

TIRES '79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 639 

TTTANIA 

TITANIA: A NEW OPTION IN EXHAUST SENSORS 
[AUTOMOTIVE EMISSION CONTROL SYSTEM] 

HS-025 821 

TITLE 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

TOOL 

TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN 
HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-025 849 

TORINO 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

TRACKS 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

TRAFFIC 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 



ANALYSIS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AND COLLI- 
SIONS 

HS-025 851 

COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE NA- 
TIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRA- 
TION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 1978, AND FEBRUA- 
RY 15, 1979 

HS-803 867 

COMPUTERIZED TRAFFIC CONTROL SAVES TIME 
AND FUEL 

HS-025 637 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY REPORT 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 797 

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICT 
SURVEYS 

HS-025 850 

DEVELOP AND TEST AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PRO- 
GRAM FOR TRAFFIC RECORDS ANALYST. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 807 

ESTIMATES OF FUEL SAVINGS THROUGH IM- 
PROVED TRAFFIC FLOW IN SEVEN U.S. CITIES 

HS-025 854 

LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST AT-FAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL 
TRAFFIC CRASHES 

HS-025 765 

LET'S DECLARE WAR ON TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 

HS-025 812 

MICHIGAN DRIVER PROFILE. SOME BASIC FACTS 
ABOUT THE TRAFFIC CONVICTION AND ACCIDENT 
RECORDS OF MICHIGAN DRIVERS 

HS-025 837 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC 
CONTROL. OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: JAPAN 
(AUGUST 1977) 

HS-025 628 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS' BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 806 

RISK EXPOSURES. STRUCTURING OF THE NEED 
FOR RISK EXPOSURE DATA FOR TRAFFIC AC- 
CIDENT ANALYSIS 

HS-025 780 



109 



HSL 79-10 



STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-8IO 341 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF ROAD TRAFFIC 
(ABBREVIATED VERSION OF INTERNRAPPORT NO. 
160) 

HS-025 838 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 

TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN 
HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-025 849 

URBAN TRAFFIC, FUEL ECONOMY AND EMIS- 
SIONS-CONSISTENCY OF VARIOUS MEASURE- 
MENTS 

HS-025 755 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 



TRAILED 

RECREATIONAL 
TYPES] 



VEHICLES. PART 1, [TRAILED 
HS-025 746 



TRANSIENT 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

TRANSPORT 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC 
CONTROL. OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: JAPAN 
(AUGUST 1977) 

HS-025 628 

TRANSPORTATION 

RISKS OF ROAD TRANSPORTATION IN A 
PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 288 

SCHOOL BUS MAINTENANCE OUTLINED. CALIFOR- 
NIA TRANSPORTATION SUPERVISOR DISCUSSES 
COSTS AND PROCEDURES 

HS-025 749 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 



STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

TRANSPORTATION ISSUES 

HS-025 835 

TRAUMATIC 

TRAUMATIC NEUROSIS [FOLLOWING A MOTOR 
VEHICLE CRASH] 

HS-025 777 

TRAVEL 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 

TREADWEAR 

UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 
COURSE MONITORING-4. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 801 

TROUBLE 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

TRUCK 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

REMARKS AT MAINTENANCE COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING [REGULAR COMMON CARRIER CONFERENCE], 
NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 17, 1979 [TRUCK SAFETY] 

HS-810 339 

TRUE 

SOFTENING THE BLOW. CAN A TRUE EXPERIMEN- 
TAL SAFETY VEHICLE BE MADE PRACTICAL? 

HS-025 776 

TUNGSTEN 

MOST '81 CARS MAY HAVE TUNGSTEN/HALOGEN 
LAMPS 

HS-025 640 

TURBOCHARGED 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

TURN 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 



TWILIGHT 
TWILIGHT [DANGERS OF DRIVING] 



HS-025 742 



110 



October 31, 1979 



TYPES 

RECREATIONAL 
TYPES] 



VEHICLES. PART 1, [TRAILED 
HS-025 746 



UBERLEGUNGEN 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DES ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

UNCOLLECTED 

SAFETY BELTS: THE UNCOLLECTED DIVIDENDS 

HS-025 645 

UNDESIRABLE 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

UNIFORM 

UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 
COURSE MONITORING--4, FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 801 

UNION 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]~2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

UNIT 

SPEED CONTROL UNIT GETS SMALLER, ADDS 
FUNCTION [1979 FORD CARS] 

HS-025 820 

UNITED 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISES OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 



PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1,6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

UNIVERSITY 

1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. AU- 
GUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

HS-025 734 



UNLIGHTED 

VISIBILITY DURING 
LIGHTED ROADS 



NIGHT DRIVING ON UN- 



HS-025 783 



UNSIGNALIZED 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

UPDATE 

UPDATE: MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS IN 1977 

HS-025 793 

UPPER 

ROLLOVER INJURIES OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY 
[OFF-ROAD VEHICLES] 

HS-025 767 

URBAN 

URBAN TRAFFIC, FUEL ECONOMY AND EMIS- 
SIONS-CONSISTENCY OF VARIOUS MEASURE- 
MENTS 

HS-025 755 



111 



HSL 7940 



USAGE 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 

BIG BROTHER IS STEPPING ON YOUR HEAD. 
[MOTORCYCLE SAFETY AND HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 843 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE IN 
COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 680 

NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 
ADMINISTRATION] CALLS IT 'NEWS' BUT IT'S THE 
SAME OLD SONG [MANDATORY MOTORCYCLE 
HELMET USAGE] 

HS-025 855 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

USERS 

THE NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER PROGRAM 
USERS' GUIDE 

HS-803 545 

UTAH 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 

1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. AU- 
GUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

HS-025 734 

UTILITY 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

VALVE 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

VANS 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

VARIATIONS 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 



VEHICLE 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

COST EVALUATION FOR FMVSS [FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE SAFETY STANDARD] 215, EXTERIOR PRO- 
TECTION 

HS-803 897 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

DIESEL VEHICLE NOISE CONTROL 

HS-025 626 

EFFECT OF CARGO SHIFTING ON VEHICLE HAN- 
DLING. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 737 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICSJ-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

GUARDRAIL/VEHICLE DYNAMIC INTERACTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 644 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT AND 
OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE OF NEW 
YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

HS-025 840 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 



112 



October 31, 1979 



DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 

PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL DEMAND 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 754 

SOFTENING THE BLOW. CAN A TRUE EXPERIMEN- 
TAL SAFETY VEHICLE BE MADE PRACTICAL? 

HS-025 776 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICSJ-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

THE EFFECT OF PRESENCE LIGHTS [RUNNING 
LIGHTS] ON THE DETECTION OF CHANGE OF VEHI- 
CLE HEADWAY 

HS-025 829 

THE INCIDENCE OF VEHICLE MISFUELING IN 
MAJOR CITIES IN CANADA 

HS-025 781 

THE 12 MOST-ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT RV 
[RECREATIONAL VEHICLE] TIRES 

HS-025 744 

TRAUMATIC NEUROSIS [FOLLOWING A MOTOR 
VEHICLE CRASH] 

HS-025 777 

WORLD MOTOR VEHICLE DATA. 1978 ED. 

HS-025 797 

VEHICLES 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL EF- 
FICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR VEHI- 
CLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER CONDI- 
TIONS 

HS-025 757 

ADAPTATION OF A GENERAL MULTIBODY DYNAM- 
ICAL FORMALISM TO DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF 
TERRESTRIAL VEHICLES 

HS-025 789 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 



EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

INJURIES TO OCCUPANTS OF HEAVY GOODS VEHI- 
CLES 

HS-025 801 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN 2UR 
METHODDC DES ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHR2EUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT AND 
OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE OF NEW 
YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

HS-025 840 

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES. PART 1, [TRAILED 
TYPES] 

HS-025 746 

ROLLOVER INJURIES OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY 
[OFF-ROAD VEHICLES] 

HS-025 767 

THE ALUMINUM-AIR BATTERY FOR ELECTRIC 
VEHICLES 

HS-025 842 

WEIGHING VEHICLES IN MOTION 

HS-025 846 

VERGLEICHS 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DES ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

VERSION 

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF ROAD TRAFFIC 
(ABBREVIATED VERSION OF INTERNRAPPORT NO. 
160) 

HS-025 838 

VIENNA 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

VIGOR 

AUTOMOBILES: NEW VIGOR FOR AN ENDANGERED 
SPECIES 

HS-025 804 

VISCOMETRY 

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PRECISION OF 
BROOKFIELD VISCOMETRY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
LUBRICANT FLUIDS 

HS-025 761 



113 



HSL 79-10 



VISCOSITY 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE BROOK- 
FIELD VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A NEW 
LIQUID BATH METHOD 

HS-025 771 

VISIBILITY 

VISIBILITY DURING NIGHT DRIVING ON UN- 
LIGHTED ROADS 

HS-025 783 

VISIT 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC 
CONTROL. OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: JAPAN 

(AUGUST 1977) 

HS-025 628 

VISORS 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

HS-025 630 

VOLARE 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH' 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

VOLKSWAGEN 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

VOLVO 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

VSB 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

VUODESTA 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 



VUONNA 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

WALKERS 

WISE WALKERS IN THE MILE-HIGH CITY [DENVER 
PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PROGRAM] 

HS-025 794 

WAR 

LET'S DECLARE WAR ON TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 

HS-025 812 

WARD 

TIRES '79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 639 

WARNING 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 

MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 



WATER 

ROAD SURFACE BULK 
THEORETICAL STUDY 



WATER DRAINAGE-A 



HS-025 762 



WAW 

TIRES '79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 639 

WAY 

EVALUATION OF THREE-WAY INTERSECTION 
REGULATION [WESTERN AUSTRALIA] 

HS-025 828 

WEARING 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

WEATHER 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 



WEIGHING 
WEIGHING VEHICLES IN MOTION 



HS-025 846 



WEIGHT 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 

HIGH STRENGTH ALUMINUM ALLOYS MINIMIZE 
BODY PANEL WEIGHT 

HS-025 817 



114 



October 31, 1979 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

TFC/IW [TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION/INERTIA 
WEIGHT] 

HS-025 758 

THE 79'S ARE LARGER INSIDE AND STRONGER 
OUTSIDE, BUT...WHERE DID THE WEIGHT GO? [U.S. 
AUTOMOBILES] 

HS-025 824 

WESTERN 

EVALUATION OF THREE-WAY INTERSECTION 
REGULATION [WESTERN AUSTRALIA] 

HS-025 828 

WINDSHIELD 

WINDSHIELD WIPER SYSTEMS EXPAND PLASTIC 
USE 

HS-025 818 

WIPER 

WINDSHIELD WIPER SYSTEMS EXPAND PLASTIC 
USE 

HS-025 818 

WISE 

WISE WALKERS IN THE MILE-HIGH CITY [DENVER 
PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PROGRAM] 

HS-025 794 

WITS 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

WORK 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 
MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 

WORKS 

LIGHTS: PT. 2. WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS] 

HS-025 642 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

WORLD 

TIRES '79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 639 

WORLD MOTOR VEHICLE DATA. 1978 ED. 

HS-025 797 

WORSE 

DRUNK DRIVING PROBLEM GROWS WORSE 

HS-025 763 



WRITTEN 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

WYOMING 

CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL ARRESTS IN A RURAL 
STATE [WYOMING] 

HS-025 769 

YELLOW 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 

YORK 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT AND 
OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE OF NEW 
YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

HS-025 840 

ZEALAND 

BLOOD TEST LEGISLATION IN NEW ZEALAND 
[ALCOHOL LEVELS IN DRIVERS] 

HS-025 290 



115 



Author Index 



Abernathy, William J. 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST 
TIVES. FINAL REPORT 



U.S. AUTOMOBILE 
FEDERAL INITIA- 

HS-803 543 



Allen, Brian L. 

ANALYSIS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AND COLLI- 
SIONS 

HS-025 851 

Allen, Merrill J. 

THE CURRENT STATUS OF AUTOMOBILE RUNNING 
LIGHTS 

HS-025 833 

Anderson, R. L. 

EFFECT OF CARGO SHIFTING ON VEHICLE HAN- 
DLING. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 737 

Archambault, Sandra 

EMS [EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES] COMPATI- 
BILITY STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 858 

Austin, T. 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

Badiali, F. L. 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 

Baguley, C. 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND HARIN- 
GEY [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 799 

Baisley, Ronald L. 

AUTOMOTIVE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS 
PROGRAM. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 648 



Bandel, Jurgen 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 



SYSTEMS PILOT 



HS-025 778 



Bang, Karl-Lennart 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

Bauer, C. S. 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 



Bayer, Anthony R. 

CALIBRATION OF THREE YEAR OLD CHILD DUM- 
MIES (PHASE 2). FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 792 

Beaudry, Lee J. 

LET'S DECLARE WAR ON TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 

HS-025 812 



Beaumont, George 

RX: DRUGS AND DRIVING 



Benner, Ludwig , Jr. 

CRASH THEORIES AND THEIR 
RESEARCH 



HS-025 795 



IMPLICATIONS FOR 



HS-025 796 



Bennion, Faye 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 



Bergan, A. T. 
WEIGHING VEHICLES IN MOTION 



HS-025 846 



Berti, F. 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 



BY ANALYTICAL 



HS-025 753 



Bertolina, Charles J. 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 

Bick, Thomas 

TARGET: HIGHWAY RISKS. 1. TAKING INDIVIDUAL 
AIM 

HS-025 841 

Black, T. L. 

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFICATIONS FOR PASSIVE 
BELT SYSTEMS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 809 

Blatt, Jesse 

WISE WALKERS IN THE MILE-HIGH CITY [DENVER 
PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PROGRAM] 

HS-025 794 

Blumberg, P. N. 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

Blythe, Katherine . 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

Bogdan, L. 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 



117 



HSL 79-10 



Bond, R. 

ROAD SURFACE BULK WATER DRAINAGE-A 
THEORETICAL STUDY 

HS-025 762 

Brodin, Anders 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

Brown, M. G. 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE STUDY OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 



Brace, R. W. 

GUARDRAIL/VEHICLE 
FINAL REPORT 



DYNAMIC INTERACTION. 



HS-025 644 



Byrne, Peter 

SELF-ADAPTIVE ANTI-SKID BRAKING SYSTEM 

HS-025 625 

Cantwell, Edward N. , Jr. 

PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL DEMAND 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 754 

Carlsson, Arne 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

Carman, Roderick S. 

CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL ARRESTS IN A RURAL 
STATE [WYOMING] 

HS-025 769 

Carpenter, David W. 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

Carraro, Barbara 

UPDATE: MOTORCYCLE ACCIDENTS IN 1977 

HS-025 793 

Carrier, Herb 

THE 79'S ARE LARGER INSIDE AND STRONGER 
OUTSIDE, BUT...WHERE DID THE WEIGHT GO? [U.S. 
AUTOMOBILES] 

HS-025 824 

Cassiani Ingoni, A. A. 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 



Casteliano, Eugene N. , Jr. 

PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL DEMAND 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 754 

Chakravarthy, Balaji S. 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN U.S. AUTOMOBILE 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST FEDERAL INITIA- 
TIVES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 543 

Chang, Man-Feng 

ESTIMATES OF FUEL SAVINGS THROUGH IM- 
PROVED TRAFFIC FLOW IN SEVEN U.S. CITIES 

HS-025 854 

Chisholm, D. B. 

DYNAMIC TESTING OF LUMINAIRE SUPPORTS 
WITH AN IMPROVED PENDULUM IMPACT FACILI- 
TY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 735 

Claybrook, Joan B. 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
FEBRUARY 26, 1979 

HS-810 341 

Claybrook, Joan 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

Cleyen, Arlene M. 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 806 

Coburn, R. 

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFICATIONS FOR PASSIVE 
BELT SYSTEMS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 809 

Coben, Stephen L. 

SIGNAL CYCLE LENGTH AND FUEL CONSUMPTION 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 848 



118 



October 31, 1979 



Cooper, Peter J. 

ANALYSIS OF 
SIGNS 



TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AND COLLI- 

HS-025 851 



Courage, K. G. 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

Cowan, David 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

Culley, C. 

EFFECT OF CARGO SHIFTING ON VEHICLE HAN- 
DLING. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 737 



Cushman, William D. 

DRIVER ED ATTACK 
GROUP 



BACKFIRES ON INSURANCE 



Dare, Charles . 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE 
COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 



HS-025 792 



HELMET USAGE IN 



HS-803 680 



De Bie, J. R. 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 



Been, Robert C. 

TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AS 
HIGHWAY SAFETY 



A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN 



HS-025 849 



DeBoer, P. C. T. 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

Donelson, Alan C. 

DRUGS AND DRIVING: A SELECTED BIBLIOG- 
RAPHY. SUPPLEMENT ONE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 879 

DRUGS AND HIGHWAY SAFETY: RESEARCH ISSUES 
AND INFORMATION NEEDS 

HS-025 764 



Dormer, H. G. 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 



SYSTEMS PILOT 



HS-025 778 



Dowdy, Mack W. 

AUTOMOTIVE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS 
PROGRAM. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 648 

Dreyer, Dell R. 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

Dugoff, Howard 

REMARKS AT MAINTENANCE COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING [REGULAR COMMON CARRIER CONFERENCE], 
NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 17, 1979 [TRUCK SAFETY] 

HS-810 339 

REMARKS BEFORE THE CHRYSLER RETREAT, ANN 
ARBOR, MICHIGAN, JANUARY 18, 1979 [FUEL 
ECONOMY REGULATORY PROGRAM] 

HS-810 340 



Byck, G. 

WEIGHING VEHICLES IN MOTION 



HS-025 846 



Eckel, Clifford 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 



Edwards, Carl 
RECREATIONAL 
TYPES] 



VEHICLES. PART 1, [TRAILED 



HS-025 746 



Enserirak, E. 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

Euler, Gary 

SIGNAL CYCLE LENGTH AND FUEL CONSUMPTION 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 848 

Evans, Leonard 

URBAN TRAFFIC, FUEL ECONOMY AND EMIS- 
SIONS-CONSISTENCY OF VARIOUS MEASURE- 
MENTS 

HS-025 755 



119 



HSL 79-10 



Fischer, Craig 

PROJECT CHILDSAFE COULD SAVE YOUR CHILD'S 
LIFE [CHILD RESTRAINTS] 

HS-025 627 

Ftschhoff , B. 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 

Fisher, A. J. 

THE EFFECT OF PRESENCE LIGHTS [RUNNING 
LIGHTS] ON THE DETECTION OF CHANGE OF VEHI- 
CLE HEADWAY 

HS-025 829 

Fujita, Kenji 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

Gafarian, A. V. 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

HS-025 852 

Geurts, C. Arthur 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 

Gilffland, D. L. 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

Goldsamt, Milton 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY REPORT 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 797 

Gott, Philip 

EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN COM- 
PONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 840 

Grattan, E. 

INJURIES TO OCCUPANTS OF HEAVY GOODS VEHI- 
CLES 

HS-025 801 



Greenslade, Rex 

BRAKES: FORGOTTEN BUT APPRECIATED 



HS-025 292 



Gregory, Dorothy Rasinski 

TRAUMATIC NEUROSIS [FOLLOWING A MOTOR 
VEHICLE CRASH] 

HS-025 777 

Griffin, Larry 

LIGHTS: PT. 1. TO HAVE OR HAVE NOT 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS, U.S. REGULATIONS] 

HS-025 641 

LIGHTS: PT. 2. WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T 
[AUTOMOTIVE HEADLAMPS] 

HS-025 642 



Gullon, A. C. 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 



SYSTEMS PILOT 
HS-025 778 



Gusakov, I. 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

Gyer, J. F. 

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PRECISION OF 
BROOKFIELD VISCOMETRY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
LUBRICANT FLUIDS 

HS-025 761 

Gynnerstedt, Gosta 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF ROAD TRAFFIC 
(ABBREVIATED VERSION OF INTERNRAPPORT NO. 
160) 

HS-025 838 



Hahn, . . 

GUARDRAIL/VEHICLE 
FINAL REPORT 



D YN AM 1C INTERACTION. 
HS-025 644 



Hall 9 R. R. 

THE EFFECT OF PRESENCE LIGHTS [RUNNING 
LIGHTS] ON THE DETECTION OF CHANGE OF VEHI- 
CLE HEADWAY 

HS-025 829 

Hampton, Bill 

HOW TO BREAK IN A NEW BIKE [MOTORCYCLES] 

HS-025 853 

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR BRAKING TECHNIQUE 

HS-025 741 

Hansson, Arne 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 



120 



October 31, 1979 



Harris, Curtis N. 

ROLLOVER INJURIES OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY 
[OFF-ROAD VEHICLES] 

HS-025 767 

Harvard, J. D. J. 

ALCOHOL AND THE DRIVER 

HS-025 768 

Harvey, M. R. 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

Hassler, C. R. 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 
DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 

Hauer, E. 

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICT 
SURVEYS 

HS-025 850 

Hayden, A. C. S. 

THE EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ON AUTOMOBILE 
FUEL ECONOMY UNDER CANADIAN CONDITIONS 

HS-025 756 

Hill, Ray 

AUTOMOTIVE TROUBLE-SHOOTING QUIZ-MATCH 
WITS WITH THE TEEN-AGE DIAGNOSTIC CHAMPS 

HS-025 638 

Hillyer, M. J. 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

Hiramatsu, Kaneo 

BILATERAL MODEL OF MANUEL [SIC] STEERING 
SYSTEM 

HS-025 790 

ffisdal, B. 

VISIBILITY DURING NIGHT DRIVING ON UN- 
LIGHTED ROADS 

HS-025 783 

Hitchcox, H. F. 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

Hobbs, J. A. 

INJURIES TO OCCUPANTS OF HEAVY GOODS VEHI- 
CLES 

HS-025 801 



Holtenemser, Chdstoph 

TARGET: HIGHWAY RISKS. 1. TAKING INDIVIDUAL 
AIM 

HS-025 841 

Holt, Donald B. 

WHY EATON GOT OUT OF THE AIR-BAG BUSINESS 

HS-025 745 

Homan, H. S. 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX- 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

Hopkin, Jean M. 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 

Horowitz, Alan J. 

ESTIMATES OF FUEL SAVINGS THROUGH IM- 5 
PROVED TRAFFIC FLOW IN SEVEN U.S. CITIES 

HS-025 854 

Hurst, Paul M. 

BLOOD TEST LEGISLATION IN NEW ZEALAND 
[ALCOHOL LEVELS IN DRIVERS] 

HS-025 290 

Hurter, Donald 

EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN COM- 
PONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 840 

Hiitchins, F. Peter 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL EF- 
FICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR VEHI- 
CLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER CONDI- 
TIONS 

HS-025 757 

Imhoff , Chris 

DDC [DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE] SUPPLEMENT 
LAUNCHES ALCOHOL CAMPAIGN 

HS-025 647 

Inooe, Sfaigem 

BILATERAL MODEL OF MANUEL [SIC] STEERING 
SYSTEM 

HS-025 790 

Isaacs, Madelyn C. 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

Iwaraoto, Sado 

BILATERAL MODEL OF MANUEL [SIC] STEERING 
SYSTEM 

HS-025 790 

Iwankiw, N. R. 

GUARDRAIL/VEHICLE DYNAMIC INTERACTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 644 



121 



HSL 79-10 



Janidd,Ed 

AUTO MAKERS USING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY 
IN NEW EMISSIONS SYSTEMS 

HS-025 811 

Janke, Mary K. 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033--GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

Jerskey, T. N. 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

Johnson, P. S. 

THE CHALLENGE OF ENERGY CONSERVATION TO 
THE COMPOUNDER [RUBBER INDUSTRY] 

HS-025 803 

Joscelyn, Kent B. 

DRUGS AND DRIVING: A SELECTED BIBLIOG- 
RAPHY. SUPPLEMENT ONE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 879 

Joscelyn, Kent D. 

DRUGS AND HIGHWAY SAFETY: RESEARCH ISSUES 
AND INFORMATION NEEDS 

HS-025 764 

Kawamura, Masuhiko 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

Kay, L W. 

MANIFOLD FUEL FILM EFFECTS IN AN SI [SPARK 
IGNITION] ENGINE 

HS-025 766 

Kerrebrock, J. L. 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

Koehler, D. E. 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 



PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

Koehler, Don E. 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

Kolb, C. . 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

Krane, Sigmund W. 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE IN 
COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 680 

Kranig, James M. 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL EF- 
FICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR VEHI- 
CLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER CONDI- 
TIONS 

HS-025 757 

Kuiperbak, Johan G. 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION SYSTEMS PILOT 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 778 



Lamure, Claude 

AUTOMOTIVE PR OPULSION 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 



SYSTEMS PILOT 
HS-025 778 



Larson, George C. 

WARNING-BUREAUCRATS AT WORK: STATES AND 
MANUALS. LEARNING TO RIDE BY THE BOOK 
[MOTORCYCLE LICENSES AND DRIVER'S 

MANUALS] 

HS-025 813 



122 



October 31, 1979 



LaBrecque, Mort 

COMPUTERIZED TRAFFIC CONTROL SAVES TIME 
AND FUEL 

HS-025 637 



Lees, G. 

ROAD SURFACE BULK 
THEORETICAL STUDY 



WATER DRAINAGE-A 
HS-025 762 



Lester, Martha 

TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO OCCUPAN- 
CY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARCH RESULTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 822 

Lester, Nancy 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES], FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY REPORT 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 797 

Levander, Goran 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

Lewis, Martin 

SAFETY FIRST [IN AUTOMOBILES] 

HS-025 636 

SOFTENING THE BLOW. CAN A TRUE EXPERIMEN- 
TAL SAFETY VEHICLE BE MADE PRACTICAL? 

HS-025 776 

Lichtenstehi, S. 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 

Luby, Robert L. 

WISE WALKERS IN THE MILE-HIGH CITY [DENVER 
PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PROGRAM] 

HS-025 794 

Mackie, Robert R. 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

Marks, Craig 

A FUEL ECONOMY MEASUREMENT DILEMMA: 
CERTIFICATION TESTING VS. CUSTOMER DRIVING 

HS-025 759 



Marshall, W. F. 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISES OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 



McCullagh, James C. 

WAYS TO MAKE CYCLING SAFER 



HS-025 830 



McGee, Hugh W. 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 

McLean, Robert F. 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 

McLean, W. J. 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 



123 



i BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

MdPherson, Kenard 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF STATE HIGHWAY 
SAFETY PROGRAMS. COURSE GUIDE 

HS-900018 

Meezkowski, L. C. 

DYNAMIC TESTING OF LUMINAIRE SUPPORTS 
WITH AN IMPROVED PENDULUM IMPACT FACILI- 
TY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 735 

Meldgin, M. J. 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

Mkhalopoulos, Panos 6. 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 

Miller, James C. 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
V AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

Mooney, Michael J. 

TWILIGHT [DANGERS OF DRIVING] 

HS-025 742 

Moore, Desmond F. 

SELF-ADAPTIVE ANTI-SKID BRAKING SYSTEM 

HS-025 625 

Mortimer, R. 6. 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

Miirtiand, W. O. 

RECENT ADVANCES IN ELASTOMER PROCESSING. 
SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 806 

Nevin, John R. 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

Nilsson, Goran 

RISK EXPOSURES. STRUCTURING OF THE NEED 
FOR RISK EXPOSURE DATA FOR TRAFFIC AC- 
CIDENT ANALYSIS 

HS-025 780 

Ninomiya, Kiyoshi 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 



HSL 7940 

Novak, J. M. 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 
ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

Novoa, Sergio M. 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 

O'Brien, Terrence V. 

CONSUMER DECISION PROCESSES IN AUTOMOBILE 
PURCHASING: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY 

HS-025 748 

O'Connor, Jerome 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 

Olson, Kenneth R. 

CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL ARRESTS IN A RURAL 
STATE [WYOMING] 

HS-025 769 

Oplinger, Douglas J. 

TIRES '79; TIRE INDUSTRY UNDER THE GUN. A 
WAW [WARD'S AUTO WORLD] SPECIAL REPORT 

HS-025 639 

Owens, J. Cuthbert 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE IN 
COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 680 

Faarlberg, William T. 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

Pacejka, Mans B. , ed. 

EXTENSIVE SUMMARIES OF PAPERS TO BE 
PRESENTED AT THE 5TH VSD [VEHICLE SYSTEM 
DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM [INTERNATIONAL UNION 
OF THEORETICAL AND APPLIED MECHANICS] SYM- 
POSIUM ON DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES ON ROADS 
AND TRACKS, VIENNA, SEPTEMBER 19-23, 1977 

HS-025 785 

STATE-OF-THE-ART ARTICLES OF THE 5TH VSD 
[VEHICLE SYSTEM DYNAMICS]-2ND IUTAM 
[INTERNATIONAL UNION OF THEORETICAL AND 
APPLIED MECHANICS] SYMPOSIUM 

HS-025 786 

PaM, J. 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

HS-025 852 

Pasewark, Richard A. 

CORRELATES OF ALCOHOL ARRESTS IN A RURAL 
STATE [WYOMING] 

HS-025 769 



124 



October 31, 1979 



Peck, Raymond C. 

MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033--GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 

Peterson, Bo . 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

Pethel, Frank 

EMS [EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES] COMPATI- 
BILITY STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 858 

Pierce, Richard N. 

UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 
COURSE MONITORING--4. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 801 

Pierrard, John M. 

PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL DEMAND 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 754 

Pollack, R. I. 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

Ponsioen, J. C. M. A. 

LIFE AND LUMINOUS FLUX OF HALOGEN INCAN- 
DESCENT LAMPS RELATED TO FILAMENT TEM- 
PERATURE, PRESSURE AND CH2BR2 [METHYLENE 
BROMIDE] CONTENT 

HS-025 784 

Powell, D. L. 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

Price, G. C. 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

Fritz, H. B. 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 



DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 



ACCIDENT 

HS-803 817 

Pusateri, G. 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 

Reynolds, S. D. 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

Roach, William T. 

TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO OCCUPAN- 
CY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARCH RESULTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 822 

Roberson, Robert . 

ADAPTATION OF A GENERAL MULTIBODY DYNAM- 
ICAL FORMALISM TO DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF 
TERRESTRIAL VEHICLES 

HS-025 789 

Robson, P. 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 

Roper, William L. 

DRUNK DRIVING PROBLEM GROWS WORSE 

HS-025 763 

Rudolph, Manfred 

METHODOLOGY OF POWER COMPARISON OF 
MOTOR VEHICLES (UBERLEGUNGEN ZUR 
METHODIK DBS ENERGETISCHEN VERGLEICHS 
VON STRASSEN FAHRZEUGEN) 

HS-025 751 

Ruschmann, Paul A. 

LEGAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS TAKEN 
AGAINST AT-FAULT DRIVERS INVOLVED IN FATAL 
TRAFFIC CRASHES 

HS-025 765 

Samples, Doran K. 

TFC/IW [TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION/INERTIA 
WEIGHT] 

HS-025 758 

Sanders, James H. 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 

Satnin, . A. 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 



125 



HSL 79-10 



Sdraff , Joan A. , ed. 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT AND 
OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE OF NEW 
YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

HS-025 840 



Schultz, Mort 

HOW TO STOP STALLING 

THE 12 MOST-ASKED QUESTIONS 
[RECREATIONAL VEHICLE] TIRES 



HS-025 743 
ABOUT RV 

HS-025 744 



Selby, P. H. 

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFICATIONS FOR PASSIVE 
BELT SYSTEMS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 809 

Shaw, S. L. 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

Shelton, Ella Mae 

MOTOR GASOLINES, SUMMER 1978 

HS-025 825 

Shin, B. Tom 

ANALYSIS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AND COLLI- 
SIONS 

HS-025 851 

Shinar, David 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

Slovic, P. 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 



Sparks, G. A. 
WEIGHING VEHICLES IN MOTION 



HS-025 846 



Stewart, J. Richard 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 

Stimpson, William A. 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 

Strampelli, Renzo 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION SYSTEMS PILOT 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 778 



Sturgis, J. K. 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

Stutts, Jaae C. 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 

Summer, R. 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND HARIN- 
GEY [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 799 



Svenson, Ola 

RISKS OF ROAD TRANSPORTATION 
PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 



IN A 
HS-025 288 



Tapia, G. A. 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

Tarnoff , Philip J. 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 



Taylor, Brian 

MAKING 55 MPH PAY 



Taylor, G. W. 

THE INCIDENCE OF VEHICLE 
MAJOR CITIES IN CANADA 



HS-025 831 



MISFUELING IN 



HS-025 781 



Taylor, Theodore , Jr. 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

Tesche, T. W. 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

Thackray, Richard M. , Jr. 

WISE WALKERS IN THE MILE-HIGH CITY [DENVER 
PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PROGRAM] 

HS-025 794 



126 



October 31, 1979 



Thiebaux, H. J. 

THE PREDICTIVE POWER OF DRIVER DEMERIT 
POINTS: A CASE STUDY OF MALE DRIVERS IN 
NOVA SCOTIA 

HS-025 291 

Thoresen, T. 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MOTORCYCLE POPULA- 
TION IN USE IN AUSTRALIA, AND THE RATE OF 
EFFECT OF DESIGN CHANGE 

HS-025 629 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

Thur, George M. 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 



SYSTEMS PILOT 



HS-025 778 

Town, S. W. 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 

Travis, Claude 

MEASURING FUEL ECONOMY...ON THE ROAD 

HS-025 832 

Tmbek, David M. 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

Vidal, Andre 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE BROOK- 
FIELD VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A NEW 
LIQUID BATH METHOD 

HS-025 771 

Waddell, Richard L. 

MOST '81 CARS MAY HAVE TUNGSTEN/HALOGEN 
LAMPS 

HS-025 640 

Wagner, Marvin 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY REPORT 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 797 

Waller, Patricia F. 
SAFETY BELTS: THE UNCOLLECTED DIVIDENDS 

HS-025 645 

Ward, T. L. 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

HS-025 852 



Watson, Inez 

EPA [ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY] 
STANDARDS REGULATE EMISSIONS, SECY. ADAMS 
CALLS FOR ENGINE OF THE FUTURE 

HS-025 810 

Wattlewortfa, J. A. 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 
DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 

Wesson, L. . 

EFFECT OF CARGO SHIFTING ON VEHICLE HAN- 
DLING. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 737 

Westertand, Bengt 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

Wigan, M. R. 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MOTORCYCLE POPULA- 
TION IN USE IN AUSTRALIA, AND THE RATE OF 
EFFECT OF DESIGN CHANGE 

HS-025 629 

MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

HS-025 630 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC 
CONTROL. OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: JAPAN 

(AUGUST 1977) 

HS-025 628 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

Willett, P. 

EVALUATION OF THREE-WAY INTERSECTION 
REGULATION [WESTERN AUSTRALIA] 

HS-025 828 



127 



HSL 79-10 



Wilson, Richard . 

DEVELOP AND TEST AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PRO- 
GRAM FOR TRAFFIC RECORDS ANALYST. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 807 

Wiquist, Richard C. 

TFC/IW [TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION/INERTIA 
WEIGHT] 

HS-025 758 

Wise, Clare . 

AUTOMOBILES: NEW VIGOR FOR AN ENDANGERED 
SPECIES 

HS-025 804 

Witkowski, Lillian J. 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 

Wood, Virchel . 

ROLLOVER INJURIES OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY 
[OFF-ROAD VEHICLES] 

HS-025 767 

Woodson, W. . 

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFICATIONS FOR PASSIVE 
BELT SYSTEMS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 809 

Yeager, Monte R. 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 

Yoo, Chang S. 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 

Zador, Paul L. 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 

Zaidel, David M. 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

Zegeer, Charles V. 

TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN 
HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-025 849 



128 



Corporate Author Index 



Aerodyne Res., Inc., Bedrord Res. Park, Crosby Drive, 
Bedford, Mass. 01730 

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF 
COMBUSTION RESEARCH ON INTERNAL COM- 
BUSTION ENGINE EMISSION AND FUEL CONSUMP- 
TION. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 722 

Agip Petroti, Rome, Italy 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 

Alan M. Voorhees and Associates, Inc. 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 

American Assoc. of Community and Junior Colleges, 
One Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 

DEVELOP AND TEST AN ASSOCIATE DEGREE PRO- 
GRAM FOR TRAFFIC RECORDS ANALYST. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 807 

American Motorcycle Assoc., Dept of Government 
Relations, P.O. Box 141, Westerville, Ohio 43081 

A REPLY TO NHTSA'S [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] ASSERTIONS THAT 
REPEAL OF MANDATORY HELMET LAWS IS THE 
MAJOR FACTOR IN INCREASED 1977 MOTORCYCLE 
FATALITIES 

HS-025 805 

Arthur D. Little, Inc., Acorn Park, Cambridge, Mass. 
02140 

EVALUATION OF AUTOMOBILE DRIVETRAIN COM- 
PONENTS TO IMPROVE FUEL ECONOMY. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 840 

Assoreni, Petroleum Products Dept, Milan, Italy 

EVALUATION OF DISPERSANCY BY ANALYTICAL 
METHODS [ENGINE OILS] 

HS-025 753 

Australian Road Res. Board, Box 156 (Bag 4), 
Nunawading, Vic., 3131, Australia 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY, TRANSPORT AND TRAFFIC 
CONTROL. OVERSEAS VISIT REPORT: JAPAN 
(AUGUST 1977) 

HS-025 628 

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MOTORCYCLE POPULA- 
TION IN USE IN AUSTRALIA, AND THE RATE OF 
EFFECT OF DESIGN CHANGE 

HS-025 629 

MOTORCYCLE HELMETS AND VISORS: A BRIEF 
REVIEW FOLLOWING A FEDERAL INQUIRY 

HS-025 630 

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY. A REVIEW OF INFORMA- 
TION GATHERED FROM OVERSEAS: JANUARY, 1978 
[UNITED STATES AND UNITED KINGDOM] 

HS-025 631 



MOTORCYCLE DISC BRAKE PERFORMANCE: A 
REVIEW OF AMELIATORY MEASURES AND TEST 
PROCEDURES 

HS-025 632 

THE AGE DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE OF MOTORCY- 
CLES IN AUSTRALIA AND THE IMPLICATIONS FOR 
DESIGN R RULES 

HS-025 633 

AutoReseardt Labs., Inc., Chicago, HI. 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

Batelle, Columbus Labs., 505 King Ave., Columbus, 
Ohio 43201 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 2: TECHNICAL 
DISCUSSION [PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT 
DYNAMICS], FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 817 

Batelle, Columbus Labs., 505 King Ave., Columbus, 
Ohio 43201 

PEDESTRIAN IMPACT: BASELINE AND PRELIMINA- 
RY CONCEPTS EVALUATION. VOL. 1: SUMMARY 
[PEDESTRIAN/VEHICLE ACCIDENT DYNAMICS]. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 816 

BfoTechnology, Inc., 3027 Rosemary Lane, Falls 
Church, Va. 22042 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 1. EXECUTIVE 
SUMMARY FINAL REPORT. 

HS-025 774 

SAFETY FEATURES OF STOP SIGNS AT RAIL- 
HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSINGS. VOL. 2. TECHNICAL 
REPORT. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 775 

Bureau of Motor Carrier Safety, Washington, D.C. 20590 

MOTOR CARRIER ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION. NL 
INDUSTRIES, INC. AND THURSTON MOTOR LINES, 
INC. ACCIDENT, APRIL 27, 1978, MORGANTON, 
NORTH CAROLINA 

HS-025 733 

Bureau of Motor Carrier Safety, Washington, D.C. 20590 

BMCS [BUREAU OF MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY] 
ROADSIDE SAFETY INSPECTIONS 1976-1977 

HS-025 827 

California Business and Transportation Ageaaey, Dept of 
Motor Vehicles, 2415 1st Aw., Sacramento, Calif. 95818 
MEDICALLY IMPAIRED DRIVERS: AN EVALUATION 
OF CALIFORNIA POLICY. FINAL REPORT TO THE 
LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN 
ACCORD WITH CHAPTER 764-1976 REGULAR 
LEGISLATIVE SESSION (SENATE BILL 2033-GAR- 
CIA) 

HS-025 747 



129 



HSL 79-10 



California Dept. of Motor Vehicles, Res. and Devel. 
Section, Sacramento, Calif. 

THE EFFECTS OF WRITTEN LICENSING TESTS 
STRESSING KNOWLEDGE OF SAFE DRIVING PRIN- 
CIPLES FOR INTERMEDIATE RECORD RENEWAL 
APPLICANTS. AN EVALUATION OF THE INTER- 
MEDIATE DRIVER COMPONENT OF CALIFORNIA'S 
SELECTIVE TESTING PROGRAM 

HS-025 779 

California Inst of Tech., Jet Propulsion Lab., 4800 Oak 
Grove Dr., Pasadena, Calif. 91103 

AUTOMOTIVE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS 
PROGRAM. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 648 

Calspan Corp., 4455 Genesee St, Buffalo, N.Y. 14221 

EQUILIBRIUM AND TRANSIENT ROLLING RE- 
SISTANCE OF TRUCK TIRES MEASURED ON CAL- 
SPAN'S TIRE RESEARCH FACILITY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 812 

Catholic Univ. of Valparaiso, Chile 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 

Center for Public Representation, 520 University Are., 
Madison, Wis. 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

Chrysler Corp. 

TFC/IW [TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION/INERTIA 
WEIGHT] 

HS-025 758 

Colorado Dept of Highways, Oiv. of Hwy. Safety, 4201 
E. Arkansas Aye., Denver, Colo. 80222 

IMPACT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE IN 

COLORADO. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 680 

Compagnie Francaise de Raffinage, TOTAL 
TECHNIQUE, Centre de Recherches 

ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW TEMPERATURE BROOK- 
FIELD VISCOSITY OF LUBRICANTS BY A NEW 
LIQUID BATH METHOD 

HS-025 771 

Cornell Univ., Ithaca, N.Y. 

THE EFFECT OF FUEL INJECTION ON NOX 
[NITROGEN OXIDES] EMISSIONS AND UNDESIRA- 
BLE COMBUSTION FOR HYDROGEN-FUELED 
PISTON ENGINES 

HS-025 782 

Corporate-Tech Planning Inc., 275 Wyman St., 

Waltham, Mass. 02154 

IMPORT PASSENGER AUTOMOBILE WEIGHT PRO- 
JECTIONS, 1979-1986. MERCEDES-BENZ, BMW, 
VOLVO, BL LTD. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 963 

Department of Energy, Bartiesville Energy Technology 
Center, Bartlesville, Okla. 

MOTOR GASOLINES, SUMMER 1978 

HS-025 825 



Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 
PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 2: 1978 PONTIAC, 301 CID (4.9 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 831 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 3: 1978 AMC, 121 CID (2.0 LITERS), 
2V. INTERIM REPORT, MAY 1978 

HS-803 832 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 4: 1978 PONTIAC, 151 CID (2.5 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT 

HS-803 833 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 5: 1978 CHEVROLET, 200 CID (3.3 
LITERS), 2V. INTERIM REPORT, JUNE 1978 

HS-803 834 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 6: 1978 VOLKSWAGEN DIESEL, 90 
CID (1.5 LITER), F. I. [FUEL INJECTION]. INTERIM 
REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 835 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 7: 1978 FORD, 98 CID (1.6 LITERS), 
IN. INTERIM REPORT, JULY 1978 

HS-803 836 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISITCS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 8: 1978 BUICK, 231 CID (3.8 LITER), 
4V, TURBOCHARGED. INTERIM REPORT, SEP- 
TEMBER 1978 

HS-803 837 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 9: 1978 FORD, 300 CID (4.9 LITER), 
IV. INTERIM REPORT, SEPTEMBER 1978 

HS-803 838 

PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTOMO- 
TIVE ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES. THIRD SE- 
RIES, REPORT NO. 10: 1978 HONDA, 98 CID (1.6 
LITERS). INTERIM REPORT, DECEMBER 1978 

HS-803 839 

Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C. 20590 
1977 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RAILROAD- 
HIGHWAY CROSSING SAFETY PROCEEDINGS. AU- 
GUST 23-25, 1977, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

HS-025 734 

Drivers License Guide Co., 1492 Oddstad Dr., Redwood 
City, Calif. !MOd3 

DRIVERS LICENSE GUIDE 1979 

HS-025 635 

Dnnlap and Associates, Darien, Conn. 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF STATE HIGHWAY 
SAFETY PROGRAMS. COURSE GUIDE 

HS-900 018 



130 



October 31, 1979 



Dunlap and Associates, Inc., One Parkland Drive, 
Darfen, Conn. 0(820 

REVISION OF NHTSA [NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAF- 
FIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION] CURRICULUM 
PACKAGES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 806 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1950 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., 

Phoenix, Ariz. 85027 

EFFECT OF CARGO SHIFTING ON VEHICLE HAN- 
DLING. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 737 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, TORINO-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 5. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 783 

IMPACT TEST OF COMPACT VEHICLE WITH 
MODIFIED SIDE STRUCTURE, 35 MPH, 60 DEGREE 
IMPACT, IMPALA-TO-VOLARE, TEST NO. 10. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-803 788 

. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Petroleum Lab. 

PROJECTIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLE FUEL DEMAND 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 754 

Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, Canadian 
Combustion Res. Lab. 

THE EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ON AUTOMOBILE 
FUEL ECONOMY UNDER CANADIAN CONDITIONS 

HS-025 756 

Environmental Protection Agency 

A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERMAL EF- 
FICIENCY OF 1977 AND 1978 MODEL YEAR VEHI- 
CLES UNDER CHASSIS DYNAMOMETER CONDI- 
TIONS 

HS-025 757 

Exxon Res. and Engineering Co., Linden, N J. 

ASTM [AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND 
MATERIALS] STUDY OF FLUIDITY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
GEAR OILS AT LOW TEMPERATURES 

HS-025 760 

Federal Hwy. Administration, Office of Res., 
Washington, D.C. 20590 

SIGNAL CYCLE LENGTH AND FUEL CONSUMPTION 
AND EMISSIONS 

HS-025 848 

Federal Hwy. Administration, Protective Systems Group, 
Washington, D.C. 20590 

DYNAMIC TESTING OF LUMINAIRE SUPPORTS 
WITH AN IMPROVED PENDULUM IMPACT FACILI- 
TY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 735 

Federal Hwy. Administration, Washington, D.C. 20590 

HANDBOOK OF HIGHWAY SAFETY DESIGN AND 
OPERATING PRACTICES. REV. ED. 

HS-025 773 

Ford Motor Co. 

PARAMETRIC SIMULATION OF SIGNIFICANT 
DESIGN AND OPERATING ALTERNATIVES AFFECT- 



ING THE FUEL ECONOMY AND EMISSIONS OF 
SPARK-IGNITED ENGINES 

HS-025 770 

General Accounting Office, Community and Economic 
Devel. Diy., Washington, D.C. 20548 

TRANSPORTATION ISSUES 

HS-025 835 

General Motors Corp. 

A FUEL ECONOMY MEASUREMENT DILEMMA: 
CERTIFICATION TESTING VS. CUSTOMER DRIVING 

HS-025 159 

General Motors Res. Labs., Traffic Science Dept, 

vVarren, Micnu 

URBAN TRAFFIC, FUEL ECONOMY AND EMIS- 
SIONS-CONSISTENCY OF VARIOUS MEASURE- 
MENTS 

HS-025 755 

Highway Loss Data Inst, Watergate 600, Washington, 
D.C. 20037 

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE LOSSES, NON-COMMER- 
CIAL COLLISION COVERAGES. VARIATIONS BY 
MAKE AND SERIES, VANS, PICKUPS, AND UTILITY 
VEHICLES. 1978 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST 
YEAR, 1977 MODELS DURING THEIR FIRST TWO 
YEARS 

HS-025 649 

Hoadaille Industries, Inc., One Financial Plaza, Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla. 35394 

COMMENTS OF HOUDAILLE INDUSTRIES ON THE 
BUMPER STANDARD. SUBMISSIONS TO THE NA- 
TIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRA- 
TION BETWEEN DECEMBER 27, 1978, AND FEBRUA- 
RY 15, 1979 

HS-803 86? 

Human Factors Res., Inc., 5775 Dawson Ave., Goleta, 

Calif. 93017 

EFFECTS OF HOURS OF SERVICE, REGULARITY OF 
SCHEDULES, AND CARGO LOADING ON TRUCK 
AND BUS DRIVER FATIGUE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 799 

Indiana Univ., Inst for Res. in Public Safety, 400 

Seventh St, Bloomington, Ind. 47405 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 1: DRIVER INAT- 
TENTION 

HS-803 793 

DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND INDIVIDUAL DIF- 
FERENCES IN ATTENTION AND INFORMATION 
PROCESSING. FINAL REPORT. VOL. 2: FIELD DE- 
PENDENCE AND HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-803 794 

Insurance Inst. for Hwy. Safety 

THE INFLUENCE OF THE TIME DURATION OF YEL- 
LOW TRAFFIC SIGNALS ON DRIVER RESPONSE 

HS-025 791 

nT Res. Inst, 10 W. 35th St, Chicago, DL 60616 

GUARDRAIL/VEHICLE DYNAMIC INTERACTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 644 



131 



John Z. Be Lorean Corp., Res. and Engineering Div., 
P.O. Box 427, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. VOL. 1. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 871 

COST EVALUATION FOR FOUR FEDERAL MOTOR 
VEHICLE STANDARDS. TASK 6, ADDITIONAL 
BUMPERS, FMVSS 215, EXTERIOR PROTECTION. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 873 

JHK and Associates, 1617 . 17th St., Santa Ana, Calif. 
92701 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 
2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

Kentucky Dept. of Transportation, Bureau of Highways, 
Lexington, Ky. 

TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL IN 
HIGHWAY SAFETY 

HS-025 849 

Lexington Technology Associates, 10 Wingate Rd., 
Lexington, Mass. 02173 

TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE IN U.S. AUTOMOBILE 
INDUSTRY: ASSESSING PAST FEDERAL INITIA- 
TIVES. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 543 

Liikenneturva, Helsinki, Finland 

SUOMEN TIELIIKENNEONNETTOMUUDET VUONNA 
1977, LISANA ERAITA TIETOJA VUODESTA 1958 AL- 
KAEN (ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS IN FINLAND 
1977, WITH SOME ADDITIONAL FIGURES STARTING 
FROM THE YEAR 1958) 

HS-025 739 

Man Factors, Inc., 4433 Convoy St, San Diego, Calif. 
92111 

DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIFICATIONS FOR PASSIVE 
BELT SYSTEMS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 809 

Marketing Science lost, 14 Story St, Cambridge, Mass. 
02138 

CONSUMER DECISION PROCESSES IN AUTOMOBILE 
PURCHASING: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY 

HS-025 748 

McMaster Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering, Hamilton, 
Out, Canada 

ANALYSIS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AND COLLI- 
SIONS 

HS-025 851 

Michigan Dept of State, Office of Prog. Analysis, 
Lansing, Mich. 48918 

MICHIGAN DRIVER PROFILE. SOME BASIC FACTS 
ABOUT THE TRAFFIC CONVICTION AND ACCIDENT 
RECORDS OF MICHIGAN DRIVERS 

HS-025 837 

Mobil Res. and Bevel. Corp. 

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE THE PRECISION OF 
BROOKFIELD VISCOMETRY OF AUTOMOTIVE 
LUBRICANT FLUIDS 

HS-025 761 



HSL 79-10 

Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Assoc. of the United 
States, Inc., Statistics Dept., 300 New Center Bldg., 
Detroit, Mich. 48202 
WORLD MOTOR VEHICLE DATA. 1978 ED, 

HS-025 797 

N. D. Lea and Associates Ltd. 

THE INCIDENCE OF VEHICLE MISFUELING IN 
MAJOR CITIES IN CANADA 

HS-025 781 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, 
Engineering Test Facility, P.O. Box 37, East Liberty* 
Ohio 43319 

CALIBRATION OF THREE YEAR OLD CHILD DUM- 
MIES (PHASE 2). FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 792 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, National 
Center for Statistics and Analysis, Washington, D.C. 
20590 

FATAL ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (FARS). 1977 
ANNUAL REPORT [NO. 3] 

HS-803 810 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, National 
Center for Statistics and Analysis, 2100 2nd St, S.W., 
Washington, D.C. 20590 

FACT BOOK. STATISTICAL INFORMATION ON 
HIGHWAY SAFETY. ANNUAL ISSUE NO. 2 

HS-803 893 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, 
Washington, D.C. 20590 

THE NATIONAL DRIVER REGISTER PROGRAM 
USERS* GUIDE 

HS-803 545 

THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMET USAGE ON 
HEAD INJURIES, AND THE EFFECT OF USAGE 
LAWS ON HELMET WEARING RATES. A PRELIMI- 
NARY REPORT 

HS-803 791 

REMARKS AT MAINTENANCE COMMITTEE MEET- 
ING [REGULAR COMMON CARRIER CONFERENCE], 
NEW ORLEANS, JANUARY 17, 1979 [TRUCK SAFETY] 

HS-810 339 

REMARKS BEFORE THE CHRYSLER RETREAT, ANN 
ARBOR, MICHIGAN, JANUARY 18, 1979 [FUEL 
ECONOMY REGULATORY PROGRAM] 

HS-810 340 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
CONSUMER PROTECTION AND FINANCE, HOUSE 
INTERSTATE AND FOREIGN COMMERCE COMMIT- 
TEE, CONCERNING AUTHORIZATIONS FOR AND IM- 
PLEMENTATION OF THE NATIONAL TRAFFIC AND 
MOTOR VEHICLE SAFETY ACT, AND THE MOTOR 
VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST SAVINGS ACT, 
OOOHS-810 342 

HS-810 341 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
ENERGY AND POWER, HOUSE INTERSTATE AND 
FOREIGN COMMERCE, CONCERNING AUTOMOTIVE 
FUEL ECONOMY STANDARDS UNDER TITLE V OF 
THE MOTOR VEHICLE INFORMATION AND COST 
SAVINGS ACT, MARCH 13, 1979 

HS-810 342 



132 



October 31, 1979 



STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
SURFACE TRANSPORTATION, HOUSE COMMITTEE 
ON PUBLIC WORKS AND TRANSPORTATION, CON- 
CERNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 
HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1978, MONDAY, MARCH 
19, 1979 

HS-810 343 

STATEMENT BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
TRANSPORTATION, AVIATION AND WEATHER, 
HOUSE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COMMITTEE, 
MARCH 20, 1979 

HS-810 344 

National Hwy. Traffic Safety Administration, 400 7th St, 
S.W., Room 4423, Washington, B.C. 20590 

CALCULATIONS AND SUPPORTING MATERIAL FOR 
THE PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE BUMPER 
STANDARD 

HS-803 868 

National Public Services Res. Inst, Alexandria, Va. 

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF STATE HIGHWAY 
SAFETY PROGRAMS. COURSE GUIDE 

HS-900018 

National Swedish Road Administration 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL, PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

National Transportation Safety Board, Hazardous 
Materials Div., Washington, B.C. 

CRASH THEORIES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR 
RESEARCH 

HS-025 796 

New York State Dept of Motor Vehicles, Empire State 

Plaza, Albany, N.Y. 12228 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS. 1977 ACCIDENT AND 
OPERATIONAL STATISTICAL DATA. STATE OF NEW 
YORK DEPARTMENT OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

HS-025 840 

NATO/CCMS Automotive Propulsion Systems Pilot 
Study Working Group 

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION SYSTEMS PILOT 
STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 778 

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Bevel., 
Road Res. Group, 2, rue Andre-Pascal, 75775 Paris 
Cedex 16, France 

NEW RESEARCH ON THE ROLE OF ALCOHOL AND 
DRUGS IN ROAD ACCIDENTS 

HS-025 740 

Perceptronics, Inc., Decision Res., 1201 Oak St., Eugene, 
Oreg. 

ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT 
USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE 

HS-025 289 



PRC Systems Sciences Co., 7600 Old Springfaouse Rd., 
McLean, Va. 22102 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 1: ANALYSIS AND FINDINGS 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 795 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 2: DISCUSSION, INTERPRETATION, 
AND APPENDICES [TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL RE- 
PORT 

HS-803 796 

DECRIMINALIZATION: ADMINISTRATIVE ADJUDI- 
CATION. VOL. 3: SPECIAL SUMMARY REPORT 
[TRAFFIC OFFENSES]. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 797 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, N.Y. 

ESTIMATION OF LEFT-TURN SATURATION FLOWS 

HS-025 847 

Seattle-King County Commuter Pool, Arctic Bldg., 
Room 600, 704 Third Ave., Seattle, Wash. 98104 

TECHNIQUES FOR MONITORING AUTO OCCUPAN- 
CY AND SEATTLE AREA RESEARCH RESULTS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 822 

Southwest Res. Inst, Tire Evaluation Section, P.O. 

Drawer 28510, San Antonio, Tex. 78284 

UNIFORM TIRE QUALITY GRADING TREADWEAR 
COURSE MONITORING-4. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 801 

Statens Tag- och trafikinstitut (VTI), Pack, 58101 
Linkoping, Sweden 

RISK EXPOSURES. STRUCTURING OF THE NEED 
FOR RISK EXPOSURE DATA FOR TRAFFIC AC- 
CIDENT ANALYSIS 

HS-025 780 

A PROGRAM FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION 
OF VEHICLE TRAFFIC ALONG TWO-LANE RURAL 
ROADS. AN APPLICATION OF STRUCTURED PRO- 
GRAMMING TECHNIQUE AND SIMULA-67 LAN- 
GUAGE 

HS-025 826 

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS OF ROAD TRAFFIC 
(ABBREVIATED VERSION OF INTERNRAPPORT NO. 
160) 

HS-025 838 

A MODEL FOR THE MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF 
TRAFFIC FLOW ALONG TWO-LANE SINGLE-CAR- 
RIAGEWAY RURAL ROADS 

HS-025 839 

Swedish Transport Res. Commission 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 

Systech Corp., Codd Professional Bldg., Severna Park, 
Md. 21146 

EMS [EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES] COMPATI- 
BILITY STUDY. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 858 



133 



HSL 79-10 



Systems Applications, Inc., 950 Northgate Drive, San 
Rafael, Calif. 94903 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL. 

1. INTRODUCTION TO AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS. 
FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 731 

HIGHWAY AIR QUALITY IMPACT APPRAISALS. VOL, 

2. GUIDANCE FOR HIGHWAY PLANNERS AND EN- 
GINEERS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-025 732 

Toyota Central Res. and Bevel. Labs., Inc., Nagoya, 
Japan 

ELECTRICAL OBSERVATION OF LUBRICANT FILM 
BETWEEN A CAM AND A LIFTER OF AN OHV 
[OVERHEAD VALVE] ENGINE 

HS-025 752 

Transport and Road Res. Lab., Access and Mobility 
Div., Crowthome, Berks., England 

THE MOBILITY OF OLD PEOPLE: A STUDY IN 
GUILDFORD [TRAVEL PATTERNS, ENGLAND] 

HS-025 802 

Transport and Road Res. Lab., Accident Investigation 
Div., Crowthome, Berks., England 

INJURIES TO OCCUPANTS OF HEAVY GOODS VEHI- 
CLES 

HS-025 801 

Transport and Road Res. Lab., Road User 
Characteristics Div., Crowthome, Berks., England 

SPEED CONTROL HUMPS IN NORWICH AND HARIN- 
GEY [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 799 

CLOSE FOLLOWING BEHAVIOUR AT TWO SITES ON 
RURAL TWO LANE MOTORWAYS [ENGLAND] 

HS-025 800 

Transport Canada, Road and Motor Vehicle Safety 
Branch, Ottawa, Ont, Canada 

ANALYSIS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICTS AND COLLI- 
SIONS 

HS-025 851 

Transport Canada, Road and Motor Vehicle Traffic 
Safety Branch, Ottawa, Ont. K1A ON5, Canada 

SMASHED. THE MAGAZINE ON DRINKING-AND- 
DRIVING (IMPACT. LA REVUE DE L 'AUTOMOBILE 
ET DE LA SOBRIETE) 

HS-025 823 

Transportation Res. Board, 2101 Constitution Ave., 
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20418 

HIGHWAY CAPACITY, MEASURES OF EFFECTIVE- 
NESS, AND FLOW THEORY 

HS-025 844 

United Technologies Corp., United Technologies Res. 
Center, East Hartford, Conn. 

MANIFOLD FUEL FILM EFFECTS IN AN SI [SPARK 
IGNITION] ENGINE 

HS-025 766 



University of Florida, Transportation Res. Center, 
Gainesville, Fia. 32611 

IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A MOV- 
ING MERGE CONTROL SYSTEM IN TAMPA. FINAL 
REPORT 

HS-025 736 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept. of 
Health and Safety Education, Champaign, 111. 61820 

EVALUATION OF THE WRITTEN TEST AND THE 
RIDING SKILL TEST USED IN THE MOTORCYCLE 
RIDER COURSE 

HS-025 738 

University of Michigan, Hwy. Safety Res. Inst, Huron 
Pkwy. and Baxter Rd., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48109 

DRUGS AND DRIVING: A SELECTED BIBLIOG- 
RAPHY. SUPPLEMENT ONE. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 879 

University of North Carolina, Hwy. Safety Res. Center, 

Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514 

A CATEGORICAL ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP 
BETWEEN VEHICLE WEIGHT AND DRIVER INJURY 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACCIDENTS. FINAL REPORT 

HS-803 892 

University of Saskatchewan, Coll. of Engineering, 
Saskatoon, Sask., Canada 

WEIGHING VEHICLES IN MOTION 

HS-025 846 

University of Southern California, Dept of Industrial 
and Systems Engineering, Los Angeles, Calif. 

SOME PROPERTIES OF FREEWAY DENSITY AS A 
CONTINUOUS-TIME, STOCHASTIC PROCESS 

HS-025 852 

University of Toronto, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Ont, 
Canada 

DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS OF TRAFFIC CONFLICT 
SURVEYS 

HS-025 850 

University of Wisconsin 

AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RETAIL USED MOTOR 
VEHICLE MARKET: AN EVALUATION OF DISCLO- 
SURE AND REGULATION 

HS-025 750 

Utah Dept of Transportation, Div. of Safety 

1977 FATAL TRAFFIC ACCIDENT STATISTICS [UTAH] 

HS-025 643 

Vattenbyggnadsbyran (VBB), Malmo, Sweden 

SWEDISH CAPACITY MANUAL. PT. 1. OBJECTIVES, 
SCOPE, AND ARRANGEMENT OF THE MANUAL. PT. 
2. CAPACITY OF UNSIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS. 
PT. 3. CAPACITY OF SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS 

HS-025 845 



134 



Contract Number Index 



DOT-FH-ll-8285 

University of Florida, Transportation Res. Center, 
Gainesville, Fla. 32611 

HS-025 736 

DOT-FH-11-8520 

ITT Res. Inst,, 10 W. 35th St., Chicago, HI. 60616 

HS-025 644 

DOT-FH-11-9143 

Systems Applications, Inc., 950 Northgate Drive, San 
Rafael, Calif. 94903 

HS-025 731 

Systems Applications, Inc., 950 Northgate Drive, San 
Rafael, Calif. 94903; JHK and Associates, 1617 E. 17th St., 
Santa Ana, Calif. 92701 

HS-025 732 

DOT-FH-11-9192 

BioTechnology, Inc., 3027 Rosemary Lane, Falls Church, 
Va. 22042 

HS-025 774 

BioTechnology, Inc., 3027 Rosemary Lane, Falls Church, 
Va. 22042 

HS-025 775 

DOT-FH-11-9195 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1850 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., 
Phoenix, Ariz. 85027 

HS-025 737 

DOT-FH-11-9261 

Seattle-King County Commuter Pool, Arctic Bldg., Room 
600, 704 Third Ave., Seattle, Wash. 98104 

HS-025 822 

IX)T-HS-4-00897 

University of North Carolina, Hwy. Safety Res. Center, 
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27514 

HS-803 892 

DOT-HS-4-00961 

Batelle, Columbus Labs., 505 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio 
43201 

HS-803 816 

Batelle, Columbus Labs., 505 King Ave., Columbus, Ohio 
43201 

HS-803 817 

DOT-HS-5-01104 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1850 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., 
Phoenix, Ariz. 85027 

HS-803 783 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1850 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., 
Phoenix, Ariz. 85027 

HS-803 788 

DOT-HS-5-OI142 

Human Factors Res., Inc., 5775 Dawson Ave., Goleta, Calif. 
93017 

HS-803 799 

DOT-HS-5-01239 

American Assoc. of Community and Junior Colleges, One 
Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036 

HS-803 807 



DOT-HS-5-01244 

Dunlap and Associates, Inc., One Parkland Drive, Darien, 
Conn. 06820 

HS-803 806 

DOT-HS-6-01285 

PRC Systems Sciences Co., 7600 Old Springhouse Rd., 
McLean, Va. 22102 

HS-803 795 

PRC Systems Sciences Co., 7600 Old Springhouse Rd., 
McLean, Va. 22102 

HS-803 796 

PRC Systems Sciences Co., 7600 Old Springhouse Rd., 
McLean, Va. 22102 

HS-803 797 

DOT-HS-6-01348 

Southwest Res. Inst., Tire Evaluation Section, P.O. Drawer 
28510, San Antonio, Tex. 78284 

HS-803 801 

DOT-HS-6-01429 

Colorado Dept. of Highways, Div. of Hwy. Safety, 4201 E. 
Arkansas Ave., Denver, Colo. 80222 

HS-803 680 

DOT-HS-7-01530 

University of Michigan, Hwy. Safety Res. Inst, Huron 
Pkwy. and Baxter Rd., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48109 

HS-803 879 

DOT-HS-7-01617 

Man Factors, Inc., 4433 Convoy St., San Diego, Calif. 92111 

HS-803 809 

DOT-HS-7-01767 

John Z. De Lorean Corp., Res. and Engineering Div., P.O. 
Box 427, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013 

HS-803 871 

DOT-HS-7-01767-Mod-3 

John Z. De Lorean Corp., Res. and Engineering Div., P.O. 
Box 427, Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 48013 

HS-803 873 

DOT-HS-7-01789 

Corporate-Tech Planning Inc., 275 Wyman St., Waltham, 
Mass. 02154 

HS-803 963 

DOT-HS-7-01818 

Systech Corp., Codd Professional Bldg., Severaa Park, Md. 
21146 

HS-803 858 

DOT-HS-S-01819 

Indiana Univ., Inst. for Res. in Public Safety, 400 Seventh 
St., Bloomington, Ind. 47405 

HS-803 793 

Indiana Univ., Inst. for Res. in Public Safety, 400 Seventh 
St., Bloomington, Ind. 47405 

HS-803 794 

DOT-OS-60156 

Calspan Corp., 4455 Genesee St., Buffalo, N.Y. 14221 

HS-803 812 



135 



HSL 79-10 



DOT-RA-75-41 

California Inst. of Tech., Jet Propulsion Lab., 4800 Oak 
Grove Dr., Pasadena, Calif. 91103 

HS-025 648 

DOT-TSC-1046 

Arthur D. Little, Inc., Acorn Park, Cambridge, Mass. 02140 

HS-803 840 

DOT-TSC-1355 

Lexington Technology Associates, 10 Wingate Rd., Lexing- 
ton, Mass. 02173 

HS-803 543 

DOT-TSC-1487 

Aerodyne Res., Inc., Bedrord Res. Park, Crosby Drive, 
Bedford, Mass. 01730 

HS-803 722 

NSF-ENV77-15332 

Perceptronics, Inc., Decision Res., 1201 Oak St., Eugene, 
Oreg. 

HS-025 289 

RA-77-07 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

HS-803 831 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

HS-803 832 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

HS-803 833 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

HS-803 834 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

HS-803 835 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

HS-803 836 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

HS-803 837 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

HS-803 838 

Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology 
Center, P.O. Box 1398, Bartlesville, Okla. 74003 

HS-803 839 



136 



Report Number Index 



ARI-RR-131 

ARRB-AIR-8124 

ARRB-AIR-812-2 

ARRB-AXR-812-3 

ARRB-AIR-812-4 

ARRB-ARR-78 

ARRMS 77/183 

BETC/OP-78/20 

BETC/OP-78/21 

BETC/OP-78/22 

BETC/OP-78/30 

BETC/OP-78/33 

BETC/OP-78/34 

BETC/OP-78/43 

BETC/OP-78/55 

BETC/PPS-79/1 

BMCS-78-1 

CAL-DMV-RSS-78-63 

CAL-DMV-RSS-78-67 

CCMS-76 

CED-78-159 

DOT-HS-8^1819-78-DAP 

DOT-HS-8-01819-78-FD 





DOT.TSC-NHTSA-7^47 




HS-803 722 




HS-803 722 




DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79.10 




HS-025 629 




HS-803 839 




DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-12 


! 


HS-025 630 




HS-803 840 




DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-13 




HS-025 631 




HS-803 543 




DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-2 




HS-025 632 




HS-803 831 




DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-3 




HS-025 628 




HS-803 832 


HS-025 628 


W)T.TSC.NHTSA.7M 


HS-803 833 




DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-5 




HS-803 832 




HS-803 834 




DOT-TSC-NHTSA-79-6 




HS-803 831 




HS-803 835 




DOT-TOC-NHTSA-7^7 




HS-803 833 




HS-803 836 




DOT-TSC-NHTSA-Tf^ 




HS-803 834 




HS-803 837 


HS-803 835 


M)T.TSC.NHTSA^9 


HS-803 838 




ED-77-2 




HS-803 836 




HS-803 806 




EF78-28R 




HS-803 837 




HS-025 731 


HS-803 838 


EF78-34R 








HS-025 732 


HS-803 839 


FHWA-RD-77.29 








HS-025 644 


HS-025 825 


FHWA-RD-78-100 








HS-025 732 


HS-025 733 


FHWA-RD-78-198 








HS-025 822 


HS-025T79 


FHWA-RD.7S.2i4 








HS-025 735 


HS-025 747 


FHWA-RD-78-29 








HS-025 736 


HS-025 778 


FHWA-RD-78-40 








HS-025 774 


HS-025 835 


FHWA-R0-78-41 








HS-025 775 


HS-803 793 


FHWA-RD-78-76 








HS-025 737 


HS-803 794 


FHWA-RD-78-99 








HS-025 731 



137 



HSL 79-10 



HLDI-V78-1 

&TRI-J6346 

JPL-78-21 

MFl-78-109-(R) 

MSI-PRR-76-121 

NASA-CR-157604 

NHTSA-OVSS-678-2 

N78-32426 

OECIMO.927-1978 

PB-286 119 

PRC-R-1857-Vol-l 

PRC-R-1857-Vol-2 

PRC-R-1857-Vol-3 

RD-20-(ll/78) 

Safety-RR-78-1 

SAE-780930 

SAE-780932 

SAE-780933 

SAE-78Q934 

SAE-780935 

SAE-780936 

SAE-780937 

SAE-780938 

SAE-780939 

SAE-780940 





SAE-780941 




HS-025 649 




HS-025 771 




SAE-780943 




HS-025 644 




HS-025 770 




SAE-780944 




HS-025 648 




HS-025 766 




SAE-780945 




HS-803 809 




HS-025 782 




SAE-780947 




HS-025 748 




HS-025 781 




TP-1535 




HS-025 648 




HS-025 823 




TRR-667 




HS-803 792 




HS-025 844 




TRRL-LR-850 




HS-025 648 




HS-025 802 




TRRL-LR-854 




HS-025 740 




HS-025 801 




TRRL-LR-859 




HS-025 644 




HS-025 800 




TRRL-SR-423 




HS-803 795 




HS-025 799 




UM-HSRI-78-3 




HS-803 796 




HS-803 879 




VXM43 




HS-803 797 




HS-025 826 




VTI-144-A 




HS-025 840 




HS-025 780 




VTI-43 




HS-025 738 




HS-025 839 




VTI-44 




HS-025 752 




HS-025 838 




ZM-5947-T-2 




HS-025 753 




HS-803 812 




1765-F 




HS-025 754 




HS-803 799 




3989-78-22 




HS-025 755 




HS-025 737 




403-2-A 




HS-025 756 




HS-803 680 


HS-025 757 






HS-025 758 






HS-025 759 






HS-025 760 






HS-025 761 







138 



CONTRACTS AWARDED 



139 



DOT-HS-7-01759 Mod. 2 



EFFECTS OF RECENT VEHICLE DESIGN CHANGE 
ON SAFETY PERFORMANCE 

The recent characteristics of the passenger car occupant safety 
problem in the side impact modes shall be determined, and its 
future characteristics then projected, reflecting the "Estimated 
Future Safety Impact" of recent design changes combined 
with the effects of implementing Federal Motor Vehicle Safety 
Standard (FMVSS) 208 Passive Protection System amendment 
of 30 Jun 79. The information needed relates to upgrading 
FMVSS 214 side impact protection when struck by a moving 
barrier, the placement and performance of dummies, and 
possible interior occupant contact protection and compartment 
integrity criteria. Information shall be developed from availa- 
ble National Crash Severity Study (NCSS) and Fatal Accident 
Reporting System (PARS) data to relate conditions of impact 
direction (2, 3, 4, 8, 9, and 10 o'clock) and severity with in- 
dividual and combined occupant positions (near side and far 
side) and shall relate these to the mechanisms of injury 
(contact area distribution and ejection) and injury severity. 
The effect of vehicle class and of belt usage (lap belt only, 
and combined lap and shoulder belt) shall be examined. The 
frequency of air bag deployments in side crashes shall be esti- 
mated (longitudinal delta V of 12 mph or greater) and the 
mechanisms of injury of this subset viewed separately. In ad- 
dition to NCSS and PARS data, comparisons with overall data 
shall be considered in estimating the restraint performance 
function. 

Minicars, Inc., Kinetic Research Division, 55 Depot Road, 
Goleta, California 93017 
Increased $34,766.00 
Extended to 30 Sep 79 



gency medical services (EMS) system and concurrently to the 
emergency response system. To accomplish this, the needs for 
highway signs that could identify all methods and points of ac- 
cess to the emergency response system must be identified. 
From this set of needs, the subset of needs for access to EMS 
will be selected and combinations of signs using the Star of 
Life symbol designed. The needs for a sign shall be identified 
and documented with subsequent validation of the use of the 
Star of Life symbol to meet these needs. 

"This contract is awarded by the Small Business 
Administration under the authority of Section 8(a) of the Small 
Business Act (USC 637a), and will be administered by the 
Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration." 
$30,188.86 

To be completed six (6) months from date of contract award 
(28 Aug 79) 



DOT-HS-9-02227 

IX>OR LOCKS AND DOOR RETENTION 
COMPONENTS 

Inspection, testing, and reporting of motor vehicle equipment 
for conformance with Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 
No. 206, Door Locks and Door Retention Components, shall 
be performed in accordance with National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration Laboratory Test Procedure TP-206-03 
dated Nov 1978. Oe t 

Artech Corporation, 2901 Telestar Court, Falls Church, VA 

22042 

Per Delivery Order 



DOT-HS-8-02037 Mod. 2 

ANALYSIS OF RIDE QUALITY DATA BASE 

The final contract briefing shall be revised and presented at a 
public meeting on 19 Jul 79. Additional analyses of the 
questionnaire shall be performed to determine what types of 
vehicles were using rubber block suspensions, what truck 
profile characteristics are associated with different 
make/model trucks, and how the characteristics of the worst 
trucks compare with the characteristics associated with com- 
fortable-riding trucks, ote 

"This contract is awarded by the Small Business 
Administration under the authority of Section 8(a) of the Small 
Business Act (USC 637a), and will be administered by the 
Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration." 
Increased $9,500.00 
Extended to 5 Nov 79 



DOT-HS-9-02226 

DUMMY, PART 572, MODIFIED IN ACCORDANCE 
WITH THE STATEMENT OF WORK AND 
SPECIFICATIONS CONTAINED HEREIN 

Seven (7) Part 572 dummies modified to assess the repeatabili- 
ty and reproducibility of their responses in various side impact 
environments shall be provided. The Part 572 dummies shall 
be modified by removal of their arms and certain parts of their 
shoulder mechanisms and suitably compensated by weights, to 
be utilized as the basis for vehicle evaluation in terms of an 
upgraded Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 214 which 
includes dynamic testing of occupant protection systems in 
side impact.Of n 

Humanoid Systems, 747 East 223rd Street, Carson, California 

90745 

$67,761.00 

To be completed twelve (12) weeks from date of contract 

award (22 Aug 79) 



DOT-HS-9-02219 

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES HIGHWAY 
SIGN EVALUATION 

The "Star of Life" highway sign shall be adopted for use to 
identify significant points and methods of access to the emer- 



141 



DOT-HS-7-01654 Mod. 8 



HSL 79-10 



DOT-HS-9-02229 

PART 575.104 UTQG TEMPERATURE RESISTANCE 
GRADING 

A test program shall be conducted to determine compliance 
with the requirements of Part 575.104, Uniform Tire Quality 
Grading System, Paragraph (g), Temperature Resistance Grad- 
ing, in accordance with National Highway Traffic Safety Ad- 
ministration Laboratory Test Procedures for Tire Temperature 
Resistance Testing TP-UTQG-H-01 dated 26 May 79. to 

Standards Testing Laboratories, Inc., P.O. Box 592, Massillon, 

Ohio 44646 

Per Delivery Order 

To be completed four (4) months from initial availability of 

test tires 



pacts; provide data tapes for additional tests; repair T-l guards 
impacted in previous tests for use in additional tests; provide 
report for additional tests; and provide extensive coordination 
activities with Texas A and M University personnel who are 
engaged in the development of underride guards under con- 
tract to the Federal Highway Administration. Under Task 9 
the following shall be accomplished: conduct Quinton Hazell 
(Q-H) 35 mph symmetric and 30 mph offset tests using Q-H 
guards, and straight-truck symmetric tests (35 mph and static) 
using 5ST guards (developed by Texas A and M); fabricate 
dynamic test device faces for straight-truck tests and provide 
data tapes for these tests; and provide report for Q-H 35 mph 
symmetric and straight-truck 5ST tests. 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1850 West Pinnacle Peak Road, 
Phoenix, Arizona 85027 
Increased $99,176.00 
No change 



DOT-HS-7-01654 Mod. 8 

ESTABLISHMENT OF ZONE CENTERS FOR NASS 

After passing the Zone Center quality control process, all ac- 
cident cases sampled between 1 Jan 79 and 15 Apr 79 will be 
entered into the National Accident Sampling System Remote 
Data Entry System via data terminal or batch input. Cases 
generating error messages will be corrected appropriately and 
reentered. All programming errors or other problems with the 
system will be reported to the Information System Division, 
National Center for Statistics and Analysis, on a daily basis. 
In addition, recommendations that will improve the system 
and enhance its field operations are anticipated. Opac 

Calspan Field Services, Inc., Post Office Box 400, Buffalo, 
New York 14225 
Increased $8767.00 
No change 



DOT-HS-7-01749 Mod. 2 

IDENTIFICATION AND FEASIBILITY TEST OF 
SPECIALIZED RURAL PEDESTRIAN SAFETY 
TRAINING 

A rural pedestrian safety training program for grades kin- 
dergarten through 12th (Ruped Youth Training Curriculum) 
shall be developed and tested for feasibility. 

Applied Science Associates, Inc., Box 158, Valencia, 
Pennsylvania 16059 
Increased $115,279.00 
Extended through 31 Jul 80 



DOT-HS-8-01905 Mod. 6 

DEVELOPMENT OF COMPLIANCE TEST FOR 
TRUCK REAR UNDERRIDE PROTECTION 

Under Task 6 the following shall be accomplished: conduct 
two additional tests using the moving test device to complete 
development of this device; design and fabricate a 
Honeycomb-Faced moving test device (in addition to load- 
measuring test device) that will include a bumper system capa- 
ble of simulating vehicle impact with the tires of a truck and 
will be designed for 35 mph symmetric and 30 mph offset im- 



DOT-HS-8-01933 Mod. 5 

TEST DEVICE AND TEST PROCEDURE TO ASSESS 
SIDE STRUCTURES 

Task 2 of Phase 2 will involve an evaluation, using accident 
data from the National Crash Severity Study and other ap- 
propriate files, of the sensitivity of the benefits to variations in 
weight of the test barrier, results to be projected to the 1985 
population of vehicles and optimum test weight for providing 
greatest potential for injury reduction in the 1985 traffic mix to 
be determined; also, approximations of frontal force-crush 
characteristics shall be determined by vehicle weight category, 
using Task 3 results and other sources, and, if possible, op- 
timum force-crush characteristics (in terms of injury reduction 
in a 1985 mix of new vehicles) for a side impact barrier shall 
be determined. Task 3 will involve the conduct of front load 
cell barrier tests to determine the characteristics of 1978, 1979, 
and 1980 model year vehicles in terms of force-deflection 
characteristics. Using the selected vehicle from Task 3, Task 4 
will involve car-to-car crash testing into selected vehicle 
models which have been modified, the results to be used to 
determine the ability of the side impactor test device to 
reproduce the car-to-car crash environment. Task 5 will in- 
volve a modification of the side impactor with the major ob- 
jective of reducing the fabrication and materials cost. Full- 
scale testing shall be conducted in Task 6 as necessary to eval- 
uate the performance and repeatability in probable compliance 
test conditions of the modified side impactor. Task 7 will in- 
volve crash testing to evaluate the repeatability of the finalized 
impactor and the compliance test condition. One side impactor 
for use in compliance testing and 15 sets of working drawings 
suitable for reproducing the side impactor shall be produced in 
Task 8. 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1850 West Pinnacle Peak Road, 

Phoenix, Arizona 85027 

Increased $469,134.00 

To be completed by 3 Jun 80 



DOT-HS-9-02214 Mod. 1 

SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) TRAINING 

An analysis shall be made of the evaluations from the Merit 
Pay Participants, focusing on specific important content areas 



142 



October 31, 1979 



DOT-HS-9-02217 



of the course. These content areas will be presented in the two 
half-day program to eliminate the less important steps and to 
highlight areas that have proven of most value to participants. 
Appropriate materials for this training shall be selected, 
drafted, and modified. A single "between sessions" assignment 
for the Senior Executive Service (SES) members to work on 
shall be developed. This assignment will be designed to aid the 
SES members in dealing with at least one of their merit pay 
subordinates. They will work with the merit pay subordinates 
particularly on the identification of critical elements and the 
drafting of performance standards, described in at least two 
levels of difficulty (fully acceptable and minimally acceptable). 
The training for 30 to 35 SES participants shall be conducted 
on 5 Sep 1979 (two half -day sessions) and 12 Sep 1979 (two 
half-day sessions), with one make-up class to be scheduled as 
necessary (two half-day sessions).to 

ODS, Inc., 825 North Parkcenter Drive, Santa Ana, California 

92705 

Increased $6904.00 

No change 



DOT-HS-9-02215 

BASIC ORDERING AGREEMENT FOR EVALUATION 
OF PASSIVE RESTRAINT SYSTEMS 

The protection performance of various restraint devices shall 
be evaluated via computer simulations, sled tests, and full- 
scale car crash tests. Computer simulations will study the ef- 
fects of vehicle crashes on front-seat restrained occupants, to 
include the use of the three-dimensional crash victim simula- 
tion developed by Calspan for the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration, or the Highway Safety Research In- 
stitute three-dimensional model with the air bag option. The 
objectives will be to obtain preliminary indications of the 
restraint system performance, to determine the important 
system parameters, such as belt anchorage points and how 
they affect passenger loading and kinematics, and to obtain 
force-deflection characteristics for determining femur loads. 
The sled testing shall involve variable or programmable 
deceleration profiles, associated instrumentation, data record- 
ing/analysis equipment, and 16 mm high-speed motion picture 
cameras. Full-scale crash testing shall include barrier and pole 
crashes at various angles or configurations, side impacts 
(moving barrier) as specified in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety 
Standard 208, and car-to-car crashes with all sizes of pas- 
senger vehicles at various angles or configurations up to clos- 
ing speeds of 80 mph (barrier equivalent velocity). Engineering 
assessments shall be made of the particular restraint systems. 

Calspan Corporation, Post Office Box 400, Buffalo, New York 

14225 

Per Task Order 

To be completed one (1) year from date of contract award (23 

Aug 79) 



DOT-HS-9-02216 

BASIC ORDERING AGREEMENT FOR EVALUATION 
OF PASSIVE RESTRAINT SYSTEMS 

The protection performance of various restraint devices shall 
be evaluated via computer simulations, sled tests, and full- 
scale car crash tests. Computer simulations will study the ef- 



fects of vehicle crashes on front-seat restrained occupants, to 
include the use of the three-dimensional crash victim simula- 
tion developed by Calspan for the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration, or the Highway Safety Research In- 
stitute three-dimensional model with the air bag option. The 
objectives will be to obtain preliminary indications of the 
restraint system performance, to determine the important 
system parameters, such as belt anchorage points and how 
they affect passenger loading and kinematics, and to obtain 
force-deflection characteristics for determining femur loads. 
The sled testing shall involve variable or programmable 
deceleration profiles, associated instrumentation, data record- 
ing/analysis equipment, and 16 mm high-speed motion picture 
cameras. Full-scale crash testing shall include barrier and pole 
crashes at various angles or configurations, side impacts 
(moving barrier) as specified in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety 
Standard 208, and car-to-car crashes with all sizes of pas- 
senger vehicles at various angles or configurations up to clos- 
ing speeds of 80 mph (barrier equivalent velocity). Engineering 
assessments shall be made of the particular restraint systems. 

Minicars, Inc., 35 La Patera Lane, Goleta, California 93017 
Per Task Order 

To be completed one (1) year from date of contract award (23 
Aug 79) 



DOT-HS-9-02217 

BASIC ORDERING AGREEMENT FOR EVALUATION 
OF PASSIVE RESTRAINT SYSTEMS 

The protection performance of various restraint devices shall 
be evaluated via computer simulations, sled tests, and full- 
scale car crash tests. Computer simulations will study the ef- 
fects of vehicle crashes on front-seat restrained occupants, to 
include the use of the three-dimensional crash victim simula- 
tion developed by Calspan for the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration, or the Highway Safety Research In- 
stitute three-dimensional model with the air bag option. The 
objectives will be to obtain preliminary indications of the 
restraint system performance, to determine the important 
system parameters, such as belt anchorage points and how 
they affect passenger loading and kinematics, and to obtain 
force-deflection characteristics for determining femur loads. 
The sled testing shall involve variable or programmable 
deceleration profiles, associated instrumentation, data record- 
ing/analysis equipment, and 16 mm high-speed motion picture 
cameras. Full-scale crash testing shall include barrier and pole 
crashes at various angles or configurations, side impacts 
(moving barrier) as specified in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety 
Standard 208, and car-to-car crashes with all sizes of pas- 
senger vehicles at various angles or configurations up to clos- 
ing speeds of 80 mph (barrier equivalent velocity). Engineering 
assessments shall be made of the particular restraint 
systems.Otio 

Dynamic Science, Inc., 1850 West Pinnacle Peak Road, 

Phoenix, Arizona 85027 

Per Task Order 

To be completed one (1) year from date of contract award (23 

Aug 79) 



143 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 
NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY 

ADMINISTRATION 
Washington, D.C. 20590 



Official Business 
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE, $300 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC 

SAFETY ADMINISTRATION 

DOT 517