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Full text of "Historical guide and other points of interest of Springfield, Illinois"

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Historical Guide 

and other points of interest of 

Springfield, Illinois 



Copyriebt 1923. By W. K. JENKINS. 






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PLACES IN SPRINGFIELD. ILLINOIS. MARKED WITH BRONZE TABLETS 



Site of Joshua Fbt Speed's Gexekal Stoke. 
107 South Fifth Street. 
Above this store Lincoln shared a sleeping 
room with Speed, on first coming to Springfield, 
in 1837. 

Site op Sbcoxd PBESBTTnu.\x CnrKCH. 

217 South Fourth Street. 
Here Lincoln attended the first session of the 
Illinois House of Representatives (1839-1S40) fol- 
lowing the removal of the Capitol from Vandalia. 

Site of the Globe Taveks. 
315 East Adams Street. 
Here Lincoln and his wife lived from the time 
of their marriage until May 2. 1844. Here Robert 
Lincoln was bom. 

Smith. C. M. BtntDi^ic. 
328 East Adams Street. 
In a room on the third floor of this buildin? 
Lincoln In January, 1861, wrote his inaugural 
address. 

Wabash Freight House. 
Tenth and ilonroe Streets. 
This in 1861 was the passenger station of the 
Great Western Railroad. Here, on the morning 
of February 11. 1861. Lincoln delivered his fare- 
well address from the rear platform of his car. 



Site op Ilusois State Joc^v.ai.. 
116-118 North Sixth Street. 
Here Lincoln first received the news (May 18, 
1860) of his nomination for President of United 
States. 

Pl-blic Receivi:«g Vacxt Oak Ridge Cemetebt. 

The body of Abraham Lincoln lay in this vault 
from the day of his funeral. May 4, 1865. until 
December 21, 1865. 

Site of the Fiest Presbvteeia:« Church. 

302 East Washington Street. 
Lincoln rented a pew here, and with his 
family attended services, 1842-1861. 

Chicago & Altos R.ulroad Passe.vgeb Station. 
Third and Jefferson Streets. 
Abraham Lincoln's body was brought to 
Springfield by special funeral train, reaching this 
station May 3, 1865. 

The Li.xcolx HoMESTr_\D. 
Eighth and Jackson Streets. 
Open to the public, 10 to 12 a. m., 2 to 5 p. m. 
Closed Sundays. 

Camp V.\te-s 1861. 
Comer Douglas Avenue and Governor Street. 
Here General U. S. Grant began his Civil 
War career. 



FOREWORD 



SPRINGFIELD, the capital of Illinois 
since so created by act of legislature 
in 1837, was founded in 1819. and lies in 
the heart of the Great Middlewest, in the 
center of the vast agricultural and coal pro- 
ducing regions. It is a city of 60.000 people 
within the city limits. 75.000 including con- 
tiguous settlements, and is constantly grow- 
ing and expanding. 

As a place to be called "The City in 
which I Live'" it is unusually attractive, with 
its thousand acres of park lands, including 
two of the most beautiful parks in the 
United States, one of them named for Lin- 
coln and one for Washington, and five hun- 
dred acres recently acquired for future park 
cultivation; its beautifully developed resi- 
dence sections, where are to be found some 
of the loveliest homes in America; its $5.- 
000.000 system of public and parochial 
schools, private seminaries and excellent 
business colleges; the splendid educational 
advantages of its fine city and state librar- 
ies; its fifty-eight churches valued at $1,- 
789.000; its finely operating form of com- 
mission government; its position as seat of 



the Sangamon county government; as the 
seat of the state government with the beau- 
tiful state buildings including the magnifi- 
cent new Illinois Centennial Building among 
its show places; its importance as the loca- 
tion of the Federal Court and United States 
District Court officials; its manufacturing 
and industrial facilities of a hundred or more 
factories of varied nature furnishing occupa- 
tion to 10.000 people, and the great many 
other advantages which it offers to progress- 
ive and public spirited men and women 
citizens. 

Four outstanding advantages which com- 
mand attention point to the desirability of 
Springfield as a home and business center: 
Springfield has the lowest priced coal in the 
United States, due to the fact that it lies in 
the heart of Illinois' great coal fields, elim- 
inating transportation costs. It has the 
lowest power and electric rates in the United 
States, outside the hydro-electric field, with 
the amazingly low rate of one and one-half 
cents per K.W.H. or less according to con- 
sumption. It has also the lowest water rate 
in Illinois, proven by all available statistics 



and by atcual working costs. And it has 
unexcelled transportation facilities with 
seven of the great trunk railroads which tra- 
verse this immense agricultural area leading 
into the city, and with surface lines of the 
most progressive type within the city itself. 

Financially Springfield has one of the 
soundest and most progressive banking sys- 
tems in the country, headed by men of 
integrity and true citizenship, nine great in- 
stitutions w^ith massed resources of more 
than $35,000,000, with industrial banks in 
workingmen's districts and loan associations 
Virith assets of $4,500,000 for the benefit of 
its people. 

The splendid civic spirit of the city is 
manifested in its progressive Chamber of 
Commerce with 2,000 working members, 
its six men's clubs, its advanced and active 
clubs for women, its splendidly efficient Y. 
M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., and its one hun- 
dred and thirty-eight fraternal societies. Its 
fine hotels offer the visitors homes, and its 
clubs provide them places of recreation, its 
excellent theatres entertainment. It will 
soon be the home also of one of the most 
magnificent Masonic cathedrals in America, 
plans for which are now being drawn. 



Not th.e least outstanding in point of 
Springfield's desirability as a residence and 
business location is the City Zoning and 
Planning Commission with the great City 
Plan which has been proposed and adopted 
and which will set Springfield in the fore- 
ground of America's proud list of cities of 
beauty and distinction. 

And then there is Springfield's own Hall 
of Fame which contains illustrious names of 
men who have done things and v^rhom the 
world recognizes. Not alone that of the 
Immortal Lincoln, but America's great poet, 
Nicholas Vachel Lindsay; its great novelist, 
Edgar Lee Masters, accorded one of ten 
outstanding world wfriters; its great states- 
man and writer. Brand Whitlock. former 
Minister to Belgium; that minister and es- 
sayist. Dr. Frank Crane, and that Lincoln 
historian and writer of charm. Henry B. 
Rankin, ^re names which have added proud 
luster to Springfield. 

As a World Shrine, because of the World 
Beloved Lincoln, as the capital of the great 
commonwealth of Illinois, and as a metrop- 
olis of the great Middlewest, Springfield 
welcomes the traveler and visitor, whence 
he may come, wherever he may go. 



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(iov«Tinir'H Miiiisiun. 



THE SCHOOLS OF SPRINGFIELD 



IN the year 1914 the Springfield Board of 
Education together with a group of in- 
terested citizens invited the Russell Sage 
Foundation to make a survey of the Spring- 
field schools and offer recommendations 
for a future program. 

Since then it has been the policy of each 
successive Board of Education to work 
toward the objectives set forth in this Sur- 
vey with the gratifying result that the 
Springfield schools now rank with the most 
progressive schools in the country. 

Of the twenty buildings used for school 
purposes all are in excellent repair, while 
fifteen are comparatively new and built ac- 
cording to the latest standard school re- 
quirements. All of the buildings except one 
are provided with auditoriums, shops, and 
special rooms. 

The senior High School completed in the 
year 1917 represented at that time an in- 
vestment of $450,000. A recent valuation 
placed the estimate at $1,000,000 for build- 
ing and equipment. The total valuation of 



school property amounts to approximately 
$5,000,000. The annual cost of school ad- 
ministration is around $1,000,000, •while 
the assessed valuation of the school district 
is a little over $30,000,000. 

Nearly 12,000 children are enrolled in 
the schools for the year 1922-2 3. These 
1 2,000 children are educated in a system of 
schools comprising kindergartens in every 
district, eighteen elementary schools, one 
central junior high school, and one senior 
high school. Tlie educational staff consists 
of 350 members, not including nurses and 
special teachers in special departments such 
as visiting teacher, and teachers for un- 
graded rooms, and supervisors. 

Supervised study is maintained in the 
senior high and junior high institutions, 
while upper grade work in the elementary 
schools has been departmentalized. For the 
past ten years the schools have been grad- 
ually modernized so that the system now 
holds a conspicuous place among the 
schools of the middle west. 




High School Building. 




Insurance CompanlFH u ith llomt- oiiu (-•« Ui .^prinsHrld. 




Some Good Places to Eul. 




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