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Full text of "Historical sketch of the origin and organization of the Reformed Church in America and of the Collegiate Church of the City of New York"

BX 

9517 

.N4 

H5 

1904 




LIBRARY OF PRINCETON 



JUN24 2005 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



BX9517.N4 H5 1904 






Historical sketch 


of the 




origin 






and organization of the 




Reformed 






Church in America 


and of 


the 


Collegiate 




) 







4 



A BRIEF ACCOUNT 

OF AN 

HISTORIC CHURCH 

THE REFORMED CHURCH 

THE COLLEGIATE CHURCH 

OF THE 

CITY OF NEVYORK 





^KRY OF PR/^ 







ISTORICAL 
SKETCH OF 
THE ORIGIN 
AND ORGANIZATION 
OF THE REFORMED 
CHURCH IN AMERICA 
AND OF THE COLLEGF 
ATE CHURCH OF THE 
CITY OF NE^YORK. 




TUB1I5HED BY THE CONSISTORY. 
THIRD EDITION 
A. D. 1904 



Cl)i0 l^isitoncal ^iictcl) 

prrparfD b^ t\)t Con0i0tor^ of tlje Collegiate 

€t\nu\), 10 presenteD iDttl) tbe com^ 

plimentfi; of ttie ^migter0, 

CiDer0 ano 2[>eaconsf, 

3it)S Object 

tflf to 0et fortb conci^el^ matters of tnteresit re^ 

flfpecting tbe UeformeU Cljurcb tn l^ol:; 

lanD anti :3imenca anU of tbe 

Collegiate Cburcb of 

3!t i)S Dcjiirablc 

tljat tbe people be attached to tlje Cburclj— 

not so mucb b^ pergonal bonbg, a0 

b^ an intelligent apprecia^ 

tion of it0 bififtor^, 

faitt), usages 

anO spirit* 



Cl)e iS^eformet) Cl)urcl) 
in J^oUantJ. 



^d^ an early period of the Reformation the Protes- 
\^1 tants on the Continent were divided into two 
"^^ bodies, the Lutheran and the Reformed. The 
latter became dominant in the Netherlands, where they 
maintained their religious liberties only after a long, 
costly and bloody struggle against the gigantic power 
of Philip IL, during which they suffered all that men 
could suffer. So calamitous was their condition before 
the eighty years' war that they gave themselves the 
name of the Church under the 

'^^'t^e^'cross"'*''' ^^^^s, and their symbol was ''A 
Lily amidst Thorns." 

In 1566, while war was raging, the deputies of the 
churches met in Antwerp and adopted the Belgic Con- 
fession, which continues to this day to be one of the 
doctrinal standards of the Reformed in Holland. 

About the same time the Heidelberg Catechism, 
which had been issued (1563) in German by the Pala- 
tine Elector, Frederick III., was translated into Dutch 
and widely circulated in the Netherlands. 

Doctrinal differences having arisen among the Re- 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 








Authors 

Heidelberg- Catechism 



'^^^'...GOURT?^^^" 



AD-1562 



formed, a Synod was convened by the States-General 
at Dort (1618, 1619,) to which all the 
Synod of Dort. Reformed Churches of Europe (save 
Anhalt) were invited to send delegates, and all did 
so; only the four selected by the French were for- 
bidden by the King to attend. The British deputies 
were George Carlton, Bishop of Llandaff; John 
Davenant, Professor of Theology at Cambridge; 
Samuel Ward, of Sidney College, Cambridge, and 
Joseph Hall, afterward Bishop of Norwich. Walter 
Balcanqual, a Scotch presbyter, was also deputed 
by King James to represent the Scottish Church. 
This body expressed its conclusions in Canons under 
five heads of doctrine ; and these Canons were accepted 
by the National Synod. After the foreign delegates 
had withdrawn, the same National Synod revised the 
Belgic Confession and the Heidelberg Catechism and 
the Rules of Church Government, and also set forth 
liturgical forms for use in public worship. 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 



The Church of Holland, thus fully organized, soon 
became distinguished for learning, soundness in the 
faith and practical godliness. She not only maintained 
a close correspondence with sister churches, but often 




THE SYNOD OF DORT 
FROM ORIGINAL PAINTING IN STADHUIS, DORDRECHT, HOLLAND 



had the advantage of the presence of their distin- 
guished men, since Holland was the common refuge 
of all the persecuted believers in Europe. Huguenots. 
Waldenses, Covenanters and Puritans found a safe 
asylum on her hospitable shores. 




Cl)e iReformet) Cljurcl; 
tn :^mertca. 



C^I'N 1609 Hendrick Hudson, in the ship Half- 

TI Moon, entered New York Bay and sailed up 

y-^^ the North River. In 16 14 a trading post was 

established on Manhattan Island, but it was not till 

1623 that a permanent agricultural 

The Early Settlers. ^, , , , 

^ settlement was made. 

The early settlers brought with them the Bible^ the 
Catechism and two persons called Krank-be:{^oekers or 
Zieken-troosters (consolers of the sick), viz., Sebastian 
Jansen Krol and Jan Huyck, who, in the absence of a 
minister, gathered the people together and read to 
them select passages of the Scripture suitably arranged 
for instruction and comfort. But in 1628 the Rev. 
Jonas Michaelius arrived, and in the 
summer of that year formally or- 
ganized a church which has had continuous existence 
to this day, and is with reason supposed to be the 
oldest Protestant church on this continent* 

In 1664 the colony surrendered to the British, and 
New Amsterdam became New York; but this fact did 



Church Organized. 



*The Collegiate Church. See page 14. 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

not affect the rights of the church, which under the 
new government retained all its former privileges. 

The conquerors required, however, to have worship 
in their own tongue, and, accordingly, the chaplain of 
the English forces officiated. But as he had no proper 
place in which to celebrate divine service an arrange- 
ment was made by which he could 

Church in the Fort. . . . , ^t , • .1 i- ^ >» 

use the Church m the Fort. 
After the Dutch had ended their own morning wor- 
ship the Church of England service was read to the 
Governor and the garrison. This custom continued 
for more than thirty years. 

Dutch churches were organized in 1642 at Fort 
Orange (Albany); in 1654 at Flatbush, L. 1., and in 
1660 in Brooklyn. Others were afterward established 
along the Hudson River and in the 
er urcies. Mohawk Valley, as well as in New 
Jersey and Pennsylvania; and by 1771 the number had 
reached seventy. The growth of the denomination 
was retarded by its dependence upon Holland for 
ministers, and by the retention of the mother tongue 
in public service when English was generally and 
increasingly spoken. Up to 1772 the churches had 
been subject to the control of the ecclesiastical author- 
ities in Holland, but in that year 
Independence Estab- ^^^ connection was Severed and the 

American Church was made inde- 
pendent and self-governed. 

While this Church accepted the standards, polity 
and usages derived from Holland, she has always wel- 
comed additions to her ministry or membership from 
other evangelical bodies. Not a few of these have 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

become strongly attached to her character and order, 

and by their loyalty have greatly increased her strength 

and influence. Her chief character- 
Characteristics. ■ X- U U J -1 

istics have been and are, jealousy 

for doctrinal truth, insistence upon an educated min- 
istry, unyielding attachment to her own views of 
faith and order, and a large charity for all others who 
hold to Christ, the Head. 

In the community of Christian churches she is well 
described by the terms — semi-liturgical, non-prelatical. 

DOCTRINAL STANDARDS. 

These are (in addition to the three early creeds, 
the Apostles', the Nicene and the Athanasian) : 

1. The Belgic Confession, originally drawn up by 
the martyr Guido de Bres and corresponding in con- 
tents and spirit with those of all other Reformed 
Churches in Great Britain and the Continent. 

2. The Heidelberg Catechism, the work of Ursinus 
and Olevianus. Being a confession of experience as 
well as of faith, it has been translated into well-nigh 
twenty languages, and more widely diffused over the 
world than any other catechism. 

3. The Canons of the Synod of Dort. These are the 
carefully prepared articles on what are known as the 
Five Points of Calvinism. Although clear and decided 
in character, they are so genial in tone and expression 
as to have won favor among all the Reformed. 

GOVERNMENT. 

The Reformed Church in America, while recog- 
nizing with all the other Reformed Churches the 

10 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

threefold ministry, yet makes four classes of church 
officers : 

1. Ministers of the Word. 

2. Teachers of Theology (Professors). 

3. Elders. 

4. Deacons. 

The two former are of the same order, but with 
different functions. The two latter are chosen for two 
years, but are eligible for re-election at the close of 
their term. 

The spiritual government is in the 

Minister and Elders. , , rxuru xxuujr 

hands of the hlders, at the head of 
whom in the local church stands the Minister. 

The specific duty of the Deacons 
is to care for the poor of the church.* 



Deacons. 



Consistory. 



OFFICIAL BODIES. 

The Minister, Elders and Deacons constitute the 
Consistory, which has control of all 
temporalities. 

Above the Consistory is the Classis, which consists 
of one Minister and one Elder from 
each church in a certain district. 

Above the Classis is the Particular Synod com- 
posed of lay and clerical delegates 

Particular Synod. ^ ^ . , ^ ^, 

from a certam number of Classes. 
The supreme judicatory is the General Synod, which 
meets annually, and is composed of 

General Synod. , , ^ r n ^1 ^1 

delegates from all the Classes. 



* In his " Christian Institutions," Dean Stanley remarks concerning the order of 
Deacons in the early Church that "The only institution which retains the name and 
reality, is the Diaconate as it exists in the Dutch Church. ' 

I I 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 
WORSHIP. 

The Reformed Church in America, like all the Re- 
formed Churches of the Continent, has a Liturgy, the 
use of which, however, is in part 
' ^^^^ optional. The use of the Offices 

for the administration of Baptism and the Lord's Sup- 
per, for Ordination and for Discipline, and the obser- 
vance of the Order of Public Worship are made obli- 
gatory by the constitution. In regard to other ob- 
servances there is freedom. Some 
churches carefully observe Good 
Friday, and some of the great festivals of the church 
year, such as Christmas, Easter, Ascension Day and 
Whitsun-Day ; others do not. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

Theological Seminaries. 

1. At New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

2. At Holland, Michigan. 

3. At Arcot, India. 

Colleges and Academies 

1. Rutgers College (formerly Queen's), at 

New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

2. Hope College, at Holland, Michigan. 

3. North-western Classical Academy, at 

Orange City. Iowa. 

4. Pleasant Prairie College, at German Val- 

ley, Illinois. 

12 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 
AGENCIES 

1. Board of Direction. Is the custodian of the funds 
belonging to the General Synod. 

2. Board of Foreign Missions. Maintains stations 
in Arcot, India; Amoy, China; Japan and Arabia. 

3. Board of Domestic Missions. Aids feeble 
churches, especially at the West, and seeks to estab- 
lish new ones where they are needed. 

4. Board of Education. Assists young men in ob- 
taining an education for the Ministry. 

s. Board of Publication. Issues denominational and 
other evangelical literature, and maintains an extensive 
book depository. 

6. The Widows' Fund provides for the widows and 
children of such Ministers as have had an interest in it. 

7. The Disabled Ministers' Fund is for the relief of 
Ministers who are laid aside by age or infirmity. 

8. The Church Building Fund aids in erecting 
Churches for new enterprises not yet self-supporting. 

9. Woman' s Board of Foreign Missions. Seeks to 
carry the Gospel to women and children in India, 
China, Japan and Arabia. 

10. Woman's Executive Committee of the Board of 
Domestic Missions. Aids in building parsonages, and 
otherwise forwarding the cause. It also maintains 
missions among the American Indians and the Ken- 
tucky Mountaineers. 

The offices of all these Boards are located in the 

RhFORMED Church Building, 
25 East Twenty-second Street, New York, 

where is also the office of the Missionary League of 
the Society of Christian Endeavor. 

13 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 



PERIODICALS 



The following Periodicals are issued in the interest 
of the Reformed Church in America: 

The Christian Intelligencer, weekly. 
The Mission Field, monthly. 
The Mission Gleaner, bi-monthly. 
The Day Star, monthly — for the young. 



Having outlined the origin and organization of the 
denomination, it remains to speak of the growth of 
its oldest church, commonly known as the "Collegiate 
Church." This, as has been stated,* was constituted 
in 1628, but was not incorporated until 1696, when 
William III, of England, granted a royal charter under 
the title,— 

*'The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church 
OF THE City of New York," 
a title which has never been altered. 

Each of the churches has a tablet on which these 
facts are concisely stated. 



m ifisiE mrrm ^m Ymi 
m^mwm ^wmm IPWee MsBSwr 



FAC-SIMILE OF ONE OF THE BRONZE TABLETS 



* See page 8. 



'4 




Collegiate IReformeD Cl)urcl) 

1904^ 

CHE Collegiate Church maintains at present eight 
places of worship. These are under the care 
of one Consistory. This body has the general 
powers of all like bodies in the Reformed Church. 
The twelve Elders and twelve Deacons who constitute 
the Consistory are chosen from the membership wor- 
shiping in the several churches. 

In the early history of New York, when the popula- 
tion began to increase and a second church became 
necessary, and one minister could no longer attend to 
the duties required of him by a double service, the 
Consistory called a second minister, who, being duly 
installed, became the colleague of the first. From this 
comes the name by which the church is familiarly 
known — The Collegiate Church. 

For very many years these ministers and their suc- 
cessors preached in rotation. As the population in- 
creased and became more extended, it was deemed 
best to discontinue this custom; and when tendering 

'5 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

a call to a new minister, to designate the special church 
in which he was to labor. 

There is still, however, but one Collegiate Church 
of New York,* although there are now several church 
edifices. The regularly installed ministers are still 
colleagues and preside in turn at the monthly meetings 
of the Consistory. Those who unite with the Col- 
legiate Church of New York should therefore feel an 
interest in her general welfare, as the different congre- 
gations are but parts of the same church, members 
of one body, pervaded by a common life, and having 
a common interest. 

The records of baptisms, members and marriages 
have been continued and preserved from 1639. 

It is interesting to know that there are two very old 




REPRODUCTION OF THE ANCIENT BAPTISMAL BASINS 
1706-1744 

silver Baptismal Basins of antique design in possession 
of the Church. On the border of one is engraved the 



* There is also in the upper part of the city The Collegiate Church of Harlem^ 
which is a distinct organization, although connected with the denomination. 

16 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

seal of the Church and the date — -1744; also an in- 
scription, of which the following is a translation: 

" To inlierit eternal life, in after life, O man, 

Be cleansed in Christ's blood, and thus before death die. 

Who in God's Son does live, life everlasting has, 

And lives through the true faith, who in that love does live." 

The other basin bears the simple inscription: "The 
North Church — 1706." 

These sacred relics of those early days are both in 
good preservation, and may continue to serve their 
purpose through centuries yet to come. 

The following sketch of the church which was 
planted on Manhattan Island by the first settlers, 
shows an unbroken line of Ministers and officers for 
over two hundred and seventy-five years. 

The first religious services on Manhattan Island, 
which in 1628 resulted in the organization of a church, 
were held in a large upper room over the mill which 
ground the colonists' grain. In the Spring of 1633, the 
Rev. Everardus Bogardus having succeeded Domine 
Michaelius, a church was erected, a plain wooden 
building, on the banks of the East River, on the site 
now known as j^ Pearl Street. 

It is interesting to record the fact that the first Elder 
of the Collegiate Church was Peter Minuit, the Director 
General of New Netherland. He was chosen to that 
office when the Church was organized in 1628. 




3^ Qyi-i 



FAC- SIMILE OF SIGNATURE OF PETER MINUIT 
>7 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

In 1642, during the rule of Governor Kieft, the 
Colony had so far increased that a new church was 
imperatively needed. It was built of stone with a roof 
of heavy split oaken shingles. It had a conspicuous 
tower, which was surmounted with a weathercock. 

On one of the old houses, No. 4 Bowling Green, 
near the Battery,* was once a large bronze tablet with 
the following inscription: 

"The Site of Fort Amsterdam, 

BUILT IN 1626. 

Within the fortifications 

was erected the first 

SUBSTANTIAL ChURCH EDIFICE 

ON THE Island of Manhattan." 

This Church was 70 feet long, 52 feet wide and 16 feet 
high, with a peaked roof and tower. *' The Church in 
the Fort," as it is often called, was then known as St. 
Nicholas Church. It accommodated the people for 
over fifty years, its stone walls often serving as a rally- 
ing place and refuge in many an alarm of Indian foray 
and massacre. On the front of the church was a stone 
tablet with this inscription: 

''An. Dom. MDCXLII., 
W. KiEFT DiR. Gen. Heeft de Gemeente 

DESE TEMPEL DOEN BOUWFN." 

"A. D. 1642, W. Kieft being Director-General, has 
caused the congregation to build this temple." 

On the bell which hung in the church tower was 
inscribed : "Dulcior E nostris iinnitihus resonat aer. 
P. Hemony me fecit 1674." \ 

* The new U. S. Custom House is being erected on this site (1904). 

t " The air resounds sweeter from our ringing. P. Hemony made me." 

18 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

The illustration on page 19 is a fac -simile of an 
original drawing, in its ancient frame, in possession 
of the New York Historical Society. It was made by 
Laurens Hermansz Block and shows New Amsterdam 
with the ''Church in the Fort" as seen from the ship 
" Lydia" in 1650. An illustration is also given on page 
21 of the original drawing accompanying the manu- 
script of the two Labadist travelers who visited New 
York in 1679, twenty-nine years later. 

By 1687, however, the old church had become too 
small for the increasing numbers. Steps were there- 
fore taken by the Consistory to build a new church on 
what was then called Garden Street, now Exchange 
Place. The land on which the edifice was erected was 
adjacent to the orchard and flower garden of the widow 
of Domine Drisius. The structure was of brick with 
a steeple on a large square foundation, so as to admit of 
a room over the vestibule for the meetings of the Con- 
sistory. By some authorities it is claimed to have been 
the finest church edifice then in the colonies, it was 
dedicated in 1693. The windows were long and nar- 
row and fitted with small panes of glass set in lead, 
on which were burned the coats-of-arms of the princi- 
pal parishoners. The bell, pulpit and furniture of the 
old church were transferred to the new, and many 
escutcheons of leading families hung against the 
walls. For plate, the people contributed silverware 
and money, which was sent over to the silver workers 
of Amsterdam, who hammered out for them a com- 
munion set and a large baptismal basin. 

The first church organ used in New York sounded 
its notes within these walls, for in 1720 Governor 

20 




21 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

Burnet brought one over and presented it to the 
Consistory. 

It is a memorable fact that the Rev. William Vesey, 
the first Rector of Trinity Church, was inducted into 
that office in this building, Trinity Church not being 
yet completed. At the request of the English Gov- 
ernor two Ministers from the Dutch Church assisted 
in the service. 

The Garden Street Church, often called the South 
Dutch Church, did not long figure as the principal 
church. Another, quite as notable in the history of the 
city, was erected in 1729, by the order of the Consis- 
tory, on Nassau Street, between Cedar and Liberty 
Streets, to which they gave the name of the New 
Dutch Church, and the other naturally became known 
as the Old Church. These names were retained for 
forty years, until it was decided to erect still another 
farther north, when the new church was designated 
the Middle Church and the others respectively the 
South Church and North Church, by which names 
they were always afterward known. 

The Old South Church continued in active use 
until 1766, when it was enlarged and repaired. A 
generation later, in 1807, having stood a hundred and 
fourteen years, it was taken down and a more com- 
modious edifice erected on its site. This building was 
entirely destroyed in the great conflagration of 1835. 

During the early history of the Collegiate Church 
the services were conducted in the Dutch language 
and the order of public worship conformed to that of 
the Mother Church in Holland. The fore singer, or 
clerk, whose place was at a desk beneath the pulpit, 

23 




THE FIRST GARDEN STREET CHURCH, 1693 
(old south church) 



23 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

or in one end of the deacon's pew, began the morning 
service by admonishing the people to " Hear with rev- 
erence the Word of the Lord" ; he then read the Ten 
Commandments, and announced the Psalm to be sung. 
During the singing the Minister entered, stood rev- 
erently for a few moments at the foot of the pulpit 




THE SECOND GARDEN STREET CHURCH, 1807 
(south church) 



stairs engaged in silent prayer, then ascended the pul- 
pit and continued the service. 

He preached with the hour glass before him, know- 
ing that if he exceeded the limit it would be the duty 
of the clerk to remind him of it by three raps of his 
cane. At the conclusion of the sermon the clerk in- 

24 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

serted in the end of his staff the public notices to be 
read and handed them up to the Minister. This duty 
performed, the deacons rose in their pews, the Minister 
delivered a short homily on the duty of remembering 
the poor, and the deacons passed through the congre- 
gation, each bearing a long pole, on the end of which 




GER. VAN WAGENEN 

VOORSANGER (fORE SINGEr) IN I733 

a small black velvet bag was suspended to receive the 
offerings. 

The afternoon service was begun as in the morning, 
by the clerk, when the Apostles' or Nicene Creed was 
read instead of the Commandments. At the close of 
every service, when the Minister descended, the elders 
and deacons stood to receive him, and each gave the 

25 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

right hand in token of approval. When the Lord's 
Supper was administered, the communicants stood 
around the Communion table, which was placed 
below the pulpit, the Minister addressing each mem- 
ber as he handed the elements, or the clerk reading 
aloud a suitable chapter from the Prophecy of Isaiah or 
the Gospel of St. John. 

The order of worship now in use is in accordance 
with the revised Liturgy. 

The custom of collecting the alms in bags, appears 
to have been continued until after the Revolution, 
when several members of the church presented silver 
collection plates to the Consistory. Each plate bears 
the name of a different donor, the name of the church, 
and the date of the gift — 1792. They are still in use 
every Sunday. 

Of the Collegiate Churches the Middle Dutch Church 
plays the most important part in the history. It was 
a spacious edifice, one hundred by seventy feet within 
the walls, its ceiling being an entire arch without 
pillars. It had a bell tower at the north end, and the 
spire, as usual, was surmounted with a weather- 
cock. It was in its day the scene of several interesting 
events. 

Here it was that preaching in the English language 
was first introduced in the Dutch Church. During 
the Colonial days the services were conducted in the 
language of the Netherlands ; but in April, 1764, a 
change was made in response to the request of a large 
number of those who worshipped in this place. The 
first sermon in English was preached by the Rev. Dr. 
Laidlie, a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, 

26 




^0 l/iejCo/iouraUe 

RIP VAN DAME 7 

Eebuced Fac-Similb or Piii.Nx PuBtisiiLD 173L 

Tngravcd byVT. Howi-a^b. 
THE OLD MIDDLE CHURCH, NASSAU STREET, 1 729 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

who had just been installed as one of the Collegiate 
Ministers. 

On September i6, 1776, as a result of the Battle of 
Long Island, the British took possession of the city. 
One of their tlrst acts was to seize the churches, de- 
spoil them of their furniture and turn them into hospi- 
tals, riding schools, barracks or prisons. This was due 
to the loyalty of the Dutch to the Continental cause. 
The entire interior of the Middle Church was de- 
stroyed, leaving only the bare walls and the roof. It 
was then used as a prison and afterward as a riding 
school by the British dragoons. After the Revolution 
it was restored and refurnished and services were re- 
sumed. It was kept in constant use until 1844, a 
total period of one hundred and fifteen years. 

On the corner of Nassau and Cedar Streets, a bronze 
tablet marks this historic spot. It is thus inscribed : 

" Here stood the Middle Dutch Church erected 1729 

MADE A British Military Prison 1776 

Restored 1790 

Occupied by U. S. P. O. 1845-75 

Taken down 1882." 

Probably the next in interest, of the Collegiate 
Churches, is the one built in 1769, on William Street, 
corner of Fulton. This Church was the first one 
erected exclusively for English services. While it 
stood, it was, therefore, a memorial of the great tran- 
sition which the community made from the tongue of 
Grotius and William the Silent, to that of Milton and 
Hooker. When the building was taken down in 1875, 
a metallic plate was found under the pillar which sup- 




THE NORTH CHURCH, FULTON STREET, 1 769 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 



THIS CHURCH "WAS £UILTBY THE COTHGRBGAXION 
OF THE REFORMED PROTESTANT DUTCH CHURCH llT 

THE City of NEW'foRK roRETSGLTSH Seruice UUDEPLTHE 

fNSPECTIOlT OFACOMMITTE OF 

Elders JdeacottS 

petermarschaie: Tsaac'Soseuelt. 

Peter iott 4driait bancker 

cohn^Bogert andrew'^arschale: 

TheodorusVait "WycX Sarret abeei 

ANDREW B REE S TED lU CARPEWTERAITD PROIECXOR 
loHN STAGG glASTER j^AS ON AND 'ALEX BATES 

^ TOE FIRST Stone WAJ XAip fiJLY 2 lySyB-i 

M^ lACOBUS ROSEUELT &N £LBER 
TRE -WAIIS EUIIT TORECEIUETHE ROOF ITJNE XJ IJO^ 
, THESE PILLARSREARED I'uNE 2| | ^^^ 
^HE FIKStEnGIISIH MINISTER FOR THE OUTCH 
CpNGREG'ATIOTT THE REIT ARCHIBALD lAIDLIE 17^4 
jEACB'BEWITHENtTHlS SACRED PLACE 
^ And holy , GIFTS ANP HEAIIENLYGRACEi 

Tobias vanzandt cleric gj^zzl fecit 



FAC-SIMILE OF THE METALLIC PLATE 



ported the gallery nearest the pulpit, upon which is set 
forth a brief history of the Church, and its projectors. 
This plate now attests the great historical fiict referred 
to, and a fac-simile of this very interesting relic is 
shown above. The Church was a large stone edifice 
in the Roman style of architecture, with a com- 
manding tower. The ten Corinthian pillars which 
supported the ceiling were noticeable; at the top of 
each of them were carved and gilded the initials of the 



50 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 




AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

Since i8so the Collegiate Church has erected four 
edifices, all of which are now standing. Each one is 
a centre of active Christian work adapted to the loca- 
tion of the church. 

fiftl) 0t)fnue anu tiriuent^^nmtl) Street* 

The church at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 
Twenty-ninth Street was opened for worsliip in i8s4. 
It is built of Hastings marble, in the Romanesque 
style of architecture. It has a massive clock and bell 
tower, terminating in a spire two hundred and fifteen 
feet from the ground, which is surmounted by a 
weathercock (six feet six inches high), after the cus- 
tom of the earlier churches. The interior has twice 
undergone thorough repairs and redecorating. The 
recent alterations were made in 1891, when stained- 
glass windows were put in; the pulpit was rearranged 
and a new organ added, which is connected by elec- 
tric wires with the grand organ in the tower. 

In 1878 a most interesting service took place in this 
building on the occasion of the celebration of the 
Quarter-millennial Anniversary of the Collegiate 
Church, when the clergy from the Episcopal, Methodist, 
Baptist, Presbyterian and Congregational Churches 
brought greetings and congratulations. 

In the court-yard stands the bell cast in Amster- 
dam in 1795 for the old North Church on Fulton 
Street. 

The Rev. David J. Burrell, D.D., LL.D., has min- 
istered to the congregation worshiping here, since May 
24, 1 89 1.* 

* For other clergy officiating at this church, see page 50. 

34 




THE CHURCH ON FIFTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-NINTH STREET 

DEDICATED OCTOBER II, 1854 



35 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

j?iftl) Bbenue anu f ort^^eigljtt) ©treet. 

The church at Fifth Avenue and Forty- eighth Street 
was dedicated in 1872. Its style is the decorated 
Gothic of the fourteenth century, the flying buttresses 
and the elaborate carving about the entrances being 
especially noteworthy. The spire is one of the highest 




THE HISTORIC BELL. PRESENTED BY COLONEL ABRAHAM DE PEYSTER 

and most graceful in the city. In the tower hangs the 
old historic bell cast in Amsterdam in 1731 and rung 
for many years in the tower of the old Middle Dutch 
Church on Nassau Street. When the city was cap- 
tured by the British, the bell was taken down and se- 
creted, but was replaced after the evacuation. In the 
spires of the different churches in the march north- 
ward it has been rung on all national fete days, and it 
still calls the worshipers to service every Sunday. In 
the Consistory room may be seen the large portraits 
in oil of all the ministers in the succession, from 

5^ 




THE CHURCH ON FIFTH AVENUE AND FORTY-EIGHTH STREET 

DEDICATED NOVEMBER 28, 1872 



37 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

Domine Du Bois, who in 1699 began his ministry in 
this city and preached in the "Church in the Fort," 
down to the present day. Here also is kept the 
Church Library, which was established for the pur- 
pose of preserving and recording books, manuscripts 
and papers which are of historic interest. 

The Rev. Donald Sage Mackay, D.D., has ministered 
to the congregation worshipping here, since January 
22, 1899.* 

g>econD aibenue anU g^cticntl) Street* 

In 189 1 two churches were erected, each to supply 
a special need. In order to carry on aggressive work 
in the populous portion of the city " below Fourteenth 
Street" a church, with parish house attached, was 
built on Second Avenue and Seventh Street, furnished 
with all the modern appliances for this special work. 




THE COAT-OF-ARMS OF JOHN HARPENDINCK 

The parish house contains reading-room, class-rooms 
and a well-equipped gymnasium. As a unique feature 
of the church architecture it is well to note the l-jeauti- 
ful memorial windows which receive their only light 

* For other clergy officiating at this church see page 50. 

38 




THE NEW MIDDLE CHURCH ON SECOND AVENUE NEAR SEVENTH STREET 

DEDICATED JUNE 26, 1 892 



39 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

by means of electricity. The large rose window is in 
memory of the long line of deceased ministers. The 
memory of the '' illustrious men who laid the founda- 
tions of Church and State in the Metropolis of the na- 
tion " is here perpetuated by three beautiful Mural Tab- 
lets. The persons thus memorialized are : Peter Minuit, 
the First Colonial Governor, A.D. 1626, and one of the 
two elders chosen when the church was organized, 
A.D. 1628 ; Sebastian Jansen Krol and Jan Huyck, The 
Krankenbezockers (Visitors of the Sick), A.D. 1626 ; 
and Jonas Michaelius, First Minister, A.D. 1628. The 
quaint coat-of-arms of John Harpendinck is preserved 
in this place. It is treasured as commemorative of his 
munificent gift of land, bequeathed to the Collegiate 
Church in 1723. This ancient relic hung for many 
generations in the Old North Church, on Fulton Street, 
above the pulpit. 

The Rev. John G. Fagg, D.D., has ministered to the 
congregation worshiping here, since January 12, 1896.* 

OTrs?t Cut) ^t3enue aiiU ^etienti^.^rtientl) Street* 

The other church erected in 1891, and the last one 
dedicated, is on West End Avenue and Seventy-sev- 
enth Street. This was built to accommodate the large 
number of families who were moving into that section 
of the city. The Flemish style of architecture em- 
ployed is historically appropriate. The corner-stone 
is inscribed : "Organized A. D. 1628 — Erected 1891." 

The interior is particularly beautiful. It is a good 
example of Dutch architecture adapted to modern 
uses: the roof is of heavy dark timber beams, the sup- 

*For other clergy officiating at this church see page 50. 

40 




> 00 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

porting arches rest on pillars of purple Knoxville mar- 
ble. The pulpit is a handsome piece of carved oak. 
the panels showing the coat-of-arms of the Reformed 
church, and the seal of the Collegiate Church. The 
armorial window at the south end is worthy of de- 
tailed examination. 

The Rev. Henry Evertson Cobb, D.D , has minis- 
tered to the congregation worshiping here, since Jan- 
uary 8, 1893.* 



Besides the churches enumerated, the Consistory has 
under its care three congregations on the West Side. 

tn^ljirt^.fourtlj Street* 

307 WEST THIRTY-FOURTH STREET. 

The congregations formerly worshiping in the De 
Witt Chapel on Twenty-ninth Street, and the Thiity- 
fourth Street Reformed Church were consolidated in 
1895, and the entire membership is now enrolled in 
the Collegiate Church. The work is under the care of 
Rev. Robert W. Courtney, who assumed charge in 
IQ04. and is conducted in the building erected in i860 
by the Thirty-fourth Street Reformed Church, which 
was acquired by the Collegiate Church (in 1895) at the 
time of the consolidation. 

^nov ©emonaU 

405-409 WEST FORTY-FIRST STREET. 

This edifice, one of the most beautiful and complete 
church buildings in New York, was finished and dedi- 
cated in i8q8, and is the third building erected by the 
Consistory for the accommodation of this work, which 

'"■ For other clergy officating at this church see page 50. 

42 




THE CHURCH ON WEST THIRTY-FOURTH STREET, NEAR EIGHTH AVENUE 

ERECTED i860 



43 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

has had an unbroken and prosperous existence since 
1858. The building is of an English Gothic design 
with a front of Indiana limestone. The interior is 
graced by two handsome memorial windows. In the 
Church and Sunday-school rooms there is accommoda- 
tion for over two thousand persons, with ample facilities 
for the spiritual, moral and intellectual improvement 
during the week of all who come within the reach of 
this Church. The Rev. Edward G. W. Meury is in 
charge. 

The work was formerly carried on in the Chapel on 
Ninth Avenue near Thirty-eighth Street, which was 
the second structure erected on that site by the Colle- 
giate Church for the Knox Memorial. 

J^ermil^e CtjapeL 

416 WEST FIFTY-FOURTH STREET. 

The work of this Chapel is carried on in the new 
building of the Helping Hand Association on Fifty- 
fourth Street, west of Ninth Avenue. It is supported 
by the congregations of the Forty-eighth Street Church 
and the West End Avenue Church. The Rev. Win- 
fred R. Ackert is in charge. 

jTulton Street ptu^tt a^ectiug^ 

I 13 FULTON STREhT, 

This daily prayer meeting at noon has now a world- 
wide reputation. It was begun in 18^7. Its oppor- 
tunities -and privileges have ever been open to all 
friends of Christ of whatever name. 

The expenses incident to the maintenance of this ser- 
vice have always been borne by the Collegiate Church. 

44 




KNOX MEMORIAL, ON FORTY-FIRST STREET, NEAR NINTH AVENUE 

DEDICATED |8<)8 



45 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 



CHROUGHOUT her long history the Collegiate 
Church has always been greatly blessed in her 
Ministry. 

Conspicuous among the ministers of the last cen- 
tury are Dr. Laidlie, the first English preacher, a man 
of consummate discretion united with glowing zeal ; 
Dr. Livingston, the first Professor of Theology at 
Queen's College, a man of wonderful influence and 
varied usefulness ; and Dr Linn, Chaplain of the House 
of Representatives in the First Congress under the 
Federal Constitution, renowned for his eloquence. 

Jonas Michaelius, 
everardus bogardus, 
Johannes Backerus, 
Johannes Megapolensis, 
Samuel Drisius, 
Samuel Megapolensis, . 
Wilhelmus Van Niewenhuysen, 
Henricus Selyns, 
Gualterus Du Bois, 
Henricus Boel, 
Johannes Ritzema, 
Lambertus De Ronde, . 
Archibald Laidlie, 
John Henry Livingston, 
William Linn, 

Gerardus Arense Kuypers, 
John Neilson Abeel, 
John Schureman, 

46 



{circa) 


1628-16^^ 




I 63 3- I 647 




1 647- 1 649 




I 649- I 669 




1652-1673 




I 664- I 668 




1671-1682 




1 682- 1 701 




169^-1751 




1713-1754 




1 744- 1 784 




1751-1784 




1 764- 1 779 




1 770-1 8 12 




1 785- 1 805 




1 789- 1 833 




1795-1812 




1809-18 1.'' 




FORMER MINISTERS OF THE COLLEGIATE CHURCH 
(copied from the portraits) 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 



Jacob Brodhead, 
Philip Milledoler, 
John Knox, 

Paschal Nelson Strong, 
William Craig Brownlee, 
Thomas De Witt, 
Thomas Edward Vermilye, 
Talbot Wilson Chambers, 
Joseph Tuthill Duryea, 
James Meeker Ludlow, 
William Ormiston, 
Edward Benton Coe, 
David James Burrell. 
Donald Sage Mackay, 
Henry Evertson Cobb, 
John Gerardus Fagg, 



1809- 
1813- 
1816- 
1816- 
1826- 
1827- 
1839- 
1849- 
1862- 
1868- 
1870- 
1879- 
1 89 1 - 
189Q- 
1903- 
1903- 



1813 

1825 
i8s8 
182s 
i860 
1874 
1893 
1896 
1867 
1877 
1888 



/Assistant Ministers. 

John Hutchins, .... 
Henry Evertson Cobb, 
John Gerardus Fagg, 
Ferdinand Schureman Schenck . 



I 892-1 895 
1 89 3- 1 903 
1 896- 1 90 3 
1897-1899 



The portraits of the former Ministers, which are here 
reproduced include all those now hanging in the Con- 
sistory room. The Church has never been able to 
procure those of an earlier date. 



48 




FORMER MINISTERS OF THE COLLEGIATE CHURCH 
(copied from the portraits) 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 

flDffictatfng Clergt* 

A. 1). 1904 



The Rev. Edward B. Coe, D.D., LL.D., Senior 

Minister. 
The Rev. David Jas. Burrell, D.D., LL.D. 

The Rev. Alfred E. Myers, Assistant. 

The Rev. Otto L. F. Mohn, Assistant. 
The Rev. Donald Sage Mackay, D.D. 

The Rev. Andrew Hageman, Assistant. 
The Rev. Henry Evertson Cobb, D.D. 

The Rev. Herman C. Weber, Assistant. 
The Rev. John Gerardus Fagg, D.D. 

The Rev. Floyd Decker, Assistant. 
The Rev. Winfred R. Ackert. 
The Rev. Edward G. VV. Meury. 
The Rev. Robert W. Courtney. 

Divine service is held every Lord's Day, morning 
and evening. 

The mid-week service is on Wednesday evening. 

The " Fulton Street Prayer Meeting" is held daily at 
noon. 



50 



AN HISTORIC CHURCH 



(Crplauatiou of tl)c iHottocsi 



CBmblrm of tt)f Krformeti Cl)urcb in America 




NISI DOMINUS, FRUSTRA. 

Without the Lord all is vain. 



" EENDRACHT MAAKT MACHT. " 

Union or Harmony makes strength. 



feral of t\)t Collegiate Ctiurc^ 

Jehovah. 




SIG -ECCL-PROT- BELG- REFORM -NEO- 
EBORACIENSIS. " 

Seal of the Reformed Protestant Belgic 
Church of New York. 



* VERITATE. 
With Truth. 



BIBLIA. 
Bible. 

5' 



' PIETATE. 
With Piety. 




THE COLLEGIATE SCHOOL 

241-243 WbST SEVENTY-SEVENTH STREET 



^2 



Cl)c Collegiate ^cljool 

3MMEDIATELY adjoining the Church on Seventy- 
seventh Street is a picturesque building for the 
use of the Collegiate day school. 

This school has a continuous history running back 
to the earlv settlement of Manhattan Island. In 1626 
Peter Minuit commenced his administration as Director- 
General of the New Netherland, and the building of 
this city really dates from that time. Within seven 
years thereafter, or in 1635, with Wouter Van T wilier 
Director-General of the Colony, came Adam Roelant- 
sen, the first schoolmaster, who founded this school, 
which is now the oldest educational institution in 
existence in America. 

Although over two hundred and seventy years old, it 
is still in a most flourishing condition. It stands for a 
great and important idea, the idea that education and 
religion can never be dissociated from one another. 
The connection of the school with the church was 
characteristic of the early Reformed Churches. 



53 



Cl^e gear TBoofi* 



^JITHE Consistory issues a Year Book every Spring, 
^^ which contains a detailed account of the work 
carried on throughout the Church, a list of the Church 
officers, and a biographical sketch of one of the Min- 
isters. 

Copies may be had by application at the office of 
the Collegiate Church, 1 13 Fulton Street. 



?4 



Princeton 



Theoloqical Seminary Ubraries 




1 1012 01214 2271