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I/I B RARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 
OF ILLINOIS 

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HISTORICAL SKETCH 



OF THE 



CHICAGO 

BOARD OF TRADE 

BATTERY 



HORSE ARTILLERY 

ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS 



CHICAGO 

1902 



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LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBANA 



Introductory 




F THE distinguished service and splendid achieve- 
ments of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery in 
the great American Civil War, much has been 
written, but no extended history of this famous 

organization has heretofore been presented in 
ri 
v- book form. The inestimable value of the services of this Battery to 

* the Government in the preservation of the Union is generally 
~ admitted by all conversant with the history of " the time that tried 
men's souls," covering the period of the War of the Rebellion, from 
1862 to 1865. 

Unfortunately in the burning of Chicago and in a subsequent 
fire, all of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery records and mementos, 
except such as are in the possession of the United States Government 
or of individual members of the Battery, were destroyed, hence, the 
value of the existing records herein compiled and which are not 
dependent for accuracy upon the memory of surviving members of 
the organization alone. 

While no attempt will be made to relate the countless incidents 
of high interest in the career of the noted Battery ; nor the per- 
sonal experiences and reminiscences of its members, which had 



I 180473 



their rise during the years of active service the Battery saw in the 
field, in camp, on the march and battlefield, it has long been the 
desire of the friends of the patriotic organization that at least the 
existing official records should be preserved in durable form. Such 
a memento it is believed will be prized by the surviving members of 
the Chicago Board of Trade Battery Association, and by their numer- 
ous friends, and will prove a source of interest and pride to be 
cherished by the decendants of the members, of the fighting battery 
in the coming generations. 

The Chicago Board of Trade Battery was among the very first of 
the volunteer organizations to respond to President Abraham 
Lincoln's'call for three hundred thousand men on July 6, 1862. Fif- 
teen days thereafter the first members of the Battery signed the muster 
roll for three years. Within the next forty-eight hours a full company 
was enrolled. The story of the activities, valor, endurance and 
capacity for fighting against all or any odds of this remarkable vol- 
unteer organization is told only in outline in the existing records. 
Beginning at Lawrenceburg, Ky., Oct. u, 1862, the Battery was 
prominently engaged in the great battles of the West, moving rapidly 
to effective participation in the battles of Stone River, Elk River, 
Chickamauga, Farmington, Dallas, Decatur, Atlanta, Lovejoy, Nash- 
ville and Selma, and in the great battles of the Army of the Cumberland 
Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Marietta, Vining 
Station, Noonday Creek, Stone Mountain and in many minor engage- 
ments and raids altogether, in eleven of the hardest-fought battles 
of the West ; in twenty-six other battles and in action forty-two times 
when on scouts, raids, reconnoissances and outpost duty. 

With such a record, marching with their horses and guns over 
5,368 miles and traveling by rail 1,231 miles, it is not strange if this 



memorial of their fighting days should recall to the surviving members 
of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery recollections which will 
cement still stronger the ties of comradeship and friendship existing 
between them, and redound to their fame in military annals for all 
time to come. 

THE COMPILER. 

CHICAGO, JULY 4, 1902 



Organization of the Chicago Board of 

Trade ^Battery Memorial 

Association 



(Application for Certificate of Incorporation. 

STATE OF ILLINOIS, ) 
COOK COUNTY. \ ss ' 

To ISAAC N. PEARSON, Secretary of State : 

We, the undersigned, B. F. Nourse, John C. Fleming, John B. Hall, S. M. 
Randolph and J. H. Hildreth, citizens of the United States, propose to form a 
Corporation under an act of the General Assembly of the State of Illinois, en- 
titled "An Act Concerning Corporations," approved April 18, 1872, and all acts 
amendatory thereof; and for the purposes of -such organization, we hereby state as 
follows, to-wit : 

i st. The name of such Corporation is The Chicago Board of Trade Battery 
Memorial Association. 

2nd. The object for which it is formed, is to secure a lot in Rosehill Cem- 
etery, to erect monument thereon and for other purposes usual to an Association 
of this kind. 

jrd. The management of the aforesaid Association shall be vested in a 
Board of Five Directors, who are to be elected annually. 

4th. The following persons are hereby selected as the Directors to control 
and manage said Corporation for the first year of its corporate existence, viz: B. 
F. Nourse, John C. Fleming, John B. Hall, S. M. Randolph and J. H. Hildreth. 



5th. The location is in Chicago, in the County of Cook, State of Illinois. 

Signed, 

B. F. NOI-RSE, 
JOHN C. FLEMING, 
JOHN B. HALL, 
S. M. RANDOLPH, 
J. H. HILDRETH. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS, ( 
COOK COUNTY. \ 



ss. 



I, Charles S. Vincent, a Notary Public in and for the County and State afore- 
said, do hereby certify that on this fifteenth day of April, A. D. 1889, personally 
appeared before me, B. F. Nourse, John C. Fleming, John B. Hall, S. M. Ran- 
dolph and J. H. Hildreth, to me personally known to be the same persons who 
executed the foregoing certificate, and severally acknowledged that they have 
executed the same for the purposes therein set forth. 

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year 
above written. 

[SEAL] CHARLES S. VINCENT, Notary Pubhc. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 
ISAAC N. PEARSON, Secretary of State. 

To all to whom these presents shall come Greeting : 

Whereas, a certificate, duly signed and acknowledged, having been filed in the 
Office of the Secretary of State, on the iyth day of April, A. D. 1889, for the 
organization of 

'The Chicago 'Board of Trade Battery Memorial Association, 

under and in accordance with the provisions of " An Act Concerning Corpora- 
tions," approved April iSth, 1872, and in force July i, 1872, and all acts amenda- 
tory thereof, a copy of which certificate is hereto attached. 

Now, therefore, I, Isaac N. Pearson, Secretary of State of the State of Illinois, 
by virtue of the powers and duties vested in me by law, do hereby certify that 



the said, The Chicago Board of Trade Battery Memorial Association, is a legally 
organized Corporation under the laws of this State. 

In testimony whereof, I hereto set my hand and cause to be affixed the great 
Seal of State. 

Done at the City of Springfield, this seventeenth day of April, in 

the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine, 

[SEAL] and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and 

thirteenth. 

I. N. PEARSON, Secretary of State. 



Constitution and 'By- 

of the 
Chicago Board of Trade Battery Memorial Association 



CONSTITUTION 

ARTICLE I. 

SECTION i. The name of this Association shall be "The Chicago Board of 
Trade Battery Memorial Association." 

ARTICLE II. 

SECTION i. Its objects shall be as set forth in the Charter from the State of 
Illinois. 

ARTICLE III. 

SECTION i. This Association shall consist both of Veteran and Associate 
Members. 

BY-LAWS 

ARTICLE I. 

SECTION i. Any member of "The Chicago Board of Trade Battery" who 
served with it in the field and was honorably discharged, shall be eligible 
to Veteran Membership. 

ARTICLE II. 

SECTION i. All male descendants of Veteran Members, or of those eligible to 
Veteran Membership, may become Associate Members upon attaining the 
age of eighteen years, and when elected by the Board of Directors, shall be 
entitled to all the privileges of Veteran Members. 

13 



ARTICLE III. 

SECTION i. The Board of Directors may, at any time, elect suitable persons as 
Honorary Members. 

ARTICLE IV. 

SECTION i. The Board of Directors shall consist of seven members, who shail 
be elected at the annual meeting in 1890, three (3) to serve for one (i) 
year, two for two (2) years and two for three (3) years; at the expiration of 
whose terms their successors shall be elected for the term of three years 
each. Said election shall be by ballot, a majority of all votes cast being 
necessary for an election. 

ARTICLE V. 

SECTION r. Immediately after their election, the Board of Directors shall 
organize by electing from their number, a President, Vice President, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, who shall also be the Officers of the Association; 
their terms of office shall be for one year or until their successors are 
elected and have qualified. 

SECTION 2. This election shall be by ballot, four (4) votes being necessary for 
a choice. 

ARTICLE VI. 

SECTION i. The Board of Directors shall control the property and general 
interests of the Association, receive nominations for membership and act 
upon same; consider complaints and may expel members for cause. 

ARTICLE VII. 

SECTION i. It shall be the duty of the President to preside at all meetings of 
the Association and Board of Directors, also to countersign all warrants 
for the disbursement of funds. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

SECTION i. In the absence of the President, the Vice President shall perform 
all the duties pertaining to that office. 

ARTICLE IX. 

SECTION i. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to keep a correct record of all 
meetings of the Association and Board of Directors, and conduct all 

14 



correspondence. He shall also notify the Treasurer in writing, of all 
disbursements ordered by the Board of Directors. And shall notify 
the members of all special and annual meetings of the Association. 

ARTICLE X. 

SECTION i. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive all funds paid in, 
depositing them in the bank designated by the Board of Directors, and 
shall disburse the same when ordered by them, with checks signed by 
himself and countersigned by either the President or Vice President. 

ARTICLE XI. 

SECTION i. The annual meeting shall occur on the first Saturday in May, at 
such hour and place as the Board of Directors may designate; due notice 
of such meeting having been mailed to last known address of each mem- 
ber by the Secretary at least one week prior to its occurrence. 

ARTICLE XII. 

SECTION i. Ten members shall constitute a quorum for meetings of the Asso- 
ciation, and four for the Board of Directors. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

SECTION i. The Annual Dues shall be two (2) dollars, payable either at the 
annual meeting or within thirty (30) days thereafter. Dues may be 
remitted by the Board of Directors. 

ARTICLE XIV. 

SECTION i. These By- Laws may be amended or added to by a two-thirds vote 
at any meeting of the Association, notice of change having been specified 
in the call. 



Historical Sketch of the Chicago 
'Board of Trade 'Battery 




CONDENSED historical sketch of the organiza- 
tion and operations of the Chicago Board of Trade 
Battery was, at the request of Adjt.-Gen. J. W. 
Vance, compiled by B. F. Nourse, S. H. Stevens, 
S. M. Randolph,]. C. Cambergand Charles Frink, 
in May, 1886, and approved by the Veteran Battery Association, 
June 24, 1886. The data is from diaries in the possession of the 
Battery members which were written daily as the events at the 
time occurred. 

July 6, 1862, the President made a call for three hundred thou- 
sand soldiers. There was not that ready response that characterized 
previous demands. At this juncture men with minds to grasp the 
situation, and whose moral judgment urged them to support the 
right, appeared with a fixed determination. These characteristics 
were developed in Chicago thus : 

CHICAGO, ILL., July 16, 1862. 
C. T. WHEELER, President of the Board of Trade : 

We, the undersigned members, request you to call at an early day, a general 



meeting of the Board to pledge ourselves to use our influence and money to recruit 

a battery to be known as the Board of Trade Battery. 

(TKORGK STEKI.. 

WM. STURGES, 

K. AKIV, 

M. C. STEARNS. 

I. Y. MUNN, 

G. L. SCOTT, 

T. J. BRONSON, 

C. H. WALKER, JR., 

E. G. WOLCOTT, 

FLINT & THOMPSON. 

The meeting was called in the Board rooms, corner South Water 
and Wells streets, July 21, 1862. Second Vice-President John L. 
Hancock presided with an outspoken patriotism in accord with the 
assembly. C. H. Walker, Jr., introduced resolutions in harmony 
with the call which were unanimously adopted. Subscriptions were 
announced, and $5,121 was pledged. A muster roll was presented 
bearing the legend, " Chicago Board of Trade Battery." The follow- 
ing names were enrolled for three years, or the war : S. H. STEVENS, 
S. C. STEVENS, J. W. BLOOM, CALVIN DURAND, VALENTINE STEEL, 
H. B. CHANDLER, A. F. BAXTER, H. J. BAXTER, J. A. HOWARD. 

The muster roll was entrusted to S. H. Stevens, and an adjourn- 
ment taken. Thus was established a precedent a commercial 
leadership with the material result of placing in the field the 
Chicago Board of Trade Battery ; the j2d, 88th and ii3th infantry 
regiments, Illinois Volunteers, and $50,000 war funds on deposit. 
On lightning wings this action flew east and west, firing the patriot- 
ism of commercial America until the nation felt its assuring influ- 
ence. An enthusiastic meeting was held the evening of the 22d, and 
the muster roll increased to 63 names. The roll was closed at 

1 8 



4 P. M. on the 23d with 180 names and many waiting to sign. This 
dispatch was transmitted : 

BOARD OF TRADE ROOMS, CHICAGO, July 23, 1862. 
ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States : 

The Board of Trade of this city have within the last forty eight hours 
raised Si 5,000 bounty money, and have recruited a full company of Artillery. 

Signed, 

J. L. HANCOCK, 
WM. STURGES, 
GEORGE ARMOI R, 
C. H. WALKER JR., 
H. W. HINSDALE, 
S. H. STEVENS. 

July 24, 1862, company occupied City Armory as drill room. 
August i, 1862, Captain J. Christopher, U. S. A., selected 155 men 
from the 180 enrolled (there was no medical examination), and 
mustered them into the service of the United States as the Chicago 
Board of Trade Battery Ills. Vols. James H. Stokes, a graduate of 
West Point Military Academy, was elected and mustered as Captain. 
August 2d, en route to camp, marched in review past the Board of 
Trade rooms on South Water street. Partook of the hospitality of 
Mrs. Henry B. Clark, corner Michigan Boulevard and i6th street. 
Marched to camp and pitched tents south of Camp Douglas, near 
what is now 37th street and Stanton avenue. George I. Robinson 
was elected Senior ist Lieutenant, Trumbull D. Griffin, Junior ist 
Lieutenant. S. H. Stevens was appointed Orderly Sergeant. 
August 4th, A. F. Baxter was elected Senior 2d Lieutenant: Henry 
Bennett, Junior 2d Lieutenant. M. S. Sanford was appointed 
Quartermaster Sergeant ; Calvin Durand, Commissary Sergeant : 
F. J. Deane, ist Sergeant; L. B. Hand, 2d Sergeant; Wm. Ran- 
dolph, 3d Sergeant; A. L. Adams, 4th Sergeant; George Bowers. 

'9 



5th Sergeant; M. H. Salisbury, 6th Sergeant; together with twelve 
corporals, six artificers and two buglers. (For complete roster of the 
Battery see Adjutant-General's report, Volume VIII, pages 644-647.) 
August nth, received six James rifled ten-pounder field artillery 
guns. August 1 3th, appeared for first time in uniform ; August 
2oth, received no artillery horses; August 22, drilled with horses 
for first time; September gth, broke camp and moved via M. C. R. R.; 
arrived in Louisville on the loth, at 7 p. M.; i5th, grand review 
on Broadway by General Charles Cruft ; i6th, exchanged four rifled 
for four smooth-bored six- pounder guns. October i, 1862, the army 
moved from Louisville on the campaign of Perryville. The battery 
was attached to General Dumont's division, which occupied the 
extreme left at Frankfort. October nth, brigade of General R. S. 
Granger, of Dumont's division was ordered to report to Major- 
General A. McD. McCook at the front. The battery moved with 
the brigade. Struck rebel General Forrest's command at Lawrence- 
burg. First engagement. One direct shot caused the enemy to 
retreat. October 30, Major-General Rosecrans took command at 
Louisville. A department of the Cumberland was the second time 
created. The troops of the department were designated i4th Army 
Corps. November 4th, the army ordered to advance on Nashville, 
Tennessee. With General R. S. Granger in command of post of 
Bowling Green, and Battery parked at headquarters, this kind of 
soldiering was not our wish. Captain James H. Stokes made appli- 
cation to be allowed to go to the front. His request was granted 
December 4th. Infantry muskets and ammunition were furnished 
for all the cannoneers, and without escort the battery moved in the 
direction of Nashville via Tyree Springs. The enemy held posses- 
sion of the entire route, but we arrived safely December 7, 1862. 



Same evening, S. H. Stevens took command of left section as Senior 
2d Lieutenant; and L. B. Hand was promoted Orderly Sergeant. 
December 14, 1862, a detail consisting of Lieutenant Stevens and 
Quartermaster-Sergeant Durand, and ten men with three teams, were 
ordered out on Franklin Pike for forage. Sixteen mounted Confed- 
erates made a dash, wounded one man and captured six. December 
2oth, attached to Pioneer Brigade. This organization, formed by a 
detail of two men from each company of infantry in the Army of the 
Cumberland, divided into three battalions under detailed officers, 
the whole commanded by Captain St. Clair Morton, of the engineer 
department regular army. December 26, 1862, campaign of Stone 
River opened. During the night December 2gth, built two bridges 
over Stewart's Creek. December 3oth, army fighting for position. 
Bivouacked on the field three miles from Murfreesboro. December 
3ist, 7 A. M., from the distant right came the sound of battle; 8 A. M., 
the whole right wing out of the fight, and the center desperately 
engaged. The battery came into position near the graveyard between 
the railroad and the pike. A slight rise beyond was occupied. To 
the left and front lay the key to the position ; not to hold the gap 
would be fatal. At this juncture Major-General Rosecrans dashed 
from left to right, and discovered the Chicago Board of Trade Bat- 
tery ready for the fray, but without positive directions. His orders 
were given to officers and men indiscriminately, as the case de- 
manded. He spurred back to near gap, returned part way, beck- 
oned, and shouted, "Right this way." As on parade, the command 
at a trot came into battery in the gap on the crest with diminished 
intervals, made necessary by a point of second-growth forest on 
either flank. On the right and immediate front on open field beyond, 
within easy musket range debouching from the death-masked cedars. 



the enemy in pursuit of the retreating blue. The cannoneers were 
at their posts, the General on the right in line. The order rang out, 
" load;" before the word "fire " came he raised his hand and plunged 
down the declivity in front. He had seen the approaching routed 
mass of soldiers, who at once would swarm on the front, over and 
through the battery, followed by the victorious foe ; a moment's 
delay and the capture of the battery would be inevitable. On came 
the exultant yell. The artillerymen stood with lanyard tightly drawn 
until to longer wait all was lost. As from one gun six death-dealing 
shells passed over the head of the commanding General into the 
mass of " Gray " beyond, and from thence thirty per minute until the 
front was clear. 

Our Battery stood in relief on the crest; each gun squad could 
be counted by the relief across the intervening space. The enemy's 
artillery opened with deadly precision, and so admirably was it 
masked that their guns could not be located. The infantry, formed 
in front of the forest, delivered a volley, and charged across the open 
field. Then canister was the cry, within thirty yards the foremost 
went down, when all not disabled sought shelter in the rear. This 
was thrice repeated. By 1 1 o'clock the enemy had learned that 
neither bravery nor numbers could carry the battery in their front, 
and all was quiet. Three of our men lay dead by their disabled 
guns. Ten wounded were taken to the rear. The battery having 
held its ground, it became the pivotal point on which the right and 
centre rested. Late in the afternoon, to meet a threatened assault 
of Preston's and Palmer's rebel brigades, the left section of Battery 
changed front to the southwest. Palmer's brigade was in ambuscade 
on the border of an open field, 200 yards to our front, and at 
twilight unmasked their line by a dropping fire on Union soldiers 



gathering dead and wounded between the lines. The section opened 
with a zeal unsurpassed. The rebels, being taken entirely by surprise, 
were thrown into the greatest confusion, some retreating; others 
advanced firing until they reached our line and were taken in. The 
section returned to its original position, and the second day at Stone 
River was closed. In the chill night, without fires, we buried our 
dead, and then lay on the frozen ground awaiting the coming of the 
morning of the new year and a renewal of the contest. January 2d, 
six volunteers from the command took from between the lines under 
fire an abandoned six-pounder gun to replace the one disabled. In 
recognition Gen. Rosecrans declared the organization a seven-gun 
battery, and it so remained until after the battle of Chickamauga. 
4 p. m. The Battery in reserve, in battery, in the forest on the left 
bank of Stone River, one-fourth of a mile in rear of left wing. Then 
Gen. J. S. Negley came dashing back. "For God's sake, Captain 
Stokes, come to the front; our men are giving way." The order rang 
out clear and full: "Limber to the front." "By pieces from the right, 
forward into column." "Trot." "Gallop." Without change of gait 
the order came, "Forward into battery." Fifty-eight cannon poured 
their iron contents into the rebel mass, and with lightning rapidity 
repeated until their lines waver, reel and break to the rear, pursued 
as by an avenging Nemesis, -the Stars and Stripes. It was estima- 
ted that in 40 minutes 2,000 rebels lay bleeding on the field. In the 
meantime the rebel Gen. Bragg had ordered a division on the left 
bank of the river but the repulse had been so quick and decisive 
that the troops did not get into position until late absorbing victory 
appeared to cover the movement to all except Captain Stokes. He 
ordered the Battery forward and without support checked the advance 
at short range. Our position being noticed, infantry was ordered 



up and the enemy dispersed. The battery crossed the river. Com- 
mands which belonged to the " left " coming into line, the Battery 
returned. 

The following dispatch was sent : 

NASHVILLE, TENN., January 3, 1863. 
MURRY NELSON & Co., Chicago : 

Murfreesboro is ours. Terrific fighting on Friday. No more casualties in 
the Battery; it has won glorious distinction. S. H. STEVENS. 

Without our knowledge it was the first news received of the 
victory of the Union arms at Stone River. January 6 to June 23, 
1863, in camp at Murfreesboro. Tenn. The most notable event 
was the changing of the command from mounted field to Horse 
Artillery, and being attached to the 2d division of cavalry, Army of 
the Cumberland, commanded by Brig. -Gen. John B. Turchin, and 
was the only Battery of horse or flying artillery in the western 
armies. June 24th, moved with the army, keeping on the flanks as 
it advanced, following Bragg's army through Tullahoma and Win- 
chester to Huntsville, Ala. July 15, from here the third section, 
under command of Lieut. Griffin, went via McMinnville and Pike- 
ville, crossing the Tennessee River on the left of the army, and at 
Ringgold, Ga., fired the first gun, which opened the battle of Chicka- 
mauga, September iQth. August 2oth, crossed the Cumberland 
mountains toward Stevenson. September 2d went over the 
Tennessee river, moving south to Big Wills Valley; gth, marched 
south on top of Lookout range, down into the valley, scouting on 
the left of Bragg's army, going within two miles of Lafayette, Ga. 
Sunday, 2oth, moved through Stevens' Gap, and at 10 a. m. joined 
the army, and fought on the extreme right during the battle of 
Chickamauga; also 2ist and 22d. 

24 



From September 23d to October ist the Battery, with the 26. 
division of cavalry, under Brig.-Gen. George Crook, was guarding 
fords above Chattanooga. On the ist, the rebel, Maj.-Gen. Jos. 
Wheeler crossed at Washington, 40 miles above, with 6,000 men; 
two other columns were preparing to cross below, one at Bellefonte, 
the other at Courtland, Ala. October ad, the 2d division cavalry, 
and guns i, 2 and 4 from the Battery, passed over Waldron's ridge 
in pursuit of Rebel Gen. Wheeler. October 3d, descended the 
Cumberland mountains. Encountered the rebels in severe skirmish. 
October 4th, passed through McMinnville, and drove rear guard 
seven miles beyond. October 5th, Gen. Wheeler reached Murfrees- 
boro, and threw out feelers to the south for his anticipated divisions, 
but they did not come. Charged his rear guard, two miles out, and, 
by a flank movement, placed the division between the enemy and 
Nashville. This, and the non-appearance of the other columns, 
caused Wheeler to turn south to effect a junction, as well as to avoid 
an engagement. October 6th, marched through Guy's Gap to within 
six miles of Shelbyville. October yth, crossed Duck River at Shelby- 
ville. Three miles beyond discovered a rebel brigade in camp, 
enjoying the rich loot of the town. Mounted infantry charged and 
dispersed them. The 2d division of cavalry ordered in pursuit. 
Without orders, the Battery joined. The rear was pushed on to the 
main column by an almost continuous fire until late in the afternoon. 
Gen. Wheeler was forced to mass at Farmington. The frequent 
contests had fully advised the rebel General of the capabilities of 
each arm engaged. This knowledge urged him to guard against 
cavalry, and make his own heavy short-range artillery effective. 
Dismounted cavalry was formed across the road, protected by the 
fences and buildings of the town, with an open country to the rear. 

25 



In front, at short musket range, a cedar thicket, about 400 yards in 
extent, resting on a gentle incline toward the west, which began 
with the cedars on the east. This thicket was so dense that dis- 
mounted men could not form until the open ground toward the 
enemy was gained. The road through the cedars was narrow, the 
evergreens meeting overhead. The rebel artillery, consisting of two 
twelve-pounder howitzers and a three-inch rifled gun, was placed at 
a bend in the road, four hundred yards down the incline. This 
distance left them outside of the cedars, so as to have an enfilad 
ing fire on any troops emerging therefrom. As no gun at the top 
of the incline could be depressed so as to be brought to bear on the 
rebel guns, to insure any execution our artillery had to be placed 
fifty yards to the front. The rebel artillery no longer sweeps the 
road. Our troops have passed the cedars, their lines enfiladed. 
Fifty yards down the incline, beneath the cedars, within three 
hundred and fifty yards of the enemy, their weight of metal as five 
to one. Our percussion shells explode in their midst. A caisson 
goes up; but the enemy fights with a will. A three-inch shell strikes 
our trail. Every man is swept from his place. All are wounded. 
Another shot, and our gun is disabled. Lieutenant Stevens, in com- 
mand, hurries to the rear, and willing hands, amidst a hell of fire 
roll the second gun into position. It opens, and the slaughter is 
such there is none to serve the rebel guns. The dismounted men 
charged, and the enemy fled. October 8th, in pursuit. Qth, found 
the enemy entrenched at Sugar Creek. Charged and routed them 
and pursued hotly to Tennessee River. Gen. Thomas reported: 
" This pursuit is unsurpassed for its energy, bravery and endurance." 
October xoth to i5th, marched to Deckard for C. and Q. M. stores. 
Found none. Countermarched to Maysville and lived off the 



country. October 2oth, Capt. Stokes relieved of command to take 
position in Q. M. Dept. November, moved to Huntsville and 
Battery again united. December 2d, Lieut. Stevens ordered to 
Nashville in interest Q. M. Dept. 

The other four guns of the Battery moved November 7th from 
Smith's Cross Roads, Tenn., via Bridgeport, and, after various stops, 
went into camp at Huntsville, Ala., November 25th. Here recruited 
horses and rested, moving December 24th toward Pulaski, Tenn. 
Camped there on 27th. Lay in camp at Pulaski, Tenn., from 
December 27, 1863, to January 12, 1864; from Pulaski a large part 
of our division re-enlisted, and went home on 30 days' furlough. On 
the 1 4th we reached Huntsville, Ala., and went into camp until 
February 2d, when the old guns and equipments with the harness 
were shipped by rail to Chattanooga. Gen. George H. Thomas, 
having declared "we had earned two or three new batteries," gave 
an order for a battery of Rodmans. February loth left Huntsville 
with the horses for Nashville, Tenn.; on the 24th were fitted out 
complete with battery of new 3-inch Parrotts, harness, etc. Leaving 
camp March loth, marched back to Huntsville, Ala. On April 4th 
started as guard to 200 wagons, being escorted by the 3d brigade of 
the 2d division cavalry; reached Columbia, Tenn., on the 8th, going 
into camp with the whole division now in command of Brig.-Gen. 
K. Garrard. April 3oth left for the front by the way of Shelbyville, 
Farmington, Tullahoma, Deckard, and over the Cumberland Moun- 
tains at Cowan; crossed the Tennessee River at Bridgeport, going 
over on the top of the railroad bridge as far as it was built, and the 
rest of the way via pontoon. Camped the 7th at Nick-a-Jack cave, 
having thoroughly explored which, we destroyed the rebel saltpetre 
works at its mouth. Moved by the way of Chattanooga to 



La Fayette, Ga., where the whole 2d division cavalry, Army of the 
Cumberland, came together, most of the division having crossed 
Lookout Range; from the nth to the lyth were continually on the 
scout, and on right flank of the army, going as far as Rome, Ga.; 
on the igth made a forced march of 20 miles toward Kingston, Ga., 
pressing Folk's rear guard, and getting to the Etowah river bridge 
in time to shell the rebels off and save it from destruction by fire; 
from Etowah were day and night in the saddle on the left wing of 
the army. At one time were 60 hours on picket duty without relief. 
In June, rations were very short, the men receiving four crackers to 
last five days; were forced to steal corn from the horses. Were in 
action June 8th, gth, nth, i5th, i8th, 2oth and 2yth. July jd passed 
through Marietta, Ga. v driving the rebels to and through Rosswell, 
capturing that place, and destroying the large cotton factories there. 
July roth crossed the Chattahoochee River; i8th, started on a raid, 
and tore up six miles of the Augusta & Atlanta Railroad south and 
east of Stone Mountain, getting back safely. On the 2oth went into 
the main line, filling a gap between MePherson and Thomas. On 
the 2ist the centre section went on a raid; 22d was a terrible day; 
we were in camp at Decatur, Ga., with the wagon trains of the i5th 
iyth and 23d army corps, and they had as guard a brigade of infan- 
try and a section of the 3d Michigan battery under a Col. Sprague. 
Suddenly at noon the rebel Wheeler's cavalry division attacked the 
camp. We formed battery in our camp, and got into action just 
where we were. 

Our use of canister was fearful in its effects ; but having no sup- 
port, the rebels came over fences and around buildings, and we lost 
eight men out of thirty-two ; but held them so long that not a wagon 
was captured. On the 2;th started on another raid, getting round 

28 



Atlanta to Jonesboro. Gen. Stoneman having gone south, we 
retraced our way to Decatur. Rations for 22 men 7 days was 50 
pounds hard bread. From August ist to i5th occupied position in 
the line circling Atlanta, and took our share in its destruction. On 
the 1 7th, guns 1,3, 4, and 5 with the ist and ad brigades, 2d divi- 
sion cavalry, reported to Gen. Kilpatrick, at Sandtown, on the right 
of the line; at 6 o'clock p. m. on the i8th, we started to make the 
raid around Atlanta, and to cut the railroads running into the city. 
Kilpatrick, instead of using the battery belonging to his own divi- 
sion, placed us in the advance of the column in the movement to 
Lovejoy Station, then, when the command was entirely surrounded, 
used us to open the way for his troops to retreat, then to cover his 
retreat. We lost 5 men, burst one gun, broke axle of another, 
throwing gun into a river, but captured and brought away a 
6-pounder. We reached Decatur on the 22d, 4 days and 3 nights 
in the saddle, having made a complete circle around Hood's army 
and the city of Atlanta, ist Lieutenant George I. Robinson com- 
missioned captain August 22d, 1864. When the army moved south 
of Atlanta, were with the rear guard, and on the flanks until Sep- 
tember loth, when we went into camp at Cross Keys, having been 
moving almost daily since April 3oth. September 2 ist broke camp, 
going through Atlanta out on the Sandtown road. October 3d, 
moved through Atlanta, north to the Chattahoochee River, crossed on 
pontoon (which swung in a raging stream) safely, reaching Marietta 
at noon on the 4th, where we halted ; some of the command went on 
top of Kenesaw Mountain, and were present when Gen. Sherman 
signaled to Gen. Corse at Altoona his world-wide known message 
"Hold the fort; I am coming. W. T. Sherman." Moved on the 
gth, going from flank to flank, or back to the rear, as needed, to 



keep off Forrest's and Wheeler's rebel cavalry. On November 1st, 
all good horses were turned over to Kilpatrick's division, and we 
moved north to Chattanooga, which place was reached on the $th ; 
on the 1 3th went by rail to Nashville, Tenn. December ist, having 
received new horses, we moved our camp into the city; and, as 
Hood's army threatened the city, we went into the breastworks. 
Maj.-Gen. J. H. Wilson was now in command of the cavalry corps. 
On the 1 5th, were on the extreme right in the battle of Nashville. 
We did not lose a man; our division captured 1,200 prisoners, 18 
pieces of artillery, 200 wagons, and drove the rebel left 5 miles, 
halting for the night on the Brentwood pike, following next day 
to Franklin. The- bridge over the Duck River having been destroyed, 
we could not get across until the 23d. On the 24th, were on the 
skirmish line all day, and in action almost every hour ; lost one man 
killed ; drove Hood's rear guard 2 1 miles, and by our quick and 
accurate firing saved the long covered bridge over Richland creek. 
During the night the rebels did not stop, but by 1 1 130 a. m. we had 
overtaken them, and our shells threw them into fearful disorder, and 
we captured 14 wagons of ammunition, and they threw into Elk 
river 7 guns, and into Duck River 17 guns. The roads were in 
fearful condition. Hood's army having crossed the Tennessee 
River, we marched to Waterloo, Ala., going into camp at a place 
called Gravelly Springs. Here gunboats and transports brought 
us rations, and we remained in camp until March 22, 1865; then, 
being fully and well equipped, and still attached to the 2d division 
cavalry, Army of the Cumberland, we commenced our last great 
move, going through Frankfort and Russellville, crossing Big Bear 
Creek to Jasper. March 2gth we safely forded the Big Warrior 
River, a wild, rough stream, where many men and horses of our 

3 



cavalry were drowned; crossed the same day the Little Warrior 
River. Water so deep that the powder was taken from the limber 
chests, and carried on the shoulders of mounted men. Crossed 
Cahawba River on the ties of the railroad bridge, 40 feet above the 
water, taking the horses from the guns, leading the horses over, and 
running the guns by hand. Each day we drove the rebel cavalry ; 
but they did not succeed in making a stand that required the use of 
our guns 

March 3oth, marched 37 miles; April ist, 47 miles. This day 
the rebels set fire to the pine woods, and we had to go through them 
for a half-mile at a gallop; fortunately, no horse fell, and none of 
the men were seriously burned; but it was almost a miracle that no 
caisson was blown up. The rebel cavalry under Gen. Roddy made 
a stand in the afternoon, when we got into action, quickly capturing 
3 pieces of artillery, and our support capturing 200 prisoners, and a 
train of cars loaded with forage. April 2, 1865, Sunday, day never 
to be forgotten while any member of the Battery lives. A march of 
20 miles brought us to the works in front of Selma, Ala., when 1,200 
men of the 2d division cavalry, armed with their Spencers, charged 
and captured the works, driving 7,000 men out of the works, taking 
2,300 prisoners, and all the artillery. The Battery fired over the 
charging line until the works were carried, then moved into the city 
with the charging line and materially helped the rebels out of the 
city. April 3d, 4th, 5th and 6th was spent destroying the artillery 
and carriages in the breastworks and forts, throwing all the ammunition 
in the arsenal into the river. On the night of the 8th we burned the 
arsenal, foundry and machine shops. Left Selma 6 o'clock morning 
of the nth, going toward Montgomery, Alabama. Marching was 
exceedingly severe on men and horses, we having but 3^ hours sleep 



out of 108 consecutive hours. Captured Columbus, Ga., the night 
of the 1 8th. We had the advance, as we always had when any right- 
ing was expected, made 58 miles, halting twice only. On igth. 
marched 42 miles (100 miles in two days), going into Macon, Ga., 
and camping two miles out on the Columbus road; 23d, rumor of 
Lee's surrender; 25th, rumor of the shooting of President Lincoln. 
May 3d we had confirmed the rumor through a New York Herald 
only five days old. May gth we remained in camp while the 4th 
Michigan cavalry (of our division) went after Jeff Davis. On 13111 
they returned, having captured his family, himself, and others of the 
Confederate Cabinet. On the 23d (the war being over) we started 
north, marching through Atlanta, Marietta, Kingston, Dalton, to 
Chattanooga, 254 miles. Loaded the guns on cars, while the horses 
and postilions went with the cavalry to Nashville, Tenn., 151 miles. 
June 23d, left Nashville by rail, arriving in Chicago at 3:30 a. m. on 
27th. At noon were received on 'Change by the Board of Trade. 
8 o'clock that evening were given a banquet in the Metropolitan 
Hall. June 2Qth reported at Camp Douglas, but allowed to go to 
the city afterward. July 3d paid in full and mustered out to date 
June 30, 1865. The Battery marched 5,268 miles; traveled by rail 
1,231 miles. Were in n of the hardest battles fought in the West. 
Were in 26 other battles. Were in action 42 times while on scouts, 
reconnoissances, or outpost. 

That you may know in what esteem we were held by all the 
Generals under whom we served, we have only to bring to mind one 
incident: Gen. George Crook said: "I thank the command for 
their good behavior in every particular. So long as I have had 
command of you I never had a single complaint made against the 
Chicago Board of Trade Battery. I never saw so well drilled or so 

3-' 



good a battery in action as you are, all gentlemen, and act the gen- 
tleman at all times." By special orders our flags (these flags being 
the first carried by an artillery company, and then by special orders) 
had placed on them "Stone River," "Elk River," "Chickamauga," 
"Farmington," "Dallas," "Decatur," "Atlanta," "Lovejoy," "Nash- 
ville," "Selma." The flags (two) were placed in the vault of the 
Chamber of Commerce in Chicago, and in the great fire of 1871 
were destroyed. All papers in the possession of Gen. James 
H. Stokes, our first Captain, were destroyed in the same fire. The 
company books, orders, etc., were burned in 1878, at the destruc- 
tion of Captain George I. Robinson's residence in Milwaukee, Wis. 



Dedication Services 

Chicago Board of Trade Battery Monument, Rosehill 

Cemetery, Chicago, Thursday, 

May 30, 1901 




N ROSEHILL Cemetery, Chicago, stands a 
massive granite monument erected to the Chicago 
Board of Trade Battery by its surviving members. 
This impressive and beautiful memorial in its 
simplicity is significant of the power of the 
Battery's guns and of the unassuming fighting qualities of its 
members. It bears the names of the more celebrated actions which 
made the Battery famous. It was dedicated on Memorial Day, 
May 30, 1901, and was unveiled by Miss Clara Nourse, daughter 
of John A. Nourse, Secretary of the Chicago Board of Trade Bat- 
tery Memorial Association, in the presence of a large concourse 
of people. 



35 






Order of Exercises 



Assembly . . v 

Prayer . . . 

Report of Secretary 

Address President Association 
Unveiling of Monument 

Floral Tribute to Our Dead 
Address President Board of Trade 
Taps . - . 



E. L. PRESCOTT 

Bugler 

REV. W. M. LAWRENCE 



J. A. NOURSE 

B. F. NOURSE 
CLARA NOURSE 

MEMBERS OF THE BATTERY 
W. S. WARREN 



E. L. PRESCOTT 
Bugler 



P. L. AUTEN, Marshal 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBANA 



<Prayer By Rev. William M. Lsforence, D. <D. 

Almighty God, Our Dear Heavenly Father and the Father of our 
Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ: Assembled on this sacred day this 
day of beautiful thoughts and precious memories, we desire to rec- 
ognize Thee as the Giver of every good and perfect gift. We thank 
Thee for our land, for our Country, for our homes and for our citi- 
zens. We thank Thee for their patriotism that led them in the hour 
of their country's peril to think no sacrifice too great to offer in her 
behalf. We thank Thee that this spirit was not confined to class 
but that our young men, our merchants and our professional men 
gladly rushed to the defense of their homes and kindred, and hesi- 
tated not to redden the green field with their blood in the mainte- 
nance of righteousness. We thank Thee that above the desire for 
gain was the devotion to State and Nation. We thank Thee that 
those who came to the help of the Nation were those who had loved 
liberty in other lands and those who were the children of our free 
schools and reverently placed their all for the honor of their flag. 

We thank Thee that the conflict is ended. We thank Thee that 
we have one land, one nation and one flag; that throughout the 
whole domain we are all brothers. We come before Thee on this 
beautiful day and in this place of hallowed resting to ask thy bless- 
ing upon us as we dedicate this monument to the beloved memory 
of those of this Battery who have passed on before and to the honor 

39 



of those who are still with us all one in life here and hereafter. 
We pray Thee as men behold it their hearts shall be warmed to 
appreciation of the services which this, stone recalls. May the youth 
and the children as their eyes fall upon it be led to love their land 
and the principles for which it stands. May real patriotism be so 
awakened in their minds that love of country shall never be sur- 
passed by love of possession. Oh our God, preserve in this memo- 
rial our ancient faith in Thee as the Lord of Lords and the ruler of 
men. Preserve our homes, our schools and our honor and conse- 
crate our new lands to the mighty service for which these heroes 
gave their lives. 

So let our land show forth truth and the Glory shall be Thine, 
Father, Son and Spirit ! Amen ! 



Extracts from the 

Report of the Secretary 

of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery Memorial 
Association 




COMRADES OF THE CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE BATTERY, MEMBERS 
OF THE BOARD OF TRADE, COMRADES OF THE ARMY, LADIES 
AND GENTLEMEN: 

S SECRETARY of the Chicago Board of Trade 
Battery Memorial Association, it becomes my 
privilege to submit a report regarding the erection 
of the Monument which we are assembled here to 
dedicate. 

To refresh the memory of our Comrades, and as there may be 
with us today some friends who may not be familiar with the history 
of the stirring times of 1861 to 1865, I will give a short sketch of 
the organization and service of the Battery. 

When the President of the United States on July 6, 1862, called 
for three hundred thousand soldiers, ten members of the Chicago 
Board of Trade, on July i6th, signed a request to the President of 
the Board to call a meeting to recruit a battery to be known as the 

41 



Chicago Board of Trade Battery, and pledged their support and 
money for the purpose. 

The meeting was called at the rooms of the Board of Trade, cor- 
ner of Wells and South Water streets, July 21, 1862. Second Vice 
President John L. Hancock presided, and announced the object of 
the meeting. 

C. H. Walker, Jr., introduced resolutions in harmony with the 
call, which were adopted. A muster roll was presented bearing the 
legend, Chicago Board of Trade Battery. Eight names were enrolled 
for three years or the war. The muster roll was entrusted to S. H. 
Stevens, and an adjournment carried. 

Thus was established a precedent by a commercial body that 
resulted in placing in the field the Chicago Board of Trade Battery. 
Illinois Volunteers. 

An enthusiastic meeting was held on the evening of the 22nd, 
and sixty-three names added to the roll. On the 23d the roll was 
again opened, and at 4 P. M. was closed with one hundred and 
eighty names enrolled, and many persons waiting to sign. A tele- 
gram was sent President Lincoln : 

BOARD OF TRADE ROOMS, CHICAGO, July 23, 1662. 
ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the Umted States : 

The Board of Trade of this City have within the last forty-eight hours raised 
^15,000. Recraited a full Company of Artillery. 

Signed, 

J. L. HANCOCK. 
C. H. WALKER, JR.. 
S. H. STEVENS. 
WM. STURGES. 
GEORGE ARMOUR. 
H. W. HINSDAI.E. 

42 



July 24th: The Company assembled at the City Armory and 
occupied the drill room. 

August ist: Captain J. Christopher, U. S. Army, selected one 
hundred and fifty-five men from the one hundred and eighty 
enrolled, and mustered them into the United States service as the 
Chicago Board of Trade Battery, Illinois Volunteers. 

JAMES H. STOKES was elected and mustered as Captain. 

August 2nd : Marched in review past the Board of Trade rooms 
on South Water Street to camp at what is now 37th Street and 
Stanton Avenue. 

G. I. ROBINSON and T. D. GRIFFIN were elected Senior and 
Junior ist Lieutenants, S. H. Stevens was appointed Orderly Ser- 
geant. 

August. 4th : A. F. BAXTER and HENRY BENNETT were elected 
Senior and Junior 2nd Lieutenants. The non-commissioned officers 
were appointed and the command was completely organized. 

August nth: Received six James rifled six-pounder field artil- 
lery guns. 

August i3th: Appeared the first time in uniform. 

August 2oth : Received full equipment of horses. 

August 22nd : Drilled the first time with horses. 

September 8th : Fully equipped, the battery paraded the streets 
of the city and passed in review before the Board of Trade. 

September gth : Broke camp and with one hundred and fifty- 
four men, fully equipped, moved to the front via Michigan Central 
Ry., arriving in Louisville, Ky., on the loth of September. 

September i5th: Participated in the grand review on Broad- 
way by General Charles Cruft, this being our first review before a 
general officer. 

43 



September i6th: Exchanged four of our rifled guns for four 
smooth-bore six-pounder guns. 

October ist : Moved with the army from Louisville on the 
campaign to Perryville. 

October iith: Our first engagement with the Confederates at 
Lawrenceburg, firing at the enemy commanded by General Forrest. 

November : The army advanced to Nashville, Tenn., 
leaving the battery at Bowling Green, Ky. 

December 4lh : Muskets were issued to the cannoneers, and 
the Battery moved to Nashville, the cannoneers acting as infantry 
escort. 

December i4th : While a detail of our men were on a foraging 
expedition they were attacked by Confederates, and one man 
wounded and six men were taken prisoners, this being our first loss 
in the war. 

December 2oth: Were attached to the Pioneer Division, com- 
manded by Captain Sr. Clair Morton. 

December 31, 1862, and January i and 2, 1863: Were engnged 
in the battle of Stone River, this being our first general engagement 
in which the whole Battery was engaged. 

January 2d : Volunteers from the battery brought in from 
between the Federal and Confederate lines a six-pounder gun to 
replace one of our guns that had become disabled. 

In recognition of this daring bravery, General Rosecrans 
issued an order making the Battery a seven-gun Battery and it so 
remained until after the Battle of Chickamauga. 

May 16, 1863 : Were attached to the Second Cavalry Division, 
Army of the Cumberland, General John B. Turchin commanding, 
and under his orders were equipped as horse artillery, being the 

44 



only Battery of this equipment in the western army. The Battery 
remained with this Division under its various Commanders to the 
close of the war, participating in all the battles and engagements 
credited to this celebrated Division. 

September 19, 1863 : The second section of the Battery, Lieu- 
tenant Griffin commanding, near Ringgold, Georgia, fired the first 
gun that opened the Battle of Chickamauga, and were engaged on 
the left of General Rosecrans' army during the several days of the 
battle. 

September igth: The first and third Sections were in the rear 
of Rebel General Bragg's army, near Lafayette, Georgia. 

September 2oth and 2ist : These Sections of the Battery took 
part in the Battle of Chickamauga, on the right of General Rose- 
crans' army. 

September 22nd : The Battery all united retired through Chat- 
tanooga to near Washington, Tenn., having fired the last gun of the 
Battle of Chickamauga and being the last Battery to retire from the 
field and enter Chattanooga after the battle. 

October 2nd to loth: Assisted in pursuit of Rebel General 
Wheeler's Command from Washington, Tenn., to Florence, Ala., 
being hotly engaged in the Battle of Farmington. In this engage- 
ment, owing to conditions of the ground we were able to operate but 
one gun, thus being pitted against the Rebel Battery as one to five. 
The first gun was disabled and every man at that gun wounded, then 
the second gun was brought into action and silenced the Rebel 
Battery. 

February, 1864: Our brass guns being worn out, General 
George H. Thomas ordered that we be equipped with new guns, 



45 



stating that we had earned two or three new Batteries. We received 
six ten-pounder Parrot Guns. 

One of these guns was exploded during the Kilpatrick raid 
around the Confederate Army at Atlanta, Ga., in August, 1864, 
and owing to the disabling of a gun carriage another of these 
guns was buried near Cotton River, Ga., and the location 
marked as the grave of a soldier. The four remaining guns 
were returned to the United States Government at Nashville, 
Tenn., in June, 1865. 

During the advance of General Sherman's Army on Atlanta the 
Battery was engaged with the Second Cavalry Division in the several 
battles of Dallas, Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, 
Marietta, Vining Station, Noon Day Creek, Stone Mountain and 
Decatur, besides several smaller engagements. 

August 1 8th to 22nd: Were engaged in a raid under command 
of General Kilpatrick around the Confederate Army commanded by 
Rebel General Hood then in Atlanta. We lost in this raid five men, 
exploded one of our guns and dismantled one. Were in our saddles 
four days and three nights and made a complete circle around the 
Confederate Army. 

October ist: We moved north with the Army, keeping close to 
the rear of the Confederate Army and moving from center to the 
flanks as our services were needed. 

November ist: General Sherman having divided his Army, we 
were ordered to turn over all our good horses to General Kilpatrick's 
command and we moved north under General G. H. Thomas, arriv- 
ing at Nashville, Tenn., on November 14. 

December ist: The Battery having been newly equipped we 
moved our camp into the city and our guns were placed behind 

4 6 



breast-works. This being the first and only time the battery was 
placed behind breast-works. 

December i5th: General G. H. Thomas' Army being ready 
to advance on Rebel General Hood's Army, we moved to the right 
of the Army and under command of General J. H. Wilson, took 
part in the Battle of Nashville, and with that Cavalry command fol- 
lowed Hood's Army to the Tennessee River, arriving at Waterloo, 
Ala., December 3oth, having been engaged with the enemy almost 
the entire distance. 

On the 24th: Being in the advance and engaged every hour, 
drove the enemy twenty miles, saved the covered bridge over 
Richland Creek, enabling our army to follow the enemy without 
delay. 

March 22, 1865: Having rested, our battery equipment fully 
repaired, and having received new horses, we moved with the Second 
Cavalry Division on the greatest raid of the war under the command 
of General J H. Wilson, moving through Alabama into Georgia, 
crossing Big Creek, Big Warrior and Little Warrior Rivers; one of 
which was so deep and swift we were obliged to swim our horses, 
and the powder was carried on the shoulders of the mounted men. 
Crossed the Cahawba River on the railroad bridge, forty feet above 
the water, the guns being pulled by the men and the horses led, in 
some cases being blindfolded. Were engaged with the enemy 
almost every day. 

March 3oth : Marched thirty-seven miles, and April ist, forty- 
seven miles. One of these days we passed through burning woods 
for a half mile on a gallop. Fortunately, none of our horses fell and 
none of the limbers were exploded. The enemy did not succeed in 
making a decided stand until this day, when their cavalry, under 

47 



command of General Roddy, made a stand in the afternoon. We 
went into action, silenced three of their guns, which our support 
captured, with two hundred prisoners and a train of cars loaded 
with supplies. 

April 2d : After a march of twenty miles, a running fight all the 
way, we arrived in front of Selma, Ala. The Battery went into action, 
firing over the charging line until the outer works were carried by 
our cavalry division, then limbered up and went into the works with 
the charging line and helped to drive the enemy, which numbered 
as six to one of the charging force. Such action of a battery 
going into fortifications with a charging line is not recorded of 
any other battery during the war. 

April 3d to loth: Were engaged in destroying the guns and 
ammunition in the forts and arsenal, and burning the arsenal. 

April nth: Continued our campaign, going through Mont- 
gomery, Ala., and Columbus, Ga. On the i8th marched fifty-eight 
miles, and on the igth, forty-two miles, making one hundred miles in 
two consecutive days, a record rarely equalled. 

April 2oth: Arrived in front of Macon, Ga , and were met by a 
flag of truce and advised by the enemy of an armistice between the 
Union and Confederate Armies. As the commanding general had 
had no communication with the Union forces for twenty eight days, 
refused to accept the news as authentic and moved into Macon and 
took possession. 

May 23d: The war being over, we started North. Marched 
to Chattanooga, where our guns were placed on cars and 
forwarded to Nashville. Tenn., while the horses were marched 
overland. 

June 23d : Left Nashville for Chicago, arriving on the 

27th of June. 

48 



July 3d : Were mustered out of the service, to date from 
June 30, 1865. 

There have died since muster out of the Battery, fifty-four mem- 
bers so far as reported to your Secretary. The address of only 
seventy-six living members is known to your Secretary. 

When the Battery was organized the promise was made that the 
remains of all members who should die in the service should be 
brought to Chicago for interment. The Board of Trade provided a 
lot for such interments. In January. 1866, the remains of our 
comrades who had been buried in southern soil were brought to 
Chicago by the Chicago Board of Trade, and on January 7. 1866, 
we laid to rest the remains of eleven comrades in this lot. Since 
that date the remains of ten of our deceased comrades have been 
placed in this lot, making the number twenty-one. 

At a meeting of the members of the Chicago Board of Trade 
Battery Memorial Association September 22, 1900, it was re- 
solved to erect upon the Board of Trade Battery lot at Rosehill 
Cemetery a monument in commemoration of the deceased members 
of the Battery. In conformity with the same, the Board of Direc- 
tors proceeded with the erection of this beautiful monument. 

COMRADES: In the burning of Chicago in October, 1871, the 
company papers and records in possession of Captain Stokes were 
burned with his residence. Later the remaining records in posses- 
sion of Captain Robinson were destroyed in the burning of his 
residence at Milwaukee, Wis. These circumstances make doubly 
valuable any mementoes of our past history that may now be in 
existence, and all such should be carefully preserved and turned 
over to the Memorial Association. 

NOTE : All this is mentioned in full and specially further on. 

49 



(Address of Benjamin F. Nourse 

President of the Chicago 'Board of Trade Battery 
cMemorial Association 



COMRADES OF THE CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE BATTERY COMRADES 
OF THE CIVIL WAR MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF TRADE 
LADIES AND GENTLEMEN : 




T IS a grand token when patriots are honored 
when we lift high the standard of patriotism in our 
Land ! It is a noble tribute to the fallen heroes of 
the Chicago Board of Trade Battery that we, its 
living members, have placed here and now dedicate 
a monument to their memory, showing the love and gratitude of the 
living. That we passed through three years of war and through 
thirty-six years of new and exacting duties since the war closed on 
a united country, is history. The monument standing here 
proclaims that we love the memory of the heroic dead, that they at 
whose side we fought were dear to us. We have selected the most 
enduring material known to mark their final resting place, and we 
wish it to stand in its simplicity, in its strength, in its mightiness, for 
time without end, as a reminder to the young and the old who may 



read the inscription thereupon, showing the names of the battles in 
which the Command participated. This we have done that, as his- 
tory is read, these names shall become more firmly imprinted upon 
the minds and hearts of the living as they year by year strew flowers 
and honor the memory of the soldiers of the Civil War. 

The Chicago Board of Trade Battery was in nearly all the fierc- 
est battles fought by the Army of the Cumberland. 

After the battle of Stone River, General Rosecrans, commanding 
the Army of the Cumberland, issued a special order, giving the 
Battery the privilege of carrying the colors presented bv the 
Chicago Board of Trade, this being the first time in the history of 
the army where a battery of artillery was allowed a stand of United 
States colors and a battery flag. By a subsequent special order 
Stone River, Elk River, Chickamauga, Farmington, Dallas, Decatur, 
Atlanta, Lovejoy, Nashville and Selma were inscribed upon the 
flags. When the Battery was mustered out the flags were returned 
to the Board of Trade and later destroyed by the great fire of 1871. 

The time will come when the story of the Rebellion will be read 
in the names of great generals (as we now read of the Revolution) 
rather than in the incidents and scenes of individual commands. 

We, the living, will soon rest, and this monument will represent 
also three years of our lives, lives spent for the good of these who 
stand around us to-day, for those who shall stand here in the genera- 
tions to come. It has been said of our forefathers, " They builded 
better than they knew." That can truly be said of us, for we were 
boys then, but thanks to our God, we have been permitted to live to 
see the fruits of our labor, ripe fruits of others' lives, and of our 
toils. To see this a unitedly free people, no thought in all our 
broad land other than the wish that freedom of thought and action, 

51 



of loyalty and love to an universal heavenly Father may be the 
heritage of every nation on the globe. May the rest of our lives, 
our remaining days, teach what we have shown our countrymen so 
far, that there must be free institutions, love for the flag, patriotism 
taught, union of hearts in love of rights, man to man. By so 
living we shall have the freest government on earth, the happiest 
people. 

Be not worried for what shall come after us, after we have 
rested from our labors. Never has a crisis come, but the man for 
the place and to meet it has come from the people. That will 
always be a certainty in the future if our faith holds straight. 
Soldiers of the Revolution brought liberty, soldiers of the Civil 
War brought equality, soldiers of the Spanish War brought 
opportunity. Oh, Americans, arise to your position of glorious 
rivalry among the nations of the world, for you shall stand 
first. Stand at the top; having, through the golden rule of life, 
done unto others as you would be done unto, you shall com- 
mand the respect of all peoples. Seeing this accomplished we 
shall see the glory of the Lord, and there will be no more 
tramping out the vintage, for there will be no more grapes of 
wrath stored up. 

Therefore, with this thought in view have we erected this 
monument where it now stands with these four monuments com- 
pleting a circle, with the county monument to the soldiers in the 
center, that all who may enter these grounds, this " city of the 
dead," this "God's acre," may be reminded of the nobleness, 
of the grandness, of the self-sacrifices of these heroes. 

In 1862, the Chicago Board of Trade purchased this lot, the 
title being in the Chicago Board of Trade in perpetuity. The 

5 2 



surviving members of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery have 
erected this monument. 

Mr. President of the Chicago Board of Trade : It therefore 
becomes my duty, as President of the Chicago Board of Trade 
Battery Memorial Association, to turn over the same to your Hon- 
orable Board for care in perpetuity. It has come to my knowledge 
that the President and Directors of the Board have caused to be 
deposited with the Rosehill Cemetery Association, a sum of money 
sufficient to care for and protect this lot and monument for all time. 

Mr. President, the living members of your war battery will soon 
lay aside the duties of life. I, therefore, desire to ask of you, in 
accepting from us this monument, that you suggest to the Board of 
Directors of the Chicago Board of Trade, that they will each Mem- 
orial Day in the years to come, provide a wreath for this monument; 
to this band of noble men, who freely gave their lives for the land 
they loved. 

Mr. President, Members of the Board of Trade, and Comrades, I 
have the honor to thank you. 



53 



c/lddress of W. S. Warren 

President of the Chicago Board of Trade 



MR. PRESIDENT, MEMBERS OF THE CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE 
BATTERY MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: 




HE memories of this hour carry us back through 
a retrospect of almost two score years to the i6th 
day of July, 1862, in a small rented room on the 
corner of South Water and Wells Streets, the then 
home of the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago. 
In point of numbers and surroundings and the volume of its 
business, it would hardly be recognized as the same institution now 
located at the southern extremity of LaSalle Street. But it is fair to 
assume that its membership was composed of the same energetic, 
hustling, nervous, impulsive and generous class of men as now. 
Their generosity is never appealed to in vain and while, like all 
other impulsive men, they have been known to make mistakes, cer- 
tain it is that they made none on that i6th day of July, 1862, when 
the following petition was handed to their President : 



CHICAGO, ILL., July i(>, 18^2. 

C. T. WHEELER, President of the Board of Trade: 

We, the undersigned members, request you to call at an early day, a general 

meeting of the Board, to pledge ourselves to use our influence and money to 

recruit a battery to be known as the Board of Trade Battery. 

GEORGE STEEL, 
WM. STURGES, 
E. AKIN, 
M. C. STEARNS, 
I. Y. MUNN, 
G. L. SCOTT, 
T. J. BRONSON, 
C. H. WALKER, JR. 
E. G. WOLCOTT, 
FLINT & THOMPSON. 

So far as I am able to discover, all the signers of this petition, 
widely known in their day, have passed over to the silent majority. 
However, the man in whose patriotic soul the whole plan originated, 
who engrossed and circulated the petition, and who subsequently 
was the first to enroll himself in the Board of Trade Battery Sylva- 
nus H. Stevens is still an honored member of the Board of Trade 
and one of its most highly esteemed and trusted officials, and is 
present with us to-day. 

The meeting was promptly held in the Board rooms on the 2ist 
of July and on the 23d the following telegram was sent to the 
President of the United States : 

BOARD OF TRADE ROOMS, CHICAGO, July 23, 1862. 
ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States: 

The Board of Trade of this City have within the last forty-eight hours raised 
$15,000 bounty money, and have recruited a full company of artillery. 

Signed, 

J. L. HANCOCK, 
WM. STURGES, 
GEORGE ARMOUR, 
C. H. WALKER, JR., 
H. W. HINSDALE, 
S. H. STEVENS. 

55 



This must indeed have been a ray of sunshine through the dark 
clouds of despair then hanging over the great war President, and in 
fact everybody interested in the welfare of the Union. These were 
about the darkest days of the whole tragic four years. Doubt and 
discouragement were permeating the North, and responses to the 
President's call of July 6th for 300,000 more volunteers had been 
slow and unwilling. The initiative taken by the Chicago Board of 
Trade proved contagious. In a short time the subscription of 
$15,000 was increased to $50,000, and in addition to the Board of 
Trade Battery, three regiments of infantry were recruited under its 
auspices and sent to the front, and within sixty days of the first war 
meeting of the Chicago Board of Trade the State of Illinois had 
furnished 50,000 additional troops. 

The Board of Trade Battery remained throughout, the especial 
pride and protege of the Board of Trade. It was promptly 
equipped, well officered, and on September loth was at the front. 
On October nth it first engaged the enemy, and subsequently was in 
action upward of seventy times, earning for itself a most brilliant 
and enviable record, returning without a blot on its escutcheon, to 
be mustered out in Chicago, June 30, 1865, at the close of the war. 

It can easily be imagined with what intense interest its move- 
ments were watched during its three years in the field by the com- 
mercial organization which had the honor of calling it into existence. 
We can see them now on the busy mart, clustering around a news- 
paper, a telegram, or a bulletin board, eager for the first tidings of 
woe or of weal after every engagement, rejoicing in the successes of 
"our boys," sympathizing with their losses, hardships and priva- 
tions ; sympathy of the practical kind, too, as evidenced by 
frequent trips to the front by members or officials of the Board, or 

56 



their agents, to look after the welfare of their soldiers; provide 
clothing and blankets and boots, hospital stores and nurses for the 
sick and wounded, and to distribute delicacies and other gifts 
prepared by loving hands at home. Ah ! those were times that we, 
in these piping times of peace and plenty and security, wot little of. 

At the close of the war the Board of Trade purchased this lot in 
beautiful Rosehill, and brought from the South the remains of the 
martyred dead of their beloved Battery. And with memories of 
their great services still alive, they have provided an endowment 
fund to insure the perpetual care of the lot. 

It is to be regretted that these fallen heroes have been left so 
long without a substantial monument to mark their final resting 
place and commemorate their deeds of valor and devotion to 
country. But there is compensation in the thought that this 
occasion, after the long lapse of years, brings us back into renewed 
and closer touch with the brave boys, living and dead, of the Board 
of Trade Battery. It rekindles the smoldering embers of our 
patriotism and civic pride ; renews the old feeling of good-fellowship 
and community of interest, so that we extend the glad hand to these 
gallant survivors and assure them that we are still just as proud of 
them as on that June day, thirty-six years ago, when we greeted the 
returning veterans with open arms and painted the town red in 
their honor. 

In these sordid, lucre-chasing times, we are in great danger of 
losing our enthusiasms and our ideals. Let us make the dedication 
of this beautiful monument a fresh starting point to ever glory in the 
achievements of these men ; the cause for which they fought, and 
bled, and died, and the results of their self-sacrifice. As the brilliant 
Webster said : " That motionless shaft will be the most powerful of 

57 



speakers. Its speech will be of liberty. It will speak of patriotism 
and of courage. It will speak of the moral improvement and 
elevation of mankind. Decrepit age will lean against its base, and 
ingenuous youth gather round it, while they speak to each other of 
the glorious events with which it is connected and exclaim, v Thank 
God, I also am an American ! ' ' 

I cannot forbear to quote on this occasion another distinguished 
American statesman and soldier as well. 

" We hold reunions, not for the dead, for there is nothing on all 
the earth that you and I can do for the dead. They are past our 
help and past our praise. We can add to them no glory, we can give 
to them no immortality. They do not need us, but forever and for- 
evermore we need them." 

I love to believe that no heroic sacrifice is ever lost ; that the 
characters of men are moulded and inspired by what their fathers 
have done ; that treasured up in American souls are all the uncon- 
scious influences of the great deeds of the Anglo-Saxon race, from 
Agincourt to the present day. 

So my friends, the lesson of this occasion for us is, that " it is 
not all of life to live, nor all of death to die ;" that we may so fash- 
ion our lives to those of the men we honor here to-day, that they may 
be an inspiration for those who come after us. This imperishable 
stone, these grassy mounds, must ever appeal to us, mutely, but 
eloquently, of the heroic self-sacrifice, the devotion to principle, the 
tenacious courage, the unswerving loyalty, lofty civic pride, that 
go to make up the model soldier, the worthy Board of Trade member, 
the ideal American citizen in any walk of life. 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBANA 



in Hattrrg Hot at U00?ljUl 



A. JFinnnj 

Killed, Battle of Stone River 
December 31, 1862. 



Killed, Battle of Stone River, 
December 31, 1861 



1U. 

Died, Chicago, January, 1878 



Died, Chicago, February, 1868 



Died, Cincinnati, February, 1 863 



E. 01. 

Died, Atlanta, August, 1864 



alumuui 
Killed, Lovejoy, Ga., August, 
1864 

A. iff. (Earbrr 

Died, Nashville, Term., 
January, i863 



. A. 

Died, Chicago, February, 1891 



iiiumum 
Died, Milwaukee, Wis., August, 
1898 



1C. 3F. Abbott 

Died, Chicago, April, 1900 



Killed, Battle of Stone River, 
December 31, 1862 



Died, Wilmington, N. C., 
Match, 1864 



Died, Chicago, August, 1878 

C W. OrlCnsla 

Died, Nashville, Tenn., 

February, 1863 

1. 3nubrrt 

Died, Nashvilie, Tenn., 
August, 1864 



Died, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 
March, 1863 



Died, McMinnville, Tenn., 
August, 1 863 



Died, Vining, Ga., August, 
1864 



Died, Chicago, 



Died, Quincy, 111., April, 1890 

Jffrtnk 

November, 1900 



6l 



List of the cMembers 

of the Chicago 'Board of Trade Battery present at the 
'Dedication of the cMonument 



B. F. NOURSE 
A. L. ADAMS 
P. L. AUTEN 
J. A. NOURSE 
G. I. ROBINSON 
J. H. HILDRETH 

C. DURAND 

W. C. MOLAU 

C. S. DWIGHT 

C. A. BALDWIN 
F. S. ROCKWOOD 

F. B. ROCKWOOD 
S. A. LOCK 

G. W. PECK 

J. J. GlLMORE 

S. M. RANDOLPH 
T. H. WATSON 
V. STEELE 



JAMES IVES 
H. DIPPE 
F. DUPUIS 

F. KNIGHT 

H. B. CHANDLER 
E. LUFF 
T. M. LYNCH 
J. M. SEXTON 

G. W. LITTLE 
J. G. PETERS 
DAVID BURR 
W. M. RAGAN 
J. B. HALL 

J. D. TOOMEY 

W. EAKINS 

A. W. MERRILL 

C. W. ERBY 



Records and Relics ^Deposited 




N a metal box in the foundation of the moument was 
placed a copy of the following document, together with 

the articles mentioned therein : 

CHICAGO, May 30, 1901. 

The Chicago Board of Trade Battery Monument, dedicated this 
3<jth day of May, 1901, has been erected by the surviving members 
of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery, and there is deposited in 
a box in the foundation the following articles: 

A muster roll showing the name of every man that was enlisted for the Chicago 
Board of Trade Battery, and giving a record of his services. 

A history of the Battery, compiled by members of the Battery in 1886. 
A copper plate giving the record of THOMAS WYGANT. 
A copper plate giving the record of J. H. HILDRETH. 
A copper plate giving the record of JAMES A. RUTLEDGE. 
A letter from CHARLES HOLYLAND. 
Photographic pictures of 
GEORGE W. GAVITT 
D. F. B ETCH EN 

GEORGE I. ROBINSON, as a soldier 
GEORGE I. ROBINSON, as a citizen 
JOHN A. NOURSE 
GEORGE BOWERS 
ALBERT MERRILL 
B. F. NOURSE 

W. C. MoLAi: 

ROBERT BARRY 
FRED W. KING 
A program of the dedication services. 

SIGNED 



JOHN MCDONALD 
JAMES IVES 

TRUMBULL D. GRIFFIN 
JOHN C. CAMBERG 
ALEXANDER LEWIS 
CHARLES FRINK 
GEORGE HANSON 
CHARLES S. DWIGHT 
W. B. GALE 
S. M. CROFT. 



J. A. NOURSE, 

Secretary, 
Chicago Board of Trade Battery Memorial Association. 



< J^pster of Living cMembers 

of the Chicago Board of Trade 'Battery 



August 30, 1902 

AUTEN, P. L 138 Washington Street . Chicago, 111. 

ADAMS, A. L. . . . . . ... 611 The Temple . Chicago, 111. 

APPLETON, J. B. . Osage, Iowa. 

A VERY, W. 610 Temple Avenue . Detroit, Mich. 

BOWERS, GEORGE York, Neb. 

BENNETT, HENRY .... 1263 Mulvane Avenue . Topeka, Kan. 

BETCHEN, D. F. Berlin, Minn. 

BROWN, W. W Decatur, 111. 

BALDWIN, C. A 1182 Millard Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

BARRY, ROBERT .... 186 South Vernon Avenue . Pasadena, Cal. 

BAER, G. J 1624 Jefferson Avenue . Kansas City, Mo. 

BURR, DAVID .... 2596 North Ashland Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

CHANDLER, H. B .- 104 Indiana Street . Chicago, 111. 

CONKLIN, J. K Soldiers' Home . Milwaukee, Wis. 

CHAPIN, A. S 768 Walnut Street . Chicago, 111. 

CRUM, SYLVESTER Riceville, Iowa. 

DURAND, CALVIN Lake and Union Streets . Chicago, 111. 

DUPUIS, FRED . Oak Park, 111. 

DIPPE, HENRY 841 Thome Street . Chicago, 111. 

DWIGHT, C. S Marshall Field & Co. (Retail) . Chicago, 111. 

Du Bois, S. A 2 North Fourth Street . St. Louis, Mo. 

ERBY, C. W 303 South Hoyne Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

64 



EAMES, C. O 414 Union Station . St. Louis, Mo. 

EAKINS, WM 6106 Normal Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

FLEMING, J. C Marquette Building . Chicago, 111. 

FOSTER, R. C 46? Flournoy Street . Chicago, 111. 

FORD, S. L Takoma Park . Dist. Columbia. 

FINLEY, J. B 354 South Canal Street . Chicago, 111. 

GEORGE, WM. ...... 314 South Twelfth Street . Tacoma, Wash. 

GARNSEY, C. A. P Evanston, 111. 

GILMORE, J. J Soldiers' Home . Danville, 111. 

GRIFFIN, T. D 2314 Pine Street . St. Louis, Mo. 

HALL, J. B. , 107 Dearborn Street . Chicago, 111. 

HILDRETH, J. H 746 West Monroe Street . Chicago, 111. 

HOLYLAND, C *. . . 244 Fifth Avenue . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

IVES, JAMES 362 1 Princeton Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

JOHNSTON, ROBERT 374 Palm Avenue . Riverside, Cal. 

KNIGHT, FRANK . . . 2169 West Twenty-Fifth Street . Chicago, 111. 

LOCK, S. A 2556 Wabash Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

LUFF, EDMUND 620 N. Oak Park Avenue . Oak Park, 111. 

LYNCH, T. M Soldiers' Home . Milwaukee, Wis. 

LITTLE, G. W 49 2 3 Lake Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

LASUER, CHARLES Toledo, Ohio, 

McELEVY, ALBERT 378 So. Negley Street . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MOLAU, W. C 5809 Indiana Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

MERRILL, A. W 269 Avers Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

NOURSE, B. F 1 86 Michigan Street . Chicago, 111. 

NOURSE, J. A Chamber of Commerce . Chicago, 111. 

PAYNE, ORMANSO Conway, Mass. 

PETERS, J. G 220 Randolph Street . Chicago, 111. 

PECKHAM, S. C Canarsic Station . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PECK, G. W Soldiers' Home . Danville, 111. 

RAGAN, W. M Waukegan, 111. 

ROCKWOOD, F. B Elmhurst, 111. 

ROCKWOOD, F. S State and Ohio Streets . Chicago, 111. 

RANDOLPH, WM 208 Union Trust Building . St. Louis, Mo. 

RANDOLPH, S. M 311 S. Scoville Avenue . Oak Park, 111. 

ROBINSON, G. 1 315 E. Water Street . Milwaukee, Wis. 

STEVENS, S. H Board of Trade . Chicago, 111. 

STEVENS, S. C 69 Dearborn Street . Chicago, 111. 

65 



SMALL, H. X . . 58 S. Oakley Street . Chicago, 111. 

SEXTON, J. M Soldiers' Home . Danville, 111. 

STEELE, VALENTINE 4848 Indiana Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

STEIGER, FRANCIS . 140 E. Robie Street . St. Paul, Minn. 

SALISBURY, M. H 1484 Newport Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

SHIPLEY, WM DesMoines, la. 

SLEMAN, J. B Washington, D.C. 

SMITH, CHRISTIAN Thermalito, Cal. 

TINSLEY, THOMAS 316 Sixth Street . DesMoines, la. 

TINSLEY, W. H 1519 High Street . DesMoines, la. 

TOOMEY, J. D 493 Forty-Second Place . Chicago, 111. 

WINSLOW, C. A Fitzgerald, Ga. 

WATSON, T. H 29 Wabash Avenue . Chicago, 111. 

WORRELL, ROBERT St. Joseph, La. 

WEBB, JOB 884 West Adams Street . Chicago, 111. 

VOI-NG, H. C. . 





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REMARKS, 


etailed Recruiting Service 
returned to command Ap 
prisoner July 10, 1864. Ret 
8, 1865. 


romoted to 2nd Lieutenant. 
Stone River, December 31, 
duty April 26, 1863. 
esigned September 22, 1862. 

ischarged for promotion i 
Died. Chicago, February 14, 
led, Chicago, January, 1897. 
romoted 1st Sergeant Decer 

romoted 1st Sergeant. 




romoted Sergeant May 8, 1! 
ischarged for promotion Ca 
C. T. Killed In Battle Pet 


23, 1864. 
led, Hospital, Murfreesboro 


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'ounded. Battle Stone River 
Died, Nashville, Tenn., Jam 


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REMARKS. 


to Corporal March 
Corporal August 1, 
Battle Stone River, 


i for duty March : 
ovejoy's Station (i 
Icago, March 22, Ihb 
to Captain 29th 
November, IbSO. 
December 14, I?>fi2. 1 


oit, Mich. Dat(- not 
ago, 1>>65. 
Artificer August. 


aS&lo 


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Corporal, Decembe 
Sergeant August 1, 
Corporal August 1, 

ospital, Marietta, 


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ospital, Murfreesl) 






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ted to Commission 


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> Hospital, Chattai 
864. Returned to 
, Ashtabula, O., 190C 


ed. Battle Decatui 


, Hospital near At] 


ted Corporal Augus 
:ed, Battle Lovejoy' 
64. Died Washingl 


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ited Artificer Augu 


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REMARKS. 


hicago, July, 1881. 
ed Corporal July 24, 1864. 
ed Sergeant, 
ed Ordnance Sergeant. 

ed 1st Lieutenant, 
ed 1st Sergeant, 
d Headquarters Cavalry Corj 
65. 


cd Quartermaster Sergeani 
Discharged for promotiol 
land. Died, Chicago. April 5. 
prisoner June 14, 1864. near 
Died prison Wilmington, N. 
35. 


d Headquarters Cavalry Cor 
5, 1864. Returned to duty Ma 
Battle Stone River, December 
ed Corporal December 10, 1864 
ed Sergeant, August 1862. 
d A. G. O., Washington, D. C., 
03. 


ed, Battle Decatur, Ga., Jul 
-ned to duty November 17, 
J Corporal Decembers, 1864. 
ed Corporal, August 1862. 
enant 102nd N. Y. Infantry, 
ed, Battle Decatur, Ga., July 25 

hicago. May 9, 1884. 
Battle Stone River, December 




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80 



Historical Relics Recovered 

of the Battery's Guidon 
and Bugle 



COMRADES OF THE CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE BATTERY MEMORIAL 
ASSOCIATION : 



I 
II 

?JM 



HAVE to-day the honor and pleasure of placing in Grand 
Army Memorial Hall, two relics dear to you all, and so far 
as I know the only relics of our Battery now in existence. 



One, the Bugle used by our late Comrade William Berdel, 
in our camps, marches, and battles, from the time you were 
mustered at Chicago, until you were mustered out at Chicago. 
It is the bugle that called you to active service in the morning, 
rain or sunshine, regardless of the short hours of sleep ; it 
sounded the call for action, commence firing, sometimes cease firing, 
but never sounded the retreat, and finally sounded at Chicago, 
"break ranks," the sweetest call you ever heard. 

Through some manner unknown to Uncle Samuel, Captain 
Stokes was able to retain this bugle unaccounted for, when he 
turned the Battery property over to Captain Robinson. When we 
were mustered out at Chicago Captain Robinson gave the bugle to 

81 



William Berdel,who carefully treasured it until his death. After 
Comrade Berdel's death the bugle was cared for by Mrs. N. I. Mix 
Miss Addie Solden, and Mr. H. A. Solden, relatives of Comrade 
Berdel, and, through their kindness, presented to your Association. 

The other relic is one of the Guidons that was furnished you at 
Chicago before you went to the front. It was with you in all your 
marches and battles, receiving its first baptism of fire and bullets in 
the battle of Stone River, the scars of which are still visible. This 
Guidon was always hailed with cheers by our supporting troops 
when seen going to the front - the Guidon that never streamed from 
its staff in the wind of a retreat. 

When our late Comrade Frederick G. Deane was mustered out 
of service he secured this Guidon and placed it with his mother, who 
could not be induced to part with it and cared for it until her death. 
After that it was cared for by her son C. H. Deane, who has now 
presented it to your Association. 

These relics are suitably inscribed and placed in Memorial Hall 
to be cared for in trust for you, and it is hoped they may be often 
seen by your children and grandchildren, and as they call to their 
minds the history of your sacrifices that they might enjoy a united 
country, be an inspiration of patriotism and love for their united 
country. Very truly yours, 

JOHN A. NOURSE. 



82 



Copy 



CHICAGO, Aug. 7, 1901. 

ECEIVED from the Chicago Board of Trade 
Battery Memorial Association, per John A. Nourse. 
Secretary, one guidon and one bugle. The relics 
were carried by the Battery during their entire 
service and are loaned to the Grand Army 
Hall and Memorial Association of Illinois for safe keeping and. 
preservation. 

CHAS. P. SWIGERT, 

Secretary. 





8j 



Officers and Directors 

of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery 
Memorial Association 



J900-J901 

B. F. NOURSE, PRESIDENT A. L. ADAMS, VICE-PRESIDENT 

J. A. NOURSE, SECRETARY P. L. AUTEN, TREASURER 

Directors 

G. I. ROBINSON B. F. NOURSE 

J. H. HILDRETH H. C. YOUNG 

A.'L. ADAMS P. L. AUTEN 

T. A. NOURSE 



1901-1902 

A. L. ADAMS, PRESIDENT J. H. HILDRETH, VICE-PRESIDENT 

J. A. NOURSE, SECRETARY P. L. AUTEN, TREASURER 

Liredors 

A. L. ADAMS B. F. NOURSE 

P. L. AUTEN > J. H. HILDRETH 

J. G. PETERS J. A. NOURSE 

C. S. DWIGHT 



Chicago Board of Trade Battery 
Banquet 



30, 1901 



At the banquet of the Chicago Board of Trade Battery given 
on the evening of May 30, 1901. the following members of the 
Battery were present, as shown in the diagram, the Guidon of the 
Battery recently reclaimed being given a place of honor in the 

center of the tables. 

F. S. ROCKWOOD 
CALVIN DURAND 

A. L. MERRILL 

B. F. NOURSE 

VALENTINE STEELE 
K. L. PRESCOTT HENRY DIPPK 

(Bugler 1st 111. Vol. Cav.) 

GEO. I. ROBINSON 
J. D. TUOMEY 
J. A. NOURSE 

F. B. ROCKWOOD 
W. C. MotAU 

E. ROBINSON WM. EAKINS 

(A Guest) G. W. PECK 

C. W. ERBY 

J. H. HILDRETH FRANK KNIGHT 

S. A. LOCK 
DAVID BURR 
A. L. ADAMS 

$. H. STEVENS 
J. J. GILMORE JAMES IVES 

C. A. BALDWIN 
J. B. FINLEY 

H. B. CHANDLER S. M. RANDOLPH 
T. N. WATSON 

C. S. DWIGHT J. B. HALL 

GEO. LITTLE 

J. G. PETERS J. M. SEXTON 

LIEUT. COL. LIVERMORE 

(jft Ohio Cav.) 
86 



Guidon Carried by 
Board of Trade Batter? 

1862 to 1865 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBANA 



Chicago Board of Trade Battery Badge 




|HE badge shown on the cover of this book repre- 
sents the Silver Badge adopted and worn by the 
members of the Battery during their term of ser- 
vice, and the particular badge shown represents the 
one of Andrew Finney, the first member of the 
Battery killed in battle. 

The Battery Badge became so well known to the members of the 
Second Division Cavalry, Army of the Cumberland, that frequently 
it was respected by guards and pickets of that division, the same as 
a pass issued by a Provost-Marshal or the General Commanding. 



APPROVED 

A. L. ADAMS 
J. H. HILDRETH 
J. A. NOURSE 

P. L. A U T E N 
C. S. D WIGHT 

J G. PETERS 

B. F. NOURSE 

Directors 



***** 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



H STORICAL SKETCH OF THE CHICAGO BOARD