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Full text of "A historical sketch of the Shuford family"

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aemj^LuGY COLLECTIO^r 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 




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Gc 929.2 3h91255 
Shuford, Jul i us H. 
A historical sketch of the 

Shuf ord f ami 1 y 




A HISTORICAL SKETCH 



THE SHUFORD FAMILY 

REV. JULIUS H. SHUFORD, A. B, 
November j90[. 




REV. J. H. SHUFORD, A. B. 



A HIS TQ RI CAI^ SKETCH 

OF 

THE SHTTFOUD 

BY 

REV. JULIUS H. SHUFORD, A. B, 
November 1901. 



PREFACE. 

When in the active duties of the ministry in the Reformed 
Church in Catawba and Lincoln Counties, N. C, 1 preached among 
the Shufords who were then living in that part of the country. I 
then learned their early history from graveyard reccrds, old family 
Bibles, and from household conversations. I have since that time 
received other information from members of the family who are 
now living in different parts of the country. This information is 
now given in this book, which is submitted to the family and a 
reading public. 

i desire to thank those who have assisted me in gathering family 
history, and also those who have assisted me in writing the book. 

J. H. S. 



JOHN SHUFORp. 1.4X7^f^'>4 

According to the best information given me, a man by 
the name of John Shuford left the State of Pennsylvania, 
before the war of the Revolution, and came South, and 
settled in the western part of North Carolina. The 
beautiful farm upon which he settled is found upon the 
west bank of South Fork River, in what is now Catawba 
County, North Carolina. That part of the farm upon 
which he built his house and lived is now in the posses- 
sion of Mr, Lee Whitener, of Hickory, N. C. 

The place where John Shuford was born is not known 
to the writer. He was a man of German origin and 
spoke the German language, and was found in North 
Carolina as early as 1766, but may have been in that 
state before that date. When he came South, he was a 
married man, and brought his wife and children with 
him. Before he came South, his home was at, or near, 
York, Pa. 

The house that John Shuford built is still standing, . 
and marks the place where he and his family lived. 
The house is built upon a plain style. It is the kind of 
liouse that a pioneer settler would erect. 

The house is built of logs hewn from the forest. It 
r has a rock stru('ture about ten feet high for a basement. 
• Under the house is found a spring, the branch of which 
N flows into another branch, which flows into the South 
.' Fork River. Here he had an excellent place to keep 
Ins milk and butter and all kinds of fresh meat during 
y^ the long, hot, summer days. 

There is a iirave-vard not far from the house. The 



4 JOHN SHUFORL). 

grave-yard is located on an elevated piece of land, and 
marks the place where John Shuford and wife, and other 
members of his family are buried. 

According to the grave-stone, which marks John 
Shuford 's resting place, he died in the year 1790. 

John Shuford is the father of the Shuford family in 
North Carolina. This family of people have settled in 
many of the states of the South and Southwest. There 
is a large family of them that live in the Western part 
of North Carolina, where John Shuford lived and ended 
his pilgrim days. Martin Shuford, George Shuford, 
Jacob Shuford, Daniel Shuford, and David Shuford 
were the sons of John Shuford. 

He had a daughter by the name of Magdalene Shu- 
ford, and a son by the name of John Shuford. 

The older settlers say there was a battle fought on the 
John Shuford farm. This battle was fought between 
the Cherokee Indians and the white settlers of that 
locality. These Indians had come across the mountains 
to destroy the new settlers of the locality. 

In this battle, the white people were the conquering 
partv. This was probably the last battle that was 
fought in that section between the white people and the 
Indians, The white people from that tmie held the 
country. 

The original farm that John Shuford entered was a 
large one. The farm contained 1,500 or 2,000 acres. 

There are many counties in the Western part of North 
Carolina that were settled by German people from Penn- 
sylvania. They began to come South as early as 1750. 
Families came at different times, and they continued to 
come until some time before the war of the Revolution. 

John Shuford came South with some of these people. 
He came to North Carolina about 1760. He is the 



THE GERMAN PEOPLE IN NORTH CAROLINA. 5 

father of the Shuford family in North Carolina and 
other states. 

The first house that John Shuford built was destroyed 
by fire, when an Tndian battle was fought upon the 
farm. This was about 1762. The second house that he 
built is still standing. This house is built over a spring. 
The early settlers in Western North Carolina built their 
houses over springs. This was done for protection in 
case of a siege by the Indians. Here they could have 
water to drink, and also could store away provisions. 
The houses had holes in them from which they could 
shoot at their assailants. 

John vShuford was a pioneer settler. He was among 
those who fought for the country in Western North 
Carolina. They captured it from the Indians and held 
it for their posterity. 

John Shuford is the father of a large family of people. 
They are now found in the Southern States and some of 
the states farther north. 

He was not a man that would surrender to difficul- 
ties. He was fitted by nature to be a frontier man. 
His sons were tall, strong, and stout-built, and fitted by 
nature to hold the land that their father had found for 
them and their offspring. 



THE GERMAN FEOPLK IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

There are some counties in the western part of North 
Carolina that were settled by German people from 
Pennsylvania. They came to North Carolina some 



6 MARTIN SHUFORD. 

years before the war of the Revolution. 

The descendants of these people are among the best 
people in North Carolina. 

Among them are found farmers, lawyers, merchants, 
and ministers of the Gospel. They are a patriotic peo- 
ple. They make good soldiers in the time of war. 

They have good schools and churches. The most of 
these German people are members of the Reformed and 
Lutheran Churches. 

John Shuford came to North Carolina with these 
German people. He is the father of the Shuford family 
in North Carolina and other states. 



MARTIN 8HUF0KL). 

Martin Shuford is a son of John Shuford who died in 
1790. Martin Shuford was born in 1744. The father of 
Martin Shuford came from Pennsylvania some years 
before the war of the Rev^olution, and his son was 
doubtless born in Pennsylvania. His father located 
upon the South Fork of Catawba River, in what was 
then Tryon County, North Carolina. This part of the 
county was given the name of Lincoln County in 17Q9. 
In 1842, it received the name of Catawba County, 

Here Martin Shiiford spent his life until he was thirty- 
six years of age, when he died in 1780. Martin Shuford 
married Eve Warlick, who is a member of the VVarlick 
family in Lincoln and Catawba Counties. The children 
of this marriage are Jacob, John, Martin, Daniel, Eliza- 
beth, and Philip Shuford. This branch of the Shuford 



JACOB J-HUFORD. 7 

family has people living in most of the states of the South 
and South- West. As a family they have maintained a high 
character of respectability. They have occupied places 
of honor and influence in church and state. They have 
represented their county in state legislatures in North 
Carolina and Texas. In the time of the war between 
the states, they made good soldiers. The most of these 
soldiers fought under Lee in Virginia. 

vSome of them died on the field of battle, and others 
surrendered under Lee at Appomattox. They are a 
progressive people, and take an active part in the im- 
provements of church and state. Some of them have 
served in the active duties of the niinistrv, and have 
made [soud soldiers of the Cmss, 



JACOB 8HUFUR]). 

Jacob Shuford is a son of Martin Shuford, who died in 
1780. Martin Shuford is a son of John Shuford, who 
died in 1790. The mother of Jacob Shuford was Eve 
Warlick, who married Martin Shuford. 

Jacob Shuford was born in Lincoln County, now Ca- 
tawba County, N. C, Feb. 12, 1770. His wife, Marga- 
ret Hoyle, was born June 28, 1769. They were married 
in 1789. 

Jacob Shuford lived on a part of the old John vShuford 
farm, to which he became heir after the death of his 
father. His father died in 1780. At that time Jacob 
vShuford was 10 years of age. The beautiful farm on 
which he lived is found upon the west bank of the South 



§ JACOB SIIUFOKD. 

Fork River. A part of the old house in which he lived 
is still standing. The house is by a branch that flows 
into the South Fork River. Here Jacob Shuford raised 
his family. He was the grandfather of the author of this 
book. There the father of the author of this book was 
raised. 

The children of Jacob and Margaret Hoyle Shuford 
are: Elizabeth Shuford, 1790; 

John Shuford, 1792; 

Martin Shuford, 1794; 

Abel Shuford, 1796; 

Eve Shuford, '799; 

Fannie Shuford, 1801; 

Eli Shuford, 1803; 

Jacob Shuford, 1805; 

Elkanah Shuford, 1807; 

Andrew Shuford, 1810; 

Susan Shuford, 1813, 

These children lived to be grown and married and 
raised families. The father of the author of this book 
belongs to this family. His name is Jacob Shuford, 
who was born in 1805. 

After grandfather Jacob Shuford raised his family, he 
gave his farm upon the South Fork River to his son Eli 
Shuford. Uncle Eli Shuford lived upon the farm until 
a short while before the Civil War. He sold the farm 
and moved to Texas. 

After Jacob Shuford left his farni upon the South 
Fork River, he located upon his farm near Catawba, 
North Carolina. This farm was known as the "Bunker 
Hill" farm. There he spent his last days. 

He had a mill upon this farm, and also a store. His 
son, Elkanah Shuford, had charge of the store. 

Jacob Shuford and wife were members of the Re- 



MARGARET HOVLE-SHUFORD, 9 

formed Church. They became members of the Re- 
formed Church under the ministry of Rev. Andrew 
Loretz, who is the father of the Reformed Church in 
North Carolina. It was through the liberality of Jacob 
vShuford that his grandson, M, L. Shuford, was sent to 
College at Mercersburg, Pa., where he graduated and 
became a minister in the Reformed Church. 

Jacob Shuford was a good business man, and owned 
several large farms. He was able to assist his children 
in getting good homes. 

Margaret Shuford died June 20, 1840, age 71 years. 

Jacob Shuford died April i, 1844, age 74 years, one 
month, and 20 days. 

They are both buried at the Bunker Hill farm, where 
they spent their last days. 



MARGARET HOYLE-SHUFORD. 

Margaret Hoyle was born in Lincoln County, North 
Carolina, in 1769. She married Jacob Shuford in 1789. 
Jacob Shuford was born Feb, 12, 1770. 

Margaret Hoyle descended from a family of people, 
who, for several generations, lived in the locality of 
Wiesbaden, Germany. 

Her ancestors came to America in 1741, and lived 
in Frederick County, Maryland. They came South and 
settled on the South Fork of Catawba River. This was 
in 1744. The place where they settled was then called 
Tryon County, North Carolina, now Lincoln County, 
North Carolina. 



[O JOHN SMYRE. 

The grandfather of Margaret Hoyle was Peter Hoyle. 
who died Nov. i, 1781, age 71 years. The wife of 
Peter Hoyle died April 7, 1787, age 83 years. 

The father of Margaret Hoyle was John Hoyle, who 
was born June i, 1740. John Hoyle married Margaret 
Costner, of Mecklenburg County, March 17, 1763. 
There were 1 3 children of this marriage. 

Margaret Hoyle was the third child of this marriage. 
She was born in 1769. 



JOHN SMYER. 

John Smyer was born Oct. 14, 1785; died Feb. 25, 
1877; 91 years, 4 mo., 11 days. 

Elizabeth Smyer born Sept. 3, 1790; died Oct. 19, 1864. 

Unto them were born 14 children. 

Malinda Smyer married Joseph Rowe. 

Eli Smyer married and lived in Texas. 

Rufus Smyer married Miss Ducus in S. C. 

Jacob Smyer married Miss McKee; died in Ala. 

Mahala Smyer married Alexander Frazier; died Oct. 
6, 1846, aged 27 years, 5 months, and 9 days. 

Frank Smyer married in Ala. 

Martha Smyer married Jake Smyer; died in Mo. 

Louisa Smyer died at 7 years. 

Fannie R. Smyer married C. J. Frazier; died Dec. 
17, 1849, aged 24 years, 8 months, 13 days. 

Jenelah M. Smyer married C. J. Frazier; died July 
10, 1898, aged 71 years. 

Elkanah vSmycr ^vent to Cal. 1853 and there married. 



JOHN SMVER. II 

The only one living. 

Joseph H. Smyer married Mary Ross in S. C, and 
there died 1899, aged 68 years. 

Louisa Smyer died; age 2 years. 

Jones Smyer was killed in the war; belonged to the 
1 2th N. C. regiment. 

Malinda (Smyer) Rowe's children: 

Elizabeth Rowe married Caleb Harman. 

Julia Ann Rowe married Seitz. 

Martha Rowe married Pane. 

Rosa Bella Rowe married Cline. 

Alonzo Rowe married Miss Deal and moved to Texas. 

Dallas Rowe married Miss Finger. 

Eli Smyer s home was blessed with seven children. 

Rufus Smyer had nine children. 

Jacob Smyer had three children. 

Cicero Sra5^er died in war. 

Frances Smyer died in infancy. 

Francis Smyer married Miss Miller. 

Mahala (Smyer) Frazier had three children. 

Janeliah Frazier. 

Frances Frazier married Probst. 

Frank Frazier died in war. 

Frank Smyer had 4 children, three boys and one girl. 

Martha (Smyer) Smyer had seven children: William, 
Robert, Cyrus. Elizabeth, Joe, John, and Emma whose 
homes are in Mo. 

Fannie (Smyer) Frazier's home was blessed with 2 
children. 

Emma Frazier married W, A. Costner. 

Quince Frazier married and settled in Tenn. 

Elkanah Smyer married in his 64th year, and is 
blessed with four children, three boys and one girl. 

Joiieph Smyer had 1 1 children. 



12 ELIZABETH SHUFORD-SM YER. 

Robert Smyer lives in Chester, S. C. 

William Smyer died young. 

John Smyer was killed on a railroad. 

Tennie Smyer married Isaacs. 

Roxy Smyer married Gibson. 

Mamie Smyer married Hoover. 

Frank Smyer died of fever. 

Viola Smyer married Brown. 

Nancy Smyer is still unmarried. 

Willie Smyer is a conductor on a railroad. 

Dollie Smyer married John Gall. 

The foregoing article has been furnished by Mrs. 
William Costner, of Lincolnton, N. C, a grand daugh- 
ter of John Smyer. 



ELIZABETH SHUFORD-SMYER. 

Elizabeth Shuford is a daughter of Jacob Shuford 
who died in 1844. 

Elizabeth Shuford married John Smyer, of Lincoln, 
now Catawba County, N. C. The father of John Smyer 
came from Reading, Pa. He was of Swiss origin. John 
Smyer was the owner of a fine farm in Catawba County, 
N. C. He lived and died on this farm. He and his 
wife are buried at Salem Reformed and Lutheran 
church. Lincoln County, N. C. His wife was a member 
the Reformed Church. John Smyer was raised in the 
Lutheran Church. 

Joseph Rowe married a daughter of John and Eliza- 
beth Smyer, They lived in Catawba County, N. C. 



JOHN SMYER. 13 

He was a farmer by occupation. They were both 
members of the Reformed Church, and he was an elder 
in St. John's Reformed congregation. 

J. D. Rowe is a son of Joseph Rowe. He married 
Miss Finger, of Lincoln County, N. C. When a young 
man he became a soldier in the Confederate Army, and 
was a member of Capt. Adolphus Host's company in the 
46th N. C. regiment. He was wounded in the battle of 
the Wilderness. He lives in Lincolnton, N. C. 

J. D. Rowe is a licentiate of Concord Presbytery, and 
finished his theological studies in Columbia Theological 
Seminary. S. C. His son Fred Rowe is a graduate of 
Davidson College, and is teaching in Georgia. His son 
John Rowe is a student in Davidson College. His 
daughter Mary Rowe is teaching school in Texas. 

Alonzo Rowe is a son of Joseph Rowe. He was a 
soldier in the Confederate Army. He was wounded 
at Pea Ridge, Ark., and was a soldier in the Army of 
the Southwest. After he was wounded he returned to 
N. C. He then became a member of the 46th N. C. 
regiment, and served as a soldier until the close of the 
war. After the war he married a Miss Deal, and made 
his home in Texas. He was a successful business man. 
He died in Texas. His widow lives in Texas. 

Emma Frazier is a daughter of Cyrus Frazier, and a 
grand-daughter of John Smyer. She married William 
Costner. They live near the old homestead of John 
Smyer. They are both members of the Lutheran 
Church at Salem, Lincoln County, N. C, 



14 JOHN SIIUFORD. 



JOHN 8HUF0UD. 



John Sliuford is a son of Jacob Shuford who died in 
1844. He is a grand-son of Martin Shuford, who died 
in 1780, and a great-grand-son of John Shuford, who 
died in 1790. 

John Shuford first married a Miss Wilfong. There 
was one child of this marriage by the name of Logan 
Shuford, who died in 1833. 

J. J, Shuford was born in 1792. In 181 7 he married 
Catharine Corpening, of Burke County, N. C. 

John Shuford lived in Catawba County, N. C. He 
had a fine farm and also owned and worked a gold 
mine. He died in 1873; age 81 years. His wife, 
Catharine Shuford, died in 1868. They were mem- 
bers of the Reformed Church at Smyrna, Catawba 
County, N. C. 

The children of John Shuford and wife are: Marcus, 
Frank, Quince, Levi, Fannie, Pink, Susan, and Henry. 



DR. FRANKLIN BREV^ARD SHUFORD. 

Dr. Franklin Brevard vShuford was born in Lincoln 
County, N. C, Feb. 3, 1820. His father was John 
Shuford, who was born in 1792, John Shuford was the 
second child and oldest son of Jacob Shuford, who died 
in 1844. Jacob Shuford is a son of Martin Shuford, who 
died in 1780. Martin Shuford is a son of John Shuford, 
who died in 1790. 



DR. FRANKLIN BERVARD SHU FORD. 1$ 

Dr. Sliuford in 1838 attended the school of Peter S, 
Ney (the eccentric Frcnciiman, supposed to have been 
Marshal Ney). In 1840 he entered Franklin and Mar- 
shall College, Mercersburg, Pa. He received the de- 
gree of B. A. from that institution in 1844. He attend- 
ed medical colleges, first at Charleston, S. C, and later 
at Philadelphia. He went to Mississippi in 1847 and 
located at Holly Springs. Soon afterward he went to 
New Orleans, La., and attended a course of lectures at 
the University of Louisiana, now Tulane University. 
He returned to Holly Springs, and practiced his profes- 
sion until the opening of the Civil War, when he volun- 
tered as a surgeon in the Confederate Army. He ranked 
as major, and had charge of a ward in the Chimborosa 
Hospital, Richmond, Va., until the close of the war. 
After the evacuation of Richmond, he left on foot, there 
being no other means of exit left by the retreating army, 
and walked to N. C. He returned to Mississippi, and 
practiced medicine until 1869, when he retired, and en- 
gaged in banking until i88t, when ill health forced him. 
to retire from active work, and he was an invalid for ten 
years, until his death. Nov. 23, 1891. 

Dr. Shuford was married in August 1870 to Elizabeth 
Reese Jones, of blolly Springs, Miss. To them were 
born four children, as follov/s: 

Rufus Jones Shuford, born June 17, 1871, who lives 
in Holly Springs, ]\Iiss., and is engaged in the mercan- 
tile business. 

Frances Crawford Shuford, oldest daughter of Frank- 
lin Brevard Shuford, was born Feb. 17, 1873, in Holly 
Springs, Miss. She attended a convent in that town for 
nine years. Then she studied music (piano), first at the 
Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, and, later, at the 
Klindworth Conservatory in Berlin. Since her return 



1 6 DR. FRANKLIN BREvARD SHUFORD. 

from Berlin, she has been a piano teacher in the Cin- 
cinnati Conservatory. 

Augusta Reese Shuford, second daughter of Franklin 
Brevard Shuford, was born in Holly Springs, Miss., 
Feb. 22, 1875. She attended the convent in Holly 
Springs, until 16 years of age, then a private school in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, for one year, then left on account of 
illness. For five years she has been engaged in journal- 
istic work, writing for several papers in New York City. 

Franklin Brevard Shuford, born August 6, 1877. He 
is engaged in railroad work and lives at Water Val- 
ley, Miss, He was married Sept, 28, 1900, to Miss 
Lucile Hyde, of Mobile, Ala. They have one child, 
Lucile Reese Shuford, born vSept. 24, 1901. 

The wife of Dr. Frank Shuford is now living at Holly 
Springs, Miss. 

The following article has been furnished by Miss Au- 
gusta R. Shuford. It appeared in a Holly Springs pa- 
per: 

IN MEMORIAM. 

Died at his residence in Holly Springs, Miss, Novem- 
ber 23, 1 89 1, at 5:30 a. m., Dr. Franklin Brevard Shuf- 
ord. 

He was born in Lincoln County, N. C, February, 
1820, entered Peter Stuyvesant's school. New York, in 
1838, where he remained for several years; afterwards 
attended Marshall College, Mercersburg, Penn., where 
he graduated in 1843. After reading medicine at Ashe- 
ville, N. C, he attended the medical school at Charles- 
ton where he graduated with the highest honors of his 
profession. He came to Mississippi in 1847, after at- 
tended a course of lectures in the University of Louisi- 
ana in 1846, located in Holly Springs in 1851, and from 



DK. FRANKLIN BREVARD SIIUFORD. 1/ 

185 1 to 1861 practiced medicine in Holly Springs and 
vicinity and had a large and lucrative practice among the 
best families of the sate. In 1861 he enlisted as surgeon 
in the Confederate army, which position he held until the 
clo"e of the war. Resuming his practice he became one 
of the most eminent physicians and practitioners in the 
northern part of the state. In 1869 he retired from his 
profession to assume the position of cashier in the Holly 
Springs Savings and Insurance Bank, which position he 
filled with marked ability until his resignation in 1881, 
caUvSedby an attack of a peculiar nervous disease which 
enfeebled him physically for the remainder of his life. 

He was married to Miss E. Reese Jones by Rev. H. 
H. Paine, April ]8, 1871, and having four children,. 
two sons and two daughters. He devoted his time to 
their educational training. A nature grand and heroic, 
he possessed those elements which make men great, yet 
whose rugged points were softened and refined by scho- 
lastic culture. Descended from a time honored family, 
the appointments of wealth and familiarity with the 
higher amenities of life gave him a polished manner 
which so eminently fitted him for the social life, which 
he adorned with his many virtues, and characterized 
him a perfect gentleman in all the walks of life. 

Possessing a broad comprehension of mind, he grasped 
the vexed questions of his day with a masterly hand, and 
made them as clearly understood as the minor details of 
some developed plot. A proficient in political economy, 
his profound interchange of thought was sought by the 
most learned men and women of the day. 

Familiarity with human suffering awoke in him a feel- 
ing so wondrous kind, and womanhood was regarded by 
him with a holy reverence, while little children com- 
manded his kindest sympathy. During the painful 



1 8 DR. FRANKLIN BREVARD SHUFORD. 

affliction of thirteen years his usefulness was not im- 
paired; he controlled and settled large estates with the 
astuteness of a learned judge, and manv a lone widow 
found in him a friend whose judgment saved a compe- 
tence for the evening of life and a wise provision for her 
fatherless children. 

He took a lively interest in all the progressive move- 
ments of the day and warmly seconded all projected 
issues which promised to enhance the building up of 
our town. 

The development of the educational interests and the 
enlargement of the sphere and resources of woman com- 
manded his special attention. Home was the clear fir- 
mament in which his character shone resplendent, the 
directing genius, he planned and executed with such an 
admirable fitness, that perfect harmon}' and happiness 
crowned the lives of his devoted wife and children with 
a sweet contentment, the offspring of the heart's perfect 
trustfulness. His last days were full of painful anguish, 
yet borne with the endurance of which martyrs are made. 
Fully conscious of his approaching end, he set his house 
in perfect order, and, with words of loving admonition 
and wise counsel, he pointed his children upward to a 
grand and noble plane of life, and among bis last words 
to tbera he told them they must live by faith, and 
through faith attain the glorious reward of the soul's 
rest. To his devoted wife, who had been the faithful 
com.panion and unwearied nurse of his invalid years, bis 
parting was touching and impressive, his confidence so 
perfect that he committed all his worldly interests to 
her keeping. His two daughters were summoned home 
from Cincinnati, where they were attending school, to 
attend his last moments, and their sweet ministrations 
of tender affections were a balm to his suffering spirit. 



MARCUS SHUFORD. ig 

Conscious to the last moment of his life, he peacefully 
passed away, surrounded by loving and sympathizing 
friends. As we looked upon him in his peaceful rest, 
with hands folded, with life's grand task finished, above 
a heart so still and cold after life's noble throbbing; his 
face so peacfully calm, even in death, reflected the holy 
inspiration of divine impress, his day passed, life's jour- 
ney ended. The friend of life's young morn, the friend 
of womanhood's years, and the friend of riper age; we 
left him alone in the majesty of death. The record of 
his life is one of the lasting footprints in the history of 
our town, and his memory will live in the hearts of 
those who loved and delighted to honor him. A large 
concourse of friends attended his funeral at the Presby- 
terian church, conducted by the Rev. J. C. Cold well in 
a mosi impressive manner. The altar, draped heavily, 
was crowned with the laurel, oak, and bay, while sum- 
mer's last offering of lovely flowers covered the casket. 
Sadly and reverently he was laid to rest in our ceme- 
tery, and how perfect the spirit's rest in its eternal home. 

A Frikni). 



MARCUS SHUFOKD. 

Marcus Shuford was married to C, J. Houston in 1844. 
The children of this marriage are: Avery, Alexander, 
Ellen, Ann, and Bruce. 

Marcus Shuford and wife are not living. 

Avery Shuford married a Miss Sherrill, of Catawba 
County, and made their home in this county. Avery 



20 FANME E. POWELL. 

died and is buried at. Newton, N. C. At the time of his 
death he was Treasurer of Catawba County, and an elder 
in the Reformed church at Newton. His widow lives 
at Newton. After his death his son Byron was appoint- 
ed County Treasurer. Byron is now a merchant and 
lives at Denver, N. C. He married a Miss Carpenter. 
The other children of Avery Shuford are: Clara, Katie, 
and James. Avery was a soldier in the Confederate 
army, being in the company of Capt. James Crawford, of 
Salisbury. 

Alexander Shuford lives in Texas. 

Ellen Shuford married Mr. Vv^ilkinson of Catawba 
County, N. C. She is not living. 

Ann Shuford married Mr. Wade Carpenter, of Lin- 
coln Count3% N. C. He is not living. She is living. 

Bruce Shuford settled at Tyler, Texas, and married. 
He has been in the postoffice at that place for many 
years. 



FANNIE POWELL. 

Mrs. Fannie Powell, widow of the late Dr. A. M. 
Powell, died June 17, 1901, at the home of her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Dr. Little, at Catawba, aged 'jy years, 4 
months, and 3 days. 

She was the oldest daughter of John J. and Catherine 
Shuford and was born Feb. 14, 1824. 

Three brothers survive her; Levi Shuford, of Monbo, 



LEVI A. SHUFORD. 21 

N. C, Dr. Quince Shuford, of Tyler, Texas, and Henry 
P". Shuford, of Aberfoyle, Texas. 

She was married to Dr. A. M. Powell, July 19, 1843, 
and was the mother of 12 children, all of whom lived to 
be grown. Three have preceeded her: Avery Powell, 
Edward Powell, and Dr. Tate Powell. Nine are still 
living: John and Robert Powell, of Starke, Fla.; An- 
drew Powell, of Duncan, Ari.; Frank Powell, of Ashe- 
ville, N. C; Pink Powell, of Charlotte; Charlie Powell, 
of Swan, Texas; Mrs. Dr. Blair, of Lenoir, N. C. ; and 
Mrs. W. E. Yount, of Newton, N. C, and Mrs. Dr. 
Quince Little, of Catawba, N. C. 

She has 40 grand-children living and 8 great-grand 
children. She died a consistent member of the M. E. 
Church, and had a great many friends in North Caroli- 
na and Florida, where she lived for a number of years. 

M. P. C. 



LEVI A. SHUFORD. 

Levi A. Shuford was born in Lincoln, now Catawba 
County, Jan. 28, 1822. He married Catharine Long in 
1846. To them were born four children: Dr. J. W., 
Thomas F., Logan H., and Carrie. The wife of Levi 
Shuford died in 1892. 

Levi Shuford was one of the owners of the Powell & 
Shuford Cotton Mills, at Long Island, Catawba County, 
and engaged in the mill business for many years. He 
afterward engaged in farming. He now lives with his 
son, Logan, at Monbo, N, C. 



22 LEVI A. SHUFORI). 

Dr. J. W. Shuford went to Texas soon after the war, 
where he settled and practiced his profession. He mar- 
ried Miss Joe Smith, of Tyler, Texas, They have six 
children: Claude, Clyde, Thomas, Pearl, Samuel, and 
Zelda. All live at Tyler, Texas, except Claude, who is 
a clerk in the postoffice at Austin, Texas. Dr. Shuford 
died in 1897. 

Thomas F. Shuford is a farmer and lives at Catawba, 
N. C. He married Miss Hibernia Martin. They have 
six children: Willie, George, Guy, Vergie, Annie, and 
Alice. George is a street car conductor at Elizabethton, 
N. J. Guy is in Mississippi, and the others live in Ca- 
tawba County. 

Logan H. Shuford married Miss Lida N. Pearson in 
1874. They have six children: Hal A., Eugene, Ed, 
May, Bessie, and Leslie. Hal is a printer and lives at 
Hickory, N. C. Eugene and Ed live in Texas. May 
married Mr. J. L. Turner, of Iredell County. The wife 
of L. H, Shuford died in 1885, He married the second 
time Mrs. Hinson, of Lincoln County in 1 894. They have 
one child living, George Deck. Logan H. Shuford is a 
farmer by occupation. He is a prominent member of the 
M. E. Church South, and has been on the board of trus- 
tees and deacons of his chucrch for 25 3^ears. He was 
three times elected President of Catawba County Farm- 
ers' Alliance, and served three years on the County 
School Board. He was also a Justice of the Peace for 
some 3'ears. 

Carrie Shuford married Mr. J. A. Neill, of Iredell 
County. To them were born four children: Lee, Buren, 
Frank, and Flow. Mr. Neill died in 1900, and his wid- 
ow and children are living at Mooresville, N. C. 



MARTIN P. SlIUFORD. 



MARTIN P. SHUFOKD. 



Martin P. Shuford was born in Lincoln, now Catawba, 
County, in 1794, and died April 1836, being 42 years of 
age. He is a son of Jacob Shuford who died in 1844, 
and a grand son of Martin Shuford who died in 1780, 
and a great-grand son of John Shuford who died in 
1790. 

He is buried in Cleveland County. He married Miss 
Rhoda Lowrance, of Catawba County. 

After his death his wife moved to Medon, Tenn., and 
lived with her youngest daughter, Susan, until her 
death, which occurred in December 1878, being 86 
years of age. She was buried at Medon, Tenn. 

Martin P. Shuford represented Rutherford County in 
the Senate from 1825 to 1828. He also represented the 
same county in the Senate in 1833. 

Martin Shuford and wife were the parents of 7 child- 
ren; 4 boys and 3 girls. The children are Mortimer, 
Margaret, Catharine, Jacob Laban, Susan, Monroe, and 
Eli. 

Margaret Amanda, the second child, was born Oct. 
13, 1819. She married Theodore Houston, and moved 
to Canton, Ga., where her husband died, leaving one 
daughter. The daughter married and moved to Texas, 
and her mother accompanied her. 

Catharine Eva Shuford was born Dec, 15, 1821. She 
married John Carpenter, and lived and died in Hay- 
wood County, N. C, leaving two sons; one, Charley, a 
Methodist minister. She and her husband are both 
buried in Haywood County. 

Jacob Laban Shuford was born March 15. 1824. 



24 rev; MORTIMER SHUFORD. 

Susan O. Shuford was born Oct, 24, 1829, and died 
Aug-. 19, 1898. She was married to Mr. Nichols, of 
Mendon, Tenn. They both died there, leaving two 
daughters. 

Eli P. Shuford was born April 26, 1826; died May 28, 
1899, at the age of 73 years. He was married to Miss 
Rosana Jane Lee in December 1849. To them were 
born 7 children, 4 boys and 3 girls; 6 of whom are living 
in Cleveland County. He was a licentiate exhorter in the 
Methodist Church. 

James Monroe Shuford, the youngest of the family, 
was born July 7, 1831: died Oct 4, 1900. He gradu- 
ated at Olin College, N. C, after which he went to 
Trinity College. He married Miss Elizabeth Rabb, of 
Statesville. He left a wife and 6 children; 5 boys and i 
girl, all of whom live at Fairview, Buncombe County, 
N. C. He spent his life teaching, and was a prominent 
educator. 



:REV. MORTIMER L. SHUFORD. 

[This chapter is taken from "The Fathers of the Reformed Church in Europe 
and America, by Rev. H. Harbaugh, D. D. and Rev. D. Y. Hei.«ler, D. D., Edited 
by Rev. Wm. M. Deatrick. D. D." Vol. VI, pp. 197-206.] 

In the decease of this excellent brother, we have lost 
a personal and very dear friend, having been associated 
with him, as classmate, during our entire literary and 
theological course. We always esteemed him very high- 
ly and now deem it a pleasure to bear this public testi- 
timony to his worth. Brother vShuford was a universal 



REV. MORTTMER L. SHUFORD. 25 

favorite with his felloiv students. He stood well in his 
classes, was attentive to his studies, kind-hearted, genial 
and courteous. He is remembered also as a very pleas- 
ant and efficient speaker. His feelings were strong and 
easily moved, his imagination brilliant, his voice clear 
and ringing, and his whole manner agreeable and im- 
pressive. We might recount many pleasant reminis- 
cences of our student life if it were deemed necessary. 

The following beautiful and appropriate sketch of 
his life was prepared by the Rev. Geo. L. Staley, D. D. , 
and read at a memorial service held in his late charge. 
This sketch we propose to use with such slight changes 
only as may be deemed necessary to adapt it to our spe- 
cial purpose. After a few preliminary remarks, Dr. 
Staley proceeds to say: 

The Rev. Mortimer L. Shuford was born in Ruth- 
erford County, N. C, January, 24, 1818, and departed 
this life at Washington, D. C, November 7, 1883. 
"The family to which he belonged," according to the 
statement of a gentleman in no way connected with it, 
"is a very large one, many of the descendants of the 
great-grandfather of the Rev. M. L. Shuford having set- 
tled in adjoining Southern states; and as far as the facts 
are known, few families of the size of this one have main- 
tained the same character of respectability — none more 
so." His great-great-grandfather was one of the earliest 
emigrants to that part of the old North Sate, in which 
the family is still largely represented, and went thither 
from York, Pa., making a home for himself in Lincoln 
County. His grandfather, Jacob Shuford, was born 
February 12, 1770, and in 1789 was married to Mar- 
garet Hoyl, who was descended from a highly respect- 
able family, that had lived for several generations near 
Wiesbaden, Germany, but emigrated to this country in 



26 REV. MORTIMER L. SM LI FORD. 

1 74 1, taking up its residence, tirst, in Frederick County, 
Md., and three years later, fixing its permanent home 
on the south fork of the Catawba River, in what was 
then known as Tryon County. As the fruit of this 
marriage there were eleven children, seven sons and 
four daughters, all of whom, as far as the writer can as- 
certain, established families and names of the highest 
respectability. Martin P. Shuford v.^as the third child 
of this family, and two of his sons entered the ministry 
of the Gospel, the Rev. M. L. Shuford as a Reformed 
and the Rev. J. L. Shuford, now of St. Matthew's S. C, 
as a Methodist minister. The Rev. J. H. Shuford, Re- 
formed pastor at Altemont, 111., belongs also to this 
family, being a son of the uncle of our deceased brother. 
In all its branches the wShuford family has occupied 
places of honor and influence in their several communi- 
ties, as professional and business men — as members of 
the Legislature in both branches — as county officers, 
and last, but not least, as prominent and successful far- 
mers. This bit of family history is here given for the 
value it has, in setting forth conspicuously, how the Di- 
vine promise is fulfilled, in the order of the Christian 
family life, from one generation to another, "Upon 
them that fear him — to such as keep His covenant, and 
to those who remember His commandments to do 
them." 

Of the early life of our departed brother, I have 
been able to ascertain but little deserving mention up to 
the time of his going to college. One little incident, 
perhaps significant of his future in another form, is all 
that I will relate. During a war excitement which pre- 
vailed in his neighborhood, he joined a regiment that 
had been raised for the war against the Seminole Indi- 
ans, and served for a short time as its adjutant. Before 



KEV. MORTIMER I,. SHUFORD. 2/ 

doing- any actual military service, his grandfather (his 
father having- died in 1836) induced him to change his 
plans and enter upon a course of preparation for a higher 
and nobler service under the great Captain of the Sacra- 
mental host of God's elect. This little circumstance he 
referred to frequently in his family by way of amusing 
his children, describing their father arrayed in full regi- 
mentals, with waving plume, and drawn sword, mounted 
on a spirited horse, riding proudly up and down the 
line of soldiers in full m.ilitary array. 

There was, however, other and better work than 
this for him to do. His pious grandfather, impressed 
wiih the conviction that he had abilities that would, if 
properly improved, qualify him for the preaching of the 
everlasting Gospel, determined to educate him for this 
work. Accordingly, in January, 1838, he entered the 
Preparatory Department of Marshall College at Mercers- 
burg, Pa., and having completed the full college curri- 
culum, graduated in 1844, having during the latter 
part of his classical course, carried along some theologi- 
cal studies. In the same year, in company with the 
Rev. H. St. John Rinker, and the late Rev. Hiram 
Shaull, he appeared before the Virginia Classis, in ses- 
sion at Zion's Church, Virginia, as a candidate for 
licensure. His examination proved satisfactory, he was 
duly licensed, and on presenting a call from the Lovetts- 
ville charge, Va., was ordained also to the work of the 
holy ministry. On the nth of July following, he was 
married to Lucinda C. Sohn, of Mercersburg, Pa., a 
marriage which the Lord blessed w^th seven children, 
of which there are now but two remaining in the land 
of the living. 

The Lovettsville pastorate continued for a period of 
five years, and seems (in the absence of any definite in- 



28 REV. iM')KTlMKR L. SlILTFORD. 

formation) to have been, to say the least, moderately 
successful. 

In November, 1849, ^^ accepted a call to the Glade 
charge, Frederick County, Md., beginning his work there 
on the 2ist of the month, but was not installed until the 
following- June. During the eight years of his stay 
among this people he was enabled to build a fine brick 
church for the Glade congregation, while preaching and 
exercising pastoral care over the six or more congrega- 
tions that formed the charge. 

The present pastor, Rev. S. M. Hench, writes that, 
"his labors were crowned with much success, and we are 
told by the older surviving members that his leaving 
was the cause of almost universal regret." 

In 1857 ^^ became pastor of the Mt. Moriah charge, 
Washington County, Md., making Sbarpsburg his place 
of residence, at which place the church w^as handsomely 
repaired during his pastorate, only to be almost entirely 
destroyed by the ravages of the late v/ar —one shell hav- 
ing passed through its walls — and after the great battle 
of the Antietam, it was pressed into service as a hospital 
for the wounded. 

It was during this period of his life that he was called 
to pass through an experience of disaster, and suffering, 
and sorrow and poverty, such as falls to the lot of but 
few. In 1 86 1, while kindling a fire, he struck an eye 
against the corner of an open door of the stove with such 
force as to destroy its sight entirely. In August, 1862, 
two daughters died, the victims of a fatal disease, mak- 
ing vacant their places in the home circle, and bringing 
desolation to the hearts of those left behind, and in the 
following year j. son was killed by the explosion of a 
shell found on the Antietam battle-field, and supposed, 
from the fact of its having long been lying in water, to 



REV. MORTIMER L. SHUFORD. 29 

be harmless. In addition to these things, Sharpsburg, 
his place of residenc, was directly on the line of march 
of the contending armies, that came and went like the 
waves of the flowing and ebbing sea. Compelled more 
than once to flee from his home, with his wife and little 
children, while balls and shells were falling thick and 
fast around them, he returned when the danger was over, 
only to find "his little family establishment (as an eye- 
witness testified at the time) a complete wreck." Thus 
in affliction and persecution, in disaster and poverty, he 
wrought on as best he could, doing the IMaster's work, 
bearing his trials (as the same witness testifies) with un- 
wavering patience. 

During the year 1863 he removed from this scene of 
desolation and suffering to Boonsboro, Md., and served 
as the pastor of the congregation there, and of the con- 
gregation at Funkstoivn also, at which place (last named) 
he completed the church building that had been com- 
menced during the incumbency of the Rev. L. A. Brun- 
ner. The people of both these congregations speak of 
him with much tenderness and affection. 

In 1867 tie received and accepted a call to the Win- 
chester congregation, Va., in whose service he labored, 
as the present pastor states, "with zeal, and as good suc- 
cess as could be reasonably expected, considering the pe- 
culiar circumstances of this charge at that time. The 
church edifice had to be almost entirely rebuilt and as 
there was but little money here, the pastor went abroad 
and succeeded in collecting enough for the purpose. He 
was greatly respected in this community as a man and a 
minister of the Gospel." In April, 1873, he became 
the pastor of this (Burkittsville) charge, which he served 
faithfully for nearly eleven years, and where, for the 
first time in his pastoral -Aork. he seemed to enjoy a 



30 KEY MDRTIMER L, SHU FORD. 

comparatively quiet and restful life. The charg-e being 
a small one, easy to labor in, with a membership tender- 
ly attached to him, and lovingly providing for his wants, 
as they were able, he enjoyed the evening of his life here, 
I think, more than its morning or noontide spent in oth- 
er places. We ma}' say, speaking geographically, that 
the circle of his life as a minister had completed itstelf 
here, as this, his last parish, is almost within sight of the 
one in which it began. 

The sum total of his work, as far as it can be ex- 
pressed in figures (and a miserably poor way it is to set 
forth the results of a ministers life work) is as follows: 
Baptisms, 970; confirmations, 371 : funeral services, 
413, and marriages, [228. And in this connection it 
may be proper to say that he was honored three times 
by an election as President of Classis — twice in the 
Maryland and once in the Virginia Classis; and by an 
election, also, as Vice-President of the late Synod of the 
Potomac at Newton, N. C. 

The meeting of this Synod furnished a fitting close 
to his ministerial life. He had long earnestly desired 
to visit his native State, to move once more among the 
scenes of his youth, mingle again with those of his own 
"kith and kin," and stand beside his father's grave — all 
of which this meeting of Synod gave him the oppor- 
tunity to do. On the Sunday of this meeting he 
preached at Smyrna, about twelve miles from Newton, 
and administered, for the last time in his life, the Holy 
Communion. On Sunday, October 28th, he preached 
twice at Hickory, where Mr. Hamilton, a citizen of that 
place, in a letter to the writer, says, 'Tt was my privi- 
lege to hear him preach. His sermon was able and ear- 
nest. He referred to the fact that his work for the 
Master was nearly finished, and that he was speaking 



KEY. MORTIMKK L. SHUKOKD. 3' 

to his audience for the last time on earth. His words 
were solerrn and iinpressive, and I trust will produce 
fruit." 

On the following Wednesday evening he preached 
in the Methodist church, near his brother's house, with 
whom he remained until Friday, and while there vis- 
ited his father's grave. On Saturday he attended a 
funeral at vSt. Paul's church, near Newton, and at Dr. 
Clapp's desire, preached the sermon. On Sunday morn- 
ing, Nov. 4th, he preached in the church at Newton, in 
the afternoon at a church, distant three miles, and at 
Newton again at night. Of this, his last work, Dr.. 
Clapp says: "The text was, 'Behold, I stand at the 
door and knock,' etc. An unusual solemnity pervaded 
the audience. The sermon was very earnest and the 
impression deep, and it will be lasting." 

After all this work and labor of love, without rest,, 
he started on his homeward journey on Sunday night, 
hoping to make such connection at Washington as 
would enable him to reach home the following night. 
He arrived at Washington on Monday evening, to make 
connection, not with any westward bound train, but far 
more glorious, to go to his Home in the Paradise of the 
Blessed by the way of suffering and death, the Master 
had ordained. And thus quickly, without prolonged 
and wasting sickness, just as he had been, perhaps, more 
than usually, active and earnest in the service of the 
Lord, he heard and obeyed the summons — -'Come up 
higher." 

Such was the life, in brief, of our departed brother, 
as it is, with a few modifications, the simple story of the 
average pastor's life — full of labor, and suffering, and 
sorrow, and poverty, with none of the rewards and few 
of the compensations, that come to men in other spheres 



32 REV. MORTIMER L. SHUFORD. 

of this world's activities. After almost forty years of 
pastoral work, sacrificing himself for the salvation of 
others, he leaves to his widow and children only a few 
books and his household effects. But, far better than 
money, or houses, or land, he leaves them the name and 
record of a life, though humble and unobtrusive, fully 
spent in the service of the Master. 

Brother Shuford, as already stated, died very sudden- 
ly in the city of Washington, D. C, on his return from 
the meeting of Synod at Newton, N. C, on Wednesday, 
Nov. 7, 1883, aged 65 years, 9 months, and 13 days. 
His remains were removed to his late residence in Bur- 
kittsville, Md., where appropriate funeral services were 
held on Friday, Nov. 9th. The following brethren 
were present and participated in the solemnities of the 
occasion: Rev. Drs. G. L. Staley and E. R. Eschbach, 
Revs. J. S. Kieffer, L. G. Kremer, S. S. Miller, A, C. 
Geary, N. H. vSkyles, A. J. Heller, T. F. and H. W. 
Hoifmeier, of the Reformed Church, together with five 
of his Lutheran brethren. Appropriate addresses were 
delivered by the brethren, Staley, Skyles, and Kieffer. 
The officers of the church acted as pall-bearers. A very 
large number of pensons were in attendance. 

Subsequently an appropriate memorial service was 
held in the church at Burkittsville, on Thursday morn- 
ing, the 13th of December. There were present the 
Rev. Drs. Santee and Staley, the Revs. T. F. and H. W. 
Hoffmeier, Skyles, Heller, Hench, and Rinker, of the 
Reformed, and Revs. Baird and Bowers, of the Lutheran 
Church. Dr. Santee preached from the words, "For 
me to live is Christ, to die is gain," a sermon eminently 
appropriate, replete with comfort and consolation; and 
Dr. Staley read the preceding biographical,sketch. The 
church was filled with his parishioners, neighbors aud 



REV. JACOB L. SHUFORD. 33 

friends, among whom there was a considerable number 
from the charges he formerly served. 

Brother Shuford was an earnest and good man, a 
respectable scholar, and an able and eloquent preacher. 
As a pastor he was affectionate, faithful and efficient. 
In his domestic and social relations he was exception- 
ally happy— having man)'' warm friends and ardent ad- 
mirers, who will long keep his name in grateful remem- 
brance. 



REV. JACOB L. SHUFORD. 

Rev. Jacob L. Shuford is a son of Martin Shuford. 
Martin Shuford was born May 24, 1794, and died April 
19, 1836; age 42 years. 

He is buried in what is now Cleveland County, N. C. 
His son, Rev. Jacob L. Shuford, was born in Cleveland 
County, N. C, March 15, 1824. On the 6th day of 
November, 1849, he married Roxana L. FuUerwiler, of 
N. C. In 1870, he married the second time, Mrs. Mary 
Bell, of South Carolina. 

He had charge of circuit work as a minister in the 
Methodist Church for nearly fifty years. He died at 
Summerton, S. C, March 19, 1892; age 68 years. 

He was a man full of prayer, faith, and the Holy Spi- 
rit. He was a strong preacher, and his preaching was 
after owned of God in the conviction of sinners and the 
salvation of souls. No manlier man ever lived and 
worked among men. He was as gentle as a woman and 



34 REV. JACOB L. SHU FORD. 

as genial as an evening zephyr. 

Rev, J. E. Mahaffey preached his funeral. His text 
is found in the Book of Genesis, 5th chapter, 24th verse: 
"And Enoch walked with God, and he was not, for God 
took him." 

His life is now given as taken from the SoHtJier)i 
Christian Advocate: 

Rev. Jacob L, Shuford was admitted on trial into the 
South Carolina Conference in December, 1844. His 
first appointment was as junior preacher on Montgomery 
circuit, N. C, then in the Cheraw District, with James 
Stacey, P. E., and Newton Goudelock, P. C. Early in 
the year, the preacher in charge was attacked with a fatal 
disease which gradually wore away his strength until he 
fell into the arms of death. This of course threw extra la- 
bors and responsibilities on the young junior preacher; but 
how well he met them, those of us who know of his life- 
long fidelity can well imagine. The following year Bro. 
Shuford served as junior preacher to Rev. Charles Wilson 
on the Edisto, Johossee and Fenwick Island Mission. 
This appointment was made in view of the very flour- 
ishing condition of the mission as reported at that ses- 
sion of the Conference, and the necessity of strengthen- 
ing the hands of the missionary who had wrought so 
faithfully. On this charge Bro. Shuford and his col- 
league served eleven plantations with regular preaching, 
and catechised some 150 children. It was a prosperous 
year; a net increase of 144 members was reported at its 
close. The next year he was appointed to Beaufort and 
Prince William's mission; in 1849 he was in charge of 
Shelby circuit; 1850, McDowell circuit; 185 1, Morganton; 
1852, Lenoir; 1853-4, Black River and Pee Dee mission; 
1855, Conwayboro circuit; 1856, Concord circuit; 1857- 
66, Wateree mission; 1867-9, Rocky Mount; 1870-2; 



ABEL SHUFORD. 35 

Fairfield; 1873-4, Newberry circuit; 1875-78, Santee; 
1879-80, Lewisville; 1881-2, Graham's; 1883-6, St. 
Matthew's; 1887, Santee; 1888-90, Bishopville. 

During the year 1890, while in charge at Bishopville, 
Bro. Shuford had his first stroke of paralysis, and at the 
Conference held at Anderson at the close of that year, 
he was granted a superannuated relation. He removed 
his family to his home near Summerton, S. C, and for 
the first time in an active ministry of nearly 50 years, 
he was left without appointment to learn the lesson of 
patient submission to the Father's will. A few weeks 
ago, he had another stroke of paralysis, from which he 
never rallied, and which proved to be the Master's voice 
calling him to his reward on high. 



1417524 



ABEL SHUFOKD. 

Abel Shuford is a son of Jacob Shuford who died in 
1844. Jacob Shuford is a son of Martin Shuford who 
died in 1780. Martin Shuford is a son of John Shuford 
who died in 1790. 

Abel Shuford was born in Lincoln, now Catawba, 
County, N. C, Oct. 11, 1796. He died Jan. 4, 1858; 
age 62 years, He married Nancy Adeline Perkins. 
vShe was born in 1798, and died June 4, 1842; age 44 
years. 

Abel Shuford was a farmer by occupation. He lived 
and died in Catawba County, N. C. The children of 
Abel Shuford and wife are: Harriet, Amelia, Susan, 
Caroline, Martha, William, Pink, and Frances. 



36 ABEL SHU FORD. 

Harriet Shuford married Daniel Reinhardt. They 
moved to Prairie County, Ark. They were the parents 
of nine children. They have a son by the name of 
Abel Reinhardt, who has been Sheriff of Prairie Coun- 
ty, Ark., several times. After the death of Harriet, Mr. 
Reinhardt married her sister, Amelia. There are three 
sons and one daughter living of this marriage. Amelia 
Shuford Reinhardt is still living. Harriet Shuford Rein- 
hardt died when about 40 years of age. 

Susan Shuford married Philip Johnson, of Burke 
County, N. C. They had seven sons and two daugh- 
ters. All lived to be grown. Two of the girls and two 
boys are now living, 1901. l^hey went from North 
Carolina to Arkansas where they raised their family. 

Cajoline vShuford married John Loretz. At this time 
(190]) the}^ have four girls and two bovs living. She is 
still living and is 72 years of age. They moved from 
North Carolina to Arkansas where they raised their 
family. ^ 

Martha Shuford married Milton Ballew, of Caldwell 
County, N. C. They m.oved to Arkansas where they 
raised their family. Mr. Ballew was a soldier in the 
Confederate Army. He was a brave soldier and was 
wounded in battle. He is dead. His wife is still living 
(1901). Her home is at Des Arc, Ark. They have five 
boys and one girl living. 

Frances Shuford married John Robinson, of Jackson 
County, Ark. They have one son living; three dead. 

William Shuford lived and raised a family in Arkan- 
sas, where he died. He has two daughters living in 
Newport, Jackson County, and one son living at the 
same place. His oldest daughter is Mrs. Robinson; the 
other, Mrs. Hare, the wife of a Methodist misister. 

Pink vShuford is not living. His home was in Arkan- 



¥ 



EVE SHUFORD RAMSAUR. 37 

sas. His widow married Mr. Kimbrow. She has three 
daughters living, Alma married Mr. John Sherrill, a 
merchant at Weldon, Jackson County. Dora married 
Mr. Robert Drummond, of Newport, Ark. Eve, the 
youngest, is not married. 



EVE SHUFORD KAMSAUJl. 

Eve Shuford Ramsaur was a daughter of Jacob Shu- 
ford, who died in 1844. Jacob Shuford was a son of 
Martin Shuford, who died in 1780. Martin Shuford was 
a son of John Shuford, who died in 1790. Eve Shuford 
Ramsaur was born in Lincoln, now Catawba, County, 
N. C, Jan. 26, 1799. She married Jonas Ramsaur 
Nov. 20, 1817. Jonas Ramsaur was born in Lincoln 
County, N. C, in 1793. The children of Jouas Ram- 
saur and wife are: John Franklin, Martin, Sidney, Mar- 
guerite, Lee, Susan, James, William, Francis, Wallace, 
and Robert Shuford. Jonas Ramsaur moved from 
North Carolina to Mississippi before the Civil War. 
His home was in Marshall County, Miss., where he 
lived, died, and was buried in Early Grove Cemetery. 
He died Aug. 20, 1857. After his death, his wife 
moired to Ashley County, Arkansas, where she died 
Dec. 25, 1868, and was buried seven miles west of 
Hamburg, in a graveyard by a Methodist church. 

John Franklin Ramsaur was born in 18 19, and in 1845 
he married Miss Sarah Ramsaur, of Lincoln County, N. 
C. He is an elder in the Presbyterian church. There 



# 



38 EVE SHUFORD RAMSAUR. 

was one child of this marriage by the name of Emma 
Ramsaur, who married W, P. Shuford. The wife, of 
John Franklin Ramsaur was a daughter of David Ram- 
saur, David Ramsaur married a Miss Loretz. She was 
a daughter of Rev, Andrew Loretz, who was the father 
of the Reformed Church in North Carolina. After the 
death of his wife in 1847, J. Frank Ramsaur moved 
from North Carolina to Marshall County, Miss., and 
afterwards married Miss Catharine Welbon. In 1859 
he moved to Ashley County, Ark. The children of J. 
Frank Ramsaur by his second wife are Clark, Susie, and 
Willie. Clark Ramsaur married Miss Dora Hawkins, 
and resides at Hamburg, Ark. Susie Ramsaur married 
William Lawson, who died in 1893, leaving his wife and 
five children. Willie Ramsaur lives at Hamburg, Ark., 
with her parents who are still living. 

Marguerite Ramsaur was born Aug, 27, 1826. She 
married David Clark and died in Mississippi in 1857. 

Lee Ramsaur was born Aug. 4, 1828. In i860 he 
moved to Woodruff County, Ark. At the beginning of 
the Civil War he joined the First Arkansas Mounted 
Rifles of the C. S. A., as a captain of a company. After 
the battle of Shiloh, he was promoted to Lieut. Colonel. 
After the war he married a Miss Mollie Beard. There 
were two children of this union. Lee Ramsaur was a 
lawyer of prominence and an elder in the Presbyterian 
church. He was wounded three times in the Civil War 
and died from the effects of the same in 1881, and was 
buried in Augusta, Ark. 

Susan Ramsaur was born Oct. 4, 1830. She married 
James Pugh and lived at Hamburg, Ark. She died in 
189]. The children of this mariiage are: Robert, Min- 
nie, Ella, Green, Thomas, and Willie. 

James Ramsaur was born Aug. ;;, T832. He belonged 



EVE SHUFOkD RAMSAUR. 39 

to the 17th Mississippi regiment. He was wounded 
nine times in battle, and died in 1867, from the effects 
of the same, and was buried at Augusta, Ark. His wife 
was a Miss Sarah Murry, of Ashley County, Ark. 

"William Ramsaur was born June 28, 1834. He 
was a soldier in the Confederate Army, and was a mem- 
ber of the 3rd Arkansas regiment. He fought through 
the Virginia campaign, and was wounded at the battle 
of Chickamauga. He surrendered under Lee at Appo- 
mattox Court House in 1865. After the war he moved 
to California and married a Miss Walker. He died in 
1896 and was buried at Los Angeles, Cal. A writer in 
a newspaper has furnished the following: 

"The following notice of the death of an old Arkan- 
sas veteran will be read with interest by many old sol- 
dier friends of the deceased throughout this section. 

The subject of this sketch was born in North Carolina 
in 1834. He passed from the land of the dying to the 
land of life on October 13, 1896, being sixty-two years 
of age. Mr. Ramsaur was one of the few men of whom 
it could be said, 'An Israelite indeed in whom there is 
no guile.' 

In early life he moved with his parents to Mississippi 
and there at the early age of ten years was converted to 
God and joined the Presbyterian church. From that 
day until he left us he lived a consistent Christian life — 
a character formed that was above reproach. 

He enlisted in the Confederate army at the beginning 
of that awful struggle and served the four years. He 
was in Company A, Third Arkansas Regiment, (Infant- 
ry), In the early part of 1862 was with Jackson. He 
was captured at Harper's Ferry, took part in the battle 
of Sharpsburg, was wounded at Chickamauga, was in 
the 'Seven Days' Fight' in front of Richmond and sur- 



40 EVE SHUFORD RAMSAUR. 

rendered under Lee at Appomattox, 

In 1869 Mr. Ramsaur moved to California, and five 
years later he was happily married to Miss Florence 
Walker, who survives him. Their union was blessed 
with five children, four sons and a daughter, all of 
whom are now living. 

Mr. Ramsaur was a peer among men; simple as a 
child; firm as a rock. This >vriter knew him for years 
and for integrity of purpose and adherence to principle 
he had no superior. All men loved him — the old and 
young delighted in his company. The widow found in 
him a wise and friendly counsellor, the orphan rose and 
called him blessed. Many a child was happier because 
he lived; many a care and sorrow has been made lighter 
because of his life. 

The world is poorer since he left it: and hundreds of 
hearts feel that they have lost a true friend. His call 
came suddenly, without a moment's warning, but we 
know where to find him, since his life was one continual 
growth toward God — he stands in the presence of the 
King and is satisfied. 

'Servant of God, well done!' T can not say, I will not 
say, that he is dead. He's just away.' 

His old comrades — members of the 'Confederate Vet- 
erans' Associatton' — bore his remains to beautiful 'Rosa 
Dale' in Los Angeles, California. There we left all that 
is mortal of him to rest where the palms and cedars to- 
gether weave a requiem and sing soft and low of God 
and the resurrection morn. We shall meet him again 
in the morning land." 

Francis Ramsaur was born Sept. 30, 1836. He was a 
soldier in the Confederate Army and was a member of 
the 3rd Arkansas Regiment. He was reported missing 
at the battle of Sharpsburg, and it is supposed that he 



.MARY Ax\N FANNIE SUl'FURl.) CANSLER. 4I 

was killed in that battle. 

Wallace Ramsaur died at the age of three years, and 
was buried at the Shuford graveyard, Bunker Hill, N. C. 

Robert Shuford Ramsaur was born Aug. 3, 1843. 
He was a soldier in the Confederate Army. He became 
a member of the 9th Arkansas Regiment in 1862. He 
was wounded at the battle of Corinth. He moved to 
California in 1869, and married a Miss Walker, and now 
resides at Los Angeles, Cal. 

Martin Ramsaur died at the age of five years, and was 
buried at the Ramsaur graveyard, Lincoln County, 
N. C. 

Sidney vShuford Ramsaur was born in 1S23, and died 
in California. He died from cholera contracted on a 
ship. 



MARY ANN FANNIE SHUFORD CANSLER. 

Mary Ann Fannie Shuford is a daughter of Jacob 
Shuford, who died in 1844. Jacob Shuford is a son of 
Martin vShuford, who died in 1780. Martin Shuford is 
a son of John Shuford, who died in 1790. 

Fannie Shuford was born Feb. 15, 1801, and died 
March 6. 1866. 

Henry Cansler was born April 29, 1800, and died 
Feb. 20, 1875. He was for a number of years Sheriff 
of Lincoln County, N. C. His children are: 

Adolphus P. Cansler was born April 29, 1823, and 
died Jan. 7, 1873. He was married to Adelaide M. 



42 MARY ANN FANNIE SHUFORD CANSLER. 

Conley, of Caldwell County, N. C, Jan. 21, 1845, who 
died June 8, 1852. He was married to Nancy M. Bobo, 
of South Carolina, June 26, 1855. He moved to Missis- 
sippi and died there. His second wife died in the fall 
of 1900. 

Alex Jacob Cansler was born May 26, 1825. He mar- 
ried Mary Ann Martin, of Wilkes County, N. C, Sept. 
7, 1847. Both are dead. 

He was a minister in the Baptist church, and was a 
graduate of the University of North Carolina, in 1847, 
He was a man of considerable gifts and energy. He 
began to preach in N. C, soon after he graduated, and 
preached in N, C, until 1867. The most of his labor in 
church work was confined to Gaston and Lincoln coun- 
ties. The churches which be served in these counties 
are known as Lebanon, Salem, Long Creek, Bruing- 
ton, and Sandy Plains, He moved to Arkansas in 1867. 
He died in Texas in 1872. September 7, 1847 ^^ mar- 
ried Mary Ann Martin, of Wilkes County, N. C. The 
Martin family was prominent. They owned large farms 
along the Yadkin river. The aunt of the wife of Rev. 
A. J. Cansler married a grandson of the famous Colonel 
Cleveland, a commander in the battle of King's Moun- 
tain, in the War of the Revolution. 

William H. Cansler was born July 26, 1827, and was 
married to Mary Jane Marrow, of Boonsboro, Missouri, 
Feb. 20, 1855. Both are dead. 

Abel T. Cansler was born Oct. 22, 1829, and married 
to Nancy McNeely, of Iredell County, N. C, Aug. 17, 
1853; moved to Texas and died there Feb. 5, 1879. 
Both are dead. 

George W. Cansler was born Oct. 29, 1831, and died 
Nov. 9, 1896. He was married to Jane E. Long, of 
Catawba, N. C, Sept. 17, 1856. She lives at Catawba 



ELI SHUFORD. 43 

Station, N. C. He is buried at Catawba, N. C. 

John P. Cansler was born Feb, 4, 1834, and married 
to Kate M. Murphy, of McDowell County, N, C, Oct. 
24, 1854. Both are dead. 

Barbaras, A. Cansler was born July 13, 1836, and 
died May 6. 1896. She was married to H. Fite, of Gas- 
ton, N. C, Feb, 1 86 1, Both died at Fairview, Bun- 
combe County. 

Fannie J. Cansler was born Nov. 30. 1838, and mar- 
ried to Dr. L. N. Durham, of Cleveland County, May 
30, 1859. Their home is in Asheville, N. C. 

Daniel M. H. Cansler was born Oct. 4, 1841 and died 
Feb. 18, 1853. 

Thomas J. Cansler was born Aug. 13, 1843, ^-i^^ ^i^d 
Feb. 7, 1863 at Chimborazo Hospital, Richmond, Va. 

Adelaide E. Cansler was born Sept. 19, 1845, and 
was married to William Cobb, of Lincolnton, N. C, 
Sept. 15, 1874. Address, Whiteside, Jackson Countv, 
N. C. 



ELI SHUFOKD. 

Eli Shuford is a son of Jacob Shuford, who died in 
1844. Jacob Shuford is a son of Martin Shuford, who 
died in 1780. Martin Shuford is a son of John Shuford, 
who died in 1790. 

Eli Shuford was born in Lincoln, now Catawba, Coun- 
ty, N. C, April 4, 1803. He married Eveline Collins, 
of Burke County, N. C. The children are: Monroe, 



44 KLl SHUFORD. 

Lena, Dudley, Poindexter, Harrison, Pink, Middlecof, 
and Caroline. 

Eli Shuford married and settled upon a part of the 
farm on which his father lived. This farm is in Cataw- 
ba County, N. C. Adolphus Hoover now owns and 
lives in the house that Eli Shuford built. 

Catawba College was built at Newton, N, C, about 
1850. Eli Shuford moved to Newton, N. C, for the 
purpose of keeping a hotel and sending his children to 
school. 

About 1855 or 1856, Eli Shuford went west. After 
moving a few times in the West, he finally made his 
home at Quitman, Wood County, Texas, in 1867. 

Eveline Collins Shuford died at Quitman, Texas, in 
1867, and is buried at that place. 

Monroe Shuford died at Little Rock, Ark., 1862. My 
recollection is that he was a soldier in the Confederate 
Army. 

Eli Shuford lived in his last days at Mineola, Texas, 
where he died and is buried. His death took place 
about 1874. 

Dudley Shuford died at Quitman, Texas, in 1866, and 
is buried at that place. 

Eli Shuford was a Justice of the Peace in Texas many 
years. 

Pink Shuford left Wood County, and moved farther 
west. The w^riter can not give his home at this time. 

Lena Shuford married Dr. Gunter. He practiced 
medicine in Lincoln, now Catawba, County, N. C. 
About 1855 to 1856 he went west, and lived many 
years in Wood County, Texas. Some of his children 
are buried at Quitman, Texas. When last heard from 
the Gunter family was living at Waxahahatchie, Ellis 
County, Texas. 



ELI SHUFORD. 45 

Harrison Shuford died at Quitman, Texas, about 
1857, and is buried at that place. 

Caroline Shuford married Mr. D. C. Williams. After 
his death, she moved away from Mineola, Texas. The 
place of her residence is not known to the writer. 

Middlecof Shuford was a soldier in the Confederate 
Army. He was captured as a prisoner of war in Louis- 
iana, and has not been heard from since. 

Poindexter vShuford is a son of Eli Shuford. He 
was born in Lincoln, now Catawba, County, N. C. The 
early teacher of Deck Shuford was Prof. Smith, who 
was, at the tim.e, president of Catawba College. Pro- 
fessor Smith is the father of Hon. Hoke Smith. M'ho was 
a member of the Cabinet of President Cleveland. Hon. 
Hoke Smith was born at Newton, N. C. 

After completing his college course. Deck Shuford 
went to Mississippi and taught school. This was about 
1855 and 1856. He also taught school at Alexandria, 
Ala. 

In i8j9 his home was at Quitman, Texas, where he 
was engaged in teaching school. In i860 he was the 
editor of a newspaper at Quitman, Texas, About this 
time he began to practice law at the same place. 

In 1 86 1 Deck Shuford was sent as a delegate to a state 
convention at Austin, Texas. At this convention, the 
question came before the convention whether the State 
of Texas should remain in the union or secede. There 
were seven in the convention, who voted for the state 
of Texas to remain in the union, and Deck Shuford was 
one of the seven. 

After the war between the states, Deck Shuford was 
appointed District Attorney by Gov. A. J. Hamilton. He 
held his office some time. He was a man of superior 
literary attainments, and a well graded lawyer. Deck 



46 poindextp:r siiuford, 

Shuford was among the ablest men that his party had in 
the state of Texas- at that time. There was no lawyer 
at the time that was his equal in his party in the locality 
of his home. He was a peer in the ranks of his party. 

"Deck Shuford studied hard and became one of the 
first lawyers at the bar in Texas." "I will say that 
Deck Shuford was a high toned gentleman and a lawyer 
second to none." — IV. A. Grogan, ex-County Judge, Gol- 
den, Texas. 

After his death, his obituary was written by D. W. 
Crow, Attorney-at-law, at Mineola, Texas. Hisobtiuary 
was published in many of the papers in the state of Tex- 

Deck Shuford married a young lady of Austin, Texas, 
She died and is buried at Quitman, Texas. Deck Shuf- 
ord died in 1874 or 1875, and is buried at Quitman, Texas, 
as. When he died he was in the prime of life, and had 
a bright future before him. He w^as a man of fine social 
qualities and had many warm friends in his party and 
out of his party. His father in his day belonged to the 
Henry Clay Whig party. 

"Deck" Shuford, as he was familiarly called by his 
brethren of the bar, was unquestionably a man of more 
than ordinary talents and ability. 

In the days of reconstruction, he was District Attorney 
for his judicial district, being a strong adherent of the 
administration. He made a highly creditable record as 
a conscientious, vigorous, and successful prosecuting 
officer. 

His contemporaries say that his literary attainments 
were commensurate with his acquirements in the lore of 
Blackstone and Coke. They speak of him as a "brill- 
iant man," — "a man of fine analytic mind." 

He was the acknowledged leader of the then dominant 
party, in his section, and one of its ablest and boldest 



JACOB H. SHUFORD. 



47- 



advocates in the entire state of Texas; and it is the uni^ 
versal opinion of those best qualified to judge, that, if 
he had lived, he would have risen high in federal favor. 

For most of the facts set out in this sketch, the author 
is indebted to Mr, J, L, Ray and D. W. Crow, Esq., of 
Mineola, Texas; Judge W. A. Grogan, of Golden, Tex- 
as; and Hon. J. S. Hogg, of Austin, formerly governor 
of the state. 

In a personal letter to the writer, Gov. Hogg says of 
the subject of this sketch: "He was 2i fine lawyer, a gen-^ 
tie kind-hearted man. The people, regardless of politi- 
cal persuasion, had respect for him as a lawyer and an 
honest man." 

This is most flattering and gratifying, coming from so 
distinguished a southern democrat, as a tribute to the 
character and ability of a reconstruction office-holder; 
and the only logical conclusion is that the death of A. 
P. Shuford was the premature termination of a brilliant, 
and honorable career. 



JACOB H. SHUFOKD. 

Jacob H. Shuford is a son of Jacob Shuford, who died in 
1844, and a grand son of Martin Shuford, who died in 
1780, and a great grand son of John Shuford, who died 
in 1790. 

Jacob H. Shuford was born Feb. 23, 1805. He married 
Catherine Baker Oct. 16, 1828. He and his wife were 
born in Lincoln County, now Catawba County, N. C. 



48 JACOB H. SIIUFORD. 

He was a farmer and lived and died in Catawba Co. , N. C. 
His home was six miles west of Newton, N. C, between 
the forks of the river. Catherine Shuford, the wife of 
Jacob Shuford, was born June 15, 18 10. 

THEIR CHILDREN. 

Margaret A. Shuford was born June 2, 1830. 
Adolphus L. Shuford was born February 27, 1832. 
Elizabeth H. Shuford was born October i, 1834. 
Sidney J. Shuford was born May i, 1837. 
William H. Shuford was born October 16, 1839. 
Abel A. Shuford was born November 13, 1841. 
Wallace P. Shuford was born November 7, 1844. 
John M. Shuford was born March 9, 1847. 
Julius H, Shuford was born December iq, 1849. 
Alice A. C. Shuford was born July 29, 1852. 
Laura C. Shuford was born Feb. 9, 1856. 

DEATHS. 

Sidney J. Shuford died December 15, 1842. 
William H, Shuford was killed in the battle of the 
Wilderness on the 5th day of May, 1864. 
Jacob H. Shuford died Oct. 31, 1874. 
Catherine Shuford died September i, 1877. 

MARRIAGES. 

Margaret Amanda Shuford and Samuel Blackburn 
were married October 17, 1852. 

Elizabeth H. Shuford and John W. Robinson were 
married October s. 1854. 

Adolphus L. Shuford and Mary A. Lindsay were mar- 
ried August 5, 1862. 

Wallace Pinkney Shuford and Emma E. Ramsaur 
were married October 28, 1866, by Rev. J. lugold, D. D. 

John M, Shuford and Alice Wilson were married Jan- 



JACOB H. SHUFORD. 



49 



uary 13, 1870, by Rev. J. C. Clapp, D. D. 

Abel A. Shuford and Alda V. Campbell were married 
December 18, 1873, by Rev. J. C. Clapp, D. D, 

Alice A. Shuford and Q. A, Wilfong were married 
December 15, 1870, by Rev. J. C. Clapp, D. D. 

Laura C. Shuford and Eli Ramsaur were married 
August 25, 1875 by Rev. J. H. Shuford. This mar- 
riage took place at the old Jacob H. Shuford homestead. 
* * 

Catherine Baker Shuford is a daughter of John Baker, 
who lived in Lincoln, now Catawba, County, N. C. He 
was born in 1775, and was a farmer by occupation. 

The beautiful farm upon which Jacob H. Shuford 
lived is found near the place where the rivers of Jacob's 
and Henry's Fork unite and form the South Fork. This 
is the farm upon which the author of this book spent 
his boyhood days. 

Jacob H. Shuford and Catherine Baker Shuford were 
the parents of the author of this book. The old farm 
was the scene of many happy days. 

Jacob H. Shuford and wife were members of the Re- 
formed Church of the United States. They became 
members of the Reformed Church under the ministry of 
Rev. John Fritchey, who was a Reformed minister from 
Pennsylvania. He preached in North Carolina from 
1828 to 1840. 

They assisted in organizing and building Bethel Re- 
formed Church in Catawba County, N. C. They held 
their membership in that church and are buried there. 
Their home was the home of the Reformed minister 
when he came into the community to preach. The 
stranger always found this home open to him for the 
night, when he was passing through the locality of this 
home. They were given to hospitality. They were 



50 MRS. CATHERINE SIIUFORD. 

kind to the poor. 

The funeral of Jacob H, Shuford was preached by 
Rev. J. C. Clapp, D. D., President of Catawba College, 
Newton, N. C. 

The funeral of Catherine Baker Shuford was preached 
by Rev. John Foil, Professor of Mathematics in Cataw- 
ba College, Newton, N. C. 



MRS. CATHEiUNE SHUFORD. 

Departed this life Sept. ist at the residence of her 
son-in-law, Mr. Quince Wilfong. She was in her 67th 
year — had suffered long from a severe stroke of paraly- 
sis received over a year ago. 

This stroke was very soon after the sudden and pain- 
ful death of her husband, and though this was almost 
more than could be borne, yet she patiently endured it 
all with that Christian resignation so characteristic of her 
long, quiet, and useful life. vShe was a kind and affec- 
tionate wife and mother; a member of the church and a 
useful Christian. She was ever ready to offer a kind 
rebuke to those around her, who from any cause should 
provoke censure. 

Few mothers have greater cause for satisfaction in 
their children than she. One, a noble young man, fell 
in his country's battle. 

Her four daughters, all Christian women, are happily 
married to good Christian husbands. Her five surviving 
sons are successful in their several avocations and use- 



THE BAKER FAMILY, 5 I 

ful and honored in their communities. How gratifying- 
to her in her old age to see all her children faithful 
members of the church of their ancestors, and prosper- 
ous and useful members of society. Especially gratify- 
ing must it have been to her that she left one, Benjamin 
of the family, on the walls of Zion proclaiming the ever- 
lasting gospel of her own dear Savior. 

Her mortal remains sleep sweetly beside those of her 
beloved husband in the new grave-yard at Bethel 
church. They were not long divided by death. Their 
spirits are now re-united in the rest that remains for the 
people of God. 

Her funeral was attended by a very large con- 
course of relatives and friends. Farewell, dear, gentle 
mother— Christian friend — the memory shall ever be 
sweet, and will cheer us along our weary pilgrimage. 

J. C. Clapp. 



THE BAKER FAMILY. 

John Baker was born 1775. 

His wife, Catherine, was born 1782, 

His son, David, was born 1798. 

His daughter, Elizabeth, wife of John Warlick, was 
born 1 80 1. 

His daughter, Sarah, wife of Philip Warlick, was born 
1804. 

His son, John, was born 1807. 

His daughter, Catherine, wife of Jacob H. Shuford, 



52 SAMUEL BLACKBURN. 

was born 1810. 

His daughter, Polly, first wife of George P. Shuford, 
was born 181 3. 

His son, Solomon, was born 18 15. 

His daughter, Eliza, second wife of George P. Shuf- 
ord, was born 1820. 

His daughter, Hannah, died young, was born 1823. 



SAMUEL BLACKBURN. 

Samuel Blackburn married Margaret Amanda Shuf- 
ord, a daughter of Jacob H. Shuford, who died in 1874, 
The marriage cermony was performed by Rev. John 
Crawford, a minister in the Reformed church in N. C, 
and a minister in the Shuford family in the counties of 
Lincoln and Catawba, N. C, from 184010 1856. Samuel 
Blackburn lived in Cat.awba County, N. C, and was a 
farmer by occupation. He was a member of the Reform- 
ed church at Grace, and held the office of elder in that 
church. He died in July 22, 1895, and is buried at Grace 
church. His funeral was preached by Rev. J. C. Clapp, 
D. D. 

Margaret Amanda Shuford Blackburn, the wife of 
Samuel Blackburn, was a member of the Reformed 
church at Grace. She died in 1898 and is buried at 
Grace Reformed church. 

The children of Samuel Blackburn and wife are: 
Emma, Julius, Willie, Eddie, Alice, Luella, Carrie, 
Samuel, and James. 



SA.MUKL BLACKBURN. 53 

Emma married James Wilfong, of Catawba County, 
N. C. They were married by Rev. J. H. Shuford in 
the fall of 1879. Mr: Wilfong; is a farmer by occupa- 
tion. He is a member of the Reformed church at Beth- 
el, and holds the office of elder in that church. He held 
the office of county commissioner. 

Julius Blackburn is not married. He lives in Cataw- 
ba County, N. C. 

Willie Blackburn married Miss Mattie Erwin, of Burke 
County, N. C. He lives in Catawba County, and is a 
farmer by occupation. 

Eddie Blackburn married Miss Susan Boyd, of Maid- 
en, N. C, and lives in Catawba County, N. C, and is a 
farmer by occupation. 

Alice Blackburn married Mr. George F. Herman, of 
Catawba County, N. C. Mr. Herman spent his early mar- 
ried life upon his farm in Catawba County, N. C. He 
now lives at Hickory, N. C, where he is educating his 
children. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and 
his wife a member of the Reformed church at Hickory 
N. C. 

Luella Blakburn married Mr. Charles Fry, of Maid- 
en, N. C. After the death of Mr. Fry, she married 
Mr. Osborne Whisnant, of Catawba County. Mr. Whis- 
nant is engaged in farming and other business. 

Carrie Blackburn married Mr. Eugene Boyd, of Maid- 
en, N. C. He lives at Bridgewater and is engaged in 
lumbering. 

Samuel Blackburn married Miss Annie Tate, of 
Bridgewater, N. C, and is engaged in lumbering. 

James Blackburn married Miss Helen Tate, of Burke 
County, N. C. He lives at Bridgewater. N. C, and is 
engaged in lumbering. 



54 



SAMUEL BLACKBURN. 



Samuel Blackburn Dead. 

Samuel Blackburn, an aged and- highly respected 
member of Grace church, Hickory charge, died at his 
home on the South Fork river on the 22nd of July, 
For some years he had been in feeble health, but recent- 
ly had improved greatly and entertained hopes of re- 
gaining his strength. But he grew worse and the end 
came quickly. He was about 85 years old. 

Mr. Blackburn had married twice, his second wife be- 
ing Amanda, daughter of Jacob vShuford, deceased. 
He leaves a wife and eleven children. 

In the absence of the pastor, the funeral services were 
conducted by the Rev. Dr. Clapp. 

He was one of the oldest citizens of his community, 
an industrious man, and for many years an office-bearer 
in the house of God. He reaps the reward of a well 
spent life. To the wife and children we extend our 
deepest sympathy. May the Lord strengthen and keep 
them,— 77-!^ Reformed Chureli Corinthian. 

A >ioble Woman Gone. 

Margaret Amanda Shuford Blackburn was born June 
2, 1830, died Jan. 5, 1898, aged (^-j years, 7 months, and 
3'days, She was married to Samuel Blackburn on Oct. 
17, 1852. To them were born nine children, all of whom 
are living. Mrs. Blackburn was the oldest daughter of 
the late Jacob Shuford and a sister of Messrs. A. A. 
and J. M. Shuford, of Hickory, N. C, and Rev. J. H. 
Shuford, of Middlebrook, Va., and of W. P. Shuford, of 
Arkansas. She has two sisters living, Mrs. Q. A. Wil- 
fong, of Louise, N. C, and Mrs. E. D. Ramsaur, of 
Lincolnton, N. C. 

Early in life Mrs. Blackburn professed faith in Christ 



A. L. SHUFORD, 55 

and was confirmed a member of the Reformed church. 
She lived a consistent member of the same until death. 
She was a quiet woman and demonstrated the humility 
of the Christian life. Her faith never wavered, and the 
day before her death expressed to her loving daughter 
the source of her hope, faith in Jesus. Her funeral was 
held from Grace church on Jan. gth, and was conducted 
by her pastor, Rev. J. L. Murphy. To the children 
and friends, our sympathy is given. 

May the Lord deal gently with them, and may his 
grace sustain \\\q\\\.^ Cori)ithiaii. 



A. L. SUIJFUIID. 

A. L. Shuford is a son of Jacob H. Shuford, who died 
in 1874. Jacob H. Shuford is a son of Jacob Shuford, 
who died in 1844. Jacob Shuford is a son of Martin 
Shuford, who died in 1780. Martin Shuford is a son of 
John Shuford, who died in 1790. 

A. L. Shuford was born in Catawba County, N. C, 
Feb. 27, 1832. His father was a farmer. The early 
life of A, L, Shuford was spent upon his father's farm. 

When a young man he learned the trade of a carpen- 
ter. He assisted in building the Western N. C. Rail- 
road through Catawba County. He was depot agent at 
Hickory, N. C, during the Civil War, and had charge 
of the Commissary Department of the Confederate Gov- 
ernment at that place. 

Adolphus L. Shuford and Adelaide Lindsay were 



56 A. L. SJIUFOKD. 

married Aug. 5, 1862. The children are: Edward L. 
Shuford, William H. Shuford, Ella D. Shuford, Eugene 
vShuford, Florence Shuford, Mary Adelaide Shuford, 
Walter Shuford, Nora Shuford, Wade Hampton Shu- 
ford, Clara Shuford, and Adrian Shuford. 

After the close of the war, be was engaged in mer- 
chandising at Hickory, N. C, for a number of years. 
He sold his interest in his store and then owned and 
controlled a flour mill at Hickory, N. C. He fininally 
settled upon a farm at Hickory, N. C, and remained 
there until his death. 

A. L. Shuford was very active in commencing and 
finishing the building of Claremont College at Hickory, 
N. C. He was very active in the work upon the first 
Reformed church that was built at Hickory, N. C. 

He was one of the first settlers at Hickory, N. C, and 
had much to do in laying the foundation for the 
future growth of the town. He was a man who had 
many warm friends. He was always ready to do his 
duty to his church and and state. He was a member of 
the Reformed church. 

His wife was a member of the Reformed church. 
She was a good woman. His children are members 
of the Reformed church. 

The children living at this time, 1901, are Edward 
L., I Ella D., Florence, Walter, Nora, Wade H., and 
Adrian. The others died when young. 

A. L. Shuford died at his home at Hickory, N. C, 
Aug, 21, 1885. His funeral was preached by Rev. J. 
Ingold, who was a minister of the Reformed church at 
Hickory at that time. 

Adelaide Lindsay Shuford was born Dec. 19, 1842, 
and died Feb. 6, 1900. 



A. L. SHUKORD. 57 

Adolphus L. Shuford was born Feb. 1832, died Aug, 
1885, 

Mr. Shuford was one of the earliest settlers of Hickory, 
and did much towards promoting the growth of the 
town. For some years, he conducted a mercantile bus- 
iness. Later he disposed of this, and bought a beauti- 
ful farm known as Maple Grove vStock Farm. He 
bought a number of tine Jersey cows, and was engaged 
in starting a dairy when death came to him . 

Mr. Shuford leaves a widow and large family of child- 
ren, some of them of very tender years. He will be 
greatly missed in the community. He was a man of 
sterling character, and ever ready to do good. 

Mr, Shuford was the founder of Claremont College, a 
building of which we should be justly proud. 

He was sick only a short while, when he died sudden- 
ly of heart disease. His funeral was preached by Rev. 
Jeremiah Ingold assisted by Dr. Clapp, a former pastor 
and a devoted friend. 

"An honest man is the noblest work of (^od." 

Again has death entered Corinth congregation and 
claimed one of the most devoted and consecrated mem- 
bers. Mrs. Mary Adelaide Shuford was born Dec. 19, 
1842, and died Feb. 6, 1900. She was born in High 
Point, N. C, and was the daughter of the late R. D. 
Linsday, M. D., of that place. In 1862 she was mar- 
ried to A. L. Shuford of Hickory. N. C. To them were 
born twelve children. Five of these died in infancy. 
Her husband preceded her to the glory land fifteen 
years. For many months Mrs. Shuford's health had 
been failing. The best medical skill and the most care- 
ful nursing were given her, but to no avail. The dis- 
ease was stubborn and would not be arrested. Hers 



\ L. SHU FORD 
58 



i?pfiTied and cultured, and 
was a most lovely character J^^^^f^l,^^^^, Early in 
with a sweet spirit .^^^e was greatly ^^^^^ ^^^^^ 

We she professed fa.th t„ Ch-t -d ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 

sue dwelt in the -^^^f ^^^ /^'without fear or doubt 
a glorious triumph of the g°"P^' , resigned to the 

she waited for the -"-«";:; ^^°„"J '„t. of February t.e 
Master's will, and early :n the morn^r ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ 

6th, surrounded '^y^l^.tfLht, and sister Shuford 
well, her sweet sp.r.t ^^^\''^^'^l^ („„ the Reformed 
is now at rest. We held her funera ^^^ ^^^^^ 

church on February the 7th, ^"^ '" passages of 

with weeping, ^Y^",^, ^ "he" were read by the 
scripture marked a,,d V^^^^^^ ,er memory by 
;ri-.-^^;^-;;|"^^:"raformlr pastor and a close 

friend. ..Abide with me," the au- 

As the choir sweetly »an j^^^_3 Ten- 

dience felt the abia.ng P- "- oj J" q^^,„„„,. The 

deny, g-''y- «; a- ommended to the care of a 
children and friends aic co ^^ ^ _ ^,_ 

loving Father, ^ 

Edward UndsayShufor.tl. oldest .^^^^^^^ 
and Adelaide Shuford, was boin 1 ^ ^^ 

Aug. B, .S63. His educat^n J -- ^,^ ^^,^^,. 
School of his -"^-^ '"J-^^ ,1,, business world, con- 
Leavtng college he entered t ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 

ducting ~^f""y^;4°Js.n" of hts mercantile bus.ness, 
and retail stores. ^'"P°' "" .,„„facturing, and was in-, 
he turned his attention '; •^^'•■;"ji f Brookford and 

strumental in «^''"'^'";\;:';,::" ' He holds the posi- 
the large cotton mills at that p ^^^^^^^ Manufacturing 
tion of President ot the t-. ■ 
Company. 



A. L. SllUbDRD. 

Mr. 



59 



Mr. Shuford has been married twice. «- ^'^^"^ 
was Adelaide Forney. Lucile is the only chtld by the 

't^Sr was t.arr,ed to Magnolia McKay «>>"f-^„ 
of Georgia. Their children are: Edward Undsay. bom 
May 3 .895: Hilton McKay, born Aug. .5. Q^. 
Katherine Elwyn Campbell, born, March ,9, ,898, 

^tr^''s;ttrl^td.^ro;;hr:e»are of those Whom 
he mploy To this end he has been interested m pre. 
vid n7 hitrch and school facilities for them. A suttaWe 
hoof building has been erected, and a commoaious 
:;urh bS established, so that ample educational 
advantages and religious opportumttes are afforded. 
\\r Shuford is a man of great energy. . , , • , 

ElUU, the oldest daughter of A. L. and Adelaule 
Shuford, married Thomas M. Johnston^ of Richmond 
Va. The marriage took place in H-kory, N^C on 
Dec 26, .892. and was performed by Rev J. L. Mu 
Phy Mr. Johnston is a prominent ra.lroad man, whde 
^■Jwife is a woman of excellent traits of character. At 
'his time they reside in Salisbury, N. C, and have one 

t ^-'^lltSt: stC-daughter of A. ..and Ade.^ 

I' r/w^;^.teirto\-irar::nnir..R^rbe. 

ongs to a protninent family of North Carolmians res.d- 
VKitterell N C. Mr. and Mrs. Reid were mar- 

ptLsses many womanly qualities which attracts to her 

"Tallrr'suuford is a son of A. L. and Adelaide 
Shuford, and by energy and perseverance has won hts 



6o JOHN \V. ROBINSON'S FAMILY. 

way to the front of the young men of his town as a bus- 
iness man. He lives at Hickory, N. C, is unmarried 
and holds the position of manager of the Hickory Mill- 
ing Company, a firm controlling one of the largest flour 
mills in North Carolina. 

Miss Nora, the youngest daughter of A. L. and Ade- 
laide Shuford, was educated at Claremont College, 
Hickory, N. C, and at Kee Mar, Hagerstown, Md., 
graduating from the latter institution. Since the death 
of her parents, she makes her home with her sisters and 
brothers. Like the rest of her family she is a member 
of the Reformed church. 

Wade Hampton Shuford lives at Hickory, North Car- 
olina, and is connected with the E. L. Shuford Cotton 
Mill Manufacturing Company. He is a young man of 
good business qualifications, and is fast rising in the 
business world. 

Adrian, the youngest child of the family, was small 
when hisifather died and had to enter the world without a 
father's advice or a father's care. He has succeeded quite 
well and now holds a position with the First National 
Bank of Hickory. Few boys have done as well as Adrian. 

All of A. L. Shuford's family are members of the 
Reformed church. 



JOHN VY. ROBINSON'S FAMILY. 

John Wilfong Robinson is a great grandson of James 
Robinson, and a grandson of Jesse Robinson and a son 



JOHN W. ROBINSON'S FAMILY. 6l 

of Henry Whitener Robinson. He is also a grandson of 
John Wilfong", his mother being the daughter of John 
Wilfong. His grandfather, Jesse Robinson, married as 
his first wife the daughter of Henry Weidner, the first 
white settler in the South Fork valley. 

Jesse Robinson's last wife was a daughter of John 
Mull, and a first cousin to his first wife. Her name was 
Mary Ann Mull. To them was born one son, Henry W. 
Robinson. Henry W, Robinson married Mary M. Wil- 
fong. 

John W. Robinson was born April 6, 1832. Elizabeth 
H. Shuford, daughter of Jacob H. Shuford, was born 
October i, 1839, and was married to John W. Robinson 
October 5, 1854. 

Elizabeth H. Robinson died June 20, 1896, and' is 
buried in the Robinson graveyard. 

The following are the children of John W. Robinson 
and Elizabeth H. Robinson: 

Raymond Whitener Robinson was born Oct. 15, 1856. 

Abel Shuford Robinson was born April 17, 1861. 

Laura Alice Robinson was born Feb. 14, 1864. 

Mary Katherine Robinson was born Jan. 7, 1867. 

Martha Etta Robinson was born July 27, 1869, 

Anna Lizzie Robinson was born Jan. 19, 1872. 

Jacob Henry Robinson was born Dec. 8, 1874. 

John Wilfong Robinson was born July 10, 1878. 

John W. Robinson was married the second time to 
Martha Abernethy, daughter of Miles S. Abernethy, 
who married Mahalah Lowrance, daughter of Isaac Low- 
ran ce. 

John W. Robinson and Martha Abernethy were mar- 
ried May 21, 1898. Mrs. Martha Robinson was born 
April 26, 185 1. There are no children by the last mar- 



52 JOHN \V. ROBINSON'S FAMILY. 

riage. 

John Robinson is a farmer. He has a farm of about 
looo acres which is regarded as one of the finest farms 
inCata;vba County. It is part of the farm of Henry 
Weidner, who was the first white settler in the South 
Fork valley; he having come to this part of the county 
about 1750. 

John VV. Robinson is a member of the Reformed 
church, and has held the office of eider for many years. 
His first wife, Elizabeth H. vShuford Robinson, was also 
a member of the Reformed church. The children of 
John W. Robinson are also members of that church. 

Raymond married Katie Coulter. He is a farmer. 
Laura married Otis Lowe, who died some years ago. 
Laura lives at Hickory, N. C. Mary married W. A. 
Self, a lawyer, and lives at Hickory. Martha married 
J. H. Aiken, and lives at Hickory also. Anna married 
George W. Cline, a conductor on the Southern Railroad. 

Ab^'el Robinson married Miss Sarah Cline, of Catawba 
County. After marriage she lived about six months. 
He lives on a part of the old homestead. 

Henry Robinson is unmarried, and is in the West. 

John W. Robinson attended school at Lenoir College, 
and married Maude E. Yoder, the second daughter of 
Rev Prof. R. A. Yoder, D. D., late President of Concor- 
dia and Lenoir Lutheran Colleges, They live at the 
old home, a historic spot, where Heinrich Weidner set- 
tled, built his fortified home, defended himself against 
the Lidians, and raised his family. 

* -A- * 

Our town and community were greatly shocked last 
Sunday morning when the information was received that 
Mrs Robinson, wife of J. W. Robinson, had died sud- 
denly at her home on the South Fork, Saturday evening. 



JOHN W. ROBINSON'S FAMILY. 63 

Mrs. Robinson had been enjoying her usual health, un- 
til Saturday when she complained of feeling bad and 
suffering with pains in her side. She lay down to rest, 
but soon got up feeling l^etter, and came and sat down 
on the porch with the family. In the midst of the con- 
versation, her head fell to one side. The children spoke 
to her, but no answer. The spirit of the true and devo- 
ted mother had taken its flight. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Shuford Robinson was the daughter of 
Jacob Shuford, and a sister of our townsmen, A. A. and 
J. M. Shuford, and also aunt to Mrs. E. L. Shuford, 
and the mother of xMrs. W. A. Self and Mrs. J. H. Aik- 
en, of our town. She was born Oct. i, 1834, and died 
June 20, 1896, aged 61 years, 7 months, and 19 days. 
She was happily married to J. W. Robinson. To them 
were born eight children, four boys and four girls. 
These were permitted to be present at the burial service 
with the exception of Henry, who is in Augusta, Ga. 
Mrs. Robinson was a member of Bethel Reformed 
church, and an humble sincere Christian woman. Kind 
and considerate to every one. She was especially kind 
to the poor. After the burial the writer found one of the 
tenants behind the garden wiping the tears from his sun- 
burnt face with his rough hands saying: "The poor have 
lost their best friend." A true and faithful wife a devo- 
ted and kind mother, a consecrated Christian, has gone. 
The burial took place on Monday at 10 o'clock at the 
Robinson grave-yard. At the house a simple service 
was held conducted by the pastor, Rev. J. L. Murphy. 
After the reading of the Scripture and prayer, Mrs. 
Murphy sweetly sang "Gathering Home." Every face 
was bathed in tears. The large audience then moved to 
the grave on the hill, when "earth to earth, ashes to 
ashes, dust to dust," the mortal remains of Mrs. Robin- 



64 JOHN W. ROBINSON'S FAMILY. 

son were laid away to await the resurrection morning. 
To the grief stricken husband and sorrowing children, 
we extend our deepest sympathies. May the Lord deal 
gently with them, and bind up the broken hearts. 

M. 

Mrs. Anna Lizzie Cline, wife of Mr. (;eorge Cline, a 
Southern Railway conductor, died at her home in Ashe- 
ville Sunday morning, Nov. 17th, from typhoid fever, 
after an illness of more than a month. The remains 
were brought down to Hickory Sunday evening accom- 
panied by the heart broken husband, Mrs. E. B. Cline, 
and Conductor George Hanger. 

Mrs. Cline was a daughter of Mr. John \V. Robinson, 
of this city. She was 29 years. 9 months, and 27 days 
old, and had been married about two years. She was a 
consistent member of the German Reformed church, 
and a model Christian lady, much admired and loved by 
all who knew her. 

The funeral took place from the residence of Mr. E. 
B. Cline, Monday evening at 3 o'clock, Rev. J. C. Clapp, 
D. D., of Newton, conducting the service. A large 
number of relatives and friends were present. The m- 
terment was in Oakwood cemetery. 

Mrs. Cline leaves a devoted husband, an aged father, 
three sisters, Mrs. J. H. Aiken, Mrs. Laura Lowe, and 
Mrs. W. A. Self: and four brothers, Messrs. Raymond, 
Abel S., Henry and John W. Robinson, Jr., all of 
whom live in or near Hickory, except Mr. Henry Rob- 
inson, who is now in Idaho. 

To all the bereaved ones we extend our deepest sym- 
pathy. 



WILLIAM HARRISON SHUFORD. 65 

W. A. Self, Esq., was born Sept. 16, 1866. He mar- 
ried Mary C. Robinson on Nov. 11, 1887. 

Mr. Self was educated at the University of North 
Carolina. He graduated in June 1886. 

While in school at the University, he received many 
distinct honors, among which was the Orators' Medal, a 
prize which is considered one of the highest that can be 
won at the University of North Carolina. 

After finishing his work at the University, Mr. Self 
began the study of law under Col. George Nathaniel 
Folk, and was licensed to practice law in Feb. 1889. 

As a lawyer Mr. Self stands in the front rank of the 
members of this profession. He is regarded as one of the 
leading members of the bar in the State of North Caro- 
lina, well informed in the law, strong, powerful, and el- 
oquent as an advocate, and a lawyer, who is loved by 
his brethren and held in high esteem by all who know 
him. 

As a public speaker, Mr. Self ranks with the greatest. 
He is prominent in the affairs of state, a d as a cam- 
paigner has won for himself the reputation of being fair 
in his arguments, broad-minded, and respectful of the 
opinions of those who do not agree with him politically 
or otherwise. 



WILLIAM HARHLSON SHUFORD 

Killed in the battle of the Wilderness on the 5th of 
May 1864. 



65 WILLIAM HARRISON SHUFORD. 

William Harrison Shuford was killed in the 26th year 
of his age The deceased was the second son of Jacoo 
and Catherine Shuford, and their fourth son m the 
army He volunteered under Capt. A. T. Bost, 46th 
reeiment N. C. T. He fought his way safely through 
five important battles. In the sixth he fell a martyr to 
the cause of liberty and independence. He feU at 
his post endeavoring to discharge his duty as a soldier 
which he had ever done from the time he first entered 
the field He was not disposed to murmur and com- 
plain of the various hardships and deprivation incident 
to a soldier's life. He knew these would come, and he 
knew that they must be met; therefore, did he beai 
cheerfully the burdens which as a patriotic soldier he 
could not avoid. . . 

He was not of those whose patriotism consists m 
word; he was never heard to boast of his patriotism 
but when it became necessary, he hesitated not to seal 
it with his blood. And now, that he has done for his 
country all that he can ever do, it is right and proper 
that some one of his countrymen record at least, a brief 
tribute of respect, and give, in behalf of his country, a 
public expression of gratitude, due for all the services 
so faithfully rendered, and from which death has given 
him a final discharge. But when we remember Ham- 
son as a patriot and soldier, we have not satisfied the 
claims of affection and sympathy. In his death a sore 
breach has been made in the family circle; fond parents 
lost an affectionate son; the neighborhood a citizen, fit- 
ted by education for usefulness (in life) and the church, 
an exemplary member. Much of his time before the 
war was spent in school. He was a close student, and 
what he undertook was thoroughly accomplished. 

So. too. in regard to religion; he joined the Methodi.t 



ABEL A. SHUFOKD. 67 

church before he entered the army; but not satisiaed 
with his hope, he continued to seek until he found peace 
to his soul. Most gladly, therefore, do we record the 
fact, for the special comfort to his bereaved and smitten 
parents and his numerous relatives and friends, that he 
died in the blessed hope of a glorious resurrection unto 
everlasting life. 

J. Ingold, 



ABEL A. SHUFOKD. 

Lieutenant Abel A. Shuford, of Hickory, one of the 
most prominent bankers and manufacturers of Western 
North Carolina, was born in Catawba County, in 1841, 
son of Jacob H. Shuford, a farmer, and a native of the 
same county. After receiving his education in the old 
field schools, he made his debut in business life as a. 
clerk in Hickory, an occupation which was interrupted, 
in ]86i, by the call for troops for defense of the state.. 
At the age of 20 years, he enlisted as a private in Com- 
pany F Twenty-third Regiment, North Carolina troops, 
under command of Col. J. F. Hoke, and was soon pro- 
moted to corpora] and then to second sergeant. WitL 
his regiment he was in camp near Manassas, Va., until 
the spring of 1862, and was then ordered to the Penin- 
sula, where in his first battle, Williamsburg, he carried, 
the colors of his regiment. He fought at Seven Pines, 
and in the Seven Days' campaign, up to the battle of 
Cold Harbor, where he was severely wounded. After a 



58 ABKL A. SllUFORD, 

season in hospital and at his home, he was again with 
his comrades at Martinsburg, after their return from 
Maryland, and engaged in the battles of Fredricksburg, 
Berryville, and Winchester, He was then elected sec- 
ond lieutenant of his company, but the battle of Gettys- 
burg which followed, was his last. Slightly wounded 
in the first day's fight, he was captured by the enemy 
and sent as a prisoner of war to Fort Delaware, and 
three months later to Point Lookout, where he was held 
for eighteen months. Then, being exchanged, he was 
civen a furlough, during which the war came to an end. 
" After farming for a time, he made his home at Hick- 
ory and embarked in mercantile busmess with a small 
capital In the years which have followed, he has met 
with much success as a merchant, and is still interested 
in that business, but as a capitalist and manufacturer he 
is most widely known. 

In 1891 he became the president of the Citizens Bank, 
H year later merged in the First National Bank, of which 
he is now the head; also is president of a bank m New- 
ton and director of the Burke County Bank at Morganton. 
He'is president of the Hickory Manufacturing Company 
and of the Electric Light Company, and since 1892 has 
been general manager of the Granite Falls Cotton Mill, 
which runs 3,000 spindles. 

In educational work he has a responsible part as a 
tru^-tee, both of Catawba College and Claremont College. 
Officially he has rendered efficient service to his fel- 
low citizens, as chairman of the Democratic County Ex- 
ecutive Committee for the past fifteen years, as county 
commissioner and city alderman, and as a member of 
the state legislature in 1884 and 1885. 

He was married, in 1873, to Alda V., daughter o Dr 
O. Campbell, and niece of Col. Reuben Campbell, of 




A. A. SrtUFORD, 

For ^^ years a Deacon in the 
Reformed Church. 



ABEL A. 8HUF0RD. 69 

Statesville, N. C. 

A. A. Shuford was baptized by Rev. Mr. Crawford, 
and his wife was baptized by Rev. Mr. Rumple, a Pres- 
byterian minister. 

Upon examining his family Bible, it is found that he 
observed the old German rule and recorded the day of 
the week, as well as of the month, of the birth of each 
child. He also recorded the name of the minister who 
baptized each child. His children were baptized by 
Reformed ministers. The record of births and baptisms 
is as follows: 

Catherine Campbell Shuford was born Oct. 21, 1874, 
and was baptized by Rev. J. Ingold, D. D. 

Maud Evans Shuford was born Feb. 10, 1877, and was 
baptized by Rev. Ingold. 

Abel Alexander Shuford was born March 25, 1879, 
and was baptized by Rev. Ingold. 

Archie Campbell Shuford was born May 14, 1881. 

Esther Gilmer Shuford was born July 12, 1883, and 
was baptized by Rev. Mr. Gnrley. 

Rosa Campbell Shuford was born May 28, 1885, ^^^ 
was baptized by Rev, Gurley. 

James Campbell Shuford was born Jan. 12, 1888, and 
was baptized by Rev. Louis Reiter. 

Mary Campbell Shuford was born May 23, 1890, and 
was baptized by Rev. J. L. Murphy, D. D. 
* * * 

A. A. vShuford is intensely interested in church work, 
and It may be that in this department of life the true 
character of the man is seen. Just before he enlisted to 
defend bis country, he enlisted under the Great Cap- 
tain, becoming a member of Bethel Reformed church, 
the church of his fathers. 

When the Reformed church was organi^.ed in Hickory 



70 ABEL A. SIIUFORD. 

in 1869, Mr. Shuford entered as a charter member, and 
w made a deacon of that congregation. This position 
he has held continuously ever since. Indeed he has 
been so intimately connected with the congregation that 
his life and that of the church seem inseparable. His 
deep interest in the welfare of the church has been man- 
ifest in many ways, but one or two instances will serve 
to show how near his heart the prosperity of his church 
lies. He has been known to leave his banking business 
and go to the church in order that he might attend to 
the arranging of a stove or the placing of the seats, so 
that everything would be ready for the Sunday service. 
Nothing is too small when it will benefit the church to 
engage Mr. Shuford's attention. He teaches in the 
Sunday-school, attends the meetings for prayer, and all 
the business meetings of the church. But withal he is 
modest, having declined several times to be elected el- 
der, prefering to serve in the lower office, that of dea- 
con. 

If there is one line of church work in which Mr. Shu- 
ord excels, it is in benevolence. He makes money, but 
he does "not love it. As he prospers the church has 
been blessed by his benefactions. His liberality is not 
limited to the congregation of his own choice, but ex- 
tends to other churches. 

Amid the many duties of life, Mr. Shuford has found 
time to give some attention to the cause of education. 
In the founding of Claremont Female College of Hicko- 
ry, he was most active. For many years he has served 
as a trustee of Catawba College, and it has been his 
good business judgment chat has relieved the trustees in 
many financial straits. The poor have been blessed by 
his liberality. 

To know Mr. Shuford as he really is, he must be seen 



ABEL A. SHUFORl). 7^ 

in the home with his wife, surrounded by a family of 

happy children, or in the Sunday-school teaching a class 

of bright, interesting girls. At these places he is happy, 

* * * 

Catherine Campbell Shuford married Dr. Henry 
Charles Menzies June 2, 1897. He was born at Ashe- 
vill, N. C, Nov. 5, 1873. He graduated in medicine at 
Davidson College, N. C, and took a post graduate 
course in New York City. The children of this mar- 
riage are: 

Henry Charles Menzies born April 6, 1898. 

Abel Alexander Shuford Menzies born Jan. 20, 190Q. 

They live at Hickory, N. C. They were married by 
the Rev. J. Alston Ramsay, D. D., pastor of the Pres- 
byterian church. Hickory, N. C. Dr. Menzies is a 
young physician of promise, and has an extensive prac- 
tice. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and 
his wife is a member of the Reformed church. 

BRILLIANT CHURCH WEDDING. 

A Philadelphia Newspaper Man Wins a Southern Bride. 

Special to "The Record." 
Hickory, N. C, April 23d,— Corinth Reformed church, 
almost hidden in choice flowers and palms and brilliant 
with myriad lights from varicolored electric lamps, was 
this evening the scene of the wedding of Miss Maud 
Shuford and Gordon H. Cilley. 

The bride's father is A. A, Shuford, one of the most 
prominent bankers of the South, while the groom, who 
is attached to the editorial staff of "The Philadelphia 
Record," represents one of the foremost families of the 
state, their home also being in this city. 

The ceremony was performed by Rev. J. L. Murphy. 

The bride, who is one of the most admired belles of 



72 WALLACE P. SHUFORD, 

this section, was attended by Miss Hattie Moore, of 
Bramwell, W. Va., who was maid of honor, and the 
bridesmaids were the Misses Essie and Rosa Shuford, 
sisters of the bride, and Miss Katherine Copeland and 
Miss Vee Copeland, of Statesville, N. C. 

Albert B. Bailey, of Philadelphia, was best man, and 
the following acted as ushers: H, A. Banks, of Char- 
lotte, N. C, Niell W. Clark, W. J. Shuford, and J. L. 
Cilley. The bride was given away by A, A. Shuford, 
Jr. her brother. 

Kathryn Seagle, as organist, played the wedding 
march from "Lohengrin." 

Abel Alexander Shuford, Jr., lives at Hickory, N. C. 
He is a merchant, and owns hardware stores at Hicko- 
ry and Newton, N, C. He is a successful businessman. 

Archie C. Shuford died of scarlet fever Nov. i6, 1883; 
age 2 years, 6 months, and 2 days. 

Misses Esther and Rosa Shuford are students at Con- 
verse College, Spartanburg, S. C. 

The two youngest children, James and Mary, are at 
home. 



WALLACE P. SMUFOKD. 

Fort Smith, Arkansas, March 13, 1901. 
Rev. J. H. Shuford, Hickory, N. C — 

Dear Uncle Julius: Father received your letter of a 
few days ago, and has requested me to answer same. 



WALLACE P. SHUFORD, 73 

We are glad to hear from you, and to know that you 
are getting along nicely. Of course, we will all take a 
book of the "Shuford Family," and I am sure it will be 
quite an addition to our small library, Well, I will 
proceed to answer your questions to the best of my 
ability. 

Wallace P. Shuford was born Nov. 7. 1844, in Cataw- 
ba County, N. C. He enlisted in the Confederate Ar- 
my of 1862, at the age of 17, Company B, 42nd North 
Carolina Regiment, Kirkland's Brigade, Hoke's Divi- 
sion, and was engaged in the following battles: Bermu- 
da Hundred, Va., Second Coal Harbor, Va., Siege of 
Petersburg, Second Battle of Kingston, N. C, Fort 
Fisher, N. C, Bentonville, N. C, and numerous other 
small engagements. Surrendered near High Point, N. 
C. under Gen Joe E. Johnson, April 6, 1865. 

He married Emma E. Ramsaur, Oct. 28, 1866. moved 
to Arkansas in 1868, and lived at Hamburg, Ashley 
County, Ark., fifteen years, and removed to Fort Smith 
in 1882, where he still resides. From their marriage 
six children were born, all of whom are still living: 
Lula C. Shuford, Mrs. S. King; two children. 
Eugene W. Shuford, married Miss Fannie Shelton. 
J. Frank Shuford, married Miss Nina Hatcher; t^vo 
children. 

Sallie S. Shuford. 
Garland J. Shuford. 
Clarence V. Shuford. 

Garland Shuford enlisted in the U. S. Army June 
20, 1899, Company B 33d Regiment, U, S. V., and 
served in the Philippine Islands, and was engaged in 
the battles of San Fabian, San Jacinto, and battle of 
Vigan. The regiment that Garland is in is the one that 
released Gilmore, and is known as the famous 33d Reg- 



74 ' JOHN M. SIIUFOKD. 

iment. 

The 33d Regiment is on its way hoine now, and we 
expect Garland home in about six weeks, and you don't 
know how glad we will be to see him, and to hear all 
his experiences. 

Uncle Julius, I am writing this letter during office 
hours, so I must close. 

I trust that the above information will be of service to 
you. 

Grandpa Ramsaur's address is Hamburg, Ark., and I 
have written to him, and requested that he write you. 

All the family send love. Your niece, 

vSallie S. Shu ford. 



JOHN M. SHUFOllD. 

John M. Shuford is a son of Jacob H. Shuford. Ja- 
cob H, Shuford is a son of Jacob Shuford, who died in 
1844, Jacob vShnford is a son of Martin Shuford, who 
died in 1780. Martin Shuford is a son of John Shuford, 
who died in 1790. 

John ]\I. Shuford was born in Catawba County, N. C, 
March 9, 1847. His father was a successful farmer in 
Catawba County, N. C. John M. Shuford was raised 
upon his father's farm. When 17 years of age, he be- 
came a soldier in the Confederate Army. He was capt- 
ured at the fall of Fort Fisher, Dec. 25, 1864, and was 
held as a prisoner of war until June 20, 1865, when he 
returned home, being released from prison. 



JOHN M. SHUFORD. 75 

He became heir to that part of the farm upon which 
his parents lived, and farmed and took care of them dur- 
ing their last days. 

While farming on the old homestead, he was consid- 
ered one of the best farmers in Catawba County, N. C. 

Some time after the death of his parents, he moved to 
Hickory, N. C, for the purpose of educating his child- 
ren. His two daughters were educated at Claremont 
College, Hickory, N. C. 

Jan. 13, 1870, he married Alice Wilson, a daughter 
of Maj. Wilson, of Catawba County, N. C. There are 
four children of this marriage. The children are: Ada 
C. Shu ford, Carroll Shuford, Suehonor Shuford, and 
Jacob Shuford. 

Since John Shuford has been living at Hickory, N. 
C, he has been farming and merchandising, and has 
been successful in both. 

He and his wife and children are members of the 
Reformed church of U. S. He was deacon in the Re- 
formed church at Bethel for many years. This is the 
church where he was raised, and where his parents wor- 
shipped in their day. He held the office of deacon in 
the Reformed church at Hickory for some years. He 
now (1901) lives at Hickory, N, C. His wife was born 
Jan. 16, 1851. 

Ada Catherine, the oldest daughter of John M. and 
Alice Wilson Shuford, was born Nov. 9, 1870, and was 
married to G. Harvey Geitner on the 17th of August, 
1892, by the Rev. J. L, Murphy. Mr. Geitner is a 
Pennsylvanian, and was born at Lititz, Lancaster Coun- 
ty of that State, and belonged to the well know Moravi- 
an community, which is noted for the thrift and sub- 
stantial character of its members. 

On coming to North Carolina, Mr. Geitner, who was 



76 JOHN M. snuFORu. 

but a boy, settled with bis father's family in the town of 
Hickory. He identified himself with the Piedmont 
Wagon Company of that town. 

On settling in Hickory, he connected himself with 
the Reformed church, and has served the congregation 
as a ruling elder, and is one of the most liberal sup- 
porters. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Geitner, are John 
George, who was born June 15, 1893, and Frances Roy- 
er, who was born July 10, 1896. 

Carroll M. Shuford was born March 22, 1872. He 
took a course of pharmacy at the Maryland College, Bal- 
timore, Md. He owns a drug store, and is a successful 
business man. His home is in Hickory, N, C. He has 
a fine home at that place. Carroll Shuford married 
Miss Elizabeth Christine Zahring, of Columbia, Mo. 
July, 14, 1898. 

Mrs. Carroll Shuford was a Teacher of Science in Clare- 
mont College, Hickory, N. C, and is a graduate of the 
State University at Columbia. Mo. 

Charles H. Geitner was born in Lancaster County, 
Pa., June 5, 1866. His wife, Susie Shuford, was born 
in Catawba County. N. C, April 13, 1877. They were 
married Jan. 30, 1900. They have a son by the name 
of Clement Geitner, Jr., who was born Nov. 27, 1900. 

Mr. Geitner lives at Hickory, N. C, and is proprietor 
of Hickory Tannery. 

He and his wife are members of the Reformed church. 

Jacob H, Shuford M. D., the youngest son of J. M. 
and Alice Shuford, was born in Catawba County, N. C, 
June 6, 1879. His early education was secured in the 
select school of the late R. K. Meade. Under the skillful 
management of Prof. Meade young Shuford showed 
great aptitude for learning and easily stood among those 



REV. JULIUS H. SflUFORD, 7/ 

who headed the class. Leaving the Meade school he 
entered Lenoir College, Hickory, N. C. Selecting the 
study of medicine as his profession, he entered the school 
of medicine at the University of Michigan, located at 
Ann Arbor. Here he studied for four years, taking a 
full course, making the study of the eye, the ear, and 
the throat his specialty. Upon graduating, in 1901, 
from the L^'niversity with honor, he returned to Hicko- 
ry, N, C, and located for the practice of his profession. 
At this time he has practiced medicine only about six 
months, but during that time has met with marked suc- 
cess, enjoying the full confidence of the profession, and 
being often called in consultation with older physicians. 



REV. JULIUS H. SHUFORD, A. B. 

Rev. J. H. Shuford is a native of Catawba County, 
North Carolina. He is a son of Jacob H. Shuford, who 
died in 1874. The father of Jacob H. Shuford was Ja- 
cob Shuford, who died in 1844. The father of Jacob 
Shuford was Martin Shuford, who died in 1780. Mart- 
in was a son of John Shuford, who died in 1790. 

The father of J. H. Shuford was a farmer. J. H. 
Shuford spent his early life upon his father's farm. 
When a young man he became a student of Catawba 
College, Newton, N. C. It was at this institution of 
learning that he was prepared for the Sophomore class 
of college. In 1871 he entered the Sphomore class of 
LTusinus College, Collegeville, Pa,, and was graduated 



78 REV. JULIUS H. SHUFORD. 

by that college in the spring of 1874. In the summer 
of 1874, he was licensed to preach the gospel by the 
Classis of North Carolina. Classis at this time met in 
special session at Newton, N. C. He was at this same 
meeting of Classis ordained to the ministry of the 
gospel. A few weeks after his ordination he was in- 
stalled as pastor of Grace charge. The charge was then 
composed of four congregations, Hickory, Bethel, Grace, 
and Daniel's. These congregations are located in the 
counties of Catawba and Lincoln. He served these church- 
es as pastor until the summer of 1 876. In the summer of 
1876 he received a call to the Western Rowan charge, 
consisting of Mt. Zion in Rowan county and Gilead in Ca- 
barrus county. While there the Mt. Zion congregation 
at China Grove raised money for the purpose of building 
a new house of worship, which was soon completed. In 
the summer of 1878, he was called the second time as 
pastor of Grace charge. The charge was then com- 
posed of three congregations, Grace, Bethel, and Dan- 
iel's. He served these churches as pastor until the sum- 
mer of 1880. The work in the charge consisted of 
preaching the word, pastoral visitation, receiving mem- 
bers in the church, and administering the Sacraments. 
Many long rides and much hard work was done for the 
Master in looking after these churches. The work was 
one of love and self-denial for the Master. 

In the spring of 1881, he was called to the Altamont 
charge, Altamont, 111. When he went there, the charge 
had been vacant about four years, and was disorganized. 
He reorganized the charge, and held the charge in good 
working order. After reorganization of the charge, he 
spent his time in preaching the gospel, visiting the sick, 
administering the vSacraments, and receiving members 
into the church. In the spring of 1884, he received a 



REV. JULIUS H. SHUFOKD. 79 

call from the Astoria charge, Astoria, 111. The charge 
consisted of two congregations; one at Astoria, and the 
other at Summum, 111. The congregation at Summum 
was about one thousand dollars in debt when he went 
there. The debt was soon paid, and the charge placed 
upon a good financial basis. At that time modern scep- 
ticism was found in the great Northwest. This kind of 
opposition to the movements of the Christian Church re- 
quired the best kind of preparation for the pulpit, and 
the best of pastoral work. In the spring of 1887, be re- 
ceived a call to the Upper Davidson charge, North Car- 
olina Classis. These churches are located in Davidson 
county, North Carolina. He spent one year in this 
charge, preaching to four congregations, and in plan- 
ning for the erection of a parsonage which was soon 
completed. 

In the summer of 1888, he was called to the Middle- 
brook charge, Middlebrook, Va. The charge for many 
years had been under the care of the Home Mission 
Board and was in a sinking condition financially. When 
he left the charge it was self-supporting and is still, 
1902, self-supporting, and is aiding in the home mission 
work, and foreign mission work. He remained in the 
Shenandoah Valley until 1899, preaching in his charge 
and, after resigning his charge, acting as supply for va- 
cant churches, and assisting his brethren in their fields 
of labor. The Valley of Virginia has ministers of high 
literary and theological attainments, and experienced 
church work and high personal character and devout 
piety. These surroundings were congenial, and were a 
guide in a development of the best system of church work. 
His stay in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia was in 
many ways pleasant. He often preached in the Valley, 
where the contending armies of the war between the 



8o REV. JULIUS H. SHUFORD. 

States marched and fought. It is a great honor to be a 
soldier of the cross, and to fight the battles of the Lord 
upon the battle grounds where the armies of our coun- 
try fought for supremacy and power. 

J. H. Shuford was once president of the Classis of 
North Carolina, and twice elected by that Classis as a 
delegate to the General Synod of the Reformed church 
in the United States, and was present at Tiffin, Ohio, 
and participated in the meeting of that body when the 
Peace Commission's report was adopred. This was one 
of the most interesting meetings in the history of that 
body and was composed of the most distinguished men 
of the church. He was once president of the Classis of 
Shelby, which has now became a part of the Illinois 
Classis. While preaching in Virginia, he was called to 
fill the president's chair in that classis also— a classis no- 
ted for its conservativism and careful deliberation of all 
legislative questions. 

He is now living at Hickory, N. C, where he began 
his ministry in 1874. He is still doing effective work 
for the Reformed church, and is also engaged in literary 
work. He is the author of a book known as the ' 'Histor- 
ical Sketch of the Shuford Family." The manuscript of 
this book has been examined and approved by men of 
prominence in different states. As the book goes to 
press, there are calls for it in the following states: Ma- 
ryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tenn- 
essee, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Texas, and Cal- 
ifornia. 

Rev. J. H. Shuford was born December 19, 1849, ^^^ 
was baptized by Rev. M. L. Shuford, a minister of the 
Reformed church in U. S., a sketch of whose life is 
found in this book. He has never been married. He 
is a good student and prepares his sermons with care. 



ALICE A. SlIUFOKIi. Si 

He became a meirber of the Reformed church under 
the ministry of Rev. J. Ingold, D. D. A historical 
sketch of Daniel's Reformed church was written by Mr. 
A. Nixon. In this sketch Mr. Nixon says that "J. H. 
Shuford served this church as pastor, and faithfully dis- 
charged the duties of his sacred office." 



ALICK A. SHI [FORI >. 

Alice A. Shuford, daughter of Jacob H. and Kather- 
ine Shuford, was born July 29, 1852. She married 
Quince A. Wilfong, son of John Wilfong, on Dec. 15 
1870. The children of this marriage were: Cora, Jay, 
Amelia, Julias, Gordon, and Mary. Amelia, Julius, 
and Mary are dead. 

O. A. Wilfong is a farmer and one of the most sub- 
stantial citizens of Catawba County. In matters of edu- 
cation and religion he has been prominent. He has 
served as a member of the school board in his district 
for several years. He is a member of Grace Reformed 
church, and has served that congregation as elder. 

Cora married R. L. Shuford, son of George Shuford, 
and one of the most progressive farmers of Catawba 
County. 

Gordon enlisted in the vSpanish- American war, and 
made an honorable record for faithful service. He en- 
listed in April 1898, in the First N. C. Regiment, Com- 
pany A , and was mustered out April 1 899. Gordon is now 
a young man of promise, clerking in the town of Hickory. 



82 LAURA SIIUFORD RAMSAUR. 

Jay lives at home with his parents. He is a fine busi- 
ness young man; has assumed the management of his 
father's farm_, and is eminently fitted for that responsi- 
ble position. The entire family are of a religious dispo- 
sition, and are members of the Reformed church. 



LAURA SHUFORD RAMSAUR. 

Laura Shuford married Eli Ramsaur. She is the 
youngest child of Jacob H. Shuford, who died in 1874. 
They were married by Rev. J. H. Shuford at the old 
Jacob vShuford homestead in Catawba County, N. C, in 
1875. The children of this marriage are: Guy, Earl, 
Maud, Middlecoff, and Brent. 

Eli Ramsaur is a farmer and lives in Lincoln County, 
N. C. He and his wife and children are members of 
Daniel's Reformed church. 

Eli Ramsaur was a soldier in the Confederate Army. 
He was wounded and captured at the battle of Winches- 
ter, Va,, where he fought under Gen. Early in his bat- 
tle against Gen Sheridan. 



ELKANAH L. SHUFORD. 

Elkanah L. Shuford was born Aug. 10, 1807. His 
father was Jacob vShuford who died April i, 1844. The 



ELKANAII L. SIIUFORD. 83 

grandfather of Elkanah Shuford was Martin Shuford, 
who died in 1780. The great-grandfather of Elkanah 
Shuford was John Shuford, who died in 1790. Elkanah 
Shuford was born in Lincoln County, now Catawba. 
He was born on the old John Shuford farm, near Grace 
Reformed church, of which he became a member when 
a young man, and in early life became an elder in that 
church. His early pastor was the Rev. John Fritchey, 
a minister in the Reformed church. 

When a young man his father moved to what is known 
as the Bunker Hill farm in Catawba County, N. C, 
where he owned a large mill and a store. His son, 
Elkanah, was a partner with him at that place in the- 
mercantile business. About this time he married a Miss 
Emeline Martin, of a prominent family in Wilkes Coun- 
ty at that time. There was one son of this marriage, 
Julius Martin, who was born March 10, 1844. 

Soon after Elkanah's marriage, he located in Lowndes 
County, Ala., where he owned a large cotton plantation. 

When only 15 years old, Julius Shuford, son of Elka- 
nah Shuford, volunteered as a soldier in the Confederate 
Army, under the command of Gen. John B. Gordon of 
Ga. He was a brave soldier, and fell at the battle of 
Malvern Hill. His body was taken to Lowndes, Ala., 
and buried. 

Elkanah Shuford spent the greater part of his life on 
his plantation in Alabama, and there connected himself 
with the Presbyterian church, wheie he was a ruling 
elder many years. 

While living in Alabama, his wife, Emeline Martin 
Shuford, died and is buried beside her son, Julius Mar- 
tin Shuford. 

Many years after the death of his wife, he married 
Miss Harriet Emerson, of Alabama. There were no 



84 ANDREW SHUFORn. 

children of this marria^^-e. She died and is buried in 
Lowndes County, i\la. 

E. L. vShuford was married to Miss Kate McKay, 
daughter of Sarah and John McKay, of Tuskeg-ec, Ala. 
She was his third wnfe. vSoon after his third marriage, 
he sold his plantation in Alabama, and located in Ac- 
worth, Ga. As a business man, he was above the av- 
erage of his day, and accumulated much property. 

While in Ac worth, he again held the office of elder 
in the Presbyterian church, and held that office until his 
death. There were two children of this marriage, 
Magnolia McKay, born at Acworth, Ga,, Nov. i, 1S74; 
Elkanah Rogers, born at Acworth, Aug. 4, 1S77. 

At different times through his life, he adopted orphan 
children none of whom lived to be grown. He raised 
and educated at West Point, Eli D. Hoyle, being a near 
relation of his. The mother of Elkanah Shuford was 
Margaret Hoyle. He was devoted to this young man, 
and loved him as a son. 



ANDREW SHUFORD. 

Andrew Shuford is a son of Jacob Shuford, who died 
in 1844. Jacob Shuford is a son of Martin vShuford, 
who died in 1780. Martin Shuford is a son of John 
Shuford who died in 1790. Andrew Shuford was born 
Feb. 24, 1 8 10. The place of his birth was Lincoln, now 
Catawba County, N. C. His father was a farmer. He 
married Elvira Collins Nov. 9, 1830. They had four 



ANDREW SHUFORD. 85 

children: Martha Shuford, Delia Shuford, Alonzo Shuf- 
ord, and Mildred Shuford, 

Andrew Shuford was for a number of years Sheriff of 
Catawba County, N, C. He represented Lincoln Coun- 
ty in the Legislature of North Carolina. In 1852, he 
settled at Canton, Georgia. He became a member of 
the Confederate Army in 1861, and remained in the Ar- 
my until 1862. He was at the surrender of Roanoke 
Island, N. C. 

He was a member of the M. E. Church South, and 
was very active in church work. 

After the close of the Civil War, he settled in Cataw- 
ba County, N. C, making Hickory, N. C. his home, 
where he ended his pilgrim days. 

Andrew Shuford died Aug. 16, 1880. His wife died 
March 11, 1886. 

Delia Shuford married Henry Wilfong. The children 
of this marriage were: Thomas, Carrie, Willie, Bragg, 
and Fannie; these are living (1901). Those not living 
were: John, Mattie, May, Charles, and Alonzo. 

Willie Wilfong married a Miss Kluttz and lives at 
Hickory. Carrie Wilfong married Andrew Marshall 
and lives at Hickory. 

Martha Ann Shuford married Dr, S, A. Suddereth, of 
Burke County, Their children were Minnie, who mar- 
ried F. B. Alexander, and Clara, who married a Mr. 
Hagler, and Charles, who died a young man. 

Mildred Shuford married Dr. Crowell. Their child- 
ren are A. H. and Samuel Crowell. After the death of 
Dr. Crowell, she married Wm. H. Ellis, of Hickory, N. 
C. The children by this marriage are Mildred and 
Annie Ellis. 

Capt. A, B, C. Shuford was born in Lincoln County, 
N. C. now Catawba County, December 16, 1837. He 



86 SUSAN SHUFORD REINHARDT. 

is a son of Andrew Shuford. 

Capt Shuford received his education at Catawba Col- 
lege, Newton, N. C. In 1852, his father moved to Can- 
ton, Georgia. In 1861, he joined the Confederate Army 
at Canton, Georgia. He was soon made Captain of his 
Company, and fought under Joseph Johnson and Gen. 
Lee in their campaign against McLelland in his effort to 
capture Richmond in 1862. 

He was wounded at the battle of Second Manassas 
Aug. 1862, and died in a few days after he was wound- 
ed. 

He was a member of the M. E. Church South. His 
funeral was preached at Canton, Georgia, Oct. 26, 1862, 
by Rev. P. H. Brewster. The text was Job 14: 10. 
Among his last words were "I am willing to die," 

Willie H. Wilfong, a son of Henry Wilfong and De- 
lia C. Shuford, was born Feb. 26, 1859. He is a me- 
chanic and lives at Hickory, N. C. He married Miss 
Lizzie Kluttz, of Rowan County N. C, May 17, 1883. 
They have seven children, viz., Carrie, Bessie, Claud, 
Fannie, Bryan, and Harvey. 



SUSAN SHUFORD REINHARDT. 

Susan Shuford Reinhardt is a daughter of Jacob 
Shuford, who died in 1844. Jacob Shuford is a son of 
Martin Shuford, who died in 1780. Martin Shuford is a 
son of John Shuford, who died in 1790. 

Lawson Reinhardt was born in Lincoln County, North 



SUSAN SHUFORD REINHARDT. 8/ 

Carolina, June 20, 181 5. 

Susan Shuford was born in Lincoln County, now 
Catawba County, N. C, June 12, 181 3. She married 
Lawson Reinhardt Sept. 19, 1837. 

The children of this marriage are: Alexander Sidney, 
Romulus Shuford, Michael, Mary Eliza, Susan Maria, 
Amelia H. Reinhardt. There was an infant son born 
and died on the same day. 

Lawson Reinhardt moved from North Carolina to 
Texas, some years before the War between the States. 
His home was near Quitman, Tex. He was a farmer 
by occupation. Susan Shuford Reinhardt died Aug. 6, 
1 86 1. She is buried in the cemetery at Quitman, Tex. 

Lawson Reinhardt married the second time. His 
widow now lives at Quitman, Tex., 1901. 

Lawson Reinhardt died Nov. 17, 1871. He is buried 
in the cemetery at Quitman, Texas. 

Alexander S. Reinhardt was born September 1838. 
He was a soldier in the Confederate Army. He was 
killed at the battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. 

Romulus Shuford Reinhardt was born Jan. 19, 1840. 
He died at Columbus, Miss., June 7, 1862. He was a 
soldier in the Confederate Army. 

Michael Reinhardt was born July 2, 1841. He mar- 
ried Nancy Ursengin June 10, 1867, He is (1901) liv- 
ing at Speer, Texas. 

Mary Eliza Reinhardt was born Nov. 28, 1845. She 
died June 8, 1846. 

Susan Maria Reinhardt was born July 7, 1847. She 
died Sept. 24, 1864. 

Amelia H. Reinhardt was born Oct. 28, 1849. She 
married Mr. F. M. Dyer. He died Aug. 13, 1888. She 
is now living at Quitman, Tex. She is the mother of 
seven children. They are living (190]). 



ELIZABETH SHUFORD RAMSAUR. 



ELIZABETH SHUFORD RAMSAUR. 

Elizabeth Shuford Ramsaur is a daughter of Martin 
Shuford, who died jn 1780, and a grand-daughter of 
John Shuford, who died in 1790. 

She married John Ramsaur, and lived in Lincoln 
County, N. C. They are buried at Daniel's Reformed 
church, Lincoln County, N. C. 

The children of this marriage are: Ann, Myra, Barba- 
ra, George, David, Catherine, Sarah, and Mary Ram- 
saur. 

Ann first married David Wilfong; after his death she 
married David Ramsaur. There is a son of this mar- 
riage by the name of William, who now lives at Hicko- 
ry, N. C, 1901. 

Myra Ramsaur married Peter Summerrow, and lived 
in Lincoln County, N. C. 

Barbara Ramsaur married David Hedrick. 

George Ramsaur married Eliza Warlick. The child- 
ren of this marriage were; Pink, Eli, Laura, Lou. Lou 
married Dan Hoover. Pink married Miss Lantz. Eli 
married Laura Shuford. Laura Ramsaur is not married. 

David Ramsaur married Rebecca Duckworth. Their 
children are: John, Milton, MoUie, Ann, William, Ada, 
and Effie. John lives in Florida. Annie is dead, and 
the others live in N. C. Milton married Rhoda Black- 
burn. Mollie married William Finger. Ada married 
Edward Henderson, and Effie married Bascom Johnston, 
of Lenoir, N. C, 

Catherine Ramsaur married Jacob Michael. Jacob 
Michael had a son William, who married Miss Isabel 
Ramsaur. Their children are: Annie, Sallie, Katherine, 
and Robert. They live at Lincolnton, N. C. Annie 



PlIILir SIIUFORD. 89 

married Thomas Hoke, of Lincolnton, N. C. 

Sarah Ramsaur married Dr. Andrew Ramsaur, of 
Lincolnton, N. C. Mary Ramsaur married millwright 
Jacob Ramsaur. The children are Theodore, Oliver, 
Melvin, Sallie, and Susan. Oliver and Susan are dead, 
and the others are living in N. C. Sallie married Daniel 
Forney. Susan married R. P. Reinhardt. Theodore 
married Mary Knupp. Melvin married Eliza Turner. 
Oliver married Elizabeth Ramsaur, 



PHILIP SHUFORD. 

In Lincoln County, N. C, on the 3rd inst., at the res- 
idence of his son-in-law, Mr. H. E. Ramsaur, Mr. Philip 
Shuford, in the 79th year of his age. The individual 
whose death we here record was a plain man: yet, plain 
and unassuming as he was, he possessed much to rec- 
ommend him to the notice and observation of all who 
knew him. 

As a neighbor, he was kind and obliging; as a friend, 
he was true and faithful; as a husband and father, he 
was tender and affectionate, and as a Chrfstian, he was 
humble and devoted. In all the relations which he sus- 
tained in life, he exhibited a character conscientious and 
devout. As a Christian, especially, his example is wor- 
thy of imitation. At the age of 19, Mr. Shuford was 
received, on profession of faith, as a member of the 
German Reformed church. For many years he filled 
the office of ruling elder in the congregation to which 



90 PHILIP SIIUFORD, 

he belonged. Few men have stronger attachments for 
the church, or are more devoted to her interest than he. 
Such was his love for the church and the high estimate 
which he had for her worship and ordinances, that he 
continued to wait upon the Lord in the use of the means 
of grace, with but little intermission up to the time of 
his last sickness, which deprived him of this privilege 
about three months. He had been in bad health for 
more than a year, yet still he continued to repair to the 
sanctuary, until prostrated by the disease which termi- 
nated in his dissolution. Thus admonished that his ser- 
vices in the church militant had ceased, and that the 
time of his departure was at hand, he bowed in child 
like submission, and patiently did he wait, as he himself 
expressed it, "The will of the Lord." 

Although his sufferings were great, and the time 
seemed long, yet he did not murmur. As we, together 
with his children and grand-children, gathered around 
our departing friend and father, did we witness a calm 
scene of resignation and holy confidence. The ardent 
desire he had to depart and be with Christ, which is far 
better, was tempered by the patient resignation of the 
aged Christian. By his meek and peaceful reliance on 
Him, in whom he had believed, he seemed to say: "All 
the days of my appointed time will I wait till my change 
come." And when the time drew near for the final 
struggle, like the aged patriarch Jacob, he "gathered 
up his feet into his bed," and breathed his placid soul 
into the bosom of his beloved, 
w * 

Philip Shuford was born Feb. 15, 17S1, in Lincoln 
County. He married Abernethy, of Lincoln County, N. 
C, Their home was in Lincoln County, N. C. 

The children of this marriage are: Catherine Shuford, 



PHILIP SIIUFORD. 91 

Elizabeth Shuford, Robert M. Shuford, Frances A. 
'Shuford, Sarah E. Shuford, Ann Shuford, Amy Shuf- 
ord, Obed Shuford. 

Philip Shuford was for many years an elder in the 
Reformed church at Grace. He is buried at Grace 
church. His wife was a member of the same church 
and is buried at the same place. 

Catherine Shuford married Peter Warlick. Their 
home was in Catawba County, N. C. Peter Warlick 
was a farmer by occupation. They were members of 
the Reformed church and are buried at Grace church. 
The children are: Margaret, Mary, Harriet, Robert, 
and Sarah. Margaret married Maxwell Ramsaur. 
Harriet married Robert Patton, of Burke County. She 
is not living. Sarah married L. F. Warlick, of Burke 
County, N. C. She is not living. Mary died unmar- 
ried. Robert died when a young m.an. 

Elizabeth Shuford was born Feb. 19, 18 10. She mar- 
ried George Cathey. Their home was in Catawba Coun- 
ty, N. C. The children of this marriage are: Robert 
Cathey and Caroline Cathey. Robert Cathey died in 
the Confederate Army. Caroline Cathey married Ru- 
fus F. Cobb. Mr. Cobb has a daughter, who lives in 
Hickory, N. C. She married Mr. Frank Johnson of 
that place. 

Frances Shuford first married John Doggett. There 
were two children of this marriage, John and Rufus 
Dogget, who are both dead. Fannie Shuford was born 
Aug. 26, 1 8 14. 

After the death of her first husband, she married 
Daniel Ramsaur. Their home was in Lincoln County, 
N. C. He is not living. She is still living. The 
children of this marriage are: Amelia Ramsaur, Anne 
Ramsaur, P'annie Ramsaur, Martha Ramsaur, Thomas 



9- PHILIP SPIUFORD. 

Ramsaur, and May Ran^saur. 

Fannie Ramsaur married David Shuford and lives at 
Louise, N. C. Martha Ramsaur married Lee Hoover. 
She is not living-. Thomas Ramsaur married Minnie 
Shank, of Cleveland County, N. C, He lives at Cleve- 
land, N. C, and is associated with his father-in-law in a 
cotton mill at that place. May Ramsaur married Pink 
Rollins and lives at Cleveland, N. C. Amelia Ram- 
saur married William Ray and lives in Cleveland Coun- 
ty. Anne died at the age of eighteen. She was not 
married. 

Sarah Shuford was born in Lincoln County, now Ca- 
tawba, Jan. 2, 1 8 17. She married Henry Ramsaur. 
Their home was in Lincoln County, N, C. Henry 
Ramsaur was for many years a member of the Reformed 
church at Grace. After leaving that locality, he joined 
the Presbyterian church. The children of this marriage 
are: Betty Ramsaur, who married Oliver Ramsaur,*a 
good man, many years an elder in the Reformed church; 
Alice Ramsaur, who married Mr. Harrell, and Ella 
Ramsaur who married Thomas ILirrell. Ella Harrell 
lives at Lincolnton, N. C. 

Ann Shuford was born in Lincoln County N. C, 
April 30, 1820. She is a daughter of Philip Shuford of 
that same county. She married Harrison Wilson, of 
Tennessee, Aug. 29, 1S44. Their last home was' at 
Hickory, N. C, where they both died and are buried. 
They were both members of the Reformed church. 

Harrison Wilson died July 25, 1886. Ann Wilson 
died Dec. 10, 1901. The funeral of Harrison Wilson 
was preached by Rev. Lewis Reiter, minister of the 
Reformed church. The funeral of Ann Wilson was 
preached by Rev. J. L. Murphy. 

''The death of Mrs. Ann Wilson removes from Cor- 



PIHLIP SliUFORD. 93 

inth congregation one of the oldest members. She died 
Dec. lo, 1 90 1, and was 81 years, 7 months, and 20 days 
old. She leaves three living children: Mrs. T. E. Field, 
of Hickory, Mrs. Sallie Clark and Mr. George Wilson, of 
S. C. For several years, Mrs. Wilson made her home 
with her daughter, Mrs. Field. 

Mrs. Wilson was a woman of sterling character, be- 
longing to the Philip Shuford family. She was a devot- 
ed member of the Reformed church, and an exemplary 
Christian. During her long illness she gave evidence 
of the fact that she was prepared and ready to go when- 
ever the summons came. Her funeral was conducted 
from the Reformed church of Hickory, Rev, J. L. Mur- 
phy, her pastor, having charge of the service, assisted 
by Rev. T. A. Boone, of the Methodist church. The 
sorrowing children have much to comfort them. Mother 
and grandmother is now at rest and waiting for the 
children. 

The children of Harrison and Ann Wilson are: George 
Wilson, Sallie Wilson, and Lillie Wilson. 

George Wilson lives at Florence, S. C, and is an en- 
gineer, and has been for years. He married Sallie 
Roberts. There are nine children of this marriage — 
eight of them are living; one is dead. 

Sallie Wilson married Alex. Clark, and lives at Abbe- 
ville, S. C. The children are: Neill Clark, Anna Clark, 
Shuford Clark, Sherman Clark, George Clark, Thurston 
Clark, Lillie Clark, and May Clark. All are living ex- 
cept Sherman Clark. Neill Clark is a merchant of 
Hickory, N. C. Mr. Clark and bis wife are members of 
the Presbyterian church. 

Lillie Wilson married Thomas Field. Their home is 
at Hickory, N. C. Mr. Field is a merchant of Hickory, 



94 PHILIP SHUFORD. 

N. C. He is a member of the M. E. Church South, and 
his wife of the Reformed church. 

The children of Mr. Field and wife are: Annie Field, 
Tommy Field, Fannie Field, Inez Field, Harry Field, 
Sadie Field, Lillian Field, Mary Field, John Field, and 
Hilda Field. 

All are living with exception of Tommy and Harry 
Field. 

Annie Field married Carlyle Lorctz Marshall. Their 
home is in Tennessee. They were married by Rev. T. 
A. Boone, assisted by Rev. J. L. Murphy, D, D. 

Robert M. Shuford, son of Philip Shuford, was born 
April 5, 1812, in Lincoln County, N. C. His early life 
was spent on the farm with his father. When a young 
man he went to South Alabama with his cousin, Elka- 
nah Shuford, and was engaged in farming in Lowndes 
County, for a number of 3^ears. He married Miss La- 
venia Pou, of Hayneville, Ala. Soon after his marriage, 
he moved to Shelby County, near Harpersville, where 
he lived until after the Civil War. The children of this 
marriage were: Richard Hunley, Jones W., and Mary 
Brent, all born in Shelby County. His wife died in 1866, 
and is buried at Harpersville, Ala. After the death of 
his wife, he moved to Lincoln County, N. C, and after- 
vvard to Catawba County. He died at the home of his 
son, Jones W., June 3, 1898, and is buried in Oakwood 
Cemetery, Hickory, N. C. 

Richard Hunley, son of Robert M, and Lavenia Shuf- 
ord, was born August 8, 1857, and died March 10, 1864. 

Jones Withers Shuford was born Oct. i, 1861. He 
married Miss Etta Suttlemyre, of Hickory, N. C. Their 
children are: Edwin Harold, Richard Harvey, Donald 
Emory, and Kate. He was engaged in merchandising 
at Hickory, N. C, until 1S98, when he was appointed 



PHILIP SIIUFORD. 95 

Post Master by President McKinley. 

Mary Brent was born Jan. 29, 1866. She married 
Wm. E. Shuford in 1890. They moved to St. Augus- 
tine, Fla., where she died Dec. 6, 1891. 

Amy A. Shuford was born Aug. 12, 1822. She mar- 
ried Elkanah Ramsaur. Their home is in Catawba 
County, N. C. He is a tanner and farmer. They are 
members of Grace Reformed church, and he has held 
the office of elder in that church for many years. The 
children of this marriage are: Mollie, Ida, Obed, Fan- 
nie, Kate, and George. 

Mollie Rarmsaur married Pink Ramsaur, of Lincoln 
County, N. C. She is not living. 

Obed Ramsaur married Katie Ramsaur. Their home 
is in Catawba County, N. C. He has held the office of 
deacon in Grace Reformed church many years. 

Fannie Ramsaur married John Corpening, of Burke. 
They were married by Rev. J. H. Shuford, of Hickory, 
N. C. She is not living. 

Kate Ramsaur married Pink Warlick, of Burke Coun- 
ty, N. C. They live in that county. Mr. Warlick is a 
farmer, and once represented his county in the Legis- 
lature. 

George Ramsaur married Mrs, Corpening, whose 
maiden name was Forney, They live in Burke County, 
N. C. 

Qbed P. Shuford was born March 28, 1826. He mar- 
ried Kate Ramsaur. Their home was for some years in 
Georgia, where he died. She lives in Lincoln County, 
N. C. 



JOHN SHUFORD. 



JOHN SHUFORD. 



John Shuford was a son of Martin Shuford who died 
in 1780, Martin Shuford was a son of John Shuford 
who died in 1790. John Shuford was a farmer. His 
home was in Lincoln County, N. C. He married a Miss 
Hallman. The children of this marriage are: Martin 
Shuford, Sallie Shuford, Anna Shuford. After the 
death of his first wife, he married the second time. 
There was a son of this marriage by the nam.e of Law- 
son Shuford. 

Martin Shuford, a son of John Shuford, married Mar- 
garet Warlick, a daughter of Lewis Warlick. Lewis 
Warlick lived a few miles west of Grace Reformed 
church. He was the father of David Warlick, who was 
a local Methodist preacher. The children of Martin 
Shuford are: Lewis Shuford, Emmanuel Shuford, Eliza- 
beth Shuford, Lavina Shuford, Noah F. Shuford, Sid- 
ney Shuford, Ann Shuford, Abel Shuford, and Pink 
Shuford. 

Emmanuel Shuford is a son of Martin Shuford. Mar- 
tin Shuford is a son of John Shuford. John vShuford is 
a son of Martin Shuford, who died in 1780. Martin 
Shuford is a son of John Shuford, who died in 1790. 
The mother of Emmanuel Shuford is Margaret Warlick. 
She is a member of the Warlick family in Catawba and 
Lincoln Counties. Emmanuel Shuford was born in 
Lincoln County, N. C, in Aug. 12, 1820, The wife of 
Emmanuel Shuford is Catharine E. Hoover Shuford. 
They were married by Eli Shuford, Esq., May 27, 1846. 
The children of this marriage are: 

Mary Jane Shuford, born 1848. 

Robert Franklin Shuford born 1850. 

Ann Elizabeth Shuford born 1852. 



JOHN SHUFORD. 97 

Lewis D. Shuford born 1854. 
Marg^aret Alice Shuford born 1856. 
Lenoir Shuford born 1859. 
David T. Shuford born i860. 
Ella A. Shuford born 1863. 
Laura Henrietta Shuford born 1868. 

Emmanuel Shuford lived in Caldwell County, N. C, 
and was a farmer by occupation. He was a member of 
the M. E, Church South, and was a steward in that 
church for many years. Emmanuel Shuford died May 
7, 1883; age 62 years, 9 months, and 17 days. 

Mary Jane Shuford died in 1865. 

Robert Franklin Shuford and Harriet Smith were 
married Dec. 4, 1884. Robert F. Shuford is a farmer 
by occupation and a member of the M. E. Church South. 
The children of Robert F. Shuford are: Eugene, Jessie, 
Russell, George, Clara, Loyd, and Thomas Ivey Shu- 
ford. The latter son is named after Rev. G. N. Ivey, a 
member of the M. E, Church South, who was a minister 
in the Caldwell Circuit 12 years. 

Lewis Shuford and Amanda Be ch were married Sep. 
20, 1870. The children of this marriage are: Ida, Ed- 
gar, Robert, Addie, Hester, Lela, John, Adolphus, 
Kate, Albert, Philmore. Lewis Shuford is a member of 
the M. E. Church South, and is a steward in that church. 
He is a farmer by occupation, and lives in Caldwell 
County, N. C. 

Margaret Alice Shuford died in 1858. 

Lenoir H. Shuford married Nelson Laxton Dec. 13, 
1877. He is a farmer by occupation and lives in Cald- 
well County, N. C, and is a member of the Baptist 
church. His wife was a member of the M. E. Church 
South. She died Nov. 7, 1901. The funeral was 
preached by Rev. G. N. Ivey, a minister in the M. E. 



98 JOHN SHUFOKD. 

Church South. The children are: Blair, Kate, Bertha, 
Lavenda, Wallace, Janie, and Ola. 

David T. Shuford died Sept. 26, 1864. 

Ella A. Shuford married John Parlier Dec. 26, 1888. 
They live in Caldwell County, N. C. He is a merchant. 
His wife is a member of the M. E. Church South. The 
children of this marriage are: Ralph, Roy, Bettie, Mil- 
dred, Clarence, Felix, and Noah. Noah and Roy are 
not living. 

Anna Elizabeth Shuford married J. L. Beach Dec. 18, 
1872. The children of this marriage are Walter, May- 
nard, Efhe, Victor, Gamewell, William, and Hill. May- 
nard graduated this year, 1902, from Wake Forest Bap- 
tist College. Walter Beach is a student in the same 
college, Mr. J. L. Beach is a member of the Baptist 
church and lives in Caldwell County, N. C. 

Laura Shuford m.arried Thomas Laxton April 22, 
1888. They live in Caldw^ell County, N. C. He is a 
farmer by occupation, and is a member of the Baptist 
church. His wife is a member of the M. E. Church 
South. The children are Lora, Addie, Nellie, Vada, 
Manilla, Anna Kate. 

Sidney Shuford, a son of Martin Shuford, married 
Miss Clara Rhodes. They lived in Lincoln County, N. 
C, near Palm Tree church. He was a farmer by occu- 
pation. They were both members of Palm Tree M. E. 
Church South, and are buried at this church. The 
children are: Robert, not living, Frances, Thomas, 
Belton, Ada, William, and Nettie. Frances married As- 
bury Allran, and lives at Cherry ville, N. C. Thomas 
Shuford married Willie Goodman, and lives at Plateau, 
N. C. William Shuford married Miss Goodman, and 
lives near Palm Tree church, Lincoln County, N. C. 
Ada married Mr. Joseph Havaner, a circuit rider in the 



MARTIN SIIUFORD. 99 

M. E. church. Nettie married C. E. Boggs. Their 
home is at Plateau. 

Pink Shuford, a son of Martin Shuford, married Miss 
Sarah Peeler, of Cleveland County, N. C. The child- 
ren were Robert and William. They are not living. 
After the death of his first wife, he married Miss Mary 
Ann Shuford, of Catawba County, N. C. The children 
of this marriage are Thomas Shuford and James Shuf- 
ord, Thomas Shuford married Anna Belle Helton. 
He is a farmer, and lives in Catawba County, N. C. 
James Shuford married Mary Roberts, and lives at 
Hickory, N. C. 

Pink Shuford is a farmer. His home is in Catawba 
County, N. C. He became a soldier in the Confederate 
Army in 1862, 56th Regiment N. C. Troops, and was 
captured at Richmond, at the fall of Richmond. Pink 
Shuford is a member of the M. E. Church South, and has 
held the office of steward in that church. 



MAKTIN SHUFOKD. 

Martin Shuford is a son of Martin Shuford, who died 
in 1780, and a grandson of John Shuford, who died in 
1790. He lived near Linconlnton, N, C. 

I, Martin H. Shuford, son of Joseph Shuford, was 
born in Lincoln County, second day of June, 1839. I 
enlisted in Capt. George Seagle's company, from Lin- 
coln County, about the first of April 1861. 

I belonged to Company B 23rd Regiment N. C. Troops. 
I went out as corporal; shortly after we were in service 
I was promoted to orderly sergeant. On the loth of 



lOO MARTIN SIIUFORD. 

May 1862, our regiment was reorganized on the Cliicka- 
hominy near Richmond, Va. Sidney A. Shuford, who 
was third lieutenant, was elected captain, and I was 
elected first lieutenant. On the 31st of May 1862, Capt. 
Sidney Shuford was killed at the battle of Seven Pines, 
carried back to Lincolnton and was buried in the old 
White Church cemetery by the Masons. There were 
four brothers of us in the Confederate service, Capt. S. 
A. Shuford, M. H. Shuford, William H. Shuford, and 
Jacob M. Shuford. I was in the battle of Cold Harbor, 
Malvern Hill, Chancellorsville, South Mountain, Md., 
and was wounded and captured at Gettysburg, Pa., the 
first day of July, 1868, was carried to Johnson Island 
near Sandusky, O., on Lake Erie, and remained in pris- 
on until the 13th of March, 1865, and was paroled. 

M. H. Shuford, Sidney A. Shuford, and Jacob M. 
Shuford belonged to Company B, 23rd Regiment. Will- 
am H. Shuford was in the 83rd N, C. Troops, and was 
wounded at Petersburg the day that place was evacuated, 

I was married to T. C. Carpenter, of Polk County, 
the 4th of Nov. 1873. We have six children, three girls 
and three boys: Lela, Lowery, Osie, Samuel, Oscar, and 
Harry. My mother was a daughter of Col. Abraham 
Mauney. I have filled the place of magistrate for a short 
time, deputy sheriff for three years, and held the office 
of high sheriff for six years. 

My grandfather was Martin Shuford. He married 
Elizabeth Rhyne. He had five sons and four daughters; 
Philip, Thomas, George, Martin, and Joseph; daughters, 
Sallie, Clara, Elizabeth, and Barbara. Sallie and Clara 
were twins. Respectfully, 

M. H. Shuford, Gastonia, N. C. 

P. S.— My uncles and aunts on the Shuford side are 
all dead. 



DANIEL SHUFOKD. lOI 

Sarah Shuford, a daughter of Martin Shuford, mar- 
ried Caleb Miller, and lived in Lincoln County, N, C. 
Caleb Miller was sheriff of Lincoln County, N. C. His 
son, Jacob Miller, lives in Lincoln County, N. C. He 
was a soldier in the Confederate Army, and is an influ- 
ential member of Daniel's Reformed church, Lincoln 
Countv, N. C. 



DANIEL SHUFORD. 

Daniel Shuford is a son if John Shuford, who is the 
father of the Shuford family in North Carolina. He 
was born in 1759. He married Elizabeth Ramsaur, of 
Lincoln County, North Carolina. She was born in 1760. 

Daniel Shuford lived upon the old John Shuford 
homestead. When he lived there that part of the coun- 
ty was called Lincoln, now Catawba, County, N. C. 

The children cf this marriage are: Daniel Shuford, 
John Shuford, David Shuford, Solomon Shuford, Henry 
Shiuford, Ephraim Shuford, Elizabeth Shuford, Mary 
Shuford, and Barbara Shuford. 

Some of these children became members of the Re- 
formed congregation, and others of the Lutheran at 
Grace, Catawba County. 

Daniel Shuford died June 3, 1S34, age 75 years, His 
wife, Elizabeth Ramsaur vShuford, died June, 1820, aged 
60 years. They are buried on the old John Shuford 
farm. This graveyard where they are buried is called 
the Shuford Graveyard. 



I02 DANIEL SIIUFORD. 

Daniel Shuford, a son, married Hannah Robinson. 
They had no children. Their home was at Lincolnton, 
N. C. 

John Shuford, a son, married Elizabeth Robinson. 
They lived on a part of the old John Shuford farm. 
They had one daughter by the name of Eliza Shuford, 
who married Albert Corpening. He was an elder in 
the Lutheran church at Grace. His children are: John, 
Camela, Melanchthon, Ann, and George. 

David Shuford, a son, married Rhoda Coulter. They 
lived in Catawba County, N. C. Their children are: 
Martin, Elizabeth, and Daniel. 

Martin moved to Yancey County, N. C, and married 
there. His children now (1902) live there. 

Elizabeth married Samuel Blackburn. They lived in 
Catawba County, N. C. The children of this marriage 
are: Jennie, Rhoda, Georgeanna, and John. 

Daniel married Rosa Kistler. They lived in Catawba 
County. Daniel Shuford was an elder in the Lutheran 
church at Grace for many years. His children are: 
Mary, David, Rhoda, and Daniel. David Shuford was a 
soldier in the Confederate Army. He married Miss 
Fannie Ramsaur. His home is at Louise, N. C. He is 
engaged in merchandising and farming. He and his 
wife are members of the Lutheran church at Grace. 

Solomon, a son, died unmarried. He lived upon the 
old John Shuford homestead. After his death, the old 
Shuford homestead went out of the Shuford family. It 
was bought by Mr. Lee Whitener, who now owns it. 

Henry Shuford, a son, married Ann Warlick, and 4 
moved west. He had a son by the name of Maxwell 1 
Shuford, who was a soldier in the Confederate Army. « 

Ephraim Shuford, a son, married Susan Hoyle. She 
was a daughter of Jacob Hoyle. Jacob Hoyle was a ^ 



DAVTD SHUFORD IO3 

brother of Margaret Hoyle. Margaret Hoyle was the 
grandmother of the author of this book. She married 
Jacob Shuford in 1769. Ephraim Shuford lived in 
Cleveland County, N. C. His children are: Pink, 
Thomas, and Cato. Pink was a soldier in the Confed- 
erate Army. 

Elizabeth Shuford, a daughter, married John Slagel 
and moved west. 

Mary Shuford married Phillis Hynes, and lived in 
Lincoln County, N. C. 

Barbara Shuford married Michael Shireman and lived 
in Lincoln County, N. C. They then went west. 



DAVID SHUFORD. 

David Shuford was a son of John Shuford, who was 
the father of the Shuford family in N. C. He married 
a Miss Ramsaur. His home was on the John Shuford 
farm. He is buried in the Shuford graveyard on the 
John Shuford farm. His wife is also buried in the same 
graveyard. 

David Shuford represented Lincoln County in the 
Senate of N. C. several terms. His son George Shuford 
was an elder in the Reformed church at Grace many 
years. His grandson, A. Craige Shuford, represented 
his district in the lower house of Congress two terms, 

Mr. Leroy Whitener, of Hickory, N. C, married 
Martha Shuford. She was a grand daughter of David 
Shuford. Mr. Leroy Whitener now owns the farm upon 



I04 DAVID SITU FORD 

which the house tha t John Shuford built stands. Mr. 
Whitener was four years a soldier in the Confederate 
Army. He surrendered under Lee at Appomattox. 
He has been mayor of the city of Hickory, and repre-. 
sented his county one term in the legislature. He is 
now a trustee of Catawba College and an elder in the 
Reformed church. 

Mr. Wilfong Whitener married Kate Shuford, a grand 
daughter of David Shuford. Mr. Whitener was a sol- 
dier in the Confederate Army, and lost a leg at Gettys- 
burg, Pa. He is one of the trustees of Catawba College, 
and holds the office of elder in the Reformed church. 
His wife is a member of the Baptist church. 

Rev. Maxwell Hoyle is a minister in the M. E. Church 
South, and has been in active work in that church many 
years. He is a grandson of David Shuford, his mother 
being a daughter of David Shuford. 

Sidney Shuford, of Catawba County, N. C, is a son 
of George Shuford, and a grandson of David Shuford. 
He married Miss Margaret Hoover. He was a soldier 
in the Confederate Army. He holds the office of elder 
in the Reformed church at Grace. 

Robert Shuford, a grandson of David Shuford, mar- 
ried Cora Wilfong. He lives in Catawba County, and 
owns a dairy farm. 

Belle Shuford, a grand-daughter of David Shuford, 
married Robert Helton. Their home is in Catawba 
County, N. C. Mr. Helton is a farmer. He is a mem- 
ber of the M. E. church, and his wife is a member of 
the Reformed church. 

Alice Shuford, a grand-daughter of David Shuford, 
married Adolphus Abernethy. Their home is at Hick- 
ory, N. C. She is a member of the Reformed church 
and he of the M. E. Church South. Mr. Abernethy is 



DAVID SIIUFOKD I05 

an active and successful business man at Hickory, N. C. 

Lemuel Shuford, a grandson of David Shuford, mar- 
ried a Miss Rhodes, of Lincoln County, N. C. She is 
not living. His home is in Catawba County, N. C. 

David Shuford married Elizabeth Ramsaur. The 
children of David Shuford and wife are: John, Sarah, 
Mary, Anna, Elizabeth, David, George, and Maxwell. 

John Shuford married Ollie Abernethey and went 
west. 

Sarah Shuford married John Rhyne, and lived in 
Gaston County, N. C. 

Alary Shuford married John Jarrett, and moved west. 

Anna Shuford married David Robinson, and lived in 
Catawba County, N. C. 

Elizabeth Shuford married Noah Hoyle, and lived in 
Cleveland County, N. C. His son. Maxwell Hoyle, is a 
minister of the gospel in the M, E. Church South. His 
daughter, Sarah Hoyle, married Mr. Daniel Keever, of 
Hickory, N. C. She died and is buried at Hickory, 
N. C. 

George Shuford, a son of David Shuford, married 
Polly Baker. There were two children of this marriage: 
Sidney and Sarah. 

Sidney Shuford married Margarett Hoover, and lives 
in Catawba County, N, C. The children of this marriage 
are: William, George, and Sarah. Sarah married Edgar 
Ramsaur. They live in the state of Washington. 
George also lives in the state of Washington. William 
lives at home with his father. 

Sarah Shuford, a daughter of George Shuford, mar- 
ried a Mr. Hoover. He died in the Confederate Army, 
After his death, she married Mr. Monroe Helderbran, 
of Catawba County, N. C. 

After the death of his first wife, George Shuford mar- 



I06 DAVin SIIUFORl). 

ried Eliza Baker. The children of this marriage are: 
Kate, Martha, \^;illiam, Belle, Alice, Lemuel, A. C. Shu- 
ford, and Robert. Kate married Peter Wilfong Wtiite- 
ner. His son, Shuford Whitener, lives at Hickory, N. 

C. He is a merchant. He married Martha Wilfong. 
They are members of the Reformed church. 

Martha married Leroy Whitener, of Hickory, N. C. 
She was a good woman, and died a member of the Re- 
formed church, and is buried at Hickory, N. C. After 
the death of his first wife, Mr. Leroy Whitener married 
Mrs. Alice Murrell, of Hickory, N. C. 

A. C. Shuford married Miss Willie Lowe, a daughter 
of Col. Thomas Lowe, who died in the Confederate 
Army. 

Lemuel Shuford married Miss Carrie Rhodes, of Lin- 
coln County, N. C. She became a member of Daniel's 
Reformed church, under the ministry of Rev. J. H. 
Shuford. She died in 1898, and is buried at Grace Re- 
formed church. 

Alice Shuford married Adolphus Abernethy. He 
lives at Hickory, N. C, and is engaged in business. 
He is a prominent member of the M. E. Church South. 
His wife is a devoted mem.ber of the Reformed Church 
of the U. S. The children are George Shuford, Anna, 
Jettie, Fred, Edgai, Ralph, Grace, Ruth, and Alice. 

Anna Abernethy married John P. Cilley, a son of 
Judge C, A. Cilley, who was a colonel in the U. S. Army 
in the War between the States. They were married 
by Rev. J. L. Murphy, D. D., the minister of the Re- 
formed church at Hickory, N. C. John Cilley is a ma- 
chinist. 

Jettie Abernethy married Walker Lyerly, November 
7, 1900. They were married by Rev. J. L. Murphy, 

D. D. Mr. Lyerly lives at Bridgewater, N. C, and is 



DAVID SIIUFORD 107 

engaged in merchandising. 

Robert Lee Shuford, the youngest son of George P. 
Shuford, lives in Catawba County, and owns a dairy farm. 
Cora Wilfong and Robert Lee Shuford were married by 
Rev. J. L. Murphy, D. D., Nov. 8, 1891. The child- 
ren are: Anna, Julius Wilfong, Mary Alice, and Robert 
Lee, 

William Shuford, a son of George Shuford, was a sol- 
dier in the Confederate Army and died while on his way 
home from prison. 

Maxwell Shuford, a son of David Shuford, married a 
Mrs. Roney. Her maiden name was Helderbran. 

David Shuford, a son of David Shuford, died unmar- 
ried, when a young man. 

George Shuford was an elder in the Reformed church 
at Grace. He took an active part in the educational 
work of his country, and was a useful and influential 
man in church work. His moral and religious character 
was of a high order. He was an Israelite in whom 
there was no giiile. He died soon after the close of the 
Civil War, His funeral was preached by Rev, J. Ing- 
gold, D. D., who had been his pastor many years. Dr. 
Ingold in his funeral discourse gave strong testimony to 
the religious and devout life of George Shuford. When 
he died a great man fell in Israel. His father, David 
Shuford, died in 1832. The wife of David Shuford died 
later. 

The wife of George Shuford, Eliza Baker Shuford, 
died a few years ago. She is buried at Grace church. 
She was a woman of high Christian character. Rev. 
Gwaltney, of the Baptist church, and Rev. J. C. Clapp, 
of the Reformed church, had charge of the funeral. 
She was a grand-daughter of Conrad Yoder, the father 
of the Yoder family in N. C. 



108 MAGDALENE SIIUFORD RAMSAUK. 



MAGDALENE SHUFORD RAMSAUR. 

Magdalene Shuford is a daughter of John Shuford, 
who is the father of the Shuford family in N. C. She 
was born Dec. 6, 1767, and died Dec. 18, 1842; age 75 
years and 12 days. She married Henry Ramsaur, and 
lived in Lincoln County, N, C. The children of this 
marriage are: David Ramsaur, Barbara Ramsaur, Eliza- 
beth Ramsaur, Solomon Ramsaur, and Mary Ramsaur. 
Magdalene and Henry Ramsaur are buried in the 
Ramsaur graveyard in Lincoln County, N. C. 

David Ramsaur married Mary Loi^etz, a daughter of 
Rev. Andrew Loretz, the father of the Reformed church 
in N. C. A. L. Ramsaur, of Hickory, N. C, is a son of 
this marriage. 

Barbara Ramsaur married John Coulter. They are 
buried in the Ramsaur graveyard in Lincoln County, 
N. C. John Coulter was an elder in the Reformed 
church many years. He was sheriff, for some years, of 
Lincoln County. 

Solomon Ramsaur married Elizabeth Warlick. Their 
home was in Lincoln County, N. C. Henry Ramsaur, 
of Lincolnton, N, C. is a son of this marriage. 

Rev. J. Ingold, D. D., a minister in the Reformed 
church, married Margarett Ramsaur, a daughter of Sol- 
omon Ramsaur. 

Elizabeth Ramsaur married Andrew Loretz, a son of 
Rev. Andrew Loretz. Andrew Loretz was sheriff of 
Linconln County, and was also a member of the legisla- 
ture. 

Mary Ramsaur married John Carpenter. Their home 
was near Matthew's Reformed chucrh. 



GEORGE PHILIP SHUFURD. IO9 



GEORGE PHLLIP SHUFOUD. 

George P. Shuford is a son of David Sbuford, who 
represented Lincoln County in the Senate of North Car - 
olina in 1806, 1812, 1813, 1815, 1816, and 1820. 

George P. Shuford was born October 24, 1806, and 
died May 17, 1867. His father, was David Shuford, 
who died Aug. 8, 1828. He was 67 years, 3 months, 
and 10 days old. The father of David Shuford was John 
Shuford who died in 17QO. The wife of David Shuford 
was Elizabeth Ramsaur. She died Feb. 28, 1853, aged 
79 years. She and David Shuford were members of the 
Reformed church. Her funeral was preached by the 
Rev. J. H. Crawford, who was a minister of the Re- 
formed church, and a minister in the Shuford family for 
many years. 

George P. Shuford married Mary Baker, who died 
Aug. 16, 1834. She is buried in the Shuford graveyard 
on the John Shuford farm. There were two children 
by this marriage, viz., John Sidney and Sarah Ann. 
He then married Eliza Baker, who was born March 10, 
1820. By this marriage he had the following children: 
David Calvin, Catharine Elizabeth, Martha Jane, Will- 
iam Henry, who was born Oct. 26, 1846, — he was a sol- 
dier in the Confederate Army and died on his way home 
from prison — Mary Isabel, EHza Alice, George Lemuel, 
Alonzo Craig, Robert Lee. 

The following obituary on the death of George P^ 
Shuford was written by the Rev. J. Ingold, D. D. : 

Died of apoplexy, in Catawba county, N. C, on the 
17th of May, 1867, George P. Shuford, Esq., in the 6ist 
year o.f his age. 



no GEORGE PHILIP SHUFORD. 

On the Sabbath previous to his dissolution, brother 
Shuford occupied his scdt in the church, and filled his 
place at the communion table. No one thought on that 
occasion, that he would outstrip all others present in the 
race for glory. Nor was he himself conscious, that 
those services, in which he participated with lively hopes, 
would be the last enjoyed by him in the church mili- 
tant. Nor did any one imagine, that on the next Lord's 
day, all that was mortal of George P. Shuford would be 
committed to its kindred dust. There was nothing in 
the appearance of the man, that indicated the neai ap- 
proach of death. 

On Tuesday night he retired to rest. His health was 
good, and he slept soundly till lo o'clock, when Mrs. 
Shuford discovered that he was ill. She asked him 
"Are you sick?" he replied, "I am very sick." In a few 
moments he was so paralyzed that he ceased to speak, and 
could only move occasionally his left hand and foot. In 
this condition he lingered till Friday night, when about 
8 o'clock, he died without a struggle and apparently 
without a pang, Thus died our friend and brother, 
whose active life had been spent in doing good. It was 
his meat and drink to do his Master's will. When nine- 
teen years of age, Mr. Shuford received the rite of confir- 
mation, having previously been instructed in the doc- 
trines of the German Reformed Church, as taught in our 
excellent formula, the Heidelberg Catechism. A few 
years after, while yet young, he was elected to the office 
of Ruling Elder. So faithfully did he discharge the 
functions of his office, that he won for himself the respect 
and confidence of all whe knew him. He guarded with 
sacred vigilance every interest of the church. The 
church felt in his hands their most important trusts were 
safe. Nor was she ever disappointed. His tact for bus- 



GEORGE PHILIP SHUFORD. Ill 

iness, his ardent piety, his benevolence and cheerful dis- 
position, will long be remembered. It is not in the 
power of the grave to hide from memory the graces 
that adorned his character. They still live to guide, to 
stimulate, and cheer us in our homeward march. 

Let the widow and orphan's desolate heart be cheered, 
as they read this tribute of respect. We commend them 
to the guardianship of the widow and orphan's God, who 
hath promised to soothe the sorrow, and heal the wound 
his own hand hath made. 

"For us the Lord intends 

A bright abode on high, ' 

The place where sorrow ends, 

And natight is known but joy; 
With such a hope let us rejoice, 
We soon shall hear the Bridegroom's voice." 

J. I. 

John Sidney Shuford was born October 32, 1832. He 
married Margaret Hoover. His wife was born P^eb. 8, 
1835. Their children are: William who was born March 
6, i860; Sarah, born July 20, 1866, and George Philip 
born July 5 1869. 

Sarah married Edgar Ramsaur and their home is in 
the state of Washington. 

John Sidney Shuford belonged to the 46th regiment 
North Carolina troops, Co. K, Captain Adolphus Bost's 
company. He fought in the battles of the Wilderness, 
Cold Harbor and 2nd Manassas. He is one of the sub- 
stantial citizens of his county, an esteemed citizen of the. 
community and prominent in the Reformed church at 
Grace. 

Sarah Ann Shuford was married to James Hoover 
who died in the Confederate army. Their children are: 
Lida, Katie and Charles. Lida and Katie are dead. 
Charles married a Miss Whitener and lives in Catawba 
County. She afterwards married Monroe Hildebrand 



I 12 GEORGE PHILIP SHUFORD. 

of Catawba County. Ada, Martha and George are the 
children by this marriage. 

David Calvin Shuford died October 8, 1840. 

Catherine Elizabeth Shuford was born Aug. 12, 1841. 
She was married to Peter Wilfong Whitener of Catawba 
County. Peter Wilfong Whitener was born Jan. 5, 
1840. They were married by Rev, J. Ingold. The 
following are the children: Shuford L., Susan, Mary 
Allie, Edward H., Martha, Claud R. and Katie. 

Shuford L. married Mattie Wilfong, Susan married 
H. E. McCombs, Mary Allie married J. F. Abernethy, 
Edward H. died while a student at Catawba College, 
Martha married Pinkney Forney of Burke County, 
Claude married Daisy Yount of Lincoln County, and 
Katie married W. C. Schell of Hickory. Mary Allie, 
wife of J, F. Abernethy, died and afterwards Mr. Aber- 
nethy was married to Martha, widow of Pinkney P'or- 
ney, who had also died. 

Peter Wilfong Whitener, husband of Catherine White- 
ner, is one of the prominent farmers of his county. 
He has served his county as county commissioner, his 
church as an elder and trustee of Catawba College and 
his country as a Confederate soldier on the field of bat- 
tle. Catherine is a woman of high Christian character, 
and a member of the Baptist church. 

Martha Jane Shuford was born March 16, 1844. She 
married L. R. Whitener, who was born in 1837. ^'^• 
Whitener was a brave soldier in the Confederate Army 
and fought in all the prominent battles of that war, 
Martha Jane was married to Mr. Whitener Jan. 16, 
1866, by Rev. John Lantz. Mrs. Whitener died Feb, 
3, 1896. She was a woman of the highest character, 
beloved by a host of friends. She was buried at HickO' 
ry, and the funeral services were conducted by Rev. J 



GEUKGE PHILIP SHUFORD. 113 

L. Murphy, D. D. Her husband is a man of promi- 
nence. Twice he represented his county in the legisla- 
ture of the state, twice elected mayor of the town of 
Hickory, and served as county commissioner for eight 
years, and for six years was director of the Western 
Asylum at Morganton. He served his church as a 
ruling elder and as trustee of Catawba College. 

Mary Isabel Shuford was born April 2, 1849. She 
married Robert Helton Feb. 1872. Their children are 
George Robert, Curtis Rolland, Annie Belle, Ira Lee, 
Willie Grace, Samuel Hoyle and Birdie Alice. Mrs.. 
Helton is a member of Grace Reformed church and re- 
flects the piety and integrity of her ancestors. She is a 
woman of fine character. 

Eliza Alice Shuford was born Feb. 28, 1852. She 
married Mr. Adolpbus Abernethy of Hickory, Mrs.. 
Abernethy possesses many excellent iraits of character. 

George Lemuel Shuford was born Dec. 3, 1854, and 
married Carrie C. Rhodes March 18, 1884. The child- 
ren of this marriage are: Charles Robert, Lois Catherine^ 
John Sidney, George P., James Watson and Jacob 
Rhodes. His wife died October 31, 1898. They were 
married by the Rev. John Foil. Lemuel Shuford lives 
on the farm of his father and has engaged in farming. 
He is noted for his honesty, high sense of justice and 
kindness to the poor. 

Alonzo Craig Shuford was born March i, 1858. Mar- 
ried Willie Lowe of Catawba county on . Their 

children are: Annie Lee, Malinda, and Sarah, and an in- 
fant. Craig Shuford is a man of fine mind and has been 
in public life. He was twice elected to represent the 
Seventh Congressional District in the National Congress 
of the United States. In his home life he is most hap- 
py, surrounded as he is by an interesting family of three. 



114 ^EV. M. H. HUYLE. 

daughters. His wife is a woman of culture and refine- 
ment. 

Robert Lee Shuford was born March 4, 1865. Mar- 
ried Cora Wilfong-. Robert is an extensive farmer own- 
ing and operating the largest dairy farm in Catawba 
county. He inherited many noble traits of character 
from his ancestors and magnified:' these in a remarkable 
degree. 



REV. M. H. HOYLE. 

Maxwell Humphrey Hoyle, son of Noah Hoyle and 
Elizabeth Shuford Hoyle, was born June 10, 1841, in 
Lincoln, now Cleaveland County, N. C. His mother, 
Elizabeth Hoyle, was the youngest daughter of Col. Da- 
vid Shuford and sister of George P. Shuford, Esq. Mr. 
Hoyle was raised in Cleaveland County, He attended 
the best schools of the county. He was a member of 
Co. F. 34th Reg't, N. C. Troops in the Confederate 
Arm3\ His regiment was in Lee's army. It was in 
about twenty-seven battles and skirmishes. Mr, Hoyle 
was in about twenty-one of them. He was a soldier 
three and a half years. He was converted when a little 
more than ten years old, and joined the M. E. Church 
South. He was licensed to preach at Wesley's Chapel 
in Catawba County, Aug. 19, 1867, and joined the South 
Carolina Conference in December of that year. He has 
had a pastoral charge every year to the present. Mr. 
Hoyle has been a close and life-long student. He stud- 



ELIZABETH SHUFORD SMYRE. II5 

ied Latin under Dr. Brantley York when he was thirty- 
six years old. 

Mr. Hoyle married Miss Mary F. Lee of Union, S. C. 
His son, Jesse L., was educated at Wofford College, 
Spartanburg, S. C. He is in the cotton mill business. 

His daughter, H. Elizabeth, was educated at G. F. 
College, and at the State Normal, and in Kindergarten 
in New York City. She has been for five or six years 
in charge of graded schools. She now is in charge of 
school at Rutherfordton, N. C. 

Mary E. was educated at G. F. College and at New 
York Art League, N. Y. City. She is teaching in the 
graded school at Lexington, N. C. 

Helen Redwyne and Maude Shuford are members of 
the Junior class at the State Normal College. 

Mr. Hoyle is now pastor of Weddington Circuit at 
Wardlaw, N. C, sixteen miles south of Charlotte, N. C. 



ELIZABETH SHUFOIID SMYKE, 

Elizabeth Shuford was a daughter of Jacob Shuford, 
who died in 1844. Jacob Shuford was a son of Martin 
Shuford, who died in 1780. Martin Shuford was a son 
of John Shuford, who died in 1790. 

John Smyre was born October 14, 1785, and died 
Feb, 25, 1877, aged 91 years, 4 months, and 11 days, 

Elizabeth Shuford Smyre was born Sept. 3, 1790, and 
died Oct. 19, 1864. 

The children of John and Elizabeth Shuford Smyre 



Il6 ELIZABETH SIIUFORD SMYKE. 

are: Malinda Smyre, Eli Smyre, Rufus Smyie, Jacob 
Smyre, Mahala Smyre, Frank Smyre, Martha Smyre, 
Louisa Smyre, Fannie R. Smyre, Jenelah M. Smyre, 
Elkanah Smyre, Joseph H, Smyre, Louisa Smyre, Jones 

Smyre. 

John Smyre was the owner of a fine farm in Catawba 
County, where he raised his family. He lived and died 
on his farm on the South Fork river. John Smyre was 
an honest, upright man, and loved by all who knew him. 

Malinda Smyre married Joseph Rowe. Their home 
was in Catawba County. Their children are: Elizabeth 
Rowe, Julia Ann Rowe, Martha Rowe, Rosa Bella 
Rowe, Alonzo Rowe, Dallas Ro^ve. 

Elizabeth Rowe married Caleb Herman and lives on 
a farm in Catawba County. He holds the office of elder 
in the Reformed church, and has been magistrate for 
many years. Their children are: Fidus Herman, Irene 
Herman, Ada Herman, Ed. Herman. 

Julian Ann Rowe married Mr. Seitz. They are both 
dead. 

Rosa Bella Rowe married a Mr. Cline. 

Alonzo Rowe married Miss Jenela Deal of Caldwell 
County, N. C. He lived at Ennis, Texas, and was a 
successful business man, and was an active and influen- 
tial member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. 
His wife and children are still living at Ennis, Texas. 
Their children are: Minnie Rowe, Lola Rowe, Carrie 
Rowe, John Shuford Rowe, Jenela Rowe, Willie Rowe, 
Josie Rowe. 

Dallas Rowe married Miss Callie Finger and lives in 
Catawba County, where he served as superintendent of 
public jschooLs several terms. 



ELIZABETH SHUFORD SMYRE. II7 

Martha Rowe married Mr. Payne, who was a soldier 
in the Confederate Army. After his death she married 
a Mr, Downs. One of their sons is a preacher and lives 
at Hudson, N. C. 

Eli Smyre went to Texas when a young man, married 
and raised a family near Paris, Texas. 

Rufus Smyre married Miss Dacusof Greenville, S. C, 
and lived there until the close of the Civil War; then 
moved with his family to Denton, Texas. 

Jacob Smyre married Miss McCee, There were three 
children of this marriage: Cicero Smyre, Francis Smyre, 
Frances Smyre. 

Cicero died in the Confederate War. 

Francis lives at Conover. He married a Miss Miller 
of Catawba County, N. C. Their children are: Clinton 
Smyre, Lula Smyre, Bessie Smyre, Wirth Smyre, Tallie 
Mary Smyre, Ellen Smyre, Amy Smyre. 

Clinton and Wirth are conductors on the railroad in 
the far West. 

Lula Smyre married Rev. A. L. Boliek, a Lutheran 
minister. She is dead, and he is preaching at Newber- 
ry, Ind. 

Bessie Smyre married a Lutheran minister, Rev, B. 
L. Westenberger, and they live in Ohio. 

The rest are not married, 

Mahala Smyer married Alexander Frazier of Catawba 
Co., N, C. The children are; Jenela Frazier, Frances 
Frazier, Frank Frazier. 

Frances married Capt. Henry; after his death she mar- 
ried Mr. Noah Probst and lives in Catawba Co., N, C, 

Frank died in the Confederate Army. 



Il8 ELIZABETH SHUFORD SMYRE. 



Frank Smyre married Miss Brannon of Gailesville, 
Ala., and settled there. Their children are: Frank 
Smyre, Walter Smyre, Hanie Smyre. 

Martha Smyre married Jake Smyre and moved to 
Texas Co., Mo. Their children are: William Smyre, 
Robert Smyre, Cyrus Smyre, Lizzie Smyre, Joe Frank 
Smyre, John Smyre, Emma Smyre. 

Louisa Smyre died when seven years of age. 

Fannie R. Smyre married Cyrus Frazier of Catawba 
Co., N. C. The children are: Emma Frazier, William 
Quince Frazier. 

Emma Frazier married William Costner, son of Hon, 
A. Costner, of Lincoln Co., N. C. Their children are: 
Jennie E. Costner, Percy Cyrus Costner, Oscar Ambrose 
Costner, George Henry Costner, Adah Male Costner, 
Alda Costner. 

Jennie Costner married R. B. Robinson of Lincolnton, 
N. C, and moved to Dallas, Texas. Their children are: 
Gordon Robinson, George Robinson, Charlie Robinson. 
Gordon is at school in Columbia, S. C. 

Percy Costner married Miss Cansler and owns a large 
farm in Lincoln Co. Their children are: Huit Costner, 
Paul Costner. Edith Costner, Mamie Costner. 

Oscar Costner married Miss Hoover. They live in 
Lincoln Co. Their children are: Walter Costner, Willie 
Adah Costner. 

Geo. Costner is a graduate of medicine from the Uni- 
versity of Md. He is a young physician of prominence 
and located in Lincolnton. 

Adah and A^lda Costner are students of Lenoir Col- 



ELIZABETH SHUFORD SxMYRE. II9 

lege, Hickory, N. C. 

W. Quince Frazier went to Tenn. when young, mar- 
ried, is a farmer by occupation and lives at Newport, 
Tenn. Their children are: Charlie Frazier, Simpson 
Frazier, Oscar Frazier, Berwelle Frazier, Barto Frazier. 

Fannie Smyre Frazier died Dec. 17, 1849. 

Cyrus Frazier was a soldier in the Confederate Army. 
After the war he married Jenela Smyre, who died July 
10, 1898. He now lives with his son-in-law, W. A. 
Costner, in Catawba Co., on the John Smyre farm. 

Elkanah Smyre went to Cal. when a young man and 
lives at Plainsburg, Merced Co. , Cal. He married late 
in life and has four children and is a successful ranch- 



Joseph H. Smyre married Miss Mary Ross, of Ches- 
ter, S. C. Their children are: Robert Smyre, William 
R. Smyre, John Smyre, Tennie Smyre, Roxy Smyre, 
Mamie Smyre, Frank Smyre, Viola Smyre, Nancy 
Smyre, William Smyre, Bertha B. Smyre. 

Robert married and lives at Chester, S. C, and is an 
engineer on the railroad. 

William Smyre died young. 

John Smyre married Miss Carper of Newton, N. C, 
and was killed on the railroad, near Asheville, N. C, 
while acting as engineer. 

Tennie Smyre married Capt. Isaacs, and lives at 
Chester, S. C. He is a conductor on the railroad. 

Roxy Smyre married a Mr. Gibson who is not living. 

Mamie Smyre married Mr, H, A. Hoover and lives 
at Charlotte, N. C. 

Frank Smyre died when a young man. 

Viola Smyre married Mr. Brown. Their home is in 



I20 LAND GRANTS TO JOHN AND MARTIN SHUFORD. 

Columbia, S. C. He is aa engineer on the railroad. 

Nancy Srayre is unmarried. 

William Smyer of Chester, S. C, is a conductor or an 
engineer on the railroad. 

Bertha B. Smyre married Mr. John Gall of Maiden, 
N. C. Their home is in Lenoir, N. C, and he is an 
operator. 

The father of these children, Joseph Smyre, is not 
living. His widow lives at Chester, S. C. 

Louesa Smyre died when very young. 

Jones Smyre died from wounds received in the war 
while a soldier in the Confederate Army. 



LAND GRANTS TO JOHN AND MARTIN SHUFORD. 

No. io6. 

To John Shuford 230 acres in Mecklenburg County 
on the West side of the South Fork of Catawba River on 
both sides of jumping branch joining Beganer, Isaac 
Johnstons and his own land. Beginning at a white oak, 
Jhonston's corner and runs with his line S. 30 west 200 
poles to a black oak, his other corner on I-egamir's line, 
thence with his line No. 30 west 216 poles to a black oak, 
thence No. 30 East 200 poles to a white oak joining his 
own land, thence to the beginning. 

(Signed) Wm. Tryon. 
• Dated Oct. 26th, 1767. 



LAND GRANTS TO JOHN AND MARTIN SHUFORD. 12 1 

No. 107, 

To John Shuford, 250 acres in Mecklenburg County on 
the West side of the South Fork of Catawba River joining 
his own new survey on the Broad Meadow. Beginning at 
a white oak near Michael Whitener's land and runs So. 75 
West 200 poles to a black oak, thence South 1 5 East 200 
poles to a white oak, thence North 75 East 200 poles 
to a stake, thence to the beginning. 

Dated 26th Oct. 1767. 



No. 109. 

To Martin Shufford, 100 acres in Mecklenburg on the 
West side the South Fork of the Catawba River joining 
John Shufford's So line. 

Beginning at a black oak on John Shufford's line and 
runs So. 55 West 127 poles to a stake, thence South 35 
East 127 poles W. O., thence No. 55 East 127 poles to a 
stake in John Shufford's line, thence with his line to the 
beginning. 

Dated 26lh Oct. 1767, 



It may be of some interest to learn the changes in 
name which Catawba and Lincoln Counties have under- 
gone. From 1728 to 1734 Catawba and Lincoln Coun- 
ties were embraced in New Hanover County; from 1734 
to 1749 in Bladen County; from 1749 to 1762 in Anson 
County; from 1762 to 1768 in Mecklenburg County; 
from 1768 to 1779 in Tryon. Any deeds to John Shu- 
ford would most probably be found registered in Meck- 
lenburg County. 



SIIUFURD GRAVEYARD. 



SHUFORD GRAVEYARD. 



The Shuford Graveyard is found on the original John 
Shuford farm. The persons named here are buried 
there. 

Cartrot Shuford died April 4, 1766. This is the first 
Shuford buried in this graveyard. The person named 
here is supposed to be a child of John and Sarah Shuford. 

Philip Shuford died April 28, 1768. He is supposed 
to be a son of John and Sarah Shuford. 

Sarah Shuford died April 8, 1786. She is buried by 
the side of John Shuford, her husband. 

John Shuford died June 8, 1790. He is the father of 
the Shuford family in North Carolina. 

Their graves have a heart and cross upon them. 



OLD FARM ON THE SOUTH FORK RIVER. 

I learn from the Piedmont Press, that the old farm has 
been sold and passed out of the family. Permit me to 
utter a few parting words suggested by the occasion. 
The farm came into the hands of my father by descent 
from his father, and it was the home of my parents from 
the time of their marriage to the time of their death. 
Eleven children were born to them on this farm, eight 
of whom are still living. 

The old plantation was at its best in the days of negro 
slavery. It was a home for the blacks, and I doubt not 
it is a dear spot to the surviving servants who labored 



OLD FAKM ON THE S(JUTH FORK RIVER. 1 23 

on it. 

It saw the departure of the boys in gray, who went 
forth to establish the independence of the Southern Con- 
federacy, and witnessed the return of all save one, who 
sleeps in a soldier's grave on the battle-ground of the 
Wilderness. There was rejoicing on the old farm vvhen 
those boys came home, such as filled the home of the prod- 
igal son when he returned to his father. The farm was 
near the river, whose waters afforded a pleasant place for 
bathing. Besides bathing, the boys hunted the rabbit by 
day and the opossum at night. These were our enjoy- 
ments in the happy past. The old farm was the home 
of hospitality. The traveler found there a resting place 
at night, and the poor were never turned from its doors 
empty. The words of the Savior, "The poor ye always 
have with you" were true in that place. There the min- 
ister of the Gospel was received with reverence due 'his 
sacred calling. The children were quiet in his presence, 
and even negro Dobson assumed a sanctified look when 
he took the parson's horse. 

Farewell to the old farm. It has now passed into the 
hands of others. May it be to them a pleasant home. 

Summum, 111., 1885- J. H. Shufokd. 



JOHN BAKEll. 
John Baker was born in 1775. He lived upon a farm 
in Lincoln County, now Catawba County, N. C. He 
married Catharine Yoder, She was born 1782. Catha- 
rine Yoder Baker was a daughter of Conrad Yoder who 
is the father of the Yoder family in N. C. The children 



124 JOHN BAKER. 

are: David Baker, born 1798, 

Elizabeth Baker, born 1801, 

Sarah Baker, born 1804, 

John Baker, born 1807, 

Catharine Baker, born 18 10, 

Polly Baker, born 181 3, 

Solomon Baker, born 181 5, 

Eliza Baker, born 1820, 

Hannah Baker, born 1823. She died young. 
John Baker was a member of the German Baptist 
church. His funeral was preached by Rev Rhodes, a 
minister of that church. His wife, Catharine Yoder 
Baker, died in August 1867. She was a member of the 
Baptist church, and is buried in the graveyard at Thessa- 
lonica Baptist church, Catawba County, N. C. The 
Baker family in Catawba County, N. C, are noted for 
their economy, integrity, and upright life. Their nigral 
and religious life is of a high order. My mother was 
Catharine Baker, who married Jacob H. Shuford, 



GEORGE SHUFOKD. 



branch of the Shuford family is the Hoi 
C.-J, H. S.] 



George Shuford, from whom has sprung the Shuford 
family of Transylvania County, North Carolina, was, 
according to the best information which the writer has 
been able to obtain, a son of John Shuford, who has been 
styled in this book "the father of the Shuford family in 
North Carolina," and was born in Lincoln County in said 



GEORGE SLIUFOKD. I25 

State, in the year 1754, and died in Buncombe County, 
now Transylvania County, on the loth day of February 
1825. The inscription on his tombstone is so dim at this 
time that it is impossible to make out the day and month 
of his birth, but the year of his birth and the date of his 
death are plainly discernible. He was married to Miss 
Mary Burrell, of Lancaster, Pa., in the year 1786, and 
moved from Lincoln County, N. C, to Buncombe Coun- 
ty, now Transylvania County, in the year 1800. Mary 
Burrell, who afterwards became the wife of the said 
George Shuford, was born in the year 1761, and died in 
Buncombe County, now Translyvania County, in the 
year 1842. 

George Shuford was one of six brothers, all of whom, 
according to family tradition, were over six feet high, 
and were men of robust constitutions and unusual phys- 
ical strength and vigor, and most of them, if not all, 
lived to old age, and raised large families. They v^^ere 
all thrifty farmers, and some of them perhaps mechan- 
ics, and were all men of more than ordinary intellectual 
endowments, and were noted for their honesty and strict 
integrity. It was a common boast among these six 
brothers during their lives, that neither had ever failed 
to perform an obligation or to pay a debt when due, and 
that neither had ever been sued in court. 

George Shuford, the special subject of this sketch, was 
first engaged in farming in Lincoln County, N. C, but 
afterwards removed to what is still known as the Shuf- 
ord place, in the Little River mountains, about five miles 
from the confluence of Little River with the French 
Broad River, in the present County of Transylvania, 
formerly Buncombe County, as hereinbefore stated, for 
the purpose of grazing stock on what was then consid- 
ered the wild Indian hunting grounds of the west. He 



126 GEORGE SIIUFORD. 

and his wife and children who accompanied him suffered 
many inconveniences and hardships incident to life in 
this primitive, wild and rugged country. One of the 
family traditions among his descendents is, that for sev- 
eral years first after his settlement in Buncombe County, 
he went regularly twenty miles to attend religious wor- 
ship and thirty or forty miles to have his milling done. 
There are other traditions to the effect that his first em- 
barkment in the business of grazing cattle proved disas- 
trous, principally because the winters in the mountains 
proved to be much more rigorous than he contemplated, 
and he had not made sufficient provision for keeping his 
stock over winter. There is also a tradition that a num- 
ber of his cattle were poisoned by drinking out of a min- 
eral spring on his premises, and the spring is known to 
this day as the "poison spring," and is most frequently 
called by the mountaineers in the neighborhood "the 
pizen spring." At any rale he did not find bis first lo- 
cation satisfactory, and within a few years thereafter 
purchased a farm on the French Broad River a short 
distance below the mouth of Little River, to which he 
removed with his family, and where he lived until 
the time of his death. He was an intelligent, industri- 
ous and thrifty farmer and raised his family in comfort 
and in the highest respectability. He was originally, 
according to tradition, a member of the Lutheran, or 
Reformed Church, but after moving to the mountains of 
Western North Carolina and finding no organization of 
the Lutheran, or Reformed Church, in that region, he 
attached himself to the Methodist Church, and was a 
devout and consistent mem.ber of that church until the 
day of his death. In those primitive days religious wor- 
ship was often held by the Methodist people in country 
churches and countrv schoolrhouses during the week, as 



GEORGE SllUFORD. 12/ 

the circuit rider traveling over a large territory could not 
supply all his charges on Sundays, and notwithstanding 
George Shuford was a busy farmer, he and his wife were 
always present with their children on days of religious 
worship in the country churches accessible to them. The 
result of their marriage was five children, one son and 
four daughters, David, vSallie (or Sarah), Elizabeth, 
P"'annie and Polly. 

David Sbuford, the eldest child and only son of 
George and Mary Shuford, was born November 3, 1788, 
and was married on August 3, 18 18, to Sarah Orr, 
daughter of Col. Robt. Orr, also of the County of Tran- 
sylvania, then Buncombe County, and died August 31, 
1862, from injuries received by a fall through a platform 
at his mill. He inherited the characteristics of his an- 
cestors, and was noted for his industry, honesty and 
liberal hospitality. He was an intelligent and success- 
ful farmer and accumulated a comfortable estate for the 
primitive country and early times in which he lived. 
He was for the greater part of his life a member of the 
Methodist Church, but was not bound by any sectarian 
principles or feelings. He entertained the greatest lib- 
erality for all Christian churches, and his house was a 
home for ministers of the gospel of all denominations. 
He was known far and wide as *' Uncle Davie Shuford," 
but while he was known by that familiar appellation, no 
one enjoyed to a fuller extent than he the respect and 
confidence of his neighbors and fellow-citizens. His 
wife Sarah Shuford was born April 28, 1793, and died 
May 8, 1883. She was not only a strong woman phys- 
ically, but was endowed with an unusually strong and 
vigorous mind which she retained in its full strength al- 
most to the time of her death, at the ripe age of 90 years 
and 10 days. She was a woman of deep piety and 



128 CEURGE SIIUFORD. 

.strong religious convictions. She was raised a Presby- 
terian, but joined the Methodist church with her hus- 
band, and notwithstanding her early training in the Pres- 
byterian church where shouting was considered almost 
as a sacrilige, she believed in shouting, and often gave 
way to her emotions in her private devotions and shout- 
ed at her home in good old Methodist style. David and 
Sarah Shuford had born to them twelve children, to-wit, 
Mary Ann, born October 12, 181 5, George, born May 5, 
1817, John, born April 6, 1819, a third son who died in 
infancy was l)orn March 11, 1821, Jason Israel, born 
April 13, i822,Lorena Mira, born June 14, 1824, Clarisa, 
born September 27, 1826, Charles Slagle, born January 
15, 1829, Jane Patton, born December 2, 1830, David 
Merrimon, born March 7, 1833, Carter Asbury, born 
April 11,1835, Perry Sylvanus, born February 15, 1839, 
David and Sarah Shuford raised their eleven children 
who survived infancy, in the highest respectability and 
gave to them all the best educational advantages the 
country afforded at that time. 

Mary Ann, the eldest child of David and Sarah Shuf- 
ord, was married to Rev. Benjamin F. King, a Baptist 
minister, on September 15, 1836, and several years 
thereafter removed with her husband to the State of 

Georgia, where she died, on the day of 18 — 

at the ripe old age of . She had nine children, 

Christenah Taylor, born July 7, 1837, Adoniron S., born 
March 27, 1839, Hazeltine M., born September 2, 1842, 
Nicholas Wheeler, born February 21, 1845, Cleopatra, 

born February 14, 1848, Sarah C, born 18 — ., 

Charles L., born June 6, 1853, Erwin P,, born April i, 
1856, and Chapman G., born November 5, 1858, Many 
of her children have emigrated from Georgia and are 
located in various v/estern states, and some of them are 



(;ii:oKGK siiuFOKi). 129 

now dead. 

George Shuford, the second child and eldest son of 
David and Sarah Shuford, was first married to Louisa 
Melissa Beacham, of Greenville County, S. C, on No- 
vember 6. 1845. She was of English descent by both 
parents, and was born February 17, 1824, and died April 
27, 1866. There was never a more faithful wife nor a 
more devoted and loving mother than she. Her life was 
untiringly devoted to her husband and her children. 
She was deeply religious and her faith in God, and her 
belief in Christ and immortality amounted to knowledge. 
Her death was a triumphant transition from mortality to 
immortality, from earth to heaven. Those who witness- 
ed her death whispered to each other that there must be 
immortality beyond the grave and that there must be a 
heaven, as they had seen her enter into glory. 

There were born to George and Louisa M. Shuford 
SIX children: Talula Waverline, born January 22, 1846, 
John Elkanah, born November 26, 1847, Daniel Capers, 
born February 2, 1850, David Gary, born December 23, 
1852, George Archibald, born August i, 1855, and Elzy 
Sterling, born August 14, 1861. 

George Shuford, after the death of his first wife, was 
again married, on the 24th day of November 1868, to 
Mrs. Carolina C. Jones, widow of Wiley W. Jones, by 
whom he had one daughter, Callie Shuford, who was 
born November 20, 1869. In his early manhood he 
served an apprenticeship as a mill-wright and mechanic, 
and for many years followed the mill-wright trade, and 
was also a contractor, and built a number of mills and 
factories in North Carolina and South Carolina. He 
was engaged either in building or repairing a cotton 
factory m Greenville County, S. C. when he met and be- 
came acquainted with Louisa Melissa Beacham, whom 



I30 GEORGL SIIUFORD. 

he afterwards married. During a part of the time he 
was serving his apprenticeship he resided in the family 
of Daniel Shu ford, at Lincoln ton, N.C., and from this 
Daniel Shuford, and also from his grand-father, George 
Shuford, and his father, David Shuford, he learned 
many traditions of the Shuford family which he used to 
relate with much interest and great clearness to his own 
children. One of these traditions was to the effect that 
the first Shuford who crossed the Atlantic Ocean was 
named George and that he came to this country in com- 
pany with a man by the name of Soamme or Summe 
who afterwards spelled his name Summey, and that they 
located in, or near York, Pa. John Shuford who after- 
wards came to North Carolina must have been a son of 
this original George Shuford. George Shuford, the son 
of David, after following his trade for many years finally 
gave up the same and devoted himself to farming and 
died on his farm near Brevard April 9, 1891. 

Talula W. Stiuford, the eldest child and only daugh- 
ter of George and Louisa M. Shuford, was married to Al- 
fred Erwin Gash on the 6th day of October 1869 and 
died July 20, 1883. Her husband, Alfred Erwin Gash, 
was accidently stabbed on the streets of Asheville on 
July 29, 1884, while attempting to separate two combat- 
ants and died from the effects of the wound August 30, 
of the same year. There were born to Alfred Erwin 
Gash four children, Leota F., Ineva T., Osceola and 
Flora F. Osceola died in infancy, but the other child- 
ren of this marriage survive. 

John Elkanah Shuford, second child and eldest son of 
George and Louisa M, Shuford moved to the State of 
Georgia in the year 1873 or 1874, and has resided in that 
state since said date. He was married to Jessie Patton, 
of Lafayette, Georgia, by whom he has two children, 



GEORGE SIIUFORD, I31 

both daughters. When he first removed to the State of 
Georgia he engaged in teaching school, but afterwards 
entered the mercantile business at Lafayette and contin- 
ued in that business for a number of years. He after- 
wards purchased a farm near Menlo in that state, and 
moved to the same with his family, and has been en- 
gaged in farming for several years. He is a man of 
liberal education and untiring energy, and has enjoyed 
reasonable success in all the vocations of life in which 
he has engaged. He is an elder in the Presby<^erian 
church and enjoys the respect and confidence of all his 
neighbors. He has never sought or held public office, 
prefering to occupy his time with his own private pur- 
suits. 

Daniel Capers Shuford, the third child and second 
son of George and Louisa M. Shuford. after engaging in 
several business enterprises, finally studied medicine, 
and after attending lectures in Atlanta, Ga,, engaged in 
the practice of medicine, for a number of years, in Oco- 
nee County, S. C, and then returned to Brevard, N. C, 
and resided therefor a short time. He afterwards emi- 
grated to the Indian Territory where he resided for sev- 
eral years devoting himself to the practice of medicine. 
He finally removed to the State of Arkansas, where he 
engaged for a short time in farming, and where he died, 
on the 13th day of March 1901. His remains were re- 
moved by his brother, G. A. Shuford, and re-interred in 
the old Shuford burying ground on Little River in Tran- 
sylvania County, on the 13th day of June of the same 
year. He was never married. He was a man of bright 
intellect and unusual capabilities, but seemed to lack 
steadiness of purpose and constancy of pursuit and con- 
sequently never accomplished that success in life which 
his friends predicted for him in his youth and early 



132 GEUKGE ARCHIBALD SHUFORD. 

manhood. He was of a cheerful, cordial disposition, and 
of ready wit, and had the special tact of making friends 
of all with whom he came in contact. It was indeed a 
remarkable and mysterious fatality which brought one of 
his social and friendly disposition to meet death solitary 
and alone in an isolated farm house in the dismal 
swamps of Arkansas. 

David Cary Shuford, the fourth child and third son of 
George and Louisa M. Shuford, followed in the footsteps 
of his father, and served an apprenticeship as a mill- 
wright and carpenter, and afterwards engaged in build- 
ing houses b}^ contract and also in sawing and manufact- 
uring lumber, in the State of South Carolina, and was 
enjoying reasonable success in business at the time of 
his death. He was killed in a cyclone at Chappell's S. C, 
where he was erecting a depot for a railroad company, 
on the 19th day of February 1884, and was interred at 
Seneca, S. C, where he had for a number of years made 
his home. As indicating the esteem in which he was 
held by the community in which he lived, the writer has 
frequently been told by citizens of the town of Seneca, 
that a larger concourse of people attended his burial 
than had ever before attended the obsequies of any other 
person in the town. He was an energetic, earnest, 
faithful and intelligent business man, and but for his 
untimely death would doubtless have attained large bus- 
iness success. He was never married. 

George Archibald Shuford, the fifth child and fourth 
son of George and Louisa M. Shuford, studied law and 
has devoted his life to that profession. His career and 
success as a lawyer prior to the time of his promotion 
to the Bench, as hereinafter stated, is agreeably told by 
Col John D. Cameron in a sketch written by him for 
iniblication in the "Cyclopedia of Eminent Men of the 




JUDGE GEORGE A. SHUFORD 

Asheville. N. C. 



GEORGE ARCHIBALD SMUFOKD. 133 

Carolinas" published in the early part of 1892. Col. 
Cameron had for many years lived in the same town 
with the subject of the sketch and had been on the most 
intimate relations with him, and was well prepared to 
speak of his characteristics. Col. Cameron was also in- 
timately acquainted with the Shuford family and his ref- 
erences to the early history of the family will doubtless 
be of interest to the readers of this book. In reference 
to the subject of this sketch Col. Cameron writes as fol- 
lows: 

* * * 

Biography has wider and more useful service than in 
ministering to the vanity of its subject or the pride of its 
friends; something more noble even than the record of 
distinction in whatever field of work it has been achieved. 
Its true mission is to seize upon such points of character 
and career as may be presented for imitation, emulation 
or encouragement; and even the humblest of men in 
conscientious di'Jcharge of duty, faithful application of 
the means opportunity presents to their use, persever- 
ance under opposition, fortitude under adversity, cour- 
age under trial, integrity under temptation, may illus- 
trate more usefully and splendidly those characteristics 
of humanity which enoble and adorn it, than those mere 
dazzling and striking examples which mankind is more 
apt and ready to take up as its idols and exemplars. 
What is worth following, worth imitating, worth wor- 
shiping, is not universally found in that higher sphere of 
action to which ambition chiefly directs its aim. With- 
out question the pages of history are adorned with names 
so indelibly inscribed with deeds of almost superhuman 
achievments that they can never lose their hold, vSo long 
as history and society last and hold together upon hu- 
man admiration and as spurs to human imitation. But 



134 GEORGE ARCHIBALD SlIUFORD. 

rare are those characters which sustain the scrutiny of 
analysis, and emerge from it free from the taint of coun- 
terbalancing vices and infirmities. It is rather in the 
more modest walks of life, in that intermediate stage of 
action, where the actor is playing his part for the pres- 
ent, not like Napoleon, for the eternity of time and the 
admiration of posterity, but with reference to present 
good and contemporary influence, that the most useful 
and practical examplars for the young, and the most en- 
couraging examples for the struggling must be sought. 
In a few brief, strong words, the Latin poet presents the 
real idea of the man who is to make the proper impress 
upon the present, without concerning himself with the 
thought of a remote temporal future: ''Justum et tena- 
cem propositi virum;" a man just in his dealings with 
his fellow man, a man fixed in his principles and tena- 
cious in adherence to them, a man so just that he cannot 
be dishonest, and so brave and sincere that he cannot be 
corrupt; and when to this lofty heathen ideal is super- 
added those graces that Christian doctrine so generally 
imparts, the daily walks of life will provide abundant 
illustrations of useful and admirable character and ca- 
reer without seeking for such in the lofty and resplend- 
ent sphere of world renowned public fame and service. 
In such daily walk we find the subject of this sketch, 
George A. Shuford, living illustration of what virtues 
and characteristics are needed for the perfection of an 
honorable and useful career, both in its private and pub- 
lic relations. He was born in the county of Buncombe, 
State of North Carolina, August i, 1855. His parentage 
was such as to give assurance of the perpetuation in un- 
broken line of moral and mental features stamped upon 
the individuality of a long succession of generations. 
II is father's family was that of German stock, now so 



GEORGE ARCHIBALD SIIUFORD. 135 

firmly rooted in the middle and western portions of 
North Carolina, into which it was transplanted during 
the middle of the last century, after having flourished 
and greatly increased in Pennsylvania. The spirit of 
emigration seized upon the Pennsylvania colonists when 
their numbers compelled the occupation of ampler terri- 
tory, and, governed by characteristic sagacity, the emi- 
grants sought that fertile, beautiful, and then almost 
unoccupied region extending parallel with the Blue 
Ridge through Virginia down into South Carolina, and 
including the rich valleys watered by the head streams 
of the many rivers which pursue their devious courses 
to the distant Atlantic. In this region, with German 
tenacity, they rem.ained fixed, as if in the language of 
the Indian finding the locality that filled all his hopes 
and wishes, they had said, "here we rest." For though 
in turn they have sent out their surplus, and, with their 
population, invigorated other lands, the main bod}- still 
remains where it first planted itself, unchanged in those 
characteristics of peacefulness, industry, thrift, integrity 
and fixity of purpose, which have always distinguished 
that branch of the human fumily. 

The Shuford family were Alsatians, coming early in 
colonial history to Pennsylvania. From that state mem- 
bers of it removed before the v\'ar of the Revolution, to 
the county of Lincoln, into that part now know as Ca- 
tawba N. C. The great-grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch was a. member of a family of six brothers, all 
of them noted for their strength and stature, all of 
them exceeding six feet in height. All were farmers, 
prosperous and independent. They were all intelligent, 
and their names were synonomo.us with integrity. The 
early record shows that they filled various places of hon- 
or and trvist, the .legacy, of a goo.d azid honored name 



136 GEORGE ARCIIIliALD SlIUFORD. 

perpetuated to tlie present day throughout Western 
North Carolina. The great-grandfather of George A. 
Shuford settled in Buncombe County, in that portion 
now erected into the county of Transylvania, soon after 
the close of the Revolutionary War, engaging in stock- 
raising; to which the character of the country offered pe- 
culiar inducements. He lived there useful and honored 
until his death at a ripe old age. He had only one son, 
David Shuford, the grandfather of the subject of this 
sketch, who, inheriting the characteristics of his ances- 
tors, was noted for his industry, generosity, hospitality, 
and stern integrity. He was endowed with a strong 
natural intellect, a high sense of honor and justice, and 
a broad liberality for his fellow men. He was a patri- 
arch and arbiter in the primitive community in which he 
lived, whose advice was often sought for and whose 
judgment in matters of controversy among his neighbors 
was usually final. He raised a large and honorable family 
of sons and daughters. George Shuford, the eldest son of 
David Shuford, was the father of the subject of this sketch. 
In his earlier years he engaged largely in the mechanic 
arts, in which he became skillful and successful; but his 
later years were given to the lab<t.'rs and pleasures of the 
farm, carefully avoiding the cares of public life, passing 
away at a good old age, leaving behind him the memory 
of a useful, honest, and respected name. He was twice 
married. His first wife was Louisa M. Beachem, a native 
of Greenville, S. C. She was of an English family 
which had for several generations lived in South Caroli- 
na. By the first marriage there were five sons and one 
daughter. On the death of his first wife, Mr. Shuford 
married again, and the issue of the second marriage was 
one daughter. 

George A. Shuford was the fourth son at the time pre- 



GEORGE ARCHIBALD SHUFORD. 137 

viously mentioned. His early years, passed like those 
of most country boys, leave no especial mark for the 
note of the biographer. His first step in the march of 
life was in the Sand Hill Academy in Buncombe Coun- 
ty, near which his father then resided, and afterwards 
he was placed at Davidson's River Academy in the pres- 
ent county of Transylvania. His teacher there was Mr. 
A. D. Farmer, regarded as a well qualified, but some- 
what eccentric pedagogue. He entered successively 
the academies at Brevard, under Dr. McNeil Turner, 
and the Franklin high school, under Mr. Daniel M. 
Jones, and attaching himself to that gentleman when he 
removed to Waynesville, he employed a portion of his- 
time from 1874 to 1876 in teaching; he then entered 
Emory and Henry College, Virginia, and there com- 
pleted a special course of study. During the fall of 1877 
he taught school, and meanwhile pursued a course of 
study preparatory to engaging in the study of the law 
which he had chosen as his profession. Thus, after long 
years of patient preparation and looking forward, he 
took the decisive step toward the attainment of those 
honors, and it may be added, those emoluments which 
reward the pursuit of the law, of all professions the one 
most sure to bring into prominence the noblest character 
of the man, the real qualifications of the student; illus- 
trating the one by illustrating the virtues of integrity 
and fidelity to responsibilities assumed, and confirming; 
public confidences by the possession of those acquire- 
ments of legal learning and enlarged general informa- 
tion without the possession of which the lawyer is im- 
perfectly equipped either for the attainment of honors 
or professional reputation. 

Mr. Shuford began the study of law in Waynesville,. 
N. C, under the instructions of the Hon. J. C. L. Gud- 



138 GEORGE ARCHIBALD 8HUFORD. 

ger and Mr. Garland S. Ferguson; the first to become 
subsequently an honored judge of the Twelfth judicial 
district; the other for eight years the able solicitor for 
the same district. He soon afterwards entered the law 
school at Greensboro, N. C, conducted by the Hon. 
Robert P, Dick, judge of the United States district court, 
and the Hon. John H. Dillard, then associate- justice of 
the Supreme Court of North Carolina, A school under 
instructors of such eminence assured the solidity of the 
acquirements of its eleves, and accordingly, after a highly 
satisfactory and honorable examination before the Su- 
preme Court of North Carolina, Mr. Shuford was admit- 
ted in January, 1879, to practice in all the courts of the 
state, and at once entered upon the practice of his pro- 
fession at Waynesville, alone at first, but soon after as- 
sociating himself with Mr. Alden Howell, an experi- 
enced practitioner of that town. At the end of two years 
this partnership was dissolved, Mr. Shuford removing to 
Asheville, and entering int<=j partnership with the Hon. 
Thomas D. Johnston, which association was continued 
until Mr. Johnston was elected to the national congress 
as a member of the house of representatives. After 
practicing alone for two years, Mr, Shuford entered into 
partnership with Mr, W. W. Jones, which connection 
still exists. A firm unsurpassed in Asheville for its hold 
upon public confidence, gained through the professional 
learning of its members, their lofty personal character, 
their interest in their clients, their inflexible regard to 
duty. In these gentlemen the profession of the law is 
illustrated with its traditional luster and elevated to the 
dignity through which it should always exact popular 
reverence. 

In 1884 Mr. Shuford was elected presiding justice of 
the inferior court of Buncombe County. The court was 



GLOKGK ARCHIBALD SIIUFORD. I 39 

given limited criminal jurisdiction, not embracing capi- 
tal offenses, yet the cognizance of the lower grades of 
crime gave ample field for the display of learning, and 
also for the exercise of firmness, impartiality, and also 
mercy when wise consideration for the public interest 
justified it. All these qualificationi: were so strongly 
and happily blended in the judicial character of Judge 
Shuford, that, during the term of four years during 
which he served, he daily added to the respect and con- 
fidence of the people while he inspired a wholesome fear 
in the minds of offenders; and then returned to duties 
of his private pursuits crowned with the reward accorded 
to the good and faithful officer. With this exception 
Mr. Shuford has never aspired to office. He is a politi- 
cian to the extent expected from every good citizen, a 
man alive to the public interCvSts, feeling sensibly the 
need of entrusting their conduct to good and able men, 
jealous of the public liberties, sensitive to the public 
honor, zealously hostile to whomsoever or whatsoever 
may attempt to abridge the one or tarnish the other. 
To this extent he is a politician, and a trusted and watch- 
ful member of the Democratic party to which he belongs, 
and as testimony to his unflinching fidelity to his party 
principles, and the wisdom and value of his counsels, he 
has ably served as the chairman of the county democrat- 
ic executive committee, and of the executive committee 
of the judical district in which he resides. But he has 
steadil}^ suppressed all aspirations for the political hon- 
ors, which, with his consent, would be so readily accord- 
ed to him. As a member of the state democratic con- 
vention of North Carolina of 1888, he served on the com- 
mittee on platform and resolutions, and, as one of a sub- 
committee ot two, he, with his associate, drafted the 
platform which was adopted by the convention, on 



I40 GEORGE ARCHIBALD SIIUFORD. 

which the democratic party wa^ed its campaign, and 
under which a splendid victory was won for democracy. 
In private life he is of an exceptionally amiable disposi- 
tion, sprightly in conversation, intelligent, and read in 
the best literature of the day, a sincere and active Chris- 
tian, a worthy member of the Methodist church. As a 
citizen he is public spirited and liberal, and participates 
and often leads in those intelligent measures having as 
their objects the improvement and advancement of the 
fine section of which he is a native. In his professional 
career he has already attained a name and eminence 
honorable to his character, and his efforts and achiev- 
ments gained in a comparatively brief professional life. 
To few men does the pathway of the future open a fair- 
er or more prospcrotis career. 

Geo. A. Shuford, the subject of the foregoing sketch, 
was appointed Judge of the Superior Court for the 12th 
Judicial District of North Carolina, by Gov. Thomas M. 
Holt, on the loth day of Feb. 1892, in the place of Judge 
James H. Merrimon resigned, and was elected to the 
same office by the people at the general election held in 
the same year, and was again commissioned as Judge of 
the Superior Court by Gov. Elias Carr, on the 21st day 
of March 1893 for a term of eight years. He served as 
Judge until January 1895, when he again retired to pri- 
vate life, and resumed the practice of law at Asheville, 
North Carolina, and has since been actively engaged in 
the pursuit of his chosen profession. He was married 
to Miss Julia Dean, of Floyd County, Georgia, on the 
27th day of Dec. 1892, and the result of this marriage is 
two children, George Adams, born September 5, 1895, 
and Mary Frances, born May 2, 1897. 

Elzy Sterling Shuford, sixth child and fifth son of 



LLZY SrERLIxNG & JOHN SHUFORD. I4I 

George and Louisa Shuford, was born August 14, 1861, 
and died at the home of his father near Brevard, N. C, 
on April 22, 1885. He was a young man of a bright 
intellect, studious habits and an exemplary character. 
His health became impaired by overwork at school, and 
although he was given the best medical attention the 
country afforded, he was never able to regain his health. 
He was of a deeply religious nature, and wrote in his 
own hymn book the exact time and manner of his con- 
version and tne date of his becoming a member of the 
Methodist Church, in which he lived consistently until 
the day of his death. 

-X- -x- * 

John Shuford, the third child and second son of David 
and Sarah Shuford, followed in the footsteps of his broth- 
er George, and was serving an apprenticeship as mill- 
wright and machinist, in the County of Lincoln, N. C, 
when he there contracted typhoid fever, from which dis- 
ease he died, on the 4th day of September 1841. He 
was a young man of fine physique, robust health, and 
sober and industrious habits, and would doubtless have 
attained marked success in life but for his untimely 
death. He was never married. 

Jason Israel Shuford, the fourth child and third son of 
David and Sarah Shuford, died on the 23 day of Decem- 
ber 1895, in his 74 year. He was a man of many mark- 
ed peculiarities, not to say eccentricities, but withal was 
a most exemplary and useful citizen and kind and consid- 
erate neighbor. If there was sickness or distress in his 
community, he was the first to find it out and the first 
to offer substantial assistance. His devotion to his aged 
mother was an illustration of his affectionate disposition 
and his kindness of heart. He was a man full of moods, 
and when in the least perplexed over business or other 



142 JASON ISRAEl, SUUFORD. 

affairs, would assume a degree of silence which was un- 
comfortable and sometimes almost distressing to those 
about him. The writer has frequently been present 
when he would sit in the same room with cheerful com- 
pany for hours without speaking a word, and he would 
often continue in this mood for days. On one occasion 
when the writer of this sketch had been absent from the 
country for more than a year attending college, and, on 
his return to the country, had put himself to considera- 
ble inconvenience to visit his uncle Jason Israel, he was 
saluted by his uncle in three monosyllables contracted 
into one word, "how'er-you;" and, although the vvriter 
remained at his house for at least twenty-four hours he 
did not address a single other remark to his guest, until 
the latter was almost in .the act of taking his leave of the 
family, when his uncle repaired to his room and brought 
forth an elegant gold watch and presented it to his 
nephew with the laconic presentation speech "you can 
have this." At other times when the writer would visit 
at his house he would find him in a most loquacious 
mood, and would wsoon realize that the best method of 
entertaining him was to assume the role of an attentive 
auditor. 

He was a man of fine intellect, considerable reading 
and of a wide range of information on practical 
subjects, and, when in a conversational mood, would 
talk most interestingly. He had some knowledge 
of mesmerism or hypnotism, and in his earlier manhood 
would occasionally amuse himself by practicing this 
power or influence on others, but in his latter years he 
could not be induced to attempt the exercise of this art, 
saying that he considered it wrong. He also had much 
practical knowledge of mineralogy, and would spend 
days and sometimes weeks wandering alone in the great 



JASUN ISRAEL SIIUFORD. I43 

mountains prospecting for minerals. He acquired much 
valuable information concerning mineral veins and de- 
posits in the mountains of Western North Carolina, 
which he never communicated to any one and which 
was lost with his death. He was also a successful hunter 
and trapper, and spent much time alone in the recesses 
of the mountains trapping for wolves and other wild ani- 
mals, in which spurt he had great success. He also had 
the power of charming snakes, or at least some secret 
art of catching and controlling snakes, and has often 
been known to capture and bring home with him the 
most venomous and poisonous reptiles without harm to 
himself. He was never married, and the explanation 
for his remaining a bachelor was doubtless best told by 
himself. When asked on one occasion why he had not 
married he remarked that he 'had never seen but one 
woman whom he cared to marry, and that she said noth- 
ing about it and neither did he,* and the presumption is 
that she never learned of his devotion. Those who 
knew him best and longest were curious to learn who 
this woman was, as he was never known to show the 
slightest attention to the opposite sex beyond common 
civility. He was a good business man, and while he 
never seemed to put forth any special eifort to make 
money or save property, he accumulated a very comfort- 
able estate, which he left to his collateral heirs, having 
made no will. He lived with his mother and his sister 
Jane, who also never married, until the death of his 
mother, and then he lived with his sister Jane at his 
own homestead until his death. He did not connect 
himself with the church until late in life, but some ten 
years before his death he made a profession of religion 
and united himself with the Methodist church and lived 
a devoted and consistent Christian life until the final 



144 LORENA MIRA SHUFORD. 

summons came. 

Lorena Mira Shuford, the second daughter and sixth 
child of David and Sarah Shuford, was married to Enoch 
TvaFayette Cunningham, on the 24th day of August, 
1848, and died at her home in Asheville, N. C, on the 
4th day of December, 1900, in her seventy-sixth year. 
Her husband Enoch LaFayette Cunningham was born 
Feb. 2, 1828, and died December 11, 1900, only five 
days after the death of his wife. Enoch LaFayette and 
Lorena M. Cunningham had born to them four children 
who died in infancy, and six children" whom they raised 
to maturity, to-wit, Sarah Jane, born August 28, 1853; 
Mary Ann, born Nov. 21, 1857; Jason Fanning, born 
April 19, i860; David Enoch, born Sept. 2, 1863; Mira 
Adelaide, born Jan. 28, 1867; and Ira Eugene, bcrn 

Sarah Jane Cunningham after completing her educa- 
tion at the Asheville Female College, and engaging for 
a short time in teaching, died on the 30th day of Sept. 
1875. 

Mary Ann Cunningham was married to Samuel W. 
Ray, on the 22 day of October, 1874, and this marriage 
has been blessed with one son and four daughters, to- 
wit, Avon O., Lorena C, Stella M., Hellen Effie, and 
Leslie Mary. 

Jason Fanning Cunningham was married in the State 
of Arkansas to Miss Kittie Melton, of that state, on the 
6th day of November, 1 886, and this marriage is 
without issue. 

David E. Cunningham was married to Miss Louisa 
Ray, on the 12th day of May, 1887. and the result of 
this marriage has been two sons and three daughters, 
to-wit, Nellie Mira, Nina Clyde, Enoch LaFayette, 
William Jason and Jessie May. 

Mira Adelaide Cunningham was married to Robert 



CLARklSSA C, & CHARLES SLAGLE SIIUFORD. I45 

S. Stewart, on the 13th day of August, 1890. The result 
of this marriage has been a number of children, only 
three of whom survive, to- wit, Roy Bascombe, Harry 
Schartle and Elbert Eugene. 

Ira Eugene Cunningham w^as married to Miss Estel- 
lena Stradley, on the 27th day of July, 1890, and by her 
has had six children. They emigrated several years ago 
to the state of Texas, where they still reside. 

Enoch LaFayette and Lorena Mira Cunningham raised 
their family in the highest respectability, and gave to 
their two eldest daughters a collegiate education, and to 
their other children such educational advantages as were 
furnished by the private schools of Asheville at that 
time. Mrs. Cunningham was a devoted member of the 
Methodist Church, and in the latter part of her life de- 
voted much of her time to church work. The ambition 
of her life was to see North Asheville Church establish- 
ed on a substantial basis and housed in a suitable edifice. 
Enoch LaFayette Cunningham was an honest, industri- 
ous man and an exemplary, useful and most highly re- 
spected citizen; and his children are following in his 
footsteps and are exemplifying the principles in which 
they were brought up. 

Clarrissa C. Shuford, the third daughter and seventh 
child of David and Sarah Shuford, was married to Ben- 
jamin Merrill and by him had two children, Ben Perry 
Merrill, a successful farmer, who resides in the County 
of Transylvania, and Rhuemma who married Luther 
Hamilton, and is now dead leaving children. Mrs. Clar- 
rissa Merrill died July 7, 1874, in her forty-eighth year. 

Charles Slagle Shuford, fifth son and eighth child of 
David and Sarah Shuford, left this country November 
I, 1850, for the purpose of prospecting for a new home 
either in Georgia or in some of the western states. He 



146 JANE 1'. & DAVID MKRKIMON SIIUFORE 

never wrote back, and was last heard of in the state of 
Alabama only a short time after his departure from 
home. It is supposed that he was either murdered or 
met death by some sudden and accidental means. When 
last heard of he was contemplating embark ment on a 
steamer on the Alabama River, and about the same 
time the wreck of a steamer on the Alabama was re- 
ported in which many lives were lost, and it has been 
thought probable by his family that he perished in this 
wreck. Various Shufords have from time to time been 
heard of in the western states who his family and friends 
have supposed might possibly be Charles Slagle Shuford, 
but on investigation the persons heard of have proved, 
in each case, to be some other descendant of the original 
John Shuford of Catawba County who had emigrated to 
the west. 

Jane P., fourth daughter and ninth child of David 
and Sarah Shuford, was never married. She lived with 
her mother until her mother's death, in 1883, and then 
resided with her brother Jason Israel Shuford until his 
death in 1895, and then with her brother C. A. Shuford. 
She died in Asheville, N. C, while on a visit to her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Cunningham, on the 13th day of September, 
1898, of typhoid fever. She was a woman of an exem- 
plary life and character and an earnest and devoted 
member of the Methodist church. While she had no 
means of making money except by the accretion of what 
her father had left her, by her economy and judicious 
investments she had managed to increase that patrimony 
several fold, and at the time of her death was possessed 
of a very comfortable estate for the community in which 
she lived, which she left to her collateral heirs. 

David Merrimon Shuford, the sixth son and tenth 
child of David and Sarah Shuford, was married to Miss 



CARTER ASBURY & PERRY SYLVANUS SHUFORD. I47 

Sarah Jane Neil], daughter of Mr. Geo. Neill, of Transyl- 
vania County, North Carolina, on the 17th day of June> 
1875, and he and his wife both survive. They have had 
born to them seven children all of whom are still living, 
to Avit, Fred, Claudius, Stella, Lola, Lorena, George and 
Maud, Fred, the eldest child and son, married Miss 
Leila, daughter of Landrum and Evaline Coxe, of Tran- 
sylvania County, and is engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness at Brevard, N. C. Stella, the third child of David 
islerrimon and Sarah Jane Shuford, married Mr. John 
Coxe and has emigrated with her husband to the state 
of California, where they now reside. 

Carter Asbury Shuford, seventh son and eleventh 
child of David and Sarah Shuford, has been twice mar- 
ried, first to Miss Julia A. Hood, daughter of Harvey 
and Jane Hood, of Transylvania County, on the 17th 
day of June, 1875, who died on the 19th day of Sept. 
1885; and he was again married, on the i ith day of No- 
vember, 1897, to Miss Ursula A. Sinard, daughter of Capt. 
and Nellie Lee Sinard, of Transylvania County, and 
the great-granddaughter of Mrs. Nellie Glazner, who 
was before marriage a Miss Lee of Virginia, and of the 
same family from which Gen. Robt. E. Lee was de- 
scended. Mrs. Nellie Lee Glazner, great-grandmother 
of Mrs. Shuford, lived to the age of 105 years, and re- 
tained her mental faculties and enjoyed excellent health 
almost to the time of her death. C. A. Shuford has not 
been blessed with children, either by his first or second 
marriage. 

Perry Sylvanus Shuford, the eighth son and twelfth 
child of David and Sarah Shuford, was married to Miss 
^lary M,, daughter of Perry and Sarah E. Orr, on the 
13th day of November, 1868. He and his wn'fe both 
survive. There have been born to them six children, 



148 WILLIAM EARNEST & CHARLES S. SHUFORD. 

all of whom are still living, to-wit, William Earnest, 
Sarah Jane, Charles S,, P'^ranklin Perry, Besssie Lenora, 
and Julia F. 

William Earnest Shuford, eldest child of Perry and 
Mary Shuford, after receiving an academic education, 
emigrated to the state of California where he resided 
several years. He afterwards returned to North Caroli- 
na and studied law at the State University, at Chapel 
Hill, receiving his license to practice law on the 30th 
day of September, 1895, and has since been engaged in 
the practice of the law and in the loan and brokerage 
business, at Asheville, N. C, where he still resides. He 
was married on the 5th day of September, 1900, to Miss 
Cora Park, of Indiana, who died on the i6th day of 
August, 1902, leaving one son, who still survives. He 
is a young man of talent and doubtless has before him a 
successful career. 

Charles S. Shuford, second son of Perry S. and Mary 
Shuford, after attending school at the A. & M. College 
at Raleigh, N. C, served an apprenticeship in machine 
shops in Birmingham, Ala., and is a machinist and 
electrician. He was married in the year 1901 to Miss 
Ada Church, of Decatur, Ala., where he now resides. 
The other children of Perry S. and Mary M. Shuford re- 
side with their parents. 

David Merrimon, Carter Asbury and Perry Sylvanus 
Shuford all reside ^near the mouth of Little River, in the 
County of Transylvania, on parts of the old homestead 
of their father David Shuford. Carter Asbury now 
owns the old homestead purchased by George Shuford 
when he removed from the mountains to the valley, and 
on which the said George Shuford raised his family and 
where he was living at the time of his death. They are 
all intelligent, prosperous farmers and representatives 



DAVID M., CARTER A. & PERRY S. SIIUFORD. I49 

of the highest citizenship. They all served with dis- 
tinction in the Confederate Army. David Mi'-' • and 
Perry vSylvanus having enlisted in the 65th Nona v. v- • 
Una Regiment, 6th Cavalry, known as Folk's Cavalry, at 
the organization of that command, and having served 
in the same until the end of the war, and Carter Asbury 
having attached himself to the 34th North Carolina 
Regiment, Seales's Brigade, and having served in the 
same until completely disabled by a wound received in 
battle, on the 22nd day of June, near Petersburg, Va., 
from which he has never entirely recovered. They were 
all gallant soldiers and won distinction for bravery on va- 
rious occasions. There are no better citizens or truer men 
than these three brothers and only survivors of the child- 
ren of David vShuford. They are all members of the Meth- 
odist Church and lead lives consistent with their profes- 
sions. Of the seven sons of David and Sarah ShuforJ 
who reached the age of maturity not one was in the least 
dissipated, and all were members of the church and men 
of the highest moral characters. In fact no descendant 
of David Shuford has ever used whiskey or other intoxi- 
cants to the least excess, with one exception, and only 
two or three of his descendants have ever been addicted 
to the use of tobacco in any form whatever. The same 
can be said, so far as the writer knows, of all the de- 
scendants of George Shuford, the father of David Shuford, 
with only two or three exceptions. Dr. Daniel C. Shuford 
after having attained the age of more than thirty years, 
while engaged in the practice of medicine and while the 
owner of a drug store, became addicted to the excessive 
use of alcoholic liquors, but abandoned the habit entirely 
for several years previous to his death. The people in the 
communiy where he died expressed great surprise when 
lold that he had ever used intoxicants. He was the only 



150 SARAH 'k ELIZABETH SIIUFORD. 

exception so far as the writer knows, to the rule of ab- 
solute sobriety among the descendants of David Shuford. 

Sarah (usually called Sallie) Shuford, second child and 
eldest daughter of George and Mary Shuford, was born 
in 1790, and was married to Burgis Lake in 18 18, and 
immediately thereafter removed with her husband to 
the state of Missouri, where she resided until the time 
of her death. In a letter written to her sister, Elizabeth 
Orr, in about the year 1867 she stated that she then had 
living forty grand -children and forty-seven great-grand- 
children. 

Elizabeth Shuford, third child and second daughter of 
George and Mary Shuford, was born on March 3, 1792, 
and was m^trjied to Col. William Orr in 1822, and died 
on the 6th day of January i 879, in her 87th year. Her 
husband, CoL William Orr, was a son of Col. Robt. Orr, 
and a brother to Mrs. Sarah Shuford, wife of David 
Shuford. He was a man of considerable prominence in 
in the County of Buncombe, where he resided. He was 
a commissioned Colonel of the Militia, a position of hon- 
or during the times in which he lived, and was also a 
member of the State Legislature during the administra- 
tion of Andrew Jackson, and was distinguished as a 
Jacksonian Democrat. He was born on the i8th day of 
December 1790, and died on the ist day of October, 
1844. His death was caused by injuries received, while 
on his way to market in South Carolina, by the running 
away of a team which he was driving. There were born 
to William and Elizabeth Orr only two children, Colum- 
bus Orr and Perry C. Orr. Columbus Orr was married 
to Miss Christiana (always called Chrissie) Beachem, sis- 
ter of Louisa M. Shuford, wife of George Shuford, on 
March 12, 1848, and died during the year 1864, from 
sickness contracted in the service of the Confederate 



FANNII-: & MARV SIIUFOKD. 151 

Army. Columbus and Chrissie Orr had born to them 
five children, only one of whom now survives. Four 
were swept away in less than a week's time in childhood 
by that most dreadful of all diseases, diphtheria. Prior 
to this time Columbus Orr had been a Godless man, and 
much given to dissipation, but this great bereavement 
worked a complete reformation in his life. He was nev- 
er known again to taste whiskey as a beverage.. He 
immediately joined the church and was a most ardent 
Christian and died a most triumphant Christian death. 

Perry C. Orr was married to Sarah E. Greer, on the 
22nd day of December, 1847, ^^^ '^^g^^ on the 27th day 
of January, 1900. His wife Sarah Orr died in the year 
1874. There were born to Perry and Sarah Orr six 
children, five of whom were raised to maturity and still 
survive. Perry Shuford married the second daughter of 
Perry C. Orr, and the only apology he ever offered for 
marrying the daughter of his double first cousin, was 
that she was the best woman he could find. 

Fannie Shuford, the third daughter and fourth child 
of George and Mary Shuford, was born in 1795, and 
married Samuel King, in 1826, and shortly thereafter 
removed with her husband to the state of Missouri. 
The result of this marriage was two sons, but their 
names are unknown to the writer. 

Mary Shuford (always known as Polly), the youngest 
daughter and fifth child of George and Mary Shuford, 
was born August 13, 1797, and was married to Charles 
vSlagle, on November 5, 1828, and died June 25, 1868, 
in her 71st year. Her husband Charles Slagle was born 
Sept. 21, 1793, and died December 25, 1858, in his 65th 
year. They had no children. Polly inherited the old 
homestead of her father, George Shuford, and lived and 
died in the house which he built shortly after his first 



152 JACOB S II U FORD, 

settlement in the mountains. 



JACOB SHUFOKD. 



Jacob Shuford is a son of John Shuford who died in 
T790. He married Barbara Hoover. The children of 
Jacob Shuford and wife are Ephraim, Clarrissa, Israel, 
Polly and Sarah. The home of Jacob Shuford was in 
Lincoln, now Catawba County, N. C. 

His son, Ephraim Shuford, married a Miss Bradford, 
and lived in Alexander County, N. C. 

vSarah Shuford, a daughter of Jacob Shuford, married 
Jacob Link, of Lincoln, now Catawba County, N. C. 
The children of Jacob Link are: David, John, Anna, 
Clarrissa, Lawson, and Ephraim. David married Miss 
Mahala Poovey, and lived in Catawba, then in Cald- 
well County, 

John Link married Eliza Poovey, and lived in Cald- 
well County. 

Anna Link married Jesse Hahn. Their home was in 
Catawba County, N. C. Jesse Hahn and wife were 
members of Zion Lutheran church, Catawba County, N. 
C. They were upright people in their day and genera- 
tion, Their sen, Robert Hahn. died a soldier in the 
Confederate Army. Their son, Augustus Hahn, now 
lives at Hickory, N. C. 

Clarrissa Link married Levi Seitz. Their home was 
in Catawba County, N. C. 

Israel Shuford, son of Jacob vShuford, married a Mis3 
Davis. Their home was in Catawba County, N. C. 
Their son, Solomon Shuford, lives in Catawba, N. C. 



153 



JOHN SHUFORD & FAMILY. 

He was a soHier i. the Conteaerate M^^'^f N. C. 
T^po-iment and was captured at Gem sDurg. 

''XrisI: Shuforf, a daughter of Jaooo S..>to, . ■ 
ried a Mr. Martin. Their home "J^; ^^^^ .„_^,,.,, 
Polly Shuford, a daughter of J^^'^^h to . 
ohn Clay. Their home was near Shelb> ,^.^- 



John Clay. 



JOHN SHl.FORD AND FAMTLY-Cokxinvko .bom p.oe U. 

^ T^Vir. Shuford, was born May 
Quince Shutord, a son of John Shufo ^^ ^^ 

4. ,8.6. He^sbon^andrard ^^^ ^^ 

He married Juha P-^t^' "Vrwle.ton S. C. He first 
attended a medical school at Charleston, b ^^^ ^^^^ 

practiced medicine at Newton N. C^ ^^^^^ 

between the States, he moved to Tyler ^^^^_ 

he still lives. The wnter -g-^ '"-t ^ ^^,^^, squ- 
ished him with a historical ^>;<= ^'^ ^n jie s~tands at the 
ford, of Tyler, Texas. ^s a phyMoan h ^^^ .^ ^^.^^ 

r;ellt::l^r:hfw:;^:-dical!cteneehehas 
teen very useful to his fellowmen. ^^^^ 

toberi90i,age^ 72 years. 



1^4 JOHN SHUFORD & FAMILY. 

Pinkney Shuford, a son of John Shuford, was born 
in Catawba County, N. C, Feb. 6, 1832. He married 
Nancy Turner, of Catawba County, N. C. The child- 
of the marriage are: Dora, Laura, Florence, Gussie, 
Fannie, Sallie, and Pinkney. Only two of the children 
are now living, namely Sallie who married a Mr. Fry, 
of Newton, N. C, and Pinkney who now lives at New- 
ton, N. C. Gussie Shuford, a daughter of Pinkney 
Shuford, married Mr. Crawford Clapp, son of Rev. J. 
C. Clapp, D. D., late president of Catawba College, 
Newton, N. C. Gussie Clapp, wife of Crawford Clapp, 
is not living. She was a member of the Methodist 
church, and lived and died a good woman. 

Pinkney Shuford now lives at Newton, N. C, He was 
a soldier in the Confederate Army, and served with honor 
and distinction. Pie became a soldier in 1 861 ; was orderly 
sergeant, then ordnance sergeant; later was made second 
lieutenant, and afterward was promoted to captain. He 
was the only officer in his regiment at the time of the 
surrender. He was a member of Company E, 32nd 
N. C. Regiment, Rhodes's Division, Ewell's Corps. He 
fought at Gettysburg and in all the battles in which 
Rhodes's Division was engaged. 

Susan C. Shuford, a daughter of John Shuford, mar- 
ried Jackson Walker in November 18, 1855. She died 
June 30, 1857. There was one son of this marriage, 
namely, P. B. Walker, who died March 1900, in VVar- 
renton, Ga, 



LAWRENCE STANLEY & ANN RANSON SHUFOKD. ] 55 



L.WVllENCE STANLEY SHUFORD. 

The life of Rev. Mortimer L. Shuford begins on page 
24. Lawrence Stanley Shuford, a son of Rev. Morti- 
mer L. Shuford, was born Feb. 25, 1851, in Fredrick 
County, Md. He was married May 3, 1882, to Jennie 
Etta Burfoot, who was born March 13, 1857, in Camden 
County, N. C. There are 4 children of this marriage, 2 
boys and 2 girls. The children are: 

Mortimer Lawrence Shuford, born Jan. 31, 1884, in 
Burkittsville, Frederick County, Md. 

Agnes Mercer Shuford and Catherine Camilla Shu- 
ford, twins, were born Jan. 21, 1886, in Burkittsville, 
Frederick County, Md, 

Lawrence Stanley Shuford, Jr., was born in Hagers 
town, Washington Count)', Md. 

Lawrence Stanley Shuford lives at Hagerstown, Md., 
and is engaged in merchandising. He and family are 
members of the Reformed church, Hagerstown, Mrl 
The pastor is Dr. S. Kieffer, a prominent divine in the 
Reformed church. 



ANN HANSON SHUFORD. 

Ann Ranson Shuford, daughter of Rev. Mortimer L. 
Shuford, was born February 14, 1849, i" Lovettsville, 
Loudon County, Va. She married Charles H. Welck. 
There is one daughter of this marriage, namely, Julia 
Shuford Welck. She married William Powers Beard. 
Her home is at Hagerstown, Md. 



jt6 CORRECTIONS, ETC. ^ 

PHILIP SHUFOKD, coktinued from page 95. 

Philip Shuford was a son of Martin Shuford, who 
died in 1780, and a grandson of John Shuford, who 
died in 1790. His wife, Anna Abernethy Shuford, 
died July 22, 1834. aged 42 years. 

Philip Shuford died 1859. aged 78 years, i month and 

18 days. . u 

Philip Shuford and wife are buried at Grace church, 

, Catawba County, N. C. 

At the request of Hon. Geo. A, Shuford, the printers 
note the following corrections: * -, r 

Paee 125: The sentence "The inscription- 'dis- 
cernible" should apply to George Shuford's wife, Mary, 
and not to him. He was born August 5, 1754- 
Page 129: 4th line from top, for "Beacham" read 
Beachem. 

- - i8th line from top, for "Talula," read ^ 

Talulah. 

- - lOth line from bottom, for "Carolina," read 

Caroline. 
" 140: 2nd line from bottom, for "May 2." read 
May 23. 

- 144: 15th line from top, fill blank-May 12, 1871. 

y a H 
Page 76: i6th line from top, for "Zahring," read 
Zaring. ,^ 

" 13: 9th line from top, for "Lincolnton, read 
Catawba County. 

-V, ff^ a ^.