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Full text of "Historical sketch of the police service of Hartford, from 1636 to 1901, from authoritative sources. Illustrating and describing the economy, equipment and effectiveness of the police force of to-day. With reminiscences of the past, including some notes of important cases"

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HISTORICAL SKETCH 



OF THE 



Police Service of Hartford 

From 1636 to 1901 

FROM AUTHORITATIVE SOURCES. 

ILLUSTRATING AND DESCRIBING THE ECONOMY, EQUIPMENT AND 
EFFECTIVENESS OF 

THE POLICE FORCE OF TO-DAY. 



WITH REMINISCENCES OF THE PAST, INCLUDING SOME NOTES OF 
IMPORTANT CASES. 



Bv THOMAS S. WEAVER. 



Published by 

THE HARTFORD POLICE MUTUAL AID ASSOCIATION 

HARTFORD, 1901. 



CHAPTER I. 

THE FIRST CENTURY. 

Samuel Wakeman, Constable, the First Police Officer — Duty, Caring 
for Lost Animals and Lying Children — First Prison House Built 
for Ten Pounds — Protection Against Indians and Wild Animals. 

The pioneers of Hartford, under the lead of the Rev. Thomas 
Hooker, were on the ground and beginning preparations for the 
coming winter, November 9, 1635. The little group of settlers 
were God-fearing men and women, brought into the wilderness 
of those days expressly to lead the sort of religious life they 
chose, and such a community did not feel the need of a police 
officer. So it happened that there was no officer of the law in 
Hartford until April 26, 1^36, not quite six months after the 
settlement. Then it was that, in connection with other officers 
of the new settlement, Samuel Wakeman was chosen con- 
stable, and he was the first man to do police duty in Hartford. 
His duties were not largely connected with caring for the crim- 
inal class, for there was none, but in viewing fences, in carry- 
ing out orders of the Selectmen, and in seeing that public wor- 
ship was not disturbed either on Sundays or *' lecture '" days he 
was kept fairly busy. The office was by no means deemed to 
be of small importance, and the oath he took before entering 
upon his official duties was most solemn and impressive. It 
read : 

" In the Great and Dreadful Name of the Everliving God, 
1 hereby solemnly swear to preserve the Publyke Peace of this 
said place and Commonwealth and will doe my best endeavour 
to see all watches and wards executed and to obey and execute 




POLICE HEADQUARTERS. 



History at Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 7 

all lawful commands or warrants that may come from any mag- 
istrate or court, so help me God in the Lord Jesus Christ." 

It was not possible, however, for Samuel Wakeman to pre- 
serve order among Indians, and during the very year he was 
appointed constable a vote was passed to this effect: 

" It is ordered that there shall be a guard of men to attend 
with arms fixed and two shots of powder and shot at every 
public meeting for religious use with two serfants to see over 
the same." 

Tims it was that the forefathers protected themselves from 
outride interference by Indians, while Samuel Wakeman, con- 
stable, cared for the civic disturbances, such as they might be. 
Constable Wakeman had some duties to perform which would 
be decidedly novel to the average policeman of these days. If 
any person appeared in excess of apparel it was his duty to warn 
such person to appear before the court, where he would either be 
fined or reprimanded. He was also under orders to look after 
all unemployed persons who would not work at rates fixed by 
the town and see that they were imprisoned, quarters having 
been provided for them. The community of Hartford in those 
early days was essentially socialistic, and would be called so in 
these davs, and fixed rates of wages were maintained by the 
town, and no man could refuse to work for the price and no 
man could refuse to pav the price to those he employed with- 
out incurring the displeasure of the court and receiving punish- 
ment. It was no era of idleness, and there was something 
doing all the time. The early records have many regulations 
about stray cattle and hogs, and about fences, and the early con- 
stables had fully as much to do in the line of warning owners 
of these animals to care for them and seeing that fences were 
kept to the proper state as prescribed by the law-making body 
as in any other line of duty. 

It was the duty of the constables of those early days to see 
that lying children received due correction at the hands of their 




MOTO. BY STUAR 



Squire" BENNING MANN. 
Justice of the Town Court. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 9 

parents, or to refer their " grievous crime " to the authorities ; 
to collect five shillings fine from all persons who remained away 
from church ; to bring all persons to the magistrate who con- 
temned God's word or His messengers, where they were to be 
fined five pounds and required to stand upon a block or stand, 
four feet high, upon a " lecture day " with a paper affixed, saying 
" An Open and Obstinate contemner of God's Holy Word." 

Whipping was a common resort for minor offenses, and it 
was done at the cart's tail upon a " lecture day," that is, a day 
other than Sunday during which there was religious instruction. 
The constables were not required to do the whipping, however, 
the punishment being inflicted by those who had been publicly 
corrected themselves. They did not set rogues to catching 
rogues, but rogues whipped other rogues and probably enjoyed 
it and considered it as a rebate for some of their own punish- 
ments. 

Branding was a common form of punishment, and those who 
were detected and convicted of burglary or robbery in fields or 
highwavs had a letter " B " branded upon them, the " Scarlet 
Letter." If the crime was committed on a Lord's day the crim- 
inal was to lose an ear ; a second offense entailed the loss of the 
other ear, and a third offense was punishable with death. 
Forgery was punishable by the pillory or stocks, and profane 
swearing by a fine of ten shillings or by punishment in the stocks. 

Notwithstanding the great number of petty offenses, which 
would not be considered as crimes in these times, the com- 
munity of Hartford did not feel the necessity of a jail until 
1640, when a prison house or place of correction was ordered 
built, and William Rescew received ten pounds sterling for 
building it. It stood not far from what is now the southeasl 
corner of State and Market Streets, probably on part of what is 
now the site of the American Hotel. Daniel Garrett was the 
first jailer. 




HOTO. BY STUAR 



ELIPHALET A. BULKELEY. 
The First Police Judge in Hartford. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. i 1 

It was necessary in those first years to have special officers 
to perform police duty in ridding the section of wild animals, 
and in 1639 Nathaniel Ely and Thomas Hosmer were appointed 
to " improve men for the killing of woolfs, either by hunting or 
shotting," and in [640 Learance Woodward was authorized to 
" spend his time about killing wolfes," and he was to receive 
four shillings and sixpense a week for his encouragement, " but 
if he kill a deer we are to have it at two pense a pound." 

The constables were in charge of the " watch " in those days, 
which was of a different character from the " watch " of later 
years. It was the duty of the watch not to remain up all night 
and to assist in preserving order, but to be awake at an early 
hour and. by the ringing of a bell, to awaken all the householders 
in the community, and if a light was not seen in any house that 
had been thus aroused by the bell within half an hour there- 
after the householder was subject to a penalty. This made the 
people an " early-to-rise " community and gave them oppor- 
tunity to set about their daily toil in ample season to perform a 
good day's work, winter or summer. 

Such were the general conditions of early Hartford and its 
needs of men to perform police duty, and the first century of the 
town's existence went on in much the same way. Police duty, 
not then known as such, was performed by constables, the many 
laws which tended '* to the improvement " were executed by 
them, the courts caring for the offenders after the constables had 
presented them. It was on the whole a quiet community, but 
there was a great deal to do in keeping that peculiar and strict 
order for which our forefathers were noted. 




PHOTO. BY STUART. 

Judge THOMAS McMANUS. 
The only surviving member of the first Police Board. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 13 



CHAPTER II. 
SECOND CENTURY. 

Watch and Patrol to Guard Against Fires — No Powers of Police Men- 
tioned in the First City Charter — Wards and Watches Established 
in 1797 — First Systematized Effort to Patrol the City. 

There is no indication in the records of the second century 
that the Hartford people felt the need of any further police duty 
than that afforded by the constables. The French and Indian 
War and the Revolutionary War, with all the agitation preceding 
and coming after them, occupied the attention of the people to 
the utmost, and local affairs cared for themselves very well. At 
public executions the train bands or militia were called out to 
preserve order, and on occasions of state these train bands did 
much the same service that our police of these days performs. 

The first charter of incorporation of Hartford as a city, in 
May, 1784, made no mention of the powers appertaining to a 
police. The town, which held its power in such matters, con- 
tinued to elect constables, and they were the officers of the law, 
for both town and city. There was. however, a City Court or- 
ganized, and the mayor and two aldermen were constituted its 
judges. Civic cases came before them. There was a great fear 
of fires, probably on account of prevailing wooden construction 
of buildings and of the lack of means to extinguish fires. Con- 
sequently steps were taken to organize a " watch " to patrol the 
city from 10 o'clock at night until 5 o'clock in the morning, " to 
look out for fires and for suspicious persons." This was the 
first organized force of men to perform patrol duty in the city. 
It was at the State House on March 6, 1797, that the Court 




ALBERT C. BILL. 
Present Judge of the Police Court. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 15 

of Common Council, with Jeremiah Wadsworth, senior alder- 
man, presiding, appointed Major Thomas Y. Seymour and Eph- 
raim Root a committee to draft a by-law for " Wards and 
Watches." Cater in the same day, the committee having per- 
formed its duties, the adjourned Court of Common Council met 
at the house of Joseph Pratt, innholder. and there, amid the 
genial surroundings of a public house of those times, and un- 
doubtedly cheered and invigorated by such refreshments as this 
famous landlord knew how to provide, the following bv-law 
was passed : 

" A by-law regulating Wards and Watches. 
" Be it enacted by the Mayor, Aldermen, Common Council, and 
Freemen of the City of Hartford in legal meeting assembled : 

" That the Court of Common Council for the city of Hart- 
ford have power and they are hereby directed as soon as may he 
to inroll all such male inhabitants of said city who in their 
opinions are suitable persons to stand watch. 

" And the said Court of Common Council shall have power 
and are hereby directed to divide said city into watch wards, 
and to appoint officers of the wards and to give said officers such 
orders as they shall deem necessary. 

"And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that 
the said Court of Common Council shall have authority by 
themselves or to empower officers of the wards to call out said 
inrolled inhabitants, at such times, in such mode and number 
as the said council shall judge expedient, to serve as watchmen 
within said city. 

"And the said Court of Common Council shall have power 
and authority to make regulations to enable the watch to take 
up all persons that are out of their houses after certain times oi 
the night, under such restrictions and exceptions as the said 
Common Council may deem expedient, and to make all other 
provisions and regulations for the security of said city thai sail! 
council may deem necessary. 

"And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, if any 
person shall refuse to stand watch when called upon by the said 




PHOTO. BY STUAR 



WALTER P. CHAMBERLAIN, 
Chief of Police from 1860 to 1871, and 1875 to 1! 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 17 

Council, or by the officers of the watch wards, under the order 
of said Council, or to procure a substitute to the satisfaction of 
the officers of the watch wards, he shall forfeit to said city the 
sum of one dollar and fifty cents to be recovered by the attorney 
of said city and applied to the purpose of hiring a watch. 

" And all the regulations and orders of the said Common 
Council made by them under authority given them by law shall 
be binding and obligatory on all persons living and being in this 
city." 

This action evidently met with the approval of the citizens, 
as on March 11, following, the Court of Common Council voted 
to appoint a watch against fire, of four persons. George Good- 
win. Timothy Burr, Thomas V. Seymour, Enoch Perkins, and 
Daniel Jones were appointed a committee to district the city into 
four watch wards, and to bring in the names of officers of the 
wards. 

The watch wards were divided as follows : 

First ward to be made up of fire wards Nos. 1, 2, and 3. 

Second ward to be made up of fire wards Nos. 4 and 5. 

Third ward to be made up of fire wards Nos. 6 and 7. 

Fourth ward to be made up of fire wards Nos. 8, 9, and 10. 

The officers of the wards were James Pratt, Ezekiel Williams, 
Ashbel Wells, and Richard Butler. They did not perform con- 
tinuous duty themselves, but drew on the inhabitants, one from 
each watch ward every night in the week, and from 10 o'clock 
at night until 5 o'clock in the morning the streets of the city 
were patrolled. The inhabitants were drawn upon in alphabet- 
ical order. 

The instructions to the watch were that it repair to the State 
House and from thence alternately to patrol the several streets 
carefully and vigilantly, attending to every unusual or extraor- 
dinary indications of fire. Any person or persons committing 
any act to expose the city to danger from fire were to be ap- 
prehended and brought before the civil authority, and in ease of 
fire the watch was instructed to call out all the inhabitants. 
2 




CALEB L. PACKARD. 
Chief of Polics from 1871 to 1875, and 1881 to li 



Histoiy of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 19 

This was the first systematized effort to patrol the city and, 
while the real object was to prevent fires, the duty was as 
strictly police duty as that of any of the patrolmen of to-day. 
It is not at all certain that this patrol was altogether effective, 
as during- the succeeding years the Common Council was often 
called upon to enact more stringent by-laws to aid in the pre- 
vention of fires. 



jtgftl 4hMn 





CHARLES D. NOTT. 
Captain of the Police Force from 1860 to 1871. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 



CHAPTER III. 
THE NEW WATCH. 

It was to Preserve Order as well as to Look Out for Fires — Wore Long 
Cloaks and Carried Staff and Lantern — Offenders Handed Over to 
Deputy Sheriff— Pay $i Per Night. 

The watch as provided by the by-law quoted in the last chap- 
ter continued in effective service until 1801. when the Court of 
Common Council, on April 16 of that year, repealed the by-law 
and enacted a new one, which was broader in its scope and was 
intended to establish a watch at night for the purposes of pre- 
serving order as well as keeping a lookout for fires. This ordi- 
nance or by-law was as follows : 

" A By-Law relative to Wards and batches. 

"1. Be it ordained by the Mayor, Alderman, Common 
Council, and Freemen of city of Hartford, That the Court of 
Common Council of said city be, and they hereby are. author- 
ized and empowered to cause a Watch to be kept in and for said 
city, from time to time, and for such length of time, as said 
Court of Common Council shall deem requisite for the safety 
of said city; and for the purpose aforesaid, to cause suitable 
persons to be employed as Watchmen, at the expense of said 
city. 

"2. And be it further ordained, That said Court of Com- 
mon Council be authorized, from time to time, to appoint one 
or more Watch Wardens, whose duty it shall be to superintend 
the Watch, and cause the same to be faithfully kept, in such 
manner, and according to such regulations, as said Court of 
Common Council shall prescribe. 

" 3. And be it further ordered. That said Court of Common 
Council shall have power and authority to make regulations to 
enable the Watch to take up all persons that are out of their 




WILLIAM H. HART. 
THOMAS CALVIN. 



GEORGE ELLIS. 

MORGAN G. BULKELEY. 

Mayor. 



G. WELLS ROOT. 
STEPHEN G. GOODRICH. 



DAVID A. ROOD. 
The Mayor and Board of Police Commissioners in 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 23 

houses after certain times of the night, under such restrictions 
and exceptions as the said Court of Common Council may deem 
expedient ; and to make all other provisions and regulations rel- 
ative to Watches for the security of said city, that said Council 
may deem necessary. 

" 4. And be it further ordained, That if any watchman shall 
neglect faithfully to keep Watch according to the regulations 
to be prescribed by said Court of Common Council ; such 
Watchman shall, for every instance of such neglect, forfeit and 
pay a hue of Two Dollars, to the Treasurer of said city, for the 
use of said city. 

" 5. And be it further ordained, That all expenses that shall 
be incurred in carrying this By-Law into effect, shall be de- 
frayed by said city, out of taxes assessed and raised according 
to the regulations of a By-Law entitled ' A By-Law relative to 
the mode of taxation.' 

" 6. And be it further ordained, That the By-Law hereto- 
fore made, entitled ' A By-Law regulating Wards and Watches,' 
be, and the same is, hereby repealed. 

" Passed in Court of Common Council, April 16, 180 1. 

" At a legal meeting of the Mayor, Aldermen, Common 
Council, and Freemen of the city of Hartford, holden at the 
State-House in said city, on the 16th day of April, 1801, the 
foregoing By-Law was read and approved."' 

The watch as organized under this by-law continued to be 
the protection of the city for many years, and there are those 
living, and many of them, who remember these patrolmen as 
they moved about the streets at night wearing long cloaks, car- 
rying a heavy staff and a lantern, and usually accompanied by 
a large dog. These men received $1 per night compensation 
for their services and were really the first organized and paid 
patrolmen. 

Although the watch as organized in 180 1 was on a some- 
what different basis from that first organized, it was particularly 
for the purpose of guarding against fires. It was not until 1812 
that the men of the watch were instructed to arrest all offenders 




Hon. ALEXANDER HARBISON, 
Mayor. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 25 

and hand them over to the deputy sheriff or constable. The pay, 
as we have seen, was $1 per night, but there were orriy twelve 
pay nights in the year, all suitable citizens having to perform 
duty or provide a substitute. So many citizens did not care to 
serve as watchmen that they readily contributed their $12 yearly 
to some other person, so that it came about that the watch duty 
was performed by a limited number of men, who depended upon 
others, and upon voluntary subscriptions and fines for non- 
attendance to watch duty, for their pay. In 1820 the watch was 
increased to five men and Jeremy Hoadley was the captain, that 
is, the man who directed the movements of the watch and saw 
that a sufficient number of men were assigned each night. 




THOMAS A. SMITH. 
Police Commissioner. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 27 



CHAPTER IV. 

THE FIRST LOCKUP. 

Jonathan Hartshorn and His Dog — Curfew Law in Force and All Per- 
sons Out after Ten O'Clock at Night Sent to Lockup — Negro Riot 
in 1824 — $5 Awarded to an Officer for Bravery, Refused. 

The first lockup was on Meeting House Square, now City 
Hall Square, but for some years such lockup as there was was 
in the rear of Jeremy Hoadley's shop, where he made hats. On 
the morning after arrest the offenders were arraigned before 
justices of the peace and fined or sent to the county jail, as 
was deemed best. 

Police justices had jurisdiction in minor criminal cases until 
the establishment of the Police Court in 185 1, and grand jurors 
continued to be the prosecuting officers until a prosecuting at- 
torney was appointed, no longer ago than 1875. The volun- 
tary system of paying for the watch continued until 1822, when 
the city laid a one mill tax to defray its expenses. 

In 1826 the captain of the watch was Jonathan Hartshorn, 
and he was noted for owning a remarkable dog with the singular 
name of " Argus," or the spy. This dog seemed to have a gift 
for police duty, and on one occasion discovered a person in a 
Main Street alleyway who appeared to be of a suspicious nature. 
Examination proved the person to be a woman in male attire 
who had escaped from the State Prison at Wethersfield. She 
was promptly returned and the dog received the credit for the 
capture and was regarded as a wonderful animal. " Argus " 
was afterwards poisoned by some one who failed to appreciate 
his sagacity; it is supposed by some offender he had detected in 
some wav or other. 




ISIDORE WISE, 
Police Commissioner. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 29 

The powers of the watchman were often arbitrary, and he 
administered punishment summarily without the interference of 
a justice of the peace. Josiah Hempstead, who performed day 
duty only about this time, would arrest some unfortunate, shift- 
less fellow and, handing" him over to a constable or deputy 
sheriff, would say : " Take him to the workhouse for forty 
days." This was decidedly summary but also very effective, and 
the miscreants kept well out of Josiah *s way. Curfew tolled at 
9 o'clock in the evening and persons out of doors after 10, unless 
they could give some good excuse, were detained in the lockup 
until morning. A good excuse was, going for the doctor, re- 
turning from other towns, or the necessity of business opera- 
tions. No other excuses would serve the purpose. 

Jonathan Hartshorn, who is mentioned as captain of the 
watch in 1826, was also entrusted with the guardianship of a 
negro named Caesar who was to be hanged for murder. During 
the night previous to the day set for the hanging, the negro 
broke out of his cell and. with a heavy iron bar wrenched from 
his cell door, was in the corridor of the jail, determined to es- 
cape. He attempted an attack on Hartshorn, but the captain 
was a man of splendid nerve and absolutely fearless. He ad- 
vanced towards the negro and in a stern voice commanded him 
" Don't you strike! Put down that bar! " The negro hesitated 
for a moment, quailed, dropped the bar, and was taken back to 
his cell. For this deed of bravery the city voted Captain Harts- 
horn the sum of $5. which he refused to accept, returning it to 
the treasury, saying that he had but done his duty. Such was 
the character of men who performed police duty in the early 
part of the century, fearless, and having a high consciousness of 
their duty to the public peace. 

One of the interesting and sensational occurrences con- 
nected with the watch was in 1824, when a negro riot of con- 
siderable dimensions occurred in " Xew Guinea," a locality near 




JAMES J. QUINN, 
Police Commissioner. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 31 

the corner of Front and Morgan Streets. A member of the 
colored community had in some fracas shot a carpenter's ap- 
prentice, named Rial Peaster, in the back, so that he died a 
few days after. The apprentices raided the house, the negroes 
resented it, and there was a great disturbance. Gaius Lyman, 
who was a justice of the peace, read the riot act from the steps 
of his house, but it had no effect in quelling the disturbance, and 
the First Company, Governor's Foot Guard, was called out to 
prevent further outbreak. The Guard remained on duty a day 
and a night, and, although the apprentices tore down a soap 
house in the vicinity, owned by negroes, no further damage was 
done. A negro was arrested for the crime of shooting Peaster, 
but nothing could be proved against him and the excitement 
died out. 




EDWARD MAHL. 
Police Commissioner. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 33 

CHAPTER V. 
OLD CITY HALL BASEMENT. 

Used as a Lockup in 1830 — Prisoners Often Made a Night of It — ■ Re- 
organization of the Force with Twenty-five Cents per Day Addi- 
tional Pay — Insignia of Office — Old Time Toughs. 

The transfer of the watch to the present police location on 
Market Street was effected after the building of the old City Hall, 
which stood on the site of the present police department build- 
ing', although for some time after the present department was 
organized the offices of the chief, captain, and lieutenant and the 
rooms devoted to the policemen were in buildings on Alain 
Street, first in the Union Hall building, corner of Main and 
Pearl, and afterwards in a building on the corner of Main and 
Kinsley Streets. 

The old City Hall was built in 1830. The land upon which 
it was built was owned by Christ Church, and it was the in- 
tention of that organization to build its church upon it, but 
there arose a great difference of opinion as to the propriety of 
the site, and when the city was looking for land upon which to 
build its first public building the church readily sold the tract 
and afterwards purchased the site at the corner of Main and 
Church Streets, where the present Christ Church now stands. 

The basement of the City Hall was used as a lockup, the 
first section being devoted to the purpose having been the 
gloomy room on the northeast corner, afterwards known as the 
morgue. It was to this lockup that offenders were taken after 
arrest, the watch making the arrest returning to his patrol duty. 
There was a stove in the room for use in the winter, and the 
prisoners kept warm and enjoyed themselves as best they could 
3 




CHARLES G. HUNTINGTON. 
Police Commissioner. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 35 

under the circumstances. ( M'ten when two or three hale fellows 
well met were confined they made quite a night of it and were 
much more comfortable than they had been roaming about the 
streets seeking for mischief to do. 

In 1835 there was a reorganization of the watch, more men 
were put upon patrol duty and the pay was increased to $1.23 
per night. The lockup was transferred from what afterwards 
became the morgue to the basement room in the south end of 
the City Hall, afterwards used by the present police department 
as stables for the patrol wagon, ambulance, and horses. In 
1856 the lockup was divided into four cells and so continued in 
form until i860. If women were arrested they were detained 
in the office of the captain of the watch. 

In 1837 Westell Russell, afterwards sheriff of the county, 
was captain of the watch, and his assistants were Watchmen 
Brockwav, Friend, and Holmes. Later. Walter P. Chamberlain 
was at the head of the watch and had Charles D. Xott and an 
officer named Wilmoth in addition to the others. The watch 
met at City Hall Square each night when going on duty and 
went out in couples. Two left Exchange corner and, going up 
Main Street, made the turn at the corner of Pleasant Street and, 
returning, came down upon the west side of the street as far as 
the Little River Bridge and back again to Exchange corner. 
The other two went down State Street to Commerce, to Ferry, 
to the old Deane Tavern, to Morgan and Front, and back 
through Front Street to State Street to Exchange corner again. 
During the night the watch rounded up for lunch at the lockup 
on Kinsley Street. It was then the custom for the watch to 
rap upon the sidewalk, at given points, with their night sticks, 
which signified " All's well.*' This was discontinued after a 
time, as it gave evil doers knowledge of the whereabouts of the 
officers and opportunity to commit depredations while the watch 
was patrolling other parts of the city. 




THEODORE NEWTON. 
Police Commissioner. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 37 

There was no attempt whatever to uniform the watch. They 
patroled in citizen's dress, well protected from the weather at 
night, usually carried lanterns and long staffs or " night sticks." 
After a time each man was permitted to wear a number on his 
hat, and late in the fifties a many-pointed silver star with the 
word " Police " in its center was adopted and was the only in- 
signia of office. 

The city was indeed much smaller than now, but the little 
force of night men had all they cared to do in preserving order. 
A totally different class of men constituted the rough element 
in those days from that which constitutes it to-dav. 

Hartford was engaged in commerce by water as it is not 
now. railroads having made a great change. The river front 
was often lined with schooners from the West Indies with 
sugar, rum, and other goods which were in demand, and be- 
sides this, in the open season of the year there was a continual 
procession of lumber rafts from Vermont and New Hampshire 
forests, bringing down timber which was not only used in this 
locality but rafted to New York and to other points along the 
coast. The sailors on the West India fleet and the raftsmen 
from the upper states were of a hardy but rough sort, and it was 
often difficult to keep them within bounds. They were given 
to liquor, and the rum on the fleet was often tapped in the in- 
terest of a night's carousal, and between these two classes of 
rivermen the watch was often busy all night long bringing men 
into the lockup for misdemeanors. 

The east side was particularly lively, as it was in that sec- 
tion that the public houses were located, and it was in them 
and about the river front where the greater part of the disturb- 
ances occurred. It became manifest in the later fifties that the 
system of watch was wholly inadequate to care for the public 
peace of the city, matters were going from bad to worse, and 
although the watch performed its duties as well as possible, the 




PHOTO BY STUAST 



GEO. N. HOLCOMBE. 
Secretary Police Commissioners. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 39 

lack of a strongly organized force, with a sufficient number of 
men to preserve order, led to the final abandonment of the sys- 
tem and the substitution of the present police department, 
which is to-day very much upon the original lines laid down in 
the first ordinance providing for its organization. 




HOTO. BY STUAR 



Captain GEORGE F. BILL. 
Chief of Police. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 4 1 



CHAPTER VI. 
PRESENT SYSTEM ORGANIZED. 

Council of i860 Elected With This in View — First Board of Commis- 
sioners Come to Grief — Walter P. Chamberlain Elected Chief — 
Salaries of the Force — Attempt to Place Force in Hands of State. 

The City Council for i860 was elected with the understand- 
ing; that some measures should be taken for the organization 
of a police force in accordance with modern and approved plans. 
The need of it had been long felt, and immediately after the or- 
ganization (if the Council, Mayor Henry C. Deming being the 
presiding officer, steps were taken towards preparing an ordi- 
nance for the establishment of a police. Of those who were 
interested in the preparation, only one person is now living. 
Judge Thomas McManus, recently recorder of the City Court, 
and a Grand Army veteran well known in all parts of the coun- 
try. Two ordinances were drafted and submitted to the Council, 
one by Goodwin Collier, who had already served upon the 
bench of the Police Court, and by Judge McManus, then a voting 
lawyer : and one by David P. Robinson, then the leading lawyer 
of the city and a man of prominence in affairs of the citv and 
state. 

The aldermen and councilmen did not agree upon either of 
these drafts, and as a result of this disagreement a compromise 
was reached by combining the two ordinances, saving from each 
the features that were thought to have value. After much dis- 
cussion and several hold-ups by the two boards, the re-drafted 
ordinance was adopted and. in accordance with its provisions, 
commissioners were appointed, taking office July 6, i860. They 
were Elisha fohnson, Andrew 1). Euson, David E. Robinson.. 




CORNELIUS RYAN. 

Captain. 
Treasurer Hartford Police Mutual Aid Association. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 43 

Goodwin Collier. James I'>. Shultas, and Thomas Mc Manns. 
Mayor Deming presided over the board by virtue of his posi- 
tion as mayor. The first meeting of the commissioners was 
held in Union Hall building, corner of Main and Pearl Streets, 
and the only business transacted was the drawing of cuts for 
long and short terms. The long term was three years, and it 
became necessary that there should be in the first board three 
classes of commissioners as to length of term. Thomas Mc- 
Manus was one of the short term or one-year men. The mem- 
bers of the Council were so restricted in their votes that it was 
impossible for the board to be a partisan one. three Democrats 
and three Republicans being chosen. The Republicans were 
David F. Robinson, James B. Shultas, Andrew D. Euson. and 
the Democrats were Elisha Johnson. Goodwin Collier, and 
Thomas McManus. It was agreed that the Republican com- 
missioners should present to the commission a list of such Re- 
publicans as they deemed suitable to serve as policemen, and the 
Democrats were to present a list of Democrats for police 
service. 

The result was that two very long lists came up at the meet- 
ing of the commissioners which was to make the appointments. 
The Republicans handed their list to the Democrats and the 
Democrats handed their list to the Republicans. The Demo- 
crats scratched from the Republican list such names as they 
would not vote for, and the Republicans treated the list of the 
Democrats in the same manner, and after the weeding out pro- 
cess had gone so far, the lists were materially reduced. From 
these lists thus reduced, sixteen policemen were selected, as 
follows: Horace Billings, Isaac B. Sanderson, Caleb L. Pack- 
ard, Loren Sidney Cowles, Nathaniel Cushman, William Wal- 
lace Hunt, George P>. Carey, Arad Benjamin, Horatio F. Teel. 
William Havens, F. 11. Kunze. Flias Litchfield. Lewis Jackson, 
James R. Sloan. Andrew H. Peck. Henry G. Kilbourn. 




WILLIAM F. GUNN. 
Lieutenant. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 45 

The commissioners then elected Walter P. Chamberlain 
chief of police, and Charles D. Xott captain. The chief was a 
Democrat and the captain was a Republican. When it came to 
the election of a lieutenant there was a division and no choice 
could be made. Each of the political parties were represented 
on the official staff, and how to choose the third member with- 
out giving it a political bias was a question which the commis- 
sioners were unable to decide. Commissioner McManus, after 
a few days, suggested the name of Charles Brewster for lieu- 
tenant, and talked with some of the Republican members of the 
commission about his name being presented at a meeting of 
the board. Brewster was a Republican who was well liked, an 
employee of the Hartford & New Haven road, and in many ways 
fitted for the place. The name was presented and Brewster was 
unanimously chosen lieutenant. The force went into service 
July 11. i860. The patrolmen were in citizen's dress for the 
first few weeks, the uniforms not having been made. When 
the uniforms were donned and the police appeared upon the 
streets with them on they attracted a great deal of attention, 
men. women, and children following them up and down the 
streets as if thev were natural curiosities. The establishment 
of the force justified itself before the close of the year. The in- 
creased number of men, over the watch, the better defined round 
of duties, and the general fear of the force resulted in a great 
decrease in the number of arrests and the saving of money to 
the city. The officers of the force received salaries as follows : 
Chief of police, $800; captain, $650; lieutenant, $650; and the 
patrolmen received $600 annually. 

The first board of commissioners came to grief in 1861. 
There was a row on the east side and, as Commissioner Mc- 
Manus says, a man named John Bresnihan '* did what no Irish- 
man is ever justified in doing." He interfered in the fight and 
the row became general. Policemen Sidney Cowles and Tohn 



46 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Senior were sent to the scene of the row, and the trouhle 
was of a character that called for the liberal use of the club. 
Bresnihan. who was never a principal in the fight, but who was 
a quiet, well-meaning citizen, was clubbed over the head so se- 
verely that he died two days after. There was intense excite- 
ment in the city, and the friends of Bresnihan were well supported 
by the public and reprisals were demanded in the shape of the 
dismissal of the policemen from the force. The commissioners 
investigated the case of the men and found that they were justi- 
fied in using harsh measures, and the policemen were retained 
on the force, to the intense disgust of the Bresnihan coterie. The 
result was that the matter was taken to the Court of Common 
Council and the entire board was legislated out of office. 

The change brought about resulted in the following com- 
mission: Alonzo \Y. Birge, Mathew M. Merriman, James 11. 
Crosby, James L. Howard. James B. Powell, and Andrew D. 
Euson, the last two named having been on the old commission, 
Powell having been appointed in place of Shultas. 

The first fiscal year of the new police force ended in April, 
1861, and was for nine months only. During that period the 
police had made 1.432 arrests, of which 834 were for drunken- 
ness, 101 for theft, 207 for breaches of the peace, and 15 for 
assaults and other offenses. 

The war broke out shortly after this, and Lieutenant Brew- 
ster of the force was given leave of absence to enter the service, 
going out with the three-months men. He afterwards re- 
enlisted and served throughout the war. and on his return en- 
tered the police service as a patrolman, remaining for many 
years. When Lieutenant Brewster went to the war, ( ieorge B. 
Carey was chosen lieutenant, but he only served a little less than 
a year. Caleb L. Packard, afterwards chief of police for many 
years, was appointed lieutenant in 1862. 

The office of the force was NTo. 289 Main Street. Union Hall 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 47 

building, corner of .Main and Pearl Streets, but the lockup was 
in the basement of the City Hall building'. 

In 1863, salaries were increased and the list was as follows: 
Chief of police, $1,000; captain, $850; lieutenant, $750; twenty- 
two patrolmen at $700 each, and twenty supernumeraries at 
$1.90 per day when on duty. 

Politics ran very high in 1862 and there was an attempt on 
the part of some of the Republicans of the city to take the ap- 
pointing power from the commissioners and place it in the 
hands of a board chosen by the State Legislature. The city 
was strongly Democratic and the state was Republican. Sev- 
eral hearings were had in the old State House, Charles Chapman 
appearing for the city. The testimony and arguments against 
the proposed change were so strong that an adverse report was 
presented to the Legislature and the scheme was dropped, never 
to appear again. 




PHOTO. BY STUART. 



WALTER W. SMITH. 
Detective Sergeant. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 49 



CHAPTER VII. 



THE POLICE COMMISSION. 



Powers Over the Force are Absolute Except as to Appropriations- — 
List of Prominent Citizens who Have Served on the Board — [Mayors 
who Have Presided Over the Commission. 

The police commissioners by ordinance have absolute power 
over the police force, except that for the necessary funds to 
carry on its operations it is dependent upon the Court of Com- 
mon Council. Thus it happens that new equipments, such as 
buildings, patrol wagons, horses, and all increases of the force, 
must be approved by the Common Council, because of the ad- 
ditional money needed. The board of commissioners appoints 
the chief, captain, lieutenant, the sergeants and detectives, and 
has a general oversight over the conduct of the force. During 
the forty years of the existence of the police force, many of the 
best-known and ablest citizens of Hartford have been called 
upon to serve on the board of police commissioners, and it is 
of interest to look over the lists and see what manner of men 
they were. All of them are remembered by persons now living, 
and a great many of them are still esteemed citizens of the city 
whose services have been highly appreciated. The commission- 
ers serve without compensation : 

LIST OF COMMISSIONERS. 

i860 — David F. Robinson, Goodwin Collier, Andrew D. 
Euson. Elisha Johnson, James B. Powell, Thomas McManus. 

1861 — Alonzo W. Birge, Mathew M. Merriman, James B. 
Crosby. James L. Howard, James P>. Powell. Andrew D. Euson. 

4 



50 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

1862-3 — Mathew M. Merriman, James B. Crosby, James L. 
Howard, Tames B. Powell, Andrew D. Euson, Hawlev Kelloerer. 

1864 — The same. 

1865 — - Mathew M. Merriman, James B. Crosby, James L. 
Howard, Hawley Kellogg, H. K. W. Welch, Thomas McManus. 

1866 — Mathew M. Merriman, Hawley Kellogg, H. K. W. 
Welch, Thomas McManus, James B. Crosby, Thomas T. Fisher. 

1867 — The same. 

1868— Mathew M. Merriman, William M. Charter, H. K. 
W. Welch, Thomas McManus, H. H. Barbour, T. T. Fisher. 

1869-70 — Mathew M. Merriman, William M. Charter, H. K. 
W. Welch, Thomas McManus, F. A. Marcy, H. W. Conklin. 

1871 — H. K. W. Welch, Thomas McManus, F. A. Marcy, 
H. W. Conklin, Ferris W. Cady, Henry C. Beckwith. 

1872 — F. A. Marcy, H. W. Conklin, Ferris W. Cady, Henry 
C. Beckwith, John L. Bunce, George G. Sumner. 

1873 — Ferris W. Cady, Henry C. Beckwith, John L. Bunce, 
George G. Sumner, H. W. Conklin, William Hamersley. 

1874 — Ferris W. Cady, Henry C. Beckwith, H. W. Conklin, 
William Hamersley, Samuel F. Jones, Stevens Rogers ; John T. 
Peters, secretary. 

1875 — Ferris W. Cady, Eugene L. Kenyon, Samuel F. 
Jones, Stevens Rogers, David A. Rood, Charles W. Cook. 

1876 — The same. 

1877 — Ferris W. Cady, Eugene L. Kenyon, David A. Rood, 
Charles W. Cook, J. B. McDonnell, John Allen. 

1878 — Ferris W. Cady, Eugene L. Kenyon, J. B. McDon- 
nell, John Allen, David A. Rood, Henry Corning. 

1879 — J. B. McDonnell, John Allen, David A. Rood, Henry 
Corning, George G. Sill, Lewis E. Stanton. 

1880 — David A. Rood, Henry Corning, George G. Sill, 
Lewis E. Stanton, G. Wells Root, George Ellis. 

1881 — David A. Rood, Thomas F. Galvin, G. Wells Root, 
George Ellis, George G. Sill, Lewis E. Stanton. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 51 

1882 — David A. Rood. Thomas Galvin, G. Wells Root, 
George Ellis, William H. Hart, Stephen Goodrich. 

1883 — David A. Rood, Thomas Galvin, G. Wells Root, 
George Ellis, William II. Hart. Stephen Goodrich. 

1884 — Linus B. Plimpton, Joel R. Holcomb, G. Wells Root, 
George Ellis, William II. Hart. Stephen Goodrich. 

1885 — The same. 

1886 — The same. 

1887 — George Ellis, Joel R. Holcomb, Stephen G. Sluvter, 
( r. Wells Root, L. B. Plimpton. Stephen Goodrich. 

1888— George Ellis, G. Wells Root, Joel R. Holcomb, L. 
B. Plimpton. Stephen Goodrich, P. H. Quinn. 

1889 — George Ellis. Oland H. Blanchard, Joel R. Holcomb, 
L. B. Plimpton, Stephen Goodrich, P. H. Quinn. 

1890 — George Ellis, Patrick H. Quinn, Stephen Goodrich, 
Oland H. Blanchard, Joseph Schwab, William A. Moore. 

1891 — Oland H. Blanchard. George Ellis, Joseph Schwab, 
William A. Moore, Patrick H. Quinn, Stephen Goodrich. 

1892 — George Ellis. Arthur F. Eggleston, Joseph Schwab. 
William A. Moore. Henry Osborn, Stephen Goodrich. 

1893 — George Ellis, Arthur F. Eggleston, Henry Osborn, 
M. Bradford Scott, Henry E. Hastings, William A. Moore. 

1894 — George Ellis. Arthur F. Eggleston, Charles S. David- 
son, William A. Moore. Henry ( )sborn, Judson H. Root. 

1895 — Charles S. Davidson, William A. Moore, Henry 
( '-born. Judson H. Root, Phineas H. Ingalls, Miles B. Preston. 

1896 — Henrv Osborn. Judson H. Root. Phineas H. Ingalls. 
Thomas A. Smith. William B. Davidson. Meigs II. Whaples, 
George X. Holcombe, secretary. 

1897 — Phineas II. Ingalls, Thomas A. Smith. William P>. 
Davidson, Meigs II. Whaples. Henry Osborn, Charles II. Law- 
rence. 

1898 — Phineas H. Ingalls, Thomas A. Smith. William B. 




GARRETT J. FARRELL. 
Detective Sergeant. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 53 

Davidson, Henry Osborn, Charles H. Lawrence, Meigs H. 
YYhaples. 

1899 — Isidore Wise, Thomas A. Smith. James J. Ouinn, 
Meigs H. YYhaples, Henry Osborn, Charles H. Lawrence. 

1900 — Thomas A. Smith, Isidore Wise, James J. Ouinn, 
Edward Mahl, Theodore Newton, Charles G. Huntington. 

The mayor of the city is ex officio president of the board of 
police commissioners but has no vote in the appointment of 
officers of the force. The mayors of Hartford who have, like 
Mc< iregor, " sat at the head of the table " in the commissioners' 
room are 

Henry C. Deming, 1860-1. 

William J. Hamersley, 1862-3. 

Allyn S. Stillman, 1864-5. 

Charles R. Chapman, 1866-71. 

Henry C. Robinson, 1872-3. 

Joseph Sprague, 1874-7. 

George G. Sumner, 1878-9. 

Morgan G. Bulkeley, T880-7. 

John G. Root, 1888-9. 

Henry C. Dwight, 1 890-1. 

William Waldo Hyde, 1892-3. 

Leverett Brainard, 1894-5. 

•Miles B. Preston, 1896-9. 

Alexander Harbison, present incumbent. 



S4 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 



CHAPTER VIII. 
CHIEF WALTER P. CHAMBERLAIN. 

Was a Member of the Old Watch — First Chief of the Department — 
Captain Nott in Service with Him — Benning Mann First Clerk of 
the Police Court. 

The police force entered active service July n, i860, as has 
been seen. The chief of the force was Walter P. Chamberlain, 
who had served previously on the watch. He entered into the 
work of organizing- and discipline of the force with energy, 
and for a small force, as it was in those early days, it was re- 
markablv efficient under his direction. Chief Chamberlain was 
a man of bright and acute intellect, shrewd, and thoroughly con- 
fident of his powers. He was a " self-made man," and as is 
the nature of that class of men was dominant and energetic. 
He was the chief of the force in every sense of the word. In 
the year 1871 there arose strong opposition to his administra- 
tion of the office, and owing to some indiscretions the police 
board suspended him from office and he was succeeded by Chief 
Packard, November 10 of that year. Chief Chamberlain, how- 
ever, had influential friends working in his behalf, and in 1875 
the city election turned in some sense upon his being recalled 
to the service and to his position. In April of that year, after 
Mayor Sprague had appointed the new members of the police 
board, Chamberlain had a majority of that board in his favor. 
Chief Packard was asked to resign and Chamberlain came in 
again as the head of the force. His second term of service in 
that capacity begun April 24, 1875, and he served for six years. 
The change in the service which brought Chamberlain back 
to the head of the force was commented upon witli decided vigor 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 55 

by the newspapers of the city, political feeling running very 
high. He remained six years in his second term and was suc- 
ceeded by Chief Packard in actual service, although Gershom 
B. Hubbell was appointed his successor by the police commis- 
sion but did not accept the position. 

CAPTAIN" CHARLES D. XOTT. 

The first captain of the police force was Captain Charles D. 
Xott. and he was closely identified with the first term of Chief 
Chamberlain, resigning at the time of the latter's suspension 
in 1 87 1. Captain Xott was also a member of the old watch be- 
fore the police was organized on its present basis, and was 
a competent officer. He did not again enter the service after 
his resignation in 1871, but carried on a livery stable for many 
years on Xorth Alain Street. He is living on Avon Street, in 
feeble health, as lie is quite an old man, but continues to take 
an active interest in affairs. 

BENNING MANX. 

A history of the police service of Hartford which did nol 
mention Squire Benning Mann would fail of its mission as a 
history. He was a lawyer in the days when it was the fashion to 
call every lawyer " Squire," and in his office on State Street was 
justice of the peace and presided over the Town Court before 
the Police Court was organized. His partner was Richard G. 
Drake, and the stereotyped sentence given to Mr. Drake for 
entry (he was clerk of the little court) was " Seven dollars and 
costs. Mr. Drake." The Police Court was organized some few 
years before the police system, with Eliphalet A. Bulkeley as its 
first judge. Benning Mann was appointed its first clerk and for 
many years held the office. He was a courteous, dignified man, 
" one of the best." as those who remember him all say. and left 
an indelible impress upon those who were concerned in the ad- 
ministration of justice in the court of those early days. 





JAMES P. CARTER. 
Sergeant. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . ST 



CHAPTER IX. 
POLICE HEADQUARTERS. 

Old Union Hall Building Occupied for Ten Years — Afterwards at 
Kinsley and Main Streets — Special Prison Building Erected — 
Kinsley Street Station and Interesting Facts about Its Inmates. 

The first police headquarters in the city, as has been stated, 
was in the Union Hall building at the corner of Alain and Pearl 
Streets, the site now occupied by the Connecticut Mutual In- 
surance building. There were rooms on the second floor well 
adapted to the purpose, and the chief and officers had one sec- 
tion and the patrolmen the other. This was a daylight head- 
quarters only, however, as the office was closed at night and 
prisoners taken to the station house on Kinsley Street. The cells 
in the lower part of the old City Hall had been abandoned, and 
when the police force was organized in i860 a small building had 
been erected to the west of the City Hall which had nine cells 
and a room in the upper story for the convenience of the night 
officer, who was usually the captain of the force. 

For about three years the headquarters continued in the 
original location, when they were moved to the Pearl Street side 
of the same building on the first floor, where the rooms were 
convenient to the public and much better every way. These 
rooms continued to be the headquarters until about 1870. when 
a change was made. Meantime the City Council, February 23, 
1867, had passed a resolution requesting the police commission- 
ers to consider the desirability of removing the offices from 
Pearl Street to the station house on Kinsley Street. This was 
reported upon adversely by the commissioners and nothing 



58 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

further was clone about it. The Union Hall building was after- 
wards torn down and the material used in building- what was 
)"< ir some years the Union Hall Hotel at the corner of Farming- 
ton Avenue and Flower Street, and is still used for hotel pur- 
poses. 

After ten years occupancy of the location at Pearl and Main 
Streets the department headquarters were fixed at the north 
corner of Main and Kinsley Street, up one flight. This was 
nearer the police station proper, and was for this reason more 
convenient. The office of the chief of police was in the corner 
room, directly over what is now the shoe store of J. Samuels 
& Company, and the rooms for the patrolmen were on the op- 
posite side of the hallway, in what is now the office of Sidney 
E. Clarke, lawyer. The offices were not long in this locality, 
as it became apparent that it would be much better for the entire 
working outfit to be together, and within close touch of the 
prison section of the station house. Therefore, on January 20, 
1870, the commissioners were authorized to take such action in 
relation to the enlargement of the station house as would make 
it convenient for the entire force. The cost was not to exceed 
$9,000, and the contract was awarded to S. E. Haskell. 

The office was on the lower floor in front and remained there 
until the department moved into the present commodious sta- 
tion. Before it was occupied for headquarters it had been the 
prison proper and there were nine cells, five on one side of a 
central hallway and four on the other. The cell at the west 
corner was larger than the others and was known as " No. 9," 
and was for women. Here the women arrested were locked up 
together and took care of themselves. The prisoners in the 
cells had no care whatever after they were locked up. as there 
were no officers to look out for them. 

Shortly after the establishment of the headquarters on Kins- 
ley Street the panic of 1873 swept over the land, and there were 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 59 

hundreds of people out of work in the city and many roaming 
through the country. The room directly over the chief's office, 
which was quite a large one, was set apart for lodgers, and it 
was full every night. One night the record gives 153 persons 
as remaining there for the night. There was a long bench run- 
ning around the room, made of hard boards, about five feet 
wide, and upon the soft side of this bed hundreds and probably 
thousands of unfortunates took their rest undisturbed by the 
continuous racket of the roughs who were rounded up, and per- 
fectly oblivious of an atmosphere that could be cut with a knife 
and which was dense enough to suffocate an outsider coming in 
from out of doors, who had never struck anything of the sort 
before. 

The door of this lodgers' room could not be opened from 
the inside, and once the lodgers were locked in behind it there 
they remained until they were turned loose in the morning. 
Captain Cornelius Ryan, who was on duty during the period, in 
charge of the station nights, was often called upon to straighten 
out the turmoil. ( )ne night there was an unusual amount of 
noise and disturbance above, and the captain stealthily crept up 
the stairs and quietly opened the door, just a crack, to see what 
was going on. Two of the lodgers were stripped to the waist 
in the center of a ring formed by the joining of hands of the 
other lodgers and a first-class bout was going on under Queens- 
bury rules, showing that hard luck and hard times had not dis- 
couraged the sporting element. Almost instantly the gas was 
turned out and the whole situation was dark. Another time 
the captain went up to care for a burly big fellow who was 
" snaking " the sleepers from the bench upon the floor. He 
caught the man just at the door, and, hitting him a sound blow 
under the jaw. laid him flat upon the rioor. That instant the 
door closed and Captain Ryan found himself inside with the 
gang and unable to get otit. There was no other officer in the 




B. L. UMBERFIELD, 
Sergeant. 



History of Police Department, Hart font, Connecticut. Ci 

office below, and he was forced to remain until the relief came 
in and let him out. He commanded the situation, however, and 
there was no trouble, the example he had made- of his man 
being good enough to last until after he was released. 

There were many changes in the police station and many 
enlargements from time to time, until the present prison block 
with its fifty-four cells was finally made a part of the present 
police station system. 

There were at least two attempts to tear down the City Hall 
and build a station house on its site before the final one suc- 
ceeded in 1897. Chief Packard, when he was in charge, after 
a fire- which had burned off the roof of the main building and 
of the prison house, had a plan made by Lewis Young and it 
came near to being adopted, but sentiment in favor of the old 
City Hall and much talk about the " grand simplicity " of its 
architecture preserved it for a few years. It was materially re- 
modeled in its interior and the main hall given over to the 
patrolmen for a drill hall, and continued to be used for that 
purpose until the building was torn down. During Chief 
Woodbridge's short term he had plans made for a new station, 
but they were given no consideration. 



62 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 



CHAPTER X. 
CHIEF CALEB L. PACKARD. 

Night Watchman in 1855 — One of the Original Sixteen Policemen — 
Lieutenant in 1862 — Twice in Command of the Force — Afterwards 
Almshouse Superintendent. 

Caleb L. Packard, for fourteen years and a half chief of 
police of the city of Hartford, has been in the service of the 
city or county as an officer of public order for over thirty-six 
years, a longer period than any other man who has been con- 
nected with the police department. He entered the service of 
the city in 1855 as a member of the night watch. Westell Rus- 
sell being captain at the time. When the present police de- 
partment was organized he was appointed one of the original 
sixteen policemen and served as patrolman, often acting as de- 
tective in citizen's dress, for one year and a half. He was ap- 
pointed lieutenant of police January 2. 1862. and from that time 
served as an officer of the force until his retirement by resigna- 
tion, January 6, 1893, with the exception of six years, begin- 
ning June 1, 1875, when he served as first deputy sheriff under 
Sheriff ( ). I). Seymour. ( )n the suspension of Walter P. Cham- 
berlain as chief, in 1871. and the retirement of Captain Charles 
D. Nott, Lieutenant Packard was the only officer of the force. 
and the dttties of chief devolved upon him temporarily. For a 
few weeks he conducted the affairs of the force in this manner, 
and November 10, 1871, was appointed chief. He remained in 
tlie office for three years and a half, and. changes having been 
made in the political and personal makeup of the commission 
under Mayor Spragtte's administration, lie was asked to resign. 



Histoiy of Police Department, Hart font, Connecticut . 63 

and Walter P. Chamberlain, who had been suspended from the 
office of chief, was reinstated. The change was the subject of 
much adverse comment by the newspaper press of the city. 
The date of his resignation was April 24, 1875. 

A report of the proceedings of the commission in a con- 
temporary newspaper is not without interest. After the board 
met. Chief Packard was called into the room and Mayor Sprague 
said to him that there was a disposition to make a change in 
the head of the department, and that it was desired to make his 
retirement as satisfactory as possible. 

Chief Packard inquired what the change was for. and asked 
if it was because of incompetency, inefficiency, neglect of duty, 
or immoral conduct. 

Xo answer coming from any member of the commission, 
Chief Packard said : " I consider this a gross injustice." 

Commissioner Jones, on behalf of the commission, then 
said: " No one makes any charges against you, but it is the 
desire of the board and of citizens that a change should be 
made." 

After some further conversation. Chief Packard turned to 
Clerk Peters of the commission and asked that his resignation 
be written, and he then signed it, saying as he did so: " I say 
again, gentlemen, that this is a great injustice. Right will pre- 
vail and justice will meet all men. Good night." 

The following June Mr. Packard was appointed first deputy 
sheriff and served for six wars, as we have seen, his office being 
with Sheriff Sevmour in Hills block. 

Walter P. Chamberlain was again installed as chiei of police, 
and for six vears was at the head of the force. Troubles came 
upon his administration again, and his resignation was called 
for. It was given, and the police commission was again en- 
trusted with the choice of a chief. After several ballots, in which 
Mr. Packard received three votes, the board, by a vote of five 




PHOTO. B» STU 



JOHN F. BUTLER. 
Sergeant. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 65 

to one, chose Gershom B. Huhhell, then a well-known citizen, 
a Republican, superintendent of the Western Union Telegraph 
Company's Hartford business. After several days' considera- 
tion "Sir. Hubbell declined the election, and the board was again 
in a position to elect a chief. Some work had been done by the 
friends of ex-Chief Packard, meanwhile, and he was again 
chosen chief, April 4, 1882. He was called into the room of the 
police commission and requested to assume the duties of the 
office at once. He immediately proceeded to the police head- 
quarters and assumed control, Captain George F. Bill, tempo- 
rarily in charge, turning over his duties to him. 

Chief Packard continued in charge of the force for eleven 
years, making his total term of service as chief fourteen years 
and a half. 

Another change came January 1, 1893. The commission 
was in session, and after a discussion of several burglaries which 
had taken place upon the Hill, Chief Packard was called into 
the room and his resignation was asked for. He inquired what 
the reason for the demand was. as upon a former occasion. The 
reply was: 'The reason is in the request." The resignation 
was handed in, and Chief Packard's career with the department 
was closed. 

His immediate successor was Jabez L. Woodbridge, who 
served for seven months, and was then appointed warden of the 
State Prison, his retirement from that position and the reasons 
for it being fresh in the recollection of the people. 

A tribute of the esteem in which Chief Packard was held by 
the entire police force was the presentation to him a few days 
after his retirement of $110 in gold, the address being made 
by Captain George F. Bill, between whom and Chief Packard 
there has always been a warm friendship. Every member of the 
police contributed to the purse. 

Mr. Packard was appointed to the superintendency of the 



66 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

almshouse June 6, 1893, and served in that position for four 
years. He now resides at No. 13 Suffield Street, and he has the 
respect of the community. 

Chief Packard was born in Hartford in 1832, and during his 
youth was nine years on a whaling ship. His experiences at 
sea gave him abundant courage, and he often had occasion to 
manifest it during his career as a police officer of the city. 



History of Police Department , Hartford, Connecticut. 67 



CHAPTER XL 
FINE NEW BUILDING. 

One of the Best in the Country. With Everything Modern and Convenient 
— White Pressed Brick and Ohio Limestone Construction — Offices, 
Court Room, and Drill Hall — Morgue and Stables. 

The police department building in Hartford is one of the 
finest structures devoted to the purpose in the New England 
states. It is on the site for many years occupied by the old City 
Hall, for a long time identified with the police department, 
and presents an attractive appearance. Its front occupies the 
entire block from Kinsley Street to Market Street, and, as the 
building sets well back from the street line, it commands a large 
open space, making it easv of access from all directions. It was 
formally occupied by the police department October 13. 1898. 
after an inspection by the police commissioners under the per- 
sonal direction of Commissioners Phineas H. Ingalls and Henry 
Osborn, the building committee, and of John J. Dwyer, the 
architect. The corner-stone was laid September [9, 1807. and 
its erection progressed with little interruption. 

The construction is of Connecticut granite, obtained from 
quarries on the Sound, fur the basement, and above the base- 
ment line it is of white pressed brick with ( >hio limestone trim- 
mings. It has three capacious Moors beside the basement, and 
is equipped with all the necessary rooms for the comfortable 
transaction of business. The principal entrance to the main 
office is on Temple Street. The office is a very large room with 
a long desk at the west side, behind which is installed the police 
telegraph apparatus and the working desks for the officer in 




JOHN CREEDON. 
Sergeant. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 69 

charge of the work during the different periods of the day or 
night. The "blotter" desk is at the south end, and persons 
arrested are brought in from the covered patrol wagon way to 
the desk, where the usual entries are made. On the east side 
of the room is a tablet containing the names of the mayor of 
the city, the commissioners of police, ami the building com- 
mittee having charge of the construction, together with that of 
the architect. 

On the Market Street front of the building there is a line 
of rooms devoted to the officers. In the northeast corner are 
the chief's reception room, his private office, and bathroom. 
Xext south is an office for the captain or the lieutenant in 
charge when the chief is off duty. Still further south is a room 
for the sergeants and detectives, while at the southeast corner 
of the floor is a handsomely furnished room for the use of the 
commissioners. This room is finished in mahogany. Just west 
of the commissioners' room is a well-furnished room which 
serves as a lounging room for the patrolmen when they are 
waiting to go out upon duty. At the extreme south end of the 
office is a vault for the police records. 

There are two entrances on the Market Street front, the 
north entrance leading to the upper Moor and the Police Court 
room, and the south entrance to the office and convenient to the 
commissioners' room. The court room is spacious and well 
ventilated, and along the second floor are rooms which are used 
for officers connected with the Police Court. At the south end 
of the second floor are rooms which are for dormitories to be 
used for reserve policemen or for any other occasion which 
makes it necessary. 

I lie drill hall occupies the third floor and is one of the most 
spacious and airy rooms in the city. There are no pillars to 
obstruct it in any way, and the whole floor makes a beautiful 
hall, not onlv for drills but for the annual ball eiven bv the 



70 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Police Mutual Aid Association. The ceiling decorations are 
artistic and in harmony with good taste. 

The basement is provided with a large locker room, where 
the men keep their uniforms or such clothes as they may need 
when not on duty. There are four shower baths in the base- 
ment and a number of wash basins. A morgue is provided for 
at the Temple Street side of the building. 

The stable for the horses, patrol wagon, and ambulance is 
at the west of the south section of the building, and the prison 
block is independent of the building, in another edifice, having 
been used before the present building was erected. There 
seems to be little room for improvement in the building, and 
its practical workings are such that the officers and men are pro- 
vided with the best modern conveniences for the transaction 
of the business of the department. 

The first public gathering in the building was on the occa- 
sion of the grand dedication ball given by the Police Mutual 
Aid Association, April 3, 1899. 

The woman's prison connected with the new department 
building is commodious, cheerful, as prisons go, and has all 
modern improvements. It is on the second floor of the Kins- 
ley Street side of the building, directly over the barn. It is 
made up of eight cells around a semicircular open space lighted 
from overhead and well ventilated. It has all the necessar) 
sanitary arrangements, and many of the wrecks picked up on 
the streets never find a better place for a night's lodging. 

The matron in charge of this department is Mrs. Louisa D. 
Hubbard, who was the first woman to be appointed to the posi- 
tion, and has served since January i, [894. She has a comfort- 
able suite of rooms in the front of the building for her own use 
and lives in the building. Her duties are to care for the women 
prisoners as they come in, search them, keep the record, and 
prepare them for a decent appearance when they come into the 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 71 

court room the next morning after their arrest. They must be 
clean, their hair combed, and their clothing in good condition. 
( H'ten there are days when no woman is arrested, and then 
again there may be a raid and numbers of them are brought in. 
The largest number ever arrested in one night was in 1899, 
when forty-two women were in Mrs. Hubbard's charge. This 
was for a short time only, as the greater number of them were 
able to procure bail for their appearance in the morning. 




P. J. FINLEY. 

Sergeant. 



History of Police Department , Hartford, Connecticut. 73. 



CHAPTER XII. 
SOME OLD TIME STORIES. 

Captain Cornelius Ryan's Recollections — Difficult Caring for Prisoners 
— Tendency to Fight — Wheelbarrows and Express Wagons to Carry 
Prisoners in - — Captain Ryan's Bout with Soldiers. 

In this year of the new century the police commissioners 
ask of applicants for promotion questions about the streets and 
buildings, the ordinances, and their knowledge regarding first 
aid to the injured. But if there had been an examining board 
in the early days the men would have been asked to explain 
what they knew of the art of self-defense, or rather how they 
could handle the human weapons of offense. There were many 
knockouts in those days, although it was before the time of 
Professor Sullivan's hitting methods. Fitzsimmons' short-arm 
hook had not been discovered, and the solar plexus punch was 
unknown. 

Citizens now frequently comment on seeing two policemen 
together. Under the present system it is not necessary for 
them to go in pairs, but under the old it was absolutely essen- 
tial. If a policeman ventured to do duty in the lower wards 
alone in the early days he would have been in the repair shop 
before night. The old Fifth and Sixth Wards were the banner 
ones for police duty, and four men for Commerce Street, from 
Pleasant to Sheldon Streets, were not thought too many, one- 
fourth of the entire force. When a man was arrested, the first 
tiling he would do would be to fight. There was no patrol 
wagon, no ambulance, and no telephone to use for calling help. 
It would be one man fighting against another, and there were 



74 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

always plenty of roughs to pitch into the police, who were re- 
garded as common prey by the fighting men. Therefore the 
advantage of traveling in pairs will be seen, although it furnished 
a precedent for all time. 

The day men did not carry clubs, but their fists were as 
hard as night sticks. The night men had those twenty-inch 
locusts, and they knew how to use them. Enterprising manu- 
facturers had not produced the cocobolo club or the ones covered 
with leather or rubber, which are warranted to deprive a man 
of his senses in the most pleasant manner possible. For years 
the firms who cater to the police trade have been trying to in- 
vent a club that will knock a man out without hurting him or 
breaking the scalp, and they have not been very successful. 
These humane views will surely result in having every patrol- 
man provided with a sponge and a small bottle of chloroform 
which he is to administer to the man who resists. When that 
time comes, women ought to make good officers. Some of the 
Police Court judges did not like the way in which the police- 
men had to handle the men. and in time the commissioners or- 
dered clubs for the day as well as the night men. 

As there were no patrol wagons, a policeman had the choice 
of carrying an obstinate prisoner, procuring a wheelbarrow, or 
sending for a wagon in the neighborhood where the arrest was 
made. There is a Hebrew policeman in New York called Ajax 
who never sends for a patrol, no matter how heavy his prisoner 
is, as he can pick up anybody under half a ton weight. The 
lightweight prisoners who were found unconscious from liquor 
or blows were often carried by the old Hartford policemen. 
Wheelbarrows were somewhat more in demand, and if a wagon 
was handy it was pressed into service, " commandeered," as they 
say now. ( )nce two policemen caught a man that was much 
wanted. He refused to walk, and a wagon was secured. The 
policemen took hold of the shafts and the weary walk to the 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 75 

prison was begun. They drew up before the prison in style, 
and when they started for the prisoner he was gone. The 
thought conies whether the horseless vehicle to come will be as 
satisfactory to the prisoner as the one of old. Wagons fell into 
disrepute after this incident, as the wheelbarrows were found to 
be more trustworthy. 

At present no one is more familiar with the work of those 
days than Captain Cornelius Ryan. He joined the force Septem- 
ber 3, 1861, and he had not been in uniform long before he was 
in the thick of the more important fights that the troublesome 
men waged upon policemen. He has a watch that caught the 
point of a knife intended for his heart. His heart continued to 
beat, but the watch stopped ticking and was ruined. The knife 
cut through four thicknesses of clothing, but it did not get 
through the watch. The thrust was delivered on a dark stair- 
way, and the officer did not know how near death he was until 
he wanted to find the time. 

Local prints have from time to time contained various arti- 
cles about some of the hard arrests made by the captain, in 
which he came out ahead. I hit there was one occasion when 
he received a good beating and was confined to his bed for sev- 
eral days. At present if an officer is asked to do duty at the 
Union station he is very glad of the job, as it is regarded as 
easy work. During the time of the Civil War the manager of 
the road asked the chief to send Officer Ryan down to the depot 
to do duty. The officer said he would go if the railroad would 
pay for his clothes. He knew how much fighting he would have 
to do, and he figured on having his clothes torn off about once 
a week on an average. The railroad agreed to buy the uni- 
forms as fast as they were destroyed. 

( )ne afternoon a Massachusetts regiment stopped over a 
train at the depot. ( )ne of the soldiers was a Springfield des- 
perado of gigantic stature. He tried to pick a fight with the 




PHOTO. BY STU 



THEO. DIETRICH, 
Acting Sergeant. 



History of Police Department, Hail ford, Connecticut. 77 

men standing" in the waiting-room, but he was let alone. There 
was a woman waiting for a train, and the soldier's language 
finally became so bad that Officer Ryan told him lie would have 
to stop. The soldier let fly a swinging blow that would have 
given him possession of the depot if it had landed. But the 
officer dodged and by a combination blow and a movement of 
the foot sent the bully across the room, falling heavily. That 
took all the fight out of him, and he was as meek as a lamb 
when he was conducted to one of the cars by Ryan. He walked 
up the steps, and as Ryan started to turn around and walk away, 
the soldier kicked him squarely in the jaw with all his force, 
and he wore heavy shoes. The blow dazed the officer, and for 
a few minutes he was partly unconscious. 

When he recovered he went into the car, took the big man 
by the collar, and dragged him part way out of the car. Then 
he was set upon by the carload of soldiers, and was pounded 
unmercifully. He was lucky to escape with his life. The con- 
ductor sent the car up the track to avoid further trouble. The 
manager of the road said that if he had been there he would 
have held the train until the desperado was captured, if the regi- 
ment was detained a week. It was learned afterwards that the 
man had a bad reputation in Springfield and had committed a 
number of crimes. 

That was the one time when the captain was worsted. Per- 
haps his best single-handed arrest was when he conquered Jim 
Coburn, a brother of Joe Coburn, and himself a pugilist of some 
importance, having a powerful frame and a degree of science 
nearly equal to his more famous brother. A colored regiment 
came here from the war, and the men had but little knowledge 
of money. A gang came up from New York, and they found a 
number of easy victims. ( )ne night there was a shooting affray 
in a hotel on Central Row, and Coburn was concerned in it. 
There was a lot of excitement over the case, and an immense 



7 8 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

crowd of people collected. ( )fficer Ryan found Jim Coburn on 
the street and placed him under arrest. He did not know who 
he was at the time. Coburn resisted and was knocked down. 
He got up and was downed again. This was repeated once 
more, and then Coburn had enough. When Ryan learned who 
the man was he was rather frightened, as he did not imagine 
he could cope with such a well-known professional bruiser. He 
told him he would have to go to the lockup, and if there was 
any more resistance, the next time he went down he would not 
be able to rise again. Coburn submitted quietly. In later years, 
Ryan saw Coburn in his place in Xew York, and the pugilist 
said he entertained no hard feelings over the manner of his 
arrest. 

The class that the police feared the worst in those davs was 
composed of several women who were fully as desperate fight- 
ers as the men. and more difficult to manage, as the police 
woidd not use their clubs on them. Some of them made as 
much trouble for the police as the Carrie Nations do to-day for 
the rum-sellers. There was one in particular who managed 
four policemen at once, on an average, although if she was 
drunk or sick, two men might arrest her. One officer was 
called to her home on Pleasant Street one night, as she was 
making a disturbance. He was surprised that she submitted 
so quietly, and was congratulating himself upon having such 
an ease time when, without any warning, his cap was pulled 
over his eves and the virago's nails were imbedded in his cheeks, 
causing the blood to flow in streams. The fighting women then 
were really powerful, and would feel disgraced if they had to 
protect themselves with hat pins, the principal resource of the 
present-day Totties and butties who defy the police. 

There was one woman who would have proved a bonanza 
for a manager of burlesque. She was five feet eleven inches 
tall, and weighed fully 225 pounds. She was as strong as she 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 79 

was big, and an ordinary man had absolutely no show in a con- 
test with her. One Sunday afternoon it was necessary to ar- 

rest her, and one of the policemen detailed for the performance 
was Horace Billings. She was taken from a honse on Front 
Street and was walked up the street, a large crowd following, 
as it was expected she would make trouble. But this Amazon 
was not in a fighting mood that pleasant Sunday afternoon, and 
she used her wits, rather than her fists, to annoy the police. She 
asked one officer to release her arm for a moment, and, as she 
had behaved so well, he willingly complied. From her waist 
fastening she withdrew one small pin. releasing all her clothing. 
The woman folded her gigantic arms and smiled sweetly npon 
the officers, knowing that with all her great strength she conld 
not have been half as successful in combating them as she was 
by withdrawing that pin. Finally a woman rushed out of a 
house with a blanket, it was thrown about the woman, she was 
picked up and carried to the prison on the shoulders of the 
police. 

An old officer says that the men had more fun in one night 
in the old davs than they have in six months now. The work- 
was different, the conditions were changed, and they entered 
into their duties with a zest. 




HOTO. By STIMRT. 



M. O. LIEBERT. 
Acting Sergeant. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 81 



CHAPTER XIII. 

DANGERS OF THE SERVICE. 

Jim Brerman. One of the Early Toughs, Who Nearly Killed Officer Crane 
— Charles Pape Badly Cut by a Sailor Thief — Attempt to Kill 
Supernumerary Flanigan — ( )fficer Maloney's Narrow Escape. 

No Hartford policeman has been killed during the perform- 
ance of duty, hut there have been many narrow escapes, in 
which good fortune or timely assistance have preserved the life 
of the officer of the law. One of the earliest cases of assault 
upon a policeman was when the station house and police head- 
quarters were separate. It was then the custom for patrolmen 
to take their prisoners to the station house, lock them up. and 
then report to headquarters. Captain Ryan, at that time a patrol- 
man, was walking down to the station house one day when he 
met a man named Crane, who said to him : " Hurrv up ; my 
brother George (who was a patrolman) has Jim Brennan in the 
lockup, and he may give him trouble." When Ryan reached 
the station, Brennan, who was an ugly fellow, had Patrolman 
Crane against the wall, with his hands upon his throat. The 
officer was limp and near the point of being choked to death 
by Brennan 's grip. Ryan gave Brennan a stiff blow under the 
jaw that lifted him in the air and threw him to the floor uncon- 
scious. Crane fell with him in a limp, almost lifeless heap. 
Brennan was dragged to a cell and locked up before Crane gave 
any sign of consciousness, but he came to himself after a while, 
having come as near to being killed outrighl as any policeman 
in the service. Brennan was a hard man, and over twenty times 
the police had severe struggles with him. He agreed, finally, 
to leave town and go to Xew York, where he had relatives. His 
6 



82 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 

fare was paid on the boat and he was shipped for the metropolis. 
He got into a row on the boat, and at the dock in New York 
was arrested. The New York Herald, telling the story of the 
arrest, said that it took seven policemen to take Brennan from 
the boat to the station house. He came back to the city after 
a few months, his head being a complete map of scars made by 
the clubs of the New York policemen. His clubbing seemed to 
have taken the life out of him, and he was after that a quiet, 
peaceable citizen. 

Probablv the worst cutting a policeman received here had 
a German named Charles Peape for a victim. He was eating 
his evening meal at his home on Village street one night when 
a neighbor came in and said her clothesline was being robbed. 
The officer left his supper and hurried out of the house, reaching 
the yard in time to see a man climbing over a fence. He fol- 
lowed and caught the man by one leg. The thief, who was a 
sailor, turned and cut Peape with his sailor's knife the width 
of his chest. The wound was so deep that a man could insert 
his hand. Peape recovered and Hartford policemen caught 
the sailor on the highway near New Haven. The man had 
walked to that city. 

An attempt was made to kill Supernumerary John F. Flan- 
igan October 13, 1900, by a man named John Dolan, who was 
wanted for robbing a blacksmith named Riley. Flanigan got 
track of his man near the Xew England road roundhouse and 
surprised him. Dolan. who gave the name of Joseph Craw- 
ford when lie was brought in, drew a revolver and threatened 
to fire if the policeman stepped nearer to him. Flanigan did 
not quail, but continued to approach. Dolan fired three shots 
which just grazed Flanigan, and the fourth wounded him in his 
left arm. Tt was Dolan's last chance, however, as Flanigan had 
reached him, and with his club hit him on the head, sending him 
to the ground in a heap. A crowd gathered about after Dolan 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 83 

had been felled and were anxious to make demonstrations against 
the man. but Flanigan said he could care for him. He was taken 
to the station in the patrol wagon. Flanigan's wound was 
dressed, and he recovered in a short time. Dolan was sent to 
prison for fourteen years. Within a few davs after this occur- 
rence, Flanigan's bravery was rewarded by his promotion to 
the position of regular patrolman. 

William Carrier, a desperate man. was beating his wife in 
a place on Asylum Street, March 4, 1897, when Officer James 
Maloney tried to arrest him. He turned upon the officer, and 
lifting a heavy demijohn struck it with full force between Ma- 
loney's eyes, well up on the forehead. The officer was for a 
long time in the hospital, but finally recovered. He carries an 
ugly scar deep in his forehead, and while his general health is 
good, he is troubled often by the seriousness of the wound. 
Carrier went to State Prison for four years for the crime, which 
came very near to being murder. 

Some years ago ( )fficer Maloney met with a singular and 
most painful experience while arresting a burglar from Spring- 
field. The burglar drew a handful of Cayenne pepper from his 
pocket and threw it full in the officer's eyes. The burglar was 
held by Maloney until aid arrived, however. It was many weeks 
before the officer was able to return to duty, and to-day he re- 
members the suffering even more intently than he does the fear- 
ful blow from Carrier's demijohn. 




HOTO. BY STU 



HERBERT £. TINKER. 
Secretary Hartford Police Mutual Aid Association. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 85 



CHAPTER XIV. 
EARLY PICKPOCKETS. 

First Gang Held up in Hartford at General Lyon's Funeral — Some Who 
Swung Around the Circle " with President Andy Johnson. 

The first pickpockets that were ever arrested in this city 
were captured by Chief Packard, then a policeman, in 1861. 
The bodv of General Nathaniel Lyon, who was killed in a skir- 
mish in Southern Missouri, was en route to Eastford, in this 
state, and immense crowds gathered to meet it at the various 
railroad points through which it passed. The crowds proved to 
be an attractive field for pickpockets, and a gang of them trav- 
eled just ahead of the train bearing the body, and at points 
wherever there was any special ceremony reaped a rich harvest. 
The bodv arrived here and was detained at the old L nion station 
until a special train could be made up on the Hartford, Provi- 
dence & Fishkill road for Willimantic, from whence it was to 
be taken to Eastford. There were many people gathered in 
towns, and complaints were coming into the office of the chief 
of police of pockets having been picked. Officer Packard and 
" Sid " Cowles were ordered to do detective work, and as a re- 
sult a party of nine pickpockets was cooped up in the smoker of 
the train going East. At a given signal, and aided by other 
officers, seven of the party were captured. About the other 
two there were not enough indications to show that they were 
of the gang, but they were shadowed all the way to Willimantic 
and conveniently lost themselves in the crowd. ( )ne oi the two 
was the chief of the gang and had with him the handbag which 
contained the " swag"." The seven were held for a few days, but 



86 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 

evidence not being" sufficient to convict them, although they 
acknowledged that they were pickpockets, they were allowed to 
go, escorted to the station and shipped to New York. One 
of the seven arrested was the notorious Johnny Wilson, a pro- 
fessional well known in all the large cities, but who had never 
before known the hand of an officer. The Xew York Herald. 
commenting upon this, said that it was a singular thing that a 
noted criminal had to go to the : ' rural city of Hartford " to 
first feel the hand of the law. 

When President Andy Johnson was " swinging around the 
circle " and was on his way from Boston, where he had been 
present at the dedication of the Masonic Temple, to Washing- 
ton, he stopped in Hartford at the Allyn House, and there was 
a great crowd following the party. ( )fficer Packard, then a 
lieutenant, went to Springfield to meet the train, and on the 
way down was seated with a former officer of the Boston police 
force, who seemed to be very much determined to entertain him 
in conversation. The result of the trip was that nine pick- 
pockets were held up and remained in the police station until 
after the Presidential party had left town. Among those ar- 
rested was the same ex-police officer of Boston, who was in with 
the gang, his special province being to inform the other scoun- 
drels of the movements of the police. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 87 



CHAPTER XV. 

THE BEVINS CONSPIRACY. 

A Jersey Tough Hired to Kill Thomas O'Neill — An Accomplice Shot 
Dead in His Tracks — O'Neill Escapes — Dennis Cahill's Flight to 
Canada, Arrest and Sentence. — James Bevins a Fugitive from Justice. 

( )ne of the most remarkable crimes ever attempted in Hart- 
ford marked the winter of 1869-70, and in its development had 
man\ interesting aspects. James Bevins, a night watchman at 
the old Woodruff & Beach foundries, a man well thought of, 
industrious, and thrifty, having accumulated a property amount- 
ing to some $18,000, quarreled with his brother-in-law, Thomas 
O'Neill, a locomotive engineer on the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford railroad, over the disposition of property in which 
the family was interested. Bevins determined to get rid of 
( I'Xeill by the convenient method of hired assassination. He 
employed a hard-looking customer from New Jersey named 
Dennis Cahill to do the job, and Cahill had a man with him 
named Patrick O'Brian. ( >'Brian was made an assistant watch- 
man, and boarded on Sheldon Street, not far from Main Street. 
Cahill was found a boarding place near the corner of Grove 
and Commerce Streets with a Mrs. Parker, where he could be 
in easy communication with Bevins, the principal in the crime, 
but who was not to take an active hand in the affair. O'Neill, 
in some way. had become aware of the plot, and was in fear of 
his life. Another brother-in-law. Thomas O'Hara, espoused 
the cause of ( >'Neill, and it was his habit to meet the engineer 
as he left his locomotive, about 10 o'clock at night, and escort 
him to his home. One night in December, a dreary, rainy 




JAMES H. NAYLOR. M. D. 
Police Surgeon. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. * l > 

night, as O'Hara and ( )'Neill were going home up the railway 
tracks and had readied the vicinity of the Walnut Street cross- 
ing, they were attacked by Cahill and O'Brian. ( >'Hara tired 
his revolver and one of the hired assassins, O'Brian, dropped 
dead in his tracks. During the scrimmage, Cahill was also 
wounded in the wrist. 

O'Hara and O'Neill went to the police station and told their 
story to Chief Chamberlain, and Captain Ryan, then a patrol- 
man, was detailed to arrest Bevins. He was a personal friend 
of the man and could not believe that such a crime could be laid 
at his door, and it was one of the most painful duties that had 
ever fallen to his lot. Bevins was brought to the station and 
locked up, and Lieutenant Packard was detailed to find Cahill. 
He was a marked man, carrying a bad scar across the lower 
part of his face, the result of a burn, and as he was about the 
streets in the cold weather wore a muffler to conceal the scar. 
Lieutenant Packard had the assistance of " Sid " Cowles, one of 
the best-known policemen of those days, and together they 
scoured the east side in search of their man. They first found 
O'Brian's boarding place on Sheldon Street, and from a boy 
in the house learned that ( )'Brian was not in (he was dead from 
O'Hara's shot), that Cahill often called upon him, and that he 
boarded at Airs. Parker's on Grove Street. Airs. Parker was 
roused up, and the doors of the house were guarded by the offi- 
cers. Airs. Parker went to the room occupied by Cahill and found 
him in bed, having tied from the scene of the attempted murder 
to his boarding place. He was arrested, and the next morning 
there was a great deal of excitement in the city. Bevins and 
Cahill were brought before the Police Court, and evidence was 
such as warranted their being held, and heavy bonds were fixed, 
with the expectation that they could not secure them. Friends 
of Bevins, however, did not believe that he could be guilty of 
such a crime, and he readily found bonds, and he had so much 



90 History of Police Department , Hartford, Connecticut. 

influence that he also procured bonds for the ill-conditioned 
Cahill, who was an entire stranger in the city and charged with 
one of the most heinous crimes. 

As was to have been expected, the men were not anxious to 
meet trial in the Superior Court, and both skipped their bonds. 
Bevins, it is understood, made his bondsman good and went 
across the Atlantic to Ireland, where he remained for some years, 
lie was afterwards, some fourteen years after the crime, recog- 
nized on the streets of St. Louis by a former shopmate. It is 
believed that he returned to Ireland, and that he is now living 
there, if living at all. Cahill went to Canada and was located 
there after correspondence with the police authorities of Mon- 
treal. Chief of Police George F. Bill, then a patrolman, was 
detailed to go to Montreal and arrest him. He found his man 
in the house of a citizen named Flannery in the village of Point 
St. Charles, a suburb of Montreal. Meanwhile, Lieutenant 
Packard had gone to Washington to secure extradition papers 
from the government to bring Cahill home for trial. On his 
way from Washington to Montreal he stopped in this city, and 
all the witnesses in the case were taken to Montreal with him, 
as the custom of Canada was to have a case proven against a 
man before he could be extradited. An ex-mayor of Montreal 
was counsel for the Hartford authorities. Cahill was found 
guilty. It then became necessary for Lieutenant Packard to go 
to ( )ttawa and get the complementary papers to complete the 
forms of extradition from the Canadian government. ( )n the 
way his train was stuck fast in a snow storm and he was thirty- 
six hours bound up by the heavy snow. 

It happened that about this time there was a great deal of 
Fenian excitement in Canada, and the Fenians objected to any 
Irishman being taken from Montreal to this country, and made 
threats that Cahill would not be allowed to leave the city. The 
mayor of Montreal said that Cahill should be extradited if it 



History of Police Deportment, Hart ford, Connecticut. 91 

took all the troops in the city to aid the Hartford officers. After 
the papers were secured. Lieutenant Packard and Officer Bill 
quietly brought their man over the line and to Hartford, where 
in less than four months from the time of the assault upon 
( >'Neill he was tried, convicted, and sentenced to twelve years in 
the State Prison, Judge Sanford, who was the presiding judge, 
saying as he pronounced sentence: " You have had a fair trial, 
and it seems to the court that the jury could have found no 
other verdict, and that you are justly convicted." The crime 
charged was conspiracy to murder. The intended victim. 
Thomas O'Neill, died in this city March 27, 10,01. 

The ex-mayor of Montreal was paid $480 for his services as 
counsel for the Hartford officers. 




ALBERT M. ROWLEY. M. D. 
Police Surgeon. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 93 



CHAPTER XVI. 

The Patrol Equipment and Electric Wagon — Ambulance and Tele- 
graph Service — All Modern and First Class — ■ Bicycle Squad. 

The patrol wagon system was begun by the police depart- 
ment in 1886, and has been of the greatest advantage to the force. 
Previous to its inauguration, as will be found by other refer- 
ences in this sketch, the patrolman making an arrest was obliged 
to get his man to the station as best he could. Sometimes it 
was by taking him there forcibly after a struggle in the street, 
but more often an express wagon was subsidized into service 
and the prisoner was taken along at freight rates. This system 
was of great disadvantage to the orderly conduct of the police 
business. It not only created an unusual stir in the vicinity of 
the arrest, but it took the officer from his beat during the time 
he was taking his prisoner to the station and coming back to it, 
having it without any protection whatever. The patrol wagon 
is equipped with a driver and an office man is detailed to go with 
it in order that the prisoner may be cared for without the officer 
on the beat leaving" his territory unprotected. 

The patrol wagon was drawn by two horses from its installa- 
tion until the present season, when the commission recom- 
mended and the Common Council voted an appropriation for 
the purchase of an electric patrol wagon, which is now in process 
of construction. Meanwhile the drivers, Officers O'Brien and 
Hayes, are practicing on a temporary vehicle which is being 
used as a patrol wagon. It has proven to be much more rapid 
in service, is easier gotten out upon the road, and bids fair to 
be a permanent improvement of importance. The charging 
outfit and a specially constructed elevating apparatus for taking 



94 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

out and renewing- the storage batteries are fixtures in the stable 
connected with the police department building. 

The first and only ambulance in the city is in charge of the 
police department, and is drawn by horses. It is called nearly 
every day for accidents and for conveying sick persons to the 
hospital. It has been of the greatest service to the department, 
as it enables the officers to get injured people immediately on the 
road to the hospitals and places where they can receive proper 
care. A surgeon accompanies each ambulance call. 

The police early took advantage of the telegraph system and 
has an excellent service, covering the entire area of the city. It 
is the well-known Gamewell system, and during the past few 
years has been greatly improved by the modification of it^ sta- 
tions from the old-time houses on street corners to the modern 
call box, mounted on a standard. The stations are so arranged 
that the patrolmen send in the record of their duty to the main 
office, where it is entered from the tape on the time book, but 
wagon and ambulance calls can easily be made, thus bringing 
every part of the city within instant touch of police headquarters. 

During the open months of the year a bicycle squad is de- 
tailed to patrol the streets, prevent scorching, and aid in pre- 
serving order in case of fires. Bicycle scorchers have a whole- 
some dread of this squad, and it has proven to be one of the in- 
dispensable equipments of the force. 

The duties of a patrolman are not wholly concerned with 
making arrests when occasion demands. He has a great many 
things to look out for, and his knowledge of the city and of the 
heat under his patrol should he very intimate. He is required 
to know all the residents upon his beat, and to be aware, to some 
extent, of their habits of life, and to thus he able to have a watch 
upon suspicious strangers who come into the neighborhood. He 
must report all violations of state laws or of city ordinances, and 
his familiarity with these enactments must be sufficient for him 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 95. 

to understand when such are violated. He has the care of the 
sidewalks and must see that they are unobstructed and are in 
condition for pedestrians, and, if not, the owner is to be notified 
to see that they are in proper condition. In the winter season 
he is entrusted with seeing that the ice and snow are cleared 
from the walks, and is required to report to all owners or resi- 
dents when a sidewalk is in dangerous condition, from being 
slippery. This is for the purpose of preventing injuries and 
also of preventing suits against the city for falls upon such walk.-. 
If his beat is the business section he is entrusted with the 
care of the stores, the alleyways, and the hallways. If a store is 
not lighted, or presents any unusual appearance after dark, or it 
the door is unlocked, the owner is to be notified ; hallways, alley- 
ways, and areas are to be kept free from intruders, and all persons 
are expected to be orderly while on the streets. 

In case of accident to anyone on his beat, the patrolman is 
to care for the person until an ambulance or a surgeon can be 
summoned, and sick or dying persons upon the street also come 
under the same care. In case of severe injury by assault, the 
medical examiner must be summoned, and the assailant arrested. 
In court, when a prisoner he has arrested appears before it, he 
must testify to the circumstances that led to the arrest, and 
oftentimes is required to tell of the record of the prisoner as a 
disturbing element, or as a law-abiding citizen, as the case may 
be. His testimony is not only required in the Police Court, but 
he may be required to attend the higher courts, weeks or even 
months after the arrest of the prisoner, to tell what he knows 
and remembers of the case. This tends to the development of 
memory, and many of the patrolmen can tell of matters thai 
came under their special notice to the minutest detail even years 
after the occurrence. At fires a squad of policemen under a 
sergeant is on duty and they have charge of the fire lines and 
keep all outsiders, or those not connected with the property or 




PHILIP D. BUNCE. M. D. 
Police Surgeon. 



History of Police Department, Hartford , Connecticut . 97 

with the work of the firemen, outside of these lines. Notable in- 
stances of this sort of service will be remembered by those who 
saw the Park Central Hotel fire, the big fire of the Averill build- 
ing-, and of the Kennedy building a few years ago, where the 
police performed severe duty for many hours during the most 
inclement winter weather. 

The patrolmen who have special assignments, such as the 
railroad station or at street corners where there is much passing 
and many street cars moving, have a great deal of work to do, 
and literally care for the lives of many people every day, who 
rush ahead without paying attention to what is in their path, 
or who become confused in crossing streets where teams and 
cars are moving in opposite directions. Any person watching 
the patrolman on duty at the corner of Asylum and Main Streets 
will see that he is remarkably well occupied and that he is of 
great assistance in preserving life and limb. 



98 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 



CHAPTER XVII. 
JAMES WILSON'S CRIMES. 

Most Notable Criminal of His Time Held up in Hartford. — Jail Breaker, 
Burglar, and Horse Thief — Splendid Physical Courage and Daring — 
His Murder of Captain Willard and Attempted Suicide. 

The most noted criminal, in many ways, that ever found his 
way to Connecticut jails, her State Prison, and finally to the 
gallows, was James Wilson, a man of Western origin, supposed 
to have served terms in Ohio under the name of Dave Kently, 
which was undoubtedly his right name, as his partner in crime 
in the West was a brother of that name. He made his escape 
from the ( )hio penitentiary through a large ventilating pipe, 
served time in Sing Sing until he had the luck to escape from 
that institution, and began operations in New London, in this 
state, in [851, where he committed a burglary for which he was 
sentenced to six years in the State Prison under the name of 
John Marshall. ( )n the night of November 1, 1868, the store 
of Brown, Thomson & Company was entered and robbed of 
nearly $2,000 worth of silks, and the police force was put on the 
job the next day. Two days after, two men having suspicious 
articles in their possession were detained in Meriden by con- 
stables of that city, and Officer George F. Bill went to Meriden 
and the two were brought to Hartford. One gave his name as 
James Wilson and the other as Charles Retscolf, although he 
was generally known as Restof, his real name being Charles 
Foster, the alias being a transposition of the letters of his real 
name. Wilson and Retscolf pleaded guilty at the next term of 
the Superior Court to the burglary, but Wilson was afterwards 



History of Police Department, Hart font, Connecticut. 99 

tried on charges of burglary in Farmington and Norwich, the 
indictment presenting him under the name of James Wilson, 
alias "John Marshall." He was sentenced to seven years for 
the Brown & Thomson burglary and to nine years for the other 
burglaries. Retscolf was sentenced for seven years. Wilson, 
while he was in prison in the fifties, made two attempts to es- 
cape which were foiled, and showed himself to be a generally 
all-around sharp and dangerous fellow. 

Wilson proved to be just as intractable during his second 
term, but opportunity for escape was not abundant, and he put 
up a scheme which included in its workings one of the foulest 
murders ever committed in the state. Wilson was aware of the 
habits of Captain William Willard, the warden of the State 
Prison, and although never having received any but the kindest 
treatment from the warden, laid a cold-blooded plan to kill him, 
apparently knowing that he would then be transferred from the 
State Prison to the county jail to await trial for the murder, and 
hoping that he could find some means of escape from the jail. 
Sunday afternoon, August 14, 1870, Warden Willard was mak- 
ing his usual round of Sunday calls upon the men, talking with 
them, and giving them words of encouragement, when he was 
notified by one of the guards that Wilson wanted to speak to 
him. Captain Willard went to his cell door and Wilson passed 
out a slate between the bars, upon which was written " Warden 
Willard. Turn the slate over." While the warden was intent 
upon the slate. Wilson, who had been allowed a cane because of 
his lameness, and had managed in some way to obtain posses- 
sion of a small penknife, which he had attached to the end of 
the cane with the blade open, stabbed the warden through the 
bars, the knife entering the abdomen. Captain Willard tried to 
pull the cane away from Wilson, and in the struggle the wound 
was made still more dangerous, but the cane caught about the 
bars with the crook in its handle. 




PHOTO. BY STUART 



CHARLES S. STERN. M. D. 
Police Surgeon. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 101 

Captain Willard called to a guard, saying " Wilson has cut 
me,"' and, after being taken to his office, died in a few hours. 
Wilson was taken to the county jail, from which he did not 
escape, as he had evidently planned, and was tried by the Su- 
perior Court at the ensuing September term, the jury finding 
him guilty of murder in the first degree, and he was sentenced 
to be hanged. He addressed the jury in his own behalf, the ad- 
dress being one of the most irreverent and defiant hits of cheap 
oratory ever inflicted upon a jury. The case was appealed to 
the Supreme Court, but no error was found, and Wilson was 
put in close confinement October 9, 1871, preparatory to his 
execution on the 13th of the same month. 

However remarkable the career of this man has been in the 
annals of crime, it remained for the last act in the tragedy to 
eclipse all the rest and give to him a record for daring and pluck, 
as well as defiance of officers and law, that has had no equal, in 
this state at least. The night before he was to be hanged he 
attempted his own life by thrusting a small wire into his breast 
with the intention of reaching his heart. His strength failed 
him. and he was discovered before he was able to accomplish 
the deed. He was hanged the next morning, and, feeble as he 
was from his unsuccessful attempt at suicide, showed the ut- 
most grit and determination at the end. He was a thorough 
villain from start to finish, and had unusual daring. 



102 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

A GROUP OF THREE. 

Michael McDonald, Forger on Local Bank — "Jimmy" Lyons, Well- 
Known Professional, Gives Himself up After Twenty Years of 
Liberty and Crime — Murder of Ira Bliss in Burnside. 

In the winter of 1868-9 a stranger registered as Henry 
Stanley at the Allyn House, and for a few weeks lived in fine 
style, having opened a large account in the Hartford Trust 
Company. It developed, after a little time, that the stranger 
was none other than Michael McDonald, a well-known crook. 
In company with another crook, Ed. Hills, he had made a de- 
posit for a small amount in the Sturtevant Bank of New York, 
and bought a draft of that bank on the Trust Company. The 
draft was raised from its original amount, a small sum, to $5,000, 
and $4,800 was drawn from the Hartford company before the 
forgery was discovered. McDonald was located in Montreal, 
and Chief Walter P. Chamberlain and ( )fficer George F. Bill 
were detailed to go to that city and get him. He was secured, 
and came to trial in the March term of the Superior Court, 1869. 
He was sentenced to State Prison for five years. He afterwards 
went to England, where he served time for an attempt to bribe 
a turnkey to aid in releasing his brother George McDonald, one 
of the Bidwell gang that made the famous attempt at forgerx 
on the Bank of England. He died there. Ed. Hills, who was 
in the forgery, was afterwards arrested for a crime in New Ter- 
se) , and also did time. 

( )ne of the noted professionals in the country was " Jimmy " 
Lyons, a burglar who was often rounded up. but seemed to have 
luck on his side in escaping the clutches of the law. Lyons was 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 103 

arrested in 1868 for a burglary committed in Granby, and in 
connection with his pal, Peter Allen, was tried, under the name 
of Samuel O. Rogers, convicted, and sentenced to a term in 
State Prison. He was remanded to jail Over night for sentence 
in the morning, and during the night both he and Allen, whose 
alias was Spencer, made their escape through the connivance 
of a " trust)- " named Curry. The bars of their cell doors were 
forced with a jimmy provided by Allen's wife, and the instru- 
ment also forced the door open into the yard, from which escape 
was comparatively easy. For twenty-two years the Hartford 
police kept a lookout for Lyons, hoping that he might again 
turn up in the clutches of the law somewhere, and that they 
might be able to get hold of him and put him where he belonged, 
in the State Prison. April 28, 1890, he was arrested in Boston 
by Inspectors Cogan and Barry, having in his possession nearly 
$3,000 worth of set and unset diamonds. Requisition papers 
were secured from Governor Bulkeley, and Chief Packard went 
to Boston to get him. Lyons had good counsel, who secured 
for him a continuance of the case until May 1st, and bonds were 
fixed at $3,000. Chief Packard, who was accompanied by 
Jailer Fenn, saw Lyons in court and absolutely identified him. 
The first bail commissioner summoned would not grant bail, 
but the second did grant it. and Lyons went his way, taking with 
him the $3,000 worth of diamonds that were returned to him 
when hail was accepted. Lyons had a marvelous career, the 
most interesting part of which was his marriage to the daughter 
of a prominent Boston family during the progress of some of 
his most daring criminal operations. He was divorced from 
his wife as soon as his character was learned, her father paying 
him a handsome sum to get rid of him. He operated in this 
country and in Furope, and served a term of seven years in 
Scotland for larceny from a hotel, showing up in this country 
soon after, and beginning operations again. Lyons had quite 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE HARTFORD FOLICE MUTUAL AID ASSOCIATION. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 105 

a " pull " with private detectives in Boston for a long time, and 
was comparative!} safe in his operations. He was a gentle- 
manly fellow of fine appearance, but was easily identified by a 
scar between both eyes, and a tattooed ship, eagle, and crucifix 
on one arm, and a flag and two hearts on the other. His case 
was called in the criminal court in this city for over twenty 
years. 

At last, in [890, Lyons, pursued and haunted by officers from 
nearly all the Eastern states, entered into negotiations with 
Samuel Jones, now deceased, who was his counsel at his trial in 
this city, gave himself up to the authorities, and was sen- 
tenced to State Prison for two years at the December term of 
that year. He served his term and left the state, and he is now 
reported as having died. 

A crime which shocked the entire community of the state 
was committed in Burnside, February 21, 1873. Ira Bliss, a 
man over seventy years old, was the station agent of the rail- 
road at that point, and it was his enstom to remain until about 
9.30 in the evening to await the clearing of all trains and care 
for his accounts. 

On the evening in question he was suddenly set upon by 
two roughs, young villains who were bent on robbing him. 
Bliss was coming from the station, and the ruffians, supposing 
that he had money with him, crept np behind him and accosted 
him. Bliss said " Good evening" to the men, and they asked 
him the road to Rockville. He pointed it out. and in an instant 

was struck down by a blow from a billet of w 1 one of them 

carried. Bliss was robbed, a watch and Si 1.75 being taken from 
his pocket. Mr. Bliss' wife, not seeing him at home at the 
usual hour, notified some of the neighbors of her fears for his 
safety. A search was instituted, and about _' o'clock- in the 
morning IMiss was found by the roadside unconscious from the 
blows he had received upon his bead. He remained uncon- 



io6 Histoiy of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

scions for three days, until he died. Tracks were found lead- 
ing from the vicinity of the crime, and they were traced through 
the snow until they became confused and were lost. Suspicion 
fell upon John Dynes, a village loafer of unsavory reputation, 
and a Burnside citizen named Elmer overtook him the next 
morning on the street and asked him to ride into Hartford with 
him. Elmer took him to the police station in this city, and he 
confessed to the crime, implicating Oscar Graves with him. 
Officer George F. Bill was detailed upon the case and found 
Graves at his boarding house on Howard Street and he was 
arrested, although he drew a revolver on the officer. Graves 
was but eighteen years old. He confessed to striking the first 
blow on Bliss' head, but said that the only motive was to stun 
him so that the two might take what Bliss had in his pockets. 
Dynes struck other blows. They were bound over to the Su- 
perior Court, and at the June term the jury disagreed, standing 
nine for conviction and three for acquittal on the charge of sec- 
ond degree murder. At the September term following, the men 
pleaded guilty and were sentenced to prison for life. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 107 



CHAPTER XIX. 

TWO NOTED MURDER CASES. 

Conspiracy Against Travelers Insurance Company Included Murder of 
Angeline Stewart — Story of the Murder of Joseph Jackson in Canada 
by William Richards — Hartford Police in Both Cases. 

Angelinte Stewart, a handsome child twelve years old, was 
murdered in Hudson, N. V., in December, 1867, for an insur- 
ance of $5,000 placed on her life with the Travelers Insurance 
Company of Hartford. The circumstances were peculiar, and 
revealed a depth of depravity in those who committed the crime 
unparalleled. Joseph Brown, a painter, of this city, and his 
wife, Josephine, conjointly committed the murder, and Brown 
was hanged for his part of it, and it is likely that the woman, 
who was probably the instigator of the crime, would also have 
been hanged but for the prejudice in the state of New York 
against hanging a woman. The woman was brought up by 
Judge Phelps of Granby, but did not prove to be worthy 
of the care bestowed upon her. She came to this city and led 
a life of disrepute, but finally married Brown, a weak-minded 
man. who was completely tinder her power. The two went to 
Columbus, O., and became acquainted with a widow named 
Stewart, the mother of the victim. They professed to be much 
attached to the child, and begged that she be allowed to go East 
with them, as it was their intention to settle in Hudson, N. Y. 
The mother reluctantly consented. On the way East, Brown 
and his wife stopped in Dayton for a time and took out a polic) 
of $5,000 (accident) on the child's life. They had lived in Hud- 
son but a short time before their house was discovered to be 




PATROLMEN. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 109 

on fire. Xo one could be found about the premises, it appear- 
ing afterwards that the woman had gone to a hotel near by, and 
that Brown had also gone out somewhere. The fire was ex- 
tinguished, and in the pantry were discovered the remains of 
Angeline Stewart, the child, badly charred. There was an in- 
vestigation, and Dr. Carney, a physician and detective of Bos- 
ton, took the case up for the Travelers. He became convinced 
that the child had been murdered before the fire, by the fact that 
the blisters on the uncharred flesh were filled with air, and not 
with water, as would have been the case had the flesh been 
living flesh. Evidence of blows on the head were also discov- 
ered. Meanwhile Brown and his wife had left Hudson, and at 
Westfield, Mass.. had sworn out a claim for the value of the 
policy before a justice of the peace, and it had been forwarded 
to the office of the company in this city. It became apparent, 
shortly after, that the couple were not in Westfield. and the 
Travelers applied to Chief Packard for their arrest. Officer Frank 
Flynn and another member of the force were detailed to go to 
Granby to find them, as it was suspected that they were there. 
They were found at Judge Phelps' house and brought to the 
station here in sleighs, being kept separate all the way in. The 
weather was severe, and the trip made by the officers was a re- 
markable one in many ways. 

At the station Chief Packard questioned them separately, but 
got nothing from them. They were locked up in cells near 
each other, and an officer put into another cell to listen for de- 
velopments. Chief Packard also " kept tabs " on their con- 
versation with each other through the spy window of the sta- 
tion. The next morning he had enough evidence in hand to 
confront them, and they confessed the crime. They were taken 
to Hudson and tried. Chief Packard being on the witness stand 
against Brown for four hours. He was hanged, the chief being 
present at the execution. The woman was tried some time 



no History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

later and got off with a cheap jail sentence. From their con- 
fession it appeared that after the girl had been killed with an 
axe she was fixed in a chair in the pantry, kindling wood placed 
ahont her body, kerosene poured upon it, and fire was set in 
such a manner that the two had time to escape before the great 
blaze was seen. The woman was strikingly handsome, but had 
the spirit of a fiend. It was said that she danced on the plat- 
form of the gallows upon which her husband was to hang. She 
was a morphine fiend, and thoroughly depraved. The Stewart 
child lies buried in ( iranby. 

The little village of Abercorn, in the province of Quebec., 
was the scene of a most brutal murder in July, 1881. Although 
the crime was not discovered until the following spring, the 
murderer was brought to justice, and escaped the sentence of 
death on the gallows by committing suicide in the jail in Que- 
bec. 1 11 the early summer of that year, William Richards, a 
man over forty years old, came across from Birmingham, Eng- 
land, to engage in farming or blacksmithing pursuits, whichever 
came most convenient, in this country. He was on the steamer 
Montreal and was landed in Canada. ( >n the same steamer was 
a young man in feeble health, but possessed of some money, who 
was in search of employment in a new climate for the betterment 
of his physical condition. The two became acquainted, and 
the younger man. Joseph Jackson, seemed to rely upon Richards, 
who was a powerful man and knew much more of the world than 
Jackson. To Richards the younger man confided his possession 
of money, and from that moment the two were not separated. 
They applied for work at several places, but could obtain none 
together. Near Abercorn they met a farmer and asked the 
way to the station. They were told, and the way led through 
a patch of woods. Richards returned through that patch of 
woods alone several hours after, and when asked where his com- 
panion was said he would be along shortly. Nothing further 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 1 1 r 

was thought about the matter. Richards came to this vicinity, 
and obtained work at the Charles M. Beach farm in West Hart- 
ford in August following this incident. During his stay there 
he brutally beat a fellow employee, John B. Bromley, and served 
two months in the county jail for the crime. He afterwards 
went to Waterbury, where he worked in the Farrell foundry. 
The spring following, two boys passing through the patch of 
woods near Abercorn station found the body of Jackson, badly 
decomposed, with the skull crushed in, but sufficient evidences 
were remaining to identify it. High Constable H. D. Pickel of 
Sweetsburg, P. Q., worked up the case and was satisfied that 
Richards did the deed and was in this section. He applied to 
Chief of Police Packard and the man was traced and located. 
John O'Malley, then a supernumerary on the force, went to 
Y\ aterbury to aid in identifying the man. as he had worked with 
him on the Beach farm. At the foundry. Richards was hand- 
cuffed on one hand and immediately put up the other, showing 
that he had been there before and knew what was wanted. A 
number of articles belonging to Jackson were found in Rich- 
ards' possession, and some of his clothes. There were some 
poetical works with the fly-leaves torn out. but enough remained 
to show that Jackson had once owned them. Richards was 
taken to Quebec, tried, found guilty, and sentenced to be hanged. 
He was a hard man. and had served two terms in English pris- 
ons for highway robbery, one of five and one of eight years. 
He had a married daughter living in West Hartford, and while 
he was in Waterbury had sent for his wife and younger children 
to come to this country. Richards cut his throat with a pen- 
knife about 3 o'clock of the morning on which he was to have 
been hanged, and was found dead in his cell. There was no 
possible motive for the crime but robbery. The working up 
of the case and the location of the man was a piece of hue de- 
tective work, the latter part of which was to the credit of the 
Hartford force. 




PATROLMEN. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 113 

CHAPTER XX. 
A CLEVER CONFIDENCE WOMAN. 

Martha Stiles, alias Robbins, Wallace, and Howe — Swindling College 
Graduates a Successful Scheme with Her — Romantic Career of Ad- 
venture in Operatic. Theatrical, and Lecture Successes, but Always 
Crooked. 

One of the cleverest confidence women in the country, with 
a long record of shady adventures, was rounded up in this city 
by the police, Sunday evening, August 19, 1804. Word had 
been sent to Chief of Police Pull from Worcester and Spring- 
field that a woman calling herself " Wallace " and several other 
names had been doing the professional men of those cities out 
of various sums, and the probabilities were that she was then in 
Hartford. During the day, complaint came in that a woman 
calling herself " Robbins "' had visited some professional men 
in Hartford and had obtained sums of money. She reported to 
Dr. W. T. Bacon, whom she had visited, that she was stopping 
at the Hotel Heublein, and surely enough she was found to be 
registered there. After notifying Dr. Bacon and other gentle- 
men who had been victimized by the woman to meet the police 
at the hotel, in order to identify her, Officers Umberfield and 
Johnson were detailed to make the arrest. 

The woman came down to the parlors when called for, and 
seemed surprised when she met the officers. Dr. Bacon recog- 
nized her, and she returned to him $25 she had received from 
him only a few hours before. She complained of feeling ill, 
but was taken to the station and locked up, charged with ob- 
taining money under false pretenses. Mrs. Robbins. as she 
called herself, proved to be Martha Stiles, a native of New 
s 



1 14 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Hampshire, belonging to a good family, but who had preferred 
the life of an adventuress to one of respectability. She married 
Edward R. Howe, likewise an adventurer, and the two had a 
varied career in all parts of the country. They lectured, gave 
operatic performances, securing school children for their cho- 
ruses, and at one time were members of the Modjeska Theatri- 
cal Company, and Mrs. Howe in her younger days posed as the 
" Drummer Boy of Lookout Mountain," claiming that she had 
enlisted under the name of " Homer Mortimer." She imposed 
upon many Grand Army Posts in this way, and made a good 
deal of money, but her style of living used it up rapidly. After 
her marriage with Howe the pair operated in nearly everv large 
town in the country, originating a clever scheme of swindling, 
which must have kept them remarkably busy in securing in- 
formation, and proved them to be shrewd and keen-witted. 

Immediately after arriving in town the pair would separate 
and make various calls upon college graduates, telling some 
story of distress or misfortune, and representing themselves to 
be relatives of some classmate of the graduate. The appeal was 
successful to a marked degree, and probably two out of three 
calls would bring money. In this city, " Mrs. Robbins " told 
Dr. Bacon that her pocket had been picked on the train from 
Springfield, and that she was the sister of Mr. Ferry, a class- 
mate of the doctor's, then living in California. After she had 
left the doctor's house he analyzed her stories and, finding dis- 
crepancies, complained of her to the police. The couple had 
been in the city a year previous, and made some money, but 
this time the woman was on a lone hunt. 

She was decidedly clever in concealing the money she had 
obtained, $85 having been found done up in her back hair. At 
the September term of the court she was sentenced to two years 
in jail, after a plea of guilty. She professed herself a fatalist 
and attempted no defense. She was about forty-five years old, 



History of Police Department , Hartford, Connecticut. 115 

tall, dressed in conventional black, was thin, and had a sallow 
complexion. She possessed a marvelously winning- speaking- 
voice and fine presence, and hundreds of college men have 
yielded to her swindles, and are out of pocket. Even while in 
jail she could not resist the temptation to be crooked, and after 
having earned " good time " lost it all by violating the rules 
and trving to send a letter out by a prisoner who was released. 
Howe did not appear in the city during her imprisonment. It 
is understood that she went to New Jersey from the jail here, 
and that family friends were to care for her in the future. She 
was not a well woman, and her " professional " career probably 
closed with her experiences in this city. 




L££^ 



PATROLMEN. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 117 



CHAPTER XXI. 

GUINAN BOYS' FATE. 

Distressing Story of Lost from Home, of Searching Parties, and Final 
Discovery in a Freight Car Suffocated — Intense Excitement and 
Sympathy of the Public. 

The most distressing incident which ever came under the 
notice of the Hartford police had whatever nothing to do with 
crime, but was of such a character that the heart of every 
parent in the city was touched to its very depths. Thursday 
afternoon, July 26, 1894, the three boys of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Guinan, Raymond, aged nine ; Leroy, aged seven, and Freddie, 
aged four, were playing about the yard near the family home 
on Broad Street, not far from the railway tracks. They were 
not seen alive after about 3 o'clock of that day. Late at night 
the children were reported to the police station as missing, and 
an attempt was made to find them. No traces of them could 
be found. The next day, Friday, the railroad cars along the 
line were searched, and reports having reached the police that 
three boys had been seen in the south meadows, Friday night 
a large force of men, under police direction, hunted the meadows 
with lanterns, but still nothing could be found of the missing 
ones. Saturday's search was equally fruitless, and the distress 
of the parents and the interest of the community was most in- 
tense. There were many theories, but none of them proved 
to be tenable. 

Sunday morning, Chief of Police Hill made up his mind that 
the boys must be in some of the freight cars on the sidings not 
far from the home of their parents. Policemen Charles Mantie 



n8 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

and Mark Grady were detailed to make a thorough and system- 
atic search, and, accompanied by John Whitmore, foreman of 
the repair shop of the railroad company, examined and unlocked 
all the cars standing on the tracks. Upon arriving at Caboose 
No. 12, which had been newly painted and was on the sidetrack 
near the north wall of the tracks, Mr. Whitmore tried the key 
in the door and was surprised to find it unlocked. Inside the 
car there was nothing apparent, but there was a strong odor, 
indicating that perhaps the bodies of the boys might be there. 
A clothes closet used by the trainmen was found locked, 
and the door was broken open. There, in a heap upon the 
floor, were the three little fellows, entombed, their arms 
wound round about each other, suffocated to death in an air 
space twenty-eight and one-half inches deep, twelve inches 
wide, and five feet high. The intense heat of the three days 
had turned the bodies absolutely black, and there were more 
distressing circumstances connected with the tragedy than any 
which had ever come to the notice of the police. The bodies 
were removed to the morgue, where autopsies were performed 
by Medical Examiner Horace S. Fuller, Dr. John O'Flaherty, 
Dr. C. C. Beach, and Dr. Griswold. The finding was that the 
children died from accidental suffocation. 

The most reasonable theory connected with the tragedy was 
that the boys, familiar with the railroads and cars, their father 
having been a locomotive engineer, had entered the caboose to 
play a game of cards, cards having been found scattered upon 
the floor of the car, and that, hearing a noise, and knowing that 
policemen arrested tramps for playing cards in cars, supposed 
that a policeman was after them, and rushed into the closet, 
which, having a spring lock upon the door, closed upon them. 
In their efforts to relieve themselves of heat and to get away, 
tlie lads had stripped off their clothing, which was found at the 
bottom of the closet. There was intense excitement after the 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 119 

discovery of the children, and crowds flocked to the police sta- 
tion all the afternoon and evening. It was the most heart- 
breaking tragedy in the history of the city, and it was none the 
less tragic because of the fact that the children were undoubtedly 
dead before they were reported as lost, and that the caboose was 
within a stone's throw of the home of their parents. 




PATROLMEN. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 121 



CHAPTER XXII. 



A BLOCK OF FIVE. 



Hartford's Only Chinese Murder — New York Pickpockets Rounded Up 
— Henry Chase, Jailbreaker and Enticer of Young Girls — A Gentle- 
man Burglar. 

Charley Lee, a Chinaman, was murdered in June Lee's 
laundry in the basement of one of the Asylum Street blocks 
below Ann Street, April 19, 1891. It appears that Charley 
Gong, who had several other Chinese aliases, had a grievance 
against Lee, who had secured, as he thought, the publication of 
an article in one of the daily newspapers which had, as he 
claimed, ruined his business. Gong went into the laundry of 
June Lee on the evening of the day mentioned and found 
Charley Lee and June playing a game of fan tan in the rear 
room. Gong immediately drew a navy revolver and fired three 
shots into his enemy. Lee was instantly killed. Gong walked 
to the police station and gave himself up, saying that he had 
shot a man, and that he hoped he was dead. He entered a plea 
of not guilty in the Police Court the next morning and was 
bound over to the Superior Court. At the September term of 
that court he pleaded guilty to murder in the second degree, and 
was sentenced to State Prison for life. Throughout his con- 
finement in the county jail he appeared to be the most happy 
person imaginable, satisfied that he had made things " even " 
for the attack on his business by Lee. He often expressed him- 
self as highly delighted with the job. 

A gang of twenty or more pickpockets came up from Xew 
York to do the races at Charter Oak Park in September, 1897, 



122 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 

but through the foresight of Chief of Police Bill they did not 
operate. A New York detective was on hand, and as fast as 
the men appeared they were spotted and arrested. Six of the 
men found rest in the station house September 2, the first day 
of the meet, and the others returned to New York. They were 
a precious lot of professionals, every one of them having done 
time previous to their coming here, and every one of them is 
now doing time in some prison in the Eastern states. They 
were George O'Neill, alias " Ed. Conners " ; John Mackey, 
alias " Paddy Irish " ; Daniel Magill, alias " Dave Norton " ; 
Robert Wellington, alias " Chinese Teddy " ; Joseph Hussey, 
alias " Red Hurley " ; Thomas Coleman, alias " Thomas Geoghe- 
gan." The officers connected with their arrest were Sergeant 
Walter Smith. Detective Garret J. Farrell, and Officers Lloyd, 
O'Mallev. and J, F. Sullivan. 

A successful jail-breaker and a villain whose special crime 
was the enticing of young girls from home for immoral pur- 
poses was Henry A. Chase, in whom the police were interested 
for a period of several months in the winter and spring of 1897. 
Chase enticed a young school girl fourteen vears old from her 
Ik mic, and for some months no traces were found of him such 
as would lead to his arrest. Sergeant Walter Smith was on the 
case, and tracked him until he was at last found in Plymouth, 
where he was detained by a constable and locked up. Sergeant 
Smith went to Plymouth after him, but when he got there a big 
hole in the cell where lie had been confined showed that he had 
flown. The girl had disappeared. Another long chase and 
tracking located him in Springfield, where he had still another 
young girl with him. He was tried at the June term in 1897, 
and was sentenced to State Prison for four years and to jail for 
one- year. After he had served his term at the State Prison, for 
some reason there was a miss of calculation between the officers 
and tlie sheriff and Chase was set free. He was recaptured and 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 123 

taken to jail for the remainder of his sentence, but escaped in 
six months, and is now believed to be in South Africa. He was 
an expert worker in wire, and easily found his way about the 
country plying his trade. He had served terms in jail and in 
State Prison before he was rounded up for the crime above 
related. The girl whom he enticed away was supposed to have 
been murdered by him, but it is known that she was not, but 
was deserted for another one after a few weeks. She is believed 
to be living in Xew York. 

A gang of burglars, Jacob Nudic, a rag peddler, Felix Aleni- 
koh, and a man named Shapira, were interested in the burglary 
and arson of a store in Marlboro in the winter of 1891. They 
loaded a wagon full of goods from the store and drove to Good- 
speed's landing, where the goods were shipped to this city. The 
building was fired and burned to the ground, and no one would 
have known of the burglary but for the fact that a rubber boot 
was found not far from the store. This set the officers at work. 
and the trio were arrested. Shapira stabbed himself in the abdo- 
men while awaiting for the preliminary hearing and died two 
days later in the hospital. Nudic and Alenikoff were sent to 
prison for four vears. Sergeant Walter Smith had the work- 
ing ii]) of the case. 

In the early part of October, 1898. the house of Mrs. Juliette 
Sumner. No. 1 1 Myrtle Street, was entered by a burglar and a 
quantity of silverware and other articles stolen. No immediate 
clue was found to aid in the arrest of the burglar, but on Octo- 
ber 9 a man calling himself William E. Travis was arrested in 
Xew York by detectives of the force of that city. It appears 
that he had been given away by a pal who had come to grief, 
and an investigation showed that he lived in a respectable local- 
ity on Schermerhorn Street in Brooklyn, and had always passed 
for a commercial traveler. His wife and her mother were un- 
aware of the character of his business, but it soon developed that 




PATROLMEN. 



History of Police Department , Hart font, Connecticut. 125 

he had been one of the most successful second-story burglars 
and operators in the country. Among some of the silverware 
taken from him were articles bearing the name of " Sumner," 
and Detective Farrell was sent to New York to identify them 
if possible. This was easily done, and after a contest made 
by Travis he was finally remanded to this city for the first chance 
at him, although he was wanted in other places for burglaries. 
He was brought to Hartford ( Jctober 18 and held for the Su- 
perior Court for trial, and at the following term was sentenced 
to State Prison for nine years. I lis name was found to be Ru- 
dolph Busch, although he was married under the name of Wil- 
liam E. Dalton. He was a gentleman in his tastes and appear- 
ance, a reader and student of the best literature, and a man who 
would have made a fine place for himself in society but for the 
xt crook " that was in him. He is regarded as at the head of his 
profession, which he will not pursue for some years, as there 
are many other complaints against him in various parts of the 
country when his sentence shall have expired at Wethersfield. 
His plan of operation was to steal valuables that were easily 
portable, and they were either melted up and sold for their 
bullion value, or, in case of jewelry, sold under the pretense 
that he was a traveling jeweler. He made the business very 
profitable. His wife was as much surprised as any one when 
the true character of the man was revealed. 




PATROLMEN. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 127 



CHAPTER XXIII. 

THE GRISWOLD CASE. 

One of the Celebrated Criminal Trials of Recent Times in Connecticut — 
Singular Circumstances surrounding the Crime of Arson, of which 
Dr. Griswold was Convicted and Sentenced for Ten Years in State 
Prison. 

One of the crimes in Hartford which created unusual ex- 
citement in the city and throughout the state was the burning of 
the Woodbridge building on Main Street, where the Sage- Allen 
building now stands. The fire occurred on the night of March 
14, 1895, an d the large stores of the Charles R. Hart Company, 
William G. Simmons & Company, the photographic rooms of 
Mrs. Lloyd, and the dental office of Dr. Malcolm Griswold were 
burned out. the loss being very heavy. There were many cir- 
cumstances about the fire that looked suspicious, and the police 
investigation fixed the fact that the fire was incendiary beyond a 
doubt. Suspicion was directed against Dr. Griswold, who had 
not been remarkably prosperous in business, largely on account 
of his habits and neglect of his profession. Xo special action 
was taken immediately, except to watch for developments, and 
they came along rapidly. 

In making out his schedule of property destroyed for the fire 
insurance company, Dr. Griswold called in the aid of Fred C. 
Jackson, who had been studying dentistry in his office. Jack- 
son did not like the inventory, as he knew it to be false, and told 
Dr. Griswold that the insurance people would suspect him of 
setting fire to the place. Dr. Griswold then went over the mat- 
ter, and incidentally mentioned some photographs that had been 



128 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

saved from the wreck and sent to his private box in the post 
office. These were old-fashioned photographs, purporting to 
be of Mrs. R. N. Thane, but in reality were of Mrs. Virtue Drake 
of Pine Meadow, with whom Dr. Griswold was carrying on a 
clandestine correspondence. Jackson pointed out that the post- 
mark on the envelope containing the photographs was earlier 
than the hour of the fire. * That is the one loop-hole left open," 
said Griswold, and he confessed to the crime of setting the build- 
ing on fire, to Jackson. Jackson informed the insurance men, 
and Officer O'Malley arrested Griswold, and he was heard before 




PATROLMEN. 

the Police Court on the Saturday afternoon succeeding the fire. 
Dr. Griswold was held in $15,000, which were furnished after 
a few days, and the most sensational trial ever known in the 
history of Hartford county was that of his case at the June term 
following, the court being in session on the case from June 11 
until July 29. The jury was out twenty-seven hours, but could 
not agree. The following September the case was tried again, 
and Griswold was found guilty and sentenced to ten years in the 
State Prison, lie was smitten with paralysis after a short time 
and has been in the prison hospital since then. An effort was 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 129 

made to secure his release by the board of pardons, but it did 
not avail. 

Burglars have had peculiar experiences in the houses of cler- 
gymen in this city. In 1885 the house of the late Rev. Dr. 
Gage, pastor of the Pearl Street Congregational Church, now the 
F^armington Avenue Church, was entered by John Gillespie, one 
of the most daring of the professional talent in the country. Dr. 
Gage attacked the burglar and held him until assistance arrived, 
and the man was sentenced to the State Prison at Wethersfield. 
He had done time frequently before, and after his release went 
to Massachusetts, where he was arrested and, under the habitual 
criminal act. is now serving a sentence for twenty-five years. 
Gillespie was a remarkable prisoner, in that he had absolutely 
no friends. He never wrote or received a letter while in the 
prison at Wethersfield, nor did any one ever call upon him as a 
friend. He was alone in the world, and his life was spent in 
preying upon society, such of it as he passed outside prison 
walls. 

July 2~. 1897, tne house of the Rev. Joseph H. Twichell on 
Woodland Street was entered by Charles King and Horace B. 
Winters, young men. Mr. Twichell's son held them up and 
they were arrested, and have just about completed their term 
in State Prison for the crime. 




F. T. COWLEY. EDWARD BEECHER. 
J. H. HURLEY. M. C. FOLEY. A. M. ROWLEY. JAMES P. MORAN. J. J. JORDAN. 
L. P. LACEY. JOHN M. HENRY. J. H. NAYLOR. E. F. O'BRIEN. Manager. W. F. TOBIN. 

G. W. BUTLER. 



Hartford Police Baseball Team. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 131 



CHAPTER XXIV. 
POLICE ATHLETICS. 

Members of the Force Who are Experts in Many Lines of Sport, Oars- 
men, Bicyclists, Boxers, and Sprinters — The Police Baseball Team 
and its Victories. 

Policemen take naturally to athletics. It is a part of their 
business^ and they get paid for it. The reader may think that 
some of the bluecoat heavyweights are not athletic. Perhaps 
they are not, but it is not safe to tackle them. The police com- 
missioners have fixed the age, height, and weight of candidates 
for the force. Our future policemen will be youthful, of good 
height, and proportionate weight. In the past few years the 
age limit has been reduced from thirty-five to thirty years, and 
at a recent meeting it was proposed to have the height five feet 
eight inches, which is a half inch over the present standard. This 
caused the mayor to remark that the board had '* cut off their 
years and wanted to add to their legs." It will be seen that it 
is the intention of the police board to have policemen who have 
the making of athletes. Each applicant is physically examined 
by a police surgeon. It may interest many who have admired 
the huge and powerful frame of Sergeant 1 hitler to know that 
when he was examined by Dr. H. S. Fuller he was declared 
to be without a blemish, and the experienced surgeon was un- 
able to find an unsound spot on him. 

On a succeeding page will be found something about some 
of the athletic triumphs of a few members of the force. Much 
of the work was done before the men became regular police- 
men. Of course, it is understood that a policeman does not have 



1 32 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

the time to train for professional events. It is doubtful if the 
hoard would grant a man a month to train for a fight with some 
slugger whose name is a household word, nor could he have a 
leave of absence for the summer to play with a ball team. But 
the commissioners encourage athletics so far as they do not 
interfere witli the work of the department, and promote the 
physical welfare of the individual. A man who has been in pro- 
fessional sports for a dozen years ought to have a level head. 




PART OF THE POLICE FORCE IN 1889. 



an even temper, and excellent judgment, all great qualities for 
a policeman. 

The police building is equipped with shower baths, a large 
hall for drilling, and a good gymnasium containing sufficient 
apparatus. Flying rings, parallel and horizontal bars, a horse, 
boxing gloves, punching bag, medicine ball, Indian clubs, 
dumbbells, chest weights, rowing machines, etc., can be used at 
all hours. At the annual meetings of the Police Mutual Aid 
Association an amusement committee is elected and this com- 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . i 3 3 

mittee often looks after athletic enterprises. The committee is 
composed of Chief George F. Bill, Edward F. O'Brien, John 
Erving Palmer. Charles L. Ramsden, and John F. Sullivan. 

In recent years the public has had an opportunity to witness 
the prowess of the department's baseball team, the undisputed 
champions of New England, and by the close of the coming sea- 
son the team expects to be the champion police team of the 
United States. Some of the enthusiasts declare that when the 
next history of the department is written the team may be look- 
ing for Old World honors and make a tour of the globe looking 
for fresh teams to conquer. 

That the public was enthusiastic about the fine record made 
by the team last season is evidenced by the sale of tickets for 
the game played here between Hartford and Worcester police. 
This game was for the benefit of St. Francis' Hospital, and after 
the expenses for entertaining the visiting team had been paid 
the sum of $558.90 was handed over to Bishop Tierney by the 
committee for the hospital. The bishop complimented the team 
for its supremacy in the national game and thanked the com- 
mittee for the large sum contributed to a worthy cause. 

It is unnecessary to mention here the many games won by 
the team, including contests with such strong players as the 
Morse Business College and the Hartford Street Railway teams, 
or to give accounts of the games with the police departments of 
other cities. The standing of the police teams in New England 
at the close of last season was as follows: 

Hartford. .... 
Worcester. .... 
New Haven. 
Bridgeport, 

Among the numerous athletes in the department may he 
mentioned George C. and Frank A. Heise, who excel in gen- 
eral gymnasium work. They have many medals won at Turner- 



.'on. 


Lost. 


P. C 


4 


1 


80.0 


1 


1 


50.0 





1 


00.0 





2 


00.0 



1 34 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

fests. If the department ever gives an exhibition, the Heise 
brothers will begin the program on the horizontal bar with the 
giant swing. 

William Weltner is the best all-around athlete in the depart- 
ment and won distinction on the Connecticut river when a mem- 
ber of the Hartford Rowing Club, of which he was secretary 
for some years. As a single sculler and in the eight he did good 
work. He is also a clever boxer and can put the light shot, and 




PART OF THE POLICE FORCE IN 186 



in 1891 he won the all-around amateur championship of Hart- 
ford. 

Sergeant John V . Butler won the amateur heavyweight box- 
ing tournament in Boston one year. He has handled the 56 
with skill, and for a heavy man is probably the fastest 100-yard 
runner in the country. He once defeated an editor of the Hart- 
ford Courant in a fifty-yard sprint, and was willing to retire after 
gaining such a reputation. During the warm season he covers 
the rieht erarden for the Police B. B. C. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 135 

John M. Henry has been in at least one hundred nftv-yard 
races with the best men in the country, and was never defeated at 
that distance. He has been in many 100-yard events and was 
beaten but twice. At one time he was open to all comers at 
either distance. One of his most famous races was his sprint 
with Alike Tiernan when both were members of the New York 
ball club. Mr. Henry guards the second bag on the police team. 

James P. Aloran, the backstop of the ball team, formerly 
played on the Hartford professional team, and is considered one 
of the best boxers in the department. He is easily the best catch- 
ing policeman in the country. 

Dr. James H. Xaylor, the pitcher of the team, is one of the 
police surgeons, and he learned to locate the slab when in col- 
lege. It was due to his efficient twirling that the team had such 
a successful season last year. He is a good batsman and a first- 
class base-runner. He can also play other positions satisfactorily. 

Dr. Albert M. Rowley, another police surgeon, has played 
third base on the team, and his good all-around work at the 
base, with his fine batting and daring base-running, was of great 
help to the team. 

"Cap" William Tobin, the first baseman, was at one time 
considered the best man in that position in the country. That 
he has not forgotten his old habit of gathering the ball, no mat- 
ter how thrown, was evident by his work last season. 

Edward Beecher, the left fielder, is the best baseball player 
that ever gave up the diamond for the little locust club. He 
has played on several National League teams, and was always a 
free hitter. In Pittsburg, Washington, and other places he was 
a great favorite. Xow when he steps up to the plate the crowd 
usually cries "Hume run!" 

< i. W. Butler, center field, is a six-footer like his brother, 
the sergeant, and has made a good record as an outfielder. 

L. P. Lacey has done well at the difficult position of short- 
stop, and he can take his turn in the box. 



136 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Among the substitutes who have done good work may be 
mentioned J. J. Jordan, F. T. Cowley, J. H. Hurley, Frank S. 
Young, and M. F. Foley. 

Edward F. O'Brien, the manager of the team, directs the 
team from the bench. He looks after the bookings of the team 
and has full charge of its finances. His treatment of the op- 
posing teams has been commended by the various departments. 

In closing this brief record it is fitting to say that one of the 
best raids made by the department in recent years was due to 
the fine bicycle riding of J. M. Henry and L. G. Melberger, 
expert wheelmen, who by their good riding were able to catch 
a violator of the law who had long defied the police. J. M. 
O'Mally, George H. Sterzing, and J. H. O'Mara are members 
of the department who have won many road races. Henry 
Hart has considerable reputation as an amateur boxer. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 1 37 



CHAPTER XXV. 
MAYOR AND COMMISSIONERS. 

Brief Sketches of .Mayor Harbison and Commissioners Smith, Wise. 
Quinn, Mahl, Newton, and Huntington. 

MAYOR ALEXANDER HARBISON. 

Alexander Harbison", mayor of the city and president ex offi- 
cio of the police commission, is a native of County Armagh, Ire- 
land, and was born in 1842. He came to this country with his 
father's family in 1849, an< ^ nas since that time lived in Hartford. 
He was early in the employ of Abraham Rose, the newsdealer, but 
attended school at the South School and at the Hartford Public 
High School, relinquishing his studies in the latter institution 
on account of trouble with his eyes. He then entered the em- 
ploy of A. L. Simmons, a marketman near the Main Street 
bridge, and continued until 1861, when the grocery firm of Har- 
bison Brothers was formed, Hugh Harbison being the partner. 
After continuing for twenty years, the firm sold out. and Mayor 
Harbison entered the real estate business and paid some atten- 
tion to brick making. He was afterwards general agent for 
the New York Life Insurance Company, and maintains his con- 
nection with that company at the present time. He was alder- 
man for four years, and during the mayoralty of Henry C. Rob- 
inson was president of the board and often presided over the 
deliberations of the police board at that time. He was after- 
wards a member of the Board of Councilmen, and was president 
of that board for two years. He has been a member of the Re- 
publican State Central Committee for fifteen years and of the town 
and ward committees for twenty vears. He made the run tor 




HOTO. BY STUART 



POLICE DEPARTMENT IN 1868. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 139 

state senator in 1876 against Charles M. Pond, but was defeated. 
He was candidate for mayor in 1876 against the late Joseph H. 
Sprague, William J. Hamersley running as an independent citi- 
zens' candidate. Sprague was elected. He was again candi- 
date for mayor in 1896, but was defeated by Mayor Preston. 
In 1900 he was for the third time candidate for mayor on the 
Republican ticket, and was elected by the majority of 3.157. 
being the first mayor to carry every ward in the city. 

Mayor Harbison is particularly well known among the har- 
ness racing men of the country, and was secretary and after- 
wards president of the Charter Oak Park Association, and has 
started horses at the races at that park for fourteen years. He 
has also started horses on all the tracks from Maine to Kentucky, 
and has been a member of the committee on rules of the Na- 
tional Trotting Association. It is doubtful if any citizen of 
Hartford is so widely known or has more personal friends in 
various parts of the country. His acquaintance with all classes 
of people in Hartford is something remarkable. 

THOMAS A. SMITH. 

The senior member of the police commission is Thomas A. 
Smith, whose appointment was made in April, 1896, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the election of Commissioner Miles B. Pres- 
ton to the mayoralty, his appointment having been made by that 
gentleman. Mr. Smith served for the first two or three years 
on the commission as auditor of accounts, but during the later 
vears of his service has been on the committee of building and 
supplies, the immense amount of detail that naturally comes 
into the bu>iness of the department going through his hands, 
lie was a member of the board of councilmen in [880 and 1886 
and served in that capacity well. His length of service has made 
him unusually familiar with the workings of the department, and 
his knowledge of police matters in general is second to that of 




(r* V~« 











If, 




HOTO. Br STU 



POLICE DEPARTMENT IN 1886. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 141 

no man outside of the actual working force. Commissioner 
Smith is a native of Hartford, educated in the city schools, and 
has been in business for many years just north of the bridge on 
Main Street. He is of the wholesale and retail butter and egg 
house of Kingsley & Smith, and is a progressive, active man of 
modern ideas and greatly interested in all matters pertaining to 
the municipal government. 

JAMES J. QUI XX. 

James J. Ouinn is the only representative of the legal pro- 
fession on the present board of police commissioners. He is a 
Democrat in politics. Commissioner Ouinn was born in Hart- 
ford in 1865. He attended the public schools of the city, and in 
1887 was graduated from St. John's College, Fordham. He then 
entered upon the study of law and was admitted to the Hartford 
county bar in 1891. The same year he was appointed clerk of 
the City Court and held the ofhee continuously until 1899. He 
has frequently declined nominations for political office, pre- 
ferring to devote his time fully to the practice of his profession. 
Commissioner Quinn was appointed a member of the board for 
three years by Mayor Preston in 1899. ^ s a member of the 
board's committee on rules and discipline he has rendered the 
city valuable service. He was instrumental in establishing civil 
service examinations as requisite to promotions on the force, and 
lie has always favored the adoption of the most modern stand- 
ards and progressive measures in the handling of the department. 
Commissioner Ouinn is a prominent member of the Order of 
Elks, the Knights of Columbus, Knights of Pythias, Ancient 
Order of Hibernian>, and Order of Foresters. 

[SIDORE WISE. 

Isidore Wise, acting president of the police commission, was 
appointed by Mayor Preston in April, 1899, to fill out an un- 
expired term, and has been an important member of the board. 



i4 2 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 

He is on the building and supplies committee, and headed the 
special committee for the purchase of the electric patrol wagon. 
Mr. Wise was born in this city, November 19, 1865, and was 
educated in the public schools. He entered the dry goods bus- 
iness as cash boy, and has worked himself up to the senior and 
managing partnership of the well-known department house of 
Wise, Smith & Company. He began business in the Cheney 
building, under the firm name of I. Wise & Company, but his 
success warranted the building of a special store for his largely 
increased business. Mr. Wise has been interested in politics 
locally, in state, and in national matters. He served two terms 
in the board of councilmen from the old Seventh ward, and was 
alderman from the old Seventh and the new Third, having im- 
portant committees. He has been thrice delegate to Repub- 
lican state conventions, and was an alternate to the National 
Republican convention in 1900 which nominated McKinley and 
Roosevelt. He is a member of Lafayette Lodge, A. F. and A. 
M., of Pythagoras Chapter, R. A. M., of B. H. Webb Council, 
Royal Arcanum, and trustee of the Congregation Beth Israel 
on Charter Oak Avenue. Commissioner Wise is a hard-work- 
ing, painstaking official who believes that success in public af- 
fairs consists in conducting public business in the same manner 
as private affairs are conducted, economically and at the same 
time progressively. 

EDWARD MAHL. 

Edward Mahl, appointed police commissioner on the Repub- 
lican side by Mayor Harbison for two years, to fill the unexpired 
term of Commissioner Whaples, resigned, is a man whose en- 
ergy and trained capacity for business had already accomplished 
much for the welfare of the city. He served eight years as coun- 
cilman from the old First and Seventh Wards, and was president 
of the lower board one year. In t8<;8 he was elected alderman 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 143 

from the Seventh Ward and served for two years. Both as 
councilman and alderman he was a working- member of various 
important committees, and it is safe to assume that few men 
possess a more thorough practical knowledge of matters per- 
taining to the government of the city. Commissioner Mahl is 
one of the most prominent Masons in Connecticut, lie is past 
master of St. John's Lodge, No. 4, F. and A. M.; past eminent 
commander of Washington Commandery, No. 1, K. T., and most 
excellent master of Hartford Council, Princes of Jerusalem, 
Scottish Rite .Masons. Cojmmissioner Mahl is a native of Nor- 
wich, Conn., and one of six brothers, all of whom are held in 
high esteem as business men and citizens. 

CHARLES G. HUNTINGTON. 

Charles G. Huntington was born in Hartford. After grad- 
uating from the Public High School he found employment in the 
office of the Connecticut River Banking Company, subsequent!) 
becoming bookkeeper. In 1898 he entered the employ of the 
Pope Manufacturing Company and is now superintendent of ad- 
vertising for the Columbia sales department of the American 
Bicycle Company. He has never held any elective political 
office, but has always devoted a good deal of attention to matter 1 
of public concern, and especially to such as pertain to the public 
schools. From [894 to i8<j7 he was chairman of the Northwest 
school district committee, and during his administration the 
school was changed from a semi-country school to a thoroughly 
graded school and provided with every convenience found in 
the larger schools of the city. In [899, having changed his resi- 
dence to the south end. he was chosen a member of the South 
school district committee. In mjoo he was appointed a police 
commissioner for three wars by Mayor Harbison. Mr. Hunt- 
ington is a Democrat in politics. Two years ago lie was a candi- 
date for alderman from the Seventh Ward and came within a few 




-lOTO. BY STUART. 

J. E. PALMER. 

C. L. RAMSDEN. 

ED. F. O'BRIEN. Captain GEO. F. BILL. J. F. SULLIVAN. 



Amusement Committee of the Hartford Police Mutual Aid Association. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . M5 

votes of election, although the Seventh is considered one of the 
Republican strongholds of the city. He is a member of Hart- 
ford Lodge. No. 88, F. and A. M. 

THEODORE NEWTON. 

Theodore Newton, whose three-years term as police commis- 
sioner dates from April i, 1900, is a native of Colchester, Vt. He 
came to Hartford as a young man in 1863 and soon established 
himself as a builder. During the last thirty years he has prob- 
ably erected as many dwellings and business blocks in this city 
as any other man in his line of business. His son, Burt L. 
Newton, a member of the board of school visitors, is associated 
with him under the firm name of Theodore Newton & Co. Mr. 
Newton served one term as a Republican councilman from the 
old First Ward, but has never been an aspirant for political 
honors. He has, however, always evinced an active interest in 
public affairs, and his advice and counsel have been frequently 
sought by those holding civic positions of responsibility and 
trust. The action of Mayor Harbison in appointing him a mem- 
ber of the police board met with widespread and cordial approval 
entirely irrespective of partisan political considerations. Com- 
missioner Newton is a member of several Masonic bodies, in- 
cluding Washington Commandery, K. T. 



!.') 



146 Histoiy of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

CHAPTER XXVI. 
CHIEF OF POLICE GEORGE F. BILL. 

Early in the Service — Veteran of the First Heavy Artillery — Holds a 
Commission for Gallant Conduct, Signed by Abraham Lincoln — 
Many Years Captain of Police — Detective with a Wide Knowledge 
of the Criminal Profession. 

On kf of Police George F. Bill came to Hartford a young man 
in 1852 and entered the employ of Hunt &: Holbrook, shoe 
manufacturers, and was interested in the old volunteer fire de- 
partment soon after being here, having joined the old Neptune 
Engine Company and serving in that company from 1854 to 
1 861. On the Monday morning following the attack on Fort 
Sumter he enlisted for service, forming a company of light artil- 
lery. This command, for some reason, was not accepted by the 
government, and with those of the company who wished to fol- 
low him he began the formation of an infantry regiment to be 
known as Colt's Regiment, and encamped on Colt's Meadow. 
This in turn was not accepted, and he joined the Fifth Connec- 
ticut Volunteers, and was encamped on the old Campfield where 
the Stedman monument now stands, until the regiment entered 
the service, ( )ctober, 1861. In 1862 he resigned his commis- 
sion as first lieutenant and re-enlisted in the First Connecticut 
Heavy Artillery Regiment, which became the most famous of 
all the artillery volunteer regiments in the service, serving in 
the most critical junctures of the war with marvelous ability, its 
marksmen being equal to any big gun handlers in the world at 
that time. He remained in this command until the close of the 
war, holding a commission as first lieutenant. He was brevetted 
captain by President Abraham Lincoln, the commission setting 
forth that the honor was conferred for " gallant and meritorious 
services in the defense of Petersburg." The commission was 
signed by Mr. Lincoln, and is one of the most cherished treas- 
ure's the chief lias in his possession. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 147 

Captain Bill returned to the city at the close of his service 
with the First Heavies, and again entered the employ of Hunt 
& Holbrook. He was appointed policeman. July, 1867, and 
served first as patrolman, then as roundsman, in which latter 
position he performed duties similar to those of the sergeants 
of tlie force at the present time. He then was appointed detec- 
tive, and for some years was successful in this most difficult 
work. He obtained a wide knowledge of crooks who were 
often in the city during race week or on occasions of public 
gatherings, and was connected with a great many of the noted 
cases that have been under the jurisdiction of the Hartford po- 
lice. He was appointed captain in 1873, an< l during his term of 
service in that capacity was in charge of the ruins of the Park 
Central Hotel, February ]8. 1888, until the last of the twenty- 
three bodies were taken from the wreck and no further sign- of 
fatality were found. This service was most arduous, in a storm 
of rain and snow, with conditions that were most harrowing. 

He was appointed chief of police November 6, 1893, an< l nas 
since filled the office with dignity and ability: The force under 
his direction has good discipline, and the city has been com- 
paratively free from professional criminals. It has become a 
proverb with the '* talent '" that to come to Hartford is to invite 
arrest, and many well-known criminals have been rounded up 
in this city under Chief Bill's direction. lie is a shrewd judge 
of human nature, and has an intuitive sense which enables him 
to circumvent violators of the law before they know it. 

As an executive officer he has fine control of the men under 
him. and the routine of the office is as smooth in its workings 
as that of any first-class establishment in the country. He is 
prorrjpt and efficient in the service of the city, and personally 
receives hundreds of complaints each week which he cause- to 
be investigated to the foundation. The unwritten and unre- 
corded service of the chief of police is even more important 
than the service which finds its way into the public press. 



148 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 



CHAPTER XXVII. 

OFFICERS OF THE FORCE. 

Group of Experienced Men in Charge of the Workings of the Force — 
Long Service on the Force and Faithful to Duty — Good Executive 

Ability. 

The police force has been extremely fortunate in its minor 
officers, as well as in the ability of its principal chiefs. The 
men who are now connected with it as officers have had long 
experience in the actual work of the patrolmen, in detective 
service, and in all the many duties that pertain to an officer of 
the public peace which call for judgment, patience, and courage. 

CAPTAIN CORNELIUS RYAN. 

Captain Cornelius Ryan is the oldest officer on the force, his 
commission dating October 3, 1861. He will be entitled to wear 
eight service stripes on his sleeve the coming October, showing 
forty years of continuous service on the police force of Hartford, 
a record of which any man might well be proud. Captain Ryan 
came to this city in 1849, an( l was employed at the well-known 
foundry of Woodruff & Beach on Commerce Street. After 
twelve years in that foundry he joined the police force and has 
been in actual service since. He has been connected with 
many important cases, and in the early days of the force was 
often in the midst of serious trouble maintaining order, the 
rougher element not having been trained to respect an officer 
of the peace as it docs now. Some account of his experiences 
will be found in other pages of this sketch of the police which 
will be well worth reading. He was commissioned lieutenant 
in 1873, and on the accession of Chief Bill to the head 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 149 

of the force became captain. His hours of duty are from 
4 in the afternoon until 12 at night, and he attends to his duties 
with all the earnestness and vigor of a much younger man. Per- 
sonally, Captain Ryan is one of the best-natured of men, over- 
flowing with humor and reminiscence. He is a closely-built, 
wiry man and in his prime was a hard one for the toughs to 
handle, as many of them learned. He has a wide acquaintance 
with police officials in many parts of the country. 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM F. GUNN. 

Lieutenant William F. Gunn entered the police service 
February 16, 1886. and early proved himself a capable and con- 
scientious officer. When the efficiency of the force was added 
to by the establishment of the office of sergeant lie was one of 
the original four to receive the honor. The duties of the ser- 
geants in the Hartford force are somewhat different from those 
of the larger police forces in the country, where they are largely 
deskmen in precincts. Here they perform the duties of rounds- 
men and attend to many other duties beside. ( )n the advance- 
ment of Captain George F. Kill to be chief. Sergeant Gunn was 
promoted to the lieutenancy of the force and has proven to be 
an excellent officer. He has charge of the force from midnight 
until the chief returns to duty in the morning, and frequently 
has the most trying duties to perform. He is a quiet and un- 
assuming man, who attends strictly to business, and while his 
work is almost wholly during the hours while the city sleeps it 
is of the first importance. His commission dates November 3, 
1893. 

When Lieutenant Gunn was a patrolman on duty in Asylum 
Street, some years ago, he discovered a man breaking into one 
of the stores, and came down upon him and took him in. He 
proved to have as fine a set of burglar's tools as one need to 
carry, and a singular fact about the whole matter was that he was 



1 50 History of Police Department , Hartford, Connecticut . 

laughing at the arrest as though it was a good joke. It was 
afterwards ascertained that he was a detective in the employ of 
the Pinkertons, working on a murder case in Bristol, and had 
got some cine to his man, which he was working out under the 
guise of a professional burglar. 

Til E SERGEANTS. 

When sergeants were added to the force there were only 
four, hut during the present season the Common Council has 




TO. BY STUAHT 



AUTOMATIC POLICE GUN. 

made provision for six, and there are also two acting sergeants, 
and they are all kept busy in the lines of their duty. 

SERGEANT CARTER. 

Sergeant James P. Carter is the ranking member of these 
officers, his commission dating August, 1892. He entered 
the service August 5, 1889, and has proved himself an intelli- 
gent and reliable officer, having the esteem of the community, 
lie is a remarkably modest and quiet man, but knows his duties 
thorouehlv and attends to them well. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 151 

SERGEANT SMITH. 

Sergeant Walter \Y. Smith's commission as patrolman dates 
November 4. 1871. and for many years he was one of the best- 
known officers of the force. He was commissioned sergeant 
November 6. [893, and was soon after detailed as detective 
sergeant, and in that capacity has had a great deal to do with 
many important cases entrusted to his care, as may be noted 
by reference to other parts of this historical sketch. He is 
painstaking and persistent, and has a great deal of native 
shrewdness to aid him in his pecnliar work. 

SERGEANT UMBERFIEEI >. 

Sergeant Burton L. L niberfield began duty as a patrolman 
May 20. 1889. and for some time prior to his appointment as 
sergeant was deskman at police headquarters during the day 
hours. His commission as sergeant dates July 27, 1897. 
He is well known, and is an excellent officer, going about his 
business in a straightforward, unassuming manner. 

SERGEANT BUTLER. 

Sergeant John F. I'mtler entered the service April 19, 1893, 
as a patrolman, and was for some time on the State Street beat, 
where he became familiar with some of the hard life of the city. 
He was made acting sergeant some time before his commission 
was given him. He is one of the largest men on the force, finely 
proportioned, and has an enviable reputation for courage and 
downright pluck. He is often at the head of the police platoon 
on parade days. His commission dates May 8, 1900. 

SERGEANT CREEDON. 

Sergeant John Creedon began service as patrolman January 
16, 1893, and for a few months prior to his appointment as 
sergeant was acting sergeant. His commission as sergeant was 
issued Febrnary 7. 1901. and was the first to be issued nnder the 
civil service examination adopted by the police commission. 



152 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

SERGEANT FINLEY. 

Sergeant Patrick J. Finley was a patrolman May 20, 1889, 
and served as such until he was appointed sergeant by the com- 
mission, February 7, 1901, under the civil service examination 
and entered upon his duties immediately. 

SERGEANT FARRELL. 

Garrett J. Farrell was appointed detective sergeant March 
11. [901. He has been on the force since 1893. anc ^ early in 




ELECTRIC POLICE PATROL. 



his career as a patrolman evidenced ability in the line of detec- 
tive work, and for some years previous to his appointment as 
sergeant had been detailed on detective work. He has had a 
fine experience in the- work for so young a man. and his daily 
duty requires an amount of shrewdness and knowledge of hu- 
man nature that is not alwavs easy to find in an officer. 



History of Police Depart men t, Hartford, Connecticut. 155 

ACTING SERGEANTS. 

Theodore Dietrich was appointed acting sergeant February 
7, 1901. His commission as patrolman dates November 6, 1893. 
He has been an east side officer and is thoroughly familiar with 
that locality, and has been called upon to do much detective 
work. He is a trusted man in important matters, and is reck- 
oned as a good officer, thoroughly competent and reliable. 

Mitchell ( ). Liebert was appointed acting sergeant February 
7, 190 1. His commission as patrolman dates from January 14, 
1897. He has shown himself to be an exceptionally intelligent 
officer, and his promotion to acting sergeant was under the civil 
service examination rules that have been recently adopted by 
the commission. 

COURT OFFICER TINKER. 

Herbert E. Tinker, the court officer, entered the service as 
patrolman, August 25, 1873, an< ^ f° r eleven years was the offi- 
cer on the City Hall Square beat, and consequently is very well 
known. He has been for several years detailed as court officer, 
and his duties are the care of the prison during the day, the pres- 
entation of the prisoners before the Police Court at its sessions, 
and the supervision of the transportation of prisoners from the 
police station to the jail, accompanying the '* Black Maria " to 
the jail with the necessary commitment papers. He has charge 
of the prisoners who are sentenced to pay fines, and sees to 
their discharge after the fines are paid, and looks out that they 
are not free prematurely. He keeps the record of the court for 
the police department. Officer Tinker served in the First Min- 
nesota Volunteers during the war for the Union, and prior to 
his coming upon the police force was night clerk at the United 
States Hotel. His duties are very exacting and oftentimes 
trvintr in their nature. 



154 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 



CHAPTER XXVIII. 

ROSTER OF THE FORCE. 

Officer Strickland Bears the Oldest Commission as a Patrolman — Some 
of the Well-Known Patrolmen. 

Hartford has reason to be proud of its police force. It is 
made up of men selected for their intelligence and physical con- 







POLICE PATROL. 



dition, and their tenure of office is so fixed that they become 
thoroughly familiar with the city, its people, and its needs for 
protection. This policy brings the force up to a very high 
average of excellence, and Hartford is a city of good order. 
While it is often the fashion to complain of all public institu- 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 155 

tions, that being the privilege of all citizens, those who com- 
plain of the police have, as a rule, small idea of the great under- 
taking of handling a large force of men, who in turn care for 
the peace of the city. If all men were peaceful and law-abiding 
there would be no need of any police at all, but they are not, 
and the perplexing circumstances that often surround a patrol- 
man in his duty cannot be appreciated by the average citizen. 
A day and a night in the police office and a day and a night on 
an east side beat, passed in observation of the actual workings 
of the establishment and its individual officers, would be a reve- 
lation to those who complain. 

This sketch of the force is intended as a general description 
of its workings, and it has been impossible to even point out 
the individual efforts of the members of the force. Life is too 
short to tell so long a story as it would make. It is sufficient 
to say that the men are conscientious in their work, and that 
results prove this assertion. 

It is fitting, however, without discriminating in any way, to 
make a few allusions. 

The oldest patrolman's commission is held by ( )fficer George 
E. Strickland, who has served thirty years on the force, having 
been commissioned as supernumerary in 1870, and promoted 
to the regular force in 1 87 1 . He is an army veteran, and fol- 
lowed Sherman in the march to the sea. He had his struggles 
with the toughs of those days of the early force, and in recent 
years has been known as a guardian of Bushnell Park, where he 
has for some time been a great favorite of the children. He is 
at desk work in the office just now. His reminiscences are al- 
ways enjoyable. 

Some of the patrolmen are as well known by public appear- 
ances in other fields of endeavor. Officer Steele is drum major 
of the First Regiment Band (Colt's), Frjftik Heise is one of the 
best trombone players in New England, and is frequently heard 



1 56 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

with pleasure. His brother George is also a musician and a 
band man. The two bear a striking- resemblance to each other. 
The Sullivan brothers. John and Peter, are so often mistaken 
for each other that they are frequently identified by citizens 
only by the numbers of their shields. ( )fficer ( \. Herbert Peck 
is the heaviest man on the force. ( )fficer Ahearn is the tallest 
man of the force. Officer Felix Quinn has for some vears been 
identified with the east side, and is mighty well known to many 
of its residents. Supernumeraries Edward W. Haves and Ed- 
ward F. O'Brien are drivers of the patrol wagon, and will soon 
be installed on the seat of the new automobile that is to substi- 
tute the horse and wagon patrol. The full list of all members 
of the force, with the date of their appointment, follows: 

Chief of Police, George F. Bill, December 25, 1867. 

Captain, Cornelius Ryan. October 3, 1861. 

Lieutenant, William F. Gunn. February 16, 1886. 

Sergeant, James P. Carter, August 5. 1889. 

Sergeant, Walter W. Smith. November 4. 1871. 

Sergeant, Burton L. Umberfield, May 20, 1889. 

Sergeant, John F. Butler, April 19. 1893. 

Sergeant, John Creedon, January 16, 1893. 

Sergeant, Patrick J. Finley, May 20. 1889. 

Acting Sergeant. Theodore Dietrich, November 6, [893. 

Acting Sergeant. Mitchell ( ). Liebert. January 14. 1897. 

PATROLMEN". 

George E. Strickland, November 4. 1871. 
William E. Tucker, December 4. 1871. 
William L. Steele, December 4, 1871. 
James Maloney, June 4, 1872. 
Michael Gavin, November 11. 1872. 
William H. Harris. April 9, 1873. 
Herbert E. Tinker, August 25. 1873. 
Edwin Johnson, September 4, 1876. 
Mat hew Pagan, March [, 1876. 
Justin ( Goodwill, July 4. 1881. 
Patrick Mahonev. November II, 1881. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 157 

George P. Harvey. November 16, 188 1. 
Keren Malloy, November 16, 1881. 
Charles H. Lloyd, June [9, 1882. 
Thomas McCue, November 10, 1884. 
Michael Gaffey, March 15. 1886. 
Charles A. Schiller. May 20, L889. 
William Tobin, May 20, 1889. 
John O'Malley, May 20. 1889. 
Albert M. Case. May 22. 1889. 
James F. Lally, August 5. 1889. 
John E. Palmer. December 22. 1889. 
Felix Quinn, April 13, 1891. 
John F. Sullivan. July 2S>, 1892. 
Edward J. Langrish, July 28. 1892. 
Charles E. Ramsden. July 28. 1892. 
Peter A. Sullivan, January 7, 1893. 
( ieorge E. Heise, January 7, 1893. 
Mark Grady. January 7, 1893. 
W. W. Whitehead, January 16. 1893. 
I'M ward Beecher. January 16, 1893. 
Charles E. Russell. February 18, 1803. 
James J. Noonan, April [9, 1893. 
Benjamin G. Schulze, April 19. 1893. 
John O'Sullivan, April 19. 1893. 
Garrett J. Farrell, June 6, 1893. 
Frank Santoro, November 6, 1893. 
Frank P. Geary. November 6. 1893. 
Charles Mantie, November 6, 1893. 
John T. McDermott, November 6, 18^3. 
James Dunn. November 6. 1893. 
Edward J. Dillon, November 6, 1893. 
Homer A. Hogaboom, November 6. 1893. 
John Flannery, March 6. [894. 
Arthur McLeod, March 6, [894. 
lames J. Hennessey, March 6, 181)4. 
William O. Brown, March 6, 1894. 
G. Herbert Peck, March 13, 1894. 
John J. Burns, September 17, 1894. 
James F. Havens. September 17. iS .1. 



158 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

Terrence \V. Brazel, October 15, 1894. 
William II. Marshall, February 18, 1895. 
John T. Fagan, October 21, 1895. 
Frank A. Heise, January 14, 1897. 
John Sheehan. January 14, 1897. 
John P. Flynn, January 14, 1897. 
Stanley J. Riley, January 14. 1897. 
William Weltner, January 14, 1897. 
William Florence, January 14, 1897. 
Thomas J. Gunning", January 14, 1897. 
James Morgan, January 14, 1897. 
Edward H. Costello, January 14, 1807. 
Edward T. Losty, January 14, 1897. 
Patrick Doran, January 14, 1897. 
Edward English, January 14, [897. 
Edward J. Farrell, January 14, 1897. 
John E. O'Brien, January 14, 1897. 
Thomas J. Pillion, January 14, 1897. 
James J. Flynn, January 14, 1897. 
Michael Finley, February 7, 1898. 
Thomas J. Elwood, February 7, 1898. 
Daniel T. Malloy, February 7, [898. 
Frank S. Young, February 7. [898. 
Frank H. Trask, February 7, 1898. 
Sprague W. Edwards, February 7, [898. 
Joseph (iraff, February 7, 1898. 
William J. Redmund, February 7. 1898. 
Andrew J. Williams, February 7, i8(j8. 
Charles F. Nichols. December 4. [898. 
James 1'. Moran, October 2, 1800. 
John Flannagan, October 15. kjoo. 
J. A. Callahan, April 2. 1 901. 
M. J. Dooley. April 2, 190 1. 

D. B. Ahern, April 2, 1901. 
W. M. Dower, April 2, 1901. 
L. (i. Melberger, April 2, T901. 
John M. Henry, April 2, 1901. 

E. F. Babcock, April 2, 1901. 
H. L. Hart, April 2, [901. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 1 59 



SUPERNUMERARIES. 



Edward F. O'Brien, 
Arthur H. Torrey, 
John C. Bogue, 
Judson Dunlap, 
John E. Borgeson, 
John J. Jordan, 
Charles H. Brooks, 
George H. Sterzing, 
William J. Moran, 
James M. Connolly, 
Arthur Pruning, 
John H. Watson. 
Antonio Notine, 
Daniel M. Keleher, 
John W. McGrath, 
Edward J. Relihan. 
Patrick Sheehan, 
John P. Duffy. 
Samuel G. Adams. 
Joseph W. Rogers. 
William J. Pendergast, 
William Luckingham, 
Martin P. Leany. 
James Riley. 
William E. Hogan, 
John Ff. Hurley. 
George W. Butler. 
Axel L. Carlson. 
James H. Vail. 
James A. Corrigan. 
Seymour E. Hilton. 
Edward W. Hayes, 
James J. Powers. 
Michael D. Connors. 
William J. Sullivan, 
James W. Allen, 
William T. Meany, 
Louis F. Hogan, 
Albert L. Thomas. 
Frank T. Cowley, 
Lawrence J. Lowe. 
John J. Butler, 
Daniel P. Broderick, 



Robert L. Myer, 
James M. Francis, 
Olaf Mathewson, 
John L. Dorsey, 
Patrick J. White. 
T. Charles Tredeau, 
John M. Sayres, 
Fred. S. Kendall. 
J. W. Miller. 
John M. O'Malley, 
Timothy Killiard, 
Herbert A. Quintard, 
James A. Shea, 
John R. Murphy. 
George K. Marvin, 
Charles P. Flynn. 
James H. O'Mara, 
Patrick J. Mannix, 
John J. Malone, 
Mark Keefe, 
Otto E. Frost. 
William H. A. Conlon, 
Patrick J. McCarthy, 
Otto M. Martin. 
George M. Hetzell. 
Lawrence P. Lacey, 
Simon Freund, 
Patrick F. McKee. 
James L. Roper, 
Patrick Moynahan, 
Harvey C. Bacon. 
Patrick M. Quinn, 
James A. Tracy. 
James J. Tiley, 
George M. Cadwell, 
James PL Clarkin. 
Jacob I. Beizer, 
James T. Heffernan. 
Thomas Nagle. 
John F. Roach. 
Morris C. Foley. 
Charles F. KoeniL r . 



i6o History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 



CHAPTER XXIX. 
POLICE MUTUAL AID ASSOCIATION. 

Successful Voluntary Organization for Relief of Policemen's Families — 
Has Distributed $8,800 to Widows and Orphans — Sources of its 
Income. 

The Hartford Police Mutual Aid Association is one of the 
important humanitarian accessories of the police department. 
It gathers together, by dues, by entertainments, and by the an- 
nual ball given in the large drill hall of the police building, funds 
to be distributed at its annual meeting to the widows and or- 
phans of deceased policemen. Nearly all of the members of 
the force belong to the association, and each member is assessed 
at $6 annually for the first three years of his membership, and 
$4 annually thereafter. By this means and by such means as 
have been outlined above the fund has reached the comfortable 
sum of nearly $12,000 now on hand in addition to $8,800 already 
distributed to its beneficiaries. ( )ccasionally the association 
receives contributions from citizens who are interested in the 
police or who have been personally benefited by its protection, 
such as caring for houses during the summer vacation and ren- 
dering other service in the line of police duty. 

The association was organized April 1, 1880, with absolutely 
nothing in the way of funds but prospects. The officers were: 
Walter P. Chamberlain, then chief of police, president; Frank 
L. Martin, vice-president; Cornelius Ryan, treasurer, a post 
which he has continuously occupied; George F. Bill, secretary. 

The present officers are: President, Chief of Police George F. 
Bill; treasurer. Captain Cornelius Ryan; secretary, Herbert E. 



History of Polite Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 161 

Tinker: trustees, Sergeant Walter \V. Smith, Sergeant [ohn 
Creedon, Thomas McCue, James I". Lally, Edward F. O'Brien, 
William Weltner, I reorge P. Harvey, Charles L. Ramsden, and 
Edward Beecher. 

One of the brilliant events connected with the history of 

this association was the dedication ball given April 3, 1899, when 
the great hall of the new department building was open to the 
general public for the first time, and the entire police building 
was overflowing with the friends of the police and of the asso- 
ciation. The occasion was one long to be remembered. Mayor 
I'reston. with the members of the citv government, members 
of all the commissions, and many of the prominent citizens of 
Hartford were present with their ladies, and the social char- 
acter of the occasion, the general good will of the brilliant as- 
sembly, and. not the least, the hue addition to the treasury of 
the association, made the event one of the most notable happen- 
ings in the annals of the police department. 



11 



i62 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 



CHAPTER XXX. 

The Police Court — It had an Existence Ten Years Before the Police 
Department was Organized — List of Judges — Present Judge. 
Albert C. Bill. 

I iii''. Police Court is an independent organization, upon its 
own basis, and not in any way connected with the police depart- 
ment, except that it must naturally be in the- closest possible- touch 




POLICE AMBULANCE. 

with it. it was organized in 1S51, nearly ten years before the 
( niiiiiiiiii Council established the police ordinance and took cog- 
nizance ot all cases brought before it by the old watch or by 
constables that arrested persons for crimes or misdemeanors. 

I he court is a state organization, and the judge is appointed 
b\ the legislature after nomination by the county representatives. 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 163 

It has no cognizance of any civil cases whatever, and its juris- 
diction of action in cases of theft is limited by the amount of 
property taken, having no jurisdiction above S50. Crimes upon 
the person are taken cognizance of. but jurisdiction is only for 
minor crimes. The court may hold for the Superior Court any 
person over whose alleged crime it has no jurisdiction. 

The judges of the Hartford Police Court have been able men, 
many of them having gone into positions of greater and wider 
usefulness, but of scarcely more responsibility. The first judge 
of the court was Eliphalet A. Bulkeley, many years a leading 
citizen of Hartford, founder of the --Etna Life fnsurance Com- 
pany, and father of ex-Governor Morgan G. Bulkeley, General 
William 11. Bulkeley, and Mrs. Leverett Brainard, all holding 
large places in the affections of the people of the city. 

Other judges of the court, and something about them, are 
given in the following paragraphs : 

Goodwin Collier, who served as judge from 1855 to 1859 
with interims, was one of the best-known lawyers of the time, 
and it was to his discernment of the needs of the city that the 
Common Council owed its consideration of the police ordinance, 
lie drafted the first ordinance, as has been stated heretofore, and 
in connection with other suggestions incorporated it became 
the foundation for the service. 

Elisha Johnson was judge in 1 86 1 and 1S63 and served with 
great acceptance. Judge Johnson is still remembered by many 
ol the younger generation of the city as a man of tall, com- 
manding figure, and he was for a long time a force in the 
affairs of the city, although he held no public office except to 
serve as councilman during two terms. 

Samuel F. Jones was judge in 1866, and is one of the best- 
remembered criminal lawyers in this section of the country. 
He was connected with more famous cases than any man of his 
time. He died but a few years aero. 



164 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 

Monroe E. Merrill held the office of judge in 1867, 1868, 1869, 
[870, and [876, and was a man universally respected. 

Harrison \'>. Freeman was the first judge of the court after 
the two-years term was established, and served in 1871-1873. 
He is a well-known lawyer and a man of public affairs, a grad- 




PHOTO. BV STUAR 



BLACK MARIA. 



nate ot Yale, and lor many years lias been judge of probate for 
this district, a most responsible place. 

Art Inn- F. Eggleston served four years as judge of the Po- 
lice Court, from 1877 until [883. Me is a lawyer of splendid 
abilities and tine reputation, and has been for main years state's 
attorney Eor Hartford county. The criminal class has a whole- 
some dread of his searching and critical examination of the 
charges against it, and the court terms an' materially shortened 



History of Police Department , Hartford, Connecticut. 165 

by the fact that prisoners had rather plead guilty than stand an 
open trial under his tremendously energetic prosecution. Not- 
withstanding his apparent severity he is one of the kindest- 
hearted of men. a true friend, and a man whose acquaintance is 
well worth the having. 

William F. Henney served as judge from 1883 to 1889. and 
his scholarly abilities added lustre to the Police Court bench. 
It was his fortune to have some unusually remarkable cases be- 
fore him, and his opinions as handed down from the bench were 
strong- documents. Judge Henney afterwards served as city 
attorney, and is a well-known lawyer, interested in corporation 
practice. 

William J. McConville was on the Police Court bench from 
1890 to 1893. He had previously been through the clerkships 
of the legislature, and since his term as judge expired he has 
been city attorney and interested in municipal affairs. He is 
one of the best known of public officials, and his opinion has 
been called for in innumerable cases as to the construction of 
ordinances and acts. He has the esteem of those associated 
with him in the business of the city and has hosts of friends. 

Svlvester Barbour was judge of the court for one term, cov- 
ering the years from 1893 to 1895. He is one of the well-known 
old-time lawyers of the city, and was esteemed as a conscientious 
judge. 

JUDGE ALBERT C. BILL. 

Albert C. Bill, the present judge of the Police Court, is a 
native of Hartford, born September 29, 1863. He early went to 
Enfield with his parents and was educated in the high school of 
that town and the Hartford Public High School. He studied 
law with Judge Charles H. Briscoe of Enfield, and was admitted 
to the bar May 26, 1886. He was appointed clerk of the Pro- 
bate Court January, 1887, and served for two years, when he 
was appointed clerk of the Police Court, serving from July 1. 



1 66 History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut. 

1889, until April 1, 1893. He was then appointed assistant 
judge of the Police Court, and for two years was associated on 
the bench. In April, 1895, he took his seat upon the bench as 
judge and has served three full terms, his fourth term beginning 
April 1, [901. Judge Bill is prominent in Masonic circles, a 
member of Lafayette Lodge, and of the various higher degrees 
of Masonry, and a member of Charter ( )ak Lodge, Odd Fel- 
lows, lie is of the firm of Bill, Tuttle & Dickenson, and enjoys 




PHOTO. BY STUART. 

LOUISA D. HUBBARD, 
Matron. 



a large law practice. He has had many important cases before 
him during his long term on the bench, and has the reputation 
of being just and fair in his decisions. His judicial office is 
conducted with much dignity and lie has brought about many 
reforms by his action upon the bench. Mis treatment of Sunday 
drunkenness and of the railroad tram]) and trespasser has been 
salutary, and the city is no longer overrun with criminals of this 
sort. The position of a police court judge is not an enviable 



History of Police Department, Hartford, Connecticut . 167 

one at the best, but Judge Bill makes of the court a tribunal 
which is thoroughly respected by the people and is a wholesome 
deterrent of the criminal classes. 

The assistant judge of the court is Arthur P. Perkins, who 
is on the bench when Judge Bill is detained by any reason. 
fudge Perkins sees many days of service during the year and 
has his share of the important work of deciding upon the de- 
gree of punishment meted out to offenders. He lias been a 
member of the Common Council, where he was useful to the 
citizens, and is a successful law practitioner of the firm of Per- 
kins cc Perkins, his father, Charles E. Perkins, president of the 
State Par Association, being the head of the firm. 

The clerk of the court is Robert C. Dickenson, who was 
formerly clerk of the Probate Court. He is of Bill, Tuttle cv 
Dickenson, a prosperous law firm having" a large business and 
representing many interests. 

The prosecuting attorney for the Police Court is J. Gilberl 
Calhoun of the younger generation of lawyers in the city, a man 
of much force of character and abundantly able to represent the 
people before this bench. 

The assistant prosecuting attorney is Harrison B. Freeman, 
Jr., one of the best-known young lawyers of the state, a graduate 
of Yale, and now serving his second term as representative in 
the General Assembly from the city of Hartford. He is a mem- 
ber of the judiciary committee and chairman of the important 
House committee on constitutional reform. 

Bennett H. Pepper is the messenger for the Police court, 
and is one of the best-known minor officers in the city. He has 
served in this capacity for main- years, and a session oi the court 
without his presence would be an anomaly. He is an amateur 
florist of much success, and is reckoned as one of the best-posted 
men on the art in the city. 



THE compiler and author of this sketch presents it as a fairly 
comprehensive story of police protection of Hartford from 
its earliest days. Necessarily many things have been omitted, but 
enough is told to give an outline of the growth of the system, of 
the present workings of the force, and some interesting reminis- 
cences of noted cases are given in detail, which may serve to reveal 
the efficiency of the men who have been engaged in preserving the 
public peace. 

For many courtesies the writer is indebted to Judge Thomas 
McManus, of the first board of Police Commissioners, to Chief of 
Police Bill, to Ex-Chief Packard, to many members of the executive 
officers of the force, and to efficient aid in searching records in the 
Connecticut Historical Society's library, in the Halls of Record, and 
the files of the Superior Court. 

The chapter on Police Athletics has been written by W. D. 
Freer, the well known sporting writer of the Hartford Courant staff. 






§ 

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Paris and London Styles 

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Protected against Burglars by Electric System. 

Insured against Moth and Fire. 



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Bicycles. 



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Cbc Columbia Bevel Gear Cbainlcss 

represents the limit of technical and artistic merit in 
the bicycle. Whether used for purposes of pleasure 
or for business, it is always at its best, always lit 
for duty. 

From the beginning 

Columbia Chain CUbccls 

have led in their class, affording the must perfect 
combination of lightness, elegance, strength and 

durability possible to the chain type. 

Our Hartford Bicycles 

are handsome, common-sense wheels that are built 
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Fur those who want reliably guaranteed machines 
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THE COLUMBIA For chainless or chain Columbias, 

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COLUMBIA SALESROOMS, 4:t<> Capitol Are., Hartford. 



W— — «5li5» 



1851 X5he 1901 



phoenix IPuiual 
Cifc Insurance Company 



of fiartford, Conn* 



Issues ENDOWMENT POLICIES to either men or women, 

which (besides giving nine other options) 

Guarantee 

when the Insured is Fifty, Sixty or Seventy Years Old 

To pay $f,500 in Cash for every $1,000 

of Insurance in force. 

Sample policies, rates, and other information will be given on 

application to the Home Office. 



JONATHAN B. BUNCE, President. 

JOHN M. HOLCOMBE, Vice-President. 

Charles h. Lawrence, Secretary. 

WM. A. MOORE, Asst Secretary. 



4± =4fc 




.... Connecticut's Leading SMillinery Establishment .... 

R. Biillcrstcin $ Co. 

Have at all seasons of the year the 
largest and most select line of 

TRIMMED HATS, 

Flowers, Velvets, Ribbons 

and Imported Novelties at most reasonable prices. 



I RAPHAEL BALL 



ERSTEIN. 



CHARLES DILLON. 



H, 



Insure your property in the.... 



artford Fire Insurance Co. A 



of HARTFORD, CONN. 

Has a Capital of One and One-quarter Million 

Dollars. 
Has Total Assets of over Eleven Million Dollars. 
Has a Net Surplus of over Three Million, Five 

Hundred Thousand Dollars. 
Has paid over Sixty-eight Million Dollars in 

Losses. 

GEO. L. CHASE, President. 
C. Royce, Secretary. Thos. Turnbull, Ass't Sec'y. 
Chas. E. Chase Ass't Sec'y. 

SILAS CHAPMAN, Jr., 

Local Agent, 51 Trumbull St.. Hartford. Conn. 




W5L 



Iplfifli 



3,3,9% 



^M~£> 



-Mi 



Jyational Fire Insurance Company, 

of HARTFORD, CONN. 

Capital $1,000,000 Assets $4,851,789.34 



Homer Blanchard, 
William B. Franklin, 
Frank W. Cheney, 
James Nichols, 



DIRECTORS. 

John R. Buck, Chas. H. Briscoe, 

Henry C. Judd. Ralph H. Ensign, 

Francis T. Maxwell. J. M. Allen. 
Byron A. Simmons. Jas. P. Taylor. 



JAMES NICHOLS. President 



R. Stillman, Secretary. 



H. A. SMITH. Assistant Secretary. 



JZ? 



F. F. SMALL (SL CO., Agents, 95 Pearl St. 



Uf>e... 



Lsonnecticut Jnutual 



Life Insurance Company 



1846 ... - 1901 




N the fifty-five years of its work almost 
98 per cent, of the premiums paid by 
policy-holders have been paid over to 
their beneficiaries or returned to them. 
What has been so returned and what is held for 
the protection of present policy-holders as net or 
ledger assets aggregates $263,502,899.67 : 127.57 
per cent, of the total premiums received. 

These results have been accomplished at an 
average expense rate of only 8.9 per cent. 

It is an unmatched record ; and The Connecti- 
cut Mutual is as thoroughly prepared for the good 
work of the future as it has at any time been for 
that of its unequaled past. 



JACOB L. GREENE, "President. 

JOHN M. TAYLOR, Vice-President. 

HERBERT H. WHITE, Secretary. 

DANIEL H. WELLS, Actuary. 



"THE LEADING FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA." 
Statement of the Condition of the 



iCTNA 



INSURANCE 

COMPANY 



Hartford, Conn. 

on the 31st day of December, 1900. 

Cash Capital, $4,000,000.00 

Reserve, Re-Insurance (Fire), . . . 3,329,848.78 

Reserve, Re-Insurance (Inland), . . . 96,349.13 

Reserve, Unpaid Losses (Fire), . . . 352,114.35 

Reserve, Unpaid Losses (Inland),. . . 79,995.55 

Other Claims 189,034.88 

§H.et Surplus, 5,309,951.03 

Total Assets, $13,357,293.72 



SURPLUS as to "Policy Holders, 
LOSSES PAID in Eighty-two Years, 



. $9,309,951.03 

$88,243,132.93 



WM. B. CLARK. President. 

W. H. King, Secretary. E. 0. Weeks. Vice-President. 

A. C. Adams. Henry E. Rees, Assistant Secretaries. 

DICKINSON, BEARDSLEY (SL BEARD5LEY, Local Agents, 
664 Main and 65 Vearl Streets. 



T 



HE TRAVELERS 

Insurance Company j.g.batterson, 
0/ Hartford, Conn. President 



Life, Jlccident and fyaltb Insurance. 



More than 



$42,643,384 



Have been Distributed to POLICY HOLDERS at a Less Cost than by any 
other company in the world. 

EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY POLICIES 

Protecting Owners and Employers against STATUTORY LIABILITY. 
NO ONE CAN AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT THEM. 



ASSETS, .... 

Reserves and all other Liabilities, 
Excess Security to Policy Holders, 



$30,861,030.06 

26,317,903.25 
4,543,126.81 



FRED R. LOYDON, State Agent for Connecticut, HARTFORD, CONN. 



Before yO\l decide what kind of a Life 
Insurance Policy you will take, see a representative of the 



Hartford Life Insurance Company 



Jffi 



. . . ©/ HARTFORD, CONN. 

HIS sterling company issues every desirable form of 
up-to-date policy contract. 

Its Industrial Policies are especially liberal and 
complete. The premiums are collected monthly. 
The policies are in immediate full benefit and vary 
in amounts from $17 to practically $1,000. 



U/ye Hartford has paid m TT ,, , _ „ _ , 

cBuy a. Hartford Life 'Policy and 

$20,000,000 ^ 

you get 2>>6e BEST. 

to policy holders and beneficiaries. 



GEO. E. KEENEY, President. CHAS. H. "BACALL, Secretary. 



\, /* «vX-» -,. ■" '■-_■- -..,y- "-,/■ - . - ' . - - ■[■- --.i^ V "■...- " [.■■* *■.,[.-* --,_ ■- -,.-" -..-■-- --.,-" -\U* -N^ *\1>- *•-[/• - . * ' . ' " , - * 



TDhej& 



Hartford Trust Company 



Organized 1868. 



Capital $300,000 Undivided Profits $191,212.40 

'RALPH W. CUTLER, "President. CHAS. SM. JOSLYN, Vice-President. 

FRANK C. SUMNER, Treasurer. 



Transacts a General Banking Business 

Authorized by Law to act as . . . 

EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRATOR., 
TRUSTEE, GUARDIAN, 

RECEIVER., ASSIGNEE. 



\ j& j& Safe Deposit Boxes to Rent jz? j& 



Connecticut Trust and 
vSafe Deposit Company 

Corner of Main and Pearl Streets 



Capital $500,000 



Surplus $300,000 



BANKING BUSINESS — Conducts a General 
Banking Business. Accounts opened and Deposits re- 
ceived subject to check at sight. Accounts solicited. Also 

SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT The most capacious 
and impregnable in the city. 1.000 safe boxes for rent 
at from $10 to $100 per annum, according to size. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT —Is authorized by its 
charter to act as Trustee for individuals and corporations. 
Executor or Administrator of estates. Guardian of 
minors, etc. 



MEIGS H. WHAPLES, President. 
HENRY S. ROBINSON, Secretary. 



JOHN P. WHEELER, Treasurer. 
HOSMER P. REDFIELD, Ass't Treasurer. 



^ ESTABLISHED in 1822 *' 




ational Assurance 

Company 



. . of IRELAND 



The Premier Irish Company in America 



United States Branch 

GEORGE E. KENDALL,, Manager 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



WEB5TER (SL BAKER, Agents 



721 Main Street 



HARTFORD, CONN. 




rient . . 

Insurance 

Hartford, Conn. Company 



\ 



A. G. McILWAINE, Jr., President 
JAMES WYPER, Secretary 



Scottish Union and 
National Insurance Co. 

of EDINBURGH 



Statement of United States 


Branch 


January 1, lQOl 




Statutory Deposit, .... 


$200,000.00 


Reserve for unpaid losses, 


239,965.58 


Reserve for unexpired risks, 


1,655,789.26 


All other liabilities, .... 


97,267.00 


Net Surplus, ..... 


2,024,054.89 


Total Assets January 1, 1901, . 


4,217,076.73 



Trustees of Funds in United States 

John 9^. ^edfield Le<verett ^rainard cMorgan G. c Bulkeley 

J. H. BREWSTER, Manager 

U/ye Geo. B. Fisher Co., Resident Agents, 197 Jtsylum St. 



93d Semi-Annual Financial Statement of the... 



Pbotnix Insurance Co. 



January I, J 901 
CASH CAPITAL . $3,000,000.00 



of HARTFORD, CONN. 



ASSETS AVAILABLE FOR FIRE LOSSES 



$5,583,494.25 

as follows: 
Cash on Hand, in Bank, and with Agents, 
State Stocks and Bonds, . 

Hartford Bank Stocks 

Miscellaneous Bank Stocks, 

Corporation and Railroad Stocks and Bonds 

County. City, and Water Bonds, 

Real Estate, 

Loans on Collateral, 

Real Estate Loans 

Accumulated Interest and Rents, 



$742,055.45 

11,900.00 

562,878.00 

141 

2,86: 
313. 

508 

9 

84 



,52'i 
,832 
1,900 

.245 
|,000 
.16!) 

,!IS5 



LIABILITIES 
Cash Capital, .... $-2,000,000.00 
Reserve for Outstanding Losses, 253,062.15 
Reserve for Re-Insurance, . 2,087,882.17 
NET SCRPLUS, . . . 1,242,5 4'.!. 1)3 

Total Assets. . $5.5*3.494.-25 



Total Cash Assets. 



$5,583,494.25 



Surplus to Policy-holders, $3,242,549.93 

Total Losses Paid since Organization of 
Company 

S4(>,tJ3(>,289.10 



D. W. C. SKILTON, President 
EDW. MILLIGAN, Secretary 



J* 



J. H. MITCHELL, Vice-President 
JOHN B. KNOX, Ass't Secretary 



LOVE/OY & SPEAR, Managers Western Department, Cincinnati, Ohio 
HERBERT FOLGER, Manager Pacific Department, San Francisco, Cal. 
J. W. TATLEY, Manager Canadian Department, Montreal, Canada 



A. E. Woodford 



H. J. Ripley 



Woodford (Si Ripley 



Brokers 



StocKs, Grain and Provisions 

Correspondents of Municipal Telegraph and Stock Co., Albany, N. Y. 

No. 7 Central Row, Room 2 
Telephone 842-6 HARTFORD, CONN. 



Mortgage Loans 

Repayable Monthly 

*\ x HE Connecticut Building and Loan Association has money to 
loan, in any sums required, upon real estate security, and permits 
return of principal and interest in monthly installments, like rent. 
Death of borrower cancels mortgage obligation. Various rates, 
depending upon age of applicant and term selected. 

"She Connecticut 
Building and Loan Association 

Hartford, Conn. 






► ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦-M 



I First National Bank I 

50 State Street | 

Capital $650,000 Surplus $220,000 



J. H. Knight, President 

W. W. Jacobs, Vice-President 



DIRECTORS 

Thomas Sisson. of T. Sisson & Co.. 
Wholesale Druggists. 

Ward W. Jacobs. Treasurer Mechanics 
Savings Bank. 

Lester L. Ensworth. Iron Merchant. 

Elisha C. Hilliard. Woolen Manufac- 
turer. Buckland. Conn. 

James H. Knight. President. 

Raphael Ballerstein. of R. Ballerstein 
& Co.. Importers Millinery Goods. 

Lucius F. Robinson, of Robinson & 
Robinson, Attorneys at Law. 

Asa S. Cook. President Asa S. Cook Co. 

Francis A. Pratt, of the Pratt & Whit- 
ney Co. 

Rienzi B. Parker, Treasurer Hartford 
Life Insurance Co. 

William B. Clark, President ^tna 
Insurance Co. 

John R. Hills, Contractor and Builder. 

Robert W. Huntington. Jr.. Secretary 
Connecticut General Life Insurance Co. 



♦^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»»»»»»0~»~»~M"»^- 



CD. Riley. Cashier 

W. S. Dwyer. Ass't Cashier 



Accounts Invited 

Every facility given ^Depositors con- 
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banking 



Safe Deposit 
Vaults 

Unsurpassed for security 
and convenience 



tshe jCtna National 
Bank 0/ Hartford 

Capital, $525,000 Surplus and Trof its, $460,000 

deposits, $3,000,000 

BANKING HOUSE, 644-646-648 MAIN STREET 

Aetna Life Building, next door to 'Public Library 



OFFICERS 

A. SPENCER. Jr.. President 
A. R. HILLYER. Vice-President 
W. D. MORGAN. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Hon. Leverett Brainard 

Pres't Case. Lockwood & Brainard Co. 

Ex-Mayor City of Hartford 
Appleton R. Hillyer ' 

Vice-President 
Hon. Morgan G. Bulkeley 

Pres't yEtna Life Insurance Co. 

Ex-Governor State of Connecticut 
James B. Cone 

Hartford 
Alfred Spencer. Jr. 

President 



Safe Deposit Boxes 



j for rent 

London Drafts 
and Letters of Credit 

\ issued 

) Special accommodations for Ladies 

) 

This Bank offers to depositors every facility 
> which their balances, business and responsibility 
) warrant 



For the accommodation of Customers and Friends, this Bank offers a 
convenient means of identification to all who contemplate visiting the 
PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION at Buffalo 



Hartford National 
Bank 



Incorporated in 1792 as 
Hartford 'Bank 



. . 58 State Street 



Capital, $1,200,000 Surplus, $600,000 Deposits, $3,250,000 

Oldest 'Bank in the city, and one of the oldest in the United States 
Its resources and past record guarantee security to depositors 

Courteous attention and efficient service assured to all its patrons 
SHEW ACCOUNTS SOLICITED Whether Small or Large 

Safe ^Deposit Accommodation for Customers 



HAROLD W. STEVENS. President W. S. BRIDGMAN, Vice-President 
FRANK P. FURLONG, Cashier W. S. ANDREWS. Ass't Cashier 



s 



ecurity 

Company 



Incorporated 1875 



62 Pearl Street 
Hartford, Conn. 



Capital, 8200,000 



Reserve Fund, 8100,000 



ATWOOD COLLINS, President 
HENRY E. TAiNTOR. Vice-President CHAS. EDW. PRIOR, Treasurer 

ACTS AS ... 

Executor of and Trustee under Wills. 

Administrator, Guardian and Conservator of Estates. 

Trustee under Mortgages and Trust Deeds to secure bond issues. 

Trustee for the Care and Investment of Sinking Funds. 

Registrar and Transfer Agent of the Capital Stock and Bonds of 

Corpora tions. 
Agent for Investing Money and Collection of Incomes. 
Agent for Care and Management of Real Instate. 
General Financial Agent for non-residents, women, invalids and 

others. 

CoaiiS money on Real Estate and on approved Collateral Security. Solicits 
Accounts of Corporations, Firms and Individuals, and offers to Depositors every 
facility which their balances, business and responsibility warrant. 

Furnishes Travelers' betters of Credit available in all parts of the world. 



NATIONAL EXCHANGE BANK 

No. 76 State Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Organized as a State Bank in 1834. 

Reorganized as a National Bank in 1864. 

Capital, . . $500,000 Hon . FRAN - c , SB . u V" ZCTORS - 

M'SI'1\ C. DUNHAM, President Hartford Electric Light I o 
^■■rnlllC <?HH hilt} w I I.I.I \ M 1: SUGDEN President Hartford County Mutual Kin I 

OUipiUS, . • «J)£UU,l/UV DANIEL I,. HOW] Preasurer Hartford Street Railway Co. 

JOHN R. RKD1 II I II IV sklent.. 

JOHN I) BKOWNE, Presidenl Connecticut Fire Insurance Co. 
JOHN R. REDFIELD, 'President. JULIUS GAY. Treasurer Farmington Savings Bank. 

EDWARD \. FULLER, tirni of E. A. & VT. P. Fullet 
FRANCIS 'B. COOLEY, Vice-President. SYLVESTER C DUNHAM. Vic-President The Travel 

LEWIS D. PARKER, President Hartford Rubber Wort I 
ELIJAH C. JOHNSON. Cashier. JAMES H BREWSTER, Mana_-r s.-ouM, r.,i..„ and National In 

Co Edinburgh, and Tin- Lion I- ire Insurance ' o, oi London. 



I^/ETNA INDEMNITY COMPANY, hartford, conn. 

Capital, $250,000. Deposited with State Treasurer, $200,000. 

■ TIM EKS. 

FRANCIS T. MAXWELL, Pres't. GEORGE L. CHASE, Vice-Pres't. E. S. PEGRAM, Sec'y. 

IlIRECTi »l<^. 

MORGAN G. BULKELEY, President -Etna Life Insurance Co. .1 IMES l>. SAFFORD, Pres t City National Bank. Springfield, 

GEORGE L.CHASE, President Hartford Fire Insurance Co. Mass. 

1\ I I.I.I OI II. BULKELEY, Vice-Pres't United States Bank. KlUNk I . si mill. Treasurer The Hartfor.l Trust Co. 

vlTI.I Hi\ R, MM 1.1 Kit, Ex-President .Etna Lank. LRTH1 If I. BISSELL, \-- i I reasurer Savings Bank of R,,ck- 

MII.I.IOI It.tl.iltk. President .Stna Insurance Co. HOSES HIX. G. Fox A Companv. L ville. Conn. 

LEVERETTRRAIKARI). I'n - t fav Lo.kwooiU- RraiuardCo. ITYVOOD COLLINS. President fhc Security Company. 

It * 1.1*11 YV. { 1 1 1. Kit, President Hartford Trust Co. HENRI R. HOBINSOX, Sec - y Conn. Trust & Safe l> 

JAMES NICHOLS, President National Fire Insurance Co. II. GARDNER TALCOTT, Talcott Bros,, fl'oolen M'frs. Tal- 

h It mi'IS T. .11 1XMK1.K. President. i otti ille, Conn. 

The ^tna Indemnity Company Acts as Surety on Bonds and Undertakings 
required in the Courts. Guarantees the b\or)esty of Persorjs holding positions of 
trust, and Issues Policies Insuring Plate Glass against breakage. 



ROTECTION in HOMES and TENEMENTS also 



-"JUStS. C. DOTY, 

REAL ESTATE BROKER, FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING, 




offers von- 






DIME, SAVINGS BANK, 

State Banh Building, 791 Main Street. 

'Sank Open 'Daily from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m., and Saturday from 9 a. m. to 12 m. 

P. H. WOODWARD, president. W. O. BURR, vice-president. 

THOS. M. SMITH, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Deposits draw interest from the first of each month free from all taxes. Dividends 
will be placed on interest, or paid to the depositors, on or after the first days of April and 
October. Money, checks, and drafts, received by mail or express, placed on deposit and 
books returned. 



JOHN W. COOGAN, 

Attorney and Counselor at Law, 

No. 877 Main Street, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Henry D. Mildeberger, 

Counselor at Laze, 



243 Broadway, 

Rooms 23 and 24, 

NEW YORK, N. Y. 



904 Main Street, 

Ballkrstein Bl'ildinr, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



T „ _„„_.„_ r.,,. .5 New York Office, '-Cortlaudt 4032.' 
1E " ram " ^■* LL - t Hartford Office, "217-3." 



GEORGE J. STONER, 


FRANCIS H. PARKER, 


Attorney at Law, 


Attorney ami Counselor at Laze, 


52 Sage-Allen Building, 902 Main St., 




HARTFORD, CONN. 


Sage-Allen Building, 


Telephone Connections. 


HARTFORD, CONN. 



Lewis Sperry. 



Geo. P. Mc Lean. 



SPERRY & Mc LEAN, 

Attorneys at Law, 



/Etna Life Insurance Building, 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



J. T. COOGAN, 2d, 

Attorney at Law, 

Room 26, Ballerstein Building, 

904 Main Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



LEWIS E. STANTON, 

Attorney and Counselor at Laze, 

16 State Street, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



WILLIAM R. SCHARTON, Andrew J. Broughel, Jr., 

Attorney at Laze, 



Attorney and Counselor at Laze, 
1040 Main St., 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



739 Main Street, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Telephone: 

Local and Long Distance. 



John R. Buck. 



Arthur F. Eggleston. 



BUCK & BGGUBSTON, 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law 

First National Bank Building, 
SO State Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



MIX & McKONE, 
Counselors at C aAA? * 

First National Bank Building. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Clifford C. Mix. 



John J. Mc.Kone. 



SIDNEY E. CLARKE. 

Counselor at Law, 
HARTFORD, CONN. 



DANIEL A. MARKHAM, 
Attorney ana Counselor at Caw, 

877 Main Street. 



HUNCERFORD, HyDE, JoSLYN & GlLMAN, 

attorneys anb Counselors at Xav\\ 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



F. L. HUNGERFORD. E. H. HYDE. 

CHAS. M. JOSLYN. GEO. H. GlLMAN. 

WM. C. HUNGERFORD. 



Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Co. Building, 
49 PEARL STREET. 



FORREST SHEPHERD, 

Attorney at Law, 

750 Main St., 
HARTFORD, CONN. 



HUGH O'FLAHERTY, 

Attorney at LaW, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Office, Ballerstein '•Building, 

904 Main St. 
Residence, 40 "Buckingham St. 



THEODORE M. MALTBIE. 
OLIVER R. BECKWITH. 

^.ttovncys at H\\w. 

3 ASYLUM ST. 



HERBERT S. BULLARD, 

(Attorney at La c w, 

Room .5, No. 2 Central Row, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



EDWARD J. GARVAN, 

Counselor, 
877 Main Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



Harrison B. Freeman, Jr., 

Attorney at Law, 

Room 36, First National Bank Building, 

50 State Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 

Telephone 201-12. 



Albert C. Bill. Joseph P. Turtle. 

Robert C. Dickenson. 

Bill, Tuttle & Dickenson, 

Counselors at Law, 

First National Bank Building, 

50 State Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



ANDREW F. GATES, 

Attorney and Counselor at Laze, 
1 1 Central Row, 

Hartford, Conn. 



CASE, BRYANT & CASE, 



Attorneys at Law, 



Ballerstein Building, 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



HENRY S. GOSLEE, 

Attorney and Counselor at Laze, 
877 Main Street, 

Hartford, Conn. 



Marcus H. Holcomb, 
(Hume Office) 

SOUTHINGTON, CONN. 



Noble E. Pierce, 

(Home Office) 
Bristol. Conn. 



HOLCOMB & PIERCE, 

Attorneys and Counselors at Law, 

Room 52, Sage-Allen Building, 

902 Main Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



CHAS. L. BURDETT, 

Solicitor of U. S. and Foreign... 

"Patents. 

Counsel in Tatent and Trade {Mark Cases, 
No. 50 State Street, 

Hartford, Conn. 



Henry Stuart Stearns, 

Attorney at Laze, 
Hills Block, Hartford, Conn. 

Telephone Connection. 



REAL ESTATE. PATENTS. 

L. P. WALDO MARVIN, 

Attorney at Laic, 

Specialty : Practice in U. S. Courts. 

Room 4, Hartford Trust Co. Building. 

Telephone No. 808-2. 



HARRY R. WILLIAMS, 

Solicitor of Patents, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



FREDERICK A. SCOTT, 



Attorney at Laic, 



HIRAM R. MILLS, 
Attorney at Law, 



750 Main Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 847 Main Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



AUSTIN BRAINARD, 

Counselor at Law, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Phoenix Mutual Life Building, 



G. HAZARD PEARCE, 

Attorney at Law, 
Room 30, Hills Block, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Telephone 266-5. 




JOS I A IT W. L i: V V . 

AtTOKXEV im.( 1 ITJNMELOR at LAW 
BaIjLEBSTEIN Buildixg. Rooms L2-13. 



Police Commissioner. 



JAMES J. QUINN, 

Attorney at Laic, 
902 Main Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



Edward B. Bennett. George O. Brott. 

BENNETT & BROTT, 

Attorneys and Counselors at Laic 

AND NOTARIES PUBLIC 

Room 30, 847 Main Street, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 




APEWELL 
Horse Nails 




are . . . 



The Leading Nails of the World 



a -a THE BEST 



Made by... 

^iCapewell Horse Nail Co, 

Hartford, Conn. 



BRANCHES : €K.e<w York, Philadelphia, Chicago, St. Louis, Boston, 
ZZZ^ZZIZZZZ^IZIZZL 'Detroit, Cincinnati, San Francisco, 'Portland, Ore., 'Buffalo, 
'Baltimore, and oA£e<u> Orleans j&j&j&j&j£/j£?j£?j£?j£?j£/j& 



COLT'S 
REVOLVERS 




SOLID FRAM£ 

Adopted by Police Departments in 
United States and Foreign Countries 



ksolt's Iratent t ire Jtrms JYlfg. Co. 

Hartford, Conn. 



Jewell Belting Co. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

^^t ************************************************************* 

TANNERS of . . . 

PURE OAK BARK LEATHER 

MANUFACTURERS of . . . 

SHORT LAP BELTING 



<KH><HXM*><H5^>«-^^«>$-^$^^<~^^^ 1 ^«<><<^ 



Xhe Perkins 
Electric Switch Mfg. Co 

NEW YORK HARTFORD CHICAGO 



Manufadurers of 



Switches 



For All Purposes to meet the Under- 
writers' Requirements 




ir 



Manufacturers of all styles and sizes 

METALLIC BEDSTEAD5 

Brass and Steel, and Brass Trimmed 

"Woven Wire and Link Mattresses 

Wire and Canvas COTS, CRIBS, CRADLES and FOLDING CHAIRS 

Also manufacturers of ORNAMENTAL WIRE WORK for Office Railings. 
Elevators. Window and Stall Guards. 

Manufacturers and dealers in Physicians' and Hospital Supplies. Sterilizers 
for Dry Heat and Steam Sterilization. A complete line of Aseptic Hospital 
Furniture, Sick Room Utensils and Disinfecters. Complete Catalogue of above 
articles furnished upon application. Also estimates cheerfully furnished. 




P. O. Box 363, 61S CAPITOL AYE., HARTFORD 



I. B. Davis Sr Son 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

&f>e BERRYMAN FEED WATER 
HEATER and PURIFIER 

<^* ^Hartford, Conn. 




The Johns=Pratt Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Vulcabeston and Moulded Mica 

FOR 

Steam Packing, Electrical Insulation, Etc. 

Hartford, Conn. 



T HE BILLINGS & SPENCER CO., 



Hartford, Conn., U.S.A. 



Manufacturers of DROP HAMMERS, PRESSES, FORGES, MACHINISTS' TOOLS and 

in Iron, Steel, Copper and bronze, of every description and for all purposes. 

, .,.,.. rv ,, 1 -^ r - 1 : 

hHm . t ■ ■ n r I 





Cut Full Size. 



Cut Full Size. 
pVERY GENTLEMAN should have one of 

C. K. Billings' Cigar Cutters and Whistles. 

SMade in the form of a Cartridge. Can be hung on the Watch Chain. 




:.-:^ii,-_ ..,.:.-_.' s. ... :.y-.^:L^,.-.^.,:.^^.^^i 




Cut % Size. 
pVERY SPORTSMAN should possess one of 

C. E. Billings' Sportsman's Knives. 

'Drop Forged of Steel. Full Nickel Plated. Warranted a First-class Article. 



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THE 



Carleton Foundry Co., § 



&2§N 



Office and Factory, |=j 



Faience St. 




HARTFORD, 
CONN. 



W 



E have SUPERIOR facilities for producing GRAY IRON CASTINGS. 
We have the LATEST IMPROVEMENTS and make GRAY IRON 
CASTINGS of the very BEST MAKE and of the VERY BEST MATERIAL. 
For THIRTY YEARS our manager has had a successful experience of making 
these Castings. For several years past he had the personal supervision of 
what was then the LARGEST CASTING CONCERN for such work in the city 
of Hartford. The methods he employed to secure the high standard of 
excellence there are now being carried out in this establishment EVERY DAY 
with improvements. We feel convinced that we are making even BETTER 
CASTINGS now than formerly. 

Our Castings are not only the BEST STOCK, but FINISH a much HIGHER 
GRADE at much LESS COST to the purchaser. This item is worth consider- 
ing. Our shipping facilities insure prompt delivery. Pattern work solicited. 
All orders receive PROMPT AND THOUGHTFUL ATTENTION. We solicit a 
share of your patronage. TH ^ CARLBTON FOUNDRY CO. 



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SHIFT KEY 



Ibartforb 

^Typewriters.,, 

Price $00.00 

Have one in the Home 

Hartford, No. 2 Full Keyboard 

Hartford, No. 4 Single Keyboard 

AN ANTITRUST MACHINE 

Catalogues on Application 

THE HARTFORD TYPEWRITER CO. 

Station cA, HARTFORD, CONN. 



H. B. BEACH H. L. BEACH 

H. B. BEACH <& SON 

Boiler Works 

ah Kinds 0/ Marine and Stationary Boilers 

Also Plate and Sheet Iron Work of Every Deseription and Design 

All our Boilers are Tested and Insured by the 
HARTFORD STEAM BOILER IIVSPECTIOX AIVD IXSURA1VCE CO. 

Late Woodruff & "Beach Iron Works. 



Smith, Bourn (& Co. 

sManufacturers of . . . 

Harness, Sa d dles 
Collars and Horse Goods 

FACTORY SALESROOMS 

Cor. Capitol Avenue and Sigourney Street 334 Asylum Street 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Established 1862 Incorporated 1885 

U/>e Cushman Chuck Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Lathe and Drill Chucks 

of all Kinds and for all purposes 

. . . Hartford, Conn. 



^•heney 



Established 1838. 
Incorporated 1854, 



OrotHers, 



Silk 



Man ufacturers. 



hills : south mmicHESTEii hnd hhrtfobd, conn. 

SALESROOMS : 
NEW YORK, 477 Broome Street. 

BOSTON, 70 Chauacey Street. 

CHICAGO, 239 Fifth Avenue. 

PHILADELPHIA, 929 Chestnut Street. 

PONGEES and FLORENTINES, 

Plain, Figured and Printed, for Dress Goods and Decorative Purposes. 

SATINS, TWILLS and ARMURE5, 

Lining Silks, Grenadines, Black and Colored Gros Grains and Taffetas. 

Velvets and Plushes, 
Uphol stery Materials, 
Drapery F abrics and Curtains. 

T> Tit, TE. f^TVJ^k. Gros Grains, Satin 
tV.IfjJDV^I^lO, and Fancy. 

TRAMS, ORGANZINE5, ana FINE-SPUN SILK* 
for MANUFACTURERS' USE. 

Silks for Special Purposes to Order. 



GEO. A. FAIRFIELD, President and Treasurer. DANIEL MORRELL, Secretary. 

Hartford Machine Screw 
Company, 

Manufacturers of Hexagon. Square and Round Head Cap Screws. Round and Square 
Head Set Screws. Thumb Screws. Collar Screws. Studs and Pins. Sewing Machine 
Bobbins and Screws. Clock. Watch. Optical. Gun and Electrical Work, and all other 
articles turned from Steel, Iron or Brass Wire, Parts of Bicycles, including Hubs, Cones, 
Cups, Steps, Bolts. Nuts. Keys. Nipples. Chain Studs, etc.. etc. Also Builders of all 
kinds of Special Automatic Turning and Threading Machinery. 

Dwig'ht Slate Machine Co. 

516 Asylum Street, HARTFORD. 

SMakers of High Grade ^MACHINE TOOLS, DRILLING 

MACHINES ( Single and Multiple Spindle), AUTOMATIC 
GEAR and PINION CUTTERS, MILLING MACHINES, 
TAPPING MACHINES, CUTTER GRINDERS, Etc, 

MODEL WORK and REPAIRS on CASH REGISTERS, TYPE- 
WRITERS, and COMPUTING MACHINES ATTENDED TO BY 
COMPETENT HELP. 






K2 



ifiartford £ treet Railway fompanp % 

. . Offices: 111-127 STATE STREET. '(> 



OPERATE through Electric cars between City Hall. Hartford, and 
Wethersfield. West Hartford. Rainbow. Poquonock, Windsor, North 
and South Glastonbury. Hockanum. Burnside. East Hartford. South 
Windsor, East Windsor Hill and Newington. 

In connection with the Connecticut Railway and Lighting Co., to Berlin. 
White Oak, Plainville and connecting roads by transfer to Southington, 
Plantsville. Meriden. Yalesville. Wallingford. Forestville. Bristol and 
Compounce Pond. 

In connection with the Farmington Street Railway Co.. through cars to 
Farmington and Unionville. 

In connection with the Hartford. Manchester and Rockville Tramway 
Co.. through cars to Laurel Park. North and South Manchester. Talcott- 
ville and Rockville. 



& $*&£*&* & & & & & & & & >>, &&@f@s$*&.*g*g4 £ £ &*& 



H. A. FRENCH, 

Manufacturer of and Denier in 

Sasli, Doors, ISIIixcLn, etc, 

75 Arch Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 

FINE CUSTOM and HARD WOOD WORK a Specialty. 



Strickland & Shea, 
Scroll Sawing, Turning, Carving, Ornamental Wood Work. 

STAIR BUILDING, CABINET WORK and MANTELS a Specialty. 

Jobbing and c Repairing. 

Telephone Connection. 20 Potter Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



J. B. PIERCE, President. CHARLES T. IVES, Treasurer. 

ROBERT P. ELLIOT, Secretary. JOHN T. AUSTIN, General Manager. 

AUSTIN ORGAN COMPANY. 

EXCLUSIVE BUILDERS OF 

Electric and Tubular Pneumatic Organs 

on the Austin Universal Windchest System. 

'pat. in the u. s., eng. and can.) 

HARTFORD. CONN., U. S. A. 



C. S. Brewer & Co. 

FRUIT and PRODUCE 
at WHOLESALE. ****ae 

Hale OrchJ/cZV^Vtiiey, fo. 34, 36, 38, 40 Union Place. 



L. L. ENS WORTH & SON, 

Importers and Dealers in 

Iron and SteeL 



__ , . . „, , ... , Agents for 

Machinists', Blacksmiths and ^ p & ^^, 

Carriagemakcrs' Supplies. Cast SfegL 

104 to 112 Front Street, Hartford, Conn. 

XXVI 



Architectural and Ornamental Iron Works. 

ARTISTIC ARCHITECTURAL 

Gates, Doors, Grilles, Fences, Work for Buildings, 

Office Railings, Guards, Shutters, Columns, Beams, Stairs, 

Balconies, Andirons, Fenders, Vaults, Hyatt Lights, Fire Escapes, 

Wire Guards, Fire Sets, Stirrups, Anchors, General Forgings, 

Elevator Enclosures, Etc., Etc. Jobbing, Etc., Etc. 



ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 



BUELLESBACH & RICK, SiSS? Vgk. 



A TL ANTIC SCREW WORKS, 

"DAVID TILTON, Proprietor, 

HARTFORD, COISX. 




Made of Steel, Brass and Bronze 




^ Whitney Mfg. Co. 

Hand Milling Machines, ...HARTFORD, CONN. 

Water Tool Grinders, 

Keys and Cutters for the Woodruff 
Patent System of Keying;, 

Presto Drill Chucks and Collets, 
High Grade Driving Chains. 



THE 



Acme Machine Screiv Company, 



Manufacturers of the 



MULTIPLE SPINDLE 
SCREW MACHINE 

AND THE PRODUCTS THEREOF. 



Hartford, Conn. 



The E(kvin Taylor Lumber Co. 

Charter Oak Ave. and Taylor St., 

Dealers in HARTFORD, CONN. 

YELLOW PINE TIMBER 

in connection with a. general stock of 

ROUGH and DRESSED LUMBER. 



ALBERT P 


. DAY, 






Presid 


■nt. 


LUCIUS B. 


BARBOUR, 






Treasurer. , 


GRANT U. 


K1ERSTEAD, 






Secret; 


iry. 



j& THE. -<s> 



llalcn & Nona Goal Go., 



DEALERS IN 



COAL «s WOOD. 

Office. New No. 801 plain Si. Yam. 56 Commerce Si. 

TKq Hertford (baJ Co., 

754 Main Street, . . . 



108 Commerce Street, 



276 Market Street. . . 



TELEPHONE CALLS. 



WHOLESALE 

629-3 

1001-3 arid WT% fci 1 A.IL*« 



T™ HARTFORD * * * 
I ELECTRIC LIGHT CO. 

Office, 266 Pearl Street, Hartford, Con a. 

Works, rear Courant Building;, and 266 Pearl Street. 

Power Furnished for 

Motors at Short Notice. 

Arc and Incandescent Lighting 
from Underground Service. 

PRICES GIVEN ON APPLICATION. 

R. W. ROLLINS, General Manager. 

OFFICERS: 
A. C. DUNHAM, PresideQt. D. N. BARNEY. Treasurer. 

CURTIS C. COOK. Secretary. 

DIRECTORS: 

&. C. DUNHAM. WILLIAM H BULK.ELEY. WILLIE O BURR, 

HENRY ROBERTS. fITWOOD COLLINS, E. B. BENNETT, 

D. N. BARNEY, E. K. ROOT, L F- ROBINSON, 

W. F- HENNEY. W L. ROBB. Dr.- HENRY P. STEARNS. 

RALPH W. CUTLER, 

Annual Meeting in 'February. 

X XVII I 






TMI HARTFORD CARRIAGE CO., 

J. P ALLEN, Secy, Treas'r and Manager, 

300, 302, 304 Allyn Street, Hartford, Conn., 

Dealers in Fine Carriages, Business and Farm Wagons, Sleighs, 

HARNESS, ROBES, BLANKETS, ETC. 

Our Prices are Lower than the Lowest. 

Tt)e Merrow Machine Co., 

28 LAUREL STREET, HARTFORD, CONN. 

Makers of the MERROW HIGH SPEED Scallop and 
Overedge Machines for Covering the Raw- 
Edges of all kinds of Fabrics. 



JLJ'A'^\_M_jL_W 




tub Best window screens plane. 

EXAMINE BEFORE BUYING ELSEWHERE. 

Bird Cages, Spark Guards, Fenders, Etc. 
All kinds of Wire Work made to order, 

F. S. AMIDON, 

Telephone 1026-3. 60 Temple Street. 



P. CH RiZHN, 

Paper and Paper Stock, 

205 AND 207 STATE STREET. 

Manufacturer of Zaza No. 1 Manilla and Zaza 
No. 1 Fibre Paper, and Nabob Toilet Paper. 

We sell the best for lowest possible prices. GIVE US A TRIAL. 



FISHER & SUISMAN, 



DEALERS IN 



OLD SCBAP IlSO:V. 

Highest Cash Prices paid for Old Rubber, 

Copper, Brass, Lead, and Metals of all kinds, 

5 NORTH STREET, t.i. no. 1011-3, HARTFORD, CONN. 



PROGRESS 

The Mercer, Cottage, Gold and Mills are successful 
Steam and Hot Water Boilers of latest design and most 
efficient construction. Made by The H. B. Smith Co., 
Westfield, Mass. 

LIB BY & BLINN, 

HEATING 

CONTRACTORS, J ^4 State Street, Hartford, Conn. 



Zh* fiartford Paving and Construction Co. 

T03 Main Street. 

Pavement of Sheet or Block Asphalt, Vitrified Brick, 
and Granite Dimension Stone, Masonry, Founda- 
tions, Sewers, Granolithic Sidewalks and Driveways. 
Concrete Bridges, Floors and Foundations a specialty. 
The Wainwright Patent Steel Bound Curb. 



I Southern New England | 

I Paving Company, | 

* * 

3£ 141 TRUMBULL STREET, Tg 

^ HARTFORD, CONN. ^ 

■^J, CONTRACTORS FOR ~j^ 

7^ 7^ 

^ Genuine Trinidad Lake Asphalt Pavements, ^ 

^4r FOR STREETS, DRIVEWAYS AND BRIDGES. -^jL 



W. H. SCOVILLE, 

•Arctytect and l3 u ''der, 

Times ^Building. 

»»M HHRTFORD.CONN, 



cManufacturers and ^Dealers in 



D. J. CURTIS & SON, 
"Brick 



Common and Pressed Brick, and Various Shapes of Moulded Sand 

Brick, Circular Brick for Steam Chimneys. 

Also, Hollow Brick for Fire-Proof Construction. 

No. 737 Windsor Avenue, HARTFORD, CONN. 



J. KELLY, Residence, 234 New Britain Avenue. M. KELLY, Residence, 236 New Britain Avenue. 

KELLY BROTHERS, 

Cut Stone Contractors. 

Estimates given at short notice for all kinds of Cut Stone. 
Telephone Connection. Office and Mills, 91=93 Charter Oak Avenue, Hartford, Conn. 



Alexander Watson, Arthur A. Jackson, John Watson, 

32 Lincoln St. 22 Congress St. 46 King St. 

WA TSON, J A CKSON & CO., 

Successors to SAMUEL COLLINS & CO., Dealers in 

FLAGGING STONE, GRANITE CURB, 

Coping, Cross-walks, 'Belgian 'Block 'Pacing, Cement, Lime, Plaster, 
Hair, €M.ortar Colors, Sea Sand, Tile, Etc. -J* J* Cement Walks and 
'Driveways. <2& <£ cArtificial Stone Work of all kinds. -J* J* cAgents for 
'Vulcanite Cement. *** -J* Flue Linings. 

OfBce : 283 Sheldon St., cor. Union St., Hartford, Conn. 

Robert Moore, 

Mason and Contractor. 

OFFICE AND YARD : 

Cor. Sheldon and Taylor Streets, 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

T? STIMA Til S JOBBING PROMPTL \~ 

■^ FURNISHED. J ATTENDED TO. 



backer & Goodwin, 

HARTRORD, COININ. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS. 

Sole Agents for 
GOLDEN BRAND CANNED GOODS. 

Finest Packed. cAsk your grocer for them. 

E. TUCKER'S SONS, 



aper a^oo 



vs 



f\ 



I 



Warehouse: 100 TRUMBULL STREET, 

[jilaiLFftiFcDipaDrp ©©qdqd 



THE HARTFORD & NEW YORK TRANSPORTATION CO. 

"HARTFORD F.INE," Pier 24, F,. R., New York. 

Daily passenger and freight line between Hartford anil New York, 
and Landings on Connecticut River. Steamers, Hartford and 
Middletown. Cargo Freighting in Barges of 350 to 1,100 tons capaeity. 
Sound and River Towing. 

General Office, Foot State Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 



E. S. COOIIKH 11. 

Pres't and Treas. 
EDGAR L. SMITH, 

See'j and Ass'l Treas, 
( . I . UOODKICH, 

General Manager. 
E. It. WILLIAMS, 

Superintendent. 



E. C. QU1GGLE, President. A. M. WILSON, Vice-Pres't and Treas. R. D. BALDWIN, Sec'y- 

THE E. S. KIBBE CO. 

Wholesale Grocers. 



"HELMET BRAND " 

Canned Goods. 

I4Q-I55 State Street, Hartford, Conn. 



TEA, COFFEE, 
SPICES and TOBACCO. 



O 
in 



o 




■j ill 



THE BEST THAT CAN BE PRODUCED. 

^UNMATCHED IN FLAVOR. STRENGTH AMD PURITY- 

tins. ALL GROCERS SELL IT 



SCA 



Geo. F. Spencer & Co., s "^:y*, M 
CARMEN. 

Office, 71 Asylum Street, Room 35, 
HARTFORD, COIS3V. 

Merchandise of all kinds handled with dispatch and by 

careful and experienced men. 
Special attention given to moving furniture about the city. 



S. W ANDREWS. WM. HUNTINGTON. 



K W. ^ AIMER & CO., 

CARMEN, 



Successors to 

EnsKVorth & Co. 



246 State Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 

Teams constantly in readiness for Transportation of all kinds of Merchandise 
to or from Railroads and Boats, and to all parts of the City. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION. 



^The Hartford Storage Company. 

Storage for Wool, Machinery, Tobacco, General Merchandise, etc. 

Negotiable Warehouse Receipts issued. 

Unexcelled facilities for Storing Furniture and Household Goods. 

Railroad Siding. 

Address or Telephone 

BARTLETT BROS., 

212 Asylum Street, Hartford, Conn. 



TELEPHONE 628-3. 



J. J. DWYER, 



...Architect. 



78 Trumbull Street. 

"Designer of the following prominent buildings in Hartford and vicinity : 

New Police Headquarters, St. Michael's Church, 
Heublein Hotel, St. Patrick's School, 

G. F. Heuhlein & Bro.'s Wholesale House, Cathedral Lyceum, 
The " Linden " Annex. Capewell Horse Nail Co. Factory, 

The "Washington Terrace*' Apartments, Capewell Horse Nail Co. Office, 
Kingsley and Smith's Building, A. L. Foster & Co.'s Store, 

St. Mary's Home for the Aged, A. Hollander's Son's Store, 

St. Thomas's Seminary, Patrick Garvan's Residence. 

XXXIII 



ESTABLISHED 1853. 

L. B. Haas & Co., 

PACKERS OF AND DEALERS IN 

Connecticut Leaf Tobacco, 

146=152 STATE STREET, 

HARTFORD, COINN. 

THF PFNTRAI ° iicts Hartford Merchants and Shippers 
I IIL ULIl I llHL the i owest rates an( j ^e quickest time to 

Mr\A/ riUPI A Nil a ^ P omts west « Also lowest rates for pas- 
HLVm LUbLmiU sage tickets to Chicago ; first class, $17.50, 
nan lkiMt/ second class, $16.50. Other points propor- 

RAILWAY 



<£> <£• <£• tionately. 



SPECIAL EXCURSION RATES to the^^ PAN-AMERICAN 

May 1st to Oct. 1st, J901. Weekly excursions. FYpnCITIfiN ± 

For information apply to — — — — — ^— 

W. J. MARTIN, Traffic Manager. J J BUFFALO ■* 

Hartford, Conn. — ^— ^— ^ — 



W W 



A. C DUNHAM, S. O. DUNHAM. IIKNKY OSBORN, 

Pbesident. Tueascrek. Secretakv. 



^ITINIIAM ^ j» j» 



D 



HOSIERY CO., 



Hosiery, Zephyrs, am. Yarns, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

mills at.... (>(> State Street. 

na0gatuck, conn. 



b^ors Every Bookkeeper 




££^.__L_I— uIGje './-- ffj 



77ie a6owe C«f represents Nos. 11, 12, 13, 14, 51 and 52 

opjned at letter 0. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Price List. 
Thousands now in use. 
Give them a trial. 



Should 

Use ^ ^ 



'5 



'8 



PATENT 
COMBINATION 
INDEX and 

IMPROVED 
TRIAL 
BALANCE 
— — SHEET. 

The use of these books 
saves valuable time and 
labor. They will be found 
invaluable in every office 
having numerous names to 
handle. The "Index " is 
alphabetically subdivided, so 
that any name can be found 
at a glance— practical, sim- 
ple and convenient. The 
"TRIAL BALANCE SHEET" 
is so arranged with short 
leaves that writing the names 
but once in twelve months 
is avoided. 



THE BURR INDEX CORIPRNY. 

336 Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 



"(She* 



ASE, LOCRWOOD 

(SL BRAINARD CO., 



J& 



mercantile 
ana 3ob Printers, 



and manufacturers of flat=0penins Blank Books, 

Many years' trial of these hooks has 
proved them to he the most durable 
and effective of any of the many flat- 
opening books. Large exj>eriencc in 
Genealogical Printing and Binding. 

General Printers ana Book Binders. 








POP 

^//dATfOm Com. 



ECORATORS... 

Simons Sr Fox, 

7 Haynes Street, 

Decorations for BALLS, FAIRS 

and all Public occasions. 




HILLS & FOX, 
Builders and Mason Contractors. 

Special Attention Given to Jobbing. 

Office, No. 22 John Street, Hartford, Conn. 



ALFRED L. HILLS. 

216 Jefferson Street. 



THOMAS S1SSON. 



THOMAS R. FOX, 

58 Annawan Street. 



GEO. P. CHANDLER. 



r. s/ssoN <* co., 

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS, 

and dealers in 

PAINTS, OILS and GLASS, 

and Manufacturers' Supplies. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 






-g^ ^ -sl^ -g^ - - ... ... ■ - 



T 



["• ■\L-» ■sL* *\L- 'sL j " ■%!.>■ ■si-" "4^ nU* •vl^ "s. y 

HE, BETTER CLASS 

0/ Clothing, Hats and Furnishings 

for Men and Boys 
TRUNKS, TRAVELING BAGS and SUIT CASES 
LADIES' TAILOR MADE SHIRT WAISTS 
GLOVES, NECKDRES.SING.S, etc. 

ORSFALL and 



% "It pays to buy our kind" 



H 



ROTHSCH ILD 



ASYLUM ST.. HARTFORD 



^Ts. *"TN, .•Tv. •TN. ^TS< 

\ X X V I 




The 'Pioneer Ladder SManufaciurers. 

€♦ C Bisbop $ Co. 



Manufacturers 

of the 



New improved 



Han lord Fire Extension Ladder, 

Equipped with the only reliable Extension Ladder Lock 
in the world, 

BISHOP'S NEW CHALLENGE LOCK. 



All Kinds of Ladders for Fire Departments, Painters, 

Carpenters, Masons, Factories, etc. 
Piazza and Lawn Furnishings a specialty. 
Step Ladders of all kinds on hand, also made to order. 
Particular attention paid to the manufacture of Painters' 

Stage Ladders, Ladder Hooks, etc. 



34 Capen St., HARTFORD, CONN. 





QUICK WORK" 

Works, 286 to 292 Sheldon St. 
Main Office, Zl Pratt St. 



PHotograpHist 

STUDIO 

HILLS' BLOCK, 847 MAIN STREET 
Hartford, Conn. 



The larger portion of pictures in this volume 

are reproductions of photographs from Stuart's Studio 

Special Rates to any who Mention this "Police " Ad. 




THE 



Hartford G Box Co. 



Manufacturers of... 



PAPER BOXES 



22 j State Street, Hartford, Conn, 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 

ROMOTER5 of * * * | 

tne Best and most C*Ai<\&> W/\^ir I 

Stylish Creations in LdUKS Wwdl\ | 

1 Costumes and ^ ^ ^ I 

I General Dry Goods. | 

ISage, Allen Q, Co.,§ 

ml i i in i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 H ARTFORDIIII MM MM MMllI 






***- 



"*% 



all. 
vV 



I BEELEY | 



27 Asylum Street. 



O nly ^ 

Fine 
ClotHing'. 




A THIRD OF A 

CENTURY'S EXPERIENCE 



in the 



StODC. furnace and Cinning Business. 



AGENTS FOR. . . 
A THE CELEBRATED 

STEBIIXe 
IC jk IN" O E - 



314 



MAIN STREET 



C. vS. HILLS (Si CO., 

£T/>e Hartford * ^» 

^ * SilR Store. 






^ WIGH CLASS 

Leaders in I 

DRY GOODS. 



W.^W(% 



Establisbed 1846. SAGE-flLLEN BUILDING 

Are Headquarters for CARPETS and RUGS of all grades, WALL 
PAPERS, LINOLEUMS, OIL CLOTHS, MATTINGS, DRAPERIES, 
SHADES, etc. Their reputation for BEST GOODS at the LOWEST 
POSSIBLE PRICE has long been established. 



W E 



TIME * * * 

sell the reliable sort of WATCHES that'll help 
you to always be on time. Strictly high-grade 
DIAMONDS and the most reliable JEWELRY. All 
sold for as little 

MOJEY * *' * 

as such goods can be honestly retailed for. 

X£a>xiseX 9 Sloan & Co., 

886 MAIN ST., HARTFORD. 



smith & Mcdonough, Ph0 ^»c^ din9 ' 

Booksellers anti Stationers. 



CARD PLATES, ADDRESS DIES, MONOGRAMS. 
WEDDING INVITATIONS A SPECIALTY. 



Manufacturers' Supplies, 
Fishing Tackle, Cutlery, 
Builders' Supplies, 
Garden and Flower Seeds. 

CLAPP & TREAT, 
hardware, 

68 State Street, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



tub J. c. Ripley mi Co., 



Successors to A. D. VORCE & CO., 



Dealers in 



Paintings, Ulater-Colors, 

<£ etchings, engravings, . 

and Bric-a-Brac 



752 Main Street, 
Hartford, Conn. 



ERVIN L. FURREY, 

StjCCEssob to FOSTER A- FTJRREY. 

Funeral Director, 

11(>(> MAIN STREET, 

Residence, 1185 Mat>t St, HARTFORD, CONN. 

Telephone Convection-. 

ATTENDAXC'K DAY OK NIGHT. LADY ASSISTANT, 

XXXIX 




' HARTF9RD,CoNN*y 

ROBERT J. ALLYN, Prop. 

JOHN J. dahill, Manager. 



AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN PLANS. 

Located in the business center, corner Asylum 

and Trumbull Streets. Electric cars pass 

the door every two minutes. Hotel 

Bus meets all trains, 

American Plan, $3,50 to $5.00 per Day, 
European Plan, $ 1.50 to $3,00 per Day. 



RYE WHISKY. 

When you become 
\ 6 tired of drinking 
1 mixed and blended 
i whiskies. try our 

^POLAND 



WHISKY- 14 YEARS 
OLD, UN CO LOR ED 
AND UNSWEETENED, 
THE NATURAL PRODUCT 
.OF THE GRAIN. 

SAMPLE BOTTLE IN PLAIN 
CASE WILL BE SENT AT CASE PRICE 

G.F. HEUBLEIN &BRO. 
29 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. HARTFORD .CONN. 




Bono's Cafe aqo Restaurant, 

HARRY S. BOND, Proprietor, 

232 ASYLUM STREET, HARTFORD, CONN. 

Private Dining Rooms. 
Everything Served in Season. 



Long's witim Palace Restaurant. 



Long Bros., 

Props. 



CENTRALL Y LOCA TED. NEWL Y FURNISHED. 
'Rates $1.25 per day and upnvards. 
'Rooms 50 cents per night and upwards. 



City Hall Square, 
Hartford. 



Restaurant 225 feet in depth. Seats 500 people. 
Walls paneled in plate glass. 
Private Dining Rooms for Ladies. 
Our 25 Cent Dinner has made our business. 
We serve an unequalled Cup of Coffee. 
Our steaks are the best to be found anywhere. 
Electric cooking at the quick lunch counter. 
Everything in Season served to order. 
Our chefs are the most skilful money will hire. 
We invite everybody to inspect our Kitchen and 
Cooking arrangements. 



Our own electric light plant. 

Our own refrigerating and ice-making plant. 

Artesian Well 200 feet deep. 

Elevator takes you from the Restaurant to the 

Roof Garden. 
Hotel has 200 rooms. 

Steam radiators and electric lights in every room. 
Sanitary arrangements the best of any hotel in 

Hartford. 
Ample provision for safety in case of fire. 



AMERICAN PLAN, 
$2.50 and UPWARDS PER DAY. 



STEAM HEAT IN EVERY ROOM 




etc 



■ Wc 



f V// 




COR. CHURCH AND TRUMBULL STS. 



R. W. NEWTON, Proprietor. 
S. S. IRVIN, Manager. 



Hartford, Conn. 



HOTEL WINDSOR, 



FIRST-CLASS TABLE BOARD. 

GOOD ACCOMMODATIONS FOR TRAVELING PEOPLE 



0. EAGAN. Proprietor. 

Opposite §H- Y., &C H. & H. Depot, 
WINDSOR, CONN. 



One Minute from Railroad Station. 



The ^"TARTFOR ' 

ALFRED A. POCOCK, Manager, 

Cor. cAllyn and High Streets, 



RATES. American. $2.50 and Upwards. 
European, $1.00 and Upwards. 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



Masonic Te tuple. 

HILLS & MARCHANT, 
Funeral Directors and Embalmers, 

$$ Ann Street, 

Hartford, Conn. 

JAMES Mc INTYRE, MICHAEL M. CLARKIN, 

No. 37 [ 2 Church Street. No. 71 Capitol Avenue. 

McINTYRE & CLARKIN, 
Undertakers. 

Telephone No. J036-4. No. \ IV* Church Street. 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

THOS. SCOTT. r>r\ r r"~r O 01\/IIT¥T J. c. SMITH. 

bUUl 1 & bMI 1 H, 
Furnishing Undertakers, 26 church st., Hartford, conn. 

Telephone Call 735. Established 1873. LADY ATTENDANT. 

J. B. DUFFY. J. O'BRIEN. 

DUFFY & O'BRIEN, 
Furnishing Undertakers, 

21 Church Street, 

Telephone 1176. HARTFORD, CONN. 

A. B. WEST & CO., 

Contractors for A |j Classes Of BuildillgS. 

IORRINP A SPECIALTY, 
JWUU11MU an d attended to promptly. 

Office and Shop : 

\o\ x A Hudson Street, Hartford, Conn. 



Chamberlin (Si vShaughnessy, 

Hatters and Outfitters, 



DUNLAP HATS. 



Nos. G5-67 Asylum Street, 
HARTFORD, CONN. 



Best Lenign. Best Free Burning. 
All Rail Coal. 

H. C. BURGESS, 

TUNNEL COAL YARD, 

3 and 5 Albany Ave. 
L,o>vest Prices. 



Hartford Wire Works 

247 Asylum Street. 

Ulindou) Screens, 
Office Grill Ulork, 
Cases and uiire Clotl), 



ismtofcc 
»ot)j) f 2i Cigars, 

GERMAN LOVERS. 
OUR "BACHELORS. 

All Dealers. 



John Mlhry Wood Working Go. 

Manufacturers of 

BANK and DRUG STORE FIXTURES, 

Church Seats, Pulpits, Altars, 

Offices, Saloons, Mantels, Sideboards, Panelled 

Wainscotings, Ceilings, Etc. 

office and j 65, 67, 69 Front St., and 

FACTORY : , 8S 87 ^ an( J , Qr()ve St 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Designs and Estimates Given for ail descriptions 
of Wood Work. 




Sigourmy T)oust, 

JJ50 Main Street, 

Hartford, Conn. 

First-class Accommodations for 

'Regular and Transient 'Boarders. 



N. J. COYLE, Pr 



OPRIETOR. 



Hart Switches 
H(aH Push Switches 



HartaNqHegeman 




32 Union Place, Hartford 



M. Fien & Katz, 

2 ,. SCRAP IRON and MB TALS. 



14 Xorth Street, 
Hartford, Conn, 



Wholesale 
Deale 



WATC 
Headqui 



ATCHES. TVAMONDS E. HOQllacH I CO.. 



Headquarters for 

American 
Watches. 



D 



SPECIALTY. 






20 State Street, 



City Hall Square. 

Established 185Q. 



THE EDWARD BALF CO., 

General 
Contractor^, 

TRUCKING, 

GRADING and 



Gross, ftpde $ Sbipman, 
Attorneys at Caw, 

750 main Street, 



EXCAVATING, 

Sand and Stone. 


Charles 6. Gross. RartfOrd, COHIt. 
Ulm. Ulaldo fivde. 
Hrthur E. Shipman. 


E. A. & W. K FULLER, 

ls)EAF 

Tobacco, 

236 State Street 
Hartford, Conn. 


Telephone Connection. ROSWELL J. CLAPP. 

John B. Clapp & Son, 

Iron and Steel 

fiERCHflNTS, 

235=237 State Street, 

HARTFORD, CONN. P. 0. Box 490. 



C. H. STRANT. 



E. D. ALVORD. 



C. H. STRANT & CO., 

U. S, Hotel and Club Stables, 

50 STATE STREET, HARTFORD, CONN. 
Boarding, Livery and Transient, Telephone Call 902, 

Van Name (& Co., 



OAL 




278 Asylum Street, 



Hartford, Conn. 



TELEPHONE. 1327. 



MONEY 



I. «». nit <l on Jewelry 

and Personal Property. 

COLLATERAL LOAN CO., 

71 Asylum, Room to. 



TFORD OPERH HOUSE. 

Tne Popular Place of flmusemeni. 

First-class Attractions. 

Open every evening and Matinees 



daily. 



\ Evening, 15, 25, 35 and 50 cents. 



p. & y BESSE, 
Caterers. 

701 Main St., Hartford, Conn. 



'PRICES 

' Matinee, 10, 15 and 25 cents. 

t.ooo Seats at io cent Matinees. 



TELEPHONE 1124. 



HARTFORD COUNTY MUTUAL 
FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

Stale Bank Bids;., 793 Main St., HARTFORD, CONN. 

Insures against loss or damage by FIRE or 
LIGHTNING. "Pays damage by Hgbtning whether 
fire ensues or not. THvellings a specialty. 

This is one of the oldest mutuals in the state, 
having been in successful operation since 1831. 

CASH ASSETS, January 1, 1900, $671,650. 

All losses honorably and promptly paid. 

VOL K. SIHIDKX, Pres't and Treat. 

JOIKs I.. NO" tltli. Via Pres't. 

\\ II. A. EKTIKti, .Sec'//. 



S. E. ELMORE, Pres't. H. W. Erving, Cashier. 
H. J. MAERCKLEIN, Ass't Cashier. 

Connecticut River 
Hanking Company, 

HARTFORD. CONN. 
Incorporated, 1824. 



Henry C. Dwight. William B. Dvvight. 


T. H. LANGDON, 


H. C. Dwight & Co., 


Plumber, 


Wool. 


Steam and Gas Titter. 


191 to 219 Allyn St. 


228 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 



ffke %w Madison. The Veeder Mfg. Co. 



D. J. Ll'CEY, Proprietor. 
Cor. Pratt Trumbull Sts., Hartford, Conn. 

ROOMS BY DAY OR WEEK. 

Newly Furnished. 

Office Open All Night. 

Private Rooms, ,S0c. 75c, and $1.00 per Day. 



.Makers of 

CYCLOMETERS, 
ODOMETERS, 
COUNTERS, 
FINE CASTINGS. 

C. H. Veeder, Pres't. D J. Post, Treas 

H W. Lester, Sec'y- 



The RICE & BALDWIN ELECTRIC CO. 
Electrical Engineers, 

214 cPearl Street, Hartford, Conn. 



LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE 
TELEPHON E. 




j Hartford 
Wholesale Branch, 

E. C. SCHIERHOLZ, 
Manager. 

MALT EXTRACT. 



Berry (& COvSgrove:, 



"THEY'RE PURE, 

THAT'S SURE," 

all Wines and Liquors purchased 
from us. We carry the largest 
assortment of bottled liquors in 
New England, and make a spe- 
cialty of supplying family trade. 



WHOLESALE AND RUTAII, 

Liquor 
Dealers. 

ggy Main Street, 

Hartford, Conn. 



R 



OPKINS (Q. CO., 

Brewers of J} { ^ p orfe/ . 



(only.) 



Special Brews for Household Use . . . 

ROPKINS BITTER ALE, $1.25 Delivered. 

ROPKINS LIGHT DINNER ALE, .65 
ROPKINS FAMILY PORTER, .65 










* * *i 

* # * * 



f2s New England Beers 




Have stood the Analyses of leading Chemists and Physicians 
who have given a guarantee as to their PURITY and 
EXCELLENCE. Sold universally in best Clubs, 
Cafes and Hotels. 

The New England Brewing Co. 

•PHowe 739. HARTFORD, CONN. 




^SIGN 



It directs you to places 
where the BEST BEER 
is sold. 



E6c HUBERT . . 
FISCHER . 
BREWERY, 



Phone 078. 



Hartford, Conn. 



= ^ = }" 




0. c Briiton % T>. Uritton C. O. 'Britton 

R.D.$ CO. Britton 



Manufacturers and Jobbers 



S.B.BOSWORTH 

Granite Salt Glazed 

Sewer Pipe 



CARRIAGES Flue Linings 

HARNESS Chimney T ° ps ' &c * 

Manufacturer of 

and HORSE GOODS Stone and Earthenware 

291=303 Allyn St. 38 4Q and 4 F 2 C p°RONT STREET 

AMERICAN HOTEL, 

Opposite 'Post Office, Hartford, Conn. 

American and European Plans. 

ROOMS, 50 cts. to $2.00 
RATES, $1.50 to $2.50 

Steam Heated Throughout. All Electrics pass the door. 
Special Rates to the Profession. 

CAFE STOCKED WITH THE CHOICEST OF 

ALES, WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS. 



Hew England Cafe, 

1219 Main Street. 

Ladies 9 and Gents 9 

Dining Rooms, 

FINELY EQUIPPED AND 
WELL APPOINTED. 

Everything: the Market affords in Season. 

Domestic and Imported 
Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

WESLEY E. DEMING, Proprietor. 

XLIX 



JOSEPH HIRTH, 

staten lsland Lager Beer Depot. 

279 Main Street, Hartford, Conn. 



A Full Assortment of 
Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 



A Specialty made of 
Bottled Lager for Family Use. 



F. P. LYNCH, 

Ak# 9 Wines, liquors 
and *Gigar#. 

365 ASYLUM ST., HARTFORD, ONN. 



£eon fireenberg, 

CALIFORNIA 
WINE AGENCY. 

72 Trumbull St., HARTFORD, CONN. 



J. H. McKERNAN, BLUE LABEL CAFE, 



^afe. 



"Home Plate" Sample Room. 

532 MAIN STREET, 
HARTFORD, CONN. 



i\-i i\~ F. W. FRANZEN, Proprietor. 

Fine bottled WINES and 
LIQUORS a Specialty. ^ 
.,<* j* ^ Choice brands of 
UNION MADE CIGARS. 

Ladies' Cafk ocq ]W!;,: n St 

in connection. J ^ / IVlOlIl Ol. 



ROBERT MURPHY, 

WHOLESALE .*.*.* 
LIQUOR DEALER. 

Sole Agent for H. CLAUSEN & SON'S 
NEW YORK ALES <md LAGER. :•::•: 
FLANAGAN, NAY & CO'.S ALE. 



J. G. LANE, 



J* J* Importer and Wholesale 'Dealer in 

IMPORTED 
& DOMESTIC 



LIQUORS. 



210-212 State St., 



Hartford. Conn. 



222, 224 and 226 State Street, 
j* j* jt j» .jt HARTFORD, CONN. 



*H kH 'J* *H 'Jt *H %H 'Jt *H 'J* >*H *M ><H >Jt 'J* <M ><M 'M ><H >J* '<H 'J* 'J* *X <M 



COLISEUM CAFE, 

W. L. CROWLEY, Proprietor. 



589 

cMain Street. 



EVERYTHING FIRST-CLASS. 

%M %H -<H '<H -J* <M 'M *H %X ><H 'J* *H -*H <M *H <M *H '<H *M Ot <M •<£ *M *J* *M 

L 



THOMAS LAWLER, 

Liquor T>ealer t 



IMPORTER and WHOLESALE 



32 FroQt Street, 202 State Street, 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

BOURBON AND %YE WHISKEYS IN <B0ND AND TAX 7 AID, A SPECIALTY. 




llS. J^OCfy'S, 605 Ma,n St., 

^rfor Food or DrinK. 



Headquarters, 

Uhe Parsons Xheatre Cafe, 

J. B. RYAN, Proprietor. 

Hartford, Conn. 



Private Dining Room for 

banquets, bachelors' dinners 

and Theatre Parties. 



M. B. SMITH, 

"DISTILLER'S AGENT. 1MF0RTER, 



FROBEL & MUCKE, 

Lager Beer, Wine 

Whiskey and Wine Merchant, «< Lunch c Room. 

CHOICE LIQUORS AND CIGARS. 

288 Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 

—:••:- -sue- telephone. ->;;c— -**- 357 Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 

REINA GAFE, a """^ 



THE FINEST OF IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 
WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS. 

OTT&HARTLEBMN, 54 j Qfa $ f W[[ 

Proprietors. tttJ ' 



Headquarters for Trusses, Elastic Stockings, Supporters, etc. 

CURTIS P. GLADDING. 

Successor to STEPHEN GOODRICH & CO., 

Prescription Druggist, 1203 Mair) Street. 

TlSS ROSED ALE-^ ~~ 



PM 



Good enough 
for a King. 



LeschKe <& Pletcher, 

1037 Main Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 




'SFi 




L 




o 



TTO HEN KING, Sole Agent for... 

izz:"%v;i::r- piel bros. real German lager, 

A Specialty of German Delicacies and Lunches. 31 Temple Street. 

Piel Bros. Real German Bottled Beer. Hartford Conn. 




AUREL ^ PARR 



HIGH CLASS PLEASURE RESORT 
FOR LADIES AND CHILDREN. 



KLECTRIC LAUNCH, SWAN BOAT and ROW BOATS. 

COMPLETE ZOO containing many rare and beautiful animals 

and birds. 
LARGE DANCING PAVILION equipped <with electric 

fans. 

CAFE open daily. 

BAND CONCERT every pleasant Sunday during the season. 
DANCING every pleasant Saturday during the season. 
ELECTRIC MERRY-GO-ROIND and SWINGS. 

" t-Poitlt of Cities tf ^ the head of the Lake is, ^without doubt, the finest 
^^ grove for small picnic parties in the State. The Electric 
Launch ivill take parties to the Point at any hour. 



TAKE either SOUTH MANCHESTER or ROCKYTLLE CARS at CITY HALL 30 Minutes Ride. 



■*H.*B. + BRHINERD'S* 

decorating and Drapery Shop. 

84 PRATT ST. 

C. H. CASE. M. H. MILLER. 






ff.)f 



( ESTABLISHED 1867. ' 



NEW METHOD LAUNDRY. 

j* £ jt .j* ,jt ,jt .j* £. cA. W. <DE BARTHE, Proprietor. jt£j*jl<£<#jlj* 

SHIRTS STRICTLY HAND IRONED. 
SHIRT WAISTS (\ SPECIALTY. 

. . . 186 and 788 TARK STREET. 

CARDS. CARDS. CARDS. 

Name, Visiting and Business 

CARDS. 

SO CENTS PER HUNDRED. 

PASTERS, 20 Cents per Hundred. s, ' m anywhere on receipl of price. 

f Write for samples. 

. • . 

HARLEY M. BLAKESLEY. <P. O. Box 386, Hartford, Conn. 



The L. T. Frisbie Company, 

^MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN jt 

SOAP, GROUND SCRAPS, 

UTTYCC CT^TNTC 79 raIcott Street, 

illUliO t OJS^HNOf Hartford, Conn. 

WOOL SKINS, TALLOW, # 

SOAP STOCKS, SALT and Factorv , Rocfcv Hill , toI1I1 . 

FERTILIZER. J>J>J-&J-J-J> 



DIAMOND & CLARK, 

Packers of and j* * jt 
Dealers in all kinds of 

High Grade Tobacco 

Importers of 



Havana 



an 



d Sumatra, 



225 and 227 State Street, HARTFORD, CONN. 




Hartford's Bicycle Center. 

WE LEAD, OTHERS FOLLOW. 

GREATEST LINE OF BICYCLES IN AMERICA. 

Reading Standard, Olive, 
Warwiek, Yale and LeRoy. 



Prices $20.00 to $50.00. 

A Year's Guarantee. 

EXPERT REPAIRING, 
SUNDRIES and RENTING. 

ALEXANDER & ELMER COMPANY, 

E. H. EEMER, Proprietor, 



744 Main Street, 



Hartford, Conn. 



Index to Advertisements. 



A I'AGE. 

American Hotel, xlix 

Allyn House, 

American Bicycle Co., ij 

.•Etna Insurance Co., 

.Ktna National Bank, The xi 

.Etna Indemnity Co., xiii 

Austin Organ Co., xxvi 

Atlantic Screw Work-, xxvji 
Acme Machine Screw Co. The xxvii 

Amidon, F. S., xxix 

.Etna Brewing Co., xlvii 

Alexander Si Elmer ( , liv 

B 



Brown, Thomson & Co., 
Ballerstein, R. A Co., 
Broughel, Jr., Andrew I , 
Bullard, Herbert S., 
Buck & Eggleston, 
Bill, Tuttle A Dickenson, 
Burdett, Chas. L., 
Brainard, Austin, 
Bennett & Brott, 
Billing- A Spencer Co., The 
Beach, H. B. & Son, 
Brewer, C. S. & Co., 
Buellesbach & Rick, 
I '. u rr Index Ci i.. The 
Bishop, C. C. & Co., 
Britton. R. D. & Co., 
B sworth, S. B., 
Burgess, H. C, 
Balf, The Edward Co., 
Besse, P. & I., 
Bond, H. S., 
Berry & Cosgrove, 
Brainerd, H. 1!.. 
Blakesley, Harley M., 



xv 

xv i 

xvi 

xvii 

xvii 

xxii 

xxiii 

xxvi 

xxvii 

xxxv 

xxvi i 

xlix 

xlix 

\liii 

xliv 



Connecticut Mutual Life 

Insurance Co., The v 
Connecticut Trust and Safe 

Deposit Co.. viii 
Connecticut Building and 

Loan Association, The \ 

Cooley, Francis R., xiii 

Coogan, John W., xn 

in, 2d, J. T., xiv 

Clarke, Sidney E., xv 

Case, Bryant & Case, xvi 
Capewell Horse Nail Co. Th. 
Colt's Patent Fire Arms 

Mfg. Co., xix 
Carleton Foundry Co., The xxii 
Cushman Chuck Co., The xxiii 
Cheney Brothers, xxiv 
Curtis, D. J. <£ Son, xxxi 
Central New England Rail- 
way, The xxxiv 
Case, Lickwood & Brainard 

Co.. Tli- xxxv 

( 'lapp .v Treat. xxxix 
Chamberlin A Shattghnessy, xhii 

Clapp, Ji lin B. A Son, xliv 

Collateral Loan Co.. xlv 
Connecticut River Banking 

Co., xlv 

Crowley, \V. L., 1 

Case, C. H. & Co., hii 

Crocker'-, Hi 

D 

Doty, S. C '., xiii 

Dime Savings Bank, xiii 

Davis, I. B. & Son, xxi 

Dwyer, J. J., xxxiii 

Dunham Hosiery Co., The xxxiv 

Dom Hotel, New xli 

Duffy & O'Brien, xiii 

Dwight, H. C. A Co., xlv 

Deming, Wesley F.., xlix 

Diamond & Clark, liv 



Ens worth, L. L. & Son, xxvi 

Empire Steam Laundry, xxxvii 
Electric Vehicle Co., lvi 



xvi 

xxix 

xxxviii 

xliv 

xliv 



First National Bank, xi 
Freeman, Jr., Harrison B., xvi 

French, H. A., xxvi 

Fisher & Suisman, xxix 

Furrey, Ervin L., xxxix 

Fien, M. A: Katz, xliii 

Fo-ter, A. L. & ( o., xliii 

Fuller, E. A. .V \V. F., xliv 
Fi-cher, The Hurbert 

Brewery, xlviii 
Franzen, F. \\'., 

Frobel & Mttcke, li 

Fri-bie, The L. T. Co., liii 

G 

Garvan, Edward J.. xvi 

Gates, Andrew F., xvi 

( loslee, Henry S., 

Garvan, P., 

Geeley's, 

Gundlach, E. A: Co., 

Gross, Hyde A: Shipman 

( ireenberg, Leon, 

Gladding, Curtis P., Hi 

H 

Hartford Fire Ins. Co., iv 

Hartford Life Ins. Co., vii 

Hartford Tru-t Co., The vii 

Hartford National Bank, xii 

Hungerford, Hyde, Joslyn 
& Gilman, xv 

Holcomb A" Pierce, xvi 

Hartford Woven Wire 

Mattress Co., xxi 

Hartford Typewriter Co., 

The xxiii 

Hartford Machine Screw Co., xxv 

Hartford St. Railway Co., xxv 

Hatch & North Coal Co., 

1 he xxviii 

Hartford Electric Light Co., 
The 

Hartford Coal Co., 

Hartford Carriage Co.. Thi 

Hartford Paving and Con- 
struction Co., The 

Hartford & N. Y. Transpor 
tation Co., The 

Hartford Storage Co., The 

Hass, L. B. A: Co., 

Hills & Fox, 

Horsfall & Rothschild, 

Hartford Box Co., The 

Hills, C. S. A Co., 

Hart, The Chas. R. Co. 

Hansel. Sloan A ( 0., 

Heublein, G. F. & Co. 

Hartford, The 

Hill- A Marchant, 

Hartford Wire Works, 

Hart & Hegeman, 

Hartford County Mutual 

Fire Ins. Co., xlv 

Hartford Opera House, xlv 

Hirth. Joseph, 

Henning, < >tto, Hi 

Hartford Steam liuiler Inspec- 
tion and Ins. Co., 

Inside back cover. 



XXVill 

xxviii 

xxix 



XXXll 

xxxiii 

xxxiv 

xxx vi 

xx xvi 

xxxvii 

xxxviii 

xxxix 

xxxix 

xl 

xli 

xiii 

xliii 

xliii 



Jewell Belting Co., 


XX 


Johns-Pratt Co.. 1 he 


xxi 


K 




Kelly Brothers, 


x x x i 


Koch'-, Gus, 


li 


Kibbe Co., The E. S., 


\ xxii 


L 




Levy, Josiah W., 


xvii 


Libby & 1 llinn, 


XXX 


1 incoln, Seyms A Co., 


x.xxii 


Long's Hot. I. 


xli 


Langdon, T. II., 


xlv 


Lynch, F. P., 


1 


J.C., 


1 


I ,awler, Thos. , 


li 


Leschke & PI. 


Hi 


1 ..uirel Park, 


Hi 



M PAGE. 

Mildeberger, Henry D., xiv 

Markham, Daniel A., x\ 

Mix a McKone, xv 

Maltbie, Tneo. M., xv 

Marvin, L. P. Waldo xvii 

Mills, Hiram R., xvii 

Merrow Machine Co., The xxix 
Moore, Robert xxxi 

McManus, J. C. & Sons xxxviii 
Ml Int\ re A Clarkin xiii 

M. Clary, |ohn xliii 

Mo Reman, |. H., 1 

Murphy, Robert 1 

N 
National Fire Insurance Co., 
National \--urance Co., 
National Exchange Bank, 
New Madison, The 
Narragansett Brewing Co., 
New England Brewing Co., 
New Method Laundry, 

o 

< Irient Insurance Co., 
O'Flaherty, Hugh 
Ott A Hartleben 

P 
Phoenix Mutual Life Ins. Co. 
Pho nix Insurance Co., 
Parker, Francis H., 
Peine, ( I. Hazard 
Perkins Electric Switch Ml^. 
Co., The 



IV 

viii 
xiii 
xl\ 
xlvi 
xlvii 



Palmer, 11. W. & Co., 


XXXIII 


Pars, mis Theatre, 


xxx v i 


Q 




Quinn, James (., 


xvii 


R 




Ripley Art Co., The J. C, 


xxxix 


Rice & Baldwin Electric Co 


., xlv 


Ropkins A Co., 


xlvi 


Ryan, J. B., 


li 


S 




Scottish Union and Nationa 


1 


Insurance Co., 


ix 


Security Co., 


xii 


Stoner, George J., 


xiv 


Stanton, Lewis E., 


xiv 


Scharton, William R., 


xiv 


Shepherd, Forrest 


XV 


Sperry & McLean, 


XIV 


Stearns, Henry Stuart 


x\ i 


Scott, Frederick A., 


xvii 


Smith, liourn A' Co., 


xxiii 


Slate Machine Co., Dwight 


xxv 


Strickland & Shea, 


xxvi 


Southern New England 




Paving Co., 


xxx 


Scoville, W. H., 


xxxi 


Spencer, George F. A Co., 


xxxiii 


Simons A Fox, 


xx.xvi 


Si-son. T. A Co., 


xx xvi 


Stuart. Photographer 


xxxvii 


Sage, Allen & Co., 


* X x \ i i i 


Smith A McDonough, 


xxxix 


Scott & Smith, 


xiii 


Sigourney House, 


xliii 


Si >by Cigar, 


xliii 


Strant, C. II. & Co., 


xliv 


Smith, M. B., 


li 


T 




The Travelers' In-. Co., 


vi 


Tay lor Lumber Co., The 




Edwin 


xxvii 


Tucker A Goodw in, 


xxxii 


Tucker s S. ms, E., 


X X X i i 


V 




Van \aine A Co., 


xiiv 


Veeder Mfg. Co., The 


xlv 


W 




Williams, Allred A. Sons, 


i 


W Iford A Ripley, 


X 


Williams, Harry R., 


xvii 


\\ hitney Mfg. Co., The 


xxvii 


Watsi in, In ksi mi .\ Co., 


xxxi 


Wind-' r 1 1 


xli 


\\. st, \ B A ( 


xiii 



Columbia Automobiles* 



ELECTMC. 
GASOLENE. 



Now in the Sixth Year of Service. 




ELECTRIC AUTOMOBILE POLICE PATROL. 

fHIS VEHICLE, the contract for which was recently awarded to this 
Company by the Hartford Police Commission, will be one of the first 
electric police wagons to be operated in this country. It was designed 
after standard horse-drawn patrol wagons in use in the large cities. It is to 
be provided with medical and surgical supplies, and being equipped with 
heavy rubber tires, it can, in cases of emergency, be made to serve the pur- 
pose of an ambulance. A charging plant is to be erected in the police stable 
which, with an extra set of batteries, will provide ever-available power for the 
wagon. The running radius on one charge will be twenty-five miles, and a 
speed of eleven miles per hour can be attained. There are seating accom- 
modations for ten persons inside, but the two seats may be lowered against 
the sides, largely increasing the carrying capacity. 

Vehicles for Every Form of Pleasure Touring, 
Transportation and Delivery Service. 

electric Vehicle Companp, 

HARTFORD, CONN. 




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