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Full text of "Historic notes and Canadian medical lore : lecture memoranda, British Medical Association, Toronto, 1906"

Historic Notes and 
Canadian Medical Lore 




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COLLESI Of PHA'RM^CY 

TORONTQ-, 




Sectional 
Index 

PAGE 
Canadas 

Progress 75 



Chronology 


77 


Formulary of 
B. W. & Co. 
Products 


"3 


Historic Notes 


11 


Historical 
Medical 
Equipments 


83 


Indians in 
Canada 


22 


Indian Medical 
Lore 


39 


' Kepler ' 
Products 


"5 


Materia 
Medica of 
Indians 


S3 


Medical 
Education 


61 


Medical Lore 
of Canada 


39 


Postal 
Information 


7 


' Soloid ' 
Products 


134 


' Tabloid ' 
Medical 
Equipments 


97 



' Tabloid ' 
Products 114, 
X20, Z26, 128, 140 



' Wellcome ' 
Brand 
Products 132, 169 




John Cabot and his son Sebastian 



Historic Notes 

AND 

Canadian Medical Lore 
ONTARIO 

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

4.4 GERRARD ST. £. 
TORONTO, 

LECTURE MEMORANDA 
'^ > <« British Medical Association 

< * F K TORONTO 



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1906 



BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. 
London (Eng.)i Sydney, Cape Town 

Cn. 13 




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Aborigines of Canada ... 

Algonquins 

Amerigo Ve.spucci 

Analysis Cases, ' Soloid ' Brand 

Argall, Samuel ... 

Bacteriological Case, ' Soloid ' Bran< 

Cabot, John and Seba.stian 

Canadian Progress 

Cartier, Jacques 

Champlain, Samuel de... 

Chemicals, ' Wellcome ' Brand 

Chronology 

Cortereal, Gaspar 

Discovery of Canada ... 

Dressings, Pleated, Compressed, ' Tal 

Education, Medical 

Edwartl Yl 

' Enule ' Products 

Exports ... 

E.xtracts, 'Wellcome' Brand... 

Formulary of B. \V. & Co. Product 

Franklin, Sir John 

Fuca, Juan de . . . 

Galenicals, ' Wellcome ' Brand 

' Hazeline ' Products ... 

Hearne, Samuel 

' Hemisine ' 

Henry VII 

Historic Medical Equipments 

Hospitals 

Hud.son Bay Company 

Hudson, Henry 

Hyi>(idcrmic Products, 'Tabliiiil' I' 

Imports ... 



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B 



rand 



IncantntiDns 

Indhin Mcilicul Lcnc 

Indians uf Canada 

Iroquois ... 

' Kepler ' Products 

Kirke, Sir David 

Laval, Francois de 

Levi, Chevalier de 

Mackenzie, Alexander 

Materia Medica of the Lidians 

Medical Education 

Medical Equipments, Historic 

Medicine Cases, 'Tabloid' lirnnd 

"Medicine Men " ... 

Montcalm, ^Larquis de 

Montreal, Founding of 

North-West Passage ... 

Ophthalmic Products, 'Tahlnid' Brand 

"Oqui" 

Phipps, Sir William 

Photographic Products, ' Tabloid ' Brant 

Population of Canadian Towns 

Prideau.x, General 

Progress of Canada 

Quebec, Foundation of 

Rae, Dr. 

Religion of Indians 

Roberval 

Serums, ' Wellcome ' Brantl ... 

' Soloid ' Prtxlucts 

Suppositories, ' Enule ' Brand 

Sweat-Lodge 

'Tabloid' Medical Equipments 

' Tal)Ioid ' Products 

Tinctures, 'Wellcome' Brand 

Verruzzano, John 

Universities 

War between French and English ... 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products ... 

Wolfe, General... 



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CANADIAN POSTAL INFORMATION 



LETTER RATES, ETC. 

Letters posted in Canada, addressed to any place within 
the Dominion, 2 cents per oz. If unpaid, such letters cannot be 
forwarded, but will be sent to the Dead Letter Office. If 
partially prepaid, the letter will be forwarded to its destination 
and double the deficiency charged on delivery. Letters mailed at 
any office for delivery at or from the same office, provided that 
the office is not one at which free delivery by letter carriers is 
established, are charged i cent per oz., and must be at least 
partially prepaid ; otherwise they are sent to the Dead Letter 
Office. Letters of this nature mailed at and for delivery from an 
office at which there is a free delivery by letter carriers are liable 
to 2 cents per ounce. All postage must be prepaid by postage 
stamps. 

United Kingdom, and British Possessions and Protectorates. 

Postage on Letters, 2 cents per i oz. 

Foreign Countries, except United States. 

Postage on letters, 5 cents per i oz. 

United States. — The rate on letters to the United States is 
the same as in Canada, and at least one rate must be prepaid. 

It is very important to bear in mind that the postage upon 
letters for the United Kingdom and all foreign countries, except 
United States, is- calculated by the half ounce and double the 
deficient postage is charged on all unpaid or short paid letters. 

Post Cards. — From any place in Canada to any place in 
Canada, or to the United States, i cent each. British and 
Foreign, 2 cents each. 

Private Post Cards.— The face of a private Post Card 
may be used for advertisements, illustrations, etc., provided that a 
clear space of at least ^ inch is left along each of the four sides of 
the postage stamp, and a clear space 3:^ inches long and lA inches 
wide reserved for the address at the lower right hand corner of 
the card. Private Post Cards must not exceed a size of 6 inches 
in length by 3I inches in width. Cards exceeding these limits 
are treated as insufficiently paid letters. The words " Private 
Post Card " must be written or printed on tlie face of private post 
cards addressed to places outside of Canada. 

Pictorial Private Post Cards which have communi- 
cations ON Address side. — Cards which have the back 
covered by a picture, and one-half of the front to the left of 
the address space reserved for written comnuinications, are 
admitted as post cards when addressed to places in Canada, 
the United States, Great Britain, France, Switzerland, Italy and 
Tunis. The rate for Canada and the United States i cent, and 
for the other countries 2 cents, 



roSTAr, INKORMATION 



REGISTRATION OF LETTERS 

Persons posting letters containing value should be careful to 
require them to be registered, and to obtain from the Postmaster 
a certificate of receipt of registration. 

The charge for registration in addition to the postage is, on all 
classes of matter, 5 cents. 

Registered letters posted at and addressed to any P.O. within 
the Dominion of Canada may be insured against loss for amounts 
not exceeding $25. 

BOOK POST, ETC. 

A Bo(ik Packet may contain any number of separate l)ooks. 
Limit of weight for tlomestic post, 5 lbs. (unless consisting of a 
single book, in which case a weight of 10 lbs. is allowed) ; for 
foreign post, 4 lbs. Limit of size, two feet in length, or one foot 
in width or depth. 

Book packets must be open at both ends or both sides, and 
must not contain any letter or sealed enclosure. 

The rate on Book Packets for delivery in Canada, Great 
Britain, the United States and all Postal Union Countries, is 
I cent per 2 oz. 

NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS 

All newspapers anil periodicals posted in Canada, other than 
Canadian newspapers sent from the office of publication and 
British and foreign newspapers posted by newsagents for regular 
subscribers in Canada, when addressed to anv place within the 
Dominion, the United Kingdom, certain British Colonies, or the 
United .States, nnist be prepaid the following rates by postage 
stamp : — 

If posted singly and weighing not more tlian i nz., half a 
cent each. 

If weighing over i oz., one cent per 4 oz., or fraction of 
4 oz. 

PARCEL POST WITH THE UNITED KINGDOM, 

NEWFOUNDLAND AND OTHER BRITISH 

COLONIES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

Closed parcels may be exchanged with the United Kingdom, 
Newfoundland, and most foreign countries and British colonies. 

The dimensions of a parcel addresseil to tlie LInited 
Kingdom must not exceed 30 in. in length, or i ft. in width or 
depth, nor must the combined length and girth of any parcel 
exceed 6 ft. The dimensions of a parcel addressed to anv 
country other than the United Kingdom, must not exceed 2 ft. 
in length by I ft. in wudth or depth. 

For each parcel the sender must fill up a Customs Declar- 
atioh. On this form the sender will supply an accurate statement 
of the contents and value of the parcel ; also the address thereof. 



POSTAL INFOKiMATlON 



with signature and place of abode of the sender. The Customs 
Declaration must be securely affixed by mucilage or paste to the 
parcel to which it relates. 

Parcels from the United Kingdom or any other place beyond 
the Dominion will be liable to Canadian Custom Duties, and 
under existing regulations must be examined for the purpose 
by an Officer of the Customs i)i the presence of the persons 
addressed. 

Rates and limits of weight vary. See Postal Guide, or enquire 
at a post office. 

Parcels must be handed to the postmaster ; in no case should 
they be dropped into a letter box or other receptacle for mail 
matter. 

POST OFFICE MONEY ORDERS 

On Money Orders drawn by any Money Order Office in 
Canada on any other Money Order Office in the Dominion, the 
United States, British Guiana, Barbados, Grenada, St. Lucia, 
St. Vincent, the Leeward Islands, or Newfoundland, the 
commission is as follows : — 

.•$5 and under ... 3 cents Over $30 and up to $50, 15 cents 
Over 5 and up to $10, 6 ,, „ 50 ,, 75.25 ,, 

.. 10 ,, 30, 10 ,, ,, 75 ,, 100, 30 ,, 

The commission on Money Orders issued in the Yukon, 
payable in Canada, Newfoundland, the United States, or any of 
the places above-mentioned, is double the aliove rates. 

No single Money Order can be issued for more than Si 00 ; but 
as many oi^ioo each may be given as the remitter requires. 

Money Orders are issued in Canada on most foreign countries 
and British possessions, at the rates of commission shown 
below : — 



For -811111: 


5 not 




For 


sums 


not 




exceeding 


$10, 10 cents 




exceeding 


.■^560, 60 cents 


)) )? 


?» 


20, 20 ,, 


J J 


) » 


TT 


70, 70 ,, 


)i ) » 


ij 


30, 30 ,, 


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80, 80 „ 


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40, 40 ,, 


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90. 90 >. 


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50, 50 >. 


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EGAL 


WEIGHTS AND 


Measures 


IN CANADA 



The legal weights and measures of Canada are the Lnperial 
yard. Imperial pound avoirdupois. Imperial gallon (of 277-27384 
cubic inches), and the Imperial bushel. The Imperial gallon is 
equal to 4-54174 litres, while the wine gallon used in the United 
States is ecjual to 3-785 litres. The Im])erial fluid oimce of 
437' 5 grains is legal for pharmaceutical purposes ; 25 of these are 
equal to 24 fluid ounces of the wine measure used in the United 
States, and thus 25 Imperial minims equal 24 American minims. 

The British hundredweight of 112 pounds and the ton of 
2,240 pounds have l)een abolished, and the hundredweight is 
declared to be 100 pounds, and the ton 2,000 jiounds avoirdupois, 
thus assimilating the weights of Canada and the United States. 




Sebastian Cabot 
From a picture by Holbein 



Historic notes 

AND 

Medical Lore of Canada 

On May 2nd, 1497, "The Matthew", a Httle caravel of 
about sixty tons burden, with sails outspread, glided down 
the Bristol Channel and commenced a voyage which 
was to influence the destinies of nations. 




An early Explorer landing on the Canadian Coast 
From a wcodcut cf the XV century 

The Captain of the vessel was one, John Cabot, a 
Venetian by birth, but for some time resident in the city 
of Bristol. Of his crew and officers, who are 

John Cabot 

said to have numbered eighteen all told, no the 
record of their names is known to exist. Little '^'^°'""'^l 
indeed is known of llieir inticpid commander, 
whose achievement proved of such magnitude, beyond 
the fact that he had obtained a patent from Henry \'IL 



HISTORIC NOTES 



King 

Henry VII 
grants 
him a 
patent 



The record is dated March 5lh, 1496, and states, that 
the King granted letters patent to John Cabot 
and his three sons, Lewis, Sebastian, and 
Sanchio, empowering them " at their own 
expense, to discover and take possession for 
England of new lands not before found by any 
Christian nation." 

Cabot laid his course north-west across the Atlantic to 
face the wild waves of a vast unknown, bestrewn by 
icebergs, darkened by fog's, and oft swept by fierce 
tempests. One can imagine this man, with a resolution 




Au Expedition crossing the Atlantic 
From an MS. of the XV Century 

as inexorable as the doom, as he boldly set his course 

across the great Atlantic, to penetrate beyond the bounds 

where the most daring had hitherto feared to venture. 

For fift)--two days the little craft, battling with wind and 

waves, traversed the waste of waters, when, as 
discovered '^^"'^ suH arose ou the morning of June 24th, the 

welcome cry of "Land Hoi" rang from the 
look-out man at the mast-head. The sight of those 
unknown shores was greeted by the ship's company with 
rousing English cheers. 



HISTORIC NOTES 13 



Cabot gave to the spot where he first touched the name 
of Prima Vista, and there he planted the Enghsh flag, 
together with that of Saint Mark and a large Cross. 
It is improbable that he realized at that time the 
greatness of his discovery, for he reported on his return, 
that he had reached the territory of the Grand Khan, so 
that, like Columbus, he thought the western coast of the 
Atlantic where he landed was the eastern shore of Asia. 

After exploring along the coast for twelve or fourteen 
days, Cabot turned the bow of his caravel homewards, 
and on August 6th he arrived back safely to the port 
of Bristol, after an absence of ninety-six days. 

It would appear that Cabot remained but a short time in 
that city, and then journeyed to London to report to 
King Henry the result of his voyage. It is 
probable that the monarch, like the navigator, ^^^°l^^ 
did not realize the importance of the latter's and his 
discovery. All that is known is recorded in 
the accounts of the Royal Privy Purse, where the following 
entry appears, under the date of August loth, 1497 : — 
"To Hym that found the New Isle ^10." 

This for the discovery of a continent 1 Two letters, 
written at the time of Cabot's discovery, make interesting 
references to his voyage. One of these, written by 
Lorenzo Pasqualigo, a Venetian, then resident in London, 
was discovered in Milan some years ago. It is dated 
August 23rd, 1497, and in it the writer states : 

" This Venetian of ours in a ship from Bristol, in quest 
of new islands is returned, and says that 700 leagues 
hence he discovered /erra firina which is the territory of 
the Great Khan. The King is much pleased 
with the intelligence. He has also given him "^'^'^ 'Great 

1 -1 1-1/- I . • Admiral' 

money wherewith to amuse himself, and he is 
now in Piristol with his wife, who is a V^enetian woman, 
and with his sons. His name is Zuan Cabot, and they call 
him the ' Great Admiral '. 

" \'asl honours are |)aid lo liini, and lu- dresses in silk ; 
and these English run after him like mad people, so that 
he can enlist as many of llicin as lie ])leases." 







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Juan de la Cosa s Map of the American Coast, A.D. 1500 

Juan de la Cosa sailed with Columbus on his first and second 

voyages. The above map purports to be a copy of John Cabot's 

chart of his first voyage, copied in MS. by de la Cosa at the close 

of the year 1500 



HISTOKIC NOTES 15 



In another letter from one Raimondo di Soncino, which 
is dated December i8th, 1497, the writer states : 

" This Master Zoanne Caboto has the description of the 
world in a chart and also in a solid globe which he 
has made." 

Unfortunately neither this globe nor the chart have 
ever been found, and not a single line written by Cabot 
himself seems to have escaped the wreck of time. 

A second patent was granted to John Cabot alone, 
which is dated February 3rd, 1498, authorizing 
him " to sail with six ships to the land and isles of Second 

'■ , patent 

late found by the said John in our name and by granted 
our commandment." From that date John 
Cabot's name disappears from contemporary records. 

Sebastian, who accompanied his father on his first 
voyage, appears to have commanded the second 
expedition, and boldly steered to the north- Sebastian 
west, risking the icebergs along the rugged '^^^°^^^ 
coasts of Labrador as far north as Hudson voyages 
Strait. When compelled to return, owing to 
the intense cold, he sailed south as far as 38" north, 
thus discovering the whole coast of North .America from 
Hudson Strait to Florida. Soon after his return to 
England, he was invited by Ferdinand of Spain to enter 
his service, which he did and remained for over thirty 
years, but in his old age he returned again to England, 
when Edward \^I bestowed on him a pension of ^166 as a 
mark of respect. He lived until nearly eighty years of 
age and died in London about the year 1557. 

Commercially the newly-discovered land was regarded 
as a failure, and the continent which was destined for so 
great a future was for the time neglected. 

Meanwhile, the Bretons and Normans, the Basques of 
France and Spain, together with the Portuguese, ^^^ ^ 
grasped that which England practically aban- eariy 
doned. Navigators from these countries set out ^°y*&"s 
to explore the new land. Among these was Amerigo 
Vespucci, an Italian by birth, who early in life settled 
in Spain. He sailed along the entire coast of the Mexican 
Ciuif and some distance up the shores of what is now 



ir> 



HISTORIC NOTES 



called Carolina. He made a second voyage to South 
America in 1499, and explored along the Northern coast 
line as far as Venezuela. 

In the year 1500, Caspar Cortereal, a Portuguese 

navigator, crossed the Atlantic and touched at 

Cortereal Labrador and Newfoundland ; and in 1524 the 

and John Frcncli despatched to the New World John 

\'erruzzano, who sailed down the Atlantic Coast 

of Nova Scotia and named the country New France. 

Then came Jacques Cartier, a sturdy and courageous 
French navigator, who discovered the St. Law- 
rence, which was at once the entrance to 
Canada, and the ocean gateway of its great 
freshwater lakes. 



Jacques 
Cartier 



Born in 1494 at St. Malo, in Brittany, he went to sea 

when a mere lad, and 
in 1 534 was selected by 
Philippe de Brion-Chabot, 
Admiral of France, to 
lead an exploring expedi- 
tion to the New World. 

During his first voyage 
he sailed up the St. Law- 
rence to Anticosti Island, 
and on the second he 
penetrated past the grim 
and frowning entrance to 
the Suguenay, until he 
reached the Isle 
d'O r 1 e a n s, which he 
called Bacchus, on 
account of the grapes 
found there b\- his crew. 




Jacques Cartier 



During his third visit in 1541, Cartier met with some 
hostility from the Indians, and eventually returned to 
France, where he died in 1557. 

In his narration of "the voyage to Canada or Newe 
France," in 1535, Cartier gives the following interesting 



IIISTOKIC NOTES 



account of a disease that attacked his crew : 

" In the months of December we understoode that the 
plague or pestilence was come to the people of Stadagona 
in such sort, that before we knew of it, according 
to their confession there were dead about fifty, earner's 

Account 0( 

whereupon we forbade them neyther to come a curious 
near us on foote nor about our ships. And albeit, ^'^^^^^ '" 
we had driven them from us the said unknown 
sickness beganne to spread itself amongst us after 
the strangest sort that e\'er was eyther heard of or seen, 
insomuch as some did lose all their strength and could 
not stand on their feete, then did their legs swell, their 
sinnows shrinke as black as any cole. To others all their 
skinnes were spotted with spottes of bloode of a purple 
couloure, then did it ascende up alofte to their anckles, 
knees, thighes, shoulders, armes, and necke ; theyre 
mouth became stincking, theyr gummes so 
rotten that all the flesh did fall off, even to Symptoms 
the rootes of theyr teeth which did also almost 
all fall out. With such infection did this sicknesse 
spread itselfe in our three shippes, that about the middle 
of Februar)' of One Hundred & Tenne persons that 
we were, not tenne whole so that one coulde not helpe 
the other a most horrible and pitifull case. 

" The daye Philip Rougement, borne in Amboisa, dieti, 
being two and twenty years olde, and because the 
sicknesse was to us unknown. Our Capitayne caused him 
to be ripped to see if by any means possible we might 
know what it was and to seeke means to save and preserve 
the reste of the Companie. He was founde to have his 
heart white but rotten and more than a pottle of red water 
about it. His liver was indititerente faire, but 
his lungs black and mortified. His bloud was ^°^' 

. , . ., Mortem 

altogether shrunk aboute his heart ; his milt Appearance 
towards the back was somewhat perished and 
rough as if it had been rubbed against a stone. More- 
over because one of his thighes was very blac k without, 
it was opened, but within was whole and sound, lliat 
done as well as we could he was buried. 



HISTflKIC NOTES 



" In such sorte did tlie sickness continue cncrease that 
there were not aliove three sounde men in the shippe. 

" We were so oppressed and greved with that sickness 
that we had lost all hope ever to see France againe, if 
God in His infinite mercie had not revealed a singular and 
excellente remedy unto us. Oure Capitayne considering 
cure estate one daye went forthe walking, when he saw a 
troupe of thoso countrymen coming from Stadagona, 
among which was Domagaia who not passing tenne or 
twehe dayes before had been very sick with that disease. 
Oure Capitayne seeing him whole and sounde was thereat 
marvellous glad. He asked Domagaia how he had done 
to heale hymselfe. He answered that he had take the juice 

and sappe of the leaves of a certayne tree and 
The Cure therewith had healed hymselfe. Our Capitayne 

asked him if any were to be had thereabout, 
desiring him to show it him. Domagaia straight sent 
two women to fetch some of it whyche brought tenne 
or twelve branches of it and therewithal showed us the 
waye how to use it, and that is thus : to take the barkeand 
leaves of the said tree and boile it together, then to drinke 
of the saide decoction one daye and the other not, and the 
dregges of it to be put upon his legges that is sicke. The 
tree is in their language called Aincda. Oure Capitayne 
presently caused some of that drinke to be made, but 
there was none durst taste of it, e.xcept one or two who 
ventured the drinking of it onely to taste and prove it, 
the others seeing that did the like and presently 
recovered their health and were delyvered of that sick- 
nesse soe\'er. 

" After this medicine was found e and proved to be true 
there was much strife about it that they were readie to kill 
one another, that a tree as bigge as anye oake in France 
was spoyled and lapped bare." 

In 1592, Juan de Fuca is stated to have followed the 
Juan Mexican and Californian coast until he reached 

de Fuca j|,p broad inlet of the sea which now bears his 

name, and forms the Southern limit of Canada on the 
Western Ocean. 



HISTORIC NOTES 



19 



The central figure, however, ot Canadian internal 
exploration and pioneer colonization was Samuel de 
Champlain, for after Cabot's discovery the 

French ad- Samuel 

de 
venturers Champlain 

were the first 
to attempt to colonize 
the new Continent. 
While Cabot first set 
foot on the Canadian 
half of the Continent, 
and Cartier led the way 
up the St. Lawrence 
to vast unknown fields 
of discovery, Cham- 
plain, the father of 
French Canada, was 
the pioneer in practical 
work and in the syste- 
matic exploration of 
the interior of the 
country. 




Samuel de Champlain 



Born in 1 5A7 at Brouage, in Western France, when 
thirty-six years of age he joined with one Pontgrave, an 
adventurous merchant sailor of St. Malo, and Pierre du 
Guast, Sieur de Monts, a chivalrous noble of Henry IV's 
Court, in an expedition to investigate the unknown regions 
of New France. The expenses of the undertaking were 
guaranteed by M. de Chastes, (Governor of Dieppe, 
who was anxious to see France in the fore-front of 
American settlement. 

The expedition sailed up the river as far as the rapids 
of St. Louis, and then after some exploration along the 
coast, in 1604, they returned to France. In 1608, 
a settlement was made by Chamijlain on the cimmp- 
shores of St. Lawrence, and the foundations Expeditions 
of the city of Quebec were laid under the 
shadow of the great rock which has frowned upon such 
varied scenes of historic strife. Man\- explorations into 



HISTORIC NOTF.S 



the interior followed, together with constant struggles with 
the Iroquois, but Champlain never relaxed his efforts to 
establisli the new France which he had made the work 
of his life. He struggled on for two years after the 
temporary occupation of Quebec by the English, but 
succumbed and died in P^ort St. Louis, on Christmas 
Day, 1635. 

The French adventurers, traders and missionaries were 
the first civilized men to penetrate far into the interior of 

the Canadian Continent. They passed from the 
The St. Lawrence through the great lakes of Huron 

Canadian '^^^ Superior, and by the many hazardous 
Colonists rivers and streams to Winnipeg, thence they 

ascended the Saskatchewan l^eyond the 
103'^'^ meridian, where they planted their most distant 
trading post. 

Early in the Seventeenth Centun,', Henry Hudson, an 

English pioneer, ascertained the existence of 

Hudson 'ind explored a great inland sea accessible from 

and his the Atlantic side of the New Continent. In his 

discovery 

honour this was named Hudson Bay, and in the 
year 1670, the whole region surrounding the Bay was 
granted by the British Crown to the Society of Merchants, 
ever since known as the Hudson Bay Company. 

To the (]reat Company, as it was also called, and 

its agents, Canada is largely indebted, for 

of "" ^ '°" owing to the persistent exertions of these 

Hudson pioneer colonists, great tracts of unknown 

Company territory were explored and opened up for 

trade. 

Between 1769 and 1772, Samuel Hearne, an agent of 
the Company, made journeys, on foot and in canoes, 
a thousand miles west from the place of his 
H^TrTe' departure on Hudson Bay. He discovered 

and his Great Slave Lake and traced the Copper Mine 

exporaions j^j^.^j. ^^ jj.g moutli in the Arctic Ocean ; while 

Alexander Mackenzie of the North- West Fur Trading Co., 



HISTORIC NOTHS 21 



between the years 1789 and 1793 was the first civihzed 
man to penetrate the Rocky Mountains and cross the 
continent to the Canadian Pacific coast. He ascended 
the Peace River to its source, and explored to its mouth 
the great river that now bears his name. 

The North-West Passage, a problem which had baffled 
the energy and skill of many navigators and explorers, 
remained unsolved at the beginning of the Nineteenth 
Century. 

The indomitable perseverence and heroic endurance 
displayed in the expeditions that went forth at this time 
will cause them to be ever remembered in Canadian 
History. 

In 1 8 19 an Arctic Land Expedition was organized 
under the command of Captain Franklin. He explored 
the Red River, the Cumberland House of the 
Saskatchewan, and thence by Fort Chipewayan, "^^^ 

• 7 1 /-< ■\ » ■ t ■ Franklin 

Port Enterprise, and the Copper Mine River Expeditions 
to the Arctic coast. In 1825 Franklin started 
on a second expedition, and having reached Lake Ontario, 
he passed by the way of Lakes Huron and Superior to the 
Red River, and thence traversed the country to Great 
Bear Lake, where he wintered. 

Another expedition, sent out by the Hudson Bay 
Company, was commanded b)- Dr. Rae, a medical 
practitioner. He and his party reached 
Chesterfield inlet, wintered in Repulse Bay, physician 
and completed a survey of almost the entire *"'' 

Explorer 

coast of the North American Continent. Alone, 
in the year 1849, he passed down the Copper Mine River 
in quest of Franklin, who was missing, and in the following 
year renewed his search. He travelled over ice for nearly 
1,100 miles, at an average rate of from twenty-five to 
twenty-six miles a day, and made the fastest long Arctic 
journey known. It was Rae who brought the tidings of 
the sad fate of .Sir John Franklin's final expedition, for 
which he received a reward of $50,000, which had been 
offered l5v the British Government. 



22 HISTOKIC NOTES 



THE ABORIGINES OF CANADA 

No account of the histor}' of Canada would be complete 
without some brief reference being made to the aboriginal 
inhabitants of the Continent. When the first explorers 
made their way into the wilds of Canada, they soon came 
into conflict with the \arious Indian nations who 

inhabited the country. The great family of the 
Nations Algonquins extended right up through the 

centre of the Continent. They formed the 
chief central race of early Canada, and reached in scattered 
masses from the Atlantic to Lake Winnipeg, and from 
the Carolinas to Hudson Bay. Cartier met them when 
he ascended the St. Lawrence, and the early English 
settlers encountered them along the coast of Virginia. 

The Delawares and Shawnees were branches of this 
race. Other branches dwelt along the shores of the 
Atlantic, and in the wastes north of Lakes Michigan, 
Superior and Huron. The latter tribes included the 
( )jibiways, the Pottawatamies, and the Ottawas, who at 
one time were partly allied and formed a check on the 
conquests of the Iroquois. In this region were also the 
Sacs, the Foxes, and other small divisions of the 
Algonquin race. 

The Iroquois stretched across what afterwards became 
the State of New York, into Ontario and Quebec, 
and included the Mohawks, the Oneidas, Onondagas, 
Cayugas, and Senecas. Another race not inferior in 
courage to the Iroquois were the Hurons who almost 
disappeared before the close of the Seventeenth Century. 

However the religions of the Indian races slightly 
differ, they all appear to believe in spiritual manifestations 
and interventions. They suppose the air to be 
beii'e^r"^ pcoplcd with fncudly or hostile spirits, and 
believe in the power of their medicine men to 
control the demons of disease and death. The Indians 
put the gieatest faith in dreams, and oratory is regarded 
as almost as great a factor in success as bravery. 

In the wars between the French and English and 
Americans, which ra\aged North America for nearly three 



THE ABORIGINES OF CANADA 



23 



centuries, the Indians exercised no small influence. The 
Algonquins and Hurons stood by the French, while the 
Iroquois and some minor tribes fought for the British. 

But whatever faults the Indian may have, he has 
always been faithful to those who have been true to him, 
true to their individual engagements, and true to their 
national pledges. Though his career as a nomadic, 
freeborn savage is now closed, to the British Crown and 
the Canadian Provinces he has in the past century been 
friendly, a fact which redounds alike to the credit of the Flag 
of England and to the honour of the Dominion of Canada. 




Champlain's Astrolabe 



24 HISTORIC NOTES 



THE STRUGGLE FOR A CONTINENT 

For the greater part of a century the Enghsh and 
French fought for mastery of the Continent to which 
each laid claim. Sometimes with the aid of the Indians, 
and at others through wars involving the Home nations, 
or in strife between the Colonists, the great struggle 
went on. 

Between 1534 and 1628 iJe Monts and de Roberval, 

Cartier and Champlain founded the settlements 

coL"nies ""^ Nova Scotla and Quebec, and took nominal 

possession for the French Crown of a vast region 

north and south of the St. Lawrence. 

Meanwhile the British had settled in Virginia and 

New England, and established themselves in 

Early Newfoundland and also upon the borders of 

British . ' 

Settlements the great northern bay, in whose dark and 
oft ice-bound waters Henry Hudson met both 
fame and death. 

Acadia was the scene of the first conflict between the 
English and P'rench, which was to lead to such prolonged 
^. strife. This action was due to Samuel 

I he 

First Argall of Virginia, who, in 161 3, whollv 

^^ up-rooted the P^rench at Port Royal and 

established a temporary British Colony in its place. 

The French claims to Canada were based on Cartier's 
discover)- of the St. Lawrence and the explorations of 
Champlain, while the English claimed the Atlantic 
countries and an indefinite territor)^ inland by virtue of 
the Cabots' still earlier discoveries. 

Thus commenced the great struggle, not onh- between the 
national governments and military forces of the countries 
concerned, but also between Colonists whose descendants 
were to occupy the soil, either as rulers or ruled. For nearh" 
130 )'ears the strife continued until the Treaty of Paris, 
made on February loth, 1763, closed the jjrotracted 
warfare, and b)- it the Canadian Continent passed into 
British hands. 



FOUNDATION OF AND FIGHT FOR OUEBEC 



Champlain 

founds 

Quebec 



THE FOUNDATION OF AND FIGHT FOR QUEBEC 

When Champlain ascended the river St. Lawrence 
with the object of estabhshing a settlement, he 
at length decided upon a spot near the Indian 
village of Stadacona, where he landed on the 
3rd July, 1608. 

Huts were soon erected, a storehouse built, lands cleared 
and sown with wheat and rye, and a few gardens made to 
ascertain the quality of the soil, which proved to be excellent. 
Here he was joined by four priests of the Recollet order 
in 161 2, and in 1625 a Mission of Jesuits was sent out from 
France and received by the Recollets in a house they had 
built on the banks of the St. Charles, on the site of which 
the Quebec General Hospital was afterwards built. 




Champlain's Map of Quebec, about 1612 

About this time hostilities broke out between England 
and France, and Sir David Kirke appeared before Quebec 
in 1628, with an English fleet, to summon 
Champlain to surrender. He returned so be"!e^ed 
spirited an answer that Kirke left the town for 
the time, but returned in the following summer with a 
stronger force, and oftercd such honourable Passes 
terms to the little garrison, that Champlain, 1"'° 

. ' British 

nnding resistance useless, gave in, and resign- hands 
ing the fortress into their hands, returned to France. 



r 



/ 



\' 



.r ^\ 



(-"■•?. r- 










^mm^^ ^^ 



V 




Ml 



1 ' 







FOUNDATION OF AND FIGHT FOK QUEBEC 



27 



The population of Quebec at this time scarcely num- 
bered a hundred souls, and Montreal and Three Rivers 
comprised but a few log huts. 

After three years the Colony was again restored to France 
by the Treaty of St. Germain-en-Laye, and Champlain 
returned once more to resume charge of the settlement. 

About [638 the Hotel Dieu, probably the first hospital 
for reception of the sick in Canada, was founded, and in 
the year following, the Ursuline Convent for the 

education of a Hospital 
founded 

girls was estab- 
lished. From 1650 the 
Colony was subjected to 
constant attacks from the 
I ndians, who invested it for 
several months. The sett- 
lers, however, eventually 
drove them off, and as the 
population of the settle- 
ment had so increased as to 
form a town of consider- 
able importance, a force 
of regular troops was dis- 
patched from France for 
its protection. 

In the year 1663 a Royal Governor was appointed, 
and seven years later the See of Quebec was 
established, Francjois de Laval, Abbot of Quebec 
Montigny, being installed as the first Bishop. ^"'""^^'^ 

Considerable jealousy had for some time existed 
between the French Colony of Quebec and the 
neighbouring settlement of New York, which then 
belonged to the British. Matters were brought to a crisis 
in 1690 by Count de Frontenac, the Governor of Quebec, 
who commenced hostilities with the British Colony. 
Retributive measures were speedily adopted, 
and a fleet of thirty-five vessels, under the phjpps ''"" 
cominaud of Sir William Pliip})s, arrived off besieges 
Quebec in October of the same year and 
summoned the garrison to suri'cnder. Frontenac, however. 




FRAN50IS DE Laval 
Bishop of Quebec 



28 



HISTOKIC NOTKS 



Montcalm's 
success 
against the 
British 




h;t(l llie city in a good state of defence, and Phipps, after 
making several attacks, withdrew his fleet. 

During the next half century the British made two 
further attempts to invade Canada, both of which, how 
ever, were unsuccessful. 

Hostilities again broke 
out in the year 1756, when 

abody of troops 

sent out from 

France, under 

the command 

of the Marquis 
de Montcalm, attacked 
the British settlements and 
demolished the fort at 
Oswego. Other British 
reverses followed, and 
in the summer of 1759 
military operations on a 
more extensive scale were 
commenced by Great 
Britain. 

A general movement of the British forces in Canada 
was organized in three divisions ; General Prideaux 
advancing against Niagara, where the French had erected 
a fort of great importance ; a second division, under 
General Amherst, proceeding up Lake Champlain : while 
a third, consisting of 8,000 men, under General \\'olfc, 
sailed up the St. Lawrence towards Quebec. 

Montcalm used every exertion in the defence of the 
ciiv and made a most stubborn resistance. 

Quebec ' , 

besieged Agaui and agam the British troops attacked 
by Wolfe ^,^g stronghold, but only to be repulsed- the 
tlifficulties confronting them were enormous. In tlic 
final battle which took jjlace on the Plains of Abraham 
just outside the town, on September i ^th, I7tC), 

Death of ^ . ' ^ . . -^ ^ 

Wolfe and which at length crowned the British arms 

TJ^ ?' , with success, the two great commanders Wolfe 

Montcalm ' o 

and Montcalm fell. Wolfe was shot while 
leading a bayonet charge at the head of his grenadiers 



Lewis Joseph de St-Veram 
Marquis de Montcalm 



FOUNDATION OF AND FIGHT FOR OUEBKC 



29 




Fall of 
Quebec 



and expired at the moment of \ictor\', while Montcalm, 
who shared his fate in this memorable battle, was mortally 
wounded and died on the following' day. 

Shorth' afterwards the cit)' surrendered to General 

T o w n s h e n d , 
and was at once 
occupied by a 
force of 5,000 men under 
General Murray. 

The British, however, 
were not allowed to re- 
main lony in undisputed 
possession, for in the fol- 
lowing spring, a force of 
12,000 men under the 
Chevalier de Levi was 
despatched to attempt to 
regain Quebec for France. 
(General Murray resol 
ved to anticipate the 
attack by meeting Levi 
at once in the field, and marched his troops out 
from the city. A desperate battle ensued 
in which Murray, overpowered by numbers, had attempt 
to fall back on the citv, which was then invested to recover 

' Quebec 

by the French General. Reinforcements for 
the beleaguered garrison, however, were already on the 
wa\- from England, and on May i 5th Commodore Swanton 
anchored with his squadron in the Ba)- and proceeded to 
attack the French fleet. The latter fled in disorder and 
were completel)- destroyed, whereupon the Chevalier de 
Levi abandoned the siege the same night and ^gf^a, ^f 
retreated from Quebec, abandoning all his guns, De Levi's 
ammunition and stores to the British. "^^ 

The reduction of Montreal by (Teneral .Amherst, and 
the entire submission of the I'rench forces in 
Canada followed soon after. The jjroxince was ti,"'war 
finall)- ceded to (ireat Britain by the Treaty of 
Peace in i7rj3,and General Murray was appointed Captain- 
General and ( 'in\crnor-in-Chief. 



Major-Ceneral James Wolfe 



30 



HISTORIC NOTKS 



During the American War of Independence, the City of 
Quebec was again invested Idv the American Generals 
Montgomer)' and Arnold. An assault was made on the 
city, which was garrisoned b)- only i,8oo men, but the 
Americans were repulsed, and on the arri\-al of reinforce- 
ments from Great Britain they evacuated Canada. 

In 1 79 1 the province was divided into Lower and Upper 
Canada Canada, a representative assembly being 

granted, and in December of the following year, 
the first provincial parliament, consisting of fifty 
members, was opened by Lieut. -Governor Clarke. 



under 

British 

rule 



The Founding of Montreal 
On the site now occupied b}' the city of Montreal once 
stood the Indian village of Hochelaga. The first 




Champlain's Map of part of the Island of Montreal, abcut 1612 

European to enter it was Jacques Cartier, on the 3rd 
October, 1535. 

The inhabitants were of the Huron tribe, and the approach 
to their village was through undulating fields of Indian 
corn. Cartier describes it as being " surrounded by three 
separate roads of palisades, with a single entrance, which 
is guarded with pikes and stakes." The cabins or lodges 
of the Indians, about fiftv in number, were built in the 



THE FOUNDING OF MONTREAL 31 

form of a tunnel, and were constructed of wood covered 
with bark. Each cabin contained several chambers, and 
the whole was so arranged as to enclose an open court- 
yard where the fire was made. 

Cartier seems to have been regarded by these simple 
people as a superior being, capable at least of 
curing disease at his pleasure, for during his '^^■'^"'1'^ . 
stay he was surprised to see the chief of the as a 
village brought towards him. The Indian, man" 
pointing to his limbs, testified by signs that he 
was suffering from pain and desired to be healed. 

The gesticulations of the chief were imitated by his 
attendants, and presently a number of other persons were 
brought in, who were either ill or decrepid from old age. 

Cartier did what he could to soothe their minds, and 
recited some verses of scripture, made the sign of the 
cross upon the sick, and distributed chaplets and images 
of the Agnus Dei amongst them, while he impressed 
them with the belief that these things had great healing 
value. " The objects, " he says, " delighted the natives 
beyond measure." 

His followers were much troubled with scurvy, and, 
while at Hochelaga, twenty of his men suc- 
cumbed to this disease. He states that the '"'*'^" 

. remedy for 

Others escaped by learning from the Indians scurvy 
their remedy for the complaint, which consisted 
of a decoction of spruce fir (Pinus canadensis). 

Montreal has now grown to be the commercial 
metropolis of Canada, and its connections have a notable 
influence on the western trade of the North 

The 

American contment. progress 

Its natural advantages are remarkable. 
Standing on a fertile island thirty- two miles in length, 
which is washed by the waters of the majestic St. Lawrence, 
at the back rises the tree-clad heights of Mount Royal, 
forming a fitting background to a scene of considerable 
beauty. 

Its growth has been consistent. At the time of the 
cession to Creat Piritain the population was 3,000, at the 



FOUNDATION OF GENERAL HOsriTAL AT MONTREAL 33 

beginning of the last century 12,000, and now it numbers 
about 350,000 souls. 

" Sprung of the Saint and Chevalier, 

And with thy scarlet tunic wed ! 

Mount Royal's crown upon thy head, 

And past thy footstool, broad and clear, 

St. Lawrence sweeping to the sea ; 

Reign on, majestic Ville-Marie ! " 

The Foundation of the General Hospital 
AT Montreal 

The foundation of the General Hospital of Montreal, 
one of the earliest in the Dominion, originated in a 
movement of an association called the Ladies' Benevolent 
Society, which was formed in 18 18 to relieve the wants of 
the poor and suffering in that city. A fund was started 
for this purpose, and it was pressed upon the attention of 
the Committee which administered it, that medical relief 
to the sick was also greatly needed. 

Dr. Blackwood, a^ retired army surgeon in private 
practice, together with other medical men, agreed to 
give their professional assistance, provided that a house 
could be obtained where the most necessitous 
cases of the sick poor could be relieved. The "^^^ "House 

ofRecovery'' 

Duke of Richmond, who was then (Governor, 
contributed a quantity of condemned barrack-bedding, 
and a small building, containing four rooms, in the 
St. Joseph suburb was then taken, and called the 
"House of Recovery". 

This became the incentive for a still greater charitable 
effort to aid the sick, and a subscription list was opened 
and donations were promised, which enabled the Com- 
mittee to take larger premises in Craig .Street, which were 
soon suitably fitted. 

The building consisted of three wards, capable of 
.acc(iinniodating twenty-foui' patients, and a housekeeper 
and attendants were enjjaged. The Medical ,, 

-^ * New 

l){'p;irtment was placed under tiie direction of Building 
four jjiofessional men, who attended niontiiiy occupied 
in rotation, and one of them as house-surgeon attended 
dailv in case of accidents. 




o 
X 

s- 
z 

M 

s 

2 



O 

O 

D 

o 



RISE OF TORONTO . 35 



On the first of May, 1819, the patients who were in the 
" House of Recovery " were removed to the new institution, 
which was named the Montreal General Hospital. 

Twelve months afterwards the Hon. J. Richardson, 
the Hon. William McGillivra)', and Samuel Gerrard, 
purchased on their joint credit, a piece of land, which 
was then a nursery garden, and held it in trust for the 
purpose of building a hospital upon it. In 1S21 
contracts for the work were entered into at an The 

r r , T ^ 1 r 1 General 

estmiate of ^2,200, and on June oth or the Hospital 
same year, the foundation stone was laid with completed 
Masonic ceremony. In less than a year the 
building was completed, and on May ist, 1822, it was 
open for the reception of patients. 

The first Medical Board consisted of Doctors Caldwell, 
Robertson, Holmes, Leodel, and Stevenson, the latter 
gentleman being appointed house-surgeon. These, 
together with an apothecar)-, a matron, three nurses 
servants and attendants formed the staff of the establish- 
ment. Ten years after the opening a new wing was 
erected in memory of the Honourable John Richardson, 
the first President, so adding .greatly to the usefulness 
of the Institution. This extension was opened for the 
reception of patients on December 7th, 1832, and with it 
the Hospital accommodation was increased to nineteen 
wards, containing 160 beds. 

The Rise of Toronto 

The City of Toronto, the most important town on the 
Canadian shore of Lake Ontario, a little more than a 
century ago, consisted of but a few log huts. In 1793, 
when it was first planned, dense and tractless forests lined 
the margin of the Lake, and the only habitations to be 
seen were the wig-wams of the wandering" Indians. 

At first the city progressed but slowly, and suffered 
considerably during the time of the war, but after peace 
had been proclaimed, its progress became rapid. Origin- 
ally called York, in 1834, when it was incorporated as the 
first city of Upper Canada, its name was changed to 
Toronto, probably derived from the Indian word which 
means " the place of meeting of the tribes". 




o. m 

M M 

Q o 

. o 

>. o 

c O 



Q. " 



0,T 



INDIAN MEDICAL LORE 39 

INDIAN MEDICAL LORE 

The earliest practitioners of healing in Canada were 
the medicine men or Shamans of the Indian tribes who 
roamed the great plains of the North American Continent 
before the white man planted his foot on its shores. 

Scrofula, tuberculosis, rheumatism, syphilis, malarial and 
other fevers, dysentery, and pulmonary diseases were more 
or less common to the Indians, who were 
dependent on the Medicine Man for help in time ^^^'J" , 

r A unnatural 

of need. Like most primitive people, they 
believed that disease and death were not natural, but were 
caused by the evil influence of animal and other malevolent 
spirits, ghosts, or witches. For the purpose of driving 
these demons out of the human body they had entered, 
they believed it necessary to employ magical as well 
as natural remedies. While believing in a great Spirit, 
the " Gitche Manitou", the Indian's actions seemed 
more frequently dictated by fear of the Spirit of Evil, or 
" Matche Manitou''. Magic he terms "bad medicine" 
and the medicine men were adepts in the use 
of this terrible power. Acquainted through Medtdne 
tradition and long experience with the medicinal Men 
properties of the herbs and trees that grew 
around him, he used his knowledge as a teirifying agent, 
and cunning as a fox in his estimate of motive and 
character, the Medicine Man could make peace or war, 
or destroy the influence of a powerful chief. 

The name Medicine Man to the Indian meant some- 
thing more than Physician or Doctor. The word 
medicine is applied to anything mysterious or unaccount- 
able, although all those who practise the art of healing are 
so called. The Physician or Medicine Man combined the 
office of spiritual adviser with that of healer of the sick. 
The Sun-Dance, the great religious rite of the plains, was 
conducted under their direction. They were regarded as 
dignitaries by their tribes, and the greatest respect was 
paid to them by the whole community. Shrewd and 
intelligent, they were the magicians and soothsayers, and 
superintended and conducted all the religious ceremonies, 



INDIAN MKDICAL LORK 41 



and were looked upon as the oracles of the nation. 
General!}- there are grades of distinction among them, 
the lower resorting to the use of herbs and other 
medicines only, while the higher rely upon supernatural 
influences to aid them, in addition to their materia 
medica. 

In some tribes there existed, and still exist, secret 
societies and organizations of Medicine Men 
who guard sacredly their medical lore and secret 

°_ . ■ Societies 

mysterious rites. of 

Medicine 

Among the Ottawas was a society called Men 
Wahbahnoowin, signifs'ing the East, and 
another termed Mide-wigan. Among some of the tribes 
of the .^.Igonkian linguistic division there was a society 
called the Mide'-wiwin, Society of the Mide or Shamans. 
The persons admitted into this society were firmly believed 
to possess the power of communing with various super- 
natural beings and, in order that certain desires might be 
realized, they were sought after and consulted. 

In these societies there were certain initiatory rites 
which candidates for the calling had to undergo in order 
to fit them for their duties. 

Among the Ojibwa Indians there are three classes of 
mystery men termed, in order of their importance, the 
Mide', the Jes'sakkld, and the Wabeno'. The 
Midc' is a Shaman ; the Jes'sakkld a seer and various 
a prophet ; while the Wabeno' is a mysterious Medi^Ue*^ 
person whose profession is not thoroughly Men 
understood, but is supposed to be ins]Mred b)- 
dreams or visions. There is also a fourth or lower class, 
termed Mask!' Kike Winfnf, or herbalists, who are 
learned in the mysterious ])ropcrties of plants, roots and 
Ijerries, which tlic)- ai'c willing to ic\cal foi-afee. Although 
these herbalists are aware that certain plants and roots 
]:)roduce a specific effect on the human system, they 
attribute any result to the fact that such remedies are 
distasteful and injurious to the demons o(( npying the 
bod\' to whom the disease is altribiUeil. 




o 

h 
Z 
O 

O 

H 



X 

O 



w 



o 
X 

I 
H 



II 

D 



INDIAN MEDICAL LORE 



43 



It is customary for the Mide' priests to preserve birch- 
bark records, bearing delicate incised Hnes to represent 
pictorially the grand plan of the number of 
degrees to which the owner is entitled. Such f^J^^^^^^ 
records or diplomas are held very sacred, and Medicine 
never exposed to public view. At one time a 
specific method of coloured facial decoration was prac- 
tised by the priests of various degrees, answering in a 
manner to the coloured hoods worn b)- medical university 
graduates to-day. 

The Mide "s implements consist of a drum and a rattle, 
which he employs at the side of the sick person to invoke 
the presence of the sacred spirit, and to assist 

... , •. '• 1 - ■ -^ 1 Instruments 

m expellmg the evil man idos or spirits who ^fheaiing 
possess the body of the patient. The rattle is 
considered the most powerful in the expulsion of the evil 
demon, and is- used as an accompaniment to the sacred 
songs. The Mide' also carries with him a small white 
shell called the Ml'gis, which is regarded as the sacred 
emblem of the Mide'wiwin. This is presented to the 
neophyte when he has been taught the sacred songs. 

Among the Crees there are four grades of Shamans 
leading to the highest position. 

The costume of the Medicine Man is generally as 
hideous and grotesque as he can make it, and usually 
consists of the skin of a bear or other wild 
animal, which he wraps round his body, while ^°j|,'^^^^^ 
his face is hideously painted. The medicine Medicine 
men of the Black Feet often use the head of f^^j'^^i^gj^ 
the animal as a mask, while the Chinooks daub equipment 
their bodies with thick grease, and then cover 
themselves with the soft down of a goose, over which they 
wear a cloak of friezed cedar-bark. Every member of 
the medical fraternity possesses the indispensable medicine 
bag containing the infection tube, the herbs in common 
use, together with a few specimens of rare drugs known 
only to the possessor, and various amulets for warding off 
disease and imparting wisdom from the gods. 




A Mandan Shai/Ian or Medicine Man 



INDIAN MKTHODS OF CI'RING DISEASE 45 



Indian Methods of Curing Disease 

The means of healing emplo)'ed by the native medicine 
men and their methods of procedure in treating a patient, 
seem to vary somewhat according to the tribe to 
which ,they belong. It may be interesting to 
quote the experiences of some of the early explorers 
who were first to visit the native tribes. Champlain 
states "the Indians have certain persons who 
are called Oqui who are the medicine men who champuin's 

. Ill account of 

heal the sick and bmd up the wounded and the •■ oqui" 
predict future events. These Oquis or con- 
jurers persuade their patients and the sick to make or 
have made, banquets and ceremonies, that they may be 
the sooner healed. When they are sick the man or 
woman who is attacked with any disease sends for the 
Oqui, who visits the patient and informs himself about 
the malady and the suffering. After this the Oqui sends 
for a large number of men, women and girls, including 
three or four old women. ' These enter the cabin of the 
sick, each one having on his head a skin of a bear or 
some other wild beast, that of the bear being the most 
common as it is the most frightful. There are three or 
four more old women al^out the sick or suffering, who for 
the most part feign sickness or are sick really in 
imagination. The old women near the sick person 
receive the presents, each singing and pausing in turn. 
When all the presents have been made, they proceed to 
lift up their voices with one accord, all singing together 
and keeping time with sticks on pieces of 
dry bark. Then all the women and girls pro- ^'"f"^ 
coed to the end of the cabin as if they were Dancing 
about to begin a ballet. The old women walk 
in front with their l)ear-skins on their heads, all the 
others following them one after the other. After dancing 
an Jiour or two, the old women lead out the sick person 
who gets up dolefully and prepares to dance, and 
after a short time she dances and enjoys it as well as 
the others. The medicine man thus gains honour and 
credit, his patient lieing so soon healed and on her feet. 



INDIAN METHODS OF CURING DISEASE 47 

" This treatment, however, does nothing for those who 
are dangerously ill and reduced by weakness, but causes 
their death rather than their cure. 

" Sometimes the patient and the Medicine Man, 
accompanied by some others, make grimaces and 
perform magic art and twist themselves about 
so that they generally end in being out of Mtuiodo'f^ 
their senses, seemingly crazy, throwing the fire curing 
from one side of the cabin to the other, eating 
burning coals, holding them in their hands for a while, 
and throwing red-hot ashes into the eyes of the spectators. 
Those who suffer, especialh' during this lime, are the 
wives of those possessed, and all the inmates of their 
cabin, from the fear they have, lest the raging one 
burn up all that is in their houses, for as soon as he 
arrives he is all in a fury, his eyes flashing and frightful, 
sometimes standing up and sometimes seated, as his 
fancy takes him. Suddenly a fit seizes him, and laying 
hold of everything he finds in his wa)', he throws them to 
one side and the other. Then he lies down and sleeps 
for some time. Waking up with a jump he seizes fire and 
stones, which he throws about recklessly on all sides. 
Then he rages and calls several of his friends to sweat 
with him. The latter is the best means they have for 
preserving themselves in health. They remain two or 
three hours or so, covered up with great pieces of bark 
and wrapped in their robes with a great many stones 
about them which have been heated hot in the fire. 
Then they give them many draughts of water, since they 
are very thirsty, when the demoniac who was crazy or 
possessed of an evil spirit becomes sober." 

Another early explorer, writing in the year 1568, gives 
an interesting description of the " Diseases most rife in 
America and Canada, and the means that they 
observe to cure them " : " Whenever any sycke D'^^^s^s 

•' ^ prevalent 

man feeleth his stomacke to swelle by the among the 
occasions of some humours in the stomacke 1568^"^'" 
and liver, the whyche by debilitic or otherwyse 
he cannot caste or vomite up, he thinketh that it is his 



48 



INDIAN MEDICAL LORE 



snule complainethe. To heule this disease they sucke 
with tlieir mouthes the place where the sore or disease 
lielh, thinking that by this meanes they drawe it oute. 
Lykewyse they sucke one another. The women use other 
meanes, they will put into the patient's mouth a threede 




A Black-Foot rv'EoiciNE Man or Shaman 



of cotton a two foote long wh\che afterwards the)' sucke, 
thynkyne also by this threede for to get away thys disease 
or sicknesse. 

"If one of them doe hurt anothere in ernest or other- 
wise, he is bounde to sucke hys wounde untill the tyme 
that he be healed. 



INDIAN METHODS OK CURING DISEASE 49 



" They have ye meanes to lette bloud betweene the 
shoulders with a kynde of herb, very cutting, 
or with the teethe of some beast. Those in ^^^^^'"^ 
the country they inhabit neare the sea are venesection 
subiecte to rotten diseases as fevers, catarres, 
and others." , 

The method of procedure among the Chenooks, Crees, 
and Black Feet, is as follows : One or two medicine men 
sit near the patient singing, praying, and 
swaying their bodies energetically, until the ^^""^ 
perspiration flows freely. One blows a whistle healing 

. ,. , 1 r 1 •! 1 among 

contmually as he sways to and fro, while the t^e 
other shakes his medicine rattle vigorously', and chenooks, 

Crees and 

the friends of the patient present, beat an Black Feet 
accompaniment on small drums and sing. 
These incantations are for the purpose of driving away the 
evil spirit that is afflicting the sick person. While these 
songs are being sung, one of the medicine men may fall 
into a trance, or he may resort to the use of his materia 
medica. Sometimes he will suddenly seize a part of the 
patient's body with his teeth, and trembling violently, after 
much exertion, will shout out that he has found the disease. 
Holding his hands to his mouth he will plunge them into 
water, and pretend that he is keeping the disease demon 
from returning to the patient. He will then exhibit the 
result of his labours in the form of a piece of flesh or a 
small reptile, which he declares is the disease he has 
extracted. 

Among some tribes, failure to cure means severe punish- 
ment or death to the medicine man. The 

^ . . • 1 .1 r 1 Death as a 

I'apagos of Arizona punish the unsuccessful punishment 
medicine man with death, and when he for 

,- T <-. 1 r I 1 1 failure 

fails to cure one of the Sachems of the tribe, he 
is lead forth after the burial and instantly shot. 

l.esides the administration of drugs, the chief methods 
of healing employed by the Indian medicine men, are 
bleeding and sweating. The idea of drawing or sucking 
out the evil spirit that causes the disease is the prevailing 






W ^ 
■M-^-^- 



^^ 



-^31 



-^ 







Indian method of healing the sick 
From a woodcut of the XVI I century 



INDIAN METHODS OF CURING DISEASE 51 

one in their theory of the practice of medicine. The 
Shaman is thus associated with the nature of a 
leech which is curiously ilhistrated in the Indian Shaman 
custom of naming their children. The names leech 
are chosen by their grandfathers or recognized 
patriarch of the family in the following manner : — The 
subject of the first striking dream he has after the child's 
birth determines its name. Thus, if he dreams of a leech 
or a mosquito, particularly the latter (being the most 
determined and energetic blood sucker), it is at once 
decided that the child, be it male or female, is predestined 
for the medical profession. 

There are several methods of bleeding, one being by 
means of a small cupping horn to which suction is applied 
by the mouth in the ordinary way, after 
scarification with a piece of flint or broken indi; 



clian 



glass. In the blood thus drawn, the Shaman ^^^'^ods 
sometimes claims to find a small pebble which weeding 
he asserts to be the cause of the disease. 
Another method is by scratching the flesh with a briar, 
flint, arrow-head, or piece of glass, and while the blood is 
still flowing, certain medicines are rubbed into the wound. 
The mouth is used also for sucking blood and for 
cleansing wounds. 

In cases of rheumatism and biliousness the actual 
cautery is often employed, and consists of a ,, 

•' 1 J 1 Use of 

piece of rotten wood called " punk ", which is the actual 

placed on the part affected, and then set on """^""y 

fire. The fire gradually consumes the wood, and the 
ashes burn a hole in the flesh. 

The sweat-lodge is one of the most frequent methods 
of treating disease, and is arranged in the following 
manner : Strong and supple boughs of the 
willow are sharpened at the thick ends and The 
inserted in the ground in a circle, then braided f^gV 
at the top, thus forming a small hut from four 
to six feet in diameter, and about three feet high, with 
an opening for the patient to crawl inside. l>]ankets or 
hides are placed over the tent, and when the patient has 



INDIAN MATERIA MEDICA 53 

entered, hot stones are placed witliin, and a vessel of hot 
water is given to him. When he has removed all his 
clothing, and every aperture of the tent is closed, he 
pours the water on the hot stones, and the steam en- 
veloping him, causes copious perspiration. The operation 
is continued until he is satisfied that the bath has been 
complete. 

Hitmorrhage from wounds is restrained by plunging 
the p;u't into cold water, and thereby producing con- 
striction of the blood-vessels. 

The Shaman estimates the condition of his patient by 
his appetite, for while an Indian is able to cat he is 
looked upon as being free from danger. 

Indian Materia Medic a 

The Indian Shaman derives his knowledge of the 
properties of the plants he employs in healing, from the 
traditions of his ancestors. This knowledge is not revealed 
to him until he attains the highest degree in his calling. 
When being initiated to the Mide', and his instruction 
comes to an end, the preceptor sings unto his pu])il a native 
song as follows : — 

My arm is alnmst pulled out from digging Medicine. 

It is full of Medicine. 

Almost crying because the Medicine is lost. 

^'es, there is much medicine you may cry for. 

Yes, I see there is plenty of it 

When I come out the sky becomes clear. 

Ihe .Spirit has given me power to .see, 

I brought the Medicine to bring life. 

I too see how much there is. 

I am going to the Medicine Lodge. 

I take life from the sky. 

Let us talk to one another. 

The Spirit is in my body, my friend. 

Curiously enough, the Indian mrdii inc man in tlic 
choice of his materia medica, is induenc(-d l)\' some fancied 
connection of the jilant with the disease-animal or .Sjjirit, 



54 



INDIAN MEDICAL LORE 



which bears a strong resemblance to the " Doctrine 

of Signatures " so widely beheved in among 

"Doctrine Wcstem nations in antient times. The 

°f stalks of chickweed, because they resemble 

worms are used as a vermifuge, plants of a 

yellow colour are chosen for the treatment of jaundice and 

bilious disorders, f^or a disease caused by the "rabbit 

spirit", the remedy must be a plant called rabbit's food or 

rabbit's ear, for " snake-dreams ", which are regarded as a 

form of disease, a plant called snake's tooth, and for 

inflamed eyes, the herb called deer's eye. 

Ceremonies There are a number of interesting ceremonies 

observed ^^^^ j.j^gg observcd in connection with the gather- 
in herb 

gathering ing of the herbs,roots and barks used in medicine. 

When the Shaman goes on these expeditions, he 
provides himself with a number of red 
and white beads. He approaches the 
plant from a certain direction, walking 
round it from right to left, one to four 
times, during which he recites certain 
prayers. He then uproots the plant 
and drops one of the beads into the 
hole and covers it up with loose earth. 
In one of the formulas for hunting Ginseng, 
the hunter addresses the mountain as the 
" Great Man " and assures it, that he only 
comes to take " a small piece of flesh " 
(Ginseng) from its side. In some cases the 
.Shaman must pass by the first three plants 
he meets until he comes to the fourth, 
which, when he has gathered, he may 
then return to the others. 

The bark of a tree is always taken 
from the east side, and when a root or 
branch is gathered, it must always be 
one that runs out towards the same 
quarter. The reason for this is, because 
those parts exposed to the east are believed to have 
imbibed more medicinal potency from the rays of the 
sun than the others. 




GiNaicNG Hoor, 

like the Man- 
drake, often bear3 
a curious resem- 
blance to the 
human form. 

Many supersti- 
tions are asso- 
ciatecl ■with 
Ginseng both in 
the Old World 
and in the New. 



INDIAN MATERIA MEDICA 55 

The Indians also use certain animal substances 
in their materia medica, which are derived Animal 
from the beaver, the musk-rat, the skunk. Materia 
the deer, toads, snakes, and various insects. 

From the mineral kingdom they employ , 

° J y^ J Inorganic 

iron pyrites, gypsum, salt, ochres, clays, and Materia 

1 , Medica 

ashes, etc. 

Writing in 1799, one of the Canadian explorers states : — 
" The country people of Upper Canada use snakes' exuvia; 
as medicine, and believe them to be very 
efficacious in the cure of rheumatism when laid Curious 

Remedies 

over the part afflicted and fastened on with a for 
bandage. The body of the rattlesnake dried ^■^^'^^' 
to a cinder over the fire, and then finally 
powdered and infused in a certain portion of brandy, is also 
said to be a never-failing remedy against the same disorder. 

" The liquor is taken inwardly in the quantity of a 
wine-glassful at once, about three times a day. No effect 
more than taking plain brandy is perceived from this 
medicine on the fii'st day, but at the end of the second day 
the body of the patient becomes suftuscd with a cold sweat, 
everyone of his joints grow painful, and his liml)s become 
feeble and scarce able to support him. He grows worse 
and worse for a day or two, but persevering in the use of 
the medicine for a few days longer, he gradually loses the 
pain and recovers his wonted strength of body." 

Rattlesnake oil still bears a high re]Kilati()n among the 
trappers and settlers in the far West as an embrocation to 
relieve rheumatism. 

The incantation formuhe recited by the Shaman during 
the treatment of a patient are very interesting, Indian 
and are full of curious archaic and figurative '"^'^"t^"™'^ 
expressions. Lack of s]3ace will oni\- |)(rmit us to quote 
a few of tJK-se. 

Formula for treating rheumatism : — 

Yu ! O ! Red woman, you have caused it. 

^■(lu liave put tlie intruder under him. 

J la ! now you have conic from the Sun lan(l. 



56 INDIAN MEDICAL LOKK 

Voii have brought the small red seats witli vour feel 

resting upon them. 
Ha 1 Now they have swiftly moved away from you. 
Relief is accomplished. 
Let it not be for one night alone. 
Let the relief come at once. 

Formula for treating toothache or neuralgia : — • 

Listen ! In the Sun land you repose, O Red Spider. 
Quickly you have brought and laid down the red path. 
O ! Great Ada'wehi, quickly you have brought down the 

red threads from above. 
The intruder in the tooth has spoken, and it is only a 

worm. 
The tormentor has wrapped itself around the root of 

the tooth. 
Quickly you have dropped down the red threads, for it 

is just what you eat. 
Now it is for you to pick it up. 
The relief has been caused to come. Vii ! 

This incantation was accompanied by blowing tobacco 
smoke from a pipe placed directly against the tooth. The 
allusion to the worm in the tooth in tlie alcove formula is 
especially interesting from the fact, that we have here a 
repetition of the antient Greek tradition that toothache 
was caused by small worms that lodged in the cavit}' or 
at the root of the decayed tooth. 

Bacteriology among the North American Indians 

Formula for Fever and Ague. (NLalaria). 

Listen ! In the pines you dwell. In the ]iines you clwell. 

For ever you dwell. Huyl ! 

Listen ! O now you have drawn near to hearken, O little 

whirl-wind. 
O Ada'wehi, in the leafy shelter of the lower mountain 

you repose. 
O Ada'wehi I you can never fail in anything. 
Ha ! now rise up. 

A very small portion (of the disease) remains. 
You have come to sweep it away into the small swamp on 

the upland. 
You have laid your paths near the swamp. 



ABORIGINAL MATERIA MEUICA 57 

It is ordained that you shall scatter it as in play, so that 

it shall utterly disappear. 
By you it must be scattered. 
So shall there be relief. 
The great chill or intermittent fever was much dreaded 
by the Indian medicine men. Curiously enough, from a 
remote period they have believed the disease to 
be caused by malicious Tsgd'ya, a generic Indian indj^n 
name for small insects. These Tsi^d'ya or idea of the 

causation 

imaginary insects, like the parasites of modern of 
science, were held responsible for a large number ""^'^"^ 
of diseases. They were supposed to exist in the 
water, the air, the foliage of trees and in decaying wood. 
In connection with recent discoveries respecting the 
causation of malarial fever, the theory of the primitive 
Indian medicine man, which he has held from time 
immemorial, is highly suggestive. 

ABORIGINAL MATERIA MEDICA 

The following is a list of trees, plants, fruits, etc., 
employed by the North American medicine men in the 
treatment of disease : — 

White Pine ( Piniis Strohiis ), used for pains in the head and 
back 

Red Pine ( Pi mis reuiiosa) 

Balsam Fir (Abies balsaviea ), to induce iliaphoresis ; also 
given for gonorrhoea and colds 

White Spruce (Abies alba) 

Black Spruce (Abies nigra ) 

Raven Tree (Abies canadensis ), for diarrhoea 

Tamarack ( Larix ainericana) 

Wiiite Cedar ( Cnpressns thyoides ) 

Red Cedar ( J uniperus virginiana), for headache 

While Oak ( Querciis alba), for diarrhcea 

Sugar Maple (Acer sacckaiinnin) 

Black Sugar Maple ( Acer nigriiin ). to promote flow of urine 

Vellow P>irch ( Behila excelsa), diuretic properties 

Cotton Wood ( Popiiliis /iioiiilijrra), tlic down .applied to 
open sores as an absorbent 

IHack Walnut (Juglans nigra) 

Witch Hazel ( Ilaniamclis virginiana ), as a styptic and 
astringent 



58 ABOKIGINAL MATERIA MEDICA 

False Spikenard ( Smilacina raceinosa), styptic, and used as 

a fumigation fur headache 
Sunflower ( Ilelianthtis occidenlalis ). crushed root applied 

to bruises 
Senega Snakeroot ( Poly-^ala Senega), for colds and coughs 
Black Raspberry ( Rubiis occidentalis )^ for pain in stomach 
Huckleberry ( Gaylussacia resinosa) 
Wild Cherry ( Priinits virginiaiia), used in gestation and 

for coughs 
Wild Black Cherry ( Fr units scroti na), t(j relieve soreness 

and pain in the chest, and as an application to heal sores 
Wild Red Cherry ( Pntnus pcnsylvanica), for stomach 

disorders 
Wild Plum ( PntjiHs americaiia), for diarrhoea 
Common Cattail ( Typha la/i/olia), as a poultice to sores 
Little flat grass ( Sporoboltcs hererolepsis ), to induce emesis 
Wikl Strawberry ( Fragaria vesca) 

Striped Maple ( Acer pennsylvanicuin), to induce emesis 
Black or Water Ash ( Fraxiniis sainbucifolia), application 

to sore eyes 
Culvers Root ( Veronica virginica), purgative 
Hoary Willow ( Salix Candida), for coughs 
Indian Currant ( Syinpkoricarpies vulgaris), for sore eyes 
Avens ( Geiciii s/rictitin), for the chest and cough 
Curled Dock ( Rumex crispiis), applications to abrasions 

and sores 
Lead Plant ( Amorpha canescens), for stomachic pains 
Early Wild Rose (Rosa blanda), application to inflamed eyes 
Anemone (species unknown), for headache 
White Sumac (Rhus aromatica), for diarrhrea 
Wild Bergamot ( Monardajis/ulosa), stomachic pains. 
Water Leaf ( Hydrophylluni virginicuni ), pains in chest 

and back 
Anemonea Pennsylvania (Anemone pennsylvanicuin ), pain 

in lumbar region 
Canada Violet ( Viola canadensis), pain in region of 

bladder 
Lopseed ( Phryina leptostachya), for rheumatic pain 
Downy Yellow Violet ( Viola pubescens), for sore throat 
Dwarf Wild Rose (Rosa lucida), application to sore eyes 
Red Baneberry ( Actaea rubra), stomachic pains 



ABORIGINAL .MATERIA MKDICA 59 

Moon Wort ( Botrvchiiiin Z'irt^^iiiicinii ), ajiplied to wounds 
Dwarf Ginseng ( Aralia trifolia), uslhI as a styptic 
Stickweeil ( Echinosperniuni. Lappula), as a fumigation for 

headache 
Black Snake Root ( Aristolocliia Scrpciitaria), used in fevers, 

coughs, and for snake bites 
Beggar Lice ( Cynoglossttin Morrisoiii ), renal diseases 
Wild Senna (Cassia iiiariland'ua), for poulticing sores, and 

administered in fever 
Life Everlasting ( Gnaphaliiiin dciurrciis ), diaphoretic 
\^etch ( I'iiia carol in/ ana ), dyspepsia, pains in back, and 

rheumatism 
Turkey Pea or Goat's Rue ( Tcphrosia vin^iniaua ), tonic 
Milkweed (Euphorbia hypcricifol ia ), for skin eruptions and 

as a purgative 
Skull Cap ( ScnteUaria laterijlora ), to promote menstru- 
ation 
Maidenhair Fern ( Adiantum pcdatttin), as a poultice in 

rheumatism, or for chills and fevers 
Cranes Bill (Geranium luaculatuin), used in thrush, and 

for diarrhcea and cholera 
Indian Physic ( Gillenia trifoliata), emetic and tonic 
Liverwort ( Hepatica acutiloba), used for coughs 
Tassel Flower (Cacalia atriplicifolia ), as a poultice for 

wounds, cuts, and for cancer 
Meadow Rue ( Thalictrnin anc/uonoides ), as a vermifuge 
Cone Flower ( Rudhcikia fuls^ida ), for snake bites, swellings, 

and inflamed eyes 
Solomon's Seal ( Polygonal uiu Diulli /loruin ct lalijoliuin ), 

for bruises and swellings 
Gravel Root ( Etipaloriuin purpureui/i ), diuretic 
Shield Fern ( Aspidiuin airoslirhoiilcs ), to produce emesis, 

and as an embrocation for rheumatism 
Sweet Flag or Fire Root (Acorns Calamus ), for colds and 

flatulence 
Yellow Pond Lily ( Nupliar aciveiui), tonic, antl used lor 

poultices 
Willow ( Salix), used for rheumatism 
Honeysuckle ( Lonicera ciliala), for bladder diseases 
Juniper licrries ( Junipcriis communis ), diuretic 
Labrador Tea (Ledum lalifolium ), for diarrh(ea 
^^lUIllaiIl Ash { Tyrus americana), for pleurisy 








1 i^. 










mu 



"<^. ^^ 



RISE AND PROGRESS OF MEDICAL EDICATION IN CANADA 61 

THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF MED1CAL\E DUCATION 

IN CANADA 

The history of the rise and progress of medical 
education in Canada goes back to the beginning of the 
nineteenth century, aUhough the eariiest Medical Act 
affecting the Colony was passed in 1788 by the British 
Parliament, which provided that no one should practice 
physic, surgery, or midwifery, within the province of 
Quebec and Montreal, without a license. This Hcense 
was to be obtained by passing an examination conducted 
by capable persons appointed by the Ciovernor or the 
Commander-in-Chief of the Province. 

Soon after the war of 181 2, a hospital was built in York 
(now Toronto), of which the present splendidly 
equipped Toronto General Hospital is the out- ^'"' 

™, ^ 1-1 • Hospital 

come. The first medical school in Canada is in Toronto 
said to have been formed in October, 1822, 
when five practitioners met together for the purpose of 
taking into consideration the expediency of establishing 
a medical school in Montreal. This .School was called 
the Montreal Medical Institution and was 
approved by Earl Dalhousie, then Governor- Medical 
General, who appointed the Members of the School 

^ . . , ^ . in Canada 

Institution the first Board of Examiners for the 
district of Montreal. The first Course of Lectures was 
given in 1824, and four years later, the Medical Institu- 
tion became the Faculty of Medicine of McGill University. 

The McGiLL University 

The founder of this great Uni\crsity was James McGill, 
a .Scotchman by birth, who was born in (Jlasgow in the 
year 1744. Emigrating to Canada early in life, he first 
became engaged in the north-west fur trade. After- 
wards lie settled in Montreal as a merchant, wliere for 
years he led a useful life, taking a prominent part in the 
affairs of the city in which he had made his home. 

On his death in 1813, he bequeathed his i)ro]KM-ty of 
" Burnside House" and a sum ot $50,000 to found a 
college in connection witli a I'i-o\ incial University which 

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THE McGILL UNIVERSITY 63 



had been contemplated before his death. His bequest 

was subject to the condition that such a College and 

University should be established within ten years of 
his decease. 

A Royal Charter was granted in 1820 but, owing to 
litigation, nine years elapsed before the erection of a 
suitable building was commenced. The opening 
ceremony was held in Burnside House, the former 
residence of the founder, in 1829. The Faculty of Arts, 
as organized on this occasion, consisted of the Principal 
and two Professors, but on the day of the inauguration an 
important addition was made to the University by the 
amalgamation with it of the Montreal Medical Institute, 
to which allusion has already been made. 

The first Session of the McGill Medical Faculty took 
place in the winter of 1829-30, and the first University 
Degree, a medical one, was conferred four years later 
in 1833. 

For more than twenty years after its inauguration, 
the University passed through a period of trouble, and 
made little progress, although the Medical Faculty 
maintained its reputation throughout and continued to 
increase its classes. At length in 1850, a 
number of the prominent citizens of Montreal mcgui 
determined to grapple with the difficulties that enters on 
beset the University, and as a result of their a new era 
investigations and labours, a new Charter was 
prepared and granted by Queen Victoria in 1852. Thus 
the College by its improved constitution was placed in a 
position to be revived and to enter upon a new and 
useful career. 



Its present prosperity dates from this period, and 
the contrast between that time and the present, forms 
a striking proof of its advance. In 1851 the classes 
in Arts contained only si.x students, and the students 
in Medicine had fallen off to thirty-six. while its 
total income was estimated at §2,700 a )C'ar. In the 
session 1901 -2, 440 were registered in the Medical 
1"" acuity alone. 




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THE MCGILL UNIVEKSITY 65 

By the liberality of Mr. John H. R. Molson and other 
benefactors, the University buildings, which up to i860 
had been in an unfinished condition, were added to and 
completed. 

These additions were finished and officially opened by 
the Earl of Aberdeen in 1895. They comprise a large 
Lecture Hall, capable of accommodating 450 students, 
with adjoining preparation rooms, together with new 
suites of laboratories for pathology, histology, pharma- 
cology, and sanitary science. 

The advance then made under the principalship of 
Sir J. Wm. Dawson has since been maintained until 
McGill University achieved its present high 
position. In less than five years, however, ^'lo^J"^ 
owing to the increase in the number of strathcona 
students, an enlargement of the buildings again 
became imperative, and Lord Strathcona generously 
provided means to meet the necessary requirements. 

The new medical buildings, the gift of Lord and Lady 
Strathcona and the Hon. Mrs. Howard were formally 
opened by H.R.H. the Prince of Wales on December 
igth, 1 90 1, and are now complete and fully equipped. 
In 1893 Lord Strathcona endowed the Chairs of Pathology 
and Public Health with 6100,000, which gift enabled the 
Faculty to equip and develop these departments until they 
are now quite up to the latest requirements of modern 
medical science. 

Universit'i' of Toronto 

About 1830 Dr. John Rolph opened a private school 
for medical pupils in his house in York (now Toronto), 
and from this beginning another important medical 
school arose. 

Dr. Rolph's school originally met in a frame building 
erected in his back-yard. One part of this room had 
plain pine seats arranged in tiers, while the 
lecturer's table consisted of the wit in use ?/• ^"'p'''"" 

Medical 

for anatomical purposes. In the same room school 
tables on trestles were provided for dissecting 
purposes. Only a thin wooden partition separated 



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RISE AND PROGRESS OF MEDICAL EDUCATION IN CANADA 67 

this primitive medical school from the rest of the 
building in which were comfortably housed the 
Doctor's horse and cow. In 1854 Dr. Rolph's school, 
which he had named " The Toronto School of Medicine", 
by arrangement with the Board of \'ictoria College, 
became the Medical Department of that University. 
Dr. Rolph eventually became Dean of the Faculty, 
resigning' his position in 1870. 

The University of Toronto and University College 
together constitute the State University of the Province 
of Ontario. It is an undenominational teaching 
body, in arts, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, of"Toronto 
law, and applied sciences, etc. As far back as 
1799 a piece of land was granted by the Crown to build a 
College or University, but it was not until 1827 that a 
Charter was received under the title of the University of 
King's College. After passing through many vicissitudes, 
the Charter was amended and the constitution reorganized, 
which was followed by the foundation stone of the new 
building being laid by Sir Charles Bagot, the Governor- 
General. By the Baldwin Act the name of the Institution 
was subsequently changed from King's College to the 
University of Toronto. 

In the year 1853 the Institution was again reorganized 
after the model of the Universit)- of London, and di\-ided 
into practically two independent parts. First an 
examining and degree-conferring body with institution 
the name of the University of Toronto, second reorganized 
a teaching body termed University Colleg^e 
controlled by the President and Professors. Both of 
these institutions are supported from a common fund 
derived from the endowments. 

The building now occupied by the University is 
admirably equipped with laboratories for physiology, 
])hysiological chemistry, bacteriology, physiological 
botany, and for students in arts and medicine. The 
total number of working places in these laboratories 
exceeds two hundred. The Medical Faculty is self- 
supporting', having an annual income from fees of about 
!iF20,ooo, and the teaching staff nuinliers about 128. 








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THE UNIVERSITY OF TRINITY COLLEGE 69 

The University of Trinity College, 
Toronto 

This University owes its origin to the King's College, in 
which, owing to a religious controversy, a split took place 
in the year 1850, when an act was passed abolishing 
religious teaching in the College and suppressing the 
Theological Faculty. The outcome of this was the founda- 
tion of Trinity College. About the same time Dr. Hodder 
and Dr. Bovell organized a school of medicine under 
the title of the Upper Canada School of Medicine, 
and offered their services as the Medical Faculty of the 
projected University. The offer was gladly accepted, and 
on November 7th, 1850, the first meeting 

of the Faculty took place in the hall of the fJ''^' 

•' _ ^ Meeting- 

Mechanics' Institute. Immediately afterwards 

the lectures were begun, and the work was carried 
on with considerable success for some years, but cir- 
cumstances occurred which, in the opinion of the 
Faculty, seemed to render desirable the closing of the 
school. After an interval of several years a Medical 
Faculty was again formed in 1871, which consisted of some 
of the old members, with the addition of Dr. Geikie, and 
several other well-known teachers. A building in Spruce 
Street was erected, with convenient arrangements for 
medical tcacliing. This new body was then constituted 
the Medical Department of Trinity University on a 
broader basis than its predecessor, and its subsec|uent 
history has given it a high position among the medical 
schools of the Dominion. 

In the year 1877 the Faculty applied for and received 
a special Act of Incorporation, as an independent medical 
school and thus became the Trinity Medical 
School. In 1888 it was raised to the standing trinity 

. '^ Medical 

of a College under the title of Trinity Medical school 
College. It occupies still the building in which 
it began to work, and is entirely self-sustaining. Under 
its Act of Incorporation the College is affiliated to various 
colleges, including Trinity (primarily), Toronto, Queen's 
and Manitoba. 



VICTORIA i;niversity, tokonto 71 



Victoria University, Toronto 

This University took its rise from an Institution which 
was estabHshed for the higher education of the young 
people of the Methodist Church, and was called the 
Upper Canada Academy. It was opened for academic 
work on June i8th, 1836. 

After five years of successful teaching, by an Act of the 
Provincial Parliament it was granted University powers, 
and in 1841 became, under an extended Royal Charter, 
Victoria College. Up to 1853 Victoria was an 
Arts College only, but in 1854 a step was F"" 
taken towards a full University status, by the stat'Js'^^"^ 
establishment of a Faculty of Medicine in 
the City of Toronto. On the accomplishment of the 
Federation of the Universities of Canada in 1889, new 
buildings were erected at a cost of about $40,000, and the 
College was formally opened in Toronto in October, 1892. 

Kingston Medical Faculty 

This Medical School was founded under somewhat 
remarkable circumstances early in the year 1854. A 
petition headed by Mr. Robert Douglas was presented to 
Queen's College and the medical profession of Kingston 
praying them to establish a Medical Faculty in that town. 
The University responded favourably and 
promised all the aid and accommodation it ^"en7^"^ 
could spare. It gave permission to the new 
Medical Faculty to retain all graduation and registration 
fees in full confidence that the best would be done to 
advance tlie cause of higher education. The Government 
of Canada, on application being made, through the 
influence of the late Sir John A. MacDonald gave an 
annual grant to the Medical School at Kingston, by the 
receipt of which the Medical Faculty was enabled to erect 
the suitable and commodious building it now occupies. 

The Lcjndon, Ontario, Mldical F'aculty 

When Bishop Ihllmuth oblaincti a Charter for the 
Western University, he approached several medical men 



72 ONTARIO MEDICAL COLLEGE FOR WOMEN 

in London, Ontario, on the subject of forming a Medical 

f'aculty, and in 1880 a meeting was called to discuss the 

matter, but nothing was done till two years 

Faculty ' . . 

organized later, when a Faculty was officially organized. 
On the first of January' following, the class 
numbered five students, but in the year 1896 they had 
increased to se\enty in number. Since then the Faculty- 
has been greatly enlarged, and the efforts of the staff 
have met with gratifying results. 

The Ontario Medical College hor Women 

This Institution, the only one of its kind in the Dominion, 
was established in Toronto in 1882, mainly through the 
efforts of Dr. Michael Barrett, who was appointed its first 
Dean. He was succeeded by Dr. Alexander Mcl'hedran, 
and on his appointment to a Professorship at the Univer- 
sity of Toronto, Dr. R. 15. Nevitt was appointed in his 
place. In 1894, the College was placed on a more 
permanent basis, a suitable building being erected for its 
accommodation. 

Since then the Institution has made rapid progress and 

has now a list of 50 graduates and 60 registered 

p'^P'^ students, many of the former occupying posts 

of importance. It is affiliated to Trinity 

University and the University of Toronto, and is recognized 

by the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Bishops College 

The Medical School connected with this College was 
organized in Montreal in 1S71, Sir William Kingston 
being the first Dean. The School was first carried on in 

the third storey of Barron's Buildings, at the 
couege north-east corner of McGill and Notre-Dame 

Streets, and its first class consisted of 25 students. 
The following session was held in a new building which 
had been specially erected, and was opened by the present 
Dean, Dr. W. F. Campbell. It is now a well-equipped 
medical school. 



MEDICAL EDUCATION IN NOVA SCOTIA 73 

The Laval School of Medicine and Surgery 

The Medical t'aculty of Laval University was founded 
in 1843, and from 1867 to 1891 was connected by mutual 
arrangement with Victoria University as its Medical 
P'aculty in Montreal, but in the latter year it became the 
Medical Department, in Montreal, of Lawal University. 
It has a large and well-eciuipped faculty. 

The school is doing good work and is prospering, and 
its students in all classes now number from „ 

Prosperity 

280 to 300 a year. The Faculty of Medicine and 

in Quebec is also connected, as its Medical ^°°'^ '"°'^^ 

Department in that city, with Laval Uni\-ersity. 

The instruction' is all given in French. In order to be 
ranked as a Catholic Institution, Laval University had to 
be acknowledged and canonically erected by the Holy 
See. This was granted by Pope Pius IX in 1876. 

Medical Education in Nova Scotia 

In December of 1867 a meeting of medical prac- 
titioners in Halifax was convened to discuss the desira- 
bility of establishing a medical school in that city, and it 
was decided that a course of lectures should be given 
during the coming summer, and that Dalhousie University 
should be asked to recognize the course thus given. The 
year following the school was definitely recognized as the 
Medical Faculty of the University, the Hon. W. J. 
Almon, M.I)., being its first President. In 1875 the 
P^aculty erected a new building near the Provincial and 
City Hospital, and in order to secure the definite ownership 
of its property, it separated from the University 
and obtained an Act of Incorporation as Halifax ^'^*^ °^ '"'^°'^' 

' poration 

Medical College, with power to grant Degrees 
in Medicine and Surgery, and the allied sciences. After 
a ])eriod of trial and difficulty, in 1889 it was reconstructed, 
and since that time its progress has been uninterrupted, 
the number of its students annually increasing. 

King's College, Windsor, dates from the year 1768, 
although a Royal Charter was not actually granted until 
1802. Commencing originally in a pri\ate house, it was 
not until I 79''i that a suital^le building was erected. Since 



74 THE UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA 

tlien, after undergoing various vicissitudes, King's College 
has developed into one of the most prominent educational 
institutions in the Dominion. 

The University of Manitoba 

The medical profession in Manitoba was first incorporated 
in 1 87 1, when the administration of the Medical Act, which 
was amended in 1886, was placed in the hands of an execu- 
tive body called the Council of Physicians and Surgeons. 
Any Medical College in Manitoba in affiliation with the 
University of Manitoba is entitled to two repre- 

Constitution . ,„, tt ■ •, • r n i 

sentatives. 1 he University consists of all the 
denominational colleges in the city. The medical college 
has a body of professors and lecturers, and connected with 
it are two hospitals, viz., the General Hospital, and that of 
St. Boniface. 

The first Medical Journal published in Canada was 
The " Le Journal de Medecine de Quebec" in 1835, 

^"■^^ ,. of which Dr. X. Tessier was the Editor ; now 

Canadian 

Medical the Dominion can boast of fourteen publica- 
tions devoted to Medicine and the kindred arts. 
In the summer of 1867 the Physicians of Canada met 
in Laval University and formed the first 

f'"' , medical association in the Dominion. .Sir 

Medical 

Association Cliarlcs Tuppcr of Nova Scotia was elected 
first president, and Mr. Alfred C. Bellean 

was appointed the first general secretary. 

The British Medical Association first met in Canada on 
August 31st, 1897, at Montreal, the first Canadian 

^"■"'. President being T. G. Roddick, M.D., M.P. 

meeting *-* ^ ' ' 

of the .Seven branches then existed in Canada, the first 

Canada'" having bccu fiimicd in Halifax in 1887, followed 

by others in Montreal, Toronto, British Columbia, 

and Manitoba in 1891, and in Ottawa and Quebec City in 

1897. 

From this brief sketch it will be seen that, in spite of 

enormous difficulties, the pioneers of the medical art in 
the Colony have succeeded in making their medical 
schools, institutions of which they and the mother country 
have every reason to be proud. 



CANADA'S PROGRESS 

The great primary sources of wealth in Canada are the fisheries, 
tlie niines, the forests and the farms, the latter being by far the 
most important of these industries. 

The great progress, especially in agriculture, made by Canada 
within the last quarter of a century is amply evidenced from the 
following details. 



Production of 
Wheat ... 
Barley ... 
Oats 



1881 

bushels 32,350,269 
16,844,868 
70,493,131 

Exports and 



Exports — Total 

,, Fisheries 

,, Mine 

„ Forest 

,, Agricultural products 

,, Animals and their products. 

,, Manufactures 

Imports — Total 

,, Home consumption 

,, Dutiable home consumption 

,, Free home consumption ... 

,, Woollen manufactures 

,, Cotton 

„ Silk 

,, Iron and steel 



i8gi 

.. 42,144,779 
.. 17,148,198 
.. 82,515,413 

Imports 
1868 

%7.567,888 

3.357.S10 

1,276,129 

18,262,170 

12,871,055 

6,893,167 

15,594,622 

•$73,459,644 

71,985,305 

43.655.695 

23.434.463 

7.667,335 

7,675.433 

1,009,365 

6,885,365 



Population of Canada 



1901 



igoi 

55.572.368 

22,224,366 

151,497,407 



1904 

§213,521,235 
10,759,029 
33,618,944 
33,091,922 

37. 138.87s 
63,812,117 
48,033,722 

.$259,211,803 

251,464,332 

148,909,576 

94,680,443 

15.159.383 
8,542,978 

3.715.037 
41,152,789 



4.833,239 
5.371,315 



P COPULATION 

Belleville 

Brantfcird 

('halliam 

(iuel])h 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

London 

*Nia.ijar.a K.ills ... . 

Ott.iwa 

St. Catharines ... . 

.St. Thomas 

Stratford 

Toronto 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



OF Cities and Towns, 
Ontario 

9,117 Almonte 

16,619 Ariiprior... 

9,068 Barrie 

. 11,496 Berlin 

. 52,634 Brockville 

. 17,961 Carleton Place 

. 37,981 Cobourg... 

5,702 Collingwood . 

. 59,928 Cornwall 

9,946 Deseronto 

11,485 Dundas ... . 

9,959 Fort William 

. 208,040 (lalt 

12,153 (i.'inanoiiue . 

8,833 Uoderich 



1901 



3,023 

4.152 
5.949 
9.747 
8,940 

4,059 
4,239 

5,755 
6,704 

3,527 
3,173 
3,997 
7,866 
3,526 
4,158 



• Niagara Falls city includes what was formerly Niagara Falls town and 
Niagara Falls vilLige 



CANADA S PROGRESS 



Hawkesburj' 

Ingersoll 

Kenora(Rat Portage) 

Lindsay 

Midland 

Napanee 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Owen Sound 

Paris 

Pembroke 

Perth 

Peterborousrh 



Hull 

-Montreal 

Quebec 

St. Henri 
Ste. Cunegonde 
St. Hyacinthe 
Sherbrooke ... 

Sorel 

Three Rivers 
Valleytield 
Chicoutiini ... 
Farnham 



4,150 

4.573 
5,202 
7,003 
3.174 
3.143 
4.907 
3.394 
8,776 
3,229 

5.156 

3,588 

11,239 



PetroUa 

Picton 

Port .\rthur 

Port Hope 

Prescott 

Renfrew 

St. Marj-s 

Sarnia 

Sault .Ste. Marie ., 
.Smiths P'alls 
Toronto Junction 

Trenton 

Waterloo ... . 



QtEBEC 



13.993 

267,730 

68,840 

21,192 

10,912 

9,210 

11,765 

7.057 

9,981 

11,055 

3.826 

3.114 



Fraserville .. 

Lauzon 

Levis 

Magog 

Granb}' 

J'oliette 

Kingsville 

Lachine 

Maisonneuve., 
St. John's 
.St. Jerome .. 
Westmount .. 



4.135 
3.698 
3.214 
4,188 
3,019 
3.IS3 
3.384 
8,176 
7,169 

5.^55 
6,091 

4.217 
3.537 



4.569 
3.416 

7.783 
3.516 

3.773 
4,220 
3,256 
5.561 
3.958 
4,030 
3,619 
8,856 



X O V .\ S C O T I .\ 



Halifax 

Sydney 

Amherst 
Dartmouth ... 
Glace Bay ... 
New Glasgow 
North .S^-dney 



40,832 
9,909 
4.964 
4,806 

6,945 
4.447 
4,646 



Pictou 

Springhill 
Sydney Mines 
Truro ... ., 
Westville 
Yarmouth 



3.235 
5.178 
3.191 
5.993 
3.471 
6,430 



Fredericton 
Moncton 
St. John 



N F, w B R f N s w I c K 

7,117 Chatham 
9,026 Woodstock 
.. 40,711 



4,866 
3.644 



Charlottetown 
Georgetown ... 



Prince E d w .-k r d Island 

12,080 Summerside .. 

1,123 



Brandon 

Portage la Prairie 

Winnipeg 

Morden 



M .\ N I T (1 B A 

5,620 Neepawa 

3,901 .St. Boniface . 

42,340 West Selkirk 
1.522 



2,875 



1. 415 
2,019 
2,188 



CHKONOLOGY OF FKINCU'AL EVENTS 



77 



Nanaimo 

Nelson 

New Westminster 



Calgary..^ 
Lethbridge 



B K I T I s H C o L r M n I A 

6,130 Rossland 
5,273 Vancouver 
6,499 Victoria ... 

Alberto 
4,865 P^dmonton 



2,326 



Medicine Hat 



Regina ... 

Moosejaw 



.S A S K A T C H K VV A N 

2,645 Prince Albert 
2,042 

Yukon 



6,159 
26,133 
20,816 



2,626 
1.975 



2,193 



Dawson 



9,142 



CHRONOLOGY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS 
IN CANADIAN HISTORY 

1497. John Cabot discovered the Eastern Coast of North America. 

149S. .Sebastian Cabot discovered Hudson .Strait. 

1500. (jaspar Cortereal entered the Gulf of .St. Lawrence. 

1524. Verrazzano explored the Atlantic coast of Nova .Scotia. 

1534- (June 21.) Landing of Jacques Cartier at Esquimeau.v Bay. First 

landing on Canadian soil. 
1535. Second visit of Cartier. P^urther explorations. Naming of the 

St. Lawrence. 
1540. Third visit of Cartier. (Died 1557). 

1542. The Sieur de Roberval and his party winter near Quebec. 
1558. Diego Homem's map showed the Bay of Fundy for the first time. 
1576-7-8. Martin Frobisher made voyages of discovery to Arctic Canada. 
1579. Sir Francis Drake took possession of the Pacific Coast, and named 

the country New Albion. 

1585. John Davis discovered Davis' Straits. 

1586. Davis made his second voj'age to Arctic Canada. 

1587. Davis made his third voyage to Arctic Canada. 
1592. Juan de Fuca discovered the Straits of Juan de Fuca. 
1598. First attempt to colonize Acadie. 

1603. Champlain arrives at Quebec. 

1604. De Monts and Champlain on the coast of Nova Scotia first ofiicially 

mention Acadie. 

1605. Founding of Port Royal (Annapolis), Acadie, by the Baron de 

Pontincourt. 
1608. .Second visit of Champlain. Founding of Quebec. Acadie transferred 

to Virginia. 
i6og. Champlain discovers I,ake Champlain. 
i6ro. Henry Hudson wintered in James' Bay, having spent three months 

in exploring Hudson Bay. 

1611. Jesuits arrive m Port Royal, Acadie. BrulJ discovers Lakes Huron 

and Ontario. 
1613. St. John's. Newfoundland, fomided. Ottawa river ascended by 

Champlain. .'\rgall of Virginia destroj-s Port Royal, Acadie. 
i6i6. William JJalTm ex,>lores liaffin Bay. First schools in Canada begmi ; 

one at Three Rivers and the second at Tadonsac, taught by 

Recollet I''.uhrrs. 



78 CHKONOLOGY OF TKINCU'AL EVENTS 



1623. Nova Scotia first settled by the English. 
1625. Jesuits first arrived in New France. 

1627. Canada, including Acadie, granted to the Company of the Hundred 

Associates by the King of France. 

1628. Port Royal (Acadie) taken by .Sir David Kirke. 

1629. Capture of Quebec by the Knglish under .Sir David Kirke. Treaty 

of .Susa between Great Britain and France. 
1632. Canada, Quebec and Acadie restored to F'rance by the Treaty of 
St. Gerniain-en-Laye. First .School opened in Quebec. 

1634. Town of the Three Rivers founded by M. de la Violette. 

1635. Marquis de (iamache foinided Jesuits College in Quebec. Lake 

Michigan discovered by Nicolet. 
1640. Lake lirie discovered by the Jesuits, Chaumonot and Brebo;uf. 
1642-1667. Frequent and serious wars between the French and the Iroquois 

Indians. 

1646. E.xploration of the .Saquenoj- River bj- the Jesuit, Dablon. 

1647. Lake St. John discovered by the Jesuit, Pere de Quen. 
1654. Acadie taken by the English. 

165s- Treaty of Westminster restoring Canada and Acadie to the Frencli. 

1657. Acadie transferred to Sir William Temple. 

1663. Company of the Hundred Associates dissolves. First Courts of Law. 

1667. Acadie restored to France by the Treaty of Breda. 

1668. First Library formed in Quebec. Quebec Seminary founded by 

Bishop Laval. 
1670. Hudson Bay Company founded. 
1673. Cataraqui (Kingston) founded by La Salle. 
1689. Massacre of Whites by Indians at Lachine. 
i6go. Capture of Port Royal by Sir William Phipps. 
1692. Acadie made part of Massachusetts. 

1696. Nova Scotia made a Royal province. 

1697. Treaty of Ryswick. 

1709-10-11. Canada invaded by the English. 

1713- Treaty of Utrecht, by which Hudson Bay, Nova Scotia (.\cadie) 
and Newfoundland were ceded to the English. Louisburg 
founded by the French. 

1736. Giles Hocquart, Intendant, signed an ordonnance declaring that 
whoever intended to free his slaves, might do so by a notarial 
deed to be registered in the nearest office of Ro\'al jurisdiction in 
civil matters ; failure to do so making void the act of freeing the 
slave. 

1748. Restoration of Louisburg (taken 1745) to the French in exchange for 
Madras, by Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle. 

1740. City of Halifax founded. Two English school teachers begin work 
in Nova .Scotia. 

1756. War between France and England. Montcalm in Quebec. 

17CQ. Capture of Fort Niagara by English under Prideaux. Battle of the 
Plains of Abraham and defeat of the French by Wolfe. Capitu- 
lation of Quebec to Admiral Saunders and General Townshend. 

1760. Capitulation of Montreal and completion of conquest of Canada. 

1769. Heme beganhis explorations of the Coppermine River region. 

1774- Quebec Act passed. Labrador transferred to Canada. 

1775. Invasion of Canada by Americans. 

1776. Americans driven out of Canada by General Carleton. 

1778. Captain Cooke in Novtha .Sound, claimed the North- West Coast for 

Great Britain. 
1780. General Assembly of Nova Scotia passed an .-^ct establishing Public 

Schools in Halifax. 



CHRONOLOGY OF PRINCIPAL EVENTS 79 



1783. Treaty of Versailles between Great Britain and France respecting 

fisheries on Newfoundland Coast from Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

Treaty of Paris and recognition of boundary line between 

Canada and the United States. 
1786. First classical school in Upper Canada opened. 
178S. Western Canada divided into four districts. English law introduced. 

King's College opened. 

1790. Vancouver Island circumnavigated by Captain Vancouver. 

1791. Division of Quebec into Upper and Lower Canada. 
1793. Rocky Mountains crossed by Mackenzie. 

1797. George III. directed that the waste lands of the Crown in Upper 

Canada be set aside for the establishment of free grammar 
schools, and for establishing other seminaries of learning. 

1798. Name of St. John's Island changed to that of Prince Edward Island. 
1807. Public grammar schools founded in Upper Canada. 

181 1. Judges excluded from Parliament. 

1812-15. War between Great Britain and the United .States, caused by 
British Orders in Council. The United States Army retired 
defeated to their own country (Nov. ii, 1813) after the battle of 
Chrysler's Farm. For another year the fighting went on until 
the war was terminated by the Treaty of Ghent (Dec. 24, 1814). 
The result of the three years' fighting was that twelve distinct 
invasions by Americans were successfully resisted. 

1815. Treaty of London. 

1816. Common schools established in Upper Canada. 

1819-22. John Franklin's overland expedition to the Arctic Ocean. 
1820. Cape Breton re-annexed to Nova .Scotia. 

1825. Treaty of .St. Petersburg defining the boundaries of Alaska. 

1826. F'ranklin and Richardson explore the Mackenzie river and the coast 

east and west. 
1829. Upper Canada College founded. 

1836. First railway in Canada from Le Prairie to .St. John's. 
1837-38. Outbreak of rebellion in both provinces. It was suppressed in 

Upper Canada bj- the militia, and in Lower Canada by the 

British troops. 
1 84 1. Union of the two provinces, under the name of the Province of 

Canada, and establishment of responsible government. Opening 

of the first United Parliament at Kingston, bj- Lord Sydenham. 

1845. Franklin finds the North-West Passage. 

1846. Oregon Boundary Treaty. 

1847. Lord Elgin, Governor-General. 

1852. Commencement of the Grand Trunk Railway. 

1855. Ottawa incorporated as a city. Post offices established. 

1856. The Legislative Council of the province of Canada became an 

elective chamber. 
1858. Adoption of the decimal system of currency. Ottawa made capital 

of the Dominion, and permanent seat of Government. 
i860. Wiiniipeg is begun to be built. 
1 861. Bank of British Columbia receives a royal charter. 

1866. Nova Scotia and New liriniswick accept confederation with Canada. 

In\asion of Canada iiy Fenians. Battle of Lime River. Union 
of Vancouver Island and P>ritish Columbia. 

1867. Union of Canada, Nova .Scotia and New Brunswick under the name 

of the Dominion of Canada proclaimed. The names of Upper 
and Lower Canada changed to Ontario and Quebec respectively. 
Lord Monck first (iovcrnor-( General of the Dominion. First 



80 CUKONOLOGY OK I'KINCIPAL EVENTS 



Parliament met on November 6th, Sir John A. Macdonald 

being Premier. 
1869. Lord Lisgar Governor-General. Red River Rebellion. Deed of 

Surrender confirming the Hudson Bay Company's sale. 
1S70. Addition of the North-West Territories to the Dominion and admission 

of the Province of Manitoba into the Confederation. 

1871. Treaty of Washington. New Brunswick School Act passed. 

Admission of British Columbia into the Confederation. The 
last regular troops leave Quebec. 

1872. Abolition of dual representation. Earl of Dufferin made Governor- 

General. 

1876. Opening of the Inter-colonial Railway from Quebec to Halifax. 

1877. Medical Council of Great Britain decided to recognize Canadian 

degrees. 

1879. Adoption of protective tariflf, otherwise called the National Policy'. 

1880. All British possessions on North American continent (excepting 

Newfoundland) aimexed to Canada by Imperial Order in Council. 

The Arctic Archipelago transferred to Canada by Imperial 

Order in Council. Royal Canadian Academy of Arts founded 

by the Marquess of Lome. 
1S82. First meeting of the Royal Society of Canada in Ottawa. The new 

seat of Government for the North-West Territories received 

the name of Regina. 
1883. Marquess of Lansdowne became Governor-General. 

1885. Rebellion in the North-West. 

1886. First through train on the Canadian Pacific Railway. First 

Canadian Cardinal. 

1888. Fishery Treaty at Washington. 

iSgi. Power given by Parliament to the Government to refer to the 
supreme Court of Canada for its opinion on important questions 
of law or fact touching provincial legislation or the appellate 
jurisdiction as to education or any other matter. 

1892. Treaty of Washington providing for arbitration in seal fishing. Con- 

vention as to boundaries between Canada and United States. 

1893. Earl of Aberdeen Governor-General of Canada. 

1894. Opening at Ottawa of the Colonial Conference to discuss matters of 

interest to the Empire. 
1896. Behring .Sea Commission met at Victoria. 
1S97. Colonial Premiers appointed Members of the Privy Council of 

England. 
iSg8. Franchise Bill passed the Dominion House of Commons. Earl of 

Minto made Governor-General of Canada. Two cent postage 

rate in operation. 
1S99. Preferential Tariff to Great Britain. 
1900. Ontario Government transferred to New Board of Governors its 

rights in Upper Canada College, 
igoi. Judicial Assembly of the Privy Council informs His Majesty that the 

Legislative Assembly of Manitoba has jurisdiction to enact the 

Liquor Act. 

1903. University of Ottawa destroyed by fire. Congress of Chambers of 

Commerce of the Empire opens at Montreal. Alaska Boundary 
settled (in pait) b}' the tribunal appointed to consider the 
questions involved. 

1904. Opening of Dominion of Canada Parliament. Agreement signed in 

London by Great Britain and France to settle disputed points in 
Newfoundland. Federal Government purchases Canadian Eastern 
Railway. Earl Grey appointed Governor-General. 




r^ILITARY MEDICINE CHEST -1588 

Fabricius. a noted Swiss physician of the XVI century, 
recommended that the m litary chest should be furnished with 
no less than 362 varieties of medicine, some of which contained 
as many as 64 ingredients. The complexity of arrangement, 
the huge bulk and great weight, the liability to breakage, and 
the complicated inconvenience of medicine chests persisted 
until the introduction of 'Tabloid' Medical Equipments. 



Historical Medical Equipments 



The medicine chests and cases used by explorers and 
missionaries possess a unique interest of the most intimate 
and personal kind ; whilst those which ha\-e formed the 
medical equipments of military expeditions, and have 
been the armamentaria employed to combat sickness and 
death in the field, naturally appeal strongly to physicians. 



The conditions under which these equipments have 
necessarily been employed, combining rough 
usage and exposure (in some cases for years) XeL^" 
to every variety of climate, form the severest 
tests to which it is possible for medicines and medicine 
cases to be subjected. 



,^^ 




One of the 'Tabloid 
Brand Medicine Cases 
specially designed for and 
supplied to the troops from 
the various British Colo- 
nies, for use in the South 
African Campaign. 



The explorer's knowledge of the ravages wrought by 
disease and death in early expeditions, the medical equip- 
ments of which were inadequate, unsuitable, 
or lacking in portability and permanence, Difficulties 
has caused him to appreciate the portable Explorers 
' Tabloid ' outfits which contain medicines of 
])r(ned keeping qualities. Early explorers, particularly 
in Africa, found the difficulties of procuring suitable 
portable medical supplies practically insuperable, and the 
horrors of disease and death associated with their expedi- 
tions were almost beyond description. 



84 



HISTORICAL MEDICAL EQIU'MKNTS 



When I think [said Sir H. M. Stanley, in the course of 
one of his lectures] of the dreadful mortality of Capt. Tuckey's 
expedition in 1816, of the Niger Expedition in 
1841, of the sufferings of Burton and Speke, and 
of my own first two expeditions, I am. amazed to 
find that much of the mortality and sickness was 
due to the crude way in which medicines were 
supplied to travellers. The very recollection 
causes me to shudder. 



Early 

Expeditions. 
Mortality 
due to crude 
Medicines 





y W vBrnno klCHS V/CLU-COMii- ;,■ Co 5 



One of the 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Chests carried by Sir H. M. 
TANLEY through "Darkest Africa", and brought back after three years' 
ourney with the remaining contents unimpaired. 



That a very marked change has taken place can be 
gathered from a more recent speech of this eminent 
explorer, in which he said : — 



In my early expeditions into Africa, there was one secret 
wish which endured with me always, and that was to ameliorate 

the miseries of African explorers. How it v.-as to 
B. W. & Co. ^-,g ^i^j^g J knew not ; who was to do it, I did not 

know. But I made the acquaintance of Messrs. 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. As soon as I came 
in sight of their preparations and their works, I found the con- 
summation of my secret wish. On my later expeditions I had 
all the medicines that were required for my black men, as 
well as my white men, beautifully prepared, and in most 



solved the 
Problem 



HISTORICAL MEDICAL EQUIPMENTS 8-T 

elegant fashion arranged in the smallest medicine chest it was 
ever my lot to carry into Africa. 

In his books, "Founding the Congo Free State" and 
" In Darkest Africa'', Sir H. M. Stanley wrote in the 
very highest terms of ' Tabloid ' Medical Equipments. 

Amongst other cases used during Stanley's travels, is 
the famous "Rear Guard" 'Tabloid' Medicine Chest, which 
remained in the swampy forest regions of the 
Aruwhimi for nearly four years, and more than s^anieyg 
once was actually submerg-ed in the river. "RearGuard" 
When it was brought back to London, the Chest tested 
reinaining contents were tested by the official Lancet" 
analyst of THE LANCET, v/ho reported 
that the ' Tabloid ' Medicaments had perfectly preserved 
their efficacy. 

The late Sljrgeon-M.\jor Parke, Stanley's Medical 
Officer, in his " Guide to Health in Africa", writes : — 

The medicinal preparations which I have throughout 

recommended are those of Burroughs Wkllco.me & Co., as I 

have found, after a very varied experience of the " None can 

different forms in which drugs are prepared for compare for 

foreign use, that there are none which can !i",^''"?! 

• i-> I > - Rehabihty, 
compare with them (' Tabloid' Products) tor Portability 

convenience of portability in transit, and tor and 

unfailing reliability in strength of doses even Convenience ' 

after prolonged exposure. 

At this point it is of interest to turn to the ' Tabloid ' 

Medicine Chest, here illustrated, which was discovered 

near Kenia, in the Aruwhimi Dwarf Countrv. ^ . „ 

,.,-,,' Emin Pasha 

It was the last case supplied to Emin P.vsha, 
Gordon's Governor of the Equatorial Sudan. It was 
taken by Arabs when he was massacred in 1892, and 
was recaptured by Baron Dhanis, commandant of the 
Congo Free State troops, after the battle of Kasongo. 
This chest was subsequently stolen by natives, and finally 



86 



HISTORICAL MEDICAL EOTriPMEXTS 



recovered by an officer of the Congo Free State, and 
returned to BURROUGHS WELLCOME & Co. 




E.MIN Pasha's 'Tabloid' Brand Mp:dici.ne Chest 

The following" is a copy of Emin's letter written to 
Burroughs Wellcome & Co., on receiving the 
chest : — 

Gentlemen, — I found the medicine chest you forwarded 
me fully stocked. I need not tell you that its very complete- 
ness made bound my heart. Articles like those could not l>e 
made but at the hand of the greatest artists in their own 
department. If any one relieved from intense pain pours out 
his blessings, they will come home to you. 

I should like to expatiate somewhat longer on the 
intrinsical value, but sickness preventing me to do so, I wish 
you to believe me, 



A history of all the ' Tabloid " Equipments associated 
with African exploration would, of itself, make a large 
volume, and it is only possible to make brief mention of 
a few other instances of their use. 

That ' Tabloid ' EyinPMENTS excel for military pur- 
poses has been abundantly demonstrated during various 
British and foreign militar}- campaigns. The 
Military following is an extract from the Official 
Expeditions Coturnmcnt ilrpcrt, made by the CHIEF 
Medical Officer of the recent British 
Military Expedition to Ashanti, on the 'Tabloid' 



HISTORICAL MHDICAL Knili'MKNTS 



Medical Equipment supplied by BURROUGHS WELLCOME 
& Co. : - 

The supply of medicines, both as to quality and quantity, 

left nothing to be desired. There was no scarcity of anything. 

The ' Tabloid ' medicines were found to be most 

convenient and of excellent quality. To be able Required 

to take out at once the required dose of any ^°^®^ *,^ °"'^^- 

^ . , -^ No delay to 

medicine, without having to weigh or measure ^veigh or 

it, is a convenience that cannot be e.xpressed in measure 

words. Time is saved to an extent that can 

hardly be realized, and so is space, for a fitted dispensary, or even 

a dispensary table is unnecessary. The quality 

of medicines was so good that no other should " Quality so 

be taken into the field. The cases supplied ^°° ' "° ,, 

, /-, other should 

are almost ideal ones tor the Ljovernment. be taken =nto 

They are light yet strong, and the arrange- the field " 

ment of the materials and medicines is as nearly 

perfect as possible. 

It is instructive to compare the experience of this 
expedition with that of the WOLSKI.EV A.SHANTI Exi^EDI- 
TION of 1873, fil^ted out according- to old-time methods. 
The suffering and loss of life were then terrible for 
want of suitable medic.il equipments. 

The expedition which, under the command of 
Lord Kitchener, defeated the Khalifa and reconquered 
the Sudan was supplied with 'Tabloid' Medical 
Equipments. 

Size of one product of ' Tabloid ' 
Cinchona Tincture, min. 80. 



Length of 30 min. tube of same 
diameter as ' Tabloid ' product. 



An illustration of one of the 'Tabloid' Medical Equip- 
ments specially designed for, and supplied to, the 15ritish 
Colonial Forces for use in the recent South .'\frican 
Campaign will be found on page 83. Similar cases were 
designed for, and supplied to, the CiTV OF LoNJ:)ON 
Imperl\l V0LUNTEER.S and the Imperi.^l Yeo^lvnrv. 



aa 



HISTORICAL MEDICAL EQIIPMENTS 



The equipment of the AMERICAN HOSPITAL Ship 
" Maine"', and the valuable services it ren- 
dered in connection with the campaigns in 
South Africa and in China, are so recent 
as to be within the memor>' of all. The 
whole of the medical outfit was supplied by 
Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 



Hospital 

Ship 

" Maine' 




One of the 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Chest-, specially de^i^ned for 
and supplied to the Hospital Ship " Maine." 

Referring to this equipment, THE LAXCET 
(London, Eng.) reported : — 

The whole of the medical outfit has been supplied by- 
Messrs. Burroughs We'.lcome & Co. One of the medicine 
chests supplietl by this tirm is in tooled leather, designed by 
Mr. Henry S. Wellcome. 

In the hitherto unsuccessful endeavours to reach the 

Poles, and in the exploration of Arctic 

Arctic and Antarctic lands, 'Tabloid' Medicine 

Exploration Chests have taken a pioneer position, and 

continue to hold supremacy. 

The 'Tabloid' belts and other Medical Equipments 
supplied to Nansen for his journey in the "Fram". 
and those used by the JaCKSON - Harmsworth 
Arctic Expedition are now added to the historic 



HISTORICAL MKDICAI. EQUIPMENTS 



89 



collection of BURROUGHS WELLCOME & CO. 




One of the 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Belts carried by Nansen on 
the Arctic Expedition. 

Commander Peary, writing from Etah, Greenland, 
reports : — 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. ' Tabloid ' Field Medicine 
Cases and supplies have proven invaluable. 




One of the ' Tabi.otd ' 
Brand Medicine 

Chests used by Com- 
mander R. E. Peary 
in his Arctic Expedition. 



Still more recently the Itall-SlN ARCTIC EXPEDITION, 
commanded by the DuKE OF THE Abruzzi, has returned. 
It has been found that despite the fact 
that the record northern latitude of 



Unaffected 
by Climate 



^6° 33' 49" was reached, the ' Tabloid ' 

Medicine Chests and Cases witli which the expedition was 



90 



HISTOKICAL MKDICAL EOriPMENTS 



equipped have been brought back with their remaining 
contents quite unaffected by the rigour of the cHmate. 




One of the 'Tabloid' Brand Medicink 
Cases carried bj- the Duke of thk 
Abruzzi's Polar Expedition. 



The entire medical outfit of the National Antarctic 
Expedition was furnished by Burroughs Wellcome & Co., 

and on the return of the " DISCOVERY ", with the members 
of the expedition on board, the medical officer made a 
highly satisfactory report on the ' Tabloid ' medical 
equipment. 

In August, 1901, the "Discovery" left England, and in 
the following |anuar\- crossed the limit of the Antarctic 




One of the 'Tabloid ' Brand Mkdicine Casks carried by the National 
Antarctic Expedition. 

Circle. Having passed the farthest eastward point 
attained by Ross sixty years before, the explorers dis- 
covered a new land, which they named King Edward \'II 
Land. One of the most noteworthy features of the 
expedition was the arduous sledge journey undertaken 
by the commander, C.A.PTAIN ScOTT, accompanied by 
Dr. Wilson and Lieutenant Shackelton. This 
journey over the ice occupied three months, and the record 
latitude of 82' 17' South was reached. On sledge jour- 
neys the question of weight is of great moment. The 
traveller, on such occasions, must carry but the barest 
necessaries, and of these the lightest procurable. The 
medicine chest is an important item, for upon the efficacy 
of its contents the lives of the explorers may depend. 



HISTORICAL MEDICAL EQUIPMENTS 



91 



To the enthusiasm of Sir CLEMENTS Markham, 
K.C.B., then President of the Royal Geographical Society, 




One of the ' Tabloid' Brand Medicine Chests carried by the Nationa 
Antarctic Expedition. 

the successful organization of the expedition is largely due. 
Referring to the ' Tabloid ' Medical Equipment of the 
"Discovery" he reports: — 



National Ar.tarctic Expedition, 
I, Savile Row, 

Burhngton Gardens, W. 

The Uedical Equipment of the Exploring Ship cf the 
National Antarctic Expedition it^s entirely supplied 
by Messrs Burroughs, Wellcome & Co. , and, proved in 
every way most satisfactory. 

The few other drugs and preparations which v/ere tel:cn 
with the Expedition were only supplied for purpcsea 
of experiment, and, can in no way be regarded as 
part of the medical equipment. 




Mr 



^ 



"H. 




J' 



\ ^n^ 



s s ' Discovery ' 
National Antarctic Expedition 

The entire medical equipment of this expedition. v.'a3 
furnished by Burroughs Wellcom.e £: Co. 



HISTORICAL MEDICAL EQUIPMENTS 93 

Dr. Kcettlitz, the Senior Medical Officer to the 
expedition, reports : — 

Discovery Antarctic Expedition. 
The Medical Equipment of the ' Discovery ' Exploring 
Ship, of the National Antarctic Expedition, was entirely sup- 
plied by Messrs. Burroughs Wellcome & Co., mostly in the 
form of 'Tabloid ', ' Soloid ', and ' Enule ' preparations. 

The preparations proved, in every way, most satisfactory, 
and there was no deterioration of any of thern in spite of the 
conditions of climate and temperature to which they were 
exposed. The few other drugs and preparations which were 
taken with the expedition were only taken for purposes of 
experiment. 

The cases supplied by PJurrough-^ Wellcome & Co. to us 
have also been found satisfactory, the small leather one was 
very useful upon sledge journeys, being light and ct)mpact. 
The No. 250 ' Tabloid ' Case was used tor some weeks at the 
camp eleven miles north of the ship, when the whole ship's 
company was engaged in sawing and blasting the ice, and it 
was found very convenient. 

The other cases were useful in our cabins, etc., for a 
handy supply. 



u^ajuU((^^^ttc^ 



The relief ship "MORNING" was also provided with a 
' Tabloid ' Medical Equipment, and the Medical Officer, 
Dr. George Davidson, sends the following report: — 

Antarctic Relief Ship ' Mornino '. 
I wish very heartily to express my perfect satisfaction with 
the medical equipment which was supplied to the Antarctic 
Relief Ship ' Morning' by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. Wlien 1 
say that it was compact, yet complete, that everything was just 
to hand, that during a period of two years and three months I 
was never at a lo.ss to find just the medicine I wanted, and that 




94 HISTORICAL MEDICAL EQUIl'MENTS 

without delay, I need say no more to emphasize the extra- 
ordinary convenience which a ' Tabloid ' and ' Soloid ' outfit is 
to a ship such as ours, whether at sea or in the ice. I found 
the ' Tabloid ' and ' Soloid ' Products to remain unchanged 
throughout the whole period of my commission, and to equal in 
efHcacy the best medical preparations I have yet had occasion 
to use. It is impossible to realize without experience how 
much can be condensed by this mode of exhibition in a very 
small space. I strongly advise all intending explorers to betake 
themselves to Burroughs Wellcome & Co. for their medical 
equipment, and they will not be disappointed. 



From Dr. Edward Wilson also, who v^•as in charge 
of some of the sledge journeys from the " Discovei^^ ■"■, 
the following report has been received : - 

Discovery Antarctic Expedition. 

Though there was but little serious illness on the ' Discovery ' 
during the recent Antarctic Expedition, the ' Tabloid ' prepar- 
ations and the cases were put to a fairly rigorous test, not only 
in the ship, but on the various sledge journeys that were 
undertaken, during which they experienced temperatures as 
low as 68° below zero, and much rough handling, without any 
loss in efficiency and usefulness. Certain of the ' Tabloid ' 
Ophthalmics were freely used for snow blindness, and were 
found to be most convenient." 



Z^uA-^-^^rv t^LJ^^y<^^ 



Mr. Julius Price, the special artist and correspondent 

of the " Illustrated London News", reports 

3°'°°^J"^'"- that he carried his 'Tabloid^ Medicine Case 

And Desert 

and Humid '^^'^^ jCooo miles through Arctic regions, 

Swamps. across .Siberia, through China, Japan and 

Extreme America. Despite the severe wear and 

Heat and <- , • 

Cold. ^^^^ O' t'l's great journey, the case has 

suffered little, and the remaining contents 

are quite unaffected by exposure to ever}- variety of 

climate. 



HISTORICAL MEDICAL E(JUII'.MENTS 95 

Two typical reports on ' Tabloid ' Equipments are 
appended : — 

Extract from the report of B. F. Rand, M.D., 
F.R.C.S., Principal Medical Officer, British South Africa 
Company :— 

We have had Burroughs Wellcome & Co.'s 'Congo' 
Chests, fitted with ' Tabloid ' medicines, in daily 
use during the occupation of this country. They " Inestimable 

1 1 f • ^- 1 1 • Service " 

have proved or inestimable service. 

Extract from the report of the late W. H. Crosse, 

M.D., xM.R.C.S., Principal Medical Officer, British Royal 

Niger Company: — 

All these ' Tabloid ' drugs are so good it is impossible for 

me to speak more highly of one than another. They are all 

of the very best qualit}', each drug is accurately 

described, and reliable. To the traveller these "~heVery 

preparations are simply invaluable, and I would Oualitv" 

strongly advise every one coming out to the 

Tropics to get a full supply of ' Tabloid ' medicines. 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. have for many years 
made a special study of the requirements of travellers 
and expeditions, not onlv in respect of 

^ , ■,• ' , Study of 

compactness, portabuity and permanence, Medicines 
but also in the selection of remedies Suitable for 
necessary to combat the maladies prevalent every Climate 
in every clime, from the arctic to the antarctic. 

'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Cases contain in a small 
space a complete outfit of pure drugs in doses of extreme 
accuracy. 

So compact are these cases that they can be carried in 
the pocket, in the carriage or motor car, or on the cycle, 
their contents being always ready for use in 
emergencies. They are specially valuable "^^'"s.^ncy 
to the country practitioner, who is often Pocket, 
called upon to cover long distances, and who Cycle, Motor 
would experience great difficulty in carrying °'^ arnage 
or obtainin;.^ supplies of such medicines as he may desire 
to administer promptly, were it not for the convenience 
and portability of ' Tabloid ' Brand Medicine Cases. 




THE SMALLEST MEDICINE CHEST IN THE WORLD 

This tiny gold medicine chest is fitted with twelve square 
medicine chest bottles eontaming 300 doses of ' Tabloid Brand 
medicaments, equivalent to 15 pints of fluid medicine 



HYPODERMIC rOCKET-CASES 'TABLOID BRAND 97 

HYPODERMIC POCKET-CASES 

'TABLOID' BRAND 

[in B. \V. >i: Co.] 

Special Designs, the propsrtj- of Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 

The word ' Tabloid ' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always 
be specified when ordering. 

' Tabloid ' Hypodermic Pocket - Cases provide complete 
armamentaria for hypodermic work. Primarily intended for 
emergency purposes, such essentials as compact- 
ness and convenience in use have received the For Waist- 
fullest attention, and with unique result. A full '^°^^ Pocket 
equipment of hypodermic drugs of utmost reliability 
and accuracy of dosage, together with syringe and needles, may, 
by means of a ' Tabloid ' Hypodermic Outfit, be carried easily in 
the waistcoat Pocket. 

Hypodermic ' Taljloid ' Brand Pocket-Cases are prepared in 
gold, silver, gun-metal, or aluminium, and in a great variety 
of fancy leathers. Each contains a B. W. & Co. Hypodermic 
Syringe with needles, and from five to fifteen tubes of ' Tabloid ' 
Brand Hypodermic products, etc. 

No. 7. Hypodermic 'Tabloid' Brand Pocket-Case 







JS^^WI 







No. 7. Ilvi'ODERMic 'Tahloio' Brand 
Pockkt-Case 



Measurements, 
3i X34 X fin. With 
special detachable 
aseptic frame cf 
novel design, and re- 
volving rack. Fitted 
with twelve tubes of 
' Tabloid ' Hj-podcr- 
mic products, nickel - 
plated .sj-ringe, or.e 
exploring and t«o 
regular steel needles. 
This case, after the 
removal of the tubes 
of Hypodermic pro- 
ducts, may be steril- 
ised with ease. In 
(jun-metal or iji 
Aluminium. 



98 



MODKRN MKDICAL E ^I'H'.M KNTS 



No. 9. Aseptic Hypoderamc 'Tabloid' Brand 
Pocket-Case 



Measurements. 35 X if X $ in. This case is a model of compact 
completeness. It is made of nickel-plated metal, each edge and corner 

being smoothly rounded. It 
contains the B. W. & Co. 
All-Glass Aseptic Syringe, 
and two regular steel 
needles enclosed in a pro- 
tective tube. The tubes 
of ' Tabloid ' Hypodermic 
products, eight in num- 
ber, are carried in a 
hinged rack, which securely 
holds them when the case 
is closed, and which, when 
swung outwards, allows of 
the easy withdrawal of the 
desired tube. This case, 
after the removal of the 
tubes of Hypodermic pro- 




No. 9. Aseptic Hypoukrmic 'T..\bloid' 
Brand Pocket-Case. 



ducts, may be sterilised with ease. Enclosed in a doeskin cover. 



No. 10. ASEPTIC H'iPODER.WlC 'TaBLOID" BRAND 

Pocket-Case. 




X(l. 10. .\VEF'TIC IIyI'uLiEKMIC 

'Tabloid' Bka.nu Pocket-Cash 



Measurements, 23 X i5 X ^ in 
Xickel-plated metal. Fitted with 
the B. \V. & Co. Ai;-Glass Aseptic 
Syringe (capacity min. 20) with 
detachable finger grip and two 
regular steel needles. Each part 
of the syringe is separately held 
in a holdfast clip. .^ hinged rack 
carries five tubes of ' Tabloid ' 
Hypodermic products. Enclosed 
in a doeskin cover. 



No. 21. Hypodermic 'Tabloid' Brand Pocket-Case 

.Me.isurements, 4 X 35 X i^ in. Fitted with nine tubes of 'Tabloid' 
Hypodermic products, nickel-plated hypodermic syringe with two steel 
needles, a small phial for sterilised water, capsule of ether, etc. In 
Morocco and other fine leathers. 



HYPODERMIC POCKET-CASES ' TABLOID ' BRAND 



E9 




No. 23. Aseptic Hypoderauc 'Tabloid' Brand 
Pocket-Case 



Measurements, 35 x 35 
xfin. In Gun-metal or 
in Aluminium, with 
special detachable nickel- 
plated aseptic frame and 
revolving rack. Contents 
same as those of No. 21 
Case, with the addition of 
a steel e.xploring needle. 
This case, after the 
removal of the tubes of 
H^'podermic products, 
maj- be sterilised with 
ease. 







No. 23. Aseptic Hvpoder.mic 'Tahloid' 
Brand Pocket-Case 



No. 32. Aseptic Hypoderamc 'Tabloid" Brand 
Pocket-Case (The Mussel Shell) ; 





No. 32. .\sEPTic Hypodermic 'Tabloid' Brand Pocket-Cask 
(The ISrussel Shell) 

Measurements, 35 X if X f in. Made of nickel-plated metal, occupies 
very little space, and is conveniently shaped for the pocket. Fitted with 
nickel-plated hypodermic syringe, five tubes of 'Tabloid' Hypodermic 
products, one exploring and two regular steel needles. This case, after 
the removal of the tubes of Hypodermic products, ma\- be sterilised with 
ease. Enclosed in a leather cover. 



100 



MODERN MEDICAL EQUIPMENTS 



OPHTHALMIC Pocket-Cases 
'Tabloid' brand 

[iii B. W. & Co.] 

Special Designs, the propertj- of Burroughs Wellcoir.e & Co. 

The word ' Tabloid ' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs WeKcome & Co. This brand should always 
be specified when ordering. 

' Tabloid ' Ophthalmic Cases are the most compact and 

complete equipments for ophthalmic work. In 

_ _. a space of two or three cubic inches they 

Two Fingers "^ . ■' 

contain supplies of active and accurately divided 

ophthalmic drugs, solution dropper, camel-hair brushes, etc. 

No. 91. Aseptic Ophthalmic 'Tabloid' Brand 
Pocket-Case 



In nickel-plated metal. Mea- 
surements, 2j X ij X J in. Fitted 
with nine tubes of ' Tabloid ' and 
' Soloid ' Ophthahiiic products, in 
nickel-plated rack, solution drop- 
per, mortar, pestle, and two 
camel-hair brushes. This case, 
after the removal of the contents, 
ma)- be sterilised with ease. 




I *, BURROUGHS WEkLCOME a C» 

^ T;qLoiy3^i,3 oPHTmuiic case. 



No. 91. Aseptic Ophthalmic 
' Tabloid ' Brand 

PoCKET-C.\SE 

No. 92. ASEPTIC Ophthalmic 'Tabloid' Brand 
Pocket-Case (The AWssel Shell.) 




No. 92. Aseptic Ophthalmic 

T.\bloid' Brand Pocket-Case 

(The Mussel Shell) 



In nickel-plated metal. Measure- 
ments, 2i X li X f in. Fitted with 
seven tubes of ' Tabloid ' Ophthalmic 
products, mortar, pestle, vulcanite 
rod, solution-dropper, and two camel- 
hair pencils. 



HYPODERMIC AND Ol'HTHALMIC POCKET-CASES ' TABLOID* BRANP 101 



HYPODERMIC AND OPHTHALMIC POCKET-CASES 
'TABLOID' BRAND 

[s B. W. & Co.] 

No. SO. Hypodermic and Ophthalamc 'Tabloid' Brand 

Pocket-Case 

(The ' British Armj' Regulation ') 



In Aluminium. Measurements, 
35 X 2^ X i in. Contains si.xteen 
tubes of ' Tabloid ' Hypodermic pro- 
ducts, eleven tubes of ' Tabloid ' 
Ophthalmic products, two camel-hair 
brushes, a pair of minute forceps and 
a booklet giving a summary of the 
chief uses of the products. 



No. So. Hypodermic and Ophthal- 
mic 'T.\bloid' Brand Pocket-Case 
(The ' British Army Regulation ') 




MEDICINE POCKET-CASES 

'TABLOID' BRAND 

[sn B. W. & Co.] 

."Special Designs, the property of Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 

The word ' Tabloid ' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always Le 
specified when ordering. 

' Ta'ijloid ' Medicine Pocket-Cases are compact equipments 
of pure, active drugs, divided, ready for administration, into 
accurate doses. They enalile physicians to have 
always with them an equipment of reliaMe Por 
medicines especially for emergency u.se. In Emergencies 
country districts, and for travelling, ' Tabloid ' 
Pocket-Cases are recognized as an e.ssential in the physician's 
equipment. 



102 



MODERN MEDICAL EOUIPMENTS 



No. 115. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Pocket-Case 



Measurements, 8j 
X 35 X ij in. Con- 
tains ten i oz. phials 
filled with ' Tabloid ' 
Brand products, etc. 
In Seal. Pigskin, 
Cowhide, Morocco 
and other fine 
leather>. 




iSo. 115. ■Tabloid' Brand Medicine 
Pocket-Case 



No. 11/. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Pocket-Case 



V"^ 



k'» 




* „.„,:;:; ""11$ 



— '^sr ''"""'I' 



. .„ ,.-^S 

I i A 1 i i 1 '^r 




Measurements, 7A x 4 x 
23 in. Contains si.xteen i oz. 
phials of ' Tabloid ' Brand 
products, etc. In Cowhide, 
Pigskin, Crocodile, Morocco 
and other fine leathe^^. 



Xo. 117. 'T.-\bloid' Brand Medici.vk 
Pocket-Case 



No. 124. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Pocket- 




No. 124. ' T.adloiu ' Bk.^nd Medicine 
Pocket-Case 



Measurements, 5A x 4 x 
zi in. Fitted with fi-om six- 
teen to twentj--four tubes of 
' Tabloid ' Brand products, 
according to size of products. 
In Seal. Crocodile. Morocco, 
and other fine leather,-. 



MEDICINE POCKET-CASES TABLOID DRAND 



103 



No. 125. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Pocket-Case 




No. 125. 'Tabloid' Bkand .MhDicixE 
Pocket-Case 



Measurements, 5^ x 4 X 
li in. Speciall}' fitted for 
emergencj' purposes with 
fourteen tubes of ' Tabloid ' 
Brand products and a remov- 
able tray containing a hj-po- 
dermic equipment of twelve 
tubes of ' Tabloid ' Hj-poder- 
mic products, B. W. & Co. 
nickel -plated hypodermic 

syringe, and two regular steel 
needles. In Cowhide and 
other fine leathers. 



No. 141. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Pocket-Case 



^TRaDs'ir'A^BlfO"^D"'flM»K^ 









No. 141. ■ Tabloid' Bkand Medicine Pocket-Case 



In Morocco leather. Measurements, 7^ X 4 X 23 in. Fitted with fifteen 
half-ounce phials of ' Tabloid ' Brand products and a leather covered metal 
compartment containing pill boxes for the physician's use in distributing 
the contents of the case. .Similar in desi^jn to No. 117. 



For full j'a7t:t.ulars of these avd miinerojis otiier exatnplex, see General 

Price I ist. 



104 



MODERN MEDICAL EQVIPMKNTS 



cycle-, carriage-, and motor-car cases 

Medical Equipment Chests, etc., 

'TABLOID' Brand 

[i.r B. W. & Co.] 

Special Designs, the property of Burroua;hs Wellcome & Co. 

The word ' Tabloid ' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always 
be specified when ordering-. 

' Tabloid ' Cycle-, Carriage-, ]\Iotor-Car and Equipment Case.s 
contain 'Tal^loid', "Soloid' and other fine products of B. \V. & Co., 

minor surfrical instruments and sundry emergency 
For General , • , . . , . 

Practitioners '-"e^sing^- -^ g^'^at variety is prepared to meet tUe 

requirements of medical men in home practice, 
according to the extent and the special character of their needs. 
For tho.se who cycle, cases are made in various designs, one for 
attaching to the handle-bar of the cycle, another for attaching to 
the stay-liar, and others for the pocket. 



'Tabloid' Medical Equipment Cases provide complete portable 
dispensaries for practitioners in distant stations, missionaries, 
e.xplorers and expeditions of all kinds. For such 
purposes they are the only really satisfactory 
form of medical equipment, and have been 
adopted universally. In addition to full supplies 
of accurately dosed, permanent and reliable drugs, 
the.se equipments contain minor surgical instruments and 
dressings. 



For 

Physicians, 
Explorers, 
Missions, 
Armies, etc. 



No. 137. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Saddle-Case 




No. 137. 'Tabloid' Br.and 
JSIedicine .Saddle-C.\se. 



In cowhide or pigskin. Measure- 
ments, 7? X 45 X 25 in. Fitted in 
the same way as No. 117 with si.x- 
teen half-ounce phials of 'Tabloid' 
Brand products, etc. This case is 
also supplied fitted with feather- 
weight containers. Measurements. 1 
7i X 43 X 2J in. (No. 139). 



CYCLE, ETC., MEDICINE CASES ' TABLOID' BRAND 



105 



No. 200. Physicia.n's Cycle Handle-Bar 'Tabloid 
Brand Medicine Case 




No. 200. Physician's Cycle Handle-Bar 'Tabloid' Brand 
Medicine C;\se 

lu black enamelled cowhide. Outside measurements, 8i X 2^ X 45 in. 
Fitted complete with nine 5 oz. phials of 'Tabloid' Brand products, minor 
surgical instruments and dressings. Weight, empty, 8\ oz. ; fu!!, about 
i.i lb. 



No. 202. Physician's Cycle Stay-Bar 'Tabloid' Brand 
Medicine Case 

In black enamelled cowhide. Outside measurements, 11 X 2f X 5 in. 
Fitted complete with twelve A oz. phials of ' Tabloid ' Brand products, 
minor surgical instruments and dressings. 



No. 209. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Case 

In morocco leather, cowhide or pigskin. Outside measurements, 
10 X s X 65 in. Contains nine 1 0/.. , twenty-four J oz., and thirteen 
2 dr. phials of ' Tabloid ' and ' Soloid ' Brand products ; medicine measure, 
extra pockets, and loops for instruments; twelve tubes of 'Tabloid' 
Hypodermic products, B. W. & Co. patent nickel-plated hypodermic 
syringe, two regular steel needles, etc. 



106 



MODERN MEDICAL EOUIj'MENTS 



No. 219. 'T.abloid' Brand Medicine Case 

Measurements, 133 X 6 X 6? in. Metal frame. Contains eight 2 oz. 
stoppered, ten 1 oz., twelve 6 dr., eight 4 dr., and ten 2 dr. corked phials. 
The rows of phials are arranged to fall so as to show the labels. Fitted 
with 'Tabloid' and ' Soloid ' Brand products, twelve tubes of 'Tabloid' 
Hypodermic products, B. W. & Co. patent nickel-plated hypodermic 
syringe, with two regular steel needles, etc. Made in morocco leather. 



No. 220. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Case 

In Morocco or Cowhide. Measurements, 14 X 5j X 93 in. Phials 
arranged in tiers to display labels. Contains eight 2 oz. stoppered, twelve 
I oz., fourteen 6 dr., and sixteen 4 dr. phials of 'Tabloid' and 'Soloid' 
Brand products, twelve tubes of ' Tabloid ' Hypodermic products, 
B. \V. & Co. nickel-plated hypodermic syringe, needles, space and loops 
for instruments, etc. Similar in design to Xo. 221 Case. 



No. 221. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Case 




^^^"*««^4b^^^'^'^ 



Xo. 221. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Case. 

In e.xtra finish Cowhide, Morocco, Crocodile and other fine leathers. 
Measurements, 14 x si x a\ in. Fitted in the same way as No. 220 Case 
with the addition of nine 2 dr. phials of " Tabloid ' and ' Soloid ' Brand 
products, and a glass-stoppered and capped ether bottle. 



No. 227. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Case 

In Cowhide or Pigskin. Measurements. 6^ X 3! X 3 in. Made of two 
metal cups and frames covered with leather. Arranged to contain twenty 
li dr., twelve i dr., and fourteen ^ dr. tubes of 'Tabloid' and 'Soloid 
Brand products. Weight about 2 lb. 6 oz. 



MEDICINK CASES TABLOID BRAND 



107 



No. 20S. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Chest 




BlitllBlilg.iii; 
No. 208. 'Tabloid' Br.and Medicine Chest 



Made of dressed and varnished raw-hide ; very light, portable and 
du.'-able. Outside measurements, 13^ X 55 X 9 in. Fitted with twelve 
4 oz. stoppered bottles of 'Tabloid and 'Soloid' Brand products, etc. 

A -.iinilar case is also made in a smaller size (Xo. 206). Outside measure- 
ments. 144 X 4j X 7j in. Fitted with twelve 2A oz. stoppered bottles 
of 'Tabloid' and 'Soloid' Brand products, etc. (as carried by Mr. Thos. 
.Stevens). 



No. 2:?l. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Case 
(As suggested b\- .Sir W. Moori- ) 




In black japanned 
metal. Measurements, 
loj X 7j X 3 in. Contains 
fifteen i oz. corked phials, 
and one 4 oz. corked 
bottle : minor surgical 
instrumentsand dressings. 
Complete with ' Tabloid ' 
Brand products, etc., as 
recommended in Sir \V. 
MoOKK.'s Manual 0/ 
I-'aiiiily Medicine for 
India. 



No. 231. ' 'Iaiiloh) ' 1!k.\nii Mi-:dici.se C.^se 



108 



MODERN MEDICAL EOT'IPMENTS 



No. 229. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Case 

Measurements, 8A X 5j X si in. Made of two metal cups and frames, 
covered with Cowhide. Arranged to contain forty 4 dr. phials of 
' Tabloid ' and ' Soloid ' Brand products. Weight, about 4 lb. 13 oz. 



No. 250. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Chest 

(As supplied to Sir 11. M. .Stanlej-, Emin Pasha, Military Expeditions, 
Missionaries, etc.) 







No. 250. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Chest 

Measurements, 15! X loj x Si in. Made of japanned sheet-steel. 
Contains six 5 oz. and thirty 3^ oz. glass-stoppered bottles of ' Tabloid ', 
'.Soloid' and other fine products of B. \V. & Co. in movable teak-wood 
tray. The lid (in two sections) is arranged to hold supplies of dressings, 
bandages, minor surgical instruments and other accessories. Weight, 
when fitted, about 40 lb. 



No. 251. 'Tabloid Brand Medicine Chest 

(As supplied to the Jackson-Harm.s\vorth Polar Expedition, The 
National Antarctic Expedition, etc.) 

Made of aluminium. Measurements, 15! X 103 X Si in. Contains forty 
3J oz. feather-weight bottles of 'Tabloid', 'Soloid' and other fine products 
of B. W. & Co. In other respects it is fitted in the same way as the 
No. 250 Chest. Weight, when complete, about 27 lbs. 



MEDICINE CHESTS ' TABLOID ' BRAND 



109 



No. 254. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Chest (The Indian) 



Made'! of japanned 
metal. Measurements, 
9t X 7 X 6i in. Con- 
tains sixteen 15 oz. glass- 
stoppered bottles, and 
from six to eight 4 dr. 
phials of ■ Tabloid ' and 
'Soloid' Brand products, 
instruments and tray 
carr3'ing sundrj- dress- 
ings, etc. Weight, about 
12 lbs. 



No. 254. 'Taisloid' Brand JlEDicixt-; Chest 
(The Indian) 

No. 256. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Chest 

Measurements loA x 6 x jk in. Fitted with eighteen 3A 07.. feather- 
weight containers of ' Tabloid ' and ' .Soloid ' Brand products, and a tray 
containing minor dressings and sundries. Made in aluminium. 

A similar case is supplied in black japan and is known as Xo. 253. 
The contents are the same as No. 256, with the exception that the ' Tabloid ' 
and ■ Soloid ' Brand products are in glass-stoppered bottles. 




No. 25/. 'Tabloid' Brand Medicine Case (The Settler's) 



Made of black japanned 
metal. Measurements, 
8t X 4i X sf in. Contains 
twelve ih o/. bottles ot 
' Tabloid ' and ' Soloid ' 
Brand products, 'Ilazeline' 
Cream, Bandages, Dressings, 
and other accessories. 




No. 257. 'Tadloid ' BxAND Mkdicink Case 
(The Settlek's) 



no MOUKRN MEDICAL EQUIPMENTS 

ANTIDOTE CASE 

'TABLOID' BRAND 
[■»; B. W. & Co.] 

Special Design, the property of Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 

The word 'Tabloid' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always 
be specified when ordering. 

A compact equipment, containing instruments and drugs ready 
for immediate use in the treatment of poisoning. 

No. 300. 'Tabloid' Brand Antidote Case 

Measurements, 12X6X3111. 
Fitted with stomach syphon- 
tube, catheter, B. W. & Co. 
nickel - plated hypodermic 
syringe, two needles, ' Tab- 
loid' Hj'podermic products, 
' Vaporole ' Amyl Nitrite, 
toxicological chart, and 




iiiiiiisKli 



•^ twenty-one 3 07.. phials of 
^31 . •pj^jjiQ^j . Brand Antidotes. 



No. 300. ' Tabloid ' Brand Antidote 
Case. 



ANALYSIS CASES 
'SOLOID' BRAND 

[.i;» B. w. & Co.] 

Special Designs, the property of Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 

The word ' Soloid ' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always 
be specified when ordering. 

No. 510. 'Soloid' Brand Urine Test Case 

The clinical importance of urine analysis is fully recognized. 

This case provides, in a most compact and 
Urine convenient form, all the requirements for making 

Analysis ^^ examination of urine at the bedside. Owing 

the ^Bedside ^° their purity and accuracy, the 'Soloid' Brand 

products contained in this case make relial-le 
te.st solutions without further weighing. 



ANALYSIS CASES ' SOLOID ' BKAND 



111 



In polii^hed nickel-plated metal, easily kept aseptic. It contains 

a complete set of 
material for making an 
examination of urine, 
both qualitative and 
quantitative, for albu- 
min, sugar, etc. The 
outfit includes a urino- 
meter, Esbach's albu- 
niinimeter, a graduated 
measure, test tubes, 
test paper, spirit lamp, 
filter papers, and a 
good supply of the ever- 
ready 'Soloid' reagents, 
including Fehling's test, 
picric acid, potassium 
ferrocyanide and citric 
No. 510. 'Soloid' Bk.^nd Urine Test acid. 

Case 
Measurements, si X 2I x 15 in. 

Each portion of the apparatus can also be obtained separately. 




No. 500. 

This 



Soloid' Brand Water Analysis Case 

convenient hand-case supplies all the apparatus, 



;eagents, etc., necessary for examining samples 
of drinking water at the source of supply, and . "^ ^^'^ 
for drawing up the usual reports concerning som-^e 
suitability of the water for domestic purposes. 



Measurements, 12J x 
jo^ X 4I in. It con- 
tains a nickel evapor- 
ating dish, Erlenmeyer 
flask, tripod, spirit 
lamp, 100 c.c. and 
other graduated cylin- 
ders, Nessler .Solution 
capsules, 'Soloid' 
Brand products of 
Silver Nitrate, Potas- 
sium Iodide and .Starch, 
Potassium Perman- 
ganate. Potassium 
Chloride, Potassium 
Ferroc3'anide, .Sodium 
Acid .Sulphate, .Soap, 
Zinc Dust, etc. 




No. 500. 'Soloid' Bhand Water Analysis 
Case 



For fuller fiarticiilars of these ami viher c.xa>iiples see General Price List 



1 12 



MODERN MEDICAL EQflPMKNTS 



BACTERIOLOGICAL CASE 

'SOLOID' BRAND 

[if, B. W. & Co.] 

Special Design, the property of Burroughb Wellcome & Co. 

The word 'Soloid' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always 
be specified when ordering. 

No. 505. 'Soloid' Brand Bacteriological Case 




No. 305. ■ Soi.oiD ' Brand Bacteriological Case 
Measurements, s x 33 x ij' in. 

This case enables medical men to carry out examinations tliat 
formerly were usually submitted to laboratory workers. Owing 
to its small size and light weight it can readily be carried in the 
pocket to the patient's bedside, to ol)tain a blood specimen or 
a throat swab. The Case is made of polished metal, easily 
kept aseptic, and contains : — 



Three stoppered bottles contain- 
ing— 

Methyl alcohol dr. i^ 
Absolute alcohol dr. 15 
Distilled water dr. lA 

A rod-stoppered bottle of Canada 
Balsam 

A graduated pipette 

Two forceps 

12 Microscopic slides 

A spirit lamp 

A glass funnel 

2 watch glasses 

A metal case of needles (straight 
No. q) 



.\ packet of filter papers 
12 blood collecting pipettes 
50 cover slips 

A glass rod for powdering micros- 
copic stains, etc. 
A sterile swab 

A tube each of the following 
' Soloid' stains — 
Eosin, Methyl Violet, 
Fuchsine, Romanowsky 
.Stain, Eosin - Methylene 
Blue, Iljematoxyrm 

(Delafield), Toison Blood 
Fluid. 



Formulary 

OF 

FINE PRODUCTS 

ISSUED 7',Y 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 



For full details see Geiieral Price List 



Alkaloids, 'Wellcome' Brand (6'et' page 169) 
Ammonium Chloride Inhaler, ' Vereker ' 
Anaesthetics, Local [Sec ' Tabloid" HypiAiermic Amcsthetic 

Compounds, page 120) 
Antidote Case (.S'tY page no) 

' Aol ", a derivative of Santalum alhuiii (See 'Tabloid' 
( rrartf Mark) Brand Products, page 142) 
Atomiser, 'Paroleine' (B. W. & Co.» 

(Trade Mark) 

Easily rendered aseptic ; with ordinary care will not get out of 
order. 
Bacteriological Case, ' Soloid ' Brand (^tij page 112) 
Bandages, Pleated, Compressed, 'Tabloid' Brand 

{ Scl I lage 115) 

Beet and Iron Wine (B. W. & Co.) nosE 

A pure detannated wine, each tablespoonful One teaspoon- 

of which contains, in an agreeable and ful forchiklren, 

highly concentrated condition, the stimu- to one table- 

lating properties of fresh beef, with the spoonful for 

equivalent of half a grain of iron, in a adults, 
readily assimilable firm. 

Beef and Iron Wine with Quinine 

(B. W. «& Co.) DOSE 

A pleasant means of administering (juiniiie One teaspoon- 
and iron in combination with other ful for children, 
restoratives. to one table- 

spoonful for 
ailults. 

' Borofax ' An emullient possessing antiseptic and sedative 
{Trad,: Marl^) properties. 



114 FORMULARY OF FINE PKODl'CTS 

Brockedon Products 

Bun-oughs Wellcome & Co. are the successors to, and sole 
proprietors of, the business of Brockedon who in 1842 
ORIGINATED COMPRESSED MEDICINES in the 
shape of bi-convex discs — issued under the designation of 
Compressed Pills. 
' Brockedon ' Brand Bicarbonate of Soda, in boxes of two sizes 
3> )) )i j; JT otass ,, ,, 

,, ,, Chlorate ,, ,, ,, ,, 

Chemicals, 'Wellcome' Brand (See page 169) 

CHESTS AND CASES (B. W. & CO.) 

A comprehensive selection of chests and cases fitted with 
medicines for every variety of climate, from the fully equipped 
chests containing supplies sufficient for medical officers to 
expeditions, etc., down to the compact pocket-cases suited to the 
needs of the private practitioner, are prepared and issued 
under the ' Tabloid ' Brand. 
For complete list and exact description, see General Price List 

Analysis Cases, ' Soloid ' Brand (Scv page no) 

Antiseptic Cases, ' Soloid ' Brand 

Fitted with from four to eighteen containers of ' Soloid ' 
Brand Antiseptics 

Hypodermic Pocket=Cases, ' Tabloid ' Brand {See 
pages 97-101) 

Medicine Chests and Cases, 'Tabloid ' Brand [See 

pages loi-iio) 

DRESSINGS, PLEATED, COMPRESSED, 
'TABL03D' Brand 

The introduction of Pleated Compressed Bandages and Dress- 
ings marks an important advance in the preparation of surgical 

accessories. These bandages and dressings are 
Important made of material of the best quality, and are 

advance subjected to great pressure under which each 

assumes a rectangular shape. After compression, 
each is enclosed automatically in an impervious covering of 
parchment paper. 



ISSUED BV B. \V. AND CO. 



J15 



Dressings, Pleated, Compressed, ' Tabloid ' Br^nd -ci»!tin)ie<i 

The requirements of modern surgical treatment are so imper- 
fectly fulfilled by many of the cheaper commercial dressings that 
the superiority of the pleated products of Burroughs Wellcome 
& Co. is at once evident. Their important advantages may be 
thus summarized : — 

1. Only materials of exceptional quality are used in their 
manufacture, and their general excellence commends them to 
critical users. 

2. They occupy the smallest possible space and yet can be 
unfolded as easily as those previously in use. 

3. They are kept free from all risk of contamination. 

4. The antiseptic dressings are evenly charged with 
medicament. 

5. By reason of their extreme compa.ctness they are by 
far tlie best for the hand-bag and cycle- or saddle-case. 






I'hc nriiinary open wove bandage of 
commerce. 6 yards x i\ in. 



|> nANOAUCI' 



Pleated Compressed Bandage. 
6 yards X 2; in. 



The above illustration graphically demonstrates the saving m 
space which is effected when Pleated Bandaires and Dressings 
rare carried. The relative sizes of an ordinary and a Pleated 
Bandage are striking. The flat sides of Pleated Bandages enable 
them to be packed in a fraction of the space required by those 
previously in use. 

The following are issued : — 

Pleated Bandages- 
Open Wove, I in. X 6 yards, in packages of i dozen 

„ 2\ in. X 6 yards, „ 
Flannel, ai in. x 5 yards, „ 

Triangular (Esmarch's Pictorial),, ,, ,, i dozen 

packets of 2 l)andages 



H6 



FORMULARY OF FINE PRODUCTS 



Dressings, Pleated, Compressed, 'Tabloid' Brand—cim^'fiaed 
Pleated Randases— com ti/i/w J 

These triangular bandages are of great service in first aid 
or other emergency work. For the benefit of those who are 
unable to obtain skilled assistance, illustrations showing the 
various uses to which the bandage may be put, are imprinted 
on the faljric itself. 

Pleated Cotton Wool- 
Absorbent, I ounce packets, in packages of I dozen 



)) 


— 


)» 






Boric, 


I 


) J 






3> 


2 


3 1 






Double Cyanide, 


I 


JT 






jj )) 


2 


3 J 






Iodoform, 


I 


y> 






)» 


2 


)» 






Plsated Gauze- 










Absorbent, 


-> 

3 


yards. 


in packages of i 


dozen 


Boric, 




)i 






Double Cyanide. 


1 
J 


)) 






Iodoform, 


-» 


)» 






3) 


I 


yard 






)) 


I 


in. X 


6 yds. „ 




Sal Alembroth, 




yards, 


in packages of 





Pleated Lint— 

Plain, I ounce packets, in packages of i dozen 

Boric, I ,, 



Carbolised, i ,, ,, ,, ,, 

Pleated Tow — 

Carbolised, 2 ounce packets, in packages of i dozen 

Pleated Tissue^ 

Absorbent Wool between Gauze, 2 ounce packets, in 
packages of i dozen 

Ear Drums, Artificial (Dr. Ward Cousins'. ^.Design) — 
A perfect protective to the inner ear. Made in four sizes. 

* Elixoid ' Brand Ammonium Valerianate 

(Trade Mrtr/cJ 

Bottles containing 8 fl. ounces. 
Also various other preparations issued under the ' Elixoid 
Brand. 



ISSUED BY B. 



117 



S'ENULE' BRAND RECTAL 
SUPPOSITORIES 

The word ' ENULE ' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always 
be specified when ordering. 

The ' Enule ' rectal suppository po.s.sesses conspicuous advan- 
tages over those of the ordinary 
conical shape, which are difficult to 
introduce, and are sometimes even 
expelled. ' Enule ' suppositories 
are encased in sheaths of pure 
tinfoil, easily stripped off at the 
They con- 
pure 




\:iiiiiiiiii?iii|iii:[;iiiiii|[iiii|ii!iiii«iiiiiiiin,ij'|iiiiii|j!i™^ 



liii i'iiiimiii!!'!''i|i'iiMil!il«iiili:illiiHlNi;ii!iiiri![i"[:riiiiiiiMllliH 



' Enule' Brand Rectal Suppository 

after removal of siieath. 

This shape originated by 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 

moment of using 
tain accurate doses of 
drugs, their active principles 
are evenly diffused throughout 
the mass, and they will retain 
the full activity of the medica- 
ment for a long period of 

time. 

PROF. CASPARI, in his Treatise oh Pharmacy, says: — 
"The usual shape of rectal suppositories is that of a cone with a rounded 
apex, but the difficulty of readily introducing them into the rectum has led to 
the designing of a new shape by H. S. Wellcome, of London, 
the great advantages of which become apparent when it Expert 
is remembered that the bulbous end is inserted into the opinion 
rectum, and, that as soon as the greatest diameter has 
been passed, expulsion of the suppositorj' is impossible, 
by reason of the very contractile force of the sphincter muscle, which 
renders retention of the ordinary conical shape often so difficult." 

Each kind is packed in boxes of a dozen (of one strength). 



' Enule ' Brand Rectal Suppository 

showing sheath of pure tinfoil. 

This shape originated by 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 



Enule ' BRAND — 

,, Belladonna Extract 

,, Bismuth Subgallate 

,, Cocaine Hydro- 
chloride 
,, Gall and Opium 

5i Acidi Tannic!, 
Ext. Opii, .. 
,, Glycerin 

(Anhydrous) 
,, ' Hazeline ' Com- 
pound 



gr. 1/2, and 



gi-- 1/4. 

gr. I 
gr. 10 .. 

gr- \ ■■ 



gr. 3 

gr. i 

95 %. Adults' or Chil- 
dren's sizes. 
Containing 'Hazeline', 
Extract of Hama- 
melis and Zinc Oxide. 
{See also 'Hazeline' 
Suppositories). 



DIRECTION 

One as 

required. 
One as 

required. 
One as 

required. 
One as 

required . 

One as 

required. 
One as 

required. 



118 



FORMl'LARY OF FINE I'RODUCTS 



' Enule ' Brand Rectal Suppositories conthined 




' Enuie ' liRAND— 


DIRECTION 


„ ' Heniisine ' o-ooi gm., equivalent 


One as 


(Trade Mark) to I C.C. (l6 minims) 


required. 


of 'Hemisine' Solu- 




tion (i in looo). 




„ Lead and Opium 


One as 


li Plumbi Acetatis, gr. 3 


required. 


Pulv. Opii, gr. I 




„ Meat (Predigested) Children's and 


One as 


Adults' sizes. 


required. 


Containing gr. 8A and gr. 15 of concentrated 




peptone from choice fresh beef. 




., Milk (Predige.sted) Children's and 


One as 


Adults' sizes. 


required. 


Containing gr. 10 and gr. 18 of concentrated 




peptone from new milk. 




,, Morphine and Belladonna 


One as 


B Morphinse llydrochloridi, ... gr. | 


required. 


Ext. Belladonnae gr- a 




„ Morphine Hydrochloride gr. 1/4, gr. 1/2, 


One as 


and gr. I 


required. 


,, Opium Extract ... gr. i 


One as 




required. 


„ Quassin, Amorphous gi'- 2 


One on each 




of at least 




twelve 




.successive 




nights. 


,, (^>uinine Bisulphate Rr. 5 


One as 




required. 


., Santonin ... ... gi'- 3 


One as 




required. 


,, -Soap Compountl 


One as 


IJ Saponis Animalis, gr. 7 


required. 



Sodii Sulphatis E.xsiccati gr. 7 

Also various other products i.ssued under the ' Enule ' brand. 

' Enule ' Brand Rectal Suppositories must be kept in a cool 
and dry place. 

Gauze, Pleated, Medicated, Compressed, 'Tabloid' 
Brand (.Wpageii6) 

'Hemisine' 

{Trad, Mark) 

A preparation of the active principle of the medulla of 
the supra-renal gland. {See ' Enule ' ' Hemisine ' ; ' Tabloid ' 
Ophthalmic ' Hemisine ' ; ' Soloid ' ' Hemisine ' ; and 
' Tabloid ' ' Hemisine.") 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



119 



I to 
dr. 



BRAND PREPARATIONS 

DOSE 

An anodyne and styptic 
fluid obtained by dis- 
tillation from the fresh 
voung twicjs 

' Hazeline ' Cream, in Combines the anodyne 
coUapsiljle tubes and astringent properties of 

Hazeline with the 
emollient action of 
' Dartring ' ' Lanoline ' 

A non -greasy prepara- 
tion, owing its astrin- 
gent, soothing and 
healing properties to 
50 per cent. of 
' Hazeline ' 
Hazeline' Supposi- Containing pure 

tories ' Hazeline ' 

{Sue also ' Enule ' ' Hazeline ' Compound) 
Also various other products issued under the ' Hazeline ' 

Brand. 



r;i 'HAZELINE 

Hazeline ' Brand of 
distilled Hamanielis 
vin^i/iiana 



glass pots 



" ' Hazeline ' Snow", 
in glass pots 



One as 
required. 



HYPODERMIC APPARATUS 

Needles for B. W. & Co. Syringes— 

[/■'or fall list see B. ]V. ^ Co.'s General Price List) 
Syringes 
AM = Glass Aseptic Hypodermic Syringe, The 
B. W. & Co. 

Barrel, piston and nozzle consist entirely of glass. The 
solid piston obviates use of packing. May be instantly 
taken apart for rendering aseptic. Two sizes, min. 15 
and min. 20, with two steel needles. A detachable finger- 
grip for this syringe (nickel-plated) can be supplied. 
(Tf desired, platino-iridiuni needles can be fitted) 

Hypodermic Syringe, The B. W. & Co. 

Solid Silver. Nozzle detachable, so that the solution of a 
' Tabloid ' Hypodermic pnjduct may be effected in the 
barrel. With two platino-iridium needles, in case. 
Capacity, min. 20. 

Hypodermic Syringe, The B. W. & Co. 

Nickel-Flated. With two nee^lles. Capacity, min. 15 or 
min. 20. 

(If desired, platino-iridium needles can be fitted) 



120 



FORMT'LARY OF FIXE PRODUCTS 



Hypodermic Apparatus— ctnHnMCii 

Serum Syringe, The B. W. & Co. AlNQIass Aseptic 

The working parts are coraposed entirely of glass, the needle 
being attached to the nozzle by a flexible rubber joint 
which guards against fracture. In five sizes, 2 c.c, 3 c.c, 
5 c.c, 10 c.c, and 25 c.c, with two steel needles in 
metal case. 

(If desired, platino-iridium needles can be fitted) 

Serum Syringe, The B. W. «& Co. Nickel=plated 

In metal case, complete, with two platino-iridium needles, 
capacity 5 c.c. or 10 c.c. 



HYPODERMIC PRODUCTS, 
'TABLOID ' Brand 

The v^ord 'TABLOID ' is a brand which desigrnates fine prcLucts 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always be 
specified when ordering. 

" They are quite free from objectionable and irritative salts." — 
BrUish Medical Journal. 

" They are very soluble and not a: all irritating."' — Lancet. 

' Tabloid ' Hypodermic Products accurately contain the stated 
weight of pure medicament. They are rapidly solulde, of 
uniform activity, and they keep perfectly. They are packed 
in tubes containing 20, vv'ith the exception of those marked 
with an asterisk, which are in tulies of 12. 

PREPARATION STRENGTH DOSE 



'TABLOID ' BRAND 

(Hypodermic) — 

,, Aconitine Nitrate 



■* Anesthetic Compound, A 

B Cocainse Hydroch'.oridi.... gr. i/io 

Morphinae Hydrochloridi, gr. 1/50 

.Sodii Chloridi gr. 1/5 

*Anaesthetic Compound, E 

B Cocainae Hydrochloridi gr. 1/5 

Morphinpe Hydrochloridi. gr. 1/50 

Sodii Chloridi, gr. 1/5 

*Anresthetic Compound, C 

R Eucainae Hydrochloridi. .. gr. 7/16 

-Sodii Chloridi gr. 3-1/2 



gr. 1/640 gr. 1/640 

As required. 



As required. 



As required. 



* /;/ tubes of 12 only {all others contain 20) 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



121 



Hypodermic Products, 'Tabloid' Brand -<.-^mtzrr?ifci 
PREPARATION STRENGTH 

♦TABLOID' PRANi. 

(Hypodermic) — 

,, Apomorphine Hydrochloride... gr. 1/20 

■•■ k^r. 1/15 
0-005 S'"- 

■•• g'- i/io 
,, r Apomorphine Hydrochloride gr. i/io 

" I Strychnine Hydrochloride... gr. 1/60 

... gr. 1/150 
... gr. i/ioo 

O-ooi gm. 
... gr. 1/60 

0-03 gm. 
... gr. 1/2 
... gr. l/io 

o-oi gni. 
... gr. 1/6 

0-015 gm. 
... gr. 1/4 

0-02 gm. 
... gr. 1/2 
... gr. 1/4 
... gr. 1/12 



Atropine Sulphate 



*Caffeine Sodio-salicylate 
* 

Cocaine Hydrochloride 



Codeine Phosphate 
Curare ... 

Digitalin (Amorphous) 

,, (Crystalline) ... 

r Digitalin (Amorphou.s) 
L Strychnine Sulphate 

Erirotinine Citrate 



Ergotinine Citrate . 
Morphine Sulphate . 
Ergotinine Citrate 
Strychnine Sulphate 

* Eucaine Hydrochloride 

11 >i 

* Eucaine Lactate 
* 



DOSE 



sr. 1/20 to 
gr. i/io 

One 

gr. 1/200 to 
gr. i/ioo (in- 
creased) 

gr. l/2togr. 4 



g>' 



i/io 

1/2 



to 




to 



gr. 1/4 to gr. 2 
gr. i/i2 to 

gr. 1/2 
gr. 1/500 

gr. I 30 

One 



<'r. 1/200 to 
gr- 1/50 



One 

One 

gr. 1/3 
irr. 2 



to 



gr. i/3togr. 2 



* /;/ /t//>fi- of 12 only ( all oilier s coiitain 20 j 



KOKMl'LARY OF FINE PKODUCTS 



Hypodermic Products, 'Tabloid' Brand —co/itheued 



STRENGTH 



DOSE 



PREPARATION 
'TABLOID' RRAND 

(Hypodermic) — 

,, HoiTiatropine Hydrochloride ... gr. 1/250 gr. 1/250 

gr. 1/20 
Hydrargyri Perchloridi. ( See Mercuric Chloride) 
Hydrargyri Succininiidi. (See Mercuric Succinimide) 
Hyoscine Hydrobromide 



to 



*Hyoscine Compound, A ... 

5^ Hj-oscinsE Hydrobromidi, 
Morphinae Sulphatis,... 
Atropinje Sulphatis, ... 

*Hyoscine Compound, B ... 
B Hyoscinje Hydrobromidi, 
Morphinse .Sulphatis, 
Atropinae Sulphatis, .. 

*Hyo.scyamine Sulphate 
# 

Mercuric Chloride 



Mercuric Succinimide . 
Morphine Bimeconate 



Morphine Hydrc:chloride 



,j J Morphine Hydrochloride 
[ Atropine Sulphate . . . 
Morphine Phosphate ... 



gr. 1/200 "I gr. 1/200 to 
gr. i/ioo \ gr. i/ioo 



••■ gr- 1,75 

... gr. i/ioo 
... gr. 1/6 
... gr. i/iSo 

... gr. i/ioo 
... gr. 1,4 
... gr. 1/150 

... gr. I 80 
... gr. 1/20 

c-ooi gm. 
... gr. 1/60 
... gr. I 30 

••• gr- 1/5 

... gr. I 8 
... gr. 16 
... gr. 1/4 

... gr. 1/3 

001 gm. 

... gr. 1/6 
C015 gm. 
... gr. 1/4 

002 gm. 
••• gr. 1/3 
... gr. 1/2 
... gr. 1/6 
... gr. 1/70 
... gr. 1/6 
... gr. 1/4 
■-. gr. 1/3 
... gr. 1/2 



(increased) 
One 



One 



gr. 1/200 lo 
gr. i/ioo 
(increased) 



1,60 to 
i/^O 

J gr. 1,6 to 
r gr- 1/4 



J gl- '/J 



gr. 



1/8 to 
gr. 1/4 (in- 
creased) 



gr 



. 1/8 to 
gr. 1/4 (in- 
creased) 



1 



One 

gr. 1/8 lo 
gr. 1/4 (in- 
crea.sed) 



* /// ttibcs of 12 only (all others coUaiii 20^ 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



123 



Hypodermic Products, ' Tabloid 

rKFPARATION 
'TABLOID' BRAND 

(Hypodermic)— 

,, Morphine Sulphate 



Brand— coniimud 

.STRENGTH DOSE 



gr. I/I2 

gr. 1/8 
ooi gm. 
gr. 1/6 
ooi5gm. 

gi-- 1/4 
002 gm. 

gr- 1/3 
oo^ em. 



gr- 



gr. 1/2 
005 gm. 
gr- I 



1/8 to 
gr. 1/4 (in- 
creased) 





/ Morphine Sulphate . . . 


... gr. 1/12 




J> 


[ Atropine Sulphate ... 


... gr. 1/250 






[ Morphine Sulphate ... 


... gr. 1/8 




) ) 


[Atropine Sulphate ... 


... gr. 1/200 






J Morphine Sulphate ... 


... gr. 1/6 




' * 


[ Atropine Sulphate . . . 


... gr. 1/180 


One of 




r Morphine .Sulphate ... 
\ Atropine Sulphate . . . 


... gr. 1/4 


required 
strength 


) ) 


... gr. 1/150 




/ Morphine Sulphate . . . 


■•• gr. 1/3 




5 J 


L Atropine Sulphate . . . 


... gr. 1/120 






' Morphine Sulphate . . . 


••• gr- 1/3 




J? 


" Atropine Sulphate ... 


... gr. 1/60 






^f. [ Morphine Sulphate . . . 
[ Atropine Sulphate . . . 


... gr. 1/2 




J ' 


... gr. i/ioo^ 






r Morphine Sulphate ... 
\ Strychnine Sulphate... 


- S>-- 1/4 1 One 
... gr. 1/60 J 


)» 






■gr. 1/8 to 


?5 


Morphine Tartrate 


... gr. 1/4 \ gr. 1/4 (in- 
creased) 


) ) 


Physostigmine Salicylate 


(Eserine Sali- f gr. i/ioo to 
... gr. i/ioo\ gr. 1/25 




cylate) 


>) 


Picrotoxin 


... gr. 1/60 gr. i/ioo to 
gr. 1/25 



* /;/ tubes of 12 only (all others contain 20 j 



124 FORMILARV OF FINE PRODUCTS 



Hypodermic Products ' Tabloid ' Brand— tw/i'/««4</ 

PREPARATION STRENGTH DOSE 

♦TABLOID' HRAND 



(Hypodermic) 

Pik)carpine Nitrate 



*Potassium Permanganate 
Quinine Bihydrochloride 




gr. I to gr. 5 



Quinine Bisulphate ... ... gr. 5 gr. i to gr. 5 

* Qui nine Hydrobroniide 

gr. 1/2 to gr. 2 

^Sparteine Sulphate ... ... gr. 1/2 gr. 1/2 to gr. i 

r- , , • , rS'- 1/500 to 

btrophanthin ... ... ... s:i'- l/'?C)0<^ , 

^ L yi- i/ioo 

Strychnine Hydrochloritie ... gr. iy';o l 

^ ^ ; ai-- 1/150 to 

,, ... gr. i/ioo \^ / 

gr. i/io 
,, „ ... gr. 1, 200 J => ' 

Strychnine Nitrate ... 0-0005 gm.-v 

.. .. o-ooi gm. I^g,-. I '[50 to 

••• gi'- 1/15 [ gr. i/io 
,, ,, ... gr. i/io J 
Strychnine Sulphate ... gr. 1/150^ 
.. .. gi'- I/IOO j 

rrr T 'fir. ^ g''- l/lSO tO 
,, ,, ... ... gl. I/DO c^ , 

rr,- T 'Ar, ! gl'- I/IO 

,, ,, ... ••■ gl- 1 ,40 '' 

gr- I '30 ' 

Trinitrin (Nitroglycerin) ... gr. 1/250 "I gr. 1/250 to 



,, ,, ... gr. i/ioo J gr. 1/50 

Also various other hypodermic products issued untier the 
' Tal>I(>id ' Brand. 

Hypodermic Veterinary Products, ' Tabloid ' Brand 

(See General Price List ) 

Inhaler (B. W. & Co.) 

' Vereker ' Ammonium Chloride Inhaler. 
Delivers neutral vapours of Ammonium Chloride. 

* III lubes of 12 only (all others contain 20 J 



ISSUED BY B. W. ANll CO. 125 



'KEPLER MALT EXTRACT AND 
COMBINATIONS 

Remember the Trade Mark ! 

Verbal instructions are not safe. To prevent fraud it is 
best to write prescriptions for original bottles 

Dose — Of all ' Kepler ' Preparations, one teaspoonful to one 
tablespoonful. 

preparation and strength 

' Kepler ' Brand Malt Extract — 

A most reliable and highly concentrated extract, prepared 
from the finest winter-malted barley. Its medicinal 
value depends not only on its high diastatic powers, but 
also on the albuminoids, phosphates, etc., which it 
contains. 
Ditto with Beef and Iron 

Ditto with Cascara Sagrada 

Each fluid ounce contains Extract of Cascara Sagrada, gr. 6 

Ditto with Chemical Food (Phosphates Compound) 

Each fluid ounce contains Iron Phosphate, gr. 2 ; Calcium Phos- 
phate, gr. 3; Sodium Phosphate, gr. 1/4; Potassium Phos- 
phate, gr. 1/4 

Ditto with Hemoglobin 

Ditto with Hypophosphites 

Each fluid ounce contains Calcium Hypophosphite, gr. 8 ; Potas- 
sium Hypophosphite, gr. 4, and Sodium Hypophosphite, gr. 4. 

Ditto with Iron 

Each fluid ounce contains Soluble Iron Pyrophosphate, gr. 4 

Ditto with Iron and (Quinine Citrate 

Each fluid ounce contains Iron and Quinine Citrate, gr. 7-1/2 

Ditto with Iron Iodide 

Each fluid ounce contains Iron Iodide, gr. 2 
Ditto with Iron, Quinine and .Strychnine (Easton) 

Each fluid ounce contains Iron Phosphate gr. 1/2 ; Quinine Phos- 
phate gr. 3/8, and .Strychnine Phosphate, gr. 1/64 

Ditto with Pepsin 

Each fluid ounce contains pure Pepsin, gr. i 

Ditto with Pepsin and Pancreatin 

Each fluid ounce contains pure Pepsin and pure Pancreatin, of each 
gr. 1/2 

Ditto with Phosphorus 

I'^ach fluid ounce contains pure Phosphorus, gr. 1/64 



126 FORMULARY OK FINE PRODUCTS 



'Kepler' Malt Extract and Combinations— lOfifimiecf 

' Kepler ' Solution (of Cod Liver ' Oil in Malt 

Extract) — ■ 

The most easily assimilable form in which God Liver Oil 

can be administered. Agreeable in flavour, and most 

efficacious in use. 

Ditto with Chemical Food (Phosphates Compound) 

Each fluid ounce contains Iron Phosphate, gr. 2 : Calcium Phos- 
phate, gr. 3 ; Sodium Phosphate, gr. 1,4 ; Potassium Phos- 
phate, gr. 1/4 

Ditto with Hypophosphites 

Each fluid ounce contains Calcium Hypophosphite, gr. 4 ; Potassium 
Ilypophosphite, gr. 2 ; and Sodium Hypophosphite. gr. 2 

Ditto with Iron Iodide 

Each fluid ounce contains Iron Iodide, gr. 2. 
Ditto with Phosphorus 

Each tluid ounce contains Phosphorus, gr. 1/64 
Also various other preparations issued under the ' Kepler ' 

Brand. 

Lint, Pleated, Plain and Medicated, Compressed, 
' Tabloid ' Brand (St-e page 1 16) 

Mallei n (Scv Serums) 

Malt Extract (Sr.- ' Kepler ') 

Medicine Chests and Cases, 'Tabloid' Brand {.?,■■; 

pages loi-i 10; 

Menthol Compound Plasters (B. W. & Co.) 

Menthol Snuff (B. W. «Sc Co.), in boxes 

An extremely efliective and convenient combination of 
Ammonium Chloride, Menthol, Eucaine (^rd per cent.), etc., 
issued in enamelled tins, after the manner of okl-fa.shioned 
black and gold snuff boxes. 

OPHTHALMIC PRODUCTS, 
♦TABLOID Brand 

The word 'TABLOID' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always 
be specified when ordering. 

' Tabloid ' Ophthalmic products are minute in size, as 
thin as note-paper, and contain exact doses of pure drugs. 
Exact prepared with a perfectly innocuous and rapidly 

Doses soluble basis. They are supplied in tubes of 25 

(except c, cc, dd, e, g, l, o, w, v, and z, which contain 12). 



ISSUED BV B. VV. AND CO. 



127 



Ophthalmic Products, ' Tabloid ' Bran 


A~coHtiniied 




'TABLOID' BRAND 






(Ophthalmic) — 






,, T Alum 


gr- 


1/250 


,, EE Argyrol 


gr- 


1/24 


,, X Atropine Sulphate 


gr- 


1/600 


>J A ,, 5, 


gr- 


1/200 


/Atropine Hydrobromide 
" \ Cocaine Hydrochloride 


gr- 


1/200 


gr- 


1/200 


,, c Cocaine Hydrochloride 


gr- 


1/20 


)> ^ A ,, ,, 


gr- 


1/50 


,, BB Dionin 


0-0005 gramme 


Eserine (Sfe Physostigniine) 






,, Y Euphthalmine Hydrochloric: 


e ... gr. 


1/40 


,, z Fluorescein 


gr- 


1/250 


,, CC ' Hemisine ' (Trade Mark) 


... o- 0006 gramme 



' Hemisine ' products present the active principle of the 
medulla of the supra-renal gland, having the characteristic 
vaso-constricting, hemostatic and astringent properties. 
'J'hey differ from other preparations in being issued in a dry, 
soluble state, and in being permanent in all climates and 
constant in action. 
H Homatropine Hydrochloride 



w 
u 

I' 



Homatropine Hydrochloride 
Cocaine Hydrochloride 
/ Homatropine Hydrochloride 
[Cocaine Hydrochloride 
Hyoscine Hydrobromide 
Physo.stigmine Salicylate 



K 

M 



gr 
gr 
gr 

gr 
gr 



gr- 
gr- 
gr- 
gr- 



f Physostigmine Salicylate 
[ Tropacocaine Hydrochloride 

Pilocarpine Nitrate ... 
j Pilocarpine Nitrate 
[ Cocaine Hydrochloride 

Scopolamine [See Hyoscine) 

'I'ropacocaine Hydrochloride ... gr. 

Zinc Sulphate ... ... ... gr. 

/ Zinc Sulphate ... ... ... gr. 

[ Cocaine Hydrochloride ... ... gr. 

Also various other ophthalmic jiroducts issued 
'Tabloid' Brand. 



1/400 
1/40 

1/240 
1/24 

1/50 
gr- I /SO 
gr. 1/600 
gr. 1/2000 
gr. 1/600 

gr- i/Soo 
i/ioo 

1/400 
1/500 
1/200 



HI)- 



1/30 
1/250 
1/250 
1/20 

under the 



128 FOKMl'LARY Or FINE PRODUCTS 



OPHTHALMIC PRODLXTS 
'SOLOID Brand 

•SOLOID BRAM. 

(Ophthalmic) — 

,, J Corrosive Sublimate (^'f/rar^./cVT/^/^r.) gr. I, looo 

tubes of 25 
For other ' Soloid ' Brand Products suitable for ophthalviic use, 
seepages 135-13S 

Ophthalmic Veterinary Products, 'Soloid' Brand 

[See General Price List) 

'Paroleine' A perfectly stable, odourless, colourless and 

{Trade Mark) tasteless oil. It is a good solvent of many of the 

remedies employed in treating diseases of the nose and throat. 

' Phenofax ' ' Phexofax ' Antiseptic Sedative Dressing 

{Trade Marii) presents ~ per cent, of pure phenol in a bland 

basis which is notable for its sedative effect on the skin and 

mucous surfaces. It disinfects, encourages granulation, 

and allays pain. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMICALS, 
'TABLOID' Brand 

The word ' TABLOID ' is a brand which designates fine products 

issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always 

be specified when ordering. 

' Tabloid ' Photographic Chemicals are much more convenient 

than ordinary chemicals ; their superior quality and accurate 

weight ensure the Ijest results. They entirely 

"?^^, ?■" obviate the trouble of weighing small quantities of 

reliable . . , , 

chemicals and the disappointments occasioned by 

the deterioration of stock solutions. They enable the tourist to 

carry all the requisite materials for developing, fixing, etc., 

with convenience, comfort and safety. At home they save 

time and trouble. 

Developers 

The developers are packed in cartons, each containing the 

'Tabloid' reducing agent, and the 'Tabloid' accelerator 

specially prepared for use with that reducing agent. 

•TABLOID' BRAND 

(Photographic)— 

Amidol Developer 

Edinol Developer 

Eikonogen Developer 

Glycin Developer 

Hydroquinone (Quinol) Developer 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 129 



Photographic Chemicals, ' Tabloid ' Brand—con/in/ied 
De\ elopers— ceniiniied 
'TABLOID' BRAND 

(Photographic)— 

Metol Developer 
Metol-Qiiinol Developer 
Ortol Developer 
Paramidophenol Developer 
Pyro Developer 

Pyro-Metol Developer ( hnpcrial Standard formula) 
*Pyro-Soda Developer ( Ilford foriitu/a) 

Accessories 

TABLOID ' BRAND 

(Photographic)— strength 

,, A /kali — 

' 'I'ahloid ' Sodium Carbonate ... ... gr. 44 

,, Clearing and Hardening — 

'Tabloid' Alum gr. 10 

' Tabloid ' Alum and Citric Acid Com- 
pound (Chrome Alum, gr. 5 ; Citric 
Acid, gr. 5 ; Sodium Sulphite, gr. 20) 

,, Density Reducers — 

' Tabloid ' Ammonium Persulphate ... gr. 11 
' Tabloid ' Potassium Ferricyanide ... gr. 2 

,, Hypo Eliminator — 

' Tabloid ' Potassium Percarbonate . . . gr. 3 

,, Inteiisifier — 

' Tabloid ' Mercuric lotlide and Sodium 
Sulphite 

, , Preservatives — 

' Tabloid ' Potassium Metabisulphite ... gr. 10 

'Tabloid' Sodium Sulphite Dried, gr. 5 Equals gr. 10 

of crystals 
,, Restrainers — 

' Tabloid' Potassium Bromide ... ... gr. I 

' Tabloid ' Ammonium Bromide ... gr. i 
' Tabloid ' Sodium Citrate gr. i 



* In ordering this special developer, it is always necessary to quote 
" Ilford formula ". 



l:W FOXMULAKY OF FINR rRODCCTS 



Photographic Chemicals, 'Tabloid' Brand—conizmted 

Fixer 

'TABLOID' HKAND 

(Photographic) — 

,, Sodium Thidsiilphate ('Hypo') Dried, / Equals gr. 44 
gr. 28-5 |_ of crystals. 

Toners 

'TABLOID' BRAND 

(Photographic)— 

,, Gold Chloride, gr. i, with Borax, gr. 15 (b I) 

,, ,, ,, Sodium Bicarbonate, gr. 15 (b 2) 

,, ,, „ Sodium Phosphate, gr. 15 (b 3) 

,, ,, ,, Sodium Tungstate, gr. 15 (b 4) 

,, ,, ,, Sodium FormateCompound (n 5) 

,, ,, ,, Sulphocyanide Compound (b 6) 

,, ,, ,, Thiosulphate Compound 

{Combined Bath for toiling and fixing P.O. P.) (b lO) 

The above are supplied in cartons containing sufficient 
for the preparation of six toning baths. For con- 
venience they may be ordered by their numbers, 
thus : — ' Tabloid ' Gold Toning, B i, B 2, etc. 
,, Copper Ferrocyanide Toning Compound (for toning 

Bromide Prints and Lantern Slides) 
,, Platinum Toning Compound (for toning Matt P.O. P.) 
,, Chloroplatinite Toning Compoimd ( Venus Formula) 
,, Sepia Toner (for Bromide Prints and Lantern Slides) 
Sensitiser (for Carbon Tissue) 

'TABLOID' BRAND 

(Photographic)— 

,, Potassium Ammonium Chromate, gr. 24 
Also various other photographic products issued under the 
'Tabloid' Brand. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC EXPOSURE RECORD AND 
DIARY, WELLCOME'S 

Published annually in November. The most useful pocket- 
book for the photographer. Contains ruled pages for recording 
exposures, a diary for the year, also numerous technical articles 
and tables, and an exposure calculator which tells the correct 
exposure under any circumstance by one turn of one scale, etc., etc. 

Two editions : Northern Hemisphere Edition, for countries 
north of the Tropic of Cancer (about 20" N.) ; Southern Hemi- 
sphere and Tropical Edition, for countries south of the Tropic of 
Cancer. 

Bound in green canvas, with wallet and pencil. 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 131 

PHOTOGRAPHIC OUTFIT, 'TABLOID' Brand 

A complete and compact chemical outfit for developing and 
fixing plates, films, bromide or gaslight paper, and for toning 
and fixing P.O. P. 
Standard Contents : — 

' Tabloid ' Metol-Quinol Developer to make 44 ounces of 
solution ; ' Tabloid ' Pyro Developer to make 40 ounces 
of solution ; ' Tabloid ' Combined Toner and Fixer to 
make 30 ounces of solution ; 'Tabloid ' Hypo ; ' Tabloid' 
Potassium Bromide. 

Outside measurements, 4^ X 4i X 2 in. In japanned 
metal case. 

' Pinol ' (Distilled Essence of the Pinus Puinilio) 

( Trai/c- Mark) 

h oz. and I oz, bottles 
' Salodent ' 

(J'raJf ^rnrk) 

An aromatic, antiseptic, liquid dentifrice. 
2 oz. and 4 oz. bottles (with sprinklers) 

SANITARY TOWELS, PLEATED, COM = 
PRESSED, 'TABLOID' Brand 

Pleated Sanitary Towels possess several points of superiority 
over ordinary commercial sanitary towels. They are made of 

materials of exceptional quality 
specially adapted for the purpose. 



PLEATED o T- ■■ \^ Their highly absorbent properties 



COMPRC6SCO 




S. T^. 

^ are particularly noteworthy. The 



r^^c .11 ih. ,b.,..,.,;.,i„ rf .u w,, , X delicate texture of the surface of 

^ ST. wjih ihe »d»anMg( [ ~^ / J 

these towels ensures perfect free- 
dom from the slightest sense of 

Pleated Sanitary Towel (No. 4) ,. _ . --\ • ^ iU 

„ ,f'.,. discomfort in use. v_)wing to the 

ridll Size, '-' 

extremely small space which they 
occupy, they are particularly convenient when travelling. 
Extreme compactness is secured by compression and perfect 
cleanliness ensured by the method of packing. 
Four sizes are issued, each size in packages of I2. 

' Saxin ' gr. ^, in bottles of lOO, 200 and 500 

f Trade Mark) 



132 KOKMULARV OF' FINE PRODUCTS 

SERUMS, 'WELLCOME' Brand 

The high reputation which these serums have with the 
medical profession is constantly confirmed by 
Reputation ^^^^ favourable reports received and the accumu- 
lating evidence proves this high reputation to be deserved. 

The ' Wellcome ' Serums are prepared at the Wellcome 
Physiological Research Laboratories, under conditions which 
fulfil everv requirement of modern science and 
Tests under the imm.ediate supervision of specialists of 

long and varied experience. The serums are not 
sent out until they have successfully passed rigorous sterility and 
toxicity tests, they are then issued in hermetically sealed phials of 
convenient sizes. 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. act as distributing agents and will 
endeavour to despatch orders for these serums immediately on 
receipt of letter or telegram. 

Diphtheria Antitoxic Serum 'Wellcome') 

Phials containing looo, 2000, 3000 and 4000 (Ehrlich- 
Behring) units. 



High Potency : 












Phials containing lOOO 


(Ehrlic 


i-Behring) 


units 


in 


I c.c. 


,, 2000 






»> 




2 c.c. 


3000 






)» 




3 c.c. 


, , 4000 






jt 




4 c.c. 


,, 5000 






)f 




5 c.c. 


,, 6000 






>i 




6 c.c. 


, , 8000 






>> 




8 c.c. 


,, 10,000 






»> 




10 c.c. 



Anti=streptococcus Serum, Polyvalent 

(' Wellcome ') : from horses immunised against cultures of 

streptococci coming in all from 60 sources, in the following 

diseases : — 

Erysipelas, Scarlet Fever, Pueri'ER.a.l Fever, 
Rheumatic Fever, Sei'tic.-emia, Angina, Pneu- 
monia, Ulcerative Endocarditis. 

In phials containing 10 c.c, 25 c.c, and 50 c.c 

Anti=streptococcus Serum, Erysipelas 

('Wellcome'): from horses immunised against cultures 

fri^n typical cases of erysipelas : — 

In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 



ISSUED BY B. \V. AND CO. 133 



Serums, * Wellcome ' Brand— i(>«//;/«(v/ 

Anti=streptococcus Serum, Puerperal Fever 

('Wellcome'): from horses immunised against cultures 
from 26 severe (some fatal) cases of puerperal fever : — 
In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 

Anti=streptococcus Serum, Pyogenes 

(' Wellcome ') : from horses immunised against 9 cultures 
of Streptococcus pyogenes from fatal cases : — 
In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 

Anti=streptococcus Serum, Rheumatic Fever 

('Wellcome'): from horses immunised against cultures 
from severe cases of acute rheumatism and of rheumatoitl 
arthritis : — 

In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 

Anti=streptococcus Serum, Scarlatina 

('Wellcome'): from horses immunised against cultures 
from 8 severe (some fatal) cases of scarlet fever : — ■ 
In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 

Anti=staphylococcus Serum, Polyvalent 

('Wellcome'): from horses immunised against various 
cultures of Staphylococcus pyogenes aureus, albus, citreus 
and ha;morrhagicus : — 
In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 

Anti=colon bacillus Serum (' Wellcome ') : from horses 
immunised against 20 typical members of the Coli group, 
mostly from cases of peritonitis and puerperal fever : — 
In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 

Anti-meningococcus Serum (' Wellcome ') : from 
horses immunised against cultures of Meningococcus (Micro- 
coccus Meningitidis intracellularis) obtained from several 
different .sources : — 
In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 

Anti-gonococcus Serum ('Wellcome'*: from horses 
inmumised against cultures of Gonococcus obtained from 
.several different .sources : — 
In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 



134 



FOKMULAKY OF FINE TRODICTS 



Serums, ' Wellcome ' Brand -contiiiii,;d 

Anti-dysentery Serum ('Wellcome'): from horses 
immunised against cultures of Bacillus Dysenterice obtained 
from several cases of dysentery : — 

In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 

Anti=venom Serum ('Wellcome')-, from horses 
immunised against the venom of typical representatives of 
colul:>rine, viperine and other poisonous snakes : — • 

In phials containing 25 c.c. and 50 c.c. 

Normal Horse Serum ('Wellcome') 

In phials containing 10 c.c. and 25 c.c. 

Mallein ('Wellcome'), for diagnosis of Glanders. 

In phials containing 2-5 c.c. (sufficient for one injection) 

Serum Syringes [See page 120) 



:.r 'SOLOID' BRAND PRODUCTS 

The word 'SOLOID' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. To ensure the supply of 
these pure and reliable preparations, this brand should always 
be specified when ordering. 

The series of ' Soloid ' Brand products provides reliable 
antiseptics, astringents, and anesthetics ; also convenient means 
of preparing stains for microscopic work 
s and test solutions for water, sewage, or 
urine analysis. Their portability, accuracy 
in dosage, uniform activity, and their ready solubility render 
them far preferable to stock solutions. 



'SOLOID' BRAND — STRENGTH 

,, Alum ... ... ... ... gr. 10 

,, Alum and Zinc Sulphate 
R Aluminis, ... ... gr. 15 

Zinci Sulphatis, ... gr. 15 

,, Alum and Zinc Compound, 
Strong 
R Aluminis, ... ... gr. 30 

Zinci .Sulphatis., ... gr. 15 

,, Argyrol, tubes of 12 ... ... gr. i 



Issued in 



bots. of 



25 



bots. of 
100 



ISSUED BY B. VV. AND CO. 



135 



' Soloid ' Brand Products^coniiHi/ecf 
'SOLOID' BRAND— 

Argyrol, tubes of 6 
Atropine Sulphate, tubes of 6 
Atropine Sulphate, ... 

and Cocaine Hydrochloride 

tubes of 6 

Boric Acid {scented with Otto 

of Rose) 
Boric Acid {unscented) 
Boric Acid and Zinc Sulphate 
{scented with Otto of Rose) 
B Acidi Borici, ... gr. 6 
Ziiici Sulphatis, ... gr. 1/2 

Carbolic Acid, tubes of 25 
>» j> >» ^2 ... 

J) ») >) o . . . 

Chinosol 

, , ... ... ... 

Cocaine Hydrochloride 



STRENGTH 

gr- 5-45 
gi-- 0-545 
gr. 0-272 

gr. I-09 



gr- 
gf' 



Cocaine and Eucaine, each ... 

Copper .Sulphate 

Corrcsive Sublimate (Hydrarg. 

Perchlor.) {Ophthalmic), 

tubes of 25 ... 
Corrosive Sublimate (Hydrarg. 

Perchlor.) 
Corrosive Sublimate (Hydrarg. 

Perchlor.) 
Corrosive Sublimate (Hydrarg. 

Perchlor.) 
Eucaine Hydrochloride 

» J )» ... 

,, Lactate 



Ferric Chloride 

This product contains a small 
quantit\- of ammonium chloride 
as a vehicle. It represents 
the amount of ferric chloride 
contained in 40 minims of 
Liquor Ferri Perchloridi, P.B. 
' Hemisine ' {Trade Mark) tubes 
of6 



6 
IS 



g'-- 5 
gr. 20 
gr. 60 
g'- 175 
gi- 875 
gr. 1/2 
gr. I 

gr- 5 

gr. 1/2 
Sjr. I 



gr. i/iooo 

g'- 175 
gi- 8 75 

gr- 17 5 
gr. I 

gr. 5 
gr. I 

gr. 5 
"X. 10 



Issued in 



hots, of 



... 0-0012 gm. 
(approx. gr. i^) 



25 
50 

25 



25 
25 
25 
25 
25 

25 



25 



25 

25 
25 

25 



hots, of 



100 
100 
100 



100 



100 



100 



100 



100 



136 



FOKMtLARY OK FINE PRODUCTS 



' Soloid ' Brand Products— Lcuiiin/ifd 

'SOLOID' BKAND — STRENGTH 

,, ' Hemisine ' (Trade .Marfc), tubes 
of6 



' Hemisine ' Compound with 
Eucaine, No. i, tubes of 6 
5 ■ Hemisine,' 

o-ooi gm. [gr. 1/64] 
Sodii Chloridi, 

0-8 gm. [gr. 12-1/2] 
Eucaina; Hydrochloridi, 

02 gm. [gr. 3] 

' Hemisine ' Compound with 
Eucaine, No. 2, tubes of 12 

(One-tenth the .strength of Xo. i) 
One ' .Soloid ' 'Hemisine' Com- 
pound with Eucaine No. i, 
dissolved in 100 c.c. of water, 
or one ' .Soloid ' ' Hemisine ' 
Compound with Eucaine Xo. 
2, dissolved in 10 c.c. of water, 
gives a solution containing 
' Hemisine ' i in 100,000 and 
Eucaine Hydrochloride 2 in 
1000. 

' Hemisine ' with Atropine 
Sulphate (for intravenous 
injection), tubes of 12 
B ' Hemisine,' 

0-0002 gm. [gr. 1/320] 
Atropinae Sulphatis, 

o-ooi gm. [gr. 1/64] 
' Hemisine' Products present 
the active principle of the 
medulla of the supra-renal 
. gland having the character- 
istic vaso-constricting, haemos- 
tatic and astringent proper- 
ties. They differ from all 
other preparations in being 
issued in a i/ry, soliiHe state, 
and in being permanent in 
all climates and constant in 
action. Ready-made supra- 
renal solutions oxidize and 
lose activity. 

Homatropine Hydrobromide, 
tubes of 6 

Lead and Opium Lotion 
R Plumbi -Vcetatis,... gr. 2 
Tinct. Opii, ... min. 20 

Lead Subacetate 

' Soloid ' Lead .Subacetate is 
prepared from basic lead 
acetate and not from normal 
lead acetate. 



0-005 gm 
(appro.x. 



gr- 0-545 



gr, 10 



Issued in 
bots. of bots. of 



2.S 
25 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



137 



gr- 


5 


gr. 


5 


and 


Alka 


gr- 


5 


gr. 


1/2 


gr. 


S 


tia' 


Com 


gr. 


8 


• gr. 


8 


gr. 


1/3 


gr. 


I/.T 


. min. 1/6 


• gr. 


1/6 


• gr. 


I/I2 


. min. 1/12 



' Soloid ' Brand Products — continued 
' SOLOID' BRAND— 

,, Mercuric Potas.sium Iodide 
{formerly known as lodic- 
Hydrarg.), tubes of 25 

,, Mercuric Potassium Iodide ... 

) » )i >> j» 

,, Nasal, Alkaline Compound ... 

B Boracis 

Sodii Chloridi, 

,, Nasal, Antiseptic 
line Compound 

IJ Sodii Bicarbonatis, 
Acidi Carbolici, 
Boracis 

,, Nasal, ' EucalypI 
pound 
B .Sodii Bicarbonatis, 
Boracis, 
Sodii Benzoatis, 
Sodii Salicylatis, 
Eucalyptol, 

Thymol 

Menthol 

01. Gaultheriac, .. 

,, Nasal, Phenol Compound 
B .Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 12 
.Acidi Carbolici, ... gr. 1-1/2 
Sodii Chloridi, ... gr. 2 

,, Nasal, Sodium Bicarbonate 
Compound ... 
B Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 5 

Boracis gr. s 

Sodii Chloridi, ... gr. 5 

,, Naso-Pharyngeal Compound 
B Sodii Chloridi, 

Boracis, 

Acidi Borici, 

.Sodii Benzoatis, 

Menthol, ... 

Thymol, 

Cocainae Hydrochloridi, 

gr. 1/6 
01. Gaultherise, ... min. 1/20 

,, Paraform 

,, Potassium Permanganate 

) » )> »t 

,, Potassium Permanganate an( 

Alum 

E Potassii Permanganatis, 

. . §'■■ -^ 

.\himnus, ... ... gr. 5 

,, Silver Nitrate 



STRENin'II 

g'-- 1-75 
gr- 4-37 
gr- 8-75 



gr. 7 
gr. 2-1/2 
gr. 3/4 
gr. 1/2 
gr. 1/50 
gr. i/ioo 



Issued in 
hots, of bots. of 



gr- 5 
gr. I 

gr- 5 



25 
25 



100 
100 
100 
100 



100 



100 



gr. 
gr- 



25 



25 



25 



25 

25 



100 



100 



100 
100 
100 

too 



138 



F0RMUL.1RY OF FINE PRODUCTS 



Soloid ' Brand Products— canfi/nieii 
'SOLOID' BRAND— 


STRENGTH 


lssu< 
bots. of 


;d in 
bots. of 


„ Sodium Chloride, tubes of 12 


gr- 


30 


— 


— 


Two dissolved in a pint (20 
ounces) of boiled (sterile) 
water gives a solution con- 










taining 0685 per cent, of 
sodium chloi-ide, for intra- 










venous injection at 100' F. 










,, Sodium Chloride Compound 
tubes of 12 ... 






_ 


. 


Two in a pint (20 ounces) of 
boiled (sterile) water for intra- 










venous injection at 100' F. 










B -Sodii Chloridi, ... gr. 25 
.Sodii .Sulphatis. ... gr. 1-1/4 
Sodii Carbonatis. ... gr. i-i'4 
Sodii Phosphatis,... gr. i 
Potassii Chloridi, ... gr. 1-1/2 










,, Zinc Chloride 


gr- 


5 


25 


— 


,, Zinc Permanganate ... 


gr- 


1/8 


— 


100 


,, Zinc Sulphate 


gr- 


I 


— 


100 


,, ,, ,, 


gr- 


10 


— 


100 


,, Zinc Sulphocarbolate 


gr- 


2 


— 


100 


)> )) )> 


gr- 


10 


— 


100 



Also a wide range of other products issued under the ' Soloid ' 

Brand. 



'SOLOID BRAND PRODUCTS 
TESTING PURPOSES, etc. 

For Urine Analysis 



FOR 



SOLOID' BRAND— 

,, Citric Acid 

,, Fehling's Test, for prcpariii'^ Fehiiiig. 

Solution, carton.s of 24 
,, Indigo Test for Sugar (Sodium Xitro 

phenyl-propiolate) 
,, Picric Acid 

,, Potassium Ferrocyanide... 
,, Salicyl-sulphonic Acid ... 



For Water Analysis 

'SOLOID ' BR.\ND— 

,, Ammonium Chloride ... 
,, Lead Acetate ... 
,, Oxalic Acid 



STRENGTH 
■ gr- I 



Issued in 

tubes of 

20 



gr- 


1/4 


20 


gr- 


I 


20 


gr- 


I 


20 


gr. 


2 


16 



STRENGTH 
000016 gm. 
00184 g'""- 

06 <zm. 



ISSUKD BV B. VV. ANU CO. 



13!) 



' Soloid ' Brand Products for Testing Purposes, 
For Water Analysis—contimifd 

'SOLOID' BRAND— 

, Potassium Chromate ... 

, Potassium Ferrocyanide 

, Potassium Iodide and Starch 

, Potassium Nitrate 

, Potassium Permanganate 

, Silver Nitrate 

, Soap 

, Sodium Acid Sulphate 

, Zinc Dust 

, Zinc Sulphide... 

/;/ packages of 25 



For Sewage Analysis 

SOLOID ' BRAND— 

,, Oxalic Acid ... 

,, Potassium Permanganate 

,, Pyrogallic Acid 

,, Sodium Hydroxide 

In packages 0/2^ 

Test Indicators 

SOLOID' BRAND— 

* Indigo-Carmine 
*Lacmoiil 

* Methyl-Orange 

* Phenolphthalein 
*Rosolic Acid 
Starch ... 
One dissolved in 10 c.c. of .solvent forms the 

/;/ ii//>es of 10 



^Xk,. —coiitiiiued 



STRENGTH 

00065 gm. 
0013 gm. 

000 1 44 gm. 
0000395 gm. 
00097 g'li- 

0324 gm. 
013 gm. 
0-25 gm. 



STRENGTH 
00079 gn^' 
000395 g"^- 

0032 gm. 
01 3 gm. 



STRENGTH 



Microscopic Stains 



SOLOID' BRAND— 

, Bismarck Brown, pure 
, Borax Methylene Blue 
, Ehrlich Triple Stain 
, Eosin, pure 

, Eosin-methylene Blue (Louis 
Jenner's Stain) 



0-5 gm. 
Pest Indicator. 



STRENGTH 

01 gin. 



o- 1 gm. 
005 gm. 



140 



FOR.MrLAKY OF FINE I'KODIICTS 



Purposes, 


etc. — continued 




STRENC.TH 




OI gm. 




oi gm. 




15 c.c. 




01 gm. 




01 gm. 




01 gm. 




0015 gm. 




0-05 gm. 




o-i gm. 



' Soloid ' Brand Products for Testing Purposes, etc. 
Microscopic Staias—contimuJ 

'SOLOID' BRAND— 

Fuchsine, pure 
Gentian Violet, pure... 
Gram'.s Iodine Solution 
Hasmatoxylin (Delafield) 
Hoematoxylin, pure ... 
Methylene Blue, pure 

Methyl Violet, pure 

Romanowsky Stain (Leish- 

man's Powder) 
Sodium Carbonate 
Thionin Blue, pure 

Toi.son Blood Fluid 

In tubes of 6 

Also a wide range of other products issued under the 
' Soloid ' Brand 

Strophanthus Tincture (B. W. & Co.). Prepared in 
accordance with the British Pharmacopceia, 1898, from 
carefully selected Strophanthus seeds. 

Strophanthus Tincture (B. W, & Co.). Prepared in 
accordance with the United States Pharmacopceia (Eighth 
Revision), from carefully selected Strophanthus seeds. 

Strophanthus, Concentrated Tincture of, ' WeII= 
come' Brand (.sVt- page 198)- 

Strophanthus Tincture, 'Tabloid' Brand [See-pzgt 163). 
:;."« 'TABLOID BRAND PRODUCTS 

The word 'TABLOID' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always 
be specified when ordering. 

Under the ' Tabloid ' Brand is issued an immen.se variety of 
drugs and their combinati<ins, all prepared from the purest 
ingredients, and divided into accurate doses with due regard 
to their therapeutic uses. They require no weighing or 
measuring, accurate doses can be immediately 
Accurate administered, and they keep unchanged in any 

Dosage climate. Owing to their extreme portability, 

supplies may be comfortably carried in the 
waistcoat pocket, and doses taken regularly whilst following 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



141 



'Tabloid' Brand Products — continued 

the usual routine of social, professional, or commercial life. 
' Tabloid ' Brand products of unpleasant drugs are coated with a 
thin film of white sugar, readily soluble in the stomach. 

Issued in 
ovals of, bots. of 



'TABLOID' BRAND— 

,, Acetanilide (Sec Antifebrin^ 



DOSE 



Aconite Tincture, B.P., min. :J: 

and min. i I frequently 
■ _ I to 3 
Aloes and 



mm. 5 
Iron (B.P. Pill), 
gr^ ^■■■ ; ■■■ 

Kach contains approximately 
Dried Sulphate of Iron, gr. 
1/2, Barbadoes Aloes, gr. i, 
Compound Powder of Cinna- 
mon, gr. 1-1/2 

Aloes and Myrrh (B.P.Pill),gr. 4 
Aloin, gr. i/io 

>, gr- 1/2 

Aloin Compound 

$ Aloini, ^ gr. 1/5 

Strychninse .Sulpha- 

tis, gr. 1/60 

Ext. Belladonnae,... gr. 1/8 

Pulv. Ipecacuanhae, gr. 1/16 

Ammoniated Quinine 

Each contains quinine sulphate 
and ammonium bicarbonate to 
correspond with one fluid 
drachm of the B.P. tincture. 

Ammonium Bromide, gr. 5 ... 

„ ,, gr. 10... 

Ammonium Carbonate, gr. 3 . 

Ammonium Chloricie, gr. 3 ... 

gr- 5 ••• 
,, ,, gr. 10 

Ammonium Chloride and Borax 
Ammonium Chloride and 
Liquorice 

K .Xmmonii Chloridi, gr. 3 
Ext. (jlycyrrhizs, gr. 2 

Antifebrin (Acetanilide), gr. 2 
.. ,. gr- 5 

Antifebrin Comyjound 
5; Antifebriiii (Acet- 

anilidi P.B.), ... gr. 2 
Camphorae Alono- 

bromata;, ... gr. i 

Caffeiriae Citratis,... gr. i 



I to 2 



I to 2 

I frequently 
I to 4 

I to 2 after 
meals, or 
I to 3 at 
bed-time 





I to 6 




I to 3 
I to 3 
I to 6 


I 


I to 4 
I to 2 
as required 


I 


as required 




I to 2 


I 


[in special 
ascs) 
I 



100 

36 



100 

25 
50 



25 



25 

25 
25 



100 



100 



100 



100 
100 



100 



100 
100 
100 
100 

IQO 
100 
100 

100 

100 

100 
100 



142 



FORMULARY OF FINE PRODUCTS 



'Tabloid' Brand Products^ci'/Ut/med 
'TABLOID' BRAND— DOSE 

,, Antipyrine (Phenazone), gr. 2i i 104, or more 

» ,, ,, gi'- 5 I to 4 

,, ' Aol ' {Trade Mari), a deriv- 
ative of Saiitaliii/i album, 
0-3 gm. (approx. gr. 5), boxes 
of 50 . . . ... ... ... 2 or more 

,, Apomorphine Compound ... i as required 

R Apomorphinae 

Hydrochloridi, gr. 1/50 

Ammonii Chloridi, gr. 3 

Ext. Glyc\'rrhiz3e, gr. 1-1/2 

,, Apomorphine Hydrochloride, 

gr. 1/50 ... .. ... I to 3 (expec- 

torant) 
,, Aromatic Chalk Powder with 

Opium, B.P., gr. 5 ... 2 to 4 or more 



Issued in 



Ar.senical Compound ... 

R Acidi .Arseniosi, ... gr. i.'ioo 
Ferri Sulphatis 

E.xsiccati, gr. i 

Calcii Sulphidi, ... gr. 1/4 

Ext. Gentianse, ... gr. 2 

Arsenious Acid, gr. i/ioo 
,, gr. 1/50 
,, gr. 1/20 
Asafetida and Opium Com- 
pound 

IJ Asafetids, 
Camphorse, 
Pulv. Opii, 
Pulv. Piperis Nigri, aa gr. i 

Astringent Mixture 

R Confectionis Aromat. 



I to 2 



I to 6 

I to 3 

I 

I to 2 



I to 2 



(P.B. 1885), 


gr. 4-1/2 


Pulv. pro Mist. 




Crets ... 


gr. 20 


Ammon. Bicarb.,... 


gr. 1/2 


Tinct. Catechu, ... 


niin. 15 


Tinct. Cardamomi 




Comp., 


min. 9 


Tinct. Opii, 


min. i-i<,'2 


Olei Cinnamomi, ... 


min. 1/8 



,, Atropine Sulphate, gr. i/loo I 

,, Belladonna Tincture, 

B.P., min. i ... i frequently 
„ ,, ,, min. 5 ... I to 3 
,, Benzoic Acid, gr. 5 ... ... I to 3 



ovals of] 1 
24 



25 



50 

25 



100 
100 
100 



50 

100 
48 



IS.SUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



143 



'Tabloid' Brand Products— cc/i/mncii 
•TABLOID' BRAND— 


DOSE 


Issuf 

ovals of 


;d in 
bots. of 


,, Benzoic Acid Compound 

IJ Acidi Benzoici, ... gr. 1/2 

Codeinae, gr. i/io 

Menthol, gr. i/io 

Pulv. Ipecacuanha;, gr. i/io 
Cocainae 

Hydrochloridi,... gr. 1/40 
01. ]Menthae Piperitae, min. 1/16 
Gumini Rubri, ... q.s. 


I as required 


25 


100 


,, Beta-Naphthol, gr. 3 




I to 3 


— 


100 


,, Beta-Naphthol Compound ... 

IJ Beta-Naphthol, ... gr. i 
Carbonis Ligni, ... gr. 4 
01. Menthae 

Piperitae,... min. 1/2 


I to 


4, or more 


25 


100 


,, Bismuth and Dover Powder... 




I to 6 


. — . 


100 


5 Bismuthi 

.Subnitratis, ... gr. 2-1/2 
Pulv. Ipecac, c 

Opio, ... gr. 2-1/2 










,, Bismuth and Soda 


I tc 


4, or more 


— 


100 


ij; Bismuthi 

Subnitratis, gr. 2-1/2 
Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 2-1/2 










„ Bismuth Carbonate, gr. 5 




I to 4 


25 


100 


,, Bismuth, Rhubarb and Soda.. 


I to 4, or more 


25 


100 


B Bismuthi 

Subnitratis, gr. 3 
Pulv. Rhei, ... gr. i 
Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 2 










,, Bismuth Salicylate {physio 










logically part) gr. 5 




I to 4 


— 


100 


,, Bismuth Subgallate, gr. 5 




I to 4 


24 


100 


,, Bismuth Subnitrate, gr. 5 




I to 4 


25 


100 


>> >> ,, gr. 10 .. 




I to 2 


— 


100 


,, Blaud Pill, gr. 5 




I to 3 


— 


100 


)) )) >> gr- 8 




I to 2 


— 


100 



,, Blaud Pill and Aloin ... ... i to 4 

B Pil. Ferrugin. 

(Hlaud), ... gr. 4 
( = 20 X Ferri Carbonatis) 

Aloini, gr. 1/20 

,, Blaud Pill and Arsenic ... i to 4 

B Pil- Ferrugin. 

(Blaud), ... gr. 4 
(=20 X Ferri Carbonatis) 
Acidi Arseniosi, ... gr. 1/64 



100 



100 



144 



FORMt'LARY OF FINE PRODUCTS 



'Tabloid' Brand Products— co'/fi'/ue^f 


Issu 






ovals of 


•TABLOID' BRAND- 


DOSE 




,, Bhuid Pill and Cascara 


I to 4 


— 


Jji Pil. Ferrugin. 






(Blaud), ... gr. 4 






(=20 X Ferri Carbonatis) 






Ext. Cascarae 






Sagradse, ... gr. 1/2 






,, Blaud Pill Compound... 


I 


— 


3 Pil. Ferrugin. 






(Blaud), ... gr. 10 






(=20 '; Ferri Carbonatis) 






Pulv. Capsici, ... gr. 1/4. 






Aloini, gr. 1/30 






Strychninae, ... gr. 1/30 






Acidi Arseniosi, ... gr. 1/30 






,, Blaud Pill with Arsenic and 






Strychnine ... 


I to 3 


— 


R Pil. Ferrugin. 






(Blaud). ... gr. s 






( = 20 % Ferri Carbonatis) 






Acidi Arseniosi, ... gr. i/roo 






Strychninae, ... gr. i/ioo 






„ Blue Pill, gr. 4 


I to 2 


25 


(Each contains gr. 1-1/3 of pure 






Metallic Mercury) 






„ Blue Pill and Rhubarb Com- 






pound 


I to 2 


— 


5 Pil. Hydrargvri, 






P.B gr. 2-1/2 






Pil. Rhei Comp., 






P.B.,... gr. 2-1/2 






,, Blue Pill, Colocynth and 






Hyoscyamus... 


I to 2 


25 


R Pil. Hydrargvri, 






P.B., gr. 2 






Pil.Colocynthldis et 






Hyoscyaini, P.B., gr. 4 






,, Bone Medulla, gr. 5, hoxe.sof 50 


I or more 


— 


„ Borax, gr. 5 


I to 4, or more 


25 


,, Boric Acid, gr. 5 


I to 3 


— 


,, Bromides Compound ... 


I t<i 6 


— 


B Sodii Bromidi, ... gr. 2 






Strontii Bromidi,... gr. 2 






Ammonii Bromidi, gr. i 






Sodii Arsenatis, ... gr. 1/60 






,, Butyl-Chloral Hydrate and 






Gelsemine ... 


I 


— 


B Butyl-Chloral 






Hydratis, gr. 3 






Gelsemina; 






Hydrochloriduni, gr. 1/200 






,, Caffeine Citrate Effervescent, 






B.P., gr. 60, tubes of 25 ... 


I to 2 


— 



bots. of 



100 



100 



100 



ICX) 



100 



100 



100 
100 
100 



100 



ISSUED BY B. \V. AND CO. 



145 



I to 4 


I to 2 


I 


I repeated 


I to 5 


I to 3 


I to 2 


I 


I to 5 



' Tabloid ' Brand Products— a'/ifi/tneii 
'TABLOID' BRAND— DOSE 

,, Caffeine Citrate, gr. 2 ... i to 5 

,, Caffeine Compound ... ... i to 4 

5; Caffeinpe, gr. i 

Aritipyrini 

(Phenazoni), gr. 3 

,, Calcium Carbonate Compound i to 4 before 
R Calcii Carb. meals, or I 

Praecipitati. gr. 3-1/2 occasionally 
Magnesii 

Carb. Pond., gr. 2-1/2 
.Sodii Chloridi, ... gr. 1 

,, Calcium Sulphide, gr. 1/4 

„ „ gr- l/'2 •■• 

„ Calomel, gr. i/io, gr. 1/6, gr. 

1/4, and gr. 1/2 

,, Calomel, gr. i ... 

.. gr-2 

,, gr-S 

gr- 5 

,, Calomel and Creosote 

U Hydrargyri 

Subchloridi. gr. 1/6 
Creosoti min. i 

,, Calomel and Jalap 
IJ Hydrargyri 

.Subchloridi, gr. i 
Pulv. Jalapse, ... gr. 3 

,, Calomel and Piperine, of each, 

gr- 1/2 

,, Calomel, gr. 1/2, and Sodium 

Bicarbonate, gr. 2-1/2 
,, Calomel, gr. i, and Sodium 

Bicarbonate, gr. 5 ... 
,, Calomel Compound ( Pliiinnur 

Pill, B. P. ),gr.Ar • 

Each contains approximately: — 
Calomel, gr. i, .Sulphurated 
.Antimony, gr. 1, (juaiacum 
Resin, gr. 2. 

,, Camphor Compound Tincture, 

B.P., (Paregoric), min. 2 i frequently 
min. 5 I frequently 

„ M min- 15 I to 4 

,, Camphor Essence (Saturated) 2 to 3 
,, Cannabis Indica Tincture, B. P., 

min. 5 I to 3 



Issued in 
ovals of bots. of 



I to 4 



I repeated 



I or more 



I or more 



I to 2 



25 



25 



100 



25 
25 

25 



100 

48 
36 

25 

48 



100 
100 



100 



100 
100 
100 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



100 



100 
100 
100 
100 



100 
100 
100 

100 



146 



FOKM!.'LAR\ OF FINE PRODl'CTS 



'Tabloid' Brand Products— conthuteif 
'TABLOID ' BRAND— DOSE 

,, Capsicum Tincture, B. P., 

min. I ... I frequently 
» ., ,, min. 5 ... i to 3 
,, Carbolic Acid (Phenol) gr. 14 

{^for the throat) ... ... i as required 

,, Carbolic Acid (Phenol) gr. 1/2 

[Jor the throat) ... ... I as required 

,, Carlsbad Salt, Effervescent I or more as 

Artificial, tubes of 25 desired 

,, Cascara Sagrada (Dry Extract), 

gr. I I or more 

., ., ,, ,. gr- 2 I to 4 

,, ,, gr- 3 I to 3 

., ,, ,, ,, gr- 4 I to 2 



Cascara and Gentian Compound 

B Ext. Cascarae 

Sagradae, 
Ext. Nucis Vomicae, 
Ext. Belladonnae,... 
Ext. Gentianae, ... 
Capsicini, 

Cascara Compound 

B Ext. Cascarae 

Sagradae, 
Ext. Euonj-mi Sicci, 

Tridini _ 

Ext. Nucis Vomicae, gr. 1/6 
Ext. Hyo^cyami 

Viridis, gr. i;3 

Castor Oil, min. 5, boxes of 50 
Cathartic Compound... 

B Ext. Colocynthidis 



I to 



gr. 2 

gr- 1/5 
gr. 1,10 
gr. I 
gr. i/io 



gr. 1,2 
gr. 1/2 



I to 4 



I or mijre 
I to 2 



Comp. 
Hydrargyri 

Subchloridi, 
Ext. Jalapae, 
Pulv. Cambogis, .. 



gr. 1-1/3 

gr- I 

gr- I 

gr. 1/4 



gr. 5 I as required 



Issued in 
vals of j bots. of 



100 

— i 100 



Cerebrin, gr. 5 ... ... i or more 

Cerium Oxalate, gr. 5 ... i to 2 

Chalk, Aromatic Powder, with 
Opium, gr. 5 ... ... 2 to 4 or more 

Each contains approximate!)-: — 
Chalk, gr. i. Opium, gr. i/3 
with aromatics. 

Charcoal (Pure Willow), gr. 5, I or more as 

bottles of 40 required 



25 
25 



25 
25 

25 

25 
25 

25 



24 



25 



100 



100 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



100 



24 100 



100 
100 



100 



100 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



147 



'Tabloid' Brand Products— tw/;';;/;/^^ 


f 


Issu 


sd in 






ovals of 


bots. ol 


'TABLOID' BRAND— 


DOSE 






,, Chemical Food (Phosphates 








Compounci), = dr. 1/2 of 








Compound Syrup of Phos- 








phates 


I or more 


25 


100 


Containing the combined phos- 








phates of iron, calcium, sodium 








and potassium, equivalent to 








drachm 1/2 of standard Com- 








pound SjTup of Phosphates. 








,, Chemical Food (Phosphates 








Compound), = dr. i of Com- 








pound Syrup of Phosphates 


I or more 


25 


100 


Equivalent to drachm i of 








standard Compound Sj-rup 








of Phosphates. 








,, Chloral Hydrate, gr. 5 


I to 4 


— 


100 


gr- 10 


I to 2 


— 


100 


,, Cinchona Tincture, B. P., 








min. 30 ... 


I to 2 


36 


100 


,, Cinchona Compound Tinc- 








ture, B.P., min. 30 


I to 2 


25 


100 


,, Citric Acid, gr. 5 


I to 4 


— 


100 


,, Cocaine Hydrochloride (Sc-e 








' Soloid ' Brand Products) 








,, CocaineCo. [SeeYoice page 165) 








,, Codeine, gr. 1/4 


I to 4 or more 


25 


100 


gr- 1/2 


I to 4 


25 


100 


,, Codeine and Nux Vomica 


I to 2 


25 


— 


B CodeinjePhosphatis, gr. i 








Ext. Nucis Vomicae, gr. 1/4 








„ 'Coffee-Mint' 


I tc.) 4 or more 


25 


100 


li Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 3 








Ammonii 








Bicarbonatis, gr. 1I16 








Ext. Coffeae, ... gr. 1/2 








Cerii O.xalatis, ... gr. 1/4 








01. IMenthae 








Piperitae, g.s. 








,, Colchicum Compound 


I to 2 


— 


ICO 


E E.xt. Colchici, ... gr. 1/2 








Acidi Salicylici, gr. 3 








,, Colocynth and Hyoscyamus 








(B.P. Pill), gr. 4 


I to 2 


— 


100 


,, Colocynth Compound (B.P. 








Pill), gr. 4 


I to 2 


— 


100 


Each contains approximately : 








Colocynth Pulp, gr. 2/3 ; Bar- 








bados Aloes, gr. 1-1/3 1 Scam- 








many Resin, gr. 1-1/3 ; Oil of 








Cloves, min. 1/6 









148 



FORMtlLARY OF FINE PRODUCTS 



Tabloid ' Brand Products -coitinned 


Issued in 


TABLOID' BRAND— 


DOSE 


ovals of 


bots. of 


,, Cretae Arom. c. Opio, Pulv., 








gr-S-- 


2 to 4 or more 


25 


100 


Each contains approximately : 








Chalk, gr. i ; Opium, gr. i/8, 








with aromatics 








,, Cubeb and Belladonna, Effer- 








vescoit 


I as required 




100 


B Pulv. Cubebae, ... gr. 1/2 








Ext. Belladonnje, gr. 1/20 








,, Cubeb Compound 


I as required 


25 


100 


B Oleo-resinse 








Cubebje, gr. 1/4 








Ammonii Chloridi, gr. 1/2 








Glycyrrhizini, ... gr. 1/4 








,, Didymin (Testicular Sub- 








stance), gr. 5 


I to 4 




100 


,, Digitalin (amorphous), gr. 








i/ioo 


I to 3 


50 


— 


,, Digitali.s Tincture, min. i 


I frequently 


ICX) 


— 


,, ,, ,, min. 5 ... 


I to 3 


48 


100 


,, Dover Powder (Ipecac, with 








Opium), gr. 1/4 


I frequently 


100 


— 


Each contains Opium and 








Ipecacuanha, of each, gr. 1,40 








,, Dover Powder (Ipecac, with 








Opium), gr. 5 


1 to 3 


24 


ICO 


Each contains Opium and 








Ipacacuanha, of each, gr. 1/2 








,, Easton Syrup, dr. 1/2 


I to 2 


25 


100 


,, ,, ,, <lr. I 


I 


25 


100 


,, Effervescent Products, 








' Tabloid ' Brand {See under 








the name of each product) 








,, Elaterin, gr. 1/40 


I to 4 


25 


— 


,, Ergotin (Ergot Extract, B.P.), 








gr- I 


I to 4 or more 


— 


100 


). ). ,, ,, gr- 2 


I to 4 




100 


') ■)■) !) )> gi'- 3 


I to 3 





100 


,, Ergotin and Strychnine 


I to 2 





100 


B Ergotini (Ext. 








Ergota;P.B.), gr. 3 








Strychnine 








Sulphatis, gr. 1/30 








,, Erythrol Tetranitrate (Tetrani- 








trin) gr. 1/4, tubes of 25 ... 


I to 4 






,, Erythrol Tetranitrate (Tetrani- 








trin), gr. 1/2 


I to 2 


25 


— 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



149 



' Tabloid ' Brand Products -cantinueJ 

♦ TABLOID ' BRAND— DOSE 

,, ErythrolTetranitrate (Tetrani- 

tnn),gi-. I I 

,, Euonymin (Euonymiis Dry 

Extract, B.P.) gr. l/8 ... I to 4 or more 
,, Euonymin (Euonymu.s Dry 

Extract, B.P.) gr. 1/2 ... i to 4 

,, Exalgin, gr. 2 ... ... ... i to 2 

,, Fellis Bovini Purificati, gr. 4 1114 

,, Fellis Porcini Purificati, gr. 4 i t^ 4 

,, Ferric Chloride, min. 10 ... i 

One represents the amount of 
Ferric Chloride in min. lo of 
Tincture Ferri Perchloridi. 
P.B. It contains a small 
amount of ammonium chloride 
as a vehicle. 
,. Ferric Chloride and Arsenic ... i 

E Tinct. Ferri Perchloridi, min. 10 
Acidi Arseniosi, gr. 1/30 

,, Ferruginous. {See Blaud) 
,, Ferrum. {See Iron) 

,, ' Forced March ' I every hour, 

Containing the combined active if required 
principles of Kola Nut and 
Coca Leaves. 
,, Galbanum Comp. (Asafetida 

Compound) B.P. Pill, gr. 4 i to 2 
Each contains approximately ; 
Asafetida, (jalbanum and 
Myrrh, of each gr. 1-1/7 

,, Gelsemium Tincture, B.P., 

min. 5 ... ... ... I to 3 

,, Gentian and Soda Compound... ito4ormore 
R .Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 3 
fAmmonii Carbona- 
<tis = Sp. Ammon. 
( Arom., min. 3 

Inf. Gentianae 

Comp., fl. dr. 2-1/2 
„ Ginger Essence (B.P. '85), 

min. 5 I 

,, ,, ,, min. 10 I 

,, Glycerophosphates Compound, 

dr. 1/2 I to 8 

Each contains Calcium, .Sodium, 
Potassium, Magnesium and 
Iron ( ilycerophosphates, 

Kola, Pepsin and Diastase, 
with gr. 1/800 of Strychnine 
(ilycerophosphate and is 
equiv.alent to 1/2 fluid drachm 
of Syrup of Gljcero- 
phosphates. 



Issued in 



ovals of 
12 

50 



bots. of 



100 
100 
100 
100 



48 



100 



25 



100 



100 
100 



to 4 
to 2 



48 



25 



100 
100 



100 



150 



FORMULARY OF FINE PRODl^CTS 



Tabloid ' Brand Products— cpiitinn 


rd 


Issued in 






ovals of 


bets, of 


♦TABLOID' BRAND— 


DOSE 






,, Gregory Powder (Rhubarb Co. 








Powder), gr. 5 


I to 4 or more 


24 


100 


Each contains : — Rhubarb, 








gr. i-i/q, Heavy Magnesia, 








gr. 3-1/3, and Ginger, gr. s'g. 








,, Grey Powder, gr. 1/4, gr. 1/3, 








and gr. 1/2 


I repeated 


100 


— 


„ „ „ gr- I 


I to 5 


100 


— 


„ ,, ,, gr- 2 


I to 3 


— 


100 


„ „ >. gr- 3 


I to 2 


— 


100 


,, ,, ,. gr. 5 


I 


— 


100 


,, Grey Powder and Dover 








Powder, of each gr. 1/2 ... 


I to 5 or more 




TOO 


Each contains : — Mercury, 








gr. 1/6, Opium and Ipecacu- 








anha, of each gr. 1/20. 








,, Grey Powder and Dover 








Powder, of each gr. i 


I to 5 




100 


Each contains : ■ — Mercury, 








gr. 1/3, Opium and Ipecacu- 








anha, of each gr. i/io. 








,, Grey Powder and Opiimi 


I to 5 


— 


100 


R. Ilydrarg. c Cret.a, gr. i 








Pulv. Opii gr. 1/6 








,, Grey Powder, gr. 1/2, and 








Sodium Bicarbonate, gr. 2^ 


I repeated 


25 


100 


,, Grey Powder, gr. i, and 








Sodium Bicarbonate, gr. 5 


I to 5 


25 


100 


,, Grey Powder, Opium and 








Quinine 


I to 3 


— 


100 


R Hydrargyri cum 








Creta, gr. 1-1/2 








Extract! Opii, ... gr. 1/6 








Quininae Sulphatis, gr. 1-1/2 








,, Guaiacol Camphorate, gr. 5 ... 


I to 2, 








increa.sed 


25 


100 


,, Guaiacol Carbonate, gr. 5 


I to 2, 








increased 


25 


100 


,, Guaiacum and Quinine Com- 








pound 


I to 4 


— 


100 


B Guaiaci Resins, ... gr. 2 








Sulphuris gr. 2 








QuininEE Salicylatis, gr. 1/2 








,, Guaiacum and Sulphur 


I to 4 


25 


TOO 


^ Guaiaci Resinae. ... gr. 3 








Sulphuris 








Prsecipitati, gr. 3 









ISSIED BV 



\V. ANU CO. 



151 



' TabSoid ' Brand Products— ci»tft/i.'/e 

'TABLOID' liRAND— 
,, Guaiacum Resin, gr. 5 


{ 

DOSE 

I to 3 


Issu 
ovals of 

25 


;d in 
bots. of 

100 


,, ' Hemisine ' {Trade Mark) 

0-0003 gm. (approx. gr. 
1/200), tubes of 12 


2 t.. 3 






,, ' Hemi.sine,'o-ooi gm.(appro.\. 
gr. 1/64), tubes of 12 

' Ilemi.sine' products present the 
active principle of the medulla 
of the supra-renal gland in a 
dry, soliihU- and stable con- 
dition. 


I 






,, Hydrarg. c Creta {See Grey 
Powder) 








,, Hydrarg. lodid. Flav., gr. i/S 


I to 4 


25 


ICO 


,, Hydrarg. lodid. Rubr.,gr. 1/20 


I 


50 


— 


,. gr- 1/16 


1 


50 


— 


,, Hydrarg. lodid. Virid., gr. 1/8 


I to 4, 
increased 


50 


— 


,, Hydrargyri Perchloridi (Mer- 
curic Chloride), gr. i/ioo ... 


I to 4 or more 


100 




,, Hydrargyri Perchloridi (Mer- 
curic Chloride), gr. 1/16 


I 


100 




,, Hydrarg. Perchlor., gr. 1/32 et 
Potass. lodid. gr. 25 


I to 2 





100 


,, Hydrarg. Perchlor., gr. 1/16 et 
Potass. lodid. gr. 5 


I 




100 


,, Hydrarg. Subchlor. {See 
Calomel) 








,, Hydrarg. Subchlor. Comp. 
(Plummer Pill, B.P.), gr. 4 

Each contains appro.ximately : 
Calomel, gr. i, -Sulphurated 
Antimony, gr. i, Guaiacum 
Resin, gr. 2. 


I to 2 


25 


100 



,, Hydrastine Compound 

IJ Hydrastinae 

Hj-drochloridi, gr. 1/4 
Ext. ErgotcC 

(Ergotini) P.B., gr. 1/2 
Cannabina; 

Tannatis, gr. 1/2 



I to 



repeated 



25 



100 



152 



FORMfLAKY OF FINE PRODl'CTS 



' Tabloid ' Brand Prodacts— continued 
'TABLOID' BRAND— 

,, Hyflrastine Compound arnl 
Stypticine ... 



E Hydrastinse 

Hydrochloridi, gr. 1/4 
Ext. Ergots: 

(Ergotini)P.B., gr. 1/2 
Cannabinje 

Tannatis, gr. 1/2 
Cotarninse 

Hydrochloridi, 

(Stypticini), gr. 1/4 



DOSE 

I to 3, 
repeated 



Hydra.stine 



Hydrochloride, 



I to 4, 
repeated 

I to 4 or more 



I to 2 



,, Hyoscyamu.s Tincture, B.P., 

min. 10 
,, Hypodermic Products 

(See page 120) 
,, Hypophosphites Compound, 
gr. i\ = dr. i of standard 
Compoimd Syrup of Hypo- 
phosphites ... 
Containing gr. 1-1/2 of the com- 
bined hypophosphites of cal- 
cium, potassium, sodium, 
manganese, iron and quinine, 
with gr. 1/128 of hypophos- 
phite of strychnine ; equivalent 
to dr. 1/2 of standard Com- 
pound Syrup of Hypo- 
phosphites 

,, Hypophosphites Compound, 
<Tr. 3 = dr. I of standard 
Compound Syrup of Hypo- 
phosphites ... ... ■■• I 

Equivalent to dr. 1 of standard 
Compound Syrup _ of Hypo- 
phosphites (containing gr. 1/64 
of hypophosphite of strych- 
nine). 

„ Ichthyol, gr. 24 

„ Ipecacuanha Powder, gr. i.'io.. i frequently 

>Tr. =; ... I every hour 
,, ., deprived 

ofits Emetic Principles, gr. 5 ito4ormore 

,, Ipecacuanha and Tartarated 

Antimony, of each, gr. lyioo I frequently 
„ Ipecacuanha\Vine,B.P.,min.5 2to4ormore 

[expectorant) 
,, Ipecacuanha \vith Opium [See 

Dover Powder) 



Issued in 
ovals of' hots, of 



25 



36 



25 



2K 



24 
100 



50 



100 



100 



100 



100 



100 



ICO 



100 



100 



100 
100 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



153 



' Tabloid ' Brand Products— cofi^iftued 
'TABLOID' BRAND— DOSE 

,, Ipecacuanha with Squill (B.P. 

Pill), gr. 4 I to 2 

One contains approximately : — 
Ipecacuanha and Opium, of 
each, gr. 1/5, Squill and 
Ammoniacum, of each gr. 2/3 

,, Iridin Compound ... ... I to 2 

]J Iridini gr. 2 

Ext. Hyoscyami 

Viridis, ... gr. 1/2 

Pil. Rhei Comp., ... gr. 1-1/2 

,, Iron and Arsenic Compound... I to 3 

B Ferri Hypo- 

phosphitis, gr. 2 
Quininae 

Bisulphatis, gr. i 
Acidi Arseniosi, ... gr. 1/50 
Strychninse 

.Sulphatis, gr. 1/50 
.Saccharini, gr. i/ioo 

,, Iron and Quinine Citrate, 

B.P., gr. 3 I to 3 

Each contains Quinine, approxi- 
mately gr. 1/2 

,, Iron and Strychnine Phos- 
phates ... ... ... I 

R Ferri Phosphatis, gr. i 
.Strychnine 

Phosphati.s, gr. 1/32 

,, Iron, Arsenic and Digitalin I to 3 

B Ferri Phosphatis 

.Solubilis, gr. 3 
Acidi Arseniosi, ... gr. i/ioo 
Digitalini(Aniorph.) gr. i/ioo 

,, Iron Carbonate Saccharated, 

gr.5 I to 6 

,, Iron Citrate Compound ... I to 3 

B Ferri et .Ammonii 

Citratis, gr. 3 

Quinina; .Sulphatis, gr. i 

Acidi -Arseniosi, ... gr. 1/60 

,, Iron Glycerophosphate, gr. 3 i to 2 

,, Iron Phosphate with Quinine 
and .Strychnine (See Easton 
Syrup) 

„ Iron Pill (.SVf Blaud) 

,, Iron, Reduced {See Reduced 
Iron) 

,, Iron Sulphate, Dried, gr. 3... I 

,, Iron \'alerianate, gr. i ... i or more 



Issued in 



ovals of 



25 



25 



25 



25 



25 



25 



bots. of 



100 



100 



100 



100 



100 



100 



100 
ICO 



100 



ICO 

100 

G 



154 



FORMULARY OF FINE PRODUCTS 



' Tabloid ' Brand Products —t('«/'/«?i:(^</ 
'TABLOID' BRAND— 

„ Jalap, gr. 5 

,, Juniper Oil, min. 3, boxes of 

50 

,, Kino Compound Powder, 

B.P.,gr. 5 

Each contains Kino, gr. 3-3/4, 
Opium, gr. 1/4, and Cinnamon, 
gr. I. 

,, Kissingen Salt, Effervescent 
Artificial, tubes of 25 



DOSE 

I to 4 



I to 4 



I or more 
as required 

I occasionally 



I to 



gr- I 

gr. 1/2 

gr- 1/4 
gr. 1/2 

gr- 1/4 
gr- 1/4 



,, Krameria and Cocaine 
]J E.xt. Krameriae, ... gr. i 
Cocainse 

Hydrochloridi, gr. 1/20 

,, Laxative Vegetable ... 

5 Ext. Colocynthidis 

Comp 

Ext. Jalapje, 
Resinse Podophylli, 
Leptandrini, 
Ext. Hyoscyami 

Viridis, 
Ext. Taraxaci, 
01. Menthae 

Piperitae, q.s. 

„ Lead with Opium (B.P. Pill), 

gi- 4 

Each contains approximately: — 
Lead Acetate, gr. 3, Opium, 

gr. 1/2. 

,, Liquorice Compound Powder, 

gr- 30 

Each represents :— Senna, gr. 5, 
Liquorice Root, gr. 5, Sublimed 
Sulphur, gr. 2-1/2, etc. 

,, Lithium Benzoate Compound . i to 4 or more 

IJ Lithii Benzoatis, ... gr. 3 
.Sulphuris 

Prsecipitati, gr. 2 

QuininaeSalicylatis, gr. 1/3 

,, Lithium Carbonate, gr. 2 
„ Lithium Citrate, gr. 5, Effervfs- 
ten! ... 



2 to 4 



Issued in 
ovals of 



I to 



I to 2 



Lithium Citrate and Sodium 
Sulphate, Effervescent, tubes 
of25 

B Lithii Citratis, --. gr. 3 
Sodii Sulphatis, ... gr. 30 



I to 2 



bots. of 
100 



30 



25 



25 



ISSUED BV n. \V. AND CO. 



155 



'Tabloid ' Brand Products- 



-COHtlliHCd. 



TABLOID' BKAM)^ DOSE 

,, Lithium Citrate and Uro- 
tropine, Effervescent, tubes 
of 25 ... ... ... ... I or mure 

IJ: Lithii Citratis, ... gr. 5 
Urotropinse, ... gr. 3 

Sails Effervescentis, q.s. 

,, Lithium Citrate Effervescent, 

B.P., gr. 60, tuljes of 25 ... i to 2 

Each contains about gr. 3 of 
Lithium Citrate. 

,, Livingstone Rouser ... ... i to 3 

Bj Pulv. Jalapae, ... gr. 1-1/2 
Hydrargyri 

Subchloridi, ... gr. i 

Pulv. Rhei, ... gr. 1-1/2 

QuininaeBisulphatis gr. i 

,, Magnesium Carbonate Com- 
pound ... ... ... I to 4 

B Magnesii 

Carbonatis, gr. 2 

Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 2 
Potassii 

Bicarbonatis, gr. 2 

Sodii Chloridi. ... gr. 3 

,, Magnesium Citrate [Trite] 
Elfervescent, gr. 60, tubes of 
25 I to 3 

,, Magnesium Sulphate Efler- 

vescent, B.P., gr. 60, tubes 

of 25 ... ... I to 4 

Each represents gr. 30 of Mag- 
nesium Sulphate. 

,, Magnesium Sulphate Com- 
pound, Efiervcscent, tubes of 
25 I to 4 

B Magnesii Sulphatis, gr. 15 

.Sodii Sulphatis, ... gr. 15 
Magnesii 

Carbonatis, gr. 5 
Tinct. Zingiberis, 

P.B. min. 12 

,, Magnesium Sulphite, gr. 5 ... i frequently 

, , 'MamosV Tradf i^rark){ formerly 
knoiun as 'Tabloid' Mam- 
mary Gland), gr. 5... ... i increased 

,, Manganese and Iron Citrate 

{soluble), gr. 3 ... ... I to 3 

,, Manganese and Iron Citrate 

[soluble), gr. 5 ... ... 1 to 2 



Issued In 
ovals of bots, of 



-D 



25 



100 



100 



100 



100 



100 



100 



156 



FORMULARY OF FINK PRODl'CTS 



'Tabloid' Brand ProAucts—coitinneJ 




Issued in 


♦TABLOID ' BRAND— 


DOSE 


ovals of 


bots. of 


,, Manganese and Iron Citrate 








with Quinine (soluble), gr. 3 


I to 3 


25 


— 


Each contains Quinine, approxi- 
mately gr. 1/2 








,, Manganese and Iron Citrate 








with Quinine [soluble], gr. 5 


I to 2 


25 


— 


Each contains Quinine, gr. 3/4 








,, Manganese and Iron Citrate 








with Strychnine [soluble]. 








gr. I ... ... ... 


I to 3 


25 


100 


Each contains Strychnine, gr. 








i/ioo 








,, Manganese and Iron Phos- 








phate [soluble], gr. 3 


I to 3 


25 


100 


,, Manganese and Iron Phos- 








phate [soluble), gr. 5 


I to 2 


25 


100 


,, Manganese Citrate [soluble], 








gr-3-- 


I to 3 


25 


— 


,, Manganese Citrate [soluble), 








gr-5-- ••• 


I to 2 


25 


— 


,, Manganese Dioxide, gr. 2 


I to 5 


25 


100 


,, Menthol, gr. 1/4 i 


repeated 





40 and 
100 


,, Menthol Compound ... 


I to 4 





100 


E Menthol gr. 1/2 

.Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 3 
.Saccharini, ... gr. 1/4 








,, Mercuric Potassium Iodide, 








gr- 1/6 


I 




100 


,, Mercury Green Iodide (See 








Hydrarg. lod. Vir.) 








,, Mercury Perchloride (See 








Hydrarg. Perchlor.) 








,, Mercury Red Iodide (See 








Hydrarg. lod. Ruhr.) 








,, Mercury Subchloride (See 








Calomel) 








,, Mercury with Chalk, and 








combinations (See Grey 








Powder and combinaions) 








,, Mercury Yellow Iodide. (See 








Hydrarg. lod. Flav. 









ISSUED BY B. W. 


.\ND CO. 




la7 


' Tabloid ' Brand Products— c77«^/««<'a' 


Issued in 






ovals of 


bots. of 


'TABLOID' BRAND — 


DOSE 






,, Methylene Blue, gr. 2 


I to 2 


— 


100 


,, Milk Sugar, gr. 3 




— 


100 


,, Mineral Water Salts, Effer- 








vescent {See Carlsbad, 








Kissingen, Seltzer, and 








Vichy) 








,, Mistura Alba 


I to S 


— 


100 


U Magnesii 








Carbonatis Pond., gr. 2-1/2 








MagnesiiSulphatis, gr. 15 








01. Menthpc- Pip., min. 1/32 








,, Morphine and Emetine 


I 


— 


50 


IJ; Morphinje 








Sulphatis, gr. 1/40 








Emetinae 








Hydrobromidi, gr. 1/80 








,, Morphine, Strychnine and 








Belladonna ... 


I as required 


25 


100 


B Morphinse 








Sulphatis, gr. 1/12 








Strychninse 








Sulphatis, gr. i/Oo 








K.\t. Belladonna;, ... gr. 1/20 








,, Morphine Sulphate, gr. 1/20 i to 4 or more 


50 


— 


gr. 1/8 


I to 4 


50 


— 


gr- 1/4 


I to 2 


50 


— 


,, Mucin Compound 


2 or more 


25 


100 


IJ Mucini, gr. 5 








.Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 5 








Na.sal {See ' Soloid ' Brand 








Products) 








,, Nitroglycerin {See Trinitrin) 








,, Nux Vomica Compound 


I to 3 


25 


100 


K Ext. Nucis Vomica, 








Aloini, 








Ferri .Sulphatis, 








Pulv. Myrrhs, 








Pulv. Saponis, ... aa gr. 1/2 








,, Nu.x Vomica Tincture B.P., 








min. I 


I frequently 


100 


— 


>, ,, >) )) min. 5 


I to 3 


4S 


IOC 



,, ,, ,, ,, mm. 10 I 

,, Ophthalmic Products {See 

page 126) 
,, Opium, gr. A ... ... ... i to 4 

,, ,, gr. I I to 2 

,, Opium Tincture B.P. (Lauda- 
num), min. 2 ... ... I or more 

,, Opium Tincture B.P. (Lauda- 
num), min. 5 ... ... I to 6 



36 



4S 
4S 



100 



100 
100 



100 
100 



158 



FORMULARY OF FINE PKODrCTS 



DOSE 



I to ^ 



I to 4 
I to 4 



I tu 4 
I to 3 



I to 



I to 



'Tabloid' Brand Products-coiii/fiueJ 

'TABLOID' BRAND— 

,, Opium Tincture B.P. (Lauda- 
num), min. lo 

,, Ovarian Substance (Sc'e 
' Varium ' ) 

,, Ox Bile, Purified, gr. 4 

,, Papain, gr. 2 ... 

,, Paregoric (Tinct. Camph. Co., 

P.B.), min. 2 i frequently 

,) ,, ,, ,, min. 5 I frequently 

,. ,, ,, ,, min. 15 I to 4 

,, Pelletierine Tannate, gr. 2 ... 

, , ' Pepana " ( Trade Mark) 

E Pepsini gr. i 

Pancreatini, ... gr. i 
Calcii 

Lactophosphatis, gr. i 

,, Pepsin and Strychnine 

5 Pepsini gr. 2 

Strjxhninae 

Sulphatis, gr. i/ioo 

,, Pepsin, Bismuth and Charcoal 

E Pepsini, gr. 2 

Bismuthi 

Carbonatis, gr. 2 

Carbonis Ligni, ... gr. 2 

,, Pepsin, Bismuth and Strych- 
nine ... ... ... ... I to 3 

E Pepsini, gr. 2 

Bismuthi 

Carbonatis, gr. 3 
Strychninae 

Sulphatis, gr. i/ioo 

,, Pepsin, Saccharated, gr. 5 ... i to 4 or more 

,, Phenacetin, gr. i ... ... i to4 or more 

gr- 5 I to 2 

,, Phenacetin and Quinine Com- 
pound ... ... ... I to 3 

E Phenacetini ... gr. 3 

Quininse 

Hydrobroniidi, gr. 1/2 

Caffeina; gr. 2/3 

Phenacetin Compound ... I to 3 

E Phenacetini ... gr. 4 
Caffeina; gr. i 

,, Phenazone {See Antipyrine) 

,, Phosphates Compound [^See 
Chemical Food) 



Issued ill 
ovals of bots. of 



36 



25 

100 
48 
36 

25 
25 



25 



25 

2.S 



100 



100 
100 



100 

i 100 



too 



100 



100 



100 



ICXD 
100 
ICO 

I 100 



100 



ISSUED BY B. \V. AND CO. 



159 



'Tabloid' Brand Products— c(}>Ui>i/i^a 


r 


Issu 


;d in 






ovals of 


bots. of 


'TABLOID' BRAND— 


DOSE 






,, Photographic (See pages 128- 








IjOy* 








,, Pig Bile, Purified, gr. 4 


I to 4 


— 


100 


,, Pilocarpine Nitrate, gr. i/io... 


I to 5 


25 


— 


gr. 1/4 ■■• 


I to 2 


25 


— 


,, Piperazine, gr. 5 


I to 2 


— 


25 


,, Piperazine, gr. 5, Effer- 








vescent, twhei oi 12... 


I to 2 






,, Pituitary Gland, gr. 2 


I to 3 


— 


100 


,, Plummer Pill {See Calomel). 








,, Podophyllin, gr. 1/4 


I to 4 


100 




,, Podophyllin and Euonymin ... 


I to 2 


— ■ 


100 


B Podophylli Resinae, gr. 1/4 








Ext. Euonymi Sice, gr. i 








,, Podophyllin Compound 


I to 3 


— 


100 


E Podophylli Resiiise, gr. 1/6 








Pil. Rhei Comp gr. 2-1/2 








Ext. Hjoscj'ami 








Viridis, gr. 1-1/4 








,, Potassium Bicarbonate, gr. 5 


I to 6 


40 


100 


,, Potassium Bromide, gr. 5 


I to 6 


— 


100 


., M ,, gr- 10 ... 


I to 3 


— 


100 


,, Potassium Chlorate, gr. 5 ... i 


as required 


40 


100 


,, Potassium Chlorate and Borax i 


as required 


40 


100 


,, Potassium Chlorate, Bora.v, and 








Cocaine Co. (See Voice) 








,, Potassium Citrate, gr. 15, 








Effervescent, tuljes of 25... 


I to 3 






,, Potassium Iodide, gr. i ... i 


frequently 


— 


100 


( expect ora7it) 






gr. 3 


I to 6 


— 


100 


gr. 5 


I to 4 


— 


100 


,, Potassium Nitrate (Sal Pru- 








nella), gr. 5 


I to 4 


— 


100 


,, Potassium Permanganate, gr. i 


I to 3 


— 


100 


.. >. ,, gr. 2 


I 


— 


100 


,, Prostate Gland, gr. 2i 


I to 2 





100 


,, Quinine, Ammoniated [See 








Ammoniated Quinine) 








,, Quinine and Camphor 


I to 5 


25 


100 


K QuiniriEe 








Bisulphatis, gr. i 








Camphorae, .. gr. 1/5 









160 



FORMULARY OF FINE PRODLXTS 



'Tabloid' Brand Products— a)«i'z««trf 

' TABLOID' BRAND— DOSE 

,, Quinine, Belladonna and Cam- 
phor ... ... ... ... I to 4 

B; Quininae Sulphatis, gr. 1/4 
E.xt. Belladonnse, gr. 1/8 
Camphorae, ... gr. 1/4 

,, Quinine Bihydrochloride, 

gr- 10 I 

,, Quinine Bisulphate, gr. i 



I or more 
I or more 
I to 5 
I to 3 
I to 2 
I to 2 
I 



I to 2, repeat- 
ed as neces- 
sary 



gr- 2 ... 

gr- 3 ••• 
gr. 4 ... 

„ ,, gr- 5 ••• 

gr. 10 ... 
Quinine Bisulphate and Potas- 
sium Citrate, Effervescent, 
tubes of 25 ... 

B Quininae 

Bisulphatis, gr. i 
Potassii Citratis, ... gr. 15 

Quinine, Camphor and Aconite i every hour 

B Quininae 

Bisulphatis, gr. 1/4 

Camphorae gr. 1/4 

Tinct. Aconiti ... min. i 

Quinine Hydrobromide, gr. 3 

gr- 5 
Quinine Hydrochloride, gr. i 

gr. 2 
M gr- 3 

,. .. gr- 4 

gr. 5 
Quinine Salicylate (physio- 
logically pure) ^x. I 

Quinine Salicylate ( physio- 
logically pun ) <gx. 3 

Quinine Sulphate, gr. i, gr. 2, 
gr. 3, gr. 4, and gr. 5 are 
supplied in packages of the 
same size as Quinine 
Bisulphate. 

Quinine Valerianate, gr. 2 ... i to 2 

Red Gvmi i occasionally 

Reduced Iron, gr. 2 ... ... 1 to 3 



I 


to 


3 


I 


to 


'y 


or more 


I 


to 


."5 


I 


to 


3 


I 


to 


2 


I 


to 


2 



I to 6 



I to 2 



Issued in 
ovals of] bots. of 



25 1 100 



24 
50 
36 
24 
24 
24 
24 
24 



25 



24 
24 
24 
24 

24 
24 
24 



too 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



100 



100 
100 
100 

ICO 

100 
100 
100 



24 100 
24 100 



100 
100 
100 



ISSUED BY B. W. AND CO. 



161 



'Tabloid' Brand Products— -canfi'mieJ 
•TABLOID' BRAND— 

,, Reduced Iron and Rhubarb 



DOSE 
I to 2 



I to 2 



I to 4 

I to 2 

to 4 or more 



I to 4 



Compound ... 

B Ferri Redacti, ... gr. 2 

Ext. Hyoscyami,... gr. i 

Ext. Nucis Vomicae, gr. 1/2 

Pil. Rhei Conip., ... gr. i 

Olei Carui, ... min. 1/4 

Reduced Iron Compound 

5: Ferri Redacti, ... gr. 2 

Ext. Hyoscyami,... gr. i 

Ext. Nucis Vomicae, gr. 1/2 

Olei Carui, ... min. 1/4 

Residuum Rubrum, gr. 5 
Resorcin, gr. 3 
Rhubarb, gr. 3 

Rhubarb and Gentian Com 
pound 

E Inf. Gentianae 

Comp.. 

Inf. Rhei 

Sodii Bicarbonatis, 
01. Mentha 

Piperitas, 

Rhubarb and Soda 

5 Puly. Rhei, 

Sodii Bicarbonatis, 
Pulv. Zingiberis, ... 

Rhubarb Compound Pill, B.P., 

gi- 4 

Each contains approximately : 
Rhubarb, gr. i ; Socotrine 
Aloes, gr. 3/4 ; Myrrh and 
Hard -Soap, of each, gr. 1/2 ; 
Oil of Peppermint, min. 1/16. 

Rhuliarli Compound Powder, 

g';5--. 

Each contains : Rhubarb, gr. 
1-1/9 ; Heav}- Magnesia, gr. 
3-1/3, and Ginger, gr. 5/9. 

Rhubarb Extract, gr. 2 

Rhubarb, Soda and Magnesia 

B Pulv, Rhei, ... gr. i 

Sodii Bicarbonatis, gr. 1-1/2 
Magnesii 

Carbonatis Pond., gr. 2 

Pulv. Zingiberis, ... gr. 1/2 

Saccharin, gr. i ... ... J 

Salicin, gr. 5 I to 4 

Salicylic Aciil ( physiologically 
pure), ^i. Tj ... ... ... I to 4 or more 



fl. dr. 2 
fl. dr. I 
gr. 5 

min. 1/6 



gr. 3 
gr. 1-1/2 
gr. 1/2 



I to 5 



I to 2 



I to 4 or more 



I to 4 

I to 5 



Issued 



ovals of 



25 



25 



24 



24 



24 



25 
25 



IOO& 

200 



bots. of 



100 



100 



TOO 
100 
100 

100 



100 



100 



100 



100 
100 



500 



25 [ too 



1 100 



162 



FORMULARY OF FINE PRODi:CTS 



' Tabloid ' Brand Products— 
'TABLOID' BRAND— 


conihiued 

DOSE 


Issued in 
ovals of bots. of 


,, Salicylic Acid {physiolci. 


'i rally 






pure), gr. 5 


I to 4 


— 


100 


„ Salol, gr. 5 


I to 3 


25 


100 


,, Santonin, gr. \ 


... I to 4 or more 


50 


— 


„ gr- 2 


I to 3 


50 


— 


„ „ gr- 3 


I to 2 


50 


— 


,, Santonin and Calomel 


I to 3 


25 


100 



as desired 
I to 4 or more 



K Santonini, gr. i 

Hydrargyri 

Subchloridi, ... gr. i 

' Saxin ', gr. \ (See page 131) 

Seltzer Salt, Effervescent, i or more, 

Artificial, tubes of 25 

Soda-Mint (Neutralizing) 

E JSodii Bicarbonatjs, gr. 4 

.\mmon. Bicarb., ... gr. 1,1: 
01. Menthse 

Piperitse, q.s. 

Sodimn Bicarbonate, gr. 5 

gr- 10 
Sodium Bromide, gr. 5 

gr- 10 
Sodium Citrate, gr. 2... 



Sodium Phosphate, Effer- 
vescent, B.P., gr. 60, tubes 

of 25 '' 

Each represents gr. 30 of Sodium 
Phosphate 

Sodium Salicylate (natural). 



., gr- 5 
Sodium Salicylate [physiologi- 
cally pure), gr. 3 ... 

Sodium Salicylate {physiologi- 
cally pure), ^\. ^ 

Sodium Salicylate (physio- 
logically pure), gr. 5, Effer- 
vescent, tubes of 25... 

■Sodium Salicylate and Potas- 
sium Bicarbonate, of each, 

gr- 5 



cfr. 3 I to 6 or more 
I to 6 

I to 6 or more 

I to 6 



25 

25 

25 



I or more 



I to 6 



100 



I to 6 


40 


100 


I to 3 


40 


100 


I to 6 


— 


100 


I to 3 


— 


ICO 


for milk 






modification 




100 


I or more 







100 



100 



-3 



:oo 



ISSUED BV 



W. AND CO. 



163 



'Tabroid' Brand Products— cv«//k«= 

'TABLOID' BRAND— 


DOSE 


Issue 
ovals of 


d in 
bots. of 


,, Sodium Sulphate Compound, 








Effervescent, tubes of 20 ... 


I to 2 






IJ Sodii Siilphatis 

E.xsiccati, gr. 30 
Potassii Tartratis 

Acidi, gr. 10 
Potassii Bicar- 

bonatis, gr. 2-1/2 
Ess. Zingiberis, ... q.s. 
Salis Effervescentis, q.s. 








,, Sodium Sulphate Effervescent, 








B. P. , gr. 60, tubes of 25 ... 


I or urore 






Each represents gr. 30 of Sodium 
Sulphate 








,, Sparteine Sulphate, gr. I 


I 


— 


25 


,, Spinal Cord Substance, gr. 2^ 


I or more 


— 


100 


,, Spleen Substance, gr. 5 


I or more 


— 


100 


,, Strontium Bromide, gr. 5 


I to 6 


— 


100 


,, Strophanthus Tincture, B. P., 








min. 5 


I to 3 


50 


100 


,, Strychnine Sulphate, gr. 1/60 


I to 4 


.SO 


— 


gr- 1/30 


I to 2 


50 


— 


gr. 1/20 


I 


50 


— 


gr. i/iS 


I 


50 


— 


,, Stypticine (Cotarnine Hydro- 




1 ■ ■/ 




chloride), gr. 3/4 


I repeated 




' 25 


,, Sugar of Milk, gr. 3 




— 


100 


,, Sulphonal, gr. 5 


I to 6 


25 


100 


,, Sulphur Compound ... 


I to 4 or more 


25 


100 


R Sulphuris 

Prsecipitati, gr. 5 
Potassii Tartratis 

Acidi, gr. i 








,, Supra-renal Gland, gr. 5 


I to 3 


— 


100 


,, Tannin, gr. 2^ 


I to 2 


— 


100 


,, Tar, gr. i 


I frequently 


50 


100 


,, Tar and Codeine 


I to 4 


25 


100 


IJ Picis Liquidai, ... gr. i 
Codeina;, gr. 1/8 








,, Tea ( See. page 166 J 








,, Test Products (See ' Soloid ' 








Brand Test Products, pages 








138-140) 








,, Tetranitrin [See Erythrol 








Tetranitratc) 









16-1 



FORMULARY OF FINE PRODUCTS 



Tabloid ' Brand Products— innti/iueif 


Issued in 






ovals of 


bots. of 


'TABLOID BRAND— 


DOSE 






,, Thirst Quencher 


I to 2 or 


25 


100 


Containing Tartaric Acid and 


more, as 






Sodium Bicarbonate, flavoured 


de.sired 






with Lemon and ' Saxin' 








,, Three Bromides Effervescent, 








tubes of 25 ... 


I to 2 






B Potassii Bromidi, 0-4 gm. [gr. 6] 








Sodii Bromidi, 0-4 gm. [gr. 6] 








Ammonii Bromidi, 02 gm. [gr. 3] 








.Salis 








Effervescentis, q.s. 








,, Three Syrups, dr. i ... 


I to 2 


25 


100 


B Syr. Ferri Phos- 








phatis cum 








Q u i n i n a , e t 








S t r y c h n i n .T 








(Easton), ... min. 15 








Syr. Hypophos- 








phitum Comp., min. 15 








Syr. Phosphatum 








Comp. (Parrish), min. 30 








Each contains 








Strychnine gr. 1/85 








,, Three Valerianates ... 


I 


— 


100 


IJ Quininae 








Valerianatis, gr. i 








Ferri Valerianatis, gr. i 








Zinci Valerianatis, gr. i 








,, Thymol, gr. i 


I to 2 


25 


— 


gr- 2 


I 


25 


— 


gr- 5 


Used in 
special cases 


— 


100 


,, Thymus Gland, gr. 5 ... 


I to 5 


■• — 


100 


,, Thyroid Colloid, gr. i 


I or more 


— 


IOC 


,, Thyroid Gland, gr. ^ 


I or more 


— 


IOC 


„ gr- I.T 


I or more 


— 


100 


„ gl-- 2i 


I or more 


— 


100 


gr- 5 


I 


— 


100 


, , Tinctures, ' Tabloid ' Brand 








fSt'f under the name of each 








tincture) 








,, Tonic Compound 


I to 3 


25 


300 


5 Ferri 








Pyrophosphatis, gr. 2 








Quininae 








Bisulphatis, gr. i 








Strychninse 








Sulphatis, gr. i/ioo 









ISSUED BY B. 



165 



' Tabloid ' Brand Products^coniirimJ 


Issued in 


'TABLOID' BRAND— 




ovals of bots. of 


,, Trinitrin (Nitroglycerin), 








gr. 1/200 


I or more 


25 


100 


X .. ,. gr. i/loo 


I to 2 


25 


100 


gr. 1/50 


I 


25 


100 


,, Trinitrin Compound ... 


I to 2 


25 


100 


JJ Trinitrini gr. i/ioo 

Capsicini, gr. 1/200 

Menthol gr. i/ioo 

„ Trional, gr. 5 


2 to 6 


25 


100 


,, Urotropine, gr. 3 


I to 5 


25 


' 100 


gi"- 5 

,, ' Varium ' (Trade Mark) 

( formerly known as V^'aXAoxA^ 
Ovarian Substance), gr. 5... 


I to 3 

I to 2 or more 


25 


100 

100 


,, Vegetable Laxative {See 
Laxative Vegetable) 








,, Veronal, gr. 5 


I to 3 


25 


— 


,, ,, 0-5 gramme 


I to 2 


— 


25 


I gramme 


I 


— 


25 


,, Viburnum Prunifolium Extract, 








gr. 2 


I to 5 


— 


100 


,, Vichy Salt, Effervescent, Arti- 
ficial, tubes of 25 


I or more, 

as desired 






,, Vichy Salt, Effervescent, Arti- 
ficial, and Lithium Citrate, 
tubes of 25 ... 

In addition to the essential con- 
stituents of Vichy Water, each 
contains Lithium Citrate, gr. i 


I or more, 
as desired 






,, \'inum Ipecacuanhae {See Ipe- 
cacuanha Wine) 








,, Voice (Potassium Chlorate, 
Borax and Cocaine Co.) ... 


I as required 


30 


80 


,, Warburg Tincture, min. 30 ... 


2 to 8 


— 


100 


,, Zinc Oxide, gr. 2 


I to 5 


— 


100 


,, Zinc Sulphate {See ' Soluid ' 
Brand Products) 








,, Zinc Valerianate, gr. 2 




— 


ICO 


,, Zinc Valerianate Compound ... 

B Zinci Vaierianatis, gr. i 
Pulv. Rhei, ... gr. i 
Ext. Belladonna:,... gr. 1/8 
Pulv. Zingiberis, ... gr. i 


I 




IOC 



166 



KORMl LAKY OF FINE PRODUCTS 



' Tabloid ' Brand Products— loniinncd 

'TABLOID ' BRAND— 


DCSE 


Issued in 
ovals of bots. oi' 


,, Zinc \'aleiianate and Asafetida 








Compound ... 


I 


— 


100 


IJ Zinci \'alerianatis, gr. i 

Asafetidse, gr. i 

Myrrhse, gr. 1/2 

,, Zinc Valerianate with Iron and 

Arsenic 


I 




100 


IJ Zinci Valerianatis, gr. 2 
Ferri Redacti, ... gr. i 
Acidi Arseniosi, ... gr. 1/60 
Ext. Gentianae, ... gr. i 








,, Zingib. {Set- Ginger). 









Also a wide range of other products issued under the ' Tabloid ' 

Brand 

' Tabloid ' Brand Tea provides the most convenient, 
portable and effective means of quickly preparing tea of 
uniform strength. It is the most suitable tea for travellers, 
sportsmen, cyclists, pleasure parties, etc. A tin of ' Tabloid ' 
Tea and a bottle of ' Saxin ' for sweetening the infusion, 
may be conveniently carried in the waistcoat pocket. 
In gold lacquered tins of 100 and 200 

' Tabioid ' Brand Tea, Special Blend , exceptional 

quality — 
In white enamelled tins of too and 200 

Terebene, Pure (B. W. & Co.)— dose 

I oz., 2 oz., 16 oz. liottles ... ... ... 5 to 15 min. 

Tinctures, Concentrated ' Wellcome ' Brand 

(See page 192) 

Tinctures, ' Tabloid ' Brand (See page 164) 

r;j.' 'VALOID' BRAND PRODUCTS 

The word ' Valoid ' is a brand which designates fine products issued 
by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should al-.vays be specified 
when ordering. 

'VALOID' BRAND— DOSE 

,, Aromatic Cascara Sagrada, 4 oz. bottles ... 10 to 60 min. 
,, Ergot, 4 oz. bottles ... ... ... ... 10 to 30 min. 

The strength of each ' Valoid ' preparation is indicated on the 
label. 

Various other products are also issued under this brand 



ICSI'ED BY B. \V. AND CO. 167 



^.\7 'VALULE' BRAND PRODUCTS 

The word ' Valule ' is a brand which designates fine products issued 
by Burroughs Wellcome & Co. This brand should always be specified 
when ordering. 

'VALULE' BRAND — DOSE 

„ Bone Medulla, gr. 5, bottles of 100 ... i or more 

(See also ' Tabloid ' Bone Medulla) 

Various other products are also issued under this brand 
1:1^ 'VAPOROLE BRAND PRODUCTS 

The word ' Vaporole ' is a brand which designates fine products 
issued by Burroughs Wellco.Tie & Co. This brand should always be 
specified when ordering. 

'VAPOROLE' KRAND— DOSE 

„ Amyl Nitrite, min. 3 ormin. 5, boxesof 12, i (b}' inhal- 
ation) 
,, Iron and Arsenic Solution, Sterilised, for 

hypodermic injection, boxes of 12 phials . i to 3 

R Ferri Citratis Viridis ... 005 gm. 
.Sodii .\rsenatis ... ... 0-002 gm. 

Aquam ad 10 c.c. 

Various other products are also issued under this brand 

' Vereker ' Ammonium Chloride Inhaler. Delivers 

neutral fumes of ammonium chloride. 

Water Analysis Case {See page 11 1) 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products [See page 169) 



Verbal instructions are not safe. To 
prevent fraud, it is best to write 
prescriptions for original bottles 






z 
< 

c 
w 



o 

o 
z 

o 

< 

z 

d 

a: 
o 



< 

Q 



o 
l- 
< 



o 



o 



t- 



'wellcojie' brand products 169 



'WELLCOME' BRAND PRODUCTS 

The purity and reliability of drugs are matters of the utmost 
importance to prescriber, dispenser, and patient p •. 
alike, and every opportunity should therefore be 'i^b^rt" 

taken to ensure the supply of those chemicals and '^^ '^ '"' ^ 
galenicals which are known to be genuine and trustworthy. 

In order that goods answering this description in the highest 
sense may be at the disposal of the profession, Burroughs 
Wellcome & Co. manufacture and issue a series of fine chemicals, 
alkaloids, etc., to which they have recently added a series of 
standardised liquid and granular extracts and concentrated 
tinctures, under the distinctive title of the ' Wellcome ' Brand. 

The advantages of galenicals containing a definite proportion 
of active principle over those that vary in strength with every 
sample of drug employed are now fully recognized, and several 
such have been admitted into the Pharmacopceia. As the result 
of much research, Burroughs Wellcome & Co. are 
able to offer many other standardised preparations Standardised 
in addition to the official ones. The standards galenicals 
adopted have been chosen after the examination 
of very many different samples of drug, and represent the 
average of the amounts of active principle found in preparations 
made from good specimens. Thus the dose remains the same as 
that of the older preparation, but the prescriber is certain of 
always obtaining the proper effect instead of one varying from 
time to time with the particular batch of extract or tincture used, 
and the advantage of this certainty, Ixith to the reputation of 
the prescriber and the health of the patient, can hardly be 
over-estimated. 

The recognized doses of ' Wellcome ' Brand Chemicals and 
Galenicals are indicated on the labels, and in the 
body of this booklet in terms of both the Imperial Doses in 
and Metric systems. The limits of dosage given J^^ " 
are approximately the same in each system, but . , ^ 

exact equivalence has not been attempted, since no 
useful object is served and awkward and confusing figures result. 

•WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, Aconite, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page 192) 

,, Aconite, Liquid Extract of (Standardised) (See page 187^ 

,, Aconitine, B.P. 

The pure crystallised alkaloid from Aconituin Napelhis, 
free from pseudaconitine and japaconitine, and from the 

For prices, see separate list 



170 ' WELLCOME' BRAND PRODICTS 

'Wellcome' Brand Products— 6v«i'/««^(;' 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 

non-toxic aconine and benzaconine. As aconitine is such 
a powerful poison, it should be prescribed and dispensed 
with the utmost caution. 

Dose — gr. 1/640 to gr. 1/400 (o-oooi gm. to 0-00015 gm.) 

Issued in tubes of gr. 5 (0-3 ^w.) 

,, Aconitine Hydrobromide 

The most suitable salt of aconitine for therapeutic 
use, being readily soluble in water, perfectly stable, and 
of uniform composition. The remarks as to purity and 
dosage of the alkaloiil apply to this salt also. 
Dose — gr. 1/640 to gr. 1/400 (o'oooi gm. to 0-00015 gm.) 
Issued in tubes of gr. 5 (0-3 gm.) 

„ Aloin, B.P. 

This is barbaloin, and is free from resin. It is lighter 
in colour and affords a clearer solution than the usual 
commercial article. 

Dose — gr. 1/2 to gr. 2 (0-03 gm. to 0-13 gm.) 

Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ^/«.) and oz. 4 (113 gin.) 

,, Aloin, Crystal 

This is barbaloin in well defined crystals, and is free 
from resin. 

Dose — gr. 1/2 to gr. 2 (0-03 gm. to 0-13 gm.) 
Issued hi bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) and oz. 4(113 gin.) 

,, Arnica, Concentrated Tincture of (See /age igzj 

,, Atropine, B.P. 

The pure crystallised alkaloid, free from hyoscyamine 
and hyoscine. 

Dose — gr. 1/200 to gr. 1/100(0-0003 gm. to 0-0006 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of gr. 60 (3-9 gn/.), oz. 14 {"J gm.), 
and oz. I (28-3 gm.) 

,, Atropine Sulphate, B.P. 

Prepared from pure Atropine. 
Dose — gr. 1/200 to gr. i/ioo (0-0003 gm. to 00006 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of gr. 60 (3-9 ^w.), «':. 14 [7 g>'i-) 
and oz. I (28-3^/;/.) 

For prices see separate list 



' WELLCOME ' BRAND PKODL CTS 171 

' Welicome ' Brand Products— (,('«i'/«Ki?iz' 

•WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Belladonna (Green), Standardised Granular Extract of 
( See page 191 j 

,, Belladonna, B.P., Liquid Extract of (Standardised) ( Ses 
page 187; 

,, Benzoin, Concentrated Compound Tincture of (See 
page ig2j 

,, Berberine Sulphate 

The salt of an alkaloid obtained from Hydrastis 
canadensis. 

Dose— gr. 2 to gr. 5 (0-13 gm. to 030 gm.) 
Issued in bjttles of oz. i (28-3 gin.) 

,, Bismuth Carbonate, B.P. 

Dose — gr. 5 to gr. 20 (03 gm. to 1-3 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 8 (227 g>n.) and oz. 16 
(454 ^^/«.) 

,, Bismuth Salicylate ( physiologically pure ) 

This preparation contains the proper proportion of 
bismuth combined with pure salicylic acid, and is 
uniform in composition. 

Dose— gr. 5 to gr. 20 (0-3 gm. to 1-3 gm.) 
Issued ill bottles of oz. I (28-3 gm.) and oz. 4(113 gm.) 

,, Bismuth Subgallate 

This is in a state of very fine powder, which is particu- 
larly important when required for local application. 
Do.se— gr. 10 to gr. 20 (0-65 gm. to 1-3 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ^^'w.) and oz. 4 {\\i gm.) 

,, Bismuth Subnitrate, B.P. 

Dose — gr. 5 to gr. 20 (0-3 gni. to 1-3 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 8 (227 gm.) and oz. 16 (454,^//;.) 

,, Caffeine Citrate, B.P. 

Dose — gr. 2 to gr. 10 (0-13 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.), oz. 4 (113 gm.) 
and oz. 8 [22"] gm.) 

For prices, see separate list 



172 ' WELLCOME* BRAND riiODUCTS 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products— co>i ii/aia^ 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Calabar Bean, Liquid Extract of (Standardised) (See 

,, Calcium Glycerophosphate 

Dose — gr. 2 to gr. 5 (0-13 gm. to o-3ogm.) 

Issued in bottles of oz. i {z'i-igm.) and oz. 4(113 g>ii.) 

,, Calcium Hypophosphite, E.P 

Special attention is invited to this salt and to its 
property of dissolving readily in water to form a perfectly 
clear solution. It conforms strictly in all respects to the 
B.P. requirements. 

Dose — gr. 3 to gr. 10 (0-20 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 tpn.), oz. d, (113 g)>i.) 
and oz. 8 (227 gm.) 

Calomel [See Mercury Subchloride) 
Calumba, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page ig2j 
Camphor, Concentrated Compound Tincture oifSee/agc ig^J 
Cannabis Indica, Concentrated Tincture of (See /age 193 J 
Cantharides, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page 193^ 
Capsicum, Concentrated Tincture of (Seepage 193^ 
Cascara Sagrada, B.P., Liquid E.\tract of ( See page 187^ 
Cascarilla, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page I93_j 
Catechu, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page 194J 
Chiretta, Concentrated Tincture of (See page 194 j 
Chloroform 

Prepared specially for anesthesia and conforming to the 

requirements of the British Pharmacopceia. Supplied in 

amber-coloured stoppered bottles. 

Dose — min. i to min. 5 (gtt. i to gtt. 5) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 2 (S7 g'>i-), 1/4 ib. (ii3^^w.), 

1/2 Jb. (22"! gin.) and i ib. (454,^'-;//.) 

Chrysarobin, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of oz. I (28-3 gni.) and oz. j\ (i I'^gin.) 
For prices, see separate list 



"WELLCOME BKAND PRODUCTS 173 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products— conirKued 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, Cimicifuga, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page 194^ 

,, Cinchona, B.P., Liquid Extract of (Standardised) 

( See page 188^ 

,, Cinchona, Concentrated Compound Tincture of 

(See page 194^ 
,, Cinchona (Miscible), Liquid Extract of (Standardised) 

(See page 188^ 
,, Cinnamon, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page ig^J 
,, Coca, B.P., Liquid Extract of (Standardised) (Seepage 1S8J 
,, Coca (Miscible), Liquid Extract of (Standardised) 

(Seepage i8S) 
,, Cocaine (Fitre Alkaloid), B.P. 

Issued in bottles of oz. i/S [ZSgni.) and oz. \j2{l\g}n.) 

,, Cocaine Hydrochloride, B.P. 

Dose— gr. 1/5 to gr. 1/2 (0-013 gm to 0-03 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 1/8 (3-5 g:n.), oz. 1/2 (14 gm.) 
and oz. I [z8--^ g!u.) 

,, Cochineal, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page \()\) 

,, Codeine, B.P. 

Dqse— gr. 1/4 to gr. i (0-015 gm. to 0-13 gni.) 
Issued in bottles of gr. 60 (3-9, ^w.), oz. 1/2 (14 g>n.) 
and oz. i (28-3 gin.) 

,, Codeine Phosphate, B.P. 

Dose— gr. 1/4 to gr. 2 (0-015 gm. to 0-13 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of gr. 60 (3-9 gm.), oz. 1/2 (14 gtn.) 
arid oz. 1 (28-3 _^w.) 

,, Colchicum Seeds, Concentrated Tincture of (See page 195^ 

,, Colchicum Seeds, Liquid Extract of (Standardised) (Sec 
page 188 ; 

,, Concentrated Tinctures ( See pa_oes igz to igS ) 

,, Coniuia, Concentrated Tincture of (Seepage 195 j 

For prices, see separate list 



174 ' WELLCOME' BRAND PRODUCTS 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products— co/i^ifi net/ 

•WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Ciibebs, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page 195^ 

,, Emetine (Pure Alkaloid ) 

This is the essential alkaloid of ipecacuanha, and not 
the mixture of alkaloids formerly known as Emetine. 

Dose — As an expectorant, gr. 1/200 to gr. 1/50 (0-0003 g™- to 0-0013 gii-) 
Dose — As an emetic, gr. 1/6 to gr. 1/3 (001 gm. to 002 gm.) 

Issued in tubes of gr. 15 (l gin.) and bottles of 

gr. 60 (3-9 g>n.) 

,, Emetine Hydrobromide 

This is the most suitable salt of emetine for therapeutic use. 

Dose — As an e.xpectorant, gr. 1/200 to gr. 1/50 (0-0003 gi"- to 0-0013 S^-) 
Dose — As an emetic, gr. 1/6 to gr. 1/3 (o-oi gm. to 0-02 gm.) 

Issued in tubes of gr. 15 (i g>n.) and bottles of 

gr. 60 (3-9,(,w.) 

,, Ergot, B.P., Liquid E.xtract of ( See page iSq^ 

,, Ergot, Granular E.xtract of ( See page 191^ 

,, Ergotin (Ext. Ergotte P.B.) 

( Phvsiologieally Standardised, Wellcome Physiological 
Research laboratories. ) 

This is made from specially selected Spanish ergot, 
carefully hand-picked and freed from all foreign matter. 
It has a pure characteristic odour, and is free from the 
objectionable properties sometimes imparted to this extract 
liy the use of exces-sive heat. 

Dose— gr. 2 to gr. 8 (0-13 gm. to 0-5 gm.) 

Issued in pots of oz. i (28- 3, ;■■///.) 

,, Eserine Salts {See Physostigmine) 

,, Euonymin (Ext. Euonymi vSiccum, P.B.) 

Prepared from the true drug, Euonyinus ntropurpureus, 
carefully picked over by hand before extraction. 
Dose — gr. i to gr. 2 (0-06 gm. to 0-13 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.), oz. 4 (113 gm.), 
and oz. 8 (227 ^'"w.) 

,, Extracts, Granular (Standardised) ( See page 191 j 
,, Extracts, Liquid (Standardised) ( See pages 187 to 190^ 
For prices, see separate list 



' WELLCOME' BRAND PRODUCTS 175 

'Wellcome' Brand Products^coKiuna-d 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Gelseiuine Hydrochloride (Gelsemininuin Hydrochloricum 
Cryst. Ger.) 
A salt of the crystallizable alkaloid of Gelsemitim 
nitidum. 

Dose — gr. 1/120 to gr. 1/30 (0-0005 afi- to 0-002 gm.) 
Issued in tidies of gr. 5 {0-3 gni.) and gr. 15 (i gni.) 

,, Gelsemium, Concentrated Tincture of ( Sre page igt, ) 

,, Gelsemium, Liquid Extract of (Standardised-) ( See page i^q ) 

„ Gentian, Concentrated Compound Tincture of (See page 195 j 

,, Ginger, Concentrated Tincture of (See page \^6) 

,, Guaiacol Camphorate 

Dose — gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 1/2 (14 o-/;/.) 

,, Guaiacum, Concentrated Ammoniated Tincture of 

( See page 196^ 

,, HEemoglobin 

This is in the form of .scales which are readily soluble 
in water. It is prepared under the most careful conditions 
from fresh blood, and is free from fibrin, serum, fat and 
other undesirable constituents. 

Dose — gr. s to gr. 20 (0-3 gm. to 1-3 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. I (28-3 gin.) and oz. 4 (113^^///.) 

,, Hamamelis, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page 196 j 

,, Homatropine Hydrobromide, B.P. 

Dose— gr. 1/80 to gr. 1/20 (o-oooS gm. to 0-003 gm.) 
Issued in tubes of gr. 5 {q-t, gm.) 

,, Homatropine, Pure 

Tubes of gr. 5 (0-3 ^--w.) 

,, Hydrastine [PHre Alkaloid) 

The crystallised white alkaloid from Hydrastis 
canadensis. 

DosR— gr. 1/4 to gr. i (0-015 gm. to 0-06 gm. 
Issued in tubes of gr. 15 {lg"i.) and bottles of oz. I 
(28-3 ^w.) 

For prices, see separate list 



176 ' WELLCOME' BRAND PRODUCTS 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products— co/tiin/eec/ 

♦WELLCOME' HKAND— 
,, Hydrastine Hydrochloride 

This salt of the pure white alkaloid is readily soluble in 
water. 

Dose -gr. 1/4 to gr. i (0015 gm. to o-o6 gm.) 

Issued ill tithes of gr. 15 ( I gm.) ami bottles of oz. \ 
(28-3 iW.) 

,, Hydrastis, Concentrated Tincture of ( See f age 196 j 

,, Hydrastis, B.P., Liquid Extract of (Standardised) (See 
page 189; 

,, Hyoscine Hydrobromide, B.P. 

The alkaloid hyoscine has also been designated as 
scopolamine, with reference to its source. The name 
recognized by the British Pharmacopoeia is here adopted. 
Dose — gr. 1/200 to gr. i/ioo (0-0003 gm- to o-ooo6 gm.) 

Issued in tubes of gr. 15 (i gm.) and bottles of gr. 60 
{y9S>"-) 
,, Hyoscyamine 

This alkaloid is free from atropine and hyoscine. 
Dose — gr. 1/200 to gr. i/ioo (0-0003 g"^- to 0-0006 grn.) 
Issued in tubes of gr. 5 (0-3 gm.) and gr. 15 [i gm.) 

,, Hyoscyamine Sulphate, B.P. 

Dose — gr. 1/200 to gr. i/ioo (0-0003 gm. too-ooo6gm.) 
Issued in tubes of gr. 5 (0-3 ^v«.) and gr. \^(igin.) 

,, Hyoscyamus, Concentrated Tincture of (Seepage ig6J 

,, Hyoscyamus, Standardised Granular E.xtract of (See 
page igij 

,, Hyoscyamus, Liquid Extract of (Standardised) (See 
page 189^ 

,, Hyoscyamus (Miscible), Liquid Extract of (.Standardised 
(Seepage iSgJ 

,, Iodine, Concentrated Tincture of (Seepage ig6J 

,, Ipecacuanha sine Emetina 

This is ipecacuanha from which the emetic principles 
have been extracted. It is practically free from alkaloid. 
Dose— gr. 10 to gr. 30 (0-65 gm. to 2 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 1 {2S-2gm.) and oz. 4 (ii3^'7//.) 

For prices, see separate list 



WELLCOME DKAND PRODUCTS 177 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products -couiiu/ied 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, Ipecacuanha, B.P., Liquid Extract of (Standardised) 

(See page 190J 
,, Iridin (Ext. Iridis Siccum) 

Prepared from the carefully selected genuine drug Iris 
versicolor. 

Dose — gr. i to gr. 5 (o-o6 gm. to 0-30 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 g>n.), oz. 4 (113 gfit.) 
and oz. 8 [22^ gm.) 

,, Iron and Ammonium Citrate, B.P. 

Dose — gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 0-65 gin.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 4(113 gm.), oz. S (22"] gut.) and 
oz. 16 (454 ^w.) 

,, Iron and Ammonium Citrate (Green) 

This preparation differs slightly in composition from 
the ofiicial citrate ; it contains about 15 per cent, of ir(jn. 
It is readily soluble in water, affording a bright green 
solution. 

Dose — gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issiced in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gin.), oz. 4 (113 gm.) 
and oz. 8 (227 gni.) 

,, Iron and Quinine Citrate, B.P. 

Dose — gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (2?>-2, gm.), oz. 4 {iiT, gm.), 
oz. 8 (22'J gm.) and oz. 16 (^^^gm.) 

,, Iron Glycerophosphate 

This is a pure salt in handsome .scales, readily solulile 
in warm water. 

Dose — gr. 3 to gr. 6 (0-2 gm. to 04 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) and oz. 4 (113 gm.) 

,, Iron Hypopho-sphite (.Soluble) 

This preparation is in handsome greenish scales, and is 
distinguished from the ordinary iron hypophosphite by its 
ready solubility in water. It contains about 12 percent, 
of iron. 

Dose — gr. 1 to gr. 5 (o-o6 gm. to 0-30 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.), oz. 4 [iii,gm.) 
and oz. 8 (227 gm.) 

For prices, see separate list 



178 'wELLCOMk' bKAND PRODUCTS 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products- con^innfc/ 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, Iron Phosphate (Soluble) 

This is a soluble ferric phosphate, in the form of bright 
green scales, and corresponds to the preparation 
recognized by the United States Pharmacopoeia. 
Dose — gr. 5 to j;r. 10 (0-30 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued inbottlt's of oz. i (28-3 gin.), oz. 4 (113,^///.) 
ami oz. 8 (227 gin.) 

,, Iron Phosphate with Arsenic (Soluble) 

This preparation contains 0-5 per cent, of arsenious 
anhydride, B.P., but is otherwise identical with Iron 
Phosphate (Soluble). 

Dose— gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 

Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gin.) and ti;. 4 (i 13 gm.) 

Iron Pyrophosphate (Soluble) 

This is a .soluble ferric pyrophosphate, in the form of 
green scales, and corresponds to the preparation recognized 
by the United States Pharmacopoeia. 

Dose— gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 065 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ^■•w.), oz. 4 (113,^-w.) and 
oz. 8 (227 gin.) 
„ Jaborandi (Mi-scible), Liquid E.xtract of (Standardised) 

( See page 190^ 
,, Jaborandi, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page igy) 
,, Krameria, Concentrated Tincture of (See page 197^ 
,, Lavender, Concentrated Compound Tincture of (See 
page 198; 

,, Leptandrin 

The true resinous principle of Veronica {Leptandra) 
virginica, as distinguished from much of the leptandrin 
of commerce, which is merely an extract. 

Dose— gr. 1/4 to gr. 2 (0015 gm. to 0-13 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.), (;c. 4 (113 gm.) 
and oz. 8 {2.2"] gm.) 

,, Lithium Benzoate 

Dose— gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. too65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. I (28-3 ^w.) and oz. 4 (113,^-///.) 

For prices, see separate list 



' WELLCOME' BRAND PRODUCTS 179 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products— con ii'/uci/ 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Lithium Citrate, B.P. 

Dose— gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of'i 'oz. (28-3 gm.), ^ oz. (113^'-;//.), 
oz. 8 (22"] gm.) and oz. 16 (454.^///.) 

,, Lithium Formate 

Dose— gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of I oz. (28-3 ^;«.) 

,, Lithium Salicylate [physiologically pw'e) 

Dose — gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of i oz. (28-3 gm), oz. 4 [w^gjn.), 
and oz. 8 [22^ gm.) 

,, Magnesium Glycerophosphate 

A white amorphous powder, freely soluble in water, 
stable in the air. 

Dose — gr. 3 to gr. 10 (0-20 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of I oz. (28-3 gm.) and 4 oz. (iii,gin.) 

,, Manganese and Iron Citrate (.Soluble) 

This is a scale salt, readily soluble in water. It contains 
about 7 per cent, of manganese and 14 per cent, of iron 
in organic combination. 

Dose— gr. 3 to gr. 10 (0-20 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles 0/ oz. i (28-3 .^--w.), oz. 4(113;,'/;/.),' 
oz. 8 {22'] gin.) and oz. 16 (454 .;■/;/.) 

, Manganese and Iron Citrate with Arsenic (Soluble) 

This preparation contains 0*5 per cent, of ar.senious 
anhydride, B.P., but is otherwise identical with Manganese 
and Iron Citrate {Soluble). 

Dose— gr. 3 to gr. 10 (020 gm. to 065 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ^^■■w.) and oz. 4 (113 gm.) 

,, Manganese and Iron Citrate with Quinine (.Soluble) 

This preparation contains 15 per cent, of quinine, but 
is otherwise identical with Manganese and Iron Citrate 
(Soluble). 

DosE--gr. 3 to gr. 10 (020 gm. to 065 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (2%-t, gm.) and oz. 4 (113 -/;/.) 

For prices, see separate list 



180 'WELLCOME BUAND PRODUCTS 



' Wellcome ' Brand ProAacts^coniinuid 
'WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, Mans^anese and Iron Citrate with Strychnine (Sohdilc) 

This preparation contains i per cent, of strychnine, but 
is otherwise identical with Manganese and Iron Citrate 
{Soluble). 

Dose — gr. i to gr. 3 (o-o6 gm. to 020 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) and oz. 4 {\\},i;iii.) 

,, Manganese and Iron Phosphate (Soluble) 

This scale salt dissolves readily in warm water. It 
contains about 7 per cent, of manganese and 14 per cent, 
of iron. 

Dose — gr. 3 to gr. 10 (0-20 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.), oz. 4 (113 ^w.), 
oz. 8 [2,2"] gill.), and OZ. 16 (454 gin.) 

,, Manganese Citrate (Soluble) 

This preparation is in the form of hand.some, nearly 
colourless scales, which are readily soluble in water. It 
contains about 12 per cent, of manganese in organic 
combination. 

Dose— gr. 3 to gr. 10 (020 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 1 [2^-t, gin.) and oz. 4 [llT, gm.) 

,, Manganese Peroxide (Pure) 

In distinction from the crude mineral usually found in 
commerce, this preparation possesses a high degree of 
purity, and is specially adapted for medicinal use. It 
contains approximately 85 per cent, of manganese 1 
peroxide, MnO,,. 

Dose— gr. 2 to gr. 10 (0-13 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.), and oz. 4(113 gm.) 

,, Mercuric Potassium Iodide (Soluble) 

Dose — gr. 1/12 to gr. 1/3 (0-005 gm. to 0-02 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ,fw.), and oz. 4 (113 <w.) 

,, Mercury Iodide, Red, B.P. (Mercuric Iodide) 

Dose- gr. 1/32 to gr. 1/16 (0002 gm. to 0004 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.), oz. 4 (113 gm.), 
oz. 8 (22"] gm.) and oz. 16 (453 gm.) 

For prices, see separate list 



'wELLCOMK' brand PRODtrCTR 181 

'Wellcome' Brand Products— cr^ftiifunti 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Mercury Iodide, Yellow (Pure Mercurous Iodide) 

A true mercurous iodide of definite and constant 
composition. Contains no free mercury. 

Dose — gr. i/8 to gr. i (o-ooS gm. to o-o6 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 .i;m.) 

,, Mercury Oleate 

This preparation contains an amount of mercury 
equivalent to 20 per cent, of mercuric oxide. 

Issued in pots of oz. i (28-3 s;m.), oz. 4 (113 i^m.) 
and oz. 8 (227, ^;«.) 

,, Mercury Oxide, Yellow, B.P. 

This is in very fine powder and is specially suitable 
for eye and other ointments where extreme smoothness is 
required. 

Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gin.), and fc. 4 (113 -/«.) 

,, Mercury .Subchloride, B.P. (Calomel) 

This drug is of uniform physical character, being 
prepared by sublimation. It is free from mercuric 
chloride and other contaminations, and therefore possesses 
the desired uniformity of action. 

Dose— gr. \ to gr. 5 (003 gm. to 0-3 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 4 (113 gm.), oz. 8 (227 gin.), and 
^"- 16 (454 ,<w.) 

, .Morphine .\cetate, B.P. 

Dose— gr. 1/8 to gr. 1/2 (0008 gm. to 0-03 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 1/8 (3-5 gm.), oz. i [z^-igm.) 
and oz. 4 (113 gm.) 

, Morphine Hydrochloride 

This .salt is presented in a more compact form of 
crystals than that u.sually .supjilied, although identical in 
composition with the official salt. It is believed that its 
diminished Inilk will render it more convenient for storage 
and dispensing. 

DosF.— gr. 1/8 to gr. 1/2 (0008 gm. to 0-03 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 1/8 {y^ gm.), oz. i (28-3 ^w.), 
oz. 4 (ii3,:^w.), and oz. 8 {22-] gm.) 

For prices, sse separate list 



182 'WELLCOME' BRAND PRODCCTS 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products— co>i/i>ti/ed 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Murphine Sulphate 

The same remarks apply to this salt of morphine as to 
the hydrochloride. 

Dose — gr. i/8 to gr. 1/2 (o-oo8 gm. to 0-03 gm.) 
issued ill bottles of oz. 1/8 (3-5 .-rw.), oz. i (28-3 ^w.), 
oz. 4(113 g»i-), ami oz. 8 (227 gm.) 

„ Morphine Tartrate 

This salt conforms strictly to the requirements of the 
British Pharmacopceia. 

Dose — gr. 1/8 to gr. 1/2 (o'Oo8 gm. to 0-03 gm.) 
Issued ill bottles of oz. i (28-3 gin.) and oz.^ (113 gm.) 

,, Nux Vomica, Standardised Granular E.xtract of (See 
page 191) 

,, Nux Vomica, B.P., Liquid Extract of (Standardised) (See 
page 190) 

„ Opium, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page 197^ 

,, Opium, Standardised Granular Extract of ( See page 191 j 

,, Opium, B.P., Liquid Extract of (Standardised) (See 
page 190; 

,, Opium (Miscible), Liquid Extract of (Standardised) (See 
page 190; 

,, Pelletierine Tannate 

An amorphous product. Prepared from the total 
alkaloids of pomegranate bark. 

Dose— gr. 2 to gr. 8 (0-13 gm. to 0-50 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of gr. 60 {y^i gm.) 

,, Physostigmine Hydrobromide (Eserine Hydrobromide) 
Dose— gr. 1/60 to gr. 1/20 (o-ooi gm. to 0-003 gm.) 
Issued ill tubes of gr. 5 (0-3 gin.) and gr. 15(1 gm.) 

,, Physostigmine Salicylate (E.serine Salicylate) 

Dose— gr. 1/60 to gr. 1/20 (o-ooi gm. to 0-003 gm.) 
Issued in tubes of gr. 5 (0-3 gm.) and gr. 15(1 gm.) 
For prices, see separate list 



'wfxlcomk' brand PRODI'CTS 183 

'Wellcome' Brand Products — contimied 

•WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, Physostiginine Sulphate, B.P. (Eserine Sulphate) 

Dose — gr. 1/60 to gr. 1/20 (0001 gm. to 0003 gm.) 
Issued in tubes of gr. 2 (0-13 gfii.) and gr. 5 (0-3^;;/.) 

,, Pilocarpine Hydrochloride 

The ' Wellcome ' Brand salts of pilocarpine are free 
from the less active isopilocarpine and the inactive 
pilocarpidine. Their purity is guaranteed by their 
respective melting points, which are indicated on each 
package. 

Dose — gr. 1/20 to gr. 1/2 (0-003 gm. to 0-03 gm.) 
Issued in tubes of gr. 15 (i gni.) and in bottles of 
gr. 60 (3-9, ^""w.), oz. 1/2 {\\gm.) andoz. i (28-3 f^w.) 

,, Pilocarpine Nitrate, B.P. 

This salt of pilocarpine is stable, and is the one best 
adapted for general use. 

Dose— gr. 1/20 to gr. 1/2 (0003 gm. to 0-03 gm.) 

Issued in tubes of gr. 15 (i gm.) and in bottles of 
gr. 60 [Z-fjgin.], oz. 1/2 [li^gin.) and oz. i (28-3^^///.) 

,, Piperine 

The pure, crystallised alkaloid of black pepper. 

Dose— gr. i to gr. 5 (o-o6 gm. to 0-30 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 1 (28-3 gin.) 

,, Poduphyllin (Podophylli Resina, P.B.) 

Prepared strictly in accordance with the official method, 
from a carefully-selected drug. 

Dose — gr. 1/4 to gr. i (0-015 gm- t''> "'"(J gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.), oz. 4 (113 gm.) 
and oz. 8 {22^ gm.) 

,, Potassium Glycerophosphate 

A syrupy liquid containing 75 per cent, of potassium 
glycerophosphate. 

Dose— gr. 2 to gr. 5 (0-13 gm. to 0-30 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) and oz. 4 (113 gm.) 

For prices, see separate list 



184 'VVELLCOMF, ' BRANn PRODIXTS 

'Wellcome' Brand Products— (-f«//«7^^(/ 

♦WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, (luinine Bihydrochloride (Acid Quinine Hydrochloride, B.P.) 
Dose — gr. i to gr. lo (o-o6 gm. to 0-65 gin.) 
Issued hi bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) 

,, Quinine Bisulphate 

This salt, being readily soluble in water (i in 10), is more 
convenient for many purposes than the insoluble official 
sulphate. 

Dose — gr. i to gr. 10 (o-o6 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) and oz. 4 (113 gm.) 

,, Quinine Ilyilrobromide 

DosE--gr. I to gr. 10 (o-o6 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.') and oz. 4 (113 gm.) 

,, Quinine Hydrochloride, B.P. 

Dose — gr. i to gr. 10 (o'o6 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) and oz. i\ (i 13 gm.) 

,, Quinine Hypophosphite 

Dose — gr. i to gr. 3 (o-o6 gm. to 0-20 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ^•■w.) 

,, Quinine Phosphate 

Dose — gr. i to gr. 10 (o'o6 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ;'-w.) 

,, Quinine Quinate 

Dose — gr. i to gr. 10 (o-o5 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of OZ. i (2 8-3, ;>•///.) 
,, Quinine Salicylate 

Prepared from physiologically pure salicylic acid. 

Dose — gr. 2 to gr. 6 (0-13 gm. to 0-4 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 .!,v;/.) and oz. 4 (113 gm.) 

,, Quinine Sulphate 

This salt is presented in a more compact form of crystals 
than that usually supplied, although identical in compo- 
sition with the official salt. It is believed that its 
diminished bulk will render it more convenient for 
storage and dispensing. 

When ordering Quinine Sulphate, please indicate 
whether " compact " or " large flake" is required. 
Dose — gr. i to gr. 10 (o-o6 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 

Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) and i?3. 4 (i 13 g'n .), 
also in tins of oz. 25 (708 o-w.) and oz. 100 (2,835 S'"-) 

For prices, see separate list 



WELLCOME* BRAND PRODUCTS 185 



'Wellcome' Brand Products^co/i h'/iued 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Quinine Sulphate {Large Flake) 

This is the official salt in the usual bulky fcirm of light 
feathery crystals. We recommend in preference the 
compact crystals, which occupy one-third the space, as 
being more portable and convenient. 

When ordering Quinine Sulphate, please indicate 
whether "compact" or " large flake " is required. 
Dose — gr. i to gr. lo (o-o6 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 1/4 (7 gni.), oz. 1/2 (14 gm.) 
and oz. I (28-3^;;/.) andin tins of oz. 4 (113 ;7«.), also in 
tins ofoz. 25 (708 ^w.) and oz. 100(2,835 gm.) 

,, Rhubarb, Concentrated Compound Tincture of (Sec 
page 198; 

,, Rhubarb, Granular Extract of (Sec page 191^ 

„ Saffron, Concentrated Tincture of ( See page 198 j 

,, Scammony Resin, B.P. 

This resin is issued in the form of a fine, light-coloured 
powder, which is specially convenient for dispensing. 
Dose — gr. 3 to gr. 8 (0-2 gm. to 0-5 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ,;,'■///.) and oz. 4(113 gni.) 

,, .Sodium f>)rmate 

Dose — gr. 5 to gr. 10 (0-30 gm. to 065 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ^^v//.) 

,, Sodium Glyceropho.sphate 

This is presented in the form of colourless crystalline 

flakes, which are permanent in the air. It is of definite 

and uniform composition and is much superior to and more 

convenient than the uncertain solutions usually employed. 

Dose — gr. 2 to gr. 5 (013 gm. to 030 gm.) 

Issued in bottles ofoz. i (28-3 ,;--///.) and oz. 4(113 gm. ) 

,, Sodium Hypophosphite (Pure Crystals) 

In colourless transparent crystals containing one molecule 
(if water of crystallization. It is free from phosphate and 
phosphite. 

Dose — gr. 3 to gr. 10 (0-20 gm. to 0-65 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.), oz. 4 (113 gm.) 
and oz. 8 (22"; gm.) 

For prices, see separate list 



186 ' WELLCOME ' BRAND PRODUCTS 

' Wellcome ' Brand Product8~coniifi?/ed 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Sodium Salicylate, B.P. ( physiologically pure ) 

This salt is issued in "powder" and in "flake." 
When ordering please indicate which is required. 
Dose — gr. lo to gr. 30 (0-63 gm. to 2-0 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. 4 (113 g'H-), oz. 8 (227 .^v//.) 
and oz. 16 (454,^;;/.) 

,, Sodium Salicylate ( N'atiiral ) 

Prepared from genuine oil of wintergreen. 
Dose — gr. 10 to gr. 30 (0-65 gm. to 2-0 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) and oz. 4(113 gm.) 

,, Sparteine Sulphate 

This definite crystalline salt is recommended as 
producing more certain and uniform results than the 
variable infusion or juice of broom. 

Dose— gr. 1/2 lo gr. i (0-03 gm. to o-o6 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) 

,, Strophanthus, Concentrated Tincture of (See /age igSJ 
,, Strychnine, B.P. 

Dose— gr. 1/60 to gr. 1/15 (o-ooi gm. to 0-004 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) 

,, Strychnine Hydrochloride, B.P. 

Dose — gr. 1/60 to gr. 1/15 (o-ooi gm. to 0004 gm.) 
Isstted in bottles of oz. i {28-2 gm.) 

,, Tinctures, Concentrated (Seepages 192-198^ 

,, Tolu, Concentrated Tincture of Balsam of (Seepage igSJ 

STANDARDISED LIQUID EXTRACTS, 
•WELLCOME' BRAND 

'Wellcome' Brand Standardised Liquid Extracts are standardised 
to represent definite quantities, not of total alkaloids, but, .so far 
as possible, of the active principle of the drug. With the exception 
of the B.P. preparations, which are prepared strictly according 
to the official directions, they are made by a special process 
embodying the latest researches on the .subject. The miscible 
liquid extracts form a clear mixture with water and on this 

For prices, see separate list 



' WELLCOME' BRAND PUODUCTS 1S7 



' Wellcome ' Brand Products— cmii/nied 

account may be employed with advantage when the ordinary 
Hquid extracts would prove quite unsuitable. The reliability and 
uniformity of ' Wellcome ' Brand Standardised Liquid Extracts 
commend them for both prescribing and dispensing. 

All our spirituous preparations can be supplied duty-free for 
export, in quantities of not less than two bulk gallons. This 
quantity may be made up of assorted preparations, such as Liquid 
Extracts, Concentrated Tinctures, etc. 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Aconite, Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is standardised to contain o- 1 gm. 
of ether-soluble alkaloid in lOO c.c. of extract. One part 
by volume represents one part by weight of standard 

drug. 

Dose — min. 1/4 to min. i (gtt. 1/4 to ijtt. i) 

/ssiu'd ill bottles of fl. oz. 4 (i 14 <■■(■), fl- oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 

andfl. oz. 16(455 c.c.) 

„ Belladonna, B.P., Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made strictly according to the 
otikial method, and is standardised to contain 0-75 gm. 
of total alkaloid in 100 c.c. of extract. 

Dose— mill. 1/3 to min. i (gtt. 1/3 to gtt. i) 
Issued hi bottles of Jl. oz. 4 (114 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 
andfl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Calabar Bean, Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made strictly according to the 
official method, but is standardised to contain 0-15 gm. of 
total alkaloid in loo c.c. of extract. One part by volume 
represents one part by weight of standard drug. 
Dose— mill, i to min. 4 (gtt. i to gtt. 4) 
Issued in bottles offl. oz. 4 (114 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 
andfl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Cascara Sagrada, B.P., Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made strictly according to the 

official method. 

Dose min. 30 to min. 60 (i-S c.c. to 3-5 c.c.) 

Issued in bottles offl. oz. 4 (114 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 

and ft. o:. 16 (455 c.c.) 

For prices, see separate list 



188 ' Wellcome' brand products 

'Wellcome' Brand Products~conii>iued 

•WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, Cinchona, B.P., Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made strictly according to the 
official method, and is standardised to contain 5 gni. of 
total alkaloid in loo c.c. of extract. 

Dose — min. 5 to min. 15 (gtt. 5 to o-g c.c.) 
Issued in bottles offl. oz. 4 {114 r.r.),y?. oz. S (227 c.c.) 
and fl. oz. 16 (455 c.c] 

,, Cinchona (Miscible), Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made by a special proces,s, and is 
-Standardised to contain 5 gm. of total alkaloid in 100 c.c. 
of extract. 

Dose —min. 5 to min. 15 (gtt. 5 to og c.c.) 
Issued in bottles of Jl. oz. 4 (114 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 cc.) 
andjl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Coca. B.P., Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made strictly according to the official 
method, but is standardised to contain o'5 gm. of petroleum- 
ether-soluble alkaloid in 100 c.c. of extract. One part by 
volume represents one part by weight of standard drug. 
Dose — min. 30 to min. 60 (i-8 c.c. to 3-5 c.c.) 
Issued in bottles offl. oz. 4 (114 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 
and fl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

„ Coca (Miscible), Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made by a special process, and is 
standardised to contain 0-5 gm. of petroleum-elher-soluble 
alkaloid in 100 c.c. of extract. One part by volume 
represents one part by weight of standard drug. 
Dose — min. 30 to min. 60 (i-S c.c. to 3-5 c.c.) 
Issued in bottles offl. oz. 4 (114 c.c), fl . oz. 8 (227 c.c) 
and fl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Colchicum Seeds, Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is standardised to contain 0-5 gm. of 
Colchicine in 100 c.c. of extract. One part by volume 
represents one part by weight of standard drug. 
Dose — min. i to min. 3 (gtt. i to gtt. 3) 
Issued in bottles offl. oz. 4 (114 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c) 
and fl. oz. 16 (455 c.c) 

For prices, see separate list 



' WELLCOME' BRAND PRODUCTS 189 



* Wellcome ' Brand Products — amtiniu-d 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Ergut, Ij.P., Liquid Extract of 

{Physiologically Standardised, IVclliomc Physiological 
Research Laboratories. ) 

This preparation is made strictly according to the 
official method. 

Dose — min. lo to min. 30 (o-6 c.c. to i-S c.c.) 
Issued in bottles of ft. oz. 4 (114 cc), fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 
and Ji. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Gelsemium, Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is standardised to contain o- 1 gm. of 
Gelsemine in 100 c.c. of extract. One part by volume 
represents one part by weight of standard drug. 
Dose — min. i to min. 3 (gtt. i to gtt. 3) 
Issued in bottles of fl . oz. 4 (114 c.c), ft. oz. S (227 <.(-.) 
and fi. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

„ Hydrastis, B.P., Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made strictly according to the 
official method, but is standardised to contain 2-5 gm. of 
Hydrastine in 100 c.c. of extract. One part by volume 
represents one part by weight of standard drug. 
Dose — min. 5 to min. 15 (gtt. 5 to o-g c.c.) 
Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 4 (i 14 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 
and fl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Hyoscyamus, Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is standardised to contain o-i"gm. of 
total alkaloid in looc.c. of extract. One part by volume 
represents one part by weight of standard drug. 
Dose — min. 3 to min. 10 (gtt. 3 to o-6 c.c.) 
/ssued in bottles offl. oz. 4 (114 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 
and fl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Hyo.scyauuis (Miscible), Liquid Extract of 

This extract is standardised to contain o- 1 gm. of total 
alkaldid in 100 c.c. of extract. One part Ijy volume 
represents one part by weight of standard drug. 
Dose — min. 3 to min. lo (gtt. 3 to o-6 c.c.) 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 4 (114 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 
and ft. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

For prices, see separate list 



190 ' VVKLLCOMH ' BKAND PRODUCTS 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products^co^ii/nuei/ 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Ipecacuanha, B.P., Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made strictly according to the oflicial 
metliod, and is standardised to contain from 2 gm. to 
2-25 gm. of total alkaloid in 100 c.c. of extract. 
Dose — As an expectorant, min. 1/2 to min. 2 (gtt. 1/2 to gtt. 2) 
As an emetic, min. 15 to min. 20 (0-9 c.c. to 1-2 c.c.) 
/ssi/t"J in bottles ofjt. oz. 4 (ii4(-.c ),_/?. oz. 8(227 c.c), 
andfl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Jaborandi (Miscible), Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made by a special process, and 
is standardised to contain 0-5 gm. of Pilocarpine in 
100 c.c. of extract. One part by volume represents 
one part by weight of standard drug. 

Dose — min. 5 to min. 15 (gtt. 5 to 0-9 c.c.) 

Issued hi bottles off. oz. 4 (114 c.c.),f. oz. i (227 c.c.) 
and f. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Nux Vomica, B.P., Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made strictly according to the 
oflicial method, and is standardised to contain 1-5 gm. of 
-Strychnine in ichd c.c. of extract. 

Dose — min. i to min. 3 (gtt. i to gtt. 3) 
Issued in bottles of fl. oz.\ (114 c.c), ft. oz. S (227 c.c.) 
and fl. oz. 16 (455 c.c) 

,, Opium, B.P., Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made strictly according to the ofiicial 
method, and isstandardised to contain 0-75 gm. of Morphine 
in 100 c.c. of extract. 

Dose — min. 5 to min. 30 (gtt. 5 to i-8 c.c.) 
Issued in bottles off. oz. 4(114 c.c), fl. oz. S {227 c.c) 
andfl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

,, Opium (Miscible), Liquid Extract of 

This preparation is made by a special process by which 
the Narcotine is removed, and the extract rendered 
miscible with water. It is standardised to contain 
0-75 gm. of Morphine in 100 c.c. of extract, and is 
identical in strength with the B.P. preparation. 
Dose — rain. 5 to min. 30 (gtt. 5 to iS c.c.) 
Issued in bottles of fl. oz 4 (i 14 c.c.),fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) 
andfl. oz. 16 (455 c.c.) 

For prices, see separate list 



' Wellcome' brand pkodi'cts 191 



STANDARDISED GRANULAR EXTRACTS, 
'WELLCOME' BRAND 

' Wellcome ' Brand Granular Extracts possess many adv'antages 
over the usual form of solid extracts. They are uniform and 
reliable and more convenient for dispensing than the ordinary 
soft extracts. 

WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, Belladonna (Green), Standardised Granular Extract of 

This preparation corresponds to the B.P. Extract, but 
is standardised to contain i per cent, of total alkaloid. 
Dose — gr. 1/4 to gr. i (0-015 gm. to o-o6 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) 

,, Ergot, Granular Extract of {Physiologically Standardised, 
Well come Physiological Research Laboratories) 
This preparation corresponds to the B.P. Extract. 
Dose — gr. 2 to gr. 8 (0-13 gm. to 0-5 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) 

„ Hyoscyamus, Standardised Granular Extract of 

This preparation corresponds to the B.P. Extract, but 
is standardised to contain o-2 per cent, of total alkaloid. 
Dose— gr. 2 to gr. 8 (013 gm. to 0-5 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 ^w.) 

,, Nux Vomica, Standardised Granular Extract of 

This preparation corresponds to the B.P. Extract, and 
contains 5 per cent, of Strychnine. 

Dose — gr. 1/4 to gr. i (0-015 gm. to 0-06 gm.) 
Issued in bottles of cz. i (28-3^7/'/.) 

,, Opium, Standardised Granular Extract of 

This preparation corresponds to the B.P. Extract, 
and contains 20 per cent, of Morphine. 

Dose— gr. 1/4 to gr. i (0-015 gm. to 006 gm.) 



Issued in bottles of oz. I (28- 



J .s 



in. 



Rhubarb, Granular Extract of 

This i)reparation is made by a special process whereby 
the full therapeutic value of the rhubarb is retained. 
Dose— gr. 2 to gr. 6 (0-13 gm. to 0-40 gm.) . 
Issued in bottles of oz. i (28-3 gm.) 
For prices, see separate list 



192 ' WELLCOME' BRAND PRODUCTS 

CONCENTRATED TINCTURES 
'WELLCOME' BRAND 

' Wellcome ' Brand Concentrated Tinctures are prepared from 
picked drugs by a special process which retains the full therapeutic 
value, while the aroma of the diluted preparations is equal to that 
of tinctures prepared by the usual methods. They are specially 
suitable for dispensing, and their diminished bulk renders them 
convenient for transport and storage. 

All our spirituous preparations can be supplied duty-free for 
export, in quantities of not less than two Imlk gallons. This 
quantity may be made up of assorted preparations such as 
Concentrated Tinctures, Liquid Extracts, etc. 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Aconite, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (70 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Aconite, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8(227 '^•''•) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 (■(■) 

,, Arnica, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (70 per cent.) makes a preparation corres- 
ponding to Tincture of Arnica, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8(227 ^•<"-) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 '■■^•) 
,, Benzoin, Concentrated Compound Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to three fluid 
ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Compound Tincture of Benzoin, B.P. 

Issued An bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 ^•'■■) 
,, Calumba, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Calumba, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. S (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 '■■'■•) 

For prices, see separate list 



' WELLCOME* BRAND PRODUCTS 193 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products— coiiinued 
WELLCOME' BRAND— 

,, Camphor, Concentrated Compound Tincture ot 

One fluid ounce of this product added lo nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Compound Tincture of Camphor, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and Jl. oz. 16 
(455 ^•'•■) 
„ Cannabis Indica, Concentrated Tincture of {Physiologically 
standardised, Wellcome Physiological Research Labora- 
tories). 

One fluid ounce of this preparation added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Cannabis Indica, B. P. 

Issued in bottles of /I. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 ^-^O 
,, Car.tharides, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Cantharides, B.P. 

Issued in bottles off. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and f. oz. 16 
(455 '•■'■•) 
,, Capsicum, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (70 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Capsicum, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 <^-<^-) 

,, Cardamoms, Concentrated Compound Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid 

ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 

corresponding to Compound Tincture of Cardamoms, B.P. 

Issued in bottles off. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 

(455 '■•'••) 

,, Cascarilla, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid 
ounces of alcohol (70 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Cascarilla, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of f. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 ^-f-) 

For prices, see separate list 



194 ' Wellcome' bkand products 

'Wellcome' Brand Products~Lti>U!Hued 
'WELLCOME' KRAND— 

,, Catechu, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to two fluid 
ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Catechu, B.P. 

Issued hi bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.') and Jl. oz. 16 
(455 '■■^'■) 

,, Chiretta, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid 
ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Chiretta, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and _/. oz. 16 
(455 '•■'■•) 

,, Cimicifuga, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Cimicifuga, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 '■■'■•) 

,) Cinchona, Concentrated Compound Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid 

ounces of alcohol (70 per cent.) makes a preparation 

corresponding to Compound Tincture of Cinchona, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 

(455 ^■•^■•) 

,, Cinnamon, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid 
ounces of alcohol (70 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Cinnamon, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 '"•'•) 

,, Cochineal, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
For prices, see separate list 



' Wellcome' brand products 195 

' Wellcome ' Brand Products— CDniim/ed 

•WELLCOME' BRAND— 

ounces of alcohol (45 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Cochineal, B.P. 

Issued ill bottles of Ji . oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 '■•'■•) 
,, Colchicum Seeds, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid 
ounces of alcohol (45 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Colchicum Seeds, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Jl. oz. 8 (227 c.c!) a)id Ji. oz. 16 
(455 ^•'■■) 

,, Conium, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid 
ounces of alcohol (70 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Conium, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Jl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and Jl.oz. 16 
(455 '■•'■•) 

,, Cubebs, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid 
ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Cubebs, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Jl. oz. S (227 c.c.) and Jl. oz. 16 
(455 <"•'"•) 

,, Gelsemium, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to 'i'incture of Gelsemium, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Jl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and f. oz. 16 
(455 f-^-) 

,, Gentian, Concentrated Compound Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (45 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Compound Tincture of Gentian, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Jl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and Jl. oz. 16 
(455 '■•'••) 

For prices, see separate list 



196 ' WELLCOME' BRAND PKODIXTS 



'Wellcome' Brand Products— cn/iu/irii 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 
,, Ginger, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Ginger, B.P. 

/ssited in bottles of Jl. oz. S (227 c.c.) and Jl. oz. 16 
(455 '■•'■•) 

,, Guaiacum, Concentrated Ammoniated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to one and a half 
fluid ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Ammoniated Tincture of Guaiacum, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Jl. oz. S (227 c.c.) and Jl. oz. 16 
(455 <••'■•) 

,, Hamamelis, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (45 per cent.) make a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Hamamelis, B.P. 

Issued in bottles off. oz. 8 {22"] c.c.) and Jl. oz. 16 
(455 '■•'■•) 

,, Hydrastis, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Hydrastis, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Jl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and Jl. oz. 16 
(455 -'■•) 

,, Hyoscyamus, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (45 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Hyoscyamus, B.P. 

Issued in bottles ojjl. oz. 8 (227 (•.<■.) and Jl. oz. 16 
(455 '•■'••) 

,, Iodine, Concentrated 'i'incture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine lluid 

For prices, see separate list 



' WELLCOME ' BKAND PRODIXTS 197 

■Wellcome' Brand Products—ctoit/'/ntt-d 

'WELLCOME' BRAND— 

ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparalinn 
corresponding to Tincture of Iodine, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Ji. oz. S (227 c.c.) ami fl . oz. 16 

(455 '■■'■•) 

,, Jaborandi, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid ounces 
of alcohol (45 per cent.) makes a preparation corresponding 
to Tincture of Jaborandi, B.P. 

Issued hi bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 

(455 '-•^•) 

,, Jalap, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid ounces 
of alcohol (70 per cent.) makes a preparation corresponding 
to Tincture of Jalap, B.P. 

Issued in bottles off.oz. S (227 c.c.) ami fi. oz. 16 

(455 '■•'■•) 

,, Krameria, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to four fluid ounces 
of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation corresponding 
to Tincture of Krameria, B.P. 

Issued in bottles off. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) ami f. oz. 16 

(455 '■•'■•) 
,, Lavender, Concentrated Compound Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corre.sponding to Compound Tincture of Lavender, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Ji. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) ami fi. oz. 16 
(455 '■•'■•) 

,, Lobelia, Concentrated Ethereal Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of Spirit of Ether, B.P., makes a preparation 
corresponding to Ethereal Tincture of Lobelia, B.P. 

Issued in iwttles of Ji. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fi. oz. 16 
(455 '■•'■•) 
,, Opium, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluicl 
For prices, see separate list 



198 ' WKI.I.COMK BRAND PRODUCTS 

'Wellcome' Biand Products— ro«//«!//'rf 

'WELLCOME BRAND— 

ounces of alcohol (45 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Opium, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of f. oz. 8 (227 r.<r.) and Jl. oz. 16 

(455 '■•'••) 

,, Podophyllum, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this product added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Podophyllum, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of Ji. oz. 8 (227 r.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 '■•^•) 
,, Rhubarb, Concentrated Compound Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this preparation added to four fluid 
ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Compound Tincture of Rhubarb, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 
(455 '"•'••) 
,, Saffron, Concentrated Tincture of 

One fluid ounce of this preparation added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (60 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Saffron, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. S (227 c.c.') and fl. oz. 16 

(455 ^•^•) 
„ Strophanthus, Concentrated Tincture of (Physiologically 
Standardised, Wellcome Physiological Research Labora- 
tories.) 

One fluid ounce of this preparation added to nine fluid 
ounces of alcohol (70 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Strophanthus, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 

(455 ^■'••) 
„ Tolu, Concentrated Tincture of Balsam of 

One fluid ounce of this preparation added to four fluid 
ounces of alcohol (90 per cent.) makes a preparation 
corresponding to Tincture of Balsam of Tolu, B.P. 

Issued in bottles of fl. oz. 8 (227 c.c.) and fl. oz. 16 

(455 (■'=■) 

For prices, see separate list 



Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 

Chief Offices and Warehouses : 

London (Eng.) 

Teleg^raphic iS-^ Cable Address^" 'Xxs.l.oW), London." 
AND AT 481, KENT STREET, SYDNEY, N.S.W. ; 5. LOOP STREET, 



Cape Town 



Special Depots Abroad : 



Special 

Depots 
Abroad 



Milan — 14, Via Carlo Alberto 
Amsterdam — H. Sanders, Rokin, 8 
Barcelona — Vicente Ferrer & Co., 

Caile de Comercio, 112 — 114 
Basle— Nadolny & Co., Spital- 

strasse, 9 
Berlin — Linkenheil & Co., 

Genthinerstrasse, 19 
Bombay — Thomson & Taylor 
Brussels — Charles Delacre & Co., 

Pharmacie Anglaise, 50—52, Rue 

Coudenberg 
Cairo, Alexandria and Port 

Said — E. Del jNIar 
CALCUTTA — Smith Stanistreet & Co. 
Colombo— Cargills, Ltd. 
Copenhagen — Alfred Benzon 

Depots in Canada : 



Geneva — Uhlmann Kyraiid, 

Boulevard de la Cluse, 12 
Hong-Kong — A. E. Watson & Co. 
Lisbon — F. Freire d'Andrade & 

Irmao, 123, Rua do Alecrim, 127 
Mexico City— Emilio Kentzler, 

Calle, lA, de San Francisco, 15 
Nice— Reilly & Co., 8, Rue Niepce 
Paris- Scott & Co., 4, Rue Chau- 

veau-Lagarde 
Pernambuco — Francisco M. Da 

Silva, 102, Rua Domingos 

J. Martins 
Stockholm — Apoteket Nord- 

stjernans Droghandel 
Vienna — -AL Kris, Brandstatte, i 



Depots in 
Canada 



Halifax, N.S.— Brown & Webb; 

Hattie & Mylius 
Montke.\l— The Lyinan Knox 

Co., Ltd. 
Quebec — W. Brunett & Co. 
St. John, New Brunswick— 

Canadian Drug Co., Ltd. 



St. John's, Newfoundland — 

T. McMurdo & Co. 
ToRO.NTO— Lyman Knox & 

Clarkson, Ltd. 
Vancouver- -Henderson Bros., Ltd. 
Winnipeg — The Bole Drug Co., Ltd. 



Full lines of 'Tabloid', 'Soloid', 'Enule', 'Kepler', and other brands of 
B. W. & Co. products always kept in stock by 

FAIRCHILD BROS. & FOSTER 
(General Wholesale Agents in U.S. A. for more than twenty years) 

F.iirchild Building, Washington and Laight Streets, New Vokk ; 

and 134, Lake Street, Chicago. 

Telegraphic Address —"Tabloid, New York." 

Depots 
in U.S.A. 



Depots in U.S.A. : 



Boston, Mass. - Eastern Drug 

Co., 8-20, Fulton .Street 
Chicago, III. -Fairchild Bros. & 

Foster, 134, Lake Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. — Smith Kline 

& French Co., 429-435, Arch Street 



New Orleans, L.\. - Finlay Dicks 
& Co., Magazine and Common 
Streets 

St. Louis, Mo. — The Meyer Bros. 
I )rug Co., 4th and Clarke .Streets 



' ' The strong thing is the just thing." 

Carlyle. 

' Tabloid ' marks the work of 
Burroughs Wellcome and Company. 

The use of the word Is to enable the 
physician, chemist and patient to get 
the right thino- with one short word, 
Instead of the firm's long name. 

If another maker applies the word 
to his product, the act is unlawful. 
' Tabloid ' is our trade-mark. 

If a vendor disregards it, In dispensing 
or selling, the act is unlawful — for the 
same reason. 

We prosecute both offenders rigorously, 
in the interest of physicians, chemists, 
patients and ourselves. 

Please inform us of any instance of 
either offence. 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 



ri ' Solo ID ' Brand 
Urine Test Case 








Analysis 
on the Spot 



This case, which only measures 5f x 2| x i| in. and 
can therefore be conveniently carried in the pocket, 
contains all the apparatus and reagents 
necessar)' to enable the practitioner to 
make an examination of the urine at the patient's bed- 
side, and thus to complete his diagnosis without delay. 
It is made of polished nickel-plated metal, easily kept 
aseptic. 



For full details see page no 



THE 




■Tabloid' 

AND 

'Soloid' 



\ 



Invented 

By 

B. W. & Co. 



Are 

B. W. & Co. 




They mark the work of 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co. 

They mean " Issued by 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co." \ 



They stand for 



products. 




'.X' 'SOLO ID' Brand 

Microscopic Stains 



Solutions of the aniline dyes for microscopic use are 
liable to decompose, and are, therefore, unsatisfactory. 
The delicate nature of the work and the necessity for 
obtaining correct and definite results, demand 
the employment of reliable agents. Upon stains 
difterential diagnosis by microscopic examina- 
tion may depend consequences, the importance of which 
cannot be exaggerated, and such diagnosis cannot be 
certain where ready-made staining solutions are employed ; 
these solutions do not keep well, and are affected by 
vicissitudes of transit and by alterations of temperature 
and of chmate. 'Soloid' Microscopic Stains mark an 
enormous advance towards the perfection of the technique 
of microscopic work. The aniline dyes used in their 
manufacture are of the highest quality ; the ' Soloid ' 
products are of such strength that small cjuantities of 
staining solutions can be made quickly and easily ; the 
activity and freshness of the dye are always assured. 

' -Soloid ' Microscopic Stains are dry, stable and readily 

soluble. They have been employed in eveiy land, and 

have been unaffected by extremes of climate. 

' Soloid ' products are easily carried ; there is Always 

. , Ready and 

no risk of loss by breakage, or of damage by stable 
escape of the staining fluid. They are always 
fresh, and are stable in all climates. They always give 
satisfaction, since they retain their activity and their 
staining power unimpaired. 

For list of ' Soloid ' Stains see page 139. 



^S 'SOLOID' Brand BACTERIOLOGICAL CASE 

This aseptic, polished-metal case provides the neces- 
sary equipment for clinical examination by the most 
recent scientific methods. With its aid 

A scientific bacteriological investigations, which are by 
equipment 

most practitioners referred to laboratory 

workers, can be undertaken with ease and convenience 




No. 505 'Soloid' Bacteriological Case. 
Measurements, s X 3^ X i^in. 

in the surger)-. It keeps together in a compact form 

the essentials for such work. Its small size and light 

weight permit of its being carried in the 

Light and pocket, and the physician can utilize it at 
compact ^ 1 • 1 1 J 

the patient's bedside to obtam a blood 
sample or a throat swab. 

The outfit includes needles and collecting pipettes, for 
taking blood samples. It provides diluting fluid and 
special stains for blood examination. It contains an 
adequate supply of slides and cover-slips, and a large 
selection of ' Soloid ' Microscopic Stains; forceps to hold 
the slide or cover-slip, and a spirit lamp for heating and 
fixing the films are also included. A rod-stoppered phial 
of Canada Balsam provides the material for mounting 
the specimen, which is then ready for microscopic 

examination. 

For full details see page 112 



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' Ernutin ' 

(Trade Mark) 

A new product presenting the active therapeutic 
principle of Ergot 

' Ernutin ', a product which is the result of extensive 
researches in the Wellcome Physiological 



Uniform 
potency 



Research Laboratories, is a preparation of 
uniform potency, and contains the active 
therapeutic principle of ergot in a state of purity which 
up to the present has never been approached. 

The various extracts and preparations of ergot in 

ordinary use consist almost entirely of inert or harmful 

matters having little or none of the therapeutic action 

^'"^ desired. Those preparations 

which exhibit the character- '^^^ ^'^^'^^ 

principle 
istic effects of ergot on the ^f gigot 

blood pressure and the uterus, 
in laboratory experiment or clinical use, 
owe their activity to traces of a specific 
active principle, the effect of which is in 
such preparations obscured and com- 
plicated by the depressor constituents. 

The action of this principle on blood 
pressure, as indicated by H. H. Dale in 
his paper, "The Physiological Action of 
Chrysotoxin " {Joiiyiuil of J'//ysiolo^y, vol. xxxii., p. 58, 
Proc. Phys. .Soc, 1905), affords a standard for the measure- 
ment of activity : the cock's comb test, on the other hand, 
appears to Ije valueless. 

'Ernutin' Hypodermic is supplied in lioxos of six pliials, each 
phial containing 10 minims. 




I'lii.il i.f 
•I->nutiir HypfKiermic 
Actual si;cL*. 



Dost': FiTi' to trii nihil Ills hy liy/><hif>-iiiir in/, r /ion 



'Hhmisinh' 

(Trade Mark) 

' Hemisine ' Products presents the active principle of 
the medulla of the supra-renal gland, having the 
X,v.!.-. xL ":L' characteristic vaso-constricting, haemostatic 

and astringent properties. They differ from 

all other products in 

being issued in a dry 

soluble state. They are 
perfectly stable in all climates and 
solutions can be instantly prepared when desired. They 
are physiologically standardised before being issued and 
therefore possess a uniform activity. ' Hemisine ' therefore 
constitutes a notable advance over 
ready made solutions which oxidize 
and lose their activity. 



Active 
principle of 
the supra- 
renal gland 



Tube of 6 ' .Soloid ' 
' Hemisine ' products 



ii 



JMiSWWt! 



' Soloid ' ' Hemisine ' ensures the 



Tube of 12 ' Tabloid ' 
' Hemisine ' products 



ready and easy preparation of fresh, active solutions, which 
are reliable agents in preventing or arresting 

Haemostatic h;cmorrhage and in relieving congestion. 

constricting Solutions and sprays of a strength of i in 

properties 5000 to 1 in io,ooo are applied to congested 
mucous membranes, as in common colds, hay 

fever, asthma and oedema of the pharynx and larynx. A 

solution of I in 1000 arrests 

bleeding from cut or abraded 

surfaces. 'Hemisine' injected 

hypodermically around the tooth 

and applied to the gums allows 

extraction to be completed without 

loss of blood. 




'Enule' 'Hemisine' 
enclosed in sheath of 

pure tinfoil. 
This shape originated by 

B. W. & Co. 



For full particulars of the therapeutic uses of ' Hemisine ' 
see special booklet sent to medical practitioners on 
apphcation. 



See also pages 118, 127, 136 & 151 



'Wellcome' brand Chloroform 



The variability of the results which occur in the 
administration of Chloroform as an anaes- 
thetic, has been frequently ascribed to the Varieties 

of 
differences existing' in the various samples Chloroform 

of Chloroform employed, and these differ- 
ences are attributed either to the materials used or to 
the methods adopted in manufacture. 

To overcome the difficulty occasioned by this varia- 
bility 'WELLCO^rE' Brand CHLOROFORM has been 
introduced. In its pro- 
duction the greatest care 

Advantages 

is taken to ensure the of 

' Wellcome ' 

highest attainable degree Brand 

Chloroform 

of purit)- and freedom 

from irritating products 
of decomposition. It is also par- 
ticularly characterized by containing 
a small but definite amount of Ethyl 
Chloride, recent demonstrations hav- 
ing shown that a proportion of f^thyj 
Chloride, so small as hardly to be 
capable of detection by chemical 
means, is often present in Chloroform, 
and has a marked beneficial influence 
on its action as an an;esthetic. (Wade and Finnemore 
"Journal of the (nicmicrd Society," 1904, 85, 938.) 

Sec also pa^^e 1 72 




The \ 111. size is issued 
in a ilroppinj^ bottle 
as illustratefl. 




General Offices 
Burroughs Wellcome & Co., London, England 




^JiiimuitaJNiiiiiurbAj iiiiiiim43iiiin i iHCii t 



FIRST 

AND. 

ALWAYS 
FIRST 



Six 

Grand PRIZES 

o 

Three 

Diplomat 

OF HONOl R 

o 

Three 

COLD Medals 




MORE THAN g 

190 
HIGHEST AWARDS 

CONFERRED ON 

BURROUGHS WELLCOME a Co 

AT THE 

GREAT EXHIBITIONS 

OF THE WORLD 

FOR THE 

SCIENTIFIC 

EXCELLENCE OF 

THEIR PRODUCTS 




ST LOUIS 

Three 
Grand prizes 

o 

Three 
Gold Medals 



Burroughs Wellcome and Co. 

LONDON, SYDNEY, CAPE TOWN 




The Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories 
King Street, London, England 

This Private Institution is absolutely separate and 
distinct from the business of Burroughs WeUcome & Co., 
and is under separate and distinct direction, although in this 
institution a large amount of important scientific work is 
carried out for the firm. 



THE 



Wellcome Chemical Research Laboratories 
were awarded 



ONE GRAND PR IZE 

AND 

THREE GOLD MEDALS 

AT THE 

International Exposition at St. Louis, 



1904. 



ONE GRAND PRIZE 
ONE DIPLOMA OF HONOUR 

AND 

TWO GOLD MEDALS 

AT THE 

International Exposition at Liege, 1905 
for Chemical and Pharmacognostical Research, etc., etc. 



GRAN D PR IZE 






jT. Louis 




THREE GOLD MRi^Al-S— ST. LOIIIS 








ct: c w 



THE 

Wellcome Physiological Research Laboratories 

were awarded 

ONE GRAND PRIZE 

AND 

ONE GOLD MEDAL 

AT THE 

International Exposition at St. Louis, 1904- 
ONE GRAND PRIZE 

AND 

TWO GOLD MEDALS 

AT THE 

International Exposition at Liege, 1905 

for Physiological Research and Preparations, 
etc., etc. 





GRAND PRIZE— St. LoIJIS 



GOLD MRDAI. — St. LoUIS 




General Offices and Warehouses. 
Burroughs Wellcome & Co.. 481. Kent Street. Sydney. N.S.W. 




¥ 



General Offices, Emergency Depot and Warehouses 
Burroughs Wellcome & Co., 5, Loop Street, Cape Town 



\^\BRA^ 



juirsiwf /, 




General Depot for Italy, 

Burroughs Wellcome & Co., 14, Via Carlo Alberto 

(facing the Piazza del Duomo) Milan 




R. O. HURST LIBRARY 



FACULTY OF PHARMACY 
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



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Restricted Book * 

The borrowing of this book 
is subject to the restriction as 
checked below. 

1. May be used only in the 
library-not to be withdrawn 
at any time. 

2. May only be withdrawn 
from 4 P.M. until 9 A.M. of 
the following day. 

3. May be borrowed for a 
period of 24 hours. 

4. May be borrowed for a 
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Ontario College 
OF Pharmacy 



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