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Full text of "The historic peerage of England, exhibiting under alphabetical arrangement, the origin, descent, and present state of every title of peerage which has existed in this country since the conquest. Being a new ed. of the "Synopsis of the peerage of England." Rev., corr., and continued to the present time, including all recent creations, extinctions, deaths, etc."

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7H- 

THE 



HISTORIC PEERAGE 



OF 



ENGLAND. 



EXHIBITING, UNDER ALPHABETICAL ARRANGEMENT, 

THE ORIGIN, DESCENT, AND PRESENT STATE OF EVERY TITLE 

OF PEERAGE WHICH HAS EXISTED IN THIS COUNTRY 

SINCE THE CONQUEST. 



BEING A NEW EDITION OE THE ' SYNOPSIS OE THE PEERAGE OF ENGLAND,' 



BY THE LATE 

SIR HARRIS NICOLAS, G.C.M.G. 



REVISED, CORRECTED, AND CONTLNUED TO THE PRESENT TIME, INCLUDING ALL 
RECENT CREATIONS, EXTINCTIONS, DEATHS, ETC. 

BY WILLIAM COURTHOPE, ESQ., 

SOMERSET HERALD; 
OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE, BARRISTER AT LAW. 

y 

o ; 









LONDON: 
JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET. 

1857. 



4-2.1 



LONDON: PRINTED BY Vf. CLOWES AND SONS, STAMFORD STREET, 
AND CHARING CROSS. 



( H* ) 



CONTENTS. 



l'AGE 

CORRIGENDA iv 

PREFACE v 

PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION viii 

EXPLANATION OF PLAN OF THE WORK AND OF ABBREVIATIONS . . xiii 

LATEST INFORMATION — OCCURRENCES DURING PRINTING .... xv 

OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES xvii 

LIST OF PEERS AND PEERESSES OF THE UNITED KINGDOM 

ACCORDING TO THEIR PRECEDENCE lxxiii 

SUCCESSION TO THE CROWN 1 

PRINCES OF WALES 8 

TITLES OF PEERAGE IN STRICTLY ALPHABETICAL ORDER .... 14 

SUCCESSION OF ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS . . . . 527 

INDEX OF TITLES 595 

INDEX OF HEIRS TO BARONIAL DIGNITIES 604 



a 2 



( iv ) 



COEEiaENDA. 

"Ill B on Fita-Wwii " •• Uth." 

v CHAMP." 

"XII. 5th Earl and XIII. 6th Earl" ead ••XIII. 
: and XIV. 6th Karl." 

vis. for ■• f"1757." 

1 last line, "4 Nov." • Hot." 

NrFOKr, line 4./ ■ •• LO Apr." I • 9 Mar." 
11,1 disjms* tA • ■• Dal s" and "Earls." 

Page 110, line 6 from bottom,/' •• Thomas " id " Ralph." 

;e 111, line 16, J . ad in*the next line for « 1679" f"1670." 

. line 17. / •• 182 I" I " 827." 
. . art. Coopeb, for " Viscounty " read " Barony." 

gc 171, art. Don lnnon, " George Brabaion II. Baron" sAontd be "George John Bra- 
baxon." 

m bottom, for •' Howard" read" l-'itz-Alan-Howard." 

Pa;: . v :. Harwich, Marquessate,/ • " 10 Apr." r«ari"9 Mar." 

s " daughter and." 

. ;' ■ •• xxviii " read •• _\li\ ." 

Page 511, line 9 from bottom, r Drummond-Willoughby " read * Drammond-Burrel)," 

and omit the parenthesis. 












P R E F A C E. 



THE Hditor does not deem any apology to be requisite for pre- 
senting bo the Public a new edition of Nicolas's Synopsis of the 
Peerage of England. 

The extensive utility of t lie Work itself, and the high literary 
reputation enjoyed by its late talented Author, have combined to 
render it. for many years", a hook of universal reference, as well as 
of considerable authority. 

A lapse of upwards of thirty years since its first publication, in 
the course of which more than one generation has pa-sod away, has 
effected those numerous alterations in the Peerage oi' England that 
would alone be sufficient to render a new edition desirable; but a 
further and still stronger inducement lias hen afforded by the fact 

that, during the same period, the liberality of the Govemmenl has 

rendered available to the Public the greal mass of the Public 
Records of the kingdom, and thereby afforded an opportunity, not 

to be neglected, for the correction of the many and oft-repeated 

errors that have occurred, not only in this work, but in those from 

which it was originally compiled. The Editor has collected from 

these inexhaustible sources much information that was in a 'Meat, 

O 

degree inaccessible to his predecessor, although he has nol don< 
to the extent he could have desired ; for, had time and opportunity 
pei mitted, no Patent should have remained unexamined. 

The Editor has also copiously availed himself of the manuscripts 
of Glover, and of Vincent, of Walker, of An>tis. and of Leake, as 
also of the late Francis Townsend, Esq., Windsor Eerald, all of 
whose invaluable collections in relation to the Baronage of England, 
form pari of the rich manuscript library contained in the Colli 
of Arms; he has been assisted likewise 1>\ the interleaved copj of 

the author of this work, and he trusts that a patient and diligent 
investigation of the subject thai has been presented to him may, 

in Some degree, compensate for the talent, with which tew have 

been so richly endowed as the late Sir N. Harris Nicolas, 

Some observations upon the alterations that will be found in this 
Sec. uid Edition may be deemed requisite :— the [ntroducton 
Observations on Dignities have been almost entirely re-written: 



vi PREFACE. 

this had become necessary from the new and important features 
developed on this subject by the Lords' Committee in their Reports 
on the Dignity of a Peer, and which have induced the Editor to 
give particular attention to those periods of the history of this 
country during which, those several changes in its constitution have 
been wrought, out of which the different degrees of Dignity in the 
Peerage, as now constituted, have arisen. 

The references to proofs of Barons' Sittings have been omitted in 
this edition, as they are to be found at length in the printed Rolls 
of Parliament ; but to supply their place, each Baron whose sitting 
may be proved by these Rolls has been sufficiently distinguished. 

The observations upon the Barons' Letter to the Pope have been 
in like manner omitted, the Editor being of opinion that the 
absence of all proof of its having been forwarded to its destination, 
and of its connexion (except as to date) with the Parliament then 
sitting at Lincoln, must render it incapable of ever being received 
as a Proof of Sitting in Parliament on the part of those individuals 
whose names are thereto attached : the nature of this remarkable 
document will be found to be fully discussed in the former edition, 
and some valuable remarks concerning it are annexed to the Fourth 
Report of the Lords' Committee. The Barons who signed this 
famous Letter are distinctly specified in the following pages. 

The lists of the Knights of the Garter and of the Bath, are 
rendered unnecessary by the voluminous work of Sir Harris Nicolas 
upon the Orders of the British Empire, and that of G. F. Beltz, 
Esq., Lancaster Herald, upon the Order of the Garter, in both of 
which very complete lists of the Knights of these Orders will be 
found. 

The lists of Archbishops and Bishops, being Spiritual Lords of 
England, have been preserved and continued to the present time ; 
but since the publication of the valuable edition of Le Neve's Fasti, 
edited by Thomas Duffus Hardy, Esq., of the Tower, no other list 
of the Spiritual Peers of England is likely to be consulted on any 
question of importance ; from this learned and laborious work the 
Editor has gathered such corrections as have been made to the former 
lists, and he is personally also deeply indebted to Mr. Hardy for his 
undeviating kindness and attention whenever he has had to consult 
the records under that gentleman's custody. 

To H. G. Holden, Esq , and H. J. Sharpe, Esq., of the Rolls, he 
would also express his obligations for oft-repeated services, and he 
has to thank the late head of that department, T. Palmer, Esq., for 
the loan of his annotated copy of the first edition of this work. 

Sir Charles G. Young, Garter, whose invaluable suggestions will 
be found to have been so highly appreciated by Sir Harris Nicolas 



PREFACE. vii 

in his original Preface, has continued the same good offices to the 
present Editor, who trusts they have not been less sensibly appre- 
ciated than on the former occasion, and by permitting him unre- 
strained access to his manuscripts and choice collection of Peerage 
cases, many important additions have been made, and former mis- 
statements corrected : to Sir Charles G. Young both he and the 
public are indebted for those additions to Dugdale's Baronage, 
which were published in the " Collectanea" from the collections of 
the late Francis Townsend, Esq., Windsor Herald, who had con- 
templated a new and enlarged edition of that learned work, and it 
is much to be regretted that so able a genealogist did not live to 
carry his intentions into effect. 

The Editor's brother officers, James Pulman, Esq., Clarenceux, 
Robert Laurie, Esq., Norroy, A. W. Woods, Esq., Lancaster, and 
T. W. King, Esq., York Heralds, have in like manner afforded him 
every possible assistance, and he sincerely hopes that in the utility 
of the work itself, they may find the best testimony of his 
obligations. 

In a book of this nature, it is next to impossible to preserve an 
entire immunity from error ; the cross references to dates and the 
repetition of the many titles are so numerous that perfect accord- 
ance can hardly in every case be anticipated ; still the Editor has 
spared no pains to accomplish such an object, and he trusts the 
labour he has bestowed, may not have been altogether in vain. 



College of Arms, 20 May, 1856. 



( viii ) 



PEEFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION, 

BY SIR N. HARRIS NICOLAS, G.C.M.G, 



Much as has been published on the Peerage of England, most 
persons conversant with the subject have probably felt that a work 
was required which should contain a concise account, not only of 
the state of every Title of Dignity which has existed in this country 
from the Conquest to the present time, but which would also 
present to a single reference the surname of each individual who 
possessed a particular honour in any year within that period ; for, 
from the mutability of political affairs in the early part of our his- 
tory, the same title has often been borne by four, five, and even 
ten different families. It is consequently impossible to remember 
the family-name of the person, when, as is uniformly the case, he 
is mentioned by historians by his title, and to ascertain it has 
hitherto been attended with much research. Antiquaries, it is 
true, generally possess those voluminous and expensive works 
which contain every information on the subject ; but from their 
comparative rarity, as well as the peculiar nature of their contents, 
they are but little consulted by the more numerous classes of the 
literary world ; and it is presumed, that even Antiquaries them- 
selves have frequently experienced the want of a small work, con- 
taining those general points of information connected with the 
English Peerage, which occasion them, on each reference, much 
trouble and loss of time. 

These considerations have led to the compilation of the " Synop- 
sis of the Peerage of England," which exhibits, under strictly 
alphabetical arrangement, the descent of every Title which has 
been conferred in this country since the accession of William the 
Conqueror, the manner and period of its creation, the dates of the 
deaths of those who inherited it, and of the year when each dignity 
became extinct, was forfeited, or fell into abeyance : and to render 
the Work more complete, a list of all the Prelates who have filled 
the different Sees within the same period is inserted ; and references 
will be found to the proofs which the printed Rolls of Parliament 
afford of the Sittings in Parliament of Barons of the Realm — an 



PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION. ix 

object of considerable importance to a work of this kind, because, 
without such proof, no title which originated in a Writ of Summons 
can be successfully claimed, or in other words, can now be deemed 
to exist. Under the same head some observations are submitted, 
tending to establish that the Letter written by the Barons, who were 
assembled in the Parliament which met at Lincoln in February 
1300-1, anno 29 Edw. I., should also be received as an undoubted 
proof of Sitting in Parliament ; and the very material circumstance, 
that the admission of that Letter would establish the existence of 
many Baronies which must otherwise be considered to be extinct, 
will, it is expected, be thought a sufficient excuse for the space 
which has been devoted to it. 

At the end of the second volume, an Alphabetical List of all the 
Knights of the Most Noble Order of the Garter is introduced, 
because such a List is only to be found in a scarce tract, whilst its 
utility to those who are interested in the biography of illustrious 
persons cannot be doubted. A similar List of the Knights of the 
Bath, or, as they are now termed, Knights Grand Crosses, from the 
revival of the Order in 1725, though perhaps not so desirable, may 
nevertheless sometimes prove acceptable. 

To the work some introductory remarks on dignities have been 
prefixed, not with the presumptuous expectation that the Editor 
could throw any light on the subject, but with the view of placing 
before the general reader a familiar epitome of the leading prin- 
ciples which regulate the descent, or produce the forfeiture, of Titles 
of Honour in this Kingdom. This appeared to be the more called 
for, because it was in some degree necessary to the full comprehen- 
sion of many of the expressions used in the work ; and still more, 
because such information was only to be gleaned from the perusal 
of legal writers. 

It will at once be seen that the plan on which the Synopsis of 
the Peerage of England has been formed was that of " Heylyn's 
Help to English History ;" and the numerous editions which that 
popular volume passed through, it is hoped, justified the expectation 
that an improved work on the same model would not be deemed 
wholly undeserving of public notice, at a period when a compen- 
dium of every species of information is honoured with approbation. 
Whilst, however, making the candid avowal that the obvious utility 
of Dr. Heylyn's work suggested the present, the Editor owes it to 
himself briefly to state those points in which, he hopes, it will be 
found an improvement on that well-known production. Neither 
Heylyn nor his subsequent editors, notice any dignity below the 
rank of Earls, excepting by the insertion of an imperfect catalogue 
of Viscounts and Barons at the end of the volume ; hence it does 



x PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION. 

not comprise nearly half the titles which have existed in this 
countrj\ The descent of the Dukedoms, Marquessates, and Earl- 
doms, from one person to another, is not in every case sufficiently 
explained ; for it does not always appear whether the inheritor of 
the dignity was the son, brother, or nephew of the last possessor ; 
and where the title passed to a more collateral line, the precise 
relationship is seldom expressed. Lastly, no account is given by 
Heylyn of the manner in which the honour terminated, whether 
from the failure of heirs, or by the act of the legislature ; and the 
descent of existing dignities has not been continued below the year 
1773. The difference, however, in many other instances between 
the " Help to English History " and these volumes is, it is pre- 
sumed, fully sufficient to justify his considering the present as a 
totally distinct work. 

As the accuracy of a work of this nature is of the very first im- 
portance to its value, a few words on its execution may be pardoned. 
If it were for one moment pretended that this compilation was free 
from errors, such a pretension would most justly entail upon its 
Editor the ridicule of every person in the slightest degree acquainted 
with the subject. The extreme difficulty of detecting the misrepre- 
sentations of former writers, the peculiar liability to mistakes which 
the collation of various statements necessarily produces, and still 
more the circumstance that every line contains either a date or a 
fact, combine to render a perfect work of this kind totally impos- 
sible. Still, much may be done towards the attainment of so desir- 
able an object; and whilst admitting that these volumes must 
unfortunately exhibit many proofs of the truth of the preceding 
remark, he nevertheless flatters himself that as few inaccuracies 
will be found as could fairly have been anticipated. To the merit 
of sedulous care, of rigid impartiality, and to having acted upon the 
resolution of not stating a single word which he did not believe to 
be strictly true, with the view of flattering the pride, or gratifying 
the ambition of others, he conscientiously feels that he is entitled ; 
and many instances will be found where dignities which by every 
previous writer have been attributed to different noble families, are 
in these pages proved either to be now vested in other individuals, 
to have become extinct, or never to have been created to the 
ancestor of the present Peer. He has felt that with respect to here- 
ditary honours, more than with any other worldly possession, 

Eien n'est beau que le vrai, 

and that to attribute a dignity to an individual who has no legal 
right to it, is a species of falsehood, which, if not so injurious, is at 
least as morally culpable, as any other deviation from truth ; hence 



PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION. xi 

he trusts that the public will possess at least one work in which no 
title is stated to be enjoyed by a Peer which is not undoubtedly 
vested in him : under the superior title of each existing nobleman, 
a list is therefore inserted of the English honours of which, to the 
best of the Editor's belief, he is possessed. 

It is no less a subject of regret to the Editor of a Peerage, than 
to those who refer to it, that the plan and limits of the work should 
preclude the possibility of stating his authorities. A short catalogue 
of the works which have been chiefly used in the following compila- 
tion, may, however, tend to show that the best writers have been 
consulted. Dugdale's Baronage, Dugdale's List of Summons to 
Parliament, the three Reports of the Lords' Committees on the 
Dignity of a Peer of the Realm, and especially the valuable Ap- 
pendix thereto, the Rolls of Parliament, the different editions of 
Collins' Peerage, Collins' Precedents of Baronies by Writ, Edmond- 
son's Peerage, Brooke's Catalogue of Honour, Banks' Dormant and 
Extinct Peerage, &c, are the works which have been most fre- 
quently employed, but every book at all likely to afford information 
on any doubtful point which arose has been referred to. On all 
occasions, however, where a fact stated in the text has been hitherto 
unnoticed, or was otherwise of peculiar interest, the authority for it 
will be found in the margin. 

The preceding list merely comprises part of the printed autho- 
rities, but in a great many cases the most valuable genealogical 
manuscripts in the kingdom have been consulted ; and in some 
instances the official record of patents of creation, and other public 
documents have been examined, and it is with particular gratitude 
and pleasure that the Editor alludes to the constant assistance 
which has been afforded him by the members of the College of 
Arms. With the majority of that highly respectable body he has 
the honour to enjoy a personal acquaintance, and with some to 
boast of a friendship which has long been to him a subject of 
peculiar gratification ; and on every occasion where he has applied 
for information, not only has access been most liberally given him 
to the public archives, but the private collections of many of the 
members were with no less readiness and liberality thrown open to 
him. To Francis Townsend, Esq., Rouge Dragon, among other 
acceptable contributions, he is indebted for the proofs of Barons' 
Sittings in Parliament, and for the use of the greater part of the 
manuscript and other collections of his late father, Francis Towns- 
end, Esq., F.S.A., Windsor Herald ; to his friend Charles George 
Young, Esq., F.S.A., York Herald, the Editor owes numerous im- 
portant suggestions, together with other communications of the 
highest value ; indeed the kindness of those gentlemen, and of 



xii PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION. 

George Frederick Beltz, Esq., F.S. A., Lancaster Herald, of William 
Woods, Esq., F.S. A., Norfolk Herald Extraordinary and Blue 
Mantle, as well as of James Pulman, Esq., F.S. A., Portcullis, was 
only limited by his unwillingness to trespass too far on their in- 
dulgence. His sincere acknowledgments are likewise due to Dr. 
Lingard, not only for affording him such information relative to the 
existence of the original letter from the Barons of England to Pope 
Boniface VIII. in the 29 Edw. I. as he possessed, but for imme- 
diately applying to Rome on the subject ; and it is to that gentle- 
man's obliging attention to his inquiry, that he is indebted for the 
facts stated in the Addenda connected with that interesting docu- 
ment. 

Before concluding these remarks, the Editor hopes that he may 
anticipate a favourable consideration towards whatever errors may 
be found in these volumes ; for it ought not to be forgotten that 
this is the first attempt which has been made since the publication 
of Sir William Dugdale's invaluable Baronage, to give an account 
of the descent of every title which has existed in this kingdom. 
The most material mistakes which have been discovered will be 
found among the " Corrigenda." A few titles which have been 
accidentally omitted in their proper places are inserted in the 
"Addenda." 



( xi " ) 



EXPLANATION 

OF THE 

PLAN OF THE WOKK AND OF ABBREVIATIONS 

WHICH OCCUR IN THE FOLLOWING PAGES. 



■5$$ prefixed to the name denotes that there is proof of sitting in the Eolls of 
Parliament. 

»J< denotes that the Baron so marked occurs in the Eolls of Parliament before 
the record of Writs of Summons commenced. 

f denotes that the Baron so marked signed the letter to the Pope, 1301. 

s. and h., son and heir. 

ttnm., unmarried. 

ob., died. 

v. p., vita pair is, in the lifetime of his father. 

V. M., vita matris, in the lifetime of his mother. 

v. f., vita fratris, in the lifetime of his brother. 

s. p., sine prole, without issue. 

s. p. m., sine prole masculd, without male issue. 

s. P. L., sine prole legitimd, without lawful issue. 

S. p. s., sine prole superstite, without issue that survived. 

s. p. M. s., sine prole masculd superstite, without surviving male issue. 

K.G., Knight of the Garter. 

K.B., Knight of the Bath. 

G.C.B., Grand Cross Bath. 

K.C.B., Knight Commander of the Bath. 

K.T., Knight of the Thistle. 

K.P., Knight of St. Patrick. 

G.C.M.G., Grand Cross of St. Michael and St. George. 

The Eoman numerals indicate the number of persons who have borne that title, 
whilst the figures show how many of the same family have inherited it ; thus 
in the title of Buckingham the two first Earls, of the name of Giffard, are 
described, 

Earls. 

I. 1066. 1. Walter Giffard, &c. 

II. 1102. 2. Walter Giffard, s. and h., &c. 

indicating that the first Earl received that dignity in 1066, and that the second 
succeeded to it in 1102. The next Earl, Eichard de Clare, is marked, 

Earls. 

III. Hen. I. Eichard de Clare, &c. 

which means that he was the third Earl, and succeeded to the dignity some time 
in the reign of Henry I., though the precise year may not be ascertained. No 



xiv EXPLANATION OF THE PLAN OF THE WOKK 

person again bore that title until 1377, when Thomas Plantagenet, Duke of 
Gloucester, was created Earl of Buckingham, and being the fourth Earl, but the 
first of his family, is marked, 

Earls. 

IV. 1377. 1. Thomas Plantagenet, &c. 

and his son, who succeeded him in 1397, is designated by the figures, 

Earls. 

V. 1397. 2. Humphrey Plantagenet, s. and h., &c. 

The last-named Earl dying without issue in 1399, the dignity devolved on 
Humphrey Stafford, Earl of Buckingham, his nephew, who became the sixth 
Earl ; in 1444 he was raised to the dignity of Duke of Buckingham, and he is 
consequently marked, 

Earls. Dukes. 

VI. 1399.— I. 1444. 1. Humphrey Stafford, &c. 

and his grandson and great-grandson, who inherited those dignities, are described, 

Earls. Dukes. 

VH. 1459. — II. 1459. 2. Henry Stafford, grands, and h., &c. 

VIII. I486.— III. 1486. 3. Edward Stafford, s. and h., &c. 

indicating that the grandson succeeded in 1459, and was the fourth Earl and 
second Duke of Buckingham, but the second of that family who bore the title of 
Buckingham, whilst the great-grandson of Humphrey Stafford above-mentioned, 
who was restored to the dignities in question in 1486, was the eighth Earl and 
third Duke, and the third person of the name of Stafford who bore those titles. 
The title of Buckingham was forfeited by the House of Stafford in 1521, and in 
1616 George Villiers was created Earl of Buckingham, in 1618 Marquess, and in 
1623 Duke of that County, and dying in 1629 was succeeded in his honours 
by his son George. These personages are therefore designated in the following 
manner : 

Earls. Marquesses. Dukes. 

IX. 1616.— I. 1618.— IV. 1623. 1. George Villiers, &c. 

X. 1629.— II. 1629.— V. 1629. 2. George Villiers, s. and h., &c 

In 1687 the line of Villiers became extinct, but in 1618 Mary Villiers was created 
Countess of Buckingham for life, and she is marked thus, 

Countess. 

I. 1618. Mary Villiers, &c. 

In 1703 John Sheffield was created Duke of Buckingham, and was succeeded by 
his son in 1720 ; they are therefore described as, 

Dukes. 

VI. 1703. 1. John Sheffield, &c. 

VII. 1720. 2. Edmund Sheffield, s. and h., &c 

In the case of Baronies, those who were Barons by Tenure are uniformly stated 
to have succeeded to each other in a specified reign, because it was impossible 
always to give the exact year when each possessor of the Barony died ; and after 
one of the family was summoned to Parliament the descent of the dignity created 
by Writ is shown by the numerals, which commence again with the person so sum- 
moned, though the figures are continued; for example, in the Barony of Astley 
the first four Barons by Tenure are marked by Roman numerals from I. to IV., 



AND OF ABBREVIATIONS. xv 

and the Barons by Writ by Roman numerals from I. to III., but the figures are 
continuous from 1 to 7, showing that the Barons, whether by Writ or Summons, 
succeeded each other in hereditary succession. 

The words "Summoned to Parliament as" when applied to Barons by Writ, 
mean that the style given is that by which he was addressed in the general Writs 
of Summons directed to him ; and the expression alluded to has been substituted 
for the more correct one of " by Writ addressed," which the grammatical con- 
struction of the quotation requires, to avoid the frequent repetition of that 
sentence. 

It should be observed that no marriage is noticed excepting where the woman 
was either herself possessed of a dignity, or was the coheir of one ; or where she 
was immediately or nearly descended from the Blood Royal. 

This mark = applied after the name of an existing Peer indicates that he is 
married, and the following one =p that he has issue. 

The limitation of all Patents of Creation is to be understood as to the heirs male 
of the body of the Grantee only, unless otherwise expressed. 



OCCURRENCES DURING PRINTING 



CEEATIONS. 

Page 54. BELPER. 

I. 1856. 1. Right Hon. Edward Strutt ; created Baron Belper of Belper, co. 
Derby, 29 Aug. 1856, present Baron Belper. =p 

Page 306. LYONS. 

I. 1856. 1. Rear-Adm. Sir Edmund Lyons, Bart., G.C.B. ; created Baron Lyons 
of Christchurch, co. Southton., 25 June 1856, present Baron Lyons. =p 

Page 470. TALBOT DE MALAHIDE. 

I. 1856. 1. James Talbot, Baron Talbot of Malahide in Ireland, created Baron 
Talbot de Malahide, co. Dublin, 19 Nov. 1856, present Baron Talbot de 
Malahide. =p 

Page 505. WENSLEYDALE. 

I. 1856. 1. James Parke, Baron Wensleydale of Wensleydale (for life) : created 
Baron Wensleydale of Walton, co. Pal. Lane, to him and the heirs male 
of his body, 23 July 1856, present Baron Wensleydale. =p 

Page 521. WYCOMBE. 

Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, Esq. (commonly called Earl of Shelburne), sum- 
moned to Pari, by Writ, 14 July 1856, and placed in his father's Barony 
of Wycombe of Chipping Wycombe, co. Bucks. 



PROMOTIONS— DEATHS. 



PROMOTIONS. 

PAGE 

205. Hugh Fortescue, IV. Earl Fortescue, elected K.G. 

234. George Douglas Campbell, V. Baron Hamilton and Duke of Argyle in 

Scotland, elected K.T. 
450. Frederick William Robert Stewart, II. Baron Stewart and Marquess of 

Londonderry in Ireland, elected K.P. 
552. Rev. Charles Baring, M.A., elected Bishop of Glouc. and Bristol, July, 

1856, vice Doctor James Henry Monck, late Bishop, dec. 
565. Archibald Campbell Tait, D.C.L., Dean of Carlisle, elected Bishop of 

London, Oct. 1856, vice Doctor Charles James Blomfield, resigned. 

591. Charles Thomas Longley, D.D., Bishop of Ripon, elected Bishop of 

Durham, Oct. 1856, vice Doctor Edward Maltby, resigned. 

592. Rev. Robert Bickersteth, M.A., elected Bishop of Ripon, Dec. 1856, vice 

Longley, promoted to the See of Durham. 



DEATHS. 

69. Edmund Boyle, V. Baron Boyle, and 8th Earl of Cork and Orrery in 
Ireland ; oh. 29 June, 1856, and was succeeded by his grandson Richard 
Edmund St. Lawrance Boyle, present and VI. Baron Boyle, &c. 
94. Robert Shapland Carew, II. Baron Carew ; ob. 2 June, 1856, and was 
succeeded by his eldest son, Robert Shapland Carew, present and III. 
Baron. 

145. Arthur French, I. Baron De Freyne ; ob. s.p. 29 Sep. 1856, when the 
dignity created by the Pat. of 1839 became Extinct, but was succeeded, 
pursuant to the limitations of the Patent of 1851, by his next brother, the 
Rev. John French, present and 2nd Baron. 

160. Edward Digby, II. Earl, and V. Baron Digby ; ob. unm. 12 May, 1856, 
when the Viscounty of Coleshill and Earldom of Digby became Extinct, 
but the English Barony of Digby devolved, pursuant to the limitation of 
the Patent, upon his cousin, Edward St. Vincent Digby, present and VI. 
Baron. 

236. Field-Marshal Henry Hardinge, 1st Viscount Hardinge, G.C.B. ; ob. 24 
Sept. 1856, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Charles Stewart Hardinge, 
present and II. Viscount. 

322. Digby Willoughby, VII. Baron Middleton ; ob. 5 Nov. 1856, unm., and 
was succeeded by his cousin, Henry Willoughby, present and VIII. Baron. 

427. John Lumley-Savile, VIII. Earl of Scarborough; ob. 29 Oct. 1856, unm., 
and was succeeded by his cousin, Richard George Lumley, Esq., present 
and IX. Earl. 

427. Nathaniel Curzon, III. Baron Scarsdale ; ob. 12 Nov. 1856, unm., when 
the Abeyance of the Barony of Wentworth (and probably also that of 
Despencer of 1387) terminated in favour of Anne Isabella, dowager Lady 
Byron, and the Barony of Scarsdale devolved on his nephew, Alfred 
Nathaniel Holden Curzon, present and IV. Baron. 

435. Bertram Arthur Talbot XX., 17th Earl of Shrewsbury ; ob. unm. 10 
Aug. 1856. 

552. James Henry Monck, 1st Bishop of Glouc. and Bristol ; ob. 6 June, 1856. 



OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 



To a work containing the descent and present state of every title of 
Peerage which has existed in this country since the Conquest, some 
observations tending to explain the nature of those dignities, with a 
brief analysis of the principles which appear to have regulated their 
descent, together with a short history of the different degrees of honour 
which constituted their possessors Peers of the Realm, and the cere- 
monies attendant upon their creations, may be thought to be necessary. 
In the following attempt to afford every possible information upon the 
subject, the Editor has not only consulted the learned works of Selden 
and of Dugdale (whose ' Baronage ' is indeed the foundation of the pre- 
sent work), Brooke, Vincent, and numerous other lesser authorities, 
but has perused with deep interest and every possible attention the 
' Reports of the Lords' Committees upon the Dignity of a Peer of the 
Realm.' The extensive research, profound learning, and important 
deductions exhibited in these Reports — deductions drawn not alone 
from all that had been there collected, but from all that had been 
before printed on the subject — render the Reports themselves, and the 
Appendices which accompany them, the most valuable work that has 
yet appeared on Peerage History. 

The Editor, whilst avowing that the most important parts of the 
remarks upon the following pages have been drawn either from this 
source, or from Mr. Cruise's ' Treatise upon Dignities,' feels it right 
at the same time to acknowledge that he has not been implicitly 
guided by the dicta laid down in either of those publications, where, in 
the investigation of the numerous titles contained in these pages, his 
access to the invaluable MS. collections of Glover, Vincent, Walker, 
Anstis, Leake, and the late Francis Townsend, Esq., Windsor Herald, 
contained in the Library of the College of Arms, has produced 
different impressions upon his mind. 

The Editor has also sought to throw additional light upon a portion 
of the Lords' Reports still left in considerable obscurity, namely, the 
History of Earldoms during the first three centuries after the Norman 
Conquest, by consulting the chronicles of the Xorman and early 
Plantagenet periods, feeling assured that the nature of the dignity 
intended to be bestowed, and its limitations, would be best shown 
(when no patent existed to set them forth) by the particular circum- 
stances that attended and the observances that accompanied the be- 
stowal of the dignity. 

b 



xvm 



OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 



In these observations each dignity is treated of under a separate 
head, in the following order : — 

BARONIES, VISCOUNTIES. 

By Tenure. EARLDOMS. 

By Writ. MARQUESSATES. 

By Patent. DUKEDOMS. 

Under the head of " Baronies by Tenure," a few remarks are sub 
mitted on feudal titles generally; whilst, under "Baronies by Writ," 
what is now considered to be the law relative to Abeyances, Sittings, 
Baronies " Jure TJxoris," and the effect of Writs of Summons to the 
eldest Sons of Peers in their Fathers' Baronies, are pointed out ; and 
the subject is concluded by some observations on the effect of attain- 
ders for High Treason or Felony, upon Dignities, whether created by 
Writ or by Letters Patent. 



BARONIES BY TENURE. 

After the Conquest all dignities were attached to the possession of 
certain lands, which, agreeable to the Feudal System, introduced into 
this country by the Normans, were held immediately of the King, upon 
condition of performing certain honorary services, and which was 
called a Feudum Nobile, and undoubtedly conferred Nobility on the 
individual to whom it was granted. 

These great tenants of the Crown were, however, of two descrip- 
tions — those who held by Knight Service in Capite, and those who 
held also in Capite by Grand Serjeant} 7 ; so called, says Littleton, 
from being a greater and more worthy service than Knight Service — 
attending the King, not only in war, but in his Court, at the three 
great festivals of the year, a and at other times when summoned. To 
both descriptions of tenants the word Baron, in its more extended 
sense of Lord of a Manor, was applicable ; but the latter only, those 
who held of the King by Grand Serjeanty, held their lands per 
Baroniam, and were the King's Barons, and as such possessed both a 
civil and criminal jurisdiction, each in his Curia Baronis, or Court 
Baron, whilst the Lesser Barons had only a civil jurisdiction over 
their vassals. 

To both ranks alike pertained the service of attending the Sovereign 
in war with a certain number of knights, according to the number 
of Knights' Fees holden of the Crown ; b and to those who held per 
baroniam was annexed the duty also of attending him in his Great 
Councils, afterwards designated Parliaments ; for it was the principle 
of the Feudal System that every tenant should attend the court of his 
immediate superior, and hence it was that he who held per baroniam, 
having no superior but the Crown, was bound to attend his Sovereign 



a The King wore his Crown on these 
occasions, but at no other time except his 
I 'm onation. 

'■ The number of Knights' Fees in a Barony 



varied considerably : Selden was of opinion 
that the number depended entirely upon the 
conditions of the grant. 



BARONIES BY TENURE. xix 

in his Great Council or Parliament, which was in fact the Great Court 
Baron of the Realm. 

As feudal tenures are not now deemed to exist in this country, it is 
not necessary to inquire into the laws which more particularly regu- 
lated these services, or to attempt to investigate the precise nature of 
the legislative assemblies of the nation, antecedent to 49 Hen. III., when 
we have proof that such assemblies were convened by Writs of Summons. 

Selden considers that the lands which were conferred by W illiam 
the Conqueror on his followers descended to their posterity, forming 
the great baronial body of the kingdom ; but such a system, so appa- 
rently complete, did not long endure : the troublous and stormy period 
of the first Plantagenet' monarchs, the frequent rebellions, and un- 
settled state of public affairs, had been in themselves sufficient so to 
reduce the power of the great tenants of the Crown, that many were 
brought to poverty, whilst others alienated portions of their pos- 
sessions; and when we add to the causes produced by their own 
turbulence, amerciaments for real or pretended offences, aids, reliefs, 
and other feudal exactions, we wonder not to find that the great 
baronial tenures began to be broken up ; licences for alienation of the 
Crown tenures became frequent, and were easily obtained : by such 
means the Crown was doubly benefited, for not only were the Ex- 
chequer coffers replenished, but the power of those great vassals 
broken, who by reason of their vast estates had been enabled to make 
head against the Crown. 

Hence the principle that had governed the assembly of the Great 
Council of the Kingdom from the Conquest until the time of King 
John ceased to exist ; the alienation by the Barons of their knights' 
fees increased the number of those who held of the King in capite ; 
but as they increased in number so did they decrease in wealth and 
power ; and it resulted that, either in the reign of King John, or in 
that of his son King Henry III., the King obtained a discretionary 
power of calling to his Great Council only such persons as he thought 
fit so to summon, and the Great Council of the Realm came to be 
divided between those whose great possessions and known fidelity to 
the Crown procured them a Writ, and those who not holding per 
baroniam were yet summoned at the King's pleasure and by a Writ 
similar to that addressed to the tenants per baroniam ; all these were 
called the Greater Barons, or Barones Majores, whilst those who had 
become possessed of sub-infeudations giving manorial rights, and those 
who still held the knights' fees granted to their ancestors, were styled 
Lesser Barons, or Barones Minores, and became in process of time the 
germ of the present House of Commons, or that body, out of which 
the freemen elected their Representatives to serve in the General 
Council of the kingdom. Henceforth, as observed by Blackstone, the 
dignity of the Peerage, instead of being territorial, became personal ; 
proof of tenure per baroniam became no longer necessary, and the 
record of the Writ of Summons came to be sufficient evidence to con- 
stitute a Lord of Parliament. 

b 2 



xx OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

Under what circumstances ilie Writ in course of time was in great 
measure superseded by the Patent will be hereafter shown ; but before 
proceeding to that second era in the history of the Baronage of Eng- 
land, it may be well to notice the few instances (since the abolition 
of the Feudal System, out of which it originated, and upon which it 
depended) of a Parliamentary dignity being attempted to be established 
in virtue of a tenure per baroniam. 

In 1433 Sir John Fitz-Alan, called 7th Earl of Arundel (Duke of 
Touraine in France), petitioned to be summoned to Parliament and 
considered as Earl of Arundel, " a dignity or name united and annexed 
to the castle and lordship of Arundel for time whereof memory of man 
was not to the contrary." This claim, though opposed by John 
Mowbray Duke of Norfolk, was admitted by the Crown, or so far 
admitted as that the assertion in the petition is made the consideration 
(with others not connected with the question) for the King's acceding 
to it, with a saving, nevertheless, of the right of the King, of the Duke 
of Norfolk (who, being the heir-general of the Earls of Arundel, had 
opposed the Earl's claim), and of every other person ; which saving 
clause, as is remarked in the First Report of the Lords' Committees 
on the Dignity of a Peer, " was that species of saving which in law 
is deemed illusory, operating nothing." From John Fitz-Alan, who 
obtained this recognition of the earldom, the dignity descended to 
Henry Fitz-Alan 12th Earl of Arundel, who died in 1580 without 
male issue, when Philip Howard, his grandson, son of Thomas 4th 
Duke of No: folk, by Mary, the daughter and eventually sole heir of 
the last Earl, succeeded to the possession of the castle of Arundel and 
to that earldom. He was attainted in 1589, when his dignities became 
forfeited ; but Thomas, his son and heir, was restored to all his father's 
honours, and in 3 Car. I. 1627 obtained an Act of Parliament, which, 
in form of a petition to the King, recites that the earldom of Arundel 
had been real and local from the time whereof the memory of man was 
not to the contrary, and had from the time aforesaid been used and 
enjo} r ed by himself and such of his ancestors as had possessed the 
castle of Arundel, &c, in almost similar words to the allegations of 
the petition of John Fitz-Alan in the reign of Henry VI. ; the petition 
prays for a new settlement of the earldom of Arundel, and for the 
annexation of certain baronies to that dignity. 

An account of the new limitations annexed to the earldom by this 
Act of Parliament will be found under the heads of Arundel and Fitz- 
Alan, by virtue of which it has descended to its present possessor the 
Duke of Norfolk. " This legislative provision," the above-quoted 
Report observes, "has put an end to all questions as to the title of 
Earl of Arundel, so long as there remain issue male from the said 
Thomas Howard Earl of Arundel." AY hat may be the effect of those 
limitations on the failure of such issue male it would be impossible to 
determine, nor does the discussion fall within the object of these 
observations. The facts stated by the Lords' Committees prove that 
the tenure of the castle of Arundel did not constitute its possessor an 



BARONIES BY TENURE. xxi 

earl at the time when dignities were indubitably dependent upon terri- 
torial possessions ; hence it is difficult to believe, if it be not totally 
incredible, that it should have done so at a subsequent period ; and 
with respect to the admission by the King and Parliament in 11 Hen. 
VI. (1433), it is to be remarked that in that reign more anomalies 
with respect to the Peerage are to be found than in any which pre- 
ceded it ; and if the extraordinary proceedings in matters connected 
with the Peerage which took place under that monarch are to be con- 
sidered as evidence of the general principle which then and previously 
prevailed on the subject of Dignities, all the inferences that are to be 
drawn from what appears to have been the principle with respect to 
titles during the long period which intervened between 23 Edw. I. 
1295 and the accession of Henry in 1422 must be, in a great measure, 
abandoned. 

In 1598 Sir Edward Neville, being seised of an estate tail in the 
Castle and Lordship of Bergavenny, claimed the dignity of Baron of 
Bergavenny, not, as has been generally supposed, on the sole ground 
that the dignity was attached to the Castle of Bergavenny, but that 
he, as being seised of that Castle and as heir male of the last Lord, 
was the more eligible person. On this occasion the Lord Chief Justice 
of England (Sir John Popham) determined that there was "no right 
at all in the heir male, and therefore he must wholly rely on the 
favour of the Prince ; the common custom of England doth wholly favour 
the heir general ; that Her Majesty may call by new creation the 
heir male and omit the heir general during her life, but yet a right to 
remain to her son, having sufficient supportation. No entail can carry 
away dignity but by express words or patent." The Lord Chief 
Justice of the Common Pleas was of the same opinion. 

Upon these opinions Lady Fane, who, as daughter and heir of Henry 
Lord Bergavenny, claimed as heir general, prayed to be allowed the 
Barony, but nothing took place until 1604, when, the claims being- 
renewed, the House of Lords came to the following extraordinary 
decision, which has more the character of an amicable adjustment, 
referring chiefly to the feelings and convenience of the parties, than as 
having been regulated by any legal principle :■ — " That the question 
seemed nevertheless not so perfectly and exactly resolved as might 
give clear and undoubted satisfaction to all the consciences or judg- 
ments of all the Lords for the precise point of right ; and yet so much 
was shewn and alleged on each side as, in the opinion of the House, if 
it might stand with the King's good pleasure and grace, made them 
both capable and worthy of honour. It was therefore moved and so 
agreed that information should be given unto the King's Majesty of all 
the proceedings of the said Court in the matter ; and that humble suit 
should be made to his Majesty from the Lords for the ennobling of 
both parties by way of restitution ; the one to the said Barony of 
Abergavenny and the ancient place belonging to the same, and the 
other to the Barony of Le Despenser." 

In the reign of Charles 11. the claim to the dignity of Baron Fitz- 



& 



xxii OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

Walter was discussed before the House. Eobert Cheeke, Esq., claimed 
as coheir of the whole blood of the last Earl of Sussex, stated also to 
have been Baron Fitz-Walter, and he rested his claim also upon the 
fact of the Barony of Fitz-Walter being a Barony by Tenure. His 
claim was opposed by Henry Mildmay, Esq., heir general of Eobert 
Fitz-Walter, summoned to Parliament 23 Edw. L, under which Writ he 
claimed the Barony. The Petitions were referred in 1660, but it was 
not till 1669 (pending which period Henry Mildmay had died and 
been succeeded by his brother Benjamin Mildmay, Esq.) that the King- 
was pleased to order that the cause should be heard by the Privy 
Council on the 19th Jan. 1669, when the two Chief Justices and the 
Lord Chief Baron were ordered to attend. 

" The Counsel for the said Eobert Cheeke affirmed that the same 
was a Barony by Tenure, and ought to go along with the land, which 
the Counsel of the Petitioner denied, and offered to argue upon the 
same. Upon which both parties being ordered to withdraw, the nature 
of a Barony by Tenure being discoursed, it was found to have been discontinued 
for many ages and not in being, and so not fit to be revived or to admit any 
pretence of right of succession thereupon. And the pretence of a Barony by 
Tenure being declared for weighty reasons not to be insisted upon, &c, and 
the other points urged by Mr. Cheeke being overruled, it was ordered 
by his Majesty in Council that the Petitioner (Mildmay) be admitted 
humbly to address himself to his Majesty for his Writ to sit in the 
House of Peers as Baron Fitz-Walter, and who was so summoned 
accordingly." 

It does not appear on what grounds Mr. Cheeke's Counsel claimed 
the Barony of Fitz-Walter by Tenure, for that Barony was originally 
attached to the Tenure of the manor of Little Dunmow in Essex, which 
was granted to Eobert Fitz-Walter in the reign of Henry I. ; and at 
the period when this claim was discussed it was not in the possession 
of either of the claimants. This fact does not however in any degree 
lessen the weight of the decision of the King in Council ; for that 
decision not only refers to the individual case before it, but to the 
general principle of whether Baronies by Tenure were then in existence ; 
and when it is considered that that resolution was formed by the advice 
of the Lord Chancellor, the two Chief Justices, and of the Chief Baron 
of the Exchequer Sir Matthew Hale, whose intimate knowledge of sub- 
jects of that nature is justly noticed by the Lords' Committees, it may 
be considered that this decision was strongly confirmatory of the 
doctrine that territorial possession constituting its possessor a Baron 
of the Eealm was deemed to be entirely exploded. 

In 1661 George, 19th Lord Berkeley, petitioned the King to be 
allowed his place in Parliament above and before Lord De la War, 
grounding his claim on the Barony being by Tenure of the honour of 
P>crkeley, and reciting the circumstance of the said honour having 
been entailed on Hen. VII. by the Marquess Berkeley, "and that 

1 Report on Barony of Litslt, p. 397-400 



BARONIES BY TENURE. xxm 

consequently Sir Maurice Berkeley, the nephew and heir of the said 
Marquess, being summoned to Parliament in 14 Hen. VIII., did by 
reason of that entail sit no otherwise than as a puisne Baron ; and that 
upon the death of King Edward VI. without issue, Henry Lord 
Berkeley, nephew and heir to the said Maurice, being not till that 
time in a capacity to challenge the place of his ancestors, was then 
under age." No resolution appears to have been made on this petition, 
which, if it be correctly given by Mr. Cruise, is remarkable for the 
omission of the contest relative to the Barony in the reign of Hen. V. 
between James de Berkeley and the Earl of Warwick ; though that 
the fact above, relative to the place in which Thomas Lord Berkeley 
sat in 25 Hen. VIII. should have been suppressed is not extraordinary, 
as it is evidently made against the claim, inasmuch as it militated 
against the assertion of the Barony being by Tenure of the Castle or 
honour of Berkeley. The precedency of the Barony of Berkeley, 
under the Writ of 23 Edw. I., is certainly above that of La War, 
which was created by the Writ of 6 Eeb. 27 Edw. I., and the claim 
was not grounded on that circumstance, probably because if it was 
admitted to be a Barony by Tenure it would give its possessor a 
precedency above every Baron who was not then seised of such lands 
as constituted his ancestors Barons of the Bealm before the reign of 
Henry I. 

In 1828 a claim to the Barony of Berkeley by virtue of Tenure was 
made by the present Earl Fitzhardinge (then Colonel Berkeley), but 
no judgment was pronounced thereupon by the House of Lords. Sir 
Harris Nicolas, in his statement on behalf of Sir John Shelley Sidney, 
Bail., petitioning at the same time that his claim to the said Barony 
might not be prejudiced, observes — that, had the claim been granted, 
it would not only have been "without a single precedent, but in 
opposition to the incontrovertible fact that no claim to a Barony on 
the ground of Tenure was ever admitted, and that at no period since 
the reign of Henry III. has Tenure per Baroniam been deemed to con- 
stitute a right to a Writ of Summons." 

On 26 July 1444 John Talbot was created Baron L'Isle, of Kingston 
L'Isle, co. Berks, by one of the most extraordinary Patents on record, 
limiting that dignity to the said John and to his heirs and assigns for 
ever, being tenants of the manor of Kingston L'Isle. John Dudley 
Duke of Northumberland sold the manor in 1538 to William Hyde, 
Esq., from whose family it passed in 1745 to Abraham Atkins, of 
Clapham, co. Surrey, Esq. 

In 1790 a Case was drawn up on behalf of the said Abraham Atkins, 
who considered that by the purchase of the inheritance of the said 
manor, and being in actual possession thereof, a right was vested in 
him to be summoned to Parliament and to be a Baron of the Bealm 
without any manner of creation : no further steps were however taken 
in the matter. 

In 1805 the question of Barony by Tenure became incidental to the 
claim of Lady Henry Fitzgerald to the Barony of Boos, she being 



xxiv OBSEKVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

coheir of the body of Eohert de Roos, summoned to Parliament 49 
Henry III, The ancestors of this Robert were unquestionably Barons 
of the Realm by Tenure, either of the Manors of Hameslake or Trusbut, 
or the Castle of Belvoir, each of which was held of the Crown in capite 
per Baroniam. The Manors of Hameslake and Trusbut were then 
alienated ; but the Honour and Castle of Belvoir was held by the Duke 
of Rutland, who consequently opposed Lady Henry Fitzgerald's peti- 
tion on the ground that the Barony of Roos was a Barony by Tenure, 
and that where an ancient Baron, holding a Baronial estate, i. e. a 
castle or manor held of the King in capite per Baroniam, was summoned 
to Parliament, his title did not arise from the Writ of Summons, but 
from his Barony, and he became a Baron by Tenure. The House of 
Lords, however, resolved, " that the Duke of Rutland was not entitled 
to the Barony claimed on the part of the coheirs of Robert de Roos." 
This decision, though not so conclusive as that in the case of the 
Barony of Fitz- Walter (for it conveys only an implied opinion on 
Baronies by Tenure, inasmuch as, notwithstanding that the House 
resolved that the Barony claimed by Lady Henry Fitzgerald was a 
distinct dignity from that contended for by the Duke of Rutland, 
yet it expressed no resolution whether the Tenure of the Castle of 
Belvoir did or did not confer a Barony on its possessor), must, however, 
be considered in a great degree confirmatory of the resolution of the 
Privy Council in 1669, so that it may be deemed highly improbable, 
if not impossible, that any claim to a Dignity by Tenure of Land, will 
ever be admitted. 

In July 1814 Lewis Dymoke, Esq., the descendant of Sir John 
Dyinoke, Knight, Lord of Scrivelsby, presented a petition to the 
King, praying him to be pleased to declare the petitioner entitled to 
the Barony of Marmion of Scrivelsby, in virtue of the seisure of the 
manor of Scrivelsby ; which petition was referred to the Attorney- 
General, who having reported thereon, the same was referred to the 
House of Lords, where evidence was received at the bar, and the 
Claimant's Counsel summed up, when the Attorney-General was heard 
in reply, and tendered some documents on the part of the Crown ; 
but the claimant died, and no judgment was given. 

With respect to this claim, it is to be observed, that, though the 
manor of Scrivelsby was held by the service of performing the office of 
King's Champion by Robert de Marmion in the reign of William the 
Conqueror, he was not by seisure thereof a Baron, but by seisure of 
the Castle and Barony of Tamworth, which he held of the King in 
capite by Knight's service ; so that, if at this period Baronies by 
Tenure were admitted, tfie possessor of the Manor and Lordship of 
Tamworth (which in the division of his property fell to the share of 
Joan, his eldest daughter, wife of William Moreteyn, and on her 
death, s. p., to Alexander Freville, husband of Joan daughter and heir 
of Ralph Cromwell, by Margery or Mazera the next sister of the said 
Joan de Moreteyn) would possess the claim to the Barony possessed 
by Robert de Marmion above mentioned, he having derived his dignity 



BARONIES BY WRIT. 



XXV 



from that Barony, instead of from the seisure of the manor of Scrivelsby. 
Moreover, if Philip Marmion, the last Baron, had died seised of a Barony 
in fee, Lewis Dymoke the claimant was not even a coheir of the said 
Philip, though he was the descendant of one of his daughters and 
coheirs. 

BARONIES BY WRIT. 

The cause to which the origin of Baronies by Writ may be imputed 
has been examined in the preceding pages ; and although it may seem 
doubtful whether to attribute to King John or to King Hen. III., 
from the causes there set forth, the first exercise, rightfully or wrong- 
fully, of that discretionary power which summoned to Parliament only 
such persons as the Sovereign thought fit, including some who held 
lands by Barony, and others who did not, thus changing the dignity 
of sitting in the supreme Council of the Kingdom from a Territorial 
into a Personal Honour, it is certain that, whatever may have 
been the privileges of those persons who antecedently held lands 
by Barony, at no period subsequent to 23 Edw. I. did such tenure 
constitute, ex debito justicice, a right in the Tenant to be summoned to 
Parliament as a Peer of the Eealm, such right thenceforth emanating 
from the King's Writ alone. 

It may be useful, however, to trace in the first Parliaments of which 
we have any recorded proceedings how far the ancient element of 
Eight by Tenure entered into, or was permitted to infuse itself into, 
the new system that had been adopted by the Crown : — ■ 

The first Writ extant is that of the 49 Hen. III., but very little can 
be gathered from it, as it does not contain the names of one-third part 
of the Baronial body, and, though issued in the King's name, the King 
was himself a prisoner to the Earl of Leicester, the leader of the 
rebellious Barons, who, it may fairly be inferred, summoned only 
those Barons who took part with him against the Iioyal cause. 

There are three Writs extant of the 23 Edw. L, but as, in the two 
last, those only who were summoned in the first Writ were included, 
it is not necessary to notice them. The earliest Writ of that year is 
tested 24 June 1295, by which eleven Earls and fifty -three Barons were 
summoned. Of the latter number, forty-two were certainly Barons by 
Tenure ; one, Alan Plugenet, was seised of lands which had previously 
been held per Baroniam ; and a second, Thomas de Furnival, is ranked 
by Dugdale among the Barons by Tenure, though he cites a record to 
prove that he did not hold his lands by Barony ; d but the remaining 
/^'//e e are not anywhere stated to have been previously Barons of the 
realm. Thus, although the greater part of those summoned by that 



d See p. 206. It was found by Inquisition 
19 Edw. II. that he did not hold by barony ; 
nevertheless he continued to be summoned, 
as were his son and grandson, thus showing 
that his Writ issued not by reason of tenure, 
but by the grace and favour, or rather the 



will, of the Crown. 

e Nicholas de Meynill, Walter de Faucon- 
berg, Robert de Hilton, Walter de Hunter- 
combe, Robert Lascells, Nicholas de Segrave, 
Hugh Pointz, Geoil'ry de Camville, and Bogo 
de Knovill. 



XXVI 



OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 



Writ were tenants of lands per Baroniam, yet, from being extensive 
landed proprietors, and consequently persons of considerable import- 
ance, they would naturally have been selected by the King to attend 
his Parliament ; and it is equally as probable that a Writ was issued 
to each of them from the mere grace of the Crown, as that the tenure 
of their lands entitled them to demand it, because we have positive 
proof that all the persons in the kingdom who held per Baroniam, each 
of whom would have had the same right to demand a Writ as those 
who received it (if being tenants of land per Baroniam constituted that 
right), were not summoned ; whilst, on the other hand, nearly a fifth of 
those summoned by the Writ of 23 Edw. I. did not hold lands per 
Baroniam, and were not consequently before considered as Barons of 
the Realm. If therefore every person seised of lands per Baroniam was, 
as has been contended, entitled to demand a Writ of Summons to Parlia- 
ment, the partial number selected by the King on that occasion, and 
still more the circximstance of nine or ten individuals being so selected 
who did not hold lands by that tenure, cannot be reconciled to any 
principle of justice on the part of the Crown. 

In the 24 Edw. I. one Writ of Summons to Parliament was issued, 
in which only thirty-seven Barons were included, nearly, if not all 
of whom had been summoned in 23 Edw. I. The Writ of 25 Edw. I. 
cannot be considered a Writ of Summons to Parliament; and the 
next Writ on record is that of 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299. This Writ 
included ten Earls and eighty Barons ; the considerable difference 
between which number of Barons and those summoned in 23 Edw. I. 
is worthy of attention. Of the fifty-three Barons included in the Writ 
of 23 Edw. I. only thirty-five were summoned in that of 27 Edw. 1.; 
hence forty -five persons were then summoned for the first time ; and 
eighteen who were summoned in 23 Edw. I. were omitted. If the 
forty-five persons in question had all been Barons by Tenure, it might 
have been argued that, though omitted in 23 Edw. I., they had, 
between that year and 27 Edw. I., established their claim to attend 
the Legislative Assemblies of the Kingdom, and that their pretensions 
to do so were then recognised by this Writ ; but on examination it 
appears that only twenty-four f of that number held lands per Baroniam, 
whilst twenty-one 8 were never before Barons of the Eealm. The twenty- 
four persons who held per Baroniam, added to the forty-two or forty- 
three who were summoned by the Writs of 23 Edw. I., would only 
make sixty-six or sixty-seven individuals who held by that tenure, if it 
be inferred that every person who held per Baroniam was included in 



1 Zouche, Deincourt, Montalt (this Baron 
is deemed a Baron by Tenure, as his brother 
to whom he was heir, and to whose lands he 
consequently succeeded, was a Baron by 
Tenure, and was summoned to Parliament in 
23 Edw. I., but died two years afterwards, 
S. P.), Pinkney, Basset of Weldon, Plessetis, 
Tony, Scales, Engaine, Eitz-Payne, Jloels, 
Hugh de Mortimer, Courtenay, Mohun, Cha- 
worth, Multon, Bardolf, Genevjl, Clinton, 



Beauchamp, Stafford, Tregoz, L'Orti, and 
Percy. 

s Ferrers (his father was Earl of Derby, 
but his lands were forfeited), Welles, Hacche, 
La Warr, Havering, Grandison, John Eitz- 
Roger, Peyvre, Tyes, St. Philibert, Leyburn, 
Vavasour, Ap Adam, Muncy, Pipard, Deve- 
roux, Latimer jun., Lansladron, Walter de 
Teyes, and Ripariis. 



BARONIES BY WRIT. xxvii 

some Writ between 23 and 27 Edw. I., a number certainly very much 
below not only the number of persons who held parts of a Barony, 
even allowing each of those parts to include the Caput Baroniw, but 
likewise the number of persons who were then seised of an entire 
Barony. 

By this Writ of 27 Edw. I. twenty-one persons were added to the 
Baronage of the Kingdom, and with the ten added by the Writ of 
23 Edw. I., and one or two summoned by separate Writs between that 
year and 27 Edw. I., the Peerage, independent of Earls, consisted in 
the year last mentioned of about one hundred persons, sixty-six of whom, 
having held lands per Baroniam, had been Barons by Tenure, and thirty- 
three or thirty-four had only become so by virtue of a W T rit of Summons 
to Parliament. The greatest number of Barons ever summoned to 
Parliament between 23 Edw. I. and 5 Edw. II., both years inclusive, 
was on 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299, when ninety-nine Barons were 
summoned. This number, agreeable to the above calcidation, was 
about what is considered to have been the extent of the Baronage of 
this Kingdom : on that occasion, however, one individual who was not 
a Baron by Tenure, Almaric de St. Amand, was summoned for the 
first time. The next greatest number ever summoned in the above 
period was in 32 Edw. I., when ninety-four Barons are named in the 
Writ tested 12 Nov. 1304 ; but they consisted only of those who had 
been previously summoned, with the exception of Piobert de Burghersh 
and William Paynell, neither of whom were Barons by Tenure. 

It would be difficult to give an exact statement of what persons were 
Barons by Tenure in 23 Edw. I. It is, however, certain that their 
number during that reign greatly exceeded the number of persons 
summoned to Parliament. Mr. Cruise remarks, " Matthew Paris or 
his continuator relates that King Henry III., being at St. Alban's, 
and having occasion to speak of his brother Kichard Earl of Cornwall, 
reckoned first the names of the Kings of England that were canonized 
for saints, and afterwards the names of the Barons of England that he 
could remember, which he found to be two hundred and fifty. Camden's 
copy has only one hundred and fifty ; and Selden observes that this 
latter number was positively the true reading, it appearing from the 
Close Kolls, 47 Hen. III., that the Temporal Barons by Tenure, being 
about one hundred and fifty, were called in that year, by several Writs, 
to be present, cum equis et armis ad habendum servitium. This calculation 
must, however, be understood to apply only to the period when it was 
made, and to the Barones Majores only, for in the time of the Conqueror 
and his sons, when every tenant in capite who had a manor was a Baron, 
the number must have been much greater." h 

Thus, admitting that the number of persons who held lands per 
Baroniam in 23 and 27 Edw. I. did not exceed the number stated to 
have done so in 47 Hen. III., namely, one hundred and fifty, and 
deducting from that amount sixty-six, the number of persons who held 

b Cruise on Dignities, page 37. 



XXV111 



OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 



per Baroniam and were summoned to Parliament, it appears that eighty- 
four, considerably above half of the individuals of the kingdom who 
before the 23 Edw. I. were indisputably Barons of the Eealm, were 
never included in any Writ of Summons to Parliament. 

Having thus discussed the circumstances attending this vast altera- 
tion in the Constitution of the Eealm, which changed altogether the 
supreme Council of the Kingdom, and, striking at the very root of the 
fexidal system, had given to its members a new dignity, making that 
personal which had before been territorial, it may be well to proceed 
next to some remarks on the nature of the dignity conferred by these 
writs. 

It is certain that the effect of them was always to render the 
persons to whom they were addressed Barons of the Eealm ; and 
though some writers have expressed a different opinion, there are 
strong grounds for considering that the dignity thus created was of an 
hereditary nature. The opinion that a Writ of Summons was not 
originally intended to create an hereditary dignity rests chiefly on 
the absence of any words for that purpose in the writs, and on the 
fact that in some instances persons were summoned to Parliament in 
the reign of Edward I., Edward II., and even in that of Edward III., 
who were never afterward summoned, or who, if summoned on 
subsequent occasions, similar writs were never issued to their 
descendants. 

Lord Eedesdale, in the course of the discussion on the Lisle 
peerage, asserted that the introduction of the creation of a Baron by 
Letters Patent, by Eichard II., was said to have arisen from its not 
having then been considered as established by law that the AVrits 
would create an hereditary dignity, whilst the reason assigned for the 
same act by the Lords' Committee in their First Eeport is, that, as 
writs were then held to create a dignity to the heirs general of the 
parties who receive them, it was the intention of that creation to limit 
the descent of the title to the heirs male of the body of the grantee. 

In support of the view entertained by the Lords' Committee, it is 
not found that, after the introduction of the creation by Patent, the 
ancient Barons, who sat by virtue of the King's Writ to them and 
their ancestors, applied for any ratification of their dignity by a 
Patent, which they would have done had they not conceived it was an 
heritable dignity, as secure and more extensive than that granted by 
the King's Patent. Neither do we find, on the other hand, a single 
instance, from the reign of King Edward I. until that of King Henry 
VI., of the termination of an Abeyance of any one of the many 
baronies which had become dormant by falling amongst female heirs ;' 
for could it be shown by incontrovertible evidence that the Abeyance 
of any one barony had been terminated in favour of one of the coheirs 
general, the principle that the summons by writ created a descendible 



' Instances are found, similar to that of 
Audley, where one of several coheirs is sum- 



moned, but there is no evidence to show that 
it was not a new Barony. 



BARONIES BY WRIT. xxix 

dignity would have been established beyond all doubt. In the 
absence of any such evidence it must either have been considered that 
the dignity was in the Crown during the continuance of the coheir- 
ships, or that it was not of that descendible nature that modern 
decisions have given to it. 

Since the reign of Henry VI., however, when the cases of St. 
Amand in 1449, and Cromwell in 1461, occurred, the cases are fre- 
quent in which the principle of the descendible nature of the dignity 
created by Writ has seemed to be recognised ; but it was not till 
1673, k in the case of the Barony of Clifton, that this principle was 
solemnly established by decision of the House of Lords (after taking 
the opinion of the Judges), and it has since been so fully recognised 
and frequently acted upon, that it may be regarded as part of the 
Constitution of the Peerage. 

The following is the usual form of a Writ of Summons to Par- 
liament : — 

" Eex, &c, dilecto et fideli nostro .... quia super quibusdam 
arduis negotiis, nos et regnum nostrum cseterosque proceres et 
magnates, de eodem regno tangent ibus, quae sine vestra et eorum 
praesentia nolumus expederi, Parliamentum nostrum tenere, et vobis- 
cum super hiis colloquium habere volumus, et tractatum ; vobis 
mandamus in fide et homagio quibus nobis tenemini, fimiiter injun- 
gentes quod sitis ad nos apud Westmonasterium .... die mensis 
.... proximi futuro, vel saltern infra terminum diei subsequentis 
ad ultimum, nobiscum super dictis negotiis tractaturi, et vestruni con- 
silium impensuri ; et hoc nullo modo omittatis. Teste me ipso," &c. 

There is a solitary instance, 1 however, of an express limitation of the 
dignity to the heirs male of the body of the person to whom the Writ 
was issued being inserted in the Writ of Summons which created the 
dignity ; but the preceding is the usual form of Writs of this nature, 
though slight variations from each other are sometimes to be found. 

Writs of Summons to Parliament are of that species usually called 
brevia dausa, because they are closed up with yellow wax, and sealed 
with the Great Seal of England ; they are then sent with labels to 
every individual Peer. Selden observes that the Writs of Summons 
differed according to the quality of the persons to whom they were 
addressed. The Spiritual Barons were commanded to be present in 
fide et clelectione quibus nobis tenemini, and the Temporal Peers in fide et 
homagio, until about the middle of the reign of Edward III., when the 



k In 1627 Catherine widow of Sir Charles j established in 1673 was confirmed, but 

Cavendish had become sole heir to the Barony J several Lords, and amongst them the Earl 

of Ogle, but it was not till 4 Dec. 1628 that j Marshal, protested against the resolution upon 

the King; declared her by Letters Patent to j the ground, apparently, that such a dignity 

be Baroness Ogle; and so late as 1694, upon | vested in the Crown immediately that it fell 

a question put to the House, " whether, if a amongst coheirs, as had been ruled by the 

Baron by Writ die, leaving issue two or more Judges in the Earl of Oxford's case in the 

daughters, who all die. one of them only ' time of Charles I. 

leaving issue, such issue has a righi to demand ' The Barony of vescy. 
a Summons to Parliament ? the principle 



XXX 



OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 



words in fide et ligeantid began to be used instead of them, but after- 
wards the word homagio was sometimes inserted. The Writs that were 
addressed to those persons who had place in Parliament but no voice 
in its deliberations, namely, the Judges, the Attorney-General, and 
the King's Serjeants, commanded them, ut intersitis nobiscum et cum 
ccBteris de consilio nostro ; and sometimes nobiscum only, super pramissis 
tractaturi, vestrumque consilium impensuri ; whereas that of the Barons was 
quod intersitis cum prcelatibns magnatibus et proceribus, &c, a difference 
which still continues.™ In these Writs the Temporal Barons were 
generally styled by their baptismal and surnames only, though in 
many instances, where there were other Barons of the same surname, 
an addition, most commonly derived from their place of residence, was 
introduced, and which, it is submitted, was not inserted with any 
other object than to distinguish one Baron from another of the same 
name. On these additions, an example of which occurs in the earliest 
Writ on record, many remarks will be found in other parts of this 
work," in consequence of some attempts having been made to establish 
that the additions in question constituted the title of the Barony, but 
for the reasons there stated it is presumed that in every instance, until 
the reign of Henry VI., the proper title of a Barony created by Writ 
was that of the surname of the person who was first summoned to 
Parliament. In subsequent years the addition of Miles, or Chevalier, 
was made to the name of each Baron, the latter of which is still pre- 
served, every Baron being now addressed only as a Knight. After 
the 20th year of the reign of Henry VI. we occasionally find that 
Barons were summoned by the style of Dominus ; for instance, " Henr' 
Percy D'no de Ponynges, Edwardo de Grey D'no de Ferrariis," &c. ; on 
which subject some comments will be found in the pages just referred 
to. Two instances occur in which the word Baron was applied in 
early Writs to names in Writs of Summons ; but this addition was 
always confined to the families of Stafford and Grey stock, who are 
frequently styled " Edmo Baroni Staff'" or " Edmo Baroni de Staff'," 
and " Joh'i Baroni de Grey stock," but for what reason they were so dis- 
tinguished has never been ascertained. 

Mr. Cruise contends that a solemn investiture with robes in Parlia- 
ment was formerly necessary to complete a dignity created by Writ of 
Summons; but this practice ceased about 13 Jas. I., when the law- 
yers declared that the delivery of the Letters Patent, without cere- 
mony, was sufficient, and in subsequent Patents of Creation investiture 
was dispensed with. 

Sir William Blackstone says that some were of opinion that there 
must be at least two Writs of Summons and a sitting in two distinct 
Parliaments to evidence an hereditary Barony ; ° but this is a mistake, 
for in the case of the Barony of Clifton there was but one Writ, and a 
sitting under it, which was held sufficient to create a Barony. p In 



m Cruise, pp. 70, 71. 

" See pages 14, 102, 1G8, 223. 



° Commentaries, lutli ed. vol 
'' Cruise, p. 79. 



400. 



BARONIES BY WRIT. xxxi 

the case of the Barony of Freschcvillo, which was claimed in 1677, 
under a single Writ of Summons, issued in 25 Edw. I., the House of 
Lords refused to allow the dignity, on the ground that a single Writ 
of Summons, without any proof of a sitting under it, did not create an 
hereditary Barony. This principle was also acted upon in 8 Jas. I., 
when a question having arisen in Parliament whether Edward Neville, 
who was summoned to Parliament in 2 and 3 Phil, and Mary, hut died 
before the Parliament met, was a Baron or not ? — it was resolved, " that 
the direction and delivery of the Writ did not make him a Baron, or 
noble, until he came to Parliament, and there sat according to the com- 
mandment of the Writ, for until that the Writ did not take effect." ( i 

As there is no instance of a Barony having been created by Letters 
Patent until 11 Eic. II., 1387, in claiming a dignity of an earlier creation 
than that year it will always be presumed to have originated in a 
Writ of Summons, and consequently that it is a Barony in fee. In the 
consideration of the question of who constituted the Barons of the 
Realm after the reign of Edward I., it has been presumed in this work 
that those only who received Writs of Summons to Parliament, either 
before the close of that reign or very early in that of his successor, 
continued to be ranked among the baronial body. 

The subject of Baronies by Writ will be concluded by a few 
observations on the question whether the many Baronies created by 
Writs in the reign of Edward I., Edward II., and Edward III., may 
still be deemed to be in existence, notwithstanding that no person has 
been summoned in them for several centuries ; and still more, not- 
withstanding that in many instances the male descendants of the 
persons so summoned, though living in affluence, and sometimes 
persons of importance, were never summoned to Parliament. It would 
be difficult to pronounce a decided opinion on the question, but it being 
now the doctrine that a Writ of Summons, and a Sitting under such 
Writ, creates a Barony in fee, it may be concluded that nothing but a 
corruption of blood can affect the descent of such dignity to the heirs 
of individuals who have been summoned to and sat in Parliament, 
however long the title may have remained dormant, or whatever 
cause may exist for presuming that, at the period when the son or 
grandsons of those who were summoned to Parliament lived, it was 
considered that they had no hereditary claim to the dignity possessed 
by their ancestor. It has been laid down that dignities are not within 
the statute of limitations, and may therefore be claimed at any 
distance of time : for as a dignity cannot be aliened, surrendered, or 
extinguished, so neither can it be lost by the negligence of any person 
entitled to it. The Lords' Committees, towards the conclusion of their 
Third Report, allude to this circumstance, and observe — 

" The descendants of many persons who have been in former times 
summoned to Parliament by Writ appear not to have been afterward 
summoned; and therefore, if the rule of law now clearly established, 



'' ( !ruise on Dignities, p. 78. 



xxxii OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

that a Writ and Sitting in Parliament will create an hereditary right to 
the dignity of Peer of the Kealm, were applied indefinitely, as the Lord 
Frescheville urged it ought to be, it would introduce many persons 
into the Peerage who are not now supposed to have a title to that 
dignity. It seems evident therefore that recourse to ancient rights, 
applying to them the principles of modern resolutions and decisions, 
must create infinite difficulty and embarrassment." 

Before closing these observations on Baronies, it may be observed 
that the first instance in which Barons and Earls appear to have been 
styled Peers is, in the award of exile, against Hugh le Despencer, and 
Hugh le Despencer, his son, in the Parliament which met at Westminster 
in 14 Edw. II., 1321, which instrument concludes in the following 
words, " Therefore we Peers of the Land, Earls and Barons, in the pre- 
sence of the King, do award that Sir Hugh le Despencer, the father, 
and Sir Hugh le Despencer, the son, be disinherited for ever," &c. 

ABEYANCE. 

The term Abeyance has been applied during the last two centuries 
to that state or condition of a Barony where the Baron by Writ having 
died, leaving only female heirs, the dignity, being indivisible, reverts 
to the Crown, as the fountain of honour, to be conferred on such one 
of the coheirs as the Sovereign should think fit, or, in default of such 
exercise of the Boyal prerogative, to remain in the Crown until there be 
a sole heir in whom it can legally vest : during this period of suspense 
the Barony is commonly said to be in Abeyance. For instance, in the 
case of the Barony of Zouche of Haringworth, an Abeyance in which 
has been twice terminated of late years : — Edward Lord Zouche, 
whose Barony was created by a Writ of Summons to his ancestor 
William le Zouche in 1308, died in 1625, leaving two daughters, 
Elizabeth and Mary, between whom the Barony fell into Abeyance. 
Both these ladies married and left issue, and the title therefore con- 
tinued in that state until 1815, when the Crown exercised its preroga- 
tive by terminating the Abeyance in favour of Sir Cecil Bisshopp, 
Bart., one of the representatives of Elizabeth Zouche above-mentioned, 
and one of the coheirs of the dignity, and who, having been summoned 
to Parliament, took his seat in the precedency of the original Barony. 
Upon his death, without issue male, 11 Nov. 1828, the dignity again 
fell into Abeyance, not, however, between his issue female and the 
other coheirs of Edward Lord Zouche who died in IG25, but between 
his two daughters only, and so continued till the following January, 
when the Abeyance was again terminated in favour of the eldest. In 
the event of failure of the issue of the body of Cecil Lord Zouche, in 
whose favour the Abeyance was first terminated, but not till then, the 
representation of the dignity will again vest in the heirs of Edward 
Lord Zouche who died in 1625 ; and should the representation of that 
personage be among two or more coheirs, the Crown ma} r again bestow 
the dignity on which of the said coheirs it may think proper. 



ABEYANCE. xxxiii 

The representation of a Barony by Writ is always vested in the 
heirs of the body of the person first created ; thus on the death without 
issue of a Baron who inherited the dignity from his ancestors, the 
title, if there be no brother living or no issue of such brother, becomes 
vested in his sister or sisters, or their heirs ; in default of which it 
will revert to his eldest and other uncle or uncles, and his and their 
issue ; failing which, to his aunts and their issue — the females of each 
generation being preferred to the males of the preceding generation. 
On the failure of the issue of a Baron inheriting a dignity from his 
mother, and also of the issue of such mother, the dignity of course 
devolves on the heir general, ex parte materna. 

The earliest instance of the Crown having terminated an Abeyance 
of a dignity has been alleged to have taken place in the reign of 
Henry VI., r the case being that of Cromwell. Ralph Lord Cromwell 
inherited the Barony of Cromwell from his grandfather Ralph de 
Cromwell (who was summoned to Parliament on 28 Dec. 49 Edw. 
III. 1375), and died in 1455 without issue, leaving Maud his sister 
his heir, on whom the Barony consequently devolved ; she married 
Sir Richard Stanhope, and by him left two daughters and coheirs ; 
Maud the eldest was thrice married, and left issue ; and Joane the 
youngest married Humphrey Bourchier, third sou of Henry Earl of 
Essex, which Humphrey, having been summoned to Parliament by 
Writs addressed " Humfrido Bourchier de Cromwell, or Humfrido D'n'o 
Cromwell, or Humfrido Cromwell, Chevalier," from 1 to 9 Edw. IV., is 
considered to have had the Abeyance of the Barony of Cromwell ter- 
minated in his favour jure uxoris. It is very doubtful, nevertheless, 
whether the first Writ to Humphrey Bourchier can be pronounced to 
be a tennination of the Abeyance of the original Barony of Cromwell, 
inasmuch as, being in right of his wife possessed of the Baronial lands 
of Cromwell, he was a fit and proper person to be ennobled by the 
Crown; and although it was at this time the common practice to 
summon the husbands of women possessed of Baronies, still it does 
not in this case appear that he had issue by his said wife, so as to 
have obtained that interest in law in his wife's inheritance which 
was considered sufficient to entitle him to a summons in her right : 
the Writ probably therefore created a new Barony of Cromwell, and 
this presumption is confirmed by his precedence in the Lists of Sum- 
monses being that of his own summons, 1461, and not that of the old 
Barony of Cromwell. 

Another instance of the termination of an Abeyance of a Barony, not 
by the exercise of the Royal Prerogative, but by the determination of 
the dignity in a sole heir, had previously occurred in the instance of 
St. Amand. Almaric St. Amand inherited the Barony of St. Amand 
under a Writ issued to his grandfather in 6 Edw. II. 1313. The said 
Baron his son, and Almaric de St. Amand his grandson, were conse- 



r The case of John Tuchet, summ. to Pari. I in right of the Barony of Audley, of which he 
as " John Tuchet" in 1405, is much earlier, | was a coheir, is extremely doubtful. 
bat whether summoned in his own right, or ' 



xxxiv OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

quently repeatedly summoned to Parliament ; but the last dying 
without issue male in 1402, the dignity fell into Abeyance between 
Gerard Braybrooke his grandson (namely, son and heir of Alianore 
his eldest daughter, who died before her father), and Ida his daughter 
by his second wife. Ida married Sir Thomas West, but died without 
issue in 1416, when the Barony became vested in the three daughters 
and coheirsjof Gerard Braybrooke above mentioned, and consequently 
was in Abeyance, and so continued till 1429, when, by the death of 
her two sisters without issue, Elizabeth the eldest and wife of William 
Beauchamp became the sole heir, and he, having issue by his said wife, 
was summoned to Parliament jure uxoris, by Writ 2 Jan. 27 Hen. 
VI. 1449, and addressed Willielmo de Beauchamp Domino de St. Amand. 
Neither of these cases therefore can be quoted as affording testimony 
of the exercise of the Eoyal Prerogative in the termination of an Abey- 
ance at the period in question, and indeed Lord Coke in his 12th 
Beport speaks of Camden (a century and a half later) having told him 
that some held that if a Baron died having issue several daughters, the 
King might confer the dignity on him who married any of them, and 
quotes the case of Cromwell. It is not till the reign of King Charles I., 
in the case of the Earldom of Oxford, 1625, that the principle of the 
termination of an Abeyance as now practised appears to have been 
fully recognised, though not acted on. On that occasion the Judges 
impute a retrospective right in King Henry VIII. to have disposed of 
the Baronies which had descended to the sisters and coheirs of John 
de Vere 14th Earl of Oxford in 1525, in such manner as he thought fit. 
They do not say that the dignities fell into Abeyance between the 
said coheirs, but that the dignities, not being dividable, had reverted 
to the Crown and were at the disposition of the King. 5 

The principle here laid down was adhered to in the case of the 
Barony of Windsor in 1660, which may probably be considered as the 
earliest instance of this principle (already recognised) being acted on, 
and of the termination of an Abeyance in a way at all analogous to the 
practice of the present day : on this occasion the King, by Patent 
having stated the death of the last Lord Windsor without issue, leaving 
two sisters and coheirs, goes on to say that, the title of Dignity and 
Barony being in the Crown, " titulus dignitatis et baronia predicta penes nos 
sunt" to be disposed of to such one of the coheirs as he thought fit, he 
therefore constituted the said Thomas Windsor Windsor, alias Hickman, 
and his heirs to be Barons Windsor. 

In the case of the Barony of Ferrers of Chartley, 17 years after, the 
declaratory Patent was dispensed with, and Pobert Lord Ferrers took 
his seat under the King's Writ only. Since that time so numerous are 
the instances of like nature that have occurred, that this exercise of 
the Prerogative has become as nmch a part of the constitution of the 
Peerage as the descendible nature of the Peerages themselves. 

The manner of terminating the Abeyance of a dignity in favour of a 



Tniise on Dignities, p. 183. 



SITTINGS IN PARLIAMENT. xxxv 

person who is not a Peer is now merely the issuing of a Writ of Sum- 
mons by the style and title of the Barony of which he is the coheir, 
although it has been shown that in 1(3 GO the declaratory Patent pre- 
ceded the Writ. Where the person in whose favour an Abeyance is 
determined is already a Peer and has a higher dignity, the King con- 
firms the Barony to him by Letters Patent ; and in the case of a female 
an Abeyance is also terminated by Patent; Windsor in 1660 is an 
instance of the declaratory Patent; Ferrers of Chartley, 1677, and 
numerous others, of the Writ only. The instances in which females 
have been allowed dignities which were previously in Abeyance, by 
Letters Patent, are those of Clifford in 1734 and 1833, Roos in 1804, Bray 
in 1839, Windsor in 1855 : in the case of the Barony of North, which 
fell into Abeyance 1802 between the three sisters and coheirs of the 
last Baron, the dignity vested in 1841 in Susan present Baroness North, 
one of the said sisters, the other two having died without issue, but in 
this case there was no declaratory Patent : in 1627, when the Barony 
of Ogle vested in Lady Catherine Cavendish in a similar way, the 
King, by a Patent 4 Dec. in the year following, declared her Baroness 
Ogle. 

SITTINGS IN PARLIAMENT. 

It has been already observed that to constitute a Barony in fee there 
must be a Sitting in Parliament under the Writ of Summons ; hence 
some observations on the proof of such Sitting may be necessary. 

The proof of a Sitting in Parliament must, according to Lord Coke, 
be by the Records of Parliament, and such only have been hitherto 
admitted by the House of Lords. The most ancient ' proof of Sitting 
in Parliament which is extant are two records published in the Polls 
of Parliament, vol. i. pp. 25 and 224, in which the names of several 
persons who then sat in Parliament are mentioned : one of them relates 
to a Parliament held in 6, and the other to a Parliament held in 18 
Edw. I., for which years no Writs of Summons are extant. 

After 18 Edw. I. no proof of Sittings is to be found on the Polls 
of Parliament until 33 Edw. I., u when certain Barons are named, 
with sundry Bishops, Abbots, and Earls, as having been assigned to 
treat of the affairs of Scotland ; but this Eecord, on being tendered in 
the Botetourt case to prove the sitting of John de Botetourt, who was 
one of the said Lords, was refused to be received as evidence by the 
Lords' Committee, on the ground that it was not written upon the 
Close Roll, but affixed or tacked to it, and that it was written in a 
different hand from that of the Roll. The next earliest proof of Sitting 
which occurs on the Rolls of Parliament is that of 35 Edw. I., which 
occurs in vol. i. p. 188 of the Printed Rolls. 

The Journals of the House of Lords commence in 1 Hen. VIII. , 
from which time all proofs of a Sitting in Parliament must be from 
the entries in the Journals : from the 7th to the 25th of that reign 



1 Cruise, p. 185. u Rolls of Pari. vol. i. 267. 

C 2 



xxxvi OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

they have, however, been lost ; hence no proof of a Sitting within that 
period can be adduced. 

In proving a Sitting under a Writ of Summons, when a long series 
of Writs are recorded to have been issued to several successive Barons, 
it seems to have been held that it is sufficient to show a Sitting of any 
individual from whom the claimant is descended ; for in the Botetourt 
case no proof was received of the sitting of John de Botetourt the first 
Baron, who was summoned from 33 Edw. I. to 18 Edw. II. ; but the 
proof that John de Botetourt his grandson and heir, the second Baron, 
sat in Parliament in 50 Edw. III. was alone read in evidence, though 
he was summoned from the 16th of that reign to 9 Bic. II. ; and the 
precedence of the earliest Writ, viz. of 33 Edw. I., was allowed to be 
the precedence of the Barony when the Abeyance was terminated in 
favour of Norborne Berkeley, Esq., in 17 04. Again, in the case of the 
Barony of Despencer, the precedency of that Barony is that of the 
Writ addressed to Hugh le Despencer in Dec. 49 Hen. III. 1264, 
though no Sitting can be shown until 35 Edw. I. The case of the 
Barony of Boos, and indeed many others, might be cited in point. 

In the event of a claim to a Barony by the descendant of the second 
or third Baron recorded to have been summoned to Parliament, it would 
not be sufficient to show that the brother or nephew of the person from 
whom the claimant was descended sat in Parliament ; for example, in 
the case of the Barony of Mauley. Peter de Mauley was summoned to 
Parliament from 23 Edw. I. to 3 Edw. II. ; his son was summoned 
from 5 Edw. II. to 28 Eclw. III., and dying in the following year was 
succeeded by his son, who was also repeatedly summoned, as was his 
son and heir Peter de Mauley, the last Baron, who died without issue 
in 1415, leaving his sisters his heirs. No other proof of Sitting occurs 
on the Bolls of a Baron Mauley than of the last Baron, who was 
present in Parliament on several occasions ; but the inability to show 
that any one of the ancestors of his sisters and coheirs sat in Parliament 
would be fatal to any claim made by their representatives. 

It is an undisputed fact that the early records of Parliament are 
exceedingly imperfect, and that not only are many circumstances which 
it is notorious were transacted in Parliament unnoticed, but, unlike the 
Journals of the House of Lords, in which every Peer who attended on 
each day of Parliament is recorded as being present, the only proof of 
a Baron having been present in Parliament, on the Bolls, is his having 
been selected to be a trier of Petitions, or as having witnessed a certain 
charter or creation made in any particular Parliament. Under these 
circumstances a proof of Sitting depends on a mere accident, and the 
absence of such proof on the Bolls, especially from the reign of Edw. I. 
to that of Henry IV., is by no means evidence that a Baron, of whom 
no such proof is to be found, was never present ; nor does it seem 
equitable, in instances where a long consecutive series of Writs are 
extant, that the want of evidence of such fact should be deemed con- 
clusive against any claimant to the dignity. In the Freschcville case, 
though the Attorney-General argued against the claim, contending that, 



BARONIES JURE UXORIS. xxxvii 

even supposing a summons to Parliament by Writ did give an estate of 
inheritance, yet, lie observed, " this must be understood when there 
had been a Sitting upon it, and that here the not repeating the Sum- 
mons was an evidence of not Sitting ; it had been objected that there 
was no evidence of any Sitting till the time of Henry VIII., when 
Journals first began ; but it was one thing where Writs of Summons had been 
often repeated, and another where they were never issued but once." 

If, as was argued by the Attorney-General, " the not repeating the 
Summons was an evidence of not Sitting," it may with equal reason 
be maintained that the issuing of a consecutive series of Writs, not 
only to one individual, but to his son, and even in some cases to his 
grandson (though no notice of either of them having ever sat in Par- 
liament can be found), must at the least be deemed evidence that the 
Crown considered they were entitled to such Writs, and acknowledged 
by the issue of them to a second and third generation that its require- 
ments had been perfected in the first. In early periods of our history 
it appears to have been an imperative duty in those who were sum- 
moned to attend Parliament, to obey such summons, and it can scarcely 
be supposed that persons who were repeatedly commanded to do so should 
for any time presume to disobey the King's Writs. If it be admitted 
that even in one instance either of the persons so summoned obeyed the 
King's command by attending Parliament, such obedience was a Sitting 
under a Writ : hence it is barely possible for a person at all acquainted 
with the manners and customs of the times to believe that, even if the 
above argument were deemed to have no weight, a series of Writs for 
even ten years should have been issued without the person to whom 
they were addressed having obeyed them, much less that two or more 
generations should have been regularly summoned, and yet that 
neither of them should ever have sat in Parliament, because no notice 
of such Sitting is to be found on the Bolls, when, as is just remarked, 
their presence in Parliament would not have been recorded unless they 
happened to have been parties to certain transactions or were selected 
for particular duties. It was in all probability considerations of this 
nature that induced Sir William Jones to observe, " that it was one 
thing wheie Writs of Summons had been often repeated, and another 
where they were never issued but once." 

BARONIES JURE UXORIS. 

It was a recognised principle from the very earliest period of the 
introduction of the Feudal System into England, that a husband who 
was seised of lands in right of his wife was bound to render to the 
Crown all the services whereby the lands were holden ; hence we find 
amongst the ancient Earldoms numerous instances of the husband or 
husbands of the female heir to an Earldom being called and known in 
history (during the Norman dynasty), and afterwards in Parliament, 
by a title which could only pertain to them jure uxoris. The three 
husbands of Hawise daughter and heir of William lo Gros Earl of 



XXXV111 



OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 



Albemarle were all known as Earls of Albemarle, and the titles of 
Essex, Leicester, and Warwick afford instances of a like nature. Ealpli 
de Montbermer, having married Joan Plantagenet widow of Gilbert de 
Clare Earl of Gloucester, was summoned to Parliament by that title 
until his wife's death and the consequent succession of her son. 

In all these cases there were undoubtedly large territorial posses- 
sions, but, notwithstanding the assertion of Lord Chief Justice Coke, 
that where no possession was had, the law of courtesy could not pre- 
vail, and consequently Summons by Writ, being a personal distinction, 
could not pass through a female to her husband, we find that at a very 
early period the same law was applied to Baronies by Writ that per- 
tained more especially to Earldoms and Baronies by Tenure, and the 
husbands of heirs female are summoned to Parliament jure uxoris, 
when, having issue by their said wives, they had obtained that interest in 
law in the wife's inheritance which Avas considered to entitle them to 
such Summons : the practice, however, clearly partook more of the 
nature of Barony by Tenure, and was not in accordance with the 
personal dignity of a Barony by Writ. 

The cases are numerous where Summonses are issued to the husband 
where no issue existed, but in all such instances a new dignity, entirely 
personal, must be considered to have been conferred on the husband, 
who, whether he had or had not issue by his wife, still occupied in 
right of her possessions such a position as would entitle him to receive 
from the Crown a Writ to sit in the Upper House of Parliament. The 
following are remarkable instances of this nature : — 

Elizabeth, sister and heir of John Lord Say, married two husbands, 
namely, 1, Sir John Falvesley, and 2, Sir William Heron, but had 
issue by neither ; both were however summoned to Parliament as 
Barons, and were known to hold, jure uxoris, the Barony of Say, but 
in neither case were they summoned by that title, and the Writs issued 
to them undoubtedly created new dignities. Elizabeth, daughter and 
sole heir of Bartholomew 3rd Lord Bourchier, married 1, to Sir 
Hugh Stafford, and 2, to Sir Lewis Eobsert, but had issue by neither : 
both of these individuals were summoned to Parliament, but neither 
of them by the title of Bourchier, and here again new dignities were 
created/ 

No instance can be shown in which a husband summoned to Par- 
liament in his wife's Barony transmitted the dignity so acquired to his 
issue by another wife. 

The cases of Sir Charles Somerset, summoned to Parliament in his 
wife's Barony of Herbert from 1509 to 151 1, of Edward Hastings, sum- 
moned to Parliament in his wife's Barony of Hungerford from 1482 till 
his death in 1507, and George Lord Stanley, summoned to Parliament 



T If any conclusion can be at all drawn 
from the place given to these Barons in the 
Lists of .Summonses, it would be that the 
Writs constituted new Baronies; they are 
found in th< place of theii wives' Baronii 
well as in the position of new-made Feers : 



the former may be accounted for by the 
Crown exercising a prerogative it then 
claimed of giving an unwonted precedency, 
whilst the latter can in no way be explained, 
if the Baronies in which they were summoned 
were intended t" be llic ancienf Baronies. 



WRITS OF SUMMONS TO ELDEST SONS. xxxix 

in his wife's Barony of Strange from 1482 till his death in 1497 (all 
three having issue by their said wives), are amongst the latest instances 
in which a courtesy in dignity was recognised and acted upon : in the 
reign of Henry VIII., and in the case of Talboys, heard before the 
King, it was still recognised though not acted on, the King himself 
pronouncing the following decision : that, ' ' forasmuch as he understood 
that there was no force of reason or law to give the name to him that 
had no issue by his wife, that neither Mr. Wymbish nor none other 
from henceforth should use the title of his wife's dignity, but such as 
by courtesy of England had also right to her possessions for term of 
his life." 

In the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and in the cases of Bertie, claiming 
to be Lord Willoughby, and Fane, claiming to be Lord Abergavenny, 
it was neither recognised nor acted upon, and from that time to the 
present a courtesy in dignities, proceeding as it did out of the Law of 
Feudal Tenure, may be said, like the Law of Baronies by Tenure, to 
have altogether become obsolete. 

WRITS OF SUMMONS TO THE ELDEST SOU" OP A PEER, 
IN" HIS FATHER'S BAKONY. 

The custom of summoning the eldest son of a Peer in his father's 
Barony is stated in the Attorney-General's Report on the L'Isle case 
to have commenced in the reign of Edw. IV., in the 22nd year of whose 
reign Thomas Fitz-Alan, alias Arundel, son and heir apparent of \\ il- 
liam Earl of Arundel, was summoned to Parliament in his father's 
Barony of Maltravers, since which period numerous instances of the 
kind have occurred. But it is somewhat questionable whether the 
practice of allowing a seat" in Parliament to the eldest son of an Earl 
is not of much earlier date ; for on the Bolls 1 Hen. IV. 1399 the name 
of Maris. Henry Percy (Hotspur), eldest son of Henry Earl of Northum- 
berland, occurs among the Barons then present, and who was evidently 
considered a Peer of the Bealm, though no Writ to him is extant. 

In the reign of Charles II. an instance occurred in which the son 
and heir-apparent of a Baron possessed of two Baronies was summoned 
to Parliament in one of his father's Baronies. Conyers Darcy was 
seised of the Barony of Darcy, created by Patent in 1641, and also of 
the Barony of Conyers, originating in a Writ of Summons in 1 Hen. 
VIII. He was however summoned to Parliament in the Barony of 
Darcy, and in 1680 his son and heir-apparent was summoned in the 
Barony of Conyers ; thus the Barony in which his son sat was of 
much higher precedency than the dignity by virtue of which his 
father was summoned, unless it be presumed that the new creation of 
1 641 gave the precedency of the old Barony of Darcy, a presumption 
certainly favoured by the Lords' Journals. Conway, in 1628, presents 
an instance of a Viscount's son being summoned in his father's barony. 
The Earl of Warwick (eldest son of the Duke of Northumberland) in 
1552 is the only instance of a son summoned in his father's Earldom. 



xl OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

Where the Writ is issued by the correct designation of the Barony 
vested in the father, no new Barony is created ; the effect of such a 
Writ is only to accelerate the descent of the dignity, and to operate in 
effect, though not in law, as an instrument of conveyance to transfer 
by licence of the Crown the father's Barony to the son, hut the honour 
is still descendible only according to the original limitation and in the 
especial line of heirs contemplated at the original creation of the 
dignity, whether by Letters Patent or otherwise ; so that, if the Barony 
be an estate in tail male, the son takes no larger estate by force of the 
Writ, but comes in as the heir male apparent (to use the words of 
Lord Chancellor Yorke), ante diem, in his father's lifetime, with leave 
of the King and of the House. If the son so summoned die before his 
father, his son has a right to claim his Writ of Summons and to sit in 
the same Barony, because he also is heir male apparent of the Peer his 
grandfather who has departed with his Barony, he being also within 
the original limitations of the Letters Patent. 

Such is now the law of Peerage and custom of Parliament, as laid 
down in the following cases : — Henry Pierrepont, son and heir- 
apparent of the Earl of Kingston, was summoned to Parliament by 
Writ vita patris in 1640, and Oliver St. John, son and heir-apparent of 
the Earl of Bolingbroke, was also so summoned in 1641. Both of these 
Barons died leaving daughters and coheirs ; but the Baronies accele- 
rated (so to speak), being dignities created to the heirs male of the 
bodies of the grantees, no abeyance was thereby created. Sydney of 
Penshurst, also a Barony originating by Patent, was claimed by the 
heir general in virtue of a Writ issued to her grandfather in the life- 
time of his father, but it was decided in 1782 that the claimant had no 
right, because the admission of her claim would have changed the 
original limitation of the Patent. On the other hand, Charles Lord 
Clifford of Lanesborough, 1694, George William Lord Hervey (after- 
wards 2nd Earl of Bristol), and later still, George Harry Lord Grey of 
Groby (present Earl of Stamford and Warrington), all succeeded in 
their grandfathers' lifetimes to Baronies that had been accelerated in 
the persons of their fathers. 

The case has not occurred where the son and heir-apparent, 
having been called up in a Barony originating in Writ of Summons, 
has died vita patris leaving an only daughter ; but it is presumed 
such daughter would become entitled to the same estate in the dignity 
which was before enjoyed by her father, she being heir-apparent of her 
grandfather, and within the original limitation of the Writ of Creation. 
There are however points connected with this Law of Peerage, as laid 
down by the House, which present considerable difficulties — such as 
the possible attainder of the father whilst the son was sitting in that 
father's Barony by virtue of an anticipatory Writ of Summons, or the 
attainder of the son so sitting in his father's Barony. In either case 
what would be the effect upon the accelerated dignity ? 

Where a Writ of Summons is issued to the eldest son of a Peer by 
the name of a Barony not vested in his father, though the Writ be 



WRITS OF SUMMONS TO ELDEST SONS. xli 

issued under the presumption that such Barony is vested in the father, 
it operates as a new creation of a Barony, and makes it descendible 
to all the lineal heirs, male and female, of the person so summoned." 
This doctrine was established in 1736, in the claim to the Barony of 
Strange, and confirmed in the following year in the case of the Barony 
of Clifford; in the first of which instances a Writ of Summons was 
issued to the eldest son of the Earl of Derby, under the idea that the 
ancient Barony of Strange was then vested in his father ; and in the 
latter the son and heir-apparent of the Earl of Burlington was sum- 
moned to Parliament as Baron Clifford, from the impression that the 
ancient Barony of Clifford, created by Writ in 28 Edw. I., was at 
that time vested in the said Earl. In each case these Barons took 
their seats, and were placed in the precedence of the ancient Baronies ; 
but as it was clearly proved that the original Baronies were then 
vested in other persons, such Writs and Sittings were held to operate 
as new creations ; and the dignities then created are now vested in 
the heirs of the bodies of the Barons to whom the Writs in question 
were issued. 

Another instance of a new creation originating in error was that of 
Pawlet of Basing in 1717, whero Charles Pawlet, son and heir- 
apparent of Charles II. 2nd Duke of Bolton, was summoned to Par- 
liament by Writ addressed " Carolo Tawlet de Basing," instead of " de 
St. John de Basing." In 1833 Francis Russell, eldest son of the Duke 
of Bedford, was summoned as Francis Russell of Streatham instead of 
Howland of Streatham, but on this occasion the Lord Speaker informed 
the House that the said Francis Russell was summoned to sit in the 
Barony of Howland, as appeared from the Warrant directing the issue 
of the Writ, and by which title he afterwards sat. 

Two inferences of some importance, besides the point established by 
these decisions, may be drawn from them : first, they appear to have 
been formed on the general principle that, whatever may be the motive 
under which a Writ of Summons is issued, the direction of such Writ, 
and a Sitting under it, if no such Barony was previously vested in 
the person so summoned, creates a Barony in fee to the individual who 
receives it and to the heirs of his body ; and secondly, that if a Baron 
sits in an erroneous precedency in the House, such erroneous prece- 
dency has no effect on the question of his right to the dignity to which 
that precedency belongs. Besides the cases of Lords Strange and 
Clifford, both of whom, as is just observed, sat in the place of the 
original Baronies of those names, the individuals who have been sum- 
moned to Parliament as Barons Percy were placed in the precedency 
of the Barony of Percy created under the Writ of 27 Edw. I., although 
it is shown, under that title, that no other Barony of Percy was pos- 
sessed by the first of those individuals than that which was created by 
the Writ directed to him in 1722, and to which Barony the other per- 
sonages succeeded. 



Cruise on Dignities, p. 225. 



xlii OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 



BARONIES BY PATENT. 

It has been observed in a former page that the opinion of Lord 
Redesdale upon the institution of Baronies by Patent (as given by his 
Lordship in the discussion on the L'Isle Peerage) differed altogether 
from that assigned for the same by the Lords' Committee in their First 
Eeport on the Dignity of a Peer ; for whilst Lord Eedesdale upon that 
occasion observed that it arose out of an intention to give to a Baron 
that hereditary dignity which until then had not been an established 
principle of law, and so augment the dignity of the Baronage, the Lords' 
Committee considered it a measure introduced to restrain the force of 
the Writ by limiting to the heirs male a dignity which was before de- 
scendible to the heirs general. 

A short review of the history of the Lords of Parliament, from the 
introduction of the Writ till the period of the introduction of the 
Patent, would seem to confirm not only the correctness of Lord 
Eedesdale's opinion that the hereditary nature of the dignity was not 
then established, but further to point to the necessity of some such 
measure as the Patent ultimately effected. 

The sovereigns had during this period exercised their authority in 
withholding Writs from those whose fathers had sat in Parliament, 
and on the other hand had issued Writs to others known only for their 
adherence to the Monarch's interests, so that there could be no need 
to restrain a principle that practically had ceased to exist : the House 
of Lords had become the party of the King when triumphant over the 
Barons, the party of the Barons (in the name of the King) when 
triumphant over the sovereign. The introduction of Letters Patent, 
fixing precisely the nature of the dignity granted, and the limitation 
of succession to that dignity to the heirs of the body of the Grantee, 
was well calculated to resist this evil and rescue the Chief Legislative 
Body of the Kingdom from that undue influence that had been obtained 
by the arbitrary issue of Writs which at the most seem only to have 
conferred a life estate in the dignity : the Grantee of the Patent might 
in himself be the servant of the Crown, but he became at the same time 
the root of that hereditary principle which, uninfluenced either by the 
Crown or the People, was destined (to quote the words of Blaekstone) 
" to support the rights of both, and form a barrier to withstand the 
encroachments of either." 

The first instance of a Barony having been created by Letters 
Patent, viz. the granting of a personal dignity, the succession to which 
was to be limited by patent, occurred in the reign of King Richard II., 
who created John de Beauchamp of Holt, Steward of his Household, 
Lord of Beauchamp, Baron of Kj'derminster, by Letters Patent dated 
10 Oct. 1387, to him and the heirs male of his body. The words of 
creation in these Letters Patent are, " ipsum Johannem in unum 
parium et baronum regni nostri Anglian prseficimus ; volentes quod 
idem Johannes et hasredes masculi de corpore suo exeuntes statum 



BARONIES BY PATENT. 



xliii 



Baronis obtineant, ac Domini de Beauchamp et Barones de Kidder- 
minster nnncnpantnr." But this Baron never sat in Parliament, having 
been attainted in the following year. The next instance of the kind 
was in 11 Hen. VI. 1433, when Sir John Cornwall was created Baron 
of Fanhope ; the operative words in his Patent are, " praefatum Jo- 
hannem in Baronem indigenam regni sui Anglias erexit prefecit et 
creavit ; eidemqne Johanni nomen stilum titulum et honorem Baronis 
de Fatmhope imposuit dedit concessit et assignavit, volens et concedens 
eidem quod ipse nomen Baronis de Faunhope habeat et gerat, ac baro 
de Faunhope vocitetur & nuncupetur & tanquam baro indigena & 
verus legeus suus ejusdem regni in omnibus teneatur tractetur & 
reputetur, sedem quoque et locum suos in Parliamentis et consilliis 
regiis inter cseteros Barones dicti regni Angliae habeat teneat et 
possideat." Sudeley and Milbroke, the latter of whom was Sir John 
Cornwall, Baron of Fanhope, were the next created Barons, in 1441 
and 1442. 

The principle of the creation of a Baron by Patent thus introduced 
in the reign of King Eichard II. did not make much progress till the 
reign of King Henry VI., and forty-six years intervened between the 
creation of John Beauchamp of Holt to be Lord of Beauchamp and 
Baron of Kidderminster in 1387 and that of Sir John Cornwall to be 
Baron of Fanhope in 1433 ; but from the 24th year of King Henry VI. 
the practice became general, and between that time and the termina- 
tion of the reign of King Edward IV. (thirty-seven years) there are 
found eleven instances, of which three are by Charter and eight by 
Patent/ Out of these eleven cases, two of them embody the old 
principle of Barony by Tenure ; z five are limited to the heirs male 
of the body," three to heirs male, b and one without words of limitation 
at all. c 

In some of the above-recited cases annuities are given for the support 



y Charters were addressed to all the various 
classes of the King's subjects separately, be- 
ginning with Archbishops, Bishops, Abbots, 
&c, and were witnessed by the Nobles and 
great officers about the person of the King, 
and may be considered as the more solemn 
act of the two : Patents were addressed only 
to those whom they concerned, and were 
tested only by the King himself. 

z Grants of the Barony of Kingston L'lsle 
1444 and 1475 to the tenants of the Manor 
of Kingston L'lsle. 

a Beauchamp, Rivers, Stourton, Stafford, 
Montjoy. 

b Hoo and Hastings, Riehemount-Grey, 
and Egremont. 

c Dacre. Sir Richard Fienes, who by this 
Patent was declared Lord Dacre and one of 
the Barons of the Realm, had married Joan 
granddaughter and heir of Thomas Lord 
Dacre of Gillesland; he was declared " Lord 
Dacre " by Patent 7 Nov. 37 Hen. VI. 1458, 
but, r<> show the uncertainty of the issue 



of a Writ at this period, both he as " Lord 
Dacre" and his wife's uncle who was heir 
male of her said grandfather as " Lord Dacre 
of Gillesland" were summoned to the same 
Parliament 9 Oct. 38 Hen. VI. 1459. That 
the Barony given to the wife's uncle was the 
Barony of Dacre of Gillesland, both the de- 
scription and the Summons (upon his decease 
without issue) of his next brother seem to 
show; and if so, the principle of tenuie was 
here preferred to representation in blood. 
The Barony given to Sir Richard Fienes 
could not have been that " of the courtesy," 
as no Patent was necessary for such a pur- 
pose ; it must therefore have been a new 
Barony, which, having no words of inherit- 
ance, was yet descendible to heirs general, in 
like manner as the Barony of Fanhope (also 
without words of inheritance) was considered 
by Lord Lyndhurstf in his speech on the 
Wensleydale Peerage, to have been a de- 
scendible dignity. — Vide Note x , p. 184. 



xliv OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

of the dignity, as with Beauchamp, Eivers, Egremont, and Mont joy ; 
whilst others have no such addition, and the practice has long since 
fallen into disuse. 

In a Peerage tract published in 1719, attributed to Mr. West, it is 
asserted, and the assertion was adopted by Mr. Hart in his argument 
on the L'Isle Peerage, that all these Patents were by consent of Par- 
liament, because the words " auctoritate Parliamenti " were found at 
their conclusion. Mr. West and Mr. Hart were alike mistaken, the 
words having reference only to an Act of Parliament 18 Hen. VI. cap. 
1, which directed that Patents should bear date in accordance with 
the Eoyal Warrants delivered into Chancery, and not bear date " before 
in any wise ; " formeidy it had not been unusual to antedate Patents, 
which had given rise to practices " against right, good conscience, and 
reason." d The dignities of Baron of Fanhope and Baron of Milbroke, 
granted to Sir John Cornwall, are the only two Baronies stated to be 
given by the advice and assent of Parliament. 

A solemn Investiture by the Sovereign formerly accompanied the 
grant of the Dignity, and there are numerous accounts of the perform- 
ance of such a ceremony, from the first year of King Edward VI. to the 
13th of King James I., when it was declared by the legal authorities that 
the delivery of the Letters Patent was sufficient, and in modern 
Patents of Creation the ceremony of Investiture is dispensed with in 
express words. On the occasion of a Baron's Investiture the person 
to be ennobled entered the King's presence between two Barons, 
preceded by another Baron bearing the Eobes of Estate, and he by 
Garter bearing the Patent ; the Patent was read by the Secretary of 
State, and at the word creavimus the King put on the new-made Baron 
the Eobe of Estate, and afterwards delivered to him his Patent. 

Anciently it was considered that Dignities were alienable with the 
consent of the Crown, and many instances occur of such alienation. 
Examples are also to be found of the surrender of Dignities into the 
hands of the Crown ; but in the case of the Barony of Grey of En thy n 
the House of Lords resolved, nemine contradicente, 1 Eeb. 1646, " that 
no person that hath any honour in him, and a Peer of this realm, may 
alien or transfer the honour to any other person ; and that no Peer of 
this realm can drown or extinguish his honour, but that it descends to 
his descendants;" and on the 18 Jiuie 1678, in the claim to the Vis- 
county of Purbeck the House also resolved "that no fine now levied, 
nor at any time hereafter to be levied to the King, can bar such title of 
honour, or the right of any person claiming such title under him that 
levied or shall levy such fine." On the former of these resolutions 
Mr. Cruise observes, " This resolution cannot be considered as having 
the authority of a law, but it is now understood that dignities are 
absolutely unalienable." 

Attempts have at various times been made to give a precedence in 
Letters Patent by which Dignities were created, beyond the pre- 

' ! Statutes at Large (Uuffhead), 18 Hen. VI. (1439), cap. 1. 



BARONIES BY PATENT. 



xlv 



cedence which would arise from the date of such Patent. In cases of 
Peerage such precedence is now universally considered to be illegal ; 
for although it is the undoubted prerogative of the Crown to create an 
individual to any degree of the Peerage which it thinks proper, it has 
not the power to give a precedence above any Peer previously created 
of the same degree. 

The form of Patent, originally simple and brief, became by degrees 
lengthy and explanatory, and the limitations of the Dignity various 
and complicated : in the following pages, where no limitation is ex- 
pressed in Dignities created by Patent, it is to be understood that 
it was solely to the heirs male of the body of the person so created. 
Instances, however, occur where the remainder has been to the second 
son and his issue male, or to such second son and his issue male with 
remainder to an eldest son in like manner ; e others, where the limita- 
tion was to the issue male of the body of the grantee by a particular 
woman ; f to the heirs general of the body of the grantee ; s to the issue 
male of the father or grandfather of the grantee failing the heirs male 
of his own body ; h to natural brothers of the grantee ; ' to sons-in-law 
of the grantee ; k to the issue of a wife whom the grantee might after- 
wards marry (excluding issue already born) ; ' and to the grantee for 
life with remainder to his son and his issue male : m but the most sin- 
gular limitation of a dignity on record is that of the Barony of Lucas of 
Crudwell, which will be stated at length under that title, and in virtue 
of which limitation the Barony of Lucas is now possessed by Thomas 
Philip Earl de Grey, present Baron Lucas. But the limitation of the 
Barony of Lucas of Shenfield is scarcely less singular : — John Lucas 
was, by Letters Patent dated 3 Jan. 1644, created Baron Lucas of 
Shenfield, co. Essex, with remainder failing his issue male to his brother 
Sir Charles Lucas and his heirs male, in default of which to Sir Thomas 
Lucas and his heirs males for ever, which Sir Thomas was elder brother 
of the said Charles, and by the same mother, but was born before 
marriage ; and in consequence of the failure of issue of the other 
persons named in the Patent, the son and heir of the said Thomas 
Lucas succeeded to the Dignity on the death of John the first Lord 
in 1670. 

But, however various the forms, and peculiar the limitations, that 
have been annexed to the granting of the Dignity of a Baron, the 
hereditary principle inherent in the Chief Legislative Body of the 
Empire seems never to have been lost sight of ; not an instance occurs 
of a Barony having been created to a man for life, in which there was 
not a remainder to some person or persons expressly named and to his 



e Barony of Lovaine ; Viscounty of St. 
John ; Dukedoms of Dover, Schombei-g, and 
Somerset. 

f Baronies of Beaulieu and Bingley ; Earl- 
doms of Bedford, Kent, Vane, and others. 

B Baiony of Arlington. 

11 Earldom of Oxford; Viscounty of Bo- 
lingbroke : Baronies of Brandon, Brodrick, 



Walpole, &c. 

1 Earldoms of Burford and Euston, and 
Barony of Lucas. 

k Earldoms of Chichester, Northumber- 
land, and Rivers, and Viscounty of Col- 
chester. 

1 Barony ami Earldom of Coningsby. 

m Barony of llervey. 



xlvi OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

and their issue ; and in the only two instances in which Baronies 
have been granted for life without such a lemainder, namely, those 
of Hay in 1606, and Keede in 1644, there were express clauses in the 
Patents prohibiting the persons so ennobled from the enjoyment of 
place or voice in Parliament : it was not till 1856 that a contrary 
principle was sought to be introduced into the House of Lords ; by 
Patent 16 Jan. 1856 Sir James Parke was created Baron Wensleydale 
for life, and a Writ of Summons to Parliament was issued ; but the 
peculiar nature of the Patent having been brought before the notice 
of the House, the subject was referred to the Committee of Privileges, 
which reported, and the House resolved, " That neither the Letters 
Patent, nor the Letters Patent with the usual Writ of Summons issued 
in pursuance thereof, can entitle the grantee therein named to sit and 
vote in Parliament." 

Susan, widow of Sir Henry Belasyse, created Baroness Belasyse, is 
the only female upon whom the life Dignity of a Baroness has been 
conferred unaccompanied by a higher Dignity ; instances of similar 
Life Creations to females in the higher grades of the Peerage are 
numerous. As connected with the subject of Dignities vested in 
females, it may be well to allude here to the personal honour which a 
wife acquires by marriage with a Peer. Every woman who is married 
to a Peer becomes entitled to the same Dignity as her husband, and 
acquires all the rights and privileges of Peerage which are consistent 
with her sex. Thus, if she be accused of treason or felony, she can 
only be tried by the House of Peers ; but if a woman who has acquired 
a Dignity by marriage afterwards marries a commoner, she loses her 
Dignity, and all the rights and privileges annexed to it, for that which 
is gained by marriage may be lost by marriage, eodem modo quod quid 
constituitur dissolvitur. 

This doctrine was formerly doubted, but the Committee of Privileges 
of the House of Lords resolved, 4 July 1661, in the case of Lady Dacre 
(who remarried Mr. Cheeke), that she had forfeited and lost the privilege 
of Peerage ; and in 1691 it was decided by the House that, if the widow 
of a Peer be married to a commoner, she shall not be allowed privilege 
of Peerage ; hence such undoubtedly is now the law on the subject, 
notwithstanding the frequent practice of the widows of Peers retaining 
the title of their first husband though married to Commoners. If a 
woman be noble by birth, or be created a Peeress, she will not lose her 
Dignity by manying a Commoner, and Lord Coke also says that, if the 
widow of a Duke marry a Baron or any Peer under the rank of her first 
husband, she still retains the name of a Duchess, because her husband 
is noble ; n but it has been held by other writers that she should be 
styled by the title of her second husband, and at the Coronation of 
King George III. the latter doctrine was acted upon, for the widow of 
the Duke of Leeds, who was then the wife of tbe Earl of Portmore, 
claimed to walk as a Duchess, but was refused. 

" Cruise on Dignities, p. 90. ° Ibid. p. 01. 



VISCOUNTIES. xlvii 



VISCOUNTIES. 



The Dignity of Viscount has from its first introduction into England 
been of a nature entirely personal, partaking in no respect of the 
feudal or territorial character which distinguishes those grades of the 
Peerage betwixt which it holds its place : it was borrowed from France, 
where the title was both feudal and official, when France was almost 
wholly in possession of the English, and it was first conferred by 
a Sovereign who had been solemnly crowned Monarch of that Kingdom : 
still it resembled the French viscounty in name only, and it was 
probably adopted by King Henry VI., or rather by his ministers, as 
a safe means of obtaining that precedence over the existing Barons 
which without such new class it was doubtful whether the King had 
power to bestow. 

The Dignity thus introduced into England has been always conferred 
by Letters Patent or by Charter, and its descent regulated according 
to the limitations set forth : it is worthy of observation that King Henry 
bestowed upon his first created English Viscount within a year of his 
advancement the feudal Viscounty of Beaumont in France, formerly 
forfeited by the rebellion of the Duke of Aleneon, and granted by 
Henry V. to his brother the Duke of Bedford, by whose decease it had 
reverted to the Crown. 

The words of Creation to John Lord Beaumont, and the heirs male 
of his body, in his Patent dated 12 Feb. 18 Hen. VI. (1440), are 
" Nomen Vicecomitis de Beaumont imponimus, ac ipsum insigniis 
Vicecomitis de Beaumont realiter investimus, locumque in Parlia- 
mentis consiliis et aliis congregationibus nostris, super omnes Barones 
rea-ni nostri assiarnavimus eidem." This Patent is stated to have been 
granted in Parliament though dated at Eeading ; and it is accompanied 
by a grant of twenty marks per annum from out of the issues of the 
county of Lincoln. 

The grant of the French Feudal Viscounty followed shortly after, 
being dated 18 Jan. 1441, and it was given to him and the heirs male 
of his body by reason (amongst others) that he and his progenitors 
were descended out of the said Viscounty, and had always borne the 
same Arms. p 

A Patent dated 12 Mar. 23 Hen. VI. (1445) more fully sets forth 
the precedence to be enjoyed by the said Viscount Beaumont ; he was 
to have seat and place before and above all Viscounts, and before and 
above the heirs and sons of all Earls, and immediately next Earls, in 
all Parliaments, &c. : as no other Viscount appears up to this time to 
have been created, this Patent may be presumed to have reference 
more to the Order of Viscounts than to the Viscount Beaumont him- 
self, more particularly as we find, very shortly after, that the Dignity 
was conferred on the Lord Bourchier, who was also possessed of a 
French Dignity — that of the Earldom of Ewe. No Charter or Patent 



p Selden, part ii. ch. 3, page 443. 



xlviii OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

of the Viscounty of Bourchier has been discovered, but there can be 
no doubt as to the fact of that having been the mode of Creation, 
because upon the Viscount Berkeley being created in 1-180, so little 
appears to have been known of the nature of the honour about to be 
conferred, that the King (Edward IV.) sent Norroy King of Arms to 
this same Viscount Bourchier (then Earl of Essex) to ascertain par- 
ticulars touching his Creation, and Norroy's report to the King was 
that he was created by Patent, and in his gown. Viscount Bourchier's 
Creation must have been in 1446, as he was summoned to Parliament 
by that title 14 Dec. 25 Hen. VI. (1446). 

Next to Viscount Bourchier, in the Boll of Viscounts, stands John 
Talbot Lord L'Isle ; and his charter of Creation to the Viscounty of 
LTsle, dated 30 Oct. 1451, places him "immediately next to the 
Viscount Bourchier and above all Barons." 

Next to him comes Viscount Berkeley, above referred to, concerning 
whose Creation we have the following curious narration, which not 
only shows the "great doubts" which then enveloped the Dignity, 
but also describes the ceremony of Investiture then practised, and the 
Robe of Estate then determined on : — 

" Memorandum that oon Ester day 21 Edw. IV., which was pposed 
to have created William Lord Barkley Vicounte Barkley, at the which 
daye there was great dowtys laied whether he shuld be created in 
habet of estat or els in his pliament robes, and what the said habets 
were, of the which the Kinge cowde not be ascerteigned at that tyme 
by no lord their being present, nor of non of the officers of amies, 
wherupon Norrey King of Amies was sent to the Erie of Essex, which 
sumtyme was creat Vicounte Boughcher, to have perfit knolage, which 
Norrey reaported that he was creat by patent and in his gowne, which 
report was not greatly praised, for sume men said he shuld be creat in 
his habet of Estat as the abet of an Erie, saving that he shuld not have 
but ij rowes and half of arrnyn, and that the furro shuld not be so 
lowe nor so depe as the furr of an Erie ys habet ; & fynally he was 
creat (dominica in Albis q ) at Grenewiche in maner as ensuyyth : 
First, he being in his chaumber in his parliament robes accustumed for 
a vicounte, that ys to saye, a sircot of scarlet, the paynetts of the slevys 
bound with a ryben of gold, a mantil of the same with ij barres & 
di of mynyver on the right syde with a litle hode rolled up about his 
necke furred of the same, and bytwene everye bane a riband of gold, 
the King commaunded the lord Dacres, Chaumberlayn to the Quene, 
and the lord Denham, Sir Thomas Vaughan, kiit., and all the officers of 
amies for to accompanye hym. And so the said lordys went on eA'ery 
syde of hym from his chaumber thrughthe hall, having before hym the 
forsayd knyght and the king's secretary beryng openly his patent, 
and the officers of armes and the trumpetts ; which lord was thus pre- 
sented to the kings grace, being under his clothe of estate. And then 
the king's Secraterye rede openly the patent, which done, delyvered it 

q Low Sunday, or the Sunday next after Easter. 



EARLDOMS. xlix 

to the King; and the King toke the same patent to the vicounte 
Barkley : present the King's secouncle sone the duke of Yorke, tharche- 
bishop of Yorke Chauncellor of England, the marquess of Dorset, the 
bishop of Lincolne lord privye Seale, the bishop of Norwich, the 
bishop of Rochester, Therl of Lincoln, the lord Wellys : And the king 
went to his chaumber ; and the vicounte, accompanyed as befor, turned 
ageyn to his chaumber, wher he dyned in a sircot with tabart slevys ; 
and at the tyme accustomed the officers of armes cryed hym at ij 
places of the kings hall de pusaunt and noble Sieur le vicounte de 
Barkley, Larges, and after dyner the forsaid vicounte went to the 
Kings chaumber, and gave him thankys of the honour that he had done 
hym, being then but in his gowne." r 

All ceremony on occasion of Creation ceased to be observed in the 
reign of King James I. (vide p. lii.). Charles II. gave to two Ladies 
the estate of a Viscountess for life, viz. to Anne Bayning, second 
daughter of Paul first Viscount Bayning, created Viscountess Bayning 
for life in 1674, and Sarah widow of Sir Vincent Corbet, created 
Viscountess Corbet for life in 1679 ; but the Dignity of a Viscount for 
life does not appear to have been at any time bestowed. 

This Dignity has been, comparatively speaking, sparingly conferred ; 
and formerly each person who received it was previously a Baron : 
but in a few modern instances individuals have been at once created a 
Baron and a Viscount ; and in others they have been raised to the 
Dignity of a Viscount without having been either previously possessed 
of a Barony, or at the same time created to one. 

EARLDOMS. 

The title or dignity of Comes, Earl, was introduced into England by 
the Normans at the Conquest, from which period until the reign of 
Edward III. it continued the highest hereditary dignity. Before the 
Conquest of England the Saxon Ealdorman, or Alderman (the nearest 
equivalent to the Norman Earl), was intrusted by the King with the 
administration of particular counties, or districts comprising two or 
more counties, and received through his deputy the Sheriff, or Vice- 
comes (as he was afterwards styled by the Normans), and in recom- 
pense for his services, the whole or a portion of the profits, to the 
King's use or to his own ; s but with the coming in of the Normans 
such administrative power ceased (excepting in the counties of Chester 
and Pembroke, where the Earls possessed palatine authority), and 
whatever influence a Norman Earl possessed within his county was 
by reason of his great possessions there ; his dignity was of a nature 
altogether personal ; he had no jurisdiction over the county from 
which he was denominated ; his title of honour had survived its func- 
tions ; and his endowment with the third penny of the pleas may have 



r L. vii. p. 8 6, Coll. Arm. 
s Judge Doddridge in his 'Treatise of 
the Nobility,' says that the third penny was 



the salary of the alderman for his "travell 
concerning the officers of the county." 

d 



1 OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

been introduced, through the policy of the Conqueror, from some sup- 
posed but imperfect connexion between the dignity of Ealdorman 
under the Saxon, and Earl under the Norman Government. 1 

But this local appellation, though incidental to the dignity of an 
Earldom, was by no means essential to its perfection ; u the dignity 
and office of his Earldom extended throughout the kingdom ; and 
his very title of Comes was derived, says Bracton,* from his being 
the comes or socius of the King, and associated with him in the govern- 
ment of the whole realm. This personal nature of the dignity of Earl 
is strongly marked by the finding of these nobles described by their 
Christian names only, or by the principal manors or castles at which 
they resided — as Comes Bogerus, Comes Willelmus de Arundel, Comes 
Albericus, Comes Bicardus de Clare — the three last of whom occur as 
witnesses to a charter of Bichard I. respecting the Earldom of Nor- 
folk/ and were respectively Earls of Sussex, Oxford, and Hertford, 
whilst Earl Boger was Earl of Salop; in like manner the Earls of 
Bembroke were denominated Earls of Strighull, the Earls of Derby 
were styled Earls of Tutbury, and those of Devonshire Earls of Exeter. 
When the Empress Maud made Aubrey de Vere Earl of Cambridge, 
and gave to him the third penny, she granted him permission (if the 
King of Scots claimed that county) to choose his title, with the advice of 
Earl Geoffrey and Earl Gilbert, from one of four others — Oxford, Berks, 
Wilts, or Dorset. 2 

Still, though the dignity was personal, and the local addition to 
the name uncertain, these Earls possessed in virtue of their Earl- 
doms a dignity that was hereditary, though not partible, 3 and the deno- 
mination of which was derived either from the girding on of a 
sword, called the sword of that particular county, or the grant of the 
third penny of the pleas of the same county, whence they took their 
hereditary title. 

The girding on of the sword is described by Bracton as creating 
them to great honour, and power, and name* and was in all probability, 
like the grant of the third penny, a remnant of the Saxon polity ; but 
in the case of the Saxons this girding on of the sword was the 
investiture with that temporal authority which the Saxon Ealdorman 
possessed, and the Norman Earl did not ; yet it is a remarkable 
exception that in one of the earliest instances of which we have any 
account of this ceremony after the Norman Conquest, such temporal 
authority was still possessed by a Norman Earl. The Earls of North- 
umberland, of whom several had been of Saxon race, had, from the 
remoteness of the district, continued to possess all the characteristics 
of the Saxon Ealdorman ; they ruled the county as petty Sovereigns ; 
and when (as in this early instance) Bichard I. gilded with the sword, 
the aged Bishop of Durham, Hugh de Budsey, making, as he himself 



1 Third Peerage Report, p. 160. 
u Lord Chief Justice Holt's Argument on 
the Banbury Case. 

x Lib. 1, cap. 8, sect. 2. 



y Third Peerage Report, p. 165. 
z Seidell's Titles of Honour, p. 538. 
a Third Peerage Report, page 237. 
b Bracton, lib. 1 , c. 8, § 2. 



EARLDOMS. li 

observed, a young Earl of an old Bishop, the investiture was really 
applicable to the temporal authority he had acquired, and for which, 
we are told, he paid the King £ll,000. c 

About the same time Eichard girded with the sword of the county 
of York (so says Eoger de Hoveden) his nephew Otho, 2nd son of 
Henry the Lion Duke of Saxony, and henceforward the girding on of 
the sword became the common form of investiture for an Earl, whether 
palatine or otherwise, and it was not even unfrequently adopted upon 
the heirs taking liveries of their fathers' earldoms ; still the titles of 
these earldoms continued to be derived from counties ; d but when in 
2 Edw. III. (1328) Eoger Mortimer was girded with a sword, accord- 
ing to custom, and had given to him the title of Earl of March (a name 
derived neither from county nor city), we may consider that no vestige 
then remained of the significant meaning that had once attached to the 
ceremony of creating Earls. 

The connexion of the Third Penny of the Pleas of a county with 
the dignity of Earl, before referred to, is found in the earliest instance 
of direct creation of which we have any account; for when Geoffrey 
de Mandeville was made Earl of Essex by the Empress Maud, she gave 
to him and his heirs the " third penny of the Shrievalty of the Pleas, 
as an Earl ought to have within his county." 6 

This charter to Geoffrey de Mandeville differs in some degree from 
all other early charters that are extant/ inasmuch as, in direct terms, 
it makes him and his heirs after him " heereditabiliter " Earls of Essex ; 
whilst in every other instance down to the reign of King John, nearly 
150 years after the Conquest, they are rather to be called grants of the 
third penny of the Pleas, of which the Earldom was a consequence, 
than a grant of the dignity itself, which was conferred by investiture. 
The words following the usual grant of the third penny of the county 
are " wide feci eum Comitem" as in the case of Hereford ; " uncle Comes 
est" as in the cases of Sussex, Derby, &c. ; or " ut sit hide Comes" as in 
that of Oxford. In the case of Hugh Bigod, created by charter Earl 
of Norfolk, the words which follow are " scilicet de tertio denario de Norwic 
fy de Norfolk" or, that is to say, by the third penny of Norwich and of 
Norfolk. This gave occasion to the Earls of Norfolk being sometimes 
styled Earls of Norwich; and it has indeed been remarked by the 
learned and indefatigable Herald, Augustine Vincent, that it was in- 
different to an Earl, who derived his third penny under a writ ad- 
dressed to the Sheriff, whether he styled himself by the name of one 



c This story is related both by Roger of 
Wendover and Matthew of Paris. 

d The only cases to the contrary are Salis- 
bury, Winchester, and Carlisle, all principal 
cities ; and when we find, as in the case of 
Bigod, that Hugh Bigod Earl of Norfolk was 
endowed with the third penny of Norwich 
and of Norfolk, and was afterwards called 
indifferently by the titles of Norwich or 
Norfolk, and also, as stated by Selden, that 
the county of Sussex was called the county 



of Chichester, it is not improbable that these 
Earls adopted the fashion of putting the name 
of the city for that of the county. The Earls 
of Shrewsbury have always been so designated, 
though the Patent creating their ancestor an 
Earl makes him Earl of Salop. 

e Selden's Titles of Honour, p. 536. Vide 
also some remarks of Dugdale on this sub- 
ject, p. 404 of this work. 

1 Selden does not quote any Record for the 
Charter, and it may not be accurately given. 

d 2 



lii OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

or other of the counties Tinder that Sheriffs authority 8 — a reasoning 
fully borne out by the fact of our finding the Earls of Norfolk called 
Earls of Suffolk as well as of Norwich, and those of Somerset called 
also Earls of Dorset. 

In the beginning of the reign of King John a fixed sum of money, 
payable out of the profits of the county, began to take the place of the 
third penny, and at the same time the words " untie Comes est," or " ut 
sit inde Comes," &c, gave way to the words " sub nomine Comitis," as 
though the shadow even of official power within the county was then 
considered to have ceased, and the title of honour only to have sur- 
vived. This practice continued till the reign of Edward III., when 
Patents or Charters first became the direct means of conveying the 
dignity intended to be bestowed. Instances had occurred, as with 
Cornwall in 1231 and 1308, and Lancaster in 1267, where the whole 
county, and not the third penny only, had been granted, without mention 
of ihe title of Earl being at the same time bestowed upon the grantee ; 
but in these cases creation had no doubt been perfected by the gird- 
ing on of the sword, and Summons to Parliament accordingly followed. 

The Girding on of the Sword was indeed the act that conveyed the 
dignity until the reign of Edward III. ; and even after that period, 
when it became subordinate to the Charter or Letters Patent, this 
solemn act of investiture continued to be performed, frequently in the 
presence of the assembled States of Parliament. In the 1st year of 
the reign of King Edward VI. the imposition of the Cap of Dignity 
and Golden Circlet was added to the ceremony, and this continued till 
13 James (1615), when the legal authorities declared such ceremonies 
to be unnecessary ; and though the form of creation was thenceforth 
disused, it continued to be recited as the manner of creation until the 
reign of Queen Anne, shortly after which period a clause was inserted 
in the Patents, dispensing with the ceremony of investiture by express 
words. 

The following is the earliest detailed account to be found of the 
ceremony of girding on the sword of an Earl : — 

" On a Sunday e the iij daye of February the first yeare of our 
sovereigne Lord King Henry the viij at Westmynster The Lord 
Henry Stafford Brother to Edward Duke of Buckingham was create 
Earle of Wilteshire in manner following After the King's offering the 
saide Lord Henry went in to the Ewer}' being at the King's great 
chamber end wheare was putt uppon him the Poabes of estate of an 
Earle the Collier of the Gartiers about his neck in tokening that he 
was knight of the said order And when the Masse was finished the 
King went to his great Chamber wheare he stoode under his cloath 
of estate having the great part of his Lords both spiritual] and 
temporall aboute him and imcdiatelie after was presented the said 
Lord Henry having the officers of Armes before him Garter principal] 
king of Armes bare the Patent of Creation which went next before the 



s Vincent upon Brooke, in Coll. Arm. MS. additions. 



EARLDOMS. liii 

Sword and presented it to the Lord Herbert Chamberlane to the King 
which presented it to the Earle of Oxenford Great Chamberlane of 
England which presented it to the King and the King delivered it to 
the Lord Thomas Eouthall Bishop of Duresme his Secretaire The 
Earle of Derby Thomas bare his Sword the pomell upwards The said 
Lord was ledd by the Earle of Northumberland Henry and by the 
Earle of Shrewsbury George alsoe being in their Roabes of Estate and 
after the third obeisance the said Lord stood before the King and the 
King comaunded the Bishop of Duresme his Secretary to rede the 
Patent openlie and when he came to Cincturum Gladij The Earle of 
Derby presented the Sword to the King and the Lord Henry kneled 
downe and the King gird his Sword about the right Sholdier and 
soe in bende over the lefte arme by the which he was create Earle of 
Wilt : which done the said Lord Secretarie red owte his Patent and 
delivered it to the King and the King delivered it to the Earle of 
Wiltshire which gave the King thankings for the great honor he had 
done unto him saying certayno words as humble thanking his highnes 
for the great honor done to him beseeching Allmightie God to give 
him grace to doe to his highnes such service that it might be to his 
pleasure. 

" Which done the King went to his chamber to dynner and the Earle 
of Wiltshire bearing his Patent accompanied as before went to the 
Counsell Chamber to dynner and there delivered to Garter for the 
office of Amies £10 and all in nobles and gave alsoe to Garter for 
such service as he had done unto him and for recompense of the 
Gowne and his apparell that he wore the same daie before that he put 
on him the Eoabes of an Earle x markes and alsoe a fee during the 
life of the said Gartier of xl s by the yeare oute of his mannor of 
Woodbury Co Somerset The Earle of Wiltshier kept the estate the 
same daie accompanied as before saving the other Earles did off their 
Roabes of Estate and satt with him at dynner in their gownes The 
King sent for the honor of the said Earles creation five markes to his 
officers of armes wherfore after the second course the King was cried 
at his chamber dore the Stile of England and of France as accustomed 
And after was cried Largeis ij Du tres noble & puissant Sieur Le . 
Counte de Wilteshire S r Henry de Stafford Fitz & Frere des dues de 
Bockingham." h 

Having thus given an account of the manner and form attending 
the creation of an Earl from the Conquest until the present time, it 
remains to consider next the nature of the dignity granted, and the 
limitation of succession to that dignity — a dignity which has been 
stated to have been personal and hereditary, though not partible. 

A review of the descent of Earldoms from the Norman era down to 
the period when the limitations were precisely determined by Patent 
would lead us to presume that the law of inheritance in dignities was 
not so clearly settled but that it was liable to be diverted from its 



W. A. in Coll. Arm. p. 9. 



liv OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

legitimate channel at the will of the Crown ; nevertheless a more close 
observation enables ns to discern certain fixed principles in the law 
of the descent of dignities seldom departed from, and only under the 
pressure of peculiar circumstances. 

From the earliest period at which words of limitation are found, 
till late in the reign of Edward III., the words of inheritance are — 
to the grantee " et heredibus suis :" these words are not to be construed 
in the general sense that would be attributed to them at the present 
day, of heirs general whatsoever; nor may they bo restricted to the 
limited sense of heirs male of the body — a construction rather suggested 
than urged by the Lords' Committee in their Third Eeport on the 
Dignity of a Peer :' their meaning and intent must be sought for in 
the general spirit of the Constitution, and not in the strict letter of the 
words themselves, for no instance is found of an Earldom descending 
to an heir general not of the body of the grantee, whilst on the other 
hand the instances are numerous where Earldoms have passed through 
heirs female, who were at the same time heirs general of the grantee. 

It has been stated that Earls were created to be the " Comites " or 
Associates of their Sovereign in the government of the realm, and it 
became therefore necessary to the maintenance of their dignity that 
such Earldoms should be suitably endowed : the third penny of the 
county was always granted to be held with them ; added to which we 
not unfrcquently find certain lordships, manors, lands, &c, erected 
into a " Comitatus," and given to descend with the newly created 
dignity. 

So long "therefore as the lands attached to the Earldom remained 
undivided the dignity remained unimpaired, and waited upon the 
descent of those lands, whether they devolved upon an heir male or 
an heir female of the body of the grantee : in the latter case the 
duties for which the Earldom was conferred were, by the courtesy of 
England, performed, and the lands held, by the husband of the heir, 
who was in consequence summoned to Parliament as an Earl, and 
held the dignity during the lifetime of his wife or nonage of his son. 
Rut if it happened that an Earl died leaving daughters and coheirs, 
amongst whom all the estates of his Earldom became partible, the 
Earldom was broken up — the dignity forsook the lands : no one of the 
divided portions of the Earldom was sufficient for the maintenance of 
its dignity, and it consequently reverted to the Crown, from which it 
had originally emanated. Such was the principle laid down by the 
law officers in the reign of Edward I., who declared that an Earldom, 
though hereditary, was not partible. The same did in fact happen to 
an Earldom as to a Barony when it fell amongst coheirs — no one 
coheir more than another could enjoy the dignity, and it became the 
King's to dispose of at his pleasure. 

But when, as in the instances of Chester, Gloucester, Huntingdon, 
Essex, Albemarle, &c, the whole lands of an Earldom passed to one 

* Page 191. 



EARLDOMS. lv 

of several daughters and coheirs, and were in no degree divided, the 
dignity passed with them to the husband and issue of such coheir. In 
the case of Albemarle, William Mandeville, Earl of Essex, became Earl 
of Albemarle, because, says Dugdale, " Hawisiam filiam comitis de 
Albemarle, cum tota patris hereditate desponsavit." k 

Such is the simple meaning which attaches to the words " heredibus 
suis," and there are not wanting numerous instances to corroborate 
this view of their construction and intent. Salisbury, Warwick, Lincoln, 
Norfolk, Surrey, Devon, Oxford, Pembroke, and others, are all cases 
where the Earldom descended through heirs of the body, whether male 
or female ; in the instance of Warwick, 1449, the dignity passed with 
the lands to the sister and heir of the whole blood, excluding from 
all interest in either three elder sisters and coheirs of the half blood. 

The Earldoms of Leicester, 1204 ; Sussex, 1243 ; Chester, 1244 ; 
Winchester, 1264 ; Gloucester, 1313 ; Lancaster and Leicester, 1360 ; 
Hereford, 1372 ; and Suffolk, 1381, are remarkable instances of the 
dignity reverting to the Crown by reason of coheirs. When this 
occurred in the case of Leicester, 1204, the King confirmed to the 
coheirs, by Charter, the division of the estates, and re-granted to 
Simon de Montfort, with the one moiety of the same estates, the third 
penny of the county, wide ipse comes est : in that of Chester, we are told 
by Camden that the King upon the death of John le Scot annexed the 
Earldom to the Crown, " ne tam prseclarse dominatio inter colos foemi- 
narum dividi contingeret," lest so important an inheritance should be 
divided amongst distaffs. 1 

Hereford in 1070, Salop in 1091, Winchester in 1219, and Leicester 
in 1239, afford instances where the possession of the lands of the 
Earldom overruled the strictly hereditary nature of the dignity; in 
the case of Winchester the Earldom vested in a 2nd son, who obtained 
livery of his father's lands during the absence of his elder brother in 
Palestine, thereby excluding from the dignity not only his said brother, 
but that brother's daughter and heir. In the cases of Hereford and 
Salop, foreign possessions enjoyed by the elder brothers may have 
operated to their exclusion from their father's English dignity. 

So inseparable were the lands from the dignity, and so much did 
indeed depend upon the dignity being upheld by suitable possessions, 
that there are instances, as in the cases of the Earldoms of Bedford 
and Kent, where the dignity of Earl was altogether taken away, or 
ceased to be attributed, by reason of poverty. 

Instances have occurred, as in that of Pembroke, where the analogy 
between Earldoms and Baronies extends beyond the point that has 
already been alluded to, — instances in which the Earldom would appear 
to be taken out of Abeyance and given to a coheir. A Patent was 
granted 13 Oct. 1339 of the Earldom of Pembroke to Lawrence Lord 
Hastings, reciting that the inheritance of the former Earl, Aymer de 



k By reason that Hawise succeeded to the 



whole lands of the Earldom, she has been descendant afterwards claimed the dignity, 
often called heir to her father, but there ' Britannia, cd. 1607, p. 464. 



seems to have been another daughter, whose 



lvi 



OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 



Valence, had fallen amongst his sisters and coheirs, and that it was 
due to the said Lawrence, as descended from the eldest sister, to have 
the name and honour of Earl of Pembroke, which was thereby granted 
to him. The Patent contains no limitation, whence it may be presumed 
the said Earldom was to be enjoyed by him, as Aymer de Valence his 
predecessor had enjoyed it. 

The earliest instance found of mention of heirs male in the limita- 
tion of succession is that of Carlisle in 1322, m which is " sibi et here- 
dibus suis masculis de corpore suo ;" the next (excepting the grant of 
the Earldom of Bedford to Ingelram de Coucy, the King's son-in-law 
and a foreigner) is that to Thomas Mowbray, created Earl of Notting- 
ham, " sibi et heredibus masculis suis de corpore suo," by Charter 12 
Feb. 1383," followed by those of the Earl of Suffolk in 1385, and the 
Earl of Huntingdon in 1387, subsequent to which the grant to heirs 
male of the body of the grantee became the rule of limitation, to which 
any other form was an exception. 

There are grounds for supposing that the limitation thus introduced 
was not presumed to restrain the former limitation beyond the mere 
confining of the dignity to a male representative of the body of the 
grantee, and that the additional words " de corpore suo " had been 
fully understood (though not expressed) in the former mode of limita- 
tion : the case of Nottingham, referred to in note n, is strongly indica- 
tive, if not indeed decisive upon this point. In the Patent of Creation 
to the Earldom of Suffolk, 1385, it is stated that, the former Earl having 
died without heirs male (that is to say heirs male of the body), the King 
is pleased to confer the dignity on Michael de la Pole and the heirs male 
of his body — the original Patent having been "heredibus suis" only. 
The Charter of Restoration to Aubrey de Vere of the Earldom of 
Oxford, which his ancestors had so long enjoyed, was to him and his 
heirs male, whilst the dignity restored was one which his ancestors pos- 
sessed under a Charter to heirs general. Neither in the case of Suffolk 
nor in- that of Oxford did the meaning of the words extend beyond heirs 
male of the bodies of the grantees ; indeed it was reserved for a decision 
of the House of Lords in the 19th century to award an Earldom to an 
heir male general, who derived his claim, as such, from an ancestor 
who lived two hundred years anterior to the Patent of Creation under 
which he claimed, and not only after three centuries of quiet acqui- 
escence in its extinction, but an acquiescence also in its re-creation to 
another family . p If this decision were correct, not an Earldom created 



m He was degraded and beheaded the fol- 
lowing year. 

n He was heir to his brother, who had 
been created Earl of Nottingham " to him 
and his heirs " only six years previously, and 
who had died under age and S. P. ; his 
brother did not succeed to this dignity, which 
he would have done had the limitation 
meant heirs general, but was re-created, and 
the difference in the words of limitation points 



accurately to the time when the new form of 
limitation came into usage. 

° Lord Chief Justice Crewe, in the Oxford 
Case, 1626, treated the creations by Henry II. 
and Richard II. as one and the same dignity. 
Vide Sir Harris Nicolas's elaborate Report 
on the Devon Peerage, Appendix vii. 

p Charles Blount, Lord Montjoy, was 
created Earl of Devon in 160o 



EARLDOMS. lvii 

for more than three centuries after the Conquest can be presumed to 
have become Extinct. 

This case of the Earldom of Devon created 1 553, brings us to consider 
the words of limitation upon which that claim was made, and which is 
first found in the Patent of the Earl of Wiltshire in 1397, viz. " sibi et 
heredibus suis masculis in perpetuum." The same limitation occurs in the 
grants of the Baronies of Hoo and Hastings in 1448 ; Bichmount-Grey 
and Egremont in 1449 ; and these cases were relied upon as precedents. 
In the case of the Earldom of Wiltshire the Creation occurred within 
a few years (as has been already shown) of the first introduction of 
the words " heredibus masculis " into Batents, and at a period when 
their meaning had been clearly defined, as in the Batent of the 
Earldom of Suffolk, 1385, q to mean heirs male of the body only. 
The Earl of Wiltshire was attainted and died s. p., but neither his 
brother nor nephew, both men of influence with King Henry IV., took 
any steps for the reversal of the attainder and obtaining the dignity. 
In the case of Hoo and Hastings, upon the death of the grantee s. p. m., 
his brother Sir Thomas Hoo became his heir male, and survived him 
more than thirty years, but never claimed the dignity. Of the Lords 
Bichmount-Grey and Egremont both died s. p. l., the former having 
been attainted, but in neither case did the heirs male seek either a 
reversal of the attainder or to claim the dignity. In all these cases, as 
was observed by the Attorney-General in the Devon case, there was 
" no exercise of rights to illustrate the nature of the grant intended to 
be made ; " and in the case of the Earldom of Wiltshire the necessary 
construction of the words of limitation was decidedly adverse to the 
Devon claim. In 1644 King Charles I. created the Lord Lucas, and 
in 1645 restored the Lord Cobham, but the Batents on those occasions 
show that even as late as that time the words "heirs males" meant 
only heirs male of the body. (See those titles.) 

Yet, although the extension of the dignity of an Earl to heirs general 
seems never to have been contemplated by the Crown, a few instances 
occur of its restriction to a life interest in the person of the grantee, but 
they are of so unfrequent occurrence that they must rather be con- 
sidered as exceptions (sanctioned by Parliament) to the general law 
that governed the descent of dignities, than emanating from the law 
itself. 

John Plantagenet, brother of King Henry V., was created in 1414, 
by consent of the assembled States of the Bealm, Earl of Kendal and 
Duke of Bedford for life, which dignities were afterwards confirmed to 
him and his issue male. Humphrey Blantagenet his brother was at the 
same time and in the same manner created Earl of Bembroke and 
Duke of Gloucester for life. A later instance is that of Bichard Beau- 

q The Charter of the Earldom of .Salisbury, I Earldom of Huntingdon, created at the same 



created in the former reign to William de 
Montiicute and his heirs, is quoted in a deed 
of donation of the same date, as having given 
the dignity to the grantee and the heirs mule 
of his body : in the instance also of the 



time, the dignity is granted " heredibus 
suis;" whilst the lands attached to the dig- 
nity, and I" descend uith it, are granted 
" heredibus suis masculis de corporc suo." 



lviii OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

champ, who, sitting in Parliament as Earl of Warwick, is said to have 
been created Earl of Albemarle for life in 1423, although no such 
Patent is to be found. The last occasion was that on which Thomas 
Howard was created Earl of Surrey for life, upon the surrender of the 
said Earldom by his father Thomas Howard Duke of Norfolk. 

Guichard D' Angle, a Poitouvin, was created in 1377 Earl of Hunt- 
ingdon for life. He had been a subject of France, but the conquests of 
the Black Prince probably changed his allegiance. He was not created 
in Parliament, where, had he been a foreigner, he could not have taken 
his seat ; he was however summoned to Parliament till his death in 
1380. In the case of Lewis de Bruges, an undoubted foreigner, created 
Earl of Winchester in 1472, the clause conferring a seat in Parliament, 
then only lately introduced into Earls' Patents, was omitted, and, 
judging from subsequent cases alluded to under Baronies by Patent, 
the same disqualification from sitting in Parliament must have attended 
the Patent of an Earldom for life as attended upon that of a Baron. 

The degree of Countess more than any other degree in the Peerage 
has been conferred for life upon females. The first instance that 
occurs is that of Mary widow of Sir George Villiers, created Countess 
of Buckingham for life, 1618, and the latest that of Amelia Sophia de 
Walmoden, created Countess of Yarmouth 1740. 

The foregoing observations may be considered to embody all the 
leading features, whether of form or limitation, that have attended 
upon the creation of an Earl ; and in arriving at the conclusions that 
have been set forth, the Editor has not done so without considering 
with deep attention those vast stores of information collected together 
by the Lords' Committee in their Eeports on the Dignity of a Peer, 
which embrace not only the earlier authorities, but are in themselves 
a learned comment upon all that has previously been written upon the 
subject. 

M ARQTJE SS ATE S. 

The title of Marquess was not introduced into this country, as con- 
stituting and accompanying the Parliamentary dignity, until it was 
conferred by King Richard II. by Charter, 1 Dec. 1385, upon Eobert 
de Vere Earl of Oxford, who was by him created Marquess of Dublin 
for life. The word Marchio, as applied to a Lord Marcher, or Lord 
of a Frontier District, had previously for many years been used in this 
country ; and William of Malmesbury, speaking of Brian Fitz-Count, 
one of the supporters of the cause of the Empress Maud against King 
Stephen, calls him Marchio or Marcher of Wallingford. At the Coro- 
nation of Queen Eleanor, wife of King Henry III., John Fitz-Alan, 
Ealph de Mortimer, John de Monmouth, and Walter de Clifford, as 
" Marchiones de Marchia Walliae " or Lords Marchers of Wales, claimed 
by the " jus Marchiae," or Law of the March, to provide and carry the 
spears that supported the pall over the King, which duty belonging to 
the Barons of the Cinque Ports, their claim was disallowed/ 

r E. libro Rubro Scaccarij, fol. 232. 



MAHQUESSATES. lix 

The Ralph de Mortimer thus referred to, who was " Marchio de 
Marchia Wallise " and Lord of Wigmore, was the great-grandfather of 
Roger Mortimer Lord of Wigmore (the paramour of Queen Isabel), 
who in the Parliament holden 2 Edw. III. 1328 caused himself to be 
created Earl of March, thus deriving his title from the office of Lord 
Marcher or Guardian of the March. 

John Lord Nevill of Raby, in a Patent 1 Ric. II. 1377-8, pt. 2, m. 13, 
is called "Marchio et unus Custodum Marchiarum Scotia?," and the 
same King some years after, " considering the nobility of race and the 
strenuous honesty and very excellent wisdom of his most dear cousin 
Robert de Vere Earl of Oxford, and desiring that the excellence of a 
more famous name should attend the splendour of his deeds," adopted 
the word Marchio as a distinct title of honour, conferring it upon the 
same Robert de Vere Earl of Oxford, whom he made Marquess of 
Dublin, with a seat among the Peers of Parliament " in the higher 
grade, that is to say, between the Dukes and the Earls." 

The following account of his creation appears upon the Parliament 
Rolls :— 

" Our said Lord the King sitting, therefore, in the present full Par- 
liament, and at the same time the aforesaid Marquis coming thither, 
and standing before him, honourably robed and adorned as the like 
solemnity requires, and as it beseemeth one raised to a summit of such 
dignity, the noble and discreet person Michael de la Pole, Earl of 
Suffolk and Chancellor of England, by the Royal command, most 
gravely explained the premises in full Parliament, with the several 
motives and impelling causes of that Creation ; and moreover the 
same Lord the King, being desirous, as beseemeth the celsitude of his 
Royal serenity, more pregnantly to honour the person of the said Mar- 
quis, whose renown of birth as is premised is notoriously illustrious, 
and who is adorned with a multiplicity of virtues, and more freely to 
augment his power and means in the form aforesaid, and more firmly 
to strengthen by the Royal authority such his estate and other the 
premises, ratifying and approving the charter aforesaid, and all matters 
therein contained, did in full Parliament, being present there the Pre- 
lates, Nobles, and Magnates, and the whole of the Commons, ratify, 
approve, and confirm the same for himself and his heirs, as far as in 
him lay, to the aforesaid Marquis for his life in form aforesaid, and 
more maturely did invest him, the said Marquis with the aforesaid title, 
name, and honour, by the girding of the sword and setting upon his 
head the coronet of gold, and to the same Marquis with his own hands 
delivered and really gave over the Charter aforesaid, in full testimony 
and perpetual trust and remembrance of the premises, and having 
immediately taken his homage for the Estate, Land, and Lordship 
aforesaid, with a gay countenance, commanded him to take his seat 
among the Peers of Parliament in the higher grade, that is to say 
between the Dukes and the Earls, which thing the said Marquis most 
thankfidly did forthwith." 8 

3 Printed evidence on the Wenslcydale Peerage Case. 



lx OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

The next instance is that of John de Beaufort Earl of Somerset, 
who was created Marquess of Dorset by the same Monarch 29 Sept. 
1397, and by another Patent the same day created Marquess of 
Somerset, although he continued to be styled Marquess of Dorset until 
1 Hen. IV. 1399, when he was degraded in Parliament, and only con- 
sidered as Earl of Somerset. On the 6 Nov. 1402 the Commons peti- 
tioned the King to restore him to the name and honour of Marquess. 

The following entry on the Polls of Parliament, in giving an account 
of this transaction, exhibits the repugnance then felt to the usage of a 
title considered to be foreign to England : — 

" Lundy, 6 Nov. 1402. Les Communes viendrent devant le Roi et 
les Seigneurs en Parlement, et entre autres choses et matires illoeges 
montrez & parlez, mesmes les Communes honorablement recomendantz 
les bone et honorable port & governance del Cont de Somersete prierent 
au Roi q. mesme le Cont purroit estre restorez a ses noun et honour de 
Marquys queux il avoit p' devan ; de quel prier le Roi et les Seigneurs 
enmercierent les ditz Communes. Et le Roi leur disoit q'il voudroit 
estre avisez & eut faire ceo q. luy sembleroit pur le mieulx touchant 
cell' matire. Et sur ceo le dit Cont, engenulant molt humblement, 
pria au Roi, q. come le noun de Marquys feust estraunge noun en cest 
Roialme, q'il ne luy vorroit ascunement doner cet noun de Marquys 
que jammais par congie du Roi il ne vorroit porter n'accepter sur luy 
nul tiel noun en ascun manere. Mais nientmoins mesme le Cont molt 
cordialment remercia les Seigneurs et les Communes de leur bones 
coers & volent celle paitie."' 

The Earl of Somerset continued therefore to be so called and kncwn 
until his decease, and nothing more is heard of the title of Marquess 
until forty years after, when it was bestowed upon Edmund de Beaufort, 
younger son of the above John de Beaufort, who was created Marquess 
of Dorset 24 June, 1442, and his creation was followed by that of the 
Marquess of Suffolk 14 Sept. 1444. Edward IV. conferred two Mar- 
quessates, and it has since become, like that of Viscount, a common 
title of Peerage in this country. 

The ancient form of investiture of a Marquess was by the girding 
with the sword and the imposition of the golden circlet, as above 
narrated, to which at the creation of the Marquess of Montagu by King 
Edward IV., 1470, a cap of estate, which prior to that period pertained 
exclusively to Dukes, was first added. The earliest account extant of 
the ceremony observed at the creation of this dignity is that of Anne 
Boleyn, Marchioness of Pembroke, which would necessarily in some 
few particulars differ from that of a Marquess. It is as follows : — 

" In the year of our Lord God 1532 and the 24 yere of the raigne of 
our Soveraigne Lord King Henrie the 8th on the first day of Sept. St. 
Giles daye being Sundaie was the Ladie Anne Rocheford Marchioness 
of Penbroke at the Castel of Windsor in maner as ensueth First the 
said Ladie being lodged and having her chamber in the said Castle 



1 Rot. 1'ar. vol. iii. p. 488. 



MARQUESSATES. lxi 

neer unto the Queens lodging She beiug apparelled in a Surcoate of 
the Estate of a Marchionesse which was of Crimson Velvet purfelled, 

and above before on the breast with 3 rowes and a half of 

Ermyn having on her head an of Gold and in her haire, 

being ledde between the Countesse of Rutland and the Countesse of 
Sussex (which for defalt of Robes of Estate did weare their own 
apparel which were Gownes of Crimson Velvet) and the Lady Mary 
Howard did beare the Circulet of Gold in her right hand and for defalt 
of another great Estate she did beare the Mantle over her shoulder & 
upon her left arme depending And before them went Garter principal 
King of Armes which beare openlie the Patent of her Creation And 
before him certain Lords as the Lord Montacue the Lord Rochford 
and divers Knights and many other Noble men of the Corte and 
Officers of Armes went in their places accustomed and in this manner 
through the great Chamber where the King was under his Cloath of 
Estate accompanied with the Ambassador of France the Dukes of Norff. 
& Suff. the Marquys of Excestre. 

" And from the entering in at the said Great Chamber into the Kings 
p'sence was made a lane and large room that the Kings Grace and the 
Lords might see to the Chamber door, where the Ladie and others 
made their first obedience And in the middest of the Chamber the 
second and the third neer unto the Kings Majesty And then the said 
S r Thomas Garter kneeling and kissing the said Fatent of Creation 
delivered unto the Kings hands whoe delivered it unto the Bishop of 
Winchester being Secretarie to reade And at the words p' Mantelli 
inductionem the King put upon her the Mantle of Estate which was 
of Crimson Velvet the upper part of Ermyns powdered with three 

rowes and an half and on each side above an of gold called 

with a lace wrought of gold and silke and tassells depending 

beneath her knee, w ch lace held her mantle togither the said Mantle 
furred w lh inforth w th lettyce and at the words p' circuli aurei upposi- 
coem she kneling the King put her Circulett uppon her head w cb is 
comonlie called a Demi Coronall w ch was of fyne gold having the halfe 
floure and the tipp And after that manner made rounde And the flatt 
border garnished w' h certayne p'cious stones w ch done the said Bishop 
being Secretarie did read out the residue of the Patent and redeliv'ed 
it unto the King w ch w th good words gave the Patent to the said Ladie 
Marchioness And alsoe she humblie gave thanks unto his highnes for 
the great hono r that it pleased his highnes to doe unto her And it is to 
be remembred that the King gave unto the said Lady a Patent of 
p'eminence and p'rogative to be above all other Marquisses of this 
Realme which for certayne causes was not openly read Alsoe after- 
wards the Lord keeper of the great Seale delivered the Patent which 
y e said Bishop did read part of The effect thearof is that the said Lady 
shold have of the Kings gift a thowsand pounds by yeare towards the 
mayntenaimce of her estate Which done the King alsoe gave unto her 
the said Patent And she openlie bearing both the said Patents in her 
hands noblie accompanied she being alsoe ledd as is aforesaid retorned 



/ 



lxii 



OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 



unto her chamber wearing the said Roabes of Estate & Circulet on 
her head."" 

These ceremonies were dispensed with, like those attending all the 
other degrees of the Peerage, in the reign of King James I. ; and 
excepting in the first instance of the Creation of the Marquess of Dub- 
lin, it has never been bestowed for life. 



' 



DUKEDOMS. 

The title of Dux, or Duke, has from the earliest ages been known 
as a title of dignity. Scripture informs us that the title of Duke (in 
its Hebrew synonym)" was that under which the sons of Esau ruled 
their people in Edom, before assuming the kingly dignity ; it was 
known both to the Greeks and to the Romans, and it had been borne 
on the continent of Europe as an hereditary dignity long before its 
introduction into this country, to which it was probably brought by 
the Saxons. During the Saxon rule, however, its signification seems 
rather to have been that of a leader or governor amongst the people, 
than possessing in itself any defined official or hereditary dignity. 
The Aldermen, or Earls of Mercia, were officially so styled, but they 
were also called Dukes of Mercia, or of the Mercians, as in the case of 
iElfhere, called "Dux Merciorum" in a charter of Oswald Bishop of 
Worcester in 962 ; Ethelfreda, daughter of King Alfred, was known as 
Lady or Duchess of the Mercians, and Hoveden, in speaking of 
Norman, a younger son of Leofwin, Alderman or Duke of Mercia, calls 
him "Dux Normaunus." These and similar instances account for the 
assertion of Selden, " that it was used with us in expressions of 
ancient Earls many ages before it was a distinct dignity in itself." 

William the Conqueror brought with him into England the title of 
Duke, as a territorial and hereditary dignity, but it continued to be 
merged in the Crown until the reign of Edward III., who conferred it 
upon his eldest son, Edward the Black Prince, in 1337, and next upon 
Henry Plantagenet Earl of Lancaster in 1351, both of whom were 
created in Parliament by the girding of the sword. These Dukedoms 
were considered by Selden and Cruise to have been Dukedoms by 
Tenure, because in the one case divers manors in Cornwall and else- 
where were erected into and made parts of the Duchy, and in the 
other the jurisdiction was Palatine ; but although by reason of such 
qualifications these Dukedoms possessed a territorial character more 
nearly allied to the Dukedoms vested in the Crown, as Normandy, 
Aquitaine, &c, the dignity of Duke was personal only, and the pro- 
perty granted was such as to enable the grantees to support the 
dignity according to their rank and consanguinity to the Crown, added 
to which the Palatinate jurisdiction of the latter was in the Earldom y of 



u W. A., page 11, in Coll. Arm. 

The word Dux or Duke, as given in the 
translation of the Holy Text, has the express 
meaning of the Rabbinical Hebrew. — Selden. 



y The Patent of the Dukedom gives him 
Palatinate jurisdiction similar to that 
of Chester, within the said County of 
Lancaster. 



DUKEDOMS. 



lxiii 



Lancaster, although now to be administered under the higher personal 
dignity of Duke. 

The next Creation of a Duke leaves no doubt as to the entirely per- 
sonal character of the dignity bestowed : Lionel Plantagenet, the 
King's thifd son, was created Duke of Clarence in full Parliament, 
13 Nov. 1362, and John, his brother, was at the same time made Duke 
of Lancaster. In neither case were these grants of dignity accom- 
panied by grants of lands or annuities ; and although the latter had 
by marriage obtained the lands of the Earldom of Lancaster, the 
former had but the honour of Clare — a portion only of the possessions 
of the Earldom of Gloucester. 

Kichard II. created many Dukes; in 1385 he made his uncles 
Edmund and Thomas Dukes of York and Gloucester ; in the next 
year he created his favourite Kobert de Vere Duke of Ireland ; and in 
1397 he created five Dukes and a Duchess in one day, viz. — Hereford, 
Surrey, Exeter, Albemarle, and the Duke and Duchess of Norfolk. 

The ceremonies of Creation and Limitation of Succession in the dig- 
nity conferred on these early Dukes were various : — 

That of the Duchy of Cornwall, created by the girding on of the 
sword, was limited " eidem duci et ipsius & hered. suorum Regum 
Anglie filijs primogenitis & dicti loci ducibus in Regno Anglie heredi- 
tarie successuris " (to have and to hold to the same Duke and to the 
firstborn sons of him and of his heirs Kings of England in hereditary 
succession), so that he who should be hereditable must be heir apparent 
of the King of England, and of such King who should be heir to the 
said first created Duke, and not heir apparent only, but first-begotten 
son, — a limitation of estate, says Judge Doddridge, "short, excellent, 
and curious," the latter, inasmuch as he is a Dux natus, non creatus, 
presumed to be of full and perfect age from the first day of his na- 
tivity, and with a right from that day to sue out his livery. 2 

The Duke of Lancaster was also created by the girding of the sword ; 
his Patent contains no words of limitation whatever, being " prefato 
Henrico nomen ducis Lancast. imponimus & ipsum de nomine Ducis 
dicti loci per cincturam gladij p'sentialiter investimus ;" the next clause 
gives him a Chancery within the said County, " ad totam vitam suam," 
so that this dignity may be considered to have been a life estate. 

The Dukes of Clarence and Lancaster were created in 1362, " to 
have and to hold to them and the heirs male of their bodies ;" the 
former was absent in Ireland, but the latter had investiture by the 
Monarch's girding him with the sword and putting on him " une cappe 
furre, & desus un cercle d'or & de peres." 

The Charters of the Dukedoms of York and Gloucester contain no 
words of limitation, being only " in ducem ereximus eidem Ducatus 
(Ebor, or Glouc.) titulum assignantes & nomen;" nevertheless the 
Polls of Parliament expressly state that the dignities were to them and 



z Doddridge's Honour's Pedigree, 1657, 
p. 24. The effect of the limitation of this 
dignity has been the subject of several solemn 



inquiries, an account of which will be found 
under the History of the Princes of Wales 
and Dukes of Cornwall. 



lxiv OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

the heirs male of their bodies ; the ceremony of investiture was 
similar to that of the Duke of Lancaster in 1362, but each of them had 
in addition annuities of 1000/. given to them. 

In the Charter creating Kobert de Vere Earl of Oxford to be Duke 
of Ireland, the words of Creation are, "prgefato consanguineo nostro 
nomen ducis Hiberniae imponimus ac ipsuni de nomine ducis Hibernise 
personaliter investimus & ducem Hibernian prseficimus," with no 
words of limitation ; but the grant of the land and Lordship of Ireland, 
which immediately follows in the same charter, is " quoad vixerit ;" 
no account of his investiture is given. 

The ceremony recorded in regard to the Creation of the five Dukes 
in 1397 is worthy of observation, from the difference of the account as 
given in the Rolls of Parliament to that stated in their respective 
Charters of Creation : the dates of the Charters and the investiture in 
Parliament are the same, and all are to the grantee and the heirs male 
of his body ; but whilst the Charter speaks of the investiture by the 
imposition of the cap and delivery of the golden rod, the Rolls of Par- 
liament inform us more explicitly that the King " ceynta le dit due 
ovek son espee & mist s r son chef un cap de honeur 8f dignite de due" 

This cap of estate or dignity was peculiar at this time to a Duke ; it 
was worn by no other degree in Parliament, nor was it allowed to the 
estates of Marquess and Earl a till many years after this period : it was 
the same with the ducal cap of Normandy and Aquitaine, in which the 
Sovereigns of England had from an early time been wont both to meet 
their Parliaments and attend their Coronations ; b and upon the sever- 
ance of the Ducal title from the Crown, it was probably considered 
that this ensign of honour should accompany and adorn the newly- 
created dignity, although no longer territorial. 

The Countess of Norfolk, created Duchess of Norfolk at the same 
time, was so created for life only ; and the same estate was giveu by 
Charles I. to Lady Alice Dudley, created Duchess Dudley ; and by 
Charles II. and George I. to their mistresses, the Duchesses of Ports- 
mouth and Kendal. 

The following is an early account of the ceremony observed at the 
creation of a Duke : — 

" On Thursday next after the daie of the buryall of the noble and 
late famous Kyng Henry the eight, being the xvij day of Februarie, 
all the temp'all Lordes assembled at the said Towre of London in their 
Robes of Estate, where was created theyse noble men hereafter follow- 
inge, viz. : 

"First Edwarde Semor, Earl of Hertford and Lord Protector, and 
uncle to the King's Ma tie aforesaid, beinge appareled in his kyrtell, was 

1 The circlet was common both to Mar- with the Cap of Estate upon their heads, and 
qnesses and Earls, but the cap does not appear j formerly the act of Coronation consisted in 



to have been given to Marquesses till 1470, 
and to Earls at a much later period. 

b The Sovereigns of England down to King 
William IV. have ever proceeded to their 



placing upon the Ducal Cap of Normandy 
the Royal Diadem of England. It is still 
borne before the Sovereign in Parliament, 
although since the reign of King James I. 



Coronations in the Robes of Estate of a Duke, j the Imperial Diadem has accompanied it 



PRINCE OF WALES— FORFEITURES. lxv 

lede from the Counsell Chamber and conducted to the King's Ma'ties 
p'sence, in manner & forme followinge, viz. Furst, The offycers of 
Amies in their coates of armes goinge before ij & ij : Then Garter 
berynge his l'res pattents : Therle of Darby berynge his Mantell : 
Then on the right hand of them therle of Skrewesbery berynge the 
rode of golde, and on the left hand therle of Oxforde berynge the capp 
of Estate with the Coronall : Therle of Anmdell berynge the Sworde 
the pomell upwarde : Then the said Erie ledde betwene the Duk of 
Suifolke and the Marques Dorset : All thesse Lords aforesaid beinge 
also in there Eobes of Estate : And thus in good order p'ceding after 
the entree into the chambre of p'sens, made iij reverent obaciens to y e 
kyngs highnes, and when they came at the clothe of astate the said 
lords standyng and the said Earle knelyng : After that, Garter 
delyv'ed the l'res Pattents to M r Secretary Paget, he deliv'ed them to 
the kynge, and the kyng gave them agayne to hym to rede, and he red 
them openlye. And at the wordes investimus the kyng put on his 
mantell, and at gladij cincturam the king put abowte hym bawdricke 
wyse his sword ; and at cappe et circuli imposiconem in capite the kyng 
putt on his cappe with the coronall ; and at traditionem virge auree, he 
deliv'ed him his rode of golde. 

" The M r Secretary redde forthe the Patent w ch conteyned the creac'on 
of hym to be Duke of Somerset and Erie of Hertford, &c, with the 
gyfte of a thowsand pounds lande yearly ; And that done and ended, 
he deliv'ed the said letters pattents to the Kinge Ma' ie , and his highnes 
gave them to the said Duke, and the said Duke, after thanks given to 
his highenes, stode on the one syde to assiste the king's ma tie to the 
creation of other astats, and then the rest of the lords & the officers of 
armes retorned to conduicte the other estats in lyke manner." e 

All such Ceremonials ceased, as before stated, in the reign of King 
James I. 

PRINCE OF WALES. 

The Ceremonies attendant upon the Creation of a Prince of Wales 
and the limitation of that Dignity are noticed under the account of 
the Princes of Wales ; the ceremonies differed only from those obseived 
on the creation of a Duke by the addition of the ring of gold placed 
upon the finger ; the rod delivered to the newly-created Prince is 
sometimes described as of gold, and at other times of silver. 



FORFEITURES. 

As in numerous instances in the following pages titles are stated to 
have been Forfeited, it is necessary that a few observations relative to 
the forfeiture of dignities should be submitted. The subject, however, 
is one of some difficulty ; and although the nature of this work pre- 

c I. 18, p. 72, in Coll. Arm 



lxvi OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

eludes the possibility of entering into it in a manner suitablo to its 
importance, still stick points may be stated as will, perhaps, be ac- 
ceptable to the general reader. 

All dignities, or titles of honour, whether held in fee simple, fee 
tail, or for life, are forfeited and lost by the attainder for High Trea- 
son of the persons possessed of them. d Persons upon whom judgment 
of high treason is pronounced, or who are outlawed upon an indict- 
ment for high treason, are said to be attainted of high treason, and 
nothing but a reversal of such act of attainder or outlawry will 
restore the person so attainted or his posterity to the honours thus for- 
feited ; nor, in the event of the issue of the body of the person attainted 
failing, will the descendants of the person who was first created to the 
dignity be admitted to it without a removal of the attainder of tho 
person by whom it was forfeited. Thus in the case of the Earldom of 
Westmoreland, which was created by Letters Patent to Ealph Nevill 
in 1397, to him and the heirs male of his body, and which continued 
vested in such heirs male until it was inherited by Charles Nevill in 
15G3, the said Charles was attainted of high treason by outlawry in 
1570, and died without issue male, and in 2 Jac. I. Edmond Nevill 
claimed the dignity as heir male of Ealph Nevill, the first grantee. 
The case was, by command of the King, propounded to the Judges, 
who decided that although the dignity was within the statute " do 
donis," yet an Earldom being an office of trust and confidence was 
forfeited by a condition tacitly annexed to the dignity. Sir Edward 
Coke acceded to this decision, although from that learned Judgo 
appears to have originated the opinion that dignities by Patent were 
protected from Forfeiture upon an attainder of felony, by coming within 
the scope and meaning of the statute " de donis conditionalibus " — a 
doctrine fraught with so many difficulties, that the present recognition 
of this doctrine of Coke's can only be attributable to the estimation in 
which its author's opinions have been always holden. 

Where a person is tenant in tail male of a dignity, with a remainder 
over in tail male to another, and such person is attainted of high 
treason, the dignity is forfeited as to him and his issue male ; but upon 
failure of issue male of the person attainted, or incapability of inherit- 
ing, tho dignity becomes vested in the remainder man or his male 
descendant/ Thus in the case of the Earldom of Northumberland and 
the Barony of Percy, which dignities were by Letters Patent conferred 
on Thomas Percy in 1557, to him and the heirs male of his body, in 
default of which to his brother Henry Percy, and the heirs male of his 
body, — the said Thomas Earl of Northumberland, &c, was attainted 
of high treason in 1571, and had he left issue male, so long as such 
issue male existed these dignities would have been forfeited ; but on 
the extinction of the issue male of his body, the remainder would im- 
mediately take effect ; as, however, he died without issue male, tho 

d Cruise on Dignities, p. 118. B Tide Third Peerage Report, p. 45. 

1 Cruise on Dignities, p. 122, 



FORFEITURES. Ixvii 

dignities instantly devolved on his brother, in consequence of the 
limitations in the Patent. The case of the Dukedom of Somerset is 
also strictly in point. Edward Seymour, Earl of Hertford, was created 
Baron Seymour and Duke of Somerset in 1547, with remainder to the 
heirs male of his body by Ann, his second wife, failing which to 
" Edward Seymour, Esq., son of the said Duke by Katherine his first 
wife, and the heirs male of his body." The Duke of Somerset was 
attainted in 1552 of Felony, which attainder would not, as will be 
more fully noticed, have affected his dignities ; but by an Act of 
Parliament passed shortly after his death, all his titles were declared 
to be forfeited to the Crown. The issue male of his body by his second 
wife did not in consequence succeed to his titles until 1660, when the 
Act which declared the Duke's dignities to have been forfeited was 
repealed, and consequently his heir male by his said second wife 
succeeded to all his honours. In 1750 the issue male of the Duke by 
his second wife failed, and the dignities of Baron Seymour and Duke 
of Somerset devolved on the issue male of Sir Edward Seymour, his 
eldest son by his first wife, by virtue of the limitation of the Patent of 
creation of those honours in 1547. It has been stated that the forfeiture 
of the Duke's dignities by the Act of Parliament of 5 & 6 Edw. VI. did 
not affect the dignity of Duke of Somerset granted to Edward Seymour 
and the heirs male of his body ; for by the terms of the grant that 
dignity had vested, immediately after the Fatent passed the Great 
Seal, in the said Edward Seymour, with limitation to the heirs male of 
his body, though the actual enjoyment of it by Sir Edward and the 
heirs male of his body was made to depend on the failure of heirs male 
of the body of the father by his second wife ; and it is consequently 
affirmed that, on the extinction of the heirs male of Sir Edward Sey- 
mour, first Duke of Somerset, the grantee, by his second wife, that 
Dukedom would have immediately devolved on the heirs male of Sir 
Edward Seymour above mentioned, even had not the Act of Restoration 
in 1660 taken place, because, so far as the said limitation was in ques- 
tion, it wanted no act for its preservation. 8 A question seems, however, 
to arise out of this case which does not appear to have been noticed. 
The words of the limitation are to the heirs male of the body of the 
Duke by Ann his second wife, failing which, to Edward Seymour, Esq., 
son of the said Duke, by Katherine his first icife, and the heirs male of his hedy. 
Hence it appears that Edward Seymour was specially named in the 
Patent ; and it might, possibly, have been doubted whether, had the 
limitation been to the issue male of the Duke by his first wife and the 
heirs male of their bodies, instead of expressly naming the said Edward 
Seymour, the dignities would have been preserved in the manner just 
stated ; but as Mr. Cruise 11 cites this case to show that an estate in tail 
is not forfeited by the attainder for felony of the preceding tenant in 
tail, it may be inferred that it was not necessary that Sir Edward Sey- 
mour should have been specially named. The case of the celebrated 

e Third Peerage Report, p. 49. " Cruise on Dignities, p. 125. 

e 2 



Ixviii OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

Henry St. John, Viscount Bolingbroke, is also strongly illustrative of 
the effect of a remainder in preserving a dignity: he was created 
Viscount Bolingbroke and Baron St. John of Lydiard Tregoze, co. 
Wilts, in 1712, to him and the heirs male of his body, in default of 
which to his father, Sir Henry St. John, and the heirs male of his body. 
Lord Bolingbroke was attainted of high treason by Act of Parliament 
in 1714 ; and though, in 1725, he was restored in blood, yet his dig- 
nities were never restored to him, and upon his death without issue in 
1751, Frederick St. John, the grandson and heir male of Sir Henry St. 
John (the Viscount's father), succeeded to the titles of Viscount Boling- 
broke and Baron St. John of Lydiard Tregoze, by virtue of the said 
remainder. 

An important difference exists between an attainder for high treason 
and an attainder for felony. Dignities, whether created by Writ or by 
Patent, become forfeited by an attainder for high treason ; but by an 
attainder for felony an entailed dignity is not forfeited, though a dignity 
created by Writ, and descendible to heirs-general, is forfeited by the 
attainder of felony of the person possessed of it. Thus Mervin Tucket, 
who was Baron Audley, by Writ, in England, and Earl of Castlehaven, 
under a Patent, in Ireland, was in 1631 attainted of felony, when the 
Barony of Audley was certainly forfeited in consequence of that 
attainder ; but the Irish Earldom was, according to modern opinions 
and the decision of Lord Northington in the Ferrers case, protected by 
the statute " de donis," which preserved all entailed honours against 
forfeiture for felony. His son was notwithstanding made Earl of 
Castlehaven by a new creation, and by Act of Parliament 29 & 30 
Car. II. was restored to the honour of Baron Audley of Hely, with the 
original precedence of the ancient Barony forfeited by his father ; but 
the dignity was by that Act expressly limited to him and the heirs of 
his body, with remainder to his brother Mervin Tuchet and the heirs 
of his body, remainder to the daughters of his father and the heirs of 
their bodies. The Barony of Audley will therefore continue to be 
vested in the heirs general of the body of Nicholas de Audley, the first 
Baron by Writ, so long as issue exists of the body of Mervin Tuchet, 
father of James the restored Lord ; but on default of such issue the 
Barony will become forfeited, or perhaps, to speak more correctly, 
extinct, in consequence of the attainder of the said Mervin Tuchet for 
felony in 1631. But in the case of Charles Lord Stourton (which 
dignity he inherited under Letters Patent granted to his ancestor Sir 
John Stourton, in 26 Hen. VI., creating him Baron Stourton, to him 
and the heirs male of his body), it appears that that dignity was not 
then considered to be forfeited by the attainder for felony ; for though 
that nobleman was convicted of murder and hanged in 1557, his son 
was summoned to Parliament (though not till nearly twenty years 
after) without any Act of Eestoration in blood or honours having ever 
been passed ; a Bill to that effect was brought into Parliament, but not 
till after he had taken his seat. And the same principle appears to have 
been confirmed in the case of the Earl Ferrers in 1700, although 



&•• m 



FORFEITURES. lxix 

this latter case the Earldom might have been claimed from the first 
Earl Ferrers and not through the attainted person. Lord Northington 
on this occasion issued a Writ of Summons to his brother as Earl 
Ferrers, being well satisfied that the attainder of Earl Ferrers of felony 
and murder did not affect the Earldom. 

In all cases of attainders whereby a dignity has been forfeited, the 
Crown has no power to restore the dignity ; and it can only be restored 
by Act of Parliament, either expressly or impliedly, by annulling the 
attainder ; for by the attainder it was utterly destroyed and gone, as if 
it had never had existence, aud the power of Parliament alone is 
competent again to bring it into existence. The King may grant a 
dignity of the same degree and by the same name, as was done by 
King Charles I. in the case of the Earl of Strafford ; but the dignity so 
granted will not be the dignity which existed before the attainder ; it 
will be a new and distinct dignity of the same quality and name, but 
not the sjn» dignity.' In most cases where a dignity has been restored 
by Act »of Parliament, it has been by a reversal of the attainder by 
which it was forfeited, which, of course, revived the honour to pre- 
cisely the same state as if such act of attainder had never been passed ; 
but in some instances the dignity has been restored with a new limita- 
tion ; k whilst in others, though the heir of the last Baron has been 
fully restored in blood, a new dignity with a limitation of a different 
nature from that forfeited by his ancestor, has, by the act of restora- 
tion, been created. 1 

In cases of entailed dignities, the issue of the person attainted must 
be capable of inheriting ; but if such issue be born out of the allegiance 
of the Crown, and so incapable of inheriting, and there be a person 
who could succeed to the dignities in consequence of a special re- 
mainder in the patent of creation, such remainder will immediately 
take effect, in the same manner as if the issue of the attainted person 
had failed." 1 

The attainder of the son and heir-apparent of a Baron by Writ, whether 
such son does or does not survive his father, will destroy the dignity ; 
for he is incapable of inheriting it in consequence of his attainder, and 
his blood being corrupted, no title can be derived through him ; so 
that the dignity becomes vested in the Crown by escheat, and is 
thereby merged and destroyed as effectually as if it had been forfeited 
by the person actually possessed of the dignity. But it is a rule of law 
that the attainder of a person who need not be mentioned in the de- 
rivation of the descent, does not impede the descent of the dignity ; 
and therefore where a person may claim as heir to an ancestor, without 
being obliged to derive his descent through an attainted person, he will 
not be affected by such attainder. Thus, if a man has two sons, and the 



' Third Peerage Report, p. 50. 

k Vide the Barony of Audley just noticed. 

1 l.umley and Darcy of Darcy. Vide Ob- 
servations up<m these restorations under the Lumley aud Darcy cases. 
respective titles. 



m Cruise on Dignities, p. 123, who cites 
the case of Cordon v. King's Advocate. 
" Cruise, p. 125 and 126. Vide the 



lxx OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

eldest is attainted of treason, and afterwards the father dies before such 
eldest son, seised of an estate in fee simple, the younger brother cannot 
inherit from his father ; for the elder brother, though attainted, is still a 
brother, and no other can be heir to the father while he is alive ; so 
that as the elder brother cannot inherit in consequence of his attainder, 
nor the younger because of the existence of his elder brother, the 
estate or dignity escheats to the Crown ; but if the elder brother dies 
in the lifetime of his father without issue, the younger brother will then 
inherit from the father, because he can derive his descent from him 
without claiming through, or even mentioning his brother. Thus in 
the case of the Barony of Beaumont, William Viscount Beaumont, and 
VII. Baron Beaumont, under a Writ of Summons to his ancestor in the 
reign of Edward II., died in 1507 without issue, leaving the sons of 
his two nieces (Joan Stapleton and Frideswide Norreys, daughters of 
his only sister Joan, wife of John Lord Lovel), viz., Sir Brian Stapleton 
and Sir John Norreys, his coheirs. Lord Lovel by the said Joan Beau- 
mont had also an only son, Sir Francis, who succeeded his father in the 
Baronies of Lovel, Deincourt, Holland, and Grey of Botherfield, and was 
created Viscount Lovel in 1483, but was attainted of high treason and 
slain s. r. in 1487. In consequence of his attainder, all the honours of 
which he was actually possessed became forfeited ; but as the Act by which 
he was attainted passed during the lifetime of his maternal uncle William 
Viscount and Baron Beaumont, and as he died without issue, it was 
held that his attainder did not affect the Barony of Beaumont, to which 
he would have succeeded had he survived both his uncle and mother. 
This case merits particular attention, because it is an example of most 
of the points relative to Forfeitures which have been noticed in these 
remarks on the subject. Francis Viscount Lovel when attainted was 
not only actually seised of several Baronies in fee under Writs of Sum- 
mons, and of a Viscounty under Letters Patent, but he was presumptive 
heir in right of his mother to another Barony in fee, namely, the 
Barony of Beaumont ; and it is highly illustrative of the law of 
Forfeiture to state the effect which his attainder had on these several 
dignities, as well as the different effect which his dying issueless pro- 
duced with respect to the Barony of Beaumont from what would have 
been the result if he had left issue. His attainder for high treason not 
only produced the forfeiture of the Baronies of Avhich he was seised in 
fee, but also of the Viscounty, in which dignity he had an estate tail ; 
but had he been attainted of felony only, the latter honour would not 
have been affected by it, though it would have destroyed the Baronies 
which he inherited under Writs of Summons. Lord Beaumont sur- 
vived him several years, and Lord Lovel's attainder, as he left no issue, 
could not in any shape affect that dignity, the representation of which 
immediately vested in his great-nephews as heirs, in right of their 
mothers, to the said Lord Beaumont : if however Francis Viscount Lovel 
had left issue, his attainder would have rendered the said Barony of 

Cruise on Dignities, p. 120. 



FORFEITURES. lxxi 

Beaumont extinct, as they could not claim but through their attainted 
father. Hence, though the Barony of Beaumont would have been 
vested in the Crown whilst any issue remained of Viscount Lovel, 
still, on the extinction of such issue, the dignity would have become 
vested in the descendants of his sister, whose claim to it would have 
been entirely free from attainder. 

Another point relative to the effect of attainder arose out of the 
same case : Henry Norreys, the second son (Sir John, the eldest, died 
without issue) of Frideswide Lovel by Sir Edward Norreys, was 
attainted of high treason, which attainder was never reversed, and it 
was consequently urged on the claim of Mr. Beaumont to the Barony 
of Beaumont in 1794, that the effect of an attainder of one of the only 
two coheirs of a Barony, was to vest the Barony in the other coheir 
in the same manner as if all the issue of such coheir had failed. The 
point was referred to the Judges, who in effect gave it as their opinion, 
25 June 1795, that the attainder of a coheir merely vested his share of 
the dignity in the Crown, without its in any degree tending to termi- 
nate the Abeyance in favour of the other coheir. p In the Camoys 
case, 1839, it was argued by the Attorney-General, on the part of the 
Crown, that the attainder of one coheir of a dignity operated as an 
extinguishment of the honour, as to all the other coheirs ; and could 
such a principle have been maintained, it would have been fatal, not 
only to that claim, but to that of Braye and many others : the question 
being, however, put to the Judges, they decided unanimously, that 
the attainder of one coheir in no way affected the dignity which was 
in the Crown, and so far as the coheirs were concerned, existing in con- 
templation of Law only. 

A very material difference exists between the effect of an attainder 
of the heir apparent to a dignity created under Letters Patent, from 
what is just stated to be the effect of an attainder of an heir apparent to 
a dignity created by a Writ of Summons. In the case of the attainder 
of the heir apparent to a dignity created under Letters Patent, which 
render the honour an estate tail, the dignity is not destroyed if lie dies 
in the lifetime of his ancestor to whom he was heir apparent ; but if he 
survives such ancestor, the dignity is lost. The former of these points 
appears to have been determined in the case of the Dukedom of Atholl 
in 1764, and the latter in that of the Earldom of Airlie in 1812. John 
Murray, Marquess of Atholl, was by Letters Patent created Duke of 
Atholl to him and the heirs male of his body, and died in 1725, leaving 
two sons, James and George. James the eldest son succeeded to the 
Dukedom, and died without issue in 1764. George, the second son, 
was attainted of high treason in 1745, and died in 1760, during the life- 
time of his brother, leaving John Murray his son and heir, who claimed 
and was allowed the Dukedom upon the ground that the Petitioner 
had a right to the titles of his said uncle, claiming, as he did, as heir 
male of the body of his grandfather, and though deriving his title 



p Sec the Report of tins case given by Mr. Cruise, p. 214 ct scq. 



lxxii OBSERVATIONS ON DIGNITIES. 

through his attainted father, yet claiming nothing from him : hence it 
appears that the son of an attainted father may claim a dignity in tail, 
provided such attainted father was never possessed of the dignity . q In 
the case of the Earldom of Airlie, the attainted ancestor survived the 
person from whom the claimant derived his pretensions. James Ogilvie, 
Lord Ogilvie, was created Earl of Airlie and Lord Ogilvy and Lin- 
trathen to him and his heirs male succeeding to him in certain lands. 
The title descended to David, 3rd Earl of Ogilvie, who had two sons. 
James the eldest was attainted of high treason in 1715, and survived his 
father, hut died without issue ahout the year 1730, leaving John his 
brother surviving, who left issue two sons, David and Walter. David, 
the eldest, was also attainted of high treason in 1746, and survived his 
father; he died in 1803, leaving a son, who died unmarried in 1812, 
when his uncle Walter Ogilvie succeeded as heir male of the body of 
James the first Earl, and claimed the honours created under the Patent 
of creation of that dignity. In the course of the proceedings on the 
claim, the following question was propounded to the Judges : 

" Whether if lands were granted by the Crown to A. B. and the 
heirs male of his body lawfully begotten, and A. B. had issue a son 
C. D., and C. D. had also issue a son E. E. ; and C. D. in the lifetime of hts 
father committed high treason, and it was by Act of Parliament enacted 
that he should stand and be adjudged attainted of the said high treason, 
and A. B. afterwards died in the lifetime of CD. and C. D. the attainted 
person, then died, E. F. the son surviving ; E. F. would be considered 
in the Courts below, after the death of C. D. as entitled under such 
grant to the lands so granted ? " r The Judges having replied that 
E. F. would not be considered in the Courts of Law after the death of 
C. D. as entitled under such grant to the lands so granted, the House 
refused to allow Mr. Ogilvy's claim. 

In concluding these observations on the subject of Dignities, the 
Editor is sensible that his remarks will stand in need of much in- 
dulgence; but he trusts that the difficulty which even the Lords' 
Committee experienced in forming accurate conclusions on some of 
the points here noticed, and the disadvantages under which he has 
laboured, not only in being obliged to compress the subject within the 
limits prescribed by the nature of this work, but in divesting it, as far 
as possible, of phrases that would seem obscure to unprofessional 
readers, may be urged in extenuation of his not having treated it in a 
manner more worthy of the vast interest and importance which attaches 
to it. 

4 Cruise, p. 128, et seq. r Fourth Peerage Report, p. 264. 



LIST OF PEERS 



AND 



PEERESSES (in their own right) 
#f % Whahto fihujbow, 

ACCORDING TO THEIR PRECEDENCE. 



S is added to Scotch Titles; J to Irish; the Star prefixed to Scotch and Irish Titles denotes that 
the individual so distinguished is a Peer also of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland by another Title of subsequent Creation, in virtue of which lesser dignity (unless a 
Representative Peer) he sits in the Parliament of the said Kingdom, though on all other 
occasions recognised by the higher and more ancient Title. 



PRINCES 

of the Blood Royal. 

Creation. 

1841. The Prince of Wales. 
1799. Duke of Cumberland. 
1801. Duke of Cambridge. 

DUKES. 

1483. Norfolk. 
1547. Somerset. 
1675. Richmond. 

, , Grafton. 
1682. Beaufort. 
1684. St Albans. 
1694. Leeds. 

, , Bedford. 

, , Devonshire. 

1702. Marlborough. 

1703. Rutland. 
1643.* Hamilton, S. 
1663.*Buccleuch, S. 
1701.* Argyll, 8. 
1703.*Atholl, S. 
1707.* Montrose, S. 

, , * Roxburgh, S. 
1716. Portland. 
1719. Manchester. 
1756. Newcastle. 
1766. Northumberland. 
1766.*Leinster, /. 
1814. Wellington. 
1822. Buckingham and 

Chandos. 
1833. Sutherland. 

, , Cleveland. 
1840. Inverness, Duchess. 

MARQUESSES. 

1551. Winchester. 
1599.*Huntly, S. 
1682. Queensberry, S. 



Creation. 

1694. Tweeddale, S. 
1701.* Lothian, S. 
1784. Lansdowne. 
1786. Townshend. 

1789. Salisbury. 
, , Bath. 

1790. Abercorn. 
1793. Hertford. 
1796. Bute. 
1789.*Waterford, /. 

, , * Downshire, /. 
1791.* Donegal, i". 

, , * Drogheda, /. 
1800.*Headfort, /. 

,, *Sligo, I. 

,, *Ely, I. 
1801. Exeter. 
1812. Northampton. 

, , Camden. 
1815. Anglesey. 

, , Cholmondeley. 
1816.* Londonderry, /. 

, , * Conyngham, /. 

, , Hastings. 

1821. Ailesbury. 

1822. Westmeath, /. 

1825. * Ormonde, /. 

, , *Clanricarde, /. 

1826. Bristol. 
1831. Ailsa. 

, , Breadalbane. 
Westminster. 
Normanby. 
Dalhousie. 



1838. 
1849. 



EARLS. 

1442. Shrewsbury. 

1485. Derby. 

1529. Huntingdon. 

1551. Pembroke. 

1553. Devon. 



Creation. 

1603. Suffolk. 


1622. 


Denbigh. 


1624. 


Westmoreland. 


1626. 
1628. 


Lindsey. 
Stamford. 


) 9 


Winchilsea. 


) > 


Chesterfield. 


1660. 


Sandwich. 


1661. 


Essex. 




Cardigan . 
Carlisle. 


1672. 
1679. 
1682. 


Shaftesbury. 

Berkeley. 

Abingdon. 


1690. 


Scarborough. 


1697. 


Albemarle. 


> > 

1706. 


Coventry. 

Jersey. 

Poulett. 


1398. 


* Crawford, S. 


1452. 


*Erroll, S. 


1455. 


Caithness, S. 


1457. 


Marr, S. 


? ? 


Morton, #. 


1458. 


Rothes, S. 


1469. 


Buchan, S. 


1507. 


*Eglinton, S. 


1562. 
1604. 


* Moray, S. 
Home, S. 


1605. 


Perth, 8. 


1606. 


Strathmore, S. 


1619. 


* Haddington, 8. 


1623. 
1624. 


* Galloway, S. 

* Lauderdale, S. 


1633. 


*Kinnoull, S. 


5 > 


* Elgin and Kincardine,<S'. 


> > 

1639. 


Traquair, S. 
*Wemyss, S. 
Airlie, S. 


9 » 


Carnwath, S. 


1641. 


Leven and Melville, S. 


1643. 


Dysart, S. 



XXIV 



LIST OP PEERS AND PEERESSES. 



Creation. 


Creation. 


Creation. 


1646. 


Selkirk, S. 


1766. Winterton, I. 


1821. 


Strad broke. 


1647. 


Northesk, 8. 


1767. Howth, /. 


1822. 


Kilmorey, I. 


1663. 


Southesk, S. 


1768.* Kingston, I. 


9 9 


Dunraven, /. 


1669. 


Dundonald, S. 


1771.*Sefton, I, 


9 9 


Listowel, /. 


1677.*Kintore, S. 


, , * Roden, /. 


1823. 


Vane. 


1682.* Aberdeen, S. 


1776. Lisburne, /. 


1826. 


Amherst. 


1686.*Dunmore, S. 


, , * Clanwilliam, /. 


1827. 


Cawdor. 


1696. 


Orkney, S. 


1777. Aldborough, /. 


9 9 


Norbury, /. 


1701. 


Seafield, S. 


1781. Mountcashell, /. 


1831. 


Munster. 


1703.* Stair, S. 


1785. Antrim, I. 


9 9 


Burlington. 


, , *Roset>ery, S. 


, , * Longford, /. 


9 9 


Camperdown. 


, , * Glasgow, 8. 


, , Portarlington, /. 


, , ^Ranfurly, /. 


1703.- 


sjjHopetoun, S. 


Mayo, I. 


9 9 


Lichfield. 


1711. 


Ferrers. 


1789. Annesley, I. 


1833. 


Durham. 


9 9 


Dartmouth. 


, , * Enniskillen, /. 


9 9 


Ripon. 


1714. 


Tankerville. 


, , Erne, /. 


9 9 


Granville. 


» » 


Aylesford. 


, , * Carysfort, /. 


1837. 


Effingham. 


1718. 


Cowper. 


1793. Desart, /. 


9 9 


Ducie. 


9 9 


Stanhope. 


, , Wicklow, /. 


9 9 


Yarborough. 


1719. 


Harborough. 


, , Clonmel, J. 


9 9 


Leicester of Holkham. 


1721. 


Macclesfield. 


1795.* Clare, I. 


1838. 


Lovelace. 


9 9 


Pomfret. 


, , * Leitrim, /. 


9 9 


Zetland. 


1729. 


Waldegrave. 


, , Lucan, I. 


1841. 


Gainsborough. 


1730. 


Ashburnham. 


1797. Belmore, /. 


9 9 


Fitzhardinge. 


1742. 


Harrington. 


1800. Bandon, /. 


1844. 


Ellenborough. 


1743. 


Portsmouth. 


, , Castle Stewart, /. 


1846. 


Ellesmere. 


1746. 


Brooke. 


, , * Donoughmore, /. 


1847. 


Strafford. 


J » 


Buckinghamshire. 


, , Caledon, /. 


1850. 


Cottenham. 


9 9 


Fitzwilliam. 


, , * Kenmare, I. 






1752. 


Guilford. 


1801. Rosslyn. 






1754. 


Hardwicke. 


, , Craven. 




VISCOUNTS. 


1756. 


Ilchester. 


, , Onslow. 






1761. 


De La Warr. 


, , Romney. 


1550. 


Hereford. 


1765. 


Radnor. 


, , Chichester. 


1620.* Falkland, S. 


9 J 


Spencer. 


, , Wilton. 


1641. 


Arbuthnot, S. 


1772. 


Bathurst. 


1803.* Limerick, I. 


1686. 


Strathallan, S. 


1776. 


Clarendon. 


, , * Clancarty, /. 


1712. 


Bolingbroke. 


J J 


Mansfield. 


1804. Powis. 


1720. 


Falmouth. 


1784. 


Abergavenny. 


1805. Nelson. 


1721. 


Torrington. 


9 9 


Talbot. 


1806.*Gosford, I. 


1766. 


Maynard. 


1789. 


Mount Edgcumbe. 


, , Rosse, /. 


1789. 


Sydney. 


? > 


Fortescue. 


, , Normanton, 7". 


1796. 


Hood. 


1790. 


Beverley. 


, , Charleville, /. 


1478. 


Gormanston, /. 


1793. 


Carnarvon. 


, , Manvers. 


1556. 


Mountgarrett, /. 


1800. 


Cadogan. 


Orford. 


1622. 


Valentia, I. 


5 J 


Malmesbury. 


, , Grey. 


> > 


Dillon, /. 


1620.* Cork, /. 


1807. Lonsdale. 


1628. 


*Strangford, I. 


1627. 


* Meath, I. 


1809. Harrowby. 


1 9 


Taafe, /. 


1628.*Fingall, /. 


1812. Harewood. 


9 9 


Rnnelagh, /. 


1647. 


Cavan, /. 


1813. Minto. 


1661. 


*Massereene, /. 


1684.*Granard, /. 


1814. Cathcart. 


1680. 


Downe, I. 


1725.*Darnley, I. 


1815. Verulam. 


1716. 


Moles worth, /. 


1733. 


*Egmont, /. 


, , Brownlow. 


1717. 


Chetwynd, /. 


1739. 


* Bessborough, I. 


, , St. Germans. 


9 9 


*Midleton, /. 


1748. 


Carrick, /. 


, , Morley. 


9 9 


Boyne, /. 


1756.* Shannon, /. 


, , Bradford. 


1720. 


Barrington, /. 


> » 


Lanesborough, /. 


, , Beauchamp. 


9 9 


*Gage, /. 


1759.* Fife, I. 


1816. Bantry, /. 


1722. 


Palmerston, /. 


1760.*Mornington, /. 


, , Glengall, /. 


1727. 


Gal way, /. 


1762. 


Arran, /. 


, , * Sheffield, /. 


1743. 


Powerscourt, /. 


5 J 


*Courtown, /. 


, , De Grey. 


1751. 


Ashbrook, /. 


1763 


Miltown, /. 


1821. Eldon. 


1763. 


Mountmorres, I. 


9 J 


*Charlemont, /. 


, , Howe. 


1766. 


Dungannon, /. 


1766 


Mexborough, /. 


, , Sommers. 


1776. 


Southwell, /. 



LIST OF TEERS AND PEERESSES. 



Ixxv 



Jreatioi 


i. 


Creation. 


Creation. 


1776. 


De Vesci, /. 


1445. 


Gray, S. 


1758. 


Lisle, /. 


1781. 


Lifford, /. 


1489. 


Sinclair, S. 


1776. 


Newborough, /. 


7 7 


Bangor, /. 


1495. 


Sempill, Bss. S. 


9 9 


Macdonald, /. 


, , % Clifden, /. 


1509. 


Elphinstone, S. 


9 9 


Kensington, I. 


1785. 


Doneraile, /. 


1564. 


Torpiehen, S. 


9 9 


Ongley, /. 


1791. 


Harberton, I. 


1606. 


Blantyre, S. 


9 9 


Massy, 7. 


1793. 


Hawarden, /. 


1609. 


Colville of Culross, S. 


1777. 


Rokeby, /. 


1800. 


Avonmore, /. 


9 9 


Cranstoun, S. 


1781. 


Muskerry, /. 


9 9 


Monck, /. 


1627. 


Napier, S. 


1783. 


Riversdale, /. 


1801. 


St. Vincent. 


» > 


Fairfax, S. 


9 9 


Muncaster, I. 


1802. 


Melville. 


1628. 


Reay, S. 


1789. 


Kilmaine, /. 


1805. 


Sidmouth. 


1643. 


Elibank, S. 


» > 


=fc Cloncurry, I. 


1806. 


Templetown, /. 


1650. 


Duffus, S. 


1790. 


Clonbrock, I. 


, , * Lismore, /. 


1651. 


Rollo, S. 


1792. 


Waterpark, 7. 


9 , 


Lorton, /. 


) ? 


Ruthven, Bss. S. 


1794. 


Graves, I. 


1815. 


Frankfort de Montmo- 


1675. *Belhaven and Stenton, 


> > 


Bridport, I. 




rency, /. 




S. 


1796. 


Huntingfield, 7". 


1816. 


Exmouth. 


1681. 


Naime, Bss. S. 


9 9 


& Rossmore, I. 


9 J 


Gort, /. 


1682.#Kinnaird, S. 


1797. 


Hotham, /. 


1827. 


Combermere. 


1690. 


Polwarth, 8. 


? ? 


SffCremorne, I. 


1828. 


Canning. 


1712. 


Middleton. 


> > 


Headley, I. 


1831. 


Guillamore, /. 


1728. 


Monson. 


,, 


Teignmouth, I. 


1835. 


Canterbury. 


1760. 


Sondes. 


1 1 


Crofton, /. 


1842. 


Hill. 


1761. 


Scarsdale. 


1798. 


Ffrench, I. 


1846. 


Hardinge. 


9 9 


Boston. 


1799. 


Henley, I. 


1849. 


Gough. 


1762. 


Holland. 


1800. 


Langford, /. 


1852. 


Stratford de Redcliffe. 


9 9 


Vernon. 


5 7 


De Blaquiere, I. 






1776. 


Hawke. 


7 7 


% Dufferin andClaneboye, 






> > 


Foley. 




I. 




B AEONS 


1780. 


Dinevor. 


7 7 


Henniker, I. 






9 9 


Walsingham. 


7 7 


Ventry, I. 


1264. 


De Ros. 


; 9 


Bagot. 


7 7 


Wallscourt, I. 


9 9 


Le Despencer, Bss. 


9 9 


Southampton. 


7 7 


Dunalley, /. 


9 9 


Hastings. 


1782. 


Grantley. 


7 7 


Clanmorris, I. 


1299. 


De Clifford, Bss. 


j » 


Rodney. 


7 7 


Radstock, I. 


1308. 


Zouche, Bss. 


1784. 


Berwick. 


7 7 


Sjf Gardner, /. 


1313. 


Audley. 


» > 


Sherborne. 


7 7 


Ashtown, I. 


» » 


Willoughby de Eresby. 


1786. 


Suffield. 


7 7 


Clarina, I. 


1321. 


Dacre. 


> > 


Dorchester. 


1801. 


Alvanley. 


1324. 


Grey de Ruthyn, Bss. 


1788. 


Ken yon. 


7 7 


Abercromby. 


13... 


Clinton. 


9 9 


Braybrooke. 


1802. 


Redesdale. 


1383. 


Camoys. 


1790. 


Douglas of Douglas. 


9 9 


Rivers. 


1404. 


Beaumont. 


1792. 


Thurlow. 


9 9 


Sandys. 


1448. 


Stourton. 


1793. 


Auckland. 


1806. 


Rendlesham, I. 


1455. 


Berners. 


1794. 


Lyttleton. 


) 7 


Erskine. 


1492. 


Willoughby de Broke. 


1796. 


Calthorpe. 


7 7 


Crewe. 


1523. 


Vaux of Harrowden. 


1797. 


Cain ington. 


7 7 


Ponsonby of Imokilly. 


1529. 


Braye, Bss. 


9 9 


Bayniug. 


1807. 


Manners. 


1534. 


Windsor, Bss. 


9 9 


Bolton. 


1812. 


Castlemaine, I. 


1554. 


North, Bss. 


9 J 


Wodehouse. 


9 9 


Decies, /. 


1559. 


St. John of Bletso. 


9 9 


North wick. 


1815. 


Churchill. 


1597. 


Howard de Walden. 


9 9 


Lilford. 


9 9 


Harris. 


1603. 


Petre. 


9 9 


Ribblesdale. 


1817. 


Colchester. 


9 J 


Say and Sele. 


1397. 


Kingsale, I. 


1818. 


Garvagh, 7". 


1605. 


Arundell of Wardour. 


1461. 


Trimlestown, I. 


1819.*Howden, /. 


1615. 


Dormer. 


1490. 


Dunsany, /. 


1821. 


Ravens worth. 


1616. 


Teynham. 


1536. 


Inchiquim, /. 


7 7 


Delamere. 


1640. 


Stafford. 


1541. 


Dunboyne, /. 


7 7 


Forester. 


1643. 


Byron. 


9 9 


Louth, I. 


7 7 


Rayleigh. 


1644. 


Ward. 


1620. 


fcDigby, /. 


1822. 


Downes, /. 


1672. 


Clifford of Chudleigh. 


1621. 


Blayney, /. 


1$>4. 


Gifford. 


1430. 


Somerville, S. 


1715. 


Carbery, I. 


1825. 


Bloomfield, /. 


1440. 


Forbes, 8. 


1718. 


Aylmer, /. 


1826. 


De Tabley. 


1445. 


Saltoun, 8. 


1756. 


Farnham, /. 


7 7 


Wharncliffe. 



lxxvi 



LIST OF PEERS AND PEERESSES. 



Creation. 


Creation. 


Creation 


1826. 


Feversham. 


1835. 


De L'Isle and Dudley. 


1839. 


Monteagle of Brandon. 


9 9 


Fitzgerald and Vesey,/. 


> > 


Ashburton. 


9 9 


Seaton. 


1827. 


Lyndhurst. 


> > 


Glenelg. 


9 9 


Keane. 


9 9 


Tenterden. 


> > 


Hatherton. 


1841. 


Campbell. 


9 * 


Plunket. 


9 9 


Strafford. 


9 9 


Vivian. 


1828. 


Cowley. 


1836. 


Stratheden, Bss. 


9 9 


Congleton. 


9 9 


Heytesbury. 


9 9 


Oranmore & Browne, /. 


1845. 


Dunsandle and Clan 


9 9 


Skelmersdale. 


1837. 


Portman. 




Conal, /. 


1829. 


Wynford. 


9 9 


Lovat. 


1847. 


Milford. 


1830. 


Brougham and Vaux. 


9 9 


Bateman. 


1848. 


Bellew, /. 


1831. 


Talbot de Malahide, I. 


1838. 


De Mauley. 


1850. 


Londesborough. 


9 9 


Panmure. 


9 9 


Wrottesley. 


9 9 


Overstone. 


9 9 


Poltimore. 


9 9 


Sudeley. 


9 9 


Truro. 


9 9 


Mostyn. 


9 9 


Methuen. 


9 9 


Cran worth. 


9 9 


Templemore. 


1839. 


Stanley of Alderley. 


1851. 


Broughton de Gyfford. 


9 9 


De Saumarez. 


9 9 


Stuart de Decies. 


1852. 


Clermont, I. 


1832. 


Godolphin. 


9 9 


Leigh. 


9 9 


St. Leonards. 


1834. 


Denman. 


9 9 


Wenlock. 


9 9 


Raglan. 


9 9 


5ff Carew, /. 


9 9 


Lurgan. 


1855. 


Fermoy, /. 


* 9 


Wenman, Bss. 


9 9 


De Freyne. 


1856. 


Wensleydale. 


1835. 


Abinger. 


9 9 


Dunfermline. 


9 9 


Aveland. 



THE 



HISTORIC PEERAGE OF ENGLAND. 



SUCCESSION TO THE CROWN. 

The Crown of England is " by Common Law, and Constitutional Custom, here- 
ditary ; and this in a manner peculiar to itself, for the right of inheritance may 
from time to time he changed, or limited by Act of Parliament, under which 
limitations the Crown still continues hereditary." — Blackstone. 

During the period of the Norman Dynasty and the early Plantagenet Kings 
of England, we have no particular account of the acts of the Great Councils of 
the Kingdom, which were undoubtedly from time to time holden ;" the laws 
made by them found not their way to the Statute Book, and we have no Rolls 
of the Proceedings in Parliament, earlier than the reign of King Edward I. 
In those cases therefore where the hereditary succession was diverted from 
the usual course, the act of Coronation must be taken as the solemn con- 
firmation of the general consent of the estates of the kingdom, whereby such 
changes in the law of succession were made, as were at subsequent periods 
effected by Act of Parliament. 



I. 1066. "William L, " The Conqueror," crowned King of England 

25 Dec. 1066 ; ob. 9 Sept. 1087. 

II. 1087. William II., surnamed " Rufus," 3rd but 2nd surviving son, 

crowned 26 Sept. 1087 ; b ob. 2 Aug. 1100, unmarried. 

III. 1100. Henry L, surnamed " Beauclerc," 4th but 3rd surviving and 

youngest son of William the Conqueror, crowned 5 Aug. il00 ; c 
ob. 1 Dec. 1135, s. p. m. 

a We are told in the Saxon Chronicle, that King William the Conqueror, three 
times each year, wore his crown when he met the Archbishops, Bishops, Abbots, 
Earls, Thanes, and Knights at Winchester, Westminster, and Gloucester ; that 
Henry I. met all the head men of the land, both clergy and laity, at Michaelmas, 
1102, and that in 1123 he sent his writs all over England for his Bishops, his 
Abbots, and Thanes, to meet him at his witan at Gloucester ; also that King Henry 
in 1125 held his council in London, sanctioned the laws of Archbishop Anselm, 
and enacted many others. 

b Not being possessed of any hereditary right, he began his reign on the day of 
his coronation, 26 Sept. 1087. Robert Duke of Normandy, his elder brother, 
having had the Dukedom of Normandy conferred upon him by his father's will, 
it was maintained by Rufus that, his eldest brother being provided for, the residue 
of the inheritance of their father vested in him. 

c Being, like his brother, devoid of hereditary right (Robert Duke of Normandy 
being still alive), he procured himself to be chosen King by the people, who were 

B 



2 SUCCESSION TO THE CBOWN. 

IV. 1135. Stephen, nephew of the last Monarch, being 3rd son of Stephen 

Count of Blois, by Adela, dan. of William the Conqueror ; 
crowned 2G Dec. 1135 ; d ob. 25 Oct. 1154. 

V. 1154. Henry II., grandson of Henry I., being son of his dau. and h., 

Maud, the Empress, "Dornina Anglorum," 6 by Geoffrey 
Plantagenet Count of Anjou ; crowned 19 Dec. 1154. This 
Monarch was also descended from the Saxon Kings of England ; 
his grandmother Maud, the first wife of Henry I., being dau. 
of Malcolm Canmore, King of Scotland, by Margaret, sister 
and h. of Edgar Atheling, the last male of the Saxon race/ 
Ob. 6 July 1189. 

VI. 1189. Eichard I., sumamed " Cceur de Lion," s. and h. ; ob. G Apr. 

1199, s. p. 

VII. 1199. John, surnamed " Lackland," younger brother of the last King, 

crowned 27 May 1199 ;» ob. 19 Oct. 1216. 

VIII. 1216. Henry III., s. and h., crowned 28 Oct. 1216 ; h ob. 16 Nov. 

1272. 

IX. 1272. Edward I., s. and h. ; ob. 7 July 1307. 

X. 1307. Edward II., surnamed " of Carnarvon," s. and h., deposed by 

Parliament 7 Jan. 1327 ; renounced the kingly dignity 20 of 
the same month ; murdered 21 Sept. following. 

XL 1327. Edward III., s. and h., proclaimed King 25 Jan. 1327 ; crowned 

1 Feb. following ; Founder of the Most Noble Order of the 
Garter ; ob. 21 June 1377. 

XII. 1377. Eichard II., surnamed " of Bordeaux," grandson and heir, being 
s. and h. of Edward the Black Prince, Prince of Wales (ob. 
v. p.), eldest son of the last Monarch ; renounced the kingly 
dignity 29 Sept. 1399, and was deposed in Parliament the next 
day ; murdered s. p. 14 Feb. following. 



the more anxious to have him for their sovereign, from his having been born an 
English prince ; by the death of his brother, 10 Feb. 1134, s. p. s., he became 
possessed of a good title to the throne, as heir to the Conqueror. 

d Endued with no hereditary right, Stephen's possession of the Crown was 
founded on his election : " assensu Cleri et Populi in Begem Anglorum electus " 
(Hearn ad Guil. Neubr. 711). 

e The style she adopted during her contest with King Stephen for the realm of 
England. 

f King Henry II. 's right to the Crown during his mother's lifetime, was founded 
on a convention with King Stephen, ratified by the Peers of each party, and the 
general consent of his subjects manifested at his coronation. On the death of his 
mother, 1167, he became heir to the Conqueror. 

e King John claimed the Crown as being nest of kin of his brother Richard, 
viz., one degree nearer than his nephew Arthur, which shallow pretence was, 
however, confirmed by the election of his subjects. In one of his charters (Tirrell's 
Bibl. Polit.) he quotes his title as " tarn Cleri quam Populi unanimi consensu 
et favore." 

u The settlement of the Crown in the person of King John rendered the accession 
of King Henry III. upon his father's death a matter of course, although Eleanor, 
the damsel of Brittany and heir of William the Conqueror, being yet alive, his 
title was probably considered to have been confirmed by the act of coronation ; 
Eleanor's death happened 1241, upon which King Henry III. became the repre- 
sentative of the Conqueror. 



SUCCESSION TO THE CROWN. 



XIII. 1399. 



XIV. 1413. 



XV. 



1422. 



XVI. 1461. 



XVII. 1483. 



XVIII. 1483. 



Henry IV., surnamed " Bolingbroke," first cousin to the last 
Monarch, being s. and h. of John of Gaunt Duke of Lancaster, 
4th son of Edward IH. ; chosen King in full Parliament 30 
Sept. 1399, and crowned 13 Oct. following.' Ob. 20 Mar. 1413. 

Henry V., surnamed "of Monmouth," k s. and h. ; ob. 31 Aug. 
1422. 

Henry VI., surnamed " of Windsor," s. and h., deposed 4 Mar. 
1461, resumed the kingly dignity from 9 Oct. 1470 until 14 
Apr. 1471 ; ob. 21 May 1471. 

Edward IV., s. and h. of Richard Plantagenet Duke of York, 
only son of Richard Earl of Cambridge (son and in his issue, 
heir of Edmund Duke of York, 5th son of Edward III.) by 
Ann Mortimer, dau. and in her issue sole heir of Roger Earl of 
March, s. and h. of Edmund Earl of March by Philippa Plan- 
tagenet, dau. and sole heir of Lionel Duke of Clarence, 3rd son 
of Edward III. ; declared in Parliament King of England by 
hereditary right from the 4 Mar. 1461 ;' ob. 9 Apr. 1483. 

Edward V., s. and h., set aside from the exercise of the kingly 
dignity 25 June 1483 ; murdered, together with his brother 
Richard Duke of York, in the Tower, within a short time after . m 

Richard III., uncle to the last Monarch, and youngest brother to 
Edward IV., crowned 6 July 1483," slain at Bosworth 22 Aug. 
1485, s. P. s. 



1 Henry IV. possessed not a shadow of claim to the Crown of England by virtue 
of hereditary right — his father's elder brother, Lionel Duke of Clarence, having left 
a daughter, Philippa, married to Edmund Mortimer, Earl of March, whose son 
Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, had been declared by King Richard II. heir pre- 
sumptive to the throne, and upon the death of whose son, Edmund Earl of March, 
in 1424, the hereditary right to the Crown passed to the house of York. Parlia- 
ment acted, however, on this occasion, as the convention sitting in form of Parliament 
afterwards did upon the abdication of King James II. — it changed the legitimate 
course of descent, and passed an Act, 7 Hen. IV. cap. 2, enacting " That the inhe- 
ritance of the Crown and Realms of England and France and all other the King's 
Dominions shall be set and remain in the presence of Our Sovereign Lord the King 
and in the heirs of his body issuing ;" and by the same Act, it was further declared 
that after the decease of the King, the Crown should remain to Henry Prince of 
Wales and the heirs male of his body with remainder to Thomas, John, and Hum- 
phrey, the King's 2nd, 3rd, and 4th sons and the heirs male of their bodies 
respectively. 

k Succeeded his father according to the terms of the Act of Succession just quoted. 

1 The first Parliament of this monarch's reign declared King Edward IV. to be 
" cousyn and heire to Kyng Richard to whom as such the Crowne of the Realrne 
of England and the roiall power estate dignitie preemynence and governance of the 
same Realme and the Lordship of Irlond lawfully and of right apperteyneth." — 
Rot. Pari. vol. v. p. 463. 

m King Edwarcl ,V., though set aside from the exercise of the kingly dignity, 
was never legally deposed, the Act which rendered such deposition legal not being 
passed till the January following his decease. 

n King Richard's assumption of the kingly dignity on the 26th June was pre- 
ceded by a petition, presented on the previous day from the States of the realm, 
convened to Parliament in the name of King Fxhvard V., though not assembled 
" in form of Parliament." To this petition, which was for the setting aside of the 
children of the late King, Richard "benighnely assented," and was crowned eleven 
days after ; but by reason that "diverse doubts, questions, and ambiguitees were 
moved and engendred in the myndes of diverse personnes," it was ordained by the 

b 2 



4 SUCCESSION TO THE CROWN. 

XIX. 1485. Hexry VII., first Monarch of the House of Tudor, crowned 

30 Oct. 1485 ;° married, 18 Jan. following, Elizabeth, eldest 
dau. and eventually sole heir of King Edward IV., and as 
such, undoubted heiress of the Conqueror ; ob. 21 Apr. 
1509. 

XX. 1509. Henry VIII., s. and h. of the last Monarch by Elizabeth of York, 

through whom he became heir, by clear indisputable hereditary 
right,* to the Crown of England ; ob. 28 Jan. 1547. 



Parliament, which met at Westminster, 23 January following, that the said 
petition should be ratified and be of the same force as if the matters therein recited 
had been done in Parliament ; it was therefore embodied in the Act which declared 
the marriage of King Edward to have been a " pretensed marriage," the children of 
the said pretensed marriage, bastards, and all the issue of George Duke of Clarence 
" dishabled by attainder." By the same Act it was further declared " That oure 
said Soveraign Lorde the Kyng was and is veray and undoubted kyng of this 
Eealme of Englond as well by right of consanguinitie and enheritaunce as by lawefull 
Ellecion, Consecration, and Coronation during his lyff, and after his decesse, on Ids 
heires of his body begotten." — Bot. Pari. vol. vi. p. 240. 

° Henry VII. was hailed King by the acclamations of the army after the battle 
of Bosworth, 22 August 1485, and immediately assumed the royal dignity. 
Excepting by conquest and subsequent confirmation in Parliament, his title, says 
Blackstone, was the " most remote and unaccountable ever set up." He Avas 
s. and h. of Edmund Earl of Richmond by Margaret, dau. and h. (which lady 
was still living) of John Duke of Somerset, s. and h. of John Beaufort Earl 
of Somerset, eldest natural son of John of Gaunt Duke of Lancaster (by his 
third wife Katherine Swinford), who, though legitimated by Act of Parliament, 
such legitimation was with express reservation (as exemplified by Henry IV. in 
1407) of any claim to the Crown. The Parliament, however, passing over his 
preposterous claim as heir of the house of Lancaster, before his marriage with 
Elizabeth of York, in the Parliament holden 7 November 1485, enacted, " That 
the inheretance of the Crounes of the Roialmes of England and of Fraunce with all 
the preheminence and dignitie royall to the same pertaineing and all other Seignories 
to the King belonging beyond the See be rest remain and abide in the most Royall 
persone of our now Soveraigne Lord King Harry the VII. and in the heires of hys 
body lawfully comen, perpetually with the Grace of God so to endure, and in noon 
other."— Bot Pari. vol. vi. p. 270. It may be added that the same Parliament 
did petition the King that he would take to wife the Princess Elizabeth, to which 
he replied " he was very willing so to do." — Blackstone. 

p From this monarch the Crown descended in regular succession, through the 
two houses of Tudor and Stuart, until the abdication of King James H. During 
the reign of Henry VIII. there were, however, several statutes for re^ulatino- the 
succession : the first was 25 Hen. VIII. cap. 22, which entailed the Crown upon 
the King and the heirs male of his body, first by Queen Anne and afterwards by 
any other wife, remainder to the Lady Elizabeth their daughter (the Lady Mary 
by reason of her mother's divorce, and, consequently, her own illegitimacy, bein-^ 
excluded) and the heirs of her body. " And soe from issue female to issue female 
and to theire heires of theire bodyes one after another by course of inheritaunce 
accordyng to theire ages as the Crowne of Englond hath byn accustomed and ou^ht 
to goo in casez when there be heires females to the same ; and for default of such 
issue to the King's right heires." 

The next Act, 28 Hen. VIII. cap. 7, declared both the issue of Queen Katharine 
and Queen Anne to be illegitimate, and settled the Crown on the King's issue 
male by Queen Jane, or any other wife or wives the King might have, remainder 
to his issue female in like manner, remainder to such person or persons as he the 
King should by letters patent or will appoint. 

The third Act, 35 Hen. VIII. cap. 1 (reciting the previous Act, and that the 
only issue of the King by the said Queen Jane was the Prince Edward), enacts 



SUCCESSION TO THE CROWN. 5 

XXI. 1547. Edward VI., s. and h. of Henry VIII. by his 3rd wife, Jane 

Seymour; ob. 6 July 1553, unmarried.* 1 

XXII. 1553. Mary, only dau. of Henry VIII. by bis 1st wife, Katharine of 

Arragon/ She married Philip II. King of Spain, 25 July 1554, 
who was associated in the royal dignity bv the style of " Philip 
and Mary." 9 Ob. 17 Nov. 1558, s. p. 

XXIII. 1558. Elizabeth, dau. of Henry VIIL, by his 2nd wife, Anne Boleyn ; 

ob. 24 Mar. 1603, unmarried. 

XXIV. 1603. James I., King of Scotland, cousin and heir, being s. and h. of 

Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots (by her cousin, Henry Lord 
Darnley, created Earl of Ross and Duke of Rothsay), dau. and 
h. of James V. King of Scotland, s. and h. of James IV. King 
of Scotland, by Margaret Tudor, eldest sister of King Henry 
VIII.' Lord Darnley, the father of this Monarch, was the 
grandson of the said Margaret, being s. and h. apparent of 
Matthew Stuart Earl of Lennox, by Margaret, dau. of Archi- 
bald Douglas Earl of Angus, her 2nd husband. Ob. 27 Mar. 
1625. 

XXV. 1625. Charles I., s. and h., beheaded 30 Jan. 1649. 

Interregnum from 29 Jan. 1649 to 29 May 1660. 

XXVI. 1G49. Charles II., s. and h., Restored to the Throne 29 May 1660 ; 

ob. 6 Feb. 1685, s. p. 

XXVII. 1685. James II., bro. and h., abdicated the Crown 11 Dec. 1688, on 

which day he quitted the kingdom. He died at St. Germain- 
en-Laye 16 Sept. 1701. 



that in the event of the death of the said Prince Edward without issue, the Crown 
should remain to Lady Mary the King's dau. and the heirs of her body, remainder 
to Lady Elizabeth the King's second dau. and the heirs of her body. 

q For a few days after the decease of King Edward VI., viz., from 6 to 17 July, 
the title of Queen was usurped by Lady Jane Grey, under an assignment executed 
by the King shortly before his decease, but which assignment was invalid to alter 
the course of succession, settled by the statute 35 Hen. VIIL cap. 1. 

r The first Act passed by Parliament on the accession of Queen Mary declared 
the " Quene's Hyghnes to have been borne in a most just and lawfull matrimonie," 
repealed all Acts of Parliament and sentences of divorce had and made to the 
contrary, and definitely confirmed the marriage. By this Act of Queen Mary the 
illegitimacy of Elizabeth was indirectly again affirmed, and Elizabeth herself 
prevented from taking the like step with regard to her own mother's marriage : 
so that, according to the statutes recited, she remains illegitimate to this day. 

6 By Act of Pari. 1 Mariaa, session 3, cap. 2, it was enacted, that from and 
after this marriage " he should have and enjoy jointly together with the Queen 
his wife the style, honour, and kingly name of the reabn and dominions unto the 
Queen appertaining." 

' King James I. was not only heir to the Conqueror, but was also possessed of 
a claim upon the Crown of England not vested in any of his predecessors, Kings 
of England, from the time of the Conquest. He was not, as Blackstone calls him, 
the heir of the Saxon Monarchs of England, but he was the eldest coheir of Robert 
Bruce King of Scotland, and, as such, younger coheir of Malcolm Canmore King of 
Scotland, by his wife Margaret, sister of Edgar Atheling, and heiress of the Scottish 
Kings ; the elder representation of the said Margaret, vested in the house of Baliol, 
and at the time of King James's accession existed in the person of Henry IV. of 
France, from whom it lias passed to his lineal heir and representative, the present 
Henry de Bourbon, Count de Cbambord. 



6 SUCCESSION TO THE CROWN. 

XXVIII. 1688. William III., Prince of Orange," only and posthumous child 

of William Prince of Orange, by Mary Stuart, eldest dau. of 
King Charles I., upon whom and upon his wife Queen Mary, 
eldest dau. of the last Monarch, the Crown was settled by Act 
of Parliament (1st Will, and Mary, sess. 2, cap. 2) ; crowned 
King and Queen of England 11 Apr. 1689. The Queen died 
28 Dec. 1694, and the King 8 Mar. 1702, s. p. 

XXIX. 1702. Anne, sister of Queen Mary, the wife of the last Monarch, 2nd 

dau. of James II., and wife of George Prince of Denmark ; ob. 
1 Aug. 1714, s. P. 

XXX. 1714. George I., Elector of Hanover, s. and h. of Ernest Elector of 

Hanover, by Sophia, dau. of Frederick Elector Palatine and 
King of Bohemia, by Elizabeth Stuart, sister of Charles I. and 
only surviving dau. of James I. ; x ob. 11 June 1727. 



u Neither King William, Queen Mary, nor Queen Anne succeeded by hereditary 
right ; the usual course of descent was set aside by the temporary force of existing 
circumstances, and the Crown was offered to the powerful genius of the Prince of 
Orange, by a national Convention sitting in form of Parliament ; the Prince of 
Orange possessed no claim to it so long as any children of his uncle King James II. 
survived ; and, notwithstanding he was thus preferred to his cousins (for even his 
wife was only nominally Queen during her husband's life), Mary's issue and the 
issue of Anne her sister were preferred to such issue as King William might have 
by any other wife. In the Statute 1st Will, and Mary, cap. 1, it is stated that. 
the 13 Feb. 1689 was the day their said Majesties at the request and advice of the 
Lords and Commons did accept the Crown and royal dignity of King and Queen 
of England, and by Statute 1st Will, and Mary, sess. 2, cap. 2, it was enacted 
that William and Mary, Prince and Princess of Orange, be and be declared King 
and Queen of England, France, and Ireland and the dominions thereunto belonging, 
to hold the Crown and royal dignity of the said dominions to the said Prince and 
Princess during their lives and the life of the survivor of them, and that the sole 
and full exercise of the regal power be only in and executed by the said Prince of 
Orange in the name of the said Prince and Princess during their joint lives, and 
after their deceases the said Crown and royal dignity of the said Kingdom and 
dominions to be to the heirs of the body of the said Princess, and for default of 
such issue to the Princess Anne of Denmark and the heirs of her body, and for 
default of such issue to the heirs of the body of the said Prince of Orange. 

x Upon the decease of Anne Princess of Denmark, and of King William III. 
without issue, the provisions of the Act of Settlement of 1 Will, and Mary, 
sess. 2, cap. 1, would have ceased and determined, and the hereditary right to the 
Crown would have reverted to the attainted son of King James II., next to whom 
and his issue stood Anne Mary, Queen of Sardinia, the only surviving child and 
heir of "Henrietta Anne, Duchess of Orleans, youngest dau. of King Charles I. 
To provide therefore against such contingency, and to secure the succession in the 
Protestant liue, an Act was passed 12 and 13 Will. III., cap. 2, reciting the 
former Act, and that the Queen and the Duke of Gloucester, son of the Princess 
Anne, were deceased without issue, and that a further provision for the succession 
in the Protestant line had become necessary. It was therefore enacted, " that the 
Princess Sophia, Electress and Duchess Dowager of Hanover, daughter of Eli- 
zabeth, late Queen of Bohemia, daughter of King James I., be and is hereby 
declared to be the next in succession in the Protestant Line to the Imperial Crown 
and Dignity of the Realms of England, France, and Ireland, with the Dominions 
and Territories thereunto belonging, after His Majesty and the Princess Anne of 
Denmark, and in default of issue of the said Princess Anne and His Majesty, and 
that the said Royal Dignity should remain to the said Princess Sophia and the 
Heirs of her body, being Protestants." This is the last limitation of the Crown 
made by Parliament, and under it the regal dignity is vested in our present most 
gracious Sovereign Queen Victoria. 



SUCCESSION TO THE CROWN. 7 

XXXI. 1727. George II., s. and h., ob. 25 Oct. 1760. 

XXXII. 1760. George III., grands, and h., being s. and h. of Frederick Prince 

of Wales (ob. v. p. 20 Mar. 1751), eldest s. of tbe last Monarch; 
ob. 29 Jan. 1820. 

XXXIII. 1820. George IV., s. and h. ; ob. 26 June 1830, s. p. 

XXXIV. 1830. William IV., bro. and h. ; ob. 20 June 1837, s. p. 

XXXV. 1837. Victoria, niece and h., being only child of Edward Duke of Kent, 

4th son of King George III., and next brother of the last King. 
Her Majesty married, 10 Feb. 1840, His Royal Highness Prince 
Francis Albert Augustus Charles Emanuel, Duke of Saxony, 
Prince of Coburg and Gotha, K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.B., 
G.C.M.G., Field Marshal in the Army, &c. ; and has issue — 

1. Victoria Adelaide Mary Louisa, Princess Royal, b. 21 Nov. 1840. 

2. Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall, &c, b. 9 Nov. 

1841. 

3. Alice Maud Mary, b. 25 Apr. 1843. 

4. Alfred Ernest Albert, b. 6 Aug. 1844. 

5. Helena Augusta Victoria, b. 25 May 1846. 

6. Louisa Caroline Alberta, b. 18 Mar. 1848. 

7. Arthur William Patrick Albert, b. 1 May 1850. 

8. Leopold George Duncan Albert, b. 7 Apr. 1853. 

Whom God long preserve ! 



PRINCES OF WALES, DUKES OF CORNWALL, 



PRINCES OP WALES, DUKES OP CORNWALL/ AND 
EARLS OP CHESTER. 

I, 1301. Edward Plantagenet, sumamed"of Carnarvon," s. and h. ap- 

parent of King Edward I. ; had a grant of the Principality of 
Wales and County of Chester by charter, 7 Feb. 1301, and in 
another charter, 10 May following, he is styled Prince of Wales 1 
and Earl of Chester, by which titles he was summoned to Pari, 
from 2 June, 30 Edw. I. 1302, to 3 Nov. 34 Edw. I. 1306 ; 
Earl of Pontbieu and Monstroile. Ascended the throne as King 
Edw. II. 8 July 1307. 

II. 1343. Edward Plantagenet," surnamed"the Black Prince," s. and h. 

apparent of King Edward III. ; created Earl of Chester, and 
invested with the County of Chester and the castles of Chester, 
Rhyddlan, and Flint, by charter 18 Mar. 1333, " habend. & tenend. 
eidem filio nro. & heredibus suis Regibus Anglie ;" invested with 
the Duchy of Cornwall by charter 17 Mar. 1337 (baring been 
created in Parliament holden on the Monday next after the Feast 
of St. Matthew the Apostle preceding b ) ; Prince of Wales also in 
Parliament 12 May 1343 ; and Prince of Acquitaine, by charter 
19 July 1362 ; K.G. Ob. 8 June 1376, vita patris. 



y There have been six Dukes of Cornwall who were not Princes of Wales, and 
will not be found in the above list : they are : — 

Henry Plantagenet, surnamed " of Windsor," only child and heir 

apparent of King Henry V., ascended the throne as King Hemy VI. 

31 Aug. 1422. 
Henry Tudor, eldest s. and h. apparent of King Henry VIII. ; ob. 22 Feb. 

1510, ast. 7 weeks and 3 days. 
A second Son and h. apparent of King Henry VIII. ; born and ob. Nov. 

1514. 
Edward Tudor, third s. and h. apparent of King Henry VIII., ascended 

the throne as King Edward VI. 28 Jan. 1547. 
Charles Stuart, s. and h. apparent of King Charles I. ; born and died 

18 Mar. 1628. 
James Francis Edward Stuart, s. and h. apparent of King James II. ; 

born 10 June 1688, deprived by his father's abdication, attainted 

13 and 14 Will. III. 1701. 

z We have no account of any ceremony attendant upon the creation of Edward 
of Carnarvon to be Prince of Wales, and Earl of Chester, but it is probable that the 
grant of the Principality was immediately preceded by investiture with circlet, 
ring, and rod for the Principality of Wales, and by the girding on of the sword for 
the Earldom of Chester, as we find to have been done in the case of the Black 
Prince ; this would agree with the statement made by Matthew of Paris, that in 
or about the year 1300-1 the King gave to his son Edward, the Principality of 
Wales, and also bestowed upon him the Earldom of Chester. 

a It is worthy of observation that Edward III. never bore the title of Prince of 
Wales ; the earliest writ of Summons to Parliament in which his name occurs is 
that of 5 Aug. 14 Edw. II. 1320, then being about eight years of age, wherein he 
is styled " Edwardo Comiti Cestrensi filio nostro charissimo," and by the same 
designation he was summoned in the 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th of Edw. II. 
— ( Vide Earls of Chester.) Some writers of authority assert that he was created 



AND EARLS OF CHESTER. 9 

III. 1376. Richard Plaktagenet, surnamed " of Bordeaux ;" eldest surviving 

son of the Black Prince, and h. apparent to the Crown, after his 
father's decease ; created by charter, dated at Havering 20 Nov. 
1376, Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall, and Earl of Chester ;<i 
K.G-. Ascended the throne as King Richard II. 22 June 1377. 

IV. 1399. Henry Plantagenet, surnamed "of Monmouth," s. and h. ap- 

parent of King Henry IV. ; created in Parliament, 15 Oct. 1399, 
Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall, 8 and Earl of Chester, and by 
charters of even date was invested with the said Principality and 
Dukedom, together with the counties of Chester and Flint, " sibi 
& heredibus suis regibus Anglia? ;" declared Duke of Acquitaine 
and Lancaster in Parliament the day following ; K.G. Ascended 
the throne as King Henry V. 21 Mar. 1413. 

V. 1454. Edward Plantagenet, surnamed "of Westminster," s. and h. 

apparent of King Henry VI., and as such, Duke of Cornwall ; r 
created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester, " sibi & hteredibus 
suis Regibus Anglian," by charter dated at Westminster 15 Mar. 
1454, which charter was exhibited to and confirmed in Parliament 
the same day ; K.Gr. ; slain at Tewksbury 4 May 1471. 



Prince of Wales and Duke of Acquitaine in a Pari, held at York, 15 Edw. II., 
Id, t not only is no notice of such an occurrence to be found in the Rolls of Par- 
liament, but the assertion is shown to be entirely without foundation, he having 
been, by the description of Edward Earl of Chester, created Earl of Ponthieu and 
Monstroile 2 Sept. and Duke of Acquitaine 10 Sept. 19 Edw. II. 1325 ; his 
father, in consequence of his creation to that Principality, was regularly sum- 
moned from 2 June, 30 Edw. I. 1302, when he became eighteen years of age, 
until he ascended the throne, as " Edwardo Principi Wallias & Comiti Cestrise filio 
suo charissimo." 

b This is the first instance of the creation of a Duke in England ; the charter 
erects the castles, lordships, <Xrc, as well in Cornwall as elsewhere, into a Duchy, 
and settles the same " habend. & tenend. eidem duci, et ipsius et heredum suorum 
Regum Angliaj filijs primogenitis, et dicti loci ducibus in regno Angl' hereditar' 
successur'." 

c Under the limitations of the Dukedom of Cornwall, quoted in the last note, 
the Dukedom had not devolved upon Richard, the Black Prince's son, he not being 
the eldest son of a King of England, though the heir of the person created : a new 
creation was therefore necessary. 

* By an Act 21 Rich. II. cap. 9, the Earldom of Chester was erected into a 
Principality, and it was ordained " q. nulle done ne gmte en ascun temps advenir 
ne s'ra faite del dite Principalte'e ne de les Chastelx s'ies & villes susdites a nulloy 
fors soulement aleisne fitz du Roy q. s'ra Prince illoeqes sy plerra au Roy affaire ;" 
and, although this Act was " wholly reversed, revoked, voided, undone, repealed, 
and annulled for ever " by Act 1 Hen. IV. cap. 3, the Earldom of Chester has 
ever since been granted in conjunction with the Principality of Wales. 

e Although Henry of Monmouth became, upon his father's accession, the eldest 
son of a King of England, he was not the heir of the person originally created 
Duke of Cornwall ; a new creation became therefore necessary ; but notwithstanding 
the express limitation contained in the preceding and subsequent charters, the 
limitations in this case are the same as those of the Principality of Wales, " sibi 
& han-edibus suis Regibus Anglian," the effect of which woiild be to vest that 
dignity in the Crown upon accession, there to remain until re-granted ; Henry VI. 
expressly states, however {Hot. Pari. vol. v. p. 293), that " his first begoten 
sonne tyme of his birth was duke of Cornewayle," so that the limitation was con- 
sidered to have been the same as in the case of the Black Prince, added to which 
King Henry VI. gives the Duchy to his said son to be enjoyed in as ample form 
as Edward son of King Edward II [., or as Henry V. his father, had enjoyed it. 

f Vide the last note. In 1460 the King, being in the power of Richard Duke 
of York, declared by consent of Parliament the said Duke of York to be heir 



10 PRINCES OF WALES, DUKES OF CORNWALL, 

VI. 1471. Edward Plantagenet, s. and h. apparent of Edward IV. ; created 

Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester, by charter 26 June 1471, 
and by charter of 17 July following invested with the Principality 
of Wales and counties of Chester and Flint ; created Duke of Corn- 
wall in Parliament by patent of the last-named date, " habend. & 
tenend. eidem duci & ipsius & hairedum suorum Regum Anglias 
fil. primogenitis & dicti loci Ducibus," &c. ;s created Earl of March 
and Earl of Pembroke 8 July 1478, to hold during the King's 
pleasure ; K.G. Ascended the throne as King Edward V. 9 Apr. 
1483. 

VII. 1 483. Edward Plantagenet, s. and h. apparent of King Richard III. ; 

created Earl of Salisbury 15 Feb. l477 ; became Duke of Cornwall 
on his father's accession to the throne ; h created Prince of Wales 
and Earl of Chester by charter 24 Aug. 1483. Ob. vita patris 
31 Mar. 1484, eet. 10 yrs. 

VIII. 1489. Arthur Tudor, s. and h. apparent of King Henry VII., Duke of 

Cornwall from the time of his birth ;' created Prince of Wales 
and Earl of Chester, " sibi & hasredibus suis, regibus Anglias," 
1 Dec. 1489,J and invested with the said Principality and counties 
of Chester and Flint by charter, 27 Feb. following ; Governor 
and Warden of the Marches towards Scotland ; K.G. Ob. 2 Apr. 
1502, s. p. 

apparent to the Crown of England, and granted to him the Principality of Wales, 
together with the counties of Chester and Flint, for life ; he w T as slain at Wakefield 
the same year. 

s Edward IV., though heir of Edward the first created, was not the heir of 
Henry the last created, Duke of Cornwall, whose last descendant had been lately 
slain atTewksbury ; he probably considered therefore that a new creation was the 
safer means of vesting the Duchy in his eldest son, and quotes the acts of his pre- 
decessors Edward III. and Henry IV., the latter " indede and not in ryght Kyng 
of Englond " as the " reason for his having delyvered the said duchie to his said 
first begoten sone." 

b There are several documents to testify to the fact of his having been consi- 
dered Duke of Cornwall, amongst them a patent for the foundation of a chantry at 
St. Mary of Rykall (York) to say mass for the earthly welfare and the souls of 
the King, Queen Anne, Edward Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall and Earl of 
Chester, and the founders, dated 4 Dec. 1483 ; it is, nevertheless, difficult to 
conceive upon what ground a legal title to the Duchy was established, without 
charter or patent, unless the King considered that the Act of Parliament passed 
immediately upon his accession, which declared King Edward's marriage to have 
been a "pretensed marriage," all the children of the said King Edward "bastards," 
and all the issue of George Duke of Clarence " dishabled by attainder," had consti- 
tuted him heir to the first created Duke, Edward the Black Prince. 

1 His mother, Queen Elizabeth, was not only heir to the throne as eldest 
daughter and coheir of her father King Edward IV., but as such she was also 
heir to the first created Duke of Cornwall ; King Henry trusted not, however, to a 
title to the Duchy for his son, which should be derived through his mother, and in 
the Parliament held at Westin., 7 Nov., 1st of his reign, it was therefore enacted 
that the King should have, hold, and enjoy from the 21st Aug. last past the 
Dukedom of Cornwall, in as large and ample maimer and form as the Kings 
Henry VI. and Edward IV. enjoyed the same, and further ordained that " when- 
soever our sovereign lord have first a son of his body lawfully begotten, that the 
same son and prince have and enjoy the said duchy of Cornwall, &c, in as ample 
and large form and manner as any Prince first begotten son of any King hath 
had and enjoyed before this Act." — Coke's Reports, part 8. 

j The Signet Bill of 27 Feb. following, for his investiture with the castles, 
manors, &c, recites his creation to have taken place 29 Nov. preceding, with 
consent and advice of the Peers of Parliament. 



AND EAELS OF CHESTER. 11 

IX. 1503. Henry Tudor, Duke of York, brother of the last Prince, and 

upon his death Duke of Cornwall k and heir apparent to the 
throne, Constable of Dover Castle, Warden of the Cinque 
Ports, Earl Marshal of England, and Lieutenant of Ireland ; 
created Prince of Wales ' and Earl of Chester 18 Feb. 1503 ; 
K.G. Ascended the throne as King Henry VIII. 22 Apr. 
1509.™ 

X. 1610. Henry (Frederick) Stuart, s. and h. apparent of James I. ; Duke 

of Rothsay, Earl of Carrick, Baron of Renfrew and Steward of 
Scotland, as h. apparent to the Scottish Crown ; and Duke of Corn- 
wall upon his father's accession to the Crown of Great Britain ; 
solemnly created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester in Parlia- 
ment 4 June, 1610, and by patent of even date the said dignities 
were confirmed, " sibi & hajredibus suis Regibus Anglias ;" K.Gr. 
Ob. unm. 6 Nov. 1612. 



k This being the first occasion on which an eldest son of any King of England 
had (since the creation of the dignity) died without issue in the lifetime of the 
King his father, leaving a second brother then living, the question arose whether 
by the words, sense, and meaning of the Statute of 11 Edw. III., the filius primo- 
gunitus natus only, or filius primogenitus existens, were by the limitation of that 
Statute to be the inheritor of the Dukedom and possessions of Cornwall. On 
this occasion the latter construction was adopted (under what authority is not 
known), for in the October following the decease of Arthur Prince of Wales we 
find a commission issued under the Great Seal, in which Henry is named Duke of 
Cornwall, and in the same instrument called second begotten son of his father. 
The question was afterwards incidentally raised in the " Prince's Case " (3 Jac. 1.), 
reported by Coke (part 8), in which it appears to have been the opinion of 
Lord Chancellor Ellesmere and the judges who assisted him (Coke, Fleming, and 
Williams) with their advice, " that he who should inherit ought to be first 
begotten son of the heirs of the Black Prince, be he heir general or collateral, but 
such heir ought to be King of England ;" and in the course of the proceedings it 
is expressly stated that Henry VIII. on the death of his brother Arthur did not 
inherit, " forasmuch as he was not the first begotten son, he was not within the 
said limitation," which is at variance with the fact already recited. In 1613 
the question again became the occasion of solemn inquiry before the King, and 
Lords and others of the Privy Council, the Master of the Rolls, and the King's 
Counsel, when it was resolved that the words of limitation possessed the more 
extended meaning of filius primogenitus existens, and that upon the decease of 
Heniy Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall, Charles Duke of York had, both 
by reason and precedence, become entitled to the honour, style, and dignity of 
Duke of Cornwall, which he had and enjoyed accordingly. — Collinses Proceedings, 
p. 148. 

1 Upon his creation to the Principality of Wales, the Letters Patent of 31 Oct. 
1494, creating him Duke of York, were declared to be "utterly voyde and of 
none effect," he having become heir apparent to the Crown ; there appears to 
be no charter investing him with the Principality and Counties, as in his brother's 
case. 

m Neither of the sons of King Henry VIII. had the title of Prince of AVales, 
although all three of them were Dukes of Cornwall ; Edward VI. was about to bo 
created at the time of his father's death. A note to ' Blackstone's Commentaries,' 
vol. i. p. 224, edit. 1844, states, on the authority of Hume, who cites Burnet, that 
Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth were created by their father Henry VIM. Prin- 
cesses of Wales, each of them at the time (the latter after the illegitimation of 
Mary) being heir presumptive to the Crown. Mary is said by another writer 
to have been declared rightful heir of the realm and Princess of Wales, and to 
have governed the Principality; but there appears to be no foundation for any of 
these statements. 



12 PRINCES OF WALES, DUKES OF CORNWALL, 

XL 1616. Charles Stuart, Duke of Albany, Earl of Ross, and Lord Ard- 
manach in Scotland, 11 Duke of York in Great Britain, and upon 
the death of his brother, 1612, h. apparent to the throne, Duke 
of Cornwall, Duke of Rothsay, Earl of Carrick, Baron of Renfrew, 
and Steward of Scotland ; created Prince of Wales and Earl of 
Chester 4 Nov. 1616 ; K.Gr. Ascended the throne as King 
Charles I. 27 Mar. 1625. 

XII. Charles Stuart, s. and h. apparent of Charles I., and as such Duke 

of Cornwall and Duke of Rothsay, Earl of Carrick, Baron of Ren- 
frew, and Steward of Scotland ; K.G. ; declared, but never created 
Prince of Wales ;p became King of England upon the death of 
his father 30 Jan. 1649.1 

XIII. 1714. George Augustus, Prince of Great Britain, Electoral Prince of Bruns- 

wick Luneburgh, Duke of Cornwall r and Rothsay, Duke and Mar- 
quess of Cambridge, Earl of Milford Haven and Carrick, Viscount 
Northallerton, Baron of Tewksbury and Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, 
and Steward of Scotland ; K.G. ; s. and h. apparent of George I. ; 
created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester by patent 27 Sept. 
1714, 8 to him and his heirs, Kings of Great Britain. Ascended 
the throne as King George II. 11 June 1727. 

n In his patent of creation to the Dukedom of York, he is also called Marquess 
of Ormond. ° Vide observations under note k . 

p Sandford states that he was declared Prince of Wales about the period of his 
installation into the Order of the Garter, which was in 1638 ; upon his Garter- 
plate, which is decorated with the Prince of Wales's feathers, he is styled Prince 
of Great Britain and Duke of Cornwall and Rothsay only. In numerous warrants 
providing for the expenses of his household between 1634 and 1644, he is styled 
" Prince Charles " only ; and one of them, in Nov. 1641, is addressed to the 
Receiver of the King's Revenue as Prince of Wales. In the Prince's subsequent 
communications with the Parliament in 1645-6, he is styled Prince of Wales. In a 
frontispiece annexed to a collection of Ordinances and Declarations in Parliament, 
published in 1646 by order of Parliament, he is represented as sitting in Parlia- 
ment on the right of the King his father. 

q From this period till the accession of the house of Brunswick, the title of 
Prince of Wales remained in the Crown. James Francis Edward, son of King 
James II., and born 10 June, 1688, was styled Prince of Wales at the ceremony 
of his reception into the Church in the Chapel of St. James 15 Oct. 1688 ; his 
father abdicated 11 Dec. following, and he himself was attainted by Act of Par- 
liament, 13 and 14 Wm. HI. (1701) cap. 3. 

r Until this time the Dukedom of Cornwall had been enjoyed by the heirs 
apparent of the existing heirs of the Black Prince, in accordance either with the 
more literal construction of the original limitation adopted by Lord Chancellor 
Ellesmere, or the more extended sense and meaning allowed to it in the later 
resolution of the Privy Council ; in such few instances, where heirship in blood 
did not exist, or might have been considered doubtful, special Acts of Parliament 
had been obtained. Upon the accession of the House of Brunswick, all right 
derived by inheritance from the Black Prince ceased and determined, and it is 
difficult to conceive by what title George Augustus, s. and h. apparent of King 
George I., became possessed of the Dukedom of Cornwall, unless we adopt the 
construction (still more liberal than that of the Privy Council of King James I.) 
given to the original statute in an Act, 9 Hen. V. (1421). This Act, which is 
for disuniting the manor of Isleworth from the Duchy of Cornwall, and annexing 
it to the Monastery of Sion, recites the intent and meaning of the Act of 11 Edw. 
III. in the following words : — " fuist accordee qe les fitz eisnes des Rois d'Ensde- 
terre c'est assavoir ceux qe serroient heirs proscheins du lioiahne d'JSngkterre 
fuissent Dues de Cornewaille & q. le Countee de Cornewaille touts jours demoreroit 
come Duchee a les eisnes fitz des Rois d'Engleterre q. serroient heirs proscheins 
du dit Roialme sans estre aillours donee." — Sot. Pari. 9 Hen. V. (1421). 

" The letters patent of creation declare, him to be likewise invested with the said 



AND EARLS OF CHESTER. 13 

XIV. 1729. Frederick Lewis, Prince of Great Britain, Electoral Prince of 

Brunswick Luneburgh, Duke of Cornwall and Rothsay, Duke of 
Edinburgh, Marquess of the Isle of Ely, Earl of Eltham and 
Carrick, Viscount of Launceston, Baron of Snawdon and Renfrew, 
Lord of the Isles, and Steward of Scotland ; K.G. ; s. and h. ap- 
parent of George II. ; created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester 
8 Jan. 1729 ; ob. v. p. 20 Mar. 1751.' 

XV. 1751. George AVilliam Frederick, Prince of Great Britain, Electoral 

Prince of Brunswick Luneburgh ; succeeded his father as h. ap- 
parent to the throne, Duke of Edinburgh, Marquess of the Isle of 
Ely, Earl of Eltham, Viscount of Launceston, and Baron of 
Snawdon, 20 Mar. 1751 ; K.G. ; created Prince of Wales and 
Earl of Chester 20 April 1751. Ascended the throne as King 
George III. 25 Oct. 1760. 

XVI. 1762. George Augustus Frederick, Prince of Great Britain, Electoral 

Prince of Brunswick Luneburgh, Duke of Cornwall and Rothsay, 
Earl of Carrick, Baron of Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, and Steward 
of Scotland ; K.G. ; s. and h. apparent of George III. ; created 
Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester 19 Aug. 1762. Ascended 
the throne as King George IV. 29 Jan. 1820. 

XVII. 1841. Albert Edward, s. and h. apparent of Queen Victoria, Prince of 

the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Prince of 
Coburg and Gotha, Duke of Saxony, Duke of Cornwall and Roth- 
say, Earl of Carrick, Baron of Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, and 
Steward of Scotland ; K.G. ; created Prince of Wales and Earl of 
Chester 8 Dec. 1841, to him and his heirs, Kings of the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, for ever ; created Earl of 
Dublin, with like limitation, 17 Jan. 1850. 



Principality and Counties, and to be confirmed in the same by these ensigns of 
honour — the girding on of the sword, the delivery of the cap and placing it on his 
head, with a ring on his finger and gold staff in his hand, according to custom. 

' Upon the death of this Prince, it was considered that the titles of Duke of 
Rothsay, Earl of Carrick, &c, had reverted to the Crown ; it was the opinion of 
the Judge Advocate of Scotland that these dignities had been settled upon the 
plan of the Act of 11 Edw. III., by which the Duchy of Cornwall was governed, 
but no instance having occurred of a like nature in Scotland, no certain opinion 
could be given ; a draft of an Act of Parliament was prepared in order to obviate 
the difficulty, but no further steps in the matter appear to have been taken. — 
Douglas, vol. ii. p. 438. 



A. 



Marquesses. 



ABERCORN. 



I. 1790. 1. John James Hamilton, 9th Earl of Abercom in Scotland, and 2nd 

Viscount Hamilton in England ; created Marquess of Abercom 
15 Oct. 1790; K.G. ; ob. 1818. 

II. 1818. 2. James Hamilton, grandson and h. being s. and h. of James Hamil- 

ton (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Marquess ; present Marq. of Abercom, 
and Vise. Hamilton in England, and Earl of Abercorn, &c. in Scotland ; 
K.G. P.C. =f 

Y 

ABERCROMBY. 

I. 1801. 1. Mary-Anne, dau. of John Menzies, Esq. and widow of Lt.-Gen. 
Sir Ralph Abercromby, K.B. ; created Baroness Abercromby, of 
Aboukir and Tullibody, co. Clackmannan, with remainder of 
the Barony to the issue male of her late husband, 28 May 1801 ; 
ob. 11 Feb. 1821. 



II. 

III. 

IV. 



Barons. 
1821. 2. 
1843. 3. 
1852. 4. 



George Abercromby, s. and h. ; ob. 15 Feb. 1843. 
George Ralph Abercromby, s. and h. ; ob. 25 June 1852. 
George Ralph Abercromby, s. and h. ; present Baron Abercromby, 



a minor. 



ABERGAVEISTNY or BERGAVENNY. 8 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Temp. Hen. III. 1. William Baron Cantelupe, by marrying Eve. dau. and 

coheir of William Lord Braose, obtained the Castle and 
lands of Bergavenny, and is said by some writers to have 
been summ, to Pari, by Hen. III. as Baron Bergavenny, 
though no record of the fact appears to be extant, and to 
have been the first who assumed the title of Bergavenny ; 
ob. 1255. 



a The Editor being unwilling to make any 
very decided difference in the classification of 
titles from that adopted by previous writers, 
has here considered all the possessors of the 
Castle of Bergavenny as Barons Bergavenny, 
or as it is now written Abergavenny ; but 
much doubt exists whether, until the Writ 
of Summons of the 29th Hen. VI. to Edward 
Nevill, as " Domino de Bergavenny," the 
proper designation of the previous barons was 
not that of their family name. The first 
possessor of that teiritory after Writs of Sum- 
mons were regularly issued was John de 
Hastings, who died 6 Edw. II. and was suc- 
ceeded by his son John de Hastings, who 
died 18 Edw. II. ; to these personages nearly 
thirty Writs of Summons were directed, and 
in no instance, in this number, does the word 
" Bergavenny" occur, in addition to which 
the said John de Hastings was entitled to 
Summons to Parliament as son and heir of 
his father Henry Lord Hastings, a Baron of 
great note, and the barony in which they sat 



passed away upon the death of the last Eail 
of Pembroke, and was separated from the 
tenure of Bergavenny. From the creation of 
the 1st Earl of Pembroke till the death of 
the last, no inference on the subject is to' be 
drawn, until the Writ of Summons to Wil- 
liam Beauchamp 16 Ric. II. who was sum- 
moned as " Willielmo Beauchamp de Berga- 
venny." This William Beauchamp not being 
related to the preceding Barons, and being 
summoned as " de Bergavenny," certainly 
affords at the first view strong grounds for 
the generally received opinion that lie was 
summoned as Lord Bergavenny, by tenure of 
that Castle. On looking attentively into the 
point, however, a conclusion equally strong 
may be drawn, that it was merely an addition 
used to distinguish him from " John de 
Beauchamp de Kydderminster." In the pre- 
vious reign, a John de Beauchamp was sum- 
moned as " de Somerset," and another John 
de Beauchamp, a younger son of Guy Earl 
of Warwick, as " de Warwyck ;" and before, 



ABERGAVENNY. 



15 



Barons by Tenure. 

II. 1255. 2. George Cantelupe, s. and h. ; ob. 1272, s. p. 

Barons by Writ. 

III. 1272. 3. John Hastings II. 8th Baron Hastings, nephew and h. ; being s. 

and h. of Henry Baron Hastings, by Eve, sist. and coh. of the 
last Baron ; summ. to Pari, from 23 June, 23 Edw. I., 1295, to 
22 May, 6 Edw. II., as " Johanni de Hastings," 1313 ; ob. 1313. 

IV. 1313. 4. John Hastings III. 9th Baron Hastings, s. and h. ; summ. to 

Pari, from 26 Nov. 7 Edw. II. 1313, to 20 Feb. 18 Edw. II. 
1325, as " Johanni de Hastings ;" ob. 1325. 

V. 1325. 5. Lawrence Hastings IV., 10th Baron Hastings, s. and h. ; recog- 

nised and confirmed in the Earldom of Pembroke by virtue of 
descent from Isabel eldest sister of Aymer de Valence last Earl 
of Pembroke, by pat. 13 Oct. 1339 ; ob. 1348. 

VI. 1348. 6. John Hastings, s. and h., Earl of Pembroke, E.G. ; m. first the 

Princess Margaret of England, and afterwards to Ann, dau. and h. 
of Sir Walter Manny, K.G. ; ob. at Arras 16 Apr. 1375. 



contemporary with, and after this William 
de Beauchamp " de Bergavenny " numerous 
Barons were named in Writs of Summons 
with the addition of their place of residence, 
without such ever being supposed to be the 
title of their Baronies : as, therefore, in the 
only instances which occur of Writs of Sum- 
mons being issued to the possessor of the 
Castle of Bergavenny, previous to that to 
William de Beauchamp, in the 16th Ric. II. 
they were never designated as " de Berga- 
venny," — and as examples of such additions 
were exceedingly frequent, without any si- 
milar inference being deduced from them, — 
there does not appear any greater cause for 
supposing that the designation in question 
was intended to express the title of the Ba- 
rony, than there is for concluding such to 
have been the case either in the instances of 
John de Beauchamp " de Somerset," " de 
Warwyk," or in either of the numerous ex- 
amples alluded to. In order, however, to 
obtain as much information as possible on 
the subject, it was necessary to inquire in 
what manner the Barons in question were 
described in the Rolls of Parliament previous 
to the reign of Henry VI., and the result of 
the examination is certainly in favour of 
William Beauchamp's being considered as 
Baron Bergavenny, though it does not posi- 
tively establish the fact, whilst it confirms 
the opinion that his predecessors in the Lord- 
ship of Bergavenny never bore that name as 
the title of their dignity. The earliest in- 
stance when Bergavenny occurs as a title 
in the Rolls of Parliament is in the 21st 
Rich. II. 1397, five years after William 
Beauchamp was summoned to Parliament as 
"Willielmo Beauchamp (de Bergavenny)," 
when he was described as " W m Beauchamp, 
S r . de Bergavenny." In the 1st Hen. IV. 
the names of " Dns. de Roos, do Willoghby, 
de Bergeveney," occur ; and in the following 



year we find among the Barons then present, 
" le S r de Bergavenny." In the 2nd Hen. 
IV. he is mentioned as " William Sire de 
Bergavenny," and in a similar manner on 
subsequent occasions. It must, however, be 
observed, on the other hand, that on the last 
and most solemn occasion when his name 
occurs in the Rolls of Parliament, viz. among 
the Peers present at the settlement of the 
Crown in the 8th Hen. IV. he is in both 
places styled " Will'mi Beauchamp de Ber- 
gcvenny ;" and at the same time Henry Lord 
Scrop of Masham is mentioned as " Henrici 
le Scrop de Masham," whilst other Barons 
are styled " Reginaldi Domini de Grey de 
Ruthyn, William Domini de Ferrers, Thomaj 
Domini de Furnyvel," &c. Richard Beau- 
champ, his son and heir, was never summ. 
to Pari, as a Baron, as he was created Earl 
of Worcester four years after he became of 
age ; and though he is sometimes styled 
" Lord of Bergavenny," and his mother, both 
in the Rolls of Parliament and in her will, is 
called " Lady of Bergavenny,"' no conclusion 
is to be drawn therefrom, for this expression 
was more frequently applied to designate im- 
portant manors and lordships than Parlia- 
mentary Baronies. On Edward Nevill's 
being summoned in the 29th Hen. VI. as 
" Domino de Bergavenny," such certainly 
became the title of his Barony : but it is to 
be considered that this occurred in the reign 
of Hen. VI., a period, as is remarked else- 
where, fruitful in anomalies on subjects con- 
nected with the Peerage, and when even, as 
is stated in a subsequent page, some instances 
occur of the addition of " Domino de," &c. 
being used, without such designation being 
the title of the dignity possessed by the Baron 
to whose name it was appended. Vide the 
observations on this subject under Charleton, 
Dudley, and Grey of Powis. 



16 



ABERGAVENNY. 



Barons by Writ. 
VII. 1375. 7. 



II. 



Ill 



John Hastings, s. and h. (by the 2nd wife) Earl of Pembroke ; 
slain under age at a tournament at Woodstock, 1391, 8. p. 
Though the Barons Hastings were possessed of the Castle of 
Bergavenny, it appears they were summ. to Pari, as Barons 
Hastings only ; the first person designated as " de Bergavenny " 
in the Writs of Summons was 

1392. 1.% William Beauchamp, 4th son of Thomas XIII. 11th Earl of 
Warwick, by Katherine dau. of Roger Mortimer, Earl of March, 
and sister of Agnes wife of Lawrence 1st Earl of Pembroke, 
and 5th Baron Bergavenny, who being seised of the Castle and 
lands of Bergavenny, by virtue of an entail dated 15 Apr. 
46 Edw. III. 1372, executed by John Hastings 6th Earl of 
Pembroke, Lord of Weisford and Bergavenny, K.G. (by licence 
of the King) ; was summ. to Pari, from 23 Nov. 16 Rich. II. 
1392, to 26 Aug. 9 Henry IV. 1408, as " Willielmo Beauchamp 
(de Bergavenny) ;" K.G. ; ob. 1411. 

1411. 2. Richard Beauchamp, s. and h. ; created Earl of Worcester in 
1420. He married Isabel Despencer, sister and sole heir of 
Richard VII. 8th Baron Despencer, and Baron Burghersh ; 
slain at Meaux in France, 1422, s. p. m., leaving Elizabeth his 
sole dau. and h. : she married 



1450. l.^J Edward Neville, 6th son of Ralph I. Earl of Westmoreland, 
and who was summ. to Pari, as " Edwardo Neville, Militi, Do- 
mino de Bergavenny," or as " Edwardo Nevyll de Bergavenny, 
Militi," from 5 Sept. 29 Hen. VI. 1450, to 19 Aug. 12 Edw. 
IV. 1472 ; ob. 1476. 

IV. 1476. 2.^ George Neville, s. and h. a?t. 36, summ. to Pari, from 15 Nov. 

22 Edw. IV. 1482, to 12 Aug. 7 Hen. VII. 1492 ; ob. 1491. 

V. 1491. 3.7$$ George Neville, s. and h. ; summ. to Pari, from 16 Jan. 12 

Hen. VII. 1497, to 5 Jan. 25 Hen. VIII. 1534 ; K.G. ; en- 
tailed the Castle and Lordship of Bergavenny on himself and 
the heirs male of his body, with remainder to his brothers 
Sir Thomas Neville (ob. s. p.) and Sir Edward Neville, and 
d. 1535. 

VI. 1535. 4. Henry Neville, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 23 Jan. 5 Edw. 

VI. 1552, to 15 Oct. 28 Eliz. 1586 ; ob. 1587, s. p. m., leaving 
Mary his dau. and h. wife of Sir Thomas Fane. 

VII. 1587. 5. Edward Neville, cousin and h., being s. and h. of Sir Edward 

Neville above named, who had been attainted of high treason 
and beheaded, 30 Hen. VJ1I. (1538-9). Tbis Edward was 
restored in blood by Act of Pari. 34 and 35 Hen. VII I. b with 
certain exceptions, whereby the estate tail under the settlement 
of George Lord Abergavenny was forfeited to the Crown, by 
reason of which he obtained another Act of Parliament, 2 and 3 
Ph. and Mary (1555-6), enabling him, upon failure of heirs male 
of the body of Henry then Lord Bergavenny, to succeed to the 
honours, castles, and lordships entailed as aforesaid ; he suc- 
ceeded his said cousin 10 Feb. 1586-7, and d. 10 Feb. 1589. 



b In Coke's Reports (Part 12, p. 70), it is 
stated that this Edward had summons to 
Pari. 2 and 3 Ph. and Mary, but died before 
Parliament met, and he gives the Writ at 
length, and takes occasion to state that it was 
decided 8 James (1610-1), that the direction 
and delivery of the Writ did not make him a 
Baron or Noble until he came to Parliament, 



and there sat according to the commandment 
of the Writ, and hence that no hereditary 
dignity was created by the Writ directed to 
him, in consequence of his never having sat 
under it. As Henry Neville Lord Berga- 
venny sat in the Parliament above referred 
to, it is difficult to account for Sir Edward 
Coke's statement. 



ABERGAVENNY —ABINGDON. 17 

Barons by Writ. 

VIII. 1589. 6. Edward Neville, s. and h. Being seised of an estate in tail 

male by virtue of the Act of Restoration, 2 and 3 Bh. and 
Mary (1555-6) in the Castle and Lordship of Bergavenny, he 
claimed in 1598 the dignity of Baron of Bergavenny, not, as has 
been generally supposed, on the sole ground that the dignity was 
attached to the Castle of Bergavenny, but that he, as being 
seised of that Castle, and as heir male of the last Lord, was the 
more eligible person. On this occasion the Lord Chief Justice 
of England (Sir John Bopham) determined that there was " no 
right at all in the heir male, and therefore he must wholly rely 
on the favour of the Prince — the common custom of England doth 
wholly favour the heir general — that Her Majesty may call by 
new creation the heir male, and omit the heir general during her 
life, but yet a right to remain to her son, having sufficient 
supportacion. No entail can carry away dignity but by express 
words or patent ;" the Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas 
was of the same opinion. Upon these opinions Lady Fane, who, 
as dau. and h. of Henry Lord Bergavenny, claimed as heir gene- 
ral, prayed to be allowed the Barony, but nothing further took 
place until 1604, when the claims being renewed, the House of 
Lords avoided a formal decision, being " not so perfectly and 
exactly resolved as might give clear and undoubted satisfaction 
to all the consciences and judgements of all the Lords for the 
precise point of Right ;" it was agreed therefore that suit should 
be made to the King for ennobling both parties by way of resti- 
tution, the one to the Barony of Le Despencer, the other to the 
Barony of Bergavenny ; and by a further resolution it was deter- 
mined that Bergavenny should go to Neville and lie Despencer to 
Fane ; this arrangement was approved of by the King, and a Writ 
of Summons was directed " Edwardo Neville de Bergavenny 
Ch r ," 25 May, 2 Jas. 1604, and letters patent dated the same day 
confirmed the dignity of Le Despencer to Lady Fane. Ob. 1622. 

IX. 1622. 7. Henry Neville, s. and h. ; ob. 1641. 

X. 1641. 8. John Neville, s. and h. ; ob. 1660, s. p. 
XL 1660. 9. George Neville, bro. and h. ; ob. 1666. 

XII. 1666. 10. George Neville, s. and h. ; ob. 1695, s. p. 

XIII. 1695. 11. George Neville, cousin and h. male, being s. and h. of George, 

only son of Richard, eldest son of Sir Christopher Neville, K.B., 
2nd son of Edward, VIII. 6th Baron ; ob. 1721. 

XIV. 1721. 12. George Neville, s. and h. ; ob. 1723, s. p. 

XV. 1723. 13. Edward Neville, bro. and h. ; ob. 1724, s. p. 

XVI. 1724. 14. William Neville, cousin and h. being eldest son of Edward 

Neville, next brother of George, XIII. 11th Baron ; ob. 1744. 

Earls. 

XVII. 1744. — I. 1784. 15. George Neville, s. and h. ; created Viscount 

Neville, of Billing, co. Kent, and Earl of Aber- 
gavenny, co. Monmouth, 17 May 1784 ; ob. 1785. 

XVIII. 1785.— II. 1785. 16. Henry Neville, s. and h. K.T. ; ob. 27 Mar. 1843. 

XIX. 1843.— III. 1843. John Neville, s. and h. ; d. unm. 12 Apr. 1845. 

XX. 1845. — IV. 1845. William Neville, bro. and h. ; present Earl and 

Baron of Abergavenny and Viscount Neville of Billing. =p 

Y 
Earls. ABINGDON. 

1682. 1. James Bertie, 3rd Baron Norreys of Rvcote ; created Earl of 
Abingdon, co. Berks, 30 Nov. 1682 ; ob. 1699, 
II. 1699. 2. Montagu Bertie (assumed the name of) Venables, s. and h. ; ob. 
1743, 8. p. 

c 



18 ABINGER— AILESBURY. 

Earls. 
II T. 1743. 3. Willoughby Bertie, nephew and h., being s. and h. of James 2nd 
son of James 1st Earl ; ob. 1762. 

IV. 1762. 4. Willoughby Bertie, s. and b. ; ob. 1799. 

V. 1799. 5. Montagu Bertie, s. and h. ; ob. 16 Oct. 1854. 

VI. 1854. 6. Montagu Bertie, s. and h., present Earl of Abingdon and Baron 

Norreys of Rycote, and coh. of the Baronies of Williams of Thame, 
Latimer, and L'Isle. =j= 

ABINGER. 

Barons. 

I 1835. 1. Sir James Scarlett, Knt., Chief Baron of the Exchequer ; created 

Baron Abinger of Abinger, co. Surrey, and of the city of Norwich, 
12 Jan. 1835 ; ob. 7 Apr. 1844. 

II 1844 2. Robert Campbell Scarlett, s. and h. ; present Baron Abinger. =p 

ABITOT. Vide Worcester. 

ABBXNCIS, or AVEEENCHES. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. William Abrincis ; ob. 1087. 

II. Hen. I. 2. Ruallus or Roland d' Abrincis, s. and h., acquired the Lordship 

of Folkestone, in Kent, by marrying Maud, dau. and h. of 
Nigel de Munevilla or Amundeville, Lord of that place, living 
1139 ; ob. ante 1147. 

III. Steph. 3. William Abrincis, s. and h., living 1170. 

IV. Rich. 4. Simon Abrincis ; ob. circa 1203. 

V. John. 5. William Abrincis, ob. 1230. 

VI. Hen. III. 6. William Abrincis, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1235, s. p. Maud, his 

sist. and h., married Hamon de Crevecoeur, whose issue male failing in the 
second generation, the inheritance was divided between the issue of his 
4 daughters. Of these daughters— 1. Agnes, m. John de Sandwich; 
2. Isolda, m. Nicholas de Lenham ; 3. Elena, m. Bertram de Crioll ; 
4. Isabella, m. Henry de Gaunt. 

ACHESON. 

I. 1847. 1. Archibald Acheson, eldest son of Archibald Acheson, Baron 
Worlingham (Earl of Gosford in Ireland) ; created Baron Acheson of Clan- 
cairney, co. Armagh, 18 Sept. 1847.— Vide Worlingham. 

ADBASTON. 

Barony, 25 Nov. 1815— Extinct 1825.— Vide Whitworth. 

AGUILLON. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Rich. I. Manser Aguillon ; ob. ante 1114. 

II. John William Aguillon, living 1233 ; ob. ante 1257. 

III. Hen. III. Robert Aguillon ; ob. 1285, s. p.m. Isabel, his dau. and h. was 

found to be aged 28 years, 20 Edw. I. (1291-2), and then wife of Hugh de 
Bardolph. 

_ . AILESBURY. 

Earls. 

I. 1604. 1. Robert Bruce, 2nd Baron Bruce of Whorlton, co. York, and 2nd 
Earl of Elgin in Scotland ; created Baron Bruce of Skelton, co. 
York, Viscount Bruce of Ampthill, co. Bedford, and Earl of 
Ailesburv, co. Bucks, 18 March 1664 ; ob. 1(585. 



AILSA — ALBEMARLE. iy 

Earls. 

II. 1685. 2. Thomas Bruce, s. and h., Earl of Elgin in Scotland ; ob. 1741. 

III. 1741. 3. Chaki.es Bruce, s. and h. ; summ. to Pari, by writ 29 Dec. 1711, 

and placed in bis father's Barony of Bruce of Wborlton ; created 
Baron Bruce of Tottenham, co. Wilts, with remainder, failing bis 
issue male, to bis nephew Thomas Bruce Bradenell, son of 
George Earl of Cardigan, by Elizabeth, his sister, 17 April 1746 ; 
Earl of Elgin in Scotland ; ob. 1747, s. p. m., wben all bis 
English honours became Extinct, excepting the Barony of 
Bruce of Tottenham, which, according to the above limitation, 
devolved on, 

IV. 1776. 1. Thomas Bruce Brudenell (assumed the name of) Bruce, neph. 

and h. above mentioned, 2nd Baron Bruce of Tottenham ; created 
Earl of Ailesbury, co. Bucks, 10 June 1776 ; ob. 1814. 

Marquesses. 

V. 1814. — I. 1821. 2. Charles Brudenell-Bruce, s. and h., created Viscount 

Savernake of Savernake Forest, co. Wilts, Earl Bruce 
of Wborlton, co. York, and Marquess of Ailesbury, co. 
Bucks, 17 July 1821 ; K.T. ; ob. 4 Jan. 1856. 

VI. 1856. — II. 1856. 3. George William Frederick Brudex ell-Bruce, s. and 

h., summ. to Pari. v. p., and placed in his father's Barony of Bruce of 
Tottenham ; present Marquess and Earl of Ailesbury, Earl Bruce, Viscount 
Savernake, and Baron Bruce of Tottenham. = 

AILSA. 

Barons. Marquesses. 

I. 1806. — I. 1831. 1. Archibald Kennedy, 12th Earl of Cassilis in Scotland ; 

created Baron Ailsa of Ailsa, co. Ayr, 12 Nov. 1806, 
and Marquess of Ailsa of the Isle of Ailsa, co. Ayr, 
10 Sept. 1831 ; K.T. ; ob. 8 Sept. 1846. 

II. 1846. — II. 1846. 2. Archibald Kennedy, grandson and h. (being s. and h. 

of Archibald Earl of Cassilis), present Marquess and Baron Ailsa, &c =p 

ALBANY Vide York. 

ALBEMARLE, or AUMABLE. 

The origin of tins title is probably to be found in the possessions held by Eudo 
de Blois, Count of Champagne, at Albemarle in Normandy, whose wife Adeliza, 
half-sister of William the Conqueror, obtained large grants of land at the con- 
quest of England, subsequently known as the Fee or Honor of Albemarle ; in 
the Domesday Survey she is called " Comitissa de Albamarle," and her son 
Stephen is, at an after period, styled " de Albemarle," or " Comes " only, but in 
a charter by which he founded the Abbey of St. Martin " beyond his Castle of 
Albemarle in Normandy," he is called " Stephanus Albemarlensis Comes,'' but 
whether this description refer to him as Count of Albemarle in Normandy or 
Earl of Albemarle in England it would now be vain to attempt to discover ; it 
may, however, be presumed that the Norman Counts who accompanied the 
Conqueror to England would not deem their dignity augmented by the acquisition 
of a title taken from the Saxon Ealdormen or Earls, and Normandy being united 
to England, the Counts of the former (no longer aliens in the country they bad 
conquered) were probably considered during the reigns of the Conqueror and his 
successors for several generations, as having the same rank with those " Comites " 
or Earls of England, who derived their titles exclusively from their English 

c 2 



20 



ALBEMARLE. 



possessions. It would seem, therefore, that the Counts of Albemarle had origi- 
nally no title to this name of dignity in England, hut that it became attached 
to their English possessions, after the conquest of Normandy (by Philip Augustus 
in the reign of King John) had deprived them of their lands in that Duchy. 

Earls. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Stephen, Count of Albemarle ; oh. 1127. 

II. 1127. 2. William le Gros, s. and h., Count of Albemarle ; received the co. 

of York from King Stephen after the battle of the Standard, c 
1138 ; oh. s. p.m. 1179. 

III. 1179. William Mandeville, Earl of Essex, first husband of Hawyse, 

only dau. and h. of William the last Earl ; ob. 1189, s. p. 

IV. 1189. 1. William de Fortibus, 2nd husband of the said Hawyse ; ob. 

1195. 

V. 1195. Baldwin de Betun, 3rd husband of the said Hawyse ; ob. 1212, 

s. p. d 

VI. 1212. 2. William de Fortibus, s. and h. of the said Hawyse, by her 2nd 

husband William 4th Earl ; he was one of the celebrated 25 
Barons appointed to enforce the observance of Magna Charta ; 
starved to death in the Levant, 1241. 

VII. 1241. 3. William de Fortibus, s. and h., m. Isabel de Piedvers, Countess 

of Devon ; ob. 1256. 

VIII. 1256. 4. Thomas de Fortibus, s. and h., at. 7 anno 44 Hen. III. ; ob. s. p. 

ante 21 Edw. I. He had two sisters, Avice and Avelina : Avice 
the eldest was the wife of Ingelram de Percy, who left her a widow 
ante 1261 — she died s. p. ; Avelina became sole heir to her father, 
and m., 1270, Edmund Earl of Lancaster, 2nd son of King 
Henry III. ; in 1273 she made proof of her age, and died the same 
year, s. p. 

Thomas Plantagenet Duke of Gloucester, youngest son of 
King Edward III. ; summ. to Pari, as Duke of Aumarle, 3 Sept. 
1385, but he was never afterwards summ. to Pari, by that title, 
nor did either of his children succeed to it. 

Edward Plantagenet, Earl of Rutland, s. and h. apparent of 
Edmund Duke of York ; created Duke of Albemarle in Pari. 
29 Sept. 1397 ; adjudged, together with the Dukes of Surrey 
and Exeter, by Pari. 6 Oct, 1399 " to lose and forego from 
them these names that they now have as Dukes, and the 
worship and the dignity thereof." e 

Thomas Plantagenet, 2nd son of King Henry IV. ; created Earl 
of Albemarle and Duke of Clarence, "9 July 1411 ; K.G. ; slain 
at the battle of Baugy, 1421, s. p., when his honours became 
Extinct. 

Richard Beauchamp, XIV. 12th Earl of Warwick ; created Earl 
of Albemarle for life by King Hen. VI. ; f K.G. ; ob. 1439, when 
this Earldom became again Extinct. 



Dukes. 

I. 1385. 



II. 1397. 



IX. 1411. 



1423. 



c John Prior of Hexham, the eontinnator 
of the Monk of Durham, says that King Ste- 
phen, elated at his success after the battle of 
the Standard, 1138, made William de Albe- 
marle " Comitem in Eboraci seiria ;" he ap- 
pears to have been one of the " Pseudo Co- 
mites" of King Stephen's making, whom 



Hen. II., his successor, would not recognise. 
Vide Selden, cap. v. pt, 2. 

d Hoveden says he was Earl of Albemarle 
" dono Ricardi Regis Anglias et duxit in 
uxorem Comitissam Albemarlia3." 

e Rot. Pari. vol. iii. p. 452. 

f He styled himself, 14 Mar. 1423 (Pat. 



ALBINI. 21 



Dukes. 



III. 1660. 1. George Monck ; created Baron Monck of Potheridge, Beauchamp, 

and Teyes, Earl of Torrington, all co. Devon, and Duke of 
Albemarle, 7 July 1660 ; K.G. ; ob. 1670. 

IV. 1670. 2. Christopher Monck, s. and h. ; K.G. ; ob. in Jamaica, 1688, 

s. p., when all bis honours became Extinct. 
Earls. 

XI. 1696-7. 1. Arnold Joost Von Keppel ; created Baron Ashford of Ashford, 

co. Kent, Viscount Bury, co. Lane, and Earl of Albemarle, 
10 Feb. 1696-7 ; K.G. ; ob. 1718. 

XII. 1718. 2. William Anne Keppel, s. and h., K.G., K.B. ; ob. 1754. 

XIII. 1754. 3. George Keppel, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1772. 

XIV. 1772. 4. William Charles Keppel, s. and h. ; ob. 30 Oct, 1849. 

XV. 1849. 5. Augustus Frederick Keppel, s. and h. ; ob. s. p. 15 Mar. 1851. 

XVI. 1851. 6. George Thomas Keppel, bro. and h., present Earl of Albe- 

marle, Viscount Bury, and Baron Ashford. =p 

Y 

ALBIiNT. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. William de Albini, surnamed " Pincerna," being styled " Pin- 

cerna Henrici Kegis Anglorum." 

II. Hen. I. 2. William de Albini, s. and h., became possessed of the Castle of 

Arundel, and was styled Earl of Arundel. — Vide Arundel. 

I. Steph. 1. Nigel de Albini, younger brother of William, father of William 

de Albini above named. 

II. Hen. I. 2. Roger de Albini, s. and h., assumed the name of Mowbray. — 

Vide Mowbray. 

ALBINI (of Cainho). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Henry de Albini, supposed to have been a younger son of Nigel, 
brother of Roger, who assumed the name of Mowbray ; ob. . . . 
Robert de Albini, s. and h. ; ob. 1192. 
Robert de Albini, s. and h. ; ob. 1224. 

Robert de Albini, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1233, s. p., when his 3 
sisters became bis heirs, viz. : — 1. Isabel, m. 1st William de Hocton, and 
2ndly Drogo de Pratellis ; 2. Asselina, m. Ralph de St. Amand ; 3. Joan, 
ob. s. p. 

ALBIKT (of Belvoir). 

I. Will. II. 1. William de Albini, sumamed Brito, Lord of Belvoir Castle, 
supposed to have been s. and h. of Robert de Todeni, Lord of 
Belvoir ; ob. circa 1155. 

2. William de Albini, s. and h. ; ob. 1167. 

3. William de Albini, s. and h. He was one of the celebrated 25 
Barons appointed to enforce the observance of Magna Charta ; 
ob. 1236. 

4. William de Albini, s. and h. ; ob. 1285, s. p. m., when Isabel, 
his daughter, or, as some authorities state, bis sister, wife of William tie 
Roos, became his heir. 

Roll. 25 Hen. VI. pt. 1, m. 15), "Ricardus i Rothomagi et Calesie :" the enrolment of 
de Bello Campo Comes Warrewiehir et the patent of the Earldom of Albemarle is 
Albemarle, dominus de Insula, Capitaneus not to be found. 



H. 


Hen. H. 2. 


III. 


Rich. I. 3. 


IV. 


Hen. III. 4. 



II. 


Hen. 


II. 


III. 


Hen 


,11. 


IV. 


Hen. 


III. 



22 ALBINI — ALVANLEY. 



ALBINI. Vide Daubeney. 



ALDBOEOUGH. 
Bakony, 7 April, 1722— Extinct 1778. — Vide Walsingham. 

ALDEBTJRGH. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1371. William be Aldeburgh; summ. to Pari, from 8 Jan. 44 Edward 
III. 1371, to 8 Aug. 10 Kich. II. 1386 ; ob. 1388. William de Aldeburgh, 
his son and heir, was upwards of 30 at his father's death, but was never 
summ. to Pari.; he died s. P. 20 Aug. 1391, leaving his two sisters his 
heirs, viz. : — Elizabeth, widow of Sir Bryan Stapilton, then jet. 28, and 
who married 2ndly Edward Kedman; and Sybilla, wife of William de 
Kyther, then set. 25 ; and between their descendants and representatives 
this Barony is in Abeyance. 



ALDEKUEY. 
Bakony, 27 July 1726— Extinct 17G5.— Vide Cumberland. 

ALDITHLEY, vel AUDLEY. Vide Audley. 

ALFORD. 

Barony, 24 Dec. 1698— Extinct 1754.— Vide Grantham. 
Viscounty, 27 Nov. 1815. — Vide Brownlow. 

ALINGTON. 

Barons. 

I. 1682. 1. William Alington, 2nd Baron Alington in Ireland; created 

5 Dec. 1682 Baron Alington of Wymondley, co. Herts ; ob. 1684. 

II. 1684. 2. Giles Alington, s. and h. ; ob. 1691 a minor and s. p., when the 

title became Extinct. 

ALTHOBPE. 

Viscounty, 1 Nov. 1765.— Vide Spencer. 

ALTON. 

Marquessate, 30 April 1694.— Extinct 1718.— Vide Shrewsbury. 

ALVANLEY. 

Barons. 

I. 1801. 1. Kichard Pepper Arden ; created Baron Alvanley of Alvanley 

co. Chester, 22 May 1801 ; ob. 1804. 

II. 1804. 2. William Alvanley, s. and h. ; ob. 9 Nov. 1849. 

HI. 1849. 3. Richard Pepper Arden, bro. and h., present Baron Alvanley. = 



AMESBURY — ANDOVEH. 23 



AMESBUEY. 
Baron. 

I. 1832. 1. Charles Dundas ; created Baron Amesbury of Kintbury Ames- 
bury, and Barton Court, co. Berks, and Aston Hall, co. Flint, 1G May 
1832 ; ob. 7 July following s. p., wben the title became Extinct. 



AMHERST (of Holmesdale ). 
Baron. 

1776. 1. Sir Jeffrey Amherst, K.B., created Baron Amherst of Holmes- 
dale, co. Kent, 20 May 1776 ; ob. s. p. 1797, when the title became 
Extinct. 



AMHERST (of Montreal). 
Barons. 

I. 1788. 1. Sir Jeffrey Amherst above named, was further created 6 Sept. 

1788 Baron Amherst of Montreal, co. Kent, with remainder, 
failing his issue male, to his nephew William Pitt Amherst ; 
ob. s. p. 1797. 

Earl. 

II. 1797. — I. 1826. 2. William Pitt Amherst, neph. and h. being s. and h. 

of William Amherst, bro. of the last Baron. Created Viscount Holmes- 
dale, co. Kent, and Earl Amherst of Arracan, in the East Indies, 19 Dec. 
1826 ; present Baron Amherst of Montreal, Viscount Holmesdale, and Earl 
Amherst. =p 

ANC ASTER and KE STEVEN". 
Dukes. 

I. 1715. 1. Robert Bertie, 4th Earl and 1st Marquess of Lindsey, and XIV. 

Baron Willoughby of Eresby ; created Duke of Ancaster and 
Kesteven 26 July 1715, with remainder, failing the heirs male of 
his body, to the heirs male of the body of Robert late Earl of 
Lindsey, his father, by Elizabeth his wife, dau. of Philip Lord 
Wharton ; ob. 1723. 

II. 1723. 2. Peregrine Bertie, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. by writ 6 Mar. 

1714, as Baron Willoughby de Eresby ; ob. 1742. 

III. 1742. 3. Peregrine Bertie, s. and h. ; ob. 1778. 

IV. 1778. 4. Robert Bertie, s. and h. ; ob. 1779, s. p., leaving his sisters his 

heirs, between whom the Barony of Willoughby of Eresby fell 
into Abeyance. 

V. 1779. 5. Brownlow Bertie, uncle and h. being 2nd son of Peregrine, 2nd 

Duke ; ob. 8 Feb. 1809, s. p. M., when the Dukedoms of Ancaster and 
Kesteven and the Marquessate of Lindsey became Extinct. 



AND OVER. 

Viscount. 
1622. 1. Thomas Howard, 2nd son of Thomas, VIII. 1st Earl of Suffolk ; 
created Baron Howard of Charleton, co. Wilts, and Viscount Andover, co. 
Hants, 23 Jan. 1622 ; created Earl of Berkshire 7 Feb. 1625-6.— Vide 
Berkshire. 



IV. 


1686. 


2. 


V. 


1690. 


3. 


VI. 


1702. 


4. 


VII. 


1710. 


5. 


VIII. 


1737. 


6. 



24 ANGLESEY — ANGUS. 



ANGLESEY. 

Earls. 

I. 1623. 1. Christopher Villiers, 3rd son of Sir George Villiers, by Mary 

Countess of Buckingham ; created Baron Villiers of Daventry, 
co. Northampton, and Earl of Anglesey in Wales, 18 April 
1623 ; ob. 3 April 1630. 

II. 1630. 2. Charles Villiers, s. and h. ; ob. 1660, s. p., when his honours 

became Extinct. 

III. 1661. 1. Arthur Annesley, 2nd Viscount Valentia in Ireland ; created 

Baron Annesley of Newport Pagnel, co. Buckingham, and Earl 
of Anglesey in Wales, 20 April 1661 ; ob. 1686. 

James Annesley, s. and h. ; ob. 1690. 

James Annesley, s. and h. ; ob. 1702, s. p. m. 

John Annesley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1710, s. p. 
5. Arthur Annesley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1737, s. P. 

Eichard Annesley, 5th Baron Altham in Ireland, cousin and h., 
being son and ultimately heir of Bichard 3rd Baron Altham, 
3rd son of Arthur, III. 1st Earl ; ob. 1761, leaving a son, 
Arthur, of the legitimacy of whose birth there is some doubt, 
although on coming of age he was summ. to the Irish Pari, as 
Viscount Valentia; but on his petitioning the Crown for a 
Writ of Summons to the Parliament of Great Britain as Earl of 
Anglesey and Baron Annesley, the question of his birth was 
referred to the House of Peers, who decided, 22 April 1771, by 
a majority of one (13 Peers being present) that the claimant 
had no right to the titles, honours, and dignities claimed by his pe- 
tition. It is however to be observed that, notwithstanding this 
decision, the House of Peers of Ireland afterwards solemnly 
adjudged that he was born in lawful wedlock. In 1793 he was 
created Earl of Mountuorris, in Ireland, and the title of Angle- 
sey has since been conferred on, 
Marquesses. 

I. 1815. 1. Henry William Paget, 2nd Earl of Uxbridge ; created Mar- 

quess of Anglesey, 4 July 1815 ; K.G., G.C.B. ; ob. 28 Apr. 
1854. 

II. 1854. 2. Henrv Paget, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ, 15 Jan. 1833, 

and placed in his father's Barony of Paget of Beaudesert, co. Staff. ; present 
Marquess of Anglesey, Earl of Uxbridge, Baron Paget of Beaudesert, and a 
Bart, of Ireland. =p 

ANGUS. 

Gilbert de Umfrevill was made Governor of the territory of Angus in Scotland by 
King Edw. I. circ. 1291, and 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, was summ. to Pari, 
as " Gilberto de Umfrevill, Comiti de Anggos," and like summonses were 
issued to his son and grandson until 26 Aug. 4 Bich. II. 1380. — Vide Umfrevill. 
Dugdale states that he was summoned in virtue of his Barony of Prudhoe, co. 
Northumberland ; but by the late Francis Townsend, Esq., Windsor Herald, the 
writ of 25 Edw. I. (1297) was considered to have created an English Earldom, 
and certainly he and his descendants are always summoned with other Earls ; 
but the Editor is of opinion that no such English Earldom was intended to have 
been created, but that the King, having in 1296 seized upon the sovereignty of 
Scotland, did, in directing summons to his Baron Gilbert de Umfreville in the 
following year, allow to him, in the way of courtesy, that title which had by 



ANNESLEY — AQUILA. 25 

marriage or otherwise been acquired in Scotland ; he was therefore summoned 
as a Baron, though by the appellation of an Earl : and it may be added, in con- 
firmation of the opinion that no English Earldom was intended to be created, 
that Henry de Beaumont, having married Alice, daughter and heir of Alex- 
ander Comyn Earl of Buchan, was summoned to Parliament from 1334 till his 
decease, 1340, as " Henrico de Bello Monte Comiti de Boghan," but that his son 
and heir, John Beaumont, having lost the Buchan property in Scotland, was no 
longer summoned by the title of Buchan, but by that of Beaumont only. 



AUTSTESLEY. 
Barony. 

20 April 1661. — Presumed to have become Extinct in 1761. — Vide Anglesey. 



ANSON. 

Baron. 

I. 1747. George Anson ; created Lord Anson, Baron of Soberton, co. South- 
ampton, 13 June 1747 ; ob. 1762, s. p., when the title became Extinct. 
Viscounts. 

I. 1806. 1. Thomas Anson, s. and h. of George Adams (assumed the name of) 

Anson, eldest son of George Adams, Esq., by Janetta, sister of 
the last Baron ; created Viscount Anson of Shugborough and 
Orgrave, co. Stafford, and Baron Soberton of Soberton, co. South- 
ampton, 17 Eeb. 1806 ; ob. 31 July 1818. 

II. 1818. 2. Thomas William Anson, s. and h., created Earl of Lichfield, 15 Sept. 

1831. — Vide Lichfield. 



AP ADAM. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1299. 1. f John Ap Adam ; summ. to Pari, from 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, to 
12 Dec. 3 Edw. II. 1309 ; he was likewise summ. 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 
1297, but for the reasons assigned under " FitzJohn " there is some doubt 
if that writ can be considered as a regular summons to Parliament ; ob. 
circa 1309, leaving Thomas his son and heir, who became of age in 1324 ; 
he was living 1330, but neither he nor his descendants were ever summ. to 
Pari. 

APSLEY. 
Baron. 

I. 1771. 1. Henry Bathurst, s. and h. apparent of Allen, 1st Earl Bathurst ; 
created Lord Apsley, Baron of Apsley, co. Sussex, 24 Jan. 1771 ; succeeded 
as 2nd Earl Bathurst. — Vide Bathurst. 



AQUILA. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Gilbert de Aquila, Lord of Pevensey, called the Honour of the 
Eagle, co. Sussex, by grant of King Hen. I. ; ob. 1120. 

2. Richer de Aquila, s. and h. ; ob. 1176. 

3. Gilbert de Aquila, s. and h. ; ob. 1204. 

4. Gilbert de Aquila, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1231. This Baron 
Forfeited all his lands for going into Normandy without the King's 
license, and in 1231 an extent of his lands was ordered to be made for the 
purpose of assigning reasonable dower to Isabel his widow. 



II. 


Hen. I. 


ill. 


lien. 11. 


IV. 


John. 



26 ARCEDEKNE — ARKLOW. 

v ,„ . ARCEDEKITE. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1321. l. Thomas le Arcedekne ; summ. to Tarl. from 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 

1321, to 13 Sept. 18 Edw. II. 1324 ; ob. 1329. 

II. 1342. 2. John le 'Arcedekne, s. and h., aet. 25, 1329; summ. to Pari. 

25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342, but' never afterwards ; ob leaving a son 

and beir, Warine le Arcedekne, wbo died s. p. M. in tbe 2 Hen. IV. (1400-1) 
leaving Alianore, wife of Walter de Lucy ; Pbilippa, of Hugb Courtenay ; 
and Margaret, of Thomas Arundel, his daughters and heirs, amongst whose 
representatives this Barony is probably in Abeyance. 



1. 



ARCHER. 

Barons. 

1747. 1. Thomas Archer; created Lord Archer, Baron of Umberslade, co. 
Warwick, 14 July 1747 ; ob. 1768. 
II. 1768. 2. Andrew Archer, s. and h. ; ob. 1778, s. p. m., when the title became 
Extinct. 

AEDEN. 
Barons. 

I. 1802. 1. Charles George Perceval, half-brother of John James 3rd Earl 

of Egmont in Ireland, and 2nd Baron Lovel and Holland in 
England ; succeeded his mother as Baron Arden in Ireland, 1784 ; 
created Baron Arden of Arden, co. Warwick, 28 July 1802 ; ob. 
5 July 1840. 

II. 1840. 2. George James Perceval, s. and h., succeeded his cousin Henry 

Frederick John James as Baron Lovel and Holland, 23 Dec. 1841 : present 
Baron Lovel and Holland and Baron Arden ; also Earl of Egmont, Baron 
Arden, &c. in Ireland. = 

ARDROSSAN. 

Barons. 

I. 1806. 1. Hugh Montgomerie, 12th Earl of Eglinton, in Scotland ; created 

Baron Ardrossan of Ardrossan, co. Ayr, 21 Feb. 1806 ; K.T. ; 
ob. 1819. ' 

II. 1819. 2. Archibald William Montgomerie, grands, and h., being s. and h. 

of Archibald (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Baron; present Baron 
Ardrossan and Earl of Eglinton in Scotland ; K.T., P.C. &c. =;= 

t 

. m ARGENTINE. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. Reginald de Argentine ; ob. ante 1139 ; to whom succeeded, 

II. Rich. I. Reginald de Argentine ; ob. ante 1223 ; his successor was, 

III. Hen. III. Richard de Argentine ; ob. 1246. 

IV. Hen. III. Giles de Argentine, s. and h. ; ob. 1283. 

V. Edw. I. Reginald de Argentine, s. and h. ; summ. 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 

1297, but for the reasons assigned under " Fitzjohn," it is doubtful if that 
writ can be considered as a regular summ. to Pari. ; ob. 1307, leaving as. and 
h. John de Argentine, who died 6 Rich. II. (1382-3) s. p. m. l., leaving 3 
daughters and coheirs :— 1. Joan, wife of Sir Bartholomew Maunton ; 2. Eliz., 
wife of Sir Baldwin St. George ; 3. Maud, Avife of Ivo FitzWarin, between 
whose descendants the dignity, if any were created, fell into Abeyance. 

ARKLOW. 

Barony, 27 November 1801.— Vide Sussex. 



ARLINGTON — ARUNDEL. 



27 



Barons. Earls. 

I. (1664.— I. 1672. 
11672. 



ARLINGTON". 



Henry Bennet, brother of John Baron Ossulston ; created 
Baron Arlington of Arlington, co. Middlesex, with re- 
mainder, failing his issue male, to the heirs of his body, 
14 Mar. 1664 ;s created Baron Arlington aforesaid, Vis- 
count Thetford, co. Norfolk, and Earl of Arlington 
aforesaid, to him and the heirs of his body, and for 
default of such issue to Sir John Bennet, K.B. (his 
brother) and the heirs male of his body, 22 April 1672 ; 
K.G. ; ob. 1685, s. p. m. 
II. 1685.— II. 1685. 2. Isabella, dau. and h., wife of Henry 1st Duke of Grafton ; 

K.G. ; ob. 1723. 

Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton, s. and h. — Vide 

and 



III 



1723.— III. 1723. 

Grafton, in which title the dignities of Earl and Baron 
Viscount Thetford are merged. 



Arlington 



ARSIC. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Manasser Arsic ; living 1103. 

II. Hen. I. 2. Robert Arsic, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

III. Steph. 3. Manasser Arsic, s. and h. ; living 1167. 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Alexander Arsic, s. and h. ; living 1196. 

V. Rich. 5. John Arsic, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1205, s. p. 

VI. John 6. Robert Arsic, bro. and h. ; ob. circa 1230, leaving his 2 daugh- 

ters his heirs : — Joan, wife of Eustace de Greinville, and after of 

Simeon ; and Alice, wife of Thomas de Haye. 



ARUNDEL. 

Roger de Montgomery, the " Comes Rogerus " of the Domesday Survey, was 
the son of Hugh, Count of Montgomery in Normandy, and nearly allied to 
William Duke of Normandy, whom he accompanied to England, commanding 
the centre of the invading army at the battle of Hastings ; he was rewarded by 
his kinsman with vast grants of land in several counties, particularly in Sussex, 
where he had 77 lordships (including the Castle of Arundel and city of Chi- 
chester), and in Shropshire, where he obtained nearly the whole county, so 
that his power there was sufficiently extensive to obtain for him the dignity of 
an Earl Palatine ; but within the county of Sussex the title of " Comes," by 
which he was known, was derived neither from Chichester nor Arundel, but 
from his possessions within the county of Salop, if not, with greater probability, 
from his Norman rank alone. ( Vide observations under Albemarle.) Upon 
the forfeiture of Robert de Belesme (son of Roger) in 1102, the Castle of 
Arundel fell to the Crown, and was by the King settled in dower upon his 
second wife, Adeliza, who, upon her re-marriage, conveyed her interest therein 
to William de Albini, Lord of Buckenham in Norfolk. 

In the elaborate discussion of the title of Earl of Arundel by the Lords' Com- 
mittees in their Reports upon the Dignity of a Peer, it has been doubted whether 
even the Earldom of Arundel was ever possessed by the family of Albini, as a 
title of dignity, and it will perhaps ever remain questionable whether it may 



K Dugdale in his MS. additions to his 
Baronage, states that this Patent was sur- 
rendered before the granting of that of 



1G72 ; but this is a mistake, as he is styled 
a Daron in the second Patent. 



28 



ARUNDEL. 



not have been attributed to the Albinis in the same manner as their residence 
at Strighull or Chepstow was the occasion of the Earls of Pembroke being called 
Earls of those Castles, or their possession of the Castle of Tutbury gave a like 
designation to the Earls of Derby. Historians and numerous contemporary 
evidences have, however, constantly styled the family of Albini by the title of 
Earls of Arundel, and they could not with propriety be omitted in this place ; 
nevertheless, it must be observed that the assertion made, upon the claim of 
John Earl of Arundel (temp. Hen. VL), that the dignity of Earl of Arundel 
had been constantly and invariably enjoyed by the Lords of the Castle of 
Arundel, cannot, under any circumstances, be maintained. 

Earls. 

I. 1155. 1. William de Albini, Lord of Buckenham, co. Norf., s. and h. of 

William de Albini, " Pincerna Regis ;" by his marriage with 
Adeliza, Queen Dowager of England, acquired the Castle of 
Arundel, which she held in dower, and King Hen. II. gave to 
him, by charter dated 1st year of his reign (1155) the Castle 
of Arundel, with the whole Honour of Arundel and its appurts., 
together with the 3rd penny of the county of Sussex, " undo 
Comes est ;" he became thereby Earl of Sussex, but is also 
styled in charters Earl of Arundel and Earl of Chichester. h 
He died 1176, and upon his death his castles and honours 
passed into the King's hands. 

II. 1189. 2. William de Albini, s. and h., Earl of Sussex; obtained from 

the King (1177) a restoration of the county of Sussex, and, 
1 Rich. I. (1189) a grant of the Castle and Honour of Arundel, 
with the 3rd penny of the pleas, in the precise words of the 
grant made to his father ; ob. 1196. 

III. 1196. 3. William de Albini, s. and h., Earl of Sussex ; ob. in Italy on 

his journey home from Damietta, 1221. 

IV. 1221. 4. William de Albini, s. and h., Earl of Sussex;' ob. s. p. 1224, 

according to the Dunstable Register, or 1233, according to other 
authorities. 



V. 



Hugh de Albini, bro. and h., Earl of Sussex ; ob. s. p. 1243, 
when his extensive inheritance was divided between his 4 sisters 
and co-heirs, or their issue ; and to John Fitz-Alan, Lord of 
Clun and Oswaldestre, son of John Fitz-Alan, by Isabel de 
Albini, 2nd dau. of William 3rd Earl, was awarded the Castle 
and Manor of Arundel by a writ dated 27 Nov. following ; 
but, although he lived till 1268, 23 years after the partition, he 
never had the title of Earl of Arundel, and is indeed expressly 
called " Dominus de Arundel," or Lord of the Honour of 
Arundel, in an Inspeximus 2 Edw. I. (1273-4), and in several 
other instruments is ranked amongst the Barons of the king- 
dom. In the inquisition taken upon his decease, 52 Hen. III. 
(1268), John " fil. dni Joins. Alani," is found to be his heir. 



h Dugdale, speaking of this Earl, vol. i. 
p. 119, says: — " In the reign of Henry he 
did not only obtain the castle and honour of 
Arundel to himself and his heirs, but a con- 
firmation of the Earldom of Sussex (for 
though the title of Kail was most known by 
Arundel and Chichester, at which places his 
chief residence used to be, yet it was of the 
county of Sussex that he was really Earl) 
by the Tertium Denarium of the Pleas of 
Sussex granted to him, which was the usual 
way of investing such great men (in ancient 



times) with the possession of any earldom, 
after those ceremonies of girding with the 
sword and putting on the robes performed, 
which have ever, till of late, been thought 
essential to their creation." 

1 In his father's Confirmation Charter to 
Robertsbridge (Dugd. Mon. ii. 120) he signs 
himself son to the 3rd Earl of Sussex, and 
in a Charter of King Hen. III. (a° 12 m. 6) 
he is called " Willielmus comes Sussex quar- 
tus.." 



ARUNDEL. 



90 



John Fitz-Alan, Lord of Chin and Oswaldestre, and of Arundel, 
was set. 22 years at his father's decease, and was never known 
as Earl of Arundel ; and it is incredible that if he had ever 
borne that title, as annexed to the Castle and Honour, the fact 
would have been omitted in the inquisition, which finds him to 
have died seised 56 Hen. III. (1272) of that Castle and Honour 
Earls. held by the 4th part of a Barony. 

VI. 1289. 1. Richard Fitz-Alan, s. and h., set. 5 years at his father's decease, 

56 Hen. III. (1272), is presumed to have become Earl of 
Arundel between 17 and 20 Edw. I. k In 1289, 17-18 Edw. I. 
(says Glover, in his ' Catalogue of the Earls of Arundel'), he was 
knighted (being then just of age) and received the sword of 
the county of Sussex from King Edw. I., " tit vocatur Comes" 
The Earldom of Sussex must at this period have been a subject 
of contention between the De Warrens and Fitz-Alans, for 
Jolm de Warren Earl of Surrey was receiving, at the very 
time that this investiture occurred, writs directed to him as 
" Earl of Sussex." John de Warren was perhaps the greatest 
noble of the time in which he lived, and his power and influ- 
ence may have operated to induce Fitz-Alan to abandon his 
claim upon the Earldom of Sussex, and to adopt that by which 
his descendants have ever since been known ; for in the 20 
Edw. I. (1291-2) we find him summoned by two different 
writs as Earl of Arundel (Placita de quo Warranto, 681), and 
in the Roll of Writs, tested 24 June, 23 Edw. I. 1295 a writ 
of summons to Parliament appears to have been addressed to 
him as " Rico. fil. Alani Com. Arundell," ranking him as junior 
to all the other Earls. Ob. 1302. 

VII. 1302. 2. Edmund Fitz-Alan, s. and h. ; summ. to Pari, as Earl of 

Arundel, 3 Nov. 34 Edw. I. 1306 ; beheaded 1326, and being 
attainted, his honours became Forfeited. After his decease 
the King gave the title and honour of Arundel to Edmond 
Plantagenet Earl of Kent, but it may not be presumed that 
the grant to the Earl of Kent made him Earl of Arundel, or 
that the restoration of the Castle and lands to Richard, s. and 
h. of Edmond, made him Earl of Arundel either : inasmuch as 
there was in the Act of Restoration a special provision applying 
to the title of Earl of Arundel as a name of dignity, and which 
would have been unnecessary had the restitution of the Castle 
and Honour been considered as sufficient. 

VIII. 1331. 3. Richard Fitz-Alan, s. and h., fully restored in blood and honours 

4 Edw. III. (1331.) This Richard by a fine, levied 23 Edw. III. 
(1349-50), and in pursuance of an entail previously executed, 
settled the Castle, Town, and Manor of Arundel, to hold the 
same to himself for life, remainder to Eleanor his wife for life, 
with remainder to the heirs male of his body by the said 
Eleanor. Ob. 1376. 

IX. 1376. 4. Richard Fitz-Alan, s. and h., K.G. ; beheaded 1397, and, 

being attainted, his honours became Forfeited. 

X. 1400. 5. Thomas Fitz-Alan, s. and h., restored in blood and honours, and 

his father's attainder reversed, 1 Hen. IV. (1400) ; K.G. ; ob. 
s. p. 1415. 

XL 1415. 6. John Fitz-Alan, Baron Maltravers, cousin and heir male, being 
s. and h. of John (ob. v. p.), eldest son of John Fitz-Alan 



k It may not be unworthy of observation 
in connection with the Creation of the Earl- 
dom of Arundel in the Fitz-Alan family, that 



the Countess Isabel, widow of Hugh 5th Earl 
of Susses, died 1282. 



30 



ARUNDEL. 



Earls. 

Baron Maltravers, jure uxoris, 2nd son of Richard, VIII. 3rd 
Earl of Arundel ; succeeded to the possession of the Castle of 
Arundel by virtue of the entail above referred to, but he does 
not appear to have assumed the title, nor was he summoned to 
Parliament by that or any other ; ob. 1421. 

XII. 1421. 7. John Fitz-Alan, s. and h., K.G. ; created Duke of Touraine 

in France by the Regent Bedford, and suinm. to Pari. 7 Hen. 
VI. (1429) as " John de Arundell de Arundell Chevalier ;" in 
11 Hen. VI. (1433) he petitioned to be summ. to Pari, and 
considered as Earl of Arundel, " a dignity or name united and 
annexed to the Castle and Lordship of Arundel, for time 
whereof memory of man was not to the contrary " — a peculiar 
and distinct claim (as stated in the First Report on the Dignity 
of a Peer, page 406), not connected with any general, but 
asserting a special right, and which, being founded on pre- 
scription, was to be supported by evidence of constant and 
immemorial enjoyment of the asserted right, which right if 
not shown to have been so constantly enjoyed, the title by 
prescription failed. This claim, though opposed by John 
Mowbray Duke of Norfolk, was admitted by the Crown, not- 
withstanding that the assertion of the constant annexation of 
the title to the Castle of Arundel could not (as it has been 
already shown) have been sustained, had it been (which it was 
not) made the subject of inquiry. Ob. (a prisoner of war at 
Beauvais, in France) 1435. 

XIII. 1435. 8. Humphrey Fitz-Alan, s. and h., Duke of Touraine, in France ; 

ob. a minor, 1438, s. p., when the Dukedom of Touraine became 
extinct. 

XIV. 1438. 9. William Fitz-Alan, uncle and h., 1 being next brother of John, 

XII. 7th Earl ; K.G. ; ob. 1488. 

XV. 1488. 10. Thomas Fitz-Alan, s. and h. ; E.G., summ. to Pari. v. p. as 

Th. Arundell de Maltravers, 15 Nov. 22 Edw. IV. 1482 ; ob. 
1524. 

XVI. 1524. 11. William Fitz-Alan, s. and h. ; K.G. ; ob. 1544. 

XVII. 1544. 12. Henry Fitz-Alan, s. and h., K.G. ; summ. to Pari. v. p. as 

Baron Maltravers, 5 Feb. 24 Hen. VIII. 1533; ob. 1580, 

S. P. M. 

XVIII. 1580. 13. Philip Howard, grandson and h., being s. and h. of Thomas, X. 

4th Duke of Norfolk (who was attainted in 1572), by Mary 
Fitz-Alan, dau. and eventually sole heir of the last Earl ; 
summ. to Pari, as Earl of Arundel, 16 Jan. 22 Eliz. 1580 ; 
he married Ann, eldest sister and coheir of George Lord Dacre 
of Gillesland, and coheir of the Barony of Greystock ; ob. 1595, 
but having been attainted in 1589 his honours had become 
Forfeited, 



1 It was not till the 3rd Dec. 1441, eight 
years after the decision of 11th Hen. VI. 
1433, that the inheritor of the Castle of 
Arundel was summoned to Pari, by that 
title ; which probably arose from this cir- 
cumstance, that at the time of that deci- 
sion John Earl of Arundel was engaged in 
the wars of France, and continued to be 
so until his death, which happened with- 
in two years afterwards ; Humphrey, his 
son and heir, died in 1437, then only ten 



years of age, and was succeeded by William, 
his uncle and heir, who was accordingly 
summ. to Pari, as Earl of Arundel. Not- 
withstanding what has been observed, that 
John Fitz-Alan, who succeeded in 1415, was 
not admitted to this Earldom, it is manifest 
he was generally styled Earl of Arundel, for 
Alice his widow in her will describes herself 
as " Countess of Arundel," and speaks of her 
late husband, "John Earl of Arundel." 



ARUNDEL. 31 

Earls. 

XIX. 1604. 14. Thomas Howard, s. and h., restored in blood, and to such 

honours as Philip his father enjoyed ; also as Earl of Surrey, 
and to such Baronies as Thomas Duke of Norfolk his grand- 
father lost by attainder, 1604. By Act of Parliament, 3 Car. I. 
anno 1627, the Earldom of Arundel, to which by the same Act 
the Baronies of Fitz-Alan of dun and Oswaldestre, and Mal- 
travers, were annexed, was settled on this Earl of Arundel and 
the heirs male of his body, failing which, on the heirs of his 
body ; in default of which, to his uncle, Lord William Howard, 
and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to the heirs of 
his body ; remainder to the said Thomas Earl of Arundel and 
Surrey and his heirs for ever. Created Earl of Norfolk 6 June, 
1644 ; K.G. ; Earl Marshal ; ob. at Padua, 1646. 

XX. 1646. 15. Henry Frederick Howard, s. and h., Earl of Arundel, Surrey, 

and Norfolk ; summ. to Pari. v. p. as Baron Mowbray and Mal- 
travers, 21 Mar. 1639 ; ob. 1652. 

XXI. 1652. 16. Thomas Howard, s. andh., Earl of Arundel, Surrey, and Norfolk ; 

restored to the Dukedom of Norfolk by an Act of Parliament passed 29 
Dec. 1660, in which dignity the Earldom of Arundel and the Baronies 
above mentioned, agreeably to the Act of Parliament 3 Carl. L, have since 
been merged, and which honours, together with the Earldoms of Surrey 
and Norfolk, are now vested in his Grace Henry Granville, the present 
Duke of Norfolk, and XXX. 25th Earl of Arundel, Earl Marshal, &c— 
Vide Norfolk. 

ARUNDEL. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1377. I.^John Fitz-Alan,™ or de Arundel ; summ. to Pari, from 4 Aug. 

1 Rich. II. 1377, to 20 Oct. 3 Rich. II. 1379, as " Johanni de 
Arundel." He married Eleanor, grand-dau. and h. of John 
Baron Maltravers, in consequence of which marriage he was 
probably summ. to Pari. ; ob. 1379. 

II. 1379. 2. John Fitz-Alan, or de Arundel, s. and h., set. 15, 1379 ; was 

never summ. to Pari., but being heir male of Thomas Fitz-Alan 
X. 5th Earl of Arundel, he succeeded to the possession of the 
Castle of Arundel, although he was never summ. to Pari, either 
as Earl of Arundel or by any other title ; ob. 1421. 

III. 1421. 3. John Fitz-Alan, or de Arundel, s. and h., set. 15 ; summ. to 

Pari. 12 July and 3 Aug. 7 Hen. VI. 1429, as " Johanni de Arundell de 
Anmdell, Chev." In 11 Hen. VI. (1433) he petitioned to be considered 
as Earl of Arundel by tenure of the Castle of Arundel, which was allowed 
(vide Arundel, Earl), but he was never summ. to Pari, afterwards, either 
as a Baron or as an Earl ; ob. 1435, when he was succeeded by his son 
Humphrey set. 7, who dying in 1438, s. P., William, his uncle and heir, suc- 
ceeded in the Earldom, and, 3 Dec. 20 Hen. VI. 1441, was summ. to 
Pari, as Earl of Arundel. If the writ of summons of 4 Aug. 1 Rich. II. 
1377, be not considered as a summons to John de Arundel jure uxoris as 
Baron Maltravers, but as creating a new dignity, this Barony is now in 
abeyance between the Lords Petre and Stourton, as heirs general of the said 
John de Arundel, and which would also be the case if he was summoned in 
the Barony of Maltravers, had it not been for the Act of Pari. 3 Car. I. 
which limited the descent of that dignity in a special manner, an account of 
which will be found under Maltravers. 

m This family affords a singular instance of the name of the dignity being adopted as the 
general surname of all the branches. 



32 ARUNDELL — ASHBURTON. 



AEUNDELL (of Wardour). 
Barons. 

I. 1605. 1. Thomas Arundell ; created Baron Arandell of Wardour, co. 

Wilts, 4 May 1605 ; ob. 1639. 

II. 1639. 2. Thomas Arundell, s. and h. ; ob. 1643. 

III. 1643. 3. Henry Arundell, s. and h. ; ob. 1694. 
IY. 1694. 4. Thomas Arundell, s. and h. ; ob. 1712. 

V. 1712. 5. Henry Arundell, s. and h. ; ob. 1726. 

VI. 1726. 6. Henry Arundell, s. and b. ; ob. 1746. 

VII. 1746. 7. Henry Arundell, s. and b. ; ob. 1756. 

VIII. 1756. 8. Henry Arundell, s. and b. ; ob. 4 Dec. 1808, s. p. m. 

IX. 1808. 9. James Everard Arundell, cousin and h., being s. and h. of 

James Everard, 2nd son of Henry 6tb Baron ; ob. 14 July 1817. 

X. 1817. 10. James Everard Arundell, s. and b. ; ob. 21 June 1834, s. p. 

XL 1834. 11. Henry Benedict Arundell, bro. and h. ; present Baron Arun- 
dell of Wardour, and eldest cob. of one moiety of tbe Baronies of Fitz- 
Payne and Kerdeston ; also Count of the Holy Roman Empire. =p 

Y 

ARUNDELL (of Trerice). 
Barons. 

I. 1664. 1. Richard Arundell ; created Baron Arundell of Trerice, co. Corn- 

wall, 23 March 1664 ; ob. 1688. 

II. 1688. 2. John Arundell, s. and h. ; ob. 1697. 

III. 1697. 3. John Arundell, s. and h. ; ob. 1706. 

IV. 1706. 4. John Arundell, s. and h. ; ob. 1768, s. p., when the title became 

Extinct. 

ASCOTT. 



r 



Viscounty, 2 August 1628— Extinct 1709. — Vide Carnarvon. 

ASHBUENHAM. 
Barons. 

I. 1689. 1. John Ashburnham ; created Baron Ashburnbam of Ashburnbam, 

co. Sussex, 20 May 1689 ; ob. 22 Jan. 1710. 

II. 1710. 2. William Ashburnham, s. and b. ; ob. 16 June 1710, s. p. 

Earls. 

III. 1710. — I. 1730. 3. John Ashburnham, bro. and h., created Viscount 

St. Asaph in Wales and Earl of Ashburnbam afore- 
said 14 May 1730 ; ob. 1737. 

IV. 1737. — II. 1737. 4. John Ashburnham, s. and h. ; ob. 8 April 1812. 

V. 1812. — III. 1812. 5. George Ashburnham, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. 

by writ 10 Oct. 1804 as Baron Ashburnham, K.G. ; 
ob. 27 Oct. 1830. 

VI 1830. — IV. 1830. 6. Bertram Ashburnham, s. and h., present Earl of 
Ashburnham, Viscount St. Asaph, and Baron of Ashburnham. =p 

Y 

ASHBURTON". 

Barons. 

I. 1782. 1. John Dunning, created Baron Ashburton of Ashburton, co. 

Devon, 8 April 1782 ; ob. 1783. 

II. 1783. 2. Richard Barre Dunning, s. and b. ; ob. 1823, s. p., when the 

title became Extinct. 



ASHBURTON — ASTLEY. 33 

Barons. 

I. 1835. 1. Alexander Baring (2nd son of Sir Francis Baring, Bart., elder 

brother of Elizabeth, wife of John Dunning 1st Lord Ash- 
burton, and mother of the 2nd and last Lord) ; created Baron 
Ashburton of Ashburton, co. Devon, 10 April 1835 ; ob. 12 May 
1848. 

II. 1848. 2. William Bingham Baring, s. and h. ; present Baron Ash- 

burton. = 

ASHFORD. 

Barony, 10 Feb. 1696-7. — Vide Albemarle. 



Baron. 



ASHLEY. 



1661. 1. Sir Anthony Ashley Cooper, 2nd Bart. ; created Baron Ashley 
of Wimborne St. Giles, co. Dorset, 20 April 1661 ; created Baron Cooper 
and Earl of Shaftesbury, 23 April 1672. — Vide Shaftesbury. 



ASTLEY. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Philip de Estley ; living 1165. 

II. John. 2. Thomas de Astley, s. and h. ; living 1220. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Walter de Astley, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

IY. Hen. III. 4. Thomas de Astley, s. and h. ; slain at the battle of Evesham, 

1264. 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1295. 5. Andrew de Astley, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 23 June, 23 

Edw. I. 1295, to 3 Nov. 34 Edw. I. 1306, but he died in 1300. 

II. 1302. 6. Nicholas de Astley, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 4 July, 30 Edw. 

I. 1302, 11 June, 2 Edw. II. 1309, and 26 Oct. 3 Edw. II. 
1309, ob. . . . s. p. 

in. 1342. 7. Thomas de Astley, nephew and heir, being s. and h. of Giles de 
Astley, next brother of the last Baron ; summ. to Pari, from 25 Feb. 

16 Edw. III. 1342, to 10 March, 23 Edw. III. 1349 ; ob , leaving 

Sir William de Astley his s. and h., who was never summ. to Pari, and 
died s. p. M., leaving Joan his dau. and h. ; she married : 1. Thomas Ealeigh 
of Farnborough, co. Warw., by whom she had no issue ; and 2. Reginald, 
III. Lord Grey of Ruthyn, by whom she had issue Edward de Grey 1st 
Baron Grey of Groby jure uxoris, with which Barony that of Astley 
descended to Henry Grey, X. Baron Grey of Groby (or more properly 
Ferrers of Groby) and Duke of Suffolk, on whose attainder in 1554 this 
Barony with his other honours became Forfeited. — Vide Ferrers of 
Groby. 

ASTLEY (of Reading). 
Barons. 

I. 1644. 1. Jacob Astley, lineally descended from Ralph, 2nd son of Thomas, 
IV. 4th Baron Astley ; created Baron Astley of Reading, co. 
Berks, 4 Nov. 1644 ; ob. 1651. 

II. 1651. 2. Isaac Astley, s. and h. ; ob. 1662. 

in. 1662. 3. Jacob Astley, s. and h. ; ob. 1688, s. p., when the title became 
Extinct. 

D 



I 



34 ATHOL — AUCKLAND. 



ATHOL. 

David de Strabolgi, Earl of Athol (which Earldom, forfeited by his father, had 
been restored to him by King Edw. I. on payment of 5000 marks to Ralph de 
Monthermer, to whom it had been granted), was summ. to Pari. 14 March 
15 Edw. II. 1322, as " David com. Athol," and his son and grandson continued 
to be so summoned till 9 Edw. III. 1369. (Vide Strabolgi.) They must, 
however, be considered as having been summoned as Barons, though by the 
appellation of a Scotch Earldom. Edward de Baliol, King of Scotland, was 
summoned in 1348 as an English Baron, though the writ was addressed " Mag- 
nifico Principi Regi Scotise ;" Henry Lord Bourchier was also summoned by his 
Norman title of Earl of Ewe, 13 Hen. VI. 1435. — Vide Observations under 
" Angus." 

T, U ITT •+ ATON". 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1324. 1. Gilbert de Aton, was found heir to land in Lincoln, which was 

held by William Baron de Vesie of Kildare, 9 Edw. II. 1315, 
and then get. 26 and more ; summ. to Pari. 30 Dec. 18 Edw. II. 
1324 ; 20 Feb. 18 Edw. II. 1325 ; and again 25 Feb. 16 Edw. 
TJI. 1342 ; ob. 1342. 

II. 1371. 2. William de Aton, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 8 Jan. 44 Edw. III. 

1371 ; ob. . . . s. p. m., leaving his three daughters — viz., Anastasia wife of 
Sir Edward de St. John ; Katherine, who married Sir Ralph Eure ; and 
Elizabeth, who married, 1. William Placye, and 2. John Coniers, of Sock- 
burne, co. Durham — his heirs, between whose representatives this Barony is 
in Abeyance. 

In 1814 the representatives of these three coheirs were : — Lord Clifford, 
the Marquess of Salisbury, and Admiral Leveson Gower (of Anastasia) ; 
Sir William Strickland, Bart, (of Katherine) ; and Thomas Stonor, Esq. 
(of Elizabeth). 



AUBENEY vel AUBINX Vide Daubenet. 

Barons by Tenure. ' AUBERVILL. 

I. Will. I. Roger de Aubervill, or Othtjrvill, held divers Lordships in 
Essex and Suffolk. 



I. 


Will. I. 


1 


II. 


Hen. I. 


2 


III. 


Steph. 


3 


IV. 


Hen. II. 


4 


V. 


John. 


5 



William de Aubervill, Lord of Berlai, co. Herts. 
Hugh de Aubervill, s. and h. ; ob. 1139. 
William de Aubervill, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 
Hugh de Aubervill, s. and h. ; ob. 1212. 
William de Aubervill, s. and h. ; ob. s. P. M. temp. John. 
Joan, his dau. and h., married Nicholas de Criol. 

Barons. AUCKLAND. 

I. 1793. 1. William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland in Ireland, created Baron 

Auckland of West Auckland, co. Durham, 22 May 1793 ; ob. 
28 May 1814. 

Earl. 

II. 1814- I. 1839. 2. George Eden, s. and h., created Baron Eden of Nor- 

wood, co. Surrey, and Earl of Auckland, 21 Dec. 1839, 
G.C.B. ; ob. unm. 1 Jan. 1849, when those titles 
became Extinct. 

III. 1849. 3. Robert John, bro. and h., Bishop of Bath and Wells ; present 

Baron Auckland of West Auckland ; also Baron Auckland in Ireland. =p 



Barons by Tenure. 



AUDLEY. 35 



AUDLEY. 



I. 


Hen. III. 


1. 


II. 


Hen. III. 


2. 


III. 


Hen. HE. 


3. 


IV. 


Edw. I. 


4. 


V. 


Edw. I. 


5. 


VI. 


Edw. I. 


6. 



Henry de Aldithley, living 1236. 

James de Aldithley, s. and h. ; ob. 1271. 

James de Aldithley, s. and h. ; ob. 1272, s. p. 

Henry de Aldithley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1275, s. p. 

William de Aldithley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1281, s. p. 

Nicholas de Aldithley, bro. and b. ; summ. 26 Jan. 25 
Edw. I. 1297 ; but it is doubtful if that writ can be consi- 
dered as a regular summ. to Pari, {vide Fitz-John) ; ob. 1299. 

VII. Edw. I. 7. Thomas de Aldithley, s. and b. ; ob. infra ast. 1307, s.p. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1313. 8. Nicholas de Aldithley, bro. and b. ; he married* Joane, dau. 

of William I. 6th Baron Martin, and sist. and eventually sole 
h. of William II. 7th Baron Martin ; summ. to Pari, from 8 
Jan. 6 Edw. II. 1313, to 25 Aug. 12 Edw. II. 1318 ; ob. 1319. 

II. 1330. 9. James de Aldithley, set. 14, 1326, the celebrated Lord 

Audley, s. and h. ; summ. to Pari, from 25 Jan. 4 Edw. III. 
1330, to 8 Aug. 10 Rich. II. 1386 ; E.G. ; ob. 1386. 

in. 1387. 10. Nicholas de Aldithley, s. and h. ; summ. to Pari, from 
17 Dec. 11 Rich. II. 1387, to 12 Sept. 14 Rich. II. 1390 ; 
ob. 1392, s. p., leaving JohnTuchet, s. and h. of John Tuchet, 
s. and h. of his sister Joan by Sir John Tuchet, then set. 20 ; 
Margaret, wife of Sir Roger Hillary, another of his sisters, 
then ait. 40, but who died s. p. 1410 ; and Fulk, son of Fulk 
Fitz-Warin, son of Margery, half-sister of the said Nicholas, 
his next heirs. The said, 

IV. 1405. 11.^ John Tuchet, was summ. to Pari, from 21 Dec. 7 Hen. IV. 

1405, to 26 Aug. 9 Hen. IV. 1408, as " Johanni Tuchet ;" 
ob. 1409. 

V. 1421. 12.^ James Tuchet, s. and h., aat. 10, summ. to Pari, from 26 Feb. 

8 Hen. V. 1421, to 26 May, 33 Hen. VI. 1455, as " Jacobo 
de Audley ;" slain at Blore Heath, 1458. 

VI. 1461. 13.7JJ John Tuchet, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 26 May, 1 Edw. 

IV. 1461, to 9 Dec. 1 Rich. III. 1483, as " John de Audley ;" 
ob. 1491. 

VII. 1492. 14.^James Tuchet, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 12 Aug. 

7 Hen. VII. 1492, to 16 Jan. 12 Hen. VII. 1497 ; beheaded 
and attainted 1497, when his honours became Forfeited. 

VIII. 1512. 15. John Tuchet, s. and h., restored in blood and honours 1512; 

summ. to Pari, from 23 Nov. 6 Hen. VIII. 1514, to 21 Oct. 
2 and 3 Phil, and Mary, 1556 ;» ob. ante 20 Jan. 1558. 

IX. 1558. 16. George Tuchet, s. and h., summ. to Pari, and took his seat in 

the House of Lords 20 Jan. 1558 ;• ob. 1560. 

X. 1560. 17. Henry Tuchet, s. and h., never sat in Pari. ; ob. 30 Dec. 

1563. 

XL 1563. 18. George Tuchet, s. and h., a?t. 12, 1563 ; summ. to Pari, from 
30 Sept. 8 Eliz. 1566, to 5 April, 12 Jac. 1614 ; created Earl 
of Castlehaven in Ireland, 6 Sept. 1617 ; ob. 1617. 



. 



n The name of John Tuchet Lord Audley 
regularly reGurs in Dugdale's Lists of Sum- 
mons until 23 Jan. 1 Eliz. 1559, but, as it 
appears from the Lords' Journals, vol. i. 



p. 514, that on 20 Jan. 1558, George Tuchet 
Lord Audley, having been summ. to that 
Pari., took his seat in the House, it is mani- 
fest that Dugdale's statement is erroneous. 

D 2 



36 



AUDLEY. 



Barons by Writ. 

XII. 1617. 19. Mervin Ttjchet, s. and h., Earl of Castlehaven, beheaded 

(having been attainted of felony) in 1631, when this Barony 
became Forfeited. 

XIII. 1634-78. 20. James Tuchet, s. and h., restored to the name, style, 

state, degree, dignity, title, and honour of Baron Audley of 
Hely, and to his heirs for ever, by letters patent, 3 June 
1634, subsequent to which his precedency in the House of 
Lords was that of the ancient Barony ; but by an Act of Pari. 
29 and 30 Car. II. 1678, " the said James Lord Audley, 
Baron Audley of Hely, Earl of Castlehaven, and the heirs of 
his body begotten, and immediately after them, Mervin Tuchet, 
3rd son of the said Mervin Lord Audley, and the heirs of his 
body begotten, and after them, then the daughters of the said 
Mervin Lord Audley and their heirs, shall and may from 
henceforth have, hold, and enjoy, and shall be and are hereby 
restored unto the honour, dignity, state, authority, and title 
of Baron Audley of Hely, with all and every the privileges, 
rights, precedencies, and pre-eminences thereunto belonging, 
as fully, amply and honourably to all intents and purposes as 
the said Mervin Lord Audley at any time, or the said George 
Lord Audley at any time during his life, did or might hold 
and enjoy the same, any matter, cause, or thing whatsoever to 
the contrary notwithstanding, and as fully, amply, and honour- 
ably as if George Tuchet, 2nd son of the said Mervin Lord 
Audley, now beyond the seas, were naturally dead without 
issue." This Act may have been occasioned by objections 
made to the right of James Lord Audley to precedence under 
the patent of 1634 ; for it is clear that in former instances it 
had been considered that %£ authority of the Legislature was 
necessary to restore a dignity lost by attainder. Ob. 1684, s. p. 
XTV. 1684. 21. Mervin Tuchet, bro. and h., Earl of Castlehaven in Ireland ; 
ob. 1686. 

XV. 

XVI. 

XVII. 

XVIII 

XIX. 



XX. 
XXI. 



1686. 22. James Tuchet, s. and h., Earl of Castlehaven in Ireland ; 
ob. 1700. 

1700. 23. James Tuchet, s. and h., Earl of Castlehaven in Ireland ; 
ob. 1740. 

1740. 24. James Tuchet, s. and h., Earl of Castlehaven in Ireland ; 
ob. 1769, unm. 

, 1769. 25. John Talbot Tuchet, bro. and h., 8th and last Earl of Castle- 
haven in Ireland ; ob. 1777, s. P. 

1777. 26. George Thicknesse (assumed in 1783 the name of) Tuchet, 
neph. and h., being s. and h. of Philip Thicknesse, by Eliza- 
beth, sist. and sole h. to the last Baron ; ob. 24 Aug. 1818. 

1818. 27. George John Thicknesse Tuchet, s. and h., ob. 14 Jan. 1837. 

1837. 28. George Edward Thicknesse Tuchet, s. and h., present Baron 

Audley ; his Lordship is also heir general of the Barony of Martin created 

by writ 23 Edw. I., and also of that of Traci by tenure. 



Barons by Writ. 

I. 1321. 1. Hugh de Aldithley, or Audley, supposed to have been a younger 
brother of Nicholas, I. 8th Baron Audley ; summ. to Pari, as 
" Hugh de Audley, Seniori," 15 May, 14 Edw. II.p 1321 ; ob 



° This exception probably arose from the 
said (ieorge being a Benedictine monk. 

p Dugdale, v. i. p. 750, states that this 



Hugh was summ. to Pari. 11 Edw. II. Nov. 
1317 ; but on referring to his Lists of Sum- 
mons it appears that it was to his son, "Hugh 



AUDLEY — BAAL UN. 37 

Barons by Writ. 

II. 1317. 2. Hugh de Audley, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. from 20 Nov. 
11 Edw. II. 1317, to 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 1321, as " Hugh de Audley, 
Juniori," and from 3 Dec. 20 Edw. II. 1326, to 24 Aug. 10 Edw. III. 1336, 
as " Hugh de Audlie ;" having m. Margaret, dau. and coh. of Gilbert de 
Clare, Earl of Gloucester, he was created Earl of Gloucester, 16 Mar. 1337 ; 
ob. 1347, s. p. m. Margaret, his sole dau. and h., m. Ealph Lord Stafford, 
and this Barony is consequently presumed to have been merged in that of 
Stafford, of the descent and present state of which a full account is given 
under that title ; and it is only necessary to observe, that on the attainder 
of Edward Duke of Buckingham in 1521, this Barony, together with his 
other honours, became Forfeited. 

Baron. AUDLEY (of Walden). 

I. 1538. 1. Thomas Audley ; created Baron Audley of Walden, co. Essex, 
29 Nov. 1538 ; Lord Ghana 1532 ; K.G. ; ob. 1544, s. p. m., when the Barony 
became Extinct. 

AUMAELE. Vide Albemarle. 

Baron. AVELAND. 

I. 1856. 1. Sir Gilbert John Heathcote, Bart., created Baron Aveland of 
Aveland, co. Lincoln, 26 Feb. 1856, present Baron Aveland. =p 

AVEEENCHES. Vide Abrincis. 



Earls. 



AYLESFOED. 



II. 


1719. 


III. 


1757. 


IV. 


1777. 


*»v. 


1812. 



1714. 1. Heneage Finch, 1st Baron Guernsey, created Earl of Aylesford 
in Kent, 19 Oct. 1714 ; ob. 1719. 

2. Heneage Finch, s. and h. ; ob. 1757. 

3. Heneage Finch, s. and h. ; ob. 1777. 

4. Heneage Finch, s. and h. ; ob. 21 Oct. 1812. 

5. Heneage Finch, s. and h., present Earl of Aylesford and Baron 
of Guernsey. =j= 

Y 



B. 



Barons by Tenure. BAALUN. 

I. Will. I. 1. Hameline de Baalun, son of Dru de Baladun, or Baalun, built 

the Castle of Bergavenny ; ob. 1089, s. p. 

II. Hen. I. 2. Wynebald de Baalun, brother of the last Baron, living 1126, 

obtained the Manor of Eastington, co. Gloucester, where his 
posterity continued ; he was father of Roger de Baalun. 



de Audele, Juniori," that that Writ was 
directed. 

That eminent author also asserts that there 
was a " James de Aldithley " of this family 
summ. to Pari, from 8 Hen. V. to 33 Hen. 
VI., but of whom he gives no further in- 



formation : it is almost certain, however, 
that he confounds him with James Tuchet V. 
12th Baron of Audley, who was summ. from 
8 Hen. V. to 33 Hen. VI. as "Jacobus de 
Audley." 



38 BADLESMERE — BALIOL. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. 1. John de Baalun, descended from the above, Lord of Eastington ; 

living 1226. 

II. Hen. III. 2. John de Baalun, s. and h., was at the battle of Evesham, 1265 ; 

he m. Auda, sister and h. of William Paganell (vide Paganell) 
of Bahanton, but ob. s. p. 1274, leaving Walter his bro. and h. 
aet. 50 yrs. 

BADLESMERE. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1309. 1.^ Bartholomew de Badlesmeke, summ. to Pari, from 26 Oct. 

3 Edw. II. 1309, to 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 1321 ; attainted of high 
treason, and executed 1322. 

II. 1336. 2. Giles de Badlesmere, s. and h., set. 14, 1328, obtained a reversal 

of the attainder against his father 1328, and obtained seisin of his lands 
1334 ; summ. to Pari, from 22 Jan. 9 Edw. III. 1336, to 20 Dec. 11 Edw. 
III. 1337 ; ob. 1338, s. p., leaving his four sisters — viz. : Margery, jet. 32, 
wife of William Baron Boos ; Maud, a?t. 28, wife of John Earl of Oxford, 
and whose descendants, though without any legal right, assumed the title of 
Barons Badlesmere ; q Elizabeth, ast. 25, wife of William de Bohun, Earl of 
Northampton (her first husband was Edmond Mortimer-) ; and Margaret, 
aet. 23, wife of John Lord Tiptoft — his heirs, amongst whose representatives 
this Barony is in Abeyance. 

The coheirs (1855) are Sir Henry John Joseph Hunloke, Bart., the Hon. Charlotte 
Monson, and Lord de Ros, as representatives of Margery, eldest sister ; the 
Duke of Northumberland, Henry Howard Hartley, Esq., Sir Charles Knightley, 
Bart., Frederick Villiers, Esq., Montagu Earl of Abingdon, Sir Robert Burdett, 
Bart., the representatives of Jermyn Grove, Esq. (who died 1775), and of the 
late James Fermor, Esq., John Lord Rollo, as representatives of the 2nd 
sister ; Henry James Jones, Esq., Emma, wife of George Julius Buncombe 
Poulett Scrope, Esq., Anna Isabella, Dowager Lady Byron, and Nathaniel Lord 
Scarsdale, as representatives of the 4th sister ; the representation of the 3rd 
sister was merged in the Crown on the accession of King Edw. IV. 

BAGOT. 

Barons. 

I. 1780. 1. Sir William Bagot, Bart., created Baron Bagot of Bagot's Brom- 

ley, co. Staff., 17 Oct. 1780 ; ob. 1798. 

II. 1798. 2. William Bagot, s. and h. ; ob. 12 Feb. 1856. 

III. 1856. 3. William Bagot, s. and h., present Baron Bagot. =p 

BALIOL. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Wido, or Guy de Baliol ; ob. . . . 

II. Steph. 2. Barnard Baliol, built Barnard Castle, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

III. John. 3. Barnard de Baliol, s. and h., was at the battle of the Stand- 

ard, 1138 ; ob. . . . 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Hugh de Baliol, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

V. Hen. III. 5. John de Baliol, Regent of Scotland, s. and h., built Balliol 

College ; ob. 1269. 

VI. Hen. III. 6. Hugh de Baliol, s. and h. ; ob. 1271, s. p. 

VII. Edw. I. 7. Alexander Baliol, bro. and h. ; ob. 1278, s. p. 



q Vide note under Bolebec. 



BALIOL — BARDOLF. 39 

Barons by Tenure. 

VIII. Edw. 1. 8. John de Baliol, bro. and h. ; competitor for the Crown of 
Scotland, and became King of Scotland, 1292. 

I. Hen. III. Bernard de Baliol, bro. of Hugh, IV. Baron, 1212-45. 

I. Hen. III. Eustace de Baliol, bro. of John, V. Baron, Sheriff of Cumberland, 
1260, and Governor of Carlisle ; took the Cross 1269. 



Edward de Baliol King of Scotland, son of John, VIII. Baron, was summ. to 
Pari. 1 Jan. 22 Edw. III. 1348, and 10 March, 23 Edw. III. 1349 ; in both 
instances the writ with his name commencing in these words, " Rex Magnifico 
Principi et fideli suo Edwardo de Balliolo Regi Scotias Consanguineo suo cha- 
rissimo, Salutem." 

BALIOL (of Cavers, in Scotland). 

I. John. 1. Sir Henry de Baliol, living 1328. 

Baron by Writ. 

II. 1300. 2. Alexander de Baliol, Chamberlain of Scotland, summ. to Pari. 

from 26 Sept. 28 Edw. I. 1300, to 3 Nov. 35 Edw. 1. 1306 ; he was im- 
prisoned by Edw. II., and died, leaving Thomas his s. and h., never 
summ. to Pari. ; and Isabel, at length h. of her father, m. to Ranald 
More. 

BANBURY. 
Earl. 

I. 1626. William Knollys 1st Viscount Wallingford, created Earl of Ban- 
bury, co. Oxford, 18 Aug. 1626, with a clause " that he shall have pre- 
cedency as if he had beene created the first Earle after His Majesty's 
accesse to the Crowne ;" K.G. ; ob. 1632, s. p. l., when all his honours 
became Extinct. 

This Earldom was claimed in 1806 by Gen. Wm, Knollys, as " heir male of 
Nicholas, son and heir of the Earl," which Nicholas had sat in Pari, as Earl of 
Banbury in 1660, but of whose legitimacy there was much doubt ; and the 
House of Lords decided, 11 March 1813, that the petitioner was not entitled to 
the title, honour, and dignity of Earl of Banbury ; and consequently establishing 
the illegitimacy of the said Nicholas. 

BANYAED. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1313. Robert de Banyard summ. to Pari. 23 May, 6 Edw. II. and 
26 July, 7 Edw. II. 1313. He is presumed to be the same with Robert de 
Banyard, or Baynard, one of the Justices of the King's Bench, who was 
summ. to Pari, as snch, 2 and 3 Edw. III. 1329-30, and d. 4 Edw. III. 
1330-31, leaving Thomas s. and h. ; but since no proof occurs of sitting, the 
identity is not so important. 

BARDOLF. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. William Bardolf ; living 1174. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Thomas Bardolf, Lord of Shelford, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

III. Rich. I. 3. Dodo Bardolf, s. and h. ; he married Beatrix, dau. and h. of 

William de Warren, and with her acquired the Barony of 
Wirmegay, co. Norfolk ; ob. 1209. 

IV. John. 4. William Bardolf, s. and h. ; ob. 1275. 

V. Edw. I. 5. William Bardolf, s. and h. ; ob. 1290. 



40 BARDOLF — BARHAM. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1294. 6. f Hugh Bakdolf, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 

1294, and from 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, to 2 June, 35 Edw. I. 
1302 ; he was also summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, but it is 
very doubtful if the latter writ was a regular summons to 
Parliament. ( Vide Clyvedon.) Ob. 1303. 

II. 1307. 7. Thomas Bakdolf, s. and h., a?t. 22, summ. to Pari, from 

26 Aug. 1 Edw. II. 1307, to 23 Oct. 4 Edw. III. 1330 ; ob. 
1329. 

III. 1336. 8.^ John Babdolf, s. and h., aet. 17, summ. to Pari, from 22 Jan. 

9 Edw. III. 1336, to 1 June, 37 Edw. III. 1363 ; latterly with 
the addition of " de Wirmegay ;" he m. Elizabeth, dau. and h. 
of Roger Baron D'Amorie ; ob. 1363. 

IV. 1376. 9.^ William Bardolf, s. and h., set. 14, summ. to Pari, from 

20 Jan. 49 Edw. III. 1376, to 3 Sept. 9 Rich. II. 1385, as 
" Willielmo Bardolf de Wirmegay ;" ob. 1385-6. 

V. 1390. 10. ^Thomas Bardolf, s. and h., set. 18, summ. to Pari, from 

12 Sept. 14 Rich. II. 1390, to 25 Aug. 5 Hen. IV. 1404, as " Thonue 
Bardolf de Wormegay ;" ob. circa 1404, s. p. M., and being attainted 1406 
his honours became Forfeited. 

The two daughters and heirs of the last Baron were — Ann, who married first Sir 
William Clifford, and secondly Sir Reginald Cobham, but ob. s. p. ; and Joan, 
the wife of Sir William Phelip, K.G., who was styled, temp. Hen. VI. Lord 
Bardolf ; but though he is said by some writers to have been so created by 
letters patent, it does not appear that he was ever summoned to Parliament. 
He left an only child, Elizabeth, who m. John, 1st Viscount Beaumont, K.G. 

BABDOLF. 

Barons by Tennre. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Hugh Bardolf, a grandson of William, 1st Baron, was Lord of 

Hoo, co. Kent ; ob. 1203, s. p. 

II. John. 2. Robert Bardolf, s. and h. ; ob. . . . s. p., leaving the 5 daughters 

of his brother Hugh (according to Vincent) or his 5 sisters 
(according to Dugdale in his ' Monasticon ') his heirs. 



I. Hen. II. William Bardolf, presumed to have been a younger sod of 
Thomas, II. 2nd Baron ; ob. ante 1205, and of whose issue there is no 
account. 

BABFLETJB. 

Viscounty, 7 May 1697 — Extinct 1727. — Vide Orford. 

BABHAM. 

Barons. 

I. 1805. 1. Sir Charles Middleton, 1st Bart., created 1 May 1805 Baron 

Barbara of Barbara Court and Teston, co. Kent, with remainder, 
failing his issue male, of the dignity of Baroness Barham of 
Barham Court and Teston aforesaid to his dau. Diana, wife of 
Sir Gerard Noel Noel, and of the dignity of Baron Barham of 
Barham Court and Teston, co. Kent, to her issue male ; ob. 17 
June 1813, s. p. m. 

II. 1813. 2. Diana, dau. and h., wife of Sir Gerard Noel Noel, Bart, (who d 

25 Feb. 1838) ; ob. 12 Apr. 1823. 

III. 1823. 3. Charles Noel Noel, s. and h., created 16 Aug. 1841 Baron 

Noel of Ridlington, co. Rutland, Viscount Campden of Campden, co. 
Glouc, and Earl of Gainsborough, co. Line. — Vide Gainsborough. 



BARNARD — BASSET. 



41 



Barons 
I. 1698. 



BARNARD. 



1. Christopher Vane ; r created Baron Barnard of Barnard's Castle, 
co. Durham, 25 July 1698 ; ob. 1723. 

II. 1723. 2. Gilbert Vane, s. and h. ; ob. 1753. 

Viscount. 

III. 1753.— I. 1754. 3. Henry Vane, s. and h. ; created Viscount Barnard of 

Barnard's Castle aforesaid, and Earl of Darlington, 3 April 1754 ; ob. 1758. 
— Vide Darlington and Cleveland. 



BASSET (of Drayton, eo. Stafford). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Ralph Basset, s. of Richard, II. Baron Basset of Weldon, Lord 

of Drayton, co. Stafford, and Colston Basset, co. Notts. 

II. Steph. 2. Ralph Basset, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1264. 3. Ralph Basset, s. and h., sunim. to Pari. 24 Dec. 49 Hen. III. 

1264, as " Radulpbus Basset (de Drayton) ;" slain at Evesham, 
1265. 

II. 1295. 4. Ralph Basset, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 23 June, 23 Edw. I. 

1295, and 6 Feb. and 10 April, 27 Edw. I. 1299, as " Radulphus 
Basset (de Drayton) ;" ob. 1299. 

III. 1299. 5.^ Ralph Basset, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by the same designa- 

tion from 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299, to 25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 
1342 ; ob. 1343. 

IV. 1357. 6.^ Ralph Basset, grands, and h., jet. 8, being s. and h. of Ralph 

Basset (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Baron ; summ. to Pari, from 25 
Dec. 31 Edw. III. 1357, to 6 Dec. 13 Rich. II. 1389 ; he m. Joan, 
sister of John de Montfort Duke of Brittany, K.G. ; ob. 1390, s. p. ; leav- 
ing, according to one inquisition, Thomas Earl of Stafford, grandson of 
Margaret Basset, sister of his grandfather, his heir ; and, according to an- 
other inquisition, the said Earl of Stafford and Alice, wife of William 
Chaworth, descended from Maud, sister of the said Margaret, were found 
to be his heirs ; but notwithstanding these inquisitions, and another, 4 
Hen. IV. (1403), on the death of Joan, widow of Ralph Lord Basset, Sir 
Hugh Shirley, s. and h. of Sir Thomas Shirley by Isabel Basset, who is 
said to have been the sister of the last Baron, is by some writers called his 
nephew aud heir. The late Francis Townsend, Esq., Windsor Herald, on 
the authority of Robert Glover, Somerset, a most learned and skilful 



1 Christopher 1st Lord Barnard was the 
son and heir of the celebrated Sir Henry Vane, 
who was executed for high treason in June 
1662 ; and it is a curious fact that the at- 
tainder of his father has never been reversed, 
notwithstanding the evidence which the ele- 
vation of his son to the peerage, and the still 
higher honours conferred upon his descend- 
ants, afford of the estimation in which they 
have been held by their sovereign. By an 
attainder the right to armorial ensigns, as 
well as to other honours, is destroyed, and 
upon the creation of Christopher Vane to the 
peerage, the then Garter King of Arms, find- 
ing himself in a dilemma as to what arms 



he should assign to the peer, applied to the 
Crown for instructions, when a license was 
granted authorising him to allow to Christo- 
pher Lord Barnard and his descendants the 
arms and quarterings of his father, notwith- 
standing his attainder ; the legality of this ex- 
ercise of the royal prerogative is not free from 
doubt, for it is held that nothing but an 
express legislative enactment can relieve an 
individual from any of the penalties of an 
attainder. The Crown may, however, assign 
to a subject whatever armorial ensigns it 
pleases de novo, and in this construction of 
the license it was of course valid. 



42 



BASSET. 



herald, considered the illegitimacy of Isahel Shirley to he indisputable ; 
quoting a pedigree drawn out in 1583 by that herald for Sir George 
Shirley, her lineal descendant and heir, in which she is called natural 
sister of the last Baron, and the coat assigned to her is debruised by a 
baton. 3 If the illegitimacy of Isabel be established, this dignity would be 
in abeyance between the representative of Thomas Earl of Stafford, who 
is presumed to be the present Baron Stafford, and of the said Dame Alice 
Chaworth, who upon the dec. of her great-granddau. and heir in 1507, 
were — 1. Joan, wife of Sir Thomas Dynham ; 2. Elizabeth, wife of An- 
thony Babington ; and 3. Anne, wife of William Mering, who died s. p. 



8 It may here be remarked as an instance 
of unaccountable negligence or ignorance, tbat 
in the Patent creating George Townshend 
Lord Ferrers of Chartley and Lord Compton 
(heir general of the above Sir Thomas Shirley 
and Isabel Basset), to be Earl of Leicester 
in 1784, he is called Baron de Ferrers of 
Chartley, Baron Bourchier, Lovaine, 
Basset, and Compton. 

In 1784 it is unquestionable that the Ba- 
ronies of Ferrers of Chartley and Compton 
were vested, jure matris, in the Hon. George 
Townshend, but it is confidently alleged that 
he was not legally possessed either of the 
Baronies of Bourchier, Lovaine, or Basset. 
As it would scarcely be imagined that titles 
of honour should be lightly attributed in a 
patent under the Great Seal, this assertion 
requires to be supported by facts, and the 
following brief account of each of the Ba- 
ronies in question may be deemed satisfactory. 

First, Bourchier. — The Barony of Bour- 
chier, as will be found more fully stated 
under that head, became merged in that of 
Ferrers of Chartley, and, together with that 
dignity, fell into abeyance in 1646; and, 
notwithstanding that the Abeyance of the 
Barony of Ferrers of Chartley was termi- 
nated in Dec. 1677 in favour of Sir Robert 
Shirley, the youngest coheir (from whom 
Mr. Townshend derived his right to that 
dignity), no act is stated to have taken place 
relative to the Barony of Bourchier ; nor 
does it appear that the Abeyance of that dig- 
nity has ever been terminated, unless the 
fact of George Townshend Lord Ferrers of 
Chartley, who was then the youngest coheir 
of that Barony, having on that occasion been 
styled under the Great Seal " Baron Bour- 
chier," be considered to have vested that dig- 
nity in him and the heirs of his body. 

Secondly, Lovaine. — This dignity seems 
never to have been a Parliamentary Barony, 
in the modern acceptation of that term, as 
only one Writ of Summons was ever issued 
to the ancestor from whom the dignity was 
pretended to have been derived ; and, more- 
over, it is very doubtful if that Writ was a 
Summons to a regular Parliament. It is 
thus manifest that no Barony of Lovaine 
could, according to modern decisions of the 
House of Lords, then have been held to be in 



existence ; and even if such did exist, the 
Earl of Leicester was only a coheir of the 
dignity. See LOVAINE. 

Thirdly, Basset of Drayton. — This title, 
though frequently assumed by the family of 
Shirley, and consequently by its represen- 
tative the Earl of Leicester, was never, it 
is believed, vested in them. Their claim to 
it was, as is fully related above, in virtue of 
their descent from Isabel Basset, the sister 
of Ralph the last Lord Basset of Drayton, 
but a rational doubt can scarcely be enter- 
tained that the said Isabel was illegitimate, 
and hence that any pretensions derived from 
her must be totally groundless. 

An instrument has thus been allowed to 
issue under the Great Seal, in w T hich three 
Baronies are recognized to be vested in an 
individual, to neither of which he was legally 
entitled ; and, what is no less extraordinary, 
one of the said dignities has never existed 
since the reign of Edward I. and another was 
at that moment entirely vested in other per- 
sons ! 

The precise effect of these dignities having 
been thus attributed to the Earl of Leicester, 
is a point of some difficulty, so much so, that 
the Editor will not presume to pronounce a 
decisive opinion ; he does not, however, con- 
sider that a misnomer in the preamble of a 
patent creating a certain dignity can have 
the effect either of adding to or diminishing 
the dignity directly intended to be created : 
Lovaine had never existed as a descendible 
dignity, and could not be recognized, and if 
it could even be argued that it was created 
by this patent, there are no words of inhe- 
ritance, and consequently would enure only 
to the grantee for life. An early instance of the 
same description occurs in the creation of the 
Earl of Kent, in 1465, where in his descrip- 
tion he is styled Lord of Hastings, Waisford, 
and Ruthyn ; according to the decision of the 
House of Lords in 1840, the Earl of Kent 
was not even a coheir of the Barony of Has- 
tings, and even in 1 640, when the " possessio 
fratris" was more relied upon, the opinion of 
the judges was unanimous against the claim 
of Mr. Longueville to the Barony of Hastings, 
although deduced through the individual in 
whose person the Barony had been thus indi- 
rectly recognized. 



BASSET. 43 

BASSET (of Hedendon, co. Oxon). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Thomas Basset, younger son of Thomas Basset and grandson of 

Ralph 1st Baron of Weldon, and to whom King John gave the 
manor of Hedendon and hundred of Bullington ; living 1178. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Thomas, s. and h. ; oh. s. p. ; leaving his three sisters Philippa, 

Joan, and Alice his cohrs., the latter of whom m. John 5th Baron 
Biset. 

BASSET (of Sapcote, co. Leicester). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. l. William Basset, s. of Richard 2nd Baron Basset of Weldon, Lord 

of Sapcote, co. Leicester ; living 1176. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Simon Basset, s. and h. ; living 1194. 

III. John. 3. Ralph Basset, s. and h. ; oh. . . . 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1264. 4. Ralph Basset, s. and h., summ. to Farl. as " Radulpho Basset 

de Sapcote " 24 Dec. 49 Hen. III. 1264 ; oh. circa 1282. 

II. 1294. 5. Simon Basset, s. and h., summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, hut, 

for the reasons assigued under Clyvedon, it is very doubtful 
if it can he considered as a regular Writ of Summ. to Pari. ; ob. 
circa 1294. 

III. 6. Ralph Basset, s. and h., never summ. to Pari. ; ob. 1326. 

IV. 7. Simon Basset, s. and h., never summ. to Pari. 

V. 1371. S.^Ralph Basset, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 8 Jan. 44 Edw. III. 1371, 

and 6 Oct. 46 Edw. III. 1372, as " Radulpho Basset de Sapcote ;" ob. 1378, 
s. p. m. ; leaving his two daughters — viz., Alice, ast. 30, wife of Sir Law- 
rence Dutton, Knt., and afterwards of Sir Robert Moton of Peckleton : 
and Elizabeth, set. 7, wife of Richard, afterwards Baron Grey of Codnor, 
K.G. — his heirs, between whose descendants this Barony is in Abeyance. 
Alice's nioiety was in the 16th century vested in Pole of Radburne, co. 
Derby, and Vincent, co. Leicester ; Elizabeth's moiety passed to her three 
daughters and coheirs : Elizabeth, wife of John Zouche of Codnor ; Eleanor, 
wife of Thomas Newport (now represented by the Earl of Bradford) ; and 
Lucie, wife of Rowland Lenthall, one moiety of whose share is in the 
present Lady Zouche. 

BASSET (of Stratton, co. Cornwall). 
Barons. 

I. 1797. 1. Francis Basset, 1st Baron de Dunstanville ; created Baron Basset 

of Stratton, co. Cornwall, with remainder, failing his issue male, 
to his only dau. Frances Basset, by Frances Susanna, his then 
wife, and the heirs male of her body, 30 Nov. 1797 ; ob. 5 Feb. 
1835, when the barony of De Dunstanville became Extinct. 

II. 1835. 2. Frances Basset, dau. and h., died unm. 22 Jan. 1855, ajt. 74, 

when the barony of Basset also became Extinct. 



BASSET (of Weldon). 
Barons. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Ralph Basset, raised from a low condition to be Justice of Eng- 

land ; ob. circa 1120. 

II. Steph. 2. Richard Basset, s. and h., Justice of England ; ob. . . . 

III. Hen. II. 3. Geoffrey Basset, s. and h., assumed his mother's name of 

Riddel ; ob. s. p. 



44 BASSET — BASSINGBOURN. 

Barons. 

IV. Rich. I. 4. Richard Basset, bro. and h. ; ob. . . . 

V. John. 5. Ralph Basset, s. and b. ; ob. 1259. 

VI. Hen. III. 6. Richard Basset, s. and b., of full age, 1259 ; ob. 1276. 

VII. Edw. I. 7. Ralph Basset, s. and h., set. 32, 1276 ; ob. 1295. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 8. Richard Basset, s. and b. ; summ. to Pari, as " Richardo Basset 
de Weldon," 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299. He was also summ. 26 Jan. 25 
Edw. I. 1297, but it is not certain that tbe latter can be considered as a 
regular Writ of Summ. to Pari, (vide Fitz-John) ; ob. 1314, leaving 
Ralph Basset his s. and h., who, though summ. 1 Edw. III. to be at New- 
castle with horse and arms, was never summ. to Pari., nor were any of his 
descendants ever so summoned or considered as Barons of tbe Realm. 
The said Ralph Basset last named ob. 1342, leaving Ralph Basset his s. 
and h., ob. 1369, whose son Ralph left a son Richard, on whose decease 
1398, his cousins, Sir John Aylesbury, son of his aunt Joan, and John 
Knyvet, son of his aunt Eleanor, became his heirs. 



BASSET (of Wycombe, co. Bucks). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. 1. Alan Basset, younger bro. of Gilbert Lord of Compton, ob- 

tained the manor of Wycombe from King John ; ob. 1232. 

II. Hen. III. 2. Gilbert Basset, s. and h. ; ob. 1240. His s. and h. dying soon 

afterwards, his uncle, 

III. Hen. III. 3. Fulke Basset, Dean of York and Bishop of London, bro. of the 

said Gilbert, succeeded to the inheritance ; ob. 1258, s. p. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Philip Basset, bro. and h., Justice of England ; ob. 1271, s. p. m., 

leaving Aliva, m. 1. to Hugh Despencer, Justice of England, and 2. to 
Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, his dau. and heir. 



BASSINGBOURNE (of Abington, Northampton). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Humphrey de Bassingbourne of Abington, co. North., in right 

of his wife Alice Lizures, widow of Vitalis Engaine. 

II. Hen. III. 2. Nicholas de Bassingbourne, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1252. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Humphrey de Bassingbourne, s. and h. ; ob. 1280. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Humphrey de Bassingbourne, s. and h. ; ob. 1298. 

V. Edw. I. 5. Humphrey de Bassingbourne, s. and h. ; ob. 1349, leaving 

Margaret, dau. and h. of Giles Bassingbourne (ob. v. p.), his granddau. 
and h. and wife of Walter Colvile. 



BASSINGBOURN (of Abington, Camb.). 

Baron by Tenure. 

I. Edw. II. 1. Warine de Bassingbourn (son of Warine de Bassingbourn, and 
descended from Warine de Bassingbourn, Sheriff co. Camb. 1170), Lord of 
Abington, co. Camb. ; ob. 1322. He was father of Warine de Bassingbourn, 
a3t. 30 in 1322, who adhered to the party of the Queen against the Spencers, 
and was in exile 1326, ob. 1348 ; leaving Warine de Bassingbourn, his s. 
and h., born 11 Nov. 1326, ob. s. p. 1370 ; when Richard de Bassingbourn, 
son of his 3rd cousin John de Bassingbourn, was found to Le his heir. 



BATEMAN — BATH. 45 

BATEMAN. 
Barons. 

I. 1837. 1. William Bateman Hanbury (who assumed the additional sur- 

name of Bateman by lie. 13 Feb. 1837), created Baron Bate- 
man of Shobdon, co. Hereford, 4 Feb. 1836 ; ob. 22 July 1845. 

II. 1845. 2. William Bateman Bateman Hanbury, s. and h. : present Baron 

Bateman. = 

BATH. 

Earls. 

I. 1485. Philibert de Shaunde, called " consanguineum nostrum " by 

Hen. VII. ; created Earl of Bath 6 Jan. 1485, but nothing 
further is known of him. 

II. 1536. 1. John Bourchter, X. 11th Baron Fitz-Warine ; created Earl of 

Bath 9 July 1536 ; ob. 1539. 

III. 1539. 2. John Bourchier, s. and h., who became sole heir general of the 

Barony of Daubeney, on the death of Henry Daubeney Earl of 
Bridgewater, 1548 ; ob. 1560. 

IV. 1560. 3. William Bourchier, grandson and h., being s. and h. of John 

Bourchier (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Earl ; ob. 1623. 

V. 1623. 4. Edward Bourchier, s. and h. ; ob. 1636, s. p. m. 

VI. 1636. 5. Henry Bourchier, cousin and h., being s. and h. of Sir George 

Bourchier, 2nd son of John, III. 2nd Earl ; ob. 1654, s. p., when 
the title became Extinct. 

VII. 1661. 1. John Granville, created Baron Granville of Kilkhampton and 

Biddeford, Viscount Granville of Lansdown, and Earl of Bath, 
20 April 1661, and by Royal licence 26 of same month was 
permitted to use the titles of Earl of Corboile, Thorigny, and 
Granville ; ob. Aug. 1701. 

VIII. 1701. 2. Charles Granville, s. andh., summ. to Pari, by Writ, v. p., 16 

July 1689, and placed in his father's Barony of Granville ; ob. 
twelve days after his father, 1701. 

IX. 1701. 3. William Henry Granville, s. and h. ; ob. unm. 1711, when 

all his honours became Extinct. 

X. 1742. 1. William Pulteney, created Baron of Hedon, co. York, Vis- 
count Pulteney of Wrington, co. Somerset, and Earl of Bath, 14 July 
1742 ; ob. 1764, s. p. s., when these dignities became Extinct. 

Marquess. 

I. 1789. 1. Thomas Thynne, 3rd Viscount Weymouth, created Marquess of 

Bath, 25 Aug. 1789, K.G. ; ob. 1796. 

II. 1796. 2. Thomas Thynne, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 27 Mar. 1837. 

III. 1837. 3. Henry Frederick, s. and h. ; ob. 24 June 1837. 

IV. 1837. 4. John Alexander, s. and h., present Marquess of Bath, Viscount 

Weymouth, Baron Thynne, and a Bart. 

Baroness. Countess. 

j. 1792 — 1803. Henrietta Laura Pulteney, dau. of William Pulteney, Esq. 
(formerly Johnstone), by Frances, daur. and h. of Daniel Pulteney, s. and 
h. of John Pulteney, next bro. to William Pulteney, father of William 
Pulteney X. 1st Earl of Bath ; created Baroness of Bath, with limitation 
of the dignity of Baron Bath, co. Somerset, to her issue male, 26 July 
1792, and Countess of Bath, co. Somerset, with the same limitation of the 
Earldom of Bath, 26 Oct, 1803; m. Sir James Murray, Bart., who 
assumed the name of Pulteney ; ob. 14 Aug. 1808, s. p., when these titles 
became Extinct. 



46 BATHURST — BAYNING. 



BATHURST. 

Barons. Earls. 

I. 1712. — I. 1772. 1. Allen Bathurst, created Baron Bathurst of Battles- 

don, co. Bedford, 1 Jan. 1712,' and Earl Batlmrst of 
Bathurst, co. Sussex, 27 Aug. 1772 ; ob. 1775. 

II. 1775. — II. 1775. 2. Henry Bathurst, 1st Baron Apsley, s. and h., Lord 

Chanc. 1771 ; ob. 1794. 

III. 1794.— III. 1794. 3. Henry Bathurst, s. and h. ; E.G. P.O. ; ob. 27 July 

1834. 

IV. 1834. — IV. 1834. 4. Henry George Bathurst, s. and h., present Earl 

and Baron Bathurst and Baron Apsley ; unni. 



BAVENT. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1313. Roger Bavent, summ. to Pari, from 8 Jan. 6 Edw. II. 1313, to 
14 March, 15 Edw. II. 1322. Attainted in 1322, when the dignity became 
Forfeited. He was fully restored in blood and honours 1 Edw. III. 
1327, and was again summ. to Pari, from 27 Jan. 6 Edw. III. 1332, to 
1 April, 9 Edw. III. 1335 ; ob. circa 1335, and is said to have left issue 
a son Roger, who died 23 April, 29 Edw. III. 1355, leaving John Bavent 
his son and heir, then aged 20 years. According to a pedigree by Vincent, 
the said John died s. p., and Eleanor, wife of William de Braose, was his 
sister and heir. Neither the son or grandson of Roger Baron Bavent 
were ever summ. to Pari. ; but, if the preceding statement be correct the 
representation of this Barony is presumed to have descended to the late 
Marquess Townshend, and from him to his two coheirs, viz. Lady 
Elizabeth Boultbee, his sister, and Marmion-Edward Ferrers, Esq., his 
nephew. 

BAYEUX. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. \ Hen. I. 1. Ranulph de Bayeux. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Hugh de Bayeux, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1196. 

III. Hen. III. 3. John de Bayeux, s. and h. ; ob. 1248, s. p. m. 

IV. Heft. III. 4. Stephen le Bays, bro. and heir male ; died ante 1250, leaving 

two daughters and coheirs : Maud, m. 1. Elias de Rabel, and 2. to Peter 
Mallore ; and Joan, m. Peter Baudrat of Poitou. 



BAYHAM. 
Viscounty, 13 May 1786.— Vide Camden. 



BAYNING. 
Barons. Viscounts. 

I. 1627.— I. 1627. 1. Sir Paul Bayning, 1st Bart., created Baron Bayning 

of Horkesley, co. Essex, 27 Feb. 1627, and March 
8th following Viscount Bayning of Sudbury, co. Suf- 
folk ; ob. 1629. 

II. 1629.— II. 1629. 2. Paul Bayning, s. and h. ; ob. 1638, s. p. m., when his 

honours became Extinct. 



« " Hora quartet post meridiem." — Vide Note under BURTON. 



BEAUCHAMP. 47 



BEAUCHAMP. 

Viscountess. 

I. 1674. Anne Bayning, 2nd dan. of Paid 1st Viscount, and wife of James 
Murray, Esq., created Viscountess Bayning of Foxley, co. Berks, 
for life, 17 March 1674 ; ob. 1698, when the title became 
Extinct. 
Barons. 

I. 1797. 1. Charles Townshend, s. and h. of William Townshend (3rd son 
of Charles 2nd Viscount Townshend, K.G.), by Henrietta, dau. 
and h. of Lord William Powlett (2nd son of Charles 1st Duke 
of Bolton), by Anne his 2nd wife, dau. and heir of Gen. Ran- 
dolph Egerton, by Elizabeth, eldest dau. and coh. of Henry 
Murray, Esq., by Anne, the last Viscountess Bayning ; created 
Baron Bayning of Foxley, co. Berks, 20 Oct. 1797 ; ob. 19 May 
1810. 

IT. 1810.. 2. Charles Frederick Powlett, s. and h. ; ob. unm. 2 Aug. 1823. 

III. 1823. 3. Henry (assumed 1823 the surnames of) William-Powlett, bro. 
and h., present Baron Bayning. =^= 



BEAUCHAMP. 

Vide Monck, of Potheridge, Beauchamp, and Teyes. 



BEAUCHAMP (of Bedford). 
Barons by Tenure. 
I. Will. I. 1. Hugh de Beauchamp, came into England with William the 

Conqueror. 
n. Will. I. 2. Simon de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; ob. ... s. p. m. 

III. Will. II. 3. Pain de Beauchamp, bro. and heir ; obtained the Barony of 

Bedford from Will. II. 

IV. Rich. I. 4. Simon de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1206. 

V. John. 5. William de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; ob. 1259. 

VI. Hen. III. 6. William de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; ob. 1260, s. p. 

VII. Hen. III. 7. Simon de Beauchamp, bro. and h. ; ob. ante 1363, s. p. m. 

VIII. Hen. III. 8. John de Beauchamp, bro. and h. ; slain at the battle of 

Evesham, ex parte Baronum 1265, s. p. m., when his three sisters — 1. 
Maud, m. 1st to Roger Lord Mowbray, and 2ndly to Roger Lestrange ; 
2. Eleanor, m. Baldwin Lord Wake ; and Beatrix, m. Sir Thomas Fitz- 
Otes — or their representatives, became his coheirs. 



BEAUCHAMP (of Eaton, co. Beds). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Milo de Beauchamp, younger son of Hugh, 1st Baron ; living 

1180 ; to whom succeeded 

II. Hen. II. 2. Hugh de Beauchamp (son of Oliver), slain in Palestine 

1185, s. p. 

III. John. 3. Roger de Beauchamp, bro. and h. ; ob. circa 1217, s. p. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. John de Beauchamp, neph. and h., being son of William 

Fitz Geoffrey de Beauchamp, by Matilda, sist. and h. of the 
last Baron. 



Barons by 


Tenure. 


I. 


Hen. 


I. 


1 


II. 


Hen. 


II. 


2. 


III. 


Rich 


I. 


3. 


IV. 


Hen. 


III. 


4. 


V. 


Hen. 


III. 


5 



48 BEAUCHAMP. 

Barons by Tenure. 

V. Hen. III. 5. William de Beauchamp, s. and h., living 1257 ; oh. ante 

1281. 

VI. Edw. I. 6. Ralph de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; ob. 1292, leaving a son, 

Roger Beauchamp, but his posterity never enjoyed the dignity of Barons 
of the Realm. 



BEAUCHAMP (of Elmley, co. Worcester). 

Walter de Beauchamp, lineal' ancestor of the illustrious 
house of Beauchamp. 
2. William de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; living 1167. 

William de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; living 1191:. 

4. Walter de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; ob. 1235. 

William de Beauchamp, s. and h., m. Isabel de Mauduit, 
sist. and h. of William IX. Earl of Warwick ; ob. 1268. 

VI. Edw. I. 6. William de Beauchamp, s. and h., succeeded, jure matris, 
as Earl of Warwick. — Vide Warwick. 



BEAUCHAMP (of Powyk). 
Barons. 

I. 1447. 1. John Beauchamp, lineally descended from Walter de Beauchamp, 

a younger son of William V. 5th Baron Beauchamp of Elmley ; 
created Baron Beauchamp of Powyk 2 May 1447, Lord Trea- 
surer, K.G. ; ob. 1475. 

II. 1475. 2. Richard Beauchamp, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1496, s. p. m., when the 

title became Extinct. 

Earls. 

III. 1806. — I. 1815. 1. William Lygon, lineally descended from William 

Lygon and Ann Beauchamp his wife, dau. and 
coh. of Richard the last Baron ; created Baron 
Beauchamp of Powyk, co. Worcester, 26 Feb. 1806 ; 
created Viscount Elmley and Earl Beauchamp 1 Dec. 
1815 ; ob. 21 Oct. 1816. 

IV. 1816. — II. 1816. 2. William Beauchamp Lygon, s. and h. ; ob. unm. 

12 May 1823. 

V. 1823. — III. 1823. 3. John Reginald Pindar (who assumed that name by 

licence 1813, instead of that of Lygon), bro. and h. ; 
ob. s. p. 22 Jan. 1853. 

VI. 1853. — IV. 1853. 4. Henry Beauchamp Lygon, bro. and h., present Earl 

Beauchamp, Baron Beauchamp of Powyk, and Viscount Elmley. =~ 

* 

BEAUCHAMP (of Kyderminster). 
Barons by Patent. 

I. 1387. 1. John de Beauchamp of Holt, grands, and h. of John de Beau- 

champ of Holt, younger bro. of William X. 8th Earl of War- 
wick ; created by patent (being the first instance of the kind) 
Lord of Beauchamp Baron of Kyderminster, to him and the heirs 
male of his body, 10 Oct. 11 Rich. II. 1387 ; summ. 17 Dec. 
11 Rich. II. 1387 only; beheaded 1387; and, having been 
attainted, his honours became Forfeited. 

II. 1398. 2. John de Beauchamp, s. and h., restored to his father's honours 

(by the reversal of the proceedings against him in the 11 Rich. II.,) in the 21 



BEAUCHAMP. 49 

Rich. II., 1398, but he was never summ. to Pari. ; in the 1 Hen. IV., 
however, the proceedings of the Pari, of the 11 Rich. II. having been 
affirmed, the dignity again became Forfeited. He died in 1420, when 
the heirs male of the body of his father failed. 

BEAUCHAMP ( of Bletsho ). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1363. ■?£ Roger de Beatjchamp, 4th s. of Walter, younger s. of William V. 5th 
Baron Beauchamp of Elmley ; summ. to Pari, as- " Rogero de Bello- 
Campo," from 1 June, 37 Edw. III. 1363, to 20 Oct. 3 Rich. IT. 1379 ; 
ob. 1379, leaving Roger Beauchamp, his grands, and h., who was succeeded 
by John Beauchamp, his s. and h., but none of the descendants of Roger 
Baron Beauchamp were ever summ. to Pari. ; Margaret, dau. and h. of 
John Beauchamp, above-mentioned, and the great-great-grand-dau. of the 
said Baron, married to her 2nd husband, John Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, 
and by him had Margaret Countess of Richmond, mother of King Henry VII.; 
but this Barony became vested in her descendants by her 1st husband, Sir 
Oliver St. John, whose great-great-grands., Oliver St. John, was created 
Baron St. John of Bletsho in 1559 ; his s. and h., John 2nd Baron St. 
John of Bletsho, died in 1596, s. p. m., leaving Anne his sole dau. and 
h., who married William Lord Howard, s. and h. apparent of Charles X. 
1st Earl of Nottingham ; their dau. and h. Elizabeth married John Mor- 
daunt, 1st Earl of Peterborough, from which family it passed to that of 
the Duke of Gordon, and upon the death of George 5th Duke of Gordon, 
s. p., 28 May 1836, this Barony, together with that of Mordaunt, fell into 
abeyance between his four surviving sisters and his nephew, Viscount 
Mandeville, s. and h. apparent of William 5th Dnke of Manchester. — Vide 
Mordaunt. 

BEAUCHAMP (of Warwick). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1350. 1. John Beauchamp, younger son of Guy XL 9th Earl of Warwick ; 
summ. to Pari, from 25 Nov. 24 Edw. III. 1350, to 15 Dec. 31 Edw. III. 
1357, as " Johanni de Bello Campo de Warrewyk ;" one of the Founders 
of the Order of the Garter, and carried the Standard Royal at the battle of 
Cressy ; ob. 1360, s. p., when the Barony became Extinct. 

BEAUCHAMP LORD ST. AMAND. Vide St. Amand. 

BEAUCHAMP LORD BERGAVEWNY. Vide Abergavenny. 

BEAUCHAMP (of Essex). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Stephen de Beauchamp (supposed of the House of Beauchamp 

of Elmley) ; ob. 1184. 

II. Rich. I. 2. Stephen de Beauchamp, s. and h., living 1190 ; ob. . . . , s. p., 

when his sisters became his heirs. 

BEAUCHAMP (of Hache, co. Somerset). 
Barons by Tenure. 

1. Robert de Beauchamp ; ob. 1228. 

Robert de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1251. 
Robert de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; living 1257. 
John de Beauchamp, s. and h. ; ob. 1283. 

E 



I. 


Hen. 


III. 


1 


II. 


Hen. 


III. 


2 


III. 


Hen. 


III. 


3 


IV. 


Edw 


I. 


4 



52 BEAUVALE — BEDFORD. 

Norreys, s. and h. of his niece Frideswide Lovel ("by Sir Edward Norreys, 
her husband), his coheirs, between whom this Barony fell into Abeyance. 

This Barony was claimed in 1798 by Thomas Stapleton, of Carlton, Esq., s. 
and h. of Nicholas, eldest son of Nicholas Errington (who assumed the name 
of Stapleton), s. andh. of Mark Errington, by Ann, dau. and at length sole heir 
of Gilbert Stapleton, great-great-grandson and heir of Sir Bryan, eldest son of 
Sir Bryan Stapleton, by Joan, eldest dau. and at length coheir of John Lord 
Lovel, by Joan Beaumont, sister and heir of William the last Viscount. The 
House of Peers, 14 March 1798, resolved, on Mr. Stapleton's petition, that 
the Barony was in Abeyance between the coheirs of William Viscount Beau- 
mont (in whom it was vested by descent from his father John Lord Beaumont, 
who was summoned to and sat in Parliament, 11 Hen. VI. as a Barony in fee), 
descended from his sister Joan, and that the petitioner was one of the coheirs. 

In 1840, the Queen was pleased to terminate the Abeyance of the Barony in 
favour of the elder coheir, 

Barons by Writ. 

VIII. 1840. 1. Miles Thomas Stapleton, eldest son of Thomas Stapleton, 

Esq., son of Miles Stapleton, Esq., next brother of Thomas 
Stapleton, who claimed the Barony in 1798, who was accord- 
ingly summ. to Pari, by writ 15 Oct. 1840, and placed next 
below the Lord Camoys ; ob. 17 Aug. 1854. 

IX. 1854. 2. Henry Stapleton, s. and h., present Baron Beaumont, a 
minor. 

BEAUVALE. 

Baron. 

I. 1839. 1. Sir Frederic James Lamb, G.C.B. ; created Lord Beauvale 
of Beauvale, co. Notts. 20 April 1839 ; succeeded his brother William 
Lord Melbourne as Lord Melbourne of Melbourne, co. Derby (Viscount 
Melbourne in Ireland), 24 Nov. 1848 ; ob. s. p. 29 Jan. 1853, when all 
his titles became Extinct. 

BEC. Vide Beke. 



„ . BEDFORD. 

Earls. 

I. 1150. Hugh de Bellomont, 3rd son of Robert, Count of Mellent 

in Normandy, obtained the Earldom of Bedford from King 
Stephen. " He fell," says Dugdale, " from the dignity of an 
Earl to the state of a Knight, and in the end to miserable 
poverty." 

II. 1366. Ingelram de Coucy, son-in-law of King Edw. III., created 

Earl of Bedford by charter, 11 May 1366, to him and the heirs 
male of his body by the Lady Isabel ; K.G. ; after the death 
of his father-in-law he resigned to King Richard II., in 1377, 
all he held from him in faith and homage, surrendered the 
insignia of the Garter, and discontinued the title of Bedford ; 
taken prisoner at the battle of Nicopolis, and died at Bursa in 
Natolia, 18 Feb. 1396-7, s. p. m., when the title became Extinct. 

Dukes. 

I. 1414. John Plantagenet, 3rd son of Henry IV., created in Pari, 
by his brother, King Henry V. Duke of Bedford and 
Earl of Kendal for life, 16 May 1414, and confirmed to 
him and his issue male by patent, 8 July 1433 ; Regent 
of France and Constable of England ; K.G. ; ob. 1435, 
s. p., when his honours became Extinct. 



BEDFORD — BEKE. 53 

Earls. Dukes. 

II. 1469. George Nevill, son of John Marquess of Montagu, 
created Duke of Bedford 5 Jan. 1469, by King Edw. 
IV. on the ground of intention to many him to his 
eldest daughter Elizabeth ; degraded by Pari. 1477. 
III. 1485. Jasper Tudor, surnamed "of Hatfield" (uncle of King 
Henry VII.) XVI. Earl of Pembroke, created Duke of 
Bedford 27 Oct. 1485, K.G. ; ob. 1495, s. p., when all 
his honours became Extinct. 

III. 1550. 1. John Russell, 1st Baron Russell, created Earl of Bedford 

19 Jan. 1550, Lord Admiral, K.G. ; ob. 1555. 

IV. 1555. 2. Francis Russell, s. andh., summ. to Pari. v. p. 1553, and placed 

in his father's Barony of Russell {vide Russell), K.G. ; ob. 1585. 

V. 1585. 3. Edward Russell, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Francis 

Russell (slain on the borders of Scotland the day before his 
father's death), eldest surviving son of the last Earl ; ob. 
1627, s. p. 

VI. 1627. 4. Francis Russell, 2nd Baron Russell of Thornhaugh, cousin and 

h., being s. and h. of William Russell, 1st Baron Russell of 
Thornhaugh, 4th son of Francis IV. 2nd Earl ; ob. 1641. 

Dukes. 

VII. 1641. — IV. 1694. 5. William Russell, s. and h., created Marquess 

of Tavistock and Duke of Bedford 11 May 1694, 
and Baron Howland of Streatham, co. Surrey, for 
life, 13 June 1695, with remainder to Wriothes- 
ley Russell, his grandson ( Vide Howland), 
K.G. ; ob. 1700. 

VIII. 1700. — V. 1700. 6. Wriothesley Russell, grands, and h., being s. 

and h. of the celebrated William Lord Russell, 
who was attainted and beheaded (v. p.) 1683, 
but his attainder reversed 1689, K.G. ; ob. 1711. 

IX. 1711. — VI. 1711. 7. Wriothesley Russell, s. and h. ; ob. 1732, s. p. 

X. 1732.— VII. 1732. 8. John Russell, bro. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1771. 

XI. 1771. — VIII. 1771. 9. Francis Russell, grands, and h., being s. and h. 

of Francis (who died v. p.), eldest son of the 
last Duke ; ob. 1802, s. p. 

XII. 1802.— IX. 1802. 10. John Russell, bro. and h., K.G. ; ob. 20 Oct. 

1839. 

XIII. 1839.— X. 1839. 11. Francis Russell, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by 
writ, v. p., 15 Jan. 1833, as " Francis Russell of Streatham, co. Surrey, 
Chev r ," but placed in his father's Barony of Howland {vide Howland) ; 
present Duke and Earl of Bedford, Marquess of Tavistock, Baron Russell, 
Baron Russell of Thornhaugh, and Baron Howland ; K.G. ^= 

BEKE (of Eresby). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. l. Walter Beke, obtained the Manor of Eresby, co. Lincoln. 

II. Hen. I. 2. Hugh Beke, s. and h. ; ob. s. p. 

III. Hen. II. 3. Henry Beke, bro. and h., but he being weak in his understand- 

ing, his younger brothers Walter and John enjoyed part of the 
inheritance. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Walter Beke, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1295. 5. John Beke, s. and h. ; summ. to Pari. 23 June, 20 Sept. and 
2 Nov. 23 Edw. I. 1295, and 26 Aug. 24 Edw. I. 1296 ; ob. 1302. 



56 



BERKELEY. 



Barons by Writ. 

VI. 1421. 11. ^J James de Berkeley, neph. and h. male, being s. and h. of 

James, bro. of tbe last Baron, sumrn. to Pari, from 20 Oct. 
9 Hen. V. 1421, b to 23 May, 1 Edw. IV. 1461. He m. Isabel, 
dau. and at length coheir of Thomas Baron Mowbray, 1st Duke 
of Norfolk ; ob. 1462. 

Viscount. Marquess. 

VII. 1462. — I. 1481. — I. 1488. 12. William de Berkeley, s. and h. ; created 

Viscount Berkeley by pat. 21 April 

1481, created Earl of Nottingham 28 

June 1483, created Marquess of Berkeley 28 Jan. 1488, 

created Earl Marshal of England, with limitation to the heirs 

male of his body, 19 Feb. 1485-6. The Marquess, 3 Hen. 

VII. 1488, settled and assured the Castle and Manor of 
Berkeley to his own use in tail general, with remainder to King 
Hen. VII. in tail male, remainder to his right heirs. Ob. 1492, 
s. p., when the Viscounty and Marquessate of Berkeley and 
Earldom of Nottingham became Extinct ; but the Barony of 
Berkeley, created in 1421, devolved on 

VIII. 13. Maurice Berkeley, his bro. and h., but he was never summ. to 

Pari. ; ob. 1507. 

IX. 1507. 14. Maurice Berkeley, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 14 Hen. VHI. 

1522 ; c ob. 1523, s. p. 

X. 1529. 15. Thomas Berkeley, bro. and h., summ. to Pari. 3 Nov. 21 

Hen. VIII. 1529 ; ob. 1533. 

XI. 1533. 16. Thomas Berkeley, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 5 Jan. 25 Hen. 

VIII. 1534 ; ob. 1534. 



of the most powerful noblemen of the time, 
and that of James Berkeley, who succeeded 
to the Barony, is, that the tenure of Berkeley 
Castle was then considered to confer the dig- 
nity of Baron on its possessor, and conse- 
quently that the said James was allowed that 
dignity as his right, rather than by the favour 
of the Crown. There were, however, other 
instances, as in Burghersh and De la War, of 
the heir male of a Baron by Writ being sum- 
moned instead of the heir general, and if mo- 
dern decisions may be applied to the subject, 
the Baronies of Berkeley, created by the Writs 
of Summons of the 23 Edw. I. and 2 Edw. II,, 
are now in abeyance between the descend- 
ants and representatives of the three daugh- 
ters and coheirs of Elizabeth Countess of 
Warwick, above mentioned, whose names will 
be found in a Note to the account of the 
Barony of L'Isle ; and the Barony possessed 
by the present Earl Berkeley is that created 
by the Writ of Summons to James de Berke- 
ley, 9 Hen. V. 

b This Writ must be considered as the 
origin of the Barony of Berkeley, vested in 
the present Earl of Berkeley, unless a right to 
a Writ of Summons to Parliament as Barons 
by Tenure could be established. Such a 
claim was made in 1828 by the present Earl 
Fitzhardinge (then Col. Berkeley), but no 
judgment was pronounced; and Sir Harris 



Nicolas, in his statement on behalf of Sir 
John Shelley Sidney, Bart., in relation to 
that claim, observes that had the claim been 
granted, it would not only have been " with- 
out a single precedent, but in opposition to 
the incontrovertible fact, that no claim to a 
Barony on the ground of Tenure was ever 
admitted, and that at no period since the 
reign of Hen. III. has Tenure per Baroniam 
been deemed to constitute a right to a Writ 
of Summons." 

c This Writ was considered as having cre- 
ated a new Barony, in the claim made by 
Colonel Berkeley, already alluded to, and it 
would certainly appear that Maurice IX. 
Baron was assigned a place in Parliament as 
junior Baron, although he never sat therein ; 
but it is equally certain (and of which no 
mention is made in the case of Colonel Berke- 
ley) that Thomas X. Baron and Thomas XI. 
Baron (neither of whom was possessed of 
Berkeley Castle) sat in the precedency of the 
older Barony, and that the accession of Henry 
XII. Baron to the Castle of Berkeley in no 
way altered his place in Parliament; indeed, 
this latter individual was in the 4 and 5 Ph. 
and Mary, and even after his controversy 
with the Lord Willoughby, 39 Eliz., assigned 
a lower precedency than had been allowed to 
his father, who was not possessed of the 
Castle. 



BERKELEY — BERKHAMSTED. 



57 



Barons by Writ. 
XII. 1534. 17. 



Henry Berkeley, s. and h., succeeded upon the death of King 
Edw. VI. to the Castle and Manor of Berkeley, under the settle- 
ment of 3 Hen. VII. 1488 ; he had special livery, 1 Ph. and 
Mary 1554-5, and was summ. to Pari, from 5 Nov. 5 and 6 
Ph. and Mary, 1558 (though he is recorded to have sat in the 
Pari, held in the 4th and 5th of that reign) to 5 April, 12 Jac. 
I. 1611- ob. 1613. 

XIII. 1613. 18. George Berkeley, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Sir 
Thomas Berkeley (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron; 
summ. to Pari, from 12 Feb. 21 Jac. I. 1624, to 3 Nov. 15 
Car. I. 1639 : ob. 1658. 



XIV. 1658.— I. 



Earls. 
1679. 



. George Berkeley," 1 s. and h., summ. to Pari, 
from 8 May, 13 Car. II. 1661, to 17 Oct. 31 
Car. II. 1679, created Viscount Dursley and 
Earl of Berkeley, both co. Glouc, 11 Sept. 1679 ; 
ob. 1698. 

XV. 1698. — II. 1698. 20. Charles Berkeley, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 

v. p. by AVrit 11 July 1689, e as Charles 
Berkeley de Berkeley ; ob. 1710. 

XVI. 1710. — III. 1710. 21. James Berkeley, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. 

p. as James Berkeley de Berkeley, by Writ, 
5 Mar. 1704, K.G. ; ob. 1736. 

22. Augustus Berkeley, s. and h., K.T. ; ob. 1755. 

23. Frederick Augustus Berkeley, s. and h. : ob. 

1810. 

XIX. 1810. — VI. 1810. 24. Thomas Moreton Fitz-Hardinge Berkeley, s. 
and h., present Earl and Baron Berkeley and Viscount Dursley ; f vmm. 



XVII. 1736.— IV. 1736 

XVIII. 1755.— V. 1755 



1. 



Barons. 
1658. 1. 



BERKELEY ( of Stratton ). 



John Berkeley (younger bro. of Charles 2nd Viscount Fitz-Har- 
dinge in Ireland), created Baron Berkeley of Stratton, co. 
Cornw., 19 May 1658, Lord Lieut, of Ireland, 1669 ; ob. 1678. 

II. 1678. 2. Charles Berkeley, s. and h. ; ob. 1682, unm. 

III. 1682. 3. John Berkeley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1697, s. p. s. 

IV. 1697. 4. William Berkeley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1741. 

V. 1741. 5. John Berkeley, s. and h. ; ob. 1773, mini., when the Barony be- 

came Extinct. 



BERKHAMSTED. 

Marquessate, 27 July 1726 — Extinct 1765. — Vide Cumberland. 



d George Lord Berkeley petitioned in May 
1661 to be allowed a higher place in Parlia- 
ment than had been assigned to him, claiming 
precedence 1st of the Lord De la War, and 
afterwards also of the Lords Abergavenny and 
Audley ; but although his claim was before 
the House till 1673, no decision was come to 
upon it, and it must be concluded that he did 
not establish his pretensions to sit in the pre- 
cedence of the original Writ. 



e He sat next below Lord Delawar, as also 
did his son. 

f As his Lordship is heir general of Thomas 
Boleyn, Earl of Wiltshire, who was created 
Earl of Ormond in Ireland, with remainder 
to the heirs of his body, 8 Dec. 1529, he pro- 
bably must be considered to have also inhe- 
rited that dignity. — See some observations on 
the Barony of Berkeley, under ' Baronies by 
Tenure,' in the Introduction. 



58 BERKSHIEE— BERNERS. 



BERKSHIRE. 

Earls. 

I. 1620. Francis Norreys II. 2nd Baron Norreys of Rycote ; created Vis- 

count Thame and Earl of Berkshire, 28 Jan. 1620 : ob. 1623, 
s. p. m. l., when the Viscounty and Earldom became Extinct. 

II. 1626. 1. Thomas Howard, 1st Baron Howard of Charleton and Viscount An- 

dover, created Earl of Berkshire, 7 Feb. 1625-6, E.G. ; ob. 1669. 

III. 1669. 2. Charles Howard, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. as Baron 

Howard of Charleton by writ, 19 Nov. 1640 ; ob. 1679, S. P. M. 

IV. 1679. 3. Thomas Howard, bro. and h. ; ob. 1706, s. p. m. 

V. 1706. 4. Henry Bowes Howard, grand-neph. and h., being s. and h. of 

Craven, eldest son of ffm. Howard, 4th son of Thomas 1st Earl ; on the 
death of his kinsman Henry Howard 10th Earl of Suffolk in 1745, he 
succeeded to that title, to which this Earldom has since been united. 

Vide Suffolk. 

BERNERS. 

In the reign of Henry V. Richard Berners " had the reputation of a Baron of this 
realm, though nothing of his creation or summons to Parliament that I could 
ever see," says Dugdale, " doth appear thereof;" ob. 1421, s. p. M. Margery, his 
daughter and heir, married to her second husband, 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1455. l.^ John Bourchier, 4th son of William Earl of Ewe by Anne dau. 

of Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester, 6th son of King 
Edw. III. ; summ. to Pari, by the Title of " John Bourchier de 
Berners, Chevalier," from 26 May, 33 Hen. VI. 1455, to 19 Aug. 
12 Edw. IV. 1472, K.G. ; ob. 1474. 

II. 1495. 2. John Bourchier, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Humphrey 

Bourchier (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Baron, summ. 
to Pari, from 14 Oct. 11 Hen. VII. 1495, to 9 Nov. 21 Hen. 
VIII. 1529 ; g ob. 1533, s. p. m. Jane, his dau. and sole heir, 
married Edmund Knyvet, Esq., Serjeant-Porter to King Hen. 
VIII., but the title lay dormant until allowed to 
Baroness. 

III. 1720. Katherine Bokenham, sister and ultimately sole heir to her brother 

Thomas Knyvet, and dau. of Sir John Knyvet, K.B., great- 
grandson of Sir Thomas Knyvet, who claimed the Barony, but 
died before the report had received the Royal confirmation, who 
was great-grandson and heir of the above-mentioned Edmund 
Knyvet and Jane Bourchier, dau. and sole heir of the last Baron, 
and wife first of John Harris, Esq., and secondly of Richard Bo- 
kenham ; by a judgment of the House of Lords, 30 May 1720, she 
was declared to be entitled to the ancient Barony of Berners ; ob. 
1743, s. p., when the Barony fell into Abeyance between Eliza- 



s In the 25th Henry VIII. 5 January, entry on the Roll ; or it might have been 
1534, the name of "Humphrido Bourchier j Humphrey Bourchier, the natural son of the 
de Berners, Chel'r," occurs in the Writs of ; last Baron, summoned from his bastardy not 
Summons, but never afterwards. It is diffi- i being then generally known ; but this is un- 
cult to decide who was the person so de- I likely from the said Humphrey being his , , 
scribed : it might either have been, that j second natural son, James his elder natural 

brother being then living, and whose de- 
scendants still exist. 



John, the last Baron, was summoned in igno- 
rance of his demise and the mistake in the 
Christian name, a misprint, or an erroneous 



BERTRAM— BERWICK. 59 



Baroness. 



beth, wife of Henry Wilson, Esq., and Lucy, wife 1st of Thomas 
Holt, Gent,, and 2ndly of John Field, the daughters and co- 
heirs of John Knyvet, s. and h. of Thomas Knyvet, next brother 
of Sir John Knyvet, K.B., father of the last Baroness. In 1832 
the King was pleased to terminate the Abeyance in favour of the 
eldest coheir, 

Barons by Writ. 

IV. 1832. 1. Robert Wilson, s. and h. of Henry William Wilson, s. and h. of 

Henry Wilson by Elizabeth Knyvet, eldest dau. and coheir of 
the aforesaid John Knyvet, summ." to Pari, by Writ 7 May 1832 ; 
ob. unm. 25 Mar. 1838, when the dignity again fell into Abey- 
ance, but was immediately determined in favour of, 

V. 1838. 2. Henry Wilson, bro. and h., sat first in Pari, after the death 

of his bro. 30 Apr. 1838 ; ob. 26 Feb. 1851. 

VI. 1851. 3. Henry William Wilson, s. and h., present Baron Berners. = 

BERTRAM (of Mitford). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. William de Bertram, Lord of Mitford. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Roger Bertram, s. and h. ; living 1171. 

III. John. 3. William Bertram, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1205. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Roger Bertram, s. and h. ; ob. 1241. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1264. 5. Roger Bertram, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 14 Dec. 49 Hen. III. 

1264, ob. . . 

Roger Bertram, his s. and h., was never summ. to Pari, and died 1311, 
s. P. M. ; his only dau. Agnes dying s. p., the issue of his four sisters, viz., 
1. Agnes, wife of Sir Thomas Fitzwilliarn ; 2. Isabel, wife of Philip d'Arcy ; 

3. Christian, wife of Penulbery ; and 4. Ada, wife of de Vere, 

aunts of the said Agnes, became his heirs. 



BERTRAM (of Bothall). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Richard Bertram, living 1196 ; to whom succeeded 

II. John. 2. Robert Bertram, s. and h. ; ob. 1203. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Richard Bertram, s. and h., a minor, 1203 ; ob. s. p. 

IV. John. 4. Roger Bertram, bro. and h. ; ob. 1261. 

V. 1261. 5. Robert Bertram, s. and h. net. 19, 1261 ; ob. 1308. 

VI. 1308. 6. Robert Bertram, grands, and h. (s. and h. of Roger, ob. v. p.) ; 

ob. 1314. 

VII. 1314. 7. Robert Bertram, s. and h., «t. 7, 1315 ; ob. 1364, leaving 

Ellen his dau. and h., m. 1. to Sir Robert Ogle, Knt., 2. to John 
Hatfield of London, and 3. to David Holgrave. 



BERWICK. 
Duke. 

I. 1687. James FitzJames, natural son of K. James II. Created Baron of 
Bosworth, co. Leicester, Earl of Tinmouth, co. Northumberland, and Duke 
of Berwick-upon-Tweed, 19 Mar. 1687 ; Attainted in 1695, when his 
honours became Forfeited. 



60 BERWICK — BINDON. 

BERWICK (of Attingham). 
Barons. 

I. 1784. 1. Noel Hill, Created Baron Berwick of Attingham, co. Salop, 19 

May 1784 ; ob. 1789. 

II. 1789. 2. Thomas Noel Hill, s. and h. ; ob. s. p. 2 Nov. 1832. 

III. 1832. 3. William (assumed in 1824 the name of) Noel-Hill, bro. and h. ; 

ob. unm. 4 Aug. 1842. 

IV. 1842. 4. Bichabd (assumed in 1824 the name of) Noel-Hill, bro. and h. ; 

ob. 28 Sept. 1848. 

V. 1848. 5. Richard Noel Noel-Hill, s. and h., present Baron Berwick of 

Attingham; unm. 

BEVERLEY. 

Marqtjessate, 26 May 1708— Extinct 1778.— Vide Dover. 

Earls. 

I. 1790. 1. Algernon Percy, 2nd Lord Lovaine of Alnwick, created Earl of 

Beverley, co. York, 2 Nov. 1790 ; ob. 21 Oct. 1830. 

II. 1830. 2. George Percy, s. and h., present Earl of Beverley and Baron 

Lovaine. =j= 

Y 

BEXLEY. 
Baron. 

I. 1823. 1. Nicholas Vansittart ; created Baron Bexley of Bexley, co. 
Kent, 1 Mar. 1823 ; ob. s. p. 8 Feb. 1851, when the title became Extinct. 



BIDUN". 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Halerand de Bidun. 

II. Hen. II. 2. John de Bidtjn, s. and h., living 1165 ; ob. s. p., when his five 

sisters became his heirs, of whom Amy m. Gerard de Limesley. 

BIGOD. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Roger Bigod, at the Domesday Survey was possessed of 23 lord- 

ships in Suffolk and Essex, by gift of the Conqueror, Lord of 
the Castle of Norwich and Founder of the abbey of Thetford ; 
ob. 1107. 

II. 1107. 2. William Bigod, s. and h., Steward of the Household to King 

Hen. I. ; perished, with the King's son and many others, by 
shipwreck, 1120, s. p. 

III. 1120. 3. Hugh Bigod, bro. and h., made Earl of Norfolk by King Stephen, 

1135. — Vide Norfolk. 

BINDON". 

Earls. 

I. 1706. 1. Henry Howard (commonly called Lord Walden), s. and h. appa- 

rent of Henry XII. 5th Earl of Suffolk, created v. p. Baron 
Chesterford, co. Essex, and Earl of Bindon, co. Dorset, 30 Dec. 
1706 ; succeeded as XIII. 6th Earl of Suffolk ; ob. 1718. 

II. 1718. 2. Charles William Howard, s. and h., 7th Earl of Suffolk ; ob. 

1722, s. p., when the Barony of Chesterford and Earldom of Bindon became 
Extinct. 



BINDON — BLOUNT. 01 

BINDON. See Howard of Bindon. 

BINGLEY. 

Barons. 

I. 1713. 1, Bobert Benson; created Baron of Bingley, co. York, 21 July 1713; 

ob. 1730, s. p. m., when the Barony became Extinct. 

II. 1762. 1. George Lane, husband of Hariot, only dau. and h. of the last 

Baron ; created Baron Bingley, co. York, 13 May 1762, to him and the 
heirs male of his body on the body of the said Hariot ; ob. 1773, s. p., when 
the title again became Extinct. 



BIRKIN. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. 1. John de Birkin ; ob. 1226. 

II. Hen. III. 2. Thomas de Birkin, s. and h. ; ob. 1230, s. p., leaving Isabel his 

sister, wife of Bobert de Everingham, his heir. 

BISET. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Steph. 1. Manser or Manasser Biset, " Dapifer Regis ;" living 1153. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Henry Biset, s. and h. ; ob. s. p. 

III. Rich. I. 3. Henry Biset, bro. and h. ; living 1199. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. William Biset, s. and h. ; ob. s. p., ante 1232. 

V. Hen. III. 5. John Biset, Chief Forester of England, bro. and h., m. Alice, 

dau. and coh. of Thomas Baron of Hedington ; ob. s. p. m., 1241, having 
had issue three daughters and coheirs, viz. : 1. Margaret, ux. Richard de 
Rivers ; 2. Ela, ux. John de Wotton ; and 3. Isabel, ux. Hugh de Plessetis. 

BLANDFORD. 

Marqtjessate, 14 Dec. 1702. — Vide Marlborough. 



BLETCHLEY. Vide Note to Villiers. 



Barons by Tenure. 



BLOUNT, or BLUND. 



Robert le Blund. 
Gilbert le Blund, s. and h. 
William le Blund, s. and h. 
Hubert le Blund ; living 1165. 
William le Blund, s. and h. ; living 1185. 
William le Blund, s. and h. ; killed at the battle of Lewes 
when his two sisters and heirs, Agnes, wife of William de 
Criketoft, and Roesia, wife of Robert de Valonijs, shared his lands. 

Barons by Writ. 

1. 1326. 1. Thomas le Blount, Lord of Belton, co. Rutland, descended from 
Hubert 4th Baron, m. Julian, dau. and h. of Sir Thomas Ley- 
bourn (widow of John Hastings Lord Bergavcnny); smnm. to 
Pari, from 3 Dec. 20 Edvv. II. 1326, to 15 June, 2 Edw. III. 
1328 ; ob. 1330. 



I. 


Will. I. 


1. 


II. 


Will. II. 


2. 


III. 


Hen. I. 


3. 


IV. 


Hen. II. 


4. 


V. 


Hen. II. 


5. 


VI. 


Hen. III. 


6. 




1263, s 


. P 



62 BOCLAND — BOLEBEC. 

Barons by Writ. 

II. 1330. 2. William le Blount, s. and h. (whether by Julian Leybourn is 
uncertain), summ. to Pari, from 25 Jan. 4 Edw. III. 1330, to 18 Aug. 
11 Edw. III. 1337, m. Margaret, dau. and coh. of Theobald de Verdun ; 
ob. 1337, leaving Sir John Blount his s. and h., whose grands. Sir 
Thomas Blount Lord of Belton was beheaded, temp. Hen. IV. 



BOCLAND. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Hugh de Bocland, living 1174 ; his successor was 

II. John. 2. William de Bocland, s. of Peter de Ludgarshall ; ob. 1215, 

s. p. M. ; Joan, his dau. and h., m. two husbands, William Musard 
and Kobert Fitz-Walkelyn de Ferrars, by the latter of whom she left two 
daughters and coheirs. 

BODMIN. 

Viscounty, 23 July, 1679 — Extinct 1764. — Vide Radnor. 



BODRIGAN. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1309, 1. Henry de Bodrigan, Lord of Bodrigan, co. Cornw. ; summ. to 
Pari. 26 Oct. 3 Edw. II. 1309, but never afterwards, nor any of his de- 
scendants, and who were no longer ranked among the Barons of the 
Realm. 

BOHUN. 

Barons by Tenure. 

Humphrey de Bohun came into England with the Conqueror. 

Humphrey de Bohun, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

Humphrey de Bohun, s. and h. ; Steward to Hen. I., m. 
Margaret, dau. and ultimately coh. of Milo Earl of Hereford ; 
ob. 1187. 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Humphrey de Bohun, s. and h., sometimes called Earl of Here- 

ford ; Constable of England. 

V. John. 5. Henry de Bohun, s. and h., created Earl of Hereford, anno 

1199. Vide Hereford. 



BOHUN (of Midhurst, eo. Sussex). 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1363. 1. John de Bohun, summ. to Pari, from 1 June, 37 Edw. III. 1363, 
to 20 Jan. 39 Edw. III. 1366, " Johanni de Bohun de Midhurst ;" ob. 
1367 ; he left issue male, whose descendants continued until the reign of 
Henry VII., but they were never summ. to Pari, or ranked as Barons of 
the Realm. John de Bohun, his great-grands, and h. left two daughters and 
coheirs, Ursula, wife of Robert Southwell, Esq., and Mary, wife of Sir David 
Owen. 

BOLEBEC ( of Buckinghamshire ). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Hugh de Bolebec, possessed at the General Survey of lands in 

Oxford, Huntingdon, and Bucks ; ob. . . . 

II. Steph. 2. Hugh de Bolebec, s. and h., living 1145 ; ob. . . . s. p. 



. Will 


I. 


1 


I. Hen. 


I. 


2 


II. Hen. 


II. 


3 



BOLEBEC — BOLINGBROKE. 



63 



Barons by Tenure. 

III. Hen. II. 3. Walter de Bolebec, bro. and h. ; ob. ante 1185, s. p. m. Isa- 
bel, his dan. and h., m. Robert de Vere, III. 3rd Earl of Oxford, whose 
descendants amongst their titles assumed that of Bolebec. h 



Barons by Tenure. 



BOLEBEC (of Northumberland). 



II. 

III. 

IV. 



Hen. I 



1. Hugh de Bolebec, held clivers lands co. Northumb. by gift of 
Henry I. ; ob. ante 1166. 

2. Walter Bolebec, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1186. 

3. Walter Bolebec, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1204, s. r. 

4. Hugh Bolebec, bro. and h. ; ob. 1261, s. p. m., leaving his four 
daughters his heirs, viz. : Philippa, wife of Robert de Lancaster ; Margery, 
wife 1st of Nicholas Corbet, and afterwards of Sir Ralph Fitz-William ; 
Alice, wife of Walter de Huntercomb ; and Maud, wife of Hugh de la Vale. 



Hen. II. 
John. 
Hen. Ill 



BOLEBROOKE. 

Barony, 11 Feb. 1782. — Vide Sackville. 

BOLEYN. Vide Rochford. 



Earls. 
1624. 



BOLINGBROKE. 



Oliver St. John, 4th Baron St. John of Bletsho ; created Earl of 
Bolingbroke, co. Line, 28 Dec. 1624 ; ob. 1646. 

II. 1646. 2. Oliver St. John, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Sir Paulet St. 

John, K.B. (ob. v. p.), 2nd son (the eldest having died s. p. m.) of 
the last Earl ; ob. 1688, s. p. 

III. 1688. 3. Paulet St. John, bro. and h. ; ob. 1711, unm., when the Earldom 

became Extinct. 

Viscounts. 
I. 1712. 1. Henry St. John, s. of Sir Henry St. John, afterwards Viscount 
St. John ; created Baron St. John of Lydiard Tregoze, co. 
Wilts, and Viscount Bolingbroke, co. Line, with remainder, 
failing his issue male, to his father, Sir Henry St. John, Bart., 
and the heirs male of his body, 7 July 1712. Attainted 1714, 
when his honours became Forfeited. Restored in blood only 
1725 ; ob. 1751, s. p. 
Frederick St. John, 3rd Viscount St. John, neph. and h., suc- 
ceeded to his uncle's honours in consequence of the limitation 
preventing the attainder affecting his interest in those dignities 
after his uncle's death, being s. and h. of John 2nd Viscount St. 
John, s. of Henry 1st Viscount, father of the 1st Viscount Boling- 
broke ; ob. 1787. 

George Richard St. John, s. and h. ; ob. 18 Dec. 1824. 

Henry St. John, s. and h. ; ob. 1 Oct. 1851. 

Henry St. John, s. and h., present Viscount Bolingbroke, Vis- 
count St. John, Baron St. John of Lydiard Tregoze, Baron St. John of 
Battersea, and a Baronet ; unm. 



II. 1751. 2 



III. 1787. 


3. 


IV. 1824. 


4. 


V. 1851. 


5. 



h In 1625 this claim was referred to the 
House of Lords, and it was resolved, 5 Apr. 
1626, that the Baronies of Bolebec, Sandford, 
and Badlesmere were in abeyance between 



the heirs general of John VII. Earl of Oxford, 
without having inquired into the origin or 
nature of those Baronies, or even their ex- 
istence in the person of the said Earl. 



64 BOLLBRS— BONVILE. 

BOLLERS. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Baldwin de Bollers ; living 1165. 

II. Rich. I. 2. Robert de Bollers, s. and h. ; ob. 1203. 

III. John. 3. Baldwin de Bollers, bro. and h. ; ob. 1209, s. p. 

BOLTEBY. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. 1. Nicholas de Bolteby, Baron of Tindale, co. Nor thumb., 

jure uxoris ; ob. 1272. 

II. Edw. I. 2. Adam de Bolteby, s. and h. ; ob. 1281, s. p. m., leaving two 

daughters and coheirs, Isabel, m. 1. Thomas de Multon, or De Lucy, 
and 2. William Tunstal of Thurgarland ; and Eve, m. 1. William de 
Cantilupe, and 2. Alan Walkingham. 

BOLTON. 

Dukes. 

I. 1689. 1. Charles Pawlet, 6th Marquess of Winchester, created Duke of 

Bolton 9 April 1689 ; ob. 1699. 

II. 1699. 2. Charles Pawlet, s. and h., Lord Lieut, of Ireland 1719, K.G. ; 

ob. 1722. 

III. 1722. 3. Charles Pawlet, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. 12 April 1717, 

as Baron Pawlet of Basing; K.G. ; ob. s. p. 1754, when the Barony 
of Pawlet of Basing became Extinct (vide Pawlet of Basing) ; 
his other honours devolved upon 

IV. 1754. 4. Harry Pawlet, his bro. and h. ; ob. 1759. 

V. 1759. 5. Charles Pawlet, s. and h., K.B. ; ob. 1765, s. p. l. 

VI. 1765. 6. Harry Pawlet, bro. and h. ; ob. 1794, s. p. m., when the Mar- 

quessate of Winchester devolved upon his heir male, but the 
Dukedom became Extinct. 
Barons. 

I. 1797. 1. Thomas Orde (assumed in 1795 the name of) Powlett, husband 

of Jean Mary, natural dau. of Charles 5th Duke of Bolton, 
created Baron Bolton of Bolton Castle, co. York, 20 Oct. 1797 ; 
ob. 30 July 1807. 

II. 1807. 2. William Orde Powlett, s. and h. ; ob. 13 July 1850. 

III. 1850. 3. William Henry Orde-Powlett, neph. and h., being s. and h. of 

Thomas next bro. of the last Lord ; present Baron Bolton. =j= 

Y 

BOLUM. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Gilbert de Bolum ; living 1165. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Walter de Bolum ; ob. s. p. m., leaving two daughters and co- 

heirs, Alice, wife of John de Calce, and , wife of James de Calce. 



BONVILE. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1449. * William Bon vile, summ. to Pari, from 23 Sept. 28 Hen. VI. 1449, 
to 30 July, 38 Hen. VI. 1460, as " Willielmo Bonevile, Domino Bonevile 
and De Chuton, ChTr," K.G. ; ob. 1460, leaving Cecily, his great-graixl- 
dau., his heir ; viz., dau. and h. of William Bonvile, Lord Harrington 
jure matris (ob. v. avi), s. and h. of William Bonvile (ob. v. p.), 
eldest s. of the Baron. The said Cecily m. 1. Thomas Grey, Mar- 



BORINGDON — BOTELER. . 65 

quess of Dorset, by whom she had issue ; and 2. Henry Stafford, 
Earl of Wiltshire, who died s. p. This Barony continued merged in the 
Marquessate of Dorset and Dukedom of Suffolk until the attainder of 
Henry Grey, Duke of Suffolk in 1554, when, with his other honours, it 
became Forfeited. 

BORINGDON. 

Barons. 

I. 1784. 1. John Parker, created Baron Boringdon of Boringdon, co. Devon, 
18 May 1784 ; ob. 1788. 

Viscount. 
U. 1788. — I. 1815. 2. John Parker, s. and h., created Viscount Boringdon of 
North Molton, co. Devon, and Earl of Morley, 29 .Nov. 1815. Vide 

MoELEY. 

BOROUGH. Vide Burgh. 



BOSCAWEN ROSE. 
Barony, 9 June, 1720. — Vide Falmouth. 

BOSTON. 

Viscounty, 24 Dec. 1G98. — Extinct 1754. — Vide Grantham. 

Barons. 

I. 1761. 1. Sir William Irby, 2nd Baronet, created Baron Boston of Boston, 

co. Line, 10 April 1761 ; ob. 1775. 

II. 1775. 2. Frederick Irby, s. and h. ; ob. 23 Mar. 1825. 

III. 1825. 3. George Irby, s. and h. ; ob. 12 Mar. 1856. 

IV. 1856. 4. George Ives Irby, s. and h., present Baron Boston, and a Bart. =p 

BOSWORTH. 

Barony, 19 March 1687— Forfeited 1695.— Vide Berwick. 

BOTELER (of Oversley and Wemme). 
Barons by Tenure. 
1. Hen. I. 1. Ralph Boteler, called "Radulphus Pincerna de Legreces- 

tria," being Butler to Robert Earl of Leicester ; settled at 

Oversley, co. Warwick ; ob. . . . 

Robert Boteler, s. and h., living 1225 ; ob. . . . 

Ralph Boteler ; living 1225. 

Maurice Boteler, s. and h., living 1245 ; ob. . . . 

Ralph Boteler, s. and h., m. Maud, dau. and h. of William 

Pantulf, Baron of Wemme, co. Salop; ob. ante 1277. 
William Boteler, s. and h. ; ob. 1283. 
John Boteler, s. and h. ; ob. 1286, s. p. 
VHI. Edw. I. 8. Gawine Boteler, bro. and h. ; ob. 1289, s. p. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1308. 9. William Boteler, bro. and h., summ. to Pari, from 10 Mar. 

1 Edw. II. 1308, to 10 Oct. 19 Edw. II. 1325 ; ob. 1334. 

v 



II. 


John 




2, 


III. 


Hen. 


III. 


3, 


IV. 


Hen. 


III. 


4. 


V. 


Hen. 


HI. 


5, 


VI. 


Edw, 


, I. 


6. 


VII. 


Edw, 


I. 


7. 



66 



BOTBLEK — BOTETOURT. 



Barons by Writ. 

II. 10. William Boteler, s. and h., tet. 36, was never sumni. to Pari. ; 

ob. 1361. 

III. 1368. 11. William Boteler, s. and h., a?t. 30, summ. to Pari. 23 Feb. 

42 Edw. III. 1368, and 6 April, 43 Edw. III. 1369 ; ob. 1369, s.p.m. 
Elizabeth, his sole dau. and h., married — 1. Robert Ferrers ; 2. Sir John 
Say ; and 3. Thomas Molinton. Her said first husband, Robert Ferrers, 
appears to have possessed the Barony, as he was summ. to Pari, as " Ro- 
bert Ferrers de Wemme," from 1375 to 1379. On her marriage with 
Thomas Molinton, he styled himself " Baron of Wemme," but was never 
summ. to Pari. ; nor does it appear that she had issue by either her 
second or third husband, so that this Barony is probably in Abeyance 
between the representatives of her two granddaughters, the daughters and 
coheirs of Robert Ferrers, her s. by her 1st husband. Vide Ferrers of 
Wemme. 

BOTELER (of Warrington). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. 1. Almaric Pincerna, s. and h. of William de Boteler, alias Pin- 

cerna, was Lord of Warrington (acquired by marriage with Bea- 
trix, dau. and coh. of Matthew Villers, Lord of Warrington, 
co. Lane.) ; ob. 1235. 

II. 1235. 2. William Pincerna, alias Boteler, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1303. 
Baron by Writ. 

III. 1295. 3. William le Boteler, Lord of Warrington, grands, and h. (s. 

and h. of Henry le Boteler, ob. v. p.) ; summ. to Pari. 23 June, 23 
Edw. I. 1295, 26 Aug. 24 Edw. I. 1296, and 6 Feb. 27 Edw. 1. 1299 ;' ob. 
circa 1328. William le Boteler, his s. and h., received several summonses 
to attend the King, from 9 to 16 Edw. II., but does not appear to have 
been summ. to Pari. ; ob. 3 Rich. II. (1380), leaving descendants settled at 
Warrington, Bewsey, and other parts of Lancashire. 

BOTETOURT. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1305. 1. f John de Botetourt ; summ. to Pari, from 19 June, 33 Edw. I. 

1305, to 13 Sept. 18 Edw. II. 1324 ; ob. 1324. 

II. 1342. 2.^ John de Botetourt, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Thomas 

Botetourt (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron, summ. to Pari, 
from 25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342, to 3 Feb. 9 Rich. II. 1385 ; ob. 
1385, leaving Joyce wife of Sir Hugh Burnell, Knt., his granddau. 
and h., viz. dau. and h. of John Botetourt, his eldest son, who 
died vit. pat. The said Joyce died s. p. in 1406, when the 
Barony fell into Abeyance between the three daughters of John 

the last Baron (who died in 1385), viz. Alice, who m. 

Kyriel ; Joyce, wife of Sir Baldwin Frevil, and 2ndly, of Sir 
Adam de Peshall ; and Katherine, who m. Maurice de Berkeley. 
It continued in that state until 1764, when the Crown was pleased 
to terminate the Abeyance in favour of, 



1 He was also summoned 8 June, 22 Edw. 
I. 1294, and 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I., 1297; 
but it is doubtful if either Writ can be con- 
sidered as a regular Summons to Parliament. 
— Vide Fitz-John and Clyvedon. It is 
also stated that both this William le Boteler 
and William le Boteler of Wemme were sum- 
moned 26 Jan. 24 Edw. I. 1296 (the other 



Writ of that year being merely a summons 
to be at Newcastle with horse and arms, in 
which, however, the name of Boteler does 
not occur), but as the name is only to be 
found once in that Writ, and then without 
any descriptive addition, it is difficult to de- 
termine to which William le Boteler it was 
directed. 



BOTETOURT — BOTEEAUX. 67 

Barons by Writ. 

III. 1764. 3. Norborne Berkeley, the lineal descendant and h. of the said 

Maurice de Berkeley and Katherine Botetourt ; he was summ. to 
Pari, as Baron Botetourt 13 Apr. 1764 ; ob. 1776, s. p., when the 
Barony again fell into Abeyance, and so continued until 1803, 
when it was terminated in favour of, 

IV. 1803. 4. Hekry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort, one of the coheirs, he being 

s. and h. of Charles 4th Duke of Beaufort, by Elizabeth (who died in 
1 799), sister and sole h. of Norborne the last Lord ; his Grace obtained 
a confirmation of the Barony of Botetourt to him and the heirs of his body 
by Patent, 4 June 1803 ; E.G. ; ob. 11 Oct. 1803.— Vide Beaufort. 



BOTETOURT (of Langport). 
Barony, 17 March 1664— Extinct 1665. Vide Falmouth. 

BOTILLER. Vide Boteler or Butler. 

BOTEEAUX. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. William de Botreaux ; ob. ante 1194. 

II. John. William de Botreaux, s. and h., living 1220 ; his successor 

was, 

III. Hen. III. William de Botreaux, living 1232 •; ob. . . . s. p. 

IV. Hen. III. Reginald de Botreaux, bro. and h. ; ob. 1272. William de 

Botreaux, his s. and h., succeeded him, and died in 1301, 
but neither he nor William de Botreaux his son, set. 27 at 
his father's decease, and who died in 1349, was ever summ. 
to Pari. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1368. 1. William Botreaux, s. and h. of William de Botreaux, last-men- 

tioned, ast. 12 at his father's decease, 1349 ; summ. to Pari, 
from 24 Feb. 42 Edw. III. 1368, to 12 Sept. 14 Eich. II. 1390 ; k 
ob. 1391. 

II. 2. William Botreaux, s. and h., set. 24, summ. to Pari. 7 Sept. 15 

Eich. II. 1391 ; ob. 1392. 

III. 1412. 3.^ William Botreaux, s. and h., set. 5, summ. to Pari, from 1 Dec. 

14 Hen. IV. 1412, to 23 May, 1 Edw. IV. 1461 ; ob. 1462, s. p. m., leaving 
Margaret his dau. and h., and who styled herself "Margareta Dn'a Bo- 
treaux." She m. Eobert 2nd Baron Hungerford, whose son succeeded to 
this Barony ; but being attainted in 1463, it, together with his other 
honours, became Forfeited. Thomas Hungerford, his s. and h., was not 
only never restored to his father's honours, but he was likewise attainted 
in 1468 ; his dau. and h. Mary m. Edward Hastings, and having ob- 
tained the reversal of the attainder of her father and grandfather, her 
said husband was summ. to Pari, as Baron Hungerford, and succeeded 
his father in the Barony of Hastings in 1483. George, his s. and h., 



k 



Though Dugdale states that William I. j twenty-three years of age, who died on the 






1st Baron, was summ. to Pari, until the 
15 Rich. II., it is most probable that the 
Writ of that year, 7 Sept. 1391, was directed 
to his son, for this Baron died Thursday, 

10 Aug. 1391, leaving William his son i was summoned, as is stated in the text. 

F 2 



25 May 1392, and, unless this conjecture 
be correct, without having been summ. to 
Pari. William, his son, was then only five 
years of age, and soon after coming of age he 



68 



BOTTESFORD — BOURCHIER. 



was created Earl of Huntingdon, in which dignity this Barony, with 
those of Hungerford, Hastings, and Molines, continued merged until the 
death of Francis, XXVII. 10th Earl, s. p. m., in 1789, when they devolved 
on Elizabeth, his sister and h., and they are now vested in Henry Weys- 
ford Charles Plantagenet, present Marquess of Hastings, Baron Botreaux, 
Hastings, Hungerford, and Molines, &c. Vide Hastings, and Hunt- 
ingdon. 



I. 



II. 



Barons. 
1835. 1 



1845. 



BOTTESFORD. 

Sir Charles Manners-Sutton, G.C.B., Speaker of the House of 
Commons, created Baron Bottesford of Bottesford, co. Leicester, 
and Viscount Canterbury of the City of Canterbury, 10 March 
1835 ; ob. 21 July 1845. 

Charles John Manners-Sutton, s. and h., present Viscount 
Canterbury and Baron Bottesford; unm. 



Barons by Writ. 



BOURCHIER. 



1 



1342. 



II 



1. Robert Bourchier, summ. to Pari, from 25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 
1342, to 10 March, 23 Edw. III. 1349 ; ob. 1349. 
1381. 2.^John Bourchier, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 16 July 5 Rich. 
II. 1381, to 30 Sept. 1 Hen. IV. 1399, when the King dispensed 
with his attendance in Parliament by patent, 14 Feb. following;; 
E.G.; died 21 May 1400. 

III. 1400. 3.^Bartholomew Bourchier, s. and h. set. 36, summ. to Pari, from 

9 Sept. 1 Hen. IV. 1400, to 26 Oct. 11 Hen. IV. 1409 ; ob. 1409 
s. p. m. Elizabeth Bourchier, his sole dau. and h. aet. 10, m. first, 

IV. 1411. ^Sir Hugh Stafford, who was summ. to Pari, from 21 Sept 

12 Hen. IV. 1411, to 22 March, 7 Hen. V. 1413, as " Hugoni 
Stafford," without any further designation ; E.G. ; ob. 1420, s. p. ; 
and his widow, the said Elizabeth, dau. and h. of Bartholomew 
the last Baron, having re-married, 

^Sir Lewis Robsert, E.G., he was summ. to Pari, from 24 Feb. 
3 Hen. VI. 1425, to 3 Aug. 7 Hen. VI. 1429, as " Lodowico 
Eobessart, Ch'l'r " only ; ob. 1431, s. p., and his widow Elizabeth 
above mentioned dying 1 July 1433, s. p., this Barony devolved 
upon, 



V. 1425. 



VI. 



Viscount. 

1435.— I. 1446. 4.^Henry Bourchier, Earl of Ewe in Normandy, then 
a3t. 27, s. and h. of William Earl of Ewe in Normandy (so created by 
King Hen. V. 10 June 1419, to him and the heirs male of his body, 
by the service of rendering to the King annually "imu gardebroche" 
at the feast of St. George) by Ann Plantagenet, dau. and h. of Thomas 
Duke of Gloucester, youngest son of King Edw. III., which said Earl 
of Ewe was eldest son of William Bourchier, next bro. of John II. 
2nd Baron ; summ. to Pari, from 5 July, 13 Hen. VI. 1435, to 13 Jan. 
23 Hen. VI. 1445, sometimes as " Henrico Bourgchier, Comiti de Ewe," 
and at others as " Henrico Bourgchier, Ch'l'r, " or as " Henrico Boursli- 
chier de Bourghchier ;" summ. to Pari, as " Henrico Vicecomiti ' Bourgh- 



1 Although no patent has been found for 
the creation of the dignity of Viscount Bour- 
chier, there can be no doubt but that a patent 
preceded the writ ; and indeed it was so stated 



by Viscount Bourchier (then Earl of Essex) at 
the creation of Viscount Berkeley, 1481-2. — 
Vide Introductory Observations on the Dig- 
nity of a Viscount. 



BOWES— BOYLE. 69 

drier," from 14 Dec. 25 Hen. VI. 1440, to 23 May, 1 Edw. IV. 
1461 ; K.G. ; created Earl of Essex 30 June 1461, in which dignity this 
Barony continued merged until the demise of Henry Bourcliier 2nd Earl 
of Essex, in 1539, when it devolved on Ann, his sole dau. and h., who 
married William Parr, Earl of Essex. Her issue heing illegitimated by 
Act of Pari, this Barony on her death devolved on Walter Devereux VIII. 
Baron Ferrers of Chartley, being s. and h. of John Devereux VII. Baron 
Ferrers of Chartley, by Cecily, sister and eventually sole h. of Henry, the 
last Earl of Essex, and VI. 4th Baron Bourchier. From that period the 
Barony of Bourchier may be considered to have been united to that of 
Ferrers of Chartley, and with it to have fallen into Abeyance on the 
death of Robert Devereux Baron Ferrers of Chartley and Earl of Essex, in 
1646, s. p., between his two sisters and coheirs, viz. Frances, wife of William 
Marquess of Hertford, and Dorothy, wife of Sir Henry Shirley, Bart. This 
Barony is now in Abeyance between the representatives of the said 
Frances and Dorothy, viz., Richard Plantagenet Duke of Buckingham and 
Chandos, as heir general of Frances the eldest coheir, and Marmion Edward 
Ferrers of Baddesley Clinton, and Lady Elizabeth Boultbee (nephew and 
sister of George Ferrars 3rd Marquess Townshend), the representatives 
of Dorothy, the younger coheir. George II. Marquess Townshend being 
heir general of Sir Robert Shirley, grandson of the said Dorothy, succeeded 
as Baron Ferrers of Chartley, the Crown having, in 1677, terminated the 
Abeyance of that Barony in favour of the said Sir Robert ; but the 
Barony of Bourchier was not taken out of Abeyance on that occasion, 
although this dignity and others have been attributed (but erroneously) 
to the Marquess Townshend. m 

The Viscounty of Bourchier became Extinct on the death of Henry 
Bourchier 2nd Earl of Essex, when the heirs male of the body of the 
first Viscount failed. 



BOWES. 
Baron. 
I. 1815. John Bowes, 10th Earl of Strathmore in Scotland, created Baron 
Bowes of Streatlam Castle, co. Durham, and Lunedale, co. York, 7 Aug. 
1815 ; ob. 3 July 1820, s. p. l., when this Barony became Extinct. 



BOYLE. 

Barons. 

I. 1711. 1. Charles Boyle, 4th Earl of Orrery in Ireland, created Baron 

Boyle of Marston, co. Somerset, 5 Sept. 1711, K.T. ; ob. 1731. 

II. 1737. 2. John Boyle, s. and h., 5th Earl of Orrery, in Ireland, succeeded 

as 5th Earl of Cork in Ireland ; ob. 1762. 

III. 1762. 3. Hamilton Boyle, 2nd son (Charles the eldest son having died 

v. p., s. p. m.), 6th Earl of Cork and Orrery in Ireland ; ob. 1764, 
uimi. 
IV 1764. 4. Edmund Boyle, half bro. and h., 7th Earl of Cork and Orrery in 
Ireland ; ob. 1798. 

V. 1798. 5. Edmund Boyle, s. and h., present Baron Boyle, also 8th Earl of 
Cork and Orrery in Ireland ; K.P. =j= 



m Upon the creation of George afterwards | instance of neglect or ignorance, which is more 

2nd Marquess Townshend to the Earldom of j fully noticed under Basset of Drayton, another 

Leicester, in 1784, he was styled in his Patent \ Barony erroneously attributed to him in the 

of Creation Baron Bourchier, an extraordinary | same Patent. 



70 BRACKLEY — BRANCEPETH. 



BRACKLEY. 
Viscounts. 

I. 1616. 1. Thomas Egerton, created Baron Ellesmere of Ellesmere, co. Salop, 

21 July 1603, and Viscount Brackley of Brackley, co. North- 
ampton, 7 Nov. 1616, Lord High Chancellor ; oh. 1616-7. 

II. 1617. 2. John Egerton, 2nd s. hut h., created Earl of Bridgewater 27 May 

1617 ; oh. 1649. 

III. 1649. 3. John Egerton, s. and h., Earl of Bridgewater ; ob. 1686. 

IV. 1686. 4. John Egerton, s. and h., Earl of Bridgewater ; oh. 1700-1. 

Marquess. 

V. 1701. — I. 1720. 5. Scroope Egerton, s. and h., Earl of Bridgewater, 

created Maixpiess of Brackley, co. Northampton, and Duke of Bridgewater, 
co. Somerset, 18 June 1720. The Marquessate of Brackley became Ex- 
tinct in 1803, hut the Viscounty devolved on John William VIII. 7th 
Earl of Bridgewater, became Extinct in 1829, and was again created, 
6 July 1846, in the person of Lord Francis Ellesmere, Viscount Brackley 
and Earl of Ellesmere. — Vide Bridgewater and Ellesmere. 



BRADESTON. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1342. Thomas de Bradeston, summ. to Pari, from 25 Feb. 16 Edw. 

III. 1342, to 3 April, 34 Edw. III. 1360, when he died, leaving his grand- 
son Thomas (son of his son Sir Robert Bradeston, dec.) his heir, £et. 8 yrs. ; 
he died 1374, leaving Elizabeth his sole dau. and h. set. 6 months, after- 
wards wife of Sir Walter de la Pole, whose only dau. and h. married 
Thomas Ingoldesthorpe, Esq., whose granddau. and h. married John 
Nevill, Marquess of Montagu, amongst the descendants of whose daughters 
and coheirs this Barony is in Abeyance. 

BRADFORD. 

Francis Newport, 1st Viscount Newport, created Earl of Brad- 
ford, co. Salop, 11 May 1694 ; ob. 1708. 

Richard Newport, s. and h. ; ob. 1723. 

Henry Newport, s. and h. ; ob. 1734, s. p. l. 

Richard Newport, bro. and h. ; oh. ... , unm. 

5. Thomas Newport, bro. and h. ; ob. 1762, s. p., when all his honours 
became Extinct. 

Sir Henry Bridgeman, 2nd Bart., s. and h. of Sir Orlando Bridge- 
man, Bart., by Ann Newport, sister and eventually sole heir of 
Thomas, the last Earl ; created Baron Bradford, co. Salop, 
13 Aug. 1794 ; ob. 1800. 

Earls. 

II. 1800. — VI. 1815. 2. Orlando Bridgeman, s. and h., created Viscount 

Newport and Earl of Bradford, both co. Salop, 
30 Nov. 1815 ; ob. 7 Sept. 1825. 

III. 1825. — VII. 1825. 3. George Augustus Frederick Henry Bridgeman, 

s. and h. ; present Earl and Baron Bradford, Viscount Newport, and a 
Baronet. =j= 

t 

BRANCEPETH. 

Barony, 4 Nov. 1613— Extinct 1645.— Vide Rochester. 



Earls. 
I. 1694. 


1 


n. 1708. 

III. 1723. 

IV. 1734. 

V. 17.. 


2 
3 
4 
5. 


Barons 
I. 1794. 


1 



BRANDON — BRAOSE. 71 



BRANDON. 

Viscounty, 21 July 1679 — Extinct 1702. — Vide Macclesfield. 

Dukes. 

I. 1712. 1. James Hamilton, 4th Duke of Hamilton in Scotland, created 

Baron of Dutton, co. Chester, and Duke of Brandon, co. Suffolk, 
10 Sept. 1712, " to hold to him and the heirs male of his body, 
and in default of such issue to the heirs male of the body of his 
late father and mother ;" K.G. ; killed in a duel 15 Nov. 1712. 

II. 1712. 2. James Hamilton, s. and h., 5th Duke of Hamilton in Scotland ; 

K.T. ; ob. 1742. 

III. 1742. 3. James Hamilton, s. and h., 6th Duke of Hamilton in Scotland ; 

ob. 1758. 

IV. 1758. 4. James George Hamilton, s. and h., 7th Duke of Hamilton in 

Scotland ; ob. 1769, unm. 

V. 1769. 5. Douglas Hamilton, bro. and h., 8th Duke of Hamilton in Scot- 

land ; ob. 1799, s. p. 

VI. 1799. 6. Archibald Hamilton, uncle and h., being next brother of James 

3rd Duke ; 9th Duke of Hamilton in Scotland ; ob. 16 Feb. 
1819. 

VII. 1819. 7. Alexander Hamilton, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ, v. p. 

4 Nov. 1806, and placed in his father's Barony of Dutton ; 10th 
Duke of Hamilton in Scotland ; K.G. ; ob. 18 Aug. 1852. 

VIII. 1852. 8. William Alexander Anthomy Archibald Hamilton, s. and 
h., present Duke of Brandon and Baron Dutton in England, 11th Duke 
of Hamilton, &c, in Scotland. =p 

* 

BRAOSE (of Bramber). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. William de Braose, Lord of Bramber, co. Sussex ; living 1075. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Philip de Braose, Lord of Bramber, s. and h. ; living 1095, and 

about to go to the Holy Land, 

III. Rich. I. 3. William de Braose, Lord of Bramber, s. and h. ; living 1125. 

IV. John. 4. William de Braose, Lord of Bramber and Brecon, s. and h. ; ob. 

1211-2. 

V. 1211-2. 5. Giles de Braose, Lord of Brecon, s. and h. and Bishop of Here- 

ford ; ob. 1215. 

VI. 1215. 6. Reginald de Braose, Lord of Bramber and Brecon, bro. and h. ; 

ob. 1222-8. 

VII. 1222-8. 7. William de Braose, Lord of Brecon, s. and h. ; taken prisoner 

and hanged by Llewelyn, Prince of North Wales, 1230, s. p. m., leaving 4 
daughters his coheirs, viz. — 1. Isabel, afterwards wife of David Llew- 
elyn Jerworth, Prince of North Wales ; 2. Eva, afterwards wife of William 
de Cantilupe, Lord of Bergavenny ; 3. Eleanor, afterwards m. to Hum- 
phrey de Bohun, s. and h. apparent of the Earl of Hereford ; 4. Maud, m. 
to Roger de Mortimer, Lord of Wigmore, and afterwards to Sir John de 
Brampton. 

BRAOSE (of Gower). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. 1. John de Braose, Lord of Gower, s. and h. of William, brother of 

Giles, Bishop of Hereford, above mentioned ; killed by a fall 
from his horse at Bramber, 1232. 

II. 1232. 2. William de Braose, Lord of Gower and Bramber, s. and h. ; 

ob. 1290. 



72 BRAOSE — BRAYBROOKE. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1299. 3. >J< t William de Braose, Lord of Gower and Bramber, s. and h. 
summ. to Pari, from 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299, to 18 Sept. 16 Edw. II. 
1322; he was also summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, and 26 Jan. 
25 Edw. I. 1297, but for the reasons assigned under Clyvedon and 
Fitz-John, it is doubtful if either of those writs can be considered as 
a regular summons to Parliament ; ob. 1326, s. p. M., leaving Aliva, wife of 
John de Mowbray, and 2ndly of Sir Richard de Peshall ; and Joan, Avife 
of James de Bohun of Midhurst, his daughters and heirs, between whose 
descendants and representatives this Barony is presumed to be in Abey- 
ance. 



BRAOSE. 

Baron by "Writ. 

I. 1342. 1. Thomas de Braose, jet. 10, 5 Edw. II. (1311) ; on the death of his 
father, Peter, half-brother of William I. 3rd Baron, he was found heir 
to his grandmother, Mary, dau. of William Lord Roos, his grandfather's 
third wife, 19 Edw. II. (1326-7) ; summ. to Pari, from 25 Feb. 16 Edw. 
III. 1342, to 15 July, 27 Edw. III. 1353 ; ob. 1361, having by Beatrice 
his wife (dau. of Roger Earl of March, and widow of Edward, s. and h. of 
Thomas de Brotherton Earl of Norfolk) three sons — John, ait. 22, Thomas, 
Peter, ob. s. p. ; and three daughters — Elizabeth, ob. s. p., Joan, ob. s. p., 
Beatrice, wife of William Lord Say ; Sir John Braose, the eldest son, died 
3 Feb. 1367, s. p., leaving Thomas, his brother, his heir, a;t. 15, and who 
was found heir to his mother, and ait. 24 in 7 Rich. II. (1383-4.) He 
died 1395, s. p. s., leaving two children, Thomas and Joanna, both of whom 
died in ward the same year, and Elizabeth Lady Say, then the wife of 
Sir William Heron, was found to be their cousin and heir, namely — 
daughter of their aunt Beatrice, wife of William Lord Say, above men- 
tioned. The said Elizabeth Lady Say died s. p. 8 July 1399, when all 
the issue of Thomas Baron Braose having failed, the dignity became 
Extinct. 



BRAYBEOOK. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. 1. Robert de Braybrook, of Braybrook, co. Northampton ; ob. 

1213. 

II. Hen. III. 2. Henry de Braybrook, s. and h. ; ob. 1234, having married 

Christiana, the dau. and h. of Wyschard Ledet, Lord of 
Wardon. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Wyschard (assumed the name of) Ledet, s. and h. ; ob. 1241. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Walter Ledet, s. and h. ; dead 1257, s. p. m., his two daughters 

— 1. Amicia, who was under age in 1257, and wife of William Baron 
Latimer of Corby ; and 2. Christiana, the wife of John le Latimer of 
Braybrook — being his heirs. 



Barons. 



BRAYBROOKE. 



I. 1788. 1. John Griffin Griffin, 4th Baron Howard de Walden, created 

Lord Braybrooke, Baron of Braybrooke, co. Northamp., 5 Sept. 
1788, with remainder, failing his issue male, to Richard Aid- 
worth Neville, Esq., and the heirs male of his body ; ob. 1797. 

II. 1797. 2. Richard Aldworth Neville (assumed the name of) Griffin, 

1797 ; ob. 28 Feb. 1825. 

III. 1825. 3. Richard Neville Griffin, s. and h., present Baron Braybrooke. =p 

Y 



BRA YE — BRECKNOCK. 



73 



BRA YE. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1529. 1. Edmoxd Braye, summ. to Pari, from 3 Nov. 21 Hen. VIII. 1529, 

to 8 June, 28 Hen. VIII. 1536 ; ob. 1539. 

II. 1539. 2. John Braye, s. and h. ; summ. to Pari, from 3 Nov. 37 Hen. VIII. 

1545, to 21 Oct. 2 Mar. 1555 ; ob. 1557, s. p. Upon bis Lordsbip's de- 
cease bis six sisters, or their representatives, became his coheirs, viz. : — 
1. Anne, wife of George Brooke Lord Cobham; 2. Elizabeth, wife of Sir 
Ralph Verney, Knt., 2ndly of Sir Richard Catesby, and 3rdly of William 
Clark ; 3. Frideswide, wife of Sir Percival Hart, Knt. ; 4. Mary, wife of 
Sir Robert Peckham, Knt. ; 5. Dorothy, wife of Edmund 2nd Lord Chan- 
dos, and 2ndly of William Lord Knollys ; 6. Frances, wife of Thomas 
Lifield, Esq., and amongst them this dignity continued in Abeyance until 
allowed to, 

Baroness. 
I. 1839. 1. Sarah Otway-Cave (widow of Henry Otway, Esq.), dau. and h. 
of Sir Thomas Cave, Bart., and who upon the decease of her kinswoman 
Mary, Baroness Fermanagh, iu 1810, became the sole b. of her great- 
great-grandfather John Verney Viscount Fermanagh in Ireland, great- 
great-grandson and b. of Sir Ralph Verney, by Elizabeth, 2nd sister and 
coh. of John II. 2nd Baron Bray. By a resolution of the House of Lords 
27 Aug. 1839, she was declared one of the coheirs of the said Barony, 
which resolution being submitted to the Queen, Her Majesty was pleased 
to terminate the Abeyance by letters patent 3 Oct. following. 

BREADALBANE. 

Baron. Marquess. 

I. 1806. — I. 1831. 1. John Campbell, 4th Earl of Breadalbane in Scotland ; 

created Baron Breadalbane of Taymouth Castle, co. 
Perth, 13 Nov. 1806, and Earl of Ormelie and Mar- 
quess of Breadalbane, 12 Sept. 1831 ; ob. 29 Mar. 1834. 

II. 1834. — II. 1834. 2. John Campbell, s. and h., present Marquess of 

Breadalbane, Earl of Ormelie, Baron Breadalbane, K.T., also Earl of 
Breadalbane, &c. in Scotland. = 



BREAUT. 

Baron by Tenure. 

I. John. Foulke de Breaut, a Norman by birth, and Lord of Chilham, co. 
Kent, by grant of King John ; he procured a grant of the third penny 
of the county of Devon from King Henry III. 1219, n but was afterwards 
banished the kingdom ; ob. circa 1228, s. p. m. Eve, his sole dau. and h., 
m. Llewelyn, Prince of North Wales. 



BRECKNOCK. 

Earls. 

I. 1660. 1. James Butler, 12th Earl, 1st Marquess of Ormonde in Ireland, 
created Baron Butler, of Lanthony, co. Monm., and Earl of Brecknock iu 
Wales, 20 July 1660 ; created Duke of Ormonde in Ireland 30 July 1661 ; 
created Duke of Ormonde 9 Nov. 1682, KG. ; ob. 1688. — Vide Ormonde. 
—Forfeited 1715. 

Earldom, 7 Sept. 1812. — Vide Camden. 



n The King, by a Writ 19 June 1219, di- 
rected the Sheriff of Devonshire to pay the 
third penny to Foulke de breaut, as William 



late Earl of Devon had received it, with ar- 
rears from the time the said Foulke had cus- 
tody of the heir. — Vide Devon. 



74 BRENTFORD— BRISTOL. < 

BRENTFORD. 
Earl. 

I. 1644. 1. Patrick Ruthyn or Ruthven, Earl of Forth in Scotland, created 
Earl of Brentford, co. Middlesex, 27 May 1644 ; ob. 1651, s. p. m., when the 
Earldom became Extinct. 

Earldom, 10 April 1689 — Extinct 1719. — Vide Schomberg. 

Baroness, 6 April 1722 — Extinct 1730. — Vide Darlington. 

BEEWES or BREWSE. See Braose. 

BRIDGEWATER. 

Earls. 

I. 1538. 1. Henry d'Aubeney, II. 2nd Baron Danbeney, created Earl of 

Bridgewater, co. Somerset, 19 July 1538, K.G. ; ob. 1548, s. p., 
when all his honours became Extinct. 

II. 1617. 1, John Egerton, 2nd Viscount Brackley, created Earl of Bridge- 

water 27 May 1617 ; ob. 1649. 

III. 1649. 2. John Egerton, s. and h. ; ob. 1686. 

IV. 1686. 3. John Egerton, s. and h. ; ob. 1700-1. 

Dukes. 

V. 1701. — I. 1720. 4. Scroop Egerton, s. and h., created Marquess of 

Brackley, co. Northamp., and Duke of Bridge- 
water, co. Somerset, 18 June 1720 ; ob. 1745. 

VI. 1745. — II. 1745. 5. John Egerton, s. and h. ; ob. 1748, unm. 

VII. 1748. — III. 1748. 6. Francis Egerton, bro. and h. ; ob. unm. 8 Mar. 

1803, when the Dukedom of Bridgewater and the 
Marquessate of Brackley became Extinct; but 
the Earldom and his other honours devolved on his 
next heir male, 

VIII. 1803. 7. John William Egerton, s. and h. of John, Bishop of Durham, 

eldest s. of Henry Egerton, younger s. of John, IV. 3rd Earl ; 
ob. 1823, s. p. 

IX. 1823. 8. Francis Henry Egerton, bro. and h., Earl of Bridgewater, Vis- 

count Brackley, and Baron of Ellesmere ; ob. 11 Feb. 1829, s. p., when all 
his honours became Extinct. 

BRIDPORT. 

Baron. Viscount. 

I. 1796. — I. 1800. 1. Alexander Hood, 1st Baron Bridport in Ireland ; created 
Baron Bridport of Crickit St. Thomas, co. Somerset, 13 June 1796, and 
Viscount Bridport, of the same place, 16 June 1800, K.B. ; ob. 3 May 
1814, s. p., when his English honours became Extinct. 

BRISTOL. 

Earls. 

I. 1622. 1. John Digby, 1st Baron Digby, created Earl of Bristol, 15 Sept. 

1622 ; ob. 1653. 

II. 1653. 2. George Digby, s. and h. ; summ. to Pari, by writ, v. p., as Baron 

Digby 9 June 1641 ; K.G. ; ob. 1676. 

III. 1676. 3. John Digby, s. and h. ; ob. 1698, s. p., when all his honours be- 

came Extinct. 

IV. 1714. 1. John Hervey, 1st Baron Hervey of Ickworth, created Earl of 

Bristol 19 Oct. 1714 ; ob. 1751. 



BRITANNIA — BROME. 75 

Earls. 

V. 1751. 2. George William Hervey, grands, and h., being s. and h. of John 

Baron Hervey (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Earl, who was 
summ. to Pari, by Writ, 11 June 1733, and placed in his father's 
Barony of Hervey of Ickworth ; Lord Lieut, of Ireland ; ob. 
1775, unm. 

VI. 1775. 3. Augustus John Hervey, bro. and h. ; ob. 1779, s. p. 

VII. 1779. 4. Frederick Augustus Hervey, bro. and h., succeeded in 1797, 

as 5th Baron Howard de Walden, Bishop of Deny : ob. 8 July 
1803. 

Marquess. 

VIII. 1803. — I. 1826. 5. Frederick William Hervey, 2nd s. and h. male 

(John Augustus Hervey, the eldest s., died v. p. leaving a dau. and sole 
h., who carried the Barony of Howard de Walden to the family of Ellis) ; 
created Earl Jermyn of Horningsherth, co. Suffolk, and Marquess of Bristol, 
30 June 1826 ; present Marquess and Earl of Bristol, Earl Jermyn, and 
Baron Hervey. =j= 

BRITANNIA. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1305. I.^John, a younger s. of John Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brit- 
tany ; summ. to Pari, as " Johanni de Britannia, Juniori," 24 May and 
13 July, 33 Edw. I. 1305 ; declared Earl of Richmond 15 Oct. 34 Edw. I. 
(1306); ob. unmarr. in Brittany 1333, when his honours became Ex- 
tinct. 

BEIWEEE. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. 1. William Briwere, Lord of Torbay, and seised of divers 

manors, castles, &c, in Devon, Somerset, and elsewhere ; ob. 
1226. 

II. Hen. III. 2. William Briwere, s. and h. ; ob. 1232, s. p., leaving his five 

sisters his heirs, viz. : 1. Grace, m. Reginald de Braose, Lord of Brecon ; 
2. Isabel, m. 1st Dover, and 2ndly Baldwin de Wake ; 3. Mar- 
gery, m. 1st Salmonaville, and 2ndly William de la Ferte ; 4. 

Alice, m. 1st William Paynell, and 2ndly Eeginald de Mohun ; 5. Joan, 
m. AVilham de Percy. 



BRODRICK. 

Barons. 

I. 1796. 1. George Brodrick, 4th Viscount Midleton in Ireland, created 

Baron Brodrick of Pepper Harrow, co. Surrey, with remainder, 
failing issue male, to the issue male of his father, George 
Viscount Midleton, dec. 11 June 1796 ; ob. 12 Aug. 1836. 

II. 1836. 2. George Alan Brodrick, s. and h., 5th Viscount Midleton ; ob. s. p., 

1 Nov. 1848. 

III. 1848. 3. Charles Brodrick, cous. and h., eldest s. of Charles Brodrick, D.D., 

Archbishop of Cashell, younger bro. of George 1st Baron ; present 
Baron Brodrick, also Viscount Midleton, &c. in Ireland. =j= 

BROME. 

Viscounty, 30 June 1753 — Extinct 1852. — Vide Cornwallis. 



76 



BROOKE — BROWNLOW. 



BROOKE. 



Barons. 
I. 1621 



1. Sir Fulke Greville, K.B., s. and h. of Fulke, eldest s. of Sir 
Fulke Greville, by Elizabeth, dau. and h. of Edward Wil- 
loughby (ob. v. p.), s. and h. of Robert, 2nd Baron Willoughby 
de Broke ; created Baron Brooke of Beauchamp's Conrt, co. 
Warwick, with remainder, failing his issne male, to Robert 
Greville, s. and h. of Fulke, only s. of Robert Greville his 
uncle, 29 Jan. 1621 ; ob. 1628, s. p. 

II. 1628. 2. Robert Greville, above mentioned, succeeded agreeable to the 

said limitation ; slain at Lichfield, 1642. 

III. 1642. 3. Francis Greville, s. and h. ; ob. 16 . ., s. P. 

IV. 16. . . 4. Robert Greville, bro. and h. ; ob. 1676, s. p. M. 

V. 1676. 5. Fulke Greville, bro. and h. ; ob. 1710. 

VI. 1710. 6. Fulke Greville, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Francis Gre- 

ville (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron ; ob. 1711, unm. 

VII. 1711. 7. William Greville, bro. and h. ; ob. 1727. 



VIII. 1727.— I. 



Earls. 
1746. 



8. Francis Greville, s. and h., created Earl Brooke 
of Warwick Castle, 7 July 1746, and Earl of 
Warwick 30 Nov. 1759, K.T. ; ob. 1773. 

1773. 9. George Greville, s. and h., Earl of Warwick ; ob. 
2 May 1816. 

1816. 10. Henry Richard Greville, s. and h., Earl of War- 
wick, K.T. ; ob. 10 Aug. 1853. 

1853. 11. George Guy Greville, s. and h., present Earl 
and Baron Brooke and Earl of Warwick. =j= 

Y 

BROUGHAM and VAUX. 



IX. 1773.— II. 

X. 1816.— III. 

XI. 1853.— IV. 

Baron. 

I. 1830. 1. Henry Brougham, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain ; created 
Baron Brougham and Vaux of Brougham, co. Westmoreland, 22 Nov. 
1830, present Baron Brougham and Vaux. =p 



BEOUGHTON DE GYFFORD. 
Baron. 

I. 1851. 1. Right Hon. Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Bart., G.C.B. 
Broughton of Broughton de Gyfford, co. Wilts, 26 Feb. 
Baron Broughton de Gyfford. =p 



created Baron 
1851, present 



I. 



Barons. 
1776. 1. 



BROWNLOW. 



Sir Brownlow Cust, 4th Baronet, created Baron Brownlow of 
Belton, co. Line, 20 May 1776 ; ob. 25 Dec. 1807. 

Earls. 

II. 1807. — I. 1815. 2. John Cust, s. and h., created Viscount Alford of Al- 

ford, eo. Line, and Earl Brownlow, 27 Nov. 1815 ; ob. 
15 Sept. 1853. 

III. 1853. — II. 1853. 3. John William Spencer Brownlow Egerton, grands. 

and h., being s. and h. of John Hume Home Cust, afterwards John Hume 
Egerton, Viscount Alford, eldest s. of the last Earl ; assumed the name of 
Egerton only by Royal License, 5 Sept. 1853 ; a minor. 



BRUCE. 77 

BRUCE. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Robert de Brus, Lord of Skelton and Annandale ; ob. 1141. 

II. Steph. 2. Adam de Brus, s. and h. ; ob. 1167. 

III. Hen. II. 3. Adam de Brus, s. and h. ; ob. 1180. 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Peter de Brus, s. and b. ; ob. 1211. 

V. Jobn. 5. Peter de Brus, s. and b. ; ob. 1242. 

VI. Hen. III. 6. Peter de Brus, s. and h. ; ob. 1273, s. p., when his four sisters 

became his heirs ; viz. : 1. Agnes, m. Walter de Fauconberg ; 2. Lucy, 
m. Marrnaduke de Thweng ; 3. Margaret, m. Bobert de Roos ; 4. La- 
derana, m. John de Bella Aqua, or Bellew. 



BRUCE ( of Annandale ). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Rich. I. 1. Robert de Brus, 2nd s. of Robert 1st Baron, and bro. of Adam 

2nd Baron, above mentioned, to whom his father gave Annan- 
dale, in Scotland ; living 1196. 

II. John. 2. William de Brus, s. and h. ; ob. 1215. 

III. John. 3. Robert de Brus, s. and h. ; ob. 1245. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Robert de Brus, s. and h., was one of the competitors for 

the Crown of Scotland in 1286, in right of his mother, Isa- 
bel, dau. of David, bro. of William, King of Scotland ; and 
refusing to do homage to Baliol, to whom the Crown of that 
kingdom was adjudged, he gave the Lordship of Annandale 
to his eldest son ; ob. 1295. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1295. 5. Robert Bruce, s. and h., Earl of Carrick, jure uxoris, summ. to 

Pari, from 23 June, 23 Edw. 1. 1295, to 26 Jan. 25 Edw. 1. 1297, 
though it is somewhat doubtful if the last Writ can be deemed 
a regular summons to Pari. Vide Fitz-John. Ob. 1304. 

II. 1304. 6. Robert Bruce, s. and h., Earl of Carrick v. p., crowned King of 
Scotland at Scone 29 Mar. 1306, when this dignity merged in the Scottish 
Crown. 

BRUCE (of Whorlton, Skelton, and Ampthill). 
Barons. 

I. 1641. 1. Thomas Bruce, 1st Earl of Els;in in Scotland, created Baron Bruce 

of Whorlton, co. York, 30 July, 1641 ; ob. 1663. 

Viscount. 

II. 1663. — I. 1664. 2. Robert Bruce, s. and h., created Baron Bruce of Skel- 
I. 1664. ton, co. York, Viscount Bruce of Ampthill, co. Bedford, and Earl 

of Ailesbury, 18 March 1664. — Vide Ailesbury. Charles Bruce, 3rd Earl 
of Ailesbury, was summ. to Pari, by writ, 29 Dec. 1711, and placed in his 
father's Barony of Bruce of Whorlton ; succeeded his said father, 1741 ; 
Extinct 1747. 

BRUCE ( of Tottenham ). 
Barony, 17 April 1746. — Vide Ailesbury. 

George William Frederick Brudenell Bruce (commonly called Earl Bruce), 
s. and h. apparent of Charles Brudenell Bruce, Marquess of Ailesbury ; summ. 
to Pari, by writ 10 July 1838, and placed in his father's Barony of Bruce of 
Tottenham ; succeeded his father as Marquess of Ailesbury 4 Jan. 1856. 



78 BEUCE— BRYAN. 

BRUCE (of Whorlton). 

Earldom, 17 July 1821. — Vide Atlesbury. 

BEUDENELL ( of Stanton Wivill). 

BRUDENELL (of Deene). 
Barons. 

I. 1628. 1. Sir Thomas Brudenell, 1st Bart. ; created Baron Brudenell of 

Stanton Wivill, co. Leicester, 26 Feb. 1628, created Earl of 
Cardigan 20 April 1661 ; ob. 1664. 

II. 1664. 2. Robert Brudenell, s. and h., Earl of Cardigan ; ob. 1703. 

III. 1703. 3. George Brudenell, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Francis 

Brudenell (ob. v. p.), s. and h. of Robert the last Baron, Earl of 
Cardigan ; ob. 1732. 

IV. 1732. 4. George Brudenell (assumed the name of) Montagu, s. and h., 

Earl of Cardigan, created Marquess of Monthermer and Duke of 
Montagu 5 Nov. 1766, and Baron Montagu of Boughton, with 
special limitation, 21 Aug. 1786 ; K.G. ; ob. s. p. m., 1790, when 
the said Dukedom and Marquessate became Extinct. The Ba- 
rony of Montagu descended to his grandson, and this Barony and 
the Earldom of Cardigan devolved on his brother and heir male, 

Of Deene. 

V. 1790. — I. 1780. 5. James Brudenell, created Baron Brudenell of Deene, 

co. Northampton, 17 Oct. 1780 ; ob. 24 Feb. 1811, 
s. p., when the Barony of Brudenell of Deene became 
Extinct; but the Barony of Brudenell of Stanton 
Wivill and the Earldom of Cardigan devolved on his 
nephew and heir, 

VI. 1811. 6. Robert Brudenell, being s. and h. of Robert Brudenell, next 

brother of James the last Baron ; ob. 14 Aug. 1837. 

VII. 1837. 7. James Thomas Brudenell, s. and h., present Earl of Cardigan, 

and Baron Brudenell of Stanton Wivill. = 

BEUNE. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1313. 1. Maurice le Brune, sumni. to Pari, from 8 Jan. 6 Edw. II. 1313, 
to 14 March, 15 Edw. II. 1322 ; and, excepting that he was summoned 

5 April 1327 to be at Newcastle with horse and arms, to serve against 
Robert Bruce, nothing further is known of him. He left issue, William 
Brune his s. and h., whose great-grands, and h., Sir Henry Brune, Knt., 
died 1462, leaving two daughters and coheirs, viz. : 1. Alice, m. 1st to 
John Berners, 2ndly to Robert Harleston, and 3rdly to Sir John Heven- 
ingham ; and 2. Elizabeth, m. 1st William Malory, 2ndly Thomas 
Tyrrell of South Okendon, co. Essex, and 3rdly Sir William Brandon. 
The representative of Alice the eldest dau. was, temp. 2 Eliz., Sir John 
Harleston, who d. 28 Feb. 1568, leaving issue ; and the representative of 
the younger dau. Elizabeth was Sir Charles Tyrrell of Thornton, co. Bucks, 
Bart., who d. s.p.m. 20 Jan. 1749. 

BRYAN. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1350. I.^Gut de Bryan, summ. to Pari, from 25 Nov. 24 Edw. III. 1350, to 

6 Dec. 13 Rich. II. 1389 ; K.G. ; ob. 1390, leaving Philippa, set. 12, and 
Elizabeth, set. 10, daughters and coheirs of Guy de Bryan, his eldest son 
(who died v. p. 1386), his granddaughters and heirs. The said Philippa 



BEY AN — BUCKINGHAM. 79 

m. 1st John Devereux, and 2ndly Sir Henry Le Scrope, but died s. p. 
8 Hen. IV. ; and Elizabeth became the wife of Sir Robert Lovell, Knt., 
by whom she had a daughter and sole heir, Maud, who m. 1st John Earl 
of Arundel, and by him had Humphrey Earl of Arundel, who died infra 
a^tatem, s. p. ; the said Maud m. 2ndly Sir Richard Stafford, Knt., and 
had issue Avice, who became the wife of James Butler Earl of Ormond, 
but died s. p. 35 Hen. VI. 1456, when the Barony of Bryan is presumed 
to have become Extinct. 

It is to be observed that the Earls of Northumberland, from having 
married Eleanor, granddau. and heiress of Robert Lord Boynings, styled 
themselves Barons Boynings, Fitz-Bayne, and Bryan, probably from the 
statement given by Dugdale, Vincent, and other good authorities, that 
Richard Lord Boynings, father of the said Robert Lord Boynings, married 
" Isabel, dau. and heir of Robert Baron Fitz-Bayne, by Elizabeth, dau. 
and h. of Sir Guy de Bryan, Knt." On reference, however, to several 
inquisitions, it would appear that Elizabeth, dau. and coheir ©f Sir Guy 
de Bryan, was aged 4 years 9 Rich. II. (1385-6), and 10 years of age 14 
Rich. II. (1390-1), whilst Isabel, her presumed child, is stated to be 30 
years of age 16 Rich. II. (1392-3) ; nor does it appear that any alliance 
ever took place between the descendants of Guy de Bryan, who was summ. 
to Barl. 24 Edw. III., and the family of Fitz-Payne, which could warrant 
such assumption, and hence that the Earls of Northumberland never had 
the slightest pretensions to the Barony of Bryan created by that writ, or 
to any other Barony of Bryan. 

BRYAN. 

Lady Bryan, Governess to the Brincess — afterwards Queen — Elizabeth, says, in 

a letter ° dated , that on the birth of Queen Mary, Henry VIII. made her a 

Baroness. Horace Walpole in his ' Royal and Noble Authors,' notices this 
statement. 

BUCHAN. 

Henry Beaumont, I. 1st Baron, having m. Alice, niece and at length h. of John 
Comyn, Earl of Buchan, was summ. to Pari, as " Comiti de Boghan " from 
22 Jan. 7 Edw. III. 1334, to 16 Nov. 13 Edw. III. 1339, but this nrast be 
considered as summons to a Baron only, though by the name of his Scotch 
Earldom. — Vide observations imder Angus and Athol. 



BUCKHUEST. 
Baron. 
I. 1567. 1. Thomas Sackville, created Baron of Buckhurst, co. Sussex, 
8 June 1567, created Earl of Dorset 13 March 1603, K.G.— Vide 
Dorset. 

BUCKINGHAM (County). 
Earls. 

I. 1066. 1. Walter Giffard, received for his services the Earldom of Buck- 

ingham from William the Conqueror ; ob. 1102. 

II. 1102. 2. Walter Giffard, s. and h. ; Earl of Longueville in Normandy ; 

ob. 1164, s. p. 

III. Hen. I. Richard de Clare, surnamed Strongbow, Earl of Pembroke, being 

descended from Rohais, sister and coheir of the last Earl, styled 
himself Earl of Buckingham ; ob. 1176, s. p. m. 



° Ellis, 2 Series, ii. p. 79. 



80 BUCKINGHAM. 

Earls. 

IV. 1377. 1. Thomas Plant a genet, Duke of Gloucester, youngest s. of King 

Edward III. ; created Earl of Buckingham 16 July 1377 ; K.G. ; 
Lord High Constable ; murdered 1397. 

V. 1397. 2. Humphrey Plantagenet, s. and li. ; ob. 1399, s. p., when his 

honours became Extinct. 



VI. 1399.— I. 



Dukes. 

1444. 



VII. 1459.— II. 1459. 2. 



VIII. I486.— III. 1486. 3, 



Humphrey Stafford, 4th Earl of Stafford, son of 
Edmond Earl of Stafford, by Ann Plantagenet, 
sister and h. of Humphrey the last Earl, styled 
Earl of Buckingham jure matris, created Duke of 
Buckingham 14 Sept. 1444, and, 22 May 1447-8, 
had special precedence given him before all Dukes 
not of the blood royal ; Lord High Constable ; 
K.G. ; slain at Northampton 1459. 

Henry Stafford, grands, and h. set. 4, 1459, being 
s. and h. of Humphrey Stafford (ob. v. p.), eldest s. 
of the last Duke ; constituted Hereditary Lord High 
Constable 1483 ; K.G. ; beheaded 1483, and, being 
attainted, all his honours became Forfeited. 

Edward Stafford, s. and h., restored 1486 ; Lord 
High Constable ; K.G. ; beheaded 1521, and, being 
attainted, all his honours became Forfeited. 



Marquesses. Dukes. 
IX. 1616.— I. 1618.— IV. 1623. 



George Villiers, 1st Viscount Villiers ; 
created Earl of Buckingham 5 Jan. 1616, 
with remainder, failing his issue male, to 
his brothers John and Christopher Vil- 
liers ; p created Marquess of Buckingham 
1 Jan. 1617-8, q and Duke of Buckingham 
and Earl of Coventry 18 May 1623. His 
dau. and then only child, Mary, had by 
letters patent 31 Aug. 1628, the dignity 
of Duchess of Buckingham limited to her 
and the heirs male of her body, in the 
event of her father dying without male 
issue. r She died 1685, having been thrice 
married, but had issue only by her second 



p The enrolled Patent of the Earldom of 
Buckingham contains no extension of the dig- 
nity beyond the heirs male of the body of the 
person created. Sir Edward Walker, Garter, 
in his MS. WQ 1726, has the following an- 
nexed to his transcript of the Patent : — 

"Honor intalliatus 24 Martij 1616 apud 
Westm : Honor Baronis Whaddon, viceco- 
mitis Villiers et comitis Buck, pro defectu 
hseredum masculorum ejusdem Georgij intail- 
lant Johanni Villiers militi f'ratri suo et suis 
haeredibus masculis et pi'o defectu ambor. 
Christofero Villiers armigero altri fratri, ut 
ante." Sir Edward also gives an account of 
the ceremonial of his Investiture (WA 206), 
which was done " uppon short notice both 
to the Attorney-Generall and the Lord Chaun- 
cellor." 

i The secrecy with which this nobleman's 
elevation to a Marquessate was conducted is 
curious, and justifies the following account 
of it by Camden : — 

"Natali Christi 1618.— The Lord Chan- 



cellor sent for me before seven in the morn- 
ing, and privately charged me on the oath 
both of my allegiance as a subject and my 
oath as a King-of-Arms, to keep secret that 
which he was to impart unto me, namely, 
that the King purposed to make the Earl of 
Buckingham Marquess of Buckingham with- 
out ceremony, willing me to give him some 
precedents to that purpose, whereupon I deli- 
vered to him these." [Here follow several 
precedents of Peers being created without 
investiture.] " Upon New Year's-day follow- 
ing the said Earl was created Marquess of 
Buckingham without ceremony, only by de- 
livering the Patent, before any of the Council 
knew it, which the King did in his wisdom 
to avoid counterposition and competition of 
others."— Harl. MSS. 5176, f. 416. 

r The event contemplated by this Patent 
did not occur, inasmuch as the Duke her 
father had a son born within a few months, 
and the birth of this son rendered the Patent 
inoperative. 



BUCKINGHAM — BUCKINGHAMSHIRE. 81 

Dukes. Marquesses. Earls. 

husband, James Duke of Richmond, viz., 
Esme', who succeeded his father, and died 
a minor and unm. 1660, set. 10, and Mary, 
wife of Richard Earl of Arran, who like- 
wise died s. p. 1667, set. 18. K.G. ; Lord 
High Admiral ; assassinated 1629. 
X. 1629.— II. 1629.— V. 1629. 2. George Villiers, s. and h., succeeded as 

Baron de Roos jure matris in 1666, K.G. ; 
ob. 1687, s. p., when his honours became 
Extinct. 
Countess. 
I. 1618. Mary Villiers, dau. of Anthony Beaumont, and widow of Sir 
George Villiers, and mother of George Villiers 1st Duke, created 
Countess of Buckingham for life 1 July 1618; ob. 1632, when 
the dignity became Extinct. 

Dukes. 

VI. 1703. 1. John Sheffield, 1st Marquess of Normanby, created Duke of 

the County of Buckingham and of Normanby 24 March 1702-3, 
K.G. ; ob. 1720. 

VII. 1720. 2. Edmund Sheffield, s. and h. ; ob. a minor 1735, s. p., when 

his honours became Extinct. 



BUCKINGHAM (Town). 

BUCKINGHAM and CHANDOS. 
Marquesses. 

I. 1784. 1. George Grenville, assumed the names of Nugent-Temple before 

that of Grenville, 1779, 2nd Earl Temple, created Marquess of 
the Town of Buckingham, co. Bucks, 4 Dec. 1784 ; ob. 11 
Feb. 1813. 

Duke. 

II. 1813. — I. 1822. 2. Richard Nugent-Temple-Grenville, assumed the 

names of Brydges-Chandos in addition 1799, s. and 
h., created Earl Temple of Stowe, co. Bucks, Marquess 
of Chandos, and Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, 
to hold the dignity of Earl Temple with special re- 
mainder (see that title), and the dignities of Mar- 
quess of Chandos and Duke of Buckingham and 
Chandos, to him and the heirs male of his body, 
4 Feb. 1822, K.G. ; ob. 17 Jan. 1839. 

III. 1839. — II. 1839. 3. Richard Plantagenet Temple-Ntjgent-Brydges- 

Chandos-Grenville, s. and h., present Duke of Buckingham and Chan- 
dos, Marquess of Buckingham, Marquess of Chandos, Earl Temple, Earl 
Temple of Stowe, Viscount and Baron Cobham, also Earl Nugent in 
Ireland, K.G. ^= 

BUCKINGHAMSHIBE. 

John Hobart, 1st Baron Hobart, created Earl of Buckingham- 
shire 5 Sept. 1746, K.B. ; ob. 1756. 

John Hobart, s. and h. ; ob. 1793, s. p. m. 

George Hobart, half-bro. andh. ; ob. 14 Nov. 1804. 

Robert Hobart, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ, v. p., 30 Nov. 
1798, and placed in his father's Barony of Hobart of Blickling ; 
ob. 4 Feb. 1816, s. p. m. 

G 



1746. 


1. 


I. 1756. 

II. 1793. 
V. 1804. 


2. 
3. 

4. 



82 BUISLI- BULMER. 

Earls. 

V. 1816. 5. George Robert Hobart (assumed the name of Hampden only 

by licence 5 Oct. 1824) neph. and h., being s. and h. of George 
Vere Hobart, next bro. of the last Earl ; ob. s. p. 1 Feb. 1849. 

VI. 1849. 6. Augustus Edward Hobart, bro. and b., present Earl of Buck- 

inghamshire and Baron Hobart, and a Bart. ^= 

t 

BUISLI. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Roger de Buisli, held numerous Lordships in cos. York, 

Devon, Derby, Leic, and Notts at the General Survey ; 
living 1088. 

II. Steph. 2. Roger de Buisli, s. and h., living 1147 ; ob. s. p. 

III. Hen. II. 3. Richard de Buisli, s. of Jordan, s. of Ernald, next bro. of 

Roger 1st Baron ; living 1164. 

IV. John. 4. John de Buisli, s. and h. ; ob. 1212, s. p. m., leaving Idonea 

his dau. and h., who m. Robert de Vipont. 



BULKELEY. 
Baron. 

I. 1784. Thomas James Bulkeley, 7th Viscount Bulkeley in Ireland, created 
Lord Bulkeley Baron of Beaumaris in the Isle of Anglesey 14 May 1784, 
assumed the name of Warren before that of Bulkeley by licence 1802 ; 
ob. 3 June 1822, s. p., when all his honours became Extinct. 



BULMER 
Barons by Tenure. 

Bertram de Bolemer, living 1162 ; his successor was, 

Stephen de Bolemer, living 1167. 

Thomas de Bulemer, s. and h., living 1171 ; to whom succeeded 

Robert de Bulemer, living 1180 ; he was succeeded by 

Bertram de Bulemer, who d. s. p. m. ; Emma, his dau. and h., 
m. Geoffrey de Nevill. 

1342. Ralph de Bulmer, summ. to Pari, from 25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342, 
to 10 March, 23 Edw. III. 1349; ob. 1357, leaving a s. and h. Ralph de 
Bulmer, then jet. 16 ; he died 1366, and was succeeded by his s. Ralph, 
then only 1 year old, and who died 1406, leaving by Agnes, widow of 
Edmund Hastings and dau. and coh. of Sir Thomas Sutton and a coh. of 
the Barony of Sutton of Holdernesse, Ralph his s. and h. set. 23, who 
died 1410, and was succeeded by his s. Ralph de Bulmer, at that time 
only 3 years of age. None of this family were ever summ. to Pari, after 
1349. The male line terminated in 1558 by the death of Sir Ralph 
Bulmer, leaving eight daughters and coheirs, of five of whom nothing is 
known; of the other three Joan was twice m. but died s. p., Frances m. 
Marmaduke Constable, of Olifte, Esq. and left issue ; and Milicent became 
the wife of Thomas Grey, of Barton in Ridale, Esq. ; she was living in 1584 
and had issue. This Barony is therefore in Abeyance between the de- 
scendants of such other daughters of the said Sir Ralph, who may have 
left issue, and the descendants and representatives of the said Frances 
and Milicent, who are likewise coheirs of the Barony of Sutton of 
Holdernesse. 



I. 


Hen. 


II. 


II. 


Hen. 


II. 


III. 


Hen. 


II. ' 


IV. 


Rich. 


I. 


V. 


John 




Baron by Writ. 



BURFORD — BURGHERSH. 83 

BUEPORD. 
Earl. 

I. 1676. 1. Charles Beauclerk, natural s. of King Charles II., created Baron 
of Hedington and Earl of Burford, both co. Oxford, 27 Dec. 1676, with 
remainder on failure of heirs male of his body to James his natural hro. 
and the heirs male of his body, created Duke of St. Alban's 10 Jan. 1683-4. 
— Vide St. Alban's. 

BURGH. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. 1. Hubert de Burgh, Justice of England, created Earl of Kent ; 

ob. 1243. 

II. Hen. III. 2. John de Burgh, s. and h., had livery of his father's lands, 

but did not enjoy the title of Earl of Kent ; ob. 1248. 

III. Hen. III. 3. John de Burgh, s. and h. ; ob. 1279, s. p. m., leaving his 

three daughters his heirs. 

Baron by "Writ. 

I. 1327. 1. William de Burgh, presumed to have been a s. of Richard 2nd 
Earl of Ulster, summ. to Pari, from 10 Dec. 1 Edw. III. 1327, to 15 June, 
2 Edw. III. 1328, but never afterwards, nor any of his descendants. 



BURGH, or BOROUGH. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1487. 1. Thomas Burgh, or Borough, descended from Hubert de Burgh, 

a younger s. of Hubert Earl of Kent, summ. to Pari, from 
1 Sept, 3 Hen. VII. 1487, to 14 Oct. 11 Hen. VII. 1495, as 
" Thoime Burgh, Chl'r," K.G. ; ob. 1496. 

II. 2. Edward Burgh, s. and h., " was destracted of memorie," and 

never summ. to Pari. ; ob. . . . 

III. 1529. 3. Thomas Burgh, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 3 Nov. 21 Hen. 

VIII. 1529, to 8 Sept. 6 Edw. VI. 1552 ; ob. 1550-2. 

IV. 1553. 4. William Burgh, s. and h., ast. 28, summ. to Pari, from 14 Aug. 

1 Mary 1553, to 23 Jan. 1 Eliz. 1559. 

V. 1563. 5. Thomas Burgh, s. and h., sunim. to Pari, from 11 Jan. 5 Eliz. 

1563, to 24 Oct. 39 Eliz. 1597, K.G. ; ob. 14 Oct. 1597. 

VI. 1597. 6. Robert Burgh, s. and h. eet. 3, living 1598 ; ob. 1601 infans, 
leaving Elizabeth, who m. George Brooke, 4th s. of William Lord Cobham ; 
Anne, who became the wife of Sir Drew Drury ; Frances, who m. Francis 
Coppinger ; and Katharine, who became the wife of Thomas Knyvet, Esq., 
(and was grandmother of Katharine Bokenham, who was allowed the Barony 
of Berners in 1720) his sisters and coheirs, between whose descendants and 
representatives this Barony, also a moiety of that of Strabolgi, is in Abey- 
ance. 

BURGH (co. Cumberland). 

Barony, 24 May 1784 — Extinct 1802. — Vide Lonsdale. 



BURGHERSH. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1303. Robert de Burghersh, summ. to Pari, from 12 Nov. 32 Edw. I. 
1303, to 13 July, 33 Edw. I. 1305 ; ob. 1305, leaving Stephen de Burgh- 
ersh his s. and h. aet. 23, but who was never summ. to Pari., and died 

G 2 



84 



BURGHERSH — BURLINGTON. 



1309-10, s. p. m., leaving Maud his dan. his h. a?t. 5 ; she was twice m., 
1st to Walter de Pavely, and 2ndly to Thomas de Aldon, and had issue 
by both husbands ; and in her representative the dignity created by the 
writs to Robert her grandfather is vested. 



BURGHERSH. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1330. 1.^ Bartholomew de Burghersh, third s. of Robert I. Baron Burg- 

hersh, summ. to Pari, from 25 Jan. 4 Edw. III. 1330, to 15 

March, 28 Edw. III. 1354, latterly with the addition of " seniori ;" 

he was found h. in certain lands to his bro. Henry Bishop of 

Lincoln in 1340, and was then aged 36 years ; he m. Elizabeth 

dan. and coh. of Theobald II. 7th Baron Verdon ; ob. 1355. 

[I. 1355. 2. Bartholomew de Burghersh, s. and h. ast. 26, summ. to Pari. 

from 15 Dec. 31 Edw. III. 1357, to 24 Feb. 42 Edw. III. 1368, E.G. ; 

ob. 1369, s. p. m., leaving Elizabeth his sole dau. and h. ; she m. Edward 

V. 6th Baron Despencer, and upon her death the dignity devolved on her 

s. and h. Thomas VI. 7th Baron Despencer, and was Forfeited by his 

Attainder in 1400 ; that Attainder was, however, reversed in 1461, when 

it is presumed that this Barony fell into Abeyance between the daughters 

and coheirs of Isabel dau. and eventually sole h. of Thomas VI. 7th Baron 

Despencer, by her two husbands, viz., Richard Earl of Worcester and 

Richard Earl of Warwick, and that it is now in Abeyance between the 

descendants and representatives of the said daughters. — Vide Despencer. 



BURGHERSH. 

Baron by Patent. 

I. 1624. 1. Francis Fane, s. and h. apparent of Mary (wife of Sir Thomas 
Fane, Knt.) who was allowed the Barony of Despencer in 1604, created 
Baron Burghersh and Earl of Westmoreland 29 Dec. 1624. — Vide West- 
moreland. 



Barons. 
I. 1571. 



btjrghley; 



William Cecil, created Baron of Burghley, co. Northampton, 
25 Feb. 1571, E.G. ; ob. 1598. 

II. 1598. 2. Thomas Cecil, s. and h., created Earl of Exeter 4 May 1605, K.G. 
— Vide Exeter. 



Earls. 

1664 



BURLINGTON. 



Richard Boyle, 2nd Earl of Cork in Ireland and 1st Baron 
Clifford of Lanesborough, co. York, created Earl of Burlington, 
otherwise Bridlington, cb. York, 20 Mar. 1664 ; ob. 1697. 
II. 1697. 2. Charles Boyle, grands, and h. (s. and h. of Charles Boyle, 
who was summ. to Pari, by writ 16 July 1689,' but ob. v. p. 
1694), claimed a writ of summ. to Pari, after his father's death 
as Lord Clifford of Lanesborough, and was summoned accord- 
ingly 1694 ; Earl of Cork in Ireland ; ob. 1704. 



8 In the Patent of the creation of this title 
it is written Burghley throughout, excepting 
in the clause which provides that the grantee 
and his heirs male shall have a seat in Par- 
liament, when it is spelt Burleigh. 



1 The writ was directed to him as " Charles 
Boyle de Lanesborough," and he sat as " Lord 
Boyle," but it was amended 10 Aug. follow- 
ing under a Royal Warrant, and he after- 
wards sat as " Lord Clifford." 



BURNELL — BURY. 



85 



Earls. 
III. 1704 



Richard Boyle, s. and h., Earl of Cork in Ireland, K.G. : ob. 
1753, s. p. m. The Barony of Clifford originating in the writ 
of summons of 1628 devolved on his dau. and h., but the 
Earldom of Burlington and Barony of Clifford of Lanesborough, 
created by patent 1644, became Extinct. 

IV. 1831. 1. George Augustus Henry Cavendish, 3rd s. of William 4th 

Duke of Devonshire, created Baron Cavendish of Keighley, 
co. York, and Earl of Burlington, 10 Sept. 1831 ; ob. 9 May 
1834. 

V. 1834. 2. William Cavendish, grands, and h., s. and h. of William 
Cavendish, eldest s. of the last Earl, present Earl of Burlington and 
Baron Cavendish. =p 

+ 

BURNELL. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1311. 1. Edward Burnell, summ. to Pari, from 19 Dec. 5 Edw. II. 1311, 
to 24 Oct. 8 Edw, II. 1314 ; ob. 1315, s. p., when the Barony became 
Extinct. Maud his sister and h., set. 25 at her brother's decease, m. 1st, 
John Lovel, and 2ndly, John Handlo, which John Handlo was summ. 
to Pari. 16 Edw. III.— Vide Handlo. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1350. 1. Nicholas Burnell, 2nd s. but h. of John Handlo above men- 

tioned, and Maud his wife, sister and h. of the last Baron, summ. 
to Pari, from 25 Nov. 24 Edw. III. 1350, to 7 Jan. 6 Rich. II. 
1383 ; ob. 1383. 

II. 1383. 2.^ Hugh Burnell, s. and h. set. 26, summ. to Pari, from 20 A112;. 

7 Rich. II. 1383, to 21 Oct. 8 Hen. V. 1420, K.G. ; ob. 1420, leaving 
Joyce, set. 24, wife of Thomas Erlington, jun., by whom she had no issue ; 
Margery, wife of Edward Hungerford, xt. 11 ; and Katherine, set. 14, 
afterwards wife of Sir John Radcliffe, the daughters of Edward Burnell 
(ob. v. p.) his only s., his granddaughters and heirs. One moiety of this 
Barony is presumed to be now vested in the heirs of the Barony of Fitz- 
Walter as representatives of Katherine Radcliffe, and the other moiety in 
Sir Henry Oxenden, Bart., and the Duke of Manchester, as representatives 
of Margery Hungerford. 



I. 



Baron. 

1712. 



II. 



1743. 
(ob. 



BURTON. 

1. Henry Paget, s. and h. apparent of William 6th Lord Paget, 

created 1 Jan. 1712 u Baron Burton of Burton, co. Stafford, suc- 
ceeded his father in the Barony of Paget in 1713, created Earl of 
Uxbridge, co. Middlesex, 19 Oct. 1714 ; ob. 1743. 

2. Henry Paget, grands, and h., s. and h. of Thomas Catesby Paget 
v. p.) eldest s. of the last Baron; ob. 17G9, s. P., when the Earldom 



of Uxbridge and this Barony became Extinct. 



BURY. 

Viscounty, 10 Feb. 1696-7. — Vide Albemarle. 



u " Hora octava ante meridiem ejusdem 
diei." This addition of an exact time to the 
day of creation is added to the enrolment of 
this Patent and seven others that follow it, 



notwithstanding which there is also a Patent 
of Precedency ranking them according to the 
hour at which they were created. 



86 BUSSEL — BUTLER. 

BUSSEL. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Warine Bussel, Lord of Penwortham, co. Lane. 

II. Hen. I. 2. Richard Bussel, s. and h. ; ob. s. p. m. 

III. Steph. 3. Albert Bussel, bro. and h. ; ob. . . . 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Hugh Bussel, s. and h., dispossessed of his Barony 1206, which 

was granted to Roger de Laci. 

BUTE. 

Marquesses. 

I. 1796. 1. John Stuart, 4th Earl of Bute in Scotland, 1st Baron Cardiff, 

and I. 2nd Baron Mount Stuart, created Viscount Mountjoy 
of the Isle of Wight, Earl of Windsor, and Marquess of the 
County of Bute, 1 Mar. 1796 ; ob. 16 Nov. 1814. 

II. 1814. 2. John (assumed in 1805 the name of) Crichton-Stuart, grands. 

and h., being s. and h. of John Stuart (ob. v. p.) eldest s. of 
the last Marquess ; ob. 18 Mar. 1848. 

III. 1848. 3. John Patrick Crichton-Stuart, s. and h., a minor, present 
Marquess of Bute, Earl of Windsor, Viscount Montjoy, Baron Mount Stuart, 
and Baron Cardiff in England, also Earl of Bute, &c. in Scotland. 

BUTLER ( of Bramfield ). 
Barons. 

I. 1628. 1. Sir John Butler, 1st Bart., created Baron Butler of Bramfield, 

co. Hertford, 30 July 1628 ; T ob. 1637. 

II. 1637. 2. William Butler, s. and h. ; ob. 1647, s. p., when this Barony 

became Extinct. 

BUTLER ( of Lanthony ). 

Barony, 20 July 1660. Forfeited 1715. 

Vide Brecknock and Ormonde. 

IV. 1801. Walter Butler, 18th Earl of Ormonde and Marquess of Ormonde 

in Ireland, K.P., created Baron Butler of Lanthony, co. Monmouth, 
20 Jan. 1801 ; ob. 1820, when this Barony became Extinct. 

BUTLER (of Weston). 
Barons. 

I. 1673. Richard Butler, 2nd son of James 1st Duke of Ormonde, created 

Earl of Arran in Ireland, and 27 Aug. 1673 Baron Butler of 
Weston, co. Huntingdon ; ob. 1685, s. p. m., when the title 
became Extinct. 

II. 1694. Charles Butler, 2nd son of Thomas 1st Baron Butler of Moore 

Park (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of James 1st Duke of Ormonde, and nephew to 
the last Baron, created Earl of Arran in Ireland 8 Mar. 1693, and Baron 
Butler of Weston, co. Huntingdon, 23 Jan. 1694 ; ob. 1759, s. p., when 
his honours became Extinct. 

BUTLER (of Moore Park). 
Barons by "Writ. 

I. 1679. 1. Thomas Butler, eldest s. of James 1st Duke of Ormonde, com- 
monly called Earl of Ossory, summ. to Pari. v. p. 5 Mar. 31 Car. 
II. 1679, as Baron Butler of Moore Park, co. Hertford, K.Gr. ; ob. 
v. p. 1680. 

' The name and title was spelt " Boteler " in the enrolment of the Patent. 



BYNG — CADOGAN. 87 

Barons by Writ. 

II. 1680. 2. James Butler, s. and h., succeeded his grandfather as Duke of 

Ormonde, &c, in 1688, attainted in 1715, when all his English honours 

became Forfeited — Vide Ormonde and Brecknock. 

BYN&. 
Barony, 21 Sept. 1721. — Vide Torrington. 

BYEON or BUEUU. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. Ernisius Burun, held 32 lordships, co. York. 



I. Will. II. Balph de Burun, held eight lordships, co. Notts., and five co. 

Derby, from whom descended, 

II. Steph. Hugh de Burun, to whom succeeded, 

III. Hen. II. Roger de Burun, living 1194, whose Barony was given by King 

John to William de Briwere. 
Barons. 



1643. 1. Sir John Byron, K.B., descended from an illegitimate s. of 
Sir John Byron, the male descendant of the above family, 
created Baron Byron of Rochdale, co. Pal. Lane, with limita- 
tion, failing his issue male, upon Sir Richard Byron, Knt., 
William Byron, Thomas Byron, Robert Byron, Gilbert 
Byron, and Philip Byron, brethren of the said Sir John 
Byron, and their issue male, 24 Oct. 1643 ; ob. 1652, s. p. 

Richard Byron, bro. and h. ; ob. 1679. 

William Byron, s. and h. ; ob, 1695. 

4. William Byron, s. and h. ; ob. 1736. 

5. William Byron, s. and h. ; ob. 1798, s. p. 
George Gordon Byron, the celebrated poet, assumed the 

name of Noel only by licence 27 Feb. 1822, grandnephew 

and h., being s. and h. of John Byron, eldest s. of John 

Byron 2nd s. of William 4th Baron ; ob. s. p. M., at Misso- 

longhi in Greece, 19 Apr. 1824. 

VII. 1824. 7. George Anson Byron, first cousin and h. male, being s. and 

h. of George Anson Byron, 2nd s. of John Byron, 2nd s. of William 4th 

Baron, present Baron Byron. =j= 

Y 



II. 


1652. 


2 


III. 


1679. 


3 


IV. 


1695. 


4 


V. 


1736. 


5 


VI. 


1798. 


6 



c. 

„ , CADOGAN. 

Barons. Earls. 

I. 1716. — I. 1718. 1. William Cadog an, created Baron Cadogan of Reading, 

I. 1718. co. Berks, 21 June 1716, created Baron Cadogan of 

Oakley, co. Bucks, Viscount Caversham, co. Oxford, 
and Earl of Cadogan, with limitation of the Barony, 
failing his issue male, to his bro. Charles Cadogan, 
8 May 1718, K.T. ; ob. 1726, s. p. m., when the 
Barony of Cadogan of Reading, the Viscounty of 
Caversham, and Earldom of Cadogan became Extinct, 
but the Barony of Cadogan of Oakley devolved, agree- 
ably to the above limitation, on, 

II. 1726. 2. Charles Cadogan, bro. and h. of the last Baron ; ob. 

1776. 






5 - 7. 



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■ ' — . 



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iii;. :.. 



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Bi 



,.t~ rj 



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:-„: . ■ 



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88 CADURCIS — CAMBRIDGE. 

Barons. Earls. 

III. 1776. — II. 1800. 3. Charles Sloane Cadogan, s. and h., created Viscount 

Chelsea, co. Middlesex, and Earl Cadogan, 27 Dec. 
1800 ; ob. 1807. 

IV. 1807. — III. 1807. 4. Charles Henry Sloane Cadogan, s. and h. ; ob. 

23 Dec. 1832. 

V. 1832. — IV. 1832. 5. George Cadogan, Baron Oakley, bro. and h., present 

Earl Cadogau, Viscount Chelsea, Baron Cadogan of Oakley, co. Bucks, 
and Baron Oakley of Caversbam, co. Oxford. =j= 

Y 
CADURCIS. See Chaworth. 

, _ ., CAILLY. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1309. Thomas de Cailly, found to be one of the coheirs of the Barony of 
Tatteshall, and aged 22 years 1306, was summ. to Pari, from 4 March, 
2 Edw. II. 1309, to 16 June, 4 Edw. II. 1311 ; ob. 1317, s. p., when the 
Barony became Extinct. 

CATiNE and CALSTOK". 

Viscounty, 6 Dec. 1784. — Vide Lansdowne. 

Barons. CALTHORPE. 

I. 1796. 1. Sir Henry Gough (assumed the name of) Calthorpe, 2nd Bart., 

created Baron Calthorpe of Calthorpe, co. Norfolk, 15 June 
1796 ; ob. 1798. 

II. 1798. 2. Charles Calthorpe, s. and h. ; ob. 5 June 1807, num. 

III. 1807. 3. George Gough Calthorpe, bro. and h. ; ob. unm. Sept. 1851. 

IV. 1851. 4. Frederick Gough, bro. and h., assumed the name of Gough 

by licence 14 May 1845, present Baron Calthorpe and a Baronet. =p 

t 
Earls. CAMBRIDGE. 

I. 1139. William de Meschines, a younger s. of Ralph Earl of Chester, 

is by some authorities styled Earl of Cambridge, and is so 
called in a recital in a charter of 11 Edw. III. ; ob. s. P. m. ; of 
his two daughters and coheirs Avicia m. Robert de Courcy 
IV. Baron de Courcy. 

Prior to 1155 the Empress Maud (says Selden, quoting 
an ancient book of Evidences in the possession of the Earls of 
Oxford) gave to Alberic de Vere the Earldom of Cambridge in 
these words : " concedo quod sit Comes de Cantebruggeseire & 
habcat inde tertium denarium sicut Comes debet habere. Ita 
dico, si Rex Scotia? non habet ilium comitatum." If the King 
of Scotland claimed the county of Cambridge, he was to have 
choice of four other counties ; and from his shortly after be- 
coming Earl of Oxford, it would seem that the King of Scot- 
land had this Earldom, and David IX. 5th Earl of Huntingdon, 
bro. of the King of Scotland here referred to, was in receipt of 
the third penny of the county of Cambridge, 7 John (1205-6), 
as appears by the Close Roll of that year. 

II. 1340. William Duke of Juliers, brother-in-law of King Edw. III., 

having m. Joan, sist. of Queen Philippa, 7th Count, 1st Mar- 
quess and 1st Duke of Juliers ; he was promised, 28 Nov. 
1339, an English Earldum on his return from an embassy to 
the Emperor of Germany, and was so rewarded by patent 



CAMBRIDGE. 89 

Earls. 

II. 1340. 12 May 1340, creating him Earl of Cambridge; all writers 

have asserted that he surrendered this Earldom into the King's 
hands, who bestowed it about 1340 upon John of Avesnes, x 
Lord of Beaumont, the Queen's uncle, who was deprived of 
the dignity in 1346 upon his going over to France. This state- 
ment is altogether incorrect, as the Marquess of Juliers is 
named in various state documents as Earl of Cambridge so late 
as 1353, when in mutual letters of acquittance between him 
and King Edw. III. his rights to the Earldom of Cambridge 
are preserved ; he was probably therefore possessed of it at his 
death in 1361. 

III. 1362. 1. Edmund Plantagenet, surnamed of Langley, 5th s. of King 

Edw. III., created Earl of Cambridge 13 Nov. 1362, created 
Duke of York 6 Aug. 1385, K.G. ; ob. 1402. His eldest s. 
Edward Plantagenet, who succeeded him as Duke of York, bore 
this title for some time during his life, but his younger brother, 

IV. 1414. 2. Richard Plantagenet, of Conisburgh, was created Earl of 

Cambridge in Pari. 1 May 1414 ; y beheaded and attainted 1415, 
when his honours became Forfeited. 

V. 1415. 3. Richard Plantagenet, s. and h., succeeded to the titles of his 

uncle Edward Duke of York, who was slain at Agincourt 1415, 
s. p. ; slain at Wakefield 1460. 

VI. 1460. 4. Edward Plantagenet, s. and h., ascended the throne as King 

Edward IV. in 1461, when this title became merged in the 
Crown. 

VII. 1619. 1. James Hamilton, Marquess of Hamilton in Scotland, created 

Baron of Ennerdale, co. Cumberland, and Earl of Cambridge 
16 June 1619, K.G. ; ob. 1624. 

VIII. 1624. 2. James Hamilton, s. and h., Marquess of Hamilton in Scotland, 

K.G. ; beheaded for Ms loyalty 1648, s. p. m. 

IX. 1648. 3. William Hamilton, bro. and h., Marquess of Hamilton in 

Scotland, K.G. ; slain, ex parte Regis, 1651, s. p. m., when his 
English honours became Extinct. 

X. 1659. Henry Stuart, surnamed of Oatlands, 3rd s. of King Charles I., 

created Earl of Cambridge and Duke of Gloucester 13 May 
1659, K.G. ; ob. 13 Sept. 1660 unm., when his honours be- 
came Extinct. 
Charles Stuart, s. and h. of James Duke of York, afterwards 
King James II., called Duke of Cambridge, but died before the 
patent passed, 5 May 1661, z set. 6 months. 

Dukes. 

XI. I. 1664. James Stuart, s. and h. apparent, at the time of his creation, 

of the said Duke of York, created Duke and Earl of Cam- 
bridge, and Baron of Dauntsey, co. Wilts, 23 Aug. 1664, 
K.G. ; ob. 1667, infans, when the dignity became Extinct. 



x Camden states in his ' Britannia ' that 
John de Hainault came to England and 
claimed this dignity in Parliament about 
1366, but "returned satisfied at last." 
No notice of such claim is found in the Polls 
of Parliament. 

y For this creation, there is neither Charter 
nor Patent, but only investiture in Parliament; 
it was the opinion of Lords Lyndhurst and 
St. Leonards, as expressed in their argument 
on the Wensleydale Peerage, that such investi- 
ture " vested in him a transmissible inherit- 



ance to his legal heirs." Although the judg- 
ment against this Earl was not reversed till 
1 Edw. IV. (1461) his son succeeded to the 
Dukedom of York, and was probably restored, 
though no such proceeding now appears. 
(Rot. Pari. vol. v. 484.) 

1 1661. " Exemplar diplomatis pro Carolo 
primogenito Jacobi Ducis Eboraci in comitem 
et ducem Cantabrigire evehendo ; pra; rnorte 
vero immatura dicti Caroli, sigillo regio nul- 
latenus muniti." — Ashnixile's Colls., Ashm. 
MS. No. 838. 



90 



CAMDEN— CAMOYS. 



Earls. 
XII. 1667.- 



Marquess. 
I. 1706.- 



Dukes. 

-II. 1667. Edgar Stuart, 4th s. of the said Duke of York, but s. 
and h. apparent at the time of his creation, created 
Duke and Earl of Cambridge and Baron of Dauntsey, 
co. Wilts, 7 Oct. 1667 ; ob. 1671, infans, when the 
title again became Extinct. 

Charles Stuart, 1st s. by his 2nd wife of the said 
Duke of York, called Duke of Cambridge, but no 
enrolment of any patent of that dignity is to be found. 
He was born 7 Nov. and ob. 12 Dec. 1677, infans. 

-III. 1706. George Augustus, Prince Electoral of Hanover, cre- 
ated Baron of Tewksbury, co. Gloucester, Viscount 
Northallerton, co. York, Earl of Milford Haven in 
Wales, and Marquess and Duke of Cambridge 9 Nov. 
1706, created Prince of Wales 27 Sept. 1714, K.G., 
ascended the throne as King George II. 11 June 
1727, when all these dignities became merged in 
the Crown. 

IV. 1801. 1. Adolphus Frederick, 5th and youngest surviving s. 
of King George III., created Baron of Culloden in 
North Britain, Earl of Tipperary in Ireland, and 
Duke of Cambridge 27 Nov. 1801, K.G., G.C.B. ; 
ob. 8 July 1850. 

V. 1850. 2. George William Frederick Charles, s. and h., 
present Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Tipperary, and 
Baron of Culloden, K.G., K.P., G.C.B., G.C.M.G. 



Barons. 
1765.— I. 



Earls. 

1786. 



CAMDEN. 



II. 1794.— II. 



Charles Pratt, created Baron Camden of Camden 
Place, co. Kent, 17 July 1765, created Viscount Bay- 
ham of Bayham Abbey, co. Sussex, and Earl Camden, 
13 May 1786, Lord High Chancellor ; ob. 1794. 

Marquesses. 
1794. — I. 1812. 2. John Jefferys Pratt, s. and h., created 
Earl of the County of Brecknock and 
Marquess Camden 7 Sept. 1812, K.G. ; 
ob. 8 Oct, 1840. 

III. 1840.— III. 1840.— II. 1840. 3. George Charles Pratt, s. and h., summ. 
to Pari, by writ 8 Jan. 1835, and placed in his father's Barony of Camden, 
present Marquess, Earl, and Baron Camden, Earl of Brecknock, and Vis- 
count Bavham, K.G. =p 

CAMELFOED. 
Barons. 

I. 1784. 1. Thomas Pitt, s. and h. of Thomas, eldest s. of Robert Pitt, father 

of William 1st Earl of Chatham, created Lord Camelford, Baron 
of Boconnoc, co. Cornwall, 5 Jan. 1784 ; ob. 1793. 

II. 1793. 2. Thomas Pitt, s. and h., killed in a duel, unm. 1804, when his 

honours became Extinct. 



CAMOYS. 

Baron by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. 1. Ralph de Camoys, Senior ; ob. 1259. 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1264. 2. Ralph de Camoys, s. and h., set. 45 

49 Hen. III. 1264 ; ob. 1277. 



summ. to Pari. 14 Dec. 



CAMPBELL— CAMPDEN. 91 

Barons by Writ. 

II. 3. John de Camoys, s. and h., set. 26, living 1281 ; he was never 

summ. to Pari. ; ob. ante 1299. 

III. 1313. 4. Kalfh de Camoys, s. and li., summ. to Pari, from 26 Nov. 7 

Edward II. 1313, to 1 April, 9 Edw. III. 1335 ; ob. . . . , 
leaving Sir Thomas Camoys, Knt. bis s. and h., who was never 
summ. to Pari, and died 10 April 1372, when it was found by 
inquisition that Ralph his s. had died v. p. without issue, and 
that Thomas Camoys s. of John Camoys was his heir virtute 
doni ; the said John Camoys is presumed to have been 2nd s. of 
Ralph III. 4th Baron, and in 34 Edw. III. was 40 years of age. 
By Margaret dau. and coh. of Richard Foliot he had 

IV. 1383. 5.^ Thomas de Camoys, who was found h. to his uncle in 46 Edw. 

III. ; summ. to Pari, from 20 Aug. 7 Rich. II. 1383 to 26 Feb. 
8 Hen. V. 1421, K.G. ; ob. 1421, leaving his grands. Hugh (s. 
and h. of Richard his eldest s. who died v. p.) his heir, then 
set. 7. The said Hugh died s. p. 1426, leaving his sisters — Mar- 
garet ast. 24, wife of Ralph Radmylde, Esq., and Eleanor set. 18, 
wife of Roger Lewknor — his heirs, among whose descendants and 
representatives the Barony created by the writ of 7 Rich. II., 
and probably also that created by the writ of 49 Hen. III., fell 
into Abeyance. 

This Barony, or rather the dignity created by the writ of 7 
Rich. II. 1383, was claimed in 1838 by Thomas Stonor of 
Stonor, co. Oxon., Esq., as eldest coh., being the great-grands, 
and h. of Thomas Stonor of the same by Mary eldest dau. and 
coh. of John Biddulph of Biddnlph, co. Staff., Esq. by Ann 
dau. and h. of Sir Henry Goring, Bart., 8th in descent from 
John Goring of Burton, co. Sussex, Esq., who m. Margaret 
eldest dau. and coh. of Robert Radmylde, s. and h. of Ralph 
Radmylde by Margaret Camois above named. The House of 
Lords having resolved 27 Aug. 1S39 that the Petitioner was, as 
alleged, eldest coh. of the said Barony, the Queen was pleased 
to determine the Abeyance in favour of, 

V. 1839. 1. Thomas Stonor, who was accordingly summ. to Pari, by Writ 

14 Sept. 1839 ; present Baron Camoys. =p 

„ CAMPBELL. 

Baron. 

I. 1841. 1. Sir John Campbell, late Attorney-General, created Baron Campbell 
of St. Andrews, co. Fife, 30 June 1841 ; present Lord Campbell. =j= 

Y 

... . CAMPDEN". 

Viscounts. 

I. 1628. 1. Baptist Hicks, created Baron Hicks of Ilmington, co. Warwick, 

and Viscount Campden, co. Gloucester, 5 May 1628 for life, 
with remainder after his decease to Edward Baron Noel of Rid- 
lington, husband of his eldest dau., and his issue male ; ob. 
1629, s. p. m. 

II. 1629. 2. Edward Noel, 1st Baron Noel of Ridlington, succeeded agreeably 

to the above limitation ; ob. 1643. 

III. 1643. 3. Baptist Noel, Baron Noel, s. and h. ; ob. 1682. 

IV. 1682. 4. Edward Noel, Baron Noel, s. and h., created Baron Noel of 
Titchfield, co. Southampton, 3 Feb. 1681, v. p., and Earl of Gains- 
borough 1 Dec. 1682, with special remainders. Extinct 1798. — Vide 
Gainsborough. 

Viscounty, 16 Aug. 1841. — Vide Gainsborough. 



I. 


Steph. 


1 


II. 


Hen. II. 


2 


III. 


John. 


3 


IV. 


Hen. III. 


4 



92 CAMPERDOWN — C ANTELUPE. 

CAMPEEDOWN. 
Earl. 

I. 1831. 1. Robert Dundas Duncan (afterwards Duncan-Haldane), 2nd Vis- 
count Duncan, created Earl of Camperdown of Lundie, co. Forfar, and 
Gleneagles, co. Perth, 12 Sept. 1831 ; present Earl of Camperdown, Vis- 
count Duncan, K.T. &c. =j= 

CAMVILLE. 
Barons by Tenure. 

Gerard de Camville, living 1139 ; his successor was, 

Richard de Camville, died at the siege of Acre 1189. 

Gerard de Camville, s. and h., living 1208. 

Richard de Camville, s. and h., living 1217; ob. s. p. m- 
Idonea his dau. and h. m. William de Longspee, Earl of Salisbury. 

CAMVILLE (of Clifton). 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1295. 1, Geoffrey de Camville, s. and h. of William, bro. of Gerard 

Camville, 3rd Baron by Tenure ; summ. to Pari, from 23 June 
23 Edw. I. 1295 to 22 Feb. 35 Edw. I. 1307 ; he was also 
summ. 8 June 22 Edw. I. 1294, but it is very doubtful if that 
writ can be considered as a regular summ. to Pari. — Vide 
Clyvedon. Ob. 1308. 

II. 1309. 2. William de Camville, s. and h. get. 40, summ. to Pari. 
4 March, 2 Edw. II. 1309 and 16 June, 4 Edw. II. 1311 ; ob. 1338, leaving 
five daughters and coheirs, viz. 1. Matilda, wife of Richard Vernon, after- 
wards m. to Sir Richard Stafford ; 2. Eleanor ; 3. Isabella, wife of Gilbert 
Birmingham ; 4. Nicholaa, wife of John St. Clere ; and 5. Katherine, wife 
of Roger de Gresley : they were all of full age in 1308, and between their 
representatives this Barony is in Abeyance. 

CANCI. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Steph. 1. Walter de Canci, living 1139. 

II. Rich. I. 2. Anfrid de Canci, s. and h. ; ob. 1194, leaving his h. a minor. 



I. John. Simon, s. of Simon de Carrci, a rebel Baron against King John, 

had his lands seized 1215. 

CANNING. 
Viscountess. 

I. 1828. 1. Joan Canning, widow of the Right Hon. George Canning, was 

created Viscountess Canning of Kilbrahan, co. Kilkenny, 22 
Jan. 1828, with remainder of the dignity of Viscount Canning 
to the heirs male of the body of her late husband ; ob. 15 Mar. 
1837. 
Viscount. 

II. 1837. 2. Charles John Canning, s. and h. ; present Viscount Canning, 

P.C., Governor General of India. = 

CANTELUPE. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. 1. William de Canteltjpe, "Senescallus Regis;" ob. in Gas- 

cony, 1238. 

II. Hen. III. 2. William de Cantelui'E, "Senescallus Regis," s. and h. ; 

ob. 1250. 



CANTELUPE — CARDIFF. 93 

Barons by Tenure. 

III. Hen. III. 3. William de Cantelupe, s. and h. ; by marrying Eve, dan. and 

coh. of William de Braose, lie obtained tbe Lordship of Brecknock and 

Castle of Abergavenny. — Vide Abergavenny. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 1.^ William de Cantelupe, s. and h. of Nicholas Cantelupe Lord 

of Gresley, co. Notts, jure uxoris, younger s. of William 
2nd Baron Cantelupe by Tenure above-mentioned ; summ. 
to Pari, from 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299 to 5 Aug. 2 Edw. II. 
1308 ; ob. 1309. 

II. 2. William de Cantelupe, s. and h., made proof of his age in 

1313 ; he was never summ. to Pari. ; ob. s. P. 

III. 1337. 3. ^Nicholas de Cantelupe, bro. and h., summ. to Pari, from 
23 Apr. 11 Edw. III. 1337, to 13 Mar. 28 Edw. III. 1354; ob. 1355, 
leaving Nicholas his grands., s. of William his s. and h. (who died v. 
p.), his h. ast. 13 ; the said Nicholas de Cantelupe grands, of the last 
Baron died 45 Edw. III. s. p., leaving Sir William de Cantelupe his bro. 
and h. set. 25, who also died s. p. 49 Edw. III., when the posterity of 
William I. 1st Baron having failed, the Barony created by writ 28 Edw. I. 
became Extinct. 

CANTELUPE. 

Viscounty, 18 March 1761. — Vide De la Warr. 

CANTERBURY. 

Viscounts. 

I. 1835. 1. Sir Charles Manners-Sutton, G-.C.B., Speaker of the House of 

Commons, created Baron Bottesford of Bottesford, co. Leicester, 
and Viscount Canterbury of the city of Canterbury, 10 Mar. 
1835 ; ob. 21 July 1845. 

II. 1845. 2. Charles John Manners-Sutton, s. and h. ; present "Viscount 

Canterbury and Baron Bottesford ; unm. 



CAPEL. 

Barons. 

I. 1641. 1. Arthur Capel, created Baron Capel of Hadham, co. Hertford, 

6 Aug. 1641 ; beheaded for his loyalty 1648. 

II. 1648. 2. Arthur Capel, s. and h., created Viscount Maiden and Earl of 

Essex, 20 Apr. 1661.— Vide Essex. 



CAPEL (of Tewkesbury). 
Baron. 
I. 1692. 1. Sir Henry Capel, K.B., 2nd s. of Arthur 1st Baron Capel of Had- 
ham, created Baron Capel of Tewkesbury, co. Gloucester, 11 Apr. 1692, 
Lord Lieut, of Ireland ; ob. 1696, s. p., when the title became Extinct. 

CARDIFF. 

Baron. 

I. 1766. 1. John Stuart, eldest s. of John 3rd Earl of Bute in Scotland, 
created, v. p., Baron Cardiff of Cardiff Castle 20 May 1766 ; succeeded 
his mother in the Barony of Mount Stuart 1794, and his father in the 
Earldom of Bute in Scotland in 1792 ; created M&rcpiess of Bute, &c. 1796. 
— Vide Bute. 



94 



CARDIGAN — CARLETON. 





Earls. 


I. 


1661. 


II. 


1664. 


III. 


1703. 



IV 



CARDIGAN. 

1. Sir Thomas Brudenell, 1st Baron Brudenell of Stanton Wivill, 
created Earl of Cardigan 20 Apr. 1661 ; ob. 1664. 

2. Robert Brudenell, s. and h. ; ob. 1703. 

3. George Brudenell, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Francis 
Brudenell (ob. v. p.) eldest s. of the last Earl ; ob. 1732. 

1732. 4. George Brudenell, assumed tbe name of Montagu (from his 
marriage with Mary dau. and coh. of John Montagu Duke of 
Montagu by Mary dau. and coh. of the celebrated John 
Churchill Duke of Marlborough), s. and h., created 5 Nov. 
1766 Marquis of Monthermer and Duke of Montagu, K.G. ; 
ob. 1790, s. P. m., when the said Dukedom and Marquessate 
became Extinct, but this Earldom and the Barony of Brude- 
nell of Stanton Wivill devolved on, 

V. 1790. 5. James Brudenell, 1st Baron Brudenell of Deene, bro. and h. ; 

ob. 24 Feb. 1811, s. p., when the Barony of Brudenell of Deene 
became Extinct ; but this Earldom and the Barony of Brude- 
nell of Stanton Wivill devolved on, 

VI. 1811. 6. Robert Brudenell, neph. and h., being s. and h. of Robert Bru- 

denell, next bro. to James last Earl ; ob. 14 Aug. 1837. 

VII. 1837. 7. James Thomas Brudenell, s. and h., present Earl of Cardigan 

and Baron Brudenell of Stanton Wivill, K.C.B. = 



Barons. 



CAEEW. 



I. 1605. 1. George Carew, descended from Nicholas de Carew, who was 

present at the Parliament held at Lincoln in 1300 as " Nicholas 
de Carew (de Molesford)," created Baron Carew of Clopton, co. 
Warwick, 4 May 1605, created Earl of Totness 7 Feb. 1626 ; ob. 
1629, s. p. m., when all his honours became Extinct. 

II. 1838. 1. Robert Shapland Carew, 1st Baron Carew in Ireland, created 

Baron Carew of Castleborough, co. Wexford, 9 July 1838 ; present Baron 
Carew of Castleborough, also Baron Carew in Ireland, K.P. =j= 

Y 

CAREY. 

Baron. 

I. 1622. 1. Robert Carey, created Baron Carey of Leppington, co. York, 
6 Feb. 1622, created Earl of Monmouth 7 Feb. 1626. Extinct 1661.— 
Vide Monmouth. 



I. 

II. 

III. 
IV. 



Barons. 
1714 



CARLETON. 



Henry Boyle, bro. of Charles 2nd Earl of Burlington, created 
Baron Carleton of Carleton, co. York, 19 Oct. 1714 ; ob. 1725, 
s. p., when the title became Extinct. 

1786. 1. Richard Boyle, 2nd Earl of Shannon in Ireland, created Baron 
Carleton of Carleton, co. York, 6 Aug. 1786, K.P. ; ob. 20 May 
1807. 

1807. 2. Henry Boyle, s. and h., K.P. ; ob. 22 Apr. 1842. 

1842. 3. Richard Boyle, s. and h. ; present Baron Carleton, also Earl of 
Shannon in Ireland, ^p 

Y 



CARLISLE — CARNARVON. 95 



CARLISLE. 

Randle de Meschines is by many writers called Earl of Carlisle, and also, and with 
greater propriety, Earl of Cumberland, which county he is said to have 
exchanged with the King, for that of Chester. 

Earls. 

I. 1322. Sir Andrew Harcla, created Earl of Carlisle 25 Mar. 1322, 

" sibi et hferedibus suis de corpore suo ;" degraded and be- 
headed 1323, when his honours became Forfeited. 

John Plantagenet, Duke of Bedford, 3rd s. of King Henry IV., 
is by some authorities called Earl of Carlisle, but from Dug- 
dale's account of him it does not appear that he either received 
or used that title ; he died in 1345, s. p. 

Richard Plantagenet, Duke of Gloucester, bro. of King Edward 
IV., afterwards King Richard III. He has by some writers 
been considered Earl of Carlisle, but there appears to be little 
ground for ascribing that title to him. 

II. 1622. 1. James Hay, 1st Viscount Doncaster, created Earl of Carlisle 

13 Sept, 1622, E.G. ; ob. 1636. 

III. 1636. 2. James Hay, s. and h. ; ob. 1660, s. p., when all his honours 

became Extinct. 

IV. 1661. 1. Charles Howard, great-grands, of William Howard (by Eliza- 

beth sister and coh. of George Lord Dacre of Gillesland), 3rd s. 
of Thomas X. 4th Duke of Norfolk, created Baron Dacre of Gil- 
lesland, co. Cumberland, Viscount Howard of Morpeth, co. 
Northumberland, and Earl of Carlisle, 30 Apr. 1661 ; ob. 
1685. 

V. 1685. 2. Edward Howard, s. and h. ; ob. 1692. 

VI. 1692. 3. Charles Howard, s. and h. ; ob. 1738. 

VII. 1738. 4. Henry Howard, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1758. 

VIII. 1758. 5. Frederick Howard, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 4 Sept. 1825. 

IX. 1825. 6. George Howard, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 7 Oct, 1848. 

X. 1848. 7. George William Frederick Howard, s. and h., present Earl 
of Carlisle, Viscount Howard of Morpeth, and Baron Dacre of Gillesland, 
K.G. ; unm. 

CARLTON. 

Baron. 

I. 1626. Sir Dudley Carlton, created Baron Carlton of Imbercourt, co. 
Surrey, 21 May 1626, created Viscount Dorchester, co. Oxford, 25 July 
1628 ; ob. 1631, s. p. m., when his titles became Extinct. 

CARMARTHEN". 

Marquess. 

I. 1689. Thomas Osborne, II. 1st Earl of Danby, created Marquess of Car- 
marthen 9 Apr. 1689, created Duke of Leeds 4 May 1694. — Vide Leeds. 

CARNARVON. 

Earls. 

I. 1628. 1. Robert Dormer, 2nd Baron Dormer, created Viscount Ascott, 

co. Herts, and Earl of Carnarvon, 2 Aug. 1628 ; slain ex parte 
Regis 1643. 

II. 1643. 2. Charles Dormer, s. and h. ; ob. 1709, s. p.m., when this Earl- 

dom ami the Viscounty of Ascott became Extinct. 



96 CARRICK — CARTERET. 

Earls. Marquess. 
III. 1714. I. 1719. James Brydges, 9th Baron Chandos, created Viscount 

Wilton, co. Hereford, and Earl of Carnarvon, 19 Oct. 
1714, created Marquess of Carnarvon and Duke of 
Chandos 29 Apr. 1719. Extinct 1789. — Vide 
Chandos. 

VII. 1793. 1. Henry Herbert, 1st Baron Porchester, created Earl of the Town 

and County of Carnarvon 3 July 1793 ; oh. 1811. 

VIII. 1811. 2. Henry George Herbert, s. and h. ; oh. 18 Apr. 1833. 

IX. 1833. 3. Henry John George Herbert, s. and h. ; oh. 10 Dec. 1849. 

X. 1849. 4. Henry Howard Molyneux Herbert, s. and h. ; present Earl of 

Carnarvon and Baron Porchester. = 



CARRICK. 

Earldom. — Vide Rothsay. 

CARRICKFERGUS — Vide Ennishowen and Carrickfergus. 



CARRINGTON. 
Barons. 

I. 1643. 1. Sir Charles Smith, created Baron Carrington of Wotton, co. 

Warwick, 31 Oct. 1643, created Viscount Carrington of Bur- 
ford hi Connaught in Ireland 4 Nov. following ; oh. 1664. 

II. 1664. 2. Francis Smith, s. and h., Viscount Carrington in Ireland ; oh. 

1705, s. p. 

III. 1705. 3. Charles Smith, hro. and h., Viscount Carrington in Ireland ; oh. 

1706, s. p., when his honours hecame Extinct. 



CARRINGTON (of Upton). ■ 
Barons. 

I. 1797. 1. Robert Smith, 1st Baron Carrington in Ireland, created Baron 

Carrington of Upton, co. Notts, 20 Oct. 1797 ; oh. 18 Sept. 
1838. 

II. 1838. 2. Robert John Carrington (which surname he assumed instead of 

that of Smith hy licence 6 Aug. 1839) ; present Baron Carrington in the 
Peerage of Great Britain, and Baron Carrington in Ireland. =jz 

CARTERET. 
Barons. 

I. 1681. 1. Sir George Carteret, Bart., created Baron Carteret of Hawnes, 
co. Bedford, with remainder failing his issue male to his brothers 
Philip and Edward, 19 Oct. 1681 ; ob. 1695. His widow, 

Viscountess. 

I. 1715. 1. Grace, Lady Carteret, dau. and coh. of John Gran- 
ville, Earl of Bath, was created Viscountess Carteret 
and Countess Granville, with remainder in the 
Viscounty of Carteret failing her issue male to 
her husband's hro. Edward, 1 Jan. 1714-5 ; ob. 
1744. 



CARYSFORT — CAUZ, 97 

Barons. Viscounts. 

II. 1G95. — II. 1744. 2. John Carteret, s. and h., succeeded his father 

in the Barony 1695, and his mother in the 
Viscounty of Carteret and Earldom of Gran- 
ville in 1744 ; Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 
1724, K.G. ; ob. 1763. 

III. 1763. — III. 1763. 3. Robert Carteret, s. and h. Earl Granville ; ob. 

1776, s. p., when the Barony and Viscounty 
of Carteret and Earldom of Granville became 
Extinct. 

IV. 1784. 1. Henry Frederick Thtnne (assumed the name of) Carteret, 

2nd s. of Thomas 2nd Viscount Weymouth by Louisa dau. of 
John Carteret Earl Granville, and sister and cob. of Robert 
the last Earl Granville, Viscount and Baron Carteret ; created 
Baron Carteret of Hawnes, co. Bedford, with remainder, failing his 
issue male, to the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and every other 
s. of his bro. Thomas Thynne 1st Marquess of Bath and their 
issue male respectively, 29 Jan. 1784 ; ob. 17 June 1826, s. p. 

V. 1826. 2. George Thynne, neph. of the last Baron, being 2nd s. of Thomas 

1st Marquess of Bath, succeeded to this dignity agreeable to 
the limitation of the patent ; ob. s. p. 19 Feb. 1838. 

VI. 1838. 3. John Thynne, bro. and h. by virtue of the special limitation ; 

ob. s. p. 1 Mar. 1849, when the Barony became Extinct. 

CARYSFORT. 

Barons. 

I. 1801. 1. John Joshua Proby, 1st Earl of Carysfort in Ireland, created 

Baron Carysfort of the Hundred of Norman Cross, co. Hunt- 
ingdon, 21 Jan. 1801, K.P. ; ob. 7 Apr. 1828. 

II. 1828. 2. John Proby, s. and h., 2nd Earl of Carysfort in Ireland ; ob. 

unm. 11 June 1855. 

III. 1855. 3. Granville Leveson Proby, bro. and h., present Baron Carys- 

fort, 3rd Earl of Carysfort in Ireland. =p 

Y 

CASTLETON". 

Viscount. Earl. 

j 1716. — I. 1720. 1. James Saunderson, 1st Baron Saunderson in England and 
Viscount Castleton in Ireland, created Viscount Castleton of Sandbeck, co. 
York, 2 July 1716, and Earl Castleton of Sandbeck aforesaid 18 June 
1720 ; ob. unm. 1723, when all his honours became Extinct. 

CATHCART. 

Viscounts. Earls. 

I l,s<>7. — I. 1814. 1. William Schaw Cathcart, 10th Baron Cathcart in 

Scotland, created Baron Greenock of Greenock, co. 

Renfrew, and Viscount Cathcart of Cathcart in the 

same co. 9 Nov. 1807, and Earl Cathcart 16 July 

1814, K.T. ; ob. 16 June 1843. 

II. 1843.— II. 1843. 2. Charles Murray Cathcart, s. and h. ; present 

Earl and Viscount Cathcart and Baron Greenock in the Peerage of the 

United Kingdom, also Baron Cathcart in Scotland, K.C.B. =j= 

Y 

CAUZ. 

Baron by Tenure. 

Hen. II. Robert de Cauz, Forester of cos. Notts and Derby, living 1165 ; ob- 
ante 1216, s. P. m. ; Maud his dau. and h. m. I. Adam Fitz Peter, and 2. 
Ralph Fitz Stephen. 

H 



98 CAVENDISH — CHANDOS. 

CAVENDISH (of Hardwiek). 
Baron. 

I. 1604. 1. William Cavendish, created Baron Cavendish of Hardwiek, co. 
Derby, 4 May 1604, created Earl of Devonshire 7 Aug. 1618. Vide De- 
vonshire. 

CAVENDISH ( of Bolsover ). 
Barony, 7 Mar. 1628 — Extinct 1691. — Vide Newcastle. 

CAVENDISH (of Keighley). 

Barony, 10 Sept. 1831. — Vide Burlington. 

CAVERSHAM. 

Viscounty, 8 May 1718— Extinct 1726. — Vide Cadogan. 

CAWDOR. 

Barons. 

I. 1796. 1. John Campbell, created Baron Cawdor of Castlemartin, co. Pem- 

broke, 21 June 1796 ; ob. 1 June 1821. 

Earl. 

II. 1821. — I. 1827. 2. John Frederick Campbell, s. and h., created Viscount 

Emlyn of Emlyn, co. Caermarthen, and Earl Cawdor of Castlemartin, 
co. Pembroke, 5 Oct. 1827 ; present Baron and Earl Cawdor and Viscount 
Emlyn. =p 

T CECIL (of Essendon). 

Baron. v 

I. 1603. 1. Sir Robert Cecil, 2nd s. of William 1st Baron Burghley, created 

Baron Cecil of Essendon, co. Rutland, 13 May 1603, created Viscount 

Cranborne 20 Aug. 1604, K.G. Vide Cranborne and Salisbury. 

Baron. CECIL < of Putne ^ 

I. 1625. 1. Edward Cecil, younger s. of Thomas 1st Earl of Exeter, created 
Baron Cecil of Putney 9 Nov. 1625, created Viscount Wimbledon, 25 
July 1626 ; ob. 1638, s. p. m., when both these titles became Extinct. 

- w -. CHAMPVENT, or CHAVENT. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1300. Peter de Champvent, summ. to Pari. 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299, 
and to the Pari, at Lincoln 29 Edw. I. ; ob. 1302, leaving a s. and h. 
John then set. 30 years ; he was never summ. to Pari., though summoned 
on several occasions " cum equis et armis ;" he is presumed to be the same 
with John Champvent, who died 1371, leaving two great-granddaughters 
and heirs — Margaret set. 5, and Joan a?t. 4, the daughters of John Champ- 
vent, s. and h. of his son John Champvent, deceased. 

Barons by Tenure. CHANDOS. 

I. Hen. I. Robert de Chandos, living 1124 ; his successor was 

II. Hen. II. Robert de Chandos ; ob. 1173. 

III. Rich. Robert de Chandos, s. and h., living 1196 ; he was suc- 

ceeded by 

IV. John. Robert de Chandos ; ob. ante 1220. 

V. Hen. III. Roger de Chandos, s. and h., living 1262. 

VI. Edw. I. Robert de Chandos, s. and h. ; ob. 1303. 



CHANDOS. 99 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1337. Roger de Chandos, s. and h. ast. 20, summ. to Pari, from 20 Dec. 
11 Edw. III. 1337, to 22 Oct. 29 Edw. III. 1355 ; ob. 1353, leaving a s. 
and h. Thomas, who was a Knight, hut was never summ. to Pari., and 
died in 1375, leaving Sir John Chandos, Knt., his s. and h., then mt. 26. 
Sir John was never summ. to Pari, and died s. p. in 1428, leaving Giles 
Bruges, s. and h. of Alice eldest dau. and coh. of Elizabeth (by Sir 
Thomas Berkeley of Coberley, Knt.), his sister, and Margaret wife of 
Nicholas Mattesden, the other dau. and coh. of the said Elizabeth Berkeley, 
his heirs ; and among the descendants and representatives of the said 
Margaret and Alice the Barony of Chandos created by the Writ of 11 
Edw. III. is probably in Abeyance. 



CHANDOS (of Sudeley). 
Barons. 

I. 1554. 1. Johh Bruges, s. and h. of Sir Giles Bruges of Coberley aforesaid, 

s. of Thomas s. of Sir Giles Bruges above named, created 
Baron Chandos of Sudeley Castle, co. Glouc. S Apr. 1554 ; ob. 
1557. 

II. 1557. 2. Edmund Bruges, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1573. 

III. 1573. 3. Giles Bruges, s. and h. ; ob. 1593, s. p. m. 

IV. 1593. 4. William Bruges, bro. and h. ; ob. 1602. 

V. 1602. 5. Grey Bruges, s. and h., K.B. ; ob. 1621. 

VI. 1621. 6. George Bruges, s. and h. ; ob. 1654, s. p. m. 

VII. 1654. 7. William Bruges, bro. and h. ; ob. 1676, s. p. m. 

VIII. 1676. 8. James Brydges, cousin and h., being s. and h.of Sir John eldest 

s. of Sir Giles Brydges 1st Baronet, s. and h. of Charles 
Bruges 2nd s. of John 1st Baron ; ob. 1714. 

Dukes. 

IX. 1714. — I. 1719. 9. James Brydges, s. and h., created Viscount Wilton, 

co. Hereford, and Earl of Carnarvon, 19 Oct. 
1714, created Marquess of Carnarvon and Duke 
of Chandos, 29 April 1719 ; ob. 1744. 

X. 1744. — 1J. 1744. 10. Henry Brydges, 2nd s. and h. male (John his elder 

bro. having died v. p. 1727, s. p. m.), K.B. ; ob. 
1771. 

XI. 1771. — HI. 1771. 11. James Brydges, s. and h. ; ob. 1789, s. p.m., when 
the Dukedom of Chandos, Marquessate and Earldom of Carnarvon, and 
Viscounty of Wilton, became Extinct. The Barony of Chandos was 
claimed by the Rev. Edward Tymewell Brydges, as h. male of Anthony 

' 3rd s. of John 1st Baron Chandos, but the House of Lords resolved, 13 
June 1803, "that he had not made out his claim to the said Barony," 
and which is therefore presumed to be Extinct. 



CHANDOS. 

Marquess. 
1822. 1. Richard Nugent-Temple-Grenville, assumed the mines of 
Brydges-Chandos in addition 1799, 2nd Marquess of Buckingham ; 
having m. Anne Eliza Brydges, dau. and sole h. of James the last Duke, 
he was created Earl Temple of Stowe, co. Bucks, Marquess of Chandos 
and Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, to hold the dignity of Earl 
Temple, with special remainder (see that title), and the dignities of Mar- 
quess of Chandos and Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, to him and 
the heirs male of his body, 4 Feb. 1822.— Vide Buckingham and Chandos. 

h 2 



100 



CHARLEMONT — CHA WORTH. 



I. 



CHARLEMONT. 
Baron. 

1837. 1. Francis William Cahlfield, 2nd Earl of Charlemont in Ireland, 
K.P., created Baron Charlemont of Charlemont, co. Armagh, with re- 
mainder, failing the heirs male of his body, to his hro. Henry Canlfield of 
Hackley in the said co. in like manner, 13 Feh. 1837 ; present Baron 
Charlemont, Earl of Charlemont in Ireland, &c. ; K.P. =p 

CHATHAM. 

Barony, 26 Nov. 1705 — Extinct 1743. — Vide Greenwich. 

Barons. 

1761. 1. Hester, dan. of Richard Grenville and wife of William Pitt, Esq. 
(afterwards Earl of Chatham), created Baroness Chatham of 
Chatham, co. Kent, with remainder of the Barony to her heirs 
male hy her said husband, 4 Dec. 1761 ; ob. 1803. 



I. 



Earls. 
1766. 



William Pitt, husband of the said Baroness, created 
Viscount Pitt of Burton Pynsent, co. Somerset, and 
Earl of Chatham, in Kent, 4 Aug. 1766 ; ob. 1778. 
IT. 1803. —IT. 1778. 2. John Pitt, s. and h., succeeded his mother in the Ba- 
rony of Chatham in 1803, K.G. ; ob. s. p. 24 Sept. 1835, when all his 
honours became Extinct. 



CHA VENT. See Champvent. 



Barons by Tenure. 



CHAWORTH, or CAJDTJRCIS. 



to whom suc- 



Patrick de Cadhrcis, or Chaworth. 
Patrick de Chaworth, s. and h., living 1194 

ceeded, 
Pain de Chaworth, 2nd s. but h. ; ob. . . . 
Patrick de Chaworth, Lord of Ogmore and Kidwelly in 

Wales (jure uxoris), s. and h. ; ob. 1257. 

5. Pain de Chaworth, s. and h. ; ob. 1278, s. p. 

6. Patrick de Chaworth, bro. and h., a?t. 25 ; ob. 1282, s. p. m. 
Maud, his dau. and h., aet. 2 years at her father's decease, m. Henry 
Plantagenet, Earl of Lancaster, and afterwards to Hugh Le Despencer. 



I. 


Will. I. 


l 


II. 


Hen. II. 


2 


III. 


John. 


3 


TV. 


Hen. III. 


4 


V. 


Hen. III. 


5 


VI. 


Edw. I. 


6 



Barons by Tenure. 

I. Rich. I. 1. William de Chaworth, Lord of Marnham, s. of Robert bro. 

of Patrick 1st Baron ; living 1200. 

II. John. 2. Robert de Chaworth, s. and h., living 1204 ; ob. s. p. 

III. Hen. III. 3. William de Chaworth, bro. and h. ; ob. . . . 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1299. 4. $ Thomas de Chaworth, Baron of Norton, co. Derby, s. and h., 

summ. to Pari. 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, living 1300. He was also sum- 
moned 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, and 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297 ; but it is 
somewhat uncertain if either were regular Writs of Summons to Pari. 
Vide Clyvedon and Fitz-John. Neither he nor any of his posterity 
were afterwards summ. to Parl. a 



The descendants of the said Thomas 
Baron Chaworth continued in lineal male 



succession until the death of Thomas Chaworth 
22 Edw. IV. s. P., when his sister Joan, 



CHA WORTH — CHERLETON. 



101 



CHA WORTH. 

Barons. 

1831. 1. John Chambre Brabazon, 10th Earl of Meath in Ireland, K.P., 
created Baron Chaworth of Heaton Hall, co. Hereford, 10 Sept; 
1831 ; ob. 15 Mar. 1851. 

William Brabazon, s. and h., present Baron Chaworth, Earl of 
Meath in Ireland. =p 

4 



II. 1851. 2. 



I. 

II. 

III. 
IV. 



Barons. 
1741. 

1742. 
1762. 
1781. 



CHEDWORTH. 

1. John Howe, created Lord Chedworth, Baron of Chedworth, co. 

Gloucester, 12 May 1741 ; ob. 1742. 

2. John Thynne Howe, s. and h. ; ob. 1762, s. p. 

3. Henry Frederick Howe, bro. and h. ; ob. 1781, unm. 

4. John Howe, neph. and h., being s. and h. of Thomas Howe, next 



bro. of the last Baron; ob. 29 Oct. 1804, unm., when the title became Extinct. 



CHELSEA. 

Viscounty, 27 Dec. 1800. — Vide Cadogan. 



CHENEY. 



Baron by Writ. 

I. 1487. 1. John Cheney, sumni. to Pari, from 1 Sept. 3 Hen. VII. 1487, to 
14 Oct. 11 Hen. VII. 1495, K.G. ; ob. 30 May 1499, s. p., when his honours 



became Extinct. 



CHENEY (of Todington, co. Beds). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1572. 1. Henry Cheney, s. and h. of Sir Thomas Cheney, E.G., neph. of 
the last Baron, summ. to Pari, from 8 May 1572, to 15 Oct. 1586, as 
" Henrico Cheney de Todington, Chl'r." ; ob. 1587, when the title became 
Extinct.b 

CHERLETON. 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1313. I.^John de Cherleton, Lord of Powis, summ. to Pari, from 26 

July, 7 Edw. II. 1313, to 25 July, 27 Edw. III. 1353, as " Jo- 
hanni de Cherleton," and from 25 Aug. 12 Edw. III. 1338, 
to 30 July, 20 Edw. HI. 1346, with the addition of " Seniori ;" 
ob. 1353. 

II. 1354. 2.^ John de Cherleton, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 15 Mar. 28 

Edw. III. 1354, to 20 Nov. 34 Edw. III. 1360, as " Johanni de 
Cherleton," and from 14 Aug. 36 Edw. III. 1362, to 4 Oct. 47 
Edw. III. 1373, as "Johanni de Chereleton de Powys ;" ob. 1374. 



wife of John Omiond, became sole heir. She 
had issue three daughters, her coheirs — 1. 
Joan, wife of Thomas Dinham, natural son 
of John the last Lord Dinham, by whom she 
had several children ; 2. Elizabeth, wife of 
Sir Anthony Babington, by whom she was 
great-grandmother of Anthony Babington, 
who was attainted in the reign of Elizabeth ; 
3. Anne, wife of William Mering of Notting- 
hamshire, but died s. P. 



b In Dugdale's ' Summonses to Parliament' 
it is stated that on the 15 Feb. 29 Eliz. 1587, 
and 4 Feb. 31 Eliz. 1589, " Thomas Cheney 
de Todington, Chl'r." was summ. to Pail., 
but it is probably either a misprint or an 
error of the transcriber or of the Poll itself, 
for the above-mentioned Henry; for, though 
stated to have died in 1587, his demise might 
not have been known. 



102 CHERLETON. 

Barons by Writ. 

III. 1382. 3.^ John de Cherleton, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 9 Aug. 6 

Rich II. 1382, to 3 Oct. 2 Hen. IV. 1400, as " Johanni de 
Charleton de Powys ;" ob. 1400, s. p. 

IV. 1401. 4. ^Edward de Cherleton, bro. and h., summ. to Pari, from 2 

Dec. 3 Hen. IV. 1401, to 26 Feb. 9 Hen. V. 1421, as "Edwardo Charle- 
ton de Powys," E.G. ; ob. 1422, s. p. m., leaving his two daughters his 
heirs, viz. — Joan, his eldest dau., who m. Sir John Grey, Knt. ; and 
Joyce, who became the wife of Sir John Tiptoft, which Sir John Tip- 
toft, Dugdale says, was summ. to Pari, in consequence of this marriage, 
and bore the title of Lord Powis : it is certain he was summ. to Pari. 
in 1426, but never with the designation of " Powis," although his s. is 
called Lord Tiptoft and Powys upon his creation to the Earldom of 
Worcester, 16 July 1449. The Lordship of Powis became the property 
of Joan her elder sister, whose grands, appears to have sat in Pari. 
1455, although no summons for such sitting is to be found, and whose 
great -grands. John Grey, was summ. to Pari, in 1482, as " Johanni Grey 
de Powes." It is, however, very doubtful if this Barony has ever been 
taken out of the Abeyance into which it fell on the death of Edward 
the last Baron in 1422 ; for although the descendants of the eldest coh. 
and the husband and descendants of the younger, were summ. to Pari, 
yet it is most probable that both the Baronies in question must be con- 
sidered as new creations. The claim of John Kynaston, Esq., in 1731, 
which is more fully noticed under Grey of Powis, appears to have been 
made under the presumption that John Grey, who was summ. in 22 Edw. 
IV. had this Barony as sole h., in consequence of the attainder of John 
Tiptoft, Earl of Worcester (the other coh.), in Oct. 1470, or that the 
Abeyance was terminated by the Crown in his favour. The former 
could not have been the fact, for such attainder would have vested that 
moiety in the Crown ; and with respect to the second conjecture, that 
the Abeyance was terminated by the AVrit of Summons to John Grey 
in 22 Edw. IV. the editor acknowledges himself incompetent to speak de- 
cisively, though, if no other evidence of the fact can be adduced, than 
the addition of " de Powes " to his name in that Writ, he presumes, 
from the numerous examples of such additions without any inference of 
a similar nature being deducible therefrom, that little stress in favour 
of such a supposition can be laid on that circumstance ; for if it be conceded 
that John Grey was summ. on that occasion as " Lord Powis, , ' > it is 
much more likely that he was then created to that title, than that it 
was intended to give him the Barony created by the writ of 7 Edw. II. 
to John Charleton ; as his proper designation, if such was the intention, 
would have been Lord Cherleton, for the appellation of Powis was not 
adopted until the 36 Edw. III. forty-nine years after the creation of this 
Barony, and then, in all probability, merely as a distinction, without its being 
intended to form the title of the dignity. Of this assertion the following in- 
stances afford strong proof. John Beauchamp, younger son of Guy Earl of 
Warwick, was summ. to Pari, from 25 Nov. 24 Edw. III. 1350, to 15 Dec. 31 
Edw. III. 1357 (when he died s. p.) as " Johanni Bello-Campo de Warrcwyk" 
probably to distinguish him from John Beauchamp of flache, in Somer- 
setshire, who is described in the writs as John Beauchamp " de Somer- 
set ;" but it cannot for a moment be contended that either Somerset in 
the one instance, or Warwick in the other, formed the titles of either of 
these Barons, and that, instead of being Barons Beauchamp, they were 
Barons of Warwick and of Somerset. These additions are to be found in 
the original writs by which those dignities were created, whilst this Barony 
existed for nearly fifty years before the words " de Powes " occur in the 
Writs of Summons ; the presumption is, therefore, more strongly in favour 
of the Baronies in question being those of Warwick and Somerset, than 
that this dignity should be that of Powis. But in order to obtain as 
much information as was possible on the pi-oper title of this Barony, 



CHERLETON. 103 

the Rolls of Pari, have been carefully consulted, for the purpose of 
ascertaining the designation of the Barons therein, and the result fully 
confirms the opinion here expressed on the subject. On no occasion where 
the names of the Lords Cherleton occur, until the 46th Edw. III. is the 
addition of Powys to be found, but in that year " Mons r . Johan de Charle- 
ton de Powys" was appointed a Trier of Petitions. Among the Lords 
present in 1397 were the "Sire de Camoys," "le Sire de Powys" "le 
Sire de Fitz-Wauter," " Wm. Beauchamp Sire de Bergavenny," " le Sire de 
Grey de Codnore," " le Sire de Grey de Ruthyn," &c. After this period, 
however, viz. in the 1 Hen. IV. 1399, he is described among the Peers 
present on that occasion as " le Sire de Cherleton," and again in the fol- 
lowing year as " Johan Sire de Cherleton," about which time he died. 
The name does not occur again until the 6th of Hen. IV. when the Earl of 
Arundel and " les Sires des Powys and de Furnyvell " were appointed to 
observe a certain ordinance. In the 8th of Hen. IV. we find the name of 
" Edwardo de Charleton de Powys," among those of several other Barons, 
present at the settlement of the succession of the Crown. No further 
notice is given of these Barons until the reign of Hen. V., and then the 
name occurs but three times, but always as "Sire de Powys." The Ba- 
rony fell into Abeyance in 1422, and consequently no more information 
is to be gained on the subject. It is presumed that this examination 
strengthens the opinion that the original and proper designation of this 
Barony was and still is that of Cherleton, and that the subsequent 
alteration should not be adopted in preference to the title of the first 
creation ; for it is evident that the original title of this Barony was not 
totally abandoned, except for a few years in the reign of Hen. V. by Ed- 
ward the 4th and last Baron, whilst of the three preceding Barons, the first 
never bore any other appellation than Cherleton ; the second, for about 
twenty years, bore the same title without any alteration whatever, but 
afterwards adopted that of "Cherleton de Powes," which addition was 
retained by his son and successor, the 3rd Baron, who, though sometimes 
described as " Sire de Powes," was nevertheless, as is stated above, on the 
two last occasions when his name occurs in the Rolls of Pari., expressly 
called " Sire de Cherleton." 

Whilst alluding to the Barony of Powis, if in fact there was such a 
Barony at that period, it is to be observed that in the Rolls of Pari. 33 
Hen. VI. 1455, the " Dominus de Powes" is said to have been present 
in Pari. This appellation could not possibly be used to describe John 
Tiptoft Earl of Worcester, mentioned below, who is said by Dugdale to 
have been Baron Powes jure matris, for this is the first mention in the 
Rolls of a Lord Powis after 1420, his father having been summoned as 
" John Tiptofte," and he himself was created Earl of Worcester six years 
before, and moreover on that occasion his name appears by his proper title 
of "Comes Wygorn;" it must therefore, the editor presumes, apply to 
Richard Grey, father of John Grey, who was summ. to Pari, as " Johanni 
Grey de Powis," 22 Edw. IV., but no account of the said Richard having 
been summ. to Pari, is recorded. 

These remarks have been made on the supposition that no act ever took 
place in favour of Edward Tiptoft, s. and h. of John Earl of Worcester, 
the other coh. of the Barony, said to have been attainted in 1470, but the 
Rolls of Pari, give no account either of such attainder or of any subse- 
quent proceedings on the subject of it (vide Note under Worcester). _ If 
there were no attainder, the moiety of the Barony of Cherleton, to which 
the said Edward Tiptoft was heir," devolved on his death, infra aetatem, 
s. p., on his aunts, viz. Philippa, who m. Thomas Lord Roos ; Johanna, 
the wife of Sir Robert Ingoldesthorp ; and Joyce, who m. Edmund Sutton, 
s. and h. apparent of Lord Dudley, or more properly Lord Sutton of Dud- 
ley ; whilst the other moiety was at the same time vested in John Grey 
de Powys, great-grands, of Joan, eldest dau. and coh. of Edw. IV. 4th 
Baron Cherleton. 



104 



CHESTER. 



Earls. 
1066. 



CHESTER. 



IV 



V. 



VI. 
VII 



Gherbod, a Fleming, had the gift of the co. of Chester from King 
William the Conqueror, but being soon after taken by his 
enemies and imprisoned, 1070, this county was conferred on 

II. 1070. 1. Hugh de Abrincis (Auranches in Normandy, of which place his 

father was Viscount), suruamed Lupus, neph. of King William 
I. being his half-sister's sou, held the whole co. of Chester, 
except the lands belonging to the Bishop, by gift of the King, 
1070 ; ob. 27 July 1101. 

III. 1101. 2. Richard, s. and h. a?t. 7, 1101 ; drowned together with his wife, 

Prince William, and many of the English nobility, 1119, s. p. 
1120. 3. Randle de Meschines, s. of Ralph de Meschines, Viscount 

Bayeux in Normandy, by Maud, sist. of Hugh II: 1st Earl, 

obtained the Earldom of Chester from Hen. I. 1120, as next h. 

of the last Earl ; ob. 1128. 
1128. 4. Randle, surnamed de Gernon, from the place of his birth in 

Normandy, s. and h., poisoned by his wife and William 

Peverel, Lord of Notts, 1155. 
1155. 5. Hugh, surnamed Cyvelioc or Kevelioc, s. and h. ; ob. 1181. 
1181. 6. Ranulph, surnamed Blundevil, from the place of his birth 

(Album Monasterium in Powis), also Earl of the counties of 

Lincoln and Leicester, s. and h. ; ob. 26 Oct. 1232, s. p. 

VIII. 1232. 7. John le Scot, X. 0th Earl of Huntingdon, s. of David Earl of 

Huntingdon (brother of William the Lion, King of Scotland), 
by Maud, sister and coh. of the last Earl ; ob. 7 June 1237, s. p. 

In the 31st Hen. III. anno 1246, this Earldom was annexed 
to the Crown for ever, but King Henry HI., in the 38th year 
of his reign, 1253, conferred it on his younger son, 

IX. 1253. Edmund Plantagenet, Earl of Chester 1253, which he sur- 

rendered to his elder bro. Prince Edward, and was afterwards 
Earl of Leicester and Lancaster. Dugdale says that this 
Edmund, in 13 Edw. I., as Karl of Chester, obtained a grant 
" from the King of divers liberties," but this appears to be an 
error, for in the Roll to which he refers this Edmund is called 
bro. of the King and Earl of Lancaster and Leicester. 

X. 1264. Simon de Montfort, the celebrated Earl of Leicester, extorted 

from Prince Edward, after the battle of Lewes, a grant of the 
inheritance of the Earldom and Honour of Chester, under the 
colour of an exchange for the Earldom of Leicester, and ob- 
tained two patents from King Henry III. confirming the same, 
the one dated 24 Dec. 1264, and the other 20 May 1265 ; killed 
at the battle of Evesham in August 1265. 

XI. 1301. Edward Plantagenet of Carnarvon, s. and h. apparent of 

King Edward I., had a grant of the Principality of Wales and 
County of Chester 7 Feb. 1301, and was summ. to Pari, as 
Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester from 2 June, 30 Edw. I. 
1302, to 3 Nov. 34 Edw. 1. 1306 ; Earl of Ponthieu and 
Monstroile ; ascended the throne as King Edward II. 1307. 

XII. 1312. Edward Plantagenet of Windsor, s. and h. apparent of King 

Edward II. stated to have been created Earl of Chester 24 Nov. 
1312, c and summ. to Pari, as Earl of Chester 5 Aug. 1320, 



c No record of such creation appears either 
upon the Patent or Charter Rolls of that 
year : the King his father, however, by two 
several Charters of that date, gave to him, by 
the description of " our son Edward " only. 



the counties of Chester and Flint, the cantred 
of Englefield, and the castles of Flint and 
Rhyddlan, " habend. et tenend. eidem filio fiio 
et heredibus suis Regibus Anglie;" his cre- 
ation by the girding on of the sword pro- 






CHESTERFIELD. 



10E 



Earls. 



created Earl of Ponthieu and Monstroile, " h'end. et tenend. 
sibi et heredibus suis masculis Regibus Anglie, seu Regni 
Anglian beredibus," 2 Sept. and Duke of Acquitaine with the 
same limitation 10 Sept. 1325. The first enrolments of these 
dignities appear to have been cancelled, the word " masculis" 
being omitted, but the subsequent enrolments are of the same 
date; ascended the throne as King Edward HI. 25 Jan. 1327. 
XIII. 1333. Edward Plantagenet, the Black Prince, s. and h. apparent 
of King Edward III., was created Earl of Chester, and by charter 
18 Mar. 1333 invested with the county of Chester and the 
castles of Chester, Rhyddlan, and Flint, " habend. et tenend. 
eidem filio nro et heredibus suis Eegibus An°;lia? ;" Duke of 
Cornwall 17 Mar. 1337, Prince of Wales 12 May 1343, K.G. ; 
ob. 8 June 1376, v. p. 

XLV. 1376. Richard Plantagenet of Bordeaux, eldest surviving s. of the 
Black Prince and h. apparent of the Crown, created Prince of Wales, 
Duke of Cornwall, and Earl of Chester 20 Nov. 1376, K.G., ascended the 
throne as King Richard II. 22 June 1377. 

By an Act 21 Rich. II. cap. 9 the Earldom of Chester was erected 
into a Principality, and it was ordained " q. nulle done ne g a nte en ascun 
temps advenir ne s'ra faite del dite Principalte'e ne de las Chastelx s'ies et 
villes susdites a nulloy, fors soulement aleisne fitz du Roy q. s'ra Prince 
illoeqes sy plena au Roy affaire," and although this Act was "wholly 
reversed, revoked, voided, undone, repealed, and adnulled for ever" by 
Act I Hen. IV. cap. 3, the Earldom of Chester has ever since been granted 
in conjunction with the Principality of Wales. — Vide Princes of Wales. 



III. 
IV. 

V. 



Earls. 
1628. 



CHESTERFIELD. 



II. 1656. 



1. Philip Stanhope, 1st Baron Stanhope of Sh el ford, created Earl 
of Chesterfield, co. Derby, 4 Aug. 1628 ; ob. 1656. 

2. Philip Stanhope, grands, and h. being s. and h. of Sir Henry 
Stanhope (ob. v. p.) eldest son of the last Earl ; ob. 1713. 

3. Philip Stanhope, s. and h. ; ob. 1726. 

4. Philip Dormer Stanhope, s. and h., K.G., Lord Lieut, of Ireland 
1745 : ob. 1773, s. p. L. 

5. Philip Stanhope, cou. and h. male, being s. and h. of Arthur 

Charles, eldest s. of Michael, s. and h. of Charles, eldest s. of 
Arthur Stanhope, younger s. of Philip 1st Earl ; K.G. ; ob. 29 
Aug. 1815. 

VI. 1815. 6. George Stanhope, s. and h., present Earl of Chesterfield and 
Baron Stanhope of Shelford. =j= 



1713. 
1726. 

1773. 



Countess. 
I. 1660. 



CHESTERFIELD. 

Katherine, dan. and coh. of Thomas Lord Wotton, and widow of 
Sir Henry Stanhope (ob. v. p.) s. and h. apparent of Philip 1st 
Earl. She m. 2mlly John Vanden Kirckhoven, alias Poliander, 
Lord of Heenvliett in Holland, and after his death she remarried 
Colonel Daniel O'Neale ; created Countess of Chesterfield for life 
29 May 1060 ; ob. 1667, when the title became Extinct. 



bably preceded very shortly the grant of these 
counties, but no mention of it is made. On 
the 2nd 1 >ec. following he had a grant also 



of the Castle of Carisbrook and divers manors 
in the isle of Wight. 



106 



CHESTERFORD — CHOLMONDELEY. 



CHESTERFORD. 

Barony, 30 Dec. 1706— Extinct 1722.— Vide Bindon. 

CHEWTON. 

Viscounty, 13 Sept. 1729. — Vide Waldegrave. 



CHICHESTER." 1 

Earls. 

I. 1644. 1. Francis Leigh, 1st Baron Dimsmore, created Earl of Chichester 

for life, remainder to Thomas Earl of Southampton, and his 
heirs male hegotten on Elizaheth his wife, dau. of the said 
Francis Leigh, remainder to the heirs male of the body of the 
said Elizaheth, 3rd June 1644 ; ob. 1653, s. p. m. 

II. 1653. 2. Thomas Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton, succeeded his 

father-in-law as Earl of Chichester, K.G. ; ob. 1667, s. p. m., 
when the said Earldom became Extinct. 

III. 1675. 1. Charles Fitz-Roy, natural s. of King Charles II. created Baron 

of Newbury, co. Berks, Earl of Chichester and Duke of South- 
ampton, 10 Sept. 1675, succeeded his mother in the Dukedom 
of Cleveland in 1709, K.G. ; ob. 1730. 

IV. 1730. 2. William Fitz-Roy, s. aud h. ; ob. 1774, s. p., when his honours 

became Extinct. 

V. 1801. 1. Thomas Felham, 2nd Baron Pelham of Stanmer, created Earl of 

Chichester June 23, 1801 ; ob. 1805. 

VI. 1805. 2. Thomas Pelham, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ v. p., and 

placed in his father's Barony of Pelham, 20 June 1801 ; ob. 
4 July 1826. 

VII. 1826. 3. Henry Thomas Pelham, s. and h., present Earl of Chichester 

and Baron Pelham of Stanmer, and a Baronet. =jz 



Barons. 
I. 1645. 



CHOLMONDELEY. 

Robert Cholmondeley, 1st Viscount Cholmondeley in Ireland, 
created Baron Cholmondeley of Wiche Malbank, alias Nampt- 
wich, co. Chester, 1 Sept. 1645, created Earl of Leinster in 



Ireland 5 March 1646 
became Extinct. 



ob. 1659, s. P., when all his honours 



II. 1689.— I. 



Earls. 

1706. 



Hugh Cholmondeley, 2nd Viscount Cholmondeley in 
Ireland, s. and h. of Robert, who was created Vis- 
count Cholmondeley in Ireland 29 March 1661, 
eldest s. of Hugh, next bro. of the last Baron, cre- 
ated Baron Cholmondeley of Namptwich, co. Chester, 
with remainder, failing his issue male, to his bro. 
George 10 April 1689, created Viscount Malpas and 
Earl of Cholmondeley, both co. Chester, with the 
same limitation, 27 Dec. 1706 : ob. 1725, s. p. 



d The title of Earl of Chichester (as well 
as that of Arundel) is frequently found given 
in early Charters to the Earls of Sussex, not 
as a title of dignity, but from their having 



been possessed of the castle and city of Chi- 
chester, the former of which was, however, 
demolished at a very early period. 



CHURCHI LL — CLANCARTY. 107 

Barons. Earls. 

III. 1725. — II. 1725. 2. George Cholmondeley, 1st Baron Newburgh in Eng- 

land and 1st Baron Newburgh in Ireland, bro. and 
h., K.B. ; ob. 1733. 

IV. 1733. — III. 1733. 3. George Cholmondeley, s. and h. ; ob. 1770. 

Marquesses. 

V. 1770. — IV. 1770. — I. 1815. 4. George James Cholmondeley, grands, and 

h., being s. and b. of George Cholmondeley 
(ob. v. p.) eldest s. of the last Earl, cre- 
ated Earl of Rocksavage, co. Chester, and 
Marquess of Cholmondeley 22 Nov. 181 5, 
K.G. ; ob. 10 April 1827. 

VI. 1827. — V. 1827. — II. 1827. 5. George James Horatio Cholmondeley, s. 

and h., was summ. to Pari. v. p., in his father's Barony of Newburgh 
5 Jan. 1822, present Marquess, Earl, and Baron Cholmondeley, Earl of 
Rocksavage, Viscount Malpas, and Baron Newburgh ; also Viscount Chol- 
mondeley and Baron Newburgh in Ireland, and a Baronet. = 

CHURCHILL. 

Baron. 
I. .1685. John Churchill, 1st Baron Churchill of Eyemouth in Scotland, 
created Baron Churchill of Sandridge, co. Herts, 14 May 1685, created 
Earl of Marlborough, co. Wilts, 9 April 1689. — Vide Marlborough. 

CHURCHILL ( of Whichwood ). 
Barons. 

I. 1815. 1. Francis Almeric Spencer, 2nd s. of George Spencer 3rd Duke of 

Marlborough, K.G., created Baron Churchill of Whichwood, cq. 
Oxford, 11 Aug. 1815 ; ob. 7 March 1845. 

II. 1845. 2. Francis George Spencer, s. and h., present Baron Churchill of 

Whichwood. = 

CIOCHES. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. Gunfrid de Cioches held 16 Lordships, co. Northampton, at 

the time of the General Survey ; his successor was, 

II. Steph. Anselme de Cioches, living 1139. 

III. Hen. III. Robert de Cioches, s. and h., living 1194. 

IV. John. Peter de Cioches, living 1205, after which nothing farther is 

known of this family. 

CIRENCESTER. 

Barony, 9 April 1689. — Vide Portland. 

CLANBRASSILL. 
Baron. 
1. L821. 1. Robert Jocelyn, 3rd Earl of Rodcn in Ireland, created Baron Clan- 
brassill of Hyde Hall, co. Herts, 17 July 1821, present Baron Clan- 
brassill, also Earl of Roden, &c. in Ireland, K.P. =p 

+ 

CLANCARTY. 

Viscounts. 
1. 1823. 1. Richard le Poer Trench, 2nd Earl of Clancarty in Ireland and 
1st Baron Trench in England, Marquess of Heusden in the Nether- 
lands ; created Viscount Clancarty of the County of Cork 8 Dec. 
1823, G.C.B. ; ob. 24 Nov. 1837. 



108 CLANDEBOYE — CLARE. 

Viscounts. 
II. 1837. 2. William Thomas le Poer Trench, s. and h., present Viscount 
Clancarty and Baron Trench in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, also 
Earl of Clancarty, &c. in Ireland, Marquess of Heusden in the Netherlands ; 
K.P. &c. =p 

CLANDEBOYE. 

Baron. 

I. 1850. 1. Frederick Temple Blackwood, Baron Dufferin and Claneboye in 
Ireland, created Baron Clandeboye of Clandeboye, co. Down, 22 Jan. 1850, 
present Baron Clandeboye; unm. 

„ CLAN" WILLI AM. 

Baron. 

I. 1828. 1. Richard Meade, 3rd Earl of Clanwilliam in Ireland, created 
Baron Clanwilliam of co. Tipperary 28 Jan. 1828, present Baron Clan- 
william, Earl of Clanwilliam in Ireland. =j= 

Y 
Earls. CLARE. 

I. Will. I. 1. Richard Fitz-Gilbert, eldest s. of Gilbert Count of Brion, or 

of Anci in Normandy (in which latter territory the town of 
Brion was situate), accompanied his kinsman William the 
Conqueror to England, and had large possessions awarded to 
him, of which the town and castle of Tonb ridge, co. Kent, and 
the manor of Clare, co. Suffolk, were the chief seats ; to this 
latter place his Norman title of Count,* or its equivalent, that 
of Earl in England, came to be attached, and his descendants 
were known as Earls Clare or de Clare until they obtained 
the English Earldoms of Gloucester and Hertford ; Richard 
Fitz-Gilbert was Justice of England, and dec. ante 1090. 
Gilbert de Clare, s. and h. 

Richard de Clare, s. and h., was Earl of Hertford, and pos- 
sessed of the third penny of the county before or earty in the 
reign of King Stephen ; slain by the Welsh 1139. 

Gilbert de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Hertford : ob 1151, s. p. 
5. Roger de Clare, bro. and h., Earl of Hertford ; ob. 1173. 

Richard de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Hertford ; he m. Arnicia, 
dau. and at length sole h. of William Earl of Gloucester, and 
was one of the celebrated 25 Barons appointed to enforce the 
observance of Magna Charta ; ob. 1218. 

VII. 1218. 7. Gilbert de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Hertford and Earl of 

Gloucester jure matris ; he was also one of the 25 Barons 
appointed to enforce the observance of Magna Charta ; ob. 
at Penros in Brittany 1230. 

VIII. 1230. 8. Richard de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Hertford and Gloucester ; 

ob. 1262. 

IX. 1262. 9. Gilbert de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Hertford and Gloucester ; 

he m. Joan Plantagenet, dau. of King Edward I. ; ob. 1295. 

X. 1295. 10. Gilbert de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Hertford and Gloucester ; 

slain at Bannockburn 1313, s. p., when these Earldoms be- 
came Extinct. 

XI. 1624. 1. John Holles, 1st Baron Haughton, created Earl of Clare, co. 

Suffolk, 2 Nov. 1624 ; ob. 1637. 

XII. 1637. 2. John Holles, s. and h. ; ob. 1665. 

XIII. 1665. 3. Gilbert Holles, s. and h. : ob. 1689. 



II. 


Hen. I. 


2 


III. 


Steph. 


3 


IV. 


1139. 


4 


V. 


1151. 


5 


VI. 


1173. 


6 



Vide observations under Albeiuarlk. 



CLARE — ( CLARENCE. 109 

Earls. Marquesses. 

XTV. 1689. — I. 1694. 4. John Holles, s. and h., created Marquess of Clare and 

Duke of Newcastle 14 May 1694, K.G. ; ob. 1711, 
s. P. M., when all his honours became Extinct. 

XV. 1714. — II. 1715. 1. Sir Thomas Pelham, Bart, (assumed the name of) 
Holles, 2nd Baron Pelham of Laughton, s. and h. of Thomas 1st Baron 
Pelham of Laughton, by Grace Holies, sister of the last Marquess of Clare, 
created Viscount Haughton, co. Notts, and Earl of Clare, co. Suffolk, with 
remainder, failing his issue male, to his bro. Henry Pelham, 19 Oct. 1714 ; 
created Marquess of Clare and Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, with the 
same remainder, 11 Aug. 1715 ; created Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyne 17 
Nov. 1756, with remainder failing his issue male to Henry Earl of Lin- 
coln and his issue male begotten on Catherine his then wife ; and Baron 
Pelham of Stanmer, co. Sussex, with remainder to Thomas Pelham of 
Stanmer, 4 May 1762, K.G. ; ob. 1768, s. p., and his bro. Henrv having died 
in his lifetime, s. p. m. s., the Earldom and Marquessate of Clare became 
Extinct. 

CLARE (of .... ) 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1309. Richard de Clare, summ. to Pari. 26 Oct. 3 Edw. II. 1309, but never 
afterwards. Dugdale gives no account of this Baron in his Baronage. There 
can be little doubt that he was the bro. and h. of Gilbert de Clare, and a3t. 22 
1 Edw. n., and 2nd s. of Thomas s. of Richard de Clare Earl of Gloucester. 
The period of his death is not known, but he left issue Thomas, who died 
s. p. and apparently a minor in the 14 Edw. II., leaving his aunts, sisters of 
his father, Margaret the wife of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, and Maud 
then the wife of Robert de Welle, and 2ndly before 1 Edw. JJI. of Robert de 
Clifford, his heirs. 

CLARENCE. 

Dukes. 

I. 1362. Lionel Plantagenet, 3rd s. of King Edward III. having m. Eliza- 
beth, dau. and h. of William de Burgh Earl of Ulster, s. and h. of 
John de Burgh by Elizabeth de Clare, sister and coh. of Gilbert the 
last Earl of Clare, obtained with her the honour of Clare, and having 
been created Earl of Ulster jure uxoris, was created Duke of Cla- 
rence in full Pari. 13 Nov. 1362/ K.G. ; Fhilippa, his dau. and h., 
m. Edmond Earl of March, and through her the House of York 
derived its claim to the Throne ; ob. 1368, s. p.m., when the Duke- 
dom became Extinct. 

IT. 1411. Thomas Plantagenet, 2nd s. of King Henry IV., created Earl of 
Albemarle and Duke of Clarence 9 July 14il, K.G. ; slain at the 
battle of Baugy 1421, s. p., when the title acrain became Extinct. 

III. 1461. George Plantagenet, bro. of King Edward IV., created Duke of 
Clarence 1461,s and by letters patent 20 Sept. 2 Edw. IV. 1462, 
the King granted to him, " com. honorem et diiium nrm. Rich- 
mondie que quidem, com. honorem et dnium Edmundus Hadham 
nup. comes Richemondie, nup. h'uit et tenuit." By separate patents, 
each dated 25 March 1472, he was created Earl of Warwick and 
Earl of Salisbury in consequence (as stated) of his marriage with 
Isabel, eldest dau. of Richard Earl of Warwick and Salisbury; 
K.G. ; murdered and attainted 1477, when his honours became 
Forfeited. 



' Rot. Pari. vol. ii. p. 273. I dium ac per apposicoem cappe capiti suo," 

B He was probably created Duke of Cla- between Mar. and Aug. 1461, but no record 

rence at the same time that his younger | of such ceremony is to be found on any of the 

brother Richard was created Duke of Glou- Rolls of that period ; he was first summ. to 

cester, which was done " cingendo sibi gla- I Pari, as Duke of Clarence 28 Feb. 1462. 



I. 


1661. 


1. 


IT. 


1674. 


2. 


III. 


1709. 


3. 


IV. 


1723. 


4. 



110 CLARENDON — CLAVERTNG. 

Dukes. 

IV. 1789. William Henky, 3rd s. of King George III., created Duke of Cla- 
rence and St. Andrews, and Earl of Munster in Ireland, 20 May 1789 ; 
ascended the throne as King William IV. 26 June 1830, when these dig- 
nities merged in the Crown. 



CLARENDON. 

Edward Hyde, 1st Baron Hyde, created Viscount Cornbury, co. 
Oxford, and Earl of Clarendon, 20 Apr. 1661, Lord High 
Chancellor ; ob. 1674. 

Henry Hyde, s. and h. ; ob. 1709. 

Edward Hyde, s. and h. ; ob. 1723, s. p. m. 

Henry Hyde, 2nd Earl of Rochester, cou. and h., being s. and 
h. of Lawrence, 1st Earl of Rochester, younger s. of Edward 
1st Earl of Clarendon ; ob. 1753, and his only son Henry Hyde 
(summ. to Pari, by writ, v. p., 22 Jan. 1750, and placed in his 
father's Barony of Hyde of Hinton) having died before him, 
s. p., his honours became Extinct. 

V. 1776. 1. Thomas Villiers, 2nd s. of William, 2nd Earl of Jersey, having 

m. Charlotte Capel, eldest dau. of William, 3rd Earl of Essex, 
by Jane Hyde, dau. and coh. of Henry, the last Earl of Cla- 
rendon (which Charlotte was coh. to her mother) was created 
Baron Hyde of Hindon, co. Wilts, to him and the heirs male of 
his body by Charlotte his then wife, and in default the dig- 
nity of Baroness Hyde to the said Charlotte for life, remainder 
to the heirs male of her body, 3 June 1756, and Earl of Claren- 
don 14 June 1776 ; ob. 1786. 

VI. 1786. 2. Thomas Villiers, s. and h. ; ob. unm. 7 Mar. 1824. 

VII. 1824. 3. John Charles Villiers, bro. and h. ; ob. 22 Dec. 1838. 

VIII. 1838. 4. George William Frederick Villiers, neph. and h. (s. and h. 
of George Villiers, next bro. of John Charles VII. Earl), present Earl of 
Clarendon and Baron Hyde of Hindon ; K.G., G.C.B. =p 

7 

CLAVERING. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Roger Fitz-Richard, Baron of Warkworth, co. Northumb., 

living 1165. 

II. Rich. I, 2. Robert Fitz-Roger, s. and h. ; ob. 1212. 

III. John. 3. John Fitz-Robert, s. and h., Lord of Horsford, co. Norfolk, 

and one of the celebrated 25 Barons appointed to enforce the 
observance of Magna Charta ; ob. 1240. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Roger Fitz-John, s. and h. ; ob. 1249. 

Barons by "Writ. 

I. 1295. 5. f Robert Fitz-Roger, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 2 Nov. 

23 Edw. I. 1295, to 16 June, 4 Edw. II. 1311 ; ob. 1310. 

II. 1299. 6. John Fitz-Robert, ret. 40 (assumed the name of) Clavering, 
s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 10 April, 28 Edw. I. 1299, to 20 Nov. 5 
Edw. III. 1331 ; ob. 1332, s. p.m. Eve, his dau. and h., ret. 40, 1345, 
m. 1. Thomas de Audley, who died 1 Edw. II. s. p. ; and 2. Thomas 
de Ufford, to whom she was m. 9 Mar. 1309 ; and 3. to Robert Benhale, 
whose wife she was in 1342. She died 43 Edw. III. 1369, and from the 
Inq. p. m. it would appear that she had no issue, in which case the Barony 
created by writ 23 Edw. I. is presumed to be vested in the descendants 
and representatives of her grandfather Robert Baron Fitz-Roger. 



CLEMENTS — CLIFFORD. 



Ill 



CLEMENTS. 
Barons. 

I. 1831. 1. Nathaniel Clements, Earl of Leitrim in Ireland, K.P., created 

Baron Clements of Kilmacrenan, co. Donegal, 20 June 1831 ; ob. 
31 Dec. 1854. 

II. 1854. 2. William Sydney, s. and h. ; present Baron Clements, also Earl of 

Leitrim, &c. in Ireland. 



Earls. 
I. 1625. 



Duchess. 
I. 1070. 



CLEVELAND. 

Thomas Wentworth, 4th Baron Wentworth, created Earl of 
Cleveland, co. York, 7 Feb. 1625 ; ob. 1667, s. p. m., when the 
Earldom became Extinct. 

Barbara Villiers, dau. and h. of William, 2nd Viscount Gran- 
dison in Ireland, mistress of King Charles II., created Baroness 
Nonsuch, co. Surrey, Countess of Southampton, and Duchess 
of Cleveland for life, with remainder after her decease to 
Charles Lord Limerick, her eldest s., and the heirs male of his 
body, remainder to George, her 3rd s. in like manner, h 3 Aug. 
1679 ; ob. 1709. 



Dukes. 
II. 1709 



Charles Fitz-Roy, eldest s. of the said Duchess, who had been 
created Baron of Newbury, co. Berks, Earl of Chichester, and 
Duke of Southampton (see those titles), K.G. ; ob. 1730. 

III. 1730. 3. William Fitz-Roy, s. and h., Duke of Southampton ; ob. 1774, 

s. p., when this dignity became Extinct. 

Marquesses. 

IV. 1833.— I. 1827. 1. William Henry Vane, III. Earl of Darlington, cre- 

ated Marquess of Cleveland 5 Oct. 1827, and Duke 
of Cleveland and Baron Raby of Raby Castle, co. 
Durham, 29 Jan. 1833 ; K.G. ; ob. 29 Jan. 1842. 

V. 1842. — II. 1842. 2. Henry Vane, s. and h., present Duke and Marquess 

of Cleveland, Earl of Darlington, Viscount and Baron 
Barnard and Baron Raby, K.G., &c. =p 



Barons by Tenure. 



CLIFFORD. 



I. 
II. 
III. 
IV. 



Hen. II. 1. Walter de Clifford, living 1165. 

Hen. III. 2. Walter de Clifford, s. and h. ; ob. 1222. 

1222. 3. Walter de Clifford, s. and h. ; ob. 1263, s. p. m. 

1263. 4. Roger Clifford, neph. and h., being s. and h. of Roger (ob. 
v. f.) next bro. of the last Baron ; ob. 1285. 



Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 5. f Robert Clifford, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Roger 

Clifford (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron, jet. 7, 11 
Edw. I., summ. to Pari, from 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299, 
to 26 Nov. 7 Edw. II. 1313, Earl Marshal 1307 ; ob. 1314. 

II. 1319. 6. Roger de Clifford, s. and h., ast. 14, summ. to Pari, from 

6 Nov. 13 Edw. II. 1319, to 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 1321 ; ob. 
1327, s. p. 



h The Signed Bill for this Patent gives the 
title of " Earl of Southampton " to the 
Duchess's eldest son, and the precedency of 



Duke's children to all her issue. Vide Note 
to Ghafton. 



112 CLIFFORD. 

Barons by Writ. 

III. 1327. 7. Robert de Clifford, bro. and h., £et. 21, summ. to Pari. 

from 10 Dec. 1 Edw. III. 1327, to 20 April, 17 Edw. III. 
1343 ; ob. 1344. 

IV. 8. Robert de Clifford, s. and h., set. 16, be was never summ. 

to Pari, as he died under age before 1354. 

V. 1357. 9.^Roger de Clifford, bro. and b., summ. to Pari, from 15 

Dec. 31 Edw. III. 1357, to 28 July, 12 Rich. II. 1388 ; ob. 
1389. 

VI. 1389. 10. Thomas de Clifford, s. and b., set. 24, summ. to Pari, from 

6 Dec. 13 Rich. II. 1389, to 7 Sept. 15 Rich. II. 1391 ; 
ob. 1392. 

VII. 1411. H.^John de Clifford, s. and h., set. 3, summ. to Pari, from 21 

Sept. 12 Hen. IV. 1411, to 26 Feb. 8 Hen. V. 1421, K.G. ; 
ob. 1422. 

VIII. 1436. 12. ^Thomas de Clifford, s. and b., a?t. 7, summ. to Pari. 

from 19 Dec. 15 Hen. VI. 1436, to 20 Jan. 31 Hen. VI. 
1453 ; ob. 1454. 

IX. 1460. 13.^ John de Clifford, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 30 July, 38 Hen. 

VI. 1460 ; ob. 1461, and having been attainted 4 Nov. 1461, 
his honours became Forfeited. 

X. 1485. 14. Henry de Clifford, s. and h. Restored in blood and honours 

1 Hen. VII. 1485, and summ. to Pari, from 15 Sept. 1 Hen. 

VII. 1485, to 16 Jan. 12 Hen. VII. 1497 ; ob. 1523. 

XL 1523. 15. Henry Clifford, s. and h., created Earl of Cumberland 18 
July 1525,' K.G. ; ob. 1542. 

XII. 1542. 16. Henry Clifford, s. and h., Earl of Cumberland, K.B. ; ob. 

1569. 

XIII. 1569. 17. George Clifford, s. and h., Earl of Cumberland, K.G. ; ob. 

1605, s. p. m. Ann Clifford, bis dau. and sole b., was twice 
m. — 1. to Richard Sackville, Earl of Dorset ; and 2. to 
Philip Earl of Pembroke, but had issue only by her first 
husband. She claimed tbe Barony in 1628, and the hearing 
of her petition was appointed for the following session, 
but there were no further proceedings on it. Her Ladyship 
died in 1675. 

XIV. 1691. 18. Thomas Tufton, 6th Earl of Thanet, claimed and was allowed 

the Barony by the House of Peers 12 Dec. 1691, as great- 
grands, and h. of tbe last Baron, being s. and ultimately 
h. of John 2nd Earl of Thanet, by Margaret, dau. and 
eventually (on the failure of the issue of her sister Isabella, 
wife of James Earl of Northampton) sole h. of Richard 
Sackville, Earl of Dorset, by Ann Clifford, dau. and sole h. 
of George Earl of Cumberland, the last Baron : ob. 1729, 
s. p. m., when the Barony fell into Abeyance between his 
daughters and coheirs, viz. — Catherine, wife of Edward 
Viscount Sondes ; Ann, wife of James Earl of Salisbury ; 
Margaret, wife of Thomas Earl of Leicester ; Mary, who m. 
1. Anthony Grey, s. of Henry Duke of Kent, and 2. John 
Earl Gower ; and Isabella, who m. 1. Lord Nassau Paulet, 
and 2. Sir Francis Delaval, K.B. ; until 1734, when the 
Crown was pleased to terminate the Abeyance, and confirm 
the Barony by Patent, 15 Aug. 1734, to, 

' He is called in the Signed Bill for his creation " Lord Clifford Westmoreland and Vesey." 
Vide Nul< under CUMBERLAND. 



CLIFFORD. 113 

Barons by Writ. 

XV. 1734. 19. Margaret, 3rd dau. and coh. of the last Baron, wife of Thomas 

Coke, Earl of Leicester ; ob. 1775, s. p. when the Barony 
again fell into Abeyance among the descendants of the 
sisters of the Baroness, who are mentioned above ; in which 
state it continued until 1776, when the Abeyance was again 
terminated in favour of 

XVI. 1776. 20. Edward Southwell, s. and h. of Edward Southwell, by 

Catherine, dau. and h. of Edward Viscount Sondes, by 
Catherine Tufton, 1st dau. and coh. of Thomas Tufton, 
Earl of Thanet, XIV. 18th Baron, and eldest sister of the 
late Baroness, summ. to Pari, by writ 17 Apr. 1776, as 
" Edward Clifford Chevalier ;" ob. 1777. 

XVII. 1777. 21. Edward Southwell, s. and h., took his seat as Lord Clifford, 

but assumed the distinction of " de Clifford ;" ob. s. p. 30 
Sept. 1832, when the Barony again fell into Abeyance between 
the issue of his three sisters — Catherine, Sophia, and Eliza- 
beth, viz., Sophia (only child of Catherine), wife of John 
Russell ; the two daughters of John Thomas Townshend 
(afterwards Viscount Sydney) by Sophia his wife ; and Vis- 
count Bury, s. and h. of Elizabeth Countess of Albemarle ; 
which Abeyance the Crown was pleased to terminate by 
Patent 4 Mar. 1833, in favour of, 

XVIII. 1833. 22. Sophia, wife of John Russell, Esq., and only child of George 
Kein Hayward Coussmaker, by Catherine, eldest sister and coh. of the last 
Baron, present Baroness De Clifford. =p 

Y 

CLIFFORD. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1628. 1. Henry Clifford, s. and h. apparent of Francis, IV. 4th Earl of 

Cumberland, summ. to Pari, by writs addressed "Henrico 
Clifford, Chevalier," from 17 Feb. 3 Car. I. 1628, to 3 Nov. 
15 Car. I. 1639, under the presumption that the ancient 
Barony of Clifford was vested in his father, but which Barony 
had passed to the heir general ; sat in several Parliaments 
accordingly, succeeded his father as Earl of Cumberland in 
1641 ; ob. 1643, s. p. m., when that Earldom became Extinct, 
but this Barony devolved on, 

II. 1643. 2. Elizabeth, his dau. and sole h. ; she m. Richard Boyle, Earl 

of Cork, in Ireland, who was in consequence created Baron 
Clifford of Lanesborough, by Patent to him and the heirs 
male of his body, 4 Nov. 1644 {vide infra) ; he was created 
Earl of Burlington 20 Mar. 1664, and died 1697. 

III. 1689. 3. Charles Boyle, s. and h., summ. to Pari, in his father's Barony 

of Clifford of Lanesborough by writ 16 July 1689 ; ob. v. p., 
1694. 

IV. 1694. 4. Charles Bovle, s. and h., claimed a writ of summ. to Pari, as 

Lord Clifford of Lanesborough, in consequence of his father 
having been so summoned, which claim was allowed, and he 
was summ. accordingly ; succeeded his grandfather as Earl of 
Cork and Burlington in 1697 ; ob. 1704. 

V. 1704. 5. Richard Boyle, s. and h., Earl of Cork and Burlington ; in 1737 

he claimed, and was allowed the Barony of Clifford created by 
the Writ of 3 Car. 1. 1628, to his great-great-grandfather Henry 
Clifford before mentioned, K.G. ; ob. 1753, s. p. m., when the 
Earldom of Burlington and Barony of Clifford of Lanesborough 
became Extinct ; but the Barony of Clifford created by the 
Writ of 3 Car. I. devolved on, 

i 



114 CLIFFORD — CLIFTON. 

Barons by Writ. 

VI. 1753. 6. Charlotte, his dau. and sole h. ; she m. William Cavendish, 4th 

Duke of Devonshire ; ob. 1754. 

VII. 1754. 7. William Cavendish, s. and h., 5th Duke of Devonshire, K.B., 

&c. ; ob. 29 July 1811. 

VIII. 1811. 8. William Spencer Cavendish, s. and h., 6th and present Duke 
of Devonshire, E.G., &c., present Baron Clifford under the Writ of 3 
Car. I. 1628. 

B CLIFFORD (of Lanesborough). 

1. 1644. Richard Boyle, Earl of Cork, having m. Elizabeth, dau. and h. 
of Henry Clifford, 5th Earl of Cumberland, was created Baron Clifford of 
Lanesborough, co. York, 4 Nov. 1644; created 20 Mar. 1664, Earl of 
Burlington. Extinct 1753. Vide Burlington. 



Barons. 



II. 


1673. 


2 


III. 


1730. 


3 


IV. 


1732. 


4 


V. 


1783. 


5 


VI. 


1793. 


6 



CLIFFORD (of Chudleigh). 

1. Thomas Clifford, said to have been descended from Sir Lewis 
Clifford, E.G., 3rd s. of Roger V. 9th Baron Clifford, created 
Baron Clifford of Chudleigh, co. Devon, 22 Apr. 1672, Lord 
High Treasurer ; ob. 1673. 

Hugh Clifford, s. and h. ; ob. 1730. 
3. Hugh Clifford, s. and h. ; ob. 1732. 

Hugh Clifford, s. and h. ; ob. 1783. 

Hugh Edward Henry Clifford, s. and h. ; ob. 1793, s. p. 

Charles Clifford, bro. and h. ; he m. Eleanor Mary, youngest 
dau. and coh. of Henry, 8th Baron Arundel of Wardour, 
youngest coh. of one moiety of the Baronies of Fitz-Payne and 
Kerdeston ; ob. 29 Apr. 1831. 

VII. 1831. 7. Hugh Charles Clifford, s. and h., present Baron Clifford of 
Chudleigh. =p 

t 

Barons by Writ. CLIFTON. 

I. 1376. 1. John de Clifton, who inherited that share of the Barony of 
Tatteshall, which had vested in the family of Cailly, was 
found h. to Margaret de Cailly 42 Edw. III. (1368), then set. 15 
years, summ. to Pari, from 1 Dec. 50 Edw. III. 1376, to 28 July, 
12 Rich. II. 1388 ; ob. 1388. 

TT. 1393. 2. Constamtine Clifton, s. and h. jet. 16, summ. to Pari. 13 Nov. 
17 Rich. II. 1393, and 20 Nov. 18 Rich. II. 1394, but never afterwards ; 
" wherefore," says Dugdale, " I shall here put a period to my discourse of 
him ;" but it appears that he died in 1395, and had issue a s. John, and 
a dau. Elizabeth, who m. Sir John Knyvet, Knt. ; the said John Clifton 
was one year old at his father's death, and though afterwards knighted, 
was never summ. to Pari. ; Margaret, his sole dau. and h., was the wife 
of Sir Andrew Ogard, Knt., but died s. p., when this Barony became 
vested in John Knyvet, the s. and h. of Lady Elizabeth Knyvet above 
mentioned, dau. of Constantine, II. Baron ; among whose descendants and 
representatives this Barony is now in Abeyance. 

Barons by Writ. CLIFTON ( of Leighton Bromswold). 

L 1608. 1. Gervase Clifton, summ. to Pari, from 9 July, 7 Jac. I. 1608, 

to 5 Apr. 12 Jac. I. 1614, as " Gervasio Clifton de Layton 
Bromswold ChTr ;" ob. 1618, s. p. m. 



CLINTON. 115 

Barons by Writ. 

II. 1674. 2. Catherine, wife of Henry O'Brien (s. and h. apparent of Henry 

Earl of Thomond, ob. v. p.), claimed and was allowed the 
Barony 7 Feb. 1674, being dau. and eventually h. of George 
Stewart, s. and h. apparent of Esme Duke of Richmond (slain 
at Edgehill v. p. 1642), by Catherine Clifton, dau. and h. of 
the last Baron; ob. 1702. 

III. 1702. 3. Edward Hyde, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Katherine 

(ob. vita, matris), wife of Edward Hyde, 3rd Earl of Clarendon, 
and dau. and sole h. of the last Baroness; ob. v. p., 
1713, s. p. 

IV. 1713. 4. Theodosia Bligh, sist. and h. ; ob. 1722. She m. John Bligh, 

who was created Baron Clifton, and afterwards Viscount and 
Earl of Darnley in Ireland, and died 1728. 

V. 1722. 5. Edward Bligh, s. and h., succeeded his father as Earl of Darn- 

ley, &c. in Ireland, 1728 ; ob. 1747, s. p. 

VI. 1747. 6. John Bligh, bro. and h., Earl of Darnley in Ireland ; ob. 

1781. 

VII. 1781. 7. John Bligh, s. and h., Earl of Darnley in Ireland ; ob. 17 Mar- 

1831. 

VIII. 1831. 8. Edward Bligh, s. and h., Earl of Darnley in Ireland ; ob. 12 

Feb. 1835. 

IX. 1835. 9. John Stuart Bligh, s. and h. ; present Baron Clifton of Leigh- 

ton Bromswold, Earl of Darnley, &c, in Ireland. =p 

CLINTON". 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Geoffrey de Clinton, Chamberlain and Treasurer to King 

Hen. I. ; living 1129. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Geoffrey de Clinton, s. and h., Chamberlain to King Hen. II. ; 

living 1165. 

HI. John. 3. Henry de Clinton, s. and h. ; living 1212. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Henry de Clinton, s. and h. ; ob. 1232, s. p., when his sisters 
became his heirs. 



I. Hen. n. 1. Osbert de Clinton, neph. of Geoffrey the 1st Baron ; living 
1161. 

H. John. 2. Osbert de Clinton, s. and h. ; ob. 1222. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Thomas de Clinton, s. and h. ; living 1264. 

IV. Edw. I. 4. Thomas de Clinton, s. and h. ; living 1283. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 5. John de Clinton, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 

1299, and in a summons to meet the King, " cum equis et 
armis," 12 Mar. 29 Edw. I. 1300, he is denominated of 
Maxstock, co. Warwick ; ob. 1315. 

II. 1332. 6. John de Clinton, grands, and h. ast. 12, 1315, summ. to Pari. 

from 27 Jan. 6 Edw. III. 1332, to 1 April, 9 Edw. III. 
1335 ; to the last writ the words " mortuus est " are added ; 
ob. 1335. 

III. 1357. 7. John de Clinton, s. and h. aH. 28, 1354, summ. to Pari, from 

15 Dec. 31 Edw. III. 1357, to 5 Nov. 21 Eich. II. 1397; 
he m. Idonea, sist. and coh. of William Baron Say ; ob. 
1397. I 2 



116 



CLINTON. 



VI. 



VII. 



11 



VIII. 1514. 12. 



IX. 1536. 13 



Barons by Writ. 

IV. 1399. 8.^ William de Clinton, grands, and h. net. 5, 1384, being s. 
and h. of William Clinton (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of tbe last 
Baron ; suram. to Pari, from 19 Aug. 23 Rich. II. 1399, to 
27 Nov. 9 Hen. VI. 1430 ; k ob. 1432. 
V 1450. 9.^ John de Clinton, s. and b. a?t. 22, summ. to Pari, from 4 Sept. 

29 Hen. VI. 1450, to 30 July, 38 Hen. VI. 1460 ; attainted 
1460, when his honours became Forfeited; restored in 
blood and bonours and summ. to Pari, from 23 May, 1 
Edw. IV. 1461, to 28 Feb. 2 Edw. IV. 1463 ; ob. 1464. 
10. John de Clinton, s. and h. aet. 30, was never summ. to Pari. ; 
ob. 1488. 

John de Clinton, s. and h., was never summ. to Pari. ; ob. 
1514. 

Thomas de Clinton, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 23 Nov. 
6 Hen. VIII. 1514 ; ob. 1517. 

Edward de Clinton, s. and h. set. 5, summ. to Pari. 27 
Apr. 28 Hen. VIII. 1536, as "Edward Clinton Chevalier," 1 
created Earl of Lincoln 4 May 1572, K.G., Lord High Ad- 
miral ; ob. 1584. 

Henry de Clinton, s. and h., Earl of Lincoln, K.B. ; ob. 1616. 

Thomas de Clinton, s. and h., Earl of Lincoln, summ. to Pari, 
v. p. 2 June 1610 in this Barony ; ob. 1619. 

Theophiltjs de Clinton, s. and h., Earl of Lincoln ; ob. 1667. 

Edward Clinton, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Edward 
(ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron ; ob. 1692, s. p., when 
the Barony fell into Abeyance between his aunts and co- 
heirs, until the Abeyance was terminated by the Crown, in 
the person of, 

Earl. 

XIV. 1721. — I. 1746. 18. Hugh Fortescue, s. and h. of Hugh Fortescue, by 

Bridget, dau. and h. of Hugh Boscawen, by Mar- 
garet Clinton, dau. of Theophilus XII. 16th Baron, 
and aunt and coh. of the last Baron, summ. to Pari. 
15 Mar. 1721 in this Barony, and created Earl 
Clinton and Baron Fortescue of Castle Hill, co. 
Devon, 5 July 1746, with limitation of the Barony 
(failing the heirs male of his own body) to his half- 
bro. Matthew Fortescue, Esq. ; ob. 1751, s. p., when 
the Earldom of Clinton became Extinct. The 
Barony of Fortescue of Castle Hill passed to his 
bro., and this Barony again fell into Abeyance 
between Margaret Fortescue his sister and h. and 
Margaret Countess of Orford, but on the death of 
the said Margaret Fortescue unm. in 1760, the 
dignity devolved on, 

XV. 1760. 19. Margaret, widow of Robert, 2nd Earl of Orford, and wife of 

the Hon. Sewallis Shirley, as h. general of Theophilus Earl 



X. 


1584. 


14 


XI. 


1616. 


15 


XII. 


1619. 


16 


XIII. 


1667. 


17 



v In a grant on the Rot. Claus. 5 Hen. VI. 
m. 15cZ, he styled himself " Will's de Clynton, 
Miles, Diis de Clynton et de Say." 

1 In 4 & 5 Ph. & M. a question of prece- 
dency arose between this nobleman and Henry 
Lord Stafford, when it was decided, 12 Feb. 
1558, that the Lords Clinton had by long 
continuance and great antiquity ranked next 



above the Lords Audley, and that the Lords 
Stafford had always ranked next below the 
Lords Talbot, and they were respectively 
placed accordingly. — Lords' Journals, vol. i. 
p. 522. Lord Clinton was consequently put 
next to Lord Bergavenny and became the se- 
cond Baron of the realm, whilst Lord Stafford 
became the eleventh. 



CLINTON — CLYVEDON. 117 



Barons by Writ. 



of Lincoln, XII. 16th Baron, she being dan. and sole h. of 
Samuel Eolle, s. and h. of Eobert Eolle, by Arabella, eldest 
dau. of the said Theophihis ; ob. 1781. 

XVI. 1781. 20. George Walpole, Earl of Orford, s. and h. ; ob. 1791, s, p., 

when the Barony of Clinton devolved on, 

XVII. 1794. 21. Eobert George William Trefusis, he being s. and h. of 

Eobert Cotton Trefusis, eldest son of Eobert Trefusis, s. and 
h. of Samuel Trefusis, eldest son of Francis Trefusis by 
Bridget, aunt of Margaret the last Baroness, and dau. of 
Eobert Eolle by Arabella Clinton above mentioned ; claimed 
and was allowed the Barony as h. general of Theophilus 
Earl of Lincoln XII. 16th Baron, and was summ. to Pari, as 
" Eobert George William Trefusis do Clinton, Chr." 27 Feb. 
1794 ; ob. 1797. 

XVIII. 1797. 22. Eobert Cotton St. John Trefusis, s. and h. ; ob. s. p. Oct. 

1832. 

XIX. 1832. 23. Charles Eodolph Trefusis, bro. and h., present Baron 

Clinton, eldest coh. of the Barony of Say, and a coh. of a 
moiety of that of Foliot. =p 

Y 

CLINTON. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1330.^ William de Clinton, bro. of John de Clinton II. 6th Baron, summ. 
to Pari, from 6 Sept. 4 Edw. III. 1330, to 14 Jan. 10 Edw. III. 1337, 
created Earl of Huntingdon 16 Mar. 1337 ; ob. 1354, s. p., when his 
honours became Extinct. 



CLIVE. 
Baron. Viscount. 

1. 1794. — I. 1804. 1. Edward Clive, 2nd Baron Clive in Ireland, created Baron 
Clive of Walcot, co. Salop, 13 Aug. 1794, and Baron Powis of Powis Castle, 
Baron Herbert of Chirbury, Viscount Clive of Ludlow, and Earl of Powis, 
14 May 1804.— Vide Powis. 



CLONCUREY. 
Barons. 

I. 1831. 1. Valentine Browne Lawless, Lord Cloncurry in Ireland, created 

Baron Cloncurry of Cloncurry, co. Kildare, 14 Sept. 1831; ob. 
28 Oct. 1853. * 

II. 1853. 2. Edward Lawless, s. and h., present Baron Cloncurry, also Lord 

Cloncurry in Ireland. =p 

Y 
CLUN AND OSWALDESTEE. 

Vide Fitz-Alan of Clun and Oswaldestre. 



CLYVEDON. 

Eeginald de Clyvedon, with about sixty other persons, was summ. 8 June, 
22 Edw. I. 1294, to attend the King, wherever he might be, to advise on the 
affairs of the Eealin, but there is very considerable doubt if that writ can be 
considered as a regular writ of summons to Pail., as none of the higher tern- 



118 COBHAM. 

poral nobility nor any of the spiritual peers were included in it ; nor was there 
any day fixed for the meeting. It is also to be observed that the writ in question 
is the earliest on record, excepting that of 49 Hen. III., that the majority of 
the persons summoned in 22 Edw. I. were never again summoned excepting 
in 25 Edw. I., m that several of those persons do not appear to have been 
Barons by Tenure, and that of those who were Barons by Tenure and sum- 
moned on those occasions, many were never included in any subsequent sum- 
mons to Pari. The writ of 22 Edw. I. has however on one occasion been 
admitted as a writ of summons to Pari, at the bar of the House of Lords," but 
the last ' General Report of the Lords' Committee appointed to search for 
matters touching the Dignity of a Peer of the Pealm,' appears to confirm the 
objections here expressed. Eeginald de Clyvedon was never afterwards summ. 
to Pari,, nor does Dugdale or any other genealogical writer give an account 
of him. 

COBHAM (of Kent). 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1313. 1. Henry de Cobham, set. 40, 28 Edw. I., summ. to Pari, from 

8 Jan. 6 Edw. II. 1313, to 22 Jan. 9 Edw. III. 1336. 

II. 1350. 2. John de Cobham, s. and h., summ. to a Council 12 Sept. and 

12 Nov. 16 Edw. III. 1342 ; summ. to Pari, as " John de 
Cobham" from 25 Nov. 24 Edw. III. 1350, to 20 Nov. 34 Edw. 

III. 1360 ; ob 

III. 1368. 3.^ John de Cobham, s. and h., apparently under age, 1341, and 

then m. to Margaret, dau. of Hugh Courtenay Earl of Devon, 
summ. to Pari, as "John Cobham of Kent" from 24 Feb. 42 
Edw. III. 1368, to 18 July, 21 Rich. II. 1397, and from 
19 Aug. 23 Rich. II. 1399, to 9 Feb. 7 Hen. IV. 1406, as 
"John Cobham, Chivaiier;" ob. 1409, s. p. M., leaving his 
granddau. Joan, ait. 30 (dau. and h. of his dau. Joan, wife of 
Sir John de la Pole), his h. ; she was then the wife of Sir 
Nicholas Hauberk, on whose death she m. her 4th husband, 

IV. 1409. John Oldcastle, who was summ. to Pari, from 26 Oct. 11 Hen. 

IV. 1409, to 22 Mar. 1 Hen. V. 1413, without any other 
designation than as " Johanni Oldcastle, Chevr. ;" executed 
1417, s. p. By her 2nd husband Sir Reginald Braybrooke, the 
said Joan Cobham had a dau. and h., Joan, the wife of Sir 
Thomas Brooke, Knt. ; their eldest s. and h., 

V. 1445. 1. ^Edward Brooke, was summ. to Pari, as "Edwardo Broke, de 

Cobham, Chivaiier," from 13 Jan. 23 Hen. VI. 1445, to 28 
Feb. 2 Edw. IV. 1463 ; ob. 1464. 

VI. 1472. 2.^ John Brooke, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 19 Aug. 12 Edw. IV. 

1472, to 16 Jan. 12 Hen. VII. 1497 ; ob. 1506. 

VII. 1509. 3. Thomas Brooke, s. and h., apparently summ. to Pari, from 

17 Oct. 1 Hen. VIII. 1509, to 12 Nov. 7 Hen. VIII. 1515, 
though each writ in those years is directed to John Cobham ; 
ob. 1529. 

VTII. 1529. 4. George Brooke, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 3 Nov. 21 Hen. 
VIII. 1529, to 20 Jan. 4 and 5 Phil, and Mary, 1558, K.G. ; 
ob. 1558. 

IX. 1558. 5. William Brooke, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 5 and 6 Phil, and 
Mary, 1558, to 19 Feb. 35 Eliz., K.G. ; ob. 1596. 



"' Vide some observations on this Writ of 25 Edw. I. under Fitz-John. 
" In the case of the Barony of Koos. 



COBHAM. U9 

Barons by Writ. 

X. 1597. 6. Henry Brooke, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 24 Oct. 39 Eliz. 1597 ; 
attainted in 1604, when his honours became Forfeited. He died in 1619, 
s. p., leaving William Brooke, s. of George his bro., who was executed and 
attainted, his next h., which William Brooke was restored in blood in 
1610, but " not to enjoy the title of Lord Cobham without the King's 
special grace," which was never conferred on him ; he left issue (besides 
three other daughters and coheirs whose issue became extinct) Margaret 
Hill Brooke, his 2nd dau. and coh. who m. Sir William Boothby, Bart., 
whose representatives in 1837 were Robert Thorp, M .D., Disney Alexander, 
M.D., Mrs. Lucy Cockerell, and Miss Harriet Lund. 

COBHAM. 

Barons by Patent. 

I. 1645. John Brooke, s. and h. of Henry, younger s. of George Brooke, VIII. 
6th Baron and next h. male of Henry, last Baron, created by letters patent 
3 Jan. 1645 at Oxford, Baron Cobham, and the King " restoreth him and 
his heires males to the same dignity with all pririledges and immunities 
thereunto belonging, and that he shall enjoye the same place and prece- 
dencie as well in Parliament and pnblique councells as elsewhere, which 
George late Lord, Cobham his grandfather, whilst he lived, enjoyed." This 
however was evidently a new Barony, and on his death in 1651, s. p., 
became Extinct. 

COBHAM (of Kent). 
Barons. Viscounts. 

I. 1714. — I. 1718. 1. Sir Richard Temple, 4th Bart, (descended from Mar- 

garet Cobham, sister of Henry X. 8th Baron, and of 
George his bro., who was attainted), created Baron 
of Cobham, co. Kent, 19 Oct. 1714, created Viscount 
Cobham of Kent 23 May 1718, with remainder, 
failing his issue male, of the dignity of Viscountess 
Cobham to his 2nd sister Hester Grenville, wife of 
Richard Grenville of Wootton, co. Bucks, Esq., and 
her issue male ; and failing such issue, to his 3rd 
sister Dame Christian Lyttleton, wife of Sir Thomas 
Lyttleton, Bart., and her issue male, together with 
an extension of the limitations of the dignity of 
Baron of Cobham formerly created (failing his issue 
male) to his said sisters Hester Grenville and Dame 
Christian Lyttleton and their issue male respectively 
as aforesaid ; ob. 1749, s. p., when the Barony and 
Viscounty devolved on, 

II. 1749. — II. 1749. 2. Hester, sist. and h., wife of Richard Grenville, Esq., 

created Countess Temple, with remainder of the 
dignity of Earl Temple to her issue male, 18 Oct. 
1749 ; ob. 1752. 

III. 1752. — III. 1752. 3. Richard Grenville, s. and h., Earl Temple, K.G. ; 

ob. 1779. 

IV. 1779. — IV. 1779. 4. George Grenville, neph. and h., s. and h. of the 

Right Hon. George Grenville, next bro. of the last Earl Temple, assumed 
the names of Nugent Temple before that of Grenville, 1779, Earl Temple, 
&c, created Marquess of Buckingham.— Vide Temple and Buckingham. 

COBHAM (of Sterborough, co. Kent). 

Barons by Writ. 

I 1342. 1. Reginald de Cobham, s. of Reginald, younger s. of John Cobham 
2nd Baron, summ. to Pari, from 25 Feb. L6 Edw. 111. 1342, 
to 20 Nov. 34 Edw. III. 1360 ; ob. 1361. . 



120 COBHAM — COLCHESTER. 

Barons by Writ. 

II. 1371. 2. Reginald de Cobiiam, s. and h. get. 13, summ. to Pari. 8 Jan. 
44 Edw. III. 1371, and 6 Oct. 46 Edw. III. 1372 ; ob. 1402-3, leaving 
Reginald Cobham his s. and h. a?t. 21, but neither he nor any of his de- 
scendants, who continued for several generations in the male line, were 
ever summ. to Pari. 



COBHAM (of Bundall, co. Kent). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1326. Stephen de Cobham, s. of Henry Cobham, half-bro. to Reginald 1st 
Baron Cobham of Sterborough, summ. to Pari, from 3 Dec. 20 Edw. II. 
1326, to 20 Jan. 7 Edw. III. 1334 ; ob. 1334, leaving John Cobham his s. 
and h. cet. 21, 1340, but neither he nor his descendants were ever summ. 
to Pari. 

COBHAM (of Norfolk). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1324. Ralph de Cobham, bro. of Hemy I. Baron Cobham of Kent ; summ. 
to Pari. 30 Dec. 18 Edw. II. 1324, and 20 Feb. 18 Edw. II. 1325 ; ob. 
1325, leaving a s. John, set. 1 year, but neither he nor his descendants 
were afterwards summoned. 



COCKEBMOUTH. 

Barony, 3 Oct. 1749. — Vide Egremont. 

COKE. 

Viscounty, 9 May, 1744. Extinct 1759. — Vide Leicester. 
Viscounty, 12 Aug. 1837. — Vide Leicester of Holkham. 



COLBOBISTE. 

Baron. 

I. 1839. 1. Nicholas William Ridley-Colborne, created Baron Colbome of 
West Harling, co. Norfolk, 15 May 1839 ; ob. s. p. m. s. 3 May 1854, 
when the title became Extinct. 



COLCHESTEB. 

Viscounts. 

I. 1621. 1. Thomas Darcy, 3rd Baron Darcy of Chiche, created Viscount Col- 

chester, co. Essex, for life, with remainder to Sir Thomas Savage 
(afterwards created Viscount Savage) and the heirs male of Ins 
body by Elizabeth his wife, the eldest dau. and coheiress of the 
grantee, 5 July 1621, created Earl Rivers, with the same limita- 
tion, 1626 ; ob. 1639, s. p. m. 

II. 1639. 2. John, 2nd Viscount Savage, grands, of the last Viscount, being s. and 

h. of Thomas 1st Viscount Savage above mentioned, by Elizabeth, eldest 
dau. and coh. of the last Viscount Colchester and Earl Rivers. Extinct 
1728.— Vide Rivers. 

Barons. 

T. 1817. 1. Charles Abbot, created Baron Colchester of Colchester, co. Essex, 
3 June 1817 ; ob. 8 May 1829. 

II. 1829. 2. Charles Abbot, s. and h., present Baron Colchester. =j= 





Barons. 


I. 


1644. 


II. 


1660, 


III. 


1688, 


IV. 


1719 



COLEPEPEK — COLVILL. 121 

COLEPEPER. 

1. John Colepeper, created Baron Colepeper of Thorcsway, co. 

Lincoln, 21 Oct. 1644 ; ob. 1660. 

2. Thomas Colepeper, s. and h. ; ob. 1688, s. p. m. 

3. John Colepeper, half-bro. and h. ; ob. 1719, s. p. 

4. Cheney Colepeper, bro. and h. ; ob. 1725 unm., when the title 

became Extinct. 

COLESHILL. 

Viscounty, 1 Nov. 1790. — Vide Digby. 



collinowood. 

Baron. 

I. 1805. 1. Cuthbert Collingwood, created Baron Collingwood of Coldbunie 
and Hethpoole, co. Northumberland, 20 Nov. 1805 ; ob. 1810, s. p. m., 
when the title became Extinct. 



COLUMBEPvS. 

Barons by Tenure, 

I. Hen. II. 1. Philip de Columbers ; ob. circa 1186. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Philip de Columbers, s. and h. ; ob. 1216. 

III. John. 3. Philip de Columbers, s. and h. ; ob. 1256. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Philip de Columbers, s. and h. ; ob. 1276, s. p. 

V. Edw. I. 5. John de Columbers, bro. and h. set. 22, surnm. to Pari. 8 June, 

22 Edw. I. 1294, but it is very doubtful if that writ was a 
regular summ. to Pari, {vide Clyvedon.); ob. 1305. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1314. 6. Philip de Columbers, s. and h. set. 24, summ. to Pari, from 
29 July, 8 Edw. II. 1314, to 3 Mar. 15 Edw. III. 1341, m. Eleanor 
dau. of William I. 6th Baron Martin, and sist. and coh. of William II. 7th 
Baron Martin ; ob. 1342, s. p., leaving Stephen Columbers, Parson of the 
Church of Shirewell, then ast. 50, his bro. and h., and who became h. to 
the hereditary dignity, if any existed by the writ to his father in 22 Edw. 1., 
but if the Barony be deemed to have been created by the writ to the said 
Philip in 8 Edw. II. it then became Extinct. 



Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. Matthew de Columbers, presumed of the same family ; ob. 1272, 
s. P. 

COLVILL. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Philip de Colvill, living 1174 ; his successor was, 

2. William de Colvill, living 1216. 

3. Robert de Colvill, s. and h. ; ob. . . . , to whom succeeded, 

4. Walter de Colvill, summ. to Pari. 24 Dec. 49 Hen. III. 
1264 ; ob. 1276. 

5. Roger de Colvill, s. and h. aet. 25 ; ob. 1287. 

6. Edmund de Colvill, s. and h. set. 1, was never summ. to 
Pari. ; ob. 1315. 



II. 
III. 


John. 
Hen. III. 


Barons by Writ, 
I. 1264. 


11. 
III. 





120 COBHAM — COLCHESTER. 

Barons by Writ. 

II. 1371. 2. Reginald de Cobham, s. and h. ret. 13, summ. to Pari. 8 Jan. 
44 Edw. III. 1371, and 6 Oct. 46 Edw. III. 1372 ; ob. 1402-3, leaving 
Reginald Cobham his s. and h. ret. 21, bnt neither he nor any of his de- 
scendants, who continued for several generations in the male line, were 
ever summ. to Pari. 



COBHAM (of Rundall, co. Kent). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1326. Stephen de Cobham, s. of Henry Cobham, half-bro. to Reginald 1st 
Baron Cobham of Sterborough, summ. to Pari, from 3 Dec. 20 Edw. II. 
1326, to 20 Jan. 7 Edw. III. 1334 ; ob. 1334, leaving John Cobham his s. 
and h. ret. 21, 1340, but neither he nor his descendants were ever summ. 
to Pari. 

COBHAM (of Norfolk). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1324. Ralph de Cobham, bro. of Henry I. Baron Cobham of Kent; summ. 
to Pari. 30 Dec. 18 Edw. II. 1324, and 20 Feb. 18 Edw. II. 1325 ; ob. 
1325, leaving a s. John, ret. 1 year, but neither he nor his descendants 
were afterwards summoned. 



COCKERMOUTH. 

Barony, 3 Oct. 1749. — Vide Egremont. 

COKE. 

Viscounty, 9 May, 1744. Extinct 1759. — Vide Leicester. 
Viscounty, 12 Aug. 1837. — Vide Leicester of Holkham. 



COLBORNE. 

Baron. 

T. 1839. 1. Nicholas William Ridley-Colborne, created Baron Colhorne of 
West Harling, co. Norfolk, 15 May 1839 ; ob. s. p. M. s. 3 May 1854, 
when the title became Extinct. 



COLCHESTER. 

Viscounts. 

I. 1621. 1. Thomas Darcy, 3rd Baron Darcy of Chiche, created Viscount Col- 

chester, co. Essex, for life, with remainder to Sir Thomas Savage 
(afterwards created Viscount Savage) and the heirs male of his 
body by Elizabeth his wife, the eldest dau. and coheiress of the 
grantee, 5 July 1621, created Earl Rivers, with the same limita- 
tion, 1626 ; ob. 1639, s. p. M. 

II. 1639. 2. John, 2nd Viscount Savage, grands, of the last Viscount, being s. and 

h. of Thomas 1st Viscount Savage above mentioned, by Elizabeth, eldest 
dau. and coh. of the last Viscount Colchester and Earl Rivers. Extinct 
1728. — Vide Rivers. 

Barons. 

L 1817. 1. Charles Abbot, created Baron Colchester of Colchester, co. Essex, 
3 June 1817 ; ob. 8 May 1829. 

II. 1829. 2. Charles Abbot, s. and h., present Baron Colchester. =p 



COLEPEPER — COLVILL. 121 



COLEPEPER. 

Barons. 

I. 1644. 1. John Colepeper, created Baron Colepeper of Thoresway, co. 

Lincoln, 21 Oct. 1644 ; ob. 1660. 

II. 1660. 2. Thomas Colepeper, s. and h. ; ob. 1688, s. p. m. 

III. 1688. 3. John Colepeper, half-bro. and h. ; ob. 1719, s. p. 

IV. 1719. 4. Cheney Colepeper, bro. and b. ; ob. 1725 unm., when the title 

became Extinct. 



COLESHILL. 

Viscounty, 1 Nov. 1790. — Vide Digby. 



COLLLBTGWOOD. 

Baron. 

I. 1805. 1. Cuthbert Collingwood, created Baron Collingwood of Coldburne 
and Hethpoole, co. Northumberland, 20 Nov. 1805 ; ob. 1810, s. p. si., 
when the title became Extinct. 



COLUMBERS. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Philip de Coltjmbers; ob. circa 1186. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Philip de Columbers, s. and h. ; ob. 1216. 

III. John. 3. Philip de Columbers, s. and h. ; ob. 1256. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Philip de Columbers, s. and h. ; ob. 1276, s. p. 

V. Edw. I. 5. John de Columbers, bro. and h. set. 22, sunim. to Pari. 8 June, 

22 Edw. I. 1294, but it is very doubtful if that writ was a 
regular summ. to Pari, (vide Clyvedon.); ob. 1305. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1314. 6. Philip de Columbers, s. and h. set. 24, summ. to Pari, from 
29 July, 8 Edw. II. 1314, to 3 Mar. 15 Edw. III. 1341, m. Eleanor 
dau. of William I. 6th Baron Martin, and sist. and cob., of William II. 7th 
Baron Martin ; ob. 1342, s. p., leaving Stephen Columbers, Parson of the 
Church of Shirewell, then set. 50, his bro. and h., and who became h. to 
the hereditary dignity, if any existed by the writ to his father in 22 Edw. 1., 
but if the Barony be deemed to have been created by the writ to the said 
Philip in 8 Edw. II. it then became Extinct. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. Matthew de Columbers, presumed of the same family ; ob. 1272, 
s. p. 

COLVILL. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Philip de Colvill, living 1174 ; his successor was, 
U. John. 2. William de Colvill, living 1216. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Robert de Colvill, s. and h. ; ob. . . . , to whom succeeded, 

Barons by Writ. 

I 1264 4. Walter de Colvill, summ. to Pari. 24 Dec. 49 Hen. III. 
1264 ; ob. 1276. 

II. 5. Roger de Colvill, s. and h. set. 25 ; ob. 1287. 

HI 6. Edmund de Colvill, s. and h. ast. 1, was never summ. to 

Pari. : ob. 1315. 



122 COMBERMERE — COMYN. 

Barons by Writ. 

IV. 1342. 7. Robert de Colvill, s. and h. set. 11, summ. to Pari, from 
25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342° to 20 Jan. 39 Edw. III. 1366; ob. 1369, 
leaving Robert de Colville, then set. 4, his grands, and h., being s. and h. of 
Walter de Colville (a3t. 8, 1349 ; ob. v. p. 1368) eldest s. of the last Baron ; 
the said Robert died an infant in 1369-70, when Ralph Basset of Sap- 
cote, set. 17, s. of Simon Bassett s. of Elizabeth sister of Edmund father of 
Robert de Colvill who was summ. to Pari. 16 Edw. III., and Sir John 
Gernon, tet. 40, s. of Alice another sister of the said Edmund were found to 
be his next heirs. 

A William de Colevill was summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. 1. 1294, but it is very doubtful 
for the reasons assigned under Clyvedon if it was a regular writ of summons 
to Parliament. Neither he nor any of his descendants were ever afterwards 
summoned. 

COMBERMERE. 

Baron. Viscount. 

I. 1814. — I. 1826. 1. Sir Stapleton Stapleton-Cotton, 6th Bart., created 
Baron Combermere of Combermere, co. Chester, 17 May 1814, created Vis- 
count Combermere of Bhurtpore in the East Indies, and of Combermere in 
the co. Palatine of Chester 8 Feb. 1827 ; assumed the surname of Stapleton 
before that of Cotton by licence 21 Nov. following ; present Baron and 
Viscount Combermere, and a Baronet, Field Marshal, G.C.B. =p 

COMPTON ( of Compton ). 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1572. 1. Henry Compton, summ. to Pari, from 8 May, 14 Eliz. 1572, to 

4 Feb. 31 Eliz. 1589, as "Henrico Compton de Compton, 
CheV ;" ob. 1589. 

II. 1589. 2. William Compton, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 19 Feb. 35 

Eliz. 1593, to 5 Apr. 12 Jac. 1614, E.G., created Earl of 
Northampton 2 Aug. 1618, in which title this Barony was 
merged until the death of James 5th Earl of Northampton and 
6th Baron Compton, s. p. m., in 1754, when 

VII. 1754. 7. Charlotte Compton, his dau. and eventually sole h. succeeded to 

the Barony ; she had before succeeded, jure matris, as Baroness 
Ferrers of Chartley ; her Ladyship m. George 1st Marquess 
Townshend ; ob. 1770. 

VIII. 1770. 8. George Townshend, s. and h., XX. 1st Earl of the county of 

Leicester, so created 18 May 1784, succeeded his father as 
Marquess Townshend 14 Sept. 1807 ; ob. 27 July 1811. 

IX. 1811. 9. George Ferrars Townshend, s. and h., Marquess Townshend, 
&c. ; ob. s. p. 31 Dec. 1855, leaving his neph. Marmion Edward Ferrers, 
Esq., and his sister Lady Elizabeth Margaret Boultbee, his heirs, between 
whom this Barony is in Abeyance. 

COMPTON. 

Earldom, 7 Sept. 1812. — Vide Northampton. 

COMYN ( of Badenach ). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. l. Richard Comyn, Lord of the honour and castle of Northallerton, 
co. York ; ob. circa 1189. 



» Though not recorded to have been sum- 
moned before 16 Edw. III., he sat in Parlia- 



ment, and apparently as a Baron, in the 
Edw. III. 



COMYN — CONING8BY. 123 

Barons by Tenure. 

II. John. 2. William Comyn, s. and h., m. 1210 Marjory Countess of 

Buchan in Scotland, who was his 2nd wife ; oh. 1233. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Richard Comyn, s. and h. hy a 1st wife ; ob. 1249. 

IV. Edw. I. 4. John Comyn (called the Bed), s. and h. ; ob. 1273. 

V. Edw. I. 5. John Comyn (of Badenach), s. and h., one of the Barons at the 

battle of Lewes, ex parte Begis, competitor for the Crown of Scotland 1291 ; 
his s. John Comyn of Badenach was summ. on several occasions to attend 
the King ; m. Joan dau. and coh. of William de Valence Earl of Bern- 
broke, and was murdered at Dumfries by Bobert Bruce 1307 ; his s. and h. 
John Comyn ob. 1325,p leaving his two sisters, Joan wife of David Earl of 
Athol, and Elizabeth wife of Richard Lord Talbot, his coheirs. 



COMYN (of Buchan). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Edw. I. 1. Alexander Comyn, s. and h. of William 2nd Baron (by Marjory 

Countess of Buchan his 2nd wife), summ. to attend King 
Edw. I. on several occasions between 1276 and 1282 as Earl 
of Buchan ; he m. Elizabeth dau. and coh. of Boger de Quincy 
Earl of Winchester. 

II. Edw. II. 2. John Comyn, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1313, when his two nieces 

(daughters of his bro. Alexander), Alice wife of Henry de Beaumont Earl 
of Buchan, and Margaret, became his heirs. 



CONGLETOJST. 

Barons. 

I. 1841. 1. Sir Henry Brooke Parnell, created Baron Congleton of Con- 

gleton, co. Chester, 18 Aug. 1841 ; ob. 8 June 1842. 

II. 1842. 2. John Parnell, s. and h. ; present Baron Congleton. = 



CONINGSBY. 
Baron. Earl. 

I. 1710. — I. 1719. 1. Thomas Coningsby, 1st Baron Coningsby in Ireland, 

created Baron Coningsby of Coningsby, co. Lincoln, 
to hold to him and the heirs male of his body by 
any wife he might thenafter marry, 18 June 1716 
(having had three sons and four daughters by his 
first wife, and Bichard the s. of Thomas the eldest 
of the said sons succeeded him in the Irish Barony), 
created Earl of Coningsby, co. Lincoln, to hold to 
him and the heirs male of his body by any wife he 
might thenafter marry, in default of which to his dau. 
Margaret (by his 2nd wife) Viscountess Coningsby and 
the heirs male of her body, 9 May 1719 ; ob. 1729, 
when the Barony created in 1716 became Extinct. 
His other honours devolved on, 
Viscountess. Countess. 

I 171 G. — I. 1729. 2. Margaret, dau. of the last Earl and wife of Sir 

Michael Newton, K.B., created v. p. Baroness of Hampton Court, co. 

Hereford, and Viscountess Coningsby of Hampton Court aforesaid, with 

remainder to her issue male, 26 Jan. 1716 ; ob. 1761, s. P. s., when all her 

honours became Extinct. 



p His son Adomar Comyn died vit. pat. I year, his aunts named in the text were found 
1316, and by an Inq. taken in the same | to be his heirs. 



124 



CONWAY — CONYERS. 



Barons. 
I. 1624.— I. 



Viscounts. 
1627. 1 



CONWAY. 



. Edward Conway, created Baron Conway of Eagle}', 
co. Warwick, 24 Mar. 1624, created Viscount Kil- 
lutagh of Killutagh, co. Antrim in Ireland, 15 
Mar. 1626, and Viscount Conway of Conway 
Castle, co. Carnarvon, 26 June 1627 ; ob. 1630. 

II. 1630. — II. 1630. 2. Edward Conway, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ, 

v. p., as Baron Conway de Bagley, and took his seat 
23 Apr. 1628 ; ob. 1655. 

Earl. 

III. 1655. — III. 1655.— I. 1679. 3. Edward Conway, s. and h., created Earl 

of Conway, co. Carnarvon, 3 Dec. 1679 ; 
ob. 1683, s. p., when his honours became 
Extinct. 



1. 



Barons. 
1703. 1. 



Francis Seymour, 2nd s. of Sir Edward Seymour, Bart., the an- 
cestor of the Dukes of Somerset ; having under the will of the 
last Earl succeeded to his estates, he assumed the name and arms 
of Conway and was created Baron Conway of Bagley, co. War- 
wick, 17 Mar. 1702-3, and Baron Conway and Killutagh, co. 
Antrim in Ireland, 16 Oct. 1712 ; ob. 1732. 
II. 1732. 2. Francis Seymour Conway, s. and h., created Earl of Hertford. — 
Vide Hertford. 



Barons by Writ. 



I. 



1509. 



CONYEES. 

William Conyers, s and h. of Sir John Conyers, E.G., eldest 
s. of Sir John Conyers by Margery, 2nd dau. and coh. of 
Philip Baron Darcy. He bore the title of Lord Conyers in 
1506, and was summ. to Pari, from 17 Oct. 1 Hen. VIII. 
1509, to 23 Nov. 6 Hen. VIII. 1514, as " Willielmo Conyers de 
Conyers, Chivaler ;" ob. 1524. 

II. 1524. 2. Christopher Conyers, s. and h. summ. to Pari. 3 Nov. 21 Hen. 

VIII. 1529, and 5 Jan. 25 Hen. VIII. 1534 ; ob. 1538. 

III. 1538. 3. John Conyers, s. and h. summ. to Pari, from 30 Jan. 36 Hen. 

Till, to 21 Oct. 2 and 3 Philip and Mary 1555 ; ob. 1557, 
s. p. m., when the Barony fell into Abeyance between his 
three daughters and coheirs, viz., 1. Ann, who m. Anthony 
Kemp of Slindon, co. Sussex, Esq., by whom she had only 
one s. Henry, who died s. p. ; 2. Elizabeth, who m. Thomas 
Darcy 2nd s. of Sir Arthur Darcy 3rd s. of Thomas Lord 
Darcy, who was beheaded in 1538 ; 3. Katherine, who m. John 
Atherton of Atherton, co. Lancaster, Esq., by whom she had 
an only child John, whose sole dau. and h. Ann m. Sir William 
Pennyman, Bart., and died 13 July 1644, s. p., when the Ba- 
rony became vested in, 

IV. 1644. 4. Conyers Darcy, s. and h. of Thomas Darcy above-mentioned by 

Elizabeth 2nd dau. and coh. of the last Baron ; he had been 
created by patent 10 Aug. 1641 Lord Darcy and Conyers to 
him and the heirs male of his body, with the original prece- 
dence of this dignity ; it was notwithstanding a new creation. 
— See observations under Darcy and Conyers. He died 1653. 

V. 1653. 5. Conyers Darcy, s. and h., Baron Darcy and Conyers, summ. to 

Pari, from 8 May 13 Car. II. 1661 to 1 Mar. 32 Car. II. 1680 
as " Conyers Darcie de Darcie," and in the two last writs with 
the addition of " and Meynill ;" created Earl of Holderness 
5 Dec. 1682 ; ob. 1689. 



COOPER — CORNBURY. 125 

Barons by Writ. 

VI. 1689. 6. Conyers Darcy, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. 1 Mar. 32 Car. 
II. 1680 as " Conyers Darcy de Conyers, CheV," succeeded as 
Earl of Holderness 1689, and this Barony continued merged in 
that Earldom until the demise of Robert Darcy VL, 4th Earl, 
in 1778, s. p. m., when that Earldom and the Barony of Darcy 
and Conyers created in 1641 became Extinct, but the Barony 
of Conyers created in 1509 devolved on his sole dau. and h., 

IX. 1778. 9. Amelia Darcy ; she m. 1. Francis Godolphin 5th Duke of 

Leeds, from whom she was divorced in 1779 ; and, 2. John 
Byron, Esq. ; ob. 1784. 

X. 1784. 10. George William Frederick Osborne, s. and h. by her 1st 

husband, succeeded his father in the Dukedom of Leeds, &c. 
in 1799, E.G. ; ob. 10 July 1838. 

XI. 1838. 11. Francis Godolphin D'Arcy D'Arcy-Osborne, s. and h., assumed 

the surname of D'Arcy by licence 6 Aug. 1849 ; present Baron Conyers, 
and one of the coheirs of the Barony of Darcy created by the writ of 
summ. to John Darcy 27 Jan. 6 Edw. III. 1332, Duke of Leeds, &c. = 

COOPER. 

Barony, 23 Apr. 1672. — Vide Shaftesbury. 

CORBET (of Caus, co. Salop). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Robert Corbet, Lord of Caus, &c. ; ob. 1221. 

II. Hen. III. 2. Thomas Corbet, s. and h. ; ob. 1273. 

By Writ. 

I. 1295. 3. Peter Corbet, s. and h. summ. to Pari, from 23 June, 23 

Edw. I. 1295, to 26 Sept. 28 Edw. 1. 1300 ; he was likewise 
summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, but it is very doubtful if 
that writ can be considered as a regular summ. to Pari. 
(vide Clyvedon) ; ob. 1300. 

II. 1302. 4. f Peter Corbet, s. and h., aat. 30, summ. to Pari, from 13 Sept. 

30 Edw. 1. 1302 to 14 Mar. 15 Edw. II. 1322 ; ob. 1322, s. p. ; 
John Corbet his bro. was his h. and set. 24, but he died s. p. 
leaving the descendants of his aunts his coheirs, when as the 
descendants of Peter the 1st Baron by writ failed this Barony 
became Extinct. 
Viscountess. 
I. 1679. 1. Sarah, dau. of Sir Robert Monson, and widow of Sir Vincent 

Corbet, Bart., created Viscountess Corbett of Linchlade, co. Bucks, for life, 
23 Oct. 1679 ; ob. 1682, when the title became Extinct. 

. „, CORMEILES. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. Ainsfrid de Cormeiles, possessed at the General Survey of 

twenty-three lordships, cos. Hereford and Gloucester, to whom 
succeeded, 

II. Hen. I. Richard de Cormeiles, ob. circa 1176 ; his successor was, 

III. John. Walter de Cormeiles, ob. 1217, s. p. m., leaving his three 

daughters or their issue his heirs. 

CORNBURY. 

Viscounty, 20 Apr. 1661— Extinct 1753. — Vide Clarendon. 



12G 



CORNWALL. 



Earls. 

1068. 



CORNWALL. 



III. 1140. 



IV. Rich. I. 



1217. 



Robert Count of Mortein in Normandy, half-bro. to William the 
Conqueror, possessed at the General Survey almost the whole 
co. of Cornwall except the lands of the King and the Church, 
he is in consequence said to have been Earl of Cornwall, but 
he is only known by the title of " Comes Moritoniensis ;" slain 
in Northumberland 1087. 
II. Will. II. 2. William de Mortein, s. and h., dispossessed of the co. of Corn- 
wall and Mortein by King Hen. I. 1104, and became a monk 
at Bermondsey ; ob. s. P. 

Reginald de Dunstanvill, natural s. of King Hen. I., created 
Earl of Cornwall by King Stephen 1140 ; ob. 1175, s. p. m. l. 

John Plantagenet, 2nd s. of King Hen. II., bore the title of 
Earl of Cornwall during the lifetime of his bro. King Rich. I., 
who in 1189 is stated by Walter de Hemingburg to have given 
him the counties of Cornwall, Nottingham, and others ; became 
King of England 1199. 

Richard Fitz-Count, natural s. of Reginald 3rd Earl, had a 
grant of the co. of Cornwall from King John, 1215, to farm till 
the realm should be at peace, but King Hen. III. by patent 
dated at Gloucester in Feb. 1216-7 gave it to him " sicut Regi- 
naldus Comes Cornubia? pater suus ilium tenuit ;" he is called 
Henry Fitz-Count Earl of Cornwall in a charter to the Priory 
of St. Nicholas Exeter, and was living 1220, when he restored 
the earldom to the King. 

Richard Plantagenet, younger s. of King John ; in 1225 his 
bro. King Henry gave him the co. of Cornwall and the whole of 
Poictou, and he was thenceforward called Count of Poictou ; 
the Earldom of Cornwall was subsequently confirmed by 
charter 10 Aug. 1231, "habend. et tenend. de nob. et hered. 
nris ipsi com. et hered. suis ;" elected King of the Romans 
1256 ; ob. 2 Apr. 1272. 
VII. 1272. 2. Edmund Plantagenet, s. and h., born 1250 ; ob. 1300, s. p., 
when the Earldom became Extinct. 

Sir Piers de Gaveston, to whom Edward II. granted the county 
of Cornwall by charter dated at Dumfries 6 Aug. 1307, " habend. 
et tenend. eidem Petro et heredibus suis, de nob. et heredibus 
nostris ;" q summ. to Pari. 19 Jan. following as Earl of Corn- 
wall ; beheaded without form of trial 1314, leaving an only dau. 

John Plantagenet of Eltham, 2nd s. of King Edw. II., created 
Earl of Cornwall by charter 1 Dec. 4 Edw. III. 1330, " habend. 
et tenend. prefato comiti et heredibus suis de corpore suo legi- 



VI 



1225. 1. 



VIII. 1308. 



IX 



1330. 



tune procreatis ;' 
Extinct. 

Duke. 



ob. 1336, s. p., when this Earldom became 



I. 1337. 1. Edward Plantagenet, Earl of Chester, eldest s. of 
King Edw. III. invested with the Duchy of Cornwall 17 Mar. 1337 by 
charter, with the following limitation, " habend. et tenend. eidem Duci et 



q By a subsequent Charter, 5 Aug. 1309, 
the county of Cornwall with its appurte- 
nances was settled upon the said Peter and 
Margaret his wife, and the heirs of their 
bodies, by reason of which Charter Margaret 
widow of Gaveston and wife of Hugh de 
Audley petitioned for restoration of the lands 
which had been seized into the hands of the 



Crown, and stating that there was issue of 
the said Piers by the said Margaret then 
living. But the Parliament ordained that 
the county, &c. should remain to the King, 
quit of the claim of Hugh and Margaret and 
of the issue of Gaveston and Margaret for 



CORNWALLIS — COURCY. 127 

ipsius et haeredum suor. regum Angliae filiis primogenitis et dicti loci ducibus 
in regno Anglia? hereditarie successuris ;" he was afterwards created Prince 
of Wales, when the Dukedom merged in that title, and has been ever since 
vested in the heir-apparent to the Crown. — Vide Account of the Princes 
of Wales for the subsequent history of the Dukes of Cornwall. 

CORNWALLIS. 
Barons. 
I 1661. 1. Sir Frederick Cornwallis, Bart, created Baron Cornwallis of 

Eye, co. Suffolk, 20 Apr. 1661 ; ob. 1662. 
IT. 1662. 2. Charles Cornwallis, s. and h., K.B. ; ob. 1673. 

III. 1673. 3. Charles Cornwallis, s. and h. ; ob. 1698. 

IV. 1698. 4. Charles Cornwallis, s. and h. ; ob. 1722. 

Earls. 

V. 1722. — I. 1753. 5. Charles Cornwallis, s. and h., created Viscount 

Brome, co. Suffolk, and Earl Cornwallis 30 June 
1753 ; ob. 1762. 

Marquesses. 

VI. 1762.— II. 1762. — I. 1792. 6. Charles Cornwallis, s. and h., created 

Marquess Cornwallis 8 Oct. 1792, Lord- 
Lieut, of Ireland 1799, K.G. ; ob. 1805. 

VII. 1805. — III. 1805. — II. 1805. 7. Charles Cornwallis, s. and h. ; ob. 16 

Aug. 1823, s. p. m., when the Marquessate became 
Extinct, but the Earldom and Barony of Corn- 
wallis and Viscounty of Brome devolved on, 

VIII. 1823. — IV. 1823. 8. James Cornwallis, uncle and h., being next bro. of 

Charles 2nd Earl, Bishop of Lichfield and Co- 
ventry : ob. 20 J^n. 1824. 

IX. 1824. — V. 1824. 9. James Cornwallis, assumed the name of Mann 
only by licence 9 Apr. 1814, s. and h. ; ob. s. P. m. 21 May 1852, when all 
his honours became Extinct. 



COTTENHAM. 
Barons. Earls. 

I. 1836.— I. 1850. 1. Sir Charles Christopher Pepys, Lord High Chancellor, 

created Baron Cottenham of Cottenham, co. Cambridge, 
and Earl of Cottenham aforesaid, and Viscount Crow- 
hurst, co. Surrey, 11 June 1850 ; ob. 29 Apr. 1851. 

II. 1851. — II. 1851. 2. Charles Edward, s. and h., present Earl of Cottenham, 

Viscount Crowhurst and Baron Cottenham, unm. 



COTTINGTON'. 
Baron. 

1. 1631. Sir Francis Cottington, Bart., created Baron Cottington of Han- 
worth, co. Middlesex, 10 July 1631 ; ob. 1653, s. p., at Valladolid in Spain, 
when the title became Extinct. 



COURCY. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Richard de Courcy, Lord of Courcy in Normandy, and after 

the Conquest of England, of Stoke Courcy, co. Somerset ; 

ob. 1098. 



128 



COURTENAY. 



Barons by Tenure. 

II. Hen. I. 2. Robert de Courcy, s. and h., Sewer to Henry I. and the 

Empress Maud. 

III. Steph. 3. William de Coubcy, s. and h., Steward to King Stephen ; ob. 

s. P. M. r 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Robert de Cottrcy, bro. and h., m. Avicia, dau. and coh. of 

William de Meschines Earl of Cambridge. 

V. Hen. II. 5. William de Courcy, s. and h., Steward to King Henry II. ; 

ob. 1171. 

VI. Hen. II. 6. John de Courcy, s. and h., created Earl of Ulster in Ireland, 

ancestor of the Barons of Kin^sale in Ireland. 



I. Steph. 



Richard de Courcy, one of the Barons at the battle of North- 
allerton, 1138. 



COURTENAY. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Reginald de Courtenay, m. Hawise, dau. andh. of Robert de 

Abrincis, Sheriff of Devonshire and Baron of Okehampton, 
co. Devon ; ob. 1194. 

II. John. 2. Robert de Courtenay, Sheriff of Devonshire, m. Mary, dau. 

of William de Redvers, Earl of Devon ; ob. 1242. 

III. Hen. III. 3. John de Courtenay, s. and h. ; ob. 1273. 

P7. Edw. I. 4. Hugh de Courtenay, s. and h., a3t. 23 ; ob. 1291. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 5. Hugh de Courtenay, s. and h., set. 16, sumrn. to Pari, from 

6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, to 24 July, 8 Edw. III. 1334, in 
the latter writs with the addition of " Seniori." Having re- 
presented to the King that he was (as h. of Isabel de Redvers 
Countess of Devon) seized of a certain annual sum as the 
third penny of the county, but that the same was refused 
payment by the Sheriff, the King by his writ 24 Sept. 1334, 
having directed investigation to be made, declared the said 
Hugh to be Earl of Devon by letters patent 22 Feb. following. 
Ob. 1340. , 

Hugh de Courtenay, s. and h. apparent, summ. to Pari, as 
" Hugh de Courtenay, Juniori," 23 Apr. 11 Edw. III. 1337, 
succeeded as Earl of Devon in 1340. 

Hugh de Courtenay, s. and h. apparent, summ. to Pari. 8 
Jan. 44 Edw. III. 1371, as " Hugh de Courtenay le Fitz," K.G. ; ob. 1374, 
v. p., leaving Hugh his s. and h., his only child, who died vita, avi, s. p. 

According to modern decisions, the two last Barons must be considered 
as having merely been summoned in their father's Barony ; but the original 
Barony, created by the writ of 6 Feb. 1299, continued vested in the Earls 
of Devon until the attainder of Thomas XIV.-6th Earl of Devon, 4 Nov. 
1461, when, with his other honours, it became Forfeited. 



COURTENAY (of Powderham). 
Viscounts. 

I. 1762. 1. William Courtenay, h. male of Sir Philip Courtenay of Powder- 
ham Castle, co. Devon, 6th s. of Hugh Courtenay, X. 2nd Earl 
of Devon, created Viscount Courtenay of Powderham Castle, 
co. Devon, 6 May 1762 ; ob. 1762. 



Ahcia, his daughter and heir, married Warin Fitz-Gerald, whose sole daughter and heir 
married Fulk de Breaut. — Vide BliEAUT. 



COVENTRY. 129 

Viscounts. 

II. 1762. 2. William Courtenay, s. and h. ; ob. 1788. 

III. 1788. 3. William Courtenay, s. and h. ; the Viscount presented a peti- 

tion to the King, claiming the Earldom of Devon, created to Sir Edward 
Courtenay 3 Sept. 1553, and the House of Lords resolved, 14 Mar. 1831, 
that he had established his claim {vide Devon, Earl) ; ob. unm. at Paris 
26 May 1835, when the Earldom devolved on his cousin, William Courtenay, 
Esq., but the Viscounty became Extinct. 

COVENTRY. 

Earls. 

I. 1623. 1. George Villiers, 1st Marquess of Buckingham, created Earl of 

Coventry and Duke of Buckingham 18 May 1623, K.G., Lord 
High Admiral ; assassinated 1629. 

II. 1629. 2. George Villiers, s. and h., Duke of Buckingham, K.G. ; ob. 1687, 

s. p., when his honours became Extinct. 



COVENTRY (of Aylesborough ). 
Barons. 

I. 1628. 1. Thomas Coventry, Lord Keeper, created Baron Coventry of 

Aylesborough, co. Worcester, 18 Apr. 1628 ; ob. 1640. 

II. 1640. 2. Thomas Coventry, s. and h. ; ob. 1661. 

III. 1661. 3. George Coventry, s. and h. ; ob. 1680. 
TV. 1680. 4. John Coventry, s. and h. ; ob. 1685, unm. 

Earls. 
V. 1685. — III. 1697. 5. Thomas Coventry, uncle and h., being next bro. 

of George 3rd Baron, created Viscount Deerhurst 
of the hundred of Deerhurst, co. Gloucester, and 
Earl of Coventry, with limitation failing his issue 
male to Francis Coventry of Mortlake, co. Surrey, 
younger s. of Thomas I. Baron, and the heirs male 
of his body ; remainder to William, Thomas, and 
Henry Coventry, children of Walter Coventry, late 
of London, merchant, descended from a younger 
bro. of the said Lord Keeper, 26 Apr. 1697 ; ob. 
1699. 

Thomas Coventry, s. and h. ; ob. 1710. 

Thomas Coventry, s. and h. ; ob. 1712, s. p. 

Gilbert Coventry, uncle and h., being next bro. of 
Thomas 2nd Earl ; ob. 1719, s. p. m., when the 
Barony became Extinct, but his other honours 
devolved on, 

9. William Coventry, s. and h. of Walter Coven tiy of London, 
merchant, eldest s. of Walter, younger bro. of Thomas 1st 
Baron, succeeded to the Viscounty of Deerhurst and Earldom 
of Coventry, agreeable to the limitation, as is before recited ; 
ob. 1751. 

George William Coventry, s. and h. ; ob. 3 Sept. 1809. 

George William Coventry, s. and h. ; ob. 26 Mar. 1831. 

George William Coventry, s. and h. ; ob. 15 May 1843. 

George William Coventry, s. and h., present Earl of Coventry 
and Viscount Deerhurst, a minor. 



VI. 1699.- 

VII. 1710.- 

VIII. 1712.- 


-IV. 1699. 6. 
-V. 1710. 7 
-VI. 1712. 8 


Earls. 
VII. 1719. 


9. William 



VIII. 


1751. 


10 


IX. 


1809. 


11 


X. 


1831. 


12 


XL 


1843. 


13 



130 



COWLEY — CRANLEY. 



COWLEY. 

Barons. 
I. 1828. 1. Sir Henry Wellesley, G.C.B., created Baron Cowley of Wellesley, 

co. Somerset, 21 Jan. 1828 ; ob. 27 Apr. 1847. 
IT. 1847. 2. Henry Richard Charles Wellesley, s. and h., present Baron 

Cowley of Wellesley, G.C.B. =p 



COWPEE, 



Barons. 
I. 1706.- 



Earls. 
1718 



IT. 1723.— II. 



ITT. 1764.- 


-III. 


1764. 


3. 


IV. 1789.- 

V. 1799.- 


-IV. 
-V. 


1789. 
1799. 


4. 

5. 


VI. 1837.- 

VII. 1856.- 


-VI. 
-VII 


1837. 
. 1856. 


6. 

7 



Sir William Cowper, 3rd Bart., created Baron Cowper 
of Wingham, co. Kent, 14 Dec. 1706 ; created Vis- 
count Fordwich, co. Kent, and Earl Cowper, 20 Mar. 
1718, with remainder (failing the heirs male of his 
body) to Spencer Cowper his bro. and the heirs male 
of his body, with a further extension of the dignity 
of Baron Cowper of Wingham (failing the issue male 
of the said William Earl Cowper) to the said Spencer 
Cowper and his issue male ; Lord Chancellor ; ob. 1723. 

1723. 2. William (assumed the name of) Clavering-Cowper, 
s. and h. ; ob. 1764. 

1764. 3. George Nassau Clavering-Cowper, s. and h. ; ob. 

1789. 
George Augustus Cowper, s. and h. ; ob. 1799, unm. 
Peter Leopold Louis Erancis Cowper, bro. and h. ; 

ob. 21 June 1837. 
George Augustus Cowper, s. and h., ob. 15 Apr. 1856. 
Francis Thomas De Grey Cowper, s. and h., present 

Earl and Baron Cowper, Viscount Fordwich, and a 

Baronet, unm. 



CRANBORNE. 

Viscount. 
I. 1604. 1. Eobert Cecil, 1st Baron Cecil of Essendon, created Viscount Cran- 
borne, co. Dorset, 20 Aug. 1604, created Earl of Salisbury 4 May 1605, 
K.G. — Vide Salisbury. 



CRANFIELD. 



Barons. 
1621. 



Lionel Cranfield, created Baron Cranfield of Cranfield, co. Bed- 
ford, 9 July 1621, and Earl of Middlesex 16 Sept. 1622. Extinct 
1674. — Vide Middlesex. 

IV. 1675. 1. Charles Sackville, 6th Earl of Dorset ; his mother being sister 

and h. of the last Earl of Middlesex and Baron Cranfield, he was 
created Baron Cranfield of Cranfield, co. Bedford, and Earl of 
Middlesex 4 Apr. 1675, K.G. ; ob. 1706. 

V. 1706. 2. Lionel Cranfield Sackville, s. and h., Earl of Dorset, created 

Duke of Dorset, K.G. Extinct 1843.— Vide Dorset. 



CRANLEY. 
Baron. Viscount. 

I. 1776. — I. 1801. 1. George Onslow, created Baron Cranley of Imber-Court, 
co. Surrey, 20 May 1776, succeeded as 4th Baron Onslow 9 Oct. following ; 
created Viscount Cranley of Imber-Court aforesaid and Earl of Onslow 19 
June 1801. — Vide Onslow. 



CRANWORTH — CRESSY. 131 

CEANWOETH. 
Baron. 

I. 1S50. 1. Sir Robert Monsey Rolfe, Lord High Chancellor, created Baron 
Cranworth of Cranworth, co. Norfolk, 20 Dec. 1850, present Baron Cran- 
worth. = 

CRAVEN". 

Barons. Viscount. Earl. 

I. 1626i — I. 1665. — I. 1665. 1. William Craven, created Baron Craven of 

Hampsted-Marshall, co. Berks, 12 Mar. 1626, with remainder, 
failing his issue male, to his younger brothers John Craven 
(afterwards Baron Craven of Ryton) and Thomas Craven, and 
the issue male of their bodies respectively ; created Viscount 
Craven of Uffington, co. Berks, and Earl of Craven, co. York, 
16 Mar. 1665, with an extension of the Barony of Craven, 
failing his issue male (his brothers having died s. p.), to William 
Craven, s. and h. of Sir William Craven of Lenchwick, co. 
Worcester, Knt., deceased, and the heirs male of his body, 
remainder to Sir Anthony Craven, Knt., bro. of the said Sir 
William, and the heirs male of his body ; the said William 
Craven having died s. p., his Lordship obtained a further ex- 
tension of the Barony 11 Dec. 1665, failing the male issue of 
Sir Anthony Craven, in favour of Sir William Craven, s. of 
Thomas Craven, Esq., bro. of the said Sir Anthony, and the 
heirs male of his body. Ob. 1697, s. p., when the Viscounty and 
Earldom became Extinct; but the Barony created by the 
patent of 12 Mar. 1626 devolved, pursuant to the last extension 
of the limitation, on 

II. 1697. 2. William Craven, s. and h. of William, eldest s. of Thomas 

Craven mentioned in the above limitation (Sir Anthony Craven 
having died s. p.) ; ob. 1711. 

DTI. 1711. 3. William Craven, s. and h. ; ob. 1739, a. v. 

IV. 1739. 4. Fulwar Craven, bro. and h. ; ob. 1764, s. p. 

V. 1764. 5. William Craven, 1st cou. and h., being s. and h. of John Craven, 

next bro. of William 2nd Baron ; ob. 1769, s. p. 

VI. 1769. 6. William Craven, neph. and h., being s. and h. of John Craven, 

next bro. of William last Baron ; ob. 1791. 

Earls. 

VII. 1791. — II. 1801. 7. William Craven, s. and h., created Viscount Uffing- 

ton, co. Berks, and Earl of Craven, co. York, 18 
June 1801 ; ob. 30 July 1825. 

VIII. 1825. — III. 1825. 8. William Craven, s. and h., present Earl and Baron 

Craven, and Viscount Uffington. =p 

CRAVEN (of Ryton). 
Baron. 

I. 1642 
Ba 
honours became Extinct. 



42. John Craven, next bro. of William 1st Earl of Craven, created 
Baron Craven of Ryton, co. Salop, 21 Mar. 1642 ; ob. 1650, s. p., when his 

*l_ 1_ .> L* , -«t'4--i -v» i-»4- 



CRESSY. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Hugh de Cressie ; living 1186. 

II. John. 2. Roger de Cressie, s. and h. ; ob. 1245. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Hugh de Cressie, s. and h. ; ob. 1262. 

K 2 



132 CRETING — CRIOL. 

Barons by Tenure. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Roger de Cressie, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

V. Edw. I. 5. William de Cressy, summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, and 26 

Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297 ; but it is doubtful if either of these writs can be 
considered as a regular summ. to Pari. Vide Clyvedon and Fitz-John. 
Neither he nor any of his posterity were ever afterwards summoned. 

CRETING. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1332. John de Creting, summ. to Pari. 27 Jan. 20 July, 20 Oct. and 
11 Dec. 6 Edw. III. 1332, but never afterwards, nor any of his de- 
scendants. " So that," observes Dugdale, " I have no more to say of 
him." 

CREVEQUER. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Robert de Crevequer, Baron of Leeds, co. Kent ; living 

1119. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Daniel de Crevequer, s. and h. ; living 1165. 

III. John. 3. Robert de Crevequer, s. and h. ; living 1196. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Hamon de Crevequer, s. and h. ; ob. 1262. 

V. Hen. III. 5. Robert de Crevequer, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Ha- 

mon (ob. v. p.) eldest s. of the last Baron, set. 24, 47 Hen. III. ; living 
1288. William his s. died s. p., leaving his aunts his next heirs. 

CREW. 

Barons. 

I. 1661. 1. John Crew, created Baron Crew of Stene, co. Northampton, 20 

Apr. 1661 ; ob. 1679. 

II. 1679. 2. Thomas Crew, s. and h. ; ob. 1697, s. p. m. 

III. 1697. 3. Nathaniel Crew, bro. andh., Bishop of Durham ; ob. 1722, s. p., 

when the title became Extinct. 



CREWE (of Crewe). 
Barons. 

I. 1806. 1. John Crewe, created Baron Crewe of Crewe, co. Chester, 25 Feb. 

1806 ; ob. 28 Apr. 1829. 

II. 1829. 2. John Crewe, s. and h. ; ob. 4 Dec. 1835. 

III. 1835. 3. Hungerford Crewe, s. and h., present Baron Crewe, unm. 

CRIKETOFT, or CRIKETOT. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. 1. William de Criketoft, m. Agnes, sist. and coh. of William 

VI. Baron Blund. 

II. Edw. I. 2. William de Criketoft, s. and h. ; ob. 1298. 

III. Edw. II. 3. William de Criketoft, s. and h., aet. 23 ; ob. 1343, leaving 

William de Criketoft his s. and h., then aat. 24 ; the latter died 1354, 
leaving William de Criketoft his s. aet. 7, whose s. Sir John Criketoft ob. 
8. p. None of this family were ever summoned to Pari. 

CRIOIi. 

Barons by Tenure. 

T. Hen. III. Bertram de Criol, of Albury, near Berkhampstead, co. Herts, 
living 1247 ; from whom descended, 






CRISPIN — CROMWELL. 133 

Barons by Tenure. 

II. Hen. III. Nicholas de Criol ; living 1269. 

III. Edw. I. Nicholas de Ceiol, s. and h., summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 

1294, and 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, but, for the reasons 
assigned under Clyvedon and Fitz-John, it is doubtful 
if either of these writs can be considered as a regular 
summ. to Pari. Neither he nor any of his posterity were 
again summoned. 



I. Hen. III. 1. John de Criol, bro. of Nicholas, II. Baron ; ob. 1263. 

II. Edw. I. 2. Bertram de Criol, s. and h. ; ob. 1306, leaving Joan his dau. 

and h., wife of Sir Richard Rokesley, then get. 28. 

CRISPIN - . 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. Milo de Crispin, Lord of Wallingford, co. Berks, by marriage 
with Maud, dau. and h. of Robert D'Oyly ; ob. 1107, s. p. 

I. Will. I. William Crispin, presumed of the same family, living 1118, of 
whom nothing further is recorded. 



CROFTS. 
Baron. 

I. 1658. William Crofts, created Baron Crofts of Saxham, co. Suffolk, by 
Patent dated at Brussels 18 May 1658 ; ob. 1677, s. p., when the title 
became Extinct. 

CROMWELL. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1308. 1. John de Cromwell, Constable of the Tower, summ. to Pari, from 
10 Mar. 1 Edw. II. 1308, to 1 Apr. 9 Edw. III. 1335 ; he m. Idonea, 
dau. and coh. of Robert Baron de Vipont, and is presumed to have died 
s. p. shortly after 1335, when the dignity became Extinct. 



CROMWELL ( of Tatshall, co. Lincoln ). 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1375. 2.^Ralph de Cromwell, s. and h. of Sir Ralph Cromwell, bro. of the 

last named Baron, summ. to Pari, from 28 Dec. 49 Edw. III. 
1375, to 5 Nov. 21 Rich. II. 1397 ; 8 ob. 1399. 

II. 1400. 3.^ Ralph de Cromwell, s. and h. xt. 30, summ. to Pari, from 9 

Sept, 1 Hen. IV. 1400, to 3 Sept. 4 Hen. V. 1417 ; ob. ante 
1419. 

III. 1422. 4.^Ralph de Cromwell, s. and h., found h. to his grandmother, 7 

Hen. V., and then set. 26, summ. to Pari, from 29 Sept. I. Hen. 
VI. 1422, to 26 May, 33 Hen. VI. 1455, Lord Treasurer ; ob. 
1455, s. p., leaving Maud his sister his h. She m. Sir Richard 
Stanhope, and by him left two daughters and coheirs, Maud 
and Joane ; Maud, the eldest, was thrice m. but only had issue 
by her first husband, Robert Lord Willoughby de Eresby, viz. 
—Joane, who became the wife of Sir Richard Welles ; Joane 
Welles, their dau. (and h. to her bro. Sir Robert Welles), m. 
Sir Richard Hastings, by whom she had only one child, who 
died s. p. Joane Stanhope, the other dau. and coh. of Maud 

8 There is also a summons, 19 Aug. 23 Rich. II. 1399, but it is doubtful whether 
addressed to him or his son. 



134 CROMWELL — CROUN. 

Barons by Writ. 

Cromwell, by Sir Richard Stanhope, married twice ; her second 
husband was Sir Robert Ratcliffe, by whom she had no issue ; 
her first husband, 
IV. 1461. 5. Humphrey Bouechier, 3rd s. of Henry Earl of Essex, was summ. 
to Pari, as " Humfrido Bourchier de Cromwell," " Humfrido D'no Crom- 
well, Cld'r," or as " Humfrido Cromwell, Cld'r" from 25 July, 1 Edw. 
IV. 1461, to 15 Oct. 9 Edw. IV. 1470 ; but having no issue by his said 
wife, tbese summonses are presumed to have created a new Barony, which 
became extinct on his death ; ob. 1471, s. p. On the death of his wife 
s. p., the ancient Barony became vested in the descendants and repre- 
sentatives of the daughters of Ralph 1st Baron, viz.— Hawyse, who m. 
Thomas Lord Bardolf (whose representatives are the Earl of Abingdon 
and Lord Beaumont); Maud, who m. Sir William Fitz- Williams of 
Elmley ; and Elizabeth, who m. 1. Sir John Clifton, Knt., and 2. Sir 
Edward Benstead, Knt., and amongst their descendants and representatives 
this Barony is in Abeyance. 

Barons CROMWELL ( of Wimbledon ). 

I. 1536. Thomas Cromwell, created Baron Cromwell of Okeham, co. Rutland, 

9 July 1536, and Earl of Essex 10 Apr. 1539, K.G. ; attainted and be- 
headed 1540, when his honours became Forfeited. 

Barons. CROMWELL. 

T | 1539. 1. Gregory Cromwell, s. and h. of the said Thomas Earl of Essex, 

I 1540. summ. to Pari, from 28 Apr. 1539, as "Gregorio Cromwell 

Ch'r," but did not sit in the House of Peers until he was created 

by patent Baron Cromwell, to him and the heirs male of his 

body, 18 Dec. 1540 ; ob. 1551. 

II. 1551. 2. Henry Cromwell, s. and h. ; ob. 1592. 

III. 1592. 3. Edward Cromwell, s. and h. ; ob. 1607. 

IV. 1607. 4. Thomas Cromwell, s. and h., created Viscount Lecale, and Earl 

of Ardglass in Ireland ; ob. 1653. 

V. 1653. 5. Wingfield Cromwell, s. and h., Earl of Ardglass in Ireland ; 

ob. 1668. 

VI. 1668. 6. Thomas Cromwell, s. and h., Earl of Ardglass in Ireland ; ob. 

1682, s. p. 

VII. 1682. 7. Vere Essex Cromwell, uncle and h., being next bro. of Wing- 
field 5th Baron, Earl of Ardglass in Ireland ; ob. 1687, s. p. m. Elizabeth, 
his dau. and h., m. Edward Southwell, Esq., whose great-grands, and h. 
Edward Southwell became Baron de Clifford by descent. The Barony 
of Cromwell created by the Writ of 28 Apr. 1539, would (had there 
been a sitting in Pari, thereupon) have been vested in the present Lord 
de Clifford, as h. general of the said Gregory, but as such does not appear 
from the journals to have been the case, the only inheritable English 
dignity is presumed to have been the Barony of Cromwell created by 
the Patent of 18 Dec. 1540, and which on the demise of Vere Essex 
Cromwell, Earl'of Ardglass and Baron Cromwell in 1687 (he being the last 
h. male within the limitation of that Patent) became Extinct. 

Barons by Tenure. CROUN". 

I. Will. I. Guy de Creon, or Croun, Baron of Friston in Holland, co. Lin- 

coln, to whom succeeded, 

II. Hen. I. Alan de Creon, s. and h., Steward to King Henry I. ; ob. . . . 

III. Hen. II. Maurice de Croun, s. and h. ; living 1181. 



CROWHURST — CUMBERLAND. 135 

Barons by Tenure. 
IV. Rich. I. Guy de Croun, s. and h., living 1189 ; ob. . . . s. p. m. Pe- 

tronel, his dau., m. 1. to William de Lonchamp, and 2. to 

Oliver de Vaux. 



I . Hen. III. Maurice de Croun, held several lordships, co. Surrey ; living 
1271. 

CROWHURST. 

Viscounty, 11 June 1850. — Vide Cottenham. 

CULLODEN. 

Barony, 27 Nov. 1801. — Vide Cambridge. 

CUMBERLAND. 

Randle de Meschines, IV. Earl of Chester, 1120, is said to have been Earl of 
Cumberland, and to have exchanged this latter county with the King for that 
of Chester. The county of Cumberland was for a long period after the Norman 
Conquest a part of the territory of the Kings of Scotland. 

1. Henry Clifford, XI. 15th Baron Clifford, created Earl of Cum- 
berland 18 June 1525,' K.G. ; ob. 1542. 
Henry Clifford, s. and h., K.B. ; ob. 1569. 
George Clifford, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1605, s. p. m. 
Francis Clifford, bro. and h., K.B. ; ob. 1641. 
Henry Clifford, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. as " Henry 
Clifford, Chevalier," from 7 Mar. 1628 to 3 Nov. 1629 ; ob. 1643, s. p. m., 
when the Barony of Clifford devolved on his dau. and h. (vide Clifford), 
but the Earldom became Extinct. 

Dukes. 

I. 1644. Rupert, Count Palatine of the Rhine, second surviving s. of 

Frederick Elector Palatine, and King of Bohemia, by Elizabeth, 
only dau. of King James I., created Earl of Holdemess, co. York, 
and Duke of Cumberland 24 Jan. 1644, K.G. ; ob. 1682, unm. 
when all his honours became Extinct. 

II. 1689. George Prince of Denmark, husband of the Princess Anne, 

afterwards Queen of England, created Baron Wokingham, co. 
Berks, Earl of Kendal, co. Westmoreland, and Duke of Cum- 
berland, 9 Apr. 1689, K.G. ; ob. 1708, s.p. s., when all these 
dignities became Extinct. 





Earls. 




I. 


1525. 


1 


II. 


1542. 


2 


III. 


1569. 


3 


IV. 


1605. 


4 


V. 


1641. 


5 



' This nobleman was advanced in dignity 
on the occasion of the creation of the Kiug's 
natural son, Henry Fitzroy, to be Duke of 
Richmond : the King at the same time made 
one Marquess (Exeter) ; three Earls (Rut- 
land, Cumberland, and Lincoln) ; and two 



creation of the Earldom of Cumberland is 
remaining amongst the Records at the Rolls, 
but without a Recepi, and there is no enrol- 
ment of the Patent ; it might therefore have 
been concluded that no Patent had passed 
the seal, had there not been a full account of 



Viscounts (Fitz-Walter and Rochford). An the creation of these Peers remaining in the 



ancient MS. in the College of Arms (Collect. 
Vine. 31) says, "These were advanced uppon 
y e joyefull newes of y e Emperours victorie at 
Pavie in Italy where the K. of France was 
taken prisoner and Richard de la Pole the 
King's dreaded enemy was slaine a little be- 
fore A° 1525." The Signed Bill for the 



College of Arms (2nd M. 16, p. 08), in which 
it is stated that " all their patentes were 
presented to the Kinges personne by Sir 
Thomas Wriothesley Gartier Principall Kyng 
of Armes." He is described in the .Signed 
Bill as Sir Henry Clifford, Knt., Lord Clifford, 
Westmoreland, and Vesey. 



136 CURZON — DACRE. 

Dukes. 

III. 1726. William Augustus, second s. of George Prince of Wales (after- 

wards George II.), created Baron of Aldemey, Viscount Tre- 
maton, co. Cornwall, Earl of Kennington, co. Surrey, Marquess 
of Berkhampsted, co. Hertford, and Duke of Cumberland, 27 
July 1726, K.G. ; ob. 1765, s. p., when all bis honours became 
Extinct. 

IV. 1766. Henry Frederick, bro. of King George III., created Earl of 

Dublin in Ireland, and Duke of Cumberland and Strathearn in 
Great Britain, 22 Oct. 1766, K.G. ; ob. 1790, s. p., when all his 
honours became Extinct. 

V. 1799. 1. Ernest Augustus, 5th s. of King George III., created Earl of 

Armagh in Ireland, and Duke of Cumberland and Tiviotdale in 
Great Britain, 24 Apr. 1799 ; succeeded to the kingdom of 
Hanover on the death of his bro. King William IV. 20 June 
1837 ; K.G., K.P., G.C.B. &c. ; ob. 18 Nov. 1851. 

VI. 1851. 2. George Frederick Alexander Charles Ernest Augustus, s. 

and h., present Duke of Cumberland and Tiviotdale, Earl of Armagh, &c. 
King of Hanover, K. G. =p 

CURZON. 

Barons. Viscounts. 

I. 1794. — I. 1802. 1. Asheton Curzon, created Baron Curzon of Penn, co. 

Bucks, 13 Aug. 1794, created Viscount Curzon of the 
same place 27 Feb. 1802 ; ob. 21 Mar. 1820. 

II. 1820. — II. 1820. 2. Richard William Penn Curzon-Howe, which latter 

name he took by licence 1821, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Penn 
Asheton Curzon (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the. last Viscount, succeeded his 
mother in the Barony of Howe of Langar, 1835 ; created Earl Howe, 15 
July 1821 ; present Viscount and Baron Curzon, Earl Howe, and Baron 
Howe. =p 



D. 



Barons by Writ. 



DACRE. 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



1321. 1. Ralph de Dacre," summ. to Pari, from 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 

1321, to 15 Nov. 12 Edw. III. 1338., as " Ranulph de Dacre ;" 

he m. Margaret, dau. and h. of Thomas Baron Multon of 

Gillesland, then set. 7 years ; ob. 1339. 
1350. 2. William de Dacre, s. and h., set. 20, summ. to Pari, from 

25 Nov. 24 Edw. III. 1350, to 20 Nov. 34 Edw. III. 1360 ; 

ob. 1360, s.p. 

3. Ralph de Dacre, bro. and h., set. 40, Rector of the church of 
Prescotes, summ. to Pari, from 14 Aug. 36 Edw. III. 1362, 
to 4 Oct. 47 Edw. III. 1373 ; ob. 1375, s. p. 

4. Hugh de Dacre, bro. and h., jet. 40, summ. to Pari, from 
1 Dec. 50 Edw. III. 1376, to 20 Aug. 7 Rich. II. 1383 ; ob. 
1383. 



1362. 



1376. 



u Dugdale (vol. ii. p. 22) states that Ralph 
de Dacre was s. and h. of William Dacre, who 
was summ. to Pari, from 28 Edw. I. to 12 



Edw. II., but his name does not once occur 
in any of the summonses in that period. 



DACRE. 



137 



Barons by Writ. 

V. 1384. 5. William de Dacre, s. and h., set. 26, summ. to Pari, from 3 

Mar. 7 Rich. II. 1384, to 18 July, 21 Rich. II. 1397 ; x ob. 
1399. 

VI. 1412. 6. ^Thomas de Dacre, s. and h., set. 12, summ. to Pari, from 1 

Dec. 14 Hen. IV. 1412, to 26 May, 33 Hen. VI. 1455, as 
" Thomae de Dacre de Gillesland ;" y ob. 1457, leaving his 
granddau. Joan, then aet. 25, dau. and h. of Thomas Dacre 
(ob. v. p.) his eldest s. his next h. Her husband, 

VII. 1458. 1.^ Richard Fienes, z declared Lord Dacre, and one of the Barons 

of the Realm, by patent 7 Nov. 37 Hen. VI. 1458,* and 
summ. to Pari, as " Richardo Fenys, Domino de Dacre, 
Militi," from 9 Oct. 38 Hen. VI. 1459, to 15 Nov. 22 Edw. 
IV. 1482 ; ob. 1484. 

VIII. 1484. 2. ^Thomas Fienes, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Thomas 

Fienes (ob. v. p.), (by Alice Fitz-Hugh, aunt and coh. of 
George last Baron Fitz-Hugh), eldest son of the last Baron 
by the said Joan Dacre, summ. to Pari, from 14 Oct. 11 
Hen. VII. 1495, to 5 Jan. 25 Hen. VIII. 1534, as " Thomas 
Fienes de Dacre ;" ob. 1534. 

IX. 1534. 3. Thomas Fienes, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Thomas 

Fienes (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron, summ. to 
Pari 8 June, 28 Hen. VIII. 1536, and 28 Apr. 31 Hen. 
VIII. 1539, in the last Writ with the addition of " de 
South." Executed for murder 1541, when his honours be- 
came Forfeited. 

X. 1558. 4. Gregory Fienes, bro. and h. of Thomas, s. and h. of the last 

Baron, restored in blood and honours by Act of Pari. 1 
Eliz. 1558, summ. to Pari, from 11 Jan. 5 Eliz. 1573, to 19 
Feb. 35 Eliz. 1593 ; ob. 1594, s. p., leaving, 



x Writs of Summons to Parliament con- 
tinued, however, to be addressed to " Will'o 
de Dacre" from 19 Aug. 23 Rich. II. 1399, 
to 24 Nov. 5 Hen. IV. 1403. 

7 The addition of Gillesland occurs for 
the first time in the Writ of 14 Hen. IV. ; 
and it may be inferred that although Ralph 
de Dacre, the first Baron, was probably sum- 
moned in consequence of his marriage, yet 
that the Barony created to him by the Writ 
of Summons 14 Edw. II. was a distinct 
Barony from that of Multon of Gillesland, of 
which his wife was the sole heir, for both 
this Ralph and his descendants were uni- 
formly summ. to Pari, for ninety-one years, 
viz. from 14 Edw. II. to 12 Hen. IV., with- 
out the words Multon or Gillesland being, 
even in a single instance, to be found in the 
Writs. The Barony of Multon of Gillesland 
is therefore presumed to have become merged 
in that of Dacre, and to have descended with 
it to the present Baron Dacre. This opinion 
is confirmed by Ralph Dacre, son of Thomas 
VI. Baron, and the heir male of the Dacre 
family, being summ. by Writ 38 Hen. VI. as 
Baron Dacre of Gillesland, when at the same 
time Richard Fienes, the husband of the heir 
general of the same Thomas VI. Baron, was 
summoned as Baron Dacre only. Had the 
Writ of 14 Edw. II. to Ralph de Dacre 
been considered the same as that inherited by 
his wife, the proper designation of the dignity 



would have been " Multon of Gillesland," and 
which title the Editor therefore feels autho- 
rised to attribute to the present Lord Dacre. 

The addition of " de Gillesland " in the 
Writ to Thomas de Multon, 1 Edw. II. was 
evidently used to distinguish him from 
Thomas de Multon, who had been regularly 
summoned from 27 Edw. I. as " Thomas de 
Multon" only; but in the 1 Edw. II. he 
was summoned as " Thomas de Multon de 
Egremund," when the Thomas first mentioned 
was summoned as " Thomse de Multon de 
Gillesland-" and the name of the latter imme- 
diately follows that of the former on the 
Roll. After the death of Thomas Multon of 
Gillesland, circa 8 Edw. II., the distinction 
was no longer necessary, and we accordingly 
find that Thomas Multon of Egremond was 
summoned without that addition in the 13 
and 14 Edw. II., and though it occurs in the 
last Writ directed to him, viz. 15 May in 
the latter year, the Writ to his son John, 
who succeeded him in the Barony, was ad- 
dressed " Johanni de Multon." 

2 Vide under Dacre of Gillesland for 
account of proceedings between him and Hum- 
phrey Lord Dacre. 

a This patent contains no words of limita- 
tion, and must be considered to be a con- 
firmation of the original Barony, with all the 
rights belonging thereto. 



138 



DACRE. 



Barons by Writ. 
XI. 1604. 5. 



XII. 1611. 6. 

XIII. 1616. 7. 

XIV. 1630. 8. 

XV. 1662. 9. 



XVI. 1741. 10. 



XVII. 1755. 11, 

XVIII. 1786. 12. 

XIX. 1794. 13. 

XX. 1819. 14. 

XXI. 1851. 15. 

XXII. 1853. 16. 



Margaret Fienes, wife of Sampson Lennard, Esq., his sister 
and h. ; she claimed the Barony in 1598, and was declared 
Baroness Dacre by an award, 8 Dec. 1604 ; ob. 1611. 

Henry Lennard, s. and h. ; ob. 1616. 

Richard Lennard, s. and h. ; ob. 1630. 

Francis Lennard, s. and h. ; ob. 1662. 

Thomas Lennard, s. and h., created Earl of Sussex 5 Oct. 
1674 ; ob. 1715, s. p. M., leaving two daughters and coheirs, 
Barbara and Ann, between whom the Barony fell into 
Abeyance. The former m. Charles Skelton, and died 
1741, s. p., when the Abeyance terminated, and her sister 
and sole heir, 

Ann Lennard succeeded to the dignity. She was thrice m. 
1. to Richard Barrett Lennard, s. and h. of Dacre Barrett 
Lennard, eldest son of Richard Lennard, second son of 
Richard XIII. Baron ; 2. to Henry Roper, Lord Teynham 
(to whom she was third wife) ; and 3. to Hon. Robert Moore ; 
ob. 1755. 

Thomas Barrett Lennard, s. and h. by her first husband ; 
ob. 1786, s. p., when this Barony devolved on his half- 
nephew, 

Trevor Charles Roper, s. and h. of Charles Roper (ob. v. 
m.) s. of Henry Lord Teynham by Ann Baroness Dacre ; 
ob. 1794, s. p. 

Gertrude Roper, sister and h., wife of Thomas Brand, Esq. ; 
ob. 3 Oct. 1819. 

Thomas Brand, s. and h. ; ob. s. p., 21 Mar. 1851. 

Henry Otway Trevor, bro. and h. ; ob. 2 June 1853. 

Thomas Crosby William Trevor, s. and h., present Baron 
Dacre of Gillesland, co. Cumberland, sole heir of the ancient 
Barony of Multon, and coheir of the Barony of Fitz-Hugh. = 



DACRE (of Gillesland, alias of the North). 



Barons by Writ. 
I. 1459. 



I.^Ralph Dacre, 2nd s. of Thomas VI. Baron Dacre, summ. to 
Pari. 9 Oct. 38 Hen. VI. 1459 as " Ranulpho Dacre de Gilles- 
land, Chl'r ;" slain at Towton 1461, when being attainted his 
honours became Forfeited. 

1473. 1. Humphrey Dacre, bro. and h. of the last Baron, who died s. p. 
Attainted of high treason 4 Nov. 1 Edw. IV., but which at- 
tainder was reversed 8 Feb. 1473 ; b summ. to Pari. 15 Nov. 



b Rot. Pari. v. 5, p. 478, vol. vi. p. 43. 
The Act of Reversal recites that the said 
Humphrey had been " admitted " to the 
King's " grace at his palace of Westminster 
in the 2nd year of his reign." This Hum- 
phrey Lord Dacre, as heir male, had great 
contests and disputes with Sir Richard Fienes 
and Joan his wife, dau. and h. of his eldest 
brother Sir Thomas Dacre, claiming as heir 
genera], concerning the lordships, &c, that 
belonged to her grandfather, which differences 
being referred to King Edw. IV., that mo- 
narch made an award, which appears to have 



created this Barony : it was given under the 
Privy Seal, 14 Apr. 1473, and after reciting 
the variances between the contending parties 
and the hearing of evidence, proceeds to de- 
clare that the said Sir Richard Fienes, Knt., 
in right of Joan his wife and the heirs of her 
body, be repute, had, named and called the 
Lord Dacre, and that the said Richard Fienes 
and the heirs of the said Joan keep, have, and 
use the same place and seat in Parliament as 
the said Thomas Dacre, Knt., late Lord Dacre, 
had used and kept. It then proceeds to award 
certain manors to the said Joan, and further 



DACEE. 139 

Barons by Writ. 

22 Edw. IV. 1482, and 9 Dec. 1 Kich. III. 1483, as " Hum- 
frido Dacres de Gillesland ;" ob. 1485. 

II. 1485. 2. Thomas Dacre, s. and h., snmm. to Pari, as " Thoma? Dacre de 

Dacre " from 17 Oct. 1 Hen. VIII. 1509 to 12 Nov. 7 Hen. 
VITI. 1515 ; he m. Elizabeth granddau. and sole heir of 
Ealph Lord Greystock ; K.G. ; ob. 1525. 

III. 1525. 3. William Dacre, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 3 Nov. 21 Hen. 

VIII. 1529, to 21 Oct. 2 and 3 Philip and Mary, 1555, in the 
1st writ as " Willielmo Dacre de Dacre and Greystok, Chl'r," 
afterwards as "de Gillesland," or "of Greystok," or "de 
North ;" ob. 12 Nov. 1563. 

IV. 1563. 4. Thomas Dacre, s. and h. ; he was never summ. to Pari. ; ob. 

1 July 1566. 

V. 1566. 5. George Dacre, s. and h. jet. 5, summ. to Pari. 30 Sept. 8 Eliz. 
1566, and described as " infra aetatern ;" ob. 17 May 1569, set. 8, leaving 
his sisters Ann (fet. 12 years, 2 months, and 3 clays at the death of her 
father), Mary, and Elizabeth his heirs ; the said Ann afterwards m. 
Philip Howard Earl of Arundel ; Mary became the wife of Thomas Lord 
Howard of Walden (who died s. p.) ; and Elizabeth m. Lord William 
Howard, 3rd s. of Thomas Duke of Norfolk, and ancestor of the Earls of 
Carlisle. 

Upon the death of George the last Lord Dacre of Gillesland a question 
arose as to the succession of the dignity ; Leonard Dacre 2nd s. of William 

III. 3rd Lord had assumed the title as heir male, which assumption was 
resisted by Thomas Duke of Norfolk the guardian of the sisters of the last 
Baron, alleging that the title could not pass to the said Leonard unless 
there were a special entail thereof made to the heirs male of some of the 
ancestors of the deceased Lord, and that the said Leonard had wrongfully 
and without any lawful title usurped the title of Lord Dacre of Gillesland 
and Greystock, and that although the trial thereof did belong to him the 
said Duke as Earl-Marshal of England, yet as he was both guardian and 
father-in-law to the said coheirs, to avoid suspicion he humbly entreated 
the Queen that some of her Council might be appointed to hear and deter- 
mine the right and title to the said Barony. Commissioners were there- 
fore appointed, but notwithstanding this show of justice it was speedily 
shown that Leonard's claims availed little against the powerful influence of 
the Duke of Norfolk, the step-father and guardian of the three coheirs, all 
of whom were afterwards m. to his own sons. After several hearings, 
during which no allusion whatever is made to the award of King Edw. 

IV. by either party, it was adjudged, on the ground that the ancient title 
of Lord Dacre commencing by writ descended to Joan Fienes as h. general, 
that this title which commenced by writ 13 Ediv. IV. ought not to de- 
scend to the said Leonard as h. male. 

Agreeably to the judgment pronounced on that occasion the Barony of 
Dacre of Gillesland is now in Abeyance among the coheirs of the 
sisters of George the last Baron, viz., the Lords Stourton and Petre as 
heirs-general of Ann, wife of Philip Earl of Arundel, the eldest coll., and 
the Earl of Carlisle as heir-general of Elizabeth, wife of Lord William 
Howard, the other sister and coh. who left issue. But if the Award in 
the 13 Edw. IV. be held to have created the Barony of Dacre of Gilles- 
land, a point upon which there is much difficulty in giving an opinion, 



declares that " the saide Humphrie Dacre, j ments next adjoining beneath the said place 

Knight, and the heirs male of the body of \ that the said Richard Fenys, Knight, Lord 

the said Thomas late Lord Dacre coming be j Dacre now hath and occupieth." 

reputed, had, named, and called the Lord c Dignities, unless originating by writ or 



Dacre op Gillesland, and he and the heirs 
male of the said Thomas late Lord Dacre to 
have, use, and keep the place in our Parlia- 



by Act of Pari., are created by Letters Patent 
under the Great Seal, and as the award is 
stated to have been under the King's Privy 



140 



DACRE — D'AMORIE. 



and that the dignity was descendible in the manner specified therein, i. e., 
to the heirs male of the body of Humphrey Dacre, it became vested in 
1569 in Leonard Dacre the then claimant, and it would consequently now 
be vested in the heir male of the body of the said Humphrey, but as the 
male line of the family is considered to have failed d the Barony must be 
deemed to be Extinct. 

DACRE (of Gillesland). 
Barons. 

I. 1661. Charles Howard, s. and h. of William s. and h. of Philip eldest 
s. (ob. v. p.) of Lord William Howard before mentioned by Ann Dacre 
sister and coh. of George last Baron Dacre of Gillesland, made Viscount 
Howard by the Protector Cromwell, and afterwards created Baron Dacre 
of Gillesland, Viscount Howard of Morpeth, and Earl of Carlisle by patent 
30 Apr. 1661. — Vide Carlisle. 

DAGWORTH. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1347. 1. Thomas de Dagworth, summ. to Pari. 13 Nov. 21 Edw. III. 
1347, and 14 Feb. 22 Edw. III. 1348, but never afterwards ; he died in 
1359, leaving Nicholas his s. and h., but neither he nor any of his posterity 
were ever summ. to Pari. 



Barons. 
I. 1815. 



DALHOUSIE. 

1. George Ramsay, 9th Earl of Dalbousie in Scotland, created Baron 
Dalhousie of Dalhousie Castle, co. Edinburgh, 11 Aug. 1815, 
G.C.B. ; ob. 21 Mar. 1838. 



II 



Marquess. 
1838. — I. 1849. 2. James Andrew Ramsay, s. andh., created Marquess of 
Dalhousie of Dalhousie Castle aforesaid and of the Punjaub, 25 Aug. 1849 
present Marquess, and Baron Dalhousie, K.T., late Governor-General of 
India. ^= 

Y 

D'AMORIE. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1317. Roger D'Amorie, summ. to Pari, from 20 Nov. 11 Edw. II. 1317, 
to 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 1321 ; he m. Elizabeth sister and coh. 
of Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and niece of King Edw. II. , 
widow of John s. of Richard Earl of Ulster and of Theobald 
de Verdon ; ob. in rebellion circa 1322, s. p. m., leaving Elizabeth 
his dau. and h., who m. John Lord Bardolf ; her grands. Thomas 
Lord Bardolf having been attainted 1406, this Barony, together 
with that of Bardolf, then became Forfeited. 



1326. Richard D'Amorie, presumed to have been nephew to Roger Baron 
D'Amorie before mentioned, summ. to Pari, from 3 Dec. 20 Edw. II. 1326, 



Seal only, it may with great propriety be 
argued that it was not a Patent of Creation, 
and hence that, notwithstanding the express 
declaration of the intentions of the Crown 
therein, it cannot be considered to operate, in 
the absence of a regular patent of creation, 
against the dignity being deemed to have 
originated in the earliest writ of summons to 
Humphrey Dacre extant, that of 15 Nov. 
22 Edw. rv. 1432. 



d Leonard Dacre, the claimant in 1569, 
and his brother Edward were attainted of 
high treason and died abroad, S. P., the former 
in great poverty at Louvaine in 1581, and 
the latter in 1579 ; Francis Dacre, their next 
brother, left an only son, Randal Dacre, called 
the last heir male of his family, who died in 
London 1634, and was buried at Greystock 
at the charge of the Earl Marshal. 



DANBY — DARCY. 



141 



to 23 Oct. 4 Edw. III. 1330 ; ob. 1330, leaving Richard his s. and h. set. 
16, who was never summ. to Pari, and died in 1375, s. p., when the 
Barony became Extinct. 



Earls. 



DANBY. 



I. 1626. 1. Henry Danvers, 1st Lord Dan vers, created Earl of Danby, co. 

York, 7 Feb. 1625-6, E.G. ; ob. 1644, s. p., when all his titles 
became Extinct. 

II. 1674. 1. Thomas Osborne, 1st Viscount Latimer, s. and h. of Sir Edward 

Osborne, Bart., by Ann dau. of Thomas Walmisley, Esq., by Eleanor 
Danvers sister of Henry the last Earl, created Earl of Danby, co. York, 
27 June 1674, created Marquess of Carmarthen 9 Apr. 1689, and Duke of 
Leeds 4 May 1694, K.G.— Vide Leeds. 



DANVERS. 
Baron. 
1603. 1. Sir Henry Danvers, created Baron Danvers of Dantsey, co. 
Wilts, 21 July 1603, restored in blood (his elder bro. Sir Charles having 
been attainted) by Pari. 1605, created Earl of Danby 7 Feb. 1626 ; K.G. ; 
ob. 1644, s. p., when his honours became Extinct. 



D'AECY (of Nocton, co. Lincoln). 



Barons by Tenure. 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 



Hen. I. 

Steph. 
Hen. II. 
John. 
Hen. III. 
Hen. in. 
Edw. I. 



1. Norman D'Arcy, s. of Norman de Adreci or D'Arcy 

came over with William the Conqueror. 

2. Robert D'Arcy, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

3. Thomas D'Arcy, s. and h. ; ob. 1180. 



Barons by Writ 
I. 



who 



ob. circa 1206. 
living 1253. 



4. Thomas D'Arcy, s. and h. 

5. Norman D'Arcy, s. and h 

6. Philip D'Arcy, s. and h. ; ob. 1263. 

7. Norman D'Arcy, s. and h. summ. 8 June 22 Edw. I. 1294, 

but it is doubtful, for the reasons assigned under Clyve- 
don, if that Writ can be considered as a regular summ. to 
to Pari. : ob. 1296. 



1299. 8. Philip D'Arcy, s. and h., summ. 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, but 
it is doubtful if that writ was a regular summ. to Pari, (vide Fitz-John) ; 
summ. to Pari, from 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299, to 20 Oct, 6 Edw. III. 

1332 ; ob , leaving Norman D'Arcy his s., his h., who died in 1340 

without having ever been summ. to Pari. ; Philip his s. and h. died soon 
afterwards infra setatem, when Sir Philip Limbury, s. of Julian, and Agnes, 
wife of Sir Roger de Pedwardine, the daughters of Philip Baron D'Arcy, 
and aunts of the said Philip became his heirs, among whose descendants 
and representatives this Barony is presumed to be in Abeyance. 6 



DARCY (of Knaith). 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1332. 1.^ John Darcy, bro. of Philip I. 8th Baron Darcy, summ. to Pari, 

from 27 Jan. 6 Edw. III. 1332, to 20 Jan. 7 Edw. III. 1334, as 
" Johanni Darcy le Cosin," and 25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342, as 
" Johanni Darcy ;" ob. 1347 



e Sir Philip Limbury had issue one son 
and one daughter, who both died s. P., when 
his share of the Barony devolved on his sister 
Eleanor, wife of Nicholas Bernake, who left 



three daughters her coheirs, viz. Margaret 
wife of James Bellers of Ketelby ; Agnes wife 
of William Wimbish of Norton ; and Eliza- 
beth wife of Sir William Wingfield. 



142 



DARCY. 



Barons by Writ. 

II. 1348. 2. John Darcy, s. and h., sumin. to Pari, from 20 Nov. 22 Edw. 

III. 1348 to 15 Mar. 28 Edw. III. 1354, as " Johanni Darcy de 
Knayth ;" he m. Elizabeth dau. and sole heir of Nicholas 
Baron Meinill ; oh. 1356. 

III. 3. John Darcy, s. and h. ; oh. infra astatem, 1362, s. p. 

IV. 1377. 4.^ Philip Darcy, hro. and h. get. 21, sunim. to Pari, from 4 Ang. 

1 Rich. II. 1377, to 5 Nov. 21 Rich. II. 1397, as " Philippe 
Darcy ;" ob. 1398. 

V. 1399. 5.^ John Darcy, s. and h. set. 22, sunim. to Pari, from 19 Aug. 23 

Rich. II. 1399, to 21 Sept, 12 Hen. IV. 1411 ; oh. 1411. 

VI. 1411. 6. Philip D'Arcy, s. and h. ; oh. a?t. circa 20, 1418, s. p. m., leaving 
Elizabeth a?t. 3, who m. Sir James Strangways, and Margery f set. 2, who 
became the wife of Sir John Conyers of Hornby, his daughters and heirs, 
between whose descendants and representatives this Barony and the 
Barony of Meinill is presumed to have been ever since in Abeyance. 

The creation to Conyers Darcy of the dignity of Baron Darcy with the precedence 
of John V. 5th Baron, as is stated in the next page, cannot be considered to have 
taken this Barony out of Abeyance, for the limitation to his heirs male ren- 
dered it a creation de novo, notwithstanding that the said Conyers Darcy was, 
jure matris, one of the coheirs of this Barony ; and the precedence so assigned 
him was, according to modern doctrines on the subject, illegal. 



Barons by Writ. 
I. 



II. 



III. 



DARCY ( of Darcy ). 

1509. 1. Thomas Darcy, s. and h. of William eldest s. of Richard (ob. 
v. p.) s. and h. of John Darcy 2nd s. of John V. 5th Baron, 
sunim. to Pari, as "Thomas Darcy de Darcv, Chl'r," from 
17 Oct. 1 Hen. VIII. 1509, to 3 Nov. 21 Hen. VIII. 1529, and 
with the addition of " de Temple Hirst" 5 Jan. 25 Hen. VIII. 
1534, and as " Thomas Darciaj, Chl'r " 8 June, 28 Hen. VIII. 
1536, K.G. ; beheaded 1538, and having been attainted his 
honours became Forfeited, 

1548. 2. George D'Arcy, s. and h., restored in blood with the dignity of 
Baron Darcy to him and his heirs male by Act of Parliament 
2 Edw. VI. 1548 ;s ob. 1557. 

1557. 3. John Darcy, s. and h., set. 28 ad mort. pat. ; ob. 1587. 



r The heir of this Margery, and conse- 
quently the coheir of the Baronies of Darcy 
and Meinill is his Grace the Duke of Leeds. 

g Of the act of restoiation the late F. 
Townsend, Esq., Windsor Herald, in his addi- 
tions to Dugdale, observes, — " The beginning 
of the act provides that he and the heirs male 
of his body shall be taken and known by the 
name of Lord Darcy, and shall have place 
and voice in Parliament, &c. as a Baron of 
this realm ; yet it is afterwards further en- 
acted and declared that he and his heirs shall 
be restored in blood only as heir and heirs 
of the said Thomas Lord Darcy, and that he 
and his heirs shall be enabled to demand, ask, 
have, hold, and enjoy all and every such 
honours, castles, lordships, manors, and all 
manner of hereditaments. Upon this view 
of the act I cannot but think that the fair 
construction is, that upon the failure of heirs 
male of his body the heirs general are let in 
to the inheritance, and this opinion will, I 
concei.e, be much fortified, if not entirely 
confirmed, by what follows. When the re- 



stored Lord came to Parliament he was 
ranked and sat there as the junior Baron, 
and continued during his life to hold only 
such place as was due to him according to 
the date of his restitution ; but after his 
death his son's name was inserted in the 
old place, and in 1 Eliz. he was admitted to 
the ancient seat and rank formerly enjoyed 
by his attainted ancestor (Lords' Journals, 
vol. i. p. 514). I do not find any steps 
taken by him to obtain this admission, but 
the fact itself appears to me to amount to a 
decision of the House, especially as the Lords 
Darcy continued in undisturbed possession of 
that precedence till the male line became ex- 
tinct in 1635. It seems, however, highly pro- 
bable that this admission of Lord Darcy was 
considered as a regular consequence of the 
then recent decision in favour of Lord Staf- 
ford, who stood precisely in similar circum- 
stances under an act of restitution, which, 
like this of Lord Darcy. limited the barony 
first to the heirs male of the body of the 
restored Lord.'' 



DAECY. 



143 



Baron by Writ. 

IV. 1587. 4. John Dabcy, grands, and h. being s. and h. of Michael Darcy 
(ob. v. p.) eldest s. of the last Baron ; he was summ. to Pari, as " Johanni 
Darcie and Meinill," probably in consequence of his descent from John II. 
2nd Baron Darcy by Elizabeth dau. and h. of Nicholas Baron Meinill 
(vide Meinill) ; ob. 1635, s. p., leaving Anne his sister, wife of Henry 
Copley, Esq., his h., and if she had any interest in the restored Barony 
such interest is vested in the Lords Stourton and Petre. 



Barons by Patent. 



DARCY and CONYEES. 



I. 



II. 



117. 



1641. 



1. Conyeks Darcy, s. and h. of Thomas Darcy (2nd s. of Sir Arthur 
Darcy, 3rd s. of Thomas Lord Darcy, who was beheaded in 
1538) by Elizabeth, 2nd dau. and eventually the only child 
whose issue survived of John III. 3rd Baron Conyers ; under 
a Patent (10 Aug. 1641) of Eestitution and Creation, as it is 
styled, but which was in fact a new creation, he took his seat 
in Pari. 20 Jan. 1641 as Lord D'Arcy and Conyers ; the patent 
is not to be found, but in the Royal Warrant (which directs 
the preparation of two hills), dated 2 Aug. preceding, he was 
declared, accepted, and confirmed to be Lord Darcy and Lord 
Conyers to him and the heirs male of his body, and it granted, 
confirmed, and restored to him and them the ancient liberties, 
places, and states in Pari, and elsewhere in England of John 
Lord Darcy and of John Lord Conyers. h Succeeded, jure matris, 
to the ancient Barony of Conyers 13 July 1644 ; ob. 1653. 
1653. 2. Conyers DArcy, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 8 May, 13 Car. 
II. 1661, to 1 Mar. 32 Car. II. 1680, as " Conyers Darcie de 
Darcie," and in the two last writs with the addition of " and 
Meynill ;" created Earl of Holderness 5 Dec. 1682 ; ob. 1689. 
1689. 3. Conyers Darcy, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 1 Mar. 32 Car. II. 
1680, in the same Pari, in which his father sat as Baron Darcy and Meinill, 
as " Conyers Darcy de Conyers, Chl'r," by which title he was also summ. 
1 James II. 1685 ; succeeded his father in his honours 1689, and the 
Baronies of Darcy and Conyers and Conyers continued merged in the Earl- 
dom of Holderness until the death of Eobert VI. 4th Earl in 1778, s. p. m., 
when that Earldom, and the Barony of Darcy and Conyers created by the 
patent of 1641, became Extinct, but the original Barony of Conyers 
descended to Amelia his dau. and h., wife of Francis Godolphin 5th Duke 
of Leeds. — Vide Conyers. 



Barons. 



n. 

in. 



DARCY (of Chiche). 

1. Thomas Darcy, presumed to have been descended from the 
ancient Barons Darcy, created Baron Darcy of Chiche, co. 
Essex, 5 Apr. 1551, K.G. ; ob. 1558. 

2. John Darcy, s. and h. ; ob. 1580. 

3. Thomas Darcy, s. and h., created Viscount Colchester for life, 
with a special remainder, 5 July 1621, created 4 Nov. 1626 Earl Rivers, 
with a special limitation ; ob. 1639, s. p. m., when the Barony of Darcy of 
Chiche became Extinct. 



1551. 

1558. 
1580. 



h Notwithstanding the direction in this 
warrant that two bills should be prepared 
for the expressed intention of restoring the 
ancient "liberties, places, and states" of 
John Lord Darcy and John Lord Conyers, it 
does not appear either from the concluding 
words or from his subsequent sitting, that 
two separate baronies were intended to be 



conferred upon him. The words are — " The 
one concerning the Barony of Darcy to be 
made for the said Sir Conyers Darcy by the 
name of Sir Conyers Darcy of Hornby, co. 
York, Knt., and the other concerning the 
Barony of Conyers to be passed in the latter 
place (Hornby) to be made to or for him by 
the title also of Baron D'Arcy." 



144 DARLINGTON — DAUBENEY. 

DARLINGTON. 

Barony, 20 Jan. 1685-6— Extinct, 1692.— Vide Dorchester. 

Countess. 
T. 1722. Charlotte-Sophia, wife of the Baron Kilmansegg, Countess of 
Platen in Germany and Countess of Leinster in Ireland, 
created Baroness of Brentford, co. Middlesex, and Countess of 
Darlington, co. Durham, 6 Apr. 1722, for life ; ob. 1730, s. p. m., 
when her honours became Extinct. 
Earls. 

I. 1754. 1. Henry Vane, 3rd Baron Barnard, created Viscount Barnard and 

Earl of Darlington, co. Durham, 3 Apr. 1754 ; ob. 1758. 

II. 1758. 2. Henry Vane, s. and h. ; ob. 1792. 

III. 1792. 3. William Henry Vane, s. and h. ; created Marquess of Cleve- 

land 5 Oct. 1827, and Baron Baby and Duke of Cleveland 29 
Jan. 1833, K.G. — Vide Cleveland. 

DARTMOUTH. 

Barony, 28 July 1675— Extinct 1680.— Vide Plymouth. 

Barons. 

I. 1682. 1. George Legge, created Baron Dartmouth of Dartmouth, co. 

Devon, with remainder, failing his issue male, to his bro. 
William Legge, 2 Dec. 1682 ; ob. 1691. 

Earls. 

II. 1691. — I. 1711. 2. William Legge, s. and h., created Viscount Lewis- 

ham, co. Kent, and Earl of Dartmouth aforesaid, 5 
Sept. 1711 ; ob. 1750. 

III. 1750. — II. 1750. 3. William Legge, grands, and h., being s. and h. of 

George Legge (ob. v. p.) eldest s. of the last Earl ; 
ob. July 1801. 

IV. 1801. — III. 1801. 4. George Legge, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ, v. p., 

15 June 1801, as Baron Dartmouth, but never sat 
as such; K.G. ; ob. 1 Nov. 1810. 

V. 1810.— IV. 1810. 5. William Legge, s. and h. ; ob. 22 Nov. 1853. 

VI. 1853. — V. 1853. 6. William Walter Legge, s. and h., present Earl and 

Baron of Dartmouth and Viscount Lewisham. =p 

DARTREY. 

Baron. 

I. 1847. 1. Richard Dawson, Lord Cremorne in Ireland, created Baron Dar- 
trey of Dartrey, co. Monaghan, 20 Sept. 1847, present Baron Dartrey, 
also Baron Cremorne in Ireland ; K. P. =j= 

7 



■j 



DAUBENEY. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. IL Ralph D'Albini, younger s. of William D'Albini, 1st Baron De 

Albini Brito ; ob. 1190 ; his successor was, 

II. John. Philip de Albini; ob. 1235. 

III. Hen. III. Philip de Albini, neph. and h. ; ob. 1294, s. p. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1295. 1. Elias Daubeney, bro. and h. set. 30, 1294, summ. to Pari, from 
2 Nov. 23 Edw. 1. 1295, to 22 Jan. 33 Edw. 1.1305 ; ob. 1305. 



DAUNTSEY — DE FREYNE. 145 

Barons by Writ. 

II. 1342. 2. Ralph Daubeney, s. and h. fet. 11, 1305, summ. to Pari. 25 

Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342, but never afterwards ; ob 

leaving Sir Giles Daubeney his s. and h., who died 1386, 
and was succeeded by his s. and h. Sir Giles, then set. 15, 
which Sir Giles died in 1402, leaving John his s. and h., 
aet. 9, and who dying in his minority, 1410, his brother, 

Barons by Patent. 

I. 1486. 1. Giles Daubekey, was found to be his h., then art. 14, created 

Baron Daubeney by charter 12 March 1486, K.G. ; ob. 
1507. 

II. 1507. 2. Henry Daubeney, s. and h., created Earl of Bridgewater 
19 July 1538 ; ob. 8 Apr. 1548, s. p., when the dignities created by the 
patents of i486 and 1538 became Extinct ; but the Barony created by 
the writ of 23 Edw. I. became vested in his neph. and h. (s. of Florence 
his sister) John Bourchier III. 2nd Earl of Bath, set. 40, 1548, as the 
heir-general of Elias 1st Baron Daubeney, and on the death of Edward 
Bourchier V. 4th Earl of Bath in 1636 fell, together with the Barony of 
Fitz-Warine, into Abeyance between his daughters and coheirs. — Vide 
Fitz-Warine. 

DAUNTSEY. 

Barony, 23 Aug. 1664— Extinct 1667.— Vide Cambbidge. 
Barony, 7 Oct. 1667— Extinct 1671.— Vide Cambridge. 

Baron. DAWNAY. 

I. 1796. John Christopher Burton Dawnay, 5th Viscount Downe in Ireland, 
created Baron Dawnay of Cowick, co. York, 9 June 1796 ,• ob. s. p., 18 Feb. 
1832, when the Barony became Extinct. 

DE ALBINI. Vide Daubeney. 

Baron by Tenure. DE BEVER ER. 

I. Will. I. Drue de Beverer, called also Drue de Holderness, from his 
having obtained from the Conqueror the Lordship of Holderness, co. York, 
came into England with the Conqueror, and retired into Flanders some 
years afterwards. 

DE CLIFFORD. Vide Clifford. 

DE DUNSTANVILLE. Vide Dunstanville. 

DEERHUEST. 
Viscounty, 26 Apr. 1697. — Vide Coventry. 

Baron. DE PREYNE ' 

I. f 1839.1 1. Arthur French, created Baron De Freyne of Artagh, co. Ros- 

1 1851. J common, 16 May 1839, and Baron de Freyne of Coolavin, co. 

Sligo, with remainder, failing the heirs male of his own body, to his 

brothers John French, Clerk, Charles French, and Fitzstephen French, 

Esquires, 5 Apr. 1851, present Baron de Freyne. = 



14(5 



DE GEEY— DEINCOUET. 



Marquess. 
I. 1740. 1 



DE GREY. 



Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent, created 19 May 1740 Marquess 
de Grey, with remainder, failing his issue male, to his granddau. 
Jemima (dau. of his eldest dau. Amabell by Sir John Campbell, 
K.B., commonly called Viscount Glenorchy), and to her issue 
male, K.G. ; ob. 1740, s. p. m. 
Marchioness. 

II. 1740. 2. Jemima Campbell, granddau. and h., Baroness Lucas ; she m. Philip 
York, afterwards Earl of Hardwicke ; ob. 1797, s. p. m., when the 
Marquessate became Extinct. 



I. 



Earls. 
1816. 



Amabell Hume Campbell, eldest dau. and coh. of the last Mar- 
chioness, succeeded her mother as Baroness Lucas, and was created 
Countess de Grey of Wrest, co. Bedford, 25 Oct. 1816, with re- 
mainder, failing her issue male, to Mary Jemima, Dowager 
Baroness Grantham, the only younger dau. and coh. of the Mar- 
chioness Grey, and to her issue male ; she m. Alexander Campbell, 
eldest s. of Hugh Earl of Marchmont, who was created Baron 
Hume of Berwick 1776, but died s. p. v. p. 1781 ; the Countess 
ob. 4 May 1833. 
II. 1833. 2. Thomas Philip de Grey, neph. and h., s. and h. of Thomas 2nd 
Lord Grantham by Mary Jemima, sister of the last Countess, present Earl 
De Grey, Baron Lucas and Baron Grantham, K.G. 



T 



Barons by Tenure. 



DELTSrCOURT. 



I. 



Will. I. 



11. Hen. I. 


2 


III. Hen. II. 


3 


IV. Kich. I. 


4 


V. John. 


5 


VI. Hen. III. 


G 


VII. Hen. HI. 


7 


Baron by Writ. 




I. 1299. 


3 



Walter Deincourt came to England with William the 
Conqueror, and was Lord of Blankeney, co. Lincoln, and of 
other Lordships, cos. Notts and Northampton. 

Ealph Deincourt, s. and h. 

Walter Deincourt, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1167. 

Edmund Deincourt ; living 1169. 

Oliver Deincourt, s. and h. ; ob. 1201. 
6. Oliver Deincourt, s. and h. ; living 1244. 

John Deincourt, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1257. 



Edmund Deincourt, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 6 Feb. 
27 Edw. 1. 1299, to 3 Dec. 20 Edw. II. ; he was also summ. 
8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, but for the reasons assigned 
under Clyvedon, it is presumed that that writ cannot be 



deemed a regular 

his 

his eldest 



granddau. 



summ. to Pari. ; ob. 1327, leaving Isabel 



viz. dau. and sole h. of Edmund (ob. v. p.) 
s., his heir, but wishing to perpetuate his name 
and arms, he obtained a licence from the King to settle 
his lordships and lands, &c, on whom he pleased ; he ac- 
cordingly settled them on William Deincourt hereafter 
mentioned, but the Barony created by the writ of 27 Edw. I. 
descended to the said Isabel his granddau., and is probably 
now in Abeyance among her descendants and repre- 
sentatives. 



1332. 



William Deincourt, s. of John Deincourt, who is presumed 
to have been bro. of the last Baron, Avho settled on this 
William all his lordships by licence of the King ; summ. to 
Pari, from 27 Jan. 6 Edw. HI. 1332, to 1 June ,'S7 Edw. III. 
1363 ; ob. 1364. 



DEINCOURT — DE LA BECHE. 



147 



h. (set. 7, 1364), being 

(ob. v. p.) eldest s. of 

Aug. 4 Rich. II. 1380, 

II. 1381 ;' ob. 14 Oct. 

be was never sunini. 



Barons by Writ. 

II. 1380. 2. William Deincourt, grands, and 

s. and h. of William Deincourt 

the last Baron, suram. to Pari. 26 

and 16 July and 22 Aug. 5 Rich. 

5 Rich. II. 1381. 

HI. 3. Ralph Deincourt, s. and h., sst. 1 

to Pari. ; ob. 7 Nov. 1384. 

IV- 4. John Deincourt, bro. and h., set. 2 ; he was never summ. to 

Pari. ;j he m. Johanna, da. and sole heir of Robert Lord 
Grey of Rotherfield ; ob. 15 May 1406. 

V. 5. William Deincourt, s. and h., set. 3 ; ob. mfra setatem, 

1422, s. p., leaving Alice and Margaret his sisters his beirs ; "the said Alice 
m. 1. Ralph Boteler of Sudeley, who died s. p., and 2. Lord Lovell of Tich- 
mersh ; Margaret Deincourt, the other coh., became the wife of Ralph Lord 
Cromwell, but died s. p. This Barony therefore became vested in the de- 
scendants of Lord Lovell and the above-mentioned Alice his wife, on the 
termination of the Abeyance by the death of Margaret Lady Cromwell. In 
1487 Francis Baron and Viscount Lovell, grands, of the above-mentioned 
William Lord Lovell and Alice Deincourt his wife, was Attainted, when the 
Barony of Deincourt, together with these of Lovell of Tichmersh, Holland, 
and Grey of Rotherfield, became Forfeited. 



DEIWCOURT ( of Sutton ). 
Baron. 

1624. 1. Sir Francis Leke, 1st Bart., created Baron Deincourt of Sutton, 
co. Derby, 26 Oct. 1624, and Earl of Scarsdale 11 Nov. 1645. Extinct 
1736. — Vide Scarsdale. 



Barons by Tenure. 



I. 


Hen. I. 


II. 


Steph. 


III. 


Hen. II. 


IV. 


Hen. II. 


V. 


Hen. III. 



D'EIVILL. 

1. Robert D'Eivill, Lord of Egmanton, co. Notts. 

2. John D'Eivill, s. and h. 

3. Robert D'Eivill, s. and h. ; ob. s. p. 

4. Robert D'Eivill, jun., bro. and h. 

5. John D'Eivill, s. and h., living 1266. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1264. John D'Etvill, summ. to Pari. 14 Dec. 49 Hen. III. 1264, living 
1270. Sir John D'Eyvill, his s. and h., was never summ. to Pari., and 
died s. p. m., leaving two daughters and coheirs, Margaret and Elizabeth, 
of whom the latter m. Alexander Leedes and left issue. 

DE LA BECHE. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1342. Nicholas de la Beche, Lord of Aldworth, co. Berks, summ. to Pari. 
25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342, but never afterwards, nor any of his posterity ; 
he died circa 1346. 



' He is called in each instance in the Lists 
of Summons " Joh'i Deyncourt ;" but this is 
evidently an error. 

J The probable cause of this Baron and 
his predecessor never having been summ. to 
Pari, was their dying so very soon after they 
became of age ; viz. Ralph, his brother, a 
minor, and this Baron about twenty-four or 



twenty-five years of age. William, his s. 
and h. the last Baron, died under twenty-one; 
so that only one out of the three was eligible 
to a seat in Parliament, and as he did not 
make proof of his age until just before his 
death, it is not likely he would have been 
summoned before he had done so. 

L 2 



148 DE LA MARE — DE LA POLE. 

DE LA MARE. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1299. John de la Make, summ. to Pari, from 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, to 26 
July, 7 Edw. II. 1313, but bis descendants were never summ. to Pari. ; 
" and," says Dugdale, " none of tbem continuing in tbe rank of Barons, I 
sball take no farther notice of tbem." He died 9 Edw. II. 1315-6, appa- 
rently s. p., as his sister Isabella, then set. 50, and the wife of Thomas 
Maydenhatch, was found to be his h., in which case the Barony then be- 
came Extinct. 

DELAMEE or DE LA MEE. 
Barons. 

I 16G1. 1. Sir George Booth, 2nd Bart., created Baron Delamer of Dun- 

ham Massey, co. Chester, 20 Apr. 1661 ; ob. 1684. 

II 1684 2. Henry Booth, s. and h., created Earl of Warrington, co. Lan- 

caster, 17 Apr. 1690 ; ob. 1693. 

III. 1693. 3. George Booth, s. and h., Earl of Warrington, ob. 1758, s. p. m., 

when the Earldom of Warrington became Extinct ; but this 
Barony devolved on, 

IV. 1758. 4. Nathaniel Booth, cou. and h. male, being' s. and h. of Robert 

Booth, 2nd s. of George, 1st Baron ; ob. 1770, s. p. m., when 
this Barony became Extinct. 

V. 1796. 1. George Hakry Grey, 5th Earl of Stamford, s. and h. of .Harry 

4th Earl of Stamford, by Mary, sole dau. and h. of George 
Booth 3rd Baron Delamer and 2nd Earl of Warrington, cre- 
ated Baron Delamer of Dunham Massey, co. Chester, and Earl 
of Warrington 22nd April 1796 ; ob. 1819. 

VI. 1819. 2. George Harry Gkey, s. andh.; ob. 26 Apr. 1845. 

VII. 1845. 3. George Harry Grey, grands, and h., being s. and h. of George 
Henry Lord Grey of Groby (ob. v. p.), s. and h. of the last Earl, present Earl 
of Stamford and Earl of Warrington, Baron Grey of Groby, and Baron 
Delamer of Dunham Massey. = 

DE LA MERE (of Vale Royal). 
Barons. 

I. 1821. 1. Thomas Cholmondeley, created Baron Delamere of Vale Royal, co. 

Chester, 17th July 1821 ; ob. 30 Sept, 1855. 

II. 1855. 2. Hugh Cholmondeley, s. and h., present Baron Delamere of Vale 

Royal. = 

DE LA POLE. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1366..$fc Michael de la Pole, summ. to Pari, from 20 Jan. 39 Edw. III. 1366, 
to 28 Sept. 8 Rich. II. 1384 ; in the writ of 50 Edw. III. he is described 
as " Admirallo Regis Flotte Navium versus partes Boreales ;" created Earl 
of Suffolk 6 Aug. 1385. This Barony continued merged in that dignity, 
and with it was Forfeited by his Attainder in 1388, but was restored with 
his other honours to his s. Michael, by the reversal of that Attainder in 
1397. In the Pari, of 1 Hen. IV. 1399, the proceedings on the subject in 
1397 were reversed, and the Act of Attainder in 1388 consequently re- 
vived ; and though Michael Earl of Suffolk obtained a patent confirming to 
him and his issue male the Earldom of Suffolk, the Barony of De la Pole 
was not included.* As, however, the proceedings in Pari, in 1399, 

k Fourth Peerage Report, p. 26. 



DE LA VAL— DE LA WARR. 149 

1 Hen. IV., relative to the Attainder in 1388 of the Earl of Suffolk and 
others, were reversed in 4 Edw. IV. 14G4-5, and which of course had the 
effect of again annulling the Attainder, this Barony was again restored 
to the h. of the body of Michael de la Pole, summ. by the writ of 39 
Edw. III., viz. John de la Pole, bro.-in-law of Edward TV., and who by 
that monarch was confirmed Duke of Suffolk, and upon the decease of 
his s. Edmund Earl of Suffolk was again Forfeited. 



DE LA VAL. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. Guy de la Val ; ob. 1199. His successor was, 

II. John. Gilbert de la Val ; living 1216. 

III. Hen. III. Eustace de la Val ; living 1257. 

IV. Edw. I. Hugh de la Val; ob. ante 1301. 



DELAVAL. 
Baron. 

I. 1786. Sir John Hussey Delaval, 1st Bart., 1st Baron Delaval in Ireland, 
presumed to have been descended from the Barons above mentioned, cre- 
ated Baron Delaval of Seaton Delaval, co. Northumberland, 21 Aug. 1786 ; 
ob. May 1808, s. p. m., when his honours became Extinct. 

DE LA WARDE. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 1. f Robert de la Warde, summ. to Pari, from 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 

1299, to 3 Nov. 34 Edw. I. 1306 ; ob. 1307. 

II. 1324. 2. Simon de la Warde, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 30 Dec. 18 

Edw. II. 1324, to 24 July, 8 Edw. III. 1334, but not afterwards, nor were 
any of his posterity, in whose descendants and representatives tliis Barony 
is probably now vested. 

DE LA WARR. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 1. f Roger la Warr, summ. to Pari, from 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, 

to 16 June, 4 Edw. II. 1311 ; he was likewise summoned 
8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, but it is doubtful if that writ was a 
regular summ. to Pari, (vide Clyvedon) ; m. Clarice eldest 
dau. and coh. of John I. Baron Tregoz ; ob. 1320. 

II 1307. 2. John la Warr, s. and h. set. 40, summ. to Pari, from 26 Aug. 

1 Edw. II. 1307, to 26 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342 ; ob. 1347. 

III. 1362. 3. Roger la Warr, grands, andh. jet. 18, being s. and h. of John la 

Warr (ob. v. p.) eldest s. of the last Baron, summ. to Pari. 
14 Aug. 36 Edw. III. 1362, and 1 June, 37 Edw. III. 1363 ; 
died in Gascony 1370. 

IV. 1371. 4. John la Warr, s. and h. set. 26, summ. to Pari, from 8 Jan. 

44 Edw. 111. 1371, to 5 Nov. 21 Rich. II. 1397 ; ob. 1398, 
s. p. 

V 1399. 5.^Thomas la Warr, bro. and h. set. 40, summ. to Pari, from 

19 Aug. 23 Rich. II. 1399, to 7 Jan. 4 Hen. VI. 1426, and, 
being a priest, by the appellation of " Magistro Thomae de la 
Warr ;" ob. 1426, s. p. 

VI. 1427. 6.-^Ke<;ixald V. 5th Baron West, neph. and h., being s. andh. 
(Thomas Baron West his elder bro. having died s. p.) of Tho- 
mas Baron West by Joan, dau. of Roger III. Baron, and half- 



150 



DE LA WARR. 



Barons by Writ. 

sist. and h. of Thomas the last Baron la Warr, summ. to Pari, 
as " Reginaldo la Warre, Chl'r," from 15 July, 5 Hen. VI. 
1427, and by that designation, or as " Reginaldo West, Chl'r," 
to 23 Sept. 28 Hen. VI. 1449 ; ob. 1451. 

VII. 1456. 7. Richard West, s. and h. set. 19, summ. to Pari, from 22 Jan. 

34 Hen. VI. 1456, to 19 Aug. 12 Edw. IV. 1472, as " Ric'o 
West, Militi," or as " Ric'o West, Chevl'r ;" ob. 1476. 

VIII. 14S2. 8. ^Thomas West, s. and h. get. 19, summ. to Pari, from 15 Nov. 

22 Edw. IV. 1482, to 15 Apr. 14 Hen. VIII. 1523, 1 K.G. ; ob. 
1525. 

IX. 1525. 9. Thomas West, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 3 Nov. 21 Hen. 
VIII. 1529, to 14 Aug. 1 Mary, 1553, K.G. ; ob. 1554, s. p., when the 
Barony fell into Abeyance between the daughters and coheirs of Sir Owen 
West his half-bro., of whom Mary m. 1st, Sir Adrian Poynings, Knt., m by 
whom she had three daughters, Elizabeth, Mary, and Anne ; and 2ndly, 
Sir Richard Rogers, Knt., and as she became eventually the sole h. of 
her father, the Barony of la Warr, as well as that of West, created by the 
writ of summons to Thomas West in 25 Feb. 16 Edw. III., must be 
considered to be vested in the descendants and representatives of the said 
Mary. 

It is a singular fact that, in the proceedings on this Barony, temp. 
Elizabeth, no allusion is made to this Mary or her descendants ; and 
the last Report of the Committee of the House of Lords on the Dignity 
of a Peer of the Realm is also silent on the subject of the issue of the said 
Mary, who left three daughters, and whose descendants still exist. 



Barons. 
1570. 1. 



William West, s. and h. of Sir George West, 2nd s. of Thomas 
VIII. Baron la Warr by his 2nd wife, and half-bro. of Thomas 
the last Baron. Having attempted to poison his said half- 
uncle, he was by Act of Pari. 2 Edw. VI. disabled from suc- 
ceeding him in honours and estate ; he is said to have been 
created Baron la Warr, to him and his heirs male, by patent 
5 Feb. 1570, and took his seat as junior Baron, in which place 
he sat in the House until his death. d He was first summ. to 
Pari. 8 May 14 Eliz. 1572, and continued to be so summoned 
until 19 Feb. 35 Eliz. 1592 ; he was also restored in blood ; 
ob. 1595. 



1 The Writs of Summons were constantly 
addressed to the Lord la Warr from the 
22 Edw. IV. to the 1 Hen. VIII. by the 
name of '' Richardo West, Chevr," " Ric'o 
West, Militi," or " Richardo West de la 
Warre, Chevr ;" but as it is certain that 
Richard West Lord la Warr died on the 
10 March, 16 Edw. IV. 1476 (Esch. eod. 
ann.), it was clearly a mistake. In the 1 
Hen. VIII. the error was corrected, and from 
that year until the death of Thomas Lord la 
Warr, he was summoned by his proper names. 

m This Sir Adrian Poynings considered that 
his issue had, in right of their mother, a 
right to the Barony, and in the 9 Eliz. 1567 
a case was prepared in which that claim 
was urged; but the heralds of that day, 
upon what principle it is impossible now to 
say, were of a different opinion. 



n The late Francis Townsend, Esq., Wind- 
sor Herald, in a MS. note upon the Barony 
of La Warr, in which he has noticed the sin- 
gular circumstance pointed out iu the text, 
observes that he had never seen any Letters 
Patent conferring the dignity upon this Wil- 
liam, and that he was of opinion none ever 
passed ; in which case the Barony of which 
he was possessed must have been created 
by the Writ of Summons in 14 Eliz. Dug- 
dale cites no satisfactory authority for this 
Patent ; but Sir Edward Walker (MS. WQ 89) 
gives an account of the ceremony of his cre- 
ation on Shrove Tuesday, 5 Feb. 1569, at 
Hampton Court Palace, on which occasion 
Garter delivered his Letters Patent to the 
Lord Chamberlain, who delivered them to 
the Queen. No enrolment of the Patent is 
however to be found. 



DE L'ISLE — DE LONGUEVILLE. 



151 



II. 



Barons. 
1595. 



III. 
IV. 
V. 
VI. 



1602. 
1618. 
1628. 

1687. 



Thomas West, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 14 Oct. 39 Eliz. 1597 ; 
he claimed the precedency of the ancient Barony in 1597, when 
the House of Lords decided that the disability of his father 
was personal only, operating against his said father for his life, 
but not affecting the petitioner : that the acceptance of a new 
creation could not injure the claimant, but that on the death 
of the said William, the old and new dignities descended to- 
gether to the petitioner, and that the old should be preferred ; 
and on 14 Nov. 1597 he was accordingly placed in the prece- 
dency of the ancient Barony ;° ob. 1602. 

Thomas West, s. and h. ; ob. 1618. 

Henry West, s. and h. ; ob. 1628. 

Charles West, s. and h. ; ob. 1687. 

John West, s. and h. ; ob. 1723. 



VII. 1723.— I. 



Earls. 
1761. 



7. John AVest, s. and h., created Viscount Cantelupe 
and Earl de la Warr 18 Mar. 1761, K.B. ; ob. 
1766. 

VIII. 1766. — II. 1766. 8. John West, s. and h. ; ob. 1777. 

IX. 1777. — III. 1777. 9. William Augustus West, s. and h. ; ob. 1783 

unm. 

X. 1783. — IV. 1783. 10. John Bichard West, bro. and h. ; ob. 1795. 

XI. 1795. — V. 1795. 11. George John Sackville- West, s. and h., assumed 
the surname of Sackville by licence 30 Oct. 1843, present Earl de la Warr, 
Viscount Cantelupe, and Baron de la Warr.P =p 

DE L'ISLE AND DUDLEY. 

Barons. 

I. 1835. 1, Philip Charles Sidney, s. of Sir John Shelley-Sidney, Bart., 

created Baron de LTsle and Dudley of Penshurst, co. Kent, 13 
Jan. 1835, G.C.H. ; ob. 4 Mar. 1851. 

II. 1851. 2. Philip Sidney-Foulis, s. and h., took the surname and arms of 

Foulis by licence, present Baron de LTsle and Dudley, &c. =p 

S' 

DE LONGUEVILLE. Vide Longueville. 



° Vide Report of the Lords' Committee to 
report on the Dignity of a Peer of the Realm, 
p. 25. After this decision, it may appear 
presumptuous to have hazarded the assertion 
in the last page, that the ancient Barony is 
vested in the representatives of Mary, the 
dau. and heir of Sir Owen West, uncle of 
this Baron ; but the case is analogous to that 
of the Barony of Percy, in which instance, 
although Algernon Seymour (afterwards Duke 
of Somerset) was summ. to Pari, in 1722 as 
Baron Percy, on the supposition that he had 
succeeded his mother in the ancient Barony, 
and although he was placed in and sat with 
the precedency of the ancient Barons Percy, 
yet it is held by the most competent judges 
of the subject, that the only Barony of Percy 



to which his descendants, the Dukes of North- 
umberland, have succeeded, is that created 
by the Writ of 1722, the said Algernon Sey- 
mour, Lord Percy, having erroneously had 
the precedency of the old Barony assigned to 
him. Vide Percy. 

p See a note to the last page, but even if no 
Patent were granted of the Barony in 15G9-70, 
the present Earl is Baron de la Wan under the 
Writ of Summons of 13 Eliz., lie being heir 
general as well as heir male of William West, 
to whom that Writ was addressed. If ever 
it should happen that the heir general is not 
the heir male of the said William, a question 
of great difficulty will in all probability arise 
on the succession of the Barony. 



152 DE MAULEY — DENNY. 



DE MAULEY. 
Barons. 

I. 1838. 1. William Francis Spencer Ponsonby, 3rd s. of Frederick 3rd Earl 

of Bessborough in Ireland, created Baron De Mauley of Canford, 
co. Dorset, 10 July 1838 ; ob. 16 May 1855. 

II. 1855. 2. Charles Frederick Ashley Cooper Ponsonby, s. and h., present 

Baron de Mauley. ^= 

DENBIG-H. 
Baron. 

I. 1563. Kobert Dudley, created Baron Denbigh 28 Sept. 1563 to him and 
the heirs of his body, created Earl of Leicester 29 Sept. 1563 to him and 
the heirs male of his body, K.G. ; ob. 1588, s. p. l., when his honours 
became Extinct. 

Earls. 

I. 1622. 1. William Feilding, 1st Baron and Viscount Feilding, created 

Earl of the County of Denbigh 14 Sept. 1622 ; slain ex parte 
Eegis 1643. 

II. 1643. 2. Basil Feilding, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. 21 Mar. and 

took his seat 24 Mar. 1627, in his father's barony of Feilding, 
created Baron St. Liz with a special remainder 2 Feb. 1664 ; 
ob. 1675, s. p. 

III. 1675. 3. William Feilding, neph. and h., being s. and h. of George Earl 

of Desmond in Ireland, younger s. of William 1st Earl of 
Denbigh, Earl of Desmond in Ireland ; ob. 1685. 

IV. 1685. 4. Basil Feilding, s. and h., Earl of Desmond in Ireland ; ob. 

1717. 

V. 1717. 5. William Feilding, s. and h., Earl of Desmond in Ireland ; ob. 

1755. 

VI. 1755. 6. Basil Feilding, s. and h., Earl of Desmond in Ireland ; ob. 

1800. 



VII. 1800. 7. William Basil Percy Feilding, grands, and h., being s. and h. 
of William Eobert Feilding (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Earl, present 
Earl of Denbigh, Viscount and Baron Feilding, and Baron St. Liz in Eng- 
land, also Earl of Desmond, &c, in Ireland. =^= 

Y 

DENMAN. 
Barons. 

I. 1834. 1. Sir Thomas Denman, Lord Chief Justice of the Queen's Bench, 

created Baron Denman of Dovedale, co. Derby, 28 Mar. 1834 ; 
ob. 22 Sept. 1854. 

II. 1854. 2. Thomas Denman, s. and h., present Lord Denman. = 

DENNY. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1604. 1. Edward Denny, summ. to Pari, from 27 Oct. 2 Jac. I. 1604, to 

17 May, 1 Car. I. 1625, as " Edwardo Denny de Waltham, 
Chl'r," created Earl of Norwich 24 Oct. 1626 ; ob. 1636, s. p. m., 
when that Earldom became Extinct, but the Barony devolved 
on his grands, and heir, 

II. 1636. 2. James Hay, Earl of Carlisle, only surviving child of James Hav, 

1st Earl of Carlisle, by Honora, only child of the last Baron ; ob. 1660, s. p., 
when this Barony became Extinct. 



DERBY. 



153 



DERBY. 



Earls. 
1138. 



III. 


Hen. II. 


3. 


IV. 


Hen. II. 


4. 


V. 


Rich. I. 


5. 



VI 



1. Robert de Ferrers, Lord of Tutluiry, q created Earl of Derby 
by King Stephen 1138 ; r ob. 1139. 

II. Steph. 2. Robert de Ferrers, s. and h., living 1141, styled himself 
" Comes Junior de Ferrariis," and " Comes Junior de Notting- 
ham." 

William de Ferrers, s. and h., living 1167. 

Robert de Ferrers, s. and h., living 1172. 

William de Ferrers, s. and h., ousted of his Earldom of 
Derby and Lordship of Nottingham by King Richard I. but 
soon afterwards restored ; ob. 1191 at the siege of Acre. 

1191. 6. William de Ferrers, s. and h., had a special restitution of 
this Earldom from King John by charter 7 June 1199, by 
grant of the 3rd pemiy and girding with the sword ; ob. 1246. 

VII. 1246. 7. William de Ferrers, s. and h., Lord of Chartley jure matris ; 

ob. 1254. 

VIII. 1254. 8. Robert de Ferrers, s. and h., excepted from the terms of 

the dictum of Kenilworth and probably attainted of high 
treason 1266 ; ob. 1278. The lands of this Earl were con- 
ferred on Edmund Plantagenet son of King Henry III., 
afterwards created Earl of Leicester and Lancaster, to whom 
many writers of authority attribute the title of Earl of 
Derby, but Dugdale expressly states, " he really had nothing 
of the title of Earl of Derby." Vide note q . 

Henry Plantagenet, s. and h. of Henry Earl of Lancaster, 
created Earl of Derby, "to hold to him and his heirs," 
16 Mar. 1337, v. p., succeeded his father as Earl of Lan- 
caster and Leicester 1345, Avas created Earl of Lincoln 
20 Aug. 1349, and Duke of Lancaster 6 Mar. 1351, E.G. ; 
ob. 1361, s. p. m. Blanch his dau. and ultimately sole heir 
m. John of Gaunt Earl of Richmond, afterwards created 
Duke of Lancaster, " who, amongst the rest of his great 
titles," says Dugdale, " used that, and not in respect of any 
formal creation, but because he had married Blanch above 
mentioned." 

Henry Plantagenet, s. and h. apparent of John of Gaunt by 
the said Blanch, styled Earl of Derby 1380, v. p., " merely 
as he was that Duke's eldest son," afterwards Duke of Lan- 
caster, succeeded as King Henry IV,, when this Earldom 
merged in the Crown. 



IX 



1337. 



X. 



1380. 



XL 



1485. 



XII. 1504. 



XIII. 1521. 



1. Thomas Stanley, 2nd Baron Stanlev, created Earl of Derby 

27 Oct. 1485, Lord High Constable, K.G. ; ob. 1504. 

2. Thomas Stanley, grands, and h., being s. and h. of George 

Stanley, K.G. (who was summ. to Pari, as Baron Strange of 
Knockyn, in right of his wife Jane, dau. and h. of John 
Lord Strange of Knockyn, and died v. p.), eldest s. of the 
last Earl ; ob. 1521. 

3. Edward Stanley, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1574. 



i From the chief residence of the Earls of 
Derby having been at the castle of Tutbury, 
they have been sometimes called Earls of 
Tutbury, and also Earls Ferrers from their 
surname : T liomas Plantagenet, s. and h. of 
Edmund Plantagenet above named, styles 
himself upon his seal, Earl of Lancaster, 
Leicester, and Ferrers. 



r John Prior of Hexham, the continuator 
of Simon the Monk of Durham, says that 
Stephen, elated with his successes after the 
Battle of the Standard, gave to Robert de 
Ferrers the Earldom of Derby, at the same 
time that be bestowed the County of York 
on William de Albemarle. 



154 



DE EEEDE — DE SAUMAEEZ. 



XV. 

XVI. 
XVII 



1592. 

1594. 
1642. 



XVIII. 1651. 

XIX. 1672. 



Earls. 
XIV. 1574. 4. Henry Stanley, s. and h. ; lie m. Margaret, only child of 
Henry 2nd Earl of Cumberland by Alianore, dau. and coh. 
of Charles Brandon Duke of Suffolk, by Mary Queen Dow- 
ager of France, and sister and ultimately coh. of King Henry 
VIIL, K.G. ; summ. to Pari, by writ v. p. 1558 as Lord 
Strange of Knockyn; ob. 1592. 

5. Ferdinando Stanley, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ v. p. 
as Lord Strange of Knockyn, and was present in Pari. 1588 ; 
ob. 1594, s. p. m. 

6. William Stanley, bro. and h., K. G. ; ob. 1642. 

7. James Stanley, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ v. p. as 
Baron Strange of Knockyn, 17 Feb. 1628, K.G. ; beheaded 
1651. 

8. Charles Stanley, s. and h. ; ob. 1672. 

9. William George Eichard Stanley, s. and h. ; ob. 1702, 
s. p. m. 

10. James Stanley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1736, s. p., when 

11. Sir Edward Stanley, 5th Bart., succeeded as next h. male, 
— being s. and h. of Sir Thomas Stanley, s. and h. of Sir Ed- 

ward Stanley, Barts., s. of Sir Thomas, s. of Sir Edward, 
s. of Henry, s. of Sir James Stanley — 3rd s. of George Stan- 
ley, Baron Strange, K.G. (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of Thomas 
XL 1st Earl ; ob. 1776. 

XXII. 1776. 12. Edward Smith-Stanley, grands, and h., being s. and h. of 

James Lord Stanley (who took the name and arms of Smith 
in addition to those of Stanley 1749) ; ob. 21 Oct. 1834. 

XXIII. 1834. 13. Edward Smith-Stanley, s. and h. ; created Baron Stanley of 

Bickerstaff, co. Pal. Lane, 22 Dec. 1832, K.G. ; ob. 30 June 
1851. 

XXIV. 1851. 14. Edward Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, s. and h., summ. to Pari, 
v. p. 4 Nov. 1844, and placed in his father's Barony of Stanley of Bicker- 
staff, present Earl of Derby, Baron Stanley, and a Bart. =p 

Y 
DE REEDE. See Eeede. 



XX. 
XXI. 



1702. 
1736. 



Earls. 



DE ROS. See Eoos. 



DEEWENTWATEE. 



I. 1688. 1. Sir Francis Eadclyffe, Bart., created Baron Tyndale, co. North- 

umberland, Viscount Eadclyffe and Langley, co. Cumberland, 
and Earl of Derwentwater, co. Cumberland, 7 Mar. 1688 ; ob. 
1697. 

II. 1697. 2. Francis Eadclyffe, s. and h. ; ob. 1705. 

III. 1705. 3. James Eadclyffe, s. and h. ; beheaded and attainted 1716, when 

all his honours became Forfeited. 



I. 



DE SAUMAEEZ. 
Barons. 

1831. 1. Sir James Saumarez, G.C.B., created Baron de Saumarez in the 
Island of Guernsey 15 Sept. 1831 ; ob. 9 Oct. 1836. 
11. 1836. 2. James Saumarez, s. and h., present Baron dc Saumavez. = 



DESPENCER. 



155 



Barons by Tenure. 
I. Will. I. 



DESPENCER. 



II. Hen. I. 

III. Hen. II. 


2 
3 


IV. Eich. I. 

V. John. 

VI. Hen. III. 


4 

5 
6 


Barons by Writ 
I. 1264. 


1 



1. Hugh (s. of Thurstan), Despencer, or Steward, to King Henry 
I., living 1105. 

2. Thurstan Despencer, s. and h. 

Walter Despencer, s. and h., to whom King Henry II. gave 
Wordy and Stanlegh, co. Gloucester; ob. s. p. 

Almaric Despencer, bro. and h. 

Thurstan Despenceb., s. and h., living 1228. 

Geoffrey Despencer, s. and h., held the lands possessed by 
Hugh, s. of Thurstan, in 1105 ; ob. 1251. 

Hugh Despencer, presumed on the authority of Glover, 
Somerset Herald, to have been s. and h. of the last Baron ; 
summ. to Pari. 14 Dec. 49 Hen. III. 1264, as " Hugh le 
Despencer, Justic' Angliae ;" killed at the battle of Evesham, 
1265. 

II. 1295. 2.^Hugh Despencer, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 23 June, 

23 Edw. I. 1295, to 14 Mar. 15 Edw. II. 1322 ; he was also 
summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, but for the reasons assigned 
under Clyvedon, it is doubtful if that writ was a regular 
summons to Pari. ; created Earl of Winchester 10 May 1322 ; B 
hanged 9 Oct. 1326, and, having been declared a traitor by 
Parliament, his honours became Forfeited. 

III. 1314. 3. Hugh Despencer, s. and h., having m. Eleanor, sister and coh. 

of Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester, and niece of King 
Edw. II., was summ. to Pari, as " Hugoni le Despencer, 
Juniori," from 29 July, 8 Edw. II. 1314, to 10 Oct. 19 Edw. 

II. 1325 ; hanged 29 Nov. 1326, and having been declared a 
traitor by Act of Parliament, his honours became Forfeited. 

IV. 1338. 4.^ Hugh Despencer, s. and h. set. 29, 11 Edw. III., summ. to 

Pari, from 15 June, 12 Edw. III. 1338, to 1 Jan. 22 Edw. 

III. 1349 ; ob. 1349, s. P. 

V. 1357. 5. ^Edward Despencer, neph. and h., being s. and h. of Edward 

le Despencer (who died 1342, leaving Edward his s. and h. 
set. 6), next bro. to the last Baron ; he m. Elizabeth, dau. and 
sole heir of Bartholomew II. Baron Burghersh, summ. to Pari, 
from 15 Dec. 31 Edw. in. 1357, to 6 Oct. 46 Edw. III. 1372, 
K.G. ; ob. 1375. 

VI. 1396. 6. Thomas Despencer, s. and h. a?t. 2, summ. to Pari. 30 

Nov. 20 Rich. II. 1396, and 18 July, 21 Rich. II. 1397, 
obtained the reversal of the Act declaring his ancestors Hugh 
II. 3rd, and Hugh III. 4th Barons traitors in 1397 ; created 
Earl of Gloucester 29 Sept. 1397, degraded in Parliament 
1399, and beheaded by the rabble 1400, and, being attainted, 
his honours became Forfeited. 

Richard Despencer, his s. and h., died 1414, infra a?tatem, 
leaving Isabel his sister his sole h. ; she m. 1st Richard 
Beauchamp Earl of Worcester and Baron Bergavenny, by 
whom she had an only child Elizabeth, who carried the Barony 
of Bergavenny to her husband Edward Neville ; the said 



s The words of creation are "ipsumque 
Hugonem ^ladin cinximus in Comitem Wyu- 
ton." There is no extension of the dignify, 



hut the annuity given with it is extended to 
Hugh le Despencer, junr., son of the grantee. 



15G 



DESPENCER. 



Barons by Writ. 



VII. 1604. 8. 



VI1J. 1626. 9. 



IX. 
X. 

XL 
XII. 

XIII. 



1628. 
1665. 
1691. 
1693. 
1699. 



Isabel m. 2ndly Richard Beauchanip XIV. 12th Earl of War- 
wick, by whom she had Henry and Ann, who became the wife 
of Richard Earl of Salisbury and whose issue still exists, and 
died in 1440; Henry her s. became XV. 13th Earl, and I. 
Duke of Warwick, and died 1445, s. p. m., and Ann his only 
child died s. p. in 1449. On the reversal of the attainder of 
Thomas VI. 6th Baron Despencer, 1 Edw. IV. 1461, this 
Barony with that of Burghersh fell, according to modern 
decision, into Abeyance between the descendants of the 
above-mentioned Isabel by both her husbands* and continued 
in that state, subject of course to the effect of the different 
attainders of the coheirs, until 1604, when it was allowed and 
confirmed to Mary, dau. and h. of Henry Neville VI., 4th 
Baron Bergavenny, and wife of Sir Thomas Fane, and who 
was a coh. of the dignity. 

Mary Neville, wife of Sir Thomas Fane, who, after the extra- 
ordinary proceedings with regard to the claims of herself and 
Edward Neville relative to the Baronies of Abergavenny and 
Despencer, concerning which see observations under the former 
title, obtained a confirmation of the Barony of Despencer by 
patent dated 25 May 1604 ; ob. 1626. 

Francis Fane, s. and h., created Baron Burghersh and Earl of 
Westmoreland 29 Dec. 1624 ; ob. 1628. 

Mildmay Fane, s. and h., Earl of Westmoreland ; ob. 1665. 

Charles Fane, s. and h., Earl of Westmoreland ; ob. 1691, s. p. 

Vere Fane, bro. and h., Earl of Westmoreland ; ob. 1693. 

Vere Fane, s. and h., Earl of Westmoreland; ob. 1699 unm. 



Thomas Fane, 
s. p. 



bro. and h., Earl of Westmoreland; ob. 1736, 



XIV. 1736. 15. John Fane, bro. and h., Earl of Westmoreland ; ob. 1762, s. p., 

when this Barony fell into Abeyance between the heirs of 
his sisters — Mary wife of Sir Francis Dashwood, Bart., and 
Catherine who m. William Paul, Esq. — until 1763, when the 
Crown terminated the Abeyance in favour of, 

XV. 1763. 16. Sir Francis Dashwood, the elder coh. ; he being s. and h. of Sir 

Francis Dashwood by the said Mary, eldest sister and coh. 
of the last Baron, obtained a confirmation of the Barony 
19 April 1763; ob. 1781, s. p., when the Barony again fell 
into Abeyance between Rachel, sister of the last Baron widow 
of Sir Robert Austen, Bart., and the heirs of Lady Catherine 
Paul, dau. of Thomas Earl of Westmoreland XIII. 14th Baron ; 
on Lady Austen's death in 1788, s. p., the Abeyance ter- 
minated, and the Barony devolved on, 

XVI. 1788. 17. Sir Thomas Stapleton, 3rd Bart., he being s. and h. of Sir 

Thomas, eldest surviving s. of Sir William Stapleton by 
Catherine, dau. and sole h. of William Paul, Esq., by Lady 



1 If the proceedings relative to the claim 
of Lady Fane in 1603 admit of any positive 
inference, it would appear that it was then 
held that the Barony of Despencer had been 
solely vested in Elizabeth, the daughter of 
Isabel by her first husband Richard Earl of 
Worcester, but had it not been for the opera- 
tion of the attainder of Thomas VI. 6th Baron 
Despencer, it would, agreeably to existing 
doctrines, have devolved, on Isabel's death in 



1440, upon her s. and h. Henry Duke of 
Warwick. When the attainder was reversed, 
Ann, wife of Richard Earl of Salisbury, was 
the other coheir, and under all the circum- 
stances it must probably be considered that 
the Barony of Despencer was forfeited in 
1400 ; that it was revived and fell into Abey- 
ance in 1461 ; and that that Abeyance was 
terminated in favour of the eldest coheir, 
Mary Lady Fane, in 1603. 



DESPENCER — DEVON. 157 

Barons by Writ. 

Catherine Fane, dan. and ultimately sole h. of Thomas Earl 

of Westmoreland XIII. 14th Baron ; oh. 1 Oct. 1831, when 

the Barony devolved on, 

XVII. 1831. 18. Mary Frances Elizabeth, dau. and h. of Thomas Stapleton 

(oh. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron; m. 29 July 1845 Evelyn Viscount 

Falmouth ; present Baroness le Despencer. =p 

DESPENCER (of .... ) 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1387. 1. ^J Philip Despencer, presumed to have heen of the preceding family, 
summ. to Pari, from 17 Dec. 11th Rich. II. 1387, to 3 Oct. 2 Hen. IV. 1400 ; 
oh. 1423, s. p. m. He m. Elizabeth, dau. of Robert Baron Tihetot, and coh. 
of that Barony, by whom he had Margery, his sole dau. and h., who m. 
Roger Wentworth, Esq., whose great-great-grands, and h., Sir Thomas 
Wentworth, was summ. to Pari, as Baron Wentworth 21 Hen. VIII., and 
whose coheirs and representatives are consequently also coheirs of this 
Barony and of the Barony of Tihetot. Vide Tibetot. 

DE TABLEY. 
Barons. 

I. 1826. 1. Sir John Fleming Leicester, Bart, of Ireland, created Baron De 

Tahley of Tabley House, co. Chester, 10 July 1826 ; oh. 18 June 
1827. 

II. 1827. 2. George Fleming Warren, who by licence 18 Feb. 1832, took 

the surname and arms of Warren only, s. and h., present Baron De Tabley 
and a Baronet of Ireland. ^= 

DEVEREUX. 

Earon by Writ. 

I. 1299. 1. William Devereux, summ. to Pari, as " William de Ebroicis " 6 

Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, but never afterwards. Dugdale takes no 
notice in his Baronage of this Baron having been so summoned ; 
none of his descendants were again summ. to Pari, until 1384, 
when, 

II. 13e4. John Devereux, who appears to have been his grands., was summ. 

to Pari, from 28 Sept. 8 Rich. II. 1384, to 23 Nov. 16 Rich. II. 1397, K.G. ; 
ob. 1394, leaving John Devereux his s. and h., who died in 1397, infra 
astatem, s. p., leaving Joan his sister (who died 10 Hen. IV.), wife of Walter 
Lord Fitz-AV alter, his h., when this Barony became united to that of Fitz- 
Walter. — Vide Fitz- Walter. 

DEVON" or DEVONSHIRE. 

Baldwin, who at the Domesday Survey was Sheriff of Devonshire, and possessed 
of 159 lordships within the county, is said to have been a younger s. of Richard 
Fitz-Gilbert (vide Clare); he was Governor of the Castle of Exeter, and 
father of, 

Earls. 
I. Hen. I. 1. Richard de Redvers, who obtained the Barony of Okehamp- 

ton, co. Devon, from King William II. and King Henry I., 
(as stated in the book of the Abbey of Ford upon the autho- 
rity of Camden), " in comitem Devonian, tertium denarium 
annul exitus ejusdem Comitatus illi concedendo, eum conse- 
quenter creavit; ob. 1137." 



in. 


1155. 


IV. 


1161. 


v. 


1184. 


VI. 


1184. 



158 DEVON. 

Earls. 
II. 1137. 2. Baldwin de Eedvers, called sometimes Earl of Exeter from 

his residence in that city, s. and h. ; ob. 1155. 

3. Eichakd de Eedtees, s. and h. ; ob. 1161. 

4. Baldwin* de Eedveks, s. and h. ; ob. before 1184, s. p. 

5. Eichaed de Eedveks, bro. and h. ; ob. 1184, s. p. 

6. "William de Eedveks, alias de Vernona (from the place of his 
birth in Normandy), uncle and h., being bro. of Eichard III. 

Earl ; ob. 1216. 

VII. 1216. 7. Baldwin de Eedvers, called also Earl of Exeter and de L'Isle, 

grands, and h., u being s. and h. of Baldwin (ob. v. p.), eldest 
s. of the last Earl, knighted and invested with the lordship 
of the Isle of Wight 25~Dec. 1240 ; ob. 1245. 

VIII. 1245. 8. Baldwin de Eedveks, called also Earl of Exeter, s. and h., 

b. 1235; ob. 1262, s. p. 

IX. 1262. 9. Isabel de Eedveks, sister and h., b. 1237, styled herself 

Countess of Devon; she m. William de Fortibus Earl of 
Albemarle, who by some writers is erroneously called Earl of 
Devon, as he died, according to the best authorities, before 
Baldwin the last Earl ; their only issue that survived was 
Avelina, their dau. and at length h., m. Edmund Flanta- 
genet Earl of Lancaster, and died in 1273, s. p. ; the Countess 
Isabel ob. 1293. T 

X. 1335. 1. Hugh Couktenay, I. 5th Baron Courtenay, s. and h. of Hugh, 

eldest s. of John, s. and h. of Eobert de Courtenay by Mary, 
sister of Baldwin de Eedvers (ob. v. p.), father of Baldwin 
7th Earl of Devon, and grandfather to the said Isabel, having 
represented to the King that he was, as h. to the said Isabel, 
seised of a certain annual sum as the third penny of the 
county, but that the same was refused payment by the 
Sheriff, the King, by his writ 24 Sept. 1334, having directed 
investigation to be made, declared the said Hugh to be Earl 
of Devon 22 Feb. following ; ob. 1340. 

XI. 1340. 2. Hugh Courtenay, s. and h., set. 33; ob. 1377. 

XII. 1377. 3. Edwakd Courtenay, grands, and h., set. 20, being s. and h. 

of Edward Courtenay (ob. v. p.), 2nd son (Sir Hugh Courtenay, 
K.G., the eldest son, having died v. p., and his only son vita, 
avi) of the last Earl ; EarlMarshal 1385 ; ob. 1419. 

XIII. 1419. 4. Hugh Courtenay, s. and h., set. 30; ob. 1422. 

XIV. 1422. 5. Thomas Courtenay, s. and h., get. 8 ; ob. 1458. 

XV. 1458. 6. Thomas Courtenay, s. and h., set. 26 ; beheaded and attainted 

1461, unm., when his honours became Forfeited. 

XVI. 1469. Humphrey Stafford, Baron of Southwicke, created Earl of 

Devon 17 May 1469,* beheaded 17 Aug. 1469; ob. s.p., 
when his honours became Extinct. 



After the death of this Earl's grand- I winter 1293, in which she styles herself 



father, Foulke de Breaute, who had married 
his mother and was consequently stepfather 
of the Earl, obtained the custody of his heir- 
ship, and by a Writ 19 June 1219 the 
sheriff was directed to pay to him the third 
penny of the County. 

T The Countess Isabel, by a deed dated on 
Monday before the Feast of St. Martin, in the 



" Comitissa Albemarl. et Devon, ac dna In- 
sule," sold to the King the Isle of Wight, 
with the Manors of Christchurch, Lambeth, 
and Salefaukes (Vauxhall in Lambeth) for 
6000 marks of silver : she died the day after 
the execution of the grant. 

* This Patent was annulled by statute 
1 Hen. VII. Pot. Pari. vi. 336. 



DEVONSHIRE. 159 

Earls. 

XVII. 1485. 1. Edward Courtenay, s. and h. of Hugh, eldest son of Hugh 

Courtenay, next bro. of Edward XII. 3rd Earl, created Earl 
of Devon 26 Oct. 1485, to him and the heirs male of his body, 
K.G. ; ob. 1509 ; and as his s. and h. "William Courtenay was 
attainted in 1504, he was incapable of inheriting the dignity. 

XVIII. 1511. 2. William Courtenay, s. and h. of the last Earl, created Earl 

of Devon 10 May 1511 ; he m. Katherine Plantagenet, dau. 
of King Edward P7. ; ob. 9 June 1511. 

XIX. 1511. 3. Henry Courtenay, s. and h., restored in blood and honours 

1511, obtained a reversal of his father's attainder 1512-3, 
and in consequence succeeded to the Earldom of 1485 ; cre- 
ated Marquess of Exeter 18 June 1525, K.G. ; attainted and 
beheaded 1539, when his honours became Forfeited. 

XX. 1553. 4. Edward Courtenay, s. and h., created Earl of Devon 3 Sept. 

1553, to hold to him " et heredibus suis masculis in perpe- 
tuum," and the clause giving a seat in Parliament runs to 
the said EdAvard " et heredes sui masculi " without the usual 
words " de corpore;" restored in blood and honours by Parlia- 
ment 10 Oct. 1553 ; Marquess of Exeter ; ob. 1556, s. p., when 
the Marquessate of Exeter became Extinct, and the Earl- 
dom of Devon remained unclaimed until 1830. 

XXI. 1603. Charles Blount, 8th Baron Mountjoy, created Earl of Devon 

21 July 1603, K.G.; ob. 1606, s. p. l., when this Earldom 
again became Extinct. 

XXII. (XXLX.) 1831. 1. William Courtenay, 3rd Viscount Courtenay, de- 

scended from Sir Philip Courtenay, s. of Hugh XI. 
2nd Earl of Devon ; claimed the Earldom in 1830 
as h. male of Edward XX. 4th Earl of Devon, and 
the House of Lords resolved, 14 Mar. 1831, that 
he had established his claim; ob. unm. at Paris 
26 May 1835, when the Viscounty became Extinct, 
but the Earldom of Devon devolved on his cousin, 

XXIII. (XXX.) 1835. 2. William Courtenay, s. and h. of Henry Reginald 
Courtenay, D.D., Bishop of Exeter, s. of Henry Reginald Courtenay, next 
bro. of William 1st Viscount Courtenay, present Earl of Devon, &c. ^= 

DEVONSHIRE. 

Earls. 

I. 1618. 1. William Cavendish, 1st Baron Cavendish of Hardwick, created 

Earl of Devonshire 7 Aug. 1618 ; ob. 1625. 

II. 1625. 2. William Cavendish, s. and h. ; ob. 1628. 

III. 1628. 3. William Cavendish, s. and h. ; ob. 1684. 

Dukes. 

IV. 1684.— I. 1694. 4. William Cavendish, s. and h., created Marquess of 

Hartington, co. Derbv, and Duke of Devonshire 
12 May 1694, K.G. ; ob. 1707. 

V. 1707.— II. 1707. 5. William Cavendish, s. and h., K.G.; ob. 1729. 

VI. 1729.— III. 1729. 6. William Cavendish, s. and h., Lord Lieut, of Ire- 

land 1737, K.G. ; ob. 1755. 
V' I J . 1755. — IV. 1755. 7. William Cavendish, s. and h., Lord Lieut, of Ire- 
land, 1754, K.G. ; he m. Charlotte, dau. and sole 
heir of Richard Earl of Burlington and Baron 
Clifford, and who was in her own right Baroness 
' lifford under a writ 3 Car. I. 1628; summ. to 
Pari. v. p. 13 June 1751, as Baron Cavendish of 
Hardwick; ob. 1764. 



160 DIGBY — DINAN. 

Earls. Dukes. 

VIIT. 1764. — V. 1764. 8. William Cavendish, s. and h., succeeded his mother 

in the Barony of Clifford in 1754, E.G. ; ob. 1811. 

IX. 1811. — VI. 1811. 9. William Spencer Cavendish, s. and h., present 
Duke and Earl of Devonshire, Marquess of Hartington, Baron Cavendish of 
Hardwick, and Baron Clifford under the writ of 7 Mar. 3 Car. I. 1628, 
K.G., unm. 

DIGBY. 

Barons. 

I. 1618. 1. John Digby, created Baron Digby of Sherborne, co. Dorset, 25 Nov. 
1618, and Earl of Bristol 15 Sept, 1622. Extinct 1698.— Vide 
Bristol. 

Earls. 

IV. 1765. — I. 1790. 1. Henry Digby, 7th Baron Digby in Ireland, descended 

from Sir Bobert Digby, eldest bro. of the above- 
mentioned John Digby 1st Baron Digby and Earl of 
Bristol, created Baron Digby of Sherborne, co. Dorset, 
with remainder, failing his issue male, to the issue 
male of his father, 19 Aug. 1765 ; created Viscount 
Coleshill, co. Warwick, and Earl of Digby, co. Lin- 
coln, 1 Nov. 1790; ob. 1793. 

V. 1793. — II. 1793. 2. Edward Digby, s. and h., present Earl and Baron 

Digby and Viscount Coleshill in England, also Baron 
Digby in Ireland, unm. 

DINAH", DINAJSTT, or DYTSTHAM. 
Barons by Tenure. 
I. Will. I. Foulke de Dinan, Lord of Dinan in Wales. 



I. Hen. I. Alan de Dynant, Lord of Burton, co. Northampton. 



I. Hen. II. 1. Geoffrey Dinant, s. of Oliver, who is presumed to have been 

bro. of Alan above mentioned. 

II. John. 2. Oliver Dinant, bro. of Geoffrey, last Baron ; living 1213. 

III. Hen. I. 3. Geoffrey Dinant, s. and h. ; ob. 1258. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1295. 4. Oliver Dinant, set. 24, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 23 June, 
23 Edw. I. 1295, to 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299; ob. 1298, 
leaving Josce Dinant his s. and h., set. 26. Josce Dinant ob. 
1300, but neither he nor any of his descendants were ever 
summ. to Pari, until his great-great-great-grands, and h., 

IL 1466. 5.^John Dynham, was summ. to Pari, from 28 Feb. 6 Edw. 
IV. 1466, to 16 Jan. L2 Hen. VII. 1497, as " Johanni Dinham de Care 
Dinham, Chl'r," E.G., Lord Treasurer; ob. circa 1509/ S.P.L., when the 
Barony is presumed to have become Extinct, for as no writ of summons 
was issued for so many generations between his ancestor, who was summ. 
in 23 Edw. I., and this Baron, the writ to him in all probability was 
deemed a creation de novo, descendible to the heirs of his body only; what- 
ever claim exists, however, to the Barony created by the writ of 23 Edw. I. 
is now vested in the descendants and representatives of the sisters and co- 
heirs of John the last Baron, who were — Elizabeth, m. 1st Fulk Lord Fitz- 
Warin, and 2ndly Sir John Sapcote ; 2. Joan, m. John Lord Zouche ; 3. 
Margaret, m. Sir John Carew ; 4. Catherine m. Sir Thomas Arundel. 

— — — 1 

7 Dugdale, on the authority of Stow, says that his will was dated 7 Jan. 1505, and 
lie died 17 Hen. VII. 1501 ; but it appears proved 4 May 1509. 



DINEVOR— DONC ASTER. 



101 



DINEVOR. 

Barons. 

I. 1780. 1. William Talbot, 1st Earl Talbot, created 17 Oct, 1780, Baron 

Dinevor of Dinevor, co. Carmarthen, for life, and from and im- 
mediately after his decease the dignity of Baroness Dinevor to 
his only child (by Mary Countess of Talbot, his wife) Cecil, 
widow of George Rice, Esq., and the said dignity of Baron 
Dinevor to her issue male ; ob. 1782, s. p. m. 

II. 1782. 2. Cecil Rice (who assumed the name of De Cardonnel only, by 

licence 21 May 1787), widow of George Rice, Esq., and dau. 
and h. of the last Baron; ob. 1793. 

III. 1793. 3. George Talbot Rice, who having taken the surname of De Car- 

donnel by licence 30 Apr. 1793, discontinued the use of it by 
licence 4 Feb. 1817, s. and h.; ob. 9 Apr. 1852. 

IV. 1852. 4. George Rice Rice-Trevor, took the surname of Trevor in addi- 

tion to and after Rice, by licence 28 Oct. 1824, s. and h., 
present Baron Dinevor. ^= 

DINORBEN. 



Barons. 

I. 1831. 

II. 1852. 



1. William Lewis Hughes, created Baron Dinorben of Kinmel Park, 

co. Denbigh, 10 Sept. 1831 ; ob. 10 Feb. 1852. 

2. William Lewis Hughes, s. and h. ; ob. unm. 6 Oct. 1852, when 

the title became Extinct. 



Viscounts. 



DOlSrCASTER. 



I. 1618. 1. James Hay, 1st Baron Hay of Sauley, created Viscount Don- 

caster, co. York, 5 July 1618, and Earl of Carlisle 13 Sept. 
1622, K.G. ; ob. 1636. 

II. 1636. 2. James Hay, s. and h., Earl of Carlisle; ob. 1660, s. p., when his 

honours became Extinct. 
Earls. 

I. 1663. 1. Sir James Scott, natural s. of King Charles II., was created 

Baron Scott of Tyndale, co. Northumberland, Earl of Doncaster, 
co. York, and Duke of Monmouth 14 Feb. 1663 ; having m. 
Ann, dau. and h. of Francis Scott Earl of Bnccleuch, he and 
his said wife were created Duke and Duchess of Bnccleuch, Earl 
and Countess of Dalkeith, and Baron and Baroness Scott of 
Whitchester and Eskdale in Scotland, 20 Apr. 1663, K.G. ; 
attainted and beheaded 1685, when his English honours became 
Forfeited. 

II. 1743. 2. Francis Scott, 3rd Earl of Dalkeith in Scotland, s. and h. of 

James 2nd Earl of Dalkeith, s. and h. of James last Earl of 
Doncaster and Duke of Monmouth, restored to the titles of 
Earl of Doncaster and Baron Scott of Tyndale by Act of Parlia- 
ment 23 Mar. 1743, succeeded his grandmother in the Dukedom 
of Buccleuch in Scotland 1732, K.T. ; ob. 1751. 

III. 1751. 3. Henry Scott, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Francis Scott 

(ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Earl, Duke of Buccleuch in 
Scotland, K.G.; ob. 11 Jan. 1812. 

IV. 1812. 4. Charles William Montagu Scott, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 

by writ 11 Apr. 1807, as " Charles William Montagu Scott 
of Tindall in the county of Northumberland, Chev.," succeeded 
his father as Earl of Doncaster and as Duke of Buccleuch in 
Scotland, K.T.; oh. 20 Apr. 1819. 

M 



102 DORCHESTER — DORMER. 

Earls. 
V. 1819. 5. Walter Francis Montagu-Douglas-Scott, s. and h., Duke of 
Buccleuch and Queensbeny, &c. in Scotland, present Earl of Doncaster and 
Baron Scott of Tyndale in England, K.Gr. =p 

DORCHESTER (of Dorchester, co. Oxford). 
Viscounts. 

I. 1628. Dudley Carlton, 1st Baron Carlton, created Viscount Dorchester 

of Dorchester, co. Oxford, 25 July 1628 ; oh. 1631, s. p., when 
his honours became Extinct. 
Barons. 
I 1786. 1. Sir Guy Carleton, K.B., created Lord Dorchester Baron of Dor- 
chester, co. Oxford, 21 Aug. 1786; ob. 1808. 

II. 1808. 2. Arthur Henry Carleton, grands, and h., being s. and h. of 

Christopher Carleton (ob. v. p.), 3rd son (but eldest that had 
issue) of the last Baron ; ob. 3 June 1826, unm. 

III. 1826. 3. Guy Carleton, cousin and h., being s. and h. of George (ob. 1814) 

6th son (but 2nd that had issue) of Guy the 1st Baron, present Lord Dor- 
chester of Dorchester, co. Oxford. =p 

4 

DORCHESTER (of Dorchester, co. Dorset). 
Marquess. 
I. 1645. Henry Pierrepont, 2nd Earl of Kingston, created Marquess of 

Dorchester, co. Dorset, 25 Mar. 1644-5 ; ob. 1680, s. p. m., when 
the Marquessate became Extinct. 
Countess. 

I. 1686. Catherine Sidley, dau. of Sir Charles Sidley, Bart., and Mistress 

to King James II., created Baroness of Darlington, co. Durham, 
and Countess of Dorchester, co. Dorset, for life, 20 Jan. 1685-6 ; 
she afterwards m. David Colyear, who was created Earl of Port- 
more in Scotland ; ob. 1692, when her honours became Extinct. 
Marquesses. 

II. 1706. 1. Evelyn Pierrepont, 5th Earl of Kingston, neph. of Henry 1st 

Marquess of Dorchester, created Marquess of Dorchester, co. 
Dorset, 23 Dec. 1706, with remainder, failing his issue 
male, to his uncle Gervase 1st Baron Pierrepont of Hanslape, 
created Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull, co. York, 10 Aug. 1715, 
K.G.; ob. 1726. 

III. 1726. 2. Evelyn Pierrepont, grands, and h., being s. and h. of William 

Pierrepont (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Duke ; Duke of 
Kingston ; ob. 1773, s. p. m., when this Marquessate again 
became Extinct. 
Earls. 

I. 1792. 1. Joseph Damer, 1st Baron Milton, created Viscount Milton of 

Milton Abbey, co. Dorset, and Earl of Dorchester, co. Dorset, 
18 May 1792 ; ob. 1798. 

II. 1798. 2. George Damer, s. and h.; ob. 7 Mar. 1808, s. p., when his 

honours became Extinct. 

DORMER. 

Barons. 

I. 1615. 1. Sir Robert Dormer, 1st Bart., created Baron Dormer of Wenge, 

co. Bucks, 9 June 1615 ; ob. 1616. 

II. 1616. 2. Robert Dormer, grands, and h., being s. and h. of William 

Dormer (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Baron, created Vis- 
count Ascott and Earl of Carnarvon 1628 ; killed at the battle 
of Newbury 1643. 



DORSET. 



163 



IV. 1709. 



V 



1712. 5. 



Barons. 

III. 1643. 3. Charles Dormer, s. and h., Earl of Carnarvon; ob. 1709, 

s. P. M., when the Viscounty of Ascott and Earldom of 

Carnarvon became Extinct; but this Barony devolved on, 

Rowland Dormer, cousin and h., being s. and h. of Robert, eldest 

son of Anthony, secondsonof Robert 1st Baron; ob. 1712, unm. 

Charles Dormer, cousin and h., being s. and h. of Charles 
Dormer, eldest son of Robert, third son of Robert 1st Baron ; 
ob. 1728. 

6. Charles Dormer, s. and h. ; ob. 1761, unm. 

7. John Dormer, bro. and h. ; ob. 1785. 

8. Charles Dormer, s. and h. ; ob. 29 Mar. 1804. 

9. Charles Dormer, s. and h. ; ob. 2 Apr. 1819, unm. 

10. John Evelyn Pierrepont Dormer, half-bro., and h. ; ob. 9 
Dec. 1826, s. p. 

11. Joseph Thaddeus Dormer, cousin and h., being the only sur- 
viving son of the Hon. John Dormer, second son who left issue of John 
VII. 7th Baron, present Baron Dormer. 1 =j= 

DORSET. 



VI. 


1728. 


VII. 


1761. 


VIII. 


1785. 


IX. 


1804. 


X. 


1819. 



XI 



1826. 



Earls. 
I. Will. I. 



Osmund, Count of Seez, in Normandy (neph. of William the Con- 
queror, being the son of Henry Count of Seez, by Isabella, dau. 
of Robert Duke of Xormandy), Chancellor to the King, and after- 
wards Bishop of Salisbury ; according to some writers he was 
made Earl of Dorset by his uncle ; ob. 1099. He has been also 
styled Earl of Somerset, where he likewise had possessions ; but 
Vincent, in his remarks upon Brooke, observes that as both counties 
were under one Sheriffs jurisdiction, it was indifferent to the Earl, 
who derived his third penny of the Pleas from a writ addressed to 
the Sheriff, whether he styled himself by one or other of the 
counties under that Sheriffs jurisdiction. 

Some authorities assert that William de Mohun was created 
Earl of Dorset by the Empress Maud ; if such was the fact, the 
dignity does not appear to have been afterwards confirmed : in 
his charter of foundation of Bruton, he styles himself " Will'us de 
Moyne, comes Somersetensis." 

John Plantagenet, afterwards King of England, is also said 
to have had this county given to him amongst the vast possessions 
granted to him by his brother King Richard. 

Marquess. 
I. 1397. John Beaufort, Earl of Somerset, eldest natural s. 
of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, by Katherine 
Swinford, legitimated by Act of Pari. 15 Rich. II. 
(with an express exception against any claim to 
the Throne), a created in Pari. Marquess of Dorset 
29 Sept. 1397, but by a charter bearing date the 
same day he was created Marquess of Somerset ; b - 



z It is a very singular fact that, although 
the Barony of Dormer had existed for above 
two centuries, the loth Lord, who was intro- 
duced and took his seat 28 Veb. 1823, was 
the first Peer that ever sat in the House of 
Lords as Baron Dormer. 

a The words " excepta dignitate regali " 
appear on the Patent Poll, as an interlineation, 
and are presumed to have been so added at 



the time that Henry IV. exemplified the said 
grant in 1407, and in which exemplification 
the words are inserted. 

b Upon reference to the Charter Roll, it 
would appeal- that the enrolment of the crea- 
tion of the Marquessate of Dorset is crossed out 
(with the remark " vacat quia nichil inde actum 
est"), and the new creation of the Marquessate 
of Somerset appears a little lower down. 

M 2 



164 



DORSET. 



TV. 



Earls. Marquesses. 

notwithstanding which, he was always styled Mar- 
quess of Dorset, by which title he was also summ. 
to Pari. ; from this dignity he was degraded by 
Pari. 1 Henry IV., and afterwards only considered 
as Earl of Somerset ; K.G. ; oh. 1410. — Vide 
Somerset. 

II. 1411. Thomas Beaufort, youngest natural s. of John of 

Gaunt, by Katherine Swinford, and bro. of the 
last Marquess, created Earl of Dorset, to him 
and the heirs male of his body, 5 July 1411, and 
Duke of Exeter for life, 18 Nov. 1416, K.G. ; ob. 
27 Dec. 1426, s. p., when his honours became 
Fxtinct. 

III. 1441. — II. 1442. 1. Edmund Beaufort, younger s. of John 1st Marquess, 

and.neph. of Thomas the last Earl, created Earl of 
Dorset 28 (18) c Aug. 1441, created Marquess of Dor- 
set 24 June 1442, and Duke of Somerset 31 Mar. 
1447, K.G. ; slain at the battle of St. Albans, 1455. 

455. — III. 1455. 2. Henry Beaufort, s. and h., Duke of Somerset; 

attainted in the Pari, that met 4 Nov. 1461, restored 
shortly after ; beheaded s. p. l. 3 Apr. 1463, and again 
attainted, whereby his honours became Forfeited. 
— Vide Somerset. 

Edmund Beaufort, his bro. and h., called Duke of 
Somerset, is by some writers said to have been re- 
stored to his brother's honours, but it would appear 
that such assertion is erroneous, for in a procla- 
mation of King Edward IV. 27 Apr. 1471 he is 
spoken of as Edmund Beaufort, calling himself Duke 
of Somerset ; beheaded the same year, s. p. — Vide 
Somerset. 

IV. 1475. 1. Thomas Grey, 8th Baron Ferrers of Groby, created 
Earl of Huntingdon 14 Aug. 1471, which title he is 
said to have resigned d to the King shortly after- 
wards, and was created Marquess of Dorset 18 Apr. 
1475 ; attainted in 1483, when his honours became 
Forfeited, but he was fully restored in blood and 
honours in 1485 ; K.G. ; ob. 1501. 

V. 1501. 2. Thomas Grey, s. and h., K.G.; ob. 1530. 

VI. 1530. 3. Henry Grey, s. and h., created Duke of Suffolk 11 
Oct. 1551, Lord High Constable 1547 ; he in. 
Frances, dau. and coh. of Charles Brandon, Duke of 
Suffolk, by Mary Queen Dowager of France, and 
sister of King Henry VIII. ; K.G. ; attainted and 
beheaded 1554, when his honours became For- 
feited. 

1603. 1. Thomas Sackville, 1st Baron Buckhurst, created Earl of Dorset 
13 Mar. 1603, Lord Treasurer 1599, K.G. ; ob. 1608. 



V. 



c Date ascribed in a Patent of 12 Oct. 
36 Hen. VI. 1457. 

d The word resigned is here used, notwith- 
standing that the Editor is well aware of the 
resolutions of the House of Peers, 1 Feb. 
1640, and 18 June 1678, that no surrender 
of a Patent can be a bar to a claim of the 



dignity so surrendered ; but at the period in 
question such surrenders were not uncommon, 
and it is presumed that the expression is cor- 
rect when applied to a transaction which took 
place nearly two hundred and fifty years be- 
fore such was determined to be the law on 
the subject by the House of Lords. 



VI. 


1608. 


2 


VII. 


1609. 


3, 


VIII. 


1624. 


4 


IX. 


1652. 


5. 


X. 


1677. 


6 



DOUGLAS — DOVER. 165 

Earls. 

Robert Sackville, s. and h. ; ob. 1609. 
Richard Sackville, s. and h. ; ob. 1624, s. p. m. 
Edward Sackville, bro. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1652. 
Richard Sackville, s. and h. ; ob. 1677. 

Charles Sackville, s. and b., created Baron Cranfield of Cran- 
field, co. Bedford, and Earl of Middlesex 4 Apr. 1675, wbicb 
titles were borne by bis maternal uncle Lionel Cranfield, Earl 
of Middlesex, to whom he was h. ; K.G. ; ob. 1706. 

Dukes. 
XL 1706. — I. 1720. 7. Lionel Cranfield Sackville, s. and h., created 

Duke of Dorset 17 June 1720, Lord Lieut, of 
Ireland 1730 and 1750, E.G. ; ob. 1763. 
Charles Sackville, s. and h. ; ob. 1769, s. p. 

John Frederick Sackville, neph. and h., being 
s. and h, of John Philip Sackville, second son oi 
Lionel, 1st Duke ; ob. 1799. 

10. George John Frederick Sackville, s. and h.; 
killed, unm., by a fall from his horse, 14 Feb. 
1815. 

Charles Sackville Germain, 2nd Viscount Sack- 
ville, cousin and h., being s. and h. of George Sackville (who assumed the 
name of Germain, and was created Baron Bolebrooke and Viscount Sack- 
ville), 3rd son of Lionel 1st Duke ; K.G. ; ob. unm. 29 July 1843, when 
all his honours became Extinct. 

Baron DOUGLAS ( of Amesbury ). 

I. 1786. William Douglas, 4th Duke of Queensberry in Scotland, created 
Baron Douglas of Amesbury, co. Wilts, 21 Aug. 1786, K.T. ; 
ob. 1810, s. p., when this Barony became Extinct. 



XII. 


1763.- 


-II. 


1763. 


8 


XIII. 


1769.- 


-III. 


1769. 


9 


xrv. 


1799.- 


-IV. 


1799. 


10 


XV. 


1815.- 


-V. 


1815. 


11 



Barons. 



DOUGLAS (of Douglas). 



II. 


1827. 


2 


III. 


1844. 


3 


IV. 


1848. 


4, 



1790. 1. Archibald Stewart (assumed the name of) Douglas, s. and h. 
of Sir John Stewart, Bart., by Jane, sister and h. of Archibald, 
last Duke of Douglas in Scotland, created Baron Douglas of 
Douglas, co. Lanark, 8 July 1790 ; ob. 26 Dec. 1827. 

Archibald Douglas, s. and h. ; ob. unm. 27 Jan. 1844. 

Charles Douglas, bro. and h. ; ob. unm. 10 Sept. 1848. 

James Douglas, half-bro. and h., present Baron Douglas of 
Douglas. = 

„ DOUGLAS ( of Lochleven ). 

Baron. 

I. 1791. George Douglas, 16th Earl of Morton in Scotland, created Baron 
Douglas of Lochleven, co. Kinross, 11 Aug. 1791, K.T. ; ob. July 1827, 
s. p., when this Barony became Extinct. 

DOURO. 

Barony, 4 Sept. 1809. 

Marquessate, 11 May 1814. — Vide Wellington. 

_ , DOVER. 

Earls. 

I. 1628. 1. Henry Caicey, 4th Baron Hunsdon and 1st Viscount Rochford, 
created Earl of Dover 8 Mar. 1628 ; ob. 1668. 



106 



DOVOR. 



II. 



Earls. 
1G68. 



Baron. 
I. 1685. 

Dukes. 



John Carey, s. and h. ; summ. to Pari. v. p. and took his seat in 
his father's barony of Hunsdon, 27 Nov. 1640 ; oh. 1677, s.p.m., 
when the Viscounty of Rochford and Earldom of Dover became 
Extinct. 

Henry Jermyn, bro. of Thomas 2nd Baron Jermyn, created Baron 
Dover of Dover, co. Kent, 13 May 1685 ; succeeded as Baron 
Jermyn. — Vide Jermyn. 



I. 1708. 1. James Douglas, 2nd Duke of Queensberry in Scotland, created 

26 May 1708 Baron of Rippon, Marquess of Beverley, both co. 
York, and Duke of Dover, to hold to him for life, with remainder 
to his second son Charles Earl of Sol way in Scotland, and to tbe 
heirs male of his body, remainder to his 3rd son George Douglas, 
commonly called Lord George Douglas, and to the 4th, 5th, 
and every other son or sons in like manner ; e K.G. ; ob. 1711. 

II. 1711. 2. Charles Douglas, Earl of Solway in Scotland, second born but 

eldest surviving son of the last Duke ; his elder bro. James having died 
s. p. v. p., he also succeeded to the Dukedom of Queensberry and his 
father's other Scottish honours ; ob. 1778, s. p., when all his English 
honours became Extinct. 



Barons. 

I. 1788. Joseph Yorke, younger s. of Philip 1st Earl of Hardwicke, created 
Baron Dover of Dover, co. Kent, 18 Sept. 1788, K.B. ; ob. 1792, s. p., 
when his honours became Extinct. 



I. 1831. 1. Right Hon. George James Welbore Agar-Ellis (s. and h. ap- 

parent of Henry Ellis, Baron Mendip and Viscount Clifden in 
Ireland), created Baron Dover of Dover, co. Kent, 20 June 1831 ; 
ob. 10 July 1833. 

II. 1833. 2. Henry Agar-Ellis, s. and h., present Baron Dover and Baron 

Mendip ; also Viscount and Baron Clifden in Ireland, unm. 



Barons by Tenure. 



DOVOR. 



II. 

III. 

IV. 



Hen. II 
Hen. II 
Rich. I. 



V. John 



5. 



I. Hen. I. 1. Fulbert de Dovor, Lord of Chilham, co. Kent ; ob. ante 
1139 ; his successor was, 

2. Hugh de Dovor, living 1167 ; ob. s. p. 

3. John de Dovor, neph. and h. ; living 1174. 

4. Fulbert de Dovor, s. and h., built the castle of Chilham ; 
living 1198. 

Robert de Dovor, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1204 ; his dau. and h. 
Roese m. 1. to Nicholas Fitz-Alan ; and 2. to Richard, 
bastard son of King John, called indifferently Richard de 
Warren, de Chilham, and de Dovor, who died ante 1232, 
leaving by the said Roese a s. and h. 
Richard de Dovor, ait. 21, 1271, m. and had issue Richard 

de Dovor, on whose death s. P. Isabel, his sister, became his h. ; she m. 1. 

David do Strabolgi, Earl of Athol, and had issue ; and 2. Alexander 

Baliol (elder bro. of John King of Scotland), Lord of Chilham (jivre uxoris), 

who died s. p. 



VI. Hen. III. 6. 



c This was the first Peerage of the United 
Kingdom: his Grace took his seat in Pari. 
as .t.i English Duke, but Writs of Sum- 
mons were refused to the Duke, of Bran- 
don three years after, and also to Charles, 
2nd Duke of Dover ; nor was the resolution 



of the House on this subject rescinded till 
1782. 

f The accounts given of this family are 
very contradictory : the above is founded 
principally upon a pedigree by Glover, So- 
merset Herald. 



D'OYLY — DUCIE. 167 

D'OYLY. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Robert D'Oyly, Baron of Hocknorton, co.Oxon, and Constable 

of Oxford Castle ; ob. 1090, s. p. m. 

II. Hen. I. 2. Nigell D'Oyly, bio. and h.; ob. 1112. 

III. Steph. 3. Robert D'Oyly, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1150. 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Henry D'Oyly, s. and h., Constable to the King; ob. circa 

1168. 

V. Hen. III. 5. Henry D'Oyly, s. and h., Constable to the King ; ob. 1232, 

s. p. s., leaving bis two sisters bis heirs, of whom Margaret the eldest m. 
Henry de K ewburgh, Earl of Warwick, and had issue ; and Joan the 
younger m. Simon Fitzwalter, Lord of Daventry, co. Northampton, but 
ob. s. p. 

DEAYCOTE. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1297. Richard de Draycote, summ. to Pari. 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, 
but never afterwards. For the reasons assigned under Fitz-John, it is 
somewhat doubtful if this Writ can be considered as a regular summons 
to Pari. Dugdale gives no account of this Baron in his Baronage. 

DUBLIN. 

Marquess. 

I. 1385. Robert de Vere, 9th Earl of Oxford, created in full Pari. Marquess 
of Dublin, 1 Dec. 1385, with the lordship and domain of Ireland, 
"h'end. et tenend. ad totam vitam," and by the title of Marquess 
of Dublin he was summ. to Pari. 8 Aug. following ; but these 
letters patent were surrendered and cancelled, and he was created 
Duke of Ireland 13 Oct. following, with the lordship and domain 
aforesaid, K.G. ; ob. 1392, s. p. ; banished and attainted 13S8, 
when all his bonours became Forfeited. 
Earl. 
I. 1850. Albert Edward Prince of Wales, K.G., h. appar.nt to the Throne 
of Great Britain, created Earl of Dublin 17 Jan. 1850, " to hold to 
him and his heirs, Kings of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland for ever ;" present Earl of Dublin, also Prince of Wales, &c. ; a 
minor. 

DUCIE. 

Barons. 

I. 1720. 1. Matthew Ducie Moreton, created Lord Ducie Baron of More- 

ton, co. Stafford, 9 June 1720; ob. 1735. 

II. 1735. 2. ) Matthew Ducie Moreton, s. and h., created Baron Ducie of 
of Tortworth r Tortworth, co. Gloucester, with remainder, failing his issue 

1 1763 1 I ma H T0 u ' s ne P n - Thomas Reynolds and his issue male ; and 

in default of which to Francis, bro. of the said Thomas Rey- 
nolds in like manner, 27 Apr. 1763 ; ob. 1770, s. p., when 
the Barony of Ducie of Moreton became Extinct; but 
that of Ducie of Tortworth devolved, agreeable to the limi- 
tation, on 

II. 1770. 2. Thomas Moreton, 8 neph.andh., being s. and h. of Thomas Rey- 

nolds, Est]., by Elizabeth Moreton, sister and ultimately sole 
heir to Matthew the last Baron; ob. 1785, s. p. 

III. 1785. 3. Francis Moreton/ bro. and h.; ob. 1808. 

b Both these Bnrons had Acts of Parliament for taking the name and arms of Moreton, 
the first in 1771 and the latter in 1780. 



168 



DUDLEY. 



Barons Earls. 

of Tortworth. 

IV. 1808. — I. 1837. 4. Thomas Moreton, s. and h., created Baron Moreton 

of Tortworth, co. Gloucester, and Earl of Ducie 
28 Jan. 1837 ; ob. 22 June 1840. 

1840. — II. 1840. 5. Henry George Francis Moreton, s. and h. ; ob. 2 

June 1853. 



V. 
VI. 



1853. — III. 1853. 6. Henry John Moreton, s. and h., present Earl of 
Ducie, Baron Ducie and Baron Moreton, both of 
Tortworth. =p 

f 

DUDLEY." 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. John de Somerie, having m. Hawyse, dau. and heiress of 
Ralph Paganell, acquired the Castle and Lordship of Dudley, 
co. Stafford. 



h Although this Barony is uniformly con- 
sidered to be that of " Dudley," it appears 
very questionable if such is the proper de- 
signation. That antecedent to the latter part 
of the reign of Edw. 1. the tenure of the 
Castle of Dudley constituted the family of 
Somerie Barons by Tenure, can scarcely be 
doubted; but that such tenure did not esta- 
blish a right in the possessor of that castle to 
demand a Writ of Sumra. to Pari, may be 
inferred from the fact, that John de Somerie, 
who was first snmm. to Pari. 1 Edw. II. 
and who continued to be regularly summoned 
to the 15 Edw. II., is never once designated 
as " de Dudley," but is merely described 
as " Johanni de Somery." On his death, 
s. i>. 1 Edw. III. according to the present law 
on the subject, the Barony created by the 
Writ of I Edw. II. became extinct. In the 
16 Edw. III. John de Sutton, his nephew 
and coheir, was summoned as " Johanni de 
Sutton de Duddele," which is the first time 
that designation occurs in the Writs of Sumra, 
to Pari., and which in all probability was 
solely used to distinguish him from another 
John de Sutton who was summ. to the same 
Pari, as " Johanni de Sutton de Holdernesse." 
A John de Sutton was also summoned from 
26 Dec. 17 Edw. II. to 30 Dec. 18 Edw. II. 
as " Johanni de Sutton," and again from 20 
July, 6 Edw. III. to 20 April, 17 Edw. III. 
with the addition of " de Holdernesse," and 
there does not appear to be any greater cause 
for considering that the addition of " de 
Dudley " created a Barony of Dudley, than 
that tfie Barony created by the Writ to John 
de Sutton, 6 Edw. III. should be designated 
as the Barony of " Holdernesse." The Writ 
of the 16 Edw. III. was the only one ever 
issued to the last-mentioned John de Sutton 
"de Dudley," although he lived about nineteen 
years afterwards ; nor was his son, or grand- 
son, though each of them died of full age, ever 
summ. to Pari., but his great-grandson was 
summoned from 18 Hen. VI. 1440. It is 
thus manifest that the tenure of the Castle 



of Dudley was not at this time considered to 
constitute a right to a Writ of Summons ; 
that John de Somerie, who was first sum- 
moned in 1 Edw. II., was not described as 
Baron " of Dudley ;" that, according to the 
decision in the case of Charles Longueville, 
Esquire, on claiming the Barony of Grey 
de Ruthyn in 1640, the proper designation 
of the Barony created by the Writ of 
the 1 Edw. II. to John de Somerie, was 
that of " Somerie ;" that the said dignity 
became extinct in the 1 of Edw. III. ; and 
that the Barony created by the Writ to John 
de Sutton 16 Edw. III. was that of " Sut- 
ton ;" or if the description used in that Writ 
be insisted upon, " Sutton de Dudley." Some 
remarks on this subject will be found under 
; ' Chelileton," p. 102 ; and after much 
consideration the Editor fully coincides with 
the position that the designation frequently 
added to the names of Barons in Writs of 
Summ. to Pari, before the reign of Hen. VI. 
never did, nor was it ever intended that they 
should, confer a title of dignity, but that it 
was generally used to distinguish Barons of 
the same name from each other, and was taken 
chiefly from their residence or possessions. 

In the reign of Hen. VI. probably from 
the numerous political convulsions which 
characterize that period, frequent anomalies 
in cases of Peerage are to be found, as parties 
when possessed of the unbounded temporary 
influence which generally attends some indi- 
viduals in such disturbed times, obtained 
from the Crown concessions which can neither 
be reconciled with previous or subsequent 
practice, and of which the case of Lisle, 
which will hereafter be stated, affords a 
sufficient proof. It was under that monarch 
that instances are to be first discovered, 
when some designations added to the names 
in Writs of Summons indisputably implied 
the title of the Barony ; but with the excep- 
tions of the cases of Bergavenny and Grey of 
Powis, it was never even then pretended, 
when the addition was derived from terri- 



Barons by Tenure. 

II. John. 2. 

III. Hen. III. 3. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. 

V. Edw. I. 5. 



DUDLEY. 

John Ralph de Somerie, s. and h. ; ob. 1210. 

Roger de Somerie, s. and h. ; ob. 1235. 

Roger de Somerie, s. and h. ; ob. 1272. 

Roger de Somerie, s. and h., aet. 18, 1272 ; ob. 1290. 



169 



Barons by Writ. 

I. 1308. 6. ^ John de Somerie, s. and h. set. 13, sumni. to Pari, as " Jo- 

hanni de Somery " from 10 Mar. 1 Edw. II. 1308, to 14 
Mar. 15 Edw. II. 1322 ; ob. Dec. preceding, s. p., leaving Mar- 
garet, then set. 32, wife of John de Sutton, and Joane, then 
33t. 29, wife of Thomas de Botetourt, his sisters' and heirs, 
when the Barony created by the writ of 1 Edw. II. became 
Extinct. 

II. 1342. 1. John de Sutton, s. and h. of John de Sutton by Margaret, 

eldest sister and coh. of the last Baron, set. 32, 1321, summ. 
to Pari, as " Johanni de Sutton de Duddeley " 25 Feb. 16 
Edw. III. 1342 ; ob. 1359. 

III. 2. John de Sutton, s. and h. : he was of full age in 1359, but 

was never summ. to Pari. ; ob. 1376. 

IV. 3. John Sutton, s. and h. set. 17, 1397, and of full age 2 Hen. 

IV. 1401 ; he was never summ. to Pari. ; ob. Aug. 1407. 

V. 1440. 4.^ John Sutton, s. and h. set. 5, 1407, summ. to Pari, as "Jo- 

hanni Sutton de Dudley, Militi" from 15 Feb. 18 Hen. VI. 
1440, to 1 Sept. 3 Hen. VII. 1487, E.G. ; ob. 30 Sept. 1487. 



tonal possessions, that such was the title of 
the dignity ; but, with the two exceptions just 
cited, in every single example where such ad- 
dition was the title of the personage to whose 
name it was affixed, it was derived from the 
name of the family from whom they inhe- 
rited, or by marriage acquired the dignity. 
This assertion will be sufficiently established 
by the following instance. In the 33 Hen. 
VI. John Bourchier was summ. to Pari, as 
" Johanni Bourchier de Berners," he having 
m. the dau. and h. of Richard Berners, who 
had the reputation of a Baron, temp. Hen. V. 
but who was never summ. to Pari. ; at that 
period there was a William Bourchier who 
sat in Parliament as Lord Fitz-Warine, which 
title he acquired by marrying the heiress of 
the Baron of that name, and who was then 
and has ever since properly been considered 
as Lord Fitz-Warine ; on the same principle 
this John Bourchier was summoned as Lord 
Berners, notwithstanding that his father-in- 
law was never a Parliamentary Baron. In 
the Writs of Summons in which these in- 
stances occur (and several others precisely 
similar might be cited), Edmund Grey was 
summoned as " Edmundo Grey de Ruthyn," 
Edward Grey as " Edwardo Grey de Groby,'' 
Thomas Dacre as " Thomse Dacre de Gilles- 
land," John Scrope as " Johanni Scrope de 
Masham," Henry Scrope as " Henrico Scrope 
de Bolton," &c. ; but it cannot for an instant 
be pretended that either Ruthyn (which, as 
it has been already just observed, was de- 
cided in the negative by the House of Peers 
in 1640), Groby, GUlesland, Masham, or 



Bolton, being all names of lands, were the 
titles of the Baronies. 

The case of Bergavenny has been com- 
mented upon in p. 14, and the conclusion 
there stated is, that the title of Bergavenny 
was never that of the Barony until Edward 
Neville was summ. to Pari, as " Domino de 
Bergavenny," 29 Hen. VI. With respect to 
that of Powis, which has also been noticed 
under Ciierlkton, and will again be 
alluded to under Grey of Powis, it is 
only necessary to observe here, that that in- 
stance appears strongly to corroborate the 
position, that when the designation was taken 
from lands, it was solely a distinction, and 
never a title of dignity, excepting in the case 
of Bergavenny in the reign of Hen. VI. or 
when the title originated in a Patent. To 
these observations it should be added that 
such descriptions are very similar to those 
since used in Patents of creation ; for example, 
" Baron Montagu of St. Neots," " Baron 
Howard of Effingham," " Viscount Duncan 
of Camperdown," &c. 

As a single Writ of Summons, without a 
proof of sitting under it, has ceen held not to 
constitute an hereditary dignity, it seems 
most probable in the event of the abeyance of 
this Barony being terminated, that it will be 
considered to have originated in the Writ of 
Summons to John Sutton in the 18 Hen. VI. 

' Edmondson asserts they were his daugh- 
ters and heirs, and hence deduces the Barony 
from the Writ of Summons 1 Edw. II. ; but 
the escheats in both instances prove that his 
sisters were his heirs. 



170 



DUDLEY AND WARD. 



Barons by Writ. 



VI. 



VII. 



IX 



X 



XI 



XIII. 
XIV. 

XV. 



1492. 



5.^ Edward Sutton, grands, and h., he being s. and h. of 
Edmond de Sutton (ob. v. p. after 1456) eldest son of the last 
Baron, aat. 30, k 1487, summ. to Pari, from 12 Aug. 7 Hen. 
VII. 1492, to 3 Nov. 21 Hen. VIII. 1529, E.G. ; ob. 1531. 

6. John Sutton, s. and h. ; he was never summ. to Pari. ; sold 
the castle of Dudley ; ob. 1553. 

VIII. 1554. 7. Edward Sutton, s. and h., restored to the castle of Dudley 
by patent 1556 ; summ. to Pari, from 12 Nov. 1 and 2 Phil, 
and Mary 1554, to 15 Oct. 28 Eliz. 1586 ; ob. 1586. 

1586. 8. Edward Sutton, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 19 Feb. 35 
Eliz. 1593, to 3 Nov. 15 Car. I. 1639 ; ob. 1643. 

1643. 9. Frances Sutton, granddau. and h., being dau. and h. of 
Ferdinand Sutton (ob. v. p. 1621), only son of the last 
Baron ; she m. Sir Humble Ward, who was created Baron 
Ward of Birmingham, co. Warwick, 23 Mar. 1644 ; ob. 
1697. 

1697. 10. Edward Ward, s. and h., Baron Ward on the death of his 
father, 1670 ; succeeded his mother in the Barony of Dud- 
ley in 1697 ; ob. 1701. 

XII. 1701. 11. Edward Ward, grands, and h., being s. and h. of William 
Ward (ob. v. p.) eldest son of the last Baron ; Baron Ward ; 
ob. 1704. 

Edward Ward, s. and h., Baron Ward ; ob. 1731, nnm, 

William Ward, uncle and h., being next bro. to Edward 
12th Baron ; Baron Ward ; ob. 1740, num. 

1740. 14. Ferdinando Dudley Lea, neph. and h., being s. and h. of 
William Lea by Frances Ward, sister and sole heir of the last Baron ; 
succeeded as Baron Dudley in 1740 ; ob. 1757, unm., when the Barony 
created by the writ of summons of 1342 fell into Abeyance between his 
five sisters and coheirs — 1. Ann, wife of William Smith of Eidgacre, co. 
Salop ; 2. Frances, wife of Walter Woodcock, Esq. ; 3. Mary, wife of 

Harvey of Stourbridge, co. Worcester, M.D. ; 4. Catherine, wife of 

Thomas Jordan of Birmingham ; 5. Elizabeth, wife of the Rev. Benjamin 
Briscoe — and amongst their descendants it is now in Abeyance. 1 



1704. 
1731. 



12. 
13. 



Viscounts. 
1763. 



II. 
III. 



1774. 

1788. 



DUDLEY AND WARD. 

1. John Ward, s. and h. of William, eldest s. of William Ward, 

next bro. of Edward XL Baron Dudley, and 2nd Baron Ward, 
succeeded to the Barony of Ward in 1740, on the death of 
William XIV. Baron Dudley and V. Baron Ward, as next heir 
male ; created Viscount Dudley and Ward of Dudley, co. 
Worcester, 21 Apr. 1763 ; ob. 1774. 

2. John Ward, s. and h. ; ob. 1788, s. p. 

3. William Ward, half-bro. and h. ; ob. 25 Apr. 1823. 



k In 1 Hen. VII. he was found to be 
cousin and coheir of Edward Earl of Wor- 
cester, i. e. son and heir of Edmond de Sut- 
ton by Joyce, dau. of John Lord Tiptoft and 
sister of the said Earl, and that he was then 
set. 26. 

1 Some of the representatives of these 
Indies will be found in Mr. C. E. Long's vo- 
lume of Royal Descents, published 1845, and 
they will be found to afford a remarkable in- 



stance of the mutabilities of fortune even of 
those who, like the individuals in question, 
are entitled to quarter the Royal Arms of 
England. Mr. Long observes of one of these 
coheirs to the Barony of Dudley that he may 
be found " taking toll at a turnpike almost 
under the very walls of those feudal towers 
that gave name to the Barony of which he 
is coheir." 



DUDLEY — DUNFERMLINE. 171 

Viscounts. 
IV. 1823. 4. John AVilliam Ward, s. and h., created Viscount Ednam of 
Ednam, co. Roxburgh, and Earl of Dudley of Dudley Castle, co. Stafford, 
5 Oct. 1827 ; ob. unm. 6 Mar. 1833, when this Viscounty, with the Vis- 
county of Ednam and Earldom of Dudley, became Extinct. 

DUDLEY. 

Duchess. 
I. 1644. Alice, dau. of Sir Thomas Leigh, aunt of Thomas 1st Lord Leigh, 
and wife of Sir Robert Dudley, son of Robert Earl of Leicester (on the 
subject of whose legitimacy there was much controversy), was created 
Duchess Dudley for life 23 May 1644 ; ob. 1670, s. p. m. ' Extinct. 

DUDLEY (of Dudley Castle). 
Earl. 
I. 1827. 1. John William Ward, 9th Baron Ward and 4th Viscount Dudley 
and Ward, created Viscount Ednam of Ednam, co. Roxburgh, and Earl of 
Dudley of Dudley Castle, co. Stafford, 5 Oct. 1827; ob. unm. 6 Mar. 
1833, when this Earldom and the Viscounties of Ednam and Dudley 
and Ward became Extinct. 

DUDLEY. Vide De L'Isle and Dudley. 

DUNCAN. 
Barons. Viscounts. 

I. 1797. — I. 1797. 1. Adam Duncan, created Viscount Duncan of Cam- 

perdown, and Baron Duncan of Lundie, co. Perth, 
30 Oct. 1797 ; ob. 4 Aug. 1804. 

II. 1804. — II. 1804. 2. Robert Dundas Duncan-Haldane, s. and h., created 

Earl of Camperdown 12 Sept. 1831. — Vide Cam- 
perdown. 

DUNCANNON. 

Barons. 

I. 1834. 1. John William Ponsonby, eldest son of Frederick 3rd Earl of Bess- 

borough in Ireland, created Baron Duncannon of Bessborougb, 
co. Kilkenny, 19 July 1834 ; succeeded his father as Baron Pon- 
sonby of Sysonby and Earl of Bessborough 3 Feb. 1844 ; Lord 
Lieutenant of Ireland ; ob. 16 May 1847. 

II. 1847. 2. George Brabazon Ponsonby, s. and h., present Baron Duncannon, 

also Baron Ponsonby of Sysonby in the Peerage of the United 
Kingdom, and Earl of Bessborough, &c, in Ireland. =p 

t 

DUNDAS. 
Barons. 
I. 1794. 1. Sir Thomas Dundas, 2nd Bart., created Baron Dundas of Aske, 

co. York, 13 Aug. 1794; ob. 14 June 1820. 
IL 1820. 2. Laurence Dundas, s. and h., created Earl of Zetland 2 July 1838. 
— Vide Zetland. 

DUNFERMLINE. 
Baron. 
I. 1839. 1. James Abercromby (Speaker of the House of Commons), created 
Baron Dunfermline of Dunfermline, co. Fife, 7 June 1839, present Baron 
Dunfermline. =p 
Y 





Barons. 


I. 


1831. 


II. 


183*3. 


Ill 


. 1845. 



172 . DUNIRA — DURAS. 

DUWIRA. 

Barony, 24 Dec. 1802. — Vide Melville. 

DUNMORE. 

1. George Murray, Earl of Duumore in Scotland, created Baron 
Dunmore in the Forest of Atlioll, co. Perth, 10 Sept. 1831 ; 
oh. 11 Nov. 1836. 

2. Alexander Edward Murray, s. and h. ; oh. 15 July 1845. 

3. Charles Adolphus Murray, s. and h., present Baron Dunmore, 
Earl of Dunmore in Scotland ; a minor. 

DUNSMORB. 
Baron. 

I. 1628. Sir Francis Leigh, 2nd Bart., created Baron Dunsmore of Dunsmore, 

co. Warwick, 31 July 1628, created Earl of Chichester 3 June 1644, with 

special limitations. — Vide Chichester. Oh. 1653, when this Barony 

hecame Extinct. 

DUNSTAlSrVILIi. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Reginald de Dunstanvill, Baron of Castlecomhe, co. Wilts, 
s. of Robert Fitz-Hugh de Dunstanvill. 

Reginald de Dunstanvill, living 1163 ; to whom succeeded, 

Walter de Dunstanvill, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1196, and was 
succeeded by, 

"Walter de Dunstanvill, s. and h. ; ob. 1240. 

Walter de Dunstanvill, s. and h. ; ob. 1269, leaving a dau. 
and h., Petronil, who m. Robert de Montford, which Robert 
died soon afterwards. 

DUWSTANVILLE. 
Baron. 

I. 1796. Sir Francis Basset, 1st Bart, (lineally descended from William 
Basset and Cecilia his wife, dau. and h. of Alan de Dunstanvill, younger 
son of one of the above Barons, and also from Thomas Basset and Margaret 
his wife, dau. and h of Richard Helegan, grands, of William Helegan and 
Margaret his wife, dau. and h. of William de Dunstanvill, also a younger 
son of one of the above Barons), created Baron de Dunstanville of Tehidy, 
co. Cornwall, 17 June 1796, created Baron Basset of Stratton, co. Corn- 
wall, with remainder to his only daughter and her issue male, 30 Nov. 
1797; ob. 5 Feb. 1835, s. p. m., when the Barony of Basset devolved on 
his dau., but this Barony became Extinct. 

DUNWICH. 
Viscounty, 18 July, 1821. — Vide Stradbroke. 

DURAS. 

Baron. 

1. 1673. Lewis Duras, Marquess of Blanquefort, and bro. of the Duke of 
Duras in France, created Baron Duras of Holdenhy, co. Northampton, 29 
Jan. 1673 ; succeeded his father-in-law, George Sondes, as Earl of Fever- 
sham 1677, K.G. ; ob. 1709, s. p., when his honours became Extinct. 



II. 


Hen. II. 


2 


III. 


Rich. I. 


3 


IV. 


John. 


4 


V. 


Hen. III. 


5 






DURHAM — EDDISBURY. 



17^ 



DURHAM. 

Earls. Barons. 

I. 1833. — I. 1828. 1. John George Lambton, created Baron Durham of 

the city of Durham, and of Lambton Castle, co. 
Durham, 29 Jan. 1828, and Viscount Lambton 
and Earl of Durham, 23 Mar. 1833 ; ob. 28 July 
1840. 

IT. 1840. — II. 1840. 2. George Frederick D'Arcy Lambton, s. and h., 
present Earl of Durham and Viscount and Baron Lambton. =j= 

t 

DURSLEY. 

Viscounty, 11 Sept. 1679. — Vide Berkeley. 

DUTTON". 

Barony, 10 Sept. 1712. — Vide Brandon. 

DYNEVOE. Vide Dinevor. 
DYNHAM. Vide Dinan. 



E. 

EAST ANGLIA. Vide Norfolk. 

EASTNOR. 

Viscounty, 17 July 1821. — Vide Sommers. 

EBRIWGTOK". 

Viscounty, 1 Sept. 1789. — Vide Fortescue. 



„ . _- .. ECHINGHAM. 

Baron by writ. 

I. 1311. 1. William de Echingham, Lord of Echinsham, co. Sussex, summ. 

to Pari, from 19 Dec. 5 Edw. II. 1311, to 14 Mar. 15 Edw. II. 1322, but 

never afterwards; ob. 1326, s. p., when the Barony became Extinct." 1 



Baron. 



EDDISBURY. 



Is4rt. 1. Edward John Stanley, s. and h. apparent of John Thomas Baron 
Stanley of Alderlcy, created Baron Eddisbury of Wilmington, co. pal. 
Chester, 12 May 1848 ; succeeded his father as Baron Stanley of Alderley 
23 Oct. 1850, present Baron Stanley and Baron Eddisbury. =p 



m Dugdale stntes that a Robert de Eching- 
ham was summ. to Pari. 1 Kdw. III., but it 
appears from the Writ that he was only sum- 
moned to be at Newcastle with horse and 



arms in that year ; he had been summoned 
on various like occasions to attend King 
Edw. II.: ob. 1328. 



174 



EDEN — EFFINGHAM. 



EDEN. 
Barony, 21 Dec. 1839. — Vide Aucklakd. 



I. 

II. 
III. 



Barons. 
1742 



EDGCUMBE. 



.. Richard Edgcumbe, created Baron Edgcumbe of Mount Edg- 
cumbe, co. Devon, 20 Apr. 1742 ; ob. 1758. 

1758. 2. Richard Edgcumbe, s. and h. ; ob. 1761, s. p. 

1761. 3. George Edgcumbe, bro. and h., created Viscount Mount Edg- 
cumbe and Valletort, co. Devon, 5 Mar. 1781, created Earl of Mount 
Edgcumbe 31 Aug. 1789. — Vide Mount Edgcumbe. 



Dukes. 



EDINBURGH. 



I. 1726. 1. H. R. H. Frederick Lewis, eldest s. of George Prince of Wales, 

afterwards King George II., created Baron of Snawdon, co. 
Carnarvon, Viscount of Launceston, co. Cornwall, Earl of 
Eltham, co. Kent, Marquess of the Isle of Ely, co. Cambridge, 
and Duke of the City of Edinburgh, in North Britain, 26 July 
1726 ; created Prince of Wales, &c. 8 Jan. 1729, K.G. ; ob. 
1751. 

II. 1751. 2. H. R. H. George, s. and h., created Prince of Wales, &c, 20 

Apr. 1751 ; ascended the Throne on the death of his grand- 
father, King George II. 25 Oct. 1760, when all these dignities 
became merged in the Crown. 

III. 1764. 1. H. R. H. Prince William Henry, bro. of King George III., 

created Duke of Gloucester and of Edinburgh in Great Britain, 
and Earl of Connaught in Ireland, 19 Nov. 1764, K.G. ; ob. 
25 Aug. 1805. 

IV. 1805. 2. H. R. H. William Frederick, s. and h., Duke of Gloucester 

and of Edinburgh, and Earl of Connaught in Ireland, K.G., G.C.B. ; ob. 
s. P. 30 Nov. 1834, when all his titles became Extinct. 

EDNAM. 
Viscounty, 5 Oct. 1827. — Extinct 1833. — Vide Dudley of Dudley Castle. 



Earls. 




I. 1731. 


1 


II. 1743. 


"2 


III. 1763. 


3 


IV. 1791. 


4 



EFFINGHAM. 

Francis Howard, VII. Baron Howard of Effingham, created 

Earl of Effingham, co. Surrey, 8 Dec. 1731 ; ob. 1743. 
Thomas Howard, s. and h. ; ob, 1763. 
Thomas Howard, s. and h. ; ob. 1791, s. p. 

4. Richard Howard, bro. and h. ; ob. 11 Dec. 1816, s. p., when 
this Earldom became Extinct. 

Kenneth Alexander Howard, cousin and h. male of the last 
Earl, created Earl of Effingham 27 Jan. 1837, G.C.B. ; ob. 
13 Feb. 1845. 
VI. 1845. 6. Henry Howard, s. and h., present Earl of Effingham and Baron 
Howard of Effingham. =p 



V. 1837. 



n Although the title of Gloucester and 
Edinburgh is placed here, it is to be re- 
marked that no separate Dukedom of Edin- 



burgh was created by this Patent ; one 
Dukedom only was created, and which was of 
the two cities of Gloucester and Edinburgh. 



II. 


1750. 


2. 


III. 


1763. 


3. 


IV. 


1837. 


4. 



EGREMONT - ELIOT. 175 



EGEBMONT. 
Baron. 

I. 1449. Thomas Percy, 3rd s. of Henry XIII. 3rd Earl of Northumber- 

land, created Baron Egremont by patent 20 Dec. 1449, to him 
and his heirs male for ever ;° slain at the battle of Northampton, 
1460, " without wife or issue," according to Dugdale, Avhen 
this dignity became Extinct. 
Earls. 

I. 1749. 1. Algernon Seymour, Duke of Somerset and Earl of Northumber- 
land, &c, created Baron of Cockermouth, co. Cumberland, and 
Earl of Egremont, in the said county, 3 Oct. 1749, with re- 
mainder failing his issue male, to his neph. Sir Charles Wynd- 
ham, Bart., s. of Sir William Wyndham, Bart., by Katherine his 
sister, and his issue male ; and in default of which to Percy 
Wyndham (who assumed the name of O'Brien, and was created 
Earl of Thomond in Ireland), bro. of the said Sir Charles 
Wyndham, and his issue male; ob. 1750, s. p. m., when the 
Earldom of Egremont and Barony of Cockermouth devolved, 
agreeable to the above limitation, on, 

Sir Charles Wyndham, 4th Bart., neph. and h. ; ob. 1763. 

George O'Brien Wyndham, s. and h. ; ob. 11 Nov. 1837. 

George Francis Wyndham, neph. and h., s. and h. of William 
Frederick Wyndham, only son that left issue of Charles II. 2nd Earl ; ob. 
2 Apr. 1845, s. p., when his honours became Extinct. 



ELD ON. 

Barons. Earls. 

I. 1799. — I. 1821 . 1. John Scott, created Baron Eldon of Eldon, co. Durham, 

18 July 1799, created Viscount Encombe of En- 
combe, co. Dorset, and Earl of Eldon aforesaid, 7 July 
1821; Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain; ob. 
13 Jan. 1838. 

II. 1838. — II. 1838. 2. John Scott, grands, and h., s. and h. of John Scott 

(ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Earl ; ob. 13 Sept. 
1854. 

III. 1854. — III. 1854. 3. John Scott, s. and h., present Earl and Baron Eldon 

and Viscount Encombe ; a minor. 



ELGIN. 

Baron. 

I. 1849. 1. James Bruce, Earl of Elgin and Kincardine in Scotland, K.T., 
created Baron Elgin of Elgin 13 Nov. 1849, present Baron Elgin, &c. =p 



ELIOT. 

Barons. 

I. 1784. 1. Edward Eliot (assumed the name of) Craggs-Eliot, created Baron 

Eliot of St. Germans, co. Cornwall, 30 Jan. 1784; ob. 1804. 

II. 1804. 2. John Eliot, 2nd s. and h. (Edward James Eliot, the eldest son, 

having died, s. P. M.), created Earl of St. Germans 28 Nov. 1815. — Vide 
St. Germans. 



Vide remarks upon this Patent in the Introductory Accounts of Baronies and Earldoms. 



176 ELLENBOROUGH — ENGAINE. 

ELLENBOROUGH. 

Barons. 

I. 1802. 1. Edward Law, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, created 

Baron EUenborough of EUenborough, co. Cumberland, 19 April 
1802 ; ob. 13 Dec. 1818. 

Earl. 

II. 1818.— I. 1844. 2. Edward Law, s. and h., created Earl of EUenborough, 

co. Cumberland, and Viscount Southam of Southam, co. Gloucester, 22 
Oct. 1844, present Earl of EUenborough, G.C.B., &c. 

ELLESMERE. 
Barons. 

I. 1(103. Thomas Egerton, natural s. of Sir Richard Egerton, created Baron 
Ellesmere of Ellesmere, co. Salop, 21 Jul y 1603, created Viscount 
Brackley, co. Northampton, 7 Nov. 1616. Extinct 1829.— 
Vide Brackley and Bridgewater. 
Earl. 

I. 1846. 1. Francis Egerton, commonly called Lord Francis Egerton (2nd s. 
of George Granville 1st Duke of Sutherland), created Earl of Ellesmere of 
Ellesmere, co. Salop, and Viscount Brackley of Brackley, co. Northampton, 
6 July 1846, present Earl of Ellesmere and Viscount Brackley, K.G. =p 

ELMLEY. 

Viscodnty, 1 Dec. 1815. — Vide Beauchamp of Powyk. 

ELTHAM. 

Earldom, 26 July 1726— Merged in the Crown 1760.— Vide Edinburgh. 

ELY. 

Marqhessate, 26 July 1726— Merged in the Crown 1760.— Vide Edinburgh. 

EMLYN. 
Viscounty, 5 Oct. 1827. — Vide Cawdor. 

ENCOMBE. 
Viscounty, 7 July 1821.— Vide Eldon. 

ENFIELD. 

Barony, 10 May 1695— Extinct 1830.— Vide Rochford. 
Viscounty, 18 Sept 1847.— Vide Strafford. 

Barons by Tenure. ENG-AINE. 

I Will. I. l. Richard Engaine, Lord of Abington, co. Northampton, men- 

tioned in Domesday Book, to whom succeeded, 

II. Hen. I. 2. Richard Engaine, living 1145. 

III. Steph. 3. Vitalis Engaine, s. and h., living 1139. 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Richard Engaine, s. and h. 

V. John. 5. Richard Engaine, s. and h., ob. circa 1216, s. p. 

VI. Hen. III. 6. Vitalis Engaine, bro. and h. ; ob. 1248. 

VII. Hen. III. 7. Henry Engaine, s. and h., ob. 1271, unm. 

VIII. Edw. I. 8. John de Engaine, bro. and h. ; ob. 1296. 



ENNERDALE— ERDINGTON. 177 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. f John de Engaine, s. and h. set. 24 years, sumni. to Pari. 

from 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, to 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 
1321 ; he was also summ. 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, but, for 
the reasons assigned under Fitz-John, it is somewhat doubt- 
ful if that writ can be considered as a regular summons to 
Pari. ;° ob. 1322, s. p., when the Barony created by the writ of 
25 or 27 Edw. I. became Extinct. 

II. 1342. John de Engaine, neph. and h. of the last Baron, being s. of 
Nicholas Engaine his bro., proved his as;e 1323, summ. to Pari, from 
25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342, to 20 Nov. 34 Edw. III. 1360, though Dug- 
dale states he died 14 Feb. 1358,p leaving Thomas his s. and h. ret. 22, 
who died s. p. 1367 without having been summ. to Pari., when his three 
sisters became his heirs, viz., Joyce, set. 30, wife of John de Goldington, 
Elizabeth, aat. 26, wife of Sir "Lawrence Pabenham, and Mary, set. 24, wife 
of Sir William Bernak, who shared his lands, and amongst whose descend- 
ants the Barony created by the writ of 16 Edw. III. is in Abeyance. 

In 1 Hen. IV. 1399 the coheirs of the Barony were the above-men- 
tioned Joyce de Goldington, Katherine the wife of Sir Thomas Ayles- 
bury dau. and h. of the said Elizabeth, dau. of the said John Baron 
Engaine ; and the above-mentioned Mary, who m. 2ndly Thomas le 
Zouche. Lady Katherine Aylesbury had by Sir Thomas, two daughters 
Isabel and Eleanor, and a son John, who was succeeded by his son Hugh, 
who died 1423, s. P., leaving his aunts, Isabel wife of Thomas Chaworth, 
and Eleanor wife of Sir Humphrey Stafford of Grafton, his coheirs ; the 
said Katherine m. 2ndly Sir William Cheney, and by him had a son 
Lawrence Cheney. 



ENNERDALE. 
Barony, 16 June 1619 — Extinct 1651. — Vide Cambridge. 

ENNISHOWEN and CARRICKFERGUS. 
Baron. 

I. 1841. 1. George Hamilton Chichester, commonly called Earl of Belfast, 
s. and h. apparent of George Augustus Marquess of Donegal in Ireland, 
created Baron Ennishowen and Carrickfergus of Ennishowen, co. Donegal, 
and Carrickfergus, co. Antrim, 18 Aug. 1841, succeeded his father as 
Marquess of Donegal and Lord Fisherwick 5 Oct. 1844, present Baron 
Fisherwick and Baron Ennishowen and Carrickfergus, also Marquess of 
Donegal, &c, G.C.H., &c. = 

Y 

ERDINGTON. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1336. Henry de Erdington, lord of Erdington, co. Warwick, summ. to Pari. 
22 Jan. 9 Edw. III. 1336, but neither he nor his posterity ever after 
received the like summons ; Giles de Erdington, his s. and h., left issue 
Thomas, whose posterity continued at Erdington for several generations. 



° This Writ may have been addressed to 
his father, for on 30 Dec. preceding, the son 
received a command to attend the marriage 
of the Princess Elizabeth, in which he is de- 
scribed as John de E. jun. Fcedera, N. E. 
vol. i. p. 850. 

p Inqs. p. m. taken upon his decease, state 



him to have died on Wednesday next after 
the Feast of St. Valentine 1358, so that the 
summons of 20 Nov. 1360 is probably a mis- 
take ; Sir John Engaine, his eldest son, died 
vit. pat., so that Thomas, the 2nd son, be- 
came heir to his father. 



N 



178 ERSKINE — ESSEX. 



ERSKINE. 



Barons. 




I. 1806. 


1 


II. 1823. 


2 


III. 1855. 


3 



Thomas Erskine, created Baron Erskine of Restormel Castle, co. 
Cornwall, 10 Feb. 1806, Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, 
K.T. ; ob. 17 Nov. 1823. 

David Montagu Erskine, s. and h. ; ob. 19 Mar. 1855. 

Thomas Americus Montagu Erskine, s. and h., present Baron 
Erskine. = 

ESPEC. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. Walter Espec, Lord of Helmesley or Harnlake, co. York ; ob. 1153, 
s. p., leaving his sisters his heirs, of whom Adeline the youngest m. Peter 
de Roos, who acquired with her the manor of Harnlake. 



Earls. 



ESSEX. 



I. 1. Geoffrey he Mandeville, created Earl of Essex by tho 

Empress Matilda,i " Anglorum Domina," as she is styled in 
the charter, which is presumed to be one of the very earliest 
charters of express creation of the title of Earl ; the words 
of creation are " do et concedo Gaufredo de Magnavilla pro 
servitio suo et ha3redibus suis post eum hsereditabiliter ut 
sit comes de Essexia et habeat tertium denarium Vicecorni- 
tatus de Placitis, sicut comes habere debet in comitatu suo ;" 
slain 14 Sept. 1144. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Geoffrey de Mandeville, 2nd s. ; after the banishment of 

Ernulph his elder bro., King Henry II. bestowed on him the 
Earldom of Essex ; ob. 1165, s. p. 

III. 1165. 3. Willtam de Mandeville, bro. and h. ; ob. 1189, s. p. 

IV. 1199. 1. Geoffrey Fitz-Piers, Justice of England, husband of Beatrix 

de Say, dau. of William de Say, s. of William de Say by 
Beatrix, sister of Geoffrey 1st Earl ; received the Earldom 
of Essex from King John on the day of his coronation 
26 June 1199 ; ob. 2 Oct. 1213. 

V. 1213. 2. Geoffrey Fitz-Piers alias Mandeville, s. and h., was one of 

the celebrated 25 Barons appointed to enforce the observance 
of Magna Charta ; he m. in 1213 Isabel Countess of Glou- 
cester, 3rd dau. and coh. of William Earl of Gloucester, and 
was in her right Earl of Gloucester, and was so styled in the 
Convention with King John 1215 : slain at a tournament 
1216, s. p. 

VI. 1216. 3. William Fitz-Piers alias Mandeville, bro. and h. ; ob. 8 Jan 

1227, s. p. 

VII. Hen. III. 1. Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, possessing the honour 

of Essex in right of his mother Mary sister of the last Earl ; 
he had the Earldom of Essex conferred upon him by King 
Henry III. before 1239, when as Earl of Essex he was 
godfather to Prince Edward (afterwards Edward I.) ; Lord 
High Constable ; ob. 1274. 

VIII. 1274. 2. Humphrey de Bohun, grands, and h., being s. and h. of 

Humphrey (ob. v. p.) eldest s. of the last Earl ; Earl of Here- 
ford, Lord High Constable ; ob. 1297. 



q He is stated by some authorities to have been tirst created to the same dignity by Kino- 
enhen. & J J & 



Stephen 



ESSEX. 



179 



Earls. 
IX. 1297. 



X. 1321. 

XI. 1335. 

XII. 1361. 



Humphrey de Bohun, s. and h., Earl of Hereford ; he m. Eli- 
zabeth Plantagenet dau. of Edw. I. ; Lord High Constable ; 
slain at Borough Bridge 16 Mar. 1321. 

John de Bohun, s. and h., Earl of Hereford, Lord High Con- 
stable ; ob. 1335, s. p. 



Humphrey de Bohdn, 
1361, s.p. 



bro. and h., Lord High Constable ; ob. 



XIII. 1372. 



6. Humphrey de Bohun, neph. and h., being s. and h. of William 
de Bohun Earl of Northampton, K.G., next bro. of Hum- 
phrey the last Earl; Earl of Northampton and Hereford, 
K.G., Lord High Constable ; ob. 1372, s. p. m. Eleanor, his 
eldest dau. and coh., m. Thomas Plantagenet Duke of Glou- 
cester ; and Mary, his other dau. and coh., m. Henry Plan- 
tagenet, afterwards King Henry IV. 

1. Thomas Plantagenet, surnamed " of Woodstock," youngest s. 
of Edward III. ; Earl of Buckingham ; having m. Eleanor, 
dau. and coh. of the last Earl, he assumed the title of Earl 
of Essex ; created Duke of Gloucester 1385, Lord High Con- 
stable, K.G. ; murdered 1397. 

XIV. 1461. 1. Henry Bourchier, Count of Ewe in Normandy and Baron 

and Viscount Bourchier in England, s. and h. of William 
Count of Ewe by Ann, dau. and eventually sole h. of Tho- 
mas Plantagenet Duke of Gloucester, the last Earl, created 
Earl of Essex 30 June 1461, E.G. ; ob. 1483. 

XV. 1483. 2. Henry Bourchier, grands, and h., being s. and h. of William 

Bourchier (ob. v. p.) eldest s. of the last Earl; K.G. ; Anne, 
his sole dau. and h., m. William Baron Parr, afterwards 
Earl of Essex ; ob. 1539, s. p. m., when the Earldom became 
Extinct. 

XVI. 1539. 1. Thomas Cromwell, 1st Baron Cromwell, created Earl of Essex 

10 April 1539, K.G. ; beheaded and attainted 1540, when 
his honours became Forfeited. 

William Parr, 1st Baron Parr of Kendal, bro. of Katherine, 
Queen of Henry VIII., having m. Ann, dau. and sole h. of 
Henry XV. 2nd Earl, was (notwithstanding that his issue 
by the said Ann Bourchier had been bastardized by Act of 
Pari. 34 Hen. VIII.) created Earl of Essex, " with the same 
place and voice in Parliament as Henry Bourchier, late Earl 
of Essex, had," 23 Dec. 1543 ; created Marquess of North- 
ampton 16 Feb. 1546, attainted in 1553, when all his 
honours became Forfeited ; restored in blood but not in 
honours 1558, and created Marquess of Northampton 13 Jan. 
1559, K.G. ; ob. 1571, s. p., when that title became Ex- 
tinct. 

1. Walter Devereux, 2nd Viscount Hereford, being great- 
great-grandson of John Devereux Lord Ferrers of Chartley 
by Cecily Bourchier, sister and eventually sole h. of Henry 
Bourchier XV. 2nd Earl of Essex ; he was created Earl of 
Essex 4 May 1572, K.G. ; ob. 1576. 

2. Robert Devereux, s. and h., Viscount Hereford, Earl Marshal 
1597, Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland 1599, K.G. ; beheaded 
and attainted 1601, when his honours became Forfeited. 

3. Robert Devereux, s. and h., Viscount Hereford : restored in 
blood and honours 1603 ; ob. 1646, s. p., when the Earldom 
of Essex became Extinct. 

N 2 



X\II. 1543. 



XVIII. 1572. 



XIX. 1576. 

XX. 1603. 



i 



Earls 






XXI. 


1661. 


1 


XXII. 


1683. 


2 


XXIII. 


1709. 


3 


XXIV. 


1743. 


4 


XXV. 


1799. 


5 



180 ESSEX — EVRE. 

Arthur Capel, 2nd Baron Capel ; created Viscount Maiden, 
co. Essex, and Earl of Essex 20 April 1661, Lord-Lieu- 
tenant of Ireland 1672 ; ob. 1683. 

Algernon Capel, s. and h. ; ob. 1709. 

William Capel, s. and b., K.G. ; ob. 1743. 

William Ann Holles Capel, s. and h. ; ob. 1799. 

George Capel, s. and b., assumed the surname of Coningsby ; 
ob. s.p. 23 April 1839. 

XXVI. 1839. 6. Arthur Algernon Capel, neph. and h., s. and h. of John 
Thomas Capel, next bro. of the last Earl, present Earl of 
Essex, Viscount Maiden and Baron Capel. ^= 

4 

ESSEX. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Swene de Essex, possessed of 22 lordships in that county. 

n. Will. II. 2. Bobert de Essex, s. and h. 

IH. Hen. II. 3. Henry be Essex, s. and h., standard-bearer to the King, and 
being accused of cowardice 1163, he was vancpiished in combat by bis 
accuser, his baronies confiscated, and he became a monk at Beading. 



EUSTON. 
Earl. 

I. 1672. 1. Henry Fitz-Boy, 2nd natural s. of King Charles II. by Barbara 
Duchess of Cleveland, created Baron Sudbury, Viscount Ipswich, and Earl 
of Euston, all co. Suffolk, 16 Aug. 1672, with remainder, failing his issue 
male, to George Fitz-Boy, otherwise called George Falmer (another natural 
s. of the King by the said Duchess), and his issue male ; created Duke of 
Grafton 11 Sept. 1675, K.G.— Vide Grafton. 



EVERINGHAM. 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1309. 1. Adam de Everingham, summ. to Pari, from 4 March, 2 Edw. II. 

1309, to 6 Oct. 9 Edw. II. 1315 ; ob. 1340. 

II. 1371. 2. Adam de Everingham, s. and h. jet. 30, summ. to Pari, as "Adae 

de Everingham de Laxton," 8 Jan. 44 Edw. III. 1371 ; ob. 1371, leaving 
Bobert his grands., s. of William de Everingham (ob. v. p.) his eldest s., 
his heir, who died on 27 Dec. in the same year, s. p., when Joan, set. 8, 
and Katherine, set. 5, sisters of the said Bobert, became his heirs, the 
former of whom m. Sir William Elys, Knt., and the latter became the 
wife of John Elton, Esq., among whose descendants and representatives 
this Barony is now in Abeyance. 



Barons. 



EVRE. 



I. 1544. 1. William Evre, created Lord Evre, Baron of Wilton, co. Dur- 

ham, 24 Feb. 1544 ; ob. 1548. 

II. 1548. 2. William Evre, grands, and h. a?t. 19, being s. and h. of Sir 

Balph Evre (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron ; ob. 1594. 

III. 1594. 3. Balph Evre, s. and h. fet. 25 ; ob. 1618. 

IV. 1618. 4. William Evre, s. and h. ait. 30 ; ob. . . . 

V. 16 ... 5. William Evre, grands, and b., being s. and h. of Balph Evre 

(ob. v. p.) eldest s. of the last Baron ; ob. . . . unm. 



EWE — EXETER. 



181 



Barons. 

VI. 16... 

VII. 1645. 

VIII. 1672. 



8. 



William Evre, uncle and h., being 2nd s. of William 4th Baron ; 

slain at Marston Moor ex parte Regis 1645, s. p. m. 
George Evre, cousin and h., being s. and h. of Horatio, eldest 

s. of Francis Evre, 2nd s. of William 2nd Baron ; ob. 1672 unm. 

Ralph Evre, bro. and li. ; ob. 1698 unm., when the title became 
Extinct. 



EWE. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. William de Ewe, Count of Ewe' in Normandy (s. of Robert 

Count of Ewe), had vast possessions granted to him on the 
conquest of England, amongst which were the Castle of Hast- 
ings and 52 lordships in Sussex ; murdered 1096. 

II. Steph. 2. Henry de Ewe, Count of Ewe, s. and h. ; became a monk, and 

ob. 1139. 

III. Hen. II. 3. John de Ewe, Count of Ewe, s. and h., became a monk and ob. 

1170. 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Henry de Ewe, Count of Ewe, s. and h., living 1194 ; ob. 

s. P. M. 

V. John. Ralph de Ysondon, husband of Alice, dau. and h. of the last 

Baron, Count of Ewe ; ob. 1218. 

VI. Hen. III. William de Ysondon, s. and h., Count of Ewe, who adhering to 

the French, the Barony became Forfeited. 

EWYAS. 

Baron by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. Robert Lord of Ewyas, co. Hereford, younger bro. of John Lord 
of Sudeley, living 1194 ; ob. s. p. m. Sybil, his dau. and h., m. 1st Robert 
de Tregoz, 2ndly William de Newmarch, and 3rdly Roger de Clifford. 



EXETER. 

Under the title of Devon it will be found that the ancient Earls of Devon, of the 
De Riparijs or Redvers family, were not unfrequently styled Earls of Exeter, 
either from Exeter being the capital of their county or from their residence in 
that city. 



Dukes. 

1397. 



II. 1416. 



John Holland, 3rd s. of Thomas Holland, 1st Earl of Kent, by 
Joan Plantagenet, dau. and h. of Edmund Plantagenet Earl 
of Kent, s. of Edward I. ; created Earl of Huntingdon 2 June 
1387, and Duke of Exeter 29 Sept. 1397, K.G. ; degraded in 
Pari. 1399 (and beheaded 1400), when his honours became 
Forfeited. 

Thomas Beaufort II. Earl of Dorset, youngest natural s. of 
John of Gaunt Duke of Lancaster by Catherine Swinford, 
created in Pari. Duke of Exeter for life 18 Nov. 1416, and 
Earl of Harcourt in Normandy 1 July 1418 by the service of 
rendering to the King at Rouen " unum florem deliciarum " 
annually on the feast of St. John the Baptist ; 8 K.G. ; ob. 
27 Dec. 1426, s. p., when that dignity became Extinct. 



1 The Counts of Ewe were considered as 
having the rank of Earls in England, and 
were probably summoned as such to the 
King's Councils, although their possession of 
the Castle and Barony of Hastings (vide 



Hoo and Hastings) made them only Barons 
in England. Vide observations under Albe- 
marle. 

6 Norman Roll, 6 II. V. 



182 EXMOUTH. 

Dukes. 

III. 1443. 1. John Holland, s. and h. of John 1st Duke, restored in blood and 

honours 1417, created Duke of Exeter 6 Jan. 1443, and by 
patent 17th of the same month had precedency assigned to 
him next the Duke of York (which placed him above the 
Dukes of Norfolk, Warwick, and Buckingham), Lord High 
Admiral, K.G. ; ob. 1446. 

IV. 1446. 2. Henry Holland, s. and h., attainted 4 Nov. 1461 (ob. 1473, 

s. p. M.), when his honours became Forfeited. 

Marquesses. 

I. 1525. 1. Henry Courtenay, XIX. Earl of Devon,' created Marquess of 

Exeter 18 June 1525, E.G., attainted and beheaded 1539, 
when his honours became Forfeited. 

II. 1553. 3. Edward Courtenay, s. and h., created Earl of Devon 3 Sept. 

1553, restored in blood and honours by Pari. 10 Oct. 1553 ; 
ob. 1556, s. p., when the Marcpuessate of Exeter became 
Extinct. 
Earls. 

I. 1605. 1. Thomas Cecil, 2nd Baron of Burghley, created Earl of Exeter 

4 May 1605, K.G. ; ob. 1622. 

II. 1622. 2. William Cecil, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1640, s. p. m. 

III. 1640. 3. David Cecil, neph. and h., being s. and h. of Kichard Cecil, 

2nd s. of Thomas I. 1st Earl ; ob. 1643. 

IV. 1643. 4. John Cecil, s. and h. ; ob. 1678. 

V. 1678. 5. John Cecil, s. and h. ; ob. 1700. 

VI. 1700. 6. John Cecil, s. and h. ; ob. 1721. 

VII. 1721. 7. John Cecil, s. and h. ; ob. 1722 unm. 

VIII. 1722. 8. Brownlow Cecil, bro. and h. ; ob. 1754. 

IX. 1754. 9. Brownlow Cecil, s. and h. ; ob. 1793, s. p. 

Marquesses. 

X. 179S. — III. 1801. 10. Henry Cecil, neph. and h., being s. and h. of 

Thomas Chambers Cecil, 2nd s. of Brownlow 
VIII. 8th Earl, created Marquess of Exeter 
4 Feb. 1801 ; ob. 1 May 1804. 

XI. 1804. — IV. 1804. 11. Brownlow Cecil, s. and h., present Marquess and 
Earl of Exeter and Baron of Burghley, K.G. =p 

EXMOUTH. 
Baron. Viscount. 

I. 1814. — I. 1816. Sir Edward Pellew, 1st Bart., created Baron Exmouth 

of Canonteign, co. Devon, 1 June 1814, created Vis- 
count Exmouth aforesaid 10 Dec. 1816, G.C.B. ; ob. 
23 Jan. 1833. 

II. 1833.— II. 1833. Pownoll Bastard Pellew, s. and h. ; ob. 3 Dec. 1833. 

III. 1833. — III. 1833. Edward Pellew, s. and h., present Viscount and Baron 

Exmouth, and a Bart. 

1 See note under Cumberland. 



FAIRFORD — FALVESLEY. 



183 



F. 



Earl. 
1664. 



FAIRFORD. 

Viscounty, 28 Aug. 1772.— Vide Hillseorough. 

FALMOUTH. 

1. Charles Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley and Viscount Fitz- 
Hardinge in Ireland, s. of Sir Charles Berkeley, bro. of John 1st 
Lord Berkeley of Stratton, created Baron Botetourt of Langport, 
co. Somerset, and Earl of Falmouth 17 March 1664; fell in 
battle 3 June 1665, s. p. m., when his English honours became 
Extinct. 
Viscounts. 

I. 1674. 1. George Fitz-Boy, natural s. of King Charles II., created Baron of 

Pontefract, Viscount Falmouth, and Earl of Northumberland 
1 Oct. 1674, created Duke of Northumberland 6 April 1683, 
K.G. ; ob. 1716, s. p., when his honours became Extinct. 

II. 1720. 1. Hugh Boscawen, created Baron of Boscawen Rose and Viscount 

Falmouth, both co. Cornwall, 9 June 1720 ; ob. 1734. 

III. 1734. 2. Hugh Boscawen, s. and h., ob. 1782, s. p. 

IV. 1782. 3. George Evelyn Boscawen, neph. and h., being s. and h. of Ed- 

ward Boscawen, next bro. of the last Viscount ; ob. 14 Feb. 1808. 



V. 1808. 



Earl. 
-I. 1821. 



Edward Boscawen, s. and h., created Earl of Falmouth 
14 July 1821 ; ob. 29 Dec. 1841. 

VI. 1841. — II. 1841. 5. George Henry Boscawen, s. and h. ; ob. unm. 29 

Aug. 1852, when the Earldom of Falmouth became 
Extinct, but the Barony and Viscounty devolved on, 

VII. 1852. 6. Evelyn Boscawen, cousin and h., s. and h. of John Evelyn Bos- 

cawen, next bro. of Edward 5th Viscount and 1st Earl of Falmouth, pre- 
sent Viscount Falmouth and Baron of Boscawen Rose. =j= 

t 

FALVESLEY. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1383. Sir John de Falvesley, fet. 16, 1342, s. and h. of Thomas de Fal- 
vesley ; having m. Elizabeth, sister and h. of John Lord Say (vide Say), 
in 1383, he was sumni. to Pari, from 20 Aug. 7 Rich. II. 1383, to 8 Sept. 
16 Rich. II. 1392, as " Johanni de Falvesley, Chevalier;" ob. circa 1392, 
8. p., when, if it be considered that he was not summoned jure uxoris as 
Lord Say, by which title he is not described in any writ of summons," 
the Barony created by the writ of 7 Rich. II. became Extinct. 



u Though never styled Lord Say in any Writ 
of Summ. to Pari., the late Francis Townsend, 
Esq., Windsor Herald, says that he had seen 
a deed beginning thus : " Sciant," &c., " quod 
ego Joh'es Falwesle, Chivaler et Dominus de 
Say dedi," &c. " Joh'i Waltham Custodi 
privati sigilli." " Dat. : apud London 1° 
die Martii, A°. R' R' Ricardi secundi post 
Conq. 10°." It is worthy of observation 



that Sir John Falvesley having married 
Elizabeth de Say, demanded the lands of her 
inheritance which were then in the King's 
hands by reason of the minority of her bro- 
ther, to whom she succeeded as heir ; but he 
was answered that she having married him 
without licence of the Crown, the lands were 
seized by the King until he should make satis- 
faction. Falvesley persisted in his claim, 



184 



FANHOPE — FAUCONBERG. 



FANHOPE. 
Baron. 

I. 1433. ^John Cornwall, created Baron of Fanhope, co. Hereford, in Pari. 
17 July 1433, confirmed by patent 12 Nov. following, and on 30 Jan. 1442 
Baron of Milbroke, co. Bedford, also in Pari. ;" he was however alway s 
summ. to Pari, as " Johanni Cornewayll, Chevalier ;" he m. Elizabeth 
Plantagenet, sister of Henry IT. and widow of John Earl of Huntingdon ; 
K.G. ; ob. 1443, s. p. l., when his honours became Extinct. 



FAKEHAM. 

Countess, 19 Aug. 1673 — Extinct 1734. — Vide Portsmouth. 



FAENBOEOUGH. 
Baron. 

I. 1826. 1. Sir Charles Long, G.C.B., created Baron Farnborough of Bromley 
Hill Place, co. Kent, 8 July 1826 ; ob. 17 Jan. 1838, s. p., when the title 
became Extinct. 



FAUCONBEEG. 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1295. 1. f Walter de Fauconberg, summ. to Pari, from 23 June, 23 Edw. I. 

1295, to 24 July, 30 Edw. I. 1301 ; he was also summ. 8 June, 
22 Edw. I. 1294, but it is very doubtful if that writ can be 
deemed a regular summ. to Pari, (vide Clyvedon); ob. 1303. 

II. 1303. 2. Walter de Fauconberg, s. andh. ast. 40, summ. to Pari, from 

12 Nov. 32 Edw. I. 1303, to 25 Aug. 12 Edw. II. 1318; ot. 
1318. 

III. 1336. 3. John de Fauconberg, s. and h. ast. 28, summ. to Pari, from 22 Jan. 

9 Edw. III. 1336, to 10 Mar. 23 Edw. III. 1349 ; ob. 1349. 

IV. 1359. 4. Walter de Fauconberg, s. and h. set. 30, summ. to Pari, from 

25 Nov. 24 Edw. III. 1359, to 14 Aug. 36 Edw. III. 1362 ; ob. 
1362. 

V. 5. Thomas de Fauconberg, s. and h. a?t. 17 ; he was never summ. to 

Pari. ; ob. 1407, leaving Joan his dau. and sole heir. 



and the affair was decided by the King and 
his Council in full Parliament in the sixth 
year of his reign in his favour, and in the 
very next year he received his Writ of Summ. 
to Pail. It equally admits of a doubt whe- 
ther the writ was issued ex debito Justitice, 
in consequence of his having by that suit 
established the validity of his marriage with 
a woman who was a Baroness in her own 
right by descent, according to existing opi- 
nions ; or whether the tenure of his wife's 
lands was then considered to entitle their 
possessor to sit in Parliament. Vide note 
under Heron. 

' The case of Sir John Cornwall is re- 
markable in several respects. Both of his 
Creations were in Parliament and enrolled 
in Pa-liament, but the former only was 
exemplified by Patent; in the latter, cre- 



ating him Baron of Milbroke, he is styled 
Sir John Cornwall only, without reference 
to his former Creation as Baron of Fanhope ; 
in neither case are there any words of inhe- 
ritance, and although the absence of such 
words, under ordinary circumstances, would 
give only a life-estate to the grantee, Lord 
Lyndhurst, in his argument on the Wensley- 
dale Peerage, considered that his being created 
in Parliament a Baron "with all and singular 
rights, privileges, and immunities in every 
place within the realm of England, as fully, 
entirely, and in the same manner and form 
as other Barons of the same realm before this 
time have used and enjoyed," gave to him 
amongst those rights the privilege enjoyed by 
other Barons of transmitting his title to his 
posterity. 



FAUCONBERG — FEILDING. 185 

Barons by Writ. 

VI. 1429. ^William Nevill, younger s. of Ralph 1st Earl of Westmoreland, 
having rn. Joan, dau. and h. of Thomas the last Baron, was summ. to Pari, 
in her right from 3 Aug. 7 Hen. VI. 1429, to 23 May, 1 Edw. IV. 1461, 
though in every writ from 7 Hen. VI. to 25 Hen. VI. he is merely de- 
scribed as " Willielmo de Nevill, Chl'r ■" in the 33 Hen. VI. he is how- 
ever called " Willielmo Nevill de Fauconherge, Chl'r," and so also in the 
38 Hen. VI. when the following memorandum appears on the roll, " vacat 
quia extra regnum ;" in the 1 Edw. IV. the words " de Fauconherge " are 
also inserted ; created Earl of Kent 1462, K.G. ; oh. 1463, s. p. m., when 
the Earldom of Kent became Extinct, but this Barony fell into Abeyance 
between his three daughters — Joane, wife of Sir Edward Bedhowing ; Eliza- 
beth, wife of Sir Richard Strangeways; and Alice, wife of Sir John 
Conyers, amongst whose descendants and representatives it is still in 
Abeyance. 

William de Fatjconberg, 3rd cousin of Walter 2nd Baron, is stated by 
Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 4, to have been summ. to Pari, in 28 Edw. I., but his 
name does not occur in the Lists of Summons in that year. 



FAUCONBERG (of Yarm). 

Barons. Viscounts. 

I. 1627. — I. 1643. 1. Sir Thomas Belasyse, 2nd Bart., created Baron 

Fauconberg of Yarm, co. York, 25 May 1627, and 
Viscount Fauconberg of Henknowle, co. Durham, 
31 Jan. 1643 ; ob. 1652. 

Earls. 

II. 1652.— II. 1652.— I. 1689. 2. Thomas Belasyse, grands, and h., being 

s. and h. of Henry Belasyse (ob. v. p.), 
eldest s. of the last Viscount, created 
Earl Fauconberg 9 April 1689 ; ob. 
1700, s. p., when the Earldom became 
Extinct, but the Viscounty and 
Barony devolved on, 

III. 1700. — III. 1700. — 3. Thomas Belasyse, neph. and h., being 

s. and h. of Sir Rowland Belasyse, 
K.B., 3rd s. of Henry, father of the 
last Viscount; ob. 1718. 

IV. 1718.— IV. 1718.— II. 1756. 4. Thomas Belasyse, s. and h., created 

Earl Fauconberg of Newborough, co. 
York, 16 June 1756; ob. 1774. 

V. 1774.— V. 1774.— III. 1774. 5. Henry Belasyse, s. and h. ; ob. 23 Mar. 

1802, when the Earldom again became 
Extinct, but the Barony and Viscounty 
descended to his 2nd cousin, 

VI. 1802.— VI. 1802. 6. Rowland Belasyse, being s. and h. of Anthony, 

eldest s. of Rowland Belasyse, next surviving bro. 
of Thomas 3rd Viscount ; ob. 30 Nov. 1810, s. p. 

VII. 1810.— VII. 1810. 7. Charles Belasyse, D.D., of the Sorbonne, in holy 

orders of the church of Rome, bro. and h. ; ob. June 1815, when these 
titles became Extinct. 

FEILDING. 

Barons. Viscounts. 

I. 1620. — I. 1620. 1. William Feilding, created Baron Feilding of Newn- 
ham Padox, co. Warwick, and Viscount Feilding 30 Dec. 1620 ; created 
Karl of Denbigh 14 Sept. 1622.— Vide Denbigh. 



186 FELTON — FERRERS. 

. „. .. FELTON. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1313. Robert de Felton, summ. to Pari. 8 Jan. and 22 May, 6 Edw. II., 
1313, and 26 July and 26 Nov. 7 Edw. II. 1313 ; ob. 1314, leaving 
John de Felton his s. and h., whom Dugdale (vol. ii. p. 64) says 
was summ. to Pari. 16 Edw. III. ; but his name does not appear 
in the List of Summonses in that year, the only person of that 
name then summoned being, 

I. 1342. William de Felton, first cousin of the last Baron, but not his heir, 
being s. and h. of William de Felton, bro. of Robert his father ; he was 
summ. to Pari. 25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342, but never afterwards ; ob. 1358, 
leaving Sir William Felton his s. and h., then set. 30, who was never 
summ. to Pari., nor were any of his posterity. The said Sir William de 
Felton, who succeeded his father in 1358, was slain in Spain 1367, leaving 
Sir John de Felton his s. and h., then set. 28, who died 31 Mar. 1396, 
leaving by his 1st wife two daughters, Elizabeth, set. 15 in 1396, but who 
died s. p., and Joan, set. 13 in 1396. By his 2nd wife he had a son, Sir 
John Felton, jet. 10 in 1396, but who died s. p. 1402, when John, the son 
of Walter Falconberg by Joan his wife, sister of John Felton his father, 
and who was then set. 30, was found to be his heir of the whole blood, and 
Elizabeth, his father's dau. by his 1st wife, and then wife of Sir Edmund 
Hastings, was found to be his heir of the half blood, then set. 23 years ; 
she left issue Sir John Hastings, father of Sir Edmund, father of Sir Roger, 
ast. 26 in 1489, and amongst his descendants this Barony is in Abeyance. 

FERRERS (of Chartley). 

The Earls of Derby of the family of Ferrers were not unfrequently styled Earls de 
Ferrers, as has been before remarked under Derby : they were also called Earls 
of Tutbury, from the Castle of Tutbury, one of the possessions of Henry de 
Ferrers, mentioned in Domesday. Thomas Plantagenet Earl of Lancaster, who 
was possessed of the Castle of Tutbury granted to his father by the Crown, 
styled himself upon his seal Earl of Lancaster, Leicester, and Ferrers ; no such 
Earldom however existed until 1711. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 1. John Feeeees, s. and h. of Robert 8th and last Earl of Derby, 

summ. to Pari, from 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, to 19 Dec. 5 
Edw. II. 1311 ; ob. 1324. 

II. 1342. 2. Robeet Feeeees, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 25 Feb. 16 Edw. 

III. 1342 ; ob. 1350. 

III. 3. John Feeeees, s. and h., he was never summ. to Pari. ; ob. 1367. 

IV. 4. Robeet Feeeees, s. and h., a3t. 7, he was never summ. to 

Pari. ; ob. 1413. 

V. 5. Edmund Feeeees, s. and h., set. 24, he was never summ. to 

Pari. ; ob. 1435-6. 

VI. 6. William Feeeees, s. and h., set. 23, he was never summ. to 

Pari. ; ob. s. p. m. 1450. 

VII. 1461. 7.^WalteeDeveeeux, having married Ann Ferrers, a3t. 11, 1450, 

dau. and sole heir of the last Baron, was summ. to Pari, jure 
uxoris, from 26 July, 1 Edw. IV. 1461, to 9 Dec. 1 Rich. 
III. 1483, as "Waltero Devereux de Ferrers, Chl'r," or as 
" Waltero Devereux, Domino de Ferrers," K.Gr. ; slain at 
Bosworth, 1485. 

VIII. 1487. 8. John Deveeetjx, s. and h., set. 7, 1470, summ. to Pari, from 

1 Sept. 3 Hen. VII. 1487, to 16 Jan. 12 Hen. VII. 1497 ; he 
married Cecily, sister and heir of Henry Bourchier Earl of 
Essex; ob. 1501. 



FERRERS. 



187 



Barons 
IX. 



by Writ. 
1509. 9. 



X 



XI. 1576. 11. 



XII. 1603. 12. 



Walter Devereux, s. and h., a?t. 10, summ. to Pari, from 17 
Oct. 1 Hen. VIII. 1509, to 24 Nov. 2 Edw. VI. 1548, created 
Viscount Hereford 2 Feb. 1550, E.G. ; ob. 1558. 
1558. 10. Walter Devereux, grands, and h., b. 1540, being s. and h. of 
Sir Richard Devereux (ob. v. p. 1547), eldest son of the last 
Baron, Viscount Hereford, created Earl of Essex 4 May 1572, 
K.G. ; ob. 1576. 

Robert Devereux, s. and h., b. 1567, Viscount Hereford and 
Earl of Essex, K.G., Earl Marshal 1597 ; beheaded 25 Feb. 
1601, and attainted, when all his honours became Forfeited. 

Robert Devereux, s. and h., restored, together with his sisters, 
in blood and honours by Act of Parliament 1603, Viscount 
Hereford and Earl of Essex ; ob. 1646, s. p., when the Earldom 
of Essex became Extinct. The Viscounty of Hereford devolved 
on Sir Walter Devereux as next heir male, and this Barony 
fell into Abeyance between his two sisters and heirs, viz. 
Frances, wife of William Seymour Duke of Somerset, and 
Dorothy, wife 1st of Sir Henry Shirley, Bart., and 2ndly of 
William Stafford of Blatherwick, Esq. (to whom she was m. 
in 1634, but by him had no issue), until the Crown terminated 
the Abeyance in favour of, 
XIII. 1677. 13. Sir Robert Shirley, 6th Bart., the younger cob., he being s. 
and h. of Sir Robert, eldest son of Sir Henry Shirley by the 
said Dorothy, sister and coh. of the last Baron ; he was summ. 
to Pari, as Baron Ferrers of Chartley 14 Dec. 1677, created 
Viscount Tamworth and Earl Ferrers 3 Sept. 1711 ; ob. 1717. 
Elizabeth Shirley, grand-dau. and h., being dau. and sole 
heir of Robert Shirley (ob. v. p.), s. and h. apparent of Robert 
Earl Ferrers, the last Baron ; she m. James Compton Earl of 
Northampton ; ob. 1741, s. p. m., when the Barony again fell 
into Abeyance between her two daughters and coheirs ; but 
on the death of Lady Jane Compton, unm., in 1749, the 
dignity devolved on, 

1749. 15. Charlotte Compton, dau. and on the death of her sister sole 
heir of Elizabeth the last Baroness ; she m. George, 4th Vis- 
count and 1st Marquess Townshend ; ob. 1770. 

1770. 16. George Townshend, Earl of the County of Leicester, so 
created 18 May 1784, s. and h., succeeded his father in the 
Marquessate of Townshend 14 Sept. 1807; ob. 27 July 1811. 

1811. 17. George Ferrars Townshend, s. and h., Marquees Townshend; 

ob. s. p. 31 Dec. 1855, leaving his nephew, Marmion Edward Ferrers, Esq., 

and his sister, Lady Elizabeth Margaret Boultbee, his coheirs, between whom 

this Barony is in Abeyance. 



XIV. 1717. 14. 



XV. 

XVI. 
XVII 



II. 

HI. 

IV. 



Earls. 
1711. 



FERRERS. 

1. Robert Shirley, XIII. 13th Baron Ferrers of Chartley, created 
Viscount Tamworth, co. Stafford, and Earl Ferrers 3 Sept. 
1711; ob. 1717. 

1717. 2. Washington Shirley, 2nd s. and h. (Robert Shirley, his eldest 
bro., having died without issue male), succeeded as Earl Ferrers 
and Viscount Tamworth ; ob. 1729, s. p. m. 

Henry Shirley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1745, unm. 



1729 
1745 



4. Lawrence Shirley, neph. and h., being s. and h. of Lawrence 
next bro. to the last Earl; executed for murder 1760; ob. s. p. 



188 FERRERS. 

Earls. 

V. 1760. 5. Washington Shirley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1778, s. p. 

VI. 1778. 6. Robert Shirley, bro. and h. ; ob. 1787. 

VII. 1787. 7. Robert Shirley, s. and h. ; ob. 2 May 1827, s. p. s. 

VIII. 1827. 8. Washington Shirley, bro. and h. ; ob. 2 Oct. 1842. 

IX. 1842. 9. Washington Sewallis Shirley, grands, and h., s. and b. of 
Robert William (ob. v. p.), eldest son of tbe last Earl, present Earl Ferrers 
and Viscount Tamworth, and a Baronet. =p 

t 

FERRERS (of Groby). 
Baron by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. 1. William Ferrers, 2nd s. of William 7tb Earl of Derby, Lord 
of Groby, co. Leicester ; ob. 1288. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1297. 2. f William Ferrers, s. and h., set. 18, 1288, summ. to Pari, from 

26 Sept. 28 Edw. I. 1300, to 20 Feb. 18 Edw. II. 1325, as 
" Willielmo de Ferrariis ;" be was also summ. 26 Jan. 25 
Edw. I. 1297, but for tbe reasons assigned under Fitz- 
John, it is somewhat doubtful if that writ can be considered 
a regular summ. to Pari. ; ob. 1325, 

II. 1331. 3. Henry Ferrers, s. and h. set. 22, summ. to Pari, from 5 June, 

4 Edw. III. 1331, to 20 Nov. 16 Edw. III. 1342, as " Henrico 
de Ferrariis ;" ob. 1343. 

III. 1354. 4. William Ferrers, s. and b. sat. 10, summ. to Pari, from 15 

Mar. 28 Edw. III. 1354, to 6 Apr. 43 Edw. III. 1369, as 
" Willielmo de Ferrariis ;" ob. 1372. 

IV. 1377. 5. Henry Ferrers, s. and h. set. 16, summ. to Pari, from 4 Aug. 

1 Rich. II. 1377, to 17 Dec. 11 Rich. II. 1387, as " Henrico 
de Ferrariis de Groby ;" ob. 1388. 

V. 1396. 6. SjJ William Ferrers, s. and b. set. 15, summ. to Pari, from 30 

Nov. 20 Ricb. II. 1396, to 3 Dec. 20 Hen. VI. 1441, as 
" William de Ferrers de Groby ;" ob. 1445. 

VI. 1446. 7.^ Edward Grey, set. 30, 1445, s. of Reginald 3rd Lord Grey of 

Ruthyn, by his 2nd wife Joan, dau. and sole heir of William, 
s. and h. of Thomas III. 7th Baron Astley ; having m. Eliza- 
beth Ferrers (set. 26, 1445), granddau. and h. of the last 
Baron, viz. dau. and h. of Henry Ferrers (ob. v. p.), his eldest 
son, he was summ. to Pari, jure uxoris, as " Edwardo de 
Grey, Militi, Domino de Ferrers de Groby," from 14 Dec. 25 
Hen. VI. 1446, to 2 Jan. 27 Hen. VI. 1449, and as " Edwardo 
de Grey, Militi, Dominus de Groby," from 23 Sept. 28 Hen. 
VI. 1449, to 26 May, 33 Hen. VI. 1455 ; ob. 1457. 

VII. 8. John Grey, s. and h. set. 13, 1445 ; he was never summ. to 

Pari. ; slain at the battle of St. Albans 1461. 

VIII. 1461. 9. Thomas Grey, s. and h. set. 13, 1464, created Marquess of Dorset 

18 Apr. 1475, having been created Earl of Huntingdon 14 
.Aug. 1471, K.G., attainted 1483, when his honours became 
Forfeited, but he was fully restored in blood and honours 
1485 ; E.G. ; ob. 1501. 

IX. 1509. 10. Thomas Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 17 Oct. 1 Hen. VIII. 

1509, as " Thomas Grey, Domino Ferrers de Groby," but in 
the 2nd Pari, in 1511, as " Thomas Grey, Marchioni Dorset," 
Marquess of Dorset ; K.G. ; ob. 1530. 



^ 



FERRERS— FEVERSHAM. 



189 



Barons by Writ. 

X. 1530. 11. Henby Grey, s. and h., Marquess of Dorset, having m. Frances, 
dan. and coh. of Charles Brandon Duke of Suffolk, by Mary Tudor, sister 
of King Henry VIII., he was created Duke of Suffolk 11 Oct. 1551, E.G. ; 
attainted and beheaded 1554, when this Barony, with all his other honours, 
viz. the Dukedom of Suffolk, the Marquessate of Dorset, and the Baronies 
of Astley, Bonville, and Harington, became Forfeited. 

FERRERS (of Okeham). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Walcheline de Feeeees/ Lord of Okeham, co. Rutland, 1164 ; 

living 1191. 

II. Rich. I. 2. Hugh de Ferrers, s. and h., living 1197 ; ob. s. p., leaving 

Isabel his sister, wife of Roger Lord Mortimer, his heir. 

FERRERS (of Wemme ). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1375. 1. ^Robert Ferrers, a younger son of Robert 2nd Baron Ferrers of 
Chartley, having m. Elizabeth, dau. and sole heir of William III. Baron 
Boteler of Wemme, was sunim. to Pari, as " Robert Ferrers de Wemme, 
Chev." from 28 Dec. 49 Edw. III. 1375, to 20 Oct. 3 Rich. II. 1379 ; ob. 1380. 
Robert Ferrers, his s. and h., died 1410, s. p. m., vita, matris, without having 
been sunmi. to Pari., leaving Elizabeth, wife of John, son of Ralph Lord 
Greystock, aet. 18 years, and Mary, wife of Ralph Nevill, younger son of 
Ralph Earl of Westmoreland, ait. 17 years, his daughters and coheirs. If 
this Barony be considered as a Barony created by the writ 28 Dec. 1375, it is 
in Abeyance between the descendants of these two daughters and coheirs ; 
and such would also appear to be the case if the writ of 1375 were only an 
extension of the Barony of Boteler of Wemme, since Robert Ferrers, the 
father of the two daughters and coheirs, was the representative of his 
mother, whether she had or had not issue by her 2nd and 3rd husbands. — 
Vide Boteler of Wemme. The Barony is now in Abeyance between 
the heirs of Greystock and the heirs of Edward Lord de Clifford, who died 
1832. Vide Clifford. 



Earls. 
1076. 



FEVERSHAM. 



1. Sir George Sondes, created Baron of Thro'wley, co. Kent, Viscount 
Sondes of Lees-Court, and Earl of Feversham, all in the same 
county, 8 Apr. 1676, for life and after his decease, with remainder 
to Lewis Baron Duras of Holdenby, co. Northampton, and the 
heirs male of his body, with a fee of 20 marks per annum for the 
better support of the dignity ; ob. 1677, s. p. m. 

II. 1677. 2. Lewis de Duras, 1st Baron Duras, son-in-law and, agreeable to the 
above limitation, heir to the last Baron, K.G. ; ob. 1709, s 
his honours became Extinct. 



p., when all 



I. 



Countess. 

1719. Erangaed Melosike Schulembuegh, mistress of George I., created 
Baroness Dundalk, Countess and Marchioness of Dungannon, and Duchess 
of Munster in Ireland, for life 16 July 1716 ; created 19 Mar. 1719, 
Baroness of Glastonbury, co. Somerset, Countess of Feversham, co. Kent, 
and Duchess of Kendal, co. Westmoreland, for life ; ob. 1743, when all her 
honours became Extinct. 



y Dugdale, in his Pedigree of Ferrers, vol. 
i. p. 259, makes this Walcheline a younger 
son of Robert, 1st Earl of Derby ; but in his 
account of this branch in p. 266, he says he 



was a younger son of William, 3rd Earl of 
Derby. The dates render the former the 
most probable account. 



190 FEVERSHAM — FISHERWICK. 



Baron FEVERSHAM ( of Downton ). 

I. 1747. Anthony Duncombe, created Lord Feversham, Baron of Downton, 
co. Wilts, 23 June 1747 ; ob. 1763, s. p. m., when the title became 
Extinct. 

Barons FEVERSHAM (of Duncombe Park). 

I. 1826. 1. Charles Duncombe (s. and h. of Charles 2nd s. of Thomas s. and 

h. of Thomas Browne, who assumed the name of Duncombe in 
consequence of his marriage with Mary, sister of Anthony Dun- 
combe, the father of Anthony Lord Feversham of Downton, and 
aunt and in her issue sole heir of his Lordship), created Baron 
Feversham of Duncombe Park, co. York, 14 July 1826 ; ob. 
16 July 1841. 

II. 1841. 2. William Duncombe, s. and h., present Baron Feversham. =p 

Y 

* 

FIFE. 

Barons. ' 

I. 1790. 1. James Duff, 2nd Earl of Fife in Ireland, created Baron Fife, co. 

Fife, in the Peerage of Great Britain, 5 July 1790 ; ob. 24 Jan. 
1809, s. p. m., when this Barony became Extinct. 

II. 1827. 1. James Duff, 4th Earl of Fife in Ireland, neph. of the preceding 

Baron, created Baron Fife of the County of Fife 28 Apr. 1827, present 
Baron Fife, also Earl of Fife, &c. in Ireland, K.T. = 

Baron FINCH (of Fordwich). 

I. 1640. 1. John Finch, 1st cousin of Thomas 1st Earl of Winchelsea, created 
Baron Finch of Fordwich, co. Kent, 7 Apr. 1640, Lord Keeper ; ob. 1660, 
s. p., when the title became Extinct. 

Baron FINCH (of Daventry). 

I. 1673. 1. Sir Heneage Finch, Bart., created Baron Finch of Daventry, co. 
Northampton, 10 Jan. 1673, and Earl of Nottingham 12 May 1681, Lord 
Chancellor. — Vide Nottingham and Winchelsea. 

Barons. FINGALL. 

I. 1831. 1. Arthur James Plunkett, 8th Earl of Fingall in Ireland, K.P., 

created Baron Fingall of Woolhampton Lodge, co. Berks, 20 June 
1831 ; ob. 30 July 1836. 

II. 1836. 2. Arthur James Plunkett, s. and h., present Baron Fingall, Earl 

of Fingall, &c. in Ireland, K.P. ^= 

Baron. FISHERWICK. 

I. 1790. 1. Arthur Chichester, 5th Earl and 1st Marquess of Donegal in 

Ireland, created Baron Fisherwick, co. Stafford, 3 July 1790 ; ob. 
1799. 

II. 1799. 2. George Augustus Chichester, s. and h., K.P. ; ob. 5 Oct. 

1844. 

III. 1844. 3. George Hamilton Chichester, s. and h., Baron Ennishowen and 

Carrickfergus, present Baron Fisherwick and Baron Ennishowen and Car- 
rickfergus ; also Marquess of Donegal in Ireland, G.C.H., &c. =p 

Y 



FITZ-ALAN— FITZ-ANSCULF. 191 

FITZALAN" ( of Bedale ). 
Jarons by Tenure. 

:. Hen. II. 1. Alan Fitz-Brian ; ob. 1190. 

I. Hen. III. 2. Brian Fitz-Alan, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1276. 

5aron by Writ. 

1295. 3. f Brian Fitz-Alan, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 23 June, 
23 Edw. I. 1295, to 22 Jan. 33 Edw. I. 1305 ; ob. 13 .., s. p. m. Maud, 
set. 7, 1307, one of his daughters and coheirs, afterwards m. Sir Gilbert 
Stapleton ; and Katherine, a3t. 5, 1307, his other dau. and coh., became the 
wife of John Lord Grey of Rotherfield, and among the descendants and re- 
presentatives of these coheirs this Barony must be considered to be in 
Abeyance. 



FITZALAN (of Clun and Oswaldestre ). 
Jarons by Tenure. 

Will. I. 1. Alan Fitz-Fleald obtained the Castle of Oswaldestre (Os- 
westry), co. Salop, from William the Conqueror. 

I. Hen. I. 2. William Fitz-Alan, Lord of Oswaldestre, s. and h. ; ob. 

1160. 

II. Hen. II. 3. William Fitz-Alan, Lord of Oswaldestre, and Lord also of 

Clun, co. Salop, in right of his wife Isabel, dau. and h. of 
Ingelram de Say, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1210. 

V. John. 4. William Fitz-Alan, Lord of Clun and Oswaldestre, s. and h. ; 
ob. s. p., 1216. 

J. Hen. III. 5. John Fitz-Alan, bro. and h. ; married Isabel de Albini, sister 
and coh. to Hugh Earl of Arundel, and ob. 1240. 

71. Hen. III. 6. John Fitz-Alan, Lord of Clun and Oswaldestre, s. and h., who 
on the partition of the lands of his uncle, Hugh Earl of 
Arundel, in 1243, obtained the Castle and Manor of Arundel. 
Vide Arundel. 

Baron. 
'.. 1627. 1. Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, the heir general 
of the family of Fitz-Alan above mentioned, was by Act of Parliament 
3 Car. I. created Baron Fitz-Alan, Lord of Clun and Oswaldestre and Mal- 
travers, and which two Baronies of Fitzalan and Maltravers were then 
annexed to the title and dignity of Earl of Arundel, and settled upon the 
said Thomas Earl of Arundel and Surrey, and the heirs male of his body, 
with remainder to the heirs of his body ; remainder to his uncle Lord 
AVilliam Howard and the heirs male of his body, with remainder to the 
heirs of his body ; remainder to the aforesaid Thomas Earl of Arundel 
and Surrey and his heirs for ever; and in consequence of this entail, 
the Barony of Fitz-Alan of Clun and Oswaldestre, and that of 
Maltravers, are now possessed by his Grace Henry Granville Howard 
Duke of Norfolk, the present Earl of Arundel, &c. — Vide Arundel and 
Norfolk. 



FITZ-AJSTSCULF or AUSCULPH. 

iaron by Tenure. 

Will. I. William Fitz-Ansculp, or Ausculf de Pinchengi, held ninety- 
one Lordships at the General Survey, whereof Dudley Castle, co. Stafford, 
was his chief seat, but of whom nothing farther is known. 



192 FITZ-BERNARD — FITZ-GEROLD. 

FITZ-BERNARD. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1313. 1. Thomas Fitz-Bernard of Kingsdown, co. Kent, summ. to Farl. 
from 8 Jan. 6 Edw. II. 1313, to 14 Mar. 15 Edw. II. 1322, as " Thomas 

filio Bernardi ;" ob leaving John his s. and h., who died without 

issue 1361, when the issue of his great-aunt Joan, wife of William de 
Badlesmere, became his heirs, and the Barony became Extinct. The heirs 
of Thomas Fitz-Bemard, who died in 1361, were the posterity of Bartholo- 
mew de Badlesmere, father of Bartholomew I. 1st Baron Badlesmere, and 
Johanna his wife, dau. of Ralph Fitz-Bernard and aunt of Thomas Fitz- 
Bernard, who was summ. to Pari. 6 Edw. II. 

Dugdale gives no account of this Baron in his Baronage, nor is he noticed 
by any other writer on the subject, excepting Banks in his ' Barones Reject:.' 

FITZCLAREWCE. 

Viscounty, 4 June 1831. — Vide Munster. 

EITZ-COUWT. 
Baron by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. Brian Fitz-Count, Lord of Abergavenny, and, in right of his wife 
Maud D'Oyly, Lord of Wallingford, co. Berks, a constant adherent of the 
Empress Maud, living 1141, went into exile, and his two sons being lepers, 
and the Baron and his wife " betaking themselves to a religious course of 
life," Henry II., soon after his accession, seized upon his lands. 

FITZ-GERALD. 

Baron. 

I. 1835. 1. William Vesct Fitzgerald, Lord Fitzgerald and Vescy in Ireland, 
created Baron Fitzgerald of Desmond and Clan Gibbon, co. Cork, 10 Jan. 
1835 ; died unm. 11 May 1843, when the title became Extinct. 

FITZ-GEROLD. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. Robert Fitz-Gerold, possessed at the General Survey of 19 
lordships, cos. Wilts and Southampton, besides lands in other 
counties ; living 1082. 



IL Hen. II. 1. Ralph Fitz-Gerold, z of Camberwell, co. Surrey ; living 1165, 
succeeded by, 

III. Hen. II. 2. Warine Fitz-Ralph, z s. and h., Chamberlain to Henry II. ; 

his successor was, 

IV. Rich. I. 3. Warine Fitz-Gerold, s. and h. ; ob. 1217, s. p. m. Mar- 

gery, his 2nd dau. and coh., m. 1. Baldwin de Redvers, Earl 
of Devon, and 2. Foulke de Breaut; and Joan, his other 
dau. and coh., was the wife of Hugh de Nevill. 



Hen. III. Henry Fitz-Gerold, a younger bro. of the last Baron, living 
1252 ; ob. s. p., leaving an only dau. Alice, wife of Robert De 
LTsle, Lord of Rugemont. 



Hen. II. Alexander Fitz-Gerold, bro. of Ralph 2nd Baron, was father 
of Robert Fitz-Gerold, whose dau. Amicia m. 1st to Philip 
Leyborne, and 2ndly to John Tregoz. 

z Both these Barons were buried in the priory church of St. Mary Overy, Southwark. 



FITZ-GIBBON — F1TZ-HERBERT. 193 



FITZ-GIBBON. 

Barons. 

I. 1799. 1. John Fitz-Gibbon, 1st Earl of Clare in Ireland and Lord High 

Chancellor there ; created Baron Fitz-Gibbon of Sidbury, co. 
Devon, 24 Sept. 1799; ob. 28 Jan. 1802. 

II. 1802. 2. John Fitz-Gibbon, s. and b.; ob. s. p. 18 Aug. 1851. 

III. 1851. 3. Richard Hobaet Fitz-Gibbon, bro. and h., present Baron Fitz- 

Gibbon, also Earl of Clare in Ireland. =p 

FITZ-HAMON. 

Baron by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. Robert Fitz-Hamon, a kinsman and companion of the Conqueror, 
and for his services had the honour of Gloucester and other large grants of 
lands; slain at the siege of Falaise 1107, s. p. M., leaving his four daugh- 
ters his heirs, of whom two took the veil ; the third m. the Earl of Brit- 
tany ; and the fourth, Mabell, became the wife of Robert Consul, natural 
son of King Henry I., who was created Earl of Gloucester. 



FITZ-HARDING-E. 

Earl. 

I. 1841. 1. William Fitz-Hardingb Berkeley, created Baron Segrave of 
Berkeley Castle, co. Gloucester, 10 Sept. 1831, and Earl Fitz-Hardinge 17 
Aug. 1841, present Earl Fitz-Hardinge ; unm. 



FITZ-HAMtlS. 

Viscounty, 29 Dec. 1800. — Vide Malmesbury. 

FITZ-HENRY. 

Hugh Fitz-Henry, Lord of Ravenswath in Richmondshire, was summoned 8 
June, 22 Edw. I. 1295, but which Writ, for the reasons assigned under 
Clyvedon, cannot, it is presumed, be considered as a regular Summons to 
Pari. He was never afterwards summoned. — Vide Fitz-Hugh. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1309. 1. Aucher Fitz-Henry, summ. to Pari, from 4 Mar. 2 Edw. II. 
1309, to 10 Oct. 19 Edw. II. 1325 ; he m. Joan, dau. and coh. of John de 
Bellew, by Laderina, dau. and coh. of Peter de Brus of Skelton ; ob. 1340, 
leaving Henry his s. then Eet. 40 years, which Henry is presumed to have 
died s. p., as the family of Cloville of Esses quartered the arms of Aucher, 
by reason of descent from Joan, his sister. 

Dugdale gives no account of this Baron in his Baronage. 

FITZ-HERBERT. 

1. Matthew Fitz-Herbert, Sheriff, co. Sussex, 12 to 17 Kino- 
John (1210 to 1215). 

2. Peter Fitz-Matthew, s. and h. ; ob. 1254, s. p. 

3. John Fitz-Matthew, bro. and h. ; living 125G. 

4. Matthew Fitz-John, s. and h., summoned 2G Jan. 25 Edw. 1. 
1297, but it is somewhat doubtful if that Writ can be deemed a regular 
Summons to Pari, (vide Fitz-John); ob s. p. 

o 





Barons. 




I. 


John 


• 


II. 


Hen. 


III 


III. 


Hen. 


III 


IV. 


Edw 


I. 



104 



FITZ-HERBERT - FITZ-HUGH. 



FITZ-HERBERT (of Eastwell). 
Baron. 

1. 1660. 1. Heneage Finch, 2nd Earl of Wincliilsea, created Baron Fitz-Her- 
bert of Eastwell, co. Kent, 26. June 1660. 

On the death of John 5th Earl of Winchilsea, and 4th Baron Fitz- 
Herbert of Eastwell in 1729, s. p., this Barony became Extinct.— Vide 
Winchilsea. 



Barons by Tenure. 




I. Will. I. 


1. 


II. Steph. 


2 


III. Hen. II. 


3 


IV. Hen. II. 


4 


V. John. 


5 


VI. Hen. III. 


6 


VII. Edw. I. 


7 


VIII. Edw. I. 


8 


Barons by Writ. 




I. 1321. 


9 



II. 



1377. 



III. 1387 



IV. 1429 



1455. 



VI. 1482 



VII. 1509 



FITZ-HUGH. 

Bardolph, Lord of Ravenswath, in Richmondshire, in the 

reign of William the Conqueror. 
Akaris Fitz-Bardolph, s. and h. ; ob. 1161. 
Hervey Fitz-Akaris, s. and h. ; ob. 1182. 
Henry Fitz-Harvey, s. and h. ; ob. 1201. 
Randolph Fitz-Henry, s. and h. ; ob. 1262. 
Henry Fitz-Randolph, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 
Randolph Fitz-Henry, s. and h. ; ob. . . . s. p. 
8. t Hugh Fitz-Henry, bro. and h.; ob. 1304.— Vide Fitz- 
Henry. 



h. summ. to 
Nov. 25 Edw. 



Pari. 15 Mav, 
III. 1351 ; ob. 



Henry Fitz-Hugh, s. and 
14 Edw. II. 1321, to 15 
1356. 
10. Henry Fitz-Hugh, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Henry 
Fitz-Hush (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Baron, summ. 
to Pari, from 4 Aug. 1 Rich. II. 1377, to 8 Aug. 10 Rich. 
II. 1385; ob. 1386. 
H.^Henry Fitz-Hugh, s. andh. set. 23, summ. to Pari, from 17 
Dec. 11 Rich. II. 1387, to 1 Sept. 2 Hen. VI. 1423. He 
m. Elizabeth, dau. and sole heir of Robert de Grey, son 
of John Lord Grey of Rotherfield (by Avice, sister and 
coh. of Robert Lord Marmion) ; K.G. ; ob. 1424. 
12. ^William Fitz-Hugh, s. and h. set. 26, summ. to Pari, 
from 12 July, 7 Hen. VI. 1429, to 5 Sept. 29 Hen. VI. 
1450 ; ob. 1452. 
13.^Henry Fitz-Hugh, s. and h. aet. 23, summ. to Pari, from 
26 May, 33 Hen. VI. 1455, to 15 Oct. 10 Edw. IV. (or 
49 Hen. VI.) 1470 ; ob. 1472. 
14. ^Richard Fitz-Hugh, s. and h. set. 15, summ. to Pari, from 
15 Nov. 22 Edw. IV. 1482, to 1 Sept. 3 Hen. VII. 1487 ; 
ob. circa 1508. 
15. George Fitz-Hugh, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 17 Oct. 1 
Hen. VIII. 1509, and 28 Nov. 3 Hen. VIII. 1511 ; ob. 1512, s. p., when 
the Barony fell into Abeyance between Alice, wife of Sir Thomas Fienes, 
Knt. (father of Thomas 8th Lord Dacre), eldest dau. of Henry, V. 13th 
Baron Fitz-Hugh, and aunt and coheir of the last Baron; and Sir Thomas 
Parr, Knt., son of Elizabeth, another dau. of the said Henry V. 13th Baron, 
and aunt of the said George last Baron. 

It is to be observed that some writers have considered this Barony to 
have been vested in the Earls of Pembroke, as the representatives of 
Elizabeth, the second dau. of Henry V. 13th Baron; but on the death of 
Philip 8th Earl of Pembroke, it would have devolved on his dau. and 



FITZ-JOHN. 195 

sole heir, Charlotte, who was twice in., and left issne by both husbands, 
and would now be vested in her representatives. The fact, however, ap- 
pears to be, that the Barony was never allowed to either coheir, and that 
it has been in Abeyance ever since the death of George Baron Fitz-Hugh, 
in 1512, and is now in Abeyance between Thomas present Lord Dacre, 
as heir general of Alice Lady Fienes, and John Patrick, present Marquess 
of Bute, as heir general of Elizabeth, mother of Sir Thomas Parr. 



FITZ-JOHN". 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. 1. John Fitz-Geoffrey, s. of Geoffrey Fitz-Piers, Earl of Essex, 

(by Aveline, his second wife), Justiciary of Ireland 1246 ; he 
m. Isabel, widow of Gilbert de Laci, and dau. of Sir Balph 
Bigod, 3rd son of Hugh Earl of Norfolk ; ob. 1256. 

II. Hen. III. 2. John Fitz-John Fitz-Geoffrey, s. and h. ; ob. 1258. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1264. 3. John Fitz-John, within age 1258, suinm. to Pari. 14 Dec. 49 

Hen. III. 1264 ; ob. 1276, s. p., when the Barony created by 
that Writ became Extinct. 

II. 1295. 4.^Richard Fitz-John, bro. and h. set. 24, 1276, sumni. to Pari. 

23 June, 23 Edw. I. 1295 ; ob. in France 1297, s. p., when the Barony 
created by that Writ also became Extinct. Maud, his eldest sister and 
coh., m. 1. Gerard de Furnival, and 2. William Beauchamp, Earl of War- 
wick, and ob. 1300 ; Isabel, his second sister, m. Eobert de Vipont ; Ave- 
line, his third sister, was the wife of Walter de Burgh, Earl of Ulster, 
and died ante 1296 ; and Joan, his fourth sister and cob., m. Theobald le 
Botiller, and ob. 1303. 

A f Matthew Fitz-John was summoned 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297; 
but, as is expressed whenever that Writ was the earliest granted to any 
personage noticed in this work, a doubt has been created in the Editor's 
mind, by a manuscript note in a copy of Dugdale's Summonses to Parlia- 
ment, which belonged to the late Francis Townsend, Esq., Windsor 
Herald, as to whether that Writ can be deemed a regular Writ of Sum- 
mons to Pari. The note in question appears to have been originally 
written in a copy of the Summonses in the College of Arms, by John 
Vincent, son of the able and well-known Augustine Vincent, Windsor 
Herald. Mr. Townsend's note is : — 

" Vincent, No. 35, p. 45, where a pencil note in the margin (of the 
hand-writing, as I think, of John Vincent) says, ' This can be no Sum- 
mons, because it is only directed to the Temporality.' " The Writ of 26 
Jan. 25 Edw. I. commands the persons to whom it is addressed to attend 
at Salisbury on Sunday,* the Feast of St. Matthew the Apostle next 
ensuing, viz. the 21st September, " nobiscum super dictis negotiis Collo- 
quium et Tractatum specialiter habituri, vestrumque Consilium impen- 
suri ; et hoc, sicut nos et honorem nostrum ac salvationem Begni, nostri ac 
incolarum diligitis, nullatenus omittatis;" and it was directed to six 
Earls and seventy-five Barons, and to the Judges ; but not one of the 
Bishops or Abbots was included. On examining the Summonses printed 
in the Appendices to the Reports on the Dignity of a Peer, it appears 
that only two writs (excepting to furnish horses and arms) were di- 
rected to the Spirituality in 25 Edw. I. ; the one dated at St. Paul's, 
London, 5th September, which recites that " Edwardus filius n'r carissimus 
tenens locu' n'r'm in Angl' vobiscum colloquium h'eat, et t'actatum vob' 
mandamus in fide, &c. q'd in instanti c'astino S'cti Mich's, London' ad 

a According to the Tables given in ' No- viz. '21 Sept., fell in the 25*Edw. I. 1297, 
titia Historica,' the feast of St. Matthew, on a Saturday. 

o 2 



190 



FITZ-MARMADUKE. 



eundem filiu' n'r'm modis om'ibus p'sonal'r int'sitis, cum eodem et 
cet'is de consilio n'ro qui ibidem aderunt s'r d'c'is negociis t'actaturi, et 
v'rm consiliu' impensuri," and which was addressed to the Bishops of 
Worcester, Ely, Carlisle, and York, to the Earls of Cornwall and War- 
wick, to John Giffard and Gunselm de Badlesmere (the latter of whom are 
described as Earls and Barons), to several Clerks of the Council, to six 
Judges, and to two Priests. It is presumed that that Writ cannot be 
considered either as a separate Writ of Summons to Parliament, or as 
being addressed to the necessary persons to make the Parliament sum- 
moned on 26 January complete; for only four Bishops are named in 
it, not a single Abbot is mentioned, and both of the Earls, one of the 
Barons (John Giffard), and three out of the six Judges, were included in 
the Writ dated 26 January. The other Writ alluded to was dated 
St. Paul's, London, 9th September, and contains the same words as 
those quoted from the Writ dated on the 5th of that month ; it was ad- 
dressed to the Bishops of Bath and Wells, Lincoln, Hereford, Norwich, 
Rochester, and S. elect of Salisbury (neither of whom were included in the 
Writ of the 5th of that month), to seventeen Abbots, four Priors, and the 
Master of the Knights Templars in England, to Roger Bigod, Earl of Nor- 
folk and Earl Marshal (who was summoned in the Writ of 26 January), 
and to Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex (who was 
not included in any previous Writ issued in 25 Edw. I.) ; likewise 
to seven Barons, neither of whom were named in the Writ of 5 Sep- 
tember, but who were all, excepting Alan le Zouche, included in that 
of 26 January. Whether the last Writ is to be considered as sum- 
moning the Spiritual Peers, and the Earl and Baron omitted in pre- 
vious "Writs, so as to perfect the Parliament ordered by the Writ of 
26 January to meet on 21 September at Salisbury, and which the 
date somewhat supports, or whether, from the names of the one Earl 
and six Barons, who were previously summoned in January to meet at 
a place different from that appointed in the last Writ, being the_ same 
as those then summoned, it must be regarded as a summons to a distinct 
meeting, the Editor will not attempt to determine. The Rolls of Par- 
liament do not contain any notice of a Parliament having been held be- 
tween 23 and 26 Edw. I. ; and as many persons whose names are in- 
serted in the Writ of 25 Edw. T. were never afterwards summoned to 
Parliament, — as some were summoned in that Writ who, though sum- 
moned in 22 Edw. L b were totally omitted in each of the three regular 
Writs of Summons in 23 Edw. I. as well as in that of 24 Edw. L, and 
who, excepting on 26 January 25 Edw. I., were never again summoned to 
Parliament, — the suspicion expressed in the MS. note before cited, appears 
to have much validity. 

On the other hand, it must be observed that the validity of this Writ of 
25 Edw. I. has not hitherto been questioned ; and though, in the Fresche- 
ville case, when Lord Frescheville claimed under it to be placed in the 
precedency of his ancestor, who was then summoned, but never _ either 
before or subsequently, the House rejected his Lordship's petition, it 
does not appear that any objection to the Writ operated in the decision of 
their Lordships. 

The Editor has thus fully stated the motive which has induced him to 
express a doubt on the subject whenever mention of this Writ occurs in his 
work, and having, to the best of his information, detailed the facts of 
the case, leaves it to more competent judges to determine how far the ob- 
jection is just. 



PITZ-MARMADUKE. Vide Thweng. 



b The Writ of 22 Edw. I., as is stated 
under Clyvedon, is generally admitted not 



to have been a regular Writ of Summons to 
Parliament. 



FITZ-OSBERT — FITZ-PAYNE. L97 

FITZ-OSBEItT. 

Roger Fitz-Osbert, who is not noticed in Dugdale's Baronage, received a Sum- 
mons 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294 ; but it is doubtful for the reasons assigned 
under Clyvedon, if it can be considered as a Summons to 1'arliament; he died 
s. p. circ. 1306. 

Barons by Tenure. FITZ-PAYNE. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Robert Fitz-Payne, Sheriff of counties Dorset and Somerset, 

sou of Payne Fitz-John, bro. of Eustace Fitz-John, ancestor 
of the Barons Vesci, living 121G ; his successor was, 

II. Hen. III. 2. Roger Fitz-Payne ; ob. 1237. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Robert Fitz-Payne, s. and h. ; ob. 1280. 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 4. f Robert Fitz-Payne, s. and h. ret. 27, summ. to Pari, from 

(J Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, to 23 Oct. 8 Edw. II. 1314; he 
was also summoned 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, but, for 
the reasons assigned under Fitz-John, it is rather doubtful 
if that Writ was a regular Summ. to Pari. ; ob. 1315. 

II. 1327. 5. Robert Fitz-Payne, s. and h. set. 28, summ. to Pari, from 7 
Aug. 1 Edw. III. 1327, to 15 Nov. 25 EdAv. III. 1351 ; ob. 1354, leaving, 
according to an Inq. 28 Edw. III. Isabel, wife of John Chideocke, li is 
dau. and h., then 30 years of age. The said John Chideocke ob. 1387, 
leaving (by his said wife) Sir John Chideocke, his s. and h., set. 40, who 
left issue Sir John Chideocke, Knt., a?t. 15, 1416, who had issue a son 
John and two daughters his coheirs, viz. Katherine, whom. 1st Sir William 
Stafford of Frome, and by him had one child, Humphrey Stafford, Earl of 
Devon, but who died s. p., and 2ndly, Sir John Arundel, Knt. ; and Mar- 
garet, the wife of William Lord Stourton; and between the descendants 
and representatives of the said Katherine and Margaret, viz. Henry-Bene- 
dict, Lord Arundell of Wardour, and Hugh Charles, Lord Clifford of 
Chudleigh, the coheirs of one moiety of the said Barony, and the present 
Lord Stourton, as sole heir of the other moiety, the Barony of Fitz-Payne 
is in Abeyance. 

Robert de Grey, younger son of Richard Lord Grey of Codnor, and 
who assumed the name of Fitz-Payne, was, in the 30th Edw. III. found 
h., by grant to Ela, widow of Robert Fitz-Payne, the last Baron. He is 
said to have been summ. to Pari., in Dugdale's List of Summonses, 6 Apr. 
43 Edw. III. 1369 ; but it appears, from a MS. note of the late Francis 
Townsend, Esq., Windsor Herald, and which the List of Summonses 
printed by order of the House of Lords confirms, that the names of the 
four Barons last mentioned in that Writ, as given by Dugdale, viz. Johanni 
filio Ricardi Grey de Codenoure, Johanni de Tibetot, Roberto Fitz-I'uine, 
and Henrico de Percy, are not on the Roll. 

Isabel, his dau. and heiress, m. Richard Lord Poynings, and from the 
heiress of Robert Baron Poynings, s. and h. of the said Richard Lord 
Poynings, and Isabel Fitz-Payne his wife marrying Henry Percy, s. and h. 
apparent of Henry XIII. 2nd Earl of Northumberland, and who was 
summ. to Pari, jure uxoris as Baron Poynings, his descendants styled them- 
selves Barons Poynings, Fitz-Payne, and Bryan. Under the latter title it 
has been clearly proved that the Earls of Northumberland had no claim 
to the Barony of Bryan ; and, with respect to the Barony of Fitz-Payne, it 
is evident that, as Isabel de Grey, alias Poynings, dau. and h. of the 
above Robert de Grey, did not descend from Robert Fitz-Payne, who 
was summ. to Pari, in 27 Edw. I., she could not have possessed any 
right to the Barony created by that Writ; and as it appears that her 
father was not summ. to Pari., or at least that there is no record of it on 
the Roll, the said Isabel could never have inherited any Barony whatever. 



198 FITZ-RALPH — FITZ-ROGER. 

FITZ-RALPH. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Ralph Fitz-Hubert, held 47 lordships in Derby and Notts at 

the General Survey. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Ralph Fitz-Ralph, s. and h. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Hubert Fitz-Ralph, s. and h. ; ob. 1221, s. p. M. 



I. Hen. III. Hugh Fitz-Ralph ; ob. 1275, Enstacbia, dau. of Ralph, his 
son, who died v. p., and then wife of Nicholas de Cantelupe, 
beinsi; his heir. 



FITZ-RANTJLPH. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Robert Fitz-Ranulph, Lord of Alfreton, co. Derby ; living 

1169. 

II. Rich. I. 2. William Fitz-Ranulph, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 

III. Hen. III. 3. Thomas Fitz-Ranulph, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1241, s. p. leaving 

his three sisters his heirs. 



FITZ-REGINALD. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Steph. 1. Herbert Fitz-Herbert, Chamberlain to King Stephen 1139, 

Sheriff of Gloucester 1195. 

II. John. 2. Peter Fitz-Herbert, s. and h. ; ob. 1234. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Herbert Fitz-Peter, s. and h. ; ob. 1247, s. p. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Reginald Fitz-Herbert, bro. and h. ; ob. 1285. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1299. 5. f John Fitz-Reginald, s. and h., summoned 8 June, 22 
Edw. I. 1294, and 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, but it is doubtful if either 
can be considered as a regular Writ of Summons to Pari, (vide Clyve- 
don and Fitz-John) ; summ. to Pari, from 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299, to 
26 Aug. 1 Edw. II. 1307 ; ob. . . . His descendants assumed the name 
of Fitz-Herbert, but none of them were ever summ. to Pari. From Peter, 
brother of this Baron, the Fitz-Herberts, Earls of Pembroke, are de- 
scended. 

FITZ-ROBERT. Vide Clavering. 

FITZ-ROGER. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1299. 1. John Fitz-Roger, summ. to Pari. 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, but 
never afterwards, and of whom nothing further is known. 



Baron by Writ. 

1. 1299. Andrew Fitz-Roger, summ. to Pari. 10 Apr. 27 Edw. I. 1299, but 
never afterwards, and of whom nothing more is recorded. 



FITZ-ROGER. Vide Clavering. 



FITZ-SWAINE— FITZ-WALTER. 



199 



FITZ-SWAIjSTE. 

Baron by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. Adam Fitz-Swaine, Founder of Monk Bretton Priory, co. York, 
son of Swaine Fitz-Aluric ; ob. s. p. m., leaving two daughters and coheirs, 
1. Maud, m. 1st, Gerard de Glanville, 2ndly, Adam de Montbegon, and 
3rdly, John de Malherb; and 2. Annabel, m. Adam de Crevequer. 



Barons by Tenure 
I. Hen. I. 1. 



FITZ-WALTER. 



II. 
III. 



1134. 
1198. 



Robert, 5th s. of Pochard Fitz-Gilbert, ancestor of the Earls of 
Hertford ; Steward to King Henry I., from whom he obtained 
the Barony of Dunmow, co. Essex, m. 1112 Maud de St. Liz, 
dan. of Simon Earl of Northampton ; she remarried Saier de 
Quincy; ob. 1134. 
2. Walter Fitz-Robert, s. and h. ; ob. 1198. 



Robert Fitz-Walter, s. and h., styled " Marshal of the Army 
of God and Holy Church," by the Barons who obtained 
Magna Charta from King John, and was one of the celebrated 
25 Barons appointed to enforce its observance ; ob. at the siege 
of Damietta 1234. 
IV. 1234. 4. Walter Fitz-Walter, s. and h. ; ob. 1257. 

Barons by Writ. 



I 



1295. 



II. 



1390. 



5.^tR° BERT Fitz-Walter, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 23 
June, 23 Edw. 1. 1295, to 10 Oct, 19 Edw. II. 1325 ; ob. 1325. 

6. Robert Fitz-Walter, s. and h. set. 25 ; he was never summ. 
to Pari. ; ob. 1328. 

III. 1341. 7. John Fitz-Walter, s. and h. a3t. 13, summ. to Pari, from 3 

Mar. 15 Edw. III. 1341, to 20 Nov. 34 Edw. III. 1360; ob. 
1361. 

IV. 1369. 8. ^AV alter Fitz-Walter, s. and h. aet. 16, summ. to Pari. 

from 6 Apr. 43 Edw. III. 1369, to 3 Sept. 9 Rich. II. 1385 ; 
ob. 1386. 
9. ^Walter Fitz-Walter, s. and h. ast. 18, summ. to Pari, from 
12 Sept. 14 Rich. II. 1390, to 25 Aug. 5 Hen. IV. 1404 ; 
he m. Joan, dau. and ultimately sole heir of John Baron De- 
vereux; ob. 1407. 
Humphrey Fitz-Walter, s. and h. eet. 8 ; ob. infra a3tatem, 
circa 1419, s. p. 

VII. 1429. 11. Walter Fitz-Walter, bro. and h. set, 19, 1419, summ. to 

Pari. 12 July and 3 Aug. 7 Hen. VI. 1429, and 27 Nov. 9 
Hen. VI. 1430; ob. 1432, s.p.m. 

VIII. 1485. 12.^JohnRatcliffe, s. andh. of Sir John Ratcliffe, c K.G., by Eliza- 

beth Fitz-Walter, dau. and sole heir of the last Baron (she 
was born in 1430, and upon her mother's death 4 Edw. IV., 
is said to have been the widow of Sir John Ratcliffe), summ. 
to Pari, from 15 Sept. 1 Hen. VII. 1485, to 14 Oct. 11 
Hen. VII. 1495, as "Johannes Ratcliffe de Fitz-Walter;" 
beheaded and attainted 1495, when his honours became 
Forfeited. 



VI 



10. 



c Historians state that Lord Fitz-Walter 
was slain at Ferry-bridge on Palm Sunday, 
1 Edw. IV., viz." J9 Ward), 1461; and a 
letter in the I'aston Letters (vol. i. p. 219), 
dated 4 Apr. 1461, has the following pas- 
sage: "On the King's part is slain Lord 



Fitz-Walter," &o. This Lord Fitz-Walter 
must have been John Ratcliffe, father of John 
Ratcliffe VIII. 12th Baron, who died (pro- 
bably of his wounds) on the 6 Apr. 1461 
(vide Escli. 16 Edw. IV.), eight days after 
the battle. 



200 FITZ- WALTER. 

Barons by Writ. Viscounts. 

IX. 1509. — I. 1525. 13. Eobeet Ratcliffe, s. and h., restored in blood 

and honours by Patent 25 Jan. 21 Hen. VII. 
1506, by virtue of an Act 19 Hen. VII. 1504, 
giving the King power to reverse attainders, and 
further procured an Act of Pari, to the same 
effect 1 Hen. VIII. 1509 ; summ. to Pari. 28 
Nov. 3 Hen. VIII. 1511, to 15 Apr. 14 Hen. 

VIII. 1523, as "Roberto Ratclyff de Fitz- 
Walter, Chl'r," created Viscount Fitz- Walter, 18 
June 1525, d and Earl of Sussex 8 Dec. 1529, 
Lord High Chamberlain 1540, E.G. ; ob. 1542. 

X. 1542. — II. 1542. 14. Henry Ratcliffe, s. and h., Earl of Sussex, E.G. : 

ob. 1556. 

XI. 1556. — III. 1556. 15. Thomas Ratcliffe, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. 

p. as Lord Fitz-Walter 1 and 2 Ph. and Mary 
1554; succeeded as Earl of Sussex, E.G.; ob. 
1583, s. p. 

XII. 1583. — IV. 1583. 16. Henry Ratcliffe, bro. and h., Earl of Sussex, 

E.G. ; ob. 1593. 

XIII. 1593. — V. 1593. 17. Robert Ratcliffe, s. and h., Earl of Sussex, E.G. ; 

ob. 1629, s. p. 
VI. 1629. Edward Ratcliffe, cou. and h., being s. and h. 
of Humphrey, second son of Robert Ratcliffe, 

IX. 13th Baron and 1st Viscount ; succeeded as 
Viscount Fitz-Walter and Earl of Sussex ; but 
the Barony devolved on the issue of Frances, 
wife of Sir Thomas Mildmay, who was the dau. 
of Henry X. 14th Baron and 2nd Viscount, and 
aunt and heir of the half blood of Robert XIII. 
17th Baron and 5th Viscount; ob. 1641, s. p., 
when the Viscounty of Fitz-Walter and Earldom 
of Sussex became Extinct. 

XIV. 1669. 18. Benjamin Mildmay, allowed the Barony 10 Feb. 1669, e being 

bro. and h. of Henry (who claimed the Barony in 1660), 
eldest son of Robert, s. and h. of Sir Henry (who claimed the 
Barony in 1640), bro. and h. of Sir Thomas, eldest son of 
Sir Thomas Mildmay, by Frances Fitz-Walter above men- 
tioned, summ. to Pari. 10 Feb. 1670 ; ob. 1679. 

XV. 1679. 19. Charles Mildmay, s. and h. ; ob. 1728, s. p. 

Earls. 

XVI. 1728. — I. 1730. 20. Benjamin Mildmay, bro. and h., created Viscount 
Harwich, co. Essex, and Earl Fitz-Walter 14 May 1730 ; ob. 1756, s. p., when 
the Viscounty of Harwich and Earldom of Fitz-Walter became Extinct ; but 
the Barony fell into Abeyance between the descendants and representatives 
of the five daughters and coheirs of Mary, wife of Henry Mildmay, of Graces, 



d Vide Note under Cumberland. The 
signed Bill for this dignity is remaining, but, 
being without a recepi, and there being no 
enrolment of a Patent, it would have appeared 
as though no Patent had passed the Seal, had 
it not been borne by Garter at the ceremony 
of the creation. 

His claim was opposed by Robert Cheeke, 
Esq. (descended from Frances, wife of Henry 
Cheeke, Esq., and si>trr of the whole blood 



of Edward last Earl of Sussex), who affirmed 
that the Barony was a Barony by Tenure, 
and ought to go with the land ; but this pre- 
tence was declared, for weighty reasons, not 
to be insisted on, and that "whatever pre- 
tence there might be for presuming that there 
were originally Baronies by Tenure, yet that 
Baronies by Tenure had been discontinued for 
many years, and were then not in being, and 
so not fit to be revived." 



FITZ-WALTER — FITZ-WARINE. 



201 



co. Essex, Esq., sister of Benjamin, XIV. 18th Baron, and aunt of Charles 
and Benjamin, successively XV. 19th ' and XVI. 20th Barons : viz. Mary, 
wife of Charles Goodwin of Rovant, co. Sussex ; Lucy, who m. Thomas 
Gardiner of Tolesbury, co. Essex ; Elizabeth, wife of Edmund Waterson ; 
Frances, who m. Christopher Fowler of London ; and Catherine, wife cf 
Colonel Thomas Townsend. Mrs. Goodwin and Mrs. Waterson died s. p. ; 
the issue of Mrs. Townsend became Extinct, and no trace whatever has 
been discovered of issue remaining from Mrs. Gardiner, so that Sir Brooke 
William Bridges, Bart, (as representative of Frances Fowler), is the coheir, 
if not sole heir of this Barony. 



FITZ-WALTER ( of Daventry ). 

Robert Fitz- Walter, s. and h. of Sir Walter Fitz-Simon, s. and h. of Simon 
Fitz- Walter, 2nd son of Walter Fitz-Robert, the father of Robert Fitz- Walter, 
Marshal of the Barons' army, temp. John ; summoned 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. by 
Writ addressed " Rob' fil' Walteri' de Daventre," but for the reasons assigned 
under Fitz-John it is doubtful if that Writ can be considered as a regular 
Summons to Pari. Neither he nor any of his descendants were ever afterwards 
summoned to Parliament. 



EITZ-WARINE. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Rich. I. 1. Fulke Fitz- Warine,' Lord of Abberbury, co. Salop, and Baron of 

Whittington, s. of Warine de Metz, succeeded his father in his 
lands, living 1190 ; ob. ante 1195. 

II. Hen. III. 2. Fulke Fitz- Warine, s. and h. ; ob. 1263. 
Barons by Writ. 



I. 



II. 



III. 



IV 



V. 



VI. 



VII. 



1295. 3. f Fulke Fitz-Warine, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 23 June 
23 Edw. I. 1295, to 24 Oct. 8 Edw. II. 1314, in the two last 
years with the addition of " Seniori ;" f he was also summoned 

8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1295, but it is doubtful if that writ was 
a regular summ. to Pari, (vide Clyvedon) ; ob. 1314. 

1315. 4. Fulke Fitz-Warine, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 6 Oct. 

9 Edw. II. 1315, to 22 Jan. 9 Edw. III. 1336 ; ob. 1349. 

5. Fulke Fitz-Warine, s. and h. a3t. 7 ; he was never summ. to 

Pari. ; ob. 1373. 

6. Fulke Fitz-Warine, s. and h. a3t. 21 ; he was never summ. to 

Pari. ; ob. 1377. 

7. Fulke Fitz-Warine, s. and h., came of age 1383 ; he was never 

summ. to Pari. ; ob. infra set. 1391. 

Fulke Fitz-Warine, s. and h. set. 9 ; he was never summ. to 
Pari. ; ob. 1407. 

Fulke Fitz-Warine, s. and h. ?et. 1 ; he was never summ. to 
Pari. ; ob. 1429, s. p., leaving Elizabeth his sister, wife of 
Richard Hanckford, his h. 



8. 



9. 



f Although Dugdale's statement, vol i. p. 
445, is followed in the text, that this Fulke 
Fitz-Warine was not summoned alter 8 Edw. 
II., it is to be remarked that the word 
" Seniori " is continued after the name of 



Fulke Fitz- Warine from 9 Edw. II. to 5 Aug. 
14 Edw. II., during which period it is con- 
sidered to have been his sou who was so 

summoned. 



202 PITZ-WARINB — F1TZ- WILLIAM. 

Barons by Writ. 

VIII. 1449. 10. 3fc William Bourchier, 3rd s. of William Earl of Ewe by Ann, 

dau. andh. of Thomas Plantagenet Duke of Gloucester, having 
m. Thomasine, dau. and h. of Richard Hanckford by the said 
Elizabeth his wife, sister and h. of the last Baron, was summ. 
to Pari, as ""Willielmo Bourghchier, Militi, Domino de Fitz- 
Waryn," from 2 Jan. 27 Hen.' VI. 1449, to 7 Sept. 9 Edw. IV. 
1469 ; ob. circa 1470. 

IX. 1472. H.^Fulke Bourchier, s. and h., summ. to Pari, as "Fulconi 

Bourghchier de Fitz-Waryn, Chev r ," 19 Aug. 12 Edw. IV. 
14721 ob. 1479. 

X. 1492. 12. John Bourchier, s. and h. ; he m. Florence, sister of Henry Earl 

of Bridgewater; summ. to Pari, from 12 Aug. 7 Hen. VII. 
1492, to 8 June, 28 Hen. VIII. 1536, created Earl of Bath 
9 July 1536 ; ob. 1539. 

XI. 1539. 13. John Bourchier, s. and h. ; in 154S he -was found h. to his 

uncle Henry Earl of Bridgewater, and then «t. 40, when he 
became sole heir general of the Barony of Daubeney created by 
writ 23 Edw. I., Earl of Bath ; ob. 1560. 

XII. 1560. 14. William Bourchier, grands, and h., being s. and h. of John 

Bourchier (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron, Earl of Bath ; 
ob. 1623. 

XIII. 1623. 15. Edward Bourchier, s. and h., Earl of Bath; ob. 1636, s. p. m., 

when this Barony, together with that of Daubeney, fell into Abeyance 
between his three daughters and coheirs, viz., Elizabeth, Dorothv, and 
Anne, all at that time unmarried; Elizabeth, the eldest, became the wife 
of Basil Earl of Denbigh, but died s. p., 1670; Dorothy, the 2nd, m. 1st to 
Thomas Lord Gfrey of Grroby, s. and h. apparent of Henry 1st Earl of 
Stamford, and had issue Thomas Earl of Stamford (who died s. p.), and 
two daughters, Elizabeth wife of Henry Benson, Esq., of Charwelton, co. 
Northampton, and Anne wife of James Grove, serjeant-at-law ; the said 
Dorothy m. 2ndly Gustavus Mackworth, Esq., and had issue, presumed 
to have become extinct; Anne, the 3rd coh. of the last Baron, m. 1st 




Esq. (who died 1775), who represent respectively Elizabeth Benson and 
Anne drove, and have a moiety between them, and Sir Bourchier Wrey, 
Bart., who represents Lady Anne Wrey, and has a moiety in himself. 



,_ m FITZ-WARINE. 

Baron by Wilt. 

I. 1342. William Fitz-Warixe, of the family of the preceding Barons, sur- 
named "le Frere," summ. to Pari. 25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342. as " Wil- 
lielmo filio Warini," but never afterwards; K.G. ; he .lied 1361, leaving 

lvo his s. and h., who was living j n I3g5 j but neither he nor any of his 
descendants were ever summ. to Pari. 



FITZ- WILLIAM. 

Dugdale in his Baronage, vol. ii. p. 105, asserts that a William Fitz-William was 
summoned to 1'arhamcnt 1 Edw. III. 1327, but it appears from his List ol~ 
Summonses in that year that he was not included in either of the summonses 
to Parliament, but only in the summons dated at Ramsay, 5 April 1327, to 
attend at Newcastle-upon-Tyne with horse and arms. 






FITZ-WILLIAM — FOLEY. 203 



FITZ-WILLIAM. 

Barons. Earls. 

I. 1742. — I. 1746. 1. William Fitz- William, 3rd Earl and 5th Baron Fitz- 

William in Ireland, descended from the above-men- 
tioned William Fitz- William, created Lord Fitz- 
William, Baron of Milton, co. Northampton, 19 
April 1742, Viscount Milton and Earl Fitz-William 
of Norborough, co. Northampton, 6 Sept. 1746; 
ob. 1756. 

II. 1756. — II. 1756. 2. William Wentworth-Fitz- William, s. and h., 

Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 1795 ; ob. 9 Feb. 1833. 

III. 1833. — III. 1833. 3. Charles William Wentworth Fitz-William, s. 

and h., present Earl and Lord Fitz-William and Viscount Milton, also 
Earl Fitz-William in Ireland, K.G. =j= 

Y 

FITZ-WILLIAM ( of Grimthorpe ). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 121)5. 1. Balph Fitz-William, s. of William Fitz-Balph, summ. to Barl. 
from 24 June, 23 Edw. I. 1295, to 6 Oct. 9 Edw. II. 1315; ob. 1316. 
This Balph Fitz-William succeeded to the Baronial lands of Greystock 
upon the death of John de Greystock in 1305 ; bis s. Bobert Fitz-Ralph 
was never summ. to Barl., but his grands. Balph, who assumed the 
surname of Greystock, was summoned as Balph de Greystock, by which 
designation his descendants ever after continued to be summoned. — Vide 
Greystock. 

FLINT. 

The county of Flint has always been considered as an appendant to that of Chester ; 
it is said " ad Gladium Cestriaa pertinere," and it has consequently formed 
part of the Earldom of Chester. Heylyn states that Edward, s. and h. apparent 
of Edward II., was summ. to Barl. as Earl of Chester and Flint, but the latter 
name does not occur in any writ of summons on record, and the statement is 
founded on his having received from the King his father a grant of both the 
counties Chester and Flint. Sandford states that he finds Arthur Brince of 
Wales styled " Comes Cestrise et de Flint " in 1489, but he was not so created 
by his patent dated 1 Dec. 1489 ; he was merely invested with the counties of 
Chester and Flint, as other Frinces of Wales had been from the time of Henry 
of Monmouth, s. of King Henry IV. ; it was never held as a distinct Earldom 
from that of Chester. 

FOLEY. 

Barons. 

I. 1712. 1. Thomas Foley, created Baron Foley of Kidderminster, co. Wor- 

cester, 1 Jan. 1712 f ob. 1733. 

II. 1733. 2. Thomas Foley, s. and h. ; ob. 1766 unm., when the title became 

Extinct. 

III. 1776. 1. Thomas Foley (grands, of Thomas Foley, first cousin of Thomas 

1st Baron), created Baron Foley of Kidderminster, co. Worcester, 
20 May 1776 ; ob. 1777. 

IV. 1777. 2. Thomas Foley, s. and h. ; ob. 1793. 

V. 1793. 3. Thomas Foley, s. and h, ; ob. 15 Apr. 1833. 

VI. 1833. 4. Thomas Henry Foley, s. and h., present Baron Foley. =p 
- * 

8 " Hora tertia post meridiem." Vide Note under Burton. 



204 FOLIOT — FORTESCUE. 

FOLIOT. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Robert Foliot, Lord of Sutton, co. Beds, and Wardon, co. 

Northampton, 1167. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Richard Foliot, s. andh., living 1199 ; ob. . . . s. p. m., Margery, 

who was living 1221, wife of Wyschard Ledet, being his dau. 
and h. 

Of this name also were several persons of eminence, but it is 
doubtful if they can be considered as Barons. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1295. Jordan Foliot, summ. to Pari. 23 June, 30 Sept. and 2 Nov. 

23 Edw. I. 1295 ; he was also summ. 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, but it is 
doubtful if the latter can be considered as a regular summ. to Pari, (vide 
Fitz-John) ; ob. 1299, leaving Richard his s. and h. set. 15 ; of this Richard 
nothing more is known than his having left issue a son and two daughters, 
the youngest of whom was born 1315 ; his son, who was also named Richard, 
died 1326, s. P., and in all probability a minor, leaving his two sisters 
Margery and Margaret his heirs, the eldest then set. 12 and the youngest 
set. 11 ; the former m. before 1330 Hugh de Hastings, a younger son by 
his second marriage of John Lord Bergavenny, and the youngest, Mar- 
garet, m. John de Camoys, and among their descendants and coheirs this 
Barony is now in Abeyance. 



FOLKESTONE. 

Viscounts. 

I. 1747. 1. Sir Jacob Botjverie, 3rd Bart., created Lord Longford, Baron of 

Longford, co. Wilts, and Viscount Folkestone of Folkestone, co. 
Kent, 29 June 1747; ob. 1761. 

II. 1761. 2. William Bouverie, s. and h., created Earl of Radnor and Baron 

Pleydell-Bouverie of Coleshill, co. Berks, 31 Oct. 1765.— Vide Radnor. 



FORDWICH. 
Viscounty, 20 March 1717-18.— Vide Cowper. 



Barons. 



FORESTER. 



I. 1821. 1. Cecil Weld Forester, created Baron Forester of Willey Park, co. 

Salop, 17 July 1821 ; ob. 22 May 1828. 

II. 1828. 2. John George Weld Forester, s. and h., present Baron Forester, 

unm. 



FORTESCUE. 
Barons. 

I. 1746. 1. Hugh Fortescue, XIV. 18th Baron Clinton, created Earl Clinton 

and Baron Fortescue of Castle Hill, co. Devon, with limitation 
of the Barony failing his issue male to his half-bro. Matthew 
Fortescue and his issue male, 5 July 1746, K.B. ; ob. 1751, s.p., 
and was succeeded in the Barony of Fortescue, agreeable to the 
said limitation, by 

II. 1751. 2. Matthew Fortescue, his half-bro. and h. ; ob. 1785. 



FOSSARD — FRESCHEVILLE. 205 

Barons. Earl. 

III. 1785. — I. 1789. 3. Hugh Fortescue, s. and h., created Viscount Ebring- 

ton, co. Gloucester, and Earl Fortescue 1 Sept. 1789 ; 
ob. 16 June 1841. 

IV. 1841. — II. 1841. 4. Hugh Fortescue, s. and b., summ. to Pari, by writ 

1 Mar. 1839, and placed in bis father's Barony of Fortescue, present Earl 
and Baron Fortescue and Viscount Ebrington. =p 

FOSSARD. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Nigel Fossard, Lord of Doncaster, co. York; ob. ante 1139. 

II. Stepb. 2. Robert Fossard, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1194, leaving Joane, wife 

of Robert de Turnliam, a companion of King Richard to the Holy Land, 
and made by him Governor of Cyprus, and whose only dau. Isabella m. 
Peter de Mauley, a Poictevin. 



POXPORD. 
Barons. 

I. 1815. 1. Edmund Henry Pery, 1st Earl of Limerick in Ireland, created 

Baron Foxford of Stackpole Court, co. Clare, 11 Aug. 1815 ; ob. 
17 Dec. 1844. 

II. 1844. 2. William Henry Tennison Pery, grands, and h., s. and h. of 

Henry Hartstonge Pery (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron, present 
Baron Foxford, also Earl of Limerick, &c. in Ireland. =j= 

FRENE. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1336. Hugh de Frene, summ. to Pari. 29 Nov. 10 Edw. III. 1336, and 14 
Jan. 10 Edw. III. 1337, but never afterwards. Dugdale's Baronage gives 
no account of this person, nor is he noticed by any other writer, excepting 
Banks in his " Barones Rejecti." 



FRE S CHE VILLE. 

"Rat/pit de Frescheville was summ. 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, but for the 
reasons assigned under Fitz-John it has been doubted if that writ can be 
considered as a regular summ. to Pari. ; he was never again summoned, nor 
were any of his descendants considered as Barons of the Realm, until his h. 
general as well as h. male, 

Baron. 

I. 1664. 1. John Frescheville, was created Baron Frescheville of Staveley, co. 
Derby, 16 Mar. 1664. In 1677 he claimed to be allowed to sit in the 
House of Peers under the writ of summons to his ancestor above named, 
in 25 Edw. I., but it being contended that to give the party summ. to 
Pari, an estate of inheritance, a sitting under the writ was necessary, and as 
the onus of proving such sitting rested with the party claiming the dignity, 
and no such proof being extant in the case of the said Ralph Frescheville, 
the claim was not admitted. Some observations on this subject are to be 
found at the commencement of this volume, under " Sittings in Parlia- 
ment," but it must be observed that no such objection appears to have 
been made to the writ of 25 Edw. I., under which the claim was grounded, 
as is stated under Fitz-John. Lord Frescheville died in 1682, s. p. m., 
when the Barony created by the patent of 16 March 1664 became Extinct. 



206 



FREVILLE — FURNIVAL. 



FREVILLE. 



Dugdale, vol. ii. p. 103, and in which he has been followed by other writers, states 
that Alexander de Freville was summ. to Pari. 1 Edw. III., but on referring 
to his List of Summonses it appears that this Alexander is not included in 
either summons to Pari, issued in that year, but only in a summons dated at 
Ramsey, 5 Apr. 1 Edw. III. 1327, to be at Newcastle-upon-Tyne with horse 
and arms, to serve against Robert Bruce. 



Barons by Tenure. 
I. Hen. III. 1 



FURNIVAL. 



Gerard de Furnival, s. of Gerard de Furnival, a Norman 
knight, was Lord of Sheffield, co. York, in right of bis wife 
Maud, dau. and h. of William de Lovetot, Lord of Hallam- 
shire, co. York ; ob. at Jerusalem 1219. 

II. Hen. III. 2. Thomas de Furnival, s. and h. ; slain in Palestine, v. m., 

1242. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Gerard de Furnival, s. and h. ; ob. s. p. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Thomas de Furnival, bro. and h. ; ob. ante 1279. 



Barons by Writ. 
I. 1295. 



II. 



1318. 



III. 1348. 



IV. 



V. 



1366. 



1383. 



5. ^Thomas de Furnival, 11 s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 23 
June, 23 Edw. I. 1295, to 27 Jan. 6 Edw. III. 1332 (from 
the 12 Edw. II. with the addition of " Seniori ") ; he was 
also summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, but for the reasons 
assigned under Clyvedon, it is presumed that the writ was 
not a regular summ. to Pari. ; ob. 1332. 

6. Thomas de Furnival, s. and h. set. 30, 1332, summ. to Pari. 

v. p. as " Thomse de Furnival Juniori," from 25 Aug. 12 
Edw. II. 1318, to 27 Jan. 6 Edw. III. 1332, and without 
the addition of " Juniori," until 15 Nov. 12 Edw. III. 1338, 
m. Joan, dau. and coh. of Theobald II. Baron Verdon ; ob. 
1339. 

7. Thomas de Furnival, s. and h. set. 17, summ. to Pari, from 

20 Nov. 22 Edw. III. 1348, to 4 Oct. 38 Edw. III. 1364 ; 
ob. 1366, s. p. 

8. William de Furnival, bro. and h., summ. to Pari. 20 Jan. 

39 Edw. III. 1366 to 7 Jan. 6 Rich. II. 1383 ; ob. 1383, 
s. p. m. 

9.^ Thomas Nevill,' bro. of Ralph 1st Earl of Westmoreland, 
having m. Joan de Furnival, dau. and sole heir of William 
the last Baron, was summ. to Pari, from 20 Aug. 7 Rich. 



h Though Dugdale places this family 
amongst those who were Barons by Tenure, 
and they probably were so, nevertheless 
Thomas de Furnival, the first Baron summ. 
to Pari., denied, in certain proceedings 19 
Edw. II. (1325-6), that he held any of his 
lands by Barony, whether at Sheffield, Work- 
sop, or elsewhere. It would seem from what 
occurred on this occasion, and which is stated 
at some length in the 3rd Report on the 
Dignity of a Peer, p. 235, that a Writ of 
Summons was not issued as a Writ of Right 
by reason of Tenure, but as a matter of favour 
of the Crown. 



' Notwithstanding that all genealogical 
writers consider this Thomas Nevill as Baron 
Furnival, he was uniformly summ. to Pari, 
as " Thomse Nevill de Halomshire ;" and if 
it were not for the fact that he is always 
styled " Le Sire de Furnyvall " in the Rolls 
of Parliament, it might admit of some doubt 
whether he should be deemed Baron Furnival ; 
his son-in-law John Talbot was summoned 
in the first and (with the exception of that 
of 1 Hen. V., when he is described as " de 
Halomshire ") in every Writ for twelve years 
as "Lord Furnyvall." 



FURNIVAL — GAGE. 



207 



Barons by Writ. 



II. 1383, to 1 Dec. 14 Hen. IV. 1412, as " Thomas Nevyll 
de Halumshire," though it appears that he died 1406 ; ob. 
s. p. m., leaving Maud, wife of John Talbot, and Joan, k his 
daughters and coheirs. 

VI. 1409. IO.^John Talbot, 2nd s. of Richard Lord Talbot of Blackmere, 
having m. Maud de Nevill, eldest dau. and cob. of the last Baron, and h. of 
her mother Joan de Furnival, was summ. to Pari, from 26 Oct. 11 Hen. IV. 
1409, to 26 Feb. 8 Hen. V. 1421, in the first and greatest number of writs 
as " Jobanni Talbot, D'no de Fumyvall," excepting on the 1 Dec. 1 Hen. 
V. 1413, when he was summ. as " John Talbot de Halomshire," and in a 
few instances, when he was styled in the writs " Jobanni Talbot de Fur- 
nyvall ;" he succeeded his niece Ankaret (dau. and h. of Gilbert Talbot) 
in the Barony of Talbot in 1421, and was created Earl of Salop, 20 
May 1442, K.G. ; ob. 1452. 

This Barony continued vested in the Earls of Shrewsbury until the 
death of Gilbert X. 7th Earl, s. P. M. 1616, when it fell into Abeyance 
between his three daughters and coheirs, viz., Mary, wife of William Earl 
of Pembroke ; Elizabeth, who m. Henry Earl of Kent ; and Alathea, wife 
of Thomas Howard Earl of Arundel. Elizabeth and Mary died s. p., and 
on their deaths the Barony of Furnival, together with those of Talbot and 
Strange of Blackmere, became vested in Alathea Countess of Arundel ; she 
died 24 May 1654, and was succeeded in the Baronies in question by her 
grands, and h. Thomas Howard Duke of Norfolk (s. and h. of her eldest s. 
Henry Frederick Howard Earl of Norfolk, Arundel, and Surrey, who died 
v. m.) ; the said Duke died s. p. in 1677, when all his dignities devolved on 
his bro. and h. Henry Howard, in whose descendants the Dukes of Norfolk, 
the Baronies of Furnival, Strange of Blackmere, and Talbot, &c. continued 
vested until the demise of Edward Howard Duke of Norfolk in 1777, s. p., 
when it again fell into Abeyance between the two daughters of Philip 
Howard, bro. of the said Duke, viz., Winifred, wife of William Lord Stour- 
ton, whose great-grands. Charles, present Lord Stourton, is her representa- 
tive and one cob. of this Barony, and Ann, wife of Robert Edward Lord 
Petre, whose great-grands, and representative William Bernard, present 
Lord Petre, is the other coh. of this Barony. — Vide Strange of Black- 
mere. 

Baron. FURNIVAL. 

I. 1839. 1. Richard Wogan Talbot, Baron Talbot de Malahide in Ireland, 
created Baron Furnival of Malahide, co. Dublin, 8 May 1839 ; ob. s. p. M. 
29 Oct. 1849, when the title became Extinct. 



G. 



i. 

i. 



Barons. 

1780. 
1790 



t 



GAGE. 

William Hall Gage, 2nd Viscount Gage in Ireland, created 
Baron Gage of Firle, co. Sussex 17 Oct. 1780, to him and his 
issue male ; created Baron Gage of High Meadow, co. Glouces- 
ter 1 Nov. 1790, with remainder failing his issue male to his 
neph. Henry Gage ; ob. 1791, s. P., when the Barony of Gage 
of Firle became Extinct ; but that of Gage of High Meadow de- 
volved, agreeable to the above limitation, upon 



k This Joan is said in the pedigrees in the 
College of Arms to have been by Thomas 
Nevill's second wife, Ankaret, daughter of 



John Lord Strange of Blackmere, and to have 
married Sir Hugh Cooksey, Knt., or, accord- 
ing to others, Hamon de Belknap. 



208 GAINSBOROUGH — GANT. 

Barons. 

II. 1791. 2. Henry Gage, 3rd Viscount Gage in Ireland, neph. and h., being 

s. and h. of Thomas, next bro. to the last Baron : ob. 29 Jan° 
1808. 

III. 1808. 3. Henry Hall Gage, s. and h., present Baron Gage ; also Viscount 

Gage in Ireland, and a Baronet. =p 

GAINSBOROUGH. 

Earls. 

I. 1681. 1. Edward Noel, s. and h. apparent of Baptist, 2nd Viscount 

Campden, created v. p. Baron Noel of Titchfield, co. South- 
ampton, to him and the heirs male of his body, 3 Feb. 1681 ; 
succeeded as 4th Viscount Campden 1682; created Earl of 
Gainsborough, co. Lincoln, with remainder, failing his issue 
male, to Baptist Noel and John Noel, Esqrs., his younger bro- 
thers, 1 Dec. 1682 ; ob. 1689. 

II. 1689. 2. Wriothesley Baptist Noel, s. and h. ; ob. 1690, s. p. m. 

III. 1690. 3. Baptist Noel, cou. and h., being s. and h. of Baptist Noel, half- 

bro. of Edward 1st Earl ; ob. 1714. 

IV. 1714. 4. Baptist Noel, s. and h. ; ob. 1751. 

V. 1751. 5. Baptist Noel, s. and h. ; ob. 1759, s. p. 

VI. 1759. 6. Henry Noel, bro. and h. ; ob. 1798, s. p., when the title became 

Extinct. 

VII. 1841. 1. Charles Noel-Noel, 3rd Lord Barham, created Baron Noel of 

Ridlington, co. Rutland, Viscount Campden of Campden, co. Gloucester, 
and Earl of Gainsborough, co. Lincoln, 16 Aug. 1841 ; present Earl of 
Gainsborough, Viscount Campden, Baron Barham, Baron Noel, and a 
Baronet. =p 

GAMBIER. 
Baron. 

I. 1807. James Gambier, created Baron Gambier of Lver, co. Buckingham 
9 Nov. 1807, G.C.B. ; ob. 19 Apr. 1833, when the title became Ex- 
tinct. 

GANT. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Gilbert de Gant, s. of Radulphus "de Gandavo," came to 

England with William the Conqueror, and was Lord of 
Folkingham and other lands, co. Lincoln ; ob. temp. Will. II. 

II. Hen. I. 2. Walter de Gant, s. and h. ; ob. 1138. 

III. Steph. 3. Gilbert de Gant, s. and h., called Earl of Lincoln, in right of 

his wife Rohais, or Hawise, dau. and h. of William de Ro- 
mara, 2nd Earl of Lincoln ; ob. 1160, s. p. m. Alice, his dau. 
and eventually sole heir, m. Simon de St. Lis, Earl of 
Huntingdon, but she dying without issue, the inheritance 
went to, 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Robert de Gant, bro. and h. ; ob. circa 1192. 

V. Rich. I. 5. Gilbert de Gant, s. and h., 4th Earl of Lincoln {vide Lin- 

coln); ob. 1241. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1264. 6. Gilbert de Gant, s. and h., summ. to Pari. 14 Dec. 49 Hen 

III. 1264; ob. 1274. 

II. 1295 7. Gilbert de Gant, s. and h. jet. 24, 1274, summ. to Pari, from 

16 June, 23 Edw. I. 1295, to 26 Aug. 24 Edw. I. 1296 ; he was also 





Barons 


1. 


1806. 


II. 


1808. 


Ill 


. 1815. 



GARDNER — GERARD. 209 

summoned 8 June, 22 Edw. 1. 1294, and 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, 
but for the reasons expressed under Clyvedon and Fitz-John, it is 
doubtful if either Writ can be considered as a regular summ. to Pail. ; 
ob. 1297, s. p., leaving Roger, then ajt. 24, son of William de Kerdeston, 
by Margaret his eldest sister ; Peter, then set. 18, son of Peter de Mauley, 
by Nicola, his second sister ; and Julian de Gant, his third sister, then 
set. 40 (and who was living in 1309, and died unm.), his heirs. 

GARDNER. 

1. Alan Gardner, 1st Baron Gardner in Ireland, created Baron Gard- 
ner of Uttoxeter, co. Stafford, 27 Nov. 1806 ; ob. 1808. 

2. Alan Hyde Gardner, 1 s. and h., K.C.B. ; ob. 27 Dec. 1815. 

3. Alan Legge Gardner, s. and h., present Baron Gardner; also 
Baron Gardner in Ireland. 

GAUGI. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. Ralph de Gaugi, living 1165 ; to whom succeeded, 

II. John. Robert de Gaugi; he was living 1218. The next mentioned is, 

III. Hen. III. 1. William de Gaugi, who was living 1233. 

IV. Hen. III. 2. Ralph de Gaugi, s. and h. ; ob. 1278, s. p. 

V. Edw. I. 3. Adam de Gaugi, bro. and h. ; ob. circa 1286, s. p., when Roger 

de Clifford was found to be his cou. and h. 

GENEVILL. 
Baron by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. 1. Geoffrey or Peter de Genevill, a Provencal, stated by Mat- 
thew of Paris to have been a man of humble birth, by others to 
have been Lord of Vaucouleur, and bro. of John de Geneville, or 
Joinville, the historian of the Crusade of St. Louis ; m. Maud, 
dau. of Walter de Lacy, and granddau. and coh. of Gilbert de 
Lacy, Lord of Trim in Ireland, obtained with her the castle of 
Ludlow; ob. 1249. 
Baron by Writ. 

T . 1299. 2. Geoffrey de Genevill, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 6 Feb. 27 
Edw. 1. 1299, to 3 Nov. 34 Edw. 1. 1306 ; ob. circa 1307, leaving three sons, 
neither of whom was ever summ. to Pari. ; Geoffrey, the eldest, ob. s. p. ; 
the two others died leaving heirs female only. 

GERARD (of Bromley). 
Barons. 

I. 1603. 1. Thomas Gerard, created Baron Gerard of Gerard's Bromley, co. 

Stafford, 21 July 1603 ; ob. 1617. 

II. 1617. 2. Gilbert Gerard, s. andh.; ob. 1623. 

III. 1623. 3. Dutton Gerard, s. and h. ; ob. 1640. 

IV. 1640. 4. Charles Gerard, s. and h. ; ob. 1667. 

V. 1667. 5. Digby Gerard, s. and b. ; ob. 8 Nov. 1684, set. 22. 

VI. 1684. 6. Charles Gerard, cou. and h., being son of Richard, son of John, 

younger son of the 1st Baron; ob. 12 Apr. 1707, s. p. m., when the title 
became Extinct. 



1 A warrant was issued for his creation to the dignity of a Viscount, but he died before 
the Patent passed the Great Seal. 

P 



210 



GERARD — GHISNES. 



Barons. 



GERARD (of Brandon). 



. Charles Gerard, s. and h. of Sir Charles, eldest son of Ratcliffe 
Gerard, younger bro. of Thomas 1st Baron Gerard, of Gerard s 
Bromley, created Baron Gerard of Brandon, co. Suffolk, 8 Oct, 
1645 ; created Viscount Brandon aforesaid, and Earl of Maccles- 
field, co. Chester, 21 July 1679 ; ob. 1693. 

II. 1693. 2. Charles Gerard, s. and h., Earl of Macclesfield ; ob. 1701, s. p. 

III. 1701. 3. Fitton Gerard, bro. and h., Earl of Macclesfield ; ob. 1702, s. p., 

when all his honours became Extinct. 



Barons by Tenure. 



GHISNES. 



II. Rich. I. 

III. John. 



2. 
3. 



Hen. II. 1. Arnold of Ghent in Flanders (son of the Castellan of Ghent, 
and grandson of Baldwin Count of Ghisnes), succeeded to 
the County of Ghisnes, on the death of Beatrix, Countess of 
Ghisnes (who had m.'lst, her kinsman, Albericde Vere, and 
2ndly, Baldwin Count of Ardres, but had died s. p. 1144) ; 
died at his manor of Newington, co. Kent, 1169. 

Baldwin, Count of Ghisnes, s. and h. ; ob. 2 Jan. 1205. 

Arnold, Count of Ghisnes, s. and h., possessed of 12 knight's 
fees in England, part of the Honour of Boulogne; ob. 
1220. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Baldwin, Count of Ghisnes, s. and h., summ. to attend the 

King into Brittany, 1234 ; ob. 1244. 

V. Edw. I. 5. Arnold, Count of Ghisnes, s. and h., sold his County of Ghisnes 

to the King of France ; ob. 1282. 

VI. Edw. I. 6. Baldwin of Ghisnes, Castellan of Bourbourg, s. and h. ; ob. 

1293, leaving two daughters and coheirs — Jane, m. John de 
Brienne, Count d'Eu, Great Chamberlain of France, killed at 
the battle of Courtray, 1302 ; and Blanch. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1295. 7. Ingelram de Ghisnes, bro. of Baldwin 6th Baron, who as- 

sumed the name of Coucy from the family of his mother Alice, dau. of 
Ingelram Sire de Coucy, summ. to Pari, from 24 June, 23 Edw. I. 1295, 
to 14 Mar. 15 Edw. II. 1322 ; he m. Christian, dau. of Sir William de 
Lindsey, by Ada Ins wife, eldest sister (that left issue) and coh. of John 
Baliol, King of Scotland ; ob. 1323. 

William de Ghisnes," 1 Sire de Coucy, s. and h. ast. 36, 1323 ; ob. 1335, 
leaving Ingelram, his s. and h., but neither of them were ever summ. to 
Pari. ; the latter ob. 1347, leaving Ingelram de Coucy his s. and h., whose 
s. and h., Ingelram de Coucy, m. Isabel Plantagenet, dau. of King Edw. 
III., and was created Earl of Bedford ; he was taken prisoner at the battle 
of Nicopolis, and died at Bursa in Natolia 18 Feb. 1396-7, when the 
Earldom of Bedford became Extinct, and the representation of the Barony 
created by Writ 1295 devolved upon his three daughters and coheirs- 
Mary, wife of Henry de Bar ; Philippa Duchess of Ireland, who died s. p. ; 
and Isabel (by his second wife), wife of Philip of Burgundy, Count of 
Nevers. Ingelram had, however, long before his death, resigned all his 
English honours and possessions. — Vide Bedford. 



m The pedigree, as here stated, is on the 
authority of Pierre Anselme, vol. viii. 542, 
hut it must be remarked that the Inqs. p.m. 
are at variance with this account ; but inas- 



much as they concern aliens, their genealo- 
gical statements may not be implicitly relied 
on. 



GHTSNES — GIFFORD. 211 

GHISNES. 
Baron by Tenure. 

I. Hen. III. Robert of Ghisnes, younger s. of Arnold, 3rd Count of Ghisnes, 
was possessed of the Honour of Chokes and Gayton, co. Northampton, 
1249. 

GIFFARD. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. 1. Osbert Giffard, a natural son of King John. 

II. Edw. I. 2. Osbert Giffard, s. and h., summoned 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297 ; 

but, for the reasons assigned under Fitz-John, it is doubtful if it can 
be considered as a regular Summons to Pari. Nothing further is known 
of him or of his descendants, excepting that they were never summ. to 
Pari. 

There were several families of the name of Giffard ; three separate 
individuals are mentioned as holding lands at the Domesday Survey, and 
amongst their descendants we find : — Sir John Giffard, slain at the siege 
of Bedford, 1223 ; Hugh Giffard, Constable of the Tower of London, 1235, 
living 1239 ; John Giffard, sent into Gascony on the King's service, 1292, 
then aet. 100 ; Andrew Giffard, held the Barony of Fonthill, co. Wilts, 
which he resigned by consent of King John ; and Walter Giffard, who was 
a Lord Marcher, 1239. 

GIFFARD (of Brimsfield). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. Osbern Giffard, possessed divers Lordships in the reign of 
William the Conqueror, of which Brimsfield, co. Gloucester, 
and Sherrington, co. Wilts, were chief seats ; ob. ante 1086. 
Elias Giffard, s. and h., living 1121, to whom succeeded, 
Elias Giffard; ob. ante 1167, to whom succeeded, 
Elias Giffard ; ob. 1190 ; his successor was, 
Thomas Giffard ; living 1194. 
2. Elias Giffard, s. and h. ; ob. 1248. 

t. 

I. 1295. 3. John Giffard, s. and h. fet. 17, summ. to Pari, from 24 June, 

23 Edw. I. 1295, to 10 Apr. 27 Edw. I. 1299 ; ob. 1299. 

II. 1299. 4. John Giffard, s. and h. set. 13, summ. to Pari, from 8 Oct. 7 
Edw. II. 1311, to 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 1321, as " Johanni Giffard de 
Brymesfeld ;" executed and attainted 1322 ; ob. s. p., leaving Katherine 
(grandmother of James de Audley), and Eleanor (mother of John, son of 
Fulk le Strange), his half-sisters, his heirs, viz. daughters of his father by 
his third wife ; and though the Barony became Forfeited by the attainder 
of the last Baron, yet as all the proceedings against Thomas Earl of Lan- 
caster and his adherents (of whom he was one) were reversed anno 1 Edw. 
III. 1327, the dignity may probably now be considered to be vested in the 
descendants and representatives of the said Katherine and Eleanor, and 
consequently to be in Abeyance. 

GIFFORD. 

Barons. 

I. 1824. 1. Sir Robert Gifford, Knt., Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, 

created Baron Gifford of St. Leonard, co. Devon, 30 Jan. 1824 ; 
ob. 4 Sept. 1826. 

II. 1826. 2. Robert Francis Gifford, s. and h., present Baron Gifford. =p 

p 2 



II. 


Hen. 1. 


III. 


Hen. II. 


IV. 


Hen. II. 


V. 


Rich. I. ] 


VI. 


John. J 


Barons by Writ. 



212 



GLAMORGAN. 



GLAMORGAN. 

Edward Somerset, son and heir apparent of Henry 1st Marquess of Worcester, is 
generally considered to have been created Earl of Glamorgan, and Baron Beau- 
fort of Caldecot Castle, by Car. I. 1 Apr. 1644 ; for the creation of which 
dignity there is now remaining in the Signet Office a Bill under the Royal Sign 
Manual, in order to his being created Earl of Glamorgan, and Baron Beaufort of 
Caldecot Castle, co. Monmouth, " to him and his heirs male on the body of 
Lady Margaret, his wife, now begotten, and for default of such issue to the heirs 
male of his body, and for default of such issue to the Marquess of Worcester, 
and the heirs male of his body;" great doubt exists, however, whether any 
Patent passed the Great Seal. Dugdale takes no notice of any such crea- 
tion, whilst Beatson says the Patent was cancelled in 1660, and Dale, in his 
Catalogue of Nobility, does not attribute these titles to the Duke of Beaufort, 
the descendant of the said Edward, in 1697. Charles I. directed several letters 
to Edward Somerset above mentioned by the title of Earl of Glamorgan ; and 
there is a Commission, no less remarkable than illegal, dated the same day, viz. 
1 Apr. 1644, and addressed to "Edward Somerset, alias Plantagenet, Lord 
Herbert, Baron Beaufort of Caldecote, Grismond, Chepstow, Ragland, and 
Gower, Earl of Glamorgan ;" giving him power to fill up certain blank Patents 
of Creation to every dignity from a Marquess to a Baronet, with a promise of 
the Princess Elizabeth in marriage to his son Plantagenet with a portion of 
300,000?., and the title of Duke of Somerset to himself and his heirs male for 
ever. In consequence of a motion made in the House of Lords after the Re- 
storation, to the effect that this Patent was deemed " in prejudice to the 
Peers," the Marquess of Worcester stated " that a Patent was made and left 
in his hands by the King to create him Duke of Somerset upon certain con- 
ditions that had not been performed, and that he was ready to deliver it 
up; this statement was made on 23 Aug. 1660, and on 3 Sept. follow- 
ing it was stated in the House, that it had been given up ; this is pro- 
bably the ground of the statement made by Beatson, that the Patent of 
creation to the dignities of Earl of Glamorgan and Baron Beaufort was cancelled 
in 1660. Although the Marquess thus resigned his claim upon the Dukedom 
of Somerset, he was nevertheless considered to be Earl of Glamorgan and Baron 
Beaufort, and in a Royal Warrant under the Sign Manual of Charles II., the 
King, after reciting a descent of the Earl of Bath, declares that in case the 
Earldom of Glamorgan should fall to the Crown during his reign for want of 
heirs male of the then Marquess, by his lady then living, "as we are informed 
the same is settled by our Royal Father," n he would not again confer the Earl- 
dom on any other family, but restore it to the Granvilles, by creating the then 
Earl of Bath also Earl of Glamorgan. The Marquess died in 1667, and in his 
funeral certificate in the College of Arms, the Earldom of Glamorgan is attributed 
to him amongst his other titles ; John Earl of Bath never received any grant of 
the promised Earldom, and it is found on several of the Garter plates of the 
Marquess's descendants down to the year 1801.° 

Another title attributed to the Dukes of Beaufort is the " Viscounty of Gros- 
mont," a title probably derived from Grosmont in Normandy, where there was 
a Priory, which had a cell, at Grandmont in Yorkshire. Dale takes no notice of 
any such dignity, and the only trace of a title at all similar is that recited in 



n This was an erroneous recital of the 
limitations of the Patent. 

° Vide an article upon the subject of the 



Earldom of Glamorgan, Collect. Topog. & 
Geneal. vol. vii. p. 190, by Sir Charles 
Young, Garter. 



GLANVILL — GLOUCESTER. 1213 

the Commission just noticed, wherein he is styled Baron Beaufort of Caldecot, 
Grismond, and Gower; this title is also found upon the Garter plates above 
referred to. 

GLANVILL. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Ranulph de Glanvill, held nine Knights' fees of the honour 

of Eye in Suffolk at the time of the Conquest. 

II. Hen. I. 2. William de Glanvill, s. and h., founder of Bromholme Priory, 

co. Suffolk ; ob. 1168. 

III. Hen. II. 3. Hervey de Glanvill, Chamberlain to King Stephen, s. and 

h., living 1175. 

IV. Hen. II. 4. Ranulph de Glanvill, Justice of England, s. and h. ; ob. at 

the siege of Acre 1189, s. p. m., leaving his three daughters his heirs, viz., 
1. Matilda, wife of William de Auberville; 2. Amabel, wife of Ralph de 
Arderne ; and 3. Hawise, wife of Thomas Fitz-Robert. 



GLASTONBURY. 

Baroness, 19 Mar. 1719 — Extinct 1743. — Vide Feversham and Kendal. 

Baron. 

1797. 1. James Grenville, s. and h. of James Grenville, 4th s. of Richard 
Grenville by Hester Countess Temple, created Baron Glastonbury of But- 
leigh, co. Somerset, 20 Oct. 1797, with remainder failing his issue male to 
his bro. Richard Grenville, Esq., Lieut.-Gen. (who died s. p. 1823); ob. 
26 Apr. 1825, s. p., when this Barony became Extinct. 

GLENDALE. 
Viscounty, 11 June 1695— Extinct 1701.— Vide Tankerville. 



GLENELG. 
Baron. 

I. 1835. 1. Right Hon. Charles Grant, created Baron Glenelg of Glenelg, co. 
Inverness, 11 May 1835, present Lord Glenelg, num. 

GLENLYON. 
Baron. 

I. 1821. 1. James Murray, 2nd s. of John 4th Duke of Atholl, K.T., created 

Baron Glenlyon of Glenlyon, co. Perth, 17 July 1821 ; ob. 12 
Oct. 1837. 

II. 1837. 2. George Augustus Frederick John Murray, s. and h., succeeded 

his uncle John 5th Duke of Atholl as Earl Strange and Duke of Atholl, &c. 
in Scotland 14 Sept. 1846, present Earl Strange, Baron Strange and 
Murray, and Baron Glenlyon, K.T. ; also Duke, Marquess, and Earl of 
Atholl, &c, in Scotland. =j= 

GLOUCESTER. 

Earls. 
I. Hen. I. 1. Robert, surnamed Consul, natural s. of King Henry I., created 
Earl of Gloucester 1109 on bis marriage with Mabell, dan. and 
h. of Sir Robert Fitz-Hamon, Lord of Gloucester ; ob. 1147. 



214 GLOUCESTER. 

Earls 
II 1147. 2. William, s. and h., ob. 1183, s.p.m.s. ; Mabell, his 1st dau. 
and coll., m. Almeric Montfort Count of Evreux in Normandy ; 
Amicia, his 2nd dau. and coll., m. Richard de Clare Earl of 
Hertford ; and Isabel, his 3rd dau. and coh., became the wife 
of John Plantagenet, younger s. of Henry II. 

III. Hen. II. John Plantagenet, younger s. of Henry II., contracted to 

Isabel, youngest dau. and coh. of the last Earl, and obtained 
with her the Earldom of Gloucester in gift from her father 
1176, although the marriage did not take place till 1189, 
ascended the throne 1199, soon after which he divorced his 
wife, who afterwards m., 

IV. 1213. 3. Geoffrey de Mandeville Earl of Essex, who became Earl of 

Gloucester jure uxoris, and was so styled in the convention 
with King John 1215 ; ob. 1216, s. p. ; Isabel, his widow, re- 
married Hubert de Burgh, but died s. p., whereupon, 

V. Hen. III. 4. Almeric d'Evreux, s. of the Count of Evreux by the above- 

mentioned Mabell, eldest dau. and coh. of William 2nd Earl, 
became Earl of Gloucester jure matris ; ob. circa 1226, s. p. 

VI. 1226. 5. Gilbert be Clare, Earl of Hertford, s. of Richard Earl of Hert- 

ford by Amicia, 2nd dau. and at length sole heir of William 
2nd Earl, Earl of Gloucester jure matris ; he was one of the 
25 Barons appointed to enforce the observance of Magna 
Charta ; ob. at Penros in Brittany 1230. 

VII. 1230. 6. Richard de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Hertford ; ob. 1262. 

VIII. 1262. 7. Gilbert de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Hertford ; he m. Joan 

Plantagenet, dau. of King Edw. I. ; ob. 1295. 

IX. 1297. Ralph de Monthermer, having m. Joan Plantagenet, widow of 

Gilbert, the last Earl, was summ. to Pari, by writ, addressed 
" Comiti Gloucestr. et Hertf." from 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, to 
3 Nov. 34 Edw. I. 1306, but she dying 1307, he was thence- 
forward summ. as " Ralph de Monthermer " only. 

X. 1307. 8. Gilbert de Clare, s. and h. of Gilbert 7th Earl, Earl of Glou- 

cester and Hertford on the death of his mother ; slain at Ban- 
nockburn 1313, s. p., leaving his three sisters his heirs, viz., 
Alianore, who m. 1st Hugh le Despencer, and 2ndly William 
Lord Zouche of Mortimer ; Margaret, wife 1st of Piers Gave- 
stone, Earl of Cornwall, and 2ndly of Hugh de Audley ; and 
Elizabeth, m. 1st to John de Burgh, 2ndly to Theobald de 
Verdon, and 3rdly to Roger D'Amorie. The above Hugh le 
Despencer is by many writers considered to have been Earl of 
Gloucester jure uxoris, but it is evident that he never bore that 
title, for not only is he not called so by Dugdale, but in the 
Parliament before his execution, viz., 19 Edw. II., he was 
summ. as " Hugh le Despencer, jun r ." 

XL 1337. Hugh de Audley, 2nd husband of Margaret de Clare, sister and 

coh. of the last Earl, created Earl of Gloucester by patent 
16 Mar. L337 ; ob. 1347, s. p. m., when (although the dignity 
was to him and his heirs) the title appears to have been con- 
sidered as Extinct. 

Dukes. 
I. 1385. Thomas Plantagenet, surnanied of Woodstock, Earl of 
Buckingham and Essex, 6th s. of King Edw. III., 
created Duke of Gloucester 6 Aug. 1385, to him and 
the beirs male of his body, K.G., Lord High Constable ; 
murdered 1397. 



GLOUCESTER AND EDINBURGH. 



215 



Earls. Dukes. 

II. 1397. 2. Humphrey Plantagenet, s. and h. ; died of the plague 
at Chester, s. p., 1399, on his return from Ireland, 
where he had been imprisoned after the murder of his 
father, when the Dukedom became Extinct. 

XII. 1397. Thomas Lord Despencer, being s. and h. of Edward, eldest s. of 
Edward, s. and h. of Hugh Despencer by Alianore de Clare, 
sister and cob. of Gilbert 10th Earl, was created Earl of Glou- 
cester 29 Sept. 1397 ; degraded in Pari. 1399, and beheaded by 
the rabble 1400, and, being attainted, his honours became 
Forfeited. 



Dukes. 
III. 1414. 



IV. 1461. 



V. 



1644. 



Humphrey Plantagenet, youngest s. of King Henry IV., 
created in Pari. Duke of Gloucester and Earl of Pembroke for 
life 16 May 1414, K.G. ; murdered 1446, s. p., when his 
honours became Extinct. 

Richard Plantagenet, bro. of King Edward IV., created Duke 
of Gloucester in Pari. 1461,p K.G., ascended the throne as 
King Richard III. 26 June 1483, when the dignity became 
merged in the Crown. 

Henry Stuart,* 5 youngest s. of King Charles I., created Earl of 
Cambridge and Duke of Gloucester 13 May 1644, K.G. ; ob. 
1660, unm., when his honours became Extinct. 

In 1689 a warrant (which did not pass the Signet) was 
issued for the creation of Prince William, K.G., s. of George 
and Anne, Priuce and Princess of Denmark, Duke of Glou- 
cester ; at a Chapter of the Garter 6 Jan. 1695-6 he was elected 
by that title, and was so called until his decease in 1700, when 
the title of Duke of Gloucester was engraved on his " Deposi- 
tum " and pronounced over his grave ; no patent, however, 
passed the seal. 

In the ' London Gazette ' of 11 Jan. 1717-8 it was announced 
under date of the 10th instant that the King had directed a 
jDatent to be passed creating Prince Frederick, eldest s. of the 
Prince of Wales, Duke of Gloucester, and he continued to be 
so styled till 1726, when he was created Duke of Edinburgh ; 
no warrant, however, ever passed the signet, nor did such a 
patent ever pass the Seal. 



GLOUCESTER ANT> EDINBURGH. 

VI. 1764. 1. William Henry, younger bro. to King George III., created Duke 

of Gloucester and Edinburgh and Earl of Connaught in Ireland 
19 Nov. 1764, K.G. ; ob. 25 Aug. 1805. 

VII. 1805. 2. William Frederick, s. and h., Duke of Gloucester and of Edin- 
burgh in Great Britain, and Earl of Connaught in Ireland, K.G., G.C.B. ; 
ob. s. p. 30 Nov. 1834, when all his titles became Extinct. 



p Dugdale states that he was created Duke 
of Gloucester in the first Pari, of Edw. IV., 
hut no notice of it appears in the Rolls of 
Parliament ; but Dugdale is no doubt right, 
for by a Writ dated 1 Nov. 1461 the Sheriff 
of Gloucester was directed by the King to 
pay to his brother Richard, whom he had 
created Duke of Gloucester ("cingendo sibi 
gladium et per apposicoem cappe capiti suo"), 



401. per annum for life. He was not sumni. 
to Pari, until 10 Aug. 9 Edw. IV. 1469, 
when he was summoned by writ addressed 
" Richardo Duci Gloueestriaj." 

q This creation took place at Oxford : no 
notice, however, of it appears in the Docket 
Books of Patents passed by King Charles at 
Oxford (Ashm. MS. No. 832), nor is there 
any enrolment of the Patent to be found. 



216 



GODERICH — GORGES. 



GODERICH. 

Viscounty, 14 Dec. 1706 — Extinct 1740. — Vide Kent. 

GODERICH ( of Nocton ). 
Viscount. 

1827. 1. Feedeeick John Robinson, s. of Thomas 2nd Lord Grantham 
(great-great-grands, of Henry Duke of Kent, the last Viscount Goderich, 
see De Geey and Kent), created Viscount Goderich of Nocton, co. 
Lincoln, 28 Apr. 1827, and Earl of Ripon, co. York, 13 Apr. 1833.— Vide 

RlPON. 



Barons. 

1684.— I. 



Earls. 
1706. 



GODOLPHIN. 



II. 1712.— II. 

OfHelston. 
I. 1735. 



1712. 



1. Sidney Godolphin, created Baron Godolphin of Rial ton, 
co. Cornwall, 8 Sept. 1684, created Viscount Rialton 
and Earl of Godolphin, co. Cornwall, 26 Dec. 1706, 
Lord High Treasurer 1702, K.G. ; ob. 1712. 

2.'jFeancis Godolphin, s. and h., created Baron Godolphin 
I of Helston, co. Cornwall, with remainder, failing his 
J issue male, to the heirs male of his uncle Henry Go- 
■; dolphin, 23 Jan. 1735 ; ob. 1766, s. p. m., when the 
Earldom and Barony of Godolphin of Rialton and 
Viscounty of Rialton became Extinct, but the Ba- 
rony of Godolphin of Helston devolved, agreeable to 
the above limitation, upon, 

II. 1766. 2. Feancis Godolphin, cousin and h., he being s. and h. of Henry 
Godolphin, uncle to the last Baron ; ob. 1785, s. p., when this 
title likewise became Extinct. 



1832. 



II. 



1. Feancis Godolphin Osboene (commonly called Lord Francis Go- 
dolphin Osborne), created Baron Godolphin of Farnham Royal, 
co. Bucks, 14 May 1832 ; ob. 15 Feb. 1850. 

1850. 2. Geoege Godolphin Osboene, s. and h., present Baron Go- 
dolphiu. =f 

GORDON ( of Huntley ). 
Baron. 

1784. 1. Alexandee Goedon, 4th Duke of Gordon in Scotland, created 
Baron Gordon of Huntley, co. Gloucester, and Earl of Norwich, 2 July 
1784, K.T. On the 11 Apr. 1807, George Gordon, commonly called Mar- 
quess of Huntley, s. and h. apparent of the said Duke of Gordon in Scot- 
land, and Earl of Norwich and Baron Gordon of Huntley, was summ. to 
Pari, in his father's Barony. Extinct 1836. — Vide Noewich. 



Viscount. 



GORDON (of Aberdeen). 



I. 1814. 1. Geoege Goedon, 4th Earl of Aberdeen in Scotland, created 
Viscount Gordon of Aberdeen, co. Aberdeen, 1 June 1814 ; assumed the 
surname of Hamilton before that of Gordon, by Royal licence, 13 Nov. 
1818 ; present Viscount Gordon, also Earl of Aberdeen, &c. in Scotland 
K.G., K.T., &c. =p 

v m ■ GORGES. 

Baron by Writ. 

1. 1309. Ralph de Goeges, summ. to Pari, from 4 Mar. 2 Edw. II. 1309, to 18 
Sept. 16 Edw. II. 1322 ; ob. 1323, leaving Ralph de Gorges bis s. and h. 



GORING — GRAFTON. 



217 



set. 16, who was never summ. to Pari., and appears to have died s. p. ante 

1400 ; the Baron had also three daughters — 1. Elizaheth, who m. 

Ashton, whose issue failed in the next generation ; 2. Eleanor, wife of 
Theobald Russel of Kingston Russel, co. Dorset ; and 3. Joan, wife of Sir 
William Cheney, to whom she was 2nd wife ; and in the descendants and 
representatives of these two last this Barony is in Abeyance. 



Barons. 
I. 1628 



GORING. 



George Goring, created Baron Goring of Hurst-Pierpoint, co. 
Sussex, 14 Apr. 1628, created Earl of" Norwich 28 Nov. 1644 ; 
oh. 1662. 
II. 1662. 2. Charles Goring, s. and h., Earl of Norwich ; oh. 1670-1, s. p., 
when all his honours became Extinct. 



Baro l. 



Viscount. 



GOUGH. 



I. 1846.— I. 1849. 1. Sir Hugh Gough, G.C.B., created Baron Gough of Chin- 
Scang-foo in China, and Maharajpore and the Sutlei in the East Indies, 
25 Apr. 1846, and Viscount Gough of Goojerat of the Punjaub, and of the 
city of Limerick 15 June 1849 ; present Viscount and Baron Gough, and a 
Bart., G.C.B., &c. =j= 

GOWEE. 
Barons. 
I. 1703. 1. Sir John Leveson Gower, 4th Bart., created Baron Gower of 
Stittenham, co. York, 16 Mar. 1703 ; ob. 1709. 



II. 1709.— I. 



Earls. 
1746. 



2. 



John Leveson Gower, s. and h., created Viscount 
Trentham, co. Stafford, and Earl Gower, 8 July 
1746 ; ob. 1754. 

III. 1754. — II. 1754. 3. Granville Leveson Gower, s. and h., created Mar- 

quess of the County of Stafford 1 Mar. 1786, K.G. ; 
ob. 26 Oct. 1803. 

IV. 1803. — III. 1803. 4. George Granville Leveson Gower, s. and h., 2nd 

Marquess of Stafford, summ. to Pari, by writ 25 
Feb. 1799, v. p., and placed in his father's Barony 
of Gower of Stittenham, created Duke of Suther- 
land by patent 28 Jan. 1833 ; K.G. ; ob. 19 July 
1833. 
L833. George Granville Sutherland-Leveson-Gower, 
assumed the surname and arms of Sutherland by royal warrant 
12 May 1841, summ. to Pari. v. p. by writ 22 Nov. 1826, and placed in 
his father's Barony of Gower of Stittenham, present Earl and Baron 
Gower and Viscount Trentham, Marquess of Stafford, Duke of Sutherland, 
K.G. =p 

GRAFTON. 



V 



1833.— IV. 

s. and h. 



Dukes. 
1675. 



1. Henry Fitz-Roy, 1st Earl of Euston, 2nd natural s. of King 
Charles II. by Barbara Duchess of Cleveland, created Duke of 
Grafton, co. Northampton, 11 Sept. 1675/ K.G. ; he m. Isabella, 
dau. and h. of Henry Bennet Earl of Arlington ; ob. 1690. 



r A Docket of the Signed Bill for the crea- 
tion of this dignity, as well as for the Duke- 
doms of Southampton and Cleveland, granted 
to his mother and natural brother, will be 



found in the Signet Books, but no enrolment 
of either one of the Patents appears to have 
been made. 



218 GRAHAM — GRANDISON. 

Dukes. 

II. 1690. 2. Charles Fitz-Roy, s. and h., succeeded his mother as Earl of 

Arlington, 1723, K.G. ; oh. 1757. 

III. 1757. 3. Augustus Henry Fitz-Roy, grands, and h., being s. and h. of 

Augustus Fitz-Roy (oh. v. p.), 2nd s. (George the eldest having 
died v. p. without issue) of Charles the last Duke; E.G.; ob. 
14 Mar. 1811. 

IV. 1811. 4. George Henry Fitz-Roy, s. and h. ; oh. 28 Sept. 1844. 

V. 1844. 5. Henry Fitz-Roy, s. and h., present Duke of Grafton, Earl of 

Arlington, Earl of Euston, Viscount Thetford, Viscount Ipswich, Baron 
Arlington, and Baron Sudbury. =p 

GRAHAM. 

Barons. Earls. 

I. 1722.— I. 1722. 1. David Graham, s. and h. apparent of James 1st Duke 

of Montrose in Scotland, created Baron Graham of 
Belford, co. Northumberland, and Earl Graham, 23 
May 1722, with remainder failing his issue male to 
his brothers William and George Graham ; ob. 1731, 
unm. 

II. 1731. — II. 1731. 2. William Graham, bro. and h., succeeded his father 

as Duke of Montrose in Scotland in 1742 ; ob. 1790. 

III. 1790.— III. 1790. 3. James Graham, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 30 Dec. 1836. 

IV. 1836. — IV. 1836. 4. James Graham, s. and h., present Earl and Baron 

Graham, also Duke of Montrose in Scotland, &c, K.T. =j= 

GRANAED. 
Barons. 

I. 1806. 1. George Forbes, 6th Earl of Granard in Ireland, created Baron 

Granard of Castle Donington, co. Leicester, 24 Feb. 1806 ; ob. 
9 June 1837. 

II. 1837. 2. George Arthur Hastings Forbes, s. and h., present Baron Gra- 

nard, also Earl of Granard, &c. in Ireland, unm. 



GRAKBY. 
Marquessate, 29 Mar. 1703. — Vide Rutland. 

GRANDISON". 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1299. Otho de Grandison, summ. to Pari, from 21 Sept. 27 Edw. I. 
1299, to 22 Jan. 33 Edw. I. 1305 ; died abroad s. p., when this 
Barony became Extinct. 



GRANDISON. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 1. ^William de Grandison, younger bro. of Otho, the preceding 

Baron, summ. to Pari, from 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299, to 10 Oct. 
19 Edw. II. 1325 ; he m. Sybil, dau. and coh. of John Baron 
Tregoz ; ob. ante 1335. 

II. 1337. 2. Peter de Grandison, s. and h., set. 40, summ. to Pari. 23 Apr. 

and 21 June, 11 Edw. III. 1337, 20 Nov. 22 Edw. III. 1348, 
and 1 Jan. 22 Edw. III. 1349, and 10 Mar. 23 Edw. III. 1349 ; 
ob. 1358, s. p. 



GKANTHAM — GRANVILLE. 



219 



Barons by Writ. 

III. 1358. 3. John de Grandison, bro, and h., Bishop of Exeter ; he sat in Pari, 
in right of his episcopal dignity, and was consequently never summoned 
in his Barony ; ob. 1369, S. P., when Thomas, his neph., s. of Otho de 
Grandison his bro. (who died in 1364), was his heir, and then set. 30, 
which Thomas was never summ. to Pari, and died s. p. in 49 Edw. III. 
1375, when his cousins and heirs were found to be — Roger de Beauchamp, 
set. 13, s. and h. of Roger Beauchamp, s. and h. of Sybil, eldest dau. and 
coh. of Mabel his father's eldest sister; Katherine," set. 50, wife of Sir 
Robert Tudenham of Kent, 2nd dau. and coh. of the said Mabel, his father's 
eldest sister ; Thomas Fauconberg, aet. 30, s. and h. of Maud, 3rd dau. 
and coh. of the said Mabel ; Alice, aet. 50, wife of Thomas Wake of Blis- 
worth, 4th dau. and coh. of the said Mabel ; William de Montacute Earl 
of Salisbury, aet. 40, s. of Katherine, his father's 2nd sister : John de 
Northwode, aet. 30, s. and h. of Roger de North wode, s. and h. of Agnes, 
his father's 3rd sister — and amongst their descendants and representatives 
the Barony created by writ 6 Feb. 27 Edw. I. 1299 is in Abeyance. 



I. 

II. 
Ill 



GRANTHAM. 
Earl. 

1698. Henry (de Nassau) D'Overqtterqtje, Junior, s. and h. of Henry 
(de Nassau) D'Overquerque, Senior, Master of the Horse to the 
King, created Baron of Alford, Viscount of Boston, and Earl of 
Grantham, all co. Lincoln, 24 Dec. 1698, with remainder, failing 
his issue male, to Cornelius D'Overquerque 2nd son (slain at the 
battle of Denain, 1712), to Maurice D'Overquerque 3rd son, and 
to Francis D'Overquerque 4th son (slain at the battle of Alme- 
nara in Spain), of the said Henry D'Overquerque, Senior, and to 
the issue male of their respective bodies ; ob. 1754, s. p. m., when 
these titles became Extinct. 
Barons. 
1761. 1. Sir Thomas Robinson, K.B., created Baron Grantham, co. Lincoln, 

7 Apr. 1761 ; ob. 1770. 
1770. 2. Thomas Robinson, s. and h. ; ob. 1786. 
. 1786. 3. Thomas Philip, s. and h., succeeded to the Earldom of De Grey 
and Barony of Lucas on the death of his maternal amit Amabel Grey, 
Countess de Grey, 4 May 1833.— Fide De Grey. 



I. 

II. 
III. 



Barons. 

1782. 

1789. 

1822. 



GRANTLEY. 

1. Fletcher Norton, created Lord Gran tley, Baron of Markenfield, 

co. York, 9 Apr. 1782 ; ob. 1789. 

2. William Norton, s. and h. ; ob. 1822, s. p. 

3. Fletcher Norton, neph. and h., being s. and h. of Fletcher Norton, 

next bro. of the last Baron, present Lord Grantley. = 



GRANVILLE (of Kilkhampton and Biddeford ). 
Barony, 20 Apr. 1661— Extinct 1711.— Vide Bath. 



GRANVILLE (of Lansdown). 
Viscounty, 20 Apr. 1661— Extinct 1711.— Vide Bath. 



8 Sir Henry Paston Bcdingfeld, Bart., as sole 
heir of Dame Katherine Tudenham, in whom 
one-fourth of a third of the coheirsbip of this 



Barony was vested, has petitioned the Crown 
for a termination of the abeyance of this 
] >arony. 



220 



GRANVILLE — GREENWICH. 



GRANVILLE (of Potheridge ). 
Baron. 

I. 1702. John Granville, 2nd s. of John 1st Earl of Bath, created Baron Gran- 
ville of Potheridge, co. Devon, 13 Mar. 1702 ; ob. 1707, s. P., when this 
title became Extinct. 



GRANVILLE. 



Countess. 



I. 1715. 1. Grace Lady Carteret, aunt and coh. of William Henry Granville 
3rd Earl of Bath, and dau. of John 1st Earl of Bath, widow of 
George 1st Baron Carteret, created Viscountess Carteret and 
Countess Granville, with remainder, in the viscounty of Carteret, 
failing her issue male, to her husband's bro. Edward, 1 Jan. 
1714-5 ; ob. 1744. 

Earls. 

I. 1744. 2. John Carteret, s. and h., Baron Carteret, succeeded his mother 

as Viscount Carteret and Earl Granville, E.G., Lord-Lieut, of 
Ireland 1724 ; ob. 1763. 

II. 1763. 3. Robert Carteret, s. and h. ; ob. 1776, s. p., when all his honours 

became Extinct. 



Viscounts. 
I. 1815.— I. 



Earls. 
1833. 



II. 1846.— II. 1846. 



GRANVILLE (of Stone Park). 

1. Granville Leveson Gower, youngest son of Granville 

Leveson Gower 1st Marquess of Stafford, E.G., and 
great-great-grands, of Sir William Gower 4th Bart., by 
Jane Granville, aunt and coh. of William Henry 3rd 
Earl of Bath, and sister of Grace 1st Countess Gran- 
ville, created Viscount Granville of Stone Park, co. 
Stafford, 12 Aug. 1815, and Baron Leveson of Stone, 
co. Stafford, and Earl Granville, 10 May 1833 ; G.C.B. ; 
ob. 7 Jan. 1846. 

2. Granville Leveson Gower, s. and h., present Earl and 

Viscount Granville, and Baron Leveson, &c. = 



GREENOCK. 

Barony, 9 Nov. 1807. — Vide Cathcart. 



Earl. 



Duke. 



GREENWICH. 



I. 1705.— I. 1719. John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyle in Scotland, created 
Baron of Chatham and Earl of Greenwich, co. Kent, 26 
Nov. 1705 ; created Duke of Greenwich 27 Apr. 1719 ; 
K.G. ; ob. 1743, s. p. m., when his English honours became 
Extinct. 

Baroness. 

I. 1767. Caroline Townshend, 1st dau. and coh. of the last Duke, created 
Baroness of Greenwich, co. Kent, 19 Aug. 1767, with remainder of the 
dignity of Baron Greenwich to her issue male by her 2nd husband the Hon. 
Charles Townshend ; she m. 1st, Francis, s. and h. apparent of Francis 
1 hike of Buccleuch, and 2ndly Charles Townshend, 2nd son of AVilliam 
Viscount Townshend ; ob. 1794, s. p. m. s. (by the said Charles Townshend), 
when this Barony became Extinct. 



GRELLE — GRESLEY. 221 

GRELLE. See Gresley. 

GRENDON. 

Barons by Writ. 

I 1299. t Ralph de Grendon, Lord of Grendon, co. Warwick, summ. to Pari. 
29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299, and 12 Nov. 32 Edw. I. 1303, but never 
afterwards ; ob. 1331, leaving a son, Robert, who according to 
Dugdale was an idiot, and who died 1348, s. p., whereupon Sir 
Ralph Rochford, his nephew, son of Joane his sister, became his 
heir, amongst whose descendants and representatives this Barony 
is in Abeyance. 



II. 


Will. II. 


2. 


III. 


Hen. I. 


3. 


IV. 


Steph. 


4. 


V. 


Hen. II. 
ob. . . 


5. 



I. 1305. Robert de Grendon, summ. to Pari, from 22 Jan. 33 Edw. 1. 1305, 
to 3 Nov. 34 Edw. I. 130G, but never afterwards. Dugdale takes no notice 
in his Baronage of such a Baron having ever been summ. to Pari. 

GRENTEMAISNILL. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. 1. Hugh de Grentemaisnill, Lord of Ashby Ledgers, co. North- 
ampton ; ob. 1091. 

Robert de Grentemaisnill, s. and h. ; ob. 1122, s. p. 

Ivo de Grentemaisnill, bro. and h. ; died on a pilgrimage to 

Jerusalem. 
Ivo de Grentemaisnill, s. and h. ; ob. infra set., unm. 

Hugh de Grentemaisnill, bro. and h., Steward of England ; 

s. p. M. Petronilla, his eldest dau. and coh., who was living 1204, 
m. Robert 3rd Earl of Leicester ; and Alice or Adeliza, his 2nd dau. and 
cob., m. Roger Bigod, who died 1107, and whom she survived. 

GRENVILLE. 

Baron. 

I. 1790. 1. William Wyndham Grenville, younger bro. of George 1st Mar- 
quess of Buckingham, created Baron Grenville of Wotton-under-Bernewood, 
co. Bucks, 25 Nov. 1790 ; ob. s. p., 12 Jan. 1834, when the Barony became 
Extinct. 

GRESLEY, or GRELLE. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Robert de Greslei, Lord of Manchester, co. Lancaster ; living 
1134. 

2. Albert de Greslei, s. and h. ; ob. circa 1185. 

3. Robert de Greslei, s. and h. ; ob. 1230. 

4. Thomas de Greslei, s. and h. ; ob. 1262. 

5. Peter de Greslei, s. and h., a minor 1262 ; living 1268. 
VI. Hen. III. 6. Robert de Greslei, s. and h. ; ob. 1283. 

Baron by Writ. 

1. 1308. 7. Thomas de Gresley, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 10 Mar. 
1 Edw. II. 1308, to 16 June, 4 Edw. II. 1311 ; ob. 1347, s. p., leaving .loan, 
wife of John la Warr, his sister and heir, when the Barony created by the 
writ of 1 Edw. II. became Extinct. 

GRESLEY. 
Baron by Tenure. 

I. John. Ralph de Gresley, Lord of Muschamp, co. Notts, living 1217; ob. 
ante 1228, s. P. m., Agues his dau., wife of Hugh Fitz-Ralph, being his heir. 



II. 


Hen. n. 


III. 


Rich. I. 


IV. 


Hen. III. 


V. 


Hen. III. 



222 GREY. 

GREY (of Codnor). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Rich. I. 1. Henry de Grey, Lord of Thurrock, co. Essex, by grant from 

King Richard I. anno 1194 ; living 1224. 

II. Hen. III. 2. Richard de Grey, s. and h., Lord of Codnor, co. Derby ; 

living 1258. 

III. Hen. III. 3. John de Grey, s. and h. ; ob. 1271. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1299. 4. f Henry de Grey, s. and h. ast. 17, summ. 8 June, 22 Edw. 

I. 1294, but for the reasons assigned under Clyvedon, it is 
doubtful if that writ can be deemed a regular summ. to 
Pari. ; summ. to Pari. 6 Feb. and 10 Apr. 27 Edw. I. 1299, 
10 Mar. 1 Edw. II. 1308, and 6 Aug. 2 Edw. II. 1308 ; ob. 
1308. 

II. 1309. 5.^Richard de Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 4 Mar. 

2 Edw. H. 1309, to 23 Feb. 9 Edw. III. 1335 ; ob. 1335. 

III. 1335. 6. John de Grey, s. and h. set. 30, summ. to Pari, from 1 Apr. 

9 Edw. III. 1335, to 8 Sept. 16 Rich. II. 1392, as " Johanni 
Grey de Codenore ;'" KG. ; ob. circa 1392. 

IV. 1393. 7.^ Richard de Grey, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Henry 

Grey (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Baron ; summ. to 
Pari, as " Richardo Grey de Codenore," from 13 Nov. 17 
Rich. II. 1393, to 3 Sept. 4 Hen. V. 1417; K.G.; he m. 
Elizabeth, dau. and coh. of Ralph last Lord Basset of Sap- 
cote ; ob. 1418. 



■ ? 



V. 1420. 8.^ John de Grey, s. and h. aat. 22, 1418, summ. to Pari, from 

26 Feb. 8 Hen. V. 1420, to 3 Aug. 7 Hen. VI. 1429, as 
" Johanni Grey de Codenore, Chl'r ;" ob. 1430, s. p. 

VI. 1430. 9.^Hexry de Grey, bro. and h. aet. 25, 1430, summ. to Pari, as 

" Henrico Grey de Codenore," from 27 Nov. 9 Hen. VI. 1430, 
to 3 Dec. 20 Hen. VI. 1441 ; ob. 1443. 

VII. 1459. IO.^Henry de Grey, s. and h. ast. 9, summ. to Pari, from 9 Oct. 
38 Hen. VI. 1459, to 14 Oct. 11 Hen. VII. 1495, as " Henrico Grey, 
Militi," but never with the addition of Codnor; ob. 1496, s. p.l., leaving 
his father's sisters, or their issue, his heirs : viz. Elizabeth, who m. John 
Zouche of Codnor ; Eleanor, who m. Thomas Newport (now represented 
by the Earl of Bradford) ; and Lucie, the wife of Rowland Lenthall (one 
moiety of whose share is in the present Lady Zouche) ; between whose 
descendants and representatives this Barony is in Abeyance. 

GREY (of Groby). 

Sir Edward Grey, Knt., eldest son of Reginald 3rd Lord Grey of Ruthyn, by his 
2nd wife Joan, dau. and h. of William de Astley, s. and h. of Thomas III. 7th 
Baron Astley, having m. Elizabeth, sole dau. and h. of Henry (ob. v. p.) eldest 
son of William Lord Ferrers of Groby, he was summ. to Pari, in 1446 as Lord 
Ferrers of Groby, but his descendants were sometimes improperly styled Barons 
Grey of Groby.— Forfeited 1554.— Vide Ferrers of Groby. 

Barons. 
I. 1603. 1. Henry Grey, s. and h. of John Grey of Pirgo (a younger son of 
Thomas 2nd Marquess of Dorset), and neph. of Henry Grey 
Duke of Suffolk, and last Lord Ferrers of Groby, created Baron 
Grey of Groby, co. Leicester, 21 July 1603 ; ob. 1614. 

1 The Writs from 15 Nov. 11 Edw. III. to I Richard de Grey of Codnor." He is omitted 
tin' 22 Edw. [II., style him "John, son of j in all Writs of the few preceding years. 



GREY. 



223 



Barons. 

II. 1614. 2. Henry Grey, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Sir John Grey 
(ob. v. p.) eldest son of the last Baron, created Earl of Stam- 
ford 26 Mar. 1628, in which title this Barony merged until 
1833, when, 

VIII. 1833. 3. George Harry Grey, s. and h. apparent of George Harry Grey 

6th Earl of Stamford, was summ. to Pari, by writ 15 Jan. 1833, 
and placed in his father's Barony of Grey of Groby ; ob. 24 
Oct. 1835. 

IX. 1835. 4. George Harry Grey, s. and h., succeeded his father as Baron 
Grey of Groby, 1835, and his grandfather as Earl of Stamford and 
Warrington 26 Apr. 1845, in which title this Barony again merged. — 
Vide Stamford. 



Barons. 
I. 1801.— I. 



II. 
III. 



Earls. 

1806. 



1807— II. 
1845.— III. 



1807. 
1845. 



GREY (of Howick). 

Sir Charles Grey, K.B. (neph. of Sir Henry Grey, 
1st Bart., descended from a common ancestor of the 
Greys, Barons Grey of Werke), created Baron Grey 
of Howick, co. Northumberland, 23 June 1801 ; 
created Viscount Howick, co. Northumberland, and 
Earl Grey, 11 Apr. 1806 ; ob. 1807. 

Charles Grey, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 17 July 1845. 

Henry Grey, s. and h., present Earl Grey, Viscount 
Howick, and Baron Grey of Howick. = 



GREY (of Powis). 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1482. 1. John Grey, s. and h. of Richard, eldest son of Henry s. and h. of 
Sir John Grey, K.G., Earl of Tancarville in Normandy," by 
Joan, eldest dau. and coh. of Edward Baron Cherleton of Powis 
(vide Cherleton), summ. to Pari, as " Johanni Grey de Powes," 
from 15 Nov. 22 Edw. IV. 1482, to 16 Jan. 12 Hen. VII. 1497 ; 
ob. 1497. 



II. 



Ill, 



2. John Grey, s. and h. ; he was never summ. to Pari, as he died infra 

aetatem, in 1504. 

1529. 3. Edward Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, as " Edwardo Grey de 

Powis, Chl'r," from 3 Nov. 21 Hen. VIII. 1529, to, it is presumed, 23 

Jan. 5 Edw. VI. 1552 ; though in Dugdale's Summonses he is in 21 and 

25 Hen. VHI. called " John ;" ob. 1552, s. p. l. 

This Barony was claimed in March 1731 by John Kynaston, Esq., 
being the descendant and heir of Sir Roger Kynaston, husband of Eliza- 
beth Grey, sister of Richard, father of John Grey, 1st Baron above men- 
tioned ; out he was opposed by Sir Nathaniel Curzon, Bart., who was de- 
scended from Eleanor Vernon, wife of Francis Curzon, and dau. and 
ultimately heir of Thomas Vernon, by Ann, dau. and coh. of Sir John 
Ludlow, by Elizabeth, the presumed daughter of the said Eichard Grey. 
In 1800 John Kynaston Powell (s. and h. of Roger Kynaston, s. and h. of 
John Kynaston above mentioned) became the Petitioner ; but the case 
has never been decided. The Petition in question appears to have been 
presented under the presumption that the Writ of Summons to John 
Grey, as " Johanni Grey de Powes," in 22 Edw. IV. did not create a 
new Barony, but took out of Abeyance what has been considered the 
Barony of Powis, but which the Editor has under Cherleton endea- 



» So created 31 Jan. 6 Hen. V. 1418, to 
him and the heirs male of his body by the 
service of rendering a bassinet annually to 



the King at the Castle of Rouen, on the feast 
of St. George. Norman Rolls, 6 II. V. 



224 GREY. 

voured to prove was properly that of Cherleton. It is not necessary to 
repeat the arguments there urged to establish the fact that that Ba- 
rony was not affected by the Writ of Summons of 22 Edw. IV. to John 
Grey, and, consequently, that the Barony conferred on him by the said 
Writ was a new Barony ; the ancient Barony of Cherleton, or as it is gene- 
rally termed Powis, still remaining in Abeyance between the coheirs and 
representatives of Edward de Cherleton, who died in 1422, of which co- 
heirs however the said. John Grey was unquestionably the eldest. 

If this view of the question be correct, when Mr. Kynaston presented 
his petition, he was not, even upon his own showing, either the h. or coh. 
of the Barony created by the Writ of 22 Edw. IV. as he was only de- 
scended from the aunt of John Grey then summoned ; and the same 
observation applies to Sir Nathaniel Curzon his opponent, as his claim 
was only as one of the coheirs of the sister of the said John Grey ; but 
either Mr. Kynaston or Sir Nathaniel Curzon was then the elder coheir 
of the Barony of Cherleton, a point depending of course upon the au- 
thenticity of their respective pedigrees. As Edward, the last Lord Grey of 
Powis, was the only surviving issue of his grandfather John Grey above 
mentioned, and as he died s. P. l., the Barony of Grey of Powis, under the 
Writ of 15 Edw. IV. (unless it were a confirmation of the Barony created 
by the Writ of Summons to John de Cherleton in 7 Edw. II.) became 
Extinct. 

It is also to be observed, that the remarks offered under Dudley, Ber- 
gavenny, and Cherleton, on the subject of the appellation added to 
the names of Barons in Writs of Summons, applies equally strongly 
against this Barony being considered as that of Fowls, though it has in 
most cases been so styled ; but for the reasons there expressed, it is pre- 
sumed that the proper title of this dignity is " Grey de Powis." The 
remark in p. 168, that excepting in the case of this Barony and that of 
Abergavenny, " it was never even then pretended, when the addition was 
derived from territorial possessions, that such was the title of the dignity," 
is not at all contradictory to the preceding observations, for it has been 
attempted to be proved, that until George Neville was summoned to Pari, 
temp. Hen. VI. as " Domino de Bergavenny," Bergavenny was never the 
title of that Barony ; and with relation to the Barony of Poms, although 
it must be conceded that this is the first time that ever a doubt has 
been expressed on the subject, still it is presumed that there is sufficient 
ground for urging it, when, in addition to what has been previously said 
both in this place and under those titles just pointed out, it is considered 
that there is this very marked distinction between this case and that of 
Bergavenny — that the first Writ to Edward Neville is expressly directed 
" Domino de Bergavenny," and which designation is frequently used both 
to him and to his descendants, though occasionally the words are only 
" de Bergavenny ;" whilst there is not a single example of either of the 
Lords Grey of Powis being designated in the Writs as "Domino de 
Powys." A reference to some of the writs in the reign of Henry VI. 
confirms the opinion, that the title of this Barony never was that of Powis ; 
whilst it also proves that in some cases, even when the words "Domino 
de," &c. were prefixed to that of a place, the name of the family was not- 
withstanding that of the title ; for example, we find " Edwardo Grey, 
Domino de Groby ;" though in the Writ of 27 Hen. VI. he was properly 
styled " Domino de Ferrariis (de Groby) ;" whilst in the same Writ Wil- 
liam Bourgchier is called " Domino de Fitz-Waryn," Lord Eoos " Do- 
mino de Roos ;" and although Groby in the instance first cited was not the 
title of the Baron to whose name it is affixed, in the case of Lord Cobham, 
on the other hand, he is described as " Edwardo Brooke de Cobham ,-" and 
Lord Lisle in a similar manner as " John Talbot de Lisle, Chl'r." 

!u fact, and with which statement the observations on this subject will 
!<>■ concluded, the additions to the names of Barons in Writs of Summons 
to Pari, admit of no general inference after the reign of Henry V., be- 



GREY. 



225 



yond the conclusion, that when the addition of " Domino " is never, even 
in a solitary instance, to be found preceding the description, such addi- 
tion cannot be considered as the title of the dignity ; that the converse 
of this rule cannot be relied upon, for as in the examples just mentioned 
(though the instances are very uncommon) it sometimes occurs that the 
words " Domino de," &c. are introduced without its ever having been 
deemed that such appellation was the proper title of the Barons to whose 
names it was added ; that as it is remarked under Dudley, with the 
exception of the titles 6f Bergavenny and Powis, the designation was never 
considered to be the title of the Barony when it was not derived from the 
name of a family ; that the word " Domino " never formed part of such 
addition until the reign of Henry VI. ; and that the origin of these 
descriptions which occur even in the first Writ of Summons on record, 
the 49 Hen. III., was manifestly to distinguish one individual from another 
or others of the same name, without its ever being intended or considered 
to be the title of the Barony. 

From an inspection of the Bolls of Parliament, it appears, that in 
33 Hen. VI. 1455, the " Dominus de Powys " is stated to have been 
then present in Parliament ; and as from the causes assigned under 
Cherleton, John Tiptoft could not have been the personage alluded to, 
it is almost certain that it must have been Richard Grey, father of 
John, here stated to have been summoned in 22 Edw. IV. ; but there 
is no notice of the said Richard Grey having ever been summoned to Pari, 
by that or any other title. — Vide Cherleton. 



Barons by Writ. 



GREY (of Rolleston). 



I. 1673. 1. Charles North, s. and h. apparent of Dudley 4th Baron North of 

Kyrteling, and husband of Catherine, dau. of William 1st Baron 
Grey of Werke, summ. to Pari, by a special writ 24 Oct. 25 
Car. II. 1673, as Baron Grey of Rolleston, but no account of 
such summons is given in Dugdale's Summonses to Pari. ; suc- 
ceeded as 5th Baron North in 1677, and was summoned 6 Mar. 
and 7 Oct. 1680 by writ directed " Carolo North Grey de Rolles- 
ton, Chevr. ;" in the summons of 1 Jac. II. the writ is " Carolo 
North and Grey de Rolston, Chl'r. ;" ob. 1690. 

II. 1690. 2. William North, s. and h., 6th Baron North ; ob. at Madrid 1734, 

s. p., when this Barony became Extinct. 



GREY (of Rotherfield). 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. 1. Robert de Grey, younger s. of Henry I. 1st Baron Grey of 

Codnor, Lord of Rotherfield, co. York. 

II. Hen. III. 2. Walter de Grey, s. and h. ; ob. 1267. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Robert de Grey, s. and h. ; ob. 1295. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1297. 4. John de Grey, s. and h. a?t. 23, summ. 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 

1297 ; but, for the reasons assigned under Fitz-John, it is 
doubtful if that Writ was a regular summous to Pari. ; ob. 
1312. 

II. 1338. 5. John de Grey, s. and h. set. 10, proved his age 1321, one of 

the Founders of the Order of the Garter, summ. to Pari, from 
25 Aug. 12 Edw. III. 1338, to 15 Dec. 31 Edw. III. 1357, as 
" Johanni de Grey de Rotherfield ;" he m. to his 1st wife 
Katherine, dau. and coh. of Baron Fitz-Alan of Bedale, by 
whom he had John his successor in the dignity, and to his 2nd 

Q 



226 



GEEY. 



Barons by Writ. 

wife, Avice, sister and coh. of Robert III. 5th Baron Mar- 
mion, by whom he had two sons — John, who was ajt. 30 at 
his father's death and who died s. p., and Robert— both, of 
whom assumed the name of Marmion ; ob. 1359. 

III. 1360. 6. John de Grey, s. and h. set, 40, sumni. to Pari, from 20 Nov. 
34 Edw. III. 1360, to 4 Oct. 47 Edw. III. 1373, as " Johanni de Grey de 
Rotherfeld ;" ob. 1375 ; Bartholomew de Grey, his s. and h. jet. 24, ob. 
1376, s. p., and was succeeded by Robert de Grey, v his bro. and h., neither 
of whom were ever summ. to Pari. ; the latter ob. 1387, s. p. m. Johanna, 
set. 2, 1387, and set. 13, 1400, his sole dau. and h., m. 1401 John Baron 
Deincourt, and by him left issue two daughters and coheirs, viz. Alice, who 
m. 1st, Ralph Boteler of Sudeley, who died s. p. s. ; and 2ndly, William 
Lord Lovell ; and Margaret, the wife of Ralph Lord Cromwell of Tatshall, 
but who died s. p. This Barony, therefore, became vested in John Lord 
Lovell (s. and h. of William Lord Lovell, by Alice, dau. and eventually 
sole heir of John Lord Deincourt, by Johanna de Grey above mentioned), 
jure matris. His son, Francis Viscount Lovell, K.G., succeeded to all his 
father's dignities, but being Attainted in 1487, this Barony with his other 
honours became Forfeited. 



GREY (of Richemount ). Vide Richemotjnt-Grey. 



Barons by Writ. 



!. 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



1324. 



1354. 



1389. 



1441. 



V. 
VI. 



1488, 
1504. 



GREY (of Ruthyn). 

1.^ Roger de Grey, younger s. of John III. 3rd Baron Grey of 
Codnor, summ. to Pari, from 30 Dec. 18 Edw. II. 1324, 
to 15 Nov. 25 Edw. III. 1351, as " Rogero de Grey ;" ob. 
1353. 

2. Reginald de Grey, s. and h., aet. 30, summ. to Pari, from 15 
Mar. 28 Edw. III. 1354, to 20 Mar. 11 Rich. II. 1388, as 
" Reginaldo Grey de Ruthyn ;" ob. 1388. 

3.3fc Reginald de Grey, s. and h., set. 26, summ. to Pari, from 6 
Oct. 13 Rich. II. 1389, to 26 Sept. 18 Hen. VI. 1439, as 
" Reginaldo Grey de Ruthyn ;" ob. 1440. 

4. ^Edmund de Grey, grands, andh., being s. and h. of Sir John 
Grey, E.G. (ob. v. p.) eldest son of the last Baron, summ. 
to Pari, from 3 Dec. 20 Hen. VI. 1441, to 23 Feb. 2 Edw. 
IV. 1463, as " Edmundo Grey de Ruthyn, Chl'r.," created 
Earl of Kent 30 May 1465, by the title of Lord of Hastings, 31 
Waisford/ and Ruthyn ; ob. 1488. 

5.' George de Grey, s. and h., Earl of Kent ; ob. 1504. 
6. Richard de Grey, s. and h., Earl of Kent, K.G. ; ob. 1523, 
s. p. 



v Dugdale asserts that this Robert was 
summ. to Pari. 1 Ric. II., but his name is 
not inserted in the List of Summonses in that 
year. 

* The Earl of Kent claimed the Barony of 
Hastings as being heir of the whole blood of 
the last Earl of Pembroke, and the question 
in regard to this Barony remained in dispute 
till 1640, when, upon Mr. Longueville's claim 
to the Baronies both of Hastings and Grey de 
Ruthyn, it was decided that a sister of the 



whole blood could not take the dignity from 
a younger brother of the half blood. — Vide 
Remarks under Hastings, p. 239. 

y The title here given as " Waisford " 
represented the ancient Lordship or Earldom 
of Wexford in Ireland, which had been vested 
in the last Earl of Pembroke, and which the 
Greys appear to have claimed, although the 
lands went to the Talbots, Earls of Shrews- 
bury, who assumed the title of Earls of 
Wexford.— Vide Note under Shrewsbury. 



IX. 


1572. 


9 


X. 


1615. 


10 


XI. 


1625. 


11 



GREY. 227 

Barons by Writ. 

VII. 1523. 7. Henry Grey, half bro. and h., Earl of Kent, but he never used 

any title of honour, from poverty ; ob. 1562. 

VIII. 1562. 8. Reginald Grey, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Henry Grey 

(ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Baron, Earl of Kent : ob. 
1572, s. p. 

Henry Grey, bro. and h., Earl of Kent ; ob. 1615, s. p. 

Charles Grey, bro. and h., Earl of Kent ; ob. 1625. 

Henry Grey, s. and h., Earl of Kent ; ob. 1639, s. p., leaving 

Susan, his sister, wife of Sir Michael Longueville, his 

heir. 

XII. 1639. 12. Charles Longueville, s. and h. of the said Sir Michael 

Longueville, and Susan Grey, his wife, claimed and was 
allowed the Barony in 1640 ; ob. 1643, s. p. M. 

XIII. 1643. 13. Susan Yelverton, dau. and sole heir; wife of Sir Henry Yel- 

verton, Bart. ; ob. 1676. 

XIV. 1676. 14. Sir Charles Yelverton, 3rd Bart., s. and h. ; succeeded his 

mother in this Barony Jan. 28, 1676 ; ob. 1679, s. p. 

XV. 1679. 15. Henry Yelverton, bro. and h., created Viscount de Longue- 

ville 21 Apr. 1690 ; ob. 1704. 

XVI. 1704. 16. Talbot Yelverton, s. and h., Viscount de Longueville, created 

Earl of Sussex 26 Sept. 1717, with a special remainder, 
K.B.; ob. 1731. 

XVII. 1731. 17. George Augustus Yelverton, s. and h., Viscount de Longue- 

ville and Earl of Sussex ; ob. 1758, unm. 

XVIII. 1758. 18. Henry Yelverton, bro. and h., Viscount de Longueville and 

Earl of Sussex ; ob. 1799, s. p. m., when the Earldom of 
Sussex and Viscounty of De Longueville became Extinct. 
Barbara, his only child, died v. p. in 1781, having m. Ed- 
ward Thoroton Gould of Mansfield Woodhouse, co. Notts, 
Esq., by whom she left issue, 

XIX. 1799. 19. Henry Edward Gould, grands, and h. (being s. and h. 

of Barbara above mentioned, dau. and h. of the last Baron), 
who assumed the surname of Yelverton instead of that of 
Gould by Royal Licence 21 Feb. 1800 ; ob. 29 Oct. 1810. 

XX. 1810. 20. Barbara Yelverton, dau. and sole h., m. 1st George Au- 
gustus Francis, Marquess of Hastings (who died 13 Jan. 1844) ; and 2ndly, 
Hastings Reginald Henry, Esq., who by Royal Licence 3 Jan. 1849, took 
the surname of Yelverton only ; present Baroness Grey de Ruthyn. ^= 

Y 
GREY (of Shirland). Vide Grey of Wilton. 



GREY ( of Werke ). 
Barons. 

I. 1624. 1. Sir William Grey, 1st Baronet, descended from a common an- 

cestor of the Lords Grey of Powis, created Baron Grey of Werke, 
co. Northumberland, 11 Feb. 1624 ; ob. 1674. 

II. 1674. 2. Ralph Grey, s. and h. ; ob. 1675. 

III. 1675. 3. Forde Grey, s. and h., created Viscount Glendale, and Earl of 

Tankerville, 11 June 1695 ; ob. 1701, s. p. m., when the Vis- 
county and Earldom became Extinct ; but the Barony devolved 
upon, 

IV. 1701. 4. Ralph Grey, bro. and h. male ; ob. 1706, s. p., when the dig- 

nity became Extinct. 

Q 2 



GREY. 



Baron by Tenure. 
I. Hen. HI. 

Barons by Writ. 



GREY (of Wilton). 

1. John de Grey, 2nd son of Henry de Grey, I. 1st Baron 
Grey of Codnor ; ob. 1265. 



1295. 



1309. 



1324. 



1343. 



1376. 



1445. 

1497. 

1509. 

1511. 
151.. 
15... 
1529. 



1561 



1593. 



2 ih f Reginald de Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 23 
June, 23 Edw. I. 1295, to 26 Aug. 1 Edw. II. 1307, as 
" Reginaldo de Grey ;" ob. 1308. 

3. John de Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 9 June, 2 
Edw. II. 1309, to 18 Sept, 16 Edw. II. 1322, as " Johanni 
de Grey ;" ob. 1323. 

4. Henry de Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 30 Dec. 18 
Edw. II. 1324, to 12 Sept. 16 Edw. III. 1342, as " Hen- 
rico de Grey ;" ob. 1342. 

5. Reginald de Grey, s. and h., set. 30, summ. to Pari, from 
24 Feb. 17 Edw. III. 1343, to 20 Nov. 34 Edw. III. 1360, 
as " Reginaldo de Grey," but after the 23rd Edw. III. 
with the addition of " Seniori ;" ob. 1370. 

6. Henry de Grey, s. and h., a?t. 28, summ. to Pari. 1 Dec. 50 
Edw. III. 1376, as " Henr' Grey de Shirland," and from 
4 Aug. 1 Rich. II. 1377, to 20 Nov. 18 Rich. II. 1394, as 
" Henr' Grey de Wilton ;" ob. 1395. 

7. Richard de Grey, s. and h., ret. 3 ; he was never summ. to 
Pari. ; ob. 1442. 

8. ^Reginald de Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 13 
Jan. 23 Hen. VI. 1445, to 14 Oct, 11 Hen. VII. 1495, 
as " Reginaldo Grey de Wilton, Chevalier ;" ob. 1495. 

9. John de Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, as "Johanni 
Grey de Wilton," 16 Jan. 12 Hen. VII. 1497 ; ob. ante 
1506. 
Edmund de Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, as " Edmundo 
Grey de Wilton, Chl'r," 17 Oct. 1 Hen. VIII. 1509 ; ob. 
1511. 
George Grey, s. and h. ; ob. infra retatem, s. p. 

12. Thomas Grey, bro. and h. ; ob. infra tetatem, s. p. 

13. Richard Grey, bro. and h. ; ob. infra aetatem, s. p. 

William Grey, bro. and h., summ. to Pari, from 3 Nov. 
21 Hen. VIII. 1529, to 5 Nov. 5 and 6 Philip and 
Mary, 1558, as " Willielmo Grey de Wilton, Chl'r. ;" 
in 1553 he was Attainted, when his honours became 
Forfeited ; but he was fully restored to them in 1558 ; 
K.G. ; ob. 1562. 

Arthur Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, as " Arthuro Grey 
de Wilton, Chl'r," from 30 Sept. 8 Eliz. 1566, to 19 Feb. 
35 Eliz. 1593 ; ob. 1593. 

16. Thomas Grey, s. and h., summ. to Pari, as "Thomfe Grey 
de Wilton, Chl'r," 24 Oct. 39 Eliz. 1597, and 27 Oct. 43 Eliz. 1601. 
Attainted in 1604, when all his honours became Forfeited; he died 
in 1614, s. p. Bridget, his sister and coheir of the whole blood, m. Sir 
Rowland Egerton, 1st Bart,, and Elizabeth, his half-sister and coheir, m. 
Sir Francis Goodwin, Knt., whose granddau. and h. Jane Goodwin was 
the wife of Lord Wharton. 



10. 



11. 



14. 



15. 



GREY DE WILTON — G RE YSTOCK. 



229 



Baron. Viscounts. 
I. 1784.— I. 1801. 1 



GREY DE WILTON". 



Sir Thomas Egerton, 6th Bart., lineally descended 
from the above-mentioned Sir Rowland Egerton 
and Bridget Grey, his wife, created Baron Grey 
de Wilton, co. Hereford, 15 May 1784 : created 
Viscount Grey de Wilton, and Earl of W T ilton of 
Wilton Castle aforesaid, 26 June 1801, with re- 
mainder, failing his issue male, to his grandson, 
Thomas Grosvenor, second son of Eleanor, his dau., 
wife of Robert Grosvenor commonly called Vis- 
count Belgrave, and his issue male, failing which, 
to Robert, third son, and to the fourth and every 
other son of the said Eleanor by the said Robert 
Grosvenor or any future husband ; ob. 23 Sept. 
1814, s. p. m., when the Barony became Extinct ; 
but the Viscounty of Grey de Wilton and the Earl- 
dom of Wilton devolved, agreeable to the above 
limitation, upon, 
II. 1814. 2. Thomas Grosvenor, who, by licence 27 Nov. 1821, 
assumed the name and arms of Egerton only ; grands, and h. as above men- 
tioned, present Viscount Grey de Wilton and Earl of Wilton. — Vide 
Wilton. =p 

GREYSTOCK:. 

Barons by Tenure. 



I. John. 



II. 
Ill 
IV 



Hen. 
Hen. 
Hen. 



III. 
III. 
III. 



1. Rantjlph Fitz-W alter, Lord of Greystock, co. Cumberland ; 
living 1210. 
William de Greystock, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1216. 
Thomas Fitz- William de Greystock, s. and h. ; living 1244. 



Robert de Greystock, s. and h., had livery of his lands 1246 ; 
ob. circa 1252, s. p. 
V. Hen. III. 5. William de Greystock, bro. and h.; m. Mary, dau. and coh. 
of Roger de Merley ; ob. 1288. 



Barons by Writ. 
I. 1295. 



6. f John de Greystock, set. 25 in 1288, s. and h., summ. to 
Pari, from 23 June, 23 Edw. I. 1295, to 22 Jan. 33 Edw. I. 
1305, as " Johanni Baroni de Greystok," or as " Johanni de 
Greystok ;" he was also summ. 8 June, 23 Edw. I. 1294, 
but it does not appear that that writ was a regular summons 
to Pari, (vide Clyvedon); ob. 1305, s. p., when the Barony 
created by the writ of 23 Edw. I. became Extinct. 2 

1.^^ Ralph Fitz- William, s. of William Fitz-Ralph Lord of 
Grimthorp, co. York, s. of Joan, aunt of the last Baron, suc- 
ceeded to the Lordship of Greystock in virtue of the settle- 
ment mentioned in the note, m. Margery, dau. and coh. of 
Hu^h de Bolebec, summ. to Pari, as " Ralph Fitz-William " 
from 24 June, 23 Edw. I. 1295, to 6 Oct. 9 Edw. II. 1315 ; 
ob. 1316. 



* This John de Greystock obtained licence 
from the Crown 25 Edw. I. 1296-7, "quod 
ipse de manerio de Graystoke et tota Baronia 
de Graystoke," &c, " feoffare possit dilectum 
et fidelem nostrum Radulphum Filium Wil- 
lielmi nobiscum in obsequium nostrum ad 
partes transmarinas pref'ecturum ;" a fine was 
levied, 27 Edw. I. 1298-9, and the said 
manor settled upon John de Greystock for 



life, with remainder to the said Ralph and 
his heirs for ever. This settlement was made, 
not only to the exclusion of his own brother 
and sister (who afterwards died s. p.), but 
also to the exclusion of the two daughters and 
coheirs of his uncle Thomas de Greystock, in 
whom was eventually vested the representa- 
tion of the original Barony of Greystock. 



230 GRIFFIN. 

Barons by Writ. 

II. 2. Robert Fitz-Ralph, s. and h. set. 40 ; he was never summ. to 

Pari. ; ob. 1317. 

III. 1321. 3. Ralph (who assumed the surname of) de Greystock, s. and h. 

set. 17, summ. to Pari, from 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 1321, to 17 
Sept. 16 Edw. II. 1322, as " Ralph de Graystok ;" ob. 1323. 

IV. 1348. 4. William de Greystock, s. and h. set. 3, summ. to Pari, from 

20 Nov. 22 Edw. III. 1348, to 15 Dec. 31 Edw. III. 1357, 
latterly as " Willielmo Baroni de Graystok ;" ob. 1359. 

V. 1375. 5.t^Ralph be Grevstok, s. and h. set. 6, summ. to Pari, from 

28 Dec. 49 Edw. III. 1375, to 5 Oct. 5 Hen. V. 1417, as 
" Radulfo Baroni de Greystok ;" ob. 1417. 

VI. 1419. 6. John de Greystock, s. and h. set. 28 ; he m. 1407, Elizabeth, 

eldest dau. and coh. of Robert Ferrers, s. and h. of Robert 
Baron Ferrers of Wemme, and consequently coh. of that 
Barony with her sister Mary wife of Ralph Nevill ; summ. 
to Pari, from 24 Aug. 7 Hen. V. 1419, to 5 July, 13 
Hen. VI. 1435, as "Johanni Baroni de Greystok, Chl'r ;" 
ob. 8 Aug. 1436. 

VII. 1436. 7.$fc Ralph de Greystock, s. and h. sat. 22, 1435, summ. to Pari, 
as " Radulfo Baroni de Greystoke, Chl'r," from 29 Oct. 15 Hen. VI. 1436, 
to 6 Sept. 18 Hen. VI. 1439, and from 3 Dec. 20 Hen. VI. 1441, to 
15 Sept. 1 Hen. VII. 1485, as "Radulfo de Greystok, Chev'lr ;" ob. 1487. 
Elizabeth Greystock, his granddau. and h., viz., dau. and sole heir 
of Robert Greystock (ob. v. p. 1483) his eldest son, m. Thomas Lord 
Dacre of Gillesland, K.G., to which Barony that of Greystock (in which 
was involved the Barony of Fitzwilliam originating in the writ of sum- 
mons to Ralph Fitzwilliam 1295, a moiety of the Barony of Ferrers of 
Wemme, a moiety of that of Bolebec, a fourth of that of Montfichet, and 
a third of that of Merley, the three last by tenure only) became united 
until the death of George 5th Baron Dacre of Gillesland, and Baron Grey- 
stock, infra a?tatem, 1569, when it fell into Abeyance between his three 
sisters and coheirs, of whom Ann the eldest, then ast. 12, afterwards m. 
Philip Howard Earl of Arundel, ancestor of the Dukes of Norfolk ; Mary, 
the 2nd sister and coh., m. Thomas Lord Howard of Walden, but died 
s. p. ; Elizabeth, the 3rd sister and coh., became the wife of Lord William 
Howard, ancestor of the Earls of Carlisle ; and between the representatives 
of these coheirs this Barony is presumed now to be in Abeyance, but the 
Barony of Greystock has by many writers been ascribed to the Dukes of 
Norfolk, the representatives of Ann the eldest coh. If the Abeyance was 
terminated by the Crown in favour of the Dukes of Norfolk, but which is 
extremely doubtful, the Barony must now be in Abeyance solely between 
the Lords Petre and Stourton, as representatives of the coheirs of Philip, 
bro. of Edward Duke of Norfolk ; and, if the Abeyance be not terminated, 
these noblemen would be the coheirs of one moiety of the Barony as 
the representatives of Ann Dacre, the eldest sister and coh. of George 
Lord Dacre above mentioned; and the Earl of Carlisle, as the repre- 
sentative of Elizabeth Dacre, the youngest sister and coh., is the other 
coh. of the Barony of Greystock. 

GRIFFIN. 

Barons. 

[. 1688. 1. Edward Griffin, created Baron Griffin of Braybroke Castle, co. 
Northampton, 3 Dec. 1688 ; he m. Essex, eldest dau. and coh. of 
James Howard 3rd Earl of Suffolk and Baron Howard de Wal- 
den ; ob. a prisoner in the Tower 1710. 

4. 1710. 2. James Griffin, s. and h., ob. 1715. 



GRIMSTON — GUILFORD. 231 

Barons. 
III. 1715. 3. Edward Griffin, s. and h. ; ob. 1742, s. p., when this title be- 
came Extinct. 

Ann, the sister, and ultimately the sole h. of the last Baron, m. William 
Whitwell, Esq., and their s. John Griffin Whitwell Griffin, was summ. to 
Pari, as Baron Howard de Walden in 1784. — Vide Howard de Walden. 



GRIMSTON. 

Viscounty, 24 Nov. 1815. — Vide Verulam. 



GRINSTEAD. 
Barons. 

I. 1815. 1. John Willoughby Cole, 2nd Earl of Enniskillen in Ireland, 

created Baron Grinstead of Grinstead, co. Wilts, 11 Aug. 1815 ; 
K.P. ; ob. 31 Mar. 1840. 

II. 1840. 2. William Willoughby Cole, s. and h., present Baron Grinstead, 

also Earl of Enniskillen, &c. in Ireland. =p 

GROSMONT. Vide Glamorgan. 



GROSVENOR. 

Barons. Earls. 

I. 1761. — I. 1784. 1. Sir Eichard Grosvenor, 7th Bart., created Baron 

Grosvenor of Eaton, co. Chester, 8 Apr. 1761, created 
Viscount Belgrave, co. Chester, and Earl Grosvenor, 
5 July 1784 ; ob. 1802. 

II. 1802. — H. 1802. 2. Robert Grosvenor, s. and h., created Marquess of 

Westminster 13 Sept. 1831. — Vide Westminster. 



GUERNSEY. 
Baron. 

I. 1703. 1. Heneage Finch, 2nds. of Heneage 1st Earl of Nottingham, created 
Lord Guernsey, co. Southampton, 15 Mar. 1703, created Earl of Aylesford 
19 Oct. 1714: ob. 1719.— Vide Aylesford. 



GUILFORD. 

Countess. 

I. 1660. Elizabeth, dau. of William 1st Earl of Denbigh, and widow of Lewis 
Viscount Boyle of Kynahneaky in Ireland, created Countess of 
Guilford for life 14 July 1660 ; ob. 1673, when the title became 
Extinct. 

Earl. 
I. 1674. John Maitland, 1st Duke and 2nd Earl of Lauderdale in Scot- 
land, created Baron Petersham and Earl of Guilford, both co. 
Surrey, 25 June 1674, K.G. ; ob. 1682, s. p. m., when his English 
honours became Extinct. 
Barons. 

I. 1683. 1. Sir Francis North, 2nd s. of Dudley 4th Baron North, created 

Baron of Guilford, co. Surrey, 27 Sept. 1683 ; ob. 1685. 

II. 1685. 2. Francis North, s. and h. ; ob. 1729. 



tilKNW UW'YIMK. 
Bnrons. Enrls. 

111. 17'J'.». — II. it.vj. 3. Franois North, s. and h., succeeded to the Barony 

of North in 17.">I, oreated Bar] of Guilford 8 A.pr, 
L7B2; ob L790. 

\y i ,:io. -ill. IT'.'O. 4. Frederick North, b, and h., Lord North, K.G.; 

Ob. 1792. 

\. 1,792, iv. L792. r>. George A.uchjstus North, b, and h., Lord North; 

ob, 20 Apr. L802, s. r., when the Barony of North 
fell into Aboyanoo ivtwtvn his daughters and 
ooheirsfsM North), but the Barony and Earldom 
of Guilford devolved on, 

yi. 1802. — V. L802. 6. Francis North, bro, and h.; ob, n Jan. L817, b.p, 

VII, L817, VI. L817. 7. Frederick North, bro, and h. ; ob, u Oct lS'JT. 

num. 

VIII. 1827. VII, 1827. s. Francis North, cousin and h. male, being a. and h. 
ofBrownlow North Bishop of Winohester, B.of Francis 1st Earl, present 
EJarl and Baron Guilford. =*= 

Y 

OURN/VY. 
Baroni by Tenure. 

I. Will. I. i. Hugh de Gurnai possessed divers Lordships at the General 

Survey, and afterwards became a monk in the Abbey o( Bee 

II. Will. U. 8. Girard ds Gurnat, s. and h.; ob. 1096, in Palestine, 
111 Steph, 3. Hugh de Gurnat, s. and h. ; ob. 1184. 

iv. Hen. II. 4, Hugh de Gurnat, s. and h.; ob, 1221. 

V, Hen, ill. !'. Hugh de Gurnat, s. and h.; ob. 1237, 8, p. x, Julian, his dau, 

and h.. in. William Bardolph, 



I. Hen. ill. L. Robert ds (iiu\v\, formerly Harpetre (vuie Harpetrb), but 

wln> took the came of Gurnay ; ob. 1269, 

II. I'.ilw. I. •;. Axsiim i«i iU'knat, s, and b.; ob. L285. 

III. l\hv. 1. 3. John pi GURHAT, s. :\iul h. ;vt. 26; ob. 1290, B.P.M, Eli 

both, his dau. ami h. a-t. lt\ was the wife of John ap AJ.atn. 



GWYPIK. 
Bareu 

i. iTiHi. i. Sti; Peter Burrbll, Bart., husband o( Prisoilla Baroness Wil- 
Loughby de K.ivsbv by descent, being eldest dau, of Peregrine 
Bertie 3rd Duke of Ancaster and Baron Willoughby of Eresby, 
and sister and ooh. of Robert ith Duke, oreated Baron Gwydir of 
Gwydir, oo, Carnarvon, it ; Juno 1796; oh. -J; 1 June L820. 

11. 1820, i. Peter Robert Burrell, s, anol h., assumed the surnames of 
Druininond-Burrell by licence 5 Nov, 1807, succeeded his mother as Baron 
Willoughby de Eresb) 29 Dec 1828, ami by another licence 26 Juno 
18 IP relinquished the name of Burrell and assumed those of Drnmmond- 
\\ tloughm i present Baron Gwvdir and Baron WMlloughby de Eresby, and 
a Bart., Joint Hereditary Great Chamberlain of England. ' q= 

T 7 



HAClli: - HAMILTON. 288 



H. 



IIACIIE. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. L299. L.^Eustacb db HacHe, Lord of Haohe, oo. Wilis, Bumm. to Pari. 

from 6 Feb, 27 Edw. I. L299, to 28 Jan. 88 Edw. I. 1805; ob. L806, 8. p. ». 

Julian, his dan. ami b.., m. John Hansard, amongst whose descendants this 
Barony must be considered to bo in Ahcynnco. 

HALIFAX. 

Viscounts. Earls. Marqnessos. 

i. L668. — I. L679. I, L882, l. Sib Gbobgb Savillb, Bart., oreated Baron 

Sa\ ille of Eland and Visoount Halifax, 
both oo. York, LSJan. L668; oreatod Earl 
ofHalifax L6 Julj L879;oreated MarqueBS 
of Halifax L7 Aug, L682 ; ob. 1695. 

II. L695. ll. L696.— II. L696. 2. William Bavillb, b, and h. ; ob. 1700, 

when all these titles became Bxtlnot. 

Barons. 

I. itoo. --ill. 1711. i. Chablbb Montague, 4th s. of George Montague, 

younger s. of Henry isi Earl of Manchester, created 
Baron Halifax, oo. Ymk, L8 Deo. 1700, with re- 
mainder, failing Ids issue male, to his noph. George 
Montague of Horton, oo. Northampton, and his issue 

male; rivaled Karl of Halifax and Yi.scomil Sun 

bury, oo. Middlesex, L9 Oot. L714; K.G. j ob. 1716, 

when the Yiscountv of Simhuiv and this Karldom 

in'cainc Kxtiiu-t, imi the Barony devolved, agree 
able i" the abo\ e Limitation, on, 

II. 1715. — 1\'. I7ir>. 2. George Montague, his neph. and h. above mentioned, 

created Yiseounl Suulum. 00. M iddlese\, and Marl 

of Halifax, 1 I dune L715; K.B.; ob. L789. 

III. L789. Y. I7.'!'d. 3. Geobgb Montague (assumed the name of ) Dune, s, 

and h., I ,ord-l -ieul . of Ireland L749j K. (I. ;<>!>. 1 7 7 ti , B.P.M., when all his 
honours became Extinct. 



HAMILTON. 
Baroness. 

I. I77i>. i. Elibabbth. 2nd dau. of John Gunning, and wife, 1st, of James 6th 

Duke of Hamilton, and2ndly of John 5th Duke of Argyll, and 1st 
Baron Sundridgo in the Peerage of Great Britain, created Baroness 
Hamilton of Hameldon, co. Leicester, 20 May I77ii, with re- 
mainder of the dignity of Baron Hamilton to her issue male; ob, 
1790. 
Barons. 

II. i7'.io. 2. Douglas Hamilton, 8th Duke of Hamilton and 6th Duke of Bran- 

don, 2nd s. and li. (.lames George 7th Duke of Hamilton, (he 
eldest son, having died v. m., 1779, b.p.)j ob. L799, s. p. 

III. L799. 3. Georgb William Campbell, half-bro. and h., being s. and h. appa- 

rent of John 5th Duke of Argyll, by Elizabeth 1st Baroness, suc- 
ceeded as Duke of Argyll, &o. 24 May L806; Baron Bundridgoj 
ob. s. p., 22 Oot. L889. ' 



234 HAMILTON — HANSELYN. 

Barons. 

IV. L889. 4. Josh Dowlas Edwabd Mi kv Campbell, g. and h., Duke of 

Argyll, &c; ob. 26 Apr. 1847. 

V. 1847. 5. Geoboe Douglas Campbell, h. and h., presentBaron Hamilton and 

Sundridge, also Duke and Earl of Argyll, Marquess of Lorn, &c. in Scot- 
land. =p 

HAMILTON. 

Viscounts. 

I. 17B'». l. James Hamilton, 8th Earl of Abercorn in Scotland, created Vis- 

counl Hamilton in England 24Aug. 1780, with remainder, failing 

lii.s issue male, to his aeph. John Jamei Hamilton, s. of his next 

tiro. .|r,im Hamilton ; ob. 1 789. 

II L789. 2. Joas James Hamilton-, neph. and b. above mentioned, created 

Marquess of Abercorn 15 Oct. L790; K.O.; ob. 1818. 
III. 1818. 3. James Hamilton, grands, and b., beings, and h. of James Hamilton 
(ob. v. p.) eldest son of the Las! Viscount, present Viscount Hamilton and 
Marquess of Abercorn, also Earl of Abercorn, &c. in Scotland; K.Q-. 
P.O. ^ 

Y 

HAMILTON ( of Wishaw ). 

Baron. 

[. L831. i. Robebt Montoomebv Hamilton, 8th Lord Belhaven and Stenton 

in Scotland, created Baron Hamilton of Wishaw, co. Lanark, lOSept. 1831, 

present I >a.ron Hamilton, a, I so ISaion Belhaven and Stenton in Scotland. — 

HAMPDEN. 

Viscounts. 

I. !77*>. l. Robebt Tbevob, 4th Baron Trevor, created Viscount Hampden of 

Great and Little Hampden, co. Bucks, 14 Jinn: 177<>; ob. L788. 

II. 1788. 2. Thomas Tbevob Hampden, s. and b. ; ob. 20 Ai^. 1824, s. p. 

in. 1824. 3. John Tbevob Hampden, bro. and b. ; ob. 9 Sept. 1824, h. v., when 
.,11 In,: honours became Extinct. 

HAMPTON COURT. 
Babont, 26 Jan. 1716— Extinct 1701. Vide Com nobby. 

HANDLO. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1342. i. Jobs de Handlo, summ. to Pari. 25 Peb. 16 Edw. HI. 1842, but 
m er afterwards; be m. two wives, of whom the 2nd was Maud, widow of 
John Lovel and sister and b.of Edward Burnell (vide Bvbnell) ; ob. 1846, 

leaving Edmund de Handlo bis gr is. and b., being s. and h. of Richard 

de Handlo (ob. v. p.) eldest son of John de Handlo by bis 1st wife, but 
who died infra retatem, L355, leaving bis two sisters his heirs, viz.. Mar« 
ii i iii ',i Gilberl Chastelyn, and Elizabeth wife of Edmund de la Pole, 
by whom she bad issue; Margaret bad no issue by Chastelyn, but by 
anothei busband, John de Apnlbv, she had an only child, Joan wife of 
John Conghull, and between the descendants of these two sisters whatever 
dignity was vested in John de Handlo is in Abeyance. 

HANSELYN. 

Barons by Tenure 

I. Will. I. Qo i ■ i; 1 1 > Hanselsn possessed divers Lordships in the reign of Wil- 
li. on the Conqueror, ofwhich Shelford, co. Notts, was the seat of 
his Barony, from whom descended, 



II. 


1732. 


—11. 


1732, 


111. 


17o0.- 


-TIL 


1 750. 


IV. 


1770.- 


-IV. 


1770. 


V. 


1799.- 


—A'. 


1799. 


VI. 


1807.- 


-VI. 


1807. 



HARBOROUGH — IIARPERESHULL. 285 

Barons by Tenure. 

1. Steph. Ralph Hanseleyn, ob, 1171, s. p. m. ; he left two daughters : Rose 

m. to Thomas Bardolph, by whom she had issue, and another dau. wife of 

Everingham. 

„ , HAEBOEOUGH. 

Barons. Earls. 

I. 1714. — I. 1719. l. Benedict or Bennet Sherard, 3rd Baron Sherard in. 

Ireland, created Baron Harborough of Harborough, eo. 

Leicester, 19 Oct. 1714, with remainder, failing his 
issue male, to Philip Sherard of Whitsundine, eo. 
Rutland, Esq., and his issue male: created Viscount 
Sherard of Staplefbrd, eo. Leicester, 31 Get. 1 7 IS, 
to him and his issue male ; and Earl o\ Har- 
borough, with the like remainder as the Barony, 8 
May 1719; ob, 1732, s. v., when the Viscounty v( 
Sherard of Staplefbrd became Extinct, but the Ba- 
rony and Earldom devolved, agreeable to the above 
limitation, on. 

2. rnii.tr Shekakp, cousin and h., being s. and h. of 
Bennet, eldest son o( Philip Sherard above men- 
tioned ; ob. 1750. 

3. Bennett Sherard, s. and h. : ob. 1770, s. r. be. 

4. Robert Sherabd, bro, andh. ; ob. 1799. 

5. Philip Sherard, s. and h, ; ob. 10 Pee. 1807. 

6. ROBERT Sheraro, s. and h.. present Earl of Har- 

borough and Baron Harborough. also Baron Sherard 
in Ireland. = 

t. t, xir •♦ HAECLA. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1321. i. Sib Andrew Habcla, summ. to Pari. 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 1321, 
and 11 Mar, 15 Edw. 11. 1822, created Earl of Carlisle 25 Mar. 1322; de- 
graded and beheaded 1328, when his honours became Forfeited. 

„ „.. . HAECOUET. 

Barons. Viscounts. 

I. 1711. — I. 1721. l. Sn; Simon Harcourt, Lord Keeper, created Baron 

Harcourt of Stanton Harcourt, eo. Oxford, 3 Sept. 
1711 ; created Viscount Harcourt of Stanton Har- 
court aforesaid 11 Sept. 1721; ob. 1727. 
Earls. 

II. 1727. — 11. 1727.— 1. 1749. 2. Simon Harcourt, grands, and h., being s. 

and h. of Simon Ilareonrt (ob. v. p.") 
eldest son of the last Viseonnt. created 
Viscount Nuneham of Nuneham Court- 
ney, and Earl Ilareonrt of Stanton Har- 
court aforesaid, I Pee. 1749; ob. 1777. 

IU. 1777. — 111. 1777. — 11. 1777. 3. GEORGE Simon HARCOURT, S. and h. ; ob. 

21 Apr. 1809, s. r. 

IV. 1809.— TV. iso-.).— ill. lso-.i. 4. William Harcourt, bro. and h.jG.C.B. s 
ob. 17 June 1830, b. v., when all his titles became Extinct. 

Baron by Writ. HAEDEBESHULL. 

1. L842. l. Johs uk Hardebeshdll, Bumm.toParl. 25 Feb. Id Edw. 111. 1342, 

but never afterwards : he left issue three daughters and eoheirs, viz. — I. 

Elisabeth, wife o\' John Culpeper ; 2. .loan, wife o( sir .lames Burfbrd ; 
.".. Margaret, wife of sir Richard Talbot : and amongst their descendants the 
dignity vested in their father is in Abeyance. Dugdale gives no account 
of this Baron in Ins Baronage, 



236 



HARDINGE — HARINGTON. 



HARDINGE. 

Viscount. 

I. 1846. 1. Sib Henry Habdinge, created Viscount Hardinge of Lahore and 
King's Newton, co. Derby, 2 May 1846, present Viscount Hardinge, G.C.B., 
General Commanding in Chief, &c. =j= 

Y 



Barons. 



Earls. 



HARDWICKE. 



I. 1733. — I. 1754. 1. Sib Philip Yobke, Chief Justice of the King's Bench, 

created Baron Hardwicke of Hardwicke, co. Glou- 
cester, 23 Nov. 1733, created Viscount Royston and 
Earl of Hardwicke, co. Gloucester, 2 Apr. 1754, Lord 
High Chancellor 1737 ; ob. 1764. 

II. 1764.— II. 1764. 2. Philip Yobke, s. and h. ; ob. 1790, s. p. m. 

III. 1790. — III. 1790. 3. Philip Yobke, neph. and h., being s. and h. of Charles 

Yorke, a next bro. of the last Earl, K.G. ; ob. 18 Nov. 
1834. 

IV. 1834. — IV. 1834. 4. Chaeles Philip Yobke, neph. and h., eldest s. of Sir 

Joseph Sidney Yorke, K.C.B., half bro. of the last Earl, present Earl of 
Hardwicke and Baron Hardwicke and Baron Royston. =p 

Y 
Barons. HAREWOOD. 

I. 1790. Edwin Lascelles, created Baron of Harewood, co. York, 9 July 1790*; 

ob. 1795, s. p., when the dignity became Extinct. 

Earls. 

II. 1796. — I. 1812. 1. Edwakd Lascelles, cousin of the last Baron, created 

Baron Harewood of Harewood, co. York, 18 June 
1796, created Viscount Lascelles and Earl of Hare- 
wood, co. York, 7 Sept. 1812 ; ob. 3 Apr. 1820. 

III. 1820— II. 1820. 2. Henby Lascelles, s. and h. ; ob. 24 Nov. 1841. 

IV. 1841. — III. 1841. 3. Henby Lascelles, s. and h., present Earl of Harewood 

and Baron Harewood and Viscount Lascelles. =p 

Y 
Barons by Writ. HARINGTON. 

I. 1324. 1. John de Haeington, summ. to Pari, from 30 Dec. 18 Edw. II. 

1324, to 13 Nov. 21 Edw. III. 1345 ; b ob. 1348. 

II. 1348. 2. John de Haeington, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Pobert 

Harington (ob. v. p.), eldest s. of the last Baron, summ. to Pari. 
14 Feb. and 20 Nov. 22 Edw. III. 1348, 1 Jan. 22 Edw. III. 
1349, and 10 Mar. 23 Edw. III. 1349; ob. 1363. 

III. 1377. 3.t*$Robeet de Habington, s. and h., summ. to Pari, from 4 Aug. 1 

Rich. II. 1377, until his death in 1405. 

IV. 1405. 4.^John de Hablngton, s. and h. The name of Robert de Haring- 

ton occurs regularly in the summonses to Pari, from 1 Rich. 
II. 1377, to 3 Sept. 4 Hen. V. 1417 ; but as Robert the last 
Baron died in 1405, and as John Baron Harington is stated in 
the Rolls of Pari. c to have been present on the 22 Dec. 8 Hen. 
IV. 1406, it may be inferred that all the writs after the 7 Hen. 
IV. were directed to this Baron, and that the Christian name of 
Robert on the Rolls after that year was an error ; ob. 1418, s. p. 



This Charles Yorke was Lord Chancellor 
of England in 1770, and on the 18th of Ja- 
nuary a warrant was signed by the King for 
his creation to the dignity of Lord Morden, 
Baron of Morden, co. Cambridge, but he died 



on the 20th of the same month, before any 
patent had passed the Great Seal. 

b In the early Writs he is called " Johanni 
de Haverington." 

c Vol. iii. pp. 582 and 583. 



HARINGTON — HARRINGTON. 



237 



Barons by Writ. 

V. 1421. 5. ^William de Harington, bro. and h., summ. to Pari, from 26 
Feb. 8 Hen. V. 1421, to 6 Sept. 18 Hen. VI. 1439; K.G. ; ob. 1457, 
s. p. m., leaving his grands. William Bon vile, s. of Elizabetb his dau. and 
heiress apparent (ob. v. p.), wife of William Lord Bonvile, his next h., 
and who became Baron Harington jure matris. Cecily his dau. and h. 
m. Thomas Grey 1st Marquess of Dorset, and this Barony, with that of 
Bonvile, continued in that family until the attainder of Henry Grey, 
Duke of Suffolk, grandson of the said Thomas Marquess of Dorset and 
Cecily his wife, in 1554, when all his honours became Forfeited. — Vide 
Bonvile and Ferrers of Groby. 



HARINGTON ( of Exton ). 
Barons. 

I. 1603. 1. John Harington, descended from Robert Harington, bro. of John, 

2nd Baron above mentioned, created Baron Harington of Exton, 
co. Rutland, 21 July 1603; ob. 1613. 

II. 1613. 2. John Harington, s. and h. ; ob. 1614, s. p., when the title became 

Extinct. 

HAELEY. 
Barony, 23 May 1711. — Vide Oxford. 

HAROLD. 

Earldom, 14 Dec. 1706— Extinct 1740. — Vide Kent. 



Barons by Tenure. 
I. Steph. 1 



II. 


Hen. 


II. 


2 


III. 


Hen. 


II. 


3, 


IV. 


Hen. 


III. 


4. 


V. 


Hen. 


III. 


5. 



HARPETRE. 

John de Harpetre, possessed of the Lordship of Harpetre 
and other lands, cos. Somerset and Gloucester ; living 1138. 

William de Harpetre, s. and h. ; ob. 1175. 

John de Harpetre, s. and h. 

AVilliam de Harpetre, s. and h. ; ob. 1232. 

Robert de Harpetre, grands, and h. (eldest son of Thomas 
1st son of the last Baron), assumed the surname of Gurnay. 
— Vide Gurnay. 



Barons. 
1730.— I. 



II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 



Earls. 
1742. 



HARRINGTON. 



1. William Stanhope, descended from Sir John Stan- 
hope, younger bro. of Philip 1st Earl of Chesterfield, 
created Baron Harrington, co. Northampton, 6 Jan. 
1729-30 ; created Viscount Petersham, co. Surrey, 
and Earl of Harrington, co. Northampton, 9 Feb. 
1742 ; Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 1746 ; ob. 1756. 

2. William Stanhope, s. and h. ; ob. 1779. 

3. Charles Stanhope, s. and h. ; ob. 15 Sept. 1829. 

4. Charles Stanhope, s. and h. ; ob. s. p. s., 3 March 

1851. 

1851. — V. 1851. 5. Leicester Fitzgerald Charles Stanhope, bro. and 
h., present Earl of Harrington and Baron Harrington and Viscount Peter- 
sham. =f 



1756.— II. 1756. 
1779.— III. 1779. 
1829.— IV. 1829. 



238 



HARRIS — HASTANG. 



HARRIS. 

Barons. 

I. 1815. 1. George Harris, created Baron Harris of Seringapatam and Mysore 

in the East Indies, and of Belmont, co. Kent, 11 Aug. 1815, 
G.C.B. ; ob. 18 May 1829. 

II. 1829. 2. William George Harris, s. and h. ; ob. 30 May 1845. 

III. 1845. 3. George Francis Robert Harris, s. and h., present Baron 

Harris. =p 

_ HARROWBY. 

Barons. 

I. 1776. 1. Nathaniel Ryder, created Baron Harrowby of Harrowby, co. Lin- 

coln, 20 May 1776 ; ob. 20 June 1803. 

Earls. 

II. 1803. — I. 1809. 2. Dudley Ryder, s. and h., created Viscount Sandon of 

Sandon, co. Stafford, and Earl of Harrowby, co. Lin- 
coln, 19 July 1809 ; ob. 26 Dec. 1847. 

III. 1847. — II. 1847. 3. Dudley Ryder, s. and h., present Earl of Harrowby 

and Baron Harrowby and Viscount Sandon. =p 

HARROWDEW. See Wath and Harrowden. 

HARTINGTON. 

Marquessate, 12 May 1694. — Vide Devonshire. 



HARWICH. 

Marquessate, 10 Apr. 1689 — Extinct 1719. — Vide Schomberg. 
Viscounty, 14 May 1730 — Extinct 1756. — Vide Fitz-W alter. 

Baron. 
I. 1756. 1. Wills Hill, 1st Earl and 2nd Viscount Hillsborough in Ireland, 
created Lord Harwich, Baron of Harwich, co. Essex, 17 Nov. 1756 ; created 
Viscount Fairford, co. Gloucester, and Earl of Hillsborough, 28 Aug. 
1772; created Marquess of Downshire in Ireland 19 Aug. 1789. — Vide 
Hillsborough. 

Barons by Writ. HASTANG. 

I. 1311. ^Robert de Hastang, summ. to Pari. 19 Dec. 5 Edw. II. 1311; 
he was living 18 Edw. II., but he was never afterwards sum- 
moned to Parl. d 



II. 



1342. Thomas de Hastang, presumed to be the s. and h. of the last 
Baron, summ. to Pari. 25 Feb. and 20 Nov. 16 Edw. III. 1342, but never 
afterwards. Dugdale states that he was also summoned to Parliament in 
5 Edw. III. 1331 ; but his name does not appear in the List of Summonses 
in that year. He left issue Sir John de Hastang, who was never summoned 
to Parliament, and who died 1366, leaving his two daughters his heirs, 
viz. Maud, set. 10, afterwards wife of Ralph de Stafford, ancestor of the 
Staffords of Grafton, and Joan, set. 9, afterwards the wife of Sir John 
Salisbury, Knight, amongst whose descendants and representatives this 
Barony is now in Abeyance. 



d This Robert appears to have signed the 
celebrated letter from the Barons to the Pope, 
dated at Lincoln, 29 Edw. I. anno 1300. His 



name is there written, " Robertus Hastang, 
Dominus de la Desiree." 



HASTINGS. 



239 



Barons by Tenure. 



II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 



Hen. I. 

Steph. 
Hen. II. 

Rich. I. 

John. 
Hen. III. 



HASTINGS. 

William or Walter de Hastings, Lord of Ashley, co. Nor- 
folk ; Steward to King Henry I. ; oh. . . . 

Hugh de Hastings, s. and h. 

William de Hastings, s. and h., Steward to King Henry II. ; 

oh. . . . 
Henry de Hastings, s. and h. ; oh. 1194, s. p. 
William de Hastings, hro. and h. ; oh. 1225. 
Henry de Hastings, s. and h. ; oh. 1249. 



Barons by Writ. 



I. 



II. 



12(14. 



1295. 



7. 



Henry de Hastings, s. and h. ; he m. Eve, sister and at length 
heir of George de Cantelupe, Baron of Bergavenny, summ. to 
Pari. 24 Dec. 49 Hen. III. 1264 ; oh. 1268. 
8>B t John Hastings, s. and h. set. 6, summ. to Pari, from 23 
June, 23 Edw. I. 1295, to 22 May, 6 Edw. II. 1313; 
Lord of Bergavenny, jure matris; he m. to his 1st wife 
Isahel, dau. of William de Valence, Earl of Pembroke ; ob. 
1313. 



III. 1313. 9. John Hastings, s. and h. set. 26, summ. to Pari, from 26 

Nov. 7 Edw. II. 1313, to 20 Feb. 18 Edw. II. 1325; 
Lord of Bergavenny ; he m. Julian, granddau. and h. of 
William Baron Leyburn ; ob. 1325. 

IV. 1325. 10. Lawrence Hastings, s. and h. a?t. 6, recognized and con- 

firmed in the Earldom of Pembroke by virtue of descent 
from Isabel, eldest sister of Aymer de Valence, Earl of 
Pembroke, by patent, 13 Oct. 1339, which Earldom was at 
the same time made a Palatinate ; Lord of Bergavenny ; 
ob. 1348. 

V. 1348. 11. John Hastings, s. and h. get. 1 ; m. 1st the Princess Margaret 

of England, and afterwards to Ann, dau. and h. of Sir Walter 
Manny, K.G. ; Earl of Pembroke and Lord of Bergavenny, 
K.G. ; ob. at Arras 16 Apr. 1375. 

VI. 1375. 12. John Hastings, s. and h. set. 2 5 ; Earl of Pembroke, Lord of 

Bergavenny ; slain under age at a tournament at Woodstock, 
1391 ; e when Reginald Lord Grey of Ruthyn, s. and h. of 
Reginald Lord Grey of Ruthyn eldest son of Roger de Grey 
of Ruthyn, by Elizabeth his wife, sister of John III. 9th 
Baron Hastings, was found his heir of the whole blood ; 
and Hugh Baron Hastings, son of Hugh de Hastings, eldest 
son of Hugh de Hastings son of the said John II. 8 th 
Baron Hastings by his second wife, Isabel Le Despenser, 
his heir of the half-blood ; between whose son Edward 
Hastings and the said Reginald Lord Grey there was a 
competition for the right of bearing the arms of Hastings, 
which was decided in favour of the latter. The right to 
the Barony vested, however, in the heir of Henry I. 7th 
Baron Hastings, viz. Hugh Hastings, great-grandson and 
heir of Sir Hugh de Hastings, son of John II. 8th Baron, 
s. and h. of the said Henry; nevertheless, the title of Lord 



e It is to be observed that in the different 
Inquisitions held after his death, he is uni- 
formly described as " John, son of John de 
Hastings, late Earl of Pembroke," and that 
in neither of them, nor in the proceeding be- 



tween Grey and Hastings in 14 Ric. II., is 
he once styled " Earl of Pembroke." This 
may be explained from the circumstance of 
his not having had livery of his lands. 



240 



HASTINGS. 



Barons by Writ. 

Hastings was assumed both by the families of Grey and 
Hastings, though never recognized as belonging to either. 
In 1640 Mr. Longueville claimed the titles of Lord Hastings 
and Euthyn, as heir of Keginald Lord Grey de Ruthyn, 
heir of the whole blood of John Hastings last Earl of Pem- 
broke ; f the proceedings in this case show that Mr. Longue- 
ville's claim to the Barony of Hastings was carefully in- 
vestigated, and not rejected until after reference to the 
Judges, whose opinions were unanimous against his claim 
to the dignity of Lord Hastings, though admitted by the 
House to the " title and dignity of Lord de Grey." 

The family of Hastings had in the meanwhile become 
extinct in the male line by the death of John Hastings, 
5th in descent from and heir of Sir Edward Hastings, bro. 
and h. of Hugh Hastings heir of the half-blood of John 
last Earl of Pembroke. John Hastings left upon his death 
in 1542 two sisters and coheirs— Anne, wife of William 
Browne, Esq., and Elizabeth, wife of Hamond Le Strange, 
Esq. ; of these two ladies there were in 1840 three coheirs, 
viz. Frances (wife of the Pev. Pichard Brownie), as sole 
heir of Anne, wife of William Browne, Esq., and Henry Le 
Strange Styleman Le Strange, Esq., and Sir Jacob Astley, 
Bart., coheirs of Elizabeth, wife of Hamond Le Strange, 
Esq. ; and the Queen having been pleased to terminate the 
Abeyance of the Barony of Hastings in favour of the latter 
and youngest coheir ; 

VII. 1841. 1. Sir Jacob Astley was accordingly summ. to Pari, by 
Writ 18 May 1841 as " Jacob Astley de Hastings, Chev'r," present Baron 
Hastings, and a Baronet. =j= 

Y 

Baron by Writ. HASTINGS ( of .... ) 

I. 1342. Hugh de Hastings, before mentioned, presumed to be son of Jolm 
II. 8th Baron, summ. to Pari. 25 Feb. 16 Edw. III. 1342 ; but neither 
he nor any of his descendants were ever afterwards summoned to Pari. 
Edward Hastings the competitor of Lord Grey de Ruthyn was his great- 
grandson, and eventually heir, and in the coheirs of the old Barony of 
Hastings this Barony is now vested. 



HASTINGS (of Inch Mahomo, in Menteith, in Scotland). 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1299. ^ Edmund de Hastings, younger s. of Henry I. 7th Baron, su mm , 
to Pari, from 29 Dec. 28 Edw. I. 1299, to 26 July, 7 Edw. II. 1313. He 
probably acquired his Scotch possessions by marriage with Isabella, widow 
of an Earl of Menteith, who appears to have been a prisoner in England 
in the custody of John de Hastings ; ob. s. p., when the Barony became 
Extinct. 

HASTINGS (of Hastings).*? 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1461. 1.^ William Hastings, descended from a younger s. of William 

III. 3rd Baron, summ. to Pari, as " Will'o Hastings, Militi, 



f On the question whether the possession 
of an Honour by the elder son gave that 
Honour to a sister of the whole blood in 
prejudice to the rights of his younger brother 
of the half blood, the Judges gave their una- 



nimous opinion " that there cannot be a 
possessio fratris in point of Honour." 

s See for earlier account of the Barony of 
Hastings Note under Hoo and Hastings. 



HASTINGS — HATHERTON. 241 



Barons by Writ. 



Domino Hastings de Hastings," from 26 July, 1 Edw. IV. 
1461, to 15 Nov. 22 Edw. IV. 1482, Lord Chamberlain, 
K.G. ; beheaded 1483. 

II. 1482. 2. Edward Hastings, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. 15 Nov. 

22 Edw. IV. 1482, as " Edwardo Hastings de Hungerford," 
and continued to be so summoned after his father's decease, 
and until 16 Jan. 12 Hen. VII. 1497. He m. Mary, the dan. 
and h. of Thomas Hungerford, s. and h. of Robert 3rd Lord 
Hungerford, in whose right he was so summoned (vide Hun- 
gerford) ; ob. 1507. 

III. 1509. 3. George Hastings, s. and h., summ. to Pari, as " Georgio 

Hastynges de Hastynges," from 17 Oct. 1 Hen. VIII. 1509, 
to 3 Nov. 21 Hen. VIII. 1529, created Earl of Hunting- 
don 8 Dec. 1529. Vide Huntingdon, in which Earldom 
this Barony was merged until the death of Francis XXVII. 
10th Earl of Huntingdon in 1789, when the Barony of Hast- 
ings, together with those of Hungerford, Botreaux, and Mo- 
lines, became vested in, 

XIII. 1789. 13. Elizabeth Hastings, his sister and heir, wife of John Rawdon, 

Earl of Moira in Ireland ; ob. 1808. 

Marquesses. 

XIV. 1808. — I. 1817. 14. Francis Rawdon-H a stings, s. and h., took the sur- 

name and arms of Hastings by Licence 10 Feb. 
1790, 1st Baron Rawdon in England; succeeded 
his father as Earl of Moira in Ireland in 1793 ; 
claimed and was allowed the Barony of Hastings 
in 1809, created Viscount Loudoun, Earl of Raw- 
don, and Marquess of Hastings 13 Feb. 1817; 
Governor General of India, K.G., G.C.B. ; ob. 
28 Nov. 1826. 

XV. 1826. — II. 1826. 15. George Augustus Francis Rawdon-Hastings, s. 

and h. ; ob. 13 Jan. 1844. 

XVI. 1844. — IH. 1844. 16. Paulyn Reginald Serlo Rawdon-Hastings, s. 

and h. ; ob. a minor, 17 Jan. 1851. 

XVII. 1851. — IV. 1851. 17. Henry Weysford Charles Plantagenet Raw- 
don-Hastings, bro. and h., present Baron and Marquess of Hastings, Earl 
of Rawdon, and Viscount Loudoun, Baron Hungerford, Molines, Botreaux, 
and Rawdon, sole heir of one moiety of the Barony of Montagu, and 
sole heir of one moiety and coheir of the other moiety of the Barony of 
Moels ; also Earl of Moira, &c. in Ireland; a minor. 

HASTINGS, LORD WELLES. Vide Welles. 

HASTINGS (of Loughborough). 
Baron. 

I. 1558. Edward Hastings, second s. of George XVIII. 1st Earl of Hunting- 
don, created Baron Hastings of Loughborough, co. Leicester, 19 Jan. 1558, 
K.G. ; ob. 1558, s. p. m., when the title became Extinct. 



HATHERTON. 
Baron. 

1835. 1. Right Hon. Edward John Littleton, created Baron Hatherton of 
Hatherton, co. Stafford, 11 May 1835, present Baron Hatherton, &c. =j= 

R y 



242 HATTON — HAWKE. 

HATTON. 

Barons. 

I. 1643. 1. Sir Christopher Hatton, K.B. (s. of John Hatton, cousin and h. 

male of Sir Christopher Hatton, K.G., Lord Chancellor to Queen 
Elizabeth), created Baron Hatton of Kirby, co. Northampton, 29 
July 1643; ob. 1670. 

Viscounts. 

II. 1670. — I. 1682. 2. Christopher Hatton, s. and h., created Viscount 

Hatton of Gretton, co. Northampton, 17 Jan. 1682 ; 
ob. 1706. 

III. 1706.— II. 1706. 3. William Hatton, s. and h. ; ob. 1760, s. p. 

IV. 1760. — III. 1760. 4. Henry Charles Hatton, bro. and h. ; ob. 1762, s. p., 

when all his honours became Extinct. 

HAUGHTON. 
Viscounty, 19 Oct. 1714. — Vide Clare and Newcastle. 



HAUSTED. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1332. John de Hausted (supposed to have been second son of Sir Eobert 
de Hausted of Horpole, co. Northampton), summ. to Pari, from 20 July, 6 
Edw. III. 1332, to 22 Jan. 9 Edw. III. 1336, but never afterwards ; Se- 
neschal of Gascony ; ob. 1337, leaving Sir William de Hausted his s. and 
h., set. 30 : ob. ante 1346, s. p., without having ever been summoned to 
Pari., when Elizabeth was found to be his sister and heir, but no trace of 
her can be found after that year. 



HAVERING. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1299. f John de Havering, received Knighthood from Edward I., and at- 
tended him in his Scottish wars, summ. to Pari. 6 Feb. and 10 Apr. 
27 Edw. I. 1299, but never afterwards ; and no further trace of him is to 
be found, unless he be [the same with John de Havering, whose dau. and 
h. Elizabeth was the wife of Matthew Besides, 8 Edw. II. 



HAVERSHAM. 
Barons. 

I. 1696. 1. Sir John Thompson, 1st Baronet, created Baron Haversham of 

Haversham, co. Buckingham, 4 May 1696; ob. 1710. 

II. 1710. 2. Maurice Thompson, s. and h. ; ob. 1745, s. p.m., when the title 

became Extinct. 



HAWKE. 

Barons. 

I. 1776. 1. Sir Edward Hawke, KB., created Baron Hawke of Towton, co. 

York, 20 May 1776 ; ob. 1781. 
IT. 1781. 2. Martin Bladen Hawke, s. and h. ; ob. 27 Mar. 1805. 

III. 1805. 3. Edward Harvey Hawke, s. and h. ; ob. 29 Nov. 1824. 

IV. 1824. 4. Edward William Harvey-Hawke, s. and h., present Baron 

ll.iwkc. z= 



HAWKESBURY — HEATHFIELD. 243 



HAWKESBURY. 
Barons. 

T. 1786. 1. Sir Chaeles Jenkinson, 7th Baronet, created Baron Hawkesbury 
of Hawkesbury, co. Gloucester, 21 Aug. 1786 ; created Earl of 
Liverpool 1 June 1796 ; ob. 17 Dec. 1808. 

II. 1808. 2. Robert Banks Jenkinson, s. and b., Earl of Liverpool, summ. to 

Pari, by Writ v. p. 15 Nov. 1803, and placed in bis father's 
Barony of Hawkesbury ; E.G. ; ob. 4 Dec. 1828. 

III. 1828. 3. Charles Cecil Cope Jenkinson, half-bro. and h., G.C.B. ; ob. 3 

Sept. 1851, s. p. m., when his honours became Extinct. 



HAY. 

Saron. 

I. 1615. 1. James Hay, 11 created Baron Hay of Sawley, co. Cumberland, 29 
June 1615, created Viscount Doncaster, 5 July 1618. (Vide Doncaster 
and Carlisle.) Extinct 1660. 

HAY (of Pedwardine ). 
Barons. 

I. 1711. 1. George Henry Hay, s. and h. apparent of Thomas 6th Earl of 

Kinnoul in Scotland, created Baron Hay of Pedwardine, co. 
Hereford, 31 Dec. 1711 ; succeeded bis father as 7th Earl of 
Kinnoul in Scotland in 1719 ; ob. 1758. 

II. 1758. 2. Thomas Hay, s. and h., Earl of Kinnoul in Scotland; ob. 1787, 

s. p. 

III. 1787. 3. Robert Auriol Hay Drummond, neph. and h., being s. and h. of 

Robert Hay (who assumed the name of Drummond), Archbishop 
of York, next bro. of the last Baron ; Earl of Kinnoul in Scot- 
land ; ob. 12 Apr. 1804. 

IV. 1804. 4. Thomas Robert Hay-Drummond, s. and h., present Baron Hay of 

Pedwardine, also Earl of Kinnoul in Scotland, Lord Lyon King 
of Arms. =p 

HA YE. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. I. 1. Robert de Haye, Lord of Halnacre in Boxgrove, co. Sussex, and 

Founder of the Priory there ; ob. ante 1165. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Richard de Haye, s. and h. ; ob. ante 1185, leaving his three 

daughters his coheirs, of whom Nicola m. Gerard de Camville; Maud 

was the wife of Richard de Humet; and , who m. William de 

Rollos. 

HEATHFIELD. 

Barons. 

I. 1787. 1. George Augustus Eliott (youngest s. of Sir Gilbert Eliott, 

Bart.), created Lord Heathfield, Baron Heathfield of Gibraltar, 6 
July 1787, K.B. ; ob. 1790. 

II. 1790. 2. Francis Augustus Eliott, s. and h. ; ob. 26 Jan. 1813, s. p., when 

the title became Extinct. 



h Before his creation as an English Baron 
he had a patent dated 21 June 1606, giving 
to him the title of Lord Hay for life, with 



precedence next to Barons, but he was not to 
enjoy any place or voice in Parliament. 



244 HEDINGTON — HERBERT. 

HEDINGTON. 

Barony, 27 Dec. 1676.— Vide Bdrfoed and St. Albans. 

HEDON. 
Barony, 14 July 1742— Extinct 1764.— Vide Bath. 



HENLEY. 
Barons. 
L 1760. 1. Robert Henley, created Lord Henley, Baron Henley of Grainge, 
co. Southampton, 27 Mar. 1760; created Earl of Northington, 
in the said county, 19 May 1764, Lord High Chancellor; oh. 
1772. 
II. 1772. 2. Robert Henley, s. and h., Earl of Northington, Lord Lieutenant 
of Ireland, K.T. ; ob. unm. 1786, when all his honours became 
Extinct. 



HERBERT ( of Herbert, and, of Ragland, Chepstow, and Gower ). 

Barons by Writ. 

I 1461. 1. ^William Herbert, summ. to Pari, as " Willielmo Herherd de 
Herberd," 26 July, 1 Edw. IV. 1461, as " Willielmo Domino 
Herbert, Chl'r," 22 Dec. and 28 Feb. 2 Edw. IV. 1463, and as 
" Willielmo Herbert, Chl'r," 28 Feb. 6 Edw. IV. 1466 ; created 
Earl of Pembroke 8 Sept. 1468, E.G. ; beheaded 1469. 

II. 1469. 2. William Herbert, s. andh., Earl of Pembroke, which Earldom he 

resigned, and on the 4th July 1479 was created Earl of Hunting- 
don; ob. 1491, s. p.m., leaving Elizabeth his sole dau. and h., 
who m., 

By Patent. 

III. 1491. — I. 1506. 1. Sir Charles Somerset, K.G., natural son of Henry 

Beaufort, Duke of Somerset ; he was created, by pa- 
tent 26 Nov. 1506, Baron Herbert of Ragland, Chep- 
stow, and Gower ; but was summ. to Pari. 17 Oct. 
1 Hen. VIII. 1509, and 28 Nov. 3 Hen. VIII. 1511, 
as Charles Herbert " de Herbert, Chivaler," created 
Earl of Worcester 1 Feb. 1514 ; ob. 1526. 

IV. 15... — II. 1526. 2. Henry Somerset, s. and h. ; succeeded his mother in 

the Barony of Herbert created by the Writ to William Herbert, dated 26 
July, 1 Edw. IV. 1461, and in 1526 he succeeded his father in the 
Barony of Herbert of Ragland, Chepstow, and Gower, created by the pa- 
tent of 26 Nov. 1506, and also in the Earldom of Worcester. — Vide 
Worcester and Beaufort. 



HERBERT ( of Chirbury ). 
Barons. 

I. 1629. 1. Edward Herbert, 1st Baron Herbert in Ireland, so created 31 

Dec. 1624, descended from a younger brother of William 1st 
Earl of Pembroke ; created Baron Herbert of Chirbury, co. 
Salop, 7 May 1629 ; ob. 1648. 



HERBERT. 245 

Barons. 

II. 1648. 2. Richard Herbert, s. and h. ; ob. 1655. 

III. 1655. 3. Edward Herbert, s. and h. ; ob. 1678, s. p. 

IV. 1678. 4. Henry Herbert, bro. and b. ; ob. 1691, s. p., when this Barony 

became Extinct. 

V. 1694. 1. Henry Herbert, s. and h. of Henry, 2nd bro. of Edward 1st 

Baron Herbert of Chirbury, created Baron Herbert of Chirbury, 
co. Salop, 28 Apr. 1694 ; ob. 1709. 

VI. 1709. 2. Henry Herbert, s. and h. ; ob. 1738, s. p., when this title 

again became Extinct. 

Of Chirbury 
and Ludlow. 

VII. 1743. — I. 1749. 1. Henry Arthur Herbert, s. and h. of Francis, 

eldest son of Richard Herbert (descended from the 
common ancestor of the preceding Barons), by 
Florentia, sister and coheir of Henry IV. 4th 
Baron Herbert of Chirbury ; created Baron Her- 
bert of Chirbury, co. Salop, 21 Dec. 1743 ; created 
Baron Powis of Powis Castle, Viscount Ludlow, 
co. Salop, and Earl of Powis, 27 May 1748 ; created 
16 Oct. 1749, Baron Herbert of Chirbury and of 
Ludlow, co. Salop, with remainder failing the heirs 
male of his body to his brother, Richard Herbert 
and the heirs male of his body, in default of which 
to Francis Herbert of Ludlow, Esq., and the heirs 
male of his body ; ob. 1772. 

VIII. 1772. — II. 1772. 2. George Edward Henry Arthur Herbert, s. and 

h., Earl of Powis ; ob. 16 Jan. 1801, when all 
his honours became Extinct. 

IX. 1804. 1. Edward Clive, 1st Baron Clive in England, husband of Hen- 

rietta Antonia Herbert, sister and sole heiress of the last Baron, 
created Baron Herbert of Chirbury, co. Salop, Baron Powis of 
Powis Castle, Viscount Clive of Ludlow, and Earl of Powis, 
14 May 1804 ; ob. 16 May 1839. 

X. 1839. 2. Edward Herbert Clive, s. and h., who by licence dated 9 Mar. 

1807, took the name and arms of Herbert only ; K.G. ; ob. 17 
Jan. 1848. 

XI. 1848. 3. Edward James Herbert, s. and h. ; present Baron Herbert, &c. 

— Vide Powis. 



HERBERT (of Cardiff). 
Baron. 

I. 1551. 1. William Herbert, created Baron Herbert of Cardiff, co. Gla- 
morgan, 10 Oct. 1551 ; created Earl of Pembroke 11 Oct. 1551. 
— Vide Pembroke. 



HERBERT ( of Shurland ). 
Barony, 4 May 1605. — Vide Montgomery and Pembroke. 

HERBERT ( of Torbay ). 
Barony, 29 May 1689.— Extinct 1716. — Vide Torrington. 



246 HEREFORD. 

HEREFORD. 

Earls. . , 

I Will I. 1. William Fitz-Osberne, Count of Bretville m Isormandy, and 
the King's Lieutenant and High-Steward there, commanded 
the van of the army at the battle of Hastings, and possessed 
the Earldom of Hereford in gift from William the Conqueror ; 
slain in battle against the Earl of Flanders, 1070. 

II. 1074. 2. Roger, younger son, succeeded to his father's English possessions ; 

engaged in a conspiracy against the King 1074, and was sen- 
tenced to forfeiture and perpetual imprisonment ; his issue is 
said by Ordericus Yitalis to have been in his time Extinct. 

King Stephen gave to Robert de Bellomont (who had 
married Amicia, niece and heir of Roger the last Earl) the 
county and borough of Hereford ; he is not called therein Earl 
of Hereford, but the county, borough, and castle are granted to 
him, " cum quibus Guil. filius Osbern unquam melius vel libe- 
rius tenuit." 

III. 1140. 1. Milo de Gloucester, created Earl of Hereford by the Empress 

Matilda, " Domina Anglorum," by patent dated at Oxford on 
the feast of St. James the Apostle, 25 July 1140. This is 
the earliest charter of express creation extant in which the 
date is to be found ; it makes the said Milo " Comitem de 
Hereford," and gives to him the moat and castle of Hereford, 
" sibi et hffiredibus suis tenendum de me et hteredibus meis ;" 
it also gives him the " tertium denarium placitormn totius 
comitatus Hereford ;" Lord Constable ; ob. 1143, 

IV. 1143. 2. Roger, s. and h., Lord Constable, obtained from King Henry II. 

a confirmation of the charter given to his father by the Em- 
press ; ' ob. 1154, s. p. 

V. 1199. 1. Henry de Bohun, s. and h. of Humphrey de Bohun, who is 

sometimes called Earl of Hereford, eldest son of Humphrey de 
Bohun by Margery, dau. of Milo III. 1st Earl, and sister and 
coh. to the last Earl; created Earl of Hereford by charter, 
dated at Porchester, 28 Apr. 1199, with the grant of 20Z. " de 
tercio denario com. Hereford, unde eum fecimus com. Here- 
ford ;" he was one of the celebrated twenty-five Barons ap- 
pointed to enforce the observance of Magna Charta ; Lord 
High Constable ; ob. 1220. 

VI. 1220. 2. Humphrey de Bohun, s. and h., Earl of Essex, Lord High 

Constable ; ob. 1274. 

VII. 1274. 3. Humphrey de Bohun, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Hum- 

phrey de Bohun (ob. v. p.) eldest son of the last Earl, Earl of 
Essex, Lord High Constable ; ob. 1297. 

VIII. 1297. 4. Humphrey de Bohun, s. and h., Earl of Essex and Lord High 

Constable ; he m. Elizabeth Plantagenet, 7th dau. of King 
Edward I. ; slain at Boroughbridge 16 Mar. 1321. 

IX. 1321. 5. John de Bohun, s. and h., Earl of Essex, Lord High Constable ; 

ob. 1335, s. p. 

X. 1335. 6. Humphrey de Bohun, bro. and h., Earl of Essex, Lord High 

Constable ; ob. 1361, s. p. 
XL 1361. 7. Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Northampton, nephew and h., being 
s. and h. of William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton, K.G. ; 
Earl of Essex, Lord High Constable, K.G. ; ob. 137^!, S. p. m., 
when this Earldom again became Extinct. 

1 This was probably considered rather as I sons of Milo are not found to have succeeded 
a new grant than a confirmation, as the other | to the dignity. 



HEREFORD. 247 

Dukes. 
I. 1397. Henry Plantagenet, surnamed of Bolingbroke, s. and h. of John of 
Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster ; having m. Mary dau. and coh. of the last 
Earl, was created Duke of Hereford 29 Sept. 1397 ; ascended the throne 
as King Henry IV. 29 Sept. 1399, when this dignity became merged in 
the Crown. 

The title of Earl of Hereford (with those of Buckingham, Stafford, 
Northampton, and Perche) was used by Humphrey Earl of Stafford, after- 
wards created Duke of Buckingham (vide an Indenture cited by Dugdale, 
dated 13 Feb. 1443 k ), being s. and h. of Edmund 3rd Earl of Stafford by 
Ann Plantagenet, dau. and sole h. of Thomas Duke of Gloucester by 
Eleanor de Bohun, dau. and coh. of Humphrey the last Earl ; but he was 
never summ. to Pari, otherwise than as Earl of Stafford, nor does it appear 
that he was ever so created. 

Viscounts. 

I. 1550. 1. Walter Devereux, Baron Ferrers of Chartley, Bourchier, and 

Louvaine, created Viscount Hereford 2 Feb. 1550, being 
descended from the above-mentioned Eleanor de Bohun, 
K.G. ; ob. 1558. 

II. 1558. 2. Walter Devereux, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Richard 

Devereux (ob. v. p.) eldest son of the last Viscount ; Lord 
Ferrers of Chartley, &c. ; created Earl of Essex 4 May 1572 ; 
K.G. ; ob. 1576. ' 

III. 1576. 3. Robert Devereux, s. and h., Lord Ferrers of Chartley, &c, 

and Earl of Essex, K.G. ; beheaded 25 Feb. 1601, and at- 
tainted, when his honours became Forfeited. 

IV. 1603. 4. Robert Devereux, s. and h., restored, together with his sisters, 

in blood and honours 1603 ; Lord Ferrers of Chartley, &c, 
and Earl of Essex ; ob. 1646, s. p., when the Earldom of 
Essex became Extinct, the Baronies of Ferrers of Chartley, 
Bourchier, &c. fell into Abeyance, and this Viscounty de- 
volved on, 

V. 1646. 5. Sir Walter Devereux, 2nd Bart., cousin and h. male, being 

s. and h. of Sir Edward Devereux, 1st Bart., 3rd son (William 
the 2nd son having died s. p. m.) of Walter 1st Viscount ; ob. 
ante 1661. 

VI. 6. Leicester Devereux, s. and h. ; ob. 1676. 

VII. 1676. 7. Leicester Devereux, s. and h. ; ob. 1683, unm. 

VIII. 1683. 8. Edward Devereux, bro. and h. ; ob. 1700, s. p. 

IX. 1700. 9. Price Devereux, cousin and h. male, being s. and h. of Price, 

eldest son of George, s. and h. of Sir George Devereux, next 
brother of Walter 5th Viscount; ob. 1740. 

X. 1740. 10. Price Devereux, s. andh.; ob. 1748, s. p. 

XI. 1748. 11. Edward Devereux, cousin and h. male, being s. and h. of 

Arthur, eldest son of Vaughan, next brother of Price Deve- 
reux, father of Price 9th Viscount; ob. 1760. 

XII. 1760. 12. Edward Devereux, s. and h. ; ob. 1783, s. p. 

XIII. 1783. 13. George Devereux, bro. and h. ; ob. 31 Dec. 1804. 

XIV. 1804. 14. Henry Devereux, s. and h. ; ob. 31 May 1843. 

XV. 1843. 15. Robert Devereux, s. and h. ; ob. 18 Aug. 1855. 

XVI. 1855. 16. Robert Devereux, s. and h. ; present A T iscount Hereford, Pre- 

mier Viscount of England, and a Baronet ; a minor. 



k Beatson in his Political Index states that he was created Earl of Buckingham, Hereford, 
and Northampton in 1403. 



248 



HERIZ — HERTFORD. 



HERIZ. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. William de Heriz, Lord of Worton, co. Notts, temp. Henry 

II. ; ob. ante 1179. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Ivo, or John de Heriz, s. and h.; ob. ante 1245, to whom 

succeeded, 

III. Hen. III. 3. Henry de Heriz ; ob. 1272, s. p. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. John de Heriz, bro. and h. set. 30 ; ob. 1298. 

V. Edw. I. 5. John de Heriz, s. and b. get. 21, who obtained livery of his 

inheritance the same year; ob. 1329, when Matilda his cousin, wife of 
Richard de la Ryvere, and aat. 30, was found to be his heir. 

HERON. 

Barons by Tenure. 

I. John. 1. Jordan Hairun, Lord of Hadston, co. Northumberland. 

II. Hen. III. 2. William Heron, s. and h. ; ob. . . . 
Hen. III. 3. William Heron, s. and h. ; ob. 1256. 
Hen. III. 4. William Heron, s. and h. set. 18 ; ob. 1296, leaving Emeline 

his granddau., set. 7, wife of John Lord Darcy of Knaith, his heir, viz. 
dau. of Walter Heron, his eldest son, who died v. p. 



III. 
IV. 



Baron by Writ. 

I. 1371. William Heron, s. and h. of Roger, 2nd son of William the last 
Baron, summ. to Pari. 8 Jan. 44 Edw. III. 1371, but never afterwards, 
and this Barony is presumed to have become Extinct on his death. 

HERON. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1393. 1. William Heron, grands, of Odonel Heron, 3rd s. of William, the 
last Baron by Tenure, having m. Elizabeth, sister and h. of John Baron 
Say, he was summ. to Pari, from 13 Nov. 17 Rich. II. 1393, to 25 Aug. 
5 Hen. IV. 1404, m as " Willielmo Heron, Chl'r," although generally con- 
sidered to be Lord Say, jure uxoris, for in a charter of 1 Hen. IV. to 
which he was a witness he is styled "William Heron Lord of Say, 
Steward of the King's Household ;" ob. Oct. 1404, s. p., when the Barony 
created by the Writ of 17 Rich. II., if considered as a distinct dignity from 
that of Say, became Extinct. 



Earls. 
I. Stcph. 



HERTFORD. 

Richard de Clare, s. and h. of Gilbert de Clare (vide Clare), 
was Earl of Hertford, and possessed of the third penny of 
that county, before or early in the reign of King Stephen ; 
slain by the Welsh 1139. 



m Elizabeth, his wife, died 8 July 1399, 
and if the Writs issued to her first and 
second husbands were only applicable to the 
Barony by Writ which had descended to her, 
and in virtue of which they were summoned, 
the issuing of such Writs would, it may be 
thought, have ceased with her life, as in the 
case of Ralph de Monthermer, Karl of Glou- 
cester, who ceased to be so summoned as 
Earl of Gloucester immediately upon the 



death of his wife ; but Sir William Heron, 
who after his wife's death became, under a 
settlement, tenant for life of the lands of his 
wife's inheritance, continued to be summoned 
until 1404. It would seem, therefore, that 
tenure of his wife's lands entitled Sir Wil- 
liam Heron to a dignity which partook of 
the nature both of the Barony by Tenure 
and the Barony by Writ. Vide observations 
under Falvesley. 



HERTFORD. 



249 



Earls. 

II. 1139. 

III. 1151. 

IV. 1173. 



V. 1218. 

VI. , 1230. 

VII. 1262. 

VIII. 1295. 

IX. 1537. 



X. 



1559. 



2. Gilbert de Clare, s. and h. ; ob. 1151, s. p. 

3. Roger de Clare, bro. and h. ; ob. 1173. 

4. Richard de Clare, s. and h., m. Arnicia, dau. and at length 

sole h. of William Earl of Gloucester, and was one of the 
celebrated twenty-five Barons appointed to enforce the 
observance of Magna Charta ; ob. 1218. 

5. Gilbert de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Gloucester, jure matris ; 

he was another of the said twenty-five Barons appointed to 
enforce the observance of Magna Charta ; ob. at Penros in 
Brittany, 1230. 

6. Richard de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Gloucester; ob. 

1262. 

7. Gilbert de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Gloucester ; he m. Joan 

Plantagenet, dau. of King Edward I. ; ob. 1295. 

Gilbert de Clare, s. and h., Earl of Gloucester; slain at 



8 



Bannockburn 
Extinct. 



1313, s. p., when this Earldom became 



1. Edward Seymour, brother-in-law of King Henry VIII. and 
uncle to King Edw. VI., created Viscount Beauchamp of 
Hache, co. Somerset, 5 June 1536 ; created Earl of Hert- 
ford 18 Oct. 1537, with remainder to his issue male there- 
after to be begotten ; created Baron Seymour 15 Feb., and 
Duke of Somerset 16 Feb. 1547, with remainder to the heirs 
male of his body by Ann, his second wife, failing which, to 
" Edward Seymour, Esq., son of the said Duke, by Kathe- 
rine his first wife, deceased, and the heirs male of his body, 
remainder to the heirs male of the said Duke by any other 
wife ;" n K.G. ; Lord Protector, &c. ; beheaded and attainted 
in 1552, when his honours became Forfeited. 

1. Edward Seymour, eldest son of the last Earl by his second 
wife, created Baron Beauchamp of Hache and Earl of 
Hertford 13 Jan. 1559 ; he m. Katherine, dau. and 
eventually sole heir of Henry Grey, Duke of Suffolk, 
by Frances Brandon, niece of King Henry VIII. ; ob. 
1621. 



n In the third General Report of the Lords' 
Committee to search for documents relative 
to the dignity of a Peer of the Realm, the 
following remark is found on the effect of 
the attainder of the said Duke on the de- 
scendants of Sir Edward Seymour, his son : — 
" The attainder of the Duke of Somerset, 
his father, and forfeiture of his dignities, by 
Act of Parliament of the 5th and 6th of 
Edw. VI. did not affect the dignity of Duke 
of Somerset granted to Sir Edward Seymour, 
and the heirs male of his body. By the 
terms of the grant, that dignity had vested, 
immediately after the patent passed the 
Great Seal, in Sir Edward Seymour, with 
limitation to the heirs male of his body, 
though the actual enjoyment of it by Sir 
Edward, and the heirs male of his body, was 
made to depend on the failure of heirs male 
of the body of his father by his second wife ;" 
and it is consequently affirmed, that on the 



extinction of the heirs male of the Duke of 
Somerset by his second wife, that Dukedom 
would have devolved on the heirs male of 
Sir Edward Seymour above-mentioned, even 
had not the act of restoration in 1660 taken 
place, "because, so far as the said limitation 
was in question, it wanted no such act for 
its preservation." As the Barony of Seymour 
was granted with the same limitation, the 
preceding observations prove that it would 
have descended in a similar manner to the 
Dukedom of Somerset. Some light is thrown 
upon this extraordinary limitation by the 
following addition in an old hand to the 
notice of the marriage of the first wife of the 
Lord Protector (viz., Katherine, daughter and 
heir of Sir William Fillol, of Fillol's Hall, co. 
Essex, Knt.) with the Duke, in the pedigree of 
Seymour, in Vincent's Baronage in the Col- 
lege of Arms, " repudiata quia pater eius post 
nuptias earn cognovit." 



250 



HERTFORD. 



Earls. 
XL 1621.- 



Marquesses. 
-I. 1640. 2. 



William Seymour, grands, and h., being eldest 
surviving s. and h. of Edward Seymour (ob. 
v. p.) eldest son of the last Earl ; the said 
Edward, in consequence of a claim made to 
the honours of the family by the heirs of the 
Protector Duke's issue male by his first wife, 
obtained letters patent, dated 14 May 6 Jac. 
1608, that he and the .heirs male of his body 
immediately after the decease of his father 
should be Barons of Parliament, and other 
letters patent of the same date for the enjoy- 
ment of the title of Earl of Hertford imme- 
diately after the decease of his said father, and 
that in the event of his dying in his said 
father's lifetime the said title should be en- 
joyed by his eldest son Edward Seymour, his 
second son William Seymour, and his younger 
son, Francis Seymour, and the heirs male of 
their bodies respectively ; created Marquess of 
Hertford 3 June 1640 ; restored to the title of 
Duke of Somerset in 1660 ; K.G. ; ob. 1660. 

3. William Seymour, grands, and h., being s. and 
h. of Henry Seymour (ob. v. p.) eldest son of 
the last Marquess ; Duke of Somerset ; ob. 
1671, unm. 

XIII. 1671. — III. 1671. 4. John Seymour, uncle and h., being second son of 

William 1st Marquess ; Duke of Somerset ; 
ob. 1675, s. p., when this Marquessate became 
Extinct, but the Earldom devolved on his 
cousin and heir, 

XIV. 1675. 5. Francis Seymour, 3rd Baron Seymour of Trowbridge, s. and 

h. of Charles 2nd Baron, eldest son of Francis 1st Baron 
Seymour of Trowbridge, 2nd son of Edward Lord Beau- 
champ, eldest son of Edward X. 1st Earl of Hertford ; 
Duke of Somerset ; murdered at Genoa, unm., 1678. 

XV. 1678. 6. Charles Seymour, bro. and h., Duke of Somerset ; he m. 

Elizabeth, sole dau. and h. of Josceline Percy XXIII. 11th 
Earl of Northumberland ; K.G. ; ob. 1748. 

XVI. 1748. 7. Algernon Seymour, s. and h., Duke of Somerset, created 

Earl of Northumberland, Earl of Egremont, &c. ; ob. 1750, 
s. p. m., when the Earldom of Hertford, the Viscounty of 
Beauchamp, and the Barony of Seymour of Trowbridge, 
. became Extinct. 



XII. 1660.— II. 1660. 



XVII. 1750. 



-IV. 1793. 1. Francis Seymour Conway, 2nd Baron Conway 
(descended from Edward 1st Duke of Somerset 
and Earl of Hertford, Lord Protector, and 2nd 
cousin of Edward 8th Duke of Somerset), 
created Viscount Beauchamp and Earl of 
Hertford 3 Aug. 1750, with remainder failing 
his issue male to his brother Henry Conway, 
Esq. ; created Earl of Yarmouth, co. Norfolk, 
and Marquess of Hertford 5 July 1793 ; K.G. ; 
ob. 1794. 



XVIII. 1794.— V. 



1794. 2. Francis, assumed the name of Ingram before 
those of Skvmour-Conway by licence 30 Dec. 
1807, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 17 June 1822. 



HERVEY — HILL. 251 

Earls. Marquesses. 

XIX. 1822. — VI. 1822. 3. Francis Charles Seymour Conway, s. and h., 

K.G. ; oh. 1 Mar. 1842. 

XX. 1842. — VII. 1842. 4. Richard Seymour-Conway, s. and h. ; present 
Marquess and Earl of Hertford, Earl of Yarmouth, Viscount Beauchamp, 
and Baron Conway ; also Baron Conway in Ireland ; K.G. ; mini. 



HERVEY. 
Baron. 

I. 1628. 1. Sir William Hervey, 1st Bart, and 1st Baron Hervey of Rosse in 
Ireland, created Baron Hervey of Kidbroke, co. Kent, 7 Feh. 1628 for life, 
remainder to William Hervey, his s. and his issue male ; oh. 1642, s. p. m. B., 
when this Barony became Extinct. 



HERVEY (of Ickworth). 
Baron. 

I. 1703. 1. John Hervey (descended from John Hervey, eldest bro. of Nicho- 
las, grandfather to the preceding Baron), created Baron Hervey of Ickworth, 
co. Suffolk, 23 Mar. 1703, created Earl of Bristol 19 Oct. 1714.— Vide 
Bristol. 

HEYTESBURY. 
Baron. 

I. 1828. 1. Sir William A'Court, G.C.B., created Baron Heytesbury of 
Heytesbury, co. Wilts, 23 Jan. 1828, present Baron Heytesbury, G.C.B., 
&c. =p 
t 

HICKS. 

Barony, 5 May 1628— Extinct 1798.— Vide Campden. 



HIGHAM. 

Viscounty, 19 Nov. 1734— Extinct 1782. — Vide Malton. 



HILL. 

Viscounts. Barons. 

I. 1842. — 1. 1 1814. 1. Rowland Hill (2nd s. of Sir John Hill, 3rd Bart.), 

11816. created Baron Hill of Almaraz and of Hawkestone, co. 

Salop, 17 May 1814, created Baron Hill of Almaraz, 
and of Hardwicke, co. Salop, with remainder, failing 
his issue male, to the issue male of his late bro. John 
Hill, of Hawkestone, Esq. deceased, 16 Jan. 1816 ; 
created Viscount Hill of Hawkestone, and of Hard- 
wicke, co. Salop, with remainder failing his issue 
male to Sir Rowland Hill, Bart., his nephew and his 
issue male, 27 Sept. 1842 ; G.C.B. ; ob. 10 Dec. 1842, 
when the Barony of Hill created in 1814 became 
Extinct, but his other titles devolved, pursuant to 
the limitations, upon his nephew, 

II. 1842. — II. 1842. 2. Rowland Hill, nephew and h., s. and h.'of John Hill, 

elder bro. of the last Viscount, present Viscount Hill of Hawkestone, and 
of Hardwicke, co. Salop, and Baron Hill of Almaraz and Hardwicke, and 
a Bart. =^= 



252 



HILLSBOROUGH — HOBART. 



Earls. 



HILLSBOROUGH. 



I. 1772. 1. Wills Hill, 1st Earl of Hillsborough in Ireland, and 1st Baron 

Harwich in England, created Viscount Fairford, co. Gloucester, 
and Earl of Hillsborough, 28 Aug. 1772, and Marquess of Down- 
shire in Ireland, 20 Aug. 1789 ; ob, 1793. 

II. 1793. 2. Arthur Hill, s. and h., Marquess of Downshire ; ob. 7 Sept. 1801. 

III. 1801. 3. Arthur Blundell Sandys Trumbull Hill, s. and h. ; ob. 12 

Apr. 1845. 

IV. 1845. 4. Arthur Wills Blundell Sandys Trumbull Windsor Hill, s. 

and h., present Earl of Hillsborough, Viscount Fairford, and Baron 
Harwich, also Marquess of Downshire, &c. in Ireland. =p 

HILTON". 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1295. Robert de Hilton, summ. to Pari, from 23 June, 23 Edw. 1. 1295, to 
26 Aug. 24 Edw. I. 1296. He was also summoned 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 
1297, but, for the reasons assigned under Fitz-John, it is doubtful if 
that writ can be considered as a regular summ. to Pari. ; ob. . . . , leaving 
Isabel, wife of Walter de Pedwardyn, and Maud, wife of Sir John Hotham, 
his daughters and coheirs. 



HILTON (of ... . ). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1332. Alexander de Hilton, summ. to Pari, from 27 Jan. 6 Edw. III. 1332, 
to 22 Jan. 9 Edw. III. 1336 ; ob. . . . ,° leaving Elizabeth his dau. his 
sole h., who m. Roger Widdrington; her h. male and h. general was Wil- 
liam the last Lord Widdrmgton,P on whose attainder in 1716 this Barony- 
became Forfeited. 



HINCHINBROKE. 

Viscounty, 12 July 1660. — Vide Sandwich. 

HINTON". 

Viscounty, 24 Dec. 1706. — Vide Poulett. 



Barons 
I. 1728. 



HOBART. 



Sir John Hobart, 5th Bart., created Baron Hobart of Blickling, co. 
Norfolk, 28 May 1728, created Earl of Buckinghamshire 5 Sept. 
1746, K.B. ; ob. 1756. 

II. 1756. 2. John Hobart, s. and h., 2nd Earl ; ob. s. p. M. 1793. 



° A Baron of Hilton sat in Parliament 
1399, and, if this Alexander were the Baron, 
he must have been above 88 years of age. 

P Lord Widdrington died S. P., leaving Tho- 
mas Eyre of Ilassop, Esq., his nephew (son of 
Mary Widdrington, his sister), his heir. But 
he also dying issueless, the representation of 
the said Elizabeth Hilton, daughter and heir 
of Alexander Baron Hilton, became vested in 



Charles Townley, Esq., in right of his grand- 
mother Mary Widdrington, aunt of the last 
Lord Widdrington ; and by the death of the 
said Mr. Townley, S. P., his only sister, 
Cecilia, or the heir general of her body, 
became heir of the Barony of Hilton. She 
married first Charles Strickland, Esq., and 
secondly to Gerard Strickland, Esq., and had 
issue by both husbands. 



HOESE — HOLDERNESS. 253 

Barons. 

III. 1793. 3. George Hobart, half-bro. and h., 3rd Earl ; ob. 14 Nov. 1804. 

IV. 1804. 4. Robert Hobart, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ, v. p., 30 Nov. 

1798, and placed in bis father's Barony of Hobart, succeeded his said father 
as 4th Earl 14 Nov. 1804.— Vide Buckinghamshire. 



HOESE, or HUSEE. 
Barons by Tenure. 

I. Hen. II. 1. Geoffrey de Hoese, s. of Henry Hosatns or de Hoese, a 

Justice Itinerant and Sheriff, co. Oxon ; ob. 1199. 

II. John. 2. Henry Hoese, s. and h. ; ob. 1213. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Henry Hose, s. and h., had livery of his lands 1213, and was 

living 1253. 



I. Hen. II. 1. Henry be Hoese, Lord of Harting, co. Sussex, 1165, elder bro. 

of Geoffrey de Hoese before named. 

II. Hen. II. 2. Geoffrey de Hoese, s. and h. 

III. Hen. III. 3. Henry de Hoese, s. and h. ; ob. 1234. 

IV. Hen. III. 4. Matthew de Hoese, s. and h. ; ob. 1262. 

V. Edw. I. 5. Henry de Hoese, s. and h. ; ob. 1289. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1295. 6. Henry Hoese, s. and h. a?t. 24, summ. to Pari, as " Henrico 

Husee " from 23 June, 23 Edw. I. 1295, to 10 Oct. 19 Edw. 
II. 1325 ; he was also summoned 8 June, 22 Edw. I. 1294, 
but it is doubtful if that writ was a regular summ. to Pari. 
(vide Clyvedon) ; ob. 1332. 

II. 1337. 7. Henry Hoese, s. and h. zet. 30, summ. to Pari, from 18 Aug. 
11 Edw. III. 1337, to 10 Mar. 23 Edw. III. 1349 ; ob. 1349, leaving issue 
Henry, set. 6, his grands, and h. (namely, s. of Mark his eldest s., ob. 
v. p.), but neither this Henry nor any of his descendants were ever summ. 
to Pari. 

HOESE, OR HUSEE (of ). 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1348. Roger Husee, s. of John Husee, presumed, from the circumstance of 
his lands lying in the same counties, to have been of the above family ; 
summ. to Pari. 20 Nov. 22 Edw. III. 1348, 1 Jan. 22 Edw. III. 1349, 
and 10 Mar. 23 Edw. III. 1349 ; ob. 1361, leaving John Husee his bro. 
and h., then ast. 40, whereupon the Barony became Extinct. 



HOLDERNESS. 

Earls. 
I. 1621. John Ramsay, 1st Viscount Haddington in Scotland, created Baron 
of Kingston-upon-Thames and Earl of Holderness 22 Jan. 1621 ; 
ob. 1625, s. p., when these titles became Extinct. 

Earldom, 24 Jan. 1644 — Extinct 1682. — Vide Cumberland. 

III. 1682. 1. Conyers Darcy, 2nd Baron Darcy and Conyers, created Earl of 

Holderness within the parts of East Riding, co. York, 5 Dec. 
1682 ; ob. 1689. 

IV. 1689. 2. Conyers Darcy, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p., 1 Mar. 32 Car. II. 

1680, as Baron Conyers ; ob. 1692. 



254 HOLLAND. 

Earls. 

V. 1692. 3. Eobert Darcy, grands, and h., being s. and h. of John Darcy (ob. 

v. p.), eldest s. of Conyers, last Earl ; ob. 1722. 

VI. 1722. 4, Eobert Darcy, s. and h. ; ob. 1778, s. p. m., wben this Earldom 

again became Extinct. 

HOLLAND. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1314. 1. Eobert de Holland, having m. Mand, dau. and coh. of Alan Lord 

Zouche of Ashby, was summ. to Earl, from 29 July, 8 Edw. II. 
1314, to 15 May, 14 Edw. II. 1321, as "Eoberto de Holand ;" 
seized by a servant of the Earl of Lancaster (whom he had be- 
trayed), and beheaded 1328. 

II. 1342. 2. Eobert de Holland, s. and h., summ. to Earl, from 25 Feb. 

16 Edw. III. 1342, to 6 Oct. 46 Edw. III. 1372 ; ob. 1373, s. p. m. s. Maud, 
his granddau. and h., viz., dau. and h. of Eobert his eldest s. (who died 
v. p.), m. John V. 9th Baron Lovel of Tichmarsh, K.G., and carried this 
Barony to that family. In 1487 Francis Viscount Lovel, the then h. male 
and h. general of the said Sir John Lovel and Maud Holland his wife, was 
attainted, when this Barony, with his other honours, became Forfeited. 



HOLLAND. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1353. Thomas de Holland, 2nd s. of Eobert 1st Baron Holland above men- 
tioned, having m. Joane Blantagenet, dau. of Edmund Flantagenet Earl of 
Kent, younger s. of King Edward I., and sister and sole h. of her bro. 
John Earl of Kent, was snmm. to Earl, from 15 July, 27 Edw. III. 1353, 
to 15 Feb. 31 Edw. III. 1357. In 1360 he assumed the style of Earl of 
Kent, and was summ. to Earl, by that title 20 Nov. in that year, and died 
on the 28 Dec. following ; K.Gr. 

This Barony continued vested in the Earls of Kent, descending to his 
grands. Thomas Holland Earl of Kent, who was created Duke of Surrey 
but afterwards degraded from that dignity, declared a traitor, and be- 
headed, but the Earldom of Kent and this Barony devolved on Edmund, 
his bro. and h., Earl of Kent, and on his death, s. p., in 1407 it fell into 
Abeyance between the issue of his sisters and coheirs. 

HOLLAND (of Enmore). See Lovel and Holland. 

HOLLAND (of Holland). 

Earls. 

I. 1624. 1. Henry Eich (2nd s. of Eobert 1st Earl of Warwick), 1st Baron 

Kensington, created Earl of Holland, co. Lincoln, 24 Sept. 1624 ; 
K.G. ; beheaded 1649. 

II. 1649. 2. Eobert Eich, s. and h., succeeded as Earl of Warwick in 1673 ; 

ob. 1675— Extinct 1759.— Vide Warwick. 

Baroness. 

I. 1762. 1. Georgiana Caroline, dau. of Charles Duke of Eichmond, and wife 

of Henry Fox, Esq., created Lady Holland, Baroness of Holland, 

co. Lincoln, with remainder of the dignity of Baron Holland to 

her issue male by her said husband, 6 May 1762 ; ob. 24 July 

1 ^T A 



1774. 



Baron. 



II. 1 77 1. 2. Stephen Fox, s. and h., Baron Holland of Foxley.— Vide Holland 
of Foxley. 



HOLLAND— HOOD. 



255 



Barons. 
I. 1763. 1. 



II. 1774. 2. 

III. 1774. 3. 
P7. 1840. 4. 



Barons. 

I. 1661. 1. 

II. 1680. 2. 

III. 1690. 3. 



HOLLAND (of Foxley). 

Henry Fox, younger bro. of Stephen 1st Earl of Ilchester, and 
husband of Georgiana Baroness Holland of Holland, created Baron 
Holland of Foxley, co. Wilts, 17 Apr. 1763 ; ob. 1 July 1774. 

Stephen Fox, s. and h., succeeded his mother as Baron Holland of 
Holland, 24 July 1774 ; ob. 26 Dec. 1774. 

Henry Eichard, assumed the name of Vassall only by licence 
18 June 1800, s. and h. ; ob. 22 Oct. 1840. 

Henry Edward Vassall, s. and h., present Baron Holland of 
Holland, and Baron Holland of Foxley. =p 

HOLLES. 

Denzil Holles, 2nd s. of John 1st Earl of Clare, created Baron 
Holies of Ifield, co. Sussex, 20 Apr. 1661 ; ob. 1680. 

Francis Holles, s. and h. ; ob. 1690. 

Denzil Holles, s. and h. ; ob. 1694, ast. 90, unm., when the title 
became Extinct. 



HOLMESDALE. 

Viscounty, 19 Dec. 1826. — Vide Amherst. 

HOO AND HASTINGS. 4 
Baron, 

I. 1447. 1. Thomas Hoo, created Baron of Hoo, co. Bedford, and of Hastings, co. 

Sussex, 2 June 1447, " sibi et heredibus suis masculis ;" K.G. ; 

ob. 1454, s. p. M., when his honours became Extinct. 



I. 



Baroness. 
1795. 1. 



Baron. 



HOOD. 

Susannah, dau. of Edward Lindzee, Esq., and wife of Samuel 1st 
Baron Hood in Ireland, created Baroness Hood of Catherington, 
co. Hants, 27 Mar. 1795, with remainder of the Barony to her 
issue male ; ob. 25 May 1806. 



II. 1806. 2. Henry Hood, s. and h., Viscount Hood, &c. — Vide Hood of Whitley. 



q The Barony of Hastings in Sussex had not, 
until now, given a title of honour to any of 
its possessors, having been constantly merged 
in higher dignities from the time that William 
the Conqueror granted it, with the whole 
rape of Hastings, to William Count of Ewe. 
In this family it continued until the reign of 
Hen. Ill,, when William de Ysondon joined 
the French king, and forfeited his lands 
{vide Ewe, Counts). Peter de Savoy, the 
queen's uncle, obtained it from the Crown in 
the reign of Henry III., from which monarch 
he also obtained the Earldom of Richmond in 
1241, and for a very long period it was con- 
sidered as part of that Honour. By the ad- 
herence of John Duke of Brittany in 1383 
to the Crown of France, it was again for- 
feited ; restored in 1391, but shortly after 
again forfeited and finally separated from the 



Dukedom of Brittany. Joan, wife of Ralph 
Basset of Drayton in 1397, and Ralph Nevill, 
Earl of Westmoreland in 1399, had life grants 
of the Barony of Hastings, and in 1412 the 
reversion, after the Earl's death, was given 
to Sir John Pelham, from whose son the 
Barony passed to the family of Hoo, and was 
confirmed to Sir Thomas Hoo by letters 
patent, 19 July 1445, by the name of the 
Castle, Barony, and Honour of Hastings. 
He died possessed of it 13 Feb. 1454-5, and 
by his will, dated the preceding day, directed 
it to be sold. In 1461 it was confirmed by 
Edw. IV. to his favourite Sir William Hast- 
ings, created Lord Hastings, in whose family 
it remained until the Earl of Huntingdon, in 
1591, sold it to Thomas Pelham, Esq. — Vide 
observations upon this Barony in the Intro- 
ductory Remarks upon Earldoms. 



256 HOOD — HOWARD. 

HOOD (of Whitley). 
Viscounts. 

I. 1796. 1. Samuel Hood, 1st Baron Hood in Ireland, husband of Susannah, 

the above Baroness, created Viscount Hood of Whitley, co. War- 
wick, 1 June 1796, G.C.B. ; ob. 27 Jan. 1816. 

Barons. 

II. 1816. — II. 1806. 2. Henry Hood, s. and h., succeeded his mother as Baron 

Hood of Catherington 25 May 1806 ; ob. 25 Jan. 
1836. 

III. 1836.— III. 1836. 3. Samuel Hood-Tibbits, who by licence 6 Feb. 1841 

assumed the latter surname, grands, and h., s. and 
h. of Francis Wheler Hood, eldest s. of the last 
Viscount ; ob. 8 May 1846. 

IV. 1846. — IV. 1846. 4. Francis Wheler Hood, s. and h., present Viscount 

Hood of Whitley, and Baron Hood of Catherington, co. Hants, also Baron 
Hood in Ireland, a minor. 

HOPETOUN. 

Barons. 

I. 1809. 1. James Hope Johnstone, 3rd Earl of Hopetoun in Scotland, created 

Baron Hopetoun of Hopetoun, co. Linlithgow, 3 Feb. 1809, with 
remainder, failing his issue male, to the issue male of his father ; 
ob. 29 May 1816, s. p. m. 

II. 1816. 2. John Hope, half-bro. and h., 1st Baron Niddry, G.C.B. : ob. 

27 Aug. 1823. 

III. 1823. 3. John Hope, s. and h. ; ob. 8 Apr. 1843. 

IV. 1843. 4. John Alexander Hope, s. and h., present Baron Hopetoun and 

Baron Niddry, also Earl of Hopetoun, &c. in Scotland, unm. 

HOPTON. 

Baron. 

I. 1643. Ralph Hopton, created Baron Hopton of Stratton, co. Cornwall, 4 
Sept. 1643, with remainder, failing his issue male, to Arthur Hopton his 
uncle and his issue male ; ob. at Bruges in Flanders, 1652, s. P., when the 
title (the said Arthur having died s. p.) became Extinct. 

HOUGHTON". 

Baron. 

I. 1616. 1. Sir John Holles, created Baron Houghton of Houghton, co. Not- 
tingham, 9 July 1616 ; created Earl of Clare 2 Nov. 1624. Extinct 
1711.— Vide Clare. 

HOUGHTON (co. Norfolk). 
Barony, 6 Feb. 1742— Extinct 1797.— Vide Orford. 

v m ■ HOWARD. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1470. 1.^ John Howard, s. and h. of Sir Robert Howard by Margaret, dau. 
and eventually coh. of Thomas Mowbray Duke of Norfolk, summ. to Pari. 
as " Johanni Howard de Howard, Militi," from 15 Oct. 49 Hen. VI. 1470, 
to 15 Nov. 22 Edw. IV. 1482, created Earl Marshal of England and Duke 
of Norfolk 28 June 1483 ; E.G. ; ob. 1485. 

This Barony continued merged in the Dukedom of Norfolk, and was in- 



HOWARD. 257 

eluded in the numerous forfeitures and restorations which attended the in- 
heritors of that dignity, an account of which will be found under Norfolk, 
until the demise of Edward Howard XIV. 9th Duke of Norfolk in 1777, 
when, with several other Bai-onies, it fell into Abeyance between the two 
daughters and coheirs of Philip the bro. of the said Duke, and is now in 
Abeyance between the Lords Petre and Stourton, as their coheirs and re- 
presentatives. 

HOWARD (of Bindon). 
Viscounts. 

I. 1559. 1. Thomas Howard, 2nd son of Thomas XL 5th Duke of Norfolk, 

created Viscount Howard of Bindon, co. Dorset, 13 Jan. 1559 ; 
ob. 1582. 

II. 1582. 2. Henry Howard, s. and h. ; ob. 1590, s. p. m. 

III. 1590. 3. Thomas Howard, bro. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1610, s. p., when the title 

became Extinct. 



HOWARD (of Castle Rising). 
Baron. 

I. 1669. Henry Howard, bro. of Thomas Duke of Norfolk, created Baron 
Howard of Castle Rising, co. Norfolk, 27 Mar. 1669 ; created Earl of Nor- 
wich and Earl Marshal of England 19 Oct. 1672 ; succeeded his said bro. 
as Duke of Norfolk in 1677. Extinct 1777. — Vide Norwich and Nor- 
folk. 

HOWARD (of Charleton). 

Barony, 23 Jan. 1622. — Vide Andover and Berkshire. 

Charles Howard, 2nd Earl of Berkshire, was summ. to Pari, by writ v. p., 19 
Nov. 1640, and placed in his father's Barony of Howard of Charleton ; succeeded 
his said father as Earl of Berkshire 1669. 



HOWARD (of Effingham). 
Barons. 

I. 1554. 1. William Howard, 4th surviving son of Thomas VIII. 2nd Duke 

of Norfolk, created Baron Howard of Effingham, co. Surrey, 
11 Mar. 1554 ; Lord High Admiral, K.G. ; ob. 1573. 

II. 1573. 2. Charles Howard, s. and h., created Earl of Nottingham 22 

Oct. 1596 ; K.G. ; ob. 1624. 

III. 1624. 3. Charles Howard, 2nd s. and h. male (William his eldest bro. 

having been summ. to Pari, as Lord Howard of Effingham, 
but deceasing s. P. M., v. p.), Earl of Nottingham ; ob. 1642, s. p. 

IV. 1642. 4. Charles Howard, half-bro. and h., Earl of Nottingham ; oh 

1(581, s. p., when the Earldom of Nottingham became Extinct 
but this Barony devolved on, 

V. 1681. 5. Francis Howard, cousin and h., being s. and h. of Charles 

eldest s. of Francis, s. and h. of Sir William Howard, 2nd s. 
of William 1st Baron ; ob. in Virginia 1695. 

VI. 1695. 6. Thomas Howard, s. and h. ; ob. 1725, s. p. m. 

VII. 1725. 7. Francis Howard, bro. and h., created Earl of Effingham 8 Dec 

1731 ; ob. 1743. 

VIII. 1743. 8. Thomas Howard, s. and h., Earl of Effingham ; ob. 1763. 

IX. 1763. 9. Thomas Howard, s. and h., Earl of Effingham ; ob. L791, s. p. 

s 



258 HOWARD. 

Barons. 

X. 1791. 10. Richard Howard, bro. and h. ; ob. 1816, s. p., when the Earl- 
dom of Effingham became. Extinct, but this Barony devolved 
on his next heir male, 

XL 181G. 11. Kenneth Alexander Howard, s. and h. of Henry, eldest sur- 
viving s. of Thomas, s. and h. of George Howard, next bro. of 
Francis 5th Baron, created Earl of Effingham 27 Jan. 1837 ; 
G.O.B. ; ob. 13 Feb. 1845. 

XII. 1845. 12. Henry Howard, s. and h., present Baron Howard of Effingham 
and Earl of Effingham, &c. =p 

HOWARD (of Eseriek). 
Barons. 

I. 1628. 1. Edward Howard, younger s. of Thomas 1st Earl of Suffolk, cre- 

ated Baron Howard of Escrick, co. York, 12 Apr. 1628 ; ob. 1675. 

II. 1675. 2. Thomas Howard, s. and h. ; ob. 1678, s. p. 

III. 1683. 3. William Howard, bro. and h. ; ob. 1694. 

IV. 1694. 4. Charles Howard, s. and h. ; ob. 1715, s. P., when this Barony be- 

came Extinct. 



HOWARD ( of Marnhull ). 
Barony 13 Mar. 1604— Extinct 1614.— Vide Northampton. 

HOWARD (of Morpeth). 

Viscounty, 30 Apr. 1661. — Vide Carlisle. 

HOWARD (de Walden). 
Barons by Writ. 

I. 1597. 1. Thomas Howard, younger s. of Thomas 4th Duke of Norfolk, 

summ. to Pari, as " Thomae Howard de Walden, Chl'r," 24 Oct. 
39 Eliz. 1597, and 27 Oct. 43 Eliz. 1600, created Earl of Suffolk 
21 July 1603 ; K.G. ; he m. Katherine, dau. and coh. of Sir 
Henry Knyvett, Knt., and one of the coheirs of the Baronies of 
Camoys and Foliot ; ob. 1626. 

II. 1626. 2. Theophilus Howard, s. and h., summ. to Pari, by writ 8 Feb. 7 

James I., and placed in his father's Barony of Howard de Walden, 
succeeded as Earl of Suffolk ; ob. 1640. 

HI. 1640. 3. James Howard, s. and h., Earl of Suffolk ; ob. 1689, s. p. m., when 
tins Barony fell into Abeyance between his two daughters and 
coheirs, viz. Essex, wife of Edward Lord Griffin, and Elizabeth, 
Avife of Sir Thomas Felton ; and it continued in Abeyance till 
1784, when it was terminated by the Crown in favour of the 
eldest coheir, viz., 

IV. 1784. 4. John Griffin Whitwell (assumed the name of) Griffin, s. and 
h. of William Whitwell by Ann, dau. and ultimately sole heir of 
James 2nd Baron Griffin, eldest son of Edward 1st Baron Griffin, 
by Essex, 1st dau. and coh. of James the last Baron ; allowed the 
Barony 3 Aug. 1784 ; created Lord Braybrooke, Baron of Bray- 
brooke, co. Northampton, 5 Sept. 1788, with remainder, failing 
t lie heirs male of his body, to Richard Aldworth Neville, Esq., 
and his issue male; ob. s. P. 1797, when, in consequence of all 
llu' issue of the said Lady Essex Howard being extinct, this 
Barony devolved on, 



HOWDEN — HOWLAND. 259 

Barons by Writ. 

V. 1797. 5. Frederick Augustus Hervey, 4th Earl of Bristol and Bishop of 

Deny, as heir-general of Thomas the 1st Baron, being s. and 
eventually h. of John Hervey (ob. v. p.), eldest son of John 1st 
Earl of Bristol, by Elizabeth, dau. and h. of Sir Thomas Felton, 
by Elizabeth, dau. and coh. of James Howard 3rd Baron Howard 
de Walden and Earl of Suffolk ; ob. 8 July 1803. 

VI. 1803. 6. Charles Augustus Ellis, great-grands, and h., being s. and h. of 

Charles Rose Ellis I. 1st Baron Seaford, by Elizabeth Catherine Caroline 
Hervey (ob. vita avi), dau. and h. of John Augustus Hervey (ob. v. p.), s. 
and h. of Frederick the last Baron ; present Baron Howard de Walden and 
Baron Seaford, co. Sussex, G.C.B. =j= 

* 

HOWDEN. 

Barons. 

I. 1831. 1. John Francis Caradoc, 1st Baron Howden in Ireland, created 

Baron Howden of Howden and Grimston, co. York, 10 Sept. 1831 ; 
G.C.B. ; ob. in July 1839. 

II. 1839. 2. John Hobart Caradoc, s. and h., present Baron Howden of Howden 

and Grimston, also Baron Howden in Ireland, K.C.B., &c. = 

HOWE. 

Barons. Viscount. Earls. 

I. 1788. — I. 1782. — I. 1788. 1. Richard Howe, 4th Viscount Howe in Ire- 

land, created Viscount Howe of Langar, co. 
Nottingham, 20 Apr. 1782 ; created Baron 
Howe of Langar aforesaid, and Earl Howe, 
19 Aug. 1788, with remainder of the Barony, 
failing his issue male, to his daughters and 
the heirs male of their bodies respectively ; 
K.G. ; ob. 1799, s.p.m., when the Viscounty 
and Earldom became Extinct, but the 
Barony devolved on, 

II. 1799. 2. Sophia Charlotte, eldest dau. and coh. of the last Baron ; she m. 

1st the Hon. Penn Assheton Curzon, and 2ndlv Sir Jonathan 
Wathen Waller, Bart, ; ob. 3 Dec. 1835. 
Earls. 

III. 1835.— II. 1821. 3. Richard William Penn Curzon-Howe, Earl Howe, 

s. and h., created Earl Howe 15 July 1821, took the surname and arms of 
Howe by royal licence 7 July 1821, present Earl and Baron Howe, 
Viscount and Baron Curzon, &c. =p 

HOWICK. 

Viscounty, 11 Apr. 1806.— Vide Grey (of Howick). 

HOWLAND. 

Baron. 

I. 1695. 1. William Russell, IV. Duke of Bedford, K.G., created Baron 
Howland of Streatham, co. Surrey, for life, 13 June 1695, with remainder 
to Wriotheslcy Russell his grands., and the heirs male of his body begotten 
on the body of Elizabeth Howland, dau. and h. of John Howland, Esq., 
dec. ; ob. 1700. — Vide Bedford. 

Francis Russell, Esq. (commonly called Marquess of Tavistock), summ. 
to Pari, by writ (v. p.) 15 Jan. 1833, as " Francis Russell of Streatham, co. 
Surrey, Chevalier," and placed in the precedency of the Barony of Howland.' 



r Upon the introduction of this Peer, the 
Lord Speaker signified to the House that His 



Majesty had been pleased to issue his Writ, 
summoning Francis Russell, Esq., to sit in 

s 2 



260 



HUME — HUNGERFORD. 



HUME. 



Barons. 

1604. 1 



II. 



George Hume, created Baron Hume of Berwick 7th July',1604, 

and Earl of Dunbar in Scotland 3 July 1605 ; K.G.; ob. 1611, 

s. p. M., when these titles became Extinct. 

1776. 1. Alexander Hume Campbell, s. and h. apparent of Hugh 3rd Earl 

of Marchmont in Scotland, created Baron Hume of Berwick 20 May 1776 ; 

ob. 1781, s. p., when the title again became Extinct. 



HUMET. 
Barons by Tenure, 

I. Steph. 1. Richard de Humet, Lord of Stanford, co. Lincoln, and Dodding- 

ton, co. Northampton ; living 1174. 

II. Hen. II. 2. William de Humet, s. and h. ; ob. 1206. Agnes his dan. and 

heir m. Baldwin de Wake. 



J olm. 



John de Humet, s. of Jordan de Humet, of the same family ; in 
1216 his lands were seized for rebellion, and granted to Richard 
de Grey, husband of Lucia his daughter. 



HinSTGERFORD. 

Barons by Writ. 

I. 1426. 1.^ Walter Hungerford, summ. to Farl. from 7 Jan. 4 Hen. VI. 

1426, to 2 Jan. 27 Hen. VI. 1449 ; E.G. ; ob. 1449. 

II. 1450. 2. Robert Hungerford, s. and h., summ. to Barl. as " Roberto 

Hungerford, Seniori, Militi," from 5 Sept. 29 Hen. VI. 1450, to 
26 May, 33 Hen. VI. 1455 ; he m. Margaret, dau. and h. of 
William Baron Botreaux ; ob. 1459. 

III. 3. Robert Hungerford, s. and h., having m. Alianore, dau. and h. of 

William Lord Molines, was summ. to Pari. v. p. as " Roberto 
Hungerford, Militi, Domino de Moleyns," from 13 Jan. 23 Hen. 
VI. 1445, to 20 Jan. 31 Hen. VI. 1453, but was never summoned 
in this Barony ; beheaded 1463, and having been attainted, all 
his honours became Forfeited. 

IV. 1482. Edward Hastings, s. and h. apparent of William 1st Lord Hast- 

ings of Hastings, having m. Mary, 6 dau. and h. of Thomas Hungerford (who 
was also attainted), s. and h. of Robert the last Baron Hungerford, Molines 
jure uxoris, and Botreaux, was summ. to Farl. as " Edwardo Hastin°es 
de Hungerford, Chl'r," from 15 Nov. 22 Edw. IV. 1482 (notwithstanding 
that the attainder of the above-mentioned Robert last Baron Hungerford, 
and that of Thomas his son, was not reversed until 1485), till his death, 
although he succeeded his father as 2nd Baron Hastings in 1483 ; ob. 1507. 
George Hastings, his s. and h., 3rd Baron Hastings of Hastings, and Baron 
Hungerford, Botreaux, and Molines, was created Earl of Huntingdon, in 



his father's said Barony of Howland, and the 
immediate production of the Writ and sitting 
of the Peer obviated all doubt as to the 
Barony specified by the Writ. There can be 
but little question, however, that the Writ 
should have been directed to Francis Russell 
of Howland, by which title he sat in the 
House. A similar mistake had occurred in 
1717, in the case of Charles Pawlet, Esq., 
eldest son of the Duke of Bolton, who was 
summoned as of" Basing," instead of " St. 
John" (of Basing); this error was then 



considered to have created a new dignity. 
Vide Pawlet. 

6 She styled herself Lady Hungerford, 
Hornet, Botreaux, Moels, Molines, and Pe- 
verell, which titles are sometimes attributed 
to the Marquess of Hastings. Hornet and 
Peverell were never Parliamentary Baronies. 
Moels, though a Barony by Writ, was not 
absolutely vested in the said Lady Hunger- 
ford, as she was only sole heir of one moiety 
and coheir of the other moiety of that dig- 
nity. Vide Moels. 



IIUNGERFOED — HUNTERCOMBE. 2G1 

which dignity these Baronies were merged until the death of Francis 
XXVII. 10th Earl, in 1789, s. p., when they became vested in Elizabeth 
his sister and heir, wife of John Earl of Moira in Ireland, and on her death, 
in 1808, they devolved on her son Francis Rawdon Hastings, Marquess of 
Hastings, Baron Hastings, Hungerford, Molines, and Botreaux, &c. — Vide 
Hastings and Huntingdon. 



HUNGERFORD (of Heytesbury). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1536. Walter Hungerford (s. and h. of Sir Edward Hungerford, eldest 
s. of Walter, younger s. of Robert 3rd Baron Hungerford), summ. to Pari. 
as " Walter Hungerford de Heytesbury, Chev'," 8 June 28 Hen. VIII. 1536, 
but never afterwards ; attainted and beheaded in 1541, when his honours 
became Forfeited. 



HUNSDON. 
Barons. 

1559. 1. Henry Carey (s. and h. of William Carey, by Mary, dau. of 
Thomas Earl of Wiltshire, sister of Queen Aim Boleyn, mother 
of Queen Elizabeth), created Baron Hunsdon of Huusdon, eo. 
Herts, 13 Jan. 1558-9 ; E.G. ; ob. 1596. 

George Carey, s. and h., K.G. ; ob. 1603, s. p. m. 

John Carey, bro. and h. ; ob. 1617. 

Henry Carey, s. and h., created Viscount Rochford, co. 
Essex, 6 June 1621, created Earl of Dover 8 Mar. 1628 ; ob. 
1668. 

V. 1668. 5. John Carey, s. and h., Viscount Rochford and Earl of Dover ; 

ob. 1677, s. p., when the Viscounty of Rochford and Earldom 
of Dover became Extinct, but this Barony devolved on, 

VI. 1677. 6. Robert Carey, his cousin and h., being s. and h. of Horatio, 

eldest son of Robert, s. and h. of Sir Edmund Carey, 3rd son of 
Henry 1st Baron ; ob. 1692, s. p. 

VII. 1692. 7. Robert Carey, cousin and h., being s. and h. of Ernestus Carey, 

2nd son of Sir Robert, s. and h. of Sir Edmund Carey, grand- 
father of the last Baron and 3rd son of Henry 1st Baron ; ob. 
1702, s. p. 

VIII. 1702. 8. William Ferdinand Carey, born beyond seas, but naturalised 

by Act of Parliament, cousin and h., being s. and h. of William, 
eldest son of Ferdinand, 3rd son of Sir Edmund above men- 
tioned, 3rd son of the 1st Baron ; ob. 1765, s. p., when the title 
became Extinct. 



II. 


1596. 2. 


III. 


1603. 3. 


IV. 


1617. 4. 



I. 1832. 1. Lucius Bentinck Carey, 9th Viscount Falkland in Scotland, 

created Baron Hunsdon of Scutterskelfc, co. York, 15 May, 1832, present 
Baron Hunsdon, also Viscount Falkland in Scotland. =p 

HUNTERCOMBE. 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1295. >J< f Walter de Huntercombe, summ. to Pari, from 23 June, 23 
Edw. I. 1295, to 16 June, 14 Edw. II. 1311 ; m. Alice, dau. and cob. of 
Hugh de Bolebec ; ob 1312, s. p. (his nephew Nicholas, son of Richard 
de Newbaud, and Gunnora, his sister, being his next heir), when this Ra- 
re my became Extinct. 



262 



HUNTINGDON. 



HUNTINGDON". 



Earls. 

1068. 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



V. 



VI. 



VII. 



VIII. 1174 



IX. 



XL 



XII. 



Waltheof (s. of Syward the Saxon), Earl of Northumber- 
land), to whom King William gave the counties of North- 
ampton and Huntingdon ; his wife was the Countess Judith 
of the Domesday Survey, niece to King William ; beheaded 
in 1075. 

1075. 1. Simon de St. Liz, having m. Maud, eldest dau. and coh. of 
the last Earl, acquired with her the Earldoms of Hunt- 
ingdon and Northampton ; ob. in the abbey of Charitty 
in France, 1115. 

1115. 1. David, bro. of Alexander King of Scotland, having m. Maud, 
widow of the last Earl, succeeded to this Earldom by the 
special favour of Henry I. ; in 1124 he succeeded to the 
throne of Scotland. 

1137. 2. Henry, s. and h. of David King of Scotland, the last Earl, 
obtained this Earldom at the treaty of peace concluded 
between his father and King Stephen 1137 ; ob. 1152. 

1152. 2. Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Northampton, s. and h. of Simon 
II. 1st Earl ; entered upon the Earldom on the death of the 
Prince of Scotland ; ob. circa 1154. 

1157. 3. Malcolm, King of Scotland, s. and h. of Henry IV. 2nd 
Earl, obtained the Earldom from Henry II. in 1157 in lieu 
of the counties of Northumberland, Cumberland, and West- 
moreland, which he delivered up, but which counties Henry 
was subsequently obliged to restore to Scotland ; ob. 1165, s.p. 

1173. 4. William, King of Scotland, bro. and h., obtained the Earl- 
doms of Huntingdon and Cambridge from King Henry 
about the year 1173, but was divested circa 1174. 
3. Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Northampton, s. and h. of Simon 
V. 2nd Earl, succeeded to the Earldom ; ob. 1184, s. p. 

1184. 5. David,' bro. of William King of Scotland, VII. 4th Earl, 
received the Earldom from his said brother, on whom King 
Henry II. bestowed it on the death of Simon, the last 
Earl ; he married in 1190 Maud, eldest dau. of Hugh 
Kevelioc, and sister and coh. of Ralph Blundevil, Earls of 
Chester ; ob. 1219. 

1219. 6. John le Scot, s. and h., Earl of Chester jure matris ; ob. 
1237, s. p., when this Earldom and his other honours fell 
to the Crown. 

1337. William de Clinton (bro. of John II. 6th Baron Clinton), 
summ. to Pari, from 6 Sept. 4 Edw. III. 1330, to 14 
Jan. 10 Edw. III. 1337, created Earl of Huntingdon 
16 Mar. 1337 ; ob. 1354, s. p., when his honours became 
Extinct. 

1377. Guischard D' Angle, Lord of Angle in Poictou, created Earl 

of Huntingdon, "tota vita, sua durante"" by charter, 16 
July 1377, K.G. ; ob. 1380, s. p. m., when this Earldom 
again became Extinct. 



1 This David appears to have enjoyed the 
Earldom of Cambridge also. Vide Cam- 
bridge. 

u Vide some remarks upon this dignity in 
the Introduction, under " Earldoms." The 
dignity was granted without issues from the 
COunty of Huntingdon, and it was probably 



beginning to be considered that such grant 
of the issues was not necessary. By letters 
patent of even date, he had 1000 marks per 
annum given to him; but these letters patent 
were cancelled and others granted 10 Dec, 
giving him, per annum, 1000?. out of the 
issues of the ports of Kingston and Boston. 



HUNTINGDON. 



263 



XIV. 1417. 



XV. 1446. 



XVI. 1471. 



XVII. 1479. 



Earls. 
XIII. 1387. 1. John Holland, 3rd son of Thomas Earl of Kent, by Joan 

l'lantagenet, dan. and h. of Edmund Earl of Kent, younger 
son of King Edward I., created Earl of Huntingdon 2nd 
June 1387, to him and the heirs male of his body, and of 
the body of Elizabeth his wife ; created Duke of Exeter 
29 Sept. 1397, Lord High Chamberlain ; K.G. ; degraded 
in Parliament 1399, and beheaded 1400. 

2. John Holland, s. and h. (Richard, his elder bro., having 
died unm. before the attainder of his father was reversed), 
restored in blood and honours, and to the Earldom of 
Huntingdon, by Act of Pari. 5 Hen. V. 1417 ; created 
Duke of Exeter 6 Jan. 1442-3 ; Lord High Admiral ; 
K.G. ; ob. 1446. 

3. Henry Holland, s. and h., Duke of Exeter, attainted 4 
Nov. 1461 (ob. 1473, s. p. m.), when his honours became 
Forfeited. 

Thomas Grey, 8th Baron Ferrers of Groby, created by 
his step-father Edward IV. Earl of Huntingdon 14 Aug. 
1471, created Marcraess of Dorset 18 Apr. 1475. It ap- 
pears that he soon afterwards resigned x the Earldom of 
Huntingdon, for it was in 1479 conferred on, 

William Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, which Earldom 
he resigned," and was created Earl of Huntingdon 4 July 
1479, "habend' et tenend' prefato Will'o Herbert til. et 
heredibz de corp'e p'fati Will'i Herbert patris exeuntib's 
imp'p't'm ;" y ob. post 1487, s. p. m. 

1. George Hastings, III. 3rd Baron Hastings of Hastings, 
Baron Hungerford, &c, created Earl of Huntingdon 8 Dec. 
1529 ; ob. 1544. 

2. Francis Hastings, s. and h., K.G. ; he m. Katherine, dau. 
and cob. of Henry Pole, Lord Montagu, s. and h. of Sir 
Richard Pole, K.G., by Margaret Countess of Salisbury, 
dau. and sole heir of George Plantagenet, Duke of Cla- 
rence, bro. of Edward IV. ; ob. 1560. 

3. Henry Hastings, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. as Lord 
Hastings 1 Eliz. 1558 ; K.G. ; ob. 1595, s. p. 

4. George Hastings, bro. and h. ; ob. 1604. 

5. Henry Hastings, grands, and h., being s. and h. of Francis 
Hastings (ob. v. p.), eldest son of the last Earl; ob. 

1643. 

XXIII. 1643. 6. Ferdinando Hastings, s. and h., summ. to Pari. v. p. as 

Lord Hastings, and took his seat 21 Nov. 1640 ; ob. 
1655. 

XXIV. 1655. 7. Tiieophilus Hastings, s. and h. ; ob. 1701. 

XXV. 1701. 8. George Hastings, s. and h. ; ob. 1705, unm. 



XVIII. 1529. 



XIX. 1544. 



XX. 

XXI. 

XXII. 



1560. 

1595. 

1004. 



x Vide Note to Dorset. 

y This Patent was of the nature of an ex- 
change of titles. All the privileges, prece- 
dence, &c, belonging to the Earldom of 
Pembroke, being annexed to the new dig- 
nity, it was confirmed by Inspeximus, 17 



May 1488, but the Habendum was altered 
to the heirs male of William the father. On 
the death of the grantee no claim appears to 
have been made, however, to the dignity, 
either by his heir male or heir general. 



264 



HUNTINGFIELD — HUSEE. 



Earls. 
XXVI. 
XXVII. 



1705. 9. Theophilus Hastings, 1 half-bro. and h. ; ob. 1746. 

1746. 10. Francis Hastings, s. and h. ; ob. 1789, unm. Elizabeth, 



Barons by Tenure. 
I. John. 1. 



ir. 


Hen. 


III. 2 


hi. 


Hen. 


III. 3 


IV. 


Edw. 


I. 4 



his sister and h., succeeded him in the Baronies of Hast- 
ings, Hungerford, Botreaux, and Molines, which have de- 
scended to the present Marquess of Hastings. 

XXVIII. 1819. 11. Hans Francis Hastings/ next heir male of George XVIII. 

1st Earl, being lineally descended from Edward Hastings, 
3rd son of Francis XIX. 2nd Earl, all the intermediate 
male descendants being extinct ; he claimed and was 
allowed the Earldom 14 Jan. 1819 ; ob. 9 Dec. 1828. 

XXIX. 1828. 12. Francis Theophiltjs Henry Hastings, s. and h., present 

Earl of Huntingdon. =p 

HUNTINGFIELD. 

William de Huntingfield a (s. of Roger de Huntingfield), 
was one of the celebrated 25 Barons appointed to enforce the 
observance of Magna Charta ; ob. 1240. 

Boger de Huntingfield, s. and h. ; ob. 1252. 

William de Huntingfield, s. and h. ; ob. 1282. 

f Boger de Huntingfield, s. and h., summoned 8 June, 22 
Edw. I. 1294, and 26 Jan. 25 Edw. I. 1297, but it is very 
doubtful if cither should be considered as a Writ of Summons 
to Farl. {vide Clyvedon and Fitz-John) ; ob. 1301. His s. 
and h. William de Huntingfield was never summ. to Farl., and 
died in 1313. Boger de Huntingfield, his s. and h., was 
likewise never summ. to Pari., and died in 1337, leaving 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1351. William de Huntingfield, his s. and h., who was summ: to Farl. 
from 15 Nov. 25 Edw. III. 1351, to 20 Jan. 49 Edw. III. 1376 ; ob. 1377, 
s. p., leaving his aunt Alicia, aet. 30, dau. of William his grandfather, and 
widow of Sir John Norwich, Knt., his kinswoman and next heir ; but, ac- 
cording to another Inquisition, the said Alice and Sir John Copledick, 
grandson of Joan, dau. of the said William his grandfather, by Sybilla, 
his second wife, were his heirs. As this Baron died without surviving 
issue, the Barony became Extinct. 

HUNTINGFIELD (of ). 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1362. John de Huntingfield, descended from the same family, summ. to 
Pari, from 14 Aug. 36 Edw. III. 1362, to 6 Apr. 43 Edw. III. 1369, but 
of whom nothing further is known. 



HUSEE. Vide Hoese. 



1 It is to be observed that the Rev. Theo- 
philus Henry Hastings (elder brother of 
(ieorge, father of Hans Francis, 11th Earl of* 
Huntingdon, who died in 1802) survived 
Francis the XXVII. 10th Ear], until 1804, 
when he died s. P., during which time he was 
in fact Earl of Huntingdon ; but as it was con- 
sidered a doubt f'ul point on whom the Earl. 1. mi 
devolved on the death of the said Francis 
XXVII. 10th Earl, until the present Earl 
was summoned by the King in Jan. 1819, on 
the report of the Attorney-General upon his 



claim, his name is omitted in the order of 
succession. 

a Dugdale considers that this family did 
not obtain Baronial rank until the Summons 
in 25 Edw. I. 1296, to William de Hunting- 
field ; but from the circumstance of Wil- 
liam, son of Roger, having been one of the 
25 Barons appointed to enforce the observance 
of Magna Charta, it is pretty evident that he 
should be considered as possessed of that 
dignity. The first regular Summons to Par- 
liament appears to be in 1351. 



HUSSEY — HYDE. 265 

HUSSEY (of Sleford). 
Baron by Writ. 

I. 1529. 1. John Hussey, eumm. to Pari, as "Joharmi Hussey de Sleford, 
Chivaler," 5 Jan. 25 Hen. VIII. 1534, and 8 June, 28 Hen. VIII. 1536. 
It appears that he sat in Parliament 21 Hen. VIII., though his name 
does not occur in the List of Summonses in that year. Beheaded and 
attainted in 1536, when his honours hecame Forfeited. 

The children of this Baron were restored in blood ; but the attainder of 
their father has never been reversed. 



HUTCHINSON (of Alexandria, and Knoeklofty). 
Baron. 

1801. John Hely-Hutchinson (bro. of Richard Earl of Donoughmore in 
Ireland), created Baron Hutchinson of Alexandria and Knoeklofty, co. 
Tipperary, 16 Dec. 1801 ; succeeded his bro. Richard as Viscount Hutchin- 
son in England, and as Earl of Donoughmore in Ireland 22 Aug. 1825 ; 
G.C.B. ; ob. unm. 29 June 1832, when the Viscounty of Hutchinson and 
Earldom of Donoughmore devolved on his neph. John Hely-Hutchinson, 
but this Barony became Extinct. 



HUTCHINSON (of Knoeklofty). 
Viscounts. 

I. 1821. 1. Richard Hely-Hutchinson, 1st Earl of Donoughmore in Ire- 

land, created Viscount Hutchinson of Knoeklofty, co. Tip- 
perary, 14 July 1821, with remainder, failing his issue male, to 
the male issue of Christian Baroness Donoughmore, dec. (mother 
of the said Earl), by John Hely-Hutchinson, Esq. ; ob. 22 Aug. 
1825, s. p. 

II. 1825. 2. John Hely-Hutchinson, 1st Baron Hutchinson of Alexandria and 

of Knoeklofty, co. Tipperary, bro. and h. ; succeeded as Viscount 
Hutchinson of Knoeklofty in the United Kingdom, and as Earl 
of Donoughmore in Ireland, agreeable to the limitations of these 
dignities ; G.C.B. ; ob. unm. 29 June 1832, when the Barony of 
Hutchinson of Alexandria and Knoeklofty became Extinct, but 
his other honours devolved on, 

III. 1832. 3. John Hely-Hutchinson, neph. and h., eldest son of Francis 

Hely-Hutchinson, next bro. of the last Viscount ; K.P. ; ob. 12 
Sept. 1851. 

IV. 1851. 4. Richard John Hely-Hutchinson, s. and h., present Viscount 

Hutchinson of Knoeklofty ; also Earl of Donoughmore, &c. in Ireland. =j= 



HYDE. 

Barons. 

I. 1660. 1. Edward Hyde, created Baron Hyde of Hindon, co. Wilts, 3 Nov. 
1660, created Viscount Cornbury, co. Oxford, and Earl of Cla- 
rendon, co. Wilts, 20 April 1661.— Extinct 1753.— Vide Cla- 

\^ RENDON. 

V. 1756. 1. Thomas Villiers (2nd son of William 2nd Earl of Jersey), having 
m. Charlotte, eldest dau. of William 3rd Earl of Essex, by Jane, dan. and 
h. of Henry Hyde, last Earl of Clarendon and Rochester, was created 
Baron Hyde of Hindon, co. Wilts, to him and the heirs male of his body, 
by Charlotte his then wife, and in default the dignity of Baroness Hyde to 
the said Charlotte for life, remainder to the heirs male of her body, 3 June 
1756. Created Earl of Clarendon 14 June 1776. — Vide Clarendon. 



266 HYDE — INSULA. 

HYDE ( of Kenilworth ). 

Viscount. 

I. 1681. Lawrence Hyde, 2nd son of Edward 1st Earl of Clarendon, created 
Baron of Wotton Bassctt, co. Wilts, and Visconnt Hyde of Kenilworth, 
co. Warwick, 24 Apr. 1681 ; created Earl of Rochester 29 Nov. 1682.— 
Extinct 1753. — Vide Rochester and Clarendon. 



(' 



I. 

ILOHESTEH. 

ILCHESTER AND STAVORDALE. 

Barons. Earls. 

f!741. — I. 1756. 1. Stephen Fox (assumed the name of) Strang ways, 
;1747. created Lord Ilchester, co. Somerset, Baron of Wood- 

ford Strangways, co. Dorset, 11 May 1741, created 
Lord Ilchester and Stavordale, Baron of Redlynch, 
co. Somerset, with remainder, failing his issue male, 
to his bro. Henry Fox, Esq. (afterwards 1st Baron 
Holland), 12 Jan. 1746-7, created Earl of Ilchester, 
with the same limitation, 17 June 1756 ; ob. 1776. 

II. 1776. — II. 1776. 2. Henry Thomas Fox Strangways, s. and h. ; ob. 

5 Sept. 1802. 

III. 1802. — III. 1802. 3. Henry Stephen Fox Strangways, s. and h., present 

Earl of Ilchester, Baron Ilchester and Stavordale, 
and Baron Ilchester. =p 

INGESTRIE. 

Viscounty, 3 July 1784. — Vide Talbot of Hensol. 

INGHAM. 

Baron by Writ. 

I. 1328. Oliver de Ingham, summ. to Pari. 15 June, 2 Edw. III. 1328, to 
25 Feb. 16 Edw. HI. 1342 ; ob. 1344, leaving Mary dau. of John Curzon 
by Elizabeth his eldest dau. set. 9, and Joane his 2nd dau. wife of Roger 
Lord Strange of Knockyn, a3t. 24, his heirs. The said Mary Curzon m. 
Stephen de Tumbye, and died 23 Edw. III. s. p. ; Joane Strange had no 
issue by Lord Strange, and m. 2ndly Sir Miles Stapleton, K.G., of Bedalc, 
co. York, by whom she had a son Miles, who was father of Sir Bryan, father 
of another Sir Miles, who died s. P. M. 6 Edw. IV., leaving two daughters 
his coheirs — Elizabeth, 2nd wife of Sir William Calthorpe ; and Jane, 
wife 1st of Sir John Hudlestone, and 2ndly of Christopher Harcourt, 
ancestor of Earl Harcourt, and among the issue of the said two daughters 
of the last-mentioned Sir Miles Stapleton the Barony is now in Abeyance. 

INNES. 
Earl. 

I. 1837. 1. James Henry Robert Innes-Ker, Duke of Roxburgh in Scotland, 

created Karl limes in the Peerage of the United Kingdom 11 Aug. 1837, 

preserd Karl Innes, also Duke and Earl of Roxburgh, Marquess of Bow- 

m Mil., &c. in Scotland, K.T. =j= 

Y 

INSULA. Vide L'Isle. 



INVERNESS — JERM YN . 



267 



INVERNESS. 

Earldom, 27 Nov. 1801. — Vide Sussex. 

INVERNESS. 
Duchess. 

I. 1840. Cecilia Letitia Underwood, eldest surviving dau. (by his second 
marriage) of Arthur Saunders 2nd Earl of Arran and