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Full text of "The Historic Wallkill and Hudson River Valleys"

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AT BEDELL'S 




One thing we 
distinctly aim 
at in this 

business is that every man who 
knows us, or who reads our ads, 
shall get the idea that this is the store 
for quality in merchandise. 

We'd a good deal rather be known 
as the right place for good stuff, than 
as a place where you get low prices. 

It's always easy to quote prices; 
but it's what the price buys that 
counts. 

We can't give you any better evi- 
dence of our quality standards than 
that ; they're the best clothes made. 



Whatever you buy here is 
good; we intend it to be 



HATS 
CLOTHING and FURNISHINGS 



WM. S. BEDELL 

363-365 Main Street - - POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 




-k AW!E5?ICAM ACRSCliLTURIST- 




EURSER5 






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g?NlWSUBOH 



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YOUR 

CREDIT 

IS 

GOOD 

AT 




NEWBURGH 
26-28 Water Street 



GLENS FALLS 
26 Warren Street 



BURGER'S 




£VEISYTHm& FpR EVERYBODY. 



BURGER'S.FURNITURE STORE 



HR 



FP n PlPJh 




Furniture 
Carpets 

Crockery 

Stoves 
Clothing 




^^^^^4c^ 



POUGHKEEPSIE 
407-409 Main Street 



SCHENECTADY 

J 36 State Street 



Wm. T. Reynolds & Company 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, - MILL AGENTS 



We have the most mod- 
ern and perfected Coffee 
Roasting Plant in the Hud- 
son River Valley. Our 
Coffees are Dry- Roasted 
and Packed on the day of 
delivery. No more stale, 
soft, flat-flavored Coffees 
possible by our methods. 

Proprietors and Roast- 
ers of the Rose-Bud, 
Porto-Rico and Pon-Hon- 
or brands of Coffee. 

Rose Bud Coffee is a 
Coffee for those to whom 
price is no object, and 
who will appreciate the 
choicest Coffee it is pos- 
sible to produce. 

PoN - Honor Coffee 
has an established reputa- 
tion for high merit at a 
moderate price. The 
Coffee for the "million." 
See that you get the only 
genuine bearing our Trade 
Mark and with an un- 
broken seal. 

PoRTO-Rico Coffee. 
The only genuine We 
are furnishing this Coffee 
to the President, both at 
the White House and his 
Ovster Bay residence. 







9? 



Tid>i9 Mart Re9':,Ur*d 



JJ 



PON-HONOR 



BI.ENI> 

COASTED COFFEE 

THE BEST COFFEE IN THE WORLD AT A LOW PRl« 



«f whole bean roasted Coffees absulH* 
"tand fine flavored. It costs on'y * 
Wfle More than Common Grad<-s 




Atrial will prove its great merit 




Packed "Pon-honor" sold on merit 



Ask for the Fleur de Lis Brand or 
table condiments if you wish the choicest 
packed. 

Christian's Superlative is, and has been 
for thirty years, the most reliable Flour 
on the market. It makes not only the 
most bread, but the best bread. Ask 
your grocer for it. 



Packers of the Cele- 
brated Rose-Bud and 
Pon-Honor Teas. 

RosE-BuD Tea is a 
blend of the choicest 
teas on the market, as 
proved by "cup value." 
Its aroma and flavor 
i s sufficiently p r o - 
nounced to stand icings 
which is where many 
Teas fail. Demand it 
from your Grocer. 

PoN-HoNoR Tea is 
correctly described by 
our remarks on the 
Coffee so well known 
of the same name. 
It is a big tea at a little 
price, giving better re- 
sults in the cup than 
any other tea at a much 
greater price. 

Proprietors of the High 
Grade Perfect, Reliance 
and Duchess brands of 
Canned Goods which are 
so well known as to ren- 
der any description useless 

Mill Agents and Dis- 
tributers of Christian's 
Superlative, Ceres ot a. 
White Sponge, Hubbard's 
Superlative, etc., brands 
of flour. 



John Schwartz & Sons 

313 Main Street 
Poughkeepsie, New York 




Manufacturers 
of Fine 




CIGARS 



wholesale and retail dealers in 



Everything for Tobacco Users 

Retail dealers will consult their in- 
terests by calling on us, as we carry 
the largest line in this section 




John Schwartz & Sons 

313 Main Street 
Poughkeepsie, New York 



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J. Schrauth's Sons 



Makers of 



The Celebrated Ice Cream 



Known as 



"The Best Made" 



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BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS 

ICE CREAM IN BRICKS OR LOOSE AT WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
Shipments promptly made by Express, Boat, Railroad or Stage 

149=151 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION 

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EMPIRE GARAGE CO. Inc. 



. 



GEORGE N. MORROW 

President 



AUGUST BRETTHAUER 

Secretary and Treasurer 



AUTOMOBILES 



. 



. 













AUTO 
LIVERY 

Long and 
Short 
Drives 



« 



AUTOMOBILES STORED AND REPAIRED 

ALWAYS A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF 

New and Second=Hand Autos 

ON HAND 



No. 97 North Street, Middletown, N. Y. 

Orange Co. Tel. No. 675 Independent Telephone < 

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 



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The Mortimer C. Drake Store 

is recognized as 

"The Altman" of Poughkeepsie 



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Not to the "Queen City" alone, is our trade confined, but from all 
directions on both sides of the Hudson River, our customers corne. 
Those who seek the best and latest of the dry goods and costuming 
creations, realize thai this store offers an unequalled stock at the 
airest of prices. 

Successors to Dates & Burroughs, we uphold their established repu- 
tation for excellence of merchandise and courtesy of treatment. More- 
over, we have greatly improved and increased our stock and facilities, 
so that we are enabled to provide assortments of the choicest merchan- 
dise that appeal to women of particular taste. 

By our policy of metropolitan methods, we have demonstrated that 
the old-time necessity of going to New York City to "shop," is now 
overcome, for we have brought New York to you —figuratively 
speaking — here in our store. Progressiveness has earned for us the 
compliment of being called "The Altman of Poughkeepsie." 

Make your next shopping trip to Poughkeepsie, with your head- 
quarters at this store. Meet your friends, leave your packages, and 
we will send all of your purchases to your home for you free of 
charge. We will take pleasure in assisting you in every way possible, 

adding to the enjoyment of your trip, the satisfaction of your purchases, and 

the economy of your expenditures. 



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M The latest styles of Suits, 

Coats, Cloaks, Dresses, 
Waists and ReaJy Made 
Garments of ei'er\ kind, for 
ivomen, misses and children. 
Household and personal 
dry g^oods of unlimited -vari 
ety and exceptional qualuies. 



MORTIMER f^ 
C. ^ ^ 




DRAKE 

310-312 Main St. 
Po'keepsie, N. Y. 

Hail orders carefully executed 



ets, Hosiery, Under- 
iL'ear, Furnishings, Nouel- 
ties, Neckivear, Silks, Dress 
Goods — 

Ei'erfthing that a modern 
store should haiie, is here in 
choicest assortments. 




s 







for Business 



A general education you can get anywhere, but come to EASTMAN for Business Trainins. It has long 
been known as the pre-eminent business school of the country ; has enjoyed an exira national repulalion for 
half a century. 

Tliis famous school is by no means local. Anybody, anywhere, who knows anything, will tell you that 
among .business schools Eastman is known everywhere and by everybody as the best. 

The enrollment this year contains the names of students from thirty-eiffhl Stales of the union, from Canada 
and many of the countries of Central and South America, from Cuba and other islands of the West Indies, 
from Norway. France. Germany. Spain. Italy. Syria, China and Japan. 

More than 47.000 students and graduates. Many of these are among the leadinff men in manufacturing, 
mining, transportation, and business circles all over the United States. More than i,ooo of them occupy 

permanent positions in banks. 

Eastman is delishtfully situated. Environment beautiful and historically interesting. Easy of access. 
Climate he.ilthful. Extensive grounds for recreation, exercise and athletic sports. Gymnasium with Y.M.C. A. 

Buildings modern and commodious. Heated by steam and well lighted with windows on all sides. 
Rooms handsomely furnished and properly ventilated. Equipped throughout with all the modern conven- 
iences and appliances. 

Living arrangements attractive. Board furnished at moderate prices. Careful oversight of welfare of 
students. Monthly reports sent to parents and guardians. 

Instruction thorough and practical, by mail and personally. Business taught by actual transactions. 
Telegraphy and railroad work taught by practical operators. Correspondence courses in Stenosrapby, Book- 
keepins. Penmanship. Etc. 

Positions obtained for all graduates of Complete Commercial Course. Constant demand for bookkeepers 
stenographers, clerks, teachers of commercial branches, and telegraph operators. 

For full information and handsomely illustrated catalogue address, 

CLEMENT C. GAINES, M. A.. B. L., President 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. 



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ColdwelTs 
Lawn Mowers 



The Coldwell Lawn Mow- 
ers vere awarded Ihe 
higbest prizes at both 
the Paris Exposition in 
1900 and at the Pan- 
American in 1901. 





-"*! wV A Klit ^ !?> *^ J5 ?• V- » . . . , 




They were also adopted for exclusive use on the grounds of both the above-named 
after several trials. The fact that they have been used for a number of years 
exclusively by the Park Systems of Greater New York, Chicago, Buffalo, and 
many of our other large cities, speak well for their fine work and durability. 

Coldwell Lawn Mower Co. 

NEWBURGH, NEW YORK 



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1 

DEVOE 

PLKHIRAD and ZINC PAINT 

Ready for Use 


Notice These Paints are Strictly Pure and are sold subject to Chemical 
Analysis 

^, , These Paints are made only of Pure White Lead, Pure White 
iiOtlCC Zinc, Pure Linseed Oil, Pure Turpentine Dryer, Pure Tinting i 
Colors 

liOTlCC These Paints are put up strictly full measure 


Manufactured by 

F. W. Devoe & Co. New York 

Established 1754 
The oldest and largest Paint Concern in the United States 


Agents for The=Fewer=Gallons=Wears=Longer Paint 

1 


FOWLER & DECKER 
Walden 


U. S. GRANT 
Kingston 


F. E. TETHER 
Florida, N. Y. 


C. A. HARTSHORN 
Marlborough 


G. & W. EAGER 
Montgomery 


JAMES DURLAND & SON 
Chester 


AYRES & GALLOWAY 
Middletown 


SMITH & STREBEL 
Monroe, N. Y. 


B. F. VAIL 
Warwick 


CHAS. E. KEEFE 
Newburgh 



9 



AMERICAN SEAL PAINT 



The 

AMERICAN 

SEAL 

Line 

embraces 

paints for 

practically 

every known 

purpose. 

No matter 

what 

your needs 

may be, 

we 

can supply 

them out 

of our 

extensive 

line 



I. American Seal Paints stand for purity, 
beauty, economy and durability. 

II. They increase the value of your prop- 
erty, make it more inviting, attractive and 
salable. 

III. They give added prestige to your 
home, neighborhood and home life, increas- 
ing your social standing in the community. 

IV. There are no adulterants in Arnerican 
Seal Paints— no deleterious or injurious 
matter of any kind. They are made from 
j ust the proper amount of pure White Carbon- 
ate of Lead to give the necessary covering 
and spreading qualities; just enough White 
Oxide of Zinc to produce the desired affinity 
with Oil and the greatest durability ; and 
Pure Linseed Oil to dominate the whole and 
give it life. 

American Seal Floor Paint 

V. It penetrates the wood. It iills up the 
pores and prevents the floor from becoming 
watersoaked. It eliminates dampness and 
prevents all possibility of the breeding of 
germs. The floor is easy to keep clean ; the 
lessening of the labor of housecleaning will 
strongly appeal to every housewife. In 
scrubbing, avoid the use of cheap soaps or 
alkalies — use only warm water. 

"American Seal" Floor Paint dries hard 
with a good gloss. It resists wear and tear; 
keeps its bright, new appearance long after 
cheap, adulterated floor paints have worn 
away. 

VI. We'll be pleased to give you any 
information regarding the use of "AMERI- 
CAN SEAL " Paints for sanitary or deco- 
rative purpo.ses. 




SOLD BY 

ALL 

THE 
LEADING 
DEALERS 

OF 
WALLKILL 

AND 
HUDSON 

RIVER 
VALLEYS 



Ask for it, 

take no 

other 



life 



THE WM. CONNORS PAINT MFG. CO. 

TROY, N. Y. 



10 



A Bit of History 



♦♦♦♦ 

THERE are many reasons why a property-owner should carefully consider the matter oi 
painting either the exterior or the interior of a residence. 

When a house was to be painted in the so-called "good old times," before ready- 
mixed paints were produced, an owner had nothing to guide him in the selection of 
colors, and the painters either adhered to the safe white and green, or copied some dull example 
oi tinted work, regardless of appropriateness or the reverse. 

Now the majority of painters are glad to use in their daily business, the sample cards issued 
by makers of paints ready for use, and as a result, one can make a contrast between the beautiful 
examples of painted exteriors then and now. 

But it is readily seen that the hand-made combination produced by mixing white lead in a 
pot with a stick, and tinting it with various shades of color, is very unsuccessful, because de- 
teriorating and becoming dull and unsightly. 

The unseen disadvantages to the property-owner whenever a painter makes paint with 
white lead by mixing it in a pot with a stick, are more than several. The property-owner buys 
white lead in a keg, say 25 pounds gross, and only gets 22 pounds of white lead, thereby losing 
three pounds, the weight of the keg. The painter's time when made use of in tinting this white 
lead is often most costly per gallon of paint made; indeed, as much as 25 or 30 cents has been 
paid for such service, and for the production of an inferior color. 

It is cruelty, in one sense, to the painter, because white lead inflicts him with lead colic, 
and the poor man is often permanently injured in health. Nothing but extreme care and clean- 
liness wherever white lead is used safeguards this dreaded malady. It is well known that in- 
haling white lead wherever it dusts from a painted surface is injurious, and therefore it ought 
to be used in combination with oxide of zinc, so as to prevent powdering or rubbing off. When 
a painted surface reaches this condition it quickly wears away and is not a protection, and for 
this reason paint manufacturers combine oxide of zinc with white lead to a sufficient extent to 
prevent this result and to create the best kind of a durable surface. 

The L. & M. Paint is made with white lead and oxide of zinc, and therefore possesses 
the greatest amount of durability, together with greater covering power, and nothing better in 
this respect is required for use. 

A frame house will always be in perfect condition if painted with the L. & M. Paint 
once in ten to fifteen years, because, as stated, the L, & M. Zinc hardens the L. & M. White 
Lead and gives the paint extraordinary life. 

Four gallons of L. & M. and three gallons of oil mixed together will paint a moderate 
sized house. 

The L. & M. Paints are sold by: 

D. C. DoMiNicK, Walden George E. Johnston, New Paltz 

Jos. VanCleft & Co., Newburgh J. Sleight's Sons, Rondout 

B. S. Pembleton, Highland Mills Geo. A. Swalm & Son, Middletown 

C. Veeder, Rosendale Conklin & Strong, Warwick 
Chas. D. Wait, Montgomery J. G. Manning. Wallkill 

H. B. Bevier, Poughkeepsie 






11 



Why We 
Sell so Many 
Pianos 




iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Partly because of the Prices— which are lower 
than anywhere else-for the same quality. 

Partly because of the Pianos which are better 
than anywhere else for the same price. 

Partly because everyone knows that the Pianos 
we sell are absolutely reliable and deserving of 
confidence or they wouldn't be here at any price. 

Partly because of Ihe Payment Plan which is 
by the month, quarter or otherwise. 

Few people buy a Piano oftener than once in a 
lifetime so those are the alMmportant questions 
to consider before the purchase is made. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiiiiii 

W. H. RIDER 

304 Wall Street Kingston, N. Y. 

Will have a piano exhibit at " The Farmer's Outing " at Walden, N. Y. 



12 



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P1 



Orange County Agricultural Society 

SIXTYSEVENTH ANNUAL FAIR 

Middletown, N. Y., August 27, 28, 29 and 30, 1907 

Premiums Amounting to nearly $10,000 

Are offered for Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Swine, Poultry, Dogs, Implements, Machines, 
Furniture, Grain, Flowers, V^egetables, Fruit, Cake, Bread, Canned Fruit, 
Paintings, Decorative Work, Drawings, Fancy Articles, Needle- 
work, plain and ornamental, Domestic Manufactures, 
School Work, etc. Many Valuable Special 
Premiums are also offered. 

The Collective Exhibits of Subordinate Granges will be 
an attractive feature of the Fair 

Athletic Games and Races will take place on the First Day 

I A^> Trotting Races on the Second, Third and Fourth Days 

Governor Charles E. Hughes is expected to give an 
address on one of the days 

Special Attractions may be expected each day of the Fair. Excur- 
sion rates on all railroads. Exhibits returned free. Electric 
cars run to grounds. Premmm list and regulations, 
with entry blank, furnished on application to any 

of the officers 

OFFICERS 

Hon. Augustus Dennislon, Washingtonville, President; E. A. Brown, 
Middletown, Vice-President ; D. A. Morrison, Newburgh, Secretary , 



William Eager, 







Montgomery, William F. Royce, Middletown, Assis 
tant Secretaries; H. M. Howell, Middletown, 
Treasurer. 

DIRECTORS 

W. H. Hallcck, Washingtonville, W. A. Law- 
re nee, Chester ; V. Edgar Hill, Stony Ford ; Charles 
Mapes, Middletown ; J. W. Houston, Florida ; John 
1. Bradley, Middletown ; Alex. F. Storey, New- 
burgh ; W. H. Nearpass, Port Jervis , 
W. C. Hart, Walden ; W. Q. Min- 
ium, Warwick ; W. B. Royce, Mid- 
'•;. dietown ; Rev. Andrew Schriver, 

~^ -^L. Chester; Dr. M. A. Stivers, Middle- 

town ; John W. Sanford, Warwick , 
Howard D. Seeley, Chester. 



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13 



iiiBiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiisiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiil^ 

The l>i^w^^^ Question is a | 

^^ i lanO Large One | 

You will probably buy but one Piano in your life- S 

time and it is important that you make no mis- 2 

take in its selection. You can certainly secure S 

The Right Piano at the Right Price | 

From the well known 5 

Holmes Music Co. | 

Middletown and Port Jervis, N. Y. E 

Successor to Jas. Munn and the Bradnack Music House E 




Y 



OUR home is not complete with- 
out a fine PIANO. 



•<► 



NO matter how elegantly furnished 
and adorned it may be yet the 
presence of an artistically constructed 
and sweet toned Piano, with the re- 
fining influence of music adds a charm 
and finish which no other one article 
of furniture can give. 

•*> 

THE development of the Piano has 
wonderfully improved of late 
years and the latest examples from 
the great makers, in exquisite natural 
wood cases, are marvels of artistic 
elegance and musical superiority. 



Great Pianos from Great Makers 



Ivers & Pond 

Hardman 

Briggs 

Mehlin & Son 

Schubert 

Holmes 

Jas. Munn 



Weber 

Steck 

Haines Bros. 

Estey 

J. & C. Fischer 

Bush & Lane 

Stuyvesant 



Harrington 

Fifteen well known and celebrated makers of 
long established reputation, whose names are a 
guarantee of excellence and durability. Over 
300 different styles and prices, from $175 to 
$1000. The most exacting purchaser can find 
on our floors exactly the Piano desired. 



Easy Payments $5 to $10 Monthly 5 

Over Three Thousand Satisfied Purchasers S 

will recommend our Instruments and S 

our fair methods of selling S 



Holmes Music Company 



70 and 72 North Street - 

73 Pike Street - - - - 

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Middletown, N. Y. 
Port Jervis, N. Y. 



14 



Over 1000 Acres in Nursery Stock 



6- -J 


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j^^HH Solid Blcck | 


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100 Apple trees, extra selected $15.00 
100 Peach trees, healthy . . 7.00 
100 Kieffer Pear trees . . . 15.00 



100 Plum trees . . 
1000 Strawberry plants 



$20.00 
2.50 



Send for free Illustrated Catalogue, giving a 
Complete List of Varieties. 



J. G. Harrison Sons 

Berlin, Md. 




ter Apples, over 
wants and get prices 

The Peach. 

beautiful golden yellow, delicious. 
Best for market, most prolific. All 
the choice varieties. We propagate in 
the greatest peach climate of the 
world. Trees always please. Ask for 
free 1905 catalogue of all fruits. 

Harrison's Nurseries, 

Box 73, Berlin, Md. 



The Apple 

is the mainstay in fruit, for ali 
raisers. Plant for the future. 
Get right stock. Our trees 
unapproached._ Ben Davis, 
Gano, Baldwin, Wine Sap, 
elc. Summer, Fall and Win- 
100 varieties. Tell us your 



We urge that ^reat favor- 
ite, E Iberia. Large. 




Box 150 



Order 



at 



Once 









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15 



THE 



JOHN Q. WILKINSON CO. 



Newburgh, New York 



g^iliilpfpSltfflTllItMffl 




JOBBERS AND DEALERS IN FINE 



CARRIAGES and HARNESS 

BUSINESS WAGONS for all purposes 

ROBES, FUR COATS, HORSE CLOTHING, Etc. 

Wagon Material 

MARK REEKS, President and Manager Telephone Connection 



16 



I 496755 



11^ 



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■ S. 



Historic Wallkill and 
Hudson River Valleys 



A. D. 1907 




ITRl- T (^|ff=PSTSS----^^=S=-i===™»=— — i 



PUBLISHED BY 

Wallkill Valley Publishing Association 

^ / WILLIAM G. HART, Secretary 

Walden, New York 

C\-A X^ 




I 



''■ ■--■ *^'^ ^^ ** 



THE MIGHTY CATARACT OF NIAGARA. 

'" Tis where Ontario's billow, 
Like ocean's surge is curl'd; 
Where strong Niagara's thunders wake 
The echo of the world." 

— Lvdia Maria Si'jounicv. 



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€*^^^M^r)C/^ PERSONAL PAGE 




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1^ 










//; //u' c.vccllciicy and readahlcncss of tlie suhjcct-matter 
presented, and in the artisfie make-np of the souvenir throngh- 
ont, fezv similar publieations of today approach its standard or 
receive liigher praise from an appreciative public. The cover 
page, "Autumn Leaves," is >nost realistic, typifying the passing 
of Summer ami tlie deatli of Ahiture. 

In sending out the fourteenth annual number of the sou- 
venir, the saddest tliought is of the many ivho have given a 
kindly u-ord to its predecessors, but zcho, during the interval 
have, in tlie words of Joaquin Miller, passed to the "River of 
Rest." 

"The boatman rises; he reaches a luind; 

He knows you zvell ; he will steer you true 
And far, so far from all ills upon land, 

From hates, from fates that pursue and pursue, 
Far oz'er the lily-lined River of Rest — 
Dear mystical, magical Rii'cr of Rest. 

A storied, s-'weet stream is this Rizer of Rest; 

The souls of all tiuie keep its ultimate shore, 
And, journey you east or journey you west, 

Unznilling or ivilling, sure-footed or sore. 
You surely zuill come to this River of Rest — • 
This beautiful, beautiful River of Rest." ^, 

To their memories li'C loiingly dedicate this volume. 

Yours fraternally, 



/^■6j6ajJ- 



Walden, N. Y ., August i, ipoy. 



T9 




Photo by Peck. 

MISS M. AVERIL CLARK, 

XEWBURGH, X. Y. 



A truthful page is childhood's lovely face 

Whereon sweet innocence has record made — 

They are idols of hearts and of households; 
They are angels of God in disguise; 

Tho' sunlight still sleeps in their tresses 
His glory still gleams in their eyes. 

— Dickens. 



20 





THE HUDSON RIVER 

Queen of all lovely rivers, lustrous queen, 
Of flowing waters in our sweet new lands. 
Rippling through sunlight to the ocean sands, 
With a smiling valley and between 
Romantic shores of silvery summer green ; 
Memorial of wild days and savage bands. 
Singing the patient deeds of patriot bands, 
Crooning of golden glorious years foreseen. 

Thy song is wholly of the heart, the lyre 
Of liberty is strung amid thy shades ; 
Behold the citv of the world's desire 
Roaring within thy once primeval glades, 
And westward in the twilight's crimson lire, 
The rocky ramparts of the Palisades ! 

"1* 'P •? ^ '^ ^^ 

Who has not read the legends of the Rhine? 
Who has not told the sweet and ancient tales 
That cluster round its flowering banks and vales ? 
The Thames has poet-laureates who entwine 
Its glories with their song; in sparkling wine 
Men toast the Danube and the moon that pales 
Its fabled waters : and no telling stales 
The story of the Seine, incarnadine. 

Yet more revered, more beautiful than these, 
More tender in traditions, richer far 
In gentle kinship with the strong and brave, 
Art thou whose mighty currents never cease 
To chant the hopes of happy hearts that are 
Born of a mother who has freed the slave. 

— Selected. 





21 




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22 




THE HILLS OF HOME 

They grow more dear each passing year, 

Tho" farther away I roam, 
For my heart will burn, and my eyes will yearn. 

For the snow-clad hills of home. 

It seems to me, Fd rather be 

Shut in an humble cot, 
Where the moonbeams fade 'neath the pine tree's shade, 

Forgetting, and being forgot. 

For in dreams I view the mountains blue, 
And they beckon and whisper "come," 

They could heal the smart of my aching heart. 
The snow-clad hills of home. 

But far away from my sight today. 

Are the kindred friends I love. 
The cottage small, with its mountains tall. 

Towering darkly blue above. 

Oh, friends of yore, I can ne'er see more, 

Tho' afar and astray I roam. 
Still your faces I keep in my heart's great deep. 

While I sigh for the hills of home. 

— Ella Z. Harris. 



23 




Courtesy New York Central Kailroad 



His liome, the spot of earth supremely blest, 
A dearer, sweeter spot than all the rest. 

— Montgomery. 



24 





^Cm-.-^-Z ' - 



"*'as seen from - 

' GATSKILL BRIDGE. 




Courtesy New York Cer.trjl Railroad 

Far from the gay cities 
And the ways of men. 

— Homer. 



How grateful is the sudden change 
From arid pavement to the grass. 

— H. T. Tuckennan. 



INDIAN SUMMER 

BY S. WEIR MITCHELL. 

The stillness that doth wait on change is here, 
Some pause of expectation owns the hour ; 

And faint and far I hear the sea complain 

Where gray and answerless the headlands tower. 

Slow falls the evening of the dying year, 

Misty and dim the patient forests lie. 
Chill ocean winds the wasted woodland grieve, 

And earthward loitering the leaves go by. 

Behold how nature answers death ! O'erhead 
The memoried splendor of her summer eves 

Lavished and lost, her wealth of sun and sky, 
Scarlet and gold, are in her drifting leaves. 

Vain pageantry I for this, alas, is death. 

Nor may the seasons' ripe fulfilment cheat 
Our thronging memories of those who died 

With life's young summer promise incomplete. 

The dead leaves rustle 'neath my lingering tread, 

Low murmuring ever to the spirit ear; 
We were, and yet again shall be once more, 

Li the sure circuit of the rolling year. 

Trust thou the craft of nature. Lo ! for thee 
A comrade wise she moves, serenely sweet, 

With wilful prescience mocking sense of loss 
For us who mourn love's unreturning feet. 

Trust thou her wisdom, she will reconcile 

The faltering spirit to eternal change 
When, in her fading woodways, thou shalt touch 

Dear hands long dead and know them not as strange. 

For thee a golden parable she breathes 

Where in the mystery of this repose. 
While death is dreaming life, the waning wood 

With far-caught light of heaven divinely glows. 

Thou, when the final loneliness draws near. 
And earth to earth recalls her tired child, 

In the sweet constancy of nature strong 

Shalt dream again — how dying nature smiled. 



26- 






ON Tufr 



SHORE 




Courtesy New York Central Railroad 



The queenly Hudson circling at my feet 
Lingers to sing a song of joy and love, 

Pouring her heart in rippling wavelets sweet, 

Which, sun-kissed, glanced up to thy throne above. 

• — Kenneth Bruce. 



27 




Courtesy New York Central Railroad 



How soothing is this solitude 
With nature in her wildest mood. 



-JV. IFilson. 



28 




Cuortesy New York Central Railroad 



CATSKILL, N. Y. 



They have their romance too, their sweet romance 
Of Indian lovers, brave and true of soul; 
And fairy bands that loved the woodland paths, 
And held sweet revel on some moonlit knoll. 

—E. A. Lent. 



SWEET MEMORIES 



NO TIME LIKE THE OLD TIME. 



There is no time like the old time, 

When you and I were young, 
When the buds of April blossomed 

And the birds of springtime sung; 
The garden's brightest glories 

By summer suns are nursed. 
But, oh, the sweet, sweet violets, 

The flowers that opened tirst ! 

There is no place like the old place 

Where you and I were born, 
Where we lifted first our eyelids 

On the splendors of the morn ; 
From the milk-white breast that warmed us, 

From the clinging arms that bore, 
Where the dear eyes glistened o'er us 

That will look on us no more ! 

There is no friend like the old friend 

Who has shared our morning days, 
No greeting like his welcome, 

No homage like his praise ! 
Fame is the scentless sunflower 

With gaudy crown of gold. 
But friendship is the breathing rose 

With sweets in every fold. 

There is no love like the old love 

That we courted in our pride. 
Though our leaves are falling, falling. 

And we're fading side by side. 
There are blossoms all around us 

With the colors of our dawn. 
And we live in borrowed sunshine 

When the day star is withdrawn. 

There are no times like the old times ; 

They shall never be forgot. 
There is no place like the old place — ■ 

Keep green the dear old spot. 
There are no friends like our old friends — 

May heaven prolong their lives ; 
There are no loves like our old loves — 

God bless our loving wives I 

— Oliver Wendell Holmes. 



30 




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THE LAST LINK 




HEN it snaps — that last link — the sensation that comes over one is 
almost mortally depressing. 
'S Gfs '^ Was it not Campbell who wrote the "Last Man ?" and is it not 

easy for him who hears the snapping of the last link — the last link binding 
him to earth — to fully appreciate just how that "last man" felt? 

Away back yonder, fifty years ago, maybe, strong but tenderly loving hands 
took hold of you, a little lump of red, frowning humanity, and a voice trembling 
with joy, exclaimed. "A man child is born unto us. Let us rejoice." 

It was the hands of your father that so gently held you, and it was your 
father's voice that proclaimed the happy news of your advent into the strange 
old bitter-sweet that men call life. 

For years those hands pressed you close to the heart that loved you, and 
that voice crooned to you patiently and softly when you were fretful and 
peevish. 

You grew up to manhood, had trials of your own to encounter, were 
forced to meet the battle and the breeze, and, among other difficulties, found 
vourself growing old — ^for the man of fifty cannot be said to be young. 

But the dear old father lived on, a hale, hearty, happy old man, loving you 
as tenderly and beautifully as ever, and the love was returned, good measure, 
shaken down and running over, for your heart, though the heart of a man of 
fiftv, was still tenderly full of the old memories, and you felt as warmly toward 
him as you did when a little boy upon his knee. 

And the dear old man sent for vou one dav and told you that he was 
croing, and the dear old withered hands again took hold of yours, and the old 
familiar voice, trembling now with age. bade you "Good-by," and your best 
friend was no more. 

The last link was broken ! Destiny had pushed herself out into the mist- 
covered waters and left you standing absolutely alone upon the shore. You 
were the "last man," and under the silent heavens you could only feel: "How 
lonesome !" 

You may still have wife and friend and comrade, but no longer have you 
a father. Never again will you feel hands like those that half a century ago 
held you up to vour mother's gaze. No more will there sound for you a 
voice like that which in the long ago proclaimed the man child's entrance into 
life. 

And under the silent skies you plod along roaming about for days, maybe, 
in a "world not realized," stunned and dumbfounded in thinking of the "touch 
of the vanished hand and the sound of the voice that is still." 

Rev. Thomas B. Gregory. 




A PREACHMENT TO MONEY-MANIACS 



il^TfOU money-maniacs drive bad bargains. I know this, though I am only a 
T<i) fo dreamer. Though landless and homeless, I would not exchange estates. Keep 
fo4^^ your acres ; I am content with continents. Keep your fish-ponds ; I appropriate the 
seas. Travel ; visit Italy ; price it ; yet it is I who shall have, on American soil, the true 
Italian sunshine in my heart. Employ servants; yet all the generations of the past serve 
me. Buy wine, yet 1 shall drink a better beverage from the wayside spring. Cirow cor- 
pulent upon rich meats ; yet I shall find more nourishment in my crust of bread. In 
vain shall you buy books that you do not read, talk inanities that induce cmiiii, expound 
philosophies that you do not understand and theories that you do not believe. There is 
but one end — you shall come to doubt the veracity of your own soul. Then turn to me. 
You shall find me in the castle of dreams, on the river of Tranquillity, where the sunlight 
coins the fair earth into golden bloom ; aye, where laughing sunbeams turn to gold- 
finches and sing ceaselessly in the lilac hedges of pleasant thoughts. I shall lead you 
back to the gentleness of simplicity. Though you have consorted with the insincere, 
I shall make you companion to the unchanging immortals ; though }-ou have paid for 
happiness and purchased pain, I shall provide you freely the joy of a love unfailing; 
though you have revelled with lepers, I shall lead you to banquet with gods. The 
finest things of this world are priceless. Whatsoever you have that gold has bought 
is less than you might have had for the taking. 

BuRRiTT Hamilton. 




Reprinted from the " Broadway Magazine" 



34 



EARLY RAPID TRANSIT IN AMERICA 




Courtesy New York Central R. K. 

NNIHILATING space in any of 
the numerous "flyers'' which 
bisect our country, we forget 
that it is within the memory of living 
man to go back to those days when 
stage-coaching was the only pubhc 
means of travel on land. 

As early as 1816 there was quite a 
fleet of steamboats plying on the Hud- 
son and in New York Bay ; all of them 
built under Fulton's supervision. 

In our first illustration we show a 
picture of one of these early type of 
boats, side wheel pattern, and very 
closelv resembling the Fulton, save that 
it has two masts, while the Fulton had 
but one. Steam was such an uncertain 
quantity that sails were still needed to 
be used in case of accident, and also for 
speed. 

In 1 82 1 there were three boats in 
packet service on Long Island Sound, 



Illustrated by Photographs of Old Blue China. 





A Hudson River Pioneer (Plate No. 2). 



A Primitive Side Wheeler (Plate No. i). 

but this was after the death of Fulton,, 
w'ho did not live to see his greatest 
triumph, the Chancellor Livingston, 
completed. 

These boats were so successful that 
soon a line of steamers was projected 
to rim between New York and Albany 
and Troy. We give one of these, 
shown on a fine old plate, made by 
Enoch Wood and Sons, those famous 
English potters, who did so much in 
historic china for the American mar- 
ket. There is the well-known shell 
border, which is almost as sure a means 
of identification as the name "Wood" 
on the back. 

(3n the paddle-wheel house are the 
words, "L^nion Line." Apparentlv. 
docks were built only at the terminals 
of the route. Passengers who wished 
to get on at intermediate points were 
subjected to what seems to us amusing 
experiences. They were taken, with 



35 




Albany and the Hndson River I-'erry (Plate No. 3). 



tlieir luggage, from the shore to the 
stL-ainer in rowboats, and to save time, 
these boats ^\'ere propelled by a rope 
being passed about the paddle-wheel of 
the steamer which then made a few 
revolutions. It is unnecessary to say 
tiiat upsettings were frequent, and after 
using this ])riniitive method for a year 
or two. something less precarious was 
adopted. 

Sa\", for example, we have acconi- 
Dlished the trip up the Hudson without 
l)cing tipset. that oin* baggage is safe 
and dry and that we have duly admired 
the cit\- of Albany (shown in No. 3\ 
where i)rimitive methods of ferrying 
were still in use. We may proceed 
from thence by train, and enjoy the be- 
wildering experience of riding as fast 
as ten or twelve miles an hour, with an 
increase to fifteen, on favorable parts of 
the road. 

When the vStockton and Darlington 
Railway, in England, was o[)ened in September, 1825. the main line and its three branches 
were thirty-eight miles long. Stephenson drove the engine as the first train started, and 
an outrider on horseback went in advance to keep the track clear. 

In iS2i) three locomotives were imported to America, and one was tried at Hones- 
dale, Pennsylvania, upon the tracks of the Delaware and Hudson. It was soon found 
that they were ill adapted for use on Amer'can roads, where very sharj) turns were made. 
Peter Cooper, that same vear. devised an engine which overcame this difficulty. 

In 1830 the Mohawk and 
Hudson Railroad, running six- 
teen miles from Albany to 
Schenectady, was opened, and 
the cars were drawn bv horse > 
till the delivery of the "Dewit: 
Clinton" locomotive, which was 
built at the West Point foun- 
dry. New York. The first trip 
this engine made was on Au- 
gust 0, 1831. 

This was only the second 
locomotive built in the I'nited 
States. The first was made at 
the same shops for the South 
Carolina Railroad. The picture 
(No. 4) we show through the 
courtesy of W. P. Jcrvis, from 
his "Encycloi^jcdia of Ceramics." 
It is a rare i)latter and gives 
rn English ty])e of locomotive. 








( V- 



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f.jfeg^' 



X 



Rail 



roaum"' 



in tlie Mohawk ni Early Day^ (i'late No. 4). 



36 




The Old Stage-Coach Car (Plate No. 5). 



quite different from the little DeWitt 

Clinton. The next illustration (No. 5) 

shows a similar type, with coach pat- 
tern of car, with luggage carried on 

top. This plate is a bone of contention 

among collectors ; one side arguing that 

it is an English train, while their op- 
ponents call it the Baltimore and Ohio 

Railroad. It is unmarked, in which the 

platter (No. 4) has the advantage. 

being plainly marked "Albany and 

Schenectady Railroad." It is supposed 

to be made by the well-known firm of 

Ridgwavs, and also bears th'j letters 

"C. C."" 

From Schenectady, w-estward. we 

may take our choice of two means of 

travel, stage coach, or packet-boat on 

the canal. The commodious ""Red-bird," 

as well as boats on several rival lines, 

were plying on the canal, and people 

who wished to broaden their minds by 

travel frequently took the trip from Al- 

banv to Buffalo. In an old journal, there is the following item concerning the writer's 

first trip on the "big ditch:" '"CommentLnl my soul to Clod and asking his defense from 

danger, I stepped aboard the canal boat and was soon tiying towards Utica." If the 

dangers of the raging canal were too great to be braved, an outside seat on the stage 

coach gave one an opportunity to see the country. The driver of the stage, as well as the 

landlord of the public, were persons of great importance. Stage driving was hereditary 

— it went in families and descended from father to son. 

The journey from Boston to Provi- 
dence, a distance of forty miles, was 
made in four hours and fifty minutes. 
This was considered the acme of fast 
traveling, and an editorial on the per- 
formance says: "If anyone wishes to 
go faster, he may send to Kentucky and 
charter a streak of lightning !" 

They had exciting times on this 
line. The fare was three dollars, which 
was considered extortionate. A rival 
line was organized that charged but two 
dollars. Soon a merry '"cut-rate" war 
was raging, and each companv alter- 
nately reduced its fare by fifty-cent 
jumps, till the old line announced it 
would carry free those travelers who 
reached the starting place in time. 

Not to be downed in this way, the 
new line promised to carry its patrons 
free, and furnish a dinner at the jour- 
nex's end. 
A Boston Carriage of the Long Ago (Plate No. 6). 




37 



Tliis posed the old line for a time, then they. too. offered the cUnner and a bottle 
-of wine. For some time the controversy stood just here. Crowded stages were the rule 
•every day. Before either company was ruined they entered into a grand "combine,'' and 
'each signed a contract to carry passengers for two dollars a trip. 

In our last picture (No. 6) we show an elegant ])rivate carriage, before the Octagon 

'Church, Boston. We can fancy a modish belle going in it to some entertainment. Her 

gown of stiff brocade was made with a pointed body, very stiffly boned ; her kerchief of 

■cobweb lawn half conceals and half reveals her throat, while her fine leghorn is heavy 

■with ostrich illumes and adorned with a rich sprigged veil. 

It is almost with a feeling of regret that we chronicle the jjassing of those days of 
leisure. 

Tavern and tavern-keeper, stage-coach and one-horse chaise have all gone, never to 
return; what shall be chronicled eighty years from today? Will the next century effect 
such a wondrous evolution? 

X. Hudson ]\Ioore. 




THE OLD STONE HOUSE AT NEW FORT 
On the Robert B. Crowell estate at Wallkill, N. Y. 

(vSee page 92) 



38 



HUDSON ON THE HUDSON 



Courtesy New York Central R. R. 

By H. R. Bryan 





The Court House, at Hudson, New York. 



HE city of Hudson, on the east bank of 
the Hudson River, and originally known 
(sT^ as Claverack Landing, was settled in 
1783; its proprietors coming chiefly from Provi- 
dence and Newport, Rhode Island, and Nan- 
tucket and Edgarton, Massachusetts. One hun- 
dred and fourteen miles from New York and 
twentv-eight from Albany, it is the head of 
natural navigation on the Hudson River. Na- 
ture has been most kind, as a high bluff bounds 
the city on the river side, and a long slope east- 
ward gives one of the finest systems of sewer- 
age in the world. Under this bluff Henry Hud- 
son, with the "Half Moon," searching for a 
waterwav across the continent, anchored and 
from this fact the city has taken the name which 
it now bears. 




THE STATE ARMORY, AT HUDSON, NEW YORK. 



39 




The New City Hospital, at Hudson, New York. 



Hudson soon became noted for its 
shipping, and was formerly a whaling 
port of great importance. The Quakers, 
who settled here, intermarried with 
their Dutch neighbors, who had fol- 
lowed them to Hudson, and today 
Quaker and Dutch names still survive; 
and the Quaker meeting-house, and the 
Dutch Reformed Church, are remind- 
ers of the early traditions of this small 
but venerable city, which, in many 
things, still adheres to the conservatism 



of its founders. 

When the city was young many in- 
dustries selected Hudson as a site. The 
Steel Tired Wheel Company is one of 
the largest of the industrial concerns of Hudson today. The city's brewing interests 
have long been noted, and the extensive plants which furnish Evans' and Granger's ales, 
have brought world-wide fame to Henry Hudson's old anchorage. Lumber mills and 
tobacco factories continue to flourish, and, in later years, large knitting mills have been 
erected, a recent combination bringing tos^ether the two largest of these, under the name 
of "The Union Mills." 

The river front site which for so many years the Hudson Iron Company occupied, 
has been recently purchased for a cement plant ; the stone and clay, but a little distance 
back being admirably suited for this purpose. The plant proper will, when built, cost 
about a million of dollars and will be a model of its kind. 

Nature intended Hudson for an ideal home and manufacturing city. It is healthy, 
it is central, and living expenses are very moderate. The Hudson River furnishes a 
waterway to the north and south, and incomparable railway facilities afford first-class 
transportation for passengers and freight in all directions, while the immediate farming 
district is easily reached by a third-rail electric system. A mosquito fleet of small steam 
yachts brings the neighboring towns on the river into close and convenient relations and 
the prosperous village of Athens, on the opposite bank of the Hudson, is reached by 
frequent ferry. Desirable building and residence sites are in the market at fair values, 
and the manufacturing advantages, which this city of ten thousand offers, are sure and 
substantial. Labor troubles are unknown ; Hudson, in its life of nearly a century and a 
quarter, never having had a single strike. 

An improved railroad service has brought Hudson into competition with the suburban 
towns of New York, and shopping and theatre parties frequently take advantage of the 
reduced rates and make excursions for the day. The shrewd real estate experts are buy- 
ing further from New York, as they read in the present demand for suburban property, a 
reasonably sure failure of supply in the immediate future. 

Hudson's taxes are moderate : her fire department a source of great pride ; her police 
force a credit : and her public schools so nearly a model, that cities many times the ten 
thousand of Hudson profit from a study of the system which has accomplished such 
great results. 

In public buildings few places of her size can compare. The State House of Refuge 
for Women, a state armory, recently erected ; a modern jail, a hundred-thousand dollar 
court house, just completed: the State Firemen's Home, a new city hospital, which will 
accommodate forty patients : a Y. M. C. A. building, with bowling alleys ; Masonic Tem- 
ple, the Hendrick Hudson D. A. R. chapter house, the Hudson Orphan Asylum, and the 
home for the aged are but a few of them. 



40 



ECHOES FROM SLEEPY HOLLOW 



By Mixxa Irving. 




"The old Dutch Church rises before you wrapped 
in memorial shadows." 



CT7ARRYTOWN is a place with a 
^J(^^ past — an historic past, full of 
Cq1<^ quaint traditions and quainter 
legends. Like an old man it is always 
looking back and living over again the 
days of its youth, delighting to tell the 
stranger within its gates long-winded 
tales of the Revolution, and of Washing- 
ton Irving, who may fitly be called its 
patron saint. But it is a charming place for 
a day's outing with lunch box and cam- 
era — an outing from which you will re- 
turn saturated with ancient lore, and 
feeling as if you had made the personal 
acquaintance of Ichabod Crane and 
Katrina Van Tassel. 

You will be very tired though, if you 
have walked, for unlike Rome, Tarry- 
but from everv hill 



a glorious view of 



town is built on nearer seventy than seven hills 
the winding Hudson is to be had. 

Barring Sunnyside, which is nearer Irvington than Tarrytown, the principal places 
of interest are to be found in the upper village of North tarrytown, where lies the 
famed Sleepy Hollow country. At Broadway the trolley car goes whizzing "over the 
hills and far away," and the sightseer must foot it from that point on to the historic scenes. 

Walking along under the spreading trees a public school is seen on the right. Here, 




TARRYTOWN ON THE HUDSON, THE llICxHLAXDS IN THE DISTANCE. 



41 



until a sliort time ago, stood the old Alutt House, half wood, half stone, in true colonial 
style, and primly set in box-bordered lawns and ancient apple trees. When it was the 
\ an Tassel Inn it was the scene of a tea-party (ine golden autuiun afterncjon in 1780, 
when the British sloop-of-war "\atlture," loitering down the river, sent a random shot 
soaring over the tow'n, and struck the door-jamb, scattering the merrymakers. A deflec- 
tion of a few inches would have sent the ball crashing squarely among the teacups and 
guests. For many years it was shown to visitors, where it lav embedded in the wooden 
jamb, a mute but eloquent, witness of Arnold's treason. 

A little further on the Andre monument stands, enclosed bv an iron fence, and shaded 
by giant trees. The base is unworthy of the statue, which is a fine bronze figure of 
Paulding, with gun in hand, and head turned as if listening, ever listening for the 
approach of the spy. 

Down a long, dusty, white road, past a yard piled up with headstones, heaps of them 
in every color, shape and size, and over a l)ridge, the Old Dutch Church rises before you, 
wrapped in memorial shadows and clustered thick with graves. A scramble over the 
rough stone wall and a peep in at the w^indows reveals the interior, where Dutch lads 
and lassies met to worship in bygone Summers. Visions of fresh young faces, in coal- 
scuttle bonnets, hover over the high-backed narrow pews, and you feel that a faint fra- 

. grance of lilacs and apple-blossoms, worn on youth- 
ful bosoms, must yet linger in the high gallery where 
the members of the choir lifted their voices long ago 
If you have time to hunt up the sexton, the old 
'1 church books are well worth perusal. In them are 
recorded the births, the deaths and the marriages of 
the early settlers, all written down in a fearful and 
wonderful language, compounded of badly spelled 
Dutch and English, and rivaling Volapuk. Johannus, 
Petrus and Henirens are easily understood as John, 
Peter and Henry, and Catrina Aeike married to 
Abram ]\Iartling, August 13th, 1762, is quickly trans- 
lated into Catherine Acker, but Maritic and Aetic, 
names frequently bestowed on girl-babies, are riddles 
hard to solve. 

The headstones in the old graveyard, too, are a 
^tudy — slabs of brown sandstone, covered w^ith gray 
lichens and carved wdth winged cherub-heads and 
weeping willows. The sunken graves give treacher- 
ously underfoot, for there is nothina- Init dry dust 
below. Close to the church door a silent sleeper in- 
forms you that he w^s brou"-ht all the way from Pitts- 
burgh to be buried there. Beyond him, some distance 
from the well-trodden footpath, is the grave or Isaac 
Martling, witli its accusing inscription like a voice 
from the tomb crying murder, for more than a hun- 
dred vears. 

''Air. Isaac Martline who was inhumanly slain by 
N'athaniel Underbill, May 26th, 1779, in the 30th year 
of his asre." 

Following the footpath up the hill into the new 

remeterv we come to \Vashinoton Irvine's plot, with 

its flight of granite steps and plain white marble 

The Paulding-Andre Alonunient at stone. Returning over the bridge, an idyllic picture 

Tarrvtown. 




42 



\ 



\ 




THE TOTTERING OLD MILL IX SLEEPY HOLLOW. 

of the tottering old mill is presented. Before it sleeps the stream, stagnant among reeds 
and rushes and fringed with willows, while the crumbling roof is patched with moss, and 
the weather-blackened walls seem just about to topple into the water. 

At the corner of Broadway and Elizabeth Street stands the church where Irving 
was a vestryman, and which bears on its front a marble tablet to his memory. A similar 
tablet is set in the wall above his pew, in which it is a signal honor for a stranger to be 
seated Sundays. The ivy which Irving brought overseas from Abbotsford and planted 
at the foot of the church tower still flourishes greenly, the favorite haunt of innumerable 
chattering sparrows. 

A trip to Sunnyside must be deferred until another day, as by this time the sun is low 
over the Tappan Zee, and the shadows are lone on the lawns by the way. And so we 
reluctantl}' bid farewell to "Sleepy Hollow's haunted vale." 




43 




TH1{ EGYPTIAN OBELISK 



I'.v A XX A S. Harlax 

7|liE celebrated Egyptian obelisk, which was brought to 
i(P New York City and re-erected in Central Park in 1881, 
(sp is a subject of Surpassing interest to Americans, as well 
as to foreign travelers in this country, who visit the park and 
do honor to this great and venerable guest. It stands on a beau- 
tiful elevation, just west of the Metropolitan Museum of Art 
and Antiquities, surrounded by pleasant walks and drives, and 
is most conveniently reached "from the Fifth Avenue entrance 
to the park. 

The monument was a gift from Ismail Pasha. Khedive of 
Eg}-pt, to the city of New York, although its removal from the 
old' world to the new was variously opposed, and attended with 
many difficulties. It is a rose-colored granite shaft, sixty-nine 
feet in height and weighing two hundred and twenty tons. 

The removal of the obelisk to this continent — an interesting 
and gigantic undertaking- — was intrusted to Lt.-Com. H. H. 
Gorringe, of the United States Xavy. European countries had 
established and followed the precedent of building vessels ex- 
Ijresslv for the transportation of these massive monoliths, but 
in no case were the voyages of such vessels wholly successful. 
It was. therefore, decided to save the time which would be re- 
([uired for the construction of such a vessel, by the use, in this 
instance, of an ordinary steamship. The steamer "Dessoug" 
was accordingly purchased from the Egyptian government, and 
entirely refitted and repaired. A temporary aperture 
was made in the bow of the shiji, through wdiich the 
obelisk was eml)arked, and the removed portions of the 
vessel were then replaced. It will be seen that the en- 
tire work of removing our obelisk from its place in 
Alexandria, Egypt, to its present location in Central 
Park, required the finest of engineering skill, and it was 
in every wav successfully accomplished. The amount 
expended, $103,732, was borne entirely by the late W. 
H. Vanderbilt. 

In order to fully appreciate the value of this obelisk 
in the light either of art or anti([uity. it i? necessary to 
become to some extent familiar with the history of an- 
cient Eg>'])t, which, but for parts preserved on monu- 
ment and toml), must have forever remained an un- 
comprehended volume and, like her ruins, buried beneath 
die sands of the desert. 

Thothmes III, whose rei^n sixteen centuries before 



44 



Christ, covered the most glorious period of Egyptian history, celebrated his power by 
founding a multitude of new temples. He also restored the ancient Temples at Heliopolis 
— City of the Sun, which is the On of Genesis. Its ruins are a very short distance from 
Cairo. He adorned the entrance of the temple with new obelisks, hewn from the quar- 
ries of Syene, whence is derived the common term syenite. The location of the place, 
now called Assouan, is at the First Cataract of the Nile, which, it will be observed, fur- 
nished a waterway for the transportation of the monuments. 

The Central Park obelisk was one of four similar stones placed before the Temple 
of the Sun — the abode of the sun-god, Ra, the deity preeminently worship in the Egyptian 
religion. Heliopolis was also the center of elegant learning and science of that time, 
and with it are associated the names of early philosophers and familiar biblical characters. 

Obelisks were the attributes of temples, and not themselves worshiped. As shown by 
the hieroglvphs with which they are inscribed, they were dedicated to the various deities. 
and intended to eternalize the names of rulers. It is to be regretted that the records of 
those times throw so little light upon the actual labor and method of quarrying and set- 
ting- up these giant stones, to say nothing of the genius of those wdio wTOUght the char- 
acters thereon. 

After the Roman con(|uest of "the dark land," two of the obelisks referred to were 
carried from Heliopolis to .Alexandria, which had then become the foremost city of 
Eevpt. Since that time thev have been known as "Cleopatra's Needles," in commemo- 
ration of that famous woman who. despite the Roman emperor, died a queen. Cleopatra 
doubtless, originallv suggested the removal of the monuments, although it was not accom- 
plished until several vears after her death. For this reason, her right to remembrance 
throuo'h them has been disputed. 

Our obelisk stood on the receding sh )re of Alexandria for about nineteen hundred 
vears, and until it was rcn^oved to the United States. Its inscriptions contain the signa- 
tures of Egvpt's greatest kines — Thothmes III, Rameses II, and Seti I — with vainglorious 
recitals of their individual achievements. Yet. above the vanity of the Pharaohs, is the 
eloquent voice of Time eulojizine- the art of the early Egvptian, and his striving for the 
ennoblement of the human rare t^irouch the re-creation of voung and beautiful forms. 

Honor this. O Land of the Pharaohs and of the double crown ! — the adopted of 
Joseph, the birthplace of Alo-es ; — land of the fabled Phoenix, and the Nile, we thank 
thee: first example of the world — pointing out the fate of nations — whose temples, soar- 
ino- heavenward in the morning, are no\v but ruins silhouetted against an evening sky 
Wonderfid land of the i)ast. over which "the Sphinx gazes forever, but never speaks!" 




45 






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■■0 



MOHONK, IN SOLITUDE. 



All day had the snow come down, — all day 

As it never came before ; 
And over the hills, at sunset, lay 

Some two or three feet, or more. 



— Eastman. 



59 




SMS 



ifmummmi 



THK OLD FARM HOME 

Homesick? AA'cll, no, not exactly that, 

I was onl\" just wishing- that I could o-o liack 

And look around the old farm for a day. 

To see if its chanL^ed nuich since I went away; 

To sec if the old home looks much the same, — 

If the harn and the stahles still reuiain 

As they did years aij,"o, when I was youn_<;-, 

Before my flight with the world had l)eiiun. 

1 would just like to run through the meadow again, 

And let down the l)ar> at the end of the lane, 

And call to the cows: — Come liossv, come Spot. 

Come White-face and LlrintUe, come Daisy and Dot, 



60 



I can sec them all now, as i)lainl\- as when 

I followed them home in the gloaming. And then 

Snch milk — ( )h ! what wonld I not give for it now, 

That warm frothy milk, from the old llrindle Cow. 

I wonld so like to lie for an honr in the shade 

Of the hig chestnnt trees, where John and I played. 




COWS COMING lleXME. 



We were Intlians hold in the wikl, wild west. 

Where we chased the gay sqnirrels, and spied ont the nest 

Of the blackl)irds and crows, that indled the corn, 

And cawed ns awake in the gray early morn ; 

And we started ont to begin the new^ day 

As blithe as the breezes, as care-free and gay. 



6i 



I would just like to climb to the hilltop a.^ain 
And drink in the beauty of mountain and plani. 
As they sprearl out before me. a picture so fau" 
The heart is enrai)tured, — the eye follows where 
Bright glints of the beautiful Wallkill are seen. 
Like a silverv ribbim entwining between 







WALLKILL RIVER, MONTGOMERY. 



Courtesy of L. H. Ta't. 



Green meadows and woodlands. — past homesteads so dear, 

While far to the north the blue Catskills appear. 

And oh ! to sleep up in the attic once more. 

And watch the bright moonbeams at play on the floor, 

Or, listen again to the pattering rain 

That lulled me to sleep with its sw^eet refrain. 



62 



And then to wake up at the call of the birds. 

And, rushing downstairs, hear the old glad words, 

"Good morning" — sweet greeting, from voices now' stilled. 

Oh! with memories tender, my heart is filled. 

Homesick? Well, yes, — I'm surely just that; 

I'm wishing, I'm longing some day to go back, 







■'fi 






VIEWS OF ^lOXTCxOMERY VILLAGE 

Reprinted from Picturesque Montgomery. 



Far away from the city, its jostle and greed, 
Its extreme of wealth and its dire abject need; 
Back, back to the peace of that valley enchanted. 
Sun-kissed, and dew-bathed, — with God's promise implanted 
In blossoming orchard, and billowing grain ; 
Where His sweet benediction delights to remain. 

— Carolyn M. Walker. 

Hackensack, N. J., February 20, 1907. 



63 



ALMOST MARRIED 



]'>\ loiix W'li/iSEE Li:e 



au.uhtcr of tlie Palatines, address- 
where the En2f- 



i 



S the war never i^onii;- to endr asked a t)UX()ni < 
T^IS in,^- her eonipanion. who chvelt on tlie otlier side of the Wallkih 
(sTto^ hsh element ])redoininated. . 

"After e'oin.u- on so manv years it will hardh- stop of itself. Miss Xanehie. hut 
Lord Cornwallis. T fanev. will soon end it to the satisfaction of those who sent him," 

re])lied George lUack- 
Inn-n, whose Tory feeling 
\' as so strong as to make 
the conrse of his love run 
anxthing hut smooth, at 
times, when his affianced 
thought such harangues 
worth rehuke. 

"]5etter a thirty 
\'ears' war. as my fore- 
fathers had at home, than 
such an ending!" gravely 
sjjoke Xanehie House- 
lander. 

"They fought for a 
free conscience and a free 
r.ihle, and I honor them, 
hrt this is a rel)ellion 
against the 'Protector of 
h'aith." Women cannot 
expect to understand 
these things, however.'' 

"I understand enough, 
(k^orge Plackhurn, to 
know that thev settled 





I 



V ' 




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J 


i 



MOXTC.OMI'.RY 



WAIXKILL R1\'1-:R, 

Reprinted t'lom Picturesque Montgomery 

for all time the i)rinci])le of imlividnal sovereignty, and so perhaps we had hetter part 
in ])eace," darkly hinted the indignant damsel. 

It was in the s])ring. and the river was high and rising to a freshet, as tliey rode 
thus discoursing. Wdien the\- had neruiy reached Ward's P.ridge at Montgomery (whose 
ruins remain) lie si)oke to turn her thoughts, and wished thev were over. 

"Xo! T wish I could always stay on this side," X\anchie j^ersisted, "there are too 
many Tories nwr th.ere. and Tories are traitors." 

Just then circumstances over which the\- had no control put an end to a dispute 
which might have ])rove(l disastrous. Going on the hridge. the water had reached the 
huhs of the wheels, hut going oiT it rose vet higher, and he fore they thought of danger, 
the swift current took their horse off his feet, and swe]3t them down the stream. They 
w'ere \et on the flats, and if the struggling steed could be guided awav from the 
'•haimel. or toward the shore, all might he well, v^o thinking, Plackhurn leaped over on 



64 




headlong in 



THOMPSON'S POND 



his hack to loosen the 
check-rein, and h o 1 d 
him more in hand, but 
Sorrel dissented, and 
sent him 
the tvirgid water. 

Directly she saw her 
lover in peril, her love 
returned in force; and 
crying to him to save 
himself (which he did) 
and not mind the horse 
or her ( which he did 
not think of doing), 
she seized one of the 
reins, and nearly pulled 
the pony's head off his 
shoulders. It happened 
to be the one next the 
shore, and brought him 
in swimmingly. T h e 
gig was light, and a 
few convulsive strokes 
carried '"' . to where he 
could touch bottom. Then, with a snort and a shiver, he sprang up the Dank, shaking the 
harness till all rattled ; and had it not been for her soaking feet, Nanchie would scarcely 
have realized the strange sail she had tak.'u. A few minutes" drive, and they were at 
their journey's end, but the chill did not reach their heart, which warmed as of old to- 
ward each other, and when they parted, it was agreed with many a kiss and as many 
blushes that their nui)tials should be celebrated in the church on the following Sunday. 

It is a picturesque spot where the old Dutch Reformed brick church stood then, and 
where the new American Reformed brick church stands now, with the graveyard sloping 

down from it, and at the foot of 

the hill below the parsonage the 
river winding along from the south 
through the \'alley of the Wall- 
kill. Far at the north stretches 
the blue range of the Shawangunk ; 
nearer by the Comfort Hills hide 
the sun in its setting, and awa}' to 
the eastward loom the loftier peaks 
along the Hudson. There is peace 
in the picture, loveliness in the 
landscape and ever there 

The old. half-forgotten, and beautiful 

daj's, 
Come out of their graves in the iwi- 

. light haze, 
And the trees of our youth's renewed 

to our eyes. 
In the shaoes of the elms hung out on 

the skies. 

And thev were a hardv race of 




mm00r 



ym'AlUULLRIVm ^^ . 



GRIST MILL AND DAM 



65 



pioneers who ])o?sesseti the land, patriotic from instinct, and loyal to liberty by all the 
memories of their liome across the <ea, or ever a rnthless decree of Romish ilk had 
depopnlated a whole district, and made them "Exiles of the Palatine.'' When the strug- 
o-le came with Britain, there was bnt one side for the sons of such sires to take, and all 
Throno-h those srloomy " years they remembered the Prince of Orange only as a type of the 
great leader Providence had given America. 

\\'hat had a Torv. acting in the sacred relation of Pastor, to do with such a people? 
This was a question they had often asked themselves; but though slow to move, their 
sudden and decided choice gave a worthy answer. 

Al)Out that time the Divine Wither^ooon was ■■])reaching politics" in the Conti- 
nental Congress. Tlie i'astors of New England did not go back on the later practice 





BELOW THE DAM 

of their Apostolic successors ; and all the clergw save a few of the Church of England 
in our ow^i province, preached the duty of resistance, and the glory of sustaining the 
noble declaration of their brethren at the Capitol, especially in the Dutch and Scotch 
Presbyterian churclies of New' York City, in the very face of the British General's staff 
and retinue. If the Pastors of that age had not l)een f(nmd on the side of right and 
heroism the returning wave of victory would have swept them ofi the pulpits they dis- 
graced, and away from the flocks they had betrayed. 

Thanks to the preaching and practice of John Knox and Martin Luther, and other 
bishops of the Catholic Church long ago, our clergy are not in bonds to speak or forbear 
at the nod of any Master General. Thanks to the heroism of "profane priests" (copperly 
so called), such as they wdio uttered no uncertain sound and stood not aloof from the 
liattle, upon a free American conscience rests a freer reindjlic than Sidney ever sketched, 
or the Greek dreamed of. AH honor to their memories; and to the ministers of our 
days, wdio honored their high vocation by rousing and directing the patriotism of the 
people, and rebuking the craven spirit of cavillers, sympathizers, Tories and traitors at 
the North; and to those wln^ stand up now in the name of Christ where he has placed 



66 



them, and, like Isaiah, denounce the enemies of the unity of the Catholic Church, of a 
security to Life and Property, and of the purity and integrity of the Republic, in spite 
of all the threats of all the slaves of all the Rings and kings in Christendom. 

There is a struggle on us now that will test the strength and mettle of the men of 
our time more sternly than did the Rebellion, the stability of the government, with no 
neutral ground for Cowboys and Skinners. The American church is a unit on the side 
of right. Let all her pulpits resound with words of righteous indignation and warnings 
of inspiration. 

"It's war we're in, not politics, 
It's systems wrestling now, not parties, 
And Victory in the end will fix 
Where strongest will and truest heart is." 

But to return to the A'allev of the Wallkill : 




A CHARMING RETREAT IN THE HILLS. 

The blood of bayoneted friends and neighbors was even then calling to them from 
the reeking ruins of Fort Montgomery ; in the light of flames the foe had kindled along 
the shore of Leister disafifected neutrality could no longer lie hidden, and they had vainly 
told him to go in peace, and leave them to fight the friends he left behind, till they joined 
him over the water. 

The whole country was roused by late reverses, and more militiainen were summoned 
to join the army of the North. Among these were Dederick Shafer who, without avail, 
had sought to win the hand of Nanchie against the more solid attractions of his rival, 
but solacing himself with the thought Byron had not vet embalmed in verse, that 



67 



Maidens, like mollis, arc ever caught by glare, 

And iManini.in wins liis way where Seraphs might despair. 

he Invckled on his armor, and li-htly l)a(le her make a patriot of her lover before he came 

back ai^aiii. , , , , . i u ^ ^i 

To New Windsor, wiience the recrtiits were to take boat, he hastened; bttt the 
^loop had left with a fair wind, and was already out of sight aliove the Danskammer. 
\'ainlv he fell back to a higher standpoint, near what is now Ab.unt Ellis, a knoll from 
whicli the whole sweep of the sparkling water for miles was visible, with the green- 
wooded Matteawan Range and l\»lipers Isl.nnd in the wondrous background, and south- 
ard, through the clustering cedars, the narrow gorge that takes on the look of a Swiss 



\\ 




MONTGOMERY ACADEMY 

lake below where the jutting headland of the Tloterberg thrusts its bold front out into- 
the channel, as if it still remembered the ancient time before the great Inland Sea had 
cloven its way through the highlands. Hill and dale, field and forest, mountain and 
moorland, rock and river ! ITow they were mingled by the Alaker, so that man had but 
to enter the charmed ])recincts. and enjoy an eternal banquet of beauty. 

i!ut without Nanchie it would be no paradise for him. however perfect in all its 
elements. There was not much ti) draw him back, but everything to urge him onward. 
So on foot and alone he started, and with his musket on his .shoulder, marched along 
the river till many miles above he passed the sloo]) becalmed, and reached the rendezvous 
before his regiment. 

There he reported to General Jessup, who had been ordered to scour the country 
along the r])])er Hudson, and was restless under the enforced delav. Hearing of their 
misfortune, lie would wait no longer for the "Orange Blossoms." but taking Dederick, 
and the little band alreadv mustered in, moved northward near the Adirondacks. 

Around the Great Falls he scouted stealthily, for his forest foes were fierce and 
sleepless. lUit the continual thundering of the roaring water drowned the noise of Indian 



68. 







/^ZwfoifK- 



I'.nich' rin'h>(jf 






foot-falls, and entranced by the 
wild sublimity of this haunt of na- 
ture, his customary vigilance was 
abated. From an overhanging clitT 
on the bank some rods above the 
cataract, the General and Dederick, 
whom he had made his orderly, were 
watching the foaming rapids and 
scanning the massive masonry, earlier than Solo- 
n-ion's, that has budded a flume through which the 
mighty Hudson runs no wider than the Bronx; 
when suddenly sounded the war-whoop close be- 
side them, and together they sprang down the 
jagged side of the mountain, and over the rocky 
shore flew to rejoin their comrades in camp be- 
low. 

Their Indian pursuers knew better than they 
into what peril they were rushing, and shoutecl, 
sure of their prey. Just below, a precipitous blufif 
would cut off their further retreat, for it was white 
with the spray. Here the river dashes a hundred 
feet over the Granite Ledges, and only pours itself 
above through a deep rock-gorge, very narrow for 
it to flow through, though too wide for a man to 
leap over. 
But turning suddenly, the General darted down the stone terraces, that rise like 
the seats of a Roman amphitheatre, and in full sight of friends and foes, leapt the chasm, 
and was up the eighty 
stone steps on the west 
side, before a single ar- 
row was sped — only hear- 
ing a grunt of compli- 
ment to his prowess, 
which no one of his for- 
mer pursuers seemed in- 
clined to imitate, and no 
one to this day has imi- 
tated, so that the Hat 
pave on which he won a 
footing has come to be 
known as Jessup's Land- 
ing, and will be forever. 
No sooner had their 
astonishment su b s i d e d 
than the disappointed red- 
skins searched long in 
everv nook for Dederick. 
trampling the wild flow- 
ers that grew out of the 
crevices, and rolling down 
the hillside hu^e boulders 




UNION STREET. MONTGOMERY. 



69 



to drive him from anv liidinQ- place. The wonderful escape ot the one, and stdl more mys- 
terious vanishincr of the other, be^an to work upon their mnate superstition, and prepared 
the way for their easy capture ; when from above, at the head of the band he had aroused 
to action (after passing so unnoticed and invisible through the midst of the awestruck 
savages), Dederick appeared again, and flanked them effectually. 

Xanchie Houslander had heard of this feat of her old suitor, and she halt regretted 
that in following her he had not shown the half ardm- displayed in the pursuit of the 
enemy. But she had chosen; and as she had said to herself: "What was Dedenck to 
her now but one she could not help honoring as a brave soldier and a staunch adherent 
of the Continental Congress?" ,• , , ,, ^ a 

The day of the wedding came clear and beautiful, and the httle bell Oueen Anne 
had given the Exiles pealed out over the field and forest, calling the worshipers. From 




GOD'S ACRE, OLD BRICK CHURCH, MONTGOMERY 

a circuit of miles, and by every road, they came, and before the hour of service the Green 
Avas covered with eager knots of talkers and listeners. No one seemed to care to go 
within, and all were waiting for something — the most for the arrival of the weddeners, 
and a few stern men on the doorsteps for the coming of the minister. 

Then the farm wagon of the Houslanders was driven up with the blooming Nanchie 
therein, well supported by sundry sisters ; afterward George Blackburn dashed among the 
crowd with his gig with a vacant seat for the bride in prospect, and full of visions of the 
grand "In fair'' his people would give her on the evening of the morrow^ Last of all 
the priest came also. 

Wondering at the concourse out of doors, as a low hum announced his presence, yet 
looking neither to the right hand nor the left, he walked under the archway. But there 



70 



was a bar to his progress. That church u^as closed on him fovcicr. Then turning him- 
self, he saw grave men of the Great Consistory standing near with a look sad but de- 
termined. 

"What does this mean?" he asked angrily. 

"It means that your friends are our enemies, and while the road to Xcw York is 
open vou had better take it !" slowly spoke a man on the steps of the portico. 

The blood shed at Fort Clinton had roused the lion, and instant tiight alone saved the 
Tory Dominie from the lion's paw. A glance over the field convinced him that discretion 
was the better part of valor, and, smothering his rage, he mounted his horse and rode 
away, shooting out his flaming eyes a farewell sermon, which none took to theiuselves, as 
usual. So left in the lurch the bride and groom, that were to be, subsided into ordinary 
people, and began to discuss the events of the morning. 

"It was basely done,"' said George, "to insult him thus openly." 

"It was well done," retorted Xanchie. "Such a domineering Dominie would not take 




WALLKILL RIVER AXD CHURCH SPH^E, MONTGO.AIERY. 

a hint that was not as wide as a broadsword." Drawing back she noticed an officer's 
uniform. 

"The Dutch Boors !'' hissed the Tory s_\'mpathizer, before he thought in whose pres- 
ence he was speaking. 

"Yes !" The same Dutch Boors who flooded their homes to keep out the armies of 
a tyrant, and the minions of a Pope ; who afterward went over at the call of vour Lords 
and Commons, and put their prince on the Stuarts' throne in order to save the rights 
England boasts today ; and who, wherever they are, will help keep the jewel of Liberty 
in the family of freedom." 

Blackburn looked up amazed to meet the steady gaze of Dederick Shafer. 

The place was growing too hot for him. His insulted betrothed had moved away 
with her friends, leaving him to the tender mercies of the "Boors." and there was nothing 
for him to do but follow the example of his illustrious predecessor. Solitary and alone, 
he rode hastily awav in the gig that was destined never to carry the fair form of the un- 
forgiving Nanchie Houslander. She never changed her name ; and if she ever regretted 
"what might have been," Dederick did not. 



71 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 

OF THE 

WALLKILL VALLKY FARMERS^ ASSOCIATION 



\',\ William C. Hart 



Q-^ 




■ a session of the Board of 1 )iM.'ctors of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association held at 
W'alden. N. Y., May i8, 1907, the Secretary. WilHam C. JIart, was requested to prepare 
an historical sketch of the Society, to he i)ul)lished in tlie Annual Souvenir of the Wallkill 
and liudson River Valleys, in coniplia xx- with that re(iuest, the following has been 
written : 
On a delightful autunnial da.\- in 1SS9. the late Chauncey A. Reed suggested to the writer 
the advisal)ility of the farnu-rs of the Wallkill Valley uniting in an effort to secure the 
appointment of a h'armers" institute, to he held under the auspices of the New York State Depart- 
ment of h'armers' institutes. An hnur later, in consultation with Nicholas J. Fowler, it was decided 
to invite representative agriculturists to meet at hi-- ofifice on the evening of November 11, at which 

lime a local society would be formed. The 
result of this meeting was highly satisfac- 
tory. William C. Weller was appointed 
Chairman. William C. Hart, Secretary, and 
Nicholas J. Fowler, Treasurer, with com- 
mittees on finance, music, addresses, etc. On 
November 2^, at an adjourned meeting, the 
execnti\e committee reported an enrollment 
of one hundred and sixty-eight members, with 
liberal responses in contributions to defray 
expenses. 

The Institute held at Scofield Hall, De- 
ceml)er ig, 20 and 21, proved successful be- 
yond the anticipations of its promoters and 
immediately suggested the desirability of 
fdrniing a permanent organization. The idea 
was greatly strengthened on February 10 at 
Coldenham, N. Y., wdien Mr. George T. Pow- 
ell of Cdieiit, N. Y., gave a stirring address 
on the imi)ortance of carrying forward the 
nidvenient. which appealed strongly to all. 
At this meeting Mr. J. D. W. Krebs read by 
request a Constitution and By-Laws, which 
was ad(i])tL'il by the members present. A glee 
chil). under the direction of Mr. Edwin 
Knaiip, furnished excellent music. Thus 
started the mnvement which has resulted in 
the present organization — an association that 
has done more to unfold the beauty and 
charm of the Wallkill Valley and spread its 
f.air name to remote localities than all efforts 
l)Ut forth by similar attempts in this direc- 
tion. We believe that as we describe the 
progress of this work that it will be a pleas- 
ant reminder to ,all wlio have witnessed the 
life of the .Association. 




THF OLD O.AKKN BITKFT 



TABULATED LIST OF DIRFXTORS 



Joseph B. Hadden 1893 — 1899 

Isaiah W. Decker 1893 — 1907 

John D. Mould 1893 — 1907 

Harvey N. Smith 1893 — 1902 

Arthur McKinney 1893 — 1900 

William C. Hart 1893 — 1907 

George W. Folsom 1893 — 1900 

Robert B. Crowell "893 — 1907 

Edwin Knapp : 893 — 1904 

P. E. Haukins 1900 — 1907 

Adam Fetter 1903 

Jonas Dubois 1893 — 1904 

John Ahrens 1893 — 1907 

George B. Andrews 1893 — 1900 

William Dunn -893 — 1907 

H. S. Burrell 1893 

Cyrus A. Bowne 1 895 — 1907 

William C. Weller 1^95—1899 

John P. Covert 1 896 — 1902 

A. S. Embler 1896— 1898 

Charles D. Wait '897—1907 

William N. Dubois 1897 — 1900 

Jesse Booth 1*^97 — iQOi 

Charles E. Stickney i '^97^1901 

Samuel FI. Knapp 1898 — 1904 



Lewis Woolsey 1898—1907 

W. H. Hallock 1898— 1907 

W. S. Flartshorn 1898 — 1907 

Horace D. Thompson 1899 

Frank Garrison 1899 

Ralph LeFevre 1900 

P. E. Hawkins 1900 — 1907 

Edward B. Walker 1900 — 1906 

C. E. Alliston 1900 

Adam Wiley 1901 — 1897 

Charles Sears iQOi — 190S 

Lewis Borden 1901^ — 1907 

Anson J. Fowler 1901 — 1905 

J. M. Hawkins 1902 — 1907 

Asher Johnson 1903 — 1907 

Elting Harp 1903 — 1907 

John H. Reid 1903 — 1907 

Philip Hasbrouck 1904 — 1907 

John K. Brown 1904 — 1907 

Allen Bryson 1905 — 1907 

Samuel V. Schoonmaker 190S — 1907 

Charles S. Wells 1906—1907 

William T. Snider 1906 — 1907 

Harry Seely 1906 — 1907 



OFFICERS 1889-1907. 



1889— W 
1900 — W^ 
1891— 
1892— 
1S93— 
1894— J. 
1895— 
1896— 

1897— 
1898— 
1899- 
1900 — I. 
1901 — 
1902 — E. 
1903 — L. 
1904— I. 
1905— 
1906 — ■ 
1907— 



PRESIDENT. VICE-PRESIDENT. 

C. Weller, Chairman. 
. C. Weller... J. K Brown 



SECRETARY. TREASURER. SUPERINTENDENT 

W. C. Hart N. J. Fowler....^. W. Decker. 



" " " W. H. Gillispie. 

'• . . . .R. B. Crowell W. C. Hart . . . 

B. Hadden... G. W. Folsom " " .... 

" ....T. D. Mould " " ..., 

" ....J. P. Covert " " ..., 

"... H. N. Smith " " . . . , 



W. Decker 



B. Walker... W. FI. Dunn., 
M. Borden... J. W. Decker. 

W. Decker.... A. Wiley 

" ....J. K. Brown.. 



.C. R. Fowler... 
. \. S. Embler. . . 
.A. J. Fowler. . . . 



. vv . 


a 




a 




u 




a 




a 




a 




a 




a 




•' 


S. H. 


Knapp 




a 




a 




a 


a 


li 


" 


(i 


\ Wilev 


ti 


a 



73 



i i 

^ n 

I OBJECTS OF ORGANIZATION % 

8 i 

% The rcalirjotion of the iiiesfiuiable majesfy: the unspeakable goodness of •:•: 

::•: God as revealed in tliis nian'elons zvllev, fJuis indireefly leading tlie thought of :•:: 

;•:• " " ^ '■<■•. 

:•:• humanity into tlic vaUe\s and rii ers of life eternal. :•:: 

:X "^ •' ' :♦ 

W :^ 

•X 

•y. 

•:•: The attainment of kno-zcleds:e whieli eoines of -n'ell ordered discussion. :$ 

•:•: •••• 

:•:• Increased skill in the methods of labor. :•:: 

i i 

.;•: yt 

S: The mutual imhrorement of its members by disseminating; reliable and <•": 

i . . . ^ ^ 

:§ valuable information tending to promote the best interests of the JJ'allkill J^allcv. •:•: 

•:•: :$ 

'■>: ^ 

S .... » 

:•:: Such ad7'antai:;es as nuiy be derived through associated effort to promote a •:: 

i . . " ... I 

•:•: hio^her decree of excellence in farm, iiardcn and aiincultural affairs '^enerallv. >:• 

!*•• •'•* 

^ . :» 

•:•: The introduction and festiiiij: of tlo7cers, shrubs, forest and ornamental trees. :♦ 

i I 

$: It IS the priinarv object of the Society to cizeakeii interest in and promote the x* 

8 . ■ i 

::•: progress of that noblest of all human calliu'^s, Ai^nculture, and it is the policy •:•: 

I ■ ' % 

:$ of the Board of Managers to interest all in its Annual Outing — and not only as -^ 

:•:• •:•: 

:•:• an exhibition of the prosperity and pn^i^ress of the farming section, of the $1 

:♦ ^rozvths of field and orchard and •j;arden., of intelli-^ent competition in stock- % 

i . i 

<^ breeding and dairy interests, but as a demonstration of the public spirit, intelli- :$ 

::•: gence and prosperity of the entire productive and business community. j;:: 



<m 



74- 




JOSEPH B. HADUEN 
Wulden. N Y 



While we indite these lines all nature is robed with a wealthof 
luxuriant growth. The sweet-scented clovers, the beautiful daisies, 
the stately golden rod. the fragrant grasses, the closing harvest scenes 
on many farms, when the garnered crops from the hillside and valley 
show the ingathering of a bounteous harvest. It is amid such scenes 
that we go forth among our sturdy farmers, for rest and recreation, 
and are received with such frank cordiality that for the time being we 
throw aside all business cares and seek the green fields, the forest 
dells, linger along the running brooks, by the margin of beautiful 
lakes, with their silvery waters, beneath tall trees, with shadows of 
the woods, and the murmuring of the summer breeze, that comes like 
the refrain of some sweet melody. 

Our drive requires an early start, while the myriads of dew- 
drops glisten on the entire landscape, we pass along well-remembered 
scenes of the long ago. We approach and pass well kept farms, with 
their respective herds of cattle, are attracted by beautiful lawns and 
often extensive floral growth of rare and beautiful plants. The quiet 
influence of flowers upon the human heart exerts a wonderful power 
for the good of humanity. All should cultivate these gems of nature. 
"Oh, the unrivaled language of flowers," sweet flowers, the glory and 
beauty of nature! Their fragrance is at the marriage hour, their 

l)eauty a solace and cheer to the weary and afflicted, upon the bier they are reverently laid in loving 

remembrance of the dead. Flowers, beautiful emblems of God's 

love; who would not recognize their priceless worth? 

It is our purpose in this article to place in profile and make 

brief mention of such members who have been or are Directors ot i ^-jg, ^m^ 

the Association, who, in response to the writer's request, have ) #1F ^^| 

given personal co-operation in the efl^ort to place in enduring form fl 

the historic data of the Society. All have been invited to join 

with us, while comparatively few have failed to respond. 

THE OUTING DAYS AND OLD HOME WEEK 

As the Society grew and prospered it was decided to establish 
a social side to the many interests represented. Arrangements 
were made with much enthusiasm on the part of its membership 
to hold beneath the open sky an ^outing that would have a tendency 
to attract the farming community with their guests and friends 
that might prove advantageous to all. September 3, 1892, Mr. 
Cyrus A. Bowne welcomed to his fine estate, Woodlawn Farm, 
a mile south of the village of Waldcn. The adiacent grove of 
S. H. Knapp made a pleasing combination wnth the Bowne tract 
circling on its edge. 




H.ARVEY N. SMITH 
Mon* gome I'll, N. Y 




MEMORABLE DAYS— DATES AND LOCATIONS OF THE 
OUTINGS OF THE ASSOCIATION. 



1.^03- 



1894- 



SAMUEL H. KNATP 



-August 
-August 
1895 — August 
1896 — August 
1897 — August 
i8p8 — August 
1899 — August 
1900 — August 
1901 — August 
1902 — August 
1903 — August 

Park. 
IQ04- 

Park. 

1905 — August 

Park. 

1906 — August 

Driving Park. 
1907 — August 

Park. 



-August 



2^1, at Woodlawn Farm. 

15, at Borden's Home Farm. 

21, at Woodlawn Farm. 

13, at Woodlawn Farm. 

26, at Woodlawn Farm, Walden. 

10, at Scofield's Grove, Walden. 

9, at Gillespie's Grove and Walden Driving Park. 

8, at Gillespie's Grove and Walden Driving Park. 

14, at Gillespie's Grove and Walden Driving Park. 
13, at Gillespie's Grove and Walden Driving Park. 
12 and 13, at Gillespie's Grove and Walden Driving 

17 and 18, at Gillespie's Grove and Walden Driving 

16 and 17. at Gillespie's Grove and Walden Driving 

15, 16 and 17, at Gillespie's Grove and Walden 

14 and i.S, at Gillespie's Grove and Walden Driving 



75 



4r- 



^ 



^r ^ 




NICHOLA? T. FOWLER 



Few men have done more for the advancement and growth of 
Walden and it^ environs than Nicholas J. Fowler. Ever alert to 
Feize upon an opportunity that foreshadowed some feasible opening, that 
would add to the general prosperity of the town, always ready and 
willing to lend a helping hand to a worthy man struggling to get a 
start in life. Mr. Fowler for many years conducted a large hard- 
ware l)U-iness at the establishment of Home Farm. The late John G. 
Borden purchased largely his immense supplies, machinery, etc.. and 
found promptness and dispatch in the delivery of goods. 

Mr. Fowler soon after coming to Walden formed the acquaintance 
of Miss Elizabeth Alillspaugh. Their marriage proved congenial and 
h.appy, their home life restful and ennobling. Three sons brought 
cheer and joy to the home circle. The eldest, Joseph ]\L, of Kingston, 
an attorney of distinction, who has represented his district in the 
legislative liall at Albany ; Anson J., an attorney, having offices at 
Newburgh and Walden. and who has been very successful in the 
development of unimproved property and who enjoys a large legal 
business; Fred, who has been highly successful in the electric light 
and telephone interests of Walden and adjacent villages. Mr. Fowler 
has been confined to his home for several years, and in his declining 
days enjovs the kindly ministrations of his family. 
William C. Hart was born at ]\b:)ntgomery, X, \'., December i8, 1843. Mr. Hart was the only 
child of Henry C. Hart and his wife, Hannah Jane Overheiser. His parents removed to the vicinity 
of East Walden during his early childhood, where the subject of this sketch has since resided on tne 
well-known farm, "Sycamore Place." On November 18, 1869, Mr. Hart was united in marriage to 
Elizabeth Mould, the youngest daughter of the late Hamilton Morrison. Two sons were born of the 
union, Henry Melvin, who has hekl important educational positions in the capacity of high school 
principal at Pueblo, Colorado ; Butte, Montana, and Spokane, Washington ; and Rubert Clarence, a 
prominent and enterprising agriculturist, by whose efforts the fame of Sycamore Place in recent 
years is largely due. 

During a long life spent on one of Orange County's most fertile farms, Mr. Hart has engaged in 
general farming and, also, in the production of fruits and flowering bulbs. A magnificent collection 
of American and foreign dahlias, covering several acres, is one of the attractions at Sycamore Place 
during the late summer and fall, when hundreds of visitors come to admire a wealth of beautiful 
flowers. A large flock of thoroughbred fowls and a Holstein dairy are also maintained. 

Mr. Hart is a member of the First Reformed Church at Walden, has served as school trustee and 
for many years a trustee of the Wallkill Valley Cemetery Association, in wb.ich he has taken great 
personal interest, and contrilmted for a former issue of this booklet a very full, accurate and com- 
plete article under the head of the "Silent City,"- valuable data relative to cemeteries at large. For 
many years he served as secretary and treasurer of the Orange 
County Sunday School Association, and by hi> personal effort in 
August. 1865. in connection with the late Rev. J. M. McNulty. 
Dr. M. V. Schoonmaker, Rev. E. E. Pinney and the Hon. H. B. 
Bull, at a meeting held in the office of Air. Bull at Montgomery. 
N. Y., organized the iirst Town Sunday School Association, the 
purpose of which was to hold monthly meetings on Sabbatii 
afternoons throughout the town, the respective schools uniting 
in the exercises of the hour. Success crowned united eft'ort 
from the first and for years this v.as a strong incentive in ad- 
vancing the cause represented. 

Mr. Hart is a director of the Orange County Agricultural 
Society. He was a founder of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' 
Association and has served on its directorate and as its secretary 
almost continuously since 1889. But it is as the editor and pub- 
lisher of the Historic Wallkill and Hudson Valleys, an annual 
souvenir devoted to the interests of this marvelous region that 
Mr. Hart is best known. The tniblication has made its appear- 
ance yearly since 1894. 'mm\ is a welcome guest in all homes 
where it finds an abiding place, and is largely filed as a historical 
publication in many prominent libraries and historical organi- 
zations as valuable and accurate information william c. hart 




76 





EDWARD B. WALKER 



Mr. Walker, who is now consul at Burslcm,__England, for 
our government, was until he received his high official position, 
very active in the life of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Associa- 
tion and ably served as a director and president for a term 
of years. 

Mr. Walker is a lawyer, and learned and eloquent m his 
profession. During campaign seasons he has often been chosen 
by the managers of his party as speaker, filling the most im- 
portant appointments. 

Mr. Walker is deeply interested in the prosperity of the 
Society, and under date of July lO writes: "I read with a great 
deal of interest of the extension of the work of your Associa- 
tion, and I congratulate your people upon your enterprise 
and public spiritedness. My thoughts are with you, and 
you know without my saying it that 1 hope for you the greatest 
success in every line of your work that tends to develop such 
a lovely and fertile vallev, of which there are none more beau- 
tiful. 

Robert B. Crowell, son of Rol)ert B. Crowell and Sarah 
Jane Burns, was born at St. Andrews, Orange county, in 1847, 
where he attended the district scliool before entering the New- 
burgh Academy. After com- 
pleting his academic course he 
studied law with Judge John 
J. Monell of Newburgh, after 
which he entered Albany Law 
School, where he graduated 
in 1868, being admitted to the 
bar the same year. 

In 1870 he married Catharine Garrison of the town of Newburgh 
and located on his father's farm near Wallkill. 

In 1882 he purchased "Echo Hill Farm" at West Wallkill, where 
he has since lived with his family of five children, conducting a large 
fruit and dairy business. 

Mr. Crowell has always manifested an interest in progressive 
agricultural enterprises, being for many years a director of the W. V. 
F. A. and an enthusiastic granger. 

Edwin Knapp was born on the Goodwill Church farm, in the 
town of Montgomery, July 25, 1847. He is the fifth son of James and 
Harriet Knapp, who were of Holland ancestry, and grandnephew of 
Uzal Knapp of Revolutionary fame. 

In 1857 his parents moved to Coldenham, at which place he re- 
ceived a common school education. At the age of seventeen he was 
apprenticed to learn the trade of a blacksmith, with Henry Taylor of 
Pine Bush, at which he served three years, then secured a position in 
Goshen, where he remained three years. He finally came to Coldenham 
in 1871, where he started the business of blacksmith and carriage 
making. 

Mr. Knapp has been active in church work since 1867. He is a 
member of the M. E. Church at Montgomery, where he has held every 
office in the church, and for many years was Superintendent of its 
Sabbath School and leader of the choir. 

He is a loyal Republican, interested in the welfare of his party. 
Also drum major of the Walden Cornet Band; for many years Clerk 
and Collector of the School District ; Director of the Wallkill Valley 
Farmers' Association and Postmaster for three years. 

On August 25, 1869, he married Miss Thomasena Armstrong, of 
New York City. They have one son, James Edwin of Cornwall, N. 
Y., and one daughter, Mary Emma at home. 

Adam Fetter has long been identified with the agricultural inter- 
ests of the Wallkill Valley, and extensively engaged in the milk busi- 
ness. During later years he purchased a tract of land near the plant 
of the New York Condensed Milk Company and erected a residence 
and barns. Mr. Fetter has served as Director of the Wallkill Valley 
Farmers' Association, and is honored and esteemed in the community 
as a representative citizen. 



R. B. CROWELL 




EDWIN KNAPP 



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A I^rEMORABLE OUTING ON THE BORDEN HOME FARM AT WALLKILL, N. Y. 

The remembrance of pleasural)le events is always a source of delight to those who participate 
in the incidents that combine to make such days of more than passing interest. The Annual Outing 
Dav of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association, 1904, will long be a pleasing recollection in the 
memory of the thousands who were enabled to assemble upon the acres of the largest and most 
renowned farm within the boundaries of the Empire State. The members and friends of this asso- 
ciation must have heard, with pardonaljle pride, the statement of one of high authority, that of all 
the agricultural organizations of their State, the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association stood first in 
its ability to pay noble tributes to the occupation of the farmer. Those who stood upon the crest 
of the hill, near the Borden homestead, early in the morning of "Outing Day," beheld a not easily for- 
gotten picture, as they watched the continued procession of fine equipages and gaily decorated 
vehicles, slowly ascending the hill. In the words of Mr. George T. Powell, "When that magnificent 
line of teams, extending nearly two miles, was ascending the sightly elevation of Home Farm, with 
flags and banners floating to the breeze of that delightful day, and from the cannons' mouth burst 
forth peal after peal, not in the spirit of war, but of peace and good will to all engaged in and 








OUTING DAYS AND OLD HOME WEEK, AUGUST 18 and jy, lyoj 

Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association, Walden, N. Y. 

dependent upon agriculture, I felt it was the dawning of a new day in farming, and the future was 
full of promise." 

THE ATTENDANCE. 

The most reliable sources give evidence that during the day between three and four 
carriages entered the various approaches to Home F"arm, and between twelve and fifteen 
people visited some part of the estate. Four thou-^arid souvenirs 
gantly-printed book, adorned 



with many 
articles from the pens of Hon. James G. 
Walden, were presented to parties who 
others, the following : 

Rev. Hiram Vrooman, Baltimore, Md. 

W. A. Bushheld, Jersey City, N. J. 

Dewilton B. Dow, Racine, Wis. 

I. Schoonmaker and wife, Paducali. Kv. 

Hiram W. Deyo. Buffalo, N. Y. 

A. S. Burtch, San Francisco, Cal. 

Charles Leonard, Wilkesbarre, Pa. 



views of special points 

Graham of Newburgh, 

re.gistered their names. 



thousand 
thousand 
of the day, in the form of an ele- 
i)f interest on Home Fariu, and 
and Rev. W. H. S. Demarest of 
From this record we find, among 



William Clifford. Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Phili]) Maguire, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Luther Terwilliger, Monroe, N. Y. 
W. J. Keatis, Toronto, Canada. 
P. R. Neff, Altoona, Pa. 
Willirnu G. Mastin. Wassaic, N J. 
H. D. Carroll, New Orleans. La. " 



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SCENES ON AMERICA S MOST BEAUTIFUL RIVER, ALONG WEST SHORE RAILROAD. 

Roll on ! Roll on ! 

Thou River of the North ! Tell thou to all 

The isles, Tell thou to all the continer. 



Edward IT. Cook. Moral Tark. L. I. 

Charles L. Ostrandc-r. Wassaic, N. J. 

Miss Jennie Follete, New Brunswick, N. J. 

George Hawkins. Lincoln, Kansas. 

David Monhl, Sioux City, Iowa. 

M. E. Ensign, Hartford, Conn. 

Miss M. S. Barcker, Paterson, N. J. 

Miss E. E. Snyder, Paterson, N. J. 

Anna S. Dunn, Port Richmond, Staten Island. 

Araminta Long, Gateswood P. O., Virginia. 

John P. Pratt, Green Cove Springs, Elorida. 

.Mrs. Isaac Schoonmaker, Padncah, Ky. 



Miss M. Maurv, Chicago, 111. 

Miss M, iMusley, Federal Point, Florida. 

Mrs. Dr. Rohinson, Newark, N. I. 

Mrs. J. D. Birdsall, Grand RapiVls, Mich. 

Mrs. Annie D. Haley, Stapleton, Staten Island. 

Mrs. Estelle Harrington, New Haven, Conn. 

Miss Ethel Eisemann, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Miss Maude Walker, Providence, R. I. 

Miss A. M. ,\hrens, Jersey City, N. J. 

Miss Edna M. Vansaun, Cortland, N. Y. 

Mr. Harrv C. Vrooman, D.D., E. Milton, Mass. 



THE PROGRAM. 

A large platform for the officers, directors and speakers was erected on the side of a small eleva- 
tion which rose opposite to the eastern slope of the main hill which was encircled with hroad drive- 
ways and winding hrooks. h'rom the ]>latform the speakers commanded a fidi view of the asseiubled 
thousands seated opposite them. l'.elow and to the right, was arranged a platform for the Wall- 
kill Cornet Band. Directly beneath were seated the following members of the newspaper fraternity: 
W. F. Doty, Oraiiiic County Farmer; Lyman H. Taft, Montgomery Reporter; H. Scott Corwin, 
Kingston Freeman; C. E. Westervelt, Marlborough /'^rt-ort/.- C. D. Allger, Kingston .-In^iis; H. Wing, 
Sonlheru t'lster; C. A. Reed, Waldcn Herald; E. H. Abell, 
R. Johnson. Xewhurgh Ne7i's; E. M. Ruttenber, Newburgh 
Xewburgh J'ress; George W. Bmuie, Newburgh Journal; 
Goshen ; Thomas B. Scott. Poughkeepsie Eagle; K. D. C. 

To stand upon this idatform and watch the constantly 
a most ins])iring sight, and 



Walden Citizen ; A. E. Layman, Charles 
Sunday Telegram; W. 11. Westervelt, 
Ira _ C. Baldwin, Independent Republiean, 
Craine, Middletown Daily Press. 
increasing numlier on the other 



nmst have given inspiration to the brilliant speakers of tlu 



side was 



liour. 



tin: Ai)iiKi:ss oi- wki.comi-: by c.mi. i'.;>kiii:n, wai.t.kii.l, n. v. 

Mr. President: .Mlow me to extend to you and to my fellow 
officers n{ the Wallkill Valley I'^armers' Association, over whom > on 
so ably presiile, as also to tlK'ir guests assembled here toda>' in such 
flattering numbers, a he;irt_\ welcome to Home Farm. That it is an 
honest and heartfelt welcouie 1 trust you will believe, and while I 
have the ojiportunity, allow me to publicly acknowdedge the honor of 
membarship in an organization so disinterested, rnid whose lirst anc 
best efforts have l)een to benefit their fellowmen. 



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KKSPONSE ON P.FH.M.F OF THK 



WINANT, 




.\SS0C1.\T10N V.y KKV. W.M.TI'^R W 
l'.KKF..\, N. Y. 

Mr. I'.ordeii: In beli;ilf of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Associ- 
;itioii ;dlow me to thank you. sir. for tlii^ hearty welcome to Home 
l-anii, and to say that what enhances our aiipreciation of it is the fact 
that we know it is heartfelt ;ind sincere. 

This generous welcome, sir. is only another of the maii_\' tokens 
by which you have shown your interest in. and .appreciation of. the 
aims and efforts of the Association, which has the honor of enjoying 
your hospitality today. Nor is this the lirst time that the .\ssociation has been indebted to you — in 
other ways you have shown >dur interest in its workings lieretofi ire. so that it has come to regard 
yon as one of its staunchest friends and most gen.'rous supporters. 

Ihit. sir. while we extend to you our sincere appreciation, we cannot forget 
energy and enterprise made this possible. He wIfi sought as little ostentation in 
was one of whom I believe it might be said truly that he went about doing godd. 

I am told that when some one asked him why he emidoycd so many men on 



GAIL BORDEN 



the 
life 

his 



one wdiose 
as in death. 

farm when a 



tiiat he replied that "That w;is the way ill wliicli he liked to spend 



smaller iinmlKM- would lia\e done, 
his uKiiiew" 

Me was one who never oppressed the poor or "the hireling in his wages." ;md though founding 
this beautiful estate, which this day through your kindness it is our iirivilege to enjoy, and the equal 
of wdiich I lia\-e never seen neither in the West, nor in the N(H-th, nor in the Sr)uth, yet we believe 
that he carried on this great work largely with benevolent juiriioses. So T am not surprised at the 
great beautv of Home i'"ann, when I know something of the beauty of the cliaracter of him wdiose 
mind conceived it, and of the motives with wdiich 1 believe that conception was carried out. And 
1 am sure, sir, that while we return you our hearty thanks, we cannot — as we look over this beautiful 



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JOHN G. BORDEN 

FOUNDER OF THE HOME FARM 



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farm — I repeat it we cannot forget the one "who, though dead, yet 
speaketh," who, though absent, yet there will be many here today 
whose memories will linger with love, esteem and gratitude around 
the name of John G. Borden. 

Monica Farm, the ancestral Weller homestead, owned by William 
C. Weller, contains two hundred acres. Mr. Weller has removed 
from his farm and occupies his village residence on Ulster Avenue, 
Walden, N. Y. He was one of the charter members of the society 
and served as its first president. 

A BEAUTIFUL GIFT TO THE ASSOCIATION 

The occasion was made memorable by the presentation, on the 
part of the Borden family, of a large silken banner, bearing on its (■ 
white background, in red letters, \ 

"WALLKILL VALLEY FARMERS' ASSOCIATION." V 

Underneath was painted the chosen emblem of the organization — 
a sprig of clover in blossom. Mr. Borden, advancing towards the 
front of the platform, before the gathered thousands of attentive 
hearers, addressed the president in the following terms : 

Mr. President : Pardon me for delaying the exercises, but we, 
the Borden family, have noticed that the Wallkill Valley Farmers' 
Association has no banner or flag to flaunt to the breezes over their 
places of meeting, and in consideration of this fact, I take great pleasure in presenting, through 
you, to the Association an emblematic flag, carrying your name and your emblem. 

We sincerely hope that your principles and conduct may be as white as its field, and your 
record as clear as its name, and may you ever remember that as we are dependent on the soil, to 
always honor that little sprig of clover. 

The flag carries with it our heartiest good wishes for the welfare of the Association. 




WILLIAM C. WELLER 



THE ACCEPTANCE 

The response, on behalf of the Association, was by Rev. W. H. S. Demarest of Walden, who 
most appropriately responded as follows : 

Mr. Borden : On behalf of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association, I acknowledge the cour- 
tesy and generosity of this gift, and give to you the Association's heartiest thanks. It is quite sure 
that the thanks will lose nothing of thei;- strength by simplicity and shortness in the words. You have 
met us here with cordial welcome, and now you have honored your guests in this very graceful 
act of recognition. A banner for this Association was surely a happy thought, and the actual 

worth to the Association will not be small. 
The idea of the banner is of course more its 
value even than its beauty or its form float- 
ing before our eyes. That idea is pride in 
the life those named and numbered under it 
pursue. Co-operation and unity in the inter- 
ests of the work; loyalty to the organization 
formed to promote the community's welfare. 
The purest and loftiest standard we know is 
that of the church, of the cross and the 
crown of Jesus Christ. Then, that of our 
land, floating above us, stirring our single- 
hearted patriotism, the flag under which your 
father and a host from this valley fought, 
suffered and gloried. Then, why not add the 
standard of the local and social and indus- 
trial life? May this floating standard be at 
least the standard for the highest life and 
wisest methods and broadest results on the 
farms, the final source of the country's 
strength and prosperity. Again, in behalf of 
the Association, I thank you, and through 
you the Borden famih^ for this most appro- 
priate gift. 

In his address of welcome, August, 1895, 
Mr. William H. Gillespie presented a word- 
picture of natural advantages of the Wall- 
kill Valley. 




EMBLEM OF THE ASSOCIATION 



83 



We arc located in one of the most fertile and lovely valleys in the State. It is exceedingly rich 
in pastoral advantages ; its broad farms and herds of fine cattle browsing in the fields suggest many 
material advantages. For variety and grandeur of scenery our valley is without a peer in the State. 

If you will look to the north you maj' see the peaks of the grand old Shawangunk mountains. 
The overhanging cliffs seem to have been hurled together by gigantic hands in some great natural 
conflict; their scarred sides are draped in many-tinted mosses and lichens; the summits glow with 
the dceo green of the mountain laurel, and the trailing arbutus, while over all the tall mouniam 
pines wave like the plumes of a warrior host. 

To the east of us, just below the hill, our beloved Wallkill dashes her angry waters over the 
rocky precipice, while only a few feet below she again resumes her placid course to the north. 

In the immediate vicinity to the north, west and south may be seen the vineyards, orchards and 
pasture lands. What more varied scenery can one desire? Upon all this we welcome you to feast 
I'our artistic eye. 

We welcome you to the intellectual feast which is about to be spread before you in the form of 
(peeches by our brilliant friends who have so kindly consented to feed us upon this occasion. We 
ivelcome you to the musical part with which this feast is interspersed. You are all most heartily 
•velcome to this grove and adjacent grounds. You are also welcome to the use of that beautiful 
Driving Park for the day through the kindness of the Walden Driving Park Association. 




THE GRANDSTAND, AUGUST, 1906 

August, 1898, Attorney I. H. Loughran in extending a welcome gave expression to the follow- 
ing: 

You are now in the heart of the Wallkill Valley; one hundred and forty-two years ago it was 
the habitation of the Indians, who roamed throughout this valley at will, fearing not, but being feared. 
As to the historic events of the valley, they have been written and rewritten. Yonder, along the 
banks of the Wallkill, in my imagination, I can see the wigwam of the Indian on the Daniel Has- 
brouck and Daniel Rogers farms. In my imagination I can see the cabin of Johanas Miller, the first 
settler, consisting of _ two crotches, a pole thereon, and timbers reaching to the ground; I can see 
the good husband with his trusty rifle over his shoulder on Sunday morning, together with his 
family, starting over the hills and through the valleys, to attend divine worship; altogether I see 
twelve distinct tribes of Indians settled in and around this vicinity. 

But this is of the past; today, and what a chuige : the sage of the Catskills did not experience 



84 




.->--9rr7^ (-,'''-■■ 



S. V. SCHOONMAKER 



such a transformation. Where a little hamlet stood, gathered 
together for self-protection, thousands are now residents 
thereof. Where the wheat field stood, now is found the fac- 
tory, with the hum of the machinery and the clang of the ham- 
mer. Walden and Montgomery we look upon with pride, and 
are recognized as two of the substantial towns of the county. 

And to whom shall we give all this praise? First to God, 
for the earth is God's priceless gift to man, then to the tiller 
of the soil, for he hath made it possible for us to obtain our 
sustenance, and our enjoyment unmolested from these fertile 
valleys, these verdant hillsides and refreshing streams. A 
writer has said, "happy, thrice happy is the man who can claim 
it as his birthright or by adoption, and around its enchanting 
bowers, draw near to nature and to nature's God." 

Nine years ago a few of the representative men of the town 
of ]\Iontgomery met for the purpose of organizing an associa- 
tion, not merely for the purpose of having a pleasant time, but 
for the purpose of aiding by concentration of thought, the far- 
mer and the businessman of the Wallkill Valley, that each 
might know the other better, and that by an interchange of 
thought, be the means not only of benefiting themselves but the vauey 
in which they reside. 

At first it struggled for an existence, as all similar organizations 
do, but by choosing their officers and directors carefully, men of life 
and of energy, men that had made a success of their own private 
affairs, and having as their chief adviser and secretary, one, who, 
knowing the needs and necessities of the farmer, gave both of his time 
and strength toward the upbuilding of the Association, until today 
it is known far and wide as the most successful farmers' organiza- 
tion in the State. 

John H. Reid was born in Vennan in 1861. He took his college 
and theological course at Yale, graduating in 1890. He spent the 
first years of his ministry in Colorado, returning to Massachusetts. 
In 1896 he went abroad and studied at the Universities of Edin- 
burgh and Oxford, and afterwards traveled with his wife on the 
continent. 

On account of ill health he gave up the active ministry in 1892 
and became owner and publisher of the Walden Citizen. He has been 

a director of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association for three TOHn h. reid 

years. 

Everett B. DuBois was born in the town of Shawangunk, April 22, 1862. He lived one mile 
north of Wallkill until 1883, when he purchased a farm south of Galeville, N. Y. He followed 
farming until 1898. 

In politics Mr. DuBois is a staunch Republiran. He held the office of assessor of the town of 

Shawangunk for thirteen years. In 1898 he was appointed postmaster 
at Wallkill, N. Y., which ofiice he is still holding. 

Mr. DuBois is interested in every public welfare and by his un- 
tiring efforts the present water system of the village was installed; 
also the Wallkill fire department, he having the honor of being the 
first chief. 

In 1883 Mr. DuBois married Ida McElhone. There arc two chil- 
dren, Kathryn C. and Ida Mae. 

Samuel Vail Schoonmaker, son of John Schoonmaker and Mary 
A. Vail, was born in Newburgh on the 13th of March, 1867. He was 
educated in the Newburgh public schools and at the Phillips Exeter 
Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire. In August, 1885, he entered the 
employ of Schoonmaker & Weller as a clerk. In 1851 he entered the 
partnership of Remillard & Co., retiring in 1895. He again became 
connected with Schoonmaker & Weller as a clerk, and on January i, 
1898, purchased the interest of Mr. A. Y. Weller in the business and 
the name of the firm changed to John Schoonmaker & Son. Mr. 
Schoonmaker married Miss Lillian W. Wardell of Philadelphia on 
February i. 1899. They have two children. John, aged seven, and 
E. B. dijBOIS Samuel Vail, Jr., aged five. Mr. Schoonmaker is a member of the 





85 





ALLEN BRYSON 
Montgou.enj. N. Y, 



Newhurgh City Club, Lawson Hose Company, Arkwriftlit Club of New York, a trustee of the First 
Presbyterian Church, trustee of the Newburgh Savings Bank, a director in the Wallkill Valley Far- 
mers' Association and a member of the Newburgh Business Men's Association. He is a progressive 
and public spirited citizen and is interested in everything that tends to the advancement and betterment 
of Newburgh and the surrounding country. 

The Saratoga Farm, on the forks of the Goshen and IMiddle- 
town roads, is one of the noted landmarks of the Wallkill Valley. 
It is the locality selected by the earliest settlers on the east bank 
of the Wallkill, and close to the famous spring now on the Miller 
farm. In those early days a log church was erected opposite the pres- 
ent residence of Mr. Bryson, and for many generations the dead 
were buried beneath its shadows. Air. Bryson tenderly cares for 
those sleeping generations, protecting the grounds from all in- 
truders. 

Mr. Bryson on November i8. 1869, married Miss Emma F., 

daughter of John and Emily Mould, a young lady of charming 

personality and most gracious manner. Three daughters brought 

sunshine and happiness to the home circle, Alice, wife of George 

Bell of Reading, Pa.; Carrie, who in the morning of life passed 

like a fair lily to the home beyond, and Josepha, who now graces 

the home circle by her gracious presence. 

On the main road leading from St. Andrews to Modena is 

the home of William H. Dunn, one of the progressive farmers of 

our valley. A large and well- 
bred dairy of forty head of cat- 
tle receive the tenderest care, 

their every want being anticipated. ]\Ir. Dunn enjoys gatliering around 
his home all the accessories that contribute to the comforts of coun- 
try life. He is active in the welfare of his locality, has served many 
terms as school trustee, is an official of the New Hurley Reformed 
Church, trustee of the Wallkill Valley Cemetery, has held the office 
of vice-president and director of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Asso- 
ciation. His household is presided over by an only daughter, Miss 
Anna, and an only son, Chester, completes the family circle. 

Adam Fetter, the subject of this sketch, is a well-known citizen 
of the town of IMontgomery, residing near the dividing line of 
Orange and Ulster counties. Mr. Fetter has been successful in con- 
ducting a large herd of dairy cows, disposing of their product at the 
Borden IMilk Company's factory at Wallkill. His farm is located on 
historic ground, near which a regiment of Washington's Continental 
army encamped during one winter, that they might protect the muni- 
tions of war from any sudden at- 
tack from the enemy and yet be in 
easy access to the defense of the 
Hudson Valley. 
Mr. Fetter takes personal interest in the Wallkill Valley Farmers' 

Association, and has served several terms of three years each as 

director of the society. 

Director Harry G. Seely, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Seely, re- 
sides upon one of the sightly elevations before which stretches the 
wondrous beauty of the Valley of the Wallkill. Few places are more 
conspicuous tTian the Seely Ridge Farm. It is noted for its wide and 
open hospitable welcome to friends and visitors. It was here that the 
late I\Ir. Wyland of New York, established a successful stock farm 
devoted to the horse. The views from the residence are revelations 
from the landscape of nature. Milk is the main product of this farm 
of one hundred acres. 

Harry N. Smith, who was for nine years one of the directors and 
for five terms vice-president, resides midway between the villages of 

Montgomery and Walden. He is engaged in the fire insurance busi- henry g. seely 

ness, having taken over twelve years ago the Montgomery agency Seily Bidge, N. Y. 



WILLL\M H. DUNN 
<S'^ Aiidrtii's. X Y. 




86 




JOHN AHRENS 
Walden. X. Y. 



established in 1851. He has always been active in church work and 
takes a deep interest in questions concerning the general welfare 
of the community. 

Mr. Ahrens was born in Giehle, Province of Hanover, Ger- 
many, October 23, 1865. His parents, John and Kathryne Ahrens, 
were descendants of one of Germany's oldest families. 

Mr. Ahrens came to America in 1884, engaging in the whole- 
sale grocery business with his uncle. In 1890 he married Miss Ida 
F. Ahrens of Jersey City. Two lovely daughters grace the home 
circle, Kathryne, Elvena and Mary Elizabeth. 

The extensive plant of John Ahrens, from which all farmers' 
supplies are sent forth, is the center of East Walden's business 
interests. Mr. Ahrens conducts a feed, coal and lumber business 
in connection with what was long regarded as Orange County's 
model farm, under the guiding hand of the late James Todd, the 
former owner of the place, from whom Mr. Ahrens purchased it 
in 1892. 

On a sightly elevation on the west bank of the Wallkill River 
there lies one of the historic farms of the Wallkill Valley, upon 
which resides the subject of this sketch. Originally a portion of 
the Galatian pattern, containing one hundred and sixty-two acres, 
purchased in 1762 by Thomas Clineman for a consideration of three 
pounds ten shillings, continuing in the Clineman family until 1875, 
the title passing to the present owner. Mr. DuBois has always farmed on the extensive system, the 
dairy predominating, while vast stores of high-grade hay has annually 
increased the revenue of the farm. As the years passed, other farms 
have been purchased, upon which sons and daughters have found 
homes. Mr. DuBois stands for what is good in life and has filled 
positions of trust and responsibility in church and state, and for many 
years an honored director of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Asso- 
ciation. Mr. DuBois is the eldest son of LeFevre and Rebecca 
DuBois. 

Mr. Harp is a resident of historic New Paltz and is engaged in 
house-furnishing supplies. For many years he has gathered large 
supplies of old-time mementoes of past generations. At one time he 
had a large and rare collection of old pewter goods. During recent 
years Mr. Harp has engaged in the real estate business and made 
great success in this line, having sold a great many farms to city peo- 
ple for summer homes. Mr. Harp is a director of the Wallkill Valle.\ 
Farmers' Association and interested in many lines that tend to de 
velop the resources of his locahty. 

The Quackenbos farm at Beaver Dam, known as the Beaver Dam 
farm, the home of the late John P. Covert, is one of the most de- 
lightfully located farms in New York State. It is one mile northeast 
of Mavbrook and two and one-half miles from Montgomery and 
Campbell Hall each. Mr. Covert, during his life, enjoyed rural life on one hundred and forty acres 

of as lovely land as lies out-of-doors, and the location of the house 
and barns is such that they command a view of the country for miles 
around. The dwelling is almost palatial in its proportions, arrange- 
ments and surroundings. It has twenty-five rooms and cost thirty- 
five thousand dollars. The dwelling is surrounded by a beautiful 
grove of sugar maples. This delightful suburban home was purchased 
in the spring of 1901 by Mr. A. von Kilch, who is extensively en- 
gaged in the dairy industry. 

Mr. Charles D. Wait is the youngest son of Thomas Wait and 
Mary (Mould) Wait and was born at the old Wait homestead, two 
miles ea§t of Montgomery, on the late Newburgh and Cochecton 
Turnpike. His parental grandfather, Samuel Wait, was a native of 
Tuigland, and his ancestry on his mother's side were of Holland and 
German origin. 

He received his education at the public school at Goodwill and 
at Montgomery Academy. He was for several years engaged at 
farming and for the last twelve years has been doing business very 
extensively at Montgomery in coal, lumber, feed and agricultural im- 




JOHN P. COVERT 




JONAS DUBOIS 



87 




ELTING HARP 



plements. He is eminently successful in business and is one ot the 
well-to-do men of the town. He is a member of Goodwill Presby- 
terian Church and a director of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Asso- 
ciation, in which he takes great interest. Recently he joined the army 
of the Benedicts by uniting in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Sey- 
mour, the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Seymour of Walden. 
William H. Hallock was born at Highland Mills, Orange County, 
N. Y., in 1842. He removed to Washingtonville in 1866, and has since 
resided there. He is widely and favorably known. For more than 
twenty-five years he was one of the largest horse and cattle dealers in 
Orange County, selling each year from three hundred to four hundred 
horses, and averaging over one thousand head of cattle a year. Dur- 
ing all this time, and doing this large business, he never had a law- 
suit. 

In 1894 he turned his horse business over to his son, Edward N., 
and devoted his time and attention to the management of his large 
landed estate, which comprises five farms containing nearly nine hun- 
dred acres of choice land. These farms are managed by himself 
personal!} — he employs his laborers by the month, believing that js 
the best way to employ them, as it gives him the benefit of their 
whole time. The farm work is laid out by him in advance, and he superintends the doing of it. 
Mr. Hallock has a hobby on "clearing up" and does not allow bushes to grow along fences or in the 
fields. He is constantly improving his farms, and says that every one 
of them produces frorn two to three times more than it did w-hen he 
bought it. 

He is one of the largest, if not the largest, milk producers m the 
county — keeps nearly three hundred cows and frequently makes over 
sixty-five cans of milk a day. 

Mr. Hallock has always taken an active interest in agricultural 
and educational matters and in local affairs. He has been a director 
of the Orange County Agricultural Society since 1879, and the effi- 
cient superintendent of the cattle department at its annual fairs for 
twenty-two years. He has been a member of the Board of Education 
for twenty-five years, and a trustee of the village of Washingtonville 
since it was incorporated. He is a member of the State Breeders' 
Association, a director of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association, 
and was recently appointed by Governor Odell one of the State 
Delegates to the National Farmers' Congress, which met October i, 
1901, at Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 

Mr. Johnson was born at Passaic, N. J., June 4, 1856, and removed 
to Orange County April i, 1872, was educated at Chester Academy, 
and removed to his present home in April, 1882. Mr. Johnson is a 
progressive farmer, having a Holstein dairy of about thirty cows, 
selected for their good milking qualities. His farm contains one hundred and thirty acres and is 
located in the environs of the historic village of Goshen, N. Y., made famous by its memorials to the 

patriot dead, among which is the Minisink monument, commemo- 
rating the early settlers who engaged in this Indian conflict. The 
Wisner monument, erected by Mrs. Wisner in honor of her Revo- 
lutionary ancestry, and the beautiful bronze and granite tribute 
in massive proportions unveiled September 5, 1907, a loving tribute 
from Colonel Thomas W. Bradley of Walden, N. Y., in memory 
of the fallen heroes of the 124th Regiment, U. S. V. Mr. John- 
son is a director of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association and 
identified with other societies. 

For about one hundred and seventy-five years the Wells 
family has been identified with the history of Goshen. The home- 
stead upon which John Wells settled (about 1735). then a wilder- 
ness tract of land containing two hundred and forty acres, has 
been successfully managed by the members of five generations, 
and upon it the subject of this sketch has spent most of his life. 
The progenitor of the Wells family, from which Charles S. WeHs 
descended, was Hon. William Wells, educated as a lawyer in 
England. He was born in the year 1608 and emigrated as a 
WILLIAM H. HALLOCK passenger on the ship True Love about 1635. Charles S. Wells, 




CHARLES D. WAIT 




8S 





ARTHUR MC KINNEY 



[born in 1852 on the farm where 
he now resides, was the young- 
est son of Alfred Wells. His 
early education was received at 
"Farmers' Hall Academy" in 
Goshen. He has spent most of 
his life on the farm that he now 
owns, was one of the active 
members to form the Grange, 
No. 975, at Goshen in March, 
1903 ; was master two terms. At 
the organization of the Goshen 
Grange Company he was elected 
president in 1905 and still holds 
that ot^ce. He has continued 
going forward in the order until 
now he is a member of the Na- 
tional Grange, and was sent as 
a delegate to the State Grange 
ASHER JOHNSON -^ ^^^^^ j^^j^ ^^ Cortland, N. Y. 

He was married on February 23, 1876 to Alice, eldest daughter of Samuel Hadden of Chester. Their 
children are S. Hadden, who married Edith Sinsabaugh in 1900; Clara L., wife of J. J. Stage of 
Goshen, and John N., at home. Mr. Wells, like his forefathers, has never sought political place or 
its emoluments. He has always been a careful observer of the advancement of the times and has 
always given encouragement to all objects of a local nature, leading in any way to the prosperity 
of the people and the development of the interests of his own town. 

One of the most enchantingly situated homes between Walden and Newburgh is Brookside 
Farm, the home of Arthur McKinney. Just in front is a bridge that spans the Ten Broeck; grace- 
fully it curves through the meadows, almost to the very door of the homes as it flows sparkling and 
flashing in the light, with rippling, bubbling music, as sweet and mild as can be found. 

Philip Hasbrouck is of Huguenot an- 
cestry, and was born in the old stone 
house, now the "Memorial House" of New 
Paltz. Ulster County, N. Y., April i, i860. 
He is the youngest son of Joseph 
Hasbrouck and Sarah Maria LeFevre, and 
was educated at the New Paltz Academy 
and later at the Union Academy, Jefferson 
County, N. Y. 

He moved with his father in 1882 to 
a farm near Walden, and there engaged 
in farming. 

In the fall of 1893 he was elected 
Superintendent of the Poor of Orange 
County, which office he held for nine 
years. 

From 1899 until January i, 1907, Mr. 
Hasbrouck was successively engaged in 
the coal, lumber and feed business of the 
firm of Hasbrouck & Sloan. He is one of 
the directors of the Shrade Cutlery Com- 
pany, holding the office of vice-president 
of the company, and a director of the 
Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association. 

William T. Snider was born near the 
village of Walden on the farm where he 
now resides, and is the son of the late 
William W. Snider. He attended the lo- 
cal schools at St. Andrews and Walden. 
In 1899 he went to Pennington Seminary 
to prepare for college. He graduated in 
the classical course with the class of 1901. 
Having decided to be a lawyer, Mr. 
Snider entered the law offfce of Attorney 




PHILIP HASBROUCK 



89 



C. L. Waring of Newburgh, N. Y., as 
a clerk and is still connected with that 
otifice. On the farm he devotes his at- 
tention to the breeding of registered 
Holstein-Friesian cattle and Conti- 
nental Dorset Club Sheep. 

He is a director of the Wallkill Val- 
ley Farmers' Association, secretary of 
Montgomery Grange, No. 916, P. of H., 
and a member of the M. E. Church 
of Walden ; Freemen's Lodge, No. 170, 
,1. O. O. F. : Wallkill Lodge, No. 627, 
F. and A. M., and of Highland Chapter, 
'Xo. 52, R. A. M., of Newburgh. 

Pliny E. Hawkins was one of a 
famil_v of six children born to Lewis 
and Mary E. Blake Hawkins. The 
homestead is located on ]Maple avenue, 
one mile southeast of Coldenham, and 
is occupied by P. E. and Jonas Haw- 
kins, who are recognized as progressive larmers. W'hether the subject of this sketch ever had 
thoughts of any other calling than that of a farmer is only known to himself. The advantages 
of education to him were only those of the district school, except what he gained in a brief term at 
the old rural academy near Walden. However, by study and self-application, he set to work to con- 
quer some of his early disadvantages and equip himself as best he could for the avocations of life. 
While his calling has been that of a farmer, he has also given his attention to religious work. In 
May, 1868, he united with the Goodwill Presbyterian Church, and on the 31st of the same month was 
elected superintendent of the LInion Sabbath School at Coldenham, and later he became superintend- 
ent of the Goodwill Presbyterian Sabbath School. So exemplary had his life been since unitmg 
with the church that he was elected to the eldership August 15. 1876. and the following Sabbath, 





CH.\RLES S. WELLS 



WILLL\M T. SNIDER 




PLINY E. H.XWKINS AND HIS NIECES, MISS EDNA TWAMLEY AND MISS AGNES B. HAWKINS. 



90 



August 20, was ordained to that sacred office. Eight of the nine members who composed the session 
at that date "rest from their labors and their works do follow them." 

During these years Mr. Hawkins has been closely associated with three pastors, and has repre- 
sented his church many times in presbytery and at synod. One of his former pastors. Rev. J. M. 
Dickson, D.D., once remarked that he had never met a person in whom religion and mirth were as 
equally blended as in the subject of this sketch. He was first vice-president, then president of the 
Montgomery Sabbath School Association for two years. 

He is a great admirer of the Wallkill Valley; he loves its beautiful scenery of hills and moun- 
tains, its beautiful lakes, its lovely trees and flowers. He has been director of the Wallkill Valley 
Farmers' Association for several terms of three years each. With the exception of six years spent 
in North Dakota, Mr. Hawkins has always been a resident of the locality in which he was born. 
He went to Dakota in the spring of 1885 and engaged in farming which proved very successful. He 
united with the First Congregational Church of Inkster, and was soon elected to the eldership and to 
the superintendencv of the Sabbath School. He was also elected secretary of the Grand Forks 
County Sabbath School Association. When the Association held its annual meeting in the Congrega- 
tional Church at Inkster Mr. Hawkins had the honor of being elected president of the day. The first 
day, June 16, the exercises were held in the Congregational Church, and the following day vast crowds 
wended their way to one of the pretty groves on the banks of the Forest River. The procession was 
nearly a mile and a half in length, led by the Inkster band. It was an ideal day; the air was vocal 
with the songs of the birds and fragrant with the sweet scent of the wild roses that grow so luxuri- 
ously in the groves that line the river banks of Dakota. Here a most delightful day was spent in 
company with so many earnest Sabbath School workers and friends. The following, which we clip 
from tlie Daily Herald of Grand Forks, Dak., will no doubt be of interest to our readers : "When 
Mr. Pliny E. Hawkins left Inkster a little incident occurred which shows the innate goodness of heart 
and modesty of the man. He had long served faithfully as superintendent of the Congregational Sun- 
dav School of that place, and on his departure a quiet canvass was made and a purse of fifty dollars 
made up with which to present him with a handsome gold watch. The matter coming to Mr. 
Hawkins' ears, he positively refused to accept the gift and made those instrumental in the movement 
promise to return all the money collected to the donors, on the ground that many of those contribut- 
ing needed the money worse than he needed a watch. Such an act is characteristic of Mr. Hawkins' 
generous and kindly nature." 

Horace D. Thompson was born December 3, 1844, and is the 
youngest of three children born to Virgil and Mary Ann (Decker) 
Thompson, natives of Montgomery. He resides on the old homestead 
midway between Goshen and Middletown. He married in 1875 Miss 
Sarah 'M. Millspaugh, the daughter of Dr. G. M. and Sarah (Cam- 
eron) Millspaugh. To this union four children have been born, Dr. 
Edward Cameron, a practicing physician and surgeon of Newburgh, 
N. Y. ; Charles Hudson, a dentist, of Goshen ; Anna May, at home, 
and Harold, a farmer, at home. His education was obtained at the 
schools in Goshen, and Ellenville High School. In early manhood he 
taught school for four years. This not agreeing with his health, he 
devoted his whole attention to farming. Mr. Thompson was for a 
number of years Justice of the Peace of his native town, and for 
eight years its Supervisor. He is one of the ruling elders of the 
Presbyterian Church of Goshen, and a trustee for six years, and for 
many years has been a member of the Board of Directors of Orange 
County Agricultural Society. 

Among the prominent and successful agriculturists of the Valley 
of the Wallkill, who have the interests of farming at heart, is Isaiah 
W. Decker. 

Mr. Decker is a native of the town of Montgomery, who formerly rented farms, upon which he 
fully demonstrated that success could be won in this as well as other pursuits in life. Mr. Decker 
later purchased a desirable farm, and provided the best of modern machinery to cultivate its broad 
acres, and upon which may be found one of the finest herds of cattle in this section, which are the 
pride of their owner. 

Various positions of trust and responsibility in the community has been honorably held by Mr. 
Decker. He was a charter member of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association, holding the position 
of General Superintendent since its organization until elected its President, December, 1899; active 
in the Walden Horse Thief Detective Society, and for two vears its President ; for a number of years 
trustee of his school district, and acting trustee of the M. E. Church. He has always taken an inter- 
est in public affairs, and active in church and public school work. Politically, he is a Republican; 
socially, he belongs to the Knights of Pythias, and is a public spirited citizen generally. He has dis- 
continued farming, having removed to Walden, May, 1907, where he expects to pass his declining 
years amid the scenes of a long, active, and successful life. 




HORACE D. THOMPSON 



91 









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INDIAN MOUNDS AT SHAWANGUNK. "NFAV FORT" 

Courtesy of Benjimin M. Brink. Reprinted from 'Old Ulster. 

(See page .18) 



92 




JOHN K. BROWN 

Vice-President 






ISAIAH W. DECKER 

President 



WILLIAM C. HART 

Secretary 




ANSON J. FOWLER 
Treasurer 



ADAM WILEY 
General Superintendent 



93 



John K. Brown, the subject of this sketch, was born at Coldenham. N. Y., in 1854, on the farm he 
now occupies. He is the oldest son of four children of the late John J. Brown and Sarah Laird. 
Mr. Brown received his early education at Newburgh, N. Y., and the district school at Coldenham. 
His occupation is a farmer. From his early youth he has had a great love for country life and any- 
thing pertaining to agriculture, taking a lively interest in all matters for the advancement of his fellow 
farmers. He is a great advocate of the producer's rights in the milk question, and believes it will 
yet be settled to their satisfaction. On several occasions he has been tlie means of securing better 
prices for the producers. 

For many years he was school trustee of his district, and under his supervision a new school 
house was erected, which the district is justly proud of. _ 

Mr. Brown has one of the finest and best improved farms in the Wallkill Valley — its fertile 
fields and broad meadows with large orchards of various kinds of fruit, denotes a thrift that can 
only be obtained by diligent perseverance to the utmost end. 

Mr. Brown married Miss Virginia Reade of Brooklyn, N. Y., April 3, 1878. Eight children 
were born unto them, seven of whom are livmg. Edith R., Florence Ida died in her eleventh year, 
John Taylor, Susie L., Annie C, Thornton Knox, Laura V., and Leonard Wilson, respectively. 

Anson J. Fowler, the subject of this sketch, is one of the prominent young attorneys of the pres- 
ent day. Mr. Fowler from early youth enjoyed the advantages of a practical business education 
while in the office of his father, Nicholas J. Fowler. Later he took up law and graduated with honor. 
In his practice he has a large following, with offices at Newburgh and Walden. He is a director and 
the treasurer of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association, also interested in several prominent orders 
and societies. Socially, he ranks among the favored few who is sought after to grace by his pres- 
ence every festive occasion among a large circle of acquaintances. 

The subject of this sketch, Mr. Adam Wiley, was born at Croton Falls. Westchester County, 
N. Y'., on the 9th day of May, 1849, his father being James Wiley and his mother Rebecca Ritchie. 

Several years of Mr. Wiley's early life were spent at school at Croton Falls, N. Y., and Mill 
Plains, Conn., but his father dying when he was fourteen years of age, without leaving any means 
of support for a large family, young Adam found it necessary to discontinue his school career and 
seek remunerative employment. 

The first few years of his new venture were spent at farming, but learning of a position open in 
one of the livery stables in Brewster, and as his mind possessed a natural bent for horses, he made 
application and procured the situation. His employment here lasted five years, and during that time 
he had an opportunity to study veterinary under Dr. Amos Smith, a then well-known veterinarian. 
The instruction thus received has proved of svich value to Mr. Wiley that he has won a meritorious 
record as a highly competent doctor of horses and cattle, and for which proficiency he was recently 
awarded a diploma by the New York State Board of Regents. 

For the past thirty years Mr. Wiley has worked for the Borden interests, and for the last twenty- 
two years he has been employed directly by the Borden family, the latter five years of which as super- 
intendent at "Home Farm." 

On November 8, 1873, he was joined in marriage with Rebecca Sweetman of Brewster, Putnam 
County, N. Y., and as a result of such union, there were four sons and two daughters, three sons 
and o_ne_ daughter still living. Mr. Wiley always takes an active part in the Wallkill Valley Farmers' 
Association, and has served as director, vice-pre>ident and superintendent. 

It has long been the opinion of our best informed citizens that the two hundred-acre farm oi 

John D. JMould was unsurpassed by any farm property within the 
limits of the town. Its barns are large and commodious. It has 
a large residence and good tenement dwelling. Its products are 
diversified. The dairj- produces large revenues. The location of 
this farm is of great historic interest. L^pon its domain the last 
Indian village of the departing race was located. ]\Ir. Mould has 
served in many positions of trust and honor in church and state. 
He has always held the position of director and for many j'ears 
was vice-president of the Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association. 

Joseph B. Hadden was well and favorably known as a man of 
sterling worth and character, whose life in the community has been 
like an open book. His homestead farm of seventy-five acres is 
located a mile west of the old Berea church. A large herd of cattle 
are the producers of the income of the place. Mr. Hadden ac- 
cumulated a competency and enjoyed his declining years surrounded 
with many of the modern improvements and comforts of this pro- 
gressive age. He died February 15, 1906. The interment occurred 
in the family lot at Goodwill cemetery, in the shadow of th« 
JOHN D. JiouLD church where the deceased worshiped so many years. 



^ 



'j^?- 





94 




THE SOUVENIR TENT— OUTING DAYS AND OLD HOAIE WEEK. AUGUST 15-16-17, 1906. 

WALLKILL VALLEY FARMERS' ASSOCIATION, WALDEN, N. Y. 

Unequaled and highly artistic booklets have been issued since 1894. The tirst two years under 
the personal supervision of Nicholas J. Fowler and William C. Hart, for the ensuing six years by 
Mr. Hart in behalf of the Association. In 1902 the society decided to discontinue the publication, 
since which time it has been issued by the Secretary, who first conceived of the feasibility of its 
introduction, and has continuously dictated its field and contents issued under the title of the Wall- 
kill Valley Publishing Association. The fourteen volumes are classified as follows : 



1894 — Borden's Home Farm. 

1895 — Historical. 

1896 — Tributary Streams of the Wallkill. 

1897 — Indian Localities and Hostilities. 

1898 — Battle of Minisink. 

1899 — Churches of the Wallkill Valley. 

1900 — Beautiful Landscape Views. 

1901 — The Wallkill Valley at Gettysburgh, 
Orange County Agricultural Society, 
Mountain Drives of Mohonk. 

1902 — Through the Valley of the Wallkill, pro- 
fusely illustrated. 



1903 — Companion Volume of 1902. 

1904 — Gems from the Hudson. Famous Horses 
of Orange County. 

1905 — The Hudson and Wallkill Rivers. City of 
Middletown. In Art and Story. 

1906 — Lake Mohonk, profusely illustrated. Or- 
ange Blossoms and guests at Gettysburgh. 
Walden in Profile. The Catskills and 
Queenly Hudson. 

1907 — Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association. Lake 
Mohonk Snowbound. 



THE SOUVENIR BOOKLETS 
The scope of the souvenir in originality and perfection of detail will interest and entertain all 
who claim this favored region by birthright or adoption, while those beyond its bounds will find 
a beautiful reminder of historic scenes and associations through which the Wallkill and Hudson 
Rivers flow. Silently it enters the precincts of the home and finds an abiding place therein. 

"my HOME land" 

Pastor's Study, First Reformed ChurcJi, Patcrson, N. J. 
I am in receipt of copies of "Historic Wallkill Valley." They are of great interest to me, and 
may say, their arrangement and finish speak the praises of committee having matter in charge. A 
perusal of these works is almost like taking a trip through my early "home land." 

Rev. Thomas Powell Vernoll. 



95 



"its diversified scenery" 

Thompsonville, Conn. 
It deals with a region noted for its diversified scenery, rich in historic incident and association, 
a valley dotted with prosperous villages and well-tilled farms, the abode of happiness and thrift. It 
serves to bring to public notice this fair valley, and former residents whose hearts still beat true 
to the old home rejoice in the spirit of progress manifested. The region famous before will become 
more famous, the character of its people, the comfort and beauty of its homesteads, the public spirit 
of its citizens, the reverence and faith of all will be worthy of the best traditions of the Fathers. 
May God's blessing abound in it all. ^ Rev. A. V. S. Wallace, 

Pastor First Presbyterian Church, Thompsonville, Conn., formerly of Little Britain, N. Y, 

"l AM ALWAYS GLAD" 

Lake Mohonk Mountain House, Mohonk Lake, N. Y. 
Please accept m}^ thanks for the copies of "Historic Wallkill Valley." It is, as usual, most 
attractively gotten up, and eminently fulfills the purpose for which it is intended. I am always glad 
to see the new editions as they appear. Very truly yours, 

Albert K. Smiley, 
"show an artist's touch" 

The Kraemer Art Co.. Cincinnati, 0. 
It is really charming. The photographs and engravings are excellent. The selection of sub- 
jects, artistically speaking, show an artist's touch. The composition shows careful preparation 
and executed in the best possible manner known to printer's art. 

A. O. Kraemer. 

Nezvburgh, N. Y. 
It is elegantly printed, the binding is perfection, the illustrations of the halftone, and the de- 
scriptive letterpress thoroughly historical and interesting. For a book of reference in years to come 
it's a treasure. J. F. Tucker. 

New York. 
My few years of residence in your section so endeared the associations to me that I yield to no 
one in my love for the beautiful scenes of nature existing therein, as well as the noble men who 
inhabit it. You will, therefore, by reason of these sentiments acqiit me of undue flattery when I 
say that the beautiful book, "Historic Wallkill Valley," is in my judgment truly "a work of art" and 
could not have been produced by anyone less inspired by the same sentiments as alluded to above. 

Augustus S. Smith. 

San Francisco, Cal. 
And now another issue fully as interesting and more charming than any of its sisters, is on iny 
table, reminding me of the home and surroundings so distant and dear, which makes it doubly wel- 
come. The views of IV^ohonk and Minnewaski are beautiful, and so true that they revive pleasant 
memories of years passed. I shall put it away among my treasures. 

S. E. Ritchie. 

Nezvburgh, N. Y. 
Its high standard of excellence has been fully sustained. The qualities to make up an attractive 
and interesting and valuable book of local scenery and history are to be readily found in this book. 
With great pleasure and profit I have read its pages and admired its views. 

Rev. William K. Hall. 
"scenes most fascinating" 

First Presbyterian Church, Austin Station, Chicago. 
You know without any words of mine how glad I am to have it in my hands, with its reminders 
of scenes most fascinating and abounding in delightful associations. The faces of old friends look 
out from its pages and remind me that it is well worth while to gather together and perpetuate 
facts whose local interest soon becomes broad and deep. I dare say you are proud of the pages de- 
voted to the "Silent City," with which you have had so much to do in enhancing its beauty. Walden 
should be proud of the book and give the issue a prominent place on its 'ibrary table. 

Rev. Robert H. Beattie. 
"it's a treasure house to all," 
_ "Send this publication to those you cherish and love, and watch with the intense satisfaction 
which is certain to be yours, the happiness and joy which is sure to be expressed as each new page 
stands revealed." On Christmas morning Mr. William E. Gowdy of Hammonton,' N. J., a former 
resident and manufacturer of Walden, N. Y., received two volumes, and in acknowledgment writes : 
"I value these copies of 'Historic Wallkill Valley' above all my Christmas gifts received. The bio- 
graphical sketches, and memorial pages of those who have passed the confines of this earth, strongly 
appeal to me." 

96 




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98 



A MIDSUMMER VISIT TO MOUNT BEACON 

Beauty o± the Perspective An Ideal Summer Resort The Refreshing Air 




The writer was born amid the hills, and ever the "lure" of the mountains has held him in thrall. He 
has had many delightful experiences in the exhilaration that comes to him who stands where ^only 
the heavens are above and the earth is unrolled at his feet. Well he knows that pain, despondency, 
exhaustion give place to exaltation in Tiim who has ascended the mountain peak. It was only yester- 
dav that Mount Beacon, arrayed in the "living green" of royal summer, enticed him again to leave the 
heated lowlands and pass a few hours within its magnificent environment. 

By car up the incline — a thrilling experience — he reached the west spur of the mountain, where 
he had a brief interview with ]\Ir. H. W. George, the general manager and proprietor of the capa- 
cious Casino. He looked admiringly on the mighty panorama of river, lake and mountainside from 
the spacious balconies of the Casino. He visited its halls, floors and rooms and drank of the wonder- 
ful water from the secret spring in the mountain. He entered the pavilions and shady nooks which 
are for the accommodation and delectation of guests, picnickers and sojourners, and saw that it is 
an ideal summer home. Some thirteen cottages have been erected hereabouts and the occupants breathe 
a most healthful atmosphere and enjoy a perpetual feast of beauty with the everlasting hills about 
them. Here, near at home, is a summer resort, unsurpassed by many whose fame is world wide. 

The writer now set out for the summit ol the mountain which he gained as follows : A path 
or promenade called "Howard's Path" has been made — nearly level from the neighborhood of the 
Casino along the northwest side of the mountain to the artificial lake in the rear solitude. This path 
winds and turns, following the irregular contour of the mountainside — comes out into open space, 
then is beneath overhanging boughs, very romantic and inviting. 

Along this promenade is a new cottage, occupied by an English lady, a lover and student of 
nature and an admirer of the Father of His Country. The cottage is known as Washington Cot- 
tage. She was giving finishing touches to vtiis her new summer home and uttered a word of welcome 
to this youthful traveler. She said her summer home was indeed elysian — that much time was neces- 
sary for a full acquaintance with nature in its ever changing moods. 

The glorious scenery beneath and beyond seemed near or far according to the atmosphere; the 
face of the mountain changed from the majestic, the weird, the threatening, to the smiling and 
benignant as the clouds shape and deport themselves in infinite space above. 

A half hour was passed at the lake at the cottage of the watchman, an old comrade, Levi Had- 
field of Company D, Q/th Pennsylvania Volunteers Infantry. 

The tramp was resumed by the old road, occasionally steep and difiicult. The writer came suddenly 
into boundless vision on North Beacon's top and stood beside the monument. Here he passed a de- 
lightful half hour. The reaction from arduous climbing into rest was delicious. The air was lustrously 
clear ; the cloud shadows came and passed with unexpected richness. The mosses at his feet, 
which cushion many mountain tops and ituercept and gather into themselves the moisture of the 
"weeping clouds" and enveloping mists for the watering of the earth beneath, were noted as a strik- 
ing example of nature's wonderful adjustment and of the wisdom of God. 

Newburgh, July 5. (See pages 182 and 183) J. F. S. 



99 



Aoa^/^r: 




WALLKILL VALLEY CEAIETERY LOOKLXG NORTHEAST 

Wallkill Valley Cemetery 

Walden, Orange County, New York 



Incorporated 
September 15th, 1865 



TRUSTEES 
John C. Seymour, President Hiram B. Wooster, Treasurer 

Theron L. Millspaugh Thomas W. Bradley 

Joseph W. Rowland William Dunn 



Irving H. Loughran, Secretary 
William C. Hart 

Samuel Andrews 



Forty acres of the grounds are laid out in Plots, Drives and Walks ; twenty-six additional acres are 
now in process of plottin.g, under the eminent Landscape Architect Downing Vaux of New York, and will 
be completed this fall. In the city of the dead, every grave is under the direct care of the superin- 
tendent, who is personally responsible to the Association for the care of the Cemetery. 

A Receiving Vault thoroughly erected, accessible at all times. The electric cars from Walden to 
Newburgh. pass the gates ; the picturesque landscape, beauty of grounds, winding drives and graceful 
walks, laid out in sweeping curves, at once impress the visitor with the natural and artificial beauty 
of the enclosure. 

Lender the Statutes of the State of New York, Cemetery Trustees are authorized to take and hold 
property, real or personal, bequeathed or given upon trust, the income thereof to be applied for the im- 
provement of the Cemetery, or the erection or preservation of any buildings, structures, fences or 
walks therein, or upon the lots of any of the proprietors; or for the erection, repair, preservation 
or renewal of any tomb, monument or other structure in or around any cemetery lot. 

No pains or expense at the outset, no solidity of material, no thoroughness of workmanship, are 
proof against the elements of nature. Headstones and monuments cannot be so firmly placed as to 
defy forever the natural forces which are continually at work to deface and destroy them. It is be- 
lieved that those who provide in Wallkill Cemetery a last resting place for themselves and kindred 
will gladly protect their grovmds and improv ments against such destroying effects. 

The income from property thus donated will be exclusively applied to the special objects designated 
by the proprietor. In most cases a very moderate investment will insure the perfect preservation of 
a lot and of its structure. 

As a guide to those wishing to avail themselves of the provisions referred to, the form of bequest 
for insertion in wills, the form of a bill of sale or transfer of property, or receipts given for the 
payment of money to the Cemetery Association, will be gladly furnished, by John C. Seymour, the 
President ; William C. Hart, Trustee, or the Secretary, Irving H. Loughran, who are a special Com- 
mittee appointed for that purpose. 



lOO 




3n fl^emortam 



J. EDWARD WELLS 

J. Edward Wells was born 
in the town of Goshen, January 
I, 1834. His parental ancestor, 
Joshua Wells, one of the early 
settlers of the Wallkill Valley, 
came from Southold, L. I., about 
1735, and settled on the Home- 
stead Farm containing two hun- 
dred and iifty acres, and situated 
about two miles west of the vil- 
lage of Goshen. The farm has 
been owned and occupied con- 
tinuously by members of the 
Wells family since it was first 
settled, and is now held by the 
fifth generation. Mr. Wells has 
been a farmer all his life, al- 
though at times he has carried 
on other business in connection 
with farming. He married Miss 
Frances E. Conkling, also of the 
town of Goshen. They have two 
children, William A., who resides with them, and Lena C, who married Mr. C. Christie of Ridge- 
field Park, N. J. 

Mr. Wells was elected a director of the Orange County Agricultural Society at is annual meeting 
held at Washingtonville, October 4, 1879, and has been successively re-elected seven times. He is 
now filling his eighth term of three years each. He has served as superintendent of various depart- 
ments of the Society's Annual Exhibitions, and has been the general superintendent of the fair 
since it was permanently located at Middletown in 1897. The work of laying out and improving the 
Fair Grounds, the erection and arrangement of suitable buildings and other structures, has all been 
done under his supervision. The care and custody of the grounds, buildings, and other property of 
the Society were by resolution of the Board of Managers entrusted entirely to him. 

His father, the late Alfred Wells, was also identified with the Society as a member for many 
years, an exhibitor at a number of its fairs, and as one of its directors during the years 1873, 1874 
and 1875. 

In March, 1894, Mr. Wells was elected Supervisor of the town of Goshen, and has since continued 
to represent that town in the County Legislature, serving as a member of the Committee on Public 
Buildings since 1896. 

Mr. Wells died May 6, 1907; interment at Phillipsburgh cemetery. 



lOl 




3n fl^emoriani 



Hon. WAI. GEORGE HASTINGS 

Hon. William George Hastings, member of 
Assembly for the First District of Orange 
County, passed away at x-Mbany June 28, 1907, 
in the forty-first year of his age. Air. 
Hastings was stricken down in the full vigor 
of robust manhood without having yet at- 
tained the zenith of his political and busi- 
ness career. By his death a life replete with 
activities for the benefit of his fellow man, 
characterized by all the noblest and best at- 
tributes of sterling manhood, was cut short. 
Few members of the lower branch of the 
Legislature were better known or better liked 
than he. A loyal friend, genial and whole- 
souled, he passed away, mourned by a legion 
of friends of all political parties and creeds, 
his memory unsullied by unworthy word or 
deed, his life-story a prized heritage for his 
stricken relatives, an inspiration for his co- 
workers. 

Mr. Hastings was a member of an old 
Newburgh family. His father is School 
Trustee James Hastings, and his mother was 
Miss Mary A. Brown before her marriage. He was born in Newburgh and received his education in the 
Newburgh pulilic schools and in Siglar's Preparatory School on Dubois street. 

From early manhood he was identified with the Republican party, and was an earnest worker 
for its success. He served as Deputy Postmaster of Newburgh under Postmaster Joseph A. Sneed. 
He had charge of the the money-order department, and it was here that his alertness, his cheery 
disposition and his willingness — even eagerness — to oblige, first attracted general attention. Later 
he acted as private secretary for Benjamin B. Odell, Jr.. when the latter was Congressman. 

In 1891 Mr. Hastings married May E. Moore, daughter of Eugene Moore, who survives him 
with one daughter. He took interest in local military affairs and was a veteran of the Tenth Sepa- 
rate Company. He was a Past Master of Newburgh Lodge. No. 309. F. and A. M. ; a member of 
Highland Chapter, R. A. M. ; Hudson River Commandery, K. T. ; Mecca Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. ; 
Acme Lodge. I. O. O. P., Ringgold Hose Company, th Newburgh Wheelmen and the Newburgh City Club. 
In November, 1904. Mr. Hastings was elected a member of the Assembly. Speaker Nixon the 
following winter appointed him to the committees on Insurance, Commerce and Navigation and Re- 
vision. Mr. Hastings was renominated and re-elected in the fall of 1905, and served under Speaker 
Wadsworth on the committees on Revision, General Laws and Public Health. He was renominated 
and re-elected a third time in 1906, and at the time of his death was serving as chairman of the Re- 
vision Committee and a member of the Committees on General Laws and Banks. In a business way 
Mr. Hastings was connected with a contracting firm. 

Besides his wife and daughter and his parents, Mr. Hastings is survived by his brother. T. James 
Hastings, and three sisters, Miss Harriet B. Hastings, Mrs. Charles B. Gilcrist of Newburgh, and 
Mrs. John A. Wilson of Brooklyn. It will be many a long day before his memory dims in the affec- 
tions of his friends, and as for his record, it is already writ in the annals of Orange County as one 
who had accomplished much and was destined to do much more had he been spared. 



102 




3n £Pemoriain 



L. S. STERRIT 

L. S. Stcrrit. son of Thomas and Jane 
Sterrit, was of Scotch-English extraction. 
His parents emigrated to this conntry shortly 
after their marriage and estahlished a home 
beside the old Presbyterian Church at 
Coldenham, where the subject of this sketch 
was born February 17, 1852. His boyhood 
days were spent in the shadow of this 
church ; he was baptized within its walls, and 
in his later years often referred to it as his 
cradle. 

His general education was gained at the 
Newburgh Academy and the Collegiate In- 
stitute at Newton, N. J. He commenced his 
legal studies at Newburgh in the office of 
George H. Clark, leaving this office to enter 
that of Judge James W. Taylor, April 3, 
1873. He was admitted to the bar at a gen- 
eral term of the Supreme Court held at 
Brooklyn in September, 1876. After his ad- 
mission to the bar, he continued to occupy 
the position of managing clerk for Judge 
Taylor, and upon the latter's death in 1883, 
succeeded to his practice. At the time of his 
death, which occurred April 4, 1907, he had 
occupied the same suite of offices in the Sav- 
ings Bank Building for a period of thirty- 
four consecutive years. 

His practice was almost exclusively con- 
fined to equity and probate work, in which 
he was an acknowledged expert. He con- 
ducted some of the most important equity 
cases of recent years, and was employed in the settlement of many large estates. His practice of his 
profession was marked by untiring industry and strict integrity ; and these won him the confidence, 
while the charm of his personality won him the firm afTection and regard of a large circle of clientj 
and friends. 

He was an eloquent speaker and a graceful writer, many of the articles which he published in the 
local press possessing literary merit of a high order. The productions of his pen related chiefly to 
local historical subjects, on which he was an acknowledged authority. 

He was prominent in the Masonic fraternity, having united with it early in life. He was a Past 
Master of Hudson River Lodge, of which he was a member, and delivered the oration at the cele- 
bration of its twenty-fifth anniversary. For fifteen years he served as a trustee and secretary ot th« 
Glebe, and was a trustee of the Woodlawn Cemetery Association for the same length of time. 

As a safe and trusted counsellor, he was ho -ored by his fellow-practitioners at the bar ; as a gen 
erous, public-spirited citizen, he was held in high regard by those among whom he lived ; but as \ 
noble-hearted friend, void of selfishness and without guile, he was loved by those who knew him 
best. This, in his life, served to bring him his most cherished reward; and, in his death, will prove 
his most enduring monument. 



103 




3n fl^emoriam 



ROBERT ASHBY 

The ancestors of Mr. Ashby came from Ashbv. England, a1)Out 1720, and settled in Dutchess 
County, N. Y. His father, Anthony Ashby, movei tr> Orange Cour.ty in 1823, and in 1827 married 
Eliza Millspaugh, whose forefathers came from Holland in 1724, antl settled on a farm west of 
Walden. Although born at Rhinebeck, Dutchess County, his earliest years were spent on a small 
place near the Millspaugh homestead. When fourteen years of age he went to live with his uncle, 
D. W. Wilkin, who resided on a farm three miles further west. In 1885 he purchased the farm, and 
in 1888 he sold it to Jonathan Falconer, the present owner, after living there forty years. 

The same year he married Editha S., daughter of the late Joseph G. Millspaugh of Walden, N. Y. 

Realizing that a milder climate was essential for health, they decided to make their future home 
in the west. Mr. Ashby has traveled through many of the states from the Hudson River to the 
Rocky Mountains, and said that for beauty of scenery and the intelligence of its people he had found 
no place superior to the Wallkill Valley, and seco id to it. the Miami Valley, which was his home 
from 1894 to June, 1900. The following August Mrs. Ashby was called to the "Better World," while 
visiting friends on the Hudson, and in November Mr. Ashby went to visit his sister in Western 
Florida. He enjoyed the mild climate and also the kindhearted Southern people, with many of whom 
he formed lasting friendship, and was useful and happy among them. On March 12, 1907, the sum- 
mons of the Master came quietly and peacefu'lw His work on earth was done, to be resumed on 
the heavenly shore. 

S. M. Ashby. 



104 




In fl^emoriam 



CAPTAIN LEWIS S. WISNER 

Captain Lewis S. \\'isner, a veteran of the Civil War, and 
one of Aliddletown's oldest and best known residents, passed 
away at his residence, i6g Wisner avenue, Saturday afternoon, 
October 8, 1906, at 4 130 o'clock, in the sixty-sixth year of his 
age. 

He was born in Middlctown, August 11, 1841. His grand- 
father, Henry Barnet Wisner, was born in Orange County in 
1772, and died in 1846. For many years he was a justice of the 
peace and started the first store in Middletown. He owned the 
land which was later purchased by the father of our subject and 
which is now part of the estate of Captain Wisner. Major 
Henry Wisner, his great grandfather, served as a Captain in 
the Revolutionary War, and later was commissioned Major of 
Colonel Hathorn's Warwick and Florida Regiment. 

The great-great-grandfather of Captain Wisner was Hon. 
Henry Wisner, born in the town of Goshen in 1720. He was a dele- 
gate to the First, Second and Third Continental Congresses, and 
voted for the Declaration of Independence July 4, 1776, but 
<lid I'Ot wait to sigh the document, for the reason that he was 
sent home to manufacture powder, which was needed to enforce that measure. He was one of the 
four commissioners who laid out West Point, and also assisted in selecting the site of Fort Putnam. 
Over the grave was recorded the following: "Sacred to the memory of Henry Wisner, who de- 
parted this life, March 4, 1790, a devoted friend to the liberties of his country. On account of the 
extensive aid furnished his country he died in poverty." 

The great-great-great-grandfather of our subject, Hendrick Wisner, was born in 1698, and died in 1767. 
He came with his father from Switzerland and in 17 19 married Mary Shaw of New England. He 
was a lieutenant in the Swiss contingent of Queen Anne's army, and is said to have been the first 
settler in Orange County on the Wawayanda patent. Captain Wisner had deeds of every one of his 
ancestors, except Johannis, as far back as 1703 and signed by Queen Anne. Daniel C. Wisner, the 
father of Captain Wisner, was by occupation a farmer. He was an elder in the Second Presbyterian 
Church, now the Westminster Presbyterian Church of Middletown. In politics he was originally a 
Whig and afterwards a Republican. He married Sarah M. Weed, who was born in 1831 at Stamford, 
Conn. ]\Irs. Wisner who died in 1885, was a relative of Uzal Knapp, one of Washington's body guards. 
Captain W'isner was educated in the public schools and finished his course in Wallkill Academy. 
Until August 6, 1862, he remained at home engaged in farming with his father, but at that time he 
enlisted in Company K, 124th Regiment (Orange Blossoms), as a private. Soon after he was pro- 
moted to Second Sergeant, then First Sergeant and in May, 1863, was commissioned Second Lieu- 
tenant. February 23, 1864, he was promoted to First Lieutenant and July 14, 1867, was commissioned 
Captain of his company. 

Returning home he purchased the old homestead, where he died. It has a beautiful location on 
Wisner avenue, which was laid out and improved at his expense. 

Mr. Wisner was married June 21, 1865, in Aliddletown to Miss Adelaide Robertson. To Captain 
and Mrs. Wisner were born four children, Mary R., wife of C. L. Stonaker of New York City; 
George R., who is in Mexico ; Henry Barnet, a clerk in the First National Bank, and Theresa 
Weed, at home. 

Besides his wife and children Captain Wisner is survived by one brother, Henry B. Wisner, of 
Berea, O. Captain Wisner was a charter member of Captain William A. Jackson Post, No. 301, 
G. A. R., and was also a member of the New York Sons of the Revolution. In politics he was a 
true blue Republican, and religiously was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1895 Cap- 
tain Wisner received a medal of honor tendered him by the United States Congress for gallantry at 
Spottsylvania, Va.. May 12, 1864. The medal, which is star-shaped, bears this inscription: "The Con- 
gress to Captain Lewis S. Wisner, Company K, 124th Regiment, New York Volunteers, for gallantry 
at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864." 

The medal was awarded to Captain Wisner because of his daring courage when in charge as bri- 
gade engineer officer, on the staff of General Hobart Ward. Captain Wisner and his men had orders 
to cut out the top of a long breastworks, near the "Bloody Angle," so the artillery of the Union 
army could answer the hot fire of the Confederates, which act seemed certain death. The men in 
the detail hesitated and Captain Wisner seized an axe, sorang on the rampart and personally cut out 
the breastworks. Captain Wisner was complimented on the field at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, for gallant 
and meritorious conduct by Colonel A. Van Horn Ellis, just as the latter rode to his death. 



105 




M fl^emoriam 



LEWIS W. Y. McCROSKERY 

Lewis W. Y. AlcCroskery, born at Newburgh, N. Y., November 8, i860, is the son of ex-Mayor 
John J. S. McCroskery and Henrietta Young. His mother was a direct descendant of Colonel Lewis 
Dubois, who served with distinction in the Revolutionary War. He was educated in the public 
schools, and graduated from the Newburgh Free Academy in June, 1876. He studied law in the office 
of Cassedy & Brown ( Hon. A. S. Cassedy. ex-Mayor of Newburgli, and Charles F. Brown, late Chief 
Justice of the Appellate Court, Second Division). After his admission to the bar. May 12, 1882, he 
remained in the office of the late Mr. Cassedy for several years, when he started practice for himself, 
in which he has continued to the present time. 

Mr. McCroskery was elected Recorder of the city of Newburgli and served from 1891 to 1895. 
In the fall of 1895 he was a candidate on the Democratic ticket for District Attorney of Orange 
County, but was defeated by Hon. Michael H. Hirschberg, who is at present one of the Justices of 
the Supreme Court. Although defeated, he ran several hundred ahead of the Democratic ticket in the 
county. He was appointed Postmaster of the city of Newburgh by President Cleveland on January 
30, 1896, and served as such until March, 1900. He served fourteen years in the National Guard as a 
private and officer. He was commissioned Second Lieutenant of tlie Tenth Separate Company, on 
November 9, 1891, First Lieutenant on March 2t, 1892, and Captain on December 12. 1893. After 
serving about one year as Captain, he resigned and was honorably discharged. At the time of the 
Spanish-American War he was again commissioned Captain and ordered to take charge of the 
One Hundred Fifth Separate Company, N. G., which company was mustered out on the return of the 
Fifth Separate Company. 

He was for one year Master of Hudson River Lodge, No. 607, F. and A. I\L, is a meniber of 
Highland Chapter, No. 52, R. A. M., Hudson River Commandery, No. 35, K. T., and also of Lawson 
Hose Veteran Association and the Newburgh City Club. 

Lewis W. Y. McCroskery died February 25, 1907. Interment at Cedar Hill Cemetery. 



[06 







In fl^emortam 



JAMES MITCHELL 

James Mitchell was born in Wigtownshire, Scotland, in 1846, and came to Newburgh with his 
parents in 1857. 

He attended the public schools and graduated from the Free Academy. 

Entering the service of the Quassaick Bank in 1865 he remained there as clerk, bookkeeper and 
paying teller until stricken with his fatal illness, a continuous connection of over forty years of faith- 
ful, reliable service. 

It is a remarkable fact that his was the tirst death since the organization of the Bank of any of 
its employes. 

Necessarily from his position in the business world, Mr. Mitchell had a large circle of friends 
ind acquaintances; but when released from business cares and responsibilities, his spare time was 
spent with his family and intimate friends, or in pursuing his favorite studies. 

He took a deep interest in geology and mathematics, and found much pleasure in studying these 
branches of science. 

His life was as an open book. Strict rectitude of conduct and absolute probity of character were 
his, and to those who knew him best his name was a synonym for honesty, fidelity and clean living. 

Mr. Mitchell died August 29, 1906, and he is survived by his wife, whose maiden name was 
Miss Jennie Gait, and one daughter, Ethelyn G. ; also one sister, Miss Jennie Mitchell. 



107 




3ln S^emoriam 



LEANDER CLARK, Jr. 

Leander Clark, Jr.. is a descendant 
from one of the Pilgrim Fathers. The 
records of the family are found in the 
early histories of Connecticut and Mas- 
sachusetts, which especially show their 
loyalty to their adopted country. Lieu- 
tenant William Clark, from whom 
Leander, Jr., is descended, emigrated to 
Xew England, March ,^o. 1630, in the 
ship ;\lary and John. He had nine 
children one of whom was Deacon John 
Clark who had twelve children, one of 
whom was Deacon John Clark, Jr., who 
liad twelve children, one of whom was 
Eliakim Clark, who had eleven children, 
.•\shahel being one of the number. 
.\shahel Clark married Snlimit Clapp, 
daughter of Major Jonathan Clapp; they 
had twelve children, one of whom was 
Lucas Clark, who married Phila Avery, 
daughter of Abner Avery, a soldier of 
the Revolution. They had seven children, one of whom was Edson H. Clark, father of our subject. 
Leander Clark, Jr.. though of New England ancestry, was born at Beattiesburgh, Sullivan 
County, N. Y. While a babe his parents moved to Newburgh, which place has been his home the 
greater part of his life. He was educated principally in private schools, graduating from the New- 
burgh Academy in TS53. At his father's foundry he became a master mechanic. At twenty-two 
years of age he ab.andoned what he thought would be his vocation for life, and became corres- 
ponding secretary and bookkeeper for Dr. C. W. Grant, an eminent horticulturalist at lona Island, 
remaining there until the breaking out of the Civil War, when he received an appointment as pay- 
master's steward on board U. S. gunboat Somerset. In 1863 he was promoted to paymaster's clerk, 
which position he held when honorably discharged from the service in August, 1864. He was super- 
intendent of the Newburgh Water W^orks from i856 to 1869, when he resigned to engage in brick- 
making. In 1888 he retired from business, but in 1898 he again entered into active business life with 
his son in plumbing and steam heating. 

He was a leading director of the Orange County Agricultural Society for fifteen years, a signer 
of its certificate of incorporation and reorganization in 1884, and the genial and efficient general 
superintendent of its annual fairs for eleven years. He is a well-known horticulturist, has been a 
director of the Quassaick National Bank for many years, and is a trustee of Trinity M. E. Church. 
He died September 19, 1906. Interment at Cedar Hill cemetery. 



108 




M fl^emortam 



WILLIAM JAMES EAIBLER 



William James Embler was born at Kaiser 
William Embler, whose father, Andrew, came 
Rockefeller, of Holland descent. His granclm 

In his younger days he attended school at 
mill at Little Britain. After hard labor he was 
married Frances M. Howell, who was the dau 
in the historic stone building on the turnpike, 
property. From thence he came to Walden an 
until four years ago, when he retired from ac 
^juietude at his home on Ulster avenue. 

He is survived by one son, Charles W., who 
and one daughter, Estelle, who married Thomas 
loved so well. But two grandchildren are 
Howse Embler. 

Mr. Embler was one of the founders of the 
the first to rear upon one of its sightly eleva 
sleep in quiet rest members of his family. 

During a long and active life he was always 
and foster any project that would contribute to 
of the Reformed Church, a man who loved his 
advanced age, after life's turmoil, quietlv fell 
Wallkill Valley cemetery at Wallkill, N. Y. 



town on September 24, 1824. He was the son of 
from Holland. His mother's name was Elizabeth 
other was Alary Tiers, born on the Rhine. 
Goodwill, and, in early manhood moved to the saw- 
rewarded by prosperity, and, on November 26, 185 1, 
ghter of Charles and Sophia Howell, and who lived 
one mile east of the well-known B. K. Johnston 
d entered the millinery business, which he continued 
tive life and spent his remaining days in peace and 

purchased the Dickson farm and now resides there, 

R. Moore and lives in the beautiful home her father 

left to remember him, Marjorie Moore and Charles 

Wallkill Valley Cemetery Association, and among 
tions a beautiful monumental memorial, around which 

ready to lend a helping hand to the worthy poor 
the advancement of public interest ; a lifelong support 

home and family and in the evening of life at an 
asleep. He died February 27, 1907. Interment in 



109 




3n S^tmoxmn 



Rev. WILLIAM K. HALL, D.D. 

Dr. Hall was born in Boston, Mass., 
November 4, 1836. He was fitted for 
college at the Boston Public Latin 
ScIkhiI and was graduated from Yale in 
the Class of '59. He then pursued his 
theological studies in New Haven and 
CTcrmany. In October, 1862, he was or- 
dained Chaplain of the i/th Connecticut 
Volunteers. His first pastorate was the 
First Congregational Church of Strat- 
ford. Conn., into which he was installed 
in October, 1866. In February, 1873, he 
accepted the call of the First Presby- 
terian Church of Newburgh, and was 
installed the following May. In 1898 
the ceremonies of the twenty-fifth anni- 
versary of his pastorate in Newburgh 
were celebrated at the church — partici- 
pated in by nearly all of the Newburgh 
pastors, together with many from other 
cities. The ceremonies lasted for three 
days. Undoubtedly Dr. Hall's life-work 
will be rounded out in his second pas- 
torate, as his congregation, among 
whom he has labored so faithfully, bap- 
tizing, marrying and burying their dead, would hardly listen to a proposition for a change. 

Dr. Hall has been honored throughout his residence in Newburgh, in many ways, by his Synod 
and the Government of the Nation, State and Municipality. He is as popular in the community as 
he is with his congregation, and is ever foremost in the promotion of the best good of the city in 
which he lives. 

The following is an extract from a notice of Dr. Hall in the Encyclopedia of the Presbyterian 
Church of the United States : "His sermons show marks of careful preparation, literary finish, 
rhetorical power and logical sequence of thought, and never lack the directness, earnestness and 
simplicity which distinguish his ordinary address. His manner in the pulpit is impressive. He com- 
bines breadth of sympathy with decision of character and thought. He is a man of public spirit, 
ready and efficient in the support of every public good.'' 

Dr. Hall married Anna B. Bond of Boston, and they have living two daughters and one son, 
IMrs. William R. Gait, Mrs. Fred Bartlett, and Walter, who is yet in school. 
Rev. William K. Hall, D.D., died September 17. 1906. 




1 10 



PIMPLES-BOILS 

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organs. It will help the kidneys to discharge the impurities, will regulate the Liver, and strengthen the Heart 

to properly circulate the blood. If you would have health, strength, comfort and a clear, pure skin, use 

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111 



PLANS AND PLANTING MAPS MADE FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF 
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All kinds of 

Monumental and Cemetery Work 

Finished in the very best manner 
99-107 Front Street New^burgh, New Y ork 

Designs and Estimates Furnished Granite a Specialty 



112 




The above Monument was designed and erected by me in the 
Wallkill Valley Cemetery, Walden, N. Y. 



^%^i^fj,:j 



I would be pleased to meet yoii 



^«-'-- 



D. C. MILLER 

cMonumental Dealer and Sculptor 

NEWBURGH, NEW YORK 

Long Distance Hudson River Telephone 348 



113 



M. W. COLLINS 

175-177 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 




TT7E have been in 
the Gra n i te 
business for more than 
thirty years. Each 
year our sales have in- 
creased. 

We make now, as 
we did then, the best 
monumental work that 
can be produced at 
any price, having fa- 
cilities that no other 
manufacturer or dealer 
in this section pos- 
sesses, in our thor- 
oughly equipped steam 
and pneumatic tool 
plant. 

We should be 
pleased to have you 
call upon us, and we 
invite inspection of 
our large and varied 
stock of monuments 

and all kinds of tombstone work in every kind of Granite and Marble. 

We are free to admit that we do not claim to be the cheapest manufacturers in the busi- 
ness, basing our claims for trade and our hopes for success rather on the fact that 

Our StocA and 2i^orkmanship are o^ the ^esf. 



114 




L. J. DOOLEY 



Sacccsor to DOOLET_S>YERS) 

Manufacturer of the Finest 

Granite and Marble Monumental Work 

From aii tde Eastern Granites and Best of IMarble 

Monuments and Memorials^ Headstones, 
Posts, Enclosures and Curbing 

Particular attention given to Lettering in the Cemeteries. Polishing highly executed by Water Motor 

Polishing Machines. Designs and Estimates cheerfully Furnished on application. All Work 

at Low Prices and Warranted. Refer by permission to Colonels Mills, Bass, 

Tillman, Lamed, Major Bellinger, and many other officers and 

residents of West Point for whom I have done work. 

Dealer in the Celebrated Pennsylvania Blue Stone for Flagging and Curbing. 

TELEPHONE GALL 136.W-I. RESIDENCE, 255 MAIN ST. 



244=254 Main Street, 



Fishkill=on=Hudson, N. Y. 



115 




116 



Vases of Plants as Substitutes for Gravestones 




npHE City of the Dead in 
the past has not been the 
most inviting place to visit. 
Going from monument to monu- 
ment reading the epitaphs has in 
many cemeteries become almost 
a thing of the past. A visit now 
to such a place becomes a pleas- 
ure, thanks to the inventive 
mind of modern manufacturers, 
who are making beautiful iron 
flower vases with only the name 
plate of the family. Nothing 
can be expected to take the 
place of a beautiful granite monu- 
ment, but in behalt of horticul- 
ture and good taste a beautiful 
vase filled with flowers and 
foliage, far surpasses in beauty 
the average gravestone ordina- 
rily used. That the effect col- 
lectively is beautiful no one of 
good taste can dispute, and as 
such effects can be had for a 
very small sum, the wonder is 
that more people do not take 
advantage of the new system of 
marking graves. 



THE KRAMER BROS. FOUNDRY CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

HARDWARE SPECIALTIES 

Cement Tools, Iron Flower Vases, Stove Casters 
Office and Factory : 

Michigan Ave., Kiefer and Dell Sts. DAYTON, O. 



117 



3 
3 

3 




"1^ '"'' ""' '"'" '"'' '"'' ■"'' '^ ''"■ '"'' * "'^ '"!' 1^ tllljl„„l[llll llllllm.llllLl lill] Illlllli,„lllll! HI ill 



i. 
"PRINTING! ft 

r & 
while you wait!" | ft 



We do our best to fill all orders 
promptly, but sometimes a rush 
of business compels us to ask 
our friends to "wait" a little. 



The A. V. Haight Company 

PRINTERS and BOOKBINDERS 
10=12 Liberty St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

%ii"ii l| | i ^ «l||r "" if|li "U ||P "nip iiiiHpi m iipiii ij |piiii[pii M inpi M iiipi i iiii pii iiip T^ 'iiTfiiiiillfiiiiillflMiinfii'Niipiiiiilp' 






1^ 



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118 



ESTABLIiiHED 1897. 



TELEPHONE CALL 32 i L 



The Vassar Ladies' Tailor 




S. GREENES 

322 Mill St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

A complete line of imported 
and domestic materials of the 
latest styles; also the latest 
Vienna and Parisian fashions, 
for ladies* tailor-made suits, 
coats and skirts, are now ready 
for your inspection. 

Deposits not required, each 
garment guaranteed as to perfect 
fit and best workmanship. 



SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

As a demand for a more reasonable garment was speedily in- 
creasing, [concluded to open up a separate department consisting 
of special- to -measure garments, where suits will be made to meas- 
ure from $25 upward. Thirty different models of the best import- 
ed styles unattainable elsewhere, will be on hand to select from. 

Hoping to receive your kind patronage. 

Respectfully yours, S. GREENES 

Fall and Winter Opening at the Palatine Hotel, Newbwrgh, Sept. 9 to J 2, J907. 



119 



"Good paper does not make a good printer, but good printing is impossible without it." 

The perfection of detail demanded 
by the best class of printed matter 
calls for a combination of expert 
pressmen, fine plates, good ink and 
last but not least one of 

DILL & COLLINS 




HIGH-GRADE PRINTING PAPERS 



MADE BY 



DILL & COLLINS CO. 

New York Warehouse: Philadelphia Warehouse: 

54 and 56 Varick St. 827 and 829 Filbert St. 

Samples and quotations on request to responsible users 

This souvenir is printed on DILL & COLLINS Pure White Coated Book 



120 



A Prosperous Produce Commission House 

When a concern has enjoyed a liberal patronage and steady popularity for many 

years it is manifest that its management is characterized by ability, 

integrity and sound judgment. Such is the record of 

S. H. & E. H. FROST 

319 Washington Street, New York City 

This house reaffirms its faithful allegiance to the best interests of those who consign to 
their care. Their business has increased beyond all expectations. They have increased 
their force of experienced salesmen, and are prepared to handle the coming crops. The 
honest manner in which this concern transacts its business and the promptness with which 
all returns are made have gained for it an enviable reputation, and it stands to-day second 
to none in the United States. They will meet the wishes of their shippers. Their advan- 
tages are in the location — 

A SUPERIOR CORNER PROPERTY WITH A LARGE COLD STORAGE PLANT 
Backed with Experience, Responsibility and Sound Judgment 




Hagopian 

Photo-Engraving 

Company 

36 Years' Experience 
Designers and Makers of all kinds of 

Half Tones -and- Line Plates 

Highest Class Three and Four 
Color Work 

39 East 20th Street 
New York 

TELEPHONE 1060 SPRING 



121 



dsiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 1 iiiiiiii iiiiii'^ 



BEAUTIFUL JEWELS 




Many people stop and wonder 
where to go when in need of a 

JEWEL OR FINE WATCH 

They also wonder who does the best repairing. 
But most people know that the best place is at 



A. 0. SNOW'S 



37 West Main Street 
GOSHEN, NEW YORK 



"YOUR JEWELER" 



Official Watch and Clock Inspector of the Erie Railroad 



riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilillililllillllllll iiiiiiiiiiiiiiilllllllllllllllllllllllllllliillliiiiilllili iiiiiiiiilii lllllir. 



122 




" Interpines " 



Is a beautiful, quiet, RESTFUL, HOMELIKE place devoted to the 

care and treatment of nervous patients who re([uire en\ ironment 

differing from that of their homes 



J. PERRY SEWARD, M. D., 
Associate Physician 
200 West 70th Street, New York City 



F. W. SEWARD, Sr., M. D., 
F. W. SEWARD, Jr., M. D., 
Resident Physicians 
Goshen, N. Y. 



"WE ARE IN OUR EIGHTEENTH YEAR" 




=W««#4 



123 






\M PURV'^l: ^^ 







^i|/^^|^ 



MIDDLETOWN. N . Y. 



Of a Perfect Dinner the Dessert is the Crowning Glory 

It lives longest on the palate and by it the dinner is remembered ; 

how hn portant then that the Flavoring of the 

Dessert be perfect. 

McMonagle & Rogers' Premium Vanilla 

Is the Ideal Flavor 

It imparts a richness and delicacy to Cakes, Custards, Puddings, Ice 
Cream and Sauces which delight housekeepers and guests alike and 
make desserts doubly delicious. McMonagle & Rogers' Vanilla is 
the delight of the connoisseur and the pride and comfort of the 
thorough housekeeper. Its high degree of concentration makes it 
most economical. Grocers who are alive to their interests and true 
to their customers, recommend it in preference to flavors which, 
though far inferior, cost their customers as much. Most Vanilla 
Extract is adulterated. 

A Thousand Dollar Guarantee 

of purity is on every bottle of McMonagle & Rogers' Premium 
Vanilla. Highest standard of excellence for thirty-five years. If 
your dealer offers you a substitute he does it for extra profit— not 
for your good. In.sist upon his supplying McMonagle & Rogers. 
He has it in his stock or knows where to obtain it. 

McMonagle & Rogers 

Middletown, New York 



124 





'Artistic 
Funeral Flowers 

Beautiful blossoms of almost every variety artistically 
arranged in the most fitting tributes to the memory 
and love of those who have been called home before. 
Our years of experience, extensive greenhouses and 
skilled assistants hold out to you a satisfaction — 
whether as to quality or price — in rounded measure. 
Telephone and mail orders from Lodges and Fraternal 
Societies receive special care and attention. 



Schaefer's, Inc., 



Florists and Decorators 

378-384 Broadway, Newburgh, N. Y. 



lJi5 



/: 



^W ^Bp*^ 







JOHN SCHOONMAKER 

grew so rapidly that requiring larger quarters, 
they built the building at 94-96 Water 
Street, into which they moved in 
September, 1878. About the first of 
July, 1885, Mr. Mills retired from the 
business and the new firm was known 
as Schoonmaker & Weller, Mr. 
Weller retired on January 1st, 1898, 
and was succeeded by Samuel V. 
Schoonmaker, the firm name chang- 
ing to John Schoonmaker ts: Son. 
The building on the north known as 
98 and 100 Water Street was pur- 
chased and added to the old store 
and the business continued to in- 
crease. The business grew so phe- 
nomenally that even the enlarged 



The Founders of Newburgh's 
Largest Dry Goods Store 

ToHN Schoonmaker, Samuel 
^ Crawford Mills and Alanson 
Youngblood Weller formed the 
partnership of Schoonmaker, Mills 
& Weller, beginning business on 
Water street in Newburgh, in Jan- 
uar}', 1863. They were each born 
and spent their early life on farms 
in the Wallkill Valley. They were 
all examples of good old-fashioned 
honesty and their early training 
on the farm contributed much to 
the success of these 3'oung men, 
each one being rugged and strong 
and capable of doing an immense 
amount of work. The business 



''^ 








SAMUEL CRAWFORD MILLS 



126 




A. Y. WELLER 



quarters became too small and on 
the 31st of August, 1905, the ad- 
joining building known as the 
Van Cleft property was purchased. 
This property has tunnel con- 
nection under the West Shore 
Railroad with Front Street, on 
which the firm has a frontage of 
one hundred and seventy-five feet. 
On account of a lease John Schoon- 
maker & Son cannot occupy the 
Van Cleft property until May 1st, 
1908. At that time vou mav look 



for largely increased facilities for 
doing business. 

John Schoonmaker died on the 
1st of January. 1904. 

Samuel Crawford Mills died on 
the 16th of March, 1904. 

Mr. Weller, the only surviving 
member of the old firm is living 
in Newburgh and interested in 

some of its largest enterprises. 
The business of John Schoonmaker 
& Son is now managed by Samuel 
V. Schoonmaker. 





SAMUEL V. SCHOONMAKER 



127 



Imported and Domestic Feathers Cleaned 

Hats and Bonnets and Curled 



MISS I. CAMPBELL 



Mourning Goods 42 Water Street 

a Specialty NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

Do You Use Tea, Coffee, Spices, Extracts, 
Baking Powder and Soap ? 

We bundle the best in the Market. Roast our own coffee. Grind our own 
spices, manufacture our own extracts, baking po\vder and soaps. Are 
largest importers and retail dealers in the United States. Buy for Cash and sell for 
Cash; hence can give better value for your money than any other house in the business. 
A trial order is solicited. 

You See Our Wagons Everywhere 

Agents Wa-nted in Every City 

( 156. 158, 160, 162, 164, 166, 168, 170, 172 Water Street 
HEADQUARTERS ^ 59, 61, 63. 65, 67, 69. 71, 73. 75, 77, 79 Pearl Street 

( 141, 143, 145, 147, 149, 151 Front Street 

NEW YORK CITY BROOKLYN BOROUGH 

BRANCH 

GRAND UNION TEA COMPANY 

48 WATER STREET. NEWBURGH. N. Y. 

J. VAN BUSKIRK. Ma^nager 



f---^- .. •■ 




What Is Home Without a Piano ? 



^Jlf^S^- 



WT? 



e 



:. I 



J* 



Nc'--* 



--W"' 



Kf^ 



"c^ 



> ! 



I 



l/S. 



TT is like a home without a mother. 
If there are children in the home 
a piano is a necessity. Do not wait 
for tomorrow, today is the time to 
buy, and a LUDWIG PIANO is the 
instrument to buy. If you cannot 
afford a LUDWIG, we always have 
cheaper pianos in stock. 
When in Newburgh make the LUD- 
WIG PIANO PARLORS your head- 
quarters, and let us demonstrate the 
LUDWIG PLAYER-PIANO for 
you. 

LUDWIG PIANO CO., 
54 Water Street, 

Newburgh, N. Y. 

65,000 Pianos in use. 



% 




■ :^} 



,^sr 



'!l-_^^ 



Vmtm 




-A^- 



■,T;THOUT_g 



I2i) 



Demorest Serving Machines 



For a quarter of a century we have made a specialty of 
building HIGH-GRADE sewing machines. Year after year 
we have made improvements until today the DEMAREST rep- 
resents the HIGHEST TYPE of sewing machine perfection. A 
million satisfied users testify to its sterling merits and the present 
phenomenal sale is a tribute to its popularity- 




When you have occasion to purchase a sewing machine 
THINK OF THE DEMOREST. Then investigate. IT WILL 
BEAR INVESTIGATION. If you cannot purchase the DE- 
MOREST through your local dealer write us direct and we will 
tell you how and where you can. 



Demoresl Manufacturing Company 

Williamsporl, Pa. 

Eastern and Export Office : 296 Broadvay, Nev York City 



130 



;^^^^v^.v.v.^•X<v^^.v.^%^v.•.^v.••^.^•^.•.•.•.•.•.■.•^.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.•.■ 

I James W. Barnes 

I 

Dry Goods Store 

I 99 WATER ST., NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

I 

jt;: Established 27 Years ago 




Dealer in 

Good Reliable Goods 
at Moderate Prices 

Our aim is to treat everybody fair, keep 
all of our old customers and get as many 
new ones as we can FAIRLY. ARE 
YOU ONE OF OUR CUSTOMERS? 
If not we hope you will be. 




JAMES W.BARNES. 





RY GOODS. 




^t^SSa.-- — ~.S- 



fm DRY goods: .i.W. BAR NES. CARPETS 




JAMES W. BARNES 

99 WATER STREET NEWBURGH, NEW YORkI 



131 




There's a 
Difference 



between a modern, up-to-date reposi- 
tory, such as ours, and those old- 
fashioned establishments of bygone 
times. The difference is in your favor 
— everybody's favor. Our sense of 
duty, ambition and business pride 
prompts us to conduct the best reposi- 
tory in this section of the country. 

NewburgR Carriage Go. 

9=11 CHAMBERS STREET 

(NEAR BROADWAY) 

NEWBURGH, = NEW YORK 

Formerly at 117-119 Broadway 





A. D. FOWIER 



WYGANT D. FOWLER 




132: 




THE NEWBURGHICARRIAGE COMPANY'S NEW HOUSE, 911 CHAMBERS ST., NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

A MODERN building erected by the FOWLER BROTHERS, combining all the latest conveniences for the display and storage of 
the various classes of Carriages and Wagons. The building is 96 by 46 feet wide, four stories and a basement 40 feet deep and 46 
feet wide, equipped with electric elevator, steam heat, electric lights, and a stairway that can be used if necessary. It is interesting, in- 
structive and educational to visit this respository, where courteous treatment is extended to all whether visitors or prospective customers 



133 



ts^^S^' 








i''''''^^ms* 



1 ] n 




MERRITT'S 

HEADACHE POWDERS TAR COUGH SYRUP 



are safe to take and sure to act 



has been curing colds for 20|years 



Theodore Merrill's Sons 

Wholesale Druggists 
38 and 40 Water St. Newburgh, N. Y. 



134 



We ou^Kt 

to cKiirgfe more 

^KtVTVwedo. 










.'■;■■.;.■>->'••♦••. 



ydMddinour 

Has The Quality. 



Sole Agents for Washburn-Crosby Co.'s Flour for Newbur^h and Vicinity 



Steohen M. 




u 



11 



Wholesale Grocer 



Front Street, Cor. Fifth 

Newburdh, N. Y 



135 





JAS, T. VAN DALFSEN. 



CHAS. J. STONES. 





rurniture Cconomv 

Our Superb assortment of medium and high-grade 
Furniture is noted for tasteful, expensive designs. We 
cater to taste in manner that few equal and none excel. 

Our Furniture — every stick of it — comes from the 
foremost makers in this country. We sell good Fur- 
niture, Carpets, Rugs, Mattings, etc., at the price 
of ordinary grades. Before deciding see our stock, dis- 
play and prices. 

VanDalfsen & Stones 

Successors to Pcck & Van Dalfscn 
21-23 Water St. Newburgh, N. Y. 





136 



ESTABLISHED 1818 




Are You Looking for Wedding Presents 

Do You Want a 

Wedding Present in Solid 
Silver or Cut Glass 

Do you want an Engagement Ring 

We have a Large and Choice Assortment of the Finest Goods. 
Chains, Charms, Lockets, Bracelets, Studs, etc. 

Gold Spectacles and Eye Glasses at Popular Prices 

MORRISON'S JEWELRY STORE 

Water Street, corner Second, NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

Lawson Hardware Company 

69 Water Street Newburgh, N. Y. 

Builders' HaLrdwa-re, Genera.] Ha-rdwaLre, House Furnishing Goods, 
Fishing Ta.ckle, Sporting Goods, Guns ©Lnd Ammunition 

a.nd Mill Supplies 

AGENTS FOR 

BUCKEYE MOWERS AND REAPERS 

COLUMBIA PLOWS 

PLANET Jr. CULTIVATORS 

Lawson Hardware Company 

69 Water Street Newburgh, N. Y. 



137 









Model 846. 



Pure, Wholesome Food 

Is Essential to Good Health 

This you are sure to obtain 
when you trade at 

Palmer's Grocery 

Newburgh, N. Y. 

150 Broadway and cor. South and Smith Sts. 



The Bright Eye, Clear Brain, Steady Nerve and 

Beautiful Face comes very largely from 

right living. 

Health makes fair faces. 



The Public is Invited to Visit Our Store 

It's anextrj occasion with us. we having Just opened a large shipment of 

The Newest Things in Footwear 

ASK FOR 




Our new styles in Women's ;ind Gents' Footwear win everybody, Our variety is 
large enough and our assortment of widths and sizes is extensive enough to please every 
taste and fit every foot. Such good leatliers as Vici, Dongola, Box Gait, Patent Golt (the 
kind that doesn't crack) are here in abundance, made up in the latest styles at f 1.25, $1.48, 
$i.gS, I2.48, $2.S8, $2.gS. Water Buck Shoe, absolutely waterproof, $2.75 and $3.25. 
Boys' and Youths' Shoes at gSc , Sr.25 and $1.48 Headquarters lor Felt Boots, Ball 
Brand $2.00, $2 25, S2.50, $2 75. Agent for Gold Seil Rubbers, best in the world. 



M c CULLOUGH'S 



46 COLDEN STREET 



NEWBURGH. N. Y. 



138 



G. T. ROOSA 



T. W. GAVEY 




GET YOUR YARN 

OF 



CHAS. T. ROOSA k CO. 

(Successor to W H. Fowlen 

93 Water Street, NEWBURGH, N. Y. 



Ribbons, Laces, 

Fancy Goods, 

Hosiery, Gloves, 

and Corsets 

All kinds of Yarns 

Muslin Underwear 
a Specialty 

Agents for 
Butterick Patterns 



WALTER V. MARTIN 

^Practical Sail, TJent and Stwrnnff TIfaker 

Flags and a General Line of Ship Chandlery Goods 



Rope Splicing of Every 
Description 

Manilla and Cotton Rope 
for Elevators 

Boat Awnings and Horse 

and Wagon Covers 

Made to Order 

Canopies for Weddings 

Crash for Dancing 




Square Garden Tents 

Hygienic 

Boys' 

Surf 

Refreshment 

Horse or Stable 

Amazon 

Wall Tents and Flys 



All Styles of Tents For Sale and For Rent by Week or Month 

16 South Water Street, Newburgh, N. Y. 



H. R. Telephone 295-L. 



Estimates Cheerfully Given 



139 



GEO. G. PECK & CO. 



^^ HOLESALE AND ReTAIL 



Bric-a-Brac, Art Goods, Jardineres, China, Glassware, 
Lamps, Gut Glass, Dinner Sets and Toilet Sets 



Very Large Line of Open Stock 
Pattern Sets sold in any assort- 
ment and easily matched 

84 Water Street 



Telephone Connection 



All Lamp Fixtures kept in stock 
Chimneys, Wicks, Globe Hold- 
ers, Globes, Burners 

Newburgh, N. Y. 



c/lrtistic ^ath ^T^om Fittings 

WE carry all kinds of Nickel Goods, such as Tea Kettles, Chafing 
Dishes, Baking Dishes, Nickel Trays, Coffee Pots, 7>a Pois 

RICH CUT GLASS 

OUR line of Cut Glass is of the Highest Grade, cut from a Pure 
White Crystal, and the prices are the lowest for this grade of s;oods 



Good health de- 
mands thes'e 
sanitary recep- 
ticles for the 
soap, sponge, 
towels, tooth 
brushes, and 
tumbler holders 




11^ 



Wmm 





These goods 
are made of 
heavy brass 
and nickel plat- 
ed, a n d will 
wear a lifetime 



Frank ]. Law son 



97 Water Street 



Newburgh, N, Y. 



140 



^ iiHi^iiii.i 




Climax 
Studio 



SQaSi'es 
Quick as a '% 
tlJinJc 



€ 



Cra^ ons, iPasteis^ Sepias, ll/ater 
Colors and J'ioih .^iyAt iPhotoo 

Tjo/ap/iono Connoctions 

W. C. !P€CJc 



7S 9l/ater St., T/ewbur^h, 9/. 2/. 

^'mTiip'iiipiMi.piii'illfliiiiillHlliiiiiiifjiiiiiiili^ 



^IIHiillllll;i.iilllil Ill llll Iltli Illll Hll]li..illill] milll„ „ilJili. lilDllMlliUlllniijlLllmiHilliinllfe 

ifewbur£fh aJookstore 

£stab/ished /S30 

cN^than S* Smith 
bookseller 

'Dealer t'n 
Office, School and ^anci/ % 

utationerj/ 

Cameras and !P/ioto Supplies 
Sold iPens, ^Pocket Cutlery 
^'ancj/ y{rticles and Sames 

76 Water St., Tfewljur^h 

% ^epcst'tory 9/eu/6urffA ^I'ble Socteij/ 



f[r iii i iiyi i iii i^ i i iiii ;iy; ii miprnniifi- % i n i | [p i i Ml| ff ll ii ii nfI i i nil | f i i i iii p i n ilipimilfl Ifl iiiiiiyMi|||; IfliMiilf iii«ifiiMll|f iimilp- 

J|ii,|l,i;ll Ul lUHnniilUli litoii ,iili!..H ..llll nil li:i nil' lil.i.iiiylLlliiii.lJly Ili!iiii..lll,, „| |i ri ii"a'- l l lll |l': Iil".-...lllll .llll Illll iMl JilJlimllilllliMiAinlAliilllllyiliiliiJlllllNlijJililNllAjiNiA 1% 



I Ask Your Grocer 



FOR 



I 




Barnes & Atkins 

Wholesale Provisions 



► 



Smoked Meats 
Hams and Bacon 
Canned Meats 




Butter 

Green Valley 
Fancy Creamery Prints 

Quality Guaranteed 

Butter 




42 S. Water St., Newburgh 



4r'iy iii fil HiyH ni]f;ii Ni ..i^iii . 'iii^V I' ' 'i ^i f^N ui, |^ii ni [l|I i i ni iy i ill, yn iiTyiim|ri.ll'ui]T;i ^m^i p.inii||y.iiniii^,)ini.i^.iiiM|^.„iiniqTP qyiH-'HifinTmyr: 



141 



Til meet pon at 


' M - 


G. A. C. VAN BUREN 

Footwear of Quality^ 


G. A. C. VAN BUREN 


61 Water, Cor. Second Newburgh, N. Y. 

(Successor to Halliday & Van BurenI 




3 STORES 



ESTABLISHED 1883 



3 STOFIES 



This cut Represents the Sole Proprietor and 

Manager of the Largest Paint and 

Wall Paper Establishment 

in the City 



Chas. E. Keefe 



95 BROADWAY 



130, 132, 134 Liberty St. 
Both 'Phones NEWBURGH, N. F. 



CHAS. E. KEEFE 



142 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS 



HATS 



Wm. R. DuMond 

•successor to B£oell i Seymour) 



77 WATER ST 



NEWBURGH, N. Y 



J. HUMPHREY 

Dealer in 

Domestic 

New Home, Household 

Wilcox & Gibbs 

SEWING MACHINES 

4 Water St. Newburgh, N. Y. 




Needles 

and 

Attachments 

for all 

Machines 

Machines 

Rented 

Exchanged 

or 

Repaired 



ABEL, ^he Practical Hatter 

Manufacturer and Repairer of FUR and SILK HATS 
of all kinds. STRAW HATS cleaned and bleached. 
DYEING AND PRESSING carefully done. A special 
Fur Hat, $1.00, soft or stiff, guaranteed to wear. 



36 Colden Street, Up Stairs 



NEWBURGH, N. Y. 



143 




We have the only exclusive Optical 
Establishment in Orange County. 
We use the latest methods to exam- 
ine your e^'es and lit glasses. Our 
Lenses are ground on the premises 
and under our own supervision, and 
every style of frame and eyeglass 
is kept in stock. If you have eye 
troubles consult us . ... 

B. EL. GURNEV 

Eycsiijht Specialist 
95 Water Street Newburgh, N. Y. 



GO TO 



Jno. Walch & Son 



FOR 



Camera Supplies 

Stationery 

Sporting Goods 



^ric-a-Brac 



Etc. 



GIVE US A CALL 



32 Water Street Newburgh, N. Y. 

Our Specialty is Wedding 

Gifts and Holiday Goods 




Ci^.e^^ 



STANDS FOR EVERYTHING THAT IS BEST IN FLORICULTURE 

AN UP- TO-DA TE STORE 

PLANTS AND FLOWERS 

the finest that can be grown, with prices extremely moderate, pots us 

in the lead in our line 

LANDSCAPE ARTISTS FUNERAL DESIGNS OUR SPECIALTY 

Orders by mail or telephone receive prompt and careful attention Your money refunded if not satisfied 



Yuess Flower Shop 



91 Water Street, 
Newburgh, N. Y. 



Hudson River Telephone 25C"L 
Colonial 292 



Greenhouses 
Washington and West Streets 



144 




MABIE & SON 

Carry a full line of Iron. Tin. Wooden and 
Enamelled Ware and General Housekeep- 
ing ArUt'les in conjunction with their 

SrOYES, HEATERS and RANGES 

Al.so a General Plumbin^^-. Roofing, Tin and 

^ Sheet Iroa Working business, and would 

most respectfully solicit a share of your 

patronage , 

46 Water Street, Newburgh, N. Y. 



ESTATES SETTLED 
BONDS AXD MORTGAGES 

Martin G. Mould 

Attorney and Counselor 
Solicitor in Bankruptcy 

H. R. Telephone: Office, 11-R . 
" " " House, 188-R 

Colonial Telephone: Office,! 87 

House, 467-B 

Office, Rooms 2 and 3 Townsend Bldg. 
39 Third St., Newburo-h, N. Y. 





C. Ou^heltree 

Successor to 

Daniel Irwin 

Ship Chandler, Sail and Awning Maker 



Tents, Awnings, 
Canopies for Weddings, etc. 

Large and Small Tents for Sale and to Rent. 

Out-of-town parties will tind it to their advan- 
tage to inspect our goods, and get our prices 
which are always reasonable. 

62 South Water Street, Newburdh, N. Y. 



^i^^*r^^ 






CRASH FOR DANCING 



145 



Something 
Interesting 



You will always find something 
that will interest you in our 
stock of 



Diamonds 

Watches 

Jewelry 

and Silverware 



when you are looking for some- 
thing in our line. We make 
prices as much of interest to 3'ou 
as we do our selection of ooods 



W. C. Cornell 

Jeweler and 
Silversmith 

39 Water Street Newburgh 



Hewitt 
& Warden 

ELECTRICAL 

ENGINEERS 

and CONTRACTORS 

Dealers in all kinds of Electrical 
Supplies, Switchboards, Dyna- 
mos, House Wiring, Electrical 
Pumps, Burglar Alarms, Trans- 
formers, Motors, Telephones, 
Medical Batteries, Storage Bat- 
teries, Dry Batteries, Lamps, 
Search Lights, Marine Work, etc. 

SPECIFICATIONS FURNISHED 
and ESTIMATES GIVEN 

on all kinds of Electrical Work. 

Write to us for further 

information 

14 South Water Street 

Newburgh, New York 



146 




GEORGE H. HALLIDAY 



People in Search of 

BEST SHOE VALUES say 




56 and 58 Water Street, cor. Second, Newburgh, N. Y. 



147 



Kingston's Pharmacy James T- Erwin 



FOR HEADACHE, TORPID L1\'ER 
AND CONSTIPATION use 

Dr. Little's Pills 

SOLD ONLY AT 

Kingston's 



Practical Carriage 

and 

Sleigh Trimmer 



154 Broadway 

Newburgh, New York 



Enamel and Patent Leather 
cut to order 

Trimmings Furnished 
7 South Water Street 

Newburgh, New York 



WOOD BROTHERS 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



Nurserymen and Florists 



FISHKILL, NE\A/ YORK 

SO ACRES 
AO GREENHOUSES 

A LARGE STOCK OF FRUIT. ORNAMENTAL AND EVER- 
GREEN TREES AND SHRUBS, VINES AND ROSES 

ALSO A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

Ornamental, Decorative and Bedding Plants 

A Large Assortment of Cut Flowers always on hand 
also Floral Designs for Funerals a Specialty 

Send fo!' Catalogue of Prices before purchasing 







mmm 



5,^ 




''^^"^AiS^ 



148 



FLOUR 
Patent Process 



TEAS 

Young Hyson, Japan, 

Oolong, Gunpowder, 

English Breakfast 



CANNED GOODS 

Fruits and Vegetables in 
Season 



BEST GOODS 



CHARLES W. INNIS 

General 
Grocer 

All Goods in their Season 

202 Broadway Newburgh, IN. Y. 



FISH 

Sweet, Fat, White 



COFFEES 

Java, Mocha, Mara- 
caibo 



BUTTER AND EGGS 

Orders called for and 
delivered 

LOWEST PRICES 



/_/ 




Tfie Newburg[i Lumber Go. 

ALL KINDS OF 

LUMBER AND TIMBER 

Special Prices by Car Lots 

Sash, Blinds. Doors, Mouldings, Trim, Building Paper, Glass and 
Hardware. We sell the best White Lead and Oils, also Sherwin & 
Williams Mixed Paints, Varnish, etc., Willer's Inside Blinds, Exten- 
sion Ladders. Special Agent for Bird Son's Paroid and Neponset 
Roofing Paper. Telephone Connection. 

Yards : 211 to 217 and 227 to 239 Broadway 



Main Office : 239 Broadway 



Newburg/i, N. Y. 



Scott's Hoof Paste Co. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 




GUARANTEED TO CURE ANY 




Scott's Arabian Paste 
Is Guaranteed 



Sore, Gall, Sprain or Bruise of 

any kind, also Caked Udder in 

_ /„, 

- Cows. One box of our paste goes farther, 
Slasts longer, does more effectual 
work than four of any other 
remedy for man or beast. 1=2 lb 

50c; 1 lb $1, Duggists, Saddlers, and Black- 
i smiths, SCOTT'S H. P. Co., Rochestei, N.^ 




-< NO CURE, NO PAY ^ 



149 



A 



nson 



B. Minard H. N. Carpenter 



Ladies' & Gentlemen's 

RESTAURANT 

Formerly Hoag s 

132 Water St., Newburgh, N. Y. 

We Desire to Announce 
to our Former Patrons 
that we can furnish the 
best 25c. Dinner in the city 



Home-Made Pies and Puddings 
a Specialty 



Colorist, 



Decorator 



AND 



Paper Hanger 

All Branches of Painting 

55 Smith St., Corner Third St. 

NEWBURGH, N. Y. 

Opposite Y. M. C. A. Building 



Residence 



82 Johnston St. 



NEWBURGH & HAVERSTRAW STEAMBOAT CO. 




STEAMER EMELINE 

Capt. D. C. Woolsey 



IF YOU HAVE HAY OR STRAW 
TO SELL, CALL and GET PRICES 

p. O. ADDRESS 

Box 78, Newburgh 
Box 425, Haverstraw 

H. R.Tel. Newburgh 114 H. R. Tel. Haverstraw 32W 

H. R. Tel. Peekskill 7F Colonial Tel. Newburgh 153 



150 



Esta.blished 1791 



Frederic R. McCullough 



Successor to JOHN R. McCULLOUQM 



Tobacco and Cigar Factory 

UNION MADE TOBACCOS 

All Leading Brands of Tobaccos, Cigarettes, Imported Key West and 
Domestic Cigars — Wholesale and Retail. Dealers will find it to their 
advantage to call, inspect goods and get prices 

SMOKE McCULLOUGH'S SUPERIOR SMOKING TOBACCO 

68 Water Street, Newburgh, N. Y. 



Wi 



JESSE F. SHAFER 

Obtains Pensions for deserving 
Soldiers and Widows of Soldiers 
of all Wars, also Bounties, Back 
Pay and Travel Pay. 

The Law of June 27, 1890, as Amended 

by New Age Order No. 7S is 

Liberal and Just. 



He prepares all papers in such 
claims as Commissioner of Deeds 
with a Seal, executes Pension Ap- 
plications and Pension Vouchers 

Room 5, Sanford Building 

64 Second St., Newburgh, N. Y. 



151 



OUR WATCHWORD 

" The Purity of our Drugs and Chemicals 

The Accuracy with which our prescriptions are compounded, and The 
Stability of all our preparations are the sterling qualities that we pride our- 
selves upon, and which are embodied in all goods we possess. Our stock 
of chemicals together with our Assorted Variety of toilet articles and druggists' 
sundries, enable us to offer to the public prices that can be favorably com- 
pared with those of any drug establishment in the country. 



J. F. THOMPSON 



Walden, N. Y. 



Pharmacist 



TEARS' 
ICE CREAM 

Bricks and Loose, All Flavors 
for the Wholesale Trade 

MANUFACTURED BY 

CHAS. R. TEARS 


FARMS FOR SALE 

C. R. TEARS, Agent 

If you want to purchase a farm in the very 
heart of Wallkill Valley, it may be to your 
interest to call on me, as 1 have several for 
sale at reasonable prices, that are very 
desirable. 

Office at Kidd Bros. Shoe Slore 



Walden - - - New York 



139 Main St., Walden, N. Y. 




NS 



Main Street, Opp. M. E. Church 

WALDEN, N. Y. 



PRACTICAL 

PLUMBING, STEAM FITTING 
and HOT WATER HEATING 

A SPECIALTY 

Estimates Given and Work Guaranteed 
ALSO DEALERS IN 

HEATERS and RANGES 



152 



WILLIAM SCOTT 

Successor to Seymour & Kelso 




153 MAIN STREET 

Walden - - New York 



P. H. SCRIBNER 



BEST 
GOODS 

103 Main Street 
Walden, N. Y. 

LOWEST 
PRICES 

Goods Delivered 

and 
Orders Solicited 



FLOUR 
Patent Process Only 

FISH 

Sweet, Fat, White 

TEAS 
Young Hyson, Oolong, 

Japan, English, 
Breakfast, Gunpowder 

COFFEES 

Java, Maracaibo, Mocha 

Delaware County Butter 
a Specialty 

CANNED GOODS 




HARNESS 

STORE OF 



We all want the best for our money 
If you do and are in need of a good 

CUSTOM MADE HARNESS 

for any particular purpose. Horse Blankets, Robes, Whips, 
Horse Collars, Collar or Saddle Pads, Blizzard Storm Buggy 
Fronts, Horse Covers or Horse Furnishings of any kind, a 
Trunk, Suit Case or Hand Bag, then call at the leading 

G. E. RUDOLPH'S us Main street. Walden,N.Y. 

We are agents for the well known 5A Horse Blankets 
There are no others like them for looks and wear 



^W e 



S.CLARK, WALDEN, N.Y 




PHONE 5 



FIRST-CLASS LIVERY and 
EXCHANGE STABLES 

We cover every line of livery at popular prices. Furnish care- 
ful drivers. Convey parties to Lake Mohonk, Lake Minnewaska, 
Sam' s Point and other mountain resorts. Furnish up-to-date 
rigs for driving parties and make a specialty on carriages for 
weddings and funerals. 

Traveliny men will have quick and prompt attention 



153 




The most 

economical and 

efficient 

Warm Air 

Generator is 

the 

KELSEY 



IRVIN RANGES are noted for their 
economy of fuel and excellent baking ■ 
qualities. 

. . . SOLD BY . . . 




The H. E Williams Co., Walden 




ESTABLISHED 1856 



THEODORE D. BARKER 

Harnessmaher and 
Carriage Trimmer 



General Line of Horse Furnishing Goods 
Pine Line of Gloves for all Purposes 

HORSES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
HARNESS OF ALL KINDS 

Quality and Price Reasonable 



Main Street, 



WALDEN, NEW YORK 



154 



Bakery Cafe 



Home-Made Candy 
Ice Cream 



John VanSteenburgh 

Oak Street Walden, N. Y. 



STYLE, FIT, WEAR 

are the VITAL elements in every 
perfect shoe and the conspicuous 
features in Shoes sold by 

Kidd Bros., 139 Main St., Walden, N. Y. 



E ARM PROPERTY 

. . Ir\ Great Variety . . 

FOR SALE BY 

Harvey Kidd, Agent 

139 Main Street Walden. N. Y, 




George WKitmore 

CONFECTIONER and BAKER 



Walden. N. Y. 



Bread, Cakes and Pies FreshEvery Day 

OUR SPECIALTY: 

Ornamenting of Party and Wedding Cakes 

Next Door to Fowler & Decker 



BABCOCK WAGONS 
Best Material, Finest Finish, 
Most Up-to-Date Styles 
Prices Right 



HAY CARRIERS 

Fully Guaranteed* Latest Improvements 
Estimates Made Without 
Charge 



CHARLES OSTRANDER 



(SUCCESSOR A. J. PINE) 



OPPOSITE THE M. E. CHURCH 



WALDEN 



NEW YORK 



HARNESS, WHIPS, ROBES, 

BLANKETS, STABLE SUPPLIES, 

OILS and HARNESS DRESSING 

IN STOCK 



Will Furnish or Order from the 

Manufacturers any 
Agricultural Implements required 
Call and let us confer together 



155 



Dr. George N. Ward 



ieitttBt 



Office 

Over the National Bank 
of Walden 



Walden, 



New York 



A. J. FOWLER 

Farm and Village Property 
Renting and Collection of 
Rents a Specialty 

Real Estate 

Mapping and Plotting of 
Undeveloped Residential 
Property 

WALDEN. NEW YORK 



M. A. SCHOONMAKER 

Photographer 

Walden, N. Y. 



WHEN IN WANT OF AN 



AUCTIONEER 



\Vho sells goods to the best ad- 
vantage, one who has had years of 
experience, who will promptly re- 
spond to all calls in Orange and 
Ulster Counties, call on or address 



F. K. WALKTER 



ST. ANDREWS, NEW YORK 



Life-Size Crayon 

Portraits 

a Specialty 



I OLD"^ ULSTER 

An Historical and Genealogical 
Magazine Published Monthly at 
143 Green St., Kingston, N. Y., 
by Benjamin Myer Brink. 

Terms $3. 00. Single Copies 25c. 



This is one of the most valuable publications 
of its class, that has come under our observa- 
tion; we prize it highly. 

WailkiU Valley Publishing Association. 



15(; 





?^=;^:^n 




Boynton^s Steam and Hot 
Water Boilers and Ranges 

Are a guarantee for Good Work when properly installed. Enquire 
of those who are using them in Walden, Wallkill and Montgomery 

INSTALLED BY 

The H. E. WILLIAMS COMPANY, Walden 



157 



Over 62,000 



Fairbanks= 
Engines 



Now 

in 

Use 




They are Built Horizontal, Vertical, Portable and Stationary, 
2 to 200 Horse Power — an Engine for Every Purpose 

(Send tbrCatalot; BCSo) 

FAIRBANKS, MORSE & CO. 

12 Dey St , New York 



V^Ji 



A Profitable Investment 



A FAIRBANKS -MORSE PORTABLE GASOLINE 
ENGINE will operate a thresher, corn busker and 
shreader, saw. feed prinder, or com sheller, at a 
very small cost. They are easy and simple to run, 
requiring no enplneer. Perfectly safe, durable and 
substantial; will stand the wear and tearof rough 
roads. A FAIRBANKS-HORSE ENGINE wl.. pay 
for Itself In a short time. 

Send for Portable Engine Catalogue No.Pgoo 

Fairbanks, Morse &, Co 

NEW YORK CITY 



sizes 

2 h. p. to 

3i h. p. 




SOLD BY 



A. B. 
GARRISON 



WALDEN, N. Y. 



168 



\ 



J^or the JLancl's Sa/ce 

. . . else 

Sdotv/cer's J^ertilizors 



^or Sale by 

^ ^. Sarrison, balden, 9f. 2/, 



A. B. GARRISON 

—Sells— 



Lehigh Coal and All Kinds of Feeds 



.-£Ac..*^ 



Now is the time to lay in Coal and Feed as the prices are low. 
I will quote you prices at any time. 

I also carry a full line of 

Farm Machinery, Fertilizers, Cement, Lime, Plaster, Hay and 
Straw, Barb Wire, Garden Tools, Seeds, Stock Food, Etc. 



159 



ANDREW K. WADE 



Tin Roofing and 

Plumbing in all its 

branches 

Tinware in every line 

of our own make 

made from the best 

materials 

When in Walden call 

and see the 
advantages I can offer 

Country orders 

attended to with 

promptness 

and despatch 

Work done in a 
satisfactory manner 



Red Cross Ranges 
and Stoves 



are the best Base-Burners on the market, 
requiring one-third less coal for heating on 
account of their superior construction 

MILK CANS 

Best Quality and W^orkmanship 



Walden 



Ne^v York 



The largest 
assortment of 

Stoves 

Improved Gas 
Stoves 

Granite Ware 

House 

Furnishing 

Goods 

Clothes 
Wringers 



UNDERTAKER 

ALPHONS J. GRAFE 

LICENSED EMBALMER 




Flowers Furnished at 
Low Prices 

All Work Guaranteed 
Satisfactory 

Calls Attended to Personally 
Day and Night 



Residence and Office on Orange Avenue 



Walden 



New York 



160 



D. C, SEARS 


E. Townsend Jones, M. D. 


DEALER m 


OFFICE OVER POST OFFICE 


Groceries and Provisions 




79 Montgomery Street 


Physician and Surgeon 


Large and varied assortment of Fruit constantly on hand 


Obstecrition and Optician 


GOOD GOODS 




IN GOOD ORDER 
PROMPTLY SERVED 


Office Hours : 


FARMERS' PRODUCE BOUGHT 


2 P. M. to 5 P. M. 6.30 P. M. to 8 P. M. 


We appreciate your patronage and are anxious to 
serve you well.' Hudson River Phone 2-L. 


WALDEN NEW YORK 



J. M. WALKER'S SONS 

GROCERS^^ 



Fancy Delaware Butter 



Headquarters for Flour 



Kreso Dip for Sheep, Cattle, Swine and all Live Stock. Fly protector 
and insect killer. Wyandotte Dairyman's Cleaner and Cleanser for 
Milk Cans, Milk Pails, etc., in 5-lb.Bags. Alabastine, the great new 
Wall Coating in fourteen colors. 



121 Main St. 



72-74 Montgomery St. 



WALDEN 



Crabel i^aga^tne 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY AT 
333 Fourth Avenue, New York 



A high class, illustrated, artistic 
monthly, always entertaining, in- 
structive and educational; the peer 
of its class 

ON ALL NEWS STANDS 



" Leave the irorld more henvtifxl than you found it " 

Park and Cemetery and 
Landscape Gardening 

THE ONLY JOURNAL OF ITS KIND 

A handsome illustrated monthly devoted to the 
artistic development of Parks, Cemeteries, 
School, Home and Station Ground. 
Instructive articles on Civil Improvements writ- 
ten by men and women of experience will be 
found helpful in every community. 

SUBSCRIPTION ONE DOtLAR A YEAR 
R. J. Haight, Pub. 324 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



161 



Chas. G. Gregg & Co. 


William Alcock 


Proprietors 


Walden, N. Y. 


' 1 he Walden Bee-Hive 


Carriage, Sign and Ornamental 


(The one-price cash House) 


Painting, Sketches in Oil or Water 


Ladies' and Gents' Outfitters and 


Color. (The first page cover of 


General Dry Goods 


this booklet shows a sample of 


BUSINESS METHODS 

1st. We handle only first class 


my work.) Fine Lettering a 


Goods and sell for the lowest 


Specialty; use only best Materials 


possible prices 

2d. Any article purchased and 


and best workmanship. Expert 


not found satisfactory, money is 
cheerfully refunded 


Watch and Clock Repairing a 


3d. We assure courtesy and at- 


Specialty. Shop in Ostrander 


tention to all 


Building, opposite M. E. Church, 


Chas. G. Gregg & Co. 


Residence on the Bee. 



Before Selecting Your Fertilizers 

You should take into consideration the SOURCE from w^hich it is made. 
That is the only way to judge of its MERITS until you have used it. 
After a trial the RESULTS speak for themselves. 



ARMOUR'S 

Animal Matter Fertilizers 

Are made from the best packing 

house materials obtainable. 

They are uniform in quality and 

analysis, and give best results, 

and are for sale by 

D. C. DOMINICK, 

Walden, N. Y. 

L. R. WALLACE, 

Middletown, N. Y. 




1% 200 y . S JLBS g 

I C armdur's ) 1 



GRAIN 
GROWER 



FERTIIIZERI 

CMICASO^ 

ciiwahtIcdVahalysis, 

BVUVIB ST 111 t»X * ^0 '^ 



pIXim 




ARMOUR'S 

Farmer's Almanac 

Will help you select the plant 
food best adapted to your soil. 
You can procure a copy from 
any of the above dealers, or we 
will send you one direct. 



The Armour Fertilizer Works, Baltimore, Md. 



162 



All the People 

can be suited some of the 
time. When it comes to 

LUMBER, COAL and FEED 

we try to suit our cus- 
tomers all the time. 

D. C. Dominick 



EAST MAIN ST. 



WALDEN 



NEW YORK 



P. P. POST 



Opposite M. E. Church 



WALDEN. N. Y. 



Carriage Making and General Jobbing 

FILING SAWS A SPECIALTY 
PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO REPAIRING 

SAMMONS S JONES 

Saocessors to GEORGE B. ANDREWS 

WALDEN, N. Y. 

Dealers in 

Choice and Staple Groceries 

Fine Butter and Flour. An extensive 

assortment of cereal foods and 

canned goods 

Highest price paid for eggs and farm produce 
in exchange. Best goods at fair prices 

Orders Delivered 

PHONE 9-W 



G. W. DOTZERT 



G. H. DOTZERT 



G. W. DOTZERT & SON 



Painters 



Paper Hangers 



Decorators 



t^ v^ ^ 

We make paper hanging and decorating a specialty, 

having the Exclusive Agency for 

one of the largest lines of 

Wall Papers 

(^* (^* ^J* 

Churches, School Houses, Country, Private Homes 

and Farm Buildings will have our 

personal attention, while only 

skilled workmen are 

in our employ 

^* ^* ^* 

Estimates cheerfully given on all kinds of work. Work done by day or contract 

with Promptness and Dispatch 

Address, WALDEN, N. Y., Main Street 



163 



Matthew Vesey 

Dealer in 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes 
and White Lead 



LUCAS TINTED MIXED 
PAINTS A SPECIALTY 

also 

Glass, Brushes and all 

Painters' Supplies 

Wall Paper 

Mat Boards 

Picture^Frames and 

Room Moulding 



Skilled Workmen 

Best Materials e 
Estimates Furnished 
Contracts Taken 



ORCHARD STREET 

Walden New York 



For Farm or Village Home 

Lucas Paints 



...A WELL PAINTED HOUSE. . 

is a pleasure to see, a satisfaction 
to own, a comfort to live in. 
It's really economical if you use 
Lucas Paints, because they cover 
so thoroughly, wear so long and 
look so tine. 

Their beautiful glossy coat seals 
the pores of the wood against 
dampness and decay and prolongs 
the life of the lumber. It pays to 
ask about Lucas Paints. 



FOR SALE BY 



Matthew Vesey . . 
Edward Tennant 
Albert Clark . . . 
Edward S. Keating . 
Geo. C Schlegel . . 
Chas. E Brown . . 
J. T. Johnson . . 
Chas. Bowman 
J. E Hasbrouck 
Thomas J. Sheridan 



. . . Walden, N. Y. 
Middletown, N. Y. 
. Poughkeepsie, N Y 
. Poughkeepsie, N Y. 
. Poughkeepsie, N Y. 
. . Highland, N. Y. 
. . Kingston, N Y. 
Washingtonville, N Y 
. . . Modena, N Y 
. . . Goshen N Y 



John Lucas 8 Go. 

Philadelphia 
New York Chicago 



164 



T. L MILLSPAUQH 

136 MAIN ST., WALDEN, N. Y. 



We can ship you for $10-95, One 55-lb. 
Elastic Cotton Felt Mattress guaranteed in 
every way, good tick, good felt and good 
workmanship. 

We furnish the same in an Art tick at 
$12.00. Why pay $15.00 and $ J 8.00 when 
we can furnish you our guaranteed Elastic 
Felt at $10.95 and $12.00? 
Guaranteed satisfactory or money refunded. 



T. L. MILLSPAUQH 

136 MAIN ST., WALDEN, N. Y. 






165 



GILT EDGE 

Confectionery and 
Ice Cream Parlors 

Your attention is called to the full 
line of High-Grade Chocolates 
found here. 

PufFs Gilt Edge Ice Cream, Ice 
Cream Sodas, Frappe with fruit 
Walnut Russe. 

Special attention given all out-of- 
town trade. Special prices for 
weddings, panics, churches, etc. 
Bricks will keep hard one hour. 

Jas. T. Scott 

Main Street 

Walden, N. Y. 



IF IT ISN'T RIGHT 

We'll gladly make it so 



That is our standing offer on whatever 
you purchase of us. We warrant every 
article to be exactly as represented, if 
it proves otherwise, we'll gladly "make 
it good" either in exchange of goods or 
in cash. Can you think of a safer basis 
on which to make your purchases of 
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, or Silver- 
ware? We do a lot of watch repair- 
ing just because we do it well. 



A. D. BRUNDIDGE 

JEWELER and OPTICIAN 

150 Main Street, Walden, N. Y. 



TERRITORY OF THE CITIZEN 




JOHN H. REID. 



We Guarantee 

That the advertisements 
in the Citizen go into 2,000 
homes. This means they 
are read each week by 
about 8,000 people. The 
circulation list is a good 
criterion of the popularity 
of a paper. The Citizen is 
the only paper that covers 
the entire territory of this 
map. Our new building 
and plant enable us to 
do better work than ever. 

Calendars and Souvenir 
Postal Cards a Specialty 



Publisher Walden Citizen 



166 



I Fruits and Vegetables 

At Attractive Prices 



X^E always have on hand the choicest 
fruits and vegetables. Our prices 
are right, and quality the best. 

PINDAR'S ICE CREAM is our leader 
this year — 35 cts. the brick, or in the 
loose at 30 cts. per quart. Served in 
all our sodas at 5c. the glass with pure 
crushed fruits and fruit syrups. Try one. 
Choice line of confectionery Remem- 
ber a generous amount of cream in 
all our sodas, 5c. the glass. 



John E. Cunningham 

MAIN ST., WALDEN, N. Y. 
Phone 9-L Opp. Bank 



Isaiah Rosencrans ^ Son 

CONTRACTORS 
and BUILDERS 



DEALERS IN 



Portland Cement, Limet Plaster, Gravel, 
Roofing Paper, Gasoline Engines 

PORTLAND CEMENT SIDEWALKS. CON- 
CRETE BUILDING BLOCKS, ETC. 

Artistic designs in CEMENT BLOCKS 
for the Wholesale and Retail Trade 



WALDEN, 



New York 



ESTABLISHED IN 1870 



The Best Equipped Office in the Wallkill Valley 



The Walden Herald 



Walden, Orange County, N. Y. Ward Winfield, Editor and Proprietor 

Subscription $1.00 a year in advance. If paid at the end of the year $1.30 



Everything printed in 
the Latest Styles. We 
charge you no more 
than the common goods 
cost. We have more 
Presses than any office 
in the town. 



The Best Advertising Medium 
in the Wallkill Valley 

The "Know How" to do good 
work is the important Thing 

One Of the best portraits of Lincoln 
ever made was drawn on a shingle 
with a hot poker by an artist 

He Knew How 

SOME OF THE BEST PRINTING 
ever done in this village has been 
done at THE HERALD office 

WE KNOW HOW 



Poster Work will be 

made a Speciahy. 

Plain and in Colors at 

moderate prices. 

With new type we 

can't help but 

to please. 



167 



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G. L. HASBROUCK 

BLACKSMITH 




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Interfering and lame horses, and those with 
quarter cracks, shod in the most scientific man- 
ner and upon the most approved principles. 
HORSESHOEING and REPAIRING receive prompt 
attention. Opp IM. E. Church 

WALDEN, N. Y. 

^ im iipii iiin pi i iii i i p [p iii ii l [p iii 'il | |y il" ii | |||| |ii i i i || |]j |l i iiil |||| || i i ii || ||||iiiiiipiiiiiipiiii||piiii|i|]|piii 



Mapes' Photographs 

Copying, Enlarging, Crayon and Color Fin- 
ishing done in the very best of styles 

We are doing better work than 
ever at the very lowest prices. 
Special attention given to group 
work and children's pictures. 
All work instantaneous 
X-Ray Photographs for physi- 
cians and surgeons made with 
the most improved apparatus 
and at moderate prices. Our 
ideas are modern and strictly 
up-to date. 

Give us a call, we will give you belter work and 
more satisfactory results than any one else. 



I 74 Water Street 

I Newburgh, N, Y. 

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. 






. 



Standard and Reporter 

LYMAN H. TAFT, Proprietor 

Oldest and Best Paper in the Wallkill Valley 

Its circulation is second to none, and the paper is read in 
nearly every home between Campbell Hail and New Paltz, 
malting it the best advertising medium in the section 



Highest Grade Souvenir Post Card Work 

Fine Job and Commercial Printing 

Poster Work IS a Specialty 






. 



MONTGOMERY, 



= NEW YORK 



168 









C. W. EMBLER 

HARDWOOD LUMBER MANUFACTURER 







i 



', 



. 



Flour and Feed Mill Attached 

Mill near Oak Street Bridge, Walden 



'X' -fl-i/:^ /Vl /zk **/-r li o n -f Do you want to reach the prosperous and substantial farmers and villagers of 
^ " IIIC iTlCIdlClIll Eastern Orange County? They form the purchasing community from which 



the merchants derive a very large portion of their best trade. 



Newburgh Semi=WeekIy Journal 



circulates i 


n the following Post 


Offices : 


Blooming Grove 


Highland Mills 


New Paltz 


Burnside 


Idlewild 


Plattekill 


Campbell Hal! 


Leptondale 


Poughkeepsie 


Central Valley 


Little Britain 


Rocklet 


Cornwall 


Marlborough 


Salisbury Mills 


Corn wall-on- Hudson 


Meadowbrook 


Savilton 


Cronomer Valley 


Middletown 


Vail's Gate 


Gardiner 


Milton 


Walden 


Fort Montgomery 


Modena 


Wallkill 


Highlands 


Montgomery 


Washingtonville 


Highland Falls 


Mountainville 


Woodbury Falls 


Newburgh Rural D( 


;livery (4 routes covering 


large territory) 


NEWBURGH JOURNAL 


h Streets 


Established 1833 


Newburgh, N. Y 



Subscription terms $2 per year 



169 



When in Walden 



Call on 



DAVID OLIVA 

152 Main St. 

for Fruits of all kinds in Season, 
also full line of Confec- 
tionery of all kinds 
in Bulk or 
Boxes 

Ice Cream Parlor Attached 



Geo. M. Kniffin 



DEALER IN 



Choice Dressed Steer Beef 

Mutton, Pork, Veal, Lamb, Poultry in 
Season and Kettle Rendered Lard 



I exercise great care in the selection and purchase of meats, 
and my patrons can rest assured that it will be my highest 
amb tion to furnish at all seasons the best the market 
affords and on the most liberal terms. Meats delivered. We 
ask the people of Walden and surrounding country one favor 
"As we journey through, life let us lire by the way." 



WEST SIDE MARKET 

WALDEN, NEW YORK 



Telephone, 2 R 




Dr. N. Moffat 

Graduate 
N. Y. C. U. of New York 

Walden, N. Y. 



Hudson River Telephone 



170 



T. W. STRATTON 

MILLER 


MRS. M. J. SHAW 
^xt emporium 

HUMAN HAIR GOODS A SPECIALTY 
1 19 Water Street Newburgh, N. Y. 




B. B. JOHNSTON 


FLOUR, FEED and GRAIN 

MONTGOMERY, NEW YORK 


Dry Qoods, Qroceries 
and Crockery 

Montgomery, New York 



CHARLES D. WAIT 



DEALER IN 



Coal, Lumber, Flour, Feed, Grain, Salt, Cement, Lime 

Brewery Grains, Sprouts, Clover and Timothy Seed, 
Fertilizer and a General Line of Farm Implements 

Agent for Deering Mowers and Binders Dealer in All Kinds of Cattle 
Railroad Avenue and Clinton St. MONTGOMERY, NEW YORK 

GEORGE T. OVERHISER 

Funeral Director 

"O EPRESENTS the leading establishments in his line. 
■*- Every requisite for the burial of the dead. He is 
competent to embalm and prepare for interment. The 
same painstaking care given calls from remote and distant 
localities without extra charges. 

Pine Garriage Painting a Specialty 
MONTGOMERY NEW YORK 




171 



Ch 



2/0 



oose a^our 



Company 

Sf i/ou desire a iPolici/ that will absoiuteii/ 
insure j/ou a£fainst the toss of your proper ti/ dy 



J'ire 



jCiffhtninff 



Wind 



patronize oid reiiable Companies, tested by 
successful business experience* Secure in 
financial strenyth with an established repu^ 
tation for fair adjustment and prompt payment 
of losses 

Hafbey N. Smith 

Insurance and Real Estate 
Montgomer^^, N. Y. 




172 



L.S AS. "HORICUM" L S.&S 



TRADE-MARK 



The San Jose Scale Killer For Faii or spring use 



Sulphur, Lime, etc., in simple, 
effectual form for use on Apples, 
Pears, Peaches, 

Plums, Cherries, etc., etc. 

Take One Gallon of "Horicum" and add to 
it 16 to 20 Gallons of Water, then spray over 
your trees when the leaves are off. 



The young scale begins to suck the 
sap as soon as the t;rowth starts in the Spring; 
in about four weeks they are grown — they 
are very prolific. These pests, called Perni- 
cious Scale or San Jose Scale, came from Asia, 
or South America, and are now nearly broad- 
cast through the United States. 




Son Jose Scale on it fear. 



m° NOTICE.— One spraying will not kill 
all the scale. Many of them get under the 
rough bark. They are very minute, but 
their multitude makes the San Jose Scale a 
plague like the plagues of Egypt 



Horicum " Is Simple, Strong 
and ready for use 



Sold by 
Seed Dealers 



Made at 



Hammond's Slu^ Shot Works 



Fishkill-on-Hudson, New York 



Hammond's Cattle Comfort cTmLi'hui^Tiy'ti'^l'" 



Hammond's 




Paint and Slu^ 
Shot Works 



PAINTS, OILS, GLASS AND CHEMI- 
CALS, PAPER AND LAMP FIXINGS 



N. E. Corner Lon^ Dock 

Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y. 



173 



£jllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll||||||||||||l2J| 

I You WaLiit the Best FoLrm PaLper | 

I Which is It? I 

= Thousands of Farmers all over the = 

= Country say it is S 

I The Rural New Yorker 




T^HEY say it increases the happiness 
of life on the farm, and helps pay off 
the mortgage. It keeps them in touch 
with practical and scientific men all 
over the country, who are making a 
study of farm problems and conditions- 
It brings weekly to their fireside the prod- 
ucts of the brightest minds engaged in 
agricultural development. It will do all 
this for 3^ou and it will cost you only 

$1^° a year 

Would you like a. free 
Sample Copy ? 



i You will appreciate its value when you see it. = 

= Let us send you a copy You mayihave it for the asking = 

[The Rural New Yorker! 

I 409 Pearl Street. New Vork | 

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174 



TELEPHONE, 782 CORTLANDT 

J. S. BIESECKER 



DEALER IN 



Dairy and Creamery Supplies 

Milk Bottles a Specialty 

59 Murray Street, New York 



The Tubular, the ''Right Now" 
Cream Separator 




Look at the position of the Supply Tank. There are no 
troublesome oil cups. It requires from one-third to one-half less 
power to operate it than any other separator on the market. 



Milk Bottles of all 
Kinds 




Headquarters for 
Sharpies 
Tubular Cream 
Separators 
Harvd and Power 
SmsLll and Large 
Capacity 
Send for catalogue of full information 



A full line for the Dairy, Creamery and Cheese Factory 

Partial List of Principal Articles 

Milk Bottles, Milk Bottle Fillers, Milk Bottle Boxes, Milk Bottle Brushes, Milk Bottle Gaps, Milk Bottle 

Carriers, Butter Jars, Butter Workers, Butter Printers, Butter Shipping Boxes, Milk Cans, Milk 

Can Tubs, Milk Can Brushes, Churns of all kinds. Creameries, Cream Vats, Scales, 

Separators, Milk Testing Instruments, Thermometers and Lactometers, Strainers, 

Dippers, Ladles, Aerators, Lanterns, Horse Brushes, Gurry Combs, 

Account Books, Rennet Extract, Butter Color, Milk Color, 

Cheese Color, Babcock Milk Tester, Perline and other 

Soap Powders, Soap Scraps, Washing Soda, 

Eureka Egg Crates, Preservaline 

EVERYTHING FOR THE PURVEYING AND PRODUCTION OF MILK AND BUTTER 



175 










I 



Proper Food for 
the Baby 

is of Utmost Importance. 

BORDEN'S 

Eagle Brand 

Condensed 

Milk 

Stands without a Peer. 

Send for 

" Baby's Biography.'' 



Borden's Condensed Milk Company 

" Leaders of Quality " 

Established 1857. New York. 






\ 

\ 
1 



176 




Feeding the Army 



T 



HE President has called out 125,000 volunteers, and 
as soon as these men enlist, they must be fed, 
clothed and cared for by the United States. It is 
a big task to feed so many men. To cook their rations 
in one utensil, for one day, would require a frying pan 
learly a mile wide, while to make the cofifee for this 
number, would require a pot as big as the average three- 
■^tory house. Six and one-half tons of sugar and two 
thousand cans of condensed milk would be needed every 
day for an army of 100,000 men, who would also con- 
sume seventy-five thousand pounds of bacon or corned 
beef, fifteen thousand pounds of beans, two thousand 
gallons of molasses, five hundred gallons of vinegar, four 
pounds of salt, and two hundred and fifty pounds of 
black pepper. 

The minimum cost for the simplest form of rations 
f(.)r this army would be $22,000 a day. As long as the 
troops are in the United States, or in easy communica- 
tion with the United States, they will be issued some of 
what, from an army point of view, are considered as luxuries, including fresh meat and canned 
goods, at a slightly increased expense. Where the troops are liable to be completely cut off from the 
base of supplies, they will be furnished with more condensed foods. 

The introduction of condensed and canned fojds has brought about the greatest improvement in 
the condition of the soldier in active service, and soldiers owe a debt, of gratitude to a Texas State 
Surveyor, who, in 1852, invented a meat biscuit, the first condensed food ever made in the United 
States. This man was Gail Borden, who had but then recently laid out the city of Galveston, and 
while surveying in the vast and almost unpopulated territory of Texas, he learned the necessity of 
possessing some portable, condensed form of food. On leaving Texas, the inventor settled in New 
York State, and turning his attention to milk, he perfected a process of condensing it, which is now in 
use throughout the world. Gail Borden was born at Norwich, New York, November 6, 1801, and 
died at Harveys Creek, Texas, January 11, 1874. 

The first great impetus given to the use of his condensed milk, to which he gave the name of 
"Eagle Brand," was furnished by the demand for supplies for the armies of the United States, 
during the Civil War, and through the occasional capture of the United States supply jtrains. the 
''Eagle Brand" condensed milk became widely known to the soldiers on both sides. Now no army 
supply train is considered complete without its quota of "Eagle Brand" condensed milk and Eagle 
Brand Condensed Coffee, and since the health and comfort of the soldiers are of prime importance m 
war, Gail Borden has rendered a greater service by his invention of condensed food and condensed 
milk than have many of the generals whose names are prominent in military history. 

We print herewith a portrait of Gail Borden, whose rugged features indicate the originality, energy 
and tenacity which were characteristic of the man and which enabled him to surmount innumerable 
mechanical difficulties in perfecting the invention which has proven such a boon to soldiers, sailors, 
miners, travelers and humanity in general, not torgetting the many thousands of babies which have 



been raised to vigorous health on the "Eagle Brand" Condensed Milk. 



B. T. N. 



177 



The Famous Trunk Line Route 

Passing as it does a^ong the West Shore of the Hudson River 
and through the Picturesque Mohawk Valley is the popular 

West Shore Railroad 



The only All-Rail Route and 
Through Parlor Car Line to 
and from the 

Catskill Mountains 

Special Trains, Parlor Cars 
attached, are run during the 
summer season between New 
York and New Paltz, via the 

WallkiU Valley Railroad 

for 

Lake Mohonk 




Parlor Cars 

between 

NEW YORK, 

PHILADELPHIA 

and ONEONTA 

without change 

also between Washington, Bal- 
timore, Philadelphia, Long 
Branch, Point Pleasant, New 
York, Faratoga and Lake George 



FAST TRAINS WITH ELEGANT PARLOR AND SLEEPING CARS 

Between New York, Boston, Newburgh, Kingston, Catskill, 
Albany, Saratoga, Montreal, Utica, Syracuse, Rochester, 
Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Detroit, Cleveland, Chicago, and St. 
Louis without change. 

For Tickets, Time-tables and ftiU information, apply to any Ticket Agent 

of the West Shore Railroad, or address 



C. E. LAMBERT 

General Passenger Agent 

Grand Central Station, New Ycrk. 



W. S. RANDOLPH 

General Agent 

Union Staiion, Albany, N. Y. 



178 




p-,,,,„.„,. 




MIDDLETOWN, N, Y, 



Orange Co, Fair. 



1906 -See page 13. 



179 



HUDSON RIVER BY DAYLIGHT 

The Most Charming Inland Water Trip on the American Continent 



The "New York/' "Albany"and "Hendrick Hudson" 

Palace Steamers 



OF THE 



HUDSON RIVER DAY LINE 



Direct Con- 
nection at 
Ne\vburo;h 
^vith the 
•Orange 
County Trac- 
tion Co, 
Railway for 
Orange Laice, 
Walden, etc. 



A trip on one of these 
famous steamers on the 
noblest stream in the 
country offers rare at- 
tractions. They are 
fitted up in the most 
elegant style, exclu- 
sively for passengers. 




1907 



TIME-TABLE 

Daily, except Sundays 



1907 



NORTH BOU>>D A M. 

i~oo 



Brooklyn by Annex 



New York: 

Desbrosses St. . 

W. 42d St., N R. 

W. 129th St. N. R 
Yonkers 
West Point . 



Newburgh . 
Poughkeepsie 
Kingston Point 
Catskill . . 
Hudson . 
Albany. Hamilton St 



» 40 
9 00 

9 20 

<5-45 
IT. 50 

P M 
12. 2i 
I. 15 
2. ID 

3 '5 

.■? 4' 
6. 10 



SOUTH BOUND 



A. M. 



Albany Hamilton St. . 8.30 

Hudson 10.40 

Catskill II 00 

p. M. 
Kingston Point . . . 12.25 
Poughkeepsie .... 1.20 

Newburgh 2.15 

West Point .... 2.50 

Yonkers 4.30 

New York: 

W i2Qth St., N. R. , 5.10 
W. 42dSt. N. R. . . 5.30 
Desbrosses St. . . 6.00 



Br loklyn. by Annex 



6.20 



The Attractive 
Route for Sum- 
mer Travel to 
and from the 
Catskill Moun- 
tains, Hotel 
Champlain and 
the North, Ni- 
agara Falls and 
the West, the 
Thousand Isl- 
ands and the St. 
Lawrence River 

Their great speed, fine 
orchestras, spacious sa- 
loons, private parlors 
and luxurious accom- 
modations in every re- 
spect, render them un- 
excelled. Send 6 cents 
in stamps for "Sum- 
mer Excursion Book." 



During the Summer Season direct connection will be made at West 42d Street Pier, New York 

City, with the Central Railroad of New Jersey (Sandy Hook Boats) thus affording 

a delightful and easy route to the seashore resorts on the New Jersey coast. 



GENERAL OFFICE 



DESBROSSES STREET PIER, NEW YORK CITY 



F, B. HIBBARD. G-neral Passenger AgenI 



E. E. OLCOTT, General Manager 



180 



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T. S. MARVEL 

Ship Building Company 




The Launching of the Hendrick Hudson 




Builders of 

IRON OR WOOD VESSELS, 
ENGINES, BOILERS, Etc. 

Larde Marine Railway and excellent facilities for building 
and repairing vessels of every description 

Newbur^h, New York 



inpmiipmTilTpiiiTipmf^^ 



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181 



A Marvelous Find ! 



Springs of Great ]\Iedicinal Pro- 
perties HAVE LiEEX Discovered and 
WILL GIVE TO MOUNT BEACON 
A Prestige never before attained. 



Water for drinking i)iirposes is snp- 
])lie(l from tliese perpetual springs dis- 
covered on the side of the mountain ; this 
water apparently comes from some great 
storage reservoir situated deep in the 
heart of the mountain, and is cool, spark- 
ling and pure. Analysts have declarea 
it the superior to many and the equal to 
anv of the waters from well-known 
springs now on the market and so popu- 
lar with the ])ul)lic. 

The Top of the Mountain is laid out 
as a ])ark with ]:)aths and walks leading 
to the dilTerent points, a large Casino 
and summer pavilions, and seats in 
nooks at resting j^laces. However, the 
arrangement of nature is left undis- 
turbed as much as possible. 

This is an ideal spot for a summer cottage 
or for camping parties. Desirable sites for 
cottages or camping may be obtained on 
reasonable terms by application to the man- 
ager. There are also desirable lots for sum- 
mer cottages for sale at the base of the 
mountain near the Incline station. 

Persons afflicted with asthma, hay 
fever, or bronchial troubles find reliet 
while on the mountains. 

This is just the place for picnic par- 
ties. A large rustic pavilion has been 
provided, with seats and tables, especi- 
ally for such parties. 

Lodges, Societies, etc., are invited to 
come here for a field day. 

Special rates furnished excursion par- 
ties. See page 99. 




MUL'Xl 



\CUX .MUX L -ME XT 



Ertctfd l>y the- Dau.yhtcTs of tlie Revolution 

Oil the eastern crest stands a nwniDnent erected 
h\ tlic Daii:^liters af the American Revolution, in 
C(>nuncniorati()n of the biirninfi of beacon fires dur- 
/'«,tf the occupation of Nezc York by the British, to 
notify JVashington and his officers of the movement 
of the enemy. The road has been in successful oper- 
ation since May 30, 1902, carrying thousands of 
people ti> the heights of this interesting and grand 
aid mountain. 



182 



MOUNT BEACON ^he new mountain resort 

^^ -^ ^ FISHKILL - ON - THE - HUDSON, NEW YORK 

God Planted them; 
, ' Behold how firm they stand! 

Rock-ribbed, tree-clothed and zvrapped in purple haze 
Unmoved through an inftnitude of days. — M. A. Kniveton. 

This historic moun- 
tain, which has lately 
been fitted up as a 
summer resort, is sit- 
uated on the east bank 
of the Hudson River, 
fifty-nine miles from 
New York Cit}-, and 
directl}' opposite New- 
burgh. The beautiful 
villages of Fishkill 
Ivanding and Mattea- 
wan nestle at its base. 
An extended view is 
also obtained of thirty 
miles of the Hudson 
River, from the High- 
lands on the south, 
with the broad ex- 
panse of Newburgh 
Bay, the City of New- 
burgh Orange Lake 
and the Shawangunk 
^Mountains in the west, 
while to the north can 
be seen the Pough- 
keepsie Bridge with 
the Catskill and Adi- 
rondack Mountains in 
the distance. 

The summit o f 
Mount Beacon is 
reached by the Mount 
Beacon Incline Rail- 
way, steepest incline 
in the world. The road is owned and operated by the Mount-Beacon-on-the-Hudson Association, and was 
opened to the public May 30, 1902, carrying more than 60,000 people the first season. 

The Ride up the Mountain for the first time is a novel experience. As the car moves rapidly 
and steadily up the incline, the lower landscape seems to be falling away and unrolling and spread- 
ing out to the view in one beautiful picture framed in the horizon. 

The View from the Summit is beautiful and varied. Tourists who have traveled in this and 
other countries are delighted with the scenery and prospect from Mount Beacon. While in sublimity 
and grandeur not equal to that of the great mountain ranges of the West, yet as an expansive, tran- 
quil picture of mountain, valley and river partly subdued by man. it is unexcelled. 

The Casino has spacious balconies on all sides, a roof observatory supplied with powerful teles- 
copes and searchlight. The cool and spacious hall is open for dancing parties each afternoon and 
evening (Sundays excepted), good music being furnished for that purpose. It has a well-equipped 
dining-room and also a quick lunch counter, where patrons are served with meals and lunches from 
9 a. m. to 10 p. m. No bar is maintained or allowed upon the premises, but persons desiring wines 
or other drinks served with meals in the dining-room are accommodated. Mr. Harry George, who 
has had large experience in catering to the public, will have charge of the Casino. 

HOW TO GET THERE.— The New York Central & Hudson R. R. R., the Newburgh, Dutchess 
& Connecticut Railroad, and the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, make connections at 
Matteawan and Fishkill Landing. The West Shore Railroad, the Erie Railroad, the Ontario and 
Western Railroad, and the Poughkeepsie & Eastern Railroad, make connections at Newburgh. New- 
burgh is connected with Fishkill by Ferry; and the Trolley line connects the Incline with the Ferry 
and all railroad lines and steamers at Long Wharf, Fishkill Landing. 

Write for terms for excursions or private parties to H. W, GEORGE, General Manager, Mattea- 
wan, N. Y. See page gg. TAKE RED FLAG CARS FOR MOUNT BEACON, 




INCLINE RAILWAY 



183 



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i 




Dr. G. H. Perkins 

Eyesight Specialist 

HOURS 
8 a. m. to 6 p. m. every week day 

Consultation tree 

Where you can get the best results 
._ for the least money 



OFFICE 
%f 286 Main St., Poughkeepsie, N. Y 

'llfl'"!ll|P Ifll"lll[^i'"ll|fl Ilfll"" 




111 llllliimiiiiiitlinMilllliiiiMililliimn, lillii.nillil Illll UlliiMiilt Illlli IJliiii.,iilllll lllimiilJllJiiiiiilJllln .|i|lili|.|..iillli i^li lllliNmllllliiiiii lllll ill illilUi ,iilill|iiii|i|Jillliiiil[lll) Hill)lii i iidl|!',:iiillllliiiiriiiliiiiiiilllll 1%. 

WILLIAM C. EWING 

SUCCESSOR TO EDWIN KNAPP 



PRACTICAL 

HORSESHOER AND 
GENERAL JOBBER 

Particular Attention 
Paid to Interfering 
and Tender Feet 




DEALER IN 

FACTORY WAGONS 

AND 

WAGONS TO ORDER 

PAINTS AND OILS 
CARRIAGE PAINTING 

Using Only Best Materials and 
Workmanship a Specialty 




West Coldenham 



iiilTf[ll""l(IJ|liiiiii|piiini 



niilipiiiiiill^ii.iiIipilMilipiir 



Orange County, N. Y. 

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184 



The historic 

Russell House 

E. A. BROWN 

PROPRIETOR 

James St., opposite 
King St. 

Only a memory, 
but from its ashes wilJ 
arise a perfectly 
equipped, modern 
building,which will be 
ready for occupancy 
in the near future. 




Walden and Its Environs 

VOLUME ONE 

AN IDEAL CHRISTMAS GIFT FOR AN ABSENT FRIEND 

J50 pages; embellished throtjghout with a wealth of high class half-tone engravings, letter- 
ed in old gold. A glance through this charming volume will show that the purpose of its 
publication is to perpetuate scenes, incidents and traditions appertaining to "Walden and its 
environs. Price: $ J. 00. 

WALLKILL VALLEY PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION, WALDEN, N. Y. 



185 



1609 IN PREPARATION 1907 

HISTORY OF ORANGE COUNTY 

NEW YORK 
By RUSSEL HEADLEY and a Corps of Special Contributors 

The work is based upon a careful study of every available authority, and its purpose is to present in a thorough 
and concise manner all the leading important factors w^hich have contributed to the growth and prosperity of the 
county ; including a description of its aboriginal occupants, a narrative of its discovery and settlement ; stirring 
scenes within its borders during the Revolutionary period; its hamlets, villages and cities; together with an 
historical account of its schjols, churches, societies, industries, farms, banks, newspapers, etc. 

The Following is a Partial List of the Special Contributors: 
General Church History, Rev. Francis Washburn ; Educational Institutions, John M. Dolph ; Medical History, 
Dr. John T. Howell; Free Masonry, Charles H. Halstead ; Agricultural Society, David A. Morrison; Wallkill 
Valley Farmers' Association, William C. Hart. 

SPECIAL TOWN HISTORIES 
Blooming-Grove, Benjamin C. Sears ; Cornwall, Miss E. M. V. McLean ; Chester, Frank Durland ; Goshen, 
George T. Gregg ; Hamptonburgh, Mrs. Margaret Crawford Jackson ; Monroe, M. N. Kane; Montgomery, 
David A. Morrison ; New Windsor, Dr. C. A. Gorse ; Warwick, F. V. Sanford, Writers for other towns will 
be selected as the work progresses 

The bjok will have from 700 to 900 pages, royal octavo; handsomely bound in morocco back and corners 
and English muslin sides ; illustrated with fine engravings. The edition de luxe is limited to 400 copies. 

Address communications to W.J. Van Deusen, Business Manager, P. O. Box 153, Newburgh, N. Y. 




KANE'S 



I EAT THERE 



Restaurant 

39 Golden St. Newburgh, N. Y. 

Regular Meals or Luncheon 

Always a Good Cup of Coffee or Tea 
Oysters in Every Style 




1 DON'T 




ELTING HARP 

f^eal Estate Broker 

New Paltz, N. Y. 

Over 150 Farms, Country Cottages and Building Sites 

for sale, located through the Historic Wallkill and 

Hudson River districts. 

Send for Catalogue, Mailed Free 



186 



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i THE NEW YORK HIPPODROME 

i SIXTH AVENUE AND FORTY-THIRD STREET 



A VISIT to the City of New York is incomplete without a visit to this vast palace of 
■^"^ amusement. Since its opening four million persons have viewed the Hippodrome 
shows. Since the present entertainment had us premier the crowds have come in volume 
which packed the great playhouse twice daily, including the most illustrious people of the 
continent. To residents of our beautiful valleys, towns and cities, with almi^st hourly serv- 
ice over our railroads, and iourneying over the queenly Hudson, a rare opportunity is offered 
tor the formation of family panies and larger number of excursionists, to v'sit the shopping 

districts of this great city, and 
include an afternoon or even- 
ing at the largest playhouse 



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in the world, where one sits 
entranced by the beauty, mag- 
nitude and grandeur of this 
vast audience room, while 
listening to the melody of the 
vast number of instruments in 
the music program. 

The Hippodrome's per- 
formances appeal not alone 
to one class, or to one's sense 
of enjoyment, the eye and 
ear at once are charmed, and 
the utmost reaches of imagi- 
nation are realized in their 
various features. In their 
spectacular scenes, in magnif- 
icence of costuming, in gor- 
geousness of scenic environ- 
ment, and in the vast number 
of people engaged, the Hip- 
podrome's performances sur- 
pass every previous achieve- 
ment of stage craft. 

Erected at a cost of $3 000,000, the New York Hippodrome is 200 feet long on 
Sixth Avenue, occupying the ertire block. Built entirely of brick, marble, and steel, it 
stands i 10 feet hijh in the rear and 72 feet high in front, with two electrical towers abutting 
from either corner which rises to a height of 120 feet above the sidewalk. In its capacious 
interior 5,200 persons find comfortab'e accommodations. 

In the formanon of your plans for the season do not fail to include a visit to this wonder 
of the wonde ful places of amusement. 



THE NEW YORK HIPPODROME 



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TAMNEY 
HOUSE 

W. C. TAMNEY, Prop. 

NEW PALTZ, N. Y. 

BOARD 
By the Day or Week 

Hotel Heated by Hot 
Water System. Fine 
Li\ery and Exchange 
Stables .Attached. Pas- 
sengers Conveyed to 
Lake Mohonk or Lake 
Minne«aska on short 
notice. 

Rates Reasonable 

Long Distance Telephone 



74 Broadway, Newburgh 
H. R. Phone 377-R 



Restaurant 



Branch: 105 Broadway, Newburgh 
H. R. Phone 709-J 




Catering for Balls, Parties, Weddings, Etc. 
We Buy, Sell and Furnish Lunch Wagons, Restaurants, Etc. 



188 



The Hotel that is Like Home 



MORGAN HOUSE 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 




The Finest Grill Room on the Hudson 

OPEN FROM 7 A. M. TO 12 P. M. a la Carte 



Luncheon from 12 li 2:30 



Dinner from 6 lo 8 



189 



THE EAGLE HOTEL 



#'■ 






R L 




MAIN AND WALNUT STREETS 



J. W. SCHULTZ, Proprietor 
Headquarters for Commercial Men 

First-class accommodation for perma- 
nent or transient guests. This house 
has recently been refitted and refur- 
nished; large airy rooms, electric lights, 
steam heat and improved sanitary con- 
veniences. Free 'bus to and from the 
Wallkill Valley Railroad. 

Table Unexcelled 

A GOOD LIVERY ATTACHED 

WALDEN, N. Y. 



NATIONAL HOUSE 

J. A. TERRY. 

Proprietor. 

MONTGOMERY, 
N. Y. 

Situated in the heart or 

the Valley of the 

Wallkill. 

Excellent Cuisine and 
Service. 

Board bv the Dav or 
Week. 

Historic Surroundings, De- 
lightful Drives, Boating 
and Fishing Unsurpassed. 
A Restful Abode for City 
Guests during Vacation 
Days. Large and Com- 
modious House for the En- 
tertainment of Parties. 




190 



■^-f-t-"+++++"+++4H-++++++T-+^-F+++++++++++++++++++++++++++-H-+++++++++ 

NEWBURQH HORSE SALE AND VENDUE CO. | 

BRUSH &, MCLEAN H 

++ 
7, 9 and 11 Johnston Street, Cor. Broadway, NEWBURGH, N. Y. tt 

+-H 
++ 

RHGULAR AUCTION EVERY THURSDAY AT i P. M. tt 

Horses, Wagons, Harness, Blankets, Whips, Furniture 
and everything that is salable. Correspondence solicited. +• 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Horses, Wagons, Harness, Sleighs 
new and second-hand, at private sale. 




Public Sheds a Specialty 

BRUSH & McLean 

Newburgh, N. Y. 



WM. F. BRUSH 

Auctioneer and Appraiser 

Sales taken in any part of the country on percentage or by the day 

Antique and Modern Furniture Bought and Sold 

WRITE AND 1 WILL CALL 

WM. F. BRUSH 

9 and 11 Johnston Street, Newburgh, New York 



-f-fi 



BOTH PHONES 



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4-+ 
4— 
4-+- 



++ 



4- 



++ 

.... 

.... 
.... 

--+ 
++ 
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+4^ 



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^^ 

4-+ 

+-- 
++ 
++ 



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191 






. 



. 



DIRECTORS 



ONE YEAR 

Elected 1904 Expires 1907 

Philip Hasbrouck. Walden 
John K. Brown, Coldenham 
W. S. Hartshorn, Plattekiil 
Lewis M. Borden, Wall kill 
Cyrus A. Bowne, Walden 
Robert B. Crowell, Wallkill 
E. B. DuBois. Wallkill 
Anson J. Fowler, Walden 



TWO YEARS 

Ejected 1903 Ejcpires 

P. E. Hawkins, Coldenham 

John D. Mould, Montgomery 

Adam Wiley. Wallkill 

J. M Hawkins, Montgomery 

William C. Hart, Walden 

W. H. Hallock, Washingtonville 

Elting Harp, New Paltz 

John Ahrens, Waldep 



1908 



THREE YEARS 

Elected 1906 ' Expires 1909 

William H. Dunn, St. Andrews 
Isaiah W. Decker, Walden 
John H. Reid, Walden 
Charles Wells, Goshen 
Charles D. Wait, Montgomery 
Henry S. Seeley, St. Andrews 
Samuel V. Schoonmaker, Newburgh 
Wm. T. Snider, Walden 



SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE ART SOUVENIRS 



1894 — Borden's Home Farm. 

I 895 — Historical. 

1896 — Tributary Streams of the Wallkill. 

1897 — Indian Localities and Hostilities. 

1898 — Battle of Minisink. 

1899 — Churches of the Wallkill \"alley. 

1900 — Beautiful Landscape Views. 

1 90 1 — The Walkill Valley at Gettysburgh, 
Orange County Agricultural Society, 
Mountain Drives of Mohonk. 

1902— Through the Valley of the Wallkill, 
profusely illustrated. 



1903 — Companion Volume of 1902. 

1904 — Gems from the Hudson. Famous 
Horses of Orange County. 

1905 — The Hudson & Wallkill Rivers. City 
of Middletown. In Art and Story. 

1906 — Lake Mohonk, profusely Illustrated. 
Orange Blossoms and guests at Gettys- 
burgh. Walden in Profile. The Cats- 
kills and Queenly Hudson. 

-Mohonk Snowbound. Historical 
Sketch Wallkill Valley Farmers' Asso- 
ciation, Illustrated. 



1907- 



Any volume, 25 cents. The entire set, 1894 1907, for $2. 50, representing more 
than one thousand views, with pen pictures describing the beauty and the utility, 
the glory and the grandeur, of the localities. Only a few complete issues remain 

. . . ADDRESS . . . 

Wallkill Valley Farmers' Association 

WALDEN, NEW YORK 



Wallkill Valley 
Farmers' Association 

Nineteen Hundred and Seven 

OFFICERS 

ISAIAH W. DECKER, President JOHN K. BROWN, Vice-President 

WILLIAM C. HART, Secretary ANSON J. FOWLER, Treasurer 

ADAM WILEY, General Superintendent 












«l 






cHf'wburgh Planing 
cMill Company 



Successors to 
THOMAS SHAW'S SONS 




PLANING, TURNING 

SCROLL SAWING 

and CARVING 

Doors, Sash, Blinds and Window Frames to 
Order. Mouldinors, Stair Rails, Newels and 
Balusters on hand or to order. Corner and 
Base Blocks in any form 

Mantels and Cabinets 
Screens, Grills, Etc. 

Ash, Walnut and Pine Ceilino; and Wain- 
scoting. Yellow and North Carolina Pine, 
Maple, Cypress, Sycamore and Quartered 



Oak Casing 



AH Work Kiln Dried 
Church Work a Specialty 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION 



Corner of South William and Johnes Streets 

iHewburgh,iK Y. 



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NIGHT closes the tired eyes and brings sleep 
to restless ones. The morning brings re- 
newed strength and vigor for the work of 
another day. But how of those to whom the 
restless days are followed by restless nights and 
broken sleep brings no refreshing awakening? 
Scott's Emulsion does for sick people what 
night does for well people. It gives refreshment 
and strength because it supplies the body with 
just the food it needs, the food to make rich 
blood, healthy nerves and sound digestion. 



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