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Full text of "History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography"

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► ROM THE BEQUEST OF 
SUSAN GREENE DEXTER 



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HISTORY 



OF 



ALABAMA 

AND 

DICTIONARY 

OF 

ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



BY 

THOMAS McADORY OWEN, LL.D. 

Lawyer, Founder and Director Alabama State Department of Archives 
and History, and author of numerous historical and 
bibliographical publications 



IN FOUR VOLUMES 



VOLUME IV 



CHICAGO 
THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1921 



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HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY 
DDaER FUND 



Copyrighted, 1921, 

BT 
MARIE BANKHEAD OWEN 



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Dictionary of Alabama Biography 



LACEY, EDWARD PULASKI physician, was 
born October 1, 1866, at Maylene, near Monte- 
yallo, Shelby County; son of James P. and Ann 
(Mclnnis) Lacey, the former a native of Liv- 
ingston County, Ky.» who removed to Jefferson 
County, and later settled in Shelby County, 
where he remained until his death in 1884, be- 
ing a soldier of the Seminole Indian War and 
a major in the Alabama State troops; grand- 
son of William and Kebecca Lacey, who lived 
in LiTingBton County, Ky., prior to his location 
in Jefferson County, and of Murdock and Mary 
Mclnnis of Montevallo; great grandson of Gen. 
E«dward Lacey, who, at the age of sixteen, set- 
tled In Chester District, S. C, and at the com- 
mencement of the Revolution, Joined the army 
and rose to the rank of colonel, soon after peace 
was won the war clouds again rose and he was 
elected brigadier-general, and was also appoint- 
ed one of the first county court Judges in Ches- 
ter District, which he also represented in the 
legislature of South Carolina. The Laceys immi- 
grated from England and settled on the Chesa- 
peake Bay and removed to Cumberland County, 
Va. Edward Pulaski Lacey received his ele- 
mentary education in the public schools of 
Shelby County, where he completed his studies 
in the high school. He graduated in medicine 
at Vanderbilt university, February, 1883, and 
entered upon the practice at Woodward in 1885, 
as resident physician for the Woodward iron 
company. Two years later he took up his 
residence in Bessemer where he remained until 
his death. He was surgeon for the Bessemer 
rolling mill, several railway systems of the 
section and on the surgical staff of the Eliza- 
beth Duncan hospital. He served two terms 
as city councilman, and was for twelve years a 
member of the board of education of Bessemer. 
He was a Democrat and served one term on 
the Jefferson County Democratic executive com- 
mittee, from which county he was also elected 
to the Alabama legislature, 1900-01. He had 
the distinction of leading the ticket in the gen- 
eral election in the fall of the former year. He 
was for ten years a member of the Alabama 
national guard and in which he was assistant 
surgeon with the rank of first lieutenant on the 
staff of Col. L. V. Clark, 1898. He was not con- 
nected with any church, nor secret society, but 
was a member of the Jefferson County medical 
association, the American medical association 
and the National geographical society. Mar- 
ried: (1) January 8, 1884, in Talladega, to Mag- 
gie E., daughter of William and Elizabeth 
Morris of Mobile; (2) January 22, 1913, at 
Chattanooga, Tenn., to Mrs. Rachael L. Rains, 



daughter of C. F. and Clara Landis of that 
city. Children: by the first marriage: 1. Philip, 
resident engineer for the Hazelhurst construc- 
tion company. Lakeland, Fla.; 2. William, sup- 
erintendent of ore mines for the Woodward 
iron company, near Bessemer; 8. James C, 
locomotive engineer, Louisville and Nashville 
railroad, Bessemer; 4. Joseph E., engineer in 
the government service, Huntington, W. Va.; 
6. Ann; 6. Kate; 7. Robert; 8. Charles M. Last 
residence: Bessemer. 

LACKEY, WILLIAM, soldier of the AmeHcan 
Revolution, aged 80, and a resident of Law- 
rence County; private Virginia Militia; en- 
rolled on April 23, 1833, under act of Congress 
of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 
4, 1831; annual allowance, $79.78; sums re- 
ceived to date of publication of list, $239.34.— 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv, Seh. 
doc 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He re- 
sided in Lawrence County, June 1, 1840, aged 
87. — Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148. 

LACKEY, WILLIAM MARTIN, lawyer, was 
bom March 31, 1856, in Tallapoosa County; 
son of James M. and Elizabeth (Wiley) Lackey, 
who were married in Talladega County, and 
lived in what is now Clay County, the former 
a soldier in Hilliard's legion, C. S. Army, who 
served about a year, then contracted a fever and 
died in a hospital in Chattanooga, Tenn., the 
latter who married Judge Hiram M. Evans of 
Clay County, after her first husband's death; 
grandson of Adam Lackey, who emigrated from 
South Carolina to Tennessee when a young 
man and settled near the Alabama line, was 
married there and moved to Tallapoosa County 
in 1836, moved to Jackson County in 1866, and 
later to DeKalb County, where he died in 1891. 
Mr. Lackey obtained his early x schooling at 
Lineville, Clay County; began the study of 
law under W. J. Pierce; and was graduated 
from the law department of the University of 
Alabama, LL.B., 1880. He began the practice 
of law immediately after his graduation, and 
has been practicing in Alabama since that time. 
He resided at Ashland for some time and later 
moved to Dadeville. He was elected to the 
State senate from the eighth senatorial dis- 
trict, composed of Talladega and Clay Counties^ 
1890-1894. He is a Democrat. Married: Janu- 
ary 5, 1896, to Imogene Disharoom. Residence: 
Dadeville. 

LACKLAND, JOHN T., lawyer, was born 
about 1852, in Virginia, and died December 26, 
1914. He moved to Alabama when a young 
man; was admitted to the bar at Eutaw; lo- 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



cated at Orove Hill in the practice of law; 
practiced for a number of years alone» then 
formed a partnership with Massey Wilson, 
which continued until the election of the latter 
as attorney general, 1902; was elected circuit 
judge in 1904; and re-elected for a term of six 
years, November 8, 1910. 

LACY, ERNEST RENFROE, lawyer, was 
bom October 11, 1877, in Talladega County; 
son of Sheriff and Mary (McCuUough) Lacy, 
the former a natire of Randolph County, who 
lived at different times in Randolph, St. Clair, 
and Talladega Counties, until 1882, when he 
moved to Jasper, is a lawyer, has served as 
county solicitor, register in chancery, repre- 
sentative in the legislature, and solicitor of 
the law and equity courts; grandson of Ab- 
ner Wise and Martha Ann (Brewster) Lacy, 
of Ashville, the former of a Virginia family 
and the latter of a South Carolina family, and 
of John Marion and Ruth (Skinner) McCul- 
lough, of Macon County, the former a (Con- 
federate soldier who was killed at the battle 
of Peach Tree Creek, July, 1864. The Mc- 
CuUoughs came from South Carolina to Ala- 
bama, and the Skinners from Ctoorgia. Mr. 
Lacy attended Howard College, 1894-1895; at- 
tended the law school of the University of 
Alabama during the session of 1899-1900, grad- 
uating, LL. B.; began the practice of law at 
Jasper, January 15, 1902; and represented 
Walker County in the State legislature, 1907- 
1911. He is a Democrat; a Missionary Baptist; 
and a Knight of Pythias. Married: November 
3, 1908, at Jasper, to Oaye Musgrove, daughter 
of John B. and Zou (Musgrove) Long. Resi- 
dence: Jasper. 

LACY, SAMUEL CHAPMAN, farmer, was 
born August 5, 1879, at Pea Ridge, Dallas 
County; son of Theophilis and Mary Newell 
(Pettus) Lacy, the former a native of Hunts- 
ville, who moved to Dallas County, and served 
during the last year of the War of Secession 
as a member of the Fourth Alabama cavalry, 
C. S. Army; grandson of Theophilis and Fan- 
nie (Binford) Lacy, of Huntsville, and of Ed- 
mund Winston and Mary Lucinda (Chapman) 
Pettus (q. v.). His great-great-grandfather 
Lacy came from England and settled in Vir- 
ginia, afterward moving to North Carolina. 
Mr. Lacy received his early education in the 
country schools, and attended Marion Military 
Institute for two sessions. Since leaving 
school, he has engaged in farming, with the 
exception of a short time when he served as 
fireman on the Southern Railway. He rep- 
resented Dallas County in the State legislature, 
1907, as a Democrat. Married: January 23, 
1901, at Jones' Switch, to Evelyn Fumiss Hogg, 
daughter of Alexander Preston and Pallie Le- 
titia (HarvUle) Hogg, the former a lineal de- 
scendant of James Hogg, the Scotch poet 
Children: Evelyn Letitia. Residence: Vale- 
grande. 

LACY, SHERIFF, lawyer and register in 
chancery, was born May 7, 1853, in Randolph 
County; son of Abner Wise and Martha (Brew- 



ster) Lacy, the former a native of Maury 
County, Tenn., who settled in St. Clair County, 
where he held numerous oflteial positicms and 
was at the time of his death, in 1887, probate 
Judge of the county; grandson of William and 
Biary (Wise) Lacy who lived in Virginia, Tenn- 
essee, Oeorgia and Alabama, and of Sheriff and 
Bfalinda (Wortham) Brewster of South Caro- 
lina, Cteorgia and Alabama. He received a 
common school education in St. Clair and Tal- 
ladega Counties, and read law in the office 
of Bradford and Bishop, in Talladega, 1879-81. 
He was licensed to practice his profession the 
latter year, and in 1882, located at Jasper, 
where he has since resided. In 1888, he was 
appointed register in chancery for Walker 
County and has continued to fill that office. 
He was a member of the Alabama legislature, 
1898-99; county solicitor, Walker County, 1886- 
87-88; for several years a member of the board 
of aldermen, Jasper; member city board of 
education. He is a Democrat; and a Baptist. 
Married: December 24, 1876, to Mary Ella, 
daughter of John Marion and Ruth (Skinner) 
McCollough, of Macon County, the former a 
native of Anderson District, S. C, a Confed- 
erate soldier under Hood and was killed in 
Peachtree Creek battle, near Atlanta, Oa. 
Children: 1. Ernest Renfroe (q. v.); 2. Cecil 
Justus; 3. Clyde; 4. Pauline; 5. Ruth; 6. Lo- 
rene. Residence: Jasper. 

LAFOY, JAMES, a soldier of the American 
Revolution, and a resident of Washington 
County; private in infantry and cavalry, par- 
ticular service not disclosed; enrolled on Sep- 
tember 9, 1836, under act of Congress of June 
7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; 
annual allowance, $25. — Pension Book, State 
Branch Bank, Mobile. 

LAGARIE, J. K., physician, graduate of the 
medical department of the University of New 
Tork, 1886. Residence: Forkland. 

LAIRD, HENRY WESLEY, lawyer and mer- 
chant, was born in 1819, in South Carolina, and 
died in 1879, in Ceneva. He was orphaned in 
early boyhood and came from the home of an 
elder brother in South Carolina to the home of 
another brother, Louis Laird, who was living 
in Eufaula; later studied law in a private of- 
fice in Elba; merchandised in Montgomery be- 
tween 1840, and 1855, and in (Geneva until the 
War of Secession broke out. He entered the 
Confederate service as captain of Co. E., Sixth 
Alabama infantry regiment, commanded by 
Col. Benjamin B. Baker. The company was 
raised by him in Cteneva and was called the 
"Gulf Rangers,'' later, was a member of Co. 
K, Alabama cavalry, under Col. C. H. Colvin 
and Cen. James Clanton. When the call to 
arms came he answered promptly, left his store, 
telling his clerks to sell what they could and 
to give what was left to the family of any 
needy soldiers. Later he was ordered to clear 
out raiders from the section, which he did suc- 
cessfully, but his store and home were burned. 
After the close of the war he practiced law in 
Elba and Cteneva. He represented Cteneva 
County in the constitutional convention of 1875. 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



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He was a Democrat Married: July 7, 1867» to 
Laura Luzene» daughter of Van and Martha 
Mathis (JackBcm) Stoudenmler, who lived at 
Aberfoil and later at Tuskegee, Auburn, and 
Pensacola, Fla.; granddaughter of Jeremiah 
Jackson of Independence, Autauga County, and 
of Louis Stoudenmier, in the Dutch Bend, near 
Autaugaville, Autauga County. Children: 1. 
Henry Stanmore, lawyer, m. Nellie Walker^ 
Pensacola, Fla.; 2. Frank Jackson, m. Kate 
Cumha, Geneya; 8. Adele; 4. Jessie, m. C. P. 
Atkinson, Greensboro; 5. Walter Marcellus, 
dentist, m. Dorothy Mercer, Demopolis. Last 
residence: Geneva. 

LAIRD, HBRVBY WOODFORD, business 
man. was born June 26, 1869, at Beaver 
Ridge, Knox County, Tenn.; son of Orville 
Dyer and Mary Crawford (Stephens) Laird, 
the former who was born at Oneida Castle, 
N. Y., studied medicine in the University 
of Michigan and served, on the Union 
side, as lieutenant of artillery, in the War 
of Secession; grandson of Orville P. Laird, 
and of the Rev. Rufus M. and Nancy 
M. Stephens, who lived at Beaver Ridge. Mr. 
Laird was educated in the common county 
schools. He was in the newspaper business 
from about 1890 to the time of his entrance on 
deputy insurance commissioner's place, Oc- 
tober 1, 1910. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; 
and a Knight of Pythias. Married: Lida Cas- 
sady, the daughter of Judge Benjamin F. 
Cassady of Anniston. Residence: Montgom- 
ery. 

LAIRD, ORVILLE D., physician, was bom 
January 20, 1840, in Columbus, Ga.; son of 
Dr. Orville P. and Nancy (Dyer) Laird, na- 
tives of Oneida County, N. Y., the former was 
a dentist, who lived in Georgia, and New York, 
removing in 1857 to Ohio, and later to Michi- 
gan. Dr. Laird was reared in New York, re- 
ceived a good academic education and began 
life as a clerk. In April, 1861, he enlisted in 
Co. E, Seventh Ohio infantry regiment, U. S. A; 
later Joined tha 116th New York infantry regi- 
ment; was promoted in 1868 to quartermaster's 
department; and in 1861, lieutenant of light ar- 
tillery. In 1859, he graduated as M. D. from 
Ann Arbor, Michigan. After cessation of hos- 
tilities, he practiced in Tennessee, locating at 
Clinton, in 1866. He engaged in the railroad 
and furnace business in 1869; was appointed 
U. S. commissioner for the district court, north- 
ern district of Alabama; later moved to Cross 
Plains. Married: October 25, 1865, to Mary 
C, daughter of Rev. R. M. and Nancy (King) 
Stevens, natives of Tennessee. Children: 1. 
Harvey; 2. George Edgar; 3. James G. Res- 
idence: Cross Plains. 

LAMAR, ANDREW JACKSON, Confederate 
soldier and Methodist minister, was born May 
29, 1847, at Cowpens, Walton County, Ga., son 
of Andrew Jackson and Mary Athena (Jackson) 
Lamar, the former bom at Milledgeville, Bald- 
win County, Ga., lived at Cowpens; grandson 
ci Zechariah and Mary (Robinson) Lamar, who 
lived at Milledgeville, and of William H. and 
Mildred (Cobb) Jackson, who lived at Athens, 



Ga.; great-grandson of James Jackson, who 
came, when a boy, from England, was major in 
the Revolutionary Army, governor of Georgia, 
and U. S. senator, and whose remains are 
buried in the Congressional cemetery, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Rev. Mr. Lamar received early educa- 
tion in private schools of Athens, (Ja., and at- 
tended the University high school at Athens. 
In 1863, he entered, as a member of the sopho- 
more class, the University of Georgia, Athens. 
In 1864, he left the University to. Join the Con- 
federate Army. In 1865, when eighteen years 
of age, and Just after the surrender at Appo- 
mattox Court House, he came to Alabama and 
settled on a plantation in Lowndes Cpunty. In 
1872, he graduated in the law department of 
the University of Georgia, receiving the degree 
of B. L. At a religious meeting at Letohatehie, 
Lowndes Ck)unty, he experienced conversion; 
being called to preach, was licensed, in August, 
1874, at C^alhoun, Lowndes County; in Decem- 
ber, 1874, Joined the Alabama conference of the 
Methodist church. South. Since 1903, he has 
been publishing agent of the M. E. Church, 
South. In the War of Secession, he was a 
private in Carlton's battery, Cabbell's battalion 
of artillery. Army of Northern Virginia. He 
is a Democrat; Mason; and a member of the 
Chi Phi college fraternity. Married: (1) in 
1878, to Martha Elsworth, of Mobile, whose an- 
cestry was English, her father coming, between 
1840 and 1850, to Mobile; (2) June 9, 1897, in 
Selma, to Mary Virginia, daughter of Rev. 
Henry and Missouri (Phillips) Urquhart, fa- 
ther long a member of the Alabama Conference, 
whose ancestors were of Scotch descent, and 
several generations have lived in Alabama. 
Children: 1. Martha, m. William M. Teague, 
Jr., of Montgomery. Residence: Nashville, 
Tenn. 

LAMAR, HOWARD, lawyer; graduate of the 
Alabama polytechnic ' institute, with the B. A. 
degree, in 1882. Residence: Jasper. 

LAMAR, THEODORE JEMISON, teacher, son 
of Dr. William Harmong and Ann Maria 
(Gleen) Lamar (q. v.). Prof. Lamar was grad- 
uated from the Agricultural and mechanical 
college, A. B., 1869, later A M.; co-principal of 
West (Georgia college; also of Opelika seminary; 
president, Auburn female college; vice presi- 
dent, Tuscaloosa female college, 1887; principal 
of the Prattville graded schools; principal, 
Opelika training school; founder of the Lamar 
training school for young men, Jasper, 1894, 
and at one time superintendent of education. 
Walker County. Married: Orlena Augusta, 
daughter of Cromwell Cleveland, a member of 
the Georgia legislature and a signer of the 
ordinance of secession of that State, and a 
direct descendant of one of the Cromwells who 
left England on the downfall of Oliver Crom- 
well. Children: 1. Leander, died in infancy; 
2. Theodore J., Jr., a labor leader, founder, and 
editor of the "Labor Review," married Edna 
Alice Ramsey; 3. Orlena Augusta; 4. Louis, died 
young; 5. Charles Cromwell; 6. Carrie Amanda; 
7. William Harmong. Residence: Jasper. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



LAMAR, WILLIAM HARMONG, jr., lawyer 
and solicitor of the postofflce department, was 
born at Auburn, December 11, 1859; son of 
Dr. William Harmong and Ann M. (Glenn) 
tiamar (q. v.). He graduated from the Ala- 
bama polTtechnlc institute, A. B., 1881; George- 
town university, LL. B. 1884, and LL. M., 1885; 
began the practice of law at Washington, D. 
C, and Rockville, Md., 1885; was a member of 
the Maryland house of repreeentatives, 1894; 
first lieutenant, Co. K, First Maryland volunteer 
infantry, later captain, U. S. volunteer signal 
corps, Spanish-American war, and saw service 
as signal officer under Maj. Gen. Jas. H. Wil- 
son, in Porto Rico campaign; was brevetted 
major, 1899; assistant attorney, U. S. depart- 
ment of justice, 1906-13; assistant attorney 
general, now solicitor, of the post office depart- 
ment since May 1, 1913. He is a Democrat; a 
Methodist; and a member of the Alpha Tau 
Omega and Phi Delta Phi fraternities. Mar- 
ried: June 21, 1887, to Virginia Longstreet, 
daughter of Justice L. Q. C. and Virginia L. 
(Longstreet) Lamar, of the U. S. Supreme 
court, of Oxford, Miss., and Washington, D. C. 
Children: 1. Virginia Longstreet; 2. Augusta 
^iicnn: 3. L. Q. C; 4. William Harmong, jr. 
Residence: Rockville, Md. 

LAMAR, WILLIAM HARMONG, physician, 
was born at Augusta, Ga., July 13, 1827, and 
died at Jasper; son of Col. Harmong and 
Martha Ann (Toung) Lamar, the former a 
member of the Gtoorgia State militia, and later 
a resident of Glenville, Barbour County; 
grandson of John Lamar, planter and slave 
owner of Georgia, and his wife, who was a 
Miss Apling, and of William Toung, of Balti- 
more, Md., and Augusta, Ga.; and the sixth in 
descent from Thomas Lamar, sr., an early 
French emigrant to Virginia who was natural- 
ized in Maryland. He attended the academy 
at Apling, Ga., Emory college, Oxford, and 
graduated from the Southern botanical med- 
ical college at Macon, Ga. He began the prac- 
tice at Auburn in 1854, where he remained until 
1895, when he removed to Jasper. Although 
unable to serve in the C. S. Army, he employed 
a substitute and several times visited the firing 
line himself. He was a Democrat; and a Meth- 
odist. . He was the author of a book of poems 
and was the contributor of many articles to 
the state press. Married: January 7, 1847, at 
Glenville, to Ann Maria, daughter of Rev. 
John Bowles and Maria (Allen) Glenn (q. v.). 
Children: 1. Theodore J., married Orlean 
Augusta Cleveland (q. v.) ; 2. Charles R., min- 
ister of the Texas and Alabama conferences, 
and now a resident of Montgomery, m. Laura 
Cain; 3. Glennie C, m. T. S. Phillips; 4. Wil- 
liam Harmong, m. Virginia Longstreet Lamar 
(q. v.); 5. Howard, lawyer, graduated from 
the Alabama poljrtechnic institute, A. B. 1882, 
A. M. (honorary), 1887; is a Democrat; ad- 
mitted to the bar, 1889, and has since prac- 
ticed at Jasper, m. Alma Hayes; 6. Annie, unm.; 
7. Oeorge Holt, m. Edith Stonestreet, and lives 
In Rockville. Last residence: Jasper. 

LAMBERT, JOSEPH SHOMO teacher. Bap- 
tist minister, was bom on March 8, 1869, at 



Mount Pleasant, Monroe Ck>anty; son d Andrew 
Jackson and Josephine Henrietta (Shaunfield) 
Lambert, who lived at Mt Pleasant, the former 
a farmer, who was ordained a minister in the 
Missionary Baptist church when he was twenty 
years old, and was actively engaged in the 
ministry fifty-eight years, who after his wife's 
death, moved to Bay Minette, Baldwin County, 
and spent the last six years of his life there, the 
latter who was bom in Mobile, shortly after her 
parents came from Ghermany, who was left an 
orphan in infancy and was reared by relatives; 
grandson of Andrew and Rebecca (Hurst) 
Lambert, who moved to Alabama from Georgia 
in pioneer days, settled in Mt. Pleasant, Mon- 
roe County, and, late in life moved to Clai- 
borne. He received his early schooling from 
his father and mother, and from Prof. William 
M. Webb, at Perdue Hill; entered Howard col- 
lege in 1889 and attended two sessions reg- 
ularly; taught school at Bluff Springs, Fla., 
1891-1892; returned to Howard college, Sep- 
tember, 1892, and was compelled to withdraw 
in March, 1893, because of ill health. He 
taught school until 1901; was appointed county 
superintendent of education for Baldwin County 
to fill an unexpired term by Supt John W. 
Abercrombie, February, 1901; was successively 
elected to that office every term until 1917, 
when he entered the service ot the State de- 
partment of education of Alabama. He was 
ordained to the ministry in the Bay Minette 
Missionary Baptist church in January, 1895, 
and has served as pastor in the towns of Bay 
Minette and Flomaton, and in country pas- 
torates. He is a Democrat; a Mason; an Odd 
Fellow; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: 
May 15, 1900, at Mobile, to Lennie, daughter 
of Richard Montgomery and Nannie (Far- 
mer) Simmons, who lived at Adairvllle, Ky.; 
grandaughter of Dr. D. G. and Frances 
(Edmonson) Simmons, the former a native of 
Virginia, who moved to Adairvllle, Ky., early 
in life. Children: 1. a son, d. in infancy; 2. 
Margaret Josephine, b. March 21, 1902. Res- 
idence: Montgomery. 

LAMBERT, MARY ELIZA PERINE TUCK- 
ER, author, was born at Cahaba, November 6, 
1838; daughter of Edward M. Perlne and wife, 
both of the New England States. She was edu- 
cated in the North; and obtained employment* 
as a journalist in New York City, becoming a 
regular contributor to the "Ledger," and other 
New York papers. Among her works are: 
"Poems," 1867; "Loew's Bridge, A Broadway 
Idyl," 1868, and "Life of Mark M. Pomeroy," 
1868. Married: (1) John M. Tucker, of MiU- 
edgeville, Ga., (2) CoL James H. Lambert, of 
the Philadelphia Press. 

LAMKIN, GRIFFIN, planter, was born in 
Virignia and died in Jasper, June 10, 1856; son 
of Peter and Winifred (Dockins) Lamkin, both 
of Virginia. He was a man of sound education. 
He entered the War of 1812 as a captain and 
was promoted to lieutenant coloneL He re- 
moved from Virginia to Madison County, about 
1800, carrying a hundred slaves with him. By 
going surety he lost the greater part of his 
fortune and removed to Walker County, then 



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1005 



a part of Tuscaloosa Ck)uiit7. He was clerk of 
Che circuit court of Tuscaloosa from 1844 to 
1862. He was a Democrat; Baptist; and Mason. 
Married: (1) December 24, 1800, in Madison 
County, to Betsey, daughter of James and Su- 
sanna Clark; (2) M&rch 24, 1831, in Tusca- 
loosa County, to Sarah, daughter of Samuel 
and Sally Thacker. By these two marriages 
there were eighteen children: by first wife: 
1. Susannah Bibb; 2. Peter Sharpe; 3. 
John James; 4. Betsey Clark; 5. Mary Booker; 
6. Griffin; 7. Petrcmilla; 8. George Griffin; 9. 
EliEa Bibb; 10. Lucy Clark; 11. Thcmias Rich- 
ard; by his second wife: 12. Petronilla, m. 
Ellias Right; 13. Mariah Jane; 14. Peter Lam- 
kin; 15. Hannah, m. William B. Orear; 16. Sa- 
rah E., m. John C. Ryan; 17. Thomas Peter; 
18. Martha Jane, m. W. L. Sides. Last resi- 
dence: Jasper. 

LANCASTER, JOHN AUSTIN, was born 
December 15, 1839, near LaGrange, Ga., and 
died March 6, 1901, at Wetumpka; son of Capt. 
William and Martha Ann (Goss) Lancaster, 
the former a North Carolinian, who moved to 
Tallapoosa County In 1837, served in the C. S. 
Army, and died in service; grandson of Jesse 
Hamilton and Mary Ann (Haygood) Goss, who 
lived near Vernon Ferry and LaGrange, Ga.; 
great-grandson of Benjamin and Susannah 
(Davis) Goss, Virginians, who moved to 
Wilkes County, Ga., 1803, and later to New- 
ton County, Ga.; great-great-grandson of 
Jonathan and Lucy (Gibbs) Davis, the former 
the founder of that branch of the Davis fam- 
ily in the United States, who was kidnapped 
in England in childhood, and brought to this 
country, was married in Virginia, and settled 
in Orange County, Va. The Lancaster fam- 
ily is descended from two brothers, younger 
sons of a branch of nobility of that name in 
England, who came to Virginia during the 
early colonization of that state. The Goss 
family settled in Virginia prior to 1661, hav- 
ing been driven from Germany, their native 
country, by religious persecutions. Mr. Lan- 
caster received his education in the public 
and private schools of Troup County, Ga., and 
Tallassee; volunteered at the outbreak of the 
War of Secession, as a private; became first 
lieutenant, Co. I, Seventeenth Alabama regi- 
ment; was dangerously wounded at Franklin; 
was elected captain and was acting as such, 
though without commission, at the end of the 
war; tau^t school after the war for a short 
time; engaged in planting and stock raising in 
Elmore County; was elected sheriff of Elmore 
County in 1870, the first Democrat to 
be elected to a public office in that county after 
the war; was elected probate Judge of that 
county in 1874, and was continuously re-elected 
to that office until his resignation in 1890 be- 
fore the expiration of his term; was the 
owner, though not the editor, of several weekly 
newspapers published in Elmore County, 1874- 
1900. He was a Democrat; a Methodist; and a 
Mason. Married: March 1, 1866, in Elmore 
County, to Frances Aldora, daughter of 
Robert Pinckney and Minerva (Ramsey) Lett, 
who lived near Good Hope, the former a 



Georgian, who served in Co. A, Thirty-fourth 
Alabama regiment, C. S. Army, and was se- 
verely wounded near Chattanooga. Her great- 
grandfather was a captain in the Revolutionary 
War. Children: 1. William Lycurgus (q. v.); 
2. Eulala Viola, m. John R. Gamble; 8. Jessie 
Aldora, m. Robert Tyler Goodwyn (q. v.); 4 
Minnie Lee, m. Dr. T. H. Street; 5. John Aus- 
tin, m. Ida M. McCullers; 6. Effie Lena, m. H. S. 
Taylor. Last residence: Wetumpka. 

LANCASTER, WILLIAM LYCURGUS, busi- 
ness man. State treasurer, was born March 4, 
1869, near Tallassee; son of Judge John Austin 
and Frances Aldora (Lett) Lancaster (q. v.). 
He was educated in the common schools of El- 
more County;, and at the U. S. Naval Academy. 
Annapolis, Md., but resigned because of 
physical disability before graduation. He 
farmed in Wilcox and Marengo Counties, two 
years; merchandised in Wetumpka, eight 
years; organized the Bank of Wetumpka, of 
which he became president; has farming and 
stock raising interests in Elmore County; has 
served on the Democratic executive committee 
of Elmore County, and of the fifth congres- 
sional district; has been alderman and city 
treasurer of Wetumpka; trustee of the Ala- 
bama State department of archives and his- 
tory; trustee of the Southern university, 
Greensboro, 1902-1908; represented the tenth 
district in the State senate, 1903, and 
Elmore County in the house of representatives, 
1907; was elected State treasurer, November 
1914. He is a Methodist; a Mason; Odd Fel- 
low; Red Man; Knight of Pythias; and a 
Woodman of the World; and has been both presi- 
dent and vice president of the Alabama State 
bankers association. Married: April 20, 1892, 
at Kellyton, Coosa County, to Bessie, daughter 
of Ben Lloyd and Mary (Hester) Gaddls, of 
that place. Children: 1. Mary Aldora; 2. 
William Lloyd. Residence: Wetumpka. 

LANDERS, JOHN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 82, resided in Benton County, 
June, 1840.— Cetwiw of Penaionera, 1841, p. 148. 

LANDMAN, GEORGE PURDOM, cotton 
factor, was bom in January, 1839, in Madison 
County; son of George P. and Eliza (Griffin) 
Landman, and brother of James Henry Land- 
man (q. v.). He was educated in the common 
schools of Madison County, and began life in 
1854, as a clerk for John Reed; became at- 
tached to the firm of Bradley, Wilson and com- 
pany, of New Orleans, La., having charge of 
their office at Huntsville. He served through- 
out the War of Secession as a member of the 
4th Alabama cavalry, C. S. Army. In 1869, he 
embarked with his brother, J. H. Landman, in 
the cotton business which he still pursues. He 
is a Knight of Pythias and a Methodist. Mar- 
ried: August 30, 1860, to Mary F., daughter 
of Joseph Sively, of Madison County. Children: 
1. Lucy Lee; 2. Lilly B., m. Robert S. Halsey; 
3. Laura, m. Jesse F. Young; 4. Arthur S.; 5. 
Joseph; 6. George P., Jr. Residence: Hunts- 
ville. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



LANDMAN, JAMES HBNRY, cotton factor, 
was bom February 28, 1835, in Madiscm Ck>an- 
ty; Boa of George P. and Bliza (Griffin) Land- 
man, the former was a native of BCadison 
County, and a farmer; grandson of William 
Landman, of Virginia; great-grandson of an im- 
migrant Landman from Germany. He received 
a good elementary education in the schools of 
Huntsville» and began life in 1849 as a clerk 
for J. H. Beadle, a merchant of Huntsville, 
where he remained six years; was employed by 
Bradley, Wilson and company, from 1855 to 
1862, when he enlisted in Kelley's troopers, or- 
ganized in Madison County, later being made 
assistant quartermaster in Forrest's command, 
where he remained until the war closed. He 
was engaged with his brother from 1866 to 
1869, in general mercantile business, shortly 
afterwards embarking in cotton, their present 
business. He was tax assessor of Madison 
County from 1880 to 1884. He belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias; Knights of Honor; Ancient 
Order of United Workmen; and is a Methodist 
Married: (1) in September, 1861, to Fannie 
M., daughter of Hamptcm W. Kelly, of Madison 
County; (2) in 1885, to Fannie, daughter of 
Joseph Carruthers, of Huntsville. Children: 
by first wife, 1. Minnie F., m. G. K. Miller, 
Huntsville; 2. Lizzie V., m. Gordon Greenfield, 
Pine Bluff, Ark.; 3. James H. J.; 4. Howard F.; 
by second wife: 5. Harry C; 6. Frank. Resi- 
dence: Huntsville. 

LANE, ALEXANDER OSCAR, lawyer and 
judge, was born October 29, 1848, in Macon 
County, and died in Birmingham; son of Dr. 
Alexander and Mary E. (Phillips) Lane, both 
natives of Georgia. He received a liberal educa- 
tion and was for a short time principal of a 
boys high school at Clayton. Reading law 
under Chancellor John A. Foster he was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1869, and began the prao- 
tice in Ozark. In 1873 he located in Birming- 
ham, where the next year he formed a part- 
nership with John T. Terry. Upon Mr. Terry's 
retirement from the practice he formed a part- 
nership with E. T. Taliaferro and B. H. Tabor; 
later and for many years, he was associated 
with Frank S. White in the practice. In 1880 
he became editor of the "Iron Age'^ ; was elected 
mayor of Birmingham in 1882, re-elected in 
1884 and 1886, and again in 1890. Since 1892 
he continually practiced his profession. He was 
appointed associate judge of the tenth Judicial 
circuit, provided by the act of 1907. At the 
time of the change of the form of government 
for the city of Birmingham in 1911, he was ap- 
pointed one of the three commissioners for 
a term of four years. He was a Democrat; a 
Presbyterian; and a Knight of P3rthias. Mar- 
ried: in May, 1876, to Minnie, daughter of Col. 
John T. and Elizabeth (Kerr) Terry, the 
former of Chester District, S. C; the latter of 
Sumter County; granddaughter of William 
Kerr of that county. Children: 1. Alma, m. 
Benson Cain, Birmingham; 2. Minnie, m. Louis 
Hart, of Gadsden; 8. Terence; 4. Lucile, m. 

Bailey, of St. Louis; 5. Frank. Last res* 

idence: Birmingham. 



LANE, CHARLES PAUL, lawyer and editor, 
was bom March 28, 1854, in Madison County, 
and died May 1, 1907, in Huntsville; son of 
George Washington and Martha Nicholas 
(Davis) Lane (q. v.). He was educated in 
Huntsville, and studied' law in the office of 
Col. Luke Pryor and Robert M. McClelian in 
Athens. He was admitted to the bar in 1873, 
and practiced law in Athens and Huntsville. 
He was elected to the State legislature from 
Limestone County in 1881; was nominated by 
the Greenback convention as their candidate 
for attorney general in 1882; and was three 
times ncmiinated by the Republican party as 
candidate for governor of Alabama. He served 
as a Blaine and Logan elector in 1884, and in 
1885 established the "New South," at that time 
the only Republican paper in the state. Later 
he founded the "Evening Tribune," another 
Republican newspaper, and was editor and pub- 
lisher of both at Huntsville. During the year 
1887, Mr. Lane was the representative in the 
north of four large land companies, the Shef- 
field, Decatur, Florence, and Huntsville. He 
was president of the Alabama commercial club 
for three terms, and a member of the Episcopal 
church. Married: January 4, 1881, at Tuskegee, 
to Eleanor Wimberly, daughter of John 
Lucas and America (Watson) Abercrom- 
bie; granddaughter of James H. and Lavinia 
(Chilton) Abercrombie, and oi Midiael Wat- 
son, who married a Miss Ross of South Caro- 
lina. Children: 1. Madge Westmoreland, m. 
Judge Milo Abercrombie, Tuskegee; 2. Mattie 
Morton; 3. Lalie Bradley, m. (3arl N. Brown, 
Cedar Town, Ga.; 4. Charles Day, m. Blanche 
Fowler, Huntsville; 5. Elizabeth Richardson, m. 
Alex McCallister, Huntsville; 6. James Aber- 
crombie; 7. William Rison, Huntsville. Last 
residence: Huntsville. 

LANE, GEORGE WASHINGTON, lawyer, 
was born in 1806, in Cherokee County, Gkt., and 
died in 1864, in Louisville, Ky.; son of Johna- 
than and Elisabeth (CoUey) Lane, also of 
Cherokee County. Other members of the fam- 
ily connection were (3en. Joseph Lane, of 
Oregon, and (3en. James H. Lane, of Kansas. 
In 1821, he came to Alabama with his parents 
and settled in Limestone County. After re- 
ceiving an elementary education, he read law 
under Judge Daniel Coleman, and entered upon 
the practice in Athens. He was elected to the 
Alabama legislature, 1829 and 1832, and dur- 
ing the latter year was elected Judge of the 
county court. Two years later he was elected 
circuit judge and was reelected, holding the 
office twelve years. In 1848, he was a Taylor 
elector for the state-at-large. After leaving 
the circuit bench, he opened a law office in 
Huntsville. Like large numbers of his fel- 
low citizens in that section of the state, Judge 
Lane was a strong Union man, and during the 
War of Secession period was appointed Fed- 
eral district judge by President Lincoln. He 
accepted the office but did not exercise its 
functions. He was a Democrat and an Episco- 
palian. Married: Martha Nicholas, daughter 
of Nicholas and Martha (Hargrave) Davis 
(q. v.). Children: 1. Robert Wilson, m Mrs. 



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1007 



Matte Goode, and died in Confederate serrice, 
a member of Forrest's cavalry; 2. George 
Gale; 3. Martha Dayis; 4. Nicholas; 5. Mary; 
6. Kate Gasskin* m. Robert Ross Townes; 7. 
Belta Collier; 8. Mary Fearn, m. Theo. West- 
moreland; 9. Charles Paul, m. Ella Abercrom- 
bie; 10. Hector Davis, m. Madge Mason. LASt 
residence: Louisville, Ky. 

LANE, HECTOR DAVIS, planter, was born 
August 26, 1880, at Athens; son of Hector 
Davis and Madge (Mason) Lane, the former a 
native of Huntsville, who served in the Ala- 
bama legislature, was first commissioner of 
agriculture elected by popular vote; grandson 
of George Washington and Martha (Davis) 
Lane (q. v.), of Huntsville, the former who was 
a Federal Judge, and of Dr. Joseph J. and Mar- 
garet Mason; great-grandson of Nicholas Davis, 
president of the Alabama senate, and a Whig 
presidential elector. He was educated at the 
North Alabama agricultural school at Athens; 
at Webb school, Bell Buckle, Tenn.; and at the 
University of Alabama. He was occupied as 
a coal dealer until 1902, and since 1903 has en- 
gaged in planting. He represented Limestone 
County in the State legislature during the 
session of 1911, and served for a time after 
the adjournment as assistant clerk in the de- 
partment of agriculture and industries. He 
is a Democrat and a Presbyterian, Married 
January 29, 1902, at Courtland, to Jessie 
Olivia, daughter of Malcolm Joseph and 
Florence (Burkhead) Gilchrist, of Court- 
land; granddaughter of Dr. J. D. Burkhead, a 
prominent Presbyterian minister. Children: 1. 
Anne Burkhead; 2. Malcolm Gilchrist. Resi- 
dence: Courtland. 

LANE, JAMES HENRY, educator, brigadier- 
general, C. S. Army, was bom July 28, 1833, at 
Bfathews Court House, Jifathews County, Va., 
and died September 21, 1907, at Auburn; son 
of Walter Gardner and Mary Ann Henry (Bark- 
well) Lane, the former of whom was bom at 
the old family homestead, "Gkwhen," Mathews 
County, and was colonel of the Mathews' mili- 
tia during the War of Secession, and member 
Virginia legislature; grandson of William and 
Dorothy Lane of Virginia, and of Thomas and 
EHizabeth (Wells) Barkwell of the "Pleasure 
House" in Princess Anne County, Va., the 
former a sergeant in the War of 1812; great- 
srandson of Ezekiel Lane, one of the early 
settlers of Mathews County when it was a part 
of Gloucester County. James Henry Lane re- 
ceived his preparatory education in private 
schools and from tutors; graduated with honor 
from the Virginia military institute in 1854; in 
1857, graduated from the University of Vir- 
ginia, in the scientific course, with the degrees 
<rf C. E. and M. A. The honorary degrees of 
LL. D. and Ph. D. were conferred upon him by 
Trinity college. North Carolina and the Uni- 
versity of West Virginia, respectively. He 
began his career as a teacher in a private 
family in 1854, and became assistant professor 
of mathematics in the Virginia military insti- 
tute in 1867; taught in a private school, 1858-59; 
professor of mathematics and commandant in 
the West seminary of Florida, 1869-60; profes- 



sor of natural philosophy and instructor in 
tactics in North Carolina military institute, 
1860-61'; teacher in a private school in Con- 
cord, N. C, 1865-67, and in Richmond, Va., 1867- 
72; professor of natural philosc^hy and com- 
mandant in the Agricultural and mechanical 
college of Virginia, 1872-80; teacher in a private 
school at Wilmington, N. C, 1880-81; professor 
of mathematics in Missouri school of mines 
and metallurgy, 1881-82; professor of civil en- 
gineering in Alabama polytechnic institute, 
1882-1907. At the beginning of the War of 
Secession, he was elected major of the First 
North Carolina volunteers, subsequently known 
as the "Bethel Regiment." A scouting party 
which he led brought on the battle of Bethel, 
the first battle of the war. He was elected lieu- 
tenant-colonel of his regiment, September 1, 
1861, and colonel of the 28th North Carolina 
infantry re^^ent, a fortnight later. He was 
in all of the large battles of the Army of 
Northern Virginia, from the beginning of the 
war to its close and was wounded three times. 
On the death of Gen. Lawrence O'Brien Branch, 
Col. Lane, "for gallant and meritorious conduct" 
was recommended by Generals Lee, Jackson and 
A. P. Hill, and appointed brigadier-general as- 
signed to the command of Branch's brigade, 
which petitioned for his promotion and assign- 
ment to them. His command served in the rear 
guard of Lee's army on its retreat from Sharps- 
burg and afterward from Gettysburg and tocfic 
an active part in the famous *Tickett's charge," 
and also helped to save the day at the "Bloody 
Angle." He was a Democrat and an Episco- 
palian. Author: numerous articles in the cur- 
rent press and journals in regard to matters 
connected with the war. Married: September 
13, 1869, at Richmond, Va., Charlotte Randolph, 
daughter of Benjamin Lincoln and Jane Eliza 
(Hardaway) Meade of that city; granddaughter 
of Everard Meade, aide upon Gen. Lincoln's 
staff and later a general in the Revolutionary 
War, and of Daniel and Anne (Eggleston) 
Hardaway; great-granddaughter of Daniel and 
Susannah (Everard) Meade, and of Daniel 
Hardaway; great-great-granddaughter of An- 
drew and Mary (Latham) Meade, the former a 
native of Ireland who settled in Nansemond 
County, Va,, in 1745, and of Thomas and Mary 
(Drewery) Hardaway. Anne Eggleston was the 
sister of Maj. Joseph Eggleston of Revolutionary 
fame. Susannah Everard was the daughter of 
Sir Richard Everard, Essex, England, the last 
proprietary governor of Carolina from 1726 to 
1730, whose wife, Susannah Kidder, was the 
daughter of Dr. Richard Kidder, Bishop of 
Bath and Wells. Children: 1. Lldie Hardaway, 
Richmond. Va.; 2. Mary Barkwell, m. Gtoorge 
Petrie (q. v.), Auburn; 3. Kate Meade, Auburn; 
4. Lottie Everard, m. Matthew Scott Sloan, Bil^ 
mingham. Last residence: Auburn. 

LANE, L. M., lawyer, living in 1918. Resi- 
dence: Greenville. 

LANE, M. C, member of the constitutional 
convention of 1865, from Butler County. 

LANE, MARSHALL HALL, Baptist minister, 
was born July 9. 1845, at Washington, Wilkes 
County, Ga.; son of Dr. James H. and Mary C. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



(Simpson) Lane, natives of Wilkes County, Ga., 
the former a physician, who was educated at 
Mercer university, and was graduated from the 
medical department of the University of Geor- 
gia; grandson of Rev. Micajah A. Lane, of the 
Baptist church, who came from Virginia to 
Georgia when he was but six years of age, and 
after a long service in the ministry, died in 
1887 at the age of ninety-seven, and of William 
Simpson, cme of the original settlers of Wilkes 
County, Ga., a native of Virginia, of Scotch- 
Irish ancestry, and a member of one of the 
oldest families in Georgia. Mr. Lane was 
reared in Wilkes County; educated in Wright 
and Hojrt high school; entered the C. S. Army 
at the age of seventeen as a member of Wing- 
fleld's battery. Hill's corps, Cutt's battalion. 
Army of Virginia; served at the battles of Get- 
tysburg and Petersburg, and in all of the en- 
gagements from Gettysburg until the close of 
the war; after the war, attended Rockby in- 
stitute, Georgia, taught by Col. R. M. Johnson; 
entered the University of Virginia where he 
studied law for two years; returned home and 
formed a partnership with Gen. Toombs and 
Gton. DuBose, with whom he practiced law for 
three years; and since that time has given his 
whole attention to the ministry and the cause of 
education. He has been pastor of several 
churches in Georgia; of the Central Baptist 
church, Nashville, Tenn.; traveled for two 
years as an evangelist in Kentucky, Tennessee 
and Arkansas; took charge of the Hern insti- 
tute, Georgia, 1871-1877; and of the Baptist 
church at Cave Springs, Ga., 1872-1877. He has 
been pastor of the Baptist church at Jackson- 
ville since 1877; was also pastor for two years 
of the Alpine Baptist church in Tallaega 
County; and had conferred upon him the hon- 
orary degree of D. D. by the University of 
Alabama in 1886. He is a Democrat. Married: 
October 6, 1868, to Undine Brown, of Hancock 
County, Ga., daughter of Dr. Algernon S. 
Brown, physician, of Georgia. Children: 1. 
John S.; 2. Edward Mcintosh; 3. Mary Undine; 
4. Louise E.; 5. Sidney B.; 6. Eugene C; 7. 
Bluebell C; 8. James A.; 9. Marshall H., Jr.; 
10. Marguerite T.; 11. Reynolds; 12. a boy, d. in 
infancy. Residence: Jacksonville. 

LANEY, ZACHARIAH WILLIAM, business 
man, was born January 29, 1829, in North Caro- 
lina; son of Evan and Leah (Seccrist) Laney, 
natives of Mecklenburg County, N. C, who 
emigrated to Talbot County, Ga., in 1886, moved 
to Alabama in 1848, and settled on a large tract 
of land in Dale County. He was reared on the 
home plantation and attended the common 
schools of Dale County, and the high school at 
Louisville. He taught two terms in a country 
school; became clerk in a business house in 
Abbeville until 1861; taught school in Abbe- 
ville, 1861-1865. He tried to enlist in the C. S. 
Army in 1863, but was not allowed to serve 
because of ill health. At the close of the war 
he engaged in mercantile business. He became 
a notary public in 1863; was elected a member 
of the town board; is a Baptist; a Democrat; a 
Royal Arch Mason; and an Odd Fellow. Mar- 
ried: in 1860, to Ann B. Culver, a native of 
Hancock County, Ga., bom in November, 1840, 



daughter of L. D. and Melvinia A. Culver, who 
were natives of Hancock County, Ga., and lived 
at that place until 1859, when they went to 
Alabama, and settled on a plantation in Law- 
renceville, Henry County. Children: 1. Pet, 
m. William O. Long, business man and clerk of 
the court of chancery, Abbeville, children, 
Lloyd, Daisy and J. B.; 2. Charles Levin, b. 
January 3, 1863, d. November 12, 1885, mer- 
chant and clerk in probate office at Abbeville, 
m. (1) Ada Lee, (2) Rossie L. Adams; 3. Zach- 
ariah William, jr., b. August 15, 1871, clerk in 
probate office, Abbeville, m. Lula Lee Trawick. 
Two other children are deceased. Last resi- 
dence: Abbeville. 

LANG, GEORGE, Presbjrterian minister and 
educator, a native of Wellwood, Ayreshire, 
Scotland; son of George MacCracken and Mary 
Law (James) Lang, of Houston, Renfrewshire; 
grandson of John and Jennie Hannah Lang, 
and of John and Mary (Law) James, the for- 
mer of Houston, the latter of NitshiU, Scot- 
land. He came to America in 1883, and his 
early education was received in Carbon Hill 
and Chickasaw, and his college and university 
work was done at the Southwestern Presby- 
terian university. Clarksville. Tenn.. 1900-06; 
University of Edinburgh, 1907-08; Columbia uni- 
versity, N. Y., and at the University of Berlin. 
1912-13. He graduated from the Theological 
seminary, Clarksville, Tenn., with the A. B., 
1905, and B. D., 1906, degrees. The Alabama 
Presbjrterian college gave him the honorary 
degree of D. D., in 1916. He served as pastor 
of the North Birmingham Presbyterian church, 
1906-07; was professor Alabama Presbyterian 
college, 1909-16; professor. Southwestern Pres- 
byterian university, 1916-17; professor of phi- 
losophy. University of Alabama since 1918; 
served as executive-secretary of the State coun- 
cil of defense for Alabama, April-September, 
1918. He is a Presbyterian; Mason; and mem- 
ber of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. Au- 
thor: brochure. "Our economic future." Un- 
married. Residence: University. 

LANGDON. CHARLES CARTER, editor, 
mayor of Mobile, member Alabama legislature 
and constitutional conventions. 1865 and 1875, 
secretary of State was born August 5, 1805, at 
Southington, Conn., and died at Mobile. June 
8. 1889; scm of Captain Giles and Sarah (Car- 
ter) Langdon, the former a soldier in the 
American Revolution, farmer and member of 
the Connecticut legislature; grandson of Giles 
and Ruth (Andrews) Langdcm, of Southington; 
great-grandson of Joseph and Rachel (Cowles) 
Langdon, the latter a daughter of Samuel 
Cowles of Farmington, Conn.; great-great- 
grandson of Joseph and Susannah (Root) 
Langdon, the former a son of George Langdori 
who immigrated from England about 1646, set- 
tling first at Springfield, Mass., and dying at 
Northampton in 1678. Mr. Langdon was reared 
or. his father's farm and educated at common 
school and the Episcopal academy at Cheshire. 
Conn., defective eyesight preventing his fur- 
ther education. He taught in Connecticut dis- 
trict school from his sixteenth to his twentieth 
year, but abandoned this work to accompany 



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HON. JOHN H. BANKHEAD 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1011 



his elder brother, Levi, to Marion, Perry 
County, who had established a dry goods store 
at that place in 1825; candidate fbr Alabama 
legislature in 1832 and 1838, defeated both 
times; moved to Mobile, 1834, where he en- 
gaged in the cotton commission business with 
BCartin A. Lee; again defeated for the State 
legislature in 1838 on the Whig platform; ap- 
pointed editor "Mobile Daily Advertiser" 1838; 
mayor at Mobile 1849, annually re-elected with 
exception of one year, until 1855; defeated for 
congress in 1851; represented Mobile in legis- 
lature 1855-6, and 1862; member constitutional 
oonventicms of 1865 and 1875; elected to leg- 
islature 1881-82-83; unsuccessful candidate for 
governor in 1872 and again in 1878; appointed 
secretary of State 1885, appointment confirmed 
by election 1886. He was an earnest Whig and 
strong Union man but from the secession of 
Alabama he loyally supported his State and 
county. He was ever greatly interested in 
agriculture and was a trustee of the Agricul- 
tural and mechanical college at Auburn. Mar- 
ried: August 6, 1829, .at Southington, Conn., 
to Eliza, daughter of Roswell Moore. Children: 
1. Sarah L.; 2. Leontine L.; 3. Henry Clay; 4. 
a son, died in infancy: 5. Charles Carter, Jr., 
died from an illness resulting from exposure 
during the War of Secession having fought 
with the Confederacy four years. Last resi- 
dence: Mobile. 

LANGDON, DANIEL WEBSTER, landscape 
architect, was bom May 5, 1864, at Marion; 
son of Daniel Webster and Emma Elizabeth 
Coast (Nelson) Langdcm; grandson of Levi 
Langdon; great-nephew of Charles Carter 
Langdon (q. v.). He was assistant Alabama 
geological surveyor, 1883-89; assistant professor 
chemistry. University of Alabama, 1889; fellow, 
gec^ogical society of America, 1890; original 
fellow and secretary, American society of land- 
scape architects, 1889-90; regent Sigma Nu col- 
lege fraternity, 1885-90. Married: August 17, 
1896, at New Haven, Cohn., Bemice Francis. 

LANGHORNE, JOHN MILLER, physician, 
was bom November 9, 1817, In Bedford County, 
Va., and died October 13, 1907, at Uniontown; 
son of William and Catharine (Calloway) Lang- 
home, natives of Warwick and Bedford 
Counties, respectively, who lived later in 
Roanoke County, Va.; grandson of John Scaris- 
brook and Elizabeth (Langhome) Langhome 
of Cumberland County, Va., and of James and 
Enizabeth (Early) Calloway of Bedford County; 
great-grandson of William and Maiy (Scaris- 
brook) Langhome, of "Qambell," a member of 
the house of burgesses for Warwick County, 
1772-74-75, and of the conventions of 1775; 
great-great-grandson of John Langhome, mem- 
ber of the house of burgesses from Warwick 
County, 1748; great-great-great-grandson of 
Capt John Langhome who settled in Warwick 
County, as early as 1675 and was a member of 
the house of burgesses for that county in 1676- 
77. He received his academic education in 
the common schools of Virginia and graduated 
with distinction from the Jefferson medical col- 
lege, Philadelphia, Pa. He entered upon the 
practice of his profession at Uniontown, Perry 



County, 1845, and at once began a useful and 
successful career which continued through the 
remainder of his life. The surrounding 
country quickly recognized his ability and his 
services and skill were called upon by suffering 
humanity for miles around. He was a Demo- 
crat; an Episcopalian; and a Mason. Married: 
.November 17, 1852, at Marion, to Lucy Ann, 
daughter of Henry Clinton and Serena Ryng 
(Rootes) Lea of that place; granddaughter of 
Thomas Reade and Sarah (Battaille) Rootes; 
great-granddaughter of Thomas Reade and 
Maria Jacqueline (Smith) Rootes; great-great 
granddaughter of Philip and Mildred (Reade) 
Rootes; great-great-great-granddaughter ot 
Thomas and Lucy (Qwyn) Reade; great-great- 
great-great-granddaughter of Col. Ctoorge and 
Elizabeth (Martian) Reade, the former hav- 
ing been secretary of the commonwealth of 
Virginia, 1637-71 ; great-great-great-great-great 
granddaughter of Robert and Mildred (Winder- 
banke) Reade of Linkenbolt, England; great- 
great-great-great-great-great-granddaughter d 
Sir Thomas and Frances (Dymoke) Winder- 
banke; great-great-great-great-great-great-great- 
granddaughter of Sir Edward Dymoke of 
Scrivelsby, hereditary champion of the king, 
which position was held in the family by virtue 
of descent from Robert de Marmion, Lord of 
Fontenay, who accompanied William the Con- 
queror to England, and whose family it is said 
were hereditary champions to the Duke of 
Normandy for many generations previously. 
Children: 1. Marion Cobb, m. William J. Vai- 
den (q. v.), Uniontown; 2. William Henry, m. 
Mary Crome Chadwick, Chapel Hill, Tex.; 3. 
John Miller m. Kate Montague Corcoran, 
Uniontown; 4. Rena Rootes, m. John Cooke, 
Uniontown; 5. Lucy Lea, m. William Henry 
Tayloe (q. v.), Uniontown. Last residence: 
Uniontown. 

LANGLEY, JAMES, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 80, resided in Chambers 
County, June 1, 1840. — Census of Pensioners, 
1841, p. 149. 

LANIER, CLIFFORD ANDERSON, author, 
business man, and educator, was born April 24, 
1844, at Griffin, Spalding County, Ga., and 
died in Montgomery, November 8, 1908; son of 
Robert Sampson and Mary Jane (Anderson) 
Lanier, the former of French ancestry, a native 
of North Carolina, who later removed to Macon, 
then Griffin, Qa,, where he practiced law, the 
latter a Virginian of Scotch-Irish stock; grand- 
son of Sterling and Sarah (Fullwood) Lanier, 
who lived in Macon, Ga., and later in Mont- 
gomery, and of Hezekiah Anderson of Notto- 
way County, Va. He received his elementary 
education in private and public schools of 
Macon, Ga., and entered Oglethorpe university, 
Midway, Ga., but his studies were interrupted 
by the events of the War of Secession. While 
here he was greatly influenced by Prof. Tal- 
mage, brother of the famous pulpit orator. He 
read law under his father-in-law, Judge David 
Clopton, and was admitted to the bar. He was 
for years proprietor of the old Exchange hotel 
with which he first became associated when a 
lad as clerk. In 1865, he returned from the 
war to resume this position, later taking mana- 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



gerial charge which he relinquished in 1884, 
although he retained a business connection with 
this famous hostelry until his death. He was 
at one time superintendent oi the city schools 
of Montgomery and his portrait hangs in the 
auditorium of the Sidney Lanier high school, 
which was named in honor of his poet-musician 
brother. He entered the Confederate Army as 
a private in the Macon volunteers, Georgia,' 
April, 1862, and was i^fterwards transferred to 
Milligan's Independent corps of signal men. 
He served in the Virginia campaigns until 1864; 
was signal officer on the blockade runner Talis- 
man, which vessel was lost He escaped to 
Cuba, ran the blockade at Galveston, Texas, 
and reached Macon, May, 1865, after the close 
of hostilities. He was a Democrat; and a 
Methodist. Author: "Thorn-Pruit," a novel; 
"Apollo and Keats on Browning and other 
poems"; "Love and loyalty at war"; "Dialect 
poems," in collaboration with his brother; "The 
Power of Prayer"; "Uncle Jim's Baptist re- 
vival hymn"; "The Power of affection, or Vot- 
ing in Alabama"; "Friar Servetus," a para- 
phrase; "Ritual of the United Confederate 
Veterans." Married: November 26, 1867, at 
Montgomery, to Wilhelmina (q. v.), daughter of 
David and Martha (Ligon) Clopton (q. v.), the 
latter the daughter of Lieut-Gov. Robert and 
Wilhelmina (PuUwood) Ligon (q. v.), of Tus- 
kegee. Children: 1. Wilhelmina, m. (1) Wil- 
liam Lehman Durr, deceased, (2) John Tilly, 
of Montgomery; 2. Clifford m. Mary Siebels 
Ball, Montgomery. Last residence: Montgom- 
ery. 

IxANIER, JAMES CRAWFORD, business man 
and legislator, was born November 5, 1846, in 
Clarke County, Ga.; son of Walter and Mary 

E. (Mead) Lanier of that place; grandson of 
Thomas J. Mead. He was educated in the 
common schools. He served eighteen months 
in Co. D, 1st Georgia cavalry regiment, C. S. 
Army. During 1908 he served in the legis- 
lature from Talladega County. He is a farmer 
and merchant. He is a Democrat; and a Meth- 
odist. Married: to Mary E., daughter of John 

F. and Mary J. (Burge) Sproull, of Stilesboro, 
Ga. Residence: Kymulga. 

LANIER, WILHEMINA (CLOPTON), patri- 
otic worker, was the daughter of David and 
Martha (Ligon) Clopton (q. v.). She was a 
member of the Alabama division, United 
Daughters of the Confederacy; president of 
the Cradle of the Confederacy chapter, United 
Daughters of the Confederacy, of Montgomery; 
and served as acting president of the Ladies' 
memorial association. Married: Clifford La- 
nier (q. v.). Last residence: Montgomery. 

LANSDALE, ISAAC, soldier of the American 
Revolution, a resident of Montgomery County; 
private Delaware Line; enrolled on September 
9, 1828, under act of Congress of May 15, 1828, 
payment to date from March 3, 1826; annual 
allowance, $80; sums received to date of pub- 
lication of list, $720,— Revolutionary Pension 
Roll, in Vol. xiv. Sen. Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st 
sess., 1833-34. He resided in Fayette County, 
June 1, 1840, aged 80. — Census of Pensioners, 
1841, p. 148. 



LAPSLEY, JOHN W., pioneer citi«en. was a 
native of Tennessee, his parents being Vir- 
ginians. He came to Selma in 1826 as a youth 
from Kentucky. He was first employed as a 
clerk, later forming a partnership with R. H. 
Croswell and embarking in the mercantile 
business. At the expiration of two years he 
entered Transylvania law school, Lexington, 
Ky., graduating in 1835. He returned to Selma 
and practiced until 1860, when he retired. He 
was interested in the railroads of Selma, 
taking especial interest in the Selma, Rome 
and Dalton railroad. Last residence: Selma. 

LAPSLEY, SAMUEL NORVELL, Presby- 
terian missionary, was bom April 14, 1866, in 
Selma, and died at Underbill, Lower (Dongo, 
March 26, 1892; son of Judge James W. and 
Sara Eliza (Pratt) Lapsley. He was gradu- 
ated from the University of Alabama, A. 
B., 1884, and A. M., 1885, and during the year, 
1884-1885, was an instructor in the university. 
He obtained his theological training at Union 
seminary, Virginia, and at McCormiok sem- 
inary, Chicago, and was graduated from the 
latter institution, B. D., 1888. Before granted 
his license, he was engaged in successful home- 
mission work among the poor, ignorant and 
destitute. He supplied the churches at Bir- 
mingham and Decatur, and at Royalton, Minn., 
during his vacations, and served as pastor of the 
Presbyterian church at Anniston, 1888-1889. 
Being much interested in the spiritual welfare 
of the negro race, he offered himself and was 
accepted as a missionary to Africa. In com- 
pany with Rev. W. H. Shepherd, a negro, who 
was also accepted, he sailed from New York 
February 26, 1890, for the Congo Free State in 
Africa, and reached that place after some nec^ 
essary delay in ESngland for an outfit, and in 
Belgium for an interview with King Leopold, 
founder of the Congo Free State. He. selected 
Luebo as a site for the Presbyterian mission, 
and began the work with Mr. Shepherd. He 
had many attacks of the African fever, but 
worked on until it* gained too great a foothold 
and he had to give up to the disease. While re- 
turning from the coast, where he had gone to 
secure titles to the mission property, he be- 
came fatally sick, and died at Underbill, Just 
below the cataracts of the Congo. Last resi- 
dence: Luebo, Congo Free State, Africa. 

LARY, WASHINGTON T., lieutenant colo- 
nel, 6th Alabama cavalry, C. S. Army. 

LATHAM, MILTON SLOCUM, U. S. senator 
and banker, a resident of Alabama in his early 
life, was bom at (Columbus, O., May 28, 1827, 
and died in New York city, March 4, 1882; son 
of Bela Latham. He was a graduate of Jeffer- 
son college. Pa.; removed to Alabama, where 
he taught in Russell County; studied law; was 
admitted to the bar, 1848, and appointed clerk 
of the circuit court He was an unsuccessful 
candidate for the recorder's court in San Fran- 
cisco the same year; district attorney of Sacra- 
mento and El Dorado Counties, 1850-61; and in 
1852 was elected a representative in congress 
on the Democratic ticket He declined a re- 
election; in 1855 was appointed clerk of the 



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port of San Francisco; was elected governor 
in 1853, and took the seat, but the day after 
his inauguration, January, 1860, he was chosen 
senator to succeed David C. Broderick, who 
had been killed in a duel the previous Septem- 
ber. He served out the unexpired term to 
March 3, 1863. During his last year his sym- 
pathies for the southern states were pro- 
nounced. He returned to San Francisco, en- 
gaged in the practice of the law, became pres- 
ident of the London and San Francisco bank, 
and later of the California Pacific railroad 
company. He was twice married. Last resi- 
dence: San Francisco. 

LATHEM, J. E. T., business man, was born 
in 1887, in Trussville, and died August 8, 1913, 
in Birmingham. He was reared in Trussville, 
and served in the C. S. Army, as a member of 
Gen. John H. Morgan's Second Confederate 
cavalry. He was a pioneer of Birmingham and 
JefTerson County, and had lived in Birming- 
ham for thirty years prior to his death. He 
was an enthusiastic Mason, was founder of the 
Georgia Anne Davis lodge. No. 348, of Truss- 
ville, and was worshipful master of that lodge 
for thirteen years. Married. Children: 1. Dr. 
6. M.; 2. Dr. Sinkler N.; 3. WiUiam T., vice 
president of the Commercial bank and trust 
company, Birmingham; 4. John D., president 
of the Monarch livery company, Birmingham; 
5. Alf H., deputy clerk of the circuit court; 6. 
Mrs. William H. Pattie, wife of the county su- 
perintendent of convicts; 7. Josephine. Last 
residence: Birmingham. 

LATHRAM, LESLIE PRITCHETT, Metho- 
dist minister, was born March 3, 1865, at Hayne- 
Tille, Lowndes County; son of John Jackscm 
and Frances Jane (Shepherd), the former a 
Methodist minister, teacher and later merchant, 
living first in Pike County, then in Escambia 
County, Fla., later at Powelton, a member Ala- 
bama conference, 1821-1865; grandson of Daniel 
and liahala (Townley) Shepherd, of Scotch and 
English descent respectively. His grandfather 
Townley, was a soldier in the Revolution; 
great-grandfather Townley, lost his life at sea 
while returning home to settle up a family 
estate, and great-grandfather Shepherd, first 
settled in North Carolina, but afterward re- 
moved to Escambia County, Fla., where he died 
of yellow fever. He was educated in the com- 
mon schools of his native county and at Powel-' 
ton, Fla.; licensed to preach when sixteen years 
of age; admitted to conference in December, 
1885, at Union Springs; was four years Con- 
ference missiouoary secretary. He is now serv- 
ing at Marianna, Fla. He is a Mason, and 
Knight of Pythias. Married: December 1, 1887, 
at Lawrenceville, Henry County, to Vida May, 
daughter of James Russell and Elizabeth 
Frances (Price) Hill, natives of North Caro- 
lina and South Carolina, respectively. Chil- 
dren: 1. Maude Evelyn; 2. Leslie Wade; 3. 
Bertie McSwain; 4. Elizabeth. Residence: 
Marianna, Fla. 

LA TOURBTTE, JOHN, early surveyor and 
cartographer in Alabama. 



LATTIMORE, JOHN COMPERE, educator, 
was born March 25, 1862, at Marion, and died 
in March, 1915; son of Rev. John Lee and 
Catherine (Shivers) Lattimore. He graduated 
from the National normal college, 1886, and 
received the B. S. 1895, and M. S., 1896, from 
Baylor university. He was superintendent of 
schools. Falls County, Texas, 1887-90; principal 
of the preparatory school 1890-92, professor of 
mathematics, 1892-97, chairman of faculty, 
1897-99, at Baylor university; superintendent 
of the city schools of Waco, Tex., 1899-1915. 
He was a member of the faculty, Texas-Colo- 
rado Chautauqua, Boulder, Colo., 1900; member 
of the Texas State board of examiners, 1900-05; 
and president Texas State teachers association, 
1899. Married: June 20, 1889, to Lucy Edens, 
of Okolona, Miss. Last residence: Waco, Tex. 

LATTY, JOHN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, "On the 30th ult, James Latty, 
an old citizen of this county in the 102nd year 
of his age. He was a nittive of North Carolina, 
but had lived on the head waters of Brierfork 
for two generations. He volunteered in the 
revolutionary war; but his father, being in a 
helpless condition, furnished means for a sub- 
stitute for his son." — The BofVithem Advocate, 
Huntsville, April 11, 1860. 

LAUDERDALE, JAMES, railroad man, was 
born in Marc)i, 1836, in Rhea County, Tenn.; 
son of James and Jane (Johnson) Lauderdale, 
natives of Tennessee, the former removed from 
Rhea County to Bradley County, Tenn., about 
1838, and aided in removing the Indians from 
that county, was later elected sherifC and rep- 
resented Bradley County, several times in the 
legislature of Tennessee; grandson of Gen. 
James Lauderdale who was intimately asso- 
ciated with Gen. Jackson in the War of 1812, 
and who was killed at the battle of New 
Orleans. The first Lauderdale emigrated from 
Scotland to Virginia in colonial days. He re- 
ceived a good common school education, and 
began work as a clerk in 1853, for Reynolds 
and Hughes at Cleveland, Tenn.; in 1855, he 
became local agent for the East Tennessee, Vir- 
ginia and Georgia and worked as such eighteen 
months; resigned at that time and in fall of 
1856, entered firm of Re3molds and Hughes at 
Cleveland, the name becoming J. Lauderdale 
and company; He enlisted in 1861 as a private 
in the Lookout battery, later being promoted 
first lieutenant. He was with the Southern 
express company after the war several months; 
subsequently worked for John M. Bridges, 
agent at Atlanta for the State railroad of Lou- 
isiana; Southern passenger agent for two years 
for the Atlanta and Washington railroad com- 
pany; for one year, agent of the Selma and 
Meridian railway at Meridian, Miss.; agent for 
Western railroad company at Selma from 1871 
to 1880, removed to Columbus, Ga., where he 
remained one year; then made agent for East 
Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia railroad com- 
pany, and the Memphis and Chattanooga rail- 
road company at Chattanooga, where he re- 
mained until 1885, when he resigned to accept 
agency of Western railroad of Alabama, at 
Selma. He is a Democrat; Mason; and Presby- 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



terian. Married: in 1876, to Florence Howard, 
of Dallas County. Children: one son and two 
daughters. Residence: Selma. 

LAVENDER, HUGH, soldier of the AmeHcan 
Revolution, aged 79, and a resident of Greene 
County; dragoon S. C. Militia; enrolled on Feb- 
ruary 10, 1834, under act of Congress of June 
7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; 
annual allowance, %^ii.21,— Revolutionary Pen- 
sion Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 
1st sess., 1833-34. 

LAVENDER, WILLIAM WEBB, lawyer, was 
born September 27, 1868, at Greensboro, Hale 
County; son of William Hellen and Jane 
(Warf) Lavender, the former a native of 
Greensboro, N. C, who came to Alabama when 
a child, and lived at Greensboro, where he was 
a planter and mill man; grandson of William 
and Nicie (Hellen) Lavender, of Greensboro, 
N. C, and of John H. and Virginia (Lindsey) 
Warf, of Canton, Miss.' He received his early 
instruction from a governess; attended South- 
ern University, Greensboro; was graduated 
from Howard College, with first honors, B. A., 
1888; and from the law department of the 
University of Alabama, LL. B., 1891. He began 
the practice of law at CenterviUe in 1891; was 
appointed county solicitor of Bibb County, 
1892; represented that county in the State 
legislature, 1896, and 1910. He is a Demo- 
crat; a Presbyterian; a Knight of Pythias; and 
a member of Sigma Nu college fraternity. 
Married: in September, 1896, at CenterviUe, to 
Ella Sue Davidson, daughter of Col. James L. 
and Susan (Powell) Davidson, of CenterviUe, 
the former a colonel in the C. S. Army, a Judge 
of probate of Bibb County, and a descendant of 
the Davidson family of North Carolina. Chil- 
dren: 1. WlUiam Davidson. Residence: 
CenterviUe. 

LAVERTY, JOHN STACKHOUSE, merchant, 
was born May 11, 1856, at Parkesburg, Chester 
County, Pa.; son of Charles and Margaretta 
McClure (Stackhouse) Laverty, who lived at 
Parkesburg, Leaman Place, and Philadelphia, 
Pa., served as an employee of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad for fifty-two years, and was a mem- 
ber of the board of education of Lancaster 
County for a number of years; grandson of 
Robert and Rebecca (Morgan) Laverty, of 
Morgantown, Pa., the former a representative 
in the Pennsylvania state legislature from Ches- 
ter County, elected on the Tory ticket, and of 
John and Elizabeth (McFarland) Stackhouse, 
who lived near Parkesburg, Pa.; great-grand- 
son of Samuel Laverty, a native of Lancaster 
County, Pa., whose father, an Irish immigrant, 
settled in Philadelphia County, Pa. Through 
an accident, Mr. Laverty lost the sight of one 
eye when he was twelve years old, and a year 
later became totally blind. Prior to the ac- 
cident, he had attended the public schools at 
Leaman Place, Pa., and later entered the Philar 
delphia school for the Blind, where he was 
graduated after six years of training. The 
year after his graduation, he entered upon his 
life's vocation of teaching music. His first 



position was that of musical director in the 
Louisiana State School for the Blind, at Baton 
Rouge, which position he held for several 
years. He was then elected to the musical de- 
partment of the Alabama School for the Blind 
at Talladega, and held that position for twenty- 
one years. He opened a music store in Tal- 
ladega in 1888, and a branch house in Gktdsden 
in 1905, incorporating the business at Gktdsden 
in 1910, under the name of the Laverty Music 
Company. He is a Democrat; and an Episco- 
palian. Married: July 8, 1880, at Baton 
Rouge, La., to Maria Louisa, daughter of 
Richard and Mary Warren (Newcomb) Loucks, 
of that place, the former a lawyer, and at one 
time attorney general of Louisiana; grand- 
daughter of Henry Loucks, a lawyer in Albany, 
N. T., and of Francis Dana Newcomb, whose 
father, Richard English Newcomb, was probate 
judge of Greenfield, Mass., for twenty-eight 
years, and served in the Massachusetts legis- 
lature. Children: 1. Charles DeWilton, m. 
Frances EiUa Thornton; 2. Phebe Maria, m. 
Dr. Edwin Gray Little; 3. Mary Warren, m. 
Marion McDonald Lawrence; 4. John Stack- 
house, deceased; 5. Robert Latta, m. Daisy Als- 
ton Armstead; 6. Margaretta Nye, m. Rufus 
Cobb Fell. Residence: Talladega. 

LAVRETTA, C. L. mayor of Mobile, 1894-97. 

LAW, EVANDER McIVER, teacher, major 
general, C. S. Army, and college president, was 
born August 7, 1836, at Darlington, S. C; son 
of Ezekiel Augustus and Sarah Elizabeth (Mc- 
Iver) Law, both of Darlington, S. C, the 
former an active lawyer, member of the state 
legislature, county judge, and commissioner in 
equity in his state for* many years; grandson 
of William and Mary (Dubose) Law, the 
former served in Marion's command during the 
last year of the Revolutionary War, and of 
Evander Roderick and Eliza (Cowan) Mclver, 
the former a brigadier general of the South 
Carolina forces during the nullification 
troubles of 1831-33, a planter of Darlington, 
S. C, who removed to Macon county; great- 
grandson of C^eorge and Anna (Lards) Law, 
the former of a Scotch-Irish family who 
emigrated from Ireland about 1760, settled in 
Williamsburg County, S. C, was a soldier in 
Marion's command during the American Rev- 
olution; great-grandson of Evander Roderick 
Mclver and wife. Miss Kolb, sister of Capt. 
Abel Kolb of General Marlon's brigade, who 
was killed by the Tories; great-great-grandson 
of Evander Roderick Mclver, who emigrated 
from Scotland in 1746, and settled near Society 
Hill, Darlington County, S. C. General Law 
was educated in the primary schools of his dis- 
trict, at old St John's academy, and the South 
Carolina military academy, graduating from 
the latter, November 20, 1856, with the B. S. 
degree. He was assistant professor of belles 
lettres at the Academy, during his senior year. 
He commenced the study of law at YorkvlUe, S. 
C, 1858, after having occupied the chair of 
history and belles lettres in King's Mountain 
military institute in that place, from January* 
1857, until May, 1860; removed to Tuskegee, 



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1015 



September, 1860, establishing the Tuskegee 
military high school of which he was principal 
at the outbreak of the war. He entered the 
Confederate Army as captain of the Alabama 
Zouaves, afterward Co. B, 4th Alabama infantry 
regiment, January to May 2, 1861; lieutenant- 
colonel of the regiment. May 2 to October 28, 
1861; and, colonel, Oct 28, 1861. He was com- 
missioned brigadier-general, October 3, 1862, 
and promoted to major general, March 20, 1865, 
holding this commission until April 26, 1865, 
when he surrendered with Gen. Joseph E. 
Johnston. He took part in the capture of Pen- 
sacola at the outbreak of the war; commanded 
his company at Dalton, Qa., when it became Co. 
B, 4th Alabama infantry regiment; was 
wounded at the first battle of Manassas; led 
the 4th Alabama at Seven Pines; commanded 
Whiting's brigade during the rest of the seven 
days fight; was at the battle of Gaines' Mill; 
and commanded the brigade at second Man- 
assas, Boonsborough and Sharpsburg. He took 
command of a brigade composed of the 4th 
Alabama, 44th Alabama, 6th North Carolina, 
64th North Carolina and the 57th North Caro- 
lina infantry regiments just prior to the bat- 
tle of Fredericksburg. The organization of his 
brigade under which some changes were made 
in January, 1863, now consisted of the 4th, 15th, 
44th, 47th and the 48th Alabama infantry regi- 
ments. He commanded General Hood's division 
on the third day at Gettysburg. He again com- 
manded the same division at Chickamauga and 
on the Knoxville campaign. He conunanded his 
own brigade at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania 
and at Cold Harbor. After the surrender he 
returned to South Carolina where he lived as a 
planter and engaged in the railroad business un- 
til 1872 when he again moved to Alabama, where 
he organized the grange, of which he was sec- 
retary, 1872-1876. In November, 1881, he re- 
turned to Yorkville, S. C, where he was asso- 
ciate principal of the King's Mountain Institute, 
1883-84. He engaged in farming and engineer- 
ing until 1893, when he removed to Florida, 
establishing in 1894, the South Florida mili- 
tary institute at Bartow, organized as a private 
enterprise, but which was made a state in- 
stitution one year later. He resigned the su- 
perintendency of this school in 1903, becoming 
In 1905, editor of the •'Bartow Courier-In- 
formant." General Law was commander of 
the Florida division. United Confederate Vet- 
erans, 1899-1903, and is honorary commander 
of that organization at the present time. He 
was chairman of the commission to erect a 
monument on the battlefield of Olustee; mem- 
ber of the commission named to erect the Flor- 
ida monument at Chickamauga; member on the 
commission to place Florida's representatives 
in Statuary Hall at Washington; Florida com- 
missioner at the Peace Reunion at Gettysburg, 
July 1-4, 1913^ one of the founders of and hon- 
orary president of Gettysburg peace memorial 
association; chairman, board of trustees of 
Sumerlin institute, 1904-1912; member of the 
county board of public instruction of Polk 
county, Fla., 1912-1920, when he was removed 
by Governor Catts. He is an Odd Fellow; Dem- 
ocrat; and a Presbjrterlan. Author: of a num- 

Vol. IV— 1 



ber of articles for magazines and other publi- 
cations relating to the War of Secession. 
Married: March 9, 1863, at Columbia, S. C, 
to Jane Elizabeth, daughter of William Albert 
and Camilla Catherine (Torrence) Latta of 
Torkville, S. C; granddaughter of Robert and 
Jane (Allison) Latta, and of James and Ann 
(Davidson) Torrence; great-granddaughter of 
William Latta, who emigrated to America from 
Ireland, shortly before the Revolutionary War, 
settled in Iredell county, N. (X, and married 
a Miss Davidson, of Charlotte. The Allisons, 
Davidsons and Torrences were all strong Whigs 
in the Mecklenburg section of North Carolina 
during the Revolution. Children: 1. Evander 
Mclver, m. Louise Boyd, Miama, Fla.; 2. Wil- 
liam Latta, m. Elizabeth H. Whitner, Rock 
Hill, S. C; 8. Annie Latta, m. Philip B. John- 
ston, Bartow, Fla.; 4. Edwin Augustus, m. 
Nelle Holbrook, Bartow, Fla. Residence: Bar- 
tow, Fla. 

LAW, FRANCIS MARION, Baptist minister, 
was born May 15, 1828, in Sumter District, S. 
C, and died May 11, 1903, at Belton, Tex.; son 
of Isaiah H. and Sarah (Gholdson) Law. He 
was educated for a physician at the Medical 
college of Gtoorgia; removed in early manhood 
to Alabama with his parents; and practiced his 
profession at Wetumpka and Selma. He was or- 
dained a Baptist minister in 1856; for five years 
served as financial secretary of the Alabama 
Baptist Bible and Colportage society; was 
chaplain on the Steamboat "Bethel" operating 
on Mobile Bay during the War of Secession; re- 
moved to Texas, served at Brenham, Planters- 
ville, Houston and Bryan. He was one of the 
editors of the "Baptist Standard"; president of 
the board of trustees of Baylor college; and 
was one of the fpunders of the Educational com- 
mission in Texas. He was married and left 
descendants. His son, Francis Marion, Jr., is 
president of the First national bank of Houston. 
Last residence: Bryan, Tex. 

LAW, JOHN, Scottish financier and adven- 
turer. See Indian chiefs and associated char- 
acters. 

LAW, JULIUS A., lieutenant colonel, 2nd 
Alabama reserves, C. S. Army. 

LAWLER, JOAB, public official, representa- 
tive in congress, was born June 12. 1796, in 
Monroe County, N. C, and died May 8, 1838, in 
Washington, D. C. His parents moved to Ten- 
nessee when he was a youth, moved to Missis- 
sippi territory in 1815, later settled in Madison 
County, and in 1819, in Shelby County. He re- 
ceived a common school education, to Which he 
added by study and reading. He held the 
offices of clerk of the circuit court, and county 
judge of Shelby County, between 1821-1826; 
was elected to the State legislature from Shelby 
County, 1826-1831; served Bibb and Shelby 
Counties in the State senate, 1831-1832, resign- 
ing in the latter year to accept the position of 
receiver of public money for the Coosa land 
district tendered him by President Andrew 
Jackson; held that office at Mardisville, Tal- 
ladega County, until elected to congress in 1835 



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over Eli Shortridge and Pleasant H. Bfay, both 
of Tnscalooea; was reelected to congress in 
1837 over H(m. H. W. Bllis of Tuscaloosa, and 
died during that session of congress. He was 
treasurer of the Unlyersity of Alabama frcmi 
1833 until 1836. He united with the Baptist 
church in 1826, and shortly afterward was or- 
dained to the ministry. From the time of his 
ordination to his election to congress, he filled 
the office of pastor. The Talladega, now Al- 
pine, and the Talladega town churches were 
originated by his ministry and he was their 
pastor. He was a Whig. Mr. Lawler is buried 
in the congressional cemetery at Washington, 
D. C. Married: to Miss Baker, sister d Hon. 
Robert A. Baker of Dallas County. Children: 
1. Gen. Levi W. (q. t.). Last residence: Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

LAWLER, LEVI WBLBOURNE, business 
man, was bom in 1816, in Madison County; son 
of Joab Lawler (q. v.). He moved with his 
parents to Talladega County in 1835; was well 
educated; and when he was nineteen years old, 
succeeded his father as receiver of public mon- 
ies of the Coosa land district, under appoint- 
ment of President Jackson. After four years 
in that office, he was suspended because of his 
(^position to the administration of President 
Van Buren, but was restored to the position in 
1841 by President Tyler, and held it for an- 
other term of four years. On the expiration of 
his term of office he returned to Talladega 
County from DeKalb, where he had moved with 
the office, and gave his attention to planting. 
While a resident of DeKalb County, he was 
elected a brigadier general d militia. In 1848, 
he located in Mobile and engaged in the com- 
mission business. He was a delegate for the 
state at large to the Charleston convention in 
1860; was elected to the State legislature in 
1861; and was re-elected in 1863, serving in 
that body throughout the entire period of the 
War of Secession, and for three years as chair- 
man of the committee on ways and means. He 
continued in the commission business after the 
war, and was a member of the firm of Baker, 
Lawler ft Company of Mobile. In 1874, he was- 
appointed by Gov. Houston as one of the state 
commissioners to adjust and liquidate the State 
debt. For many years he was one of the trus- 
tees of Howard college, and of the Agricultural 
and mechanical college of Alabama. He was 
a member of the Baptist church. Married: 
(1) to Miss Jenkins of Talladega County; (2) 
to a grand-daughter of Hon. William Smith of 
South Carolina, a member of the First U. S. 
congress. Last residence: Talladega. 

LAWLER, ROBERT THOMPSON, farmer, 
miller and legislator, was bom September 4, 
1858, at Brownsboro, Madison County; son of 
John and Susan Ann (Thompson) Lawler, the 
former of Brownsboro, served in Capt Thomas 
Taylor's company, C. S. Army, the latter of 
Buckingham County, Va.; grandson of Ben- 
jamin and Rhoda (whitaker) Lawler, of Mays- 
ville, and of Robert and Ann Thompson of 
Buckingham County, Va. He was educated in 
the schools of Brownsboro, Maysville and Lar- 
kinsville. He is a farmer and miller. He rep- 



resented Madison County in the legislature at 
1911. He is a Democrat; a Cumberland Pres- 
byterian; an Odd Fellow; and Woodman ot the 
World. Married: October 7, 1890, at Mays- 
ville, to Aggie Gilbert, daughter of Lenard and 
Catherine (Pickens) Lamberson, of Browns- 
boro. Residence: Brownsboro. 

\ 
LAWRENCE, JOHN, merchant and planter, 
was bom November 2, 1825, in Jefferson County, 
Tenn.; son of James and Chelnessa (Doherty) 
Lawrence, who came to Alabama in 1889 and 
settled (m a farm near Cedar BlufC; grandson 
of James Lawrence who moved, from North 
Carolina to Jefferson County, Tenn., where he 
married a Miss Cats; great-grandson of 
Thomas Lawrence, who fought in the Revolu- 
tionary War, and setUed in North Carolina, 
and of Gen. George Doherty, who served in the 
Creek War of 1812-1816. He is brother of Dr. 
George D. W. Lawrence, who was graduated 
from the medical college at Augusta, Ga., prac- 
ticed medicine at Gaylesville and in Cedar 
Bluff, was surgeon-general of the State militia 
before the War of Secession and during that 
war served as post surgeon, being prevented 
from entering the field by ill health, served as 
county health officer after the war; and of Rob- 
ert Lawrence, a merchant and farmer of Cedar 
Bluff, who was vice president of the North 
Georgia and Alabama exposition, held at Rome, 
Ga., 1888, one of the organizers of the Cedar • 
Bluff Land, Mining ft Manufacturing Company, 
editor of the 'Industrial Free Press." The 
Lawrence family is an ancient family at Eng- 
land. The progenitor of the branch in this 
eountry came to America early in colonial 
times and settled in Virginia. Mr. Lawrence 
was reared on a farm and educated in the 
common schools and at a college in Jefferson 
County, Tenn. He taught school for a short 
time, then read law and was admitted to the 
bar, but never practiced law. He engaged in 
the mercantile business at Gaylesville from 
1851-1854; moved to Cedar Bluff and remained 
there and on a farm on the Chattanooga River 
near there until the fftll of 1862, when he 
moved to a plantation near Cedar Bluff in the 
Coosa Valley. He was elected a member of the 
Alabama state convention in 1866 for the re- 
organisation of the State government; was 
elected to the State legislature tram Cherokee 
County in 1865; was re-elected in 1866, and in 
1878. He was a Itemocrat, a Mason and a Bap- 
tist Married: (1) in June, 1854, at Cedar 
Bluff, to Emily E. (Hampton) Watt, who died 
February 18, 1887; (2) December 22, 1887, in 
Chattanooga, Tenn., to Martha A. Cate, daugh- 
ter of William T. Cate, sheriff of Hamilton 
County, Tenn., who was murdered by a ga^g 
of desperadoes in 1882. Children, by first mar- 
riage: 1. James R.; 2. George G.; by second 
marriage: 3. Nellie C; 4. Samuel Cate. Last 
residence: Cherokee County. 

LAWRENCE, WILLIAM HAYWOOD, pub- 
lisher and editor, was bom March 18, 1860, at 
Tuscaloosa; son of William Haywood and El- 
vira E. (Caldwell) Lawrence, the former of 
whom entered the C. S. Army as corporal in 
the Warrior Guards under Robert E. Rodes 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1019 



as captain, was promoted to captain of Co. K., 
Eighth Alabama cavalry* G. P. Boll, colonel, 
and was killed in battle, October 12, 1864, near 
Rome, Ga^ daring an attempt to check Sher- 
man's raid through Georgia; grandson of Wil- 
liam Haywood and Mary (Prince) Lawrence 
(q. y.)> and of John S. and Mary (Eddins) 
Caldwell, of Tuscaloosa. He was educated in 
private schools at Tuscaloosa, and spent two 
years in the University of Alabama. He be- 
came a printer, publisher and editor, entering 
the business first in the office of the Tuscaloosa 
'^lade" in 1873, when he was thirteen years 
of age. Afterwards, he established a paper at 
Clant<Hi, in 1881. He has served as secretary 
of the county Democratic committee of Chilton 
County, is a Baptist and a Knight of Pythias. 
Married: August 8, 1888, in Montgomery, to 
Emily Jordan Reid, daughter of Samuel Q. and 
Clara (Gerald) Reid, of Montgomery, the for- 
mer the editor of the Montgomery "Advertiser" 
during the War of Secession, 186M86&, editor 
of the Montgomery "Bulletin" after the War, 
and U. S. Marshal under President Grant's 
administration. Children: 1. Minnie Reid, m. 
Thomas J. Auld, Portsmouth, Va.; 2. Julia C, 
m. Mavens E. McCk)nnell, Livingston. Resi- 
dence: Livingston. 

LAWRENCE, WILLIAM HAYWOOD, plan- 
ter, was bom September 24, 1791, at Raleigh, 
N. C and died June 22, 1858; son of Josiah 
and C^harity (Haywood) Lawrence, the former 
a native of New Jersey, who moved from that 
state to North Carolina, and was either a 
br<^er or nephew of the naval hero, James 
Lawrence; grandson of Col. William and Char- 
ity (Hare) Haywood, who lived in Edgecombe 
County, N. C, the former colonel of militia 
forces of Edgecombe County, N. C, a member 
of the council for Halifax District in 1775, a 
member of the provisional congress of North 
Carolina at Halifax, April, 1776, and November, 
1776, a member of the committee in the last 
named body which drafted the state constitu- 
tion and bill of rights, a member of the coun- 
cil of state in 1776, and one of the commis- 
sioners who signed the Revolutionary currency 
of North (Carolina; great-grandson of Col. John 
and Mary (Lovett) Haywood, wha came from 
New York and settled in Edgecombe County, 
N. C, the former colonel of colonial militia, a 
member of the North Carolina assembly, 1746- 
1752, commissioner of coast fortifications in 
1748, treasurer of the northern counties of the 
colony, 1752, surveyor to Earl Granville who 
was last of the lord proprietors of North Caro- 
lina. Mr. Lawrence moved from North Caro- 
lina and settled at LaGrange, where he built 
the first college building of old LaGrange col- 
lege. In 1836, he moved from LaGrange and 
settled at Tuscaloosa. He was a planter, and 
was "such a fair and just man that he was 
arbitrator among his neighbors in many differ- 
ences and was called 'judge' by his neighbors 
on account of their appreciation of his fairness 
among them." 

Married: (1) to Mary Prince; (2) May 16, 
1S36, at Tuscaloosa, to Udegerte L. Anthony, 
dauji^ter of Henry Tate and Mary CJaroline 
(Liovell) Anthony, natives of Henry County, 
Va., who were married December 1, 1805, grand- 



daughter of Mary and Nancy (Tate) Anthony, 
and of William and Mary (Marshall) Lovell, 
the latter a sister of Chief Justice John Mar- 
shall, great-granddaughter of Joseph Tate of 
Albemarle County, Va. Children, by first mar- 
riage: 1. Oliver James, b, December 6, 1818, 
was graduated from the University of Alabama, 
A. B., 1840, and A. M., 1841, practiced law at 
Tuscaloosa, enlisted in the C. S. Army as priv- 
ate in Tarrant's Alabama battery, was wounded 
at Corinth, Miss., and died as a result of his 
wounds, 1864, m. Margarie Ridgeway; 2. CUiar- 
ity Hare, d. in Mississippi, m. Mr. Neville; 3. 
Josiah, d. in 1842, unmarried; 4. Mary, d. at 
nineteen years of age, unmarried; 5. Arabella 
Timesia, d. in Greensboro, m. James W. Mc- 
Crary; 6. Col. Robert J., colonel of the Four- 
teenth Mississippi regiment, d. at Shubuta, 
Miss., m. Bettie Ledgyard; 7. Maria, m. Hay- 
wood Parker; 8. Harriet, deceased, m. John Col- 
gin; 9. Capt. William Haywood, b. July 30, 
1830, became a merchant at Tuscaloosa; en- 
listed in the C. S. Army as corporal of the War- 
rior Guards, 1861, was made captain of infan- 
try in 1862, served as captain of cavalry. 
Eighth Alabama regiment, 1863-64, killed in 
battle near Rome, Ga., October 12, 1864, m. El- 
vira Caldwell, child, William Haywood, jr. (q. 
V.) ; by second marriage: 10. Lieut Nicholas P., 
served with the Forty-third Alabama regiment, 
C. S. Army, d. in 1867, m. Kitty Vaughn; 11. 
Lieut Charles M., served with the Forty-third 
Alabama regiment, C. S. Army, killed Decem- 
ber 14, 1863, at Beanes Station, Tenn.; 12. 
Sergt. Henry A., served with the Forty-third 
Alabama regiment, C. S. Army, killed at Pet- 
ersburg, Va,, December 25, 1864; 13. Udegerte 
L., d. December 13, 1909, m. Alto V. Lee (q. 
v.); 14. Sherwood H., d. in 1913, m. Mamie 
Allen, ij&st residence: Tuscaloosa. 

LAWSON, JAMES HENRT, business man, 
was bom September 27, 1848, at Talladega; son 
of James and Mary (Elliott) Lawson, the 
former who was bom in Sevierville, Tenn., 
lived at Ashville, St. Clair County, and Talla- 
dega, served as postmaster of Talladega, and as 
justice of the peace for forty-seven consecutive 
years; grandson of Robert and Martha 
(Nickles) Lawson, of Sevierville, Tenn., and 
Talladega, and of Capt Thomas and Elisabeth 
Elliott, of Winchester, Tenn., and Talladega. 
Mr. Lawson was educated in the schools of Tal- 
ladega; served as a private in (3o. A, Maj. • 
Joseph Hardie's battalion of reserves, Alabama 
State troops, in the War of Secession; served as 
county surveyor for more than twenty years; 
was a public school trustee for eighteen years; 
and was for a number of years a member of the 
county board of education. He represented 
Talladega County in the State legislature, 
1896-1897, and again in 1907. He is a Metho- 
dist and an Odd Fellow. Married: December 
81, 1873, at Talladega, to Alice B. Ooss, 
daughter of Col. Thomas J. and Bliza (Ed- 
wards) Cross, the latter a descendant of a 
Revolutionary soldier. Residence: Talladega. 

LAWSON, WILLIAM HENRY, farmer, mem- 
her of the Alabama legislature, and Confederate 
soldier, was bom May 12, 1845, in CJhambers 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



County; son of David and Martha Jane (Lyle) 
Lawson, both natives of Georgia. He was 
reared in Coosa County, and on July 19, 1861, 
at the age of seventeen years^ he enlisted in the 
Confederate seryice as a private in Co. C, 13th 
Alabama Infantry regiment, serving under Colo* 
nel Winston, Birkett D. Fry, and James Aiken, 
and under Stonewall Jackson and A. P. Hill in 
the Army of Northern Virginia until the sur-. 
render at Appomattox. He participated in the 
battles of Yorktown, Williamsburg, Seven 
Pines, the Seven Days before Richmond, South 
Mountain, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chan- 
oellorsville, Gettysburg, Bristoe Station, the 
Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, and 
the fighting about Petersburg. At the dose 
of the war he returned to his home, and later 
removed to Montgomery County, where he con- 
ducts a successful plantation. He has held the 
position of chairman of the Democratic county 
committee, and membership on the State com- 
mittee, and two years was chairman of the con- 
gressional committee, and was active in the 
overthrow of carpet-bag and negro rule. In 
1878-79, and 1884-85, he was a member of the 
State legislature. For four years he was clerk 
of the convict department. Married: (1) in 
1871, to Ellen Ready, (2) in 1886, to Virginia 
Lee Steagall. Children: six sons and four 
daughters. Residence: Montgomery County. 

LAY, GEORGE WILLIAM, clergyman, was 
bom on February 26, 1860, at Huntsville; son 
of Bishop Henry Champlin and Elizabeth With- 
ers (Atkinson) Lay (q. v.). He received his 
early education at St. Paul's preparatory school, 
Conoord, N. H.; took his A. B. degree at Yale, 
1882; B. D., General theological seminary, N. 
Y. 1886; and D. C. L. from the University of 
the South at Sewanee, 1915. He was ordained 
deacon in the Protestant Episcopal church, 
1886, and priest, 1886; was assistant minister 
St. Paul's parish, Erie. Pa., 1885-87; St 
George's parish, Newburgh, N. Y., 1887-88; mas- 
ter in St Paul's school, Concord, N. Y., 1888- 
1907; secretary board of missions, diocese of 
New Hampshire, 1895-1907; and since 1907 has 
been rector at St Mary's school, Raleigh, N. C. 
He is a Democrat; and a member of the Psi 
Upsilon college fraternity. Married: June 26, 
1894, to Anna Booth Balch, of Baltimore, Md. 
Residence: Raleigh, N. C. 

LAY. HENRY CHAMPLIN, Protestant Epis- 
copal bishop, ^as born at Ri<!hmond, Va., De- 
cember 6, 1823, and died at Baltimore, Md., 
September 17, 1886; son of John Olmsted and 
Lucy £!mma (May) Lay. Bishop Lay graduated 
from the University of Virginia, 1842, and from 
the Episcopal theological seminary, Alexandria, 
1846; received the degree of D. D. from Hobart 
college, 1867, and from William and Mary col- 
lege, 1873; and LL. D. from Cambridge Univer- 
sity, England. He was ordained a deacon by 
Bishop Meade in Christ's church, Alexandria, 
July 10, 1846, and served the following six 
months at Lynnhaven. He accepted a call to 
the Church of the Nativity, Huntsville, 1847, 
and while here was ordained a priest, July 12, 
1848, by Bishop Nicholas Hamner Cobbs. He 
remained at Huntsville for twelve years, leav- 



ing that place at his election as missionary 
bishop of the South-West He was consecrated 
at Richmond, Va., October 23, 1869. After the 
War of Secession his Jurisdiction was some- 
what restricted and his title was changed to 
missionary bishop of Arkansas. He was elected 
and translated as the first bishop of Eaton, 
April 1, 1869, when the diocese of Maryland 
was subdivided. He wrote many books and 
tracts. Married: May 13, 1847; to Elizabeth 
Withers, daughter of Roger and Mary T. (With- 
ers) Atkinson, granddaughter Thomas and 
Elisabeth (Qrammer) Withers, all of Bristol 
Parish, Va.; great-granddaughter of Thomas 
and Priscilla (Wright) Withers, the former 
clerk to Anthony Walke, in Nansemond County, 
Va., and afterwards private secretary to Gov. 
Dinwiddle. Children: 1. Rev. George, m. Anna 
Booth Balch (q. v.) ; 2, 3 and 4. names un- 
known. Last residence: Baltimore. 

LAY, WILLIAM PATRICK, promoter and 
developer, was bom June 11, 1853, in Cherokee 
County; son of Cummins M. and Elizabeth 
(McGhee) Lay, who lived in Cherokee County, 
the former a pioneer in the operation of steam 
boats on the upper Coosa River in Alabama, 
to which vocation he devoted his life; grand- 
son of John Lay, who moved from Virginia 
to Cherokee County in the early settlement of 
the state, and was a pioneer in the flat boat 
trade, from the upper stretches of the Coosa 
River, during high-water, down through the 
great rapids on that river to Wetumpka and 
Mobile, and of John McGhee of Tennessee. He 
was educated in the common schools, and at 
the age of eighteen began the machinist's trade 
in the engine department of extensive railroad 
shops, working at that trade for six years. He 
went on the road for a time as locomotive engi- 
neer, and in 1874 went to Gadsden as book- 
keeper for William P. HoUingsworth. He be- 
came executor of Mr. HoUingsworth's estate in 
1879, then embarked in the lumber business in 
Gadsden, and conducted that business until 
1890. It was largely through Mr. Lay's efforts 
that the first blast furnace was located at Gads- 
den in 1883. He built and owned the first 
electric light plant in Gadsden in 1887, and in 
1888 figured largely in the construction of the 
railroad from Anniston to Gadsden, now a part 
of the Louisville and Nashville system. He 
was president of a hotel company that built, 
the Printup Hotel in Gadsden; was instrumen- 
tal in inducing the Louisville A Nashville Rail- 
road Company to build a connecting section of 
railroad between Gadsden and Oneonta in Ala- 
bama; and it was due solely to his efforts that 
the Southern Steel Company, now the Standard 
Steel Company, located its plant in Gadsden in 
1902. In 1903, he built and owned the little 
water-power plant on Big Wills Creek near At- 
talla, which now supplies the city with its 
electric current Mr. Lay has been an active 
worker for the improvement of the Coosa-Ala- 
bama River for more than a third of a century, 
aad has been chairman of the Coosa River Im- 
provement Association for more than twenty 
years. As a part of his plans to bring about a 
dual development of that kind, he organized 
and incorporated the Alabama Power Company 
in 1906, which company built the power plant 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1021 



on Lock 12 of the Coosa River. He has been 
a member of the city council of Gadsden twice; 
was an elector at large for the state of Ala- 
bama In 1812 to vote for President Wilson: 
was commiiBsJoner at large from Alabama to 
the St. Louis exposition in 1903; and was chair- 
man of the Alabama conseryatimi commission 
in 1908. He is a Democrat and a Methodist 
He compiled the original Coosa River Mem- 
orial in 1899, is author of a booklet entiUed 
"The Great Coosa-Alabama River and Valley, 
Georgia and Alabama," and of several other 
booklets treating on the Coosa-Alabama River 
and the benefits to be derived from the proper 
improvement thereof. Married: April 26, 1876, 
at Gadsden, to Laura J. HoUingsworth, daugh- 
ter of WiUiam P. and Mary Josephine (Lewis), 
of that place, the former a major in the C. S. 
Army, War of Secession, * and a merchant at 
Gadsden. Children: 1. Earl, insurance man, 
m. Mary Martin, Gadsden; 2. Carl, merchant, 
m. Josephine Caldwell of JacOcsonville, Gads- 
den; 3. Tracy, deputy consul general for the 
United States in London, unmarried; 4. Or- 
ville, chief chemist of the Woodward Iron Com- 
pany, Woodward, unmarried; 5. Everett, Gads- 
den. Residence: Gadsden. 



LAZARUS, LEW, manufacturer, was born 
July 4, 1858, in Louisville, Ky. In 1872, he 
went to Houma, La., where he resided two 
years; removed to Muncie, Ind., remaining 
here, for two years, and from this place went 
to Shelbyville, Ky. In 1886 he removed to Bir- 
mingham, where he has since resided. He is 
engaged in the manufacturing business. He is 
a Mason. Married: in 1879, to Hannah 
Schwab, of Louisville, Ky. Children: 1. son; 
2. daughter. Residence: Birmingham. 

LAZENBY, E. M., planter and mill owner, 
was bom on September 27, 1823, in Columbia 
County, Ga.; son of Ellis and Frances (Zach- 
rey) Lazenby, the former a Georgian, the lat- 
ter a descendant of an old Virginia family; 
grandson of Ellis Lazenby, a Marylander who 
emigrated to Georgia in early youth. He was 
reared on a farm, with no facilities for secur- 
ing an education; emigrated to Alabama, about 
1844, where he engaged as a bridge builder 
with the Western railroad; removed in 1853, 
to Butler County, where he farmed until the 
close of the War of Secession when he became 
identified with the mercantile and milling 
business. He is a Democrat, and Methodist 
Married: December 14, 1848, in Butler County, 
to Mary, daughter of James K. Benson, a sol- 
dier of the War of 1812, and one of the gar- 
rison of Fort Bibb, in the spring of 1818, when 
Capt Butler, in honor of whom Butler County 
is named, and several others were surprised 
and massacred by the Indians. Chilclren: 1. 
John G., m. Mrs. L. J. Powers; 2. James B., 
m. Carrie Green; 3. George; 4. Henry G., m. 
Ella Floyd, Monterey; 6. Frances, m. J. G. 
Reynolds. Residence: Forest Home, i 

IiAZENBT, GEORGE SAMUEL, planter was 
bom July 6, 1864, in Butler County; son of 
EHias Marion and Martha J. (Benson) Lazen- 



by, the former a native of Columbus, Ga., who 
came to Alabama about 1850, was a farmer and 
mill operator, and during the War of Secession* 
served as a bridge builder; grandson of James 
K. Benson, and his wife, a Miss Drake, the 
former who came to Alabama from South Car- 
olina in 1816, was among the first settlers of 
Butler County, and was in Fort Bibb when 
Gen. Butler was killed by the Indians. The 
Bensons were of English stock. He obtained 
his early education in country schools; at- 
tended Greenville Institute, 1873-1874, and 
Southern University, 1874-1875. He is a 
planter and merchant; a Democrat; and has 
served as steward in the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, south, for forty years. Married: 
(1) September 16, 1876, to Carrie Clayton 
Greene, daughter of Captain A. C. and Mary 
(Purifoy) Greene, who came to Alabama from 
Georgia in 1866, and settled in Monroe County, 
the former who serv^ in the C. S. Army; (2) 
February 1, 1911, to Mary Edna Davis, daugh- 
ter of Bpinetus Monroe Davis, of PrattviUe. 
Children: 1. George Claudius, m. Elizabeth 
Howard; 2. Mary Etta, m. Dr. Conrod Wall; 
8. Vandiver; 4. Augustus Greene. Residence: 
Forest Home. 

LAZEJ^nBY, M. E., Methodist minister; mem- 
ber of the Alabama conference. Residence: 
Demopolis. 

io^^' ALLEN, major, 2nd, also known as 
19th, battalion, Alabama cavalry regiment, C. 

5. Army. 

i.olb?4' COLUMBUS W., lawyer, was born in 
1800, in Clarke County, Ga., and died in 1869, 
in Marion; son of a Georgia planter, a native 
of Virginia, who married a Miss Moffat, also 
of Virgina. He was educated at the University 
of Georgia and shortly after graduation opened 
a law office at Marion, practicing for several 
years but finally becoming a planter. He rep- 
resented Perry County in the legislature, 1832, 
1833, 1834, 1836, 1837, and 1844. He wa^ 
elector for Pierce and also for Douglas, and 
was a member of the constitutional convention 
of 1865. Married: Miss Parker, of Tuscaloosa 
and left descendants. Last residence: Marlon. 

LEA, HENRY CLINTON, lawyer, was bom in 
1803, in Clarke County, Ga., and died in De- 
cember, 1854; nephew of Columbus W. Lea 
(q. v.). He graduated from the University of 
Georgia, and came to Alabama in 1829; read 
law; was admitted to the practice; and was 
elected solicitor soon after. He represented 
Perry County in the State senate, 1836 and 
1839; was in the house, 1847 and 1851; and was 
elected solicitor in 1853. Married: August 

6. 1828, to Serena Ryng. daughter of Col. 
Thomas Reade and Sarah Ryng (Battaile) 
Rootes, the former a distinguished lawyer and 
member of the house of delegates in 1793, of 
Virginia; granddaughter of Thomas Reade and 
Martha Jacquelin (Smith) Rootes, of Federal 
Hill, near Fredericksburg, Va., and afterwards 
of White Marsh, Gloucester County, Va.; great- 
granddaughter of Capt. John and Mary 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



(Jacquelin) Smith, of Shooter's Hill, the 
former a member of the house of burgesses 
from Middlesex, Va., 1737-68, of Col. Philip and 
Frances (Wilcox) Rootes, the former of "Rose- 
wall," King and Queen County, Va., and sheriff 
of that county in 1765; great-great-granddaugh- 
ter of Maj. Philip and Mildred (Reade) Rootes, 
the former the earliest ancestor to whom the 
family has been traced, who lived at "Rose- 
wall" in King and Queen County, owning lands 
in New Kent and Orange Counties, and was 
justice of King and Queen County, in 1739, of 
Edwafd and Martha (Cary) Jacquelin, the 
former of County Kent, England, who emi- 
grated to America, locating in Virginia in 1697, 
and of Augustine and Sarah (Carver) Smith, 
of Virginia; great-great-great-granddaughter of 
William and Martha (Scarbrook) Cary, of War- 
wick County, Va., of John and Elizabeth (Crad- 
dock) Jacquelin, of County Kent, England, of 
John Carver, of Qloucester County, Va., of 
Thomas Reade, of Virginia, and of John and 
Mary (Warner) Smith, of Virginia, the former 
captain in the provincial service, and burgess 
from Qloucester County; great-great-great-great- 
granddaughter of Col. Augustine and Mildred 
(Reade) Warner, of Warner Hall, Va., and of 
John and Anne (Bernard) Smith, the former 
lieutenant colonel and speaker of the house of 
burgesses, of Virginia; great-great-great-great- 
great-granddaughter of Thomas Smith, emi- 
grant, of Richard and Ann (Corderoy) Bernard, 
the former a native of Petsoe Parish, Bucking- 
hamshire, England, who located in Gloucester 
County, Va., the latter of St Andrew's in the 
Wardrobe, England; great-great-great-great- 
great-great-granddaughter of John Bernard, 
governor of the Bermudas. Children: 1. Lucy, 
m. Dr. J. M. Langhorne (q. v.) ; 2. Sumter, (q. 
v.); 3. Henry C, m. Bettie Moseley; 4. 
Martha, m. James A. Harwood; 6. Mary 
Willis, m. B. P. Harwood. Last residence: 
Perry County. 

LEA, SUMTER, lawyer, was born February 
16, 1835, in Perry County; son of Henry Clin- 
ton and Serena R3^ge (Rootes) Lea (q. v.). 
He attended the University of Alabama until 
his junior year, studied law, and was admitted 
to the bar, opening his law practice in Mar- 
ion. He was elected captain of the first mili- 
tary company organized at Marion, and im- 
mediately upon the secession of the state from 
the union, went with that company under or- 
ders of the governor of Alabama to take pos- 
session of Fort Morgan, on Mobile Bay, Janu- 
ary 8, 1861. Later he enlisted in the C. S. 
Army, and was appointed adjutant of the 
Twenty-eighth Alabama regiment. After the 
battle of Murfreesboro, he was discharged from 
miltary service on account of loss of sight 
Later, when his vision was partially restored 
he was appointed to a position on the staff 
of a brigadier general, but was forced to de- 
cline the appointment He reported as a staff 
officer to Richmond, Va., from his plantation in 
Dallas County; took part in the battle of Selma, 
and was taken prisoner during that engage- 
ment After the war he practiced law in Mar- 
ion. He was elected a delegate to the consti- 
tutional convention of 1875 from Dallas County, 



and represented that county in the state legis- 
lature in 1884. He moved to Birmingham in 
1887, and soon after became permanently blind. 
Married: December 11, 1860, in Cahaba, to 
Susan Isadore Hill. Children: 1. Samuel Hill; 
2. Lucy; 3. Sumter; 4. Susie; 6. Lillian; 6. 
Thomas R. R.; 7. Lucian D. Residence: Bir- 
mingham. 

LEACH, SEWELL JONES, dentist and busi- 
ness man, was bom in New York City, No- 
vember 14, 1812, and died in Tuscaloosa, Au- 
gust 6, 1886; son of Ephraim Leach and Sophia 
(Jones) Leach. His educational advantages 
were limited as he was unable to attend &(diool 
longer than four months in any one year. At 
the age of eighteen, he took up the profes- 
sion of teaching and for two years conducted 
a school in the state of New York. He then 
took up the study of dentistry at Utica, N. Y., 
and removed to Mobile, 1837, where he began 
the practice at his profession. Remaining 
there only one year, he moved to Tuscaloosa 
and engaged in the Jewelry business with his 
brother, Cyrus Sidney Leach; moved to Union 
town, 1840, and again practiced dentistry at 
the same time managing his plantation in 
Marengo County. Returning to Tuscaloosa, 
1842, he resumed the practice of his profes- 
sion. He, with Dr. F. A, P. Barnard, after- 
wards president of Columbia oollege, Nerw 
York, successfully conducted a series of ex- 
periments in producing sun pictures, antedat- 
ing the promulgation of the discovery by the 
distinguished Frenchman, Daguerre. Dr. 
Leach throughout his entire life was a ma- 
chinist of the rarest ability. On account of 
his practical knowledge of machinery he was 
employed to purchase the outfit for the first 
cotton mill built in Tuscaloosa, 1846, and also 
for the paper mill. He established, 1852, on 
the banks of the Warrior River, in Tuscaloosa, 
the Leach and Avery iron and plow oo. It 
was destroyed by fire, 1859, rebuilt, and dur- 
ing the war was employed in casting cannons 
for the Confederate government, until 1864, 
when it was burned by the Federals. On ac- 
count of declining health, 1878, he accepted 
the less ardous position of general superin- 
tendent and machinist of the Tuscaloosa oot- 
t(m mills, into which the foundry was con- 
verted. He was a Mason; an Odd Fellow; and 
an Episcopalian. Dr. Leach, although a north- 
erner by birth, was a man of strong southern 
feeling. Married: October 10, 1839, to Eliza- 
beth Faulcon, daughter of James Harris and 
Rebecca Emily (Alston) Fitts (q. v.). Chil- 
dren: 1. James Harris, d. in infancy; 2. Sid- 
ney Fitts (q. v.), m. Mary Lee Peck; 3. Emily 
Alston, m. James Slaughter Carpenter; 4. Sam- 
uel Thomas, student at the University of Ala- 
bama, 1862-63, member of Fowler's battery, 
C. S. Army, 1863-65; 5. Norma Lela, m. John 
Snow (q. v.); 6. Carolyn Medora, m. Edward 
E. Kirkham; 7. Susan Virginia, d. young; 8. 
Lelia, d. in infancy; 9. Sewall Leach, Uni- 
versity of Alabama, 1874-76, bookkeeper, 1888- 
94, manager laundry and electric light plant 
of University of Alabama, general manager 
S. F. Alston furniture co., m. Kate Brantley 
Arrington, of Tuscaloosa; 10. Edward Faulcon, 



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1023 



UniTeristy of Alabama, 1874-77, agent U. S. 
express co., Birmins^m» 1887-92, private, Ck>. 
F, Second AlalKuna TOlunteer regiment, Span- 
ish-American War, m. Marie Louise Tait, of 
Montgomery; 11. Pitts, d. young. Last resi* 
dence: Tuscaloosa. * 

LEACH, STDNBT, physician, was bom Janu- 
ary 25, 1876, at Tuscaloosa; son of Sidney Fitta 
and Mary Lee (Peck) Leach, who lived at Tus- 
caloosa, the former a soldier in the C. S. Army, 
who served as a sergeant in Fowler's battery, 
Smith's regiment of artillery; grandson of 
Sewell Jones and Elizabeth (Faulcon) Leach 
(q. v.)> and of Elijah Woolsey and Lucy (Ran- 
dall) Peck, of Tuscaloosa. He was educated 
in the Tuscaloosa ' public schools; attended 
University high school at Marion, and Marion 
military institute; was graduated from the 
Alabama polytechnic institute, B. S., 1894 and 
from the University of Virginia, M. D., 1896. 
He served in various hospitals in New York, 
and was a member of the house staft of the 
New York polyclinic medical school and hos- 
pital in 1899; was appointed first assistant 
physician of the Alabama insane hospital, and 
served in that capacity, 1899-1904; since that 
time has heea practicing medicine at Tusca- 
loosa. He Is a Democrat, an Episcopalian, 
and a Mason. Married: April 25, 1900, at 
Tuscaloosa, to Nanieta Somerville McEachin, 
daughter of Archibald Bruce and Eudora 
(Somerville) McEachin, who lived at that 
place. C!hildren: 1. Mintum Peck, d. 1904; 
2. Mary Lee; 3. Sidney McEachin, d. 1905; 
4. Archibald Bruce; 5. Eudora Somerville; 6. 
Randall Peck. Residence: Tuscaloosa. 

LEIADBEATER, LAWRENCE C, teacher and 
lawyer, was bom in 1873, and died September 
15, 1917, in Birmingham. He received his 
higher education at the University of Virginia, 
graduating with the M. A. degree. Later he 
taught Latin at the Marion military institute, 
tmt returned to the University in 1897, to study 
law. He was associated in his law practice with 
Benjamin Russell, Gteorge P. Bondurant, and 
Forney Johnson, and finally he became a partner 
in the firm of Tillman, Bradley and Morrow. 
Last residence: Birmingham. 

LEADBETTER, DANVILLE, captain U. S. 
Army, brigadier-general C. S. Army, was born 
in Livermore, Maine, in 1811, and died at Clif- 
ton, (Canada, September 26, 1866. In 1832 he 
entered the West Point Military Academy; was 
gnt^tduated brevet second lieutenant. First Artil- 
lery on July 1, 1836; transferred to engineers, 
November 1, 1836; transferred to artillery, De- 
cember 31, 1836; transferred to engineers, July 
31, 1837; was promoted to first lieutenant, July 
7, 1838; commissioned captain, October 16, 1852; 
and resigned December 31, 1857. From 1838 to 
1845, Lieut Leadbetter served on garrison duty 
at Oswego Harbor, New York; from 1845 to 
1848 he was in charge of the engineer agency in 
New York for the purchase and shipment of 
sopplies for the construction of fortifications; 
he was then a member of a Joint commission of 
naral and engineer officers for examination of 
the Pacific coast; in 1853 he was in Mobile 



as superintending engineer of the repairs of Ft. 
Morgan and the building of Ft Qaines; the cus- 
tom house at Mobile was built under his su- 
perintendence. Resigning from the army, Capt 
Leadbetter lived as a private citisen of Mobile 
until the outbreak of the War of Secession; he 
accepted the commission of lieutenant-colonel 
from Alabama and was placed in command of 
Ft Morgan; in August, 1861, he was assigned to 
duty in Richmond as acting chief of the Engi- 
neer bureau; in November, 1861, CoL Lead- 
better was assigned to the command of the 
troops stationed for the protection of the rail- 
road between Bristol and Chattanooga, his du- 
ties being to reconstruct bridges, repair and 
keep open the line of communication between 
these two points; he also had the arduous task 
of preserving order and in holding in check 
the disaffected and insurgent east Tennesseans 
along the line of the railroad and in the adjoin- 
ing regions. On March 6, 1862, CoL Leadbetter 
was promoted to the rank of brigadier-gen- 
eral; on April 29, 1862, he had an encounter 
with the Federal army marching upon Chat- 
tanooga; he was in command of a brigade, with 
Gen. Bragg in his campaign in Kentucky; he 
was later ordered to Mobile to superintend the 
construction and completion of its defensive 
works; and on October 23, 1863, Oen. Leadbetter 
was announced as chief of the engineer de- 
partment of the army of Tennessee. His first 
work with that army was the construction of 
the lines along Missionary Ridge, while Oen. 
Bragg was investing Chattanooga. Gen. 
Leadbetter left Longstreet, November 23, 1863, 
and arrived in Dalton, Ga., December 3; served 
the Confederacy faithfully until the close of 
the war; at its close removed to Mexico and 
afterwards to Canada. Married: to a Mrs. Hall, 
nee Kennedy, a native of Alabama. Last resi- 
dence: Clifton, Canada. 

LEAK, TILMAN, planter and merchant, was 
bom April 1, 1809, at Zebulon, Pike County, 
Ga., and died August 11, 1872, at Montgomery; 
son of Rev. Samuel Leak, Baptist minister, of 
Zebulon. He was educated in the schools of 
Zebulon and Griffin, Ga., and engaged in farm- 
ing. He served in the Indian war of 1833-36; 
and later, on the Mexican frontier. He re- 
moved to Alabama and settled at Wetumpka, of 
which place he was mayor, in 1850; later locat- 
ing in Montgomery, he engaged in merchandis- 
ing and planting operations. He was a Whig 
and then a Democrat; a Mason; and a Meth- 
odist Married: October 20, 1831, in Zebulon, 
Ga., to Mary Ann Ford. Children: 1. Susan 
Providence, m. Alfred Franklin; 2. Rebecca 
Jane, m. Piatt Croom Stout; 3. Charlton Shep- 
pard; 4. Henry Cunningham; 5. William Wes- 
ley; 6. Tilman Ford, m. Rebecca McLemore; 7. 
Fannie Anna, m. J. R. Warren. Last residence: 
Montgomery. 

LEATH, JAMES HILL, manufacturer and 
legislator, was bom March 22, 1864, at Broom- 
town, Cherokee County; son of James Hill and 
Hasseltine (Rickey) Leath, who lived at 
Centre, Cherokee County. He was educated 
in the common schools of Centre; in 1880 he 
engaged in printing at Centre, on the "Chero- 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



kee Advertiser"; in 1887 was editor of "The 
Telephone/' a weekly paper at Centre, and in 
1888 of the "Sylacauga Argus"; remoTed to 
Birmingham in 1889, where for ten years he 
was a printer. He is a cigar manufacturer, 
and prominent in labor circles. He was one 
of the representatives in the legislature from 
Jeflersmi County, in 1901, and was author of 
the State printing bill, the union label bill 
and mechanics lien law for Jefferson County, 
and a child labor law. He is a Democrat; and 
a Baptist. He is unmarried. Residence: Bir- 
mingham. 

LE BARON, WILLIAM A., commission mer- 
chant, and vice-consul, was born November 7, 
1827, at Pensacola, Fla.; s(m of Charles and Ann 
(McVoy) Le Baron, the former a native of 
New Orleans, La., a merchant; grandson of 
Colonel Le Baron, a quartermaster, with the 
rank of colonel in the Seminole War, and for 
some years vice-consul at Mobile for Mexico 
and Spain, and of Martin McVoy, a native of 
Scotland, who migrated to Baldwin County, 
and piloted Gen. Andrew Jackson and his army 
from Mobile to Pensacola in the War of 181S. 
Mr. Le Baron was educated in Mobile, complet- 
ing his studies at Spring Hill college perfect- 
ing himself in Spanish as well as in English. 
In 1846 he helped to organize the "Mobile 
cadets," and engaged in the cotton compress 
business, 1856. In 1862, he was elected lieuten- 
ant colonel 24th Alabcuna infantry regiment, 
C. S. Army, but resigned this office a few 
months later to enter the navy, acting from 
1863 to the close of the war as clerk to Com- 
modore E. Farrand. On the restoration of peace 
between the sections he Joined his father in 
the commision business, becoming soon after- 
wards a partner in the firm. He was appoint- 
ed in 1881, vice-consul at Mobile for Spain; 
and in 1888 for Mexico, and in 1889, for 
Nicaragua. He is a Democrat and Roman 
Catholic. Married: in 1848, to Eliza J. Robb, 
a native of the city of Mexico. Children: nine 
children were born of this union. Residence: 
Mobile. 

LBDBETTER. EMMETT WALTON, banker, 
was born October 81« 1868, at New Hope, Mad- 
ison County; son of J. M. and Mary (McDon- 
ald) Ledbetter, who lived at New Hope and 
at Anniston. He was prepared in the common 
country schools, and was graduated from South- 
em University, B. S., 1890. He entered the 
banking business at Anniston in 1890; became 
cashier of the Bank of Piedmont; served as 
councilman of Piedmont, 1894, and 1897-1898; 
as mayor of Piedmont, 1896; councilman of 
Sylacauga, 1901; cashier of the Bank of Syla- 
cauga; and was a delegate from Talladega 
County to the constitutional convention of 1901. 
He was a private in the Anniston Rifles, 1890; 
is a Democrat; and a Methodist Residence: 
Sylacauga. 

LEDBETTER, SAMUEL LEONIDAS, physi- 
cian, graduate of the Medical college of Louis- 
ville, Ky., 1879. Residence: Birmingham. 



LEDBETTER, W. G., business man, was born 
in 1851, in Madison County; son of John W. 
and Elizabeth (Qlover) Ledbetter, natives, re- 
spectively, of Virginia and South Carolina, the 
former of whom was bom in 1811, and came 
to Alababia in 1821; grandson of Archie Led- 
better. He was reared in his native county, 
and, due to the outbreak of the War of Seces- 
sion, received but a limited education. After 
the war, he went to New York, and for nine 
years was connected with a wholesale hat 
business. For five years after that time, he 
engaged in the manuf^usture of tobacco in 
Lynchburg, Va., then moved to Winston, N. C, 
and continued the manufacture of tobacco in 
that place for four years. He came to Ala- 
bama in 1887, and located- in Anniston, where, 
during the same year, he assisted in the or- 
ganization of the bank of that city. He was 
elected vice-president of the bank of Anniston 
for two years, then was elected president, and 
has continued to hold the latter position. On 
the organization of the Piedmont Land Im- 
provement Company in 1890, he was chosen 
vice-president, and in 1892, was elected presi- 
dent of the company. He was made a di- 
rector of the Anniston Land Company when 
it was organized;* was the organizer of the 
Ledbetter Land Company and is president of 
the Woodstock Iron Company. He is a Bap- 
tist and a Mason. Married: in 1877, to Sarah 
Draper, a native of Oxford, daughter of Daniel 
D. and Caroline (Woods) Draper, natives of 
South Carolina. Children: 1. Ruth; 2. Ralph; 
3. Grace; 4. Willie G. Three other children 
are deceased. Residence: Anniston. 

LEE, ALTO VELA, lawyer, was bom Decem- 
ber 28, 1844, at Louisville, Barbour County; 
son of Lovard and Susan Emeline (Loveless) 
Lee, the former a native of Augusta, Ga., who 
moved to Barbour County in 1832, served in 
the Indian wars, led a company in the C. S. 
Army, and prior to the War of Secession was 
a general of militia; grandson of Needham 
and Lydia (Pryor) Lee, and of William Love- 
less. He was prepared in the schools of Clay- 
ton to enter the University of Alabama, but 
was prevented from attending the university 
by joining the C. S. Army, January 17, 1861. 
He became orderly sergeant in the Clayton 
Guards, the first company organized in Bar- 
bour County, and served with that company 
for a year; assisted in the organization of the 
Lee Guards, and was made second lieutenant 
in that company; resigned from that company 
because of ill health in 1863; accepted a cadet- 
ship at the University of Alabama for eight 
months, and at the end of that time returned 
home and raised a company of which he was 
elected captain; led his company in the bat- 
tles of Blakely and Spanish Fort; was taken 
prisoner in the latter engagement, and held 
on Ship Island. After the war he studied law 
in the office of Col. D. M. Scales at Clayton; 
was admitted to the bar and began the prac- 
tice of law in 1867; served as mayor of Clay- 
ton for a number of years; was solicitor of 
Barbour County, 1868, 1872, and 1874-1876; 
was elected solicitor of the eighth Judicial dis- 



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LOUIS B. WHITFIELD 



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1027 



trict, 1876-1880; was re-elected in 1880 and 
1886, eenring in that office for sixteen years; 
and later became associate Judge of the city 
court of Gadsden. He was a trustee of the 
UniTersity of Alabama for six years; is a 
Democrat; a Methodist, serving the church as 
secretary of the Eufaula district conference 
and as statistical secretary of the Southern 
Alabama Conference; and is a Blason. Married: 
December 19, 1865, in Tuscaloosa, to LdUie 
Lawrence, daughter of William Haywood and 
Ildegerte Lucy (Anthony) Lawrence, of Tusca- 
loosa; granddaughter of Josiah and Charity 
(Haywood) Lawrence; great-granddaughter of 
Col. William Haywood, who was colonel of 
militia forces of Edgecombe District, N. C, 
a member of the provincial congress of North 
C^arolina at Halifax in April, 1776, a member 
of the committee in that body which drafted 
the State constitution and the bill of rights 
a member of the council of state in 1776, and 
one of the commissioners who signed the Revo- 
lutionary currency of North Carolina; great- 
great-granddaughter of John Haywood who 
moved from New York to North Carolina, was 
a colonel of militia, a member of the North 
Carolina assembly, 1746-1752, commissioner of 
coast fortifications in 1748, and surveyor to 
Earl Granville. Children: 1. Lawrence Hay- 
wood, m. Augusta Alston; 2. Vela, m. G^rge 
W. Peach; 3. William Lovard (q. v.); 4. 
(Charles W., m. Nettie Passmore; 5. Henry 
Pitzhugh (q. v.); 6. Alto Vela (q. v.). Resi- 
dence: Ckidsden. 

LEE, ALTO VELA, lawyer, was born July 
28, 1876, at (Hayton, Barbour County; son of 
Alto Vela and Lillitf (Lawrence) Lee (q. v.) ; 
and brother of Henry Fitzhugh Lee (q. v.), 
and of William Lovard Lee (q. v.). He was 
prepared for college in Clayton Academy; was 
graduated with honor from the University of 
Alabama, A, B.. 1897, M. A., 1899, and LL.B., 
1903. He taught as principal of the Clio pub- 
Uc school, 1897-1898; was a fellowship student 
at the University of Alabama, 1898-1899; prin- 
cipal of AttaUa public school, 1899-1902; served 
as commandant of the University of Alabama, 
1902; and began the practice of law in Gads- 
den in 1903. He is owner of a half interest in 
the Eitowah Abstract Company; was elected to 
the State legislature from Etowah County, 
1907; and to the State senate from the sixth 
distHct, 1915; is a Democrat; a Methodist; 
a Mason; and an Elk. Married: February 
28, 1906, at Attalla, to Eloise Frost, 
daughter of Clarence Miller and Anna Lavinia 
(Hudspeth) Frost, of that place; granddaughter 
of George Washington and Eliza Jane Frost, 
and of William L. and Sophia Hudspeth. Chil- 
dren: 1. Eloise; 2. Lillian. Residence: Gads- 
den. 

LEE, B. E., Cumberland Presbyterian minis- 
ter; living in 1913. Residence: McCalla. 

LEE, COLUMBUS W., lawyer, planter, was 
bom in 1800, in (Harke County, Ga.. and died 
in 1869 in Perry Ck>unty; son of Greene Lea, 
a wealthy planter, who married a Miss Moffat. 



Both of his parents were Virginians. He was 
a cousin of Henry Clinton Lea (q. v.), and 
changed his name from Lea to Lee. He re- 
ceived his collegiate education from the Uni- 
versity of C^eorgia, and opened a law office 
in Marion soon after his graduation. He was 
the law partner at different times of A. B. 
Moore and J. P. Graham, but retired from the 
practice of law early, in order to devote his 
time to his planting interests. From 1832 
to 1838, he was elected annually to the legis- 
lature with the exception of one year; and 
was again a representative from Perry County 
in 1844. His party being in the minority in 
Perry County, he was defeated two or three 
times for the State senate. In 1852, he served 
on the Democratic electoral ticket for Pierce 
and King, and in 1860 was on the Douglas 
electoral ticket He opposed the policy of 
secession in 1861, but after the measure was 
pased in Alabama, supported the state in her 
efforts for defense. He was a delegate from 
Perry County to the constitutional convention 
of 1865, and soon after canvassed the state 
for congress unsuccessfully, in opposition to 
Joseph T. Taylor. The latter part of his life 
was passed in retirement He was a Baptist 
Married: to Elizabeth Parker of Tuscaloosa. A 
number of his descendants reside in Perry 
County. One of his sons, Wajme Emmet Lee, 
a planter in Sou^ America, was bom Novem- 
ber 30, 1843, served as a captain in the C. S. 
Army and was married in 1868, at Marion, to 
Sue Billingslea. Last residence: Perry County. 

LEE, DAVID, Baptist minister, was born 
February 4, 1805, in Johnston County, N. C; 
son of Joel Lee (q. v.) ; brother of (George and 
Hanson Lee (q. v.). Rev. Mr. Lee removed 
with his parents to Alabama and located in 
Conecuh County in 1817. He began to exhort 
in 1827, was ordained in 1833, and served the 
Hopewell church. Mount Willing, for over 
thirty-five years. Author: many religious pa- 
pers.' Married: Mary Coleman, of Mt Willing. 
They left many descendants. Last residence: 
Mount Willing. 

LEE, ELI FRANKLIN, Presbjrterian minis- 
ter, was born March 28, 1879, at Newton Grove. 
Samps(»i County, N. C; son of Arthul and 
Elizabeth Jane (Coats) Lee. the former a 
native of Johnston County, N. C, who moved 
to Newton Grove, Sampscm County, N. C, served 
in the C. S. Army, and was county surveyor of 
Sampson County for about twenty-five years; 
grandson of Westbrook and Esther (Smith) 
Lee, who lived near Peacock's Cross Roctds, 
Johnston County, N. C, and of William and 
Emily (Hudson) Coats, who lived near Rosin 
Hill, Sampson County, N. C; great-grandson 
of Joab Lee; great-great-grandson of Jesse Lee 
of Fayetteville, N. C, and of Westbrook Lee, 
one of four brothers. Westbrook, Samuel, Wil- 
liam and Noah Lee, who emigrated from Arling- 
ton Heights, Va., to North Carolina during the 
latter part of the eighteenth century, and who 
were closely related to the family of Gen. Rob- 
ert E. Lee; great-great-great-grandson of Joel 
Lee who came from England early in the 
eighteenth century. Ancestors on both sides of 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



the familj were named Lee, but the two fam- 
illee were not related. Rev. Lee received his 
preparatory training in the public schools of 
North Carolina and in Turlington institute at 
Smithfleld, N. C. He was graduated from Trin- 
ity college, cum laude, A. B., 1905; from Co- 
lumbia university, M. A., 1908; from the Union 
theological seminary, New York, 1909; and 
completed all courses for the degree of Ph. D. 
in Columbia university, 1911. He began teach- 
ing in the public schools of North Carolina 
when he was sixteen years of age; entered as 
a candidate for the ministry in 1901; became 
assistant pastor of the Arlington Avenue Pres- 
byterian church, Brooklyn, N. T., from April, 
1907 until January, 1909; was ordained by the 
Brooklyn Presbytery, June 2, 1909; served as 
pastor of the St. Albans Presbyterian church, 
St. Albans, Long Island, N. T., 1909-1912; pastor 
of West Bnd Presbyterian church, Birmingham, 
1912-1918; pastor of Buffalo Presbyterian church 
at Greensboro, N. C. He is an Independent 
Democrat and a Royal Arch Mason. He is 
author of "Social Solidarity and Race Inequali- 
ties in the South," 1911. Married: August 16, 
1905, at East Durham, N. C, to Elsie Amana 
Barbee, daughter of Bartlett Washington and 
Louvinia Tarpley (Smith) Barbee, of Durham, 
N. C; granddaughter of Gray and Sarah Haw- 
kins (Scoggins) Barbee; great-granddaughter 
of John Barbee, who married a Miss Morris. 
Residence: Greensboro, N. C. 

LEE, GEORGE LASSITER, Baptist minister, 
was born November 28, 1819, near Burnt Corn, 
Conecuh County, and died February 16, 1867; 
son of Joel Lee (q. v.) ; brother of David and 
Hanson Lee (q. v.). He received a good Eng- 
lish education and during his ministerial ca- 
reer served the Bethlehem association as clerk 
and moderator. Married: Nancy C. Hender- 
son, of Monroe County. There were ten chil- 
dren bom of this union. Last residence: 
Conecuh County. 

LEE, GEORGE WASHINGTON, Baptist min- 
ister, was bom October 30, 1842, in Covington 
County, and died at McKenzie, Butler County; 
son of Greenbery and Martha Jane (Taylor) 
Lee, the former a native of Putnam County, 
Qa.. who went to Alabama and resided at West- 
over, Covington County; grandson of Richard 
and Martha Taylor, of Putnam County, Ga. 
Mr. Lee received a limited education in the 
country schools; was ordained a Primitive Bap- 
tist minister, November 15, 1871; was in the 
ministry for forty years, serving churches in 
Butler, Covington, Crenshaw and Conecuh 
Counties, and other places; was clerk of the 
Antioch Primitive Association for thirty years; 
and was pastor for thirty years of Elizabeth 
church. For ten years he taught school, and 
for two terms was tax collector of Butler Coun- 
ty. He represented Butler County in the State 
legislature in 1903. During the War of Seces- 
sion, he was a member of Co. B, and Co. C, 
Seventeenth Alabama infantry regiment, C. S. 
Army, and lost his arm at Vicksburg. He was 
a Democrat Married: (1) February 17, 1864, 
to Rhoda A. E. Mitchell, daughter of R. M. J. 



Mitchell; (2) to Rebecca L., daui^ter of Joseph 
Howell, of Butler County. Last residence: Mc- 
Kensie. 

LEE, HANSON, Baptist minister, was bom 
December 27, 1815, in Johnston County, N. C, 
and died May 7, 1862; son of Joel Lee (q. v.) ; 
brother of David and George Lee (q. v.). He 
was a graduate of Southwestern theological col- 
lege, Eastern Tennessee, reoeivjbig the degree 
of A. M. He was ordained in 1844. and in con- 
nection with preaching adopted teaching as a 
profession. He first taught at Brooklyn, later 
in Georgia, and was president of Mossy Creek 
college, Eastern Tennessee. In 1854 he founded 
Mount Lebanon college, Louisiana, became the 
president and founded the "Louisiana Bap- . 
tist." Married: Blartha Cates. Last resi- 
dence: Mt Lebanon, La. 

LEE, H. A. G., Methodist minister; member 
of the Alabama conference; pastor of the Court 
Street church, Mcmtgomery, 1887. 

LEE, HENRT FXTZHUGH, accountant. State 
Auditor, was born August 31, 1874, at Clayton, 
Barbour County, son of Alto Vela and Lillian 
Frances (Lawrence) Lee, (q. v.); brother of 
Alto Vela Lee (q. v.), and William Lovard Lee 
(q. v.). Mr. Lee was educated in the common 
schools of Clayton, and later took a business 
course in Columbus, Ga. In 1900 he was chief 
clerk of the probate court in Eufaula, having 
charge of the business of the branch court 
house there. He served as examiner of public 
accounts under Governors Jelks and Comer, 
1906-1911; was chief clerk in State auditor's 
office, 1911-15; secretary. State board of equal- 
ization, 1915-1919, and was elected State auditor 
in November, 1919. He is a Democrat, a Metho- 
dist, a Mason, a Knights of Pythias, and a 
Woodman of the World. Married: January, 
1897, at Clayton, to Wyllanne Pmett, daughter 
of Judge William H. and Anne (Browder) 
Pruett of Eufaula. Children: 1. Henry Fiti- 
hugh, jr. Residence: Montgomery. 

LEE, JACOB MARTIN, physician and plan- 
ter, was born November 10, 1810, at Charles- 
ton, S. C, and died April 30, 1874, at Carlow- 
ville; son of Paul Smyrna Hudson and Jane 
(Martin) Lee, who lived at Carlowville, the 
foraier a native of CharlestcMi, S. C, a major 
in the army; grandson of Stephen and Dorothea 
Allison Lee, who lived at Charleston, S. C, 
the latter the widow of Rev. Hugh Allison, 
of that place; great-grandson of Thomas and 
Mary (Giles) Lee, the former a native of 
Bridgetown, Barbadoes; great-great-grandaon of 
Francis Lee and Mary of Barbadoes, who bore 
the same coat of arms as Harry Lee, one of 
the captains of London, and the son of Rob- 
ert, Lord Mayor of London in 1602. The coat 
of arms was granted DecOTiber 20, 1593. He 
was educated in the schools of Charleston, 
S. C, and was graduated, M. D., from Charles- 
ton university of medicine. He became a physi- 
cian and planter, and practiced in (3arlowville 
and the surrounding country from 1885 to 
1872. He was a Democrat and an Episco- 



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1029 



paliao. Married: January 10, 1882, in Charles- 
ton, to Rebecca Ballard, daughter of 
Thomas and Bliza (Maxwell) Fishbum, who 
liTed at Walterboro and Charleston, S. C. Chil- 
dren: 1. Paul Cornelius, b. January 10, 1885, 
d. March 18, 1875, was graduated from the 
UnlTerslty of Alabama, A. B., and from the 
UniTersi^ of FennsylTanla, M. D., 1858, serred 
as surgeon in the C. S. Army, and later, as a 
physician at Montgomery, m. Bettie Scott Pol- 
lard; 2. Thomas Fishbum, b. April 8, 1887, d. 
June 22, 1865, at Mobile, attended the Univer- 
sity of Alabama, and was graduated from the 
University of Pennsylvania, M. D., 1860, phjrsi- 
clan at Tuscaloosa, m. Lucy J. Foster; 8. Har- 
riet Blisa, Selma, m. Josiah Henry Smith, de- 
ceased; 4. William Julian, b. June 8, 1840, d. 
August 15, 1865, attended the University of 
Alabama, served as lieutenant. Third regiment, 
Alabama cavalry, C. S. Army; 5. Frances Elea- 
nor, m. Andrew Pickens Calhoun, both de- 
ceased; 6. Sarah Mallet, Birmingham, m. Rob- 
ert James Ldde, deceased; 7. Florence Olivia, 
nou James Francis Calhoun, both deceased; 8. 
Mary Louisa, Selma; 9. Jacob Martin, m. Rosa 
Mary Jordan, both deceased; 10. Elisa Martin, 
m. William Asbury Bibb, Albany. Last resi- 
dence: Carlowville. 

LEE, JESSE, Baptist minister, was born in 
1803, in Alabama, and died October 9, 1872. 
He became a preacher in 1837, and removed 
to Caddo Parish, La., in 1847. He also served 
at Shreveport and Sumner Grove. 

LEE, JOEL, pioneer settler and planter, was 
bom January 4, 1773, at Smithfleld, N. C, and 
died October 21, 1862. He came to Alabama in 
1817, settling near Burnt Corn, Conecuh Coun- 
ty. He was a planter and was the first justice 
of the peace in Alabama. He was a Baptist 
and a Democrat. Married: Media Lassiter. 
Children: 1. Owen; 2. Susan, m. (1) Mr. Wil- 
liams, (2) Dr. John Miller, (3) Frank Farrow; 
8. Martin, m. Nancy Partin; 4. Lee, m. Emily 
Witherington; 5. David (q. v.), m. Mary Cole- 
man; 6. Eliza, m. Elazarus Carter; 7. Robert, 
m. Parthenia Autrey; 8. Mary Ann, m. Sebas- 
tian Witherington; 9. Hanson (q. v.), m. Mary 
Cates; 10. George Lassiter (q. v.), m. Nancy C. 
Henderson. Last residence: Conecuh County. 

LEE, JOHN COOK, farmer and legislator, 
was bom January 22. 1856, in Perry County; 
son of John and Harriet (Cook) Lee, the for- 
mer of Anson County, N. C, the latter of La- 
Orange, Ga.; grandson of Solomon and Martha 
Lee. He was educated in the common schools, 
and at Howard college. He represented Perry 
County in the legislature of 1911. He is a 
Democrat; a Baptist; and a Knight of Py- 
thias. Married: (1) to Ludie Scears, of Eutaw; 
(2) October 24, 1894, in MontgomeVy, to Lynda, 
daughter of J. C. and Florence (Fowlkes) Tar- 
rant, of Marion. The Fowlkes family was of 
English descent who settled in Virginia, two of 
whom, Joseph and John, were officers In the 
War of the Revolution. The mother of Mrs. 
Florence Fowlkes was Mary Bradley, of South 
Carolina. Children: by first wife. 1. John C, 
jr.; 2. Pettus; 3. Scears; by second wife, 4. 



Edward Tarrant; 5. Bradley Fowlkes. Resi- 
dence: Marion. 

LEE, LAWRENCE H., lawyer, was bom 
▲uSQSt 2» 1867» at Clayton; son of Alto V. and 
LiUie (Lawrence) Lee; brother of Fitzhufl^ 
Lee (q. v.). He was educated in the common 
schools of Clayton; graduated A.B., in 1887, 
and LTi.B., in 1888, from the University of 
Alabama. He served as solicitor for Barbour 
County, 1889-90; alderman of Clayton, 1896- 
97; and representative from his county to the 
State legislature, 1898-99. In September, 1901, 
he removed to Gadsden and was city attorney, 
1902-08. He was appointed reporter of the 
supreme court of Alabama, November 29, 1906, 
and still holds that position. Biarried: Octo- 
ber 29, 1889, to Augusta, daughter of Judge 
Augustus H. Alston (q. v.). Children: 1. Lilly, 
m. Dexter Rood, of New Haven, Conn.; 2. Mil- 
dred, m. Capt Charles Buckner, U. S. Army; 
8. Theodosia; 4. Lawrence H., jr. Residence: 
Montgomery. 

LEE, MART (GRAVES) GRAVES, vice-presi- 
dent, for Alabama of the Confederate ladies 
memorial association of the South, was born 
October 15, 1885, in Abbeville District, S. C, and 
died in Montgomery September, 1916; daughter 
of Dr. Thomas and Harriet (Lomax) Graves, of 
Abbeville S. C; niece of Col. Tennant Lomax 
(q* v.); granddaughter of Dr. George and 
Mary (Scott) Graves; great-granddaughter of 
Samuel Scott, a Revolutionary soldier of the 
South Carolina line. In 1856 she removed with 
her parents from South Carolina to Glenville. 
Some years previous to the War of Secession 
she removed with her husband to Lafayette 
County. Ark. During the war she and her hus- 
band opened both home and private hospital 
for the benefit, without charge, to sick and 
wounded Confederates. In 1868, their property 
swept away, they came to Montgomery to make 
their home, and opened a large private hotel. 
This business she carried on, after her hus- 
band's death until her own demise. She en- 
gaged actively in the patriotic labors of Mont- 
gomery women; was member of Sophie Bibb 
chapter, U. D. C; vice-president, and later pres- 
ident of the Ladies memorial association of 
Montgomery, the oldest patriotic organisation 
in America, concerning the War of Secession, 
and as president, caused the placing of the 
memorial tablet in the hall of representatives 
in the Capitol, Montgomery; was elected vice- 
president, for Alabama, of the Confederate 
States memorial association; assisted mate- 
rially, in assembling the money to erect the 
Chickamauga monument, Chickamauga Park. 
She was active in caring for the inmates of the 
Soldiers home, Mountain Creek; vice-president 
for Alabama Confederate Southern memorial 
association. Married: in 1859, to Dr. J. C. Lee, 
of near Glenville. Last residence: Montgomery. 

LEE, MOSES J., farmer, was bom in 1880, 
in Greene County, Ga.; son of Charles S. and 
Elizabeth (Broughton) Lee, natives of Greene 
County, Ga., who moved to Alabama in 1835, 
and settled in Chambers County, moved after 
a few years to Bullock County, then to Coffee 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



County in 1850, and finally moved to Elba where 
they spent the remainder of their lives; grand- 
son of William Lee, a native of Virginia, and 
a member of the distinguished Lee family of 
that state, who served in the. Revolutionary 
War, and moved from Virginia to Greene 
County, Ga., and of John H. Broughton, a South 
Carolinian, who moved to Greene County, Ga., 
and served in the Revolution. Mr. Lee was 
reared on a farm, received a common school 
education, and attended LaGrange male col- 
lege. When he was twenty years of age, he 
began life for himself as a clerk in Bullock 
County; later he was for a time in the col- 
lecting business; then became occupied in 
farming. He was also, at different times, 
engaged in the. mercantile business. Dur- 
ing the War of Secession, as his four broth- 
ers and three brothers-in-law were in the C. S. 
Army, Mr. Lee remained at home to take care 
of the family. Later he entered the State 
service, and became captain of a company 
which performed provost duty. Married: in 
1862, at Union Springs, to Georgia A. Coleman, 
a native of Morgan County, Ga., who was edu- 
cated at Union Springs, daughter of James M. 
and Patience Coleman, natives of Wilkes and 
Morgan Counties, respectively, who moved to 
Bullock County in 1844, and to Coffee County 
in 1860, the former a merchant and planter 
who died in 1868, the latter who died in 1892, 
in Gainesville, Ga. Children: 1. Charles S.; 
2. Robert E.; 3. Moses J.; 4. Lillie, deceased; 

5. William J.; 6. Mary; 7. John C, deceased; 8. 
Jack D.; 9. Edward Lamar; 10. Anna. Resi- 
dence: near Elba, Coffee County. 

LEE, NEEDHAM, farmer, was born Decem- 
ber 10, 1808, in Ejast Tennessee; son of Need- 
ham and Susan (Bailey) Lee (q. v.). He was 
raised upon a farm and had little opportunity 
for attending school. He came to Alabama 
with his parents in 1816, and eventually be- 
came a farmer in Shelby County. He was 
elected Justice of the peace in 1839, and served 
In that position continuously until 1888. He 
was elected tax collector in 1847, and at dif- 
ferent times refused the candidacy for the 
State legislature, for sheriff and for probate 
Judge. He was a Democrat; a Presbjrterian; 
and a Mason. Married: (1) May 13, 1829, to 
Nancy Wharton, who was born August 10, 1809, 
in South Carolina, and died December 24, 1869, 
daughter of Stephen and Sarah (Griffin) Whar- 
ton, natives of South Carolina, who came to 
Alabama in the twenties, the former of whom 
was a son of a colonel in the Revolution; (2) 
February 2, 1871, to Martha (Stripling) Broad- 
enax, daughter of Aaron and Susan Stripling. 
Children, by first marriage: 1. Edward Fields, 
served in Co. B, Second Alabama cavalry regi- 
ment, C. S. Army; 2. Stephen Wharton, served 
in the C. S. Army; 3. Susan J.; 4. William 
Martin, entered the C. S. Army as second lieu- 
tenant, was promoted to captain of Co. C, Tenth 
Alabama regiment, was wounded in the seven 
days fight before Richmond, and died in a hos- 
pital shortly afterward; 5. James Lacy, served 
in the Second Alabama cavalry, C. S. Army; 

6. Parthena; 7. Anna P.; 8. Hellen N.; 9. Martha 



M.; 10. Josephine. Last residence: Shelby 
County. 

LEE, NEEDHAM, Sb., pioneer, was born in 
Virginia, and died in 1820, at his home In Ca- 
haba Valley, Shelby County; son of Thomas 
and Mary Lee, the former of whom Is said 
to have been very closely related to Light Horse 
Harry Lee. Not much is known 'Of his early 
life, but he probably lived for a time at Crab 
Orchard, Ky., then in Hawkins County, Tenn., 
and later at Bean Station, Knox County, Tenn. 
It is possible that he lived in Cumberland 
County, Tenn., also. He moved to Alabama 
in 1816, and settled in Cahaba Valley, Shelby 
County, which was at that time St. Clair Coun- 
ty, Alabama territory, living there until his 
death. The second year after his arrival he 
was a candidate for the legislature and was 
defeated by a majority of one vote. He served 
as Justice In the first court ever held in Shelby 
County, and held that office until his death. 
When he came to Alabama, his second son 
brought the family and party down the Ten- 
nessee River to Gunter's Landing, while Mr. 
Lee and his eldest son brought the horses and 
stock overland. The family walked from Gun- 
ter's Landing, one hundred miles to the place 
of settlement. At least three of his sons and 
forty-six of his grandsons served in the War 
of Secession, a record probably unequalled in 
the United States. Married: probably in Vir- 
ginia, to Susan Bailey. Children: 1. Thomas, 
served in the War of 1812, married, children, 
Frederick, d. In War of Secessicm, Willis, cap- 
tain in C. S. Army, and Bailey; 2. Col. Wil- 
liam Carroll, served in the War of 1812, and 
in the Indian Wars, where he was promoted to 
colonel, married, children, William Carroll, Jr., 
served in C. S. Army. John Shakelford. served 
in the C. S. Army, Martin, enlisted in the C. S. 
Army from Mississippi, James Ed and Rev. 
Polk Darcus, both of whom served in Co. A, 
Tenth Alabama infantry, C. S. Army, Henry 
(Raines, Bryan Oldham and Robert Edward; 3. 
Winifred, m. James Bailey; children. James 
Irwin and Tom, both of the Twentieth Alabama 
infantry, C. S. Army, William, Needham and 
John Sevier, the last two of whom enlisted in 
Co. K., Thirtieth Alabama infantry, C. S. Army; 
4. Zilpha, m. Samuel Acton, children, Needham. 
member of the home guard during the War of 
Secession, John and Dr. Samuel, both of Co. 
K, Thirtieth Alabama regiment, the latter sur- 
freon of the regiment, Gaines, served in the 
Twentieth Alabama and died on Dag Creek, 
Dr. William Madison, served in the Thirtieth 
Alabama and was shot down while leading a 
charge, Aaron Crawford, served with the 
Twentieth Alabama, and Thomas Monroe; 5. 
Ingram, married, children, James, served in 
Whistnant's Company, C. S. Army, Edward 
Givins, served in the Tenth Alabama infan- 
try, and S. A.; 6. John W., married, children, 
Perry, served in Second Alabama cavalry and 
died at home before the war was over, Sidney, 
Thomas, Gregory and William C, the latter 
two of whom served in the Tenth Alabama 
infantry, and Needham; 7. Sallie, m. E#dward 
Byrum, children, Alden, Marlon, served with 
Co. K, Thirtieth Alabama, killed in 1864 in 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1031 



front of Atianta, Ga., Mai, Co. K, Thirtietli 
Alabama infantry, Enarden, Silas, Co. K, Thir- 
tieth Alabama, and William; 8. Elizabeth, m. 
Hev. William Acton, children, John Vincent, 
William H., and James Qaines, all of whom 
served in the C. S. Army; 9. Needham, jr. (q. 
^.) ; 10. Henry R., married, children, Mitchell 
and Capt Melvin, members of Alabama regri- 
menta, C. S. Army, and William; 11. Edward, 
served in the C. S. Army with the Twentieth 
Alabama regiment, married, children, Warren, 
Co. B, Second Alabama regiment, Thomas, Co. 
C. Tenth Alabama, and James J. Polk,- died 
about close of war; Perry, enlisted in Twen- 
tieth Alabama, d. of measles at Mobile, mar- 
ried, children, William and Shelley, members 
of Alabama regiments, C. S. Army, Needham, 
and A. Jackson; 13. Mary, m. Maiden Roy, 
children. Bill, Marion, Lafayette, and Perry, 
the first three served in the C. S. Army; 14. 
Gaines, married, child, David Needham; 15. 
Susan, m. Wesley Hall Hollingsworth, children, 
Jchn Perry, and Ed Columbus, both served in 
C. S. Army, the latter captured and held pris- 
oner at Syracuse, N. Y.; 16. Martin; 17. James 
Franklin, served throughout the War of Seces- 
sion. Last residence: Cahaba Valley, Shelby 
County. 

LEE, ROBERT MONROE, farmer, was bom 
August 19, 1846, at Louisville, Barbour County; 
son of Needham and Emiline (Lewis) Lee, the 
former a native of Jefferson County, Ga., who 
served In the Indian War of 1836; grandson of 
Needham and Lydia (Pryor) Lee, and of Elvy 
and Emeline (Benton) Lewis, of North Caro- 
lina. His Lee ancestors came from England to 
Virginia in the sixteenth century. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools of Louisville; en- 
tered the a S. Army, March 10, 1862, Joining 
Co. A, Forty-fifth Alabama infantry regiment; 
IMtrticipated in the battle of Murfreesboro, and 
in all subsequent battles of the Western Army 
until July 22, 1864, at which time he was cap- 
tured; was carried to C!amp Chase, Ohio, as a 
prisoner of war, and paroled March 2, 1865. 
After the war, he engaged in farming; repre- 
sented Barbour (3ounty in the State legislature, 
1907; is a Democrat; a Methodist; a Mason. 
Married: January ' 19, 1881, to Annie T., 
daughter of Dr. John A. and Sarah Eliza- 
beth (Huey) Reynolds, of Louisville. Children: 
1. Robert Davis, deceased; 2. George Greer; 3. 
Huey Reynolds. Residence: Clio. 

LEE, SIDNEY W., business man; president 
of the Alabama grocery company. Residence: 
Birmingham. 

LEE, WILLIAM D., lawyer, was bom August 
18, 1833, in Perry County; son of David and 
Haran (Holmes) Lee, natives of North Caro- 
lina, the former who came to Perry County 
In 1818, remained one year and returned to 
North Carolina to be married, brought his wife 
back with him to Alabcona, and became one 
of the largest planters in the state; brother of 
Richard Henry Lee, a graduate of the Univer- 
sity ot Alabama, A. B. and A. M., a merchant 
at Mobile and a planter in Perry County, who 

Vol. IV— » 



was married in 1855 to Tabitha Jordan Curry, 
and died November 10, 1878. Mr. Lee was 
graduated from Howard college, 1852, and at- 
tended the law school of the University of Vir- 
ginia for two years. He was admitted to the 
bar in Perry County, 1865, and was practicing 
law at Marion at the time of the outbreak of 
the War of Secession. He enlisted in the C. S. 
Army as a private in the Eighth Alabama cav- 
alry, 1862, and served until the end of the war. 
He returned to Perry County, and engaged in 
planting on the old homestead until 1869, when 
he moved to a farm in Greensboro. He was 
appointed a member of the state board of in- 
spectors of convicts by Gov. O'Neal, March 1, 
1883, and was re-appointed at the end of two 
years for the succeeding four years. Married: 
in July, 1860, to Imogen, daughter of Matthew 
Hobson, a planter of Hale County. Residence: 
Greensboro. 

LEE, WILLIAM ITHAMBR, teacher, was 
born August 13, 1876, in Covington County; 
son of Samuel Asberry and Hulda (Deal) Lee 
of McKenzie, the former a Confederate soldier; 
grandson of Eli and Sarah (Piles) Lee, of Cov- 
ington County, and of George W. and Tabitha 
Deal, of Butler County. The Lees came from 
England and settled in South Carolina, later 
moving to Georgia and from there to Alabama. 
Mr. Lee received his education in the public 
schools of Butler County; in Creorgiana high 
school; and the State normal school, Troy. 
He began teaching in 1898; taught eleven years 
in the public schools of Butler, (Covington and 
Geneva Counties, and for nine years as princi- 
pal of the McKenzie public school; was mayor 
of McKenzie, 1912; and was elected to legis- 
lature from Butler County, 1918. He is a Demo- 
crat; a Methodist; and a Woodman of the 
World. Married: October 21, 1903, at McKenzie, 
to Ethel Estelle, daughter of James R. and Mit- 
tie Harper of McKenzie; granddaughter of Rob- 
ert Alexander and Susie (Purnell) Harper, and 
of John and Sarah (Sellers) McPherson. Chil- 
dren: 1. Mary Evelyn; 2. Hulda Madia. Resi- 
dence: McKenzie. 

LEE, WILLIAM LOVARD, lawyer, was bom 
April 17, 1873, at Clayton, Barbour County; 
son ot Alto Velo and Lillie (Lawrence) Lee 
(q. v.). He attended the public schools of 
Clayton, and the University of Alabama, 
graduating from the latter place in 1892. He 
read law in the office of Lee and Lee, Clayton, 
and began the practice of his profession at 
Columbia, in 1895. He served as city attorney, 
1897-1899; mayor, 1899-1903; and a representa- 
tive in the State legislature from Houston 
County, 1907. He is a Democrat, having served 
as a member of the executive committee of 
Henry County, 1896-1898, 1901-1903, as chair- 
man of the same, 1898-1899, and as a member 
and secretary of the executive committee of 
Houston County, 1903-1906. He is a Methodist; 
a Knight of Pythias; and a Mason. Married: 
in 1896, to Ellen, daughter of Peter P. and Ellen 
(Cassady) Thomas, of Lawrenceville, the 
former a Confederate soldier. Children: 1. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



William Lovard, jr.; 2. Wallace Thomas; 3. 
Eloise. Residence: Columbia. 

LEEDT, WILLIAM BIBB, real estate and 
insurance man, was born December 25, 1846, 
at Aberdeen, Monroe County, Miss.; son of 
Lorenzo Dow and Sarah Ann (Bibbs) Leedy, 
who were married and lived in HuntsviUe, the 
former a native of Abingdon, Va., born Febru- 
ary 22, 1816, who lived at that place until he 
was eighteen years of age, when he moved to 
Alabama and located at HuntsviUe, the latter 
a native of Madison County, born in 1818; 
grandson of James Leedy, a teacher and farm- 
er, who lived at or near Abingdon, Va., and 
of William and Sarah (Qarrett) Bibb, of Hunts- 
viUe, the former a Virginian, bom in 1783, 
in Goochland County, who died and was buried 
in HuntsviUe, 1883, the latter also a native 
of Virginia, bom In 1785, in Amherst County, 
who died and was buried in HuntsviUe, 1839; 
great-grandson of James and Elizabeth (Bibb) 
Bibb, cousins, and William and Ann (George) 
Ckirrett, the former a native of Amherst Coun- 
ty, Va., who moved to Nashville, and fought 
in the Revolutionary War, first enlisting as 
a private, then entering the artillery service. 
Mr. Leedy was reared and educated at Aber- 
deen, Miss., until, on account of the death of 
his mother in 1851, and of his father in 1862, 
he went to live with his mother's people at 
HuntsviUe. At that time HuntsviUe was occu- 
pied by Federal troops, and Mr. Leedy, with 
several of his boy friends and schoolmates ac- 
cepted a position as clerk under a quartermas- 
ter in the U. S. army, on condition that he 
should not be required to take the oath of 
allegiance. When the troops were withdrawn 
previous to Hood's advance in Tennessee, in 
November, 1864, Mr. Leedy took part in the 
immediate organization of a cavalry company 
for the C. S. Army. His company was mustered 
in as CU>. I, Fourth Alabama cavalry, Russell's 
regiment, Forrest's command, and he became 
second sergeant of the company. In the first 
fight in which he took part, on Hood's retreat 
to the Tennessee River, he and a number of his 
comrades were captured and imprisoned at 
NashviUe. When the fact that he had held a 
clerical position under the Federal quarter- 
master at HuntsviUe was discovered, he and 
eighteen others, similarly situated, were 
charged as spies and tried before a "drum 
head" court martial. They were offered the 
choice of taking the oath of allegiance and 
going north until after the surrender, or of be- 
ing convicted and sentenced to death. Before 
the sentence could be carried into effect, Qen. 
Forrest sent an officer to Nashville under the 
fiag of truce with the warning that he should 
hang a Federal officer for every one of the nine- 
teen that were executed. Proceedings were 
stayed until the matter was brought before 
President Lincoln, who gave orders which re- 
sulted in the exchange of the nineteen for Fed- 
eral prisoners in Libby prison. Sergt Leedy 
obtained his freedom at Richmond, March, 1865, 
and was on a sixty day furlough at the time of 
Lee's surrender. He gave himself up at Meri- 
dian, Miss.; was paroled, and given transporta- 
tion to HuntsviUe. He became a pharmacist 



at Memphis, T^n., 1866-1870, attending a col- 
lege of pharmacy at Philadelphia, Pa., 1868- 
1869. He entered the banking business at 
HuntsviUe in 1870; became a partner of W. R. 
Risen and company, bankers, 1876-1887; moved 
to Birmini^m in 1887, and became a dealer in 
real estate' and insurance. He is a member of 
W. J. Hardee camp. United Confederate Vet- 
erans; and has been a colonel on the staff of 
Cen. Ceorge P. Harrison, and of Creorge B. 
Cordon, S. D. Lee, Clement Evans Cordon, and 
Bennett H. Toung. He is a Democrat; a Pres- 
byterian; and an Elk. Married: September 18, 
1873, at Memphis, Tenn., to Kate Stratton, 
who died June 9, 1914; daughter of John 
Thomas and Emma (Ferguson) Stratton, of 
Memphis, natives, respectively, of Franklin, 
Ky., and Brownsville, Tenn.; granddaughter of 
Henry and Margaret (Raybum) Stratton, Vir- 
ginians, who moved from their native state to 
Franklin, Ky., then to Holly Springs, Miss., and 
finally to Memphis, Tenn., and of James Butler 
and Eliza (Qibbs) Ferguson, natives, respect- 
ively, of Belfast, Ireland, and Wilmington, N. C. 
Children: 1. John Stratton, unmarried; 2. Wil- 
liam Bibb, Jr., m. Mabel Roy, Birmingham, 
child, Katherine Leedy; 3. Emma Stratton, m. 
I. F. Young, Birmingham, child, Kate Leedy. 
Residence: Birmingham. 

LEEPER, JAMES THEOPHILUS, Judge, was 
born September 23, 1832, at Moulton, Lawrence 
County; son of Samuel and Elanora (Stone) 
Leeper, the former bom in Georgia in 1800, was 
taken to Tennessee in 1809, and came to Ala- 
bama in 1821, settling in Lawrence County, 
was merchant in early life, later studying law, 
and twice representing Shelby County in the 
legislature, and died in 1871. In the extreme 
youth of James T. Leeper, his parents moved to 
Talladega County, where he received a common 
school education. In 1848, young Leeper moved 
to Shelby County, but in 1850, returned to Tal- 
ladega to be employed as clerk in the probate 
office, a position he held for a year and a half. 
Coming again to Shelby, he was employed in 
the same capacity. In 1864, he was admitted to 
the bar. In 1855, he assisted M. H. Cruick- 
shank, register in chancery for Talladega, with 
the duties of his office. The next year he was 
himself appointed register for Shelby County 
by Chancellor James B. Clark, of Eutaw. In 
connection with his duties as register, he en- 
tered upon the practice of law, in co-partner- 
ship with his father. He was elected a member 
of what is known as the "Parson's Convention" 
of 1865. In 1865, he was appointed solicitor for 
his circuit by Cov. Parsons; in 1866, formed a 
partnership with Mr. Lewis; two years later, 
was appointed register in chancery for the dis- 
trict of three counties, Jefferson, St. Clair and 
Shelby, by Chancellor Woods, afterward asso- 
ciate Justice of the supreme court of the United 
States. The year folowing, 1869, he was ap- 
pointed Judge of probate for Shelby County by 
Gov. W. H. Smith. He held that and other im- 
portant offices continuously for the greater part 
of fifty years. He was a prohibitionist; a 
Presbyterian; a Mason; and Odd Fellow. Mar- 
ried: November 1. 1867. to Antoinette M. Bandy. 
Children: 1. Samuel B.; 2. James T., attorney 



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DR. JOHN H. PHILLIPS 



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DICTIONARY OF ATiABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1085 



at Columbiana; 3. Olive, m. Frank Nelson (tf 
BirmtDshani ; 4. Ct&arles Stone» banker of 
Birmingham; 5. Lacile, m. Andrew Qrlzsard 
Patterson, of Falkrllle. Last residence: Shelby 
County. 

LiEFTWICH, JABEZ, representative in con- 
gress, bom 1762, was a native of Bedford 
County, Va.; educated in the common sdiools; 
colonel of a regiment in the War of 1812; and 
a representative in congress from that State, 
1821-26. He removed to Madison County, about 
1827, and represented that county in the gen- 
eral assembly, 1836 and 1836. He died in 1865 
and left numerous descendants in the State. 
Last residence: Madison County. 

LEGRAND, MH^TON PAUL, physician, busi- 
ness man, was bom November 10, 1832, at 
Wadesboro, N. C, and died September 22, 1898, 
in Montgomery; son of William C. and Jane 
(Paul) LeGrand, natives of North Carolina, of 
Huguenot and English ancestry, respectively, 

who came to Alabama in 1887, and settled atJDemocratio executive committee for twenty- 

f^ seven years; is a trustee and steward in the 



Virginia Goldthwaite, daughter of Robert W. 
and Annie (Paul) Goldthwaite (q. v.), of Mont- 
gomery; 2. William Homer, planter, b. June 16, 
1871, attended the University of Alabama, m. 
Kate Elsberry, Montgomery; 3. Eloise, d. in 
1900, m. J. Craig Smith (q. v.), formerly state 
treasurer. Last residence: Montgomery. 

LEGR^NDB, JOHN C, president of the med- 
ical association of Alabama, 1900. 

LEIGH, JOHN DAVID, lawyer, circuit Judge, 
was bom June 26. 1872, at Pollard, Escambia 
County; son of Norvelle Robertson and Cath- 
erine (Burnett) Leigh (q. v.). He was edu- 
cated at Brewton collegiate institute, and was 
graduated from the law school of the Univer- 
sity of Alabama, 1894. He entered the practice 
of law at Brewton, July 21, 1894; has acted as 
solicitor for fourteen years; and is now Judge 
of the twenty-first Judicial circuit composed of 
the counties of Monroe, Conecuh, Escambia and 
Baldwin. He has been county chairman of the 



Tuskegee where they spent the remainder ol 
their lives, the former dying in 1839, and the 
latter in 1842. He received his early educa- 
tion at Tuskegee, and as a preliminary step 
toward preparing himself for the medical pro- 
fession, entered a drug store at Marion. At 
the end of four years, he returned to Tuskegee 
and opened a drug store on his own account. 
He conducted that store for about three years, 
then opened a similar business in Montgomery 
on a much larger scale. His failing health 
caused him to give up the drug business, and 
after a rest of a year or two, he entered the 
grocery and dry goods business, and built up 
the largest trade in that line that Montgom- 
ery had ever possessed. He continued in that 
business until 1882. He was one of the organ- 
isers of the Montgomery and Florida railroad 
company, and was elected its president in 1881. 
In Jtme, 1886, finding other business affairs 
too pressing, he declined re-election to the 
presidency, and was made vice president of 
the company. On the organization of the Com- 
mercial fire insurance company in 1876, Mr. 
LeGrand was made president In 1889. he or- 
ganized the Bank of Montgomery, which he 
conducted until his death. He had served for 
two years in the C. S. Army, having retired 
from active service because of his physical con- 
dition. Married: in Febraary, 1864, at Tusca- 
loosa, Louisa Jones, who died August 21, 1891, 
daughter of Dr. Brastus W. Jones, of Tusca- 
loosa. Children: 1. Milton Paul, b. March 26, 
1861, at Tuscaloosa, d. in August, 1918, at his 
summer home on Perdido Bay, was graduated 
from Vanderbilt university, B. S., 1883, and 
from the University of Alabama, LL. B., 1894, 
b^an the practice of law with Horace String- 
fellow in the firm of Stringfellow and LeGrand, 
became president of the Bank of Montgomery 
on the death of his father, and held that posi- 
tion until 1900, when that bank and the Mer- 
chants and planters bank were consolidated, be- 
came vice-president of the resulting Merchants 
and planters bank, was on Gov. Jones' staff for 
four years, and on Gov. Seay*s staff four years, 
occupying the position of Judge advocate gen* 



Methodist Bpiscopal church. South; and a 
Knight of Pythias. Married: February 26, 

1908, at Brewton, to Mabel, daughter of 
William and Florence Crook, who lived at 
that place. Children: 1. Catherine Burnett, b. 

1909. Residence: Brewton. 

LBIGH, NORVELLB ROBERTSON, lawyer, 
circuit judge, was bom May 31, 1886, at Brook- 
lyn, Conecuh County; son of John David and 
Nancy (Robertson) Leigh, who lived at Wil- 
liamsburg, Covington County, Miss., the for- 
mer a native of Virginia, who moved with his 
father to Savannah, Gfu, when a boy, and 
moved to Brooklyn, Ccmecuh County, in 1820, 
became a farmer and merchant, and died De- 
cember 28, 1848; grandson of Norvelle Rob- 
ertson a native of Georgia, of Scotch descent, 
a Baptist minister, who lived in Mississippi 
and preached the gospel for seventy-two years, 
and died in 1867, at the age of ninety-four 
years. On his father's side, his ancestors were 
Scotch-Irish immigrants who settled in Vir- 
ginia in colonial days. He was educated in 
the common schools of Conecuh County, and 
when he was fifteen years of age became a 
clerk in the mercantile house of Charles Willi- 
ford, at Quitman, Miss., remaining with that 
concern until 1865. During the latter year, he 
went to Milton, Fla., and became a clerk in a 
store owned by his brother. In 1857, he pur- 
chased his brother's stock and followed the 
general mercantile business until the beginning 
of the War of Secession. He entered the C S. 
Army as second lieutenant of a company of 
mounted rangers, and on the reorganisation of 
the company eight months later, was chosen 
captain of Co. E, Fifteenth regiment of cavalry, 
and commanded that company until the dose, of 
the war. For some time after the war, he en- 
gaged in farming in Conecuh County, but in 
1867, entered the mercantile and timber busi- 
ness at Pollard, Escambia County, and con- 
tinued in that business until 1879. He was 
elected probate judge of Escambia County in 



eral of state troops^ m. April 27, 1893, to Mary i^880, and was subsequently re-elected until he 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



had held the position for twenty-four succes- 
sive yea^s. He is a Democrat, a Baptist and a 
Mason. Married: ^arch 31, 1864, at Belleville, 
Conecuh County, to Catherine, daughter 
of John H. and Margarett (Donald) Bur- 
nett, who lived at that place. Children: 1. 
Maggie, m. David M. Hand, Birmingham; 2. 
Katie, m. E. S. McMillan, merchant, Brewton; 
3..Norvelle Robertson, Jr., b. July 23, 1870. was 
graduated from the University of Alabama, 
LLi.B., lawyer at Brewton, member of the con- 
stitutional convention of 1901; 4. John David, 
(q. v.). Residence: Brewton. 

LEIGH, WILLIAM, Baptist minister, was 
born October 4, 1790, in Amelia County, Va., 
and died July 31, 1873, at Florence. He pre- 
sided as moderator over the Sandy Creek Bap- 
tist church, Amelia County, Va., in his seven- 
teenth year; was licensed to preach, August 5, 
1810; and was ordained to the gospel ministry 
by a presbytery, June 16, 1821. He was a min- 
ister for sixty-three years and an ordained min- 
ister for fifty-two years. At the meeting of the 

. Muscle shoals association in 1823, Elder Leigh, 
w^o had recently moved to Alabama, proposed 
that the association advise the churches to take 
into conslderati<« the aubject of missions, with- 
in the bounds of the association. His proposi- 
tion was. rejected by the churches, though the 

' association that ye$ir . appointed four mission- 
aries. He continued his efforts to infuse a mis- 
sionary spirit among the Baptists of northern 
Alabama, - and through his influence a mission- 
ary > society was organized in Carmel church of 
which he was a member, June, 1824. The 
society met with much opposition, even up to 
1846, when the association by its action became 
a missionary body. He advocated and secured 
the organization of a missionary society which 
met at the same time and place of the associa- 
tion. He was clerk of the association in 1839; 
moved to Kentucky in 1849, and remained there 
four years; returned to Alabama in 1854, and 
resided in Moulton until 1856; moved to Flor- 
ence and lived there until his death. He was 
the Whig candidate for the State legislature 
from Franklin . County in 1840, but was de- 
feated. He had no charge of churches previous 
to his death, but preached occasionally. He 
was buried with Masonic honors at the grave- 
yard near Leighton, which place takes its name 
from him. He was grand master of the grand 
lodge of Masons of Alabama in 1834, and was 
author of a work on Masonry entitled *The 
Ladies' Masonry or Hieroglyphic Monitor, con- 
taining all the emblems explained in the de- 
grees of the Holy Virgin and Heroine of Jerico 
duly arranged," published in 1851. He was 
twice married, but the names of his wives are 
unavailable. He had several children by his 
first wife. One daughter was married to Elder 
Richard B. Burleson, and died in Moulton; and 
another married Mr. Ligon, son of Chancellor 
D..O. Ligop. L*ast residence: Florence. 

LEITH, MARTIN LUTHER, lawyer, was 

,born February 19, 1868, near Corona, Walker 

County; son of Michael Porter and Sissaline 

(Chilton) Leith, the former a native of Center- 

, ville, who lived at Carbon Hill, and was a- Con- 



federate soldier; grandson of George and 
Elizabeth (Branner) Leith, and of Richard and 
Sallie (Key) Chilton, all of whom came from 
Rockingham County, Va., to Jefferson County, 
Tenn., and later moved to Alabama, settling In 
Bibb County; great-grandson of Ebenezer 
Leith, a Baptist preacher, who came from Scot- 
land. Mr. Leith was educated in the common 
schools of Walker County; worked on a farm 
until he was nineteen years of age, after which 
he spent six years working in coal mines ; stud- 
ied law under Thomas L. Sowell; was admitted 
to the bar in December, 1897, in Walker Coun- 
ty; has continuously practiced law in that 
county; was elected to the State senate from 
the twelfth district in 1907-1911; and re-elected 
in 1919. He is a Democrat; a Metho- 
dist; and a Woodman of the World. Mar- 
ried: October 18, 1891, in Walker County, to 
Clelia, daughter of John K. and Mary 
(Johnson) Guthrie, of Townley, Walker County, 
the former a planter, and sheriff of Walker 
County during the War of Secession; grand- 
daughter of Robert Guthrie, a Baptist preacher, 
and a merchant. Children: 1. Carlos, deceased; 
2. Vera, m. Davlfl Erskine Moore; 3. Quinnie, 
m. Ralph Root; 4. Willie, m. Leo Edwards. 
Residence: Jasper. 

LENNARD, JOHN BORUM, planter, was 
bom January 1, 1807, on his father's plantation 
located on Kettle Creek, near Washington. Ga., 
and died December 6, 1870, at Woodland, Free- 
stone County, Tex.; son of John Borum and 
/Mary (Wood) Lennard, natives of Virginia, 
who after their marriage removed to Wilkes 
County, Ga.; grandson of Thomas and Nettie 
(Borum) Lennard, of Virginia, and of Capt. 
and Katherine (Price) Wood, natives at Vir- 
ginia, the former was either a captain oi^ 
colonel in the Revolutionary War, and was 
killed in battle, his widow. Katherine Price 
Wood, married again, and removed to Georgia, 
where she was celebrated during the war period 
for several acts of bravery, carrying important 
dispatches and molding bullets for Washing- 
ton's army. The Lennards are descended from 
French Huguenots who migrated to Virginia. 
The maternal lines are Scotch-Irish. John 
Borum Lennard received his educaticm at 
Washington, Ga., and after his father's death, 
which occurred when he was fourteen years of 
age, he entered the mercantile business. Upon 
suffering severe losses oy fire, he engaged in 
agriculture and left a valuable landed estate 
to his heirs. In 1847, he removed from Wash- 
ington. Ga., to Nixburg, Coosa County, but after 
the War of Secession located in Texas. He was 
a major of cavalry in the Florida Indian Wars, 
1833, his regiment being commanded by Col. 
Robert Toombs of Georgia. In 1861 he was a 
member of the Alabama Secession convention; 
a Whig in politics and opposed to the State's 
withdrawal from the Union, but finally yielded 
and voted with the majority for the inevitable. 
He was a Methodist; and Mason. Married: (1) 
December 2, 1829 to Sarah Frances, daughter of 
Joseph and Mrs. Anne (Grinnage) Beard Mar- 
shall, of Columbia County, Ga.; granddaughter 
of Levi Marshall; great-granddaughter of 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1037 



Daniel Marshall, a pioneer Baptist minister 
and closely related to Chief Justice John 
BCarshall, niece of Dr. Nathan Crawford, who 
was grandfather of Senator Charles Culberson 
of Texas, and also related to Gov. Crawford. W. 
H. Crawford, and Nathan Crawford Barrett, 
notable characters in Qeorgria's political his- 
tory; (2) April 14. 1836, to Jane Daniel, 
also of Georgia; (3) to Eliza Townsend of Ala- 
bama. Children: by the first marriage, 1. 
Joseph Marshall, graduate JefTerson medical 
ooll^, Philadelphia, surgeon in the Confeder- 
ate Army, Nizburg; 2. John Borum, III, planter, 
lieutenant. C. S. Army, m. L. A. Smith, daugh- 
ter of Alexander Smith of Coosa County, a 
member Alabama legislature before the War of 
Secession, resided at Alexander City; by the 
second marriage, 3. Mary Ann, m. Alexander 
Kendrick; 4. William Daniel, died of fever in 
Virginia as a Confederate soldier; 6. Eliza J., 
m. A. M. Kendrick; 6. Thomas C, killed at the 
battle of South Mountain, fighting with the Con- 
federates; 7. Sarah, m. John A. Smith; by the 
third marriage, 8. Kate E., m. M. H. Harris, 
Freestone County, Texas; 9. Alice L., m. W. P. 
Oden, Sylacauga; 10. Ellen, m. A. J. Oden, 
Sylacauga. Last residence: Woodland, Texas. 

LENTZ, HENRY, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 81, and a resident of Lime- 
stone County; private and sergeant N. C. Mili- 
tia; enrolled on June 14, 1833, under act of 
Congress of June 7, 1832, pajrment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance. |59.33; sums 
received to date of publication of list, 1148.32. 
— Revolutionary Pennon Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. 
doc 614, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

LESESNE, JOSEPH WHITE, lawyer, chan- 
cellor, was bom in 1811, in Georgetown, S. C. 
and was drowned by the upsetting of a sail- 
boat in Mobile Bay. October 15. 1866, while 
crossing from his residence at Point Clear; son 
of John Lesesne; grandson of Daniel and Mary 
(Simons) Lesesne. His family was of Hugue- 
nx>t extraction, being descended on the paternal 
side from Isaac Lesesne, the founder of the 
family in South Carolina, who emigrated to 
America in 1679, and on the maternal side from 
Benjamin Simons, a Huguenot, who was a 
member of the assembly in 1761. The Simons 
family is prominent and widely connected in 
South Carolina His great-grandmother was 
Mary Esther DuPr6, whose family were Hugue- 
nots of noble extraction. One of his Lesesne 
ancestors was a captain under Gen. Francis 
Marion in the Revolution. He received his 
education chiefly in and around New Haven, 
Conn., and attended Yale college when he was 
seventeen years old. He left Yale with Andrew 
P. Calhoun and others who refused to inform 
upon a fellow student, and entered the South 
Carolina college, at Columbia, where he was 
graduated with first honors, 1832. He then 
engaged in politics; wrote for the "Columbia 
Telescope," a Nullification paper; and became 
co-editor of that paper. He went to Yorkville, 
S. C, in December, 1834, and read and prac- 
ticed law for one year, then moved to Mobile 
where he spent the remainder of his life. He 



was associated in the practice of law in Mobile 
with John Forsyth and William D. Dunn, and 
soon took high rank at the bar. He was ap- 
pointed by Gov. Fitzpatrick as commissioner to 
make the annual examination into the affairs 
and condition of the Branch bank of Alabama, 
at Mobile; and on the death of Chancellor 
Crenshaw, in 1847, was appointed chancellor of 
the southern division by Gov. Martin. The 
legislature elected him to that position for a 
term of six years, over Hon. Francis Bugbee, 
of Montgomery, and he filled the office during 
that time. During the heated controversies of 
1866-1866, he assisted in the political guidance 
of the "Register," and acquired considerable 
reputation as a political writer. He was a 
Democrat of the Calhoun school. Married: 
December, 1834, to Miss Cooper, a daughter of 
President Thomas Cooper, of South Carolina 
college. His eldest son was drowned with him, 
but another son, a member of the capsized 
party, was rescued. Henry Deas Lesesne, who 
was connected with the Alabama steel works, 
at Mobile, in 1900, is a grandson. Last resi- 
dence: Mobile. 

LESLIE, WILLIAM PERRY, lawyer, was 
bom in 1819, in Monroe County, and died Octo- 
ber 10, 1867, at Pascagoula, Miss. He was a 
brother of Judge John W. Leslie, who was bom 
May 11, 1814, in Pendleton District, S. C. and 
died September 10, 1897, in MonroeviUe, who 
was judge of probate of Monroe County, and 
occupied other prominent positions in the pub- 
lic affairs of the county. His father was a 
planter. He was reared on a farm until he was 
eighteen years of age, then became clerk in a 
store for two years. He moved to Claiborne 
and read law in the office of A. B. Cooper for 
about two years, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1840 or 1841. He practiced law in Sparta in 
partnership with W. B. H. Howard for several 
years, then returned to Claiborne in the spring 
of 1843, and formed a partnership with Mr. 
Cooper which lasted until 1860, when Mr. Cooper 
moved to Wilcox County. At that time he 
formed a partnership with Judge R. C. Torrey, 
and remained in that association until 1861. 
In 1861, he was elected to the State senate from 
the district composed of Monroe, Covington and 
Conecuh Counties. He was a Union man and 
opposed to secession, but after war was 
actually in force, he raised a company of artil- 
lery, principally from Monroe County, in the 
fall of 1861, and volunteered as a private. He 
was assigned to a second lieutenancy, and re- 
mained in service until some time in 1868, 
when he was relieved because of ill-health. At 
the close of the war, he sold his property in 
Monroe County and in 1866 moved to East Pas- 
cagoula, Miss., and erected on the bay a large 
steam saw and planing mill. He was also 
founder of several industrial establishments at 
Claiborne. On a visit to Mobile on business in 
October, 1867, he contracted the yellow fever 
and soon after died. Married : in April, 1847, to 
Miss Agee, daughter of W. A. Agee of Monroe 
County, and sister of Hon. N. A. Agee. He had 
six children. Last residence: Pascagoula, Miss. 

LESTER, JOHN HENRY, business man, was 
born July 9, 1873, near Attalla; son of James H. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



and Elizabeth G. (Cox) Lester, the former a 
phsTBlcian in and around Crudup» the latter who 
was born near Attalla; grandson of James Madi- 
son and Elizabeth (Goodwin) Lester, who 
moved to Rome, Ga., and from there to Colum- 
bus, Ga., and of Thomas and Mary Anne (Boyd) 
Cox, the former of whom was bom in East Ten- 
nessee and came to Alabama when about six 
years old, the latter a native of Talladesra 
(bounty; great-grandson of Edward Cox, who 
served with distinction in the Revolutionary 
War. He received a common school education 
and at the age of seventeen entered the Bank 
of Attalla as collection clerk. He was promoted 
to bookkeeper, teller, and in 1895 to cashier, 
and is also one of the stockholders and direc- 
tors in the bank. He is a stockholder and 
director in the wholesale firm of B. B. S. gro- 
cery company at Attalla; and, in partnership 
with T. C. Banks, owns the Attalla manufactur- 
ing company. He served as city treasurer, 
189&-1903; is a Democrat; and a Methodist 
Married: April 17, 1901, to Jack J. Jolly, of 
Birmingham, daughter of CoL Jack Jolly, a 
lawyer of Birmingham, who was a colonel in 
the C. S. Army during the War of Secession. 
Children: 1. Jewell H. Residence: Attalla. 

LETCHER, JOHN TALBERT, lawyer and 
city commissioner of Montgomery, was bom 
December 2, 1881, at Shorter, Macon County, 
and died May 7, 1916, in Montgomery; son of 
Dr. Francis Marion and Claudia (Caroline 
(Howard) Letcher, the former a native of 
Pish Pond, Coosa County, who lived later at 
Central Institute, Elmore County, in New Or- 
leans, La. and Montgomery, the former a sur- 
geon in C. S. Army; grandson of John David 
and Ann Matilda (Bozeman) Letcher of El- 
more County, and William John and Ann Fle- 
wellen (Billingslea) Howard of Shorter; great- 
grandson of Giles and Agnes (Talbert) Letcher, 
the former a native of Edgefield District, S. C, 
who located in Alabama in early boyhood, and 
of James and Elizabeth (Slatter) Billingslea 
of Jones County, Ga.; great-great-grandson of 
Joseph Letcher, of John and Louisa (Stoner) 
Howard, and of James and Mary (Smith) Bil- 
lingslea of Wilkes County, Q&.; great-great- 
great-grandson of Rhesa and Hanna (Few) 
Howard, the latter a relative of William Few, 
signer of the Constitution from (Georgia, of 
Peter and Mary (Miner) Stoner of Virginia, 
and of Solomon and Nancy (Flewellen) Slat- 
ter; great-great-great-great-grandson of Joel and 
Frances (Bastin) Slatter of North Carolina, 
and great-great-great-great-great-grandson of 
William Flewellen and wife who was a Miss 
Branch. He received his elementary educa- 
tion in the public schools of Shorter and 
Cross Keys; was graduated from the Ala- 
bama polytechnic institute, B. S., 1901, M. S., 
1902. He was master of Sewanee gram- 
mar school, 1902-03. In 1903 he was admitted 
to the bar, .and at once began the practice in 
Montgomery. He was elected alderman of 
Montgomery in October, 1909, and served until 
April, 1911; was appointed in May of that year 
city commissioner. He was a Democrat; a 
Baptist; a Red Man; Knight of Pythias; Ma- 
son; and member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity. 



Married: September 7, 1911, at Ckidsden, to 
Lillian, daughter of William Thomas and Hat- 
tie Elizabeth (Hamrick) McCord of that place. 
Children: 1. Talbert, daughter. Last residence: 
Montgomery. 

LETCHER, MARION, U. S. consular ofBcial, a 
native and for a number of years a resident of 
Alabama, was bom in Macon County, September 
6, 1872; son of Dr. Francis Marion and Claudia 
Caroline (Howard) Letcher, and a brother of 
John Talbert Letcher (q. v.). He graduated 
from the University of Alabama, A. B., 1894; 
taught at Hamner Hall, 1896-97; was principal 
Seale high school, 1897-98; 1st lieutenant Co., A» 
Fifth U. S. infantry regiment (Immunes), Span- 
ish-American war, 1898; president Douglassville 
college, Ga., 1900-01; employed in U. S. Bureau 
of education, Washington, 1908-09; consul at 
Acapulco, Mex., 1909-11, Chihuahua, 1911-16; 
acting foreign trade adviser, department of 
state, Washington, since June 10, 1916; ap- 
pointed consul general, April 16, 1917; rendered 
valuable aid to (Jen. Pershing during the puni- 
tive expeditions of 1916-17. He is a member of 
the Sigma Nu college fraternity; a Democrat; 
and an Episcopalian. Married: November 7, 
1901, to Marilu Ingram, of Coweta County, Ga. 
Residence: Chevy Chaae, Md. 

LETSON. JESSE WALTER, teacher, was 
bom March 26, 1873, at Adger, JefTerson (boun- 
ty; son of Andrew Jackson and Mattie Frances 
(Jones) Letson, the former a native of Griffin, 
Spalding County, Ga., who lived in JefTerson 
County; grandson of Dr. W. T. and Susan Let- 
son, of Old Jonesboro, the former of German 
descent, and of Nathan and Winnie Jones, of 
McC!alla. He received his early Bchoolinf at 
McCalla; attended Howard college, 1896-1897; 
and summer sessions at the State university, 
at Knoxville, Tenn., and Valparaiso, Ind.; final- 
ly graduating, B. S., in 1911. He began the 
work of a public school teacher in a rural school 
in Fayette County, 1891; and has taught in 
Fayette, Shelby, Jefferson, and Walker Coun- 
ties. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; and an 
Odd Fellow. Married: June 80, 1897, at Silu- 
ria, to Emma Eugenia, daughter of Wil- 
liam Caples and Sarah Emma Benton, of 
that place. Children: 1. Neilmore Hobson; 2. 
Eunice Thelma; 8. Elsie May; 4. Vivian Dora; 
6. Jesse Walter, jr. Residence: Jasper. 

LETSON, WILLIAM PALESTINE, teacher^ 
was born December 4, 1870, at Falls City, Wins- 
ton County; son of William Henry and Susan 
£2miline (Steward) Letson, the former who 
was born in Fredonia, Chambers County, lived 
at Mountain Home, Sparta, South Lowell, and 
Glen Allen; grandson of (George John and 
Nancy (Martin) Letson, of Fredonia, the 
former a (Jeorgrian, who came to Alabama about 
1840, and lived in Chambers and Lawrence 
Counties, who served in the C. S. Army with 
Gen. Lee in all of his campaigns from the first 
of the War of Secession until the surrender at 
Appomattox, and of Manly Palestine and Susan 
Steward, of Jasper. The Letson family came 
from Holland to South Carolina, and the great- 



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grandfather Letson served in the Revolution. 
Mr. Letson was educated in the common schools 
and the Glen Allen school. He began to teach 
at Poplar Springs, In 1888, and since that time 
has been teaching in Marion and Fayette Coun- 
ties. He served as county superintendent of 
education, 1898-1900; and represented Marion 
County in the State legislature, 1911. He is 
a Democrat; a Methodist; a Mason; and an Odd 
Fellow. Blarried: March 29, 1903, at Stricklin, 
Marion County, to Martha Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Rev. Andrew Jackson and Nancy 
Jane McWhirter, of that place, the for- 
mer of Irish descent; great-granddaughter 
of Archibald Whitehead, who was with Qen. 
Jackson in the Creek War, 1813. Children: 1. 
Lorens Hearsh; 2. Lothair Everett; 3. Burwell 
Braxton; 4. Kermlt. Residence: Qlen Allen. 

LEVERT, ENGENE V., grand niaster, grand 
council. Masons, 1866-67. 

LEVERT, OCTAVIA (WALTON) author, was 
born in 1810, at "Bellevue," near Augusta, Ga., 
and died March 13, 1877, at that place; daugh- 
ter of George and Sally Minge (Walker) Wal- 
ton, the former a native of Georgia, who re- 
moved to Pensacola, Fla., was territorial secre- 
tary under Gen. Andrew Jackson, at one time 
acting governor, removed to Alabama and was 
mayor of Mobile, 1837-39; granddaughter of 
George and Dorothy (Chamber) Walton, the 
former a native of Prince Edward County, Va., 
was apprenticed to learn the trade of carpen- 
ter, studying at night, removed to Georgia at 
end of apprenticeship in 1769, studied law, 
admitted to the bar in 1774, practiced in 
Augusta, secretary of the provincial congress 
in 1774, member of committee of safety, member 
council of safety, served several terms in State 
legislature, delegate to continental congress, 
1776-81, signer of Declaration of Independence, 
soldier in Revolutionary War, captured at 
Savannah, governor at Cteorgla, 1779-81, chief 
justice of Georgia, 1773-86, elected a delegate 
to the federal constitution convention in 1787, 
but declined, governor in 1789, chief justice in 
1793, appointed to the United States senate to 
fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of 
James Jackson, serving from November 16, 1795, 
to February, 1796, commissioner to treat with 
the Indians at Easton, Pa., and to negotiate a 
treaty with the Cherokees in Tennessee, and 
judge of the middle circuit of Georgia, whose 
silver garter buckles are preserved in the Ala- 
bama State department of archives and his- 
tory, his wife the daughter of Mr. Chamber, an 
Englishman of Georgia who returned to Eng- 
land at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War; 
and of George and Eliza (Talbot) Walker; 
great-granddaughter of John and Mary (Mose- 
ley) Talbot, the former a native of Amelia 
County, Va., member of the house of burgesses, 
one of the signers of the Williamsburg declara- 
tion of independence, June 4, 1774, removed to 
Georgia in 1783, served several times as mem- 
ber of the state legislature, died in Wilkes 
County, Ga., brother of Ck)v. Matthew Talbot, of 
Georgia; great-great-granddaughter of Matthew 
and Annie (Williston) Talbot, the former a na- 
tive of Ireland, whose people by lineage were 



from Castle Talbot, Ireland, and descendants of 
the Earl of Shrewsbury, who emigrated to 
America, located in Maryland, later removing 
to Virginia, and residing at different times in 
Amelia, Prince George, Lunenburg, Charlotte 
and Bedford Counties, Va., and of Col. William 
Moseley, of Princess Anne County, Va. Madame 
LeVert received her education from her grand- 
mother, mother, and an old Scotch tutor. At 
the age of twelve she spoke fluently French, 
Italian and Spanish and conversed in French 
with Lafayette upon his visit to Pensacola. 
She also christened the new capital of Florida 
"Tallahassee." She spent 1833-34 in a tour of 
the United States and everywhere was received 
with enthusiasm. In 1835 she moved to Mobile 
with her parents and spent the years 1853-64, 
and 1855 in Europe. Up to that time she was 
the only American who obtained access to the 
better circles of European society and in 1855 
she was an otDcially accredited representative 
from Alabama to the Paris exposition. She met 
such interesting people as the Brownings, Na- 
poleon III, Empress Eugenie, Pope Pius IX, 
Harriet Hosmer, Crawford Ives, Lamartine and 
others; in America she numbered among her 
personal friends such distinguished citizens as 
Washington Irving, Edwin Booth, Henry W. 
Longfellow, Henry Clay, MUlard Fillmore, N. P. 
Willis, Jefferson Davis, Daniel Webster, Alexan- 
der H. Stephens, Robert Toombs and John C. 
Calhoun. She was one of the originators of 
the plan of the American women to preserve 
Mount Vernon and was for years vice-regent for 
Alabama of the Mount Vernon association. Al- 
though opposed to secession she remained in 
Mobile throughout that period and did all in 
her power to alleviate the sufferings of South- 
ern soldiers. In 1865 she and her daughters 
made a last visit to New York and Washington. 
She appeared for a time in 1874 as a public 
reader and later returned to her old home near 
Augusta, Ga. Author: "Souvenirs of travel," 
1857. Married: in 1836, in Mobile, to Dr. Henry 
Strachey LeVert, son of Dr. Claude LeVert, fleet 
surgeon to Rochambeau, and wife, a Miss Met- 
calf, of Virginia, niece of Admiral Edward Ver- 
non, under whom Lawrence Washington served 
at the battle of Carthagena and in whose honor 
he later named his home, "Mount Vernon." 
Children: 1. Octavla, d. unmarried; 2. Annette, 
m. Regyle Reab, of Augusta, Ga. A son and 
daughter died in infancy. Last residence: 
"Bellevue," near Augusta, Ga. 

LEVY, EDWARD S., rabbi, a resident of Ala- 
bama for some years, was bom February 6, 
1851, at Philadelphia, Pa., and died February 
26, 1914, at Fort Smith, Ark. He received his 
early education in the public schools and later 
attended the Hebrew educational school of 
Philadelphia, where he completed his classical 
education and a theological course. He became 
a teacher in the Hebrew orphan asylum in New 
York city, at the same time continuing the 
study of theology in preparation for the rabbi- 
nate. In 1877 he received his first call, it being 
to the congregation of Augusta, Ga.; and re- 
moved to Selma in 1887. After serving in 
Selma for twenty years removed to Fort Smith, 
Ark., and remained there until his death. He 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



was the author of many articles published in 
different periodicals. Married: (1) at Augrusta, 
Ga., to Frances, daufirhter of Moses and Elise 
(Schwartz) Goldsmith, of that place; (2) in 
1907, at the home of her sister in Selma, to 
Fanny, daughter of Simon and Elise Cohen of 
Montgomery. No children. Last residence: 
Fort Smith, Ark. 

LEWIS, AARON, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 76, and a resident of Clarke 
County; private S. C. Continental Line; en- 
rolled on April 20, 1833, under act of Congress 
of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 
4, 1831; annual allowance, 153.33; sums re- 
ceived to date of publication of list, |160. — 
Revolutionary PenHon Roll, in Vol. xiv, Sen. 
Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He re- 
sided in Pike County, June 1, 1840, aged 80. — 
Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149. 

LEWIS, AXIOM, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 75, resided in Clarke County, 
June 1, 1840, with William R. Hamilton.— 
Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149. 

LEWIS, B. E.. primitive Baptist preacher, 
was born January 12, 1830, in Montgomery 
County, and died September 27, 1900, in Mont- 
gomery County. He served in the War of Seces- 
sion in the C. S. Army, and joihed the Primitive 
Baptist church in the fall of 1866, at Bethlehem 
church, Montgomery County.. A few years later 
he was chosen deacon and was set apart to that 
office by Elder B. A. Waker and O. H. P. Cook. 
After serving the Bethlehem church for several 
years, he joined the Bethel church in Montgom- 
ery County, and served there as clerk and dea- 
con until his death. Married: December 20, 
1854, to Elizabeth J. Talley. Two sons and two 
daughters died in infancy and two of his daugh- 
ters are living. Last residence: Montgomery 
County. 

LEWIS BENJAMIN H., lawyer, was born 
February 4, 1885, nine miles east of Troy; 
son of Benjamin H. and Sarah (Hutchison) 
Lewis, the former who was born at Woodville, 
Pike County, resided at Henderson in the same 
county, where he died September 15, 1882, 
and the grandson of John and Sarah Lewis, 
who lived at Monticello, and of William and 
Barbary Hutchison, also of Monticello. Ben- 
jamin H. Lewis, jr., was educated in the old 
field schools of Pike County and in R. W. 
Pruet's Academy, at Troy. He read law under 
Hon. W. D. Roberts, at Elba; was admitted to 
the bar, May 12, 1882; practiced in Elba 
until February, 1883, when he moved to An- 
dalusia, where he has ever since resided in 
the practice of his profession; and was judge 
of the city court of Andalusia, 1907-1911. He 
is a Democrat; has served several times as 
chairman of the county executive committee, 
and often as a delegate to state conventions. 
He is a member of the Woodmen of the World. 
Married: Ella E., daughter of Dr. S. I. S. and 
Lizzie (Pynes) Cawthon, of Andalusia. Resi- 
dence: Andalusia. 

LEWIS, BURWELL BOYKIN, lawyer, rep- 
resentative in congress, president University of 



Alabama, was bom July 7, 1838, at Montgom- 
ery, and died October 11, 1885, at the University 
of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; son of Paul Hamilton 
and Elizabeth (Shortridge) Lewis (q. v.). He 
was left an orphan when quite young, and made 
his home with his uncle. Judge George Short- 
ridge, at Montevallo. He was prepared for col- 
lege in a private school, in Montevallo, taught 
by a Mr. Lewis; and was graduated from the 
University of Alabama, A. B., 1857, before com- 
pleting his nineteenth year. The honorary de- 
gree of LL. D. was conferred upon him by his 
alma mater in 1880. He studied law with Judge 
John Haralson in Selma, and commenced the 
practice of law in Shelby County with Col. John 
S. Storrs, of Montevallo. On the outbreak of 
the War of Secession, he helped organize a com- 
pany of cavalry for the C. S. Army and was 
offered the captaincy of the company but re- 
fused the po'sition. He became second lieuten- 
ant, and was soon promoted to first lieutenant 
The company was mustered in with the Second 
Alabama regiment of cavalry as Co. B, and 
served during the war in Alabama, Florida, 
Mississippi, Tennessee, Georgia, and the Caro- 
linas. Lieut. Lewis was, during the greater 
part of his service, in command of his company, 
and, often, of the battalion. At the end of the 
war, he resumed the practice of law at Shelby. 
After the death of Col. Storrs, he became at 
different times, the law partner of Judge J. T. 
Leiper of Columbiana, and of Gov. Rufus Cobb. 
He was elected to the State legislature from 
Shelby County in 1870, and was returned in 
1871. He moved to Tuscaloosa in 1872, and 
formed a partnership with Col. A. C. Hargrove, 
which continued until he retired from the pro- 
fession. He was elected to the U. S. congress 
in 1874 as a representative of the state at large, 
and was again elected in 1878, but resigned the 
office before the end of his term, in order to 
accept the presidency of the University of Ala- 
bama, and the professorship of constitutional 
and international law at that institution. He 
served in that capacity from July, 1880, until 
the time of his death. He was a Democratic 
presidential elector in 1868, and was very active 
in the reconstruction of the state after the war. 
He was a Methodist; a Mason; and was au- 
thor of numerous pamphlets on current topics. 
He was writing a book on political economy 
at the time of his death. 

Married: Januarv 21, 1860, at the University 
of Alabama, to Rose, daughter of Dr. Landon 
Cabell and Louisa Frances (Garland) Garland 
(q. v.), third cousins, the former of whom was 
at that time president of the University of Ala- 
bama, who later was president of the University 
of Mississippi, was one of the founders of the 
Vanderbilt university, and was first chancellor 
of that Institution, holding that position for 
more than twenty years until his death in 1895; 
granddaughter of David S. Garland, whose 
mother, Jane Meredith, was a niece of Patrick 
Henry. Both parents were descended from 
distinguished Virginia ancestry. Mrs. LeWis 
had thirteen cousins killed during the War of 
Secession. She is a former president and 
corresponding secretary of the Pelham chapter. 
United Daughters of the Confederacy, and a 
member of the Sumter chapter. Daughters of 



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ROBERT JEMISON, V 



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1013 



the American Reyolation. Children: 1. Eliza- 
heth, deceased, m. (1.) Louis L. Bradfleld, (2.) 
G. E. Morris; 2. Caroline Matilda, m. J. Alex- 
ander Montgomery, Birmingham; 3. Rose, m. 
Robert Eden Scott Rives, Birmingham; 4. 
Louise, artist, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, 
Qa.; 6. Nan Meem, was graduated from Van- 
derbilt university, B. A., Miller school, Va.; 6, 
Nellie Bryce, Birmingham; 7. Bertha Boykin, 
m. Hugh Barr Miller, Hazelhurst, Miss. Last 
residence: University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. 

LEWIS, DAVID PETER, lawyer, governor of 
Alabama, was bom in 1820, in Charlotte County, 
Va^ and died July 3, 1884, at HuntsviUe; son 
of Peter C. and Mary Smith (Buster) Lewis, 
of Virginia. His father was of Welsh and his 
mother of English ancestry. He moved to 
Madison County with his parents in childhood, 
and grew up there, receiving a college educa- 
tion. He studied law in Huntsville; was ad- 
mitted to the bar; and settled in Lawrence 
County where he bunt up a successful practice. 
He represented Lawrence County in the State 
constitutional convention of 1861, and voted 
against secession, but signed the secession ord- 
inance after it had been passed by the conven- 
tion. He was elected to the Confederate provis- 
ional congress at Montgomery by the conven- 
tion, but resigned his seat In 1863 he was 
appointed judge of the circuit court of Alabama 
by Gov. Shorter, and after holding the position 
for several months, passed through the army 
lines to Nashville, Tenn., where he remained 
until the close of the war. He returned to 
Alabama in 1865, and settled in Huntsville in 
the practice of his profession. He was elected 
governor of Alabama to succeed Gov. Lindsey^ 
by the Republican party, in 1872, and served 
until 1874. The turmoil of the reconstruction 
period had not yet subsided when he entered 
the office, and he was unfortunate in the period 
of his incumbency. He doubled the taxes on 
the people, and recognized a body of Republi- 
cans claiming to be legally elected, and since 
known in the history of the state as the "court- 
house legislature," and appealed to the military 
authorities, still dominant in Alabama, to up- 
hold his action. The matter was finally re- 
ferred to the attorney-general of the United 
States for settlement, and under his decision 
the Democrats had the majority. The Repub- 
licans, however, gained the ascendancy and 
secured a majority for the election of their 
chosen candidate, George E. Spencer, to the U. 
S. senate. The radical state officers under Gov. 
Lewis spent a total of about one hundred fifty- 
five thousand dollars more of the state money 
than the officers under the succeeding adminis- 
tration. After serving his term of office, Gov. 
Lewis resumed the practice of law in Hunts- 
ville. He was neter married. Last residence: 
Huntsville. 

LEWIS, DIXON HALL, lawyer, representa- 
tive in congress, U. S. senator, was bom August 
10, 1802, in Hancock County, Ga., and died in 
New York City, October 25, 1848; son of Francis 
and Mary Dixon (Hall) Lewis, the former a 
native of Dinwiddle County, Va., who moved 
with his parents to Hancock County, Ga., in 
his youth, and in 1818, moved with his 



family to Alabama and settled in Lowndes 
County; grandson of Francis Lewis who 
lived in Dinwiddle County, Va., and of Dixon 
and Anna (Hunt) Hall, who lived in Han- 
cock County, Cki., and in Montgomery Ck>unty, 
the former a soldier in the Revolution: 
great-grandson of John and Catherine (Croy) 
Lewis, of Belvoir, and of John and Anne (Boi- 
ling) Hall, the former a justice in colonial 
times, the latter a member of the Boiling and 
Randolph families. The Lewis family is of 
Welsh descent; the original emigrant, Robert 
Lewis, came with his wife ]6lizabeth from 
Graves End, England, in April, 1636. Mr. Lewis 
received his early education from Mount Zion 
academy, under the direction of Rev. Nathan 
S. S. Beeman, and was graduated from Co- 
lumbia college. South Carolina, 1822. He read 
law in the office of Judge Hitchcock in Cahaba; 
was admitted to the bar in 1823; and opened a 
law office in Montgomery in 1825. The follow- 
ing year he was elected to the State legislature 
from Montgomery County, and was reelected in 
1827 and 1828. He was a leading member in 
the counsels of the legislature, and in 1827 
made a report in the house on the relation and 
policy of the State toward the Indian tribes 
within its territorial limits, which established 
for him a high position as a legislator and ex- 
erted an influence in the removal of the remain- 
ing tribes from the state. Mr. Lewis was 
elected a representative in congress in 1829 
from southern Alabama, and was ag^Un elected 
in 1831, defeating Gov. Murphy of Monroe 
County. He was returned to congress in 1833, 
1835, 1837, and 1839, with little opposition, and 
during the latter year, during the contest for 
speakership which lasted three months, was 
seven times balloted for as the nominee of his 
party for the position, but was defeated by the 
faction of his party controlled by Senator Ben- 
ton. In 1841, he was elected to congress for the 
seventh time, that time on the general ticket 
with Hon. H. W. HiUiard of Montgomery as his 
opponent; and two years later defeated Hon. 
Henry C. Lee of Perry. He resigned in 1844, 
after a service of fifteen consecutive years in 
the house of representatives, in order to accept 
the appointment made by Gov. Fitzpatrick to 
the U. S. senate to fill the vacancy caused by 
the appointment of the Hon. William R. King 
to the court of France. His appointment was 
ratified the following December by the legisla- 
ture. In 1847, Mr. Lewis was reelected to the 
Federal senate over Hon. William R. King, who 
had become a candidate for his former seat, 
and Judge A. F. Hopkins, and was serving in 
that body at the time of his death. During his 
service in the national house of representatives, 
he was chairman of the committee on ways and 
means, and in the senate was chairman of the 
financial committee. His politics were of the 
extreme state-rights school, and he advocated 
nullification and secession. He was a trustee 
of the University of Alabama, 1828-1831. His 
death occurred while on a visit to New York 
City, and the city authorities arranged a public 
funeral. 

Married: March 11, 1823, in Autauga County, 
to Susan Elizabeth, daughter of Gen. John 
Archer Elmore (q. v.), a soldier in the Revolu- 
tion, who moved to Laurens District, S. C, and 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



served in the State legislature, married a Miss 
Martin, sister of Abram Martin of Montgomery, 
and moved to Autauga County In 1819, where 
he became a representative in the Alabama 
legislature; sister of BlrankElnaore, who suc- 
ceeded John C. Calhoun intEeTr. S. senate 
after the latter's death, but survived him only 
a few months, of John Elmore, a distinguished 
lawyer at the Montgomery bar, of Rush Elmore, 
appointed chief Justice of the territory of Kan- 
sas by Franlclin Pierce, of Wiliam A. Elmore, 
superintendent of the New Orleans mint during 
President Buchanan's administration, and of 
Col. H. M. Elmore, who commanded a Texas 
regiment in the C. S. Army, during the War of 
Secession.. Her eldest sister married Benjamin 
Fitzpatrick, who was^ three times governor of 
Alabama, and was U. S. senator at the time of 
secession. Mrs. Lewis moved from Alabama to 
Texas in 1854, with her surviving children. 
Children: 1. Laura Ann, m. Robert Lindsey 
Scott; 2. Francis Maxcy, served in the C. S. 
Army, War of Secession, m. Carrie Balcer; 3. 
John Archer, b. 1829, d. 1850; 4. Mary Susan, 
b. 1830, d. 1850; 5. Dixon Hall, b. February 3, 
1834, served as a captain in Emons regiment, C. 
S. Army, War of Secession, d. April, 1899, m. in 
1860, to Sarah Hill, of West Texas; 6. William 
Henry, killed in the battle of the Wilderness, 
1864; 7. Sarah Terry Fitzpatrick, b. 1838, d. 
1839. Last residence: Washington, D. C. and 
Lowndes County. 

LEWIS, J. N., Presbyterian minister, was 
a native of Pennsylvania, and died in Bag- 
dad, Fla. He was educated at Lafayette col- 
lege and Union seminary. He labored in 
Pennsylvania for eighteen years; removed to 
Virginia serving first as a colporteur and then 
as a minister, serving at Danville for six years. 
He moved to Alabama and served in Dallas 
County, later removing to Florida. Last resi- 
dence: Bagdad, Fla. 

LEWIS, JOSIAH, Methodist minister, presi- 
dent Southern university, was born May 4. 
1839, at Raytown, Talliaferro, Ga., and died 
January 13, 1885, at Sparta, Ga.; son of Josiah 
and Elizabeth (Moore) Lewis, sr., who lived at 
that place, the former a native of Siloam, Greene 
County, Ga., who lived at Sparta, Ga., and was 
a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
south; grandson of Walker and Mary (Graham) 
Lewis, who lived at Siloam, Green County, Ga., 
the latter a native of Mecklenburg County, N. 
C, and of Gen. John P. and Nancy .(Davis) 
Moore, who lived near Lincolnton, Ga.; great- 
grandson of J. H. Lewis, who was born either 
in Mecklenburg or Dinwiddle County, Va., and 
who lived in both counties. He attended vari- 
ous common schools where his father was 
stationed, and was graduated from Emory col- 
lege with first honors, A. B., 1859, and A. M., 
1862. He studied law and was admitted to the 
bar, but never practiced the profession. He 
entered the C. S. Army in 1861, and served 
through the four years of the war. He accepted 
a professorship in Emory college in 1866, and 
taught Greek and Latin in that institution until 
1877. He became a nrofessor in the Southern 
university at Greensboro in 1877, and became 



chancellor of that university in 1879. He re- 
signed the latter position in 1881, and entered 
the Methodist itineracy. The honorary degree 
of D. D. was conferred upon him by Trinity 
college. North Carolina, in 1878. He was a 
Democipat; and a frequent contributor to maga^ 
zines. Married: (1) May 3, 1866, to Mary 
Rosina Hubert, who died April 14, 1873, at 
Athens, Ga., daughter of Dr. Robert W. and 
Nancy (Turner) Hubert, who lived at War- 
renton, Ga.; (2) Bfarch 25, 1875, at Monticello, 
Fla., to Sarah Williamson Lamar, who lives at 
Marietta, Ga. Children by first marriage: 1. 
Laura Elizabeth, m. Barry Palmer Harris, 
Brunswick, Ga.; 2. Mary Rosina, d. October 16, 
1904, m. Osiah George Mingledorif, Guyton, Ga.; 
3. Claudia Julia, unmarried, Sparta, Ga.; 4. 
Josiah Sidney, professor of languages and 
mathematics at Rhinehart college, Waleska, 
Ga.; by second marriage: 5. Sarah Lamar, un- 
married, Marietta, Ga.; 6. Dr. Lamar Thomp- 
son, Luzon, Philippine Islands; 7. Col. Miles 
Walker, Jacksonville, Fla. Last residence: 
Sparta, Q&. 

LEWIS, LORENZO DOW, Presbjrterian min- 
ister, was born July 11, 1847, near Gaylesville, 
Cherokee County; son of Chrisman and Annie 
(Webb) Lewis, the former a native of Chest- 
nut Hill, Jefferson County, Tenn., who lived 
at Davis Cross Roads, Cherokee (bounty, and 
was a blacksmith; grandson of Gabriel and 
Debie Lewis, of Chestnut Hill, Jefferson County, 
Tenn., the former a soldier in the War of 1812, 
and of Thomas Webb, of Chestnut Hill, Tenn.; 
great-grandson of Shellie Lewis; great-great- 
grandson of George Lewis, who came with his 
two brothers, Amos and Mordecai, to the United 
States from Wales in 1794. He received his 
early education in Cherokee County, at Davis 
Cross Roads, and attended the Cumberland uni- 
versity for three years. He became a minister 
of the Presbyterian church, and served the 
greater part of his life in that calling. 
Married: to Indiana Alabama, daughter of 
John Tyler and Melvinie Culpeper, who 
lived near Gaylesville, after coming from Ten- 
nessee to Alabama. Children: 1. Lottie, Bir- 
mingham, m. Robert L. McNutt, deceased, five 
children; 2. Minnie, m. Robert Engle, one child; 
3. Mack, married, four children. Mill Creek, 
Okla.; 4. O. W., married, five children, Bes- 
semer; 5. W. M., married, two children, Rose- 
dale; 6. Leona, Birmingham. Residence: Bir- 
mingham. 

LEWIS, NECT, business man, was bom 
August 7. 1888, at Midway, Bullock County; 
son of Necy and Fredonia (Sellers) Lewis, 
of Bullock County; grandson of Necy and 
Rebecca Lewis and of Gamelier Sellers and 
wife, all of Bullock County. The Lewis family 
is of English descent, and came early to 
North Carolina, later removing to Alabama. 
Mr. Lewis received his early education in 
the public schools at Midway; attended the 
Troy normal school; and in 1910 received 
the degree of B. S. from the University of 
Alabama. He taught school at Enterprise and 
Brundidge, 1910-1913; and in the latter year 
went into business at Midway. He was elected 



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to the State legislature as a representative 
from Bullock County, 1919. He is a Democrat 
and a Baptist Married: November 25, 1910, 
at Midway, to Emma Claire, daughter of 
James Milton and Nettie (Owens) Bishop, of 
that place. Children: 1. Necy; 2. James Mil- 
ton. Residence: Midway. 

LEWIS, OSCAR SCOTT, lawyer, was born 
June 12, 1872, at Tuskegee, Macon County; 
son of Lawrence and Marion (Kelton) Lewis, 
the former who was born at Boolnose, Sweden, 
emigrated to America in 1855 and came to 
Tuskegee in 1859, entered the C. S. Army, 
January, 1861, as a member of the Zouaves, 
was wounded at the first battle of Manassas, 
but fought throughout the war; grandson of 
Lawrence and Katherine Lewis, natives of 
Bolln&s, Sweden, and of Milton Scott and 
Elizabeth Mariah Kelton, of Tuskegee. He 
received a high school education; studied law 
and entered upon the practice in January, 
1898, at Tuskegee, in partnership with Wil- 
bur F. Foster; served as mayor of Tuskegee, 
1903-1909; was captain of Co. K, Second in- 
fantry, Alabama national guards 1908*1914; 
was appointed chancellor of the southeastern di- 
vision to succeed Hon. W. R. Chapman, October 
1, 1915; and was elected to the State senate 
from the twenty-sixth distHct, 1915. He Is an 
Episcopalian and a Mason. Married: July 7, 
1907, at Atlanta, Ga. to Eva, daughter of Bar- 
sillai Tale and Miranda (Roys) Sage, of that 
city. Children: 1. Oscar Yale; 2. Eva Placide. 
Residence: Tuskegee. 

LEWIS, THOMAS H., major of Lewis' bat- 
talion Alabama cavalry, C. S. Army. 

LEWIS, W., Methodist minister, pastor of 
the Court Street church, Montgomery, 1911; 
transferred to Alabama from the Georgia con- 
ference. Deceased. Last residence: Atlanta, 
Qa. 

LEWIS, WILLIAM LINN, teacher, was bom 
November 20, 1808, in Chester District, S. C, 
and died May 17, 1895, at Talladega; son of 
Samuel and Mary (Lemon) Lewis, the former a 
native of Wales, the latter of Irish descent; 
grandson of William Lewis. He was educated 
In the schools and academies of Chester Dis- 
trict, S. C, and at the age of twenty-one years, 
began teaching school at an academy at Provi- 
dence, near Lowrysville, Chester District, S. C. 
In 1830, he moved to Alabama, and settled in 
Perry County, where he taught school for a 
time. Six years later he returned to Chester 
District, S. C, for two years, then moved to 
Talladega County, and was a resident of that 
place for nearly sixty years. The grreater part 
of his life was spent in teaching school, al- 
though he did not teach with any degree of 
regularity after the War of Secession. He was 
county superintendent of education for a num- 
ber of years; and was an elder in the Marble 
Springs Presbyterian church in Talladega 
County. Married: (1) January 3, 1839, in Ches- 
ter County, S. C, to Sarah Pogue, who died in 
1847; (2) February 26, 1848, to Esther Adams, 
who died September 7, 1881, daughter of James 



and Mary Adams, who lived near Talladega. 
Children: 1. a son, killed in the battle of Sharps- 
burg, 1861; 2. Robert S., Sterrett, Shelby 
County; 3. Mary, m. Mr. Sweetman, Jackson- 
ville, Fla,; 4. Sallie, m. Mr. Elder, Guthriesville, 
S. C; 5. Eppie, Talladega; 6. Janie A., m. Mr. 
Sparling, Tuscaloosa; 7. Julia, m. Mr. Elliott, 
Talladega; 8. Fannie, Talladega. Last resi- 
dence: Talladega. 

LIDDELL, DANIEL, merchant, was born 
May 30, 1850, in Gwinett County, Ga.; son of 
William C. P. and Eveline B. (Wynne) Liddell, 
natives of Georgia and South Carolina, who 
came to Alabama in 1856, and settled near 
Hokes Bluff, in Etowah County, moving in 1859 
to Gadsden, the former a third lieutenant in the 
C. S. Army, who was discharged from the serv- 
ice because of ill health. His grandfather Lid- 
dell was a soldier in the Revolutionary army. 
The Liddell family was among the earliest set- 
tlers of Georgia. Mr. Liddell was reared on his 
father's farm and received his education from 
the neighborhood schools. When he was 
twenty-one years of age, he moved to Texas and 
entered the mercantile business. Returning to 
Alabama after two years, he engaged in farm- 
ing until 1876, when he again entered the mer« 
cantile business. He continued in that line 
until April, 1885, when he was appointed post- 
master of Gadsden. He is a Democrat and 
served for several years as chairman of the 
county Democratic committee. He is a Baptist; 
a Mason; Odd Fellow; and Knight of Pythias. 
Married: November 10, 1874, at Gadsden, to 
Mary V. Nuckolls. He hae three children 
living, and two who are deceased. Residence: 
Gadsden. 

LIDDON, WILLIAM ABRAM, civil engineer, 
was born in 1793, in New Hanover County, 
N. C, and died December 19, 1853, in Belle- 
fonte, Jackson County; so|i of Benjamin and 
Sarah (Rutledge) Liddon, also of New Hanover 
County, the latter belonged to the distinguished 
South Carolina family of that name, being at 
the time of her marriage to Col. Liddon,. the 
widow of Maj. Abram Ivy; grandson of Benja- 
min Liddon, a native of Scotland, landed in 
Virginia, but afterwards settled in Wilming- 
ton, N. C, was a colonel in the Revolutionary 
War, and awarded a tract of land for special 
services located on Stone River, Rutherford 
County, Tenn., to which he removed. Wil- 
liam Abram Liddon .began his education in 
Wilmington, N. C, and later attended the best 
schools of Nashville, Tenn. He followed the 
custom of the period and learned the trade of 
a silversmith, later studied civil engineering, 
and for many years was county surveyor of 
Jackson County, to which he moved from Ten- 
nessee in 1830. He was an accomplished musi- 
cian and for a long time used this talent for 
the pleasure of the community about Belle- 
fonte, where he was leader and instructor of 
local musicians composing the brass band. He 
was Justice of the peace at that place, and al- 
though a student of law never practiced it as 
a profession. On the other hand he freely gave 
of his knowledge to the poor of the land who 
were unable to employ legal advisers. He was 



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DICTIONAEY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



a strong adYOcate of temperance, and among 
the first in his section to join that order. 
He was a Whig and Mason. Married: in 1818» 
near Shelbyville, Tenn., to Mary White, daugh- 
ter of Henry and Margaret (Price) Davis of 
that place; great-granddaughter through her 
mother, of one of the noted Pinckneys 6f South 
Carolina. Children: 1. Sarah Jane, m. John 
Henry Crawford, Jacksonville; 2. Margaret, hl 
George Black, Arkansas; 3. Mary Tennessee, m. 
F. S. Parham, Chattanooga, Tenn.; 4. Eliza, m. 
Robert E. Neeld, Fayetteville, Tenn., later St 
Petersburg, Fla.; 6. Nancy, third wife of Jo- 
siah Fisher, Chattanooga, Tenn.; 6. Caroline, 
m. William Hamby Cowden, Cherokee County, 
later of Palo Pinto County, Tex.; 7. Julia, sec- 
ond wife of Josiah Fisher; 8. Harriet Atwood, 
m. (1) Benjamin O. Salvage, Rome, Ga., (2) 
Alonzo Edwards, Midland, Tex.; 9. Cynthia, m. 
(1) Charles C. Dodson, Jacksonville, (2) 
Thomas Sterling of Connecticut, later of Los 
Angeles, CaL; 10. Catherine Cobb, m. (1) Rob- 
ert Moore, Rome, Qa., (2) William Hamby Cow- 
den, Midland, Tex. Last residence: Belief onte. 

LIOHTNER, A. D., formerly general manager 
of Birmingham belt line railroad company. 
Residence: New Orleans. 

LIGON, DAVID GREENHILL, lawyer, was 
bom about 1792, in southwestern Virginia, and 
died in 1856. He was well educated and read 
law in Virginia, and in 1828, came to Alabama, 
where his maternal uncle, Hon. John L. 
Townes, of Madison, had already settled. He 
opened a law office in Courtland and resided 
there or in Moulton, with the exception of a 
short time, for the remainder of his life. He 
was elected to the State legislature from Law- 
rence County in 1829, but moved to Walker 
County shortly after, and resided there for a 
year or twa He was an unsuccessful candidate 
for congress twice, and in 1846 was elected chan- 
cellor 'Of the northern division, defeating Alex- 
ander Bowie and Thomas D. Woodward. In 1851, 
he was elected by the legislature an associate 
justice of the supreme court to succeed Judge 
Silas Parsons who had resigned. Upon a re- 
organization of the court in 1858 he declined 
a rejection to the office. He had entered the 
ministry of the Christian church about the 
year 1845, and was preaching in Lawrence 
County when he was seized with apoplexy and 
died almost immediately. Married: Miss 
Greenhill, his cousin, who lived in Lawrence 
County after his death. Children: 1. Paschal, 
deceased, a senator in the Arkansas state legis- 
lature; 2. a daughter, Lawrence County. Last 
residence: Lawrence County. 

LIGON, ELLEN LEB (BARRETT), osteo- 
pathic physician, was bom August 10, 1862, on 
a plantation, "Patagonia," Lauderdale and Kem- 
per Counties, Miss.; daughter of Benjamin 
Temple and Louisiana Adams (Martin) Barrett, 
the former of whom was born on the family 
estate "Presque Isle," King William County, 
Va., 1807, removed to Claiborne, 1886, and to 
Mobile, 1839, where he remained until his death 
in 1880; granddaughter of Dr. John Stracham 
and Anne Brooke (Temple) Barrett, who lived 



at "Presque Isle," prior to settling in Gaines- 
ville, and of John Taylor and Sarah (Beale) 
Martin, of "Aspen Grove," the family estate In 
James County, Va.; great-granddaughter of CoL 
Benjamin Temple, captain of Virginia dragoons, 
lieutenant-colonel of Ist Continental dragocms, 
transferred to the 4th dragoons during the 
Revolutionary War, of John Barret of "The 
Hermitage," the family estate in Louisa County, 
Va., mayor of Richmond, Va., 1791-98, of Wil- 
liam Martin of Virginia, and of Joshua Beale, 
a native of Pennsylvania; great-great-grand- 
daughter of Charles Barret, burgess from 
Louisa County; great-great-great-granddaugh- 
ter of Charles Barret of Louisa County, Va. 
The Barrets, Temples, Martins, and Beales, 
were all of English origin, and came to America 
before the Revolution. Ellen Lee Barret re- 
ceived her education in Mobile, graduating with 
first honors from the Bagby high school In 
1877, and did post-graduate work at the same 
school in 1878. She graduated from the Ameri- 
can school of osteopathy, February, 1900, with 
the degree of Doctor of Osteopathy and re- 
ceived the degree of M. D. from the Alabama 
State medical examining board, February, 1908. 
She began the practice as a physician in Mo- 
bile about 1900 and practiced there until 1906 
when she removed to New York City. There 
she was licensed to practice osteopathy and 
remained in that city until 1911, at which time 
she returned to Mobile and resumed the prac- 
tice of her profession. When her right to 
practice osteopathy in Alabama was questioned 
she was given the privilege of the floor of the 
Alabama senate and made her professional de- 
fense to that body. Two years later she made 
the fight before the Alabama legislature for 
the passage of a bill that would exclude fake 
osteopaths from the practice in Alabama, and 
put osteopathic practiticmers under an osteo- 
pathic board. The bill passed the house but 
was lost in a tie vote in the senate, which was 
presided over at the time by a medical doctor. 
She is an Episcopalian; a member of the Colo- 
nial Dames; vice-regent of the Mobile Chapter, 
D. A. R.; member U. D. C; and the Business 
woman's club. She organized, in 1888, and 
was for two years president of the Okolona 
book club, the oldest woman's club in Missis- 
sippi. Married: June 9, 1886, in Mobile, to Dr. 
Greenwood Ligon, son of Dr. Williain and 
Calpumia (Greenwood) Ligon, who lived in 
Chickasaw County, Miss.; grandson of ThiHnaa 
Ligon of Laurens District, S. C. Dr. William 
Ligon was a graduate of Transylvania medical 
college and located first in Athens, but in 1842, 
removed to Chickasaw County, where he bought 
what had formerly been the town site of (Col- 
bert. Children: 1. Lucile Barret, m. Clinton 
Rowland Macartney, Mobile; 2. Margherita. 
Residence: Mobile. 

LIGON, ROBERT FULWOOD, lawyer, plant- 
er, legislator and lieutenant-governor of Ala- 
bama, was bom Decembelr 28, 1823, in Watkins- 
ville, Ga., and died October 11, 1901, in Mont- 
gomery; son of Robert and Wilhelmina (Ful- 
wood) Ligon, the former bom on the country 
estate of his parents in Halifax County, Va., 
removing in 1810 to (Georgia, where he practiced 



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DICTIONAEY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1047 



law and died at the age of thirty-five; grand- 
son of Robert and Judeth (Scott) Ligon of 
Halifax County, Va., and of Major Robert and 
Jane Ware (Hunter) Pulwood of South (Caro- 
lina and later of Ware County, Ga. The Ldgon 
family is of French Huguenot extraction, the 
early ancestors going from France to England 
and thence to America, locating in Virginia 
and South Carolina, shortly after the Rerolu- 
tionary War. Crovemor Ligon received his early 
education in the country schools of his native 
county and in Uie academy near Watkinsville. 
Later he attended the Georgia university. In 
1844 he removed to Tuskegee, Macon County, 
where he read law under Judge David Clopton, 
was admitted to the bar and formed a partner- 
ship with his legal mentor. He later removed 
to Montgomery where he formed a partnership 
with James E. Cobb. Prior to the War of Se- 
cession he was a member of the legislature 
from Macon County and was State senator in 
1864. During the heated campaign that re- 
stored white supremacy in the State following 
the reconstruction period, Senator Ligon was 
elected lieutenant-governor on the ticket with 
George S. Houston, governor, the office having 
been created by the constitution of 1867. It 
was however abolished in 1875, and not re- 
created until the adoption of the constitution 
of 1901. Lieutenant-Governor Ligon was elect- 
ed to congress from the 5th district, 1876-78. 
He was captain of a company in the Mexican 
War, 1849; and elected captain of the "Macon 
Confederates," which was Co. F, 12th Alabama 
infantry regiment, Rodes' division, C. S. Army. 
He was a Democrat, and canvassed the state 
during the campaign of 1874, for his party. For 
many years he was president of the board of 
trustees, Alabama female college, and also 
a trustee of the Alabama polytechnic institute. 
Auburn. He was a Methodist and a Mason. 
Married: in 1850, at Watkinsville, Ga., to Emily, 
daughter of Edward Courtenay and Caroline 
Matilda (Brinton) Paine of that place, the 
former a distinguished lawyer, who had re- 
moved from Baltimore, where his parents resid- 
ed, to Georgia. Mrs. Paine, his wife, was the 
daughter of Major Henry Bointon, who resided 
near Philadelphia and was of Quaker ancestry. 
Cniildren: 1. (Carrie, deceased, m. Edward T. 
Vamer, Tuskegee; 2. Emma, m. Richard A. 
Johnson, Atlanta, Ga.; 3. Cornelia, m. Alex- 
ander H. Graham, Dallas, Texas; 4. Mattie, de- 
ceased, m. George P. Harrison (q. v.), Opelika; 
6. Robert Fulwood, Jr. (q. v.). Last residence: 
Montgomery. 

LI(K)N, ROBERT FULWOOD, lawyer, was 
bom September 24, 1864, at Tuskegee; son of 
Robert Fulwood and Emily (Paine) Ligon (q. 
v.), of Tuskegee and Montgomery, the former 
who was lieutenant governor of Alabama; 
grandson of Robert and Wilhelmina (Fulwood) 
Ligon, of Halifax County, Va., who moved to 
Watkinsville, Clarke County, Ga., and of Ed- 
ward and Matilda (Brinton) Paine, of Georgia. 
Both grandfathers were lawyers. Mr. Ligon 
was prepared at the Park high school at 
Tuskegee; and was graduated from the Agri- 
cultural and mechanical college, at Auburn, 
A. B., 1882. He was admitted to the bar» 

Vd. IV— 4 



September, 1886; took the summer law course 
at the University of Virginia in 1888; was 
mayor of Tuskegee, 1886-1888; entered in a 
law partnership with Qen. George P. Hani- 
son at Opelika, 1888; moved to Montgomery 
in 1892 and became law partner of the late 
Tennant Lomax; was elected clerk of the 
supreme court, 1898, and re-elected in 1904 
and 1910; was appointed a trustee of the 
Alabama polytechnic institute, 1900; has 
served as captain of the Tuskegee light in- 
fantry, and lieutenant colonel on the staff 
of Gov. Jones and of Ck)v. Gates; was adjutant 
general of Alabama, 1896-1899, embracing the 
period of the Spanish-American War; was 
nominated brigadier general and inspector gen- 
eral of the Alabama national guard, by Gov. 
Jelks in 1903, and by Gov. Comer in 1907, 
and each time unanimously confirmed by the 
senate; was nominated brigadier general and 
quartermaster general by Gov. Emmet O'Neal 
in 1911, and again unanimously confirmed by 
the senate; was placed on the retired list of 
the national guard officers at his own request 
in 1911, with the rank of brigadier general. 
He is a Democrat and served as a delegate 
to the national conventicm, at Baltimore, 1912; 
is a Methodist; a Mason; Knight of Pythias; 
a member of the Phi Delta Theta college 
fraternity; of the Alabama State bar asso- 
ciation; and has served as president of the 
Alumni association of the Alabama polirtech- 
nic institute. Married: January 31, 1895, at 
Montgomery, to Aileen, daughter of Dr. 
Thomas A. Means (q.' v.), of Montgomery; 
granddaughter of Dr. Thomas Alexander 
Means, president of Emory College, Oxford, Ga., 
for a long time. Children: 1. Emily Castle- 
ton. Residence: Montgomery. 

LILE, HENRY THOMAS, teacher, was bom 
October 15, 1863, at Blount Springs, Blount 
County; son of John Allison and Louisa Eliza- 
beth (Minor) Lile of Huntsville, and brother 
of William Minor Lile (q. v.). He acquired the 
foundation of his education in the Mountain 
Spring high school, established by his father 
in 1872, and was prepared for college by Prot 
J. Ray Baylor of Albemarle County, Va. He 
subsequently entered the University of Vir- 
ginia, but on account of the death of his father 
did not finish his course at that instltutlcm. 
His preparation had been so thorough, however, 
that at this time, 1883, when nineteen years 
of age, he was made professor of Latin and 
mathematics at his preparatory alma mater. 
Mountain Spring. Three years later, he re- 
turned to the University of Virginia for fur- 
ther study. He conducted his mother's planting 
interests during the period of his teaching and 
in 1901 established Lile's university school at 
Trinity, of which he was president for fifteen 
years. This school was built upon the begin- 
nings of Mountain Spring school, which hia 
father had foimded for the education of his 
seven scms and the sons of his neighbors, its 
special purpose being the preparation of stu- 
dents for entrance to the University of Vir- 
ginia. The patronage came from neighboring 
states and was limited to twenty boys. Prot 
Lile was superintendent of education of Mor- 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



gan County, 1896*98, and candidate for the 
State superlntendency in 1898, bat was defeated 
by Hon. John W. Abercrombie. Owing to the 
fttilure of his health, he gave up his school 
and removed to Bvergreen, where he became 
president of the Second district agricultural 
schooL He is a Democrat; Baptist; Mason; 
and Knight of Pythias. Married: December 
21, 1891, at Danville, Morgan County, to Emma, 
daughter of Jonathan Qibson and Martha (Bur- 
leson) Orr of Decatur. Mrs. Lile's maternal 
grandfather was a captain in Gen. Jackson's 
army during the Indian Wars in Alabama. He 
settled a farm where Decatur now stands in 
1812, and his eldest son, Aaron Burleson, phy- 
sician, was the first white child bom in Mor- 
gan County, 1813, and is the father of Mrs. 
James K. Vardaman of Mississippi, wife of 
the former governor and U. S. Senator of that 
state. Children: 1. Henry Orr; 2. Louisa 
Olenn; 3. John Allison; 4. Richard Darwin. 
Residence: Evergreen. 

LILE, WILLIAM MINOR, educator, was born 
March 28, 1859, at Trinity, Morgan County; 
son of John Allison and Louisa E. (Minor) 
Lile. He received the degree of LL. B. from 
the University of Virginia, in 1882, and the 
honorary degree of LL. D., from William and 
Mary college, in 1901. He was admitted to 
the Virginia bar in 1882; began the practice 
at Lynchburg; was a member of the firm of 
Kirkpatrick and Blackford, 1885-89; in partner- 
ship with R. G. H. Kean, 1891-93; since Sep- 
tember 15, 1893, he has been professor of law, 
and since 1896, dean of the law school, Uni- 
versity of Virginia. He is a member of the 
American and Virginia bar associations; mem- 
ber of Phi Beta Kappa and Kappa Sigma col- 
lege fraternities; honorary member Phi Delta 
Phi college fraternity; director, Bologna so- 
ciety; member board of governors, Woodberry 
Forest school for boys. Orange, Va. He was 
founder, 1895, associate editor, 1895-97, editor, 
1897-1901, editor-in-chief, 1901-02, Virginia Law 
Review. Author: "Elementary work on 
equity procedure for students," 1916; and mon- 
ographs on various law topics. Married: Jan- 
uary 25, 1888, to Maud Lee Coarsen, of Lynch- 
burg, Va. Residence: University, Va. 

LINCECUM, GIDEON, naturalist and pioneer 
settler, was born in April, 1793, in-HancocIc 
County, Qa., and died November 28, 1878, at 
Long Point, Texas. He was educated in a 
country school in South Carolina; served in the 
War of 1812; studied medicine and taught 
school in Georgia, removed to Tuscaloosa which 
was then located in the wilderness, later went 
to Mississippi and finally located in Texas. 
He was the collector of many valuable specimens 
in natural history. Last residence: Long Point, 
Texas. 

LINDSAY, DAVID, soldier of the American 
Revolution. A soldier of this name is buried 
at Elliottsville, Shelby County, but no facts as 
to his age or service have been ascertained. 

LINDSAY, JAMES, soldier of the American 
Revolution, and a resident of Marion Ck>unty; 



private, particular service not shown; enrolled 
on August 22, 1835, under act of Congress of 
June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 
1831; annual allowance, |20.— Pension Book, 
State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

LINDSAY, MATTHEW W., lawyer, attorney 
general, was born in Tennessee, and died in 
Aberdeen, Miss. He came from Tennessee to 
Alabama and settled in Morgan County, and 
represented that county in the State legisla- 
ture in 1835, 1836 and 1838. In 1839 he was 
elected attorney general of the state. He 
moved to Tuscaloosa in 1840, and Identified 
himself with the Whig party, taking an active 
part in the campaign for Oen Harrison, by 
addressing Tippecanoe Clubs and other assem- 
blages. Sometime afterwards he moved to Aber- 
deen, Miss. Married: to Miss Perkins, daughter 
of Constantino Perkins (q. v.), at one time 
attorney general of the state, whose gallant 
behavior at the battle of Emuckfaw, under the 
command of (3en. Andrew Jackson, in loading 
the cannon with his musket as a ramrod, and 
firing it upon the Indians just in time to drive 
them back, is a matter of history. Last resi- 
dence: Aberdeen, Miss. 

LINDSAY, ROBERT BURNS, lawyer, gov- 
ernor of Alabama, was bom July 4, 1824, in 
Lochmaben, Dumfriesshire, Scotland, and died 
February 13, 1902; son of John and Elisabeth 
(McKnlght) Lindsay. He was educated at the 
parochial schools, at the University of St An- 
drews, and was a prize student of the founda- 
tion bursary under the principalship of Sir 
David Brewster. He came to the United States 
in 1844 on a visit to his brother David R. Lind- 
say, a school teacher in North Carolina, and 
concluded to remain in this country. He ac- 
cepted charge of a boys' academy in North 
Carolina, and in addition to his teaching, be- 
gan the study of law under Col. Robert Treat 
Paine. In 1849 he moved to Tuscumbia, Frank- 
lin County, where he continued teaching school 
and studying law, until 1852 when he was ad- 
mitted to the bar. He opened a law office in 
Tuscumbia, and the following year was elected 
to the State legislature as a representative of 
Franklin County. In 1867, he was elected to 
the State senate on the Democratic ticket, and 
during the same year was on the board of visi- 
tors to West Point Military Academy. He 
was appointed a presidential elector on the 
Democratic ticket In 1860, but when the breach 
in the party placed two candidates in the field, 
Douglas representing the Union wing and 
Breckenrldge the states rights or southern 
wing, Mr. Lindsay who was a conservative 
and opposed to secession, refused to serve on 
the Breckenrldge ticket and became an elec- 
tor on the Douglas ticket. He resisted seces- 
sion with all his power, but after the ordinance 
was passed, remained loyal to the state, and 
served for part of the time during the war im 
Roddy's cavalry, organized at Tuscumbia, in 
December, 1862. He was elected to the State 
senate in 1865, and in 1870, under the consti- 
tution of 1868, which permitted a foreign bom 
citizen to hold the office of governor of Ala^ 
bama, was nominated and elected governor by 



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the Democratic conservative party, over Gov. 
William H. Smith, the radical incnmhent. An 
attempt was made by Gov. Smith to contest 
his election and prevent his inauguration, but 
after a few stormy weeks, during which Gov. 
Smith called in the power of the Federal army 
to sustain him, Gov. Lindsay was left in pos- 
session of the executive authority. He served 
through his term and refused to allow his name 
to be presented for a second term. Two months 
after his term of governor had expired, he 
was stricken with paralysis, and became an 
invalid. He continued his law practice, al- 
though not as actively as before, and took no 
farther part in politics. He was a Presby- 
terian, and one of the oldest members of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows in the state. 
Married: in 1854, to Sarah Miller, daughter of 
William Winston; sister of Gov. John Anthony 
Winston (q. v.) ; sister-in-law of Gov. Pettus, of 
Mississippi; and cousin of Edmund Winston 
Pettus (q. v.), U. S. senator from Alabama. 
Of nine children bom to him, the following 
survive: 1. Mamie, m. Robert H. Watkins, for- 
merly of the Birmingham "Age," resides in 
Washington, D. C; 2. Minnie Bums, m. Joseph 
H. Nathan, lawyer, Sheffield; 3. Mattie I^ 
Sheffield; 4. Maud, Sheffield. Last residence: 
Tascumbia. 

LINDSEY, SAMUEL PERRIN, Baptist min- 
ister, was bom September 15, 1855, at Buena 
Vista, Monroe County; son of William Kyser 
and Harriett (Newell) Lindsey, the former a 
native of Chestnut Comer, Monroe County, who 
lived at Buena Vista, and served in Co. G, 
Thirty-sixth Alabama regiment, C. S. Army, 
until he was taken prisoner at Manchester, 
Tenn., June 8, 1863; grandscm of Rev. Larkin 
W. and Theresa (Dekle) Lindsey, who lived at 
Allenton, Wilcox County, TurnbuU, Chestnut 
Comer, and Buena Vista, Monroe County, and 
of William W. and Elizabeth Henry (Fountain) 
Wiggins, who lived at Philadelphia, Monroe 
County, and Monroeville; great-grandson of 
Stephen Wiggins^ who came from Sampson 
County, S. C, about 1818. He received his 
early education at Buena Vista, in Wilcox 
County, and at Monroeville; and was graduated 
from Howard college, A. B., 1893. He estab- 
lished the Pine Apple "Gazette" in 1882; 
clerked in the store of his uncle, Capt William 
Stephen Wiggins; and entered the ministry in 
July, 1887. He was licensed to preach, Sep- 
tember 11, 1887, and was ordained, September 
26, 1888, at the PhUadelphia Baptist church. He 
has served as pastor of churches in St. Clair, 
Jefferson, Walker, Monroe, Conecuh, and 
Escambia Counties, and Escambia County, Bla., 
and has served churches of prominence in 
Ensley City, Georgiana and Evergreen. For 
several years he was moderator of the Bethle- 
hem Baptist association. He is a Mason. Mar- 
ried: June 17, 1890, to Julia, daughter of Noah 
Haggard and Tryphenia Richison (Mathis) 
Fancher, who lived near Montevallo. Children: 
1. Harriet Tryphenia, deceased; 2. Perrin 
Fancher; 3. William Rupert; 4. Samuel Pleas- 
ant, deceased. Residence: Belleville. 



LINDSEY, WALLACE HENRY, lawyer, was 
born October 8, 1872, at Gaston, Sumter Coun- 
ty; son of Henry Thompson and Martha Jane 
(Wallace) Lindsey, the former a native of 
Greene County, who lived at Desotoville, and 
served in the C. S. Army as lieutenant of Ck). 
C, Fifty-fourth Alabama infantry regiment, 
1861-1865; grandson of Ellis and Martha 
(Thompson) Lindsey, of DeSotoville, the form- 
er who came to Alabama from (Georgia in 
1820, and of Daniel and Jennie (Kennedy) 
Wallace, of DeSotoville and Spray, Miss., the 
former an Irishman, and the latter bom in 
South Carolina, of Irish parents. He obtained 
his education in the common schools of Choc- 
taw County, and &t Chapel Hill academy, 
DeSotoville. He began the practice of law at 
Butler, 1905, having read law while clerk of 
the circuit court of CJhoctaw County, to which 
office he was elected in 1898, and re-elected 
in 1904. He resigned that position in 1906, 
when he began to practice law. Prior to 
his election as derk, he had taught in the 
public schools of Choctaw County. In 1907, 
he was appointed deputy solicitor of Choctaw 
County, a position which he held for some 
time; was a member of the board of educa- 
tion of that county, and at one time public 
administrator; and represented his county in 
the State legislature, 1907. He is a Demo- 
crat; a Methodist; a Royal Arch Mason; Knight 
of Pythias; and a Woodman of the World. 
Married: December 28, 1904, at Butler, to 
Maggie, daughter of William B. and Janie 
(Brewster) Gilmer, of Butler, granddaughter 
of J. W. Brewster, an early settler of 
Choctaw County. The GUmers came from 
Dallas County, and settled near Mt Sterling, 
in CJhoctaw County. ChUdren: 1. liary. Resi- 
dence: Butler. 

LINN, E. W., bank cashier, was bom in 1852, 
in Montgomery; son of Charles Linn, founder 
of the First national bank of Birmingham. He 
was educated in the public schools of his native 
city, and in 1870 entered the University of 
Illinois, from which he graduated two years 
later. For several years after completing col- 
lege he conducted a farm; was a commercial 
traveler, for a Cincinnati hardware firm, for 
one year; appointed secretary and treasurer of 
the Linn iron works and held that place until 
he entered the First national bank as exchange 
clerk and collector, advancing to assistant cash- 
ier and finally to cashiership. In addition to 
his banking connections he was director of the 
Birmingham gas and illuminating company, 
and secretary-treasurer of the East Birming- 
ham land company. He also acquired consider- 
able real estate. Residence: Birmingham. 

LINTON, JOHN, soldier of the AmeHcan 
Revolution, aged 76 years, and a resident of 
Butler County; private N. C. Militia and State 
Troops; enrolled on Oct 19, 1833, under act 
of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date 
from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $76.66. — 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in part 8, voL xiii. 
Sen. doc 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He 
resided in Butler County, June 1, 1840, with 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Hugh Linton, aged S2,— Census of Pensioners, 
1841, p. 149. 

LIPSCOMB, ABNER SMITH, lawyer and as- 
sociate justice supreme court, was born Feb- 
ruary 10, 1789, in Abbeville, S. C, and died 
December 3, 1857, near Austin, Tex.; son of 
Joel and Elizabeth (Childs) Lipscomb, natives 
of Culpeper County, Va., the former a Revo- 
lutionary officer, having moved to South Caro- 
lina prior to that event, afterwards migrated 
to the Mississippi Territory and settled on the 
Tomblgbee River in Washington County, now a 
part of Alabama. Abner Smith Lipscomb se- 
cured the educational advantages afforded by 
the common schools of the period; studied law 
in the office of John C. Calhoun and George 
Bowie at Abbeville, S. C; and settled in the 
practice in 1811 at St. Stephens, then Missis- 
sippi Territory. The following year he served 
as captain of a company of volunteers, raised 
to suppress the Indians of the southern fron- 
tier who had been excited by the War of 1812. 
He was a member of the Alabama Territorial 
legislature, 1818; judge of the supreme court of 
the State of Alabama, 1820-24; and chief justice, 
1824-35. He resigned his seat upon the bench 
and removed to Mobile and in 1838 was elected 
from Mobile County to the legislature. Through 
his influence the common-law system of plead- 
ing was simplifled and the judicature of the 
state rendered more uniform and expeditious. 
In 1839, he removed to Texas and in that state 
rendered public service of as high value as he 
had done in Alabama. President Lamar of the 
Republic of Texas invited him to accept the 
part of secretary of state in his cabinet and 
later he warmly espoused the policy of Texas 
annexation. He was elected to the Texas con- 
vention of 1845, and introduced the resolutions 
accepting the terms of annexation proposed by 
the Federal government The provisions of the 
Texas constitution, adopted at that time, relat- 
ing to homestead exemptions and marital 
rights, were largely the result of his influence. 
His services were recognized by his appoint- 
ment to the supreme court of Texas, a position 
which he adorned for eleven years, and until 
his death. Lipscomb County, Texas, was named 
in his honor. The University of Alabama con- 
ferred upon him the honorary degree of LL. D. 
in 1834. Married: (1) in 1813, in the Missis- 
sippi Territory, te Elizabeth Gaines, daughter 
of a planter; (2) in 1848, to Mrs. Mary P. 
Bullock, daughter of Dr. Thomas Hunt of Aus- 
tin, Texas. Children: he left a family of nine 
or ten children, among these, Ellen, m. Percy 
Walker (q. v.) and several of whom resided in 
Texas. Last residence: Austin. 

LIPSCOMB, ANDREW ADGATE, Methodist 
minister, educator, and author, was born Sep- 
tember 6, 1816, in Georgetown, D. C, and died 
November 23, 1890, in Athens, Ga.; son of 
Rev. William Corrie and Phoebe (Aigate) Lip- 
scomb and grandson of John and Elizabeth 
(Degge) Lipscomb. He received his fundamen- 
tal education ih the best schools in Virginia, 
attending the Military academy at Georgetown. 
He entered the Methodist ministry in 1834; was 
pastor in Baltimore, Md., Alexandria, Va., and 
Washington, D. C, 1834-42, removing to Mont- 



gomery, during the latter year. His superior 
abilities were quickly recognized by his breth- 
ren, and he was elected president of the Ala- 
bama conference. Owing to ill health he with- 
drew from the active ministry and established 
the Metropolitan institute for young ladies in 
Montgomery, which was soon after destroyed 
by fire. In 1867, he was made president of the 
Female college, Tuskegee, and two years later 
chancellor of the University of Georgia. From 
1860 to 1814 he held the latter position, except 
during the war period when the institution was 
closed. From 1875 to 1890 he was professor 
and professor emeritus of philosophy and criti- 
cism at Vanderbilt university, Nashville, Tenn. 
He received the honorary degree of D. D. from 
the University of Alabama in 1851 and LL. D. 
from Emory college, 1853. He was a profound 
Shakesperian scholar and critic and was 
esteemed as one of the most learned men of his 
generation. Author: wrote editorials for Har- 
per's magazine, and for more than forty years 
was a regular contributor to the Independent 
Methodist recorder, and Christian advocate. 
During his travels in Europe he wrote frequent 
letters to the senior class of the University of 
Georgia which were printed in the current 
press, the topic being principally a description 
of the educational institutions of the Old World. 
His public addresses were frequently printed 
in pamphlet form by the associations before 
which he had spoken. Other published works 
are "Our country;" 'The Social spirit of Chris- 
tianity;" "Christian Heroism;" "Lessons in the 
life of St. Peter;" "Studies in the forty days." 
Married: (1) in Baltimore, to Blanche Henri- 
etta, daughter of Rev. Benjamin Richardson of 
that city; (2) in Alabama, to Susan Dowdeli. 
Children: by the first marriage, 1. Francis Ad- 
gate, adjunct professor of ancient languages, 
1869-72, and professor belles-lettres and rhet- 
oric. University of Georgia, 1872-73, died 1875. 
Last residence: Athens, Ga. 

LISTBR, JOSIAH, pioneer physician, was 
born in Georgia, and died at State Line, Miss, 
before the War of Secession; son of Eral- 
bourn Patterson Lister. He was a pioneer 
physician at old St. Stephens, and practiced 
at one time at Winchester, Miss. Married: 
Rebecca Powe of Winchester, Miss. Children: 
1. Dora; 2. Joseph, both died in infancy. 
Last residence: State Line, Miss. 

LISTER, J. N., telegrapher, was bom June 
6, 1840, near Aberdeen, Miss.; son of Jeremiah 
and Eliza (Bush) Lister, the former of Georgia 
removing to Mississippi from Alabama, but 
later returned ; grandson of John Bush, an early 
settler and Indian fighter, of St Clair County. 
He attended the schools of Cahaba, and early 
became interested in telegraphy. In 1858 he 
was placed in charge of the telegraph office 
at Cahaba; and later transferred to Selma. 
When the War of Secession opened, he was 
detailed to the telegraph department of the 
Confederate government at Cahaba, but later 
sent to Selma. At the close of the war, he 
was train-dispatcher at McDowell. In 1867, he 
located permanently at Demopolis, Marengo 
County, where he has since been connected 



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1053 



with the telegraph service. He is a Democrat; 
a Biasoii; and a Christian. Married: December 
1866, at McDowell to Joella Coats. They have 
eight children: Residence: Demopolis. 

LITTLE, BENJAMIN F., merchant, farmer, 
railroad agent and real estate man, was born 
November 80, 1842, near Russellville; son of 
Claiborne and Sarah (Bruton) Little, the 
former a merchant, reared eight children, two 
sons, Coleman R. and John C, members of the 
10th Mississippi infantry regiment, C. S. Army, 
lost their lives in the services c^ their country; 
great-grandson of Blaj. William Russell of 
Tennessee, who served with Gen. Jackson in 
the battle of New Orleans, located in Alabama 
and for whom {LusseU's Valley was named. The 
paternal ancestry was of Irish stock. Mr. 
Little received his education in the schools 
of his community, and at the age of twelve 
began clerking in a store, eventually engaging 
for himself in the mercantile business in part- 
nership with J. 0. Jones, at Russellville and 
Florence. In 1861, he entered the Confederate 
States Army, enlisting as second sergeant, in 
Co. H, 4th Alabama infantry regiment. He 
participated in the first battle of Manassas, 
after which he was promoted to 2nd lieutenant; 
transferred, 1862, to the Army of Mississippi, 
and served in the forage department of Bragg's 
army; appointed to command a company of 
sharpshooters and was engaged at Bryantsville 
and Pernnrille; was made aide-de-camp of 
Woods' brigade on the retreat from Kentucky; 
appointed captain in the 5th Alabama cavalry; 
appointed recorder of the military court for 
the northern district of Alabama, where he 
served until the close of the war; appointed 
major, but did not receive his commission ow- 
ing to the cessation of hostilities. After the 
war he located at Tuscumbia where he engaged 
in the real estate business. He had previously 
assisted the Sheffield and Birmingham railroad 
in procuring the right of way for its lines. He 
is a Methodist and member of the Knights of 
Honor, liarried: (1) August 2, 1864, at Tus- 
cumbia, to Mattie, daughter of John D. Inman, 
a substantial citizen of that place; (2) Emma, 
daughter of Daniel Jones, of Holly Springs, 
Miss. Children: by the first wife, 1. John C; 
2. Mattie R., m. F. W. Ross; 3. Sac; by the 
second wife, 4. Lulie W.; 5. Edward; 6. Laura 
F.; 7. Henry; 8. Benjamin. Residence: Tus- 
cumbia. 

LITTLE, GEORGE, teacher and geologist, 
was born February 11, 1838, at Tuscaloosa; son 
of John and Barbara (Kerr) Little, the former 
a native of Corry Hill, Dumfries, Scotland, a 
resident of Tuscaloosa from 1885-80, druggist 
there for forty years, teacher in Charleston, 
S. C, manager of the Iron works at Beatty's 
Ford, N. C, and connected with a number of 
other business activities; grandson of William 
and Janet Little, of Dumfriesshire, Scotland, 
and of George and Margaret (Pool) Kerr, also 
of Dumfriesshire, Scotland, the former was for 
forty years a teacher in Tuscaloosa, and died 
there at the age of ninety-two, in 1864, whose 
daughter Barbara (Kerr) Little, taught in Tus- 
caloosa also for forty years. Dr. Little received 



his early education from his mother and his 
cousin. Miss Mary Irving, *George Bell, a grad- 
uate of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, 
and other teachers of the period. He attended 
the University of Alabama, 1851-65, and gradu- 
ated with the A. B. degree. During 1857-68, he 
attended the University of Berlin and in 1868- 
59, studied at the University of Gottlngen from 
which he received the Ph. D. degree. In 1906, 
the honorary degree of LL. D. was conferred 
upon him by the University of Alabama. He 
taught in Tuscaloosa, 1855-57-65; was profes- 
sor of natural science, 1860-61-66-67, Oakland 
college, Mississippi; professor of mineralogy, 
and geology and agriculture. University of (Geor- 
gia, 1876-78; State geologist, Mississippi, 1870- 
74; State geologist, Georgia, 1874-81; geological 
expert, Chattanooga, Tenn., 1889-92; geological 
expert, Tuscaloosa, 1892-1912; secretary Tusca- 
loosa board of trade, 1909-12. While a student 
at the University of Alabama, he held the rank 
of corporal and sergeant successively in the 
cadet corps. He entered the Confederate Army 
as a private in Lumden's Battery, 1861, and 
was promoted through the successive ranks of 
orderly sergeant, lieutenant, captain of artil- 
lery, major and lieutenant-colonel at the close 
of the war. He is a Democrat and Presbyterian. 
He is a trustee, Pontotoc, Miss., Presbsrterlan 
collegiate institute; fellow American associa- 
ti(m advancement of science. Author: inan- 
gural thesis for degree of Ph. D., Gottlngen, 
Germany, 1869; "Selenium and the Seleniu- 
rets;" "Reports of progress of the mineral, 
geological and physical survey of (Georgia;" 
"Ores, minerals and woods;" "Handbook of 
Ctoorgia;" "Cretaceous fossil;" in Philadelphia 
Academy of Science, part ill, 1876; "Clays of 
Alabama," 1900. Married: May 18, 1869, at 
Sardis, Miss., to Caroline PatiUo, daughter of 
Rev. Daniel Gillespie and Mary Ann (PatiUo) 
Doak, who lived at Zion church, near Columbia, 
Tenn., the former was a native of Guilford 
County, N. C, the latter bom in Person Coun^, 
N. C, 1843; granddaughter of John Pranklin 
Patillo and great-granddaughter of Rev. Henry 
PatiUo, author of Patillo's sermons, and a 
soldier in the Revolution. Children: 1. Mary; 
2. Daniel Doak, teacher, 1891-96, student Pres- 
byterian theological seminary, Louisville, Ky., 
1897-1900, pastor Presbyterian church, Monte- 
vallo; 3. Gtoorge Kerr, U. S. engineer; 4. James 
Waddell, U. S. engineer; 6. John Goulding, civU 
engineer; 6. Margaret Carolyn. Residence: 
Tuscaloosa. 

LITTLE, JOHN, Presbyterian minister, was 
bom AprU 29, 1874, at Tuscaloosa; son of Dr. 
John and Amanda (Harris) Little (q. v.). He 
was prepared for college by Prof. W. H. Ver- 
ner; was graduated from the University of Ala- 
bama B. A., 1893, and from the Presbyterian 
theological seminary of Kentucky, 1899. He 
was ordained to the ministry by the Presbytery 
of Louisville, Ky., 1899. Rev. Little was found- 
er and superintendent of the Presbyterian col- 
ored missions of Louisville. The institution 
was opened February 1, 1898, and is in the na- 
ture of institutional churches for negroes, giv- 
ing religious instruction and industrial train- 
ing under the supervision of white teachers. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Married: (1) September 2, 1905, at Chicago, to 
Eleanor Tarrant, who died November 1, 1917, 
(2) August 16, 1919. to Bertha Hill Tarrant, 
daughters of Samuel A. and Eliza (Selleck) 
Tarrant, of Macon, Miss.; granddaughters of 
Charles and Mary Ann (Patton) Selleck. Chil- 
dren: 1. Elizabeth Tarrant; 2. John. Resi- 
dence: Louisville, Ky. 

LITTLE, JOHN, physician, banker, business 
man, was born June 19, 1841, at Tuscaloosa, 
and died February 1, 1919, in that place; son 
of John and Barbara (Kerr) Little, and broth- 
er of Dr. George Little (q. v.). He was edu- 
cated in the schools of Tuscaloosa and by his 
mother and Dr. George Little. The years of 
1856-59 were spent at the University of Ala- 
bama. He graduated with the degree of A. B., 
from Oakland college, Mississippi in 1860 and 
served as head of the preparatory department 
of that institution from his graduation until 
his entry into the C. S. Army; was a sergeant 
in Lumsden's Battery, Alabama light artillery, 
1861-65; graduated as M. D. from Tulane, 1869, 
and was made first assistant at the Bryce in- 
sane hospital, by his friend Dr. Peter Bryce; 
entered general practice, 1875; and managed 
a drug store until 1881. He was elected cash- 
ier of the First national bank of Tuscaloosa 
in 1881 and served in that place until 1910 
when he became vice-president, which posi- 
tion he held until his d^th. Dr. Little was 
treasurer of the Alabama Bryce insane hospital 
from 1884 until 1918 when he resigned. He 
was a Democrat; and a Presbsrterian. Mar- 
ried: November 14, 1872, at Tuscaloosa, to 
Amanda, daughter of Richard Norfleet and 
Amanda M. (Banks) Harris, (q. v.) of that 
place. Children: 1. John III (q. v.), m., (1) 
Eleanor Tarrant, (2) Bertha H. Tarrant, Louis- 
ville, Ky.; 2. Richard Harris, m. 1902, Johnnie 
Darden, Tuscaloosa; 3. Robert Irving, Ph. D., 
assistant professor of modern languages at the 
University of Alabama, unm. Last residence: 
Tuscaloosa. 

LITTLE, JOHN BUCKNER, educator and 
editor, was born October 10, 1861; son of John 
G. and Sophronia E. (Howell) Little, of Green- 
ville. He entered the University of Alabama 
in 1879, and received the degrees of A. B., 1883, 
and A. M., 1886, from this institution. He was 
assistant professor of chemistry. University of 
Alabama, 1883-87; president. South Alabama in- 
stitute, Greenville, 1887-90; principal. Military 
academy, Huntsville, 1890-91; editor, "Tusca- 
loosa Times," 1886, "True Democrat," 1888, 
"State Review," 1895-96; later a teacher in 
Butler County. Author: "History of Butler 
County," 1885. Married: in 1890, to Lula Dun- 
can, of Huntsville. Residence: Butler County. 

LITTLE, JOHN GOODWIN, farmer, was bom 
December 3, 1825, near Rldgeville, Butler Coun- 
ty, deceased; son of Amos and Elizabeth 
(Hays) Little, who came from Union Dis- 
trict, S. C, to Butler County in 1820, later 
moving to Conecuh County; grandson of John 
and Martha (Manning) Little, and of Thomas 
Norris and Cansody (Goodwin) Hays, all of 
Union District, S. C. The Hays, Little and 



Manning families were all of Irish stock, 
having come from near Cork, Ireland, to Mary- 
land, prior to the Revolutionary war. Mr. 
Little was reared on a farm, and received a 
limited education in the country schools. In 
1846, he became employed as overseer with 
Col. Estey of Mississippi for eighteen months; 
later invested in land near Cedar, Butler 
County; during the War of Secession raised 
provisions for the army; engaged in farming 
for five years after the war; moved to Monte- 
rey, where he lived for fifteen years; and in 
1888 moved to Greenville, where he lived in 
retirement. He was a Democrat and a Baptist. 
Married: December 22, 1855, to Sophronia 
Elizabeth Howell, who died January 10, 1892. 
Children: 1. Theresa Jenelia, m. Dr. Jabes J. 
Garrett; 2. Susan Elizabeth, m. William Andrew 
Jackson Stuart; 8. John Buckner, who was as- 
sistant professor of chemistry. University of 
Alabama, 1883-1887, president of the Southern 
Alabama institute, Greenville, 1887-1890, prin- 
cipal of the Military academy at Huntsville, 
1890-1891, editor of the "Tuscaloosa Times," 
1886, of the "True Democrat," 1888, of the 
"State Review," 1895-1896, and author of "His- 
tory of Butler County," m. Lula Mary Duncan; 
4. Annie B., m. Dr. Frank H. Mason; 5. Charles 
Town, merchant, m. Eugene McDowell. Last 
residence: Butler County. 

LITTLE, WILLIAM G., Jb., member of the 
constitutional convention of 1875, from Sumter 
County; president of the State senate, 1878-79. 

LITTLE PRINCE, or TUSTENUCKJEB HO- 
POIE, Creek Chief. See Indian chiefs and 
associated characters. 

LITTLEPAGE, EMILY (LIPSCOMB), edu- 
cator and patriotic worker, was born Novem- 
ber 13, 1832, at Poplar Grove, King William 
County, Va., and died October 22, 1916, in 
Montgomery; daughter of Ambrose and Maria 
(Guthro) Lipscomb, who lived near Dillware 
Town, Va., a planter; granddaughter of Am- 
brose Lipscomb, and of Dr. Simon and Eliza- 
beth (Quarles) Guthro, the former a native of 
Bordeaux, Prance, who came to America in 
1776, graduated at the Philadelphia medical 
college, served as surgeon in the Revolutionary 
War and spent his remaining years in King 
William County, Va., where he practiced until 
his death in 1842. The LipsccMnb family is 
of English origin, and furnished soldiers to 
the Revolutionary Army. Mrs. Littlepage re- 
ceived her early education in the private school 
of Mrs. Thomas Dabney, in King William 
County, Va., and later attended the Midway 
seminary, Essex County, Va., 1848. She taught 
in a private school in Montgomery, 1861; pres- 
ident of the Montgomery female institute, 1875 ; 
principal of the Hull Street, and later of the 
Lafayette, public schools of Montgomery, un- 
til 1907. She was intensely patriotic and took 
an active part in all the Work done by the 
women of her section during the Mexican, Se- 
cession, Spanish-American and European Wars, 
from 1857 to 1916. Married: July 29. 1860, at 
Mount Hope, Va., to Hardin B. Littlepage, son 
of Col. Edmund and Martha A. (Hilliard) Lit- 



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DICTIONAEY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



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tlepage of Oakdale, Va.; grandson of Hardin 
and Eliza Sutherland (Quarles) Littlepage, the 
former justice of King William County. 1799; 
great-grandson of Thomas and Ann (Burnly) 
LitUepage, justice of King WilUam County, 
1793; great-great-grandson of Edmund Little- 
page; great-great-great-grandson of Richard 
LdtUepage, II, burgess New Kent, 1685; great- 
great-great-great-grandson of Richard Little* 
page, I, a native of Kent, England. Children: 
L William C, Texas; 2. Emilie B., m. Thomas 
W. Hannon, Montgomery; 3. Hardin Beverly, 
Knob, Shasta County, Calif. Last residence: 
Montgomery. 

LITTLETON, CHARLES, soldier of the 
American RevoViUion, aged 74, and a resident 
of Lauderdale County; private Georgia Mili- 
tia; enrolled on October 29, 1833, under act of 
Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance $80.— Kevoiu- 
tionary Pension Ron, in vol. xiv, Sen. doc. 614, 
23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He resided in 
Lauderdale County, June 1, 1840, aged 79. — 
Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148. 

He is buried in a little country graveyard, 
15 miles from Florence, Ala., and nearly a mile 
from Bethel Grove Methodist church on Mid- 
dle Cypress Creek. His grave is marked by a 
stone which bears this inscription: 
CHARLES LITTLETON. 
Revolutionary Soldier. 
Died March 29th, 1848, at 3 o'clock P. M. 
Aged about 103 or 105 years. 

Mrs. P. H. Men, in Alabama Historical So- 
ciety, Transactions, vol. iv, p. 554. 

There is a discrepancy in the age given In 
the ofBcial records and on his tomb. 

LITTLETON. JESSE TALBOT, college pro- 
fessor and dean, was bom October 27, 1856, at 
Portsmouth, Norfolk County, Va.; son of Oscar 
and Martha Elizabeth (Bernard) Littleton, the 
former a native of Leesburg, Loudoun County, 
Va., who later by virtue of his being a Metho- 
dist minister, lived at a number of Virginia 
towns, being both pastor and presiding elder 
during his career; grandson of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Bufflngton) Littleton, also of Lees- 
burg, and of Overton and Martha Jane 
(Thomas) Bernard of Portsmouth, Va. The 
Bernard ancestry sprang from French Hugue- 
not stock that belonged to the old aristocracy. 
The Bufflngtons were New England people and 
the Littletons were <)f English ancestry. Dr. 
Littleton received his preparatory education in 
his home from his father. He later attended 
Liocustville and Onancock academies in Acco- 
mac County, Va. He graduated with the A. M. 
degree in 1880 from Randolph-Macon, where he 
won the writer's prize in the college magazine, 
and also the mathematics prize and the Pace 
medal for the best English essay. He was 
for two years at Sauveur College des Langues, 
Amherst, Mass., and attended summer schools in 
Paris and Brussels. In 1877 he was assistant 
in Greek at Randolph-Macon; was professor of 
modem languages Wesleyan female college, 
Murfreesboro, N. C, 1881-83; taught Greek and 
German at WofFord college, S. C, 1883-86; prin- 
cipal of Belle Haven academy, 1887-90; taught 



English and modern languages in the Danville 
college for young ladies, 1890-93; and English 
and modem languages at Emory-Henry, Va., 
1893-98. He also taught modern languages at 
the Southem university, Greensboro. 1898-1910, 
and at Woman's college ot Alabama, of which 
last institution he was also for several years 
the dean. Since 1914 he has been president of 
the Thomas industrial institute, Florida. He 
was the founder of the Literary and scientific 
association at Greensboro. He is a Democrat 
and a Methodist Author: "Story of Captain 
Smith and Pocahontas"; "My pet cage bird"; 
"Spencer and Tennyson"; "The Drama"; "How 
shall I educate my girl"; "How shall I edu- 
cate my boy"; "King Lear"; "The Idyls of the 
king"; "Our educational renaissance"; "Mod- 
ern languages versus ancient" Married: De- 
cember 26, 1882, at Farmville, Va., to Lucile, 
daughter of Leonidas and Martha Woodward 
(Chandler) Rosser of Portsmouth, Va.; grand- 
daughter of John A. and Christina Elizabeth 
(Nollner) Chandler, the former a lawyer of 
Norfolk, Va., who was a member of the house 
of delegates from his county in 1831-32, presi- 
dent of the Virginia bank of Portsmouth; 
great-granddaughter of Kincher and Mary Ros- 
ser Henry, and of Jane Nollner. The Nollners 
were originally of Gterman stock. (Shildren: 1. 
Martha Elizabeth, M. A., University of Illinois, 
professor of French and German, Galloway col- 
lege. Ark.; 2. Jesse Talbot, jr.. Ph. D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin; assistant professor of 
physics, University Michigan. Ann Arbor, m. 
Bessie Cook; 3. Leonidas, Ph. D., University 
of Illinois, professor of chemistry, Emory- 
Henry college, Va.; 4. Oscar Emory; 6. Lulie 
Bernard; 6. Wilbur Fisk; 7. Norman Lunni- 
son; 8. Wallace Duncan. Residence: DeFun- 
iak Springs, Fla. 

LIVING, STEPHEN, sr., solJier of the AmerU 
can Revolution, aged 80, resided in Pike Coun- 
ty, June 1, 1840.— Cen«M» of PenHoners, 1841, 
p. 149. 

LIVINGSTON, HENRY JAMES, lawyer, 
colonel C. S. Army, was born July 27, 1833, 
near Prattville. Autauga County, and died Sep- 
tember 13, 1907, at Prattville; son of Robert 
Tatum and Rachel (Whitstone) Livingston, 
natives of South Carolina, who were married 
September 2, 1813, in Orangebury District, S. 
C, and lived at that place until 1821, when 
they moved to Alabama, and settled in Autauga 
County, near Prattville. He studied law, was 
admitted to the bar, and practiced his pro- 
fession at Prattville. During the War of Se- 
cession, he was colonel of the Eighth Ala- 
bama cavalry regiment, C. S. Army. He was a 
Democrat; a Methodist; and a Mason. Mar- 
ried: September 24, 1863, near Benton, 
Lowndes County, to Eleanor E., daughter 
of George Livingston and Amanda Ann 
(Bishop) Stewart, who lived near Benton. 
Children: 1. George Stewart, b. June 19, 
1865, near Benton, d. February 27, 1919, was 
graduated with honors from Southern uni- 
versity, 1885, was admitted to the bar, 1889, 
was appointed a trustee of the townsite board 
of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Territory, by 



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DICTIONAEY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



President Cleveland, 1893, became bookkeeper 
with the Prattville cotton mills and banking 
company, was elected Judge of probate of Au- 
tauga County in 1898, and served in that office 
for three terms, married, two children; 2. John 
R., civil service, Chattanooga, Tenn.; 3. Mel, 
Prattville. Last residence: Prattville. 

LIVINGSTON, SAMUEL, soldier of the 
American Revolution, aged 76, and a resident 
of Morgan County; private N. C. Militia; en- 
rolled on July 2, 1833, under act of Congress 
of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 
4, 1831; annual allowance, $21.67; sums re- 
ceived to date of publication of list, $61.01.— 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. 
doc 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

LIVINGSTON, W. L., Presbyterian minister; 
living in 1913. Residence: Woodlawn. 

LLOYD, BENJAMIN, primitive Baptist min- 
ister and compiler of hymns, was bom October 
6, 1804, in Talbot County. Ga., and died January 
14, 1860. in Greenville; son of John B. and 
Elizabeth Lloyd. His paternal ancestors came 
from Wales with William Penn chiefly settling 
in Virginia, though members of the original 
family remained in Pennsylvania, others set- 
tled in Maryland, one branch continuing south- 
ward from Virginia. Benjamin Lloyd was a 
minister of the gospel, in the Primitive Baptist 
church. Under President Buchanan's adminis- 
tration, he was receiver of the land office of the 
United States, at Greenville. He was major of 
militia in the Indian War of 1836. Author: 
"Primitive hymns"; "The primitive hymns, 
spiritual songs, and sacred poems, regularly se- 
lected, classified and set in order, and adapted 
to social singings and all occasions of Divine 
Worship." Married: February 22, 1832, at 
Eatonton, Ga., to Naomi Ann, daughter of Elder 
Cary and Martha (Roundtree) Cox, who lived 
at Eatonton. The family of Roundtrees lived 
in Edgefield District, S. C. Children: 1. John 
Franklin, Confederate soldier, died from 
wounds received in battle of Chickamauga, 
Tenn., m. Mary Eliia Lee; 2. Cary Chapelle (q. 
v.). Confederate soldier and Baptist minister, 
m. (1) Susan M. Lee, (2) *Julia A. Snelgrove; 
3. Joseph Lafayette, Baptist minister, m. (1) 
Mary Ann Henderson; (2) Lucy Payne; 4. Co- 
lumbus James, d. in infancy; 5. Eugene E}mory, 
d. unmarried; 6. Benjamin, jr.. Confederate sol- 
dier, killed during War of Secession in railroad 
accident, near Cleveland. Tenn., September 9. 
1862; 7. Frances Elizabeth, d. in infancy; 8. Wil- 
liam Holt, Confederate soldier, m. Mary Frances 
Reynolds; 9. Andrew Jackson, Confederate sol- 
dier, kiUed at the battie of Richmond, Va., 
July 2, 1862; 10. Wylie Willis, Confederate 
soldier, m. Carrie Cooper; 11. Jesse Cox, Con- 
federate soldier, m. Mattie Eliza Reynolds; 12. 
Orren Datus, Confederate soldier, m. Mary E. 
Norvell; 13. Milton Stephens, Confederate sol- 
dier, m. Melissa Harwell; 14. Martha Ann Eliza, 
d. young; 15. Ichabod David, m. Mary Hundley; 
16. Fannie Joe, m. Y. C. Norris; 17. Thomas 
Jefferson, m. (1) Fannie Perryman, (2) un- 
known; 18. James Buchanan (q. v.), m. (1) 
Maggie Herbert Adams, (2) Sallie Bamett 



Adams; 19. Albert Adams, m. Lena Brown. 
Last residence: Greenville. 

LLOTD, CART CHAPPBLLE, physician, was 
bom April 2, 1834, at Talbotton, Talbot County, 
Ga.; son of Rev. Benjamin and Naomi Ann 
(Cox) Lloyd (q. v.). He received his academic 
education in the common schools of the period 
and completed his medical studies at the Jef- 
ferson medical colleges, Philadelphia, Penn., 
and Atlanta, Ga., graduating with honcNrs in 
1856, at the age of twenty-two, at the latter 
institution. He entered upon the practice of 
his profession at Greenville, the following 
year. He enlisted in the Confederate Army in 
1861, at the outbreak of the War of Secession, 
Co. D, 17th Alabama cavalry regiment, and was 
made assistant regimental quartermaster with 
the rank of captain of cavalry. He is a Demo- 
crat, an ordained minister of the Missionary 
Baptist church, and was clerk of the Alabama 
Baptist association for twenty-five years. Bfar- 
ried: April 28, 1868, at Mt Willing, Lowndes 
County, to Susan Miller, daughter of Rev. David 
and Mary (Coleman) Lee of that place. Chil- 
dren: 1. Carrie Lee, m. John R. Brooks, Lib- 
erty, N. C; 2. Francis Bartow, (q. v.) m. Sarah 
Lillian Carter, Butler Springs; 3. EHeanor C, 
Greenville. Residence: Greenville. 

LLOTD, EDWARD READ, teacher and di- 
rector experiment station, was bom March 10, 
1867, at Auburn, Lee County; son of William 
Edward Lloyd of that place. He was educated 
in the public schools and graduated from the 
Alabama polytechnic institute with the degrefes 
of B. S., in 1887, and M. S., in 1888. He at- 
tended the Graduate school, Columbus, Ohio, 
and Ames, Iowa, and took a course in agricul- 
ture at the University of Wisconsin. In 1888 
he became assistant agriculturist of the Ex- 
periment station, Mississippi agricultural and 
mechanical college; was made agriculturist in 
1890; vice-director in 1895; professor of agri- 
culture, 1900; in 1906 was elected director of 
the Farmers institutes; and in 1910 was made 
director of the Experiment station. He is a 
Democrat and a Baptist. Married: December 
18, 1890, at Starkevllle, Miss., to Fannie Abort, 
daughter of Henry Arthur and Mary Delia (Bil- 
lington) Bell of that place. Children: 1. Ed- 
ward Read, jr.; 2. Lani. Residence: Agricul- 
tural College, Miss. 

LLOTD, FRANCIS BARTOW (Rufus San- 
ders), editor and author, was bom August 12, 

, at Mt Willing, Lowndes County; son of 

Cary Chappelle Lloyd (q. v.). He received his 
primary education in the common schools of 
the state, and concluded his studies at the 
Greenville high school under Pro! J. M. Thig- 
pen. At twenty years of age he read law for 
a short time in the office of J. C. Richardson, 
but abandoned his professicm for newspaper 
work. He was reporter on the "Selma Times" 
and afterwards, city editor. Later he entered 
the service of the "Montgomery Advertiser" 
and was city editor of that paper for six years. 
He was elected to the legislature of Alabama 
from Montgomery County, 1B90 - 01, and was 
again returned to the lower hmise from Butler 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1059 



County. He was a Democrat and Baptist. 
Author: ''Sketches of country life/' a newspaper 
series published under the pen name of "Rufus 
Sanders/' later made into a book by his wife 
and published as a memorial to him under the 
title, "Humor, wisdom and pathos/' by Rufus 
Sanders. Married: Sarah Lillian, a graduate 
of the Alabama central female college, 1885, 
daughter of Harris and Clara Carter who lived 
at Butler Springs; granddaughter of William 
Carter, pioneer and planter of Pine Flat, Butler 
County. Children: 1. Francis Bartow, pharma- 
cist, Brewton; 2. Mary, graduate of Judson col- 
lege; 3. Clara Lee, graduate of Judson college, 
m. Leroy Monroe Parker, Equality. Last resi- 
dence: Greenville. 

LLOTD, FRANCIS ERNEST, botanist, a resi- 
dent of Alabama, 1908-12, was bom October 4, 
1868, at Manchester, Eng.; son of Edward and 
Leah (Pierce) Lloyd, both natives of Wales, 
who removed to the United States about 1882. 
He was educated at the Liverpool institute, 
England; York collegiate institute, Pennsyl- 
vania; Lafayette college, Easton, Pa., A. B., 
1891; and Princeton university, A. M., 1895. 
studied at Munich, 1898, and at Bonn, 1901. 
He was instructor in biology at Williams col- 
lege, 1891-92; professor in biology and geology, 
1892-95, and biology, 1895-97, at Pacific univer- 
sity. Forest Grove, Ore.; adjunct professor of 
biology. Teacher's college, Columbia university, 
1897-1906; staff member of Desert botanical lab- 
oratory, Carnegie institution of Washington, 
1906; instructor. Harvard summer school, 1907; 
cytologist, Arizona agricultural experimental 
station, 1907; director of the department of in- 
vestigation, Continental-Mexican rubber com- 
pany, 1907-08; professor of botany and plant 
physiologist, Alabama polytechnic institute and 
Alabama agricultural exprimental station, 1908- 
12; and is now McDonald professdr of botany, 
McGill university, Montreal. He was the edi- 
tor of The Plant World, 1905-08, and is the 
author of various books and papers on botani- 
cal subjects. He is a Mason. Married: May 
18, 1903, to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas and Lucinda (Wotton) Hail, respec- 
tively of Northfield and Boston, Mass. Chil- 
dren: 1. Mary Elizabeth, deceased; 2. Francis 
Ernest L., Jr.; 8. David Pierce C. Residence: 
MontreaL 

LLOTD, JAMBS BUCHANAN, merchant, was 
bom February 2, 1857, near Old Fort Dale, 
Butler County; son of Benjamin and Naomi 
Ann (Cox) Lloyd (q. v.), the former who was 
bom in Talbot County, Ga., emigrated to Ala- 
bama in 1836, lived in several places in the 
state, was a Primitive Baptist minister and the 
compiler of the "Primitive Baptist Hymn 
Book," was a major of Alabama militia in the 
Indian war of 1813, and receiver of the U. S. 
land office at Greenville under Buchanan's ad- 
ministration; grandson of Cary and Martha 
(Ronndtree) Cox, of Eatonton, Gheu The Lloyds 
came from Wales with William Penn. Mr. 
Lloyd was educated in the Greenville schools, 
and after leaving school engaged in merchan- 



dising. He was postmaster at Pine Apple, 1891- 
1897; and represented Wilcox County in the 
State legislature, 1911. He is a Democrat and a 
member of the Christian church. Married: (1) 
November 8, 1882, to Maggie Herbert Adams, 
and (2) December 28, 1892, to Sallie Bamett 
Adams; both dau^ters of Dr. David and 
Martha (Blankenship) Adams, of Pine Apple; 
granddaughters of John and Mahalath (Atkins) 
Adams of Georgia, and of John and Eliza (Car- 
ter) Blankenship. Children, by second mar- 
riage: 1. James Adams. Residence: Pine Apple. 

LLOYD, WILLIAM R., former secretary of 
the State tax commission. 

LLOTD, W. S., pioneer Missionary Baptist 
preacher, who died in his pulpit; father of W. 
B. Lloyd, of Auburn. 

LOBMAN, NATHAN, merchant, was bom 
June 2, 1851, in New York City; son of Henry 
and Theresa (Steiner) Lobman, natives, respec- 
tively, of Heidelberg, Bavaria, and Tachan, 
Austria, who emigrated to New York in 1846 
or 1847, and were married in that city, who 
came to Greenville In 1854, and moved to Mont- 
gomery in 1861, the former of whom engaged 
in cabinet making and merchandising until the 
death of his wife in 1876, when he went to Pine- 
apple to live. He was educated in a school 
taught by Col. Thomas Herbert in Greenville, 
and after leaving school, clerked for two years 
in Greenville, for the firm of L. Bear and com- 
pany. In 1869, he moved to Montgomery where 
he conducted a general store, and two years 
later moved to Pineapple, where he opened a 
general store in partnership with L. Steiner, 
under the firm name of Steiner and Lobman. 
After nineteen years in business together at 
Pineapple, Mr. Lobman and Mr. Steiner opened 
a wholesale drygoods house in Montgomery. 
Mr. Lobman was elected alderman of Mont- 
gomery in April, 1903. He is a director in 
the Peoples cotton factory, a director of the 
Commercial and industrial association, and a 
trustee of the Jewish Temple. He is a Mason; 
an Odd Fellow; a Knight of Pythias; a member 
of the National Union; and of the B'nai B'rith. 
Married: January 14, 1884, to Carrie, daugh- 
ter of Joseph Pollock, of New York City. 
Children: 1. Theresa; 2. Walter; 3. Myron; 4. 
Bernard. Residence: Montgomery. 

LOCKE, ANNIE REES, author, was bom in 
Greensboro, Hale CJounty; daughter of James 
Whitehead and Helen (Gayle) Locke, the 
former a student at Princeton college when 
the War of Secession broke out, left school 
and Joined Co. D, 5th Alabama infantry regi- 
ment, C. S. Army, afterwards a planter, resid- 
ing in Greensboro; granddaughter of John and 
Anne Elisa (Rees) Locke, the former sixth in 
descent from Sir Francis Locke of England 
whose son, Matthew Locke, emigrated to Ameri- 
ca during the Colonial period, settled in Penn- 
sylvania, and shortly afterwards removed to 
Rowan County, N. C, where he supported the 
Revolution, being a member of the house of 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



commons of North Carolina, in 1775, and of the 
convention that framed the constitution of 
1776, brigadier-general State troops, served 
thirty years in the legislature, had four sons 
in the Revolutionary War, of whom Col. George 
Locke was cut to pieces on the King's high- 
way, near Charlotte, by Carleton's dragoons 
to whose memory the Mecklenburg chapter, D. 
A. R., in recent years erected a monument, 
and of Qov. John and Clarissa Stedman (Peck) 
Gayle (q. v.). Miss Locke received her 
education at the Female academy, Greensboro. 
She prepared herself for the profession of 
librarianship and holds that position in the 
public library of Greensboro. Author: "The 
Flower of Fort Louis," which ran for one year 
as a serial in "Advance." She has also written 
numerous short stories and articles published 
in periodicals north and south. Unmarried. 
Residence: Greensboro. 

LOCKE, HUGH ALLEN, lawyer, was born 
February 9, 1886, near Moscow, Fayette County; 
son of Robert and Susannah Francannah 
(Crenshaw) Locke, the former a native of 
Murfreesboro, Tenn., who lived at different 
places in that state, who served four years as 
a Confederate soldier, and was a civil engineer 
and a farmer. The grandson of David Shelton 
and Clarissa Caroline Crenshaw, who lived 
near Memphis, Tenn., and of Robert Locke, 
who was from the north of Ireland, of Scotch 
descent, came to America and finally settled 
near Memphis, Tenn., where he became a 
planter. The Crenshaws are of Welsh descent, 
and settled in North Carolina. Judge Locke 
was educated in the gn*ammar and high schools 
of Somerville, Tenn. He graduated from Bir- 
mingham college, 1905, B. S.; from Vanderbilt 
university, LL.B., 1907, and the same year be- 
gan the practice of law in Birmingham. He 
served as assistant solicitor of Jefferson Coun- 
ty from January, 1911, to April, 1914; was 
elected judge of the tenth judicial circuit of 
Jefferson County, January, 1916; and is a trus- 
tee of the Birmingham-Southern college. He is 
a Democrat; a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, south; is a Mason; a Shriner; am 
Odd Fellow; Knight of Pythias; Woodman of 
the World; and. a Maccabee. He is unmarried. 
Residence: Birmingham. 

LOCKE," THOMAS COURTNEY, major. U. 
S. Army, and assistant adjutant general of 
Alabama, was born September 10, 1881, at Clap- 
ham, Surrey County, England; son of Richard 
Langford and Eliza Julia (de Tunzelman) 
Locke, the former a native of New Castle West, 
Limerick County, Ireland, who was a civil en- 
gineer for the British government in India 
thirteen years, and was the London represen- 
tative of the East India tea co.; grandson of 
John and Jane (Langford) Locke, of Dublin, 
Ireland, and of Waldemar and Georgina 
(Finch) de Tunzelman, of London, England. 
He is a descendant in the fourth generation 
from the great philosopher, John Locke, and 
of Reginald Courtney, Earl of Devon. Major 
Locke left England and came to Hillsboro Coun- 
ty, Fla., moving in 1897 or 1898 to Mobile. 



He was educated in the public schools of 
Florida and at the Alabama polytechnic in- 
stitute. Auburn, where in 1910 he received cer- 
tificates in electrical engineering, mechanical 
engineering, mechanical drawing and physical 
geometry. He enlisted in Co. A, 2nd Alabama 
Infantry regiment, Alabama National Guard, 
April 23, 1902, and has held commissions as 
second lieutenant, first lieutenant, captain, and 
on November 20, 1913, was commissioned major 
in the adjutant general's department On June 
18, 1916, he was assigned as adjutant of the 
1st Alabama brigade; saw service on the Mex- 
ican Border at Nogales, Ariz., October 29, 1916, 
to March 18, 1917; became adjutant of mobili- 
zation camp, Montgomery, March 22, 1917; and 
continued as such until September 17, 1917, 
when he became adjutant of the 62nd infantry 
brigade, at Camp Wheeler, Macon, Ga. He was 
overseas with the 31st Division, from Octo- 
ber 31, 1918 until November 11, 1918, when 
be was placed in charge of the embarkation of 
rroops at Bassens, Bordeaux, returning to 
America on August 10, 1919. He was appointed 
assistant quartermaster for the national 
matches. Navy rifle range, Caldwell, N. J., and 
on October 31, 1919, he was discharged from 
the service. He now holds rank of major, quar- 
termaster corps, and on April 1, 1920, was ap- 
pointed assistant adjutant general of Alabama. 
He is a Baptist and a member of the Kappa 
Sigma college * fraternity. Unmarried. Resi- 
dence: Montgomery. 

LOCKETT, SAMUEL HENRY, educator, civil 
engineer, was born July 7, 1837, in Mecklen- 
berg County. Va., and died October 12. 1891, at 
Bogota. United States of Colombia. He moved 
to Alabama with his father when he was a 
child; was graduated from Howard college at 
the age of sixteen; and in 1854, was appointed 
a cadet from Alabama to the U. S. military 
academy, at West Point. He was graduated 
with the second highest rank in his class. 1859; 
was made second lieutenant of engineers; ap- 
pointed an assistant professor at West Point; 
and assisted in the construction of Forts Pu- 
laski and Jackson, near Savannah, until his 
resignation, which immediately followed the 
secession of Alabama. He was made a major 
in the engineering corps of the army of the 
state of Alabama, in February, 1861. and served 
with (Sen. Bragg at Pensacola, Fla., until 
August. 1861; succeeded Cten. J. F. Gilmer a« 
chief engineer of the C. S. army, with the rank 
of captain upon the staff of Qea, A* S. John- 
ston; and at the battle of Shiloh acted with 
gallantry on the field. Promoted to major, 
he served on the staff of Gen. Pemberton as 
chief engineer, participating in the battle of 
Baker's Creek, constructing and improving the 
defenses of Vicksburg, and performed impor- 
tant duty all through the siege. After his ex- 
change as one of the Vicksburg garrison, he 
served with distincticm on the stail of Gen. 
Joseph E. Johnston, and during 1864-1865 had 
charge of the defenses of Mobile, which he con- 
structed with such ability as to win a wide 
reputation as an engineer. He also planned 
and partly constructed the defenses of Pen- 
sacola, Corinth, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1061 



Jackson. At the dose of the war» he surren- 
dered with the troops of Gen. Richard Taylor. 
After the war he became professor of mathe- 
matics and natural sciences at Judson insti- 
tute, Bfarion, 1866-1867; professor of mechanics 
and engineering, and commandant of cadets, 
Louisiana State university, 1867-1873, and di* 
rector of the Louisiana topographical survey, 
1869-1873; was president of a school in Ala- 
bama, 1874-1875; was colonel of engineers in 
the Egyptian Army, 1875-1877. Upon his re- 
turn to this country, he became professor of 
engineering and mechanics in the University of 
Tennessee; was principal assistant engineer to* 
Gen. C. P. Stcme in the placing of the Bartholdi 
statue of liberty, 1888-1884; constructed water 
and gas works in various cities of the United 
SUtes, 1884-1888; was sent to Chili in 1888, and 
secured a twenty million dollar contract for the 
North and South American construction com- 
pany; was appointed chief engineer to con* 
struct water works by the United States of Co- 
lombia, and was holding that position at the 
time of his death. Last residence: Bogota, 
United States of Colombia. 

LOCKHART, H. C. lieutenant colonel of 
Lockhart's battalion, Alabama Exempts, during 
the War c^ Secessicm. 

LOCKLIN, LAWRENCE WHEELER, mer- 
chant, was born February 27, 1867, at Perdue 
Hill, Monroe County; son of Charles William 
and Bfartha Barbara (Moore) Locklin, the 
former a native of Claiborne, Monroe County, 
who lived at that place and at Perdue Hill, 
was in the steamboat business at the outbreak 
of the War of Secession, and during the war 
was engaged as captain of steamships trans- 
porting men and equipment for the C. S. Army 
from Mobile to Montgomery, was president of 
the Mobile trade company from 1870 until he 
retired in 1872; grandson of William and 
Amelia (Wheeler) Locklin, of Milledgeville, 
Ga., who moved to Alabama in 1812, and of 
William and Mary Moore, who lived near Clai- 
borne; great-grandson of Samuel Locklin, a 
Scot, who settled in (Georgia, and of William 
Wheeler a merchant of Baltimore, Md., who 
moved to Claiborne in 1816. Mr. Locklin at- 
tended private and public schools at Perdue 
Hill; was a student at Howard college for 
three years; and was gn*aduated at E^astman's 
business college, 1884. He became a member 
of the mercantile firm of Roberts, Locklin and 
company, in 1886, at Perdue Hill; later became 
president of the Claiborne ranch company at 
Perdue Hill; was a member of constitutional 
convention of Alabama in 1901; and served as 
supervisor of census for the first Alabama dis- 
trict, 1910. He is a Democrat and a Baptist 
Married: November 5, 1889, at Fort Worth, 
to Corinne, daughter of Robert and Estell 
(Agee) Rives, of Benton, Lowndes County; 

granddaughter of Rives, a Virginian, and a 

descendant of Sir John Rives of Dorcetshire, 
England. Children: 1. Anderson J. Residence: 
Perdue HUl. 

LOCKWOOD, J. L., business man, was born 
December 15, 1848, in Dubuque, Iowa; son of 



Ezekiel and Ann B. (Warren) Lockwood, both 
natives of New York, residents of Montgomery 
after 1846, the former a Baptist minister. Major 
Lockwood was educated at Linm, N. T., and at 
Williamsburg, Mass., leaving the latter place 
in 1860, and locating in Montgomery. He en- 
tered the Confederate service in 1861, as a 
member of the "Dixie Rifles," which was after* 
wards assigned to the 22nd Alabama Infantry 
regiment; promoted ordnance sergeant, and at 
the battle of Shiloh, to sergeant major; was 
made aide-de-camp on the stafE of Qea, Prank 
(Gardner, 1862, and served in this position until 
the battle of Murfreesboro; was transferred to 
the trans-Mississippi department and served 
there until the fall of Port Hudson; joined the 
Army of Tennessee at the battle of Chickar 
manga, and was commissioned adjutant of the 
22nd Alabama regiment; served through the 
Qeorgia campaign and was badly wounded at 
Jonesboro. When the army was ccmsolidated 
in 1864, he was promoted major and served 
with this rank until the close of the war. He 
participated in the battles of Shiloh, where he 
was twice wounded; Corinth, was wounded in 
the retreat to Saltillo, Perryville, and slightly 
wounded. Crab Apple Orchard, and a week's 
fighting on the retreat, Murfreesboro, Port 
Huds(Hi, where he was twice wounded, Chicka- 
mauga. Missionary Ridge, Dalton, Resaca, Ken- 
esaw Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro, where he 
was badly wounded, Franklin and Boonville, 
N. C. After the cessation of hostilities. Major 
Lockwood returned to Montgomery and kept 
books. In 1871 he removed to Birmingham and 
went into the mercantile business, adding con- 
tracting. He became president of the Ellis drug 
company; director in the North Birmingham oil 
and asphalt company; a stockholder in a num- 
ber of successful business enterprises; and 
served two years as alderman. He is a Mason; 
Knight of Pythias; Odd Fellow; Knight of 
Honor; a Democrat; and Episcopalian. Mar- 
ried: (1) in May, 1873, to Jodie C, daughter 
of Dr. Thomas Martin, of Elmore County; 2. 
to Abigail H., his deceased wife's sister. Chil- 
dren: by the first wlfe,'l. and 2. both died in 
childhood; by the second wife, 3. Henry W. 
Residence: Birmingham. 

LODOR, JOHN A., grand master, grand 
lodge, Bfasons, 1863. 

LOEB, JACQUES, wholesale merchant, was 
born March 31, 1855, at Reichshofen, Alsace, 
France, and died March 29, 1912, at Montgom- 
ery; son of Gkibriel and Caroline (Baroch) 
Loeb, of Alsace, France. He was educated in 
Alsace, and came to America soon after the 
Franco-Prussian War in 1872, and settled in 
Montgomery. He entered the grocery and dry 
goods business and conducted that business 
until his death in 1912. He was president of 
the Winter Loeb grocery company of Mont- 
gomery; vice-president of the chamber of com- 
merce, Montgomery; director of the New Fir- 
ley national bank; secretary of the United 
Hebrew charities of Montgomery; a trustee of 
the Carnegie Library; a trustee of the Leo N. 
Levi memorial hospital, Hot Springs, Ark.; a 
member of the State militia of Alabama under 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Capt John G. Winter and Capt A. B. Garland 
of the Montgomery True Blues; a member of 
the Standard and Thirteen Clubs of Montgom- 
ery; a Democrat; president of the Young Men's 
Hebrew association; a member of B'nai B'rith; 
a Mason and a Knight of Pythias. Married: 
January 28, 1885, in Montgomery, to Selena, 
daughter of Henry and Jeanetta Weil, 
who lived at Montgomery. Children: 1. Lu- 
cien S., Montgomery; 2. Cecile L., m. Gaston 
J. Greil (q. v.), Montgomery; 3. Blanche L., 
m. Louis A. Weil, New Orleans, La.; 4. Raphael 
J., m. Myrtle Kaufman, Montgomery. Last 
residence: Montgomery. 

LOFTON, GEORGE AUGUSTUS, Baptist 
minister, was bom December 26, 1839, in Pon- 
totoc County, Miss.; son of John B. and Olivia 
Ann (Settle) Lofton, natives of Edgefield Dis- 
trict, S. C. He received his early education 
in the common schools of Mississippi, at Starrs- 
ville, Fayetteville, and Montioello, Ga., and was 
attending Mercer university at the beginning 
of the War of Secession. He joined the Gate 
City Guards at Atlanta, Ga., in June, 1861, and 
was assigned to the First Georgia regiment of 
volunteers. He participated in the battle of 
Cheat Mountain, and in November, 1861, was 
discharged because of ill health. In the spring 
of 1862, he joined the Ninth Georgia artillery 
battalion, of which he was elected adjutant, 
and served with Humphrey Marshall in the 
fall of 1862; in Virginia, during the winter of 
1862-1863; and in the spring of the latter year 
was stationed at Knoxville, Tenn. At Chatta- 
nooga, he was made aid to chief of stafF of Gen. 
Buckner, and in November, 1863, took command 
of Battery A, Ninth battalion, and joined Gen. 
Longstreet in the battles of Campbell's Station 
and Knoxville. In the Lynchburg campaign 
he was presented with a captured battery, and 
in the latter part of 1864 rendered distin- 
guished service in the Shenandoah Valley. He 
was next transferred to Richmond, and on the 
James River and at Drury's BIufF, commanded 
two batteries. From November, 1864, to the 
retreat from Richmond, he was actively en- 
gaged. He surrendered with Lee at Appomat- 
tox. After the war. Col. Lofton taught school 
in Webster County, until 1867, when he was 
admitted to the bar at Weston, Ga. He began 
to practice law at Americus, Ga., but in the fall 
of 1867, was licensed as a Baptist minister, and 
began to preach near Americus. In 1868, he 
was called to Antioch, Lee County, Ga.. and 
ordained to the ministry. He preached at 
Shiloh and other places in Georgia until 1869; 
was called to Dalton in 1870, where he founded 
the Crawford high school, now the Joseph E. 
Brown institute; became pastor of the First 
Baptist church at Memphis, Tenn., in July, 
1872; canvassed Tennessee in the interest of 
the centennial endowment for the Southern 
Baptist university in 1876; became pastor of 
the Third Baptist church at St Louis, Mo., in 
January, 1877; resigned in November, 1881, 
having become prostrated from much work; re- 
turned to Georgia, and in January, 1884, again 
took charge of the church at Dalton, Ga.; and 
came to Talladega as pastor of the Baptist 
church in October, 1886. Married: March 29, 



1864, to Ella E. Martin of Atlanta, Ga. ReBi« 
dence: Talladega. 

LOFTON, THOMAS, soldier of the Ameri' 
can Revolution, aged 73, and a resident of Pick- 
ens County; private, captain and sergeant S. 
C. Militia; enrolled on February 2, 1833, under 
act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to 
date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, 
1840; sums received to date oi publication of 
list, %lfi20,'-'Revolutionary Pension Roll, in 
vol. xiv. Sen. doc 614, 28rd Cong., 1st sess., 
1833-34. He came from Pendleton District, S. 
C, to Alabama. The young people of his neigh- 
borhood knew him as "Grandsire Lofton" and 
loved him for his kind and genial disposition; 
some are still living who remember his inter- 
esting stories of the Revolution. He was a 
member of the Presbyterian church. He is 
buried at Bethesda church near Benevola; no 
stone marks his last resting place. — ^Mrs. P. H. 
Mell, in Alabama Historical Society, Transac- 
tions, vol. iv, p. 554. 



LOGAN, STEPHEN DOUGLAS, lawyer, 
born May 29, 1859, in Centreville; son of John 
H. and Levinia (Moseley) Logan, the former a 
native of Shelby County, N. C, bom in 1802, 
who went, when quite young, with his parents 
to Tennessee, and later to Alabama, where they 
located at Centreville, who became captain of 
all the flatboats that floated to Mobile from 
Centreville, on the Cahawba and Alabama Riv- 
ers, and continued that enterprise in connec- 
tion with farming for twenty-five years, after 
which time he devoted his entire attention to 
farming, the latter a native of Edgefield Dis- 
trict, S. C, born in 1818, who came with her 
parents to Centreville when a small child. He 
was reared on a farm near Centreville; at- 
tended schools at that place and the Montevallo 
high school; and was ^aduated from the 
University of Alabama, LL. B., 1877. He was 
admitted to the bar immediately after his 
graduation, and began the practice of law at 
Centreville. In addition to his law practice, 
he conducts a plantation near Centreville. He 
served as superintendent of education for Bibb 
County, 1886-1890: He is a Presb3rterian. Mar- 
ried: (1) November 1, 1885, to Mamie V. Gard- 
ner, who was born November 4, 1865, in Centre- 
ville, daughter of John S. and Rebecca (Car- 
son) Gardner; (2) January 20, 1898, at Tal- 
ladega, to Alice A. Ivey. Children, by first 
marriage: 1. Gardner C, b. August 10, 1886; 2. 
Douglas C, b. March 10, 1889; 8. Edna L., b. 
December 16, 1890, d. August 15, 1891; 4. Win- 
nie Rebecca, b. June 15, 1892. Residence: 
Centreville. 

LOLLAR, JOHN B., farmer, was bom No- 
vember 30, 1835, near Jasper; son of John A. 
and Susan (Gillin) Lollar, the former of whom 
came to Walker County at its first settlement; 
grandson of Hugh Lollar, who named the town 
of Jasper. He was a brother of Hugh Lollar, 
jr., who served as sheriff of Walker County 
before the War of Secession, and who was 
killed at the battle of Murfreesboro. He was 
reared on a farm at Lost Creek, and entered 
the C/ S. Army as third lieutenant of Co. G, 



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1063 



Thirteenth Alabama oavalry regiment, under 
Col. Hewlitt. The regiment was consolidated 
with the First Alabama, commanded by Col. 
Bo7le of Mobile, and for about a year did gar- 
rison duty at Columbus, Miss., later serving at 
other places in that state. For some years after 
the war, Mr. LioUar raised com and cotton on 
Lost Creek. He was elected sheriff of Walker 
County in 1877; was elected tax collector in 
1880; was appointed postmaster at Jasper, 
1885; and in 1886 was elected derk of the cir- 
cuit court Married: in 1867, to Elizabeth, 
daughter of Isaac Taylor, a citizen of 
Poplar Cove, who died in Texas. Children: 1. 
William R.; 2. Fannie E.; 3. Meta J.; 4. Queen 
Victoria; 5. Margaret E.; 6. Isaac H.; 7. An- 
drew J.; 8. Joe. Residence: Jasper. 

LOMAX, CARRIE (BILLINGSLEA), patriotic 
worker, was born March 17, 1825, in Clinton, 
Jones County, Ga., and died June 30, 1907, in 
Montgomery; daughter of James and Elizabeth 
(Slatter) Billingslea. On her maternal side she 
was descended from a Revolutionary soldier. 
She was active in church work and a charter 
member of the Ladies memorial association. 
Her portrait hangs in the statehouse between 
the pictures of her two husbands, both distin- 
guished in Alabama history. She was a Metho- 
dist. Married: (1) in 1848, to Reuben C. 
Shorter, (q. v.) of E}ufaula, brother of Gov. 
John Gill Shorter (q. v.) ; (2) Col. Tennent 
Lomax (q. v.). Children: by the first mar- 
riage, 1. James Billingslea; 2. Reuben Clarke; 
by the second marriage, 3. and 4. twins, Carrie 
Mizabeth, died in childhood, and Tennent Lo- 
max, jr., (q. v.). Last residence: Montgomery. 

LOMAX, TENNENT, lawyer, colonel, C. S. 
Army, was born September 20, 1820, in Abbe- 
ville, S. C, and was killed June 1, 1862, at 
Seven Pines, Va.; son of William and Eliza 
(Tennent) Lomax, the former a lawyer in 
Abbeville, who served in the South Carolina 
legislature; grandson of James and Jane (Dill- 
worth) Lomax, and of William Peter and 
Martha (Middleton) Tennent; great-grandson 
of BiaJ. Hugh Middleton, of the Revolutionary 
Army. James Lomax emigrated from Rocking- 
ham County, N. C, to AbbeviUe District, S. C, 
where he built a colonial home and reared his 
family. He was the son of William Lomax, 
who came from England to America, and who 
was descended from Laurent Lomax, a compan- 
ion of William the Conqueror. The original 
colonial ancestor of Gen. Lomax in the Ten- 
nent branch was Rev. William Tennent, a Pres- 
byterian minister, who, in 1727, established the 
log college, from which sprang Princeton the- 
ological seminary. Four sons of William Ten- 
nent were Presbyterian ministers, and one of 
these, William Tennent, jr., was the founder of 
Tennent church, at Freehold, N. J. His son. 
Rev. William Tennent, of Charleston, S. C, 
father of William Peter Tennent, was known 
as the "preacher and patriot," and a slab com- 
memorating him is on the walls of the Arch- 
dale church of Charleston, S. C. 

Gen. Lomax's mother died at hlB birth, and 
his father died during his boyhood. He was 
educated at Randolph-Macon college, graduat- 
ing fourth in a class of which Justice C^opton 

Vol. TV— 5 



of the Alabama supreme court, was valedic- 
torian, A. B., 1840. He received the degree of 
A. M. in 1861. After his graduation, he moved 
to Alabama, and read law in the office of John 
C. Calhoun, at Bufaula. On completing his 
studies, he was admitted to the bar, and en- 
gaged in the practice of law and in planting 
at Eufaula. Upon the outbreak of the war with 
Mexico, he raised a company, and became its 
captain. The organization became Co. D, First 
battalion Alabama infantry, and was on duty 
in the Department of Orizaba while Orisaba 
was occupied by the United States troops in 
1848. Soon after his return to civil life, he 
moved to Ck>lumbus, Ga., where for several 
years, he became one of the proprietors and the 
editor of the Columbus "Times and Sentinel.'' 
He was elected State printer of (Georgia, by the 
legislature of that state, and was president of 
the Democratic convention which first nomi- 
nated Senator Joseph E. Brown for governor 
of Georgia. He was at one time tendered the 
position of charge d'affaires of the United 
States to Belgium, but declined the appoint- 
ment. He returned to Alabama in 1857, and 
engaged in planting at Montgomery. While a 
resident of Columbus, Ga., he was captain of a 
military company for several years, and shortly 
after his removal to Montgomery, he became 
captain of the Montgomery True Blues, a posi- 
tion he held until the outbreak of the War of 
Secession. Through his infiuence the Second 
volunteer regiment was raised soon after the 
Harper's Ferry raid, and in 1861, as colonel of 
that regiment he was ordered to Pensacola by 
(3ov. Moore to assist the Florida authorities in 
taking possession of the forts and navy yard. 
Forts Barancas and McRae were surrendered to 
him by Lieut. Slemmer of the U. S. Army, who 
withdrew to Fort Pickens, on Santa Rosa 
Island. Not being allowed to take Fort Pickens 
by assault, (Sen. Lomax wrote to Gov. Moore 
asking their recall, and shortly after its return 
to Montgomery, the regiment disbanded. 

In April, 1861, Qea. Lomax was elected lieu- 
tenant colonel of the Third Alabama infantry 
regiment, and repaired with it to Virginia. He 
became colonel by the promotion of Col. With- 
ers, and was commissioned a brigadier-general 
just before the battle of Seven Pines, but re- 
mained in command of the regiment for that 
battle. On June 1, 1862, while at the head of 
his regiment, he was instantly killed. His 
body, which fell into the hands of Federal 
troops, was subsequently recovered and buried 
in the cemetery at Montgcmiery. Married: 

(1) in 1849, to Sophie Shorter, who died, March 
18, 1850, daughter of Qea. R. C. Shorter of 
Eufaula, and sister of Gov. John C. Shorter; 

(2) Mrs. (Caroline (Billingslea) Shorter, widow 
of Reuben C. Shorter, by whom she had two 
sons, daughter of Augustus and Elizabeth 
(Slatter) Billingslea, of English descent 
Children: 1. a daughter, d. in infancy; 2. Ten- 
nent (q. v.). Last residence: Montgomery. 

LOMAX, TENNENT, lawyer, county solici- 
tor, and member constitutional convention of 
1901, was born April 29, 1858, at Montgomery, 
and died at that place November 21, 1902; son 
of (3en. Tennent Lomax (q. v.) and Carrie 
Shorter (Billingslea) Lomax (q. v.). He was 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



educated in the public and private schools of 
Montgomery, and at the University of Alabama, 
reqeiving the M. A. degree in 1878» and B. L. 
in 187^. In July of the latter year he was 
admitted to the bar, and practised his profes- 
sion in Montgomery continuously until his 
death. From 1878 to 1888 he was secretary of 
the Democratic State executive committee; 
lieutenant of the Montgomery True Blues, 1882- 
1887; delegate to the Democratic national con- 
ventions of 1888, 1896, and 1900. He was presi- 
dent of the Auditorium company of Montgom- 
ery, 1901; director of the Montgomery commer- 
cial, and industrial association; the Capitol City 
bank, and the People's cotton factory. In 1902 
he was elected as a delegate from the State 
at large to the Alabama constitutional conven- 
tion, and served as chairman of the committee 
on preamble and declaration of rights. He was 
appointed assistant solicitor of Montgomery 
County under Capt. Fred S. Ferguson, in 1880, 
soon after entering the practice and upon 
the latter's retirement in 1886 was elected 
to succeed him as county solicitor, an' office he 
occupied by successive elections for twelve 
years, and was filling at the time of his death. 
It has been said: "As a student, lawyer» politi- 
cal leader and business man Mr. Lomax was a 
leader of marked strength. As a parliamen- 
tarian and orator he was at the head of the 
young men of his generation and equal to many 
of his seniors in years and public service." 
•He was a Democrat; Methodist; Knight of 
Psrthias; member board of trustees. University 
of Alabama; Alabama historical association; 
Alabama bar association; Red Man; Odd Fel- 
low; and commandant, Camp Holtzclaw, United 
sons of Confederate veterans. Unmarried. Last 
residence: Montgomery. 

LONDON, ALEXANDER TROY, lawyer, was 
bom February 28, 1847, at Wilmington, New 
Hanover County, N. C, and died August 27, 
1908, while on a visit to Chautauqua, N. T.; 
son of Mauger and Rachel Jane (Troy) Lon- 
don, who lived at Wihnington, N. C, the for- 
mer a native of that place, a prominent lawyer 
of the old school; grandson of John and Anne 
Thomey (Mauger) London, who were mar- 
ried at Charleston, S. C, and lived at Wihning- 
ton, N. C, the former a native of London, 
England, who came to North (Carolina before 
the Revolutionary War, having been married 
foV the first time in England, and settled on 
the coast just below Wilmington, N. C, the 
latter a native of the Isle of Jersey, who came 
to Charleston, S. C, with her father in 1788, 
and who was descended on her mother's side 
from French Huguenots, and of Alexander and 
Francis (Shipman) Troy, who lived near 
Whiteside, Columbus County, N. C, the former 
who served for a long time as district solici- 
tor, and died on his circuit and was buried 
at Wadesboro, N. C; great-grandson of John 
and Mary (Wollaston) London, both of Bran- 
don, Suffolk, England, of John Mauger, and 
of Michael and Jane (^•otts) Troy, who were 
married in Pennsylvania, and moved to North 
Carolina at the time of the Wyoming Valley 
troubles, and settled in Salisbury, the former 
of whom came with his bi'other, Matthew Troy, 



from Londonderry, Ireland, about the year 
1711, and settled in Pennsylvania. 

Mr. London attended private schools in Wil- 
mington, N. C, and read law in the office of 
his father. He was admitted to the bar at 
Wilmington, June 30, 1869, and began the 
practice of law in North Carolina, continu- 
ing his profession at that place until 1884, 
when he moved to Montgomery. He entered 
a law partnership with his uncle, Daniel Ship- 
man Troy, and Henry C. Tompkin, at that 
place, and maintained that association until 
1890, when he moved to Birmingham. He con- 
tinued his practice in Birmingham until his 
death. He was elected a representative in the 
State legislature from Jefferson County in 
1902. During the War of Secession, ha served 
as first lieutenant and adjutant of the First 
North Carolina regiment. Junior reserves. He 
was a Democrat, and an Episcopalian. Mar> 
ried: December 6, 1892, at Selma, to Mary L., 
daughter of Clifford Daniel and Louisa (Swift) 
Packe, who lived at Selma, the former a phy- 
sician. Children: 1. Mary Packe; 2. Rachel 
Troy; 8. Alexandra Mauger, Birmingham. 
Last residence: Birmingham. 

LONDON, JOHN, lawyer; president of the 
Alabama State bar association, 1910-11. Resi- 
dence: Birmingham. 

LONG, BENJAMIN McFARLAND, merchant, 
was born November 6, 1827, at Carrollton, Ga., 
and died June 17, 1908, at Cordova; son of 
John and Nancy Davis (Long) Long, who 
lived at Marshall's Ferry, Grainger County, 
Tenn., until 1826, when they moved to CJar- 
roUton, Gki., the former a native of Marshall's 
Ferry, Tenn., who served in the Georgia legis- 
lature, 1868-1869, and was clerk of the supe- 
rior court at Carrollton, Ga., for forty years; 
grandson of Robert and Isabel (Leeper) Long, 
who lived at Marshall's Ferry, Tenn., and of 
James and Jane (Walker) Long, of Carter's 
Valley, Hawkins County, Tenn. The Long 
family came from Belfast, Ireland, and set- 
tled in Rockbridge County, Va., in 1760. Mr. 
X^ng was the first white child bom in Car- 
roll County, Gki., and was reared and educated 
at Carrollton. He was one of the first volun- 
teers in the Mexican War, and served through- 
out that war under the command of Robert 
E. Lee. He became a merchant in partner- 
ship with his father at Carrollton, 1849-1866, 
and continued in the mercantile business for 
the remainder of his life. He moved to Ala- 
bama before the War of Secession, and set- 
tled near Cordova, Walker County. At the 
beginning of the war, he raised the first com- 
pany from that county, was elected captain, 
and entered the C. S. Army as captain of Co. 
G, Col. Looney's regiment, Hindman's division. 
He conducted his business in Jasper for a 
long while after the war was ended, then 
moved to Cordova, and foimded that town. 
He was a leader in the coal development of 
Walker Cunty, and was directly responsible 
for the location of Indian head mills at Cor- 
dova. He was a member of the constitutional 
convention in 1866; served in the Georgia leg- 



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STERLING A. WOOD 



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1067 



islature, 1872-1874, and in the Alabama legisla- 
ture, 1880-1882; was presidential elector from 
the sixth Alabama district in 1884; was a 
candidate for governor of Alabama on the Re- 
publican ticket, 1890; and was the candidate 
of that party for congress in 1894. He was 

Spposed to secession, was originally a Whig, 
tien became a Know-Nothing, and after the 
War of Secession was aflUiated with the Re- 
publican party. He was a Methodist, and a 
Royal Arch Mason. Married: October 17, 1864, 
near Carrollton, 6a., to Amanda Caroline, 
daughter of Henry Pope and Melissa 
Caroline (Hinton) Wootten, who liyed at 
Wilkes County, Ga., prior to their residence in 
Carroll County, Ga. Children: 1. Henry Whit- 
field, merchant at Cordova, 1884-1899, and at 
Carrollton, Ga., after that time, m. at Cwroll- 
ton, Ga., Lula Mandevllle; 2. John Benjamin, 
m, Missouri Musgrove, Jasper; 8. Carrie Ger- 
trude, m. (1) Newton Camak, (2) Roy Gar- 
ner, Lawrenceburg, Tenn.; 4. Thomas Leeper 
(q. ▼.) ; 5. Robert Wootten, Jasper; 6. Ida Jane, 
m. Dr. J. M. Miller, Cordova; 7. Bffle Lou, m. 
Horace Stewart, Carrollton, Ga.; 8. Ada Clare, 
m. Sidney Holdemess, Carrollton, Ga.; 9. Pope 
McFarland, m. Bertie Bills, Cordova; 10. Jesse 
Orville, m. Nona Bell Sprott, Jasper; 11« Edgar 
Wootten, m. Catherine Phifer, Cordova. Last 
residence: Cordova. 

LONG, DANIEL, toldier of tfce American 
Revolution, aged 80, and a resident of Madison 
Coun^; dragoon Virginia Continental Line; 
enrolled on November 22, 1888, under act of 
Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $100; sums 
received to date of publication of list, $800.— 
Revolutionary PenHon Bon, in vol. xiv, Sen. 
doc. 514, 28rd Cong., 1st sees., 1838-84. 

LONG, DANIEL, physician, deceased, of Irish 
descent, was reared in Laurens District, S. C. 
He was graduated from the Jefferson medical 
coUege at Philadelphia, Pa., and engaged in the 
practice of medicine. During the War of 1812, 
he was surgeon in the U. S. Army, under Col. 
Alston, of South Carolina, 1812-1816; moved to 
Perry County, near Marion in 1818, and con- 
tinued his profession there. Married: in 1824, 
near Marion, to Mary, daughter of Thomas 
Billingsley, who lived near Marion. The 
Billingsleys came from North Carolina, and 
were of Scotch descent. Dr. Long left descend- 
ants. Last residence: Perry County. 

lX)NG, JOHN LEE, business man, was bom 
January 12, 1868, at Greenville; son of John 
T. and Louisa (Thagard) Long, who lived in 
Greenville; grandson of Solomon and Patience 
P. (Warr) Long, and of Rev. Solomon Tha^ 
gard. In early life, Mr. Long clerked in a 
store, then went into business for himself as a 
cotton buyer. He has served Greenville sev- 
eral times as councilman, treasurer, and mem- 
ber of the school board: has been chairman of 
the board of revenue for Butler County; chair- 
man of the Democratic executive committee 
of Butler County; a member of the State execu- 
tive committee, and chairman of the congres- 
sional executive committee; was a member of 



the constitutional convention of 1901; became 
a member of the staff of Gov. Joseph F. John- 
ston with the rank of lieutenant colonel; was 
elected to the State legislature in 1906, and 
was re-elected in 1910 and 1919; served in 1910 
as chairman of the campaign conunittee having 
in charge the successful fight against the adop- 
tion of the proposed amendment to the State 
constitution providing for constitutional pro- 
hibition; was appointed chairman of the State 
tax commission in 1911, and held that position 
until September, 1913, when he resigned to en- 
ter business in Greenville. He is a Demo- 
crat and an Episcopalian. Married: May 23, 
1900, to Sallie Dickerson of Greenville. Resi- 
dence: Greenville. 

LONG, JOHN R., merchant, was bom August 
25, 1836, in Pickens County; son of Rich- 
ard and Mary H. (Coleman) Long, natives of 
Virginia, who moved first to South Carolina, 
and in 1828, to Alabama, settling on a plan- 
tation in Pickens County, near PickensviUe, 
until the death of the former in 1868. His 
paternal grandfather was bom in Ireland, and 
his grandmother in England. He began life 
for himself as a clerk for Drary Miller, a 
merchant at Bridgeville, and remained there 
for three years, when, on the death of his 
father, he returned home and took charge of 
the plantation, at the same time conducting 
a farm of his own In Noxubee County, Miss. 
He enlisted in the C. S. Army in 1861, join- 
ing Ca C, Forty-first Alabama infantry, and 
remained in the service of the c(Mnmissary 
department until the latter part of 1864, when 
he was discharged on account of disability 
for service. In 1866, he formed a partnership 
in the mefcantile business with Dr. A. Bf. 
Wilkins at PickensviUe, and at the same time 
formed a partnership with S. W. Hood, at 
Franconia. He maintained the latter associa- 
tion until 1869, when he sold his interest in 
the business at Pranconia, and gave his en- 
tire attention to the store in PickensviUe, as- 
suming full control of the business in 1887. 
He was a township trustee for twenty years, 
and is a Mason. Married: (1) in 1869, to 
Dora Stinson, who was bom in Pickens County, 
and died December, 1882, daughter of James 
and Nancy (Cotton) Stinson; (2) in Novem- 
ber, 1886, to Mary Archibald, a native of Pleas- 
ant Ridge, Greene County. Children, by first 
marriage: 1. Walter, b. in January, 1871, a 
graduate of Marion military institute, 1892; 2. 
Julia, b. in March, 1873, attended Judson col- 
lege; 3. LiUie, b. in December, 1876, attended 
Judson college; 4. John R., Jr., b. in January, 
1877, attended PickensviUe institute; 6. Dmry, 
b. in July, 1881; by second marriage: 6. Annie, 
b. in January, 1889. Residence: PickensviUe. 

LONG, NIMROD W. E., farmer, merchant, 
was born March 26, 1834, in Upson County, 
Ga.; son of Nimrod W. and Catherine (Davis) 
Long, the former a native of Baldwin County, 
Ga., born in 1800, who was married in Hous- 
ton County, Ga., lived in Twigg and Upson 
CounUes, Ga., until 1836, when he moved to 
RusseU County, near Scale, and in 1868, moved 
to Columbus, Ga., where he was living at the 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



time at his death in 1876, who served in the 
Seminole War in Florida, and represented 
Russell County in the state legislature in 1837 
and in 1845. The Davis family was originally 
from North Carolina. Mr. Long was gradu- 
ated from the University of Georgia in 1864, 
and was a civil engineer until the outbreak 



LONG, THOMAS LEEPER, merchant, was 
born May 18, 1860, at CarroUton, Carroll County, 
Ga.; son of B. M. and Amanda C. (Wooten) 
Long (q. v.). He was educated in the conmion 
schools of Georgia. He is a merchant; was 
mayor of CarroUton, Ga., 1886; mayor of Jasper 
twice; presidential elector, 1892; repfesentatiye 



of the War of Secession, when he enlisted in Irom Walker County in the legislature of 1890 

Bt Alabama *^and 1900; and a member of the constitutional 



1862, as a private in Co. B, Fifty-first 
cavalry. He served mostly with the western 
army, at Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, in the 
Atlanta campaign, and following Sherman 
into the Carol inas. He was a member of a 
scouting company most of the time. After 
the war, he returned to his home and engaged 
in farming for ten years, then moved to Hurts- 
boro, where he conducted a mercantile busi- 
ness in addition to farming. He represented 
Russell County in the legislature from 1884- 
1888. Married: in 1860, at Perote, Bullock 
County, to Martha J. Gamble. Children: 1. 
George D., d. in infancy; 2. Jackson Edward, 
attended Vanderbilt university, and was gradu- 
ated from the University of Alabama, LL. B., 
1886, practiced law at Eufaula four years, then 
at Birmingham, d. April 16, 1894, at Eufaula, 
m. October 26, 1887, at Eufaula, Mamie Bealle 
Dent, daughter of Capt. S. H. Dent of Eufaula, 
left three children; 3. Jesse L., bookkeeper at 
Columbus, Ga., d. in 1890, unmarried; 4. Nim- 
rod Walton, d. May 10, 1887, while attending 
the University of Alabama; 6. Anne Frances, 
Hurtsboro; 6. Lunsford, d. 1890; 7. Queenelle, 
Hurtsboro. Residence: Hurtsboro. 

LONG, RICHARD HUGHS, farmer, was born 
July 9, 1868, near Gainesville; son of Thomas 
McClery and Annie (Horn) Long, the former 
a Virginian, bom at Castle Wood, Russell Coun- 
ty, who lived near Gkiinesville, and was a 
Confederate courier for Gen. Archer, during 
the War of Secession; grandson of Richard 
Bemy and Pricilla (Dickerson) Long and of 
Iredell Hughs and Elizabeth (Massey) Horn, 
of Greene County. The Longs came from Vir- 
ginia after 1860 to Gainesville, where they 
have since remained. Mr. Long received his 
early education at the Cedar Grove military 
academy, Livingston. He attended Southern 
university, Greensboro, graduating in 1887 with 
a degree of B.P., and also studied civil engineer- 
ing. He is a farmer; has served as examiner 
of Cheppama Indian Lands, 1893-4; as U. S. 
consul for the district of Sonora, Mexico, 1896 
and 1897, and was mayor of his home town. 
He was elected to the State legislature from 
Sumter County in 1919. He is a Democrat and 
a member of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity. 
Married: at Gainesville, to Sallie Barnes, 
daughter of Charles McPherson Aduston and 
Annie (Barnes) Rogers, who lived near War- 
saw. Children: 1. Annie Lida; 2. Sarah Eliza- 
beth; 3. Janie Rogers; 4. Clarence Hughs; 6. 
Thomas McClery. Residence: Gkiinesville. 

LONG, ROBERT A., member of the con- 
stitutional convention of 1876, from Washing- 
ton County; father of Judge D. J. Long of 
Chatom. 



convention of 1901. He is now engaged in the real 
estate business in Florida, but retains his Ala- 
bama residence. He is a Democrat, and a 
Methodist Married: May 29, 1889, at Livings- 
ton, to Augusta M. Sprott. Children: 1. Henry 
M.. served as captain in 117th Field artillery, 
U. S. Army during the European War; 2. Car- 
rie, m. ; 3. Fred. Residence: Jasper. 

LONG, WILLIAM HAL, lawyer, was bom 
April 16, 1877, in Dallas County; son of Wil- 
liam Henry and Nannie Lane (Thompson) 
Long, the former a Confederate soldier, who 
served through the War of Secession in Co. 
D, Fourth Alabama infantry regiment; grand- 
son of Dr. Daniel and Mary (Billingsley) Lon^, 
the former who was of Irish descent, a gradu- 
ate of Jefferson medical college, Philadelphia, 
who was assistant surgeon under Col. Alston 
of South Carolina in the War of 1812, and 
came to Alabama in 1818, and of John Simp- 
son and Nancy Lane (Bryan) Thompson, the 
former a native of Wordmelow Island, S. C, 
who emigrated with his parents to Alabama, 
settling in Washington County, and later lived 
and died at Old Spring Hill, Marengo County, 
the latter whose grandfather was a member of 
Continental Congress, 1779; great-grandson of 
Samuel Alexander and Jane (McMean) Thomp- 
son. The Thompsons and Bryans were of Eng- 
lish descent, the latter from Westmoreland Coun- 
ty, Va. Mr. Long was educated in the public 
schools; was admitted to the bar, March 22, 
1906; and practices law in Decatur. He was 
elected to the State legislature from Morgan 
County for the session of 1907. He has held 
many offices in the Alabama national guard; is 
a Democrat; a Presbyterian; and an Elk. Resi- 
dence: Decatur. 

LONG, WILLIAM GATES, lawyer, was bom 
November 20, 1860, at Banks, Pike County; 
son of James B. and Mary Jane (Gates) Long, 
the former a native and resident of Pike (boun- 
ty, a soldier in the Fifteenth Alabama infantry 
regiment, C. S. Army, who died in the service, 
the latter a sister of the late William C. Gates 
(q. v.), grandson of William and Sarah Gates, 
of Pike County. Mr. Long was educated in the 
village school at Abbeville, and at the Uni- 
versity of Alabama where he was a student for 
three years. He has practiced law at Abbeville 
since 1881; was elected mayor of that town in 
1882 and has been re-elected three times; 
served as register in chancery for Henry Coun- 
ty.* 1884-1898; was elected to the lower house of 
the State legislature in 1900, and to the State 
senate from the thirty-fifth district, 1902. He is 
a Democrat. Married: January 17, 1882, at 
Abbeville, to Pet, daughter of Z. W. and 



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1069 



Ann B. (Culver) Laney, of Henry County. 
Residence: Abbeyille. 

LONGCRIER, J. H., Missionary Baptist min- 
ister; living in 1913. Residence: Jasper. 

LONGSHORE, ADOLPHUS PARKER, law- 
yer, was born September 16, 1864, near Hickory 
Flat, Chambers County; son of Levi and Mary 
Ann (Parker) Longshore, the former who was 
born near Newberry Court House, in Newberry 
District, S. C, moved early in life with his par- 
ents to Alabama, and enlisted as a private in 
the Thirty-eighth Alabama infantry regiment, 
C. S. Army, serving four years, grandson of Eu- 
clidus and Sarah Longshore, the former who 
emigrated from Ehigland to Pennsylvania, 
served as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, 
and died during the war, and of John and Fan- 
nie (East) Parker, of Chambers County, the 
former an English immigrant. Mr. Longshore 
received his early education in the public 
schools of Chambers and Coosa Counties, later 
attended Washington and Lee university but 
did not graduate on account of lack of means. 
Reading law with Osceola Kyle, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Wetumpka in 1878; com- 
menced to practice at Alexander City; two years 
later moved to Dadeville; and in 1886 removed 
to Columbiana. He was a member of the 
legislature of 1888-89, 1890^91, 1894-96, and 
1918-19; was elected judge of probate of Shelby 
County, in 1898; re-elected in 1904 and 1910; 
and entered the practice of law in 1917 with 
F. G. Koenig and W. L. Longshore. He was 
first a Democrat, later a Populist, and is now a 
Republican. He is a Missionary Baptist; a 
Mason; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: 
November 1, 1882, at Dudleyville, to Fannie 
TerreU, daughter of William Andrew and Laura 
Jennings, of that place, the former who served 
in the War of Secession. Children: 1. Lallage; 
2. Houston, deceased; 3. A. P., jr.; 4. Annie 
Laurie, m. Sam Friedman; 6. William Levi; 6. 
Alice; 7. Leslie; 8. Mary Nell; 9. Paul; 10. 
Frances; 11. James; 12. Louise. Residence: 
Columbiana. 

LONGSTREET, JABOS, soldier, was bom in 
Edgefield District, S. C, January 8, 1821, and 
died January 2, 1904; son of James and Mary 
Ann (Dent) Longstreet of New Jersey and 
Maryland respectively. He removed with his 
IMirents to Alabama in 1831 and was appointed 
from that State to the U. S. military academy 
at West Point, where he was graduated in 1842 
and assigned to the Fourth U. S. infantry, and 
served in the Indian and Mexican wars. He 
rose to the rank of lieutenant-general, C. S. 
Army, and was accredited to Alabama for his 
whole Confederate service. After the war he 
united with the Republican party; was ap- 
pointed f^urveyor of customs at New Orleans 
by President Grant; later was supervisor of 
internal revenue of Louisiana; postmaster at 
Gainesville, Ga.; U. S. minister to Turkey; 
U. S. marshal for district of Georgia; and after 
1897. was commissioner of Pacific railroads. 
Married: (1) March 8, 1848, to Maria Louise 
Garland of Lynchburg, Va., who d. December 



28, 1889; and (2) September 8, 1897. to Helen 
Dortch, of Atlanta, Ga. Last residence: Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

LOOKINGBILL, DANIEL, soldier of the 
American Revolution, age not given, a resi- 
dent of Dallas County; private 14th U. S. 
Regular; enrolled on July 30, 1831. payment 
to date from July 25. 1831; annual allowance. 
$96; sums received to date of publication of 
list, $260.89; acts military establishment. — 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in voL xiv. Sen, 
doc. 614. 23rd Cong.. 1st sess., 1833-84. Re- 
sided also in Marion. Fayette and Tuscaloosa 
Counties.— Pension Book, State Branch Bank, 
Mobile. 

LOOMIS. JOHN C, professor of ancient lUn- 
guages at the University of Alabama, Tusca- 
loosa, 1869-70. He held the A. M. degree. 

LORE, DAVID, member of the constitutional 
convention of 1867. from the sixth district; 
grand-father of G. W. Russell of Eufaula. 

LORIMORE. T. B.. minister of the Christian 
church. Residence: Mars Hill. 

LOTT, ELISHA B., public official, was bom 
October 16, 1819, in Mobile County; son of 
Jesse and Levica (Williams) Lott, the former 
a native of Georgia, a farmer, who settled in 
Mobile County in 1800. and died in 1843, the 
latter a native of Washington County, who 
died about 1876. He was reared on a farm 
in Mobile County, and was educated in the 
common schools of the county. When he was 
eighteen years of age, he went to Mobile, and 
after clerking for several years, engaged tn 
merchandising for himself. He continued in 
that business until 1868; was elected tax col* 
lector of Mobile County in 1864; and was 
elected to that oflice thirteen times, serving 
in all thirty-seven years. He made a trip to 
California in 1849 on account of the impaired 
condition of his health, and returned in 1862. 
During that time, he devoted his attention to 
mining. He served in the C. S. Army as a 
member of the Thirty-sixth Alabama infantry 
regiment, 1862-1866, and at the close of the war 
held the rank of first lieutenant. He was 
wounded at the battle of Chickamauga and was 
disabled tor three months. He was a Demo- 
crat; a Baptist; a Mason; and a member of the 
Toung Men's Christian Association. Married: 
January 20. 1846, to Mary E. Swain, of Mo- 
bile. He had eleven children of whom four 
sons and six daughters are living. Last resi- 
dence: Mobile. 

LOUGHRIDGE, ROBERT McGILL. Presby- 
terian minister and missionary, was bom De- 
cember 24. 1809. at Laurens. S. C. and died 
July 8. 1900, at Waco. Tex.; son of James and 
Deborah Ann (McGill) Loughridge, the former 
a native of County Antrim, Ireland, a tailor, 
who came to America in 1796. and settled in 
Laurens. S. C, who raised a battalion of cav; 
airy to defend the state during the nullification 
excitement and was elected major, moved to 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Alabama in 1822 and settled in St Clair County 
where he engaged in farming, moved to Greene 
County in 1830, or 1831, and laid out the town 
of Mesopotamia, later Eutaw, and died in 1837 
while on a trip to Texas, the latter a South 
Carolinian, of Scotch-Irish Presbyterian stock; 
grandson of Allen and Sarah (BccleB) Lough- 
ridge, who lived in Ireland, and of Robert and 
Blisabeth (Gray) McGill, of Abbeville, &. C 
He received his early education in an academy 
at Eutaw, and was graduated A. B. from Miami 
university, Oxford, O., in 1887. He received the 
honorary degree of D. D. from his alma mater 
in 1886. He spent one year at the theological 
seminary at Princeton university, and left 
school in 1838 because of his father's death. 
He ccmtinued the study of theology under Rev. 
Dr. J. H. Gray, and was licensed to preach by 
the Presbytery at Eutaw, April 9, 1841. He 
preached in the churches at Oxford, Payneo- 
vllle and Elizabeth for six months, and was 
appointed missionary to the Creek Indians, west 
of Arkansas, by the Presbyterian board of for- 
eign missions and ordained as evangelist at 
Clinton, October 15, 1842. 

The following month he set out on horse- 
back on the Journey to the Indian territory to 
offer the Indians a school and a preached gos- 
pel. Among his letters to the chiefs he bore 
one from the U. S. secretary of war, commend- 
ing him and his mission. The Creeks had, five 
years before, driven out the missionaries of 
the Presbyterians and other churches, and Rev. 
Loughridge was making the prospecting tour to 
ascertain if the planting of a mission would 
now be allowed. Presenting his letters to the 
chiefs, he was told that in a council to be 
held three weeks later, they would consider his 
applicaticm and give him an answer. The 
council first consented to his teaching a school 
but would not give permission to preach. When 
Mr. Loughridge declined to come unless allowed 
to preach the council consented to his preadi- 
ing at the school but no where else. He yielded 
to their demands, and while preparing for 
removal to the field, spent some time visiting 
churches in Alabama and Mississippi where he 
presented the claims of the Indian mission 
work. He located at the town of Coweta, and 
started his school in an Indian hut. A year 
later, he erected a substantial hewn log house 
of seven rooms, and took eight' or ten hoys and 
girls to board at the school on the condition 
that they should work part of the time. That 
was the beginning of the great and successful 
system of manual labor boarding schools among 
the Indians. For two years Dr. Loughridge 
preached at the Mission, then as missionaries 
of other denominations had come in and were 
allowed to preach anywhere, he appealed to 
the chiefs for the removal of Uie restriction 
placed upon him and his request was granted. 

About six years after the planting of the 
Coweta school the Nation enlarged the ca- 
pacity of the buildings and founded another 
manual labor school at Tallahassee which was 
placed in the charge of Dr. Loughridge as su- 
perintendent. During the War of Secession, the 
work was suspended, and Dr. Loughridge moved 
with his family to Texas where he spent eight- 
een years serving churches in the Presbyteries 



of central and western Texas. In 1880 he ac- 
cepted an invitation to return to the Creek 
Nation to take charge of a school at Weleetka» 
and after conducting that school for Bome 
years, resigned and devoted himself to preach- 
ing and preparing books and translations in 
the Indian language. He returned to Texas in 
1892, and, though more than eighty years of 
age^ was for several years actively engaged in 
the work oi the ministry, serving home mission 
fields in the Presbytery of central Texas. He 
translated several of the goiqoels into the Creek 
langauge; compiled the Creek hymn book and 
tracts; prepared a "Dicticmary of Creek and 
English Words;" and was author of "The Mode 
of Baptism, as taught and practiced by Jesus 
Christ" He was a Democrat Married: (1) 
December 6, 1842, at Selma, to Olivia Diantha 
Hills, who died in 1845, daughter of David 
Hills of Rcmie, N. T.; (2) December 4, 1846, 
to Mary Avery, who died in January, 1850, 
daughter of Joseph Avery of Conway, Mass.; 
(3) October 15, 1853, at Park HiU, Cherokee 
Nation, to Harriet Johnson, who was at that 
time principal of a mission school in the Indian 
territory, and who died May 28, 1900, daughter 
of James and Ursula Johnson of Sturbridge, 
Mass. Children, by first marriage: 1. Robert 
HIU, Ph. D., m. Bessie M. Webb; 2. Olivia 
Diantha, d. in childhood; by third marriage: 
3. Mary Belknap, m. Joseph T. SomerviUe; 4. 
Harriet Elisebeth, missionary, d. April 11, 1889, 
m. Rev. A. T. Graybill; 5. John Gray, d. August 
17, 1860; 6. James Allen, m. (1) Ruth PatiUo, 
d. 1894, (2) Emma Foster. Last residence: 
Waco, Tex. 

LOVE, ANDREW PICKENS, merchant, was 
bom October 12, 1818, in Anderson District, 
S. C, and died September 19, 1896, at China 
Grove, Pike County; son of James and Ann 
(Dowdell) Love, natives of South Carolina, 
the former of whom was bom in Anderson 
District, and became a tanner, moved to Ala- 
bama, and lived in Tuscaloosa County, in 
Greene County, at Pleasant Hill, Dallas County, 
tit Monticello, Pike County, and fln^y at 
Wetumpka, where he died. His education was 
limited to the old log cabin country school 
at Monticello, and he became a merchant, deal* 
ing in general merchandise in Troy, Linwood, 
and China Grove. He was elected sherift of 
Pike County in 1850, and was a delegate to 
the secession convention in 1861. During the 
War of Secession, he became captain of Co. 
I, Twenty-second Alabama infantry regimoit, 
organized at Troy, and later was made ci^ 
tain of Co. I, Fourth battalion ci Aifthi^tn^ 
cavalry. As senior captain, he commanded 
the Fourth battalion, which Joined Phillip's 
legion, Hampton's cavalry. He was an old line 
Whig, and a strong Union man, but went with 
the state when Alabama seceded. He was a 
Methodist, and was worshipful master of his 
lodge of Masons. He was never married. Last 
residence: China Grove, Pike County. 

LOVEJOY, THOMAS E., banker and presi- 
dent of the Manhattan life insurance company, 
was bom September 16, 1875, at Spalding, Ma- 
con County, Ga.; son of P. H. and Henrietta 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1071 



(MeKeoBle) Loveio7f the former bom in Jasper 
Coiiiit7» OtL, resided at Hawkinsville, Ga., was 
a merchant and planter, for years actiye in 
politics; grandson of W. C. and Catharine 
(Parker) Love joy. who lived in Jasper County* 
Gf).. an<i of J H. McKenzie. who lived at Monte- 
snma, Qa. He received his early education in 
public schools of Hawkinsville, Ga.» and col- 
legiate education at Sadlers Bryant and Strat- 
ton business college of Baltimore, 1898. From 
1894 to 1909, he was engaged in varied kinds 
of business in Hawkinsville, conducting a retail 
grocery business, sharing in the organiza- 
tion of banks and becoming vice-president of 
one until 1913, being proprietor of a depart- 
ment store, organizing and being president of 
the Gulf line railway company. In March, 1909, 
he moved to Montgomery, to accept the vice- 
presidency of the Montgomery bank and trust 
company, of which he was president, 1910-13. 
In April, 1913, he was elected as vice-president 
of the EiXchange national bank of Montgomery. 
In May, 1913, he was called to the presidency 
of the Manhattan life insurance company of 
New York, and was the youngest man ever pres- 
ident of any one of New York's prominent in- 
surance companies. He is director in several 
financial institutions in Alabama, Georgia, and 
New York. He is a Democrat; and a Baptist 
Married: November 9, 1897, in Talbotton, Ga., 
to Fannie, daughter of Harry C. and Susie 
(Dowdell) Brown, who lived at Talbotton. Mrs. 
Lovejoy died September 3, 1910, in Montgomery. 
Children: 1. Susie; 2. Henrietta; 3. Frances; 
4. Thomas E., Jr. Address: New York City. 

LOVELACE, EDWIN MARSHALL, business 
man, was bom July 14, 1854, at Pleasant Hill, 
Dallas County; son of Basil Manly and Amanda 
(Lovelace) Lovelace, the former a native of 
Edgefield District, S. C, who moved to Alaba- 
ma with his parents, lived in Dallas County 
until 1859, then moved to Escambia County; 
grandson of Aaron Lovelace, of English parent- 
age, who was born in South Carolina, married 
a Miss Blalock, and later moved to Dallas Coun- 
ty, and of Thomas Lovelace, of Edgefield, S. C. 
Mr. Lovelace was educated in the common 
schoobs of Brewton, and at Brookljm high 
school. He left school at the age of sixteen 
years to work in a logging camp, and has since 
been engaged in the timber business in all its 
branches. He has been president of the Love- 
lace lumber company for many years; a direct- 
or in the Bank of Brewton; commissioner of EIs- 
cambia County, 1904-1910 ; alderman of Brewton 
for eight years; president of the board of 
trustees of the Brewton institute; and State 
senator from the twenty-first district, 1911. He 
is a Democrat; a Baptist; a Knight of Pythias; 
a Knight of Honor; and an Elk. Married: to 
Frances, daughter of Captain B. B. and 
Elizabeth (Floumoy) McKenzie, of Eufaula, 
the former of whom was captain of Co. B, 
Love's Fourth Alabama infantry battalion, 
later a part of the Jeff Davis legion, one of the 
most conspicuous commands of the army of 
northern Virginia. Children: 1. Edwin Mc- 
Kenzie; 2. William Yancey; 8. Barnes Flournoy. 
Residence: Brewton. 



LOVELADY, ROBERT FRANKLIN, druggist, 
was bom August 24, 1865, at Danville, Mor- 
gan County; son of Clark C. and Martha Jane 
(Sherrell) Lovelady, of Danville; grandson of 
William H. and Eliza (Malone) Lovelady, the 
former a Revolutionary soldier, who came from 
England, and settled in Danville, and of Wiley 
B. Sherrell, of Danville. He attended the com- 
mon schools of Danville; studied phannacy at 
home; and passed the State board of pharmacy. 
May 17, 1887. He entered the drug business at 
Pratt City, 1888; served as president of the 
Amzi Godden company, 1899-1901; established 
the Harris, Lovelady furniture comiMUiy in 
1891; served as alderman of Pratt City, 1897- 
1904; and represented Jefferson County in the 
State legislature, 1907. He is a Democrat; a 
Methodist, serving the church as steward for 
more than twenty years; and a Mason; 
Shriner; and Knight Templar. Married: Octo- 
ber 20, 1887, at Verbena, to Henrietta E., 
daughter of Alonzo L. Haralson, of that city; 
granddaughter of Col. W. B. Haralson of Selma, 
and of Jack Chappell. Children: 1. Robert 
Grady; 2. William Earnest; 3. Mable Browning; 
4. Miriam Elizabeth; 5. Henry Clyde. Resi- 
dence: Pratt City. 

LOVELL, William S., m^Jor, 1st battalion 
Georgia infantry regiment, C. S. Army; major, 
36th, Villepigue's, Georgia infantry regiment; 
major, 1st Confederate infantry regiment, for- 
merly the 36th Georgia. 

LOVEMAN, ROBERT, lyric poet and author, 
was bom April 11, 1864, at Cleveland, Ohio; 
son of David Reuben and Esther (Schwartz) 
Loveman, the latter the daughter of Alexander 
Schwartz, all natives of Hungary, the parents 
coming to America during the early eighties. 
He received his academic education in thtt 
schools of Crawford and Dalton. Ga., and gradu- 
ated from the University of Alabama with the 
A. M. degree, later studying and traveling 
abroad. He has for the past twenty-five years 
contributed to the highest class magazines. He 
has published several books of verse, 1889, 1893, 
1897, 1900, among them. "A book of verse;" 
"The gate of silence," 1905; "Songs from a 
Georgia garden;" "The blushful South," 1909, 
"On the way to Willowdale," 1912; "Sonnete of 
the strife,^ 1917. Reviewers both in America 
and England, have given Mr. Loveman's poems 
the very highest praise, and have compared his 
work to the greatest Isgric poets. His poem 
"The rain song," has been declared by the 
critics to be "one of the best songs in American 
poetry, and the most widely copied poem since 
the days of Longfellow and Tennyson." Unmar- 
ried. Residence: Dalton, Ga. 

LOVETT, JAMES ARCHIBALD BRAD- 
FORD, teacher, was born March 3, 1848, in 
Winston County, and died October 19, 1910, 
at Bessemer; son of Abel J. and Mary (Hard- 
wick) Lovett, who lived near Shelby, the for- 
mer a native of Georgia; grandson of Thomas 
Lovett, of Georgia, who was of Scotch descent, 
and of James and Violetta (Elder) Hard wick, 
who lived in (Georgia, the former a member 



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1072 



DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



of the Alabama legislature for several years, 
whose father came from England. He was 
educated at Ashville, and at the age of flfteea 
ran away from school to enter the C. S. Army. 
He was made drummer boy in the Fifty-eighth 
Alabama regiment, Co. O, under Capt. A. B. 
Vandegrift, and after two months' service, was 
captured, June, 1863, and held a prisoner at 
Camp Chase and at Fort Delaware until the 
close of the war. After the war, he worked 
his way through the theological department 
of the Cumberland university, Lebanon, Tenn., 
and was graduated with the degree of D. D. 
He received the degree of A. M. from the col- 
lege at Winchester, Tenn. He Joined the min- 
istry of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, 
and was pastor of churches at Huntsville, 
Winchester, Tenn., and Beech Grove, Tenn. 
After giving up the ministry on account of 
throat trouble, he entered the profession of 
teaching. In 1882, he organized the Huntsville 
grade schools, and later was made superin- 
tendent of the city schools of Huntsville, and 
superintendent of education of Madison Coun- 
ty. He was at one time secretary of the South- 
ern interstate cotton convention, and was ap- 
pointed as one of a comniittee to visit Presi- 
dent Roosevelt in the interest of the expansion 
of the cotton market. He was elected to the 
presidency of Blount college in 1889; estab- 
lished Spring Lake college, at Springville, and 
later, the Montezuma university, since de- 
stroyed by fire, at Bessemer; and was twice 
elected president of the Ninth district agri- 
cultural school, which replaced Blount college 
after its destruction by fire. He was one of 
the founders of the Birmingham dental school 
in 1893, and of the Birmingham medical col- 
lege in 1894. In the former he was profes- 
sor of chemistry and meUUurgy, and in the 
latter, of chemistry and toxicology. He was a 
Democrat; a Mason; and a member of Camp 
William Rose McAdory of Confederate Vet- 
erans. He established an educational journal, 
•'The Teacher at Work," said to have been 
the first educational Journal in the state, in 
Huntsville, about 1886. Married: September 
2, 1866, to Frances Priscilla, daughter of 
William and Ellen Gilbert, who lived at 
Highland, Shelby County. Children: 1. Ed- 
ward Goode, deceased; 2. Dr. James Marion, 
m. (1) Emma Mae Baker of Hunisville, (2) 
Olive Nichols of Delavan, 111.; 3. Mary Eleanor, 
Bessemer; 4. Dr. William Abel, m. Fannie Kemp 
Dennis, Birmingham; 6. Richard Beard, de- 
ceased; 6. Susie Mae, deceased. Last residence: 
Bessemer. 

LOWE, RARTLET M., merchant, brigadier 
general state militia, was bom in Edgefield, 
S. C, and died in New Orleans, La. His par- 
ents were from Maryland, of an old family 
which came over from England with Lord Bal- 
timore. His father, who had been a captain 
in the Revolutionary Army, moved from South 
Carolina soon after Gen. Lowe's birth, to 
Florida and accepted service with the Span- 
ish government for which he received a very 
large grant of land. Gen. Lowe subsequently 
moved to Huntsville, and became a success- 
ful merchant at that place, until the financial 



revulsion of 1837 swept away his fortune. Hie 
was elected a brigadier general of Alabama 
militia, under the major-generalship of Benja- 
min Patteson. After his reverses at Hunts- 
ville, he moved to New Orleans, and engaged 
in the factorage and commission merchant 
business, and continued in that business until 
his death. Married: to Sarah Sophia Manning. 
Children: 1. Sophia, b. in Huntsville, m. CoL 
Nicholas Davis of HuntsviUe; 2. Dr. John 
Thomas, b. November 6, 1824, d. about 1893, 
was graduated from the University of Ala- 
bama, A. B., A. M., 1861, and from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, M. D., 1846, served as 
chief surgeon of Gen. Loring's division of in- 
fantry, C. S. Army, War of Secession, and prtu^ 
ticed medicine at Aberdeen, Miss.; 3. Robert 
Joseph, b. July 11, 1836, attended the Univer- 
sity of Alabama, studied law and was admitted 
to the bar, lawyer at Huntsville, represented 
Madison County in the State legislature, 1859, 
enlisted in the first company raised in north 
Alabama, for the C. S. Army, was assigned to 
the Fourth Alabama regiment, commanded by 
Col. E. J. Jones, became a victim of camp or 
typhoid fever after the forced march to Ma- 
nassas, and died in 1864, m. Matilda Holding, 
left two sons, one of whom is Robert Joseph 
(q. v.); 4. William Manning (q. v.). Last 
residence: New Orleans. 

LOWE, ROBERT JOSEPH, lawyer, was born 
January 31, 1861, at Huntsville; son of Robert 
Joseph and Matilda (Holding) Lowe, of Hunts- 
ville, the former a lawyer, who served in the 
State legislature, 1869-1861, enlisted in the 
Fourth Alabama regiment, C. S» Army, as a 
private, and died as a result of camp fever 
brought on by the forced march to Manassas; 
grandson of Gen. Bartley M. and Sarah Sophia 
(Manning) Lowe (q. v.), and of Richard Hold- 
ing, of Huntsville, who came from North Caro- 
lina to Alabama and became an early settler 
of Madison County. He was educated in pri- 
vate schools of Huntsville, was graduated from 
the law department of the University of Ala- 
bama, LL. B., 1881, and was admitted to the 
bar at Huntsville, that same year. In the fall 
of 1881, he moved to Birmingham, and began 
the practice of law. In 1884, he became asso- 
ciated with William H. Smith, former gover- 
nor of Alabama, and David D. Smith, his son, 
in the law firm of Smith and Lowe. He con- 
tinued in that firm for about ten years, then 
practiced alone. He was a member of the 
State legislature, from Jefferson County, 1888- 
1889; and a member of the constitutional con- 
vention of 1901 from the state at large. He 
served as first sergeant of the Madison County 
rifies, 1879, 1880; as first lieutenant of the 
Birmingham artillery, 1882; and as captain of 
the latter, 1883-1886. He was elected chair- 
man of the Democratic pounty executive com- 
mittee, 1898-1900; chairman of the state exec- 
utive committee, 1898, 1900 and 1902; chair- 
man of the Democratic caucus of the con- 
stitutional convention; was a delegate from 
the state at large to the national convention 
in 1900; and was temporary chairman of that 
delegation. Married: (1) in May, 1892, at 
Athens, to Harriett Emily Pryor, who was 



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killed in a storm at Birmingham, March 25, 
1901, daughter ot Senator Luke Pryor (q. v.) ; 
(2) in April, 1902, at Eufaula, to Carrie (Coch- 
rane) Jackson, daughter of Judge John Coch- 
rane, of Eufaula. Child, by second marriage: 
Robert J., b. March 24, 1903. Residence: Bir- 
mingham. 

LOWE, WILLIAM MANNING, lawyer, rep- 
resentative in congress, was born January 16, 
1842, in Huntsville, and died October 12, 1882, 
at Huntsville; son of Oen. Bartley M. and 
Sarah Sophia (Manning) Lowe (q. t.). He 
attended the public schools at Florence; the 
law department of the University of Tennessee, 
from which he was graduated in 1860; and was 
a student at the University of Virginia in 
1861, when he volunteered as a private in the 
Fourth Alabama infantry, C. S. Army. He 
was dangerously wounded at the first battle 
of Manassas, and on his recovery served as 
lieutenant colonel on the staff of (Sen. Clan- 
ton, in Georgia, Alabama and Tennessee, until 
captured at the battle of Franklin. He was 
held prisoner at Camp Chase and Fort Dela- 
ware until three months after the surrender. 
He was elected solicitor of the Huntsville cir- 
cuit in 1866, and held the position until ousted 
from office by the reconstruction measures in 
1868. In 1870, he represented Madison County 
in the State legislature; was elected a dele- 
gate to the state constitutional convention 
of 1875; was elected as a Greenback Demo- 
crat to the Forty-sixth congress, 1879-1881, 
and successfully contested the election of 
Joseph Wheeler to the Forty-seventh congress, 
1882, in which he served until his death. Last 
residence: '"The Grove." Himtsville. 

LOWE, WILLIAM THOMAS, lawyer, was 
bom September 14, 1860, at Reform, Pickens 
County; son of Marcus Wilbum and Susan 
(Shelton) Lowe, of Pickens (bounty, the former 
a second lieutenant in the C. S. Army; grandson 
of John Franklin and Patsy (Munday) Lowe, 
and of Crispen and Susan Shelton, all of whom 
lived near Reform, Pickens C>>unty. He was 
prepared in the common schools, and was 
graduated from Florence normal school in 
1884. He studied law in the office of Judge 
W. P. Chitwood at Monlton, Lawrence County, 
and began the practice of law at that place in 
1887; was a delegate from Lawrence County to 
the constitutional convention of 1901; repre- 
sented that county in the *State legislature, 
190S; moved to Decatur where he has since 
practiced law, 1904; and was elected to the 
State senate from the second district, 1906. 
He is a Democrat, and a Knight of Pythias. 
Married: December 8, 1888, in Moulton, to 
Sarepta, daughter of William D. and Frances 
L. (Lynch) , Irwin, of Moulton. Residence: 
Decatur. 

LOWRY, SAMUEL, H., physician, was bom 
October 16, 1850, in Huntsville; son of John 
T. and Vl^nia H. (Miller) Lowry, the former 
of Scotch-Irish descent, a merchant and planter 
at Huntsville, a member of the firm of Lowry, 
Hamilton and company, merchants, and of the 
lumber iirm of Mayhew and Lowry, who served 



in the commissary department of the C. S. 
Army, War of Secession, and died in 1886; 
grandson of Rev. Samuel and Elizabeth (Tate) 
Lowry, the former a minister in the Cumberland 
Presbyterian* church. He attended the schools 
of Huntsville and the University of Virginia, 
where he began the study of medicine and was 
graduated from the Bellevue hospital medical 
coUege, New York, M. D., 1873. He began the 
practice of his profession later in that year 
in partnership, with Dr. Dement of Huntsville, 
and has continued in that place. He has served 
as health officer of the city of Huntsville and 
the county of Madison; has acted as secre- 
tary of the county board of censors; is a mem- 
ber of the Madison County medical society; 
a member of the college of counsellors of the 
State medical association; and a Knight of 
Pjrthias. Married: November 26, 1890, in 
Huntsville, to Jimmie L., daughter of Robert 
L. Pulley of that place. Children: 1. John 
Tate. Residence: Huntsville. 

LUCAS, JAMES, soldier of tJ^e American 
Revolution. Mary, wife of James Lucas, a resi- 
dent of Montgomery County, was enrolled on 
January 12, 1888, under act of Congress of 
June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 
1831; annual allowance, $600.— Petwion Book^ 
State Branch Bank, Mobile. She resided in 
Montgomery Coimty, June 1, 1840, with Jane 
W. Freeney, aged 80.— Ccntit* of Pensioners, 
1841, p. 149. 

LUCAS, JOHN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, private, particular service not dis- 
closed; enrolled on January 10, 1837, under 
act of Congress of June 7, 1832; annual allow- 
ance, $20; no record made of any pasrment — 
Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

LUCAS, RANDOLPH, soldier of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, private, particular service not 
disclosed; enrolled on January 10, 1887, under 
act of Congress of June 7, 1832; annual allow- 
ance, $20; no record of any payment having 
been made. — Pension Book, State Branch Bank, 
Mobile. 

LUCKIE, JAMES BUCKNER, physician and 
surgeon, was bom July 16, 1888, in Newton 
Ck>unty, Cku; son of William Dickinson and 
E31iza (Buckner) Luckie, natives of Georgia, of 
Scotch descent. Dr. Luckie was educated at 
the common schools of his native county, and 
at Gwinnett institute. He began the study of 
medicine under Dr. John B. Headrick; attended 
course of lectures in Augusta, Cku, in winter 
of 1858-64; later graduated at Pennsylvania 
medical college, in 1855. He immediately be- 
gan the practice of his profession at Newton 
County, Cku; removed in 1856 to Orean, Pike 
(bounty, where he practiced until the outbreak 
of the war. In 1861 he raised a company of 
infantry and reported to Montgomery. The 
Confederate government being unable to equip 
them, the company was disbanded. Dr. Luckie 
was appointed assistant surgeon, however, and 
was ordered to Knoxville for duty, accompanied 
General Kirby-Smith, on his invasion of Ken- 
tucky as medical purveyor, a rank to which ha 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



was raised from that of assistant surgeon; was 
later inspector of hospitals. After the return 
to Knoxville, he was made chief of the bureau 
of small-pox and vaccination for the army of 
east Tennessee. When General Kirby-Smith 
was sent to the Trans-Mississippi department, 
he was at his own request assigned to field duty, 
in Grace's brigade, first in the 16th, then in the 
48d Alabama till the close of the war. After 
the cessation of hostilities, he located at Pine 
Lievel, Montgomery County, and resumed his 
practice, removed soon however to Montgomery 
where he practiced until 1872, when he removed 
to Birmingham. He represented the thirteenth 
district in the senate of 1880, and was for many 
years a councilman of Birmingham. He organ- 
ized the City fire department, and was its first 
chief; also the Birmingham rifies and artillery. 
He is a Mason. Married: (1) Eliza Imogen, 
daughter of James F. and Eliza Fielder, of 
Georgia; (2) in 1866 to Susan Oliver, daughter 
of James R. and Sarah Dillard, of Montgomery 
County. He is the father of nine children, 
among these, Lorenzo Foster (q. v.). Resi- 
dence: Birmingham. 

LUCKIE, LORENZO FOSTER, dentist, was 
bom December 20, 1875, in Jefferson County; 
son of Dr. James Buckner and Susan Oliver 
(Dillard) Luckie (q. v.). Dr. Luckie was edu- 
cated in the common schools of his native 
county and took a special course in dentistry. 
He served as Ist sergeant Co. G, Ist Alabama 
regiment, volunteer, Spanish-American Waj, 
and derk to mustering officer. Residence: 
Birmingham. 

LUEDDEBfANN, GUIDE, merchant, was 
bom in Erfurt, Germany; son of Frederick A. 
and Christina (Linsdorff ) Lueddemann, the for- 
mer of whom was an officer in the Pmssian 
Army, emigrated to America in 1847, locating 
«in Ohio, and later on at Milwaukee, Wis. Guide 
Lueddemann received a good common school 
education, and engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness; in 1864, he located at NashviUe, Tenn.; 
in 1865, he removed to Tuscumbia where he 
formed a partnership with H. Leiforth, and 
engaged in the dry goods business until 1868, 
when Mr. Leiforth withdrew and was succeeded 
by James N. Sampson, of New York, under the 
firm name of Lueddemann and company. This 
is the oldest business house in Tuscumbia and 
one of the strongest in Colbert County. He is 
a Mason and Knight of Pythias. Married: at 
Nashville, to Johanna Chisholm. Children: 
1. Frederick; 2. Max; 3. Ernest; 4. Frieda. 
Residence: Tuscumbia. 

LULL, FRANCIS WAYLAND, lawyer, was 
born October 19, 1872, at Wetumpka, Elmore 
County; son of Cabot and Sarah Graham 
(Crow) Lull, the former a native of Norwich, 
Conn., who came when a youth in 1852 to 
Wetumpka, was the first Democratic mayor of 
that town after reconstruction, clerk of pro- 
bate court and probate Judge of Elmore County, 
merchant; grandson of Albe and Mary Levina 
(Cabot) Lull, and Joseph and Lenora (Hall) 
Crow; great-great-grandson of Thomas Lenoir. 
The founder of the line in America was 



Thomas Lull, of Ipswich, Mass., born in 1636, 
ancestor of Tin^othy Lull, a Revolutionary sol- 
dier. Francis Wayland Lull was educated in 
the public schools of Wetumpka; graduated at 
the University of Alabama, with the degree of 
LL. B., 1896; began the practice of law, Jan- 
uary, 1897, in Wetumpka; served as mayor, 
October, 1910-14; was first lieutenant, Co. B, 
Alabama National Guard, 1900-04. He is a 
Democrat; Baptist; Mason; Odd Fellow; Red 
Man; and Knight of Pythias. Married: August 
7, 1901, at Wetumpka, to Ida Bell, daughter of 
Berry and Eliza Phillips of Tuskegee. Chil- 
dren: 1. Sarah Eugenia, d. in infancy; 2. Ida 
Bell; 3. Frank W., jr. Residence: Wetumpka. 

LUMPKIN, WILLIAM H., lawyer, bom Febm- 
ary 6, 1882, at Forney, Cherokee County; son of 
John Alfred and Susan (Mathews) Lumpkin, 
the former of Floyd County, Ga,, the latter of 
Forney, Cherokee County; grandson of Hiram 
Lumpkin, of Polk and Floyd (bounties, Gki., and 
of William and Mary Mathews of Forney. The 
family belongs to the noted Lumpkins of Geor- 
gia, and the Barringers of North Carolina, one 
of whom was in congress. Mr. Lumpkin was 
educated in the common schools of Forney, in 
the Agricultural college of Dahlonega, Ga., and 
in the law department of the University of 
Michigan. He is engaged in the practice of 
law at Outer, and served in the State legisla- 
ture in 1911. He is a Democrat; a Biason; an 
Odd Fellow; and a Knight of Pythias. Mar- 
ried: September 10, 1906, at Dalton, Ga., to 
Lula, daughter of Hugh Walker and Lula 
Cardon, of Center; granddaughter of Judge 
Samuel K. McSpadden, who was in the 
State senate, 1867-1863, and was colonel of the 
Nineteenth Alabama infantry regiment, C. S. 
Army; great-granddaughter of John Garrett of 
Cherokee. Residence: Center. 

LUMSDEN, CHARLES L., teacher and sol- 
dier, was bom May 12, 1834, at Petersburg, 
Dinwiddle County, Va., and killed In 1867; son 
of Charles and Martha Laura (Jones) Lums- 
den of Edinburgh, Scotland, and Sussex 
County, Va., respectively. He was educated In 
the private schools of Petersburg, Va., and 
graduated at the Virginia military institute in 
1858; after his graduation, taught until the 
opening of the War at the Alabama military 
institute at Tuscaloosa. He served through- 
out the War of Secession as captain of Lums- 
den's battery. He was an Episcopalian. Mar- 
ried: Hattie Raoul, of Tuscaloosa, who bora 
him two children. Last residence: Tuscaloosa. 

LUNDY, P. H., clerk of the Alabama Baptist 
State convention, 1853. He held a charge at 
Prattville at one time. 

LUPTON, FRANK ALLEMONG, physician 
and surgeon, was born January 6, 1878, at Tus- 
caloosa; son of Nathaniel Thomas and EUla 
Virginia (Allemong) Lupton (q. v.). He was 
reared in his native county and was educated 
in the common schools, after completing his 
primary work, he entered the Alabama poly« 
technic institute and took his B. S. and M. S. 
in 1891 and 1892, respectively; later attended 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1077 



Johns Hopkins university where he was gradu- 
ated with the degree of M. D., in 1899; imme- 
diately began the practice of medicine in Bir- 
mingham, in association with Dr. Lewis Cole- 
man Morris, where he haa since practiced. He 
was professor of bacteriology and clinical 
microscopy in the Birmingham medical col- 
lege. He is a Democrat; Methodist; and Blk. 
Married. Residence: Birmingham. 

LUPTON, NATHANIEL THOMAS, educator 
and fifth president of the Uniyersity of Ala- 
bama, was bom December 19, 1830, near Win- 
chester, Frederick County, Va., and died June 
11, 1893, at Auburn; son of Nathaniel C. and 
Elizabeth (Hodgson) Lupton, natives of Vir- 
ginia, of English descent. He receiyed his early 
schooling at Newark, Del.; was graduated from 
Dickinson college, Carlisle, Pa., M. A., 1849. 
He became professor of chemistry at Aberdeen 
female college, Mississippi, 1861-1852; profes- 
sor of chemistry at Petersburg female college, 
Virginia, 1852-1853, and president of that in- 
stitution, 1854-1857; was professor of chemistry 
at Randolph-Macon college, Virginia, 1857- 
1858; attended the Uniyersity of Heidelberg, 
Germany, and studied chemistry and physics 
under Prof. Robert Wilhelm Bunsen, 1874-1875, 
at the same time selecting the apparatus foir 
the chemistry department of Southern uni- 
yersity; was professor of chemistry and physics 
at Southern uniyersity, 1859-1871; professor of 
chemistry and fifth president of the University 
of Alabama, 1871-1874 ; resigned his position at 
the University of Alabama to take charge of 
the chemistry department of the new Vander- 
bilt uniyersity, at Nashville, Tenn., and again 
yisited Europe to select apparatus for his 
d^artment, 1874; attended the congress of 
orientalists in London, England, 1874; pro- 
fessor of chemistry, Vanderbilt university, 
1874-1885; resigned his position as dean of the 
pharmaceutical faculty and professor of chem- 
istry at Vanderbilt uniyersity, to accept the 
position of State chemist of Alabama and pro- 
fessor of chemistry at the Alabama polytechnic 
institute, which position .he held from 1885 
nntil his death in 1895. During the War of 
Secession, he served as chemist of the Confed- 
erate mining and nitre bureau for the manu- 
facture of gunpowder. He was a Democrat; a 
Methodist, steward in the church and three 
times delegate to the general conference; and 
was a Mason. Dr. Lupton was vice president 
of the American society for the advancement 
of science, 1880; president of the Association 
of official agricultural chemists, 1892; was 
twice president of the Chemical section of the 
American scientific association; a member of 
the Victorian institute of England; and of the 
Pharmaceutical society of Great Britain. He 
was author of "Elementary Principles of Scien- 
tific Agriculture," 1880, and of numerous arti- 
cles on chemical subjects published in various 
scientific Journals; was correspondent to scien- 
tific Journals in the United States and Europe; 
and contributed largely to Indian and Mound 
Builders' relics of the Smithsonian institution. 
Married: September 26^ 1854, at Newtown, 



Va., to Ella Virginia Allemong, daughter of 
Rev. John and Hannah (Paine) Allemong, who 
lived at Newtown, Va., the latter of Huguenot 
ancestry. The Allemong family was introduced 
in America by three brothers who landed at 
Charleston, S. C, about 1740. Two of those 
brothers settled in Virginia, one of whom was 
the great-great-grandfather of Mrs. Lupton. Chil- 
dren: 1. Kate, deceased, who was the first wom- 
an to graduate from Vanderbilt university, M. 
A., 1897, was professor of physics and chemistry 
in the State normal school at F^rmviUe, Va., 
translated from the French Fenelon's "Educa- 
ti<Mi of Girls," contributed articles to sciwitific 
Journals, m. Prof. L. W. Wilkinson of Tulane 
uniyersity, one son, Lupton Allemong; 2. Frank 
(q. v.), was graduated from the Alabama poly, 
technic Institute, B. S., 1891, and M. S., 1892, as- 
sistant Instructor of chemistry at that institu- 
tion, 1892-1893, was graduated from Johns 
HopWns university, M. D., 1899, and since then 
has been a practicing physician at Birming- 
ham, m. Mary Watts Woods of Charlottesville, 
Va-. daughter of Capt. MIcaJah Woods, two 
children, Micajah Woods Lupton and Virginia 
Lupton; 8. Ella, m. MaJ. R. B. Noble, U. S. 
Army. Last residence: Auburn. 

LUSK, JOHN ALEXANDER, lawyer, was 
born November 29, 1859, at Salem, S. C; son 
of Erastus Capehart and Eleanor Swaftord 
(Alexander) Lusk, the former a member of the 
First South Carolina cavalry regiment, Hamp- 
ton's brigade, C. S. Army, who moved from 
South Carolina to Guntersvllle, in 1866, be- 
came a merchant and farmer until his death 
in 1901; grandson of Nathan and Rosanna 
(Capehart) Lusk, and of (Partington and Mary 
Ann (Swafford) Alexander, aU of old Pickens 
District, S. C. Mr. Lusk was educated in the 
public schools; was admitted to the bar in 
1877; practiced untU 1883 in Blount County, 
with the exception of one year of travel in the • 
west; has practiced in Guntersvllle since 1883; 
was appointed circuit solicitor in 1885 and elect- 
ed in 1886; represented Marshall County in the 
State legislature, 1908; was elected to the 
State senate from the fifth district, in 1907, 
and again in 1915; and was appointed asso^ 
date railroad commissioner to succeed MaJ 
John O. Harris, deceased, July 15, 1908. He 
is a Democrat; a Presbyterian; and a Mason. 
Married: October 27, 1887, in HuntsviUe, to 
Leila Lee, daughter of Robert and Elisa- 
beth Lee (Coles) Fearn, of Marshall County. 
The Fearns are intermarried with the Lee 
family of Virginia; and the first ancestor of 
the Coles family in America was John Coles, 
who came from Ireland before the Revolution. 
Children: 1. Robert Fearn; 2. John Alexander, 
Jr.; 3. Walter Coles; 4. Mart on Fearn; 5. Eliza- 
beth Lee. Residence: Guntersvllle. 

LUSK, LORENZI D., physician, was born 
October 7, 1829, near Walhalla, Pickens County, 
S. C; son of Nathan and Rosannah (Capehart) 
Lusk, the former a native of Pickens County, 
S. C, bom March 20, 1793, who was a hatter 
and farmer, and lived near Walhalla, S. C, 
where he died December 28, 1872; grandson of 
Henry and Eleanor (McKidy) Lusk, the former 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



who entered the Revolutionary army when a 
boy, and served under Andrew Pickens; great- 
grandson of James Lusk, who served In the 
Indian wars prior to the Revolution, and was 
shot through the body In oae encounter with 
the Indians but recovered, and who was se- 
verely wounded In the Revolutionary War and 
left for dead, but survived on that occasion 
also. The Lusk family came from Ireland and 
first settled in southwestern Pennsylvania, mov- 
ing later to Virginia, then to the Carolinas. 
Dr. Lusk attended the ccxnmon schools of his 
neighborhood; came to Alabama In 1852 and 
located In Marshall County; and taught school 
for two years. He began reading medicine dur- 
ing those two years, » and In 1856 moved to 
Guntersville. He was graduated In medicine 
at Nashville, Tenn., In 1858, and began the 
practice of medldne and surgery at Gunters- 
ville In that year. He was actively engaged 
in the practice of medicine until 1888, whra he 
retired and entered the banking business, sub- 
sequently becoming president of the Bank of 
GuntersviUe. For thirty years Dr. Lusk was 
also an extensive and successful planter. He 
was elected probate Judge <rf Marshall Cknmty 
In 1868, and held the office until November, 
1874, when he was not a candidate for re-elec- 
tion. He served as vice-president of the Wyeth 
City land and Improvement company, which he 
helped organize; and was interested in the 
Ck>osa and Tennessee railroad qompany. He was 
an Independent Democrat, opposed to seces- 
sion; was a Methodist; and a Mason. Married: 
in September, 1859, to Mary Emma, daugh- 
ter of Allen and Roxanna (Hodges) Love- 
less, who lived where Decatur, Ga., now sUnds, 
and later at Guntersville. Children: 1- Emer- 
son, b. August 23, 1860, d. January 14, 1862; 2. 
Margarette Euphrasia, b. September 1, 1863, m. 
Thomas L. Farrow; 3. Phocian B., physician 
and farmer, b. June 17, 1866, m. Mary Thoma- 
son, daughter of Dr. William L. .and Ida 
(Pearce) Thomason, GuntersviUe; 4. Thurst^ 
Gm physician, b. September 1, 1869, m. (1) 
Mary Todd. (2) Clementine TetMoux, New 
York City; 5. Mary Emma, b. November, 1872, 
m. Oliver Day Street (q. v.), Guntersville, 
Last residence: Guntersville. 

LUTHER, SARAH EMERSON, teacher, was 
born November 20, 1874, at Lake City, Colum- 
bus County, Fla.; daughter of Oliver Perry 
and Sarah Jane (Emerson) Luther, of Rock- 
ingham County, N. C, who removed to Florida, 
previous to the War of Secession, in which he 
could not participate personally, but gave freely 
of his means; niece of Prank Luther, lieutenant 
In Forrest's cavalry, of Rev. Andrew Jackson 
Emerson, chaplain, and John L. Emerson, 
brothers, and members of a North Carolina regi- 
ment decimated at Gettysburg, John losing his 
life, and of Thomas Emerson, blockade-runner 
off the North Carolina coast, 1862-64. She was 
educated at the Lake City academy; graduated 
from the high school at the age of fourteen; 
from Decherd college, Tenn., with first lionors, 
1894; Normal school, Warrensburg, Mo., 1888- 
90; Columbia university, 1908; student of Chi- 
cago university correspondence school, 1910- 
12. She began teaching in the rural schools of 
Alabama in 1890; was elected professor of 



English, in the Troy normal; teaches in sum- 
mer schools in Alabama and Tennessee; prin- 
cipal of the Castelberry high school; superin- 
tendent of education for the county of Conecuh; 
now connected with the State department of 
education. She is the originator of the lyceum 
for rural schools in Alabama, now formally 
adopted as a part of the regular work of all 
the normal schools of the State, and was the 
first teacher to demonstrate the success of the 
girls' canning club movement, 1911. She urges 
the idea of the school as the center of activity 
of rural life. She is unmarried, but has 
adopted some orphan relatives to whom she is 
giving educational advantages. Residence: 
Montgomery. 

LTLE, JOHN, soldier of the American Revo- 
lution, aged 84, resided in Covington County. 
June 1, 1840, with John B. Dixon.— Ccn«tw of 
Pensioners, 1841, p. 149. 

LTMAN, EDWARD SHERMAN, lawyer, was 
bom July 7, 1862, at Montevallo, Shelby County; 
son of Henry R. and Lucy (Hart) Lyman, the 
former a native of Meridian, Conn., who came to 
Montevallo about 1850; grandson of Samuel and 
Lucy (Dickinson) Hart, of Kensington, Ck>nn.; 
and a descendant of Richard Lyman, the pro- 
genitor of the family in America, who came 
from England to Boston, 1661, first settled at 
(3harlestown, Mass., and moved to Hartford, 
where he was one of the original proprietors, 
in 1865. The first American maternal ancestor. 
Deacon Stephen Hart, emigrated from England 
about 1632, settled first at (Cambridge, Mass., 
and went to Hartford, which was named for 
him, with Mr. Hooker's company in 1635. 
Mr. Lyman was educated in the conmion schools 
of Montevallo; was admitted to the bar In 
1884; was appointed special judge of the cir- 
cuit court of Shelby CJounty by Gov. W. J. 
Samford, and held the spring term, 1901; was 
elected first mayor of Montevallo to serve for 
two years, 1901; has served as treasurer of the 
Girls' technical institute since 1907; repro- 
sented Shelby County in the State legislature, 
1903; and has been Judge of the law and 
equity court of Shelby County for a number 
of years. He is a Democrat and an Episco- 
palian. Married: November 22, 1887, at Monte- 
vallo, to Florence May, daughter of French and 
Florence (Killough) Nabors, of that place; 
great-granddaughter of Col. Eidward Lacey, an 
ofllcer in the Revolutionary Army. Residence: 
Montevallo. 

LYNN, JAMES, soldier of the American Rev- 
olution, aged 70, and a resident of Morgan 
Coimty; private N. C. Continental Line; en- 
rolled on September 24, 1833, under act of Con- 
gress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $74.33; sums 
received to date of publication of list, $222.99. 
— Revolutionary Pension Roll, in Vol. xiv. Sen. 
Doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. He re- 
sided in Morgan County, June 1, 1840, aged 76. 
--Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148. 

LYNNE, SEYBOURN ARTHUR, lawyer, was 
born July 5, 1877, near SomerviUe, Morgan 



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1079 



County; son of Dayid Wilson and Susan Jane 
(Russell) Lynne, both of Morgan County; 
grandson of Moses Wilson and Blizabeth Lynne, 
of Somenrille, Morgan County, and of Samuel 
E. and Matilda E. Russell, of Center Grove, 
Morgan County, both grandfathers senring in 
the C. S. Army; great-great-grandson of Col. 
James Russell, a Scotch immigrant who settled 
in South Carolina. Mr. Ljmne was educated in 
the Somerrille public schools; the Somerrille 
academy; in 1895 received B. S. degree, and 
in 1896 the A. B. degree, at Morgan County col- 
lege. He studied law under Judge E. M. Rus- 
sell, taking the law course at the University of 
Alabama in 1897-1898, and began to practice his 
profession at Decatur in 1898. In 1903 he 
represented his district in the State senate. 
He was elected city attorney for Decatur in 
1918; and was elected to the legislature from 
Morgan County in 1919. He is a Democrat; was 
a delegate to the State convention which 
nominated delegates to the Constitutional con- 
vention; and a delegate to the Democratic na- 
tional convention which nominated Judge 
Parker for president. He is a Baptist; an 
Odd Fellow; a Knight of Pythias; and a J. 

0. U. A. M. Married: at Decatur, April 19, 
1906, to Annie Leigh, daughter of CoL C. C. 
and Julia W. Harris, of that place. Children: 

1. Seyboum Harris; 2. Julia Leigh; 3. Russell 
Wilson. Residence: Decatur. 

LYON, ANNE BOZEMAN, author, was bom 
February 25, 1860, in Mobile, Mobile County; 
daughter of Thomas Temple Armstrong and 
Mary Morgan CofTee (Heard) Lyon, the former 
a native of Stokes County, N. C, later a resi- 
dent of Mobile, where he was successfully en« 
gaged in the wholesale mercantile and cotton 
business, major in the Confederate Army; 
granddaughter of William H. and Elisabeth 
(Armstrong) Lyon of Stokes County, N. C, and 
later of Demopolis, and of Maj. Franklin Coffee 
and Ann Matilda (Boseman) Heard of MiUedge- 
ville and Augusta, Oa., and later of Mobile; 
great-granddaughter of Betheland (Gaines) 
Lyon, daughter of James and Elizabeth 
(Strother) Gaines of Virginia, sister of Gen. 
Edmund Pendleton and (3ol. George Strother 
Gaines, soldiers and distinguished pioneer 
builders of Alabama. The Lyon family is of 
English origin, the founder In America having 
migrated from that country to Blassachusetts. 
CoL James Lyon of Henry County, Va., one of 
the descendants of the emigrant, was a notable 
figure in the French and Indian Wars. 
Through intermarriage, the subject of this 
sketch is related to the Dabnejrs, Daltons and 
other distinguished Virginia families. The an- 
cestral connections reach to France, Ireland, 
Wales and England. Anne Boseman Lyon re- 
ceived her preparatory and academic education 
in Locquet institute and other schools in New 
Orleans, La., and in the Quigley and Towle 
schools of Mobile, specialising in modem lan- 
guages and music Author: Her first published 
verses appeared in the "Memphis Appeal," in 
1884*86, and. in the "Louisville Courier-Jour- 
nal" about the same date. Character sketches, 
verses, short stories and negro dialect stories 
from her pen were published in the "New 

Vol. IV— « 



Orleans Times-Democrat" during 1892. "Van- 
ity Fair/' became the publishing medium dur- 
ing 1895-96. She was the successful contestant 
for recognition of merit in Short Stories, and 
Current Literature, winning the prise in the 
latter for a dramatic etching, entitled "The 
Mourner/' thirteen hundred competitors being 
in the contest. Other writings by her are: 
"No Saint," a novel, 1890; "Early missions of 
the South," a booklet, 1896; "Padre Felipo," a 
short story, published in Poor Soul's Advocate, 
1895; "A Futile amendment," published in 
Southern Magazine, Louisville, Ky.; "Ninita," 
published in Mid-Continent; "Chitto's mar- 
riage," published in The Telegraph, Cincinnati; 
"L'Huile de Marie/' published in The New 
World, Chicago; "Casemir-Jacques," published 
in National Magazine, Boston. In addition to 
the foregoing, she has also done much news- 
paper and feature work, and has written a 
number of historical articles from time to 
time. Residence: Mobile. 

LYON, FRANCIS STROTHER, lawyer, rep- 
resentative in congress, was bom February 25, 
1800, in Stokes County, N. C, and died Decem- 
ber 81, 1882, in Demopolis; son of James and 
Behetheland (GtoUnes) Lyon, who lived on their 
estate, a fine tobacco farm, in Stokes County, 
N. C, the former a native of Henry (bounty, 
Va.; grandson of CoL James and Christine 
(Harmon) Lyon, who lived in Henry County, 
Va., and of James and Elisabeth (Strother) 
Gaines, the former a captain of a company of 
North Carolina mUitia in the battle of QuU- 
f ord CoQTt House, Revolutionary War, and a 
member of the convention of a ccdony of North 
Carolina, which ratified the constitution of the 
United States; and a descendant of Francis 
Strother of Culpeper County, Va. He was 
uncle of (George Ckiines Lyon (q. v.). He at- 
tended the common schools of North Carolina, 
and early in the year 1817 came with his 
brother, James G. Lyon, to live with his uncle, 
(George Strother Ckiines, the agent of the U. S. 
government then in control at the St Stephens 
agency for the Indians, on the Tombigbee 
River, above Mobile. Mr. Lyon was for a time 
employed in the bank at St Stephens, and then 
in the oflice of the clerk of the county court 
He studied law under Abner 8. Lipscomb, W. H. 
Crawford and Henry Hitchcock; was admitted 
to the bar in 1821, and practiced at Demopolis. 
The following year he was elected secretary of 
the State senate, and held that oflice by suo- 
cessive elections for eight years. He was 
elected State senator from the district com- 
prised of Marengo and Wilcox Counties, in 
1833, and from Biarengo and Sumter Counties 
in 1834. During his first term in the senate 
he was defeated for the presidency of that body 
by Hon. John Erwin of Greensboro, and in the 
next year, was elected president of the senate 
over Mr. Erwin. 

Mr. Lyon was elected to congress in 1885, de- 
feating Robert Emmet Bledsoe Bayton, of Dal- 
las County, and Joseph Bates of Mobile; and 
was reelected in 1837. In 1845, when the state 
bank and its branches were placed in liquida- 
tion, he was selected with William Cooper and 
Clement C. Clay as a commissioner to adjust 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



all claims. After that commission made its 
report to the Stote legislature in 1847, and was 
discharged, Mr. Lyon was continued as sole 
commissioner until the final settlement in 1868. 
He was chosen as chairman of the State con- 
Tention of the Democratic party in 1860, and 
by that convention was sent as a delegate to 
the Charleston conyention of 1860, where the 
southern delegates withdrew, he among them. 
He was a representative in the State legisla- 
ture in 1861; was elected to the provisional 
Confederate congress but declined to serve; 
was elected to the first congress under the 
constitution of the Confederates States of 
America, 1862-1864. He was elected to the 
second Confederate congress in 1864, and 
served until the close of the war. He was a 
delegate to the State constitutional conven- 
tion of 1876, and made the draft of the consti- 
tution adopted by the convention. He was 
elected a State senator in 1876. He was an 
Episcopalian. 

Married: March 4, 1824, in Demopolis, to 
Sarah Serena, daughter of Allen and Sarah 
(Norwood) Glover (q. v.), who lived at that 
place; grandson of Frederic and Elizabeth 
(Cato) Qlover. Children: 1. Mary Amanda, m. 
William H. Ross, merchant at Mobile, served 
as major in the C. S. Army; 2. Sarah Norwood 
m. Oliver H. Prince, a law partner of Mr. Lyon 
before the War of Secession, who was killed 
while commanding a company In the Forty- 
third Alabama infantry in the assault upon 
Gen. Thomas's corps at Chickamauga, Septem- 
ber 20, 1868; 8. Helen Gaines, New York City, 
m. Gen. Zachary Cantey Deas (q. v.), deceased, 
a cotton broker, a brigadier general in the C. S. 
Army; 4. Amelia; 6. Eugenia; 6. Frank Glover, 
d. March 13, 1893, planter at Demopolis, priv- 
ate and lieutenant, C. S. Army, on staff of Gen. 
Z. C. Deas, m. Sarah Henley, daughter of John 
W. Henley; 7. Ida, m. Dr. William M. Polk, 
physician, an ofllcer in the C. S. Army, New 
York City, son of Gen. Leonidas Pcdk, C. S. 
Army. Last residence: Demopolis. 

LYON, GEORGE GAINES, lawyer, was born 
January 11, 1^21, in Washington County; son 
of James Gaines and Rosa (Fisher) Lyon, na- 
tives of North Carolina, the former a lawyer 
and for several years derk of the circuit court 
and register in chancery in Washington County, 
who went to Mobile in 1827 where he engaged 
In the real estate business in addition to the 
practice of law and was for a time register 
in chancery; nephew of Francis Strother Lyon 
(q. v.); and grandnephew of George S. Gaines 
and Gen. E. P. Gaines, who were among the 
first settlers of Alabama. He studied law at 
Yale college law school, and began the prac- 
tice of law in Mobile, soon afterward moving 
to Demopolis. He was admitted to the bar in 
February, 1840, and later was admitted to prac- 
tice before the supreme court. During the war, 
he held the office of sequestrator, and was one 
of the commissioners of the Confederate gov- 
ernment; was appointed governor's aid for west 
Alabama during the administration of Gov. 
John Gill Shorter; and was appointed U. S. cir- 
cuit court commissioner. He declined two 
nominations of the Whig party to run for the 
State legislature, once for the lower house and 
once for the senate, and in 1868 refused to be 



a candidate for the office of chancellor. In 
1876, he was appointed by Gov. George S. Hous- 
ton as c<»nmissioner of immigration. He was 
a Mason and an Episcopalian. Married: in 
April, 1860, to Annie G. Glover, daughter of 
Allen and Mary A. (Diven) Glover, of Marengo 
County. Children: 1. James G., deceased; 2. 
Allen G., deceased; 3. Norman, deceased; 4. 
Francis Strother, d. January 19, 1888, in his 
twenty-fourth year, was graduated from the • 
University of Alabama, A. B., 1886, and was a 
law student in his father's office at the time 
of his death; 6. Rosa, d. in the burning of the 
steamer Gardner, on the Tombigbee River in 
1887, m. William T. Rembert; 6. Susie D., d. 
with her sister in the burning of the Gardner, 
m. Julius P. Rembert; 7. George Gaines, jr., b. 
April 6, 1860, was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Alabama, A. B., and from the Pulte 
medical college, Cincinnati, C, M. D., 1888, 
agent. Southern express company, Little Rock, 
Ark., and Memphis, Tenn., 1882-1886, physician 
at Mobile, m. Rebecca R. Ulmer; 8. Mary G.; 
9. Annie G. Last residence: Demopolis. 

LYON, MATTHEW, publisher, editor. Bap- 
tist minister, was born August 27, 1812, in 
Warren County, Tenn.; son of MaJ. James 
Lyon, who published papers in New Orleans 
before the War of 1812, and who was the first 
person to publish a newspaper in the English 
language in Mobile; grandson of Col. Matthew, 
a native of County Wlcklow, Ireland, born July 
14, 1760, who emigrated to America some time 
after his father had been put to death for en- 
gaging in a conspiracy against the British 
crown, resided in Connecticut and^as married 
to a Miss Hosford, a niece of Ethan Allen, 
moved to Vermont, known then as the New 
Hampshire grants in 1774, and settled in Wal- 
lingford, joined Ethan Allen in the capture of 
Fort Ticonderoga, served as adjutant of Col. 
Warner's regiment under Gen. Montgomery in 
Canada, 1776, was commissioned paymaster 
with rank of captain in the Continental regi- 
ment commanded by Seth Warner, resigned 
from the army in 1778, served the state of Ver- 
mont as a member of the council of safety, cap- 
tain in the militia, pay-master general, deputy 
secretary to Gov. Chittenden and his council, 
assistant to the treasurer and colonel of mili- 
tia, represented Arlington in the Vermont legis- 
lature, 1779-1784 and Fair Haven for ten years 
between 1783 and 1797, was the founder of Fair 
Haven in 1783, where he built saw and grist 
mills, established an iron factory, manufac- 
tured paper and established a printing office 
publishing "The Farmer's Library," was 
elected to the U. S. congress in 1793 and com- 
menced the publication of "The Scourge of 
Aristocracy," was indicted for criticising the 
president under the alien and sedition laws in 
1798, fined one thousand dollars and imprisoned 
four months, and while in prison was re-elected 
to congress, was married secondly to Buelah 
(Chittenden) Galusha, daughter of Gov. 
Thomas Chittenden, was the unsuccessful anti- 
Federalist candidate for the Second, Third, 
Fourth and Fifth congresses, 1791-1799, and 
was elected by his party to the Sixth and Sev- 
enth congresses, 1799-1801, moved from Ver- 
mont to Kentucky in 1801 on advice of Andrew 



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NATHAN L. MILLER 



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1083 



Jackson and founded the town of Eddyville, 
Ky., declined the position of commissary gen- 
eral of the western army offered him by Presi- 
dent Jefferson; was a representative in the 
Kentucky legislature, 1802, and a representa- 
tive in the Eighth, Ninth, Tenth and Eleventh 
congresses, 1808-1811, opposed the second war 
with England, which stand cost him his seat 
in the Twelfth congress, was appointed U. S. 
factor to the Cherokee nation in Arkansas Ter- 
ritory by President Monroe in 1820, was 
elected the seccmd delegate to congress from 
Arkansas, but did not live to take his seat, 
died August 1, 1822, at Spadra Bluff, Ark. 

Elder Lyon attended the town academy for 
several years in Cheraw, Chesterfield District, 
S. C, and was brought up as a printer in the 
printing office of his father who established the 
first newspaper in that town. From Decem- 
ber, 1829, to Mardi, 1831, he worked during the 
congressional sessions in the printing office of 
Qen. Duff Qreen, editor of the "United States 
Telegraph," Washington, D. C. He returned 
home and became a printer at Camden, S. C; 
in 1837, conducted "The Baptist," a monthly 
publication established at Nashville two years 
before; worked on the "Huntsvllle Democrat" 
for Philip Woodson, 1838; taught school at 
Pleasant Ridge, Greene County, 1840; and in 
1841 became a printer in Piokensville, remain- 
ing in Pickens County for about fourteen years. 
He practiced law, and became register in 
chancery at Carrollton for four years. Early in 
1849. he was licensed to preach by the Carroll- 
ton Baptist church, and later in the year was 
ordained to the ministry. After preaching for 
two or three years, he resigned from the law 
and taught school in connection with his duties 
as a minister. He served in Pickens County as 
pastor of the churches at Ebenezer, Providence, 
Spring Hill, Carrollton and Pickensville. In 
1854, he moved to BrooksviUe, Miss., and taught 
school and preached there for three years. In 
1858, he was pastor of Grenada church, Mis- 
sissippi, and a teacher in the Baptists female 
institute at that place. In 1859, he started 
'^he Baptist Messenger," a weekly publication 
which was discontinued during the first year 
of the war, and while conducting the paper, 
preached in various churches in Mississippi. 
Moving from Memphis, he lived successively in 
Hernando, Panola, and Grenada, Miss., preach- 
ing, printing and teaching at different times. 
He was a missionary of the Home Mission 
Board, 1865-1869; settled at Winona, Miss., in 
1868, where he printed and preached; moved to 
Moulton for a short time, was called back to 
Central church. Holmes County, Miss.; became 
pastor at Carrollton in 1876, and in Moulton, 
in 1880, and after that time served in churches 
at Danville, Enon, Harmony and Pleasant 
Grove. Married: June 25, 1848, in Sumter 
County, to Susannah Muscogee Compere, daugh- 
ter of Elder Lee Compere (q. v.). Children: 1. 
Compere Adolphus, enlisted in the C. S. Army, 
participated at the battle of Shiloh, and served 
until the last month of the war when he was 
dragged from a sickbed and murdered by Fed- 
eral troops; 2. Laura, m. W. P. Chitwood, Tus- 
cumbia. Last residence: Tuscumbia. 



LYONS, ALBERT SIDNEY, business man, 
was bom February 22, 1864, at Mobile; son of 
Mark and Amelia (Horsier) Lyons, of Mobile, 
the former a native of New York city, who 
moved to Mobile in early life, served as an 
officer in the First Florida volunteer infantry, 
C. S. Army, and was rft Fort Pillow with Gen. 
N. B. Forrest, later became an officer in Gen. 
Randall Gibson's division, surrendering with 
that command in 1865, and represented Escam- 
bia County in the State legislature, 1878-1879. 
He was educated at Pollard and at St. Joseph's 
college. Spring Hill; entered business at Mo- 
bile, 1882; served as councilman of the city of 
MobUe, 1891-1894; as alderman from 1897 until 
1911, whex^ the form of municipal government 
was changed to a commission; was elected to 
the State senate from the Mobile district in 
1898; represented Mobile County in the State 
legislature, 1908, and 1907; and during the 
latter year was chairman of the general coun- 
cil and mayor pro tem of the city of Mobile. 
He was chief of ordnance and lieutenant colonel 
of cavalry on the staff of MaJ. Gen. J. W. Whit- 
ing of the Alabama state troops, 1892-1894, 
and chief of engineers and colonel of cavalry 
on the staff of Gov. Johnston, 1896-1900. He is 
a Democrat Residence: Mobile. 

LYONS, JOHN B., grand master, grand coun- 
cil, 1906; grand high priest, grand chapter* 
Masons, 1912. 

LYONS, PAT J., wholesale grocer, mayor of 
Mobile, was bom January 16, 1850, in Mobile; 
son of Thomas and Johaima Lyons, of County 
Waterford, Ireland, who emigrated to America, 
and setUed in MobUe in December, 1849. He at- 
tended school for a few years but was com- 
pelled to leave school when a boy to earn his 
living. He engaged in all sorts of odd jobs un- 
til he was thirteen years old when he entered 
the steamboat service on the Alabama River, 
between Mobile, Selma and Montgomery, and by 
successive promotions became clerk, captain 
and finally owner of several steamers. He fol- 
lowed that life until 1889, when he retired 
and gave his entire attention to the wholesale 
grocery business as a member of the firm of 
Michael and Lyons, which had been organised 
seven years before that time. In addition to 
being president of that firm, he is president 
of the Southern sui^ly company; vice presi- 
dent of the City national bank and trust com- 
pany; and a stockholder and director in vari- 
ous other enterprises at Mobile. He served as 
a member of the city council of Mobile for 
twelve consecutive years; was president of the 
council and mayor of the dty. He is a Demo- 
crat; a Roman Catholic; an Elk; and a member 
of the Mobile Mardi-gras societies. Residence: 
Mobile. 

M 

McADORY, ISAAC WELLINGTON, teacher, 
was bom September 17, 1843, at Pleasant Hill, 
eighteen miles southwest of Birmingham, Jef- 
ferson County; son of Thomas and Bmily El- 
more (Owen) McAdory, a daughter of Thomas 
Owen who died in Okolona, Mississippi; grand- 
son of Thomas and Celia (McAshan) Mc- 
Adory, who removed from Hopkinsville, Ky., 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



about the year 1818, and both of whom 
were of Irish descent, their parents having 
emigrated to this country from Ireland. Prof. 
McAdory received his education in the Jones- 
boro Salem academy, in Jefferson County, and 
on March 1, 1862, joined the Confederate army, 
enlisting as a private in Co. H, Twenty-eighth 
Alabama regiment. He was in the army of 
Tennessee from April 6, 1862, and participated 
in the battle of Shiloh and all other battles 
until April 26, 1865, when Qen. Johnston sur^ 
rendered the army in North Carolina. He was 
county superintendent of education from Octo- 
ber, 1899, until 1913, and during this time pub- 
lic schools were established in all the com- 
munities in the county in reach 'Of all the 
children, but with separate schools for white 
and colored children. Prof. McAdory com- 
menced teaching June 1, 1866, and taught regu- 
larly for about eleven months every year for 
about twenty-three years. He has never en- 
gaged in any other business and now owns a 
farm in Jefferson County, where he has re- 
sided for the past seven years. He is a Demo- 
crat and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. South. Married: near Pleaaant Hill, to 
Alice Bulalia, daughter of Isaac W. and 
Martha (Prude) Sadler. Children: 1. Welling- 
ton Prude (q. v.), graduate of Harvard college, 
Jefferson County, graduate in medicine and sur- 
gery at the University of Virginia, m. Lilly 
Hunt at East Lake; 2. Isaac Sadler, m, Mrs. 
Cora Scott at Auburn; 3. Martha Caroline, grad- 
uate of Randolph-Macon female college, Ljmch- 
burg, Virginia, taught several years in various 
colleges, m. Lawrence Otis Caldwell, October, 
1918; i, Margaret Eulalia, graduate in draw- 
ing and. art at Columbia University, New York, 
teacher of art and supervisor of art in Jeffer- 
son County public schools; 6. Richard Rose, 
graduate of agriculture in the Poljrtechnic in- 
stitute at Auburn, June, 1919, served in World 
war from 1917 to end of war, teacher, m. Louise 
Bradley; 6. Thomas, graduate of Polytechnic 
institute at Auburn in 1900; engaged in engi- 
neering for two years; studied law and gradu- 
ated from the University oi Alabama, 1912; 
practiced law and was engaged in that profes- 
sion at the time of his death in May, 1913; 
two bojrs and one girl died in infancy. Resi- 
dence: Jonesboro. 

McADORY, ROBERT A., lawyer and lieu- 
tenantr C. S. Army, was bom October 14, 1846, 
in Jefferson County; son of CoL James and 
Nancy Tucker (Saddler) McAdory, the former 
a native of South C&rolina, an early settler of 
Jefferson County and one of its wealthiest plan- 
ters and slave holders, who served in the Creek 
War of 1886, as captain of the only company 
which went out from Jefferson County on that 
occasion, the latter a native of North Carolina 
and related to the Tucker family of Virginia; 
brother of Alions T., of the Confederate Army, 
who was killed at Dranesville, Va., of William 
R., captain of Co. H, 28th Alabama infantry 
regiment, killed at Missionary Ridge, of Cham- 
bers, who was wounded at Corinth, and of 
James S., a graduate of Jefferson medical col- 
lege, Philadelphia, Penn., assistant surgeon of 
the 36th Mississippi infantry regiment, who 



died as the result of exposure in the Confed- 
erate service, in 1865. He was admitted to the 
University of Alabama in 1862, and in 1868, en- 
tered the Confederate service as a private in 
Captain Storr's company, the "University 
cadets." In December, 1863, he was promoted 
to second lieutenant of Co. H, 28th Alabama in- 
fantry regiment, with which he served in Mani- 
gault's brigade, Hindman's division, Hardee's 
corps, army of Tennessee, until the close of the 
war. He participated In the campaign from 
Dalton to Atlanta, including the battles of 
Resaca, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, 
Atlanta, Ezra Church and Jonesboro, and com- 
manded his company at the memorable battles 
of Franklin and Nashville, Tenn. In 1868, he 
graduated in law at the University of Mis- 
sissippi, where he was under the tutorship of 
L. Q. C. Liamar. He began his practice in Ely- 
ton, and in 1868, removed to Birmingham. 
Married: in 1869, to Harriet E., daughter of 
Alfred Du Puy, of Jefferson County, and grand- 
daughter of Col. John M. Du Puy, of French 
Huguenot descent. Last residence: Birming- 
ham. 

McADORY. ROBERT JOHN, physician, was 
born August 15, 1872, at Mobile; son of James 
and Esther Louise (Sweeney) McAdory, the 
former a native of Liverpool, England, who 
lived at Mobile, and served in a Mobile company 
in the C. S. Army, was an alderman of Mobile, 
and was lieutenant of the Gulf City guards 
at the time of his death in 1878; grandson of 
Robert and Catherine McAdory, who emigrated 
to America from Belfast, Ireland, and settled 
in Mobile, and of John and Jane Eliza (Swan) 
Sweeney, who lived at Ft. Barancas, Fla., and 
Mobile, the former who emigrated to America 
at an early age from southern Ireland, and set- 
tled in Pensacola, who was engaged for the 
greater part of his life under the government in 
the construction of the fortifications at Baran- 
cas, Fla., the latter a native of New York City, 
whose l)arents emigrated to that place from 
Londonderry, Ireland. He was educated in the 
common schools of Washington, D. C. attended 
St. John's college, Annapolis, Md., Columbian 
university, Washington, D. C, and Stanford 
university, California; and was graduated from 
the medical department of the University of the 
City of New York, M. D., 1897. After his gradu- 
ation, he spent one year in the New York City 
hospitals. During the Spanish-American War, 
he was acting assistant surgeon in the revenue 
cutter service, following which and up to 1903 
he was acting assistant surgeon in the U. S. 
Army, serving in the Philippine and Hawaiian 
Islands and California. He was in private prac- 
tice in Washington, D. C, 1903-1907, in Los An- 
geles, Calif., 1907-1913, and since then has 
been travelling, with San Francisco as his resi- 
dence. During the war with Germany he 
served as first lieutenant in the medical reserve 
corps, U. 3. Army. Residence: San Francisco, 
Calif. 

McADORY. WELLINGTON PRUDE, physi- 
cian, was born February 28, 1875, in McCalla, 
Jefferson County ; a son of Isaac Wellington and 
Alice Eulalia (Sadler) McAdory (q. v.), Well- 



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1085 



ington Prude McAdory receiyed his education 
in Howard college at East Lake, graduating A. 
B., in June, 1895; Uniyersity of Virginia, 1897, 
M. D.; and took a post graduate course in the 
New York post graduate school hospital which 
he completed July, 1899. He is now practicing 
medicine and surgery in Birmingham. He is a 
Democrat; Mason, haying taken all of the de- 
grees from first to thirty-third inclusiye in the 
Scottish Rite and is a Knight Templar in the 
York Rite; a member of Sigma Nu, college 
fraternity; a member of Psi Chi, medical fra- 
ternity; and is president of the Fraternal hos- 
pital in Birmingham. He is likewise a member 
of the Baptist church. Married: Noyember 7, 
1900, at Bast Lake to Lillie Belle, daughter of 
William Hunt Residence: Birmingham. 

McAFEE, QREEN TALIAFERRO, teacher, 
merchant, lawyer, was bom March 4, 1804» in 
Rutherford County, N. C, and died July 9, 
1884; son of Abner and Delilah (Green) Mc- 
Afee, who llyed at Rutherfordton, N. C., the 
former a natiye of that place, bom Mandi 7, 
1774; grandson of Anderson C. McAfee, who 
fought in the battle of King's Mountain In the 
Reyolutionary War. The family came to 
America from Scotland. Mr. McAfee receiyed 
his early education in the log cabin schools 
of North Carolina, and added to the knowledge 
gained there by study and reading under his 
own direction. He left his home in North Caro- 
lina for the new wilderness state of Alabama in 
1823, in order to Join his kinspeople, the Greens 
and Perkins family. He first located in St 
Clair County and taught school for a time, then 
established a store on Beayer Creek, a few 
miles east of Ashyille. He was elected to the 
State legislature as a representatiye from St. 
Clair County, and during his attendance in that 
t>ody, drew up the bill establishing Talladega 
County. He moyed to Talladega County in 
1832, the year the county was established, and 
was elected county judge, which oflice he held 
ten years. He built the first store-house in the 
city of Talladega, and as he spoke the Indian 
language, had a large trade among the Indians 
as well as among the whites. He opposed se- 
cession until the state left the union, then gaye 
two sons and all his wealth to the cause of 
the Confederacy. He was elected to the State 
senate, 1868-1870, and was chairman of the ju- 
diciary committee; and practiced law from 1869- 
1879. He was originally a Whig in politics, 
and after the War of Secession, a Republican; 
and was a Baptist Married: (1) March 13, 
1828, at Ashyille, St. Clair County, to Charlsle 
Ann Hall, of Centre, Cherokee County, a ward 
of Gen. Garrett of Cherokee, goyemment Indian 
a«ent; (2) December 18, 1837, to Elizabeth 
Letcher Scales, of Talladega, who died August 
28, 1869. Children, by first marriage: 1. Augus- 
tus Wellington, b. Noyember 2, 1829, d. at Mata- 
moras, September 8, 1846, yolunteer in Capt. 
J. O. Shelley's rifle regiment, Mexican War; 2. 
BAary Eliza Emma, b. October 20, 1832, d. March 
8, 1903, m. Dr. John H. Vandlyer, children, 
Mrs. Charles Vandlyer Cannon, Spartanburg, 
S. C, J. Wellington Vandlyer, Talladega, and 
Dr. C. W. Vandlyer, Port Meyers, Pla.; by sec- 



ond marriage: 3. Nicholas Scales, m. (1) Eliza 
Page, deceased, <2) Annie Easton; 4. Charlsle 
Ann, m. Fred B. McLure, Pulaski, Tenn.; 6. 
Elizabeth Lake, m. Alyah Dayid Bennett, 
Brooklyn, N. Y.; 6. Green Prior Perkins, de- 
ceased. Liast residence: Talladega. 

MoAFEE, major, 6th battalion. Confederate 
infantry regiment, C. S. Army. 

McALEXANDER, EDWARD, major and later 
lieutenant colonel, 27th Alabama infantry regi- 
ment, C. S. Army. 

McALISTER, ANGUS, former State senator 
from Coyington and Dale Counties. 

McALPINE, BLANTON, public official, mem- 
ber of Alabama legislature, and merchant, was 
bom February 27, 1804, in Georgia; son of 
Solomon and Elizabeth McAlpine, the former 
a natiye of Scotland who settled in Georgia. 
He was educated in the common schools of his 
natiye state and immigrated to Mobile where 
he engaged in the mercantile business. He 
was a member of the legislature from Mobile 
County, 1841, and mayor of the city of Mo- 
bile, 1845-46. An interesting coincidenoe in 
regard to Mr. McAlpine's leglslatiye seryice 
was that his brothers, Solomon and Jefferson 
C, were State senators from Greene and Sum- 
ter Counties, respectiyely, at the same time he 
was serying in the house. He remoyed from 
Mobile to California between 1846-60, where he 
died. Last residence: California. 

McALPINE, FRANK CLARKE, soldier, was 
born June 21, 1880, at Talladega; son of Frank 
Clisby and Martha (Clarke ) McAlpine, the for- 
mer a natiye of Coosa County, who liyed at 
Talladega, senred as alderman seyeral terms 
and as city treasurer for a number of years; 
grandson of Dr. Augustine Iryine and Martha 
(Clisby) McAlpine, of Talladega, and of 
Thomas and Martha (Cards) Clarke, of Cin- 
cinnati, (X, the former' a natiye of England, 
and the latter of County Dunn, Ireland; great- 
grandson of Paul Clisby, of Wales, who liyed 
in Boston, Mass., was in the shipping busi- 
ness and seryed in the Reyolutionary Army, 
and of Robert McAlpine, a Presbyterian min- 
ister, a lieutenant in a Tennessee company, 
who fought under Qen. Jackson in the battle 
of Talladega, whose father came from Scot- 
land. He was educated in the priyate and 
public schools of Talladega, the Talladega mili- 
tary academy, and in the Alabama poljrtechnic 
institute. He was occupied in the mercan- 
tile business, and as a planter and animal hus- 
bandryman, 1899-1916. He enlisted in Co. L, 
Third infantry. National guard of Alabama, 
1894, and was appointed successiyely, corporal, 
sergeant and captain, serying until 1906; be- 
came captaih of Co. L, Thirty-fifth infantry, 
1907-1912; captain of Troop M, First Alabama 
cayalry, 1916-1917, and major of that organiza- 
tion in the latter year; major of the One hun- 
dred seyenteenth field artillery, 1917-1919, and 
of the Fortieth field artillery. Fourteenth di- 
yision. He was graduated from the School 
of Fire, Fort Sill, Okla., December, 1917; 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



served as regimental artillery instructor, One 
hundred seventeenth artillery, January to April, 
1918; senior artillery instructor, Fourth offi- 
cers training school, Camp Wheeler, Georgia, 
May to July, 1918; Brigade training school. 
Camp Jackson, South Carolina, July to Octo- 
her, 1918; Overseas service, October to Decem- 
ber 1918; Brigade training school, Coetque- 
don, France; assistant camp inspector, Camp 
Custer, Michigan, March to October, 1919; and 
since that time has served as morale officer, 
education and recreation officer, naturalization 
officer and polo officer at Camp Caster. He is a 
Democrat; a Presbyterian; a Mason; Elk; and 
a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon college 
fraternity. Married: February 5, 1908, at Tal- 
ladega, to Sarah, daughter of John W. and 
Ophelia (Montgomery) Bishop, of Talladega. 
Residence: Headquarters, Camp Custer, Mich- 
igan. 

McALPINE, R. E., Presbyterian minister of 
North Alabama. 

McALPINE, ROBERT BROWN, Presbyterian 
minister, was born January 26, 1848, near Rock- 
ford, Coosa County; son of Aurelius Emmons 
and Harriet Newel (Brown) McAlpine, the 
former a native of east Tennessee, born 1826, 
educated in Jacksonville, where his father re- 
sided in 1837, studied medicine in New Or- 
leans, located in Three Creeks, Union (bounty, 
Ark., where he died March 27, 1886; grandson 
of Rev. Robert and Mary E. (Temple) Mc- 
Alpine, of Jacksonville and Coosa County, the 
former graduated at Greenville college, east 
Tennessee, under Rev. Charles Coffin, D. D., 
and was captain in the U. S. Army, under An- 
drew Jackson in the war with Great Britain 
in 1812, studied theology later and entered 
the Presbyterian ministry, conducted for a 
time in Jacksonville a classical school attended 
by Gen. Hindman, Gen. Forney and Dr. Curry, 
and of Duncan Brunn, who was a successful 
planter in Arkansas, whither he removed from 
Brunnsville, about 1865-56. The family came 
originally from North Carolina. Robert 
Brown McAlpine attended school at private in- 
stitutions, Mt Holly, Arkansas, of which Prof. 
Espey Watts was principal and at Three 
Creeks academy. Ark. He entered Davidson 
college, N. C, in 1867, graduated in 1870 with 
the degree of A. B., afterwards, for work done 
received the degree of A. M.; graduated from 
Theological seminary of Columbia, S. C, 1873; 
took post graduate course at University of 
Virginia, entering in 1874; spent nearly a year 
at Princeton seminary and university, enter- 
ing in 1879; was ordained in the ministry, May 
12, 1877, and held pastorates at Uniontown, 
Goldsboro, N. C, (3dlumbus, Miss., and Gads- 
den. He taught theology for nine years, be- 
ginning August, 1889, in the Stillman insti- 
tute for training colored ministers, under the 
care of the Southern Presbyterian church; has 
been chairman of committee on Christian edu- 
cation and ministerial' relief and trustee in 
two institutions of learning for short periods. 
Married: June 2, 1880, at Selma to Mary El- 
vira, daughter of Hon. Benjamin Hogan and 



Eliza Reese (Tucker) Craig, of Midway, Ga.; 
granddaughter of Hon. James D. and Elvira 
S. (Berry) Craig of Cahaba, who removed to 
Selma after the War, and in the seventies to 
San Francisco, Cal., and granddaughter of 
Mary (Bivens) Tucker. Benjamin Hogan Craig 
was married to his wife December 4, 1856, at 
Midway, Ga., lived a while at C^ahaba, moving 
to Selma in 1859; a member of the legislature 
of 1900-02, the constitutional convention of 
1901; a lawyer and for many years register in 
chancery of Dallas County. Children: 1. Laura 
Craig, m. Frank Freeman, Birmingham; 2. 
Mary Kirby, Tuscaloosa; 3. (Gertrude Elvira, 
Tuscaloosa; 4. Robert Brown, jr.. Meridian, 
Miss. Residence: Tuscaloosa. 

McAULEY, JOSEPH CUNNINGHAM, Pres- 
bjrterian minister and member constitutional 
convention, 1866, was bom August 29, 1828, in 
Autauga County, and was killed November 18, 
1876, at Mumford, while attempting to board 
a tr^Cln; son at Daniel and Anna (McNeil) 
McAuley, the former bom on the Isle of Wight, 
England, and emigrated to this country early 
in life, and the latter a native of North Caro- 
lina, removed to Autaugaville about 1815; 
grandson of Lochlin and Margaret McAuley of 
Scotland, later of the Isle of Wight, and ot 
Robert and Eliza McNeil of Nortli Carolina. 
The family is (me of a large number of Scotch 
families who early located in North (Carolina, 
and scattered over the South. He was educated 
in town schools at Mardisville, Talladega 
County; studied law in the office of Hon. Alex- 
ander White, of Talladega, but never practiced; 
entered the ministry of the Southern Presby- 
terian church, in Selma, in April, 1873; had 
charge of the primary department of Oxford 
college, Calhoun County, when Messrs. Dodscm 
and Borden were principals; was county school 
conunissioner; president of the county fair as- 
sociation, and one of the leaders of the grange 
movement; represented Calhoun County in the 
constitutional c<mvention of 1865; and was 
ordnance officer of the 51st Alabama mounted 
infantry regiment from March, 1863, to 1865. 
He was ordained ruling elder when he was 
twenty-one years of age and held this office 
until he was ordained to the ministry in 1873. 
He was a Whig and a Mason. Married: Janu- 
ary 10, 1846, near Alexandria, Calhoun County, 
to Sarah Frances, daughter of James and Sarah 
(McKinney) Hampton, who lived near Wat- 
kinsville, Clarke County, Ga., later moving to 
Calhoun County. Children: 1. Emma F., m. 
Peter Pelham, son of Dr. Atkinson Pelham (q. 
v.), and resides at Poulan, Ga.; 2. James D., 
m. Ezzie Martin, residence White Plains; 3. 
Thomas J., m. Lula Morrison, residence Albert- 
ville; 4. Robert, m. May Young, residence Red- 
dick, Fla.; 5. Mary E., m. Gtoorge Boggs, of 
Selma; 6. Edward P., m. Elise Barry, residence 
Delta, Macon County, Ga.; 7. Pelham, deceased; 
8. William A., deceased. Last residence: Alex- 
andria. 

MCAULEY, WILLIAM HALL, Presbyterian 
minister and foreign missionary, was bom De- 
cember 1, 1811, in Montgomery County, N. C, 
and died at Stockton, Baldwin County, January 



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1087 



15, 1885; son of Daniel and Ann (McNeil) Mc- 
Auley, and brother of Joseph G. McAuley (q. 
T.). He received his early education in the 
village schools of Autaugaville; later became a 
student in Danvile, Ky.; received his theological 
training at Princeton college, and was ordained 
in the Presbyterian ministry, April, 1840. Im- 
mediately thereafter, accompanied by his wife 
and three others who had been his fellow stu- 
dents at Princeton, he set sail from Boston, 
August 5, 1840, for India. The party was sta- 
tioned at Futiguer, but ten years later, owing 
to the ill health of his wife, Mr. McAuley re- 
turned to Alabama, where he served as pastor 
in Tallad^^, two years; in Uniontown, fifteen 
years; and at Stockton, seven years, and where 
he died and was buried. Blarried: June 3» 1840, 
to Emma, daughter of Robert and Rebecka 
(Gulick) Bayles, of Princeton, N. J. Children: 

1. Anna Rebecka, m. William Brown, deceased; 

2. Bmma» m. William Russell; 3. Bliza Jen- 
netta, m. E. J. Harrison, residence Birming- 
ham; 4. William Daniel, m. Ella Underwood; 
5. Robert Chalmers, m. Laura Dean; 6. Mary 
Elizabeth, m. John M. Bowie. Last residence: 
Stockton. 

9 

McBRTDE, ANDREW, grand treasurer, grand 
chapter of Alabama, Masons, 1826; father of 
Wade A. McBryde (q. v.). 

Mc®RYDE, WADE ALLEN, druggist, was 
bom May 6, 1840, at Montgomery; son of An- 
drew and Ann Rebecca (Allen) McBryde, who 
moved to Montgomery in 1819, the former a 
native of Charlotte, N. C; grandson of Andrew^ 
and Harriet (Henderson) McBryde, the former 
ol whom was bom in 1784 in Charleston, S. C, 
and died in 1828 in Montgomery, and of Wade 
and Katie ((Carpenter) Allen, of Montgomery; 
sreat-grandson of Dr. Thomas Henderson of 
Charlotte, N. C, who was a surgeon in the Revo- 
lutionary Army under (Jen. Nathaniel Greene. 
He received his education in the common 
schools of his neighborhood, and became a 
druggist in Montgomery in 1853, continuing 
that profession for the greater part of his life. 
He was captain of Co. F, Third Alabama regi- 
ment, until 1865; served as chief of the fire 
department in 1876 and 1877; was elected alder- 
man from Ward 6, Montgomery, 1877-1881; and 
•was appointed commissary general with the 
rank of colonel of cavalry on the staff of Gk)V. 
B. A. 07«Teal, 1885-1887. He is a Democrat; a 
Testryman in the church of the Holy Comforter; 
a Mason; was grand chancellor of the Knights 
of Pjrthias, 1875; an Elk; and a member of the 
National Union. Married: September 28, 1869, 
to Caroline Virginia Sayre, daughter of Phile- 
mon D. and CSaroline Virginia Sayre, of Mont- 
gomery, the former a native of New Jersey, 
and the latter, of Georgia. Residence: Mont- 
gomery. 

McCAIN, JOHN RICHMOND, business man, 
was bom January 28, 1865, at Lineville; son of 
Rev. James Erwin and Minerva D. (Sims) Mc- 
Cain, the former a native of Tennessee, a Meth- 
odist minister, who lived at Lineville and other 
places; grandson of James O. and Sadie Mc- 
Cain, of Lineville, and of Reuben and Nancy 



Sims, of Center. Mr. McCain was educated in 
the common schools of Clay County, and at 
Lineville college, graduating from the latter 
place, Ph. B., 1892, and A. B., 1896. He also 
attended the Southern university, Greensboro, 
and (Columbian university, Washington, D. C. 
He taught school for some years; was elected 
to the State senate from the eighth district, 
1898, and served two terms; served as State 
land agent, November 16, 1901, to January, 
1907; was land clerk in the State auditor's 
office, 1907-1911; superintendent of the North 
East Alabama agricultural and industrial in- 
stitute, 1911-1913; was appointed postmaster of 
Lineville by President Woodrow Wilson, May, 
1913; and held that position until November, 
1914, when he was elected to the State senate 
from the thirty-fourth district, 1914. He is now 
connected with the U. S. internal revenue office 
at Birmingham. He is a Democrat; a Meth- 
odist; and a Knight of Pythias. Residence: 
Lineville. 

McCALL, CHARLES EDWARD, acoountant, 
was born November 21, 1867, at DesotoviUe, 
Choctaw County; son of Dr. Daniel and Nancy 
Elizabeth (Thompson) McCall, of DesotoviUe; 
brother of Daniel T. McCall (q. v.); grand- 
son of John and Mary (Campbell) McCall, 
the former a native .of Scotland, who emi- 
grated to South Carolina from this state, moved 
to Florida, thence to Alabama, where he died, 
and of Benjamin and Sarah Menifee (Davis), 
who lived in Hale, Autauga and Choctaw Coun- 
ties. Mr. McCall received his early education 
in the common schools of Choctaw County; and 
afterwards was three years in Dr. Seth S. Mel- 
len's school at Mt Stirling. He received his 
higher education in the Cooper institute at 
Daleville, Miss., and in the University of Ala- 
bama, from which he graduated in 1885, with 
the degree of A. B. After graduation he taught 
school for ten years. He was the founder and 
editor of "The Choctaw Advocate," Butler, 1890- 
1892; was admitted to the practice of law in 
1908; was probate judge of Choctaw (bounty, 
1898-1909; assistant examiner of public accounts 
of Alabama, 1909-1910; appointed chief exam- 
iner of public accounts, April, 1911. He is a 
Methodist; a Royal Arch Mason; past chan- 
cellor of Knights of Pythias; a Woodman of 
the World; a member of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles; and of the Sigma Nu fraternity. Mar^ 
ried: to Mary Rebecca Collins, of CoUinsville, 
Miss., daughter of James Madison and Amanda 
(Etheridge) Collins, of Lauderdale County, 
Miss. Children: 1. Charles Campbell; 2. Wil- 
lard; 3. Mary; 4 and 5, twins, d. in infancy. 
Residence: Montgomery. 

McCALL, CHARLES RODERICK, consul and 
teacher, was bom October 3, 1858, at Perote, 
Pike County, and died August 24, 1898, at 
Troy; son of Daniel Alexander and Serena 
(Dennis) McCall, the former a native of Chun- 
berland Ck>unty, N. C, who came to Alabama 
in 1839, settled in Barbour County where he 
engaged in planting, merchandising, and steam 
boating until 1866 when he removed to that 
part of Pike County, now embraced in Bullock, 
was elected probate judge of Bullock, admitted 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



to the bar early after the war and practiced 
in Union Springs as a partner of Col. James N. 
Arrington; grandson of Judge Charles A. and 
Esther (Maddox) Dennis of Orion, Pike County, 
among the early settlers there, coming from 
Talbot County, Qa., represented Pike County 
in the legislatures of 1826-27-29-35. Mr. McCall 
receiTed his early education in Union Springs 
where he was taught by E. J. Mclver, Angus 
McDonald, and C. L. McCartha; graduated at 
the University of Alabama with the degree of 
A. B. in 1878, and M. A., in 1879. Of five prizes 
competed for by his class he won the prize in 
Greek and the two first prizes offered in Eng> 
lish. On the day of his first graduation, he 
was elected instructor in Latin and English 
in the university and held this position for two 
years. In 1880 he resigned from his profes- 
sional duties to become editor of the "Green- 
ville Advocate." Three years later he removed 
to Troy to become editor and part proprietor 
of the "Troy Messenger." In 1886 he was ap- 
pointed by Secretary of State Bayard, vice- 
consul general of the United States at Rio de 
Janeiro, was promoted by President Cleveland 
to be consul at Santos, Brazil, which promotion 
was made on recommendation of Assistant Sec- 
retary of State, James D. Porter: "for merit 
and for tried eflAciency in the consular service." 
During his residence in Brazil he learned to 
speaJc Portuguese and Spanish and increased 
his knowledge of French and German. He re- 
signed the consularship in 1889, shortly be- 
fore President Harrison was inaugurated, and 
returning to Alabama became editor and part 
owner of the "Union Springs Herald." In 1890 
he was unanimously elected teacher of lan- 
guages in the State normal school at Troy 
where he taught Latin, Greek and French un- 
til his death. During the summer of 1896-97 he 
taught Latin, Greek and Spanish in the schools 
of the Monteagle assembly, Monteagle, Tenn., 
besides delivering a course of lectures before 
the assembly on literary and historical sub- 
jects. He was a Democrat and a Presbyterian. 
Married: November 28, 1889, at Ocean Springs, 
Miss., to Emily, daughter of Thomas C. and 
Sarah Foster. Last residence: Troy. 

McCALL, DANIEL THOMPSON, physician, 
was born September 4, 1849, at DeSotoville, 
Choctaw County; son of Daniel and Nancy 
Elizabeth (Thompson) McCall; brother of 
Charles E. McCall (q. v.); grandson of John 
and Mary McCall and of Benjamin F. and 
Sarah Thompson, all of DeSotoville. He was 
educated at Cooper's institute, Spring Hill, 
Miss., at Pushmataha and Furman, and gradu- 
ated at the University of Alabama, 1886, with 
the A. B. degree, completing his medical 
studies, 1894, at the Louisville medical college, 
now the University of Louisville, Ky. He en- 
tered immediately upon the practice of his pro- 
fession at Gaston where he remained four years. 
In 1899 he located in Butler where he remained 
until 1908 when he entered upon a post grad- 
uate course in diseases of children, studying 
in New York. Completing this work he located 
in Mobile. He was county health oflAcer of 
Choctaw, 1899-08; member county board of 
school commissioners, Mobile County, 1912-18, 



and president of that board, 1918-19; president 
board of health. Mobile County, 1916, and chair- 
man of that board, 1917-18; member State 
board of education, 1919. He is a Democrat; 
Methodist; Mason; and Knight of Pythias. 
Married: July 10, 1907, at Butler, Choctaw 
County, to Caroline Winston, daughter of 
Green Berry and Rosa Lee (Wilcox) Bush, of 
that place; granddaughter of Judge Curtis 
Nash and Sallie Battle Dade (Winston) Wil- 
cox, the latter a descendant of Peter Fontaine, 
an ESpiscopal dergjnnan in colonial Virginia, 
the former a descendant of Jonathan Wilcox, 
a Puritan settler of Connecticut Children: 
1. Daniel Thompson, Jr.; 2. Winston Bush. Resi- 
dence: Mobile. 

MoCALL, JOHN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 70, and a resident of Lime- 
stone County; private and sergeant N. C. (Con- 
tinental Line; enrolled on January 6, 1883, un- 
der act of Congress of June 7, 1832, pajrment 
to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, 
120; sums received to date of publication oC 
list, %Q0.— Revolutionary Pension RoU, in voL 
xiv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Con., Ist sess., 1883-34. 

McCALLA, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS, civil en-' 
gineer and Chevalier L6gion de la Honneur, was 
born November 7, 1866, at Lewis Turnout, Chea- 
ter District, S. C; son of Richard CJalvln and 
Margaret Eliza (Lewis) Mc(3alla. He was 
educated by tutors in Tennessee; at the pub- 
lic and private schools of Tuscaloosa, and at 
the University of Alabama, 1883-1886. He be- 
gan his life work in September, 1886, as a 
^ivil engineer. On June 30, 1917, he was com- 
missioned a major of engineers, and on Sep- 
tember 12, 1917, was called into service, and 
was assigned to the 25th Engineers at CJamp 
Devon, Ayer, Mass.; sailed for France Novem- 
ber 25, 1917, in command of 504th Engineer*! 
battalion; promoted lieut^iant colonel Febru- 
ary 13, 1919; returned to United States, April 
20, 1919; discharged April 24, 1919. His entire 
service in France was with the Department of 
construction and forestry in S. O. S., and en- 
gineer officer in charge of construction of A. S. 
P. C, No. 2. He was made a Chevalier in the 
Legion of Honor by the French government, in 
recognition for his valuable services during the 
European struggle. Upon his return to Ala- 
bama he was selected as assistant State high- 
way commissioner which position he now oc- 
cupies. He is a Democrat and a Presbyterian* 
Married: June 2, 1897, to Fannie Bilae, daugh- 
ter of Jake and Frances (Ljmch) Raiford, of 
Tuscaloosa. Children: 1. Margaret Carolyn, 
graduate of the University of Alabama. Resi- 
dence: Montgomery. 

McCALLEY, HENRY, tutor in chemistry at 
the University of Alabama, 1879-83. 

McCANN, JAMES EDWARDS, Methodist 
minister, was bom September 3, 1857, at New- 
bern, Hale County; son of John Wilson and 
Jane Teresa (Gk)ff) McCann, the former spent 
his boyhood in his native state and his early 
manhood in Alabama, where he taught school 
in Clay County, admitted to the Methodist min- 
istry by the Conference in 1845 at Mobile, and 



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DR. JOHN D. S. DAVIS 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1091 



of which he was a member for forty-four years; 
grandson of Michael and Polly (Bishop) Mc- 
Cann of Hawkins County, Tenn., the former a 
member of the Tennessee bar who died at the 
age of forty-one; and of Edmund and Lucretia 
(Wells) Ctoff, of Jackson County, Miss.; great- 
grandson of James McCann who immigrated 
from Ireland and settled in Virginia, a Roman 
Cathollo in religion, a physician by profession, 
surgeon In the Revolutionary War, twice mar- 
ried, his second wife, a widow Arnold, who 
b(M*e two children, Michael, and a daughter, 
who married a Reese. James E. McCann was 
educated in the village schools, and graduated 
at the Southern university, A. B., 1877; taught 
school for two years after graduation. Joined 
the Alabama conference at Tuskegee, December, 
1879, has held pastorates in Alabama and Call- 
fcnmia conferences continuously since admis- 
sion to the ministry. Married: October 1, 1884, 
at Santa Maria, Calif., to Sarah Ann, daughter 
of Irving Noland and Sarah Esther (Omdit) 
McGuire. Her father was a "Forty-niner," and 
her mother was from Ohio. CHiildren: 1. James, 
Jr.; 2. Irving CtofP, pastor Oreen street congre- 
gational church, Chicago, m. daughter of Wil- 
liam H. Sands, Richmond, Va.; 8. Annie Esell, 
m. a Russell oC C<dumbus, Oa.; 4. John Wilson; 
5. Christine Esther; 6. Ruth Aline; 7. Allle 
Boone; 8. Mary. Residence: Eufaula. 

McCANN, JOSEPH D., member of the con- 
stituticHial convention of 1865, from Talladega 
County. 

MoCARTER, JAMBS, soldier of the Ameri- 
can RewmiUUm, aged 69, and a resident of 
Greene County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled 
on November 4, 1833, under act of Congress 
of June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 

4, 1831; annual allowance, |80; sums received 
to date of publication of list, |200. — Revolt- 
iUmary PenHon Rott, in voL xlv. Sen. doc 514, 
23rd (3ong., Ist sess., 1833-84. He resided in 
Greene County, June 1, 1840, aged 76. — 0en$U9 
of Pensioneri^ 1841, p. 149. 

MoCARTHA, CLARENCE LINDEN, teacher, 
was bom March 15, 1841, in Fairiield County, 

5. C; son of Jeremiah and Emily (Britain) 
MoCartha; grandson of Jesse McC!artha and 
wife, who was a Miss Boland, of Lexington 
County, S. C; paternal great-grandparents im- 
migrated from Scotland, and the family of his 
grandmother came from Hesse CasseL Profes- 
sor McCartha was taught at home by his par- 
ents until sixteen years of age; entered sopho- 
more class at Columbia academy, Columbia, S. 
C; was graduated from Wc^ord college, A. B., 
June, 1861, poet-graduate (non-resident) work 
led to the A. M. degree in 1864; has taught con- 
tinuously from January, 1862, until the present, 
doing academic and classical work in Colum- 
bia and Abbeville, S. C, Lawrenceville, Union 
Springs, Gtordon, Geneva, and Newton, Bluffton, 
Cku, and Greenwood, Fla.; professor in Troy 
State normal college, 1889-90; in Southern uni- 
versity, 1890-92; and again in State normal 
college, Troy, 1892 to date. He has been local 
preacher in the Methodist Episcopal church. 
South, since 1858; and ordained local deacon 



in 1866. He is a Mason. He is the author of 
"The lost tribes of Israel, or Europe and 
America in history and in prophecy," 1893; and 
"A catechism of English grammar," 1901. Mar- 
ried: (1) December 5, 1861, in Spartanburg, 
S. C, to Susan Jane Farrow; (2) July 7, 1870, 
In Henry County, to Loula Louise, daughter of 
emerge W. and Lucinda Ann (Latimer) Culver, 
descendants of early settlers of Hancock 
County, Ga. Children: 1. William Emory, de- 
ceased; 2. Sallie Marlon, m. Dr. Horatio D. 
Vaughn; 3. Mamie Warren, m. William M. 
Newell, residence Samson; 4. Lillie Jane, d. in 
infancy; 5. Dolly, d. in infancy; 6. Clarence 
Linden, m. Mabel McSwain, residence Troy; 7. 
Emily Chicora, m. Cephas K. Knox of Troy. 
Residence: Troy. 

MCCARTNEY, JOHN, soldier of the AtnerU 
can Revolution, aged 75, and a resident of Mad- 
ison County; private N. C. Militia; enrolled on 
July 2, 1833, under act of Congress of June 7, 
1832, pasnment to date from March 4, 1831; an- 
nual allowance, 151.34; sums received to date 
of publication of list, %12%M.— Revolutionary 
Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. doc 514, 23rd 
Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

MCCARTY, MICHAEL, soldier of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, aged 90, resided in Jefferson 
County, June 1, 1840. — Census of Pensioners, 
1841, p. 149. 

McCARY, JAMES H., business man, was bom 
March 11, 1862, in Maplesville, Chilton County; 
son of Jarvis Fletcher and Bvalina M. (Lilly) 
McCary, the former a native of Chilton County, 
a merchant, who served in the Twentieth Ala- 
bama regiment, C. S. Army, was wounded at 
the battle of Resaca, and died from the wound 
in a hospital at Macon, Ga.; grandson of St. 
Clair D. and Elizabeth (Atkinson) McCary, 
natives of South Carolina, who went to Chilton 
County in 1820, and purchased lands from the 
Indians. His great-grandfather served in the 
War of 1812. He received his early education 
in the schools of Clanton, and attmded the Ala- 
bama pol3rteehnic institute at Auburn. After 
leaving school in 1881, he clerked in a hotel 
at Blount Springs untn 1888, then moved to 
Birmingham and clerked in a hotel there for 
a year. In 1884, he became occupied as a mer- 
diandise broker, and the next year established 
himself as a wholesale grocer and produce 
dealer. He continued in that business for 
many years, under the firm name of J. H. Mc- 
Cary and company. He has served as president 
of the board of trade; as president of the board 
of police commissioners; is a director in the 
Building and loan association; was an or- 
ganizer and director in the Birmingham na^ 
tional bank. He was a lieutenant of State 
militia under Col. Thomas G. Jones, and one 
of the organizers of the Jefferson Volunteers. 
He has been a member of the county Demo- 
cratic executive committee; a steward in the 
Methodist church; president of the board of 
trustees of the Order of Elks; a Knight of 
Pythias; and a member of the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen. Married: October 30, 1888, 
to Frances, daughter of William F. and Eliza- 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



beth Nabers of Birmingham. Children: 1. 
William; 2. James H., jr.; 3. Helen; 4. Carolyn. 
Residence: Birmingham. 

MoCARY, RICHARD, soldier of the Amerir 
can RevoliUion, aged 81, and a resident of Bibb 
County; private Virginia Continental Line; 
enrolled on June 12, 1819, under act of Con- 
gress of March 18, 1818, payment to date from 
May 3, 1819; annual allowance, |96; sums re- 
ceived to date of publication of list, |1,497.31; 
transferred from Edgefield District, S. C, from 
March 4, 1827. — Revolutionary Pension Roll, in 
vol. xiv, Sen. doc. 614, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 
1833-34. He also resided in Washington County. 
— Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

McCASKILL, JOHN, lieutenant colonel, 3rd 
Confederate cavalry, C. S. Army. 

McCASLIN, ROBERT HORACE. Presby- 
terian minister, was born June 8, 1883, at Sweet- 
water, Monroe County, Tenn.; son of Joseph 
Henry and Margaret Ella (Magill) McCaslin, 
the former also a native of Monroe County, re- 
siding at Sweetwater and later at Sanford, 
Fla., a hardware merchant for thirty years, 
member of the Democratic executive committee 
of Monroe County for many years, a trustee of 
the Tennessee military institute, and a ruling 
elder in the Presbjrterian church; grandson of 
WilUam and Lydia (Messimer) McCaslin, of 
Monroe County, and of James Franklin and 
Mari^aret (Johnston) Magill, of MadisonviUe, 
Tenn. The name, McCaslin, was originally 
MacCausland, and descended from that Baron 
MacCausland of Ulster, who went to Ireland 
during the reign of James VI. In 1841, two 
brothers of the family came to America, one 
Fettling in South Carolina, the other, William 
McCaslin, going to Virginia, where he served 
with the patriots of that state in the War of 
the Revolution. His son, John, moved to North 
Carolina and there reared a large family. His 
second son, William, was born in Buncombe 
County, N. C, removed to Monroe County, from 
which he entered the Confederate Army as Cap- 
tain of Co. D, 62nd Tennessee infantry regi- 
ment. The founder of the maternal line was 
William Magill of Scotland, born 1670, whose 
son, William, came to America and settled in 
Augusta County, Va., and was a part of the 
Scotch-Irish immigration that came to this 
country, 1725-40. After the Revolutionary War, 
he, with his son, James, settled in Greene Coun- 
ty, Tenn., the latter having served in the Revo- 
lutionary War as a member of the 12th Virginia 
regiment, his second wife being Margaret Mc- 
Means. His son, Nathaniel, married Jane Ran- 
kin, and was a planter. His son, James Franklin, 
was born in 1825 and died in 1901, a prominent 
citizen of the county, a planter and devout Pres- 
byterian, having been a ruling elder in his 
church for nearly fifty years. Dr. McCaslin re- 
ceived his early education in his native home, 
among his teachers being Dr. Lynn Bachman, a 
Presbjrterian minister and for half a century a 
teacher, a distinguished orator, and Confed- 
erate soldier. In 1900 he graduated from 
Sweetwater military college with the B. S. 
degree and three years later took the A. B. de- 



gree at Maryville college. In 1906, he completed 
his course at the Union theological seminary^ 
Richmond, Va., and received the Ph. D. de- 
gree from Central university, 1909, and the 
honorary degree of D. D., from Richmond col- 
lege, 1912. He was ordained as a clergyman of 
the Presbyterian church at Knozville, Tenn., 
1906, his first pastoral charge being the First 
Presbyterian church at Cleveland, Tenn., where 
he served until 1908. at which time he 
was called to the First Presbyterian church 
at Bowling Green, Ky. In 1918, he assumed 
the pastorate of the First Presbyterian church 
in Montgomery, where he still remains. Dr. 
McCaslin takes a profound interest in the 
civic affairs of his adopted city and State. 
He was appointed a member of the educa- 
tion commission by Gov. Thomas E. Kilby 
to revise and recommend an educational stand- 
ard for Alabama, and in 1920. appointed by the 
Governor as a member of the State board of 
education; president of Montgomery Rotary 
club, 1918; director Alabama children's home 
society; director Montgomery chamber of com- 
merce since 1915; vjce-chairman, Montgomery 
War camp community service, during the World 
war; director and vice-president Montgomery 
Y. M. C. A.; director Montgomery associated 
charities; member Navy league of the U. S.; 
National geographic society; director Alabama 
branch of the League to enforce peace, and of 
the Interracial commission of the South; chap- 
lain, 2nd infantry regiment, A. N. G. He is a 
Mason; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: 
June 7, 1906, in Richmond, Va., to Grace Nelson, 
daughter of Rev. Dr. John and Virginia (Bag- 
by) Pollard, a prominent Baptist minister and 
professor in Columbian college, having served 
pastorates in Baltimore and Richmond, and for 
twenty years a professor in Richmond college; 
granddaughter of Col. John Pollard, a distin- 
guished attorney of King and Queen County, Va., 
whose mother was Katherine Robinson, a mem- 
ber of the family that produced Christopher 
Robinson, president of the King's council, and 
John Robinson, speaker of the house of bur- 
gesses. Children: 1. Susie Virginia; 2. Rob- 
ert Henry, deceased. Residence: Montgomery. 

McCLANAHA, J. M., member of the con- 
stitutional convention of 1861, from Shelby 
County. 

McCLELEN. SAMUEL DURHAM, fanner, 
was born August 5, 1820, in Winchester, Frank- 
lin County, Tenn., and died December 11, 1887, 
at Piedmont; son and youngest of eis^t children 
of Samuel and Frances (Kelley) McClelen, of 
York, S. C, whence they removed to Georgia, 
thence to Tennessee, and finally in 1834 to 
Talladega County, where he died in 1846, and 
his wife four years later, the former was a boy 
in South Carolina during the Revolutionary 
War. His father was a native of Ireland of 
Scotch ancestry, and his name was either 
Thomas or Robert McClelen. S. D. McClelen 
was educated in the common schools; and lo- 
cated near Alexandria as a farmer, where his 
life was spent, excepting six years in Talla- 
dega County. In 1838 he aided in the removal 
of the Indians from the State. He held the 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1093 



office of justice of the peace; was comity com- 
missioner; and a member of the legislature of 
1861. He was captain of Co. E, 82nd Alabama 
infantry regiment; resigned in 1863 on ac- 
count of ill health; in 1864 re-entered the serv- 
ice as captain of a cavalry troop in Biajor 
Joseph Hardie's battalion, and served until the 
close of hostilities. He was elected sheriff of 
Calhoun County, and served during the recon- 
struction period. He was a Democrat; a Bap- 
tist; and a Blason. Married: (1) February 7, 
1839, near Alexandria, to Sarah, daughter of 
William and Elizabeth (Autrey) Hill, of Gwin- 
nett County, Oa.; and (2) May 10, 1846, to De- 
borah, daughter of James and Sarah (Shields) 
Price of Sevier County, Tenn., who removed 
to Alabama in the thirties. Children, by first 
wife: 1. Bailey George, born January 18, 1840, 
m. Louise Walker, July 18, 1864, was a member 
of Co. D, 10th Alabama infantry regiment, from 
June 18, 1861, to the end of the struggle, has 
lived in Calhoun County practically his whole 
life, five children, and now resides in Alex- 
andria; by second wife: 2. Blisha Durham, 
born October 24, 1847, near Jacksonville, and 
died November 28, 1915, at White Plains, his 
last residence, a farmer and a merchant, m. 
(1) in 1874, Dollle Barron, of Jackson County, 
who bore one daughter, and (2) Sallie Glover, 
of Cherokee County, by whom he had seven 
children. Last residence: Piedmont 

McCLELLAN, AURORA (PRYOR), club- 
woman, was born May 28, 1846, at Acacia Grove, 
Limestone County; daughter of Luke and Isa- 
bella Virginia (Harris) Pryor; granddaughter 
of Luke L and his second wife Anne Batte 
(Lane) Pryor (q. v.) ; great-granddaughter of 
Luke Pryor of Dinwiddle County, Va. Through 
her ancestress, Anne (Bland) Pryor she is the 
direct descendant of Richard Bennett, colonial 
governor of Virginia, and William Randolph 
of Turks Island, Va. Mrs. McClellan was edu- 
cated at the Tennessee conference female Insti- 
tute, and as amanuensis to her father in his 
legal practice acquired a knowledge of law 
which was later of much use to her state. She 
founded the Athens chapter. Daughters of the 
American Revolution, and was its regent for 
four years and for two terms regent for Ala- 
bama and is honorary life regent of Alabama 
in that organisaticm ; member of the Athens 
chapter. United Daughters of the Confederacy; 
vice-president of the National fioral association ; 
member of the Society of Colonial dames and 
of the order of Descendants of colonial gov- 
ernors of America. She is a member of the 
Christian church. Mrs. McClellan is particu- 
larly remembered for her work during her 
regency of the Alabama D. A. R., by marking 
historic places and primitive roads of the State. 
She also was responsible for the purchase of 
rugs, draperies, and first furniture contributed 
to the Alabama room in the Continental me- . 
morial hall at Washington. Through her efforts ^ 
the golden rod was adopted by a number of or- 
ganizations as the national flower of the 
United States, and the schools of Alabama as 
the State flower. Married: February 7, 1872, 
at Athens, to Robert Anderson McClellan (q. 
v.). C!hildren: 1. Thomas Cowan (q. v.); 2. 



Aurora Anderscm, d. in infancy; 8. Memory, 
m. Robert Henry Walker, ot Athens; 4. Son, 
died in infancy. Residence: Athens. 

MoCLELLAN, ROBERT ANDERSON, lawyer, 
State senator, member of constitutional con- 
vention, 1875, was bom December 24, 1843, in 
Lincoln County, Tenn., and died July 27, 1898, 
at Athens; son of Thomas Joyce and Martha 
Fleming (Beattle) McClellan, the former of 
whom was born July 2, 1811, in Rockingham 
County, N. C, migrated to Tennessee and thence 
to Alabama in 1844; brother of Thomas Nicho- 
las McClellan (q. v.) ; grandson of William and 
Matilda (Joyce) McClellan of Rockingham 
County, N. C; great-grandson of William and 
Hannah (Beavers) McClellan of Loudon 
County, Va., captain of cavalry during the 
Revolutionary War. Mr. McClellan was edu- 
cated by private tutors and was at a prepara^- 
tory school in Lincoln County, Tenn., at the 
outbreak of the war between the States when he 
enlisted in Co. C, Seventh Alabama cavalry regi- 
ment, C. S. Army, under Colonel J. C. Malone, 
and served for the duration, of the war, being a 
lieutenant at the time of surrender. He read 
law in the office of Judge Wm. H. Walker at 
Athens; was admitted to the bar, November 
10, 1868; elected to constitutional convention 
1875, and in the same year elected to the State 
senate where he served one term. Although a 
Christian, Mr. McClellan had no church affilia- 
tion. He was a charter member of the Scotch- 
Irish society of America. Married: February 
7, 1872, at Athens, to Aurora Pryor (q. v.). 
Children: 1. Thomas Cowan (q. v.); 2. Aurora 
Anderson, d. in infancy; 3. Memory, m. Robert 
Henry Walker, of Athens, one son, William Mc- 
Clellan Walker; 4. a son, died in infancy. Last 
residence: Athens. 

McCLELLAN, THOMAS COWAN, lawyer and 
associate justice Alabama supreme court, was 
born Junuary 11, 1873, in Athens; wm of Rob- 
ert Anderson and Aurora (Pryor) McClellan 
(q. v.); grandson of Thomas J. and Margaret 
(Beattle) McClellan, and of Luke and Isabella 
Virginia (Harris) Pryor (q. v.). He received 
his early education in his native town, and 
was for two years a student at the University of 
Alabama, 1890-92. but did not graduate. He 
was mayor of Athens for ten years, and a 
trustee of the University of Alabama from 
1899 to date. In 1906 he was elected an as- 
sociate Justice of the supreme court of Ala- 
bama, re-elected November 5, 1912, for six years, 
and again re-elected in 1918. Married: (1) 
December 20, 1894, at Athens, to Emily, daugh- 
ter of Judge James E. and Emily (Donelson) 
Horton, of Athens, (2) to Sue Ruth Philips, 
of Pulaski, Tenn. Children: by the first mar- 
riage, a son, who died before reaching man- 
hood; 2. Ruth. Residence: Athens. 

, McCLELLAN, THOMAS NICHOLAS, chief 
justice of the supreme court of the State of 
Alabama, was born February 23, 1863, in Lime- 
stone County, and died in February,. 1906; son 
of Thomas Joyce and Martha Fleming (Beat- 
tie) McClellan, the former a native of Lincoln 
County, Tenn., a Whig, member of the constitu- 
tional conventions of Alabama in 1861, and in 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1866. and a member of the house of representa- 
tives from Limestone County in 1862, who had 
come to Limestone Cbunty in 1844, and died 
there in 1887; brother of Robert Anderson 
McGlellan (q. v.) ; grandson of John and Joanna 
(Moore) Beattie, of the same county. His pa- 
ternal ancestors are Scotch-Irish, emigrating 
from north Ireland, and his maternal an- 
cestors came from EiUgland, both branches 
settling in Virginia. On both sides his an- 
cestors were soldiers in the War of the Rer- 
olution. Judge McClellan was educated in the 
common schools, and at Oak Hill college, Ten- 
nessee. In June, 1872, he took his degree of 
LL. B. in the law department of Cumberland 
university, Lebanon, Tenn. He began the 
practice in September, 1872, at Athens, in co- 
partnership with his brother. Captain Robert 
A. McClellan. He was register in chancery of 
Limestone County, 1874-76; State senator, 1880- 
84; State attorney-general, 1884-89; associate 
justice supreme court, 1889-98; and was chief 
justice, from November, 1898, until his death. 
He was a Democrat, and was unmarried. Last 
residence: Montgomery. 

McCLUNG, FRANCIS B., major, and later 
lieutenant colonel, 1st Confederate infantry 
battalion, C. S. Army. 

MoCLUNG, JAMBS WHITE, lawyer and 
speaker of Alabama house of representatives, 
was born June 6, 1798» at Knoxville, Tenn., and 
died May 31, 1848, at Huntsville; son of Col. 
Charles and Margaret (White) McClung, the 
former bom near Leaman place, Leacock town- 
ship, Lancaster County, Pa., who removed to 
Knoxville which he surveyed, was first clerk 
of Knox County, U. S., commissioner to super- 
intend running the Cherokee boundary line es- 
tablished by the Treaty of Holston, charter 
trustee Blount college, 1794, second lieutenant 
territorial cavalry of Hamilton District, 1796, 
delegate from Knox County to the first con« 
stitutional convention of Tennessee of 1796, and 
a member of the committee which drafted the 
Instrument, died while In Harrodsbnrg, Ky., 
on a visit, and his remains in December, 1904, 
brought to Knoxville; grandson of Matthew and 
Martha (Cunningham) McClung, the former 
a Scotch-Irish immigrant from Ireland to Lan- 
caster County, and of Qen. Jasnes and Mary 
(Lawson) White, of Knoxville, parents of Hon. 
Hugh Lawson White, tho former a captain in 
the North Carolina militia, 1776-1781, a Revo- 
lutionary soldier, proprietor and founder of 
Knoxville, lieutenant, colonel commandant of 
Knox County in its organization in 1792. chair- 
man of the first court of that county, delegate 
to the convention that framed the constitution 
of Tennessee, state senator from Knox County 
and speaker of the senate 1797, 1801, 1803, 1805, 
commissioned brigadier general East Tennessee 
militia volunteers, and commanded a brigade 
in the Creek War, though then an old man; 
great-grandson of Moses and Mary (McCon- 
nell) White, and of Hugh Lawson, all probably 
of Rowan County, N. C, and great-great-grand- 
son of Moses and Mary (Campbell) White, from 
Lancaster, Pa., to Rowan County, and of Scotch- 
Irish stock also. James White McClung at- 
tended Blount college at Knoxville, where he 



had his early training and graduated at the 
University of North CJarolina, A. B. 1816. He 
read law under James Hopkins, the most emi- 
nent lawyer at the Lancaster bar; was ad- 
mitted to practice in 1819 in that place; and 
at once located in Huntsville, where he was 
"Commissicmed" as a lawyer by the territorial 
governor. He entered the house of repre- 
sentatives from Madison County in 1822, served 
again in 1826; speaker of the sessions of 1836, 
1837 and 1838; elected in 1842 and served as 
chairman of the judiciary committee; again re- 
turned in 1844, and made chairman of the 
committee on ways and means "on account of 
the critical state of the public debt." In 1845 
he was elected to the senate for a four year 
term, and he headed the judiciary committee 
in both that and the session of 1847. He made 
the race for governor in 1841 on an inde- 
pendent ticket, but was defeated by Benjamin 
Fitspatrick, the Democratic nominee. Of this 
campaign Miller, "Heads of the Alabama Legis- 
lature," 1842, says "He was beaten by a ma« 
jority that perhaps taught him it was better 
to belong to one of the political parties, with 
avowed principles, than to stand on solitary 
ground, fighting for what others could not see 
or understand, however obvious his policy to 
himself." As a lawyer he stood at tho head 
of the bar "his qualifications as a presiding 
officer were of the highest order," and in 
natural ability he was the peer of any of his 
contemporaries. Married: (1) April 29, 1828, 
to Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of Gov. David 
Brydie and Jane (Mills) Mitchell, of Savannah, 
and later of Mllledgeville, Ga.; (2) in 1834, to 
Elizabeth F., daughter of Elliott and Sally 
(Littlepage) Spotswood, who lived near Hunts- 
ville; (3) June 26, 1839, at Fayetteville, Tenn., 
to Margaret E., daughter of Isaac and BCatUda 
(Penn) Patrick. Children, by first marriage: 
1. CJharles, m. (1) Laura Bunch, no issue; (2) 
Alice Deaderick, of Knoxville; 2. Mary Ann, 
m. Pleasant Miller McClung, her first cousin, 
killed in battle at Knoxville, 1868; 8. David 
Brydie Mitchell, d. young; 4. Hugh Lawson 
White, m. Trophic Catherine Carlisle, of Aber- 
deen, Miss.; 5. Thomas Feam, d. young; 6. 
Matthew, who upon being adopted by his 
mother's friend, Mrs. John Robinson, of Hunts- 
ville, changed his sumamo to Robinson by an 
act of the legislature, m. Eliza Snodgrass, of 
Cherokee County; by second marriage: 7. 
James White, m. (1) Bettie Heiskell, of Mor- 
ganton, Tenn., (2) Sarah T. Balard, of Can- 
ton, Ark.; 8. Elliott Spotswood, m. Pattie Booth 
of Vicksburg, Miss.; by third marriage: 9. Wil- 
liam Penn, m. Virginia Taul Anderson, resi- 
dence Memphis; 10. Annie Parsons, m. Andrew 
Jackson White; 11. Prank Armstrong, m. Buell 
Drake and resided in Chattanooga; 12. Howard, 
d. in infancy; 13. Arthur Henderson, a lawyer, 
m. Mary Adelle Lee, of Pickens County. Last 
residence: Huntsville. 

MoCLURE, JOHN, soldier of the American 
RevoltUion, aged 76, and a resident of Lime- 
stone County; private and sergeant N. C. Mm- 
tia; enrolled on May 10, 1834, under act of 
Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance, |80.— Kevo- 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1095 



HtUmary Pen9ion Roll, in toI. xIt, Sen. doc. 
514, 23rd Cong^ let sees., 1833-34. 

McCLUSKBY, JOHN DANIEL, lawyer and 
legislator, was born August 6, 1841, at New- 
burg» Franklin County, and died at Vernon, La- 
mar County; son of James and Amanda Fits 
Allen (Chiles) McCluskey, the former a native 
of Londonderry, County Derry, Ireland, who 
migrated to Alabama, the latter a native of 
Virginia; grandson of Samuel and Fannie 
Chiles, of Bowling Oreen, Caroline County, Va., 
and of Bartholomew and Mary (McLeod) Mc- 
Cluskey, of Londonderry, Ireland; great-grand- 
son of Henry Chiles, a soldier of the Revolution, 
who lost an arm while engaged in carrying dis- 
patches from Washington to Lafayette. He at- 
tended the common schools of Lawrence and 
Franklin Counties, and the LaOrange college 
in North Alabama. He enlisted in the 38th 
Tennessee infantry regiment, C. S. Army; was 
wounded at battle of Perryville, later placed 
in command of a company of sharpshooters and 
assigned to Col. Jeft Forrest's command; later 
attached to 5th Alabama cavalry regiment; was 
captured at Selma, and carried to Macon where 
he was paroled. He was admitted to the bar 
in 1868, at Aberdeen, Miss.; practiced six years 
there and then removed to Vernon, where he 
resided until his death. He was at one time 
mayor of Vernon and was a representative from 
Lamar Cbunty in the legislature of 1892 and 
1903. He was a Democrat; Baptist; and an 
Odd Fellow. Married: August 9, 1874, to Ma- 
tilda Catherine, daughter of William and Leo- 
dice (Springfield) Kuykendall. Children: 1. 
Fannie Fitz, deceased, m. Charles V. Thomp- 
son; 2. Thommie Pocahontas, deceased, m. Wil- 
liam Zadi Huggins; 3. Johnnie Dave, now re- 
sides in Arkansas. Last residence: Vernon. 

Mc(X)LLOM, J. W., deceased missionary to 
Japan. 

McCOLLUM, WILLIAM W., grand master, 
grand council, 1882-85; deputy grand high 
priest, grand chapter. Masons, 1885-86. 

McCONAUGHY, JAMES LACBY, coal opera- 
tor, was bom October 21, 1852, in Jefferson 
County; son of William and Harriet (Lacey) 
McCcmaughy, the former a native of Dela- 
ware who removed to Dallas County, about 
1840 and later to Montevallo; grandson of Pat- 
rick and Mary (Hanson) McConaughy, natives 
of Ireland who came to Delaware in 1806, and 
of Joshua Lacey, a Kentuckian who settled in 
Jefferson County, pioneer period; great-grand- 
son of (}en. Edward Lacey, one of the heroes of 
the American Revolution. Mr. McConaughy re- 
ceived a high school education; entered at an 
early age upon a business career; and has been 
for more than thirty years connected with the 
Montevallo coal mining company. He assisted 
in securing for Montevallo the location of the 
Alabama girls' technical institute. He is a 
Democrat; Presbyterian; and a Mason. Mar- 
ried: June 26, 1895, at Talladega, to Ck)nradine, 
daughter of James and Lavinia (Smith) 
Skaggs, of that place. She was a graduate of 

Vol. IV— T 



the University of Nashville, vice-president Ala- 
bama Federation of Women's Clubs, 1892-1893; 
and chairman of the scholarship committee Ala- 
bama girls' technical institute. Children: L 
Hazel; 2. James Lacey. Residence: Montevallo. 

McCONNELL, FELIX GRUNDY, lawyer, 
member of Congress, was born April 1, 1809, 
at Nashville, Tenn., and died September 10» 
1846, in Washington, D. C; son of Major John 
Perry and Martha Campbell (Kennedy) Mc« 
Connell, natives respectively of Fayetteville, 
Tenn., and Augusta County, Va.; grandson of 
John and Martha (Campbell) McConnell; great- 
grandson of Robert and Esther (Edmiston) 
Kennedy; great-great-grandson of William and 
Martha (Campbell) Kennedy. He was educated 
in Tennessee and located in Talladega County, 
in 1834, and there read law and entered upon 
the practice. Possessed of a magnetic person- 
ality he quickly made friends and in 1838 was 
elected to represent his county in the lower 
house of Alabama legislature. The next year 
he was elected to the State senate and served 
four years. In 1843 he was elected to con- 
gress and two years later re-elected. He was 
a Democrat and a Methodist Married: Octo- 
ber 23, 1835, at Mardisville, to Elizabeth Jen- 
nings, daughter of William and Hannah (Bal- 
linger) Hogan of that place; granddaughter 
of Richard and Sarah (Jennings) Ballinger; 
great-granddaughter of William Jennings, cap- 
tain in the Revolutionary War. The mother 
of Captain Jennings was the niece of Benjamin 
Franklin. Children: 1. Kathleen, m. (^n. 
Charles M. Shelley (q. v.); William Kennedy 
(q. v.), m. Martha Ellen Smith; 3. Olivia, sec- 
ond wife of (3en. Shelley; 4. Felix Grundy. Last 
res idence : Talladega. 

McCONNELL, JAMES, sen., soldier of the 
American Revolution, aged 83, resided in Lime- 
stone County, June 1, 1840. — Census of Pension- 
era, 1841, p. 148. 

McCONNELL, WILLIAM KENNEDY, com- 
mandant Alabama university, tax collector and 
railroad agent, was bom March 25, 1841, in 
Talladega County, and reared from the age of 
eight until of age by an uncle in Tennessee; 
son of Felix Grundy and Elizabeth (Jennings) 
McConnell (q. v.). He attended XiaGrange col- 
lege and, leaving there, joined Co, B, 16th Ala- 
bama infantry regiment, C. S. Army, as a pri- 
vate; soon afterwards made color-bearer, and 
later drillmaster of volunteers, promoted to 
lieutenant of engineers, transferred to 30th 
Alabama infantry regiment He participated 
in the battles of Wild Cat, Mill Springs or Fish- 
ing Creek, Shiloh, Farmington, Corinth, Boona- 
ville, Chattanooga, Munfordville, Perryville, 
Vicksburg, Chickasaw Bayou, Warrenton, Bak- 
er's Creek, Big Black River bridj^e, Lookout 
Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Dalton, Frank- 
lin and Nashville. He was placed in command 
of his company at the Baker's Creek fight by 
order of (3en. Stephen D. Lee, and at Jonesboro 
was made adjutant of Shelley's brigade. At 
the close of hostilities he returned home for 
a brief stay and then proceeded to Mexico 
where he remained for two years. Returning 
to Alabama, he located in Selma, but shortly 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



afterwards was appointed commandant of the 
State university. Later he was i4;>pointed tax 
collector for Dallas County, and held that office 
seven years. In August, 1884, he located in 
Talladega where he was employed as railroad 
and express agent He is a Mason and Knight 
of Honor. Biarried: May 7, 1868, to Martha 
Ellen Smith, of Columbia, Tenn. Children: 
four in number. Residence: Talladega. 

MoCONNELL, W. S., retired business man. 
Residence: Birmingham. 

MoCONNICO, FRANK HAWTHORN, phy- 
sician; graduate of the medical department of 
Tulane university, New Orleans, 1899; licensed 
to practice by the county board of Wilcox the 
same year. Residence: Montgomery. 

MoCONNICO, WILLIAM WASHINOTON, 
farmer, was bom August 12, 1888, at AUenton, 
Wilcox County, and died January 19, 1918; son 
of Charles Timothy and Mary (Robinson) Mo- 
Connico, the former a native of Sumter Dis- 
trict, S. C, who resided at Claiborne, Monroe 
County, and later at Allenton; grandson of 
William Washington and Mary Ellis (Spann) 
MoConnico, and of Dr. Allen and Sally (Hill) 
Robinson, of Allenton. The McConnico family 
is of Scotch origin. The first immigrant to 
America was William McConnico, who settled 
in Virginia, and his sons moved to South (Caro- 
lina and to Tennessee. W. W. McConnico was 
given the educational advantages of the neigh- 
borhood schools; became a farmer; was Justice 
of the peace for twenty years; was for one 
year in the First Alabama infantry regiment, 
and later a captain in Hannon's brigade of 
cavalry, serving from February 2, 1861, to 
May, 1865. He was a Democrat; an Episcopa- 
lian; and a Mason. Married: December 1, 1859, 
at Pine Apple, to Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas Jefferson and Catherine (King) Haw- 
thorn, of Belleville, Conecuh County; grand- 
daughter of Joshua Hawthorn, a native of 
North Carolina, who emigrated to Alabama, 
and of John King, who came to Alabama from 
South Carolina. Mrs. McCk)nnico died Febru- 
ary 19, 1918. Children: 1. Mary CJatherine, m. 
Dr. S. O. Jones, of Snow Hill; 2. Stonewall, 
who resides at Snow Hill, planter, sheriff of 
Wilcox Count|r> 1896-1900; 8. Etta Hawthorn, 
Snow Hill; 4. Frank Hawthorn, physician, 
graduate of Tulane university, 1899, and now 
resides in Montgomery. Residence: Snow Hill. 

McCORD, DAVID, grand treasurer, grand 
lodge, Masons, 1821-25. 

McCORD, E. O., lawyer, editor, was bom 
March 1, 1867, in Conyers. Ga.; son of William 
H. and Ellen G. (Davis) McCord. He received 
his early schooling in Rockdale County, €ku, 
and attended the North Georgia agricultural 
college for two years. He went to Alabama 
and taught school in Marshall County for sev- 
eral years, during which time he was instru- 
mental in the founding of Blount college at 
Blountsville. He taught languages and science 
in Blount college in its initial year; was su- 
perintendent of the Attalla public sdiool for 



two years; moved to Albertville and founded 
the "Marshall County News"; studied law and 
edited that paper for two years; was admitted 
to the Madison County bar in 1889; and en- 
tered the practice of law four years later at 
Albertville. He is a steward in the Methodist 
Episcopal churdi, and superintendent of the 
Sunday school; is a Knight of Pythias and an 
Odd Fellow. Biarried: in March, 1890, to Rena 
B., daughter of Dr. F. N. and Pamelia E. 
(Doyle) Hudson, of Blountsville. Children: 
1. Minnie Lee; 2. Eric Oliver; 8. Frank Henry; 
4. Roy Davis; 6. Winnie Ruth. Residence: 
Albertville. 

MoCORD, LEON CLARENCHS, lawyer, was 
bom June 21, 1876, at Conyers, Rockdale Coun- 
ty., Ga.; son of William Henry and Ellen Ghrant 
(DavU) McCord, of Albertville, Marshall 
County, the former whose parents came from 
Ireland to Georgia, was inajor oi the Nine- 
teenth Georgia infantry regiment, serving 
through the War of Secession and was for a 
number of years one of the county commission- 
ers ct Marshall Ckmnty. Mr. McCord was ed- 
ucated in the schools of Albertville, AttaUa, 
and Blountsville, and was graduated from the 
law department of Vanderbilt university, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. He is a lawyer, having practiced 
at Scottsboro and Guntersville eight years be- 
fore becoming secretary of the supreme court 
in 1903, which position he held for six years. 
He served as second lieutenant €i Third Ttoxas 
volunteers in the Spanish-American War; is at 
present battalion adjutant. Third infantry, 
Alabama national guard. From January, 1911, 
to January, 1916, he served as a member of 
the railroad commission. On the death of 
Judge W. W. Pearson, May 9, 1916, he was ap- 
pointed to serve out the unexpired term for 
judge of the fifteenth judicial circuit He is a 
Democrat, and has been on the state executive 
committee from the seventh congressional dis- 
trict for four years; is a Methodist; a Knight 
of Psrthias; and an Elk, having been at the head 
of the charities committee for a number of 
years. Married: February 20, 1906, at Lynch- 
burg, Va., to Bobbie, daughter of Willis Richard 
and Mary Frances (Sanderson) Tanner, of 
Ljmchburg, Va., the former an officer in the 
C. S. Army; grand-niece of Governor Tanner 
of Virginia. Residence: Albertville. 

McCORD, ROBERT A., major, 14th Alabama 
infantry regiment, C. S Army. 

MoCORKLE, ALEXANDER B., Presbyterian 
minister, was bom October 15, 1806, near Lex- 
ington, Rockbridge County, Va., and died Sep- 
tember 4, 1886, in Talladega; son of Alexander 
and Mildred (Welch) McCorkle, who lived near 
Lexington, in Rockbridge County, Va., the for- 
mer of whom was bom there, lived at that 
place all his life, was curtain of a company of 
militia for many years, and was a magistrate; 
grandson of John and Rebecca (McNutt) Mc- 
Corkle, who lived at the McCk>rkle homestead 
on North River, near Lexington, the former a 
soldier in the Revolution, who fought at the 
battle of King's Mountain, was wounded at the 
battle of Cowpens, and died on the retreat 



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OAYLORD B. CLARK 



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1099 



of Oreen*8 army to North Carolina, and was 
bnrled at Beattie's Ford, in Lincoln County* 
N. C, the latter who married Robert Glasgow 
after the death of her first husband, and was 
the ancestress of the Glasgow family of Rock- 
bridge County and Richmond, Va. It is be- 
lieyed that John McCorkle came from Lan- 
caster County, Pa., to Rockbridge County, Va., 
some years before the Revolution, bought a 
farm, and was married at that place. Mr. Mc- 
Corkle was prepared for college in the com- 
mon schools of the county, and was graduated 
from Washington College, Lexington, Va., 1827. 
He spent some months at Princeton theologi- 
cal seminary, but failing health compelled him 
to giye up his studies for a time, and he re- 
turned to Rockbridge, later engaging in busi- 
ness with his brother, Samuel McCorkle, at 
Lynchburg, Va. He finished his theological 
course at Union seminary, Hampden Sidney, 
Va.; was licensed by the Lexington presbytery 
in 1836, and ordained in 1836. He was stated 
supply and evangelist for two years after his 
licensure in Rockingham County, Va.; was pas- 
tor of Savannah and Bethel churches, Augusta 
County, four years; labored as domestic mis- 
sionary in Cherokee and Chattooga Counties, 
Ga., for four years; took charge of the church 
at Talladega in 1846, and served that church 
until failing health led to his resignation in 
1871. He was instrumental in founding the 
Si^odical college for women in Talladega in 
1849, and was the first president of the board 
of trustees, doing valuable work in raising 
the original endowment Married: November 
2, 1842, at "Pleasant Green," Chattooga County, 
Ga., to Lucilla Agnes, daughter of Rev. James 
and Sarah (Ramsey) Gamble, who lived on 
Cowpasture River, in Augusta County, Va.; 
granddaughter of Dr. James Ramsey and of 
Rev. James Gamble, who received as a land 
grant from George IH a large part of the sec- 
tion around Fort Defiance, Augusta County, Va. 
Children: 1. and 2. names unknown; 8. Alex- 
ander Gamble, b. December 27, 1846, in Talla- 
dega, d. October 27, 1881, at Wolfs Summit, 
W. Va., taught school until his death, m. Ida 
Chitfield; 4. Sallie Lyle, teacher, Talladega; 6. 
Rev. William Parsons, b. 1866 in Talladega, 
Presbyterian minister, author of "Christian 
Science a False Christ," served various charges 
in Synod of North Carolina, pastor of the First 
diurch. Savannah, Ga., six years, pastor of An- 
derson memorial church, Martinsville, Va.; 6. 
Mildred Welch, b. 1869, Talladega, d. Septem- 
ber 8, 1890, near Summerville, Ga. Last resi- 
dence: Talladega. 

MoCORMACK, BENJAMIN, soldier of the 
Amerioan Revolution, aged 89, and a resident 
of Perry County; private Georgia Militia; en- 
rolled on September 17, 1833, under act of Con- 
gress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
ICarch 4, 1881; annual allowance, |90; sums re- 
oeived to date of publication of list, |270.— 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in voL ziv. Sen. 
doc 614, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1888-84. 

MoCORMACK, GEORGB BRYANT, coal op- 
erator and banker, was bom April 4, 1869, at 
FUttin, Jefferson County, Mo.; son oi Reed 
and Luctnda Catherine (Kindrick) McCorma^ 



the former judge of the County court of Jeffer- 
son County, a representative in the Missouri 
legislature two terms, a resident of PlatUn and 
of Hematite, Mo., and later of Birmingham; 
grandson of Hardy and Elizabeth (Mitchell) 
McCormack of Plattin, and Patrick and Phoebe 
(Fuller) Kindrick of Lebanon, Va.; great- 
grandson of Peter P. McCk>rmack, who came to 
America from Dublin, Ireland, as a soldier in 
the British Army under Lord John Rawlin, but 
who deserted to the American Army,* with 
which he fought through- the Revolutionary 
War. His great-great-grandfather married a 
Scotch woman and lived in or near Dublin. 
Mr. McCormack was educated in the puMic 
schools of Jefferson County and in Carleton in- 
stitute, St Francis County, Mo. He began his 
business career as a merchant's cletk in his 
native state; was a telegraph operator, and rail- 
road agent in Arkansas; bookkeeper, stenogra- 
pher, private secretary, coal mine superintend- 
ent, superintendent and later general manager 
of coal mines, blast furnaces, steel plants, iron 
ore mines, and quarries both in Tennessee and 
in Alabama. He later became a banker, and is 
now a merchant, banker, coal and iron ore 
operator and interested in an insurance wm- 
pany. He is a Democrat; has no church affil- 
iations; and is a Mason. Married: August 20, 
1881, to Leonora Augusta, daughter of Maurice 
Ludwig and Margaret (Johnson) Lichtenstad^ 
of Atlanta, Ga. (Children: 1. Maurice DonneU, 
d. in infancy; 2. Carr, president Newcastle coal 
company, m. Mrs. Myrtle (Hickey) Phillips, 
Newcastle; 8. George Bryant, Jr., owner and 
operator. Black Creek coal company, m. Hawsie 
Norvell, Birmingham; 4. MBTgaret, m. (1) 
Thcnnas Owen Gillespy, (2) William Lawrence, 
Montgcnnery; 6. Alfred Shook, d. in boyhood; 
6. Harry Jones, owner and operator* Remlap 
cooperage company, m. Madge Blair; 7. Peiry 
Reed, m. Kitty Sibley, Newcastle; 8. Katherlne. 
unmarried. Residence: Birmingham. 

MoCORBfACK, JOS. R., eoMier of the AmerU 
can Revolution, aged 96, resided in Jacksmi 
CJounty, June 1, 1840. — Census of Pensioners, 
1841, p. 148. 

MoCORiaCK, GEORGE C, merchant, was 
bom July 26, 1843, in Louisville, Barbour 
County; son of William and Anne (McKigney) 
McCormick, of Scotch and Irish descent respec- 
tively, the former a native of Richmond County, 
N. C, and who in 1836, at the age of eighteen, 
came to Barbour County, was in the Indian 
Wars, 1836; grandson of John McCormick, a 
native of Scotland, who came to the United 
States when a young man and located in North 
Carolina. Mr. McCormick was educated in the 
common schools of his native county. On 
April 4, 1861, he joined the "Louisville Blues," 
with which he saw service at Pensacola, and 
also a year's service in the army of Tennes- 
see. Later' he was a first lieutenant of Co. 
D, Hilliard's legion, and after reorganisation, 
his company was in the 69th Alabama infiintry 
regiment He was so seriously wounded at the 
battle of Chickamauga that he was kept al- 
most a year in a hospital. Upon recovery, he 
Joined his regiment in the trenches of Peters- 
burg, and served throughout the war. After 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



the war he located In Eufaula, became a suc- 
cessful buBlnesB man; organised the McCor- 
mlclc-Kendall grocery company In 1890, of which 
he was president; and served as member of 
the city council of Bufaula. He Is a Democrat; 
a Knight of Pythias; Knight of Honor; United 
Workman; and a Presbyterian. Married: Feb- 
ruary 17, 1867, to Catherine Love, daughter of 
Dr. George L. Allan. Children: 1. William 
Love, • student at the University of Alabama, 
1884, m. Henrietta Fontane Copeland, residence, 
Eufaula; 2. Annie, m. E. T. Dent, of Eufaula; 
3. George R. Residence: Eufaula. 

Mccormick, JOHN H., 33rd degree Honor- 
ary Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. 

McCORVEY, THOMAS CHALMERS, teacher 
and author, was born August 18, 1861, on his 
father's plantation In Mcmroe County; son of 
Judge Murdock and Lydla Jane (Ranaldson) 
McCorvey, the former a native of Robeson 
County, N. C, who removed to Monroe County 
with his parents In territorial days, was pro- 
bate Judge of that county, 1866-68, soldier In the 
Creek Indian War, 1836, teacher and planter; 
grandson of John Murphy and Barbara (Mc- 
Millan) McCorvey, both natives of Scotland, 
w^o came to America as children with their 
parents about 1783, settled In Robeson County, 
^. C, later, 1817, removing to Mcmroe County, 
^nd of Drewry Allen and Mary (Slngletary) 
Ranaldson, natives of Cumberland County, who 
removed to Mcmroe County, about 1816; great- 
grandson of Archibald and Mary (Allen) Ran- 
alddon, the former a native of Scotland who 
emigrated to America after the battle of Cul- 
loden, settled in Cumberland County, N. C, 
where he married, the latter the daughter of 
a Cape Fear River planter and of the family 
of the North Carolina Revolutionary soldier, 
Drewry Allen. The Allen and Slngletary fam- 
ilies are of English descent. The Ranaldsons, 
or McRanaldsons, belong to the clan Ranald 
branch of the McDonald clan. The three close- 
ly connected families of Murphys, McCorveys, 
and McWilllamses came from Klntyre, Scot- 
land, about 1783, and settled in Robeson County, 
N. C. Colonel McCorvey received his early edu- 
cation under the direction of his father and sis- 
ters and at Monroevllle academy; attended 
Erskine college, S. C, 1870-71; entered the Uni- 
versity of Alabama. 1871, Ph. B. 1873, LL. B. 
1874, A. M. 1878, LL. D. 1906; conmiandant of 
cadets. University of Alabama, 1874-88; student 
history and economics, University of Chicago, 
1898. He has been an officer and professor In 
the University of Alabama since graduation In 
1873, having taught at different periods, mili- 
tary science, psychology, ethics, economics, his- 
tory, and political science. He was appointed 
by President (Heveland in 1886, as a member 
of the board of visitors of the West Point mil- 
itary academy, and by (Governor Kilby, In 1919, 
as a member of the Alabama centennial com- 
mission. He Is a Democrat; baptized a Pres- 
byterian but attends the Episcopal church; and 
was a member of the Knights of the White 
Camellia, In reconstruction days. Author: 
"The government of the people of the State 
of Alabama," 1896; 'The masses and classes In 



Southern politics," In vol. 4, Transactions of 
Alabama historical society; "Samuel Mlntum 
Peck," In Library of Southern literature; and 
of numerous magazine and newspaper articles. 
Married: July 22, 1880, at Green Springs, to 
Netta Lucia, daughter of Henry and Julia 
(Ashe) Tutwiler (q. v.). Children: L Jean 
Campbell; 2. Gessner Tutwiler, m. E«mlly 
Cameron Gray, of Mobile; 3. Eleanor Parker, 
m. George Doherty Johnston, Jr., University; 
4. Thomas Chalmers, deceased. Residence: 
University. 

McCORVEY, WILLIAM GILBERT, Judge 
and legislator, was bom July 10, 1856, at Mon- 
roevllle, Monroe County; son of Neal and 
Sarah Jane (Beard) McCorvey, the former a 
private In the Confederate Army; grandson of 
John and Barbara McCorvey, and of Neal Beard. 
He was taught by private tutors at Monroevllle 
and studied law In the office of Thomas L. 
Sowell, Monroevllle. He served as a member 
of the State legislature, 1893-94; was a county 
solicitor; regfster in chancery; and Judge of the 
law and equity court of Monroe County from 
the date of Its establishment until abolished. 
He served as second lieutenant in the Mcmroe 
County corps during its existence. He is a 
Democrat; Presbyterian; Mason; and a Knight 
of Pythias. Married: June 28, 1893, at Scot- 
land, Monroe County, to Elizabeth, daughter 
of William and Margaret (Du Bose) Nettles of 
that place. Children: 1. William G., Jr.; 2. 
Joseph Flnley. Residence: Monroevllle. 

MoCOSKLIN, , soldier of the Ameriean 

Revolution, aged 78, resided in Sumter CkMmty, 
June 1, 1840. — Censue of Pensioners, 1841, p. 
149. 

MoCOY, FRANKLIN J., major, 21st Alabama 
Infantry regiment, C. S. Army. 

McCOT, HENRY R., major, 34th Alabama 
infantry regiment, C. S. Army. 

McCOY, JAMES HENRY. Methodist Episco- 
pal minister and bishop, was bom August 6, 
1868, in Blount County, and died BCarch 22, 
1919, in Birmingham; son of Dr. William Clark 
and Annie (Vaughn) McCoy, the former a na- 
tive of Missouri, a courier under Gen. Stone- 
wall Jackson, in the War of Secession, who 
came to Alabama after the war, married, en- 
tered the North Alabama conference, and at one 
time served as agent of Southern university. 
Bishop McCoy received the A. M. degree from 
Southern university, Greensboro. His first 
work was at Bessemer, where he went imme- 
diately after graduation. He was admitted on 
trial in the North Alabama conference, 1889, 
and his first appointment was Oakland Circuit; 
pastor. South Decatur, 1891; Daderille and 
Alexander City, 1892-93; Wesley Chapel, Bir- 
mingham, 1894-95; Tuscaloosa, 1896-98; Hunts- 
ville, 1898-1901; editw, 1902-06, "Alabama 
Christian Advocate," at the same time preach' 
ing at Five Points, South Highlands, Birming- 
ham, and helping organise the Highland Meth- 
odist church; president, Birmingham college, 
1906-10. At the general conference in Asherille, 



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1101 



N. C^ Bfay 17, 1910, he was elected bishop, 
senring until his death. Married: (1) Decem- 
ber 31, 1896, to Annie Bradley, of Birmingham, 
granddaughter of Rev. J. R. Ourley, one of the 
pioneer preachers of Alabama, (2) in 1917, to 
Mary Norman Moore (q. v.). Children: by 
first wife, 1. William Richard;. 2. Margaret; 
S. Jean; 4. James. Last residence: Birming- 
ham. 

McCOT, MART NORMAN (MOORE) teacher, 
was born August 6, 1874, at HuntsTille; 
daughter of William Henry and Mary Prince 
(Poe) Moore, the former a native of Chapel 
Hill. N. C, who lived in HuntsviUe from 
1824 until the date of his death, August 7, 
1891, having moved from North Carolina with 
his parents when he was two years old, who 
was a lawyer, a planter, a colonel of militia 
in the C. S. Army, and Judge of the city 
court; granddaughter of Edward and Jean 
(Tyson) Moore, who lived near Chapel Hill, 
N. C, the latter whose parents were Scotch 
Quakers, and of Washington and Selina Shir- 
ley (Norman) Poe, of Macon, Bibb County, Oa., 
who were of English and Irish descent, the 
former a lawyer, who was nominated and 
elected to the U. S. house of representatives 
and refused to serve, and who was, through his 
mother, Frances Winslow, connected with the 
Beverlys. Johnstons and Wyatts; great-grand- 
daughter of Samuel and Letitia (Dalton) 
Moore, the latter an English gentlewoman; 
Cnreat-great-granddaughter of John Moore of 
Albemarle County, Va., an officer in the Vir- 
ginia house of burgesses, who came from Eng- 
land about 1759, and is said to have married 
a daughter of Pierre Jouett of Revolutionary 
t&me, and of William Norman, of the Third Vir- 
ginia regiment, Capt. Lee's company, of 
Weeden's brigade. Her ancestors on both sides 
served in the Revolutionary War witlj the Con- 
tinental troops. Miss Moore received her early 
education from her parents at home, and was 
graduated from HuntsviUe female college at 
the age of fifteen, with the degrees of Mistress 
of Literature and Mistress of Latin. She at- 
tended summer school at Harvard university; 
read law; and for six years was engaged in 
commercial life. She began teaching in Hunts- 
viUe in 1892; and taught successively in the 
Hamburg high school, Arkansas, the Hunts- 
viUe academy, the HuntsviUe public schools, 
and was elected president of Athens college, 
July, 1904. She is a Methodist; is president 
of the North Alabama woman's missionary so- 
ciety; a member of the general board of mis- 
sions, Methodist Episcopal church. South; and 
has contributed to church periodicals. Mar- 
ried: in 1917, to Bishop James H. McCoy (q. 
v.). Residence: Athens. 

McCOY, THOMAS W., business man, was 
horn about 1803, in Augusta, Ga. He moved to 
Alabama and became a merchant at Mobile, 
and was extensively connected with the busi- 
ness of insurance, and well acquainted with 
the principles and details of banking. He was 
elected to the State legislature in 1842, and was 
laade a member of the Joint examining com- 
mittee on the State bank and branches. He 



introduced a bill to better the currency of Ala- 
bama, by dividing a certain per cent of specie 
on the circulation and funding the balance of 
the bank issues, in State bonds bearing five per 
cent interest, and payable five years after is- 
suance. "When a member inquired of Mr. Mo- 
Coy for the purpose of embarrassing him, if 
he had not supported the measures which his 
correspondents placed at the bottom of the 
panic he promptly replied that he had voted 
for the liquidation of all the branch banks, and 
he gloried in the act; to him it was the proud- 
est refiection of his life; and when his chil- 
dren became old enough to read the journal of 
the house, it was his consolation that they 
would see his name recorded in favor of the 
wisest financial movement that had ever been 
made in the state. He thanked his God that 
he had lived to take part in the session; that 
it had seemed peculiarly fortunate to him, after 
declining so many previous solicitations to be- 
come a candidate, he had yielded at last, and 
now he was satisfied." For a number of years, 
Col. McCoy commanded the First Alabama regi- 
ment, an organization composed of volunteer 
companies; and upon the resignation of Maj.- 
Gen. Bates, of the Sixth division, he was elected 
his successor. He moved to Baltimore, Md., 
late in his life. He was a Whig. Married? 
Miss Poe, a daughter of George Poe, formerly 
cashier of the United States branch bank at 
Mobile. He had a daughter named Angusha. 
Last residence: Baltimore. 

MoCOT, WILLIAM CLARKE, Methodist min- 
ister and Confederate courier, was bom Octo- 
ber 8, 1843, in Monroe County, Mo., and died 
August 14, 1891, at Decatur. He was educated 
in the common schools of his native state, and 
in 1886 the honorary degree of D. D. was con- 
ferred upon him by Emory college, Oxford, Ga. 
He entered the Confederate Army as a private 
in Quantreirs rangers, was later transferred 
to the Army of Northern Virginia; served 
under Stonewall Jackson and soon became one 
of the great general's trusted couriers. It was 
said of him: "shot and shell were never too 
thick for him to go to any part of the field of 
battle for his beloved general." He was cap- 
tured May 12, 1864, and taken as a prisoner 
of war to Elmira, N. Y. At the close of the 
war he settled in Alabama. He was converted 
while in prison at Elmira, under the ministry 
of the Rev. Mr. Blount of Alabama, and in 
November, 1869, was licensed to preach. The 
following year he traveled Marshall circuit as 
a supply. In 1870 he was appointed to Sand 
Mountain mission, and in 1872 served the Cof- 
feetown circuit. In the fall of that year he 
was ordained deacon and appointed to the Van 
Buren circuit which he served four years. He 
was ordained elder in 1874 and served the 
Jones Valley circuit for four years. He was 
appointed presiding elder of the Birmingham 
district in 1880 and remained in that respon- 
sible place four years. After serving the De- 
catur charge for a few months he was appointed 
financial agent of the Southern university, 
Greensboro, by Bishop McTyeire and in 1886 
was elected editor of the "Alabama Christian 
Advocate" which latter position he filled for 
four years. In 1890 he was returned to the 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Decatur district, and while there his useful 
life was brought to a close. In 1889 he was a 
delegate to the general conference and that 
body placed him on the board of missions. 
He was a Democrat and a Mason. Married: 
July 25, 1867, in Blount County, to Annie, 
daughter of Hiram Jackson and Maria Vaughn, 
of Summit. Children: 1. James Henry (q. v.); 

2. Margaret, m. Jesse B. Wadsworth, Gadsden; 

3. John Pierce, m. Elizabeth Cochran, Birming- 
ham; 4. Annie, m. Rev. L. D. Patterson, Sung- 
kiang, Ku, China; 6. Sallie, m. Rev. G. M. 
Davenport, Jonesboro. Last residence: Deca- 
tur. 

McCRARY, CLEOPAS RHETT, farmer and 
legislator, was born November 8, 1851, in Mus- 
cogee County, Ga.; son of Timothy Green and 
Elizabeth Ann (David) McCrary, the former 
a native of Georgia, was a soldier from that 
state in the Indian wars, and received a land 
grant near Columbus; grandson of Rev. Jacob 
and Margaret David, of Harris County, Ga. His 
paternal ancestors were of Irish descent, and 
the maternal ancestors of Welsh stock. He 
was educated in the common schools and at 
Bowdon college, Georgia. He has been a farmer 
in Lee County since 1885, and was a repre- 
sentative from that county in the legislature 
of 1903. He is a Democrat; and a Missionary 
Baptist. Married: January 4, 1877, to Mary 
Frances, daughter of Richard and Sarah (Wil- 
liamson) McNeely, of Lee County. C!hildren: 
2 sons, both graduates of the Alabama poly- 
technic institute, Auburn. Residence: Ope- 
lika. 

McCRAVY, JOHN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 87, resided in Jackson County, 
June 1, 1840, with Thomas Coleman. — Census 
of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148. 

McCRAW, ABNER GARY, Baptist minister, 
was born June 4, 1803, in Newberry District, 
S. C, and died January 14, 1861, at Selma; son 
of Stephen and Ann (Gary) McCraw, of South 
Carolina. He was educated in the schools of 
Newberry District, S. C, and when fifteen, 
sent by his father to prepare a home for his 
family in the wilds of Alabama. He was 
elected colonel of militia when twenty-one 
years of age, 1825, and was active in politics. 
Ordained to the Baptist ministry in 1831, he 
served largely as an evangelist for ten years, 
filling charges at Oakmulgee, Montevallo, and 
Selma; was president of the Baptist State con- 
vention many years. He was a Mason. Mar- 
ried: (1) in 1821, in Perry County, to Mary, 
daughter of Joshua and Sarah Jones; (2) In 
1850, at Marlon, to Sarah Kingsbury. Chil- 
dren: 1. Teretha, m. William Hale, Benson, 
La.; 2. Melissa W., m. Dr. Gary; 3. Ann G., m. 
W. B. Benson; 4. Abner Rush; 5. Sarah P., m. 
Dr. J. E. Prestridge; 6. James Travis; 7. Mary 
Catherine; 8. Elizabeth Jane, m. James S. 
Cleveland, Biltmore, N. C; 9. Stephen N., m, 
Bppie Reynolds; 10. Ella L., m. Thomas Car- 
son; 11. Jeptha Everette; 12. Joshua George, 
m. Sallie McCraw. Last residence: Selma. 

McCRAW, B. B. chancellor, 1868. 



Mccreary, ADAM, pioneer settler, was 
born about 1772, in Barnwell District, S. C, 
and died In 1844, in Conecuh County. About 
1818 he removed to Alabama, settling in Cone- 
cuh County in the thrifty little community of 
Old Town. He was an extensive planter. He 
left many descendants in Alabama and other 
States. Last residence: Conecuh County. 

McCREARY, JOHN A., physician, was born 
November 11, 1832, in (Donecuh County, near 
Evergreen; son of John and Narcissa (Autrey) 
McCreary, of Conecuh County; grandson of 
Adam McCreary, who was bom in South Caro- 
lina in 1768, and moved to Conecuh County in 
1818, settling near what is known as Old Town, 
and of Alexander and Parthenia B. (Irvin) 
Autrey, the former, bom of French and Ger- 
man parents in North Carolina, January 4, 
1780, moved to Georgia in 1810, then to Monroe 
County, and settled in 1815 in Conecuh County, 
where Hampton Ridge now stands, and is said 
to have been the second white man to make 
a permanent settlement in Conecuh County. Dr. 
McCreary attended school at Evergreen, and 
when he was eighteen years old became em- 
ployed as a derk in the store of (3eorge Chris- 
tian at Evergreen. He remained in that 
occupation for three years, then purchased and 
conducted a store for himself until 1855, when 
he began the study of medicine under Dr. 
Jordan, at Ehrergreen. He took a course of 
lectures in the Eclectic school of medicine, 
Cincinnati, 0„ and was graduated from the 
University of Louisiana, at New Orleans, 1860. 
He began the practice of medicine at Sparta, 
and continued his profession at that place until 
1862, when he enlisted in Co. H, Second Ala- 
bama cavalry, C. S. Army, and served in that 
company until the close of the war, being for 
the greater part of the time on detail duty in 
Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi. After the 
war, he returned home, and entered a partner- 
ship with Dr. Taliaferro for a few months, con- 
tinuing the practice of medicine in connection 
with the drug business until 1866, when he 
gave his Interest entirely to that business. He 
was elected treasurer of Conecuh County in 
1888, and was re-elected in 1892; and has 
served as mayor of EJvergreen for several 
terms. He is a Democrat; a Baptist; an Odd 
Fellow; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: (1) 
in October, 1860, to Marcella Johnston, who 
died in 1870, daughter of Asa Johnston; (2) 
in 1871, to Elizabeth Ethridge, daughter of 
John W. Ethridge. Children, by first wife: 1. 
Earnest, druggist, Evergreen; 2. Edward J., 
merchant. Evergreen; 3. John A., jr., attorney, 
Bessemer; by second marriage: 4. Marcellus; 
5. Willie A.; 6. Lizzie Eatelle; 7. Mattie Lou. 
Residence: Evergreen, Conecuh County. 

McCREARY, JOSEPH HARVEY, planter, was 
born about 1820, near Brooklyn, Conecuh 
County, and died in 1864, at Belleville; son of 
Adam McCreary, jr., of Barnwell District, S. C, 
who removed to Conecuh County in 1818; 
grandson of Adam McCreary, of Ninety-six, S. 
C, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
Army, South Carolina line. He was educated 
in the schools of his community; engaged in 



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1103 



farming, and later was one of the founders 
of the town of Belleville. He acquired ezten« 
sive holdings of land near that place* and 
erected a mill and engaged in trading and 
farming, to the day of his death. He was a 
Whig; and a Baptist. Married: in Conecuh 
County, to Almira Strange, whose parents 
also were pioneer settlers. Children: 1. Adam 
III, m. Miss Turk; 2. Joseph, m. Jane Crosbjr; 
3. John, m. Sallie Stallworth; 4. Susan Jane, 
m. James Cunningham; 5. Almira; 6. Martha 
Frances, m. Robert Augustus Lee; 7. Robert 
James,, m. -Mary Stanley; 8. William, m. Mary 
Menrin; 9. Rubin Strange, m. Nannie Tomlin- 
son; 10. Samuel Elijah, m. Mrs. Bilings. Last 
residence: Belleville. 

McCRORY, JAMES, soldier of the AmeHcan 
Revolution. "James McCrory is buried in a 
cemetery at 'Old Bethany Church' (Primitive 
Baptist), near the town of Vienna in Pickens 
County. The following inscription is on his 
t<Hnb: 

In Memory of 
JAMES M'CRORY. 
Died Nov. 24th, 1840, aged 82 years, 
6 mo. and 9 days. 
Deceased was a soldier of the Revolution and 
was at the battles of Oermantown, Brandy- 
wine and Guilford Courthouse, and was one 
of Washingtcm's lifeguard at Valley Forge 
and served his country faithfully dur- 
ing the war. Peace to the soldier's 
dust. 
"The following account is from the Tusat- 
loosa Flag of the Union, December, 1840: 

'"James McCrory was born May 16, 1758, at 
Larga, on the river Bann, in the county of An- 
trim, Ireland. He sailed from Belfast in 1776 
when he was 17 years old and landed at Balti- 
more July 1st, in the same year. In 1776 he 
settled in Guilford County, N. C, and enlisted 
in the Continental army in the same year. He 
was at the battle of Brandywine, September 11, 
1777, under General Washington at the battle 
of Germantown, and wintered at Valley Forge 
in 1777-78. Subsequently he fought under Gen- 
eral Greene at Guilford Court House, March 15, 
1781, was in the battle of Eutaw Springs, and in 
the battle of Stono. He was with General Gates 
at his defeat at Camden and with General Mor- 
gan in the glorious victory at the Cowpens. 
For courage, good service and meritorious con- 
duct he was promoted to the rank of ensign 
in the Life Guard of General Washington, and 
while acting in this capacity, he was taken 
prisoner and confined on board a prison ship 
for six months. He came to Alabama while 
it was yet a territory, and made his home at 
Tuscaloosa for the last twenty-five years of 
his life. This true patriot died November 24, 
1840. at the age of eighty-two.' 

"In a list of North Carolina Continental 
troops published in the N. O. Historical and 
i^enediogical Regiter, p. 424, is the name of 
James McCrory, ensign in the Ninth regiment^ 
under Col. John P. Williams, May 2, 1777. 
Th(Hnas McCrory was a captain in the same 
regiment The services of James McCrory are 
also stated in the proceedings of the 27th Con- 
gress, 2d Session, in the Senate, February 4th, 



1842, report <tf the Committee on Revolution- 
ary Claims: 'James McCrory was a sergeant 
in Capt. Cook's ccMnpany of the 9th regiment, 
enlisted on the 15th day of April, 1776, for the 
term of three years; on the 2d day of May, 
1777, he was prcmioted to the rank of ensign. 
In January 1778, the nine regiments which 
composed the line, being reduced to three, the 
supernumerary officers were sent home, of 
which he was one. He then joined the nine 
months' men and marched to the south and 
was at the battle of Stono, the 30th of June, 
1779, and was at Gates' defeat in August, 1780, 
and was taken prisoner on the 24th o^ Febru- 
ary, 1781, by Tarleton's dragoons and was 
kept prisoner four months at Wilmington and 
then paroled; and, in November, 1782,^ he took 
prisoner Colonel Bryant, a British officer, and 
gave him up to a regular officer of the American 
army.' " 

In spite of this array of gallant services 
the committee reported adversely because of a 
technicality. — Mrs. P. H. Mell in Transactions 
of the Alabama Historical Society, Vol. iv, pp. 
554-556. 

Other details of his service: Ensign 9th 
Regular N. C. Line; enrolled on June 13» 1829, 
under act of Congress of May 15, 1828, pay- 
ment to date from March 3, 1826; annual al- 
lowance, $240; sums received to date of publi- 
cation of list, $2,160; John McCrory, agent — 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in VoL xiv, Sen. 
Doc. 514, 23rd C(»ig., 1st sess., 1833-34. He 
resided in Pickens County, June 1, 1840, aged 
82, with Robert McCrory. — 0en9us of Pension- 
ers, 1841, p. 149. 

MoCRORY, JESSE D., farmer, was bom Au- 
gust 11, 1866, near Butler Springs, Butler 
County; son of William M. and Mary Ella 
(Wagnon) McCrory, the former a South Caro- 
linian, who served three years and six months 
in the C. S. Army, was captured at Mobile and 
held prisoner on Ship Island three months, 
guarded by negro soldiers, and after the war, 
located at Stallings^ grandson of Thomas Mc- 
Crory, and of William C. and Jane Wagnon, 
the former a Confederate soldier. Mr. McCrory 
was educated in the common county schools; is 
eif^ged in farming and milling; was elected 
to the State legislature from Conecuh County, 
1907; and has served as agent of the Mutual 
life insurance company of New York. He is 
a Democrat; a Baptist; and a Mason. Married: 
October 28, 1886, near Bowles, to Fannie D., 
daughter of George and Lucindie Kyser, the 
former a native of South Carolina, who served 
in the Indian War of 1836, and in the C. S. 
Army. Residence: Bowles, Conecuh County. 

McCROSSIN, WILLIAM PATRICK, lawyer, 
was bom March 21, 1861, at Philadelphia, Pa.; 
son of Patrick William and Sarah (Quigley) 
McCrossin, the former was bom at Silver Hill, 
town of Strabane, County Tyrone, Ireland, 
whence he emigrated to Philadelphia, thence 
to Bedford County, Va., and later to Birming- 
ham; grandson of Edward McCrossin, and of 
James and Bridget (Gallagher) Quigley, of 
Philadelphia. Judge McCrossin received his 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



early edaeation in the public schools of Phila- 
delphia, and at '^olf Hill/' Bedford County, 
and graduated at La Salle oollege, Philadel- 
phia, B. S., June 20, 1878. He first entered the 
coal business with his father, but in May* 1887, 
located in Birmingham, where he engaged in 
contracting and building with his brother, 
Edward J. McCrossin, until 1891. In that year 
he read law under Judge A. A. Coleman in 
Birmingham, was admitted to the bar March, 
1892; was elected recorder of Birmingham, 
1898, and reelected 1894 without opposition; 
in 1911 was appointed by Gk>T. Emmet O'Neal 
associate Judge, and in 1912 senior Judge of 
the criminal court of Jefterson County. He is 
a Democrat; a Roman Catholic; an Elk, a 
Knight Of Columbus; and a Beaver. Bfarried: 
March 9, 1886, in Philadelphia, to Helen 
Theresa, daughter of William and Theresa 
(Tiemey) Delany, of that city. Children: 
1. Edward Francis, graduate of Ohio State 
university. M. E., 1909; 2. William P., Jr., Uni- 
versity of Alabama, B. S., 1911, and later a 
student of Tulane university. Residence: 
Birmingham. 

McCULLOUGH, AUGUSTUS W., clerk U. S. 
circuit court, was bom September, 1836, in 
Lancaster County, Pa., and died April 16, 1898, 
in Huntsville; son of James and Sarah (Gar- 
vin) McCuUough, the former an Irish immi- 
grant who at fourteen years of age settled in 
Lancaster County. He received a good educa- 
tion, graduated from the MiUersville normal 
school and taught for a number of years. In 
1865, he came to Alabama as agent of the 
Freedman's aid society of Philadelphia, or- 
ganizing and superintending the schools of 
Huntsville. From 1868 to 1872 appointed by 
the State authorities, superintendent of public 
schools for Madison County. In 1874 he was 
made derk of the U. S. circuit court by Judge 
Woods; 1876 clerk of the U. S. district court by 
Judge John Bruce. He was delegate to the 
Chicago Republican convention which nomi- 
nated Garfield for president of the U. S., al- 
though he voted thirty-six times for Grant 
He was also a delegate to the convention which 
nominated Blaine; chairman of the Republican 
central committee of Madison County, chiAr- 
man of congressional committee and member 
of the State committee; an Odd Fellow; Knight 
of Pythias; United Workman and Forester. 
Married: (1) July 18, 1864, to Mary A. Zell 
of Pennsylvania who died leaving one child, 
Bfrs. H. P. McEntire, of Huntsville; (2) Septem- 
ber 24, 1866, in Philadelphia, to Mrs. Laura B. 
Jones, no children. Last residence: Huntsville. 

McCUNE, J. H., business man, was bom in 
1841, in Pennsylvania; son of J. B. and Mary 
(Wilson) McCune, natives of Pennsylvania. 
He was reared upon his father's farm in Penn- 
sylvania, and received a good education. He 
enlisted in Co. A, Ninth Pennsylvania reserves, 
U. S. Army, in 1861, and served as a private 
for three years during the War of Secession. 
He fought at Drainsville, first and second 
Fredericksburg, and second Manassas, where 
he was taken prisoner, and subsequently at 
Gettysburg. After the war, he was occupied 



for several years as a carpenter in the coal 
works of Allegheny and the Bliia Furnaces of 
Pittsburgh. Later he was engaged at various 
places, superintending blast furnaces, am* 
tracting to build, and managing manufactur- 
ing enterprises in Pennsylvania, Ohio and West 
Virginia, the greater part of the time the man- 
ager of the Riverside furnace and the Wheel- 
ing iron and nail works furnace, of Wheeling, 
W. Va. He came to Alabama in 1882, and 
built the Woodward furnace at Wheeling, 
where he remained for more than two years. 
He moved to Birmingham and conducted the 
Sloss furnace for a short time; was asso- 
ciated with Robert Roberts in manuffetcturing 
sheet-iron work and boilers; was placed in 
charge of the Henryellen coal mines; erected 
the second furnace for the Woodward com- 
pany, and was made superintendent, resigning 
after one year's service; and from that time on 
devoted his attention to building furnaces in 
Birmingham. He is a Presbyterian i^d a 
Mason. Married: November 28, 1866, to Mag- 
gie J. Douglass. Children: 1. Hasie. Resi- 
dence: Birmingham. 

MoCURDY, WILLIAM DIXON, planter, was 
bom March 26, 1886, near LaGrange, Cku; son 
of Edward Sellers and Mary Jane (Harris) 
McCurdy, the former a North Carolinian, who 
lived in Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia and 
about 1838, moved from Troup County, Cku, to 
Alabama, settling as a planter at Oakbowery; 
grandson of Edmund Harris, and his wife, for- 
merly a Miss Hall, who lived at LaGrange, 
Ga., and had large planting interests in Cham- 
bers County. He was prepared in the common 
schools of Oakbowery, and was graduated from 
Emory college, Georgia, B. A., 1866. He has 
been a teacher, a railroad contractor, a miner, 
a hotel owner and a planter, and after 1861 
was continuously engaged in the latter occu- 
pation at Lowndesboro. He was elected to the 
State senate at one time; represented Lowndes 
County in the State legislature to fill the un- 
expired term of Jesse Coleman, 1909-1911; and 
was re-elected to the legislature in 1911. He is 
a Democrat; a Methodist, and a member of the 
Phi Gamma Society at Emory college. Har- 
ried: July 12, 1869, at Lowndesboro, to Cor- 
nelia Harper, daughter of Nathaniel Reese, 
a pioneer of that section of Lowndes County; 
granddaughter of MaJ. Lewis Tyrus, a 
pioneer of Autauga County. Children: 1. 
Reese, deceased; 2. Claudia, m. William C. 
Cochran; 3. Alice, m. Robert W. Smith; 4. Ed- 
ward Harris. Residence: Lowndesboro. 

McCUTCHEN, JOHN, soldier of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, aged 78, and a resident of 
Jackson County; private N. C. Militia; en- 
rolled on January 2, 1834, under act of Con- 
gress of June 7, 1832, paj^ment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance, |80. — Revolu- 
tionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. doc 
614, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-84. The follow- 
ing account is tram the Southern Advooate, 
HuntsviUe, Jan. 27, 1836. 

"Jackson County, Ala., Jan. 19, 1836. 

"It is our unhappy lot to announce that an- 
other Revolutionary Hero has gone! CoL 



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EDMUND R. McDAVID 



\ 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1107 



John McCutchen, who, in the times that tried 
men's souls/ stood boldly forth in defense of 
the liberty and independence of his country, 
bidding defiance not only to oppression, but 
confronting the armed myrmidons of the Ty- 
rant, was on the 17th (inst.) in the eightieth 
year of his age, summoned to 'another and a 
better world.' 

"He engaged early in the Revolutionary con- 
flict, was at the defense of Fort Moultrie, the 
battle at Eutaw Springs, and with a true patri- 
otic zeal participated in all the perils and dis- 
tress that so peculiarly characterized the un- 
feeling warfare, then waged throughout the 
Carolinas; nor did he retire until he had the 
satisfaction of beholding the independence of 
his country, for which he had so long and 
ardently struggled, permanently secured. 

"Haying devoted his youth to the service of 
his country in the field, in the maturity of 
manhood he engaged with those fearless and 
enterprising pioneers, who emigrating to the 
West, embarked in the arduous undertaking of 
reclaiming the fertile valley of the Tennessee 
from its then savage wilderness, and prepar- 
ing it for the enjoyment of all the arts, luxu- 
ries and refinements of social life. 

"He has ever been noted as a man of un- 
common intellectual endowments — ^for the last 
forty years has been a professor of Christian- 
ity of the Baptist order, and been esteemed by 
all as a worthy example and an honor to his 
profession. Thus ripe in years and rich in the 
consciousness of having at two difterent per- 
iods of his. life, rendered important services 
to his country, and in the consoling hopes of 
a glorious immortality, the veteran has de- 
parted, leaving his relatives and numerous 
friends to mourn his loss. 

"On Monday the 19th inst., as the citizens 
of this vicinity had convened to pay the last 
honors to the deceased, on motion of Maj. John 
B. Stevens, they constituted themselves into 
a meeting, for the purpose of making a publie 
manifestation of their grief, to acknowledge 
the services, and express the high regard they 
have ever entertained for the principles of 
their departed friend. Col. James Bmith was 
called to the chair and Maj. John B. Stevens 
appointed secretary — when the following reso- 
lutions were unanimously adopted, viz: 

''Resolved, That, under a deep sense of the 
gratitude we owe to those sages and heroes 
who achieved our independence, we deem it a 
duty incumbent upon us, their sons, with a 
filial piety to pay every tribute of respect to 
their virtues and their valor, as the only 
remuneraticm in our power, for the manifold 
rights and privileges that we now enjoy. 

''Resolved, That in the death of Col. John 
McCntchen, we have to lament the loss of one 
of that band of aged warriors, whose presence 
never fails to enliven our zeal in the cause of 
liberty and to remind us what It cost — that in 
him we have lost a firm patriot, a worthy citi- 
zen, a pious christian and an esteemed friend. 
And while we respectfully acknowledge his 
public services, stern integrity and private 
worth, we deeply sympathize with his toidow 
and other members of his family in their be- 
reavement. 



"Resolved, That the above resolutions be 
signed by the Chairman and Secretary, and 
transmitted to the Democrat and Southern 
Advocate for publication. 

"James Smith, Chairman." 

"John B. Stbvkns, Secretary." 

McDANIEL, EDWARD DAVIES, physician 
and teacher, was bom July 7, 1822, at the coun- 
try home of his parents in Chester District, 
S. C, and died June 27, 1898, at Denver, Col., 
while on a tour in the west; son of William 
and Jane (Strong) McDaniel, a teacher and 
surveyor of Chester, S. C; grandson of Ed- 
ward and Elizabeth (McCaw) McDaniel, also 
of Cheater District, a Revolutionary soldier. 
The founder of the American branch of the 
family was a native of the Isle of Jersey, who 
settled in Pennsylvania prior to the Revolu- 
tion, and his descendants migrated southward. 
Dr. McDaniel received his elementary educa- 
tion in the schools of his native district; ac- 
quired a knowledge of bookkeeping; entered a 
mercantile life as a financial stepping stone; 
and later graduated from Erskine college, Due 
West, S. C, A B., 1844. He removed to Dallas 
County in 1845, where he devoted himself to 
teaching. He studied medicine for one year 
under Dr. John Douglass of Chester, and read 
medicine alone for ten years before entering 
the medical college of South Carolina from 
which he graduated in 1857. Immediately upon 
completing his professional studies, he located 
in Camden, Wilcox County. In 1849 he was 
selected to superintend the manufacture of 
suitable telescopes for the astronomical obser- 
vatory of Erskine college, S. C, and while at- 
tending to this duty he visited various institu- 
tions of learning. In 1854 he received the de- 
gree of M. A from the University of Alabama, 
in recognition of his having sent the best 
prepared students to that institution. He was 
a member of the Wilcox County medical so- 
ciety; was its vice-president for many years; 
was for one year vice-president Medical asso- 
ciation of Alabama, and president in 1876. In 
1877 he received the honorary degree of LL. D. 
from the Unlversitgr of Alabam^^ During 
1873-74 he occupied the chairs of chemistry, 
physiology and geology in the Wilcox female 
institute. He was employed during the War 
of Secession in various services for the Con- 
federate government, as physician to the poor, 
and to the smallpox hospital in Camden, and 
as examining surgeon. He was a member of 
the Camden town council; served as president 
of the Wilcox agricultural and mechanical 
association; was for ten years professor of 
materia medica, therapeutics and chemical 
medicine in the medical college of Alabama at 
Mobile; and was emeritus professor of that 
institution at the time of his death. He was 
one of the vioe-presidents of the first Pan- 
American medical congress held in Washing- 
ton, D. C, in 1893; was for many years a 
member of the American medical association, 
and it was while attending its annual meeting 
at Denver in 1898, that he contracted the ill- 
ness from which he died. He was interred at 
Camden. Author: "Irritation of the urinary 
organs, produced by santonica and santonins;" 



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1108 



DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



"Hemorrhagic ma^iarial fever in Alabama;" 
"Warm oerebroepinal bath in congenital 
apnoea;" and "New method of artificial respira- 
tion/' Imown as McDaniel's method. He was a 
Democrat; and a Presbyterian. Married: May 
12, 1858, in her father's home in Dallas Oounty, 
to Matilda Blair, daughter of John and Lucy 
(Crenshaw) Tabb; granddaughter of Edward L. 
and Elizabeth B. Tabb, and of David and Eliza- 
beth Crenshaw. Both the Tabb and Crenshaw 
families were natives of Mecklenburg County, 
Va., and both were connected with tho Spotts- 
wood, Beverly, Burwell, Curtis, and other fam- 
ilies of Virginia. Children: 1. Infant son; 2. 
Cornelia Ellen; 8. Mary Agnes; 4. Edward 
Leroy, m. Ida Sabra McDavid, Milton, Fla.; 
principal Santa Rosa academy, 1891-92, super- 
intendent public instruction, Santa Rosa Coun- 
ty, Fla., superintendent schools, died July 28, 
1916; 6. Lucy Jane, m. David Jere Spiva, Cam- 
den; 6. John Beverly, m. Rosa Tait, Camden; 7. 
Kate, resides at Grantwood, N. J.; 8. James 
MofCatt, physician; 9. Matilda Tabb, m. Ben- 
jamin Merryman Cross, of Atlanta, Oa. Last 
residence: Camden. 

McDAVID, EDMUND RICHARDSON, busi- 
ness man and secretary of State, was bom Feb- 
ruary 2, 1870, at Huntsville; son of John 
Jackson and Mary Jane (Patton) McDavid, and 
brother of Robert Patton McDavid (q. v.). Hie 
early education was received in private schools, 
and from a tutor; attended the Florence State 
normal school, and Bingham school, Asheville, 
N. C, one year each; and at the University of 
Alabama, 1886-87. He became an employee of 
the Alabama national bank in 1887; later en- 
gaged in the insurance business; r^noved to 
New Orleans, La., in 1894, where he was cashier 
for the Standard oil co.; three years later 
transferred to Charleston, S. C, and after one 
year's residence there resigned his position to 
again engage in the insurance business in Birm- 
ingham; was secretary of the Southern mutual 
fire insurance c<Mnpany, and of the Birming- 
ham underwriters' agency, which positions he 
held, until in April, 1900, when he was ap- 
pointed secretary of State by Gk>v. Wm. D. Jelks 
to fill the unexpired term of J. Thomas Hefiin, 
who had been elected as representative in con- 
gress. Upon the expiration of his term of 
eflice in 1907 he returned to Birmingham where 
he engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business. He is a Democrat; and an Episcopal- 
ian. Married: June 30, 1891, at Birmingham, to 
Mittie (q. v.), daughter of Rose W. and Sarah 
E. (Smith) Owen (q. v.) ; granddaughter of Dr. 
Joseph R. and Margaret (Jordan) Smith (q. v.). 
Children: 1. Rose Owen, m. Lonnie R. Munger; 
residence, Birmingham; 2. Edmund Richard- 
son, Jr.; 3. John Jackson, Jr.; 4. Mitylene Owen. 
Residence: Birmingham. 

McDAVID, MITTIE ROSE (OWEN), author, 
was born in Birmingham; daughter of Rose 
Wellington and Sarah Emma (Smith) Owen (q. 
v.), the former who was the founder of the 
Birmingham Southern college at Owenton, Bir- 
mingham, and the latter who was the daughter 
of Dr. Joseph Riley Smith (q. v.), who was a 
pioneer and capitalist of Birmingham, and who 



was the first white child born in Jefferson 
County; and a descendant of the Roses, Flem- 
mings, BolUngs, Scotts, Harrises, Owens, and 
Jordans of Virginia. Mrs. McDavid received her 
.education at the Tuscaloosa Episcopal school 
and the Huntsville college, from which latter 
school she was graduated in English, French, 
and dramatic art She is president of the 
Birmingham Writer's Club, a member of the 
National genealogical society of America, a 
member of the D. A. R., U. D. C, and is eligible 
to membership in the Daughters of the Crown 
and the Colonial Dames. She is also a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal church of the Advent* 
Birmingham. Author: "Princess Pocahontas"; 
"Children of the Meadows"; also short stories, 
poems, and genealogical and special feature 
work. Married: June 30, 1891, at Birming- 
ham to Edmund Richardson McDavid (q. v.)» 
son of CoL John J. McDavid; grandson of 
Gk>v. Robert M. Patton (q. v.). Her husband 
served his state both as state insurance commis- 
sioner and as secretary of state. Children: 1. 
Rose Owen, m. L. P. Munger; 2. Edmund R., jr.; 
3. John Jackson; 4. Mitylene Jordan. Reslr 
dence: Birmingham. 

MoDAVID, ROBERT PATTON, business man 
and secretary of State, was bom April 16, 18€7» 
at Huntsville, and died August 20, 1916; son of 
John Jackson and Mary J. (Pattern) McDavid 
who lived at Huntsville and at Florence; grand- 
son of Ck)v. Robert M. and Jane L. (Brahan) 
Patton (q. v.), and of John and Nancy (Clay- 
ton) McDavid, who came to Madison County in 
its early years, the latter's ancestors being na- 
tives of Ireland; great-grandson of Gen. John 
Brahan, (q. v.), and of Wm. and Nancy (Dur- 
roh) McDavid of Scotch ancestry who came 
from Ireland to South Carolina in 1785. Mr. 
McDavid received his first instruction in private 
schools in Huntsville, attended the Florence 
State normal college; and later entered the 
University of Alabama from which he gradu- 
ated, A. B., 1885. He located in Birmingham, 
and engaged in newspaper work; was first a 
reporter on the "Evening Chronicle;" later took 
a position on the staff of the "Age-Herald," and 
rose from police reporter through the successive 
stages to the position of managing editor. In 
the mean time he was interested in the real- 
estate business. In 1894 he removed to Mcmt- 
gomery where he became correspondent for a 
chain of seventeen non-resident newspapers, 
through which he rendered incalculable service 
in presenting to the world the resources of Ala- 
bama. He was a clerk in the house of represen- 
tatives during the 1894, 1896 and 1898 sessions 
of the legislature. In 1898 he was elected secre- 
tary of State, and re-elected in 1900, serving 
four years. In 1896 he was an alderman of 
Highland Park, then a suburb of Montgomery. 
He was aide de camp on the staff of Gk>v. Wm. 
J. Samford, with the rank of lieutenant coloneU 
and later upon the staff of Ck>v. Wm. D. Jelks. 
He was a trustee of the Troy normal school. 
He returned to Birmingham upon the conclu- 
sion of his second term of office and engaged in 
the real estate and insurance business. He was 
a Democrat; and a Methodist Married: De- 
cember 23, 1890, in Birmingham, to Virginia 



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1109 



Irene, daughter of Dr. Joseph R. Smith. 
Children: 1. Robert Fatten, Jr.; 2. Mary Vir- 
ginia; 3. Joseph R.; 4. Charles Jordan; 6. Ned 
R. Last residence: Birmingham. 

MoDEARMON, THOMAS, soldier of the 
American Revolution, aged 82, and a resident 
of Jackson County; private S. C. Militia; en- 
rolled on January 17, 1834, under act of Con- 
gress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1881; annual allowance, |34.44; sums 
received to date of publication of list, 1103.32.— 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. 
doc 614, 23rd Cong., 1st sees., 1833-34. 

McDBRMENT, JOS., soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 83, resided in Blount County, 
June 1, 1840, with John Cook.— Cen«tf« of Pen- 
MUmers, 1841, p. 148. 

Mcdonald, Alexander addison, law- 
yer and legislator, was born in 1862, near Car- 
thage, Moore County, N. C; son of John and 
Nancy (St. Clair) McDonald; grandson of 
Peter and Margaret St Clair, all of Moore 
County. He was educated in the common 
schools. In 1876 he came to Barbour County; 
studied law at Clayton; was admitted to the 
practice in 1884; and for many years has been 
engaged at Louisville. He was a member ol 
the legislature from Barbour County, 1892-93, 
and again in 1903. He is a Democrat; and a 
Presbyterian. Married: February 6, 1888, at 
Louisville, to Mamie B., daughter of S. J. and 
Mary P. Cumming of that place. Residence: 
Louisville. 

Mcdonald, H. C, educator, principal ol the 
Macon County high school. Residence: Nota- 
sulga. 

Mcdonald, JOHN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 81, resided in Jefferson 
County, June 1, 1840, with Launcelot Arm- 
strong. — Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149. 

Mcdonald, Stephen emert, mechanic 

and legislator, was bom December 27, 1862, at 
Green Hill, Lauderdale County; son of Joseph 
Emery and Qenie (English) McDonald, the 
former a native of Wartrace, Bedford County, 
Tenn., moving in 1884 to Green Hill, where he 
was a teacher and Baptist; grandson of John 
and Margaret (Emery) McDonald. He was 
educated in the public and high schools of 
Green Hill; is a general mechanic and primi- 
tive Baptist minister, being ordained in 1890. 
He was one of the representatives in the legis- 
lature of 1919, from Lauderdale County. He 
is a Democrat; and Knight of Honor. Mar^ 
ried: December 17, 1906, at Florence, to Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Thomas and Bettie (Brent) 
Hall, of that place. Children: several, all de- 
ceased. Residence: Florence. 

McDonald, THOMAS CARSON, business 
man, was bom November 2, 1864, at Greens- 
boro; son of William Jackson and Cynthia 
Ann (Madison) McDcmald, the former who 
served in the C. S. Army, first at Fort Morgan, 
and later in the army of northern Virginia, 



who lived at Greensboro until 1871, when he 
moved to Birmingham; grandson of William 
Jackson and Betsy (Perkins) McDonald, of 
Greensboro, the former who was brought when 
a child by his parents from Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, to Virginia, and moved to St. Stephens 
in 1812, and of Peyton and Hannah (Webster) 
Madison, of Greensboro, the former who came 
from England to Nova Scotia, thence to Vir^ 
ginia, where he was married, and after the 
dose of the Creek War in 1813, moved to Ala- 
bama, settling in Greene County. Mr. McDon- 
ald attended the common schools of Gre^is- 
boro; went with his parents to Birmingham in 
1871; moved to Tuscaloosa in 1878; and in 1886 
returned to Birmingham, where he made in- 
vestments in real estate. He served for six- 
teen years on the Birmingham police force, 
during the latter eight years of that time a« 
chief; and was a member of the house of rep- 
resentatives from Jefterscm County in 1911. 
He is proprietor of the White Swan Laundry 
of Birmingham; is a Democrat; a Baptist; a 
Red Man; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: 
January 20, 1881, in Sumter County, to Annie 
Brackett Isbell, daughter of James B. and Elis- 
abeth Ann (Branch) Isbell, of Sumter County. 
Children: 1. T. C, deceased; 2. Kenneth Mad- 
ison; 8. Aleta Brackett Residence: Birming- 
ham. 

MoDONELL, JAMBS, soldier of tT^e Ameri- 
can Revolution, aged 82, resided in Lawrence 
County, June 1, ISAO.—Oensus of Pensioners, 
1841, p. 148. Resided also in Pickens County.— 
Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

MCDONNELL, HENRT, physician, was bom 
May 18, 1848, near Huntsville, Madison County; 
BOD. of Archibald and Mary Serbia (Jones) 
McDonnell, who lived at Huntsville, the former 
a graduate of the University of Alabama, a 
planter, who died October 1, 1892; grandson of 
Archibald and Betty (Dinsmore) McDonnelL 
He obtained his early schooling at Huntsville, 
attended medical lectures at the University of 
Virginia, and was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Louisiana, 1870. He formed a partner- 
ship with his uncle. Dr. A. H. Jones, in Lauder- 
dale County, where he remained for a year; 
moved to Madison County in 1787; and in the 
fall of that year, moved to Huntsville, where 
he has since resided and practiced medicine. 
He is a member of the Madison County Medi- 
cal Society, and ot the State Medical Associa- 
tion; and is a steward in the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. South. Married: in 1878, to Ada 
Fennell, daughter of I. Fennell of Huntsville. 
CHiildren: 1. Isham Fennell, dealer in electrical 
supplies and fixtures in 1899 at Birmingham; 
2. Beulah May; 3. Lizzie; 4. Henry. Residence: 
Huntsville. 

McDOUGALL, ELI DANIEL, Presbyterian 
minister, was bom September 17, 1867, at Dun- 
dee, Fond du Lac, Wis.; son of Daniel William 
and Ruth Priscilla (Kraggs) of Argyleshire, 
Scotland; grandson of Richard Kraggs, an 
Englishman, who emigrated to Wisconsin. Fol- 
lowing his high school training in Sheboygan 
Falls, Wis., he was graduated from the South- 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



western Presbyterian university, Clarksville, 
Tenn., With the degree of A. B. and B. D., later 
receiving the honorary degree of D. D. He was 
ordained to the ministry by presbytery of 
Cherokee synod, Oa., and has served pastorates 
at Capersville, and at Thomasville, Ga., and 
at Florence. He was a member of the com- 
mittee on foreign missions of the Presbyterian 
general assembly. He was chaplain of the Third 
regiment, A. N. G., seven years with rank of 
captain, and was on the staff of Gov. Ehnmet 
O'Neal, with the rank of colonel. He was 
president of the Presbyterian college for men 
at Anniston, 1911 to 1917. Married: at Thorn- 
asville, Ga., to Anna Hall, daughter of Judge 
Arthur and Julia (Merrttt) Patten, of Thomas- 
vllle, whose ancestry on both sides came to 
America in Colonial days, and settled in Massa- 
chusetts and Pennsylvania, but very soon there- 
after removed to Carolina and to Georgia. 
Residence: Franklin, Tenn. 

McDOW, ALEXANDER, planter, was bom 
April 10, 1823; and died FW)ruary 5, 1891, at 
Victoria, Tex.; son of Captain WiUlam LofUn 
and Jane (Ramsay) McDow. He was educated 
in the common schools and spent, 1843-44, at 
the University of Alabama. He served as first 
lieutenant Co. I, 16th Texas infantry regiment, 
C. S. Army, 1862, and was captain from 1863- 
65. He was a planter and spent the latter years 
of his life at Victoria, Tex. Married: (1) Sep- 
tember 8, 1845, to Adaline Fleming, of Sumter 
County; (2) June, 1864, to Mrs. Harriet Posey, 
of LaGrange, Ga. Last residence: Victoria, 
Tex, 

McDOW, JOHN RAMSAY, physician, was 
bom April 15, 1829, and died in the military 
service of the C. S. Army at Harrisonburg, La., 
February 16, 1864; son of Captain William 
Loftin and Jane (Ramsay) McDow. He was 
educated in the common schools; graduated 
with the degree of A. B. at the University of 
Alabama, 1862, and M. D. at Jefferson medical 
college, Philadelphia, Pa.; also took a course 
in medicine at the University of Louisiana. 
During the War of Secession he was a member 
of the Eighth Texas Cavalry, and later became 
assistant surgeon of the Polignac brigade, C. S. 
Army. Last residence: Sumterville. 

McDOW, WILLIAM LOFTBN, planter, was 
born October 15, 1794, in Pendleton District, 
S. C, and died March 30, 1870, in Sumter 
County; son of Arthur and Margaret (Loften) 
McDow. the former a soldier of the Revolution, 
the birth plrice of the former being unknown by 
descendants, emigrated from Pennsylvania to 
South Carolina, and died near Clinton, Greene 
County, 1839, the latter a native of Ireland; 
grandson of Sarah (Neil) Loften, of Pendle- 
ton District, S. C. Mr. McDow was a planter 
and served Sumter County in many public 
capacities, among them as member of the 
board of education, county commissioner, drill 
master of the home guards, and road master. 
At the age of fourteen he served in the Creek 
Indian Wars under Gen. Andrew Jackson. He 
was a Democrat and a Presbyterian. Married: 
July 29. 1819, in Pendleton District, S. C, to 



Jane, daughter of Alexander and Mary (Bgger) 
Ramsay, who emigrated early in the century 
from South Carolina to Tuscaloosa, ridlns 
horseback to their new wilderness cabin, the 
former was a soldier of the Revolution, a na- 
tive of South Carolina. His mother Jane Her- 
vey, was a native of Ireland. Mary Bggers 
mother's maiden name was Elliabeth Orr, and 
she too was bom in Ireland. Children: L 
Mary, m. Andrew Lindsey Neville; 2. Alexan- 
der, captain Co. I, 16th Texas infantry, C. S. 
Army, student at the University of Alabama, 
m. Mary Adeline Fleming; 3. Jane Ramsay, m« 
(1) Robert Fleming, (2) William F. Fulton; 4. 
Arthur, m. Sarah Edwards; 6. Jcdin Ramsay, 
alumnus of University of Alabama, graduated 
in medicine in Philadelphia, surgeon in the 
General Polignac command, C. S. Army, died of 
pneumonia, February 16, 1864, at Harrison- 
burg, La., and there buried; 6. William Loften, 
m. Martha C. Moore. Last residence: Sumter 
County. 

MCDOWELL, CHARLES SAMUEL, Jr., law- 
yer, was born October 17, 1871, at Eufaula; son 
of Charles Samuel and Margaret (McKay) Mc- 
Dowell, the former lived in Greenville, Tenn., 
until after the War of Secession, when he re- 
moved to Eufaula; enlisting at the age of six- 
teen in Lynch's Battery, with which he served 
until the end of the war; and is now postmas- 
ter at Eufaula; grandson of James Patton and 
Elizabeth (Burkhardt) McDowell and of Archi- 
bald and Catherine McKay, all of Eufaula. Bfr. 
McDowell was educated in the private schools 
of Eufaula taught by Professors J. D. S. Bell, 
W. H. Patterson and T. A. Craven; later at- 
tended the University of Alabama, 1888-89. 
While probate clerk of Barbour County, 1896- 
97, he read law, and was admitted to the bar. 
May 12, 1896; practiced alone until Bfarch, 
1912, when he formed a partnership with Judge 
Perry Thomas of Eufaula. From 1897-1906, he 
was superintendent of education of Barbour 
County; 1908-12, mayor of Eufaula; member of 
the board of trustees of the Alabama normal 
schools, 1911-17, and is now a member of the 
board of trustees Alabama polytechnic insti- 
tute; was captain of Company G, "Eufanla 
Rifles," Second infantry, A. N. G., 1899; and 
lieutenant colonel on the staff of Governors 
Samf ord and Jelks. He was chairman of Demo- 
cratic executive committee, Barbour County, 
1898; member State executive committee, 1898- 
1900; delegate from the 3rd Alabama district 
to the Democratic national convention at Bal- 
timore, 1912; president of the Alabama bar as- 
sociation 1915-16; and State senator, 1919-20. 
He is a Presbyterian; a Mason; Knight of 
Pythias; Red Man; Woodman of the World; 
and a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon 
college fraternity. Married: October 15, 1902, 
at Eufaula, to Caroline, youngest daughter of 
Captain Stanley Hubert, sr. and Anna Beall 
(Young) Dent (q. v.). Children: 1. Annie 
Dent, deceased; 2. Caroline Joy. Residence: 
Eufaula. 

Mcdowell, JOHN, soldier of the AmerU 
can Revolution, aged 76, and a resident of Mor- 
gan County; private Maryland Continental 



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DICTIONAEY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



nil 



Line; enrolled on April 18, 1833, under act of 
Congress of Jane 7, 1882, payment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance, 186.66; sums 
recelTed to date of publication of list, 173.32. — 
iRevolutianary PenHon Boll, in toL ziv. Sen. 
doc. 614, 23rd Ck>ng., Ist sees., 1833-34. 

MoDOWELL, WILLIAM ANGUS, farmer and 
legislator, was bom July 8, 1883, at Camden. 
Wilcox County; son of Samuel William and 
Julia (Tait) McDowell; grandson of John 
Robert and Harriet (Sellers) McDowell, and of 
Maj. F^liz Tait (q. v.). He was educated in 
the common and high schools of Camden. He 
is a farmer, and was sheriff of Wilcox County. 
He represented Wilcox County in the State 
legislature, 1919. He is a Democrat; Method- 
ist; Mason; and a Knight of Pythias. Mar- 
ried: May 14, 1913, at Pine Apple, to Madeline, 
daughter of William J. and Prudie Stanford 
of that place. Children: 1. Madeline Stanford. 
Residence: Camden. 

McDUPP, DANIEL, soldier of the American 
Revolution, a resident of Madison County; and 
captain S. C. Line; enrolled on June 1, 1830, 
under act of Congress of May 15, 1828, payment 
to date from March 8, 1836; annual allowance, 
$480; sums received to date of publication of 
list, 12,432; W. P. McDuff, administrator; ad- 
mitted under act of April 2, 1830. Died March 
26, 19Z1.— Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. 
xiy. Sen. doc. 614, 23rd Cong., 1st sess.. 1833-34. 

McDUFPIB, JOHN, lawyer, representative in 
congress, was born September 25, 1888, at 
River Ridge, Monroe County; son of John and 
Virginia Marion (Lette) McDuffle, the former 
a native of Clarke County, who lived near River 
Ridge, and was a planter; grandson of Arch- 
ibald and Nancy M. (Johnson) McDuffle, of 
River Ridge, the former who came to Monroe 
County from North Carolina, and of James Bd- 
ward and Elizabeth Boykin (Hunter) Lette, 
of Burnt Com; great-grandson of William and 
Mary (Murphy) McDuffle, of Scotland, who em- 
igrated to America in 1800, and settled in New 
Hanover County, N. C, of John Seawright and 
Mary (Leslie) Johnson, who went from Ireland 
to Abbeville District, S. C, and later moved to 
Monroe County, and of Edward Lette, a land 
and slave owner of Monroe County, who came 
to Alabama from Mecklenburg County, Va. Mr. 
McDuffle received his early education at home; 
attended Southern university for one year; 
and was graduated from the Alabama poly- 
technic institute, B. S., 1904, and from the law 
department of the University of Alabama, 
LL. B., 1908. Since 1908 he has practiced law 
at Monroeville. He was elected to the State 
legislature from Monroe County, 1906-1911; 
was elected solicitor of the first Judicial circuit 
of Alabama, 1910-1919; served as captain and 
adjutant of the Second infantry, Alabama na- 
tional guard, 1909-1916; and was nominated in 
the Democratic primary for the Sixty-sixth 
congress, and had no opposition at the general 
election. He is a Democrat ; a Baptist ; a Mason ; 
a Knight of Pythias; a Woodman of the World; 
and a member of the Alpha Tau Omega and 
Theta Nu Bpsilon college fraternities. Mar- 
v«i.rr— • 



ried: October 18, 1915, to Cornelia Hixon, of 
Hixon. Children: 1. a girl. Residence: Mon- 
roeville. 

McDUFPIB, JOHN VAN, planter and rep- 
resentative in congress, was bom May 16, 1841, 
in Addison, Steuben County, N. T., and died at 
Hayneville, November 18, 1896; son of Isaac 
and Cynthia (Baker) McDuffle, natives respect- 
ively of New York, and of Pennsylvania; 
grandson of William McDuffle of New York 
State, and of Samuel and Easter (Fields) 
Baker, the former a native of Connecticut, bom 
in 1761, Revolutionary soldier, and sergeant in 
the War of 1812; and great-grandson of Wil- 
liam McDuffle, a native of Scotland, who came 
to the United States in 1758. Mr. McDuffle re- 
ceived his early education in the common 
schools of his native town; when a mere lad 
went west to Bureau County, IlL, and attended 
school in Illinois, and later the Lutheran col- 
lege of Iowa. He joined Co. B, Second Iowa cav- 
alry, U. S. A., at the beginning of the War 
of Secession; served successfully as sergeant 
and sergeant-major of the regiment, and was 
mustered out at Selma. He located in Lowndes 
County after the war, as a planter; studied 
law and was admitted to practice in the state 
courts; in August, 1868, he was elected by Re- 
publicans and negroes, probate Judge of the 
county and served twelve years. He actively 
participated in the councils of the Republican 
party in Alabama, and was a delegate from his 
congressional district to the National republi- 
can conventions of 1872 and 1876. In 1886 he 
ran for congress against A. C. Davidson, and 
upon being defeated, unsuccessfully contested 
the seat; ran in 1888 against Lewis W. Turpin, 
and upon a contesting was seated. He ran to 
succeed himself but was defeated, although he 
once more contested the seat, the last time un- 
successfully. He was elected to the constitu- 
tional convention of 1875, but did not qualify. 
He was an Odd Fellow, a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and & member of the 
Sons of the American Revolution. Married: 
in 1870, to Mrs. Martha Alice (Quinn) Kelley, 
daughter of Christopher and Emily (Johnson) 
Quinn, the former a native of County Down, 
Ireland, the latter of Ohio, residents after their 
marriage of Planesville, Ohio. Mrs. Kelley was 
the widow of a Confederate soldier, and she 
had fled as a refugee to Alabama from Monti- 
cello, Mo. CHiildren: by the last marriage, 1. 
Edwin; 2. Maud; 3-4. died young. Last resi- 
deuce: Hayneville. 

McBACHERN, JOHN ADOLPHUS, physi- 
dan; graduate of the Medical college of Louis- 
ville, Ky., 1889; licensed to practice by the 
board of Pike County. Residence: Brundidge. 

MoEACHBRN, ^ JOHN CAMERON, planter 
and business man, was bom January 1, 1887, in 
Dale County, and died May 8, 1903, at Eufaula; 
son of Gilbert and Catherine (Cameron) Mo- 
Eachem, natives of near Glasgow, Scotland, 
who migrated to Barbour County, the former 
being amcmg the founders of the old Scotch 
Presbyterian church, 'Tea River church," and 
a Justice of the peace.. His uncle, Archibald 



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DICTIONAEY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



McEachern, was a soldier in Lord Comwallis' 
army and surrendered with the British at York- 
town, Va. He was serving as a substitute for 
his brother who had a family and had been 
conscripted. Mr. MoBachem received his edu- 
cation in the schools of Barbour County, was 
a lieutenant in the "Clayton Ouards," First Ala- 
bama regiment, enlisting, February, 1861, and 
serving until the end of the war, 1865. He was 
a Democrat; and a Presbyterian. Married: 
June 11, 1868, at Clayton, Victoria, daughter 
of Judge S. and Euphemla (McNeill) Williams, 
of that place; granddaughter of John McNeill, 
the first white man buried in Barbour County. 
Children: 1. Judge Norman, died in infancy; 
2. Maxey Cameron, died in infancy; 8. Richard 
Malcolm, m. Ruby Dunbar, Eufaula; 4. Victoria 
Williams, m. Mercer S. Davie, Dothan. Last 
residence: Bufaula. 

McEACHIN, ARCHIBALD BRUCE, lawyer, 
was born November 18, 1837, in Robeson 
County, N. C, and died December 26, 1909, at 
Tuscaloosa; son of Peter and Maria (McQueen) 
McEachin, also natives of Robeson County; 
grandson of John and Mary (Graham) Mc- 
Eachin, and of Col. James and Nancy (McRae) 
McQueen, natives, respectively, of the Isle of 
Skye and of Kentyre, Scotland, who emigrated 
to America in 1765, the former settling in Wil- 
mington, N. C, the latter going to Charleston, 
S. C, with her parents, to later become the wife 
of Col. McQueen; great-grandson of Flora (Mc- 
Donald) McQueen, a niece and namesake of the 
famous Scotch heroine, and of John and Mary 
McRea. Mr. McEachin was in the twenty-sec- 
ond generation of descent from Robert Bruce. 
He received his academic education at Sandy 
McLean's private school at Floral college, N. C; 
and his professional education at Judge Pear- 
son's law school, at Rockford, N. C, from which 
he graduated in 1868. He entered upon the 
practice at Carthage, Moore County, N. C. but 
in 1869 removed to Marlon. After the dose of 
the War of SececBion he settled in Tuscaloosa 
where he held a position at the bar until the 
close of his life. He entered the Confederate 
Army as 1st lieutenant Ck>. D, Sixth Alabama 
cavalry regiment, was wounded and entered the 
Quartermaster's department with the rank of 
captain, June 16, 1863, and served throughout 
the war. He was post quartermaster in Savan- 
nah, (3a., when that city was captured by Qen, 
Sherman. On locating in Tuscaloosa he formed 
a law partnership with Judge H. M. Somer- 
ville, a connection that continued until the 
latter was elevated to the supreme court In 
1886 he formed a partnership with Hon. John 
M. Martin, and the firm practiced in Birming- 
ham, but Capt McEachin retained his residence 
in Tuscaloosa. Upon the dissolution of the 
firm he returned to his office in Tuscaloosa. 
On January 1, 1878, he issued^ the first number 
of the Southern law Journal at Tuscaloosa, and 
continued its publication until November, 1879, 
when he disposed of it to H. G. McCall by 
whom the name was changed to Southern law 
Journal and reporter. He prepared many 
articles for its pages, and he was also a con- 
tributor to the newspaper press. During his 
leisure hours he collected much data oa the 
history of Tuscaloosa which he published in the 



local newspapers. In 1891-92 he was president 
of the Alabama State bar association. He was 
a Presbyterian and a Democrat Married: Jan- 
uary, 1861, at Tuscaloosa, to Eudora, dauc^ter 
of James and Helen Olassell (Wallace) Somer- 
ville, of that place and sister of Judge Hender- 
son M. Somerville (q. v.). She was a descend- 
ant of William Wallace and of one of the Dukes 
of Argyle. Children: 1. James Somerville law- 
yer, bom January 20, 1862, deputy derk, cir- 
cuit court, Tuscaloosa County 1881-82 resided 
in Lamar County 1889-94, solicitor 6th Judicial 
circuit, 1891-93, moved to Texas 1894 where he 
was county Judge of Fort Bend County, 1896-1901, 
served with the Alabama State troops fourteoi 
years, and rose from lieutenant to major, was 
attorney for the Southern Pacific railway, m. 
Annie Graham McPherson of Charlottesville, 
Va., August 5, 1882; 2. Helen QlasseU, m. Ed- 
ward St Clair Bailey, and resides in Chicago, 
111.; 8. Eudora, m. Lee M. Otts, son of Rev. Dr. 
J. M. Otts (q. V.) ; 4. Nanelta, m. Dr. Sydney 
Leach, of Tuscaloosa; 6. Maebelle, m. Barnard 
Augustus Wood, of Mobile; 6. Archibald Bruce, 
m. Kate Porter Melton, daughter of Rev. I. O. 
Melton (q. v.). Last residence: Tuscaloosa. 

McELDERRY, THOMAS, merchant and 
farmer, was born January 18, 1790, at Leesburg, 
Loudoun County, Va., and died July 16, 1883, 
at McElderry; son of John and Ann (Sinclair) 
McElderry, natives respectively of Chester, 
Chester County, Pa., and Leesburg, Va., the for- 
mer a teacher, and Revolutionary officer, first 
of the 11th Pennsylvania and later of the 11th 
Virginia line, removed to Knoxville, Tenn., in 
1800; grandson of Patrick McElderry of County 
Antrim, Ireland. BIr. McElderry came to Ala- 
bama about the time of its admission to the 
Federal Union, was a merchant in Tuscaloosa, 
1819-20; purchased a farm in Morgan County, 
where he remained until 1836; and he then 
located in Talladega County where he resided 
until his death. He was a member of the State 
senate from Morgan County, 1828-29; and cir- 
cuit court clerk of that county in 1826. For 
a short period he practiced law. He was a 
lieutenant in Chiles regiment, Tennessee vol- 
unteers, and served two years under Oen. An- 
drew Jackson in the war with the Indians, 
1813-14. He was a Whig, and after the death 
of that party, a Democrat Married: (1) Eliza 
Boteler; (2) Frances Turner; and (8) Martha 
Dozier, daughter of Dinwoody and Mary Eliza- 
beth (Chapman) Dozier of Montlcello, Oa. 
Children by first wife: 1. Caroline, m. Dr. B. 
W. Oroce; 2. A^nanda, unmarried; 3. William, 
unmarried; by second wife: 4. Thomas Turner; 
6. John Sugars, Confederate soldier, killed in 
battle May 9, 1864; 6. Marcus, reared on a 
farm, educated in Talladega and La Orange 
college, member of Co. A, Eighth Alabama cav- 
alry regiment, C. S. Army, farmer, merchant m. 
September, 1868, to Oeorgia Chilton Bowdon, 
and had three children, Fannie C, Elbert J., 
and Horace T., d. February 13, 1913; 7. Louisa 
A., m. Elbert Sevier Jemison, and resides in 
Talladega; by third wife: 8. Emma, m. L. N. 
Jones; 9. Achsah Elizabeth, unmarried, resides 
at Talladega; 10. Cteorge Thomas, m. Mary 
Irion, Talladega; 11. Hugh Lawson, lawyer, 
graduated from Emory and Henry college, Va., 



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ROBERT E. COLLINS 



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1115 



1878, m. Ruth VanAosdal, resides Talladega. 
LAst residence: McElderry. 

MoBLHANBT, F. G., dentist, planter and 
hotel proprietor, was bom May 11, 1826, in 
Chester County, Pa., and died in 1904 at Au- 
bnm; son of Samnel and Mary (Cowan) Mc- 
Elhaney the former also a native of Pennsyl- 
vania and descended from Scotch Irish ances- 
try. The Cowans were of Welsh origin. He 
came South in 1843, an older brother having 
proceeded him and located first in Harris 
County, Ga., where he entered school. In 1848 
he returned North and studied dentistry at 
Kennett Square, Pa. Two years later he came 
back South and located at Columbus, Oa., where 
he practiced his profession. In 1868 he re- 
turned to Ellerslle where he remained until 
1853 when he located in Auburn. He bought a 
farm of six hundred acres near Auburn and 
also conducted the village hoteL He was a 
Democrat; a Mason; and local Methodist 
preacher at that place. Married: (1) Septem- 
ber 3, 1852, in Harris County, Ga., Amelia 
Frazer, widow of his brother Isaac McElhaney 
and daughter of Arthur Frazer, of Wilkes 
County, Ga.; (2) in December, 1886, to Mrs. 
Mary J. Carter, niece of his deceased wife, and 
daughter of John Haywood and Catherine 
(Glace) Frazer, who moved in 1844 to Smith's 
station, Lee County. Children: by the first 
wife, 1. Cary; 2. Hortense; 3. Mary, deceased. 
Last residence: Auburn. 

MoEWBN, GEORGE W., planter a^d miller, 
was bom October 22, 1828, in Gwinnett County, 
Oa.; son of Kirkham and Mary (Kanada) Mc- 
Ewen, of Georgia who located in Alabama, in 
1836. settling on the Tallapoosa River, south of 
Dadeville, later going to Calhoun County, Bftiss., 
where both are buried; grandson of Robert M<y' 
Ehiren who removed from North Carolina to 
Newton County, Ga., where he married and 
later settled in Gwinnett County where he and 
his wife both died. In 1860, Mr. McBwen, who 
was an extensive f^urmer located on Hatchett 
Creek, north of Rockfbrd, where he built and 
operated a mill. He was 1st lieutenant in Co. 
C, 63rd regiment Alabama Cavalry, C. S. Army, 
and was wounded at the battle of Atlanta, los- 
ing part of one hand. He was a Democrat, a 
Mason, and a Methodist Married: December 
29, 1849, in Coosa County, to Mary C. Sears. 
Children: 1. Martha A., m. S. M. Adams; 2. J. 
K.; 3. W. P.; 4. George W., jr.; 5. J. T.; 6. 
Emma J., m. J. A. Miller; 7. Mary S., m. T. J. 
King of Greenhill, Ark.; 8. Arsula, m. John 
Dobson; 9. Archie A. Last residence: Ro6k- 
ford. 

MoFARLAND, ROBERT, lawyer, was bom 
August 6, 1886, in County Londonderry, Ire- 
land son of William and Jane (McCulley) Mo- 
Farland. He was educated in Ireland and was 
prepared for the army. Failing to get into the 
Crimean War he left Ireland and came to 
America, landing in New York in May, 1854. 
Soon thereafter he entered Washington Col- 
lege, now Washington and Lee University, and 
was graduated third of his class, 1858. He 
studied law at Lexington, Va., under John W. 
Broek«iboroagh, and was graduated, LU B., 



1860. He began the practice of law in Florence 
in 1860, in partnership with James B. Irvine, 
and entered the C. S. Army, April 28, 1861, as 
captain of the Lauderdale Volunteers, later a 
part of the Fourth Alabama infantry regiment 
At Harper's Ferry, the command joined Stone- 
wall Jackson's corps, and participated in the 
first battle of Manassas. When his first year 
of service had expired, Capt. McFkrland was 
authorized to recruit a cavalry regiment, and 
with part of the regiment. Joined Gen. John H. 
Morgan at KnoxviUe, Tenn., remaining with 
Morgan until after the Ohio raid. Later he 
was assigned to Gen. Cleburne's command, and 
led the charge at Dug Gap. He was wounded 
at Villa Rica, Ga., by having his horse killed 
from under him, and never fully recovered 
from the wound. In December, 1864, he was in 
command at Huntsville, and remained there 
until driven from the city by the enemy, in 
January, 1865. After the war he returned to 
Florence and resumed the practice of law. He 
was a supporter of Douglas and the Union 
before Alabama seceded, but went with the 
state at that time. He was a delegate to the 
Democratic convention at Baltimore, which 
ncmiinated Horace Greeley for president; and 
is a Knight of Pythias. Married: in Blarch, 
1868, to Kate Armistead, daughter of Fontaine 
Armistead, then of Franklin, later of Colbert 
County. Six of the seven children bom to him 
are living. Residence: Florence. 

MoFARLANE, DUGALD, grand high priest, 
grand chapter. Masons, 1823. 

MoFERRIN, ANDERSON FURDY, Methodist 
minister, was bom October 14, 1851, at Nash- 
ville, Davidson County, Tenn.; son of Anderson 
Purdy and Minerva (Porter) McFerrin, the for- 
mer a native of Murfreesboro, Rutherford 
County, Tenn., who lived at CourUand and at 
Nashville, Tenn., and was author of a book of 
sermons, "Heavenly Shadows," and •War of 
the Universe;" grandson of Rev. James M. and 
Jane Campbell (Berry) McFerrin, who lived at 
Abingdon, Va., and of Rev. Thomas Duncan 
and Mary (Hughlitt) Porter, who lived near 
Nashville, Tenn.; nephew of Dr. J. B. McFto- 
rin. He was educated in the preparatory 
school of Hughes and Mims, and was graduated 
from Ehnory and Henry college, at Emory, Va., 
with the degree of B. A. He studied for the 
law and was admitted to the bar, but after a 
very short practice in that profession, entered 
the ministry in 1882. He has served the lead- 
ing appointments in the Tennessee conferencie, 
and since becoming a member of the Alabama 
conference was in charge of the First church 
at Opelika for four years, the St Francis 
street church at Mobile, two years, the Metho- 
dist church at Troy for two years, and returned 
to the First church at Opelika for four years. 
At the present time, because of the condition 
of his health, he holds temporarily a supemu- 
merary relation. He is a Mason and a Knight 
of Pythias. Married: December 27, 1876, to Sal- 
lie J. Williams, daughter of Dr. James and 
Elisa A. (Hughes) Williams, who lived near 
Nashville, Tenn. Children: 1. Annie Porter, m. 
Overton Fullton, secretary and treasurer of the 
Alabama Fuel 4k Iron Company, Birmingham; 



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1116 



DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



2. James Madison, auditor for the International 
Agricultural Association, m. Bessie Young 
Craige, of Columbia, Tenn., Atlanta, Ga. Resi- 
dence: Birmingham. 

McFERRIN, JOHN PORTER, Methodist min- 
ister, and Confederate soldier, was bom Feb- 
ruary ,24, 1843, in Triune, Tenn., and was 
educated at Bandusia seminary, near Nash- 
ville, under Nathaniel Cross. He enlisted in 
April 1861, in the Second Tennessee infantry 
regiment, C. S. Army, and was with this com- 
mand in its early serrice on the Potomac 
rirer; was transferred to the west in 1862, and 
fought at Shiloh, Richmond, Perryville, Mur- 
freesboro, and Chickamauga, and in the last 
named battle was severely wounded in the 
right hip, disabling him for active service. In 
1864, he was made chaplain of his regiment, 
and served in that capacity to the end of the 
war. At the conclusion of hostilities he re- 
turned to the ministry of the Methodist church, 
serving at Columbia, Tenn., and in 1895, was 
appointed to the pastorate ci the Broadway 
Methodist church, Louisville, Ky. Prom there 
he was transferred to the North Alabama con- 
ference and given the pastorate of the First 
Methodist church, Birmingham. Later he was 
transferred to the Georgia conference. Mar- 
ried: in 1867, to Julia, daughter of George and 
Carrie Patton. Children: 1. a s(m&, deceased in 
childhood; 2. a daughter. 

McGAHA, ARTHUR WATKINS, BapUst min- 
ister, president of Howard college, was born 
September 12, 1858, in Marshall County, and 
died November 29, 1901, at Huntsville; son of 
George Washington and Jane (Stone) McGaha 
the former who was bom near Vienna, Mar- 
shall County, and lived at what was then 
Vienna, near Paint Rock River, who was a far- 
mer and merchant, and served as cavalryman 
in the Twentieth Alabama regiment, C. S. 
Army; grandson of William R. and Katherlne 
Stone, who lived at Talladega. He was gradu- 
ated from Howard college, A. B., 1881, and 
from the Southern Baptist theological semi- 
nary. The degree of D. D. was conferred upon 
him in 1894. His first pastorate was at Flem- 
ingsburg, Ky., but he soon left Kentucky to 
accept the pastorate of the First Baptist church 
at Huntsville. He went frcnn that place to 
East Lake, and was in charge of the church at 
the place at the time of the resignation of Dr. 
Riley from the presidency of Howard college. 
Dr. McGaha was offered the position, and 
served as president of that institution until he 
accepted a call to Fort Worth, Tex., to become 
the successor of Dr. J. M. Wells. On the resig- 
nation of Dr. B. H. Carroll, pastor of the 
church at Waco, Tex., Dr; McGaha was invited 
to fill the ensuing vacancy. His further min- 
isterial efforts were curtailed by the failure of 
his health, and he returned to Huntsville to 
live the remainder of his life. Married: to 
Masetta Miller, daughter of Moses Alexander 
and Casandra Fidelia Miller, of Huntsville. 
She survived Dr. McGaha, and has since been 
married to E. M. McDuffln, of Birmingham. 
Children: 1. Reynolds Welch, deceased; 2. 
Arthur Watkins, Jr.; 3. Harry Miller, Ljmch- 



burg, Va.; 4. Bonner Knight; 5. Walter Tartt; 
6. Ruby Griffin; 7. Willie Harrington. LASt 
residence: Huntsville. 

McGAUGHY, JOHN H., major, lieutenant 
colonel, 16th Alabama infantry regiment, C. S. 
Army. 

MoGAUPHY, SABfUEL, soldier of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, aged 71, and a resident of Law- 
rence County; private, ci^tain and lieutenant 
N. C. Militia; enrolled on January 4, 1834, 
under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment 
to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, 
$233.32; sums received to date of publication 
of list, %^SZM.^Revolutionary Pension Roll^ in 
vol. ziv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., Ist seas., 
1833-34. He resided in Lawrence County, June 
1, 1840. aged 78. — Census of Pensioners, 1841, 
p. 148. 

McGEHEE, ABNER, pioneer settler, was born 
in 1779, in Prince Edward County, Va., and died 
In 1855, at McGehee's Switch, Montgomery 
County; son of Micajah and Anne (Scott) Mc- 
Gehee, the former a native of Virginia, who re- 
moved to Broad River Settlement, Ga., where 
he became a prosperous planter; grandscMi of 
Edward Mack Gehee and wife, who was a Miss 
De Jarnette, the former a planter of Amelia 
County, Va., and of James and Frances (Col- 
lier) Scott, of Prince Edward County, Va., 
moved to South Carolina, 1770; the latter the 
great-aunt of Governor Collier (q. v.); great- 
grandsoif of Thomas and Anne (Baytop) Scott, 
the former emigrated from County Cumber- 
land, England, lived in Gloucester County, and 
later in Caroline County, Va., of John Collier 
of 'Torto Bello," York County, Va., and of 
thomas Mack Gehee, who emigrated from Soot- 
land and settled in St. John's Parish, Kin^r 
William County, Va., before 1727; great-great- 
grandson of Thomas Baytop of Staplehurst, 
County Kent, England, who emigrated to Amer- 
ica with his parents and married a Miss Alex- 
ander; great-great-grandnephew of Col. James 
Baytop of Gloucester County, Va., an officer 
of the American Revolution; great-great-great- 
grandson of David Alexander of Gloucester 
County. Va., and of Thomas and Hannah Bay- 
top, the former a merchant of Staplehurst, 
County Kent, England, who emigrated to Amer- 
ica in 1679, and settled in York County, Va^ 
where he invested In plantations and merchan- 
dise; great-great-great-great-grandson of Thomas 
Baytop and wife, a Miss Pell, of County Kent, 
England. The De Jarnettes were of Huguenot 
descent and settled in Prince Edward County, 
Va. The Colliers were originally from England 
but all of the family who settled in America 
were Whigs during the Revolution. The Scotts 
were also of English descent Abner Mc(3ehee 
was a well educated man. He was a planter, 
tanner, and general trader of Broad River Set- 
tlement, Qa, He removed to Montgomery 
County and settled at McCtohee's Switch, where 
he purchased a large plantation; was owner 
of the Planter's hotel in Montgomery, built in 
1833; contributed largely to the building, and 
was one of the contractors, of the West Point 
railroad ; and was founder of the Alabama Bible 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1117 



Bocietya He was a Whig and a Methodist 
Married : (1) to Charlotte Spencer, his first 
cousin, and sister of Octayius Spencer^ who rep- 
resented^ Jefferson County in the les^lature, 
1837 andv 1844, (2) to Jane (Oilmer) Johnson, 
widow of\^ Thomas Johnson, and daughter of 
John and^J|lldged> (Meriwether) Gilmer, the 
former an oAcer under Marquis Lafayette, a 
native of Williamsburg, Va., who removed to 
Broad River Settlement, Oa.; granddaughter of 
\i Dr. George Gilmer, a native of Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, who emigrated to America, settled in Wil- 
liamsburg, Va., and married Harrison Blair, 
sister of Dr. Blair, the first president of Wil- 
liam and Mary college, and of Thomas and 
Elizabeth (Thornton) Meriwether; great-grand- 
daughter of David and Anne (Holmes) Meri- 
wether; great-great-granddaughter of Nicholas 
and Elisabeth (Crawford) Meriwether, of Kent 
(^unty, Va., and of George Holmes of King and 
Queen County, Va.; great-great-great-grand- 
daughter of Nicholas Meriwether of Wales or 
England, and of David Crawford, of Assasquin, 
New Kent County, Va.; (8) to Mrs. Mary (Rus- 
sell) Graves. Children: by the first marriage, 
1. Ann Scott, m. William Taylor (q. v.); 2. 
Harriet, m. Thomas Key Jarrett; 3. Mildred, 
m. Dr. Samuel Clark Oliver (q. v.) ; 4. Spencer, 
d. young; 5. Charlotte, m. George Bibb; 6. Ab- 
ner, m. Elizabeth Smith; 7. James, m. Rachael 
Susannah Daily, parents of Rev. Dr. Oliver C. 
McC^ehee (q. v.); by the second wife: 8. 
Thomas, killed by lightning; 9. Elizabeth, m. 
(1) Dr. Briggs, (2) Col. James Gilchrist; 10. 
Sarah, m. Peyton Graves; 11. daughter, m. Dr. 
George Tait. Last residence: McCtehee's Switch. 

MoGEHEB, AGNES CATHERINE (VEN- 
ABLE), patriotic worker, was bom in Novem- 
ber, 1817, at Longwood, near Farmville, Va.; 
daughter of Nathaniel E. and Mary E. Venable, 
of Prince Edward County, Va. Mrs. Mc(3ehee 
was a member of the Ladles' memorial associa- 
tion and an untiring worker for the proper 
burial of the Alabama dead of the Confederate 
Army. Married: Albert Gallatin Mc(3ehee 
(q. v.). Last residence: Montgomery. 

McGEHEE, ALBERT GALLATIN, planter, 
was bom March 28, 1812, at Milton, Caswell 
County, N. C, and died January 21, 1888, at 
Hope Hull; son of Joseph and Martha (Ward) 
tdcOehee, of Milton, N. C. The McCtehee family 
came to America from England. He received 
his education in the village schools. He re- 
moved to Alabama at an early age; assisted in 
laying off the town of Tuskegee, and later lo- 
cated in Lowndes County where he became an 
extensive planter and a large slave holder. He 
was a Whig and a Presbyterian. Married: (1) 
in Amelia County, Va., to Anna Virginia, daugh- 
ter of William and Sarah (Scott) Payne, (2) 
September 25, 1855, to Agnes Catherine, daugh- 
ter of Nathaniel E. and Mary E. Venable, of 
Farmville, Va. Mrs. Agnes Catherine McCtohee 
was a member of the Ladies memorial associa- 
tion of Montgomery. Children: 1. Virginia 
Alice, m. Clement Read Venable. Last resi- 
dence: Hope HulL 



MoGEHEE, EDWARD P., lieutenant colonel, 
25th Mississippi infantry; lieutenant colonel, 
2nd Confederate Infantry, C. S. Army. 

MoGEHEE, OLIVER CLARK, Methodist 
preacher, was bom January 7, 1867, at Mc- 
Gehees, Montgomery County; son of James 
and Rachel SusannaV>( Daily) McGehee; grand- 
son of Abner and Charlotte (Spencer) McGehee, 
the former resided on his plantation between 
McGehees and Snowdoun, was a man of busi- 
ness ability, energy and deep piety, was largely 
instmmental in building the Western railway 
between Montgomery and West Point, (3a., and 
founder of the Alabama Bible society located 
in Montgomery, and of Dr. Samuel and Mildred 
(Oliver) Daily, the former a resident of Dud- 
lejrvllle. Chambers County, a physician of abil- 
ity, and a local Methodist preacher; great- 
grandson of Mlcajah and Anne (Scott) McGe- 
hee of Virginia, the latter a member of the 
Winfleld Scott family, and both later residents 
of the Broad River settlement, Ga. Rev. Dr. 
McGtehee was educated on his father's planta- 
tion and vicinity, his teachers being Miss Ben- 
ham, Rev. James Smith, Mr. Tarver, Mr. 
Grimes and Mr. Maloy. He graduated at 
Auburn, June, 1879, with degree of B. S. The 
degree of A. M. being conferred by his alma 
mater later, and the degree of D. D. conferred 
in 1903 by the Southern university at Greens- 
boro; entered the ministry in 1886 at Opelika, 
and has served pastorates at Montgomery, Mo- 
bile, and other leading churches, and has held 
appointments as presiding elder several times. 
He is at present presiding elder of the Pratt- 
vllle district. Married: January 6, 1881, at 
Wetumpka, to Mary Linton, daughter of G. C. 
and Martha (GuUatte) Henderson of Auburn, 
the former a native of North CJarolina who 
moved to Georgia where he taught school and 
married and later located in Auburn. (Chil- 
dren: 1. William Wallace, physician; A. M. 
Southern university, 1903; M. D., University of 
Alabama, 1907; m. Mozelle, daughter of W. A. 
and Alice (Downing) Hill, of Brewton; resi- 
dence, Montgomery; 2. Robert Bruce, member 
of faculty of Gulf port military academy; m. • 
Frances Hemdon, of Tennessee, residence, Gulf- 
port, Miss.; 8. Paul Duncan, physician; A. B., 
Southern university. 1905; M. D., University of 
Alabama, 1907; m. Mary, daughter of John 
McDuffle; residence, Mobile; 4. Mary Kate, m. 
J. I. Chilton, residence, Montgomery; 5. Marion, 
m. T. Bestor Ward, residence, Greensboro; 6. 
Oliver Clark, jr. m. Hermione, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. D. M. Newton,' of Evergreen; resi- 
dence. Evergreen; 7. Edward Henderson, U. S. 
Navy, died suddenly in New York City, 1919. 
Residence: Montgomery. 

MCGEHEE, WILLIAM, soldier of the AmerU 
can Revolution, aged 79, and a resident of 
Jackson County; private Virginia State 
Troops; enrolled on January 4, 1834, under act 
of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date 
from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, |30; 
sums received to date of publication of list. 
175. — Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv, 
Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 



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DICTIONAEY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



McGILLIVRAT, ALEXANDER, diplomat and 
merchant, was born probably at Fort Toulouse, 
or in the town of Taskigl, one half mile below 
the fort, and died February 17, 1793, at Pensa- 
cola, Fla.; son of Lachlan and Sehoy (Mar- 
chand) McGiUivray, the former a native of 
Dunmaglass, Scotland, who, at the age of six- 
teen, came to the Carolinas, Joined a party of 
Indian traders, is first known as an Indian 
trader on the Chattahoochee River, probably at 
Coweta, in 1735, who after the Revolution em- 
barked for his native land, leaving his wife and 
children, his plantation and worldly possessions, 
in the hopes that they might be allowed to 
fall into their possession, but all of his property 
was seized and they were left in destitute cir- 
cumstances, the latter a half breed Creek 
woman; grandson of Captain Marchand and 
wife, a full blood Creek woman of the Wind 
Tribe, the former was killed at Fort Toulouse 
in 1722. Alexander McGiUivray was educated at 
Charleston, S. C. In 1784 he was known as the 
emperor of the Creeks and Seminoies and nego- 
tiated the treaty with Spain at Pensacola. He 
visited President Washington at New York in 
1790 and was appointed agent of the United 
States, with rank of brigadier-general. Shortly 
afterwards the King of Spain appointed him 
superintendent general of the Creek Nation for 
Spain. At the same time he was a member 
of the firm of Panton's, merchants of Pensa- 
cola. His principal residence was at Little Ta- 
lasi, five miles above the present site of We- 
tumpka on the Coosa River, on what is now 
known as the Rose plantation. His plantation 
on Little River was known as "Cowpen" and 
still another was at Hickory Ground, on the 
left bank of the Coosa two miles above Fort 
Toulouse, and below the present site of We- 
tumpka. He had three wives and left three 
children, Alexander, jr., and two daughters. 
Last residence: Little Talasi, on the Coosa 
River. 

MoGOUGH, GEORGE LAFAYETTE, planter, 
was born September 8, 1861, at Columbus, Ga.; 
son of John and Mary Elizabeth (Dawson) Mo- 
Gough, the former a native of Jones County, Ga., 
later a resident of Alabama, who served as a 
captain in the home guards during the War of 
Secession; grandson of Robert and Sandal 
(Cabaniss) McGough, of Monroe County, Ga.» 
and of Dr. Thomas Henry and Ann (Blair) 
Dawson, of Appling, Columbia County, Ga., the 
former a native of Abbeville District, S. C, 
who served in the War of 1812, the latter a 
Georgian; great-grandson of John and Elisa- 
beth (Carson) McGtough, of Cleorge and Hannah 
(Clay) Cabaniss, of Thomas and Susannah 
(Dawson) Rogers, and of Hugh and Mary 
(Lee) Blair, the latter a lawyer, who com- 
manded the Second Ctoorgia regiment during 
the War of 1812; great-great-grandson of 
George and Ruth (Skidmore) Dawson, the for- 
mer a native c^ Lincolnshire, England, who 
emigrated to North Carolina in 1774, and who 
later settled in Georgia, and of Greenberry and 
Elizabeth Lee, the former a colonel in the Rev- 
olutionary War, and also of Capt. Hugh and 
Jemmimah (McCarty) Blair; great-great-great- 
grandson of John Dawson. Mr. McGough re- 



ceived his early education in the schools of 
Glenville, ana attended the Alabama poljrtech- 
nic institute, 1878-1879. During the Spanish- 
American War, he served as first lieutenant in 
the Third Alabama regiment, and was con- 
nected with the State militia for a number of 
years. He is a farmer, and represented Russell 
County in the State legislature in 1915. He is 
a Democrat, a Methodist and a Mason. Resi- 
dence: Pittsview. 

McGK)WEN, WILLIAM EASLEY, business 
man and legislator, was born June 3, 1858, at 
Old Bennett's Station, Sumter County; son of 
William Rufus and Virginia Noble (Easley) 
McGowen, the former was born in Tipton Coun- 
ty, Tenn., and came with his parents to Greene 
County, later removed to Sumter County where 
he enlisted in Co. A, 40th Alabama infantry 
regiment, C. S. Army, as a sergeant, before the 
cessation of hosilities however, he became first 
lieutenant of his company; grandson of Wil- 
liam Robert and Edith (Watkins) McGowan. 
who lived in Duplin County, N. C, Tipton 
County, Tenn., removed to Alabama, located in 
Greene County, and died in Sumter County, 
and of Warham and Emily (I^oble) Easley, who 
emigrated from Easley, S. C, to Alabama, dy- 
ing in Sumter County. The McCtowen family 
emigrated from Great Britain in 1758 and set- 
tled in Duplin County, N. C. The Easley fam- 
ily were immigrants from England to Virginia 
between 1700 and 1750. Both families had rep- 
resentatives in the American army during the 
Revoluticmary War. Mr. McCtowen was edu- 
cated in the schools of York, and at Cooper's 
Institute, Daleville, Miss., but did not graduate. 
He has been a merchant in Cuba since 1885; 
and president of the Bank of Cuba, since its or- 
ganization in 1904. He has been two terms 
mayor of Cuba; and twice* commissioner ot 
Sumter County. He was a delegate to the St. 
Louis convention that nominated Alton B. 
Parker, and in 1911 represented Sumter County 
in the legislature. He is a Democrat; Baptist; 
Woodman of the World; Columbian Woodman; 
Eastern Star and a Knight of Pythias. Mar- 
ried: August 10, 1881, at Cube, to Margaret 
Annie, daughter of Solomon and Annie (Hall) 
Ward, of (Jaston; granddaughter of James Wal- 
lace and Hannah Tolson (Neale) Hall, residents 
of Newberne, N. C; great-granddaughter of 
Col. Enoch Ward, a Revolutionary soldier of 
Beaufort, N. C. Children: 1. Virginia Eliza- 
beth, m. K. B. Mitchell; 2. Charles Ward; 3 
Annie Neal, m. R. D. Vance; 4. Gertrude; 5 
Luclle; 6. William Henry; 7. Merle; 8. PauUne. 
Residence: Cuba. 

McGRATH, JOHN, pioneer settler, was born 
March 29, 1799, in County Waterford, Ireland, 
and died June 4, 1878, in Selma. He served 
for six years in the English navy and in the 
American navy for seven years. After receiv- 
ing his honorable discharge he engaged in the 
American fisheries on the New Foundland 
coast. He located in Selma about 1835, where 
he followed for years the occupation of ditch- 
ing and served for years as city sexton. Last 
residence: Selma. 



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1119 



MoQREGOR, ALBERT G., teacher, was born 
Bfarch 1, 1836, in LAwrence County; son of 
William and Elisabeth (Carpenter) McGregor; 
grandson of William Carpenter, who served in 
the War ot 1812. The McGregors are of Scotch 
descent, and came from North Carolina to Ala- 
bama and became farmers in Lawrence County. 
Mr. McGregor obtained his early schooling in 
Lawrence County, and was graduated from La- 
Grange college in 1854. He was elected to the 
chair of mathematics in LaGrange the follow- 
ing year, and continued to teach in that school 
until he joined the C. S. Army in 1861. He 
became quartermaster in Col. Jeff Forrest's 
regiment, and served with Gen. P. D. Roddy 
and Gen. Forrest in north Alabama, north Mis- 
sissippi, and west Tennessee. After the war, 
he raised cotton for four years, then returned 
to LaGrange where he taught school in a 
church building for about six years. He took 
charge of the academy at Tuscumbia for one 
year, then was forced to stop teaching because 
of ill health, and return to farming. In Feb- 
ruary, 1885, he took charge of Hartselle col- 
lege, and was president of that instituticm for 
many years. He is a Methodist and a Mason. 
Married: December 28, 1858, to Celia King, 
daughter of Robert King, a planter of Lawrence 
County. Sev^i <diildren were bom to the mar- 
riage. Residence: Hartselle. 

MoGUIRE, ELIJAH, soldier of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, aged 77, and a resid^it of Tus- 
caloosa County; sergeant S. C. Continental 
Line; enrolled on December 12, 1827, under act 
of Congress of Bfarch 18, 1818, payment to date 
from October 12, 1827; annual allowance, |96; 
sums received to date of publication of list, 
%^^,ld.— Revolutionary PenHon Roll, in vol. ziv. 
Sen. doc 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sees., 1833-34. 

McGUIRE, JOSEPH H., lawyer, was bom 
September 29, 1848, in Tuscaloosa County, and 
died May 9, 1899; son of Henry W. and Sarah 
(Bmbry) MoGuire, natives of Alabama; grand- 
son of John and Nancy (Rogers) McGuire, na- 
tives of Tennessee, who came to Alabama in 
1817, and of Joseph Embry. He attended pri- 
vate schools and was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, LL. B., 1878. He served as 
principal of the Holly Grove high school, 1876- 
1877; began the practice of law in Pickens 
County; remained there for one year, then re- 
moved to Fayette where he continued in the 
practice of law until his death. He held the 
office of register in chancery in Walker County, 
1872-1876, and in Fayette County, 1880-1883. He 
was a Democrat and a Missionary Baptist Mar- 
ried: in 1878. to Seleta J. (Anderson) Wind- 
ham, a native of Alabama. Children: 1. 
E^rerett; 2. Joseph Hilliard, Jr., b. September 
13, 1883, attended the University of Alabama; 
3. Mary; 4. Florence, m. William B. Bankhead 
(q. v.). Last residence: Fayette. 

McGUIRE, MOSES, public official, was a resi- 
dent of Tuscaloosa. The time and place of his 
birth, as well as the names of his parents are 
unavailable. He was elected clerk of the county 
court of Tuscaloosa County, 1837, and held that 



office by successive reflections, until 1845, when 
he was elected sheriff of the county. He was a 
Democrat, and of such popularity, that he was 
elected to the State legislature in 1849, on a 
divided ticket, with Mr. Jemison and Mr. Per- 
kins, both Whigs. His long experience in the 
details of county police regulations was a gain 
to the house, relative to the probate court sys- 
tem, then about to be established. In 1850, 
when the election of Judge of probate was given 
to the people, Mr. McGuire was elected to that 
office, and continued in the position until after 
the War of Secession. He was a delegate to the 
State constitutional convention in 1865; and 
was prevented from holding further office by 
the reconstruction measures, after having held 
public office for thirty years, without ever suf- 
fering a defeat in any election before the people. 
Last residence: Tuscaloosa. 

MoILKENY, JAMES, toldier of the American 
Revolution, age not given, a resident of Madison 
County; private Virginia Continental Line; en- 
rolled on May 23, 1820, under act of Congress 
of March 18, 1818, payment to date from October 
8, 1818; annual allowance, |96; suspended 
under act of May 1, 1S20.— Revolutionary Pen- 
sion Roll, in vol. xiv, S^i. doc 514, 23rd Cong., 
1st sess., 1833-34. 

MoINALLY, JONAH, soldier of the American 
Revolution, resided in Jackson County, June 1, 
1840. — Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148. 

McINTOSH, WILLIAM, Creek Chief. See 
Indian chiefs and associated characters. 

.McINTOSH, W. H., president of the Alabama 
Baptist State convention, 1864. Residence: 
Marion. 

McINTYRE, FRANK, major-general, United 
States Army, was bom January 5, 1865, at 
Montgomery; son of Denis and Mary (Gaug- 
han) Mclntyre. the fonner of County Donefi^, 
Ireland, the latter of County Mayo, Ireland; 
grandson of James and Mary (Buchanan) Mc- 
lntyre, both natives of County Donegal, Ire- 
land. General Mclntyre was educated in the 
public and private schools of Montgomery, and 
spent 1880-1882, at the University of Alabama, 
completing the Junior year. He entered the 
U. S. military academy at West Point, in 1882, 
and graduated in 1886 as A second lieutenant 
He has been promoted as follows: first lieu- 
tenant, 1892; captain, 1899; major, 1908; colo- 
nel, 1910; brigadier-general, 1912; and major- 
general, 1917. From 1887 until 1903, General 
Mclntyre served with the army in Texas, Kan- 
sas and Michigan. From 1890 to 1894 he was 
an instructor at the Military academy. West 
Point He was stationed at Porto Rico, 1898- 
1899; Philippine Islands, from 1899 to 1902; 
and in California, 1902 and 1903. In the lat- 
ter year he was assigned to the general staff, 
Washington, D. C, and from 1905 to 1918 was 
assistant chief of staff and chief of the Bu- 
reau of insular affairs, supervising affairs of 
the United States in Porto Rico and the Philip- 
pines. During the European War he was chief 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



military censor and now he Is again assistant 
chief of staff. On February 13, 1919, he was 
awarded the distinguished service medal, and 
was a commander of the Legion of Honor, 1919. 
He is a Roman Oatholic Married: July 12, 
1892 at Dallas, Tex., to Marie, daughter of 
James Wilson and Marie (Dufllho) Dennett, 
of New Orleans, La. Children: 1. James D., 
officer in U. S. Army, m. Gena Cahoon, of 
Montgomery, stationed at Fort Monroe, Va.; 
2. Frank, Jr., d. 1915, age nineteen; 8. Edward; 
4. Marie D.; 5. Margaret D.; 6. Nora. Resi- 
dence: Washington, D. C. 

McINTYRE, HAMILTON, farmer, was bom 
in August, 1837, in LeGrand, Montgomery Coun- 
ty; son of Peter and Ann (Sealle) Mclntsrre, 
the former a native of Richmond County, N. C, 
bom in 1801, of Scotch parents, a school teacher 
in Georgia, studied medicine, who moved to 
Alabama in 1849, located in Montgomery where 
he practiced homeopathy, and died in 1856, the 
latter a native ci Marlborough District, S. C, 
who was born in 1802, and died in 1889. Mr. 
Mclntyre went to Alabama in 1849 with his 
father; received a fair education; attended the 
law school of Chancellor Wade Keys, in Mont- 
gomery, 1859-1860; was admitted to the bar in 
the supreme court of Alabama in 1860; and 
moved to Pike County where he commenced the 
practice of law in partnership with his brother. 
On the outbreak of the 'War of Secession, he 
joined the First Alabama cavalry, under Clan- 
ton, August, 1861; was promoted to lieutenant 
of Co. H, at Corinth ; was wounded at Murf rees- 
boro, and* disabled for the remainder of the war 
at the battle of Lookout Mountain. After the 
war, he resumed the practice of law in Pike 
County, and moved to Montgomery in 1867, 
opening a law office there. In 1870, he aband- 
oned the practice of law because of poor health, 
and moved to the country where he engaged in 
cotton raising. He later became interested in 
stock-raising and dairying. He was elected 
state solicitor for Montgomery County, 1867 and 
1868, and was a representative to the State 
legislature from Montgomery County in 1882 
and 1883, declining to serve in the next session. 
He was author of the Mclntyre road law, by 
which the public roads were greatly improved. 
He served continuously for more than ten years 
as justice of the peace, road overseer, and post- 
master. Married: ,in December, 1870, to Mattie 

A. Mastin, of Montgomery, daughter of Peter 

B. and Mary A. Mastin, natives of Tennessee 
and South Carolina, respectively. Children: 1. 
Annie L., was graduated with distinguished 
honor from the Normal college at Florence, 
taught school at Birmingham and at Mont- 
gomery; 2. Peter Mastin, B. S., 1898, teacher in 
the Agricultural school at Abbeville, 1900; 3. 
Mary P. Residence: LeOrand. 

McIVBR, D. R. W., Baptist minister, was 
bom in 1794, in Charleston, S. C, and died 
February 10, 1863. He was educated at the 
University of South Carolina and began his 
religious work by preaching to the slaves on 
his plantation. He removed to Alabama and 
served pastorates at Prattville and Wetumpka. 



In 1856 he located in DeSoto Parish, La., where 
he served until 1862. 

MoKEE, JOHN THOMAS, teacher, was bora 
August 7, 1879, near Brundidge, Pike County; 
son of Madison Jasper and Mattie Emma (Hals- 
ten) McKee, who lived near Brundidge, the 
former who was born near Eufaula, Barbour 
County; grandson of John Allen and Catherine 
(Kellcy) McKee, who lived near Eufaula, and 
of Thomas Washington and Harriet Emma 
Haisten, who lived near Brundidge, the former 
a soldier in the War of Secession. He received 
his early education in the schools of Pike Coun- 
ty, and in the Baptist collegiate institute, at 
Newton; and was graduated from Howard col- 
lege, A. B., 1905. He has taken post graduate 
work during the summer sessions at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. He began to teach school 
in 1905, spending four years at Newton, one 
year as secretary of the state Baptist mission 
board, one year as principal of the Cullman 
County high school, then became president of 
the Second district agricultural school at Ever- 
green. He was elected county superintendent of 
education of Colbert County, 1920. He is a 
Baptist Married: August 7, 1905, at Newton, 
to Mattie Maude Cobb, daughter of John 
Thomas and Mattie Elizabeth (Brown) Cobb, 
who lived at Cuthbert, Ga. Children: 1. John 
Ralph, b. May 14, 1906, at Newton; 2. Walter 
Tate, b. May 7, 1909, at Newton; 3. Mary EHlsa- 
beth, b. August 17, 1912, at Evergreen. Resi- 
dence: Tuscumbia. 

McKEE, ROBERT, editor, was born in 1830, 
in Fleming County, Ky. His father was a 
farmer and blacksmith. He received but a 
limited education, and worked on a farm for 
wages for three years. When he was eighteen 
years of age, he became a clerk in a country 
store, and four years later became a bookkeeper. 
He contributed articles to the Paris "Flag," 
in 1856, which attracted public notice, and a 
year later was editor and owner of the Mays- 
vllle "Express," which position he held until 
he accepted the chief editorship of the Louis- 
ville "Courier," in 1859. Because of its course 
in siding with the South, that journal was sup- 
pressed in October, 1861. Mr. McKee was a 
delegate to the Charleston convention in 1861, 
and was secretary of the revolutionary conven- 
tion which met at Russellville, in November, 
1861, to take Kentucky out of the Union. He 
was chosen secretary of State of the provisional 
government by that convention, but the evacua- 
tion of Kentucky by the Confederates made that 
position a nominal one. At the battle of Shiloh 
he was a voluntary aid in the Kentucky 
brigade; was wounded and had a horse killed 
under him; and received special mention in 
Col. Trabue's report 111 health kept him from 
a participation in any other important engage- 
ment of the war. At Its close the rewards for 
his arrest had not been withdrawn, and he re- 
mained in the hills of Jefferson County until 
October, 1865, when he located in Dallas Coun- 
ty. He engaged in editorial work and other 
writing which gave him a reputation second to 
none in Alabama. Last residence: Dallas County. 



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1123 



MoKEITHEN^ ARCHIBALD, planter, was 
born in 1772 in Bladen Ck>ant7, N. C.» and died 
in 1847 at his home "Thomfleld" near Robin- 
son Springs; son of Archibald and Katherlne 
(Baleer ) McKeithen, who emigrated from Glas- 
gow, Scotland, to Bladen County, N. C. He was 
educated in North Carolina and 1818 came to 
Alabama, locating at Robinson Springs, Autau- 
ga, now Elmore County, the first of the Mc- 
Keithens to settle in this State. His pioneer 
home, still owned and occupied by descendents 
was called Thomfield." He owned many slaves 
and conducted large planting interests. He 
was a Whig and a Presbyterian. Married: in 
North Carolina, before his remoyal to this 
State, to Mary, daught^r of Daniel and Marian 
(Taylor) Robertson, of that state. She was a 
kinswoman of the Scotch historian Robertson. 
Children: 1. Duncan, d. unm.; 2. Daniel, d. 
unm.; 3. Alexander, deceased, m. Elizabeth 
Smith Forman, daughter of Thomas Smith, of 
Prattville; 4. Archibald, d. unm.; 6. Eathejrine, 
deceased, m. John Cotton; 6. Isabel, d. unm.; 7. 
Sarah Marian, deceased, m. Buckner Harris (q. 
v.). Last residence: Robinson Springs. 

McKBNZIE, BETHUNE BEATON, ciTll en- 
gineer, soldier, and member constitutional con- 
vention, was bom October 11, 1837, near Louis- 
ville, Barbour County; son of Daniel and 
Amanda (Burch) McKenzie, the former bom 
near Rockingham, Richmond County, N. C, and 
lived near Louisville; grandson of Kenneth and 
Anne (Herrington) McKenzie, who lived near 
Rockingham, N. C, the former bom on the Isle 
of Skye, and of Rev. Jesse and Susie (Dean) 
Burch, who lived near Shreveport, La.; great- 
grandson of Murdo McKenzie, who with his son 
Kenneth, came, lust after the American Revolu- 
tion, to the United States, and of William and 
Hattle (Blackwell) Burch, the latter of Qeorge- 
town, S. C, the former a member of General 
Sumter's command in the Revolutionary Army, 
married soon after the Revolution, and of Wil- 
liam Dean; great-great-grandson of Seaborn 
Desn, major in the Revolutionary Army. These 
ancestors were all farmers. He received his 
early education at Louisville academy and at 
Helicon academy in Crenshaw County, under a 
very early and especially capable teacher, Prof. 
Angus R. McDonald. His collegiate education 
was obtained at Howard college, from which he 
graduated June 24, 1868, with the degree of A. 
B., making the highest scholastic record in his 
classes. Consideration of health induced him 
to adopt the profession of civil engineering. 
Soon after the close of the War of Secession, he 
had charge of the building of the railroad from 
Eufaula to Clayton, and later was chief en- 
gineer for the Central of Georgia railroad, re- 
arranging yards and extending wharf in Sa- 
vannah, and building the first compress on the 
wharf. In 1880-2 he was with the Louisville 
and Nashville railroad company, managing the 
tradE department from Decatur to Mobile, and 
a branch to Selma and Pine Apple. Before 
reai^ing the age ai twenty-one years he was 
elected county surveyor which position he held 
until the beginning of the War of Secession. He 
was a member of the constitutional convention 



of 1865, probably the youngest member, being 
less than twenty-eight years of age. He was in 
1861, sergeant in Co. E, Seventh Alabama in- 
fantry regiment, C. S. Army, and in 1862, was 
1st lieutenant of Co. C, 39th Alabama infantry 
regiment; captain of Co. B, Fourth Alabama 
battalion cavalry, 1864; captain Co. I, Jefferson 
Davis legion. Army of Northern Virginia. He is 
a Democrat; a Mason; and* a Baptist Married: 
October 14, 1858, in Eufaula, to Caroline Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Qen. Thomas and Caroline 
Elizabeth (Rogers) Floumey, who lived at Eu- 
faula, the latter tamilj having migrated from 
Dinwiddle County, Va.; granddaughter of Col. 
Josiah and Martha (Bfanley) Floumey, the 
former of Edenton, Ga.; great-granddaughter of 
John Manley, an ofDcer in the Revolutionary 
Army, and a cousin of Gen. Winfield Scott 
Children: 1. Edgar Floumey, Georgiana; 2. 
Mrs. U. C. Vinson, deceased; 3. Mannie, m. Dr. 
W. W. Mangum; 4. Anne Josephine, m. S. T. 
Suratt; 5. Daniel Burch, Eufaula; 6. Fannie 
Floumey, m. E. M. Lovelace, Brewton; •?. Bfary 
Lou, m. J. E. Methvin, Eufaula; 8. Susie Dean, 
m. J. A. Copeland, Atlanta, Ga. Residence: 
Eufaula. 

MoKENZIE, PETER BEAUREGARD, lawyer, 
mayor and cyclopedia writer, was bom March 
2, 1862, at Franklin, Macon County; son of 
Peter Robeson and Elizabeth Caroline (Robe- 
son) McKenzie, the former bom at Chester- 
field Court House, S. C, and lived at Tallassee; 
grandson of John and Elizabeth Ann (Robeson) 
McKenzie, who lived near Tallassee, Tallapoosa 
County, and of William Lord and Margaret 
Jane (Sweeney) Robeson, who lived at Chester- 
field Court House, S. C; great-grandson of 
James McKenzie, a native of Scotland, who near 
the beginning of the American Revolution, came 
from London to (3amden, S. C; great-great- 
grandson of Calvin Spencer, one of the very 
early ancestors who settled in or near Chester- 
field and Cheraw, S. C, near the line of North 
Carolina, came from Connecticut, lieutenant in 
the Revolutionary Army, delegate to convention, 
1788, which ratified the Federal constitution, 
delegate to constitutional convention of 1790, 
Judge of county court, representative in the 
lei^slature, colonel of militia, 1800, and of Dr. 
James P. Wilson, bom in Pennsylvania before 
the Revolutionaiy War, moved to Long Bluff, 
S. C, was Justice of county court, surgeon in 
General Marion's brigade, and lost heavily by 
British destruction of property. Mr. McKenzie 
received his early education at Tuskegee, and 
his professional education at the University of 
Alabama, from which he was graduated June, 

1883, with the degree of B. L. He is a lawyer 
by profession, beginning practice, January 1, 

1884, in Eufaula, and afterwards practicing in 
Birmingham. He was register in chancery for 
Barbour County, March, 1885-April, 1889, and 
mayor of Eufaula, June, 1894-October, 1899. 
During several years before 1896 he was a mem- 
ber of the Democratic executive committee of 
Barbour County. He is a Methodist; an Odd 
Fellow, and a Knight of Pythias. Author: 
articles in the Cyclopedia of Law. Married: 
November 23, 1887, at Perry, Houston County^ 



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Ga., to Claudia Emily, daughter of Isaac T. and 
Bugenia (Morris) Hill, who lived at George- 
town, Ga. Children: 1. Claudia Hill, m. Wil- 
liam Brasher Clayton, grandson of Judge Henry 
D. Clayton, of Clajrton, and resides in Dallas, 
Texas; 2. Donald Spencer. Residence: Talla- 
dega. 

McKINIRY, DAVID, Catholic priest, was 
bom near Linsmore,* Ireland, February 5, 1830 
and died at Mobile, December 18, 1896. Father 
McKiniry, while very young, was a student at 
St. John's diocesan college, Waterford; later 
transferred to Maynooth college; Joined the 
Society of Jesus, December 8, 1854, while a 
student at Maynooth, and was professor at 
Clonglowes Wood college, the principal college 
of the Jesuits in Ireland. He was sent to 
America in 1856; was professor of rhetoric at 
St. Charles college. Grand Coteau, La., and 
later at Spring Hill college. Soon after he was 
sent to Ireland and Australia and passed some 
time at the University of Louvain. He re- 
turned to America and spent one year at the 
Jesuit college, St Louis; was stationed at the 
Jesuit college, New Orleans, 1878-74; spent the 
years 1872-1884 as lecturer at St. Joseph's uni- 
versity, Beirut, Syria. He again returned to 
America in 1884 and was president of Spring 
Hill college from that date until 1888, when he 
l^^came president of the Jesuit college. New 
Orleans. His health began to fail so he was 
again, 1895, sent to Mobile as spiritual father 
and chaplain to the Visitation convent. He 
remained at this station until his death. Last 
residence: Mobile. 

Mckinley, JOHN, lawyer, U. S. senator, as- 
sociate Justice U. S. supreme court, was bom 
in May, 1780. in Culpeper County, Va., and 
died July 19, 1852, in Louisville, Ky. He spent 
the early years of his life in Franklin County, 
Ky., where he was for some time a mechanic. 
He read law and practiced for some years at 
Frankfort and Louisville, Ky., and moved to 
Alabama in 1819. He opened a law office in 
Huntsville, and in 1820, was elected to the 
State legislature from Madison County. Two 
years later he was a candidate for a vacant 
seat in the U. S. senate and was defeated by 
a majority of one by William Kelley of Madi- 
son. He was elected to the Federal senate in 
1826 over C. C. Clay, to fill the seat left vacant 
by the death of Gov. Israel Pickens, and during 
that term, became a resident of Florence, Lau- 
derdale County. On the expiration of his term 
in the senate in 1831, he was elected a repre- 
sentative from Lauderdale County in the State 
legislature and in 1833 was elected to represent 
the district in congress, defeating Gen. James 
Davis of Franklin. In 1836, he again served 
Lauderdale County in the State legislature, and 
during the session, was elected to the U. S. 
senate to succeed Gov. Gabriel Moore. Before 
taking his seat he was appointed an associate 
Justice of the supreme court of the United 
States by President Van Buren, 1837, and held 
the position until his death in 1852, residing 
much of that time in Washington, D. C, and 
Louisville, Ky. He was a Jackson Democrat. 
Married. His daughter, Mrs. Donald Campbell, 



was a resident of Louisville, Ky., and his son, 
Andrew, held an important office in that state. 
Last residence: Louisville, Ky. 

McKINLET, JOHN, lawyer, was bom Decem- 
ber 12, 1871, at Demopolis, Marengo County; 
son of John Henry and Martha Ann (Stanton) 
McKinley, who lived at Demopolis, the former 
a native of Kennebunk Port, Me., who came 
south when about eighteen years of age, served 
in the Forty-third Alabama regiment, C. S. 
Army, and was transferred to the engineers 
corps, serving first with the western army, and 
being transferred after the battle of Mission- 
ary Ridge to the Virginia army; grandson of 
Thomas and Mary (Owen) Stanton, who lived 
near Alston, S. C. He was educated in the pub- 
lic schools at Demopolis, and on his father's 
death in 1887, went to work to aid in the sup- 
port of the family. While working at the bench 
as a mechanic, he devoted his nights to the 
study of law, and was admitted to the bar, 
September 21, 1896, before the circuit court of 
Marengo County. He opened his practice in 
Demopolis, moved to Eutaw in 1897, and has 
since conducted his profession at that place. 
He was for two years associated with Edward 
deGraffenried, later of the supreme court 
bench; then formed a partnership with Ber- 
nard Harwood, which lasted until Mr. Harwood 
became Judge of the sixth judicial circuit At 
that time, Mr. McKinley became senior member 
of the firm of McKinley, McQueen, Hawkins lb 
Snow, with offices at Eutaw and Tuscaloosa. 
He is a Democrat, a deacon in the Baptist 
church, has been past master of his lodge of 
Masons, past noble grand of Odd Fellows, and 
past chancellor of the Knights of Pythias. Mar- 
ried: April 27, 1898, in Eutaw, to Margaret 
Augusta Braune, daughter of Gustave and Nora 
Braune, of Eutaw. Children: 1. John McKin- 
ley, jr., b. December 9, 1899, at Eutaw. Resi- 
dence: Eutaw. 

McKINLEY, VERGIL PARKS, teMdier, was 
bom October 2, 1875, at Oakmulgee, Perry Coun- 
ty; son of Richard and Fannie Barton (Crowe) 
McKinley, the former a native of Mecklenburg 
CJounty. N. C, who lived at 25ebulon, (3a^ until 
the close of the War of Secession, served in 
the C. S. Army, lived in Bethlehem, 1879-1892, 
and was postmaster. Justice of the peace, and 
township superintendent of schools at that 
place; grandson of Leroy and Mary Louisa Mc- 
Kinley, of Zebulon, Ga., and of Elijah Palmer 
and Fannie (Olderm) Crowe, who lived at 
(3enterville. The McKlnleys are of Scotch-Irish 
descent, and were introduced into America by 
Mr. McKinley's great-grandfather, who landed 
somewhere in New England and later moved to 
North Carolina. On the Crowe side, his an- 
cestry was of English descent, his great-grand- 
father Crowe being the first pastor of Salome 
Baptist church, at Marion. He attended the 
rural schools of Perry County and Prof. J. D. 
Cooper's high school at Centerville; was gradu- 
ated from the State normal college, Troy, with 
the degree of bachelor of pedagogy, 1903, and 
from Teachers' college, Columbia university. 
New York City, B. S.. and with a bachelor's 
diploma in manual training, 1908. He began 



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teaching in 1896 at Oakmnlgee, and taught in 
the rural schools of Alabama until 1908 when 
he was elected to the principalship of the high 
school in connection with the Troy normal 
college. In 1908, he was elected to the prin- 
ciiNtlBhip of the department of arts in the Troy 
normal college, and held that position until he 
moved to the University of Alabama to take 
charge of the department of yocaticNial educa- 
tion. He is a Democrat, a deacon in the Baptist 
charch and president of the Pike County Sun- 
day Schocd Association, and a past chancellor 
in the Knighto of Pythias. Married: July 6, 
1911, at Knoxville, Tenn., to Mary Emma Key, 
daughter of John G. and Sarah E. (Carroll) 
Key. who lived at Troy, the former treasurer 
of Pike County for twelve years, the latter a 
Biater of J. S. Carroll of Troy. Residence: 
University. 

McKINNEY, CHARLES, soldier of the Amer- 
jcc» Revolution, aged 71, and a resident of 
i^eatone County; private and sergeant Vir- 
ginia Militia ; enrolled on June 14, 1833, under 
act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to 
date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, 
127.33; sums received to date of publication of 
list. ^i%,Z2.— Revolutionary Pension Roll, in 
ToL xiv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sees.* 
1833^4. 

McKINNET, JAMES, member of the consti- 
tutional convention of 1861, from Dale County. 

McKINNEY, JAMES ISAAC, railroad super- 
intendent, was born November 22, 1852, at Stan- 
ford. Lincoln County. Ky.; son of George Hous- 
ton and Hannah McKinley (Paxton) McKinney, 
the former a native of Stanford, Ky., who lived 
at that place, was circuit clerk of Linden Coun- 
ty, and was quartermaster of the Nineteenth 
Kentucky regiment, U. S. Army, War of Seces- 
sion; grandson of George and Panthea (Hous- 
ton) McKinney, who lived at McKinney's Sta- 
tion. Lincoln County, Ky.. and of Joseph and 
Elizabeth Paxton, who lived at Leidngton, Rock- 
bridge County, Va., and moved to Stanford, 
Lincoln County. Ky., in 1814; great-grandson of 
John Paxton. of the South River Paxtons of 
Rockbridge County, Va., a captain in the Rev- 
olutionary Army who was killed in the battle 
of Guilford Court House, N. C, 1781. The 
Paxtons were of English and Irish descent, and 
supported Cromwell in the overthrow of Charles 
I. On the restoratlcm of Charles II they fled 
from Ireland to America about 1650. They were 
of rqoral blood, and owned lands in Scotland and 
Ireland which were confiscated. Mr. McKinney 
was educated in Stanford. Ky., under Charles 
Barnes. He began working for the Louisville 
4 Nashville Railroad Company in January, 
1878, was advanced through various depart- 
ments, and on December 1, 1889, was made 
superintendent of the road at Montgomery, in 
which position he has continued. He is a Re- 
publican, a Presbyterian, and ah Odd Fellow. 
Married: May 7, 1898. at Richmond. Ky., to 
Kate Slaughter (q. v.). Residence: Mont- 
fomery. 



McKINNEY, KATE SLAUGHTER, author, 
was bom February 6, 1859, at London, Laurel 
County, Ky., daughter of James Love and Lu- 
cinda Jane (Price) Slaughter* the former a na- 
tive of Boonville. Ky., who later lived at Lon- 
don, and Richmond, in that State; granddaugh- 
ter of John L. and Mary (Montjoy) Slaughter 
of London, Ky., and of Gkibrlel and Elisa (Gar- 
rard) Price, of Manchester, Ky.; great-grand- 
daughter of Gk)v. (Gabriel Slaughter and of Qor. 
James Garrard of Kentucky. The Slaughters 
came from Wales and settled in Culpeper 
County, Va. Gen. Theo. Garrard of the War of 
Secession was a great-uncle of Mrs. McKinney. 
She received her education in Kirksville, Ky.; 
and at the Daughters' college. Harrodsburg, Ky., 
where she graduated in 1876 with first honors. 
She is a member of the Christian church. Un- 
der the nom-de-plume, "Katydid," she con- 
tributed to the current press numerous poems 
and short stories. Author "Katydid's Poems," 
1887; 'The Silent witness," 1906; "A weed by 
the wall," 1911. She has also written the verses 
for a number of published songs, among which 
is "The green Kentucky pastures," sung at the 
opening of the Kentucky building at the St 
Louis world's fair. Married: May 7, 1878, at 
Richmond, Ky., to James I. McKinney (q. v.). 
Residence: Montgomery. 

MoKINNON, JOHN A., grand master, grand 
council. Masons, 1894; grand commander, 
grand commandery. 1891-95; grand high priest, 
grand chapter. 1892-93. 

McKINNON, JOHN ALEXANDER, physician, 
was bom July 12, 1842, in Pike County. He was 
educated in the conunon schools, and began 
reading medicine at Macon, Ga., when he was 
nineteen year of age. The year before, he had 
entered the C. S. Army, from Lowndes County, 
as a private in the Third Alabama infant)ry regi- 
ment After the battle of Malvern Hill, he was 
commissioned a lieutenant and was placed in 
charge of the medical laboratory at Macon, Ga. 
He went to Selma in February, 1866; was gradu- 
ated from Uie University of Louisiana, M. D., 
1867, and from the Bellevue Hospital medical 
college. New York, 1874 and 1875. He began 
to practice medicine with Dr. Fahs at Selma, 
1867, and continued in that partnership for 
eighteen months. He makes a specialty of 
surgery, and was surgeon of the railroads run- 
ning into Selma for many years. He is a mem- 
ber of the Medical Association of Alabama, of 
the Selma Medical Society, of the city board of 
health, and was a delegate to the International 
Medical Congress at Philadelphia, 1876. He is 
a Knight Templar, and has been eminent com- 
mander of the order; is a member of the 
Knights of Honor; the National Union; and the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is also 
connected with the Railroad (Conductors' Insur- 
ance Association and the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers, as medical examiner. Resi- 
dence: Selma. 

McKINSTRT. ALEXANDER, colonel 82nd 
infantry regiment, C. S. Army, lieutenant gov- 
ernor of Alabama, member Alabama legislature, 
lawyer and Jurist, was bom March 7. 1822, in 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Augusta, Oa., and died October 9, 1879, at Mo- 
bile; son of Alexander and Elizabeth (Thomp- 
son) McKinstry, the former of New England 
stock; grandson of Jesse and Nancy (Clarke) 
Thompson of Augusta, Oa., and of Ezekiel and 
Rosina (Chapman) McKinstry of Ellington, 
Conn.; great-grandson of Qen. Elijah and Han- 
nah (Arrington) Clarke of (3eorgia, and of 
Alexander and Sarah (Lee) McKinstry of 
Litchfield, Conn.; great-great-grandson of John 
and Elizabeth (Fairfield) McKinstry, the 
former a native of Erode Parish, Antrim 
County Ireland, although of Scotch descent, 
who emigrated to America in 1718 and married 
at Winham, Mass.; great^great-great-grandson 
of Roger and Mary (Wilson) McKinstry, of 
Edinburgh, Scotland. Orphaned at an early age. 
Colonel McKinstry, made his way to Mobile 
where he had relatives, and found employment, 
at fourteen, in a drug store where for several 
years he remained. He later read law in the 
office of Hon. John A. Campbell who subse- 
quently became a U. S. supreme court Judge, 
and at once showed a marked aptitude for the 
legal profession. He was admitted to the bar 
in 1845 and the following year formed a part- 
nershlp with William G. Jones. During these 
first years of his public career he filled the 
offices of alderman of Mobile, notary public 
commissioner of revenue of Mobile County, of 
which board he was president, and commis- 
sioner of roads of the county. He was elected 
colonel of the 48th Alabama infantry regiment, 
9th brigade, 4th division State militia, in 1847, 
but resigned this office in 1850. During that 
year he was elected Judge of the city of Mo- 
bile, re-elected in 1856, and resigned in I860*' 
to resume his practice in partnership with 
Daniel Chandler. Although strongly opposed 
to the Secession movement he surrendered his 
Judgment to the will of the pec^le and on 
April 29, 1862, was commissioned colonel 32nd 
Alabama infantry regiment . under special or- 
der; September 21, 1862, he was assigned to 
the command of the post of Chattanooga and 
the troops between Hiawassa and Bridgeport. 
On April 6, 1864, he was commissioned colonel 
of cavalry, attached to MaJ.-Oen. N. B. Forrest, 
and was later assigned to the duty of provost 
marshal general of the Army of Tennessee, the 
State of Alabama and North (3eorgia under 
Qen. Braxton Bragg. He was president of the 
military court attached to Qen. N. B. Forrest's 
command from the spring of 1864 until the 
close of the war. He returned to Mobile and 
resumed the practice of the law, in the 
State, U. S. courts and before the U. S. supreme 
court In the fall of 1865 he was elected to 
the Alabama legislature from Mobile County 
and was made chairman of the Judiciary com- 
mittee, and a member on the committee on the 
revision of the code which was adopted in 
1867. In 1869 he was again elected to the legis- 
lature and in 1872 was elected lieutenant gov- 
ernor of the state. He was an Episcopalian. 
Married: March 20, 1845, to Virginia Thomp- 
son, daughter of Robert Richards and Mary 
(Thompson) Dade, of Mobile, the former a 
native of King (George Court House, Vs.; grand- 
daughter of Robert Townsend and Elizabeth 



(Parker) Dade, also of King Ctoorge County, 
his wife being a native of C^rtaret (bounty, 
N. C. Children: 1. Alexander, m. Annie Fobs, 
Eureka, Calif.; 2. William Dade, m. E}va Shel- 
don, Mobile; 3. Louise Dade, m. Keith Moffat, 
Mobile; 4. Virginia Dade, Mobile; 5. Mary 
Ingersoll, m. Marion Chalkley, Richmond, Va. 
Six other children bom to them died in in- 
fancy. Last residence: Mobile. 

MoKINSTRY, 0. L., public official, was born 
March 19, 1842, in Pickens County; son of 
Thomas W. and Perilla A. (Mobley) McKinstry, 
natives, respectively, of South C^irolina and of 
Troup Ck>unty, Cku, the former a farmer, who 
emigrated from South Carolina to Alabama in 
1836 and lived there until his death in 1869. 
The father of ThcHnas W. McKinstry was a 
native of Ireland, who emigrated to South Car- 
olina and became a farmer in that state, mar- 
ried a Miss Allston, a close relative of Qor. 
Allston of South Carolina, and a native of Scot- 
land. Judge McKinstry enlisted in the C. S. 
Army in 1861, Joining Co. D, Second Alabama 
infantry regiment, and served with that coxa* 
mand one year, then Joined the Forty-seomd 
Alabama infantry. He participated in the 
battles of Corinth, seige of Vicksburg, Lookout 
Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kenesaw 
Mountain, New Hope Church, Peach Tree Creek, 
and BentonviUe, at which last place he was 
taken priscmer. After the war he returned to 
his home and engaged in farming, and in 1876- 
1877 represented Pickens County in the State 
legislature. He was appointed probate Judge 
^of Pickens County in 1890, to fill a vacancy 
caused by the death of Judge T. O. Williams, 
and was elected to that office in 1892. Biarried: 
in 1868, to Hester Mayhew, daughter of Joseph 
H. and Susanna (Collier) Mayhew, both natives 
of South Carolina, who emigrated to Alabama 
in the early days of the state. Children: !• 
Thomas H., b. October, 1869, physician; 2. 0. L., 
Jr., b. April, 1874; 3. Hester, b. November, 1880. 
Residence: Carrollton. 

McKISSIC*, ANTHONY FOSTER, professor 
of electrical engineering, Alabama polytechnical 
institute. Auburn, 1891-99. He held the A. M. 
and M. M. E. degrees. Residence: Anderson, 
S. C. 

McKLEROT, JOHN MARTIN, lawyer, super- 
intendent of education, was born BCay 18, 1843, 
at Eufaula; son of William H. and Martha Gill 
(Shorter) McKleroy. He was graduitted from 
Howard college, 1860, and the following year 
went to Texas. After a few months' seivice 
with a Texas frontier company in the Indian 
territory, he enlisted. May, 1861, as a private 
in the Third Texas cavalry, and with that com- 
mand, served one year in the west He was 
appointed adjutant of Hilliard's legion with 
the rank of first lieutenant, 1862, and with that 
command, saw service in Tennessee, KentudEy, 
(3eorgia and the Carolinas. At the formation of 
the Tenth Confederate cavalry, of which Hil- 
Ifard's command formed a part, he was elected 
third lieutenant of Co. A, and later was made 
captain of the company, and for a time corn- 



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manded the regiment He was wounded near 
Fayetteyille, N. C, March 10, 1865, and returned 
to Eufaula soon after the final surrender. He 
began to study law, was admitted to the bar In 
Noyember, 1865, and entered at once upon the 
practice of law in Eufaula. He was elected 
State superintendent of public instruction in 
1874, held the office one term, and declined 
reflection. He was a representatiye in the 
State legislature in 1876, declined re-election, 
and in 1882 and 1886, was an unsuccessful can- 
didate for goyemor. He was chairman of the 
State Democratic ezecutiye committee in 1866. 
In January, 1887, he was made president of the 
Anniston City Land Company, and attorney and 
general agent for the Alabama Mineral Land 
Ckxnpany. Soon after that time, he located in 
Anniston, and retired from the practice of law, 
except in the interest of the companies he rep- 
resented. Married: February 28, 1867, to 
Martha I. Woods, daughter of Clayton R. Woods 
of Eufaula. Children: 1. William H.; 2. Hat- 
tie H. Residence: Anniston. 

McKLEROT, WILLIAM HENRY, mayor, 
banker, and colonel State militia, was bom 
October 26, 1868, at Eufaula, and died July 8, 
1919, at Anniston; son of John Martin and 
Martha Isabell (Wood) McKleroy (q. y.) ; 
grandson of William Henry and Sophie 
(Shorter) McKleroy. and of Clajrton R. and 
Harriette Wood, all of Eufaula. He receiyed 
his early education in the schools of Eufaula 
and attended, 1884-87, Howard college, from 
which he graduated with first honors and the 
degree of A. B. He entered Columbia uni- 
yersity, New York City, in 1887, and graduated 
with the degree of M. E., in 1890. From that 
date to 1895 he was cashier of the Anniston 
national bank and from the latter date to 1911, 
was president of that institution. He then 
became yice-presldent of the Anniston city na* 
ticmal bank, and president of the Oxford na- 
tional bank. In 1909 he became yice-president 
of the bank at Hefiin; member, 1896-08, of 
the city council of Anniston; for eight years 
mayor, pro tern, of Anniston. He was cap- 
tain of Co. E, 2nd Alabama National Guard, 
1891-94, and colonel of the 3rd regiment, Ala- 
bama National Ouard, 1905-12. He was a Dem- 
ocrat; Mason; and a Baptist. Married: Au- 
irnst 18, 1907, in Chattanooga, Tenn., to Susan 
(Neal) Musgroye, widow of Judge Coleman 
Musgroye of Birmingham; daughter of Dr. and 
Mrs. Neal, who liyed at Georgetown, Ky. Chil- 
dren: 1. William Henry, Jr. Last residence: 
Anniston. 

McLAIN, DAVID HUBBARD, physician, was 
bom April 28, 1861, in Winston County, and 
died May 81, 1897; son of Allen Boston and 
Bfary (Hewlett) McLain, the former a North 
Carolinian, of Scotch-Irish descent, who came 
to Alabama with his parents when a child, and 
located on a farm in Walker County; grandson 
of William Hewlett, of Virginia. His ancestors, 
the McLains, H^wletts and Hubbards of North 
Carolina and Virginia achieyed distinction in 
the War of 1812, and were prominent in the 
polities of the country and the cause of the 
Confederacy. He receiyed his schooling at 
yti. rr— f 



Mount Hope, and in Spring Hill academy, 
Tennessee, under the direction of Col. John 
Peebles. He worked on his father's farm until 
1872, when he began the study of medicine 
under Dr. J. M. Clark, at Mt. Hope, and grad- 
uated from the medical college of Alabama, 
M. D., 1875. After practicing for one year in 
Allen's Factory, Marion Ck>unty, he moyed to 
Maysyille, Madison Coimty, and from there to 
Gurley, 1879, where he soon established him- 
self in a practice extending oyer the eastern 
part of Madison County. He was a member of 
the Madison County medical society and of the 
State medical association, and for two terms 
was a member of the board of censors of the 
former; was a Democrat; a steward in the 
Methodist Episcopal church; and a Knight of 
Honor. Married: June 10, 1880, to Ella Mc- 
Broom, a graduate of Huntsyille female col- 
lege, daughter of C. C. McBroom, of Qurley. 
Children: 1. Deceased; 2. Allen. Last resi- 
dence: Gurley. 

Mclaughlin, jab^es biadison, physi- 
cian, was born March 22, 1888, at Leeds, Jef- 
ferson County; son of John and Margaret 
(Drinker) McLaughlin, the former a natiye of 
Tennessee, and a resident of that state until 
he moyed to Alabama, the latter a Tennessean 
of (German descent; grandson of Alexander 
Andrew McLaughlin, who emigrated from Scot- 
land to Tennessee and was one of the first 
settlers of that state. He was educated in the 
public schools, read medicine with Dr. Robert- 
son and Dr. Freeman at SpringyiUe, 1859-1860; 
and attended the Atlanta medical college two 
years; enlisted in Co. C, Eighteenth Alabama 
infantry regiment, C. S. Army; was soon made 
captain of the company; and in 1864 was made 
lieutenant colonel, occupying that position until 
the end of the war. He had been appointed 
assistant surgeon of the regiment but declined 
to senre. After the war, he engaged in the 
general practice of medicine, and conducted a 
drug store. He* has seryed as examiner for the 
New York life insurance company, for the 
Penn mutual life insurance company, and for 
the Equitable life insurance company of New 
York; as a member of the board of pension 
examiners; as county health officer; was mayor 
of SpringyiUe three times; a member and one 
of the organizers of the St. Clair medical 
society; and a counselor of the State medical 
association. He is a Democrat; a Presbyterian; 
a Mason; and a Knight of Psrthias. Bfarried: in 
1877, to Isidora, daughter of James and Parthe- 
nia (Dean) Forman, of SpringyiUe. Children: 
1. Katharine Burt, m. Jacob Forney (q. y.), 
professor in the Uniyersity of Alabama until 
his death in 1902, children,. Caroline and John 
McLaughlin Forney. Residence: SpringyiUe. 

Mclaughlin, john felix, teacher, 

farmer and tax assessor, was bom September 
16, 1842, at Jonesboro, Jefferson County; son 
of Duncan Stuart and Elyira Caroline (Adding* 
ton) McLaughlin, natiyes of the same county; 
grandson of Andrew and Nancy (Carmichael) 
McLaughlin of that place, the latter bom about 
1778 in the Isle of Mull, Scotland, seryed as 
a sailor for nearly twenty years and located 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



in Marlborough District, S. C, about 1808, 
where he married and moved to Tennesaee, 
thence to Jefferson County, where he remained 
until his death in 1858, and of Jaeon and 
Elvira (Sandefur) Addington of Jefferson and 
Pickens Counties. Mr. McLaughlin received his 
early education in the schools of Jefferson and 
Tuscaloosa Counties, and has followed teach- 
ing and farming; was elected tax assessor of 
Jefferson County in 1896 and reelected in 1900, 
serving, in all, nine years; entered Confederate 
Army in Co. B, 10th Alabama infantry regi- 
ment, June 16th, 1861, and was in the Army 
of Northern Virginia until the surrender of 
Lee at Appomattox. He is a Democrat Mar- 
ried: July 20, 1871, to Sarah Ella, daughter of 
Jasper Newton and Jerusha (Carroll) Mere- 
dith, who lived near Montevallo, a descendant 
of Colonel. Edward Lacy of Revolutionary fame, 
and related to Charles Carroll of CarroUton, the 
signer of the Declaration ot Indep^idence. 
Children: 1. Maud, m. B. P. Mims of Birming- 
ham; 2. Anna Stuart, m. James A. Dupuy of 
Fairview; 3. Willie C3n*ene; 4. Jason Meredith. 
Residence: Birmingham. 

McLEAN, CHARLES E., mayor of Mobile, 
March 1903 to July 1904. 

McLEAN, JAMES MoGREABT, Presbyterian 
minister, was bom February 13, 1821, near 
Carthage, Greene, now Hale County, and died 
April 7, 1890, at Oxford; son of James and 
Mary (Sloss^ McLean, the former a native of 
North Carolina. His great-great-grandfather 
McLean came to America from Scotland and 
settled in North Carolina. He was graduated 
from the College of Mississippi, 1845, and after 
some attendance at Lane theological seminary, 
was graduated at Union theological seminary. 
New York, 1848. He was licensed to preach 
about 1844, and was ordained by the Newton 
Presbytery in 1848. He preached first at 
Marion, Miss., then at Coila Springs and Lex- 
ington, Miss. He was pastor of the Fourth 
Presbyterian church at Mobile, 1854-1863; took 
charge of Fayetteville, Hatchet Creek, Unity 
and Scott's Grove churches, having organized 
the last named, 1864; took charge of the 
churches at Oxford, Jacksonville and Marble 
Springs, 1869; and sometimes combined with 
those churches at New Lebanon, Harpersville 
and Columbiana. His labors extended through- 
put the counties of Talladega, Clay, Shelby and 
Calhoun. He was a Mason and an Odd Fellow. 
Married: June 21, 1848, at Marion, Miss.: to 
Julia, daughter of John Fox and Harriet 
(Wood) Chester, who lived at Sumterville, 
S. C. Children: 1. Chester Cummings, d. Sep- 
tember 9. 1860; 2. Ida, d. October 19, 1905, at 
Marshall, Tex.; 3. Charles Wood, d. July 27, 
1873, at Oxford; 4. James Dunning, minister, 
president of the South-Westem Presbyterian 
home and school for orphans, Itasca, Tex.; 5. 
Harry Herndon, minister, d. in April, 1884, in 
Goochland County, Va.; 6. Carrie Hoadley, m. 
Julius P. Word, Lubbock, Tex.; 7. Mary Eliza- 
beth, m. David P. Rogers, d. January 15, 1907, at 
Princeton, W. Va.; 8. John Ephraim, minister. 
Forth Worth, Tex.; 9. Joseph Geoj-ge, d. August 



3, 1868, at Fayetteville. Last residence: Ox- 
ford. 

MoLEMORE, CHARLES, merchant, was bom 
in Jasper County, Ga., and died in 1858, near 
Memphis, Tenn. He was educated as a physi- 
cian, came to Alabama in 1833, and settled on 
the river in Tallapoosa County. Soon after he 
came to Lafayette, where he established him- 
self as a merchant He was elected to the 
State legislature from Chambers County in 
1836, and between that time and 1844, was re- 
elected five times to that body. He was sent 
to the State senate in the latter year, and served 
two years. He was again elected to the senate 
in 1849, was unanimously elected president of 
that body in 1851, and served in the upper 
house until 1855, when he was defeated by Dr. 
H. W. Bacon. He died while on a visit to Ar- 
kansas, to look after lands In which he was 
interested. He was a Whig. Mr. McLemore 
was married three times, the last time to a 
Miss McCoy, daughter of Neal McCoy of Cham- 
bers County. One of his sons, CoL J. J. Mc- 
Lemore, an (^cer in the mUltia, who was de- 
barred from active service in the War of Se- 
cession because of physical disabilities, drilled 
many soldiers for the C. S. Army, and con- 
ducted a fiour mill, which was thrown open tor 
the families of soldiers during the war; he 
served in the State legislature and offered a 
series of Joint resolutions for the state to care 
for the soldiers' families, which later became 
a law. His youngest son was Col. Owen Kenan 
McLemore (q. v.). Last residence: Chambers 
County. 

MoLEMORE, MOSES, farmer, was born in 
1857, in Montgomery County; son of Andrew J. 
and Sarah C. (Smith) McLemore, the former 
a native of Jones County, Ga., who came to 
Alabama with his parents about 1820, and was 
first married to Margaret Caffey, by whom he 
had three daughters, was married again In 
1854, and spent the remainder of kls life on a 
plantation in Montgomery County, and died in 
1870, the latter a native of Orangeburgh Dis- 
trict, S. C, who came to Alabama with her 
imde, Daniel Rast, who settled in Lowndes 
County; grandson of Rev. James McLemore, 
a Virginian and a Missionary Baptist minister, 
who came to Alabama in 1820, and is said to 
have built the first church in Montgomery 
County, and of Jacob and Mary Smith, natives 
of South Carolina, who lived in that state all 
their lives. He was educated in the country 
schools and in Montgomery, and at the age A 
seventeen, began farming in Montgomery 
County. He has followed that oocupation all 
his life, and for some years he was also en- 
gaged in merchandising and in conducting a 
cotton gin. Married: in 1890, to Annie Ben(mi 
Tanner, who was bom in Tuskegee, daughter 
of L. H. and Ophelia Tanner, who cam^ to Ala- 
bama from Georgia, the former of whom died 
at Union Springs. Residence: Montgomery 
County. 

MoLEMORE, OWEN KENAN, Confederate 
soldier, was born October 21, 1838, in Lafayette, 
and died September 30, 1862, at Winchester, 



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BETHUNE B. McKENZIE 



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U81 



Qa.; son of Charles McLemore (Q. y.). Wliev 
be was sixteen years of age, he was appointed 
to a cadetohip at West Point, from the seventh 
congressional district of Alabama. He was 
graduated with honor from the military acad- 
emy, July 1. 1866; was stationed in Kentucky 
as second lieutenant in the Eighth infantry reg- 
iment, U. S. Anny, for a short time, then was 
transferred to the Sixth infantry; was with the 
latter command in San Francisco when Ala- 
bama seceded; resigned from the U. S. Army 
and returned to Alabama to Join the C. S. 
Army; was first employed in recruiting soldiers 
for the Fourteenth Alabama infantry regiment; 
was assigned to duty as first lieutenant of ar- 
tillery, and ordered to report to Qen. Beaure- 
gard, at Manassas Junction, June, 1861; par- 
ticipated in the first battle of Manassas; was 
appointed major of the Fourteenth Alabama 
regiment; commanded the regiment at Wil- 
liamsburg, at which time his horse was shot 
from under him; was elected lieutenant colonel 
of the Fourth Alabama regiment, May 21, 1862, 
and after falling back from Richmond to York- 
town, was promoted to colonel; commanded the 
Fourth Alabama in the battle of Seven Pines, 
and when the regiment followed Stonewall 
Jackson from the valley of Virginia; after 
forced marches formed a juncture with Gen. 
Lee's forces in time to assist in the defeat of 
Gen. McClellan and to save Richmond in the 
seven days* battle, at which time Col. McLe- 
more received a severe flesh wound; fought at 
second Manassas and in all the ensuing en- 
gagemento until he was fataUy wounded while 
commanding his regiment, at the battle of 
Sharpsburg, September 17, 1862; died at the 
home of Mrs. Carson, in Winchester, September 
30, 1862, and was buried in N. May Cemetery, 
Winchester, with military honors, the regi- 
ment and division band marching several miles 
to perform the last rites. Last residence: La- 
fayette. 

McLBNDON, GEORGE GRANDBBRRY. Bap- 
tist minister, was born December 14, 1807, in 
Morgan County, Ga.; son of Josiah MoLendon, 
a native of North Carolina, who married a 
daughter of Elder George Grandberry of North 
Carolina, one of the first Baptist preachers. He 
moved with his father to Alabama in 1818, and 
settled near Burnt Com, Conecuh County. After 
residing there for six years, he moved with 
the family to Pike County, 1824, near what is 
now Brundidge. He farmed for a few years, 
and in 1882 united with the Salem Baptist 
church. Up until that time, he had little op- 
portunity to gain even the rudiments of an 
education, but after he decided to enter the 
ministry, he devoted himself closely to read- 
ing and study and became a profound Biblical 
scholar. He was ordained to the ministry, 
July 27, 1840, and was assigned to his first 
charge at Aberfoil, in what is now Bullock 
County. He was a member and one of the or- 
ganisers of the Selma Baptist association, and 
was sent as a missionary of the association in- 
to Florida and southern Alabama in 1844, and 
served there for three years. He served for a 
number of years as moderator of the Selma as- 
sociation, and was in active church work for 
more than fifty years. He was a Royal Arch 



Mason. Married: January 15, 1828, in Pike 
County, to Martha, daughter of John Mar- 
tin, a native of Maryland, who moved from 
Georgia to Alabama, settling near Horse Shoe 
Bend on the Tallapoosa River, 1818, later mov- 
ing to Butler County, then to Pike County, near 
Brundidge. Children: 1. James R. (q. v.); 2. 
Jonathan D., farmer and merchant, served in 
Co. G, Fifty-third Alabama volunteer regiment, 
m. 1859, Susannah Myrick, daughter of W. B. 
Myrick; 3. Jackson J., teacher, farmer and 
architect, served in the C. S. Army, for several 
years, township superintendent of free public 
schools, m. in 1858, Eleanor E. Cook, of Mont- 
gomery County; 4. Jasper G., wounded in the 
battle of Shiloh and never heard from since; 
5. Joseph F., killed at the battle of Shiloh, April 
7, 1862; 6. Judson Cary, killed July, 1891, on 
the Louisville and Nashville railroad, m. in 
1869, Josephine Burgess, daughter of William 
Burgess of Pike County; 7. Jane E., d. in in- 
fancy; 8. JuUa, d. in infancy; 9. JuUa Ann, 
deceased, m. George Edge, left a son, George, of 
River Falls; 10. Josephine, deceased, m. J. M. 
Talbot, left three children, James T., Mollie 
F., and Clarence If. Last residence: Pike 
County. 

MoLENDON, JAMES R., farmer, was bom in 
1828, in Pike County; son of George Grand- 
berry and Martha (Martin) MoLendon (q. v.). 
He was reared on a farm, received a good edu- 
cation, and attended the military school at 
Tuskegee. He taught school until in August, 
1862, when he joined the Partisan Rangers, Co. 
H, Fifty-first Alabama mounted infantry, un- 
der CoL John T. Morgan. He fought at Mur- 
freesboro, and participated in the Georgia cam- 
paign, from Dalton to Atlanta, losing his left 
hand, July 28, 1864. After some time in a hos- 
pital, he was furloughed home for sixty days, 
then was made superintendent of the hospital 
garden at Meridian, Miss., where he remained 
until the close of the war. For a short time 
after the war, he resided and taught school 
in Butler County, but in 1865, moved to Mont- 
gomery County, where he conducted a farm. 
He contributed to various periodicals, and is 
author of an article, "Music on the Farm." He 
served in the State legislature in 1888 and 1889, 
and was a member of the committee on edu- 
cation and temperance. He was a Missionary 
Baptist. Married: in November, 1856, to Mary 
Jane, daughter of Dr. J. C. and Caroline Court- 
ney, natives of South Carolina and Montgomery 
County, the former a physician, farmer and 
nurseryman, who died in 1889, in Chilton 
County. Thirteen children were bom to the 
marriage. Last residence: Montgomery County. 

MoLENDON, LOUIS MARSHALL, physician 
and legislator, was born January 10, 1848, at 
Wadesboro, Anson County, N. C; son of Louis 
May and Mary Ann (Waddell) McLendon, who 
resided in Wadesboro until 1855, when he moved 
to DeKalb, Kemper County, Miss., a member of 
the board of supervisors for five terms in North 
Carolina, and sheriff of Anson County, that 
state, for one term; grandson of Joel and 
Susan (May) McLendon of Anson County, N. C, 
and of Edward Waddell and wife of Cheraw, S. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



C. The family was of Scotch-Irish descent. 
Dr. McLendon had a common school education 
in Kemper County, Miss., and graduated with 
the M. D. degree from the medical department 
of the University of Alabama, Mobile, 1874. He 
entered upon the practice of his profession at 
Oak Grove, Miss., and later practiced at Oeor- 
giana, at Muscogee, Fla., and at Brewton, where 
he has resided for the past twenty-five years. 
He was coroner of Escambia County for two 
terms and Confederate pension examiner for 
two terms. He entered the Confederate Army 
in 1867, at fifteen years of age, from the State 
of Mississippi, and was a corporal. He repre- 
sented Escambia County in the legislature of 
1911. He is a Methodist; Democrat; Mason, 
a Knight of Honor; and a member of the Fra- 
ternal Union. Married: November 23, 1866, 
at Oak Orove Miss., to Mary Ann, daughter of 
Peter P. and Elizabeth Cullom, the family be- 
ing of French origin. Children: 1. Mary Eliza- 
beth, m. M. C. Smith, Oak Grove, Miss.; 2. 
Alyce, m. J. R. Bradley, Century, Fla.; 3. Wilma. 
Residence: Brewton. 

Mclennan, JOHN D.. lieutenant colonel, 
59th Alabama infantry; major, 4th battalion 
Alabama artillery, Hilliard's Alabama Legion, 
C. S. Army. 

MoLEOD. ARCHIBALD LONZO, lawyer, was 
bom December 27, 1859, in Jackson, Clarke 
County; son of John and Christian (Calhoun) 
McLeod, the former a native of Clarke County, 
who served in the C. S. Army, In Co. C, Thirty- 
second Alabama infantry regiment, and was 
killed at the battle of Franklin; grandson of 
Duncan Calhoun, who came to Alabama from 
North Carolina. He was graduated from the 
University of Alabama, A. B., 1886, A. M., 1888; 
taught in the public schools of Selma, 1885- 
1887; organized a newspaper, "The South Ala- 
bamaian," at Jackson, and began the practice 
of law in that city; served in the legislature 
from Clarke County, 1888 ajid 1889; moved to 
Selma, 1890, where he continued his law prac- 
tice; was elected mayor of Selma, 1899-1901, 
and re-elected without opposition, 1901-1903. He 
is a Methodist; a Democrat; a Mason; an Odd 
Fellow; and an Elk. Married: (1) in Selma, to 
Augusta Jordan, who died November 1, 1891; 
(2) February 6, 1901, at Montgomery, to Eliza- 
beth Dawson, daughter of George W. Hails (q. 
v.), who was at one time tax collector of Mont- 
gomery County. Children, by second marriage: 
1. Elisabeth Furnlss. Residence: Selma. 

McLEOD, J. F., Methodist minister; mem- 
ber of the Alabama conference. Residence: 
Montgomery. 

McLEOD, JOHN CALVIN, physician, was 
born July 1, 1880, at Good water, Coosa County; 
son of Angus Kelley and Laura (Jones) 
McLeod, the former a native of Gk)odwater, 
who lived there, and at Wetumpka and Syla- 
cauga, Talladega County, who was U. S. deputy 
collector of internal revenue under Cleveland's 
second administration; grandson of William 
W. and Margaret McLeod, of Goodwater, and 



of John Calvin and Angeline (Love) Jones, 
who lived at Bradford, Coosa County. He at- 
tended the common schools of Coosa County, 
the high school at Auburn, and took one year's 
course at the Alabama polytedinlc Institute. 
He was graduated from the Birmingham med- 
ical college, April, 1900; began to practice 
medicine at Bay Minette in 1900, and has been 
engaged in the general practice since that time. 
He was a member of the common council of 
Bay Minette, 1908-1912; was chairman of the 
Baldwin County Democratic executive commit- 
tee, 1913; ruling elder of the Burgett Memorial 
Presbyterian church; past master of his lodge 
of Masons; and past chancellor of the Knights 
of Pythias. Married: November 15, 1904, at 
Jemison, to Virginia, daughter of L. J. and 
Susan Hand, who lived at Jemison, Chilton 
County. Children: 1. Pauline Glover. Resi- 
dence: Bay Minette. 

McLEOD, JOHN COLEMAN, physician, was 
bom April 2, 1878, at Clayton. Barbour County; 
son of John C. and Alice (Baker) McLeod, of 
White Oak Springs and Eufaula; grandson of 
Daniel and P. R. McLeod, and of James and 
Nancy Baker, all of Barbour County. Dr. Mc- 
Leod was educated in the common schools of 
Barbour and Henry Counties; the Southeast 
Alabama agricultural school, Abbeville, and the 
medical department of the University of Ala- 
bama, Mobile, from which he graduated, 1904, 
with the degree of M. D. He began the practice 
of his profession in May, 1904, at BakerhlU, 
where he remained for one year; lived at Elba, 
Coffee County, two years; and at Opp, where 
he has practiced for the last ten years. He 
was a member of the city council at Opp for six 
years; and was elected to the legislature from 
Covington County, 1918. He is a Democrat; a 
Presbyterian; a Mason; a Shrlner; a Knight 
of Pythias; and a Woodman of the World. 
Married: February 22, 1906, at Elba, to Mjrrtle 
L., daughter of William J. and Rebecca Hutch- 
ison. Residence: Opp. 

McLEOD. JOHN WILLIAM, teacher and law- 
yer, was born October 22, 1887. at King Insti- 
tute, Clarke County; son of William Allen and 
Mary Zeola (Vaughn) McLeod; grandson of 
John and Christian (Calhoun) McLeod, the for- 
mer a Confederate soldier who lived In Clarke 
County, and was killed at the battle of Frank- 
lin, Tenn.. and of William and Mary Vaughn 
of Wilcox County. He received his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of Demopolis, and 
graduated A. B., from the University of Ala- 
bama, 1906, and LL. B., 1912. He taught In 
the Mobile military institute, 1906-09; principal 
Grove Hill academy, 1901-11; principal Clarke 
County high school. 1912-13; after which latter 
date he entered upon the practice of law. Au- 
thor: "A history of Clarke County." He is a 
Democrat. Methodist and Mason. Unmarried. 
Residence: Mobile. 

McLEOD. NORMAN BURNS, Methodist mln- 
ister, was born November 11, 1885, at Salitpa, 
Clrrke Countv; son of Lionel Erastus and Mary 
Elizabeth (Walte) McLeod; grandson of Henry 
Waters and Matilda (Chapman) Waite of Neal- 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1138 



ton, and of John and Christian (Calhoun) 
McLeod of Jackson; great-grandson of Neal and 
Nancy (Calhoun) McLeod of Richmond or 
Cumberland County, N. C, but who removed to 
Clarke County prior to 1822. The McLeods 
immigrated to America in 1792, from the Isle 
of Skye. Many Methodist and Baptist minis- 
ters in Alabama have sprung from the original 
immigrant pair. Rev. Mr. McLeod was edu- 
cated in the public schools and the Agricultural 
school at Jackson; graduated at Auburn with 
the degree of B. S., 1907, winner of society 
declamation medal, sophomore and Junior 
medals, class orator, editor-in-chief of "Orange 
and Blue," 1st corporal, sergeant, major and 
adjutant; graduated at Vanderbilt university, 
June, 1913, with degree of Bachelor of Divinity; 
entered ministry of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. South, 1908, and has served as pastor 
and supply minister of Greene Circuit, Selma, 
Montgomery, Hattiesburg, Miss., and Phoenix 
City. He held the chair of history in Seventh 
district agricultural school, Albertville. He is 
a Mason and a member of Tau Kappa Alpha 
college fraternity. Unmarried. Residence: 
Nashville, Tenn. 

Molester, JOSEPH, banker, nerchant, was 
born July 27, 1848, at North Port, Tuscaloosa 
County, and died April 26, 1896, at Birming- 
ham; son of James Augusta and Jane (Simon- 
ton) McLesterv who lived at North Port, the 
former a native of North Carolina, who came 
to Alabama early in the history of the state, 
and became a merchant at North Port for many 
years; grandson of James and Nancy (Tomp- 
kins) McLester, who lived in Lauderdale 
County, the former a captain in the Tenth 
North Carolina regiment. Revolutionary Army; 
sreat-grandson of Joseph McLester, bom in 
Scotland in 1730, who came to America as a 
child with his father Joseph McLester. The 
family name was originally McAlester, form- 
erly of the Scotch clan, Alester or MacAlester. 
Mr. McLester attended the North Port academy, 
and a school in Tuscaloosa, until he entered the 
University of Alabama. He was a member of 
the cadet corps at the university which opposed 
Croxton's raiders in 1865, and after the war 
was over, completed his college course at Wash- 
ington and Lee university, under the adminis- 
tration of Qen, Robert E. Lee, graduating in 
1869. On returning from college, he became 
cashier of the First national bank of Tusca- 
loosa, and treasurer of the Alabama insane 
hospital, for eight years. In 1881, he moved 
to Birmingham, and became a member of the 
wholesale grocery firm of McLester and Van 
Hoose, in which business he continued until 
his death. He was a Democrat and a Pres- 
byterian. Married: November 10, 1875, in 
Carrollton, Miss., to Nannie, daughter of 
James and Martha (Hudson) Somerville, who 
lived at Memphis, Tenn., and Carrollton, 
Miss.; granddaughter of Dr. James Somerville, 
who came to Tuscaloosa from Virginia. The 
first James Somerville of Virginia emigrated 
from Scotland to this country, and was a de- 
scendant of Lord Somerville, who in turn was 
descended from Baron Somerville, who accom- 
panied William the Conqueror to England, and 



fought at the conquest. Children: 1. James 
Somerville, was graduated from the University 
of Alabama, A. B., and from the University of 
Virginia, M. D., 1899, was resident physician 
at the Philadelphia polyclinic hospital, now 
a physician in Birmingham, m. Ada Bowron; 
2. Janie, m. R. E. Meade, Birmingham; 8. Dora, 
m. Paul E. Chalifaux, Birmingham; 4. Susie, 
m. R. E. Hawkins, Birmingham. Last resi- 
dence: Birmingham. 

McLURE, JOHN R., educator, superintendent 
of city schools of Troy. 

McMATH, WILLIAM MALCHIJAH, lawyer, 
was born February 17, 1848, In Jefferson 
County, and died November 5, 1878, in Ck>lum- 
biana; son of John Duncan and Martha Ann 
(Thomas) McMath, who lived in Shelby 
County, near Montevallo, the former a native 
of Tuscaloosa County, who served in the C. S. 
Army; grandson of William Malchijah and 
Sarah (Davidson) McMath, who lived near 
Green Pond, Tuscaloosa County, and ot Wil- 
liam and Melinda (Moore) Thomas, of Jeffer- 
son County; great-grandson of William Mal- 
chijah McMath who moved from (Georgia to 
Alabama and settled near Oreen Pond, and 
of (George and Elizabeth (Cother) Thomas, who 
lived in Tuscaloosa County. The McMaths came 
from Ayrshire, Scotland, about 1700, and set- 
tled in South Carolina, later moving to 
Qeorgia. Mr. McMath received his early 
schooling at Montevallo, and attended the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, 1863-1865. An honorary 
diploma was granted him by the university. 
May 13, 1914. He studied law and was ad- 
mitted to the bar, January 16, 1873, and prac- 
ticed in Columbiana and the courts of Ala- 
bama. He was a member of the State legis- 
lature, 1876-1877. He was a private in Co. 
C, Alabama corps of cadets, C. S. Army, 1863- 
1865, in the battalion commanded l^y Col. 
James T. Murfee. He was a Democrat, and 
a member of the State executive committee; 
was a Baptist; and a Mason. Married: De- 
cember 20, 1870, near Montevallo, to Drusilla, 
daughter of Philip Denton and Martha Jane 
(Richardson) Meroney, of Shelby County; 
granddaughter of Lloyd and Alice (Edwards) 
Meroney, and of Charles and Mafy Ann Rich- 
ardson, who came to Alabama when the 
Indians occupied the state; great-granddaugh- 
ter of Philip De Loucy and Martha (Semmes) 
O'Meroney, the former who came from Dub- 
lin, Ireland, to Maryland before the Revolu- 
tion, who organized and equipped his own 
regiment, the First Maryland battalion of 
the flying corps, at the beginning of the War 
for Independence, and as captain of that com- 
mand served throughout the war, following 
Oen. Greene in his campaign through the Caro- 
linas, and who settled in South Carolina after 
the Revolution. Children: 1. Emmet Meroney, 
b. 1871, d. 1892; 2. William Burwell, b. 1874, 
d. 1906, m. Daisy Canterberry, deceased; 3. 
Anna Ethel, b. 1877, m. 1907, Robert Benjamin 
Dawson, Patton. Last residence: Columbiana. 

McMillan, benjamin franklin, mer- 
chant, was born March 21, 1841, at Monroe- 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Tille; son of Murdoc and Celia Ann (Salter) 
Molftillan, the former a North Carolinian, who 
moved to Monroeville, and in 1842, to Stockton, 
Baldwin County, and was a member of the 
home guard in the War of Secession; grandson 
of Malcolm and Margaret (Smith) McMillan, 
of North Carolina, and of John and Catherine 
(McMillan) Salter, who llyed at Monroeyille 
and Stockton, and at Pensacola, Fla.;' great- 
grandson of Archibald McMillan, and his wife, 
formerly a Miss Murphy, who about 1760, emi- 
grated from the highlands of Scotland, and set- 
tled in Richmond County, N. C. Mr. McMillan 
was educated in the common schools, and has 
liyed the greater part of his life in Stockton* 
He senred as first corporal In Co. O, Wirt 
Adams' cavalry, C. S. Army, throughout the 
War of Secession; engaged in merchandising 
in 1867; and in 1872 added the sawmill busi- 
ness. In 1901, he was representative from 
Baldwin County in the constitutional convention 
of Alabama. He is a Democrat; a Presbyterian; 
and a Mason. Married: June 11, 1872, in Mobile, 
to Annie Darrington, daughter of Duncan 
Witten and Sarah Darrington (Carter) Mur^ 
phy, of Mobile, the former who went in 
1849 to California and prospered, was elected 
speaker of the house of representatives in 1852 
of California, and on his return to California 
from a visit to Alabama, died of yellow fever; 
granddaughter of Qoy. John Murphy (q. v.). 
Children: 1. Sue Danner, m. Orrie W. Byrne; 
2. Murdoc Murphy, m. Lillie Crosby; 3. Ben- 
jamin Franklin, m. Ella Pickens; 4. Anne Dar- 
rington, m. Dr. J. Hamilton Hastie; 5. John, 
m. Annie May Hastie; 6. Duncan William, de- 
ceased; 7. Darrington, deceased. Residence: 
Stockton. 

McMillan, lee, business man, legislator 
and member constitutional convention 1901, 
was born January 12, 1865, at (3ee's Bend, Wil- 
cox County; son of James A. and Emma Jane 
(Heath) McMillan, the former of Dinwiddle 
County, Va., who came to (Jee's Bend in early 
life; grandson of James and Mary (Haley) 
McMillan, of Prince Cteorge County, Va., and 
of Albert and Elizabeth (Cooper) Heath, of 
(Georgia. He was educated in the schools of 
Rehoboth, Wilcox County; has been successfully 
a farmer, merchant, and banker; from 1890 
to 1892 was editor of the •'Wilcox Program," 
at Camden; represented Wilcox County in the 
general assembly of 1901; member of the con- 
stitutional convention of 1901; mayor of Qas- 
tonburg, 1901-1905; member of the county 
board of education for many years; and was 
re-elected to the legislature of 1907; for fifteen 
or twenty years served as member of his 
county executive committee; also has been a 
delegate to several state conventions. He is 
a Democrat; Methodist; and a Mason. Mar- 
ried: October 18, 1886, at Rehoboth, to Pearl 
Omega» daughter of John H. and Fannie (Moss) 
Malone. Children: 1. Emmet Erie; 2. Edwin 
Lee; 3. Cecil Malone. Residence: Oastonburg. 

McMillan, THOMAS M., 33rd degree Hon- 
orary Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. 

McMILLION, LEMUEL G., teacher, public 
official, was born in 1794, in Pendleton District, 



S. C, and died August 29, 1865, in Jefferson 
County. He came from South Carolina to 
Jonesboro, in 1819, and was a school teacher 
at the latter place for more than twenty years, 
during which time he compiled a spelling book 
of a superior kind. He was for ten years a 
member of the State legislature from Jefferson 
Ck>unty, and was a strict Democrat, alwasra 
voting the party ticket He was major of CoL 
Frazier's regiment, which marched into the 
Oeek country in 1836. He had been out of 
public life many years before his death. Mar- 
ried: Miss Freeland. One of his daughters 
married Dr. Gilbert T. Deason, of Jefferson 
County, who represented Jefferson and Shelby 
Counties in the State senate, 1865-1867. Last 
residence: Jefferson (bounty. 

MoMORRIS, BOLING KAVANAUGH, lawyer, 
circuit Judge, and soldier, was bom March 12, 
1872, at Wetumpka, Elmore County; son of 
Charles Kincaid and Mary Elizabeth (Kav- 
anaugh) McMorris (q. v.). He was educated 
in the public and private schools of his native 
town and graduated from the U. S. naval acad- 
emy, 1894, member of the engineering division, 
standing second in the division of thirteen 
members. Upon receiving his commission as 
assistant engineer in the U. S. navy he was 
sent with Assistant Engineer J. M. Hudgins, 
U. S. Navy, to take a special course in mechan- 
ical and electrical engineering, at the (Antral 
technical college of the city and guilds of 
London institute, London, England, and re- 
mained there from 1896 to the outbreak of 
the Spanish-American War, 1898. He was an 
officer, in the line division, U. S. Navy, trona. 
that time to early in 1901 when he resigned. 
He was one of three officers to receive the 
cruiser "Amazonas'' from Brazil, from which 
country that vessel was purchased by the United 
States, at Gravesend, England, in the spring 
of 1898, and served on that vessel which was 
renamed the "New Orleans" during the Span- 
ish-American War. He was a naval cadet, 
U. S. Navy, 1890-96; assistant engineer, U. 8. 
Navy, 1896-99; lieutenant. Junior grade, U. S. 
Navy, 1899-1901; served on the U. S. ships; 
Ck>lumbia, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Helena, 
U. S. fish commission steamer. Albatross; 
cruised gS the coasts and in the waters of the 
United States, England, (3ermany, Gulf of 
Mexico, Carribean Sea, Sandwich Islands, South 
Sea Islands of Pacific, Japan, China and the 
I'hilippine Islands. He was captain, Ck>. I, Ala- 
bama National Guard in 1904. He read law 
privately and was admitted to the bar in 1905. 
Upon resigning from the navy he returned to 
Wetumpka, but in 1913 located in Birmingham. 
May, 1916, he was elected grand keeper of the 
record and seals of the grand lodge of Ala- 
bama, Knights of Pythias, but in September 
when the disorders along our Mexican border 
broke out he Joined the First Alabama cavalry 
regiment, in which he was commissioned major. 
He served with that regiment stationed at San 
Antonio, Texas, December 12, 1916, to March 
21, 1917. Later this regiment was transformed 
into field artillery, October 1, 1917, and sta- 
tioned at (3amp Wheeler, Macon, Cku The 
regiment went overseas but did not see active 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1135 



service on account of the armistice and the 
end of the European War. In December, 1919, 
he was appointed Judge of the 19th Judicial 
circuit, and on May 11, 1920, he was nom* 
inated in the primaries as his own successor. 
He is a Democrat; Methodist; Mason; Odd 
Fellow; Knight of Pythias; Red Man. Unmar- 
ried. Residence: Wetumpka. 

McMORRIS. CHARLES KINCAID, county 
treasurer, sherift and merchant, was bom 
March 5, 1835, at Lafayette, Chambers County, 
and died December 6, 1912, at Wetumpka; son 
of Spencer James and Margaret (Kincaid) 
McMorris, the former a native of Newberry 
District, S. C, who located at Wetumpka where 
he was a Universalist preacher, and the author 
of treatises on that denomination; grandson 
of Capt John and Nancy (Morgan) McMorries, 
of Fairfield District, S. C; great-grandson of 
Major Spencer Morgan of Spring Hill, and 
Newberry, S. C, a senator from that district 
in the South Carolina legislature, IB08-12. The 
McMorries family, although coming to Amer- 
ica from Ireland in 1768, was of Scotch origin. 
The founders, brothers, William and John, both 
fought in the American Revolution under Gen. 
Francis Marion. The "e" was dropped from 
the name by Mr. McMorris' father. He was 
in the mercantile business at Wetumpka, from 
1870 to 1883; deputy collector of internal 
revenue from 1866 to 1870; sheriff of Elmore 
County, 1884-88; city clerk of Wetumpka, 
1889-92; treasurer of Elmore County, 1892-1912, 
having served five full terms, and was holding 
the place to which he had first been re-elected 
at the time of his death. He entered the Con- 
federate Army as a Private in Co. I, "Wetump- 
ka Light Guards," Third Alabama infantry regi- 
ment and served throughout the four years 
of the War of Secession in that command. He 
was a Democrat prior to 1892, and a Populist 
from that date to 1896 at which time he re- 
turned to the former party. He was a Bap- 
tist and a Mason. Married: July 26, 1866, 
at Wetumpka, to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of 
Henry G. and Harriet S. (Young) Kavanaugh, 
who lived in Montgomery and Elmore coun- 
ties; granddaughter of Bernard and Dorothy 
Young of Amelia County, Va. Children: 1. 
Spencer James, Jr., m. Annie Robinson, daugh- 
ter of Horatio H. Robinson, Confederate sol- 
dier, Wetumpka; 2. Charles Gentry, Wetump- 
ka; 3. Nora Lee, m. Louis G. Johnson, 
Wetumpka; 4. Boling Kavanaugh (q. v.); 5. 
Margaret Kincaid, m. Frank B. McCaskey, 
Wetumpka. Last residence: Wetumpka. 

McMURRAY, FRANCIS, major, 23rd Ala- 
bama infantry regiment, C. S. Army. 

McNAMEE, JAMBS MONROE, banker and 
Jeweler, was bom in Lee County, April 9, 1838, 
and died in Opelika, January 1, 1902; son of 
Thomas and Mary (Curran) McNamee, ot Innis- 
killen, Fennimaugh County, Ireland, who emi- 
grated to Quebec, 1830, removed to New York 
City, thence to Dahlonega, Ga., about 1833, and 
to Lafajrette, about 1843. His education was 
obtained In the log-house schools of Opelika 
and Lafayette and his businesB training was 



acquired in commercial pursuits. He was a 
Jeweler, until about 1870, when he was made 
president of the Bank of Opelika. He was a 
private in Co. I, 37th Alabama infantry 
regiment, C. S. Army. He was a Demo- 
crat; Mason; Knight of Honor; and a Meth- 
odist. Married: (1) Leah Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of William Hampton and Rosanna Jane 
(Machen) Anderson, the former of Columbia, 
the latter, from Newberry, S. C; (2) Rowena, 
daughter of John Heywood and Catherine 
(Glaze) Frazer, of Harris County, Ga. The 
Anderson and Machen families are of Revolu- 
tionary ancestry, including among others the 
Wade Hamptons, of South Carolina. Children: 
by first wife; 1. Mary Ross, m. Daniel Bullard 
Williams, of Opelika; 2. William Thomas, m. 
Maude Russell, of Columbus, Ga.; 3. Anna 
Kathleen, m. James Wilson Roby, now a widow 
and cashier of the Exchange Hotel, Mont- 
gomery; by second wife: 4. James Frazer, m. 

(1) Nellie Bryan, one child, Agnes Rowena, 

(2) name unknown; no children. Last resi- 
dence: Opelika. 

McNEAL, D. H., Methodist minister; mem- 
ber of the Alabama conference. Residence: 
Ozark. 

McNEAL, W. H., Methodist minister, mem- 
ber of the Alabama conference. Residence: 
Troy. 

McNEEL, ALBERT WILLIAMS, merchant 
and postmaster, was born October 1, 1822, in 
Yorkville, York District, S. C, and died May 
1, 1886, in Autaugaville; son of Tinas, Jr. and 
Anne (Morrow) McNeel, of Yorkville, S. C; 
grandson of Tinas McNeel of Scotland, who 
Immigrated to South Carolina. 1790. He re- 
moved with his parents, in 1837, to Wetumpka, 
where they lived and died, and was educated in 
the common schools of that place. He began 
merchandising at an early age. Later he re- 
moved to Montevallo, going to Vernon Land- 
ing, Autauga County, on the Alabama River. 
Here he carried on an extensive trade with the 
great plantations of that region, by means of 
freight facilities of the great steamboats that 
plied between Mobile and Wetumpka. Later the 
Autauga cotton factory formed the nucleus 
for Autaugaville. The citizens of Vernon re- 
moved in a body to that place and he became 
postmaster, which position he held until his 
death. He was a Mason; an Odd Fellow; a 
Good Templar; and Ku-Klux; and a Methodist. 
Married: (1) Miss Stoudenmire; (2) to Ann 
Louisa Houser, widow of William Whetstone. 
Children: by the first wife: 1. Tynus, m. Alice 
(]k)dbold; by the second wife: 2. Andrew H., 
m. Minnie Allen; 3. Frank J., m. Mattie Wil- 
kinson; 4. John, m. Ida Shackleford; 5. Bessie 
M., m. William Howard; 6. Jessie G., m. Joseph 
Atkins; 7. Fannie H., m. W. H. Hart, of Cam- 
den. Last residence: Autaugaville^ 

MoNEEL, ANDREW HALL, business man, 
was born February 14, 1855, in Autaugaville; 
son of Albert W. and Ann L. McNeel, of 
Autauga County, the former a merchant; 
grandson of Tinas and Anne (Morrow) 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



McNeel, of Scotch-Irish descent, who settled in 
Torkville, S. C, in 1780, moved to Alabama in 
1837, settling near Wetumpka, and later mov- 
ing to Autauga County, and of Louis and 
Sophie (Stoudenmire) Houser, who came from 
Holland to Orangeburg, S. C, in 1780, who 
moved to Wetumpka in 1837, and afterwards 
moved to Autauga County where they formed 
the Dutch Bend colony, and became Successful 
planters. Mr. McNeel was reared and edu- 
cated in Autauga County, and went to Mont^ 
gomery in 1872, entering the office of Whet- 
stone, Sistrunk and company. After that firm 
went out of business, he became connected with 
Allen, Bethune and company, as Junior partner 
in the cotton business. The firm is now known 
as the Mutual warehouse company, and Mr. 
McNeel is its secretary and treasurer. He is 
ruling elder in the First Presbjrterian church, 
Montgomery. Married: January 21, 1879, in 
Columbus, Ga., to Minnie E., daughter of 
Augustus Massillon and Sallie (Bellinger) 
Allen. Children: 1. Millie Louise, d. in in- 
fancy; 2. Allen Massillon, b. March 4, 1882, in 
Montgomery, was graduated with honors from 
the Alabama polytechnic institute, 1902, is 
assistant to the general manager of the Teague 
hardware company, Montgomery. Residence: 
Montgomery. 

McNEEL, JOHN D., lawyer, was born Octo- 
ber 13, 1871, at Bullock's Creek, York County, 
S. C; son of O. L. and Mary Ellen (Davidson) 
McNeel, the former a native of Fishing Creek, 
Chester County, S. C, who lived at Yorkvllle, 
S. C, saw hospital service in the War of Seces- 
sion, and was a member of the South Carolina 
legislature; grandson of Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Rainey) McNeel, of Fishing Creek, S. C, the 
former who came from Scotland to Pennsylva- 
nia, and later moved to South Carolina, and of 
John GiUis and Jane (Hamilton) Davidson, of 
Bullock's Creek, S. C, the former a Confederate 
soldier; great-great-grandson of David Hamil- 
ton, who came from Scotland before the Revo- 
lution, lived at Little York, Pa., between 1760 
and 1765, then moved to York District, east of 
Broad River, S. C, and of William Kennedy 
of Union County, S. C, a soldier in the Revo- 
lution. Mr. McNeel attended Davidson col- 
lege, North Carolina, 1888-1889; South Caro- 
lina university at Columbia, 1889-1891, grad- 
uating in the latter years with the degree 
of A. B.; Johns Hopkins university, Mary- 
land, 1891-1894; and was graduated from 
the University of Virginia, B. L., 1895. He is 
an attorney; was clerk of the court of Talla- 
dega County, 1906-1909; served as private sec- 
retary to Oov. Comer, 1911, and filled that po- 
sition for a few months with Gov. O'Neal, 1913; 
and in 1914 was appointed U. S. collector of 
internal revenue tax for the district of Ala- 
bama and Mississippi by President Wilson, 
1914. He is a Democrat; a Presbjrterian; and 
an Elk. Married: October 27, 1897, at Robin- 
son Springs, to Adele, daughter of Albert 
Taylor and Priscilla Cooper (Tyler) Goodwyn 
(q. V.) of Robinson Springs; granddaughter of 
Albert Gallatin and Harriet (Bibb) Goodwyn, 
the former a descendant of Capt. James Taylor 
of the Revolutionary Army, the latter the niece 



of Alabama's first two governors, and of Robert 
and Priscilla (Cooper) Tyler (Q. v.). Children: 
1. Letitia Tyler; 2. Hulda. Residence: Bir- 
mingham. 

McNBELY, DAVID, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 76, and a resident of Madison 
County; private Virginia Continental Line and 
Militia; enrolled on June 13, 1888, under act 
of Congress of June 7, 1832, pajrment to date 
from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $30.77; 
sums received to date of publication of list, 
%92,Z1.— Revolutionary Pension Roll, in voL 
xiv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st seas., 1833-34. 

MCNEILL, DANIEL ARCHIBALD, teacher, 
was born March 9, 1877, near Sylacauga, Tal- 
ladega County; son of Jasper Newton and 
Susan Daniel (Keahey) McNeill, the former a 
native of Talladega, now Clay County; grand- 
son of Archie and Effle (McFatter) McNeill, 
who moved from North Carolina to Alabama, 
and of Daniel and Elizabeth (Brown) Keahey, 
who also came from North Carolina to Ala- 
bama. He was educated in the common schools 
of Clay and Talladega Counties, and was grad- 
uated from Lineville college, A. B., 1899. He 
taught school for two years before his gradua- 
tion; was elected secretary of Lineville col- 
lege, two years; served as principal of a pub- 
lic school at Fitzpatrick, five years; as presi- 
dent of Lineville college, one year; resigned 
that position to accept the superintendency of 
the city schools of Talladega in 1906; and held 
the last mentioned office until he became 
county superintendent of education of Talla- 
dega County. He is a Democfat; chairman of 
the board of deacons in the Presbyterian 
church; and past consul commander of the 
Woodmen of the World. Married: February 
10, 1901, in Lineville, to Hirsch Lucile, daugh- 
ter of Christopher B. and Matilda (Gtoton) 
Nichols, of that place. Children: 1. Helen 
Gray, b. September 25, 1906. Residence: Tal- 
ladega. 

MoNEILL, HAMILCAR HANNIBAL, Metho- 
dist minister, was bom September 4, 1852, near 
Pine Level, Montgomery County; son of Han- 
nibal and Susan (Eubank) McNeill, the former 
a native of near Pine Level, where his par- 
ents settled in 1815; grandson of James and 
Jane Raford (Smilie) McNeill, who came to 
Alabama from North Carolina, settling first on 
Line Creek, near Montgomery, 1813, and of 
John and Susan (Moore) Eubank, who came 
from MiUedgeville, Ga., to Pine Level, the lat- 
ter a half-sister of David Dixon, the (Georgia 
cotton-planter; great-grandson of Gen. Malcolm 
McNeill, an officer in the Revolution, whose fa- 
ther came to America from Scotland and set- 
tled in Edgecombe County, N. C; great-great- 
grandson of Robert Raford who married Miss 
Pickett. The Picketts and Rafords were from 
England. Mr. McNeill was educated in private 
schools, and in the high school at Pine Level. 
He became a minister in the Alabama confer- 
ence, Methodist Episcopal church, South; was 
ordained an elder in 1874; Joined the confer- 
ence in December, 1888, at Mobile; has served 
as pastor in churches at Clajrton, one year; 



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ALBERT P. BUSH 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1139 



Pensacola, Pla., three years; Dothan, three 
years; PrattYille, four years; Mobile, four 
years; Opelika; and is now pastor of the 
church at Marianna, Fla. He instituted a re- 
form moYement in Pensacola, Pla., 1897, and 
organized and led the fight for prohibition and 
law enforcement in Mobile, 1907-1909. He has 
written tracts and newspaper articles on the 
liquor traffic, law-enforcement, and good goy- 
emment. He is a Democrat and a Mason. Mar- 
ried: November 10, 1875, in Montgomery 
County, to Missouri, daughter of James An- 
derson and Harriet (Trotter) SeUers, who 
lived at Union Academy, Montgomery County. 
Children: 1. Lillie, m. Henry Edward Qipson, 
lawyer, Prattville; 2. Guillo Grove, timber 
merchant, Slidell, La.; 3. Stanton Sellers, de- 
partment store, LaGrange, Ga.; 4. Laura Eu- 
bank, m. William Leslie Denham, architect. 
Mobile; 5. Hamilcar Hannibal, lawyer. Resi- 
dence: Marianna, Pla. 

McNUTT, HUGH M., business man and ac- 
countant Residence: Birmingham. 

MCPHERSON, JOHN, farmer, member seces- 
sion convention, 1861. was bom March 6. 1796, 
at PayetteviUe, N. C, and died and was buried 
at Sandy Ridge church, near Pt. Deposit; son 
of William and Christian (McDonald) McPher- 
s<m, a native of Scotland, who came to America 
and located in North Carolina. He received 
a common school education in the country 
schools; became a farmer, and served as county 
commissioner. He was a member of the con- 
stitutional convention held in Montgomery in 
1861, was a Democrat, and strong advocate of 
secession. He was an elder in the Presby- 
terian church. Married: in 1825, in Marion 
District, S. C, to Mary Bethune. . He had no 
children. Last residence: Greenville. 

McQUEEN, JOHN, lawyer, circuit solicitor, 
and legislator, was bom Pebruary 9, 1863, in 
Darlington, S. C; son of John and Sarah E. 
r Pickens) McQueen, the former a native of 
Robeson County, N. C, who emigrated to Ben- 
nettsvUle, Marlboro District, S. C. Where he 
read law and practiced that profession, con- 
ducting planting interests, was a member of the 
U. S. congress for fourteen years, and for four 
years a member of the congress of the Con- 
federate States of America; grandson of 
James McQueen and wife, a Miss McRae, the 
former a native of Scotland, who early in life 
emigrated to America, settling in Robeson 
County, N. C, where he became an extensive 
planter; and of Col. Joseph Pickens, and wife, 
a Biliss Calhoun, of Butaw; great-great nephew 
of Plora McDonald, who saved the life of 
Charles the Pretender, and a lineal descendant 
of Robert Bruce; great-great-grandson at Gen. 
Andrew Pickens of South Carolina, a Revolu- 
tionary officer of great distinction. Mr. Mc- 
Queen received his preparatory education in the 
common schools of Eutaw, and attended the law 
department of the University of Alabama, 
1882-83, graduating with honors. He located 
In Jasper and was elected solicitor of Walker 
County, holding that office for a year and a 
half. Later he practiced in partnership with 
Col. G, W. Hewitt, at Jasper, but in 1890 re- 



moved to Birmingham and formed a partner- 
ship with Col. J. J. Altman; was elected to 
represent Jefferson County in the legislature, 
1892, and was re-elected 1894-96, and 1897-98; 
made assistant prosecuting attorney for Jef- 
ferson County, 1898, filling that place for three 
years, resigning to resume the practice; and 
was elected solicitor of the tenth Judicial cir- 
cuit, 1904. He is a Mason. Marrtetf : in Mont- 
gomery, to Caroline Beale. Children: 1. Jesse 
Beale. Residence: Birmingham. 

McQueen, JOSBPH p., lawyer, planter, was 
bom June 22, 1854, in Greene County, and died 
January 20, 1904; son of John and Sarah E. 
(Pickens) McQueen, and brother of John Mc- 
Queen (q. v.). He received his early educa- 
tion in the common schools of North and South 
Carolina and after the death of his father re- 
moved, with his mother, to Eutaw, where he 
read law under Chancellor James B. Clark. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1875 and began 
practice in Butaw. He was elected to the leg- 
islature of Alabama, for the sessions of 1884- 
1885; was for six years chairman of the Dem- 
ocratic executive committee of Greene County, 
and for some years a member of the State 
executive committee of his party. Married: 
December, 1875, to Roberta, daughter of Robert 
and Anna (Parker) Kirksey of Marengo Coun- 
ty. ChUdren: 1. Anna; 2. John; 8. Joseph P., 
Jr.; 4. Robert. Residence: Eutaw. 

McQueen, peter, creek Chief. See Indian 
chiefs and associated characters. 

MCQUEEN, STEWART, Episcopal clergyman, 
was bom October 15, 1857, at "Scotch Glen? 
?«7%^rf® p^J^^y^ Fla-; son of James Archibald 
^ aImW ^?^^^^ McQueen; grandson 
of Archibald and Eliza Prances (Moore) Doug- 
lass, of Lowndesboro. This branch of the A^- 
Queen family came to America from Scotland 
in 1740 and settled In Robeson County, N. C 
Rev. Mr. McQueen attended the community 
school of Lowndesboro, and graduated from 
1^1 S^u°*o department of the University of 
ih! ?kS!?' pw^e«' Tenn., in 1878, and from 
the theological department in 1881. He was 
made deacon that year and priest the year fol- 
lowing, and was rector of the Episcopal church 
at Decatur, 1881-83; Marlon, im-Slt Qeo^l 
town, S. C, 1887-92; Durham, N. C, 189M4. 
Goldsboro, N. C, 1894-97; Church of the Holy 
Comforter, Montgomery, since 1897. He was 
president of the standing committee of the 
diocese of Alabama, 1908-1916; deputy to four 
SSl?®^ ^^^^®^^^^» manager and editor of 
•The Church Record," the official organ of the 
diocese. He is a Bfason; Knight Templar; and 
a member of the Thirteen club. Married: No- 
vjonber 1, 1888, at "The Forrest," near Natchex, 
Miss., to Virginia, daughter of Richard Field 
5J? Mary (Williams) Dunbar, of that place. 
Children: 1. Douglass, Birmingham: 2. Marv 
Residence: Montgomery. 

McRAE, COLIN JOHN, Confederate finan- 
cial agent, was bom October 22, 1812, at Sneeds- 
S?^?; J^^9' ^^^ *^^ February, 1877, in Bellae, 
British Honduras; son of John and Elisabeth 
Mary McRae, natives respectively, of Sneeds- 



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PICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



boro and Anson County, N. C, and residents 
later of Winchester and Pascagoula, Miss., and 
of Mobile. He received a careful preparatory 
education at the hands of tutors and later at- 
tended the Catholic college, Biloxi, Miss. He 
was a cotton commission merchant at Mobile; 
general of militia and member Mississippi legis- 
lature in 1838; elected delegate to the pro- 
visional congress of the Southern States and 
upon the termination of this service was com- 
missioned financial agent of the Confederate 
government and sent to Europe by President 
Davis in the performance of his difficult duties. 
After the close of the War of Secession he 
emigrated to Spanish Honduras, where, in part- 
nership with the brother of Hon. J. P. Benja- 
min, he entered the mercantile business. He 
was a Democrat, and a Presbyterian* Last 
residence: Belize, British Honduras. 

McREE, HUGH CLARK, physician, was bom 
November 2, 1875, at Soddy, Hamilton County, 
Tenn.; son of Robert Clark and Mary Ann 
(Anderson) McRee, the former a native of 
Soddy, who lived at that place sixty-five years, 
was a captain in the C. S. Army, studied law 
after the war, practiced law in Chattanooga, 
Tenn., was elected probate judge of Hamilton 
County, 1880-1888, was appointed member of 
the staff of Gov. Buchanan in 1890, resided in 
New Mexico for eight years, and returned to 
Soddy, Tenn.; grandson of Robert Clark and 
Jane (Brooks) McRee, of Soddy, Tenn., and of 
Josiah McEntyre and Nancy (Lamb> Ander- 
son, who lived at Delphi, Sequachie C!ounty, 
Tenn.; great-grandson of William, and Jane 
(Craighead) McRee, who came to America, the 
former from north Scotland and the latter from 
north Ireland, and settled in Mecklenburg 
County, N. C. He attended the public schools 
at Soddy, Tenn., and was graduated from the 
University of Nashville, M. D., 1898. He be- 
gan the practice of medicine at Whitwell, 
Marion County, Tenn., and remained at that 
place four years, then moved to Hartselle, 
where he continued his profession. He is now 
located at Decatur. He is a Democrat and a 
Presbyterian. Married: January 31, 1899, at 
Whitwell, Tenn., to May Amanda, daughter 
of Samuel La Fayette and Margaret Lucy 
(Williamson) Pryor, of that place; granddaugh- 
ter of William and Amanda (Prigmore) Pryor, 
the former a captain in the U. S. Army, and of 
R. Mlziel and Eliza (Talliaferro) Williamson, 
who lived at Turmell Hill, Ga. Children: 1. 
Hugh Clark. Jr., d. in infancy at Whitwell, 
Tenn*; 2. Gladys, d. in infancy, at Whitwell, 
Tenn.; 8. William Milton, b. September 14, 
1903; 4. Robert Pryor, b. June 17, 1905. Resi- 
dence: Decatur. 

MoSPADDEN, SAMUEL KING, lawyer, chan- 
cellor, was born November 12, 1823, in Warren 
Ck>un^, Tenn., and died May 3, 1896, at Cen- 
ter; son of Rev. Samuel and Rebecca (Donald- 
son) McSpadden, natives, respectively, of Vir- 
ginia and North Carolina, the former one of 
the founders and early ministers in the Cum- 
berland Presbyterian church. His educational 
advantages were limited, and when he was six- 
teen years old he was apprenticed to a saddler. 
He worked at that business until in January, 



1842, when he came to Alabama. He worked 
in Lebanon, Portersville, MackBfB tan-yard, 
and in Talladega, 1842-1850, and in the mean- 
time, having read law under Hon. Samuel F. 
Rice, was admitted to the bar, 1848. He began 
the practice of law in Center, in partnership 
with George S. Walden, 1860; was elected a 
brigadier general of militia, in 1866; was 
elected to the State senate, defeating CoL Clif- 
ton, 1857; and was reelected in 1860, over A. 
L. Woodlief. While he was a member of the 
senate, he enlisted in the C. S. Army aa a 
private, and was appointed major of the Nine- 
teenth Alabama regiment at its organisation. 
In 1862, on the return of the army from Ken- 
tucky, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel, 
and at Tullahoma, was promoted to eoloneL 
He commanded the Nineteenth at Murfreea- 
boro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Dalton, 
and Resaca, and in the latter battle was cap- 
tured. May, 1864, and taken to Johnson's Is- 
land, where he was detained until March, 1866. 
In 1866, he was elected chancellor of the north- 
ern division, and held that office until dis- 
placed by congress under the reconstruction 
measures. He retired to his law practice in 
Center, until again made chancellor in 1886. 
He was elected to the State senate in 1882, 
and resigned from that body in order to accept 
the chancellorship. In November, 1886, when 
the term which he had been appointed to fill 
had expired, he was regularly elected dian- 
cellor for the ensuing term of six years. He 
was a Presb3rterian and a Mason. Married: 
June 14, 1864, at Center, to cniarlotte Ann, 
daughter of Gen. John H. Garrett. Children: 
1. Lulu, m. H. W. Cardon of Center. Last 
residence: Center. 

McSWEAN, COLIN, major, 39th Alabama in- 
fantry regiment, C. S. Army. 

McTYER, JOHN FULMORE, farmer and leg- 
islator, was born February 6, 1849, in Marl- 
boro County. S. C; son of Robert Adair and 
Caroline H. (Fulmore) McTyer, the former 
a native of South Carolina who removed to 
Eufaula; grandson of Andrew and Agnes Ful- 
more, of Robeson County, N. C. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools of Eufaula and 
at the Bingham school in North (Carolina, but 
was not graduated. In 1864 he enlisted in 
Kolb's battery, C. S. Army, and served a few 
months before the close of the war. Since 1873 
he has been a farmer in Barbour County. In 
1902 he was elected to the legislature from 
Barbour County. He is a Democrat; and a 
Presbyterian. Married: (1) in 1876, to Eva, 
daughter of Judge B. B. Fields; (2) November 
19, 1890, to Lizzie Clyde, daughter of Amos 
and Caroline Thompson, of Columbia, Henry 
County. Children: by first wife, 1. Carrie; 2. 
Fields; 3. Fulmore; by second wife, 4. Stella. 
Residence: Eufaula. 

McTYERIE, HOLLAND NIMMONS, Metho- 
dist bishop, was bom July 28, 1824, in Barnwell 
District, S. C and died at Nashville, Tenn^ 
February 15, 1887; son of John and Eliioibeth 
Amanda (Nimmons) McTyer ie, the former of 
Scotch descent, the latter of Irish, residents of 
Edgefield County and Barnwell District, S. C, 



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DICTIONABY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1141 



respectiyely, who removed from the latter place 
to Alabama in 1838; grandson of Andrew and 
Jemima (Montgomery) Nimmons, the former 
a native of Ireland who emigrated to America 
and settled in Barnwell District, S. C, where 
he married about 1800. Bishop McTyerie re* 
ceived his early edncaticm at Cokesbury and 
Collinswood schools; graduated from Randolph- 
Macon college, Va., 1844; and received the hon- 
orary degree of D. D. from Bmory college, 
(hu, 1858; Joined the Virginia conference of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, 1845; ap- 
pointed to serve at Williamsburg, and the next 
year, 1846, he was transferred to Alabama; pas- 
tor St Francis Street church, Mobile, 1846; 
Demopolis, 1847; Columbus, Miss., 1848; New 
Orleans, La., 1848-58; editor of the New Orleans 
"Christian Advocate," 1858. In 1861, at the be- 
ginning of the War of Secession, he was re- 
turned to the Montgomery conference and 
served as pastor of the Court Street Methodist 
church, until 1866, when he was elected a bishop 
of the Methodist Bpiscopal church. South. By 
the terms of the first gift of endowment of 
Cornelius Vanderbilt, he was made first presi- 
dent of Vanderbilt university. Author: "The 
duties of Christian masters," 1851; "A cate- 
chism on church government," 1869; "A cate- 
chism on Bible history," 1869; "A manual of 
discipline," 1870; and a "History of Method- 
ism," 1887. Married: November 8, 1847, in 
Mobile, to Amelia Townsend. Children: 1. 
Mary Gayle, m. Joseph D. Hamilton, Nashville, 
Tenn.; 2. John Townsend, died 1901, unmarried, 
Nashville; 8. Walter Montgomery, died 1911, 
unmarried, Nashville; 4. Amelia, m. Rev. John 
J. Tigert, who was later a Methodist bishop; 6. 
Holland Nimmons, m. Mrs. Kate M. Brown; 6. 
Bmma Jane, m. Proftosor William M. Basker- 
ville, teacher and author, Vanderbilt univer- 
sity. Last residence: Nashville, Tenn. 

MoVAT, HUGH, planter, governor of Ala- 
bama, was bom in 1788, in South Carolina, and 
died in 1851, in Lauderdale County. His far 
ther was a soldier in the Revolutionary Army, 
and a farmer. Mr. McVay was a brother of 
Hon. Zadoc McVay, of Lawrence County. He 
received a limited education, and in 1807 came 
to Alabama and first settled as a planter in 
Madison County. He represented Madison 
County in the territorial legislature of Missis- 
sippi, 1811-1818, and on the formation of Ala- 
bama territory, moved to Lauderdale County, 
1818, representing that county in the conven- 
tion at Huntsville, which framed the State con- 
stitution, 1819. He was elected to the lower 
house of the State legislature, serving from 
1820 to 1825; and was elected to the State 
senate in 1826, and served by successive elec- 
tions until 1844. He was elected president of 
the senate in 1836, defeating Samuel B. Moore, 
by one vote, and in June, 1837, when Qov. Clay 
resigned to become a U. S. senator, discharged 
the duties of executive, by virtue of his office 
as president of the senate, until relieved of its 
duties by the inauguration of Gov. Bagby, in 
December. He was a Democrat; an extensive 
planter; and a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copalian church. Married: Miss Hawks, of 
South Carolina. One of his sons lived near 
Florence. Last residence: Lauderdale County. 



MoVOT, BDGAR CORNELIUS, Methodist 
minister, was bom September 10, 1872, at Sum- 
merfield, Dallas County; son of Alexander Diego 
and Anna Cannon (DuBose) McVoy, the former 
a native of New Jersey, who lived at Auburn, 
Talladega, Mobile and Selma, was president 
of the Centenary female college, Summerfield, 
1872-1880, of the Aberdeen female college, 
Aberdeen, Miss., 1880-1883, of the East Missis- 
sippi female college. Meridian, Miss., 1883- 
1888, of the Mansfield female college, Mans- 
field, La., 1888-1890, taught in the Synodical in- 
stitute, Talladega, 1869, in Peabody institute, 
Auburn, 1870-1872, was chaplain of Fortieth 
Alabama regiment, C. S. Army, during entire 
war, and died April 11, 1903, at San Antonio^ 
Tex.; grandson of Diego and Hannah (Nicoll) 
McVoy, the former a practicing physician of 
Mobile, and of Samuel L. and Mary Ann (Can- 
non) DuBose, who lived at Darlington, S. C. 
On the DuBose side, he was descended from 
Huguenots, and some of his ancestors came 
over on the Mayflower. His great-grandfather 
McVoy helped lay out the city of Mobile. He 
attended schools taught by his father at Sum- 
merdale. Meridian, Miss., and Aberdeen, Miss., 
and was graduated from Southern university. 
A. B., 1891. He received the degree of D. D. 
from that university in June, 1908. Rev. Mc- 
Voy was licensed to preach at Greensboro, No- 
vember, 1889; was admitted on trial at the 
north Texas conference, Methodist Episcopal 
church. South, at Terrell, Tex., November, 1890; 
preached first at Oak Lawn, near Dallas, Tex^ 
1890-1892; pastor, St Jo, Tex., 1893-1894; at 
Alvord, Tex., 1894-1895; Jonesboro, Tenn.. 1896; 
Denver, Colo., 1896; Albany, Mo., 1896-1899; 
ChiUicothe, Mo., 1899-1903; Hannibal, Mc 1903- 
1904; Troost Avenue church, Kansas City, Mo., 
1904-1908; Scruggs Memorial church, St. Louis, 
Mo., 1908-1909; Cabanne church, St. Louis, Mo., 
1909-1910; Oklahoma City, Okla., 1910-1911; 
Highlands church, Birmingham, 1911. He is 
a Democrat and a Mason. Married: December 
2, 1908, at Neosho, Mo., to Ruth, daughter of 
Cassius McLain and Sarah Frances (Kinnear) 
Shartel, who lived at Sedan, Kas. Children: 
1. Cassius, b. September 2, 1909, at Neosho, 
Mo.; 2. Arthur DuBose, b. June 14, 1911, at 
Oklahoma City, Okla. Residence: Birmingham. 

McWHORTBR, ELIPHALET A., major, 6th 
Alabama cavalry, C. S. Army. 

McWHORTER, GEORGE TILGHMAN, phy- 
sician, was bom April 11, 1849, at Riverton, 
Colbert County; son of George Washington and 
Elvira Caroline (Tucker) McWhorter, the for- 
mer a native of Huntsville, a merchant and 
bookkeeper, who lived at Tuscumbia, at East- 
port, Miss., and at Riverton, served as first lieu- 
tenant in the Tuscumbia Rifies, under Capt 
Thomas Cook, in the Seminole War, 1836; 
grandson of Hansell McWhorter, one of the 
eariy emigrants of Madison County, who later 
moved to Lawrence County, and of John and 
Eve Tucker, of Bexar; great-grandson of John 
McWhorier, who served in the Revolutionary 
War as a member of Capt Henderson's com- 
pany. North Carolina rifiemen, and was wound- 
ed at Guilford Court House in 1783, whose 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



father came to America from ScoUand. The 
Tucker ancestors came from York County, 
BngUnd, and setUed In Virginia, and descwid. 
ants of that family moved to North Carolina 
and later to Alabama. He was educated in the 
common schools and in Caledonia high school. 
Mississippi; attended LouisvIUe medical adlege, 
1872 and 1878; began to practice medicine in 
Colbert County, 1873; served as a representa- 
tive from Colbert County in the State legisla- 
ture, 1884-1886; and as State senator from the 
thirty-flrst senatorial district. 1906-1910; was 
twice president of the Colbert County medical 
society; counsellor of the Medical association 
of Alabama; president of the Medical associa- 
tion of Alabama, 1906-1907; member of the 
American medical association; temporary su- 
perintendent of the Alabama sanatorium for 
tuberculosis and consumption; headed the AU- 
bama delegation to the international congress 
on tuberculosis, Washington, D. C. September- 
October, 1908; president at the Colbert County 
branch of the Southern cotton association. 
Dr. McWhorter has published many mono- 
graphs on different diseases. He is a Demo- 
crat; a Baptist; and a Mason. Married: April 
2, 1882, to Mary Susan, daughter of Kibble 
and Miury Anne (Marchbanks) Terry, of River- 
ton, the former a sergeant in the Florida 
Seminole War, 1886; granddaughter of Elijah 
and Adaline (Bankhead) Marchbanks, the for- 
mer who was sheriff at Payette County at one 
time, and a State senator. Children; 1. Mary 
B., m. Jc^n W. Newbem; 2. Roger Barton; 8. 
George Tilghman, Jr.; 4. Zella AbagaU; 6. Su- 
san Duke. Residence: Riverton. 

MCWHORTER, JOHN, soldier of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, aged 70, and a resident of Law- 
rence County; prtvate S. C. Militia; enrolled 
on December 20, 1833, under act of Congress 
of June 7, 1832; payment to date from March 
4, 1881; annual allowance, $80; sums received 
to date of publicaUon of Ust, $200.— Uevolw- 
tionary Pension Roll, in vol. xlv, Sen. doc. 
514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

MABBRRY, GEORGE, soldier of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, aged 82, resided in Bibb County, 
June 1, 1840.— CetwiM of Pensioners, 1841, p. 
149. 

MABRY, ALBERT GALLATIN, physician, 
was born September 7, 1810. near Jerusalem, 
now Courtland. Southampton County, Va., and 
died February 23, 1874, in Selma; son of Rich- 
ard and Polly Braxton (Mabry) Mabry, distant 
relatives, the former a farmer in Southampton 
County, who died when his son was a child; 
grandson of Nathaniel Mabry, who died in 
Greensville County, Va.. and left a will which 
is on record in that county providing that as 
each of his slaves attained the age of twenty- 
flve years, they were to be free and at their lib- 
erty, and setting aside tracts of lands for homes 
for some of them; uncle of Robert Mabry, 
first lieutenant in Capt. James Massie's com- 
pany of the Fifteenth Virginia regiment, which 
marched to Dumfries. Va.. 1777. then to Phila- 
delphia. and on to New Jersey where it Joined 
Gen. Washington's Army, who was commis- 



sioned captain lieutenant in 1779. served as 
sheriff of Southampton County, Va.. in 1799, 
and was one at the gentleman Justices of the 
county, 1802-1806. His ancestors were of Eng- 
lish origin, and were among the early settlers 
of Surry, Brunswick, Greensville and South- 
ampton Counties, Va., and were slave owners 
and land owners. Dr. Mabry left the home 
farm when he was sixteen years old. and went 
to Jerusalem to engage in business. He studied 
medicine imder Dr. William Sharp, and in 
March, 1837, was graduated at the medical de- 
partment of the University of Pennsylvania, 
M. D. He practiced medicine for a year or 
two at Jerusalem, then moved to Whitesville, 
Harris County, Ga., where his half sister. Mrs. 
James Lundy. and his brother, Robert B. Ma- 
bry, lived. He practiced there for several 
years, and early in the year 1843, moved to 
Selma. where he entered a partnership with 
Dr. Drewry Fair, which lasted for many years, 
until Dr. Fair left Selma. He became asso- 
ciated with Dr. James Kent in 1856, and be- 
cause of his failing health, gradually turned 
his practice over to Dr. Kent, until in 1857, 
he retired from the active practice of his pro- 
fession. After the surrender of the C. S. Army, 
Dr. Mabry resumed the practice of medicine 
and was so engaged at the time of his death. 
He was a member of the State legislature from 
DaUas County, 1857-1868, 1859-1860, 1861, 1862, 
and 1866-1867. 

Soon after he came to the state, Dr. Mabry 
interested himself in the establishment of the 
Alabama insane asylum, and because of his 
marked interest in the subject, was instructed 
by the Selma medical association in 1847, to 
make the proper investigation respecting the 
fitness of the old state house at Tuscaloosa, for 
a lunatic asylum, and the probable amount it 
would cost to fit it up for that purpose. That 
was the beginning of the movement which 
resulted in the establishment of the Alabama 
insane hospital, and after the completion, Dr. 
Mabry was among the first seven trustees 
appointed by the governor, and, excepting for 
a brief intermission, held that office until the 
day of hla death. He was one of the prime 
movers in the organization of the Alabama 
State medical association, in 1847, served as 
vice-president that year, presided at the 
Wetumpka session of 1849. and at the Selma 
session of 1862; was active in the reorganiza- 
tion of the association after the war, and was 
president at the sessions of 1868 and 1869. He 
also held offices in the Selma medical society. 
He is author of "Report on the diseases of 
Selma and vicinity," 1852; "The Medical Profes- 
sion." 1859; "MiasmaUc fever." 1869; "Obser- 
vations on the medical properties at the sul- 
phate of quinine." 1870; "A case of hem- 
orrhagic malarial fever." 1872; all of which 
were contributed to the proceedings of the 
State medical association. At one time he was 
vice-president of the Selma. Rome and Dal- 
ton railroad, and was a director in the Salem 
and Meridian railroad. He was a Democrat, and 
an Episcopalian. Married: July 2. 1845, to 
Mrs. Martha (Riggs) Tartt. widow of Thomas 
E. Tartt. of the firm of Tartt. Stewart and com- 
pany of Mobile, and sister of Daniel M. Rigga 



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DICTIONABY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1143 



and Joel Riggs. Mrs. Mabry was bom In Sur« 
T7 County, N. C, and died August 25, 1898, 
in Selma. By her marriage with Mr. Tartt, she 
had one child, Gertrude T., who married 
Oatesby ap Roger Jones (q. y.). Children: 1. 
Albert Gallatin, lawyer, d. in December, 1878, 
Selma; 2. Daniel Riggs, d. in infancy; 8. Wil- 
liam Spark, civil engineer, Selma; 4. John Win- 
ston (q. v.). 5. Virginia, Selma; 6. Richard 
Henry, president of the Mabry securities com- 
pany, Selma. Last residence: Selma. 

MABRY, JOHN WINSTON, lawyer. Judge of 
Selma city court, was born in Selma, Dallas 
County; son of Albert Gallatin and Martha 
(Riggs) Mabry (q. y.). He was educated in 
the common schools of the state and at the 
Virginia military institute. He studied law, 
was admitted to the bar, and was elected Judge 
of the city court of Selma. He is a Democrat, 
and Episcopalian. Married: December 19, 
1895, to Eunice L. White, of Selma. Children: 
1. John Winston, Jr. Residence: Selma. 

MABRY, MH-TON HARVEY, Judge, a naUye 
of Alabama, was bom June 17, 1861, in Pickens 
County; son of Jesse Hughes and Sarah Caro- 
line (Prude) Mabry, the former of Alabama 
and Mississippi, the latter of Alabama. He 
receiyed his early education in the public 
schools of Verona, Miss.; attended the Uniyer- 
sity of Mississippi, and receiyed the degree of 
LiL. B. from the law school at Lebanon, Tenn., 
1872. He began the practice of his profession 
at Tupelo, Miss., the year of his graduation. In 
1879, on account of ill health, he remoyed to 
Leesburg, Fla., where he continued to practice 
law; was a member of the Florida house of 
representatiyes, 1883-84; lieutenant goyemor, 
1884-88; Justice of the supreme court of Flor- 
ida, 1891-1903, and is now clerk of the supreme 
court. Married: (1) in December, 1876, to 
EHla D., daughter of John W. Bramlett, an ex- 
tensive farmer near Verona, Miss., who d. Jan., 
1908; and, (2) Noyember 15, 1906, to Irene 
Washburn, of Louisville, Ky. Residence: Tal- 
lahassee. Fla. 

MACDONALD, ANGUS R., deceased teacher 
in Montgomery. 

MaoDONALD, ROWALEYN GORDON CUM- 
BflNG, lawyer and member constitutional con- 
vention, was bom October 16, 1868, at Mt. 
Meigs, Montgomery County, and died there in 
1906; son of Dr. Alfred and Oliyia (Cooper) 
MacDonald, natives of South Carolina and 
Pennsylvania, respectively, the former of whom 
was educated in Philadelphia, Pa., located in 
Alabama in 1840, and in 1855 was killed by 
one of his slaves, who in turn was burned at 
the stake by the infuriated neighbors; grand- 
son of Thomas and Mary (Fair ley) Cooper, the 
former a native of near Liverpool, England, 
who came to America in 1802, settled in New 
York City and married a daughter of Major 
James Fairley and wife, a Miss Van Ness, the 
former of whom was on the staff of Baron 
Steuben during the Revolutionary War, the 
latter a daughter of Judge William W. Van 
Vol. rv— It 



Ness, of the supreme court of New York, in 
early days, and his wife, who was a Miss 
Yeates, daughter of Hon. Joseph Yeates, also 
supreme Justice of New York. The great- 
grandfather, Alfred MacDonald, was one of the 
few survivors of the celebrated massacre at 
Glencoe and came to the United States about 
1745. Gordon MacDonald received his early 
education at home under the instruction of 
private teachers. He began the study of law 
at the age of eighteen in the office of Fiti- 
patrick, Williamson and Gk>ldthwaite, in Mont- 
gomery, and was admitted to the bar April, 
1874. For three years he practiced in the 
capital city, but in 1887 removed to Anniston 
where he formed a partnership with Howard 
Williams. Later he returned to Montgomery 
and was county delegate to the constitutional 
convention of 1901. He was an Episcopalian 
and a Democrat Married: April 27, 1882, at 
Richmond, Va., to Isabel Gordon, daughter of 
(3apt G. A. Cary. Children: 1. Olivia. Last resi- 
dence: Montgomery. 

MaoFARLAND, ROBERT, president of the 
board of directors of the State normal college, 
Florence; major, Lauderdal volunteers, C. S. 
Army. Deceased. Residence: Florence. 

MacINTYRE, ARCHIBALD CROSSLAND, 
called "Charles," artist, was bom August 81, 
1882, in Wajme County, Qa., and died Novem- 
ber, 1890, in Selma; son of Dr. Peter and Ann 
(Scale) Maclntyre (q. v.). He was entirely 
educated by his father. Upon his graduation 
he chose photographical chemistry as his pur- 
suit, removed to Montgomery, where he opened 
a "Daguerrean Gallery" for making pictures. 
He later developed the art of making photo- 
graphs upon large canvases and then painting 
the same, producing an oil portrait When the 
Confederate government was established he 
photographed the inauguration of President 
Jefferson Davis, the first out-door photography 
ever attempted in the South. This picture is 
the one so widely used. He acquired an im- 
mense fortune, which he gave over to the use 
of the Confederate cause. He discovered and 
developed the artistic genius of E. C. Billing, 
"the foremost portrait painter of America," 
who died in Boston, about 1900. He was a 
Democrat, Secessionist; and a Methodist Mar- 
ried: October, 1864, in Grenada, Miss., to Mat- 
tie Goode, widow of James Montgomery, and 
daughter of Judge Gtoode and wife, who, was 
a Miss Douglass, of Montgomery. No children. 
Last residence: Selma. 

MacINTYRE, EDWARD LEGARE, lawyer 
and State senator, was bom September, 1829, 
in Bennettsville, S. C, and died December 31, 
1869, near Troy; son of Dr. Peter and Ann 
(Seale) Maclntyre (q. v.). He was educated 
by his father, a noted teacher at South (Caro- 
lina and Georgia; studied law and graduated 
from the law school of Augusta, Gku In 1847 
he removed to Cross Keys to teach school in 
order to acquire means for taking his law 
course. He located in Troy and was asso- 
ciated at that bar with such men as Gen. Henry 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Clayton, Senator Pugh, Morgan Seale, Benjsr 
min Gardner, Elmore Fitzpatrlck, Bird FitSB- 
patrick and William E. Parks. He represented 
Pike County in the legislature as senator in 
the sixties. In 1862 he raised a company in 
Pike County and Joined Hilliard's Legion, C. S. 
Army, was made Judge-adyocate of the Legion 
and served with Oen. Kirby-Smith in the Ken- 
tucky campaign. In 1864 he was recalled to 
his legislative duties for the State. At the 
close of the war he resumed the practice of 
law. He was a Whig and a Union man, but 
went with Alabama in 1861 and fought for 
her defense. Unmarried. Last residence: 
Troy. 

MacINTYRE, peter II, teacher and physi- 
cian, was bom May 7, 1801, in Laurinburg, N. 
C, and died February, 1854, in Montgomery; 
son of Peter I, and Margaret (Maclntyre) Mac- 
Intyre, the former died about 1777, and both 
of Laurinburg; grandson of John Maclntyre 
and wife who was a Miss McLaren, the former 
a Revolutionary soldier, on whose farm "The 
battle of Maclntyre Farm," near Charlotte, N. 
C, was fought by the North Carolina farmers 
and Comwallis's foragers. Dr. Maclntyre was 
educated in the schools of his day, fitted for 
college, and graduated with high honors in 
Latin and Greek. At the age of twenty-two he 
engaged in teaching at Bennettsville, S. C, and 
later was the instructor who fitted the noted 
Dr. Thornwell for college. About 1830 he re- 
moved to Georgia, teaching in Wayne County, 
Fort Valley, and finally accepting the deanshlp 
of the Southern botanical college, Macon, Ga., 
where he served until 1849, when he removed 
to Montgomery. Having prepared himself to 
practice medicine, according to the homeo- 
pathic school, he associated himself with Dr. 
Ames and practiced until his sudden death in 
1864. One of his medical students was the late 
Dr. John Hazard Henry. He was a Whig; a 
Royal Arch Mason; reared a Presbsrterian, but 
joined the Methodists. He is buried on "The 
Masonic Square" in Old Oakwood, Montgom- 
ery. Married: about 1823, in Bennettsville, S. 
C, to Ann, daughter of Rev. William and 
Temperance (Croesland) Scale; granddaugh- 
ter of Edward Stuart Crossland, Revolutionary 
soldier and founder of Bennettsville, S. C. 
Children: 1. Edward Legare (q. v.); 2. Archi- 
bald Crossland (q. v.) ("Charles"), m. Mattie 
Goode, Montgomery; 3. Hannah Page, m. Wiley 
P. M. Cozart, of Atlanta, Ga.; 4. James Hamil- 
ton, m. Mattie Mastin, children: 1. Annie Lou, 
m. Dana Taylor I (q. v.); 2. Peter M., m. (1) 
Jan Na Brown of Georgia, (2) Kitty Brown; 
6. Annie Catherine, m. Francis M. Pennington 
of Troy. Last residence: Montgomery. 

Mackenzie, STUART, lawyer. Residence: 
Montgomery. 

MACKINTOSH, ROGER SHERMAN, horticul- 
turist, was bom February 18, 1872, at Lincoln, 
Middlesex County, Mass.; son of William and 
Elizabeth Jane (Tuttle) Mackintosh, the form- 
er a native of Ponkapog, Mass., who lived at 
Lincoln, Mass., and at Cottage Grove, Minn.; 
grandson of Gideon and Nancy (Sherman) 



Mackintosh, of Massachusetts, and of David and 
Patty (Smith) Tuttle, of Lexington, Mass.; 
great-grandson of John Sherman, and of Gideon 
Mackintosh; great-great-grandson of Roger 
Sherman, of Connecticut, signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence, and of Col. William Mack- 
intosh, of the Revolutionary -War. He received 
his early schooling in Lincoln, Mass., and Lansr- 
don, Minn.; was graduated from the Minnesota 
school of agriculture, St. Anthony Park, Minn., 
in 1900; from the college of agriculture. Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, B. Agr., 1902; and at- 
tended sessions of the graduate school of agri- 
culture at the University of Illinois in 1906, 
and at Cornell university in 1908. He served 
as assistant in horticulture, at the experiment 
station. University of Minnesota, 1897-1903; 
and has been professor of horticulture, at t^e 
Alabama pol3rtechnic institute, and State hor- 
ticulturist, since 1903. He is a Republican; a 
Unitarian; a Mason; and a Knight of Pythias. 
He has been secretary of the Alabama State 
horticultural society since its organization in 
1908. Married: September 18, 1901, at Cottage 
Grove, Minn., to Laura Belle, daughter of Ed- 
ward Wright, of Denmark, Minn. Children: 
1. Orlesta May. Residence: Auburn. 

MADISON, JOHN, 80ldier of the American 
Revolution, and a resident of Greene County; 
corporal 39th Regular U. S. Infantry; enrolled 
on September 16, 1816; payment to date €rom 
July 9, 1814; annual allowance, $96; sums re- 
ceived, $927.16; transferred from Lincoln 
County, Tennessee, from March 4, 1826; under 
act of March 3, 1819, to date tram March 4, 
1824, rate reduced to annual allowance of $64, 
under which the sum of $640 received to date 
of publication of list. — Revolutionary Pen$ion 
Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., Ist 
sess., 1833-84. 

MADISON, PEYTON, soldier of the American 
Revolution, age not given, a resident of Greene 
County; private 39th Regular U. S. Infantry; 
enrolled on September 16, 1816; pajrment to 
date from July 9, 1814; annual allowance, $48; 
sums received, $1,023.15; transferred from Bed- 
ford County, Tenn., from March 4, 1825; un- 
der act of March 3, 1819, to date from March 
4, 1825, rate reduced to annual allowance of 
$24, under which the sum of $34.60 received, 
and April 12, 1826, old rate of $48 annual al- 
lowance restored, under which the sum of 
$363.18 received to date of publication of list. — 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen, 
doc. 514, 23rd Cong., Ist sess., 1833-34. 

MAFFITT, JOHN NEWLAND, Methodist 
minister, was born December 28, 1794, in Dub- 
lin, Ireland, and died May 28, 1850, near Mobile. 
His father died in 1806, and the son was edu- 
cated in an academy in Dublin, and afterward 
settled in business there as a merchant tailor. 
He joined the Methodist church in 1813, in 
spite of the opposition of his mother and wife, 
and began praying and exhorting in public, 
soon showing power as an evangelist. He 
finally gave himself over wholly to the work of 
the church, and came to New York in 1819. He 
became an itinerant preacher in the New Eng- 
land conference, 1822, and was sent as a mis- 



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JOHN B. GASTON 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1147 



sionary to Boston, Mass. He was stationed 
saeeessiyely at Fairhaven, New Bedford, and 
Barnstable, Mass., 1828-1824; Dover and Somer- 
worth, N. H., 1828-1829; and Boston, Mass.. 
1830; became a local preacher in New York 
City, 1832; was associated with the Rev. Lewis 
Garrett in publishing the "Western Methodist," 
later known as the "Christian Advocate," at 
Nashville, Tenn., 1836; and continued his 
preaching in the south and southwest He was 
agent for the LaGrange college, 1836-1837, and 
later served as professor of elocution and belles 
lettres; was chaplain to the U. S. house of 
representatives, 1841-1843; travelled in the At- 
lantic states preaching, 1843-1846; edited the 
"Cavalry Token," Auburn, N. T., 1846-1856; 
went to Kansas and Joined the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, South, receiving a second license 
to preach. He is author of "Tears of Contri- 
tion," 1821; "Pulpit Sketches," 1828; "Poems." 
1839; an "Oratorical Dictionairy"; and an "Au- 
tobiography." Married: (1) in Ireland, name 
unknown; (2) in 1847, to Frances Smith, of 
BrooUjm, N. Y. Among his children was John 
Newland Mal&tt, naval officer, b. February 22, 
1819, at sea, d. May 16, 1886, at Wilmington, 
Del., Joined the XT. S. Navy in 1832, was made 
a lieutenant in 1848, retired in 1866, became 
a commodore in the C. S. Navy in 1861, was 
sent with a cargo to England and brought 
tMick the Crete, afterward called the Florida, 
as commander of that vessel captured about 
fifty-five prizes and seriously damaged the 
commerce of the United States, resigned be- 
fore the dose of the war as a result of injury 
to his health from yellow fever, and spent the 
remainder of his life in retirement. Last resi- 
dence: near Mobile. 

MAGBY, VARDRY, soldier of the American 
Bevolution, aged 102, resided in Walker Coun- 
ty, June 1, 1840, with Robert Mabgly (sic).— 
Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 160. 

MAGOFFIN, JAMBS, pioneer settler and 
legislator, was educated in Philadelphia and 
removed to St. Stephens in 1809. He repre- 
sented Washington County in the Mississippi 
Territory legislature, and established a store 
near Grove Hill about 1816, remaining there 
until 1830, or later, when he removed to St 
Stephens. He represented Clarke County in 
the constitutional convention of 1819, and in 
the legislature of 1821. After his return to 
St. Stephens he was appointed register of the 
United Stat^ land office and held that position 
for over thirty years. He also was interested 
in the nursery business in Clarke County and 
St Stephens. He was unmarried. Last resi- 
dence: St. Stephens. 

MAHAN, JESSE, member of the constitu- 
tional convention of 1867, from the twenty- 
sixth election district, 1867, Bibb County. 

MAHARG, ARCHIBALD, soldier of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, aged 71, and a resident of St. 
Clair County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled 
on July 24. 1833, under act of Congress of 
June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 
4, 1831; annual allowance. $35; sums re- 
ceived to date of publication of list, $106. — 



Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. 
doc. 614, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

MAHORNER, MATTHIAS, lawyer, was born 
September 13, 1874, near Macon, Miss.; son of 
Matthias and Mary (Teague) Mahomer, the 
former a native of Baltimore, Md., who was 
brought to Macon, Miss., by his parents whea 
less than two years old, and lived there for 
fifteen years, enlisted in the C. S. Army, Join- 
ing the Gulf City guards, Third Alabama regi- 
ment served until the close of the war, and 
became a planter in Mississippi; grandson of 
Matthias and Sarah Ann (Davis) Mahorner 
who lived at Macon, Miss., and gave five sons to 
the Confederate cause, three of whom died 
from wounds while in prison, the farmer a na- 
tive of King George County, Va., who began 
a seafaring life when fourteen years of age, and 
lived at Macon, Miss., 1839-1868, and of Addison 
M. and Amanda F. Teague, of Edgefield, S. C; 
great-grandson of William Davis, of Baltimore, 
a soldier in the War of 1812, who took part in 
the battle of North Point Mr. Mahorner was 
reared on the Mahorner plantation, near Macon, 
Miss., attended the private seminary of Prof. 
Jesse Buck, and was graduated with first hon- 
ors from Spring Hill college, B. A., 1894, and 
from the law department of Harvard university, 
LL. B., 1897. He was admitted to the bar at 
Mobile, December, 1897; became senior member 
of the law firm of Mahorner ft Glennon, 1898, 
and Junior member of the firm of Gaillard ft 
Mahorner, June, 1902. He is a Democrat a 
Catholic and has served as chancellor of the 
Knights of Columbus. Married: June 1, 1898, 
to Katherine V. Glennon, daughter of James K. 
and Florence (Barlow) Glennon, of Mobile. 
Children: 1. Matthias Glennon, b. August 24, 
1899, d. June 6, 1903; 2. Matthias Mahorner, IV, 
b. June 6, 1901; 3. Howard Rajrmond, b. Feb- 
ruary 11, 1903. Residence: MobUe. 

MAINYARD, COLBT, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 74, and a resident of Lime- 
stone County; private Virginia Continental 
Line; enrolled on January 26, 1830, under the 
act of Ccmgress of March 18, 1818, payment to 
date from January 2, 1830; annual allowance, 
$96; sums received to date of publication of 
list %Zb2.^tr-Revolutionari/ Pension Roll, in 
vol. xiv. Sen. doc. 614, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 
1833-84. 

MAJORS, BENJAMIN, soldier of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, and a resident of Dallas Coun- 
ty; private, particular service not disclosed; en- 
rolled on August 28, 1834, under act of Con- 
gress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $30. — Pension 
Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

MALATCHIE, MALACHEB or MALACHI, 
Creek Chiet See Indian chiefs and associated 
characters. 

MALLBRY, JOHN, soldier of the AmeHcan 
RevoluHon, aged 76, and a resident of Lime- 
stone County; private and sergeant Virginia 
State Troops; enrolled on February 23, 1833, 
under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, pajrment 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, 
$80; sums received to date of publication of 
list, %240.^Revolutionary Pension Rolh in vol. 
ziv, Sen doc 514, 23rd Cong., Ist sess., 1833-34. 

MALLET, JOHN WILLIAM, chemist, was 
born October 10, 1832, in Dublin, Ireland, and 
died November 6, 1912; son of Robert and Cor- 
delia (Watson) Mallet, the former a civil en- 
gineer and a fellow of the Royal Society of 
London. He was graduated at Trini^ college, 
Dublin, A. B., 1868; and from the University 
of Gk>ttingen, Ph. D., 1852; came to the United 
States in 1853; served as assistant professor of 
analytical chemistry, Amherst college, Mass., 
1854; chemist to the geological survey of Ala- 
bama, 1855-1856; professor of chemistry at the 
University of Alabama, 1855-1860; officer on the 
staff of Gen. R. E. Rodes, C. S. Army, 1861; 
transferred to the artillery in 1862, and placed 
in general charge of ordnance laboratories of 
C. S. A.;. paroled as lieutenant colonel of artil- 
lery, 1865; professor of chemistry in the medical 
d^artment of the University of Louisiana* 
1865-1868; professor of analsrtical, agricultural 
and industrial chemistry. University of Vir- 
ginia, 1868-1872, and of general and industrial 
chemistry there, 1872-1883, and 1885-1908; 
emeritus professor of chemistry, University of 
Virginiay 1908; lecturer, Johns Hopkins uni- 
versity, 1877-1878; professor of chemistry and 
physics, and chairman of the faculty, Univer- 
sity of Texas, 1883-1884; professor of chemistry, 
Jefferson medical college, Philadelphia, 1884- 
1885; investigated the chemical methods used 
for determining organic matters in potable 
waters and made a study of the water supply 
of various cities in the United States, comparing 
both the methods and the waters, for the na- 
tional board of health, 1880-1882; was a member 
of the assay commission of the United States 
three times; was a fellow of the Royal Society 
of London; president of the American Chemical 
Society, 1882; vice president of the Cheipical 
Society of London, 1888-1890; fellow of the Lon- 
don Chemical Society; member of the Chemical 
Society of Paris and of the German Chemical 
Society; associate fellow of the American Acad- 
emy of Arts and Sciences, Boston; correspond- 
ing member of the New York Academy of Sci- 
ences; member of the American Philosophical 
Society, and fellow of the College of Physicians, 
Philadelphia; honorary member of the Medical 
and Chirurgical faculty of Maryland; member 
of the Washington Academy of Sciences; fellow 
of the Medical Society of Virginia; and mem- 
ber of scientific societies in Brazil and New 
Mexico; was author of various papers in scien- 
tific transactions and Journals; received the 
honorary degree of M. D. from the University of 
Virginia, 1868; and the degree of LL. D. from 
William and Mary college, 1872; from Univer- 
sity of Mississippi, 1872; from Princeton, 1890; 
from Johns Hopkins, 1902; and from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, 1906. Married: (1) in 
1857, to MuT E. Ormond, daughter of Judge 
John J. Ormond, of Tuscaloosa; (2) in 1888, to 
Mrs. Josephine Burthe, of New Orleans, La., 
daughter of Joseph Pages, of Toulouse, France. 
Last residence: University, Va. 



MALLORY, HUGH SHEPPERD DARBY, law- 
yer, was bom February 6, 1848, at "Selwood," 
his father's plantation in Talladega County, 
and died in Selma, March 10, 1920; son of 
James and Ann Maria (Darby) MaUory, the 
former a native of Madison County, Va., a farm- 
er, who removed to Talladega County, in 1832, 
near the present town of Alpine; grandson of 
Uriel and Melinda (Welch) MaUory of Orange 
County, Va., also a farmer, and of Adam and 
Catherine (Shepperd) Darby of Rapid Ann, Va., 
the former a native of ScoUand; great-grand- 
son of Nathaniel and Betsy (Terrell) Welch, 
Uie former a soldier in the French and Indian 
Wars, and an officer in a Virginia regiment dur- 
ing the Revolution. great-great-grandscMi of 
John Terrell, whose son, Col. Edmund TerrelL 
fought with distinction in the Revolutionary 
War. The latter subsequently moved to Ken- 
tucky and fought in the Indian Wars. The 
MaUory family came from England to America 
in the colonial period; the Welch famUy from 
Wales; the Darby and the Shepperd families 
from Scotland. Mr, Mallory received his 
preparatory education in the Male high school 
at TaUadega, and entered the University of Ala- 
bama, where he was a student in 1866 when the 
Institution was burned by Federal troops. He 
received the degree of A. B., and in 1866 en- 
tered the law department of the University of 
Virginia, from which he graduated, LL. B., 1868. 
He entered Upon the practice in July, 1869, at 
Selma, where he has continuously resided. He 
W9A mayor of Selma, 1886-87; member of the 
Selma city board oi education; president board 
of trustees of the Dallas male and female acad- 
emy; member of the board of trustees Alabama 
girls technical institute; member board of trus- 
tees State normal school for colored students at 
Montgomery; president Selma bar aissociation; 
president Alabama BaptUt State convention: 
president Alabama State Sunday school associa- 
tion; trustee Southern Baptist theological semi- 
nary; president Alabama State bar assodaticm. 
He was an unsuccessful candidate for governor 
in 1910 against Gov. Emmet O'Neal. In 1911 
Howard college conferred upon him the honor- 
ary degree of LL. D. He was a Democrat; a 
Mason; a Knight of Honor; and Odd Fellow 
Married: October 16, 1872, at Summerfleld, to 
Jacqueline Louisa, daughter of Dr. Clement Bll- 
lingslea and Jacqueline Louisa (King) Moore, 
of that place, the former a native of Greene 
County, Ga., whose mother was a Billlngslea, the 
latter descended from the Byrds of North Caro- 
lina and Virginia. Children: 1. Hugh, cadet, 
U. S. naval academy, 1891-92, graduated at the 
University of Alabama. A. B., 1896, and Cum- 
berland university, LL. B., 1897, m. Claude Mel- 
vin. resides at Selma in the practice of law with 
his father; 2. Louise, m. James C. Privett, Sel- 
ma; 3. Kathleen M. (q. v.) ; 4. Elisabeth F., m. 
T. W. Dansby, Vicksburg, Miss.; 6. Irma B., m. 
Edgar A. Stewart, Selma; 6. James V.; 7. Clem- 
ent B., d. in infancy. Last residence: Selma. 

MALLORY, JOHN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 75, resided in Benton County. 
June 1, 1840, with Henry H. Mallory.— CctiMi* 
of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



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MALLORT, KATHLEEN MOORE, teacher 
and Baptist missionary secretary, was bom Jan. 
24, 1879, at Summerfleld, Dallas County; daugh- 
ter of Hugh Shepperd Darby and Jacqueline 
LiOuise (Moore) Mallory (q. y.)* She was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Selma coid at the 
Dallas academy, of which Professor Richard 
Hardaway was principal. She graduated from 
Ooucher college, Baltimore, Md., in 1902, with 
the degree of A. B.; taught school in the public 
schools of Demopolis, 1902-03; secretary Ala- 
bama Baptist woman's union, 1901-12; cor- 
responding secretary of the Woman's mission- 
ary uniim of the Southern Baptist convention, 
1912-20. Author: "Manual of woman's mission- 
ary union methods," 1917; and is one of the 
editors of "Royal service," the monthly maga- 
zine of the Woman's missionary union. Un- 
married. Residence: Baltimore. 

MALONE, CORNELIUS, soldier of the Amer- 
icon Revolution, aged 76, and a resident of Mor- 
gan County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled on 
July 2, 1888, under act of Congress of June 7, 
1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; 
annual allowance, $63.33; sums received to date 
of publication of list, ilSBM.-— Revolutionary 
Pemion RoU, in vol. ziv. Sen. doc. 514, 28rd 
Cong., 1st sess., 1888-84. He resided in Morgan 
County, June 1, 1840, aged 81. — Census of Pen- 
sioners, 1841, p. 148. 

MALONB, G. W., member of the legislature 
firom DeKalb County; a prominent Republican 
and Union man. Deceased. Last residence: 
Port Payne. 

MALONE, GEORGE HOLCOMBE, banker, 
member constitutional convention, 1901, was 
bom May 19, 1863, near Brundidge, Pike Coun- 
ty; son of George Tewell and Tabitha Eleanor 
(Wallace) Malone (q. v.). He was educated In 
the common schools at Brundidge; engaged in 
merchandising September 1, 1888, and in bank- 
ing, January 1, 1900. He resided first at 
Geneva; moved to Dothan in 1891; was a mem- 
ber of the city council of Dothan, 1894, and 
again in 1896; was president of the board of 
trustees of the Dothan City schools, 1897, 1898, 
1900, and 1901; was a member of the constitu- 
tional convention of 1901; is a Democrat, hav- 
ing been a delegate to the Kansas City conven- 
tion, 1900; and is a Missionary Baptist Mar- 
ried: June 10, 1891, at Columbia, to Florence 
Roberta Davis. Residence: Dothan. 

MALONE, GEORGE TEWELL, merchant and 
banker, was bom July 12, 1830, at LaGrange, 
Oa., and died AprU 6, 1906, at Dothan; son of 
William Plnckney and Keziah (MacMurphy) 
Malone, the former a native of South Carolina, 
bom near Spartanburg, who was a merchant at 
Columbus, Ga., for many years; grandson of 
Robert and Mary (Davenport) Malone, who 
lived in South Carolina and moved to Hamilton, 
Oa., and of John and K. P. (Martjm) MacMur- 
phy, who lived at Sunnyside, S. C, near 
Augusta, Ga.; great-grandson of Robert Malone, 
who came from Ireland with two brothers, 
David and Henry Holcomb Malone, and settled 
in Virginia. Mr. Malcme was half-brother of 



Henry H. Malcme (q. v.). He attended the 
Wynnton school, Columbus, Ga., and was gradu- 
ated from Emory college, Oxford, Ga., in 1848 or 
1849. Shortly afterwards he went to California 
through Central America, and remained there 
four years, living part of that time in the Sand- 
wich Islands. He established himself in busi- 
ness near Bmndidge in 1866, and conducted a 
mercantile house at that place and at Troy for 
many years; moved to Geneva in 1880, and later 
to Dothan; at the time of his death was presi- 
dent of the First National Bank at Dothan. He 
served throughout the War of Secession as cap- 
tain of Co. P, Fifteenth Alabama regiment, C. S. 
Army, and was twice wounded in the seven days 
battle around Richmond. He was a Democrat; 
a Methodist, serving as superintendent of the 
Sunday school for forty years; and a Royal 
Arch Mason. Married: in 1866, in Pike County, 
to Tabitha Eleanor Wallace, daughter of Allen 
and Eleanor Johnson (Huey) Wallace, the 
former a school teacher and a native of Scot^ 
land, the latter a South Carolinian, from Lan- 
caster District Children: 1. George H., (q. 
v.); 2. Willie, m. John J. Morris, Samson; 8. 
Edgar R., m. (1) Laura Ellsberry, Montgomery, 
(2) Monte Sebastian of Tennessee, Dothan; 4. 
Arthur Y., m. Mary L. Leslie. Dothan; 6. May, 
m. William W. Bamett, Dothan; 6. John W., 
m. Nettie Mosely, Dothan; 7. Sue, Dothan; 8, 
Charles G., Cottonwood; 9. Prank H., Dothan. 
Last residence: Dothan. 

MALONE, HENRY H.-, physician, was bom 
March 29, 1837, in Columbus, Ga.; son of WU- 
liam P. and Rebecca P. (Griggs) Malone, the 
former who was bom in South Carolina, in 1800, 
moved to Columbus, Ga., in early life, and con- 
ducted a mercantile business, and fought in the 
Creek War; grandson of Robert Malone, a na- 
tive of South Carolina, of English-Scotch 
descent, who was descended maternally from 
one of the old Virginia families which settled in 
Dinwiddle County, Va., before the Revolution, 
and of WiUiam and Charlotte (Penn) Griggs, 
natives of Virginia, who were married and 
lived in Hancock County, Ga^ the latter a sec- 
ond cousin of William Penn, founder of Phila- 
delphia; great-grandson of Jesse Griggs, a Vir- 
ginian of Welsh-Irish descent. Mr. Malone is a 
half brother of George Yewell Malone, son of 
William P. Malone by his first wife. He studied 
medicine and was graduated from the medical 
department of the University of New York, M. 
D., 1860; began to practice his profession in 
Brewton and has spent his life in that place. In 
1861, he raised a company for the First Florida 
infantry, served as captain in the C. S. Army 
for a year, and resigned at the end of that time 
because of illness contracted in the service. 
Upon recovering, he resumed his practice with 
great success. "During the yellow fever epi- 
demic which raged throughout the southem 
states in 1883, and which visited Brewton with 
especial vimlence, more than 60 per cent of 
the cases in the town proving fatal. Dr. Malone 
did not desert his patients, but labored assidu- 
ously, night and day in behalf of the sufferers 
for a period of six weeks, during which time the 
plague reached its most violent stage." He is a 
Democrat and a Methodist Married: in July 



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DICTIONARY OF ATiABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1865, Mary A. Snowden, daughter of James and 
Elisabeth Snowden. Children: 1. Rebecca P.; 
2. Eugene; 8. Walter J.; 4. Ella Penn; 6. 
Jessie; 6. Maud; 7. Ruby. Residence: Brewton. 

MALONE. JOHN N., lawyer, was born in 1814, 
in Sussex County, Va., and died October 3, 
1888; son of George and Sallie (Moyler) Ma- 
lone, natives of Virginia, and of Irish descent, 
came to Limestone County in 1828, and spent 
the remainder of their lives there. He was 
graduated from LaGrange cMege, A. B., 1889, 
and A. M., some years later. He studied law 
with J. W. McClung at Huntsville; was admit- 
ted to the bar, 1841; practiced law until 1861, 
then devoted his attention to planting until 1861. 
He was elected to the State senate in 1861 from 
Limestone and Morgan Counties, and served six 
consecutive years in that body; was a delegate 
to the National convention at Baltimore in 1862, 
and supported Pierce and King; suiH;K)rted 
Douglas for the presidency in 1860 in opposition 
to secession, but after Alabama seceded, upheld 
the state. After the war, he resumed the prac- 
tice of law and planting, and in 1881 was ap- 
pointed probate Judge to fill an unexpired term 
of five years. He was one of the trustees of the 
University of Alabama from 1861, until the 
beginning of the War of Secession and was one 
of the trustees of the Agricultural and mechani- 
cal college at Auburn at its organization, in 
1874. He was a Democrat, a Methodist Episco- 
palian and a lAason. .Married: (1) in 1844, in 
Lauderdale County, to Mary Lucy Kemachan, 
who died in 1848; (2) in 1864, in Lauderdale 
County, to Rebecca Simmons. Children, by first 
marriage: 1. Robert, planter. Limestone Coun- 
ty; by second marriage: 2. Linda M., m. R. S. 
Chew, Van Buren, Ark.; 8. George, clerk of the 
circuit court of Limestone County; 4. Anna M., 
m. Fay Chew, Little Rock, Ark.; 6. Sallie; 6. 
Henry M., b. September 4, 1868, at Athens, be- 
came express agent at Athens, 1888, and has 
engaged in the coal business since 1893, was 
elected mayor of Athens, 1893, 1896, and 1902, 
m. Nannie Kelly, daughter of Joshua O. and 
Sallie B. (Strong) Kelly, of Madison County, 
children, Sallie 6. and Rebecca Boothe. Last 
residence: Athens. 

MALONE, JULIUS WH^IAM, Baptist min- 
ister, was bom March 18, 1832, at Penfleld, 
Greene County, Ga.; son of Toung Gressom and 
Mary (Price) Malone, who lived in Greene, 
Butts and Randolph Counties, Ga., and in 
Alabama in Henry County; grandson of Eph- 
raim Price, of Greene CJounty, Ga. He was 
educated in the country schools of Greene, Butts 
and Randolph Counties, Ga.; served three years 
in Co. C, Fifty-first Georgia infantry regiment, 
C. S. Army; entered the Missionary Baptist 
ministry in 1874; and served a number of 
churches in southeast Alabama and southwest 
Georgia. He has also engaged in farming; 
served as a school trustee of Henry Ck>unty for 
ten years; and represented Henry County in 
the State legislature in 1907. He is a Democrat 
and a Mason. Married: (1) in 1867, near Ab- 
beville, to Nancy Ann, daughter of Peter M. 
and Martha Ann (Sparks) Thomas, of Henry 
County; (2) to Nancy, daughter of James 



Richards of Barbour County; (8) to Atti^ 
daughter of William Doswell, of Henry 0>unty. 
CHiildren: 1. Thomas, m. Carrie Barrow; 2. 
Minnie, m. Marion Craddock; 8. Annie Virginia, 
m. (1) D. F. Rich, (2) T. J. Howerton; 4. 
Martha; 6. C3al D., m. Arra Barker; 6. Blary 
L., m. John W. Helton; 7. Joseph W., m. Veola 
Hollis; 8. Maggie N., m. James C. Howerton; 
9. Ella E., m. John W. Howerton; 10. Alex. 
Residence: Abbeville. 

MALONE, WILLIAM, soldier of the AmerU 
can Revolution, aged 77, and a resident of 
Limestone County; private and sergeant S. C. 
Militia; enrolled on August 12, 1888, under act 
of Congress of June 7, 1882, payment to date 
frcmi March 4, 1881; annual allowance, |90; 
sums received to date of publication of list, 
%22h.— Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. 
Sen. doc. 614, 23rd Cong., 1st sees., 1838-84. He 
resided in Limestone County, June 1, 1840, aged 
86.— Ccfwiw of Pensioners, 1841, p. 148. 

MANASCO, JOHN, fanner, member congti'- 
tutional convention 1876, ^was bom March 28^ 
1800, at Nickajack CJave, Franklin County, (3a.. 
and died November 23, 1896, at Townley; son 
of John and Vicy (Odum) Manasco, who lived 
in northwest Georgia, then moved to Duck 
River Valley, Tenn., where they lived untU 
1816, moved to Alabama and lived first in BCadi- 
son County and later in Morgan County, the 
former a native of Virginia, who served 
throughout the War of 1812 as one of Jackson's 
Tennessee riflemen, and took part in the battle 
of New Orleans, January 8, 1816, the latter of 
Scotch-Irish descent; grandson of Jeremiah 
Manasco, a native of Wales, who came to Vir- 
ginia during colonial times, was a captain Ib 
the revolution, and subsequently lived in North 
and South (Carolina and in Alabama, and of 
Abraham Odum of South Carolina. Cten. Man- 
asco never attended school. His first instruc- 
tions came from his employer while he was 
working as a farm hand in Madison County. 
He became a farmer and in 1836 moved to 
Walker County. He was elected to the State 
legislature for the first time in 1846, and for 
the last time In 1876, serving in all through 
fourteen sessions of the legislature. He wa«i 
a member of the constitutional convention of 
1876,- and was a close personal friend of Le- 
roy P. Walker. He served for some time as 
brigadier general of the Alabama state militia; 
was an ardent states-rights Democrat, yet (H>- 
posed secession until Alabama left the union, 
when he supported the state; was a layman In 
the Primitive Baptist church, and a Master 
Mason. Married: February 4, 1829, in Lime- 
stone County, to Lucinda Lester, whose parents 
were from Kentucky. Children: 1. Carlton W., 
married, Smartsville, Calif.; 2. Dr. Jeremiah, 
killed in battle of Shiloh, unmarried; 3. Rev. 
David, deceased, married; 4. Sarah, deceased 
m. Rev. J. E. Cox, Littleton; 6. James K. Polk^ 
married, Townley; 6. Dr. John, married, Town- 
ley. Last residence: Townley. 

MANASCO, ORIZABA, physician, was born 
January 28, 1882, at Townley, and died in 1919, 
in Townley; son of John and Sarah J. (Grace) 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



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Monasco, the former a native and resident of 
Townley, who was a practicing physician; 
grandson of Gen. John and Lucinda Bfanasoo, 
the former, who represented Walker County in 
the legislature thirteen times, was a member of 
the constitutional convention of 1876, and a 
p<^tical leader of northwest Alabama for over 
twenty-flye years and was a close friend of 
John T. Morgan and George S. Houston, and of 
John and Hannah Grace of Pickens County; 
great-great-grandson of Jere Monasco, a native 
of WalM, and a Revolutionary soldier, whose 
8on was one of Gen. Andrew Jackson's Tennes- 
see riilemen who won the battle of New Or- 
leans. Dr. Monasco was educated in the public 
schools of Walker County; Howard College and 
Birmingham Medical College, graduating in 
1905 with an M. D. degree. He began the prac- 
tice of medicine in Townley in 1906; was 
alderman of Townley, 1913-1918; was elect- 
ed to legislature from Walker County in 1918. 
He was a Democrat; a Missionary Baptist; a 
BCason, Scottish Rite, Knight Templar and 
Bhriner. Married: April 80, 1906, at Town- 
ley, to Hodie, daughter of W. R. and Martha 
Bashell, of Townley, and granddaughter of 
WiUiam R. King. ChUdren: 1. Fred S.; 2. 
Charles Mayo; 8. Gilmore Kerley; 4. John, Jr.; 
5. Sarah. Last residence: Townley. 

MAKER, OLIN CONNOR, lawyer, was bom 
October 28, 1878, at Allendale, Barnwell 
County, S. C; son of Samuel and Emma Jane 
(Connor) Maner, the former a native of Rob- 
erts viUe who later settled at Allendale; grand- 
son of MaJ. John Scott and Catherine (Mor- 
gandollar) Bfaner, the former for thirty years 
a member <^ the South Carolina legislature, 
and an officer of the War of 1812, and of 
David L. Connor, and wife, who was a Miss 
Seigler, who lived at Connors, Orange- 
Imrg County; great-grandson of William 
and Jessie (May) Maner, the former a 
Revolutionary soldier, serving as adjutant of 
CoL Hardin's Upper Granville County regi- 
ment Mr. Bfaner was educated in the common 
schools of his native coimty and at Wofford 
college, Spartanburg, S. C, but did not gradu- 
ate. He was admitted to the bar at Montgom- 
ery, June, 1897, by the supreme court, and 
practiced his profession there. In November, 
1902, he was chosen to the legislature and re- 
elected in 1906. He is a Democrat; and a Meth- 
odist Married: December 6, 1900, at Montgom- 
ery, to Sallie Nicholson, daughter of A. P. and 
Ellen (Arrlngton) Tyson. Children: 1. Pitt 
Tyson. Residence: Montgomery. 

MANGUM, JOHN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 71, and a resident of Pickens 
County; private S. C. Militia; enrolled on 
March 16, 1838, under act of Congress of June 
V, 1882, payment to date from March 4, 1831; 
annual allowance, $60; sums received to date 
of publication of list, %1S0,— Revolutionary 
Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. doc. 614, 23rd 
Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

MANGUM, ROBERT HENRY, lawyer, was 
bom April 21. 1876, at Tuskegee; son of The- 
ophilos Fields and Julia Frances (Perkins) 



Mangum (q. v.). He received his preparatory 
education in the Selma high school, in a priv- 
ate school in Opelika, and the preparatory de- 
partment of the Southern university at Greens- 
boro; graduated from the Southern university, 
1896. He read law in McKinney, Tex., and 
Montgomery, admitted to the bar in Collier 
Cotmty, Tex., 1896, where he practiced three 
years; and practiced in Montgomery, 1899 to 
1908, when he located in Selma. He was as- 
sistont attorney of Collier County, Tex., 1897- 
98; and deputy solicitor, Dallas County, 1907- 
1918. He was 2nd sergeant troop C. Alabama 
national guard, 1906^)8. He edited the "Selma 
Journal" for six years, and has written and 
spoken in the interest of educational, indus- 
trial and social matters in many sections of 
the State. During the European War, Mr. 
Mangum was one of the associates in the office 
of Richard M. Hobble, Federal food administrar 
tor for Alabama. He is a Democrat; a Metho- 
dist; a Mason; Knight of Pythias; Odd Fel- 
low; and Elk. Married: June 6, 1919, in Mont- 
gomery, to Mrs. Elizabeth Dawson (Hails) 
McLiCod, widow of A. L. McLeod, and daughter 
of (3eorge W. and Susan T. (Nesbit) Hails 
(q. v.). Residence: Montgomery. 

MANGUM, THEOPHILUS FIELDS, Metho- 
dist minister, was bom February 11, 1884, in 
Granville County, N. C, and died March 80, 
1904, at Eufaula; son of Josiah Thomas Blan- 
gum, a native of Orange or Granville Ck>unty, 
N. C, who later lived in Talladega, Lowndes- 
boro, Wetumpka, Marion, Uniontown, Tuskegee, 
Greenville, SeUna, Auburn, Troy, Greensboro, 
Opelika, and Eufaula, serving in these several 
charges and districts as a Methodist minister; 
grandson of Josiah T. Mangum and wife, a 
Miss Kirkland, natives of North Carolina who 
removed to Alabama and located at Selma, left 
an orphan, he went at fourteen years of age 
to Dale County where he lived in the home 
of Rev. J. W. Solomon's father, working on 
the farm and at the wagon and carriage making 
trade, read law, and studied for the ministry. 
Rev. Theophilus Fields Mangum was self edu- 
cated except for two terms at the Summer- 
field institute, 1869-60; entered the Alabama 
conference Methodist Episcopal church, South, 
in 1866, and remained an itinerant preacher in 
that dencmiination until his death. He served 
as chaplain at different points in Alabama. 1861- 
66. He was a Democrat; trustee Southern 
university; member publishing committee 
"Alabama Christian Advocate;" chairman of 
the committee on itinerancy at two sessions of 
the general conference; member of numerous 
church and correctional boards and commit- 
tees; an Odd Fellow; and Knight of Pythias. 
Married: at Uniontown, to Julia Frances, 
daughter of Judge William Columbus and Maria 
(Thomas) Perkins, of Cuthbert, Ga., the former 
a descendant of colonial settlers in Georgia, a 
native of LaGrange, Ga., served one term in 
congress, was for many years circuit Judge, the 
latter the daughter of Gen. Whitfield Thomas 
of Cuthbert, Ga., whose ancestors were con- 
nected with the early history of that state. 
Children: 1. Bake, m. Bessie Lamm; 2. The- 
ophilus Fields, jr. (q. v.); 8. William Wight- 



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1152 



DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



man, m. (1) Mamie McKenzie, (2) Nan (Dent) 
Long; 4. John Bradfleld; 5. Robert Henry (q. 
v.)» m. Bessie (Hails) McLeod, Montgomery; 
6. Josiah Thomas, m. Edith Hooper, Charlotte, 
N. C; 7. Helen Ira, m. G. E. Laughlin. Last 
residence: Eufaula. 

MANGUM, THEOPHH.US FIELDS, Jr., law- 
yer, was bom Oct. 21, 1868, at Stewart planta- 
tion, Dallas County; son of Theophilus Fields 
and Ellen Keren (Stewart) Mangum (q. ▼.), 
brother of Robert H. Mangum (q. v.). He re- 
ceived his preparatory education under Judge 
Pitts of Selma, James Parks of Tuskegee and 
Rev. Urquehart of Greenyille, and graduated 
with the degree of A. B. and captain of Co. B, 
at the Alabama polytechnic institute, 1888. In 
1886 he was admitted t^ the bar in Alabama, 
and entered upon the practice in McKinney, Col- 
lier County, Tex., where he was city-attorney; 
chairman of Collier County Democratic execu- 
tive committee; presidential elector from the 
16th congressional district, adjutant 4th Texas 
volunteer regiment, Capt Collier guards; fore- 
man McKinney hook and ladder company, vol- 
unteer fireman; delegate several times to the 
Texas State democratic convention; one of four 
who responded to address of welcome by Ck>v. 
O'Neal of Alabama at home coming of Auburn 
students, June, 1918; was presented a sword 
by Ck>v. E. A. O'Neal, sr., as captain of the best 
drilled company of cadets, A, P. I., 1888. He 
is a Presbyterian; a Mason; and a Knight of 
Pythias. Married: November 11, 1891, to Alice, 
daughter of Col. Robert and Kate Fitzhugh, of 
Fitzhugh Mill, Collier County, Texas, members 
of the distinguished Fitzhugh family of Vir- 
ginia. Children: 1. Robert Mase, San Antonio, 
Texas; 2. Alioa Residence: San Antonio, 
Texas. 

MANLY, A. H., Presbyterian minister, living 
in 1913. Residence: New Decatur. 

MANLY, BASIL, educator, second president 
University of Alabama, was bom January 29, 
1798, near Pittsborough, Chatham County, N. 
C, and died December 21, 1868, in Greenville, 
S. C; son of Basil and Elizabeth (Maultsby) 
Bfanly, who lived in Chatham County, N. C, 
near Pittsborough; grandson of Thomas and 
Mary (Ford) Manly ^ the former whose father 
emigrated from Ireland early in the eighteenth 
century, and settled in Maryland, near Leon- 
ardstown. His Maultsby ancestors were of 
Welsh and English extraction. He was licensed 
to preach in 1818, when he was twenty years 
old, and very soon afterward went to South 
Carolina, entering the South Carolina college 
in December, 1819, and graduating with first 
honors, B. A., 1821. He was ordained to the 
ministry in 1822, and labored in and about 
Edgefield Court House until March, 1826, when 
he became pastor of the Baptist church at Char- 
leston, S. C. During his ministry in South 
Carolina, he was largely influential in securing 
the establishment of an institution of learning 
under the patronage of the Baptist State con- 
vention, for the special training of young men 
for the gospel ministry. That institution, after 
several changes of name and location, became 



Furman university, now in successful opera- 
tion in Greenville, S. C. Early in 1837, the 
degree of doctor of divinity was ccmferred on 
Dr. Manly by the University of North Carolina, 
and in August of that year, he was unani- 
mously elected president of the University of 
Alabama. With the cooperation of a strong 
faculty. Dr. Manly served the University for 
eighteen years, with such results that at the 
end of that time, the university occupied a 
position of highest honor among the colleges 
of the country. He resigned the presidency 
in 1866, and returned to Charleston, S. C, to 
resume his work as a Christian pastor, and 
was influential in the establishment of the 
Southern Baptist theological seminary, first 
located, in 1869, at Greenville, S. C, but since 
1877 at Louisville, Ky. Coming again to Ala- 
bama in 1869, he spent nearly two years in 
general evangelistic work, preaching throoi^- 
out the state, and taking an active interest 
in the establishment of the hospital for the 
insane at Tuscaloosa. The outbreak of the War 
of Secession put an end to his work as an 
evangelist, and he became pastor of the First 
Baptist church in Montgomery, then the capital 
of the Confederate States of America. He 
moved to Tuscaloosa in December, 1862, and 
became connected with the management of the 
Alabama central female college. He was pros- 
trated by a stroke of paralysis, November 22, 
1864, from which he never fully recovered, and 
while on a visit to his son. Dr. Basil Manly, ]r^ 
in Greenville, S. C, he died. He was organizer 
of the Southern Baptist convention of 1846; 
was the founder of the Alabama historical so- 
ciety; published several sermons; and with his 
son, Basil, prepared "The Baptist Psalmody," 
1860. 

Married: December 28, 1824, to Sarah Mur- 
ray, daughter of Zebulon and Abigail (Murray) 
Rudulph, who lived at Camden and Columbia* 
S. C, and in Lowndes County, where they died, 
the former a native of Maryland, followed the 
fiouring business at Elkton, Md., where he 
owned a mill and store, moved to Camden, S. 
C, 1798, and engaged in milling and mer- 
chandising there until 1811, when he moved 
to Columbia, S. C, to accept a position as 
steward of South Carolina college, resigned 
his position in 1816, and located on a planta- 
tion near Columbia, moved to Edgefield Dis- 
trict, S. C, in 1821, and conducted a mill and 
plantation there, moved to Lowndes County in 
November, 1829, and died March 4, 1866, the 
latter a native of Philadelphia, Pa., whose 
ancestors came from Scotland to Elkton, Md.; 
granddaughter of Jacob and Frances (Jacob) 
Rudulph, the former a native of Elkton, Md., 
born September 8, 1726, and died July 18, 1800, 
at Camden Mills, S. C, whose son by a former 
marriage, Michael Rudulph, was a captain in 
Lee's legion, during the Revolutionary War, 
the latter who was the widow of Robert Broom, 
was of Welsh extraction, and died at Camden. 
S. C, in 1874; great-granddaughter of Michael 
Johannes and Anna Rudulph, the former who 
was born on the Prussian Rhine, who served 
seven years in the army of Frederick the Great 
of Prussia, and emigrated to Maryland. Chil- 
dren: 1. Basil (q. v.); 2. Charles (q. v.); 3. 
Capt. R. T., an officer in the Fifty-ninth Ala- 



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LEROY BREWER 



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1155 



bama regiment, C. S. Army, during the War of 
Secession, Mobile. Last residence: Qreenville, 

8. C. 

MANLT, BASIL, jb., Baptist minister, was 
bom December 19, 1825, in Edgefield District, S. 
C, and died January 31, 1892, in Louisyille, 
Ky.; son of Basil and Sarah Murray (Ru- 
dolph) Manly (q. v.)* He was prepared for 
college in Charleston, S. C; was graduated 
frcmi the University of Alabama, A. B., 1843, 
and A. M., 1846; attended the Newton theo- 
logical insUtute. Newton, Mass., 1844-1845, and 
the Princeton theological seminary, 1845-1847. 
He was licensed to preach in 1844, and was 
ordained a minister in the Baptist church at 
Tuscaloosa, January 30, 1848. He was pastor 
of the church at Providence, 1848-1849; of the 
First Baptist church at Richmond, Va., 1850- 
1854; founded the Richmond female institute, 
and was Its president, 1854-1859; was one of 
the four founders and one of the first profes- 
sors of the Southern Baptist theological semi- 
nary at Oreenvllle, S. C; occupied the chair 
€i Biblical instruction and Old Testament in- 
terpretation, 1859-1871, and during the War of 
Secession while the s^ninary was suspended 
preached to several churches in the neighbor* 
hood; served as president of Ctoorgetown col- 
lege, Ky., 1871-1879; returned to his former 
position at the Southern Baptist theological 
seminary which had been moved in 1877 from 
Greenville, &. C, to Louisville, Ky^ 1879-1892. 
The degree of doctor (tf divinity was conferred 
upon him by the University of Alabama, 1859, 
and by Wake Forest college, 1859, and the 
degree of LL. D. by the Agricultural and me- 
chanical college, 1874. During the War of Se- 
oessloQ he was president of the Sunday school 
board of the Southern Baptist convention at 
Greenville, S. C, which issued catechisms, 
tracts and periodicals, of which he was largely 
either editor or author; was co-author with 
his father of ''The Baptist Psalmody," 1858; 
author of -A Call to the Ministry," 1867; "The 
Choice;" "The Bible Doctrine of Inspiration," 
1888; and several hymn and music books. He 
was a Democrat 

Married: (1) April 28, 1862, at Marion, to 
Charlotte Ann Bliiabeth, dauf^ter of George 
William and Katharine (Hart) Whitfield, 
who lived at Sumterville; (2) June 10, 
1869, at Newberry, S. C, to Harriet Summers, 
daughter of MaJ. Peter and Rosa Caroline 
(Summers) Hair, and a descendant of C^L 
Philemon Waters, of the Revolutionary War. 
Children, by first marriage: 1. Kate, d. in in- 
fancy; 2. Basil Rudul]^, d. in 1879, unmarried; 
3. Lizzie Pratt, m. Lyman Lewis Parks, d. in 
1910, living at Anderson, S. C, with her four 
children; 4. Louise Prances; 5. George Whit^ 
field. Ph. D., professor of Latin in Denison 
university, Ohio, and in Wake Forest college. 
North Carolina; 6. Murray Boyce, unmarried, 
Kentucky; 7. Sarah Rudulph, d. in 1912, m. 
Evan Clement Stevenson, of Rockwell City, la., 
left seven children; 8. William Gwathmey, pro- 
fessor of Greek in the University of Missouri; 

9. Mary Lane, d. in Greenville, S. C; 10. Alice, 
d« in infancy; 11. Archibald Thomas, d. in in- 
fancy; by second marriage; 12. Clarence Julius, 
unmarried, surgeon in U. S. Army, major. 



stationed at El Paso, Tex., in February, 1914; 
13. and 14. John Broadus and Carrie Summers, 
twins, d. in infancy; 15. Hattie, d. in infancy; 
16. Rosa, d. in infancy; 17. Charlotte Broadus, 
m. Thomas Toliver Gtoldsmith, Greenville, S. 
C; 18. Charles James Fuller, unmarried, Green- 
ville, S. C. Last residence: Louisville, Ky. 

MANLY, CHARLES, educator, was bom May 
28, 1837, at Charleston, S. C; son of Basil and 
Sarah Murray (Rudulph) Manly (q. v.). He 
was prepared for college by Richard Furman 
in Tuscaloosa; was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, A. B., 1855, and A. M., 
1859; and from Princeton theological semi- 
nary, in May, 1859. He was licensed to preach 
by the Tuscaloosa Baptist church in 1855; was 
ordained to the ministry in 1859; and has 
served as pastor of churches at Tuscaloosa 
1859-1871; at Murfreesboro, Tenn., 1871-1873; 
at Staunton, Va., 1873-1880; at Greenville, 8. 
C, 1880-1881; at Belton, S. C, 1882-1898; at 
Brushy Creek, S. C, 1882-1886; at Rocky Creek, 
S. C, 1882-1886; at Seneca, S. C^ 1886-1898; at 
Lexington, Mo., 1898-1903; and at Lexington, 
Va., 1903-1914. He was president of the Ala- 
bama Central female college at Tuscaloosa. 
1862-1864, and 1869-1871; was president of 
Union university, Murfreesboro, Tenn., 1871- 
1873; president of Furman university, Green- 
ville, S. C, 1881-1897; teacher in the Patrick 
military institute, Anderson, S. C, 1897-1898; 
and in Lexington, Mo., 1898-1903. The degree 
of D. D. was conferred upon him by William 
Jewell college, Missouri, 1872. He prepared 
Sunday school notes for the American Baptist 
publication society for several years, and has 
contributed to magazines. Married: Novem- 
ber 16, 1864, in Sumter Ck>unty, to Mary, 
daughter of John and Keziah (Hellen) Mat- 
thews, of Sumter CUmnty. Children: 1. John 
Matthews (q. v.), b. September 2, 1865, in Sum- 
ter County was graduated from Furman uni- 
versity, A. M., 1883, from Harvard university, 
A. M., 1889, and Ph. D., 1890, received LL. D. 
from Furman university, 1912, and Litt D. 
from Brown university, 1914, taught at Greer's 
high school. South Carolina, 1884, at William 
Jewell college. Liberty, Mo., 1885-1888, at Rad- 
cliffe college, 1890-1891, at Brown university, 
1891-1898, professor and head of department of 
English at University of Chicago since 1898, 
Chicago exchange professor at University of 
Gottingen, 1909, granted leave of absence for 
duration of the war, enlisted in the U. S. Army 
for five years, commissioned captain, October 
27, 1917, assisted to military intelligence sec- 
tion, war college division, general staff, au- 
thor of "The Language of CJhaucer's Legend 
of Gk)ode Women," 1893, of "Shakespeare's 
Macbeth," 1896, of "Specimens of the Pre- 
Shakesperean Drama," 1902, of "English Po- 
etry, 1170-1892," 1907, "English Prose, 1137- 
1890," 1909, "The Bailey-Manly Spelling Book," 
and "Lessons in English" with B. R. Bailey, 
1912, and "English Prose and Poetry." 1916, 
managing-editor of "Modem Philology," since 
1908, and contributed to Cambridge History of 
English Literature, Encyclopedia Britannica," 
eleventh edition, the "Shakespeare Memorial 
Volume," 1916, and to various periodicals, ad- 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



dress, Army War College, Washington, D. C; 2. 
Hellen, m. R. G. Patrick, D. D., Chicago, 111.; 
3. Mary, d. March 29, 1910; 4. Sarah, m. Rev. 
J. I. Kendrick, Huhhard, Tex.; 5. Annie, Chi- 
cago, 111.; 6. Belle, m. Edward Watson, Gaffney, 
S. C; 7. Charles Matthews, m. Grace Wishart, 
Whitehall Building, New York, N. Y.; 8. Linda 
Peyton, m. C. G. Dold, M. D., Lexington, Va.; 
9. Basil Maxwell, m. Marie Bradley, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Residence: Chicago, 111. 

MANLY. JOHN MATTHEWS, educator, was 
bom September 2, 1866, in Sumter County; son 
of Rev. Charles and Mary Esther Hellen 
(Matthews) Manly (q. v.). Dr. Manly re- 
ceived the A. M. degree from Furman uni- 
versity, 8. C, 1883; A. M., 1889, Ph. D., 1890, 
Harvard university; LL. D., Furman university, 
1912; and Litt. D., Brown university, 1914. He 
was associate professor and professor of Eng- 
lish, Brown university, Providence, R. I., 1891- 
98; has been professor and head of the depart- 
ment of English, University of Chicago, since 
1898; and was Chicago exchange professor at 
the University of Gottingen, 1909. He was 
granted leave of absence during the European 
War; enlisted in U. S. Army for five years; 
commissioned captain, October 27, 1917; as- 
signed to military intelligence section. War col- 
lege division. General stafT; chief, section eight. 
War college division, August, 1918-May, 1919; 
discharged and commissioned major. Officers re- 
serve corp, July, 1919. He is a member of the 
American philosophical society; American 
phflological association; Modem language as- 
sociation of America; American dialect so- 
ciety; Deutsche Shakespeare Gesellschaft; Ma- 
lone society; English Shakespeare society; and 
the Bibliographical society of America. Con- 
tributor: "Cambridge history of English liter- 
ature"; "Encyclopedia Britannica," eleventh 
edition; "Shakespeare memorial volume"; and 
to various periodicals. Editor: ''Macbeth," 
1896; "Specimens of Pre-Shakespearean 
drama," 1897; "English poetry," 1907; "Eng- 
lish prose," 1909. Author: "Lessons in Eng- 
lish." 1912, with E. R. Bailey; "A Manual for 
writers," 1914, with J. A. Powell; "English 
prose and poetry," 1916; "The Writing of Eng- 
lish," 1919, with E. Rickert He is the gen- 
eral editor of "Modem Philology." Unmarried. 
Residence: University of Chicago, Chicago, 

MANLY, R. F., clerk of the AUbama Baptist 
State convention, 1868-71. Residence: Birming- 
ham. 

MANNING, AMOS REEDER, Uwyer, was 
bom in 1810, in New Jersey. In early youth 
he came with an uncle, James Manning, of 
Madison, to Alabama, and was educated in 
Greene academy, where he was a schoolmate 
of L. P. and Percy Walker, J. D. Phelan, and 
Gen. J. M. Withers. After graduating from the 
University of Tennessee, he read law with Hon. 
A. F. Hopkins at Huntsville. He was admitted 
to the bar, and opened a law office in Linden in 
1836, later moving to Demopolis. At the latter 
place, he was, at different times, the partner 
of John Rains, F. S. Lyon, D. C. Anderson, 
and William E. Clarke. In 1846, he was elected 



to the legislature from Marengo County, and 
two years later, was elected to the State senate 
from Wilcox and Marengo Counties. He served 
in that body until 1851, and a year later moved 
to Mobile, where he continued the practice of 
law. In 1866, he received a complimentary 
vote in the legislature for Justice of the su- 
preme court, and some time afterwards, formed 
a partnership with Hon. Percy Walker. He 
was a Whig. Married: to Miss Lewis, a sister 
of Hon. David W. Lewis of Georgia, and a 
cousin of Hon. D. H. Lewis of Lowndes County. 
Grace Manning of Perth Amboy, N. J., is a 
daughter. Last residence: Mobile. 

MANNING, ROBERT WILLIAM, business 
man, was born January 17, 1864, at Lineville, 
Clay County; son of Henry Allen and Marthy 
(Burrough) Manning, of Ashland, the former 
a native of Marietta County, Ga.; grandson of 
John Burrough, of Abner, Clay County. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of 
Ashland; entered upon the mercantile business 
at Ashland in 1886, continuing until 1908, when 
he established a life and fire insurance agency 
at Lineville, which he conducted until 1907. He 
served as postmaster of Lineville, 1886-1889, 
and 1894-1897; was appointed State land agent, 
succeeding John R. McCain, 1907; and since 
1911, has filled the position of land clerk in the 
State auditor's office. He is a Democrat; a 
Methodist; a Mason; and a Knight of Pythias. 
Married: to Eldorado, daughter of Benjamin 
Franklin and Amelia Holdrldge, of Ashland. 
He has one adopted daughter, Lucile. Resi- 
dence: Montgomery. 

MANNING-BREWER, ESTELLE HEBfP- 
STEAD, author of several novels. Married: 
Horace Augustus Thompson (q. v.). Residence: 
Lowndes County. 

MANUCY, DOMINIC, third Roman Catholic 
bishop of Mobile, was bom December 20, 1823, 
at St Augustine, Fla., and died December 4, 
1886, in Mobile. He was a cousin of Bishop 
Pellicier, first bishop of San Antonio^ Tex., and 
a descendant of Prancis Pellicier, who led the 
Minocans from the colony and oontrd of Dr. 
Tumbull, to St Augustine, Fla., in 1777. He 
was educated at Spring Hill college, Mobile, 
and in New Orleans, La.; and was ordained 
priest by Bishop Portier, August 16, 1860, at 
Mobile. He was stationed at the cathedral of 
the Immaculate Conception, 1860-1864, and was 
pastor of St. Peter's, Montgcmiery, 1864-1874. 
He was made titular bishop of Dulma, and 
appointed the first vicar apostolic of Browns- 
yille, Tex., by Pope Pius IX, and was conse- 
crated bishop at the cathedral of the Immacu- 
late Conception at Mobile, December 8, 1874^1 
by Archbishop Perche, assisted by Bishop 
Elder, of Natches, Miss., and Bishop Dubuls 
of Galveston, Tex. He immediately took pos- 
session of his see, which at that time was 
inhabited chiefiy by roving Mexicans. He es- 
tablished nine churches and secured the serv- 
ices of the Oblate Brothers, the Ursuline Sis- 
ters, and the Sisters of the Incarnate Word. 
Under his guidance schools were formed in 
Texas, at Laredo, Brownsville, and Corpus 
Christ!; academies at San Patricio and 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1157 



Refugio; St Joseph's college in charge of the 
Oblate Brothers at BrownsylUe; a high school 
at Laredo; and several free parochial schools. 
He was transferred bishop of Mobile and ad* 
ministrator of BrownsylUe, in March, 1884, as 
successor to the Rt. Rey. John Quinlan, de- 
ceased. Because of feeble health, he resigned 
both posts a few months later, and was re- 
appointed yicar-apostollc of Brownsville with 
the titular see of "Maronea/' but died before 
he could return to that place. Last residence: 
MobUe. 

MAPLES, WILLIAM C, soldier of tTie Ameri- 
can Revolution, "Died— At the residence of his 
sons, in Madison County, Ala., on the 26th ult., 
WnjjAH C. Maples, in the 8l8t year of his 
age. He was a native, of Virginia and was 
one of the Guard, at the age of fifteen years. 
on Dan River, when the battle was fought at 
Guilford Court House. He emigrated to Bast 
Tennessee in the year 1796, and served as a 
volunteer in the war of 1812; and emigrated 
to Alabama in the year 1833. He had been a 
member of the Baptist church for the rise of 
fifty years; he was a faithful and useful mem- 
ber of that society, and filled the office of a 
Deacon and Clerk for the church for a number 
of years; he was esteemed as a father in the 
Gospel; a tender husband and an afTectionate 
father to his children; an agreeable and ob- 
liging neighbor. He departed this life in the 
triumph of a living faith — 'In the hope of that 
eternal life which God, that cannot lie, prom- 
ised before the world began.' He has left a 
numerous train of connections, scattered al- 
most from the Atlantic to the Pacific ocean. 
The Athens, Tenn., and Lynchburg, Va., papers 
are requested to copy." — The Democrat, Hunts- 
viUe, Ala., Nov. 17, 1847. 

BIAPLES, WILLIAM CASWELL, physician, 
was bom August 81, 1869, at Poplar Ridge, Mad- 
ison County; son of John M. and Martha 
Prances (Ledbetter) Maples, the former a na- 
tive of Poplar Ridge, a farmer who lived at 
that place until 1896 when he moved to John- 
son County, Tez., and in 1902 moved to Jeffer- 
son County, Okla.; grandson of Peter and Mary 
Maples, who lived at Poplar Ridge, having 
come from Sevier County, Tenn., to Alabama 
in 1827, and who were of Holland descent, and 
of Daniel R. and Mariah Ledbetter, who came 
from Virginia and settled in New Hope, Madi- 
son County. He was educated in the common 
schools in the neighborhood of Poplar Ridge, 
and was graduated from the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Tennessee, M. D., 
1881. Since that time he has taken several 
post graduate courses. He began the practice 
of medicine in Poplar Ridge in 1881; practiced 
for eight years at Belief on te; and for more 
than twenty-five years at Scottsboro. He 
served as alderman of Scottsboro; was a mem- 
ber of the town council for five years; and 
county health officer for two terms. In 1890 
he was elected a counsellor in the Alabama 
State medical association. He is a Democrat. 
Married: February 27, 1889, to Sophronia, 
daughter of Gideon and Almarinda Starkey, 
who lived at Bellefonte, Jackson County, the 
former a captain in the C. S. Army, the latter 



whose people came to Jackson County from 
South Carolina. Children: 1. Willie; 2. Annie, 
m. Charles Heath, Stevenson; 3. Robert Cas- 
well; 4. Houston Ledbetter; 5. John Wade; 6. 
Emmett Starkey;* 7. James C. Residence: 
Scottsboro. 

MARBURY, JOSIAH H., business man, was 
born in 1841, in Shelbyville, Tenn., son of "L. 
W. and Mary (Kidd) Marbury, natives of Ten- 
nessee, who spent their entire lives in that 
state, the former a Primitive Baptist minister, 
a merchant, a soldier in the Mexican War, and 
a member of the Tennessee legislature, whose 
father was a North Carolinian, and moved from 
that state to Tennessee. He was reared prin- 
cipally at Tullahoma, and received a limited 
education. In July, 1861, he Joined the First 
Tennessee artillery, C. S. Army, and served 
with that command until October, 1864, when 
he was captured, and held prisoner at Camp 
Douglas, Chicago, lU., and at Point Lookout, 
Maryland, until the close of hostilities. While 
he was in the army, his father died, and for 
several years, he was left with the care of his 
mother and two sisters. He went to work as 
a carpenter and cabinet maker, at Blue 
Springs, Tenn., and in 1872, started in a co- 
partnership with Mr. Taft, in a sawmill at 
Jamison. They conducted their mill there 
until 1876, when they moved to Bozeman, and 
were Joined by a Mr. Smith. The firm was op- 
erated under the name of Smith, Taft and Mar- 
bury until December 1, 1887; Marbury and 
Jones, until January 1, 1892; and then became 
the Marbury lumber company, with Mr. Mar- 
bury at its head. He is a Mason and a Mission- 
ary Baptist. Married: (1) March 1, 1865, in 
Tennessee, to Mary Allen, a native of Louisi- 
ana; (2) to Mrs. Nancy E. Taft, the widow of 
his former partner, and a native of Pennsylva- 
nia, daughter of William Robinson and his wife, 
who were bom in England. Children, by first 
marriage: 1. Lizzie, m. C. W. Wilkinson, Bir- 
mingham; 2. David H., in the lumber business 
with his father; 3. Mary A.; 4. Neva W.; 6. 
Nellie T.; 6. Earnest L.; 7. Clara V.; 8. Jo- 
siah H., Jr. Residence: Bozeman. 

MARCHMAN, ROBERT LEE, teacher, was 
bom March 21, 1870, near Dalevllle, Dale 
County; son of William Henry and Nancy 
(Davis) Marchman, the former a native of 
Twiggs County, Ga., who lived at Daleville, and 
was elected to several county offices by the 
people of Dale County, who served four years 
in the C. S. Army, and lost his left arm in the 
battle of Atlanta, July 28, 1864; grandson of 
William Stephen Marchman, who lived near 
Macon, Ga. The family is of German descent, 
and his great-grandfather Marchman came from 
Maryland, to Georgia. He received his early 
education from the country schools at Dale- 
ville and Ozark; was graduated from the Troy 
normal school in 1896; and attended the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, one year, and Vanderbilt 
university, Nashville, Tenn., one year. He be- 
gan teaching in the country schools; later held 
the principalship of the high schools at Enter- 
prise, Sheffield and Andalusia; was elected 
county superintendent of education of Dale 
County, October 1, 1913; and continues to hold 
that position. He is a Democrat; a Baptist; a 



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Bfason; and an Odd Fellow. Married: June 27, 
1906, in Atlanta, Ga., to Eleanor Rowena, 
daughter of John Henry and Mary Jane Paris, 
who liTed in Kentucky. Children: 1. Robert 
Lee, Jr., b. May 5, 1906; 2. Frances Muriel, b. 
August 12, 1907; 3. Frederick, b. January 28, 
1912. Residence: DaleyiUe. 

MARDIS, NAPOLEON BONEPARTE. law- 
yer, was bom in Shelby County, and died Oc- 
tober 13, 1892, at Columbiana; son of Reuben 
and Margaret Mardis, the former a native of 
Tennessee, who lived in Shelby County and was 
a Methodist minister. He received his educa- 
tion in the common schools of Shelby County, 
studied law, was admitted to the bar, and prac- 
ticed in Columbiana. He was elected county 
treasurer of Shelby County in 1846 and con- 
tinued in that office unti 1857; represented 
Shelby County in the State legislature in 1857; 
was again elected county treasurer and held 
the office until he Joined the C. S. Army in 

1861. While he was serving in the army, he 
was elected Judge of probate of Shelby County, 

1862, and held that position until 1869. He 
was appointed and served as postmaster of 
Columbiana for a number of years before his 
death in 1892. He was a Republican and a 
Methodist. Married: to Adelaide Curtis, who 
survived him only a few years. He had no 
children of his own, but adopted two orphan 
children who lived with him a few years, one 
of whom was Mrs. John Cromwell of Colum- 
biana. Last residence: Columbiana. 

MARDIS, SAMUEL W., lawyer, representa- 
tive in congress, was bom June 12, 1800, in 
Tennessee, and died November 14, 1886, at 
Mardisville; son of Reuben Mardis, a farmer. 
He received an academic education, studied 
law, was admitted to the bar, and went with 
his father to Shelby County. He began to 
practice law in Montevallo; was elected to 
the State legislature from Shelby County in 
1823, and represented the county for several 
successive terms; was elected to congress over 
Gen. Garth of Morgan County and Col. Baylor 
of Tuscaloosa, 1831; was re-elected to con- 
gress, defeating Hon. Elisha Toung, of Greene 
County. At the expiration of his second term, 
he moved to Mardisville, Talladega County, 
and continued to practice law until his death. 
He was a Democrat. Married: to Miss Taylor, 
daughter of Robert Taylor, of Shelby County. 
His half-brother. Judge N. B. Mardis, was a 
citizen of Shelby County. Last residence: 
Mardisville. 

MARECHAL, EDWIN LESLEY, physician, 
was born June 27, 1850, at Chambersburg, 
Franklin County, Pa., and died August 19, 
1909, at Mobile; son of Charles Francois and 
Mary Selina (Blackburn) Mar^chal, the 
former a native of Verdun, Alsace-Lorraine, 
France, born February 1, 1806, the latter a 
South Carolinian, bom in Lancaster, whose 
surname originally was Maz^e, until she took 
the name of her step-father, Mr. Blackburn: 
grandson of Elise (Dernier) Mar^chal, of 
Verdun, France. His maternal ancestors were 
French Huguenots, who came to South Caro- 



lina in colonial times, and participated in the 
Revolutionary War, his great-grandfather 
having been injured at the battle of Cowpens. 
Dr. Marshal's father served seven years as 
an officer in the French Army in Algiers; 
came to New Orleans, La., in 1840; lived at 
Donaldsonville, La., for one year, then went 
to Camden, S. C, where he was married; con- 
ducted a mercantile business at Wilmington, 
N. C, until 1846; was professor of modem 
languages, of which he knew seven, in Dickin- 
son college, Chambersburg, Pa., 1846-1851, 
and in the Maplewood female seminary, 
Pittsfleld, Mass., 1851-1864; returned south 
and had charge of the modern language de- 
partment of the public schools of Mobile, 
1854-1862; enlisted in the French guards of 
Mobile, 1862, and was elected captain, doing 
principally provost duty; and taught school 
after the War of Secession, until his death in 
1877. Dr. Mar^chal attended the public 
schools of Mobile, and spent three years at 
Mobile college, now defunct. -He was gradu- 
ated from the medical college of the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, M. D., 1870; attended 
lectures at Tulane university. New Orleans, 
in 1871; began to practice medicine at 
Daphne, Baldwin County in 1871, and con- 
tinued there for three years when his health 
failed; withdrew from his practice tempo- 
rarily, and was connected with the press in 
Meridian, Miss., 1873-1874; returned to his 
medical practice in Daphne, 1877-1880; prac- 
ticed at Stockton until 1889; then located at 
Mobile, where he practiced until his death. 
While in Baldwin County, he organized the 
Baldwin County medical association; was 
county health officer for a number of years; 
and was president of the board of health of 
that county; was at one time health officer 
of Mobile County; served as lecturer on hy- 
giene and medical Jurisprudence, Medical 
college of Alabama, and was the first presi- 
dent of the alumni association of that insti- 
tution; was at one time president of the 
Alabama medical association; was a member 
of the school board of Mobile County for 
eighteen years, and for some time was presi- 
dent of that body. He was a Democrat; a 
Presbyterian; a Mason; and a Red Man. He 
was author of a number of published papers 
on medical subjects, and was founder and 
editor of the "Mobile Medical and Surgical 
Journal." Married: in 1874, at Meridian, 
Miss., to Julia Eliza, daughter of Isaac 
Saddler Orlando Grandison and Martha Ann 
(Mclnnis) Greer, of Jones Bluff, Sumter 
County, the former an early settler in 
Meridian, Miss., and head of the firm of Greer, 
Bogle and company, cotton factors. Her an- 
cestors on both sides were early settlers of 
Alabama, having gone there from south Caro- 
lina. Many of her relatives were participants 
in the Revolutionary War, and in the War of 
Secession. Children: 1. Marie Augusta, m. 
Samuel Sllenus Murphy (q. v.) ; 2. Grandison 
Greer, d. in infancy; 8. Julia Greer, m. H. J. 
Woods, of Meridian, Miss.; 4. Edwin Leslie, 
Jr., m. Leila Alice Harris, Mobile; 5. Edith 
Whitfield, m. Samuel Sllenus Murphy (q. v.) ; 
6. Greer Mclnnis, Washington, D. C; 7. 



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1159 



Claudia Silver, Mobile. Last residence: Mo- 
bile. 

MARKBLL, CHARLES FREDERICK, au- 
thor and lawyer, was bom October 16, 1855, 
at EYederick, Md.; son of Frederick and 
Catherine Sue (Thomas) Markell, the former 
a native of Frederick; grandson of Jacob and 
Rebecca (Miller) Markell, of Winchester, Va., 
the former a captain of the Maryland line in 
the War of 1812, and of George Thomas and 
wife, a Miss Rogan, of Kingsport, Tenn.; 
great-grandson of Conrad Markell, an officer 
in the German army who came to America 
from Alsace, 1747. landing at Philadelphia, 
Pa. Mr. Markell was educated at the Fred- 
erick academy, the male high school at 
Columbus, Miss., the St. John's military 
academy, at Alexandria, Va., St. John's col- 
lege, Frederick, Md., and was graduated from 
the Columbian, now Ctoorge Washington uni- 
versity, LL. B., 1876. He was admitted to 
the bar and practiced in the District of Col- 
umbia and in Maryland; was a member of 
the Maryland house of delegates, 1884-86, 
1896-97; U. S. secretary of legation to Brazil, 
1892, and charge' d' affairs 1893; and in- 
duced the Brazilian government to remove 
expediente tax on wheat flour from U. S. He 
located in Alabama in 1908. He is a Re- 
publican; and an Episcopalian. Author: 
'"Chamodine and other poems;" "The Chas- 
kell papers;" "Ypiranga — A love tale of the 
Brazils." Married: January 28, 1902, in New 
Tork City, his cousin Sue Markell, daughter 
of LaFayette and Ella Jane Rogan of Bir- 
mingham, a family of Irish origin. Resi- 
dence: Birmingham. 

MARKHAM, LEWIS, soldier of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, aged 75, resided in Lauder- 
dale County, June 1, 1840.— Cetwtw of Pension- 
ers, 1841, p. 148. 

MARKS, GEORGE MATHEWS, lawyer, 
was born in Montgomery County, June 28, 
1853; son of Samuel Blackburn and Mary L. 
(Crain) Marks, the former a native of 
Georgia, who removed to Montgomery County, 
and was colonel on Gen. J. M. Wither's staff 
during the War of Secession, and cousin of 
Samuel Blackburn Marks (q. v.) and Spencer 
Crain Marks (q. v.) George M. Marks was 
educated under Dr. Henry Tutwiler, at Green 
Springs; at Bellevue high school, Bedford 
County, Va., the University of the South, Se- 
wanee, Tenn., graduated from the Virginia 
military institute, 1874; and received the 
LL.B. degree from the University of Virginia, 
1876. He began the practice of law in At- 
lanta, Ga., remaining here only a year, re- 
moved to Montgomery and formed a partner- 
ship with Benjamin Fitzpatrlck. Upon the 
removal of Mr. Fitzpatrlck to Elmore County, 
he formed a partnership with Lester C. Smith 
and Gordon McDonald; in 1886 formed a 
partnership with P. C. Massie and at the 
present time is a member of the firm of 
Sayre and Marks. Married: in 1878, to Het- 
tie, daughter, of Napoleon and Mary Clay 
(Lockett) Lockett, of Perry County. Chll- 

Vol. IV— 11 



dren: 1. George Mathews, Jr.; 2. Mary 
Louise, m. Prof. Augustus Keaton McKemie, 
of Harrodsburg, Ky.; 3. Fannie Lockett, m. 
Robert Emmett Selbels, of Montgomery; 4. 
Hettie, m. William Bauer, of New London, 
Conn.; 5. Agnes Carey, m. Charles Allen Hop- 
kins, of Mobile. Residence: Montgomery. 

MARKS, SAMUEL BLACKBURN, planter 
and capitalist, was bom in Montgomery 
County, April 7, 1844; son of William 
Mathews and Catherine Ann (Crain) Marks, 
and brother of Spencer Crain Marks (q. v.). 
Mr. Marks received his early education in the 
public schools of Montgomery and was a stu- 
dent at the University of Alabama at the out- 
break of the War of Secession. He left the 
University in 1863 and enlisted in Co. A., 
Seventh Alabama cavalry and served through- 
out the war as a private. He was wounded at 
Lowndesboro, during the Federal raid under 
Gen. James H. Wilson. After the war he be- 
came a planter of Montgomery County and is 
now a stockholder in the First national bank, 
the Jasper coal and coke company and nu- 
merous other business interests of the State. 
Married: (1) in 1868, to Martha, daughter 
of Robert Means, of Pointe Coupee Parish, 
La.; (2) in 1879, to Laura Lewis, daughter 
of Lorenzo James (q. v.). Children: by first 
wife: 1. Hugh Means, planter of Mont- 
gomery County; by second wife: 2. Ellen, m. 
(1) Dr. Moharren Bey, of Munich and (2) 
L. Stafford Betty, of Montgomery; 3. 
Charles, planter, physician; M. D. University 
of Virginia; m. Priscilla, daughter of John B. 
and Priscilla (Tyler) Scott, of Montgomery; 
4. Churchill, planter, student at Alabama 
polytechnic institute for two years; m. Sallie 
Watkins, daughter of Dr. M. L. Wood (q. v.). 
Residence: Montgomery. 

MARKS, SPENCER CRAIN, banker, was 
bom at Pike Road, Montgomery CJounty, 
March 7, 1840, and died in Montgomery, 
January 12, 1904; son of William Mathews 
and Catherine Ann (Crain) Marks, the former 
a native of Oglethorpe County, Ga., who re- 
moved to Alabama in 1820 with his parents, 
located in Montgomery County, and became 
one of the wealthiest planters of the State 
and brother of Samuel Marks (q. v.); grand- 
son of Nicholas Meriwether and Ann Paul 
(Mathews) Marks, the former a native of 
Fredericksville Parish, Albemarle County, 
Va., who removed to Broad River settlement, 
Ga., and shortly after his marriage to Mont- 
gomery County, where he acquired extensive 
and valuable property, the latter the grand- 
daughter of Gov. Mathews, of Georgia, and of 
Spencer and Mary (Tomkins) Crain, of 
Montevallo, Jasper County, Ga.; great-grand- 
son of James and Elizabeth (Harris) Marks, 
the former a native of Albemarle County, 
Va., and magistrate of this county in 1873, 
who removed to Wilkes County, Ga., where 
he became a well known member of the Broad 
River settlement; great-nephew of John 
Marks, a captain in the Revolutionary Army, 
who married Lucy Meriwether Lewis, the 
widow of William Lewis and mother of Meri- 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



wether Lewis, the explorer, of Peter and 
Joanna (Lydwor) Marks, the former ee- 
cheater of Albemarle County, Va., and of 
Hastings and Ann Scott (Jefferson) Marks, 
of the tide water-district of Virginia and the 
latter the sister of President Thomas Jeffer- 
son; great-great-grandson of John and Lady 
Elisabeth (Hastings) Marks, the former a 
native of Suffolk, England, who emigrated to 
America and settled in Albemarle County, 
Va., and of John and Martha (Oaines) Marks, 
the former a natiye of Oargunnock, Sterling- 
shire, Scotland, who emigrated to America 
and located at Aberfogle, Albemarle County. 
Va., lived for a while in Richmond County, 
Va. and was King's attorney of Amherst 
County, Va., from 1761-68. Spencer C. Marks 
was educated in the public schools of Mont- 
gomery, attended Dr. Henry Tutwiler's school 
at Green Springs for three years, and was 
a student at the University of Virginia, grad- 
uating in 1860. He left on the breaking out 
of the War of Secession, returned to Mont- 
gomery and joined the First Alabama cavalry, 
under Oen. James. H. Clanton. After the war 
he engaged in the cotton business as a mem- 
ber of the well known firm of Marks and 
Gayle. He was the first democratic treasurer 
of Montgomery County after reconstruction 
days; was a director in the Merchants and 
planters, Farley national and the Fourth na- 
tional banks, and for many years served as 
Junior warden of St John's Episc(^»al church. 
Married: October 1, 1862, at Montgomery, to 
Laura Hall, daughter of John Atkinson and 
Amanda (Hall) Snodgrass, of that place. 
Children: 1. William Mathews, m. at Ra- 
leigh, N. C, to Jane Hawkins, daughter of 
Col. A. B. and Julia M. (Johnston) Andrews, 
the former 1st vice-president of the Southern 
railway at the time of his death, and grand- 
daughter of Col. William and Ann Eliza (Gra- 
ham) Johnston, of Charlotte, N. C; 2. Spen- 
cer Grain, d. young; 3. Bthel» m. Guy R. 
Brightwell, of Mazeys, Ga. Last residence: 
Montgomery. 

MARSHALL, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, 
Methodist minister, was bom near Carroll- 
ton, Carroll County, Miss.; son of James Al- 
fred and Mary Elizabeth (Farish) Marshall, 
the former who was born near Livingston, 
Sumter County, and emigrated to Carroll 
County, Miss., in 1842, enlisted in Co. A, 
Forty-second Mississippi regiment. May, 1862, 
and was discharged because of a crippled 
hand, later enlisted in the First Mississippi 
battalion, and was parolled April, 1866, at 
Greensboro, N. C; grandson of Benjamin 
Thomas and Carolin (Swann) Marshall, who 
lived in Madison, Marengo and Sumter Coun- 
ties, and in Carroll County, Miss., the former 
a native of Madison County, who served sev- 
eral times in the legislature, and of Robert 
Stephens and I^ncy (Ware) Farish, who 
lived at Tuscaloosa, and at Black Hawk, 
Miss.; great-grandson of Thomas Marshall 
and a Miss Malone, who emigrated to Madi- 
son County in 1811, the latter a daughter of 
a Revolutionary soldier, who came to Ala- 
bama and settled in the Tennessee Valley; 
great-great-grandson of James Marshall, who 



lived in Kershaw District, S. C, near Camden, 
and was a colonel in the Revolutionary Army. 
He received his early education at Greenwood, 
Miss., under A. F. Gkurdner, and at Carroll- 
ton, Miss., from J. C. Hardy, later the presi- 
dent of the Agricultural and mechanical 
college at Starkville, Miss. He was gradu- 
ated from Southern university at Greensboro, 
A. B., 1895, and became a minister in the 
Methodist church, in December of that year. 
He has served as pastor of churches at Butler, 
Faunsdale, Eutaw, Montgomery, Abbeville, 
Gastonburg, Dothan, and Opp, in Alabama, 
and is now in charge of the Methodist church 
at De Funiak Springs, Fla. He is a Dono- 
crat; a Royal Arch Mason; and a Knight of 
Pythias. Married: December 18, 1895, at 
Demopolis, to Panthea Mary, daughter of 
Thomas Henry and Lucie (Baltzell) De- 
Loach, who lived at Demopolis; grand- 
daughter of Panthea Mary Bullock, of Greene 
County, sister of Hon. James Bullock, a mem- 
ber of the Alabama senate. The Bullock 
family is connected with the mother of Presi- 
dent Roosevelt Children: 1. Nell. Residence: 
De Funiak Springs, Fla. 

MARSHALL, JAMES WILLIAMS, Presby- 
terian minister, a native of the State and 
whose early life was spent here, was bom 
January 20, 1882, at Perdue Hill, Monroe 
County; son of John Lee and Janie Edwards 
(Foster) Marshall, the former 1st lieutenant 
Co. G, 86th Alabama infantry regiment, for 
a number of years tax collector of Monroe 
County, a descendant of Needham Bryan who 
settled in Bertie County, N. C, 1722. Rev. 
Mr. Marshall attended the public schools of 
Perdue Hill, and received the degrees of 
A. M., 1905, and B. D., 1907, from South- 
western Presbyterian university, Clarksville, 
Tenn.; was ordained October 23, 1907, at 
Tuskegee, by the East Alabama presbytery, 
and served churches at Tuskegee, Downs, 
Calebee and Montgomery, before removing to 
Arkansas. He is a Democrat; Mason; a Red 
Man; and a member of the Pi Kappa Alpha 
college fraternity. Unmarried. Residence: 
Junction City, Ark. 

MARSHALL, JOSEPH WALDEN, Sb., busi- 
ness man, was bom August 16, 1881, at Center, 
Cherokee County; son of John Lawrence and 
Martha Elizabeth (Shackleford) Marshall, of 
Cherokee County; grandson of Samuel P. 
L. and Margaret (Lawrence) Marshall, of Bd- 
dyville, Lyon (bounty, Ky., the former, a de- 
scendant of John Marshall, chief Justice of the 
U. S., was a Judge in Kentucky during the early 
settlement of that state, and owned one of the 
first furnaces ever established in Alabama, at 
Round Mountain, Cherokee County, and pro- 
duced great quantities of iron for the Confed- 
eracy, and of William Clark and Elisabeth 
(Hale) Shackleford, of Center. Bfr. Marshall 
was educated in the public schools at CJenter 
and Girard. He was for a number of years in 
the hotel business in Alabama and (Georgia; in 
1911, was appointed assistant postmaster of the 
Girard post-ofllce, and in 1917 the postmaster; 
was local secretary of the U. S. civil service 
commission, Russell County, 1914-1917; and 



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GREGORY L. SMITH 



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1163 



represented that county in the state legislature, 
1919. He is a Democrat Married: December 
26, 1907, at Hillsboro, Washington County, Ore., 
to Anna Marie, dau^^ter of Collin C. and Ma- 
tilda (Williams) Frazier, of La Grande, Union 
County, Ore., the former who came to the 
United States from Scotland when a boy of six* 
teen; great-granddaughter of Roy. Jolly, who 
preached the first sermon in the First Presby- 
terian Church of Portland, Ore. Children: 1. 
Joseph Walden, Jr.; 2. Lawrence Collin. Resi- 
dence: Gadsden. 

MARTIN, ABRAHAM, lawyer, was bom in 
1798, in Edgefield District, S. C; brother of 
Hon. William D. Martin, of South Carolina, and 
of John Martin (q. t.). The family of Martins 
in Edgefield District, S. C, were conspicuous 
during the Reyolutionary War for their united 
efforts in the cause of independence. There 
were seven brothers, William, Bartly, James, 
John, Edmund, Marshall* and Mathew Martin, 
all of whom took an active part in the war. 
Several were wounded, but all survived tiie war 
except William Martin, who fell at the seige of 
Augusta, and at the time of his death was one 
of the oldest captains in the service. Mathew 
Martin was alive in 1846, residing in Tennessee, 
but died at the close of that year. Mr. Martin 
moved from South Carolina to Tennessee with 
an unde, and was graduated at Greenville col- 
lege. He was admitted to the bar in 1821, and 
served as district solicitor in Tennessee for 
several years. He moved to Montgomery Coun- 
ty in 1832, and conducted his law practice there 
until 1837, when, on the death of Judge William 
R. Pickett, he was elected Judge of the circuit 
court, defeating E. S. Dargan and J. P. Booth of 
Barbour. He served in that position for six 
years, then resumed the practice of his profes- 
sion, part of the time in association with M. A. 
Baldwin and P. Tucker Sayre. During the War 
of Secession, he was collector of the government 
revenue in the state. Last residence: Mont- 
gOTiery. 

MARTIN, ALBURTO, lawyer, was born July 
9, 1830, in Jefferson County, and died in No- 
vember, 1880, in Birmingham; son of Col. John 
and Sarah (Kilpatrick) Martin who were 
among the first settlers of Jefferson County. He 
was graduated frcHn the University of Alabama, 
A. B., 1850, and A. M., 1857. He began to prac- 
tice law in El3rton, 1856, and three years later 
was elected to the State legislature from Jeffer- 
son County. He was re-elected in 1861, and 
served until 1863. At the outbreak of the War 
of Secession, he raised a company, which later 
became a part of the Tenth Alabama infantry, 
and was made captain, 1861. He served with 
his command at Drainsville, Yorktown, Wil- 
liamsburg, Seven Pines, Gaines' Mill, Frazier's 
Farm, and at Second Manassas, and at the last 
named place was dangerously wounded by a 
shell, and crippled for life. He was elected 
solicitor at the Judicial circuit of Jefferson 
County in 1863, was displaced by Gov. Parsons, 
and was re-elected by the general assembly of 
1865, serving until disqualified by congress in 
1S68. From that time until his death in 1879, 
he practiced his profession in and around Birm- 



ingham. He was a member of the constitutional 
convention of 1875. Married: at Elyton to Har- 
riet Louisa, daughter of Judge William S. Mudd 
(q. v.). One of his sons is William Mudd Mar- 
tin, lawyer at Birmingham, who was born De- 
cember 15, 1868, and served in the Spanish- 
American War, 1898, as first lieutenant of Co. 
A, First Alabama volunteer infantry, U. S. 
Army. Last residence: Birmingham. 

MARTIN, ANDREW, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 86, and a resident of Madison 
County; private N. C. Continental Line; en- 
rolled on September 26, 1833, under act of Con- 
gress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $36.66; sums 
received to date of publication of list, $91.65. — 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. 
doc 514, 23rd Cong., Ist sess., 1833-34. He re- 
sided in Madison County, June 1, 1840, aged 
105. — Census of Pensioners 1841, p. 148. 

MARTIN, A. L., pioneer Missionary Baptist 
preacher; deceased; father of Harry Martin, 
of Ozark. 

MARTIN, CHARLES DOTHARD, business 
man, was born March 26, 1854, at Jacksonville, 
Calhoun County; son of James B. and Mary E. 
(Nisbit) Martin, the former a native of Haber- 
sham County, Ga., who moved to Alabama and 
lived in Jacksonville, Talladega and Cahaba, 
was a lawyer, a circuit Judge, and entered the 
C. S. Army as lieutenant colonel of the Tenth 
Alabama regiment, and was killed at the battle 
of Drainsville, Va., December 20, 1861; grand- 
son of John and Eliiabeth (Sisson) Martin, 
who lived in Habersham County, Qa., and at 
Athens, Oa., and of John and Nancy (Baldwin) 
Nisbit, of Athens, Ga., and Jacksonville; and 
a descendant of John Nisbit, a member of the 
provisional congress of 1775, who served as a 
private soldier in the Revolutionary Army, and 
was the first senator from Iredell County, N. C. 
Mr. Martin's great-great-grandfather Martin 
was a continental soldier, enlisting from North 
Carolina. The Nisbit family came to Pennsyl- 
vania from Scotland in 1704, and moved to 
North Carolina in 1742. Bfr. Martin obtained his 
education in private schools. He is a farmer, a 
railroad builder and a lumberman. He has 
served the city of Jacksonville as treasurer, 
member of the council and as mayor, and for 
four years was county commissioner. He rep- 
resented Calhoun County in the State legisla- 
ture, 1911; is a Democrat; a Presb3rterian; a 
Mason; Woodman of the World; Knight of 
Honor; and Columbian Woodman. Married: 
in April, 1899, to Georgia, daughter of Dr. 
George and Martha Minge (Douglass) Hoke, 
of Jacksonville, the former who moved to 
Alabama from North Carolina in 1832 or 
1833, the latter a native of Danville, Va. Resi- 
dence: Jacksonville. 

MARTIN, CHARLES PATRICK, physician, 
was bom November 21, 1877, at Coaling, Tusca- 
loosa County; son of William Bruce and Wil- 
mouth Catherine (Crunk) Martin, the former 
a native of Springfield, Robinson County, Tenn., 
who lived at Woodstock; grandson of Patrick 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Patterson and Martha (Farmer) Martin, of 
Springfield, Tenn., and Walton and Nancy 
(Benton) Crunk, of Springfield, Tenn. He re- 
ceived his early education at Coaling, at Wood- 
stock academy, and at University high school 
at Tuscaloosa. He was graduated from South- 
ern university at Greensboro, B. S., 1895, and 
from Vanderbilt university, M. D., 1900. He 
began the practice of medicine at Russellville, 
June 1. 1900; moved to Blocton in January, 
1903, and practiced there for three years; lo- 
cated at Woodstock in 1907; and after several 
years at that place, moved to Texas, where he 
continued the practice of medicine. He served 
as vice-president of the Bibb County medical 
society; as vice-president of the Association 
of surgeons of the Southern railway; was a 
member of the State medical association of 
Alabama; of the Southern medical association; 
is a Democrat; a Methodist; a thirty-second de- 
gree Scottish Rite Mason; a Knight Templar, 
and was elected grand commander of the 
Knight Templars of Alabama, May 14, 1913, at 
Dothan. Married: December 12, 1900, at Rus- 
sellville, to Willie Virginia, daughter of 
William T. and Carolina Virginia Reid, who 
lived at West Union, S. C. Children: 1. Wil- 
liam Reid; 2. Charles Patrick, Jr. Residence: 
Texas. 

MARTIN, EDMUND W., lawyer and legisla- 
tor, was born December 15, 1821, near the city 
of Montgomery, and died October 22, 1878, at 
Evergreen. He was educated at West Point 
military academy. After returning home he 
was admitted to the practice of law at Hayne- 
ville, about the year 1843. During the con- 
fiict with Mexico he raised a company known 
as the "Lowndes County Volunteers," was made 
captain and went immediately to Mobile where 
they were mustered into the government's serv- 
ice, but did not arrive at the scene of action 
as transportation facilities prevented their be- 
ing transferred. He removed to Sparta in 1849, 
where he resumed the practice of law. During 
the War of Secession he raised a company of 
volunteers; was made captain and subsequently 
major, 38th Alabama infantry regiment, C. S. 
Army. He was wounded at the battle of Dal- 
ton, Qa. Major Martin was elected to the State 
senate in 1872, but was not seated because of 
the dominancy of the Republican party. In 
1S74 he was re-seated, however, as the Demo- 
crats had gained the ascendency. He was the 
candidate for lieutenant-governor in the con- 
vention of 1874 but was defeated and was, in 
1878. defeated as a candidate for congress. Last 
residence: Evergreen. 

MARTIN, HARRY, lawyer. Residence: 
Ozark. 

MARTIN, JAMES, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 75, and a resident of Greene 
County, private S. C. Militia; enrolled on Sep- 
tember 17, 1833, under act of Congress of June 
7, 1832, payment to date from March 4, 1831; 
annual allowance, $40; sums received to date of 
publication of list, $120. — Revolutionary Pen- 
8ion Roll, In vol. xiv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 
1st sess., 1833-34. 



MARTIN, JAMES BENSON, lawyer, was bom 
September 17, 1825, in Habersham County, Ga., 
and was killed in battle, December 20, 1861, at 
Drainsville, Va.; son of John and Elizabeth 
Martin, who lived in Georgia until the death 
of the former, after which time Mrs. Martin re- 
sided in Jacksonville. He was deprived of edu- ' 
cational advantages by the death of his father, 
and when he was nineteen years old, went to 
Calhoun County, where he read law under Hon. 
A. J. Walker. He was admitted to the bar in 
1845, and began to practice his profession in 
Jacksonville, first associated with J. L. Lewis, 
and later with A. J. Walker. In 1852, he was 
elected general of Alabama militia, and the fol- 
lowing year, went to Talladega, where at differ- 
ent times he was associated with John T. Mor- 
gan and A. W. Bowie. He was elected to the 
State legislature from Talladega County in 
1857; opened a law office in Cahaba in 1858; re- 
mained there for some months, then returned 
to Talladega. He was elected Judge of the tenth 
judicial circuit in 1860, and returned to Jack- 
sonville shortly before the beginning of the Waf 
of Secession. He was commissioned captain of 
the Pope Walker guards, by Gov. Moore, May 
27, 1861, and appointed by President Davis, 
lieutenant colonel of the Tenth Alabama in- 
fantry regiment on its formation. The regiment 
was sent to Virginia, and in one <^ the first bat- 
tles, the battle of Drainsville, Col. Martin was 
shot and instantly killed.. He was a Democrat 
and a Presbyterian. Married: to Mary Eliza- 
beth Nisbet, daughter of John and Nancy (Bald- 
win) Nisbet, of Jacksonville. Among his chil- 
dren were John Thcxnas Martin (q. v.), and 
James Benson Martin (q. v.). Last residence: 
Jacksonville. 

MARTIN, JAMES BENSON, lawyer, was 
born March 16, 1856, at Talladega; son of James 
Benson and Mary Elizabeth (Nisbet) Martin (q. 
v.). He attended the common schools of Jack- 
sonville, and was graduated from the law school 
of the University of Alabama, LL. B., in July, 
1876. He was admitted to the bar in October of 
that year, and has practiced in Gadsden since 
that time. He is a Democrat, and a deacon in 
the Southern Presbyterian church. Married: 
December 12, 1882, at Gadsden, to C^harlsie 
Ward, daughter of Q. W. and Sarah A. Ward, 
of Gadsden. Children: 1. Mary, m. William 
Elarl Lay, of Gadsden. Residence: Gadsden. 

MARTIN, JOHN, banker, was bom about 
1800, in South Carolina, and died in 1844, in 
Montgomery; brother of Abraham Martin (q. 
v.). His family was connected with the Elmores 
and Fitzpatricks, and he was a relative of 
Senator Dixon H. Lewis. He came to Mont- 
gomery at an early period in the history of the 
city, and filled many positions of public trust. 
He was elected president of the Branch Bank 
of Montgomery in 1837, and was continued in 
that position by successive elections until his 
death. He was a Democrat Married: to a 
daughter of Cyrus Phillips, a merchant of Mont- 
•gomery. Among his sons was Gen. Edmund W. 
Martin, lawyer, who was born December 15. 
1821, near Montgomery and died October 22, 
1878, at Evergreen; was graduated from the 



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U. S. Military Academy at West Point; took a 
course in law; was admitted to the bar; and 
began to practice law in Hayneville, 1848; 
raised a company upon the beginning of war 
with Mexico in 1846, and was elected its cap- 
tain; in 1849 practiced law in Sparta; raised a 
company of volunteers during the War of Seces- 
sion; was made its captain, and subsequently 
major of the regiment to which his company 
was attached; was wounded at the battle of 
Dalton, Oa^ February, 1864; was elected to the 
State senate from Butler and Conecuh Counties, 
1872; was an unsuccessful candidate for lieuten- 
ant governor in 1874, and for congress in 1878. 
Last residence: Montgomery. 

MARTIN, JOHN JACOB, lawyer, was bom 
September 12. 1826. in Abbeville District, S. 
C; son of Jacob Moon Martin, a native of Albe- 
marle County. Va., who moved to Edgefield Dis- 
trict. S. C. with his parents in early childhood; 
grandson of Charles and Nancy (Moore) Mar- 
tin, of Abbeville District. S. C, the former of 
whom served as high sheriff of Albemarle and 
Bedford Counties in the colonial history of Vir- 
ginia, and of William Modre who married a 
Miss Nichols and lived in Edgefield District, 
and in Cambridge. S. C. He received his edu- 
cation in South Carolina high school and 
Brskine college, and studied law with the firm 
of Martin ft Marshall, of Abbeville. S. C. He 
was admitted to the bar and began practicing 
law in 1849, in Abbeville, becoming a partner 
in the firm of Martin ft Parker. He volunteered 
as a private for the Mexican War in 1846, and 
was assigned to the Palmetto regiment of South 
Carolina volunteers U. S. Army. He was ap- 
pointed first lieutenant of the Twelfth regiment, 
U. S. infantry by President Polk, after the 
siege of Vera Cruz, and later was made cap- 
tain of Co. A, Twelfth regiment He was a 
Democrat until 1861, but was opposed to seces- 
sion, and since 1865 has been a Republican. 
He is a member of the Aztec Club of 1847 in 
the Mexican War. Married: in 1868. in Sa- 
vannah, Oa., to Mary E. Walker, daughter of 
Benjamin and Caroline (Edwards) Walker, 
who lived in Richmond County. Qa. Children: 

1. Carrie B., m. E. J. Allen, East Point, Ga.; 

2. B. W. d. at College Park; 8. Annita, m. H. 
K. Sturdevant, Greenville, S. C; 4. John J., jr., 
Atlanta, Ga.; 5. Summerstill. Atlanta. Ga. 
Residence: East Point. Ga. 

MARTIN. JOHN MASON, lawyer, representa- 
tive in congress, was bom January 20. 1888. in 
Athens, Limestone County, and died June 16, 
1898 in Bowling Green. Ky.; son of Joshua 
Ijanier and Sara (Mason) Martin (q. v.). He 
received his early schooling at Greene Springs, 
from Dr. Henry Tutwiler; attended the Uni- 
versity of Alabama for two years; and was 
erraduated from Centre College, Danville. Ky., 
A. B., 1856. He studied law under E. W. Peck, 
later chief Justice of the state; was admitted to 
the bar at Montgomery. August, 1868; and be- 
gan the practice of law at Tuscaloosa. He con- 
tinued in his profession until in April. 1861, he 
enlisted in the C. S. Army, joining the first com- 
pany organized at Tuscaloosa. His company 
was assigned to the fifth Alabama infantry, and 



he remained with that command for a year, 
when on account of physical disability he was 
discharged. He again entered the service, ac- 
cepting an appointment as captain and assist- 
ant quartermaster of the Forty-first Alabama 
infantry, and twenty months later was trans- 
ferred to Montgomery and made post quarter- 
master. After the war, he resumed his law 
practice, and in August, 1871, was elected to the 
State senate to fill a vacancy. He was re-elected 
in 1872 for a full term, and during the five 
years of his service was for three years presi- 
dent pro tern of that body. He was prominent 
in the calling of the constitutional convention 
in 1875. was a member of the joint committee 
on the State bonded indebtedness, was chairman 
of the joint committee on penitentiary affairs, 
and served on the committees on judiciary, 
finance, taxation and education, and was chair- 
man of the local legislative committee. He was 
elected professor of equity jurisprudence at the 
University of Alabama in 1875, and at the same 
time, the board of trustees, at the request of the 
faculty, graduated him with the degree of A. M.. 
and directed that his name should be enrolled 
with the original class. He occupied the pro- 
fessorship until 1886; was elected a representa- 
tive in the Forty-ninth congress from the sixth 
district of Alabama, 1885-1887, serving in the 
first session as k member of the committees of* 
elections and patents, and was one of the six 
Democrats who voted against the Morrison 
tariff bill. That act gave offense to the agricul- 
tural portion of his district and he was de- 
feated for renomination. In 1891, he was 
elected chairman of the Democratic executive 
committee of Jefferson County. He formed a 
law partnership with Capt A. B. McEachin of 
Tuscaloosa, in September, 1886, and in the next 
month the firm moved to Birmingham and con- 
tinued its practice. The degree oi LL. D. was 
conferred upon Prof. Martin by Centre college, 
1886; by Central university. 1878; and by 
Georgetown university. He was a Mason, a 
Knight of Pythias, a Knight of Honor, and a 
Knight Templar. Married: November 24, 1857. 
to Lucy E. Peck, daughter of E. W. Peck, of 
Tuscaloosa. Of his nine children, four died in 
infancy, and one son, Lanier, at the age of four- 
teen. The others are: 1. Wolsey Randall, was 
graduated A. B., LL. B., 1884, and A. M., 1889. 
from the University of Alabama, lawyer at Fort 
Smith, Ark., m. Sue Dedie Bozeman; 2. Lucy 
Grace Archer, b. November 8, 1873, m. William 
Nessler McKelvy.^ captain in the U. S. Navy; 8. 
Sara; 4. Lydia Peck. b. September 1, 1879. m. 
William Marshall. Ann Arbor. Mich. Last resi- 
dence: Bowling Green, Ky. 

MARTIN. JOHN THOMAS, lawyer, was bom 
February 13, 1850. at Jacksonville. Calhoun 
County, and died January 27. 1911, at Jackson- 
ville; son of James Benson and Bfary Elizabeth 
(Nisbet) Martin (q. v.) . He obtained his school- 
ing in Montgomery and Jacksonville, studied 
law and was admitted to the bar in 1870 or 1871. 
He practiced his profession in Jacksonville and 
Anniston; was elected solicitor of the seventh 
judicial circuit of Alabama in 1880; was re- 
elected in 1886. and served in the office for 
twelve years. He was a member of the State 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



constitutional convention of 1901, representing 
Calhoun County; was a Democrat, and a Pres- 
byterian. Married: February 5, 1873, at Jack- 
sonville, to Sue H. Francis, daughter of Dr. 
James C. and Amy (Ingram) Francis, of Jack- 
sonville; granddaughter of Miller and Hannah 
(Henry) Francis, of Tennessee, the former of 
whom was treasurer of that state for a number 
of years. Mrs. Martin had six brothers in the 
War of Secession: Dr. Miller W. Francis, surg- 
eon; MaJ. Thomas W. Francis; Capt. James C. 
Francis, Jr., who was wounded in the first battle 
of Manassas; Hopkins T. Francis; Col. John C. 
Francis, killed in the battle near Dalton, Oa., 
and buried at Jacksonville; and Joseph H. 
Francis. Children: 1. Woodson James, m. 
Jimmie Earl Jackson, Gadsden; 2. Frank, d. 
1904 at Jacksonville; 3. Joseph Francis, d. 1904, 
in New York, N. Y.; 4. Amie, m. Robert Wilson 
Morris, Birmingham; 6. John Thomas, Jr., 
Jacksonville. Last residence: Jacksonville. 

BIARTIN, JOSHUA LANIER, lawyer, repre- 
sentative in congress, twelfth governor of Ala* 
bama, was bom December 6, 1799, in Blount 
County, Tenn., and died November 2, 1856, in 
Tuscaloosa; son of Warner and Martha 
(Bailey) Martin, the former a farmer, the latter 
a sister of Hon. Henry Bailey, attorney general 
of Sputh Carolina in 1836-1846; a descendant 
of Louis Montaigne, who fled from France ia 
1824 and settled in South Carolina, changing 
his name to Martin. He was <^ French Hugue- 
not, Scotch and Gterman ancestry and was a 
brother of Hon. William B. Martin of Lauder- 
dale County, and of Peter Martin (q. v.). He 
studied under the Rev. Isaac Anderson of Mary- 
ville, Tenn., and the Rev. Gideon Blackburn, 
and moved to Alabama in 1819. After complet- 
ing the study of law with his brother in Russell- 
ville, he was admitted to the bar, and entered 
upon the practice of law at Athens, Limestone 
County. He was elected to the State Legislature 
from Limestone County in 1S22, and served 
continuously, with the exception of one year, 
until 1828; was elected solicitor of the fourth 
Judicial circuit in 1829, and held the position 
until 1834, when he resigned in order to accept 
a seat on the bench of the circuit court; was 
elected over Qen. James Davis and Ralph 
Thatch to represent his district in the U. S. con- 
gress, 1835; was re-elected in 1837 over Hon. 
David G. Ligon of Lawrence County, and served 
until 1839; was elected chancellor of the middle 
chancery division of the state, defeating Hon. 
E. W. Peck, 1841. In 1845, he opposed the regu- 
lar Democratic nominee for governor, assailing 
the convention as a "rump convention," which 
did not represent the Democracy of the state, 
but was held and manipulated in the interest of 
the debtors of the state bank and its branches. 
He announced himself as candidate and took 
the stump to wage one of the most brilliant 
campaigns in the political history of the state. 
He was elected governor with a plurality of six 
thousand votes. Soon after his inauguration, a 
commission was created into whose charge the 
whole matter of the state banks was given. 
During his administration, war was declared 
with Mexico and the capital of the state was 
removed from Tuscaloosa to Montgomery. At 



the expiration of his term. Gov. Martin resumed 
his law practice. His last public service was 
to represent his county in the State legislature 
in 1853. He served in public life for more than 
a quarter of a century and was never defeated 
for any position which he sought Married: 
(1) to Mary Gillam Mason, (2) to Sarah Ann 
Mason, natives of Virginia, sisters of Hon. Wil- 
liam Mason, of Limestone County; cousins of 
Hon. John Y. Mason, who descended from Col. 
John Mason, an Englishman and a soldier in 
the army of Charles I, who fled to America on 
the execution of that monarch, and became the 
progenitor of the Mason family of Virginia. 
Mrs. Sarah Ann Martin survived her husband 
many years, and died at the residence of her 
daughter, Mrs. Kinnaird, in Kentucky, March 9, 
1886. Children: flve sons and two daughters, 
among whom are: 1. John Mason (q. v.); 2. 
Peter, b. July 4, 1839, d. December 18, 1883, was 
a planter at Orlando, Fla.; 3. Charles James, b. 
May 16, 1845, served as a private in the C. S. 
Army, Justice of the peace, m. in Jones' Valley, 
December, 1867, to Nannie Smith, Birmingham ; 
4. Mrs. Kinnaird, Kentucky. Last residence: 
Tuscaloosa. 

MARTIN. LUCIEN VAN BUREN, Judge and 
planter, was bom March 31, 1829, in Belleview, 
Franklin County, and died In Tuscaloosa, March 
22, 1873; son of Judge Peter Martin (q. v.). He 
received his early education in the schools of 
Tuscaloosa, where his parents had removed; 
received the degrees of A. B., 1849, and A. M. 
1852, from the University of Alabama; read law 
in the ofllce of his father and was admitted to 
the bar, 1852. He was elected solicitor of the 
third Judicial district, 1856, by the legislature 
and held this office until the comm^icement of 
the War of Secession. President Johnson ap- 
pointed him district attorney for the southern 
district of Alabama, but he was unable to dis- 
play his talent in this offlce as the presiding 
Judge, Richard Busteed, threw every obstacle 
in his way because <^ his opposition to the ap- 
pointment of Col. Martin. The conduct of 
Judge Busteed became so overbearing that Col. 
Martin attacked and shot him down on the 
streets of Mobile. The case was tried by the 
civil tribunal and only a small flne was imposed 
upon him. He was editorial manager of "The 
Tuscaloosa Observer;" a Democratic political 
paper, at the same time practicing law and 
supervising the management of his large cotton 
plantation. Married: October 16, 1850, to 
Susan Virginia, daughter of James Hiurris, 
sr., and Rebecca Emily (Faulcon) Fitts (q. v.). 
Children: 1. Emily Lee, m. (3eorge Wooisey 
Van Hoose; 2. Harriet, d. young; 3. SalUe 
Bell, m. Gideon Frederick Martin; 4. Susau 
Fitts, d. in Infancy; 5. Lucia, m. James WU- 
liam Erwin; 6. Harry Pegues, d. in infancy. 
Last residence: Tuscaloosa. 

MARTIN, LYMAN WADDELL, lawyer, was 
born May 21, 1834, at Monterey, Abbeville 
District, S. C; son of Charles Washington 
and Susan Caroline (Giles) Martin, the for- 
mer a native of Abbeville District, S. C, who 
lived at Monterey, then called Church HilU 
was a Presbyterian minister and died when 



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he was twenty-nine years old; grandson of 
Jacob Moon and Nancy (Moore) Martin, of 
Monterey, S. C, and of Andrew and fc$ara 
Caroline (Patterson) Giles, of Monterey, S. 
C; great-grandson of Charles and Patsy 
(Moon) Martin, of Albemarle County, Va., 
and of Thomas Giles of Virginia, who emi- 
grated to Elbert County, Ga., about 1780, and 
was killed by Indians, on Broad River, Elbert 
County, 1796, and of Josiah and Abigail 
(Blair) Patterson, who lived in Abbeville Dis- 
trict, S. C, the former whose father was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary Army; great- 
great-grandson of Capt. Thomas Martin of the 
provincial service of Virginia, a native of 
Albemarle County, Va., born in 1714, and of 
Jacob Moon, of Virginia; great-great-great- 
grandson of John Martin, who was born in 
1686 in Albemarle County, Va.; great-great- 
great-great-grandson of Abram Martin, bom 
in Ireland, of Welsh parents, who came to 
America in 1680, and married a Virginian. 
Mr. Martin attended an old field school taught 
by Peter Gilbert, and beyond the instruction 
he gained there, was self-educated. He read 
law in the office of his uncle, Benjamin Y. 
Martin, at Columbus, Ga., in 1854, and later 
in the office of Allen Eiland, at Crawford. 
He was admitted to the bar in July, 1856, by 
the supreme court at Montgomery; practiced 
law in Russell County for fifty-four years, and 
then retired. He was appointed superin- 
tendent of education for Russell County in 
1867; was elected to the office in 1858, 1860, 
1862, and 1864, and served in 1865 until Gov. 
Parsons became the executive. He was of- 
fered the office by Gov. Parsons, but dedihed. 
He was elected to the State legislature, and 
served in the session of 1878-1879. During 
the first year of the War of Secession, he 
served as high private, and was made colonel 
of militia of Russell County in 1863. He was a 
Democrat and a Mason. Married: November 
11, 1859, at Crawford, Russell County, to 
Anna Liowis Calhoun, daughter of John Liewis 
and Hannah Louisa (Morgan) Calhoun, of 
Russell County, the former a native of Abbe- 
ville District, S. C; granddaughter of Stoke- 
ley and Mary (Evans) Morgan, the former a 
native of North Carolina; great-granddaugh- 
ter of Jesse Evans, who emigrated from 
Georgia to Mount Meigs, in the early settle- 
ment of that place. Children: 1. Caroline 
Louisa, m. Benjamin Rhodes, Barnesville, 
Ga.; 2. Lucia Mallette, m. William Gardy 
Killian, Barnesville, Ga.; 3. Lewis Calhoun, 
deceased; 4. Selma Roberts, Seale; 5. Mary 
Grace, m. Wesley Solomon McLeod, Opelika; 

6. Ruth Ella, m. Henry Jebb Martin, Seale; 

7. Lyman Waddell, Jr., m. Miriam Roberts 
Swift, El Centre, Calif.; 8. Anna Calhoun, 
Seale, m. Jarvis Gipson Boykin, deceased; 9. 
Augusta Benning, Montgomery. Last resi- 
dence: Seale. 

MARTIN. PETER, lawyer, was bom Feb- 
ruary 27, 1797, in Blount County, Tenn., and 
died November 10, 1862, at Tuscaloosa; son 
of Warner and Martha (Bailey) Martin, the 
former a farmer in Marysville, Tenn., the 
latter a sister of Hon. Henry Bailey, attorney- 



general of South Carolina, 1836-1847; grand- 
son of John William and Martha (Metcalf) 
Martin; and a descendant of Louis Montaigne, 
who fled from France in 1724, and settled in 
South Carolina, changing his name to Martin. 
He was of Huguenot, Scotch and German an- 
cestry, and was a brother of Gov. Joshua 
Lanier Martin (q. v.). He obtained his 
schooling from Rev. Isaac Anderson, of 
Marysville, Tenn., and studied law under 
Judge Campbell and Judge Hugh L. White in 
Knoxville, Tenn. He was admitted to the bar 
at Knoxville, and moved to Alabama in 1818, 
beginning the practice of law at Russellville, 
Franklin County. In 1819, when the first 
elections of Alabama as a state were held, Mr. 
Martin was made solicitor of the circuit. He 
was elected to the legislature from Franklin 
County, in 1825; was elected attorney gen- 
eral of the state in 1832 and served four 
years, moving to Tuscaloosa during that time; 
was appointed Judge of the circuit court in 
1836, and twice elected to that office, holding 
it until he resigned in 1843; was elected to 
the legislature in 1844 on a divided ticket, 
and served as chairman of the committee on 
the state bank and branches. His service in 
the legislature at that time was the last public 
office he held, and on the expiration of his 
term, he resumed the practice of law in Tus- 
caloosa. In addition to his profession, Mr. 
Martin was a successful planter, and was 
owner of "Glendower," a plantation in Greene 
County. Prior to 1826, he bui}^ a large brick 
residence at Russellville. said to have been 
the first brick house built in the Tennessee 
Valley. He was a Democrat and a Presby- 
terian. 

Married: (1) to Sarah Bell Burnley, (2) to 
Mary Burnley, daughters of Reuben and Har- 
riett (Triplett) Burnley; granddaughters of 
Daniel and Elizabeth (Richards) Triplett, 
who were married at Falmouth, Stafford 
County, Va., the former the owner of the 
Haphazard Mills and Mines in Madison 
County, Va.; great-granddaughters of Simon 
Triplett, and of John Richards; great-great- 
granddaughters of Hedgeman Triplett, one of 
three brothers who came from Wales during 
the reign of George I, and settled in West- 
moreland County, Va., and of William Bird 
Richards ; great-great-great-granddaughters of 
Dr. Thomas Triplett, sub-dean of Westmins- 
ter, who is buried in the Abbey. The 
Burnleys came from England to Virginia, and 
were connected by marriage with Joseph 
Hume, of the English parliament. Children, 
by first marriage: 1. Harriett Triplett, d. a 
few months after graduating from the Staf- 
ford School; 2. William Henry, attorney gen- 
eral of Alabama in 1847, d. in Memphis, and 
is buried in Tuscaloosa^ m. Artemissa Jones 
of Tuskegee; 3. Leonidas, attorney general 
of California, was appointed consul to Mazat- 
lan, d. before taking the office, while on a 
visit to his father in Tuscaloosa, 1857; 4. 
Lucien Van Buren, lawyer, editor of the 
"Tuscaloosa Observer," solicitor of Tusca- 
loosa circuit, 1856-1860, appointed attorney 
for the southern district of Alabama by Presi- 
dent Johnson, 1867, d. March 22, 1873, In 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Tuscaloosa, m. Susan Virginia Fitts; by sec- 
ond marriage; 6. Albert Burnley, private in 
the C. S. Army, was blown up on a steamboat 
on his way home from the army, 1865; 6. Joshua 
Lanier, planter, private in C. S. Army, d. in 
Emory, Tez., m. Emma Blocker, of Tuscaloosa 
Coun^; 7. Horace Walpole, served in Fowler's 
battery, C. S. Army, until close of war, was 
wounded at the battle of Shiloh, mayor of 
Emory, Tez., and city attorney of Quanah, Tex.; 
m. Mintre Cook, of Texas, Quanah, Tex.; 8. 
Landora Louisa, d. December 26, 1912, at 
Quanah, Tex., m. Reuben Robinson Brown. Last 
residence: Tuscaloosa. 

MARTIN, THOMAS WESLEY, lawyer, wai 
bom August 13, 1881, at Scottsboro, Jackson 
County; son of William Logan and Maggie 
(Ledbetter) Martin (q. v.). He was educated 
in the Scottsboro College and Normal School, 
the public schools of Montgomery; and at 
Starke's University School, which he attended, 
1898-1898. He attended the academic depart- 
ment of the University of Alabama for some 
time, and later the law department, from which 
he was graduated, LL. B., 1900. He began the 
practice of law at Montgomery, in December, 
1901, in partnership with his father, continuing 
that association until the death of the latter in 
1907. He served as assistant in the office of 
the attorney general, 1P08-1907; and in 1907 
was appointed by Alexander M. Qarber, attor- 
ney*general, to the newly created position of as- 
sistant attorney-general. Since 1911, he has 
been associated with the Alabama power Com- 
pany, and is now vice president and general 
counseL He is a Democrat, a Presbyterian, a 
Bfason and a Knight of Pythias. Married: to 
Evelyn, daughter of John C. and Evelyn Tyson, 
of Montgomery. Residence: Birmingham. 

MARTIN, WILLIAM, soldier of tJie American 
Revolution, and a resident of Montgomery 
County; private, particular service not dis- 
closed; enrolled on August 21, 1834, payment 
to date from March 4, 1881; annual allowance, 
%20,— Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

MARTIN, WILLIAM, major and later lieu- 
tenant colonel, 56th Alabama Partisan Rangers, 
C. S. Army. 

MARTIN, WILLIAM BUCKINGHAM, lawyer, 
was born in 1807, in Blount County, Tenn.; 
nephew of Gov. Joshua Lanier Martin (q. v.) 
and of Judge Peter Martin (q. v.). He had a 
good common school education, studied law, and 
was admitted to the bar. After practicing for 
a short time in Tennessee, he came to Alabama 
and opened a law office in Jacksonville, 1834. 
Three years later he was elected to the State 
legislature from Calhoun County; was elected 
solicitor and held the office for about two years; 
was again sent to the legislature in 1842 and 
1843; was a presidential elector for Polk and 
Dallas, 1844; was elected to the State senate in 
1847 and 1849, and again in 1858, at which time 
he was made president of the body; was the 
unsuccessful candidate for congress in opposi- 
tion to Sampson W. Harris, 1856; was again 
elected to the lower house of the legislature. 



1861, and served two years. After the War of 
Secession had begun, he enlisted in the C. S. 
Army as a private, but his age and inflrmities 
compelled him to return home. In 1866, he 
moved to Etowah County, and continued his law 
practice in Gadsden. Bfarried: a Miss Mont- 
gomery of Tennessee. Capt. James B. Martin, 
formerly of Talladega, who died in 1870 in 
Texas, was his son. Last residence: (Gadsden. 

MARTIN, WILLIAM ELIJIUS. college presi- 
dent, was bom in Tuscaloosa County, February 
21, 1874; son of William Thomas and Mary Loa 
(Martin) Martin; grandson c^ William Seaborn 
and Susanna (Huchison) Martin, and oi 
Elijius Telf^r and Alice (Rosser) Martin* of 
Hale and Tuscaloosa Counties. He received his 
early education in the graded schools of Ha- 
vana, Hale County; graduated from Southern 
university, Greensboro, A. M., 1896, and from 
Johns Hopkins university, Ph. D., 1901. He was 
principal of Lower Peach Tree academy, 1897- 
98; professor of history and political economy, 
Emory and Henry college, Va., 1901-04; vice- 
president and president of Sullins college, Va., 
1904-10; president of Woman's college of Ala- 
bama, Montgomery, 1910-16; president Ward- 
Beimont, Nashville, Tenn., 1916; and again 
president Sullins college since 1916. Author: 
"Internal improvements in the State of Ala- 
bama," 1901. He is a Democrat; a Methodist; 
and a member of the Phi Beta Kappa (honor- 
ary), and of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon college 
fraternity. Married: September 19, 1908, to 
Aurelia McTyiere, daughter of Dr. William Ma- 
loQe and Janie (McTyiere) Baskerville, of 
Nashville, Tenn. Dr. Baskerville was for many 
years professor of English at Vanderbilt uni- 
versity, the author of several English text books 
and the well known series "Southern writers;" 
and wife was the daughter of Holland N. Mc- 
Tyiere, the late senior bishop of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, South. Children: 1. Janie 
Baskerville; 2. William Thomas, Jr. Residence: 
Bristol, Va. 

MARTIN, WILLIAM JOSEPH, lawyer, was 
bom July 1, 1869, near Shelby Springs, Shelby 
County; scm of William Hampton and Susan 
Elizabeth (Cobb) Martin, the former a native 
of South Carolina, who moved to Shelby County 
early in life, and was a farmer; grandson of 
Robert and Elizabeth (Crim) Martin, of Shel- 
by County, and of Elijah and Elizabeth (Dar 
vis) Cobb, who lived near Chehaw, or Tuskegee, 
Macon County, the former who was a soldier 
in the Creek and Mexican Wars. He obtained 
his early education from his mother, and later 
attended Pratt's academy, at Six Mile, Bibb 
County. He taught school for a number of 
years, and during that time studied law. He 
was admitted to the bar in September, 1895; 
began to practice at CHanton, Chilton County; 
moved to Ensley in 1899; served as city at- 
torney for Ensley, Jefferson County, 1902-1904; 
moved to Stevenson, Jackson County, in 1906; 
represented Jackson County in the State legis- 
lature of 1911, and after the adjournment of that 
session, was appointed State land agent, serv- 
ing until 1915. He is a Democrat; a Baptist; 
an Odd Fellow; a member of the Junior Order 



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SAMUEL P. GAILLARD 



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U71 



United American Mechanics; and of the Red 
Men. Married: November 17, 1896, to Sadie 
Fancher, daughter of Thomas M. and Miriam 
(McGuire) Fancher, who lived at Six Mile, 
Bibb County, the former who served in Co. D, 
Sixth Alabama infantry regiment, Clanton's 
brigade, and after the war was tax assessor of 
Bibb County. Children: 1. Margaret Resi- 
dence: Stevenson. 

BfARTIN, WILLIAM LOGAN, lawyer, was 
bom November 3, 1860, at Union Chapel, Mad- 
ison County, and died May 7, 1907; son of 
ThcMnas Wesley and Blizabeth Jane (Horton) 
Martin, the former a native of Madison County, 
who was a farmer, school teacher and a mer- 
chant; grandson of Jesse Bfartin, a soldier in 
the War of 1812, and of John B. Horton, both 
of Madison County; great-grandson of Frank 
Martin, a Revolutionary soldier, who moved 
from Virginia to Madison County in 1808. The 
Martins and Hortons are both of English de- 
scent, the ancestors of the former settling in 
Virginia, and of the latter in South Carolina. 
Mr. Martin was educated in the common 
schools of Madison County; was graduated 
from the law school of the Cumberland univer- 
sity, Tennessee, in 1873; began the practice ef 
law in Soottsboro in 1873, practing alone until 
1889, then forming a partnership with Virgil 
Bouldin, with whom he practiced until 1902, 
under the firm name of Martin and Bouldin. 
He was register in chancery for Jackson Coun- 
ty, 1878-1885; attorney general of Alabama, 
1889-1894; and code commissioner, 1896. He 
represented Montg(»nery County in the State 
legislature, in 1907, and was elected speaker of 
that body, serving as such until his death, 
shortly before the close of the session. He 
was a Democrat, a Knight of Honor, and a 
Knight of Psrthias. Married: to Margaret, 
daughter of Joel P. and Jane C. Ledbetter, of 
Jackson County. Children: 1. Fannilee, m. 
Harry C. Abell; 2. Thomas Wesley (q. v.) ; 3. 
WiUiam L., Jr; 4. Kathleen; 5. Susie; 6. Helen. 
Last residence: Montgomery. 

BfARX, JULIUS LEE, banker, was born Feb- 
ruary 6, 1866, at Mobile; son of Isaac and 
Amelia (Weidenreich) Marx, the former a na- 
tive of Geklingin-Rhine Pflaz, Germany, who 
came to Alabama in the early forties, located 
in Demopolis in 1844, and resided there until 
the beginning of the War of Secession, when he 
Joined the C. S. Army and served in the quar- 
termaster department, the latter who lived at 
Prankenthal Rhine Pflaz, Germany, and was 
educated in Berlin, who came to Demopolis in 
1853. He attended the private and public 
schools of Demopolis, and was graduated from 
Spring Hill college, near Mobile, A. B., 1886. 
The degree of A. M. was later conferred upon 
him by the same college. He became a banker, 
and is now president of the Marx Banking 
Company, Demopolis. He is president of the 
congregation of B'nai Jerushun, Demopolis, and 
superintendent of the Sunday school; is past 
chancellor of the Knights of Pythias, an Elk, 
and a member of B'nai B'rith. Married: March 
1, 1898, at Chattanooga, Tenn., to Hattie Simp- 



son, daughter of Aaron and Fannie Simpson, 
of Chattanooga, Tenn. Children: 1. Amelia 
Simpson, b. March 6, 1906, at Demopolis; 2. 
Julius Simpson, b. October 1, 1910, at Demo- 
polis. Residence: Demopolis. 

MASON, CASSITT E., teacher, was bom at 
Florence; daughter of Dr. Joseph Daniel and 
Eliza Maria (Bigelow) Mason, of Jackson, 
Tenn., granddaughter of Daniel and Dorothy 
(Smith) Mason, of Northampton Court House, 
N. C, and Paris, Tenn., and of Elijah and 
Maria (Oliver) Bigelow, the former an early 
editor, and the latter an educator, of Jackson, 
Tenn. She received her education at the Mem- 
phis conference female collegiate institute, Jack- 
son, Tenn., graduating, 1881, and received the 
honorary degree of LL. M., 1896; did special 
work at New York university, Columbia, and 
the University of Chicago; also studied abroad 
at Paris and Geneva. She was principal of St 
James hall, Bolivar, Tenn., 1891; Brooke hall 
seminary. Media, Pa., 1892-96; founded in 1896, 
and since that date the principal of The Castle, 
Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N. Y. She took the law 
course at New York university; has served as 
president of the international council for patri- 
otic service; chairman, educational committee 
of the Sorosis club; is independent in politics; 
and is a member of the Episcopal church. Ad- 
dress: Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

MASON, ENOCH MARVIN, physician, grad- 
uate of the Alabama polytechnic institute with 
the degree of B. S., 1900; M. S. 1901; and of 
Johns Hopkins university, with the M. D. de- 
gree, 1906. He was licensed to practice by the 
State board in 1907. Residence: Birmingham. 

MASON, J. M., Methodist minister; member 
of the Alabama conference; deceased; father 
of Dr. E. M. Mason of Birmingham. 

MASON, JOHN, ioldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 72, resided in Mobile County, 
June 1, 1840.— <7cn«ut of PenHoner9, 1841, p. 
149. 

MASON, WILLIAM I., grand master of the 
grand lodge, 1831. 

MASON, WYLIB W., lawyer, chancellor, was 
born in (Georgia, and died in 1870, at Tuske- 
gee. He was educated at the University of 
(Georgia, and came to Alabama about 1838. 
He began the practice of law at Wetumpka, in 
partnership with Hon. Armistead B. Dawson; 
was elected chancellor, defeating Hon. J. B. 
Clarke of Greene County and others, in 1846, 
and filled the office for six years; moved to 
Macon (bounty in 1862, and resided in Auburn 
and Tuskegee; was elected to the State legis- 
lature from Macon County in 1861. Married: 
to Matilda Warren Catchings. He left a num- 
ber of descendants in Macon County, and one 
of his sons, William R. Mason, was register in 
chancery of the county for many years. An- 
other son, Wylie Alfred, served in the C. S. 
Army as sergeant of Co. B, Sixty-first Alabama 
infantry regiment, 1863, and as lieutenant, 
1865; became a minister in the Baptist church. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



and was pastor of churches at Glenville, 1869; 
at Okolona, 1870; at Grenada, 1873; at Canton, 
1875; at Chrystal Springs, Miss., 1886; at Mon- 
roe, La., 1878; at Bowling Green, Ky., 1891; at 
Deadwood, S. D., 1895; at AmarlUo, Tex., 1897; 
was employed as lecturer in Chicago, Wiscon- 
sin and Iowa; is author of "Lessons ot the 
Ages for this Age," "Bphesiam Truth," "The 
Satan of the Scriptures versus the Devil of 
Christendom;" received the degree of D. D. 
from the University of Alahama, 1892; m. (1) 
Mary Hill Stackhouse, (2) Pearle Martha 
Bailey. Last residence: Tuskegee. 

MASSEY, JOHN, educator, was bom Decern!* 
her 16, 1834, in Choctaw County; son of Drury 
and Vashti (Graham) Massey, the former a 
native of Spartanburg, S. C, who lived in that 
place until the beginning of the nineteenth cen- 
tury, when he moved to Tennessee, served in 
the War of 1812 under Gen. Jackson, moved 
to Alabama in 1817, and followed farming in 
Choctaw County until his death in 1849, his 
wife surviving him until 1857; grandson of 
Christopher and Ann (Vaughn) Graham, ot 
Washington County. He passed his boyhood on 
the farm in Choctaw County, and was taught 
to read at home. When he was thirteen years 
old, he was for a short time a pupil of John 
James, an Irishman, whose large library was 
open to the boy for several years. Later he 
was for six years, a student in the school of 
Prof. Greorge F. and Dr. S. S. Mellen, and 
for two years was Dr. Mellen's assistant 
teacher. He entered the University of Alabama 
in 1859, and was graduated with honor, A. B., 
1862, and A. M., 1875. The degree of Doctor 
of laws was conferred by his abna mater in 
1879. During the last half of his senior year 
at the university, he served as lieutenant in 
command of one of the companies of the cadet 
corps, by appointment of the governor of Ala- 
bama. At his graduation, he was solicited by 
Dr. L. C. Crarland, president of the University, 
to remain with the institution as assistant 
professor and instructor in military tactics. 
He declined the position in order to enter the 
C. S. Army; enlisted in Hilliard's legion, and 
was appointed adjutant of the First battalion. 
In the first large battle of that command, at 
Chickamauga, he was distinguished for gal- 
lantry, and won a place on the roll of honor. 
He was twice wounded in that battle, while 
leading his battalion in the last charge up the 
heights of Snodgrass Hill, September 20, 1863. 
Early in 1864, at the request of the president 
and trustees of the University of Alabama, and 
of the governor of the state, he was permitted 
to resign from the army and accept the posi- 
tion of instructor in tactics and assistant pro- 
fessor in the university, which was at that 
time considered the West Point of the C. S. 
A. He held that position until the university 
was destroyed by the enemy April 3, 1865, 
Just before the dose of the war. 

After the war. Dr. Massey taught a high 
school at Mt. Sterling, in Choctaw County for 
a year; was principal of the male school at 
Summerfleld, 1866-1874; taught in a high 
school in Mobile, 1874-1876; was elected to the 
presidency of the Alabama conference female 
college, at Tuskegee, in 1876, and held the posi- 



tion until 1909. Among his former students 
are found such men as John R. Tyson, former 
chief Justice, J. R. Dowdell, former chief jus- 
tice. Judge J. C. Richardson, Judge Miller, 
F. M. JadLSon, of Birmingham, and U. C. 
Gaines and Dr. V. C. Gaines, of Mobile. Dur- 
ing his thirty-three years at the head of 
the Alabama conference female college. Dr. 
Massey was offered the presidency of the 
University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, the 
presidency of the Southern university at 
Greensboro, and the presidency ol the Girls' 
industrial school at Montevallo, all of which 
he declined. He was a Democrat; a stew- 
ard in the Methodist Episcopal churdi; a 
member of the board of educaticxi of the 
church; a member of the board of education 
of the Alabama Conference; a member of the 
National Educational Association; of the 
Southern Educational Association; and ci the 
Alabama Educational Association, of which he 
was president, 1894-1895. Married: (1) Sep- 
tember 22, 1866, in Jackson, to Fredonia 
Alethia Taylor, who died November 21, 1871, 
daughter of Walter and Amanda C!. Ttiylor, of 
that place; (2) July 9, 1873, in Summerfield, 
Dallas County to Elnora Frances Dallas, who 
died October 21, 1912, daughter of Alexander 
Dallas, who was born in Scotland, and emi- 
grated to America, becoming an early settler 
and planter of Greene County. Children, by 
first wife: 1. Louis Vaughn, b. September 29, 
1869, m. Annie Castleman of Greensboro, Chi- 
cago, 111.; 2. Fredonia Eva, b. October 14, 1871, 
teacher in Ward seminary, Nashville, Tenn.; 
by second marriage: 3. Mabelle, b. Bfarch 19, 
1879, m. December 14, 1911, to Benagee B. 
Cobb, Tuskegee. Last residence: Tuskegee. 

I 
MASTERSON, BENJAMIN 0., member of the 
constitutional convention of 1867, from Law- 
rence County, part of the fifty-first election dis- 
trict; father of Dr. John S. Masterson, of Moul- 
ton. 

MASTIN, CLAUDIUS HENRY, physician, 
was born June 4, 1826, in Huntsville; son of 
Capt. Francis Turner and Ann Elizabeth Caro- 
line (Lavert) Mastin, natives respectively, of 
Maryland and King William County, Va., the 
former a planter who came to Alabama as a 
volunteer aid to Gren. Jackson soon after the 
war of 1812, and located in Huntsville, where 
he spent the remainder of his life; grandson 
of Francis T. Mastin, of Wales, who came to 
America with Lord ^Fairfax and settled in 
Maryland, and of Claudius and Ann Lee (Met- 
calfe) Lavert, the former a native of Lyons, 
France, and a physician, who was chief sur- 
geon of the fleet commanded by Count 
Rochambeau, who came to America during 
the Revolutionary war to assist the colonies, 
the latter a great-niece of Admiral Edward 
Vernon of the British Navy, after whom 
Mount Vernon, the home of Washington, 
was named. Dr. Mastin was a half-brother 
of James Hervy Mastin, formerly a banker 
at Huntsville, who was president of the 
Madison Turn Pike Company, and of the First 
National Bank, who married Mary Jane Ers- 
kine, and died April 18, 1895, and of Gustavus 
Lyle Mastin, who was a planter before 1860, 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1173 



then became a merchant at Huntsville, was 
married to Elenor Fearn, and died August 11, 
1880. Dr. Mastin was graduated from the Uni- 
Tersity of Virginia; studied medicine at Hunts- 
TiUe, and was graduated from the medical de- 
partment of the Unlyersity of Pennsylyania, 
M. D., 1849. The next year he attended lectures 
in the University of France, the Royal college 
of surgeons, England, and the University of 
Edinburgh. On his return to the United States, 
he located at Mobile in the practice of medicine. 
At the beginning of the War of Secession, he 
entered the C. S. Army as a volunteer surgeon 
on the staff of Gen. Bragg, was immediately 
commiesioned surgeon, and ordered to Manassas 
Junction, Va., as surgeon of that post. He wa9 
transferred to the staff of Gen. Polk as medical 
director of the first grand division of the west- 
em department in 1862; remained with Gen. 
Polk as his corps surgeon until after the battle 
of Shiloh; and was then transferred to the staff 
of Gen. Beauregard as medical director of the 
army of the Mississippi in which position he 
served until the end of the war. After the war 
he returned to the practice of his profession in 
Mobile. The degree of LIJ. D. was conferred 
upon him in 1876, by the University of Penn- 
sylvania. He was a member of the Boston 
Osmeoological society, of the American Associa* 
tion of Andrology and Syphilology, and of the 
Southern Surgical and Gynecological Associa- 
tion. He was founder of the Congress of Amer- 
ican physicians and surgeons; was one of 
the organizers of the American Surgical 
Association im 1880, and served as second 
vice president, 1883-1884, as first vice presi- 
dent, 1889-1890, as president, 1890-1891, and 
as council member, 1891-1892; was one of the 
trustees of the Pan-American Medical Con- 
gress of 1876; was a member of the cen- 
tral council of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania; and waa medical examiner of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania for the states of Alabama, 
Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas. Mar- 
ried: in 1848, to Mary Eliza McDowell of Hunts- 
ville. He had four children, two sons and two 
daughters. Of the two sons, both physicians, 
William McDowell studied medicine under his 
father, was graduated from the University of 
Pennsylvania, M. D., 1874, and received the hon- 
orary degree of LL. D. from St Joseph's col- 
lege, Mobile, 1905, was interne at the hospital 
of the University of Pennsylvania two years, 
and at the Wills eye hospital, Philadelphia, one 
term, has practiced at Mobile since 1877, has 
been surgeon of the Mobile City hospital and 
Providence infirmary since 1895, was for several 
years one of the associate editors of "Annals of 
Surgery," and is a frequent contributor to 
medical and surgical literature, m. in 1882, to 
Margaret L. Crawford, of Mobile, children, one 
son and two daughters. Last residence: Mo- 
bUe. 

MASTIN, PETER BLACKWBLL, sr., plant- 
er, was bom in 1811, in Robinson County, 
Tom., and died March, 1866, at "Fairview" his 
plantation home near Montgomery; son of 
Gabriel Mastin, who commanded a company in 
tbe War of 1812, under Gen. Andrew Jackson. 
The Mastin family is of English stock, settling 



first in Virginia. He came to Montgomery 
County in 1851 and settled near Le Grand and 
engaged in digging canals to drain the wet 
prairie lands of the wealthy planters of that 
community, thus introducing the canal system 
which spread to all the bla<^ prairie counties of 
the State. He built a saw mill near Le Grand, 
acquired both land and negro slaves and added 
extensive planting to his other activities, en- 
Joying an income of |25,000 a year. He built a 
large residence on the plantation Just south of 
Montgomery to which he removed his family. 
At one time he served as U. S. Marshal and 
was appointed sheriff of Montgomery County. 
He served in the Creek Indian War with rank 
as captain. He was a Democrat; and Secession- 
ist Married: in 1836, at Le Grand, to Mary 
Amelia, daughter of Richard and Mildred 
(Mlms) Myrick, of Edgefield District, S. C, who 
removed to Alabama in 1819, locating near 
Ramer, entering lands between Le Grand and 
Ramer. Children: 1. Thomas, m. (1) Sara Isa- 
belle Graham, one child, Thomas B., Jr., (2) 
Lily C. Taylor; 2. Peter Blackwell. Jr., (q. v.) ; 
3. Martha Ann, m. Hamilton Maclntyre; 4. Mil- 
dred Rebecca, m. William A. Graham, of Pratt- 
ville, six children, (1) Mary Foster; (2) Wil- 
liam; (3) MasUn; (4) Peter; (5) Malcolm; (6) 
Mildred; 5. Mary Amelia, m. George Clinton 
Clisby; two children: (1) Mary Mastin, (2) 
Emily Hughes; 6. Sarah Louise, m. Samuel 
Thomas Westcott, one child, Thomas. Last resi- 
dence: "Fairview," near Montgomery. 

MASTIN, PETER BLACKWELL, Jr., planter, 
representative Alabama legislature 1907-11, was 
bom September 29, 1842, near Le Grand, and 
died October 16, 1918, at his ancestral home 
"Falrview" Montgomery; son of Peter Black- 
well and Mary (Myrick) Mastin (q. v.). His 
early education was received in public and pri- 
vate schools of his native county, with two 
years attendance in Irving college, Warren 
County, Tenn.; while a student at the Univer- 
sity of Alabama, 1861, the War of Secession be- 
gan and in August he enlisted in Co. F, 17th 
Alabama infantry regiment, being made 3rd 
lieutenant He was at the bombardment of 
Pensacola and Warrenton navy yard, Fla., as- 
sisted in the capture of Prentiss' division at 
Shiloh, April 6, 1862; fought at Farmington; 
promoted to 1st lieutenant, and commanded Co. 
I., same regiment; captain Co. G., 53rd Ala- 
bama cavalry, taking part in the fight at Chero- 
kee station; in command of a company of 
scouts under Gen. Kelly; captured three Union 
soldiers, single handed while they were en- 
gaged in destroying a railroad bridge in Sher- 
man's rear; accompanied Wheeler's raid into 
Tennessee to destroy Sherman's communica- 
tions; was in the battle of New Hope church 
and of Atlanta, July 22, 1864, and on duty in 
Columbia, S. C, at the end of hostilities. He 
was a master of the county grange, a notary 
public, deputy tax collector, 1892-93; chairman 
Montgomery County Democratic executive com- 
mittee and State board Confederate pension 
examiners. 

On May 7, 1907, he was elected, without op- 
position to succeed the late William; L. Bfar- 
tin as a representative from Montgomery 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



County, and was again elected to that body 1911. 
Capt Mastin was chosen by the committee or 
the Alabama Division. U. D. C. having in 
charge the monument to Alabama troops at 
Shiloh, to assist in the selection of a proper site 
and was present and participated in the unveU- 
ing exercises in May. 1907. Married: October 
10 1864, at Columbus, to Miss Mary Eliza, 
daughter of James Warren and Sarah Jane 
(Reid) Harris, her parents being natives of 
North Carolina. Her maternal grandmother 
was an Oliver. In 1914 Capt. and Mrs. Maatln 
celebrated their golden wedding at their home 
"Pairview." Children: 1. Walter; d.; 2. Mat- 
tie Alston, m. Robert Austin Jones of Texas, 
several children; 3. Thomas B., d.; 4. Peter B., 
Jr.. m. Mabel Ward, two children. Last resi- 
dence: Montgomery. 

MASTIN, WILLIAM McDOWELL, surgeon, 
was bom July 3, 1853, in Mobile; son of Dr. 
Claudius Henry and Mary E. (McDowell) Mas- 
tin (q. v.). He received the degree of M. D., 
from the University of Pennsylvania in 1874, 
and LL. D., from St. Joseph's college. Mobile, 
1905. He has practiced at Mobile since 
1877, and has been surgeon of Mobile city hos- 
pital and Providence infirmary since 1882. He 
is a fellow American surgical association; 
American college of surgeons; Southern sur- 
gical and gynecological association; and a 
member of the American genito-urinary asso- 
ciation. Contributor: American practice of 
surgery; reference handbook of the medical 
sciences, etc Author: numerous articles for 
medical and surgical Journals. Married: in 
November, 1882, to Margaret L. Crawford, of 
Mobile. Residence: Mobile. 

MATHEWS, BENJAMIN, soldier of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, aged 70, and a resident of 
Jackson County; private Virginia Continental 
Line and Militia; enrolled on January 2, 1884, 
under act of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment 
to date from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, 
$46.66; sums received to date of publication of 
list, $139.98.— Bcvoltttionory Pension Roll, In 
vol. xiv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sees., 
1833-34. He resided in Jackson County, June 1, 
1840, aged IZ.—Oensus of Pensioners, 1841, p. 
148. 

MATHEWS. DAVID CHAPMAN, teacher and 
farmer, was bom June 10, 1886. near Jackson, 
Clarke County; son of James Waldrum and 
Francis IsabeUa (McLeod) Mathews (q. v.); 
grandson of David and Rebecca (Waldrum) 
Mathews, the former who served In the C. S. 
Army, Thirty-second Alabama infantry regi- 
ment, and was captured at Lookout Mountain, 
and of John and Christine (Calhoun) McLeod, 
who lived near Jackson, the former a Confeder- 
ate soldier, killed In the battle of Franklin, 
Tenn.; great-grandson of Louis Martin, who 
belonged to Sumter's command. The Mathews 
family came to Alabama from Edgefield Dis- 
trict, S. C. Mr. Mathews received his education 
in the schools of Clarke County and at the First 
District Agricultural school at Jackson. He is 
a teacher; a farmer; has taught for twelve 
years in the counties of Clarke and Washing- 



ton; and represented Clarke County in the 
State legislature, 1919. He is a Democrat and a 
Baptist. Married: April 24, 1910, at Jackson, to 
Emma Lee, daughter of R. S. and Mima Bump- 
ers, of Allen. Children: 1. Forrest Lee; 2. 
Louis Waldrum; 3. Frances Louise. Residence: 
Allen. 

MATHEWS, JAMES WALDRUM. farmer and 
legislator, was born September 9. 1852, near 
Grove Hill; son of David and Rebecca (Wald- 
rum) Mathews, the former of Edgefield Dis- 
trict. S. C, and a member of the 32d Alabama 
infantry regiment. C. S. Army, was captured 
and spent fourteen months In Rock Island, 111., 
prison, the latter of Clarke County; grandson 
of Joslah and Lucy (Martin) Mathews, of 
South Carolina, and of James and Polly 
(Walker) Waldrum, of Clarke County, the 
former a veteran of the Creek Indian War; 
great-grandson of Louis Martin, who was in 
G^eneral Sumter's command during the War of 
the Revolution. He was educated at Highland 
academy, near Grove Hill. He Is a farmer; 
Justice of the peace; and was a member of the 
board of education of Clarke County, which he 
represented In the legislatures of 1898-9; 1911 
and 1915. He is a Democrat; and a Baptist. 
Married: (1) November 10, 1870, near Grove 
Hill, to Frances Isabella McLeod, who died 
September 22, 1895; (2) October 11, 1896, to 
Christian, daughter of Daniel and Matilda Mc- 
Leod, of Grove Hill, and cousin of first wife. 
Children: by first wife, 1. Forrest Lee; 2. 
Wynona, m. J. A. Bolen; 3. W. E.; 4. 
Charlsea A., m. E. H. Walker; 5. Albert 
Sydney, m. Juddie Williams; 6. Mary A. m. 
Arvin Payne; 7. David C, m. Emma Bumpers; 
8. MIttle; 9. MItford McLeod; 10. Fanny. 
Residence: Jackson. 

MATHEWS, JOEL EARLY, planter, waa 
bom October 21, 1809, at Goose Pond, Ogle- 
thorpe County, Ga., and died May 11, 1874, at 
Selma; son of Col. Charles Lewis and Lucy 
(Early) Mathews, of Georgia, the latter a Bister 
of Gk)v. Peter Early of Georgia; grandson of 
George and Anne (Pond) Mathews, who lived 
at Staunton, Va., the former an officer in the 
French and Indian Wars, colonel of the Ninth 
Virginia regiment In the . Revolutionary War, 
who moved to Georgia after the Revolution, 
was elected governor of that state in 1786 and 
again In 1793, and was one of the first three 
members of congress from Georgia; great- 
grandson of John Mathews who married a Miss 
Archer, and emigrated from Ireland to Amer- 
ica, settling near Staunton, Va., and of John 
Paul, the son of Hugh Paul, bishop of Nottincr- 
ham. England. Mr. Mathews was educated at 
the University of (Georgia and the University of 
Virginia, and was graduated In both law and 
medicine at the latter Institution. He never 
engaged In the practice of either profession, and 
in 1831. soon after his graduation, moved to 
Alabama and settled on a plantation on the 
Alabama River, near Cahaba, in Dallas County. 
He spent forty years of his life In the manage- 
ment of his large estate at that place. Because 
of his age, he took no active course during the 
War of Secession, but contributed largely to the 
Confederate government. Soon after Alabama 



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seceded, he sent his check for fifteen thousand 
dollars in gold to Gov. Moore, to be used at his 
discretion for the defense of the state. He 
equipped several military companies at his own 
expense, supplied the needs of the army liber- 
ally from his plantation all through the war, 
and cared for the families of a number of men 
at the front He was a JefTersonian Democrat, 
of the order of John C. Calhoun, but never held 
any public office. He was a pioneer in the 
manufacturing life of the state, building one of 
the first, if not the first, cotton mill in Alabama, 
at Cahaba, before the war. After that mill was 
burned, he built again in Selma, where his last 
years were spent 

Married: October 5, 1830, to Elizabeth Woods 
Poague, of Albemarle County, Va., who died 
November 5, 1869, daughter of Ma]. 'William 
Poague, and his wife, before her marriage, a 
Miss Warwick, who lived in Bath County, Va. 
The Poague family was prominent in Augusta, 
Rockbridge and Botetourt Counties, Va. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mathews survived all their children but 
one, Joel Early, Jr., who died a few years after 
their death without children. Two daughters, 
Anne Eliza and Lucy Early, married respective- 
ly, CoL N. H. R. Dawson, of Dallas, and Col. 
Daniel S. Troy, of Montgomery. Both died 
young, the latter childless, and the former leav- 
ing an only daughter, who later married Dr. 
John P. Fumiss, of Selma. Last residence: 
Selma. 

MATHIS, IDA ELIZABETH (BRANDON), 
farmer and promoter of diversified farming, 
was bom September 16, 1866, at Florence, 
Lauderdale County; daughter of Washington 
McClure and Mary Baldwin (Munn) Brandon, 
the former was born in Franklin County, lived 
in early life in Tuscumbia, and later locating 
in Florence, where he died; granddaughter of 
Jared and Jennie (Smith) Brandon, natives of 
South Carolina who later removed to Alabama, 
and of Matthias and Roxanna (Finney) Munn, 
the former of South Carolina, a student for 
several years at the University of Pennsylvania, 
moved to Alabama in 1820 and settled first in 
HuntsviUe, the latter was born in Huntsville 
in 1822, and removed to Tuscumbia in 1848; 
£nreat-grand daughter of Mathew Smith, a sec- 
ond lieutenant under Capt. Goodrich Crump of 
the 1st Virginia regiment in the Revolutionary 
War; great-great-granddaughter of Sallie Wal- 
lace, daughter of John Wallace, Presbyterian 
minister, of Londonderry, Ireland, and a lineal 
descendant of Sir William Wallace, of Scot- 
land. The paternal ancestors were of English 
and Scotch descent, the Smiths were also 
Scotch, settling in Virginia in the early his- 
tory of the country, later going to South Caro- 
lina, where they met the Brandons. The Munns 
were English, and located first in New Jersey, 
and the Finneys were Irish. Mrs. Mathis was 
educated in Florence, and graduated from the 
Synodical college there, June 1874, with hon- 
ors, and the M. A. degree. For several years 
following, she was a member of the Oxford, 
Ala., college faculty, teaching natural science 
and expression. Later in life she managed her 
own plantation and gained a practical experi- 
ence that has inspired and instructed other 
Vol. nr— 11 



farmers to a marked degree. During the 
period of the European War, 1916-17, at which 
time the ravages of the boll weevil and the 
closed European markets caused a grave 
economic depression in the cotton states, Mrs. 
Mathis was invited to appear upon the plat- 
form or serve as a member of committees com- 
posed of the wisest leaders of the section, to 
aid in formulating a program of agricultural 
revolution and to raise the spirits of the 
masses. Her work locally brought her national 
reputation, and she was frequently called to 
Washington to consult with government of- 
ficials, and to New York, to advise with Wall 
Street financiers regarding the situation. In 
addition to her platform and conference work, 
she contributed liberally to the press on agri- 
cultural and economic subjects and her opin- 
ions were sought by agricultural and finance 
magazines. Married: November 8, 1882, near 
Florence, to Giles Huffman Mathis, a mer- 
chant and cotton buyer. The Mathis family 
lived near Spartanburg, S. C, and. moved to 
Calhoun County in 1855, locating near Alex- 
andria, being substantial citizens and farmers. 
Children: 1. Rosa, m. C. G. Kershaw, New 
York; 2. Emma Munn, teacher; 3. Allen Wash- 
ingt(fti, graduate of University of Alabama, 
1913, in law; 1st lieutenant, 26th Division, 
103rd infantry, U. S. Army, in European 
War; wounded July 18, 1918, at Chateau 
Thiery, m. Ola Davis, of Tuscaloosa, and lives 
in Gadsden. Residence: Gadsden. 

MATLOCK, JOSEPH D., grand master, 
grand council. Mason, 1912; 33rd degree Hon- 
orary Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. 

MATTHEWS, BARNETT HOUSBR, mer- 
chant, was born October 20, 1874, at Autaugar 
ville, Autauga County; son of Britton Dixon 
and Rachael Louisa (Houser) Matthews, of 
Autauga County; and grandson of John Smith 
and (Harris) Matthews, of Oak Bow- 
ery, Chambers County, and of Reddick Pierce 
and Mary (Whetstone) Houser, of Autauga- 
ville, Autauga County. His maternal grand- 
parents emigrated from Orangeburg, S. C, to 
Autauga (bounty. They were of Scotch and 
Dutch descent His paternal grandparents re- 
moved from La Grange, Ga., and located in 
Chambers County. Mr. Matthews received his 
education in the public school at Autaugaville. 
He was engaged in the insurance business, 1891- 
1895; was shipping clerk for Teague k Sons, 
1895-1897; traveling salesman, 1897-1907; and 
has been in the mercantile business since 1907. 
He was councilman and mayor of Camden, 
1909-1917; was a member of the city board of 
education, 1908-1916; and represented Wilcox 
County in the State legislature, 1919. He is a 
Democrat; a Methodist; a Mason; and a Knight 
of Pythias. Married: December 22, 1896, at 
Montgomery, to Claudia A., daughter of Wil- 
liam Henry and Nellie Eaton (Nail) Miller, of 
Benton, Lowndes County. Children: 1. N^ie 
Nail; 2. Callie Louise; 3. Bessie Barnett Res- 
idence: Camden. 

MATTHEWS, EMMET ABRAM, physician, 
was born September 4, 1859, at Marion Juno- 



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DICTIONABT OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



tion, Peny Coanijf deceased; son of Samuel 
Jasper and Marj Elixabeth (Mathews) Hat- 
thews, the former a mitire of Mecklenburg 
Coonty, Vs., who liYed near Marion, senred 
foor rears In the War of Secession* was. with 
Oen« Lee at Oettrstmrg , and was wonnded in 
the battles of the Wilderness and Cold Harbor; 
frandson of Greene and Mary Matthews, of 
Mecklenbnrg County, Va., and of Abram and 
Harriet Mathews, of Perry County. He re- 
ceired his early schooling in Hamburg frcMn 
Moody H. May; attended Howard college at 
Marion; studied medicine and attended the 
UnlTerslty of the City of New Tork« He passed 
the state board of examiners of Alabama, 1886, 
and was graduated at the Medical college of 
Alabama at MobUe, M. D., 1887. He began the 
practice of medicine at Clanton, and has con- 
tinued his profession at that place. He was 
elected mayor of Clanton in Bfarch, 1907, and 
senred in that position through 1913. He is a 
Democrat and a Mason. Married: February, 
28, 1888, at Selma, to Belle, daughter of 
Samuel S. and Mattie S. Johnston, who liYed 
at BumsYille, the former a major In the C S. 
Army. Children: 1. Marlon, m. Dr. G. B. 
Wlmberley of Reform, who senred one ten^ as 
State senator from Pickens County; 2. Samuel 
Curry, first honor graduate from Marion insti- 
tute; 3. Emmet, was graduated from Judson 
college A. B. Residence: Clanton. 

MATTHEWS, HENRY H., clerk of Mont- 
gomery city court, was bom October 28, 1864, 
at the Arsenal academy, Columbia, S. C, and 
died June 6, 1906; son of Capt. Joseph and 
Margaret Jane (Campbell) Bfatthews, the for- 
mer a native of Liverpool, England, at one 
time a private in the U. S. Army, later super- 
intendent, with the rank of captain, of the 
Arsenal academy, Columbia, S. C, the latter a 
native of Ireland. He was educated in the 
schools of bis native city. He removed to Ala- 
bama In 1870, locating in Montgomery, and 
was appointed clerk of the city court of Mont- 
gomery which position he held until his death. 
He was a Mason and an Episcopalian. Mar- 
ried: in February, 1878, to Mary Charles Ray, 
of Mount Meigs. There were six children bom 
of this union. Last residence: Montgomery. 

MATTHEWS, JAMES CALVIN, merchant 
and farmer, was born in Dale County, and 
died May 23, 1894, at Crittenden's Mill; son 
of Moses and Mary (Trult) Matthews, the for- 
mer a native of South Carolina, bom March 
12, 1778, who came to Alabama about 1815, and 
lived at Osark; grandson of Kirt Tmit He 
was educated in Dale County, and engaged in 
merchandising and farming during the greater 
part of his life. He laid out the city of Osark; 
represented Dale County in the State legisla- 
ture, 1865 and 1866; served as commissioner of 
Dale County for two terms; as Justice of the 
peace for several years; and as notary public 
He was a captain in the home guard for some 
time; was a Union man; a Baptist; and a Ma- 
son. Married: about 1843. at Newton, to Unity 
Tonson, daughter of Kineth Telverton, of 
Newton. Children: 1. Rev. C. L.; 2. Chris 
Livingston, m. Zada Martin, daughter of 



Benjamin Martin; 3. CaHdeaia, m. BUlie Mol>- 
ley Clinton; 4. Calhoon, m. Linie Creach; 5. 
Bamlna, m. Amie Edwards; 6. Oliver Lamar, 
m. SaUie Martin; 7. Mattie, m. Dr. Sid Jeff. 
Last residence: Crittenden's MUL 

MATTHEWS, JAMES FOUCHE, lawyer, was 
bom July 26, 1879, at Center, Cherokee County; 
son of Thomas Van Rennselaer and Susan 
Elisabeth (Fouch6) Matthews, the former a na- 
tive of Cherokee County, who lived at Center 
and practiced law in ChenAee County until 
1889, when he removed to Anniston, and prac- 
ticed law there until his death on January 2, 
1912; grandson of James Abercrombie and 
Eurydlce (Croft) Matthews, of Cherokee Coun- 
ty, and of George Washington and Louisa 
(Drake) Fouch6, d Bamesville, Cku He re- 
ceived his early education at the Noble insti- 
tute for boys, Anniston; was graduated from 
the University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn., 
with first honors, A. B., 1898, and A. M., 1900, 
and from the department of law. University of 
Pennsylvania, LL. B., 1904. He was admitted 
to the bar at Anniston, in October, 1904, and 
has been engaged in the active practice of 
law at that place since that time. He was 
elected deputy county solicitor of Calhoun 
County, February, 1912. Residence: Anniston. 

MATTHEWS, JOHN, Methodist minister, 
pastor of the Court Street church, Montgomery, 
1867-70. 

MATTHEWS, JOHN, farmer, was bom 
March 18, 1792, In (Georgia, and died June 9, 
1870, at Tuscaloosa; son of William and Dor- 
cas (Wright) Matthews, who lived in €(eorgia, 
not far from Milledgeville, the former an Eng- 
lishman, who came to America with two 
brothers, one of whom settled In Virginia, the 
other in a northern state, while he located in 
(Georgia, and became a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary army, where he was wounded. Though 
himself imperfectly educated, he gave liberally 
to the endowment of Howard college In Ala- 
bama, and for a number of years maintained 
at his own home a school for the education 
of girls. He was a farmer, and in addition 
to his plantation In Sumter County, where he 
made his home for many years, owned a large 
plantation in Newton County, Miss., which 
was desolated by Sherman's army. From his 
home in Sumter County, he fed large bodies 
of Confederate troops, retreating before Sher- 
man. After the war, he moved to Tuscaloosa, 
where he spent the remainder of his life. He 
was a Democrat and a Baptist Married: In 
October, 1844, In Sumter County, to Keziah 
(Hellen) Wldeman, who died April 9, 1881, in 
Greenville, S. C, widow of Henry Wldeman, 
and daughter of William and Rachel (New- 
bold) Hellen, who lived in Onslow (bounty, 
N. C. Children: 1. Mary, m. November 16, 
1864, to Charles Manly, Lexington, Va.; 2. 
John, d. in infancy. Last residence: Tusca- 
loosa. 

MATTHEWS. KEENER NORWOOD. Meth- 
odist minister, was bom August 17, 1876, at 
Hanover, Coosa (bounty; son of Dr. John 



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Thomas ana Sarah Frances Ann (Norwood) 
Matthews, who lived at Qreenyille, Ga., the 
former a native of Campbell County* bom near 
Fairbnm, Oa., who was a graduate of medical 
colleges in Atlanta, Ga., and Mobile, and who 
practiced medicine for more than fifty years. 
He attended the public schools ci Coosa 
County, the high school at Hackneyrille, Tal- 
lapoosa County, and was graduated from 
Southern University at Greensboro, A. B., 
1899. He became a minister in the North 
Alabama conference of the Methodist Bpis- 
c<^wil church, South; was admitted on trial 
at Decatur, December, 1900; served the Weo- 
gufka circuit two years; the Daviston circuit 
three years; the Holmes Street church, Hunts- 
ville, two years; the Wesley Chapel, Birming- 
ham, one year; Eleventh Avenue « church, Bir- 
mingham, four years; First church, De<^tur; 
and is at present pastor of the First Methodist 
church at Anniston. He is a Democrat; a mem- 
ber of the board of missions and of the ex- 
amining committee of the north Alabama 
conference; and a Mason. Married: (1) July 
12, 1900, at Hanover, to Mamie Ware, who 
died June 10, 1903, at Daviston, daughter of 
Elisha and Ella Ware, of Goodwater; (2) 
December 21, 1906, at Wedowee, to Eunice 
Prescott, daughter of Monroe and Nannie Pres- 
cott of Wedowee. Child: Mabel. Residence: 
Anniston. 

MATTISON, GEORGE W.. major. 31st, Hud- 
ley's. Alabama infantry, C. S. Army. 

MATTOCKS, THOMAS H., Jeweler, was born 
May 9, 1852, in Coventry, Warwickshire, Eng- 
land. He emigrated to America in 1878, locate 
ing in Elgin, 111. In 1888 he removed to Al- 
bany where he has since been in the Jewelry 
business. He is a Mason. Married: In 1876, 
to Emma Carvell. Residence: Albany. 

MAULDIN, TYIRIE HARRIS, lieutenant 
colonel. 3rd Alabama cavalry. C. S. Army. 

MAUMENEE. ALFRED EDWARD, physi- 
cian, graduate of the medical department of the 
University of Alabama, 1905; licensed to prac- 
tice by the county board of Wilcox, 1905. Res- 
idence: Mobile. 

MAUPIN, ROBERT LEMON, business man, 
was bom December 29. 1836, in Boone County, 
Mo.; son of William and Isabella (Lemon) 
Maupin, natives of Kentucky, who went to Mis- 
souri in 1816, before the state was admitted 
into the union, and when it was inhabited by 
Indians, the former of whom was one of the 
seccHid train of traders that went to Mexico 
in 1820; grandson of Robert Lemon, a Ken- 
tuckian, and a soldier in the Revolutionary 
War, who went to Missouri during the twen- 
ties and died in that state. Judge Maupin 
was reared in Boone County. Mo.; attended 
the University of Missouri four years; then 
entered William Jewell college, where he was 
graduated in 1858. He worked on his father's 
farm for the year following his graduation, 
then went to Glasgow, Ky., and read law with 
his brother-in-law, Presley H. Leslie, who was 



afterward governor of Kentucky and terri- 
torial governor of Montana. Judge Maupin 
was graduated from law school at Lebanon, 
Tenn., in December, 1860; practiced at Colum- 
bia, Mo., for a short time; then went to Texas 
on a prospecting tour. At the beginning of 
the War of Secession, he returned to his old 
home in Missouri, and raised a company for 
Qen. Price's command in the campaign of west 
MissourL He Joined the army at Corinth after 
the battle of Shilc^; twice wounded, and was 
captured at Vicksburg, and paroled; was ex- 
changed and rejoined his command; was se- 
verely wounded at Kenesaw Mountain, but re- 
covered after almost a year in hospitals, and 
Joined his command at Baldwin, Miss.; and was 
captured with his command at Mobile, April, 
1865. In February, 1863, while on a mission in 
Missouri, where he had been sent by the war de- 
partment of the Confederate States of America, 
Judge Maupin was captured in Boone County, 
and taken to St. Louis, where he was tried as a 
spy. On the afternoon the trial was ended, 
he made his escape from prison by imperson- 
ating the surgeon of the prison. After the 
war, he became associated with A. C. Danner 
in cutting and supplying wood to the Meridian 
and Selma railroad, now the East Tenndssee. 
Virginia and Georgia railroad; and later he 
engaged in cotton planting in Marengo County. 
He was appointed probate Judge of Marengo 
County in 1871 and served for three years; 
moved to Mobile in 1877. and became manager 
of the wood and coal yard of A. C. Danner and 
company; organized the Mobile stock yards 
company in 1878, and continued in that busi- 
ness. He is a Baptist. Jdarried: in November. 
1864, to Annie 0. Tayloe, of Macon. Four of 
the five children born to that marriage sur- 
vive. Last residence: Mobile. 

MAURY, HARRY, lawyer, colonel C. S. 
Army, was bom about 1827 in Virginia, and 
died in February, 1869. in Mobile. He was a 
member of the family of Commodore M. F. and 
Gen. Dabney H. Maury. After leading a rov« 
ing life for several years, he settled in Mobile 
in 1848, and went into the coasting trade in 
command of a schooner. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1852, and practiced several years; 
became an active politician in 1855; and was 
elected marshal of the city of Mobile. In 
1858, he fought and wounded Capt De Riviere, 
later Baron De Riviere, a French citizen of 
Mobile, in a duel; and the next year com* 
manded an armed vessel in Walker's last at- 
tempt on Nicaragua. At the organization of 
the Second regiment of Alabama infantry, 
C. S. Army, early in 1861, he was elected 
colonel and commanded the regiment at Fort 
Morgan until It was disbanded a year later. 
The Thirty-second Alabama regiment was then 
formed and he was made lieutenant colonel. 
He commanded a brigade at Stevenson and 
Lavergne, in 1862. and commanded the regi- 
ment at Murfreesboro, where he was wounded 
in the side while leading his men. In the 
summer of 1863. he took part in Johnston's 
Mississippi campaign and was again wounded 
at Jackson. On the organization of the Fif- 
teenth Confederate cavalry, he became its 
colonel, and commanded it on the coast until 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



disabled by another wound near the dose of 
hostilities. After peace was established he 
engaged in the mercantile business in Mobile 
until his death. Last residence: Mobile. 

BIAXON, a. W., professor of English, at the 
Alabama polytechnic institute* 1878-85. 

MAXWELL, EVELYN GROOM, lawyer and 
Judge, was bom July 27, 1863, in Alabama; son 
of Augustus Emmet and Julia Hawks (Ander- 
son) Maxwell. He graduated from the nor- 
mal department, Uniyersity of Nashyille, 1882. 
He was admitted to the bar December 17, 1885; 
Judge of the criminal court of Escambia Coun- 
ty, 1892-96; Judge, first Judicial circuit court 
of Florida, 1896-1901; supreme court commis- 
sioner, September, 1901; Justice supreme court 
of Florida, 1902-04; resigned and is now prac- 
ticing law. Married: February 1, 1894, to 
Wilhelmina Thornton, of Pensacola, Fla. Resi- 
dence: Pensacola, Fla. 

MAXWELL, GEORGE WASHINGTON, farm- 
er and legislator, was bom January 25, 
1843, in Union Township, Hunderton County, 
Ni«J.; son of Henry and Christeann (Manning) 
Maxwell, of that place; and great-grandson of 
William Maxwell, a Revolutionary soldier. He 
is of Scotch Irish descent; was educated in the 
common schools of his native state, and came 
to Alabama in 1869, where he has since resided, 
and farmed. He represented Marion County in 
the legislature of 1900-01. He is a Democrat; 
and while not a church member, holds to Pres- 
byterian belief. Married: November, 1867, in 
Tennessee, to Mary Catherine Inman. Resi- 
dence: Hamilton. 

MAXWELL, JACOB CARREKER, farmer, 
merchant, was born June 10, 1850. near Alex- 
ander City, Tallapoosa County; son of Allen 
Thornton and Cynthia Susan (Carreker) Max- 
well, who lived in Alexander City, the former 
a native of Elbert County, Ga., who was a 
member of the Alabama legislature from Coosa 
County, 1860-1861, served in the state guards 
for a ejiort time in 1864, and was retired to 
make supplies for the army on his planta- 
tion; grandson of Reuben and Elizabeth 
(Thornton) Maxwell, who lived near Alex- 
ander City and of Jacob and Nancy Hays 
(Thomas) Carreker, of Talbot County. Ga.; 
great-grandson of John Maxwell, of Elbert 
County, (Ja.; great-great-grandson of Thomas 
Maxwell, a Baptist preacher of distinction, 
and a native of Orange County, Va.; great- 
grea^great-grandson of Joel Maxwell, of 
Orange County, Va., who was of Scotch-Irish 
descent. He attended Jackson academy, Coosa 
County, 1857, and was graduated from Bow- 
don college, Georgia, A. B., 1870. He farmed 
in Coosa County, 1871-1883; conducted a mer- 
cantile business in Alexander City, 1883-1891; 
and became cashier of the Alexander City 
Bank in 1892, which position he continues to 
hold. He served as Justice of the peace of 
Coosa County for a number of years; was 
councilman and treasurer of Alexander City 
for a number of terms; represented the sena- 
torial district of Coosa and Tallapoosa Coun- 



ties in the constitutional convention of 1901; 
promoted and helped organize the Alexander 
City cotton mill, and was local treasurer and 
agent for nine years. He is a Democrat; a 
deacon in the First Baptist church, moderator 
of the Central Baptist Association, was form- 
erly president of the Tallapoosa 0)unty Sun- 
day School Convention; is a Knight of Pythias 
and a Knight of Honor. Married: September 
7, 1871. near Equality, Coosa CJounty, to Temple 
Josephine Austin, who died September 23, 
1910, at Alexander City, daughter of CJol. 
Toliver Louis and Elizabeth (Lazal) Austin, 
who lived near Equality, natives of Newton 
Coutity, (3a., who came to Alabama in the 
forties, and settled in Tallapoosa, later mov- 
ing to Coosa County. ChUdren: 1. Susan 
Elizabeth, b. February 8, 1874, d. January 3, 
1890, at Judson college; 2. Willie Virginia, b. 
April 26, 1887. m. James Henry Henderson, 
banker, Alexander City, chUdren, Virginia 
Austin, Jake Maxwell, and Ruth. Residence: 
Alexander City. 

MAY, JOSEPH J., major and later lieutenant 
colonel. 16th Alabama infantry regiment, C. S. 
Army. 

MAYBERRY, GEORGE, soldier of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, aged 74, and a resident of 
Perry County; private Virginia Militia; 
enrolled on December 18, 1833, under act of 
Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1881; annual allowance, $32; sums 
received to date of publication of list, $96.— 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xlv. Sen. 
doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

MAYFIELD, JAMES JEFFERSON, lawyer, 
legislator, teacher, associate Judge Alabama 
State supreme court, and code commissioner, 
was bom March 22, 1861, at Moore's Bridge; son 
of James Jefferson and Amanda C. (South) 
Mayfield, the latter a native of Tuscaloosa 
County, was a teacher the greater part of his 
life, captain of the 'Tuscaloosa plough boys.- 
Co. G, 38th Tennessee infantry regiment, C. 8. 
Army, 1861-65, was twice wounded in the battle 
of Shiloh; grandson of Obediah and Harriet 
Mayfield who lived at Hughes' Mill, Tuscaloosa 
County, and of Ransom and Elisabeth South, 
of Davis Creek, Fayette County. Judge May- 
field received his early education in the rural 
schools of his native county. He attended the 
preparatory school of Prof. W. D. F6nville in 
1881-83; entered the University of Alabama the 
latter year and graduated with honors, June, 
1885. He accepted a position as tutor of physics 
and astronomy at the latter institution, and at 
the same time took the law course, graduating 
in that profession in 1888. An opportunity was 
at once opened to him and he began the practice 
in the law office of (Jen. S. A. M. Wood, in Tus- 
caloosa. He was elected to the Alabama legis- 
lature, 1894-95; was elected Judge of the law 
and equity court of Tuscaloosa in 1896. and oc- 
cupied that position until October 1, 1903, when 
he resigned to accept the office of code commis- 
sioner, to which he had been elected by the leg- 
islature. On November 3, 1908, he was elected 
associate Justice of the Alabama supreme court 



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for a term of six years, was reelected November 
S, 1914, for a like term, but resigned in 1919 
to again take the office of code commissioner. 
Author: "Digest of Alabama Reports/' seven 
volumes; "Constitutions of Alabama/' paral- 
leled, annotated and indexed; "Annotations of 
the decisions of the Supreme court of Alabama." 
He assisted Hon. W. L. Martin in the prepara- 
tion of the code of 1896, and himself prepared 
the codes of 1907, and is now preparing the 
code authorized by the legislature of 1919. He 
is a Democrat Married: June 30, 1897, at 
Little Rock, Ark., to Susie Fitts, daughter of 
Gideon Fred and Sallie (Martin) Martin of that 
state. Children: 1. Sarah; 2. James. Resi- 
dence: Montgomery. 

MATFIELD, SAMUEL, toldier of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, aged 75, and a resident of 
Tuscaloosa County; private S. C. Militia; 
enrolled on April 18, 1833, under act of Con- 
gress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $26.66. — 
\Revolution4iry Pension Ron, in vol. xiv. Sen. 
doc 614, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

MAYFIELD, SURRT FOSTER, druggist, was 
bom November 9, 1867, at Moore's Bridge, Tus- 
caloosa County; son of James Jefferson and 
Amanda C. (South) Mayfl^d, the former who 
was bom at Bethany, Tuscaloosa County, was 
a farmer, and during the War of Secession was 
captain of the Plow Boys, a company trom Tus- 
caloosa County, which served in the Thirty- 
eighth Tennessee infantry regiment, grandson 
of Obadiah and Harriett Mayfleld, of Hum- 
phrey, and of Ransom and Elisabeth South, of 
Davis Creek, Fayette County. Dr. Bfayfleld was 
educated in the common schools of Tuscaloosa 
County; and graduated from the Univeristy of 
Alabama with the A B. degree, 1888, and re- 
ceived an honorary degree of A M. from that 
oniversity, 1893. From 1891 to 1894, he was 
druggist at Northport In 1896 he took his 
degree of M. D. from the medical department 
<^ Tulane university; practiced medicine at 
Northport until 1902, since which date he has 
resided in Tuscaloosa where he has continued 
the practice of medicine. In 1909 he was 
chosen as a Democrat to suoceed J. Manly Fos- 
ter, who had removed to Montgomery, in the 
State legislature. He is a member of the Mis- 
sionary Baptist diurch. Married: April 6, 1898, 
to Susie, daughter of E. I. and Josephine Hag- 
ler, d Tynor. Residence: T^^uM^aloosa. 

BiAYRANT, JOHN, 8.oldier of the American 
Bevolntian, and lieutenant in the navy, par- 
ticular service not disclosed; annual allow- 
anoe, |360; to be paid from September, 1835; 
transferred from South Carolina.— Pffn«ion 
Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

MATS, THOMAS SUMTER, lawyer, planter, 
state senator and probate Judge, was bom in 
1806, upon the family plantation in Edgefield, 
S. C, and died Febmary, 1863, in Montgomery; 
son of Samuel and Sarah (Grigsby) Bfays of 
South Carolina, the former a soldier of the 
Revolutionary War, having entered at the age 
of sixteen. Other ancestral representatives 



served their country in military and polite 
ical positions, both prior to and during the 
Revolution. He received his elementary edu- 
cation in private echoed, graduated in 1827 at 
the South Carolina college, Columbia, hav- 
ing been chosen valedictorian ter the Clara- 
sophic society. Later he studied law in South 
Carolina, and entered upon the practice in 
that state, before locating in Montgomery 
where he continued successfully the practice 
of his profession. He was deeply interested in 
agriculture, and lived part of each year on 
his plantation near Montgomery. He was 
elected from that county to the Alabama State 
senate, and was later elected probate Judge; 
a presidential elector; clerk or reporter of the 
supreme court of Alabama. He was a Demo- 
crat, and a Methodist Married: December 
31, 1846, at Montgomery, to Elisa Ann, daugh- 
ter of Gen. Jack (John) and Elisabeth (Sim- 
kins) Glascock of Edgefield, S. C; grand- 
daughter of (General Thomas Glascock of 
Ctoorgia, who distinguished himself during the 
Revolutionary War. She was also a descend- 
ant of the Bacon and Simkins families who 
were prominently connected with the colonial 
history of the country. Children: 1. Thomas 
Sumter, C. S. Army, killed in the Seven Days' 
Fight before Richmond, Va.; 2. Sarah, m. 
Judge McLAUghlhi of Lexington, Va.; 3. Hat- 
tie Glascock, m. MaJ. George C. Ball (q. v.); 
4. John Glascock; 6. Pierce Butler; 6. Samuel 
Warren; 7. Annie, m. R. T. Dow, Atlanta, Oa. 
Last residence: Montgomery. 

MEAD, LEMUEL G., lawyer and major C. S. 
Army, was bom February 7, 1827, and died 
at Paint Rock, January 14, 1879; son of Sam- 
uel and Frances (Hanes) Mead, the former 
a native of Virginia who emigrated to Ala- 
bama and located at Paint Rock. He prac- 
ticed law at ^Huntsville; entered the C. S. 
Army and rose to the rank of major; served 
one term as sheriff of Jackson County. He 
was a Democrat; and a Mason. Married: (1) 
Susan Daniel, of Maisville; (2) at Pulaski, 
Tenn., to Mary Francis, daughter of John C. 
and Rodie Dorothy (T(»nlin) Kimbrough, of 
that place. The parents of Mrs. Kimbrough 
were from North Carolina and Limestone 
County respectively. Children: 1. Blary F., 
m. Morris Gktrdiner, of Tuscaloosa; 2. Lemuel 
G., unmarried. Last residence: Paint Rock. 

MEAD, SAMUEL, member of the constitu- 
tional convention, of 1819, from Madison 
County. 

BfEADOR, DANIEL JOHN, planter, was bom 
March 22, 1869, at FeasterviUe, Fairfield 
County, S. C; son of Daniel R. and Emily 
R. (Estes) Meador, of that place; grandson of 
Job Meador, who served under Gen. Bfarion 
during the Revolutionary War. He was edu- 
cated at FeasterviUe academy; at Col. Patrick's 
high school for boys at FeasterviUe; and at 
Furman university, Greenville, S. C. After he 
left school he engaged in planting at Myrtle- 
wood, Blarengo County; represented that 
county in the State legislature, 1888-1889, 1890- 
1891, 189M893, 1894-1896, and 1896-1897; and 
was a State senator, 1898-1899, and 1900-1901. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



During his service in the lower house of the 
legislature, he was chairman of the committee 
on reappointment in 1890; chairman of the 
committee on appropriations* 1892-1898; and 
chairman of the ways and means c(nnmittee» 
1894-1896, and 1896-1897. In the senate, he was 
chairman of the finance committee, 1898-1899, 
and 1900-1901. He was president pro tern of 
the s^iate while William D. Jelks was acting 
governor. He is a Democrat; a Baptist; and a 
Mason. Married: November 22, 1882, in 
Blairs, S. C, to Lidie A., daughter of Edward 
Poellnitz, of Marengo County. Residence: 
Myrtlewood. 

MEADORS, JOHN CALHOUN, lawyer, mem- 
ber constitutional convention 1867, was bom 
April 1, 1838, at Cusseta, Chambers County, 
and died January 8, 1896, at Opelika; son of. 
Warner Williams and Nancy (Purgerson) 
Meadors, natives of Laurens District, S. C, 
who came to Alabama and lived in Chambers 
County, the former a captain of a company 
of volunteers, who entered the C. S. Army 
from West Point, Ga., early in the war, and 
was killed at the battle of Corinth, October, 
1862. He received his early education in a 
country school in Chambers County, and in a 
military school at Tuskegee, and was grad- 
uated from the University of Alabama, A. B., 
1859. He entered the C. S. Army with the 
Zouaves from Tuskegee, in 1861, but soon after 
Joined his father's company in the Thirty- 
seventh Alabama regiment, later becoming a 
member of Col. Dowdell's staff with the rank 
of captain, and adjutant of the regiment He 
served until the close of the war. He studied 
law with Hon. W. H. Barnes in Lafayette, and 
was admitted to the bar In 1866; practiced 
law with Mr. Barnes in Opelika until the 
death of the latter; formed a partnership with 
Gov. Samford and Judge J. M. Chilton of Mont- 
gomery in the firm of Samford, Chilton and 
Meadors, and continued the association until 
failing health caused him to retire from active 
practice and devote himself to office work. He 
was elected a trustee of the University of 
Alabama, 1865-1868; was a member of the con- 
stitutional convention of 1867; was elected to 
the State legislature in 1865 and again in 1872; 
served as Judge of the city court of Opelika 
until 1873; was county superintendent of edu- 
cation and Justice of the peace from 1892, 
until his death in 1896. He was a Democrat; 
a trustee and steward in the Methodist church; 
and a Master Mason. Married: November 15, 
1865, in Chambers County, to Rebecca Cora, 
daughter of Zadock and Mary Ann (John- 
ston) Jackson, of Leesburg, Lee County. Oa.; 
granddaughter of Jack and Polly (Daven- 
port) Johnston; great-granddaughter of John 
and Lucy (Barksdale) Davenport, the former 
of whom was killed in 1781, at the battle of 
Guilford Court House, N. C, during the 
Revolutionary War; great-great-granddaughter 
of Collier Barksdale; great-great-great-grand- 
daughter of William and Sallie (Collier) 
Barksdale ; great-great-great-great-granddaugh- 
ter of Capt. John Collier of King and Queen 
County, Va.. who came from England about 
1700. Children: 1. Walter Nesbitt, d. in in- 



fancy; 2. John Calhoun, Jr., d. in infancy; 
3. Cora, d. in infancy; 4. Alexander Bamette, 
d. in infancy; 5. Margaret Frances, m. Novem- 
ber 16, 1898, to Dr. August Burghard, dentist, 
Macon, Ga., children, Martin Calhoun, Augrust^ 
Jr., Margaret Meadors, Frances Marion, and 
Cora Jackson; 6. Willie Gatra, d. in childhood; 
7. Thomas Otis, d. in infancy; 8. Raleigh Wil- 
liams, d. in infancy; 9. Irby Meadors, Ope- 
lika; 10. Rutledge Meadors, m. July 23, 1907, 
in Albany, Ga., to Maggie Inman, Albany^ 
Ga. Last residence: Opelika. 

MEADOW, ALBERT E., physician, was bom 
November 22, 1860, in Humphreys County, 
Tenn.; son of Jacob E. and Susan (Crockett) 
Meadow, the former a planter, Mason, Pres- 
bjrterian; grandson of William D. and Sarah 
(Harris) Meadow, natives of Tennessee, the 
former of whom was an overseer on Gen. 
Harding's plantation before the war, later 
moving to Houston County, Tenn. Through 
his mother he is a lineal descendent of David 
Crockett He was reared on his father's farm 
and received his early education in the county 
schools. In 1879 he began the study of medi- 
cine and in the fall of 1881 he entered the 
Homeopathic medical college of Missouri, at St. 
Louis; during 1882-83 he attended the Pulte 
medical college at Cincinnati. He entered 
upon the practice of his profession in Bir- 
mingham, with Dr. A. L. Monroe, remainincr 
there until 1885, when he removed to Blocton, 
where he has since resided. In 1892 he formed 
a partnership with his brother, J. M. Meadow, 
with whom he now practices. He is a Mason ; 
Knight of Pythias; and a Methodist. Married: 
September 24, 1885, to Emmie, daughter of 
Dr. David Andrews of Oxford, Miss. Children: 
1. Anson. Residence: Blocton. 

MEADOWS, JAMES DANIEL, colonel C. S. 
Army, member constitutional convention 1875, 
was bom January 9, 1827, at Thomaston, Upson 
County, (Ja., and died January 14, 1900, in 
Dadeville; son of Miles Robley and Susan 
Martha (Parker) Meadows, the former a native 
of Putnam County, Ga., who lived at Thomas- 
ton, Ga., and represented Upson County in the 
Georgia legislature; grandson of James and 
Rutha Meadows, of Putnam County, Ga., and 
of Daniel and Lucy Parker, of Jones County, 
Q&. He received his early schooling in Thom- 
aston, Ga., and attended Emory college. 
He enlisted in. the C. S. Army and became 
captain of Co. A, First regiment of Alabama 
volunteers, and was promoted to the rank of 
colonel during the latter part of the war. He 
was active in local politics, and was elected 
a delefcate to the constitutional convention of 
1875. He was a Democrat; a Baptist; and a 
Mason. Married: September 3, 1846, at 
Eufaula, to Mary Jane Johnston, a native of 
Harris County, Cki., who died April 12. 1884, 
daughter of John and Marthy Ann Johnston, 
of Whiteville, Harris County, Gku Children: 
1. John Miles, b. May 17, 1849, d. September 
27. 1864; 2. William Franklin, b. April 28, 
1851, d. October 2, 1864; 3. Josephine, b. March 
12, 1853, d. August, 1855; 4. Martha Anne, b. 
February 5. 1855. d. October 29, 1868; 5. James 



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1183 



D., Jr., b. October 28, 1865, d. February 17, 
1866; 6. Leola Jane, b. January 23, 1867, m. 
November 6, 1889, to James Colbert Spratlin, 
Tallapoosa County; 7. Georgia Anne, b. May 2, 
1871, d. September 15, 1871. Last residence: 
Dadeville. 

MEANS, GEORGE H., Methodist minister, 
member of the North Alabama conference; liv- 
ing in 1918. Residence: Birmingham. 

MEANS, THOMAS ALEXANDER, physician, 
was bom October 11, 1831, at Oxford, Coving- 
ton County, Ga.; son of Alexander and Sarah 
Ann Eliza (Winston) Means, the former a 
native of Statesville, N. C, a physician, Meth- 
odist minister and educator, who was licensed 
to preach in 1828, was principal of the Geor- 
gia conference manual labor school i^ Cov- 
ington, Ga., 1834-1838, attended JefTerson med- 
ical college, Philadelphia, 1838-1839, was pro- 
fessor of phsyics in Emory oollege, Oxford, 
Ga., 1838-1855, and 1865-1883, was professor of 
pharmacy and chemistry in Georgia medical 
oollege, Augusta, 1840-1859, president of the 
Masonic female college, Covington, Ga., 1853- 
1854, and of Emory college, 1854-1855, profes- 
sor of chemistry in Atlanta medical college, 
1855-1867, was a member of the Georgia seces- 
sion convention, was agricultural chemist for 
Georgia with headquarters at Savannah, 1868- 
1877, received honorary degree of M. D. from 
Augusta medical college, 1841, of D. D. from 
Emory college, 1854, and of LL. D. from Emory 
college, 1858, author of the "Centennial of 
Chemistry," and of "A Cluster of Poems for 
the Heart and Home," died June 5, 1883, at 
Oxford, Ga.; grandson of Alexander and Sarah 
(McClellan) Means, who lived in North Caro- 
lina, the former a native of County Tyrone, 
Ireland, the latter a native of Scotland, and 
of Thomas and Ann Austin (Tinsley) Winston, 
of Virginia; great-grandson of John Winston, 
of Virginia, captain of a Virginia regiment in 
the Revolutionary War; great-great-grandson 
of MaJ. Tinsley, for whom Tinsleyville, Va., 
was named; great-great-great-grandson of Capt. 
Johnston, aide-de-camp to Gen. Washington. 

Dr. Means obtained his early schooling in 
Oxford, Ga., and was graduated from Emory 
oollege at that place, in 1851. He read medi- 
cine for four years under his father; attended. 
his first course of lectures at the Medical col- 
lege of Georgia, 1855; attended the Atlanta 
medical college, 1856; and spent the succeed- 
ing four years in Europe, studying medicine 
in London, Paris, Dublin and Edinburgh. He 
returned to the United States, and began the 
practice of medicine in Memphis, Tenn., 1859. 
He was commissioned surgeon of the Tenth 
regiment of Georgia volunteers, in 1861, and 
participated at the first battle of Manassas. 
He continued in the army of northern Vir- 
ginia until the battle of Gettysburg, when, 
after the retreat of Lee's army, he was, by 
order of Gen. Longstreet, left in charge of the 
wounded of his corps, and the divisions of Hood 
and Pickett. He remained in the field for one 
month, and was then transferred, with the 
wounded under his charge, to Camp Letterman, 
near Gettysburg, and placed on duty as sur- 



geon of the Ccmfederate officers, prisoners of 
war. He remained there until the hospital was 
broken up three months later, and after being 
held at Fortress Monroe as a prisoner of war 
for a short time, was exchanged and ordered 
to hospital duty further south. He was sta- 
tioned at Columbus, Ga., in charge of the 
Marshall hospital, and remained at that place 
until the close of hostilities. In 1867, he located 
at • Montgomery in the practice of medicine, 
and conducted his profession at that place 
throughout his active life. He was secretary 
of the Medical association of the State of Ala- 
bama for about twenty years; president of the 
board of education for more than twenty years; 
secretary of the board of health of Montgom- 
ery; city physician and register of vital statis- 
tics of Montgomery; secretary of the Medical 
and surgical society, and later president; sur- 
geon in charge of the city school hospital; one 
of the consulting physicians of the Montgomery 
city infirmary; and president of the Young 
Men's Christian association of Montgomery. 
He is author of many papers and lectures on 
professional subjects, and was a frequent con- 
tributor to medical journals. He was a Meth- 
odist Married: in 1863, in Montgomery, to 
Annie, daughter of William R. and Frances S. 
Powell, of Montgomery. Children: 1. Annie 
Jette, m. Louis Bulow Farley, son of James 
A. Farley (q. v.), Montgomery; 2. Aileen M., 
m. (1) Daniel Hillman, deceased, (2) Gen. 
R, F. Ligon (q. v.), Montgomery; 3. Thomas 
Alexander, Montgomery. Last residence: 
Montgomery. 

MEDLEY, EDWARD N., pioneer settler, was 
born June 10, 1821, in Lawrence District, S. C. 
His education was limited as he was left an 
orphan at an early age. He removed to Ala- 
bama and located in Russell County, where he 
resided until about 1841, when he removed 
to Greene County, becoming a planter. He 
removed to Selma in 1865 and invested his sav- 
ings in real estate. Last residence: Selma. 

MEEK, ALEXANDER BEAUFORT, author 
and lawyer, was born July 17, 1814, in Colum- 
bia, S. C, and died November 30, 1865, in 
Columbus, Miss.; son of Rev. Samuel M. and 
Anne (McDowell) Meek, both natives of South 
Carolina, who came to Tuscaloosa from South 
Carolina, the former of whom was a Methodist 
minister, a physician and a druggist; grandson 
of John and Elenor (Mills) Meek; brother of 
Benjamin Franklin Meek (q. v.). His ances- 
tors on both sides were of Irish descent, and 
those on his father's side came from County 
Antrim. He graduated from the University 
of Alabama, A. B., 1833, and A. M., 1836, and 
received the honorary degree of A. M. from the 
University of (Georgia, 1844. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1835, and practiced law in Tus- 
caloosa. When the troubles with the Creek In- 
dians occurred in 1836, he volunteered as en- 
sign in the U. S. Army. During that same 
year, he was appointed attorney general of the 
State by Gov. Clay to fill a vacancy, and held 
that position until the following winter. He 
was editor of the "Flag of the Union," at Tus- 
caloosa, 1835-1839, and of the "Southron," a lit- 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



eraiy magazine* 1889-1842. In 1842, Oct. Fiti- 
patrick appointed him Judge of the prohate 
conrt at TuBcalooea, and he held that position 
until 1845. During the latter year he was ap- 
pointed assistant secretary of the U. S. treasury 
by President Polk, and became legal adviser of 
that department. After holding the office about 
two years, he retired with the commission oi 
federal attorney for the southern district of the 
Stote, and was retained in that position until 
the close of Mr. Polk's term. He was associate 
editor of the Mobile "Daily Register/' 1851- 
1858; represented MobUe in the Alabama house 
of representatives, 1853-1855, and as chairman 
of the committee on education, secured the es- 
tablishment of a system of free public schools 
in the State. In 1854, he was appointed Judge 
of the probate court of Mobile by Ctov. Winston, 
and hold the office until Biay, 1855; was elector 
on the Buchanan ticket, 1856; and a repre- 
sentative in the State legislature and speaker 
in the house, 1859-1861. He was a trustee of 
the University of Alabama, 1862-1864. He was 
author of "The Red Eagle," 1855; "Songs and 
Poetry of the South," 1856; "Romantic Pas- 
sages in Southwestern History," 1857; and an 
unfinished "History of Alabama"; and prepared 
a supplement to Aiken's "Digest of Alabama," 
in 1842. Married: (1) in 1856, to Mrs. Emma 
Donaldson Slatter, of Mobile, the widow of 
Hope Hull Slatter; (2) in 1864, to Mrs. Eliza 
Jane Cannon, of Columbus, Miss., the widow of 
William R. Cannon, who was for a long time 
president of the Mississippi senate. He had 
no children. Last residence: Columbus, Miss. 

MEEK, BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, educator, 
was bom September 20, 1836, at Tuscaloosa, 
and died June 16, 1899, at Tuscaloosa; brother 
of Alexander B. Meek (q. v.). He was grad- 
uated at the University of Alabama, A. B., 
1854; A. M., 1858; and received the honorary 
degree of LL. D., from the University of Mis- 
sissippi, 1879. He was assistant professor of 
ancient languages at the University of Ala- 
bama, 1863-1865; and professor of ancient lan- 
guages at Florence Wesleyan university, 1869- 
1871. From 1871 until his death, he filled the 
chair of English at the University of Alabama, 
where he became widely known as a forceful 
and elegant writer, an erudite critic and a great 
teacher. He was an authority on all matters 
connected with that department. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
South; served the church as Sunday school su- 
perintendent for over a quarter of a century; 
and was the lay delegate from the North Ala- 
bama conference to the Methodist ecumenical 
conference, held in London. He was a member 
of the Odd Fellows. Married: in September, 
1889, at San Antonio, Tex., to Nettie, daughter 
of F. F. Hemphill, of Tuscaloosa. He leaves 
no descendants. Last residence: Tuscaloosa. 

MBEKS, WILLIAM MARION, publisher and 
editor, was born February 16, 1845, in Floyd 
County, Ga. His parents moved to Alabama 
when he was four years of age and settled at 
Cherokee. When he was twelve years old, he 
entered the office of the "Coosa River Argus," 



published at Center, by L. M. Stiff, and re- 
mained in that employ for three years; in 1860, 
went into the office of the "National Demo- 
crat," a campaign paper which was suspended 
on the election of Abraham Lincoln; returned 
to Georgia and early in the spring of 1861 
entered the office of the "True Flag," published 
in Rome, Ga.; continued as foreman of that 
paper until its suspension in the fall of that 
year; served with the Rome "Courier" untU 
the early part of 1862; entered the C. S. Army 
with a volunteer company from Cherokee 
County, and continued in the service until the 
close of the war; became connected with the 
"Advertiser," at Center, 1866; returned to 
Atlanta, Ga., 1866, and worked as a Journeyman 
printer until 1869; returned to Center and took 
charge of the "Advertiser;" purdiaaed the 
Gadsden "Times," July 1, 1871, and continued 
its editor and proprietor for many years, until 
that paper was consolidated with the "News," 
becoming the "Times and News," with Mr. 
Meeks and Mr. Johnson as proprietors. Bfr. 
Meeks is a member of the Alabama press 
association and for some years served as its 
president. Married: November 16, 1866, to 
Mary J. Cothran, of Center. Residence: 
Gadsden. 

MEGGINSON, GEORGE D., hotel proprietor^ 
was bom January 24, 1800, in Montgomery 
County, N. C, and died May 26, 1853, at Grove 
Hill; son of Thomas and Elizabeth Megginson, 
who moved from North Carolina to Tennes- 
see. He came to Clarke County in 1812, and 
became a member of Pigeon Creek Baptist 
church in October, 1830. He settled in Grove 
Hill about 1834, and conducted a hotel there 
for many years. Under the oUi military regular 
tions of the otate, he was appointed a colonel of 
militia. He was a deacon in the Baptist church; 
was a Mason; and a member of the Sons of 
Temperance. Married: to Sarah N. Hill, who 
died in 1856, sister of Elder William Hill, 
and of Travis Hill, who married Rev. John 
Talbert Children: 1. Caroline, grew to woman- 
hood, d. of consumption; 2. Washington, d. at 
twenty-eight years, unmarried; 3. William T., 
d. in 1857, m. a Miss Tucker; 4. Alfred, d. about 
twenty-eight years of age, unmarried; 5. John 
L., d. December 25, 1858, in his twenty-ninth 
year, unmarried; 6. A. Jackson, d. in 1863, m. 
Martha Pugh; 7. David A., m. Pamela Danzey, 
resides near Choctaw Comers, has five sons and 
five daughters; 8. Edwin T., b. 1839, served in 
the C. S. Army and was killed at the battle of 
Shiloh, 1863; 9. Josephine, d. in 1869, m. Rev. 
J. C. Foster. Last residence: Grove Hill. 

MELAM, JOHN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 81, and a resident of Madison 
County; private Virginia Continental Line; 
enrolled on December 31, 1882, under act of 
Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date 
from March 4, 1881; annual allowance, |80. — 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. 
doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sees., 1833-34. 

MELL, PATRICK HUES, college president, 
inventor and scientist, was bom May 24, 1850, 
at Penfield, Greene County, Ga., and died Octo- 



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SPENCER C. MARKS 



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ber 12, 1918, In Fredericksburg* Va.; son of 
Rer. Patrick Hues and Lurene Howard 
(Cooper) Mell, the former born July 19, 1814, 
at Walthonville, Ga., was left an orphan at 
an early age, attended Amherst college from 
1833 to 1835, but left before graduating, taught 
in Massachusetts, Connecticut and (Georgia and 
later was professor of ancient languages in 
Mercer university, 1842-55, and at the Univer- 
sity of Georgia, 1855-56, professor of meta- 
physics and ethics, 1860, until his death and 
chancellor of that institution, 1878, ordained 
Baptist minister, 1842, and was for many years 
president of the Georgia and Southern Baptist 
conventions, author: •'Baptism," 1852; "Correc- 
tive church discipline," 1860; ''Slavery," "Pre- 
destination," "The philosophy of prayer," 1868; 
"Parliamentary practice," 1868, and "Church 
polity," 1878, was colonel of the Ninth Georgia 
infantry regiment, 1863, died in Athens, Ga., 
January 26, 1888; grandson of Major Benjamin 
and Cynthia (Sumner) Mell of Liberty County, 
Ga., and of George and Nancy (Conner) Cooper, 
of Montgomery County, Ga.; great-grandson of 
Thomas Sumner of Liberty County, Ga., a Revo- 
lutionary soldier, and of William Conner of 
Montgomery County, Ga., who conimanded a 
company of mounted riflemen in the War of 
1812-15; great-great-grandson of William Mell 
of Beach Hill, and of Patrick Hues, of Berkeley 
County, S. C, both Revolutionary soldiers; 
great-great-great-grandson of Thomas Mell and 
wife, a Miss Canty; great-great^great-great- 
grandson of Gteorge Canty who came from Bar- 
badoes in 1670 and settled in Berkeley County, 
S. C, and of John Mell, of English stock, who 
settled in Charleston, S. C, in 1677. Dr. Mell 
received his early education at home under 
the direction of his father and graduated from 
the University of Georgia with the degree of A. 
B., 1871, C. E., 1872, M. B. 1873; the honorary 
degree of Ph. D. was conferred upon him some 
years later. He served as state chemist of 
Georgia, 1874-77. In 1905, he received the hon- 
orary degree of LL. D. from the University of 
South Carolina; was teacher of geology and 
botany, Alabama polsrtechnic institute; presi- 
dent Clemson agricultural college, S. C., 1902- 
10; inventor of the system of weather signals 
now in use by the United States weather serv- 
ice; director Alabama weather service, 1884- 
93; director Alabama agricultural experiment 
station, 1898-1902. He was first commander Ala- 
bama division, Sons of Confederate veterans, 
1898; fellow, Geological society of America; fel- 
low. American association for the advancement 
of science; member. Southern, Alabama, and 
the South Carolina historical societies; mem- 
ber. National geological society; member. Sons 
of the Revolution; recipient of a medal from 
the Paris exposition, 1900, given In recognition 
of his efforts in London, England, collecting 
cotton for the exhibit of the South at the Paris 
exposition; invited to Join the "Authors Club," 
London, England. He was a Baptist; member 
home mission board of the Southern Baptist 
convention, and first president of the Baptist 
young peoples union of Alabama; member Kappa 
Alpha and Phi Beta Kappa college fraternities. 
Author: "Southern soapstones and fireclays," 
1882; "Hybrids ftom American and foreign cot- 



ton," 1897; "Life of Patri<* Hues MeU," 1895; 
"Grasses and their cultivation," 1889; "Botani- 
cal laboratory guides," 1895; "Biological labora- 
tory methods, 1892; "Revision of White's CJar- 
dening for the South." 1901; "Wild grasses of 
Alabama," 1886; "Microscopic study of cotton 
plant," 1890; "Climatology of cotton plant," 
1893; "Climatology of Alabama," 1890; "Indus- 
trial education and its value to the South," 
"Contributions of the South in building of the 
Nation," "Administrative methods in American 
colleges;" besides numerous articles on scien- 
tific literary and historical subjects, that have 
appeared in leading Journals; also a MS. his- 
tory of Georgia. Married: June 15, 1875, at 
Athens, Ga., to Annie Rebecca, daughter of 
William Nathaniel and Rebecca (Benedict) 
White who lived at that place, the former a 
native of Walton, N. T., who came South in 
1847, settling in Athens, Cku, soon became 
prominent as a writer on agricultural and his- 
torical subjects, author of a work "Gardening 
for the South," that has gone through several 
editions and is still an authority, editor of the 
"Southern cultivator," which is the oldest agri- 
cultural paper in the South, and the only one 
that had a continuous issue throughout the 
War of Secession. Mrs. Mell is descended from 
the old New England ftunilies. White, Benedict, 
Fitch, Carter, St John, North and others, and 
through them is a member of the Colonial 
Dames and Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution. Through her father, who was a mem- 
ber of the Ninth Georgia "Light Guards" regi- 
ment, she is a member of the United Daughters 
of the Confederacy. She has been State his- 
torian of the Alabama D. A. R.'s and for two 
years edited that society's department in the 
"Montgomery Advertiser." She was State 
treasurer, U. D. C, of Alabama for two years; 
vice-president Alabama Federation Women's 
Clubs, and an official in the Colonial Dames. 
Author: "Revolutionary soldiers buried in Ala- 
bama;" "Genealogy of the Mell family;" also a 
number of articles for the papers and for wom- 
en's clubs on historical and biographical sub- 
jects. Last residence: Atlanta, Ga. 

MELLEN, GEORGE FREDERICK, edu- 
cator, was bom June 27, 1859, at Pierce's 
Springs, Clarke (bounty, Miss.; son of Seth 
Smith and Susan Huntington (Bush) Mellen 
(q. v.). He received his early education at 
Goodman institute and Mt. Sterling high school, 
and was prepared for college by his father and 
George Washington Taylor. In 1877 he entered 
the University of Alabama as a senior in Latin, 
Greek and mathematics, and was graduated 
with the degree of M. A., in 1879, receiving 
at commencement the first prize offered by the 
Early English text society of Great Britain, for 
the best examination in Anglo-Saxon, and the 
first prize by the New Shakespeare society of 
Great Britain, for the best examination in 
Shakespeare. He took graduate work in the 
University of Leipsic, (Germany, from which 
he received the Ph. D. degree, October 80, 1890, 
having for thesis "Monograph on some popular 
errors in education in the United States and 
their remedy." He entered upon the profes- 
sion of teaching in Gainesville, 1879, and re- 



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1188 



DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



mained at that place until 1882; Livingston, 
1882-85; Demopolis* 1887-91; professor of Greek 
and French, University of Tennessee, 1891-98, 
and of Greek and history, 1898-1900. He was 
elected to the legislature of Tennessee, 1905-07. 
He is a Democrat, and a Methodist Author: 
collaborated with William Rule in a "History 
of Knoxville," 1900; collaborated with Henry N. 
Ingersoll, "Memorial volume," containing 
sketch and choicest writings of Joshua W. 
Caldwell; prepared three chapters for Vol. 
VIII in the "South in the building of the na- 
tion"; contributor "Southern humorists"; 
"Southern editors"; sketch of Joseph Clover 
Baldwin, in "Southern literature"; special con- 
tributor and editorial writer "Knoxville Sen- 
tinel" for thirteen years, and regular contrib- 
utor to the "Chattanooga News"; author nu- 
merous articles in "New England magaiine," 
"Methodist Review," Nashville, Tenn., "Sewa- 
nee Review," "Methodist Review," New York; 
contributor to various daily and weekly news- 
papers. Married: July 7, 1885, at Mont Eagle, 
Tenn., to Mary Briscoe, daughter of Gyrus Bris- 
coe and Eliza J. (Van de Gn^) Baldwin^ of 
Houston, Miss., the former a native Virginian, 
the latter a Kentuckian. Children: 1. Seth 
Baldwin; 2. Helen Van de Graff; 3. George 
Frederick, Jr.; 4. Cornelia Daniel. Residence: 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

MELLEN, SETH SMITH, educator, was bom 
February 7, 1821, at Pelham, Hampshire 
County, Mass., and died May 30, 1893, at Liv- 
ingston; son of Jeremiah and Mary (Hastings) 
Mellon; grandson of William and Hannah 
(Smith) Mellen. He received his early educa- 
tion at Wilbraham academy, where he was pre- 
pared for Williams college, which he attended 
1839-43, graduating during the latter year with 
the degree of B. A., third man in his class, 
and the philosophical orator. He taught at 
Longstreet academy, Twigg County, Ga., 1843- 
55; at Gk>odman institute, Clarke ^County, Miss., 
1855-69; Mt Sterling high school, Choctaw 
County, 1869-80; superintendent of education, 
(Hioctaw County, 1872-80; co-president, Tusca- 
loosa female college, 1880-83; co-principal, boys 
academy, Livingston, 1883-88; superintendent 
Sumter County, 1885-92. After forty-five years 
service in the field of education he retired with 
a competency. In 1883 he received the hon- 
orary degree of LL. D. from the University of 
Alabama. In politics he was originally a Whig, 
but upon that party's dissolution he became a 
Democrat; a Methodist; and a Mason. Mar- 
ried: August 24, 1848, at Westfield, Mass., to 
Susan Huntington, daughter of Levi and Anna 
(Ayers) Bush, who resided at Whately and 
later at Westfield, Mass., representatives of old 
New England families. Children: 1. (3eorge 
Frederick (q. v.) ; 2. Charles Howard, teacher, 
A. B., A. M., who died, aged twenty-one, at the 
University of Alabama. December 27, 1882; 3. 
William Bush, d. young; 4. Henry Levi, m. 
Annie Grace Tartt, Livingston; 5. Sarah Hast- 
ings, d. in infancy. Last residence: Living- 
ston. 

MELTON, WIGHTMAN FLETCHER, teacher 
and author, was bom September 26. 1867, at 
Ripley, Lauderdale County, Tenn.; son of Rev. 



Isaac Quimby and Fannie Louise (Ellis) Mel- 
ton, the former a native of Ashville, St. Clair 
County, a flfer in the 25th Alabama infantry 
regiment, C. S. Army, and later a Methodist 
minister who served a number of charges in 
the north Alabama conference; grandson of 
John and Mary (Sowell) Melton of Ashville, 
and of Rev. Enoch and Statia (Atkins) Ellis 
who lived near Attalla. The name Melton, was 
originally Middletown, then Middleton. In Eng- 
land there are still Middletons, Miltons, and 
Meltons, of which the latter name is the Irish 
pronunciation for Milton. The first Melton to 
settle in America was an Irishman, Jimmie Mel- 
ton who located near Halifax, Va. The great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch came 
from Spartanburg, S. C, to Ashville. BIr. Mel- 
ton received his preparatory education in the 
common schools of Alabama and attended the 
Southern university at Greensboro, throughout 
the soph(Hnore class, 1886. In the fall of the 
latter year he entered Peabody college for 
teachers, Nashville, Tenn., and in 1889 was 
graduated with the degree of licentiate of in- 
structi<m. He graduated from Blount college, 
Blountsville, in 1890 with the degree of A. B.; 
studied at "Johns Hopkins university, Balti- 
more, Md., 1903-06, and graduated with the 
degree of Ph. D. the latter year. He taught In 
the public schools of Blountsville and Chepul- 
tepec, and Hawthorn, Fla.; was president of 
the Florida conference college, 1892-95; vice- 
president, Nashville college for young ladies, 
Nashville, Tenn., 1895-96; president, Tuscaloosa 
female college, 1897-1903; head of the depart- 
ment of English, Baltimore city college, 1906- 
08; professor of English at Emory college, Ox- 
ford, Ga., from 1908 to date. He established the 
first class in journalism in the South, and in- 
augurated a movement looking to the establish- 
ment in Johns Hopkins university of a Sidney 
Lanier lectureship in American literature, a 
wish still unfulfilled. He was regarded by the 
late Prof. Charles Eliot Norton of Harvard uni- 
versity as authority, both in England and 
America, on the poetical works of John Donne. 
He is a Democrat; and member of the Kappa 
Alpha college fraternity. Author: "The 
Preacher's son," 1894; "The Rhetoric of John 
Donne's verse," 1906; editor, Ruskin •'Crown 
of Wild Olives; Queen of the Air," 1908; 
sketch of Edward Coote Pinkey, in Library 
of Southern literature, 1908. Married: Septem- 
ber 19, 1889, at Lake Providence, La., to Oliver, 
daughter of Oliver Hazsuurd Perry and Emily 
(Bass) Keller, who lived at that place. The 
Kellers were of Swiss origin, the first to emi- 
grate to America being Caspar Keller who set- 
tled on Lengonoir Creek, in western Maryland. 
The paternal grandfather, Jacob S. Keller, 
fought in the battle of New Orleans, and the 
father, 0. H. P. Keller was for four years a 
Confederate soldier, and died a few years after 
the war from wounds received in battle, having 
been mentioned for conspicuous bravery by his 
commanding officers. Children: 1. Oliver 
Quimby, B. S. degree from Emory college, 1912, 
teacher in Allen academy, Bryan, Texas; 2. 
Emily Louise, A. B. degree, Wesleyan college, 
1913; 3. Keller Fletcher. Residence: Oxford, 
Ga. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1189 



MENAWA, Creek Chief, 
and associated characters. 



See Indian chiefs 



MBNOES, BENEDICT, Roman Catholic ab- 
bot, was born July 31, 1840, at Obermohr, Pala- 
tinate, Rhenish Bavaria. He received his 
early education in the schools of his native 
province, specializing in the classics in view 
of his determination to become a priest. He 
arrived in America during his young manhood 
and entered St. Vincent's abbey in Westmore- 
land County, Pa., On Oct 15, 1872, he was ad- 
mitted to the priesthood and ordained, Decem- 
ber 21st, of that year. His first <diarge was as 
assistant priest at St Joseph's church, Chi- 
cago, 111., which city was still suffering from 
the effects of the fire that had practically de- 
stroyed it His second charge was at Alleg- 
hany, Pa., where he remained four years be- 
fore being ordered by his superior to take 
charge of the struggling missions in north 
Alabama, Birmingham was then an interior 
hamlet and here he labored for a while. Hunts- 
TlUe, Tuscumbla, Florence and St. Florian, 
were the scenes of nineteen years of his mis- 
sionary service. In 1879 when yellow fever 
scourged that section he stayed at his post liv- 
ing at the time in Huntsvllle, where he nursed 
the sick and dying. He was made superior of 
the Benedictine houses in Carrollton, Pa., and 
Covington, Ky., but his heart was set upon 
culmination of his hopes to establish the Bene- 
dictine order in Alabama, and to build an ab- 
bey in that section. With the aid of several 
other priests the order was organized, Septem- 
ber 29, 1891, and confirmed by Pope Leo Xin, 
December 15, of that year. The fact that funds 
to build the abbey must be raised did not daunt 
him. Remembering the warm friends he had 
made during his years of labor in Alabama, 
through seasons of sunshine and of stress, he 
applied to them for assistance and by dona- 
tions and loans, St Benedict was established. 
Cullman County was chosen for the location of 
the monastery and college, the site being a com- 
manding height near the town of Cullman. 
The Alabama legislature chartered the institu- 
tion, the purpose of which was to educate young 
men in moral and intellectual training. St 
Bernard was the name bestowed upon the in- 
stitution. Residence: Cullman. 

MEREDITH, JESSE, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 79, and a resident of Dallas 
County; private Virginia Continental Line; 
enrolled on November 10, 1819, under act of 
Ck>ngress of March 18, 1818, payment to date 
from September 27, 1819; annual allowance, 
196; sums received to date of publication of 
list 11,008. Suspended under act May 1, 1820. 
Continued from March 4, 1823, and transferred 
from Smith County, Tenn. — Revolutionary Pen- 
Hon Ron, in vol. xlv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 
1st ^ess., 1833-34. 



IffERIWETHER, GEORGE MATHEWS, phy- 
sician, was bom in Oglethorpe County, Ga., 
June 15, 1814, and died at Mathews station, 
October 12, 1873 ; son of Dr. Nicholas Lewis and 
Mary (De Tampert) Meriwether (q. v.). Dr. 
Meriwether was educated in the common 



schools of Montgomery, now Bullock County; 
graduated from the University of Alabama, A. 
B., 1835; and received the degree of M. D. from 
Jefferson medical college, Philadelphia. He 
practiced medicine in Macon and Montgomery 
Counties for about thirty years, and was at 
the same time a prosperous planter. Married: 
(1) in 1838 to Sarah Ann, daughter of Bird 
and Dorothy (Graves) Fitzpatrick, of near 
Union Springs, and niece of Gov. Benjamin 
Fitzpatrick (q. v.); (2) in 1858, to Josephine 
Hortense Landrum; (3) In 1871, to Susan 
Knox, daughter of Frank Meriwether and Sarah 
(Borden) Barnett of Pike Road. Children: 
by first wife: 1. Mary, m. Phillip Fitzpatrick, 
son of Columbus and Elmira (Fitzpatrick) 
Mitchell, who resided at Fitzpatrick station; 
descendants; 2. Thomas Nicholas, d. unmarried 
as a member of the Metropolitan guards. Third 
Alabama infantry regiment in Virginia; 3. Bird 
Fitzpatrick, m. Julia Fitzpatrick, daughter of 
Columbus and Elmira (Fitzpatrick) Mitchell, 
and resides at Montgomery; descendants; 4. 
Martha Phillip, m. William B. Hooper, nephew 
of Dr. B. R. Jones (q. v.), descendants; 5. Fran- 
cis Valentine, d. young unmarried; by second 
wife: 6. Rebecca, m. H. C. Lamar, of Snowden, 
descendants; 7. Sarah Ann, m. Henry Calloway 
of Snowden. no children; 8. Joseph, unmarried 
bridge builder on the Atlantic Coast line; 
by third wife: 9. child died in infancy. Last 
residence: Mathews station. 

MERIWETHER, NICHOLAS LEWIS, physi- 
cian, was born January 17. 1782, in Virginia, 
and died near Mathews station, September 27, 
1863; son of Dr. Frank and Martha (Jamison) 
Meriwether, the former a native of Virginia, 
who removed to Gteorgla in 1784-5, where he 
practiced medicine and was at the same time a 
prosperous planter, the latter a sister of Col. 
Jamison of Virginia (Continental line; grandson 
of Thomas and Elizabeth (Thornton) Meri- 
wether, of "Clover Fields," Albemarle County, 
Va.; great-grandson of David and Anne 
(Holmes) Meriwether, the former of near Char- 
lottesville, Va.; great-great-grandson of Nicho- 
las and Elizabeth (Crawford) Meriwether, the 
former a man of great wealth in Virginia, and 
of Oeorge Holmes, of King and Queen County, 
Va. Dr. Meriwether's early education was lim- 
ited. He spent most of his time attending the 
sick of the Broad River settlement 0&, His 
friends prevailed upon him to take a course in 
medicine and by study, practice and experi- 
ence, he soon became a successful physician. 
He removed to Montgomery County in 1816 
where he practiced for a number of years. 
Married: March 14, 1805, to Mary do Yampert 
a full sister of Lucius Qulntus Cincinnatus de 
Tampert and a half sister of Thomas Jef- 
ferson de Tampert, of Montgomery and later 
of Dallas, or Marengo County, and all of them 
children of a French physician who served in 
the Revolutionary War. Children: 1. James 
Bradley, a planter, who lived and died near 
Pike Road, and had a large family, m. Lucy 
Sophia Taliaferro; descendants; 2. Francis 
David; 3. Nicholas, d. young; 4. Thomas, m. 
Elizabeth Matilda, daughter Benjamin and 
Nancy (Fitzpatrick) Baldwin, near Mathews 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



station, Thomas Meriwether, a son and a plan- 
ter, resides at Pike Road; 5. George Mathews, 
(q. Y.) m. Sarah Ann Fitzpatrick; 6. Charles 
L<ewi8, planter, m. Fannie Baldwin, sister of 
Matilda Baldwin, lived and died near Mathews 
station, descendants; 7. Nicholas, m. Mrs. Susan 
Hazzard, resided near Mathews station, no chil* 
dren; 8. William Lucius, m. to (1) Tahitha 
Fitzpatrick Baldwin, sister o£ Matilda Baldwin 
above, (2) his first cousin, Mary Barbara, 
daughter of Charles Bontwell and Mildred 
(Meriwether) Taliaferro, five children by first 
wife, including Thomas George who married 
Edna Turner, daughter of Thomas Gilliam and 
Martha C. (Tomlinson) Pierce, and had three 
children, by first and nine children by second 
wife. Last residence: Pike Road. 

MERRICK, JOHN, sen., soldier of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, aged 82, resided in Dale County, 
June 1, 1840. — Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 
149. 

MERRILL, ALLEN HUNTER, lawyer, bank- 
er, member legrislature, was born November 
29, 1845, at Eufkula, Barbour County; son of 
Allen Kent and Elizabeth Aiken (Hunter) Mer- 
rill, the former a native of Middlebury, Addison 
County, Vt, who removed to Bufaula where he 
practiced law, being still a young man at the 
time of his death; grandson of Thomas Abbott 
and Eliza (Allen) Merrill of Andover, Mass., 
afterwards of Middleburg, Vt, and of John 
Lingard and Sarah (Bohler) Hunter of 
Eufaula. He was educated in the common 
schools of Eufaula and instead of entering col- 
lege for which he had been prepared he enlisted 
in the Confederate Army. At the close of hos- 
tilities he read law in the office of U. S. Senator 
James L. Pugh and was admitted to the bar, 
January, 1869, upon examination before the city 
court of Eufaula, and at once entered upon the 
practice. He has been president of the Bast 
Alabama national bank of Eufaula since its 
establishment. In 1896 he was elected to the 
legislature and in 1901 was a member of the 
constitutional convention. His military record 
is highly creditable, being a member of the 
Eufaula light artillery, which brilliantly dis- 
tinguished itself during the War of Secession. 
He enlisted in the early fall of 1863 and served 
throughout the remaining years of the struggle, 
participating in all the campaigns from Dalton 
to Atlanta. He was also in all the battles of 
Gen. Hood's Tennessee campaign. He is a 
Democrat, and was chairman of the Executive 
committee of that party in Barbour County for 
a number of years, and also member of the 
Democratic State executive committee for five 
years; delegate from the 3rd Congressional Dis- 
trict to the national democratic convention 
which met in Chicago and nominated President 
Cleveland for the second time; delegate from 
the state-at-large to the Democratic National 
Convention which met at Kansas City and nom- 
inated William J. Bryan for the second time 
as standard bearer of the party for the office 
of president of the U. S. He is an Episco- 
palian and a Mason. Married: September 12, 
1876, at Eufaula, to Tade Sims, daughter of 
William Hoardley and Mary (Bullock) Bray 



of that place. Children: 1. Elizabeth Aiken, m. 
John C. McRea; 2. Mary Bray, m. A M. Brown; 
3. Tade. m. R. Buford Harrison; 4. Allen Kent; 
5. William Hoardley; 6. Eliza Starr; 7. Theresa 
Hunter, all resided in Eufkula. Residence: 
Eufaula. 

BfBRRILL, ALLEN KENT, lawyer, was bom 
March 26, 1885, at Eufaula, Barbour County; 
son of Allen Hunter and Tade Sims (Bray) 
Merrill (q. v.), of Eufaula, the former a lawyer 
and a banker; grandson of Allen Kent and 
Elizabeth (Hunter) Merrill, and of William 
Hoardley and Mary (Sims) Bray, all of Eu- 
faula; great-grandson of Gton. John L. Hunter, 
of Barbour County. He attended the public 
schools of Eufaula, and was graduated from the 
University of Alabama, A. B., X905, and LL. B., 
1907. He was admitted to the bar at Eufaula, 
1907; and represented Barbour 0>anty in the 
State legislature, 1911. He is a Democrat; an 
Episcopalian; a Mason; and an Elk. Resi- 
dence: Eufaula. 

MERRILL, HUGH DAVIS, lawyer, was born 
December 20, 1877, at Franklin, Heard County, 
Qa.; brother of Walter Benjamin Merrill (q. 
v.). He received his education in the public 
schools of Franklin, Ga., and of Eklwardsville, 
and at Oxford college, graduating from there* 

A. B., 1896. He was graduated from the law 
department of the University of Alabama, LL. 
B., 1897, and soon afterward began the practice 
of law with his father at Edwardsville. In 
1902, he moved to Anniston, and became a mem- 
ber of the fli^ of Knox, Acker it Blackmon; 
moved to Heflin in 1908 and became a partner 
with his brother, W. B. Merrill. He was a 
member of the State legislature of 1900-1901; 
was city attorney of Anniston, 1906-1908; was 
appointed Judge of the seventh Judicial circuit 
to succeed Judge John Pelham, March 11, 1911; 
was nominated to succeed himself, and was 
elteced without oppositicm in the general elec- 
tion of November, 1912. After his re-election, 
he moved to Anniston. He is a Democrat; a 
Baptist; a Shriner; an Elk; and a Knight of 
Psrthias. Married: December 27, 1906, at De- 
Armanville, to Martha Chitwood, daughter of 
J. W. and Georgia Chitwood, oi that place. 
Children: 1. Ralph. Residence: Annistim. 

MERRILL, J. B., lawyer, was bom November 
12, 1843, in Carroll County, Ga.; s<m of Jos^h 

B. and Susan (Lamberth) Merrill, natives of 
Georgia; grandson of Joseph and Maria (Bell) 
Merrill, natives of South Carolina, the former 
one of the pioneer settlers of Forsyth County, 
Ga., and of John and Permelia (Garrison) 
Lamberth, pioneer settlers of Tallapoosa Coun- 
ty, the former of whom served as tax collector 
of that county for many years. Mr. Merrill was 
reared on the farm and attended the common 
schools of the county, entering Irwin college, 
Tennessee, in 1860. At the outbreak of the 
War of Secession, he, with about sixty other 
students, left the college, and entered Co. A, 
Capt. John B. Wilcoxon's battalion, Phillips' 
legion. May, 1861. He served as a private until 
1862, was then elected second lieutenant, a year 
later first lieutenant, and eight months later 
was promoted to captain. He was ^ith the 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



U91 



legion in its first campaigning in West Vir- 
ginia, and subsequently on the Gtoorgia coast 
while Oen. Lee was in command of that de- 
partment Returning to Virginia when Qen. 
Lee did, he was immediately transferred to the 
cavalry under Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, and after 
participating in the battles of the Wilderness. 
Jack's Shop, Yellow Tavern and Gettysburg, the 
seven days' fight before Richmond, and other 
engagements in Virginia, he went with Wade 
Hampton to the Carolinas and took part in the 
last campaign against Sherman, including the 
battle of Bentonville, N. C. He was paroled at 
Lexington, N. C, in the spring of 1865. Re- 
turning to Georgia, he farmed for some years, 
reading law in the meantime. He was admitted 
to the bar in 1872 and began to practice law 
in Carroll Ck)unty, Ga. In 1886, he moved to 
Edwardsville to look after his large interests 
in mineral lands in Alabama, and continued 
the practice of his profession in that place. 
He was elected mayor of Edwardsville four 
times. He is a Mason. Married: in 1867, to 
Mary E. Faver, a Georgian, daughter of Sanders 
and Caroline (Davis) Paver, both of French 
descent Children: L Walter B. (q. v.); 2. 
Rose, m. J(din W. Abercrombie (q. v.) ; 3. Hugh 
(q. v.); 4. Myrtle; 5. Clyde. Residence: Ed- 
wardsville. 

BfERRILL, WALTER BENJAMIN, lawyer, 
was bom April 5, 1873, at Franklin, Ga.; son of 
James Benjamin and Mary Elizabeth (Faver) 
Merrill (q. v.), the former a native of Carroll 
County, Ga., who lived at Franklin, Ga., and 
moved from that place to Edwardsville, was a 
captain of John B. Wilcoxon's battalion, Phillips 
legion, C. S. Army, served as mayor of Ed- 
wardsville for four years, and practiced law 
from 1872-1904; grandson of Joseph B. and 
Susan (Lamberth) Merrill, and of Sanders 
Walker and Caroline (Davis) Faver, all of 
Gteorgia. Mr. Merrill is a brother of Hugh 
Davis Merrill (q. v.). He received his early 
schooling at Franklin, Ga., and at Edwards- 
ville; and attended Oxford college, from which 
institution he was graduated, A. B., 1891. He 
was admitted to the bar in November, 1892, 
and immediately became a member of the firm 
of Merrill & Bridges, in which association he 
continued until 1894 when he was appointed 
solicitor of the county court of Cleburne 
County by CJov. Johnston. He was mayor of 
Edwardsville, one yeaif; solicitor of the county 
court, ten years; a member of the school 
board of Hefiin, four years; and a State 
senator from the thirty-fourth senatorial dis- 
trict in 1911. He is a Democrat serving since 
1898 as chairman of the Democratic executive 
committee of CHebume County, and as alter- 
nate delegate to the National Democratic con- 
vention in 1894; is a Baptist; a Royal Arch 
Bfason; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: 
(1) December 23, 1894, at Edwardsville, to 
Vicda Abercrombie, deceased, daughter of 
Henry M. and Sarah A. Abercrombie; (2) Feb- 
ruary 17, 1904, to Lilla Jones, daughter of 
James W. and Mary F. Jones, of Jones' Mill, 
Monroe County, a representative from Monroe 
County in the State legislature, 1911. Chil- 
dren, by first marriage: 1. John Dodsen; 2. 

Vol. IV— It 



Glad3^; 3. Pearl; by second marriage: 4. (3ecil» 
deceased; 5. Evelyn; 6. Pelham Jones; 7. CHyde 
Louise. Residence: Hefiin. 

MERRITT, FISHER HARRISON, cotton mer- 
chant, was bom in 1840, in Todd County, Ky.; 
son of Daniel R. and Penelope (Hannum) Mer- 
ritt, the former a native of Tennessee, of Eng- 
lish ancestry, who moved to Kentucky when 
a young man, and farmed there until his death 
in 1887. the latter a native of Kentucky, of 
Scotch-Irish descent, who died in 1889. He ob- 
tained his early education from a school in 
Allensville, Ky., and was a student at Cumber- 
land college, Lebanon^ Tenn., when the War 
of Secession began. Leaving college in the 
spring of 1861, he returned to Kentucky, and 
entered the service of the state, enlisting in 
an independent company of infantry com- 
manded by Capt James Childress, which was 
organized in Todd County, Ky., in order to 
protect the state from invasion by either the 
Confederate or Union troops. Soon after, he 
and his two brothers went to Lynchburg, Va., 
and enlisted in the C. S. Army. They served 
with Co. K, First Kentucky regiment for twelve 
months, then joined a cavalry company, com- 
manded by Capt Dorch, of which Mr. Mer- 
ritt became lieutenant. He was wounded at 
Buffington's Island, while trying to recross the 
Ohio River, was captured and taken to John- 
son's Island, where he was held prisoner until 
the end of the war. After his release, he re- 
turned to Todd Ck>unty, Ky., and farmed for 
two years. He came to Alabama in 1867, lo- 
cated in Lowndes County, and engaged in plant- 
ing there and in Montgomery County until 1882. 
At that time, he went to Montgomery and 
entered the cotton business, in which he is 
engaged at this time. He is a Methodist and 
a Knight of Honor. Married: (1) in 1867, 
to Lucy Grattan, who died in 1876, daughter 
of Dr. John Grattan, of Columbus, Miss.; (2) 
in 1878, to Fannie Grattan, deceased, sister of 
his first wife. Residence: Montgomery. 

MERRITT, HENRY PAUL, lawyer, planter, 
legislator and Jurist, was born June 7, 1873, 
near Old Spring Hill, Barbour County; son of 
Mickleberry Clinch and Margaret Elizabeth 
(Owens) Merritt, the former* a native of Henry 
County, Ga., but removed later to Barbour 
County, soldier of the Ck>nfederate Army, serv- 
ing for two years; grandson of Henry Clinton 
and Jackie (Green) Merritt who lived in 
Greene County, Ga., and of William Howard 
and Margaret Elizabeth (Owens) Owens of 
Palmyra, Ga., who afterwards removed to 
Texas. Judge Merritt was educated in the com- 
mon schools of Barbour and Bullock Counties, 
and at the Southern university, Greensboro, at- 
tending the latter institution, 1890-91. He 
studied law at the University of Virginia and 
was admitted to the bar, November 30, 1893, 
but did not actively enter the practice until 
1896, when he located at Tuskegee, where he 
has since resided. He served in the Alabama 
State senate from the twenty-sixth district, 
1907; in the house of representatives, 1911, 
1915, and 1919, and was speaker of that body 
during the latter year. He was a member of 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



the Joint committee on the Code of Alabama, 
1907; appointed Judge at the court of appeals, 
November, 1919, by Gov. Thomas E. Kilby* and 
elected to succeed himself in that position, 
1920. He has been a trustee of the Alabama 
schools for the deaf and blind. While speaker 
of the house of representatives, 1919, he intro- 
duced and passed an act creating the Alabama 
memorial commission, to erect a memorial to 
Alabama and Alabamians in the European War. 
He registered for mUitary duty during the 
European War but his class had not been called 
when the war ended. Married: November 14, 
1894, in Marion, to Annie Seay, daughter of 
William H. and Biartha (Toland) King, who 
lived at that place. Children: 1. William King, 
captain Co. K, 328th infantry, American Expe- 
ditionary Forces, wounded three times in the 
Argonne; 2. Marvin, in Camp Hancock, Au- 
gusta, Ga., and ready for overseas service when 
the armistice was declared; 3. Paul, in Camp 
Greenleaf, Fort Oglethrope, Ga., also ready for 
overseas duty when the war ended; 4 and 5. 
Evelyn and Elicabeth. twin daughters. Resi- 
dence: Tuskegee. 

MESSENGER, ASA, editor, was bom in Con- 
necticut, removed to Delaware, Ohio; and from 
thence to Tuscumbia, where among other enter- 
prises he founded and edited "The North Ala* 
bamian." He was opposed to secession and 
advocated through his paper the cause of the 
union until compelled by public pressure to 
suspend publication during the years of the 
war. Although in fkith strongly union he was 
loyal to his adopted State. The slaves that he 
owned remained with him until freed by eman- 
cipation. He had accumulated a comfortable 
property in land and real estate in Tuscumbia 
and Franklin County and his mountain home 
reflected in the orchards, vineyards and fields 
surrounding it, the intelligent and progressive 
agriculturist. Married: (1) Ann Allen, (2) 
Miss Lighfoot Children: by first wife, 1. 
North Allen (q. v.), m. Lillian Rozell (q. v.); 
by second wife, 2. Asa, who died after Uie War 
of Secession from the effect of wounds received 

in Confederate service, m. flmma of 

Denison, Texas. Last residence: Tuscumbia. 

MESSENGER, LILLIAN ROZELL, author, 
was bom in 1844, near Milburn, Ballard 
County, Ky.; daughter of Dr. Francis Overton 
and Caroline (Cole) Rozell, natives of Virginia, 
the former a descendant of John Laurence 
Rozell, a gifted physician. The paternal grand- 
father came to America from Nice, France, 
during the Napoleonic war, and settled in Vir- 
ginia. The Cole family was of English an- 
cestry. Her childhood was passed amidst pas- 
toral scenes, an advantage that has continued 
to reflect itself in her literary work. Careful 
preparatory training fitted her at an early age 
for college and before she was sixteen she had 
almost completed her academic work at Forest 
Hill institute, near Memphis, Tenn. She there 
acquired a technical knowledge of music and 
art, and later developed unusual powers as a 
dramatio reader. Called home from college by 
her father's death she removed to Arkansas 
and soon thereafter became the girl-bride of 



the young husband whose death four years 
later left her a widow before she had reached 
her twenty-flrst birthday. For four years she 
resided at Tuscumbia, devoting her life to 
rearing the child of this union and to an ac- 
tive literary career. After her husband's 
death she removed to Arkansas, 1868, and was 
the flrst woman elected to membership in the 
State press association. Later she removed to 
Washington, D. C, where for more than thirty 
years she has been engaged in general literary 
work. She was one of the charter members of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution, and 
belongs to other patriotic and literary organi- 
zations. Author: while still a school girl she 
began her literary career, being encouraged and 
introduced by such eminent men as M. C. Gal- 
loway, Solon Borland, and Geo. D. Prentice. 
She flrst wrote under the pen name of ''Zena 
Clifton," but gaining confldence by general ap- 
proval she b^ran writing under her own sig- 
nature. Among her flrst acknowledged poems 
were those later brought out in a volume 
entitled, "Threads of fate," 1872. Other vol- 
umes are "Fragments tram an old inn," 1885; 
"The Vision of gold," 1886; "The Southern 
cross," 1891; "Columbus," read by Ctovemor 
Hoyt of Wyoming at the patriotic celebration 
in the woman's building at the Chicago world's 
fair, 1893. "In the heart of America," was read 
at the Atlanta exposition. Married: in 1861, in 
Pine Bluff, Ark., to North Allen Messenger 
(q. v.). Children: 1. North Overton, Journal- 
ist, Washington, D. C. Residence: Washing- 
ton. D. C. 

MESSENGER, NORTH ALLEN, editor, was 
bom March 22, 1839, in Tuscumbia, and died 
in 1866 at that place; son of Asa and Ann 
(Allen) Messenger (q. v.). He received a good 
education in his native town and at the age 
of twenty-one assumed the editorship of the 
"North Alabamian" founded and edited by his 
father prior to that time. Married: in 1861, 
in Pine BlufT, Ark., to Lillian Rozell (q. v.). 
Children: 1. North Overton, Journalist, Wash^ 
ington, D. C. Last residence: Tuscumbia. 

MESSICK, JOHN FREDERICK, professor of 
mathematics at the Alabama polytechnic insti- 
tute. Auburn, 1910-1913. He held A. A. and 
Ph. D. degrees. 

MESSING, A. J., Jewish rabbi, a native of 
Bloomlngton, 111., for several years a resident 
of Montgomery, rabbi, Temple Beth Or. 

METCALF, HAMILTON BONNER, druggist, 
was bom December 24, 1836, in Greensboro, 
Ga.; son of Eliphelet H. and Mary Jones (Bon- 
ner) Metcalf, the former a native of North- 
umberland, N. T., bom in 1809 and settled in 
Montgomery in 1852, a mail contractor, carry- 
ing the mails over the red etage-coach lines 
throughout the south; grandson of William 
Metcalf who was bom in Connecticut in 1776, 
and of Hamiltcm Bonner of Hancock County, 
Ga.; great-grandson of Eliphelet Metcalf, who 
was bom in Connecticut, 1748, and died in 
1834. The emigrant ancestor was Michael Met- 
calf, a native of Tatterford, Norfolk County, 
England, bom 1536, and settled flrst in Ded- 



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JOHN P. TILLMAN 



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1195 



ham, Mass., where he was among those who 
built the first church at that place. Mr. Met- 
calf was educated at the Troy conference acad- 
emy, 'WBst Pooltney, Va., and at Nourse's high 
school, Washington, D. a He entered the drag 
hosinees in Washington, after leaving school, 
and )n 1867 remoTed to Montgomerj where he 
heoame a drug clerk. In 1862 he formed a 
partnership with Dr. George Pollard and ten 
years later purchased the interest of his asso- 
ciate after which he conducted a drug store in 
his own name for more than a quarter of a 
century. He served two years as alderman of 
Montgomery. Married: in 1867, at Cross Keys, 
to Anna P., daughter of MaJ. W. J. Howard. 
Qilldren: 1. Mary Louise; 2. Howard; 8. 
ylaudia; 4. Anna; 6. Eugenia Woodruff. Resi- 
dence: Montgomery. 

METCALF, JOHN MH^TON PUTNAM, Con- 
P^sational minister, teacher, was bom Octo- 
^ 28, 1864, at Blyria, O.; son of Isaac Stevens 
^^Antoinette Brigham (Putnam) Metcalf, the 
jj22®^ a native of Roiralston, Franklin County, 
/«2i^-> who was graduated from Bowdoin col- 
bnUl ^^'^* became a civil engineer and as such 
!r^^ the second division of the Illinois Central 
WlWay, was colonel of the local volunteer 
tHiUtia during the War of Secession, served as 
justice of the peace of Elyria, and as a mem- 
ber of the board of education; grandson of 
Isaac and Anna Mayo Stevens (Rich) Metcalf, 
who lived at Royalston, Mass., the former a 
native of that pla<5&, and a teacher in the pub- 
lic schools, the latter a native of Warwick, 
Mass., and of Rev. John Milton and Arethusa 
(Brigham) Putnam, who lived at Dunbarton, 
K. H.; greatrgrandson of Peletiah and Lydia 
(Estey) Metcalf, the former bom June 24, 
1744, at Wrentham, Mass., the latter of Thomp- 
son, Conn.; great-great-grandson of Peletiah 
and Hepsibah (Mann) Metcalf, of Wrentham, 
Mass.; great-great-great-grandson of Michael 
and Abigail (0>lbum) Metcalf, of Wrentham, 
Mass.; great-great-great-great-grandson of Elea- 
sar and Meletia (Fisher) Metcalf, of Wrentham, 
Mass.; great-great-great-greatpgreat-grandson of 
Michael and Bfary (Fairbanks) Metcalf, the 
former bom August 29, 1620, at St Benedicts, 
England, who settled in Dedham, Mass., May 
18, 1642; great-great-grea^great-great-great- 
grandson of Michael and Sarah (Elwyn) Met- 
calt who were married October 13, 1616, at 
HIngham, Ehigland, and came to America, April 
15, 1687, settling in Dedham, Mass., the former 
who became a selectman of Dedham, Mass., a 
native of Patterford, England, bom June 15, 
1587, son of Rev. Leonard Metcalf of that place. 

Mr. Metcalf attended high school at Blyria, 
0., and was graduated trcm Oberlin college, 
A.B., 1886, and A.M., 1890. The degree of 
D. D. was conferred upon him by Oberlin col- 
lege in 1910. He spent two years in Oberlin 
theological seminary, and one year in Union 
theological seminary, graduating from the 
latter institution in 1888. He was a student 
at the University of Berlin, Germany, 1898- 
1896. Dr. Metcalf was ordained to the Congre- 
gational ministry at St Louis, Mo., in Septem- 
W, 1888, and served as pastor of the Peoples 
tabemade congregational church, at St. Louis, 



1888-1890. He was head of the English course 
and professor of the English Bible, at Oberlin 
theological seminary, 1890-1893; and became 
affiliated with Talladega college (Negro), in 
1896, serving as professor of theology, 1896- 
1904, as dean, 1904-1907, acting president, 
1907-1909, and has held the presidency since 
1909. He is translator of Hugo Winckler's 
"Tel-El-Amarna Tablets," from the Cterman, 
1896; is independent in politics; and is a 
member of the examining board of the First 
Congregational church, at Talladega. Mar- 
ried: September 12, 1888, in Bellville, 0., 
to Caroline Phebe Post, daughter of Franklin 
and Elisabeth (Olin) Post, who lived at Wal- 
lingford, Vt; granddaughter of Oaylord Post, 
who married a Miss Meacham* CJhildren: 1. 
Franklin Post, b. June 10, 1892, at Oberlin, O.; 
2. Robert Wilder, b. June 22, 1899, at Talla- 
dega. Residence: TaUadega. 

METCALF, WILLIAM, member of the con- 
stitutional convention of 1819, from Franklin 
County. 

METCALFE, LEE S., farmer, was bom No- 
vember 9, 1862, in Lamar County; son of Wiley 
S. and Virginia E. (Bradley) Metcalfe, of 
Alabama and Virginia; grandson of James and 
Elizabeth (Bankhead) Metcalfe, natives re- 
spectively of North (Carolina and Tenessee, and 
of William R. and Ellen S. (Ck>vington) Brad- 
ley, of Virginia. He was educated in Lamar 
County and began farming at an early age, a 
calling he still follows and was sheriff of 
Lamar County, 1888-1892. He is a Methodist. 
Married: in 1889, Jola Guin, daughter of Jason 
Guin. (Hiildren: 1. Wiley L.; 2. Jason 8. 
Residence: Sulligent 

METER, EMIL JOSEPH, general agent, 
Massachusetts mutual life insurance company, 
was bom December 21, 1857, at CJharleston, 
Charleston 0>unty, S. C; son of Emil Joseph 
and Emily Fredericka (Oppenheim) Meyer, 
also of Charleston; grrandson of Joseph and 
Julia Meyer, of Belefelt, Prussia, and of Hertz 
W. and Catherine Oppenheim, the former a 
native of Hanover, Germany, and connected 
with the banking house of Oppenheim in which 
Meyer Anselm Rothschild, founder of the house 
of Rothschild, was at one time a clerk. Hein- 
rich Heine, the great (German author, was re- 
lated to the Oppenheim house. Leopold Zunz, 
professor of Hebrew literature at the Univer- 
sity of Cologne was a great uncle of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, being brother to his 
paternal grandmother. Hertz Wolf Oppen- 
heim had six sons, five of whom served in 
the Confederate Army. Mr. Meyer was edu- 
cated in the private school of Dr. Henry S. 
Chapin of New York and attended the Uni- 
versity of New York City through the junior 
course. He has been the general agent for 
the Massachusetts mutual life insurance com- 
pany in Alabama since October 1, 1904; was 
elected alderman of Mentgomery, 1895-99; 
member of the board of education of that city 
since 1899 and is now filling his fourth term 
of five years each; chairman board ol equali- 
zation of Montgomery County, 1916. He is a 



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DICTIONARY OF ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Democrat, Mason, Knight of Pythias, Shrin^r, 
and a Jew. Married: May 3, 1883, at Atlanta, 
Ga., to Eda, daughter of Isaac and Emma 
(Steinback) Hirschfield, of Memphis, Tenn. 
Children: 1. Tilla, m. Ben Friedman, Eufaula; 
2. Emily; 3. Emil Joseph Jr., m. Miriam 
Blumenseld; 4. Edith Lucile. Residence: 
Montgomery. 

MICHAEL, JACOB O., physician, was bom 
February 21, 1840, near Spring Hill, Mobile 
County; son of George and Mary Catherine 
(Breitling) Michael, who lived near Spring 
Hill, 1833-1840, then moved to Demopolis; 
grandson of George and Eva (Mather) Michael, 
who owned extensive vineyards at Wineberg, 
near Strasburg, Germany, on the River Rhine, 
and, objecting to compulsory military duty for 
their sons, sold their poesessions and came to 
America about 1833, and lived near Spring 
Hill and at Demopolis, and of Jacob and Cath- 
erine Breitling, the former a land-owner near 
Stuttgart, kingdom of Wurtemburg, Germany, 
who was induced to come to America by his 
brother, Gottlieb Breitling, of Demopolis, and 
settled on a farm about four miles south of 
Demopolis. He was educated in private schools 
at Demopolis; at Green Springs, under Prof. 
Henry Tutwiler, 1853-1854; and attended the 
Georgia military institute at Marietta, Ga., 
X857-1858. He read medicine with Dr. Ashe 
and Dr. Ruffln in Demopolis, 1858; attended the 
medical department of the University of Louis- 
iana, at New Orleans, 1858-1859; a summer 
course in Philadelphia, 1859; was a student at 
the Jefferson medical college at the time of 
the John Brown raid, and, with about six 
hundred southern medical students, left the 
school in January, 1860, and finished his course 
at the Medical college of Virginia, at Rich- 
mond, from which he was graduated, M. D., 
1860. From the time of his graduation until 
January, 1861, he was engaged as surgeon's aid 
in the marine hospital at Mobile, and as a mem« 
her of the Mobile rifles, took part in the cap- 
ture of the Mount Vernon arsenal. Under the 
Confederate government, he was appointed post 
surgeon at the arsenal, in which capacity he 
was employed until the fall of 1864. Subse- 
quently he did special service at Mobile and 
at Spanish Fort and Blakely until the evacua- 
tion of the city, after which he was surrendered 
and paroled at Meridian, Miss., under the capit- 
ulation of Gen. Richard Taylor. He practiced 
medicine at Mount Vernon for a year following 
the war, and in 1866, moved to Belmont, Sum- 
ter County, where he continued his practice. 
In February, 1877, he went to Citronelle and 
established the Hygeia hotel and sanatorium, 
which he conducted in connection with his pro- 
fession, until he retired from the practice in 
1890. He served as mayor of Citronelle for two 
years after its incorporation, and after the 
expiration of his term sb mayor, was a mem- 
ber of the town council for several terms. Be- 
cause of his part in establishing the school sys- 
tem of the city, he was made an honorary mem- 
ber for life of the board of trustees. He is 
a Democrat, a Protestant E}piscopalian, and a 
Royal Arch MsBon. Married: April 29, 1862. 
to Margaret Ann Simison, daughter of MaJ. 



Boyd Denny and Martha Taylor (Bamett) 
Simison, of Mount Vernon, the former a native 
of Carlisle, Pa., who contracted for most of the 
building material used in the construction of 
the Mount Vernon arsenal, the latter a mem- 
ber of an old Georgia family. Children: 1. 
George Boyd, a graduate of the University of 
Alabama, B. E., and C. E., 1890, land agent for 
the M. ft O. Railroad, m. May 31, 1893, at Belle- 
ville, 111., to Elsie Scheel, Meridian, Miss.; 2. 
Minnie Josephine, Mobile; 3. John Raff, de- 
ceased, mayor of Citronelle, 1895-1896, secretary 
of Hygeia Hotel ft Improvement Company, book- 
keeper of "Pride of the West Mine," Washing- 
ton, Ariz.; 4. Murray Simison, Beaumont, Tex.; 
5. Ida Bolivia, m. C. W. Hempstead, Mobile; 6. 
Marie Catherine, Mobile, m. F. C. Marsh of 
Franklin, La., deceased; 7. Ruffln Bailey, Mo- 
bile. Residence ^ Mobile. 

MICHEL, RICHARD FRASER, physician, 
was bom February 15, 1827, at Charleston, 
S. C, and died April 4, 1907, at Montgomery; 
son of William Daniel and Eugenia Ash 
(Fraser) Michel, of Charleston, S. C, the 
former a native of that place, a physician, edi- 
tor of the "Carolina Journal of Medicine, 
Science and Agriculture," who was given a 
medal by the decree of Napoleon Bonaparte, 
having served in his army; grandson of Rich- 
ard and Rebecca Ann Eugenia (Ash) Fraser, 
of Charleston, S. C. He received his early 
schooling in the academy of Alexander Springs, 
Charleston, S. C, from which he was graduated 
in 1844; studied medicine in Philadelphia, P&., 
1845-1846; and was graduated from the med- 
ical college at Charleston, S. C, 1847. He be- 
gan the practice of medicine at that place 
immediately after graduation, and was elected 
professor of materia medica, Charleston med- 
ical institute. 1848, holding that position ontU 
1860. In December of the latter year, he en- 
tered the C. S. Army, in Fort Moultrie, Charles- 
ton Harbor, as a surgeon with Gen. Evans' 
brigade, and remained in the service until the 
surrender of Lee. 1865. After the war, he lo- 
cated at Montgomery, and practiced medicine 
in that city until his death. He was appointed 
surgeon general of the State of Alabama on 
Gov. CNeal's staff, 1883, and held the posi- 
tion for fifteen years. He became a member 
of the board of health of Montgomery in 1869, 
and for some time was president of that body; 
was elected president of the Medical Associa- 
tion of the State of Alabama, 1869. and of the 
Medical and Surgical Society of Montgomery, 
1869; was elected vice president of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. 1872-1873; and was 
orator of the state medical association in 1S76, 
and later was grand senior counselor of the 
association. During his residence in Soi(th 
Carolina, he served as counselor oi the Medical 
Association of the State of South Carolina, 1859- 
1860. He was a Democrat; a vestryman of St 
John's church, at Montgomery, for thirty years, 
and senior warden for eleven years; was a 
Mason, a Knight of Pythias, an Elk, and a 
member of the American Legion of Honor. He 
was author of a "Monograph on Hemorrhagic 
Malarial Fever," New Orleans Journal oi Med- 
icine, October. 1869; "Pathology of Yellow 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1197 



Fever," 1874; "Break Bone Fever," Southern 
Journal of Medical Sciences, February, 1867; 
''Puerperaemia," Transactions of the Medical 
Association of Alabama; "Anatomical and 
Phjsiologlcal Reflections on Some Parts of the 
Bye," Richmond and Louisville Medical Jour- 
nal, September, 1871; and other papers. Mar- 
ried: February 15, 1854, at Charleston, S. C, 
to Annie Rivers, daughter of William and 
Susan Rivers, of that place. Children: 1. 
Eugenia Fraser, d. in Charleston, S. C; 2. Sue 
Fraser, m. Fred Gordan Hammond, Montgom- 
ery; 3. William Middleton, Montgomery. Last 
residence: Montgomery. 

MICKLB, JOHN JOSEPH, planter, was bom 
November 3, 1796, in South Carolina, and died 
in Lowndes County; son of John and Elizabeth 
(Starke) Mickle of South Carolina; grandson 
of Joseph and Martha (Belton) Mickle, the 
former of Scotch-Irish descent, having come to 
America from the old country, and settled in 
Charleston, South Carolina. Later he removed 
to Fairfield District; greatgrandsim of John 
and Mary (English) Belton, the latter being of 
Quaker Stock. John Joseph Mickle was at one 
time adjutant general of Alabama and was also 
a gallant soldier in the Mexican War. Mar- 
ried: about 1825, at C!amden, S. C, to Rebecca 
Ballard Martin, of that place. Children: 1. 
Elizabeth Starke, m. Nathan Cook (q. v.); 2. 
Cornelia, m. Walter Ckx>k; 3. Rebecca, m. John 
Rice; 4 Annie, m. William Bettis; 5. Beltcm, 
m. Lucy Minor; 6. John J., m. Martha Stone. 
Last residence: Lowndes County. 

MICKLE, WILLIAM ENGLISH, adjutant gen- 
eral United Confederate Veterans, was bom 
October 31, 1846, at Columbia, Richland County, 
S. C, and died February 18, 1920, at Mobile; 
son of Joseph Thomas and Nancy C. (Oandy) 
Mickle, the former who was bom near Cam- 
den, Kershaw County, S. C, and lived at that 
place until he was eighteen years old, moved 
to Ckdumbia, S. C, where he was married and 
lived twenty years as a commission merchant 
and owner of a line of boats between Charleston 
and Columbia, was director of the Bank of 
South Carolina, moved to Alabama in 1852 and 
established himself in Mobile as a commission 
merchant, organized the "Merchants' Guard," 
during the War of Secession, was made captain 
and served for a year in the trenches around 
Mobile and in guarding prisoners, resigned and 
returned to Camden, S. C, in 1864, served as 
Judge of Kershaw County, S. C, for several 
years, ^nd died in 1898; grandson of MaJ. 
Joseph and Martha (Belton) Mickle, of Ker- 
shaw (bounty, S. C; grandson of Joseph Mickle, 
who settled on the Wateree River in 1753, and 
bought a plantation about fifteen miles from 
Camden, which is still in the hands of de- 
scendants, owned and operated a ferry over 
the Wateree River. He was educated at the 
Summerville institute, Noxubee County, Miss., 
and went from there to the front in 1864, Join- 
ing the Mobile Cadets, Co. A, Third Alabama 
infantry, of Battle's brigade, near Winchester, 
Va. He was severely wounded twice at the 
battle of Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864; was 
furloughed home for three months, and rejoined 



his company oii crutches, February, 1865; was 
examined before the medical board of Rodes 
Division, and retired from the army for a 
period of nine months, during which time the 
war was ended. After the war he was employed 
in the public schools of Mobile County, and was 
principal of the Boys' Senior Grammar School 
for several years. He gave up that position to 
enter the book trade, and became a dealer in 
second-hand and out of print books in the state 
of Alabama, at New Orleans, La., and at Mo- 
bile. For nearly a quarter of a century, he 
was connected with all the prominent agricul- 
tural fairs held in the state, as secretary or 
as assistant secretary. He was one of the 
charter members of Raphael Semmes camp. 
United Confederate Veterans; served almost 
continuously as adjutant of the camp from its 
formation until his death; was appointed ad- 
jutant general and chief of staff of the United 
Confederate Veterans, with the rank of major 
general, by Gen. J. B. Gordon, commander-in- 
chief, January 19, 1903. He served as pension 
examiner of Alabama for several years; was 
an unsuccessful candidate to the State legis- 
lature at one time; compiled "Confederate Vet- 
erans, and their War Records," a book giving 
the records of about three thousand Confederate 
soldiers, with their residences; was a Demo- 
crat; and a deacon in the Presbyterian church. 
Married: October 8, 1867, at Mobile, to EUle 
Squire Woodhull, daughter of John Foster and 
Sarah (Squire) Woodhull, of Mobile. Children: 
1. Ellie Woodhull, deceased; 2. William English, 
m. Mary Holmes, three children. Mobile; 3. 
Louie Gorham, m. Thomas B. Crossland, Mo- 
bile; 4. May Cornelia, m. Daniel Wheeler, Jr., 
one child. Mobile; 5. Caro, Mobile; 6. Josephine 
Belton, Chicago, 111. Last residence: Mobile. 

MICOU, WILLIAM HENRY, farmer and 
sergeant, C. S. Army, was bom September 25, 
1838, in Montgomery. He was reared upon 
the farm, and entered the Confederate Army 
in the Spring of 1862, as a private in Co. A, of 
the 1st battalion, Hilliard's legion, and subse- 
quently was promoted to ordnance sergeant. 
His first service with the legion was in east 
Tennessee and his first great battle was Chicka- 
mauga, September 19-20, 1863, fighting with Gra« 
cie's brigade in Gton. William Preston's division. 
In November the legion left Missionary Ridge 
to accompany (General Longstreet into east 
Tennessee, where they participated in the siege 
of Knoxville, and the battle of Bean's Station. 
The legrion was then reorganized as the 59th 
and 60th Alabama infantry regiment. In 1863, 
before the regiment went into Virginia, he 
was transferred as a private to Co. G, 1st Ala- 
bama cavalry, then on duty in east Tennessee. 
With this cavalry he served under (Generals 
Martin, Allen, and Joseph Wheeler throughout 
the Atlanta campaign, the raid through Ten- 
nessee, the fighting with Sherman from At- 
lanta to Savannah, and the final campaign in 
the C^rolinas. Soon after the close of the 
war he became associated with the Tallassee 
manufacturing company, and later was its as- 
sistant treasurer. Married: in 1870, to Mary 
Phinisy, of Augusta, Ga. Children: 1. Augusta 
Louise. Last residence: Tallassee. 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



MIDDLETON, JOHN OSMOND, lawyer and 
legislator, was bom September 25, 1882, in 
Montgomery County; son of William Armstrong 
and Catherine Hunter (Calvin) Middleton, the 
former a captain in the 23rd Alabama battalion. 
Grade's brigade, C. S. Army; grandson of 
Augustus Washington and Eliza (Gause) Mid- 
dleton, the former a soldier in the War of 1812, 
and of Col. Robert and Catherine (Hurst) Cal- 
vin. He was educated in the schools of Clan- 
ton; graduated LL. B.. 1903, at University of 
Alabama, entered on the practice 1903, at Clan- 
ton; mayor of that place 1904; elected solicitor 
of Chilton County, 1905; represented Chilton 
County in the house of representatives of 1907. 
He is a Republican; a Methodist; and a member 
of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon college fraternity. 
He is unmarried. Residence: Clan ton. 

MILBURN, WILLIAM H.. Methodist minis- 
ter; pastor of the Court St. church, Mont- 
gomery, 1848-49. 

MILES. GEORGE CRANBERRY, grand 
keeper, records and seal, Knights of Pythias, 
was bom June 13, 1853, near Columbus, Ga., anj 
died April 25, 1912. at Montgomery; brother of 
John Embry Miles (q. v.). During the War 
of Secession, while his father and four brothers 
were serving in the C. S. Army, he became the 
main support of the family, and could spend 
only his spare time in school. In the fall of 
1878, he left his farm, and entered the lumber 
business in Montgomery. A few years later, 
he moved to Birmingham and conducted a mer- 
cantile business there until 1886, when he 
entered the real estate business. In 1891, he 
went to Columbus, Ga., as manager of a life 
insurance company, and five years later sold 
his business and returned to Montgomery, be- 
coming state manager of the Phoenix Mutual 
Life Insurance Company, of Hartford, Conn. 
He held that position until 1910, then entered 
farm real estate business with his son George. 
He was a Democrat; a Baptist, was deacon and 
treasurer of the church, moderator of the Mont- 
gomery Baptist Association for thirteen years, 
president of the Baptist state board of missions 
for ten years, and president and chairman of 
the executive committee of the Alabama Sunday 
School Association for many years; and was 
grand keeper of the records and seals of the 
Knights of Pythias, appointed in 1903, and re- 
elected until he resigned. Married: February 
20, 1884, in Athens to Mattie Lucy Hine, daugh- 
ter of James and Elizabeth (Reedus) Hine, of 
that place. She was a descendant of Thomas 
Hine or Hinde, who was located in Milford, 
Conn., as early as 1638 or 1639. His sixth son, 
Stephen Hine was the father of Ambrose Hine. 
Ambrose Hine and his son Silas were both cap- 
tains in the Revolutionary War, and are the an- 
cestors of Mrs. Miles. Children: 1 and 2. boys, 
d. at birth; 3. Eleanor, d. at age of three weeks; 
4. George Granberry, Jr., b. 1888, in Decatur, 
resides in Toledo, 0.; 5. Bessie Embry, b. 1890, 
m. Arthur M. Mead, Montgomery; 6. Thomas 
Jasper, b. 1891, Montgomery; 7. Margaret 
Lucile, b. 1893, Montgomery. Last residence: 
Montgomery. 



MILES, JOHN EMBRT, lawyer, was bom 
September 12, 1839, at Hamilton, Harris 
County, Ga., and died February 28, 1918, at 
Columbiana; son of Thomas Jasper and Elinor 
Minerva (Embry) Miles, who lived at Colum- 
bus, Cki., where Mrs. Miles died in 1855, the for- 
mer a native of that place, who entered the min- 
istry of the Baptist church at the age of eigh- 
teen years, and preached for more than forty 
years, who came to Alabama and settled at 
Pine Level in 1859, conducted a farm and a 
mercantile store in addition to his ministry, 
and served as a chaplain in the C. S. Army, dar- 
ing the War of Secession; grandson d Reuben 
Embry, who lived near Columbus, Ga. The 
American ancestor of the Miles family was one 
of three brothers who came over from Wales. 
Mr. Miles was a brother of Gtoorge Granberry 
Miles (Q. v.). He was educated in the country 
schools and in Cusseta, Ga. He located at 
Montgomery in 1858, and in May, 1861, entered 
the C. S. Army, as a member of the First Aisr 
bama cavalry, Clanton's brigade. He served in 
the army for three years, and was severely 
wounded and disabled for further service at the 
battle of Shiloh. He farmed for two years after 
leaving the army; entered the mercantile busi- 
ness at Pine Grove in 1867, and from there 
moved to Montgomery; gave up the mercantile 
business in May, 1872, and moved to Texas; 
studied law in Texas and was admitted to the 
bar in 1885; went to Birmingham in 1887, and 
practiced law for ten years at that place; and 
traveled for thirteen years in the interest of 
the Law Book Publishers, the Lawyers Com- 
pany, the Operative Publishing Company, and 
the Edward Thompson Law Book Company. 
He was a Baptist and a Mason. Married: April 
6, 1865, at China Grove, to Josephine Bmma 
Youngblood, daughter of Dr. Oliver and Tinxy 
Terrell (Townsend) Toungblood, of that place; 
granddaughter of Col. Eli Townsend, a planter 
and slave-owner at China Grove. The Town- 
send ancestor was Lieut John Townsend, who 
came to America with Lord Baltimore, and was 
a lieutenant in the Revolutionary Army. His 
home was in Townshend, England, named for 
his family. Children: 1. Lillian, m. Richard 
Francis Johnston (q. v.); 2. Oliver, m. Myra 
Hamner. Columbiana; 3. Fay, m. Samuel Ben- 
ton, Columbiana and Birmingham, children, 
Samuel, Jr., John Miles, Charles Henry and Pay 
Miles; 4. Myrtle Youngblood, "Cincinnati 
Times-Star," Cincinnati, O. Last residence: 
Columbiana. 

MILFORD, WALKER WALTON, farmer, was 
born April 11, 1878, at Westminster, Oconee 
County, S. C; son of Samuel Marshall and Ma- 
riah (Palmer) Milford of Westminster, S. C, 
grandson of Charles Starke and Miriam Mil- 
ford, and of Thomas B. and Amanda (Palmer) 
Milford, all of Anderson, S. C. The Milfords 
are of Irish descent, coming from the north of 
Ireland and settling in S. C. Both grand- 
fathers of Mr. Milford served in the C. S. Army. 
Mr. Milford received his education in the com- 
mon schools of Anderson County, S. C, and 
Kansas City. Mo. He also attended Clemson 
college. South Carolina, and the Alabama poly- 
technic institute for short periods, but did not 



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1199 



graduate from either college. He has spent 
most of his life farming, coming to Walker 
County, from Anderson County. S. C, in De- 
cember, 1902. He was elected to the legislature, 
fnmi Walker County, in 1918. He is a Demo- 
crat, and a Methodist Married: December 
27, 1899, at Townyille, S. C, to Ella, daughter 
of Peter Marshall and Sarah Whitfield, of that 
place. Children: 1. Roy Leslie; 2. Clara Etta; 
3. Floyd S.; 4. Josephine Alberta; 5. Ella Al- 
rena; 6. Edna; 7. Alma. Residence: Jasper. 

MILFORT, LECLERC, French adventurer and 
author, was bom about 1750, in Tiriles-Moutiers, 
near Mezieres, France, and died in 1817, in 
Mezieres. He fled from his native land after 
baying killed a servant of the king's household 
in a duel. In May, 1776, he reached Coweta, on 
the Chattahooche River, in the midst of the 
Creek nation. He became acquainted with Colo- 
nel McGillivray, the great chief of the nation, 
accompanied him to the Hickory Ground, upon 
the banks of the Coosa, and thereafter made 
his home at McGillivray's house, at Little Tal- 
lase, above Wetumpka. He was created Tuste- 
nuggee, or grand chief of war, and led Indian 
expeditions against the Whigs during the Amer- 
ican Revolution. After twenty years among the 
Creek nation he returned to. France lind was 
made a general of brigade by Bonaparte. Au- 
thor: "Memoire ou coup d'oeil rapide sur mes 
differens voyages et mon sejoir dans la nation 
Creek," 1802. Married: sister of Col. Alexander 
McGillivray. Last residence: Meilere0» France. 

BilLHOUS, PHILIP, grand commander, 
grand commandery, Masons, 1898. 

BiOLLARD, NATHANIEL, soldier of the 
Ameriacn Revolution, age not disclosed; and 
a resident of Dallas County; private Tennessee 
Militia; enrolled on January 15. 1828; payment 
to date from Sept 1, 1822; annual allowance, 
f48; sums received to date of publication of 
list, $430.31; Acts military Establishment— 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. 
doc 514, 28rd Cong., 1st sess., 1838-34. 

MILLER, BENJAMIN MEEK, lawyer and 
Judge, was bom March 18, 1864, at Oak Hill, 
Wilcox County; son of Rev. Dr. John and Sarah 
(Pressly) Miller (q. v.). Judge Miller was 
educated at Oak Hill and Camden, and was 
graduated from Erskine college, S. C, with the 
A. B. degree and class honors in 1884; gradu- 
ated from the law department of the University 
of Alabama in 1888; and was admitted to the 
practice the same year. In 1904 he was elected 
circuit judge of the 4th Judicial circuit and 
re-elected in 1910; member of the legislature 
from Wilcox County 1888-89; lieutenant in the 
Wilcox mounted rifles, 1887-89. He was a Demo- 
crat; a Presbyterian; Knight of Pjrthias and a 
member of the Kappa Alpha college fraternity. 
Married: September 21, 1892, at Birmingham, 
to Margaret Otis, daughter of Thomas and 
Nancy (Staton) Duggan of Mobile; grand- 
daughter of John and Eliza (Dever) Staton, the 
former of Virginia, and of Thomas and Mary 
(Vernon) Duggan, natives respectively of 
Dublin, Ireland, and of Charleston, S. C. Chil- 



dren: 1. Benjamin Meek, Jr.; 2 Margaret Otis. 
Residence: Camden. 

MILLER, CHARLES HOUSTON, business 
man and State senator, was bom February 22, 
1867, at Allenton, Wilcox County; son of 
George Oliver and Susan (Trussell) Miller, the 
former a native of North Carolina, located as . 
a teacher in Greenville, in the forties, removed 
to Allenton, Wilcox County, where he became 
a merchant, served in Co. I, later Co. B, 1st 
Alabama infantry regiment, C. S. Army, and 
after the cessation of hostilities removed to 
Marengo County, where he died; grandson of 
James and Mary (Thornton) Miller, and of 
Mathews Trussell, the former were residents 
of North Carolina, the latter of near Gallion, 
Hale County. The Millers are of German 
origin, the Trussells are Scotch-Irish. He was 
educated in the ccmimon schools of Wilcox and 
Marengo Counties, and is a merchant, farmer, 
stock raiser, and president of the First national 
bank of Linden. He was a member of the 
board of revenue of Marengo County, 1892- 
1904; member of the constitutional convention 
of 1901 from the twentieth senatorial district, 
and a member of the State senate of 1911. He 
is a Democrat; and a Missionary Baptist Mar- 
ried: (1) February 2, 1886, to Maggie Elan, 
daughter of Benjamin F. and Mary (Owens) 
Watts; (2) December 3, 1895, at Atlanta, Ga., 
to Mary Caroline, daughter of Greorge W. and 
Peter Placida (Wright) Thomas, who lived at 
Stanton, Chilton County, the former served in 
the 4th Alabama infantry regiment, C. S. Army, 
the latter resides at Miller. Children: by sec- 
ond wife: 1. Charles Augustus; 2. Nina Placi- 
da; 3. Mary Margaritte; 4. Greorge Washing- 
ton; 5. Willie Minerva. Residence: Miller. 

MILLER, EDWARD ANDREW, teacher* was 
bom February 2, 1878, at Albertville, Marshall 
County; son of Thomas Jefterson and Alpha 
Balma (Ray) Miller, the former a farmer and 
business man, native of Henry (bounty, Ga.» who 
removed with his parents to Albertville, and in 
1897 to Hungerford, Tex.; grandson of James 
Cicero and Martha Ann (Albert) Miller, of Al- 
bertville, the former a Confederate soldier, 
killed in the seven days fight around Richmond, 
1862, and of Asa and Emily Jane (Richards) 
Ray, who lived at Geneva, Thadeus and Albert- 
ville, the former a Confederate soldier who rose 
to the rank of lieutenant colonel; great-grand- 
son of Thomas Albert and of Ralph and Mar- 
garet (Gray) Ray, Scotch covenanters who set- 
tled in the northern part of South Carolina, and 
of Henry and Marjorie (Webster) Richards, 
both of English extraction and direct descend- 
ants of New England settlers. Bfr. Miller re- 
ceived his early education at Albertville in the 
Seventh district agricultural school and gradu- 
ated from the Alabama polytechnic institute, 
1900, with the B. S. degree; graduate and as* 
sistant in department of bacteriology, 1901; re- 
ceived M. S. degree, 1903; began teaching in 
the public schools, July, 1898, as vacation work; 
taught in the agricultural school, Albertville, 
five years; president Multi district agricultural 
schoc^, Blountsville, three years and later presi- 
dent of the Seventh district agricultural school, 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



Albertville. He is a Democrat; Methodist, Odd 
Fellow, and Knight of Pythias. Married: 
August 27, 1905, at Albertville, to Jessie Belle, 
daughter of Wiley Cunningham and Mattie Vio 
toria (Irwin) Sims who lived successively at 
Dadeville, Alexander City and Albertville; 
granddaughter ai Carroll Sims, a Confederate 
soldier, and of William Franklin Irwin; great- 
granddaughter of John Irwin. Children: 1. 
Grace Marjorie. Residence: Blountsville. 

MILLER, EMERSON R., professor pharma^ 
ceutical chemistry, was bom June 2, 1862, at 
Bascom, Seneca County, O.; son of George and 
Charity (Hook) Miller, the former bom at 
Bascom; grandson of John and Eliza (Andres) 
Miller, who lived at Bascom. Prot Miller re- 
ceived his early education in the public schools 
of Ohio, and his collegiate course in the Nor- 
mal school at Lebanon, Ohio, Wittenberg col* 
lege, Springfield, Ohio, University of Michigan, 
Ann Arbor, and University of Marburg, in 
Hesse, Ctormany, and his professional educa- 
tion in the University of Michigan, receiving 
therefrom the degrees of phan^aceutical chem- 
ist, 1892, master of pharmacy, 1893, B. S., chem- 
istry, 1894, and M. S., 1895. He was assistant 
in chemistry at the University of Michigan, 
1894-5; professor of pharmacy, Alabama poly- 
technic institute. Auburn, 1895-1905; head of 
department of chemistry, Cuban experiment 
station, Santiago de Las Vegas, Cuba, 1905-6; 
and from this period to the present has been 
professor of pharmaceutical chemistry, Ala- 
bama polytechnic institute. Married: June 22, 
1892, at Union City, Mich., to Mary Ada, daugh- 
ter of Dana Paul and Elizabeth Tracy (Glea- 
son) White, who lived at Keokuk, Iowa. Resi- 
dence: Auburn. 

MILLER, GEORGE KNOX, lawyer, judge 
Talladega city court, was born December 80, 
1836, at Talladega, deceased; son of George and 
Cynthia Tennent (Hamilton) Miller, the former 
a native of Charleston, S. C, who lived at Pen- 
dleton, S. C, from infancy until 1833, when he 
with his family moved to Talladega, moved to 
Memphis, Tenn., in 1844, to El Dorado, Ark., 
in 1849, to Pendleton, S. C, in 1851, and re- 
tumed to Talladega in 1855, dying there in 1873, 
who served with the South Carolina militia 
in 1832 as a nullifier, and with the Alabama 
militia in 1836 in removing the Creek Indians: 
grandson of John and Jane (Grey) Miller, who 
lived at (Charleston and Pendleton, S. C, and 
of Thomas and Ann (Kennedy) Hamilton, who 
lived at Bullock's Creek, York County, and near 
Pendleton, S. C, the former a soldier under 
Gen. Marion in the Revolution, who fought at 
the battle of Cowpens and in other engage- 
ments; great-grandson of John Miller, bom 
about 1730, in London, England, a printer, re- 
porter and editor, who was closely associlBited 
as partner with Henry Sampson Woodfall in 
the publication of the 'Tfondon Evening Post," 
an adjunct of Woodfall's "London Daily Ad- 
vertiser," in which papers the celebrated 'let- 
ters of Junius" were first printed, who per- 
sisted in publishing the debates, after he had 
been proceeded against by the court of the 
king's bench in 1771, and was compelled to 



leave England, who came to America with his 
family in 1782, settled in Charleston, S. C, 
where he published a paper, and founded the 
Pendleton Messenger, which was continued for 
many years after his death in 1809 by his son 
John, great-grandson of David Hamiltcm, a na- 
tive of County Renfrew, Scotland, of the clan 
Hamilton, an adherent of the Stuarts, who 
sought safety in the colony of Pennsylvania 
after the battle of Culloden Moor, settling with 
his tamily between 1745 and 1755, at what was 
then called Little York, who left Pennsylvania 
after Braddock's defeat in 1755, and settled on 
Blood River, S. C, and of William and Mary 
Ann (Brandon) Kennedy, the latter a sister of 
Qen, Thomas Brandon of Revolutionary fame. 
Capt. Miller was educated in schools at Tal- 
ladega; Memphis, Tenn.; El Dorado, Ark.; at 
the Baptist male college in Talladega; was 
graduated from the classical course of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia; and was attending the law 
course at that institution at the outbreak ol 
the War of Secession. He left school and 
joined the C. S. Army, April, 1861, enlisting in 
Capt. A. W. Bowin's company of cavalry, Ala^ 
bama national guard. He was mustered into 
the C. S. Army in August, 1861,' and assigned 
to Co. A, Brewer's cavalry battalion, under Gen, 
Polk. He received successive promotions, until 
he became captain of the company, August 13, 
1862, and served in that capacity throughout 
the war. He spent the first year following the 
war on a farm in South Carolina, and in the 
summer of 1866, began to practice law in Talla- 
dega County, having been admitted to the bar 
in that county in May, 1861. He was appointed 
register in chancery for the district composed 
of Talladega and Clay Counties, 1868; resigned 
the chancellorship in 1884, to accept the ap- 
pointment as Judge of probate for Talladega 
County; held the latter position until 1898, 
when he became judge of the city court of 
Talladega. He served as mayor of Talladega 
from 1874 to 1884, with the exception of one 
two-year term, and was editor of the "Mountain 
Home," 1881-1884. He was a Democrat, a Pres- 
byterian, a Mason and a Knight of Honor. Bfar- 
ried: December 31, 1863, at Atlanta, Ga., to 
Celestine McConn, daughter of Thomas Hamp- 
ton and Narcissa (Walker) McCk>nn, of 
Equality, Anderson County, S. C, the former 
a native of that place; granddaughter of Rob- 
ert and Jane (Hamilton) McConn, the former 
a native of County Cork, Ireland, the latter a 
sister of Thomas Hamilton, Mr. Miller's grand- 
father, and of William and Jane (Leman) Wal- 
ker. Children: 1. Rosa, b. August 2, 1866, m. 
Judge Samuel Earle Greene (q. v.) ; 2. Jessie, b. 
February 11, 1869, m. Thomas L. Welch, of 
Talladega County; 3. Hampton Knox, b. July 
30, 1871, B. S., 1893, M. S., 1894, Alabama poly- 
technic institute, assistant in chemistry at that 
institution, 1893-1894, at the Agriculture and 
mechanical college, of Florida, at Lake City, 
1894-1896, assistant chemist. North Carolina 
experiment station, 1896-1899, chemist. Univer- 
sity of Florida and experiment station. Lake 
City. 1898-1904, since 1904 with Summit nur- 
series, Monticello, Fla., m. Margaret Burt of 
Talladega County; 4. Celeste, b. July 21, 1876, 
m. William C. McMillan of Talladega Ck>unty; 



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WILLIAM P. LAY 



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1203 



5. Zemulah Walker, b. October 23, 1879, m. 
James C. Bart of Talladega. Last residence: 
Talladega. 

MILLER, JAMES MATTHEW, lawyer, was 
bom at AUenton, Wilcox County, son of G. O. 
and Susan C. (Trussel) Miller, who lived at 
that place. He received his early education in 
the old field schools and was graduated from 
Southern university. He studied law and was 
admitted to the bar September 25, 1889. He 
practiced law at Linden, and before the supreme 
court of Alabama, and edited the Marengo 
"Democrat,'^ 1892-1896. He was elected to the 
State legislature, 1898-1899; and was elected 
solicitor of Marengo County, November 3, 1898. 
He was a Populist until 1896, and since that 
time has been a Democrat; and is a Baptist. 
Married: November 9, 1898, at Jefferson, to 
Jennie Compton Allen. Residence: Linden. 

MILLER, JOHN, Presbyterian minister and 
college president, was born June 24, 1825, in 
York District, S. C, and died June 3, 1878, at 
Oak Hill, Wilcox County; son of Joseph and 
Nancy Bamette (Neely) Miller, grandson of 
Samuel and Elizabeth (Neely) Miller of Scotch 
stock who emigrated from North, Ireland to 
South Carolina near the beginning of the 
American Revolution and settled in the vicinity 
of the historic town of Torkville. He was a 
graduate of Erskine college. Due West, S. C, 
and in 1857 was elected president of that in- 
stitution, an honor which he declined, however 
not to his prejudice, for later his alma mater 
conferred upon him the honorary degree of 
D. D. He removed to Alabama in 1846 to as- 
sume the pastorate of the Reformed Presby- 
terian church at Oak Hill, a position which 
he held for thirty-one years; president Wilcox 
female college, 1867-72; chaplain Wilcox True 
Blues, during the War of Secession. Married: 
Sarah, daughter of Dr. Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Hearst) Pressly, who, prior to 1836, resided 
at Cedar Springs, Abbeville County, S. C, 
whence they removed to Wilcox County; grand- 
daughter of David and Jane (Patterson) Pres- 
ely, and of Joseph and Jane Hearst of Abbe- 
ville. The Presslys are of English origin. 
(Children: 1. Joseph Neely; 2. Mrs. Bamette 
Payne, Oadsden; 3. 4. (twins) John Hearst 

and Sallie, married Brice, Chester, 

S. C; 5. Janie Dale; 6. James Pressly, mer- 
chant, Camden; 7. Benjamin Meek (q. v.); 8. 
Davis Pressly, merchant, CJamden. Last resi- 
dence: Oak Hill, Wilcox Ck>unty. 

MILLER, JOHN, lawyer, was bom October 
1, 1882, at Camden, Wilcox County; son of Jo- 
seph Neely and Minnie Frances (Bonner) Mil- 
ler, both of Oak Hill in the same county, the 
former who was U. S. district attorney from 
1893-97, and was a member of the constitu- 
tional convention in 1901; grandson of Rev. 
John and Sarah (Pressly) Miller and of Dr. 
Joseph Hearst Bonner, all of Oak Hill. His 
grandparents were from South Carolina orig- 
inally, being Scotch-Irish Presbyterians. Mr. 
Miller received his early education at Camden; 
was graduated at Erskine college, South Caro- 
lina, A. B., 1903, and studied law at the Uni- 



versity of Alabama, 1909-10. He passed the 
State bar examination in March, 1911; became 
county solicitor of Wilcox County, January, 
1917; and was elected to the State senate from 
the twenty-second district in 1919. He is a 
Democrat, a Presbyterian, a Mason, a Knight of 
Pythias. Married: November 28, 1911, at Fur- 
man, to Clyde Purifoy, daughter of W. Scott 
and Mary (Loeb) Purifoy, of that place. Chil- 
dren: 1. Minnie Loeb. Residence: CSamden. 

MILLER, JOHN HEARST, lawyer and judge, 
was bom August 1, 1858, at Oak Hill, Wilcox 
County, and died January 2, 1919, in Birming- 
liam; son of Rev. Dr. John and Sarah (Pressly) 
Miller (Q. v.). Jtldge Miller was educated in 
the public schools of his native county and at 
Erskine college, S. C, where he graduated in 
1880, second in his class, being awarded medals 
for debating, essay writing and proficiency in 
mathematics, serving as teacher of the latter 
subject at that college, 1882-88, and in 1895 re- 
ceiving from it the honorary degree of A. M. 
He studied law at the University of Virginia 
and later took a special course at Johns Hop- 
kins university. He returned to Alabama in 
1888, and located in Birmingham where he en- 
tered upon the practice of the law. He served 
as city recorder, 1891-92; special judge circuit 
court of Jefferson (bounty under gubernatorial 
appointment, 1907; elected November, 1912, 
judge of the city court of Birmingham for a 
term of six years, an office abolished by the leg- 
islature of 1915; elected one of the judges of the 
10th judicial circuit He was a director in the 
Traders national bank; member board of di- 
rectors Homestead trust company and the 
Southern indemnity company. He was a Demo- 
crat and a Presbyterian. Married: June 10, 
1896, in Birmingham, Eugenia, daughter of C. 
W. and Margaret A. Alexander of that city. 
Mrs. Miller died in March, 1899. Children: 1. 
Pressly Alexander, died young. Last residence: 
Birmingham. 

MILLER, JOSEPH NEELY, lawyer, member 
Alabama constitutional convention of 1901, was 
bom July 14, 1849, at Oak Hill, Wilcox Ck>unty, 
and died in 1910; son of Rev. Dr. John and 
Sarah (Pressly) Miller (q. v.). He was edu- 
cated in his home community and prepared for 
college, entering the University of Alabama in 
1864. Later he attended Erskine college. Due 
West, S. C, from which he graduated with the 
degree of A. B., 1869, and was invited by his 
alma mater to be anniversary orator in 1881 
and again in 1892 when he delivered the ad- 
dress at the semi-centennial of the Philoma- 
thean literary society; received the honorary 
degree of M. A., and was a tmstee Erskine col- 
lege. He read law under Gen. E. W. Pettus of 
Selma and Judge S. C. Cochran of CJamden, and 
was admiUed to the bar in 1873, beginning the 
practice in Camden. He was U. S. district at- 
torney for the southern district with headquar- 
ters in Mobile, 1898-97. He was a Democrat; 
and a member of the Alabama constitutional 
convention 1901. He was a Knight of Pythias 
and for many years an elder in the Associate 
Reformed Presbsrterian church at Camden and 
in 1913 was a delegate to the Centennial Synod 



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DICTIONAEY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



of the church at Winnsboro, Q. C; delegate to 
the Pan PreBbyterian council held in Liyerpool, 
England, June, 1904. Married: (1) September 
6, 1877, to Minnie Lee, daughter of Dr. Joseph 
H. and Sarah (Toung) B<mner, of Wilcox 
County; (2) July 28, 1898, to Lena, daughter 
of Dr. Joseph and Elisabeth (Acre) Tucker of 
Mobile; (8) November 6, 1901, to Nellie Tucker, 
sister ol his second wife. Children, by first 
wife: 1. Joseph B., lawyer, deceased; 2. twin of 
Joseph B., d. in infancy; 8. Sarah P., m. John 
M. Bonner, Camden; 4. John, m. Clyde Purifoy, 
Camden; 6. Minnie M., m. Dr. J. Heustis Jones, 
Camden; 6. Annie B.; 7. Joseph N., d. young; 
8. Elisabeth H., d. young; by third wife: 9. 
Lina T.; 10. Elisabeth H.; 11. James Pressly. 
Last residence: Camden. 

MILLER, LAWRENCE DEAN, teacher, au- 
thor, was bom February 3, 1860, at Pine Grove, 
Spartanburg County, S. C; son of Gen. Joel W. 
and Bivira (Orr) Miller, the former who was 
bom on Tiger River, Spartanburg County, S. 
C, served as brigadier general in the South 
Canriina state cavalry, 1845-1850, as a member 
of the house of representatives, 18S4-1860, and 
of the State senate at the close of the War of 
Secession, the latter a sister of Gov. Jamea L. 
Orr of South Carolina, who was speaker of the 
lower house in congress, 1866-1858, and of Judge 
J. A. Orr of Columbus, Miss., a member of the 
Confederate congress, and of Dr. H. C. Orr, of 
Mississippi, a surgeon in the C. S. Army; 
grandson of Samuel and Cassandra (Dean) 
Miller, the former a sheriff of Spartanburg 
Diatrict, S. C, who fought in the Revolutionary 
Army, and of Christopher and Martha (Mc- 
Cann) Orr, formerly of Anderson, S. C, who 
moved to Pontotoc County, Miss., in 1844; great- 
grandson of Col. Orr and Capt McCann, mem- 
bers of a Pennsylvania regiment of cavalry 
in the Revolutionary Army, who moved south 
before the end of the eighteenth century, of 
Mr. Dean who served in the Revolution, and 
of Mr. Miller, also a soldier in the Revolution- 
ary Army, who was killed by Indians and Tories 
in 1785. Mr. Miller was prepared for college 
in the ReidvlUe male high school. South Caro- 
lina, and attended Wofford college for a year. 
He was elected assistant principal of the Reid- 
ville male high school, and while holding that 
position, completed his college course. He 
taught for three years in South Carolina, moved 
to Alabama in 1872, and spent five years as 
principal of the Alexandria high school. He 
has conducted a large fkrm in Calhoun County, 
since his removal to Alabama; has served as 
superintendent of education of Calhoun County 
for six years; has been president of two county 
fairs, master of the county grange, and presi- 
dent of the county alliance; is a Democrat and 
a Presbyterian. He is author of "Miller's His- 
tory of Alabama," written in 1899-1900, which 
has been largely adopted as a text-book in the 
state. Married: (1) October 22, 1871, to MatUe 
Crook, a graduate of Judson Institute, who died 
January 8, 1884, daughter of Col. John M. and 
Bfiurgaret (Miller) Crook, who lived at Alexan- 
dria; (2) to Lissie Vernon, who died September 
11, 1908, daughter of MaJ. Frank and Letitia 
Vernon, of Spartanburg, S. C. Children, by 



first marriage: 1. BCartin Crook, b. September 
10, 1872, d. 1873; by second marriage: 2. Prank 
Vernon, d. young; 8. Lettie, d. young. Resi- 
dence: Jacksonville. 

MILLER, LEONARD, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 80, and a resident of Jefferson 
County; private N. C. Continental Line; en- 
rolled on September 26, 1883, under act of Con- 
gress of June 7, 1832, payment to date from 
March 4, 1881; an9ual allowance, $20; sums 
received to date of publication of list, $50. — 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in voL xiv. Sen. 
doc 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess.» 1833-34. 



MILLER, NATHAN LEE, lawyer and lieuten- 
ant-governor, was born March 6, 1866, at Dan- 
ville, Morgan County; son of Nathan and Elis- 
abeth (Torrence) Miller, the former was bom 
near Madison Station, Limestone County, where 
he grew to manhood, graduated in medicine in 
Nashville, Tenn., and practiced his profession 
in Danville until 1883, when he removed to 
Birmingham; grandson oi Benjamin and Eliza- 
beth (Hobbs) Miller, of Lawrence County, and 
of Adam Torrence and wife, a Miss Matthews, 
all of Oakville. He received his education in 
public schools, at the State normal college, 
Florence, and Bellevue academy, Birmingham. 
He studied law in connection with duties as 
clerk and register of the city court of Birming- 
ham; was admitted to the bar, December, 1897, 
and entered upon the practice in that city, No- 
vember, 1898. He practiced alone until De- 
cember, 1904, after which he formed a partner- 
ship with Judge H. A. Sharpe, he being a Junior 
member. He was clerk and register of the city 
courts of Birmingham from January, 1888, to 
September, 1898. On November 6, 1906, he was 
elected State senator from the thirteenth sena- 
torial district, served 1907-11, and was elected 
lieutenant-governor of Alabama on the ticket 
with Thomas E. Kilby, as governor, November, 
1918, and assumed the office, January, 1919. He 
held the office of lieutenant in Co. K, Birming- 
ham Rifies, Alabama State Troop, 1889-91. He 
is a Democrat, and was secretary of the Jeffer- 
son County democratic executive committee, 
1894 to 1898, and of the State campaign commit- 
tee those four years. He is a Methodist; Ma- 
son; and a Knight of Pythias. Married: Feb- 
ruary 8, 1899, in Birmingham, to Sarah, daugh- 
ter of LaFayette and Ellen J. (Hunt) Rogan 
(Q. v.). Children: L died in infancy. Resi- 
dence: Birmingham. 

MILLER, SAMUEL, soldier of the American 
Revolution, age not disclosed; and a resident 
of Franklin County; private 39th Regular U. 
S. Infantry; enrolled on March 10, 1818; pay- 
ment to date from July 9, 1814; annual allow- 
ance, $96; sums received to date of publica- 
tion of list, $1,887.09; April 24, 1816, trans- 
ferred from West Tennessee, from September 
4, 1819. — Revolutionary Pension Roll, in voL 
xiv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., Ist sess., 18S3-34« 

MILLER, WILLIAM, lawyer, bom March 27, 
1815, at Londonderry, Ireland, and died Sep- 
tember 9, 1891, at Tuscaloosa; son ol Samuel 
and Jane (Brown) Miller, natives of London- 



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DICTIONAEY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



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derry and Belfast, Ireland, the former of whom 
came to America in 1817, and settled in Balti- 
more, Md., as a consulting engineer. He at- 
tended high school in Baltimore; learned the 
carpenters' trade and worked at his trade until 
he was of age; moved to Alabama in 1840 
and settled at Tuscaloosa as the Junior partner 
in the wholesale house of Miller and Hogan. 
After leaving that firm, he established himself 
as a builder and contractor, and among others, 
built the main building of the Insane hospital 
at Tuscaloosa. He studied law, was admitted 
to the bar, and began the practice of law at 
Tuscaloosa in 1867. He was elected Judge of 
probate in 1868 and served a term of six years; 
was appointed postmaster in 1876, and served 
until 1887. It was through the influence of Mr. 
Miller that the first apprc^riation was secured 
for the opening of the Warrior River. He wa« 
a Republican; a Presbyterian; and an Odd Fel- 
low. Married: June 23, 1846, in Tuscaloosa, 
to Ann Olivia, dau^^ter of Daniel Haven and 
Ann Maria (Bacon) Bingham, of Tuscaloosa, 
a direct descendant of Deacon Thomas Bing- 
ham, the first American ancestor, who was 
bom in 1642 in Sheffield, England, and setr 
tied in Norwich, Ck>nn., in 1660. Children: 
1. Florence Maria; 2. Col. William Haven (q. 
v.); 8. Kate Stuart, m. Joseph Fletcher Roper; 
4. Helen Parkhurst, m. Frank Hull; 6. 
Olivia Jane; 6. Abbie Searcy, m. Charles Mc- 
Leod Peterson; 7. Margaret, Tuscaloosa; 8. 
Thomas Hugh, postmaster of Tuscaloosa, 1892, 
bookkeeper at Birmingham, m. Mrs. Mattle 
Thompson Royster; 9. Harlan Bingham, lawyer, 
LL. B., Vanderbilt university, 1887, m. Mar- 
garet Adams Smiser, PrattviUe. Last resi- 
dence: Tuscaloosa. 

MILLER, WILLIAM HAVEN, quartermaster 
general, U. S. Army, was born January 31, 1849, 
at Tuscaloosa, and died April 11, 1911, at Seat- 
tle, Wash.; son of William and Ann Olivia 
(Bingham) Miller (q. v.), the former a native 
of Londonderry, Ireland, probate Judge of Tus- 
caloosa County and postmaster at the town; 
grandson of Samuel and Jane Miller of Balti- 
more, Md., and of Daniel H., and Ann Maria 
(Bacon) Bingham of Tuscaloosa. He received 
his early education in the public schools of 
his native town and attended the University of 
Alabama; entered the U. S. military academy. 
West Point, N. T., and graduated captain of 
the cadet corps, 1872. He was appointed sec- 
ond lieutenant in 1st U. S. cavalry and was 
promoted to a first lieutenancy, 1879; served 
with that regiment in campaigns and in gar- 
rison in the northwest, northern California, 
Oregon, Washington* Nevada and Montana, 
until September 4, 1890, when he was ap- 
pointed captain and assistant quartermaster, 
U. S. Army; quartermaster U. S. military 
academy. West Point, N. T., 1890-94; quar^ 
termaster. Fort Riley, Kan., 1894-96; con- 
structing quartermaster at Spokane, Wash., 
building the military post of Fort Wright, 
Wash., 1896-98; appointed major and chief 
quartermaster U. S. volunteers, August 15, 
1898; division chief quartermaster at South- 
em Camp, Anniston, 1898-99; chief quarter- 
master, department of Santa Clara and liCatan- 



ZBS, at Cienfuegos and Matansas, Cuba, 1899- 
1900; depot quarterma8t^r, Boston, Mass., 190(^* 
01; depot and chief quartermaster, depart- 
ment of the Lakes, Chicago, 1901-06; in charge 
of the general depot, quartermasters depart- 
ment. New York City, 1905 to death, pro- 
moted by seniority to major and quarter* 
master, U. S. Army, 1900, to lieutenan^oolonel 
and deputy quartermaster general, U. S. Army, 
1903, to death. He participated in the Mo- 
doc Indian War, 1872-73, including the bat- 
tles of January 18, and of April 15, 16, and 17, 
1873, and brevetted first lieutenant, 1890, for 
"gallant services in action against Indians at 
the Lava Beds, Calif., April 17, 1873, and gallant 
and meritorious conduct during the Modoc 
War." He also served in the Nes Perce War, 
June to October, 1877, taking part in the battle 
of the Forks of the Clearwater River, Idaho, 
July 11-12, 1877, and in the Bannock campaign, 
Idaho and Nevada; served as quartermaster in 
the field and in garrison from May, 1877, to 
March, 1887, and was, during that time, regi- 
mental quartermaster, 1st cavalry, August 15, 
1878, to March 31, 1887. He was a Republican 
and a Presbyterian. Married: November 20, 
1889, to Anna, daughter of John and Susan 
Abbott, who lived at Walla Walla, Wash. Chil- 
dren: 1. Harlan A.; 2. Margaret Last resi- 
dence: Seattle, Wash. 

MILUGAN, MARTIN GATEWOOD, Cumber- 
land Presbyterian minister, was born December 
16, 1827, near Oakville, Lawrence Ck>unty; son 
of Johnston and Jane Holmes (Kyle) Milli- 
gan, the former of Scotch-Irish ancestry, who 
came to Alabama from Tennessee, and was a 
mechanic, the latter a daughter of James Kyle 
of near Moulton. He went to school near Stark- 
ville, Miss., and to Oak Grove academy; be- 
came a minister of the gospel in the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian church, in 1847; and served 
the church for sixty years. Most of that time 
was spent in Alabama, although he preached 
in several states. He was a Democrat, opposed 
to secession, but supported the state when it 
withdrew from the union; and a Royal Arch 
Mason. Married: (1) to Elizabeth Starkey, 
daughter of Nancy Starkey of Belief onte; (2) 
Hypatica Ann Pickens. Children: 1. James 
Calvin, d. at the age of twenty-three years; 2. 
Samuel Newton, m. Amy Frances Scarborough, 
Jacksonville; 3. Elisabeth Jane, d. in infancy; 
by second marriage: 4. Ehnma Jane, d. in in- 
fancy; 5. Willie Gatewood, m. Lulu Pineon, 
Jacksonville. Last residence: Jacksonville. 

MILLS, MORGAN, soldier of the AmeHccfn 
Revolution, age not given, a resident of Dallas 
County; private 2nd Regulars New Jersey Line; 
enrolled on December 18, 1828, under act of 
Congress of May 15, 1828, payment to date from 
March 3, 1826; annual allowance, $80; sums 
received to date of publication of list, $680. — 
Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. 
doc 514, 28rd Ckmg., Ist sees., 1888-34. He re- 
sided in Dallas Ckmnty, June 1, 1840, aged 78. 
—Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 149. 

MILLS, R. J., Methodist minister; member 
of the Alabama conference. Residence: Marion. 



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DICTIONARY OP ATiABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



MILLS, WILLIAM JEFFERSON, fanner and 
legislator, was bom November 8, 1839, near 
Lumpkin, Stewart County, 6a.; son of Richard 
and Eveline M. (Gilstrap) Mills, the former a 
native of South Carolina; grandson of W. I. 
and Nancy (McCormick) Gilstrap, of Hawkins- 
viUe, Ga. He was educated in the country 
schools; was a private in Co. K, 25th Alabama 
infantry regiment, C. S. Army, from January, 
1862 to November, 1864, when he lost his right 
arm at the battle of Franklin; tax collector, 
Geneva County, 1871-74; member house of rep- 
resentatives from that county, 1892-93, 1894-96, 
and re-elected in November, 1902. He is a 
farmer. He is a member of the Peoples Party. 
Married: November 12, 1872, at Geneva, to 
Elizabeth J., daughter of William and Mary 
(Kennedy) Coleman. Residence: Costilla. 

MILNER, HENRT KEY, business man, was 
born September 25, 1866, at Greenville, Butler 
County; son of Major Willis Julian and Gus- 
tine Caroline (Key) Milner (q. v.), the former 
who was a distinguished Confederate soldier, 
was wounded three times and cited four times 
for "gallantry in action" or conspicuous bravery 
under fire, was the most notable of all pio- 
neers of Birmingham in the extent and variety 
of the great accomplishments which today 
make Birmingham a great city, having planned 
and built the water works, the Birmingham 
belt railroad, the Highland avenue car line, 
planned the entire South Highlands develop- 
ment, and was a contributor to the fund to 
demonstrate the possibility of making pig iron 
from coke made of Alabama coal. Henry Key 
Milner grew up in Birmingham, attending the 
public schools and after a four years course 
received the degree of Mining Engineer from 
the University of Georgia in 1887. Later he 
took a post-graduate course in the School of 
Mines of Columbia College at New York. Dur- 
ing summer vacations while attending the uni- 
versity he was assistant engineer of the Bir- 
mingham water works company; was later 
employed in the construction of the aqueduct 
bringing water from Five Mile Creek to the 
pumping station at North Birmingham; was 
also identified with the construction of the 
Birmingham belt railroad. In 1887 as engi- 
neer of the Fort Payne land company Mr. 
Milner designed and laid out the town of Fort 
Payne; the following year he located the present 
CSahaba River pumping station, the Shades 
Mountain reservoir, and connecting lines to 
Birmingham for the Water works company; 
in 1888 he became the junior member of the 
firm Milner and Kettig, Jobbers in mill, mine 
and furnace supplies, which firm later became 
incorporated as the Milner and Kettig com- 
pany; was secretary and treasurer of the cor- 
poration until it was finally sold to the Crane 
company in 1905; in 1912 upon the organization 
of the Milner land company he was made presi- 
dent which office he now holds. Under his di- 
rection property that had laid dormant and 
practically in a state of nature has been re-, 
claimed and improved and is now among the 
most desirable section of Birmingham and 
known as Milner Heights. He was for years' 



an important factor in the good roads move- 
ment; served as vice president and member of 
the executive committee of the Alabama good 
roads association; was one of the organizers 
and secretary and director of the Warrant 
warehouse company; is now a director of the 
American trust and savings bank of Birming- 
ham; and a director of the Magnolia com- 
press and warehouse company of Mobile. He 
has taken an active part in the Warrior River 
movement, and was chairman of the terminals 
and transportation committee, contributing 
greatly to its development and use for barge 
transportation. He was appointed by Gk>v. 
Thomas E. Kilby, chairman of the State har- 
bor commission of Alabama in March, 1921, 
for a term of five years. During the World 
War he was chief of the American protective 
league. He is a Democrat; also a member of 
the Chamber of commerce of Birmingham; 
was one of the organizers and for its first 
two years president of the country club of 
Birmingham; he is also a member of the Roe- 
buck, Rotary and Motor clubs, the Birmingtuun 
athletic club; has been president of the Asso- 
ciated charities of Birmingham, and is a mem- 
ber of the Church of the Advent, Episcopal, 
which he has served as vestryman. Married: 
(1) February 14, 1889, to Helen Bishop of 
Athens, Gki., whose death occurred in 1910; (2) 
June 2, 1915, to Susie Gabard, daughter 
of the late William L. Martin (q. v.), of 
Montgomery who served as attorney-general 
of Alabama and speaker of the house of rep- 
resentatives. Children, by first marriage: 1. 
Martha, m. Dr. Samuel Ravand Benedict, son 
of Samuel C. and Anna Bloomfield Benedict; 
2. Justine Key, m. Robert V. Mabry, son of 
Thomas Elliott and Julia Gwyn Mabry. Resi- 
dence: Birmingham. 

MILNER, JOHN COOPER, lawyer, was bom 
May 28, 1868, at C^rgiana, Butler County; 
son of John Ashley and Sallle (Cooper) Milner, 
the former a native of Barnesville, Ga., who 
moved to Alabama and lived at Georgians, 
Calera, Pine Apple, Monroeville, Leeds and Bir- 
mingham, and during the War of Secession waB 
employed by the Confederate government in 
making iron; grandson of Pitt Sanders and 
Pamelia N. (Parker) Milner, who came to 
Georgiana from Barnesville, Ga., and of Peter 
and Symantha (Moncrief) Cooper, who lived at 
Cooper's Station. The Milner family originally 
came from England. One of that family, Capt. 
John Milner, served in the Carolinas in the 
War of the Revolution. Mr. Milner attended 
public schools in various parts of Alabama; 
Moore's business university in Atlanta, (Ja.; 
and was graduated from the law department 
of the University of Alabama, June, 1889. He 
began the practice of law in Birmingham in 
1889; was county solicitor of Lamar County, 
1891-1892; mayor of Vernon, 1896-1896; served 
as a private in Co. M, Alabama State troops. 

/ 1892-1894; represented Lamar County In the 
State legislature, 1911; and was a State sen- 
ator from the twelfth district, 1916. He is a 

^ Democrat; has served as chairman of the cam- 



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DICTIONABY OP ATiABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1207 



paign committee of Lamar County; as beat 
commissioner, 1896-1898; has been a delegate 
to many State conventions; a member of the 
State executive committee, 1908-1910; *and a 
member of the congressional executive com- 
mittee, 1906-1910. He is a Methodist; a Mason; 
an Odd Fellow; and a member of the Alpha 
Tau Omega college fraternity. Married: June 
29, 1892, in Vernon, to Adine Pearl, daughter 
of Roland Wallace and Laura Ghappel (Price) 
Cobb, of that place; granddaughter of Alexan- 
der Cobb (q. v.)> who was a member of the Ala- 
bama legislature from Fayette County, 1861- 
1865, and probate judge of Lamar County from 
1874 to the time of his death in December, 1887. 
Children: 1. Adine Ashley, m. Elonzo R. Har- 
ris; 2. Laura May, deceased; 3. Sallie Cobb; 4. 
Annie Mildred. Residence: Vernon. 

MILNER, JOHN TURNER, civil engineer, 
was born September 29, 1826, in Pike County, 
Ga.; son of Willis Jay and Mary Ann (Turner) 
Milner; brother of Willis Julian Milner (q. v.). 
His early education was limited as he went to 
school and worked alternately. At the age of 
ten he learned his first lessons in mining at 
his father's mines in Lumpkin County, Ga. 
From his twelfth to his fifteenth year he was 
engaged in railroad construction under the di- 
rection of his father who at that time was a 
railroad contractor, and at the age of seventeen 
he entered the gold mines near Dahlonega, Ga. 
He next entered the University of Georgia but 
was forced to leave at the end of his third year 
on account of failing health. Returning to his 
home he became interested in civil engineering, 
working under George H. Hazelhurst, the dis- 
tinguished civil engineer, who at that time was 
engaged on the Macon and Western railroad. 
In less than two years Mr. Milner was princi- 
pal assistant engineer in Uie construction of the 
Muscogee road, now a part of the Columbus and 
liacon railroad. In 1842 he drove an ox team 
across the plains to Oregon and California and 
in the latter state was appointed by General 
Riley, the then provisional governor of Califor- 
nia, city surveyor of San Jose, the capital of 
the state. He returned to Georgia in 1852 and 
shortly afterwards removed to Alabama, where 
he became connected with the Montgomery and 
West Point railroad, at Chehaw, Macon County. 
Governor Moore commissioned him in 1858, 
under an act of the legislature, to survey and 
lotate a railroad line connecting the navigable 
waters of the Alabama River with those of the 
Tennessee. He selected and recommended the 
line upon which the South and North railroad 
was built On November 3, 1858, he was elected 
chief engineer of the South and North railroad 
company. He continued in this position until 
October 1, 1872, when the railroad was com- 
pleted and placed under the control of the Louis- 
ville and Nashville system, at which time he 
retired from active service. He founded the 
sawmills at Boiling and projected the great city 
of Birmingham. Before Colonel Powell, Josiah 
Morris, or any others thought of such a place 
he had entered into a written agreement with 
R. C. McCalla, as the chief engineer and rep- 
resentative of the managers of the Alabama and 
Chattanooga railroad to buy for their respective 

V#l. IV— 14 



companies the land at the crossing ef the two 
roads, with the view of building a great indus- 
trial city. He purchased about seven thousand 
acres, in Village Creek valley, several miles 
northwest of the present site of Birmingham, 
and extending from a point near Pratt Mines 
towards the east. The unwarranted withdrawal 
of the managers for the Alabama and Chatta- 
nooga people from their written agreement 
thwarted him in his purposes. They changed 
the location of their line and bought the 
present site of the city of Birmingham, but as 
a matter of precaution, not knowing exactly 
where Mr. Milner would cross their line with 
the South and North, they only took sixty day 
options on the purchases they had made. There 
was no other available crossing except where 
Birmingham now is, after changing the line 
from the Village Creek valley to the Ely ton 
valley. Throughout the sixty days he gave no 
intimation or sign as to where the crossing 
would be located but had surveys made for 
crossings at every available point above and 
below Elyton for miles. At the expiration of 
the three days of grace allowed in such transac- 
tions, the dropped or forfeited Stanton options, 
covering the site of the great city, were taken 
up and the money paid for them. Mr. Milner, 
faithful to the trust confided in him as engineer 
of the South and North Alabama railroad had 
arranged for his company to own half of the 
great city of the future. After the development 
of the Coalburg coal property, near Birmingham, 
he sold it in May, 1883, to the Georgia Pacific 
railroad company, at a profit of over two thou- 
sand dollars. He also developed the New Castle 
coal property, about nine miles east of Birming- 
ham, was the owner of valuable property in the 
city of Birmingham, and was stockholder in the 
most important land companies there. Author: 
''Alabama as it was, as it is, and as it will be." 
Married: December 30, 1855, to Flora J., daugh- 
ter of John C. Caldwell, of Greenville. He left 
descendants. Last residence: Birmingham. 

MILNER, WILLIS JULIAN, civil engineer, 
Birmingham pioneer and major, C. S. Army, was 
born May 3, 1842, in Barnesville, Ga.; son of 
Willis Jay and Mary Ann (Turner) Milner, the 
former a railroad contractor and builder, who 
founded the town of Milner, Ga., and also en- 
gaged in mining, the latter a native of North 
Carolina; grandson of John Milner and wife, 
who was a Miss Calloway, the former a Baptist 
clergyman, the latter a descendant of Richard 
Calloway, one of the early settlers of Kentucky, 
and among the defenders of Fort Boone, and 
of John Gainer Turner, of North Carolina; 
great-grandson of Capt. John Milner, who serv- 
ed under General Pickens in the War of the 
Revolution; and brother of John T. Milner (q. 
v.). He was reared in Georgia, Alabama and 
Florida; and was associated with his father 
in business. In the spring of 1861, while a 
student at Mercer university. Georgia, he en- 
tered the Confederate service in Florida and 
assisted in raising a company of which he was 
appointed first lieutenant, but as there appear- 
ed no immediate prospect of duty with this 
company he resigned and enlisted as a private* 
in the "Clinch Rifles/' of Augusta, Ga., which 



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DICTIONABY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



had already been assigned as Co. A, to the 6th 
Georgia Ixitantry regiment, then stationed at 
Pensacola. With this regiment he served in 
the Kentucky campaign under General Bragg» 
and at the battle of Murfreesboro, where he 
was wounded, fighting with Jackson's brigade 
of Breckinridge's division. Later he was trans- 
ferred as a private to Co. D, 33rd Alabama in- 
fantry regiment, Hood's brigade, Cleburne's di- 
vision. Army of Tennessee. In April, 18G3, he 
was promoted to first lieutenant and put in 
command of Co. K, of his regiment, and served 
in the Tullahoma campaign, the retreat to Chat- 
tanooga and the Chickamauga campaign, 
where he was again wounded. On returning to 
duty he was appointed adjutant of the regi- 
ment, serving from Dalton to Atlanta. Later 
he was appointed to the staff of General Low- 
rey, with the rank of captain, serving as such 
during the remainder of the Atlanta campaign, 
receiving a slight wound at Spring Hill, and 
taking part in the battles of Franklin and 
Nashville. At the death of General Cleburne, 
General Lowrey took command and Captain 
Milner was appointed adjutant-general of IjOW- 
rey's brigade. After the battle of Bentonville 
the 16th, 33rd, and 45th Alabama were consoli- 
dated as the Ist Alabama, in the brigade of 
Gen. C. M. Shelley, and he was promoted to ma- 
jor of the consolidated regiment. His serv- 
ices ended with the surrender of the Army 
at Greensboro, N. C, April 26, 1865. In 1858, 
from the top of Red Mountain, he first viewed 
Jones' Valley, the present site of Birmingham. 
Of that first impression he later said: "It 
was one vast garden as far as eye could reach, 
northeast and southwest. I had traveled all 
over the United States. I had seen the great 
and rich valleys of the Pacific coast, but no 
where had I seen an agricultural people so 
perfectly provided for^ and so completely 
happy." After the end of the War of Seces* 
cession Major Milner located in Greenville, 
where he resided until 1871, when he removed 
to Jefferson County, and became one of the 
founders and pioneer builders of Birmingham. 
His professional services as a civil engineer 
were of great value in laying off the young 
city, and his business qualities were applied to 
the development of private enterprises and 
public utilities. He was secretary and treasurer 
of the Bl3rton land company; and later general- 
manager; one of the incorporators of the Na- 
tional bank, the first bank in Birmingham, of 
which Charles Lynn was president; laid out 
South Highlands, and in 1884 graded South 
Highland avenue, which had been designed by 
John A. Milner; contracted Lakeview park; 
built and operated the first horse car lines, 
and the Highland Avenue and the belt lines, 
the latter having both passenger and freight 
departments, using steam engines, and called 
"dummy lines." He established the first gen- 
eral supply and machinery business of the 
Birmingham district, taking in as partner, in 
1886, William H. Kettig, thus establishing the 
firm of Milner and Kettig, and founding a busi- 
ness that has continued until today. He also 
established the waterworks of Birmingham, 
and was its chief engineer for twenty-five 
years. Married: in 1865, to Gustrine C, 



daughter of Dr. James F. Key of Lowndes 
County, a relative of Francis Scott Key, author 
of "The Star Spangled Banner." Children: 1. 
Mary Clare, m. Alexander Sloan Tutwiler; 2. 
Henry Key (q. v.), m. (1) Helen Bishop; (2) 
Susie Martin, daughter of Hon. WllUam L. 
Martin (q. v.). Residence: Birmingham and 
Tampa, Fla. 

MILSTEAD, FRANK DAVIS, consulting en- 
gineer. Residence: Tallassee. 

MILTON, JAMES, grand master, grand 
council, 1876-78; deputy grand high priest, 
grand chapter. Masons, 1875-77. 

MIMS, WILLIAM J., major, 48rd Alabama in- 
fantry regiment, C. S. Army. 

■< MINGE, JOHN HENRY, business man, was 
bom May 25, 1851, in Mar^igo County, and died 
in 1908; son of David and Elvira (Adanas) 
Minge, the former a native of Charles City 
County, Va., who moved to Alabama in 1833; 
grandson of Dr. John and Margaret (Winston) 
Adams, of Richmond, Va. His grandmother 
Minge was a sister of President William Henry 
Harrison; and his mother's grandmother was a 
sister to Judge Cyrus Griflin, president c^ the 
first congress that met in Philadelphia. The 
Adams family came from Scotland, and the 
Minges from Wales, both settling in Virginia. 
Mr. Minge attended the neighborhood schools 
of Marengo County, the St Wilifred school at 
Marion, and the Hanover academy, in Hanover 
County, Va. In 1875, he went to Texas to live, 
but returned the next year. He resided on his 
plantation in Hale County, 1876-1884, and later 
moved to Faunsdale. He was engaged in farm- 
ing; in the manufacturing of cotton seed oil 
at Faunsdale, and of cotton yarns at Fauns- 
dale; and in merchandising at Faunsdale. He 
was elected representative in the State legisla- 
ture in 1886; State senator in 1890, in which 
body he was chairman of the committee on 
finance; was a delegate to the National Demo- 
cratic convention of 1896; was a member of 
the State Democratic executive committee, 
1892-1896; and was again elected to the legis- 
lature from Marengo County in 1902. He was 
an Episcopalian. Married: March 24, 1874, to 
Bessie Croom, daughter of Jackson N. and 
Mary (Croom) Chad wick. Children: 1. John 
Henry (q. v.). Last residence: Faunsdale. 

^ MINGE, JOHN HENRY, real estate and bond 
dealer, was bom February 3, 1875, on the Nor- 
wood plantation near Faunsdale, Marengo 
County; son of John Henry and Bessie (Chad- 
wick) Minge (q. v.). He was educated in the 
private and public schools of Faunsdale and 
had his college career at Marion institute, and 
at the University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. 
He entered the general mercantile business 
with his father at Faunsdale in 1899, and later 
they erected a cotton seed oil mill at that place. 
In 1905 he removed to Birmingham where he 
has since engaged in the real estate, mortgage 
loan and stock and bond business. He was 
first lieutenant of the "Pelham Guards" at 
Uniontown, 1897. He is a Democrat; Episco- 
palian; Knight of Pythias; and Woodman of the 



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World. Married: November 10, 1897, in Bir- 
mingliam, to Roea, daughter of Col. James 
Withers and Mattie (Lundie) Sloss (q. v.). 
Children: 1. Martha Sloss; 2. John Henry. Resi- 
dence, Birmingham. 

MINOR, HENRY, first Alabama supreme 
court reporter, lawyer, Alabama supreme court 
justice, was bom January 4, 1783, in Dinwiddle 
County, Va., and died January 1, 1839, at Mi- 
norca, Greene County; son of Thomas Carr and 
Anne (Redd) Minor, who lived at Topping 
Castle, Caroline County, Va., the former a na- 
tive of Spottsylvania County, an extensive plant- 
er, having landed estates in Orange and Louisa 
Counties in addition to the foregoing; grand- 
son €l Garret and Diana Vivian Minor, the for- 
mer a justice of Middlesex County, Va., and of 
Samuel and Lfucy (Rogers) Redd, also of Vir- 
ginia. The Minor f^anily was known in Somer- 
setshire, England, in Uie reign of Edward III, 
and Richard II, made grants of land to his 
"trusty subject Richard Minors." The first of 
the name in America was Thomas, son of Cle- 
ment Minor, who migrated to America, in 1630, 
landing at Salem, Mass., and finally settling in 
Stonington, Conn., and is believed to be the 
progenitor of all the Minors or Miners except 
those who probably descended from the brother 
who settled in Ireland. Thomas married Grace 
Palmer, in 1684, and left twelve ch^ildren, 
among them Judah or Doodah, who located in 
Virginia in 1673 and married Diana Howard. 
The several lines represented in these inter- 
marriages were of English and Scottish stock. 
Justice Minor was carefully educated, having 
sprung from a family of scholars. He read 
law under his uncle Judge Minor of Fredericks- 
burg, Va., and located in Huntsville in 1816, a 
period when a large number of young men of 
good Virginia families migrated to that section, 
making in the years that followed, a liberal 
contribution to the honorsa)le history of the 
State of their adc^tion. He was a member of 
the constitutional convention of 1819, and was 
elected by the first legislature of the State as 
reporter of the supreme court, and in this re- 
lation compiled Minor's Reports. In 1828 he 
was elected to the supreme court bench of Ala- 
bama and served two years. Upon being de- 
feated for reflection he was made clerk of the 
court whose ermine he had so recently worn. 
His ability as a Judge was generally recognised, 
but being of a retiring nature he was not suited 
for a pioneer campaign and therefore lost the 
judgeship to his opponent. He settled down to 
his new duties, the fees supporting the oflice 
being more than a Judge's salary, and retained 
the position until his death. He removed from 
Huntsville, Madison Ck>unty, to Greene County, 
in 1826, in order that he might be nearer the 
capitol at Tuscaloosa He was an Episcopalian. 
Harried: September 14, 1809, at Petersburg, Va. 
to Frances ThrockmorUMi, daughter of Mordecai 
and Elisabeth (Strode) Barbour, who lived at 
Fleetwood, Culpepper County, Va. Mordecai 
Barbour was a Revolutionary oflicer and drew 
a pension for military service. John Strode, 
the maternal grandfather, owned a a gun fac- 
tory near Falmouth, and supplied arms to the 
Virginia troops during the Revolutionary War. 



Children: 1. Henry, studied at the University of 
Alabama, 1881, graduated at the U. S. military 
academy. West Point, N. T., and died at sea, 
November 25, 1839; 2. Mordecai; 3. Ann Vir- 
ginia, m. John Gillian Friend, Mobile; 4. Elisar 
beth Barbour; 5. Frances Cosby; 6. Maria Bar- 
bour, m. Dr. E. F. Bouchelle; 7. Louisa; 8. La- 
fayette Mordecai, graduated, A. B., University 
of Alabama, 1841, died as a Confederate soldier 
in the Federal prison, Elmira, N. Y., February 
14, 1865, m. Hattie Fleming; 9. John Launcelot, 
student University of Alabama, 1842, physician. 
Mobile; 10. Philip Pendleton Barbour, student 
University of Alabama, 1846, physician, gradu- 
ate Medical college, Philadelphia, Pa., surgeon 
C. S. Army, m. Eliza Williams Perry; 11. Lucy 
Landon Barbour, m. Dr. Joseph C. Hamilton. 
Last residence: Minorca. 

MINOR, JOHN W., president of the Bessemer 
fire brick ccmipany; president of the Bank of 
Alabama. Residence: Birmingham. 

MINTBR, WILLIAM TOWNSBND, planter, 
was bom in 1805, in Jones County, Ga., and 
died April 2, 1865, near Selma, Dallas County; 
son of Morgan and Johannah (Rutherford) 
Minter; grandson of John and Elisabeth (Mor- 
gan) Minter of Powhatan Ck>unty, Va., and of 
CoL Robert and Dorothy (Brooks) Rutherford 
of Amherst 0>unty, Va., later of North C!arolina, 
finally of Newberry District, S. C. Both John 
and Morgan Minter served in the Revolutionary 
War from North Carolina. The family is of 
Scotch and Welsh extraction, coming to Amer- 
ica early in the 17th century and settling in 
James City Ck>unty, going from there to Pow- 
hatan County, thence to Bedford County in 
1770. They located on the Otter River, near the 
Peaks of Otter, and moved to Chatham County, 
N. C, in 1776 and from thence to Washington 
County, Ga., finally settling in Dallas County, 
in 1830. William T. Minter was well educated, 
and owned and operated a large landed estate. 
He was sheriff of Dallas County, commanded a 
company in the Seminole War; commanded a 
company of Ccmfederate soldiers at the battle 
of Selma where he was killed, and was buried 
at Pleasant Hill. He was president of the 
Selma and Pensacola railroad, driving over the 
route and securing the right of way. This road 
is now known as the Pensacola division of the 
Louisville and Nashville railroad. He was a 
Presbyterian and a Mason. Married: in Cahap 
ba, to Susan, daughter of Col. Hill of that 
place. Children: 1. Clara J.; 2. Lucia M., m. 
William Minter Weaver, Selma; 3. Isolene, m. 
Capt Fred Wilberly, Twiggs 0>unty, Cta. Last 
residence: Dallas County. 

MITCHAM, GEORGE NATHAN, civil and 
mining engineer, was bom July 5, 1878, at West 
Point, Ga.; son of (George Thomas and America 
Washington (Atkinson) Mitcham, of Birming- 
ham, the former a merchant, who left LaGrange 
military college during the War of Secession, en- 
listed in the C. S. Army and was first assigned 
to duty as drill master of the raw recruits at 
Savannah, Ga., joined Ck>. I, Eighth cavalry, 
February 8, 1862, at Cusseta, had four horses 
killed under him and was once wounded during 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



the war, and was paroled at Hillsboro, N. C, 
May 3, 1865, as second lieutenant; grandson of 
George Washington and Henrietta Mltcham, 
who moved from Meriwether County, Oa., to 
Chambers County, and of Nathan Lane and 
Frances B. Atkinson, natives of Greene County, 
Ga., who lived near West Point, Troup County, 
Ga. Mr. Mltcham was educated in the public 
schools of West Point, Ga., in the north Georgia 
agricultural college at Dahlonega, and was 
graduated from the Alabama polytechnic insti- 
tute, B. S., 1897, C. E.. 1898, and M. B., 1899. He 
served as assistant at the Institute, 1897-1899; 
as assistant engineer and engineer of the Blue 
Creek division, and resident engineer on con- 
struction of the steel plant at Bnsley, Tennessee 
coal, iron and railroad company, June, 1899- 
1901; draftsman and later assistant to the gen- 
eral superintendent of the shops, Wisconsin 
bridge and iron company, Milwaukee, Wis., 
1981-1902; assistant engineer of the Pratt mines 
division, and later division engineer of the 
Pratt mines, Tennessee coal, iron and railroad 
company; was appointed to the chair of mining 
engineering, Alabama polytechnic institute, 
1903-1907; and was transferred to the depart- 
ment of civil engineering in 1907. He spends 
the summer months in the practice of his pro- 
fession, and in 1911, on the creation of the 
State highway commission by the legislature, 
became an ez-offlcio member of the commission. 
He is a member of the Alabama good roads 
association, of the Alabama association of 
highway engineers, the Engineering associa- 
tion of the South, the American association for 
the promotion of engineering education, and 
the American society of civil engineers. Resi- 
dence: Auburn. 

MITCHELL, ARCHELAUS, Methodist min- 
ister; pastor of the Court Street church, Mont- 
gomery, 1858-59. 

MITCHELL, CHARLES ERASTUS, lawyer 
and legislator, was bom September 2, 1868, at 
Thornhill, on the headwaters of Buttahatchee 
River, in Marion County; son of Andrew IX 
and Lourilda E. (Cagle) Mitchell; grandson of 
Lloyd Cagle of Winston County. He was edu- 
cated at Thornhill, and graduated in June, 1890, 
frcHn the Florence normal college; received in 
June, 1893, the LL. B. from the University of 
Alabama; since that year he has practiced In 
Hamilton; was a member board of aldermen of 
that town, 1896-1900; superintendent of educa- 
tion of Maricm County, 1896-98, and 1900 to 
1904; was nominee of the Democratic party to 
the proposed constitutional convention of 1899; 
was chairman from 1904-06, of the Democratic 
executive committee; and represented Marion 
County in the legislature of 1907. He is a 
Democrat; Mason; and Woodman of the World. 
Married: November 25, 1896, at Hamilton, to 
Leota, daughter of Jason Parks and Adaline 
(Weatherford) Ford, all of Marion County. 
Children: 1. Ralph; 2. Ruth; 3. Leslie; 4. 
William Charles; 5. Loyce. Residence: Hamil- 
ton. 

MITCHELL, FLUD, soldier of the American 
Bevolvtion, aged 77, and a resident of Lime- 



stone County; private and sergeant N. C. Mili- 
tia; enrolled on February 21, 1838, under act 
of Congress of June 7, 1832, payment to date 
from March 4, 1831; annual allowance, $80; 
sums received to date of publication of list, 
$240. — Revolutionary Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. 
Sen. doc. 514, 23rd Cong., 1st sess., 1833-34. 

MITCHELL, J. E., lawyer; living in 1913. 
Residence: Mobile. 

MITCHELL, JACOB, soldier of the American 
Revolution, and a resident of Montgomery 
County; private, particular service not shown; 
enrolled on November 21, 1829, under act of 
Congress of March 18, 1818, pasrment to date 
from September 4, 1835; annual allowance, $96. 
— Pension Book, State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

MITCHELL, JAMES A., lawyer, Uving in 
1913. Residence: Livingston. 

MITCHELL, JESSE, soldier of the American 
Revolution, aged 75, and a resident of Lime- 
stone County; private and sergeant; enrolled 
on February 23, 1833, under act ot Congress of 
June 7, 1832, payment to date from March 4. 
1831; annual allowance, $80; sums received to 
date of publication of list, $200. — Revolutionary 
Pension Roll, in vol. xiv. Sen. doc. 514, 23rd 
Cong., Ist sess., 1833-34. He resided in Lime- 
stone County, June 1, 1840, aged 75. — Census of 
Pensioners, 1841, p. 148. 



MITCHELL, JOHN JACKSON, lawyer, 
born September 15, 1854, at Florence, Lauder- 
dale County; son of William Henry and Mar- 
tha (Jackson) Mitchell (q. v.), the former was 
a native of Monoghan, Monoghan County, Ire- 
land, was pastor of the Presbyterian church at 
Wetumpka, 1843-1850, at Florence, 1850-1871, 
and president of the Florence synodical col- 
lege, 1848 to his death, served in the C. S. 
Army and was imprisoned by the Federal sol- 
diers; grandson of James and Mary (Nelscm) 
Mitchell of Monoghan County, Ireland, the for- 
mer who was sheriff of his county, and of 
James and Sarah (Moore) Jackson of Florence, 
the former who was a native of county Mono- 
ghan, Ireland, immigrated to America and set- 
tled in Nashville, Tenn., in 1818 removed to 
Florence, was several times a member of the 
senate of Alabama, and was a planter, and im- 
porter and breeder of race horses. John J. 
Mitchell was educated in the private schools of 
Florence, the Florence Wesleyan university, 
and the University of Mississippi, and was 
graduated LL. B. from the law department of 
the Cumberland university, Lebanon, Tenn., in 
1874. For about ten years he was a Journalist, 
owning and editing the following papers: 
"Chilton County Courier", 1875-76; "Florence 
Gazette". 1876-1882; and the Florence "North 
Star", 1884-85. He was elected probate Judge 
jot Lauderdale County, November, 1886; served 
''^ until 1892; and again served from January 26, 
1900, to November, 1904; was a member of the 
house of representatives, 1896-97, which session 
passed the tax commission law of which he was 
the author; was again in the house, 1898-99. 
serving as chairman of the committee <m ways 



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1218 



and means; from 1907 to 1911 seryed as chair- 
man of the state tax ccnnmission. He is a 
Democrat, has serred as chairman of the Lau- 
derdale Connty Democratic ezecative commit- 
tee in 1884» and was a member of the state 
Democratic executire committee, 1906; is a 
deaccm and elder in the Presbyterian church; 
and an Elk. Married: June 25, 1879, at Pratt- 
Tllle, to Btoile, daughter of Joseph and Mary 
(Abbott) Hnrd, natives of New Jersey but res- 
idents of Prattrille, the former who served 
throughout the War of Secession in the C. S. 
Army, and later engaged in the drug business. 
Children: 1. William Henry (q. v.) ; 2. Joseph 
Hurd. Residence: Florence. 

MITCHBIjL, JOHN WALTER, farmer and 
merchant, was born February 18, 1874, at 
Sand Rock, Cherokee County; son of Wil- 
liam and MiUie Jane (Clifton) Mitchell, the 
former who was bom in North Carolina, 
moving to Sand Rock in 1839, served in the C. 
S. Army from Alabama the whole duration of 
the war; grandson of Joseph Mitchell, of Por- 
tersville, and of Hiram and Elisabeth Clifton, 
of Odar Bluffs. Mr. Mitchell received his edu- 
cation in the public schools at Sand Rock, 
Round Mountain, Cednr Bluff, and upon going 
to Texas in 1892, attended school at Merit, 
Tex., 1893-4. He attended Emerson college, at 
Campbell, Hunt Ck>unty, Tex., 1902-4; returned 
to Alabama in 1909 and the following year en- 
gaged in the farming and mercantile business. 
He represented (Cherokee (3ounty in the legis- 
lature, 1919. He is a Democrat; a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, South; is 
an Odd Fallow; and a Woodman of the World. 
Married: January 8, 1897, at Floyd, Hunt 
County, Tex., to Maudie M., daughter of An- 
drew F. and Julia (Woody) Jones, of that 
place. Children: 1. Melissa May, m. Martin 
H. Copeland; 2. James Monroe; 3. John An- 
drew. Residence: Round Mountain. 

MITCHELXi, T. J., president of the State nor- 
mal college, Florence, 1886-88. He held the 
Ph. D. degree. 

MITCHELL, WILLIAM, soldier of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, aged 78, and a resident of Mor- 
gan County; private Virginia Continental Line; 
enrolled on July 28, 1824, under act of Congress 
of March 18, 1818, payment to date from April 
26, 1824; annual allowance, $96; sums received 
to date of publication of list, $802.39.— BevoZtt- 
tUmary Pension Rott, in vol. xiv, Sen. doc. 514, 
23rd Cong., let sess., 1833-34. He resided in 
Lawrence County, June 1, 1840, with A. Mit- 
chell, aged 86. — Census of Pensioners, 1841, p. 
148. 

MITCHELL, WILLIAM HENRY. Presby- 
terian minister and college president, was born 
September 20. 1812, in Monaghan, Ireland, and 
died October 3, 1872, in Florence; son of James 
and Mary (Nel«on) Mitchell, of Monaghan, Ire- 
land, the former high sheriff of that county. 
He was fitted for college by Professor Bleakley. 
and entered Belfast college where he studied 
law and later theology. He came to America 
between 1840 and 1843, in the latter year being 



installed as pastor of the Presbjrterian church 
at Wetumpka. In 1850 he removed to Florence, 
where he was pastor until 1871. In 1858, he 
was made president of the Florence s3^odical 
female college, and continued at its head until 
his death. In 1862. while Florence was in pos- 
session of Federal forces, under Col. Harlan, 
afterward Justice Harlan, of the U. S. supreme 
court, Dr. Mitchell was arrested, by Harlan 
himself, for praying in the Presbyterian pul- 
pit for the success of the Confederacy. He was 
sent to the military prison at Alton. IlL, and 
held for six months being paroled September, 
1865. He was a Democrat and an ardent Seces- 
sionist; a Mason. Married: (1) in Ireland, to 
Annie Jane Byrne, daughter of John, of Dun- 
dork; (2) to Martha, daughter of James and 
Sarah (Moore) Jackson, of "The Forks," near 
Florence, the former bom in Monag h an, Ire- 
land, and a pioneer settler of Lauderdale Coun- 
ty, the latter a descendant of the Moore family 
of North Carolina. Children: 1. David, de- 
ceased; 2. Anne, m. Samuel Adams of We- 
tumpka; 3. Mary Nelson, m. Robert Martin 
of Florence; 4. William Henry, Jr., deceased; 
5. John Jackson (q. v.), m. Etoile Hurd, of 
PrattviUe. Last residence: Florence. 

MITCHELL, WILLIAM HENRY III, lawyer, 
was bom April 8, 1882, at Florence; son of 
John Jackson and Etoile (Hurd) Mitchell (q. 
v.), of Florence; grandson of Rev. William 
Henry and Martha (Jackson) Mitchell (q. v.) ; 
great-grandson of James Jackson, of Lauder- 
dale County, and of Joseph and Mary (Ab- 
bott) Hurd, of PrattviUe. He was educated 
at the Florence normal school, receiving his 
diploma in 1900; entered the University of 
Alabama, 1902, and graduated A. B. and LL. B. 
in 1904. He began the practice of law, 1904. 
He was a member of the city school board from 
1909 to date; chairman Lauderdale Ck>unty 
Democratio executive committee, 1906-10; a 
Knight of Pythias; an Elk; member Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon college fraternity; and a Pres- 
byterian. Married: May 18, 1910, in Flor- 
ence, to Ann Olestine, dauc^ter of David 
Larkin and Ellen (Gilchrist) Martin, of Court- 
land, the latter the daughter of Philip and 
Alice (Garth) GilchrUt of Virginia. C^iildren: 
1. Ellen Gilchrist; 2. Celestine Martin. Resi- 
dence: Florence. 

MOBLEY, THOMAS BARNETTB. soldier, 
was bom in 1835 at Lower Peachtree, Wilcox 
County, and died in battle in Tennessee, 1863; 
son of Col. Barnette and Rebecca (Campbell) 
Mobley, the former a native of South CJarolina, 
who removed to Alabama, fought in the Indian 
massacre at Montgomery Hill, July 12, 1712, 
and was a colonel in the Revolutionary War. 
Thomas B. Mobley attended school at Greens- 
boro. He served during the War of Secession 
as captain until his death. Married: January 
12, 1859, to Maria, daughter of William and 
Jane Peebles, of Lower Peachtree. Children: 
1. John Barnette. Last residence: Lower 
Peachtree. 

MODAWELL, WILLIAM B., lawyer, w^ie 
born in 1819 in Madison County. His early 



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DICTIONABY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



educational advantages were limited on ac- 
count of the death of his father. From his 
twelfth to his twentieth year he was employed 
as a clerk and spent his spare time in study. 
He removed to Marengo County in 1889; was 
a teacher for five years and later deputy 
sheriff. He then began the practice of law. 
He represented Marengo County in the legis- 
lature of 1863. In 1867 he removed to Perry 
County and was an unsuccessful candidate for 
the State senate in 187L 

MOFFAT» JOHN, hotel manager, was born 
December 21, 1859, at Annan, Dumfrieshire, 
Scotland; son of William and Elizabeth (Gra- 
ham) Moffat, the former who was of lowland 
Scotch ancestry, came to Canada in 1872, and 
located in Teeswater, Ontario, where he en- 
gaged in farming; grandson of William and 
Elizabeth (Armstrong) Graham of Longtown, 
Cumberland, England. Mr. MofCat was educat- 
ed in the public schools of Annan, Scotland, and 
Teeswater, Ontario. He engaged in clerical 
work for a number of years; came to Alabama 
in 1889;' entered the hotel business in Mont- 
gomery, 1901; was appointed recording secre- 
tary to the governor by the Hon. Emmet O'Neal, 
May 2, 1913; was reappointed on February 15, 
1915, by (jk>v. Charles Henderson; and has been 
engaged in the hotel business as manager of the 
New Exchange, in Montgomery. He is a Dem- 
ocrat; a Presbyterian; a Knight of Pythias; 
and a member of the Knights of Maccabees. 
Married: (1) June 14, 1886, at Chicago, to 
Margaret, daughter of John and Euphemia 
(Baigarie) (3amduff of that place but originally 
of Scotland; (2) January 7, 1903, at Mont- 
gomery, to Edna, daughter of Herman and 
Eugenia (Hrabowski) Kenneworth. Children, 
by first marriage: 1. Effie, m. A. J. Rappole, 
New York City; 2. Margaret; 3. William; by 
second marriage: 4. John. Residence: Mont- 
gomery. 

MOHR, CHARLES THEODOR, botanist, was 
bom December 28, 1824, in Esslingen, Wurtem- 
burg, (Germany, and died at AsheviUe, N. C, July 
17, 1901; son of Louis M. Mohr. Reared in his 
native country, he was educated at the Poly- 
technic school at Stuttgart, in the natural sci- 
ences, particularly in botany and chemistry, in 
the latter subject having as his instructor the 
renowned Fehling. He spent most of the year, 
1846, in Dutch Guiana collecting natural his- 
tory specimens; worked from May 1847, to 
August 1848, as a chemist in a manufacturing 
establishment in Brunn, Austria, and embarked 
for America on leaving this work. His first em- 
ployment in America was with a (German chem- 
ical manufacturer in Cincinnati. He left there 
in March 1849, in company with fifty young 
men to seek his fortune in the gold fields of 
California, which place he reached, after many 
hardships and disappointments, on the 10th of 
August. Leaving there in September 1850, he 
reached Cincinnati about the close of the year, 
after a trip via Panama and New Orleans. His 
intentions were to settle on a farm in Clark 
County, Indiana, but the hardships which he 
had endured in South America and the west of 
the United States had left him in such physical 



condition, never having been very strong, that 
he was forced to give up this work, and after 
a much needed rest, he embarked in the drug 
business in Louisville, Ky., in 1852. Here he 
remained until about the end of the year 1856, 
when he was advised by his physicians to go 
south. Going first to Louisiana, thence to Vera 
Cruz from which place he was forced to leave 
on account of a political revolution, he landed 
in Mobile in the autumn of 1857, where he es- 
tablished himself in the drug business, in which 
profession he continued until March, 1900. He 
was employed by the Confederate government 
during the War of Secession to manufacture 
drugs from native resources. His first compre- 
hensive work on Alabama material was his 
"Study of the mosses of Alabama" and the 
"Ferns of south Alabama," both begun in 1860, 
the results of the former being contributed to 
"Mosses of North America," 1884, and those of 
the latter to Prof. Eaton for his "Ferns of 
North America." He began an examination of 
the gold resources of the metamorphio region 
in 1876, and during the Journeys made for this 
purpose, had an opportunity to study the flora 
of the State. The results of these observa- 
tions were published in Berney's "Handbook 
of Alabama," 1878. The collection of minerals 
of economic importance brought together on 
these excursions was the basis of a report on 
the "Economic geology of Alabama," 1887. The 
collection finally went to the department of 
agriculture in Washington. A treatise on the 
"Grasses and forage plants of Alabama," was 
prepared for the department of agriculture in 
1878-1879. In 1880, in connection with the State 
geological survey, he began the arrangement of 
an herbarium of Alabama plants, from the col- 
lections made by Dr. Eugene A. Smith, and 
himself. "Preliminary list of the plants grow- 
ing without culture in Alabama," was prepared 
by him and published by the Survey in 1880. 
The natural sequel to this work was his great 
volume, "Plant life of Alabama," which occu- 
pied most of his time till his death, and which 
was published less than two weeks thereafter. 
He did much work for the U. S. department of 
agriculture in the installation and arrangement 
of agricultural, geological and forestry collec- 
tions at the several expositions held in the 
Southern States between 1875 and 1900. He had 
charge of the State of Alabama's exhibit at the 
New Orleans exposition in 1884, and later car- 
ried it to Louisville, Ky. The catalogue, pub- 
lished under the title, "Natural resources of 
Alabama," was said by Prof. Lamson-Scribner 
to be "one of the f^w papers of its kind which 
possesses real scientific merit." He did much 
work for the Louisville and Nashville railroad 
in making collections of agricultural, forestry 
and mineral resources and of soils, climate and 
such of the territory traversed by this system. 
Much time after 1892, when he relinquished the 
active management of his drug business to his 
son, was spent in arranging the herbarium of 
Alabama plants at the University. In recogni- 
tion of this, the collection is known as the 
Mohr Herbarium. His work on the pines, 
the C3npress, the Juniper and the red cedar was 
done during these last years. He explored the 
forests of the Gulf States, for the report of the 



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lOth census, 1880, on forests of North America. 
In March, 1900, he removed to Asheville, N. C^ 
and spent the active time of the last two years 
of his life in the Biltmore Herbarium, his last 
illness coming on suddenly after a day spent 
at work here. He received the honorary de- 
gree of Ph. D.from the University of Alabama 
in 1890. He was chosen botanist of the Ala- 
bama geological survey in 1884; agent of the 
forestry division of the U. S. department of 
agriculture, 1889. He was a corresponding 
member of the Philadelphia academy of sci- 
ences; the Torrey botanical club of New York; 
the Massachusetts horticultural society; the 
Philadelphia college of pharmacy; the Alabama 
pharmaceutical association; the American 
pharmaceutical association; honorary member 
of pharmaceutical associations of Louisiana, 
Pennsylvania, Missouri and Ohio; a member of 
the committee on revision of the U. S. Pharma- 
copoeia of 1890; a fellow of the American 
association for the advancement of sciences, 
and a non-resident member of the Washington 
academy of sciences and the Society of Ameri- 
can foresters. Married: March, 1852, at Louis- 
ville, Ky., to Sophia Roemer. Last residence: 
Asheville, N. C. 

MOHR, DR. H. B., former chief clerk. State 
health department 

MOLTON, THOMAS HUNTER, business man, 
was bom November 16, 1863, in Montgomery 
County; son of Charles Hooks and Julia (Hun- 
ter) Molton, both natives of Duplin County, N. 
C, the former who was a member of the legis- 
lature of 1867; grandson of Thomas and Cath- 
erine (Hooks) Molton, and of John and Eliza- 
beth (Whitfield) Hunter, both families owners 
of plantations near Kenansville, Duplin County, 
N. C, until their removal to Alabama, the first 
about 1826, coming to what was afterwards 
Montgomery County, the latter about 1826 to 
Greene County; great-grandson of MaJ. Abra- 
ham Molton, of Duplin County, N. C, who rep- 
resMited his county in the house of commons 
for many years during Colonial times, and 
served as a major in the Revolutionary Army, 
and of Charles Hooks, who was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War, was a member of congress 
from Duplin County district and a brother of 
Mary Slocomb, one of the famous women of the 
Revolution, and of John and Jemima (Hay- 
wood) Whitfield, the latter who was a sister 
of John Haywood, who held the office of state 
treasurer of North Carolina for about forty 
years. The early ancestors of Mr. Molton came 
from England during the seventeenth century, 
settling in North Carolina and Virginia. 
Thomas H. Molton received his primary edu- 
cation in the city schools of Montgomery and 
later studied under Dr. Henry Tutwiler of 
Green Springs. He engaged in farming for a 
number of years; in 1886 located in Birming- 
ham; engaged in the real estate and insurance 
businees;' was at one time a member of the 
Jefferson County sanitary commission; and in 
the session of 1911 was one of the representa- 
tives from Jefferson County. He is a Demo- 
crat; a Methodist; a Knight of Pythias; and 
a Knight of Honor. Married: November 6, 
1888, in Birmingham, to Liszie, daughter 



of Charles and Eliza (Summerlin) Linn, the 
former who was a native of Abo, Finland, ar- 
rived in the United States June 16, 1833, set- 
tled in Montgomery in 1838, and removed to 
Birmingham in 1872; and granddaughter of 
Thomas Summerlin of Montgomery, who later 
removed to Louisiana. Children: 1. Ellen 
Linn; 2. Gertrude; 3. Thomas Hunter, Jr. Res- 
idence: Birmingham. 

MOND, DUNCAN, soldier of the American 
Revolution, private, particular service not dis- 
closed; annual allowance, $48; records do not 
show any payments made.— Pension Book, 
State Branch Bank, Mobile. 

MONIAC, DAVID, cotton planter, major, U. 
S. Army, was bom in 1802, in Alabama, and 
was killed at Wahoo Swamp, November 21, 
1836; son of Sam and Elizabeth (Weatherford) 
Monlac, the former who was the Red Eagle 
of the Creek Indians, the latter the sister of 
William Weatherford, the warrior, and half 
sister of David Tate; grandson of William and 
Polly (Colbert) Moniac, the former a native of 
Holland, the latter a Tuskegee woman, and of 
Charles and Sehoy (McGilllvray) Weatherford. 
the latter a sister of Alexander McGilllvray. 
He was appointed to West Point from Alabama, 
and was educated and prepared for the acad- 
emy by John McLeod, an Irish scholar who had 
a military school in Washington, D. C. He was 
a cadet at West Point from September 18, 1817. 
to July 1, 1822, when he was graduated and 
promoted to brevet second lieutenant, Sixth in- 
fantry, U. S. Army. He resigned from the army 
December 31, 1822, and engaged as a cotton 
planter in Baldwin County, 1822-1836. He was 
appointed captain of Creek mounted volunteers, 
August 17, 1836, for service in the Florida War, 
and was promoted to major, November 16, 3836. 
He was engaged against the Seminole Indians 
in the battle of Wahoo Swamp, November 31, 
1836, and while crossing a difficult morass in 
face of the fire of the enemy posted on the 
opposite bank, he was killed. Married: to 
Mary Powell, a cousin of Oceola, whose real 
name was Powell. Children: 1. David A., who 
served two terms as sheriff of Baldwin County; 
2. a daughter. Last residence: Baldwin County. 

MONK, WILLIAM FRANCIS, teacher, was 
bom November 21, 1869, in Dale County; son of 
Marion and Martha Emma (Stuckey) Monk, the 
former a native of Henry County, who lived on 
a farm near Sklpperville, and served in Co. 
A, Thirty-seventh Alabama regiment, C. S. 
Army; grandson of Allen and Evelin Monk, 
who lived near Sklpperville, after coming from 
South Carolina to Alabama, and of Enos and 
Elizabeth Stuckey, who lived near Clopton. 
His paternal ancestors were descendants of 
CJen. Monk, who came to America with Ogle- 
thorpe when he settled near Savannah, Ga. He 
received his early education in the country 
schools, in Ozark and in Abbeville; was grad- 
uated from the Normal college at Troy, B. S., 
1894; and M. S.. 1898; and attended the summer 
school at the University of Chicago, 1904. He 
began teaching in the country schools when he 
was twenty-one years old, and taught in coun- 
try and village schools until 1901. He served 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



as superintendent of Phoenix City schools, 
1901*1902; as superintendent of schools at 6i- 
rard, 1902-1904; at Richland, Ga., 1904-1905; at 
Marshallville, 6a., 1905-1906; and ih 1906 be- 
came president of the First District agricul- 
tural school at Jackson. In 1900, he was 
enumerator of census in Beat six. Dale County. 
He is a Democrat; is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopalian church, South, and has 
served the church as chairman of the board of 
stewards and as delegate to district conferences; 
is a Mason; an Odd Fellow; and a Wood- 
man of the World. Married: June 80, 1895, 
near Clopton, to Minnie Bliza, daughter of 
Harmon and Phoebe Jane Strickland, who lived 
at that place, after coming to Alabama from 
Cumberland County, N. C. Children: 1. Min- 
nie Eunice. Residence: JaQjLSon. 

MONROE, WILLIAM O., publisher and editor, 
was bom in 1835 at Athens, Georgia; son of 
John and Emily (Paschal) Monroe, the former 
a South Carolinian and the latter a daughter 
of John Paschal of Georgia. In 1843 he moved 
to Alabama with his pare^te, who settled at 
Hinton's Grove, Greene County. In all he spent 
five years in school. In 1846 he entered the 
office of "The Eutaw Whig" as an apprentice, 
and remained there for five years. In 1859, 
when twenty-four years of age, he purchased a 
half interest in "The Whig" and in 1861, pur- 
chased "The Observer," consolidating them dur- 
ing the same year, under the name of the 
"Eutaw Whig and Observer." He served in the 
War of Secession a short time as lieutenant of 
cavalry in Clanton's brigade, but owing to ill 
health was forced to resign his command. He 
continued in copartnership with Anderson in 
publishing "The Whig and Observer" during 
the war, after which he became sole proprietor, 
a position which he has since maintained. He 
is a church member and a Royal Arch Mason. 
Married: in 1866, to Jane, daughter of 
Rev. John Du Bois of Greensboro, who was 
for fifty years a minister of the gospel, and 
inventor of the Du Bois cotton-gin. Children: 
1. Jane; 2. Louise. Residence: Hinton's Grove. 

MONTAGUE, ANDREW PHILIP, educator, 
was born September 27, 1854, at Fountain Run, 
Essex County, Va.; son of Howard Williams 
and Mildred Columbia (Broeddus) Montague, 
the former a native of Middlesex County, Va., 
and a Baptist minister for over forty years, 
the latter a Georgian, granddaughter of Dr. E. 

B. Teague for many years a distinguished Bap- 
tist minister of Alabama; grandson of Philip 
and Elizabeth Montague, residents of Essex 
County, Va., and of Rev. Andrew Broaddus and 
a Miss Honeyman, residents of Caroline County, 
Va. His early education was received in the 
public schools of Essex County and in Aber- 
deen academy, Va. In 1875 he was a partial 
graduate of University of Virginia, and 
was graduated from Columbian university, now 
George Washington university, Washington, D. 

C. receiving the degree of A. M., in 1879 and 
Ph. D., in 1888; in 1896, he received the degree 
of LL. D. from Richmond college, Richmond, 
Va. He taught at Columbian univereity, Wash- 
ington, D. C; was professor of Latin there 



from 1882-97; principal of the academy, 1884-98; 
dean, 1895-97. From 1897-1902, he was presi- 
dent of the Furman university at South Caro- 
lina; from 1902-12 was president of Howard 
college at Birmingham, and was president of 
Columbia college, Fla., for several years. For 
nine and one-half years Mr. Montague has trav- 
elled, making public addresses in the interest of 
education and religion. He is a Democrat; a 
.deacon in the Baptist church and a licensed 
minister. He is a Master Mason. Mr. Mon- 
tague edited the "Selected Letters of Cicero" in 
1890, and the "Selected Letters of Pliny" in 
1893. Married: (1) November 3, 1881, to 
Blay, daughter of Judge Joseph and Au- 
gusta (Healy) Christian of Richmond, Va.; (2) 
May 8, 1907, to Florence, daughter of H. 
F. and Blanche (Teague) Wood of Birming- 
ham. Children, by first marriage: 1. Maude 
Augusta; 2. Howard Christian. Residtoce: 
Lake City, Fla. 

MONTGOMERY, HUBERT HATNBS, State 
superintendent of banks, was bom September 
11, 1884, at Jacksonville, Calhoun County; son 
of Henry F. and Mary E. (Linder) Montgom- 
ery, the former a native of Fulton County, Giu, 
who removed early to Jacksonville, and later 
to Anniston, for one term tax collector of Cal- 
houn County, and United States commissioner, 
served in C. S. Army during the last year of 
the War of Secession; grandson of James Floyd 
and Elizabeth A. (Toung) Montgomery, of Ful- 
ton County, Ga., the former a captain in the 
Indian War of 1836, and of Dr. P. P. and Willie 
(Draper) Linder, of Calhoun County; great- 
great-grandson of James Montgomery, who 
came, in 1740, from northern Ireland to Wax- 
How, S. C. Mr. Montgomery was educated in 
the schools of his native county, and at the 
State normal school, Jacksonville. Since 1901 
he has been engaged in the banking business, 
first with the Tredegar national bank, after- 
wards with the First national bank, of Jack- 
sonville. While cashier of the Traders national 
bank, of Birmingham, he was appointed State 
superintendent of banks. During 1917-18 he 
was mayor of Jacksonville. He is a Democrat; 
a Presbyterian; and a Mason. Married: De- 
cember 18, 1907, at Anniston, to Bunnie, daugh- 
ter of William A. and Edna (Evans) Darden, 
of that place. Children: 1. Mary Edna; 2. 
Emily Darden. Residence: Montgomery. 

MONTGOMERY, MRS. JAMES, patriotic 
worker, was born at Oakley, a suburb of Mont- 
gomery; daughter of Samuel Watkins (3oode 
and wife. Miss Douglass, the former a native 
of Washington County, Ga., and who removed 
to Oakley in 1830, the latter a native of Middle- 
bury, Vt. She was one of the most prominent 
early workers of the Ladies' Confederate Me- 
morial association. Last residence: Mont- 
gomery. 

MOODY, ANDERSON EDWARD, was bom 
March 30, 1827, in Chesterfield County, Va., and 
died December 11, 1874, at Linden; son of Car- 
ter and Sarah (Pankey) Moody, natives respec- 
tively of Essex and (Chesterfield Counties, Va.; 
grandson of Lewis Moody and wife, a Miss 



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JAMES H. BALLENTINE 



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DICTIONARY OP ALABAMA BIOGRAPHY 



1219 



Gatewood, and of Stephen Pankey, all of Ches- 
terfield County. The Moody family is of Bnglish 
origin. The Pankeys are of French ancestry* 
CoL David, father of Stephen Pankey, being a 
soldier of the American Revolution, his serv- 
ices of such merit that the government granted 
him several thousand acres of land in Chester- 
field County. He received his preparatory edu- 
cation in his native county, his college educa- 
tion in Richmond, and his legal training in 
Philadelphia. He entered upon the practice 
of his profession at the age of twenty-four and 
located in Marengo County. He wae a mag- 
istrate of that county for several years. Ow- 
ing to his frail health, he could not take the 
field during the War of Secession, but in the 
fall of 1862 was commissioned by Gov. Moore, 
colonel of the home guards of Marengo County. 
Later in life, he removed to Mobile and en- 
gaged in merchandising, and also the cotton 
brokerage business, the firm being Smith and 
Moody. He was a Democrat; Methodist; and 
Maeon. Married: May 16, 1853, in Essex 
County, Va., to Willie Ann, daughter of James 
and Mary (Allen) Owen of that place, the for- 
mer a planter and slave owner. The grand- 
father Allen was an English peer and married 
Bille. Latane, a French Huguenot The pater- 
nal grandmother was a Miss Montague, near 
relative of Gov. Montague of Virginia. Chil- 
dren: 1. Willie Owen, m. James W. Stubbe, 
Norfolk, Va. Last residence: Linden. 

MOODT, FRANK SIMS, lawyer, banker and 
State senator, was born on October 29, 1849, at 
Tuscaloosa, and died there February 21, 1920; 
the only son of Washington and Jane Hamilton 
(Sims) Moody (q. v.). Senator Moody at- 
tended the private schools of Tuscaloosa. Dur- 
ing the latter part of the war the University of 
Alabama was both a literary and military insti- 
tution, and while he was enrolled as a cadet 
by special permission he attended lectures at 
the University without being a matriculate, and 
he was thus engaged when the buildings of 
that institution were destroyed by Federal 
troops, in 1865. In 1867 he entered Washing- 
ton college, which later became Washington 
and Lee university, where he graduated A. B., 
1870, and was the recipient, at the commence- 
ment of that year, of one of the Robinson prize 
medals at the hands of Gen. Lee. In 1871 he 
became the cashier of the First national bank 
of Tuscaloosa, the bank having been founded 
during that year; in 1874 took the degree of 
B. L. in the first class to graduate from the 
law department of the University of Alabama; 
began the practice of law in 1875; served as 
solicitor of Tuscaloosa County and on the death 
of his father, in 1879, was made president of 
the First national bank of Tuscaloosa, a posi- 
tion he continued to hold until his death. For 
twenty-five years he was engaged in farming. 
To fill a vacancy he was elected to the State 
senate in 1894 and was elected to the same 
position in 1896, in 1906 and 1910. He wa« a 
Democrat and was chairman of the Democratic 
executive committee of the sixth congressional 
district from 189