(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History and Directory of Kent County, Michigan, Containing a History of Each Township, and the ..."

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



7ff7¥7i. 



i.- 






yGoosle 



yGoosle 



yGoosle 



EIBTORT AHB BlIlWrrORT OF XVST OOoHTI. 




/Goosle 




COLE & BRO., 

The oldest and most reliable 

BOOT &, SHOE HOUSE 

Uie Best of Cnstom-Made Work constantly on hand. 

No. 20 Canal St., 
GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAW. 

L A. MERRILL'S 

Gem Picture Gallery, 

Me. m &mmal Mi., 

•Juat Stwth of Lyon Street. Call and let flie Pietureg do the puffing. 

' GET THE BEST 

%t%mm WBiMm mm. 

H. LEONAED & SON, Agents, 

No. 13 Monroe Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - - UICHIOAN. 

«•« A.dvertlaement on FaB« ISl. 

Hosted by njOOQIC 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY 



MICHIGAN, 



iijtorg ol rach louinsliip, and (!« litg of Irantl Mnpls, ; 

The Name, Location and Postoffice Address of all 

Residents outside of the City ; a List of 

Postoffices in the County ; a 

Schedule of Population; 

AlfD OTHER VALUABLE 8TATISTICB. 



COMPILED AJ^D PUBLISHED BY 

QILLENBACK & LEAVITT, 

CouNTT, History, Directory and Wap Publishers, 



yGoosle 



r ' Hosted by GoOQIc 



INTRODUCTION. 



Tlie publishers of thia work take pleasure in presenting to the citizens of 
Kent County a boolt that supplies a longfclt need experienced by biiaitioss men, 
and which unites with its utility an amount of truly interesting historical mat- 
ter. At the same time, they pride themselves upon its ociginality of design and 
tasty execution — not being altogether blind, however, to its defects. Doubtless 
errors will be found, which, to some may seem almost inexcusable; but where 
they occur the public may rest assured that they are not the result of earelees- 
nesa on the part of the publishers. It can be safely said that no book of the 
kind was ever published which was free of errors. In collating the historical 
matter great care was taken to draw the information from the moat reliable sour- 
ces. As you glance through the history of your township or city, or any town- 
ship with whose history you claim to be acquainted, do not hastily pro- 
nounce statements errors until you are confident that you are corrtct and the 
historian wrong ; hut remember that some one equally as well informed as you, 
in regfvrd to the general tacts, has stated otherwise. In a number of instances, 
the histories of particular townships have been wijtten by residents, who have 
taken great pains to collect fact) into the form in which they appear. To this 
diversity of authorship may bo attributed the repetitions which occur in some of 
the sketches ; similar thoughts in regard to the sufferings and privations of the 
pioneers being in the minds of all. 

The publishers are well aware that a work of this kind, relating, as it does, 
facts with which purchasers are themselves acqaainted, will meet with more or 
less criticism. Knowing this, thej have left no stone unturned which would 
assist in making the book wljat the prospectus represented it would be. Besides 
using every precaution to aroid errors in the matter promised, they have even 
added to its appearance and utility a very pretty map of the State, which wa« 
engraved expressly for this work. 

The book purports to contain the name of every man la the countv (of twenty- 
one yeara of age and upwards) outside of Grand Rapids city, and of every widow 



yGoosle 



8 HitrroBT UTS dibectobt or zwr covmt. 

owning real estate. The caavaaBerg wer6 instructed to call at ever; hoase, tuid 
to be as thorough as a census taker. 

The natnea were copied, compared, and arranged in every instance before they 
were placed in the hands of the printer; and where a question arose in the mind 
as to the correct same, or mode of spelling, it was referred to the canvasser. 

KumerouB advertisements have been inserted, but in no instance in a man- 
ner that can be made just cause ot complaint. The history is complete in itself, 
and ont; here and there have advertisements been plaeed in the directory mat- 
ter, and even then uniformly on the right hand page. Further, the advertiae- 
nents are from the best business firms in the county, and if carefully noted, will 
prove of great value to purchasers. 

It has been customary to prepare Directories of cities exclusively, while tLero 
has been even greater need of Directories of counties and farming territory. The 
publishers intend to make this the first of a series ot like publications, in this and 
other States, and, while they hope to increase their facilities for preparing even 
better books than the present, they trust this will not only meet the present de- 
mand in this locality, but be preserved us a book containing an account of the 
suflerlngs, trials, and achievements of the pioneers of Kent county. 

The generous patronage and cordial co-operation of all classes of the com- 
munity have fully Justified the publishers^ reliance on their intelligence and public 
spirit; and tliey are under obligations, in every town, to the township officers 
and old residents for historical and statistical ioformation, always cheerfully 
furnished. 

GoAiTD Rafipb, Micb., Ifor. SI, 18T0. 



yGoosle 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



Aikin N. J., physician ISO 

Albert & Krupp, groceriea, etc £37 

AUjn C. B., drj goods, etc 245 

Antiadel A. R., proprietor Eagle Hotel 180 

Antiadel & Hawk, proprietors liathbun Houae 211 

Antrim Mrs. E., milliner 109 

Ajers A. 0., general store, (Casnovia) ■, 177 

Balis. B., livery between 13U and 137 

Bank, City National 133 

Bank, First National 253 

Barker Mrs. S, A,, proprietress National Hotel 173 

Barker Wm. P., dentist : U5 

Barr & Liesveld, marble works 267 

Bexkey Brotliers ± Qaj, manufactarera of famitnre luside of first cover. 

Birge & Somers, groceries 220 

Biaaooette Cbas. A., manufacturer wagons 233 

Bole John, job printer 181 

Borden A. D. & Co., contractors, etc 213 

Bndington C. O., Justice of Iho PeaoB 309 

Burcliard C, clothing 103 

Butterworth & Lowe, iron works 149 

Button K., dentist 175 

ChildsF. L., books and engravings 318 

Cody D. D., grooeries. between 136 and 137 

Cole & Bro., boots and shoes i 

Comstock C. C, manufacturer lumber, etc 149 

CoDgdon W. H., quick lime 377 

CorWm. A Co., Valley City Pile Works 811 

Crosby & Son, insurance and real estate agents 139 

Cross Mrs. Alma, oculist between 136 and 137 

CnmmingsE. H., physician 309 

Currier & Putnam, booksellers and stationers 145 

Deniaon W. C, agricultural implements 157-187 

Deane Q. S. £ Son, agricultural implements SIS 

Dewey H, E., inaurance agent. 179 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



10 HISTOUT jUTD DIBIOXOKT 01 KBITT COVKTT. 

DeVinney A. F., engraver 261 

Dikoman £. B., jeweler 185 

Earla J, E. &W. S., furnishing goods 385 

Eaton & Lyon, bookaellerB and stationers 1C9 

Eaton E. G., jeweler 337 

Emmer Joseph, manufacturer of buggies, &c 38S 

Emmer Joseph, Jr., painting 309 

Escott B. B., druggist 185 

FsrwellJ. H., undertaker 189 

Fiebig & Rathman, manufacturers of carriages 353 

Fiuckler Joseph, groceries SIS 

Fitch Geo. C, maaufacturef of carriages 169 

Fos John 1S7 

Foi P. v., &.F. N., genaral insurano* agents 307 

Fretts G. L., sewing machines 351 

Giles John, groceries (Lowell) 16 

Grady & Smith, carpenters 277 

Hall L. A., conleotionary S45 

Hall Fran cillo, housebuikler 213 

Harrison Wm., manufacturer of lumber wagons 148 

Hatch & Seymour, fine art emporium between 136 and 137 

Heath Fred, photographer ^ 259 

Berliner J. C, jeweler ". 227 

Hcrnnnii Louis, manufacturer of baslcets and chairs 203 

Holdeii, Bates & Co., insurance agents 231 

Holmes E. S., dentist 269 

HnpkiusD. S., architect 338 

HortonO. W., photographer betwion 136 and 18J 

Huuseman & May, clothing .^. ? 

Hovey Wm.. superintendent and agent of Qr. R. Plaster Co 15( 

Humphrey R. J., dentist 20'. 

Hunt & Hoyt, physicians and surgeons between 136 and 18' 

Husled N. P., proprietor Gr. River Nurseries (Lowell) 37' 

Inucs Wm. P., insurance and real estate agent 20: 

iTesC. L., iivery i 26 

Johnson W. B., furniture, Lowell 19 

Kendall E.M., clothing 18 

Kennedy J. M., livery 21 

KetchamS. G., confectionery 23 

Eetchum M. D., hotel between 136 and U 

Kingsbury S. O., insurance and real estate agent 15 

Kopf John & Co., manufacturer of cbaiFB, Lowell 17 

Kreokel A Schroder, clothing b; 

Kru£;er C. J., & Co., man n facta rers of harness, etc.... 1' 

Kustcrer P., groceries, &C H' 

Lankaster and Sister, miUinen 3< 

Lapham Smith, proprietor of the Americui Home !• 

, Google 



tedbyV^OOgi 



HISTOKT AKB DIKICIOKT OI EUTT OOtTinT. 11 

Latourette D. L., bftnker 175 

LeoDard H. & Son, crockery dealera 4&151 

lioettgert F., yariety etore 16 

LoDg A. B. it Sons, Inmber 3H 

LoomiB & Brown, boots and shoes 169 

Manufacturing Company, G. B 319 

McConneM, Laaey A Co., mMmfaoturais of Snow's Catarrh Eemedy 817 

McKay A Son, old books between 136 and 13T 

MoKae Miss C, cloak and diess-raaking 309 

Merrill L. A., photographer * 

Merrill R. S., portrait painter 259 

Miller E. T., attorney between 136 and 137 

Mitchell A. J., mnsio store 316 

Morgan H. A Son, inenrance and real estate between 136 and 137 

Nuegele J., proprietor Michigan Honse 311 

Nelson, Matter & Co,, manufacturers of furniture. .^ 147 

Newhorg D. L., dry goods 813 

Nichols >& Naysmitb, manufacturers of doors, sash, &c 237 

Osterle F. & Co., manufacturers of carriages, &c .■ 369 

Organ Company, Empire 171 

Owen Geo. F., sewing machines 345 

Parks S. D., jeweler 147 

Patterson James, Valley City Faint Shop 311 

Feck H. B., manufacturer of Catarrh Specific 16 

Ferry Bros,, hats, caps, Ac 153 

Plank James, bee-keeper. Section 8 Cannon 181 

Potter Charles J., attorney 311 

Powers W. H. A E. E., mannfaotoaeiB of doora, cash, etc 36i 

Putnam Alfred, Justice of the Peace betwsen 136 and 137 

Putnam Bros., A Co., eonfeotioners 229 

QuintuB J., insurance agent 181 

Kamsey J. M. and H. C between 136 and 137 

Keid A Smith, trail paper, Ao ". 178 

Kidell A Co., painters 263 

Eingelberg H., groceries, Ac 197 

Bindge L. J. A Co., boots A shoes 161 

Bitter E. P., boot and shoemaker. between 136 and 137 

Bobinaon, Chapin A Co,, grocers (lowell) 177 

Robinson, Solomon A Co., mannfactarera of lumber, &b 276 

Bcae A. J., groceries 236 

Kose C. H., dentist on map. 

RuBche John A., shoemaker. 318 

Schenckelberg C, groceries 219 

SoheuSer F. A Son., hardware 377 

Seeley J. M. A Co., perfomeni (Detroit; 167 

Seymour A Waite, general store, mill creek, Esnt county and Paris, MeooataCo.... 188 

Shickell Peter C, groceries, £o 189 

Shinknuin A Janks, insorance ^euts. 807 

i-,ted by 



Google 



12 HISTORY AND DIKBITIORT OI KBHT OOUHTT, 

Simonds J. C, mannfactnrer of ateam engine* !6» 

SinolaiiBroa., 4 Co., insurance and real asUte »gonii 2t3 

Stinner A Ward, insutfince and wac-olwin agenU 139 

8onle Gleo. H., groceries ■ 267 

Southwick 5^ Wrigbt, crockery, Ac M5 

Smith, Mosely&Co., boots andehoes 161 

Smiths. 0., groceries 221 

Spring & Avery, dry goods 319 

Gqmer Milon L., grooeriea, Ac., (CasnoTia) 167 

Stang George, foandry 313 

Steketee 4 Kimin, druggists ■ 318 

Slepbennoit H. C, physician (Lowell) SOT 

Stnart Geo. M., draggist 289 

Sweneberg i Eobbinn, proprietora ot Coromercial College 141 

Thomss Edgar M., roanufaoturer of bed bottoms 147 

ThmnWm,, druggist 261 

Tooher John E., groceries 227 

Tomtjkins J. H., photographer 309 

Topping R. H,, general store, fCasnovia) 183 

Tuoket & Eogerj, iardirare, &o 173 

Tyier, Graham i Co., Yankee notions 197 

VanHouten & Co., painters, ifaj ! between 136 and 137 

Voorheis A Co., gruCEi'ies between 136 and 137 

Toigt & Herpolsheiuier, dry goods, etc between 136 and 137 

WidoB John, merchant tailor 317 

Wilkins W. L. & Co., dry goods 16T 

Williama U. B., groceries, &o 187 

Withey L. H. & Co., jnamifacturers of lumber, &o 211 

Wood Artbnr, manufacturer of bnggies, eto 169 

Woodruff E., physician 161 

Wjlies, photographer 187 



yGoosle 



GENERAL INDEX. 

Ada Historj of, - - 80 

Algoma History oi, - - 33 

Alpine History of, - 29 

Bowne Historj of, ----- 38 

BuainesB Directory ■..,-, 305 

Byron, History ot; 36 

Caledonia, History of ---,------- 40 

Cannon, History of - ■ 43 

Oiiscftde, History of ----- - 46 

County officers, list of, 15 

Courtland, History of - - - 58 

Directory of Kent County, -..--..-- 137 
Onioes, History of ----------- 65 

Grand Rapids Township, History of, S8 

Grand Eapids city, History of - - - - 114 

Grattan, History of _ - . 50 

Kent County, Sketch of 19 

Lowell, History of, ._--...__, 64 

Map of Michigan, - - - between 16 and 17 

Nelson, History of, - - - 71 

Oakfield, History of 73 

Paris, History of 78 

Plainfield, History of 83 

Population, Table of 17 

Postoffices, List of ----------- 18 

Bolon, History of-. 86 

Sparta, History of 90 

Spencer, History of 94 

State officers, List of 14 

Tyrone, History of 90 

Vergennes, History of----- 99 

"Walker, History of 102 

Wyoming, History of 107 

/ 



yGooQle 



STATE OFFICERS. 



(JoTOmcr HENRY P. BALDWIN. 

LienteDBnt QovenioT MORGAN BATES. 

Beoretaty of State DANIEL STRIKER. 

Btftte Traasuter '. VICTORY P. COLLIER. 

Auditor Gfioeral WILLIAM HUMPHREY. 

Commiasioner of Land Office CHAS. A. EDMONDS. 

SnperiQteQdent of PubUc Inatructioii ORAMEL HOSFOBD. 

Attorney General DWIGHT MAY. 

Member of Board of Education WITTER J. BAXTER, 



yGoosle 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

State Senator BYHON D. BALL. 

Eepreaentative l8t DiBtriet JULIUS HOUSEMAN. 

RepwBentatiTe 2d Diatriot SAMUEL M. GARFIELD. 

Representatiye M District ASA P. FERRY. 

RepreaeutativB 4th District NICHOLAS R. HILL. 

Sheriff JESSE F. WYOEOFF. 

Clerk DANIEL McNADQHTON. 

Tteasorer GEORGE YOUNG, Jb. 

Register WILLIAM O. BECKWITH. 

Proaecuting Attoniey ANDREW J. REEVES. 

Dircnit Court Commissionera OMAR H. SIMONDS, JAMES B. WILSON. 

Coroners JOHN BRADY, CHARLES G. HYDE. 

Surtejor ROBERT S. JACKSON. 



yGoosle 



HIBTOBT AND DIRBCTORT OF KBNT COUNTY. 



Variety Store, 

16 CANAL STREET, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

flNCYGDO]IS,WOBnEllTOYS 



Baskets, Childrens" Wagons, Carts and Sleighs. 



Hoop Sk irts & Corsets made to Order. 

JOHN GILES, 
Grocer, 

Lowell, - - Michigan. 

7-44. BE WABD GIV EN. 7-44 

All who have got that terrible Disease, CATARRH, will get a REWARD bj 
procuring a bottle of 

X>3E«.. 3E3C. 33. 3E»3EC3EX.''S 

CATAHHH SPECIFIC, 

Ab it WM never known to fail in any genuine case 6f Catarrh, and givee relief the 
first dose, causing no prostrating effect on the Bjatem. Sold by Druggists. 

7-44 XjO'WiEIXjXi, IkAIOEC. V-44- 

_iooQle 



C, 3E3E . 3E1. O Si 3S 



STATE<>f Michigan 




Special attention given to the preservation of the Mtturat Teeth. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

CYRANO BAPXBS. 



yGooQle 



yGoosle 



HIBTORT AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Population of Kent bounty. 



T REPRESEBTATIVK D 



City of Grand Kapids, lat Ward. . 



. 3,781 
. 1,557 



SECOND REPRESENT iTITB 




Wjomiag Towns! lip 
Paris 
Cascade 
Lowell 
" 1 
Bowne 
Caledonia 
Gaines 



FOURTH REPREBBNTATIVB 

Grattan ■' 1,137 

Oakfield " 1,078 

Courtland ■' 947 

Rockford Village f ' ""^ 

Sparta Township 939 

Tyrone '■ 173 

Solon " 893 

Nelson " 4G3 

Spencer " 



Total 

*City and Township. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



^ost-oMces in JCent €ounty. 



NAUE. 
Ada, 

Alaska, 

Alpifte, 

Alto, - 

Alton, 

Austeilitz, 

Belmont, 

Bostwick Lake, 

Bowne, 

Burch'a Mills, - 

Byron Center, 

Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station, 

Cannonsburg, 

Cedar Springs, 

Cody's Mills, 

Courtland Center, 

Edgerton, 

Spencer Mills, 

Vergennea, 

EngiiBtTille, 

Failftssburg, 

Gainesville, 

Grattan Center, 

Grand Rapids, 

Grandville, 

Hammond, 

Harris Creek, 

Indian Creek, 

Kellogg ville, 

Lisbon, 

Lowell, 

Mill Creek, 

Nelson, 

North Bjron, 

Oakfield, 

Pleasant, 

Rockford, 

Sand Lake, 

Sparta Center, 

Spencer Mills, 

VergonneB, 



TOWNSHIP. 

Ada. 

Caledonia. 

Alpine. 

Bowne. 

Vergen 

Plainficld. 

Plainfield. 

Cannon. 

Bowne. 

Algoma. 

Byror 

Caledonia. 

- Caledonia. 

Cannon. 

Tyro 

- Nelson. 

Courtland. 

Algoma. 

Spencer. 
Vergenni 

Alpine. 
Verge nnes. 

- Gaines. 
Grattan. 

Grand Rapids City. 
Wyoming. 



Walker. 

- Sparta. 

Lowell. 
Plainfield. 

Nelson. 

Oakfield. 

Alpin 
Algoma. 

Nelson. 

Spencer. 
Vergennes. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY, 



COUNTY OF KENT. 

The county of Kent was organized in the year A. D. 1830. It was at that time 
very thinly populated, fifteen years only having elapsed since the first white set- 
tler placed his foot upon its soil. Eix Robinaon came in the year 1821, and re- 
mained several years almost entirely alono, trading with the Indinna. In. 1836, 
Uncle Louis Campau settleii here, and from that time forward the county has 
been steadily settling up. 

The soil of Kent, considered as a whole, is not as good as that of some of its 
neighbors; however, it possesses some of the finest and most productive farma in 
the State. Some individual townships in the county possess as much good 
land aa can be found anywhere within a limit of thirty-six square miles. But ia 
the northern part of the county especially, there is much poor land, the timber 
being chieSy pine. 

Its railroad faciUties within a few years have become quite good, and, we are 
happy to say, are still improving. Tlie Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad passes 
through the entire county, from east to west, having stations at Grand Rapids, 
Lowell and Ada. The Kalamazoo Division of the Lake Shore & Michigan South- 
ern Railroad comes in from the south, passing through the townships of Byron 
and Wyoming, and has tlie following stations r Eagle Mills, G-randville, Scudder 
and Byron Center, with a northern terminus at Grand Rapids. 

The Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad passes through the entire length of the 
county, from north to south, and has the following stations: Cedar Springs, 
Burchville, Bdgerton, Rockford, Child's Mills, Whitney, North's Mills and Grand 
Rapids, thereby opening up the northern part of the county, whence come most 
of the lumlDcr and logs in this section. This road has recently been completed 
between Fort Wayne and Grand Rapids. 

The Grand River Valley Division of the Michigan Central Railroad comes in 
from the south, and passes through the townships of Caledonia, Gaines and 
Paris, with a northern terminus at Grand Rapids. Tliis road has the following 
stations: Hammond, Pai-is and Caledonia. 

The villages in the county are all smsll with the exception of Lowell and Rock- 
ford; the former having a population of 1503, and the latter 58S. Both of these 
are thrifty, go ahead places, and are rapidly building up. 

Grand River enters the county on its east line, and meandering nortli-weateriy 
and south-westerly, touches in its course eight townships and passes ont a little 
south of a point directly opposite of the place of entrance. At the rapids, in 
the City of Grand Rapids, it furnishes an immense water power, which has been 
considerably improved. 

Tliornapple River forms a junction with tlio Grand at the village of Ada, the 
Flat River at the village of Lowell, and the Rouge River at Austcrlitz (formerly 
Plainfleld-) 

This sketch being inteniled simply as an introduction, we will leave the more 
particular history of the county to Iw treated under the head of the several 
townships. 



yGoosle 



20 HIBTOBY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

ADA. 

Ada township is eentrslly located in tLe county ; being bounded on tlie north 
by Cannon, on the east by Vergennee, on tbe south by Cascade, and on th« west 
by Grand Kapids. It was named, — it is said, — after a highly respected lady by 
the name of Ada Smith, who then resided in the township. 

UnfortuDately the records of the township are not now in existence previously 
to the year 1835, which,-^iowcTer, must have been aoon after the date of its orga- 



The township of Ada originally embraced a large tract of country, including 
several of what are now the adjacent towns. It was of Ada as it then existed, 
that Rix Robinson, Esq., was elected the first supervisor. The first entry upon 
the records, under date of 1835, is to the effect that Norman Smith was elected 
supervisor by one majority, he receiving in all thirty-two votes. 

Supposing that he had but one competitor, — as he probably had, — wo estimate 
the whole number of votes sixty-three. Just think of it 1 In an extent of terri- 
tory where there were at the last election at least one thousand votes polled, 
thirty-five years ago they could muster but dxty-thTee. Picture in your mind the 
Bights of a "town meeting" during those times. Here they come, one by one. 
from the different points of the compass, hard-working, honest men. It is a 
gala day with them. They meet perhaps for the first time in months. They go 
early and stay late. They urge their brief political campaign in their homely 
way. They enjoy as well as perform their duty, and then part for the scenes of 
stern laiior. Thus the times count themselves, each year bringing an increase in 
numbers, until fourth and fifth sub-divisions count more votes than the original 
united one. 

One of the most prominent of the early settlers was Rii Bobinson, Esq,, the 
first white man in the township, and one of the first in tLe country. For a long 
time he was engaged in the fur trade with the lodians on Grand Kiver. Alone 
he traversed the forests, and " paddled his own canoe," surrounded with savages 
by nature, — and sometimes by deed, — but he remained unmolested by them. 
The spirit of the natives had already been somewhat subdued by the influence of 
Christianity, and itinerant missionaries were then laboring among them. A tribe 
of these Indians remained on sections six and seven of the present township of 
Ada, until about the year 1860 or '01, when they sold their lands, and removed 
to Pentwater. During the latter years of their residence on these lands, they 
cultivated the soil, built respectable dwellings, had well organized schools and 
comfortable churches. They were of the Roman Catholic faith. 

Mr. Robinson, or " Uncle Rix," as he is lamiliarly called, during his sojourn 
and life among the Indians, became quite attached to them ; so much so that he 
chose one ai tlieir daughters as his partner for life, with whom he now lives. 
They have but one son, and he is well known throughout Grand River Valley as an 
energetic business man. 

The life of the pioneer is fraught with toil, and peril, and actual suffering. It 
is pleasant for us to sit by the warm fire on a chilly night, and listen while the 
grandfather tells of the " dark days," as he oace called them, in the history of 
his experience. We have often heard him repeat the story of the nights he 



yGoosle 



UISTOEY AND DIRECTORY or KENT COUNTY. 21 

spent in the woBds alone, far from anyhopse; of fording streams in winter; of 
encouoterB with wolres and other animals ; of the poor log house with ita stick 
chimney ; o( sickness and death in the family, with no attending physician, and 
BO on through the long lists. But we are not the only delighted one. What a 
change came over the countenance of the ^ed man as he recounted those scenes ! 
Ah ! yes, he was ''dreaming a dream of the olden time." All was not sorrow, 
hardship and Buffering. It may have seemed to him at the time that it was 
nearly all " rainy weatiier ; " but as he now calls up their " shadowy forma," he 
discovers that 

" Taking the year all around ' • * • 

Then we have passed through the valley of youth and middle age, and have 
ascended the hill of years, as we look hack into the valley through which we 
have come, we ehall discover many more scenes of real enjoyment tlian of dis- 
content. So it is: whatever may he his experience, wherever he may be, in 
country, town, or wilderness, with pure mind, and a laudable ambition, every 
individual has his share of the mnsic of hfe. 

The experience of the pioneers of Ada, was similar to that of other townships ; 
they worked hard, they endured much, and they enjoyed much. They lived a 
noble lite, although it was a life perhaps few of us would choose. They lived a 
noble life. I say, and did a good work. Every stroke of their pioneer axe sounded 
a note in the song of a " thousand years." 

Among the bajh-y suttlers of Ada in addition to the one we have already 
mentioned may be named Edward Robinson, who settled in 1830, Torrey Smith, 

A. H. RiggB and Edward Pettis in 1836-7, Peter McLean, R. G. Ghaffee, Heze- 
kiah Howell, E. McCorniick, P. Fingleton, Gurden Chapel, John Findlay and J. 

B. Schenck, 1840 to 1845. 
The principal 

RIVERS 
in the township are the Grand and Thornapplc, Grand River crosses the town- 
ship from the northwest to the southct^t, and is navigable for small crafts. Be- 
fore tlie completion of the Detroit and Milwaukee Railroad, steamboats passed 
up the river as far as Ionia. 
Among the 

LAKES 
" Chase's" is the only one worthy of mention. It is located on sections 
two and eleven, and contains about one hundred and sixty acres, 

THE TIMBER 
is mostly oak, 

THE LAND 
being what is usually termed " oak openings." It is rolling, particularly on 
either side of Grand River, but becomes nearer level as it recedes from the 

THE SOIL 
is rather sandy, being well adapted to fruit culture. It is well suited also to the 
production of tlie different kinds of grain. 
The citizens of Kent County appreciate the value of good educational faculties. 

^,fed by 



GooqIc 



aa HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KEKT COUNTY. 

No township can be said to be an exception to this atatement. The 

SCHOOL HOUSES 
of Ada are located and numbered as follows : School house No. 1 was erected in 
1858, at a coBt of |600, on section thirty-four. Material, wood. School house 
No. 3 18 located on section twenty, value, $800. Material, wood. School house 
No. 3 was erected in 1859. Material, wood. School house No. 4 (fractional 
Ada, Vergenues and Lowell,) was erected in 1853, at an expense of |300. Ma- 
terial, wood. School house No. 4 was erected in 18G7, at an espenae of $800 ; 
located on section twenty-three. Material, wood. School house No. was 
erected in 1854, at a cost of $450; on section twelve. Material, wood. School 
house No. 8 was erected in 1856, at an expense of $800, on section Ave. School 
house No. 13 was erected in 1867 at an expense of $1,000, located on section ten. 
Material, wood. 

ADA VILLAGE 
was laid out into lots by Dairy m pie & Dunn when the Detroit and Milwaukee 
Railroad was built, — about the year 1858 ; and although one or more additional 
plats have been made its growth seems to be quite slow. It is located on sections 
thirty-tliree and thirty-four, neat the confluence of the Thornapple and Orand 
Rivers, ten miles, via the railroad, from the city of Grand Rnpids. It pos- 
sesses a tolerably good water power, which, as yet, has bcru but slightly 
improved. Two good grist mills are situated on Thornapple River, and appear 
to be doing a good business. One of them is called the "Ada Mills." It was 
huilt in 185C, and cost about $15,000. The present proprietors are B. Bradfield 
& Sons. The other, called the " Kent County Mill of Ada," was built in 1865, 
at an expense of about $15,000. It is situated at the mouth of the Thornapple, 
River, and is owned and operated by E. Averill & Co. 

The Baptist Chorcli, which, by the way, is the only church in the village, is a 
substantially built and well furnished brick structure. The village also contains 
a good school-libuse, two hotels, three dry goods stores, one drug store, two 
grocery stores, besiiles various blacksiuith, butclier, cooper and shoemaker sho])s. 



ALSOMA. 

Algoma lies north of Plainfiold, and is bounded on the north by Solon, east by 
Courtland, and west by Sparta. 

It was first settled by Smith Lapliam, from Washtenaw county, in 1843. He 
settled on the east side of Rouge River, in the southeast part of the township, 
where he now lives in the midst of the village oi Rocktbrd, (fonnerly called 
Laphaniville.) 

He was soon followed by the Hunter Brothers and others, in this corner ; but 
none went farther north or west until 1845, when Joshua Briggs and family, 
from Yates county, New York, went on the east line of section twenty-five. 
John Davis and family, from Ingham county, went a mile fartlicr north on the 
east line of section twenty-four, and Henry Helsel and Henry Shank and fam- 
ilies, from Ohio, went up the right bank of the rivet and settled on sectioD 
twenty-one. Mr. Helsel now has a fine farm of 380 acres, mostly improved ; Mr. 

JedbyGoOQie 



IIlaTORY AND DIBBCTOKY OP KENT COUNTY. 23 

Briggs and Ills sons have nice tarma where tliey first settled ; and Mr. Davis now 
lives, on an enchanting spot, oa the bank of a roaring brook, which leaps and 
tumbles ovor a dam close to hie cabin door, two miles west of his old home. Mi. 
Shank is not now a resident of the township. 

Bcnj. Pettingill, and hia son B. N. Pettingill, who came from Ingham county, 
and settled in the southeast corner of the township in 1845, are now living on a 
good farm on section twenty-sis. The Longs and Turners who came in at ao 
early day and settled in this vicinity, have good farms, with nice farm buildings, 
orchards, &c. 

Among other pioneers in this township we would mention tlie names of Henry 
Morn n^star a 1 so John Boyer John Jacobs, Jacob Ipe and sons, John M. 
S tl Jan es S tl Js s Barnes Andrew House, Duniel Youngblood, James 
AIos! cr a 1 M a s E mo s Hull Bowers and Christy, all within the first ten 
yea s M E on v s tl c Jirat ttler on t!ie west line, north of the river. 
Mr Morn j, '*■■ * 1 ^"J s w re tl e Srst to penetrate the forest and settle on the 
now th ekly settl i bne one an I one 1 alf miles east of, and parallel with the west 
townsliip line. They were soon followed by John Dome and Daniel Youngblood. 

They were then three and one-half miles from Mr. Ilelsol, who was their 
nearest neighbor. 

This is now one of the finest farming regions of tite township. Tke farm of 
Mr. John Hull being the largest and one of the best. On the south line are some 
old, nice farm8,"among the largest ol which arc those of Messrs. Jewell and Bennett. 

Rut we must return to the 

ORGANIZATION 
of the township under the present name — Algoma — which was given in honor of 
a steamer of that name then plying on Grand River, between Grand Rapids Jind 
Grand Haven. 

Algoma was previously attached to Plainfleld. The first annual township 
meeting of Algoma was held in 1849, at which time the following were elected 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS : 

Supervisor — Smith Laph am ; Clerk — William Thornton; Treasurer— Albert L. 
Pickett ; Justices — Morgan Allen, John H. Jacobs and John Hamilton. 

Tiie township meetings have generally been held at the scliool house, one mile 
Boutli of the center, known as the Helsel school house, or more commonly as the 
"Gougeburg" school house. By a majority vote of the electors the place of 
meeting was changed in 1889, to Rockford village. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor— H. N. Stinson ; Clerk— C. B. Blakeley ; Treasurer— Richard Briggs ; 
Justices — Charles Q. Ilyde, Benj. W. Soule, William Powell, Oscar House. 
GENERAL DBaCRIPTION. 

Pine was the prevailing timber of this township, although very mucii mixed 
with beech, maple, oak, etc. 

There are some small parcels of land timbered esclusively with heech and 
maple; but they are small parcels, and few in number; and are situated prin- 
cipally in tlie west and southwest part. 

Hosted by Google 



a4 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

In the Boutlieast part, near Rouge River, oak prevails ; but there are only 
a few farma in the towiiahip which are entirely free from pine stumps. The 
northeaetern part is still almost an unbroken pine forest, with but little other 
timber. 

Ab may be inferred from the timber, there is a great variety of soil. We were 
told by one man that he could show as great a diversity of soil on twenty acres 
of his farm, as could be found in the State. There is scarcely any swampy land 
in the township. 

The south part along the river is very much broken, some of the hills being 
very steep, and nearly a hundred feet above the level of the land along the 
streams. This is chiefly a sandy or clay soil, intermixed with stone and gravel. 
In the remaining portions, those parts which are timbered with beech and 
maple are usually a fine, rich loam, and the parts which are esclusivclj timbered 
with pine are generally sandy. 

We commenced our general description by describing the timber, as that has 
oeen more valued in the past than has the soil ; but as the timber is being rapidly 
taken off, more interest is now taken in the latter. 

At first it was bought in large tracts by speculators, wlio generally hold it 
until the pme can be culled, and all of the best taken off; then it is sold out in 
smaller parcels to ac'tual settlers. At one time, J. B. Cliipman, of the State of 
Kew York, owned nearly a thousand acres of land, cliiefij timbered with pine, 
in the northeast corner of the township. In 1854, his son, Walter Chipman, a 
lawyer by profession, came to look at the land, and, becoming enamored of 
"backwoods life m Jlichigan," settled here, where he still remains, a much 
esteemed citizen. 

Some years previous to coming hither, Mr. Cliipman, being obliged, hy a de- 
cline in his health, to give up his profession, joined a regiment of soldiers just 
starting out for our Western coast, and when he was dischargi'd, remained as a 
pioneer in California. He was a member of the Convention which framed the 
Constitution of that State when it was admitted into the Union. Returning to 
New York, he spent some time with his friends, then went to Vermont, where 
he engaged in teaching for a year, and at last came here as before stated and 
became a pioneer in this township. I say pioneer, for although the south part 
had been settled eleven years, the north part was very new when he came. His 
brother J. B. Chipman, Jr., came on some years later. 

Andrew House, who was one of the first settlers of Plainfleld, as well as 
AlgoBia, owned, at one time, 700 acres of pine land, in the east part oi the town- 
John Almy, of Grand Rapids, also owned several hundred acres in the north 
and northwest. These were among the largest tracts, although there were others 
who owned parcels of considerable size. 

STREAMS, LAKES, &C. 

Rouge River is the principal stream of Algoma, It flows in on section thirty, 
from Sparta; thence southeast for a short distance; then northeast, and lastly, 
south across nearly the whole width of the township, and out, on section thirty- 

Hosted by Google 



Hiaxony and direotoey of Kent county. 25 

BIX, into Plaicfleld. It is a good sized, rather Bwift-flDwing stream, and furnisbes 
plenty of power for tlie manufacturing now done, ivith much to Bjiarc. This 
stream is quite extensively used for running pine logs to tlie various mills be- 
low, on this and Grand River, 

Cedar Creek conies from Solon, enters the northeast coruer of Algoma, flows 
southwest, to the northeast corner of section sixteen, where it unites with a 
branch called the Little Cedar, which also comes from the northeast, bat farther 
to the south. From here it flows south, and enters Rouge River on section 
twenty-two. This stream furnishes good water power in two places, which are 
used. It might be used in various other places. 

A spring creek, sometimes known as Wicked Creek, nbout five miles long, rises 
in the west part of Courtland, flows soutlicast, crossing sections thirteen and 
fourteen, and enters Rouge River on section twenty-three. This stream, though 
but a mere spring brook runs suiSciently swift to furnish power for twelve mills, 
all of which are within four miles of its month ; eight of them in this township, 
and four in Oourtland. 

A fine spring brook, two and one half miles in length, rises in the western part 
of Courtland, flows across the farm of E. II. Penfield on section twenty-five, and 
empties into Rouge River. This stream is remarkable for its nearly uniform size 
throughout the whole length, and during the whole year. This uniformity is 
caused by its being so short that it is hardly affected by heavy rains. 

In the nortliwest part of this towuship, and on the adjoiaiag sections in the 
southwest corner of Solon, and the northeast corner of Sparta, are a number o( 
small lakes, among which are the following : 

Camp Lake is a long, iiB,rrow lake, nearly one mile in length, situated in the 
west part of Algoma, on sections seven and eighteen. Its outlet is a small 
stream which flows nortliwest through sections twelve and one of Sparta, and 
enters Rouge River. 

Long Lake is nearly aa large, and lies in the southwesterly part of section 
thirty-one, in Solon. 

Round Lake is smaller, and lies on the line between Algoma and Solon. So 
also do the two Sand Lakes and Big Lake. 

On and near the line of Algoma and Sparta are the two Indian Lakes and 
Squaw Lake. The outlet of these latter lakes is a small stream, sometimes called 
Indian Creek, which flows across section one of Sparta, and enters Rouge River 
from the northeast. 

These lakes abound in small flsh, such as bass, perch, etc., and an effort is being 
made to propagate pickerel in some of them. 

Marl or Bog-lime has been found on the south side of Big Lake, on the sonth 
line of section thirty-two, of Solon, much of which has been burned and used 
for building purposes in the surrounding country. 

The land in this vicinity is rolling, and is said to be good for the production 
of fruit. 

VILLAGES, 

Roekford is a flourishing little town of over 600 inhabitants. It is situated on 
the Rouge River five miles from its mouth, and thirteen miles from Grand Rapidi, 



yGoosle 



26 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTy. 

on the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad. It is in the extrer 
comer of Algoma, on section thii'ty-six, and includes a small piece of section one 
of the townsliipof Plainfield. Tlie first settler liere was Smith Lapliam, pre- 
Tiously mentioned as the first settler of the township. He came in the year 1843, 
constructed a dam across the river, and erected tlie hnilding now used by Mess- 
more & Watkins as a shingle mill. The mill on the west side of tlie stream, 
now used hy the same firm, was erected the following year hy Hunter Brothers, 

In the year 1845 a Postoffice was established here, with S. Lapham as the first 
Postmaster. The mail being carried hy him from Phunfield, once a week, in his 
pockets, for want of a mail-bag. 

In the year 1848, White and Rathbun, of Grand Rapids, opened the firat stock 
of store goods sold here. A grist mill was erected by Chase and Judson, in 
1852, which contains three run of stone, and is now owned and operated by 
Messtuore and Wafkins. 

The Tillage was first platted in 1856, under the name of Laphamville, replatted 
in 1865, and the name changed to Rockford. It was regularly incorporated by 
an act of the Board of Supervisors, in Juno, of the year 18G6. It now contains 
fifteen stores, one livery stable, two meat markets, three shoe shops, two brick 
yards, one foundry and two or three blacksmith and wagon shops, etc. Also a 
photograph gallery, a good snpply of lawyers and doctors, and last, but not 
least, we noticed two or three good looking millinery establishments. There are 
two good frame hotels, one kept by H. N. Stinson, and the other hy Smith Lap- 
ham ; a steam stave factory, owned hy Barker and Hyde, which cuts aljout three 
million staves and one million heading per year; a sash, blind and door factory, 
run by water power, and owned by McConnell and Addison, who do a good cus- 
tom business and ship some work north ; beside the grist mill and two saw mills 
of Messmore and WatkiuB, before mentioned, and which seem to be doing a good 
business. 

The Baptist Church is a good frame building, 36xG0 feet in si/.e. It was erected 
in 1858. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church is also a frame building, 24x00 feet in size, and 
TVas erected in 1805. 

The schools are on the graded system, consisting of three departments. This 
is the original district No. 1, of Algoma, and the frame building used for the 
school, years ago, still stands in the southern part of the village, on an eleva- 
tion, near tlte river. This hjilding was abont 25x35 feet in size, and when the 
Tillage began to grow np, an addition, nearly the same size, was Duilt on the 
rear. Subsequently the wood house was taken for a primary department, and 
now, these three failing to be sufficient to accommodate the '■ rising generation," 
ft fine, large brick school house 60xG3 feet in size, is being erected at a cost of 
120,000. This building is on the original site, which has TPceived some addi- 
tions and now includes nearly a whole block. 

Burchville, situated near the centre of section one, in the northeast corner of 
Algoma, is a thriving " lumber station," on the Grand Rapids and Indiana Rail- 
road, five and one-half miles from Rockford, and about eighteen from Grand 
Bap ids. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUHTY. 27 

It was platted Id 1868, by Jolm 3. Weller, of Ann Arbor, and named in honor 
of ilia partner, Jefferson Burch, who came here and built tlie first steam saw mill 
in 1860. That mill was totally destroyed by fire in 1867, and a new one erected 
by Mr. Burcii on the same site. This mil! is now operated by M, L. Whitney 
and has a capacity for cutting 13,000 feet of lumber and 15,000 shingles per day. 
It now cuts only about half that amount for want of logs. 

In 1867, George R. Congdon & Co., erected a mill of about the same capacity, 

wliicli was destroyed by fire in June, 1870, with about flOO.OOO worth of lumber. 

It was at that time owned by Isaac Newton & Co., of Grand Rapids, who are 

now erecting a new mill on the same ground. Newtoa ifc Co, have also a small, 

portable steam mill near by, which cuts 10,000 feet of lumber per day. 

Campbell & Stanton have a portable steam shingle mill about one hundred rods 
west of the station, which cut* 15,000 shingles per day. This mill has been run- 
ning since October, 1868. 

In 1868 a school district was organized here, and a school is kept in a board 
shanty, although money has once been raised and paid for building a school 
house. Finding that they were the victims of misplaced money as well as mis- 
placed contiilencc, the people iiave voted $010, and let the job to another man, 
who is to put up a good frame house this summer, It.will be 30s3G feet in size, 
with sixteen feet posts. 

The present population is probably about two hundred, including those on 
Congdon's addition, recently platted, and which incluiles all of that part of the 
village lying south of the Little Cedar Creek. 

Edgerton is the name of a railroad station about halfway Ijctwcen Rockford 
and Burchville, and a little more than half a mite from the east line of Algoma. 
Tliis place boasts a postofflce and two groceries. Andrew House is the present 
Postmaster. This is near the well known " Porter Itollow," wliicli contains the 
stream that is noted for so many 

MILLS, 
which we now will proceed to describe : Going fteat from the station about a 
quarter of a mile, we come to the first saw mill built on this stream. It stands 
on the southwest corner of section thirteen, imd was erected in 1846 by Newton 
Andrews. It is now run ljy Charles Fox, and cuts 4,000 teet of lumber or 12,000 
shingles per day. 

Half a mile southwest of this at the nioiith of the creek, is the shingle mill of 
John S. Doty. This was built by Hiram Davis in 18(iG, and cuts 10,000 shingles 
per day. 

We will now retrace our steps and go up the creek nearly to the railroad, and 
about one quarter of a mile from the station, where we come to a grist mill and 
shingle mill, both of which are operated by David Munro. These mills were 
erected by Harvey Porter, in 1854, and are now owned by Jones and Johnson. 
These parties also own and operate a saw mill just above the railroad track, 
which was erected in 1854, by S<!th Porter. The grist mill is principally used 
for custom business, altliough tliey ship some flour and feed north. The shingle 
miU cuts 10,000 shingles per day, and the lumber mill about 10,000 feet of lum- 
ber. Up the creek three-foucths of a mile farther, is a siiingle mill, capable of 



yGoosle 



28 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KBST COUNTY, 

cutting 10,000 per day, owned and operated by Si'tli Porter. A few loAa farther 
east, near the Courtland line are the grist mill and saw mill of Coon & Scarvell. 
These mills were erected by Dennis Porter in 1863. They are small castom mills; 
the former making some flour and feed for sale. All of these mills except the 
second are on section thirteen, and that is on twenty-three. 

Two miles west of Edgerton, on the Cedar Creek, near the west line of section 
twenty-two, Jaokaoa and George Coon are erecting a grist mill, on the site of a 
saw mill which was destroyed by fire some time ago. 

One and a half miles up this creek, on the north side of section sixteen, is the 
saw mill commonly known as the Morningstar Mill. This mill was erected in 
1852, by Norman Ackley, and refitted, and mostly rebuilt, in 18GG, by Solomon 
and Caiae, who now own and operate it. Its capacity is about 7,000 feet of lum- 
ber, or 14,000 shingles per day. 

About one and one-fourth miles farther up the Big Cedar, is a large, steam 
saw mill, which was erected in December, 1868, by Amraoo Fox, who still 
owns and operates it, cutting 14,000 feet of lumber, or 15,000 shingles per day. 

There is a portable detached steam saw mill on tlie west side of section eleven, 
on the Little Cedar, erected in June, 1869, by McClure & Kidder. This mill 
cuts 10,000 feet of lumber, or 15,000 shingles per day. It will be better known 
as the " Hodag " mill. 

This name was given it, from the fact that an unknown and mysterious animal 
was heard, seen, and eren fired at, in the woods near here, some years ago, and 
as no other name could be tound for it, it was called " Hodag," and when the 
mill was built, this was the name given to it by the people of Burchville. 

Jacob Long has a small water power saw mill on the northwest-quarter of sec- 
tion five, near the northwest corner of the township. This mill was built by 
Zimrod Burnham, in 1860, and cuts about 3,000 feet of lumber per d;iy. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

District No. S (fractional with Courtlaad), organized iu 1650, and a small 
frame house erected, which was used until 1868, when the present frame building 
was erected at a cost of $500, one half mile east of Edgcrton station, on the 
township line. District No. 3 has a small, wooden frame house, erected in 1853. 
This school house is one mile south of the centre of the township, and half a 
mile north of the little collection of houses known as Gougeburg, where a dam 
was once built across Rouge River and a saw mill erected by C. C. Comstock, of 
Grand Rapids. The mill burned down, the proprietor failed, and so also did the 
village, which was springing up around the mill. District No. 4 has a small 
frame house, which was erected in 1854, on the center of section twenty-nine 
District No. 6 organized in 1853, and erected a small log house on the south side 
of section eight. In 1863 the site was changed to the north side of eight on 
account of a division of the district, and a block house erected the following 
year, which is still used. District No. 7 has a building called the " House" school 
bouse. It is a frame building, and was erected in 1863, on the south part of sec- 
tion twenty-three. District No. 8 organized in 1860, and a log house was erected 
near the north side of section aistecn, on the farm of Calvin Babcook, 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 29 

Tlie Good Templara arc erecting a frame haU 24s3G feet in size, at the center of 
Bcction twenty- Dine. Estimateil cost $300. 

ALPINE. 

Alpine is one of the wcat tier ot townships, and is bounded on tlie north by 
Sparta, on the east by Plainfield, on tlie south by Walker, and on the west by the 
township of Wright, Ottawa county. It retains its original form and size, con- 
taining thirty-six square miles. 

The first settlers were Solomon Wright and family, who came from Wayne 
county, New York, iu the year 1837, and located on the south line, near Indian 
Creci. The family consisted of the old gentleman and lady aail Ave sons, Benja- 
min, Solomon, Noadiah, Andrew and Jeremiah, only one of whom remains in the 
township, and that is Solomon. The old people are both dead, one son lost his 
life in the recent war, one in living at Lowell, and two are ia Walker. In the 
year 1840 John Coffee and Richmond Gooding eame from Ohio, penetrated the 
forest nearly five miles beyond the Wright neighborhood and settled on section 
nineteen, near the west line of the township. Por years this was considered the 
"jumping off place," aa they called it, there being no settlements north of them, 
and in fact no house in any direction nearer than three or four miles. About the 
same time Jacob Snyder — a German — settled on section thirty-five, and another 
'German by the name of John Platteeon section thirty-six, in the southeast corner 
of the township. A short time before this, Turner Hills and family came from 
Vermont, and locatcil in the east part of the township, on section thirteen, where, 
forseveral years, they were the northernmost settlers. Mr. Hills died many years 
ago, but the widow and two sons remain in the township. 

Among other pioneers who settled in various parts of the township, were Noel 
Hopkins, Ball as Schaffer, Peter Schlick, James Snowden, Sherman Pearsall, John 
B. Colton, A. B, Toms, Thompson Kasson, Joseph Ilipler, John EUis, Edward 
Wheeler, Hervey Wilder, Joseph Bullen, Moses Ramsdcll, John J. Uowner, 
Hiram Stevenson, Artemus Hilton, Henry S. Church, Charles Anderson, Francis 
Greenley, and the Boyds, Denisons, Meads, Brewers, Davenports, and Cordes, all of 
whom came before 1850; and most of them jet remain to enjoy the fruits of their 
early labors and auiforings. 

Many and varied were the privatioiis endured by these early settlers. We who 
have never been pioneers cannot fully appreciate the sufferings, the trials, and 
liardahips which were their lot. Think of a journey to Grand Kapids with an os 
team, over rough roads, with a grist for the mill ; of a return in the aight with its 
many perplexities, now and tlicn losing the indistinct road, with a consequent 
delay of an half hour; of finding trees blown across the way, preventiDg further 
progress until they have been removed by the use of the ax, and so on through 
the list. 

Again imagine tlie loneliness of a. lainily coming from a thickly settled part of 
the counti7, and making n home in tlie wilderness, with no actual neighbors; 
with no schools; with no churches; and in fact with no associations except those 
of their own fireside. Little time can be spared for social intercourse even at 

Hosted by Google 



80 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

Lome. The rouod of duties consumes each day but the Sabbath, which is to 
them indeed a day of holy rest. 

We would not wish to be understood to iutiinate that there are no enioymeuts 
connected with such a life, for downright satisfaction is always the result of 
manly toil. -Situated, aa the pioneer is, in an unbroken forest, with every stroke 
of the ax, and with eyery effort made toward improvement, he aeems to be hew- 
ing out a little world of his own. Every acre added to the cleared space adds 
more than its proportionate amount of pleasure to the soul of tlie laborer. He 
looks forward to the time when his broad acres shall be seen elothed with the 
rich yellow grain of a plenteous harvest. He walks by faith and not by sight. 
The " sweet byi; and bye " ia anticipated, and that is what incites liiui to labor 
and to endure. 

Then again much pleasure is found in the little visits which they Lire occasion- 
ally favored with. That peculiar community of feeling which is the churacteristic 
of persons in depressed circumstances, is enjoyed by pioneers, and early settlers, 
in an unusual degree. There is a mutual dependence of one upon another, felt 
by everybody; and this never fails to beget a spirit ot triendship between tb em. 
ORGANIZATION. 

Alpine was united with the township of Walker, until tlie year 1(^47. Its first 
independent township meeting was held at the School House in the southeast 
corner of the township, on tiie 5th day oi April, 1847; which, resulted in tlie 
election of the following named persons aaoSicera ; Supervisor, Edward Wheeler ; 
Clerk, C. D. Slicnich; Treasurer, Casper Cordes; Justices, Wm. 11. Withey, John 
Coffee, John Colton, and John Tusbury. The next annual meeting was held at 
the house of Edward Wheeler, near the center of the township. Soon after this a 
small log School Houae was erected on the corner of Mr. Wheeler'a farm, one-half 
mile east of the center, and was used us a place of holding township meetings 
until about the year 1860, when anice, frame, Town Hall building was erected on 
the northeast corner of section twenty-one. 

THE PRESENT OFFICiaiS 
of Alpine are Supervisor, Isaac Ilaynes; Clerk, Ilanaon Roiiers; Treasurer, 
Charles Dole; Justices, John Coffee, Wiirren Baik-y, Cliarles Waterman, and 

HoUis R. Hills. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Alpine — which is said to have derived its name from tlie supposition of many 
of the early aettlers, who were near the streams, and in the eastern part of the 
township, that it was chiefly timbered with pine— ia very different from what its 
name would indicate to a stranger. There was, originally, considerable pine 
along the larger atreams, and in the northeasterly corner of the township. At one 
time, seven saw mills were situated on Mill Creek, and were doing a briBk busi- 
ness; but now there is hardly enough pine left to sustain three. 

The source of Mill Creek is Cranberry Lake, which is situated on the liue be- 
tween Kent and Ottawa counties, extending into section six of Alpine. From 
there to Pickerel Lake on section ten Mill Creek is but a small rivulet. We 
mention thia as the main stream ; however there is anotlicr branch about the 



fed by 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COONTV. SI 

same size, which comes in from Sparta, and unites with tlie former near the north 
line of section nine. From Piclierel Lalie to its mouth it is fed by several araall 
streams, one of which comea from Downer Lake on the aontlieast quarter of sec- 
tion ten. Tlie main stream passes about one and one-half milea north of the 
center of the township, thence southeasterly until it unites with Grand River in 
the southwest corner of Plainfield, For a distance of five or six miles from its 
mouth, the water power is sufficiently good for manufacturing purposes. Along 
this stream is a series of small swamps, extending nearly the whole width of the 
township from east to west, and bordered on either side by clay blulTs, rising in 
some places to a height of sixty or seventy feet. 

North of this, and extending into Sparta, is a ridge of high, rolling, timbered 
land, wliicli is as good as can ha found in the county, for farming purposes, fruit 
growing, etc. On the south is a similar ridge, wliicli divides Mill Creek on one 
side from Indian and Sand Creeks on the other. 

One branch of Indian Creek rises near the center of the township, and the other 
in tlie western part. These branches unite in the north part of section twenty- 
eight; thence the stream flows south into Walker, crossing the south line of 
Alpine near the center. 

One branch of Sand Creek rises in the Western part of Alpine; and flows south 
into Walker, and thence west into Ottawa county. Another branch of the same 
stream lias source in a small lake covering about ten acres, situated on the line 
between sections twenty-eight and twenty-nine. 

Minnie or New Boston Lake is situated on the east line of section twelve, and 
extends east into Plainfield. The lake and surrounding swamp cover about forty 
acres. A number of yenra ago a saw mill was erected on the north side of this 
lake, and an effort was made to build up a burgh, which was cliristenod New 
Boston ; but like many other enterprises of a like nature it never went much 
beyond the paper plfit. 

THE SOIL 
of the beach and maple timbered portions of Alpine — winch comprise about two- 
tbiriia of the township— is generally clay or loam. Indeed Alpine is a townsliip 
of good land, well adapted to the production of both grain and fruit. The good 
looking orchards, and the loads of nice apples, peaches, plums, pears, etc., as well 
as the excellent yields of wheat and other grain, speak for themselves. The soil 
of the pine timbered portions is sandy, but it grows fair crops when well culti- 
vated and improved. Among the largest and best farms in tlie township, are 
those of Solomon Wright, A. Downer, Mrs. James Snowden, Judson Buck, L. N. 
Dennison, David Herrick, Richmond Gooding, and Ebci'hard Cordes, each of 
which comprises two hundred acres or more. 

MILLS AND MANUFACTURING BSTABLIHllMENTS. 

Colton's Saw Mill, built in the year 1845 by Colton and Phillips, situated on 

the south side of section thirteen, is now owned and operated by Gideon Colton. 

This mil! is capable of cutting nearly a million feet of lumber per year ; but on 

account of the scarcity of pine does a comparatively small business. 

The Saw Mill situated on the northeast corner of section twenty-five, commonly 



yGoosle 



6z HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COBNTY. 

called Withej's Mill, is manufacturing large quantities of sliingles and some lum- 
ber. It is owned and operated by Aaron Leland. 

Stonehouse's Steam Saw Mill, aitnated on the northeast comer of section twen- 
ty-five, was erected by John Stonehouse in the year 18G8, on the site of an old 
■water power mill owned by him, and which wae destroyed by Are in tlio year 
1807. The new mil! is turning out large quantities of shingles, also some lumber 
and lath. 

Ellis & Brown's Grist Mill, situated on section thirteen, on Mill Creek, la iJoiog 
a good custom business. 

The Wolverine Pump Works, 8. N. Edie, Proprietor, aie situated on section 
thirty-six, one-half mile northwesterly of Mill Creek Poat-office. This establish- 
ment was erected in the year 1888. It is located on a small branch of Mill Creek, 
whose waters give it motive power. The shop is furnished with fueilities for manu- 
facturing £ve tliousitnd pumps per annum, 

Orrin Gee owns and operates a small Brick Yard on the south side of section 
thirty-one. 

There is a water power Cider Mill sltnated on MillCreek, owned and operated by 
Gideon Colton, which is worthy of notice. The mill is so built on the bluff at the 
side of the stream, that the apples can be unloaded from the wagon into the hop- 
per at the top, where they are ground, below which thcj are pressed, then bar- 
reled and loaded into wagons at the foot of the hluff without necessitating the 
lifting of a pound. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

District No. 1 is in the center of the township. Its first School House was huilt 
on the farm of Edward Wheeler, on the north side of section twenty-two. The 
present School Building was erected in the year 1891, and is a substantial frame 
structure. It stands on the south side of section fifteen, one-hiilf mile east of tlie 
Town Hall. 

District No. 3 has an old wooden building, commonly known na the Coon 
School House. 

District No. 3 (fractional with Wright,) has a nice, brick building situate on 
the north side of section thirty. It was erected in 1868 at an expense of |1,000. 

District No. 4 (fractional with Sparta,) has a smal! frame house, known as 
Rouse School House, situated on the north line of section three. 

District No. 6 (fractional with Sparta), has a school house in the northeast 
corner of section five. It was erected in the year 1864. at a cost of about $1200. 

The school house in District No. 7 (fractional with Plainfield), known as the 
Colton school house, situated on the south side of section thirteen, is a neat 
frame structure. It was erected in the year 1869, at an expense of |1950. 

District No. 8 has a small, frame house, known as the Pearsall school house, 
which was erected in 1851, on the northwest corner of section twenty-eight. 

District No. 9 (fractional with Plainfield), has a very old building, known as 
the Withey school house, situated on the northeast corner of section thirty-six. 

District No. 10 (fractional with Wright), has a small frame house, known as 
the Boyd school house, standing on the southwest corner of section eight. It 
was erected in the year 185Q. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AHD DIREOTOBY OF KENT COUNTY. 33 

District No. 1*1 has a small, wooden building, wliicli was erected in the year 
1855, and used until tke year 18G0, when the Roman Catholics of the district, 
with the aid of those of surrounding districtsi, erected s building of their own at 
at a cost of $1500, in which they flow haTe a German-English school. The de- 
serted building is situated on the aoath side of section twenty six, and the new 
one at the center. 

District Ho. 13 (fractional with Walker), has a nice frame building, known aa 
the Johnson school house. It was erected in the year 1839, and stands on the 
south side of section thirty-four. 

District No. li (fractional with Sparta), has a small, frame building, which was 
erected in the year 1852, and is known as the Eoglishrille school house. It is 
located on the north side of section one. 

District No. 15 (fractional with Walker), has a small, frame building, known aa 
the Monroe school house. 

CHURCHES. 

The Alpine and Walker Baptist Church is a good frame building, 36x5S feet in 
size. It WAS erected in the year 1839 on the south side ol section thirty-three, at 
a cost of probably $2000. 

The Roman Catholic Church, situated on tlie north side of section thirty-four, 
was erected in the year 1849, at a cost of about $1500. It is a frame Btructuro 
26x46 feet in size. 

HOTELS. 

The Alpine House, which was erected in the year 1867 by SI. Crill, is a large, 
commodious, frame building, situated on the south side of section thirteen on 
the Spftrta Center road. This is located in the midst of a little cluster of houses, 
sometimes called Coltonirille. They have a postofflce known as' Alpine, also two 
or three shops, and not far distant on the same section, are the grist and saw 
mills heretofore described. The "Brick Inn," erected by Joseph Bettes, in the 
year 1862, on the site of the old " Log Inn," is now owned and kept by Wash- 
ington neatli. It is located in the south part of section thirty, on the Newaygo 
State road. 



BOWNE. 

Bowne is the southeastern township of Kent Coiinty. It is bounded on the 
north by Lowell, on the east by Campbell, Ionia county, on the south by Irving, 
Barry county, and west by Caledonia. The surface of the township is rolling in 
the south part, the western part is mostly timbered openings, while the eastern 
part is beech and maple land, and is rather level. It is all rich and eicellent soil, 
and well adapted to all kinds of agricultural pursuits. And, although compara- 
tively new, is fiist being developed into fine farms. It is watered by the Cold- 
water, or Little Thornapple, which enters the township on its eastern boundary 
on section thirty-six, and flows in a westerly direction through the township, 
leaving its western boundary on section thirty-one. This is a very rapid stream 
and would afford five or six mill sites within the limits of thb township, only 
two of which are Improved. Ons oq leotion twenty-nma, occupied by Patter- 



yGoosle 



34 HISTORY AHD DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

son's saw mill, and one on section thirty-six, occupied by Ricliardson's saw mill. 
In the western part of the township is a email stream flowinp; from the north, 
called Harris Creek, on which Hon. A. D. Thomas has a grist mill with two run 
of stone, driven by an overshot wheel with a fall of thirty feet. In the eastern 
part of the township is another small stream called Duck Creek, which affords 
in the northeast corner of the township water power for a s.iw mill, owned by 
Jaepar Kuykendall. 

In 18S6, Mr. Jonathan Thomas, of Ovid, New York, entered a large tract of 
land in the southwestern portion of this township, and, in 1837 came on to im- 
prove it, bringing with him Mr. Frederick Thomaon and faiiiiiy, who still reside 
in Bowne, Mr. Israel Graves and family, and Mr. William Wooley and family. 
They came by water to Toledo, and thence to their destination with ox teams, 
making the trip from Toledo in ahout two weeks. They proceeded to build houses 
and clear up the farm now owned by A. D. Thomaa. The first house they built, 
and the first within the town, is still standing, and is preserved by Mr. A. Y>. 
Thomas as a relic of the past and as a contrast with the present. It is of logs, 
abont twelve by fourteen feet square, without any chamber^ and with only one 
door and one window and a " shake " roof- Near this Mr. Thomas built two 
other houses anti a small log building for an office for himself. Sir. Thomas was 
taken sick soon after he arrived, and was sick most of the time until the nest 
winter, when his son-iu-law Mr. John Harris came, and they fixed a bed in a 
sleigh and he started for his home in New York. They made the whole distance 
with a sleigh, dragging through northern Ohio in the slush and mud. During 
the first summer, when they got out of provisions, Mr. Thomas, although quite 
ill at the time, had his bed fixed in a wagon, and taking hia whip started his ox 
team lor Kalamazoo. He was obliged to go a few miles beyond there and buy 
wheat, bring it back to Kalamazoo and have it ground. Mrs. Thomson says there 
were a great many Indians on the Coldwater when they moved there. They 
found them good neighbore when they were sober, but when they could get 
" fire water" they were quarrelsome, and occasioned trouble at times. One came 
to their house one day when Mr. Thoinson was away from home, and sat down in 
the rocking chair before the fire and rocked himself over into the fire-piace, she 
pulled him out of the fire and he became enraged and attempted to stab her. 
But when she picked up an axe, and told him she would kill him if he did not 
leave, he beat a retreat. Another time, a lot of Indians came up on their ponies, 
when the men were gone, and ordered Mrs. Wooley to get them something to 
eat. She ran to her door and called to Mrs. Thomson, who went over, she says, 
as brave as could, be, and talked to them. The old chief ordered her to go back 
to her wigwam and get him something to eat. She obeyed, trembling with fear 
all the time, and got the best dinner she could under the circumstances, setting 
her table with the nicest spread and dishes she had. The chief ate his meal 
alone at her house and seemed much pleased, told her she was a. " brave squaw," 
and that they would not harm them then, but after a certain number of moons 
they were going to kill all oi the whites in the country. The other families 
that eame with them soon became discouraged and went back, and they were left 
alone, seven miles at first, from any white neighbors. One time Mrs. Thomson 



f9dby 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KBMT COUHTY. 



remained alone eight days, Mr. Tliomson went to Kalamazoo to mill, and while 
there his osen strayed away, and before he could find tliein and get home, eight 
days passed by. She remained at home until nearly noou the last day, when the 
suspense became so great she could not bear it any longer, and she started, on 
foot, for the nearest neighbor's, "Leonard's," seven miles distant. After proceed- 
ing about half way she met a wliite man. He was very much surprised at meet- 
ing a woman under such cireum stances, and inquired of her where she was going. 
She told hiin, and inquired if he liad seen or heard of her husband. He told her 
of his losing his cattle, and that he was on the road and would be along before 
night, and as it was rery warm advised her to either go baek or wait until her 
husband came along, and when she told him " No," she would never stop until 
she had seen lier husband, be said that he was a bachelor, but if be could jlnd a 
woman who would endure as mnch and as bravely for him he should certainly 
marry. They usitd to see many wolves and boars, but never felt much fear of 
them. For some years they went to " Scale's Prairie" to meeting, and aiTierward, 
when there got to be population enough so that preachers used to come among 
them, Mrs. Thomson says she used frequently to entertain three or four at a time in 
their little log shanty, twelve by fourteen feet squaie. 

In the spring of 1838 Messrs. Malcolm and John McNuughton commenced 
" breaking " on section twenty. They broke up forty acres that year and put it 
into wheat. In the fall of 1838 Messrs. Roswell Tyler, Norman Foster and J. G. 
Beach settled at the centre of Bowne. They came from Detroit with teams, ma 
Gull Prairie, and were about ten days on the road. Mr. Tyler and another man 
came through from Jackson on toot, following what wag called the Clinton Trail. 
At this time there were no settlements nearer on the north than Ada and Lowell. 
Among tiie other early settlers whose names we have been able to get, we iind 
James H. Truas, Jared Miller, William Stewart, Daniel C. McVean, Abraham 
Lowe, and Messrs White and Cobb, who settled at different times racging from 
1840 to 1S15. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 
There are eight school houses in Bowne, all frame buildings, situated on sectious 
31), 28, S4, IS, 7, 4, 33 and 30. Bowne is well supplied with 
POSTOFFICES. 
Containing three, viz : Bowne, Alto, and Harris Creek. The Bowne postoffice, 
James C. Johnson, P. M., is located at Bowne Center. Alto postoffice is situated 
near the centre of section four, and kept by David M. Skidinore. Harris Creek 
postoffice, Wilbur 8. March, P. M., is on the southwest part of section twenty- 
nine, near Thomas' Mills. 

LAKES. 
Foster Lake, on section 24, is a line sheet of water about a quarter of a mile in 
length. On the northwest comer of section 33, near the residence of Stephen 
Johnson, is a small lake called Putnam Lake. A small lake near the centre of 
section 10, is known as Number Ten Lake. Campbell Lake is a handsome lake, 
about hali a mile in length, on section 19. In the north part of the township 
are several large swaiups, interspersed with small lakes or ponds; one range lying 
on sections 1, 3, 3, and 4, and one lying on sections 5 and 8, 



yGoosle 



86 HISTORY AHD DIRECTORT OF KENT COUKTI. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The township of Bowne was organized in the year 1848, by tlie election of the 
following DHmed gentlemen as the 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS: 

Superviaor — Roswell C Tyler; Clerk — Daniel C. McVean ; Treasurer — -jQstus 
G. Beach ; Justices of the Peace— Jared Miller, Norman Foster ; Assessors — ■ 
Abyah Poole, John A. Campbell ; Commissioners of Highways — Loren B. Tyler, 
James H. Truax, Asa. R. Tyler. School Inspectors — Jared Miller, William Gib- 
son. Overseers of the Poor — Roswell F. Tyler, John Umk-rwood. Constables- 
Salmon B. Piatt, Henry C. Poster. 

TOWNSHIP OFFICERS IN 1870. 

Superviaor — Ahner D. Thomas. Clerk— Abel Ford. Treasurer— James M. 
Nash. Justices of the Peace — Stephen Johnson, Benjamin J. Lee, Levi Stone, 
Henry D. Francisco, Commissioners of Highways- Lorcn B. Tyler, Henry D. 
Francisco, William H. Stone. Constable— Oliver A. Stone. 



BYEON. 

The township of Byron ia situated in the extreme southwestern part of Kent 
county, with Wyoming on the north, Gaines on the east, Dorr, Allegan county, 
on the south, and Jamestown, Ottawa county, on the west. 

The surface of it is rolling, being covered with gently rolling swells and small 
knolls, with the exception of a swamp which commences on section thirteen and 
extends in a sontliwesterly direction into Allegan county. Tliis swamp varies 
fi'om ei|;htj rods to one mile in breadth, and is mostly timbered with tamarack 
and cedar. The extreme southwestern part of the township is somewhat broken, 
but not enough so to injure its value for farming purposes. The soil varies from 
argillaceous to sandy ; but is what is generally known to farmers as cither clayey 
or Handy loam. The surface of some of the creek bottoms is underlaid with mar! 
or " bog lime," while the " big swamp " is a bed of muck, in many places of 
several feet in thickness. On section twenty-one, on the farm of 8. S. Towner, is 
a small swamp timbered with tamarack, through which the track of the northern 
branch of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railroad passes, which has 
several times sunk so as to engulf the road bed. Thisawamp ia probably the site 
of a lake which has become covered with a coating of vegetable matter of suffi- 
cient thickness to support trees of from fifty to sixty feet in height. 

This township is composed of what is known as " timbered lands," comprising 
within its limits nearly every variety of trees known in this climate, viz . the Oak, 
Ebn, Basswood, Whitewood, Sugar and Soft or White Maple, Blaekwalnnt, Butter- 
nut. Sycamore, Pepperage, Beech, White and Black Ash, Hickory and Bitter Wal- 
nut, Pine, Cedar and Tamarack. And in some very favored localities a few Ilack- 
berry trees are to be found. Of shrubs nearly all that flourish in this State are 
found, and in the rich hollows of the heavy timbered lands the Paw Paw flourishes 
to a considerable extent. 

Byron is quite well watered by Buck and Rush Creeks, and the springs and 

.-.fed by 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUKTI. S7 

numerous small streamB that form these creeks. One branch of Buck Creek rises 
in the extreme southeastern corner of the township, flows a north westerly clirec- 
tion for Bome distance, and then north hy east until it leaves the town on its 
northern hmits at tlie center line of section one. Another branch rises in Dorr, 
Allegan county, and flows northeasterly through the " hig swamp '' until it forms 
ajunttioa witii the main stream. 

About the center of section twenty-six is a small lake called "Mud Lake." 
Rush Crock rises near the center of the township and flows in a northwesterly 
direction, leaving Byron very near its nort hwestern limits. 

Go hack with nie reader for a space of thirty-fonr years, to the summer of 183C. 
Byron was then an unbroken wilderness. The ruthless hand of the wliite man, 
armed with that terribly destructive weapon, the ase, had never been laid on 
natures beautiful forest that crowned the liills and shaded the vales. As the God 
of nature created it so the grand old forest stood. But the axe, the Pioneer's 
great weapon, as honored as his rifle, was soon destined to be heard in its depths. 
During the summer ol this year Mr. Nathan Boynton located a farm on section 
five, and selected a place to huild a house on a Httlc knoll near the banks of Kush 
Creek. Mr. Boynton returned to Grandville and was taken sick, bat in August 
or September sent his brothers, Messrs. William and Jerry Boynton to huild a 
house for him. All the guide they had was the section line. This they followed 
until they came to the line between the present townships of Byron and Wyom- 
ing, where they, not knowing that there was a variation in the section lines of 
the difierent ranges of townships, lost the line and were sometime finding the 
place Nathan Lad selected for his dwelling. Having found the spot they went at 
work to erect a house. Listen reader while we give you the dcscrijition Mr. 
William Boynton gave us. It was built of small logs, such as they could carry 
and put op, the roof was of small basswood, split in two parts and gutters cut, 
with an ax, in the flat side. One tier of these was laid with the fiat side up and 
the other with the flat side down, so that the outside edge of the upper tier fitted 
into the gutter of the lower. The floor and door of the house were made of plank, 
or as woodsmen usually call them " puncheons," split frona basswood trees. The 
fire place was built of clay, which Mr. Boynton says he mixed bi treading with 
his bare feet, and was built up with small twigs; while the chimney was huilt of 
split sticks laid up in the same kind of mortar. This fireplace and chimney were 
used, and did good service for a goodly number of years. Such was the first 
house erected iu the township of Byron. 

Messrs. Jerry and William Boynton soon located farms on sections nine and 
eight, respectively, and commenced improving their present homesteads, which 
by their skill and energy thej have rendered both attractive and productive. In 
1837 Mr. John Harmon settled on section nine. During the same year Mr. Har- 
mon Kellogg settled on section three, and Mr. James B. Jewell on section nine. 
We cannot find that any one settled in the township in 1838 except Mr, Ella 
Judaon, who during this year settled on section eight. Mr. Judson says that 
when he built his log house he had to go adistance of four miles for men to help 
"raise" and only bad eight men at that. In 1830 Mr, Larkin Ball settled on 
■ection twenty, at which time he was the only man south of the center of the 

Hosted by Google 



So HISTORY AND DIRBCTOKT OF KBNT COUNTT, 

township. Soon after, Peter Qoldin settled on the same section. Mr. William 
Bojutoc says that four of them cut the lo^a, carried them, and raised Mr, Goldin's 
house. This house was standing as late as 1859. During this jear Mr. Eli Cros- 
sett settled on section seventeen ; also Mr. Ameiek Tayloi- on the same section. 
Mr. Alden Coburn on section seven, and Mr. Benjamin Robiusou on section six. 
During 1840 there was but one new settler in the town, Mr. William Olmstead, 
who settled on section eiglit. 1841 went by witliout any augmentation of the 
numhers of this sturdy band of pioneers. In 1842 Samuel Ilubbel settled on sec- 
tion twenty-eight, Joseph Gallup on section thirty-two, and Henry A. Vanneat on 
section five. Mr. William Boynton says that when they " raised " either Mr. 
Oallup's or Mr. Hubbcl's house, he has forgotten which, they did not get it up 
the first day, nnd it was so far to go home that they stayed and camped out over 
night, and finished "raising" the nest day. And all they had for supper and 
breakfast was roast potatoes. 

During the year 1843 Mr. Pox was the only man who settled iu the "South 
Woods," Oliver Harris settled on section fourteen about this time, hut we have 
not been able to fix the exact date. 

During 1844 Mr. Ezekiel Cook settled on section tbirty-flve, Mr. Tuft on sec- 
tion twenty-three, and Messrs. E. B. Ide and James K. McKciUHy on section 
twenty. 

Mrs. Cook tells us that when they moved into the woods they had no neighbors 
nearer than four miles, they being the first to settle in the southeast part of the 
township. And their nearest Post-oflice was at Grand Ra])ids, a distance of four- 
teen miles through an unbroken wilderness. At the time Mr. Kenney moved on 
his place there was no road from thereto Grandville except as he followed the 
trails til at wound around through the woods. Mrs. Mc tie nney says that they 
moved into their house the 19th day of November, 1844. and tliat there were 
neither doors nor windows in the house, and no floor below. They moved Into 
the toft or chamber, and the next day Mr. McKenney Wiis taken sick and was 
confined to his bed for two weeks. And before he was well enough to build a fire- 
place and chimney there was two feet of snow. And that during all this time she 
had to do all of lier cooking out of doors by a log Are. Mrs. Tuft says tiiat they 
moved on their place the last day of December, 1843, and all the signs of a house 
they had was a small sled load of lumber. Mr. McKenney says that for some 
time lie used to carry his " grist " to Jerry Boynton 's, a distance of chree miles, 
on his shoulders, get luQi to take it to Grand Rapids to mill, and when he re- 
turned, carry it home again. 

During the year 1845 Messrs. Corkins Barney, Clark S. Wilson and William 
Davidson settled within the limits of the township. Among the early settlers 
whose names we have been able to procure are Josiali R. Holden, Bradley 
Weaver, Daniel Prindle, Carlos Weaver and Prentice Weaver, who settled in Byron 
from 1846 to 1849. During 1850 and "51 Messrs. Eli Young and James M. Barney 
settled on section thirty-two. About this time is famous among the old set- 
tlers as the " wolf year." Mr. Young says that he killed one within four rods of 
his door, .with his dog and corn cutter. Mr. William Boynton says that frequently, 
when he was obliged to work at Grandville to get pro- 

JedbyGoOQie 



HISTORY AND DlHECTOBT OP KENT COUNTY. 39 

Tision for the support of hia family, he would work all day, get the proceeds of 
labor in proviaiona, and at dark start for home, a distance of about five miles, 
through the woodB, while the wolrea were liowliog all around him and sometimes 
coming almost within reach of the good, stout cudgel which he carried. Mr. 
Jumes M. Barney says that during the first summer that he lived on hia place he 
had to keep his cow and calf in a high log pen near his house, nights, to keep 
tliem from tlie wolTes. He says that one night, after being kept awake until 
almost morning, lie took his gun just at daylight and sallied forth, determined on 
veQgeance. When he went out the wolves retreated for a short distance. But 
when he came into a thicket of bushes they surrounded him, and he backed up 
against a tree, and they kep him there for about two hours, until broad daylight. 
He sliot at them several times, hut the bushc* were so thick that ho did not kill 
any, although they would come bo near that he cuuld hear tiiem snap at each 
other. Tlie wolves were never very thick alter this season, and as they decreased, 
nntil about 185C, deer increased and became very thick. Mr. Barney says that 
he has had during the winter from forty to fifty deer hungup in the woods at 

ORGANIZATION. 

The first township meeting (Hie township of Byron then embraced Wyoming 
also), was held at the house of Charles H. Oaks, in GrandTille, on Jlonday, the 
second day of May, A. D. 1836. The following offlcers were chosen, viz: 

Supervisor — Gideon H. Gordon. Township Clerk — Isaac A. Allen. Assessors — 
Eli Yeomins Ephraim P Walker and Justin Brooks. Justices of the Peace — 
Gideon H Gordon Eo! ert Howlett and Ephraim P. Walker. Collector — Lorenzo 
French. Commissioners ot Highways — Gideon H. Gordon, Eli Yeomaos, and H. 
Pitts. Commiisionera of Schools— Joseph H. Copeland. Sanford Buskirk and 
James Lockwood SchoDl Inspectors— Gideon H. Gordon, Isaac A. Allen and Eli 
Yeomans. Overseers of the Poor — Ephriam P. Walker and Justin Brooks. Con- 
stables—Lorenzo French and Sanford Buskirk. 

At the first general election held at Grandville, November, 1830, the highest 
number of votes cast for electors tor President and Vice President was twenty. 

The following are the present township officers, viz. ; Supervisor, William P. 
Whitney ; Township Clerk, Silas L. Hamilton ; Treasurer, Samuel A. McKeuney ; 
Justices of the Peace, William P. Whitney, James M. Brown, George W. Ewing 
and Isaac M. Winegar, Jr. ; School luspectora, George W. Ewinga and William 
P.Whitney; Commissionere of Highways, Jerry Bojnton, George W. E wings 
and John Ilomrich ; Constables, A. A. Palmer and William D. Tibbita. 

The whole number of votes cast at the last general election held at Byron 
Center, November, 18G8, was SDT. 

For the first few years the settlement of Byron progressed very slowly. It re- 
quired a brave heart and a strong arm to encounter the dangers and hardships 
consequent to the opening up of a new and heavy timbered country. But 
gradually the forest yielded to the axe of the pioneer ; beautiful fields, thrifty 
orchards, comfortable dwellings, and well-fllled barns have taken the place of the 
little log cabin and unbroken forest. Byron is now fast becoming one ol the 
foremost agricultural townships in Eent County. With a varied soil, adapted to 

Hosted by Google 



40 HISTORY AND DIRECTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 

■early all of tlie different branches of husbandry, and eapecially to fruit growing, 
and the very best facihties for marketmg its produce, its farmers must sood 
stand among the best. Byron is traversed by two railroads, viz. : the northern 
branch of the Lake Slioie and Michigan Southern E. R., and the Grand Rapids 
and Indiana K. R. The Lake Shore and Michigan Soutliern runs north and south 
through the town, and has two stations on its line, in Byron, viz. : Byron Center 
and North Byron. The Grand Rapida and Indiana runs north and south through 
the eastern part of the township, and has one station near tlie south part of the 
town. The present population is 1,328. 

. Mr. George L. Tobey carries on the mannfacture of lumber, at his mill, on sec- 
tion twelve, and Rosenberger Bros. & Co. carry on the manufacture of flour, feed, 
lumber and heading, at the village of Cody's Mills, on section twenty-five. 
POST-OFFICES. 
. Cody's Mills, Byron Center and North Byron. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Byron has eight school houses, ranging Irom flrat-clasa to indiflerent. District 

No. ) has a fair wooden house ; District No. 2 has one of the finest country school 

buildings in the county ; it was erected in 1858. There is a very good school 

house at Cody's Mills. The peopleof this township support their schools liberally. 



CALEDONIA. 

Caledonia is one of the southern tier of townships of Kent County, and is 
bounded on the north by Cascade, on the east by Bowne, on the south by Thorn- 
apple, Barry County, and west by Gaines. It is traversed from south to north by 
the Thornapple river which divides it info two equal parts. The banks of the 
river are high and the country on both sides of the river is high and rolling. On 
the east side of the river the land is what is known as " openings," the soil being 
sandy and gravelly with a slight mixture of clay, and is timbered principally 
with oak and hickory. The soil on this side of the river is especially adapted to 
wheat and fruit, but produces good crops of al! kinds of grain and most grasses. 
There are several lakes on this side of the river. There is a lake on sections one, 
two, eleven and twelve, about one mile long, and from eighty to one hundred and 
sixty rods in width. The shore on the southeast side is sandy and on the north- 
west side mucky and marshy. Barber's Kake ia on sections twenty-five and 
twenty-sis. Tobey's Lake is on section twenty-three. Lovejoy's Lake ia on sec- 
tion twelve. The Coldwater or Little Thornapple enters Caledonia on section 
thirty-aix and empties into the Thornapple on section thirty-five. The west aide 
of the river is all " timbered lands," producing all of the kinds of timber that 
usually grow in this climate on such lauds. The surface of most of this part of 
the town ia high and somewhat roiling, with a clayey loam soil, that ia well adapted 
to all kinds of farming purposes, especially to grazing. All kinds of truits grow 
almost to perfection on this soil. There are a great many fine (arms in this town- 
ship, and its agricultural resonrces are being developed very fast. 

Th« Thornapple ia a very rapid straam h«r«, ftnd with its high banki ia oapt- 

tedbyGoOQie 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 41 

ble of affording a great amount of water power. Mr. Warren 8. Hale informs us 
thatfhero are at least nine chances for water powers, only tliree of wliich are de- 
veloped, within tlie limits of this township, with a fall at each of from five to 
eight feet without OTerfiowing the banks at any place. This river is full of pic- 
twr^que ialanda, varying in size from one-half acre to three acres. With the rich 
agricultural country tributary to it, with its unfailing water power, the time must 
come when this town will be the " Lowell " of Western Jlichjgan, when, the busy 
hum of machinery will be lieard from its northern to its southern boundary. 

Nestled among the hills on the banks of the Thornapple, in the northern part 
of the township, is the thriving Uttie village of Alaska, formerly known as North 
Brownville. It lias a very pleasant location and is aa active, enterprising place. 
It contains one dry goods and grocery store, one dry goods, grocery and drug 
store, one grocery store, one hardware store and tin shop, one flouring mill, two 
sow mills, one furniture manufactory, which ships a great deal of cabinet work 
in the white besides finishing for the home market ; one carriage and wagon fac- 
tory and one hotel, besides the usual number of blacksmith shops, boot and shoe 
shops, &c. There is not a saloon in the place. Surrounded by a rich agricul- 
tural country, its growth must be rapid and its future prosperous. 
EARLY SETTLEMENT. 

Mr. Asaliel Kent was the flrst settler in the township, settling on section thirty- 
five in 1838, Mr. Kent, and after his death Mrs. Kent, kept a public house, 
which became famous for its good cheer, al! oyer the surrounding country. A 
gentleman who lived at that time in New York State, tells us that he used to 
hear people who had been to Grand River tell about " Kent's Tavern," aud when 
one would return, others who had traveled on this route — the "Gull Trail" — 
would always inquire after the Kents. Mrs. Kent afterwards married Mr. Peter 
McNaughton, and the place became equally well known to travelers on the Battle 
Creek and Grand Rapids stage route, as McNaughton's. And while talking of 
this subject there are some reminiscences of this stage route that Mr. Edward 
Campau relates, that we may as well give now, and which will help contrast the 
mode of traveling in those days with that of the present. Mr. C. says that in 
1839, he, then a boy of 14, made the journey with three or four others from 
Grand Rapids to Detroit, and that they stopped at " Kent's " over night, and he 
with others of the men had to sleep out in a sort of shed, as the house was so 
small it would not accommodate them. At this time this was the only house 
Irom Ada to " Leonard's," a distance of seventeen miles. About two years after 
this he commenced to drive stage on this route, and drove for several years. The 
road at this time wound round through the woods, and it was no uncommon 
thing to get " stuck " in the mud or to overset. At one time, a very dark, 
stormy night, they broke an axletrce about sis miles south of Ada, and the pas- 
sengers, five or sis in number, had to walk through mud and snow to that place, 
as it was the nearest settlement. At another time Hon, John Ball, Mrs. Thomas 
B. Church and others were in the stage ; they overset in a mud-hole and the pas- 
sengers were all landed (f) in the water. It was quite dark, and Mr. Fred. Church, 
then an infant, was nearly suffocated before they foand him. At another time 



yGoosle 



42 inSTOKY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

Hon, Wm. i. Richmond and Hon. Harvey P. Tale were his only passengers, the 
roads were muddy and badly rutted out and the night dark. Mr. Yale fell 
asleep and the wheel btrikiog into a deep rut pitched hiia out into the mud. 
After a hc.irty laugh he resumed his place and they labored along. There is a 
great conlrast hctft-een travel over that route, and over the different railroad 
routes, with their elegant passenger eoaches, now leading from the Valley City. 

To go baek to the settlement of Caledonia : Mr. James Minscy settled on sec- 
tion thirty-six in 1838 or 1830. Among tiie earlier settlers were Orscmua liath- 
bun, Eber Moffitt, Hiram McNiel, Peter McNaoghton, Levi Toboy, John Sinclair, 
O. B. Barber, John Pattison, Ilcnry Jackson, Win. H. Brown, and Warren S. 
Hale. Mr. Lyman Gerrald was the first settler on the west side of the river. 
Jlr. Win. H. Brown erected the saw mill at Alaska, now owned by L. W. Fisher, 
in 1848, and the flourinf; mill now owned by J. W. Boyntim, in 185;!, and is now 
one of the proprietors of the Caledonia mills, two miles above Alaska, on section 
twenty-two. Mr. Orseuius Rathhitn is the oldest settler now residing in the 
township. 

Among the incidents connected with the early settlement ol the township, 
showing some of the hardships the pioneers had to endure, we liave the follow- 
ing : Mr. Wm. H. Brown, previous to hiB settlement at Brownsville, but after he 
located his land, lived at " Scale's Prairie " or Middlcville. Having occasion to 
go there one winter, he started Irom home in the morning on horseback, intend- 
ing to return the same day. After making his observations and examining his 
land about where the village of Alaska now stands, he started for home ; night 
soon came on, and after eudeavormg to follow his track for a while he found out 
that he was lost. He dismounted, and aa he had nothing to kindle a fire with, 
cleared the snow out of a path, with his feet, and some bark from a dry tree, and 
walked backwards and forwards in it all night. When morning came he mounted 
his horse and after riding for some time came out at the Green Lake House. His 
friends had started afler him in the morning, expecting to find him frozen to 
death, and followed his tracks until they found him at Green Lake. 

At the mouth of the Coldwater was a great Indian camping ground and burial 
place. They did not leave here entirely until within a very few years. One of 
them, old Soh-na-go, or " Squirrel," has been since seen visiting the burial place 
and the hunting grounds of his fathers, but the "White man's ase" had been 
there, and it was no longer a home for him. 

Caledonia has nine school houses, all wooden buildings, and two churches, vix: 
The Baptist Church at Alaska, and a Catholic Church on section twonty-flve, both 
wooden structures. There are two hotels in this township, the Alaska Hotel, at 
Alaska, Wm. H. Lock, proprietor, and the Oak Grove House, O. B. Barber, pro- 
prietor, on section twenty-six. There is a saw mill on section twenty-seven, 
Jacob Brown, proprietor. 

The postofiic«s are as follows .—Alaska, Warren S. Hale, P. M,; Calcdonm, 0. 
B. Barber, P. M.; Caledonia Station, Adam B. Sherk, P. M. 

The Grand River Valley Railroad crosses the southwest corner of the township 
and has a station on section twenty-nine. 



yGoosle 



HlflTOKY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 43 

ORGANIZATION. 

The townsliii) of Cak'doiiia was organized in 1840 'ly tliu choice of the following 
named ctHcers : 

Supervisor — John P. McNaugiiton. Clerk — ,lustus G. Beiith. Justices of the 
Peace — Justus G. Beacli, Loren B. Tyler, Malcolm P. lIcNaughton, Asahel Kent. 
Tieasurer — Noriuan Poster. Assessors — Itoswell F. Tyler, MalcolJn i*. MeNaugh- 
ton, John A. Caiiiplieil. Highway ComuiiBsioDers— Asahel Tyler, Asab el Keot, 
Norman Foster. School InBpectors—Noriiiiiii Foster, William G. Woolu.y. Direc- 
tors of the Poor— Roswell Tyler, .Tohn Campbell. Collector— Kos well F. Tyler. 
Conataljles— lioswell F. Tyler, Frederick B. Tliompson. 
OFFICERS IN 1870.' 

Sujiervisor— Adam B. yiierk. Clerk— Daniel S. Ilavllaml. Treasurer— SI icr- 
iiiau T. Colson. Justices —Adaiu B. Sherk, Levi White, Hugh B. McAlister, 
Elijah V. E. Pratt. Highway Commissioners— John Patterson, David Kinaey, 
I»HM) Stauffer. School Insijeetors— Alfred W. Stoive, I,evi White. Constables- 
Fayette Melntyre, Charles E. Emmons, Elipiialut Scott. 



CANNON. 

Cannon, originally a part ot Plainfteld, lies northwest of Grand Rapids, having 
(Jimitland on the north, Grattan on the east, Ada on the south, and Plainfield on 
the west. 

In the year 1837 the lirst farm was entered within its territory by Andrew 
Watson, who came with his family, aeeompanicil^by A. D. W, Stout and family, 
and settled on suction thirty, where Mr. Watson and his aged wife yet reside. In 
the next year ciuue Isaac Tomlinson, Sen., loeating upon section twenty-seven, in 
a beautiful situation commanding an e.-stensive and enchanting view of Grand 
River and its beautiful valley. In 1839 Wm. 31. Miller settled upon section nine- 
teen. Steadily now a tide of emigration set in, rolling the wilderness back by the 
sturdy energy of the hardy and determined pinneer, swilllr nniltlplying farms 
and broadening cleared acres. 

Prominent among the new comers in 1810 wei'c James Thonias, on section 
twenty-seven, Oliver Loviyoy, on section seven, ^Ir. Itood, and Rev. Mr. Frieze, on 
section nineteen, the lirst Minister of the Gospel who took up his residence 
within the town. 

Among the early settlers who bore a conspicuous part in tlie development imd 
organization of the new town, we would make honorable mention of M. A. Pat- 
rick, locating on section twenty-six, and Ebeuezer C. Smith, on section twelve, 
m 1844. About the same time Mr. Samuel Steel located five lots for as many sons, in 
the near vicinity of Mr. Smith, thus Jixing the name of Steel's Corners to a most 
beautiful and productive part of the town. Mrs. John IIartwell,on section thirty- 
tour, and Demas Iliiie, on section thirty, settlers of 1845, and Jnines Dockery, on 
section fbnr, who settled in 184fi. ^ 

In 1845 u separation from Plainfleld wa,s effected, and Ihc township was erected 

iJedbyGoOSle 



44 HUTOEI AMD DIRBCXORr OP KEHT COUNTY. 

into a separate town, under the name, by a mistake in the Legislature, of Church- 
town, assuming its present name, however, in honor of its principal village, at 
its first town meeting, held to complete its organization, on the first Monday of 
April, 1846, at the house of C. Slaght, in Cannonsburgh. At that time it had a 
population of about 280, and the whole number of votes cast were 64. Its present 
population is 1,136 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor, Andrew Watson; Clerk, Henry H, Worden; Treasurer, Lewis D. 
Dean; School Inspectors, Loyal Palmer, M. A. Patrick; Directors of the Poor, 
Ebenezer C. Smith, Martin Jolinson ; Commissioners of Highway, Jolm Hartwell, 
Cornelius Wample; Justices of the Peace, Harlow T. Judson, John Bishop, Deinas 
Hine, Jared Spring; Constables, Robert Howard. Major Worden, Isaac Tomlin- 
son, Miiidrus Wliitney. 

OFFICERS IN 1870. 

Supervisor, Asa P. Fetrj; Clerk, Thomas Noy; Treasurer, Charles A. Provin ; 
Justices of the Peace, Nathaniel Steel, James Nesbit, Demaa Hine, M. A. Patrick ; 
Highway Commissioner, Wm. C. Young; School Inspector, John C. Cliapman; 
Constables, John 8. Baker, John JI. Thomas, Charles A. Provin, Henry C. 
Watkins. 

Cannon presents a great variety of surface, soil and productions, beino; quite 
hilly and broken along Bear Creek and in the vicinity of Grand River, but in 
other parts, more gently rolling, or beautifully undulating scenery meets the view. 
In the southern part there are patches of beech and maple timber land, with a 
sprinkling of pine along the streams, but, mainly, the town is oak openings, plen- 
tifully interspersed with hickory. Its main staples raised for the market are 
wheat, wool, corn and apples. Of the former, large quantities are exported, and 
its rolling lands and dry, healthful climate make its wool growing a success. 
Lying within the great Western fruit belt, and being blessed with a deep, pliable 
soil, it is eminently adopted to horticultural pursuits ; of this its people are fully 
aware, and we find in many flourishing orchards. Apples, pears, peaches, cherries 
and currants abound, while grapes and the small fruits are fast becoming speci- 

Whatevcr may he said of its business centers,. thrift and enterprise mark its 
rural districts. Comfort smiles from its tasteful dwellings, nestled ainid shade 
and bloom, and an abounding plenty peeps from its well filled and commodious 
bams. Indigence is scarcely known among its population. All are, to a remark- 
able degree, independent in worldly goods. 

Bear Creek, the exclusive property of Cannon, rises in the norlhwest corner ot 
the town, on section one, in a large spring having the peculiar power of petrify- 
ing ail substances that may chance to lie in its waters. The creek, fed by springs 
all its length, takes its devious way south and southwest, catting the town nearly 
in two, debouching in Grand River on sectioQ thirty, the southwest corner of the 
town. This stream, being fed by springs, presents a never failing supply of water, 
and, running rapidly, gives an opportunity for a number of mill sites, and escel- 
!ent facilities for manufacturing purposes. 



Hosted by 



Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOUT OJ KENT COUHTT. 45 

Cannonsburgli, the only businesa center of any note within the town was fouo- 
ded in 1842, an Indian war trail ita main thorouglifare, and the settler's as the 
only key that would open the forest gates that guarded ita entrance. In 1844 
and 1845 its mills were erected bj E. B. Bostwick, H. T. Jndson architect, and a 
store opened. As an inducement to permanent settlement, the village was platted 
in 1845, and Mr, Bostwick, the enterprising business agent of LuGrand Cannon, 
ita proprietor, (an eastern capitalist and large land holder in the town,) was in- 
structed to give a village lot to each resident not otherwise provided for; thus 
twenty-flye lots were given away. The town received the name it now bears in 
honor of its founder, who testified his appreciation of the distinction conferred 
by presenting tlie village with a small ordnance bearing his name and the date. 
This is treasured as a memento of early times, and used on the 4th of July and 
other holiday occasions, wakening the echos of memory in many a heart as its 
thunders reverberate among the hills that completely surround the little village. 
Cannonsburg is situated upon both sides of Bear Creek. Laterly it has suffered 
much by fire. It has one store, one grist mill, one woolen mill, with a cider mill 
attached, one saw mill, one cooper shop, two wagon shops, three blacksmith 
shops, and one hotel. It has no dedicated place of worship, but. the Methodists 
are about erectiog a fine church, to be constructed of wood, 38sG0 feet in size, 
and costing $3,300. It has a Union School House, situated on a picturesque bluff 
overlooking the town; it is built of wood, two stories high, Mx'iG feet in dimen- 
sion. Two teac^ers are employed in its schools. 

Buennvista is situated on section thirty, near tlie moutb of Bear Creek. It con- 
sists of eight or ten dwelhng houses, and the Bear Creek flouring mill, erected in 
1848, and now owned by Carey & Horton, of Grand Rapids. There is nothing 
more to be said ot it, save that it is located amidst beautiful scenery, and is some- 
thing of a wheat martin the fall of the year. 

There are several lakes within the town, but only two are worthy of particular 
note. Silver Lake, on sections niuo and ten, lying just north of and toucliing the 
line of the Grand Rapids and Ionia State Road, as its name indicatea, is a most 
beautiful sheet of water, containing about 300 acres. 

One mile directly east of Silver Lake we come upon Bostwiek Lake, a huge 
crystal, in emerald setting. No more beautiful scene can well be imagined. Its 
waters are very cold, evidently emanating from springs, as it has no visible inlet 
or natural outlet. This Wiis a favorite rssort in early days for fishing parties, and 
parties of pleasure coming from the villajfe often caniped on its banks and tarried 
over night. A huge canoe, iiishioned by an Indian, from a white wood tree grown 
a mile south of Canuonsburgh, was transported with a vast amount of labor to its 
shores and launched upon its waters. The distance traversed was five miles, occu- 
pying two days in tUe transit, and employing four yoke of oxen. There, in the 
later years, the settlers on lands adjacent to the lake founil the deserted canoe, a 
monster of its kind, over thirty feet in length. Wind and wave have long aince 
done tlieir works upon it; only a fragrant of it remaining as a relic in the family 
of 8. B. Eutz, formerly of Cannon, now a resident of Rockford. This lake also 
lies north of the State lload, winch bends slightly in passing round its southern 
shore. It contains about 400 acres. 



yGoosle 



46 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT GOUKTY. 

Ball Hill is a noteworthy eminence on section one. It rises abruptly trorn the 
surrounding country, and lifting its lofty tower above the forest trees, is visible 
for many miles awny. It received its name from its long time-owner, John Ball, 
of Grand liapida. It is now the property of Mr. Cowen, siid phinied with apple 
trees to its very summit. 

CHURCHES AND SCHOOLS. 
There ai'e eight district schools in the town, and two cliurolies. Tlie First Con- 
grsgatioual Churoli, (Rev. Mr. Eaton, of Lowell, present officiatiiigpastor.) la a 
wooden structure 36x50 feet in dimensions. It stands upon a little eminence cast 
of anti couirannding a beautiful view of Bostwick Lake. It has a small Ceiuetei'y 
attached. The First M. E. Church, at Steel's Corners, one milo cast, was erected 
in tlie same year. It is also built of wood and ia a trifli' smaller tliiin tiie CoJigre- 
gatioual Church. 

The number imd pi-osperity of the achools and cliurclins in the town are a reflex 
of the intellectual and spiritual enterprise of tlie people, speaking m()re than 
volumes of history for their useful and mor.'il lives. 

It ia worthy of record here, that, of the tirst sis famiiiea aettling In the town, 
namely A. Watson, A. D. W. Stout, I. Tomlinaon, E. Whitney, Mr. Hood and J. 
Thomas, both heads of each family are yet living, and four faniiics still reside in 
the town. 

It is an equally remarkable fact tliat the first two white ohildi-en were bori) in 
the families of Mr. Stout and Mr. Watson, on the same day, September 37. 1837. 
Both were daughters, and there was but two lionrs dift'orence in their birth. The 
children were named respectively Mary Stont anil Jeanette Watson. 

May G, 1843, the great destroyer entered the lamily of Mr. Isaac Tomlinson and 
laid low his little daughter, Martha Jane. This was the first death in the town, 
occurring among the whites. 

Moat of the early settlers are living yet, but some are dead. Of tlioae who are 
p«one, juatice denuuids that, as in a " roll of honor," should be placed the names of 
E. B. Bostwiek, business agent for Mr. Cannon, who died on an overland journey 
from the States to California ; 8. S. Haskius, closely identified with the early his- 
tory and pro.sperty of the town, and several yearsadealer in dry goo<is and groceries 
at Cannonsburgh ; Timothy Wetmore, horticulturist, and at one time an efficient 
Supervisor of the town, and BenJ. Davis, also Supervisor for some years, and 
dying while yet holding that office. These have passed on, but in the prosperity 
of the peoitle, and smiling fields from the wilderness reclaimed, theii' works do 



CASCADE. 

Caacade lies in the second tier of townsliips from tlie south and east line of the 
county, and is bounded on the north by Ada, oii the east by Lowell, on the south 
by Caledonia, and on the west by Paris. The Detroit and Milwaukee Railroad 
passes through this town, entering on the norlh pait of secti»)n 12, and following 
the course of the Grand River Valley through the southwest corner of section 1, 

, Google 



Hosted by * 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. ii 

crossing section 3 in almost a direct line Ironi southeast to northwest, into A(]a, 
where is locate.) its neatest depot, four mik's from Cascade villatfo. 
GJ5NERAI, DESCRIPTION. 

CiLfWade presents ii variety of soil, froni light sand and gravel t(i heavy clay, 
and is greatly 'livcrsified liy hills, valleys, streams, lakes, springs and macsUca, 
Grand liiver flows northwest through seetions 12, 1 and 3, into Ada, and the 
Thornapplu — one ot the most iiiiportaiit trilio'.aries of Grand River— takes its 
eourso north ttii-noglt tlic centre of the township. Entering Cliiao^de from the 
south on section 34, it flows through 37, 33. 10, !), 10, 3 and 4 to Oi'and River, at 
Ada village. On the east of the Thornapple, a creek rises in section 11, and 
enters that sti-oam at section 10. Another, one hranch of which rises in section 
30, Lowell, and the other in section 1, of Caledonia, fonns a junction at section 
3(i, in Cascade, and carries its united currents to tiiu Tiiornapple at 37 ; furnish- 
ing, in its rout«, water power to a saw mil! on section 20. On the west side of 
tlie river, a creek rising on section 3J), forms a janctioii with it on section 34, 
Anotlier having its head on section 10, enters the river at Hi. Another, whose 
source is a large hoiling spring on section 0, in its course of two and a half miles 
attains considerahle si/.e, aud empties its waters into the Thornapple at section 
0. Reniaiiis of an old beaver dam were to he found on this creek, quite recently. 
On the southeast corucr of section 14, is found a lake with a greater depth of 
water than Lake Erie. The alioriginca of the country have a singular supersti- 
tion with regard to this lake ; never floating their canoes on its bosom, or eating, 
the fish of its waters, asserting that it is inhabited by an ■' Evil Spirit," or, as 
they terra it, a " Great Snake." Another lake is also found on the line of sec- 
tions 4 and o. Also one in the northwest corner of section 8, matched hy one 
some forty rods directly south. 

TTMliER- 

This township contains but little pine, wiiicli is sparsely scattered aloii"- the 
borders of its streams. The sandy soil is ciiiefij oak openings ; while the gravel 
and clay bear some fine sugar orcliards and arc also productive of beech, ehu, ash, 
hickory, and a meager supply of white wood. 

MINERAL WEALTH. 

Lime is manufactured on section 35. Brick liave also been manufactured on 
section 3, and a bed of red oclire lying on section 8 was used in painting some of 
the first buildings and the old red scliool house on that section. This mineral is 
not considered pure enough to be profitably worked. Tlio soil also shows traces 
of bituminous coal, copper and iron. The latter ore, manifesting itself in mag- 
netic 6t mineral springs. One of these, of great power, has been discovered thin 
year, on the farm of James Sutphen, section 28. The water bubbles up from the 
soil with icy coldness, and flows over a pebbly bed, staining— with brilliant 
coloring— its stony path. Iron brought in contact with it becomes heavily 
charged with magnetism. The water has not yet been analyzed, 
KABLY SETTLEMENT. 

This township was at first a part of the township of Ada. Lewis Cook, a 



yGoosle 



48 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTS. 

native of New Jersey, ib aaid to have beea tke first aettier within the liaiits of 
Cascade. He removed from that State to Seneca county, New York ; from 
thence to Washtenaw county, ia tills State ; from which lie came, a pioneer set- 
tler to Cascade in 1830. At or near this time also came Mr. liiram Laraway to 
this place from New York. Ilia wife being a, sister of Mrs. Cook. But, dis- 
couraged by the Iiardshipa of the wilderness, he soon returned to hia native 
place. In the following year, Edward Liaen, a native of Ireland — whose shores 
he left for America in 1830— aettled in Cascade, whore he yet residea, a usefol, 
industrious citizen. During the year 1838, and the aubsetiuent year, he waa fol- 
lowed by James Miiy, David Petted, Joha Farrell, James and William Annis, 
Michael Matthews, Patrick, Christopher and Michael Eardley, all natives of the 
sameconntry, most of whom yet3Urvlve,orderlycitizen3of their adopted liome. In 
1838, Frederick A. Marsh, of New York, united in niarria^'e with Olive Guild, a 
daughter of Joel Guild, one of the pioneer settlers of Grand Rapids — and began 
domestic life in. the unbroken wilderness, one milenorth, and west of where Cas- 
cade village now stands. Mr. Marsh lived to see tiic torest yield its place to cul- 
tivated fields and comfortable dwellings, and to have a school house erected on his 
owft land. He was killed by a fall from hia wagon in 185G. Mrs. Marsh, afterwards 
Mrs. Walden, survived her husband eleven years, and often spoke of those days, 
when her nearest neighbors were miles away, and for three months at a time she 
did cot see thefaceof a whiteman, except her husband, while a human being paas- 
ing over the newly cut road waa arelief to her intense loneliness. She died at the 
old homestead in 1867. 

Sometime during 1839 or 18i0, Mr. Laraway returned to his Cascade posses- 
sions, and was frozen to death between that place and Ada, in the winter of 1841. 
Widow Laraway bravely met the heavy burdens of pioneer life, and trained up 
three sons and a daughter to lives of usefuluess. While the name of aunt Mary 
Laraway became a household word in the commnnitj and a synonym of virtue 
and piety. She lived to see her children settled in life, and died suddenly iuthe 
summer of 1809. Her oldest son is well known as the proprietor of a stone- 
cutting establishment in Grand Rapids. 

Peter and George Teepie came to Cascade during these years, joining the set- 
tlers on the west aide of the Thornapple, while the eastern side was yet unmarked 
by civilization, but inhabited on and near sections 33 and 36, by a colony of 
about 350 natives, known, through the adoption of the name of their missionary, 
as the Slater Indians. 

In the year 1841, Peter Whitney, of Ohio, moved his family into that part of 
Cascade known as Whitneyville, and E, D. Gove, of Maaa., selected a site for his 
future home near the center of the township on sections 33, 15 and 14, to which 
he brought his family in the summer of 1842. Horace Sears, from New York, 
and Zerah and Ezra Whitney,'(father and brother to Peter) accompanied them in 
their jouniey and settled in Whitneyville. Mr. Gove yet resides on the land he 
first settled, on section 15. But the old homestead on section 21 — -being the second 
house built on the east side of the river, in this township-— having sheltered chil- 
dren and grand children, was burned in the autumn of 1809. Mr, Sears yet-lives 
in Whitneyvilla ; and Zerah Whitney, alected Justiea of th« Fiaea at tha first 



■.f?d by 



GooqIc 



HIBTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTT. 49 

township meeting — now an oged man — residcB with his son Ezra on a farm south - 
of Grand Rapids. Another eon of Zerah Whitney, Oscar, died at Whitneyville 
in 1849. And the reraiiining sons, Peter, Jolinaon and Martin, now reside in other 
parts of the county. 

In the Spring of 1843, Asa W. Deuison, andtamily, of Mass., (accompanied by 
a brother, Gideon H. Denison, look ing for a homestead, to which he brought hia 
family the following year,) came to join the settlers on the west side of the 
Thornapple. Coming in on the Stat« road, from Battle Creek to Grand Eapida, 
the teams, women and children of the company, were obliged to wait at Ezra 
Whitney's public-bouse, for tlie road to be " chopped out" between that point 
and the river, theirs being the first teams that passed over the road. At Cascade 
they forded the Tliornapple with their household goods, and found timbers on 
the ground for the erection of the old Ferry House, (now Cascade Hotel,) which 
was, at that time, owned by D. S. T. WcUer. During that year the house wae so 
far completed as to admit ol occupancy, and the first ferry-boat commenced its 
trips just above where the bridge now spans tint stream. D. S. T. Weller then 
owned tbe plat of land now occupied by Cascade village, although first pur- 
chased by Joel Guild ; and it was at that time staked out into, lota of one acre 
each, aa the fine fall on the river gave hopes for the speedy erection of mills at 
that place, some of the most sanguine settlers pbopbesying that Cascade would 
outstrip Grand Rapids in the strife for precedence. Mr. W. sold out his prop- 
erty here to W. S. Gunn, in 1846, who held it until after the organization of the 
township. Ml-. Weller ultimately settled in Grand Rapids city, where he re- 
maned until he transferred liis home to Detroit, in 18C9. 

During the year 1845, a disease, which our old settlers denominate the black 
tongue, broke out among the Indians near Wbitneyville, reducing their number 
in a few weeka to about 200 persons. The band now became slowly wa8t4jd by 
disease and removal, until leas than fifty remained at the time of their removal 
to the Indian Reservation in 1858. In the year 1846, another family was added to 
the few settlers, of the east side of the river ; — Jared Strong, the first settler in 
the forest between E. D. Gove and Ada. The following year a school was opened 
in a little loghouse on the rive[ bank, section 37, for the fcwpupllsof that vicinity. 
Who the young woman was, to whom belongs the rank of pioneer teacher, we 
have been unable to ascertain, or whether this was the first school taught in the 
township. It was certainly the first on the cast side of the river ; and the lum- 
ber sawn for tlie Whitneyville school house, erected in 1848, was among the first 
work done by the old aaw mill, on Sucker Creek, then owned by Pet«r Whitney. 
Abont this time, also, the Kalamazoo stage made its trips through Whitneyville — 
via Ada— for Grand Rapids. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The first township meeting was held at Whitneyville, April 3, 1848, and the 
following board of township oflicers was elected : 

Supervisor— Peter Teeple. Clerk — John R. Stewart Treasurer — Asa W, 
DenisoD. School Inspectors— Jamw H. Woodworth, Thomas I. Seeley. Com- 



yGoosle 



50 HIBTORT AND DIRBOTORI OF KENT COUNTY. 

missioners of Highways — Ezra Whitney, Fred. A. Marsh, Win. Degolia. Justices 
of the Peace— Leonard Stewart, Zetah Whitney. Assessors — Thomas I. Seelcy, 
Harry Clark. Constables— Morris Dfnison, 0. P. Corson, Wm. Cook, Petur J, 
WhitDey. 

Of the above board, Peter Teeple is yet a respocte<l inembur of the township. 
J. R. Stewart, after filling other offices of trust, and teaching for several terms 
the Cascade school, remored to the city, where ho now residua. A. W. Denisoa, 
was alao a recipient of the various gifts of the voting public, for many years, and 
died from injury by the kick of a colt, in 1857, aged 53 years, universally 
mourned hj his townspeople. His widow — now Mrs. .Tohtison — yet lives, and to 
her are we indebted for much of our information in regard to the early days of 
Cascade. J. H. Woodworth is now engaged in fruit culture in the north part of 
the township, near Ada village. Of T. I. Seeley we have known nothing since 
1853. Messrs. "Whitneys and Marah, we have spoken of in our preceding pages. 
Wm. Degolia amassed a fine property, and left the county in 1860. A few months 
after his removal, his body was brought back for burial. L. Stewart is also with 
those, who, sleeping, dream not! Harry Clark yet lives, where he first broke 
ground, a hale old man. Mr. Denison is a thriving farmer on the north line ot 
the township. 

About the year 184S, W. H. Chilison came to Cascade anil erected a small 
(Iwelling house near the hotel ; also a log house just across the river, to which, 
in 1849, Rev. Erie Prince, of Ohio, brought a small stock of Yankee notions and 
opened a store, or grocery, for those whose nearest tmdiug point wasGrand 
llapids. Elder Prince deserves more than a passing notice. He soon identified 
himself with the religious, and educational needs of the young community. He 
held at one time the office of School Inspector, and, up to the time of his death, 
worked actively in the Sunday school cause, as Superintenilent in the different 
neighborhoods, now grown around tlie first nucleus of settlers. Was a picnic or 
temperance meeting to be looked after, or were chastened hearts called to lay 
their treasures in the dust, Elder P. was ever found ready to speak the kindly 
word, pour forth the earnest appeal, or—with tender thought of sympathy — lead 
the sorrowing mourner to Him, who is the " resiirrection and the life." The 
fathers' and mothers of the little ones of to-day remember with affectionate 
respect the tall, slightly bowed form, the kind face, the searching, yet mild grey 
eye, and the hand lightly laid on the head, as he passed tliem with some friendly 
question, or brief admonition — seed sown in life's morning time ! In the autumn 
of 1853 he was called upon to speak before the Kent County Agricultural and 
Horticultural Society, at Grand Rapids, October 6th ; and his address will be 
found in the records of the society, for that year. About the year 1858, he 
donated to the township of Cascade the land occupied by the Cascade cemetery ; 
and there his body lies buried. His grave is shadowed by a young oak, and 
unmarked— by an explicit clause in his will — by a headstone. He died August 
7, 186S, aged 65. In church connection he was a Presbyterian. 

We have been unable to learn the precise time that a postoflice was given this 
township. We think, however, it was established at Whitneyville, soon after its 
organization. The first Postmaster was Clement White, who held that poiition 

tedbyGoOQie 



HI8T0KT AND mBECXORT OF KBBT COUHTY. 51 

witli only an intermission uf one ot two years, until the ofRoe was discontinued 
in 1868. 

A. postoffite wits also estabiiBiied at Cascade in 1S54, postmaster Dr. M, W. 
Alfred, first resident physician, A store was opened the same year at Cascade by 
Seymour Sajje, and William Gardner. When the drumbeat of the Union echoed 
through ouv land in ISfil, Cascade wjts not forgetful of her trusts and privileges 
as a small luembur of a great country. It is to be regretted that no complete list 
of those who (Icinned the soldier's unitoria has been preserved. We have called 
to mind eighty volunteers, and the number is probably about a hundred. Of 
those who never returnei.l we are also unatile to give a perfect record. But, from 
eviry battle field of the Itepublic from 1861 to the close of the eonteat, came 
back a voice bidding some heart grow chill with pain, yet glow with hallowed 
pride, for the ^wih that were " marching on 1 " 

CASCADE TO-DAY. 

Caseado has liecJi an organiBud township for twenty-two years, and, according 
to the census for 1870, has 11T5 inhabitants. Children, between the ages of five 
and twenty, by report of public schools, 18li9 — il6. Votes cast at the last April 
election— 337. Property assessed, real estate, $304,107 ; personal, |32,31T. 

The follinving is tliH present Board of township ofticers: Supervisor, Edgar li. 
Johnson; Clerk, Henry C Denison ; Treasnrer, Geo, W. Qorham; Justices of the 
Peace, Geo. S. llichardson, John F. Proctor, Lawrence Meach, Hugh B. Brown ; 
School Inspectors, E, R. Johnson, (^has. F. Holt; Highway Commissioners, Jona- 
than W. Sexton, Clinton A, Wood, Chas. M. Dennison; Constables, 8. G, Fish, T. 
J. Hulbert, Miner Spnnlding, Warren Streeter, 

SCHOOL HOUSES, 

Cascade can claim one or two school houses of decidedly fine appearance and 
convenience. But many of her school buildings are those erected in her infancy, 
and are wholly iuadequatc to the demands of the present school papulation. A 
movement is being made, however, to remedy this detect in many districts. 

Her present number of districts is ten. District No. 10 was organized in 18i7. 
There is afrftnic house on section 35, built in IH-t^, District No. 4 was organized 
in 1847, and built a small frame house on section <J : are now (1870) erecting a 
line structure on the same site, on the Cascade and Grand Rapids ro:id, one mile 
from Cascade village. District No. 1 was organised in 1818, and bailt a school 
house in 1840, on section 20, which stood until 1869, when a frame house was 
erected on tiie same site. District No. 8 was organized in 1849, and built a small 
log house on section 10, which yet stands. District No. 13 (fractional district, 
Cascade and Paris) was organized in 1810, and built a small frame house on sec- 
tion 31, iu 1350. In 1807 a good frame house, painted white, and protected by 
window blinds, was erected. District No. 3 was organized in 18,)3, and built a 
frame house on section 14, in 1834. District No. 8 has a frame school house, 
painted white, built in 1858, on Relation 8. Fractional District No. 10 (Oaacada 
and Lowell) was organized in ly.li), and lias a small log house on east side of sec- 
tion 13. District Nu, 5 was organized in 1837, and school taught in a small log 
house on south side of section 33 ; was reorganized in 1880 and log house built in 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



EISTOKT AMD DIRXCIORT OF KENT COUHIlf. 



center of wction 33. This was burned in 1887, and a temporary building has 
supplied its place until the present year. A fine house is now in process of erec- 
tion on section 38. District No. 6 was organized about 1860, and has a nice frame 
Bohool building, painted white, and fitted with black walnut furniture, on sec- 
tion 36. 

CHURCHES. 

Only one church edifice has as yet been erected in Cascade. Tliia Las been 
built by the Roman Catliolic Brotherhood, and staoda on the northeast comer of 
section 31, It was built in 1856, and cost about $1,000. The building is ol wood, 
with a stone foundation. The society worshiping here was founded by Fathers 
Decunic and Fizaski. The latter was parish priest in 1849, when the church mem- 
bers were few and worshiped in private houses. Now the church numbers about 
47 families, to whom Father Rivers preaches monthly. A Sabbath School ia con- 
nected with the church. The M. B. Church also has two classes in this township, 
numbering about 60 members and worshiping in school houses. The Xliiited 
Brethren persuasion have a small charge of about a dozen members. And the 
"Christiana" also hold public worship, but the strength of the order we have not 
ascertained. 

We regret our inability to give the number and membership of our Sundiiy 
Sehoala; though nearly every district has one connected with its regular church 
worship, 

CEMETEltlES. 

Cemetoriea are located on section 31~Oatholic. Section 10 — Cascade Burial 
Ground. Section 35— Whitney vi lie. Section 7 — West part of township. ■ 

CASCADE VILLAGE. 

Cascade village is located ou the lino of sections 9 and 10, on the west side ol 
the Thornapple river. It contains a Hotel, now owned by DeWitt Marsh, where 
all township business is transacted ; a general store, and Post-office, in charge of 
E. D. Johnson ; flourmg and saw mills, owned by H. L. Wise and Jacob Kusterer ; 
a physician's office, occupied by Dr. Danforth ; and less than a dozen private resi- 
dences. The flouring mill is a large, well constructed building, with a capacity 
for three run of stone. Dr. Danforth is the resident physician, and is making 
preparations for opening a drug store in connection with his office. His practice 
is Eclectic. 

Gaylord Holt, professor and teacher of mu»c, resides one mile north of Cas- 
cade, on the river road, This was also the former home of Hon. H. H. Holt, now 
of Muskegon, who has represented his district in the State Legislature. 

WHITNBYVILLE. 
Whitnejville is apoint on the old State Road, between Battle Creek and Grand 
Rapids; and is situated ou section 35. A Hotel, erected there in 1853, and famil- 
iarly known as the Whitney Tavern Stand, yet opens its doors to the public, under 
charge of S. F. Sliter. Jnmea Sutphen now owns the old Whitney saw mill on 
section 36, 



yGoosle 



niBTORV AND DIRECTORY Of KflNT COUNTT, 53 

COURTLAND. 

Courtinnd is loumlcd od tLe north by Nelson, on the eust by Oakfiekl, on tlie 
Bouth by Cannon, and on tlie west by Algoma. 

Barton Johnson, tJie first settler of the township, located in May, 1838. He is 
still a resident, and may be 'found on the west half of the southwest quarter of 
section twenty- two. Alexander De.in settled in the township in I8S9. He was 
the first to locate lands, selecting the northeast quarter of section twenty-one. 
The manner in which this tract came to be located by him is quite amusing. Mr. 
Dean and fifteen others came into the country to select homes and lands, with the 
understanding that the right of first choice should be decided among them by 
lot. So they drew, and lo and bthold the lot fell upon — not Jonah, but Alexau- 
der, and he therefore exercised the right of first choice by selecting the piece 
just mentioned. 

These sixteen persons jociited land contiguous to eueh other, and moving to the 
township a short time afterward, organized it, and resided there alone for a num- 
ber of years — or until about the year 1844, or 1815, when tbey were joined by 
Horace Colby, Philip Becker, the two Thompsons and others. The first town- 
ship meeting was held at the residence of Barton Jolia>on, in the spring of 1830. 

Among the other early settkrs of tiie township were the following named per- 
sons: Thomas Addison, lohn Aiistm, Sabm Johnson, Benjamin Botsford, David 
Haynes, Lauren Auhlin, Irani liarnes An^ion Ensign, Philo Beers, James Kinyon, 
the Rounds and Hunting (tmiliis, Zeiias B White and others. 

The present township ot Couitlund, togethei with some five olher townships, 
were united under the n inie of Courtland, ■ibout the year 1830. Subsequently 
Algoma was detached ftoni thi^ organization and atill later by a legislative mis- 
take, Oakfiekl and CoiirtUnrt were reorganized under the the euphonious name 
of Wabaais. 

The first officers of the township were bnpervnor, Phiio Beers; Clerk, Thomas 
Addison. The reeords do not give the names of the persons filling the less im- 
portant ofiici'S. 

The 

i'Kt;S£NT OFFlCEliS, 
are. Supervisor, Win. U. Myers; Clerk, Isaac M. Hunting; Treasurer, Frederick 
C. Stegaman; Justices ot the Peace, Joseph Salkeki, Henry 1). Burliiigame, Wm. 
II. Myers, Thomas Addison; Commissioners of Highways, Simon P. Peterson, 
Ezra Stoner, Jos. SalkcM ; Constables, Robert Carlyle, John Peterson, Peter Cud- 
ington, Cornelius Richnrdeon; School inspectors. Nelson Graham, Charles H. 
Carlyle. 

THE SOIL 
of Courtland is mostly good. The southern part is what is called timbered open- 
ings; the northern part is timbered with pine, mixed with liard wood, and the 
soil is less productive than the southern part. There are many better townsbipa ; 
but yet tiiere is some land within its bounds that cannot be outdone in the 
production of the staple crops. 

There are many fine farms in Courtland, among which arc those of Alexander 
Dean, Joseph F. Hayes, Calvin and Almoa Tliompson, Philip Becker, Jacob Sny- 

.-.fedby 



GooqIc 



alSTORT AND DIRBCTORI OF KBNT COUNTT. 



der, Daniel S. Moore, Edward S. Fuller, Nathan D. Saunders, Zenas B. White, 
Win. H. Myera, Horace Colby, Robert Cornell and Noah R. Ashley. 
THE LAJvES. 

lu this township are few in number. Silver Lake, the lavj^est, \s situated oil 
sections twenty-seven and twenty-eight. It is triangular in shape, being about 
one and one-halt miles in length by one half mile in breadth in the widest place. 
It has fine gravelly banks, and is one of the moat beautiful lakes in the county. 
Johnson Lake, a small, but fine body of water, is situated on the southeasterly 
portion of section twenty-two. Big and Little lirowcr Lakes are situated on the 
soutUcrn part of section thirty-four. Both of them are siiiFill. 

THE SCHOOL HOUSi'IS 
are numbered ami located aa follows : The Round's sehool house, in district No. 
S, is located on the south line of section thirty, ia a sm^ll, red, frame atructurc, 
and was built in the year 1860. 

The Stinson school house, in district No, I, is situated on the ^outh lino of sec- 
tion twenty-eight. It is a wooden building, painted white, and was built aoiiiu 
twelve years ago. 

The Shank school house, district No. 2, is located on the north line of section 
twenty-nine, near the residence of G. Shank. It is a rtspoctalile looking, red, 
framed structure. 

The Graham sehool house, in district No. 7. a small, frame btiikiin^. painted 
white, is located on the east lino of seetiou twenty -seven. 

The Becker school house, in district No. 4, is locatwl on the south line of section 
twenty-five. It is a small, white, framed atriicture, and baa been built some 
fifteen years. 

The Smith school house, in dLstrict No, 0, i>i built of logs, .'lud is situated on 
the north line of section two. 

The Courtland Center school house, in district Xo, ;i, is located on the north 
line of section twenty-two, one-half mile east of the centre of the towiialiip. It 
is a fine, framed structure, painted white, and his been standing but two years. 

The Benham school house, in district No, r>, is located on the west line of sec- 
tion nine. It is a framed building, painted red, and was erected In the year 
J8(!0. 

MILLy. 

The Becker Shingle Mill, Jacob Becker, proprietor, if located on the north line 
of section twenty-three. It was built in the year 180». 

The Davis steam saw and shingle mill combined, is located near the centic of 
section 10. It was erected in the year 1809, Hiram U, Davis, proprietor. 

The Becker saw mill, Garrett Becker, proprietor, is locatcil near the northwest 
corner of section eight. It was erected in the year 1S(!7. 

The Anderson saw mill, John H. Andi'rsou, proprietor, is located ni'ar the 
south hne of section 7, on Potter Creek. It was liiiiH in the year ISIiti. 

Hosted by Google 



UISTORT AND DIRECTORT OF KEKl COUNTY. ■ 56 

The Porter shingle mill, Dennis Porter, proprietor, is located on Porter Creek, 
ifiar the centre of section 7. It was built in the jear 1S(18. 
The 

COUUTLAND CENTER HOUSE 

» tlie only liotel in tlie townahip. It is sitnattid at Courtland Cenler, on the 
ioiitkwest corner of section 15. It is a fine, framed stnictitro. 



GAINES. 

Tlie township of Gaines — town 5 north, of range 11 west —is situated in the 
southern tier of townships of Kent county. It in l>onnd(;d on the north by Paris, 
on the oast by Caledonia, on the south by Leightou, Allefjan county, and on the 
west by Byron. 

The first settler in this township was Ale;(ander Clark, who located on section 
8, in the spring of 1837. Ho was joined the following autumn by Alexander L. 
Bouck, who located on section 3, bis present homestead, and Andrew and his son, 
Kenssalaer Mesnanl, who located on section 17, the place now occupied by Henry 
Eelley; and soon after by Foster Kelloy, Charles Kelley and Joseph Blain, who 
located on their present homesteads, on sections 4 and 5, Gaines at that time had 
little to recommend her to the eyes of civilization ; being nothing more or less 
than 86 square miles of wilderness. Yet to the hardy, enterprising pioneers her 
heavy forests ot beech and maple, and in some localities pine and oak, abundant 
supply of fresh water, with an average supply ot licar, wolves, deer, wild turkeys, 
etc., possessed a charm that was irresistablo. And the ice once broken the develop- 
ment of her resources was only a question of time. 

At this time the only thoroughfare within the limits of the territory of Gaines 
was a rood known as the " Old Gull Road," rujioing a zig-zag course from north 
to south And the first settlers seemed for evident reasons to strike for the vicinity 
of th s roa 1 And we now find some of the richest farms in tiie county near its 
1 ne It It as fterward straighiened as tlie township became settled, to coitcs- 
po 1 witl tl e section iiucs, and becanic a stage route from Grand Kapids to Kala- 
a 170O 11 t 1 the completion of the plank road in 1834. 

An oug tl e first settlers who still reside in the township, and identified with 
its organization, growth and prosperity, are Daniel Woodward, Stephen A. Ham- 
mond, John E. Woods, Ciiarles B. Keefer, Benjamin Colhurn, R. G. Sessions, Jas. 
Reynolds, Wiiliam Kelley, John Wolcott, R. R. Jones, William Ilendrick, Aaron 
Brewer, Thomas and Wilmot H. Biain, William Budlong, James M. Pelton, Orson 
Cook, Peter Van Lew, Eseck BurlingaHic, James T. Crumback and Bryan Green- 
Gaines, aside from her agricultural prospects, offered but little inducement to 
business men. Plaster and Buck Creeks both rise near the center of the town- 
ship, but were too small during most of the year for mill sites. There was, how- 
ever, a small water mill erected on the latter stream about the year 1852, by Kseck 
Buiiingame, on section 18, which is still running, and which cut t.he lumbw for 
some of the firtt frame buildings in the town«hip. 



Hosted by 



Google 



56 HISTORY AND DIRECTOBY OF KENT COUNTY. 

Moat of the settlers of Gaines, aa is usual, were poor, having barely means 
enough to enable them to purchase tlieir land ol the government at ¥1.35 an 
acre, get their familiee and household goods transported through the wilderness, 
and gain afoothold on their forms. But with persistent energy they set to work, 
and the heavy forests began to disappear. It was sooa foiiiid to be one of the 
richest tracts m the vicinity for agricultural purposes, and at the present date is 
one of the boat in the county. The northhalf of tlie township ia gently rolling, is 
well watered with springs and small streams. The soil is good and of almost 
every variety. Apple and peach orchards abound. Pears, grapes, ((ninees and 
cherries are cultivated to some extent and with good success. 

The southern portion comprises a range of beautiful hills ami table lauds, ad- 
mirably adapted to fruit and vine culture, and although not developed to any 
great extent, has some of tlie best orchards in tha county. The soil is gravelly, 
with a mixture of clay and loam, and ia well adapto.l to all kinds of grain. 
ORGANIZATION. 

The first attempt at organization was as a part of Paris, in 1839. Foster Kelley, 
Joseph Blain, Alesander Claik and Andrew and Renssalaer Mesnard were among 
the township officers of said organization. In the year 1848, it was organized 
under the name of Gaines, and the first township meeting was held at the old red 
school house, on the northeast corner of section 8. Among the laws passed at the 
firat meeting was the following: 

"On motion of Orson Cook, it was voted that a tax of two dollars and fifty cents 
be raised for every wolf killed in the townsliip." 

Wolves were rather troublesome neighbors in those days, and the autlior of the 
motion probably owed them a grudge for their former depredations. Wolves 
made frequent viaits to t!ie early settlers, and would make the very earth tremble 
with their bowlings and complaints to the intruders of their time-honored homes, 
and usually levied a tax before morning. And, like the wolves of the present day, 
were only satisfied with the best qaality of mutton. One occupation of the boys 
and larger girls of that day used to be to Are the old stumps about the place in 
the evening to scare away the wolves. About the year 1840, there was a wolf who 
had her beat from this vicinity to Gull Prairie, in Barry county, and was known 
as the "Gull Prairie wolf," who usually made the round trip once a week. (Better 
time than the early stages.) The dogs would not molest her, and she seemed to 
fear neither man nor beast. She had been caught once in a steel trap, and all 
efforts to entrap her again were lor a long time unsuccessful. Even the children, 
in time, learned to distinguish her voice from other wolves, and were in the habit 
of listening for her on certain nights. She seldom disappointed them, and made 
night hideous with her dismal howls. She finally killed four sheep in one niglit 
on the premises of Mr. Mesnard, belonging to Sir. Rice. Mr. R. R. Jones, who 
lived near, requested the owner to leave one of the carcasses which madame wolf 
had partially devoured, and he did so. Mr. Jones and Orson Cook then held a 
council of war. It was determined to make one more effort to entrap her. 
Accordingly two traps were set about the carcass. But on her nest visit she 
contrived to remove the carcass several rods, taking care to avoid the traps. 
Another council resulted in tome more trap*. Four wert fat — placing in ths in- 

^,fpd by 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT^COUSTT. 67 

termediate spaces small pieces of iron, wliicli wore leit in sight, wliile the traps 
were carefully concealed. This time they outwitted her. For after visiting two 
barns in the neighborhood, and trying to obtain a fresli quarter of mutton, alia 
went and put her identical game foot into one of the traps. Early on the follow 
iDg morning, MesBrs. Jones and Cook took the trail in pursuit. Thej obtained 
a glimpse of their victim near the present residence of Mr. Blake, on section 15, 
and, after following her to the vicinity of Duncan Lake, in Barry County, suc- 
ceeded in getting her headed toward home. They followed and overtook her on 
section 25, in Gaines. She " caved in," completely vanquished, and submitted to 
being bound with bark and slung to a pole ; our two hunters resolving to carry 
her back alive the the scene of her recent murders. A thing, by the way, much 
easier resolved thin executed. For they were soon satisfied to leave all but the 
pelt, for which they received one dollar, and ten and a half dollars in the shape 
of County and State bounties. They soon after caught a neighbor's boy by the 
heel, in one of the same traps. A large, good natured specimen of the " Genus 
Yankee," about twenty years of age, who, anxious to become versed in all the 
mysteries of woodcraft, waa peering about to see how a wolf trap was set. He 
found out— as well as how one was sprung. His cries soon brought his father to 
bis assistance, and gave the wolf hunters no further trouble. 

But the wolves, and their alhes the bears and wild-cats, have disappeared. The 
growth of the township has not been rapid. It could not be expected when we 
consider the difficulties to be overcome. At the first township meeting only S5 
votes were polled. Yet in 1B08, at the Presidential election, she polled 353 votes, 
and her present population (1870) is 1,205. Thrifty farms greet you at every 
turn; comfortable frame cottages take the place of the log hut of the pioneer; 
roads on section lines traverse all parts of the township ; and, from 36 square 
miles ot wilderness, she has grown in thirty-three years to be an enterprising, 
thrifty, agricultural town. 

The first school was taught in a log house erected by Mr. Clark, on the north- 
east corner of section 8, about the year 1843. This, in time, gave way to a small 
frame building, painted red, and known throughout the country as the " red 
school house," which was succeeded, in 1893, by the present elegant structure on 
the same site, which takes the name and color of its predecessor. There are, in 
all, eight school houses in the township — all comfortable frame buildings. 

The society of United Brethren built a church on section 38 in 1867, which, 
although plain and modest is neat and tastv an honor to the association and an 
ornament to the commun y It t d fth m t 1 vated points 

in the township, and can b f ra 1 d 

Gaines has been witho t 1 1 
when the Grand River V 11 y R 1 
Hammond Station was e t 1 1 h i 
and a large freight and p g 
ward & Buckingham ha t I 

Philetus Marsh, Esq., ha ! 

aeinmes a business aspect. 





as 
f 

8 


th 


t 
f 8 

J 


1th 


P 


t year, (1870) 










p 1 

1 

11 


ph ffi 
1 t 


W 

d th 


ed. Wood- 
ff Pierce and 
place already 



yGoosle 



58 HISTORY AND DIRECTOKY OF KEHT COUNTY. 

PIR3T TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

BLBOTED APBIIi 3d, 1848. 

Supervisor— Peter Van Lew. Clerk — James M. Pelton. Treasurer— Charles 
Kelley. Justices of tiie Peace— Joseph Blain, Josiah Drake and Robert B. Jones. 
Assessors— Foster Kelley and Abraham T. Andrews. Com mi sai oners of Highwajs— 
Daniel Rice, Ley! M. Dewey and William Kelley. School Inspectors— Ren ssalaer 
Mesnard, A. T. Andrews. Poor Directors— Orson Cook, Levi Cheney. Consta- 
bles—Lorenzo W. Sandford, John E. Guild, Foster Kelley, Daniel Williams. 
PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — James M. Pelton. Clerk— George Cook. Treasurer— Morris Free- 
man. Commissioners of Highways — Cliester 0. Mitchell, John M. Hanna, William 
B. Pickett. School Inspectors- Abraham C. Clemens, Aaron C. Bowman, Over- 
Beera of the Poor— James M. Pelton, Morris Freeman. Constables— Samuel Zel- 
ner, John M. Hanna and Thomas M. Read. 



GRAND RAPIDS. 

The township of Kent was organized April 4th, 1834. There does not appear 
to have been any certain limits to the organization, but it is supposed to have 
embraced all the settlements within the present County of Kent. The records 
from that time to the present are now in the possession of the township clerk. 
The division, now called the township of Grand Rapids, received its name in 
April, 1843. 

The first township meeting was held at the house of Joel Guild, April 4, 1834. 
This bouse stood on the present site ot the City National Bank, and was the only 
frame building in the county except that occupied as a Catholic church. The 
officers elected were : Supervisor— Ris Robinson ; Clerk— Eliphalet Turner ; 
Assessors— Joel Guild and Barney Burton ; Collector— -Ira Jones. This is the 
same election that was referred to in the history of Ada, to be found in another 
place. 

At the time of the organization, and for several years thereafter, the tases were 
collected by the collector, and paid over to the supervisor, and disbursed by him. 
In 1839 a treasurer was elected. The first entry on his book reads as follows : 
" May, 14, 1839, received of E. W. Davis, supervisor, eight dollars, on the Grand 
River Bank. Three dollars on the Ypsilanti Bank, one dollar and twenty-five 
cents on the Bank of Pontiac, and sixty-two cents in specie." Amouut of taxes 
collected the year previous, fl74.00. This includes all the tasea collected in 
what is now Grand Rapida town and city, Ada and Paris. The rapid growth 
and prosperity of the township will be seen wiien it is stated that the taxes col- 
lected for the year 1869 in Grand Rapids township amounted to 17,763,00. 

The first settler within the present limits of the township was Ezefciel Davis, 
who located on section thirty-four in 1834. He also erected the first house. 
Dnring the same summer Lewis Reed, Ezra Reed, Porter Reed, David S. Leavitt, 
Robert M. Barr, settled in the township. James McCrath, George Young, and 
Simeon Stewart settled in the year 1836. Robert Thompson, John W. Fisk, and 

-.f?d by 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 59 

Mathew Taylor settled in tlic year 1837. Mr. Fisk erected the first hotel, now 
known as the Lake Hnuse. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS 
of the township are ; Supervisor —Foster Tucker ; Clerk — ^Charles J. Manktelow ; 
Treasurer — Henry B. Davis. 

THE SOIL 
is of good quality, excepting tliat in the northeastern part of the township. The 
land is usually rolling, yet in places is quite hiltj. The town is generally adapted 
to the production of wheat and other grain, and is equally well adapted to fruit 
culture. There are several small marshoa in the town, but the largest and most 
productive is on section eight, and contains about one liundred and fifty acres. 
The principal part of it belongs to the eatat« of Obed H. Foote. Saddle Bag 
Swamp contains about three hundred acres, and is situated on sections twenty- 
three, twenty-four, twenty-five and twenty-sis. There are a few more swamps, 
but all of them are small. 

There are twelve 

LAKES 
in the township. The largest is Reed's. This lake is well known to the citizens 
of Grand Rapids, being a recognizedsummer resort for pleasure seekers. Grounds 
have recently been fitted up and tastily laid out with walks by the Grand Rapids 
Boat Club, which will add greater attraction to the place. On the north side of 
the lake is the " Lake House," whose present proprietor is Delos Drew, Esq. 
Boats and fishing tackle are kept by H. B. Miller and John Paul on the south 
side, lor the use of visitors. 

The 

MINERAL SPRING 
escitement which has run ao high throughout the State during the past summer, 
has not passed us by. One of theae 'Tountaina of Youth " hai been discovered 
on the banks of tlie lake just mentioned, which is supposed to be of considerable 
medicinal value. The water has been analyzed by Prof Kedzie, of Lanaing, who 
makes the following report : 

SOLID RESIDUE IN A GALLON, 38.336. 



Carbonate of lime „ , ,11.59 

Carbonate of magnesia .., 10.80 

Carbonate of iron », 50 

Sulphate of lime 1.49 

Common salt ^, IJiO 

Chloride of Potassium .,. ,, 85 

Silica , 1.10 

Organic matter and loss .,, , 1.Q6 

Free carbonic add 17.1-6 inches. 
The public 

SCHOOLS 
in this townaliip are in a iiourishing coaiiitioD, everj inliab itant being attwhed 
to a regularly organized achool district. 

trdbyGoOQle 



60 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

Lake sehool house, in district No. 3, situated on the southeast corner of section 
twenty-nine, waa erected la the year 1859. It is a brick structure, with a bell. 
The school room is supplied with many oi the modern conveniences. 

The school house in district No. 8, situated on the southwest corner of section 
five, was erectud in the year 18li3. It is a neat, substantial wooden building. 

Knapp school house, in district No. 7, situated on section seventeen, ia a 
wooden structure. It waa erected in the year 1850. 

The school house in district No. 5, situated on section thirty-six, near the resi- 
dence of James H. Martin, was erected in the year 18j3. It is a wooden building. 

The school house in district No. 2, situated on section tweuty-flve, near Perry 
nills, is R substantial wooden structure with a beli. It was erected in the year 
1869. 

The school house in district No. 9, situated on the southwest corner of section 
eleven, was constructed of wood, ia the year 1830. 

The school house in district No. 10, located on section ten, was erected in the 
year 1860. It was cnustrntted of wood. 

The Beckwith school house in district No. 1!, situated on section sixteen, was 
erected in the year 18()0. It ia a very neat, wooden structure. 

The schoel house in district No. 4, situated on Bridge street, on section number 
twenty-one, was erected in the year 18(iO. Material, wood. 

There are two 

HOTELS 
in the township. The Powers Hotel, and the Lake House. The former ia situated 
near the city limits, and is kept by A. Powers. The latter is situated neiir Reed'a 
and is kept by Delos Drew. Owing to its proximity to the city this township 
has no postoffice, mill, factory, machine shop, store or church. 

GRATTAN. 

Grattan, one of the eastern tier of towns, is hounded on the north by Oakfield, 
on the east by Otisco, Ionia county, on the south by Vergennes and on the west by 
Cannon. It was originally a part of Vergennes, and was erected into a separate 
town in 1846. It was largely settled in its southern portion, by emigrants direct 
from Erin, and in deference to them, the new town waa named Grattan, in honor 
of the great Irish orator, at the instance, and by the influence of Hon. Volney. W. 
Caukia, now a resident of Sparta. 

Its first town meeting to perfect its organization, waa held on the first Monday 
of April, 1848, at the house of Converse Close ; and the number of votes polled 
was twenty-three, resulting in the election of tbe following named gentlenica as 
its 

FIRST OFFICERS. 

Supervisor— Milton C. WatkinB. Clerk— Volney W. Caukin. Treasurer— Eraa- 
tusW. Beasom. Highway Commisaioners— Thomas J. Morgan, Joshua Fish, Wm. 
0. Stanton. Justices of the Peace— Samuel H. Steele, John P. Weeks, William 
Byrne, Luther B. Cooi. School Inspectors— Samuel H. Steele, Wm. Beaurmann. 
Constables— Jedediah H. Wood, Thomas J. Morgan. Overseers of Poor — Lather 
B Cook, Samuel H, Steele. Assessors- Anthony King, Barlow Barto. 

oJedbyGoOQie 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY, til 

OFFICERS IN 1870. 
Supervisor — Oliver J. Vrsitl^LTis. Treasurer — Joseph Towlt. Clerk — George D. 
Wood. Juslicea of the PtaM— Joseph Tower, Oliver I. Watkins, Wm. Daniels. 
School Inspectors— Asa W. Slajton, George 0. Adams. Constable— Thomaa M, 
Henry. CommisaioDcrs of Hi^jhways—Wm. C. Slayton, Thomaa M. Ileurj. 
The number of votea polled at the last town meetiug was 240. 
By the census returns, tiie town has now a population of 1,303. 
Although tlie siirfucu is qnite broken in consequence of its estra ordinary net- 
work of lakes, there are no ranges of hills, nor prominent highlands in tbe town, 
J and its soil is remarkably uniform, adapting it to tlie mixed husbandry of the coun- 
try, and especially rendering it tlie best wheat growing portion of the county. Its 
wool interest* are more than an arerago, and its productions of hay, corn, oats, 
potatoes, and neat stock are vury fiir. Apples, pears, peaches, cherries, currants 
and grapes, are a uuiversul success, and much attention is being paid by some to 
the cultivation and improvement of ehoice varieties of fruita. Prominent among 
these stands Asa W.Slayton, and it well repays a lover of rural beauty, and horti 
cultural enterprise, and suucess, to Tisit his pleasant and tasteful home, situated 
on section 33, south of the Grand Rapids and Ionia State roiid. ' 

Formerly, considerable attention vas paid to tbe raising of hops, and some 
years tbe returns for this crop reached as high as $10,01)0, but tbe reduction of 
prices has mined the hop interest here, as in many other places. 

Mainly, the town is heavily wooded with oak and hickory, but sections 35 and 
36, and a portion of sections 5 and 35, are rich timber lands. 

There are uo Itss llian twenty-four lakes in this town, covering an area of 
from 36 to 300 acres each, besides a host of smaller lakes or ponds; but six de- 
mand especial notice. Nagles, or Murray's Lake, lies on sections 33 and 34 in 
Grattan, and exteniling more tban half across section 4 in Vergcnnes, is the 
largest of these, and is remarkable for its peculiar shape, being nearly divided in 
two by a long, narrow, promontory of land owned by Mr. W. Fullington. 

Crooked Lake, lying on sections 30, 31 and 39, is one mile long, quite irregular 
in shape, and is noted for its Islands. Round Lake, a pretty sheet of water, on 
section 31, is one half mile long, and about the same in width, and contains about 
80 acres. This lake and Crooked Lake discbarye their waters through Seely 
Creek into Flat River. 

Slaylon Lake is anotbcr'sniull, but beautiful sheet of water, lying on section 33. 
It takes its name from one of the early settlers whose residence is near its shore. 
Musk-PLflt Lake, on sections, 4, B, 8 and 9, is one mile and a half long, and about 
one-fourth of a mile wide, on the average. It contains about 330 acres, and is 
bountifiilly stocked witli fish. The kinds caught in it are black, rock and silver- 
bass, pickerel and muskelonge. 

Pine Island Lake, lying on sections 3 and 10, one mile and a quarter long, and 
three eights ol a mile wide, is the most beautiful of tliem all. Pine Island, Irom 
which the lake takes its name, lies on its bosom like a gem on tbe wave. The 
tar sweeping lake with its picturesque shores and forest crowned isle, as seen from 
the home of Mr. Converse Close, near it, fixes tiie gaze of the bebolder like some 
enchanted scene, of which we sometimes dream. 

JedbyGoOQie 



62 HISTORY AND DIBBCTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 

Grattan has no water course of any note, eic ept Seelj's CrGek, the outlet of 
nine of ita principle lakea. It is an insignificant stream, averaging no more tlian 
two rods wide, yet, with its numerous, and inexhaustible fountains, supplying 
water power sufficient for three grist mills and one saw roil), in its short course of 
half a dozen miles. It takes its rise in a small lake on section lH, just north of 
the State Road, three fourths of a mile east of Grattan Center, r unning north one 
and one quarter miles, through Pine Island Lake, west one and one quarter miles 
through Musk-Rat Lake, south-east one and one quarter miles through Wolf 
Lake, where it appears as a small stream running thence due east, parsing within 
80 rods of its source, and debouching in Flat River, at the village of Smyrna, in 
Ionia county. It was named after Munson Seeiy, a youn;; hunter, who, in early * 
days camped upon its banks and pursued the chase through its adjacent forests. 

In 1850, Edward Bellamy and Nathan Holmes, brothers in-law, formed a part- 
nership, and erected a grist mill upon the stream, near ita embouchure from 
Wolf Lake, on section 16. This was the nucleoua of Grattan Center. The mill is 
now owned by J. A. Adams & Bros. This place is the only businua* center in the 
town. It has twelve or fourteen dwellings, one hotel, one cabinet shop, one 
wagon shop, one cooper shop, two blacksmith sho2>s, one paint shop, one drug 
store, two dry goods stores, and a fine new church. (Baptist, C. C. MMIlt, Pastor.) 
It was erected in 1868. It is built of wood, painted white, costing $5,400. 

The Grattan Union School Hous«, a white, two story, frame building, with two 
departments, is located here, on a beautiful eminencejust east of the village. The 
Metropolitan Cheese Factory, is located just west of here, and its enterprising pro- 
prietor, Capt. B. .Madison, is opening up an apparently prosperous business for 
himself and the farmers for miles around, by this new branch of industry. Grat- 
tan Center is situated in a fine rural district, and its proprietors are wide-awake 
and enterprising, but altogether too far away from railroads for their own con- 
venience, or comfort. Within the past year, the place has suffered a severe loss 
in the sudden death of its esteemed citizen W. L. Atkins, a long time merchant, 
and efficient business man of the town. 

As early as 1848. the Catholics erected a small church in their cemetery, on sec- 
tion 33, dedicated to St. Patrick. In ten years their congregation had become 
much too large for the seating capacity of the ho use, and it was moved upon sec- 
tion 31, and converted into a School House, and a new and commodious edifice 
erected on an eminence one fourth of a mile west of the old site. 

This building, while undergoing repairs, was accidentally burned in 1868. Im- 
mediately, scores of teams were put upon the roads hauling lumber preparatory 
to the building of a new church, which ia now in process of erection, and when 
completed will be an honor to its builders, and an ornament to the town. It is 
136 by 50 feet in size ; has a tower 168 feet high, and is lighted with massive 
windows of sfained glass, which show with pleasing effect. 

The congregation is very large, and their annual pic nic for the benefit of the 
church has become an " institution" of Grattan. It is noted for its tastefully ar- 
ranged, and bountifully supplied tables, and tiie hosts that congregate. Father 
Rivers is closely identified with the early history and prosperity of this people, 
but J. P. McMannus is now the resident priest. 

Besides the Union School, Grattan has but four district school houses, bat, ai 



fed by 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. Od 

would at first seem, its educational interesta are not neglected, as it is coraplctelj 
•urrounded bj fractional districts. 

In 1843, the first settlement was made within the limits of tlie towD, by Dennie 
and John McCarthy, on section 30, and Richard Giles, on section 33. In 1844, 
Luther B. Cook built the first house north of Seelj's Creek, on section 12. The 
same year, William Smith, also settled on section 12, Converse Close, on section 
11; Jared Watkins, on section 13; Henry Green, on section 13 ;Anthony King, Alan- 
son King on section l;Volney W. Caukin,onsection 9; Michael Kennedy, on section 
19 ; and William McCarthjj on section 30. Prominent among the settlers of 1845, 
we may mention John P. Weeks, located on section 35 ; Orson Nichoson, on "'c- 
tion 3 ; William Byrnes, on section 37, and Anson Green, on section 14. In I -"46 
Kussel Slayton, located on section 14, and Dudley Newton, on section 17. Among 
the settlers of 1847, we find Martin Mason, loc^itcd on section 33. Of these old 
settlers, most reside where they first located, but Anthony King, Russel Slayton 
and Orson Nichoson, are dead. Marshal King, son of Alanson King, born Decem- 
ber, 1844, is supposed to be first white child horn in the town. The first death 
OCCWred in the fall of 1848, in the family of a Mr. Springer, then living on section 
15. Isaac Springer, an interesting little boy of five years, was the first victim, but 
in less tlian 18 months, five of the family were laid side by side, and now sleep 
on the very spot where the Union School House stands. 

There are many interesting personal experiences incident to the early settle- 
ment of a new country, which the limits of this work will not permit us to record, 
but the circumstanees attending the first wedding in this town are so peculiar, we 
may not omit to mention it here. A widely known, and highly esteemed couple, 
still residents of the town, wished to get married, but there was no functionary 
in that part of Kent, vested with autliority to perform the ceremony. A well 
known Justice of Ionia county, chanced to be visiting at the house where the par- 
ties were, and their dilemma was made known to liim. Oi course he had no 
jurisdiction in Kent, but the county line was only half a mile away, and a walk 
through the forest, was proposed and agreed to. The Justice took his stand in 
Ionia county, and the bride and bridegroom, protesting they would not leave 
the town to be married, joined hands just over the line, and in the presence of a 
few friends, gathered beneath the grand old oaks, on the pleasant afternoon of 
July S8, 1844, the twain were made one to their own gratification and the gratifi- 
cation and amusement of their friends here, as elsewhere. 

In those early days, the settler, with his axe, cut the way for his future home, 
and in the absence of stores, grist mills and saw mills, supplied, by his own in- 
genuity, the actual necessities of himself and family. To-day, all the conveniences 
of civilized life are at his hand, and the well cultivated farms, and the more than 
ordinary wealth displayed in dwellings and out buildings, are highly significant 
of the sobriety, enterprise, and consequent prosperity of the people. 

Qrattan has not only maintained an honorable position in the county, but has 
also made its record among the dignitaries of the State. Of its first set of ofiicers, 
Hon. Volney W. Oaukin has once represented the Twenty-ninth District, at Lan- 
sing, and Hon. Milton U. Watkina, its first Supervisor, has been Representative, 
also Senator in the State Legislature, and now holds an appointment under the 
United States Government. 



fed by 



GooqIc 



b4 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KEKl COUNTY. 

LOWELL. 

This townsliip lies north of Bowne, and aouth of Vorgconeg. It is one of the 
eaatern tier of townships in Kent county, being hounded on the east hy Boston, 
Ionia county, and on tlic west bj the township of Cascade. 

Its soil, timber and productions are greatly diversified. The soil of the south 
half is mostly clay or loam, lies very high, and is generally level and well adapted 
to farming purposes, and on account of its elevation, an excellent frnit section. 

The north half is considerably broken; by Grand River, which crosses the 
township from east to west, at an average distance of one mile from the north 
line, and Flat River, which cornea in from Vergennes, on the north, ani\ enters 
Grand River about one and one half railea west from the county line, of Kent and 
Ionia counties. The river bottoms, from half a mile to a mile in width, are 
heavily timbered with elm, ash, soft maple, etc, and when cleared make good 
meadow lands. Next back of these bottoms, on either side, rise the sand and clay 
bluffs, wlilch line these streams throughout the greater part of their course io tlie 
county. In some places they rise to the highth of nearly 300 feet, and are usual- 
ly covered with oak, some time quite heavy, but in other places only what is com- 
monly known as "openings," the timber being light, and the ground covered 
with a small growth of oak, interspersed with hazel, and other shrubs. These 
bluffs, somewhat broken by many small brooks which come in from both sides, 
extend back an average of about a mile on each side, wliich, on the north side 
brings us about to the township line, and on the south to the high level tract be- 
fore mentioned. This latter is partially watered by some small lakes, the largest 
of which is Pratt Lake, covering about 300 acres on the north part of section 35, 
near the east line of the township, and about three miles south of Grand River. 
It is named in honor of William Pratt, who settled on tlie north side of it about 
the year 1850. Barcis, or McBwing Lake, on the east part of section 33, is nearly 
one mile in length, but qnite narrow, its greatest width being less than 80 rods. 
It extends from the northeast to southwest; On the northwest corner of the 
same section is a pond of about ten acres, called Morse Lake. Between them, and 
on the south part of the same section, is a small lily pond, hardly to be called a 
lake. Stoughton Lake is a small lake of 4 or 5 acres, near the center of section 
8S, and has a tamarack swamp of about 20 acres on the east of it. There is also 
a small lake of 3 or 4 acres, and a swamp of about 15 acres on the south side of 
section 23. A swamp of some 300 or 400 acres lies west of Pratt Lake, on section 
30. On the south side of section 33, and estending over the line into Bowne, is 
a fine marshof about 40 acres. From Pratt Lake and the swamp already mentioned, 
to this marsh is a ravine through which is a stream of water in wet seasons, but 
which dries away in ordinary weather, leaving the lake without any visible out- 
let. The people along the line have recently petitioned the County Drain Com- 
missioner to open this natural water course deep enough to form a living stream, 
to the south line of Lowell township, from which it would flow into a small 
stream which runs to Thornapple River. Aside from the sources already men- 
tioned, and some few smaller ponds and swamps, water can only be obtained in 
this part of the township by digging a depth of 50 to 100 feet. The timber 
of this Bouthetn part was originally sugar maple and beech, interspersed with 



f9dby 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOKT OP KEST, COUNTY. 66 

very large red and whito oaks. This township ia well supplied with atone for 
building purposes, and in some parts they are used to some estiiat for fencing, 
especially in the northwest eorner of the township, and Tarioua other places north 
of Grand River. Pine gravel beds also abound throughout the north part, and 
the Boil ia ijuite gravelly along the road leading down ths river from Lowell vil- 
lage. 

PIONEEKS. 

In the year 1829, Daniel Marsac came from Detroit, and went among the In- 
dians in the vicinity of the present village of Lowel!, as a trader, although a re- 
gular.trading post was not established until 1831, when Mr. Marsac built a log 
hut on the south side of Grand River, near the present site of J. Kopf & Co. 'a ex- 
tensive chair worka. 

What changes a few years have made ! When Mr.Maraac first pitched his tent 
within the borders of Kent county, then an almost unbroken wilderness, the only 
roads were the Indian trails, and the only meana of navigation was the canoe, or 
" dug out," aa it ia sometimes called ; or, for more extensive tranaportion, a raft 
made of poles, or small loga, fastened together. We do not need to speak of the 
railroads and other facilities for travel now, as the reader can easily compare the 
present with the past. 

In the spring of 1835, a family by the name of Robinson, numbering in all 44 
persona, set out from the State of New York, and arriving at Detroit, embarked 
on a small vessel for Grand Havon via Mackinaw. On the 7th day of June of that 
year they reached the mouth of Grand River, and, putting their household goods, 
etc., on rafta, and "paddling their own canoea," made their way up the river and 
settled in Kent and Ottawa counties, principally the latter, in the vicinity of 
Blendon. These were only a part of the Robinsons. Ris Robinson had been 
trading with the Indians at Thornapple — now called Ada — for several years prev- 
ious to this, and had one son by the squaw whom he had taken for a wife soon 
after he came there. A year later, in 1838, another brother, named Lewis, cam* 
with his family and settled on the west bank of Flat River, in the south part of 
what is now the village of Lowell. He was soon followed by Rodney, a brother 
from the Blendon settlement, who remained one year with Lewis, and then re- 
moved up the river into the present township of Vergennes, where he and another 
brother, Lacaa, have made good farms. Philander Tracy— a relative of the 
Robinson family, who now resides at Grand Rapids, and ia generally known as 
Judge Tracy, also came from the State of New York, and was for some time with 
Lewis Robinson. The timber for their first log hut was ent two or tliree miles up 
Flat River, and floated down by the help of Indians, who were always friendly to 
those who used them well. 

There were good and bad Indians, as well as good and bad whites. One Indian, 
named Negake, who was not, however, a member of either of the tribes then oc- 
cupying this portion of the State, but a renegade from some Eastern tribe, who 
had taken up his abode with the Potcawotamies, caused the whites some trouble, 
and was reported to have killed one of the Government Surveyors some years 
previous, when an attempt was made to survey and throw into market all lands 
up to the 43 degree of latitude, which parallel cut across a bend in the rivet in this 



yGoosle 



66 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY, 

township, and took a strip about a mile in width on tbe nortli side, to which but- 
Tey the Indians objected. Subsequently the river was made the frontier line, and 
no lands north of the river were put iuto market until Aui^ust, 1839. 

A tract of land lying on the east aide of Flat River, was set apart as University 
lands. In 1836. Luther Lincoln, from Grand Rapids, formerly from the south part 
of the State, where he had been quite a wealthy man, came and settled on a small 
lot of this University land, and built a log house, which was afterwards used by 
Don A, Marvin, as a tavern. Mr. Lincoln and Rodney, and Lucas Robinson, 
helned the Indians to fence in a tract of about 100 acres, on the east side of Flat 
River, and about one mile from Grand River, for a planting ground, to prevent 
any trouble on account of their letting their cattle run at largo on " Uncle Sam's 
Domain," as the cattle would have been likely to destroy their crops, and this 
would n at d rally have led to hostilities. 

Mr. Rodney Robinson states that the Indiana were usually good neighboi's, and 
even Mr. Lincoln — -whose mind was somewhat wandering, and consequently led 
him into some trouble with the early white settlers, always got along finely with 
the Indians, and whes, on account of some " uupleasantness " with the whites he 
was obliged to leave this point, he went up the river a long distance and erected 
a saw miU, right in the midst of the Indian country. Tliey were often employed 
to work for the early white settlers, and generally well paid, although it was 
usually best to pay them in provisions and other necessaries, rather than in 
money, for, if they got money, many of them would go off to places where they 
could get liquor, and come home drunk, when they would be quarrelsome and 
dangerous neighbors, until the flre-water and its effects were gone. No liquor 
was allowed to be sold to them in this vicinity if the settlers could prevent it, 
although itinerant traders would sometimes undertake to sell it to them in order 
make it easier to cheat them in their trades. 

In 1837, Charles Newton, Matthew Patrick, Samuel P. Rolf, Ira A. Danes, Wil- 
liam Vandeusen and Mr. Francisco— nearly all of whom were from New York, 
settled along the north side of Grand River, on the old Grand River Road, from 
two to five miles west of Flat River. This road came Jrom Ionia, by the way of 
Fallassburg— at which point the first bridge was built across Flat River, in 1840, 
previous to which the river was forded— and passed about two miles west of the 
mouth of the river, thence along down Grand River, near the side of the blafb. 

The following bit of school romance is introduced without any apology: In 
1837 the people of this vicinity organized a School District, including all the set- 
tlers on Flat River, and being the only School District between Grand Rapids 
and Ionia. They erected a log school house in 1838, in the north part of the pre- 
sent village, on the west side of Plat River, and employed Miss Caroline Beard, 
from New York State, to teach tbe first school that summer. The following win- 
ter the district furnished a cook-stove and provisions, and Miss Beard hved in 
the school house and kept the school. Caleb D. Page, who had taken up a piece 
of land near the Fallassburg of later days, took matrimony into his head and 
MisB B. to his heart, and the bonds of wedlock were entered into by this couple 
in tbe school house. 

la 1839, William B. Lyon and Ransom Rolf, also from New York, settled on the 



fed by 



GooqIc 



HieTORT AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUHTT. 67 

Bftine road, near those preyinuslj mentioned. At the time of tlie sale of iaada ia 
this tract, (previously mentioned aa occurring in August, 1839) the Indians at- 
tempted to enter and hold the land tiiey had been tilling, under the pre-emption 
laws, but, as the agent knew nothing about whether the red man could hold land 
by those lawa, tlie matter was referred to the General Land office, and, while 
waiting the decision, Philander Tracy attempted to gain possession by erecting 
a imall hnt on it, and sowing the field to oats, which were destroyed by the In- 
dians. His papers which had been granted were afterward revoked, and, al- 
tliough the decision was that Indians could not enter lands in their own name, 
they lent money to a Frenchman by the name of Nontah, and he bought the land, 
and afterward, failing to pay back the money, he gave them a deed of it. 

The lands were afterward found to be a part of the " University Grant," and so 
alao was the land taken by Lincoln. When Mr. L. leil here, he sold his claim io 
Daniel Marsac, who, in 1847, platted it under the name oi " the village of Dans- 
Tille," which name it retained until about tlie year 1855. In 1850 Mr. M. sold his 
claims to Edwin Avery, of Ionia, who then paid the State and obtained a com- 
plete title to the same. John B. Shear and some others, came in about the year 
1844, and settled in or near the present village of Lowell. In Decomber, 1846, 
Cyprian 8. Hooker, forineriy from Connecticut, came from Saranac, Ionia county, 
where he had been a pioneer and almo'itthe only settler. Mr. Hooker erected the 
first framed house n tl to nsl ii wh ch was also the first in the village. His 
lumber was bron^,! tir n S rinac He commenced his house on the 18Lh day of 
December, 1S46, and on tl e ensuin^ CI r stinas moved into it with his family. 
This would be called j^u k wo k ev n n these days of steam and electricity. 
Said house is the one now owned and occupied by Robert Marshall. In 1847 Sir, 
Hooker erected the grist mill on the east side of Flat River, now owned and since 
enlarged by William W. Hatch, who erected another large mill on the west side 
of the river in 18G7. When Mr. H. first erected his mill it was run by an overshot 
water-wheel— water being brought by means of a race, a distance of about 40 rods 
from the Island iu Flat River. In 1849, Mr H k t acted the dam across 

the river just below Bridge street. In 1849 th first mon ever preached in 
Dansville, was delivered at the house of C. fa II k E i I y Rev. S. S. Brown, 
a Congregational Minister. Mr. Hooker al h d tu j b f building the first 
frame school house in the village, which was th ti t n tl ast part of the coun- ' 
ty. It was built in 1830 and stood on the pr nt M E CI u h site. Soon after 
this a Sunday School was established by the agent of the Congregational Union. 
Society. 

The Lowell post office was established about the year 1848, and took its name 
from the township, which was organized about this time, and which seems to 
have been named on account of its prospects as a manufacturing point, although 
the village was still called Dansville. After Mr. Avery bought Mr. Marsac's 
claim, he added some territory to the original plat, making in all about 100 acres. 
In 1854 Messrs. Riciiards & Wickham platted nearly 100 acres on the west side of 
Flat River, which they named 

LOWELL. 
About the same time Chapiu & Booth's addition to the village of {Dansville was 



.Goosle 



68 HISTOKY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

platted, containing about 30 acres, and Ijing on the eaat of the original plat, but 
within a year, by common consent, the whole Tillage was called Lowell, since 
which the following additions have been platted, and called Additions to the 
Village of Lowell; Fox's Addition, lying north of R. & W.'a plat on the west aide 
Flat River, containing 53 acres, platted by James S. Fos. Lee') Addition, on the 
north of Avery's plat, east of Flat River, containing 48 acres, platted by Peter Lee 
in 1868. -fti^K's Addition, on the west and south of B. & W.'s addition, contain- 
ing about 50 acres, platted hy Mrs. Caroline Snell in 1889. EUsteorth'g Addition, 
lying north and east of Lee'a addition, contains SO acres. 20 of which are within 
the present corporate limits of the village of Lowell, and the remainder in the 
township of Vergennes, platted hj A. M. Ellsworth in 1870. 

An act to incorporate the Village of Lowell paaaed the State Legislature in 1859, 
but for some reason the village was not then organized. It waa re-enacted March 
15, 1861, and the organization completed in the summer following. 
FIRST VILLAGE 0PFI0ER8. 

President — Cyprian S. Hooker. Recorder — Charlea A. Blake. Treasurer — 
Simeon Hunt. Marshal— J. Chapman. Assessor — Cyrus Hunt. Trustees — Wil- 
liam W. Hatch, J. B. Shear and Arvine Peck. 

PRESENT VILLAGE OFFICERS. 

P reaid en t^M orris R. Blodget. Recorder — .John Hugging, Treasurer — Clark 
M. Devendorf. Marshal — Robert Marshall. Truatees ~L. B. Lull, John C. Scott 
and Simeon Hunt. 

The village proper now contains 1,503 inhabitants, according to the census of 
1870. During the past tour years some fine brick buildings l^ve been erected, 
among which are the large two story block on Bridge street, west of the river, 
containing five stores below, and a large hall and offices above ; Lee'a Block, two 
story, which contains two stores and a hall above ; King's Block, now used by 
Joseph Amphiett as a carriage factory, and Graham's Block, three story, contain- 
ing two stores, printing office and other offices, and which was erected almost en- 
tirely by Mr. Graham with his own hands. Beaides the brick storea there are 
some very good wooden buildings. The village contains in all between 30 and 40 
stores, besides the usual number of meat markets, restaurants, etc. There are two 
. hotels: The Clifton House, part brick, kept by Charles Morse, and the Franklin 
House, a large frame building, kept by C. C. Parks. 

MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

Hatch & Craw's grist mills are two large framed mills containing three run of 
stone each, and capable ot grinding 50,000 barrels of flour per year, besides doing 
a large custom business. Water power. 

The Lowell Woolen Mil), erected by Blodgett Brothers, in 1867, is a good, 
framed building, now owned by M. R. Blodgett, and does about $20,000 worth 
of business per year. Water power. 

Wilson, Gardner & Co. have a steam planer, sash, door and blind factory, 
erected in 1868, and are doing a good custom and shipping business. 

Avery & Johnson have a planer and sash, door and blind factory, which is 
doing an extensive custom business, and shipping largely both east and west. 



fed by 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 69 

This factory runs by water power, and was erected ia 1868, on the site of their 
mill wLich was destroyed by fire the previous year. Ia connection with this 
mill ia a machine for the manufacture of wooden cave troughs— a new invention 
of Mr. E.W. Avery. 

FORT'S WESTERN MEDICINE MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

E. M. Fort, the patentee of these medicines, commenced business a few years 
aince on borrowed capital, paying thenfor at the rate of 15 percent, interest. 
Many of our readers will remember having seen his pleasant face on the streets 
of the various towns Mid villages of Kent county, when he was selling his reme- 
dies at retail. The business had increased so rapidly and become to popular in 
Lowell, that in March, 1870, some of tlie leading capitalists of the town joined 
him, and established the above-named stock company with a chartered capital of 
1100,000, making Mr. Fort the secretary and business manager, with the assist- 
ance and advice of a hoard of directors. Since that time they have branched oat, 
and are rapidly introducing it in the adjoining states, and money invested in the 
company's stock must prove exceedingly profitable. Parties who know best, 
think it will soon pay a dividend of 30 per cent, as the sales are already immense 
and largely on the increase ; these preparations being acknowledged to be among 
the best medicines in the market, their popularity having gained for them the 
endorsement of the widely known and popular drug house oi Fan and, Sheley & 
Co., of Detroit, generally admitted to be the largest wholosile drug house in 
Michigan, who have purchased a large amount ot the capital stock of the com- 
pany, and are acting as their agents for Detroit. 

Boycc & Nash hav« a shop for the manufacture of agrn ultural implements, 
axes, etc., making about 130 dozen axes per year, and manufacturing in ali about 
|e,000 worth per year. 

Joseph Amphlett's carriage factory is quite an extensive est iblishment, turn- 
ing out about 100 carriages and wagons per year, 
CHURCHES. 

The Methodist Episcopal church building is a fine brick structure 40x60 feet in 
size, completed and dedicated in 1859. It stands on a little rise of ground on 
Bridge street, east of the business part of the village. Cost over |8,000, includ- 
ing furniture. Near this is the unpretending Baptist church, which is a good, 
little framed building, erected in 1859. During the present season this church 
has been tastefully fitted up and newly painted. The Congregational church on 
th« west side of Flat River is a good looking, ftamed building, 40x56 feet in size, 
erected in 1858 at a cost of $3,500. There are also two or three church societies 
and a Masonic Lodge and a Good Templar's Lodge, which meet in halls. 
SCHOOLS. 

There is a good, framed school-house 3Gx54 feet in size, and two stories high, 
which was erected in 18G2 at a cost of about #3,000. It is being repaired the 
present season, but is small for tl)e size of the district, which takes in quiti a 
large extent of territory, and a larger building will soon be required. There is 
one ward or branch school in connection with this district, which ia the old dia- 



yGoosle 



70 HISTORY AND DIRBCTOBT OP KENT COUNTY. 

trict No. 1, of the township of Lowell. This branch school is located on the 
ionth side of Grand River, in the vicinity of the Detroit and Milwaukee Railroad 
depot, where a village called Segwun was platted by William Cheaebra, about 
the time the railroad waa built, but which is seldom known bj that name. 
MILLS AND FACTORIES. 
On the above-mentioned plat is the ateam saw mill of 0. T. Wooding, erected 
in 1866 by Knapp & Tucker, and capable of cutting 30,000 feet of lumber per 
day; also, the cider and vinegar manufactory of E. R. Peck, erected in 1889, and 
eapable of grinding 18,000 bushels of applea per year. In this vicinity ia also 
quite a collection of small houses, mostly occupied by laborers in the above- 
named estabhsbments and on the railroad. Near at band and a little east of the 
depot is the extensive chair factory of John Koph & Co., which has a small cluster 
of pleasant looking buildings around it, and has withal an appearance of thrift 
and neatness. Thig building waa erected in 1858, by Setli Cogswell, and the 
machinery is run by an overshot waterwheel, water being obtained from a Biiiall 
spring brook which rises about two miles south and comes in through a gorge in 
the hills. 

About amile distant is the laz^ grain cradle and bed bottom factory of B. W. 
Tucker. His first mill was a three-story frame building 30s40 feet in size, erected 
in 1863, in connection with which ia a new mill or shop 35x50 feet, erected in 
1868, In the one item of grain cradles they have facilities for manufacturing 
1,300 dozen per year, besides bed-bottoms and harvesting implements, such as 
hay-rakes, etc. This is also run by aa overshot water-wheel. From 20 to 60 
hands are employed. 

At the head of this stream, and about two miles south of the depot, is a fine bed 
of marl, on tlie farm of Alexander McBride, from which Mr. McB. has manufac- 
tured $4,000 worth of lime within the past four years. 

THE GRAND RIVER Nl'RSERIES. 
N. P. Husted, proprietor, are situated about five miiea southwest of the 
Lowell depot, lie commenced planting in 1863, putting out about 40,000 
apple trees, 40,000 peach trees, and other stock, since which time he has 
been gradually increasing until now he sets 300,000 apple and 300,000 
peach and other stock every year. Besides this be is giving conaiderable atten- 
tion to ornamental stock. The nurseries now cover 130 acres, all closely planted, 
and the amount of sales is nearly $aO,000 per year. From 30 to 60 hands are 
employed. He is also turning his attention to orchard culture, having at present 
1,000 four-year old peach trees, over 500 apple trees, 400 pear trees, 300 pium 
trees, and 4,000 grape vines ; also, a good assortment of small fruits. The soil is 
a clay loam, which is well adapted to the growlh of hardy, sound, nursury stock 
and profitable orchard culture. There are now over 15,000 orchard trees in the 
immediate vicinity, all of which have been set within a few years. Poaches have 
borne well every year. 

EARLY SETTLERS SOUTH OF GRAND RIVER, 

Among the pioneers in this part part of the county was George Post, who came 

fcom Connecticut iu 1843 aad settled on the northwest corner of section S3, at the 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



HISTORY AND DIEECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 71 

crossing of the territorial road from Portland to Grand Rapida, and the one from 
Battle Creek via Hastings, to the trading post then eatablisiied by Daniel Marsao 
at Lowell. He was the first, and for three years the only settler south of the pres- 
ent line of the D. & M. Railroad, within the township. In 1843, Mainard Chater- 
don, with his wife and family of three sons and three daughters, came from Cal. 
houn county, Michigan, (formerly from the state of New York), and went nearly 
to the southwest corner of the township, on section 31, where his widow and the 
three sona and one of the daughters still live, and have nice farms. In 1848-9, 
Harrison Wickham, Peter Hornbrook, Charles Gordon, Mr. Monk, and Mr. Mon- 
tague settled in the south and southwest part of the township, followed in 1850 
to 1854 by John Brannan, William Pratt, John Yeiter, Jacob and Christian 
Lojer, George Acker, Jacob Yeiter, James Eaaterby, James Wallace and William 
Proctor, most of whom were from Ohio, and of Dutch descent, and nearly «ll of 
whom are now wealthy farmers, having good farms and buildings. 
ORGANIZATION. 

The township of Lowell was organized in 1848, being previously a part of the 

township of Vergcnnes, which originally included all of the east part of the 

county. The first township meeting was held at the house of Mr. Timotliy White. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor— Cyprian S. Hooker. Clerk — Timothy White. Treasurer— Henry 
Church. Jnstices^C. 8. Hooker, Daniel McEwen, Samuel P. Rolf and Ira A. 
Danes. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor— Robert Hunter, Jr. Clerk — John Huggins. Treasurer— Webster 
Morris. Justices — Robert Hunter, Jr., Simeon Hunt, Joseph W. Sprague and 
Matthew Hunter. 



NELSON. 

The township of Nelion is one of the northern tier of townships, and is bounded 
on the north by Pierson in Montcalm county on the east by the township of 
Spencer, on the south by Courtland an I on tl c w t 1 y Solon. 

Twenty years ago this town h p was an unl roken n 1 Icrness where wild ani- 
mals made their homes but 1 ttle moleste I by man an I twenty years is a short 
time in which to make a h story But the stalwart men who are now cutting 
down its forests and conrert ng the t ml cr nto lun 1 r wh le at the same time 
fitting the soil for the growth of gra ns and tru ts are do ng a good work, which, 
if it offers few salient points f r the 1 stor an s 1 11 of a mense value to man- 
kind. If he who causes all le of grass to grow where tl re was none before is 
a public benefactor, the world must owe mu 1 to those who open the wildernesB 
to the uses of man. 

We are informed that William H. Bailey was the first white settler in Nelson, 
having settled there in 1851, some time in July of that year. He still resides in 
the township on section 8. We are glad to have sold him a copy of this history, 
and have no doubt he will feel a justifiable pride when he reads the long list of 

^,fed by 



GooqIc 



72 arsToRY and dikectory of kent county. 

residents who now point him out as that honored individual " the oldest inhabi- 
tant." Mr, John S. Jones moved into the township during the same year, and is 
aaid to be the second settler. He now resides on section 33. 

Among the earlj settlera, although we did not learn the date of their coming, 
were John M. Towns, Josiah Towns, N. R. Hili, D. B. Stout, H. M. Stanton, 
George Stout, Andrew Stout, Riley Smith, Samue! Punches, Joseph M, Clark, 
Andrew S. Tindall, John N. Tindall, John Dean, Elisha Dean, H. D. Streeter, 
Thomas Alray, Mr. Ream and his two sons, Bradford Bailey, James Bailey and 
Joseph WooJ. 

Wm. C. Benjamin, a bachelor, came to this town several years ago with a 
" pocket full of rocks," from California, purchased a fine farm, and improved and 
beautified it. He also repented of this lonely state, married an intelligent lady 
and became the father of two ehiltiren. Last summer, at the close of harvesting, 
in which he had worked hard, he committed suicide by cutting his own throat, — 
it is supposed in a fit of temporary insanity. This sad tragedy cast a gloom over 
the entire commnnity where he lived. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Nelson waa organized as a township by the Board of Supervisors on the 13th 
day of October, 1834, and the first township election was held at the house of 
Charles H. Leake on the first Monday of April, 1855, George Hoyle, John S. 
Jones and George N. Stoddard, being Inapectora of Election. The following were 
the 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor— George Hoyle. Clerk— George N. Stoddard. Treasurer- Charles 
H. Leake. Justices of the Peace— Samuel Punches, Simpson Anderson, Cyrus 
Stillwell, Harlow H. Stanton. Commissioners of Highways — Smith Barrett, Har- 
low H. Stanton, Moses E. Ross. School Inspectors — Harlow H. Stanton, Ithiel 
R. Smith. Constables — Bradford Bailey, Josiah D. Townes, Amos Bessey, Peter 
D, Buck. Overseers of Poor — Church Bailey, Joseph Wood. 

From this election we take a step of fifteen years and present the names of the 
PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Mindrus H. Whitney. Clerk — Brownell S. Simmons. Treaaurep— 
David B. Stout. Justices of the Peace — Brownell S. Simmons, Mindrus H. Whit- 
ney, Jason R. Squires. Commissioners of Highways— Jaaon R. Squites, Stephen 
Ferner, Nathaniel Hughey. School Inspectors — OrloQ Smith, Nicholas R. Hill. 
Constable— William A. Dean. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

Pine timber predominates in this township, and in the northeast corner there 
are many large cedar and tamarack swamps. But the soil, although in many 
places light, as the presence of pine denotes, is still very productive, where, as is 
gederally the case, beech, maple and other hard wood trees are mixed with the 
pine. For fruit raising this town promises to be one of the best in the county. 
Its streams are Black Creek, m the northern part of the township, and Little 
Cedar and Big Oedar, in the western part. Pine Lake is a fine sheet of water, 
- covering some 100 acres on Bections 86 and 35. ^_^ 

tedbyGoOQie 



HISTORY AND DIRECIORt OP KENT COUHTT. 73 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Tlie school house in District No. 1, known 33 the Clarli: School Houae, is located 
in the center of section 8, and is & fine framed building, painted white. 

The school house in District No. S, is a plain framed structure, standing near 
the northwest corner of section 30. It was huilt in 1809. 

The school house in District No. 3, a large white, framed building, was erected 
in 1869. It stands on the southeast corner of section 23. 

District No. 4, has a good, white, framed acliool house on the west line of aectioa 
34. It was erected in 18G7 and is known as the " White Dovo '' school house. 

The Cedar Springs school houses, used for a graded school, are described in the 
history of 

CEDiR SPRINGS, 
which village is located partly in this township and purtly in Solon, its descrip- 
tion being given under the latter head. 

OAKFIELD. 

Oal(field, formerly a part of Courtland, lies twenty-one miles northeast of Grand 
Kapids, having Spencer on the north, Eurelca, in Montcalm county, on the east, 
Grattan on the south, and Courtland on tlie west. 

The first settlement was made within its territory, June 5th, 1833, hy Hon. 
Wm. R. Davis, who located on section 19. There seems to have been no one save 
himself and family to breali the solitude of the wilderneaa, till June, 1839, when 
Mr. Isaac Towe St pi nS T wer and William Thornton, (ei-Sherifl of Kent 
county,) with th f m 1 mo d in, and become comparatively near neighbors 
to the hitherto 1 n ly p Stephen S. Tower and Mr. Thornton locating 

on section 89, an 1 M la T wer on section 30. There were no more settle- 
ments till April, 1843 wh n Th mas Crinnion located on section 18, and David 
J. Gilbert on sect 10 n S pt mber of the same year. In 1844, Sheldon Ashley 
selected a beautiful home on section 36, and in 1845, three brothers, Harry, Giles 
and Erie McArthur, located respectively on sections 33, 33 and 34. Slorria Hart, 
section 8; Nathaniel W. Mack, section 13 ; John Davis, section 33 ; Levi White, 
section 31 ; James Elstley, section 31 ; William Peterson, section 30, and Benjamin 
Potter, section SI, may be mentioned as among the settlers of 184Q and 1847. 

At one time the town was organized under the name of Wabasis, but by sub- 
division of the territory, was again incorporated with Courtland, and finally per- 
manently organized under the name ofOakfield, through the influence of Sheldon 
Ashley, in March, 1849. Its first town meeting was held the first Monday of 
April, 1849, at a little log school house in district No. 1, on section 39. This was the 
first school house in the town, hut the log cabin was replaced in 1852, by a frame 
structure thirty-sis by twenty-six feet in size. This is the famous No. 1, that has 
educated, and sent forth more, and better teachers, than any other district school 
in the county. It is known as the White Swan School. Oakfield has sis other 
district school houses: noteworthy among these is the Hor ton School House, a 
large frame edifice, painted white. It was erected in 1868, and is used as a church, 
10 



yGoosle 



74 HISTORY AHD DIRECTORY OP KENT CODKTY. 

as well aa for school puqjoscs. It is located on sections 17 ami 18, just across the 
road from the Horton Cemetery, beautifullj situated on the soutliwest corner of 
section 8. Tliero is no Union School in the town ; but its wlucational interests 
are, and hare always heeii of paramount importaace in the minds of its people. 
Its first school was organized with but six acholars^ali the children then in town 
and kept in a priTato house, with Miss Sarah Dayia, now Mrs. Almon Thompson 
of Conrtland, as teacher. When a school house was fiualiy erected, Mr. Harry 
McA.rthur was installed as teacher, and to his earnest labors many, not only in 
this town, but in adjacent towns, owe much of their advancement in knowledge. 
CHURCHES. 

Religious societies among the people of Oakficld hare reached a highly ad 
vanced, and truly enviable position, if we may beallowed to judge of moral atatua 
by aucceaa, and pecuniary prosperity. It has three very fine church edifices, 
and all its places of worship are weU attended. 

The First Baptist Church of Oakfield, is a fine frame structure, located on sec- 
tion 36. It waa built in 1863, and has a fine bell. It cost about $3,S00, and the 
honor of its erection is largely due to Shelden Ashley, one of the oldest inhibi- 
bitants of the town. C. C. Miller is the present pastor. 

The Second Baptist Society of OakHeld waa organized in April, 1805, with some 
40 members, under the ministration of Rev. C. C. Miller, pastor, and Stephen 8. 
Tower, Henry Rich, Thomas Jones, Nathan R. Squiera and William R. Jones, 
Trustees, The house belonging to this Society^the Second Baptist Church, ol 
Oaklleld — a fine frame building, dedicated January 14, 1808. stands upon on acre 
of ground purchased from the farm of Robert Olmsted, in the southeast corner of 
section 19, It is 36 by 58 feet in siae, iind has a tower flu feet in height, which is 
furnished with a very line toned bell that cost $100. The whole cost of the 
church waa $4,150, of which the citizens of the City of Grand Rapids generously 
donated over f.'JOO. It has an organ, and an excellent choir under the efficient 
leadership of Mrs. Samuel Tower. Rev. C. 0. Miller, is the pastor. 

The First Methodist Episcopal Church, of Oakfield, is also a very fine frame 
building, located on the south line of section, 0, one fourth ol a mile away 
from the Second Baptist Church. 

The total coat of its erection closely approximated $4,oOO. It was dedicated 
April 14, 1809, and ia yearly suppUed fay the circuit with a pastor. 

The physical geography of this town presents us with a rolling surface, quite 
frequently broken with lakes and ponda, with a soil much too aandy in the north- 
ern part, but a rich clay loam in the more aouthern portions, peculiarly adapt- 
ing it to wheat culture, wool-growing, and dairying, besidus the ordinary pro- 
duction of corn, oats, potatoes and buckwheat. 

Ot wheat, large quantities of excellent quality, annuiilly find their way from 
this town to the marketa east and west; and as to wool, Oaklictd has some of the 
best flocks, and carries aome of the finest clips to the fiictories, of any town in 
the county. 

The dairy is receiving more and more attention, and pays esceedingly well, 
where care and capital are expended. 

Horticulture ie in its infancy here aa in many other towns ; but on some fariuB 



yGoosle 



HI3T0RT AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 75 

it has received a sliare of attention, and the returns in apples, peara, peachus, 
grapes, cherries, currants and strawberries, show that Oakfleld, in fruit raising, 
may becornea peer of iier successful sister towns. The timber is mainly oa)i; but, 
scattered over tlie town, there were some fine groves of pine, which are fast 
being rtecimaled l)j tlie jumljermen's ase and saw. 

On sections 1 and2l!iere is a very fine bedof marl lime, so pure as to be cut from 
the ln^ in squares, dried, and placed immediately in the kiln for burning. To fa- 
cilitate the mining of this bed, a chain of lakes on sections 1, 2 and 11 were drained. 
Tliuir natural outlet was through Stack's Lake, which emptied into Black Creek ; 
but, by dint of engineering, an outlet was effected into 'Wab-ah-see Creek, from 
the head of the Horse Shoe — a large lake on section 2 — which is thus rendered 
nearly dry. Of this mart deposit George and JoIi» Banks are proprietors. 

Besides the above, there are several small 

LAKES 
that demand hut a passing notice. Of such is Scram's lake, and Addis' lake 
closely connected witli it, lying on sections 17, 18 and 19 ; the Zeigenfues lake on 
sections 11 and 14— the outlet from which forms the north branch of Wab-ah-see 
Creek; and also a number of little lakes on sections 33 and 34, the principal of 
which is Flat-iron Lake near tlie residence of Harry McArtliur, Esq. But Long 
Lake, about one-half mile long, and one-eighth wide, situa'ed on section 34, 
cannot be thus lightij passed by, for on its frozen surface in March, 1843, oc- 
curred the first death among the wliites of this township. Grin Gilbert, brother 
of Rev. D. Gilbert, in endeavoring to reach his brother's house from Cook's 
Corners, was overciime by fatigue and cold, and perished on this lake. Soon after 
Tahanah, an Indian, in passing on the trail, discovei'ed him lying on the snow. 
The wily Indian did not ajiproacU him, but, after circling several times around 
the prostrate form to make sure that he was dead, sped away to convey the sad 
intelligence to his IVionds. Ever after, the Indians called this "Dead Man's Lake." 

Wab-ah-sec, or Wabasis, as the white people call it, is much the largest lake of 
the town, or even of the county, being two miles lonff. It is very irregular in 
shape, but it is said to average nearly one mile in width. It has excellent fisiiing 
grounds, and at C('rtain seasons of the year- -though they are caught at no other 
time, and even then, are only found in particular places— whitefish are caught in 
considerable quantities. How they come there no one can tell, and where they - 
disappear to is equally a mystery. 

The Wab-ah-see abounds with pickfrel, and agigautic specimen of this variety 
offish has frequently been seen by seekers of the finny spoil, so immense in ita 
dimensions as to excite almost as much woudcr as the periodical appearing of 
the fabulous sea-serpent. Wah-ah-see projects into sections 39, 33 and 34, but 
lies mainly on sections 27 and 38. It was named after the Indian chief Wab-ah- 
see (White Swan), who fell under the displeasure of his people for selHug their 
lands, and also (as they supposed) for secreting and retaining the gold lor the 
purchase. To obtain this, fbey deferred his death, and banished him to the 
shores of this beautiiul and romantic lake. By some the gold is supposed to be 
hidden on its shores, and maoi have sought for it by torchliglit and by sun- 
light, with equal latk of success. Failing to extort money, and maddened by the 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



76 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

loSB of their tinnting grounds, the big chief He ogg ah nnh with almost fiendish 
Bubtlety, iuduceil Wal>-ah-see to go beyoni his hoiitB an 1 in a rirunkei frolic, 
killed hira with a firebrand. His broken ^kuU la nf w in a museum in Connec- 
ticut, having been sent there by Mr. Hall, of Plainfiel 1 

The Oakfield grist mills, containing two run (f stone* eriLtcl in I^ ■* is lo- 
cated upon section IS, on Wabasis Creek, the outlet of the lake wlin-h becomeB 
quite a stream, emptying into Flat River in Montcalm county 

Tbe first saw mill in town was built by John Davifl about the year 1846 or 
1847. It was located on Beaver Dam Creek a small s'rc im running into Wab- 
ali-see Lake, Three times it was swept into r uns bv the freshets and aa often 
repaired, or rebuilt, by the indomitable perseveiance of its owner Gut at last, 
patience and capital ahke gave out, and a steam m;ll was erected in its stead. 
That has since been dismantled, and desolation now reigns where sterling enter- 
prise once presided. No inhabitant of Oakteld and adjacent to towns who 
may read these pages, shall be allowed to forget for lack of a record hero the 
history ot the old mill on Beaver Dam Creek or the Yici='*itudts of its cheery aud 
brave-hearted owner, who snapped his fingers m the face of the jaJe Fortune, 
when she made faces at him, and went whittling awav to tlie tune ot Old 
Bagged," despite nil adversity. (The foregoing quaint cognomen mil be under- 
stood bj every old-time business man of Kent coi nty ) 

The Lillie Steam Shingle Mill was built in 1861 on spction 3 It^saslurned 
on the 17th of April, 18G8, and rebuilt in tlie simc yeir Tbe Ad lis Shingle and 
Cider mills are located on the northwest quarter of section 30 and were I uilt in 
1860 ; John Addis, proprietor. Tlie OakfiUd shingle mill is located on Wab ah- 
see Creek, adjacent to the grist mill spoken of above Near theie nulls a little 
village, consisting of a store or two, a blacksuiiHi shop and half a dD7cn dwell- 
ings, has sprung up within a few years, Thii is the only tus neaa center in the 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Thoraas Spencer. Town Clerk — Harry McArthur. Treasurer-— 
Barry Oagood. Justices of the Peace — Thomas Spencer, Harvey D. Pond, David 
J. Gilbert, Wm. M. Gould. Constables— Nathan H. Gould, Giles McArthur, Wil- 
liam Chapman, Jesse Stewart. Commissioners of Highways — Benjamin Morey, 
William Peterson, CjrUB B. Tliomaa. School Inspectors — John Davis, Lafayette 
Knight. Overseers of the Poor — Sheldon Ashley, Harry Osgood. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Wm. B. Davis. Clerk — Azariah V. Rowley. Treasurer — John 
Ashley. Justices of the Peace — Henry Watson, Oliver R. Lewis, John Ashley, 
George Cathey. Commissionersof Highways — Henry E. Rowley, Chester A. Lillie, 
Rufin Caukin. Schoollnspectors— Wm. H. H. Davis, Henry E. Rowley. Con- 
stttblea — John W. Gilbert, Henry E. Rowley, Edward Jones. 

The town has now a population of 1,083. Of the old settlers, and men who 
took an active part in the organization of the town, Isaac Tower and Morris 
Hart, are dead ; also Thomas Spencer, the first Supervisor of the town, who 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIKECXORT OF KENT COUNTY. 77 

was torn in pieces by the machinery in a mill, in Montcnlm county, in the spring 
of 1867. 

The fitat marriage in the town was solemnized by Uev. James Ballard, August 
2nd, 1840. Bride— Miss Hannah Tower, daughter of Isaac Tower; bridegroom— 
Zenas Q. Winsor, now of Grand Rapids. 

The firet hivth among tlie whitua, was Wm. H. H. son of Wm. R. and Electa 
M. Davis. Boru April 24, ISW. 

Among other first things occurring in the town, was the iirst bear killed, by 
John, and his brotlier, Win. R. Davis, present member of the State Legislature, from 
the Fourth Representnlive District, and present nominee for the same position. 
Returning late one afternoon, in the summer of 1843, from mowing on a marah 
on Crinnion Creek, in the north part of the town, AVilliam riding a horae, and 
carrying sonic game he had caught through the day, John on foot, equipped with . 
a fine rifle, imd closely followed by a faithful dog, were surprised and delighted 
when witliin two miles of homo, by the discovery of a huge black bear. The dog 
gave instant pursuit, closely folloi\ed by the brothers. Frightened by the haying 
of tlie dog, the bear wa« aoon treed. The brothers were quickly upon the spot, 
"William, anticipating bruin a speedy victim to his brothers .unerring aim ; but 
what was their chagrin, on examining the rifle, to find that in the hurry of the 
pursuit, their last cap had been lost from the gun. Here was a dilemma; but 
necessity is said to be the mother of invention, and she diit not belie her charac- 
ter in this case. The only expedient waa to send William one and one half miles 
away, to Mr. Crinnion's, the nearest house, tor caps, if they could be found, 
otherwise for lire, while John and the dog kept watch by the bear. Mounting 
old Dutch, his borse, and furiously flounshing his whip, William was soon lost to 
sight, returning in a very short time, not with gun and caps, however, but a burn- 
ing brand from Mrs. Crinnion's flre-place. He found bruin a few rods from where 
he left him, in another tree, and John and the dog stiU watching. It was already 
du&lc ; what was to be done, must be done speedily. Powder was poured intothe 
tube, and John, a splendid marksman, took aim, while William stood by with a 
live coal, ready to apply at the word fire, wliich soon came, William asserts, in a 
trembling voice, bnt whether John's voice trembled, or William's ears, has not 
been decided to this day ; however, that the sharp crack of the rifle rang through 
the forest depths, and that the bear lay dead at the foot of the tree, are verities 
not to be disputed. 

David J. Gilbert built the second frame barn and dwelling in the town ; Isaac 
Power having built a frame barn in 1840, and William Thornton a frame honsa 
in 1841. In future time, posterity may open its eyes with wonder, asking "of 
what, then, were other dwellings made ?" and it is therefore well to record that, 
in the early days, the woodman's ax was his only saw mil!, and the forest, with 
its treetops waving many feet ahift in the breezes, his only lumber-yard ; conse- 
quently his house was made of rough logs rolled one above another, his floor of 
logs, his roof of pieces of the same, called " shakes ;" his lire place was composed 
of sticks and clay ; his fire of huge logs stood on end and walked across the floor, 
aside at a time, and rolled to their place with a hand-spike. The doors were 
rude oaken planks split from the heart of some huge forest giant, and as for win- 



fed by 



GooqIc 



78 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

dowa— some houses had very small holes in their sides wliich passed hy that 
name, and some had none. 

The only means of transportation, either for husioess or pleasure, was the lum- 
ber wagon, or sled, drawn by the patient ox, whose rate of speed miglit be three 
miles an hour in good going; and many a party of pleasure, clad in homespun 
and homemade garments, and seateti on the straw in the bottom of the wagon 
or sled, as tlio case might he, has heen home thus slowly over the 
devious roads leading from ono caliin to another, and have found 
ample time to enjoy themselves by the way, sure of a hearty welcome at tlio end of 
their ride, who now live in stately dwulhnga, dress in costly raiment and ride in 
fine carriages, •after dashing steeds timed to many a mile the hour. But nota wliit 
the ligliter are tlieir hearts now, than then ; tortunate indeed are they, if, in the 
trials and perplexities of life they have not grown sad. Then, men broke ground, 
and civili7,ation came after. Now, the log cabin is an institution of the past, and 
the hardships of frontier life, a tale that is told. Now the iruurrti^ pushes its way 
into distant gorges, and unbroken forests, and on the coming railway train man 
follows, bnnging with him all the comforts and appliances of civilined life. 

In these days of easy and speedy transportation and mechanical improvements, 
teeming fields are won from tlie wilderness in a few moutlis; pahitial residences 
lise, and cities spring np as if by magic, almost surpassing the ti^bled oriental 
stories of the olden time. 

The people of this town arc noted for industry, sobriety and hospitality. Tiiere 
is but one place in the town where strong drinks are sold. 

Oakfield responded nobly to the call for volunl^■e^^ in the late rebellion, send- 
ing lier bravest and lier best to t!ie tront, and many of lier noble boys lie buried 
in known and unknown graves, in southern soil. Many suffered the untold hor- 
rors of southern prisons. Prominent among these was Chjier B. Davis, made 
prisoner nt Oetfjsburg, July 3, 1803, who endured all forms of hardships, 
in all the Southern prisons from Belle Isle to Anderson vil I e, for 17 moutlis, when 
he was paroled, a mere walking skeleton, and iinally discharged at Port Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, in June, 1805. Ho recovered, as hy a miracle (rora his long suffer- 
ing, and starTatiou, and is now farming in this town. 

PARIS. 

The township of Paris is sitnated in the second tier of townsiiipsfrom the south 
line of the county, and is bounded on the nortli by Grand Rapids, on the east by 
Cascade, on the south by Gaines, and on the west by Wyoming. Being situated 
BO near the City of Grand Rapids, which is amarkettor all its produce— and being 
traversed by the Grand River Valley Railroad, it is, so far as convenience is con- 
cerned, an exception to the general location of townships. 

Paris is next to tlie oldest townsiiip in the county. As long ago as the year 
1833, Barney Burton, Edward Guild, Joel Guild, Daniel Guild, and James Van- 
derpool located within its present limits. Benjamin Clark and Abram Laraway, 
settled in the year 1835; Jacob Patterson, Miner Patterson, James Patterson, Orleans 
.Spaulding and Philanzo Bowen, in the year 1836 ; Nicholas Carlton in the year 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



HlaXORY AND DIRECTOR? OP KENT COUNTY. (9 

1837 i Hiram H All n n the y a 1838 Among the other early settlers were 
De Witt Shoeiiiftk CI nt n bl o maker Robert Shoemaker, Al?in H. Wansey, 
Tared Wansey, J n a B 11 1 Stepl n Hinadil!, Abrsm Laraway and Roburt 
Barr. We would h e al n ake [ al n ention of " Captain Davis," ns he was 
familiarly called, who waa the father of Ezekiel W. Davis, commonly known as ' 
" Jadge," He settled in the township in the year 1834, and remained a resident 
up to the time of hia death, which occurred some twenty-five yeara ago. 

The trials and hardships undured by tlie pioneers of those days seem to have 
been unusual. Nearly all of the settlers were poor, and conscqiieutly were un- 
able to relieve tlie unequal distress of the leas fnrtunate among them. The lots 
of some were peculiarly distressing. Orleans Spaulding, who was before men- 
tioned as bavin;; settled ia the year 1838, informs us that, in th". month of June, 
1837, ho was afflicted with sore eyes, and that for six years he was thereby unfltted 
for labor. During three years of the time he was totally blind, and that, too, while 
his family was dependent upon the productions of their little farm for a living. 

But there were trials of a general nature which had to be endured at this period, 
occasioned by the " hard times," or " wild cat times," as they were commonly 
called. Many of llie new settlers had but a small part of their farms cleared, and 
and a still smaller part cultivated, and consequently were obliged to buy their 
provisions. Those who bad been in the country longer, and had larger improve- 
ments, raised a few bushels of wheat more than was required for their own use, 
but they could sell it neither for money, nor for groceries. Usually it could be 
given in exchange for " shelf goods" as they were called, provided no more than 
filty cents per bushel was charged. 

While wheat was selling at only fifty cents per bushel, flour was selling at |I5 
per barrel, pork $30 per barrel, potatoes J3 pec bushel, and butter flfly cents per 
pound. 

We are informed by Mrs. Burton," that when she commenced keeping house in 
the township, on what is now the Qarfteld farm, she had no neighbors oa the 
south nearer than Gull Prairie, none on the east nearer than Ionia, and none 
whatever on the west. Uncle Louis Campsu, Joel Guild and Jonathan P. Chubb, 
were the only residents of Grand Rapids. RLx Eobinson was in the township of 
Ada, trading -among the Indians. 

Mr. Burton built the first log house in the township of Paris, and erected the 
first barn the county. He also erected the first frame house in the township, 
upon the site of the present tine residence of S. M. Garfield. 

The following incident illustrates the condition of the country at an early day: 
when Mr, Burton was oa his way from Gull Prairie to Grand llapids, one night 
he and his few com p anions halted as usual, spanceled their horses, and took their 
rest. In the morning, the horses belonging to Mr. Burton were nowhere to be 
seen, so he started out in search of them. He wandered about in the thick woods 
for several hours, without success, and finally turned about with the intention of 
returning to the camp. Ho traveled until the sun was low in the west, and no 
oamp could be found. Night came on, and he rested himsell, a lost man in a 
dense forest. The experience of the sueceeding day was similar to that of the 
first; and it was not until the third day tliat he reached a settlement. By follow- 



yGoosle 



80 HISTORY AND DIKECTORY OF KEHT COUHTY. 

ing a creek which lie found in his wanderings, lie readied the Thornapple river, 
tracing whicli to its mouth brought him to what is now the Villago of Ada. 
Thence he proceeded to Grand Rapids wliore lie found the settlers quite exeited 
over the fact of his disappearance, which had been reported bj his companions ; 
Mr. Campau having already dispatched a number of Indians in the direction 
he supposed Mr. Burton would be, to search tor him. 

At one time in the winter of the years 1835 and 1830, the cries of what was sup- 
posed to be a man were heard in the vicinity of Mr. Burton's residence. He was 
answered, horns were blowed, and other noises made to attract his attention, with 
no result. About tlie same time a grey horse came to the residence of Abram 
Laraway, not many miles away, which none of the settlers claimed. Early in the 
spring a saddle was found by Robert Barr In the woods not far away. Still later 
the body of a man was found on what is now called the Penny property, in the 
Third Ward of the City. Its appearance indicated that death had taken place 
some months previously. A few dollars in money, a watch, and some papers were 
fonnd on his person, the latter indicating the name of the man to have been 
Moore. Nothing further was ever ascertained in regard to the matter. He pro- 
bably lost his way in the pathless woods, wandered about for several days, perhaps 
lost his horse, and finally starved to death; or, overcome with weariness sank 
down to rest, and perished by the excessive cold. 

In the year 1835 or 1830, a man by the name of Sizer was shot by an Indian, 
near Plaster Creek, on what are now the premises of Henry Allen. At that place 
on the creek was a deer lick, which of course was watched by the early settlers as 
well as by the natives. The parties concernc I in the affair to which we refer 
were both looking for deer, the one not knowing of tlie presence of the other. 
As the white man was moving about m tht, bushes, the eye of the Indian caught 
a glimpse of bis white shirt bosom wh ch he mistook to be a spot upon a (leer 
about to run. A second more, and the wl te man lell dead, with a bullet through 
his heart. You can imagine the terror of the In lian when he discovered what he 
had done, as he supposed his own life must pay the forfeit. 

It seems to have been the custom of the Indians to demand a life for a life. We 
were informed by an old settler that, at one time, while a little Indian girl was 
taking care of an infant white child, near what is now the city, she accidentally 
let it fall from her arms upon the ground, and it was taken up dead. Tlie Indians 
took the girl with the intention of executing her ; but upon the earnest solicita- 
tion of DbcIo Louis Campau, and Joel Guild, and the offer of an amount of money 
for her life, she was spared. 

In this instance the Indian went immediately to the missionary named Slater, 
who lived on the west side of the river, told him all, and gave himself up. Mr. 
Slater advised him to go back, arouse the whites and tell them what had he 
done ; and assured him that he would not be punished. He did as he was ad- 
vised, and the affair there ended. 

When Benjamin Clark came into the township, in 1835. ho selected a piece of 
land on section twelve, located upon it, and has ever since made it his home. 
When he settled, no one was living in that part of the township, except Alexander 
Clark. He says he came all the way from Morau's residence near Reed's Lake, to 
Abram Laraway's, without seeing a house. 

tedbyGoOQie 



HIBTORY AND DIEECTOBr OP KENT COUNTY. 81 

James Patterson came into the townaliip in 1833, via a road on the east side 
of Thornapple River, wliich he followed to Ad*. There he found John W". Fiak 
keeping tavern in the wilderness. His cattle awam the river, while himaelf and 
family and team were ferried across on a scow owned by Mr. Fisk. From there 
he took a sou (h westerly coil rae through awaraps, streama, and woods, without 
the least sign of a road, a distance of six miles to his new home. On his route 
thither he saw only one settler, and he had but just located. 

When Hiram H. Allen settled in the township in the year 1838, there was but 
one regular thoroughfare through it, and that was the old Gull Prairie, or Kala- 
mazoo road. N. 0. Sargeant had just previously established a line of stages 
between Kalamazoo and Grand Rapids. Mr. Allen says he took a trip through 
Cascade in 1838, and found but very few settlers. From the Patterson aettle- 
ment on sections 13 and 13 to Cascade village, there were no passable toada for 
teams. 

During the first few years of early settlement th w n ula aai of 

Indians in the township. Occasionally they would pthth ttf a few 
days on their hunting and fishing excursions, but th h t ul 1 ny was 

formed about the year 1840, on or near Bection 33. Th y 1 Uh e f s e al 
years, but when the county became more thoroughly ttl T h y Id th lands 
and left. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Tlie township of Paris — which then included Gaines— was organized in the 
year 1839, and the first town meeting was lield at the house of Hirara H, Allen, 
which resulted in the election of the following officers : 

Supervisor—Joel Guild. Olerk — Hirara H. Allen. Treasurer— Robert Barr. 
Aasessors — Stephen Hinsdill, Poster Kelley, Joseph H. Blaia. Justices of the 
Peace — H. H. Allen, Hezekiah B. Smith, Barney Burton, Alexander Clark. Com- 
missioners of Highways— Joseph Blain, Jacob Patterson, John Kirkland, School 
Inspectors— James Ballard, Renssalaer Meanard, Joaeph K. Palmer. Directors of 
the Poor — Andrew Mesnard, Daniel Guild. Collector — Jacob Patterson. Con- 
stables — Jacob Patterson, Joseph J. Baxter, Palmer Alien, 
SOIL, TIMBER, Etc. 

The soil of Paris as a township, is quite good. To be sure it has its poor land 
as well as ofher townahipa ; but considered as a whole, it is considerably abore 
the average. The soil in the southeasterly and central parts is heavy clay, while 
in. the northerly and westerly parts it is sandy. 

The timber iu the southeasterly and central parta is quite heavy ; th^ in the 
northerly and westerly parts light, and what might be called oak openings. In 
the southwesterly part of the town is some pine, in places mixed with elm, black 
ash, etc. 

There are many good farms in Paris, among which may be mentioned those 
belonging to T, S. Smith, on section 37 ; Stark Le Fever, on section 35 ; Seeley 8. 
Buck, on section 34 ; Isaac D. Davis, on section 39 ; Philauzo Bowen, on section 38 ; 
Abram Q. Shear, on section 31 ; Oscar S. Shafer, on section 23 ; James Patterson, 
on section 13 ; Miner Patterson, on aection 13 ; S. 3. Bailey, on section 13 ; Myroa 
11 



Hosted by 



Google 



82 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

Hicharda, on section 10; John H. Ford, on sectina 3; S. M. Q^irlield, on section 7 ; 
John D, Alger, on section 7; Joel Siuioada, on section 7. 

Some of the best residences in the township are those owned by T. S. Sinitli, 
Myron Richards, S. M. Garfield, John D. Alger, and Ktley Cole. The orchard on 
the premises of John 11. Ford, is the most thriflj .tiid extensive of tlic many we 
saw in the township. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

The first school-house erected in tlie township stood on the corner of tlie north- 
east quarter of section 7. It was used for many years, but was finally removed, 
and the present building erected in 1857. There are several fine school-houses 
in the township. The Godwin school-house standing oil the old plank road, a 
short distance beyond the Godwin tavern, is a good brick building, and an orna- 
ment to the locality. The school-house on the southwest corner of section 10, 
built of brick, presents a fine appearance, and exhibits the enterprisint; character 
of the inhabitants in its vicinity ; also, the frame school-house situated near the 
northeast corner oi section 34. We mention these as being particularly good, 
while, in fact, all of the school buiidiugs in the township are abava the average 

COUNTY POOR HOUSE. 

The county farm and poor-house are located in Paiis, on section ]G. The farm 
contains 104 acres or thereabouts, and baa tiie appearance of being well worked. 

At the time the farm was purcliased hy the county, a log house was standing 
on it, which was used for a number of years as a poor house. It was removed in 
1880, and the present frame building erected in its stead. Several additions have 
been made to it, until now it is a large structure. The present keeper is Joiin 
Otis. 

MILLS. 

The Bostwick Grist and Saw Mills were erected many years ago, oa Plaster 
Creek, on the east line of section 17. Four dams were constructed at different 
times, but in each instance they were cairied away. The mills were run at in- 
tervals, but never for any great length of time, and were fin.illy abandoned. 

The Tanner Mills, situated on the southeast corner of section 30, were operated 
for a number of years; but are now among the tilings of tlic past. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS 
ot'Paris, are: S a per visor— Samuel M. Garfield. Clerk —John Steketee. Treasurer 
—Everett Hurd. School Inspectors— John H. Ford, Gilbert G. Bailey. Justices 
of the Peace— Hiram H. Allen, Abram C. Barclay, Seeley S. Buck, John H. Ford. 
Commissioners of Highways — G. G. Bailey, Mason L. Shaler, Bester Brown. Con- 
stables— Abram T. Cook, Thomas H. Foster. 



PLAINFIELD. 

Plainfleld lies north of Grand Rapids, east of Alpine, south ot Algmnii, and 
west of Cannon, and has a population of 1,499. 

It was settled in 1837 ; and in 1838, when it was organized, comprised within 
its limits, several townships of land, that eventually organized into separate towns, 
under their respective names of Algoma, Courtlsvnd, Cannon, etc. 

Hosted by 



Google 



HISTORY AND DIHECXORY OF KENT COUNTY. 83 

It was named for tlie many plaina within its borders, tliat, swept clean by tlie 
annuo! Indian flres, presented their wild, but beautiful acres to the admiring gaze 
of the settlers. Its lirat township meeting to complete ita organization, waa held 
on tbc first Monday of April, 18!(8, at a rude log scbool house on section 23. There is 
no record of the number of votes cast ; hut at its last town meeting, the number 
of votes polled was 230. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. ' 

Supi^rvisor— Zenas G. Winaor. Clerk— Ethiel Whitney. Assessors— Daniel 
North, An<lrew Watson, George Miller. Highway Commissioners — A. D. W. 
Stout, Warner Dexter. Scliool Inspectors — Zenaa G. Wiusor, Ethiel Whitney, 
Cornelius Friant. Collectors— Damas Francisco, Henry Godwin. Poor Masters 
— Jacob Francisco, Jacob Friant. Justices of the Peace— Daniel North, Samuel 
Baker, Zenas G. Wiiisor, George Miller. Constaliles — James Francisco, Henry 
Godwin, Ezra "Whit iicy- 

OFFICERS IN 1870. 

Supervjjor— Ilullis Konkle. Treasurer— J araos Crawford. Clerk — Edwin A. 
Morris. Justice of the Peace — George S. Curtis. School Inspectors — George H. 
Outhouse. Highway Commission ers— Joseph C. Upson. Constables— Caleb E. 
Carr, Gillictt Dickerson. 

Piamfleld presents many variations in soil and surface. High bluffs along 
Grand River, and the Rouge, present the beholder with many magnificent out- 
looks, over lowland, water course, hillside and plain, rarely excelled; and no more 
beautiful spot can well !je found, than the little prairie set in hills, lying on the 
Grand Rapids and Ionia State Road, just north and east of the little village of 
Plainfiekl, where, for many years was the home of the Hon. Harry C. Smith, now 
a resident of Grand Rapids. 

There is a troublesome amount of stone in some portions, and some saiid along 
the western line ; but, as a general thing, the soil is a rich clay loam, rendering 
tliis a first class agricultural town. 

Ita timber ia mainly oak, with some beech and maple, and considerable pine 
along its western borders. 

Ita principal productiona arc, wlieat, wool, corn, oats and potatoes, all of which 
it exporta in fair quantities ; but most of wheat, wool, and corn. Its rich intervals 
of grass lands, its numerous 3i>ring brooks, and clear and rapid watercourses, 
peculiarly adapt it to dairy purposes ; but no especial attention is paid, as yet, 
to this healthful and Incratiro branch of husbandry. 

It also lies within the great western fruit belt, and where the altitude is favor- 
able, gives splendid riturn a of apples, peaches, cherries, currants, and the small 
fruits generally ; but in the bottom lands, and low situations, the returns are by 
no means sure, the frosts destroying the peaches, and the winters killing the trees. 
It presents many fine locations for vinyarda, and the hardier varieties of grapes 
ripen nicely here ; but nothing worthy of note is being done in this branch of 
horticulture. 

There are several inconsiderable lakes in the town, but only two are worthy of 
note, namely: Scott's Lake, lying on section 17, about three-fourths of a mile 



yGoosle 



84 . HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

long, and half a mile wide, quite deep, and well stocked with fish; and Crooked, 
or Dean's Lake, on sections 33 and 34, one mile long and half a mile wide. It 
has an Island of one acre, is generally shallow, and quite destitute of fish. These 
lakes are adjacent to no highway, Lence are only visited by fishing parties, or 
hogs seeking aquatic sports. But for what it lacks in lake views, it makes .irnplu 
amends in river scenery. 

THE RIVERS. 

Grand Blver, the Owash-te-nongof the redman, enters itsbordi^rs hy its eastera 
boundarj, at the northeast corner of section 36, reaches the highest northern 
point at the exact center of section 23, where the bridge on the Grand Rapids 
and Ionia State Road, crosses its stream; then it sweeps away to the southwest-- 
its banks adorned on eitlier hand with billowy maples, and grand old elms, that 
have shed their leaves for centuries on its waves, leaving the town by its aonthem 
tine, on the southeast quarter of section 31. 

The Rouge River, so called from the peculiar tint of its waters, enters tUe town 
from the north, on the west half of section 1, and runs southwesterly, debouching 
in Grand River, on the line of sections 22 and 23, 

The G. R. and 1. R. R. entering the town on section 1, and leaving it near 
Plumb's mill, on section 31, crosses this stream sis times within two miles, hence, 
as may readily be seen, it is very crooked in its course, and being very rapid, pre- 
sents vast facilities for manufacturing purposes. 

In 1840, Gideon H. Gorden erected on section 15, the first mill placed upon tlie 
stream. It is only a saw mill now, and owned by Mr. Walters, of Grand 
Rapids, but then it had a small grist mill attached, and there the settlers and 
Indiana carried their corn to be ground. 

In 1848, a saw mill was erected by Roberts and Winaor, on section 3, at a point 
then called Gibraltar. It is now owned by II. B. Ciiilds & Co., who erected in its 
near vicinity, a paper mill in 1866, which was destroyed hy fire in 1869, hut re- 
built the second year by tlie enterprising proprietors. It is on the line of the G. 
R. and I. R. R. and the place is now known as Child's Mills Station. 

In 1830, a saw mill was erected by Robert Konkle some forty rods from the 
mouth of the Rouge. It is now owned by Tradewell & Towle. Save the above, 
no use ia made in this town of the immense water power of the stream, amply 
sufficient to drive a continnous chain of machinery, several miles in extent. 

Mill Creek runs through the southwest corner of the town, and as early as 1838, 
a saw mill was erected on this stream on section 31, hy Daniel North. It ia 
now owned by Eli Plumb, who erected a flouring mill at the same place, an 1860. 
It lies on the line of the G. R. & I. Railroad, and is known as North's Mills 
Btation. Tliere is also a railway station at Belmont, about six miles northeast of 
Grand Rapids. It lies in the midst of a fine farming district, and has a large 
hotel, kept hy Mr. Post, for the accommodation of parties of pieasui'c ; otherwise, 
it possesses no particular advantages or attractions. 

Plainfield village is a very small place, at the foot of the bluffs on section 23. It 
was the old ferrying post, when a ferryboat was the only means of communication 
— if we except the Indian canoe— between the two banks of the Grand River. It 
has a sunny site, and a pleasant outlook up and down the river. 



Hosted 



by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTOKY OF KENT COtrMTY. 85 

Plain field has ten district sehool-liouaea, but its Union sehool interests are 
merged at tlic present with Rocliford, In Algoma, and the same may be said, in 
a measure, nf its cliurdi interests. It has but one church edifice, which belongs 
to the Episcopalians. It is picturesquely situated on the bluff above the viilaEe 
of Pi ain field, ia a wooden structure 30xG0 fcet in size, is painted brown, and has a 
tower sixty feet liigh. It was erected in 1852. Its officiating clergyman was Rev, 
Wi". Van Antwerp, of Gi-and Iia2>ids, It has uo pastor at the present time. 

Among the early settlers, we find, in 1837, George Miller, Esq., located on sec- 
tion 33 ; .Tamess Clark, on section 24 ; Thomas Friiint, on section 24 ; and Warner 
Dexter, on section H. In 1838, Cornelius Pnant, on section 24; Zera Whitney, 
on section 15 ; Gideon II. Gordon, on section 15 ; and Daniel North, on section 
31 ; and in 1844 Samuei Post settled on section 8, while his father, Jacob Post, 
and seven other sons, settled about the same time. 

In 1835, Samuel Gross made liis way with his lamily, by the aid of his axe, to a 
home on section 2 ; and in 1840 Cheater Wilson settled on section 13. 

The first family on the ground was Mr. George Miller, and the deprivations 
which fell to tlioir share was the common lot of all who made their homes in this 
new land, at that early day. Grand River was the only thoroughfare and means 
of communication with the outside world, hence the settlers di;pended mainly on 
what tliey raised, and their own ingenuity, to prepare it for food. Pork, if im- 
ported, was $(iO ]>er barrel. The nearest flouring mill was sixty miles away, and 
the bread eaten in the family of Mr. Miller, for eighteen months, was ground in 
a coffee mill. 

In the fall of 1838, tho first birth occurred among the whites, in the family ot 
Mr. Miller, a twin girl and hoy, living but a short time, making the first deaths, 
also, among tlie settlers; and the greatest delicacy loving friends were able to 
offer Mrs. Miller during her confinement, was boiled wheat. 

In the winler of 1838, the accidental shooting and subsequent death of Mr. 
Peleg Barlow, who hud come to seek a home, but had not located, cast a sadden- 
ing gloom over the little band of pioneers. 

Altliough the lands were being surveyed and rapidly located, they were not in 
market, and it was no uncommon tiling to see white men and Indians tilling their 
corn in the same fields, in amicable proximity to each other. But in the fall of 
1839 the great land sale came off, when the settlers secured their claims, and the 
red man vanished from the scene, leaving naught in mefiioriam but the bcnes of 
his deail, on section 28, where the burial mounds, worn by the attritions of the 
plow, are fast being leveled with the surrounding country. 

Of those who bore a conspicuous part In the settlement and organization of the 
town, Warner Dexter, James Clark, Thomas Friant, Daniel North and Gideon H. 
Gordon are dead ; but by their tireless energy, they helped to open up a town- 
ship possessed with natural resources of wealth, surpassed by none in the country. 
Smiling vineyards should terrace its sunny slopes, and teeming factories line the 
rapid flowing Rouge, for fabulous wealth lies hidden there, awaiting the fiat of 
combination and enterprise, surer to the seeker than in the goidea gorges of the 
mountains that lean against our western skies. 



yGoosle 



CD UIBTOEY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

SOLON. 

Tliis towiisliip lies in tlie iiortli part of the county, bttwoeu Alj^omn on tliu 
south and the township of Ensley, of Nuwaygo county, on the north; with Tyrone 
on the ȴC3t, and Nolsou on the east. 

It was first settled in 1834. Some of the residents claini that a Mr. Deals, who 
is not uow B, resident of the township, was the first settler, and others that J. M. 
Rounds, who uow resides in Algoma, was in advance. They were soon followed 
by John and Martin Hicks, fi-om Indiana; also Robljiiis Hicks, from Ohio. In 
1850 and 1857 the Jewells, Smiths, Roys and Whispels came, followed iu 1838 by 
Ansel Rogers. J. D. 'Watkins, now a resident of Alpine, settled on section twenty- 
six in 1855. 

ORGANIZATION. 

This towuship was attaelied to Algoraa (and ci^llcd north Algoma) until 1857, 

when it was organised as a separate township, under the name of Solon. The first 

annual meeting was held at the liouse of Walter Rowc, one mile south of the 

center. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 
Supervisor — Edwiird Jewell. Clerk — John E. Roys. Treasiirt-r— John D. 
^Vatkius. Justices — Andrew Fluent, Mnnson Robinson and Obadiuh Smith. 
For several years the annual township meetings were held at the school house 
'o.' district No. 3. la 1865 the place of meeting was changed to Cedsu- Spring**— 
ivhere they are now lield. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS, 
Supervisor— ISenj. Faircliild. Clerk— John Thetge. Treasuroi— Wni. Johiisot). 
Jastices— John Thetge, C. B. Ford and J. D. Chirk. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 
The elevation of Solon is probably as great as any towuship in thu county, it 
being nearly on the divide between Grand and Muskegon rivers. It is compara- 
tively level, and, in the eastern part, somewhat swampy. 

The timber is cliiefly pine throughout the whole township, being interspersed 
with some grand old oaks in some parts, and in others with beech and occasion- 
ally a little maple. 

The farms are generally new, with but small improvements. The farms ol M. 
H, Clark, Jewell, and one or two others might be mentioned asesceptions to this. 
Fruit does well on this pine land wherever orchards have been set. The south- 
eastern part of the township is the most thickly settled, while nearly the whole 
of the northwest quarter is an unbroken forest. 

LAKES, STREAMS, ETC. 
In describing the lakes and streams of this townslup we will commence at the 

First, then, there is a small lake on the north line of section four, lying partly 
in the township of Ensley, Newaygo county. This is sometimes called Lampman 
Lake. On the Kent county map, published in 18G3, there was a large sized stream 
marked as the outlet of this lake, but we failed to find any such stream. It haa 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIREOTOEY Of KENT COUNTY. 87 

no outlet. One and ii half inilos east of this, on the nortliwcst corner of section, 
two, ia a large, flowing spring, fcnowii as Craadall's Spring, wliicli ia the source 
iif tlie west briinch of Diiko Creek. The stream flows southeasterly tlirough three 
lakes, known as the Chain of Liikes; the first heingou the line of sections two anil 
tliree, (chiefly on three) ; the next near the center of section two ; and the tliird 
on the south line of two and partially on seven. This stream tlicn flows a little east 
of south, to the north part of section twenty-four, where it unites with the east 
branch, which rises in Jordan T^ake, on section one, fiows out into Nelson, where 
it receives some additional water, and again enters Solon at the southeast corner 
of section twelve. At the junction of these two streams Wellman & Co. con- 
structed a dam in 1856, at a cost of $1,000, with tlie intention of erecting a largo 
saw mill, whicli, however, was never built. From this point Duke Creek flows in 
a southwesterly direction across the township, and piisses out on section thirty, 
into Tyrone. It is fled by several small streams, the largest of whicli comes from 
a small lake near the center of section fourteen, (for which wt heard do name), 
and flows into the main creek on the north side of section twenty-eight. This 
stream has been much used for running togs to the Ronge, and thence to Grand 

There is a small lake on the north line of section Sfteen, known as Mud Lake, 
which has no outlet. 

The size of these seven lakes varies from ten to oue hundred acres each. 

Cedar Creek rises in Nelson, flows across the southe^ist corner of Solon, and 
southwest into Algoma, in the history of whicli it will be mentioned at greater 
length. 

In the southwest corner are Long Lake, and some smaller ones, which will be 
farther spoken of in oonuection with the lakes in the northwestern part of 
Algoma. 

THE VILLAGE OF CEDAR SPRINGS 
was platted in 18."J9, and probably will be incorporated at the next session of the 
State Legislature. 

It is situated twenty miles nortlieast from Grand Rapids, by the G. R. & L Rail- 
road, and lies about half in Solon and half in Nelson, one mile from their south 

The flrst settler Iiere was Robbiiis Hicks, who came in 1855, and was previously 
mentioned as one of the early residents of Solon. lie now resides with his family ■ 
in the northeast corner of tlie township. 

There were but few inhabitants and but a very limited amount of business in 
Cedar Springs until 1867, wlien the railroad was completed to that point. This 
immediately infused life into the place, and it continued to grow rapidly as long 
as it was the terminus of the railroad north, which it was for nearly two ycara. 
Since that time, although it has not grown as rapitily, and business has not been 
quite as good in some respects, still it is steadily progressing, and new enter- 
prises are being engaged in. 

A line has been surveyed the present season, for a railroad from this place to 
Muskegon, in connection with a road projected from Greenville liither, which, in 
a with the road now running from Lansing to Ionia, and the one being 



yGoosle 



88 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

constructed from Ionia to Greenville, would make a continuous line from tlie 
lake shore to our state capital, directly through Cediir Springs. 

We are iaformed by Mr. Faittbilil, wiio, by the way, is wide awake on railroad 
matters in that vicinity, and in tact on matters of every kind connected with the 
growth and prosperity of the village, that the Continental Improvement Com- 
pany contemplate building a branch railroad from tills place to Newaygo. A 
state road passes through here from Grand Rapids to Big Il;ipida ; a,lso, one from 
here to Muskegon. 

A Flour-Barrel, Stave and Heading Factory has Ijeen erected the present sea- 
son, by Richards & Sharer, which seems to he doing a. good business, cutting 
30,000 staves and 10,000 headings per day, besides circling fitly to Beventj-Hve 
barrels per day for their own use, in packing the heading which they ship. 

The village contains six Steam Saw Mills, which cut tn the aggregate 50,000 
shingles and 50,000 feet of lumber per day. These mills have all been erected 
since 1866, and are severally owned and operated by the following gentlemen 
and firms : V,'. L. Barber & Co., Byroa Prentiss & Co., Mr. Slawson and J. H. 
Shaw, ail of this place ; and Isaac Newton and Chauncey Pelton, of Grand 

It also contains about twenty stores, three or four restaurants, tliree liotela, 
kept respectively by Benj. Pairchild, J. S. Tigdell, and C. W. Denison, one livery 
stable, four blacksmith and several other shops, such as wheeiriglit, cooper shops, 

The Baptist Society have a very good frame church, 36s60 feet in size, which 
was erected in 1868, at a cost of about |1,000. 

The Methodist Episcopal Society are erecting a nice, Irame structure, in size 
40x70 feet, which is to be finished in good style, with stained glass windows, and 
B spire one hundred feet high. This will be the best churcii building north of 
Grand Rapids, and will cost from $5,000 to $G,000. 

The Masonic Order have a nice little Hall, tastefully fitted up tor their accom- 
Djodation. There are also two or three halls for public meetings, the largest of 
which is a new ooe christened Union Hall, just completed by Paine & Manly. 
The Post-office is kept at present by Mr. II. C. Russell, in his drug store. A 
weekly newspaper, called the Wolmrine Clipper, is published by Maze & Sellers. 

The schools are on the graded system, and consist of three departments, which 
are kept in three buildings, for want of a good Union School House. 
MILLS, 

Outside of the village there are a number of mills, which cut a large amount of 
lumber and shingles. 

We will first mention that of George French, of Rockford. Tliis is a steam saw 
mill, capable of cutting 10,000,000 shingles and 3,000,000 feet of lumber per year, 
and stands on the southwest corner of section twelve. It wiis erected by Mr. 
French in 1868. 

We next come to a first-class steam saw mill, on the north line of section one, 
which was erected in 1869, on the site of one built the year previous and destroyed 
by fire. Capacity of this mill, 30,000 feet of lumber and 16,000 shingles per day. 
Proprietor, John B. Wagner. 



fed by 



GooqIc 



HISIORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 89 

A Binail, Water-power Saw Mill is to be erected the present year, on the north- 
east corner of section twenty-eight, on Dulte Creelc, by Lewis S. Hancock. This ia 
intended to be nsed as a lumber and shingle mill. 

Andrew J. Fluent has a Portable Steam Shingle Mill, on tlie west side of sec- 
tion twenty-two, which cuts 15,000 shingles per day. 

The Portable Steam Saw Mill, situated on the south side of section ten, is capa- 
ble of cutting 10,000 feet of lumber aud 15,000 shingles per day. The lumber mill 
ia owned and operated by H. Morse & Co., and the shingle attachment by 0. A. 
Tower & Co. 

The Portable Steam Saw Mill of Willard Barnhart, set up in May, 1870, on the 
west aide of section thirteen, ia capable of cutting 10,000 feet of lumber per day. 
Solomon Ipe'a Portable Steam Shingle Mill, on the south side of section twenty- 
three, was erected by him in 1866, and euts 14,000 aliinglea per day. It will be 
noticed that every mill now running in this township is run by ateam, although 
good water power could be obtained on ahnost any section which now has a 
mill. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

District No. 1 was organi:ied in 1838, and a small frame house erected, which was 

used until 1860, when a good frame building was erected at a'cost of $600. It is 

located one and one-lialt miles west of Cedar Springs, on the north side of section 

thirty-five. 

District No. 2 —Solon Center— -waa organized in 1858, and a amal! log house 
erected. In 1869 a nice frame building was erected on the southeast corner of 
section aixtcen, at a cost of $700, 

This School House is really an ornament to the district, and, in fact, to the 
township, showing, as it does, that the people of Solon are wide awake, and un- 
derstand the effect of good educational advantages on the growth and prosperity 
of a new country, and are willing to provide for the comfort of their children. 

We mention this house more particularly because it stands in a much newer 
portion of the township than the one previously mentioned. 

District No. 3 (fractional with Nelson) was organized in 1860, and a small log 
Louse was erected, which still stands on the west side of section thirteen, near 
the residence of A. B. Fairchild. This district is about to raise money for a new 
house, to bo built on the same site, at a cost of 1600 or $700. 

District No. i (fractional with Algoma) was organized in 1809. In the spring 
of 1870, a nice little frame house was erected at a cost of #350, located on the south- 
west corner of section twenty-nine, four and one-half miles west of Cedar Springs, 
on the C. S. & M. State Road. 

District No. 5 was orgrnized in 1860, and a small frame iiouae erected the same 
year on the west side of section eleven, at a coat of $180. 

There are many older townships which can erect large churches and other 
public buildings, but fail to do as well for their school interests as this " back- 
woods" township of Solon. 



yGoosle 



90 HISTORY AKD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUSTY. 

SPARTA. 

This is one of the western tier of townships, adjoining Chester, Ottawa county, 
on the west, and Algoma on the east, and lying between Alpine on the south, 
and Tyrone on the north. 

This township was first settled in 1844, when Lyman Smith— now reeiding at 
Grand Traverse — settled oa section 25, near the southeast part. Very soon 
after, Morinan and Edwin Cummings went on section 34, on the aonth line, and 
commenced chopping on the farm now owoed by Norman. So far there was no 
house (worthy of the name) in the township — they only having small shanties. 

In a short time, Lewis W. Purdy came from Genessee county, settled on the 
BOuthwest corner of section 28, and erected the first log house in the now thickly 
settled township of Sparta. Mrs. Purdy was the first white woman in the town- 
ship. In January, 1845, Joseph English and family came direct from England, 
and went just over the line on section 36, in the southeast part of the township. 

Mr. English, although unable to read or write when he came to Sparta, being 
a man of great perieverauce, succeeded, in the course of a few years, in erecting 
a large steam saw mill, which drew quite a number of men, who bought lots and 
erected small houses, thereby making a little village, which was called Euglish- 
yille. This mill being destroyed by fire, Mr. English moved to Laphamville, now 
known as Rockford, which was then considered about dead. 

By buying some of the mills and renting others, he succeeded in getting con- 
trol of nearly all of the mills on Rouge River, from which he shipped a large 
quantity of lumber to Chicago; but owing to a decline in prices, he failed to 
make it pay, and was obliged to give up in that quarter, but not until he had — 
by his great energy and venturesome spirit— infused new life into the whole lum- 
bering district of Rougo River. 

He afterwards, with his sons, erected a water mill on the north part of hia farm, 
which is now run by his sons, William, Joseph and Richard. The post office 
still known as Bnglisiiville, is about all that remains to remind us ot the once 
flourishing little Ville, which will probably again revive, if the Grand Rapids 
and Newaygo Railroad, which has been surveyed, is constructed, and a station 
established there. 

In the spring of 1843, Mr. Cummings — the father of Norman, Edwin and Nel- 
son Cummings — came with his family to the place where the sons had previously 
began. 

The parents are long since dead, but the three sons still remain on the south 
line, one in Sparta and the others in Alpine, where they have large farms with 
good buildings, as the fruits of their early labors in pioneer days. 

Mr. Lyman Smith and Mr. Purdy did not long remain residents of Sparta, but 
the marks made by them still remain. 

In June, 1845, John Symes, Elihu Rice, and Anthony Chapman, met in Alpine, 
while on their way to settle in Sparta. They were strangers, but soon found, by 
comparing descriptions, that the lands which they had respectively bought or 
pre-empted, alS lay adjoining, and, going on the principle that " in union is 
strength," they, after some consultation, decided on the coarse they would take ; 
and the nest morning Rica and Symea started trom the house of Joseph English 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



HieXORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 91 

to underbrush a road from tliere west, aloog the present town-line of Alpine and 
Sparta. Meanwhile Cliapman had returned to Mill Creek lor provisions. After 
cutting west to the section corner, now known as Rouse'a Corners, they turned 
north, and followed the line between sections 34 and 35. Toward night they 
ware beginning to think of returning to the house of Mr. English, but at that 
moment they heard a wagon approaching, and on waiting for it to come up, 
found it was Cliapman, wlio had come with supplies. Tbey now built a fire hy 
the side of a log, and camped for the night, with the wolves howling around 
them while they slept ; and in the morning completed their road to what was to 
be their homes. 

Mr. Rice's land was on section 27, and Mr. Symea' and Mr. Chapman's on 36. 
Three trees wore found on the line of Symea' and Chapman's land which would 
do for three corner posts of a shanty ; and by putting in one post, and the use of 
a few boards which had been brought along Irom Mill Creek, a shelter was soon 
formed, to which the families were taken the nest day, where they lived together 
until houses were erected. About this time David B. Martindale, who now lives 
Just east of Sparta village, settled on section 3G. 

During the following fall and winter, Hiram II. Meyers settled east of Rouge 
River, on section 34, and was soon followed by his fcther and family from Canada. 
This family took a large tract of land in the east part of Sparta, where they have 
engaged i^uite extensively in lumbering, especially Hiram, John and Myron Bal- 
com near the centre of the township, and William Blacbal! and family southwest 
of the center, Myron Balcora is now in Missouri, and John, commonly known as 
Deacon Balcom, is now living in the village of Sparta. William Blackall has 
long been laid beneath the aod ; but his sons, Benjamin and Charles, still remain. 

We neglected to mention Mr. Clark Brown, who came from the state of New 
Yflrk, early in 1845, and is still living on the farm where he first commenced, on 
the south line of section 33. 

In 1846, J. E. Nash, from Massachusetts, settled where he now lives, one mile 
east ol the center of the township. 

Among other early settlers who were pioneers in various parts of the township, 
were the Spangenburgs, Amidons, Bradfords, Hinmans, McNitts, Taylors, Steb- 
bins', B. D. Hastings, and Ira Blanchard, most of whom still reside in Sparta. 
Hon. Lyman Murray settled in Sparta at an early day, but soon removed to 
Alpine. 

ORGANIZATION. 

Sparta was organized very soon after it was settled. Tlie first annual meeting 
was held in April, 1846, at the house of Clark Brown, on the south line of the 
township, at which time there were only eleven votes cast. As the full ticket 
requires sisteen ofScci^, there could not have been much opportunity for a 
choice. 

The present township of Tyrone was attached to Sparta from the time it began 
to be settled, until 1855. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor— Lewis W. Purdy. Clerk— John M. Balcom. Treasurer— Myron 
H. Balcom. 



yGoosle 



92 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

At a sabsequent annual election, John M. Balcora was elected to tlie office of 
Constable by one vote. 

The township meetings arc now held at the school-house in the village of 
Sparta. 

OFFICERS IN 1870. 

Supervisor— Vol ney W. Caukin. Clerk — Ervin J. Emmons. Treasurer — 
Charles 0. Eddy. Justices— A. B. Cheney, Voluej W. Caukin, Albert Pinch, 
GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

The general surface of Sparta ia high and rolling, and it contains but little 
waste land. 

There are several small swamps in various parts ol the township, but none ol 
much account, except in the north and northwest parts. 

On sections 2 and S is a swamp of some extent, requiring the seiviccs of the 
Drain Commissioners. Also a series nearly or quite connected, extending west 
across sections 4 or 5, and passing off into the south part of Tyrone. There are 
two quite extensive swamps which commence on the west part of section 6, and 
run west into Chester. Between them is the ridge, well kn^nvn to those accus- 
tomed to travel the G. R. & Newaygo State Road, as the Hog-back Hill. The 
highest hills and deepest valleys are in the northwest ; still it contains some as 
nice farming lands as are to bo found in the township. 

The timber is mostly beech and sugar-maple, with some pine in the northeast 
and southeast parts. There is some hci»!ock interspersed with the pine in the 
northeast. The soil is generally a rich loam, suited to the production of wheat, 
corn, oats, grass, potatoes, etc. Nearly all kinds of fruit whicli can be raised in 
the county, do well here. 

Among the large farms of Spana, we would mention that of Mrs. John Manly, 
in the southwest part of tiie township, which wintains 280 acres, and that of 
Elias Darling, farther north on tlie same road, containing 330 acres. The large 
farm of Moses Bradford is now divided between his sons, Jason and Perry. 
The farm formerly owned by Nathan Earl, is now owned by his soc-in-law, 
Charles M. Chapman. Norman Cumniings has 240 acres on the south township 
line, which is, however, in two separate parcels. 
STREAMS. 

Rouge River is the principal stream of Sparta, entering it on section 1, from 
Tyrone, and passing south and southeast through the east tier of sections ; 
thence out into Algonia. from the east pnrt of section 25. It is used for running 
logs, having been cleared lor that purpose nearly twentv ycai's ago, through this 
township. 

Ball Creek, which has also been considerably used lor logging, enters Sparta 
from Tyrone, near the central part of the line and flows in a soufheisterly direc 
tion across sections 8, 2 and 11, into Rouge River, of which it is the principal 
branch from this township, 

Nash Creek, formed by several small branches from the weat, flows tiirough the 
central part, and empties into Rouge River on the southeast corner of section 
fourteen. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Sjraes Creek risEB in tlio soufliern part of tlie township, and flowa northeast- 
erlj into Rouj^c River, on the southwest corner of section twenty-four. 

A small atreiim, sometimes known aa the River Jordan, cornea in from Alpine, 
and flows io a northerlj direction across sections twenty-fire and twenty-aii, and 
empties into Rouge River near tlie center of tlie latter section. 

Two small atreams einptj into Rouge River from the northeast, on section one, 
being the outlets of a chain of lakes in the west part of Algoma. Thcae atrcanis 
have also been used for rnnning logs. 

VILLAGES. 

The village of Sparta, not jet incorporated, ia a flourishing little town of about 
200 inhubitaiita, located on Nasli Creek, one mile east of the geographical center 
of the township, and 15 miles from Grand Rapids. This place was first settled 
by J. E. Nasii, in 1840, and for some time known as Nashville. It now contains a 
Post-oiRce, known as Sparta Center, two churches — Baptist and Methodist Epia- 
copai — both of which were erected in 1866, at a cost of about $3,000 each, a good 
steam saw niiil, five stores, two blacksmith shops, and one wagon shop ; also a 
yery good hotel, known aa the Sparta House, and kept by John M. Itaicom. But 
as yet no graded achool buildiusj has been erected, although it is greatly needed. 
A sniall, franie, district school bouse, erected in 1849, is the only public school 
building in the place. A good select school is kept during the winter months by 
Mr. Amherst Cheney. The steam saw milt already mentioned, is now owned and 
operated by Wm. Olmsted and Son*. It has a planing machine attached; also 
one run of stone for grinding flour and feed. 

LISBON VILLAGE, 
on the west line of Sparta, is sixteen miles from Grand Rapids, on tlie Grand 
Rapids and Newaygo State Road, It waa first settled by Joiiu Pintler, who came 
liere Irom the State ol New York, in 1846. In 1848 a Mail Route was established 
from Grand Rapids to Newaygo, with a Post-oflice at this point, under the name 
of Pintler's Corners, Mr. Pintler being the flrst Postmaster. In 1859 the name of 
the office was changed to Lisbon. Tlie firat goods sold from a store in tliis place 
were by Miner Atherton, in 1855. In March, 1809, it was regularly incorporated 
MB a village, including half a mile each way from the northwest corner post of 
section 30. It will l>e noticed that this includes half a section — or, more properly, 
two quarter sections — from the township of Cheater, Ottawa county ; but, as the vil- 
lage is under the jurisdiction of Kent county, we will include the whole in our 
History and Directory. 

Tliis village now contains nine stores, three blackamitli shops, two wagon shops, 
one hotel, a good, two-story frame school house, and three good sized frame 
churches: also a gootl steam griet mill, and a saw mill. 

The Hotel is a good, frame building, owned and kept by Lorenzo Chubb. 

The Graded School building, erected in the summer of 1869, ia a good, substan- 
tial frame structure, twi> stories high, 80x46 feet in size, and cost $3,700. 



yGoosle 



94 HIBTORT AND DIEECTOBY OF KENT COUNTY. 

SPENCER. 

The township of Spencer is situated in the norteast corner of the county, and is 
hounded on the north bj the township of Maple Valley, Montcalm county, on the 
east hy Montcalm, Montcalm county, on the south by Oaklield, »nd on the west 
Ijy Nelson. 

The first white inhabitant of Spencer was an old trapper, by the name ofLin- 
coln. He had a shanty on the bank of the lake of that name, and there he lived. 
Boon like, for a nnmher of years. 

The first regular settler of the township was Cyrus B. Thomas, who located in 
the summer of 1846. Henry Stroup, the second settler, located in January, IBlfl, 
Both of these settled on a plain in the southeastern part of the township, near the 
Oabfield line; and, for a number of years, were the only actual settlers. Matthew 
B. Hatch, the present Supervisor of Spencer, and one of the earliest settlers, came 
to the township in 1853. In the list of early settlers may also be mentioned the 
names of S. B. Cowles, U. G. Parks, Jacob Van Zandt, Wm. H. Hewitt, Wm. T. 
Parslmll, Daniel Haskina, the Coooer lamily, and others. 

The township of Celsus was organised in the year 18til, and the first townsliip 
meeting was held on the first Monday of April, in tbesame year, at (he residence 
of Thomas Spencer. Matthew B. Hatch, Thomas Spencer, andShepardB. Cowles, 
acted as inspectors of election. The election resulted in tiie choice of the follow- 
ing named persons as 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 
Supervisor — Freeman Van Wickle. Clerk — Henry A. Freeman. Treasurer — 
Daniel Haskins. Commissioners of Highways- -W m. W. Hewitt and Freeman 
Van Wickle. Jnstices — Wm. W. Hewitt, Edwin D. Clark. School Inspectors- 
Hiram Conse and Alfred Hulburt. Constables— Wm. H, Smith, Geo. McClelland, 
Henry Strope, and Darius Gray. 

The name of the township was subsequently changed to Spcuccr, in honor of 
Thomas Spencer, one of the early settlers. 

PRESENT OFFICERS. 

Supervisor— Matthew B. Hatch. Clerk— Aaron Norton. Treasui'cr— Beriali 

G. Parks. Justices — Warren F. Getman, Samuel Van Wickle, Avery J. Sutton, 

Edward H. Smith. Commissioners of Highways — Edwin Wilson, John Moran. 

School Inspectors — Wm. B. Powell, Shepard B. Cowles. Constable — Joseph De- 

THE SOIL 
of Spencer is, as might be supposed, rather poor, the timber being principally 
pine. There are, however, some pieces of good land, which it pays to cultivate. 
There are some fine farms within its limits, among which are those owned by M. 
B. Hatch, Owen D. Cooper, Beriah G. Parks, Edward H. Smith, Payette Hough, 
and Wm. Rittinger. 

Spencer is inconveniently located, having no railroad within its limits, and no 
railroad station within a number of miles; nevertheless, it is fast settling up, and 
everything indicates that a few years will greatly increase its population and 
wealth. The first -^ . 

fedbyLnOOQle 



HISTORY AtfD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 95 

LUMBBRINQ 
establishment, on Black Creek, was commenced in 1853. Daring the year 1870, 
one million feet were run out of that stream. The Van Wickle saw mill is located 
on the same creek, near the south line of section twenty-five. It was built in the 
jear 1856 : H. Van Wickle, proprietor. The Powell steam saw and shingle mill, 
combined, is situated ou the bank of Lincoln Lake, on section twcntj-seren. It 
was built in 1807: Wm. B. Powell, proprietor. The Parka steam saw mill, near 
the center of section seven, was built in 1868 : E. H. Gibbs, proprietor. The Qris- 
wold steam saw and shingle mill, combined, is located nearthesouthwest cornerof 
section twenty-nine. It was built in the year 1868; Jabes W. Griawold, proprietor. 
The Spencer Mills, from which the Post-office and settlement derived its name, 
was built in 1855, by Thomas Spencer, near the southeast corner of section twen- 
ty-seven. It was burned in the year 1861. 

BLACK CREEK 
is the principal stream that flows through Spencer. It enters from the northwest 
and passes southeasterly through the township. It is of sufficient width and 
depth to float logs, and a number of millions of feet are run out every year. It has 
several small tributaries, among which are Clear and Butternut Creeks. 
Among the 

LAKES 

in this township, Lincoln is the largest. It is a fine sheet of water, situated a short 
distance east of the center of the township, and is nearly one and one-half miles 
in length, by one-half mile in width. Cooper Lake, in the easterly part of section 
thirty-five, is a narrow strip of water, surrounded by a marsh. There is a lake 
in the southwesterly part of section thirty-four, composed of two distinct sections, 
connected by a narrow neck. Conjointly they are about one-half mile in length. 
Nortii of Lincoln Lake is an assemblage of small lakes, exteuding through the 
township into Maple Valley, in Montcalm county. 

Our list shows but three 

8CHOOL3 
in Spencer. The first is held at the Griswold School House, in fractional district 
No 1. The building is a fine, wooden structure, painted white, and stands near 
the southwest corner of section twenty-nine. It was built in 1869. The second 
is held at the Hatch School House, in district No. 3. This is a substantial wooden 
building, is located at the center of section seventeen, and was built in 1867. The 
third is held at the Mill School House, in regular district No. 1. The building is 
a fine, slate-colored wooden structure. It was erected in 1861. 

The only 

POST-OFFICE 
in Spencer is in tlie soutlieast corner of section twenty-seven. Oliver P. McClure, 
Postmaster. 



yGoosle 



yo flISTORr AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

TYRONE. 

This is the nortliwest corner townabip of Kent county, lying nortli of Sparta, 
and west of Solon ; and beings bounded on the north by Grant township, Newaypo 
county, and on the west by Cnsnovia, Muskegon county. 

Tyrone was first settled in 1849, by Mrs. Louisa Scott and family, who went in 
to board workmen on the State Road then being made oa the west line of this 
township, by Jolin Brooks, of Newaygo, who had the contract from the State. 
The family were deprived of the father, by insanity, a short time after going into 
the woods; but, owingto the great perseverence of Mrs. Scott, they remained, and 
have succeeded in building up a good home, and making a fine farm on section 
thirty-one, in the southwest part of the township. In 1850 Lot Ferguson, from 
Hillsdale county, went about one mile farther and settled on the southwest part 
of section nineteen, where the Casno via House now stands. Alfred Bonner set- 
tled on section thirty, but remained only a short time. 

In 1852 Jacob Smith, from Cleveland, Ohio, and Harlow Jackson, from Branch 
county, Mich., settled one mile east from the state road, and a mile north from 
the township line, on the present state road from jCcdar Springs to Muskegon. 
There was not a white settler east of them nearer than Greenville. 

In 1853 John Thompson came into the same neighborhood, from Tioga county. 
New York, and about the same time, Joseph Kies came from Hillsdale county, 
Mich,, and settled near Mr. Fulkerson. 

In 1855 Uriah Chubb, who had been living for a few years in Chester township, 
Ottawa county, settled on the west part of section thirty, and Leander Smith, 
from Otsego county. New York, went into the Jackson neighborhood. 

About this time Asa Clark and family, from Steuben county, New York, pene- 
trated the forest northeast from Sparta Center, or Nashville, as it was then called, 
and built their cabin on section thirty-six, in the southeast part of the township. 
Hero they had no neighbors, except those who came for a few months at a time 
to cut pine logs along the river; and during the war they were the only regular 
settlers in the east part of the township. 

James Blackall, from Sparta, also went on section thirty-two in 1855. From 
that time to the commencement of the war there were many additions, and since 
the war its population has increased very fast. 

ORGANIZATION. 
This township was for some time attached to Sparta. 

In 1855 it was organized as a seperate township, under the name of Tyrone, the 
first annual meefing being being held at the only school house, which stooiX on 
the west line, near the residence of Mrs, Scott. The township meetings are still 
held in the same school district, the house now used being about a mile north ol 
where the old one stood. 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Uriah Chubb. Clerk— Albert Clute, Treasurer — Harlow Jackson. 

Justices — Patrick Thompson, Albert Clute, and Uriah Chubb. 

PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — James M, Armstrong. Clerk — Harlow Jackson. Treasurer— B. S. 

Treadway. Justices — J. M. Armstrong, U. Chubb, L. V. Hoag, and David Clark. 



fpd by 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 97 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

About three- fonrtlis of this township is timbered with pine, which extends 
along the Rouge River in the east, and across the north part in connection with 
the great Muskegon belt. The southwest portion is timbered with beech and 
maple, interspersed with some pine throughout nearly the whole extent — there 
being but two sections (thirty and thirty-one) which had aooe. The pine timber- 
ed portions here, as elsewhere, are principally sandy, while the beeecli and maple 
timbered part is mostly clay soil, or rather a clay loam, which makes excellent 
farming land. This township is high and rolling, and is a good fruit region. 

There are no very large improvements yet; those of Messrs. Smith, Jackson and 
Hemaley, one mile from the south line, and about the same distance from the west 
line, are probahly the largest. Mr, Daniel Hanson, and others, a mile north, are 
making a good start, and, juding from present appearances, will soon have splen- 
did farms. Tlie same may also be said of H. C. Wylie, and others, east of those 
first mentioned. On the west line the land is divided into smaller parcels, with 
one or two exceptions. Mr. Edward Hayward has a nice, large farm lying partly 
in this township and partly in Casnovia. 

STREAMS AND LAKES. 

Rouge River is the principal stream of Tyrone. It rises in Rice Lake, in the 
township of Grant, Newaygo county, about three miles nortli of the township 
line, enters Tyrone about one ond one-half miles west from the northeast corner, 
flows a little eaat of south, and then flows out near the southeast corner into 
Sparta. It is fed by several small streams, omoni^ which Duke Creek, wliich 
flows through Solon and comes in from the northeast on section thirty-six, is 
the largest. Ball Creek rises in several small streams in the west part of the 
township, flows southeast, and passes out into Sparta near the mi{ldle of the 
township line. 

A curiosity may be found on this stream, on the farm of II, C. Wylie on section 
thirty-three, which is worthy a description. 

It is no more nor less than an old Beaver Dam. This dam was about sixty rods 
long and rose to a higlit of throe, four, and even five feet in some places. It was 
built in a zig-zag form, the sections being uniformily about two rods m length. It 
must have been built a long time ago, for large trees are found growing on the 
embankment. Where the pond was, the timber has been killed by the flowing, leav- 
ing nothingbut a marsh. This pond had apparentlycoveredfromten to fifteen acres, 
and perhaps more. The remains of trees, cut down by those curious and wo nder- 
.ful animals, have been found there, showing plainly the prints of their teeth in 
the frood. The stream has broken through in three places. The river, and these 
creeks, have been much used for fioating pine logs. 

South Crockery Creek, in the southwest part of the township, rises in Sparta, 
flows northwest through two sniall lakes, on section thirty-two, thence across 
thirty-one and out into Muskegon county, ou the west. 

There is a lake of about twenty acres on the line of sections seventeen and 
eighteen, the outlet of which flows southeast across the township into Rouge 
River. Another, nearly as large, near the center of section twenty-two, also has 
a small stream flowing from it to Rouge River. 
13 



yGooQle 



08 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

There is coneiderable wet, swampy land, in the northeast part of the township, 
and a few small swamps in yarious other parts ; but none ot anj great estent. 
CASMOVIA CORNERS 

(not incorporaled) is nearly as much ol a II as m wl h h 

been platted and incorporated many years. It w fl tl d I y L t Fulk 

son (before mentioned) in 1850. Mr. Fulkers nw thfitt pnh 
doors for the accommodation of travelers, and s p t h d k p 

a regular country tavern. In a short time his littl t j 1 b b m 

too small for the accommodation of his guests, adhth f tdagd 

frame building for tliat purpose, which was afterw 1 k pt 1 y M M n an 1 
later by Mr. Heath, who erected a large hall a Ij Tl b 1 1 g a 

now owned and kept by Mr. John Tuxbury, form ly f Al] 

In 1853, a post office was established, with Dan IB tt wh 1 1 j t 
the line, as postmaster. The first store goods ■« UlyHHmlt n 

May, 1863. 

There are now four stores, a blacksmith shop t I a t m w m U 

which was erected in 1804, now owned by Patte B 1 Th y d ng 

a good, fair business, and have pine enough withi It th m II tw n y 

Asher and Robert Post have a portable steam saw mill three miles north of 
here ; also one on the west line of the township. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

District No. 1, (fractional with Oasnovia) was organized in 1833 with nine 
scholars in attendance at school. A small log house was erected and used until 
1881, when the present frame building was erected at a cost ot about litOO. The 
former stood on section 31, and the latter stands ou the west side of section 30, 
near the residence of Mr. Chubb. 

District No. 2, (fractional with Sparta), erected a frame house worth about 
$400, in 1803. This house stands on the northwest corner of section 86, and is 
commonly known aa the Clark school house. 

District No. 3, (fractional with Casnovia), erected a small frame house in 1864, 
on the southwest corner of section 6, known as the Murray school house. 

District No. 4, was organized in 1851, and a nice frame house was built, worth 
$500, the following year. It stands on the southeast corner of section twenty- 
nine, and is known as the Leandcr Smith school house. 

District No. 5, was organized in 180S, and a good frame bouse erected at a cest 
of $500, known as the Ross' school house. It stands on the northeast corner of 
section nineteen. 

District No. 6 was organized in January, 1870. It has four scholars in summer, 
and about twenty in winter — being in the midst of a pine country, which brings 
in the people in winter, and drives them out in summer. This district has no 
school house yet, school being held in the house of Mr. L. R. Burch, It has been 
chiefly sustained by Mr. B. thus fdr, at a cost of $50 per term. 

District No. 7, was organized in 1870. A house is to be erected on section 
tffentj«two or twentj-aeyea at a cost of about $500, ^^ 

wdbyGooQle 



HISTORY AHD DIRECTOBY OF KENT COUNTY. 99 

Tyrone lias no churches, and only one hotel, besides the one mentioned, situated 
at the Corners, in the Tillage of Casnovia. 

This other hotel is generally known as the Block Taveru, being made of hewn 
logs, and stands on the Cedar Springs and Muskegon state road. It is now kept 
by Allen Cumings. Mr. L. V. Hoag, and others, are quite sanguine of getting a 
Post-office estabiisiied here soon, and building up a Tillage. This is nearly twenty 
miles from Grand Rapids, and Casnovia is about twenty-two miles from the same. 
The Cedar Springs and Muskegon state road crosses this township on the section 
liue, one mile from the Sparta line. The surveyed ronte of the C. S. & M. R. R. 
runs nearly parallel to the state road, and very near it. The surveyed liue of the 
Q. R. and Newaygo R. R. also crosses this township, and strikes Casnovia 
Corners. 



VEKGENNES. 

Vergennes is bounded on the north by Grattan, on the east by Keene, Ionia 
county, on the south by Lowell, and on the west by Ada. 

Sylvester Hodges, tlie first white settler in tlie township. Came from the State 
of New York, in the year 1836. He transplanted the first apple trees put out in 
the township of Lowell, also assisted, in building the first house where the village 
of Lowell now stands. The trees referred to, may now be seen standing on a lot 
owned by Mrs. Caroline Snell, near the bank of Plat River, a short distance from 
the road leading from the Tillage to the D. & M. Railroad depot. 

The township of Vergennes was organized in the year 1838. The first town- 
ship meeting was held on the second day of April, oi the same year, when the fol- 
lowing persons were chosen as 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — Rodney Robinson. Clerk — M. Patrick. Assessors —Lewis Robin- 
son, T. I. Daniels, John M. Pos. Collector — Porter Ralph. School Inspectors — 
Everett Wilson, Lewis Robinson, George Brown. Directors of the Poor — Everett 
Wilson, Chas. Newton. Commissioners of Highways — Lucas Robinson, Henry 
Daines, P. W. Foi. Constables— Porter Ralph, A. D. Smith, O. H. Jones, Jas. S. 
Fox. 

We are informed by Renj. Fairchild, Eaq., that at this time tliere wei'e only 
about nineteen families in tht township. This gentleman, who went there during 
the year 1838, says that, as he passed through the township of Lowell, on his way 
from Canada, he counted but three houses. For several years the farmers in that 
vicinity were obliged to take their grist to Ionia, to Grandvitle, or to Kalamazoo 
to be ground. Considering the poor roads which the scattered community were 
then tormented with, and the bridgeless streams which must be crossed, such 
journeys doubtless seemed quite uninviting. 

Reader, have you ever traveled through a new country 'i If jou have, you can 
understand the meaning of the expression, "poor roads," "horrid roads." Ton 
who have not, I would advise to take a trip into the northern part of the State 
of Michigan immediately after a heavy rain. A trip of that kind will benefit your 
health as much as a voyage on the lakes, iluring rough weathtr., . . . ^. ;; 



yGoosle 



100 HISTORY AND DIEBCTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

The entire county was then a howling wilderness. Grand Rapids could boast 
of but half a score of houses, with most of them owned by one man ; and two 
Stores, one kept by " Uucie Louis," and the other by a man named Wataon. 

Among the early settlers may be mentioned the following : Silas S. Fallass, wlio 
Bettled in the year 1838, J. Wesley Fallass, in 1839, Lucas Robinson, in 1837, 
Thompson L Daniels, in 1837, .Tames Wells, in 1843, A. R, Hoa^',m 1843, Sylves- 
ter Hodges, in 18.16, .lames S. Fox, 1836, William P. Perrin, in 1837, Aleiander 
Rogers, ia 1837, Alanson K. Shaw, in 1839, Emery Foster, in 1837, Neweomb 
Godfrey, in 1838, Amos Hodges, in 1838, Eliab Walker, in 1838, Christopher 
Misner, in 1838, Morgan Lyon, in 1838, Benjamin Fairchild, in 1838, John Bran- 
agan, in 1837, Alfred Van Deusen, in 1838, Adam Van Densen. in 1840. 

THE SOIL 
of Vergennes is mostly heavy ; yet along the banks of Flat River we found some 
quite lightand sandy. The greater portion of the township consists of what might 
be called oak openings. We noticed a belt of timbered land ejiteodiny: south from 
Eagle or Horse Shoe Lake, one and one-half miles wide, and four miles in length, 
reaching into sections twenty and twenty-one ; also a short strip of timbered 
land on the west side of the same lake. 

The township is well watered by Flat River, and numerous little tributaries, 
through the easterly and central part, and Honey Creek, wluch passes through 
three sections on the westerly tier. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS 
of the township are: Supervisor — J. W. Walker. Clerk— Jolin L. Covert. Treas- 
urer — James Casey. Justices — Joseph S. Jasper, J. L. B. Kerr, Dennis Driscoll, 
John L. Covert, Constable — John Hull. 

The site now occupied by 

THE VILLAGE OF FALLASSBC'RG 
was settled upon about the year 18iO, by the family or families from which it de- 
rived its name. 

The two mills and the hotel therein situate were erected before the present 
thriving village of Lowell had commenced to be built up. Fallassburg Grist Mill, 
situated on Flat River— -a tliree-story wooden building — was erected in 1840: 
Proprietor, J. Wesley Tallass. Ilecox's Saw Mill, situated here, is an old, wood 
colored, thrcc-story building. The upper part is occupied as a chair manufactory. 
It was erected in 1839 : Proprietor, Charles Hecos. 

Fallassburg supports one store, which has been in operation fiir many years ; 
and the building was erected before any similar structure in the village of Lowell. 
The village school house, located in the easterly part of the burgh, is a fine 
wooden structure, painted white. It was built in the summer of J8ij7, 

FLAT RIVER 
passes into Vergennes from the east, three-quarters of a mile soutli of the north- 
easterly corner of the township, when it curves and passes hack into Ionia county, 
at a point about three-quarters of a mile south of the place of entrance. It re- 
enters^: section ^hijteen, aud, meandering southwesterly, passes out near the 

■" ■ ■'■■ Hosted by GoOqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OS KENT COCNTY. lOl 

quarter post, on the south line of section thirty-five. It forms a junction with the 
Grand at the village ol Lowell. 

THE LAKES 

in Vergennes are nearly all small. Eagle, or Nagle, or Horae Shoe Lake, projects 
a short distance into the town. Eagle was once the most familiar name. It was 
thus christened, af I er a bird of that spuciea, which built its nest in a large oak, on 
an island or peninsula in the lake. Prom its resemblance to a horse shoe itsorae- 
times passes by that name. It has an outlet called Lake Creek, which is a tribu- 
tary of Plat River. 

Odi^ll Lake is situated near the center of section twenty-nine. It is fifty rods 
in width, and has an average depth of thirteen feet. The lake and surrounding 
swamp cover about eighty acres. 

Cole's Lake, situate ou the east half of section thirty, is a shallow sheet of 
water, covering about ten acres. Miller's Lake, situate on the west half of sec-, 
tion twenty-nine, is quite deep, and covers four or five acres. 

Long Lake, situate on section nineteen, is a fine body of water, about three 
quarters of a mile in length, with an average width of thirty rods. It is fre- 
quented by pleasure seekers in both summer and winter, 

Vergennes hr.s good educational facilities. Its 
SCHOOLS 
are well organized, and are supplied with competent teachers. The school build- 
ings are generally good, though not costly, and present a tidy appearance. 

The Valley School house, situiite on the south part of section twelve, is a plain, 
wooden structure. It was once white, but the elements have produced their 
usual effects upon it, until now it presents a wood-colored appearance. 

Bailey School house, situate on the northeast corner of tlie northwest quarter 
of section twenty-nine, is a plain, white, wooden structure. It was built in 3855. 

The school liouse at Fox's Corners is a beautiful, new, wooden building, is 
situate on an eminence at the southeast part of section twenty-seven, and was 
built in IHTO. The SIcPherson school house is situated on the northeast corner 
ol the southeast quarter of section eighteen. It is a white wooden building, built 
in 1861. 

The Aldrich school house, sitaate at the center of section nine, is constructed 
of logs, is quite old, and, to all appearance, is becoming unsafe. The people of 
the district intend to build a new one ere long. 

The Kelsey school house, situate on the northeast corner of section thirty-two, 
was erected in 1853. It is a red wooden building. 

llarto school house, situate on the northeast corner of section two, is a plain, 
white, wooden structure. It was built in the year 3856, The Godfrey school 
house, situate on the south half of the southeast quarter of section two, is an old 
red wooden building. It was built about twenty-five years ago. 

The Water's school house, situated on the northwest corner of section twenty- 
three, is a neat wooden structure, painted white. It was built in 1868. 

There are two 



yGoosle 



102 HISTORY AND DIRECTOET OF KENT COUNTY. 

CHURCHES 
in Vergennes, outside tlie village of Fallassbnrg. The First Methodist Episcopal 
church is situated on the SDuthwest corner of section twenty, witliin a short dis- 
tance of Long Lake, It is a suhstantial wooden building, painted white, and has 
a capacity to seat three or four hundred persons. The present pastor of the con- 
gregation who worships there, is the Rev. Charles Chick. The First Christian 
Church of Vergennes, situated at the southwest corner of section two, was built 
in 1868, and ia a substantial wooden structure, painted white. The Wesleyan 
Methodists in this vicinity also hold their meetings in the same building. 

There are two grist 

MILLS 
and one saw mill in Vergennea, outside the village of Fallassburg. The Foster 
grist mill is situated on Flat River, on section twentj-six. It ia a three-atory 
wooden structure, painted white. Proprietors, T. W. Fos & Co. 

Alton grist mill ia situate on the northeast corner of section ten, on Wood's 
Creek. It is a two-story wooden building, used exclusively for mdl purposes : 
Proprietor, Thomas B. Woodbury. 

Ring's Saw Mill and Wagon Shop, are situated on the northwest corner of sec- 
tion ten, on Wood's Creek. The mill contains one upright saw. Proprietor, 
Edmund Ring. 

There are 

BLACKSMITH SHOPS 
at the following places : Northwest corner of section twenty nine ; northwest 
corner of the southwest quarter of section fifteen, (Lewis Smith, proprietor); and 
northwest corner of section thirty-four. 

WALKER. 

Walker is in the western tier of townships, being bounded on the north by 
Alpine, on the east by Grand Rapids townshp and city, on the south by Wyom- 
ing, and on the west by Talmadge, Ottawa couuty. It waa originally six miles 
square ; but, owing to the course of Grand River, which has become the estab- 
lished eastern and southern boundary, it is now quite irregular. The corpora- 
tion of tlie city also takes five and one-fourth sections out of the southeasterly 

The division line between the township of Grand Rapids and Walker, waa for- 
merly what is now Division street, in the city ; therefore, a list of the early settlers 
of Walker woald include those who located west o? that line. However, as the 
history of the city will be made a special theme, in this we will refer to that part 
only which lies within what are now the bounds of Walker. 

In the year 1836 Samuel White, then a man fifty years of age, came with his 
family from Canada, and settled on section twenty-three. lie had five sons and 
several daughters, one or two of whom were married. The family purchased of 
the Government about six hundred acres of land on aectiona ten, fourteen, Stleeu 
and twenty-three. Mr. White built the first frame barn west of Grand River ) and 
Eoon alter this, with the assistance of his sons, Miio and James, erected a saw mill 

Hostscl by 



GooqIc 



HI8T0R7 AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 108 

OQ Indian Creek, on the north side of section fifteen. Mr. and Mrs. White are 
Btill liying on tlie old iiomeatead, and can now count a family of over siity chil- 
dren, grand children, and great grand children, notwllhstanding tlio loas of one 
Bon in the Mexican War, and one in the recent War for the Union. 

Later in the year 1836, Jesse Smith, who was also from Canada, settled on 
Bridge street, about two miles west of the river. He had a largo family of sons 
and daughters, some of whom were married, and who settled in different parts of 
the township. One of the elder sons, Benjamin, commenced at an early day on 
the south side of section ten, where lie built a small grist mill and machine shop 
on Indian Creek. The parents arc now deceased, and the family scattered. 

During the same year, a Frenchman, by the name of John J. Nardin, who had 
served in the French army under Napoleon the First, came from Detroit, with a 
large iamily, and settled in the southern part of the township, west of where the 
Eagle Plaster Mills now stand. The parents are still living on the old tarm, while 
near them reside two sons, John and George, and two daughters, Mrs. Roger 
Atkinson and Mrs. James Sawyer. Late in the same year Zelotis Bemis and Robert 
Hilton went still further south, and located on the north bank of the river, two or 
three miles below the plaster mills. A portion of the Bemis farm, now owned by 
John N. Butterfleld, was tbrmerly an " Indian Planting Ground." Soon after he 
settled, Mr. Bemis commenced raising wheat quite estensively, the harvesting of 
which furnishe<l einployinciit for some of those that came a year or two later. 

The following named persons settled in the township soon after those just men- 
tioned: Henry Helmka, Win. W. Anderson, Joseph Denton, John Hogadone, and 
Harvej Monroe, from Canada ; John Harrington, of Vermont, and Patrick O'Brien, 
Stephen O'Brien and James Murray, trom Ireland. The family of Edisona also 
came at an early day, and settled on what is now Bridge street, of which family 
John Edison is now the wily representative on that street. 

There are many others who could hardly be classed as first settlers, but who are 
known as old residents; among whom are Thomas McMan, David Waters, Wm. 
C. Davidson, Jonathan Blair, Martin Wheeler, Bernard Courtney, and Quigley, in 
the south part ; Samuel Westlake, the Schermerhorns, Phillips, Escotts, Burds, 
Samuel Corporon, Thomas OoBney, Asa Pratt, Thales Dean, Daniel Stocking, 
and the Armstrongs, near the central part; the Matthews, A. C. Bailey, Samuel 
Root, Miner Johnson, John Miller, Peter Huwer, Andrew Loomis, Tenuy, the 
Chappells, Fullers, Tabors, Coveli, and Dean ia the north ; and Palmerlee, Tryon, 
Berry Walt, Devendorf, and Lamoreaux, in the west. 
ORGANIZATION. 

The first townahip meeting was held in the month of April, 1838, at the Mission 
School House, wliicb stood on the west bank of Grand River, near the present 
jai! site. The records indicate that this was the only school house then in the 
township, for it was spoken of as " the School House of Walker." 

THE FIRST OFFICERS 
of the townahip were : Supervisor — Lovell Moore. Clerk — Isaac Turner. Treas- 
urer — Harry Eaton. Justices—Robert Hilton, Isaac Turner, Ira Jones and Isaiah 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



About three years after tlie' organization of the township, a log seliool housft 
was erected on the nurth aide of section twent j-two, and the township meetings 
were, for a time, held there. Alpine was detached from Walker in the year 1847; 
for a year or two previous to which time the meetings were held at the Siraond's 
School House, and afterwards at the center. In the year 1867 a nice Ijrick building, 
in size 30x36 feet, was erected on the north side of section twenty-two, for a Towu 
Hall. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS 

of the township are : Supervisor— Ezra A. Hebard. Clerk — Henry 0. Sehennerhoni. 
Treasurer — Qeorge Weaver. Justices^ThoiniLS Healey, Nathan Earle, Bernard 
Courtney, and Daniel Schermerhora. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 

The soil ot Walker is strangely diversified. On the east and south, along Grand 
River, is a tract of low land, from eighty rods to a mile in width, extending from 
the northeast to the southwest corner of the township, which is underlaid with a 
strata of lime stone, lying from two to ten feet below the surface. Above this is 
a gravelly loam, which, in some parts, is filled and covered with large boulders. 
Back of this is a series of hills and sandy bluffs, rising to a height of fifty or sixty 
feet. The sandy belt also extends diagonally across the township from northeast 
to northwest, and varies in width from one-half to two miles. The original timber 
of the former was pim, black oak, soft maple, hemlock, cedar, etc., and of the 
latter, pine and oak. 

We nest come to what is commonly called timbered land ; the timber being 
chiefly beach and sugar maple, with considerable valuable oak interspersed 
through some portions. This timbered land extends throughout the remainder 
of Walker, and northwest into the adjoining townships of Ottawa county. The 
soil of the northwestern portion is chiefly clay, with some small parcels of rich, 
black, saudy loam. The face of the country is ge ly un lul t n with but few 
hills and swamps. 

Walker is as thickly settled as any township wh h nt i n village. The 
southeasterly part is mostly divided into small lots t f i five to forty 

acres, and which are usually devoted to market fed d fruit-growing. 

The westerly and northwesterly part is devoted p p lly t f ing pnrposes. 
In that locality are to be seen some quite large, as well as fine, farms. Stephen 
O'Brien owns two hundred and eighty acres, situated south of Bridge street, two 
miles west of the plaster quarries, two hundred acres of which is in a good state 
of cultivation. Mr. O'Brien informed us that he raises from nine hundred to one 
thousand bushels of wheat per year, besides other genera! crops; and that he has 
sold as high as one liundred tons of hay as the result of one year's yield. P. F. 
Covell, N. C. Wright, and Daniel Schermerhorn, near the center ; Haines Edbon 
and B. F. Woodman, in the northern part of the township ; and McCarthy and 
Davidson in the southern part, have farms containing from one hundred and 
sixty to two hundred and sixty acres each. Peaches, apples and other kinds of 
fruit are raised in abnndance on the sandy belt, and on most parts of the clay 
land. The low lands along the river produce good crops of grass and grain. 

o,ted by Google 



HISTORY AMD WEECTOEY OF KENT COUNTY. 105 

The greatest elevation in the township is the high rolling swell of land exteDd- 
ing from section thirty-two in the southwest, passing through the central part, 
broken bj Brandy Creek, near the residence of William Dunnett, continuing 
northward on the west of Indian Creek, and afterwards crossing the line into 
Alpine. On the highest part of this ridge, near the center of section nine, is a 
lake covering about four acres, situated in the middle of a swamp of about twentj 
acres. This lake is about one hundred feet above the level of Grand River, and 
lias no visible outlet. Poles have been run down sixty feet without striking any 
solid bottom. 

There is a swamp of about one hundred acres on Bridge street, three and one 
half miles west of the river, lying mostly on section twenty-nine. There is also 
one about the same size in the sourthern part ot section six. We found one of 
rather small dimensions on section eight ; also, one on section thirty-four. There 
are other small swamps in different parts of the township, some of which are 
being drained and cultivated, and are fast becoming rich meadow land. In ail, 
there are, probably, about four hundred acres of swamp laud in the township. 

Of the streams in Walker, Indian Creek, formerly known as Indian Mill Creek, 
is the most important. It derived its name from a mill which was erected near 
its mouth by the Indiana, or for them — we have not learned which^many years 
ago. (The site of this mill was near the present junction of the Detroit & Mil- 
waukee with the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, on section thirteen.) The 
source of the stream is in Alpine. It enters Walker from the north, near the pres- 
ent location of the Indian Creek post office, and passes through sections ten, 
fifteen, fourteen, and thirteen, and unites with Graad River near the D. & M. 
Railroad bridge. There was once considerable pine along its banks, and during 
the first ten years of the early settlement of the township, five saw mills were 
erected. In the year 1850, three of them remained. Now, the pine is very nearly 
gone; and at the time we went through the township (May, 1870), but one of the 
mills was running. 

Brandy Creek, which is a branch of Indian Creek, rises on section sixteen, and 
flowing north easterly, enters the latter on the south side of section tea. 

Black Skin Creek — so-called after an Indian chielf of that name — rises in the 
southern part of the original township, and flowing south alongside the plant- 
ing ground before mentioned, enters Grand River on the south side of section five. 

Sand Creek flows through the northwesterly part of the township, and passes 
out into Ottawa county on the west. 

There are several other small creeks in the township, but none demanding 
special notice. 

RAILROADS. 

Walker ia crossed by three railroads. The Detroit & Milwaukee passes through 
the northern part of the township ; the Kalamazoo, Ailegan & Grand Rapids 
divisionof the Michigan Southern runs through the southeasterly part; and the 
Grand Rapids and Indiana runs parallel with the rivet through the northeasterly 
part. 

14 



yGooQle 



106 HISTORY AND DIHECTOKT OF KEHT COUNTY. 

MILLS AND MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS. 

In the year 1845, Joseph BuUen erected a aaw mill on the eastern part of ■sec- 
tion 4. It is run by an overshot waterwheel ; the water being convoyed from tho 
pond on Indian Creek, near the residence of Solomon Wright, in Alpine, e, dis- 
tance of nearly ninety rods. The mill possesses the facilities for sawing one mil- 
lion feet of lumber per year; but on account of the scarcity of pine, it does ft 
"mnch smaller business. The mill also contains one run of mill-stones for grind- 
ing "feed," etc. The present proprietors are McNitt & Wilder. 

The plaster mills and quarries on section thirty-four, two and one half miles 
below Bridge street, in the side of the bluff near the river, are on the east part of 
section thirty-four. Plaster was first discovered here by R. B. Butterworth, of 
Grand Rapids, who then owned the land. He opened the first quarry in the year 
1853, which was operated under the saperintendeace of Bernard Courtney. This 
is the mine now known as " Plaster Cave," or " Hovej's Cave," and is operated by 
the Eagle Mills Plaster Company. They Lave large mills and extensive works for 
grinding the rock for land plaster, and also for the manufacture of stucco. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

The school houses of Walker are generally good, although, perhaps, not quite 
eqaal to those of some other townships, nor quite as good as should be expected 
of a wealthy class of inhabitants near a city of the size of Qrand Rapids. 

District No. 4, commonly known as the " Walker Center" district, was organ- 
ized in 1841, and then included a territory of about fifteen square miles. Their 
first house was a log building, and stood on the north side of section 32 ; the nest 
was a small wooden building standing at the original geographical center of the 
township, on the northeast corner of section twenty-one. This bailding was used - 
until 1867, when a nice frame building was erected at a cost of $1,000. This is 
the best school house in the township. 

District No. 7 — Bridge street — has a good wooden building, which was erected 
in the year 1860. Cost, $400. It is located on the south side ol section twenty- 
two. 

District No. 8 was organized in the year 1845. A log house was built, which 
was used until the year 1858, when the present frame structure, which is gen- 
erally known as the O'Brien school house, was erected at a cost of J400. Loca- 
tion, south side of section twenty-nine. 

District No. 3 is the oldest district now in existence in Walker. A log build- 
ing was first used. The present frame building was built in the year 1800. at an 
expense of about $300. Location, near south side of section thirty-three. This 
district is about to be divided to form a new one in the vicinity of the plaster 
mills. 

District No. 3 has a small frame building on the northeast corner of section 
nineteen, near the residence of Henry 0. Hogadone. 

District No. 13 has a small frame house on the north side of section seventeen, 
near the residence of A. T. Liscomb. 

District No. 6 was organized about the year 1840, and a small frame building 
erected, which was used until 1S58, when a large frame house was erected at a 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT CODNTT. 107 

cost of $700. Tiiia house is located on the aouth side of section three, and ia com- 
monly known as the Simonds' school house. 

District No. 11 was organized in the jear 1850, and a small frame house built 
on the weat side of section twelve, known as the Wait school house. 

In District No, 5, the first school house was built on the farm of Andrew 
Loomia, on the southwest corner of section sis. The present building— a small 
frame structure — stands on the northeast corner of section SBTen. 

There are aoveral fractional diatricta, partly in Walker, of which the school 
houses are in the adjoining townships. 

CHURCHES. 

Walker contains none jet, but one is being built by the Wesleyan Methodist 
society, on the southeast corner ol section two, which is to be a wooden building 
38x44 feet in size. The estimated coat is $1,500 to |],600. 
HOTELS. 

The Walker House, owned and kept by Solomon Pierce, was erected in the 
year 1858, by N. C, Wright, It is a three-story frame building, and stands on 
the north side of aection ten, four miles from the city. 



WYOMING. 

Wyoming is one of the western tier of townships of Kent county. It is bound- 
ed on the north and northwest by the city of Grand Rapids and the township of 
Walker, on the east by Paris, on the south by Byron, and on the west by George- 
town, Ottawa county. 

The soil of this township ia diversified, a portion of it, extending Irom the 
northern, northeastern part of the township in a southwesterly direction, with a 
breadth of about two miles, and a length of about five miles, has a gravelly soil, 
timbered with burr and white oak. It is now principally under cultivation, and 
is especially adapted to wheat growing. Adjoining this, on the westerly side, 
are the Grand Kiver bottoms, varying in widtli from one-fourth to oue-half of a 
mile; and on the east is a large swamp and open marsli. Parts of this swamp are 
densely timbered with cedar and pine, with an occasional island hemlock and 
maple. Bast of thia is a large tract of sandy openings, timbered with white and 
yellow oak. The soil is light, but affords a fair quality of farmmg lands. South 
of this is Buck Creek, with its bottom lands ; adjoining which on the south ia a 
strip of pine, of aboat one mile in width, extending from the south line of the 
township in a north, north westery direction, to within about two milea of its west- 
ern border. South of this is a strip of beech and maple land, varying in width 
from one mile at its eastern extremity to three at its western. 

Buck Creek enters Wyoming from the south, about the center of section thirty- 
six, and flows northwesterly, entering Grand River on section seventeen. This 
stream aflbrda three good mill sites within the township, which are occupied as 
follows : One by Fisher's Saw Mill, David Fiaher, proprietor, on section twenty- 
seven ; another by Dewey's Saw Mill, on section twenty-one, Egbert Dewey, pro- 



yGoosle 



108 HISTORY AND DIBBCTOET OF KENT COUNTY. 

prietor ; ftud the third by the Wyoming Flouring Mill, at GraadTiUe, H. 0. 
Weston, proprietor, 

PlftBter Creek enters Wyoming from the east, on seotion twelve, anil flows 
northwest, leaving the township just before it reaches Qranci River. 

There are numeroue small spring brooks throughout thia township, one of 
which, entering it from Paris, on section one, and flowing west into Piaster Creelt, 
affords water power for running the plaster mills. 

THE VILLAGE OF GRANDVILLE 
is located in the western part of this township, on the left bank of Grand River, 
and contains a populat on ot al o t 30O It contains five dry goods and grocery 
stores, two drug stores two blacks th shops one wagon shop, one boot and 
shoe store, and one har ess lop It has two churches; one Cangregational, 
which waa erectel al ut the year 18 o and a Methodist Episcopal, now nearly 
finished. The hrst Coa^regat onal bo efy w t organized at Grandviilee in 183S, 
and Rev. James B liar I vf a the first p'istor Ihe GrandvLlle Union SchoolHouse, 
erected in 18G7, is a very fine building. It is thirty feet in width, by sixty in 
length, with a transept si steen by thirty feet in size, has two stories above the 
basement, and is surmounted by a tower. The cost was $10,000. 

David Tucker built tUe first frame house in Grandville. It stood a little nortli 
of the present residence of II. O. Weston. 

PLASTEiE. 

The existence of gypsum beds, on Plaster Creek, was known to the Indians at 
the time when the first white settlers came to this township, and gave the stream 
its napie. A portion of the rock was exposed in the bed of tiie creek at the site 
ol the first plaster mill, where George H. White & Co.'a works are now located. 
Douglass Houghton, State Geoiotjiat, visited tiie place in 1838, and gave the first 
published account of the deposits. Prior to that time the 80 acres of land on 
section two, on which the plaster was found, had been purchased by Mr. De- 
garmo Jones, of Detroit, with a view to its mineral worth. 

The first mill for griodlng plaster was built in the winter of 1840^1, by Mr. 
Daniel Ball, of Grand Rapids. It was driven by n large water wheel, and con- 
tained but one run of stone. The last remains of this budding, in use until a tew 
years ago, were torn down in 1889. Mr. Ball leased the bed of Mr. Jones, and paid 
him in plaster, delived in Detroit via Grand River and the lakes. Mr. Henry R. 
Williams bought the lease of Mr. Ball in 1843, and during the same year built an 
addition to the works, putting in another run of stone fur custom flouring. Mr. 
James A. Rumsey entered these works in 1842, and has been "connected with the 
business since that time, being now employed as foreman by George H. White & 
Co. The plaster produced for the first four years found a market principally at 
Detroit, but by dint of wise exertions on the part of the proprietors, who sold it, 
and often gave it away to farmers for trial, its use as a fertilizer became quite 
general in the southern part of the State. It was often conveyed on sleighs for 
Dse on farms, from 30 to 100 miles distant. George H. Wbite & Co. now own the 
80 acres on which the first mill was built, and land adjoining, to the amount of 
435 acres in all, of which ahont 300 acres is underlaid with plaster. The stratum 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



now quarried is 13 feet in thickneas, and is overlaid with from 13 to 16 feet of 
earth, and in places by a stratum of partially decomposed plaster, known as the 
" seren foot course." Tlie following is the estimated product of these works irom 
1853 to the present time : 
From 1843 to 1850 -------- 500 tons yearly 

" 1850 " 1860 ...-..-.- 2.000 " " 

" 1860 " 1804 3.000 '• " 

" 1864 " l&fi8 8,000 " " 

During the year 1880 - - 13,000 tons. 

" " 1870 probably 13,000 tons. 

They have a water mill with one run of stono capable of grinding two tons per 
hour, and a steam mill with two run of stone that grind four tons per hour, and 
storage tor 4,000 tons of ground plaster. Their capital is sufficient to supply all 
the present or future demands of tlie trade. The works are located half a mile 
south of tbe city limits, on the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, having easy 
access to all other railroads leading to tlie city, and also to Grand River. 
8A.W MILLS. 

The Saw Mill ot David Fisher is located on section twenty-seven. It contains 
two saws, one upright and one circular, and cuta about two and one-half million 
feet per annum. Egbert Dewey carries on the manufacture of lumber and lath at 
his saw mill on section twenty-one. Tbe mill contains sis saws, and cuts about 
one million two hundred tliousand feet per annum. 

H. 0. Waaton carries on the manufacture of flour at the Wyoming Mills, at 
Grandville. This miU Uaa three runs of stone, and has a capacity ot about fifty 
barrels of flour per day. . It was erected by Egbert Dewey, about the year 1856. 

These mills are all driven by water power, and are located on Buck Creek. 

David Fisher carries on the manufacture of lime, from marl, or bog lime, near 
his saw mill, alfording an excellent lime for mason work, and a good fertilizer. 
Mr Carpenter also carries on the manufacture of the same kind of lime on section 

RAIL ROADS. 

Wyoming is traversed by tliree railroads. Tiie Grand River Valley Railroad 
crosses the northeast corner of the township. The Grand Raoida & Indiana runs 
'across the townsliip, from north to south, near the center line of the eastern tier 
of sections, and has a station near the center of section thirty-aix. The northern 
branch of the Lake Shore & Miciiigan Southern Railroad runs north and south 
through thia township, very near its center line, and has a station near the center, 
called Grandville Station. 

EARLY SETTLERS. 

As near as we can learn from the memory of the early settlers, Mr. David 
Tucker was the first settler in Wyoming, he having seitled at Grandville in 1833. 
During the same your Gideon II. Gordon settled at Grandville. In 1833 Luther 
Lincoln, Joseph B. Copeland, Iliram Jenison, and William R. Godwin settled at 
Grandville, Jonathan F, Cliubh on section four, Myron Roys on section nine, and 
Henry West on section twenty. During 1834 Koawell Britton, Julius C. Abel, 

, Google 



Hosted by * 



110 HISlOKY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

Ephraim P. Walker, Abraham Bryant, aod Josinh McCarthy settled at Orand- 
ville, Robert Howlett, and George Thomson on section nine, and Alvali Wanzy 
on section one. Charles H. Oaks, Joaeph A Brooks, Thomas H. Buxton, and 
Manly Patchen siitUed at Grandville in 1835, and during the same year. Ransom 
Sawyer, and Richard Moore on section nineteen, and Justus C. Bogtrs ou section 
fourteen, and Eli. and BrastuB Yeomans also came to Qrandyille. la 1836 Hiram 
Osgood, OrrcyHill, Nathan White, Charles Wheeler, Dwiglit Rankin, James 
Lockwood, Jacob Rogers, Cliarles J. Rogers, Leonard Stoneburner, and Mr. Fet- 
terman located at Grandville, and in different parts of the townaliip. Among tlie 
settlers of 1837 and 1838, we flud the names of Lewis Moody, Chase Bdgerly, Col. 
Hallifiway, William Butts, James P. Scott, Jotliam Hall, SaToy H. Deals, Cyrus 
Jones, Cyrns Marsh, Horace Wilder, and James McCray. Edward Pekin was also 
one of the t-arliest settlers. Of these, the first settlers of this township, lorty-aeven 
in number, only thirteen are now hving in Wyoming, viz : Myron Roys, Joseph 
B. Copeland, Thomas H. Buston, Richard Moore, Justus C. Rogers, Dwight Ran- 
kin, Brastus Yeomana, Eli Yeomans, Charles J. Rogers, Leonard Stojie burner, 
Lewis Moody, Horace Wilder, and Edward Fekin. Of the others, some few liave 
removed, but the greater part are deceased. Savoy R, Reals and Cyrus Jones had 
resided in this county some time before settling in Wyoming. 

Grandville was one of the first settlements in Kent couaty ; and, for a nnmber 
ol years, one of the largest places. One of the firsv saw mills, if not the first, (ex- 
cept one built on Indian Mill Creek for the Indians,) was built near the site of tho 
Wyoming Mills, by Messrs. Bail and Wnglit, in 1834. This mill, after passing 
through various bands, was destroyed by fire many years ago. 

In 1834 Gideon H. Gordon built a saw mill on section seventeen. This mil! 
afterwards fell into other hands, and finally rotted down. During this year 
Messrs. Britton and Brown also built a saw mill on the site of Dewey's mill, on 
section twenty-one. It was afterwards torn down to make room for the mill 
which DOW occupies the site. 

la 183.5 Mr. Fetternian commenced to build a saw mill at the mouth of Rush 
Creek, just within the limits of Wyoming, and afterwards sold it to Geo. Kotchum, 
who completed it, and also put in a run of mill stones for grinding grain. They 
were the first ever run in Kent county, and were twenty or twenty-two inches in 
diameter. 

Mr. Gideon H. Gordon, during the same year, built a saw mill on section twen- 
ty-sevea, on the site of Fisher's Mill. It was afterwards burned. Josiah Burton 
also built a saw mill on the site of Rumsey's Plaster Mill, in 1836. 

Ketclium and McCray built the first furnace and machine shop on Grand River, 
at Grandville, in 1837. Horace Wilder says that in 1837, under the direction ^of 
Mr. McCray, he melted and cast the first iron ever cast in Kent county. 

During 1837-8 George Kctchum built, and put in operation, the first flouring 
mill at Grandville. This mill was burned in 1843. and was never rebuilt. In 1838 
the State authorities commenced to bore a salt well at the marsh, on section three, 
about where the railroad bridge of the L. S. & M. S. R. R. now crosses Grand 
River. The work was under the charge of Dr. Douglas Houghton, State Geolo- 
gist. During this year a dwelling house, Iwarding house, blacksmith shop, aiid^~« . 

JedbyLiOOQie 



SI8T0RT AND DIRECTOR? OF KENT COUNT?. Ill 

Btablea were erected, a ■lock built, tower erected, and curb sunk to the rock, and 
a Bteam engine set and rande ready for tlie next year's operfttions. The nest year 
the job of boring the well was let to Hon. Lucius Ljon, of Detroit, who bored to 
the depth of 700 feet, when the shaft broke, and the drill, with a portion of the 
shaft, was left at the bottom of the well. The work was then abandoned and the 
buildings left to decay. 

George Ketchum also built a Gang Saw Mill, at an early day, in what is now 
Georgetown, Ottawa county, on tlie site of Jeniaon's flouring mills, 

INCIDENTS OF EARLY SETTLEMENT. 

Justus 0. Rogers came to Kent county in 1835. He walked from Detroit to 
Chicago, and from there back to Grand Rapids. At that time the only public 
conveyance across Michigan was a lumber wagon ttngc, and walking was prefera- 
ble to riding in it over the roads as they were then. In the spring of 1836, Mr. 
Rogers built a small frame house on the site of his present residence, on section 
fourteen, and in September of the same year there caine a tornado which took it 
up from the foundation and carried it about one rod. Wlien it struck it ended 
over, so that the south end of the frame lay to the north, and the whole building 
a wreck. Some of the roof boards and shingles were carried more than a mile, 
and the woods were strewed with them for quite a distance. Mr. Roger's family 
had not yet arrived, and he was absent from home at tlie time. The course of 
the tornado was from southwest to northeast, and the nest building in its course 
was a log house, on section six, of Paris, which was occupied by Cyrus Jones and 
family. This it blew down, to within three or four logs of the ground, but luckily 
none of the inmates were seriously injured, although none of them escaped with- 
out some bruises. 

Erastus and Eli Teomana came to Grandville in 1835. They came from Pon- 
tiac on foot, via the Shiawassee trail, and had to ford all the streams. Dwight 
Kankin came with a wagon in 1838, by way of Gull Prairie, and was nine days 
coming from Detroit to Grand Rapids. When they forded the Coldwater they 
got " set," and were an hour or two getting through. 

A pole boat called the Cinderella, was launched at Grandville in June, 1837, 
and Mrs. Rankin says the occasion was made one of general rejoicing. AU the 
people around were invited, and the boat was poled up and down the river, while 
they had music and dancing on board. Mr. Lewis Moody came to Grandville in 
the spring of 1837, hut did not bring his family until November. They, with 
others, came by Green Lake, and were six days getting through. They had four 
01 teams, and four wagons, and were frequently obliged to put the four teams on 
one wagon. Just at dark of the fourth day, they came to the outlet ol Green 
Lake, and found the polos that composed the bridge afloat, and were about two 
hours getting across; and it was raining all of the time. When they reached the 
Green Lake house, they found some three or four others there before them, but 
they had none ot them had any supper, and all they could muster towards it 
were some potatoes and onions that the people who kept the house had, and 
some venison tliat one of tlie travelers had. Mrs. Moody told them ahe could 
furnish bread, and they made out a supper that relished well, tired and hungry 



yGoosle 



1J2 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

as tiiey were. Tlie nest niglit for supper they bad nothing but bread ; and the 
same, in a very limited quantity, for breakfist. Mr. Mooiij says the Fourth of 
July, 1837, waa the "liveliest" Fourth he ever saw. The steainhoat, '-Gov. 
Mason," made her trial trip from Grand Rapids to Grandville. Dr. Scran ton was 
to deliver an address on board of the host at Grandville, but, as it was yery 
lengthy, when he was but p»rtly tlirough, some one blowed the whistle, aad the 
crowd cheered and broke up. There were four liberty poles raised at Grandville 
that day, but at night none of them were stauiilng. Mr. M. aaya that when they 
first began to carry the United States mail from Grandville to Grand Haven, they 
used tiD tie it up in a pocket handkerchief. Mr. Leonard Stoneburner relates the 
following story, which Mr. B. B. Bostwick told of one of the mail-carriers, an 
Irishman. He started from Grandville late, and did not get to the lumber camp, 
where he was to stay all night, until after dark. Just before he got through, Mr. 
Bostwick, who was but a short distance behind him, heard an owl cry out, '• Tu 
who-o, who-o," aud the Irishman answered, " Me name ia Jemmy O'Nale, sure, 
and I carry the mail." 

Ebenczer Davis, now of Wyoming, was one of the early settlers of Kent county, 
having settled at Grand Bapids in 1836. Mr. Davis says that in the spring of 
1837, there was a scarcity of flour; and for three weeks there was none to be 
had at Grand Rapids, and almost everybody lived on sturgeon. The first supply 
of flour came from Jackson, down Grand River, on a flat boat. Mr. Wilder, and 
others at Grandville, say that in 1838, they had no flour at Grandville, escept 
some which waa said to hare been sunk in Lake Michigan. After Icnocking 
the hoops and staves off, the flour retained the shape of the barrel, and 
had to be cut to pieces with an axe, and pounded up. That sum- 
mer was Tery sickly, and most of the time this was all that could be had 
for Mck or well. Mrs. McCray aajs she made bread for her husband, of the aame 
flour, when be waa very sick, and for a long time they could get no butter; but 
finally Mr. Myron Roya, who kept bachelor's hall on his place, and had two cows, 
made some for them. Mrs. McCray says that, when she hears people complain of 
hard times and hard fare, now, she always feels like seeing them have a slight 
trial of those times. 

Hiram Jenison says, that, when be came to Grandville in 1834, there waa no 
aettlement between Grandville and Grand Ilaven, and but two families at Grand 
Haven: Messrs. Ferry and Throop. Ottawa was at that time a part of Kent county. 
He went to Grand Rapids once to attend aa election. 

At the time Mr. Roys settled in Wyoming all of the opening lands were entirely 
free from bushes, and, except the trees, were almost like the prairies, Mr. Roys 
says that, the first summer he was in Michigan, he worked for Mr. Weight, at the 
mill, and the woman who waa there to cook for them became homesick, and went 
back to the settlements, and they put him in cook. He would cook meat, beans, 
etc., as well as any of them, but making biscuit and bread puzzled him. He uaed 
to put salerstus into sweet milk, until one nigbt liis cow laid out, and the milk 
soared. He was in trouble; bat, finally, concluded to put his saleratus into the 
fwiir milk, mixed it up and baked it, and found that he had learned to maks 
biscuit. 

,,ted by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOKr OF KENT COUNTY. 113 

FIRST TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

The township of Wjoming was organized in 1848. Wm. R. Godwin was the 
first Supervisor ; Josepli Blake, Clerk ; Cliase Edgerly, Treasurer ; Eraatus Yoo- 
mana and Roawell Britton, Justices of tlie Peace ; Nicholas Shoemaker, Dwight 
Rankin, and James B. Jewell, Comniiaaioners of Highways; Luther D. Abbott 
and Juatua C. Rogora, School Inspectors; L. D. ibbott and J, C. Rogers, Ovor- 
seers of the Poor; Wm. Richardson, J. A. Britton, C. J, Rogers, and H.N. 
Roberts, Conatables. 

At the general election, Not. 1st, 1848, the whole number of votea cast was 101. 
At the general election in 1808, there were 344 votes cast. 
PRESENT TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 

Supervisor — William K. Emmons. Clerk — ^Adclbert H. WestoQ. Treasurer^ 
John V. D. Haven. Justices of the Peace — William H. Galloway, Alexander Mc- 
Inroy, Cyrus Freeman, Augustine Godwin. Higliwaj Commissioners — Daniel 
Stewart, Augustine Godwin, Cyrua Freeman. ScJiool Inspectors — W. K. Em- 
mons, W. H. Galloway. Overseera of the Poor— Cyrus Freeman, J^imes Jewell. 
Constalilea — Charles L. Moody, "W. L. Gallowny. 




yGoosle 



114 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KEKT C0I:K3T. 

CITY OF GRAND RAPIDS. 

Grand Eapiila is located on Grand Kiver — tlic largest inliiud stroam in the state 
— about forty miles from its mouth, and at tiic liead of navigation. Its sit* is 
one ofgre.it natural beauty, lying on both aides of the river, botween the liigU 
bluffs that stand nearly two miles apart, and from whose summits the eye tnkus 
in a beautiful panorama of hill, vale and river, with all the strc'uts of the busy 
city laid out like a map at the feet of the beholder. 

Grand River at this point runs nearly south, but soon after leaving the city 
resumes its general westerly direction. On the west side of the rivei-, the ground 
is nearly level back to the bluffs ; on the east side, there were smaller lulls between 
the bank and the bluiTs, the leveling of which has cost, and is yet to cost, large 
sums of money. The cast side bluffs, once an ornament to the town, are now 
marred with deep cuts and unsightly excavations, which may be likened to con- 
stantly open sores on the face of nature. But the sores are liiiely, we must add, 
to be soon healed, and covered by a crown of comJortable homes, with clmroh 
spires shooting up from their midst to point the way to the h<mie above. 

In writing this sketch, we are not compelled to go to ancient hooka and dusty 
files for the record of how the town has grown ; for its founder is still alive, and 
a large proportion of its early settlers. What we write is derived from their lips, 
and if we fail to mould it into the symmetrical form o" legitimate history, we beg 
some allowance to he made to the live elements that compose it, which will per- 
sist in sticking out iiice the hands and feet of a class of vigorous boys, and will 
not easily be folded smoothly down like a " preeerve<l specimen." 

We have no knowledge of the first white man who visited the rapids ou Grand 
River, called by the Indiana the Owashtenong. An Indian village had long ex- 
isted here— of the Ottawa tribe — before any white men ctmt h^re to reside The 
history of this village, of its chie& and warriors oi lis f rays and defences its 
councils and treaties, is lost in oblivion from huiian knoilul^e an I only writ- 
ten in the hooks of the Recording Angel 

In 1831, Isaac McCoy — who was ipp intel ly the Boiidol Minageraof the 
Baptist Slissiouary convention forthe Lnitc 1 Itatci t » la' or lo Ilhn>i>i tnd In- 
diana—visited Gen. Lewis Oass at Detroit to hy hetori, him the claims ot that 
society, and the needs of Indian tribes of Michigan Territory The general re- 
ceived him cordially and gave him $4jO m goods for tin. ! tntfit ot his mission 
at Port Wayne. 

At the Cliicago treaty of the same year, through the influence ot Uol. Trimble, 
of Ohio, the Pottawattomies agreed to give one mile square of land, to be located 
by the President, in consideration of the promise of the government to locate 
thereon a teacher, and a blacksmith, for the instruction and aid of the Indians ; 
the government agreeing to appropriate $1,000 each year for that object. A 
similar arrangement wai afterwards made with the Ottawa?, the government 
agreeing to maintain a teacher, a blacksmith and a farmer, at an expense of 
{1,500 per year. 

Detroit at that time contained only a few hundred inhabitants, and the whole 
territory of Michigan waSj a vast wilderness, with only here and there an oasis of 

..tedbyGoOQie 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORT OF KBST COUMTY. 115 

a fort or trading post. On tlie west side of Grand River, and on what is now the 
Fifth Ward of the city of Grand Rapida, stood, at that time, a collection of 50 or 
60 huts, Kewkislikain being the village chief, acknowledging the control of Noon- 
day, chief of the Ottawas, 

On the 28th of June, 1833, Mr. McCoy went Irom Fort Wayne to Detroit, for 
the purpose of securing the privileges of the Chicago treaty, the war department 
having placed the matter under the control of Gen, Cass. Gen. Caas commis- 
Kioned Charles C. Ti-owliridge to make definite arrangements with the Indiana for 
the sites of the missionary atations. The site for the Pottawattomie station was 
eatablbhed on the St. Joseph Giver, and that of the Ottawas on the Rapids of 
Grand River. Mr. JlcCoy visited Grand Rapida in 1823, accompanied by a 
Frenchman named Paget, and one of hia Indian pupils, for tite purpose of put- 
ting mattei's into operation at the contemplated station among the Ottawas ; bnt 
was unable to make any satisfactory arrangement, and soon returned to Carey, aa 
the Pottawattomie station waa called. In the fall of the same year he had a 
blacksmith shop set up at Kalamazoo, but only a little waa done with it, so far 
as we can learn, and it waa afterwarda removed to Grand Rapida. 

Some time in 1834, iis near aa we can learn. Rev. L. Slater, Baptist missionary, 
and a blacksmith, and one or two other white workmen, came to Grand Rapida 
and commenced work. The winter proved a very hard one, and auppliea had to 
bo sent them on liorsebai;!; before spring. JMr. Slater erected a log house for him- 
self, aud a log school house — the first buildings ever put up in tlie county. 

Religion having let a my of lijjht into the wilderncaa. Commerce, her necessary 
handmaid, Vi-.vi not long in following. The first white settler of Grand Rapids, 
who came iu'ro to S)uiid a business aud make himself a home, was Louis Campau, 
an Indian trader. J[r. Cimipau is still alive, and well known to all the older 
residents of the city, who honor and respect liim as a venerable pioneer and true 
gentleman. His pordait may be found in the City Directory for 1870, thus mak- 
ing (lis fiice familiar to those wlio, from tlieir short term of residence, had not 
made lijs acfpiaintance. Jtr. Campao was born in Detroit, in the year 1701. Hia 
ancestors were Froneli, and came to Detroit before the war of the Revolution. 
Ue had but fuw advantagca of early education, but made bis own career with a 
clear head, a strong right arm, and an honest purpose, la the fall of 1814, he 
went to Saginaw to trada with the Indians, at which place he remained for ten 
years, before removing to Grand Rapida. 

Mr. Campau came to Grand Rapids at the solicitation and under the anspices 
of William Brc-water, of Detroit, who waa very estenaivelj engaged in the tur 
business in rivalry with the American Fur Company, aud who furnished him with 
ail that he needed to carry on his business, Mr. Oaiiipau afterwanis opened 
trading posts and established his agents at Muskegon, Manistee, lialamazoo, 
Lowell, Hastings, and Katon Rapida. He had no trouble with the Indians, but 
found them Itieudly aud peaceable. They were uniformly lionest, and could be 
' trusted with goods, never failing to pay as soon as they had the ability. The 
currency of that time was— fur. And this wag all the Indian had to exchange 
for the products of civiii/atiou. 

From 1830 to 1333, Mr. Campau's only white visitors were traders like h 



fed by 



GooqIc 



116 HISTORY ASD- DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

with a few occasional travelers. He cut clown the timber from a few acres of 
ground to let in t!ie sunljglit, but did not attempt anj extenaive improvements. 
Hia brother, Touasaint, tlien only a youtt, waa with him most of the time, and 
helped carry on the business. Toussaint Campau ia still a resident of Grand 
Rapids, and not much burdened with the weight of years. 

In 1833, the pionecra of civilization, of whom we may call Mr. Campau the fore- 
runner and scout, began to find their way to Grand Rapids. A land office was 
opened at White Pigeon in that year, and Louis Campau and Luther Lincoln 
were the first purchasers. Mr. Campau bought a tract of laud in what is now the 
city of Grand Rapids, and Mr. Lincoln took up a portion of the site of the present 
village of Graudville. 

In theapring of 1833, Mr. Samuel Dcster came to Ionia with a colony of 63 per- 
sons from New York, cutting a road through the woods from Pontiac, nliich was 
afterwards known as the Dexter trail— and ho laid out what ia known as the 
Dexter Fraction in this city. Several of thia company afterwards became resi- 
denta of Grand Rapids and vicinity. Louis Campau, who carried a quantity of 
goods up the river in iiatteaus for Mr. Dexter, brought back with him Mr. Joel 
Guild, carrying his household goods free. He sold Mr. Guild a lot, adjoining the 
one on which the City National Bank building now stands, for twenty-five dol- 
lars. On this lot Mr. Guild erected, during the next summer, a small frame 
house, which waa the first frame building erected in the citj, unless, possibly, we 
may except a building which Mr. Cniupau erected, just across the street, for a 
store, and which was completed aliout the same time. Mr. Guild came from 
Paris. Oneida county, New Tork, and brought with him hia family, consisting of 
a wife and seven children. Three of those children are still living ; Mrs. Baster, 
Mrs. Burton, and Consider Guild ; the two former in this city, both widows, but 
Iwth loved and honored by a largo circle of fi'iends, for their useful and consistent 
lives. The latter now carries i>n a faim in Ottawa county. 

Joel Guild, soon after his arrival, was appointed Postmaster, ajid held that 
position for some time, being succeeded by Darius Winaor. Mail was brought 
once a month from Gull Prairie, on the backs of Indian ponies. Postage was two 
shillings on a letter, and the ties of friendship had to be pretty strong to sui>port 
a regular correspendence. A gentleman who came several years later, says that 
the fifty cents a month I'Cfxuired to pay postage on his letters, and tlie replies of 
his sweetheart in New York, proved a fearful drain on his pocketbook. 

Grand liapids in 1831), contained but a few acres of cleared land on either side 
of the river. The Indians had three or four acres cleared oa the west aide, just 
below where the bridge of the Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad now stands, 
and about as much more on the east side, along what is now Waterloo Street. 
The timber in that part of the city lying between Fulton and Lyon Streets was 
mainly oak, and the soil light and aandy. Prospect Hill, (where are the present 
reaidences of Dr. Shepard and Deacon Haldane,) which is now nearly removed, 
was an elevation of remarkable beauty, but in many places so steep that a wagon 
could not be drawn up without much difficulty. 

But the tide of emigration was now fairly set in this direction, and in the next 
four years Grand Rapida became quite a village. 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOKY OF KENT COUNTY. 117 

Eliplialet Turner, whose death occurred this fall, (1870), csme in 1833 ; also Ira 
Jones, who BUrrived Mr. Turner but a few days. During the same year came 
Jonathan F. Chubb, with his wife and two children, Mr. Chubb located and im- 
proved a beautiful farm between here and Grandville — the same now occupied by 
Mr. A. N. Norton — but, in a (ew years, sold out, moved into the 'city and opened 
an i^ricultural store on Canal street. He died several years ago, but his son, A. 
L. Chubb, is now one of our most active business men. 

Rev. Mr. Barrigau, atterward Bishop of the Lake Superior region, also came as 
a missionary among the Indiana, and a church building was commenced on the 
west side of the river— a small, framed structure. Mr. Campau wanted the build- 
ing on the east side, and eventually carried his point, luring Barney Burton to 
move it across tlie river ou the ice. Mr. Barrigau did not succeed to suit him, 
and did not remain long. 

A saw mill was erected on Indian Creek, about just above Wonderly & Co.'s 
mammoth mill, some time during the same year. 

In the fall of 1833, Mr. Slater kept a school on tiie west side of the river, and 
every morning sent nfl Indian across wi^h a canoe for the wliitc children on the 
other side. 

Among the seftlers of 1834, were Richard Godfroy, who set up a store to trade 
with the Indians, Robert Barr, Louis Morau, and Lovell Moore, E^q. The first 
marriage in Grand Rapids occurred in 1834. Mr. B.irney Burton and Harriet 
Guild were the happy pair. 

The first town meeting was held in 1834. (see history of Grand Uiipids town- 
ship). It was held in the house of Joel Guild, and the wholennmber of voters was 
nine. 

In the fall of 1334, Mr. Campau commenced a large frame building, which now 
exists as the upper two stories of the Rathhun House. During the year 183->, 
Edward Guild and Darius Winsor moved down the river from Ionia, and quite a 
large number of settlers arrived, among whom were Hon. Luciuo Lyon. Jeffers<m 
Morrison, Antoinc Campau, James Lyman, A. Hosford Smith, Demetrius Turner^ 
William C. Godfroy, Dr. Wilson. Dr. Charles Shepard, and Julius C. Abel. Dr. 
Wilson was the first Doctor. He was furnished with a medicine case and a set 
of instruments by Louis Campau, and commenced practice among a population 
of about 50 souls. Julius C. Abel was tlie pioneer law3'er, and grew rich out of 
the misunderstandings of the growing town. J^ames Lyman and Jeil'erson Morri- 
son set up stores and commenced trading. In the same year, N. O. Sargeant 
purchased an interest with Lucius Lyon in the Kent Plat, and came on with a 
posse of men to dig a mill race. Judge Almy and wife came at the same time, 
with Mr. Sargeant. Among the men in his employ was Leonard G. Baxter. The 
entrance ol that number of men was an interesting and exciting event in the little 
town. The workmen came into the place with their shovels and picks on their 
shoulders, to the inspiriting notes of a bugle in the hands of one of tlieir number 
— Crampton by name, now living in ^da — who afterward blew the same bugle on 
the first steamboat that ascended above the Rapids. Old Noonday thought they 
were enemies, and sent Mr. Campau an ofier of assistaace to expel the invaders. 

About this time, Martin Ryerson, then a premising boy sixteen or seventeen 



/Goosle 



lie HISTORY AND DIRECTOKT OP KEKT COUNTY. 

years old, came here as a clork in the employ of Ricliard Godfroy. He liaa since 
become one of the leading lumbermen in Chicago, and is now traveling in Europe 
with his family. Among other young men nliocame here, and remained for some 
tijne, were Lj'man and Horace Gray — the latter a Major in the Fourth Mich. Cav. 
during the Rebellion — and Andrew Robliins. Rev. Andrew Vizoiskj also caine in 
1885, aad, for seventeen years, was pastor of the Catholic flock in this city. Mr. 
Vizoisky was a native of Hungary. He received hia education at the Catliolic in- 
stitutions of learning, in Austria, under the patronage of the Hungarian Olian- 
cery. From these sources lie obtained tliat profonnd knowledge of ancient liter- 
ature, and of the history and doctrines of the Holy Catholic Church, wliicli dis- 
tinguished him even in a Brotherhood of world wide reputation for erudition. 
He came to the United States in 1831. By the appointment of the Bishop of 
Detroit he officiated three years in St. Clair County. Thence, in 183.), he removed 
to the Grand River Slission. His ministry in Grand Rapids was marked by un- 
snipassed devotion, and tiie most gratifying success. No road was rough snough, 
Bod no weather inclement enough, to keep him from the post of duty. To tht 
poor he brought relief; to the sick, consolation: and to the dying, the absulvalory 
promises of his office. He died January 3nd. IS.ia, at the age of sixty years ; hav- 
ing lived to see a handsome stone church edifice erected on Monrni.- street, two 
years previous to his death, and fllled with a numerous and proajiurous congre- 
gation. 

1836 witnessed tlio advent of a large number of new settlers, ami the mania of 
speculation possessed the town. Lots were held at almost as high prices as they 
will bring to-day. If a man bought a piece of land for $100, lie iiuraediatciy set 
his price at |1,000, and confidently awaited a purchaser. The currency was in- 
flated, and " wild cat money " in abandan(^e supported these flotitious values. 
Every man got largely in debt, and every man lived to rue the indiscretion, long 
and bitterly. 

Among those wLo came in 1838, were Hon. .John Ball, William A. Richmond. 
John W. Pierce, Philander Tracy, Bbenezer W. Barnes, Isaac Turner, A. B. Turner, 
George C. Nelson, Jaii^s M. Nelson, Warren P. Mills, G-orge Young, Robert 
Hilton, BilliuB Stocking, Abrani Randall, William A. Richmond, Truman H. 
Lyou, William Haldane, Loren M. Page, Charles U. Taylor, Jacob Barnes, Wil- 
liam Morman, David Burnett, K. S. Pettibone, Asa Pratt, Samuel Howland, J. 
Mortimer Smith, HcKekiah Green, George Coggeshall, John J. Wntson, George 
Martin. Myron Hiiisddl, Stephen Ilinsdill, Hiraiu Hinsdill, and Harj'y Eaton. Mr. 
Eaton, in 1840, was elected Sheriff of tlie county. His death occurred in 1859. 

Itoswell Brittou, of Grandville, was the first Representative io the S-ate Legis- 
lature from this section. Ilis uistrict comprised Kent, Ottiiwa, Clinton, and Ionia 
counties. The State Constitution had been adopted only the year before — 183'!. 
Major Britton was succeeded in 1837 by John Ahny ; in 18:!8, by Jolm Ball ; in 
1839, by Noble H. Finney ; and in 1840, by 0. L Widker. 

Hon. John Ball, who has contribntcd not a little to the growth and prosperity 
of the town, is a native of Hebron, N. 11., and afterward resideil in Lansingburg 
and Troy, N. Y. Ho graduated at Dartmouth College in 1820, and afterwurd 
practiced law in Troy. He came here as a land operator, and has since devoted. 



V_n 



ooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIBECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 119 

more of liis time to real estate business than to law. He took A. D.Rathboneintrt 
partnership with him in 1840, who continued in that relation for about a year. In 
1S44 Solomon L. Withey became his partner, and the firm was known as Bull A 
Withey. Afterward George Mai-tin became a partner, and the firm was Ball, 
Martin & Withey. Afterward it was Ball, Withey & Sargcant. It is now Bali & 
McKee. 

Myron Hins;Iill erected the National Hotel ifl 183G. and it soon after went into 
.the hands of Canton Smith. 

John W. Peirce, the pioneer dry goods man of Kent, came here with the late 
Judge Aliiiy, and assisted that gentleman in surveying and platting that portion 
of the city now comprising so much thereof as lies under the bluffs. He erected 
tLe dwelling on Ottawa street in 184S, and resiiled therein until, within the last 
few weeks, (Oct. 15, 1870) he removed into Ida new and elegant residence, corner 
of Bronson and Kent streets — having occupied the old mansion for nearly twenty 
seven consecutive years. He is one of the gentlemen who had an abiding faith in 
Kent, and the Rapids in general, and by great and and unwearied perseverance 
has become comfortably off in tiiia world's goods, and, by his enterprise, added 
many new buildings to this growing city. Mr. Peirce says that he counted all the 
frame buildings in Grand Rapids when he carae, and there were just thirteen. 
His book store was the first one in the State, west of Detroit. 

John J. Watson came from Detroit, and erected, in 1836, a very large atore- 
Loaae, about where tlie skating rink now stands. It was, in the course of time, 
moved up the river, and became a part of W. D, Foster's old wooden store. 

George JIartin, previously mentioned among the settlers of 1836, was a grad- 
uate of Middlebury College, Vt. He was for a number of years County and Cir- 
cuit Judge of this county, and, at tlie time of his death, was Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court of Michigan. 

In 183G, llichard Godfroy built the first steamboat on Gvand RLvcr, and called 
it the " Gov. Mason." The lirst boat, liowaver, other than the batteaux of the 
traders, was a pole boat called the " Young Napoleon," constructed for Mr. Cam- 
pan by Lyman Gray, 

The " Gov. M;iaou " was commanded by Captain Stoddard. It only had a short 
existence, being wrecked off the mouth of the Muskegon River in 1838. Captain 
Stoddard died a number of years ago, in Barry county. 

We have mentioned Judge Alniy as one of the pioneers of the place. His genial 
disposition, most corteous manners, aud unbounded hospitality, added to a pliy- 
sique at once commanding and nobie, made him a representative gentleman in the 
early days. He was a civil engineer and practical surveyor, of eminence, and was 
in charge, in 1837-8, of the improvement of the Grand and Kalamazoo Rivers; was 
a member of the State Legislature, and one of the County Judges. He was also 
a lawyer by profession, but did not practice any after coming to Michigan. Few 
men, dying, have left behind them the reflection of a better spent life than John 

The late George Coggeshall emigrated, in 1830, to this place, from Wilming- 
ton, N. C, with his family, and invested his means in Kent, fie erected the frame 
house, on tjie corner of Bridge and Kent streets, now occupied by the distinguished 



yGoosle 



120 flISlORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUHTY. 

Homeopatliic physician, Dr. Charles Hempe!, and which has been somewhat modi- 
fled from its primitive appearance. Mr. Ooggeahall was a man of many sterling 
qualities, and was a firm heliever in the future of that once impaBaaljle quagmire, 
" Kent," which is now a part of the most populous ward in the city. 

Among those who came here in 1837, were Israel V. Harris, Rey. James Ballard, 
Leonard Coveli, G. M. HcCray, William A. Tryon, L. B. Atwater, William I. 
Blakely, A. Dikeraan, H. K. Rose, John F. Godfroj, Gains S. Dcaoe, Henry 
Dean, C. P. Calkins, James Scribner, and CoL Samuel F. Butler. 

The first banking establishment was the Grand River Bank, established in 
1847, Judge Ahny being President, and Lucius Lyon, Cashier. It lasted a conple 
of years, and issued bills which were considered good, but finally succumbed to 
the hard times, and left its promises to pay, a dead loss in the hands of the 
holders. 

Another bank, called " The People's Bank," was started during the same year, 
under the auspices of George Coggeshall, with Louis Oampau for President, and 
Simeon Johnson for Cashier. The institution failed to secure cash and naila 
enough to comply with the State Banking Law, and was soon wound up ; John 
Ball being appointed Receiver. 

For several years succeeding 1837, this was a very " bine" place. Polks were 
terribly poor, and real estate was hardly worth the taxes. A good many French 
mechanics, who had been attracted here by the rapid growth of the town, were 
thrown out at employment, and left iu disgust. 

A little atcamhoat, called the " Joha Almj," was buiit in 1837, to run ahove 
the Rapids. It went up the river as far as the mouth of Flat River,— Crampton 
(vaking the echoes with his bugle,— but, alas I sunk before it completed its trip, 
and rotted away in the bed of the river. 

A. Dikemau opened the first watchmaker and jeweler's eitablishment, in 1837, 
on Monroe street. It was kept up by him until 18S7, and since that time by his 
son, E. B. Dikeman, whose store is now on Canal street. 

Among the settlers of 1838, we may mention W. D. Roberts, John T. Holmee, 
Esq., Amos Roberts, C. W, Taylor, Erastus Clark, J. T. Finney, and Solomon 
Withey and his sons, S. L., William, and Orison. 

The Bridge Street House was built in 1837, and first kept by John Thompson ; 
subs^iuently, it was kept by Solomon Withey, who was succeeded by William A. 
Tryon and Truman U. Lyon— the last two still living in tiiis city. 

Amos Rathbun, Ira S. Hatch, Damon Hatch, W. M. Anderson, G. B, Rathbun, 
and F. D. Richmond, came in 1839. R. E. Butterworth, Heman Leonard, John 
W. Sqiiier, and Silas Hall, came in 1843. 



The following description of the place and its prospects appeared in the first 
newspaper ever printed in Grand Rapids, and was headed " The Rochester of 
Michigan." We quote it entire, as it appeared in the editorial columns of the 
Grand Bwer Times, Tuesday, April IS, 1837 : 

" Though young in its improvements, the site of this Tillage has long been 
known, and esteemed for its natural advantages. It was here that the Indian 
traders long since made their grand depot. It was at this point that the mission- 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 121 

ftry berald established his institution of learning — taught tlte forest child the 
beauties of civilizatioii, and inestimable benefits of the Cliristian religion. Tills 
bus been the choicest, dearest spot to the unfortuuate Indian, and now is the 
pride of the white man. Like other villages of the west, its transition from the 
aav^e to a civilized state, has been aa sudden as its prospects are now flattering. 

Wiio would have believed, to have visited this place two years since, when it 
waa only inhabited by a few families, most of whom were of French origin, a peo- 
ple BO eminent for exploring the wilds and meandering rivers, that this place 
would now contain its twelve liundred inhabitants ? Who would have imagined 
that thus rapid would have been the improvement of this romantic place. The 
rapidity of its settlement is beyond the most visionary anticipation ; but its loca- 
tion, its advantages, and its clime, were sufficient to sat ify the observing mind, 
that nothing but the frown of Providence could blast its prospects ! 

The river upon which this town is situated is one of the most important 
and delightfiil to be found in the country — not important and beautiful alone 
for its clear, silver like water winding its way through a romantic valley of some 
hundred miles, but for its width and depth, its susceptibility for steam naviga- 
tion, and the immense hydraulic power afforded, at this point. 

We feel deeply indebted to our Milwaukee triends for their lucid description of 
the advantages to be derived from a connection of the waters ot this river with 
those of Detroit, by canal or railroad. A canal is nearly completed around the 
rapids at this place, sufficiently large to admit boats to pass up and down, with 
but little detention. Several steamboats are now preparing to commence regular 
trips from Lyons, at the mouth of the Maple River, to this place, a distance of 
sixty miles; and from this to Grand Haven, a distance of thirty-five or forty 
miles ; thence to Milwaukee and Oliicago. 

Thus the village of Grand Rapids, with a navigable stream — a water power of 
twenty*five feet fall— an abundance of crude building materials— stone of escel- 
lent quality — pine, oak, and other timber in immense quantities within its 
vicinity, can but flourish— can bnt be the Rochester of Micliigan ! The basement 
Btory of an estensive mill, one hundred and sixty by forty feet, is now completed; 
a part of the extensive machinery is soon to be put in operation. There are now 
several dry g.iods and grocery stores — some three or four public houses — one 
large church, erected, and soon to be finished in good style, upon the expense of 
a single individual, who commenced business a few year ago, by a small traffic 
with the Indians. Such is the encouragement to Western pioneers ! The village 
plat is upon the bold bank of a river, extending back upon an irregular plain, 
some eighty to a hundred rods, to rising bluffji, from the base and sides of which 
some of the most pnrc, crystal like fonntalns of water burst out in boiling.springs, 
pouring forth streams that murmur over their pebbly bottoms, at once a delight 
to the eye and an invaluable luxury to the thirsty palate. 

New England may surpass this place with her lofty mountains, but not with 

her greatest boast, purity aud clearness of water. Our soil is sandy and mostly 

dry. The (own is delightful, whether you view it from the plain upon the banks 

of the river, or from the bluffs that overlook the whole surrounding country. To 

16 



yGooQle 



122 HI3T0RT AND DIBBCTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 

ascend these bluffs ;oa take a gradual riae to the height of a hundred feet, vhen 
the horizon only limits the extent of vision. The scenerj to an admirer of beau- 
tiful landscape is truly picturesque and romantic. Back east of the town is seen 
a widespread plain of burr oak, at once easy to cultivate and inviting to the agri- 
culturist. Turning westward, especially at the setting of the sun, jou behold the 
most enchanting prospect — the din of the ville below — ^thc broad sheet of water 
murmuring over the rapids— the sunbeams dancing upon its swift gliding ripples 
— the glassy river at last losing itaelt in its distant mcauderings, presents a 
Bcenerj that awakes the most lively emotions. But the opposite shore, upon 
which you behold a rich, fertile plain, still claims no small amount of admiration. 
Near the bank of the river is seen tlie little, rude village of the more civilized 
Indians — tbetr uncouth framed dwellings — their little churches, and moundlike 
burying places. The number and size of the mounds which mark the spot where 
lies the remains of the proud warrior, and the more humble of his untamed tribe, 
too plainly tell the endearment of that lovely plain to the native aborigines, and 
how quick the mind will follow the train of association to by-gone days, and con- 
trast these reflections with present appearanees. Thus we see the scenes of savage 
life, quickly spread upon the broad canvass of the imagination — the proud chief- 
tain seated, and his tribe surrounding the council fires— the merry war dance— 
the wild amusements of the 'red man of the forest,' and as soon think of their 
present unhappy condition ; the bright flame of their lighted piles has been ex- 
tinguished, and with it has faded the keen, expressive brilliancy of the wild man's 
eye! Their lovely WaiAtenartg, upon which their light canoes have so long 
glided, is now almost deserted ! 

It is from this point, too, that you can see in the distance the evergreen tops of 
the lofty pine, waving in majesty above the sturdy oak, the beech, and maple, 
present g t tl y w Id lit pi th its thousand charms. Such 

is the 1 t tl I t I th I t f this youthful town. The citi- 

zens altl ttU ttp ed industrious character. Their 

ly 1 hert — the clatter of mallet and 

y wly raised and recently covered 
a th wl ves of the river, speak loudly 
Lies ol ail kind find abundance of employ, 
and reap a rich reward for their labor. Village property advances in value, and 
the prospect of wealth is alike flattering to all! What the result ol such advan- 
tage and prospect will be, time alone must determine. 

But a view of this place and its vicinity, where we And a rich and fertile soil, 
watered with the best of springs, and enjoying as we do a salubrious climate, a 
healthful atmosphere, and the choicest gifts of a benign Benefactor, would satisfy 
almost any one that this will soon be a bright star in the constelliition of western 
villages. Such, gentle reader, is a faint description of the place from which our 
paper hails — from which we hope will emenato matter as pleasing and interest- 
ing as the town is beautiful and inviting." 

The following graphic sketch, from the pen of C. W. Eaton, we quote entire : 
" We have been told many good anecdotes of Meccissininni, the young chief of 



buildin-^ 1 g t tj 


d h 1 


ehisel- ih 1 k f ti 1 


n — th 


frames— d tl i kit 


b ts p 


for the enterprise of the pla( 


;e! Much! 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 123 

the Grand River Indians in an early day, by an o)d resident of tliis place. Mec 
cissininn las c lied the iounc- Chief, and old Blai-k Skin the Old Chief; 
although Meec s n waa not a Tory young man, being 45 ; but, aceording to 
the custom of the In 1 ns a young brave that marries the Chief's daaghter is 
made CI ef an 1 calleltle lo ng Chief. He was an eloquent orator, a very 
proud, hiugl ty L d a and wanted to be like hia white brethren," as he often 
said. He always Iressed 1 ke h a white brethren, and you mifrht often see him on 
a hot day in the summer tarrying an umbrella, when there was no sign of rain — 
to keep from being tanned, probably. 

He waa one of the band of Chiefs that went with Louis Campau. Rix Robinson, 
and Rev. Mr. Slater to Washington to make a treaty relative to selling their lands 
on the west side of the river, which was consummated in 1835, While in Wash- 
ington, Gen. Jackson wished to make him a present of a good suit of clothea, and 
Baked him what kind he would prefer. He said as General Jackson was Chief of 
his people, and he was Chief of the red men, he thought it would be appropriate 
if he had a suit like his. The General ordered the suit. It was a black frock 
coat, black satin vest, black pantaloons, silk stockings, and pnmps; but the best 
of the thing was. Gen. Jackson wore at that time a white bell-crowned hat, with 
a weed on it, being at the time in mourning for his wife. The unsuspecting 
Indian, not knowing that the weed waa a badge of mourning, had one on his' 
hat aiso, which pleased Gcu. Jackson and his Cabinet not a little. lie was much 
delighted with the warm receptions he received in the different cities on his return 
home. 

After he returned, a council met to hear the nature of the treaty, where Meccis- 
sininni distinguished himself as an orator, in his portrayal of the treaty. They 
sold their lands, and the treaty provided for their removal west of the Mississippi, 
in a certain number of years; wiiere lands were given them. Several of the 
Chiefs were opposed to the treaty; but Meccissininni was in favor of their re- 
moval, and made an eloquent speech in support of it. In his remarks he said that 
for bis part he h,ad rather remain here, and be buried where his forefathers were ; 
but, on his people's account, he had rather go west oi the Mississippi, as his peo- 
ple would become debased by association with the pale faces. 

In 18il he was invited to a Fourth of July celebration. The dinner was served 
up near the present site of Ball's Foundry, where, after the oration, and refresh- 
ments, the cloth was removed and regular toasts drank. Meccisaininni was called 
upon for a toast, and responded as follows ; 

"The pale faces and the red men— the former a great nation, and the latter a 
remnant of a great people ; may they ever meet ia unity together, and celebrate 
this great day as -a band of brothers." 

Our narrator relates an incident which occurred while he was keceping a grocery 
and provision store on the west side, opposite the Barnard House, where the old 
ferry was located. Meccissininni said he wanted to get trusted for some provis- 
ions, and would pay at the next Indian payment. When ho returned from tlie 
annual payment, he was asked to settle his bill. He told the provision vender 
that he must put it ou paper, send it to his home, and he would pay it. He said 
he wished to do business like white people. So our friend made out his bill and 

.-.fed by 



GooqIc 



134 HISTORY AMD DIEKOTOET OF KEMT OOUMTY. 

repaired to the Chief's house, and was ushered ia with all the politeneaa imagin- 
able. He promptly paid the bill, and signified his wish to hare it receipted. 
After showing him all his presents, and donning his suit wliich Gen. Jackson bad 
presented him, he brushed hia hair back and imitated the walk of the General, 
taking long strides back and fortli across tlie room ; and also mimicked that of 
the Vice President, Martin Van Buren, by stepping short and quick. Having 
passed an hour very plewantlj, lie took his leave, with a polite invitation from 
Mecciasininni t^D call ag^n. 

About the year 1843, he was attacked with a disease of the lungs, which, after a 
short illness, terminated liis existence, at the age of Sfty. He lived and died a 
professor of the Cathoiic taith, under the spiritual guidance of the late Rev. Mr, 
Vizoisky, lie was followed to his last resting pla<;e by a large concourse of the 
citizena of Grand Rapids, together with his own tribe." 
INDIAN MOUNDS. 

The Indian burying ground on the west side, in the Filth Ward which the 
denizens of the village of Kent found in 1833, remained, with its rude enclosure, 
the wonder of all strangers, until about the year 18o0, whtn it had gradually 
disappeared under the power of decay, and the avarice of man. In this mound — 
small portions of which yet remain— the sainted priest, Vizoisky, had consigned 
to their final rest the bones of many a converted Ottawa, wlio had been taught to 
Bay his Pater Noster and Ave Maria, and perform his daily Matins in the tiny 
church, that for years was the spiritual home of that good and devoted Catholic 

BRIDGES. 
The first bridge that spanned Grand River was a narrow foot bridge budt by 
James Scribner and Lovell -Moore, in 1843. E. H. Turner and James bcribner 
built the first wagon bridge in 1845. The first toll bridge, on Bridge street, was 
Unished in 1652, and for tbe first year did not pay the expenses of running it 
Now there are three in the city, all of which are fine, covered bridges, and pay 
large dividends. Pearl street bridge was completed in 18o8, aud Leonard street 
bridge in 1859. On the sixth day of April, 1858, Bridge street bridge took flre 
and was utterly destroyed. A foot bridge was at once commenced, and com- 
pleted by April 10th. During the interval between the destruction of the bridge 
and the completion of a now one, the steamer Nebraska ran back and forward as 
a ferryboat. 

GAS. 
. The Grand Rapids Uas-Light Company was incorjiorated in 18S7, and in No- 
vember of that year the stores-on Monroe street were lit with gas for the first 
time. Gas-pipes were not estended across the river until 186!*. 

PLANK UOAD, 
The plank road from this city to Kalamatoo was completed in 1854, previous 
to which, stages were two days in going from one town to the other. Tbe plank 
road enabled them to make tlie trip in one day. W. H. Withey was the pro- 
prietor of the first line of stages on the new road. This road was of immense im- 
portance to the rising city, and, until the completion of the Detroit and Milwan- 



f9dby 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AHD DIRECTORT OP KENT COUKTT. 125 

kee Railrond in 1858, it was the aTenue by which nearly all visitors from the east 
approached the city. The author haa counted as many as 170 teams in one day, 
coming to the plaster mills In this city and Wyoming township. , Many of these 
t«ams brought loads of corn and pork for the supply of the Qrand Rapids market, 
which then, aa at tlie present time, furnished immense quantities of those staples 
to the lumbermen in this Ticinity and farther north. In 18G9, the toll-gatea were 
aboliahed, and now the planks are fast breaking up and becoming a nuisance, and 
in many places are entirely taken up. 

NEWSPAPERS. 

The first newspaper, tailed the Grand River Times, was started by George W. 
Pattiaon in 1837, anil the first number pubUshed April 18th, of that year. Several 
copies of the first number are still extant, having been printed on cloth with a 
view to their preservation. Uncle Louis Oampau has one of these sheets, which 
was presented to hira by the editor, with his name printed on the margin. Mr. 
Pattison was assisted, as editor, by Noble II. Pinney. The press on which this 
paper was printed was drawn up the river irom Grand Haven, on the ice, by a 
team of dogs. It was purchased the winter previous at Buffalo, by Judge Almy. 
At Detroit it was shipped for Grand Haven on the steamer Don Quixote, which 
was wrecked off Thunder Bay, and the press taken arou nd the lakes on another 
boat. Some years after, the paper passed into the hands of James H. Morse, who 
published a neutral paper for several years. Tiie political department was di- 
vided equally between the Whiga and Democrats. Articles were written oa the 
Democratic side by Simeon M. Johnson, C. H. Taylor, Sylvester Granger, and C. 
I. Walker, and on the Whig side by George Martin, Wm. G. Henry, E. B. Bost- 
wick, and T. W. Higginson. Finally Mr. Johnson was ejnployed as editor, and 
in 1841 changed the name of the paper to Eiuiuirer, after the Rkhmoad Enquirer, 
which was his favorite paper. lu 1843, E. D, Burr became a partner, and hoiated 
the Democratic flag, with the name of John C. C4lhoun for President. In 1844, 
it supported James K. Polk, and published a campaign slieet called Yuuitg Hickory. 
After this the paper was published by Jacob Barnes, as agent, with T. B. Church, 
as editor. Then C. 11. Taylor became partner, and was the editor. 

In March, 18oy, A. E. Gordon started the Daily Herald, which was the first 
daily paper published in Grand Rapids. This waa followed in 1856 by a daily 
from the Enipdrer ofHce, Taylor & Barnes, proprietors, J. P. Thompson, editor. 
In a short time the two papers were merged in the Enquirer and Hernld, Gordon 
& Thompson, publishers. Mr. Thompson, now assistant editor of the Eagle, left 
the Enquirer and Herald, and, associated with Charles B. Benedict, establised a 
semi-weekly paper called the Qrand Bapidt Pre^s. Gordon continued the En- 
quires and Herald until it was closed under a mortgage held by H. P. Yale. It 
was resurrected by N. D. Titus, who afterwards took in Pordhain as a partner, 
and called the Democrat. M. H. Clark soon after obtained an interest in the paper. 
Titua went out, and Mr. Clark continued it, with a Mr. Burt as partner. After 
Mr. Burt left, C. 0. Sexton and Robert Wilson had an interest in it, and finally 
Dr. C. B. Smith. The Demoerat, under the able management of Mr. Clark, now 
boasts one of the finest printing establishments in this part of the state, and is a 
large, well filled, handsome and prosperous paper. ' . 



yGoosle 



126 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

The Eagle was commenced as a weekly, December 35, 1844, (tlio press and type 
arriving' in time to print tickets for Henry Clay), by A. B. Turner, witli Qenrjie 
Martin and Cliarles F. Barstow as nominal editors. Eirly in 1848, Ralph W, 
Cole was assodate editor. In 18.)I, James Scribner became a partner, but, being 
a Democrat, bad nothing to do with the editorial department. Mr. Scribner's in- 
terest was purchdscil by A. B, Turner in the fall of 1953. Iramealately after the 
defeat of Scott in 1853, the Eagle abandoned the Wbig organization and advo- 
cated a new one, which assumed the name of Republican at the Jackson conven- 
tion, in July, 1854. Mr. Turner started a daily May 36, 1850, with telegraphic 
dispatches by stage from Kalamazoo. He was assisted during the Fremont cam- 
paign by Albert Baxter, who continued on the paper until 18(50. After that 
time L. J. Bates, now of the Deleoit Post, assisted him until 18GS, when Mr. Bax- 
ter returned. Mr. E. F. Harrington lias had an interest in the Eagle since 18i(5. 
Mr. J. P. Thompson came in September, 18G9, as anotber assistant. No man in 
Grand Rapids hia shown more persistent energy, often under the most diacourag. 
ing circumstances, than has Aaron B. Turner, and he is now at the head of a 
profitable business, and in prosperous circumstances: his printing office being 
one of the best in the state. 

In 1857-8. C. W. Baton and W. S. Leffingwelt published, for a year, a small 
monthly, called the Young Woltieriiiie, to a file of which we are indebted for some 
interesting facts. They were then typos in t\iti ^Bnguirer and Herald office. P. R. 
L. Peirce's exceedingly comical " Rhythmical History of Grand Rapids, More or 
Less," in choice doggcral. appeared in this little sheet. 

In 1857, Thomas D. Worrall started the Greiit We«!tr>i Journal, a weekly paper 
whose high sounding name did not save it from a final collapse in a short time. 
Several other newspapers have risea and died out since that date. 

The Vrijheida Banier —Bnaaet i>i' Liberty — a paper printed in the Holland liin- 
guage, is published weekly from the Miiglc building, by W. Veriiurg. 

The Tiroes, daily and weekly, C. C. Sexton, proprietor, was started a few months 
ago, and has achiisTed a large circulation. 

A weekly paper, called the Pioneer, is printed in the Geriiian langudge. 

COURT HOUSE. 
For several years, the question of the location of tlic Court House and County 
olfices agitated the Board of Supervisors at almost every session from 1851 to 
1861 ; and it is not clear that it is yet deSnitely settled. Tho first building 
erected for court purposes, was on the square, directly in front of Mr. A, B. Judd's 
present residence. It was a wooden structure, two stories high, with an impos- 
ing cupola in the center of the roof. The second story was used lor a court room, 
and also for religious meetings. The lower floor for a jad, and jailor's residence. 
In this primitive edifice, Judges Pratt and Whipple ol the Circuit, assisted by 
Side Judge Almy, deceased, B. W. Davis, and P. Tracy, both yet living, ex- 
pounded and interpreted the law, which was being " practiced" by George 
Martin, A. I). Rathbone, Sylvester Granger, E. E. Bargeant, and others not now 
living, and by T. B. Church, John Ball, J. T, Holmes, J. 0. Abel, C. P. Calkins, 
J. 8. Chamberlain and S. L. Withey, who are still on tei-ra Jirimi. Those were 
high old days for the law, and, had not the records of the county b«en burned ia 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



BISTOBT AND DIRECTORY OF KEHT CODNTT. 127 

January, 1861, BOtne tare information couldhave been obtained from them ; but 
muth of this is still in tlie head of a gentleman still living amongst us, who was 
for fourteen years clerk of the county, aod who personally knows more of the 
days we wrileof than any other man in the city, and can recall with photographic 
exactness a hundred incidents of peculiar interest, touching those palmy days of 
Grand Rapids, which we hope ho may some day find it convenient to give the 

Among the number of those who contributed not a httle to tile "opening up" 
ot the futare of this city, was the Hon. Lucius Lyon, one of the proprietors, with 
tlie late Hon. Charles H, Carroll, of tliat part of the city called the Kent Plat. 
Believing that salt could be made here, and knowing thnt this section indicated, 
geologically, saline springs, he, in 1841, commenced sinking a well on the weat 
bank of the canal, above the big mill, which, after many difficulties and embar- 
rassments, became a supposed success, and the manufacture of salt was, in 1843- 
4 and 5, prosecuted with considerable spirit, by means of boiling and evapora- 
tion. But it failed of being profitable, owing to the difficulties in keeping out 
fresh water which diluted the brine. We believe Mr. Lyoa expended upwards 
of $20,000 in this experiment, and his profits were nothing. Subsequently, in . 
1858 to 18G4, Messrs. Ball & McKee, J. W. Winsor, W. T. Powers, C. W. Taylor, 
and the late James Scribner, with others, renewed the effort to make salt, and 
several wells were sunk, and several thousand barrels made, but East Saginaw 
had, in the meantime, found the "Seat of Empire,' and, from superior and purer 
brine, soon demonstrated that she was " master of the situation, and our people 
could not compete with her, and the works in this city gradually went the way 
of all unprofitable enterprises. 

Hon. Solomon L, Wilhey was born in St, Albans, Vermont. lie came to this 
city in 1838. After studying law for some time he was admitted to the bar, and 
became the law partner ot Hon. John Ball in 1844. He was also, for several years, 
law partner of lion. George Martin, aficrwards Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court of Michigan— now deceased. In 184S lie was chosen Judge of Probate for 
Kent county, and held (hat office for four years. In 1880 he was elected State 
Senator, and served during the regular session, and two extra sessions called to 
meet th« exigencies of the rebellion. Upon the organization of the Western Dis- 
trict of Michigan, in 1863, he was appointed by President Lincoln to the honora- 
ble position of United States District Judge thereof, in which capacity be has 
since served. In 1800 he was tendered an appointment as Judge of the United 
States Circuit, comprising the States of Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennes- 
see, which, after due consideration, he declined. He is President of the First 
National Bank of Grand Rapids, and enjoys, to a remarkable degree, the respect 
and confidence of the public. 

W. D. Foster came to Grand Rapids, from Rochester, N. Y., in the year 1838. 
He started a small "7x9 " store, at the foot of Monroe street,|in 1845, keeping a 



yGoosle 



128 aiSTORT AHD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

general aBflortmcnt of tin whistles, patty pans, skimmers, pie plates, and such like, 
catting and bammering them all out, and soldering the same with his own hands, 
there not being business enough to warrant having a journejniati. He did quite 
a thriving trade for several jeaia, gradually, by great industry, economy and 
perseverance, accumulating and adding to his slow gains, until, having been 
prospered, as such men will be, he has become the foremost man in the hardware 
line in Western Michigan, owner of a large brick block, fire stories high, filled 
from top to bottom with his own mercliandise ; and not to know Wilder D. Foster 
is to acknowledge one's self unknown. He emploja men by the dozens, and his 
trade is measured annually by tens of thousands. Mr. Foster has had several 
partners. The firm for a time was Foster & Parry, then Henry Martin and Mar- 
tin Metcalf became bis associates, and it was W. D. Poster & Co. Afterward it 
was Foster, Martin & Metcalf, then Foster & Metcalf, and, since 1863, W. D, Fos- 
ter alone. He built his present block in 1868. "Live and let live," lias ever been 
Mr. Foster's motto, and, if the gratitude of hundreds to whom lie has lent sub- 
stantial assistance in time of need, is worth anything, he is rich in something 
better than earthly stores. 

HON. p. R. L. PEIHCB. 

Probably no man hits been more intimately connected with public afiaira in 
Kent county, during the past twenty years, than Hon. P. R. L, Peirce, a native of 
Qeneseo, N. Y., or Peter Peirce, as he is familiarly called by half the men In the 
county. It is possible that some men in the county worit harder than Mr. Peirce, 
and that some man may get olf more jokes, but entirely improbable that any 
other man works as hard and says aa many funny things aa he does. He came to 
Grand Rapids to reside in the year 1840, from Detroit, and studied law in the 
office of Judge Martin, along with Hon. 8. L. Withey, acting as Deputy County 
Clerk in 1843-3. In 18j3 and 18S4, he was City Clerk, and, in 1854, he was elected 
Clerk of Kent County, which ofiice he lield during a period of fourteen years. 
He was generally conceded to be as good a County Clerk as any in the State, and 
was always in high favor with the .Judge and members of the bar. The young 
lawyers regarded him almost as a father, and men from all parts of the county 
came to him with their grievances, sure of sympathy, and assistance if it lay in 
hia power. During the past eigUteen years he has contributed largely to the city 
press, on various topics of personal and local interest to the community, and is a 
walking encyclopedia of useful information with regard to all that has transpired 
in the county since he came here. He enjoyed great popularity with the soldiers 
during the rebellion, and has worked steadily for their interests at all times. In 
1868 he was elected State Senator, in which capacity he has proved one of the 
most infiuential men from this part of tiio State. He ia now assistant to Hon. 
William A. Howard, in the Land Office of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad, 
for which position his rare clerical skill renders him peculiarly fitted. 

HBMRT K. WILLIAMS. 

Among those who are worthy to be mentioned as having contributed not a 
little to the growth of this city, was the late Henry R. Williams. Mr. W. came 
to Orand Rapids in|1841, from Rochester, N. Y., and entered into buslnesa vritb 

^,fpd by 



GooqIc 



HIBTORT AND DIRECTORT OF KENT COONTT. 129 

Warren Granger, of Buffalo, N. Y., aiicl occupied one of the Nelson stores, on tbe 
corner of Canal and Bronson streets — being now a portion of the Bronson House. 
T!ie firm of Warren, Granger & Co. were engaged in merchandising, flouring and 
boating, and Mr. Williams built up a splendid reputation as a prompt, efficient, 
and tellable business man. He was once a cindidatc for Congress against Hon. 
Samuel Clark (lately deceased). His genial companionship, and earnest endeavors 
to open up this once wild section, endeared him to all of the then dcnizena ; and 
the " old settlers " recall his memory with feelings of uniform kindness and pleas- 
ure. He died some twelve or fitlieen years ago. In his lifetime, he built the elegant 
stone residence ou tlie hill overlooking Bronson street, now owned by Mr. O. S. 



Any history of this city would be imperfect without a brief reference to Rev. 
F. H. Cuming, D. D., who died in 1803. Doct. Cuming Ciirae here from Ana 
Arbor (aad Rochester, N. Y.) in 1843, and t(>ok charge of the Episcopal Church. 
He was a man of Isirge business capacity, of indomitable energy, and a wonderful 
perseverance, and, outside of his immediate pastoral labors, he gave much of hia 
time to the various enterprises of a local and public nature, calculated to advance 
the growth and redound to tho interest of the city. He hadmany tempting offers 
to go to various cities, where his vast capacity could have a larger field of useful- 
ness, but he declined them all, for he had great faith in the future of this city and 
county, and ventured the prognosticatiim that persons were then horn who 
would live to see a population of 30, 001) inhabitants here. Doct. Cuming erected 
the substantial residence (on the hill between Bridge and Bronson), now occu- 
pied by liis esteemed widow and family, and was oigfitcen years rector of the 
Episcopal Church, erecting, with the aid of his flock, the large stone edifice on 
Division, at the head of Pearl street, now occupied by St. Mark's congregation. 

REV. JAMES BALLAKD. 

One of the i>ionecra who has miule his mark in the valley City, is the Rev. James 
Ballard, a native of Charlemont, Massachusetts, who graduated at Williama Col- 
lege, and, alter re I f t \ f 1 I way to this city in 
1887. He was pi t 1 C t I Ch h f n years, and, during 
that time, exhibit dhlltef wllf r associate hia name 
with tho history f h t t Th 1 1 C t 1 Church building, in 
use until about y gw tl Ih iftsp chased of Mr. Louis. 
Campau, and Mr B II I Ik I t 1 III through the Eastern 
States, and appeal ittl h h tl t ssthmn buying a Catholic 
Church building f I f P t t t ty Wl n he had raised the 
greater part of tl q I h h m I tg d his own property 
to pay the remainder. (The old church was built by Mr. Campau, in 1837, and, 
until the last stick of it is in ashes, it will be a monument to the noble, religious 
zeal of Louis Campau, the Catholic, and James Ballard, the Protestant. Mr. 
Campau sold it because his business affairs required the use at a part of the 
money which it cost, and the Church was not able to refund it,) When the 
church changed hands, the Catholics reserved tho iron cross which surmounted 
the cupola, and, in removing it, a man lost hia life. 

17 



yGoosle 



180 BISTORT AND DIRECTORT or KENT CODNTT. 

Mr. Ballard, BB mentioned liereafler, has been, at different times, principal of 
both the Union Schoola in this city. He still resides here, as active as ever, and 
is now State Agent for the Freedmen'a Aid Society, in which capacity he is, as 
usual, doing a good work. lie ia also very extensively known for his labors in 
the Sunday School cause. 

GRAND RAPIDS IN 3846. 

Prof. Franklin Everett, in the City Directory for 186S, thus describes the infant 
city of twenty-four years ago: 

"We will step back about twenty years to the time when I first saw the village 
in the wilderness. Then, forty acres was about the extent of the plac?. Division 
street might be said to bound civilization on the east, Monroe street on the south, 
Bridge street on the north, and the river on the west. There were scattered 
buildings, only, outside of those limits. A wing dam ran half way across the 
river, and furnished water power for three saw mills, two grist mills, and sorae 
minor works. Irving Hall, Fanucl Hall, Commercial Block, Backus' Block, corner 
of Canal and Bronson streets, and Peirce's Franklin Block, were tlie stores pfr 
eminence — the last two "clear out of town." Sinclair's store, where Luce's Block 
now is, was the busioessatandfartherest up Monroe street— '■ too far outof town to 
do business."' Canal street was the muddiest liole in all creation. A two foot side 
walk, supported on posts, kept the pedestrians out of the mud. It must be borne 
in mind that this street has been filled from five to ten feet. Where Fitch & 
Raymond's carriage shop now is, and around there, was a fine, musical frog pond ; 
and there was another, (which by the way is not now altogether filled), north- 
west of there. The stumps were in the street, and the houses were all one story. 
Our communication with the outside world was by the Battle Creek stage. Peo- 
ple came to church with os teams. They came to worship God — not, as we go now, 
to show dry goods. There were no fashionables; men and women dressed plain, 
and almost all had the ague. Every cow had a bell on, of course; hence we 
lacked not for music. Wood was one dollar a cord, and a drug at that. Wheat, 
fifty cents a bushel ; corn, twenty-five cents ; venison, half a cent a pound ; poi k 
and beef three cents ; young ladies were scarce and in active demand. Mr. Bal- 
lard was preaching in the Congregational Church, and got his living by farming. 
The Episcopal Church was the building, since much improved, opposite Fitch Sn 
Raymond's shop. The Catholics used a dwelling house for a chapel. The Metho- 
dists had their present house. We had no fashionable churches or christians. 
Poor people could go to meeting and be considered decent ; and I observed that 
people spoke of the sermons more than the dresses. It was an out-of-the-way, 
stirring, primitive place, with warm hearts and energetic heads." 
THE PRESENT CITY. 

On the first day of June, 1870, Grand Rapids contained, according to the 
United States census, 16,507 inhabitants, and is therefore the second city in the 
State, in population. It contains fifteen hotels, twenty dry goods stores, upwards 
of fifty groceries, eight hardware stores, nine drug stores, twelve clothing stores, 
sixteen boot and shoe stores, six photograph galleries, seven watchmaker and 
jewelers' establishments, seven printing offices, three book-binderies, upwards of 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



HISTORY AND DIBBCTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 181 

fifty lawyers, upwards of forty pliysipians, fourteen dentists, six banking houses, 
eiglit machine shops, five flouring milis, four breweries, eii furniture manufac- 
tories, three large brick manufactories, oue fanning mill niauufaotory, one file 
manufactory, one mammoth box factory, one file manufactory, one axe factory, 
two hub factories, two marble cutting establisUments, one organ factory, two 
woolen milla, seven planing mills, eight saw mills, one immieneo factory for the 
manufacture of Water's patent barrels, fourteen wagon and carriage manafac- 
tories, etc., etc. The traveler can approach or leave the city by railroad, in sis 
different directions, and several new roads are contemplated, and will aooa be 
constructed. 

A street railway extends from the depot of the Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad, 
the full length of Canal and Lyon streets, a distance of over two miles. 
WAR RECORD. 
Grand Rapiils was behind none of her sister cities in her support of the govern- 
ment during the late civil war. The Third and Eighth infantry reginieut'i had 
their rendezvous here, and the Second, Third, Sixth, Seventh and Tenth cavalry 
regiments; all of which were largely filled by Tolunteers from this vicinity. Each 
and ail did credit to the city and State on many well fought fields. 
SCHOOLS. 
That portion of Grand Rapids which lies upon tlie cast side of Grand River, 
and south of tlie Coldbrook district, was, in the year 1849, organized under the 
school law then esistiug, aa School District No. 1, of the City of Grand Rapids. 
The stone building whicli stood on the hill, known as tJie " Central School," was 
erected in the autumn of 1843. The first school in it was opened in 1850, under 
the supervision of Mr. Johnson, with four assistants. Mr. Johnson was soon alter 
succeeded hy Rev. .Jauies Ballard, who had charge of the school about three 
years, when he was followed by the late Prof. Edward Chesebro. After Prof. 
Ohcscbro resigned, on account of illness, his brotiier, George Chesebro, was Su- 
perintendent for a short thiie, when Prof. Danforth took the place, with Prof- 
Edwin Strong, aa Principal of the High School department. Prof. Danforth re- 
mained about three years, and was succeeded, in 1883, by Prof. Strong, who has 
since filled the place to the complete satislactlou of all. 

In 18G7, the stone building having become too small to accommodate the 
greatly increased attendance, and as it was thought unsafe by reason of defectiTe 
walls, the present edifice was commenced. It was completed and the old build- 
ing removed in 1868. Having a commanding site, its tower 137 feet high, it is 
the first object that attracts the eye ol a stranger on. entering the city, and the 
last he sees when leaving it. The cost of the building was about $50,000. 

Primary No. 1, is a commodious and nicely arranged brick building, on the 
corner of Division and Bridge streets, and cost about $15,000. 

Primary No. 2, is on South Division street. It is a frame building with a biick 
basement, and has cost about |5,000. 

Primary No. 3. is located on Fountain street, east of Prospect, and is a large 
wooden structure. 

Primary No. 4, is situated on tin; corner of Wealthy Avenue and Lafayetta 
atreet. This building was completed in 1SI>9, ia of brick, and cost 112,000. 

Hosted by 



Google 



IBS HISTOET AND DIKECTOKT OF KEHT OOUKTT. 

The West Side CeDtral School building was erected in 1855. and during the 
iummer of 1869, thoroughly overhauled and re-arranged. 

In 1809, a brick Bchool house was begun in the Fifth Ward, wliicli, when com- 
pleted, will cost about $15,000. A part of it is now in use. Prof. S. Montgomery 
IB Superintendent of tlie West side schools. 
GRAND RAPIDS BUSINESS COLLEGE AND TELEGHAPHIC INSTITUTE. 

The Grand Rapids Business College and Telegraphic Institute, Swensberg & 
RobbiiiB, proprietors, baa been in successful operation for tlie last five years, and, 
during that time, has educated several huiidred young ladies and gentlemen. 
We can safely say that no similar institution in the northwest is more favorably 
regardi'd, or oiTers botter advantages to students, who dcsiru a tliorough business 
education. Prof. C. G. Swensberg, who gives his whole time to the school, with 
able assistants, is one of t1ie finest pennten and most acconitilished teachers in the 
west. The large and commodious rooms of this institution are located in Luce'a 
Blocic, Monroe street. 

CHURCHES. 

There are, in this city, twenty church buildings, and two more in proceas of 
erection. The finest among tliesc are tlie Congregational, Methodist Episcopal, 
Episcopal, Presbyterian, Catholic {new). True Reformed, Second Reformed, and 
Univeraalist churches. Anything like a satisfactory history of the different socie- 
ties would far transcend the limits of this sketch. 
RAILROADS. 

The first train of ears entered Grand Rapids on the tenth day of July, ISdlJ, at 
4:30 P. M. : the Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad Company Imving that day com- 
pleted their road to the long expectant and preriously isolated city. This was 
one of the most important events, as touching the development of the town, that 
we have to record, aud let in at once a new tide of enterprise and capital. 

The next road that led out from the place was a section o( the Grand Rapids & 
Indiana Railroad, from here to Cedar Springs, on which regular trains commenced 
running on the twenty-third day of December, 1867. Through trains commenced 
running on this road, lo Fort Wayne, Indiana, on the tenth day of October, 1870; 
opening a new market for our manufactures, which promises to prove of great 
importance to the leading branches of industry. 

The first train of ears on the Kalamazoo, Allegan & Grand Rapids Railroad, 
now a division ol the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad, arrived on the 
first day of March, 1809. 

Regular trains commenced running on the Grand River Valley Railroad, now 
a branch of the Michigan Central, on the seventeenth day of January, 1870. 
MANUFACTURING ESTABLISHMENTS— PL AST Eli. 



plaster works are situated in the city, on the Grand River, and convenient to all 
the railroads for shipping. They have 100 acres ot plaster land. The stratum of 
piaster is about twelve feet thick, exposed by removing the earth above it, and 
furnishes 35,000 tons per acre. F. Godfrey discovered plaster at this point in 
1858, and works were erected in 1660, the product for that year being about 1,000 

I Instscl by 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRKCTORT OF KBNT COtJNTT. liSS 

tons. From tiiia amount tlie yearly product lias stendilj increased until 18l!9, in 
which year they quarried 13,000 tons. They have one water mill and a steam 
mill, each willi twi> run of stone, and can grind in the two mills 80 tuna of plaster 
in ten hours, or 100 tons in 30 hours. Their calcining works are very exteusive, 
being suffidwit to manufacture 260 barrels of calcined plaster per day, and their 
capital is amply sufficient for all their purposes. 

The first phisLor discoveries on the west side of Grand River were made by Mr. 
R. E. Butterworlh, an English gentleman of culture and enterprise, now proprie- 
tor of one of the principal machine shops and founderies in Grand Rapids. He 
purchased 103 acres of land, now owned by the Grand Rapids Plaster Company, 
in 18*3. His knowledge of fjeo logy led him to think that his land contained 
plaster rock, and he made repeated borings to ascertain the fact. In 1819 he dis- 
covered plaster near the present site of the B^gle Mills, and erected a plaster mill 
in 1853. In 1850 he sold to Hovey & Co. for $a5,000. 

Uiivcy&(J(i. bought liieir property in 18)0, and built thair mill during the 
summer of 18oT. The first year they mined about 2,000 tons. The business 
Bteadilj increased until IBfiO, when the Grand Rapids Plaster Company was or- 
ganized and thelirm ot Hovey & Co. merged in that. The ainountof plaster quar- 
ried and sold by them prior to 1809 was about 98,000 tons, and tor 18119 the total 
was about 18,000 tons. They have now increased their facilities, so that they can 
grind 200 tons of land plaster in 30 hours, and have the power to double their 
capacity it they choose. They have just completed and put in running order a 
new engme of 200 horse power: and have facilities for loa^ling from 40 to 50 cars 
per day. They liave also recently put in one of the Illinois Pueumatic Gas Com- 
pany's machines for lighting their quarry and mi!L Tho quarry is under a low 
bluff, and is widely known as the great plaster cave, being about live acres in ex- 
tent and covered with from 30 to 15 feet of earth and rock. The stratum is about 
13 feet in thicitnesa. The Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad (Kalamazoo 
Division) runs through their mill yard, connecting with other railroads leading 
into the city. 

These mills aro owned by C. H. Taylor. B. F. McReynolds, P. 3t, h. Peirce, and 
L. G. Mason, under the firm name, however, o" Taylor & McReynolds, who own 
alwut 10 acres of plaster land, which will work out about 85,000 tons per acre. 
They bought the property three years ago, and have mined for the past three 
years an average of 10,000 tons per year. Their works were trebled in extent 
during the year 1370, and can manufacture 300 tons of ground plaster in 33 hours, 
and 30,000 barrels of stucco per year, Their location is on Grand River, near the 
city limits, and on the line of fhe Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railroad 
(Kalamazoo Divisinn), and they quarry under the hill the same as the Eagle Mills. 
The product of this mill for 1870 will be about 10,000 tons. 

The compauies above named, toi?ether with Geo. H. White & Co., mentioned in 
the history of Wyoming, are all that are engaged in plaster mining in Qfand 

Hosted by Google 



134 HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTT, 

Rapids and vicinity, and the aggregate capital now engaged ia this business ie 
about 1400,000. The total of the productirm of plaster in and near Grand Rapids, 
up to the close of 1809, wna about 277.000 tons, and the aggregate value thereof 
has been ?l,24ft,000. The total of the production of 1860 waa about 50,000 tons. 
Plaster has been found at Grandvllle, seven milea below Grand Rapids, on Grand 
River, and also at points two and three miles above Grand Rapids, and it is prob- 
able that nianj good quarries may be opened in the future, should the demands 
of the trade require it. The beds now worked are practically ineshaustible. 



Sir. 0. C. Comatock ifl one of the leading manufacturers in Grand Rapids. He 
has two saw mills, a pail and tub factory, planing mill, and sash, blind and door 
lactory. His principal manufactories are situated on the east side of Canal street, 
between Mason and Newberry streets, occupying, with the yard for piling staves 
and luiiihcr, drying houses, etc., sixteen lots, 60x100 feet each. The principal 
building is of brick, and 230 feet in Jength, averaging 45 feet in width, three 
stories high, is covereJ with a durable tin roof, and is divided by fire walls and 
iron doors into six apartments. In the other buildings and the old pail factory, 
45sl00 feet, and two stories hif;h, a full set of pail machinery i? running. In 
another building, 22x70 feet, ten saws are run, cutting pail and tub staves and 
bottoms. On the grounds are nine dry kilns, either built or lined with brick, 
the largest quite expensive, and lire proof, beside a number of large buildings for 
drying, jtorage, etc. The number of men in his employ is about 50, and it re- 
quires an outlay of nearly or quite $150,000 per year to carry on his business. 



It would be hard to find in this part of the West a more complete establishment 
for the manufacture and sale of furniture, than that of the above named firm, in 
this city. Their manufactory at the foot of Lyon street is 88x00 feet in size, four 
stories high, and full of the most improved machinery for turning, sawing and 
carving the numerous styles of furniture which they manufacture. Their store- 
houses on Huron street are 54x68 feet in size, and four stories high, and their ele- 
gaot sales rooms, 20 and 31 Canal street, are 34x80 feet, and occupy three floors. 
They, employ, constantly, about 90 workmen, and ship their manufactures to all 
parts of Michigan, to Illinois, to Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Nebraska, 
Kansas, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. 

G!^\D BAl'tOS MANUPACTDBINO COUI'ANV. 

The above named company have their works on Water street, weat side, and 
their office in Hall's new block. Canal street, and are extensively engaged in the 
manufacture of agricultural implements and machinery. They make, among other 
things, large numbers of Sulky Rakes, and ol the Buckey Saw Machine ; employ- 
ing from 30 to 40 men. The sales rooms of the company, in Ball's block, are 23x 
100 feet in size, and occupy four floors ot that elegant building. The business was 
first established by the lale J. P. Chubb, in 1850, and went into the hands of the 
present company about a year ago. Mr. A. L. Chubb has been connected with 
the works ever since they were 8tBrt«d, and is now Prosideat of the company. 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



HISTORT AND DIKECTORI OP KENT COUNTT. 135 

EMPIRE OKQAN COMPANY. 

The Empire Organ Company is one of the man ufactn ring institutions which 
reflects credit on the city. It was Srst established in KalamsKOO, in 1807, and re- 
moved here last April. The exeellenee of the musical instruments whicii they 
Bend ont, achieves for the makers xucceas, esteem and pstronage, which other 
manufacturers have not been able to acquire in years. Mr. Piggott has had a long 
esperience in this branch of mnnuiactures, an<l there is not amnre thorough mas- 
ter of the art of making reed instruments than he. Their instniments have taken 
the first premium in competition with the Smith's American, Mason & Hamlin, 
and Estey orgaus. Their factory and. music store is located at 05 Monroe street, 
and occupies three floors, employing several first-class workmen. The firm con-, 
fiists of George Piggott and A. F. Burch. Sir. E. A. Baird is traveling agent. 

One of tlio largest manufacturing establishments in the city is the lumber 
wagon manufactory of Wm. Harrison, occupying two buildings, one on Front 
street, west side of the river, and the other on Mill street, east side. Mr. H. com- 
menced the manufacture of wagous in the building situated on the west side of 
the river, iourteen years ago. His business becoming very extensive he finally 
found it neecHsary to occupy a second building, devoting the one on this side of 
the river to machinery work, and the other to hand work. The latter building is 
a large, stone structure, 40x30 feet in size, three stories high. The former is oOxTO 
feet in size, and is two stories high. 

Mr. Harrison has about 35 men constantly in his employ, and has turned out 
during the past year TOO wagons. He is doing & large wholesale business through- 
out this State, and sends some of liis wagons as far as Texas, They are sold, in 
large numbers, in the States of Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Minnesota, and Iowa. 
He does not confine himself to the wholesale trade, however, but does a large re- 
tail business. Everybody has heard of "Harrison's wagons," and very many in 
this vicinity, and elsewhere, can testify to their strength and durability. 



Located near the foot of the east side canal, in tlie very heart of the city, are 
the Foundry and Machine Shops ot Butterworth & Lowe. Long years ago a por- 
tion of the sits on which they stand was occupied by Uncle Louis Campau's In- 
dian trading post. Tliese works were first started by James McCray, since de- 
ceased, in 1843. In 1844, Mr. Daniel Ball became a partner. In 1851, Mr. 
McCray died, and the business was carried on by Mr. Ball, in company with Q. 
M. and S. B. McCray — sons of the first proprietor. Mr. Ball finally bought out 
their interests, and, in 1856, admitted Mr. R, E. Butterworth as a partner. Mr. 
Butterworth, two years later, bought out Mr. Ball, and was sole proprietor until 
1889, when he admitted his present partner, Mr. James Lowe, recently from near 
Manchester, England. Mr. G. M. McCray is now principal foreman. These works 
are among the oldest and largest in western Miciiigan, and occupy, witii foundry, 
machine shops, blacksmith shops, agricultural shop, pattern shop, storehouses, 
etc., over half an acre of ground; givmg employment to from fifty to sisty hands. 



Berkey Bros. & Gay have one of the most extensive furniture manufactories in 

ted by Google 



136 flISXORr AND DIRECTOKT OF KENT COUNTY. 

the Western Slates. Their factor? is situated on the east side canal, near Bridge 
street, and is 50x140 feet in size, with four floors. On thu corner of Kent and 
Hastings streets tiiey tiavo two warehouses for sliipping and storage purposes, 
each 35x100 feet in size, and three stories high. Tlieir retail rooms are situated 
at No. 43 Monroe street, occupying three floors, each 35x00 feet in size, in one 
block, and tivo of about the same Oimcasions in an adjoining building. They ace 
now making, and keep on hand, some of the finest upholstery n-ork, lainberkins 
and cornices, manufactured in the country. During the past year they have 
shipped about $1SO,OPO worth of furniture of their otfn manufacture, and their 
traile extends not only over our own state, but into New York, Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebrask;i, Kansas, Missouri, 
and Colorado. They employ as many as 120 men in and about tiieir establish- 
ment, and keep on hand some 1,500,000 feet of walnut and otlier valuable 
lumber. 

EMPIRE GANG SAW MILLS. 
Among the roost important manufacturing establishments in Oraiiil Rapids are 
the extensive steam sawmills of Wonderly & Co., situated on the we^t side of 
Grand River, between Leonard street Bridge and the track of the Dettoit & Mil- 
waukee Railroad. This enterprising firm, thoroughly acquainted with Iho lum- 
ber business in Pennsylvania, commenced operations herein the latter part oi 
October, 1800. Since that time they have erected one of the most e.ttensive saw 
mills in the State, capable of cutting 15,000,000 feet per season, and manufactured, 
up to November Ist, 1870, over 8,000,000 feet of lumber. Their main building ia 
50x116 feet in size, two stories liigh, and lias engine and boiler rooms attached. 
The machinery is run bj two engines of 150 horse power. A gang of saws, in 
which fwenty-eight saws can be run when necessary, converts the largest log into 
boards in a few minutes, it being first trimmed on two sides by a Ave foot circular 
saw. The lumber is distributed in Ihe yard by means of some 4,300 feet of horse- 
railway, elevated about ten feet from the ground. A railroad track extends to 
the yard, which, with about 1,000 feet of track between the dilTercnt lumber 
piles, gives easy access to all railroads extending from the city. Tlieir logs are 
procured on Rouge River, Flat River, Fish Creek, and their tributaries, where 
they have a supply of pine timber that will last for many years. Their booms 
hold about 2,000,000 feet of logs at one time. They ship immense quantities of 
lumber to southern Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and some to Pennsyl- 
vania, competing successfully with Chicago dealers. In connection with Ihe saw 
mill is a large planing mill, containing two heavy flooring and matching machines, 
a surfacing machine, patent siding mill, circular re-sawing machine, etc. J. II. 
Wonderly and D. B. Little, both young men, compose the flrni. 

TUB MIOHIQAN BARREL COMPANY 
have recently erected nn immense factory near the depot of the Detroit ifc Mil- 
waukee Railroad, in which they have one of the largest steam engines in Western 
Michigan. They manufacture the " Water's improved barrel," bail, salt and 
grease boxes, and all kinds of rim work, employing a large number of men and 
boys, and shipping their manufactures to nearly all parts of the union. The 
building which they occupy is vast in its proportions, and admirably arranged 
throughout. 



yGoosle 




' M&M TM WES TEM. 

MurnAr, life instieanoe oompant, 

Bpoadwai, cemsr of Wlsoeastn St., 

SIIL-WAXJKEE, -WIS. 



Hf |i«[iw %mnm |oi»pwn i Hf l^rtdiwi. 











» \ 
a tu 

o 
o 



Ttt« tKtgf!6st Fl^seirrs or Seourlt^ ^novra in Am«i>ic«n lii«ur«n««. 



HOLBM© A HIGH mSSEa¥S. 

eted H ith KNTIBB SAFETY, at « HIGH BATE 
Itliy p<.i-tion o/ the toontry, ihus aecnring » ijOW 
ij 'rf[E GREATEST nppottnnln (or tlie Urfrest 
iduceiiienip to the itxauring (.ublfc. 

,T. H. VAS l>YKE 



. erf INTEEeST, ana its risfci belne i; 
RATE of MORTALITY, givee the 



HKBEK SMITH, AI!«. (JAl'I.ORI). 

7 ^ H.MOKCXni. Agent. GKANID K4PIL>«, MIICH 

^C%.-_- ^— ^ : 




\ iOoqIc 





LOANED FOB FIFTY TEARS, 

At S per C^nt, Compound Interest, smonnts to f 18,430.1S 

' " " " 9«,4ST.«8 

® '* " " " 4«.901.61 

'• " " ** •* 11T,3»0.85 



!f®ptiw®it©rH Mitiml Mil 

INSUEANOE COMPANY, 

Loans Us funds In tl,e West, where money is in demand a 
Higli Hates of Interest. 



ITS E^TE Q)W MOItXAOXT 

alnce its organiratlor\ has been BELOW t^e average of j 

Companies. These TWO advantages reryder it able 

to furnish insurance AS CHEAPLY as any 

COMPANY in tt|e COUNTI^Y. 



1 Kent County, an anrtount equal to the fteserve 
on its Policies in the County, 




,OOQle 



HIHTORT ASD DIRSOTORY OF KEHT COUNTT. 

VOORHIS &, GO'S "T" STORE, 



XJEA-LEB 



Fine Teas, Green, Roasted and Ground Coffees, 

PUKE GKOUND SPICES, 

And FINE FAMILY GROCERIES, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - - MICHIGAN. 

VAN HOUTEN & CO., 

Paints, Oils, Brushes, Varnishes 

Pictures, Picture Frames and Glass. 

Painting, Graining & Paper Hanging done in tlie Best Style, 
12 Canal Street, 

H.MOBQAN&SON, 

CmMlINSUMKCEAIifm 

AN D ADJUSTE RS. 

Money Loaned on unencumbered Real Estate, Farms and City Property 
Bought and Sold. 

Agents Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, 



GRAND RAPIDS,- - - MICHIGAN. 

Hosted by \jOOQ 



BISTORT AMD DIHKOTOBY O* KBBT COUHTr. 



Mrs. Alma Cross, 
OCXJLIST, 

61 Greenwich Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

Kent street House, 

GRAND RAPIDS, ■ - MICHIGAN. 

Boftrd per week ** 55 

DajBo«rd » »« 

Single MeaiB * ** 

M. D. KETCHUM, Proprietor. . 

D. D. CODY, 

Wholesale and Retail Grocer, 

25 IVIonroe Street, 

Having purchftsed the interest of C. D. Lyon, in the late firm of Lyon & Cody, 
I am prepared to offer 

GBEATINDUCElHTSTOCOUNTeilDEOS 

A LAKOE ABSOETMENT OF 

OYSTERS AND LIQUORS. 

ORDERS PROMPTLY PILLED. 

X). JD. OOIDIT. 

ted by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OV KBHT OOCHTT. 

MAN«OB, j^ BARTH, 




WhoJetale and Retail Deafer in 

nf!t 



Nolions, Toys, Ladies Furnishing Gnods, 

Zephjrs, Kid Gloves, Ribbons, 

W^CH AID AHBICU COIISIIS, 

Willow Baskets, Ladles Keady-made Garments, 

&c. [^"A^enta for the Abdominal Corset B. 

I.OVZ:XiiAND & PomrERs, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRUITS, NUTS, OYSTERS, CIGARS, iC, 

No. 106 Monroe Street, 

"Vi.'gi'ar GRAND RAPIDS, MIOH. 

W. O. RINDGE, 

$d-44l« an4 Harness S3»<of » 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

Harnesses, Saddles, Whips, 

Horse Blankets, Buffalo Robes, &c., 

(CHUBB'S OLD BTAND.) 

GRAND BAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

»d by Google 



BISTORT AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 

MEW mmYm&&mB mt&mb 



Voigt c£ Herpolsheixner, 

DEALERS IN 

DRY GOODS and NOTIONS, 

"VVJiolofiial© Azxd Zl.eta.ll. 

41 Monroe Street, 

Drs. Hunt& Hoytr 

lOierATIIC FIYSICMS 

suRGKonrs. 



FUSE 80ME0PATHtG MEOtOtNES SOPPtlEO. 

Medicine Cases, Booi<s, etc., kept constantly on hand, 

15 Monroe Street, 
Grand Rapids, - - - Michigan. 

Hosted by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 

~ HATCH'S 

Fine Art Stationery Emporium 

AND 

PICTURE FRAME MANUFACTORY 

49 Monroe & 3 Justice Streets. 



SCHOOL BOOKS, WRITIITG DESKS 

BLANK BOOKS, 

ALL KINDS OF ARTISTS' MATERIALS, 

A, 1PVIL.TL. ASSOKTJUEIVT OF 

ElEGANT BHACKErS 

AND 

PARLOR ORNAMENTS. 

CISOHOS & OIL rAiHTlGS, 

Stereoscopes & Stereoscopic Views, 

PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUMS, &c , 

Grand Rapids, - - - Michigan. 

trd by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KBITT COUNTY. 




The undersigned would express his thanks to the multitude of friends who have 
given him a share of their patronaee during the last eighteen, years, and extends a 
cordial invitation to all to call on him at his 

New Art Gallery, 

In Leonard's Block, 
lMCOISr3E1. 03B ! S» «r'3E1.3e!3B'X' 

HAVINQ ADOPTED 

ALL THE LATE IMPROVEMENTS 

In arrangement of Light and other fixtures in the Operating De- 
partment, together with his 

LONG EXPERIENCE IN THE BUSINESS, 



W®RR WMKSM ©ftlSOeJOT BE iKeiiti® 

In clearnesB of detail and beauty of tone, either East or West. 

PICTURES MI1D[ FROM THE SMftlLEST TO LIFE SHE, 

OLD rimiRIS COPIED AND nUBtlD TO AM SB DESIDRD. 
A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF FRAMES ALWAYS ON HAND 



Hortoa's Hew Art Gallery's 
17 Foot of Monroe Street, 17 

Sign >( tk Dig Cjniri GKAND RAPIDS. 

O. W. HORTON, Artiit 

Hosted by LjOOQIC 



HISTOBY AMD WBBCIOBT OF KENT COUHTT. 

JES. 3F». 3E1.X'X"»3P'3E3F1., 

WaEPAIRtNG NEITLY DONE. 

■AB Ocma,! Street, t3tvcixx€L Tta,^lcgiia. 



EeBldenco, Comer Barclay and Fountain Btreet. Offlco, S8 Lyon St., (up ilalra,) 



J. M. & H. C. Ramsey, 



DEALERS IN 



Foreign and American Marble, 

MOKUMENTS, HEABSTONES, 



EASTERN PRICES OBSERVED, WITH ADDITION OF FREIGHT. 

Near Pearl Street Sridge, 

GBAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

OLD BOOK STORE, 

61 Monroe Street, Gl 

OPPOSITE THE CATHOLIC CHURCH, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

We buy and sell all kinds of Books and MaKazines, and keep School Books and 
Stationery for sale, or eichange, CHEAPER THAN ELSEWHERE, at the Old 
Book Store, 81 Mooroe Stceet, Grand Rapids, Micli. 

McBL&Y & SON. 



yGoosle 



HIBTOET AND DIRECTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 

Livery, Omnibus &, Hack Stables 

Opposite the Rathban and Eagle Hotels, 

Waterloo Street, 

GRAND KAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

L. E. ATWATBR, 
NOTARir PUBI<IC, 

Represents the following Reliable Companies : 

Great Western— Grand Rapiila Brancti Capital |I,000,000 

Lamar— Grand Rapids Branch " 1,000,000 

8hn, Cleveland, O " 300,000 

Buffalo German, Bnffalo - ". " 200,000 

Lniuberman's, Chicago " 300,000 

GRAND BAPIDS, - - MICHIOAU. 
E. T. SEILLES, 



Solicitor ia Chaucevj, 

Office, 65 Canal Street, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 
MAECUS W. BATES, 



Office with Grand Rapids Savings Banlc, 

GRAND RAPIDS, ■ - - MICHIGAN.^ , 

ted by Google 



Directory of Kent County, 

IMCLUDIXG ALL THE TERRITORY OUTSIDE Oi 
aUAJS'B RAPIDS CITY. 



In the following list the figures and names following the names of individuals, 
indicate the number of the section upon which the peraon resides, the name of 
townahip, aniJ post-office address, in the order mentioned. 



A 



ISAlfoi 



Abbott Mrs. Juli 

Abbott John Henrj, 13 Algi 



a, Edger- 
a, Edger- 



Adnuis George C, 16 Qrattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Adams John A., 16 Grattan, Grattan 

ADAMS 'jOHN H., 34 Tyrone, Spart.i 
Cod. 

Adama J. B., Lowell. 

ADAMS DANIEL. Sparta Center. 

Adama James, — Cannon, Cannonsburg 

Adams Seymour H., Lowell. 

Adams Wm. W., 33 Qainea, Hammond. 

ADAMS JAMES W., 25 Bjroo, Cody's 
Mills. 

Adams H. 8., Lowell. 

Adama John P., 8 Cannon, Rockford. 

Adams Marcellua, 28 Tyrone, Caanovia. 

Adams Marcellus W., 29 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Adams James, 34 Walker. G. Rapids. 

Addison Albert, 33,Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

ADDISON THOMAS, 23 Courtland, 
C our Hand Center. 

Addiaon Robert, S3 Courtland, Court- 
land Center, 

Addiaon Robert, Rockford. 

ADDIS GEO. W., 30 Oakfield, Oak- 
Held. 

ADDIS JOHN, 20 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Alton Charles. 27 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

AKERLY BENJ. N., i Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Abbey Henry, 30 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Albert Martin, 1 1 Alpine, Alpine. 

FORT'S WESTERN I.INIHENT CURES ALL LAUENESS. 



Abbott Ezra R., 1 Bowne, Lowell. 
ABBY SYLVESTER, Cedar Springs. 
Abby Sylvester, 35 Solon, Cedar Springs 
Abel Myron, 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Abel Carlos A., 30 Wyoming, Grand 

Abraham Edson, Lowell. 

Abraham James, 30 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Abrania Delos, Lowell. 

Abram Patrick. 1 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

Ackley Edward, 33 Paris, Grand 
Bapids. 

Ackley Samuel L. Village Cedar Springs 

Ackerson William, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Ackerson C, 8 Grand Rapida. 

Ackert Peter A., 32 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Ackert Oliver C, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Ackert George T., 15 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Acker Theodore, Rockford. 

Acker Geo., 85 Lowell, Lowell. 

Adams John, 3 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

ADAMS ALASSON R., 1 Oakfield^ 
Greenville. 

ADAMS FRANK D., 10 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 



18 



yGooQle 



HISTOET AND DIRECTORT OP KEHT COUBTT. 



Albee N. F., 19 Tyrone, Caanovia. 

Albright Gideon D., 30 Paris, Grand 
Rapida. 

Albright Isaac, 5 Byron, Grandville. 

Albright John, 31 Wyoming, Grand- 
Alcorn Jogepli, Lowell. 

Alcorn John, Lowell. 

Alcombrack Daniel, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Alcumbrack Aionzo, 27 Vcrgennes, 
Loweil. 

Alderman Erastus D., 24 Lowell, Low- 
ell. 

Aldrich Harmon, 32 Tyrone, CasnoTia. 

Aldrich Marvin, Lowell, 

Aldricb Lyman, Lowell. 

ALDRICH JAMES, 16 Bowne, Alto. 

Aldrich Cyrus, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Aldrich Henry, 35 Grattan, Alton. 

Aldrich Hiram, 33 Vergennes, Ver- 

ALDRICH AURILLA, 24 Vergennes, 

Fallassburg. 
Aldrich Marshal, 2 Vergennes, Alton. 
Aldrich Julins, 9 Vergennes, Alton. 
Aldrich Edward, 20 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
ALDRICH WILLIAM, 9 Vergennes, 



BUY TRUNKS AND VALISES OF ROUSE &. D0OL1TTLE. 



Allen Robert T., 35 Gaines, Caledonia 

Station. 
Allen Samuel, 16 Lowell, Lowell. 
ALLEN SYLVESTER, 30 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
Allen Liiban, 20 Courtland, Couri;!and 

Center. 
Allen Hiram II., 19 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Alien, Isaac, S7 Courtland, Courtland 

Allen Wright C, IB Paris, Grand 

Allen William, 23 Plainfield, Auateriitz. 
ALLEN ASA M,, Rockford. 
Allen L. W„ 3 Walker, Indian Creek. 
ALLEN THOMAS W., 1 Solon, Sand 

Allen Ebene^^er, 27 Algoma, Rockford. 

ALLEN CHAS. B., 6 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Allen Lahan, 29 Cannon, Ansterlitz. 

ALLEN VOLNEY, 3 Oakfield, Spencer 
Mills. 

Almy Aionzo, 28 Nelson, Cedar Springs 

Almy Thomaa, 28 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Almy Williara, 28 Nelson, Cedar 



Alden Scott, 2 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Alden Avery E., Alaska Village. 
ALDEN ELIJAH D., Alaska Village. 
Alden John S., Alaska Village. 
Alden Avery E., Alaska. 
Alexander Willard, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Alexander Nelson W., 14 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
Alexander Charles, 14 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
ALGER LOUia J., 12 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Alger John L., 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Alger John D., 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Allen Joseph W., 3 Walker, Indian 

Allen James, 28, Lowell, Lowell. 
ALLEN WM. T., 29 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Allen William G., 7 Cascade, Grand 

Rapids. 
Allen Mrs. Mary A., 20 Courtland, 

Courtland Cen. 
Allen Henry, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

rOBT'9 WESTERN LINIMENT 



Almy Alphonso W., 5 Walker, Indian 

Althen Charles, Lowell. 
Ames John, 4 Ada, Ada. 
Ames B., 18 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
AMES WALTER C, 24 Wyoming, 

Kelloggsville. 
Amidon Caleb, 9 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Amidon Wiliard, 16 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Ammerman Nelson, 30 Cannon, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Ammerman David, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
AMMERMAN NELSON, 1 Plainfield, 

Austerlitz. 
Ammerman Elisha, 23 Cannon, Can- 

noDsburg. 
Ammerman David, 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 
AMOND GODFREY, Cedar Springs. 
Amond Joseph, Cedar Springs. 
Anion John, 20 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
Aniphlett Joseph W., Lowell. 
Amsden L. Miles, Lowell. 

CUBES SPAVINS ft HVINDGALLS 



yGooQle 



HI8T0RT AKD DIRSOTORT OF KBHT COmm. 189 

A. I» BKIKKEB. flEO. B. WABD. 

SKINNER & WARD, 

Office up stairs, City National Banl< Building, 
.,„...«.. .,.,.,. „»... GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Dr. AIKIIff, 

Office, No. 11 Canal Street, - - Grand Rapids, 

(First stHirs north of Sweet's Hotel.)— Attends to Cases in AH Branehea of His 





impoalure, noflsttertngor e 






injurtc 




lDMl<™wiatheDK»trel 








I bjHci 




"S.™.B.'».; 












■anee of the Bye and Ear, Tliti 


Mt,LU 




Hearl^ 


Li?er and Kidneys, and all 




iDd Blood Diseases. 










Skillful slteoHongivei 


to BUoBses in Surgery. 










SaSKftK 


uoatisff^ Neurilgii, BpUepgy, 


. Scrofula, Piles 


, Drops 


y, Dyapepali, 4c, cured. 


Csncors Mid Tumot 


« removed wltJiDDt tbe kuife. 












ailBs— Surest uid quiclEest kQ 
!S of Btricture «nd Chronic Ve 


Qwntoi 


rail Pri- 


fate m 


™es of both eeiea, young 








iuicklj 


relieved. Mo Uereurj uaed. 


Travelers supplied villi medlciiiss st short notice. 










ToYoDTasAHnMBH: 


: ThBonlffperfiJOtiJiiM, perminenta 


nd leliat 


>le. tor 1 


Seminal Weakness, Nervous 


^-Inallspecist, Imp- 


X Worth Sl,0«D to the onfo. 
abim SMcti]/ CBufidenHaL 








or deception. The fullest 










irtant csseB, slop unretlsble o 


ruselei 








Cll, or «na postage for 


drciilarsmdqueBtioni (H< 


.uraSt 


"Addres 




B J AIKIN M. O 


P. O. Drawer, 20»I. 










■ Grand lipids. Mich. 



CROSBY & SON'S 

GENERAL 

Insmance and Heal Estate Agency, 

13 Canal Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS. MICH. 



Capital Represented, $73,178,105.38. 
Agents "Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Co." 

Hosted by Google 



HISTOBT AND DIRECTOR! OF KENT OOUMTT. 



Amstice James, Cedar Springs. 

Amy Samuel, 14 Courtlanfl, Courtland 

Center. 
Andersoft M. B., 1 Bjron, Grand 

Rapids. 
ANDERSON JOSEPH, 20 Bowni 

Harris Creek. 
Anderson JotiD, 33 Lowell, Alto, 
Anderson John A., 8 Qaines, Gaina 

ANDERSON PETER, 20 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Anderson Duncan, IS Vergennqs, Ver- 

gennes. 
ANDERSON DONALD, 16 Vergeiines, 



Anderson Cbristirtn, 17 Grattan, Grat- 

tan Center. 
Anderson Andrew, ID Sparta, Sparta 

Anderson William, lli Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Anderson John, 16 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
ANDERSON CHARLES, 39 Alpine, 

EnglishTille. 
Anderson Joel, Lisl)on. 
ANDERSON JOHN H., 7 CourtUiiid, 

Edgerton. 
Anderson Isaac, SOOakfield, Oakiiekl. 



Anknej Michael, 36 Gaines, Hammond. 
Ankney Jonathan, 35 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Annis Solomon, Lowell. 
Annis Alexander C,, 18 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Annis Richard, 30 Cascade, CascaAc. 
Annis Solomon, Lowell. 
ANNIS WILLIAM, 38 Cascade, C.is- 

Annis Wallace, Lowell. 

Ann is Alson, Lowell. 

ANNIS JAMES, 1 Alpine, Englishvillc. 

ANNIS MRS. GRACE, 38 Cascade. 

Cascade . 
Anna Nicholas, 33 Byron, Bvron Center 
Ansalmaon John, 37 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Antor Adam, 10 Alpine, Alpine. 
Anwaj Ira, II Tyrone, Sparta Center. 
Apet George, 9 Courtllind, Courtland 

Center. 
Apple Andrew, Lisbon. 
A]>sey John, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 
APTED A. M., 34 Walker, G, Rapids. 
Arbour James P., 38 Alpine, G. Rapids 
Arbnur M. T., Rockford. 
Arbour IJ. P., 38 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 
Armstrong Riel, Cedar Springs. 



W, D. FOSTER, HARDWARE, STOVES, AND TIN WARE, l 



Anderson Joseph, 20 Oakfield, Onkflcld. 

Anderson Thomas, 33 Lowell, Alto. 

Anderson Goram, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Andrews James H., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

Andi'ews Alva H., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

Andrews Norman, 10 Gaines, Hammond 

Andrews Samuel, 1 Plainfleld, Rock- 
ford. 

Andrews Oliver, 35 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

ANDREWS WILLIAM, 6 Bowne, Alto. 

Andrews John A., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

Andrews Lewis P., 38 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Andrus Lemon, 2!> Oakfluld, Oakfield. 

ANDRUS CHARLES W., 1 Alpine, 
Englishvillc. 

Andrus Mrs. Sarah, 1 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

Anderson Jacob, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Anderson Alexander, 16 Vergenues, 
Tcrgennes. 

ANN ABLE GEORGE, G Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Ange! Heber, 33 Lowell, Alto. 

AN&ELL ABIAH, 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Angell Amasa, 18 Oakfield, Oakfield. 



Armstrong George W., 20 Cannon, Can- 
Armstrong Charles, 31 Cannon, Can- 

ARMSTRONG JAMES, Cedar Springs. 
Armstrong Jesse B., 30 Cannon, Can- 
non sburg. 
Armstrong Jawes M., 30 Tyrone, Cas- 

Arnold Alonzo J., 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
Arnold Abram H., 35 Nelson, Nelson. 
Arnold William, 31 Grand Rapids. 
ARNOLD DARIUS C, 8 Gain es. Gain es- 

Arnold Janus, li) Spencer, Nelson. 
Arnet William, 4 Gaines, Grand Rapids 
Arndt Jacob W., 2B Walker, Q. Rapids. 
ARSNOB NELSON, 18 Plainficid, Al- 

Arsnoe James, 34 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
ARSNOB PETER, 34 Alpine, Alpine. 
Arsnou Charles, 34 Alpine, Alpine. 
Arthur John, Village Cedar Springs. 
Artin Thomas, 26 Grand Rapids. 
Aschenbrcnner Fred., 23 Alpine, Alpine 



FORT'S SALVE CURES CUTS, BRUISES, AND OTHER WOUNDS. 



yGoosle 



BISTORT AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 




yGoosle 



HI8T0RT AHL DIRBCTOST 01 KBNT COUNTT. 



ASHLEY SHELDON, 1 Grattan, Ash- 
Ashley Calvin, 35 Cannon. Cannons- 
burg. 
ASHLEY NOAH R., 28 Courtland, 

Conrtlanri Center. 
ASHLEY CHARLES, 3 Grattan, Aah- 

ASHLEY ABNER, 1 GraUan, Aahlej. 
ASHLEY JOHN, 36 Oakfleld, Ashley. 
Ashmore Samuel, 5 Walker, lodian 

Creelt. 
ATHEETON SYLVANU8, Liebon. 
Atherton George, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Atkinson Ro^er, 23 Walker, G. Rapids. 
ATKINS JOHN P., Lisbon. 
ATKINS WM. J., 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Atkins Horace G., 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Atkins Guy H., 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Atkins Mrs. W. L., 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Atwood William, 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Auble Milo C, 26 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
AUBLE ISAAC E., 30 Cascade, Grand 

Rap ids. 
Auble William, 30 Cascade, G. Rapids. 
ROUSE & DOOLITTLE, 
Aublu George, 3.5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Aubfe Andrew J., 8 Cascade, Cascade. 
Auger Lewis, 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Augustine Rinaklo, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
Austin John, Lowell. 
Austin Henry, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
Austin Leonard C, Rockford. 
Austin Orville. 17 Lowell, Lowell. 
Austin Charles E., 17 Lowell, Ijowell. 



AUSTIN LAUREN, 15 Conrtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Austin Piiineas, Rockford. 
Austin Nelson P., 16 Plainfleld, Bel- 
Austin J. J., Rockford. 
Austin John, 21 Courtland, Courtland 

AUSTIN L. H., 14 Solon, Cedar Springs 

Austin Isaiah W., 33 Paris, G. Rapids. 

AUSTIN DAVID 0., Rockford. 

Austin Henry J., 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

AUSTIN AMOS, Rockiord. 

Austin Lewis, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Austin Russell, 33 Oakfield, ^Grattan 
Center. 

AUSTIN GEORGE, 4 Grand Rapids. 

Austin Reuben S., I PlaiuHeld, Rock- 
ford. 

Austin Lumae, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Austin Philip, 12 Plainfleld. Rockford. 

Averill E., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Averill Levi P., 7 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Avery H. W-, Lowell. 

Avery Wm. H., Rockford. 

Asery Robert, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Avery Edward, Lowell. 

Avery Earl W., Lowell. 

SS MONROE STREET. 

Avery Robert, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 

Avery George, Lowell. 

Avery Mrs. F. R., Lowell. 

Avink Amber, 14 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Avink Aaron J., 24 Paris, Grand Rapids 

AYERS AUGUSTUS, 19 Tyrone, Cas- 

AYLESWORTH WILLIS, 22 Cannon, 
Cannonsburg. 



B 



Babcock Calvin, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 
Babcock Charles A., 16 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Babcock Henj. F., Sparta Center. 
Babe James, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 
Babe James, 4 Caledonia, Alaska. 
BACON JOHN, 10 Grand Rapids. 
Bacon Elisha D., Village Cannonsburg. 
Bacon B. F., 1 Alpine, Engiisiiville. 
BACON RICHARD, 22 Tyrone, Cae- 

Bacon Horace L., 22 Tyrone, Caanovia. 
Bacon Rufus, 3 Grand Rapids. 
BACON S. 8., 17 Grand Itapids. 



BADGLEY JOHN, 21 Plainfleld, Bel- 

Bahre William, Lisbon. 
BAIL J. W., 80 Tyrone, Caanovia. 
Bail F. A., 30 Tyrone, Casnovia, 
Bailey Bradford, Cedar Springs. 
Bailey W. J., 35 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
RAILEY WARREN, 1 Alpine, EngUsh- 

Bailey Mrs. R., 35 Algoma, Rockford. 

BAILEY MRS. NANCY, 2 Alpine, 
Englisbville. 

BAILEY H. L., 1 Alpine, Bngliehville. 

BAILEY CHARLES, 1 Alpine, Eng- 
lisbville. 



PORT'S HEDICIVES ARE WARRAKTSB. 



d by Google 



HlaTORY AND BIRBCTORt OF KEHT COONTI. 143 

WM. harrisonT 



Manufacturer of 



ikA^^mw^t 



An Old Established House. 
SEHS EXTENSIVELY AT WHOLESALE. 



Wagons at Wholesale and Eetail. 



46 Front St., West Side, 
Mill Street, East Side, 



Grand Bapids, Mich. 

Hosted by Google 



HIBTORT AND DIRECTOHr Ol KBNl .COUHTT. 



BAILEY ARTHUR, 1 Ada, Ada. 

Bailey Murray, 1 Ada, Ada. 

Bailey Harvey K., 34 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Bailey Otis, 30 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Bailey Wm. K., 34 Cannon, Caiiiiona- 
burg: 

Bailej Benjamin, 33 Bowne, Bowne. 

Bailey John, 35 Bowne, Bowne. 

Bailey Bradford, 30 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Bailey Emerson, 33 Bowne, Bowne. 

Bailey Sanford H,, 19 Nelson, Cedar 

Bailey Gideon, 15 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
BAILEY WM. IL, 8 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Bailey Gilbert G., 14 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Bailey Freeborn F., 13 Paris, G. Rapids 
Bailey Joseph C, 19 Nelson, Cedar 

Bailej Mary, 17 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
BAILEY SMITH, 30 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
Badey Joseph S., 14 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Bailey Ansil E., 14 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Bailey Wm. L., 3 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Bainbridge Thomas, 31 Byron, Byron 

Center. 



Baldwin Henry, SB Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Baldwin William, Eockford. 

Baldwin Edward, 18 V ergenncs,^ Ver- 
gennes. 

Baldwin James L., Jr., 18 Vergennes, 
Vergennes. 

BALDWIN JAMES L., 18 Vergennes, 

Baldwin William, 2 Cannon, Rockford. 
Baldwin James H., 33 Cannon, Can- 

nonsburg. 
Baldwin James A., VHlai;'^ Cannona- 

burg. 
Ball J. S., Lowell. 
Ball Wm. N., Lowell. 
Ball, Allen P., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
BALL SILAS, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
BALL NATHAN A., 33 Byron, Byron 

Ball Benton W., 39 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Ball Nathan P., 39 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Ball Mrs. Huldah C, Grandville. 
Ballard Charles L., 35 Sparta, English- 

ville. 
Ballard Lyman S., 35 Sparta, English- 

Ballard Benjamin, 3 Walker, Indian 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS AT W. D. FOSTER'S, H ana IB Monro^t 



Bainbridge John, 9 Gaines, Hammond. 

BAINBRIDGE WM. R., 9 Gaines, Ham- 
Baker William, 15 Byron, Byron Center 

Baker Isaac, 13 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Baker Alonzo, 36 Caledonia, Middle- 
ville, Barry County. 

Baker John, 13 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Baker Nathan N., 30 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Baker Lorenzo, 36 Caledonia, Middle- 
ville, Barry County. 

Baker Zelken, 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

Baker George R., 12 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Baker John C, 34 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

BAKER JOHN, 3 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Baker William, 3 Plaiuield, Rockford. 

Baker John, Village Cannonsburg. 

Baker George R., 12 Vergennes, Alton. 

Baker John C, 13 Vergennes, Alton. 

Baker Eunice, 39 Cannon, Austerlita. 

Balcom George B., Lowell. 

BALCOM JOHN, Sparta Center. 

Bale Henry, 16 Grattan, Qrattan Center 

Baldwin Edward, 39 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 



Ballard 0. T., 22 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Ballard Sherre H., 35 Sparta, Enslisli- 

ville. 
BALFOUR JAMES, 9 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Bammaerlin Lewis F., 30 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
BAMMAERLIN REINHARDT F., 30 

Plainfield, Mill Creek. 
Banks John, 1 Oakfleld, Greenville. 
Banks George, 1 Oakfiuld, Oreenville. 
Bannister Willis, 31 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Barber George W., 37 Caledonia, Cale- 

Barber James M., 37 Caledonia, Cale- 
BARBERGEORGEjlOGttinus, Gaines- 
Barber M. C., Lowell. 
Barber Leonard, 9 Grand Rapids. 
Barber J. H., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Barber Alfred, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 
Barber Alfred, 84 Lowell, Lowell. 
Barber WilUara R-, Lowell. 
Barber Martin, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Barber Wallace, 9 Grand Rapids. 
Barber Robert, Lowell. 



NO RISK IN USING FORT'S REHEDISS. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECXOEY OF KENT COUSTT. 14& 

W. p. BARKER, 

Office, 65 Monroe Street, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan, 

(OPPO.STTE THE CATIIOJJC CIH/UOS,) 

All work done, prompthj and in the beat manner. Chloro Nitrous Oxide Gas, 
the safest and most reliable anaesthetic in use in Dental Surgery, administered 
with care and altill. 

Currier & Putnam, 

ITewsdealers, Bookljinders, 

And Manufacturers of all kinds of 
Shelfi Confectionery and Medicine Boxes. 

CONSTANTIiY ON HAND, A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF 

WALL AND CDRTAIN PAPER, PICTURES, ALBUMS, 
BIBLES, POCKET BOOKS, POCKET CUTLERY, 

Also, a good stock of F AIKCHILD'S GOLD PEN'S & PEMCILS. 

|!S'"Sul»scription3 receiyed for all Daily, Weekly aud Monthly Papers and 
Magazines. 

Leonard's New Block, 15 Monroe Street. 



yGoosle 



HISTORT AND DIREOTORT^OT KlHT COtfJTT. 



BAKBBB OSCAR B., Postmaster at 

Caledonia. 
BARBER A. A., Lowell. 
Barber Aaahel, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 
Barber Robert, Lowell. 
Barber William, 13 Wjoming, Grand 

Rapide. 
Barbm Ralne, Lowell. 
Bardeea Lewis, 30 Oakfield, Oalifield, 
Baragar James, 23 Wyoming, Grand 

Kapida. 
Baragar Theodore, 33 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Barr Axtj! Y., 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
BARR GUILD, 7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Barr R. M., S8 Grand Rapids. 
Barr Georce R., S5 Grand Rapida. 
BARR REUBEN, Cedar Springs. 
Barr Thomas B.. 6 Lowell, Lowell. 
Barringer Marcus, 28 Algotua, Rock- 

ford. 
Barringer David, 28 Algoma, Rockford 
Barigan Dennis, 10 Courtland, Coilvt- 

land Center. 
Barringer John, 38 Algoma, Rockford. 
Barrett George, Alaska. 
Barrett Smith, 7 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
BARRETT HIRAM A.,9Grattan, Grat- 



Barnes Mott, 4 Conrtland, Oourttand 

Center. 
Barnes Thomas, 33 Bowne, Harria 

Barnes Augustus, 25 Grattan, Smyrna, 

Ionia County. 
Barnes B. P., 17 Grand Rapida. 
Barnea Iram. 2S Nelson. Cedar Springs. 
Barnes James, 23 Plaiufleld, Austerlitz. 
Barnes John, 39 Grand Rapida. 
Barnes John M., 34 Algoma, Edgerton, 
BARNES T. D., Lisbon. 
Barnea Reuben, 31 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Barnes Iram C, IG Oakticld, OakSeld. 
Barnes Ely, 35 Byron, Cody'a Mills. 
Barnes Jacob, 23 Walker, O. Rapida. 
BARNEY CORKINS, 18 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Barney James M., 83 Byron, Byron 

Barney Simon Z., S3 Byron, Byron Cen. 
BARNUM WM. W., 30 Paris, Grand 

Barnum Franklin H,, 31 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Barnum Franklin, 35 Wjoming, Kel- 

loggville. 
Barkman James, 19 Algoma, Sparia 



BUY SHIRTS OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Barrett Ilenry J., 84 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
Barrett Charles I.., 37 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
BARRETT JOHN, Alaska. 
Barry James. 3B Grand Rapida. 
Barrows George H., 36 Sparta, English- 

vilie. 
Barrows Asabel, 33 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapida. 
Barrows Corydon, 24 Cascade, Cascade. 
Barrows Abner, 3 Cannon, Bostwick 

Barris Ransom, Alaska. 

BARKIS WILLIAM, 3 Caledonia, Al- 

Barris Ransom J., Alaska Village. 
Barras Chartea, 23 Cascade. Caecade. 
Bareis Jacob, 32 Lowell, Atto. 
Barris Btron B., 2 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Barnard 'Ezra P., 30 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Barnard James, Lowell. 
Barnard William, 80 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
BARNARD JAMES P., Lowell. 
BARNARD STEPHEN P., 33 Grand 



Barkley Wm. II., 33 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

BARKLEY CHARLES, 29 Grand 
Rapids, Grand Rapids. 

Barkley Wellington, Village Cedar 
Springs. 

Biirkley Byard, 15 Ada, Ada. 

Bnrkley Harvey, 28 Lowell, Lowell. 

BARCK JOHN H., Alaska. 

BARCLAY ABRAHAM C, 34 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 

Barker John W., Rockford. 

Barker J, W., Rockford. 

Barker R. W., Rockford. 

Barker Thomas N., Rockford. 

Barker I. Irving, Rockford. 

Barker Nelson, 30 Wjonung, Grand- 
Barker T. Newton, Rockford. 

Barker Isaac. Rockford. 

Barker Mason A., 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Barker Charles L., 29 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

Bartlett Jonah, 5 Nelson. Sand Lake. 

BARTLETT HORATIO N., 17 Cas- 
cade, Cascade. 



FORT'S LXNIUENT CURES RHZVUATISH AND NEVRAXGIA. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AHD- DIRECTORT Ot KENT COTTNTT. 147 

Nelson, Matter & Co., 

(SUCCESSORS TO NELSON, COMBTOCK fc CO,,) 

Manufacturers of 

TURE. 

The Largest Assortment of Parlor, Chamber 

and Common Furniture, in 

Western Michigan, 

SOLD AT PRICES TO SUIT THE TIMES. 

Ware Rooms at 29 & 31 Canal Street, 

Call and Examine our Stock. 
EDGAR M. THOMAS, 

Maiiufacturfer and Dealer in 

Improved Spring Bed Bottoms, 

JWFamily, Town, County and State Eights for Sale. 
KELLOGBSVILLE, MICH. 

S. D. PARKS, 

DEALER IN 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, 

§tWiR mU PCOTi® W*Ri, 
No. 15 Monroe Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 

Jiff-Persoiial attention to Ijepairing, and Work Warranted. 

frdbyGoOQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOKT OF KENT COUNTY. 



BATtTLETT GEO. E., 30 Lowell, 

Lowell, 
Barto Bariow, 3.') Grattao, Alton. 
Barton John, 23 Spencer, Spencer Mills 
Bartcn Elliott, 23 Spencer, Spei 

Mills. 
Barton Silas, .Jr., 33 Spencer, Spencer 

MilU. 
BARTON GEO. W., S6 Spencer. Spenci 

Mills. 
Barton Silas, 23 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 
Bash George, 1 Bowne, Alto. 
Baasinger Winfield, 33 Vergflnnes, 

Lowell. 
Baasett Alnioa, 26 Grattan, Grant. 
Bassett Ezra, Village Cedar Springs. 
Bassett Frederick, Sr., 20 Gaines, 

GaineBville. 
Bass Wm. 8., 1 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Bassett George, 6 Bjron, Grandvilie. 
Bassett Mrs. Plicbe, 30 Gaines, Gaines- 

BATCHELTER JOHN T., 13 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
Bates Alfred G., 3t) Buwne, .Harris 

Creek. 
Bates B. P., IT Grand Itapids. 
BATES EDWARD, IS Grand Kapids, 
Bates George, 31 Oakfleld, Uaktield. 



Beach Richard W., 19 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Beach Mrs. Rosanna, 1 Ada, Ada. 

Beach Samuel, 16 Ada. Ada. 

BEACH VALENTINE, 83 Cannon, 
Cannons burg. 

BEACH WM. A., 12 Bowne, Bowne. 

Beach Wm. H., 1 Ada, Ada. 

Beach Warren, 22 Ada, Ada. 

BEAK GEORGE, 3S Grand Rapids. 

Beals Abram E., 13 Courtland, Oak- 
fleld. 

Beais Edward, 13 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Beala Mrs. S. R.. 15 Wjoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Beala William 8., 16 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

BRAMER JOHN 11., Alaska. 

BEAR TIMOTHY C, 3 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Beard Linsan. 5 Cascade, Cascade. 

Beard Linsan, Jr., 5 Cascade. Cascade. 

Beard Nelson, 5 Cascade, Cascade. 

BEARDSLEY WU.UAM L., Vill^e 
Cannonsburg. 

Beardalee Abi'aui, 35 Oakfleld, Green- 
ville. 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE &. TOOLS AT W. D. FOSTER'S, U ami K 



Batss Nathan, 15 Grand RM])ids. 
Bates P. E. P., IT Grand Rapids. 
Bates Seth C, 24 <Jrattan, Grant. 
Bates George R,, 8 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Bateman Caleb L,, 34 Caledonia, Alaska 
Bauchanip Anthony, 13 Alguma, Edger- 

BAUCHAMP JOSEPH, 1-8 Algoma, 

Edgerton. 
Bauchamp William, 13 Atgoma, Edgcr- 

Bawn Troman, 10 Grand Rapids. 
Baxter Bernard, 33 Cascade, Casi^adi;. 
Baxter Eber H., 33 Cascade, Cascade. 
Baxter Milo, 22 Cascade, Cascade. 
Baxter Ormon, 33 Cascade, Cascade. 
Bayiis' Thomas M., 14 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Bayle Henry, 31 Lowell, Alaska. 
Beaber Joseph, 31 Bjron, New Saleiu. 
Beach Admiral, 1 Ada, Ada. 
Beach Benjamin, 23 Ada, Ada. 
Beach Mrs. Laura, 31 Paris, Grand 

Beach Mary H., 33 Cannon, Cannons 

Beach Orrin, 22 Ada, Ada. 

FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES COLDS AND SORE THROAT. 



BeaKlslec John C, 34 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Beatty Hamilton, 28 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Beatty William, 36 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

BECHTEL BENJAMIN H., 38 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 

Bechtel Ephraim, 32 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Bcckwith Charles VV., 23 Verge 
Pallassburg. 

Beckwith Elijah, Rockford. 

Beckwith Edgar L., 15 Verge 

Beckwith Geo. IL, IS Vergenaes, Low- 
ell. 

Beckwith Lysander, 33 Grand Rapids. 

Beckwith Peter, 21 Grand Rapids. 

BECKWITH WM. G., IQ Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Becker Daniel, 13 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Becker Garrett, 8 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Becker Jacob N., 16 Oaklield, Oakfield. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIBECTOET OF KENT COnNTT. 149 

GRAND RAPIDS IRONl\fORKS, 

Butterworth & Lowe, Prop'rs, 



MASILFACTIIRERS OF 



LAND AS^D MARINE STEAM ENGINES, 

Also, Circular Log Mills and Siding Mills, 

WITH ALL THE LATEST IMPROVEMENTS. 

Building Castings and Furnace Work of every kind, Bridge Bolts and 

Blacksmith Work of all descriptions, Agricultural Implements 

and Machine Work in general. 

Office and Works on Huron Street, off Canal Street, 

G-raxxca. :Et.c»,j;>l.<%ef - - - aMCloliigem- 

Manufacturer and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

SHINGLES, SASH, 

DOORS, BLINDS, PAILS AND TUBS. 

ALSO, 

DEALER IN REAL ESTATE, 

Both in and out of the City, 

Hosted by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTORT OT KBNT COTTNTT. 



Becker Philip, 86 Courtland, Courtland 

BECK^li THEODORE W., 27 Court- 
land, Courtland Cen. 

Beuklej Everett A., 8 Cascade, Caaca'te. 

BEEBE GUIRDEN F., South 6 Walker, 
Graud Rapids. 

Bcebe Rbds, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Beech Frank, 14 Grand Rapids. 

Beede Franklin, 31 Walker, Grand 
RapidB. 

Beelilcr George, Lowell. 

Beer John, 13 Walker Grand Rapids. 

BEERS JOHN H., Z^ Vergeunes, Lc"- 
eli. 

Bteton John, 23 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Begrow Charles, 31 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Begrow Henry, 30 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Behler John, 34 Lowell. Alto. 

BEHLER LEONARD, 34 Lowell, Alto. 

BELKNAP ANSEL, 33 Vergennes, 
I-owell. 

BELKNAP CHARLES, BBjron, Grand- 
ville. 

BELKNAP CHARLES E., 24 Spartt 
Sparta Center. 



Bence Geo.. Cedar gprings. 

Benewa Luey, 11 Gaines, Hammond. 

BBNEWA JACOB, 11 Gainea, Ham- 
Benedict Edgar R., Cedar Springs. 

BenedictE. R., Cedar Springs. 

Benedick Eli 8., Lowell. 

Benedict J. 0., Cedar Springe. 

Benedict Julius 0., Village Cedar 
Springs. 

Benedict Luther, Rockford. 

Benham Frederick, 9 Courtland, Court- 
land, Center. 

BENHAM FERNANDO, 8 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

BENHAM FRANCIS, 8 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Benham John, 7 Bowne, Alto. 

Benham Mrs. Lorain, 9 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Bennett George B., Lowell. 

Bennett Geo.. 2^ Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Bennett Harmon, 14 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Bennett Harmon, 13 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Bennett Horace T., 19 Paris, Grand 



BUY FURNISHING GOODS OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Bt-lknap Jamea A., 24 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Belknap Joshua, 6 Byron, Grandville. 

Bellows Ezra, 7 Cannon, Rockford. 

Bellows Edmund C, IS Cannou, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Bellows John D., 34 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

BELLOWS LYMAN 0., Alaska. 

Bellows Simeon, 34, Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Bell C. C, 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bell E. B. 5 Grand Rapids. 

BELL C. E., 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 



Bellamy William, 17 Cascade, Cascade, 

Bement H. H., Rockford. 

Bemis Charles E., Rockford. 

Bemis Charles, 2 Plaiiifield, Rockford. 

Bemis Henry, 2 Flainfield, Rockford. 

Beaaway Chas. H., 14 Caledonia, 



Bennett John, 14 Courtland. Court- 
land Center. 
BENNETT JOHN S., 21 Alpine, Grand 

Bennett Jonathan, Cedar Springs. 
Benjamin Lewis, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Benjamin William C, 24 Nelson, Nel- 

Benjamin Stephen H., 24 Ada, Ada. 
Bennett Albert C, 21 Alpine, Grand 

Bennett Aroelius A., 4 Lowell, Lowell. 

Bennett Adeibert, Rockford. 

Bennett Benjamin, Burch'B Mills. 

Bennet Charles, 22 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

BENNETT CLARK L., 4 Lowell, Low- 
ell, 

Bennett B. B., Lowell. 



Bennett Frances E. W., 4 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Bennett Morris 36 Alpine, Grand Rap- 



FORI'S EHEMT OF PAIN CURES TOOTHACHE ft NEURAItOXA^ 

Hosted by CiOOQle 



HIBTORT AND DIRECTORY Of KENT CO0NTt. 151 



S3jBitAl3l.lsl3.ec5l ±13. 18-i-^. 



H. Leonard & Son, 



ffil 

No. 13 Monroe Street, 

•WHOLESALE ANO RETAIL OEALERSI IX 

Crockery, 

China, 

Glassware, 
Lamps, 

Table Cutlery, 
Silver Plated Ware, &c.. 
And all Articles usually kept in a First-Class Crockery Store. 

From a long experience iu the business, we are enabled to offer customers 
the , 

VEK/"^ BEST a-OOIDS 

AT THE 

LOWEST POSSIBLE FBICES! 



CHINA HALU 

13 Monroe Street. 

Hosted by njOOQIC 



JSISTORI AND DIRECTORT OF KEHT COUHTT. 



Bennett Mrs Ssrab, 14 Conrtland Court- 
iand Center. 

Bennett Lyman 14 Courtland Courtland 
Center. 

Bennett Win. II. VillBffe, Cedar Springs 

BENNETT WILLIAM 34 Ada Ada. 

Bennett William H. Algoma, Rock- 
lord. 

BENTON JAMES, 31 Alpine, Indian 

BENSON PETER. 84 Nelson, Cedar 
Springa. 

Beotloy Alvin, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Bentley Abisha, 34 Vergennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

Bepka -Joseph, SO Plainfleld, Auater- 
litz. 

BERQY EMANUEL, 35 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Bergj Isaac, 80 Caledonia. Caledonia. 

Bergy Peter, 30 Caledonia, Caledonia. 

Bergin J. 5., Lowell. 

BEBGER HENRY R., Souths Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Berger W,, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

BEKKEY PETER, 35 Paris, Grand 

Berrj Arthur, 33 Lowell, Alto. 
Berry Caroliae, 10 Oakficld, Oakfield. 

ANVILS, VICES, BELLOWS & BLACKSMITH TOOLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S 



Bickford Aloazo T., 33 Oakfield, Grat- 

tan Center. 
BicklHfrt Jacob, Cedar .Springs. 
BTCKNELL CHESTER C, 36 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
Biddinger George, 84 Cnaoade, Alaska. 
BIDDLEMAN HIRAM, 27 Sparta, 

Sparta Center, 
Biddleman Simeon P. F., 37 Sparta, 

Sparta Center, 
Bietwork William, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Bigford Thomas, 18 Oriitlan, Grattan 

Center. 
Bigler William, 13 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Biggers John, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 
Billinga Calvin, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Billings Ezra, 13 Piainfield, Autiterlitz. 
Billings George, Cedar Springa. 
Billings Mrs. Mary Ann, 18 Sparta, 

Lisbon. 
Bills C. S., Lowell. 
Bingaman Benj. F., Alaska. 
Birch Alfred, 11 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Birch Edwin, 11 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Bird Edward, 9 Conrtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Bird John, 3 Grand Rapidg. 



Berry Edward, 33 Tu'one, Sparta Cen. 
Berry Henry, 13 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Berry John, 9 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 
Berry John, 1 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Berry Justus, 1 Cannon, Boatwick Lake. 
Berry Lester, 18 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Berry Matthew, 13 Wyoniing, Grand 

Rapids. 
Berry Peleg. .10 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
BERRY SIDNEY, S9 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
Besard David, 33 Wyoming, North 

BESSEY L. F., 9 Nelson, Sam! Lake. 
BEST JONATHAN, 16 Walker, Grand 

Betterly Albert, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
Betterly Adelbert, -5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
BETTERLY LEWIS, 5 Alpine, Lisbon, 
Bettes Henry, 31 Sparta, Lisbon, 
Bettes Jamea, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Bettes Joseph, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Bettes William E., 6 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Bettes Gilbert, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Betzler Joeepli, 33 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
Bevins David W., 7 Cascade, Cascade. 



Bird Joseph F., 18 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Bird Patrick, 3 Grand Rapids. 
Bird Peter, 17 Grand Rapids. 
BIRDSALL WM., 34 Alpine, Indian 

Bisby George, 25 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Biabee John, Cedar Springs. 

Bishop Christian, 3 Wyoniing, Grand 

Bishop Edmund B., 13 Oakfield, Green- 
Bishop Frederick, 2 Wyoming, Grand 

Bishop Loomis K., 24 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

BISHOP WM, P., 27 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Bissell Arnold, 32 Spencer, Cedar 
Springs, 

BlaclcatI Abraham H., 30 Sparta, Lia- 

Blackall Benjamin, 39 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Blackall Cbarlea, 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Black Andrew, 34 Courtland, Bockford. 
Black John, 39 Algoma, Bockford. 
BLACK JAMES, Cedar Springe. 



TRT FORT'S REKESIES. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AHD DIRECTOBT OF KENT COONTT. 168 

11 Monroe Street, 11. 

PERRY BROS, 

Exclusive Dealers in 

Hats, Caps, Purs, Eotes and Gloves, 



.WAY8 KEEP A FULL BTOCK 



Seasonable Goods 

AT THE 



IlEMKMISEH. THE Fl^ACE, 

No. 11 Monroe Street, Grand Rapids, Mick 

CITY NATIONAL BANK 

O E 

No. 1 Monroe Street. 



DESIGNATED U. S. DEPOSITORY. 


Capital paid in, - 
Surjaus and J^rofits, 


$200,000.00. 
~ $05,000.00. 


XJIRECTORS: 

TeoS. D. aiLBEKT, MOSES V. ALDEICH. 
WM. B. LEDYiRD, HENRY PBALICK, 
RANSOM E. WOOU, HANSOM (!. LUCE, 

OFFICERS: 

TBOS. D. GILBBBT, Pm, WJI.B. LBDVAfiD. Vi« Pres. 


JAMES M. NELSON, 

J. mum SAABS, Miff. 



Culiect'wng made aaid Promptly Remitted for at Qurvent Bates of Exchange. I>raflt 

on all tkeprindpiU CitUs of Europe eold at Lowest Sates. 

Gold, Silver anci CaaaAa, Cmrrenoy Bought and Sold. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AKD DIRECTORY OF KBST COUNTY. 



Black John, 1 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Black William J., Rockiord. 
Black ■William, Cedar Springs. 
Blac'kley Aaron, 18 Courtland, Edger- 

Blackatone Cassius, 20 Vergennes, 

Lowell: 
Blackmer Richmond, Cedar Springs, 
Blackman Lorenzo D., 17 Sparta, Lis- 

Blacksbiel Richard, S3 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
BLAIN CHARLES H., 5 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
BLAIN GEO. W., 17 Gaines, Grand 

Blaine George, 20 Byron, Byron Center. 
Blain Joseph, 5 Gaines. Grand Rapids. 
Blain John, Lowell. 
Blair John D., 36 Ada, Lowell. 
Blain Joseph R., 5 Gaines, Q. Hnpids. 
Blair Nathan, 17 Lowell, Lowell. 
BLAIN NORMAN B.. Lowell. 
BLAIN OSCAR W., 18 Gaines, Qaines- 

Tille. 
Blain Thomas, 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 
BLAIN WILMOT H., 29 Gaines, Gain es- 



BLANCHARD WALTER D., * Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

Blanchard Edwin W., 12 Oakfield, 
Greenville. 

Blanchard Charles N,, 21 Oakfield, Oak 
fleld. 

Blanding Charles, Lowell. 

Blaoding Alex. H., 38 Vergenni 
Lowell. 

Blanding Daniel S., 38 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

BLANDING NOAH P., 32 Vergennes, 

Blass Charles, Lowell. 
Blaurelt John W., 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Blias Adelbert F., Rockford. 
Bliss Albert, 5 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bliss Curtis, 31 Bowne, Bowne. 
Bliss Edward, 6 Cannon, Rockfbrd. 
Bliss Wm. J., Rockford. 
Blobet John, 39 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Blodget Alvin, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 
BLODGETT CHAUNCEY, 33 Paris. 

Grand Rapids. 
Blodgett Heman, Alaska. 
Blodgett SI. R., Lowell. 
BLOMSTROM CHARLES E., Lisbon. 
Blomstrom C, Lisbon. 
Blood Abel, 83 Alpine, Indian Creek. 



BAR, ROD AND SHEET IRON, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 1* ™a H Monroe BtnA 

W., 36 Sparta, Englieh- 



Blair Edwin JI., 23 Solon, Cedar 

BLAIR JONATHAN, South 6 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Blaisdell Wra. B., Lowell. 
Blake Joseph, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 
BLAKE JOSEPH, Grandville, 
BLAKE SAMUEL P., 15 Gaines, Ham- 

Blakeny Dwight, 26 Conrtland, Conrt- 
land Center. 

Blikeny Edward. 26 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Blakealee Alex., 29 Lowell, Lowell. 

Blakeslce EnosL., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 

Blakeslee Daniel C, 38 Lowell, Lowell. 

Blakelejr Buel, 19 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 

Blakeley Charles E., Rockford. 

Blakely Egbert, 12 Alpine, English- 
Tille. 

Blakeley Moses, 30 Algoma, Sparta 
Center. 

BLAKELEY R. L., Rockford. 

BLANCHARD IRA, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Blanchard Orriu D., Lisbon. 

Blanchard Riley, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 



Blood Ilirj 

BLOOD ISAAC D., 23 Ada, Ada. 
BLOOD J. M., 4 Walker, Indian Creek. 
Blood Mrs. Mary, i Walker, Indian 

Blood Putnam, 33 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Blood Zflcliariah, 30 Sparta, English- 
ville. 

BLOSS CHARLES A., Sparta Center. 

BlosB David, 82 Pans, Grand Rapids. 

BlosB Henry, 20 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Bloss Vulney, 15 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Blouffb Jacob, 24 Bowne, Lowell. 

Blount Walter, Rockford. 

Blush Christian, 20 Tvrone, Casnovia. 

BLUSH BODOLPHUS, 20 Tyrone, 
Casnovia. 

Boardman Arthur P., 2 Grattan, Ash- 
ley. 

Boardman William, 3 Plainfield, Rock- 
lord. 

Bodell Benjamin, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Bodell Henry, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Bodell Jacob, Lowell. 

Bodell Michael, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 



THIS LINE IS lO ADVERTISE FORT'S LINIUENT AND PILLS. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUITIY. 155 

S. 0- KINGSBURrS 
FIRE and INLAND 

Insurance Agency, 

Grand Rapids, Michigan, 



COR. OF CANAL AND 

PEARL STREETS, 



(OPPOSITE SWEET'S HOTEL,) 
Kepresents tlie folto'vrlus Old and Kellabte Oompanlee i 



^tnft Inaurauce Co., Harflord, Conn $3,000,000 00 |5,744,373 66 

LorilUrd Insurance Co. of New York 1,000,000 00 1,680,590 46 

Intecnational Inaiirance Co. of New York, 500,000. 00 1,353,398 17 

(OOLD.) 

Pacific Insurance Co. of San Francisco, Cal., 1,000,000 00 1,696,854 80 

Occidental Insurance Co. of San Francisco, Cal.,. . 300,000 00 444,311 47 

Detroit and FireMarine Insurance Co., Det., Mich. 150,000 00 236,873 06 

Policies Issued without delay in either of the above sterling old Companies, 
at Hates as Moderate as other responsible Companies offer. 

Special attention will be given to Insuring Dwellings, Barns and 
Contenta, for a period of One, Three or Five Years, and 

XO ASSESSMENTS MADE. 

S. O. KINGSBURY, 

General Land and Tax Agent, 

GRAND RAPIDS, KENT COUNTY, MICH,, 

Established in, 1850, 

Will attend to the Purchase, Sale and Exchange of Eeal Estate. 
Particular attention will be given to the Payment of Taxes, 
Purchasing Lands sold at Tax Sales, Examining Titles, Eeelaiming 
Lands Sold at Tax Sales, and will take a general supervision of all 
Lands entrusted to his charge. 

Hosted by 



GooQJe 



HISTORY AND DIRKCTORI OF KBNT COUNTY. 



Boden Anthony, 33 Paris, Qtand 
Boden Joseph L.. 23 Paria, Grand 

Bogardus Henry H., 30 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
Bo^rdu3 Jacob, 19 Wyoaiing, Grand- 

ville. 
Bohlen John, 33 Alpine. Alpine. 
Boha John A., ST Walker, Grand 

Bohlen Micliael, 23 Alpiuu, Alpine. 
Boice Albert, 14 Sol-m. Oedar Springs. 
BOICE LUTHENIUS S., 27 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
Bolan James. 27 Grand Rapidy. 
Bole George W., Village Cedar Springs. 
Biilgar John, 3 Grand Rapids. 
Bolhuis Lanowert, 23 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Bolt Adolphua E., 3(i Cascade, Alaska. 
BOLT LOUIS J., Sparta Center. 
BOLTER LEWIS, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bolzar Dennis, IT Plaiuficld, Aasterlitz. 
Bomas Peter, 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Bond B. F., 34 Sparta, Englialiville. 
Bonser John, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bonma Oats, IT Wyoming, tlrandville. 



BOUCK ALEXANDER L.. 5 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
Bouck Oscar, 5 Gaines, Hammond. 
Bouck Theodore, 5 Gaines, Hammond. 
Boufk William, S5 Eowne, Fillmore, 

Barry county. 
Bouchard Edward, 14 Paris, Grand 

Boughton Israel, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 

Bonghton Ira, 1 Alpine. Englishville. 
Hovio Peter D.. Burdi's Mills. 
Bowen Amos, 25 Lowell. Lowell. 
Bowen Elijah, 35 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bowen Orange, 2(i Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Bowen Jehiel, 2G Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
BOWEN 3IEBRICK, 20 Gaines. Cody's 

Mills. 
BOWEN PHILANZO, 28 Paris, Gfand 

Bowers Benjamin, 8 Algoma, Rockford. 
Bowers Henry, 8 Algoma, Bockiord. 
Bowler James, 4 Algoma, Rockford. 
Bowler Richard, 13 Grattan, Cannons- 

Irarg. 
Bowimtn Aaion C. 28 Gainea, Grand 

Rapids. 



BUY TRUNKS AND VALISES OF ROUSE &. DOOLITTLE. 



Bouter James, 31 Alpine. Indian Creek. 

Boo key James, Village Cannons burg. 

Boomer Moses, 33 Vergennes, Fallass- 
burg. 

Boorom A. J., 6 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Boorom A. W., 6 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Boorom Darius, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Boorom Lewis, 17 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Booth Andrew, 23 Vergennes, Lowell, 

Booth Andrew, 34 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Booth Edwin, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Booth E, J., Lowell. 

Booth Henry W , 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

Boquette Wm, H,, Village Cedar 
Springs. 

Boss Charley, 25 G.tincs, Caledonia 
Station. 

Boshoven Peter, 39 Grand Rapids. 

BOSWORTH H. J., Lowell, 

Botslbrd David, 13 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

BotrufT Adam, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 

Bntruff Isaac J., 16 Algoma, Rockford, 

Botruff Samuel S., — Tyrone, Sparta 
Center, 

Botraff William, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 



Bowman Altsaloni, 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

BOWMAN BENJ. B., 32 Gaines, Cody^s 
Mills. 

Bowman Charles, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Bowman Elias, 28 Oaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

BOWMAN ELIAS C, 27 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station, 

Bowman Gabriel W., 33 Courtland, 
Oakfield. 

Bowman Jacob W„ 30 Oakfield, Oak- 
lield. 

Bowman Jacob, 27 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia SUtioc, 

BOWMAN JOSEPH C, 35 Gaines, 
Grand Rapids. 

Bowman Levi, 34 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Bowman Nelson B., 30 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Bowman Owen C, 27 Gaines, Grand 

BOWMAN SOLOMON, 4 Caledonia, 

BOWMAN WENDELL C, 35 Gaines, 
Grand Rapids. 



WE BECOHMEND FORT'S UEDIGIHES TO AU.. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTT. 1 

DRY GOODS! DRY GOODS! 



W. L. WILKINS «5 CO., 

(sue GESSOES TO R, C. LUCE,) 

STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS. 

We shall always keep a Full and Complete Stock of Goods, and at Prices 
that will not fail to suit. 

W. L. WILKINS & CO. 



Agents for Stone Sewer Pipe and Fire Brick, 

I'aitiOR i-oiiteiii]i!;iting Building .Sewers or Drains, are invited to 

One of the Best Sewer Pipes that is made. 

54 Monroe Street. W. L. WILKINS & CO. 

GRAND RAPIDS 

AgricTiltural Implement Agency. 

W. C. DENISON, Agent, 

FOK THE SALE l»F 

Reapers, Mowers, Threshing Machines, 

WOOD SA W MACUIXES, CLOVER BULLERS, 

GRAIN DRILIS. SULKY HAY RAKES, 

CULTIVATORS, TLOWS, (either Oast, Coiubination 
or Steel,) 

Cider Mills, Mower Knife Grinders, and all kinds of 
Agricultural Machinery of the most Approved Patterns. 

MAciii?*ji: r:xTiiAS coNSTAismjir oiv iiAixr*. 

Office and Sample Room in Gilbert's Block, 

No. 104 Monroe Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 

ConsIcDment of Saleable Articles solicited. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Boyoe Wm., Lowell. 
BOYD GEORGE, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 
UojdJivraea, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Ifoyd Samuel G., 19 Courtland, Rock- 
lord. 
BOYER DAVID, 21 Plainfleld, Bel- 

Boyfer George, 14 Bowne, Lowell. 
Boyer John, 38 Algoma, Rockford 
BOYER JOHN W., 4 Plainfleld, Bel- 

Boylon Cornelius, 6 Yergennes, Can- 
non sburg. 

BOYLON CORNELIUS, 21 Grattan, 
G rattan Center. 

Boylan Larry, 81 Wyoming, Grandville. 

BOYLON THOMAS, 7 Ada, Grand 
Rapids. 

BOYNTON JEREMIAH W., Alaska, 
Village. 

BOYNTON JERRY, 9 Byron, NortL 
Byron. 

EOYTON LEVI B., 2S Grand Rapids. 

BOYNTON PHILIP W., 10 Caledonia. 
Alaska. 

BOYNTON WILLIAM, 5 Byron, North 

BOYNTON WILLIAM, a* Cascade, 



BRADFORD MOSES, 39 Grand Rap- 
ids. Grand Rapids. 

BRADFORD MOSES, 11 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Bradford Perry, 11 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Bradford Robert N., Lowell. 

Bradfield Edward, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Bradfield Henry H.. 34 Ada, Ada. 

BRADFIELD JOHN R., S4 Ada, Ada. 

Rradfield Sidney C, Lowell. 

Bradfield Wasliington, 13 Algoma, Ed- 
gerton. 

Bradish Jnahua, 10 Grand Rapids. 

Bradish Benjamin, Lisbon. 

Bradley Hyacinth M., 11 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Bradley Lanael, 7 Algoma, Sparta Cen, 

BRADIN JOHN, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Brady Charles, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 
Brady Hugh, 21 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bradshaw Edward, 23 Speucer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Bradshaw Jared, 38 Spencer, Spencer 



Braford Jesse, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 



LEATHER AND RUBBER BELTING, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, i 



Btaam Adrian, 39 Grand Rapids. 

Brabb George, Rockford. 

BrabI) George, Rockford. 

BRACE AVERY, 3 Walker, Indian 

Brace Hiram L., Cedar Springs; 

llrnce Emmett, 3 Walker, Indian Crrek. 

Brace George W., 3 Sparta, Spiirta 
Center. 

BRACKETT ALBERT, Sparta Center. 

Brackoae John, 11 Pans Grand Rapids 

Bradbury William, Lisbon. 

Bradford Aljner S., 30 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

BRADFORD CHARLES H., 21 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Bradford Durfee T., 21 Walker, Grand 

Bradford Mrs, Eunice, 16 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Bradford Bphraim A., 10 Sparta, Sparta 

Bradford Edmund, 31 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 
BRADFORD EDWARD, Sparta Cen. 
BRADFORD JASON S., Sparta Cen. 



] 1 I^i'ogg Alexander, 13 Gaines, Ham- 

BRAGG ELMER M., 13 Gaines, Ham- 

BRAGG GEO. N., 13 Gaines, Ham- 

Brainard Alfred, 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Brainard Dudley, 33 Wyoming, Grand- 

Brainurd Hugh, 33 Wyoming, Grand- 

Brakey Thomas, 17 Lowell, Lowell. 
Braman H. O., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Branagan John, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes.' 
Brandon Adam, Alaska Village. 
Brandt Adelbert. 38 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Bran nan Isaac, 32 Lowell, Alto. 
Brifnnan John, 32 Lowell, Alto. 
BRANNAN JAMES, 32 Lowell. Alto. 
BRANT JOHN, 31 Plainfleld, Mill 

Brantner George, 2 Plainfleld, Rock- 
lord. 
Brantner John, Rockford. 
Brasted Silas, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 
Brasted Silas, Jr., Lowell, Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES HEADACHE. 



yGoosle 



History and DlEBcioEr of kent coukts, 159 

A R THUR -WOOD, 

MANllFACTOEEB OF 

BUGGIES, SLEIGHS, 

And LIGHT WAGONS. 




STATE TAIB, in IgTO. ti>-All work irammloil, 
BRICK SHOP, 

33 Waterloo Street, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

EATON & LYON, 

(Successors to H. M. Hinsdill,) 

$$ Canal $lr>$'$t^ 

BOOESEim & STATIOmS 

And Dealers in 

Grand Rapids Plaster Co., 

nANVFACTUBERS AHR DEALERS IN 



LAITD and CALCINED PLASTEE, 

WM. HOVEY, Supt. & General Agent, 
Office 11 Canal Street,' 



yGoosle 



HIBTORX AND DIRECTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 



Brownell George, 11 Plainfleld, Auster- 

litz. 
Uray Beni- C, 12 Gaines, Hammond. 
BRAYMAN JAMES H., 7 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
Brearley Amoa, 35 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
BREARLEY EMORY, 33 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 
BREAK ABRAHAM B., 20 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 
BrccLting William, 33 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
Brcese Jolin, Village Cedar Springs. 
Bremer Francis, 15 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Bremer Henry, Rockford. 
BRENNER ANDREW, Burcli's Mills. 
Brenner Isaac. Burch's Mills. 
Breuenstuhl George, 13 Urattan, Qrat- 

tan Center. 
Bresee Jared N., 34 Ada, Ada. ■ 
Bresaahan Etlea, 18 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Bresnahan John, 18 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Breanahan Patrick, 30 Grattan, Grattan 

BREWER AARON, 9 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Brewer Alonzo, 9 Alpine, Grand Rapids 



BEIGGS ROBERT, 6 Gi'and Rapida, 

Grand Rapids. 
Brigga Richard, 18 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Briggs Spencer B., 33 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Briggs S. M., 23 Algonia, Rockford. 
Briggs Simeon L., 3a Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Briggs Volney, 13 Algoma, Eclj!«rton. 
Brigham Fitch M., 10 Walker, Grand 

Brighiira George, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 

Center. 
Brighani John, 33 Oakfield, Oiikfieki. 
Brigham Timothy, 10 Walker, Grand 

Brink John, 25 Grand Rapids. 
BRINK LOREN, Village Oannonsburg. 
Brinkman Herbert, 35 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Bristol Bethel, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Britton Dewitt C, Grandville. 
Broad Charles, Lowell. 
Broad William, Lowell. 
Broadbent Thomas, 7 Bowne, Alaska. 
BROCK JAMES, 31 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Brommao Oiarlea, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Bromman Franklin, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 



BRIGGS GEO. A., 14 Algoma, Edger- 

BRIGGS HORACE J., 3 Solon, Cedar 

Sprincrs. 
Briggs Hiram, 25 Algoma, Rockford. 
Briggs Isaac, 18 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Britton Josiah, 31 Algoma, Rockford. 
Briggs Joshua, 25 Algoma, Rockford. 
Briggs Jason, 18 Nelson, Cedar Springs 
Briggs Richard, Eocklbrd. 



ROUSE i. DOOLITTLE, 33 MONROE STREET. 

Brewer Francis, 9 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
BREWER FREEMAN, 9 Gaines, G. 

Rapids. 
Brewer Nelson, 16 Gainea, G. Rapids. 
Bresee Charles W., 33 Walker, Grand 

Bride Francis W., 17 Plainfleld, Auater- 

Brigham Albert, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 
Briggs B. B., 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Briggs Barnett W., 36 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Briggs Barber, 7 Grand Rapids. 
Briggs Charles, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Briggs Charles, 13 Solon, Cedar Springs 
Brigga E. L., 7 Grand Rapids. 
Briggs Mrs. E. A., Cedar Springs. 



John, 5 Sparta, Lisbon, 

Bromman Jones, B Sparta, Lisbon. 

Bromman Peter, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 

BRONSON FRANK, 35 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Bronson H. 8., 18 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Broomhall John, 3 Cascade, Ada. 

Brooks Elias, 30 Courtland, Rockford. 

Brooks Elisha, 3!t Oakfield, Grattan 
Center. 

Bropks Hollis L., 4 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

BROOKS JOSEPH A., Grandville. 

Brooks Joseph, Lisbon. 

BROOKS JOHN, Lisbon. 

Brooks James, 33 Plainfleld, Austerlitz. 

Brooks Lucius, 4 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Brooks Willis, 11 Nelson, Nelson. 

Brooks Lemuel, 33 O:\kiield, Grattan 
Center. 

Brot Washington, 33 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

Brotliwell George E., C Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Brott Washington, 33 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 



FORT'S BEBf EDIES ARE SAFE ANB RELIABLE. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AHD DIRECTORY OF KENT CODNTY. 161 

Dr. E. WOODRUFF, 

OFFICE AT HfS 

Boot, Bark and Herb Store, 

m eftKftt, sTKEfT, eaftMB rapi©s, mmw.. 

Where, for 10 years, every Deaeriptioa of 

Acute, Chronic and Private Diseases has been 
Successfully Treated, 

STRICTLY ON BOTANIC PRINCIPLES. NO POISON USED. 
-P. O. Draiirer, 2391. Cottnuel at O/Uce Free, 

I.. J. RINDGX: & CO., 

nANIIFACTtlRERS AND DEALERS IX 

14 Canal Street, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan, 

SMITH, MOSELY & CO., 

IMa.ii.xi.fa.otvir'ors of tlae 

CELEBRATED 



^nd. Jol>l>ers In 

SOOTS, SHOES ANB RUBBERS, 

17 Canal Street, up stairs, 

Sw, trSJiKm GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



y Google 



HISTOBlr AHD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Broughan Dennie, 31 Cascade, Grand 
Bapids. ' 

BROUGHANJOHN.Sl Cascade, Grand 
Rapids. 

Broughan Williara, 31 Cascade, Grand 
Bapids, 

Brownell Philo, 3 Plaiofleld, Rockford. 

Brownell Wni. 31 Vergennea, Lowell. 

Brownell Charles, 10 Walker, Grand 
Bapids, 

Brower Abraham C, 24 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Brower Daniel C, 33 Gaines, Grand 

BROWER HENRY C, 33 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

BROWER ISAAC C, 23 Gaines, Grand 
Rapida. 

BROWER JOHN C, 24 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 

BROWER JOSEPH, 19 Caledonia, 
Caledonia Station. 

Brower Mosee C, 35 Gaines, Caledonia 
Station. 

Brower Sylvester, Lowell. 

Brower W'm., 33 Gaines, Grand Rapids, 

Brown Azetns, 31 Tyrone, CasnoTia. 

BROWN ALLEN, 33 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 



Brown Ezra, 9 Alpine. Grand Rapids. 
Brown Edward, 1 Byron, Gainesville. 
Brown F. Z., 39 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Brown George E„ IS Caledonia, Alaska. 
Brown Henry, 34 Walker, Q. Rapids. 
Brown Hosea, II Alpine, BngiiahTille. 
Bpown Hiram, 33 Sparla, Englishrille. 
Brown H. F., S3 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Brown Hugh B., 30 Cascade, Cascade, 
Brown L E., Rockford. 
BROWN JOHN R., 16 Walker, Grand 

Brown James, 36 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Brown John, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Brown Jarvis, 18 Alpine, Pleasant. 
BROWN JAMES M., 4 Byron, North 

Brown John A., Sparta Center. 
BRpWN JOHN, 34 Bparta, English- 
Brown John, Sparta Center. 
BROWN JOSEPH, 19 Ada, Ada. 
Brown Joseph, 6 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Brown Kearney, 3 Alpine, EngUshrille. 
Brown Mrs. Lavinia, Lowell, 
Brown Lorenzo, 17 Alpine, O. Rapids. 
Brown Lorenzo D., Rockford. 
Brown Martin, 30 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
BROWN 0. L., Rockford. 



BUY FURNISHING GOODS OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Brown Albert E., Rockford. 
Brown Bester, 37 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Brown Byron, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 
Brown Charles, 33 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
Brown Charles, South 5 Walker, Grand 

Brown Charles IL, 15 Cascade, Cascade. 

Brown Charles, 86 Sparta. 

Brown Christy, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

BROWN CHARLES E,, 9 Oakfiekl, 
OakSeld. 

Brown Charles, 33 Wyoming, Grand- 
7iile. 

Brown Charles H., 19 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Brown Charles, 31 Algoma, English- 
Brown Clark, 33 Sparta, Englishyille. 

Brown David T., 15 Oakfldd, Oakfield. 

BROWN EPHRAIM B., Plainfield, 
EMiishville. 

BROWN EITQENE, 25 Bvron, Cody's 
Mills. 

BROWN EDGAR, 1 Algoma, Burch's 
Mills. 

BROWN ELISHA T., 3B Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 



BROWN OLIVER, 5 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Brown 0. E., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Brown Peter C, Cedar Springs. 

Brown Perry, 83 Sparta, Enghshville. 

Brown Fletcher, 29 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Browu Robert J,, 5 Courtiand, Court- 
land Center. 

Brown Robert J., 36 Grand Rapids. 

Brown Roswell, Grandville. 

BROWN ROBERT, 30 Grand Rapids. 

Brown Stillman, 4 Alpine, Englishyille. 

Brown Samuel, 1 Courtiand, Oakfield. 

Brown T. F., Ijowell. 

Brown Thomas, 18 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Brown William, 15 Cannon, Cannons- 
Brown William, 31 Plainfield, Mill 

Brown William A. C, Lowell. 

Brown William, 39 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
Brown William E., 1 Vergennes, Alton. 
BROWN WM, H., 1 Vergennes, Alton. 
Brown William, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
BROWN WILLIAM, 16 Cannon, Can- 

nonabnrg. '> 



FORT'S STICKING SAI.VI: IS ONI<T 15 CENTS PER ROL^ 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OT KENT COUHTY. 



168 



O 
O 
H 

O 

o 

» 

O 
W 

09 

H 
» 
M 
H 
H 



m 



4M 
m 

n 



n 



(W» 






o 
o 
o 

D 

O 

r- 
O 
H 
X 



O 

o 

r- 
O 
H 
I 
09 



a 



Q 

I 

c 

Q 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



Brown ■William, 19 Oakfield, Oaltfield. 
IJrown William, 33 Wjoming, Qrand- 

Tille. 
BROWN WM. H., Alaska. 
Bradi Charlea, 4 Bjron, North Byron. 
BRUDI JOHN C, 4 Bjron, North 

Bjron. 
Brudi Jacob, 35 Wyoming, Nortli 

Byron. 
Brunell David, 13 Spencer, Spencer 

Milla. 
Bruner Anthony, Lowell. 
Bruton Mrs. Ann, 30 Bowtic, Harris 

Bruton Michael, 24 Caledonia, Calc- 

Bruton Patrick, 34 Caledonia, Cale- 

Bmton Eohcrt, 24 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
Bruncr Richard, 12 Cannon, Bostwick 

Brunner Joseph M., 19 Lowell, Lowell. 

Brunner W., 39 Grand Rapids. 

Bryant Amos, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Bryant Caspar W., 8 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Bryant Daniel, S3 Lowell, Lowell. 

Buchanan Augustus, 35 Vergennes, 
Loweil. 



Budway Daniel, 34 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Buel Alfred, 36 Grand Riipids. 
BUEL MARCUS, 11 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Buel Mrs, Susan, 36 Grand Rapids. 
Bnell William, 31 Ada, Ada. 
Bull J. N.. 16 Grand Rapids. 
BuUard Edwin M., 8 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
BULLARD JOSEPH, 1 Alpine, Eng- 

lishville. 
BuUard Martin, 9 Bowne, Alto. 
Bulleu Chauncey, 33 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Bullen Mre. Hannah, 3 Walker, Indtnn 

BULLEN JOSEPH, 33 Alpine, Indian 

Bulliment Thomas, — Wyoming.Grand- 

Bullis Isaac, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Bullia James, 1 Walker, Mill Creek. 
BULLOCK JOHN, 34 Algoma, Bdger- 

BULLOCK JOSEPH, Cedar Springs. 
Bunce Aaron, 3 Lowell. Lowell. 
BUSKER EDWIN A., 16 Bowne, Alto. 
Burch Alfred, 11 Vergennes, Lowell, 
Burch Noah, Itf Lowell. Lowell, 



BEAUTIFUL JAPANNED WARE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, U wd 16 Monroe sfreet. 



BUCHANAN JAMES R., 25 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
BUCHANAN JAMES W., 39 Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 
Buchanan Samuel, 30 Sparta, English- 

ville. 
Buck Alonzo, Rockford. 
Buck Cary, 4 Alpine, Lisbon. 
BUCK CURTIS, Village Cedar Springs. 
BUCK ELIJAH, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Buck Eli g., 34 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Buck Judaun J.. 4 Alpine, Lisbon. 
Bock Ira J., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bnck Mjrnn, Village Cedar Springs. 
Buck Seelej S., 34 Paris, Grand Rapids, 
Buck Seralpha A,, 31 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Buck Seralpha C, 31 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
BUCK THOMAS D., 23 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
Buckle WUIiam, 7 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Buckley P. B,, Rockford. 
Biiddinger Mrs. Margaret, 19 Byron, 

Byron Center. 
BUDLONG WM. H., 18 Gaines, Gaines- 

Yille, 



Burch Alpheua, 8 Lowell, Lowell. 

Burch David, 16 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Burch D. W. C, Rockford. 

BURCH HOMER A., 19 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Burch JetFerson, 5 Nelson, Sajid Lake. 

Bucch Mrs. Lucy, 30 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Burch L. K., 14 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

BURCH TRUMAN H,, 16 Plainliekl, 
Belmont. 

Burch Truman H,, 10 Plainfield, Bel- 

Burcliard A, H,, 33 Grand Eapida, 
Burdick Eli, Lowell. 
Bnrdick Marcus T,, 19 Ada, Ada. 
Burdick Truman C, 18 Ada, Ada. 
Bnrd Joseph, 30 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Burdison Andrew, 13 Oakfield, Green- 
Burgees Cyrus N,, 35 Cannon, Can- 
Burgess B. J., Rockford. 
Burgess John M., Village Cannonebui^. 
Burger Stephen S., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Burget Isaac, 8 Algoma, Sparta Center. 
Burgi Joseph, 35 Byron, Cody's Mills. 



IF I HAD THE RHEUUATISH 1 1V01TLD USE FORT'S I.INIHENT. 



^iOoqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTORT OF KEHT COUNTY, 165 

Dikeman's Watch Depot, 

Established in 1837, 

Wlio, by honest and liberal dealing for THiRTr-THREB ybabs, has built up n 
large business, hik!, hiiving succeeded him in business, it will be my chief aim 
to rutain liis good name and business. I liave constantly on hand all the 

OF 

LADIES' AND GENT'S 

GOLD WATCHES, 

Alt Grades of the 

A I.nrg-e SInck of (be 

FINEST JEWELRY, RIN&S AND CHAINS, 

All Patterns and Stjies of the Seth Thomas Clocks, 
FINE BRONZE CLOCKS, STERLING FINE SILVER WARE 

And a Large Stock of Silver Plated Ware. 

S«te ftgefit fQP t!»6 M S © PiiKiTT W*T©ffli§, 

A.1SO lor the 

CELEBRATED DIAMOND SPECTACLES. 

All of my stock I sh;ill endeavor to Sell as Cheap as any First-Claas Goods can 
be sold. 

Catt ^i ^$ Carnal $l» 

ED. B. BIKEMAN. 

NOTICE— Rpiriembur, after the 1st of May, 1871, I shall remove to No. 88 
Canul Street, when, with great expense, I shall Lave the handsomest store and 
largest stock in the city, and 1 ean say outside of Detroit, 

ED. B. DIKEMACr. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY ASD DIBECTORT OP KENT COUNTY. 



Burke John, 39 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Burke James, 29 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Burkhoider Dayid, 38 Paris, Grand 
Kaptds. 

Burkliolder John, 28 Paris, G. Rnpids. 

BURLINGAME HENRY D.. 17 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

BURLiNGAME EDWIN A., 3 Wyom- 
ing, Grand Rapids. 

Burlingame Eaeck, 18 Gaines, Gaines- 

Burlingame James, 5 Oak field. Oak- 
field. 

BURLESON STEPHEN, 14 Plainfield, 
Auaterlitz. 

Burns Dennis, 12 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Burns Felix. 23 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Burns Francis, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 

BURNS LAWRENCE, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Burns Michael, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 

Burns Patrick, 12 Wjoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Burns Philip, BurcUville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Bui'ns Thomas, 16 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Burns Thomas, 23 Caledonia, Oaledo- 



BurtB. B., Lowell. 

Burt Beldin H., 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Burt Justus W., 29 Ada, Ada. 
Burton E. O.. 13 Algoma, Bdgerton. 
Burton Henry, 16 Plainfleld, Belmont. 
Burton Henry, Cedar Springs. 
Burton George, 32 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
Burt Lucien, 3 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
BURTCH HARMON A., 20 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
BURTCH HIRAM, 9 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
BUSH DANIEL. 15 Walker, Grand 

Bush Daniel, 10 Walker, Indian Creek. 
Bush Mrs. Fanny, 18 Plainfield, Alpine. 
Bush HoratioN., Village Cannonsburg. 
Bush XI. T., 10 Walker, Indian Creek. 
BUSH ISAAC, 11 Cannon, Bostwick 

BUSH JAMES, 18 Grattan, Grattan 

Bush Jacob, Village Cannonsburg. 
Bush William, 10 Cannon, Bostwick 

Bush William H., 10 Cannon, Bostwick 

BUTLER CHARLES H., 31 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 



BUY SHIRTS OF ROUSE fit DOOLITTLE. 



BURNS WILLIAM, 3G Oakfield, Ash- 
Burns John, 8 Ada, Plainfleld. 
Burns Sr. John, 35 Caledonia, Caledo- 

Burns James, 24 Plainfleld, Grand 

Burns Jr. John, 25 Caledonia, Caledo- 

Burns James, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 
Burnham Charles, 23 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Burnap Tracy, 7 Grand Rapids. 
Burnett Wm., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Burpee George, 16 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Burroughs Mrs, R. E., Lowell. 
Burroughs Mrs. E. J., Lowell. 
Burroughs San ford, 9 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Burrill Z., 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Burr Aaron. 4 Oascade, Cascade. 
BURR EDMUND, 18 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Burr Levi, 18 Lowell, Lowell. 
Burse Esburn, 17 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 



Butler Cornelius, 36 Caledonia, Caledo- 

Butler Edwin H., 13 Walker, Grand 

Butler Helen L., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Butler Henry, IS Plainfleld, Austerlita. 

BCTLER WM. H., 7 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Butler I. G.,2 Alpine, Englishville. 
BUTLER JAMES, 25 Caledonia, Cale- 

Butler Jonah, 36 Sparta, Englishville. 
BUTLER MRS. MARGARET, 28 Cale- 
donia, Caledonia. 
Butler Henry N., 38 Plainfleld, Grand 

Butler William, 3G Caledonia, Caledo- 

Butrick Charles, South 1, Ada,,Lowell. 

Butterfieid Albert, South 5 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

BUTTKRFIELD CHESTER, 6 Caledo- 
nia, Grand Rapids. 

BUTTBRFIELD JOHN N., South 5 
Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Butterfleld William, South 5 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 



WHERE KNOWN. FORT'S MEDICINES SEI.I. THEMSELVES}^ 

rtsdbyLnOOgl' 



yGooQle 



HIBTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 167 

J. M. Seely & Co., 

263, 265 and 267 Woodward Avenue, 
DETROIT, ■ ■ . ■ MICHIGAN, 

HANVFAlTl'ltEBS OF 

FIAVORING EXTRACTS, 

Perfumeries, Odors, Colognes, Hair Oils, 
Pomades, Cosmetics, &c., &c., 

ftt 2@3, g@§ & mi Waadwgifd toe., Betirojt. 
MILON L. SQUIER, 

DEALER. IN 

Agricultural Implements, Hardware, etc.. 

Also Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

CASNOVIA, Kent Co., Mich. 

All Orders promptly Filled, at Lioweat Caeli I»rlo©s. 

AMERICAN HOUSE. 

ANl* 

GREENVILLE STAGE OFFICE, 

Courtland Street, 

(NEAR THE DEPOT,) 

SMITH LAPHAM, - - - Proprietor. 



Google 



Hosted by ^jOOQ 



HISTORY AND CIRBCTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



BUTTON DARIUS T., 33 Walker, G. 

Button Ira, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
BUXTON THOMAS H., Grandville. 
Bjera John, Jr., 20 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Bvers Jacob, 33 Cnurtland, Rockfonl. 
BYHNK JOHN, 28 Grattan, Grattan 

Cunter. 
Byrne Lawrence, 13 Ada, Ada. 
BYRKE THOMAS, 2 Grattan, Grattan 

BYRNE MICHAEL, 38 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Byrne^ William, Jr., 33 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

BYRNES THOMAS, 18 Vorgonnes, 

Byrnes Toboiiie, 33 Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 
BYRNES JAMES, 18 Vergennea, Ter- 

CABOT ' FRANCIS M,, 34 Tyrone, 

Sparta Center. 
Cady Elislia, 33 Wyoming, Grand 

Rap ids. 
Cahill Edward, 35 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 
Cahill Patrick, 9 Waiker, Indian Creek. 
Gaboon Geo. H., 15 Lowell, Lcwell. 



Camp Mrs. Sarah A., 10 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Campbell Cha!<., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Campbell Edward, 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Campbell Finley, Lisbon. 
CAMPBELL G. W., 3 Sparta, Sparta 

Center, 
Campbell Hugh, 34 Tyrone, Sparta 

Campbell Ira, 13 OakQeld, Greenville. 

Campbell Isaac M., 1 Algoma, Burch'a 
Mills. 

Campbell John J., C Bowne, Alto. 

Campbell Lemuel U., 10 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Campbell Lewis, 13 Oakfield, Greon- 
Tille. 

Campbell Mrs. Mary, 85 PiaiuQcId, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Campbell Peter, 18 Waiker, G. Rapids. 

Campbell Peter, 10 Nelson, Nelson. 

Campbell Mra.Phila A., 5 Bowne, Alto. 

Campbell Sophronia, 18 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Campbell Samuel, 22 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

CAMP BELL STEVEN, 3 Sparta, Sparta 



AXES, CHAINS. COOPERS' TOOLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, i 



CAINE JAMES B., 16 Algoma, Edger- 

Cairns Thomas, 3G Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

CALDWELL HENRY 0„ 83 Ada, Ada 

Caldwell Walter, Alaska Village. 

CALKINS ALANSON, 30 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Calkins Addison, 31 Paris, G. Rapida. 

Calkins Andrew M., 30 Lowell, Lowell. 

CALKINS DANIEL, 20 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 

Calkins John, 25 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Calkins Milo, 25 Vergennea, Lowell. 

CALLEN JOHN, 3 Grand Rapida. 

Callen Peter, 3 Grand Rapida. 

Callard Robert, 9 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Callard Samuel. Sr., 8 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Callard Samuel. Jr., 9 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Callard Thomas. 7 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Camp Charles, 37 Algoma, Rockford. 

Camp Edward P., 4 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

CAMP JOHN, 33 Ada, Ada. 

CAMP P. SPENCER, 4 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 



Campbell Wilton, Cedar Springs. 
Campbell Wm. T., Wyoming, Grand- 

CAMPATT EDWARD, 11 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Campfield Frank, 37 Ada, Ada. 

Camfield Bradford, 83 Lowell, Alto. 

Candle Jamea, South 5 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Canfield Alfred N., 10 Ada, Ada. 

Canfieid J. H., 5 Ada, Ada. 

CANFIELD MOULTON II., 13 Grat- 
tan, Grattan Center. 

Canfleld William, 13 Grattan, Grattan 

CANEN ' CARLTON, 33 Tyrone, Cas- 

Canen Michael, 30 Tyrone, Casnoyia.- 
Cane William, Burehville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Canton Michael, 10 Grand Rapids. 
Caples Michael, 33 Sparta, Grand 

Rapids. 
Caples Michael, 29 Walker, Grand 

Card J. H., 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Carey William, 30 Ada, Grand Rapids, 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES CORNS AND WARTS. 



yGooQle 



HIBTORt AND DIRBOTORIT O/ KENT OOONir. 189 

The Best Place to Buy Millinery Goods. 
Mrs. E. ANTRIM, 

FashionaUe Millinery Rooms, 

ALSO AGENT roR 

Mrs. D. A. JACKSON'S FRENCH PATTERNS, 

TRIMMED AND PLAIN, 

57 Monroe Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Grand Rapids Carriage Manufactory, 

134 & 136 Division St., 

GEO. C. FITCH, - - - Proprietor, 

The beat of miiteriala used, and flrBt-class workmen employed. Sole manufacturer 
of tlie 

Pat. Improved Swell Body Sleigh, 

Acknowledged to be tlie best looking, most durable and strongest Sleigh that 
can be built. 

Lumber Wagons, of superior selected Lumber, 
Made to Order. 

JLOOMIS & BliOWN, 

* Ow'^V Manufacturers and Dealers in 

" *^^ BOOTS, SHOES, 

^, Eubters, &c., 

^f 30 Canal St., 

Friprltlm UOMIS' WAKE mU PWf. 




yGoosle 



HIBTOBY AND DIBECTORY OT KENT COUNTY, 



cade. 
C&tlton Nichulaa, 11 Paris, Grand 

CARLTON PHIL. P., 15 Cimnon, Can- 



Carlton William, 8 Wjoming, Grand- 

TillB, 

CARLISLE JAMES, 85 Gainea, Middle- 
ville, Barry Couoty. 

Carliilo William, 4 Cannon, Rock ford. 

Carlyle Charles H., 21 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Carljle John, Jr., 28 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Carljle John, 28 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

CARLYLE ROBERT, 33 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Carll Gideon, 37 Cascade, Alaska. 

Carll John, 27 Cascade, Alaska. 

Carl Ralph L., Lowell. 

Carl William P., 30 Ada, Ada, 

CarUn Edward, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapid fl. 



CARR ALFRED B.. 36 Plainfield, Aui- 

terlitz. 
Carr Aaron, 17 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Carr Caleb B., 36 Plainfield, AJaterlitz. 
Carr Edward, Lowell. 
Carr Geo. B., 1 Lowell, Lowell. 
Carr John, 22 Grand Rapids. 
CARR ROBERT, 28 Speiieer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Carr William, 17 Sparta. Sparta Center. 
Caraon Charlea, SO Cascade, Grand 

Rapids. 
CARSON ROBERT, 23 Walker, Grand 

Rap Ida. 
CARTER CHAS. B.. 3 Lowell, Lowell. 
Carter Theodore, 38 Vergennea, Lowell. 
CARTER Zb:x\A W., 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
CartwrightM. H., Burchville (Burch'» 

Mills.) 
Carty Maggie, 27 Oakfleld, Ashley. 
Carver Sarah W., 10 Vereennes, Alton. 
Gary Charles, 18 Lowell, LowelL 
Cary Horace, 18 Lowell, Lowell. 
Carey Patrick, 1 Courtland, Courtland 

Cary Patrick, 83 Cascade, Alaska. 
Cary Patrick, 7 Vergennea, Vergenne*. 
Case David, Lisbon. 
Case Horace, 7 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 



IRON, NAILS AND STEEL, AT W, D. FOSTER'S, i 



Carlton Nulaon, 11 Paiis, Grand Rapids. 

Carmer William, 36 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

earner Hiram, 2 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Carold Daniel, 31 Grattan, Cannona- 
burg. 

Carpenter Benj. T., 18 Nelaon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Cai'penter Chaapcr H., 3G Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Carpenter Darius W., 2t Byron, Byron 

• CARPENTER H. D., 39 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
Ca 'penter James, 21 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Carpenter Jasper B., 17 Paris, Grand 

Rapida. 
Carpenter Levi, 23 Caledonia, Calc- 

Carpentcr Lorenzo, 18 Plainfield, Aus- 

Carpenter Oscar P., 83 Gaines, Cody'a 

Mills. 
Carpenter Mrs. Melinda, 13 Plainfield, 

Austerlitz. 
Carpenter Peter, 10 Byron, Byron Cen. 



Case Jusfus, 17 Bowne, Alto. 
Case William C, Sparta Center 
CASEY JAMES, 15 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Casner George, 3 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Casntr Jerry, 8 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Gasner Peter, 5 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Casner William, 3 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Caasada Albert B., Rockford. 
Caasady John, 37 Walker, Grand RapiAi. 
Caaaedy James, 35 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
CASSEL ABRAHAM B., 16 Gaines, 

Grand Rapids. 
Caswell Benj. C, 26 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Caswell Eliaha B,, 37 Nelson, Cedar 

CATHBy' GEORGE, 9 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Cathey Geo. L., 9 Oakfleld, Oals field. 

Caton Thomas, 35 Grattan, Gram. 

Caukin Rufin, 31 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

CAUKIN VOLNEY W., 10 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Cavener Alexander, Rockford. 

CAVNBR JAMES, 8 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Cftzier Edward, 18 Alpine, Pleasant. 



, FORT'S WESTERN LINIUXNT CURES ALL LAM ENESSi 



yGooQle 



HISToaT. AST) DIRECTORT 



or KENT COUHTt. 171 



Empire Organ Company, 

Manufacturers of the 

P£| ^^,„., ,,_^ 




ti* 



Pbq 



'3 

Sheet Husic, Musical Merchandise, 

&c., &c. 

^•.A-OTOHSr and IB.^X<SIS XIOOBCS 

No. 65 Monroe Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

OEO. PIOGOTT. A. F. BOKCH. 



We invite all interested i» the purchase of Good InstrumenL', to 
call at our Factory ami examine our stock. 

ALL GOODS ARE FULLY WARRANTED. 

Hosted by njOOQIC 



HISTORY AND DIREOTOKT OF KBST COtlHTT. 



Ciizier Samuel, IQ Alptae, Pleasant. 

Ceah Christian, 1 Bjron, North Byron. 

CiBco Warren, 3 Oaines, Hammond. 

CHAFFEE B. M., 3;i Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Cbaffee Edwin N., 33 Ada. Ada. 

Chaffee Rodolphus G., 33 Ada, Ada. 

Chaffee W, T., 24 Aigoma, Rocktord. 

Ohalmere Andrew, 38 Aigoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Chalmers John, 32 Aigoma, Rockford. 

Ctaambere Geo. W,, 16 Alpine. Grand 

Chambers George, 18 Alpine, Alpine. 
Chambers Joseph. 10 Ada, Ada. 
CHAMBERS HIRAM J., 18 Alpine, 

Grand Rapids. 
Chambers Mrs. Ljdia, 16 Alpine, Grand 

Chamberliti Charles L., Village Can- 
non sburg. 

Chamberlam Frank, 16 Alpine, Grand 
Rapida. 

Chamberlain John H., Rockford. 

Champion David, Jr., 5 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Champiou J. D., 19 Tyrone, Caanovia. 

Champlin Jeffery C, 20 Walktr, Grand 






CHAPEL JESSE B., IT Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Chapel Jerod, Sparta Center. 
CHAPEL LEMON B., 27 Ada, Ada. 
CHAPEL M. D, L.. 5 Ada, Ada. 
CHAPMAN BENJ., 36 Solon, Cedar 



Chapman Miitoo, II Lowell, Lowell. 
Chaiie AmoB G., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Chase Abel, IS Alpine, Qrand Rapids. 
Chase Homer, 30 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Chase James S., Village Oannonsburg. 
Chase Lafayette, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Chase S., Village Cannonsburg. 
CHASE SEYMOUR, Village Cannons- 
Chase Witham, 18 Alpine, Grand 
Charles Joel, 13 Wyoming, Grand 

Charles James, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
OHATERDON GEO. W., 31 Lowell, 

OHATERDON JOHN, 33 Lowell, Alto. 
Chaterdon Mrs. Minerva, 31 Lowell, 

Alto. 
Chaterdon William, 31 Lowell, Alto, 
(.'hester Brayton, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 
CHESTER ELISHA II., Cedar Springs. 



ROUSE &. DOOLITTLE, S3 MONROE STREET. 



Champlin J. C, 30 Grand Rapids. 

Chapman AntUony, 36 Spaita, Sparta 
Center. 

Chapman Charles M.. 16 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Chapman D., 6 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. , 

Chapman E. A., Lowell. 

Chapman Jared, 7 Grand Rapids. 

Chapman John C, 3'> Cannon, Can- 
non sbnrg. 

CHAPMAN JOSEPH B., South 5 
Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Chapman Lorenzo, 36 Tyrone, Sparta 

CHAPMAN LE GRAND C, 35 Cannon, 

Cannonsburg. 
Chapman William, 30 Sparta, Lisbon, 
CHAPIN E. E., Rockford. 
Chapin Piavel, 13 Grattau, Grant. 
Chapin Gilbert A., 9 Grand Rapids. 
Chapin Joseph, 9 Grand Rapids, 
CHAPIN J. ELY, Lowell. 
CHAPPELL DANN., 7 Walker, Berlin. 
Chappell George S., 7 Walker, Berlin, 
' Cbapel Gurden, 37 Ada, Ada. 



Chester Elisha, IS Sparta, Lisbon, 
Chester Elijah, 10 Sparta, Lisbon. 
CHBSEBKO ALLEN D., 8 Paris, Grand 

Chesebro Mrs. Isabella, 5 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
CHEE8EBR0CGH JOB, 31 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 
Cheeseman James, Lowell. 
Cheney Amherst B., Sparta Center. 
Cheney Elliott, 37 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Cheney Nehemiah N., 23 Sparta, Sparta 

Chick Charles, 34 V'ergennes, Fallass- 
bnrg. 

CHILD E. K , Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Child George, 1 Vergennes, Alton. 

Childa James W., 35 Sparta, English- 
ville, 

Childs Nicholas, 33 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

CHILDS WM. n., 3 Plainfield, Rock- 
tord. 

Child Stephen, 1 Vergennes, Alton. 

Cbilson Alonzo, 19 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Chilson William, 80 Cannon, Austerlitz. 



FORT'S IVESTERN HESZCIHE HANUFACTURIHO CO.. LOWELL. 

otsdbyGooQle 



HISTORY AMD WRBCTOBT or KBHT COVSTT. 



A. J. irCKEH. 



DENBia L. BOOERB- 



rrucKXSR & Rogers, 

{SQccessors to E. E. Butterworth,) 

Hardware, Stoves and Rags, 

Agricultural Tools, Wrought, Scrap &. Cast Iron, 

Jmfidarm of III, C»HI1 AID Mill IMJ WABI, " 

33 &. 35 Canal Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 

Particular attention is callpd to tlieir INVINCIBLE (HOT AIR) COOK 
STOVES— tile latest and most approved style— Patented 1870. Examine and 
be satisfied. 

EEID & SMITH, 

DEALERS IN 

WALL PAPER, WINDOW SHADES 



ALSO MANCPACTUBBBS or 

Monroe Street, under Rathbun House, 

GRAND RAPIPS, - MICHIOAIT. 

NATIONAL HOTEL, 

graai SapUs, Mfei. 

Free Omnlbusses to and from all Passenger 
Trains. 



n?/iCE, ea.oo :e>eii?/ jdatzt. 

MRS. S. A. BARKER, - - Proprietress. 

£. J. J J CKSON, Clerk. E. S. JEXyE, Jfanoycr. 

Hosted by GoOqIc 



HISTORY 4ITD DIRECTORY OF KBKT COUMTT. 



Chipman John B., 2 Algoma, Burch- 
ville (Burcb's Mills.) 

CBIPMAN WALTER, 2 Algoma, 
BuTcliVille (Burch's Mills.) 

Chirgwin Martin, 28 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Chirgwin Tbomas H., 26 Cannon, Can- 
Donsburg. 

Cbifgwin Ricliard, 88 Cannon, Can- 
nonaburg. 

CHITTENDEN F., 17 Grand RapMs. 

Chittenden Jamea, 3 Grand Rapids. 

Christy Jobn^ 2ttlA)wel), Lowell. 

Cbriety Lafayette, 8 Algoma, Rockford. 

Cbriatenson JoUd, 12 Oakdcld, Grecn- 

Christenson Nelson, 13 Oaklield, Green- 
Christenson Samuel, 13 Algoma, Etlger- 



Cbubbuck Horace G., 



Tyrone, Cas- 



CHUBB GEO. 8., Lisbon. 

Chubb Lorenzo, Lisbon. 

CHUBB LEWIS L., Burcbville (Buret's 

Mills.) 
CHUBB MILES, Lisbon. 
CHUBB URIAH, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
CHURCH ALBERT, 10 Bowne, Alto. 

LANTERNS, ALL KINDS; ALSO SKATES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, HtiaMonrM-rt. 



Clark Alex., 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Clark AlTin, 6 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Clark Almond, 5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Clark Arba, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 
CLARK ARUNA S., 15 Grand Rapids. 
CLARK ASA, 3G Tyrone, Sparta Cen- 
ter. 
Clark Mrs. Bridget, 16 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Clark Benjamin, 13 Paris, Grand Rap- 
Clark Charles H., 8 Alpine, Grand 

Clark Charles, 11 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Clark Chaa, 28 Lowell, Lowell. 
Clark David, 18 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Clark David H., 23 Cascade, Cascade. 
Clark Eli, 2 Cascade, Ada. 
Clark Kdward, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Clark Frederick, 29 Paris. Grand Rap- 
Clark Goodhand, 2 Plainfield. Rock- 
ford. 
Clark George H„3 Casfade, Ada. 
Clark H. F., Lowell. 
Clark Henry A„ 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Clark Henry, 34 Walker, Grand Rap- 



Cburcli Cephas, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 

Church Cliauncey, 26 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

CHURCH COLBTN E., 2 Alpine, Eng- 
lish vi lie. 

Church Calvin, 7 Gaines, Gainesville. 

CHURCH CHESTER, 3 Vergcnnes, 

Church David C, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Church Eustes E., 36 Lowell, Lowell, 
Church George W., 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Church John, 13 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Church Henry, Lowell. 
Church Henry S., 2 Alpine, English- 

viile. 
Church Lewis H., 2 Alpine, Englisb- 

CHURCH LEONARD W., U Ada, 
Ada. 

Church Silas, 5 Bowne, Alto. 

Church Wilson, 12 Vergennes, Alton. 

Church William, 13 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Clackner J. F., 24 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Clackner J. H., 24 Sparta, Sparta Cen- 
ter. 

Clapp William, 9 Byron, Nortli Byron. 



Clark Henry, 34 Walker, Grand Rap- 
Clark, N. M., Lowell. 
Clark Henry, 11 Tyrone, Sparta Center, 
CLARK HARMON, 86 Cascade, Al- 

Glark Henry, 3 Cascade, Ada. 
CLARK ISAAC M., village of Cedar 

Springs. 
Clark Jay, 3 Cascade, Ada. 
Clark James D., 17 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Clark John. 20 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Clark. Joha H., 31 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
Clark John R., 13 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Clark John IL, 36 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
CLARK JOSEPH M., 5 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Clark Lyman, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Clark Oresta E., Rockford. 
Clark Lewis P., 23 Grand Rapids. 
CLARK LEWIS S., S5 Cascade, Lowell. 
Clark M, J., Cedar Springs. 
Clark Peter 8., 12 Plainfield, Rockford. 
Clark Perry, 1-1 Bowne, Alto. 



FORT'S WESTERN X.nnKSNT CURES SPAVINS ft WINGALU. 



GooqIc 



BISTORT AND filRECTORt Ot KENT COUHTT. 175 

D. L. LATOURETTE, - ' BANKER. 

Biulneas pBper dlacnusted. 

BuilneM bccoudU lollcited. 

Depoalls ItooeWed. Dally sccnunlH md npecvisl dupiMLta, 

Cau«i>thiiu made on all Dolnts. 

IntcTHt paid on Depositli. 

Foreign Exchange on &J1 points for ulo. 

Specie, V. a Bonds, fta, Tjoi^hl and aolfl. 

S»iing9 depoBitB nooived. Interest allowed. 

Eictianga on New Tork, nad all points Ijougbt and Bold, 

Office hours, S to S daily. Saturday, fl 4. >t. to 8 P- if. 

Grsnll Hitpid!!. oppoaile l>oataffice. 
Bef«r«neei<:— National Park Bank, NevYork^ Central National Bau^,llFn York; Seeond National 



R. BUTTON, ^a^a»^ DENTIST, 




GRAND ■HMgpp RAPIDS, 

And has neatly fitted up tlie ^Hf f ^^B"^rPV^J Rooiub formerly occu- 
pied by the City Council. ^•^-^i^*^*'^^ jje f^ela confident, 
after an experience of 18 years, of giving satiafiiction to all wishing the aer»iceB 
of his prolession. 

REMEMEEK THE NUMBER, 

34 CANAL STREET, 

Two Doors South of the Star Clothing House, up stairs. Call and see Specirnens, 

C JF. 3EX:3E^lGr<3-3B3Fl. «fc Co. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Saddles, Harness, Trunks, and all kinds of Horse ' 

iBu-CTcfclo Xt.o'kieis, 'VCT'lilx^s, cAiCr, 

D SOLE MANUFACTTTEEDS OP THE 

Common Sense Neck Pad I 

The Only Pad Known to Prevent Gall- 
ing the Neck or Cutting 
the Mane. 

Ladies' Saratoga & Sole Leather 
Trunks, 

Of our own manufacture, always on hand. 
^ 79 lUonroe JStreot. 




THK OLDEST AND LARQBaT ESTABLISHMENT IN THE STATE. 



yGooQle 



HIBTOBT AND DIRBCTORT OT KENT COUNTT. 



CLARK PHEBB J., 13 Vergennes 

Fsllassburg. 
Clark Robert, 3 Alpine, EngHahville. 
Clark Timothy C, Grandville. 
Clark Thomas, 33 Plainfield, Auster- 

lltz. 
Clark Warren, 1 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Ciark WillianiM,, 15 Grand Rapids. 
Clark William 8., 16 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Clark William, 3 Courtland, Courtland 

Clark William H., 5 Kelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Ciark Walter, 13 Vergennes, Fallaas- 

burg. 
Clark William, 30 Cascade, Alaska. 
Clausen Martin, 39 Grand Rapids. 
Claun Charles, Bnwne, Alto. 
CLEMENS AMOS M., 17 Gaines, 

Grand Rap i da. 
Clemens Abraham C., 17 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Clemens Christian, M Gaines, Grand 

Clemens Henry W, 36 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
CLEM0N8 ALONZO, 34 Oakfield, 

Qrattan Center. 



Close Edward R., 33 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Cloae Samuel A., 33 Courtland. Rock- 
ford. 

Close William W., 4 Cannon, Rockford. 

Clousterhouse Claus, 21 Grand Rapids. 

Clousterhouse Ral ph, 31 Grand Rapids. ' 

CLUTE DARWIN B., 38 Tyrone. Cas- 

OLUTE' ORLANDO H., 30 Tyrone, 

Casnovia. 
Cljne Elias, Alaska Village. 
Ci,YNBPETER,9 C ii led on i a, Alaska. 
Coats Mrs. A., Lowell. 
Coats Freeman, 16 Wyoming, Grand- 
Coats Leman J., 16 Wyomiiig, Grand- 

CoataMaryin, 16 Wyoming, GrandTillo. 

Coats Oliver, Lowell. 

Cochlan Patrick, 30 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Cochlan Michael, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Cobb Ezekiel H., 8 Cascade, Cascade. 
COBB JAMES, JR., 8 Bowne, Aito. 
Cobb James, 8 Bowne, Alto. 
Cobb Thomas M., 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 



BUY TRUNKS AND VALISES OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



demons Henry, 3 Grattan, Grattan 

Clements John L., 34 Ada, Ada. 

Clements Jacob, SI Piainlield, Belmont. 

Ciepper Henry, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
lord, 

Clerk Henry P., Lowell. 

CLEVELAND ELEAZER B, 36 Spen- 
cer, Spencer Mill. 

CLEVELAND W. H,, 33 Sparia, Spar- 
ta Center. 

Clifford Frederick, 17 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Clifford James, 33 Oakfield, Ashley. 

CLINGEB HENRY J., Village Can- 
nousbnrg. 

CUHTON OKAS. E., 7 Courtland, 
Cedar Springs. 

Clinton Frederick, 1 Grand Rapids. 

Clock Henry W., Village ot Cedar 
Springs. 

Gloffenstein John, 36 Gaines, Cody's 
Mill. 

CLOSE CONVERSE, 11 GratUn, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Close Elnathnn D., 4 Cannon, Rockford. 

CLOSE EVAN, 4 Cannon, Rockford. i 



Coburn Andrew J., ^9 Byron, North 

Coe George F., 13 Byron, Gainesville. 
Coe William, 39 Grand Rapids. 
COFFEE JOHN, 19 Alpine, Pleasant. 
COFFIN MARION E., 18 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
Coffin Monroe, SO Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Coger Charles, 8 Cascade, Cascade. 
COGER JABEZ D., 8 Cascade, Cascade. 
Cogshall Henry, 24 Bowne, Bowne. 
Cogswell Harvey D., 11 Walker. Grand 

COGSWELL LUMAN W., 13 Lowell. 
Lowell. 

Cogswell Martin', Lowell. 

Coil John, 16 Ada, Ada. 

Coker Albert, 2 Plainfield, Rockford. 

COLBY HORACE, 33 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Colby Isaac C, 18 Bowne, Alto. 

Colby James, 33 Courtland, Rockford. 

Colby Truman', Rockford. 

(Colby Truman W.. Rockford. 

Colby Spencer, 37 Tyrone. Sparta Cen. 

COLBURN ANDREW K., 19 Tyrone, 

r Casnovia. 



FOR SICK HEADACHE USE FOB'TS LIVES FII'Z.S. 



yGooQle 



HIBTORT AKB DIRBCTOBT OF KBHT OOUMTT. 177 

ROBINSON, CHAPIN & CO., 
GrIR;OOERS, 

LOWEI.L, MICHIGAN. 



J, R CHAPIN. 



A. C. AVRSS, 



DEAI.t:R IN 



DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, 

BOOTS AND SHOES, &c., 
CASNOVIA, KENT CO., MICH. 

EVERYTHING IN MY LINE AT LOWEST CASH PRICES. 

JOHN KOPF & CO., 

PROPBIF.TOBS OF THE 

Alio UBDiifactuiers and Senlera Id all kinds of 

FURNITURE & UPHOLSTERY. LOOKING GLASSES, 

READY-MADE COFFINS, £c., 

LOWELL. - ■ - - MICHIGAN. 

Grand River Nurseries, 

3L0WE1L, - KENT COUNTY, - MICHK^AN, 
NOAH P. HUSTED, Proprietor. 

One Hundred and Twenty-Five Acres under thorough Cultivation. 

TLe growing of well-tested, hardy and reliable varieties, adapted to the West 
and NortliweBt, made a. SPECIALTY. 

^"AU authorized Agents Irom this Nursery will be furnished with a Certifi- 
cate of recent date. 

NOAH P. HUSTED, 

Lowell, Kent Co., Mich. 
23 



yGooQle 



HI6T0RT AMD DIRECTORY OF KENT COnKTY. 



Colbarn Benj. Q., 33 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Colburn David, 6 Graod Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Colburn R. H., 19 Tyrone, Caanovia. 
Colburn Sylvester, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 
COLBORN AMOS, Caledonia Station. 
Colborn John, Caledonia Station. 
Cole Albert, 8 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
COLE ABRAM, 33 Ada, Ads. 
COLE ANDREW, 30 Vergenncs, Ver- 

genues. 
Cole Bradley, 9 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Cole Charles, 33 Ada, Ada. 
Cole Franklin. a3 Ada, Ada. 
COLE GARRETT, ISWjoming, Grand- 

COLE G. FILLMORE, 15 Walker, 

Grand Rapida. 
Cole Henry, 15 "Wyoming, GrandviUe. 
Cole Harlan, 28 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Cole Hiram, 19 Alpine, Pleaaaut. 
Cole Jolin D., 33 Ada, Ada. 
Cole Jame^i, 2S Gaines, Hammond. 
Cole James, 19 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Cole Lemuel, 24 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 
Cole Lutber, 33 Ada, A<la. 
Cole Peter, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Cole Peter B., 13 Gainoa, Haoimoad. 



CoUey Watson, 16 Byron, Byrou Cen- 

Coliagan John, 19 Ada, Ada. 
COLSON SHERMAN T., Alaska. 
Colton Benton, 10 PlainBeld, Auster- 

htz. 
Colton Gideon, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Colvin Eli, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Colvin James, 13 Vergennea, Fallass- 

burg. 
Colvia George, 28 I^well, Alaska. 
Colvin Samuel, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Colwell Hulbert, 28 Byron, Bjron 

Center. 
Colwell josiah, 19 Wyoming, Grand- 

Colwell Weaver B., 19 Wyoming, 

GrandviUe. 
Colyer Henry J., 30 Nelson, Cedar 



Colyer N. J., 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Combs Cbarles, 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
Combes Thomas, 18 Walker, Grand 

Compton A. T., 28 Algoma, Rockford. 
Compton Franklin W., 31 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
Compton James R., 31 Plainfield, Mill 



BUY SHIRTS OF ROUSE &. DOOLITTLE. 



Cole Reiley, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids, 

Cole William, 2S Sparta, Lisbon. 

Colejnao Albert, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Collar Abraham, Lowell. 

Collar Cbarles D., 2Q Ada, LowelL 

Collar E. R., Lowell. 

COLLAR NELSON, 29 Vergennes, Ver- 

COLLAR SILAS, 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Collar Sylvester W., 15 Ada, Ada. 
Collins Charles, 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Collins Cornelius, 81 Spencer, Oakfield. 
Collins Dennis, 1 Nelson, Nelson. 
COLLINS JAMES, 5 Nelson, Sand 

Lake. 
Collins Julian, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Collins James, Rockford. 
Collins Jabez, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Collins James, 1 Grand Rapids. 
Collins Michael, 24 Grand Rapids. 
Collins Simon, 24 Grand Rapids. 
Collins Thomas W., 1 Alpine, English- 

viiiB. 

Collins Timothy B., 5 Nelson, Sand 

Lake. 
Oollum Samuel, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 



Comstock Joseph, 28 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Comstock Nathan, 21 Tyrone, Casno- 

Conant Chester, 9 Conrtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Conant Horace, 28 Cast'ade, Alaska. 
Conant Plimpton, 23 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Ooncidine John, 16 Byron, Byron Cen- 

Condon H. W., 31 Algonia, English- 
Condon John, n Walker, Grand Rap- 

CONDON SAMUEL, 12 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Condon Thomas, 13 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Cone Ira, Village of Cedar Springs. 
Congdon William C, Burchville, 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Congdon George R., Burchyille, 

(Bureh's Mills.) 
Conkhn Alfred, 19 OakGeld, Oakileld. 



rORX'8 UHIHENT CURES RHEtTKATISM AND NEURALGIA. 



yGooQle 



HI8T0ET AND EIRKCTORT OT KBNT COUBfTY. 



Voigt i£ PerpoZslieiniery 

DEALERS IN 

Iff ®®iiis ami Setttmis 

41 Monroe Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

GRAND RAPIDS BRANCH 

Eeputlic Insurance Company. 

CASH CAPITAL, $1,000,000. 

DIBBCTOItW I 

R. C. LUCE, JAMES MILLER, GEO. W. THAYER, WM. SEARS. 
JAMES 3IILLEE, Freeident. IT. E. DEWEY, Manager, 



ksues Policies Covering Damage by Fire, and Lightning where no Flra 
ensues, and, in case of Loss, 

Pays immediately, without Discount for Interest 

Hosted by Google 



BISTORT AND DIRICTORT or EBHT OOOITTT. 



Conklin CharleB C, 14 Wyoming, 

Oraod Rapids. 
Conklin Du Bois, 21 Alpine, Grand 

CONKLIN GEORGE M., 17 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Connelly Edward, 2 Grand Rapids. 
Connelly James, 3 Grand Rapida. 
Connelly Patrick, 3 Grand Rapida. 
Conolly John, 15 Grand Rapids. 
CoonerT. W., 18 WjoniiBg, Qrandville. 
Conrad Edmund L., Lisbon. 
Conula Peter, 20 Grand Rapid^. 
Converse James, 37 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Conway Nicliolas, 34 Wyoming, North 

Cook Ariston J,, 33 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Cook Abraham, 24 Paris, Grand Rapide. 

COOK CLEVELAND 0., 35 Byrou, 
Ccdy's Mills. 

Cook Emery, 16 Alf[oma, Rockford. 

COOK EZRA, 26 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Cook G. W., IS Byron, Byron Center. 

COOK GEORGE, 17 Qiiines, Gaines- 
ville. 

COOK HENRY, 23 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Cook Henry V., 8 Gaines, Grand 



Cool Benj. J., Cedar Springs. 

Cool Eli J., 83 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

COOL URI, 32 Nelson. Cedar Springs. 

Coolty Geo. S,, 14 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Cooley Geo. B., Lowell. 

Cuolcy George W., 31 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Cooley John, Lowell. 
COOLEY SEYMOUR E., 21 Solon, 

Cedar Spring. 
COONS A. LEWIS, 23 Bowne. Bowne. 
Coons Jacob J., 23 Bowne, Bowne. 
Coon Dennis, 9 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
COON CHARLES L., 23 Sparta, Sparta 

Coon Geo. T., 5 Walker, Berlin. 
COON GEORGE, 22 Algoma, Edger- 

Coon George, 30 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
Coon Hally B„ S Walker, Berlin. 
COON JACKSON, 13 Algoma, Edger- 

Coon Phillip, 9 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
COON REUBEN, 4 Byron, North 

Cooper Adelbert, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 
Cooper Calvin C. 17 Spencer, Spencer ■ 

mils. 
Coonej P.. 33 Grand Rapids. 



SAWS, (MILL AND CROSS-CUT,) AT W. D. FOSTER'S, HandlBMou 



Cook Ira, 17 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Cook Jackson, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
COOK JOEL P., 1 Qrattan, Ashley. 
Cook John F., 28 Cascade, Alaska. 
Cook Jehial, 6 Cannon, Rockford. 
Cook Jesse, 21 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Cook Joseph, 25 Alpine, Alpine. 
COOK SYLVESTER R,, 38 Cascade, 

Alaska. 
COOK LEWIS, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
COOK LUTHER B., 13 Grattan, Otisco, 

Ionia County. 
Cook Martin, 19 Gaines, Cody's Milh. 
Cook Madison W., 24 Paris, Grand 

Cook Oliver, 37 Wyoming, GraudviUe. 
Cook Orson, 17 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Cook Reuben W., 38 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
COOK TRUMAN F., 13 Grattan, Otisco, 

Ionia County. 
COOK THOMAS, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
Cook William, Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cook William, 3B Byroa, Cody's Mills. 
Cook Wm.G.,17Nelson. Cedar Spr" 
Cook Wm. F., 38 Cascade, Alaska. 
Cooi Beiy. H., Cedar Springs. 



Cooper !Franklin H., 36 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cooper Edwin, 7 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Cooper George W,, 36 Grattan, Alton. 
Cooper Horatio N., 33 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Cooper John D., 20 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cooper Just ns, II Algoma, Burchville 

(Biirch's Mills.) 
Cooper James, 2 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Cooper J. C, Burchville (Burcb's 

Mills.) 
Cooper John, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Cooper Lewis C, 28 Byron, Bjron Cen. 
Cooper Nelson P., 27 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Cooper Owen, 17 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cooper Rogers C, 36 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Cooper Samuel, S3 Plainfield, Auster- 

iitz. 
Cooper Samuel, 33 Plainfield. Awster- 

litz. 
Cooper William, 7 Bowne, Alaska. 



FORT'S HEOICINES ARE WARRANTED. 



yGooQle 



HISTOBT ASD DIRBOTOEY OT ISNT OOUMTY. 




BEN. FRANKLIN 

Book i Job Printing 

OFariCE, 

Ldvell's Block, Opposite Swttt'a Hotel, 

CANAL STREET, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MtCBIOAN, 

The Cheapest and Best 

Flacf la Onind Beptas to get Job Printing dona, snch u 
CBrdB, BUl-headH. Labels, Lettor-lieadK, Hsnil-blllB, Pro. 

rwOrdarB (Tom the eonntry promptly Mtenfled to. 

cBMd IK ffuron(« mlwB saiu/ocflun. 

JOHN BOLE, ppopietop. 



Insure Your Life in 
INSURANCE CO., OF NEW YORK. 



^.amTsmm, - - - - A-ix.ooo.ooo. 

rriic Hiai'srest Company In the "VS^orld. 

J. QUINTUS, Agent, 

Office, Justice St„ near Monroe, Grand Rapids, Mich, 

Oi^ettn Fansnffe TicJcets and Drafts on Europe for Sale- 

JAMES PLANK^ 

iaiSS:3ES 3K. 30 3B 3F> E: 3E1. , 

SECTION 8, CANNON, 

' Has congtantiy on hand 

GOOD THRIVING HIVES FOR SALE. 



Is prepared to fill orders for ITALIAN QUEEN BEES— 1 Bee, 
85 ; 2 lor $8 ; or a Hive for $15. He is also prepared to give 

Xr&atx>-uotloxis for ^^eex^lUB ^ees. 

Address, ROCKFORD, MICH. 



yGoosle 



HIBTORT ISD DIREOTOET OF KMT COUNTS. 



Spem 



, Spencer 



Cornell Perry, 32 Bowne, Hiirria Creek. 
CORNELL ROBERT B., 3H Oourtlaii<l, 

Bostwiok Lake. 
Cornell William M., 23 Oakeolcl, Oak- 

field. 
Cornwell Charles M., 28 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Cornwell John A., 3 Vergennes, Alton. 
Cornwell John K., 12 Vergennes, Alton. 
Cornne P. D., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Cornula Martin, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Corporon Samuel, 16 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
OORRIGAN PETER, 10 Vergennes, 

Corrigan Patrick, 37 Ada, Ada. 
Corser George W. N., 38 Walker, G. 

Cortright Cornelius, 16 'Ada, Ada. 
Cortright Samuel, 39 Wyoming, Grand- 
Cory Mary, 20 Byron, Byron Centre. 
Cory Philip, Lowell. 
CORYELL CHARLES E., 7 Courtland, 

Edgerton. 
Cotney Mrs. Ann, 16 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Cotney Henry, 18 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Cotney James, 16 Walker, G. Rapids. 

BUY FURNISHING GOODS OF ROUSE & DOOLITTLE. 



Cooper Warren, 
Milts. 

Cooper William, 1 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Cope Alhert A., Rockford. 

Cope George, 6 Ada, Auaterlitz. 

Cope Robert, 31 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Cope Robert, 31 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 

Cop el and Joseph B., Orandville. 

C0PPEN8 CHARLES, 26 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Coppena Francis, 9 Bowne, Alto. 

Coppena Peter T., Lowell. 

Coppernoll Peter, 2 Gaines, Hammond. 

Oorbett Reuel, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Corbin Charles G., 7 Byron, Grand- 
viUe. 

CORCORAN JAME9. 38 Ada, Ada. 

Corcoran Thomas, 29 Paris, Grand 
Rapida. 

CORDES CASPAR, 27 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Cordea Ebcrhard, 26 Alpine, Grand 

Gordes William, 36 Alpine. Grand Rap- 



Corey Harvey T., 27 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Corey Joseph J., 39 Byron, Byron Cen- 

Oorey Lyman H., 85 Wyoming, North 

Corey Rufus B., 18 Gainea, Gainesville. 
Corey Silas W., 37 Sparta, Sparta Cen- 

Corkins Geo. W., 10 Wyoming, Grand 

CORKINS ORSAMUS, 10 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
CORKINS RUFUS, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapida. 
Corkins Wariner, 10 Wyoming, Grand 

Corlis Cornelius, Lowell. 
CorliB John S., 34 Walker, Grand Rap- 
ids. 
Corman Isaac, 34 Lowell, Lowell. 
Cornall James, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Corn N. B., 3 Alpine, EngHshville. 
Cornell David, 10 Walker, Grand Rap- 



Cotney Thomas W., 8 Walker, Grand 

Rapida. 
Court Marcus D., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 
Court John H., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 
Couraon Hampton, 8 Wyoming, Grand- 

Courtwright Aaron, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 
COURTNEY BERNARD, 34 Walker. 

Grand Rapida. 
Covell Charles, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Covell Daniel, 84 Algoma, Itockford. 
Covell Gideon R., 14 Cascade, Cascade. 
Covell George, SO Ada, Ada. 
Covell Joseph W., 13 Algoma, Edger- 

Coveil James, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
COVELL P. F., 32 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Covell Martin, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 
COVEY E. H,. 4 Walker, Indian Creek. 
Covey John W., 3 Algoma, Burch's 

Mills. 
COVEY L. R., 35 Tyrone, Spaita Cen. 
Covert Dyer, 3 Vergennes, Lowell. 
COVERT JOHN L., 3 Vergennts, 

Lowell. 
Corey Silas W.. 37 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Cowan Austin, 33 Courtland, Rockford. 



HO RISK IN USING FORT'S MEDICINES. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIREOTOBT OF lOaiT COCNTT. 




19 Monroe Street, 
Grand Rapids, .- - Michigan, 

(SUCCESSOR TO BALL, THE CLOTHIER.) 

TKT. B. jrOHIffSOnr, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

CABINET \Wm% SOPHS, MUTTRESSES, CHIS, 

Patent Spring Beds, Looking Giasses k Picture Frames. 

ROCKFORD, - - - MICHIGAN. 

"O A-SIsT O-VIA. S TOB.E." 

R. H. TOPPING, 

General Dealer in 



Hardware, Boots and .Shoes, Clothing, Stationery, 
Fancy Goods, etc., etc., 

OASNOVIA, 

TERHIB, CASn. K«iit Coniity. Mich. - 

SEYMOUH fi, WAITE, 

And nealers in 

Hardware, Tinware, Agricultural Implements, Flour. Feed, 

Grain, Produce, etc.. 

Mill Greek, Kent Co., and Far^ Mecosta Co., Mich. 

AH Orders promptly Slled at Iioweat C«ali Prices. _ 

nUMK BITUOUlt. LUKS W. WAITB. 



yGoosle 



HISIORT AHD DIEBCTORY OF KENT COiraTT. 



Cowan AloDEo P., 18 Grattan, Bostwick 

Cowan Alexander, 33 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

COWAN ALEXANDER, Snd, 6 Grat 
tail, Bostwick Lnke. 

Cowan Alexander T., 33 Courtlaad, 
Rock ford. 

Cowan David, 14 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Cowan MiH. Eunice, 19 Courtland, 
Rock ford. 

COWAN JOHN C, 6 Graitan, Bost- 
>Jick Lake. 
■ Cowan Peter, 18 O rattan, Bostwick 

COWAN THOMAS M., 32 Courtland, 

Rock ford. 
Cowan Tliouiaa, 1 Cannon, Bostwick 

Cowan Wm. 8., 18 Grattau, Bostwick 

' COWELL ISAAC, 34 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
COWLEY JOHN.23 Vergennea, Lowell. 
Cowley Robert, Lowell. 
COWLES BHEPARD B,, 29 Spencer, 

Nelson. 
Cos John, 9 Courtland, Courtland Cen. 



Crane Samuel M., 34 Vergennes. Fallaw- 

burg. 
Crane William, LowpU. 
Cranston Gardner, 15 Plainfield, Bel- 

CRANSTON THOMAS, 15 Plainfield, 

Belmont. 
Crannell Wm. W., IG Gnittan, Grattan 

Center. 
CRANMER CHARLES, 11 PlaiiiBold, 

Rock ford. 
Cranmer Eugene, Lisbon. 
Cranmer Israel, 9 Alpine, Grand] Rap- 

Cranmer James M., 13 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

CRANMER JOHN, 9 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Crandall Alonzo H., 10 Plainfield, Bel- 

Crandle Joseph, 14 Paris, Grand Rap- 

Crandall Myron, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Crandall Nathan, 17 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Crandall Ormond P., 30 Wyoming, Kel- 
loggsville. 



HARDWARE AND CUTLERY, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 1 



d 16 MonroB Strei 



Coi James, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Cox Nicholas, 39 PlainHeld, Grand 

, Coy Daniel, 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Crabtree Wm. B., 20 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Crager Cornelius, 18 Paris, Grand 

CRAHAN JAMES, 24 Grand Rapids. 
Crahan Martin, 34 Grand Rapids. 
Oraheu John, 25 Grand Rapids. 
Craig Wm. T., 37 Grand Rapida. 
CRAKES FRANCIS, 25 Ada, Ada. 
Crakes GeorgB, 28 Vergennes, Lowell. 
'Crakes John J., 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Crakes Theodore W., 35 Vergennea, 

Cramer Adelbert, 39 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 
Cramer George, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
CRAMER JEROME, 20 Paris, Grand 

Cramer Jobn G., 30 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
CRAMTON ALANSON, 21 Ada, Ada. 
Cramtoa Charles, 27 Ada, Ada. 
Crans W. J., 10 Walker, Indian Creek. 



Crandall Stuart, 17 Gaines, Gainesville. 
CRAW EDWIN R., Lowell. 
Crawford David, 35 Oakfield, Ashley, 
Crawford Green B., 11 Grattan, Grat- 



litz. 
Crawford John, Lowell. 
Crawford James, Lowell. 
CRAWFORD JOHN W., 11 Grand 

Crawford Samuel, 3fl Oakfield, Ashley. 

Creamer Thomas, Sparta Center. 

Creager John, 80 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Creager William, 30 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

Creit Averd, 30 Grand Rapida. 

CREVLING BENJAMIN, 7 Plainfield, 
Alpine. 

Crill Mark, 13 Alpine. Alpine. 

Crinion Michael, 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Crmion Thomas, 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



FORT'S SALVE CUBXS CUTS, BRUISES AND OTHER WOUNDS. 

/ Hosted by GoOQIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOBT OF EBHT COUUTY. 



Crinniaii Thomas, 34 Walker, Grand 

Crippen Alfred A., 36 Wvoming, Kel- 
lofrgsville, 

GRIPPES W. S.. 38 Wyoming, Kel- 
Inppsville. 

CRItiHER JOHN L., 24 Alpine. 

CrisBey, J. W., 13 Algoma, EJgerton. 

CR183EY WILLIAM 8., 13 Algoma, 
Edgerton. 

0RI88MAN JOHN, 29 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Crissinan WilliHm, 7 Ctrnoon, Rock- 
ford. 

CrisSinaa Htnry, 31 Plainfield, Auater- 

Crissman Henry K., 13 Plainfidd, Rock- 

tbrd. 
Crits George, 33 Paria, Grand Rapids. 
Critchett Geo. W„ Ifl Ada, Ada. 
Crocker Aianaon, 14 Byron, Bjron Ceu- 

Crocker Alvan, 30 Qaines, Cody's Millo. 
Crocker I^wis N., 11 Byron. Byron 

Crocker SaiMelJ., 30 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Cromwell Alexander, 24 Vcrgennes, 

Pallassburg. 



Crowley Patrick, 28 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Crowley William, 28 Sparta, Sparta 

CROW GEORGE, 21 Ada. Ada. 
Crumhank Mrs. Ciiarity M., 35 Gaines, 

Cody'e Mills. 
Crumhack George, 20 Bowne, Bowne. 
CRUMBACK GERHARD W., 34 

Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
Crumback^ames T., 26 Gaines, Hatn- 

mond. 
CRUMBACK SAMUEL W., 25 Gaines, 

Caledonia Station. 
CRUMBACK SAMUEL, 36 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
Crusen John, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Crjaler Henry, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Cubitt William, 33 Ada. Ada. 
Oudahie M., 23 Grand Rapids. 
Cuddeback Solomon, 20 Walker, Grand 

Cuddihie James, 14 Grand Rapida. 
Cuddibie Micliae), 14 Grand Rapida. 
Cndeihy Tliomaa, 11 Bowne, Alto. 
Cudington Peter, 17 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Gulp Hiram, 9 Algoma, Sparta Center. 
" ' Hra. Azuba, 35 Spans, Engliah- 



ville. 



■ TABLE AND POCKET CUTLERY, AT W, D. FOSTER'S, 3 



Id 16 Mod 



t EtKCt. 



Cromwell B. C, 10 Grand Rapida. 

Cromwell Geo. W., 3 Plainfleld, Rock- 
foriL 

Cronan Timothy, 30 Grand Rapids. 

CRONINGER DANIEL, 35 Caacade, 
Alaaka. 

Croninger Jacob, 3.J Cascade, Alaska. 

Croninger Juaeph, 23 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia. 

CRONINGER MICHAEL, 23 Caledonia, 
' Caledonia. 

Croninger Talcott R., 35 Cascade, Al- 

CROnIngER WM, B., S Caledonia, 

Crook Wm. A., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
CROOK JOHN R.. 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Crosby Geo, W,, 20 Vergennes, Lowell. 
CROSBY WM,, 13 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. ■ 
Cross Cbarles H., Rockford. 
Croaa EIry E., 35 Paria, Grand Rapids. 
CROSS SHUBEL. 39 Grand Rapids. 
Crosaman Jacob, 39 Algoma, Sparta 

Crowley Jerry, 38 Sparta, Sparta Ccn. 



Culver Lewis M., 34 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Culver Orria, 85 Sparta, Englishville. 
Culver Robert G., 35 Caledonia, Cale- 

CUMIN'gS ALLEN, 20 Tyrone, 

Sparta Center. 
Cummings Mra. Bridget, 30 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Cuniinga Edwin, 3 Alpine, English- 

Cuniings Fred. M., 13 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
CliMlNGS JOSEPH M,, 13 Sparta, . 

Sparta Center. 
Cummings Jolin, 24 Plainfield, Aus- 

Cummings John, 30 Walker, Grand 

Cnmiiiga Marcus, 18 Algoma, Bparta 
Center. 

CUMIN09 MARCENE, 13 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

CUMlNtiS NORMAN, 34 Sparta, 
Englishville. 

earnings Nelson, 3 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

CUMMER JACOB, Cedar Springs. 

FORT'S ENEHT OF PAIN CURES COLDS AHB SORE THROAT. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY Or KENT COUNTY. 



Cummer Wellington W., Cedar Springs. 
Cunningham Allen, 39 Wyoming, Grad- 

Tiile. 
CUNNANE PETER, 3 Ada, Ada. 
CUPPLES ROBERT, 17 Sparta, Lis- 

Curlcy James, 20 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Curley John, 20 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Curlej James, 33 Grattan, Vtrgennes. 
Curluy Patrick, ]0 Bnwne, Bowne. 
CURBAN JOHN, 33 Walker, Grand 

CURIIEN EZRA, 1 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

CURREN LEVI, 1 Courtland, Cedar 
Springs. 

CURREN WELLEN, 1 Courtland. 
Courtland Cenier. 

Currin Charles W., 25 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Curren Jtrome M., 25 Oakfield, Green- 

CurttBB Charles, 16 Plninfleld, Belmont. 
Curtis Clias. F., 27 Vergennos, Lowell. 
Curtis Charles, 10 Plainliuld, Belmont. 
Curtiss Charles H., 10 Pl-iiafleld, Bel- 

Curtisa Chauncey, S3 Plainfield, Aua- 



Curtis Elliott, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Curtiss George. 11 PlainHeld, Bockford. 

Curtiss John L., 38 Ada, Ada. 

Cure Andrew J., 12 Byron, Gainesville. 

Curtias S. P., 39 Lowell, Lowell. 

CU8ACK MAilTlN, 28 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

CuBhman Alphonzo, 30 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

Cushman J. B., Lowell. 

Cushelman Michael, 10 Alpine, Eng- 
lish vi He. 

Cushway Paul, 13 Grand Rapida. 

Cusser Isaac, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 

Cutler Charles J., Gaines, Qaines- 

Cutler -lolin L, 6 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
CUTLER JOHN, 6 Gainea, Kelloggs- 

Cuttenbacker John, 1 Walker, Mill 

Oreelc. 
Cults George, 31 Courtland, Courtland 



CUYKENDALL JASPER, 

Bowne. 
Cujkendall Solomon, 33 
Bowne. 



1 Bowne, 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, No. t C«m1 Btwtt, 



D 



Dager John, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Daggett Marshall, 3G Sparta, English^ 

Daggett William, 38 Tyrone, Casnovla. 

Daily Henry, Grandville. 

Daily John, 20 Grand Kapids. 

Dal berg Charles, 28 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Daily Dennis, 11 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapida. 

Daley James, 3 Plainfield, Rockford. 

Dantbrth Albert, 3 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

DANPORTH MORTIMER W., 9 Cas- 
cade, Cascade. 

DANFORTH WILLIAM A., Roekford. 

DANIELS AARON P., 31 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

DANIELS CHAS. H., 7 Lowell, Lowell, 

Daniels John S., 33 Vergennes, LoweU. 

Daniels Howard, Rocktord. 

Daniels Napoleon, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 

DANIELS THOMPSON I., 83 Vt.- 
g ones, LowelL 

rORT'S ENEUT OF PAIN CURES TOOTHACHE AND NEVRALOZA 



Daniels William, 30 Grattan, Smyrna, 

Ionia County. 
Danicleon Andrew, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Darling Edward, 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Darling Eliaa, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Darling George, 33 Alpine, Alpine. 
Darlinff Hiram II., 10 Paris, Grand, 

DARLING MARTIN, 31 Lowell, Low- 
ell!. 
Darline Silas, IG Paris, Grand Rapids. 
DARLING SAMUEL, 35 Grand Rap- 

Darrow Alexander L., 31 Courtland, 

Rock ford. 
Darrow John, 31 Courtland, Roekford. 
Darrin Byron, 5 Nelsnn, Sanil Lake. 
DART FREEMAN, 3 Vergennes. Alton. 
Darwin Erastus, 27 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Daughertj John, 1 Wyoming, Grand 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 187 

U. B. -nrililjiIAlMES, 

a-K.A.iasr, 

CASH PAID FOR SIIEEl' PELTS AND PRODUCE. 



fliiodti Delivered lit Tumti Free of Clitrrtfe. 

i.ov\7'E!ii^rj, - - - Mroiiia-A.3sr. 



"W. C. Denison, 




PHOTOGHAPH GALLERY, 

48 nS/dlOimOE ST., 

The Best Place in town to get Photographs, 

and all kinds of Sun Pictures. 



f irtutw Mlawfl itt |nl$, 0il ai<() W»t(» (Koto. 



M'o. 4a lMCorx:=-^o St., 

GKAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Hosted by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Davenport Aaron, 30 Plainfield, Mill 

Davenport George, 9 Oftkfield, Oak- 
liel.l. 

Davenport George, 16 Cannon Gannons- 
burg. 

Davenport Ithamcr, 30 Plainfield, Mill 

Davenport Jonatliati, 13 Plainfiiild, 

Mill Creek. 
Davenport Mrs. Miriam, 30 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
DAVIS ALBERT W. 12 Cannon, Bost- 

wick Lake. 
Davis Alonzo. 13 Paris, Cascaile. 
Davis Alanson, 23 Altroma, Edgerton, 
Davia Abraham, 3(i Paris, Grand Rap- 
Davis Alexander D., 37 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Davis Asa B., S7 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Davis Chyler, B., 20 Oaklield, Oak- 
field. 
Davis Daniel, 14 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Davis Dennis 0., 13 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Davis Daniel S., 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



Davia Jolin, jun,, 23 Algoma, Edger- 

Dftvis John H., Rockford. 

Davis James M., 25 Sparta, EngHsb- 

ville. 
DavIa Jerome. Wyoming, Grandville. 
DAVIS JAMES P., 19 Oakfield, Oak- 

fleid. 
Davis Jordpn, 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Davis JosepTi, 29 Courtland, Eockford 
Davis Jobn, 23 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Davis Jobn, 20 Gninii Rapids. 
DAVIS ISAAC D., 29 Paria, Grand 

DAVIS KING S., 16 Plainfield, Bel- 
Davis L. H., 14 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
DAVIS LUTHER B., 25 Grand 

Davis Martin, 17 Nelson, Cedar 

DAVIS MARTIN, Rockford. 

Davis Naney N., 12 Cannon, Bostwick 

Davis Perry H , 33 Algoma, Edgerton. 
DAVIS PETER, 3 Wyoming, Grand 



SASH. GLASS AND PUTTY, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, « wd la Monroe Slreet 

Davis Reuben, 1 Cannon, Bostwick 



Davis Elisba, Rock lord. 

Davis Ezckiel W., 20 Grand Rapids. 

DAVIE EDWARD, 7 Cannon, Rock- 

tord. 
DAVIS EBENEZER, 9 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Davis Emmet B., 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Davia Franklin M., 18 Cascade, Cas- 

Davis Frank, 14 Wyoming, Grand Rap- 
Davis George, Lowell. 

DAVIS GEORGE C, 27 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

DAVIS GEORGE W., 36 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

DAVIS HIRAM R., 10 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Davis Henry, 24 Grattan, Smyrna, 
Ionia County. 

DAVIS H. B., 20 Grand Rapids, Grand 

DAVIS HORACE W., Grandville. 
DAVIS HENRY S., 7 Cannon, Rock- 
lord. 
DAVIS JOHN S., 34 Grand Rapids. 



Lake. 
Davis Reuben E., 9 Wyoming, Grand- 

Davia Stephen B., 36 Paris, Grand 

Davis Solomon, 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Davis Wm. H. H., 29 Oakdeld, Oak- 

tield, 
DAVIS WM. R., 19 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Davis, Wm. W., 34 Ada. Ada. 
Daviaon William, 17 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
)avidaon Walter, 8 Ada, G. Rapids. 
DAVIDSON WILLIAM C, South 7 

Walker. Gran<l Rapids. 
Dawley Cbarles K,, Rockford. 
Dawson David, Lowell. 
Dawson Elias, Lowell. 

iHenian P., Lowell. 
Dawson .lames H., Lowell. 
Dawson Ui chard L., 35 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Day Elexis, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
DAY LEVI, Grandville. 
DEACON ELIJAH E., Cedar Springs. 
Deacon Jonathan, 17 Paris, G. Rapids. 



WE RECOMMEND FORT'S MEDICINES THROUGH THE LAND. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 181* 

PSTER C. SHICKSIiIa, 

DEALER IN 

CHOICE FAMILY GHOCEHIES! 

Floup, Feed, Canned Fruits, Vegetables, Yankee Notions, 
Crockery, Glassware, &e. 

HtCSIIEMT rmot; paid for E'A.Etfti:E:R»^ rUOUTJCE, 

Corner of Pront and Leonard Sts., JFeitt Side, 

GRAND RAPIDS. - MICHIGAN. 

COR. WATERLOO AND LOUIS STREETS. 



STRICTLY TEMPERANCE. 



A. R. ANTISDEL, - - - Proprietor. 

J. H. PABWELL, 

UND ERTA KER. 

Coffins and Caskets at Wholesale and Retail 



26 lilTOlT STK,EET, 

Opposite the Post Office, 
Residence, Bostwick St., between Lyon and Bronson, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 



yGoosle 



HI8T0EY AND DIBECTORT OP KENT COUNTY. 



Deal, Joshua, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Deal Jasper, 35 Oakfield, Ashlej. 

DEAL SOLOMON, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 

DEAN ALEXANDER, 31 Courtlaod, 
Courtland Center. 

Dean, A. J., Lowell. 

Deiin Bethuel P., 31 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

DEAN D. J., 30 Grand Rapids. 

Dean Eiisha, 3S Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Dean John P., Lowell. 

Dean Moriiraer B., IC Courtland, Court- 
la ad Center. 

Dean Rassell J., 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 

DE.\N WM. A., 33 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

De Biier Brown, 10 Wyoming, Grand. 
Rnpida. 

De Bc.iit Leonard, 18 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

DEAiiLING JAMES, Lowell. 

De Oinip E. W,, 3-1 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

DECK WILLIAM, 3 Cannon, Cannons- 
burn. 

Decker George, 31 Caledonia. Cale- 
donia, 

Deeker Mrs. Maria, 30 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

DECKER MICHAEL S., Lisbon 



Delavan John, 3 Nelson. Sand Lake. 
Demings Phillier, 80 Wyoming, Grand- 

Deniing Aaron S,, 23 Bcwne. Bowne. 
Deming Charles, 33 Biiwne, Bowne. 
Demor Lander, 8 Paris. Grand Rapids. 
Denipsey Simpson, 3 Plaindeld, Rock- 

tord. 
Demund Edward,. 3 Gaines, Ilaniuiond. 
Demand George R., 3 Gaines, Ilain- 

Denise William, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Denise David H,, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
DENISON CALVIN W., Cedar Springs. 
DeiiisoQ Henry A,, 28 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Denison William. 17 Alpine, Grand 

Jlaiiids. 
DENNIS AARON. 19 Vcrgennes, Ver- 

gennea, 
DmnU Byron, VJ Vurgennes, Ver- 

gcniies, 
Dennis James, 21 Wvouiing, Grand 

Uupi.ts. 

Dennis John, 1!) Verptmin'S. Vergennes. 

Dennis Leonard L., 11 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

Denuis Mulilon, 32 Adn, Ada. 



BUY PATENT IVEDICINES AT a Canal 



Decker William, 17 Courtiand, Court- 
land Center. 

DE COU GEO, W., 23 Nelson, Nelson. 

DE COU BENJ. P., 34 Nelson, Cedar 
aprirgs, 

Deen John J., Cedar Springs. 

Deer George, 2 PiainBeld, Itockford, 

Dc Forrest Sylvester, 14 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Detreze John, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Defries W., 39 Grand Rapids. 

Degerjames, 22 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

De Glopper Cornelius. 3 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

De Groot Dirk, 19 Wyoming, Grand- 
Tille. 

De Graw Augustus M., 3 Oakfield, 
Greenville. 

De Graw John, 8 Oakfield, Greenville. 

De Graw Joseph, 33 Spencer, Oakfield. 

De Graw Nelson, 31 Spencer, Oaklield. 

DEISHER CHARLES, 34 Ada, Ada. 

De Jon^e In(>le, 4 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

DELANEY JOHN,4.Vergenne8, Alton. 

DBLANEY KER, 35 Wyoming, Grand 

Delancy William, 4 Vergennes, Alton. 



DENNIS WM. H., 18 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 
Dennis Mrs. Eleanor, l.l Ada, Ada. 
Dennis James A., 15 Ada, Ada. 
Dennison LoreuKoN., 17 Alpine, Grand 

Dennison Morris W., 3 Cascade. Ada. 
DENNISON DANIEL P., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Denison Ilenrj C, 11 Cascade, Cas- 

DENNEY MAXIM, 34 Vergennes, Fal- 

t ass burg. 
Dennison Asahel J., 14 Paris, Grand 

Dennison Barnard M., 14 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Denison Charles M., 8 Cascade, Cas- 

Deninau John, 1 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Denmau Joseph, 1 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Denny Jesse F., 33 Ada, Ada. 
Denny Joseph, Lowell. 
Denny Joseph, 1 Lowell, Lowell. 
Densmore Luther, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Dent Samuel, Burch vide (Burch's Mills.) 
Denton Alexander, 3(1 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 



THIS LZNf: IS TO ADVERTISE FORT'S LINIMENT AND PIIJ.S. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIBECTORT OF KEHT COUNTY. 



Denton George, 36 Vergennea, Lowell. 
Denton George, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Denton Joseph, 3 Walker, Grand 

De Pew John, 33 Alj^oma, Rockfnrd. 

De Pew Ralph, 36 Al^onia, Rookford. 

DBRMITT THOMAS, 31 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

De Ruiter Henry R., Grsndville. 

Detray Albert C, 28 Oaioes, Cody's 
Milla. 

Detray Henry M., 32 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

DETRAY JACKSON B., 26 Gaines, 
Cody's Mills, 

Detwilder Abraham W., 7 Caledonia, 
Hammond. 

Detwilder Isaac, 29 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Detwilder Joseph, 23 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Deael Jonepli. 35 Courtland, Rotkford. 

De Vail EliKaheth. 12 Caseade, Cascade, 

DEVENDORF CLARK M., Lowell. 

DEVENDOKF C. V,, 29 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Devendorf David, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 

DEVENDORF J. J,, Lowell. 



De Young Gurt, 39 Grand Rapids. 
Bias David. 19 Oaines. Gainesville. 
Diaa John, Sr., 19 Gaines. Gainesville. 
DIAS JOHN, Jr., 19 Gaines, Gainea- 

Dias James. 19 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Bias William, 10 Gaines, Gainesville, 
Diliri Peter, 19 Byron, Bjron Center. 
Dice Stephen, 35 Alpine, Alpine. 
Dickson Daniel, 18 Vergennes, 

gennes, 
Dickson Edward, 18 Vergennes, 

gennes. 
Dickerson Gilbert, 13 Plainfield, 



DICKERSON SILAS M., 9 Oakfield, 

Oak Held. 
DICKINSON G, W,, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Dicks John, II Lowell, Ijowell. 
DIETRICH C, J.. 2B Grand Rapids. 
DIEFENBACKBR JACOB, Alaska. 
Dieflen backer Jacob, 9 Caledonia, AI- 

Dieien backer Philip, Ala.ika. 
DIkumnster John, 30 Qaiiies, Grand 
Rapids. 



TINNER'S STOCK, AND TINWARE, AT W, D. FOSTER'S, H fud 19 Moflr<*rt. 



DEVINE EDWARD, 8 Vergen 



Devioe Mary A., 3 Vereennes, . 
Devine William, 8 Vergennc 



ville. 
De Vriend Charles, 7 Ada, Grand 

Rapids. 
Dewey Egbert, 31 Wyoming, Grand- 

Dewitt Issacher, 2 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Dewey Lafayette, 35 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

De Wolf John, 29 Plainfield, Grand 

DEYARMOND ALEX. F., 10 Ver- 
eennes, Alton. 
DE YOUNG ADRIAN D., 36 Grand 

De Young Cornelius, 29 Grand Rapids. 
De Young James, 30 Grand Rapids. 
DE YOUNG JOHANNES, 39 Grand 



Dikestraw Qaram, 33 Grand Rapids. 

Dikestraw John, 29 Grand Rapida. 

Dikeatraw William, 39 Grand Rapids. 

Dikestraw John, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Dikenian Reynard, 5 Cascade, Caacade. 

DILLENBACK BYRON A., 14 Wjo- 
tnine'. Grand Rapids. 

DILLENBACK CHRISTIAN, 14 Wyo- 
ming. Grand Rapids. 

DILLENBACK GEO. W., 35 Wyo- 
ming, Grand Rapids. 

Dildine Harmon, 4 Algoma, Rockford. 

Dilley Calvin F., 30 Algoma, Sparta 
Center, 

DILLINGER JOHN M., 39 Bowne, 
Harria Creek. 

Dillmgham James C, 18 Cannon, 
Rookford. 

Dimick Leander B,, 11 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Dines Joseph, 28 Solon, Cedar Springs, 

Dines Philip. 31 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Dines Wm., 31 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Dinger Joseph, 13 Walker, Grand Rap- 



FORT'S REMEDIES ARE SAFE AND REZJABLE. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY iND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUHTT. 



DIVINE LEANDER G,, 19 Oakfield. 
OakUclcl. 

DH^INE WlLLIiM,24 Caledonia, Cal- 
edonia. 

Dixon Mr3. Isabel, 13 Ada, Vergennes. 

Diion Roger, 34 Walker, Grand Rap- 

DoljBon John, 4 Walker, Grand Rap- 



Dookj Patrick, 33 Bownc, Harris 

Creek. 
Doolittle Franklin, 37 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Dorand Jolin, Orandville. 
Dory William, 8 Byron, Nortli Byron. 
Doster Peter, Rockford. 
DOXr ELWOOD F., Lowell. 
DOTY JOHN S., 23 Algoma. Edgerton. 
Dougherty Jolin, 37 Tyrone, Sparta 



DOUGHERTY JERRY, B PlainSeld, 

Rocktor<l. 
Douglas Edward, 5 Wiilker, liidinn 

OriMik. 
Douglas James, 11 Caledonia, Alaska, 
DOUGLASS OHLIN, 24 Vergcnnes, 

Fsllassburg. 
DOUGLASS ROBERT, 13 Qrattan, 



Dob.-(on JoLn, jr., 4 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
DoL-keray Clarence H., 6 Cannon, 

Rockt'or<t. 
Dockeray Clarence, 33 Algoma, Edger- 

DOCKERAY JOSEPH, Q Cannon, 
Rocklord. 

Dockeray Joseph A., 5 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

DOCKERAY JAMES, 5 Cannon, Eock- 
fc.rd. 

DOCKERAY R. L., Rockford. 

Dockeray Robert, II Cannon, Rockford. 

Dockeray R. Lewis, 5 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Dodge Henry A., 17 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Dodge laauc, Lowel). 

Dodge Isaac F.. Lowell. 

Dmtge Joshua, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 

BUY oaUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DftUG STORE, 6 Cuma Street 



Qra 



n Cente 



DougUia T., 18 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
DOL'GHAN JOHN, 28 Walker, Grand 

Dowhng John, 3 Walker, Grand Rap- 

DOWLING MELVIN, 3 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
DOWLING WM. C, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 



DODGE OWEN, 20 Gaines, Gaines- 
Dodson David, 35 Paris, Grand Rap- 
Dole Charles, 16 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 
DOLE JAMES E., Burch's Mills. 
Dole Martin P., 3ii Alpine, Indian 

Doller Jacob, 32 Byron, Byron Center. 
DONALDSON DWIGHT, 20 Grattan, 

Qrattan Center. 
Donaldson James, 24 Flainfield, Aub- 

terlitz. 
Donaldson James, 26 Plainfield, Aus- 

Donalioe Gerald, 31 Cascade. Cascade. 
Donahue Charles, OakHeld, Oakfield. 
DONNELL J. O., 34 Grattan, Alton. 
DonoTOn Daniel, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Donovan Fulmoth, 34 Grattan, Grant. 
Donovon John, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Donovan William, 24 Grattan, Grant. 
Doody Patrick, 33 Cannon, Canaons- 
burg. 



DOWNER AVERY. 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Downer Chas., Cedar Springs. 
DOWNER SILAS B.. Burcirs Mills. 
Downs Michael, 13 Ada. Ada. 
Downing Abraham, 28 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Downing Erastus, 14 Sparta, tipdj-ta 

Center. 
Downing WilHam, 3 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Doyle Barney, 4 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Doyle Ji.hn, 8 Grand Rapids. 
Doyle John, 5 Vergennes, Alton. 
Doyle Michael, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Doyle Martin, 20 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Doyle Michael, 1 Aila, Cannonsburg. 
Doyle Owen, 3U Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Doyle Thomas, 5 Vergennes, Cannona- 

burir. 
Doyle Thomas, 1 Ada, Cannonsburg. 
Doyle William, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Draper Jacob S., 3 Bowne, Alto. 
Drake Dwigiit S., 34 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Drake Gilbert, 34 Sparta, Englishville. 
Drakey Frank, 18 Gaines, Hammond, 
Dresser A. L,, Lowell. 
Dresser Wdliam, 15 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
DREW DELOS, 38 Grand Rapids. 



TRY FORT'S REHEDIHS. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOKY OP KBNT COUNTT. 



DREW GEO. H., 30 Grand Rapida. 
Drew Patrick, 28 Grattan, Grattaii. 
Drinkall Jotin, 20 Byron, Byron Center. 
Drinkall William, 17 Bjron, Byron Cen. 
DRINDLE A., Lowell. 
Driscoll Daniel, 8 Vergennes, Alton. 
]>riscoll Duanis, S vergennes, Ver- 

Driacoil Daniel, Lowell. 
Driscoll DennU, 32 Grattan, Alton. 
Driscoll D., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Driscoll John, 33 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Driscoll James, 30 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Driacoll Micliael. 30 Walker. G. Rapids 
Driacoli Mrs. Margaret, 30 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Driscoll Patrick, 5 Vergennes, Ver- 

Druce Charles, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 
DRUCE MARK, 27 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
Dry Peter, 32 Grand Rapida. 
Dudbridge John, 24 Vergennes, Fal- 

lasiburg. 
DUFF PATRICK, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Duffey Charles, 18 Paris, Grand Rap- 






Plainfleld, 



Dunham James H,, 17 Lowell, Lowell. 
Duuham Johnson A,. Cedar Springs. 
Dunhain Linnaeus, 31 Bowne, Uarria 

Dunlap James H., 15 Walker, Grand 

DUNDAP RILEY R,, 15 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
DUNLAP SAMUEL M., 14 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Dunn Dennis, 30 Lowell, Lowe!], 
Dunn Joseph, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
Dunn Lewis, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Dunn Robert, 30 Algoraa, Sparta Cen- 

Dunn Wm., 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Dunnett Wm., IG Walker, G. Rapids. 
Dunton R. M.. 14 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Dunwoodj William, Burch's Mills. 
Dupee David C, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 
DUPEE FRANK, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 
Durend Milo, 12 Byron, Gainesville. 
Durfee Milton J., 14 Nelson, Nelson. 
Durley Nathan, 26 Ada, Ada. 
Duster Peter, Rockford. 
Dutcbc-r Charles, 32 Ada, Ada. 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, Wo. o Cnal Strert. 



Duffey James. 15 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Duffey Robert, 1 Plainlield. Rockford. 
Duffie William, 6 Oaklield, Oaklield. 
Duffy Cairn, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Daffy John, if Vergennes, Alton. 
Duffy Patrick, 34 Walker, G. Rapida. 
DUGA JEROME A., 37 Grattan, Lowell. 
Dugs Alexander, 27 Grattan, Lowell. 
DIJLEY JAMES, 17 Algoma, Rockford. 
Dumas Peter, 33 Nelson, Nelson. 
Dumphy Adam, Rockford. 
Dnnphey Addison, Rockford. 
Duncan Ebenezer, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 
Dundas A. A- 20 Grand Rapids. 
DUNHAM ABNER. 33 Grand Rapids. 
DUNHAM ANDREW J. Grandviile. 
Dunham Charles B., 16 Caledonia, Al- 

Dunham Eden S., Grandviile. 
Dunham John F., Grandviile. 



Dutcher Charles W., 33 Ada, Ada. 
Dutclier David, 14 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Dutmers John, 10 Plainficid, Alpine. 
Dutmers Martin, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Dutt Philip, Grandviile. 
DCTTON ALFRED, 34 Alpine, Alpine. 
Dutton Ira, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 
Dutton Edwin, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 
Dutton Ralph, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 
DWYER JAMES, 36 Caledonia, Cale- 

Dwyer William, 26 Caledonia, Caledo- 

Dwyer Walter, 26 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
Dwyer Edward, 31 Plainfield, Mill 

Dyer .John, Sparta Center. 

Dygert Thomas, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Dyke Jacob L., 8 Wyoming, Grandviile. 



LVHBBXtllEN USE FORT'S W^ESTERN LINIUENI. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT CO0HTY. 



E 



Eftgan Mrs. Catherine, 5 Caledonia, 

Giigan Keer.in, i Caledonia, Alaska. 
Earhardt JdIiii, 28 AiU. Ai'a. 
Karbardt William, 28 Ada, Ada. 
Eardley James W., SI Cascade, Cascnde. 
Eardlj John, 19 Cascade, Cascade. 
Bardlj James, SO CHHuade, Cascade. 
Eardiey Patrick. 33 Uuscadi', Cast-ade. 
EARDLY WILLIAM, SO Cai-cadc, Caa- 

EAKDLY THOMAS, 19 Cascade, Cas- 

Earle Adelbert, ISPIainfield, Kockford. 
Earl Catharine, 4 Courtland, Cuurtland 

Cenlre. 
EARLL NATHAN, 13 Walker, Grand 

Eiisterbj James, 27 Lowell. Lowell. 
Easteriirook HBDrv, Ifi Lowell, Lowell. 
Eastman Alexander, 20 Tyrone, Uaa- 

Eaaton E. A., 17 Grand Rapids. 
Eastwood Charles, II ISparta, Bparta 

Eaton E. L., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 



1 Edgerton Zeno, 18 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
' Edie D. W., Lowell. 

E.iie James, Lowell. 

Edie 8. N., 88 Alpine, Grand Rapida. 

Edie William. Lowell. 

Edison Albert R.. 37 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Edison Enos, 2 Wiilker. Grand Rapids. 

Edison George M., 21 Walker, Grand 
Rapids, 

Ellison George, 3 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Edison Hrtines, a Walker, Grand Rapids, 

Edison lsa»c. !j Walker, Grand Rapids. 

EDISON JOHN, 37 Watkur, Grand 

EDISON'jAMES R., 21 Walker, Grand 

EDISON JOHN IL, 3 Alpine, Euglish- 

ville. 
Edison Milo IL, 2 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Edison Mrs. 0. M., 38 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Edmunds Samnel F., B Lowell, Lowell. 
Ed«-Br<is Charles B,, 10 Walker, Grand 

Rapids, 



SASH, DOOFIS AND BLINDS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, Hand 18 Monro* Sltert. 



Eber Aaron, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
BbrMs- Henry. 11 Alpin'?, Alpine. 
Evker Wm. B., 5 Paris, Grand Rapida. 
Ecker Wm. J., Lowell. 
Eckiestaffer Ernest, 21 Plainfield, Bel- 

ECKLESTAFFER LEONARD, 21 

Plainfield, Bdmont. 
Eddy Cliarks, IB Grattan, Graltan Cen. 
Eddy Charl.;8 C, Lisbon. 
Eddy Mrs, E. M., 16 Alpine, Alpine. 
Eddy James, SS Plainfield, Grand 

EDDY MRS. MALINDA, Lisbon. 
EDDY MRS. MARION A., Cedar 

Sprinjifi. 
Eddy Malcom, 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Cinter. 
Eddy Wallace, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
EDDY WM.H.-LowpU. 
Ede Edwin E. H., 11 Walker, Grand 

Edaerton Albert, 3 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Edgerton Curtis, 32 Solon, Cedar 
SpnnjjB. 



Edwards Ephraim, 7 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Edwards H. B,, 10 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Edwards Henry E., 10. Wyoming, 
Gran dvi lie, 

EDWARDS JAMES. 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field, 

EdwiirdsP, S.. Roekford. 

Eggleston Harvey, 35 Algoma, Bock- 
lord. 

EGGLESTON HARRISON, 8 Cannon, 
Kockford, 

Eggleston James, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 

Eldrldge Danie), 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Eldridge Edward. 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

ELDRIDGE EDGAR M., 24 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 

Eldridge Harry VY., 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Eldridge Ira, 10 Oourtland, Oourtland 
Center. 

Eldridge Ira, Jr., 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Eldridge Charles J., 7 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Eldridge Charles, 10 Courtland, Court' 
land Center. 



FOBrS WESTHBN LINIHZVT CUBES ALL LAUEHLSS- 



yGooQle 



HleTORT AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 195 

~E. B. ESCOTT, 

Wholesale and Retail 

DRUGGIST, 

57 Canal Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN, 



DEAI.EB IN ALL THE 



Popular Proprietary Medicines, 

Pure Drugs, Wines and Liquors, California 

Wines, Isabella and Catawba Wines, from 

the Urbana Wine Co., New York, 



WFetVs Medicinal Preparations, 

WARNER'S SUGAR-COATED PILLS, AND PARKE, 
JENNINGS & CD'S FLUID EXTRACTS. 

Also on hand, a Inrge slock at 

Paint Brushes, Paints, dry and ground in OiJ, 

Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Lubricating Oils, of 

diflerent grades, at 

M A.IfftJI'.a.OTTJIlESH.S' FXI.IOE3S I 

Pure White Lead, from the Best Manufacturers, Artists' Brushes, 

Gold Leaf, Bronze, Tube Colors, and other articles 

too numerous to mention. 

All of the Best Quality and at Reasonable Prices. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KBHT COUHTY. 



Eldridge Cbas. J., 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 
EldridKe Reuben N.. 24 Grattan, Gtat- 

Eldridge William, 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Eldridffe Wat. J., 16 Bjrnn, Byron Cen. 

ELDRED A. J., V, Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Eldred Auios, 13 Phiinfield, Rockford, 

ELDRED BENED[CT, 8 Plalnfield, 
BelmoDt. 

Eldrud Clariaa. 8 Cannoji, Rockl'ord. 

ELDRED JOHN, 17 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

ELDRED SAMUEL T., 5 Plainfield, 
Belmont. 

BLKINS AUGUSTUS W., 35 Court- 
land, Rockford. 

Elkina Squire F., 30 Courtlar.rt, Rock- 
ford. 

ELKINS WM. J., 6 Grattan, Bo3twick 
Lake. 

ELMONDORPH JA.MES L.,18 Walker, 
Grand Kapids. 

Elmer Charles, BiirchviUe (Biircli'B 
MilU.) 

Ellerton Thomas, 20 Grattan, Grattan 
Center, 



ELLSWORTH ZARA W., 5 Nelsen, 

Sand Lake. 
Elsby Daniel B., 33 Plainfleld, Grand 

Elshey James.'SI Oakfield, Oakfieid. 
Elsbey John E., 31 OakBeld. Oakfield. 
EUweilChauntey, 13 Byron, Gainesville. 
Ely John J., Rockford. 
Emerson George, 33 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Emery Hiram, 83 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Emery Horace F., 9 Walker, Grand 

Emmert Isaac, 21 Wyoming, Grand- 
Emmons Andrew K., 14 Byron, Byron 

Centre. 
Emmons Christopher, 18 Algoma, 

Sparta Centre. 
Emmons Charles E., 39 Caledonia, Cal- 



edoi 



a Stat 



ElIMONS CHARLES, 11 Grattan, 
Grattan Centre. 

EMMONS DAVID V., 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Emmons Ervin J., Sparta Centre, 

Emmons Hiram, 13 Grattan, Otisco, 
lojiia Co. 

EMMONS JOHN T., 34 Wyoming, 
North Byruu. 



BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, « Ci 



ELLIS ALFRED. 10 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

ELLIS ARTHUR, 7 Boivne, Alaska. 

Ellis Albert G., Village Oannonsburg. 

Ellis Benjamin, 12 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Ellis Hiram, — Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Ellis Hiram, 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Elis Ira, Village Cannonsburg. 

Ellis John, Lowell. 

Ellis John J., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

ELLIS JOHN, Grandville. 

Ellis Mrs. Maria, 7 Bowoe, Alaska. 

Ellis Williard. 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Elliott Dolly, ^3 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Elliott George M,, 32 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Elliott Henry, 31 Algoma, Englishville. 
Elliott Hiram, 33 Plainfield, AuiterlJtz 
Elliott John H., 23 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Elliott Nelson T., 33 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Elliott William J., 4 Sparta, Sparta 

Centre. 
ELLMAKER CHARLES V., 34 Ada, 

Ada. 
Ellson P. W. C, Lowell. 
EL8W0RTH A. M.. Lowell. 
ELSWORTH HENRY, Rockford. 



li street. 

Emmons John, 6 Grattan, Gi'attaii Cen. 
Emmons Nicholas, 18 Algoma, Sparta 

Centre, 
Emmons Nicoll D., 34 Wyoming, North 

Emmons Simon, 9 Algoma, Sparta Cen, 
EMMONS WM. K., 34 Wyoming, North 

Byron. 
Emmons Uriah, 6 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Emmons Uriah, 11 Grattan, Grattan 

Endres Fritz, 39 Byron, Byron Center. 

Bnesa Geo. L., 28 Ada, Ada. 

Engel Louis, 25 Wjouiing, Grand Rap. 

ids. 
Engles John, 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Engel Louis, 35 Wyoming, Grand Rap. 

English Edward 9., 36 Sparta, English- 
English Joseph S., 36 Sparta, English- 
ville. 
English Joseph 8. jun., 35 Sparta, Eng- 
lishville, 
English Richard S., 36 Sparta, English- 



rOBT'S WESTERN LIKIUENX CUBES BHETTUATISU. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 




E- Ei 1= ^ I E, E) I?, 

or Hit ktnds of 

Sewing Machines, 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Etc., 

125 MONROE STREET, 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 



DEALER I-V 

ilot®© family fedteilesj 

Flour, Feed, liqoofs, Veptabies, Ma Notiotis, Crockery, 

EARTHENWARE, ic. 

llX011]E:S'r PRICE I*AII> for FjVIt>IER)^ PRODVCti, 

No. 159 Ottawa St„ 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

TlMB, &AHA1I & Co., 

Wholesale Dealers in 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

»d by Google 



HI8T0EY AND DIRECTOBT OP KENT COUNTY. 



English William B., 35 Sparta, Eogtish- 

Ennii^ Goddfried, 31 Byron, New Ssr 

. BN08 RUSSELL J., Lowell. 
Eiiricli Joliii, 30 Spencer, Spencer 

Millfl. 
Enricb Leonard, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
En I ri con Giiorge, 38 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Entwistte AltVed, Lowell. 
Erb MoBes, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 
ERB D. C, 13 Lowell, LowelL 
Erwiii Jared, 28 Byron, Byron Center. 
ErlerTitua, 24 Oaiucs, Oaludouia Sta- 

Ernst Frank, 10 Lowell, Lowuil. 

Ernst Joseph. 10 Loi.vi;ll, L.iwell. 

ESCOTT GEORGE S., 15 Walker 
Grand Rajiida. 

ESCOTT J08KPII, 15 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

Bsterke Puter, 15 Verecnnes, Lowell. 

Esterlte Peler, jr., 15 Viirgeuues, Low- 
ell. 

Eiilrich Philip, 33 Spencer, Spencer 
Mtlla. 

Evans Amos, 23 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Evana Alfred, 35 Bowne, Bowue. 



Evans Edwarri, 30 Vergennes, Lowell, 

Evans Ira, 10 Wyominz, G. Rapids. 

EVANS JAMES A., 39 Gaines, Cod j' a 
Mills. 

EVANS NATHANIEL, LowelL 

EVANS THOMAS, 11 Bowne, Bowne. 

Evana Thomas J., 33 Piainfltld. Aus- 
terlitz. 

Evans William, Sen., 13 Ada. Ada. 

Evans William. Jr., 12 Ada. Ada. 

Evans William L, 33 Byron, Byron 

Evans w'm., 39 Lowell, LowelL 
EvarlH 8. H., 29 Grand Rapids. 
EVEIiETT BESJAMIN F., 22 Sparta, 

Spuria Center. 
Evi-ret Tonas B., 20 Sparta, Sparta 

Ctntcr. 
Everts H. P., 25 Bvron, Crdv's Mills. 
Everts N. K., 3a Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Ewing Alexander, 10 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Ewinf; George W., 26 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
EWING WEBSTER B., 6 Gaines, G. 

EWING JAMES, 33 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 



FAIRBANK'S STANDARD SCALES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, H 
Evans Judson, 26 Sparta, Sparta Cen- || EYER MICHAEL, 



Ffthay Patrick, 30 Grand Rapids. 
Fain Michael, 7 Paris, Grand Rapidsi. 
FAIltUHlLD A. B., 14 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Fairchild Benjamin, 17 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Fairchild Benj., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fairchild Mrs. Betsey, 15 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
FAIRCHILD BENJ.. Cedar Springs. 
FAIRCHILD WM. F., 17 Vergennes, 

Veriienncs. 
Fairchild Eliezer, 35 Grand Rapids. 
Fairchild Horace R., 1 Caledonia, AI- 

Fairchild Joseph E., Lowell. 
Fairchild John, 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Fairchild L. L., 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fairchild Mrs. N. A,, Loweli. 



23 Vergennes, 



FALEN MICHAEL, South 5 Walker, 

Crnnd Rapids. 
FALLASS HENRY B., 24 Vergennes, 

Fallassburg. 
Fallasston James, 18 Cannon. Auster- 

ii'7,. 
Fallass J. Wtbk-y, 2-1 Vergennes, Fal-' 

lassburfj. 
FALLASS SILAS 1 

Fallassburg. 
Fallass Silas S., jun., 23 Vergennes, 

Fall ass burg. 
FALLASS WILLIAM A., Lowell. 
Fancher Anilresv, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Fancett Charles, 19 Ada, Ada. 
Fannagun Lewis, 31 Cascade, Cascade. 
Fanning Peter, Lowell. 
Fanniburg Edward, 18 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF FAIN CUBES COLIC. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIBECTORT OF KENT COUNTy. 



Farmer Qika A., S3 Wyomiog, Grand 

Papids. 
Fnriner Darid 0., 30 LnwcU. Lowell. 
Farnam Reuben, 4 Kelsnn. Cedar 

Fariiliam Boiijamin, 7 Caledonia, llam- 

FarhHDi Cjiroliiifi E., 10 Cascade, Ada. 
Farnhatii Darwin, 18 Nelson, Cedar 

8]>ringa. 
PARNHAM WJI. D., 7 Caledonia, 

Parnsworth B. C, 27 Wallcpr, Grand 
RHfids. 

FARR CHARLES, 5 CourEland, Coart- 
land Cei^ter. 

PAUR E[,I A.. 13 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

FARIl IIENltY F., 14 Cannon, Can- 
non sburir. 

FARR JEHU,32 Nelson. Cedar Sprinsa. 

Farr Tlir.mas, 5 Courfland, Cedar 
Springs. 

Farril John, 28 Caacnde, Cascade. 

Farrall G»rrett, 14 Ada, Acln. 

Parrall Michael, 11 Ada, Ada. 

Farrall William, 11 Ada, Ada. 

Fasel Matthiiis. K1 Bvr.m, Bvron Center 

FAUNCE CIIESTKU R., M Ada. Ada. 

Faulkner Arnold T., U Lowtll, Lowi'll. 



Ferrand L., 34 Walker, Grand Rapid'. 
Ferrnnd Louis G,, 15 Wjouiing, Grand- 

ville. . 
Fero Charles G., Lowell. 
Fun JsiDCs D., 13 Ada, Ads. 
FERO MUNSON B.. 18 Vergennes, 

Verfrennes. 
Ferris Jmiah B., 81 Ada, Ada. 
FKRRY A. P., 18 Cannon, Rockford. 
Furrj George, 34 Cannon, Cannons- 

hurg. , 



FESSEL G. M., Cedar Sprinffs, 
Fiss<.n<ion Flenrj', 13 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Fewlass John R., 11 Gaines, Hammond. 
Fiance Andrew, 24 Plnindeid, Austur- 

Fiance Cornelius, 24 Plainfield, Auster- 

lilz. 
Field B. F.. 15 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Field Charles S., 2« Sp-.rta, Sparta Cen. 
Field Chauncey R., 2 Alpine, English- 
Field Giijlor, 35 Pparia, Englishville. 
Fiela Jesse U., ."i Alpine, Pleasant. 
Field John W., 28 Sparta, Lisbon. 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT « Cmal 



(, 8 Tvr 



'., Cna 



FAl'ST JOHN, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Paxnn Samuel, Ada Village, Post- 
master. 
Pekin Edward, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Pelo C. B., Lowell. 

Penton Ambrose W., 14 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Fenning Peter, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fenn Edwin T., 34 Algoma, Roekford. 
Penton Joseph, 18 Algoina. Sparta Cen. 
FertoD Lewis, 35 Sparta, Sparta Ceo. 
Feiiton Thomas, S PlHinlie.ci, Rockfbrd. 
Ferguson Amirew, 7 Byron, Grandville 
Ferguson B. C, 33 Solon, Cedar Springs 
Feiguson George, 2 lijion, Nortli 

Byron. 
Ferguson James, 7 Ga'nep, Gainesville. 
Ferguson Matthew, l9 Paris, Grand 

Ferguson Stcplien, 39 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Ferrand Charles, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 

FORT'S ENEUY OF PAIN CITBES CHOLERA If ORBITS. 



Field Lyman, 6 Alpine, Pleasant. 

FIELD SYLVESTER II., 35 Sparta, 
Englishville. 

Fiiield Jehial, 24 Vcrgennes, Fallasa- 
burg. 

Fiiield Jehiel, 4 Graltan, Grattan Cen. 

FiHeia Philbert E., 13 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Filkins Alphonso, Lowell. 

Filkins Elijah, 13 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Filkins Hiram. Lnivell. 

Filkms Isaac, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Filkins John, Lowell. 

Filkins William, 2 Caurtland, Court- 
land Center. 

PINCH ASA, 83 Grand Rapids. 

Fineh Alfred, 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Pinch Albert, 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Finch Franklin, 33 Sparta. Lisbon. 

Finch Henry, 37 Walker, G. Rapids. 

FINCH JAMES N., 8 Plainfield, Bel- 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIKECTOBT OP KENT COUNTY. 



Findlay Alesander, 9 A3a, Ada. 

Findlay John. 9 Ada, Ada. 

F>ndlaj William, 9 Ada, Ada. 

Fingleton Dan'l, 35 Cauiion) Cannons- 
burg. 

FINGLETON PATRICK, S Ada, Can- 
nonaburg. 

FiriKleton William, 34 Cannon, Can- 
noDBUurg. 

Finn James, 8 Tergetines, Vergennea. 

Finn Jame$i, 1 Ada, Ada. 

Finn John, 1 Wyoming, Grand Rapida. 

Finnej J. G., Lowell. 

Finney James A. 10 Paria G. Rapids. 

FINTON UHAS. H,, 20 Gainea, Cody's 
Mills. 

Fintoa Jamea W., 20 Gainea, Cody'a 
Mills. 

Fisher Albert, 17 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Fisher Albert, 39 Grand Rapids. 

Fisher Daniel, 33 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

FISHER ELIAS T., 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

FISHER JAMES, 39 Grand Hapida, 

Fisher Leonard, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 

FlSHEK LEVI W., Alaska. 

Fisher Miciiae!, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Fisher William H., 34 Paris, G. Rapids. 



Fitzgerald laaac, 33 Walker, Q. Rspids. 
Fit74;erakls Joel, 18 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Fitzgerald Michael, 28 Waiker, Grand 

Fitzgerald Michael, 6 Oakfield, Oak- 
Held. 

Fitzgerald Patrick, 13 Lowell, LowelL 

Fitzgerald Thomas, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Fiizgfrald William, 10 Vergennes, 
Alton. 

PITRGERALDS WM., 7 Alpine, Pleas- 

Fitzpatrick James, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapid a. 
Fitzi)atrick Michael, 36 Walker, Grand 

FITZPATRICK PATRICK, Rockford. 
Flanagin Isaac D., 3 Walker, Indian 

Flanagan John, 26 Grattan, Grant. 

Fianigan Terry, M Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Flaiiigan Michael, 34 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Plannery Adeline, 24 Byron, Gaines- 
ville. 

Planner Rodolphus J., 31 Plwnfleld, 
Grand Rapids. 

FLEMING MARTIN J., 30 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 



MASONS' AND MECHANICS' TOOLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, H ud Id Uouroc^ft 



Fiah Charles D., 10 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Fish Baiory W,, 1 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Fish John, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
Fish t^anford G., 6 Cascade, Cascade. 
F.sk John W., 38 Grand Rapids. 
Flak Nathaniel, 27 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Fisk William H., Sparta Center. 
Pitch AmasB, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Fitch Benjamin, 30 Algoma, Sparta 

Pitch Charles A., 14 Cannon, Host wick 

Lake. 
Fitch Calvin, 14 Cannon, Boatwick 

Fitch George, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Pitch Joseph, 30 Algoma, Sparta Oen- 

Fitch Norton, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
PITCH NELSON H., 31 Walker, G. 

Rapids. 
FITCH WELLINGTON, 32 Sparta, 

Lisbon. 
FITCHET MERRITT, 3 Vergennes, 

Alton. 
Fitzmorrls James. SWalker, G. Rapids. 
FITZGERALD DENNIS, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Fitzgeralda George, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. | 



Fleming Watson B., 30 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Plemming John, Cedar Springs. 
Fletcher l>avid, 32 Cannon, Austerlitz. 
FLETCHER DANIEL C, 30 Cannon, 

Austerlitz. 
Fletcher George, 1 Vergennes, Alton. 
Fletcher Jerome, 24 Lowell, Lowell. 
FLETCHER JESSE, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fletcher James, 27 Plainfield, Grand 

Fletcher John, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fletcher James, 1 Vergennea, Alton. 
Fletcher John R., 30 Cannon, Aus- 

Flelcher Levi, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Flood Dennis, 27 Grand Rapids. 
Flood Thomas. 37 Grand Rapids. 
FLUENT ANDREW J., 22 Solon 

Cedar Springs. 
FLYNN BERNARD, 33 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Flynn Edward M., Jr., 28 Grattaa, 

Grattan Center. 
Fljnn Edward, 38 Grattan, Grattan 



FO&T'S WESTERN LinTIMENT IS THE BEST FOR HORSES. 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



FLYNN FRANK, 28 Bowqe, Havris 

Creek. 
Plynn John, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Flynn James. 3* Walker, Grand Rapids. 
FLYNN PETER, 35 Caledonia, Cale- 

Flynn William, 23 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

FOQARTY MRS. MARGARET, 31 
Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Foffle Jacob, 11 Alpine, Alpine. 

Foley James, STPlainfield, Q. Rapida. 

Foley John, 27 Plainfleld, G. Rapids. 

Foley Martin, 11 Grand liapids. 

Foley Tbomaa, 27 Plainfleld, Austeriitz. 

Foley Tliomas, 3 Ada, Ada. 

Follett Harmon L., 1 Wyoming, Grand 

FolBom George, Sparta Center. 
Folsom Benj. G., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Fonger Jamea, 24 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapida. 
Fonger Lcti, 34 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Foote James, 33 Wyoming, GrandyiUe. 
Foote Merritt, Oakfield, Cedar Springs 
Foote Lavias II., II Byron, Byron Cen. 
FOOTE OBED H., 8 Grand Rapids. 
FOOTE PETER S., 39 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 



Ford Orren, 35 Grattan, Alton. 
FORD WARREN, 34 Grattan, Alton. 
Forman Edwin, Lowell. 



Springs. 
FORT EDWIN M,, Lowell. 
Fort John, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fort John P., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Foster Abraham, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Foster Charles M., 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
Foster Emery, 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Foster Gilbert, 31 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Foster John, 33 Ada, Ada. 
FOSTER NORMAN, 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
Foster Oscar, 31 Wyoming, GraodTiile. 
FOSTER RUPUS, JR., 35 Grattan, 

Alton. 
Foster Thomas H,, 5 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Foster Wm. H., 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Fountain BcnjamiD, 3d Cascade, Alaska 
Fountain Cornelius, 29 Grand Rapids. 
FOWLER E. D., 30 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Fox Ammond, 4 Algoma, Cedar Springs 
Fox Amos, 34 Bowne, Fillmore, Barry 

County. 
Fox Ambrose L., 6 Byron, GrandviUe. 
FOX BENTON D., Lowell. 



DETROIT SAFES, FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF, AT W. D. FOSTER'S- 



Foote Wm. R., 3 Cannon, Bostwick 

Forbes John W., 3 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Forbea William, 3 Lowell, Lowell. 
Forbee William, 21 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
FORCE BRIXTON, 5 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 
Fordham Theodore, 4 Sparta, Sparta 

Ford Abel, 2 Vergennes, Alton. 
FORD ANNA M., 3 Vergennes, Alton. 
FORD ALFRED T., 3 Vergennes, 

Alton. 
Ford Abel, 31 Bowne, Bowne. 
Ford Amos, 11 Grattan, Grattan Center 
Ford Alfred T„ U Lowell, Lowell. 
Ford Andrew 0., Cedar Springs. 
FORD CHESTER S- Cedar Sptings. 
Ford Hiram, 11 Lowtll, Lowell. 
Ford Horace B., 35 Grattan, Smyrna, 

Ionia County. 
Ford Ira, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 
Ford Joseph T., 3 Vergennes, Alton. 
Ford John H., 2 Paris, Grand Rapida. 
FORD JACOB A., 16 Spen 

Mills. 
FORD LEVI, 24 Bowne, Bowne. 

FORT'S UEDIOINES 



Pox Charlea, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Fox Charles M., Lowell. 
POX DANIEL R., 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Pox Brastus J., 33 Alpine, Indian Creek 
POX GEORGE, Alaska Village. 
Pos Gilbert, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Fox Henry, 6 Byron, GrandviUe. 
Pox John M., Lowell. 
Fox Jacob, 37 Vergennes, Lowell. 
FOX JAMES S., S3 Vergennes, LowelL 
Fox Jacob. 29 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Fox Joaiah, 29 Wyoming, GrandviUe. 
FOX JORDAN, 34 Bowne, Fillmore. 
Fox Wesley, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fox William, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Pox Philip W., 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 
FOX RICHARD, 32 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Pox Theron J., 22 Alpine, Indian Creelc, 
Pox William H., 27 Vergennes, Lowell, 
FRANCISCO CHAS., 20 Grattan, 

Francisco Chas. E., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

Francisco Henry D., 31 Bowne, Harria 
Creek. 

Francisco Jeremiah, 21 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

AB£ WARRANTED. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AKD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUHTT. 



FRANCISCO LEVI J., 37 Grattan, 

Alton. 
FRANCE W. W., 39 Grand Rapids. 
Frank George, 33 Spencer, Cedar 

SpiiDgR. 
Frantz Jolin, 11 Byron, Byron Center. 
Fraser John H., 3S Cascade, Alaska. 
Fraaer John C, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 
Pravel George, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Frawley James 24, Grand Rapids. 
Frawley Patrick, IS Ada, Q. Rapids. 
Frawley Blmon, 24 Grund Rapids. 
Frawley Thomas, 24 Grand Rapids. 
Frayer Abrara, 24 Cascade, Lowell. 
Frayer Martin J., 34 Cascade, Lowell. 
Frayer Robert, 24 Cascade, Lowell. 
Frazier Ales., Cedar Springs. 
Frazier Charles, 35 Ada, Ada. 
Frazier Darius N., 10 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
FRAZIER GEORGE, 31 Vcrgennes, 

LoweU. 
Fraaier Ira, 35 Ada, Ada. 
Frazier Nelson, 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Fredenberg Elijah, 32 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
FreddelCeilt Henry, 13 Walker, Grand 

Free Daniel, 34 Bjron, Cody's Mills, 



FREYERMUTH JOHN, 30 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
FREY ADAM, 30 Cannon. Austerlitz. 
Frick William. 30 Sparta, Lisbon. 
FRIEND CHRISTIAN P., 24 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
FBOST ALEXANDER B., Lisbon. 
Frost Charles J., 23 Plainfleld, Auster- 

iitz. 
FROST CHARLES H.. 30 Cascade, 

Cascade. 
Frost Sylvanus H., 31 Plainfiold, Grand ■ 

Rapids. 
FROST SAML'EL, 3a Plainfleld, Grand 

Frost Sylvanus, 34 Plainfleld, Grand 

Rapids. 
Frost William, 9 Gaines, Hammond. 
Frost William, 25 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Fry Allen S., 19 Oakfield, Oakficld. 
Fry Samuel M., 21 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Fry Wm. J,, 9 Lowell, Lowell. 
Fulbert Peter, IS Walker, G. Rapids. 
FULKERSON BURNETT, 19 Tyrone, 

Casnovia. 
FULKERSON LOT, 30 Tyrone, Oas- 



JAME3 GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, 1 



« CUISl BtTMt. 



Free Mrs. Huldah, 25 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Free Patrick 0., 19 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Free William, 25 Byron. Cody's Mills. 
FREEMAN CYRUS, 31 Wyoming, 

G rand vi lie, 
FREEMAN ERASTUS, Cedar Springs. 
Freeman George, 34 Vergennes, Fallass- 

bnrg. 
Freeman Seymour, 28 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
FREEMAN MORRIS, 10 Gaines, Grand 

Freeman Otis, 32 Wyoming, Grand- 

Friedenthaier Clirlstian, 20 Tyrone, 

Casnovia, 
French Arod, 18 Lowell, Lowell. 
Freoch, Mrs. Deborah, 13 Lowell, Lo- 

French George, Rockford. 

French Hiram W., 9 Cascade, Cascade. 

French Steven, 30 Algoma, Sparta Cen- 



ter. 

French Wyman, 
Springs. 



Solon, Cedar 



Fuller Charles, S Grattan, Grattan 

Oeoter. 
Fuller Blisha W., 10 Alpine, Alpine, 
Fuller Elijah, Lowell. 
FULLER EDWARD S., 13 Courtland, 

Court land Center. 
Fuller Hiram, Rockford. 
Fuller Horatio, Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Fuller Henry A., G Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Fuller James. 6 Walker, Berlin. 
FULLER MORRIS, 37 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Fuller 0. B., Lowell. 
Fuller Oiney B., Lowell, 
Fuller Suel, 6 Walker, Berlin. 
Fuller Sanford, 25 Ada, Ada. 
Fuller William, 34 Cascade, Cascade. 
FULLER WINDFIBLD B., 11 Grattan 

Grattan Center. 
FuUerton S. S., Lowell. 
FULLINGTON GEORGE W., 10 Ver- 

ge^ines, Alton. 
Fulliagton Norman, 21 Yergennes, 

Lowell. 



FOBT'S ABOMATIC OINTMENT CURES PIIJS. 



yGooQle 



HIBTORT AND PIREOTORT 07 KBHT COUITTT. 203 

Just What you have so long Wanted, 

County Map. 

Nowis theTime to Get It. 
Louis Herrmann, 



HAWUFACTL'BER OF 



I Re-Seat all Willow and Cane Chairs, 
mU TO ORDER ait KIKOS OP RUSTIC WORK 

Division Street, Three Doors South of the Union Brewery, 

GRAND RAPIDS. MIOH. 

WM. P. INNES, 

iLAWB, MBwrnAmm, 

And Business Agent, 

Attends to the Purchase and Sale of Farms, Wild Lands, Mills, Mill Sites, 

Town Lots, City Properly, Bonds and Mortgages. 
AGEKT FOR SALE OF KANSAS PACIFIC H. R, LANDS. 

Bpecial Attention giveit to ths Twoestitjntion of Taj: Titles, Collection of Rsata, 
Payjneni of Taxes and Conveyancing., 

No. 81 Monroe St., 

(IffOSlTE THE NATIONAL HOTEL, WrFftllCl R&piClS, JVLlCllt 

'Jr-d by 



Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY, 



FULLINGTON ORMUS, SlTergennes, 
Lowell. 

FurloDg Geo. W., 37 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Purman Jaraes W., Crandville. 



PURTNEY AMOS, 8 Gainea, Gainee- 

FUETNEY SAMUEL C, 36 Gaines, 

Cody's Milla. 
Furtnej Samuel F., 36 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 



Gains Frank, 24 Gratlan, Grant. 
Gaines Frank, 10 Lowell. Lowell. 
Gaines J., 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
GAIN WILLIAM, 7 Rparta, Lisbon, 
Gaiter Nicholas, 36 Alpine, Intlian 

Gale Benj. P., 15 Cascade, Cascade, 
Gallaway Andrew, Jr., Grandville. 
Gallaway Andrew 8., Grandville. 
Gallaway Washington L. Grandville. 
Gallaway Wra. H., Granaville, 
Gallup Ira, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Gannon Channcej S., 33 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Gano Julius 0.. 20 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Ganson Jolin, 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Garter Henry, 16 Gaines, Gainesville. 



Gasper Joseph S., 25 Vergennes, Lowell 
Ganlthier Lewis, 1 Walker. G. Kapids. 
GAVIN JOHN, South 5 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Gavin Thomas, 34 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Gajlord Orson, 23 Vergennes, Fallass- 

burg. 
Gean James, 25 Cannon, Cannonabnrg. 
Gee Charles, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Gee Orrin, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Gee Walter S., Roekford. 
Geges Henry, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 
Geib George, 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 
GEtB NICHOLAS, 22 Gaines, Grand 

Geiger George, 35 Bownc, Pilhnore, 
Barry County. 
iQeill Frank A., 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 



BAG TIES-SIMPLE, CHEAP AND EVERLASTING, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 



GARDNER DANIEL C, 9 Pparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Gardiner Earls, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Gardner Frank N., 10 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Gardner Ira, 84 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
GARDNER IRA, 9 Bowne, Alto. 
Gardner Ira, 25 Grattan, Smyrna, Ionia 

County. 
GARDENBR JULIUS, Sparta Center. 
Gardner Jonathan, 28 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Gardner Robert H., 15 Cascade, Cas- 

GARDNER W. B., Lowell. 
GARPIBLD SAMUEL M , 7 Paris, G. 

Garitj John, 16 Couitland, Courtland 

Center. 
Garity James, 16 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Garlick Rohert, 15 Plainfieid, Belmont. 
Garlick WiUiam, 15 Plainfieid, Bel- 

Qarrity Patrick, 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Gasper Freeman S., Lowell. 



Geill F. E., Lowell. 

Golfoyle John, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Gerald Pitz, 34 Gtattan, Grattan. 
Gcttings Louis, 8 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Getman Warner P., 19 Bpencer, Nelson. 
Gibby Abraham, 19 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Gibbs Alfred 0., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Mrs. Anna, 4 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Charles N., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Calvin, 17 Byron, Byron Center. 
Gibbs Edmund L., 33 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs James W., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Job, S3 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbs Josiah H., 4 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Gibbs Thomas W., 19 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Gibbs Wm. H., 4 Ada, Ada. 
Gibbon John, Grandville. 
Gibson Archibald K., 25 Ada, Ada. 
GIBSON CHARLES K., Ada Village. 
Gibson Henry, 21 Algoma, Roekford. 
GIBSON JOHN A., 3 Bowne, Alto. 
GIBSON WILLIAM 14 Bowne, Bowne. 
Gibson William, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Giffin Johnson M., 13 Grattan, Otiaco, 

Ionia County. 



FORT'S AROUATIC OINTMENT CURES SORE I 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 205 

SOUTHWICK & WRIGHT, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CROCKERY, 

China, 



HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS 

jilso a Fine Assortment of 

Silver Plated Ware, Table Cutlery, Lamps, 
Burners and Chimneys, 

Of tlae lOoiat Stylo ci.ud c^xiallty. 

And all Goods pertaining to the Crockery Business, ofTered at 

WHOLESALE AND BETAIL. 

44 Monroe St., 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 

»d by Google 



HISTORY AHD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Gilbert Charles, 33 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Gilbert David J., 19 Oaicfield, Oakfield. 
Gilbert Egbert, 30 Lowell, Lowell 
GILBERT JOHN W., 19 Oakfield, Oali- 

field, 
Gilbert John TV., 80 Tjrooe, Caauovia. 
Gilbert Truman, 3 Byron, North Byron, 
Gilbert Tliomaa M., 13 Solon, Cedar 

Gilbert Norton, as Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Gilden Robert, 34 Paria, Grand Rapids. 
Giles Alpha, 9 Byron, North Byron. 
GILES CHARLES L., 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Giles Elijah, 35 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Giles Edward W., 13 Solon, Cedar 

Giles Edwin, 13 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

GILES ,JOHN, Lowell. 

Giles Richard, '62 Grattan, Cannons- 

bnrg. 
Giles Richard, jr ,,32 Grattiin, Cannons- 

burft. 
Gilfelling Joseph, 1 Algoma, Cedar 

Springs. 
Giltoyle Michael, 38 Spencer, Spencer 

Spencer Mille. 
Giltbyie William, 82 Spencer. Spencer 

Slills. 



Gilaer Frederick, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Gilson Asa J., 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Gimble William, 17 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

Girdler Benjamin C, 7 Walker, Berlin. 

Girdler William P., 7 Walker, Berlin. 

Gitchell Lafayette. 23 PlainfieW, Au8- 
terlitz. 

Glacier Seneca, 17 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Glass Cyrus, 16 Plainfleld, Belmont. 

Glass Peter, 16 Plainfleld, Belmont. 

GOBLE JACOB, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 

Godfrey George F., 5 Byron, Norlh 

GODFREY GEO. H., 11 VergenHea, 

Godfrey Joseph G., 33 Bowne, Bowne. 
Godfrey Newcomb, 3 Vergennes, Alton. 
Godfrey Smith, 3 Vergennes, Alton. 
Godfrey Zerah, 33 Bowne, Bowne. 
Godwin Augustine, IS Wyoming, Grand 

Goff Charles, 17 Grand Rapids. 
Goff W. H., 3i Algoma, Englishville. 



BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 C»n^ Street. 



Gillett Ales., 31 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Gidet Dan'l A„ S Alpine, Englishville. 
GILLETT GEO. H., 30 Paris, Grand 

Gillett Lewis E., 30 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Gillett Wiikes, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Gill Buell, 4 Caledonia, Alaska. 
GILL CHARLES N., 16 Gaines, Ham- 
Gill Isaac, 16 Gaines, Hammond. 
Gill Jay J., 6 Walker, Berlin. 
Gill Mrs. Joanna, 4 Caledonia, Alaska. 
. GILL PATRICK, 15 Grand Rapids. 
Gill Simon, 15 Gaines, Hammond. 
GILL GODFREY, 28 Alpine, Indian 

GILLAM BENJAMIN, 22 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Oillam John, 37 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Gillcland James O., Rocktbrd. 
GILMAH GEORGE, 36 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Gilmaa Jacob M., IT Cannon, Cannons- 
Gil man Steven, 37 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Gillmore Darwin, 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 



Goggins Barney, 34 Bowne, Harris 
Goggins Patrick, 20 Bowne, Harris 

Goggin Thomas, 13 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Goler John, 35 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
GOLDS GEORGE. 14 Ada, Ada. 
Golden Charles, lOTyrone, Casnovia. 
Golilner John, 13 Alpine, Alpine, 
Goldsmith Vincent J., 30 Nelson. Cedar 

Springs. 
Gooch Benjamin, 1 Alpine, Englishville. 
Gooch Nathan W.,18 Plainfleld, Alpine 
Goodell Duwane,9 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Gondell John, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Goodell Warren, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Goodenough Fred., 35 Ada, Lowell. 
Goodfruit Chas. G., 29 Ada, Ada. 
GoodfcUow James, 33 Sparta, Sparta 

Gooding C. C, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Gooding Richmond, 19 Alpine, Pleas- 
ant. 

Gooding Seymour, 30 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. ' 

Goodin Philip, 26 Vergennes, Lowell. 



FORT'S STICKING SALTE MAKES A GOOD PLASTEBi 



GooqIc 



HiBlORY" AND DIBECTOKT OF KENT COUNTY. 



Goodseli D. M., Lowell. 

GOODSELL JOHN 0., 24 Vergecnes, 
Fallassburg. 

Goozen Peter, 15 Solon, Oedar Springs. 

GORDON GEO. W., 33 Cascade, Alaska 

Gordon Cliarles, 31 Lowell, Lowell. 

Gordon Harvej, Alaska. 

GORDON ISAAC H., 7 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Gore John, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Gore John, Jr., 20 Griind Rapids. 

Gorham George W., 16 Cascade, Caa- 

GORHAM MARVIN, 4 Oalodonia, 

GORMAN PATRICK, 10 G. Rapids. 
Gormin Patrick, 37 Ada, Ada. 
QOSCH ALBERT, 39 BoivQe, Harris 

Gosch Henry, 39 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Goach Zerubabel, 20 Bowne, Harris 
■ Creek. 
G OSS Benson O., 13 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Goss Darius, 13 Cannon, Bostwick 

Goss Keyes 11., 19 Nelson, Cedar 



Graham James, 32 Cascade, Cascade. 
Graham John F., 36 Gourtland, Conrt- 

land Center. 
Graham Joseph, 37 Lowell, Lowell. 
Graham John G., Oedar Springs. 
Graham Jason, 87 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
GRAHAM NELSON, 30 Conrtland, 

Gourtland Center. 
Graham Philip, 3S Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Graham Wm. K., 33 Lowell, Lowell. 
GRAHAM WM. B., 27 Lowell, Lowell. 
Gramberg Chas. A., Lisbon. 
Grant Alfred, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 
Grant Gerffge, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 
GRANT GEORGE, Cedar Springs. 
Grant James, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Giant James, 8 Ada, Ada. 
Grant John, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 
GRANT JOHN, 15 Ada, Ada. 
Grant William, 5 Ada, Ada. 
Graves George G., 6 Gaines, Gainea- 

Grayes Jeremiah A., 34 Cascade, Lowell. 
Graves John W., 9 Ada, Ada. 
Graves N.B., 6 Ada, Ada. 
Graves Wil.iam, 6 Ada, Ada. 



DISSTON'S NONPARIEL CROSS-CUT SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Goas Orin L., 11 Cannon, Bostwick 

Gougerty William, SO Bowne, Harris 

Gonld Charles, 8 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
GOULD H. L., 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
Gould Joseph W., 37 Plainlieid, Grand 

Rapids. 
Gould J. B., Sparta Center. 
GOULD NATHAN H., 3S Oakfleld, 

Oakfield. 
Gould Piatt, 3 Oakfield. Greenville. 
Gould Simeon, 8 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 

Gonld Wm. W., 5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Gouldsborough Robert J., 30 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
GOVE EDMUND D., 16 Cascade, Cas- 

Grachtrup Joseph, 35 A'pine, Grand 

Rapids. 
GRAHAM ARCHIBALD, 15 Grand 

Rapids. 
Graham Charles, 23 Lowell, Lowell. 
Graham Elwood, 37 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Graham James, 35 Cannon, Cannons^ 

burg. 



GRAVES LIVEU8, 6 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
GRAVES Mrs. M. B., 30 Walker, Grand 

Grawn Augustus, 16 Sparta, Sparta 

Grawn Andrew, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Gray Darius, 3 OakHekl, Spencer Mills. 
Gray James, 8 Wyoming, Grandville. 
GRAY JAMBS, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Gray John, 33 Sparta, Bnglishville. 
Gray Lyman 0., 29 Alpine, Indian 

Gray Ogden, 19 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Gray Thomas, 13 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

GRAY WM. H., 36 Grattao, Grant. ■ 

GREE^f ANSEL D., 14 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Centre. 

Green Birds ley, 19 Tyrone, Casuovia. 

Greene Benjamin, Lowell. 

GREEN EDMUND, 8 Gourtland, Court- 
land Centre. 

Green Henry, 13 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

GREEN H. W., 26 Grand Rapids. 

Green Henry, 13 Grattan, Otisco, Ionia 
Co. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AHD DIRECTORY OP KENT COUMTT. 



Oreeo Isaac D., 15 Bowne, Bowne. 

Green Obidiaii 8., 32 Lowell Lowell. 

GREEN SAMUEL J., 35 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 

Green Thomas, IG Grand Rapida. 

Green Wm., 11 Lowell, Lowell, 

GREEN WILLIAM W. G.,ie Bowne, 
Alto. 

GREEN WARREN, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Green William, 36 Grand Rapida. 

GREENLY HARLAN A., 20 Alpine, 
Grand Rapida. 

GREENMAN BRYAN, 18 Gainea, 
Gainesville. 

Greenwood Joseph, 6 Algoma, Sparta 
Centre. 

Gregory Abraham, 13 Algoma, Edger- 

Oregory Giles, 27 Wyoming, G. Rapida. 
Gregory Lorenzo, 34 Cascade, Cascade. 
Gieiner Jaliua, Lisbon. 
Grid ley Charles, GrandTille. 
Gridlej George W., South 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
GRIDLEY WILLIAM C, South 6 

Walker, Grand Rapids. 
GRIFPIN CHARLES, 15 Plainfield, 

Belmont. 



Groner Jacob, 28 Cannon, CaQDoas< 
burg. 

Groner Theodore, 33 Cannon, OannonB- 
burg. 

Groner Valentine, 33 Cannon, Can- 
non aburg. 

Groom Mattliew, 16 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Gross Alexander, 34 Algoma, Rockford, 

Grose Charles, 33 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Grose Frank, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

Grose Reuben, 34 Algotna, Koekford. 

GROSE WILLIAM, 30 Algoma, Rock- 
ford, 

Gross Henry, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 

Gross J. P., Lowell. 

GROSS MICHAEL, 14 Paris, Grand 

Gross Samuel, 3 Plainfield, Rockford. 
Grossman Christian, 30 Cannon, Aua- 

terlitz. 
Grouw Jacob, 14 Grand Rapids. 
GROSVENOR EDWARD, 14 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
GRUNWELL WILLLAM, S Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Grutsch Peter, 17 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT 6 Can»i Street 



Griffin James, 5 Vergenuea, Cannons- 
burg. 

Griffin John, 81 Wyoming, Grandville. 

Griffith Rha P., B Ada, Ada. 

Griffith Grffiith E., 32 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Griggs George W., 6 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Griggs Joseph E., Lowell. 

GRIGGS LEVERETT S., Lowell. 

Grindle Mrs., Lowell. 

GrJBWold Jabez W,, 32 Spencer, Cedar 
Springs. 

Oris wold Scott, 33 Spencer, Cedar 
Springs. 

GROAT NICHOLAS, Rockford. 

Groff Henry, 33 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Grommet James, 2 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 



Grutter Garrat, Grandville. 
Grutter Jacob, Grandville. 
Guild Albert H., 8 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Guild Edward, 4 Paris, Grand Rapida. 
Guild Horace H., 4 Paris, G. Rapida. 
Guilmer Thomas, 3 Plainfield, Roek- 

ford. 
Gulliford James, Lowell. 
Gunn Heetor W., 21 Walker, Grand 

Gunning Stephen, 9 Vergennea, ARon. 
Gurnee Caleb, 15 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
GURNEE SAMUEL B., 14 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
Gwinnell Daniel, 11 Algoma, Burch's 

Mills. 
Owinn Mrs. M. A., 1 Byron, Q. Rapids. 



rOBTV HANSBAKE PIIXS, 



yGooQle 



HIBTORT AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COCNTT. 



H 



Hans Chrifltoplier, 25 Wyoming, Grand 

Ritpids. 
Hftclimuth Chrislj C, 38 Alpine, G. 

Itspids. 
Hachjniith Henry, 1 Walker, Grand 

Hackett James, SS Caledonia, Cale- 

HACKING HENRY, 37 Walker, G. 

Rapids. 
Hadden Horace, 13 Walker. G. Rnpids. 
Hadden Tliomaa, 28 Bowne, Harris 

Hadley Martin, 11 Alpine, Alpine. 
Haede Kocip, SB Walker, G. Rapids. 
HafTcr Georpe, 24 Byron, Gainesville. 
HAFPY THOMAS, 83 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Hagerty 'X-Jmotliy, 33 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Hafjadone Peter, 7 Sirnrta, Lisbon. 
Hagadoue William H., 7 Sparta, Lis- 

Ilagget John, 26 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Haines Hftrvey, 18 Cannon, Austerlitz. 
Haines Henry, 34 Walker, G. Rujiids. 



Hall Elihu. 27 Plainficld, Auaterlltz. 
HALL E. D.. 12 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Hail Edward, 13 Solon, Cedar Spring! 
HallE. M., Rockfbrd. 
HALL ELIAS, 28 Plainfleld, Grand 

Rnpida. 
HALL GEO. W., 26 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Hall Frederick, 16 Byron, Byron Can. 
Hall Henry, 20 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Hall Harrison, 18 Nelson, CedarSprings 
Hall Henry S., 9 Gaines, Grand Rapids 
llnll Jonathan B,, 1 Grattan, Ashley. 
Hall J. F., 20 Algoma, Sparta Center. 
Hall .lames L. 28 'Walker, G. Rapida. 
HALL JOSEPH, Lowell. 
Hull John B.. 23 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hall Levi, 2 Cascade, Ada. 
Hall M. E,, Rockfbrd. 
HALLSETHT.,11 Grand Rapids. 
Hall Samuel p., 11 Gaines. Hammond. 
Hall Thomas,' II Solon, Cedar Spcinga. 
Hall Wni. H., Lowell. 
Haljten James, 34 Ada, Adft. 
Halpen John, 14 Ada, Ada. 
Halpen Mrs, Mary, 14 Ada, Ada. 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, i 



B Cuul Stnct 



Haines Moses D., 5 Cannon, Rockford. 
Haines William. 34 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Haines Virgil, 21 Cannon, Canuons- 

Haight George, 19 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 
Haight Mrs. Lowell. 
Hait John, 33 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Haket Cyprus, 19 Ada, Ada. 
Halcro James, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Haiders Tees. 83 Grand Rapids. 
HALDANE MRS. EMELINE T., South 



Hale Elisha G., 81 Wyoming, Grand- 
Hale Henry W., 33 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. > 
HALE WARREN S., Alaska. 
Hall A. G., 1 Alpine, Englisiiville. 
Hall Alfred A., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hall Charles, 31 Wyoming, Grandville. 
Hall Dwight E,, 1 Gcattan, Ashley. 
Hall Daniel, 19 Wyoming, Grandville. 



Halsted David, 39 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Hamburg Peter, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hamer John D., 12 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Hamer John D., Jr., 12 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
HAMILTON AMOS H,, 29 Byron, 

Byron Center. 
Hamilton David, 2 Bowne, Alto. 
HAMILTON HARMON, 19 Tyrone, 

Casnovia. 
Hamlinton Henry F., 10 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Hamilton Isaiah B., 8 Wyoming, Grand- 

Yille. 
Hamilton -James W., Cedar Springs. 
Hamilton Robert, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
HAMILTON SILAS L., 81 Byron, 

Byron Center, 
lamlin John R., Grandville. 
Hamlin Loomis, 18 Algoma, Sparta 

lammersraith Prank, 23 Alpine, Grand 
RKpids. 

llannnond Mrs. Anna, 11 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Hammond Charles, 17 Walker, Qrand 



A HARMLESS SUBSTITUTE FOR OALOHEI.. 



yGooQle 



HI8T0BV AHD DIRECTORY OP KDKT COUNTT. 



HAMMOND ESA8MUS L., 14 Gaim 

Hammond. 
Hammond Eli E,, 11 GaiueB, Hammond. 
Hammond Horace C, 8 Gaines, Ham- 
Hammond HortuD G., 14 Gaines, Ham- 
Hammond Ira H., 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Hammond James, 11 Gaines, Ham- 
Hammond Jolin 0., 13 Gaines, Ham- 
Hammond Randall S., II Gaines, Ham- 
Hammond Stephen A., 1 1 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 
Hammond William, 2 Walker, Grand 

BapidB. 
Hanchett Edward E., Lowell. 
Hancock George, 38 Solon, Cedar 

8pring3. 
Hancock Lewis S., 28 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Hand Caleb M., 29 Grand Rapids. 
Hand Thomas, 31 Wyoming, Grand- 

Handlin Thomas, 80 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Eaaer Alfred, Lowell. 



HANSON DANIEL N., 29 Tyrone, 

CasnoYia. 
Hanson John, 33 Oakfldd, Ashlcj. 
Hanson S. H., Lowell. 
Hanson William, 14 Solon, Cedar 

Hapeman John Q., 35 Grattan, Alton. 
HARD W. P., South 6 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Hardj George W., 9 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Hardy John, 19 Nelson, Cedar Springa, 
Hardy Eugene, 9 Gaines, Grand Rapids 
HAUDY WM. J., Gaines, G. Rapids. 
Hardy John, 26 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Hardy William, 20 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Hardwick James, 34 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
Ilarger Harvey, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Harger Leonidas, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 
HARLAN JOSEPH, 5 Cascade, Gas- 
Harmon Anthony, 23 Cannon, Cannons- 

burf!, 
Harmon Delos, 4 Bowne, Alto. 
Harmon James, 23 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Harmon John, 31 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
Harmon Michael, 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Harmcn William, 24 Byron, Gainesrille 



DISSTON'S CIRCULAR, MILL AND DRAG SAWS. AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Hanes John, 3 Byron, North Byron. 
Haner Conrad, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Haner Charles, Bock lord. 
Hanei John, 27 Plaiodeld, G. Riipids. 
Hanes Reuben F., 3 Byron, North 

HANNA JOHN M., 20 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 
HANNA JOHN. 3 Gaines, Hammond. 
HANNA KENNEDY, SO Gaines, Cody's 

Hills. 
Hanna Kennedv. 28 Grand Rapids. 
HANNA SAMlTBL, 26 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Hanna Wesley, Lisbon. 
Hanna Wilham, 26 Gaines. Hammond. 
Hanrahan John, 33 Spencer, Bpencer 

Mills. 
Hanrahan Thomas, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Hanrahan William, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Hanscom Abnec L., 13 Nelson, Nelson. 
Hanscom Zebulon J., 18 Nelson, Nelson 
HANSES ANTHONY, 13 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Hansen Casper, 35 Alpine, G. Knpide. 



HARNISHFINDLEY, South 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Harnish Jacob, Sonth 7 Walker, Grand 

Harper John, 15 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
Harrigan Michael, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Harrington John, 2 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Harrington Jasper, 1 Flainfield, Koclc- 

ford. 
Harrington Levi M., Burchville (Burcb's 

Mills.) 
Harrington Ternoa, 3 Walker, Grand 

Harrison Luther C, 15 Paris, Grand 

Harris George W., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Harris George W., 30 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Harris Richard, 11 Casca.le, Cascade. 
Harris Robert, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Harris Wjliiam, 15 Cascade, Cascade. 
Harroun Henry E., Lowell. 
Harsey Lawton, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
HART LUTHFR, 6 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Hart Sarah, 8 Oakfield, OakQeld. 



rOBT'B EXXKT OF PAUT CUBES HEUBAZ.GU.. 



yGooQle 



HISToaT AND DIRECTORY OF KKNT COXINIT. 211 

L. H. Withey & Co., 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Pill XIMBEB. 

Shingles, Lath, &c., 
GBAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

Office and Yard, Coiner of Founfain and Greenwich Streets. 
Mill, near D. &M. R. R. Bridge. 



{Centrally Located,) 

Comer of Monroe and Waterloo Streets. 

FIRST-CLASS HOUSE— MODERATE TERMS. 

W, W. HAWK, ( f ropfistors. 

GEAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

UraY.SAIEANDBOABDIHe 

JS 'X^ j£)l 33 Xji DESy 

Cor. hwAm k GrttDvicb Streets, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

J. M. KENNEDY, Proprietor. 

Hopaes Boarded "by tbe Day or ^Veelc, amd Icept Tor Sole. 

trd by Google 



HISTORY ASD DIRECTORY OF KEKT COUNTY. 



Hart Thomns, 1 Solon, Saml Lake. 

UAET WILLARD M., SOakfield, Oak- 
fleld. 

Hftrtt John, 13 Lowell, LowelL 

Hartt George W., 13 Lowell, LowoU, 

Hartley John, 32 Lowell, Alto. 

Hartman David, 17 Byron, Bjron Cen, 

Hartwell John W., 34 Cnnnon, Can- 
nonaburg. 

Hartwell Jobn, 34 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Hartwell Mrs. M. J., 35 Cannon, Can- 
Donsbnr^. 

Hartwell Win. Clias., Village Cannons- 
burg. 

HARTWKLL WILLIAM, 37 Cannon, 
Cannnnsburg. 

Hftrtz John, 13 Walkor, Grand Rapicla. 

Harlzy Antoine, 15 Byron, Grandville. 

Hartzy Henry, S Byron, Grandville. 

Hartzy Peter, 5 Byion, Graniiville. 

Hasha Barnbart, 18 Lowell. Cascade. 

Hasbbarger Abraham, 36 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Hashbarger Toiiias, BG Paris. Grand 

Haskin Clark, 8 Ado, Add. 
Hftskin Mrs. M., 8 Ada, Ada. 
Hawkins Asa, Lowell 

BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 ci 



HAVENS CHA8. R., 81 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
HAVEN JOHN V. D., Grandville. 
Havens John W,, 15 Paris, Grand 

-Havens Nathanie!, 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. ^ 

Haviland Daniel L., Alaska Village. 

HAVILAND DANIEL 8„ Alaska. 

Hawkins Abraham, 14 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Hawkins Charles, 16 Sparta, Sparta 
Cen. 

Hawkins Hiram, 14 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Hawkins G. C, Rookfnrd. 

Hawkins Richard, Lisbon. 

Hawkinsnn John, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Hawk Edward, 22 Cannon, CannonB- 
burg. 

Hawley Jame?, 32 Alpine, Indian 

Hawley Salma B., 3 Alpine, English- 

ville. 
Hawthorn Thomas, 35 Plainfield, Aua- 

terlitz. 
HAYDOCK WILLIAM, 35 Nelaou, 

Court I and Center. 
Hayt's Daniel, 30 Plainfield, Mill Creek. 



Haskins Jesse, 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
HASLBM JOHN, 28 Walker, Grand 

Hastie Archie, 38 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hastie James, 23 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hastings George IL, 23 Sparta, Sparta 

HASTINGS W. H., 8 Lowell, LowelL 

Hastings Thomas 11,, i Lowell, Lowell. 

Hastings W. G., 3 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Hatchew .Mrs. Lena, LowelL 

Hatch Atphens, Lowell, 

Hatch B. G., 3il Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Hatch Charles W., Lowell. 
Hatch Ephrifim, Lowell. 
HATCH JOHN P.. 21 Lowell, Lowell. 
HATCH JOHN, 39 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
HATCH MATTHEW B., 17 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
HATCH WM. W., Lowell. 
Hathaway H. M., 22 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Hattan Charles, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
HATTON GILES, 21 Eo*ii«. Bowne. 
Hattun Leslie, 31 Bowne, Bowne. 



HATES EDWIN P., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
HAYES HORACE N., Burch's Mills. 
Hayes Ira A., 23 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
HAYES JOSEPH F,, 33 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
HAYES PATRICK, 30 Plainfield, Mil! 

Hayes Roday, 19 Plainfield, Alpine. 
Haymaker Mrs. Mary A., 25 Byron, 

Cody's Mills. 
Ilaynes David, 37 Courtland, Courtland 

Haynes George, 81 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
HAYNES ISAAC, 31 Alpine, Indian 

HAYNES HJKAM B., 34 Paris, Grand 

Haynes Oscar, 2 Courtland, Courtland 

HAYNES ROBERT, 34 Paris, Grand 

HAYNES FRANCIS, 21 Alpine, Grand 

Hays Virgil, 30 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Hay ward Edward, 30 Tyrone, Ousnoviii. 



TORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES LAUENESS. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COTJNTT. 



Francillo Hall, 



AND 

O-EITEE/^Xj CrOBBEE/, 

Shop OH Water Street, 2<l door South of Bridge Street, 
West Side, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

N.n.— Contracts Wollelted. 

GEORGE STANG, 

IRON m BRASS FflllBY. 

All Patent Right and other Castings 
Made to Order. 

FOUNDRY OfPOSTTFl JACOUOICE'S SfACIlIIVE 
euoP, KIVEB 8TKEET, WE«T SIDE, 

Grand Eapids, Mich. 
A. D. BOEDEN & CO., 

Contractors and Master Builders, 



D DEALERS IN 



DOORS, SASH, BI.INDS, 

And Door and Window Frames. 

t Sawing and Custon 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



yGoosle 



HIBTOEY AND DIKEOTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



HAYWARD J. W„ Sparta Center. 
Haze It on John, 12 Sparta, Sparta 



litz. 
Heaiilej Artemus S., Rockford. 
Headlcy George, Ada Village. 
Hradiey Hiram, Ada Village, 
Headley John, Ada Village. 
Heatlley Orville, SPlsiiifield, Rockford. 
HEADWORTH CHARLES, 31 Bowne, 

HEADW'ORTH WILLIAM, S7 Plaiti- 

fleld, AuHterlitz, 
Heaiy Heory J., 39 Walker, Grand 

Healy John, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
HEALY THOMAS, 29 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Beaton Abraliam, SI Ada, Ada. 
Heaton Mrs. Eunice. 2» Ada, Ada. 
Heath Caleb, 19 Plainfiekl, Mill Creek. 
Heath Daniel, 18 Piainfield, Mill Creek, 
Heath George L., 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Heath Guy, li2 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Heath George, 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Heath Jesse B., 20 Sparta, Lisbon. 



Heintzleman Andrew J., 36 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
Heintzleman Joseph, 30 Cascade, G. 

Heintzleman Nathan, 35 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Heintaleman Peter, 38 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Heintzelman Reuben, 3D Cascade, 

Grand Rapid a. 
Hwntz Henry, 87 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
HEINTZ JOHN, 34 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Heinrich William, 3S Bowne, Bowne. 
Hellelien James, 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Helmer Henry, Lowell. 
Hdlinlka Henry, 15 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Uelmka Henry S., 16 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Helpin Peter, 32 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Helsel Henry, 31 Altfoma, Rockford. 
Helsel Joseph. 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 
HELSAL JOHN. 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Helsal Joseph, 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Helsel Luster, 16 Algonia, Rockford. 
Helsel Noah, 33 Algoina, Rockford. 
Helsel N'>ah F., 31 Algoma. Rockford. 
Helsel Philip, Burchville,(Burch's Mills) 



TUTTLE'S PATENT CHAMPION CROSS-CUT SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 

19 Piainfield, Mill 



Heath Jonathan. 

HEATli OSCAR L., 30 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Heath Mrs. Susan D., 19 Piainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

HEATH WASHINGTON, Lisbon. 

Hebard Ezra A., 16 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Hecox Don, 24 Vergennes, Fallassburg. 

Hecox Francis M., 23 Vergeunes, Lo- 
well. 

Ileft'ron Daniel, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
bnrg. 

Heffron Edward, 35 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

HEFFItON GEORGE, 23 Cannon, Can- 

HBFFLON HIRAM, B Lowell, Lowell. 
HEFFRON JAMES, 25 Cannon, Can- 

nonsburg. 
Hefi'ron Michael, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Heffron William, 31 Qrattan, Cannoas- 

burg. 
Heidchnh Philip, jun., 11 Bowne, Alto. 
Heidchuh Philip, 11 Bowne, Alto. 
HEIMLER JOHN B., 20 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 



Helsel P. P., 33 Al^onia, Rockford. 

HEMBLING ABRAHAM D., Alaska 
Village. 

HeiiinHngway Gabriel, 37 Oakfleld, 
Oakfield. 

Hemmingway Moses, 22 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

IIEMMINGWAY LAWSON, 27 Oak- 
field, Oakfield. 

Heinphrey George, 23 Cascade, Cas- 
caile. 

Hemaley William, 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

UemswoFth James, 26 Walker, Grand 
Rsiiids. 

HEMSLET GEORGE, 
Casnovia. 

Hendrick D. Millard, ! 

HENDRICH ERWIN, 5 Gaines, G. 

Hendrick Gideon A., 3 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Hendrick Harlan, 6 Gaines, Grand 

Rapids. 
Hendrick Henry M., 5 Gaines, Grand 

Hendrick Wm., 5 Gaines, G. Rapids. 



31 Tyrone, 
Vergennes, 



FOR SPASHODIO COI.IC IN HORSES, 



yGooQle 



filsTORt AND DimCTORT OF KENT COUNTT. 



Hendereon lanac, 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Henderson Philo P., 12 Oakfieid, 

Greenville. 
Hendereon Samuel. 7 Walker, Berlin, 
Bene Philip, 17 Walker, G. Rspida. 
Heuneesey John, 31 Caacade, Grand 

Hennessey William, 21 Cascade, Cas- 

Hennagin George, 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 
Henry Charles. 5 Grattan, Grattan 

Henry David, 11 Plainfield, Auatcrlitz. 
Henry Dewitt C, 34 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Henry Delo89 Q., 3S Ada, Ada. 
Henry Mrs. Haley, 5 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Henry James, 17 Cascade, Cascade. 
Henry Thomas M., 5 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 

Hensel, Michael, 31 Byron, New Salenli. 
Henshaw Albert T., 4 Byron, North 

Byron. 
Henshaw Charles J., 16 Cascade, Cas- 

Henshaw Horace. 16 Cascade, Cascade. 
Henteg George, 33 Grand Rapids. 



Heyford Charles, 24 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Hibbard Charles H., Grandville. 
Hibei Adam, 18 Byron, Byron Center. 
Hibel John, 18 Byron, Byron Cester. 
Hice, Adlim, 83 Walker, Grand Itapids. 
RICE JOSEPH, 32 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Hice Jerome, 33 Walker, G. Rapids, 
HICKEY SYLVESTER K., Alaska. 
IHCKS ALBERT R., 37 Spencer, 

Spencer Miila. 
HICK.8, BENJAMIN H., 38 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Hicks Daniel, 23 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Hicks, Dnmel C, 38 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hicks Freilerick, 1 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Hicks Martin, 25 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
HICKS R0BBIN3, 1 Solon, Cedar 

Springs, 
nicks, Stephen, 8 Cannon, Rockford. 
Hicks Seely, 33 Spencer, Cedar Springe. 
HICKS WILLIAM, Rockford. 
HICKOCK BENJAMIN P., 5 Nelson, 

Sand Lake. 
HICKOX LUCIUS L., 33 Byron, Bj- 

ron Center. 



BUY. PATENT MEDICINES AT 8 c»b»i street 



Henteg Frank M., 33 Grand Rapids. 

Hergrove James, 26 Grattan, Grant. 

Hergrove William, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Heriman Ira S., 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 

HERltICK DAVID, 21 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

Herrick Martin C, 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Herrick Wm., 31 Gaiaes, Cody's Mills. 

HERRIMAN IRA S., Lowell. 

Herron James 0., 10 Bowne, Caledonia. 

Hershey Isaac, 22 Courtland, Courtland 

Hertley Martin, 11 Alpine, Englishrille. 

Hesler Gottlieb, 82 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

HESS B. W., 1 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 

Hessler Charles, 3 Byron, North Byron. 

Heltis William, 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Hevera Michael, 32 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Hewes Joseph, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

HEWITT, J. B., Rockford. 

Hewitt, Rosannah, 21 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Hewitt William W., 22 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 



HIDE URIAH R., Village of Cannons- 

Hidtsgetter .Tohn, 15 Alpine. Alpine. '■ 

Hiur John, 34 Gaines, Caledonia Station. 

Higby Stephen, 14 Byroo, Byron Ceo, 

Higgins Henry, 29 Grand Rapids. 

Hike Case, 2 Wyoming, Grand Rapids. 

Hildebrandt Wm., 14 Alpine, Alpine. 

HILDRETHA. S., Lisbon. 

Uildreth Cyrus, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

Hildreth John A., Lisbon. 

Hildreth Lester C, Lowdll. 

Hiler Milo, Lowell, 

Hiler Mrs. M., Lowell, 

HILER WALTER, 38 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

HILLS AARON H., 28 Alpine, Alpine. 

Hill Andrew, 33 Algoma. Rockford. 

Hill Albert, 1 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Hills Mrs. Adelia, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Hill Albert C-, Itf Bowne, Alto. 

HILL ALPHEUS G., 15 Caledonia, 
Alaska, 

Hill Bryant, 35 Solon, Cedar Spring*. 

Hill Chas. O., U Lowell, Lowell. 

Hills David E., Rockford. 



SREKOH WITH FORT'S XHEMT OF FAIN. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



HILL ELDIN G., 32 Cannon, Ada. 
Hills H. B., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Hill Horatio, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hill Hushes B., 15 Caledonia. Alaska. 
HILL JAMES, 17 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Hill John, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 
Hill James, 32 Cannon, Ada. 
Hill LoTte. 23 Tyrone, Caanovia. 
HILL NICHOLAS R., 31 Nelson, Cedar 



HJLL PRENTICE, 11 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
HILL OTIS, 19 Ada, Ada. 
Hill Orton, 11 Lowell, LowuU. 
Hill 01e,'5 Plainfield, Belmont. 
HILL ORPHEUS B., Village Cedar 



Hilla Jefferson, 35 Grand Ripids. 
HILLS PERRY, 25 Grand Rapida. 
Hill Thompson, 31 Gainca, Cody's 

Mills. 
Hilliker Wm. H., 23 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Hillman Samuel B., 24 Nelson, Nelson. 
Hillock Joseph, Caledonia Station. 
Hilty David, 24 Gaines, Caledonia 

Btation. 
HILTON ALANSON T., 21 Sparta, 

Sparta Centre. 



Hitchcock Hugh, Sparta Center. 
Hittle John, 3U Algonia, Rockford. 
Hitzert Williftm, 2BTron,North Byroo. 
HINE (M. D.,) DEMA8, 30 Cannon, 

Aiiaterlitz. 
HIKE JAS. W., Lowell. 
HINK M. B., 30 Cannon, Auaterlitz. 
Hine Martin N., Lowell. 
Hines John, 31 Wyoming, Grandviila. 
Hinea Stephen, 16 Wyoming, Qrand- 

Hinkson James, 16 Sparta, Sparta 

HINMAN ALFRED S., i Sparta, 

Spaita Center. 
Hinman C. C, 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Hinuian Chaites, Sparta Center. 
Hinuian Enoch, Cedar Springs. 
Hinmsin John, Sparta Center. 
Hiuman J. T., Sparta Center. 
Hinman Norman, Sparta Center. 
Hininan Newell, Spartu Center. 
Hinman N. D , 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 
HINMAN, Z. M., 9 Sparta, Spart* 

Hinyan Oliver P., 33 Lowell, Alto. 
HIXSON JOHN, Lowell. 
HOAQ ALBERT, 26 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 



WELCH &. GRIFFITH'S CIRCULAR SAWS. AT W. D. FOSTER'S- 



Hi ft on Arte mas, 2S Alpine, Indian 
HILTON DAVID, 35 Alpine, Indian 

HILTON DAVID W., 6 Walker, In- 

dian Creek 
HILTON GEORGE W., 7 Cannon, 

Rockford. 
HILTON MRS. JANE, 8 Gra^d Rnpida, 
Hilton J. K., 28 Byron, Codv'a Milla. 
HILTON LEONARD R., 3 Waiker, 

Indian Creek. 
Hilton Newell.'Burch'a Milla. 
Hilton W. W., 34 Alpine, Indian 

Creek, 
Hiize Matthias, 32 Byron, Byron 

Hinies Amaaa, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 
HIMBECK JOSEPH, 13 Alpine, Al- 
pine. 
Hirat George, 21 Byron, Byron Center. 
Hirst Thomas, 21 Byron, Bjron Center. 
HINB CHAS. R., Lowell. 
Hinckley George, 14 Gaines, Ham- 

Hiplef Joseph, 34 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Hlmbeck Frederick, IS Alpine, Alpine. 



HOAO ARTEMUS R., SO Vergennes, 
Verge nnes. 

Hoag Catherine, 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Hoag Earl, 2 Grand Rapids. 

Hoag John E., 23 Cannon, CannODa- 
buVg. 

HOAG LYMAN V., 26 Tyrone, SparU 

HOAG LORENZO D., 23 Cannon, Can- 
non sburg. 

Hoag Myron B., 23 Cannon, Cannona- 
burg. 

HOAQ SIDNEY E., 34 VergenoCB, 
Lowell, 

Hoag Warren, 36 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 

I oagesteeger, Adrian, 33 Grand Rapid* 

Hobourt H. A., Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

HOBBS WILLIAM, 17 Bowne, Alio. 

Hodley Norton, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 

Hodley John, 23 Algonia, Rockford. 

HODGES AMOS, 32 Vergennes, Lowell 

Hodges Cheater D., 23 Lowell, Lowell. 

Hodges James, 31 Lowell, Loweil. 

Hodges Levi, 16 Sparta, Spaita Center. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES THE WORST OASES 



yGooQle 



BIBTOttT AND DIRBCTOBT Ot EEKT COOSTT. 



HODGES OREN S., 33 Vcrgennea, 

Lowell. 
HodgcB BuBsdt, i Alpine, Ed glUh villa. 
Hodges Sylvester, 33 Vergennes, Lowell 
Hodgers John, 6 Plaintiuld, Belmont. 
Hciffman AdHtn, Liaboa. 
Hoffman Hugli, 1 Botvne, Loirell. 
Hognn Heniaa G., 1 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hogsn Mielinel, 1 Wyoming, G. Rapida. 
Hogan Patrick, 37 Grattan, Grant. 
HogaD 8. U., 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hogadone £dwin D., 28 Walker, Grand 

Itapide. 
HOGADONE HENRY 0., 19 Walker, 

Grand liHplds. 
HOGADONB JOHN B., 28 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
HOQLE GEO. W., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springa. 
HolbenBeniamin, 20 Tyrone, Caannvia. 
Holbs James, 36 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 
Holben Jacob, 30 Tyrone, Uaanovia. 
Holcomb Edwin K., 6 Nelaon, Sand 

Holcomb Hornce, 31 Vcrgcanes, Lowell 
HOLCOMB MARTIN A., 26 Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 
Holcomb Phineas W., 3 Algoma, Cedar 



Holmdon Williani, 24 Oakfield, Green- 
ville. 

HOLMES ALBERT N., 31 Tyrone, 
Cusnovia. 

Holmes Edgar C, 17 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Holmea George, 10 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Holmea Jnlin, 10 A'pine, Knglishrille. 

Holmes Mrs. Martba, 1 Wyoming, G. 

HOLMES NELSON, IT Grattan, Gf»t- 

Ilolnies Robert, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Holoway Samuel, 11 Alpine, En gliah- 

Hoist John, 30 "Lowell, Lowell, 
Holt. H. Gaylord, 3 Cascade, Cascade. 
HOLT HENRY, 3 Cascade, Cascade. 
Holt Simeon I)., 35 Ada, Ada. 
Holy Cliristian, 16 Gaiues, Hammond. 
Honirich John, 30 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Homrich Peter, 31 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Homrich Sebastian, 30 Bjron, Byron 

Center. 
Honeyiiiiin George, 26 Walker, Grand 

HOOD ANDREW, 2C Grand Rapids. 
Hookstraw B., 33 Grand Itapids. 

HUBBARD BROS. CIRCULAR, MILL & DRAG SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



HOLCOMB W. F., 27 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

Holden Cliapin B., 18 Courtland, Rock- 
for<L 

Holden Charles M., 18 Courtland, Bock- 
ford. 

Holden Horntio 3., 18 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

HOLDEN WM. W,, 27 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Holiday George W , 39 Algoma, Rock- 
lord. 

Holiday Henry, 17 Algoma, Rockford. 

Holldriddor Franklin, Lowell. 

Holiday Jolin A., 36 Sparta, English- 
vilie. 

Holland John, 10 Courtland, CoDrtland 
Center. 

Holland Theodore, 32 Sparta, Lisbon. 

HOLLISTBR WILLIAM, Sparta Cen. 

Hollis A., 31 Wyoming. Grandville. 

Holly James, 1 Gainea, Hammond. 

Holly Milo B., 18 Caledonia, Hammond. 

HOLLY ORLANDO H., 1 Gainea, 
Hammond. 

Holm John P., 33 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 



Hookatraw Martin, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Hookalmw Nater, 33 Grand Rapida. 
HOOKER CYPRIAN S., 11 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
HOOKER EDWARD C, 16 Gaines, 



Gaine 



rille. 



Hooker George W., 35 Plaiafleld, Aus- 

ilooker J. S., Lowell. 

HOOK MARK, 14 Wyoming, Grand 

Hooper Clement, Grandville. 
Hooper David, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
Hooper Elam, Village Cedar Springs. 
Hooper Edward, 30 Wyouiing, Grand' 

Hooper Joaepli, 30 Wyoming, Grand- 
Hooper Henry, 30 Wyoming, Qrand- 

TiUe. 
HOOSE MADISON, 1 Alpine, Eng- 

liahville. 
HOOVER ABRAHAM, 38 O^nei, 

Caledonia Station. 
HOOVER BARNEY, 83 Gaines, Co- 
dy's MillB. 



OF OATAKRR IN THRZE HINtTTZS. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECfTORY 07 KENT COCSTT. 



Hoover John, 24 Gaines, Hammonil. 

HooTei John, 83 Gaines. Cody's Mills. 
HOPE HENRY, 3 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
HOPE JOSEPH, 23 Sparta, Sparta 

HOPE JAMES M„ 28 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
HOPKINS ANSEL, 4 Grand Rapids. 
Hopkins Truman H., 10 Lowel), 

Lowell. 
HOPKINS aiRDIN, 29 Alpine, In- 

H0PKIN8 HIRAM, 5 Grand Rapida, 

Grand RApi<ls. 
HOPKINS JOHN L., Alaska Village. 
Hopkins John T., Lowell. 
Hopkins Lewis, 82 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Hopkins Nelson R.. 30 Alpine, Indian 

Hopkins Mrs. Noel, 83 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
HOPKINS SIMON P., 39 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Hoppe William, 85 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Horaffan Martin, 81 Walker, Grand 

Rariids. 
Hornbrook Peter, 34 Lowell, Lowell. 

BUY DAUaS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 Ouul stnot. 

Horton I. W., 17 Wyoming, Orand- 

Tille. 
Hotton Isaac, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Horton Josse M., Qrandville. 
HortOQ John. 11 Wyoming, Grandrille. 
Horton, James B., 9 Wyoming, Grand 

Horton John, 8 Byron, North Bjron. 
Horton Peter, 8 Byron, Grandville, 
HORTON SILAS P., 7 Oakfleld, Oak- 

fleld. 
HORTON Mrs. 8. M., Cannonsburg. 
HORTON WILLIAM, 17 Wyoming, 

Gnuidville. 
H«tford Pred. H., Lowell. 
Hosford Frank H., Lowell. 
Hoekins Henry, 33 Ada, Ada. 
H0SKIN8 JAME3 R., 26 Solon, 

Ced«T Springs. 
Hosle; Jabez J., 84 Byron. Cody's 

Mills. 
Host Anthony, 30 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Host John, 80 Alpine. Indian Creek. 
HOUOK PAYETTE, S3 Bowne, 

Bonne. 



HOUGH FAYETTE, 29 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Houghtaling E. F., 10 Grand Rapids. 
Houghtaling Henry, 1 Paris, Gruid 

Hougbtaling Ransom, 28 Plainfisld, 

HOUQHTALING W. 0., 16 G. Rapids. 
Hough Theodore G,, 23 Gaines, Ham- 
Houlihan Patrick, 3 Vergennes, Alton, 
Hounsom John H., Sparta Center. 
HOUSE ABRAHAM P., 30 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
HOUSE ANDREW, 13 Algoma,Edger- 

Huuse Ahraham. Rockford. 
House Alonzo, 1 Alpine, Engllahville. 
House Conrad, 5 Plain Held, Belmont. 
House James W., 23 Algoma, Edgerton 
House Oscar, 34 Algoma, Edgerton. 
House Robert, Rockford. 
Housman Charles F., Cedar Springs. 
Houseman Jacob, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Housell James, 11 Plainfield, Hoekford. 
Houser Frederick, 9 Vergennes, Alton. 
Houser Gustavus, 9 Vergennes, Alton. 
HOVER MRS. CATHARINE, 23 
Bowne, Bowne. 



Howard Andrew, 16 Grattan, Orattan 

Center. 
Howard Christopher, 6 PlainReld, Eng- 

liahrille. 
Howard (^rispan, 6 FtainSeld, English' 

Howard Daniel, 5 Vergennes, Ver- 

HOWARD JOHN, Lowell. 

Howard Jumes, 23 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Howard John, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Howard Mary, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Howard Orville, 1 Algoma, Burchville 
(Burch's Mills.) 

Howard Owen, 8 Vergennes, Vergennes. 

Howard Robert, 4 Orattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Howard William, Jr., 4 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Howe C. B., Lowell. 

Howe Elisha B., 22 Walker, G. Rapids. 

HOWE GARDNER, 5 Nelson, Sand 



FORT'S wEB^nx xunuBirr u tbk bbst tor horses. 



yGooQle 



HI8T0HT AND DIBBCTOET OF KBHT COCOTT. Zl» 

GRAND RAPIDS 

lAlFAtTISIE COmNY, 

(SBCCESSOSB TO OBUBB, STEWABT & LnTHEB,) 

Manufaetorers and Dealers in 

Horse Powers &. Saw Machines, 

Sulky Bakea, Plows, Cultivators, 

field Keiters, ioad Ssraptirs, @)t Takes. &e.> 

Agenls for tlie Sale of Reapers, Mowers, Tliresliio| Machines, 

Cider Mills, and nearly every kind of Agricultural Machinery. 

SAL-ESIIOOM AND OFfrCl!:, 41 CANAU SXRBET. 

Manufactory, South Water Street, 

GRAlfD RAPIDS. - - MICHIGAN. 
JOSEPH FINCKXiER, 

DEAIiER IS 

Groceries and Provisions. 

CASH PAID FOR PRODUCE. 

No. 104 Canal St., 
Grand Rapids, HIichisan. 

P. SCHENKELBERG, 

DEAI.ER IS 

Groceries and Provisions, 

Crocker} and Glassware, Cips and Tobacco. 

CASH PAID FOR PRODUCE. 
Ifo. 23 Front Street, { IFeft Side.) 



yGoosle 



BISTORT AWD DIEECTORY OP SENT COCMTT. 



Howe H. A., Lowell, 

Howe Jesse B., 3S PlainS«ld, Orahd 

lUpida 
Howe 2»dok. Lowell. 
UOWBLL HEZAKL-iH, 31 Ad.t, Grand 

HoWrir Jostiua, iO Gmttiw. Grattan 

Center. 
Howell John, 10 Grattan, Grattan Cen, 
Howell Rebecca, 10 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. ' 
HdWUiVhCndore I., 31 Ada, G. Rapids. 
Hawaii Wtlli»in, 81 Ada, Ads. 
Howk Andrew J;, Lowell. 
Howk Jacob, Lowell. 
HowlettTlioiuas, 39 WjominR, Grand- 

rHid ■ 
Hoirlott William, 39 Wyoming, Grand- 
villa. 
Ilowiuan John, 30 Paris, Grand Riipids. 
Huxie Oollins, 6 Gnuid Rapids, Grand 

Rapttla. 
HOXIB WM. n., 5 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Bnpids. 
HOrLE GEORGE, 35 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Hojte Henry, 30 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Hiijt Albert, Roeklbrd. 
Hoj-t BJwiu, 1 Paris, Grand Rapiiis. 



Hoebn Mrs, Ljdia, Rockfnrd. 
Hnfehe* Monroe, 2 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Hntnlies W. Scott, S4 WjomiDR, Grand 
^Rafrtd.. *' 

Httgaes William, 11 Spartd, Sparta Cen. 
lltubey Nathaniel, 84 NcUuo, Cedar 

ap rings. 
Hujjhson T. E., Jewell. 
Hu;Zgins George, Lowi;ll. 
Hug^DS Joiin, LoweU. 
H-uggine Win. R., Loweil. 
Haggard ?rnncil. 19 Nelson; NelMia. 
Huggard John, 1 Nelson, Nelson. 
Hulbert Charles E., Lowell. 
HDLBERT JOHN W., 23 Cascade, 
I Casraile, 
Hnlburt Thomas J., 10 Cascade, Caa- 

Hulburt William, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 
Hull Amass, 2 OakHeld, Greenville. 
HULL CYRUS, Alaska. 
Hull E. F., Alaska. 
HULL GEO. F., Alaska. 
HULL JOHN, 8 Algnran, Rockford. 
Hull John, 24 Vergennes, Fallassburg. 
HULL SYLVANUS E., 7 Bowne. Alto. 
Hull William H., 8 Algoma, Rockford. 
Hull Zachary, 1 Uakfield, GreeuTille. 



RUSBEFl AND HEMP PACKING, AND LACE LEATHER, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Hoyt Kathan, Lowell. 
Hoyt Wilbur. Rockford. 
HUBBArm AUGUSTUS, Lisbon. 
Habband GtiarJt'S, Lisbon. 
Hubbard J.hJ M.. 6 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Habbard John. 25 Solon. Cedar Springs 
Hnbboll ElmonB., 81 Oaktieki, Grattan 

Center. 
Hubble Eurotns G., 25 Grattan, Grant. 
Hubbel EIntun d., 1 Canatm, Grattan 

Huhbell Jobn, 81 Oakfield, Grattan 

llubbet John, 1 Cannon, Grntran Cen. 
Huibon Alexander, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Hudictn Joseph, M A^gnma, Edgerton. 
Hudson Samuel S., II Lowell, Lowell; 
Huff Andrew, 23 Gaines, Hjiuiuiond. 
Huff A«4m. 89 Gainef^ Hammond. 
Haff rvdefick:. 22 Gwoea, Hammond. 
Huff Httrnron, 13 Byriin, Gainesville. 
Hufflsaac, 21 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Huff Jamea F., 82 Tyrone, Caanovia. 
Hughes James, 10 Grattan, Grattan 

Hui^bes John, 24 Wyoming, Grand 
Bspids. 



' Hulliberger Lee, 2 Conrlland, Court- 
Hull Jabez H.,' 3S Ada. Ada, 
flume« Cornelius, a Cuurtland, Oourt- 

land Center. 
Hammer George, Grandville. 
Hummer Jacob, Grandville. 
Hunt Leonard H., Lowell. 
Hunt Simeon, Lowell, 
HUNT WILLARD, Cedar Springs. 
HuntZenas, 1 Plainaeld, Rockford. 
HuntM Arvine P., Lowell. 
Hunter Adelmer, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 
HUNTER C. P,, Lowell. 
HDNTBRB. B,, Lowell. 
Hunter Edwin, Lowell. 
HUNTER JAMES I., Lowell. 
Hunter John, 30 Spencer, Nelson. 
H^ter Matbew,-2D Lowell, I^welL 
Hunter, Robert, jun., Lowell. 
Hunter Robert C, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
HUNTER ROBERT, sen., Lowell. 
Hunter William, sen., 16 Spencer, 

Spencor Mills. 
Hunting Edward B., 28 Couttland, 

Courtlwid Center. 



TORT'S KNEHT OF PAIR CrRES TOOTHACHE. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AWD BIRECTOET OF KKFT COCiBTr. 



ISstnbllAhea In ISSO. 

General Insurance Agents and Adjosters. 

Cash Capital Represen ted, - Over $20,00J,000. 

Office in the B(T»e»ne»f Booms of the City JfationaZ Sank BnltiUnff, 

rorn«r of Monroe nnd Pearl StreeM. 

G-iTAXica. H.et^t<3.ei, - - - 3MClol3.1SAxx. 

W« itre SPECIAL uid ADJUSTIHS Agept> la the Stats of Hiohlgim, foe tha totlowlng Qom^eiilMt 
Tonbrra and Neir York Insnranee ro., of irew Torb, Cn>& AameU, t|I,»oo.no«> 
And» Inaamnee Co., of (.'Inelnnntl, O., » " I.OOBAOD 

IN8UBANCE EFFECTED WITHOUT DHL*! ON ALL CLASSES OF IlfStniABLE PROPEKTT AT 

Losses ADJUSTED and PAID, at this Agency, when "fair and square," 
without delay. 



y at Lav and Oeneral Adjnater of Flie Lobih. 
ret df tbe Qraod Bipida tjavlogi Bask. 
JOUS K. STEWAUT, NotUTUidCDn 
t. TANDERH'IEF, Book Keeper and Solicitor. 



BrMil Dealer In 



TOYS, CONFECTIONERY, 

Fresh and Canned Fruits, Cigars, Fresh & Cove Oysters. 

Brldse Strecl. West SMe, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - - MIOHiaAN. 



CO 



71 Monroe Street, 
Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 

Hostid by Google 



HUTOftT AND DIBECTOBT Or KS1TT COUBTTT. 



HCNTING GEOHGE 8., 88 Courtland, 

Ciiurtlsnd CenUsr. 
HUNTING ISAAC M., 24 Courtlan.:!, 

Courtland Oenter. 
Huntiogton ThninaSjSSBowne, B<» 
HuntlDgton William, S8 Bowne, 

Boffne, 
HUNTLEY ADELBERT C, 11 Grat- 

tan, Qrnttao Oetiter. 
Huntley Erwio, 11 GrattaD, Grattaa 

HantlCjr Hre. i'mtcla, SQ 0. Rapicts. 

Huntley Jumf-B. 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
HUNTLEV ORIN P.. 37 Ada, Ada. 
HUNTLEY THOMAS, 33 Paris, Ham- 

HURD A. D., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Hurd Charles W., i Paris, G. Rapids. 
Hurd Everutt, 10 Paris, Grand Kapids. 
Kurd Juliii. 36 Wyoming. G. Bapids. 
Hurley Cbristopher, o Vergeones, Ver- 

frenncs. 
Hurley William, 8 Vergennes, Ver- 

tcennea. 
Hurlburt Charles. 33 Grand Rapids. 
HurJburt P. S., 83 Grand Rapids. 
Huse Carr, 86 Sparta, Engl ishvi lie. 
Husted Elijah, 16 Lowell, Lowell. 



Husted James D., 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
HL'STBD NOAH P., 20 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
HUBTBD SYLVESTER, 8 Lowell. 

Lowell. 
Hutchinson Bradley, 17 Paris, Grand 

Rnpids. 
Hutchina Charles, Cedar Springs. 
HijUle Henry. 5 Vergennes, Vergennes. 
HUWER ANDREVT, 36 Alpine, Al- 

Huwer Mrs. Barbara, 26 Alpine, Al- 

Huxley Edward, Lowell. 
HYDE C. G., Rocklbrd, 
Hyde Charles N., Rockford. 
Hyde Charles N., 1 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 
HYDE OSCAR F., Rotkford. 
Hyde Oiicar. 1 Plainlield, Rockford. 
HYDORN HENRY C., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Hyland Peter, 80 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Hyler Wm., 6 A'pine, Lisbon, 
HY8ER WILLIAM, 33 Plainfield, Aua- 

HYSTE'tHOMAS, Grandville. 
Hyste James, Gramlvdle. 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT • c.n*l 8 



Ide Edwin, 30 Byron, Byron Center. 
[de EIrazear R., 20 Byron, Byron Cen. 
ide Frank, lO Lowell, Lowell. 
Ide Orvrlii', 38 Byron, Bymn Center. 

Ingersoll Berlin, 31 Algoma, Rockford. 
Ijigersoll Theodore P., 17 Lowell, 

Ingrabam Aaron, 16 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Ingruham Frank E., SO Spencer, Bpen- 

cer HillB. 
INGRAHAM ISAAC M., 18 Paris, G. 

Inwood JanieB, 10 Gannon, Autterlits. 
Ipe Jacob, S Algoma. Sparta Cetttre- 
IPE MRS. ELIZA, 5 Algoma, Sparta 

Centre. 
IPE FBBDBniCK, 8 Atfoma, Sparta 

Cwt(«. 



Ipe Jackson, 38 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Ipe Solomon, 28 Solon. Cedar Springs. 

Ireland Wm. H., S Walker, G. Rapids. 

Irish E. L., Lowell. 

Irish Heman, Lisbon. 

IRISH H. B., Lisbon. 

Irons Andrew, 6 Caledonia, Alaska. 

IRONS JOSIAH, Alaska. 

Irwin David, 17 Byron, Byron Cen, 

Irwin Nelson, 17 Byron, Bj-ron Cen. 

ISHAM MRS. LOVINA, 14 Alpine, 

Englishville. 
labam Robert A,, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 
Isbam Charles, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 
Isham James, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 
Ives Benager, 19 Plainfield, Mill Creek. 
Ives Ubas. W., S Cannon, Rockford. 
IVES FLOYD H., 19 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
Ivinson Thomas, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 



OLS HEU AND WOKEN. TOUNQ HEN AND 



yGooQle 



HtaTORT AHS DtBGCTOST Or KSST COClTTr, 



JACKSON DUDLEY, 33 Oakfield, 

Gratlan Ctntre. 
JACKSON HARLOW, 30 Tyro oe, Cw- 

Jnckson Henry, 2 Caleclonia, Alaska. 
JACKSON JOEL G., 2 Caledonia, 

Alaskn.- 
JACKSON ROBERT S., Alaska. 
Jackson Robert, 1« B.yron, Byrcin Oen. 
JackBon William, 14 Caledonia, Alaska. 
JAC0B8 FRANK E., 20 Sparta, Lis- 

Jaoolw John H., SO Algnma, Rockford. 
JACOBS REUBEN, Village Cedar 

Springs. 
JACOBS WM. S., 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springa. 
Jaco» Allen B., 10 Gaines, Hammond. 
Jacox David, 24 Byron, Gainesville. 
Jakeway Asa, 33 Grattan, Grant. 
Jakewaj Ami, 26 Grattnn, Grant. 
Jakeway John H., 33 Grattan, Grant. 
JAKEWAY JAMES, 23 Grattan, 

JAMI8QN EUGENE, 13 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 



Jennings Daniel, 39 Algoma, Rockford. 
Jennings David, 24 Cascade, Cascade. 
Jennings Howard. 8 Paris, G. Rapida. 
Jennintfs Mlsa, Lowell. 
JENNINGS THOMAS, 30 Plainfleld, 

Mill Creek. 
JEWELL CHAS. A, 3 Nelson, Sand 

Jewell Edward, Tillajie Cedar Springs. 

Jewell George, 3 Plainfluld, Rockford. 

Jewell Harmon, 33 Wyoming, Grsiid- 
villf,-. 

Jewe 1 JiLitiea, 8 Wyoming, Qrandville. 

Jewell Looniia, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 

Jewell Rodolphaa D., 36 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

JEWELL SILAS E., 5 Nelson, Sand 

Jipaon Almond, 13 Grand Rapids. 
Johnston Robert, 35 Courtland. Court- 
land Center. 
JOINER PAULINA, 16 Grattan, Grat- 

Jobnson Abram H ,36 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



RUBBER HOSE, AT W. D. roSTER'*, 1 



ud U HoBl 



JAMISON HUGH, 13 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Jameson James, Cedar Springs. 

Jaqua Charlea D., 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

JAQUA CHARLES J., 31 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Jaqnes I-ewis, 11 Ijoweil, Lowell. 

JAQUA NELSON, 5 Nelson, Sand 

JARMAN JOHN C, Alaska. 

Jarman Henry J., Alaska. 

Jarvi« Morria, 11 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Jastopher Michael, — Cannon, Can- 
Jean Jerry, 35 Conrtland, Rockford. 

JENKS C. W., 85 Alpine, IndUn Creek. 

Jenkins Jahez, 35 Byron, Cody's Mills. 

Jenkins John, 31 Wyoming, Grand- 
yille. 

JENNE LANSING K., 7 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapida. 

Jenne Newton E., !fl Courtland, Court- 
land Centre. 

Jenneaa Mrs. John, Grandville. 

Jennings Daniel, 6 Grand Rapids, Q. 
Rapida. 



Johnson Allred C, 28 Grattan, Grattan 

JOHNSTON BARTON, 22 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Johnson Benjamin, 23 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Johnson Calrin D., 24 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Johnson Charles, Lowell. 
Johnstin Charlea, Sparta Center. 
Johnson Cord, 2 Plainfleld, Rockford. 
Johnson Chandler, Lowell. 
Johnaon Carl, GrandTille. 
Johnson Chaa. W., Cedar Springs. 
JohnaonCharlesP., 36 Spencer, Spencer 

Milia. ' 
Johnson Charles, 3S Gaines, Caledonia 

Station. 
JOHNSTON CHAS. L., 26 Byron, 

Codt'a Mills. 
Johnaon Charkft W., 34 Bttou, Oaines- 

Tille. 
Johnson Charles, 30 Alpine, Indian 

Creflk. 
JOHNSON CHAS. B., Sparta Center. 
JOHSSON CHARLES, 17 Sparta, Lis- 



MAIOEHS, USX FOKT'S VBDtOIinQI. 



Hosted t)y 



Google 



aiBTOET iVD DIRECTORY Of EKHT COUSTT. 



JOHNSON DAVID R., B5 Bolon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Johnaon Daniel, Sparta Center. 
JnliDkOD Edds, 31 tiainea, OHiDeavillc. 
JotaneoD Erastus W., 10 Walker, IndUo 

Cretk. 
JOHNSON EDGAR R., 17 Cascado, 

JOHNSON EZRA D., IS Coacade, Caa- 

Jobnson Mrs. E. M., Lowell. 
JohuHOD Edwin C, Lowell. 
Juhnsoo Eli D., 23 Caledonia, Cale- 

Johnson Frederick, 29 Lowell, Lowell. 
JOHNSON GEORGE, 7 Grattan, Grat- 

tan Center. 
JohnaoD Gilbert £., 13 Conrtland, 

Courtland Center. 
J ol in ton George W., 10 Courtland, 

Co art land Center. 
Johneou Gi'orge, Lowell. 
John HOD Guet, 8 Spartn, Lisbon. 
Johnson Harlej M., 16 Caacade, Cas- 

Johnao'n Heb.r W., 15 Oakfleld, Oak- 
field. 
JoliuHon Henry, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Jobnson Henrj E., Lowell. 



JOHNSON LUKE, 



Qaines, Ham- 
Indian 



Job II son Lewis, 28 Alpi 

JOHNSON LUTHER H, 83 Alpine,, 

Indian Creek. 
Jobnson Michael B., 29 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 
Jobnaon Morris, Lowell. 
JOHNSON MINER T., 30 Tyione, Cas- 

Jobnaon Martin W., Rockford. 
Jobnson Marquis L., 2 Cannon, Boat- 
wick Lnke. 
Jobnson Nathaniel, Lowell. 
Johnson Nathaniel C, 22 Bowne, 

JOHNSON NELSON M., 1 Cannon, 

Bostwick Lake. 
JOHNSON ORBIN L, 15 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
Johnson Pyrrhus E,, 18 Grattan, Grat- 

Johnson Mrs. Phebe, Rockford. 
JOHNSON PEiiLEY W., 4 Walker, 

Indian Creek. 
Johnson Peter, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Johnson Sabin, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 



JAMES QALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, N 



JOHNSON ISAAC W., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Johnson John, Nelson, Sanil Lake. 
JOHNSON JAMES C, 1« Bowne, 

Bowne. 
JOHNSON JEFFERSON, 15 Cascade, 

Cascade. 
JOHNSON JONATHAN R., 17 Caa- 

JOHNSON JAMES, 8 Grand Rapids. 
Johnson Joseph, liS Grattan, Grattan 

Johnson John, 84 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Johiison John, 4 Walker, Indian Creek. 

Jobnson Joseph, 22 Conrtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Johnson John, 38 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Johnson Joseph, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Johnson Jasper, 22 Bowne, Bowne. 

JohntOD John, 17 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Johnson John C, 2)1 Bowne, Bowne. 

JOHNSON JAMES E., 10 Alpine, 
Englishville. 

Johnson Jainea, 18 Algoma, Edgerton. 

JOHNSON JOSEPH B., Rockford. 

JOHNSON JAMES, 21 Cannon, Can- 
non a burg. 



Johnson Salem, 3Q Conrtland, Rock- 
ford. 

JOHNSON STEPHEN, 22 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Joiinaon Samuel W., Lowell. 

Johnson Thomas C, 23 Courtland, 
Courtland Centre. 

Johnson Thomas, 26 Grattan, Grant. 

Jobnson William A., SS Courtland, 
Courtland Centre. 

JOHNSON W. W,, 32 Grand Rapids, 
G. Rapids. 

JOHNSON WILLIAM B., Rockford. 

JOHNSON WILLIAM C, 31 Court- 
land, Courtland Centre, 
liey, 30 L 

w. w. 

Lowell. 
Johnson William, 4 Sparta,' Bpsrta 

Center. 
Johnson Wm. 8., 28 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Johns Richard, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Joles Albert A., Q Caledonia. Alaska. 
Joles Alfred A, 9 Caledonia, Alaski. 
Joles James, 9 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Jones Alyah, 13 Lowell, LowelL 



Johnson Wesley, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
JOHNSON W. W. JR., 80 Lowell, 



TORVS LINIMSNT CURES CAKED UDDER, 



yGooQle 



HIBTORT AXD DIEEOTORT OF KEHT COUBtTT. 



Jones Abram, 3 Bjron, North Byron. 
Jones Mrs. Amelia, 32 Plain£e]d, Aug- 

terlitz. 
Jones Almon, 11 Walker, G. Rapids. 
JONES A. B., e Grand Rapids, Grand 

JONES CHARLES, 27 Wyoming, 
Grasd Raptda. 

Jones Cyrus, 18 Wyoming, O. Rapids. 

JONES MRS. ELIZABETH, 13 Cale- 
donia, Alasiia. 

Jonea Edward, 21 Oakfleld, Oakfleld. 

JONES E. E., 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Jones Frederick, Lowell. 

Jones George, IH Oourtland, Courtland 
Center. 

JONES QAYLORD, 11 Walker, Grand 

Jones George G., 11 Vergennes, Alton. 
JONES ISAAC, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Jones Ira B., IS Lowell, Lowell. 
JONES JOHN 8., 33 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
JONES JOHN. 8 Plainfleld. Belmont. 
Jonea James M, W., 3 Byron, North 

Byron. 
Jones John, 3 Byron, Nortli Byron. 
Jones James, 3 Ada, Cannonsbnrg. 
Jones Loven, 31 Oakfleld, Oakficid, 



Jones Orrin E., 16 Grattan, Otattan 

Center. 
Jones Philip, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 
Jones Philip A., 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 
JONES PHILETUS P., Village of 

Cannonsbnrg. 
Jones Ross, 14 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
Jones Riley A.. 24 Grattan, Grant, 
JONES ROBERT B., 17 Gaines, 

Gainesville. 
Jones Samuel, 39 Tyrone, Gasnovia. 
JONES THOMAS J., 38 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Jones Thomas, 31 Oakfield, Oakfleld. 
Jones Wm., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Jones William, 21 Grattan, Grattan 

Cen ter. 
Jones Wesley, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 
Jones Wm. H.. 11 Walker, G. Rapids. 
JONES WILLIAM R., 13 Oaklield, 

Greenville. 
JORDAN HENRY C, jr., 20 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
Jordan Her - " 
Joslin Blyni 
J08LIN BENJAMIN, ' 3i Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
Joslin William W., 38 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 



JAMES GALLUP, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST, No. a c««l Bi 



Jones Leonard S., 33 Cannon, Cannons- 
bnrg. 
Jones Michael, 21 Grattan, Grattan 

Jonea Owen, SS Grattan, Grattan Gen, 



Judd A. H., 30 LowBll, Lowell, 
Jiidd Martin, 35 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
JUDSON ELLA, 8 Byron, Byron €en. 
Jodson H. T., Wyoming, Grandville. 
JUNE GEORGE, 33 Paris, G. Rapids. 
June Hanford, 1 Plainfleld, Rocklbid. 
June Henry, 33 Paris, Grand Rapids. 



K 



Kane Thomas, Rock ford. 
Kannedy Alonzo, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 
Karcher Adam, 36 Bowne, Bowne. 
KARCHER GEORGE, 36 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
Karmsen Charles, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
KARMSEN WILLIAM, Lowell. 
KARSCHNEB JOHN, 34 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Rating Patrick, 4 Grattan, Grattan 

Kauffman Jonas, 13 Bowne, Lowell. 
Kavenaugh Thomas, Vergennes, Ci 

nonsburg. 
Kealiher Sewell, 33 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Keamerhng Servaas, 26 G. Rapids. 



Kearney N.. 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Kearney Patrick, 37 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Kearns James, 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Keary John, 33 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Keary James, 35 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Keech Andrew, 6 Walker, Berlin. 
Keecb Alexander, 36 Algoma, Rook- 

ford. 
Keech David II., 13 Gannon, Boatwick 

KEECH HENRY, 14 Grattan, Grant. 
Keech Joseph, 13 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Keech Peter, 23 Grattan, Grant. 



S9 



IT HAS SAVED VALUABLE COV^S. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTOKY OP KENT COUNTV. 



Hellogg H. H., Cedar Springs. 
Kellogg Isaac, Lowell. 
Kellogg Jason, 31 Plalnfield, Mill Creek 
Kellogg Lafiijetfe, 3 Byron, North 

Byron. 
KELLOGG LEWIS B., 3 Byron, North 

KELLOGG 0B80N, 39 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapide. 
Kellogg Orrin, South I Ada, Lowell. 
Kellogg Titus, 17 Vcrgonnes, Ver- 

gennes. 
Kellogg Wm. H., 3 Byron, North Bjroa 
Kelsey Samuel, 17 Cascade, Cascade. 
Kelsey Tberou A., 17 Cascade, Cascade. 
KEMP JOHN, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Kemp Nicholafl, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
KENNEDY ALEXANDER, Sparta 

Kennedy James, 14 Gaines, Hammond. 

Kennedy James, 30 Grattan, Cannona- 
burg. 

Kennedy James, 31 "Walker, G. Rapids. 

KENNEDY MRS. JANE, 17 G. Rapids. 

Kennedy Joseph, 17 Grand Rapids. 

Kennedy John N., 8 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Kennedy Michael, 19 Grattan, Can- 
non sburg. 

JEFFORD'S St HATHAWAY'S AXES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 md IB Monroe atr«t. 



Keech William, 6 Walker, Berlin. 
Reefer Charles S., 15 Gaines, Ham- 

Keefer Joel C, 15 Gaines, Hammond. 
KEEPER CHARLES B., 15 Gaines, 

Hamnond. 
Koeler George W., 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Keeier Timothy D., 35 Daklield, Ashley. 
Keena John, 10 Ada, Ada. 
KEBNET FRANKLIN, 25 Grattan. 

Keeney Francis, 10 Bowne, Alto. 

KEENBY JOHN M,, 10 Bowne, Alto. 

Kegal Fred., Alaska. 

Kehoe Patrick, 1 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

Keifer Andrew J., Grandville. 

Keifer Furman, Grandville. 

Keifer Samuel, 16 Wyoming. Grand- 
ville. 

Kelder Peter, 16 Wyoming, Grandville. 

KELLER CHRISTIAN, jun., 34 
Bowne, Bowne. 

Keller Christian, 34 Bowne, Bowne. 

Kellier John, 23 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

KELLBY AUGUSTUS, 31 Paris, 
Gainesville. 

Kelly Dennis, 39 Cascade, G. Rapida, 

KELLEY DANX B.,38 Lowell, Lowell. 



Kelley Charles W., 21 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

KELLBT CHARLES, 4 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kellej Foster, 4 Gaines, G. Rapids. 

KELLEY HENRY, 17 Gaines, Grand 
Rapids. 

Kelley Lee, 4 Gaines, Grand Rapids. 

Kelley Nelson, 4 Gaines, Griind Rapids. 

Kelley James, 37 Ada, Ada. 

Kelley James, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Kelley Norman, 12 Grattan, Otisco, 
Ionia County. 

Kelly Patrick, 34 Grand Rapids. 

Kelly Patrick, 8 Walker, Grand Rapids 

Kelley Patrick, 35 Nelson, Nt^lson. 

Kelley Patrick, Cedar Springs. 

Kelley Patrick, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Kelley Randolph, 83 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Kelley Timothy, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Kelley William, 20 Gaines, G, Rapids. 

Kellogg Charles, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids 

KELLOGG FRANKLIN B., 30 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

Kellogg Francis N,, Cedar Springs. 

Kellogg Harmon, 3 Byron, North Byron 



Kennedy Michael, 30 Grattan, Can- 
nonsburg. 
Kennedy Michael, 10 Grattan, Can- 
Kennedy Patrick, 19 Paris, G. Bapids. 
KENNEDY SIMON, 30 Grattan, Can- 
nonsburg. 
Kennedy Sherman, 11 Vergennes, Alton 
Kennedy Wm. W., 17 Grand Rapids. 
Kcnney Edward, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Kenney Elyah, 13 Vergennes, Fallass- 

burg. 
Kenney James, 3 Plainfleld, Rockford. 
KENNY JOHN, 8 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Kenny Mrs. Mary, 8 Walker, G. Rapids 
Kenny Patrick, S Walker, 0. Rapids. 
KENNEL ENOCH J., 5 Nelson, Sand 

Kennon Marshall, 34 Walker, G, Rapids 
Kenny Thomas, 33 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Kent Cyrus, Rockford. 
KENT MARCUS A., 11 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Kent Marvin, 9 Grand Rapids. 
Kent Simeon, 11 Caledonia, Alaska. 
KENT WILLIAM, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 



POST'S ENZHT OF PAIN CUBES CHOI.ERA KORBOS. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AHD DIRBOTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 227 

Coldbrook St, Grocer, 

R«UifI D«Bler tn 

GROCERIES, STONEWARE, 

O^sli P^id for I»r'oca-u.oo efts ^^ixva, 

■'•"'"■■"■"•'■"■ GKAND RAPIDS. 

E. G. Eaton, 



(BUCCES80K TO EATON b CANFIELD,) 



WHOLESALE AND BETAIL 

No. 7 Canal St., 

Grand .Rapids, - ? Michigan. 

~ J. C. HEEKNER, 

DEALER IN 

Clocks & Watches, 

7 MONROE STREET, 7 

I»~ltepalrliiii Done ^Tltl» Neatness aud mspateb..^ 

Hosted by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



KENTON CRANDALL A., i Plain- 
fleld, RockJord. 

Kenyon George W., 1 Wyoming, Qraod 
Rapida. 

Kenyon E. G., 19 Byron, Byron Center. 

Kepkey Frederick, 23 Caledonia, Alaska 

Kerickes M. Bela, 1 Lowell. Lowell. 

Kerr Bd., 81 AiRoma, EnglisliTiUc. 

Kerr James L. B., 22 Vergeimes, Ver- 
bena es. 

KREH JAMES H., 22 Vergennea, Ver- 
geunes. 

Kerrer John, 20 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Kerrer Michael, 19 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Kerrer Michael, 20 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Ketchura Edward, » Lowell, Lowell. 

KETCHUM LORIN E,, 31 Solon, C^dar 



Keyes Henry D;, 18 Paris, Grand Rapida 
Keyes Jamea, 33 Paris, Grand Rapida. 
KEYES JAMES A., 83 Paris, Grand 

Kilta Nicholas, IT Nel.^oti, Cedar 

Springs. 
Kimball Charles W., 13 Nelso^i, Nelson. 
Kinche Dan forth, Lowell. 

BUY DRUGS AND MEDICINES AT J. GALLUP'S DRUG STORE, 6 CBtuJ 8i 



King George, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
KING JOHN L., 36 Cascade, Alaska. 
King John J., 36 Oaacade, Alaska. 
King Thomas, 83 Ada, Ada. 
King Michael G., 34 Vergennea, Fal- 



KING MYRON J., 34 Vergennes. 
Lowell, 

King Melvin A., 34 Grattan. Alton. 

King Myron A,, 36 Cascade, Cascade. 

KINGIN HARRY H,, 19 Courtland, 
Edgerton. 

KINGIN JAMES, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Kingitt Oliver T., 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Kinne Edwin, 5 Grand Rapida, Grand 

Kinne Lyman, 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapida. 
KINNEY DANIEL G., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Kinnej Daniel, 8 Ada, Ada. 
Kinnty Daniel, Lowell. 
Kinney George, 14 Paris, Grand Rapida 
Kinsley Abisha, Lowell. 
Kinsey David, Caledonia Station. 
Kinsey Isaac, 80 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 



Kindry Wm. S.,37 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 
King Alvin B., 27 Cascade, Alaska. 
King Augustus, 13 Cascade, Cnscade. 
Kies Othniel, 3 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Kibble Richard, 33 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Kibboom Jacob, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
KIDDER M.C., 11 Algoina, Edgerton. 
Kiefer Samuel E,, 19 Walker, Grand 

Kiel Simon, 19 Lowell, Lowell. 

Kies William, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

Kies Joaeph, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia, 

KILBURN JOSIAH R, 34 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapida. 

Kilgus Frederick, 1 Bowne, Alto. 

Killmartin -Jerrv, 5 Caledonia, Alaska, 

KILMER VANRENSSELAER, 30 Cas- 
cade, Cascade. 

Kilmer Simon, 9 Caledonia, Ala ka. 

King Arza H., 34 Grattan, Alton. 

King Charles B., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

King David H., 34 Vergennes, Lowell. 

King Darius, 18 Walker, Grand Rapids 

King Edmund, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

King Eraatus, 20 Ada, Ada. 

KING FRANK W., 1 Grattan, Ashley. 



Kinsey Jacob, 30 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
KINSEY JOHN, 4 Gaines, Hammond. 
Kinsman A. C. Lowell. 
KINSMAN JOHN H., 11 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Kinyon Joaeph, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 
Kinyon Jas. W., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 
KINYON WM. W., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 
KIPP JESSE, 21 Walker, G. Rapids. 
KIPP MOSES J., 4 Cannon, Rockfbrd. 
Kirby Peter, 3 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Kirehner Fred, Lisbon. 
KIRKLAND JACOB C, Burchville, 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Kistler Washington, 8 Gaines, Gainee- 

Kistlor Manelioas S., 8 Gaines, Gaines- 

Kitchen Henry, 8 Paris, Q. Rapids. 
KITCHEN Z, E,, 13 Walker, Grand 

Klau3 Peter. 36 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Kleinlogel Charles, 1 Solon, SandLake. 
Klenk G., 30 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Kienk John F., 19 Alpine, Pleasant, 



FORT'S £NEHT OF PAIN CURES COEIC. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTT. 229 

BIRGE ISOMERS, 

staple and Fancy 

GROCERS! 



EXTENSIVE DEALERS IN 



Teas, Cof ee, Sugars, Sjnrups, Molasses, 

SPICES, CANNED GOODS, &c,, Sic. 
SELLING EVERYTHING LOW FOR CASH. 

Higliest Maiket Price Paid foi Country Produce, 

35 Monroe St., 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAX. 



Putnam Bros. & Co., 

Wtiolesale Dealers in 

OYSTERS, 

And Manufacturers of 

20 Monroe Street, 
GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

»d by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTOKY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Kline Jaiia A., 24 Tei^enaeB, Fallass- 

KLIKE JOHN W., 1 Bowne, Alto. 

Kline Philip, Rockford. 

Kline William, Burcliville, (Bureli's 

-Mills.) 
KLINOMAN DAVID, S3 Gaines. Ham- 

Klingiuan Jacob, 2Z Gaines, Ham- 

KlingDian John K., 25 Qaincs, Grand 

Kloot JooBt, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Klumpp August E., Lowell. 
Klampp William E., Lowell. 
Knapp Araaaa, 27 Vergennet), Lowell. 
Koapp Albert B., 21 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Knapp Abner, Lowwll. 
KNAPP E. U., 17 Grand Rapicla. 
Knapp Franklin C, 27 Vergennes, 

Low-ell. 
KNAPP HARRY, Lowell. 
KNAPP STEVEN B., Lowell. 
Knee Wesley H., 35 Grattan, Alton. 
KNIFFIN HIRAM, Alaska, 
Knickerbocker Charles, 16 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 



Kodderetsch August W., 26 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
Konklfi Abraham, 28 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Konkle Elijah, 31 Plainfield, Belmont. 
KONKLE HOLLIS, 28 Plainfield. 

Belmont. 
Konkle Phineas, 31 Plainfield, Mill 

KONKLE TIMOTHY, 28 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Kooistra John, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 

KOOn' CHARLES E,, Lisbon. 
KOON WM. L., 19 Tyrone, Caanovia. 
KOON SHERMAN J., Lisbon. 
Koopman Cornelius, 28 Grand Rapids. 
Kopf Goodrich, LowelL 
KOPF JOHN, Lowell. 
Koster Henry, Grandrille. 
Koyack Authonv, 6 Plainfield, English- 

ville. 
KRAFT GEORGE B., Caledonia, 

KRAFT VALENTINE, r,owell. 
Kramer Nicholas, I'i Walker, Grand 

Kramer Peter, 33 Alpine, Indian 



PUMPS, PIPE St POINTS FOR, PAT. DRIVE WELLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Knickerbocker Cjrenius, 16 Caledonia, 

Knickerbocker Porter, 16 Caledonia, 

Knickerbocker Walter, 12 Oakfield, 

Greenville. 
Knickerhocker Sylvanus, 16 Caledonia, 

Knight George W., 8 Byron, North 

Knight Homer, 13 Algoraa, Edgerton. 
KNIFFIN ADGATE C, 30 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Kniffin Colossian, Lowell. 
Kniffin Charles, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
KNIFFIN HIRAM, Alaska. 
Knowles James A., Grandrille. 
Kocher Albert, Sparta Center. 
KOCHBB CHRISTOPHER, 3 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Kocher Elmon A., 8 Sparta, Sparta 



Krance Christian, 13 Walker, G. Rapids, 
Kreke Conrad, 35 Wyoming, North 

Byron. 
Kritcher Conrad, Lisbon. 
Kromer Augustas, Cannonshurg. 
KROMER ABRAHAM, Village Can- 
non shurg. 
KROMER RUSSELL, 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
KRUM ADELBERT, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Kram Abram, 33 Vetgecnea, Lowell. 
KRUM CORNELIUS, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Krum Edwin B., 33 Vergennes, LowelL 
KRUM WILLIAM, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Krupp Daniel, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
KULP JARED, Alaska. 
Kusterer Christian, 30 Walker, Grand 

Rapidi. 
Kusterer Jacob, 9 Cascade, Cascade. 
KUTZ S. B., Rcckford. 



THE KHOWINO ONES, AMD GOOD JUDGES. USE 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOBT OF KENT COtlHTT. 



Laaweoinan Gaart, 33 Grand Rapids. 
LaBarge Benjamin, 16 Caledonia, 

Alaslia. 
LaBarge Francis, 16 Caledonift, Alaska. 
LABARaE GEORGE, 36 G. Rapids. 
LaBarge Stephen H., 33 Ada, Ada. 
LaBarge William, 29 Ada, Ada. 
LaBarr Joseph H^ 30 Sparta, Lisbon. 
LaBarres James, Rockford, 
Laberdy James, 1 Lriwell, Lowell. 
LACEY HEZEKIAH, Cedar Springs. 
Lacey John R., Village Cannonsburg. 
Laddburj Lewellyn, 13 Gaines, Ham- 

Ladner Herbert, 30 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Ladner Francis. 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Ladner Henry, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Ladner James, 8G Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

LADNER JAMES, 20 Cannon, Can- 
non aburg. 

Lafayette Isaac, 18 Spencer, Nelson. 



Lampbier Lorenzo, 39 Grand Rapids. 
Lamoreaux Andrew W., 13 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek, 
Lamoreaux Andrew W., 31 Plainfield, 

Mil! Creek. 
Lamoreaux Andrew J,, 1 Walker, Mill 

Creek. 
Lamoreaux Andrew, 1 Walker, Mill 

LAMOREAUX AMBROSE, 8 Ada, 

Ada. 
LaniiireaHX David, 31 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
Lamoreaux Florence, 1 Walker, Mill 

Creek. 
LAMOREAUX, GEORGE W., 13 

Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Lamoreaux Lester H., 1 Walker, Mill 

Lamoreaux Peter, 36 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz, 
Lamoreaux Wm, M., 20 Cannon, Aua- 

Lamont Alexander, 34 Walker, Grand 



BUY PATENT MEDICINES AT « 



kl StiHt. 



Laison Jacob, 1 Wyoming, G, Rapid. 
Laiaon John, 1 Wyoming, G, Rapids. 
Lake John T,, 31 Bowne, Bowne, 
Lallor Joseph, 17 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Lally Martin, 11 Bowne, Bowne. 
LALLY PATRICK IL, 27 Grattan, 

Lally Thomas 8., 11 Bowne, Bowne. 

Lally Thomas, 27 Grattau, Grant. 

Lamb Thomas B., Lowell. 

LAMBBRTON DANIEL C, 5 Grand 
Rapids, Grand Rapids, 

Lamberton, Daniel C, Jr.. 5 Grand 
Rapids, Grand Rapids. 

Lamberton Charles, 17 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

LAMBERTON JACOB, 17 Spencer, 
Spencf-r Mills. 

Lamberton Theron, 17 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills, 

Lampman Henry, 25 Lowell, Lowell. 

Lampman James, 25 Lowell, LoweU. 

Lampee Henry, 19 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Lamphier Albert, 17 Grand Rapid&. 

Lamphere Calvin, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 
viJle. 

Lamphere Lester S., 31 Ada, G, Rapids. 



Lamont John, 34 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Lament Silas H., 16 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Landon Adonijah, 1 Ada, Oannons- 

burg. 
Landon David F , Lisbon. 
LANDON D. F., Lisbon, 
LANDON IRA, Cannonsburg. 
Landis Eli, 7 Byrou, Grandville. 
Landis John, 18 Bjron, Grandville. 
Landis Samuel, 18 Byron, Grandville. 
Lane C. C. 14 Lowell, Lowell, 
Lane Mrs, F. A., Lowell. 
Lane Geo,, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lane George F., 22 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Lane James M., 35 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Lane John, 24 G rattan. Grant. 
Lane Jonas H., Lowell. 
Lane Palmer, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Lane Wm, E., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Langley George, Lowell. 
Langley Warren, Lowell. 
Langs Aionzo, 11 LoWell, LowelL 
Langs Jacob, 11 Vergennes, Alton. 
Langs Jamea M., 11 Vergennes, Alton. 
Langs, Mrs. Mary, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Langs Wallace W,, 11 Lowell, LowelL 



FORT'S XXTBAOT OF LEMOH. 



yGooQle 



HISTORT AMD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



LiNNING EDWARD, 13 Courtlaad, 

Oakfield. ' 
Lapham Darius A., Rock ford. 
Laphani Embre B., Rockford. 
LAPHAM SMITH, Eoukford. 
LappiQ Michael, 31 Grattan, Caiino 

burg. 
Laraway Aivin, 17 Paris, G. Rapida. 
Laraway Barney J., 8 Parle, G., Rapids. 
LARAWAY JAMES R., 4 Cascade, 

Cascade. 
LARA WAT WILLIAM. 28 G. Rapids. 
Larimer James, 33 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Larkin Peter, Cedar Sprioffa. 
Larson Lars, 9 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Last William, 26 Grand Rapids. 
Latham Leonard, 31 Wyoming, Grand- 

Laughlin John, 7 Vergennea, Ver- 

gennes. 
Laughlin James, 28 Grattan, Grattan 

Laughlia Patrick, 8 Vergennea, Ver- 



Laughlin William, 

nonsburg. 
Lavendar John, 10 Vergi 



Cannon, Can- 
Lowell. 



LAWYER JOHN, 8 Bowne, Alto. 
LAWYER MRS. LYDIA, 35 Grand 

Lawyer Wm. R., 35 Grand Rapida. 

Lazier James, 33 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Leach Cerril, 13 PlainBeld, Rockibrd. 

Leach Collina, Rockford. 

LEATHERS DEWITT, Sa Cascade, 
Cascade. 

LEATHERS D. J., Rockford. 

Leathers Samuel, 36 Algoma, Rockford. 

Leatherman John, 16 Gaines, G.Rapids 

Leavitt Henry A., 16 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

LEAVENWORTH ALONZO D., 34 
Algoma, Edgerton. 

Leavenworth Fred, M., 24 Algoma, 
Edgerton . 

Le Baron William, 4 Alpine, G. Rapids 

Leclear Baptist, 36 Cascade, Alaska. 

Leclear Daniel, 35 Cascade, Alaska. 

LECLEAR FRANCIS, 36 Cascade, 
Alaska. 

Leclear Jamea, 3R Cascade, Alaska. 

LECLEAR LEVI, 37 Cascade, Cascade. 

LE CLEAR GEORGE R., 15 Caledonia, 

LE CLEAR THOMAS, 15 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 



PUMPS FOR CISTEFINS, AND FORCE PUMPS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Lavender Mrs. Lncretia, 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Lavender Marvin B., 7 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Lnverty Henry, 14 Grattan, Grattan 

LAVERTY HARVEY E., 14 Grattan, 

Grattan Center. 
Lawless James, 5 Vergennea, Ver- 

LAWRASON ROBERT, 35 Cascade, 

Alaska. 
Lawrence C. D., IS Grand Rapids. 
Lawrence George, 21 Plainfield, Bel- 

LAWRENCE LYMAN, 11 Walker, 

Grand Rapida. 
Lawrence Thomas, 13 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Lawrence Wm. Cedar Springs. 
Lowry Ephraim, 3 Bowne, Alto. 
Lowry Leonard B., 17 Cascade, Caa- 

LOWRY MOSES, 3 Bowne, Alto. 
Lawaon Lewis G., 13 Walker, Grand 

Lawyer Fred., 21 Lowell, Lowell. 



Ledger James, 15 Byron, Byron Ceafer 
Ledward John, 39 Grand Rapida. 
Ledyard Wm. B., South Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Lee Benj. J., 38 Bowne, Bowne. 
Lee Charles II., 36 Paris, Grand Rapida 
LEE EDMUND Jr., Lowell. 
Lee J. Edwin, Lowell. 



LEE SOLOMON, 34 Vergennea, Lo- 

Lee William, 20 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

LEE WILLIAM, 37 Bowne, Bowne. 

Leeee Ferdinand, 11 Bowne, Alto. 

Leece John, 1 Bowne, South Boston. 

LEBMAN WALTER, 18 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Leeuw Abram, 32 Paris, Grand Rapida, 

LEPFINGWELL 0. W., 33 G. Rapids. 

Lefller David, 38 Alpine, Indian Creek. 

Leffingwell Henry H.. 13 G. Rapids. 

LEFEVER, FRANCIS M., 35 Paris, 
Hammond. 

LePever Stark, 35 Paris, Hammond. 

Legg Elijah, Rockford. 



: A BLESSING TO ANY COUNTRY-FORT'S 



yGooQle 



HIBTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUHTT. 



23S 



Leiblcr Jacob, 20 Gaines, G. Rapids. 
Leiaod Aaron, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
LEMON JOHN A. Lowell. 
LENNON EDWARD, 39 Cascade, Cas- 

Lennon John, 29 Cascade, Cascade. 
Lennon Thomas, 39 Cascade, Cascade. 
Lent Adam, 17 Algoraa, Rockford. 
LENT GEORGE W., Sparta Center. 
Lent James M., 13 Walker, G. Rspids. 
Leonard Cliarles, IS Sparta, Sparta 

Leonard Henry, i Bowne, Alto. 
Leonard Henry S., 15 Algoma, Rock- 

LBONARD PATRICK, 17 Bowne, Har- 
ris Creek. 

Leonard Patrick, 37 Ada, Ada. 

Lcpard David, 10 Paris, G. Rapids. 

LeRne, Lewis B., 30 Grand Rapids. 

LESLIE CHAS. H., 38 Lowell, Lowell. 

LESLIE JAMES B., 26 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 

Lester Henry S., 19 Sparta, Lisbon, 

Lester, Miss Elnor, 30 Ada, Ada. 

LESTER JOHN L., 30 Ada, Ada. 

Lester James, 23 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Lessen Barnard, 26 Grand Rapids. 



LILLIE CHESTER A., 3 Oakfteld, 

QreenTiile. 
Liliie Chester, 3 Oakfield. Greenville. 
Lillie William H., 3 Oakfield, Oakfleid. 
Lillibridge Ricliard, 80 Alpine, Indian 

Lillibridge C, 31 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Lillibridge Thomas, 31 Alpine, Indian 

Greek. 
LILLY GEORGE, 21 Byron, Byron 

Byron Center. 
LILLY JULIA A., 10 Byron, Gaines- 

Linberg John, 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 
LTNDERMAN G. S., 39 G. Rapids, 
LINDERMAN JASON, 16 Courtland, 

Courtland Center, 
Linderman Richard, 15 Wjominjt, 

GrandTille. 
Lind George, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
Lind Wra. H., 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Lind William, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
Lindsay Joseph W., Lowell 
LINDSAY JOHN L., 17 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. ^ 

Lind»ay Solomon, 5 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Lindsley Lester S., 9 Grattan, Grattan 



ROPES, ALL SIZES, AND TACKLE BLOCKS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



LESSITER HENRY, 4 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

LBSSTPER WILLIAM, 33 Oakfield, 
-ishley. 

Lewis Allen, 15 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Lewis Abner, 14 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Lewis Benton, 17 Nelson, Cedar Springs 

Lewis Dennis. ITNcIson. Cedar Springs 

LEWIS EDWARD, 14 Algoma, Edger- 

Lewis George, 15 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Lewis George R., 35 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Lewis Harry, 10 Oakfield, Oalcfield. 
Lewis J. S., Burchville (Burch's Mills ) 
Lewis Julius, 8 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Lewis John, 33 A^oma, Rockford. 
Lewis Joseph, 30 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Lewis Loren, 13 Cascade, Cascade. 
Lewis Oliver R., 15 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Lewis Peter, 13 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Lewis Wm. H., 10 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Liddle George, Rockford. 
Liddy James, Cedar Springs. 
Lifer John, 4 Sparta, Casnovia. 
Light George W., 38 Sparta, Lisbon. 



Linesetter John, 36 Plainfield, Grand 

Link Alonzo, Cedar Springs. 
LINNELL GEORGE, 33 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
LINSEA WfLLIAM, 12 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Linsey Myron, Alaska Village. 
Linsley Henry, 15 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Lippela Christian, 4 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Lippela John 0., 4 Oakfield, Oakfleid. 
Liscomb A, Q., 17 Walker, G. Rapidi. 
LISTON DANIEL, 9 Solon, Cedar 

Springs, 
Litle Charles E,, 15 Cannon, Cannona- 

, burg. _ 
Litle Lois, 15 Cannon, Oannonsburg. 
LITLE WM. G., 15 Cannon, Cannons- 

Littell A. J., Rockford. 
Littiefield Samuel, Lowell. 
Livergood Andrew Q., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Livingston Charles, 30 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Livingston Hiram, 3 Bowne, Alio. 
LIVINGSTON HARVEY, 34 Ada, Ada 
Livingston John, 31 Ada, Ada. 



VESTE&N I.INI]f £NT AND LIVER FILLS- 



Hosted by 



Google 



HISTORY AND DIREOTOBY OP KENT COUNTY. 



Livingston Moses, 3 Bowne, Alto. 
LLOYD MAEION, 3 Plainfleiti, Rock- 
ford. 
LIVINGSTON MRS. P. A., Ceiiar 



Livingston Wm. H., Cedar Springs. 

LivingatoQ William, 23 Plaiulield, Aas- 
terlitz. 

LOASE JOHN F., Rockford. 

LOCK WM. H., Alaska Village. 

Lock Wm. N., 37 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Lockwood Dis, S3 Courtland, Ci>iirt- 
land Center. 

Lockwood George, 19 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Lockwood Harvej, Burcliville iBurcli'a 
Mills.) 

Lockwood Hezekiah, 84 Ada, Ada. 

Lockwood James M., 18 Nelson, Ceilar 
Springs. 

Lbcbwood John W., 21 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Lockwood John A.. 23 OakBeld, Ashley 

LOCKWOOD NANCY J., 33 Oakfield, 
Ashley. 

LOCKWOOD S. R., Lisbon. 

Lockwood Seth, 33 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



Lord Edwin, 11 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 
Lord Wiliiam C, 15 Nelson, Nelson. 
Lord Wm. L., 25 Sparta, Sparta Center 
Loschet Michael, 31 Alpine, Indian 

IjOt William, 1 Bowne, Lowell. 
Lott Charles, 30 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
LouckesAlvah, 3 Walker, Grand Rapids 
Louckes John, 2 Walker, Grand Rapids 
LOUDON JOHN, Cedar Springs. 
Loudon John, 36 Tjrone, Sparta Cen. 
Loughhn Frank, 84 Walker, G. Rapids 
Loughlin Thomas, 34 Walker, Grand 

Lounsburj Gerret R,, 5 Parts, Grand 

Love Henry, 27 Cascade, Alaska. 
Lovejoj Asa T., 4 Bjron, North Byron. 
Lovejoy Aianson, 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Lovejoy Cyrus. Lowell. 
Lovejoy Daniel, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lovejoy David, 32 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lovejoj Hiram, 38 Byron, Byron Oi-n. 
Lovejoy James, 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Lovejoy John, 30 Neieon, Cedar Springs 
Love, oy Lewis T., Lowell. 
Lovojoy Oliver, 7 Cannon, Rockford. 
LOVELAND CYRENO, 37 Lowell, 
Lowei!. 



COOPERS' AND BLACKSMITHS' TOOLS, AT W. D, FOSTER'S. 

Lohr Henry, 17 Pans, Grand Rapids. 
Lokrke Julius J., M Ada, Ada. 
Long Jacob, 5 Algoma, Cedar Sprin) 
LONG JOHN R., 3 Byron, North 



Long John, 37 Algoma, Rockford. 

Long Samuel, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Long Wiliiam, 3.1 Algoma, Rockford. 

Longcore John, 8r,, 3 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Longcore John, Jr., 8 Tyrone, Casnovia 

LOOK JOHN Q., Lowell. 

Loomis Alvin C., 8 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Loomis Alfred, 6 Walker, Grand Rapids 

Loomis Alexauder, 36 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Loomis Daniel, Cedar Springs. 

Loomis Hugii. 6 Grattan, Orattan Cen, 

LOOMIS JEFFERSON W., 4 Ver- 
ged nes, Alton. 

Loomis Levi, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Loomis Lovica B., 14 Byron, Gaines- 

Loomis Wm. H., 2S Gainea, Cody's 

Mills. 
Loop John, 9 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Lord Charles, 1 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 



Loveless Sylvester, 1 Gaines, Ham- 

LOVELL EDWARD, 15 Walker, O. 

Lovell James, 39 Algoma, Rockford. 
Love 11 James, Burchviile, (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Lovell James, 13 Vcrgennes, Fallass- 

Lovell Joseph, 14 Vergennes, Alton. 

Lovell James, 6 Plainficld, Belmont. 

Lovell Sally, 6 Plajnfleld, Belmont. 

Lovell Sylvester, 6 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Lovelock Levi, 31 Oakfield, Oakfield. 

Low Alvah, 11 Grattan, Otisco, Ionia 
County. 

Lowden Mrs., Lowell. 

Lowden James, 85 Tyrone. Sparta Cen. 

Lowden Stephen E., 85 Tyrone, Sparta 
Center. 

LOWE CHARLES C, S3 Sparta, Spar- 
ta Center. 

Lowe Charles, 36 Gaines, Caledonia 
Station. 



LUHBEBHEH USE TORT'S WESTEBN I.IHIHE1IT, 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTORT OP KBNl COUNTY, 

CHAS. A. BISSONETTE, 



MANTFFAtTUREB OF 



Light and Lumber Wagons, 

Ai-.IL. ■work: wa»ra.p*te». 

No. 42 Bridge St West Side. 

- GRAND KAPIDS. MICH. 

LADIES AND CHILDREN'S 

Furnishing Goods Store! 

No. 39 Monroe Street. 

Ladies' Uunder Garments, Hosiery, Children's 

Hose, Wrappers and Drawers, Corsets, 

Handkerchiefs, Collars and Cuffs, 

Lace Goods, Forms, Bustles, 

Gloves, Hoop Skirts, &c. 

THE ONLV STOBE OF THE KIND IN THE CITV, 
Our Prices are Low. 

J. E. & W. S. Earle, 

No. 39 Monroe Street. 

A. J. ROSE, 

DEALER IN 

Groceries aiid Provisions, 

FIOGH, FEES, -CHAIN, &C. 

A.r-1. ORTtKRS T>nOMI>TL.Y ATTENDED TO, 

Corner Court and Bridge Sts., 

"""""' GRAND KAPIDS, MICH. 

ted by Google 



HI8T0KT AND DIRBCTOET OF KEHX COUSTY. 



Lowe Hiram, 28 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Lown Joseph, 13 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Lowry Ephraim, 2 Bowne, Alto. 
Lowry Leonard B., 17 Cascade, Caa- 

LOWRY HENRY NEWELL, 17 Cas- 
cade, Cascade. 
LOWBY MOSES, S Bowne, Alto. 
Loyd Patrick, 18 Paris, Graud Rapida. 
Loyer Christian, SS Lowell, Lowell. 
Loyer Jacob, 34 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lucas Hetirj, 32 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
LUCAS HOWARD J., 33 Paris, Grand 

LUCE E.'m., Lisbon. 

Luce Hiram C, 34 Cascade, Cascade. 

Ludington Wm. D., 1 Byron, Kelloggs- 

Ludwig Endres, 30 Byron, Byron Cen. 
LULL LUUIAN B., Lowell. 
Lull Lyman, 31 Tergennes, Lowell. 
Landun Charlea, 9 Sparta, Li ebon. 
Luodeen Gustavus, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Luneke Luis, 25 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Lusher John. 38 Algoma, Rockford. 
Luak Eliza P., 14 Lowell, Lowell, 



LuBk Jeremiah, 86 Lowell, Lowell. 

Lybarker George, 24 Caledonia, Alaska. 

LYBABKER LAFAYETTE, 33 Cale- 
donia, Caledonia Station. 

LYNCH JEREMIAH, 31 Walker, G. 
Rapids. 

Lynch Jeremiah, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Lynch Mrs. J., 1 Wyoming, G. Rapida. 
Lynch Timothy, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapida. 
Lyndyek Peter, 13 Wyoming, Grand 

Lynch Patrick, 31 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Lynn Nathan, 15 Gaines, Hammond, 
Lyon Henry M., 8 Bowne, Alto. 
Lyon Morgan L,, Lowell. 
Lyon Morgan, 20 Vergennes, Vcr- 

gennes. 
Lyon Nelson T., 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lyon R. B., 7 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lyon Sanford W., 38 Grand Rapids. 
Lyon Wm. B., 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Lyons John, 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Lyons Orsamua, 16 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 



AMERICAN CIDER MILLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, " "d 



M 



Maas Joseph, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Maben Cbarltis, 13 Paris, Cascade. 
Mabie Amos C, 38 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
MABIE ELIAS, 11. Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Mabie Nelson, 31 Solon, Cadar Springs. 
MABIE JOHN F., 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Macomber Horatio B., 11 Cannon, Bost- 

wick Lake. 
Mack Nathaniel, IS Oakfield, Green- 

Maddern Edwin, 36 Cannon, Cannona- 
burg. 

Maddern Frank, Village of Cannons- 
burg. 

Maddocks Alpbonao, 14 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Madan Owen, 18 Paris, Grand Rapi'ds. 

MadigsD Jamea, 30 Cascade, Cascade. 

Madison Cass B., 16 Grattan, Grattan' 



Madison Charles, 36 Tyrone, Sparta 

MADISON GRANVILLE, 13 Cannou 
Bostwiclc Lake. 

MADISON LUTHER K., 16 Grattan 
Grattan Center. 

Madron David, 7 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Maera William, 20 Ada, Ada. 

Magaron John, 36 Plainfield, Austolitz. 

Magaron John, 34 Plainfiekl, Auster- 
htz. 

MAGEE FRANS, 4 Grand Rapids. 

Magoon Henry, 11 Algoma, Sparta 

Magoon Thomas, 17 Algoma, Sparta 

Centre, 
Mahane John, 19 Grattan, Caunons- 

Mahoney J., 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
MAIER JACOB, 24 Gaines, Caledonia 
Station. * 



FORT'S WESTERN LIMIUENT CURES ALL LAMENESS. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AHD DiaECTORY Or KBNT COUHTY. 



CHOCEEIES,PBOYISIOBIS, 

Crockery, Glassware, 

86 Canal Street, 
GBAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

X.B.— HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOB PRODUCE. 

NICHOLS 85 NATSMITH, 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Doors, Sash, Blinds, 

Stair Bviildlng, Scroll Sawing, and Custom 

Planing, Done to Order. 

28 Mill Street, South of Bridge St. Bridge, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

Agents for the JVew Patent Machine Made Roped Moldings.' 

P. KUSTERER, 

Wines and Liquors, Cigars and Tobacco, 

OF ALL KINDS. 

No. 100 Canal Street, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 

Hosted by Google 



HI8T0EY AND DIfiECTORT OF REST COUNTT. 



MAIN GEORGE, 1 Oakfleld, Green- 
ville. 
Main John, 84 A\gom&, Rockford, 
Main Samuel, 26 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 
Main William, 1 Oaitfield, Greenville. 
Makkss Garrat, 18 Wyoming, Grand- 

Makkas Klaa*, 18 Wyoming. Grand- 

MALC'OLM ISAAC B., Alaska. 
Malcolm Joshua T., 15 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Malcolm John, 20 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Malcolm James W., 30 Walker, Grand 

MALCOLM JAMES, Alaska. 
Malin William. S Byron, Grandville. 
MAUN PATiaCK, 8 Byron, Grand- 

Mallory M., Burcbville, (Burch's 

Miile.) 
MALLORT RUaSEL, 30 Courtlaud, 

Courtland Center. 
Maione John, 28 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Malone Jptan, 29 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Malune Michael, 22 Grattan, Qrattan 

Maione Patrick, 3 Ada, Cannonsburg. 

: SPINNING WHEELS AND REELS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, i 



Manning Martin, 36 Grand Rapids. 

Man waring Wm. 11,, 8 Wyoming, Grand 
ville. 

MANWARING WILLIAM, 8 Wyom- 
ing, Grandville. 

Mapea Andrew, 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Mapes Barnabas, 27 Sparta, Spartit Cen. 

Mapes Fernando C, 31 Lowell, Lowell. 

Mapea Josepli, 6 Plainfit-ld, Engiishville 

Mapea Jesse, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Mapes Nebemiah, 28 Sparta, Sparta 

Mapons Wm. H., 10 Byron, Horth 

Byron. 
March Wilbur S., 29 Bowne, Harris 

Morgan Charles, 7 Lowell, Lowell. 
MARIS PAUL, 29 Grand Rapids. 
MARKEN THOMAS, 3 Grand Rapids. 
Markham Bradley, 21 Alpine, Berlin. 
Markham Chauncey, 18 Alpine, Pleas- 
Marks John, Alaska. 
Marritt James, 15 Byron. Rvron Center 
MARSH CHAS C, 5 C^i^cade, Cascade 
Marsh Uenry 6., Alaska, 
MARSH PHILETUS L., 11 Gaines, 



Maione Patrick, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Maione Sidney, 33 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Matony Michael, 30 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Maloy P., 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Malpass Daniel, Lowell. 
MANCHESTER JOHN, 7 Sparta, Lib- 

MANCHESTER MARTIN, 18 Bowue, 

Alaska. 
Manglt'tz E., Grandville. 
Manktalow Charles J., 16 G. Rapids. 
MANLY EDMUND, 4 Walker, Indian 

Manly Edwin, 6 Alpine, Pleasant, 
Manly John. 4 Walker, Indian Creek, 
MANLY MRS. J., 32 Sparta, Lisbon, 
Manly Sherebiah H., Lisbon. 
MANN CHARLES, 33 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Mann Christian, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 
MANN JACOB F., Lisbon, 
Mann Peter, 16 Vergennes, Lowell, 
Manning John, 86 Grand Rapida. 



Marshall George, 3 Byron, North Byron 

Marshall Isaiah, 10 Byron, North Byron 

Marshall Joseph, 3 Byron, North Byron 

Marshall Robert, Lowell. 

MARSHALL SAMUEL, 2 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Marshall Scott, 16 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Marshall Wm. D., 33 Lowell, Alto. 

Martin Conrad, 37 Alpine, G. Rapids. 

MARTIN DANIEL W., 18 Caledonia, 
Caledonia Station. 

Martin David, 13 Algoma, Edgerton, 

Martin Ensley, Rockford. 

Martin Frederick, 13 Algoma, Edger- 

Martin Gandliff, 13 Algonia, Edgerton. 

Martin George, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 

MARTIN JOSIAH, 18 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

MARTIN JOSEPH, 6 GaincB. Grand 
Rapids. 

MARTIN JAMES H., 36 O. Rapids. 

Martin Joseph A,, 33 Walker, Grand 

Martin John, Alaska Village. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES RHEUUATISH. 



yGooQle 



fllsTOfty ASD biKEcToM oJ KESt cotiimr. 289 

o^ ARCHITECT. *. 

Desips for Citj and Counlry furnished irpon Short Notice, 

Office, 26 Canal St., (up stairs,) 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

West Side Drug Store, 

Martin's Block, Bridge St., (West.) 

GEO. mTsTUART, 

deai.es in 

DRUGS, MEDICINES AND CHEMICALS, 

oils. Paints, Varnishes and Brushes. 

The Choicest Brands of Cigars, Smelling; & Chewing Tohaccos, 

A Carefully Selected Assortment of 

STATIONERY & SCHOOL BOOKS 

Has been added to the above stock. 

GRAND BAPIDS, MICH. 

JHannfoclnrer of 

BUGGIES, SLEIGHS, 

mm AID HIAVY IIIMBB WAtGNS, 

BLACKSMJTHING AND ALL KINDS OF 

REPAIRING. 

N(M. 13 Bnd 14, Cor. Bronaon and Kent Sta., 




yGoosle 



HlflTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KBMT COUHTY. 



Martin N. M., 5 Grand Rapida, Grand 
martin' RUP0S W., 6 Cascade, Cas- 

MARTIN SIMON P,, S Caledoaia, 

Alaska, 
Martin Thomas, 30 Vergennea, Ver- 

gennes. 
MARTIN THOMAS W., 16 Paris, 

Grand RapidR. 
MARTIN THOMAS, 6 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
MARTIN THOMAS 8., 26 Paris, Grand 

Martiodale Benjamin F., 27 Walker, 

Graad Rapids. 
MABTINDALE CHARLES J., 11 

Sparta, Spar(a Center. 
Martindaie David B., Sparta Center. 
MARTINDALE THEODORE F., 34 

Alpine, Indian Creek. 
MARVIN OKVILLE G., 5 Nelson, 

Sand Lake. 
MaeoD Mrs. A. H., Lowell. 
Masno Benjamin, 16 Grattan, Orattan 

Center. 
MASON ELLIOTT, 25 Grattan, Grant. 
MasoD Fraak, Dowell. 
Maaon James, 3 Ada, Cannonaburg. 

NOVELTY CLOTHES WRINGER, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, l» & M Monroe Street. 



Maifield Allen D., 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Maxfleld Slatthew M., 27 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Maxfield W. W., 34 Grand Rapids. 
Maxim Mrs. Mary, 13 Algoma, Edger- 

MAXWBLL HUGH T,, i Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
May Gustavua, 34 Alpine, Indian Creek 
May James, SO Cascade, Cascade. 
Maybee William, 1 Alpine, Englishville 
Mayer Jacob, 30 Plainfiold, Mill Creek. 
MAYNARD JOHN, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 
MAYNARD THOMAS R., 38 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Majne Andrew, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
MAZE JAMES H., Cedar Springs. 
McALISTER HUGH B., Alaska. 
McAlon Swindle, 33 Plainfield, Grand 

McArthur Prank, 33 Oakfield, Grattaa 
Center. 

McARTHUR GILES, 32 Oakfield, Grat- 
tan Center. 

McARTHUR HARRY, 33 Oakfield, 
Grattan Center. 



Maaon Martin, Si Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
MASON SAILSBURY, 3 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
Mason Theodore W., Lowell. 
Mason William, 34 Plainfleld, Grand 

Rapids. 
MASON WM. R., 36 Grattan, Grant. 
MASTENBROECK HENRY, 33 Ver- 

gennes, Fallassburg. 
Masterbrooks John, 30 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Matthewson Jno. E. W., 24 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
MATHEW80N J. M,, Lowell. 
Mathewsou Neil, 33 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Matthews John, IB Alpine, Pleasant. 
Matthews James E., 18 Alpine, Pleas- 
Matthews John, 1 Lowell, Lowell. 
Matthews Michael, 16 Cascade, Cas- 

Mattbews Philip F., 18 Alpine, Pleas- 
ant. 

Maurer Mrs. Anna M., 6 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 



McArthnr Orange, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 
Center. 

McArthnr Robert, SO Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

McArthur Solomon, 30 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

McArthur Truman, 36 Byron, Cody's 
Mills. 

McBRIDE ALEX., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

McBRIDB WM. T., 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

McOabe Andrew, 86 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

McCabe Chester, Lowell. 

McOabe Henry, Lowell. 

McCaine Simon, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

McCall Mrs. Catharine, 4 Bowne, Alto. 

McCALLUM DUNCAN, SB Bowne, 
Harris Creek. 

McCarthy Charles, 39 Walker, Grand 
lUpida. 

McCarthy CHARLES, 30 Grattan, 
Cannonsburg. 

McCarthy Dennis, 30 Grattan, Can- 
nonsburg. 

McCarthy Dennis, 34 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 



LET SVEBT.ONEITROUBI.ED WITH X.IVEB 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AHD DIREOTOKT OF KENT COUNTY. 



Mi-Carlhy Jeremiah, 20 Walker, Grand 

Eapida, 
McCarthy John, 80 Graltan, Orattan 

MoCartliy John, 7 Vergennes, Ver- 

McCarthj Wiiliam, 80 Grattan, Can- 

McCartj Clmrka, Lowell. 

McCariy Charles, ii3 Bowne, Harris 

McCartj Daniel. 34 Walker, G. lUpids. 

McOarty John, I Wyoming, Q. Bapids. 

McOarty Mosea A., 31 Guinea, Cody's 
Mills. 

Mccarty MICHAEL, BI Gaines, 
Codj'e Mills. 

MtCarlvN.L-, Lowell. 

McOAUTY PEllRY, 35 Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

MeCaul Benj. B., 20 Ada, Ada. 

McCaul Charles S., 20 Ada, Ada. 

McCaul, Wm. U., 20 Ada, Ada. 

McCauley Barney, 32 Urattan, Can- 
non sburj;. 

McCanley James, 28 Grattan, Grattan. 
Center. 

MtCauley Patrick, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 



McConnell William, 38 ByroD, Byron 

Center. 
McConnell Wm. A., Lowell. 
McConnell William, 3 Caledonia, Alaska 
McConuon Patrick, 23 Paris, Grand 

Rspida. 
McCord Patrick, 20 Grand Itapids. 
McCORMICK, BDWARD, 3 Ada, Can- 

nonshurg. 
McCormick II. F., 23 Grand Rapids. 
McCormiuk James, 3 Ada, UaonoDS- 

McCormick Michael, 33 Cannon, Oan- 

nonahiirg. 
McCOY MARK II., Grandville. 
McCoy Sheldon, Lowell. 
McCrath Charles, 31 Grand Rapids. 
McCHATIl JAMES, 21 Grand Rml&t. 
McCrath J^wis, U Paris, Grand Kapids. 
McCrory B. 8., Bocktbrd. 
McCULLY THOMAS, 20 Bowne, Harrii 

McDanioI Daniel, Lowell. 
MeDaunell O. C, Lowell. 
McDIARMlD ANGUS, 15 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
McDIARMlD CIIAUNCET, 27 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
McDiarmid Duncan, 15 Bowne, Bowne. 



THE AMERICAN BASE BURNER COAL STOVE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 

McDiarmid Jamea D., 23 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
McDIARMlD JAMES, 28 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Bowne, 



HcCanky Peter, 33 Oakfield, Grattan 
McCauley Wm. 11,, 28 Piainflcld, Aub- 

McCIIESNEY JOHN M,, Village Cedar 

Springs. 
McUleUn Jamea L., 33 Ada, Ada. 
McClelan Wm. H., 33 Ada, Ada. 
McClure Jay, 11 Algoma, Edgerton. 
McClure Oliver P., 27 Speucer, Spencer 

Mills. 
McCombs Hiram, 20 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
McConnell Gilbert C, Rnckford. 
McConnell Geo. W., 5 Sparta, Sparta 



Springs. 
McConnell John, 23 Bowne, Bowne. 
McCONNELL JOHN 8., 22 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
McConnell Lafayette, Rockford. 
McConnell Lather, 39 Lowell, Lowell. 
McCONNELL MARCUS, 4 Caledonia, 

McConnell Milo, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 



McDIARMlD JOHN D., 
Harris Creek. 

McDonald Alexander, is Bowne, 
McDonald Alexander, a Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 

McDonald Angus, 2 Alpine, English- 
ville. 

McDonald ANDBEW Jk., B Ver- 
gennes, Alton. 

McDonald Andrew, 5 Vergennes, Alton. 

McDonald Barney, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

McDonald Charles 17, Wyoming, Grand- 
ville. 

McDonald Duncan, 13 Sparta, Spurt* 
Center. 

McDonald Edward, 23 Walker, Grand 

McDonald Finley, 84 Ada, Ads. 
Mcdonald JOUN, 32 Bowne, Harrii 



COUPI.AINT, TRY FORT'S FILI.S. 



yGooQle 



HISTOET AND DIRECTOKY OP KENT CODNTY. 



McDonald JAMES, 32 Bowne, Harris 

Creek, 
ilcDonald John, 4 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
McDonald John, IS Alpine, Grand 

Rapida. 
McDonald Jaiiieg, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapida. 
McDonald Patrick, 8 Walker, Grand 

McDonald Peter, 5 Vergennes, Alton. 
McDonald Thomas, 30 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

McDonald Washington, 35 a:- 

goma, Rock ford. 
McDonald William, 3 Alpine, Enghsh- 

McDorman Geo. W., 14 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
McDougal JameB, 36 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
McDowell Jaa. A., 36 Byron, Cody'a 

Mills. 
McEwen Charles, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapida. 
McEwing Daniel, 8 Bowne, Alto. 
McEwen Patrick, £0 Grand Rapida. 
Mcilwen Mrs. Sarah, 3 W joining, 

Grand Rapids. 



McGlin Timothy, 7 Vergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
McGlynn Patrick, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
McGovern Michael, 10 Grattan, Qrat- 

McGovern Patrick, 11 Nelson, Nelson. 
McGovern Thomas, 11 Nelson, Nelson. 
McGoveran Hugh, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
McGuire James, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
McGuire James, IG Lowell, Lowell. 
JIcGurk James, 3(i Oakfield, Ashley. 
McGrain Daniel, 35 Wyoming, Grand 

McGHATH THOMAS, 30 Alpine, Ber- 

]ia. 
McGregor A. H.. Lowell. 

McGregor amos u., i3 lowcu, 

Lowell. 
McGregor Asa, 10 Walker, Indian 

McHugh John, JJ Ada, Canoonshurg. 
Mclntire James, 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Mcintosh James, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Mclntyre Fayette E., 4 Caledonia, il- 

Mulnroy Alexander, Grandville. 
Mclnroj William, Grandville. 



COOK AND PARLOR STOVES. ALL KINDS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



McEwen William, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

McFadden James, Burchville, (Burch'a 
Mills.) 

McFall Jonathan, 20 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

McFarland John, S6 Lowell, Lowell. 

McGann Michael, 3 Ada, Ada, 

McGARRY JAMES, 35 Caledonia, Cal- 
edonia, 

McGaven John, 34 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

McGEE BERNARD, 10 Vergennea, 

McGee Cormick, 33 Graltan, Grattan 

McGee James, 31 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
McGEE JOHN, 28 Grattan, Grattan 

McGee James, 10 Vergennea. Alton. 
McGee Owen, 34 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
McGILLIVRAY DUNCAN D.. Station 

Agent at Ada Village. 
McGinnia John, 18 Bowne, Harris 

McGinnis Kerns, 3 Ada, Cannonsburg. 



McKee William, 10 Cascade, Ada. 
MeKenzie Alexander, 37 Walker, G. 

Rapids. 
MeKenzie Mrs. Marion E,, 13 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
McKenna Jaraea, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapida. 
McKenney James K., 30 Byron, Byron 

MoKENNEY SAMUEL, 17 Byron, 

Byron Center. 
McKoight Jamea, 20 Cascade, Cascade. 
McKnight Thomas, 29 Cascade, Caa- 

McKinzie Kinneth, 8 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

McKinster Charles, Cedar Springs. 

McKinney John, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 

McKinney William, 3 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

McKoy Wm. M., 7 Grand Rapida, 

McLain Abner, 30 Caoiion, Austerlitz. 

McLain George, 84 Ada, Ada. 

McLain Mrs. James, 8 Alpine, Liabon. 

McLAIN JOHN, 34 A'(a, Ada. 

McLane Curtis, 8 Alpine, Pleaaant. 

McLane David, 8 Alpine, Pleaaant. 



Z-ORT'S AROMATIC OINTKXNT CURES SORE EYES. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTOKY OP KENT COrmiT. Zi 

REAL ESTATE AGENCY 



siiyrci:.AiR bros. «£ co., 

O Canal Street, 

Established 8 Years. (Sweets hk\ Bkk.) Established 8 Years. 



WehsTB, sLhm TS«2. bPen unintertuptedly enonged Ln a Gsneral Real Estate Agency, 
City of arsTTd RipldB, Mich. We buy »ud xell Skl E»late (pr Kesidents uid Non-Res 
Estates, Fay Taiee, &c 


r„-,ssg 


Ont- 9«l«. r"r I8«» Bmciinwrt tn over 830O.Oi>0,Oi>. In Jnne, IS 
878.00O.U0 worth of Kcal E»tal«. Oura 1h, without doubt, the mv» 
l^nA AKcnvy In !lf l^lllKBn. 


70. we Bnlil 
t exMualve 


t-#"l( joii bave Ji'srnis or Uitj IToperty (or Bile, laave il mtb lis. Uorrespondence 


soliciled. We 


Me»nL E. P. A S. I. FULLER, BaaHera. City. 





1* Jr. ninoun, iquHBV^uu, iui\:i]i)j4ui. 

T NATIONAL BANK. City. 
O, C, C0M8TOCK, City. 

.lAMS, BASRtS b CO., 362 Broadway. New York. 
Oar Senior Partner is Vice President of tlie Nntional Board of Seal Eitate 
AgentK of the Vailed Stiitea, and its rates govern our office. 

List of Lots, Blocks, Lands, River Fronts, Manufacturing and Business 
Property, aiways for Sale, 

INSURANCE. 



Strongest and Best Companies in the United States, viz.; 

Kllivar Paaseng'erB Life Ins. Co, 
IioFiilx, ot Haritord. 



Itoser Wllllanisi, of Ulioile iBlanil. 
Putnam, ot Hartford. 
melropolitan, or Slew York, 
■.aniar, or i^lctv V»rk. 
American, of 47hlcaso. 

I Life Ins, Co. 



ifoinv, »f tx'vw 1 

Nonvich, of Connecilc 
jnvrclBants, of Rhode I 



Union mutual Life InsHurance Co. 

hepbesenting a. cash capitax- of over 

$60,000,000.00. 

Dwellings and Barns insnred for a Term of Years, at 

^-FARMERS are invited to call on ua for Inaurance. 

SINCLAIR BROS. & CO., 

;Vi>. U Canal street, CtraaA XlapldSi 

Ueneral Agents fur tlie " Roxur Williams Fire Insurance Co., of Providence," to 
whom all applications for Agencies throughout Michigan, must be made. 



yGoosle 



HISTORT AND DIRBCTORT Ot KENT COUNTY. 



McLknghlin Michael, 9 Vergennee. 

Alton. 
McIjAUGHLIN THOMAS, 5 Ver- 

senDeB, Alton. 
McLEAN ALEXANDER, 19 V 

eennea. Ver^ennt-B. 
McLeaD Neil, 18 Vergennes, Vergenn 
McLean Peter, 13 Aiia, Atla. 
MoLenPtlinn Cbarles, 30 Gaines, Cale- 
donia Station. 
McLOUTH PETER H., Village of 

Cedar Springs. 
McMalion Owen, 3 Ada, Cannonsburg. 
MeMann John, 11 Grand Rapids. 
McMANN THOMAS. II Grand Rapids. 
McMann William, 22 Flainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
HuMannuB J. P., 31 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
McMillan Archibald. .Jr., B Ada, Ada. 

McMillan Archibald, 33 can- 

Don, Ada. 
McMillan Cornelitis, d2 Cannon. Ada. 
McMillan JOHN, 4 Ada, Ada. 
McMiUen John, 34 Walker. 0. Rapids. 
McMinnia B. P., IS Solon, Cedar 

SpringH. 
McMuUen Isaac, 13 Lqwc!!, Lowell. 
McMurray Mrs. Hannah, 34 Ada, Ada. 



McNitt William, i Walker, Indian 

McNorton William, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
McPherson Jolin. 32 Cannon. Ad*. 
McPheraon Peter W., 18 Vergennea, 
Verge n nee. 

Mcpherson willtam, is Ver- 

genneB, VergenncB. 
McPoland Terry, U Walker, G. Rapids. 
McQUARRIE JOHN, £3 Ualudonia, 

Caledonia. 
McQueen JOIIN, 3.5 cascade, Alaska. 
McQueen J. G., 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 
McTammany John, 23 Tyrone, Sparta 

McVEAN DAVID E., 10 Bowne, Alto. 
McVcan Hohert, 3 Bowne, Alto. 
McVEAN MRS. LUCY, 10 Bowno, 

Alto. 
McVicker Mrs. M.. Lowell. 
McWHINNKY WILLIAM, 36 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
Mcach Asa W., IS Pari?, Grand Kapids. 
Meach Charles, 1.5 Paris, G. Rapida. 
Meach David, 11 Paris, Grand R;ipid3. 
Meach George, 15 Paris. Grand Rnpida. 
Meach Volnej. 11 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Mead Clark. 12 Alpine. Alj)ine. 
Mead Ebunezer, 5 Bowne, Aito. 



PATENT SAP SPILES-BEST THING OUT, AT W. D. F0STER.'3. 



McNamara John, 30 Grand Rapids. 
McNaraara Michael, 16 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
McNamara Michael, 34 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
McNamara Martin, 23 Grand Rapids. 
McNamara Michael, 1 Paris, G. Rapids 
McNamara Simon, 34 Walker, Grand 

McNana, Patrick, 13 Grand Rapida. 

tfcNaughton Arcliibald, 30 Bowne, 
Harris Creek. 

HcNaugliton Alexander, 18 Ada, Ada. 

McNAUGHTON DOUQALD, 33 Can- 
non Cannonsburg. 

McNaugbton Dougald, 18 Ada, Ada. 

McNaugbton John, 33 Cannon, Can- 
nonsburg. 

McNAUGHTON JOHN D., 9 Ada, Ada 

McNaugblou Mrs. M., 4 Ada, Cannons- 

McNAUGHTON RICHARD D., 31 

Bowne. Harris Creek. 
McNeal Abrani H., 11 Caledonia. Alaska 
UcNee James, 39 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
UcNitt Frank, Lisbon. 
McNITI SAMUEL, Lisbon. 



Mead Enos, 13 Alpine, En<rlishvil]e. 

MEAD LAFAYETTE, 34 G. Kapids. 

Mead Wm., 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Meaka Charles, 16 Plainlield, Belmont. 

Mears A. T., Lowell. 

Medler Charles, i Conrtland, Conrtland 

Center. 
Medler Samuel F., 34 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Medler W. J., Lowell. 
MEDLER WM. H., 34 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Meeeh Lawrence, 7 Cascade, Cascade. 
MEEHAN MICHAEL T., 24 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
Meeker Allen, 39 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Meggison William, 13 Algoms, Ed- 

MEKEEL WILLIAM H,, 30 Ada, Ada. 
Melervy John, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
MELONING EMMETT, Village of 

Cedar Springs. 
MelTille John, 39 Grand Rapids. 
Meredith Joseph, 8 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Merley August, Alaska Village. 
Merren John, 9 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 



FORT'S AROMATIC OINTMENT CURES PII.ES. 



yGoosle 




HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 245 

THE OLD3ST MACHINE IN THE WORLD. 
THE OBIGINAt 

Sewing Machine! 

WITH ALL THE 

Late Improvements, 

EVERY MACHINE 

Warranted for 3 Ifears! 

ft GEO. F. OWEN, 

_ jiffent, 

^-^ 27 Monroe Street. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

C. .^. A 1. 1« IT Iff, 

GENERAL 

DHY GOODS, CARPETS, &c., 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

®i and ?® Stenpoe Street. 
GRAND BAPIDS, MICH. 

I>. A. HAIiiI., 

DEALER IN 

Confectionery, Canned Fruits, 

arsTiRS. eies,BS am© T@8ftae@. 

^'.A.nMmis' i».EiSTja.xjn..A.ia'a7. 

Warm Meals at all Hours. 

No, 14 Front Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

o,ted by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOBY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Merren Patrick, 19 Nelson, Cedar 

MERRILL CHARLES, 30 Tjrom 

Ca^'novia. 
MBrrill OrBeinos, 38 Pnris, G. Rapidi 
Murrill Roawell, 36 Paris, G. Rapicls. 
Merritt Einmett, Lnwell. 
MERRIMAN WILLIS L., 30 Vei 

genijes, Lowell. 
MRRVAU ANDREW, 15 Gaines, 



Ilan 



ind. 



MESLER WILLIAM 0., U Par 
Grand Rapiiis. 

MESNARD CYRUS, 3B Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Mesnavd Eiiocli. 2.'>Giunes, Gainesville 

MESNARD GEORGE E., 35 Gaines. 
Gainesville, 

MESNARD NOAH W., 16 Gaines, 
Gainesville. 

Messmore E. M., Rockford. 

Melvalf Joseph, Rockford. 

Moyers Andrew, 24 Sparta, Sparta Cen, 

Meyura Andrew P., 34 Sparta, Spar's 



Cento 



J,U-y,^j 



Andrew, 



Algon 






Jteyers George, 4 Algoi 



MILLER DAVID H., 3S Buwne, Fill- 
more, Barry Ooujity. 
Miller David, 4 Alpine. Pleasant. 
Miller, David M,, 29 Vargenncs, Lo- 

Miller Ezra, 17 Oakfield, Oaktield. 
Miller Edward, soatb B Walker, Grand 

Rapida. 
MILLER ELI J. 32 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills, 
MILLER EZRA C, 12 Paris, Grand 

Miller Gnriat, Grand villo. 

Miller G. W., 17 Alpine, Indian Crerk. 

Miller George, 33 PlaiuBeld, Aiisterlitz. 

Miller George, 17 Piaintield, Austerlitz, 

Miller Henry B,, 18 Oakfield, Oaktield, 

Miller Henry S,, Roekfbrd. 

MILLER HENRY M,, 19 Cannon, Aus. 

Miller Homer, 19 Cannon, Austerlitz. 
Miller Hugh, 14 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Miller Henry D., 11 Grattan, Grattan 

Center, 
MILLER H. B,, 34 Grand Rapida. 
MILLER JARED, 5 Bowne, Alto. 
Miller John, 11 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Miller Jolin 8,, 9 Walker, Indian Creek, 



NORTH AMERICAN COOK STOVE, AT W, D, FOSTER'S, : 



MEYERS HIRAM II., 24 Sparta. 
Sparta Center, 

Meyers James M., 33 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station, 

MEYERS PETER, 34 Sparta, Sparta 
Cenler. 

MICHAEL ANTHONY, 19 Walker, 
Grand Rapids, 

Midendorf Martin, 3 Wyoming, Grand 
Hapi'ts. 

Milan Mrs. Margaret, 34 Walker, Grand 
iiaplds. 

Miles R<iuben, 23 Solon, Cedar Springs 

Milford Tlionius, 34 Nelson, Nelson. 

Miller Abram, 33 Vergennes, Failass- 
burg. 

Miller Alfred, 33 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Miller Antliony, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 

Miller Alfred P., 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Miller Benjamin, 27 Cascade, Alaska. 

Miller Charles W., 17 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Miller Charles, 27 PlaiHlield, Austerlitz. 

Miller Charles D., 24 Cannon, Can- 
Miller Charles, 1 Courtland, Courttand 
Center, 



Miller James S,, 3U Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
Miller John, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 
Miller John, 15 Grand Rapids. 
Miller James, 10 Byron, Byron Center. 
Miller John D., Rockford. 
Miller James B., 33 Vwgennes, Lowell. 
Miller John II,, I Alpine, Eaglisliville. 
Miller Joseph, Lisbon. 
MLller John, 36 Algoma, Rockford. 
MILLER JOHN, 35 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
Miller John T,, 34 Grand Rapids. 
Miller J. H,, 9 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Miller John, 30 Sparta, Lisbon, 
Miller Levi, 24 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 
Miller Levi, 3S Gaines, Caledonia Sta- 

Miller Lyman, 12 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Miller Mrs. Mary, Graudville. 
Miller Major, 84 Ada, Ada. 
Miller Manson, 34 Ada, Ada, 
Miller Muses, 38 Cascade. Alaska, 
Miller Michael, 15 Grand Rapids. 
Miller Martin, 15 Grand Rapida. 
Miller Oliver, 3 Alpine, Englishville. 
Miller Peter, 24 Bowne, Bowne. 



FORT'S 0INT9KEHT~A SOVXBEIQN REMEDY 



yGooQle 



srsTOBT AND DiRECToar OP Sent countt. 



MILLER RBY. C. C, 1 Grattan, Aahlcy 
Miller Wm. H., 24 Cannon, Oannooa- 

burg. 
Miller Wm. R., 15 Lowell, Lowell. 
MILLER WM. E., 1 Alpiue, Englisli- 

MILLER WM. H., 33 PUinfield. Aua- 

Milla Aaron, Rockford. 

Milla Benj. P., 15 Grant! Rapida, 

Milla Daniel, GrandviHe. 

Mills Daniel W., Rnckford, 

MILLS ELNATHAN, 12 Paria, Grand 

Mille Epliraim F., 34 Cannon, Cannona- 

bnrft. 
Milla Hezakiah. 16 Grand Kapida. 
Mills JoUn, 33 Wyoming, GrandviHe. 
Mimg Henry, Lowell. 
Minderhnut Cornelina, GrandviHe. 
Mioderhout Martin, 27 Wyoming, 

North Byrnn. 
MINER BUWARD, 4 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Miner Hubbard, 1 Byron, GrandviHe. 
Kines Matthew, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Miniaee John, 18 Byron, GrandviHe, 
Hinbeo William, 3 Qaines, Hammond. 
Miuzey Franklin, 15 Walker. G. Rapids 



MITCHELL HENRY, LoweH. 

Mitchell Isaac, LoweH. 

Mil Mrs. Sarab, Sparta Center. 

Mizner Abner, Rockford. 

Mizner Henry, 34 Nelson, Nelaon. 

MIZNER HIRAM W., 1 Alpine, Bng- 

lishville. 
Moe Irving W., 16 Grattan CenterCen. 
Moe Robert, Lowell. 
MOFFIT EDMUND G,, 4 Caledonia, 

MofHt Jaaper, 4 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Moffit Lester C, Alaska. 
Moffit Mrs. Nancy J., 4 Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 
MOFFIT NEWTON, 4 Caledonia, Al- 

Moffitt William S., 33 Cannon, Auster- 

\Mz. 
Moffltt WilUara B., 32 Cannon, Auster- 

litz. 
Molesta Henry, 16 Paria, Grand Rapida. 
Moll Abram, 13 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
Monger Edwin, 17 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Mongeraall Samuel, 21 Sparta, Sparta 

Monka PhHip A.. Lowell. 
Mountstepliens John, 13 Walker, Grand 



THE AMERICAN BROILER, AT W. D. FOSTER'S,! 



Minzey James, 15 Walker, Grand Rapids 
MISNER AMDKEW, 33 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
MISNER CHRISTOPHER, 33 Ver- 

genoes, LoweH. 
Misner Charles C. 33 Vergennes, Lowell 
MISNER DANIEL, LoweH. 
Misner George, 7 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
MISNER HIHAM, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
MISNER JAMES, 30 Cannon, Cannons- 

Misner Join, 7 Algoma, Sparta Center. 
Misner Jnlin, 4 Algoma, Cedar Springs. 
Misner John, 14 Cannon, Cannonaburg, 
Misner John, 13 Cannon, Bostwick 

Misner Peter, 36 Cannon, Cannona- 
burg. 

Mi-ner Peter, 34 Plainfleld, Austerlitz. 

Misner Wm. II., 14 Cannon, Cannona- 
burg. 

MISNER WILLIAM 11, Lowell. 

Mitchell Ciiarlea, 14 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

MITCHELL CHESTER C, 7 Gaii 
Gainesville. 

Mitetaell Charles, 31 Ada, Ada. 



MONROE C. W., 33 Alpine, Indian 

MONROE DAVID, 6 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
MontroBa David, 34 Vcrgennca, Falloas- 

burg. 
MONROE EDWIN, Alaska. 
Monroe Henry D., Village of Cedar 

Springs- 
Monroe Harvey B., 5 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Monroe Jamea, 5 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
MONROE ORVILLE B., 5 Waiker, 

Indian Cre«)t. 
Monroe Stephen, 5 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
MONSEAU EDWARD, 10 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
MONSEAU EDWARD, 10 Gaines, 

Hammond. 
Montgomery Henry, 7 Algoma, Sparta 

Montgomery James, 30 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Montgomery Thomas, 7 Algoma, Sparta 



FOB. QALI^ AND SOBES ON HOBSES. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KEHT COUHTT. 



I, Sparta 

Moody C. W., S2 Grand Rrtpids. 
Moody Charles L., Grandville. 
MOODY LEWIS, Grandviile. 
MOODY AVATSON. 6 Alpina, Pleasant 
MOON CHARLES B., 34 Nelson, Cedar 

Moult Cassius, 14 Solon, Cpdar Springs. 
Moon Henry B., 4 Vergcnnes, Alton. 
Mooney Ann, 4 Grattan, Grnttan Cen. 
Mimney Henry, 5 Vcrgemies, Grand 

R.<pi(ls. 
Uoooey Jacob, 35 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Mooney John, 5 Yergcnnes, Alton. 
Moonuy Peter, 5 Vergennes, G. Rapids 
Moore Albert, 8 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Moore Albert, 33 Plainiield, Austerlitz. 
Moore Benjamiu, 8 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Moore Charles, Burcliville (Burcb's 

Mills.) 
MOORB CVRTI8S T., Lowell, 
MOORE CHARLEB H., 6 Gaines, 

Gainesville. 
Moore Daniel, 23 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 



Moore John, Lowell. 

MOORE JOHN D., 13 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Moore James M., fi Onkfield. Oakfield. 

MOORE NELSON H., 18 Oakfield, 
Oiiklield. 

MOOUE RICHARD, 19 Wyoming, 



Qra 



idville. 



Will. L., 8 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
MOORE WM. R., 81 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Moore Williiim, 23 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Moiirumn William, 7 Byron, Grandville. 
Moorman Wm. T., 7 Byron, Grandviila. 
Mornn John, 38 Speiucr, Spencer Mills. 
Aloran James, 28 Speneer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Moran John, S Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Moran Thomas, 28 Spencer, Si)encer 

Mills. 
Murdu IF James, 10 Onines, Hammond. 
Mordiiff Proctor. 10 Gaines, Hammond. 
MORE MRS. ANN M., 33 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
Morehouse Emery, 1 Algoma, Bnrch- 

ville (Burcb's Mdls.) 
Morehouse Mrs. Eueeltne, 33 Solon, 

Cedar Sprinjig, 
MOREHOUSE EDMUND, S3 Bowne, 

Bowne. 



THE FLUTING FLAT IRON.AT W. D. FOSTER'S, U ft IB M 



MOORE DANIEL S., 33 Courtland, 

Uourtland Center. 
Moore David 3., OakScId, Oakfield. 
M lore Bilward, 35 Byron, Cody's Mills. 
MOORE FREDERICK, 33 Algoma, 

Edgerton. 
Moore Geo. L, Jr., 21 Walker, Grand 

MOORE GEO. L, 21 Walker, Grand 

Moore Henry, 33 Plainfield, Aueterlitz. 
Moore Hiram, T Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Moore John, 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Moore John. D., 35 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Mnore John, 33 Algoma, Rockford. 
MOORE JAMES W., 35 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Moore James, 8 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
Moore Jobn, Lowell. 
MOORE JOSEPH, 23 Cannon, Can- 

nonsburg. 
Moore James, 33 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 
Moore James, 38 Wyoming, Kelloggs- 

ville. 
Moore John R., 34 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 



iiroo Street. 

Solon, Cedar 



Morehouse George, 

Morey John C, 33 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Morgau Isaac W., 10 Grattan, Grattan 

Morgan J. G., 3 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids, 
Norman George, 18 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Morman Ran sal er, lU Byron, Byron 

Morningstar Henry, 17 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Morningstar Henry, Jr., 17 Algoma, 

Rockford. 
Morningstar John, IS Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Morningstar Wm. 11., 10 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Morrell Alfred, 23 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Morrell George, 18 Plaiufieid, Belmont. 
Morris Edwin A., 15 Pluicfield, Bel- 
Morris George, II Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Morria Isaac D., Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LUIIlfENT IS WARRANTED 



yGoosle 



HIStORT AND DIRECIOBT OF KENT COUNTT. 



Morris James K,, 15 Plainfield, Bel- 

Mnrris John, 38 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
MOliRTS LEANDBU E., Cedar 

MORRIS NELSON, I Caledonia, Al- 

Morria Robert, 17 Byron, Bjron Cen. 
MORRIS WAYNE K., Lowell. 
MORRIS WEBSTER, Lowell. 
Morrison David, 33 A I pom a, Edgerton. 
Morrison Daniel, Alaska Village. 
Morrison Lewis, 15 Grand Rapids. 
Morrisey Martin, 1 Grand Bapida. 
Morriase; Thomas, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Morrill Andrew J., 35 Wyoming, Grand 

Morrill James M., 35 Wyoming, North 

Morse Benj., 32 Lowell, Lowell. 

Morse Oarrolton. Bowne, Alto. 

MORSE CHARLES, Lowell. 

Morae Edgar S., Lowell. 

Morse Freeman, 34 Wyoming, Grand 

M0R8K FRANK, 30 Walker, Grand 

Rnpids. 
MORSE HENRY, 10 Solon, Cedar 



Mount Nisbet, Sparta Center. 
Mount Nathan, Sparta Center. 
Mowat John, 13 Ada, Ada. 
Mower Jacob, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
MOXON J. S., 5 Giand Rapida, Grand 

Rapids. 
MojE Samuel, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 
MOYER GIDEON M., 15 Gaines, 

Hammond, 
MOYER JONATHAN E,, 38 Gaines, 

Grand Rapids. 
Moyer Nathan, 15 Qaines, Hammond. 
Muchler Lnrenzo E. 2 Cascade, Ada. 
MUELLER THEODORE, Lowell. 
Miiir AlexFinder, 37 Grand Ritpids. 
Muir Hugh, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Muir Jolin, 10 Plain tiiild, Belmont. 
Mnir Thomas, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
ML'LFOKD MILES, 36 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Miilfnrd ThoniiLS, 34 Nelson. Nelson, 
ML'LtlOLLAND JACKSON, 7 Bjron, 

North Byron. 
Miillin Micl.atl, 17 Walker, G. Rapida. 
MULL DANIEL J,, Grandville. 
Mulligan Michael, 10 Ada. Ada. 
Mulligan Patrick, 3 Ada, Ada. 
Multer It. P., 14 Solon, Cedar Springs. 



BEST CATTLE TIE YOU EVER SAW, AT W. D, FOSTER'S, U k IB Monro* St. 



Morse Joel, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 

Morse James, 1! Lowell, Lowell. 

MORSE LAURA A., 10 Grattan, Grat- 
ia n Center. 

Morae Nathan, 22 Lowell. Lowell. 

Morse Peter, 31 Lowell, Alto, 

Morae Peter, 30 Low'ell, Lowell. 

Morse Wm,, Lowell. 

Morey Wm. C„ S Alpine, G. Rapida. 

Mosher Mrs. Almini, 33 Algonia, Rock- 
ford. 

Mosher Electa, 11 Verge nnea, Lowell, 

MoBher Edwin, 24 Vergennes, Faliass- 
borg. 

Mosher Eseck J., 11 Vergeunt 



MOSHER WILLIAM, 11 Vergi 

Lowell. 
Moaier Alrenzo, 4 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Mosier Wm., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Moaa Martin, Lowell. 
Motley Williftui, 9 Cascade, Cascade, 
Moulsta Frank, 7 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Moulata John, 13 Paris, Grand Rapids, 
Moulton Marcus C, 8 Ada, Ada. 



Mulohill Larence, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Riipida, 
Mnlyneeney John, 19 Yergennes, Ver- 

gennes. 
Munger D. C, 10 Grand Rapida. 
Munn Jonathan S., 11 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
MUNRO DAVID, 13 Algoma, Edger- 



Munson Wm,, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Mansbsw Lambert, 21 Paris, Grand 
Rapi.la. 

MUKPHY ARCHIBALD, 34 Ada, 
Ada. 

Murphy Andrew, 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford, 

Murphy Daniel,jr., 18 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Murphy Daniel, 18 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Murphy Daniel, 14 Cannon, Bostwick 

Murphy Edward, 3 Gaines, Hammond. 



TO CURE YOUR I.AHE BACK- 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRB0TOKY]J^OF KENT COCRTT. 



MURPHff FRANK, 22 Grattan, Qrat- 

tan Center. 
Murphy George, 3 Plainfielil, Rockford, 
MURPHY GEORGE, 35 Solon, Cedar 

SjirinKa. 
MURPHY HENRY E., 14 Cannon, 

Bostteick Lake. 
Murphy James, 10 Ada, Ada. 
Murphj Joiin, 10 Ada, Ada. 
Murphy James, 14 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
Murphy John, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 
Murphy John, 31 Grattan, Grattan Cen 
Murphy Michael, 36 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 
Murpby Margaret, 33 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
MURPHY PETER, 10 Ada. Ada. 
Murphy Patrick, 5 Vtrgennes, 

genm 



Ver- 



Murpliy Patrick, 29 Grand Rapida. 
Murphy Patrick, 3 Paria, Grand Rapids 
Murphy Patrick, 31 Cascade, Cascade. 
MURPHY THOMAS, 31 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 
MURPHY THOMAS G., 1 Solon, Sand 

Murphj Richard, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 
Murphy 'Willtam, SO Lowell, Lowell. 

THE TUBULAR LANTERN-THE BEST IN USE-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



MURRAY MICHAEL, 39 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
MURRAY NATHAN C, 4 Oourtiand, 

Courtland Center. 
Murray Patrick, 13 Ada, Ada. 
Murray Patrick, 39 Walker, 5 Grand 

Murray William, 38 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Murray Wm. H., 33 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Murthy John, 33 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Muste John, 30 Graud Rapida; 

Muate Leonard, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Musscn Richard, 20 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Mutching Martin, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Myers Charles K., II Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

MYERS DURANCE, 19 Plainfield, 
Mill Creek. 

MYERS HENRY, 9 Bowne, Alto. 

Myers Henry, 34 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

MYERS JOHN 1)., 11 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Myers John, 9 Bowne, Alto. 

Myer Jacob, 15 Alpine, Alpine, 

MYERS JOHN P., 3 Bowne, Alto. 



Murray Daniel, 33 Gratlan, Grattan 

Murray George, 18 Grand Rapida. 
Murray John, 24 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
MURRAY JAMES N,, 3 Vergennes, 

MURRAY LYMAN, 5 Alpine. Lisbon. 
Murray Lucius B., 6 Tyrone, Caanofia. 
Murray Michael, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 
Murray Mrs. ftJargaret, 29 Walker, 
Grand Rapida. 



Myers Martin, 13 Ada, Ada. 
Myers Merritt, 33 Plainfield, Austerlitz 
Myers Mra. R., 24 Sparta, Sparta Center 
Myers Hpencer J., 10 Grattan, Grattan 

Myers Mrs. Sarah, 23 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
MYERS THOMAS n.,34 Sparta, Sparta 

Myers Wm. H., 38 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



N 



Kaftzger Josiah, 34 Vergennes, Fallass- 

bnrg, 
Nairracon Henry C, 34 Ada, Ada. 
N.»ramor John, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 
NARDIN GEORGE, 33 Walker, Grand 

HARDIN JOHN P., S3 Walker, Grand 

Rapida. 
Nardin John James, 33 Walker, Grand 

Ripida. 
Marregang Owen, 8 Wyoming, Grand- 

TiUe. 



Nash Mrs., Lowell. 

Nash David, 30 Caledonia, Middleville, 

Barry County. 
Nasti Harmon, Lowell. 
Naah Ira, Lowell. 

NASH JONATHAN E.. Sparta Center. 
NASH JAMES M., 23 Bowne, Bowne. 
Nash Levi, 6 Lowell, Lowell. 
Nash M. B., Sparta Center. 
Nason Charlea F., 33 Plainfield, Grand 



TORT'S USDXOINES ABE WARRAHTXD. 



yGooQle 



HI8T0RT AND DIRECTORY OF KKNT COUNTY, 



OIF 



KEN T COU NTY. 

TJSEFTJI. TO EVEBTBODT, 

And to Farmers and Business Men in particular. 



WM. H. 85 E. K. POWERS, 

HAN1TFACTCRERS OF 

Doors, Sash, Blinds, 

Window and Door Frames, Moldings, Flooring and Beveled 
Siding. Also, Bristol's Patent Water Elevator, 

Which we are prepared to deliver and get up on short notice. 

Boklern In Lumber, lath and Sblnglea, at Wholesale or EetaiL 



Grand Rapids, MicMgan. 



Finkle & Lyon Improved Sewing Machine. 

They are Simple, Silent aud Durable. Have a 

Self-Adjusting Needle, 

Which no other Shuttle Machine has, and . 

Equal to any Machine made, 

And in Eonie points better. We do not heai- 
tftte to say that, witb the recent improvements, 
it is the one to choose, 

^^Try them, and convince yourselves, be- 
fore bujing any other. Every machine war- 
ranted. Send for Circular, 

OIBce, 7 A 9 Honroe %U 

Q. L. FRETTS, Agent. 




Google 



tedbyV^OOg 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KBNT COUNTY. 



Nason Wm. A., 34 Plainfleld, Graod 

NAYeMITH JOHN, 9 Ada, Ada. 

NATSMITH JAMES, 1 Grand Rapids. 

NEAL D. B., 16 Grand Rapids. 

Neal James R., 25 Plainfleld, Austerlitz 

Neal Jesse, 30 Grand Rapids. 

Neal Lewis, afl Grand Kapida, Grand 

Rapids. 
N«ar Abrain, 2 Bjron, North Bjron. 
Needhani Beia C, 3a Lowell, Lowell. 
Needhani Geo. G., 23 Lowell, Lowell, 
Neinheiis Venedert, 2 Wyoming, G. 

Rapids. 
Nelist William P., 14 Paris, Grand 

NellinB Henry, 6 Bowiic, Alto. 
Nellist John D., 13 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Nelles Jolin J., 2 Wulker, Indian 

Creek. 
NELSON CHARLES, 3 Vergonaes, 

Alton. 
Nelson F. W., Lowell. 
Nelson Geo,, Lowell. 
Nelson John. Cedar Springs. 
Nelson Micliacl, S5 Algnmu, Rocldord. 
Nelsffn N., 13 Algoniii, Edgertoa. 
Nelson Peter, I'i Oaklield, Grtenville. 



Newland James, 22 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
NEWLAND STEPHEN 8., 13 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
NEWMAN JOHN W., 26 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
Newman Lewis, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 
Newson Mrs. Emily M.. Alaska. 
NEWSON HORACE S., Alaska. 
Newton Clark, LowelL 
Niwton Dewitt, Burcliville, iBurch's 

Mills. 
NEWTON DDDLE V, 17 Grattan, Grat- 

tan Center. 
Newton Uaniel, GrandTiJIe. 
Newton Gifford, Burchville {Burch's 

Mills.) 
Newton Ilenry, 17 Grattan, Gratfan 

New ton John, Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

NEYGUS ISAAC, Cedar Sprinjjs. ' 

Nicely Elias, ID Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Nicholson A. U., Burchville (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Nicliols P. R., Eotkford. 

Nichols A. L., 81 Cannon, Austerlitz, 

Nicholson Geo. W., 2li Courtlaud, Court- 
laud Center. 



THE ONLY GENUINE MORGAN CRADLE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



NELSON SHEAR, 15 Oakfleld, Oak- 
fleld. 

NELSON THEODORE, Lowell. 

Nelson Theodore, jun., Lowed, 

Nesbitt James. Cannonsburg, 

Nesler Uhristian, 33 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

NESTLE HARVEY, 3a Tyrone, Sparta 

Nestle Peter, 25 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 
Nestle William H., 35 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
NeviuB John 8., I Wyoming, Grand 

Neyius William S„ 32 Grand Rapids. 
.NEWBERRY HENRY B., 33 Cannon, 

Cannonsburg. 
Hewcomb Alfred J., South 5 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
NEWHALL EUGENE J., Alaska. 
Newhall John W., 13 Wyoming, Graad- 

Newins Thomas, 81 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station, 
Ncwkirk Aaron B„ 6 Paris, Grand 



Nichols I. C, Rockford. 

NICHOLS HENRY C, 14 Oakfleld, 
Oakfleld Center. 

Nichols Henry, 4 Walker, Indian Creek 

Nichols Jonathan, 15 Vergennea, Alton. 

NICHOLS JAMES 17 Grand Rapids. 

Nichols Josiah, 31 Paris, G. Rapids. 

NICHOLSON JOHN W-, 33 Grattan 
Grattan Center. 

Nichols Levi, 33 Cascade, Cascade. 

Nichols Mary A,, 31 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 

Nichoson Matilda, 23 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

NICHOLS MRS. MARIA L,, 27 Cale- 
donia, Alaska- 
Nichols Uriah, M., Rockiord. 

NICHOLSON WM. D , 8 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

NICK0L8 ABRAM, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

Nickols Benj. F., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Niehaus Henry, 33 Alpine, G. Rapids.| 

Nightliuger John, 3li Vergennes, Lowell 

Niles Edgar, 28 Ada, Ada. 

Nippress Gilbert, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 

Nippress TUomas, 14 Ada, Ada. 

Nippress William, SO Lowell, Lowell. 



FORT'S TtTESTERN LIKIUENT CURES LAMENESS. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 253 

First National Bank, 

GEAUD EAPIDS, MICH. 

Capital, - - - - $400,000. 

SOLOMON L, WITHEY, JAMES M, BARNETT, 

President. Vice President. 

HARVEY J. HOLLIST ER, €,,.„■„. 

Collections made on all points In the United 
States. 

Drafts issued on all the principal Cities of 
Europe. 

New York Correspondent National Park Bank. 

I>1 llKCTOItS ! 

MARTIN L. SWEET, JOHN CLANCY, W. D. ROBERTS, 

W. D. FO^EK, AMOS RATHBONB, L. H. RANDALL, 

T. II. LYON, Jr. 

RIDElJiIji <£ CO., 

HtBOI SKEET, Di,ir Bullmirlb's Fiiidrj, 

Grand Rapids, Mich., 

DEALERS IN 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Brushes, &c., 

PAINTINU, GRAINING, KALSOMINING AND PAPER HANGING, 
In all its Brandies. 

FIEBIG & RATHMAN, 

Carriage and Wagon 

MAKERS, 

No. 221 Canal St., 

Gaand Rapids. 




Hosted by Google 



HIBTORT AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Niron Martin, 7 PIsinfleW, Englishville 
HnbbB Matthew, 11 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Noble B. R., Lowell. 
Noble Btnj. C, 16 Oflkfield, Oakfield. 
U0BLE8ERA8TCS, 17 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Noble Joseph, 20 Cannon, AiiBterlitz. 
NOBLE JOHN, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Noel John, 17 Wyoming, Orandvillii, 
NOEL PETER E., 20 Wyoming, 

Qrandville. 
Nolen Henry, 6 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Nolon John, 7 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Nonnan John, 31 Plainfield, Grand 

Noonan John, 3 Grand Rapids, 
Noonan Peter, 3 Grand Rapids. 
Noonan Thomas, 25 Cannon, Cannons- 

Noonan William, 3 Grand Rapids. 
Noonan William, 25 Cannon, Caunons- 

burg. 
Norcutl Daniel, i Lowell, LowelL 
Norman Edward, 24 Bjron, Cody's 

Mills. 



NORTON ANSON N,, i Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids, 
NORTON AARON, 7 Spencer, Bpenrer 

Mill. 
Norton C, C, 13 Walker. G. Rapi<ls, 
NORTON ERASTUS W., 3 Sparia 

Sparta Center. 
Norton Fred A., Lowell, 
NORTON JAMES W., Lowell. 
NORTON JOHN. 24 Alpine, Alpine. 
Norton James, 27 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Norton John, 27 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Norton John, 22 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Norton John, 34 Oourtland, Rockford. 
Norton M,, 8 Grand Rapids, G. RapiiU. 
Norton Mary, 35 Oakfield, Ashley. 
NORTON NELSON A, 23 Alpine, 

Alpine. 
Norton Patrick, 22 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Notting Albert. Grandville. 
Noy Thomas, 31 Cannon, CannonBhurg. 
Nugent Daiaiel, 24 Cannon, Cannons- 

itugent Emanuel, 6 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Nugent Hugh, 34 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Nugent James, 24 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg, * 



HAY SCALES PUT UP BY W. D. FOSTER, " 



North Mrs. Helen, 6 Bowne, Alaska, 
North James, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
North Rolwrt, Roekford. 
North Robert, 23 Plainfield, Austcrlitz. 
Northrup Neediiam, 13 Algoma, Edger- 






)n, Rock- 



Nugent John, 34 Cannon, Cannonsburg 
Nugent Russell, 16 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Nnltj James, 31 Cascade, Alaska. 
Nuraa Hvnry, Cedar Springs. 
NUTLER JOHN M., 3 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 
NYE LEONARD J., 35 Gaines, Ham- 



o 



Oboiy Caleb, 35 Vergennes, Lowell. 
O'Brien Daniel, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
O'Brien Dennis, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
O'Brien James, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
O'Brien Michael, 30 Walker, G, Rapids. 
O'Brien Michael, 38 Oakfield, Ashley. 
O'Brien Mary, 36 Oakfitld, Ashley, 
O'Brien Patrick, 29 Walker, G. Rapids. 
O'BRIEN STEPHEN, 33 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
O'Brien Scatley, 26 Grattan, Grant;. 
O'Brien Timothy, 3 Lowell, Lowell. 



O'Brien William, 80 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
O'Brien William, 84 Walker, 0, Rapida 
O'Brien William, 30 Walker, G, Rapids 
O'Brien William, 30 Oakfield, Ashley. 
O'Conner John, 30 Pans, Grand Rapida 
O'Conner John, 34 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station, 
ODELL ADELBERT, 30 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Odell Charles, Lowell, 
Odell Orson, 9 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 



FORT'S ENEHT OF FAIN CURES 



yGooQle 



flISTORY AND filRECTORt Of EBNt COtJHW, 



Odell Mrs. Silence W., 30 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Odell Simeon J., Lowell. 
O'Donaki James, 36 Plaiiifield, Auster- 

litz. 
O^Donald Jolm, S4 Plainfield, Austet- 

litz. 
O'DONNELL MICHAEL, 16 Ada, 

Ada. 
O'Farrell Garret, 16 Wyoming, Grand- 

Tillo. 
Offeo George, 4 Nelson, Sand Lake, 
Offen Justus, 10 Nelson, Nelson. 
Ogden William L,, 23 Cascade, Ada. 
Ogg Andrew, 10 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Ogg John, 3 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
OGILVIE ALEXANDER, 8 Grattan, 

Grattan Center. 
Ogilvie Jolin, 6 Grattan, Grattan Oen. 
O'ilane Michael, 1 Wjoming, Grand 

O'Hara H., 23 Lowell, Lowell. 
O'Heran Timothy, 34 Walker, Grand 

Ohitr Adam'. Orandville. 
Ohler Jacob, 24 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Ohlur Peler, 33 Walker. Grand Rapida. 
O'Keete James, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 



OMANS LEVI, 33 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Onan Alex. J., 17 Lowell, Lowell. 
n Gabriel, 13 Vergennes. Lowell. 

ONAN SAMUEL, 17 I.oweil, Lowell. 

O'Neil Cornelius, IB Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

O'Neii Dennis, 13 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

O'Neill Daniel, 8 Walker, Gr. Rspids. 

ORCOTT SAMUEL O., 33 Tyrone, 
Sparta Center. 

ORCUTT Mrs. J. S., 32 Solon. Cedar 
Springs. 

Orcutt Matthew, 20 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlilz. 

Orcutt Samuel, 33 Solon. Cedar Springs. 

Orlop John. 28 Ada. Ada. 

Orlop Jacob, 28 Ada, Ada, 

Orinan Pstrick, 31 Walker, 6. Rapida. 
liston James B.. Lowell. 

Orr Peter A., Rockfnrd. 

Orrin Albert N., 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapida. 

Oraer Henry, 2a Sparta, Sparta Center. 

ORTH BERNARD. 30 Grand Rapids. 

Ortii Peter, 20 Grand Rapida, 

Osborn Dan'l, 19 Lowell, Cascade. 

Osborn David, 33 Ada, Ada. 

OSBORN GEORGE W., 21 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 



COOPERS' TOOL8-A FULL ASSORTMENT-ATW. D. FOSTER'S. 



Olbske. Joseph, 8 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Okott Mrs. Elizabeth H., 11 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Olcolt Philander W., 11 Lowell. Lowell. 
OLDFIELD CHAS., Cedar Springs. 
OLDS ALBERT, 23 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Olds Mathew, 16 Grattan. Grattan Cen. 
O'Learj Mrs. Margaret, Cedar Springs. 
Oleson John, 8 Grand Rapida. 
Clin John 0., 33 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Olin Osmond, 2 Alpine, Englisbville. 
Olin Henry, 15 Lowell, Lowell. 
Oliph Hubert, 35 Alpine, O. Rapids. 
Olish Joseph, 3S Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Olish Matthias, 24 Alpine, Alpine. 
OliTer John, Grandville. 
Oliver William, 36 Grand Rapids. 
Olmsted Gideon, 35 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Olmsted Isaac, 25 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Olmsted Joseph, Sparta Center. 
OLMSTED ROBERT, 10 Oakfleld, 

Oakflekl.- 
OLMSTED W. C, Sparta Center. 
Oluutead W. I., Sparta Center. 



OSBORN HIRAM, Alaska Village. 
Osburn Albert, U Tyrone, Sparta Cen 
Oaburn Eli, 10 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 
Osgood Harry, 10 Oakiield, Oakfield. 
O'SHIIITZ HENRY, 21 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Osmar Henry, 85 Cannon, Cannons- 

burg. 
OSTBUHAND f,, Cedar Springs. 
Osterwick Matthew, 18 Wyoming, 

Grandvdle. 
Osterhonse Jacob, 14 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Osterhouse Nicholas, 32 Paris, Grand 

Osterhuia George, 18 Wyoming, Grand- 

Osterhuis Henry, Grandville. 
Osterhuis Nicholas, Grandville. 
OSTROM JACOB L., 33 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
O'Sullivan Timothy, 30 Walker, Grand 

Otis John, 16 Paris, Grand Rapida. 
Otterbach Christian, 38 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 



COLDS AND SORE THROAT. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIREOTORT OP KENT COUNTT. 



Otterbftch Oottlib, 28 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Otterbaeh John, 20 Spencer, Nelson. 

Otterbfteh Jacob, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 

Otterbien Ambrose, 18 Walker, Grand 
Rap ids. 

Outhouse Geo. 11 , 11 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Ovorholt Abraham, 10 Gaines, Ham- 

Overholt Amos, 10 Gaines, Hammond. 
Overholt John, 10 Gaines, Hammond. 



Orerholt ■William, 10 Gai 






Overbeck Francis, 39 Grand Rapids. 

Overlay Martin, 11 Nelson, Nelatm. 

Overlay Thomas, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

OTeasbire John F., 18 Loivell, Lowell. 

Ovenshire Richard G., I8 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

OWEN HIRAM G., 3 OakSeld, Green- 
ville. 



Packard John, 35 Byron. Cody's Mills. 
Page George, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
Page Wright, Sr, Byron, Cody's Mills. 
Paine Bphraini, 4 Walker, Indian Creek 
Paine Hiram H., 34 Wyoming, Grand 

Jtapids. 
Paine Lawson A., 3 Alpine, English- 

Paine Marvin H., Cedar Springs. 
Paine R. N.. 34 Spi.rta, Englishville. 
PAKE KRYNNES, 39 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 



Pangborn Luther W., Barchville 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Pangborn Samuel, Cedar Springs. 
PANGBORN SALMON H., Burchville 

(Burch'B Mills.) 
Paunell John, 11 Walker, Grand Rapids 
Pardee Eli, 14 Bowne, Bowne. 
Pardee James W., 24 Bowhe, Bowne. 
Pardee Ozi, 14 Bowne, Bowne. 
PARDEE WAYNjS, 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
Parish- Leonard, 5 Algonia, Cedar 

Springs. 



TUCKER CRADLES AND RAKES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, H » 



■ Daniel, 37 Walker, Grand 



Palme. 

Byron. 
Palmer Amos W.. 15 Caledonia, Alaska 
Palmer Alexander, 33 Byron, Byron 

FalmeT Benjamin, 33 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
PALMER CHARLES, 33 -Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Palmer Carlos H-, 35 Paris, Alaska. 
Palmer Davia, 33 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Palmer Geo. P., 14 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Palmer Hiram. 17 Caledonia, Alaska. 
PALMER LOYAL, 39 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
PALMER L. E., 9 Grand Rapids. 
Palmer Oliver. 32 Solon. Cedar Springs 
PALMERLEE HEMAN, 2 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Palmiter Edson, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
PANGBORN ALBERT, Cedar Springs 
Pangborn Joel S., Cedar Springe. 



Parker Charles, 10 Oakfield. Oakfield. 
PARKER ELIAS D., 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Parker Eliaha D., 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Parker George, i Lowell, Lowell. 
Parker G. W., Lowell. 
PARKER GEORGE J., 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Parker Henry W.. 37 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Parker James, Cedar Springs. 
Parker Jane, 7 Vergennes, Vergennes. 
Parker John, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Parker Leonard F., 7 Walker, Grand 

Parker Tl'iomaa, IB Bowne, Alto. 
Parker Robert, 7 Vergennes, Vergennes. 
PARKER SHELDON, 31 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
PARKER THOS., Jr., 4 Nelson, Sand 

Parker Thos., Senr., 4 Nelson, Sand 
Lake. 

Parker Wm. H., 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Parker Wm. H., Jr., 31 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Parker Wilson J., 4 Bowne, Alto. 

PARKHURST ISABELLA, 19 Plain- 
field, Alpine. 



IF T01T VflSa TO HAVE TOCR WIFE CUEEHFUIi, 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORT OF KENT COUITTT. 



PARKINSON HENRY, 8 Courtland, 
Coiirtlaini Center. 

FarkiiiBon Roliert, 8 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Parka BoriHU 0„ IB Silencer, Nelson. 

PARKS C. C, Lowell. 

Parks Leonard C, Alai^ka. 

Parks Mimimcr. Lowell. 

Parks Oliver, 7 Biwne, Alaska. 

Parks Wni. It.. Lowell, L.iwc-11. 

Purmer Altram H., 12 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

PAKMER LEWIS, 3 Oakficld, Grecn- 

Pannlee Jolin, 22 Walker, Q. Rnpida. 

Parr John H, U Bjron, Oritntiville. 

Parr Steplii-n S., li Uyrou, Grandvilte. 

Parrieh 0. B., Lowe>l, 

Parrish Eugene, LoHell. 

Parrolt Clement. 33 Lowell, Lowell. 

Parrolt Chas. M. F., 28 Loivell. Lowell. 

Parrott George, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 

Parrolt Jntob, 38 Lowell, Lowell. 

Parshall Terry, il2 Speneer, Spencer 
MlIIh. 

PARSHALL WltXIAM T., 32 Spen- 
cer, Spencer Mills. 

Parsons William 8., 5 Paris, Grand 
BApids. 



PATTERSON MINER, 13 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Patterson Perry W., 31 Parii, Grand 

KHplde. 
Patersi'ii Perry W., 31 Pari«, Grand 

R»pld!'. 

PaieiMon Peter, 19 Tyrone, Ca-tnovis. 
Putlerson IloljerC, 12"Piiris, Cascade. 
Patterson Mrs. Roaa A., 13 Parts, Grand 

Itapidg. 
Patterson Wm. P., 38 Plainfleld, Grand 

Hap Ida. 
Pntlermn Warren A , 13 Paris, Grand 

Itaprds. 
Piitiersoii William, 13 Paris, Cascade. 
PATTEN C. H., 20 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
PAl'TES MRS. S. L., 35 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
PATTJSON JOHN, 11 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Pattison Joliu, Jr., 11 Caledonia, Al- 

Paul Anthony, 3 Paris, Grand Itapida. 
Paul Ji>lin, U Grand Rapids. 
Payne Alouzu, lli Algoma, Rockfiird. 
Pavne Uaiiiei B., 11 Oakfield, Qreea- 

ville. 
Payne Lorenzo, 10 Algoma, Rockford. 



ALL KINDS OF FARM AND GARDEN TOOLS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Parter Jolin, 31 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
PASKIL GEO,, II Lowell, Lowell. 
Patchin William E., II Alpine, Alpine. 
PATRICK M. A., 2fi Cauuou, Can- 

Paitee Asa D., 4 Alpine. Indian Creek. 
PATTEE AMOS, 3 Walker, Indian 

PATTEE E. D,, Burcliville, (Burcb's 

Mills.) 
Pattee QustavuB, 21 Sparta, Sparta 

PATTERSON ALEXANDER, 20 G. 

Rapids, Grand Rapids. 
Paterson Adam, lU Tyrone, Cnsnovia. 
Patterson Cbauncey, 10 Cascade, Cas- 

Patterson Franklin, 10 Cascade, Cas-. 

PATTERSON GEO. W., 29 Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 
Puteraon James, 19 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Patterson Jolia M., 19 Cascade, Cas- 

Patterson Jolin. 34 Paris, G. Rapids. 
PATTERSON JAME5, 12 Paris, Cas- 



Pnyne William, 10 Algoma, Rockford. 
PeakH Lemuel, Rookloid. 
Hcarsail Williaifl. L.iwell. 
PEAliSOLL SHERMAN M., 28 Alpine, 

Grand Rapids. 
Peasley Albert, 23 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Pehsb Charles D., Lowell. 
Pease David P., 33 Sparta, EngliahvillB 
PEASE HERMON B., 1 Ada, Ada. 
Pease Jerome C, Lowell. 
Pease Lester, 24 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
PBASLEY CHARLES, 2Q Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Peasly Mrs. Marion, 23 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Peasley Timothy, 35 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Peat Cliarles, 6 Bowne. Alto. 
PECK AUVINE, Lowell. 
Peck C. W.. U Lowell, Lowell. 
Peck Charles, 13 OaklielO, Greonvillo. 
Peck Horatio N.. 10 Grand Uapids. 
Puck H. B.. Lowell. 

Peck Ilorton B.. 3(J Vergennes, LowclL 
Peck E. R,, 11 Lowell, LowelL 



USE FORT'S WESTHBN LINIHENT, 



yGooQle 



HiaTORTT AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COCHTT. 



Peck Horace, 13 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Peck Mauser W., 85 PftriB, HammODd, 
Pccttham Hiram, Plainfidd, Belmont. 
PECK FREELING W., 35 Paris, Grand 

Rapida. 
Peel George, 34 Plainfleld, Grand 

Rapids. 
Peel Thomas, 34 Plainfield, G. Rapids, 
Pcet Enan, 2 Catedoaia, Alaska. 
Peet Edgar M., 37 Caledonia, Gale- 

Peet Kosciusko, 31 Lowell, Alaska. 

Peet Giicar D., 22 Caledonia, Alaska. 

PEET ROLLA A., 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Peice Edward, 83 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Peirce L. W., II Lowell, LoweK. 

Peirce Walter J., 19 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 

Peirce Warren L., 35 Paris, G. Rapida, 

Peiscth John, 81 Byron, Bvron Center. 

Pellet William H., 4 Courtland, Cedar 
Springs. 

Pellet William, 27 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Peltoii Andrew J., 18 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

PeltoQ Alfred, 36 ByroD. Cody's Mills. 

Pellon Ephraim, 83 Walker, G. Rapids. 



PERRIN WILLIAM P., 28 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Perry Abijah S., 23 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Perry Albert A., 38 Byron, Codj'8 

Mills. 
PERRY ARTHUR E., 17 Plainfield, 

Ruimont. 
Perry Mrs. C. R„ Lowell. 
Peirs Edmund, 17 PlainBeld, Belmont, 
Perry James S., 20 Algoma, Sparta 

Perry John i). D., 32 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Perry M. M., Lowell. 

Perry P. R., 23 Algoma, Rockford. 

Perry Wm. IL, 34 Ada, Vergennes. 

PERRY WILLIAM, 3 Oakfield, Spencet 
Mills. 

Perry Wni. R., Lowell. 

Peters Chsries, 13 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Peters Isaac, 8 Cascade, Cascade. 

Peters William, 9 Byron, Byron Center 

Peters William. 13 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Peterson Alonzo, 33 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Peterson Charles F., 83 Tyrone, Cas- 



SAP PANS, GALVANIZED AND RUSSIA IRON, AT W. D. FOSTEFl'S. 



PBLTON CHAUNCEY, Village of 

Cedar Springs, 
PELTON J. M., 18 Gaines, GainesTille. 
Pelton Samuel, 13 Byron, Gainesville. 
Pember John W., S(> Plainfleld, Au3- 

terlitz. 
Penfield Edwin H,, 35 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Pennel John W., 18 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Pennington James, 34 Courtlaad, 

Rockford. 
Penny Ross, Lowell. 
Perean Richard, BurcliviUe, (Burcli's 

Mill.) 
PERKINS CHARLES, Burehville, 

(Burch's Mill.) 
Perkins C. J., 16 Grand Rapida. 
Perkins C. S., 16 Grand Rapids. 
Perkins Daniel, 9 Cascade, Cascade. 
Perkins Erastus, 16 Bowne, Bowue. 
Perkins James B., 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Perkins Mrs. Lucy, 33 Ada, Ada. 
Perkins William, 16 Bowne, Bowne. 
PerLee Abraham F., 36 Alpine, Mill 

Creek. 
Perrin Theodore, 28 Vergennes, Lowell. 



Puterson Frank, 32 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Peterson G.. 33 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Peterson John, 34 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Peterson John, 1 Plalntieid, Austerlitz. 

Peterson Moses, 85 Oakfield, Ashley. 

Peterson William, 20 Oakfield, Oakfield 

Peterson Samuel, 30 Oakfield. Oakfield. 

Peterson Simon P., 24 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

PETERMAN- JOHN, 29 Bowne, Harris 

Petit Simon, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
PETTINGILL B. N,, 36 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Pettingill Benjamin, 36 Algoma, Rock- 

Petrie Isaac, 13 Grattan, Otisco, Ionia 

County. 
PETTED BERNARD, 6 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
PETTED DAVID, 20 Cascade, Cascade. 
PETTIS EDWARD, 38 Ada, Ada. 
Pfyffer Henry J., 34 Wyoming, North 



FORT'S EMZHT OF PAIN C1TRE8 TOOTHACHX;. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTOET OP KENT OOUNTI. 259 

R.S. MERRILL, 

PORTRAIT & LANDSCAPE 

3F»jaL3C3V'TC3E3Fl., 

No. 19 Monroe Street, in Heath's Photograph Gallery. 

Portrait, Miniature 4 Photograph 

PAINTING, 

Xi3. All Its :Bi^a,i3.o]aes. 

Copies from Old and Faded Pictures Enlarged to any size, and 
satisfactorily painted in any style desired. 

jji^'Call and aee specimens. Studio open to visitora from 10 
A. M. to 4 P. M. 

FRED. HEATH'S 

EXCELSIOR 

PHOTOGRAPH ROOMS, 

23 Monroe Street, 

Opposite Rathbun House, 

GRAND KAPIDS. MICH. 



The best-arranged Gallery in the City. Well 
lighted and elegantly furnished. Pictures col- 
ored in Ink, OU and Water Colors. 

Hosted by 



Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KBNT COUHTY. 



PlielpsArthar.lT Alpine-, GrandRapi'lB 
Pholps Aia G., 6 P,iriH, Grand Riipiila. 
PHELPS COUNT P., 33 Nelson, Cedftr 

Sprinits. 

Phulps Edzar, Bl NeiBon, Cr;dnr Springs 
Plidips E'.i M., 1 Uuurtlaad, CuurtLaud 

Center. 
Pbelps G. W., Cedar Springs. 
Plielps Qeorge, 4 Walker. Indian Crepk 
Phelps HeuTy, Cuurtland, Courtliiud 

Phelps Horace, 10 Courtlnnd, Court- 
land Center. 
Phelps Isaac, C Grand Rapids, Grand 

PliiTlps Jeremiah, 10 8j>arta, Sparta 

CenUT. 
Phelps Lester, 8 P'alnfield, Belmont, 
Piielps Lealer, 10 CourtUmI, Uouriland 

Center. 
Phelj'S Lester, II Couitland, Courtland 

Phe'lpa Mra. JL J., Lowell. 

Phftlp3 Sylviwua, 3 Courtland, Conrt- 

hii) Ctiiter. 
Pliri.Pb THEODORE, Cedar Sprinpa. 
Plieips Wuliinffton, 10 Coiirtlaud, 

Courtland Center. 



Phillips Luther E., 14 Plainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Phillips Levi, 24 Vcrgennes. Pallasa- 

Pljillips Newton, ST Sparta, Bparta 

Center. 
Phillips Peter. 14 Paris, GrandRnpids. 
PHILIPS JOilN, Gran.lvilie. 
Phillips Spary E., 2B ISowui;, Harris 

Creelt. 
PHILLIPS WILLIAM H., Burchvillc, 

(Bureh's Mills.) 
Phillips William, 37 Sparta, Sparta 

Piiteiiijt Samuel W., 20 Paris, Grand 

Picard Joseph, Lowell. 

Pickerd Aduni, 14 Algoma, Edgerton. 

PJCKERU JOHN, 14 Algoma, Edger- 

PICKET A. L., RoEklbrd. 
Pi(:ket itiehnnl. 2U Grand Rapids. 
PICKETT WJI. ]J., 33 Gaiiiw, Grand 

Rapids. 
Pilcaard John, 29 Grand Rnpida. 
PIERCE BARTON T., N. E. comer 

Walker, Mill Cn-ek. 
PIERCE CHARLES B., 10 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 



THE GEM RADIATOR-THE BEST DRUM IN USE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Phelps Zimri, 33 Kelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Pbilpott Abram, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Phillips Calvin, 7 Cannon, Rockfurd. 
Phillips Conrad, 17 Walker, Graud 

Rapids. 
Phillips David, 3 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Phillips Daniel C, 27 Plaiafleld, Grand 

Rapids. 
PHILLIPS EDWARD, Burchville, 

(Burch's Mills.) 
Phillips Ensign, rLowell, Lowell, 
Phillips Eli C. 1 Lowell, Lowell. 
PHILLIPS GEO. W., 7 Caunnn, Rock- 

toid. 
Philips Jerome E., 19 Paris, Grand 

PHILLIPS JOHN W,, 21 Walker, G. 

Phillips James W., 24 Vcrgennes, Fal- 

laesburg. 
Phillips Lewis, 3 Nelson, Sand Lnke. 
Phillips Levi L., 33 PJainlield, Grand 

Rapids. 
Phillips Lewis, 27 Bowne, Fillmore, 

EaiTj Couuty. 



Pierce Lewis, 23 Pnris, Grand Rapidn. 

Pieree Solomon, 10 Walker, Giand 
Rapids. 

Pierce Blephen, 27 Grand Rapids. 

Pierce Walter, 27 Grand Rapids. 

PiLTce Warren E., 21 Grand Rapids. 

Piersou William, 29 Courtland, Rock- 
foixi. 

PIERCE WARREN H., 14 Gaines, 
Hammon.l. 

PIERCE WM, W., 2 Gaines, Hammond 

Pier60a Mis. C. M., 3(( Algoum, Rock- 
ford. 

Pierson Georgf, 34 Algoma, Rockfnrd. 

Piter Charles W., 7 Gaines, Gainesville. 

PJIlpi) Adolphus. 11 Li>well. Li)well. 

PINKNKY WM. B., 10 Plainfield, Bel- 

Pinkertnn Andrew, 38 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
PINTLER CURTIS. Lisbon. 
Pintlcr Harmon, 14 Bowne, Bowne. 
Pintler Mrs. llary, Lisbon. 
Pintler William, 7 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Pisot Henry, 7 Walker, Grand Rupids. 
Pitcher Benjamin, 22 Oaklield, Onkdeld 
Pitcher Harrison, Village Cannonsburg 



FORT'S ENEMT OF PAIN CUR£S NCURAZ.aiA. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COTIHTY. 5 

wmtthum; 



DEALER IN 



FIRE BRESAl rams, 

Pure Wines and Liquors, 

(rOR MEDlCrNAL l'9E.> 

Perfumery, Fancy Crood^ and Toilet Articles, Trosses, 
Bruslies, etc., 

92 Canal Street, opposite Opera Hall, 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 
A. F. DeVIKNV, 

General Engraver &. Die Sinker, 



Sttpsftap Steel Stamps fci? Rtarfeing Toate, 

Stencil Marking Brands for Marking Barrels, Bales, Boxes, &c. 

SEAL PRESSES, SEALS, 

Canceling Stamps, Door Plates, Badges, Railroad, Hotel and Key Checks, 

Slencil Material f. Ink, Paste, Bi-usheHf 

NA-ME PLATE AND KEY CHECK DIES ON HAND, OR 

MADE TO OKDER. 

Steel Alphabets and Fl<jures, Brass Alphabets and Figures, Pattern 
heiters for Otstings. 
All Steei Die Work made of tlie best of English Steel, and war- 
ranted to give the best of satisfaction. 

All Kinds or BURIVIJVO UltATVDB A SSPECIATY. 

57 Canal Street, 



yGooQle 



HIBTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



Pitch Marlio, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 
Pitts Ransom, 80 Wyoming, Grandville 
Pitts Wiiliam. 7 Courtiand, Eclgtrton. 
Pixley Lewis R., 15 Grattan, Ijfattan 

PlHce Arthur, 5 Alpine, Lisbon. 

Plaice Charles, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

PLANK JAMES, 20 Plaintieia, Aus- 
terlitz. 

PLANK JAMES, 8 Caation, Eookford. 

PlBHs John, 37 Algoma, Rocklbrd. 

Platchley John, Cedar Springs, 

Platte John, 3^) Alpine, Grand Rapids. 

Pietcher Daniel E., 10 I/owell, Lowell. 

PLECNE ADRIAN, 15 Grand Rajiida. 

Pleune Peter, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Plowman James, 31 Alpine, Berlin. 

PLUMB ELI, 31 Plainfield, Mill Creek, 

Pluiiipton George, 35 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Plumb Hiram, 18 Spencer, Nelson. 

Pluin)j Henry D., 31 Plaioliold, Mill 
Creek. 

Plumb John, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 

Poats Ira J., 13 Sparta, Sparta Center. 

Pnats Schuyler, 19 Algoiua, Sparta 

Pollock John, 33 Plainfield, Austcrlitz. 
Poole A. J., 33 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
TUBS, PAILS, AND ALL KINDS OF WOODEN WARE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



PORTER PETER B., 34 Alpine, Alpina 
Porter Ralph, 13 Nelson, Nelson. 
Porter Sybean, Aliiska. 
PORTER SBTH, 18 Algoma, Etlgerton 
Porter Sabine, 10 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Porritt Jolin, 28 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Porritt William, 27 Bowne, Uowne. 
Post Asher, 7 Tyrone, CasJiovia. 
Post Alanson, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Post Aaron, 10 Courtland, Courtland 

Post Christopher, 8 Plainfield, Bel- 

P08T GEO. C, 14 Lowell, Lowell. 
Post Henry. 38 Algoma, Itocktbrd. 
POST J. CARTER, 14 Lowell, LoweU. 
Post John, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 
POST JACOB, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Post Jacoh, jr., 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Poss John, 3U Plainfield, Mill Creek. 
Post Jacob, 10 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Post John, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Post Leander J., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 
Post McKenzie, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 



Post Rohert, 7 Tyrone, Cajfnovia. 
POST SAMUEL, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Post William, 33 Plainfield, Austerhtz. 



POOLE CLEWREY, 14 Bowne, Bowne 
Poole Henryr 14 Bowne, Bowne. 
Poole N. C, 35 Solon. Cedar Springs. 
Pool Samuel J., 19 Ada, Ada. 
Poole S. J., 35 SoUtn, Cedar Springs. 
Pool Wm. A., 31 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Pope George, 4 Plainfield, Belmont. 
P<jpe Mrs. S., a Algoma, Roekford. 
Pond Cyrus, 3.J Oaklield, Ashley. 
Pond Edrou 11., 3.t Uakfield, Ashley. 
POND HARVEY D., U Oakfield, 

Ashley, 
Pond Traflon, 19 Courtland, Roekford. 
-Ponting Benjamin, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 
Porter Curtis, 31 Alpine, Grand Rapids 
Porter Henry, 30 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Porter Dennis, 17 Courtland, Edgerton 
Porfer David C, 21 Alpine, G. Rapids, 
PORTER GEORGE, 2« Alpine, Indian 

Porter John, 10 Wyoming, G. Rapids. 
PORTER LORENZO, 1 Gaines, Ham- 
Porter Martilua, 13 Nelson, Nelson. 
Porter Sorens L., 3 Plainfield, Rock- 
lbrd. 



Potrafz Albert, 30 Lowell, Lowell, 
Potter Benjamin, 31 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Potter John, 19 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Potter Joshua, 31 Oaklield, Oakfield. 
Potter John, 31 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Potter Joel, 4 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Potter Myron, 12 Oaklield, Greenville. 
Potter Mrs. Lois, Sparta Center. 
Potter Wm. A., 4 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
Pottraz John, 2IJ Ada, Ada. 
Powers A, L., 39 Grand Kapids, Grand 

POWERS A., 39 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Powers George W., 19 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Powers Henry, 11 Sparta, Bparta'Cen. 
POWERS JOHN, 31 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Powers Jonathan, 4 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Powers John, 38 Ada, Ada. 
POWERS J. C, BurcUville, (Burcli's 

Mills.) 
Powers Mrs. Mary, 30 Walker, Grand 

Powers Wm., south 5 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 



FORT'S STICKINQ SALVE MAKES A GOOD FZ^STEB. 



yGoosle 



filsToRY AND BIRBCTOBV OF KENt CODNTT. 



Powell Chaunoej, Grandyille. 

Powell Edward, 30 Ada, Ada. 

Powell George S., B«ckforcl, 

Powell George, BurcliTiile, (Buret's 
MillB.) 

Powell Oscar F., Grandrille. 

Powell Silas, Grandville. 

Powell William, Bockford. 

Powell William B., 87 Spencer, Spen- 
cer Mills. 

Powlison OnmeliuB, Lowell. 

Pratt Asa, 20 Grand Rapids. 

Pratt Cliarlea, 27 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Pratt CharleB, Rockford. 

Pratt Cliarles K., Uockiord. 

Pratt David 0., 9 Cannon, Cannona- 
bavg. 

Pralt Elyah V. E., 23 Caledonia, Al- 

Pratt J. Edwin, 26 Vergennea, Lowell. 
PRATT LL'TIIER C, 10 Solon, Cedar 

Springn. 
Pratt Marshall T., 5 Byron, Nortii 

Byron. 
Pratt Polycarpus S., 26 Vergennes. 

Lowell. 
PRATT URIAH, south 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Prentiss Mrs., Lowell. 

WOODEN AND TIN SAP BUCKETS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 1* sua l« Monro* Street 



Proct<Jr Benjamin, Alaska Vdlage. 
Prottor Henry H., Alaska. 
Proctor Henry, 27 Lowell, Lowell. 

Proctor John T., S4 Cascade, Alaska. 
Proctor John, 8 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
PROCTOR J. B., 35 Caledonia, Cale- 

Proctor John, 27 Lowell, Lowell. 
PROCTOR OLIVER, 3U Cascade, Al- 

Proctor Wm., Jr., 27 Lowell, Lowell. 

Proctor William, 37 Lowell, Lowell. 
Proper John, IS Nelson, Cedar Sprin)^. 
PROPER WILLIAM, 14 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
PROVIN ANDREW J.,9Uaunou,Can- 

PROVm CIIAS, A., IC Cannon, Can- 

Provin James, 16 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Provin Tyler W., 17 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Pnddefoot Alfred, Spnrfa Center. 

Fugh A, J.. 8 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Pugh James, 8 Alpine. Pleasant, 

Pullen William, Lowell. 



Prentice Byron, Cedar Springs. 
PRENTICE ISAAC, 36 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Prentice Richard, 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 
PRESCOTT BENJAMIN, 3(J Grand 

Rapids. 
Prescolt Geo. W., 1 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Pre8Co:t Price H., Rockford. 
Prescott William H., Rotkford. 
Pressev Ransom R., 30 Sparta, English- 

TiUe: 
Pressey Thomas, 28 Tyrone, Caenovia. 
Prestage Henry, 18 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Preston Sheldon, 37 Walker, Grand 

Preston John, 17 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Price Arthur. 33 Ada, Ada. 

PRICE GEORGE, Village of Cannons- 
burg. 

Price Luther G.. 29 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes, 

PRICE LEWIS N., 30 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

PRINDLE MRS. MARY L., 85 Byron. 
Cody's Mills. 

Ptindle Seth, 36 Byron, Cody's Mills. 



Henry N., 26 Sparia, Sparta 



Pulv! 

Cente 

Pi'lte Augnst, 23 Alpine, Grand Rapids 
PUNCHES SAMUEL, 20 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
PURI)YGEO.W.,25 G rattan, Smyrna, 

Ionia County. 
PURDY HERMAN D., 33 Gaines, 

Cody's Mills. 
Purdy Henry, 14 Grattan, Graut. 
Purdy James L., 14 Grattan, Grattan 

Purdy -lohn, 25 Grattan, Smyrna, Ionia 

County. 
Purdy Oirin, 16 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
PURDY PERRY, 23 Grattan, Grant. 
Purple Daniel, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Purple James, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Purple Thomas, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Purple Wilham, 5 Lowell, Lowell. 
PURSEL WM. R., 18 Gaines, Gainea- 

Tille. 
Putnam Alplieus, 6 Cannon, Rockford. 
Putnam Cheater B., 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Putnam John, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Putnam Mrs. Maria, 23 Bowae, Bowne. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KBTTT COUNTt. 



a 



Quftckenbos Abrnm, 35 Bjroii, Cody's 

MillB. 

Qoiickeiibo3 Wm. P., 35 Byton, Cody's 

Mills. 
QUICK J. H., Lowell. 

Quick Jnliii, Oiaiiaville. 

QukkM. S., Lcmell. 

QuH-k Kcubmi S„ l.oivell. 

Qujggli^ Siliis P., 14 Ciii-cade, Cascade. 

QuiKity Edward II., 30 Tyrone, Cas- 

Quigley George, 1 Parif, Grand Rapids 
Qiiigley Jnsi;|)li, 34 Walker, G. Rujuds. 
Quiliin Andrew, 8 Veiytiiues, Vcr 

gCDQCB. 



Quiliin John, 8 Yergcnnes, VerRennes. 
Quiliin Ttrry, 8 Vi-rgeimts, Vergennes. 
Quimhy ii.H«c-, 10 Svlsou, Sand Lake. 
Quiiistj George, 32 Gaines, (Jody'a 

MiLs. 
Quinsej John, 32 Gnhies, Cody "a Mills. 
Quin <-y Mrs. Juiia, 32 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills. 
Quinn Daniel, 30 Wyoming, Grandville 
Quinn Patrick, 30 VV'joniiiig, Graud- 

Quhk Patrick, 13 Wyoming. G. Rapids 
Quirk William, 20 Wyumiug, Grand- 



R 



THE BEST STOCK OF SCYTHES-ALL WARRANTED-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Raap Aiitoine, 1 Wyoming. G. Rnpids. 
Race Alvin S., 31i Lowtll, Loivell. 
Usee Abriiliam, 1^ Algoiua, Burdiville 

(Biircli's Mills.) 
Rage Peter, B Paris, Grand Rnpids. 
KaddigHQ John, 31 Gialtan, Cannona- 

Itafterly Mrs. Aun, 8 Walker, Grand 

BntfBFty George, 8 Walker, G. Bapida. 
Haj^an James, Lowell. 
Kamer fciamuel, 18 Courtland, Edgcrton. 
RaRiMiill Moses, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Hamsdill Orrin, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
KAMtjDELL JACOiJ. Lowell. 
RAMSDELL BOLOMOJJ, 17 Grattan, 



II Cei: 






RANDALL HORATIO, 
KrtpMs, Grand Riipida. 
KANDALL JOHN L., 16 Grattan, 



Ol'H 






RASDALL KIJSNICUM, 34 Oakfield, 

Aaliley. 
Randall Romanzo, 20 Oiikfield, Ashley. 
Randall Richard F., ZO tjpaitn. Lisbon. 
RANUEL BDMOND 3., 10 Caniion, 

Roatwick Lake. 



RANDEli SILAS, 10 Cannon, Bost- 
wick Lake. 

Rankin Albert D,, 10 n'yoming, Grand- 
viltc. 

RANKIN DWIGHT, IB Wyominjr, 
Grandville, 

Eaniiey George, 30 Graftan, Cannons- 
burg. 

Ransley John -R., 3 Oakfield, Spencer 
Mills. 

Rapelyea John, 17 Plainfield, Auster- 
litz. 

Raricb William, 8 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Riirick Jacob, 13 Sparta. Spnrta Cen. 

R.iRlOK JOHN U., la Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Ratbbone D. S,, 29 Plainfield, Grand 
Hap ids. 

Eathbun Seba, 29 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

RATIIBUX G. B.. 28 Grfiod Rapids. 

Bathbmi Hugo B,, 10 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

BaitiUuu James, 20 Caledonia. Cale- 



FORT'S MANDRAKE PIX«I.S. 



yGooQle 



BISTORT AND DIKECTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 



BATHBUN LANSING K., 17 Paris 

Grand Rapids. 
RATHIiliN LEVI C, 20 Cnledonis 

Caledonia. 
Rathbun Orsomus, i Wyoming, Graud- 

RATHBUN OltSEHL'S, 26 Caledi 

Caledonia. 
RatUbun Thomas, 33 Caledonia, Cale- 

Raiib Andrew, 37 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
RAUCH JACOB. 6 Byron, Grandville. 
Raynier Jolin, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 
Raymond Leander, IS Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Raymond Leander A., 15 Sparta, Sparta 

Read Mrs. Loritta, IG Caledonia, Al- 

REAu' THOMAS M., 7 Gaines, Gaines- 
ville. 

Reagan Dennis, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

Reams Abram, 13 Byron, UHines«ille. 

Reams Jolin, 10 Courtlaud, Gourtland 
Center. 

Reardon John, 29 Caseade, Cascade. 

Rebels Arselos, 2li Lowell, Lowell. 



REED NATHANIEL, 27 Bowne, 

Bowne. 
Reiid Seymour A., 22 Plainfleld. Ana- 

terlitz. 
Reed Thomas E., 33 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rnpids, 
Reed Thcopliilus, 11 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Reed TheopbiUis, jr., 11 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Reen Timothy, 34 Walker, Or. Rapidi. 
REES GDSTAVUS. Lowell. 
Rees Theodore, Lowell. 
Reese Ilarmon, 2 Wyoming, Grand 

Rnpida. 
RRESE OSCAR, Lowell. 
REEVES L. t'., 28 Cannon, Cannona- 

Reid John, 2 Grattan, Grattan Center, 
LU-id Thomas, 1 Grattan, Ashley. 
Rei-h Peter, IG Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Reiley Edward, 34 Caledonia, Cale- 

Remin<!ton M., jr., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
REMINGTON WAGAR T,, 4 Bowne, 

Alto. 
RENHLAN SOLOMON, 23 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 



ROPE AND BED CORDS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. Hsna : 



Rebroon Edward, 7 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Rocktbrd Rollin, 11 Grand Rapids. 
Rector Benjamin, 24 Algoma, Edgcr- 

RECfoR EDWARD, 30 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
Rector George. 14 Algoma, Edgerton. 
RECTOR HENRY E., 23 Algoma, 

Rockford. 
Rector Jacob, 1 Algoma, Bnrcliville, 

(Burch'B Mill.) 
Rector William F., 14 Cascade, Cascade, 
Bedinger Michael, 35 Lowell, Lowell. 
Redinger Gaudloupe, 35 Lowell, Lo- 

Redinger John, 35 Lowell, Lowell. 
Redmire Jobn, 17 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Redmbn Jolin,ll Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
REED GIBSON D., 13 Grattan, Otisco, 

Ionia County. 
Reed Horace, 27 Bowne, Bowne. 
Reed Henry G., 2-1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Reed Horace W., 7 Paris, G. Rapids. 
REED HARRISON, 32 Grand Rapids. 



Renisliagen Jacob, 13 Plain field, Rock- 
ford. 

Ream Andrew, 1 Wycming, Grand 
Riipida. 

Rennehen John, 34 Walker, Grand 

RBSH CHARLES, 13 Alpine, Alpine, 
liessequye Harvey, 35 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Retao Andrew E., 33 Wyoming, Nortli 

Byron, 
RE TAN JOHN R., 33 Wyoming, Nortli 

Byron. 
RETTLNGER WILLIAM, 26 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Reuletstcrz Philip, Lowell. 
Rewsliaw Francis, South 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Rexford William, 24 Vergennes, Fal- 

lassburg. 
Rexfoi'd Alanson, 83 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Rexfurd Amos, 31 Tyrone, Casnovla. 
itesfiird David, 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Rexford Daniel, 31 Tyrone. Caanovia. 
Reynolds Alexander, 11 Nelson, Neb on 
Reynolds Benj. F., 10 Cannon, Can- 
nons burg. 



A HARMLESS SUBSTZIUTi: FOK GAI.OMJSL. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AHD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUSTY. 



Rejnolds Bradley, I Plainfield, Rock- 

Ibra. 
REYNOLDS D. L., Rockford. 
Reynolds Elisha, 19 Lowell, Lowell. 
Reynolds George N., 14 Plainfield, Aas- 

terlitz. 
Reynolds Ira, 14 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
REYNOLD .JAME3 S., 29 Gaines, 

Grand Rapids. 
Reynolds John M., 14 Plainfield, Aus- 

Reynolds Levi, 14 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Reynolds J. Mason, 30 Plaiatield, Aus- 

Reynolds Moses, 33 Oakflold, Oakfield. 
Reynolds Myron, 25 Nelson, Cedar 

Sprinf(3. 
Reynolds OrTille. 19 Lowell. Cascade. 
REYNOLDS PATRICK, iiO Gaines, 

Cody's Mills. 
Reynolds Stephen, 35 Grattan, Alton. 
Reynolds Steven, 27 Sparta, Spnrta Cen 
RHTNE8 DANIEL, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
RHOADES JOHN H., 30 Spencer, Nel- 

RHODES HIRAM A., 17 Ada, Ada. 
Rhodes J. H., 89 Grattan, Grant. 
Rhodes John, 3G Grattan, Alton. 
Rice Elihii, 87 Sparta, Sparta Center, 



Richards Horace. 2 Pari.^, Gr. Rapids. 
RICHARDS HENRY S., 22 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Richards J. B., 36 Algoma, Rockford. 
RICHARDS J. C, Cedar Springs. 
Richards Myron, 10 Paris. Gr. Rapids. 
RichardB Simeon, Alaska Village. 
Richards Truman, 13 Paris, Grand 

Richards Theodore F., 26 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Richards "Warren.ie Caledonia, Alaska. 
Richards Wilson H., 10 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Richardson Andrew, 33 Plainfield, 

Austerlitz. 
Richardson Cornelius, 35 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
RICHARDSON CHARLES H., 1 

Bowne, South Boston. 
Richardson George S., 9 Cascade, Cas- 

Richardson Geo. S., jr., 11 Paris, Gr. 

RICHARDSON JOSEPH H., 86 

Bowne, Fillmore, Barry County- 
Richard son Norman, 26 Plainfield, 
Austerlitz. 



DRAG TEETH AND CULTIVATOR TEETH, AT W. D FOSTER'S. 



Rice Geo. H., 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

RICE HUGH, 34 Alpine, Alpine. 

Rice H. A., Lowell. 

Rice John, 33 Solon, Cedar Sprinirs. 

Rice James, 31 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Rice Lewis, SO Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Rice Newell J., 11 Byron, Gainesville. 

RICE OltEN 8., 27 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Rice Russell, 19 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 

Rice Timothy F., 11 Byron, Gainesville 

Rice W. F., 24 Alpine, Alpine. 

Rice William, 13 Alpine, Alpine. 

Richards Alvin, 10 Paris, Grand Rapids 

RICHARDS BEZAL B., Alaska Vil- 
lage. 

Richards Daniel C, 9 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Richards Daniel C., 4 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Richards Edward, 16 Caledonia, Alaska 
■ Richards Erbin, 10 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Richards Francis, 8 Paris, Grand Rapids 

Richirts Frederick, 85 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Richards Fletcher, 9 Algoma, Rockford. 

Richards Frank, 17 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Richards Gilbert, 8 Cascade, Cascade. 



Richens Paul H., 15 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Rickets Henry, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 

ville. 
Ricketts William, Lowell. 
Richley Jerry, 34 Ada, Ada. 
Richmire Augustus, 30 Plainfield, Mill 

Creek. 
RICHMOND BENJAMIN F., 10 

Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Richmond David. Cedar Springs. 
Richmond Mrs. Einma, 11 Gr. Rapids. 
Richmond Fred J., 14 Vergennes, Lo- 

Richmond James C, 14 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Richmond OIney A., 31 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Rich Albert P., Lowell. 
Rich Frank H., 13 Oakfield, Greenville. 
Rich Nelson, 29 Oakfleld, Oakfield. 
Rider James, 19 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Rider Mortise, 30 Alpine. Gr. Rapids, 
Ridge way Levi, 34 Nelson. NelsoQ. 
RIGGS AUGUSTUS H., 24 Ada, Ada. 
Riggs E. W., Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LIKIKEHT CURES LAMENESS- 



yGooQle 



BIBTOBY AND DIRKCTORY OF KBNT COIJHTT. 267 

Dr. R. J. Humphrey, 



(Over Perry Bros.' Hat Store,) 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

K.B.—All tvorJc (tone promptly and in the best manner, 

GEO. H. SOULE, 

Retail Dealer in 

Groceries and Provisions, 

Ciprs and Tobacco, Wines anii liquois, 

49-^ Fine Aesortment of TEA.8 oonetantly t>n hand. 
No. 234 South Division Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

Ba-CA8H PAID FOR PRODTJOE. 

Steam Marble Works. 

BAEH & LIESVELD, 

Dealers in Scotch Oranite and Marble 

'Honuments, Grave Stones 

AMD FVBNITITBE MARBLE, 

63 Monroe and 9 Fountain Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH; 

»d by Google 




H. W. UESVELP. 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



mat 



Orville A., 33 Gaines, Cody's 



Ribbien Earnest, 23 Walker, G. Rapids 

BILEY B. B., Cetlar Siirings. 

RILEY EDWARD E.. Cedar Springs. 

Riley Hugh, 34 Plainlklil, Austerlitz. 

Rilej Isaac, 1 Solon, Sand Lake. 

Riley Patrick, 24 Plainfiuld, Au^terlitK. 

Riley Thomas, 33 Spencer, Speucer 
Hills. 

Ringuet Henry St., Lowell. 

Kiordan Micbnel, 5 Caledmiia, Aia.^ka. 

Riplow John, aWvominic, Grand Riipids 

Rippey Matthew F., 14 "PI a in field, Aus- 
terlitz. 

Risedorph Henry, Lisbon. 

Rish Henry, 17 I'liris. Grand Rapids. 

Kietcliow Louis, 35 Wyoming, Grand 

RITENtlER FREDERICK, 3 Bowne, 

Alto. ' 

ROACH ANTHONY, 8 Uwell, Lowell. 
Roach Thomas, 8 L..well, Lowell. 
BoHch Thomas, 18 Grand Rapids, Grand 

Rapids. 
Roback Richard. 13 Solnn, Rorkfurd. 
Rohhina Mrs. Eiiziiheth, 7 Calirdouia, 

Alaska. 
Riibbias Ebcr, Cedar Springs. 

A FULL LINE OF REFRIGERATORS, AT W. D. FOSTEFl'S, 14 & lOMourof, su-ed 



ROBINSON E. W., 7 Grand Rapids, 

Grand Rapids. 
Robinson G. F., 7 Grand Rapids, Gr. 

ROBINSON JOHN, 30 Algonia, Sparta 

Robinson Jefferson, 35 Vergcnnes, Lo- 
well. 

ROBINSON JESSE H,, 35 Tyrone, 
Sparta Center. 

ROBINSON JOHN R, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Robinson Jolin T., 21 Lowell, Lowell. 

ROBINSON JOHN, jr., 23 Paris, Gr. 

Rohiiision Oscar, Lowell. 

liobinson James, 27 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Robinson Jeremiah, 30 Courtland, 
Rotkford. 

Robinson Lucas J., 35 Vereonnes, Lo- 
well. 

Robinson Lucas, 35 Tergennes, Lowell. 

ROBINSON MUNSON, 20 Solon, 
Cedar Springs. 

Robinson Mrs. M. H., 13 Algoma, 
E<lgerton. 

Robinson Mrs. Mary, Lowe!!. 

Robinson Marion, 13 Algoma, Edger- 



ROBBINS JOHN C, 7 Caledonia, 

Alaska, 
Robbins John M., 26 Lowell, Lowell. 
Robbing Warren, 3(1 Lowell, Lowell. 
Kobeos Saniord, 1 li Paris, Grand Rapids 
Roberts Arthur. 5 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Roberts Albert, Lowell, 
ROBERTS Mils. CATHARINE, 17 

Sparla. Lisbon. 
Roberts K<lson, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Roberts Ii-a, 3t Spencer, Cedar Springs. 
Roberts J<iseph, U Algoma, Sparta Cen, 
Itoherts Wm. IL, Burchvillc (liurch'a 

Mills.) 
Roberts Wm. C, 12 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Roberts Wm. M.. Algoma, Sparta 

Eoburson Wm. W., 24 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
ROBERTSON DAVID, 33 Grand 

Rapids, Grand Rapids. 
ROBERTSON GEORGE, Cedar Springs 
Robinson Alien, 35 Vergcnnes, Lowell. 
ROBINSON ALONZO, 13 Algoma, 



BODINSON MELVIN, 13 Oakfield, 



Gre 



vilie. 



Nelson, 7 Aila, Ada. 
Robinson Nathan, 3« Ada, Ada. 
liobinson Nathan 0., 15 Cannon, Can- 

RobinKOH ciscar, Lowell. 

Robinson Orville G.. Lowell. 

Robinson Peter, 10 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

ROBINSON RODNEY, Lowell. 

Robinson Rix, 37 Ada, Ada. 

Robinson Rufus, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 

Robinson Seth T., 35 Vergenues, Lo- 
well. 

Robinson William, 23 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

liobinson William J., 22 Paris, Grand 

liobinson William E., 25 Sparta, Sparta 

ROBINSON WILLIAM, 30 Vergenncs, 

Ada. 
Robinson WiHiani J., Rockford. 
Robson Ohas. J., 83 Cannon, Auster- 



FOBT'S ENXMY OF PAIN CURES CHOX.ERA UORBUS. 



yGoosle 



HISTOKT AHD DIRECTORY OF KENT CODNTT. 




F. OSTERLB 85 CO., 

CAHHIAGE&WAGOIT 



GRAND BAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 

Carriages, Wagons, Sleighs and Cutters on hand, and made to order, 

LIVERY, 

l©Mi sal Salt ilill©^ 

C. L. IVES, Proprietor, 



Nvnr l.lie ■•oHt flflire. 



{STJOCEBSOK TO A. J. GILL,] 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



E. S. HOLMES, D. D. S., 

Particular attention given to the Cure of Diseases and 
Derangements of the Teeth and IVIouth. 

TO I>3EsW'TP'XiS"3P'S». 

Goods, for Sale at 

GRAND RAPIDS. 

J. C. SIMONDS, 

MAWrrACTURER OF 

P _, .... _^j 

SHINGLE MACHINES, MILL GEARING, 

And all binds of Hachlnery, 

26 Waterloo Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.. 



Google 



tedbyV^OOg 



HIBTOar AND DIRECTOBT OP KBBT COUNTY. 



EOBSON JOHN, 31 Canuon, AuBter- 

litz. 
ROSY EDWIN A., Sparta Center. 
Bite Adam, a Nelson, Sonri Lake. 
Roe James, 29 Grattan, Grattau Center 
Roe John, 39 Grand Rapidu. 
Roe John, 30 Alpine, Pleasant. 
ROE MICHAEL, 29 Grattao, Grattan 

Center. 
Roe Patrick, 29 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 
BOE PATRICK H., Jr., 14 Grattan, 

Grattan Center. 
ROGERS A. JACKSON, 5 Alpine, 

Pleasant. 
ROGER&ALEXANDER, 27Vergenuea, 

Rogers Mrs. Betsey A., 28 Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 
ROGERS CHARLES J., Grandville. 
Rogers Chauncej L., 38 Alpine, Indian 

Rogers Cjrtia, 23 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Roifei's Erwin M., 14 Wyoming, Grand 

Rogers Edwin, 21 Solon, Cedar Springs 
Rogers Fred., 1^1 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Rogers Geo. W., 3 Alpine, Pleasant. 
ROGERS HANSOM H., 29 Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 

KEDZiE'S CELE.BFIATED FILTERS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, l 



Rosenkrana Argelos M., 31 Cascade, 

Grand Rapids. 
R08ENKRANS FRANCIS M., 31 Cas- 
cade, Grand Rapids. 
ROSE ALBERT G., 21 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Rose A. W., Lowell. 
Rose Chauncey, 33 Vergennes, Lowell. 
ROSE CHARLES H., 15 Walker, Gr. 

Rapids. 
Rose David. 28 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
ROSE DAVID, 6 Cannon. Rockford. 
ROSE ERASTUS W., 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Rose Elmer, 22 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
ROSE LYMAN, 15 Bowne, Alto. 
ROSENBERGER ABRAHAM, 30 

Gaines, Cody's Mi 'la. 
ROSENBERGER AMOS, 25 Bjrou, 

Cody's Mills. 
ROSENBERGER CORNELIUS, 28 

Gaines, Cody's Mills. 
Rosenberger Daniel, 11 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
Rosi-nberger Jacob, 30 Gaines, Cody's 

Mills, 
Rosenburg Charles, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Rosenberger Jacob, sen., 30 Gaines, 

Cody's Mills. 



Rogers Henry L., 20 Alpine, G. Rapids. 
Rogers James, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Rogers John, T Grattan, Bostwiok Lake 
ROGERS JUSTUS C, 14 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
Rogers Joseph, 25 Vergennes, Fallass- 

burg. 
Rogers Nelson, 31 Lowell, Lowell. 
Bolt Alvali R., 9 Lowell, Lowell. 
Rolf Alburn, 7 Lowell, Lowell. 
Roll Ransom, T Lowell, Lowell. 
Roniig John, Lowell. 
RoDOQ Mike, 24 Plainfleld, Austerlitz. 
Ronsjt Patrick, 12 Grand Rapids. 
Rood Zebulon, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 
Rooney John, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids 
Root Andrew, 29 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Root Elijah, 33 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 
Root QustavuB, 12 Alpine, Englishville. 
Root J. I., Lowell. 

Root Joseph, 12 Alpine, Englishville. 
RootLoTin, 29 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Root Samuel V., 9 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
ROOT WILLIAM, 13 Alpine, Engilsb- 
Tille. 



ROSENBERG DAVID, 25 Byron, 
Cody's Mill. 

Rosenberg Peter, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 

ROSZELLE OBADIAH, 20 Bjron, Bj- 
ron Center. 

Roaser Simon P., 32 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Ross Duncan, 19 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Ross Daniel, 36 Bjron, Cody's Mills. 

ROSS FRANK, 30 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Iloss George, 21 Algoma, Rockford. 

Ross Hiram, Lowell. 

ROSS HUGH, 18 Plainfleld, Alpine. 

Ross John S., 17 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Ross James, 34 Algorao, Rockford. 

ROSS JOHN, 30 Gaines, Gaines- 
Ross Peter, 30 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Boss William, Sparta Center. 

Ross William, 33 Sparta, Gr. Rapids, 

Ross William, 30 Gaines, Gainesville. 

Rounds Ambrose, 1 Algoma, Burchville 
(Barch's Mills.) 

Rounds Eli C, 22 Solon, Ced:ir Springs 

Rounds Geo. W., 30 Courtland, Rook- 
lord. 

Bounds Henry C, 30 Coartland, Bock- 
lord. 



FOR SPASMODIC COLIC IN HORSES, 



yGooQle 



HlBTOltt AND DIRECtORIT 0* feENt COUNTt. 



Rounds Horton, 80 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Rounds J. M., t Algoma, Cedar Springs 

ROUNDS J, M., Jr., BurcliTille 
(Burch's Mills.) 

ROUNDS LORENZO D., 31 Courtland, 
Rockford. 

Rounds Maudlj, 27 Solon, Cedar 
Springs, 

Rounds NathaD, 31 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Rounds Richard A., 8 Paris, O. Rapiiis 

ROUNDS WM. H., 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Roundtree James, 8 Spencer, Spencer 
Mtlla. 

ROUNDTREE WM. W., 30 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 

Rouse Henry M., 33 Paris, G. Rapids. 

ROUSE J., Alpine, Grand Bapids. 

ROUSE MRS. NANCY, Sparta Center. 

Rouse Siiiicon, 3 Alpine, Englisliville. 

Roush John, 3G Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

ROUSH JOHN L., 36 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

Rousb Michael, 83 Bowne, Fillmore, 
Barry County. 

Roup Jacob, 28 Alpine, Indian Creek. 



Roys E. J., Cedar Springs. 
Roys Geo., 35 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Roys Holmes, 9 Wyoming, Grandville, 
Roys Holmes, 16 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
Roys John E., 3-'S Solon, Cedar Springs. 
ROY JAMES, i Walker, Indian Creek. 
Roys James, 4 Wyoming, Grandville. 
Roys Myron, 9 Wyoraiug, Grandville. 
Ro!;ema Hilbrant, 3 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
RUCKLE DAVID, 36 Bowne, Fill- 

more, Barry County. 
Rudea Aaron, Cedar Springe. 
RUDES HENRY M., 31 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Rugg Samuel, 30 Bowne, Fillmore, 

BHrry County. 
RuliB Joliii, IT Caledonia, Alaska. 
Runion Perry, 33 Plainflcld, Austerliti, 
RUTHARDT GEORGE M., ID Alpine, 

Ruthardt Phillip, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 
Ruthardt William, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Rusche Anthony, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 
RuBche Peter, 14 Alpiue, Alpine. 
Rusco Isaac C., 33 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Ruaco James H., 33 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
RUSH A. W.. Lowell. 
RUSH JOHN, 13 Alpine, Engliahyille. 
Russague Harvey, 8 Grand Rapida. 



MEAT CUTTERS AND SAUSAGE STUFFERS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



ROWE DAVID, 35 Tyrone, Sparta Cen 
Rowe George, 32 Solon, Cedar Springs 
Rowe William, 10 Walker, Q. Rapids. 
ROWE WALTER, 27 Solon, Cedai 

Springs. 
Rowland Mrs., 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Rowland Almond, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
Rowland Fraaklin, 31 Bownt, Harris 

ROWLAND FRANCIS M,, 37 Cale- 
donia, Caledonia. 

Rowland Ira B., 8 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Rowland Josepli, 31 Bowne, Harris 
Creek. 

Rowland Luke, 37 Caledonia, C 

ROWLAND WM. A., 37 Caledonia, 
Caledonia. 

ROWLEY AZARIAH V., 8 Oakfleld, 
OakSeld. 

Rowley Henry E., 1 7 Oakfield, Oakfield 

ROWLEY HARVEY A., 15 OakBeld, 
Oakfield. 

ROWLEY JAMES M., 7 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 

Rowswell T. J., 7 Algoma, Sparta Cen, 



Russell Alraon, 23 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
RUSSELL EDWIN F,, 35 Vergennea, 

Lowell, 
RusBell Eliplialet. 3 Caledonia. Alaska. 
RUSSELL FILIER, 33 PlainSeld, Aus- 

terlilz. 
RUSSELL HENRY C, Village of 

Cedar Springs, 
Russell Isaac, 14 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
Russell Julia A., II Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Russell Luther, 4 Nekon, Cedar 

Spring. 
Russell Peter L., 36 Courtland, Bost- 

wick Lake. 
Russ€ll Warren, 10 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Russell , 8 Paris, Grand Rapida. 

Russ Christian, 33 Paris, Grand Rapids 
RusB Henry H., 21 Cascade, Cascade. 
Russ Nathan H., 31 Cascade, Cascade. 
Ryan Mrs, Ann M., 17 Walker, Grand 

Ryan Joseph L., 17 Walker, Grand 

Rapids, 
Ryan N., 1 Courtland, Courtland Cen, 
Ryan Patrick, 3 Ada, Cannonsburg. 



DRENCH "WITH FORT'S ENEUT OF PAXK. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Bynn Patrick, 17 Walker, G. Rapida. 
Byan Taylor, 1 CouttlaaJ, Courtland 

Ceuter, 
Ryder Benjamin, 85 Vergennca, Lowell. 
Ryder Charles C, 1 Algoma, BurcliTille 

(Burcli's MDIb.) 
Ryder .lolin, Lowell. 
Ryder Rnjland, 35 Tergennes, Lowell, 
Rykert George W., S5 Ada, Ada. 



Rykert George L., 4 PlBinfleld Rock- 
ford. 

Rykert Huldali W., 4 Plainfield, Rock- 
ford. 

Rykert Sanford, Rockford. 

Ryno Ephraim W., 33 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Ryno Eber, 33 Gaines, Cody's Mills. 



Sabine H. B., Spnrfn Center. 
Sabin Daniel, 33 Nelson. Nelson. 
SabiD .Tames, 23 Nelson, Nelson. 
Sach Mrs. Sarali A., 10 Paris, Grand 

Riipids. 
Sackett Wm. H., 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Sadler Elipliniet, 6 Byron, Grandville. 
.Sadler Henry, 33 Wyoming, Grandville 
Sadler Henry P., 15 Byron. Byron Ccn. 
Sage Adrian, 30 Wyoming, Grandville. 
Sage Amos, 18 Cannon, Hiicklbrd. 
8^e George A., 1 Plainfield, Ruckford 
Sage Jolin, 32 Vtrgenoes, Lowell. 
Sage Lafayetto, 33 Vergonnes, Lowell. 
SAGE VOLNEY, Rockford. 

DETROIT STOVE-MADE OF LAKE SUPERIOR IRON-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



SA>fFORD JOHN S., 8 Walker, Grand 

Sapp Diiniet, Lowell. 

Sapwdl Mrs. Susan, 14 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Sapwell Wm., 14 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Sarel Edwin, Rockfurd. 

Sarel Josepli. 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Srtull John, 30 Grattan, Grnttan Cen. 

«aull Micliael, 30 Qrnltan, Grattan Cen. 

Saulsbury William, Oakiield, Oak- 
field. 

SADNDERS GEORGE T., 10 Court- 
land, Couttland Cunter. 



Sailor Martin, 32 Alpine. Indian Creek. 

Salihimry Nagus. 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

SAUSBURY RUSSELL W., 5 Nelson, 
Sanil Lake. 

Salisbnry Wm. M., 18 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Balkeld Joseph, 25 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

SALMON ARCHIBALD, 33 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

Balmon Vincent J., 20 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

SALYER DAVID, 16 Outfield, Oak- 
field. 

Salyer Jacob H., 18 Oakfield, Onkfleld. 

Samuel Andrew, 81 Sparta. Sparta Cen. 

Samuel Alvah, 21 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

Samuel James C, 3 Cascade, Ada. 

Samuels Mordecai, 8 Casade, Ada. 

Samondinger Leonard, 34 Lowell, Lo- 

SANBORN MRS. CORNELIA, 15 

Caledonia, Alaska. 
Sanders Joel, Lowell. 
Sandtrs Oliver Rockford. 



SAUNDERS NATHAN D., 15 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

Sanders Martin. 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Saunders Martin, 33 Plainfield, Auater- 

Saur Andrew, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 
SJftnr Charley, 18 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Saur John, 30 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Saur Johnson, 8 Alpine. Pleasant. 
SAUR PETER, 8 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Sawyer Charles, C Alpine, Lisbon. 
Sawyer Eugene P., 83 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Sawyer James, 33 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
Sawyer Joseph, 5 Byron, Grandville 
SAYLES ALFRED B., 23 Cascade, 

Cascade. 
Sayies Alonzo, S3 Cascade, Cascade. 
Sajles Daniel C, 15 Verge n u es. LowclL 
SAYLES EL1A8, 36 Vergenues, Lo- 

Sayles Francis, Lowell. 
Iraylea J. Harris, Lowell. 
Sayles Serene, Lowell. 
Sayles Thomas, Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CITRES THE WORST 



yGoosle 



HISTORt AND DIRBOTORT OF KENT COUNTT. 



Sayles William G., Lowell. 

SAYLES WILLIAM H., 15 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Scaddin Charles, 35 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
Scally Barnard, 33 Grattan, Graltaa 

SOALLY JOHN, 37 Grattan, Grant. 

Scalley O'Brien, 26 Grattan, Grant. 

Scaulz Peter, 33 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Scalley Thorn aa, 37 Grattan, Grant. 

Scally Timothy, 10 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

S carve 11 Thomas, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Scelly Patrick, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapida. 

Scelly Thomas, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapida, 

80IIA0ND0RF MICHAEL, 19 Byron, 
Byron Center. 

Schauta Andrew, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

SCHANTZ HENRY, C Caledonia, Al- 
aska. 

Scliafer John, 38 Cannon, Cnnnonaburg. 

Schaffer Baltas, 37 Alpine, Gr. Rapids. 

SCHAFFER JOSEPH, 37 Alpiae, Gr. 
Rapids. 

Schaffer Stephen, 37 Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

SCHEIDEL HENJtY, 33 Caledonia, 
Caledonia Station. 



' Schlich Battholoniew, 34 Alpine, Grand 

Schlief .Jnhn, 36 Wyoming, G. Bapids. 
Schlief Michael, 36 Wyoming, Grand 

Schmidt John, 13 Walker, G. Rapids, 
Schmidt WilUam, 39 Grand Bapids. 
Schmidt Waltmer J., 34 Hparta, Sparta 

Schmit John, Grandville. 

Schnable Henry, Alaska. 

Schneider Martin, 19 Lowell, Lowell. 

Schneeberger Jacob, 17 Paris, Grand 

Rapida. 
Schnell Augustus, 5 Walker, Indian 

Schnoble II., Alaska. 

Scholield John, 1 Solon. Sand Lake. 

Schoniakcr Christian, 35 Byroa, Cody's 

Mills. 
Schooley Asa B., 33 Gaines, Hammond. 
Schooley John L., S3 Gaines, Uam- 

Schooley Jonas, 16 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Selioolmaater Joseph, 17 Paris, Grand 

Schoonmnkar Iliirrison, 33 Gannon, 
Cannousljurg. 



CALL AND SEE OUR PATENT PANCAKE GRIDDLE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Scheiflley Frederick, 31 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 
Scheiflley Gideon, Alaska. 
SCHENCK JACOB S., 23 Ada, Ada. 
Sclienck William Y., 30 Ada, Ada. 
Schentema K., 33 Grand Rapida. 
Scherer Nicholna, 36 Alpine, Alpine. 
Schermerhorn Cornelius P., 33 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Schermerhorn Daniel, 33 Walker, 

Grand Rapida. 
Schermerhorn George, 33 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
SCHERMBRHURN HENRY O., 33 

Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Scliemierhorn Isaac V., 31 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
SCHERMERHORN M. R., 38 Cannon, 

Cannonaburg. 
Schindler Edward, IJ Alpine, English- 

Scbindler Ferdinand, 33 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Schidell Ferdinand, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 

Schiedel John, 35 Uourtlaud, Court- 
land Center. 



Schoonmaker James, 31 Cannon, Can- 
no nsburg. 

Schoon maker Walter, Village Can- 
non sburg. 

Schram Abraham, 33 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Schrapper Theodore, 3 Courtland, 
Courtland Centwr. 

Schroeder Mat., 34 Alpine. G. Rapids. 

SCHWADERER MRS. FREU., 34 
Lowell, Alto. 

Schwitzer Nicholaa, 35 Alpine, Grand 

Scott Aaa, 31 Algoma, Englialiville. 

Scott E. L., Lowell. 

SCOTT ELIPHALET, 13 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Scott Henry, 16 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Scott Ilarley, 16 Alpine, Grand Rapids 
Scott Henry, 21 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 
Scott James, 14 Cannon, Boatwick Lake 
Scott John, 5 Qrattaa, Grattan Center. 
SCOTT JOHN C, Lowell. 
Scott Jesse W., 34 Cannon, Cannons- 
Scott James, 16 Vergennes, Lowell. 
SCOTT JAMES H., 38 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 



CASES OF CATARRH IN THREE MINUTES) : 



yGooQle 



2T4 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KEKT COUNTY. 



Scott John M., 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Bcott Mri. Louisa, 31 Tyroce, Casnovia. 
Scott LeW, 36 Gaines, Caledonia Station 
SCOTT LUTHER W., 18 Grattan, Can 

uouBburg. 
Scott Morgan, II Cascade, Ada. 
Scott Melvin J., 19 Grattan, Oannoiis- 

burj;. 
Scott 8epter, 38 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Scott Simon G., 19 Grattan, Canoons- 

bnrg. 
Scott Thomas, 31 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
Scott Theodore P., 31 Tyrone, Caa- 

SCOTT WILLIAM, U Plainfield, Aiis- 

terlitz. 
Scott Walter D., 26 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
ScoTille Caas, 26 Plainfield, Auaterlitz. 
Scoville Lorenzo, Rocktbrd. 
ScoTille Marinus, Rockford. 
Scrantoa Leonidas S., 6 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
SCRANTON SAMUEL B., 17 Grattan, 

Grattan Center. 
Scudder Cyrus A., 4 Byron, North 



Serrice Chauncey, Itookford. 

S every Luther, Lowell. 

Severy Myron, Lowell. 

Sexton BarCley, 37 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

SEXTON BLISS, 26 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Sexton Jonathan W., 4 Cascade, Ada. 
Sexton Patrick, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
Sexton William, 4 Cascade, Ada. 
SEYMOUR FRANK, 31 Plainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
Seymour Henry, 5 Paris, Or. Rapida. 
Seymour Luther, 18 Tyrone, Casuovia. 
SHACKELTON H. 11., Rocklbrd. 
Shackelton William, 16 Walker, Grand 

Shadduck Asa, 19 Conrtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Shadduck George W., 19 Courtland, 
Rocklbrd. 

Shaddock Horton, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Shadle Daniel, 4 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

Shater John, 23 Parts, Grand Rapids. 

Shafer John M., 21 Walker, Grand 
Rapkls. 

Shafer Lorenzo, Q. 10 Walker, Indian 



GALVANIZED WIRE FOR CLOTHES-LINES, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Scudder Henry W., 4 Byron, North 

SCUDDER SAMUEL, Village Cedar 

Springs. 
Scully James, 1 Grand Rapids. 
Seabolt Henry, 15 Cascade, Cascade. 
Sears Austin, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Sear* Charles F., Rockford. 
SEARS FRANK 0., 3 Caledonia, Al- 

Sears Horace, 36 Cascade, Alaska, 
Soars Luke, 30 Courtland, Rocklbrd. 
Sebring John, 14 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Sebring Thomas B., 14 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Sedgwick James, 12 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Seely Edward, 20 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Seeley William, 1 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Seitzemer Cluus, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
SELLERS T. M.. Cedar Springs. 
Senges Charles, Alaska Village. 
Sent Frederick, 23 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
SesaionB John, 3 Grand Rapids. 
SESSIONS RODNEY G,, 39 Gaines, 

Grand Rapids. 



SHAFER MASON L., 20 Paris, Grand 

Shafer Marion A., 26 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
SHAFER OSCAR S,, 23 Paris, Grand 

Shafer Sherman B., 26 Paris, Grand 

Shalfer Levi, 14 Oakfteld, Greenvillo, 
Shaner Sebastian, 20 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Shangles David, 6 Sparta, Casnovia, 
Shanglea Joseph E., 6 Sparta, Cas- 

Shangler James, 18 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
SHANK DALLAS M., 29 Courtland, 

Rockford. 
SHANK E. W., 1 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Shank George, 39 Courtland, Rockford, 
Shank Henry, 1 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Shank Jacob, 7 Courtland, Edgerton, 
Shanti Jacob, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Shapels Peter, 18 Ada, Ada, 
Sharp Amos, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Sharp Arthur, 9 Paris, Grand Itapids. 
Sharp Augustus C, 18 Gaines, Gaines- 
Sharp James G,, 9 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 



itO&I*S WESTERN LINIMENT IS THE BEST FOB HORSES- 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIHBCTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 275 

Drs. Hunt& Hoyt, 

lOMOFiTiic mimm 

Pure HomcBopathie Medicines Supplied. 

Medicine Cases, Books, Etc, kept constantly on hand. 

37 Monroe Street, 
Grantd Rapids, - - Michigan. 

ROBINSOIT, SOLOMON & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Lumber, Timber, Lath 

Shingles, Sash, Doors, Blinds, 

FHAIEES, MOLDIITGS, BRACKETS 

And all kinds of Material for Joiners' Use. 

Particnlar attention paid to SAWING BILL STUFF, and 
Manufacturing Goods to Order. 

Office and Yard, Corner of Canal and Trowbridge Streets, 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIEBCTORY OF KEST COUNTY. 



Sharp Lewis, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Sbftttuck Mrs. Mahala, 17 Sparta, Lis- 

Shaughlonessy Patrick, 34 Aila, Ada. 

Shaver Henry, 17 Byron, Byron Center. 

Shaver William, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 

SHAW ALANSON K., 23 Ver{,'enneB, 
Lowell. 

Sbftw Charles B., 33 Grand Rai>ida. 

Shaw Charles, 30 Sparta, Engliahville. 

Shaw Edwin P., Lowell. 

Shaw Hi, 34 Algonia. Rockford. 

SHAW GEOIIGE N., 30 Couttlaud, 
Rockford. 

Shaw Henry, 34 Algoma. Rockford. 

SHAW JEROME H., Cc-dar Sjirings. 

Shaw McDole, Lowell. 

Shaw Nicholas, 30 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Shaw Winslow, 25 Algoma, Edgorton. 

Sbaw Willis 0., 33 Lowell, Alto, 

Shaw Winslow, Cedar S]iringB. 

Shear Abram G., 31 Paris, Gr. Raiiids. 

SHEAR ABRAM, 33 I'lainfleld, Grand 
Rapids. 

Shear Charles, 21 Paris, Grand Rapids. 



Shepnrd Albert E., 13 Ada, Ada. 

8HEPARD CHARLES, 34 Bnwne, 
Fillmore, Barry County. 

Shepard Casey P., 13 Ada, Ada. 

Slit'pard James, 13 A<la, Ada. 

SIIEPARD LAWRENCE B., 17 Oak- 
field, Oaklicld, 

Shepard Z. W., Lisbon. 

Shephard Henry, Lownll. 

Shephard Horace, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Sherck Samuel, Lisbon. 

Sheridan Michael, 31 Grattan, Oan- 

aUERINGtON ROBERT, 33 Gaines, 
Hammond. 

8HERK AMOS, 31 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

SHERK ADAM B., 30 Caledonia, Cal- 
edonia Station, 

Sherk Aaron G., IT Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station, 

Sherk Christian, 31 Caledonia, Caledo- 
nia Station. 

Sherk David, 33 Gaines, Hammond. 

SHERK HENRI', 16 Caledonia, Gale- 
donia Station, 

Sherk Joseph, 16 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

SHEIIK JOHN, 33 Gaines, Hammond. 



WOODEN CHURNS AND POPCORN POPPERS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Shear Charles, 19 Tyrone, Cssnovia. 
Shear C. L., 13 Grand Rapids. 
Shear David E., 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Shear John W., 31 Paris, Or. Rapids. 
SHEAR JOHN B., Lowell. 
Shearer Alvin, 33 Alpine, Alpine. 
Sheelian Joseph, 10 Vergennes, Alton. 
Sheehan John, 33 Caseade, Cascade. 
Sheehan Michael, 33 Grattan, Cannons- 

Sheeh'an Patrick, 39 Cascade, Cascade. 
Slieehan Patrick, 31 Grattan, Cannons- 
Sheffield Harvey H., 8 Paris, Grant 

SHEICKLER ADOLPII B., 13 Gaiuca 

Alaska. 
Sheidel J., Alaska. 

Sheldon Geo. W., Village Cedar Springs 
Sheldon Norris B., Village Cudn 



Sheler Calvin, 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Shelhammer Moses, 27 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Shelhammer Sylvester, 37 Algoma, 
Rockford. 

Shenamau Lovina, 39 Cascade, Cascade. 



SHERK MENNO, 30 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Sherk Samuel, 20 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station, 

SHERMAN & MILLS, Lowell. 

Sherman Arthur, Lowell. 

Sherman Alfred, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Sherman Edward, 3 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Sherman James, 39 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Sherman Oliver, 37 Plaiiifield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Sherwood Byron D., 30 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Sherwood Charlotte M., 30 Paris, Grand 

Sherwood Delos, 15 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
SHERWOOD JEROME, Sparta Center, 
Sliimmel Adam, 3 PIninfield, Rockford. 
Sliimrael A. N., 21 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Shimmel Henry, 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Shiramel J. W., 31 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Shine John, 3D Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Shimmel John, 83 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Shipman W., 18 Algoma, Sparta Center 
SHOEMAKER CLINTON L., 8 Gaines, 
Grand Rapids. 



FORT'S ENEMY OF PAIN CURES COLIC. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KBNT COUSTY, 277 

VALLEY CITY LIME^OUKS. 



MAJfrFACTUKEK OF 



Vff. H. CONGDON, 

And Dealer in Akron Cement, Milwaukee 
Lime and Plastering Hair. 

Klln«i— West Hiile, oppo«lt.. n. A n, R. nenof, P„„„J D^^'.J~ RJl' L 

om.. 4« <!.i..i «t,»„. " brand KapiQS, Mich. 

GRADV <£ SmiTH, 

Carpenters, Contractors, 

A.1VI> 

PEACTICAL STAm BUILDEHS. 

Shop on Canal Street, opposite Kent Woolen Mills, 

GBAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

N.B,-- We make a Specinlty of Stair Huildinfj 

JOHN GRADY. EDWARD SMITH. 



FEEDINAND SCHEUFLEE & SON 

DKALEItS IN 

Stoves, Tinware, &c. 



MASflFACTUBEKS OF 

Tin, Copper, and Heavy Sheet Iron Work. 



EAVE TROUGHS, CONDUCTORS AND ROOFING MADE TO ORDER. 

Repairing pronipll; atfended to. 

Shop Corner Canal and Bridge Sts., 

GRAND RAPIDS, MIOH. 

trdbyGoOQie 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



SHOEMAKER NICHOLAS, Graodvilie 

Shores William, 7 Bowtic, Alaska. 

SHOTWELL DAVID S., 35 Court- 
land, Courtlaiid Center. 

Shotwell David S., Jr., 35 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Shotwell Isaac M., 10 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Shonp Austin, 11 VerEcnnes, Alton. 

8H0UP HENRY. 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

SHRIKER G. HENRY, 31 Sparta, Lis- 
bon. 

Sliriner Banford, 21 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Shug Henry, 34 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 

Sbuman Erastus P., 3 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Shumway Leonidas, 4 Nelsoa, Cedar 
SpringB. 

Shu pert Eli, 16 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

SibertJoliD, 28 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Sibley Abner, Grandville. 

Sidon William, 13 Walker, G. Rapids. 

Sidon , 13 Walker, Grand Rapids, 

Silcox Mrs. Adaraiiy, 31 Bowne, Harris 

SiHaway Joseph, 20 Tyrone, Ca^novia. 
SILVER HORACE, 1 Alpine, English- 
Til le. 



SIMPSON JOHN S., 37 Bowne, Bowne 
Sinclair Albert G., 24 Cascade, Cascade 
Sinclair Barney, 13 Cascade, Cascade. 
SINCLAIR DANIEL A., SS Bowne, 

Harris Creek. 
Sinclair George W., 24 Cascade, Oaa- 

Sinclair Hiram, 24 Cascade, Cascade, 
Sinclair Hosea B., 13 Cascade, Cascade. 
Sinclair John D., 39 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
Sinclair Peter J., 39 Bowne, Harris 

Singer Alexander, 10 Caledonia, Alaska 
Sip pie Christopher, 15 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
SIPPLE WILLIAM, 16 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Sissem Albert T., 18 Courtland, Edgei 

Siasem Benjamin, 12 Algoma, Burch- 

vdle(Burchs Mills.) 
Sissem Charles 12 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 
bissem John, 36 Solon. Cedar Springs. 
SissoD Reuben B., 36 Flaiiifiuld, Aus- 

Sisson Samuel B., 7 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs 
bkellenger Charles B., 34 Ada, Ada. 



POST HOLE AUGERS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, » "S 



SIMMONS BORWNELL 8,, 18 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
Simmons Charles, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Simmons Henry. 33 Nelson, Nelson. 
SIMMONS HENRY A.. 13 Sulon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Simmons John, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 
Siiiimons John, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 
Hiinmons Jonas, 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
■ SFMMONS JONATHAN B., Village 

Cedar Springs. 
Simmons Oscar A., 35 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 
Simmons Sylvester, 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
SIMMONS WM. W., 18 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Simonds Joel A., 7 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Simonds James, 39 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Simonds John A., 20 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Simon Joseph. 19 Byron, Byron Center 
SIMPSON FRANK. 1 Bowne, Lowell. 
SIMPSON HORACE, 31 Pans, Grand 



Skellinger Henry, 13 Grattan, Smyrna, 

Ionia County. • 
Skellenger James S., Rockford. 
Skidmore Mrs. Catharine, 4 Downe, 

Alto. 
SKIDMORE DAVID M., 4 Bowne, 

Alto. 
Skinner Christopher, Rockford. 
Skinner Charles W., 8 Byron, Byron 

Skinner David, 8 Byron, Byron Center. 
Skinner James, 16 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
SKINNER JOSEPH, 8 Bjron, Byron 

Center. 
Skinner John, 1 Plainfield, Rockford. 
Skinner Reuben, 1 PlainHeld, Rockford. 
SKINNER THOMAS W., 33 Paris, 

Grand Rapids. 
Skutt George, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Skutt Myron, 24 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Slade Merritt, 34 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
SLAGHT SPENCER, 14 Vergennes, 

Lowell. 
Slate George, 16 Plainfield, Belmont. 



OLD MEN AND "WOHEN. YOUNG MEN 



yGooQle 



HiaiOST AND DIRECTORY Ot KENT COUNTY. 



Slater George, 15 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Slater Isaac, 14 Grand Rapids. 
Slater Peter, 23 Vergenots, Vergennes. 
Slater Robert. 15 Paris. G. Rapida. 
SLAUGHTER ABRAHAM, 10 Oak- 
field, Oakfleld. 
Slaughter Daniel, 10 Oakfield. Oakfield 
Slaughter Garrett, 33 Plainfield, Aua- 

SlHWBOn Leander B., 15 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 
SlawBOQ Morris, Cedar Springs. 
Slawson N. F., Cedar Springs. 
SLATTON ASA W., 32 Grattao, 

SLAYTON CHESTER M., 14 Grattan, 

Grant. 
SLAYTON PRANCiS M., U Grattaii, 

G rattan Ctnter. 
Slaylon Thomas J., Lowell. 
SLAYTON WM. C, 24 Grattan, 

Sleeper Amer!cus, 21 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
SLEEPER PETER A., Sparta Center. 
Sliter Alfred V., Village Cedar Springs. 
Sloatniaker Mark, 39 Grand Rapids. 
Slover Benjamia, 7 Qaines, GaineBviHe. 
SLUSSAR HARRISON, d G. Rapida. 



Smith Barlow. 2 Wjoming, Gr. Rapids. 
Smith Beniamin, 14 Grand Rapids. 
Smith B., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Smith Charles H., 33 Walker, Grand 

Smith Conrad, 19 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith Charles W., 35 Paris, Grand 

Rapida.. 
Smith Cyrenua, 36 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Smith Charles, 38 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Smith Charles, 34 Ada. Lowell. 
Smith Charles R. Burchville. 
Suiitb Mrs. Catharine, 3 Alpine, Eng- 

hshville. 
Smith Charles A. C, 13 Solon, Cedar 

SMITH CHARLES. 10 Alpine, English- 
Smith Daniel, 3 Alpine, Bnglishville. 
Smith David G., 35 Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith David R., 14 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith Daniel B., 3 Courtlnnd, Coart- 

land Center. 
Smith Mrs. D. W., 9 Walker, Grand 

Smith Edward, 14 Byron, Bjron Cen. 
Smith Elijah C, South G Walker, Gr. 



HAY FORK PULLEYS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. U -^d 16 Monroe 8i 



Smack William, 13 Algoma, Edgertoi 
Smallej John, 5 Grand Rapida, Grand 

smiley' MERRILS F., 5 Algoma, 

Cedar Springs. 
Smith A. Oacar, IG Bjron, Byron Cen. 
Smith Alfred D., 34 Alpine, Alpine. 
Smith Amos J., 14 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Smith Anthony D., 13 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Smith Albert, 3 Wyoming, Gr. Rapids. 
Smith Abraham, 21 Walker, Grand 

Smith Asa, south 6 Walker, Grand 

Smith Albert, 2 Wyoming, Gr. Rapids. 
Smith Almon C, 21 Caledonia, Cale- 

Smith Almon K., 16 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Smith Abrani, 3 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Smith Aaron, 38 Bowne, Harris Creek. 

Smith 'Alexander, 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Smith Alvah, 30 Sparta. Lisbon. 

Smith Alonzo, 33 Courtland, Rockford. 



Smith Eli, 33 Solon, Cedar Springs. 

Smith Edward, 31 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Smith Eliiiu B., 33 Gainea, Cody's 
Mills. 

Smith E^ander, 34 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

SMITH EU, 8 Grattan, Grattan 

Smith Edward H., 38 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Smith Elihn, 7 Grand Rapids. 
Smith Eugene, 39 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Smith Eli, 23 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
SMITH EBENEZER C, 13 Cannon, 

Bostwick Lake. 
Smith Freeman,. 3 Grattan, Grattan 

Smith Frank, 3 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Smith FrankUn DeF., 34 Alpine, Al- 

Sraith George, 36 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith Geo. T., Lowell. 
Smith Gilbert, 16 Solon, Cedar Springs, 
Smith George, 13 Plainfield, Rockford. 
SMITH GEORGE, 33 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Smith George J., 35 Algoma, Rockford. 



AND MAIDENS, USE FORT'S MEDICINES. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORr OF KENT COUNTY. 



Smith George, 23 Alpine, Alpine. 
Smith Henry K., 31 Ada, Atia. 
Smith Henry, 35 Ada, Ada. 
Smith Hiram M., 30 Plainfielil, Mill 

Smith Heman H., Alaska. 

SMITH HARVEY, 7 Courtland, Ed- 

SiTtim. 
SMITH HEMAN S., 25 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
SMITH HIRAM W., Lisbon. 
Smith Israel D., 21 Wyoming, Grand- 

SMITH ISRAEL C, 15 Solon, Cedar 



SMITH ISRAEL, 3 Alpine, English- 
Smith .lohn H., Rockford. 
Smith John, 10 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Smith Joseph, 15 Bowne, Bowne. 
■ Smith John M., 16 Algoma, Rocltford. 
Smith James, 34 Walker, Q. Rapids. 
Smith Jacob A., 35 Sparta, Sp&rta 

Smith John, 3 Oakfidd, Greenville. 
SmithJohn, Jr., 12 0aklield, Qreenrille 
Smith John W., 16 Wyoming, Grand- 



Smith James L, 35 Algoma, Rockford. 

Smith Joseph E.. Sparta Center. 

Smith Jolm II., Rockford. 

Smith J. J., Lisbon. 

Smith Jacob, 39 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Smith Joseph, 11 Byron, Byron Center 

Smith James W., 12 Cannon, Bostwick 

Smith Jack, 7 Cannon, Rockford. 
Smith James, 1 Courtland, Courtland 

Smith Levi S., 15 Bowne, Bowne. 
Smith Lcander, 39 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Smith Lyman, 33 Courtland, Rockford. 
SMITH LEWIS, 15 VurgenDes, Lowell. 
Smith Mervin A,, 80 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith Michael, IG Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith M. De LaFayette, 2 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Smith Martin 0., 3 Grattan, Ashley. 
Smith M., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Smith Mosca R., H Ada, Ada. 
SMITH MORTISE, 25 Alpine, Mill 

SMITH NEIIEMIAII, 3 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Smith N. J., 11 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

SMITH NliWTON N., 12 Grattan, 
Otisco, Ionia County. 



FOUR BUCKWHEAT CAKES TURNED AT ONCE, AT W. D, FOSTER'S. 

Smith James W., 23 Wyoming, Grand Smith Orlow L., 17 Nelson, Cedar 

Smith John W., 3B Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Smith John S., 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
Smith John, 18 Nelson. Cedar Springs. 
SMITH JOHN W. B., 15 Grattan, Grat- 

Smith John C, 3 Grattan, Ashley. 
SMITH JOHN, 15 Bowne, Bowne. 
Smith Joseph M., 14 Cascade, Cascade. 
Smith John 8., 23 Cascade, Cascade. 
Smith John, 15 Courtland, Courtland 

Center. 
Smith John M., 35 Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith John L., 85 Algoma, Rockford. 
SMITH JAMES, 34 Algoma, Rockford. 
Smith James, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Smith Jamei, 26 Algoma, .Rocktord. 
Smith John , 36 Grand Rapids. 
SMITH J. HOWARD, LoweU. 
Smith Joseph W-, 34 Algoma, Edger 

Smith John B., Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Smith John V., 15 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
SMITH JOSEPH H,, 33 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 



Smith Oscar R., 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

SMITH OBADIAH, 11 Soloo, Cedur 
Springs. 

Smith Orlow, 17 Nelson, Cedar Springs. 

Smith Perry W., Cedar Springs. 

Smith Peter K., 30 Ada, Ada. 

SMITH PETER, 18 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Smith Philo, 33 Spencer, SpencerMills. 

SMITH PHILIP, 1 Courtland, Oak- 
field. 

Smith Peter S., 30 Alpine, Indian 
Creek. 

Smith Phineas P., 6 Cannon, Rockford. 

Smith Robert, 4 Lowell, Lowell. 

Smith Robert, 33 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Smith Russell, 14 Bowne, Bowne. 

SMITH RILEY, 20 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Smith Robert J., 7 Byron, Grandvllle. 

Smith Sflth, 18 Bowne, Alaska. 

Smith Samuel B., 38 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

SMITH G. H., 7 Grand Rapids. 

Smith Sala, 14 Grand Rapids. 

Smith Sydney B., Lowell. 



FORT'S LINIMXNT CUBES CAK£D UDDER. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTOBT O! KElTr COUNTY. 



Smith Thomas, 28 Ada, Ada. 

Smith Torry, 35 Ada, Ada. 

Smith Timothy S,, 37 Paris, Q. Rapids. 

Smith Tiioma.-!, 36 Lowell, Lowell. 

Smith Thomas, 21 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Smith Tlioraas, 15 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Smith Valentine, 4 OakGeld, Spencer 

Mills. 
Smith V. R., 33 Cannon, Ada. 
Smith William H., 14 Paris, Grand 

Smith William, 12 Grattan, Otisco, 

Ionia Uoujity. 
SMITH WILLIAM H., 81 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Smith William, 20 Loweli, Lowell. 
Smith William H., 1 Cannon, Bostwick 

Smith William O., 18 Tyrone, Casnovia, 
SMITH WM. B., 7 GHines. Gainesville. 
Snioake Jacob, 36 Lowell, Lowell. 
Snapen Henry, 1 Solon, S"nd Lake. 
Snell Anson, 3 Wyoming, Gr. Rapids. 
Snethen Charles, 10 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Snell Jefferson, 16 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Sni'l! Joseph C, 13 Lowell, Lowell, 



Snyder James, 17 Wyoming, Grand- 
Tille. 

Snyder James, 25 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Snyder John D., Grandville. 

Snyder Jacob, 2o Courtland, Courtland 

SNYDER JACOB, 33 Ada, Ada. 
Snyder Lester E., 18 OakSeld, Court- 
Sand Center. 
Snyder Lewis C, 30 Courtland, Edger- 

8NYDER L. C, 13 Algoma, Bdgerton. 

Snyder Lewis, 20 Oaktield, Oakfleld. 

Snyder Robert, GrandTille. 

Snyder Spencer, GrandTille. 

Snyder William, 37 Walker, G. Rapids 

Snyder Wm. T., 27 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

Soddard J., 34 Walker, Grand Rapida. 

Solomon Mrs. Amanda, 11 Gaines, 
H^imraoiid, 

Solomon Joseph, 21 Plainfield, Aus- 
terlitz. 

SOLOMON LEWIS A,, 4 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

SYMES JOHN, 3G Sparta, Sparta Ccn. 

Symes James A,, 30 Sparta, SpartdCen. 

SYMONDS.)OnN P., 35 Grand Bfepid* 

Sones Charles, 20 Grand Rapids. 



LETTERS FOR MARKING BAGS AND SHEEP, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Snetlien John, 11 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Snider Frederick, 19 VergennuB, Ver- 

Snider Joseph, jr., 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Snider John, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Suider Jacob, 35 Alpine, Gr. Rapids. 
Snider Josiah, 6 Cannon, Rocklbrd. 
Snitzler John, Orandville. 
Snook Edward, Cedar Springs. 
Bdow Albert, 38 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Snow Ansel, 27 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Snow Duwitt, 31 Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Snow Horace 8., Sparta Center. 
Snow Henry, 28 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Snow Uriel, 13 Cascade, Lowell. 
Snow William R., 13 Sparta, Sparta 

Snow Warren, 13 Cascade. Lowell. 
Snowden James A., IT Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
Suyder Albert, 18 Oakfield, Courtland 

Center. 
Snyder Alfred, GrandviUe. 
Snyder George R., south 7 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 



SOPER DAVID, 3 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Soper David, 33 Plainfield, Austerlitz. 
Soper Francis B., 3 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Soper John W., 5 Paris, Grand Hapids. 
Soper James. 3 Paris, Grand Kapids. 
Soudera John, Courtland, Cedar 

Springs. 
Soule Susan A., SQVergennes, Lowell. 
Soules B. W., 19 Algoma, Sparta Center 
Sours Lawrence, 29 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Sours William, 39 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Southard Mrs. Margaret, Lowell. 
Soutliwer Fred., Burchville (Buret's 

Mills.) 
Southwick Frank, 32 Alpine, Indian 

Southwick Nelson, 29 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Soulier Frederick, 30 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

SOWER ANTHONY, 3fl Alpine, Grand 

Sower Peter, 85 Alpine, Grand Rapids. 
SOWERBY EDWARD, 3 Cannon, 

Rockford. 
Sowerby John, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 



II HAS SAVED VALUABLE COWS. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AKD DIBEOTOBY OP KENT COUSTY. 



SOWEBBY THOMAS, 4 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Soy Arthur, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 

Soy Richard, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids 

Spangenberg George, 21 Sparta, Lisbon 

Spangenberg Jacob, 21 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Spark Ephraim, 8 Plaiiifleld. Belmont. 

Sparks Edgar C, 33 Oainea, Hammond 

Sparka Geo. W., 33 Gaines, Hammond. 

Sparks Jaraes, 8 Plainfield, Belmont. 

Sparks Jamea, 32 Courtland, Rockford. 

Spaulding Charles S., 8 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Spaulding Francis, 13 Algoma, Edger- 

Spaulding Hermon, 21 Nelson, Cedar 



Spaulding Hirnm, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 

Spaulding Isaiah, 38 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Spaulding J. E., 3 Grand Rapids. 

Spaulding John, 38 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Spaulding Jaraes M., 10 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Spaalding Jefferson, 39 Nelson, Cedar 
Bpitngs. 

Spaulding Jerry, 33 Plainfield, Auster- 



litz. 



SPENCER CHESTER, 17 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Spencer Enos, Lowell. 

Spencer Jacob, 6 Ada, Austerlitz. 

Speucer James, 3 Cannon, Kockford. 

Spencer John, 17 Ada, Ada. 

Spencer Luther D., 17 Bowne, Bowne. 

Spencer Reuben, 6 Ada, Ansterlitz. 

Spence Perry, 17 Ada, Ada. 

Speuce William, 17 Ada, Ada. 

Spence Edward, 17 Ada, Ada. 

Spence James, 8 Cascade, Ada. 

Spicer Henry L., B Algoina, Cedar 

Springs. 
Spieer John, 16 Algoma, Rockford. 
Spiker John, 35 Bowne, Lowell. 
Spiker Samuel, 24 Bowne, Lowell. 
Spiller Daniel, 37 Tyrone, Oasnovia. 
Spitzer Aaron, 3 Caledonia, Alaska. 
Sprague A. 8., Cedar Springs. 
Sprague Arthur, ISOaklield, Greenville 
SPRAGUE EDGAR, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Sprague John P., 10 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Sprague Joseph W., Lowell. 
Spragae J. A., Lowell. 
Sprague J. B., Lowell. 
SPRAQL'B RICHARD, 11 Lowell, 

Lowell. 



THE BEST CATTLE TETHER IN MARKET, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



SPAULDING LYMAN, 15 Oakfleld, 

Oakfield. 
Spaulding Miner, 37 Cascade, Alaska. 
SPAULDING MURRAY, 39 Nelson, 

Springs. 
Spaulding Orleans, 12 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Spaulding Ransom L., 13 Paris, Grand 

Spaulding Samuel, 36 Plainfield, Grand 

Rapids. 
Spaulding Timothy, 35 Sparta, Sparta 

Speaker G. D., 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
Spears Alexander, 39 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Speicher Abijah W., 13 Gaines, Ham- 

Speicher Abraham, 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Spencer Almon, 16 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Spencer Alfred, S Ada, Austcrlitz. 

Spencer Geo. M., 15 Qrattan, Grattan 

Spencer Charles, 33 Plainfield, Anster- 
litz. 



Sprague Wm. H., 16 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Sprague William, 34 Algoma, Eager- 

Sprague Wesley, 13 Oakfield, Oreen- 
rille. 

Spring Daniel W., 17 Cannon, Cannoua- 
burg. 

Spring Jared S., 8 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Spring Volney, 18 Cannon, Cannous- 
burg. 

Springsted Jacob, 31 Wyoming. 

Sponable John, 8 Wyoming, Grandville 

Spooner Charles, 19 Wyoming, Grand- 
viUe. 

Spooner Rev. J. Q., Alaska. 

SPOOR ABRAM, 37 Vergennea, Lowell 

Spoor Amaziah, 37 Vergennea, Lowell. 

SPORE J. M., Rockford. 

Spore Jacob C, Rockford. 

Squier.s Lewis M., Rockford. 

Squicrs Robert, 36 Algoma, Rockford. 

Squier Mrs. Eflie M., 33 Paris, Grand 

Squires Gideon, 33 Nelson, Nelson. 
Squires Gideon, 4 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 



rOBT'B WESTJERir LINIUENT CURES AI.I. ] 



yGooQle 



mSTORT AND DIBBCTOBY OP KBHT COCHTT. 



BQUIBES JASON R., 23 Nelson, Hel- 
8QUIER MTLON L., 30 Tyrone, Cas- 

Squier Manly M., 23 Paris, Grand Rapids 

SQUIRE8 MRS. NATHAN, 24 Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

Squires Nathan, 34 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Squirfs Robert, 8r., 35 Courtland, 
Courtland Center. 

Stase George W., 37 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Stage John, 9 Alpine, Englishrille. 

Stahl Alexander, 13 Bowne, Lowell. 

Standish Ira, Lowell. 

BTANIfORD GEORGE, 38 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 

Stance John, 33 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Stanton C. C, 1 Algoma, Burchville 
(Burch'a Mills.) 

STANLEY ISAAC W., 18 Alpine, 



Plea 



Dt. 



Stanton B. W., 7 Grand Rapids. 
Stanton Ellaha, 15 Qrattan, Grattan 

Center. 
Stanton Fletcher L,, 1 Algoma, Burcb- 

Tille (Burch's Mills.) 



Stauffer Isaac T., 33 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stauffer Isaac, 37 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Stauffer William, 33 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stearns James, Lowell. 

8TEBBINS CHAUNCEY P., 34 Paris, 
Hammond. 

Stebbins Charles D., 36 Sparta, Sparta 
Center, 

Stebbina Gains P., 39 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Stebbins Joseph P., 33 Paris, Grand 

Stebbins Orrin. S Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
STEBBINS WILLIAM G., 1 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Stcdman Devilio, 25 Sparta, Euglish- 

Stedman Joseph, 25 Sparta;' English - 

viUe. 
Steed Charles, 36 Sparta, Englishville. 
STEEL DANIEL D., 8 Caledonia, 

STEELE GEORGE, 18 Grattan, Bost- 

STEELE LUCETTA M., 16 Grattan, 
Grattan Center. 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE-LATEST STYLES-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Stanton F. A., BurcliTille (Burch's 
Mills.) 

Stanton Harmon, 14 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

STANTON X^EWIS W., Burchville 
(Burch'a Mills.) 

Stanton Lafayette J., 16 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Stanton Zael, 14 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Stang Charles, 35 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Stapleton Wm. H., 14 Cascade, Caseade 

STARK JAMES M., Caledonia Station. 

Stark Lewis V.. 9 Cascade, Cascade. 

Starks Charles' H., U Alpine, Grand 
Rapids. 

STAHKS D. S., n Alpine, Englishville 

Starks Myron, 16 Bowne, Bowne. 

Starr Irving P., 15 Grand Rapids, 

STARR JOHN, 15 Grand Rapids. 

Staats Jacob, 12 Lowell, Lowell, 

Stauffer David, 33 Caledonia, Caledonia 
Station. 

Stauffer Hiram, 30 Caledonia, Cale- 
douia Station. 



STEELE NATHANIEL, 13 Cannon, 

Bostwick Lake. 
STEELE SAMUEL H., 18 Cannon, 

Bostwick Lake. 
Steele Samuel, 13 Cannon, Bostwick 

Lake. 
STEKETEE JOHN, 22 Paris, Grand 

Steketee Peter, 21 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Steiinett -Toshna. 4 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 

STEPHENSON H. C, Lowell. 

Stephenson James B., Lowell. 

Sternbergh Sylvester, 15 Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Sterling Daniel, 31 Lowell, Lowell. 

Sterling Marcus, 31 Lowell, Lowell. 

Sterling , IS Grand Rapids. 

StetKwick John, 29 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stetzwick Paul, 30 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stetter Geortre, 30 Spencer, Nelson. 

Stetter John, 30 Spencer, Nelson. 

STEVENS AMOS W., 28 Oakfield, 
Oakfield. 

Stevens B. F., 33 Byron, Bjron Cen, 



LVMBSBKEN USE FORT'S WESTERN LIMIMEITT. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIBBCTORY OF KEtfT COUNTY. 



STEVENS CHARLES E., 14 Wjo- 
ming, Grand Rapkls. 

Stevens Gabriel, IT Oakfield, Oakfleld, 

Stevens Henry, 33 Alpine, Alpine. 

Stevens Joha S., 31 Oaiinon, Cannona- 
burg. 

Stevens James D., 3 Plainfleld, Rock- 
ford. 

Stevens John P.. 6 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Stevens John, 23 Oakfield, Oakfleld. 

Stevens James W., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Stevens Ransom, 8 Byron, Byron Cen. 

Stevens Robert, 13 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Stevens Ruasel, 3 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Stevens Robert, 7 Bowne, Alask*. 

Stevens Samuel, 12 Courtland, Oakfield. 

Stevens Saninel H., n Oaklield, Oak- 
field. 

StevenaWB Hiram, 10 Alpine, Englisli- 

8TBVBNS0N WM. H., 3 Alpine, 

Engiisllville. 
Stewart Asa P., Village of Cedar 

Springs. 
Stewart Charles R., 23 Wyoming, 

Grandvillo. 
STEWART DANIEL, 31 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 

STEELYARDS WEIGHING FROM so TO i.OOO POUNDS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Stilwill NirUm, 33 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Stilwill Pliebe.SS Oonrtland, Rockford. 

Stingle William 11., 3.^ Ada, Ada. 

STINSON H. N., Rockford. 

STINTON JOSEPH, 7 Lowell, Lowell. 

Stinton Wm., 7 Lowell. Lowell. 

STOCKS HENBY, 27 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Stocks Thomas, 37 Spencer, Spencer 
MHIb. 

Stocking Dan'l M., 16 Grattan, Grat- 

Stocking FidJuB D., Lowell. 

Stocking Miller J., 16 Grattan, Grat- 

STOCUM D.'r,, Rockford. 

Stofklard Chester S., 27 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Stoddard Eli B., 30 Nelson, Cedar 



Stoddard Henry W., 30 Cannon, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Stoddard Mrs. Hannah, 36 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Stoddiivd Orange W., 30 Cannon, Aus- 



Stewart Ezra, 36 Algoma, Rockford. 
STEWART IIILAN H., 5 Cascade, 

Ada, 
Stewart Henry W., 31 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
STEWART JOHN, 11 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Stewart Marvin. 36 Algoma, Rockford. 
Stewart Mrs. Mary, SO Grand Rapids. 
STEWART OSCAR L., Village of 

Cedar Springs. 
STEWART SIMEON S., 35 Grand 

Rapids. 
STEWART SYLVESTER J., 11 

Walker, Grand Rapids. 
STEWART WILLIAM H., 3 Bowae, 

Alio. 
Stiles Benjamin, 31 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
STILES CHAS 0., Village oi Cedar 

Springs. 
Stiles L. W., Cedar Springs. 
Stiles .Tedediah B., 31 Paris, Grand 

Riipids. 
Stiles Raymond, 9 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Stilwell Cyrus, 31 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 



Stoddard Richard, Sparta Center. 
STOKES WILLIAM H., 30 Plainfield, 

Ansterlitz. 
Stolp Leonard, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Stoaer Alfred, 35 Byron. Cody's Mills. 

Stoner Charles, 33 Courtland, Court 
land Center. 

Stoner Ezra C., 14 Courtlaud, Court- 
land Center. 

Stoner .Jacob J., 23 Conrtland, Court- 
land Center. 

STONER JOHN, Rockford. 

Stoner Riley, 33 Courtland, Courtland 
Center. 

Stonebraker Albert C, 36 Gr. Rapids. 

Stonebreaker Henry, 34 Alpine, Grand 

Stonehou'se, John, 25 Alpine, Mill 
Creek. 

Stoneburner John, 16 AVyoming, 
Grandville. 

STONEBURNER LEONARD, 16 Wyo- 
ming, Grandville, 

Stone A. R., Rockford. 

Stone Chester G., Lowell. 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIMENT CURES RHEUMATISM. 



GooqIc 



BISTORT AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COTJHTT. 285 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

SADDLES, ^^ HARNESS, 




Blankets, ^l^r Fly Nets, 

M Everftbi pertaining to the Saddlers' Business, 
No. 67 Canal Street, 

(Empire Block,') 

Grand Rapids, - - Michigan. 

LEMON'S 

FRAME FACTORY, 

71 Canal Street, 

Om m SQUARE mnpS MADE TO OROER, 

Old Mirrors & Picture Frames 

Repaired, and made as Good as lew. 



The subscriber, beiti^ a practical Gilder, warrants his work to give satis- 
faction. Call and Examine my stock of Oval and Square Frames, before pur- 
chasing elsewhere. ^"Don't forget the number, 

7X GetTxekX Sliireet, 



a. W. LEMON, Proprietor. r- i 

fr^dbyLiOOgle 



HMTORT ASD DIRKOTOBT OF KENT OOTJNTY. 



Stone David T., BurchTille, (Burch'a 

Mills.) 
STONB DAVID, Burchville, (Burch's 

Mills.) 
Stone Blias B., 4 Bowne, Alto. 
STONE FRANKLIN C, Rookford. 
Stone George, 6 Bowne, Alto. 
SIONE HENRY G., 23 Walker, Qr. 

STONB ISAAC L., 31 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Stone John B., Lisbon. 

Stone Levi, 6 Bowne, Alto. 

Stone Normantlus A., Lowell. 

Stone 0. A., Lisbon. 

Stone Oscar, Lowell. 

Stone Oliver, 6 Bowne, Alto. 

Stone Wiiliara -L, 31 Algoma, Rockford. 

STONE WM. H., 6 Bowne, Alto. 

Stoops James A., Rockford. 

Storm Adam, 27 Alpine, Grand Rapids 

Storm Philip, 37 Alpine, Grand Rapids 

Stover Fred., S3 Ada, Ada. 

Story Benjamin, 4 Grattan, Grattan 
Center. 

Story Benj. A., Jr., 9 Grattan, Grattan 

Story Eugene, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 



STOWE LOTHEOP OOOLEY, 18 Cas- 
cade. Cascade. 

Stow Russell, 34 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

STOW THOMAS S., 10 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 

Stow Thomas, 11 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Stowe William. IB Cascade, Cascade. 

Stowe Zebulon, 18 Cnscade, Cascade. 

Stowera Adelbert, 29 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

S towers Nathan, 29 Algoma, Rockford. 

8T0WELL NATHANIEL W., 31 Plain- 
fleld, Mill Creek. 

Straight Royal A., 21 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Straight Lemuel, 34 Paris, G. Rapids. 

Strait Nehemiah, 33 Caledonia, Alaska. 

STRAUB E. AUGUST, 30 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

Stroble Benjamin, 30 Grattan, Can- 
non sburg. 

8TREETER HARMON D., 38 Nelson, 
Oedar Springs. 

Streeter Mr". H. M., 3 Cannon, Boat- 
wick Lake. 

Streeter Morris N., 2 Cannon, Bost- 
wick Lake. 



I X L POCKET KNIVES AND RAZORS AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 1 



tnH IS Uonro* St 



Story Thomaa B., 33 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

STOUT ANDREW, 3 Courtland. Court- 
land Center. 

ST0UTANDREWDEWITT,19 Plain- 
field, Austerlitz. 

STOUT DAVID B., 34 Nelson, Court- 
land Center. 

Stout Ira, 19 Courtland, Rockford. 

STOUT JOSEPH S,, 23 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Stout John, 3 Courtland, Courtland 

Stout Lafayette, 33 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 

Stout Oscar, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 

Stout Samuel, 19 Courtland, Rockford. 

Stout Samuel S., 19 Plainfield, Alpine. 

Stout Urias, 38 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 

ST0U6HT0N CHARLES, 35 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

Stow Alfred W., 17 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 

Stow Christopher. 11 Caledonia, Alaska 

Stowe Elbridge, 18 Plainfleld, Auster- 
litz. 

Stow Joseph, 11 Caledonia, Alaska. 

THE KNOWINO ONES, 



STREETER WARREN, 35 Cascade, 

Alaska. 
Strock Aaron. 33 Cascade, Alaska, 
Strock John, 6 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Strock Marion, 33 Cascade, Alaska. 
Strong Truman, 11 Oaicade, Ada. 
STRONG GEORGE, 23 Ada, Ada. 
STRONG HENRY W., 29 Byron, By- 
ron Center, 
STRONG JARED, 11 Cascade, Ada. 
Strong Nathan, 11 Cascade, Ada. 
STROPS GEORGE W., 35 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Stroup Edgar, 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
STROUP HENRY, Jr., 35 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
STBOUP HENRY, 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Stroup Oscar, 34 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Stuart Charles, 9 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
STULTS FRANCIS M., fl Oakfield, 

Oakfleld. 
Stuttard Henry, Sparta Center. 
Stuart William, 1 Alpine, Engliehville. 



AKD GOOD J17DaE8, 



yGooQle 



HI8T0BT AHD MRBOTORT OP KENT OOtlirnr. 



SDDDICK JOHN, U Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Sullivan Dennis, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Bapids. 
SULLIVAN DANIEL, 31 Grattan, 



3 Paria, Cascade. 
I Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
"' " Byron, North 



Sullivan John, 
SalliYan John W. 

Sullivau James, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

Sullivan John, 31 Grattan, CannonB- 
burg. 

SULLIVAN JOHN, 34 Ada, Ada. 

Sullivan Michael, 13 Gaines, Ham- 
mond. 

Sullivan Hichael, 30 Grattan, Cannona- 

SuUivan Patrick, 20 Grand Rapids. 
Sullivan Patrick, 30 Waiker, Grand 

Sullivan Simon, Grandville. 

Sullivan Solomon, 30 Plainfleld, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Bnllivan Timothy, Village Cannons- 
Sullivan T., 34 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Sunderland Myron W., 10 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 



SUTTON AVERY J., 36 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
Sutton H. H., Burchville (Burch'i 

Milk.) 
Swan Andrew J., 10 Ada, Ada. 
Swan Charles, 8 Ada, Ada. 
Swan Ebenezer, 9 Ada, Ada. 
SWAN BEEN, 8 Ada. Ada. 
SWAN JOHN A., Lisbon. 
Swan Josiah, 8 Ada, Ada. 
Swan Lyman D., 1 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Swan Solomon, 8 Ada, Ada. 
Swank John, Cedar Springs. 
Swank Peter, 31 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Swartout Andrua, 11 Oakfield, Green- 



Co nrad, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
SWARTZ AUGUSTUS, Rockford. 
SWARTZ EDWIN, 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Swenson Charles, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
SwenaoD Isaac, 5 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Sweet Edward 0., 5 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Sweet Ebenezer P., 26 Lowell, Lowell- 
Sweet John 0., 5 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
Sweet Wm. J., 7 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
Sweet! and Charles, Lowell. 
Sweetland Samuel, Lowell. 



KNIVES AND FORKS FROM J' TO tl3 PER SET, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Sanderlin Eugene A., Lowell. 
Bunderlin E. A., Lowell. 
Sutherland Alexander, Lowell. 
Butphen James, 36 Cascade, Alaska. 



Swift Morgan L., Lowell. 

Swift Silaa, 33 Spencer, Spencer Mills. 

Sylverthorn Thomas, 34 Vergennes, 

Fallassburg. 
SYMONS JOHN, 2 Sparta, Sparta Cen 



TABER JAMES, 13 Solon, Rockford. 

Taber Justin O., SI Walker, G. Rapids. 

TABER MARCIU8, 5 Walker, Indian 
Creek. 

Taber Nathan, Rockford. 

Taft Charles L., 13 Oakfiald, Greenville 

Taggart Harvey, ST Sparta, Sparta Cen 

Taggart William, 8 Byron, Grandville. 

Takens Gaart, 32 Grand Rapids. 

Tftlbot T. F., 5 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapids. 

Talbot Dennis, 33 Grattan, Qrattan Cen 

Talbot Dennia, Jr., 33 Grattan, Ver- 
gennes. 

TaLBOTT JOHN, 33 Grattan, Alton. 

TALBOT RICHARD, 38 Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 



Tallman T. W., 18 Sparta, Lisbon. 

Tallman John C., Village Cannonaburg. 

TALLMAN LEWIS D., Village Can- 
nonsburg, 

Tatman Edson, Lisbon. 

Tanner James H., Alaska Village. 

Tanner Levi H., Sparta Center. 

TANNER WARREN D., 6 Gaines, 
Gainesville. 

Tate George, SO Grattan, Grattan Cen, 

Tate James, 17 Courtland, Courtland 
Center, 

Taplin Wra. T., 16 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Tapley S., Cedar Springs. 

Tate Thomas, Lowell. 

TAYLOR A. J., 34 Alpine, Alpine. 



USX TOnVM ZZTKAOT OI- IXHOH. 



yGooQle 



HieiOET AND DIRBCTORT OF KBNT COUNTY. 



Taylor Allen, 18 Algoraa, Sparta Center 
Taylor Mrs. Catbarine, Rockford. 
Taylor Corwin, 3 Lowell, Lowell. 
Taylor Charles, 31 Vergennes, Lowell. 
Taylor Daniel, 18 Algoraa, Sparta Cen. 
TAYLOR GEO. E., 36 Grand Rapids. 
Taylor Geo. P., 16 Lowell, Lowell. 
Tavior Htnry, Lowell. 
TA'YLOH HOLLIS R., 36 Grand Rapids 
TAYLOR HARMON S., 9 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Taylor John, 20 Lowell, LowelL 
Taylor John, Lowell. 
TAYLOR J. BKAINAED, Sparta Cen. 
Taylor Keodrick, 13 Bowne, Alto. 
Taylor L. L., Lowell. 
Taylor Loyal L.. 9 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
TAYLOR MRS, MARY, 17 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Taylor Michael, 8 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Taylor Martin, Cedar Springs. 
Taylor Matthew, 21 Grand Rapids. 
Taylor Orlando, 3 Lowell, LowelL 
TAYLOR OLIVER, 26 Cascade, Caa- 

Taylor S- J., LowelL 

Taylor Simeon H., 3 Sparta, Sparta 



Templar Gilbert, 33 Spencer, Cedar 

Springs. 
Ten Eyck Joseph, 14 Plainfidd, Aua- 

terlitz. 
Terriil Adelbert S., 10 Bjron, Byron 

Center. 
Terriil A. Jackson, 15 Byron, Byron. 

Center. 
Terriil A. Philoman, 10 Byron, Bjron 

TERRILL EDWARD L., 10 Solon, 

Cedar Springs. 
Terriil Tillitson, 33 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Terwilliger Silas W., 25 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Terry Frank, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Terry Minerva M., Village Cannonsburg 
TETLEY WILLIAM, 13 Paris, Grand 

Thatcher Darid, 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Tbayer George N., 13 Sparta, Sparta 

THAYER LEWIS, 38 Alpine, Indian 

Thede John, 30 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
Therry Nicholas, Lowell. 
Thetge John, Cedar Springs. 
Tliibos John, 18 Lowell, Lowell, 



SLEIGH BELLS AND WHIPS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S, 14 »nd lO Mon 



Taylor Samuel, 18 Algonia, Sparta 

Center. 
Taylor Samnel A., Sparta Center. 
Taylor William H., Sparta Center. 
Taylor William, 36 Cascade, Alaska. 
Teed Lamoreaux, 1 Alpine, English- 

Tille. 
Teeple Chaa., 8 Lowell, Lowell. 
Teeple Elbert B., 83 Cascade, Alaska. 
TEiiPLE GEORGE W., 18 Cascade, 

Cascade. 
Teeple James, 15 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Teeple Oscar F., 18 Cascade, Cascade. 
TEEPLE PETER, 18 Cascade, Cas- 

TEEPLE PETER, Jr., 30 Cascade, 
Cascade, 

Teeple Seneca, 18 Cascade, Cascade. 

Tupple William M., 15 Sparta, Sparta 
Center. 

Teesdale Charles, ST-Algoma, Rock- 
ford, 

Tefft Amos B., 20 Courtland, Rockiord, 

Tefit Orrin J., 17 Courtland, Courtland 

TELLER P. 3., Rockford. 



THOMAS ALBERT, 5 Cascade, Ada. 
Tiiomas Abner D., 31 Bowne, Cale- 

Thomas Ashley, 23 Cascade, Cascade. 
Thomas Alexander, 11 Cannon, Bost- 

Thomas Alfred, 11 Cannon, Bostwick 

Thomas Benjamin, 13 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Thomas Calvin, 37 Wyoming, Grand 

Thomas Chauncey, 34 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Thomas Charles, 3 Byron, North Byron 
THOMAS DEWITT C, 14 Cascade, 

Ada. 
Thomas Edward, 37 Wyoming, Grand- 

Tilie. 
THOMAS EDGAR M., 25 Wyoming, 

KelloggBTille. 
THOMAS FRANCIS, 18 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Thomas Hndson B., 16 Plainfleld, Bel- 

Thomaa Jonathan T., 3S Cascade, 

Lowell. 



A BLESSING TO ANT COUNTBT, 



yGooQle 



HISTORt^AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTT. 



THOMAS DR. J. R., 28 Grttin.1 RapidB. 

Thomas Joseph, Lowell. 

Thomas Jotihua, 13 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. . 

Thomas John.H.. 30 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

THOMAS JAMES, Village Canoons- 
burg. 

Thomas John M., 38 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Thomas James L.. 28 Cannon, Cannona- 
bui^. 

Thomas Levi, 34 Spencer, Spencer Mills 

Thomas Lewis D., 28 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

THOMAS LORENZO D., 3 Oakfield, 
Greenville. 

THOMAS MARTIN P., 16 Spencer, 
Spencer Mills. 

Thomas Nathan, 30 Grand Rapids, 
Grand Rapids. 

Thomas Peter K., 13 Bowne, Lowell. 

Thomas Richard, 16 Plainfield, Hul- 

Thomas Sidney S., 8 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Thomson Samuel, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
THOMAS WILLIAM, 32 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 



Thompson Horton, 31 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 

Thompson John T., 18 Lowell, Lowell. 

Thompson John, 25 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

THOMPSON JAMES R., 88 Bowne, 
Bowne. 

Thompson John, 82 Tyrone, Casnoria. 

Thompson John W., 32 Tyrone, Cas- 



Thomp.^on Lorenzo, 23 Cascade, 

Thompson Leroy, 24 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Thompson Michael, 34 Walker, Grand 

THOMPSON ROBERT, 17 G. Rapids. 
Thompson Sylvester A., 21 Spencer, 

Nelson. 
Thompson Sylvanus D., 10 Bowne, Alto 
Thompson Thomas, 9 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
THOMPSON THOMAS, 8S Wyoming, 

KeliogKsville. 
Thompson William, 28 Grand Rapids. 
Thomson Andrew, 31 Ada, G. Rapids. 
Thompson Hiram E., 10 Byron, Bjron 



LADDERS FOR PICKING FRUIT, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. U «nil 16 M 



Thomas William, 18 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Thomas William, Village Can Honshu rg. 
Thomas Wm. W,, 10 Byron, Nortli 

Byron, 
Thomas Mrs. Tabitha, 3 Oakfield, 

Greenville. 
THOMAS WILLIAM, 18 Wajker, Grand 

Tliome Michael, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 
Thome Peter, 34 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
THOMPSON ALMUN, 30 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Thompson Adam. 13 Grand Rapids. 
THOMPSON ANDREW, 34 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 
THOMPSON CALVIN, 25 Courtland, 

Courtland Center. 
Thompson Charles S., 23 Grand Rapids 
THOMPSON BLIAS, 18 Sparta, Lisbon 
THOMPSON FREDERICK B., 13 

Bowne, Bowne. 
Thompson Frederick W., 23 Q. Rapids. 
Thompson George, 35 Sparta, Sparta 

THOMPSON HENRY H., 37 Bowne, 
Harrb Creek. 



Thomson Isaac R., IS Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Thomson Robert, 5 Ada, Grand Rapids 
Thorington Smith, 16 Walker, Grand 

Thurbur Darius, 11 Grand Rapids. 
Thuretin S. L., 2 Alpine, EnglishviUe. 
Thurston Daniel, Lisbon. 
Tburston Daniel B., Lisbon. 
Thurston Franklin, Lisbon. 
THURSTON JOHN, Lisbon. 
Tibbets Henry, 7 Byron, Grandville. 
Tibbcts Wm. D., 8 Bjron, Qrandville. 
Tierney Michael, 24 Grand Rapids. 
Tiffany Alva, 25 Cannon, Cannoneburg. 
TIFFANY REUBEN C, 35 Cannon. 

Uannonsburg. 
Tim Charles, 28 Caledonia, Caledonia 

Station. 
Timmersma Derrick, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Timpson Joseph, 9 Bowne, Alto. 
TindoU Smith, 37 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Tindall John N., 34 Nelson, Cedar 



Springs, 
ISDEli J< 



FORT'S WESTERN LINIUZNT AND UCVER PILI^. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AlfD DIRKCToaT OF KENT C0tI5TT. 



Tobey Albert, 36 Caledonia, Caledonia. 
TOBEY GEO. L., 11 Byron, Byron Cen 
TOBBY PRINCE W., 36 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
■ TOBEY SA.MUEL, fi Byron, Byron Cen 
Tobio William, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Tobias ChariuB, 8 Cascade, Cascade. 
Tobias Stepben, 16 Paris, Grand Rapids 
Toolej Edward, 11 Grand Rapids. 
Toolej Isaac, 15 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Tooley Noali, 15 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Tole Mies Ptiebe A., S4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Tomlinson Isaac, Sen., SI Cannon, Aua- 

terlitz. 
Tomlinson Isaac, Jr., 31 Cannon, Aua- 

terlitz. 
Tomlinson Stephen, 11 Vergennes, 

TOMPSBTT CHARLES, 21 Cannon, 

Cannonsburg. 
Tompsett Henry, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 
Tompsett James, 24 Nelson, Nelson. 
TOMPSETT JESSE, 24 Nelson, Nel- 

Tompsett Jesse, Lowell. 

Toinpaett James, 31 Ciinnon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Tompkins Henry, 15 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 



TOWER ISAAC, 29 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
Tower Joseph, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Tower Rufua C, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Tower Solomon, 15 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
TOWER SCHUYLER, 2 Vergennes, 

TOWER STEPHEN S., 29 Oakfield, 

Oakfield. 
TOWLE JAMES, 22 Piainfield, Ana- 
Town Alfred B , 33 Cascade, Alaska, 
Towner Samuel W., 21 Byron, Byron 

TOWNER SAMUEL S., 21 Byron, By- 

Townes John A,, 33 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
TOWNES JOSIAH D., 33 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
Townes Simon, 33 Nelson, Cedar 



Towns John, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Townsend George, 25 Wyoming, Kel- 

loggville. 
Tracy Michael, 2 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapida. 



EVERYTHING IN THE HARDWARE LINE, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Tompkins William H,, 15 Nelson, 

Cedar Springs. 
Toms A. L., 1 Alpine, Eiiglishville. 
Toma A W., Rockford, 
TOMS A. B., 1 Alpine, Englishville. 
TOMS JOSEPH E., 1 Alpine, EngUsh- 

Toms Oscar, Rockford. 

TOPPING E. H., 16 Tyrone, Caenoria. 

Torrey Ezra 0., Lowell. 

TORREY LUCIUS W., Village of 

Cedar Springs. 
Torrey Seymour, 13 Lowell, Lowell. 
Totten J. J., 33 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 
TOTTEN THOMAS, 26 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Totten Thomas, 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Tower Adelbert A., Rockford. 
Tower Charles E., 15 Grattan, Grattan 

tower' CHARLES A., 10 Solon, 
Cedar Springs. 

Tower David, Koekford. 

Tower George, 29 Algoma, Rockford. 

TOWEJl ISAAC L., 30 Oakfield, Oak- 
field. 



Train Jarvis C, Lowell. 

TRAIN MRS. CAROLINE, 34 Lowell, 

Lowell. 
Tramper J. W., 36 Grand Rapids. 
Trauger John, 11 Lowell, Ijowell. 
Trask Chaa. H., 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
Traak H. M., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Trailer Alex,, 6 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
TREADWAY BENJ. S., 19 Tyrone, 

Treat B. P., 38 Tyrone, Sparta Center. 

Treat Mrs. Elizabeth, 16 Grand Rapids. 

Treat Oscar F., Rockford. 

Tredenick James, LoweU. 

TreuBt Lurn, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Treiton William, 13 Walker, G. Hapids. 

TRILL DAVID P., 22 Nelson, Nelson. 

Trill Edward, Rockford. 

Trill Samuel, 22 Nelson, Nelson. 

Trill Thomas, 9 Courtland, Courtland 

Trill William. 33 Nelson, Nelson. 
TRIM SAMUEL, Cedar Springs. 
Trimmer Da»i<l, 33 Lowell, Lowell. 
Troost Paul, 29 Grand Rapids. 
Trowbridge P. C, 21 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Troj Edmund M., 19 Caledonia, AlaakA. 



FORT'S HEBICIHBS ABE WARRANTED, 



yGooQle 



HISTORY ASH DIBXCTOBT OF KENT COUNTT. 

JOHN P. CREQUE, 



Manufacturer of UPHOLSTERED GOODS, 

69 Canal Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

A. LEITELT & BRO., 

Sf ANVFACTITRERS OF 

mm £im & num. 

Foundry and Machine Shop opposite the Bronson IHouse, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 
GRAND RA PIDS LI ME WORKS. 

JOHN HILL, 



MANrFACTCRER OF 



And Dealer In Milwaukee, Sheboygan &. Toledo Lime, 

Calcine Plaster, Water Lime, Hair etc., 

OB oa.rL»i St., o-nA-up n..a.r»ipa. 

Kinney & Mitchell, 

lOlSESIOMGAlJOIfilE 

A Specialty made of Shoeing Horses that are Tender-Footed, 

and those that Interfere, o^" We guarantee satisfaction. 

Shop, four doors North of Bndgo Street, opposite Canal Street House, 

f wTo^^'L.} Grand Rapids. 



fpd by 



GooqIc 



HI3T0ET AND DIEECTORY OF KENT COUHTT. 



Trn; James, 19 CiLledonia, Cftledoaia 

Station. 
Troy John C, 19 Caledonia, Alaska. 
TRO¥ JOHN M., 8 Caledonia. Alaska. 
Truai James, 3 Plainficld, Rockford. 
TBUAX JAMES H., 8 Bowne, Alto. 
Truax Mrs. Eleanor, Bowne, Alto. 
Truax Mrs. Elizabeth, 8 Bowne, Alto. 
Trumbull Cassiua, 30 Qrattan, Alton. 
Trumbull Oren S., 36 Grattan, Alton. 
Tryon F. B., 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Tubba Cornelius, liockford. 
Tubba Cornelius, 6 Cannon, Rockford. 
Tubba Hoaea, 23 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Tubbs Israel, 10 Walker, G. Rapida'. 
Tnl.bs Martin S., 23 Grand Rapids. 
Tubbs Nathan, South 7 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
TubV>s Mrs. Rebecca, 3G Algoma, Rock- 

Tv'y i Tunia, 10 Gaines, Gainesville. 
Tucker E. W., 33 Lowell, Lowell. 
TUCKER FOSTER, 17 Grand Rapida. 
Tucker Henry, 21 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Tucker J. B., 9 Byron, North Byron. 
Tunker Joseph D., 10 Sparta, Sparta 

Centre. 
TUCKER SOLOMON J., 10 Sparta, 

Sparta Centre, 



Tuttle Abraham S., 26 Nelson, Cedar 

Sprinits. 
Tuttle Eugene, S5 Cannon, Cannona- 

burg. 
Tuttle George L,, 6 Cannon, Rockford, 
Tuttle Hiram, 35 Cannon, C.iunons- 

TUTTLE -T. E., 24 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Tuttle John, Rocktbrd. 
Tuttle Lyman V., 20 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Tuttle Oscar, 34 Algoraa, Edgerton. 
TUTTLE STEPHEN L., « Cannon, 

Rockford. 
TuthiU Jason, 31 Oakfield, Oakfleld. 
Tuthill Stephen H., 31 Oakfluld, Grat- 

TUXBCRY 'bENJ. T., 38 Alpine, Gr. 

Rapids. 
TuxUury Byron S., 19 Tyrone, Cas- 

TUXBCRY JOHN 8., 19 Tyrone, Caa. 

Tuxbury Norton, 38 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids, 
Tyler Asa R., 27 Bowne, Harris Creek. 
Tyler Augustus, 33 Bowne, Harris 

Tyler Adnn, 13 Bowne, Bowne. 

Tyler Alban A,, 26 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 



SLEIGH BELLS AND WHIPS, AT W D. FOSTER'S, i* "od 16 Monroe Street 



Tucker Samuel, 10 Sparta, Sparta Cen, 

TUPFELMIRB ABRAHAM, laSparta, 
Sparta Centre. 

Tully Patrick M., 3 Qrattan, Ashley. 

Turk John W,, 36 Qrattan, Grant. 

Turner Alfred, 11 Grand Rapids, 

Turner L. R., 36 Algoma, Rockford. 

Turbush Barnard, 13 Cascade, Cascade. 

Turner Lewis, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 

Turner Marvin C, 15 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

TURNER MARVIN, 27 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

TURNER SALEM T., 6 Paris, Grand 

Turner William, 26 Algoma, Rockford. 
Tumbuli Robert, 6 Ada, Ada. 



Tyler Alexander G,, 27 Paris, Grand 

Tyler Edward, 16 Cascade, Cascade. 
TYLER HEWITT, 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
TYLER JUSTUS J., 35 Paris, Grand 

Tyler John, 38 Cascade, Alaska. 
Tyler Loren B., 13 Bowne, Bowne. 
Tyler' Oren, 26 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Tvler Uoswell F., 15 Bowne, Bowne. 
Tyler William, 30 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
TYSON ISAAC W., 8 Gaines,* Gaines- 

TWADEL JOHN, 33 PlsinMd, Ans- 

Twiss Loren, 32 Alpine, Indian Creek. 
Tttohay John, 3i) Grattan, Cannons- 
burg. 



u 



Umlor Tebolt, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 
Uuilor Joseph, 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 
UNDERBILL ALFRED, 21 Sparta, 
Sparta Center. 



Underbill Geor; 

ford. 
UNGER CHRISTIAN, 

Unger Solomon, 8 Vergennea, Alton. 

FOBT'S AROMATIC OINTMENT CURES SORE ETES. 



IS Conrtland, Rock- 
Vergcnnes, 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OP KENT COUNTY. 



UNGER WILLIAM, 15 Oakfluld, Oak- ■ 

lield. 
Upaon Jesse, 4 PIsinfiekl, Itockford. 
Upson JoBepli 0., 4 PlninBeid, Rock- 

Jord. 
Utter Amos, 33 Wyoming, GrandTille. 



Utter Franklin, 



V 



VALA-NCB AMOS, 10 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Tallance Jolin, S Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Vanamlmrgh John Nelson, 33 Cascade, 

Alaska. 
Vanambnrgh Lewis, 38 CflBCade, Alaska 
Van am burgh William, 33 Cascade, 

Alaska. 
Van Antwerp John, 17 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
Van Antwerp John, 16 Paris, Grand 

Van Antwerp Samuel E., 17 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 
Van Antwerp, Wm. L., 17 Sparta, 

Sparta Center. 



Vac Deuaen Chaiincey B., I Plainfield, 

Rook ford. 
Van Deiisen Elam, S8 Vergennea, Ver- 

gennes. 
Van Deusen Hiram, Lowell. 
Vandeusen Jeaae, 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Van Deusen John 8., 38 Vorgennes, 

Vergennes. 
. Van Deusen Ray, 5 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
' Van Deusen William. 8 Lowell. Lowell. 
Vandine Jacob, S9 Grana Rapids. 
Van Doren John T., S4 Ada, Ada. 
Van Donge Dennis, 19 Walker, Grand 

Van Uonge Jolin, 19 Walker, Grand 

Rapids. 
Vandyke Albert, 8 Bownc, Alto. 



HAY FORK PULLEYS, AT W. O. 

VAN AUKEN JAMES, 17 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Van Blaricum Lutlier, 21 Lowtll, Lowell 
Van Buren Geo. W., 28 Lowell, Lowell. 
Vanderslotpe Engel, 33 Grand Rapids. 
Vanderpool James, 18 Paris, Grand 

llapida. 
Vanderhoof Simon, 1 Paris, G. Rapids. 
Vanderhoof William, Lowell. 
Vanderbilt John, 18 Cascade, G. Rapids 
Vandi^rmasa Martin, 39 Grand Rapids. 
Vanderlip JoUd, Lowell, 
Vanderstol 0., 18 Grand Rapids. 
Vanderfliet Martin, 39 Grand Rapids. 
Vanderburg Cornelius, 29 Grand Bapids 
Vandewerker Henry, 34 Bowue, Bowne 
Vandewerker Nelson, 34 Bowne, Bown 
Vandetbroeck John. 1 Vergennes, Alton 
Vandorbroenk R., 1 Vergennes, Alton. 
Van Deusen Austin, 31 Lowell, Lowell, 
VAN DEUSEN ALFRED, 38 Ver- 
gennea, Vergennes. 
Van Deusen A. Delos, 38 Vergennes, 

Vergennes. 
Van Deusen Adam, 34 Vergennes, Ver- 
gennes. 



FOSTER'S li 









Vandyke i 
Springs. 

VAN EVERY GEO. W., Alaska. 

Van Hooven Aaron, 7 Paris, G. Rapids 

Van Hoven Edwin, SO Paris, G. Bapida 

Van HooTcn Mrs. Nellie, 30 Paris, 
Grand Rapids. 

Vanilen Daniel, Village Cannonshurg. 

VAN LEW JOHN. 31 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Van Lew Oscar G., 31 Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Van Lew Peter, 31 Gaines, Cody's Mills 

Van Liew Daniel, 31 Algoma, Rock- 
ford, 

Van Liew James C, 31 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

Van Liew William, IG Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 

VAN LIEW WINFIELD 8., 8 Nelson, 
Cedar Springs. 

VAN LOON VOLNEY, 13 Algoma, 
Edgerton. 

VANNEST GEORGE, 5 Bjron, North 

Van Nornum Harrison, Lowell. 



rORT'S AROMATIC OINTMENT CURES PILES. 



yGooQle 



HIBTOaT AMD DIBECTOKT OP KBHT COUNTY. 



VANNALSTINE LAMBEllT, Ada Vil- 
lage. 
Vaiioalstine Peter L., Ada Village. 
Van Order Isaac, 31 Bowue, Harris 

Van Order William, 39 Bowne, Harm 

Creek. 
Van Reen Herman, Graiidsille. 
Van Raaltc Ratfee, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Eapida. 
VAN 8CHOTBN GEORGE, 31 Can- 

□ on, Austerlitz. 
Van Schuyler James, 19 Sparta, Lisbon 
Van Schuyler Richard, 19 Sparta, Lis- 

Van Sickles Alfred, 1 Paris, G. Rapids, 
Van Size Simon B., Village Cannoas- 

burs. 
Van Sledriglit Art, 15 Paris, G. Rapids 
Van Stolsman Peter, 2 Wyoming, 

Grand Rapids. 
Van Wagner John, 6 Oakfield, Oakfield 
Van Winkle Samuel, 25 Spencer. 

Spencer Mills 
Van Wiirincr James, Rcckford. 
Van Volkinburg Jonathan, Burchvillc 

(Burcli's Mills.) 
VAN ZANDT JACOB, 23 Spencer, 

Spencer Mills. 



Veriin Miehaef, 16 Ada, Ada. 

Verlin Richard, 17 Vergennes, Ver- 
ge nnea. 

Verbanks John, 20 Wyoming, Grand- 
Vincent Benjamin, Sparta Center. 

Vincent Michael, 34 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Viukcmulder John, Grandville. 

VINTON H.H., I Dep' J Sheriff.) Lowell. 

Vinton Jerome, 13 Alpine, Grandville. 

Vinton Porter, 13 Alpine, Gr. Rapida. 

Virgil James E., 1 Wyoming, Grand 
Rapids. 

Vittj John, 7 Grand Rapids. 

Vogt Henry, 3B Lowell, Lovell. 

Volpert John, 14 Alpine, Alpine. 

VOND JOHN, 83 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

VOND WILLIAM C, B Sparta, Lisbon. 

Von Elirenkrook Charles, Lowell. 

VONNEY BICK, 19 Algoma, Sparta 

Von Manen Stephen, 16 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Vorholick Andrew, 33 Alpine, Indian 

Vorholick Sebastian, 33 Alpine, Alpine. 
Vrealand John T„ 8 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
VROOMAN JOHN 0., 23 Paris, Gr. 



LETTERS FOR MARKING BAGS AND SHEEP, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 

., 11 Walker, 11 Vroman William H., Alaska Village. 



w 



Waddell John. 19 Cannon, Austerlitz. 

Waddell William, 30 Cannon. Aus- 
terlitz. 

Wade John, 13 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Wade Lawson N., 31 Plainfield, Grand 
Rapids. 

Wadenfcllow John, 19 Byron, Byron 

WadBWorth A. 0., Lowell. 

Wagener Christian, 31 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
WAGNER JOHN B., 1 Solon, Sand 

WAIT DeLOSS v., 5 Cannon, Rock- 
lord. 

Wait Hastingfl, Sparta Center. 

Wait Milo, 37 Cannon, Cannonsburg. 

Wait Paine, 13 Grattan, Otiaco, Ionia 
County. 

Wait Sanford, Lowell. 



Wait Mrs. Susan, Sparta Center. 

Waite F. F., 10 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

Waite Joseph, 12 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

WAITE L. W,, 13 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 

WAKEMAN ALFRED, 1 Grattan 
Grattan Center. 

Wakenian John, 38 Spencer, Spencer's 
Mill. 

Wakeman Stephen, 38 Cannon, Can- 
nons burg. 

Walden Lodowic, 16 Gaines, Ham- 

Walden Guy 9., 9 Cascade, Cascade. 
Walker Albert B„ 33 Grand Rapids. 
Walker David, 33 Plaindeld, Grand 

Walker Eliab, 
Walker George 



Vergennes, Lowell. 
Grand Rapids. 



LEI EVERT ONE TROUBZ.ED WITH LIVER 



yGooQle 



HISTORY ASD DIRECTOKT OF KEHT COUHTT. 



"WALKER HUGH, 9 Sparta, Sparta 

Center. 
WALKER ISAAC, 29 Solon, Cedar 

SpringB. 
Walker John J., 19 Lowell, Lowell. 
Walker Joha J., Jr., 19 Lowell, Lowell. 
WALKER JACOB W., 28 VergenoeH, 

Lowell. 
Walker Levi, 21 Vergennea, Lowell. 
Walker Melvin, II Lowell, Lowell. 
Walker Thomas, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Wall Samuel, 85 Courtland, Bostwick 

WALL'wILLIAM, 1 Piainfield, Rock- 

iord. 
WALLACE MRS. CAROLINE, SB 

Sparta, Sparta Center. 
Wallace Charles IL, 24 Sparta, Sparta 

Wallace Corjdon, 19 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

Wallace Jamea, 2G Lowell, Lowell. 

Wallace John W., 11 Lowell, Lowell. 

Wallace Nathaniel, 12 Grattan, Otisco, 
Ionia County. 

Wallace Nathan, 1 Lowell, Lowell. 

Wallace Nathaniel T.. 11 Lowell, Lo- 
well. 



Walton John 8., 35 Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County. 
Walton Ransom, 2S Bowne, Fillmore, 

Barry County, 
Walz George, 26 Ada, Ada. 
Wamsley Edwin C, Village Cedar 

Springs. 
Ward Charles, SO Grand Rapids. 
Ward Hugh H.. IS A.la, Ada. 
Ward Horatio G., 36 Ada, Ada. 
Ward Henry, 8 Walker, Grand Rapids. 
Ward Jonathan, Village Cedar Springs. 
Ward John, 5 Vergennea, Cannonshurg. 
Ward James, 31 Spencer, Cedar Springs 
Ward Jared, 19 Spencer, Nelson. 
Wani Michael, 31 Spencer, Cedar 

Springs. 
Ward Silaa, 16 Grattan, Grattan Center 
Ward Wm. W., 24 Ada, Ada. 
WARD WM, D., 14 Grattan, Grattan 

Wardwel'l William, 37 Walker, Grand 

WARE SAMUEL L., 4 Nelson, Sand 

WARING H. E., 21 Grand Rapids. 
Warner Amos W., 33 Bowne, Harris 

Creek. 
WARNER ANDREW, U Grand Rapida 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE-LATEST STYLES-AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



WALLACE SAMUEL M., 11 Lowell, 
Lowell. 

WALLACE WILLIAM, 15 Ada, Ada 

Waller William A., Rockford. 

Walhn Charles, 20 Courtland, Rock- 
ford. 

WALPOLE JOHN, 11 Paris, Grand 
Rapids. 

Walpole Thomas, 11 Paris, Gr. Rapida. 

WALSH HUGH, 33 Walker, Grand 

Walsh John, 8 Vcrgennes, Vergennes. 
Walsh John, 34 Walker, Gr. Rapids. 
Walsh Patrick, 25 Alpine, Mill Creek. 
Walsh Thomas, 19 Walker, G. Rapids. 
WALTER JOHN, 36 Grand Rapids. 
Walter James, 15 Grand Rapids. 
Walters George, 17 Tyrone, Caenovia. 
Walters Homer P., 34 Ada, Ada. 
Walters John, 30 Paris, Grand Rapida. 
Walters Niel, 19 Algoraa, Sparta Center 
Walters Stephen, 86 Wyoming, Kel- 

loggsville. 
Walters Townsend, 19 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
Walterson John, 26 Cascade, Cascade. 
Walton Andrew J., Lowell. 



Warner Abijah J., 35 Tyrone, Sparta 

Center. 
Warner Benjamin F., 32 Bowne, Harris 

Warner Calvin F„ 35 Cascade, Alaska. 
Warner Ezra G., 16 Byron, Byron Cen. 
Warner Oilman, 35 Paris, Hammond. 
Warner Qeorgfe, 22 Piainfield, Austor- 

litz. 
Warner George W,, 26 Piainfield, Aus- 

terlitz. 
Warner Henry, Rockford. 
Warner H. S., 19 Algoma, Sparta Cen. 
Warner John W., 13 Caledonia, Alaska 
Warner James, 35 Tyrone, Sparta Cen. 
Warner Lawson S.. Lowell. 
WARNER LEWIS, 11 Walker, Grand 

Warner Lewis W., 14 Paris, Grand 

Rapids, 
Warner Lyman, 20 Bowne, Bowne. 
Warner Truman G., 20 Bowne, Bowne. 
Warnock William, 17 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
Warner William, 35 Lowell, Lowell. 
Warren Chas, H,, LoweU. 
Warren Francis, 31 Byron, Byron Cen. 



COKPUinfT TRY FORT'S PILI.I. 



yGooQle 



HISTOKY AHD DIRECTORY OF KENT COUNTY. 



Warren Geo. R,, Cedar Springs. 
Warren G. W., 24 Solon, Cedar 

Springs. 
Warren Ira, 14 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
WARWICK MRS, A. A., Lowell. 
Washburn Benjamin, F.. 33 Ada, Ada. 
Washliurn Benjamin F,, 39 Grand 

Rapids, Grand Rapids. 
Wasliburn Charles J., 36 Cascade, Al 

Washburn Clark D., Ada Village. 
Washburn Daniel, 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
WASHBURN JAMBS A., 1 Cannon, 

Boat wick Lake. 
Washburn Nathan, 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
WASHBURN ROLLIN F., 3B Cascade, 

WASHBURN MRS. ROSETTA, 14 

Cascade, Cascade. 
Waterburj Dewitt, 2 Wjoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Waterman Charles, 16 Alpine, Grand 

Rapids. 
Waterman John, 11 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Waters B: G., 18 Grand Rapids. 
Waters Charles, Lowell. 
Waters David L., south 5 Walker, Gr. 

Waters H., 18 Grand Rapids. 



Watson H. C, 30 Cannon, Austerlitz. 
WATSON HENRY, 2 Oakfield, Qreen- 

WATS'ON JOSEPH J., 17 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
WATSON JOHN S., 2 Oakfield, Green- 
Watson Montgomery D., 9 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Watson Thomas, 24 Oakfield, Ashley. 
Watts James N., 18 Byron, GrandTille. 
Watts William, 21 Bowne, Bowoe. 
WATTS WM, H., 18 Byron, Grandville 
Weaver Asa, 2S Byron, Cody's Mills. 
WEAVER BRADLEY, 35 Byron, 

Cody's Mills. 
Weaver Carlos, 34 Bjron, Cody's Mills. 
Weaver George, 31 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Weaver Josian, 11 Bowne, Lowell. 
Weaver John, 34 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Weaver Joseph, 34 Alpine, Indian 

Weaver Martin, 19 Alpine, Alpine. 
Weaver Prentiss, 34 Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Weaver Randall, 2G Byron, Cody's 

Mills. 
Weatberwas Henry, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Weber John, 34 Walker, Grand Rapids 



THE BEST CATTLE TETHER IN MARKET, AT W. D, FOSTER'S. 



Waters Levi, 12 Lowell, Lowell. 
Waterson Wm., 20 Lowell, Lowell. 
Watkins Adrian, 4 Walker, Indian 

Creek. 
Watkin* Charles J., 2 Grattan, Grattan 

Watkins E. C, Rockford. 
Watkins Joseph, 22 Algoma, Edgerton. 
Watkins J. D., 11 Alpine, EngUshville. 
Watkins Joseph W., 15 Algoma, Edger- 

WATKINS JOHN, 1 Plainficld, Rock- 
ford. 
Watkins Jated, 13 Grattan, Grant. 
WATKINS JASON C, 23 Grattan, 

WATKINS L. W., 16 Grattan, Grattan 

Center. 
WATKINS MtLTON C, 3 Grattan, 

Grattan Center. 
WATKINS OLIVER L, 13 Grattan, 

Watson Andrew, 30 Gannon, Austerlitz 
Watson Cyrus P., 29 Cannon, Auster- 
litz. 
Watson Daniel W., SO Cannon, Auater- 



WEBSTER ERASTL'S W., 9 Cascade, 

Cascade. 
Webster George, 13 Cascade, Cascade. 
Webster Iliram, Jr., 12 Cascade, Caa- 

Webater Hiram, 12 Cascade, Cascade. 

Webster Henry, Lisbon. 

Webster Henry T., 18 Walker, Grand 

Webster Stephen B., 17 Walker, Grand 

wedge' HENRY D., 82 Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 

Wedge Joseph, Sparta Center. 

Wedgewood Amaziah, 10 Wyoming, 
GrandTillc. 

Wedgewood Amaziah, 17 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Wedgewood Chas. H., 10 Wyoming, 
Grandville. 

WEDGEWOOD GUSTAVUS R., 16 
Byron, Byron Center, 

Weeks Abel, Lowell. 

Weeks John P., 25 Grattan, Grant. 



FORT'S TPESTEBN LINIHENI IS UTARRANTED 



yGooQle 



BISTORy AND DIRECTOJIT OF KI1NT_^C00NTT. 



WeekB John J., 30 Nolson, Cedar 

S|»ringB. 
WeukB jitmeB II., Lowell. 
Weeks Orrin I)., 4 Verj^ennes, Alton. 
Weed Sylvanus, 1 Oftktipld, Greenville. 
Wefr< II Swell, 3 Sparta, Lisbon. 
Weilz GeorKc, 34 Giiiiies, Cndj'a Mills. 
Weititig Johu, 34 Wyoming, North 

Byn.n. 
Wciringa Henry, 33 Alpine, Indian 

Creek. 
Wekeiimann Ilenrj, 24 Gaines, Cale- 

Wekennianii StoiinaB, 84 Gaines, Colc- 

doLiia Stntiiin. 
Welch Andrew. 8 diledonifi, Alaska. 
WELCH CYUUS S., 12 Games, Ilam- 

WoJch Edward, 25 PlainfieUl, Auster- 

litz. 
Welch James, 25 Paris, Grand Rapids, 
Welch Mrt Lavina, Orandville. 
Welcli Patrick, 34 Plaitjdeld, Auster- 



WELCU WILLIAM. 8 Nelson, Cedar 
bprjngs. 



Wells James L., 80 Paris, Gr. Hapida. 
Wtlls Nstiian, 31 Courtland, Rockford. 
Welt on George, 27 Spencer, Spencer 

MdU. 
WELTON MORTIMER O., 30 CalB- 

donia. Caledonia. 
Welty Frederick. 2 GaincB, Ilamn; >,-d. 
Wella Orrille Q., 20 Plainfieid, Anster- 

iitz. 



litz. 

WelU T. W., 311 AlRomn, Rockford. 
Wells Winsor,Rr>ckfimi. 
Welsh James, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Welsh Wni., Lowell. 
Welsh Wm., 31 Solon, Sparta Cpnter. 
Wendovf Jolin, 24 Wjominu, Grand 

Rapids. 
Wendover Henry, Lowell. 
WE>fGER ISAAC G., 18 Caledonia, 

WENGER JONAS G., 7 Caledonia, 

Alaska. 
Werdim Oscar N., 17 Walker, Grand 

Wercion'sirs., 33 Alpine, Indian Creek. 



I l;.ij 



a Vill 



Charles, 13 Alpine, Englishville. 



WELCH Si GRIFFITH'S CIRCULAR SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



WELLER HENRY K, 23 Cannon, 
Caniionshiii'!;;. 

Weller Harvey, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 

Weller John P., 13 Plaiuliekl, Auster- 
litz. 

Weller Mirza, 3 Cannon, Rockford. 

Weller Morton H., 9 Cannon, Cannons- 
burg. 

Weller Sidney, 8 Cannon, Cannonshiirg 

Weller Theodore, 4 Cannon, Cannona- 

WELLBR VIRGIL, 18 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

WELLMAN EOSTICE J,, 31 Oakfleld, 
Oaktield. 

Welling Henry, f Wjoniing, Grandville 

WELLS ALilERN, 30 Vergennes, 

WELLS C. B., Lisbon. 

Wells George IL, 3S Plainfield, Aus- 

terlilz. 
Wells Henry, 1 Paris, Grand Rapids, 
WELLS JAMES, 30 Vergennes, Ver- 

genues. 



WEST II. S,, Lowell. 

WEST J. 0., Lriwell. 

West Lorenzo, 25 Alpine, Alpine. 

West Warren. 13 Alpine, BnglishTille. 

WEST WILLIAM 11., 30 Ptainfield, 

Mill Creek. 
Westbrook Thomas, 23 Vergennes, Lo- 

Wcstbrook Uaggai, IG Vergennes, Lo- 

Westhrook John R., 34 Nelson, Cedar 

Westcott Charles, 9 Byron, Bjron Cen. 

Westcott Dester, 23 Byron. Byron Cen. 

Westcott William B., 32 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Weaterhouse F. J., 34 Walker, Grand 
Hapids. 

Westervdt John, 81 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Westfidl Abram. l.'i Grand Rapids. 

WESTFALL BENJAMIN, 6 Grand 
Rapids. 

Westlall Frederic, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Weatfail George, 8 Grand Rapids. 

Westfall William, 33 Sparta, Lisbon. 



TO CURE TOUR LAKE BACK. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AHD DIKE(frORY OV KBST COOlTTT. 



Wratlftke Samuel, 20 Walker, Qrood 

Rapids. 
WES TON ADELBERT H., Grsnrtvilk. 
Wwton Nathan, Ba Uascade, Alaska. 
Weston Horace 0., Grandvilli!. 
Weston Henrv, 31 Algoroa, Rockford. 
Wfston William, 3a Solon, Cedar 

SpHnRS. 
WIIALEN KER, U Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Wbalen Michael, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Wbalen Tliomas, 81 Walker, Grand 

Wbaley Isaac, 21 Ada, Ada. 
Whcdon Hamilton, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Whedon Israel, 11 Lowell, Lowell. 
Whelan Andrew, !1 Wyoming, Oranil 

Wlielan Mrs. Alice, 20 Wyoming, 

Grandville. 
Whelan Edmund, 11 Wyoming, Grand 

Whelan Michael, 13 Wyoming, Grand 

HapidB. 
Whelan Thomas, 1 Wyoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
Wheeler Barnes, 14 Grand Rapids. 
Wheeler Edward A., 22 Alpiue^Alpine. 



White Chsrlee, IS Courtlud, tiavrt- 

land Center. 

White Elijah, 31 Cannon, Austerlilz. 

White Frank, Lowell. 

WHITE GEORGE, it Vergennes, Alton 

White Isaac N., Lowell. 

White Isaac W., 10 Vergennes, Alton. 

White James, 33 Ada. Ada. 

WHITE JOSEPH, ITBowne, Alto. 

While John, 16 Grattan, Qrattan Cen. 

White James M., 10 Walker, G. Rapids 

White Mrs. Julia, Lowell. 

WHITB JOHN II.. 35 Grattan, A'ton. 

■WHITE LEONARD. Lowell. 

White Levi, 1 Caledonia, Alaska. 

White Otis, 24 Grattan. Grant. 

WHITE OTIS, 24 Grattan, Grant, 

White Orange, 3 Wyoming, Q. Rapids. 

White Robert, 8 Bowne, Alto. 

WHITE SAMUEL, Jn., 23 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

WHITE SYLVESTER C,,«1S Court- 
land, Courtland Center. 

White Safford, Alaska, 

White Samuel, Sr., 23 Walker, Grand 

WHITE WM, C. 35 Cascade, Alaska. 
WHITE WILLIAM, 10 Caledonia, 
Alaska. 



DI3ST0N'S NONPARIEL CROSS-CUT SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Wheeler Edward, 22 Alpine, Alpine. 

Wheeler John, 14 Grand Rapids. 

Wheeler John, 20 Algoma, Roekford. 

Wheeler Joseph, 15 Alpine, Alpine. 

Wheeler Montster, 31 Wyoming, Qrand- 
ville. 

Wheeler Martin O., South 6 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Wheeler Nelson J,, 8 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

WHEELER WM. W., 32 Alpine, Al- 
pine. 

Whipple John, 13 Algoma, Edgerton. 

Whii)ple Wallace, 33 Byron, Byron 
Center. 

Whitl>eck Benj., 2 Oakficld, Greenville. 

WLitlieck Elizabeth, 2 OakHeld, Green- 

Whitcomb Riggs, 83 Byron, Byron 

WHITE ALBERT C, 34 Wyoming, 

Grand Raptds. 
White Araos S., Lowell. 
White Anna, 21 Oakfield, Oakfield. 
While Anson. 31 Cannon, Austerlitz. 
White BurtiB. Lowell. 
White Benjamin, 1 Yergennes, Alton. ' 



White William. 32 Grand Rapids. 
WHITE WALTER, 10 Vergennes, Al- 

White Zenas B., 15 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Whitehread Lewis, 16 Atgoraa, Rock- 

Whiteiiead Thomas, 23 Algoma, Rock- 
ford. 1 
Whitfield HenrT, Rockford. 
frbitlbrd Mrs, Abbey A., 7 Paris, Grand 

Whitford Henry M., 38 Paris, Grand 

WHITFORD LINAS, B Gaines, Ham- 

Whitford Rufus, 84 Paris, Hammond. 
Whitford Silas. 31 Gaines, Gr, Rapids. 
WHITING MRS. CATHARINE, Cedar 

Springs, 
Whiting Mrs. Elizabeth, 19 Gaines, 

Grand Rapids. 
Whiting James S., 26 Ada, Ada. 
Whitlow J. T., 23 Algoma, Rockford. 
Wbitmore James, 1 Spart^ Sparta 

Whitney [Ethel, IS Plainfleld, Belmont. 



FORT'S W£8TERN LIHIHSNT CUBES I.AHEMES8. 



yGooQle 



HIBTORT AKD DIRECTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 299 

BROWN & FOSTER, 

DBA LESS in 

Saddlery -Hardware! 

Carriage and 

Wagon Goods. 



Manufacturers of Bent Cutter-Stuff, Bent Felloes 

Poles and Shafts, Bent Logging and 

Road Bob-Runners. 

The Flace to Buy all manner of Goods neeaed in Building or 

Mepalrinff Carriages, Buggies, Wagons, SleigJts, 

Cutters and Harness, 

HORSE CLOTHIITG of ALL KIUDS 

BUNKETS, NETS, SLEIGH BELLS, WHIPS, LAP ROBES, 
MATS, HORSE COLLARS, Uc, ic, 

2S Canal Street, 

Grand Bapids, Mich. 

trd by Google 



HISTORY AKD DIEECTOET Of KEHT COUNTY. 



WHITNEY EUGENE C, 16 Cannon, 

Oannonaburg. 
WMtney Herman E., 18 Grattan, Grat- 

tan Center. 
Whitney Henry, 8 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Whitney Job, 2 Byron, North Byron. 
Whitney Leonard, 1!) Cascade, Cascade, 
WHITNEY MINDRUS H., 8 Nelson, 

Cedar Spriiiga. 
WHITNEY M. L., BurcIiTilie. 
WHITNEY MARTIN, 13 Colednnia, 

Alaslta. 
Whitney Solomon, 23 Nelson, Cedar 

Wiiitney Wm. P., 3 Byron, North 
Byron. 

Whitney Wiiliiini E., 16 Cannon, Can- 
non shurg, 

Whitney Zerah, 16 Piainfield, Belmont. 

Wiiitseli Andrew. Lisbon. 

Whitsell Samuel, Lisbon. 

WHITWORTfl GEORGE, 17 Algoma, 
]ioekford. 

Whittatl Thomas, 23 CoiirtIan<l, Court- 
land Center. 

Whtttemore Jemima, 22 Plainfiuld, 
Austerlitz. 



Wightman William, 26 £o!on, Cedar 

Springs. 
Wilbur Hiram H., 23 Gainea, Ham- 
Wilcox Ira, 1 Paris, Grand Rapids, 
Wild Moses, Lowell. 
WILDER HORACE, Qraiidvilie. 
Wilder Josepb,4 Walker. Indian Creek 
Wilder Marion, Grnndville. 
WILEY NATHAN W., S2 Cannon, 

Cannon sburg. 
Wilhetin Georye. Lowell. 
Wilkcrson Sherwood D., 33 Caledonia, 

Caledonia Station. 
Wilkes George, 23 Oakfield, Oak/icld. 
Wilkinson Andrew J., 18 Alpine, Pieas- 

Wilki'iison AndrewS., 3 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Wilkineon G, A,, Rock ford. 

Wilkinson Jamas C, S Grattan, Grat- 
tan Center. 

Wilkinson .lames A., 9 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Wilkinson L. 11., Rockford. 

WILKINSON OLIVER, fl Cannon, 
Rockford. 

Wilkins Almeron, 19 A«a, Ado. 

V.'illard Aaron, 23 Ryron, Bjroii Center 



DISSTON'S CIRCULAR, MILL AND DRAG SAWS, AT W D. FOSTER'S, 



Whitten John, Jr., 7 Grattan, Grattan 

Whitten John, 7 Grattan, Grattan Cen. 

Wiiitten William, 33 Uakfiald, Grattan 
Center. 

WliitterB WilHam, 2G Grand Rapids. 

Wbitters Robert, 81 Sparta, Lisbon. 

WHI'mcCS WILSON, 28 Tyrone, 
CadDOvia. 

Whittirgton George, 23 Piainfield, 
Austerlitz. 

Whittinifton Levi, 22 Piainfield, Aqs- 
terlitz. 

Wickham H. C, Lowell. 

Wiekham H. S.. Lowell. 

"Wickhaui William, 35 Vergennes, Lo- 
well. 

Wicks Henry, 24 Algoma, Edgertoit. 

Wicks Wm. E., 8 Lowell, Lowell. 

WIBRIG ALLEN, 2a Gaines, Cody's 
Mills. 

Wieland Caleb, 1 Bowne, Alto. 

Wieland Cbristian, 1 Bowne, Alto. 

Wiggins Culin, 24 Grattan, Grant. 

Wiggins William, 1 Vergennes, Alton. 
Wighrman David H., 26 Solon, Cedar 
Springs. 



Willard John H., G Walker, Berlin. 

Wiillrd Warren, 6 Walker, Berlin. 

Willcos Gardner, 35 Vergennes, Lowell 

WillcoxBuu JamcB, 34 Ada, Ada. 

WilleiC Lyman C, 18 Cannon, Rock- 
ford. 

Willett Win. M,, 8 Cannon, Rockford. 

Williams Alonzo, Grandville. 

Williams Chas. A., 1 Wyomitig, Grand 
Rapids. 

WILLIAMS CHARLES, I Wyoming, 
Grand Rapids. 

Williams Edmond II., 7 Paris, Grand 
Rnpids. 

Williams Eli, 16 Alpine, Alpine. 

Williams Egbert, Cedar Springs. 

Williams George, 24 Byrou, Giiinesvilte 

Williama George, S5 Grattan, Smyrna, 
Ionia County, 

Williams Geo. W., Alaska Village. 

Williams Gersham H., AUska. 

Williams George B,, Alaska, 

Williams George, 4 Alpine, Lisbon. 

Williams Hiram, 31 Paris, Gr. Rapids. 

Williams Jesse B,, 33 Byrou, Byron 



FORT'S ENXMT OF PAIN CURES NEURALGU,. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AHD DIRECTORT OF KENT OOONTT. 



WILLIAMS JACOB C, 23 Byron, 



WilliainB Joel, 6 Brron, Grandt 


ille. 


WiUiJinia JaaiPB W., 23 Vei 




I^owtll. 




Williams Jncob. Alaska. 




Williiims JohnC, Lowell. 




WilliHiiis John J., 5 Gaines, 

RHpi.U. 
WilliHiTis John A., 6 Gaines, 


Grand 


Grand 


Rii|ti<la. 




Williams Lewis, IB Alpine, Alp 




Williams Leonard. Ill Alpine 


Alpine. 


Williiims Orrin H., 10 Algoma 


, Hock- 


ford. 





Williams Silas, 30 Oakfldd. Aslilcy. 
Williams Sidney L., 23 Bjron, Bjron 

Center. 
Williams Tliomaa R., 5 Paris, Grand 

Williams Wort liy A., 33 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

Williams William, 16 Algiuna, Rock- 
lord. 

Williams William, 20 Gmnd Rjipids. 

Williams Win. L., 7 Alpine, Pleasant. 



Wilson David A., 33 Vergennes, Lo- 

Wilson Daniel, 20 Cannon, Cannons- 

l.urg. 
Wilson Edwin, 8 Spencer, Spencer 

Mills. 
WILSON GEORGE M,, 23 Plainfield, 

AueCerlitK. 
Wilson George, 3 Wyoming, Grand 

Rnplds. 
Wilson Henry D,, 30 Nelson, Cedar 

Sprmgs, 
Wilson Ilenrj, 20 Nelson, Cedar 

Springs. 
Wilson Jolin. S3 Lowell, Lowell. 
Wilson John C, 19 Ali)ine, Pleasant. 
Wilson John S., Lowell. 
Wdson Mutunox, 28 Caledonia, Cale- 
donia Station. 
WILSON 11. A.. Lowell. 
WILSON REUBEN A., 4 Byron, North 

Byron. 
Wilson Thomas, 20 Byrou, Cody's 

Mills. 

William, 20 Plainfield, Auster- 



lilz 
WILSON WM. R., U Tyr( 

Wilson Wm. P., i Byron, North Byn 






TUTTLE'S PATENT CHAMPION CROSS-CUT SAWS, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Williams W. W., 5 Tyrone, Casnovia. 

WILLIAMS U. B., Lowell. 

Williams Znbin, 8 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Wtliiania — , — Alpine. Indian Creek. 

Willianison Sylvia, 24 Vergennes, Fal- 
tassburj;;. 

Willianison Mrs. S., Lowell. 

Wiliougliby Herbert. SB Bowne, Fill- 
more, Barry County. 

Willey Pi-anklin, 33 Wyoming, North 
Byron. 

Wiley George E-, S3 Walker, Grand 
Rapids. 

WILMAKTH DARIUS A., 25 Nelson, 
Nelson. 

Wison Andrew, 1 Alpine, Englishville. 

Wilson A. A.. 18 Walker, Gr.Rnpids. 

WILSON ALBERT E., IB Alpine, 
Pleasant. 

WILSON ANDERSON, 33 Vergennes, 
Lowell. 

WILSON B. G.. Lowell. 

Wilson Colvin B., 30 Lowell, Lowell 

Wilson Chester, 13 Plaindeld, Hock- 
ford. 

WILSON CLARK S., 4 Byron, North 
Byron, 



Wilton Thomas, 29 Tyrone, Casnovia, 
Wilton William. 29 Tyrone, Casnovia. 
Wiltse Benj., 13 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Winans^rank M., Lowell. 
Winana John. Lowell. 
WlNCIIESTEli CALVIN, 10 Byron, 

Byron Center. 
Winchester Jerome L., 15 Byron, Byron 

Winchester Justus J., 4 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Winchester John L., 14 Byron, Byron 

Winchester Laadau, 10 Bvron, Byron 

Center. 
Winchester Lorenzo Q., Alaska Village, 
Winchsel Isaac, 30 Unktield, Oaktield. 
Winciiell Justus. 7 Pnris, Gr. Rapids. 
WINCHELL MONROE, 13 Btnvne, 

Bowne. 
WINEGAR ASHBEL, 15 Vergennes, 

Lowell, 
Winegar Isaac, Jr., 38 Byron, Byron 

Center. 
Winegar Miiton, 28 Byron, Byron Con. 
WLNEGAK U. D., Lowell. 
Wingler John, Lowell, 



FORT'S ENEUT OT PAIS C0BES TOOTHACHIi. 



yGooQle 



HISTORY AND DIEEOTORY OP KKNT COUNTY. 



Wingier.loHepli, 19 Lowell, Lowell; 
Winkler William, 27 Gaiiiei. Cody'e 

Milla. 
WINKS CHARLES, 28 Caledonia, 

Caledonia. 
Winka Henry S., 28 Caledonia, Cale- 

Winslow Peter, 18 Spencer, Spencer 
Mills. 

Winslow Robert, 10 Spencer, Spencer 
MiUe. 

WINSOIt JACOB W., 32 Grand Rapids 

Winter Alljtrt. 5 Graltan, Graltan Cen. 

Winttra Albert, 20 Spenctr, Spencer 
Mills. 

WiiiUTB Albert, 11 Cascade, Ada. 

Winters Cbarles, 2 Plainfleld, Rock- 
lord. 

Winters Freeman, 12 Byron, Gaines- 



Janies, Burehville (Burch's 



Wint< 

Mills.) 

Wirfei Lewis, 22 Paris, Grand Rapids. 
WISE ABRAM. 4 Plainfield, Belmont. 
Wise Benjamin F., Village Cannona- 

Wise Henry L., Cascade, Cascade. 
WItiE SAMUEl^, 27 Algoma, Rockford. 
Wise Samuel, Rockford. 



Wolcott Philo G., 20 Gninea, Gaines- 
ville. 
Wolf Alonzo, 30 Wyoming, GrandTille, 
Wolf Baldaaar, 30 Byron, Byron Center 
Wolf Jacob, 30 Hyron, Byron Center. 
Wolf Jacob. Jr., 30 Uyron, Byron Cen. 
Wolfe Frederick, 4 Oaktield, Oakfield, 
Wolte Mary E,, 16 Grattan, Grattau 

Wolner Juliua, 22 Walker, G. Rapids. 
Wolven George E.. 29 Algoiua, Itock- 

ford. 
WOLVEN HARVEY H., 24 Algoma, 

Rockford. 
WolvcrLoa John C, 20 Spencer, Spencer 

Milla. 
WOOD AMASA, 24 Pans. G. Rapids. 
Wood Abraham, 10 Cascade, Ada. 
WOOD BEVERLY B.. 1 Alpine, Bng 

lisbville. 
Wood Clinton A., 23 Cascade, Alaata. 
Wood Clayton, 5 Nelson, Sand Lake. 
WOOD Db ROY A.,25Caacade, Alaska 
Wood Francis, 28 Wyoming, Grandville 
Wood Frank A., 25 Caat;aite, Alaska. 
WOOD GliP. D,, 23 Grattau, Grattaa 

Wood Harrey .L, Alaska. 
Wood Henry, 21 Grand Rapids. 



DETROIT SAFES, FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 

WOOD JOSEPH, 7 Nelson, Cedar 
Springs. 



Wiser Joseph, 29 Algoma, Rockford. 

Wisingcr Alexander, 12 Bowne, Bownt 

"■■ - Henry C, 11 Gaines, Ham- 



mond. 

Wisner Byron B., 26 Cascade, Alaaka. 
Wisner M. L„ Lowell. 
Wisner Peter S., 2S Cascade, Alaaka. 
Wite Gilbert N.. 18 Tyrone. Cusnovia. 
Witham Joe. G., 1 Oakfield, Green- 

■ville, 
Wiiiiey Albert, 34 Sparta, Englisbville. 
Withey Calvin, 35 Wyoming, Grand 

Wiihey John H., 3 Cascade, Ada. 
Withey jHmeB L., G Byron. Grandville, 
Witbey Livius, 24 Sparta, Sparta Cen. 
Witliuj Reuben L., 3 Paris, Grand 

WITHER HENRY D., 34 Gaines, Ham- 
Witty Jacob, 18 Paris, Grand Rapids, 
WOLCOTT ASA, 10 Sparta. Sparta 

Center. 
Wolcott George B., 20 Gaines, Grand 

KHpids. 
WOLCOTT JOHN, 20 Gaines, Gaines- 



Worid "Jaines, Burchville (Burch's 

Mills.) • 
Wood Jedediah H,, Lowell. 
WOOD JOHN, 2 Courtland, Cedar 

Wood Granlhan, 2 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 

Woofl Piiilo, 24 Paris, Grand Rapids. 

Wood Pbiletus W., S3 Gaiues, Cody's 
Mills. 

Wood Sylvester. Alaska. 

Wood Solomon, Aaska. 

WOOD WM. I,, 24 Caledonia, Alaska. 

Wood Wjn. A., Alaska Village, 

Woodall AlonKo, 7 Spencer, Nelson. 

WOODARD EPHRAIM H,, 7 Walker, 
Grand Rapids. 

Woodbeck John, 2 Oakfield, Greenville 

Woodbury Samuel, 4 Algoma, Uedar 
Springs. 

WOODBL'RY THOMAS B., 10 Ver- 
gennes. Alton. 

Woodcock John, 28 Vergennes, Lowell. 

Woodell John, 33 Wyoming, Gcandvitle 



FORT'S OINTMENT-A SOTEBEIQH ItZHEDT TOR 



yGooQle 



fltsloiit aS6 gl&EWO&V ()& EEilT cotrSTY. 



Wootliu Eleazer, BurchviUe (Burcli's 

Mills.) 
WOODIN RUSSELL IL, Sparta Center 
Wooding Chnrlea T., Li)well. 
Woodins J'lLn, 11 Cnscade, Casciide. 
WOODMAN LEWIS C, 4 Walker, Iq- 

dtRti Creek. 
Wooiimnn Nathsniel H.. Sparta Center 
Woodruff Ch dries. Ili Grand Rapids. 
Woodruff F. M, Knckford. 
Wimdraff ViJlney, Cciinr Sprinj^. 
Woods Andrew, 7 Caledonia, Alaska. 
WomU John, 7 Ada, Grand liapida. 
Woods Joiin, 1 Wyominij, G. Rapids. 
Woods John H., II Gaines, Hammond. 
Woods John E.. 11 Gaines, Hammond. 
Woods Thomas, Lowell. 
Woodward Daaiei, S Oainea, Ham- 

WOODWARD GEO. W., S Gaines, 

Woodward R. 8., Alaska. 
WOODWARD WM. B., 1 Gaines, 

Ilammond. 
Woodwurth J. H., 83 Grand Rapids. 
Woo<lwor(li Saiuuel, 32 Flaintield, 

Grand Rap id a. 
WoodwortU Thomas, 83 Plainfield, 

Grand Rapids. 



WRIGHT EBER K.. 8-5 Lowell, Lowell 
Wright Francis C, 10 Lowell, Lowell. 
Wright Geo. B., IS Lowell, Lowed. 
Wri{;ht Geo. E., 16 Vergennea, Alton, 
Wright Geo, N., 18 Walker, G. Rapids, 
Wright Joseph. 4 Lowell, Lowell. 
Wright John W.. Lowell, 
WRIGHT JEREMIAH S., 27 Walker, 

Grand Rapids. 
Wright Leander, 3 Wjoming, Grand 

Rapids. 
WRIGHT N, C, 15 Walker, Grand 

Rapidn. 
WrlKht Patrick N., 13 Walker, Grand 

Writtiit Philander B.,35 Bjron, Cody's 
Milla. 

Wright Rigdon, 7 Plainfield, English- 
Tille. 

WRIGHT SOLOMON, 33 Alpine, In- 
dian Creek. 

Wright William, Lowell, 

Wright William, 4 Tyrone, Casnorla. 

WRIGHTMAN HENRY C, Village 
Can D on G burg. 

Wunsuh Anton, South 1 Ada, Lowell. 

Wunsch Sehaatian, South 1 Ada, 

Wurzler Frederick, 11 Walker, Grand 



BAG TIES-SIMPLE,:CHEAP AND EVERLASTING, AT W. D. FOSTER'S. 



Woolever Henry, 20 Cannon, Austerlitz 
Wooster August W,, 21 Grand Rapids. 
Woost«r Coonrod, 38 Courtland, Court- 
land Center. 
Worcester Mrs,, Lowell. 
Worden Annanina, 4 Cannon, Rockford. 
Worden Dnfid, 17 Grand Rapids. 
Worden Henry M., 15 Paris, Grand 

Worden Silas. Lowell. 

Worden Wilson M., 27 Vergennes, 

Lowell, 
Wornica Mrs. Malvina, 31 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Wride Anderson, 83 Ada, Ada. 
Wride James C, Q Cascade, Cascade. 
Wride Joseph, 6 Cascade, Cascade, 
Wride Mrs. Malinda. 31 Ada, Ada, 
Wright Adelhert. 4 Lowell, Lowell, 
Wright Anaon, 3 Wyoniing, G. Rapids. 
WRIGHT BENJ. B,, 14 Bowne, Lowell 
Wriglit Buiijauiin, 8 X^well, Lowell. 



Wykes Jamea, 10 Paris, Grand Rapida. 
Wykes John P„ 10 Paria, Grand Rapids 
W?lie George P.. 17 Grand Rapids. 
WYLIE H. C. 33 Tyrone, Caanovja, 
WYLIB HENRY H,, 28 Tyrone, Cas- 

Wvlie Wra, D„ Sparta Center, 
WYLIE WM. M,, 17 Grand Rapida. 
Wvman Daniel, 34 Solon. Cedar Springs 
WYMAN DANIEL O,, Cedar t-priiiga. 
WYMAN JOHN R., S3 Algoma, Edger- 

Wymkn Lafayette M,, 16 Lowell, Lo- 

Wyman O, C, Cedar Springs, 
Wyman Samuel J,, 27 Vergennea, Lo- 

WYNNE DANIEL, 19 Vergenncs, 

Vergennes, 
Wynne Thomas, 18 Vergennes, Ver- 



GALLS AND 80BES OK HOUSES. 



yGooQle 



804 



srsToii* Aifb DtREOtoJilr ot' Kent cotiHtt. 



Y 



Yftgle Franlt, 27 Alpine, Gr. Rapitls 
Tiiie George W., 8 Paria, Gr. KHpids. 
Yale Welcome, » Paris, Gr. Rapids. 
Ynnsoti Clmrles, 21 Paris, Gr. Rnpitls. 
YHteiiinn Williaiu, Sa Bowiie, Harris 

Creek. 
Yates Mre. HetKe, Cedar Springs. 
Yeiter David, SO Ix>wcll, Lowell. 
Yeitt-r Ered'k 37 '■ 
Yeiter Fred., jr., 30 Lowell, Lowell. 
Teiter Jacob, 22 " " 

Yniter Joiin, 20 " 

YENOHE MOSES, south 4 Walker, 

Qriind Rpipids. 
YeoMiauB Elliott, 31 Wjomiiig, Grand- 

Yille. 
Yenmnns Ell, 31 Wyominp, Grandville. 
YBOMANS ERASTUS, 33 Wjoming, 



Yen mans Levi, 



Young Daniel, 27 Solon, Cedar Springs. 
Yoana Elihu R., 30 Coiirtland, Rock- 

fi.rd. 
YOUNG GEORGE, 83 Grand Rapids. 
Young Jolin, 10 Cannon, Bostivick 

Lake. 
Young Jolin. 33 Bjron, Bjron Center. 
Young Jacob, Lowell. 
Young T. E., 33 Grand Rapids. 
Young Vachel 1)., Lowell. 
Touiig — — , !> Paris, Grand Rapids. 
Young William C, 10 Cannon, Can- 

YOUiNG ZEBULON, 80 Courtland, 

Rocktiird. 
Youngljlood Daniel, 8 Algoma, Sparta 

Center. 
YOUNGBLOOD JAMES, 8 Algoma, 

Spartii Ututer. 



LETTERS FOR MARKING BAQS AND SHEEP, AT W. D, FOSTER'S. 



Yerkes William. Lowell. 

YODER JOSEPH, JB Bowne, Lowell. 

YODER STEPHEN, U Bowue, Lo- 

Yokuin P. F., 29 Grand Rapids, Grand 
Rapi.ls. 

Yr.nge Henry, 10 Wyoming, Grand 
H-pirts. 

Yongsoii Rasmus, 3 Oakfiekl, Green- 
ville. 

TnnkerB Andrew. 7 Sparta, Lisbon. 

York Joseph, 3 Pans, Grand Rapids. 

Yost Jacob, 37 Alpine, Indian Creek. 



Youiigblood Thomas N., Algoma, 

Sparta Center. 
Younga Eli, 33 Byron, Byron Center. 
Youngs Edward, 33 Solon, Cedar 

SpringB. 
Youngs Fayette E., 30 Paris, Grand 

Rapids. 
Yonnga James B,, 33 Byron, Byron 

Youngs Jatnes T., U Lowell, Lowell. 
Youngs Philip. 31 Byron, New S.ilera. 
Younga T. Newton, 33 Byron, Byron 



Zelner Aaron, 3^ Bownc, Bowne. 
Zelner Aaron. 13 Gaines, Hammond. 
ZELNER JOHN, 12 Gaines, Ham- 

Zelner Samnel, 12 Gaines, Hammond. 

Ziegentuss Clmrles, 21 OakliBld, Oak- 
Geld. 

Ziegenfues David, 13 Oakfieid, Grcen- 
Tille. 



I ZIEGENFU9S HANNAH, 13 Oakfiekl, 
Greenville. 
ZlMMEll GEORGE, 6 Byron, Grand- 
viile. 

George A., 32 Courtland, 



a Paul, 83 Conrtlaod, Rock- 



FORT'S ENEUT OF FAIN CURES COLIC. 



yGooQle 



HISToar ANDDIRECTORT OF KBNT COUNTY. 



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY OF ADVERTISERS 



ADA VILLAGE. 

BRIDOEBCILnER. 

Jared N. Bresee. 

DBVOaiST. 

Cbwlei K. Gibson. 

COOPER. 

Bethal Bristol. 

oaOCERIES. 

John R. BobinsoD. 

nASOH. 

Manaon Miller. 

HECIIAXIC. 

Andrew G- Livtrgood. 

MERCHAXr Mff.l,F.R. 

John R. Bradticild. 

KILLERS. 

William Benaett. 
John Kemp, 

WAflOX MAKER. 

Edward Davie. 

ALASKA VILLAGE. 

BLACK SMITH. 

A. D. HeiDbling. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

Josiah Irons. 

CARPENTERS AND JOI.VEKS. 

John L. Hopkins. 
CjtUB Hull. 

CARRIAGES AND WAGONS-IManu- 
facturer of.) 

B. B. BichttrdB. 

DRT GOODS AND GROCERIES. 

Beamer & Haviland. 

FLOVUIMG niLL. 

J. W. Bojnton. 

FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS. 

Van Every A Bellows. 

FURXITURE-lWholesale.) 

h. W. Fiflher. - 

GENERAL STORE. 

8. T. CoUon & Co. 
19 



. AND TIN. 

KniSiii & Proctor. 

HOTEL. 

William H. Lock. 

JUSTICE «IF THE PEACE. 

Hugli B. MfAtjster. 

M.ASON AND PLASTERER. 

Sjivttler K. Iliukey. 

JIIKRCUAMT TAILOR. 

John Miirtin. 

MEAT MARKET. 

Honice 8. Nc\vson. 
HI I.: 

MILLWRIGHT AND DEALER IN 
T|;hBIN»: WATER WHEELS. 

E. V. Alden. 

PAINTINU-PI.AI\ AND ORNA> 
UENTAL. 

D.inid R. Fos. 

. AND SURGEONS. 



POSTMASTER. 

Warren S. Ilaie. 

PHOTOG RAPHER. 

G. P. Hull. 

SCRVETOR AND ENGINEER. 

Robert S. Jackson. 

SAW MILL. 

L. W. Fisher, proprietor. 

BOIFXE TOWNSniP. 

WAGON-MAHEB. 

Jno. M. Dillinger, at Thomas' MiUs, 
CASNON TOfFXSniF. 

APIARIST. 

J.\>IES PLANK. Section 8. (3eo 
Advertiaetueut page 181.) 

DAIRY-KEEPER. 

Lorenzo D. Hoag. Section 28. 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AHD DIRBCTORY OF KBHT CODNTT. 



MERL'HANTS. 

IraElliB, CannosBbiirg. 

HEKCHANT MILLERS. 

S. Cliaae & Son, CaDcouaburg. 
WAGOH HAUEBS. 

Edward DBvie. Section 7. 
Lorea Brink, Canaoui^burg. 

CASNOriA. 

OEA'ERAL STORES. 

A. C. AYRES, (See Advertisement.) 
R. H. TOPPING. (See Advertlne- 

MILON L. SQUIEtt. (See Adver- 
tisement. 

HOTEL. 

J. Tuibury. 

PHYSICIAN ANn )!ii;rcieon. 

R. H. Colburn. 

CEDAR SPRINGS. 
DRveeisTS. 

V. Hajes. 
H. C. RuEsell. 
Feisell & Hajea, 



Qoldsborougli & McLouth. 
G. M. Stoddard. 
Stiles Brothers. 

OKOCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Isaac M. Clark. 
C. Pelton. 

HOTELS. 

B. Fttircbild. 

National, C. W. Denison, proprietor. 

LITERT. 

Theodore Piielps, 

' LrnBER, Etc. 

JSiCob Cummer. 
Morris & Johnson. 

C. Pelton. 
Silisburj & Co. 

NOTARY prBLIC. 

B. Pairchild. 

PHT8ICLANS. 

E. T, Chester. 
V. Hayes. 
Fesaell & Hajes. 
■ALOON-^lce Cream and' Batlnc.} 

E. A. Straab. 



HHINOLI», E<r. 

Goldsborough & McLoath, 
Salislmrv & Co, 
0. Pelton. 



OAINES TOWNSHIP. 

OKA IN HKllC HANTS. 

Woodward & Buckingham — Ha 
mond Station. 



SAW IHILI^ 

Wm. R, Pursel, proprietor, section 18. 
GRANDVILLE. 

BLACKSMITH. 

D. 0. Britton. 

BOOTS ANn SHOES, HIDES, AC. 



A. J. Dunham. 

FLOUR, FEED, Ap.-HANIIFAC- 
TVRER AND DEALER. 

H. 0. Weston. 

GENERAL STORES. 

Shoemaker & McCoy. 
Bilaa Powell. 
Daniel J, Mull. 
Haven & Mclnroy. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

J. A. Knowles. 

HOTEL. 

John Ellis. 

HARNESS. 

3. W. Furman. 

FHTSICIAN A SURGEON. 

A. H. Weaton. 

GRAND RAPIDS TOWN- 
SHIP. 

HOTEL. 



DeloB Diew, (Lake Houbs.) 



yGoosle 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTOET OF KBNT COUNTY. OUT 

H. C. STEPHENSON, 

HomceopatMc Physician &> Surgeon, 

Manufacturer and Wholesale Dealer in 

Stephenson's Patent Trusses and Supporters. 



LOWELL, 



MICHIGAN. 



P. V. & R N. FOX, 

State Agents of the 

Mutual Benefit Life Ins. Co., 

OF NEWARK, N. J., 

Ciljr National Bank Building, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MIOH. 



Merchants Insurance Company 



or CHICAGO. 




Dwelling Houses and Farm Property Insured against Rre 
and Lightning for a Term of Years, at Low Rates. 

tedbyCOOgle 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORY OF KENT COUHTY. 



GBATTAN CENTER. 

Cheese Manufacturer. 
C«B3 B. MndisuD. 

Cabinet Maker. 

J. A. AJaQis & Bros. 

Miller. 
J. A. A(Um« & Bros. 

"Wagon Makers. 
J. A. AdnDis lib Bros. 
Robert Douglass. 

KELLOGG VILLE. 

Mf.nufacturer and Dealer in 
"Wilkinp' & Plumb's Patent 
Spring Bad Bottoms. 



LOWELL VILLAGE. 

Barber. 
Jolin Romii^. 

Chairs~(Manufacturer of.) 
JOUN KOPF. (See advciti^cmoiit, 
page 177. 

Groceries. 
John Giles. 
D. B. WILLIAMS. (Ste a<ivertiso- 

mt-n(,) 
RUBIXSON, CHAPJN & CO. (See 
w Iyer tiaeui eat.) 

Lawyer, 
J. M. Matliewson. 

Fort's "Western Medicine Man- 
ufacturing Company. 

^,M. FORT, Secretary. 

' >■■ Nursery. 

NOiU.P. nvSTED. (See advertise- 
ment, »EWgii 177.) 
Physician and Surgeon. 

J. Suwaril Smith. 
OAKFIELD TOWNSHIP. 

General Stores. 
D. V. EmmonH, Oiikliuld Center. 
H. A. Rowlcv, Oaktield Center. 
Chester A. Lillle, seoiion 3. 

Physician. 
Abraham SI aug liter. 

Shingles. 
Cheater A. Lillie, section 3. 



BOCKFO RD VILLA 6E. 

Clothing. 
Peter S. Teller. 

Drugs. 
H. n. Shackelton. 
C. E. Blakeiey. 

Furniture. 
W. B. JOHNSON. See Advettise- 

General Store. 
John J. Ely. 

Hotels. 
AMETIICAN HOCSE, SMITH LAP- 
HAM Proprietor. See Adyertise- 

Lawyer. 

Johu F. Lease, 

Saw Mill. 
George Freiieh. 

Watchmaker and Jeweler. 

R L. Dockeray. 

SPARTA TOJVNSHIP. 

Boots and Shoes. 
Thomas Creamer, Sparta Center. 

Carriages and Wagons. 
Blometrom & Gramberg, Lisbon. 

Drugs. 
Dre. C. E. & S. J. Itoun, Lisbon. 
General Stores. 

R. H, Woodin. Sparta Center. 
T. D. Barnes. Lisbon. 
Chubb & Thurston, Lisbon. 

Grist Mill. 
Washington Heath, Lisbon. 



J. J. Smith &, Co., Lisbon. 

Hotels. 
Jiio. M. Balcom, Sparta Center. 

Notary Public. 
Jno. M. Balcom, Sparla Center. 
FERGENXES TOWNSHIP. 

Blacksmith. 
George W. Fullington, Alton. 

Farmer. 
Orlin Douglass, Fallasshurg. 

Miller. 
Thomas B. Woodbnry, Alton. 

^,fed by 



GooqIc 



HISTORY AND DIRBCTORY OF KENT COUHTT, 309 

JOS. EMMEE, Jr., 

Carriage, Wagon & Sign Painting, 

No. 14, Cor. Kent and Bronton Sts., GRAND RAPIDS. 

" MISS C. MC'RAB, 



All Kinds or Work ta this line aoli«Ueil. 

No. 33 Cml Street, Central BWk, Grand Rapids. 

DK. E. H. OUMMINGS, 

Homcepathic Physician and Surgeon. 

No, 10 Canal Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH, 

EBppplnl Httentlon given to < hronie DlacnNCH. Addr^NS Bos SOI. 

CLAUSON O. BUDINGTON, 

JUSTICE 01" THE PEJ.CK 

Oite, Cirier it CamI 4 Erit Sk, G'B.K'S'O ■B.lv'?'\'B 9. 

(Patented JdIj- l«th, IS«7.) 
THE EXCLUSIVE RIGHT to make these ebarming Pictures, in Grand 
Rapifis, lias just been granted to tbe undersigned, during the existence of tbe 
patent. Specimens may be seen at the 

J. 3E3C. •nPOJXX.JE'lEiiXJSriS. 

Hiss ITellie Lankester & Sister, 



Ladies' Bonnets, Ribbons. Flowers, ic, always on hand. 

No. 59 turn Street, np stairs, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - MICHIGAN. 

»d by Google 



HISTORY AND DIRECTORT OP KENT COUNTT. 



WALKER TOWJVSIIIP. 
Blacksmitb. 
James Roy, 

Groceries. 
SEYMOUR & WAITE, Mill Creak. 
See Aclvertisument. 

Wagon Maber. 
A. D. Pattee, Indian Creek. 

WrOMLVG TOWJVSfflP. 

Nursery. 

Taylor & White, Graiidville road. 

CITY OF GILiJri} BAPIDS. 
Agrlcultaral Implements. 

W. C. DENISON, 104 Monroe street. 

(See adverlisement.) 

G. R. Man u fact II ring company, 41 

Canal street. (See advertiseniunt.) 

Archltttct 

DAVID S. HOPKINS, 20 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 

Altornej'. 

C. J. POTTER, 24 Cnnal street. iSee 
advertisement.) 

Banks. 
CITY NATIONAL BANK, 1 Monroe 
street. (See advertisement.) 

D. L. LATOUBETTB. opposite Post 
Office. (See ndvertiaemunt.) 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK, coruer 
Canal and Pearl streets, (See ad- 



t.) 

Baskets and Chairs— (Man iifiicturer 
of.) '' 

LOUIS HERRMANN, Division street, 
three doiiru south Union Brewery. 
(See advertisement.) 

Blacks ml tbs. 

KINNEY & MITCHELL, near corner 
Bridge and Canal streets. (See ad- 
vertisement.) 
Booksellers and Stationers. 

CURRIER & PUTNAM, 15 Monroe 
street. (See advertisement.) 

EATON & LYON, 2a Canat street. 
(See advertisement.) 

Bootfl and Shoes —(Wholes ale and 
Retail.) 

L. J. RINDGE & CO.. 14 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 

LOOMIS & BROWN, 30 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 



COLE& BROTHER, 20 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 
Boots and Shoes— (Wholesale.) 

SMITH, MOSELY & CO., 17 Canal 
street, up stairs. (See advertise- 

Buslness College and Telegraphic 
Institute. 

aWENSBERG & BOBBINS, proprie- 
tors. Luce's bloclt. (See advertiae- 

Carrlages, Buggies, Sleigbs, Stc. 

A. WOOD, 33 Waterloo street. (See 
advertisement. 

GEO. C. FITCH, 134 and 136 Divi- 
sion street. (See advertisement.) 

Carriage and Wagon Goods, Etc. 
BROWN & POSTER, 25 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 
Clothing. 

C. BUROHARD, foot of Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 
E. M. KENDALL, 19 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 
KRECKEL & SCHRODER, 101 Canal 

street (See advertisement.) 

Confectionery, Etc. 

S. G. KETCHAM, Bridge street, 

(West Side.) (See advertisement.) 

PUTNAM BROTHERS & CO., 20 

Monroe street. (See advertisement.) 
L. A. HALL, 14 Front street. (See 

advertisement.) 

Crockery. 
H. LEONARD & SON, 13 Monroe 

street. (See advertisement.) 
SOUTHWICK& WRIGHT, 44Monroe 

street. (See advertisement.) 

Dentists. 

W. P. BARKER, 65 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 
R. BUTTON. 34 Canal street. (See 

advertisement.) 
R. J. HUMPHREY, 11 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 
E. S. HOLMES, 18 Monroe street. 

(See advertisement.) 

Doors, Sasli, Blinds, Etc. 
NICHOLS & NAYSMITH, S8 Mill 

street. (See advertisement.) 
WM. H. & E. K. POWERS, Water 

street. (West Side.) (See adver- 
tisement. 



ted by 



Google 



fllSTOIlT AHD WBKCTOBt OP KEBT COTJSTY. 311 

CHARLES J. POTTER, 

Attorney, Counselor and Solicitor, 

Office, Vo. 24 Canal Street, 

GRAIfD RAPIDS, - MICHIGAN. 

VALLEY CITY FILE WOEKS, 

(OPPOSITE LBITELT'S MACHINE SHOP,) 
FILE BE-CUTTING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. t»-NEW FILES FOR 3A.LE. 

WM. cox &. CO. 

VALLEY CITY PAII*T SHOP. 



Painting, Glazing, Graining, Paper Hanging, Kalsomining, 

&c. Also, can be found at all times, a good assortment of 
SA.tSH FURNISHED ItEAUy G1L.AZET>. 

No- 10 BroDBon Street, (up stairs,) OBAS^D RAPIDS. 



a. H. LOMO. 



.A.. IB. I.ONG & SONS, 



LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES AND PICKETS. 

Offlte at (he Dlill, West Side, near Detroit aud Hilwaiikec R. R. Depot, 
P. g DRAWER an4i>. GRAND RAPIDS. 

Michigan House, 

Corner X^oiits and Justice Streets, 

GRAND RAPIDS, - - - - MICHIGAN. 



Ol3.AX>ses 3UEc3dex>ate. 



^« MA%€^%>%^ t>s>of rioter* 

ted by Google 



HISTORY AND DIBEOTORT OF KENT COUNTY. 



Drain TUe. 

H. LEONARD & SON, 13 Monroe 
street. (See advertisement.) 

Drags, Medicines, Etc 

E. B. ESCOTT, .17 Caoal street. (See 

advertisement.) 
GKO, M. STUART, Bridge street, 

(West Side.) {See advcrtisemeut,) 
WILLrAM THUM, 92 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 
8TEKETEE & KIMM, 87 Monroe 

sireet. (See advertisement.) 
JAMES GALLUP, 6 Canal street. 

(See lines.) 

Dry fioods. 
W. L. WILKINS & CO., 54 Monroe 

street. [See advertisement.] 
VOIGT & HERPOLSHEIMER, 41 

Monroe street. [See advertisement.] 

C. B. ALLVN, 08 and 70 Monroe 
street. [See advertisement.] 

SPRING& AVERY, 48 Monroe street. 
[See advertisement.] 

D. L. NEWBORG, 4H Canal street. 
[See advertisement.] 

Foundries. 

GE0EGE8TAN0,Riverstreet, [West 
Side.] [See advertisement. 1 

BUTTEitWOBTH & LOWE, Huron 
street. [Sue advertisement.] 

Frame Factor;. 

G. W. LEMuN, 71 Canal street. [See 
advertisement.] 

Furnishing Goods. 

J. E. & W. S. EAHLE, 89 .Monroe 

street. [See advertisement.] 

Farnltare. 

NELSON, MATTER & CO., 39 and 

81 Canai street. [See advertise- 



droceries. 

JOHN E. TOOHER, Coldbrook street. 

[See advertisement.] 
BIRGE & SOMERS, 85 Monroe street. 

[See advertisement.] 
A. J. ROSE, corner Court and Bridge 

streets, [West Side.] [See adver- 



ALBERT & KRUPP, 86 Canal street. 

[See advertisement.] 
P. KUSTEREB, 100 Cana! street. [See 

advertisement.] 



GEO. H. SOULE, 334 South Division 

street. [See advertisement.] 
PETER C. SHiCKBLL, corner Front 

and Leonard streets. West Side. 

(See AdvertisBment.) 
N. BINGBLBERG, 159 Ottawa st. 

(See advertisement.) 
JOSEPH FINCKLEK, 104 Canal st. 

(See advertisement.) 
P. SCHENKBLBEBG, 13 Front st.. 

West Side. (See advertisement.) 
S. C. SMITH, 71 Monroe street. (See 

advertisement.) 

Hardware. 

W. D. FOSTER, 14 and 16 Monroe 

street. 
TUCKER & ROGERS, 33 and 35 

Canal street. (See advertisement.) 
FERDINAND SCHEUFLEKA SON, 

Corner Canal and Bridge streets. 

(See advertisement.) 

liar n ess, T ranks, etc, 

0. J. KRUGER & Co., 73 Monroe 
street. (See advertisement.) 

FRANK MATTISON, 67 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 

Hats, Caps, &c. 

PERRY Bros., II Monroe street. (Sea 

advertisement.) 

Hotels. 
National Hotel. (See advertisement.) 
Eagle Hotel. " " 

Butlibun House. " " 

Michigan House. '' " 

Honse-boUders. 
FRANCILLO HALL, Water street, 

West Side. (See advertisement.) 
A. D. BORDEN & Co., Front street. 

West Side. (See advertisement.) 
GRADY & SMITH, Caual street, 

opposite Kent Woolen Mills. (See 

advertisement.) 

Fire Insurance. 
SINCLAIR Bros. & Co., Caual st. 

See advertisement. 
SKINNER & WARD, City National 

Bank building. (See advertise- 

CROSB'Y & SON, 13 Canai street. (See 
Advertisement.) 

S. O. KINGSBURY, corner Canal 
and Pearl streets. (See advertise- 
ment.) 

H. E. DEWEY.l Leppig'a block. (S« 
advertiiement.) 



yGoosle 



HISTORT AND DIEECTOET OP KEHT COUNTT. 813 

JOHN A. RUSCHE, 

Shoemaker, Hide and Felt Dealer. 

pm H« Sells Cheap ntid Bur" Dear. Cor, ITIanTOO and DItIbIoh Jtta-i 

g-x'a.nca. TtQ,^lca.s, - ■■ - ]\ai;icii3.isq.xi. 

G. S. DEANE & SON, 

HaiafaclDnts nd Desleri Id ill Liudi of 

^Agricultural Implements and Machinery. 

D. L. NEWBORG, 

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 

Dry Goods! 

Notions and Hosiery. 

Country Merchants Supplied at Chicago Prices. 

SJo. 4, <DEixxEt,± tSo SI X*eA3fl street, 

iMvetVs Block, 

GRAND RAPIDS.- - - MICHIGAN. 

F. I.. ch:ii«i>s, 

Publishers' General Ageat 

FOR 

First-Class Books and Engravings. 

^"A few active Agenla wanted to take orders for "IL.l a' Guide Borrd to 
Health, Peace and Competence"— the beat seltine book of tUe day. We oKer 
■uperior inducements, and ezperieaced Ageiits find our work the moi>t acceptablt 
of any in the field. -^ . 

*» tedbyCaOOQle 



HIBIOKY Ajm DIRKOTOXr 07 EBNT 00D5TT. 



W. P. INNES, 81 Monroa street. (See 
advertiBeinent.) 

HOLDEN, bates a Co., City Na- 
tional Bank building. (See adVer- 
tiBcmeiit.) 

8HINKMAN & JENKS, 24 Canal 
■treet. (See advertisement.) 

Life iBHsraBce. 

CROSBY & BON, 13 Canal street. 
(See Advertisement.) 

B. O. KINGSBUKY, corner Canal 
and Pearl streete. (See advertise- 

J. QUINTUS, Justice street, near 
Monroe. (See advertisement.) 

HOLDBN BATES & Co., City Na- 
tional Bank l>uilding. (See adv.) 

SINCLAIR BROS.& Co., 9 Canal 
street. [See adv.] 

H. MORGAN & SON, Leonard'a 
Block. (See advertisement.) 

Iron WorbB. 

BUTTERWORTH & LOWE, Huron 

street. (See advertisement.) 
Jeweler§, etc. 
S. D. PARKS, 15 Monroe street. (See 

advertisement.) 
E. B. DIKEMAN, 38 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 
E. G. EATON, 7 Canal street. (See 

advertisement.) 
J. C. HERKNER, 7 Monroe street. 

(See adTertieement.) 

Justice or the Peace. 

C. 0. BUDINGTON, corner Canal 
and Erie streets. (See advertise- 
ment. 

lime. 
W. H. CONGDON, 40 Canal street. 

(See advertisement.) 
JNO. HILL, 53 Canal street. (See 

advertisement.) 

Hiery. 

J. M. KENNEDY, corner Fount«in 

and Greenwicli streets. (See ad- 
vertisement.) 

C. L. IVES, Kent street. (See adver- 
tisement.) 

lamber. 

C. C. C0M8T0CK. (See advertise- 

L. H. WITHEY, corner Fountain 
and Qreaawicli streets. (See adver- 
tisement.) 



ROBINSON, SOLOMON & Co., cor- 
ner Canal and Trowbridge streets. 
(See sdvertiseuieut.) 

A. _B. LONG & SONS. (See adver- 
tisement.) 

MachlniBts. 

J. 0. 8IM0NDS, 26 Waterloo street. 
(See advertisement.) 

A. LEITELT & BRO. [See advert! se- 

Marble Works. 

BARR & LIESVELD, 83 Monroe 
street, [See advertisement.] 

J. M. & H. C. RAMSEY, near cor. 

Pearl and Canal sts. (See adv.) 

HilUnery. 

Mrs. E. ANTRIM, 57 Monroe street. 
[See advertisement.] 

MISS NELLIE LANKESTER & SIS- 
TER, 6B Monroe Street. [See ad- 
vertisement.] 

MISS C. McRAE, 83 Canal street. 
[See advertisement.] 
OcnllBt. 

MRS. ALMA CROSS. Greenwicli st. 
(See advertisemeut.) 
Organs, Melodeons, Pianos, etc 

EMPIRE ORGAN CO., 65 Monroe 
street. [See advertisement] 

A. J. MITCHELL, 36 Canal street. 
(See advertisement.) 

Painter— (Portrait and Landscape.) 

B. S. MERRILL, 19 Monroe street. 
[See advertisement.] 

Paints and Fatntipg. 

RIDELL & CO., Huron street. [See 
advertisement.] 

J. PATTERSON, 10 Bronson street. 
[See advertisement J 

JOSEPH EMMER, Jr., corner Kent 
and Bronson streets. [See adver- 
tisement.} 

Fbotographers. 

WYKES, 48 Monroe street. [See 

advertisement.] 
FRED. HEATH, 33 Monroe street. 

[See advertisement.] 
L. A. MERRILL, 18 Canal street. 

[See advertisement.] 
J. H. TOMPKINS, 84 Canal street. 

[See advertisement.] 
0. W. HORTON, Leonard's block, 

Monroe street. [See advertisement.] 



/ioosle 



HISTOKT jUn> DISBOTOBT OV KBRT OOUnT. 



8;tfl 



£2 --u 

to s ts! 

^ CO 
O CD 

g S W J— 5 B 

9 ^ ^ 



# > 



H 
O 

I 

m 






« 






02 






H 

Q 




y.Goosle 



HISTORY AND MaSOTOBT OF KENT CODHTT. 



Dr. N. J. AIK.1N, first stairs, north 

Sweet's Hotel. [See aclTertiBement.] 
Dr. E. woodruff, 87 Caniil street. 

[See aJ7erti6eoient.] 
Dbv hunt & HOYT, Monroe street. 

[SceadJertisemeiit.] 
Db. E. H. CUMMING, !0 Canal street. 

[See advertisement.] 
Plaster. 
O. B. PLASTEK CO., 11 Canal 

itroet. [See advertisement.] 
Printing— Job. 
JOHN HOLE, eorner Canal and Peart 

streets, third floor. [See advertise- 
Real Estate Agfnts. 
CROSBY A SONS, ]3 Oaual street. 

[See advertisement,] 
S. 0. KINGSBURY, corner Canal and 

Pearl streets. [Sue advertisement.] 
W. P. TNNES, 81 Monroe street. [See 

Sen Id g Machlues, 
JOHN FOX (repairer) 125 Monroe 

street. [See advertisement.] 
GEO. F. OWEN, 27 Monroe street. 

[See advertisement.] 
G. L. FRETTS, 7 and 9 Munroe street. 

[See advertisement,] 

Btencl! Establlsbmcnt. 



tndertaker. 
J. H. FARWELL, S6 Ljon street. 
[See advertiaement.] 

Variety Store. 

F. LEOTTGERT, 16 Canal street. 
[See advertisement,] 

Wagon Hanar^ctorles. 

WM. HARRISON, 48 Front street, 
(WwtSide), and Mill street, (East 
Side.) [See advertisement.] 

A. WOOD, 33 Waterloo street. [See 
advertisement.] 

CHAS. A. BISSONETTB, 43 Bridge 
street, (West Side.) [See advertise- 
ment.] 

JOSEPH EMHER, corner Bronson 
and Kent streets. [See advertise- 

FIEBIG & KATHMANN, SSI Cftnal 

street. [See advertisement.] 
F. OSTERLB & CO,, Ctinal street, 
tliree doors north of Bridge street, 
[See advertisement.] 

Wall Paper, Picture Frames, £c. 

REID & SMITH, Monroe street, 
under tlie liathbun House. [See 
advertisement.] 

War Claim Agents. 

SKINNER & WARD, City National 
Bank building. 
Yankee 7(otlons"CWIiolesale.) 

TVLER, GRAHAM & CO., IS Canal 



NOV 9- ms 



yGooQle 



'W 



HI3T0BY AHD DtRBOTORT OF KKirT CODNIT. 817 

JOHN WIDOE, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 



AND X*EA.I:.EIl ir* 



HATS, CAPS & GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 

61 Canal Street, 
Opposite Bronson House, - GRAND RAPIDS, MI CH. 

Snow's Great Catarrh Remedy, 

TUE GREATEST DISCOVERY OF THE AGE. '* 

It Cures Bronchitis, Colds intlieHeadj or Nervous Headaclie. 

fejDOdy for Otttwil 

Ci L. HaudeteoD, U, D„ Q 
Haiirr Jc««tl, StBtloDEr, el 
I. L. Cclttenden, Clothier, 
E. £. Jada, Hardware Deal 
B. D. Burr, Editor Dailj' Si 
M. TtgKsrt, Goanselor bI I 
CoL A. T. MoBBynolds, Att 



Canton Smttb, Esq.. " 

H. H. HinBditI, Wbal^e St&tfoaer, " 

I*!-!©©, r'lfty Cfonts r>©i- bottle. 



HIIBljBirT & EVSALI., Wboleaale Asentsi 38 Lake Jl., Cblcaito, IlllnaU. 

SOLD BY AI^I- FlRqT.I'F.AqR TIHnrtftlQTU ■ ' ^^ 



yGoosle 



tit HinOKT Airp .JUXEOtOK! OT EBHT OOUITTT. 

STEEET^IE & KIMM, 

MAinlFACTUBBRS AND PBOPttlETORS OF 

STEKETEE di KIMM'S FAM ILY MEDICINES. 
Eimm's: Anti-BilioDs Root and Plant Ells 

WILL CUBE *T.T, 

IIVER COHPi:.AINTS, 

AND AOT ON THE 

GENERAL DISABILITY OF THE SYSTEM. 

THEY ALSO PURIFY THE BLOOD. 

An > Medicine for Cnrtnfi s11 BlUonnneM, tb«e PUH crnnot bs eurpunKI. An ■ C«tl«rtln PIU, no pUI 
ttaui Uiree or fuur at aoy other kind, uid «e vuruit uld Pilli FREE FBOU CALOMEL OR JUjUP. 

Meastyns why they are so much Betl-er than all others, 

And why Ihej opoMte to much qniokar than other pUI*, Is becsius we purchsBe the roota wid pUnts In 
bulk. Uld pnlTerlH the medicine oncielve<.lnrile»l of compounding them ot medlctnei miud up of 
articles Bubafltuted Id pines of the geauine •rtlclea. Thouauids of nameg we could attach to the sborg 
If necemary. Be euTB and 6«k for 

KIMM'S ANTI-BILIOUS ROOT AND PLANT PILLS. 

W None we genuine QUleei algnsd bj BTEKBTBB b KIMM. Beware of countarfatta. 

M. B. K.IM.M:, CbemlBt, 
STEKETEE ^ KTSflM, Sole Froprietora, 67 Monroe-St., 

OBAND BAPIDS, HICS. 



STEKETEE A. KIMM'S 

Holland Stoznacli Bitters, 

BeiuonH ntay no hnve ao Oreat b Demnnd for our Bitter*. 

FlBBT—Becange the; sre more foodiome than other bitterg. Bicohd— Became the l>nttleii are as large 
aa a great tnaiy bitten which eeU for $1.00, while oura ace gold for the umall sum of FirXY CPNTS. 

DutBCTIONS.— One-half wine glass before each mcaL Take one-third bitteis and two-third* water 
or liquor, and yon will have a pleasant drink, 
sold by dealers generally, 

STEKETEE & KIMM, Sole Proprietors, 

fi7 Monroe Street, - _ _ Grand Itapidf, Mick, 

Himm's Holland Worm Cakes. 

These Wonn Cakes are a safe and certain cure for Worma, and are a safe asd pleuaaC lemody. 
Ohildrsn lore them as well aa they do candy. Blity thousand boxes of worm cakes wero manufactured 
by Mr. U. B. Kimm, the Junior partner and chemist of the firm ot ateketco b Elmm, while engaged In 
tb* viDn&etuiag of Worm Cakes for Mr. W. TrasllDg, of Holland. Europe, who ablpped them to the 
Eaat lodlet, where they were aold, and ever since has oontinuad to manufacture, on account of the in- 
creased demand. Bundrede and thouainde of names could we attach to the aboie, did space allow us. 
BUY NO OTHEB WOHM CAKES THAN THOSE PUT DP BY 

sa?33BLEiTrsj3si c«3 :K:EBa:nc, 

ei MONROE STREET, - - GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

IV Bioh Box h» fbe dtieeUoni on the boi. Price, Twenty-Fire Oect* per box. 
N. B. AU the above medkdiies an prepared by M. B. Kimm, (Chemist,] junior putoar of Um ibo** 
flim, wbohMSaduei^erleneealSOyMBiMOluimialln Kiut^e. ^^ 

Hosted by GOOQie 



yGoosle 



yGoosle 



yGoosle 



***_*_*!?■_ ^_*_*_*Jffl»- 'iJU^'S. *« ^1^< *' j >**i *^ ww^* ^ *«^ V »i. 



le